Science.gov

Sample records for delta2 binds d-serine

  1. Glycolytic flux controls d-serine synthesis through glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase in astrocytes

    PubMed Central

    Suzuki, Masataka; Sasabe, Jumpei; Miyoshi, Yurika; Kuwasako, Kanako; Muto, Yutaka; Hamase, Kenji; Matsuoka, Masaaki; Imanishi, Nobuaki; Aiso, Sadakazu

    2015-01-01

    d-Serine is an essential coagonist with glutamate for stimulation of N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) glutamate receptors. Although astrocytic metabolic processes are known to regulate synaptic glutamate levels, mechanisms that control d-serine levels are not well defined. Here we show that d-serine production in astrocytes is modulated by the interaction between the d-serine synthetic enzyme serine racemase (SRR) and a glycolytic enzyme, glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH). In primary cultured astrocytes, glycolysis activity was negatively correlated with d-serine level. We show that SRR interacts directly with GAPDH, and that activation of glycolysis augments this interaction. Biochemical assays using mutant forms of GAPDH with either reduced activity or reduced affinity to SRR revealed that GAPDH suppresses SRR activity by direct binding to GAPDH and through NADH, a product of GAPDH. NADH allosterically inhibits the activity of SRR by promoting the disassociation of ATP from SRR. Thus, astrocytic production of d-serine is modulated by glycolytic activity via interactions between GAPDH and SRR. We found that SRR is expressed in astrocytes in the subiculum of the human hippocampus, where neurons are known to be particularly vulnerable to loss of energy. Collectively, our findings suggest that astrocytic energy metabolism controls d-serine production, thereby influencing glutamatergic neurotransmission in the hippocampus. PMID:25870284

  2. Significance of the D-serine-deaminase and D-serine metabolism of Staphylococcus saprophyticus for virulence.

    PubMed

    Korte-Berwanger, Miriam; Sakinc, Türkan; Kline, Kimberly; Nielsen, Hailyn V; Hultgren, Scott; Gatermann, Sören G

    2013-12-01

    Staphylococcus saprophyticus is the only species of Staphylococcus that is typically uropathogenic and possesses a gene coding for a D-serine-deaminase (DsdA). As D-serine is prevalent in urine and toxic or bacteriostatic to many bacteria, it is not surprising that the D-serine-deaminase gene is found in the genome of uropathogens. It has been suggested that D-serine-deaminase or the ability to respond to or to metabolize D-serine is important for virulence. For uropathogenic Escherichia coli (UPEC), a high intracellular D-serine concentration affects expression of virulence factors. S. saprophyticus is able to grow in the presence of high D-serine concentrations; however, its D-serine metabolism has not been described. The activity of the D-serine-deaminase was verified by analyzing the formation of pyruvate from D-serine in different strains with and without D-serine-deaminase. Cocultivation experiments were performed to show that D-serine-deaminase confers a growth advantage to S. saprophyticus in the presence of D-serine. Furthermore, in vivo coinfection experiments showed a disadvantage for the ΔdsdA mutant during urinary tract infection. Expression analysis of known virulence factors by reverse transcription-quantitative PCR (RT-qPCR) showed that the surface-associated lipase Ssp is upregulated in the presence of D-serine. In addition, we show that S. saprophyticus is able to use D-serine as the sole carbon source, but interestingly, D-serine had a negative effect on growth when glucose was also present. Taken together, D-serine metabolism is associated with virulence in S. saprophyticus, as at least one known virulence factor is upregulated in the presence of D-serine and a ΔdsdA mutant was attenuated in virulence murine model of urinary tract infection. PMID:24082071

  3. Effects of Chronic D-Serine Elevation on Animal Models of Depression and Anxiety-Related Behavior

    PubMed Central

    Otte, David-Marian; Barcena de Arellano, Maria Luisa; Bilkei-Gorzo, Andras; Albayram, Önder; Imbeault, Sophie; Jeung, Haang; Alferink, Judith; Zimmer, Andreas

    2013-01-01

    NMDA receptors are activated after binding of the agonist glutamate to the NR2 subunit along with a co-agonist, either L-glycine or D-serine, to the NR1 subunit. There is substantial evidence to suggest that D-serine is the most relevant co-agonist in forebrain regions and that alterations in D-serine levels contribute to psychiatric disorders. D-serine is produced through isomerization of L-serine by serine racemase (Srr), either in neurons or in astrocytes. It is released by astrocytes by an activity-dependent mechanism involving secretory vesicles. In the present study we generated transgenic mice (SrrTg) expressing serine racemase under a human GFAP promoter. These mice were biochemically and behaviorally analyzed using paradigms of anxiety, depression and cognition. Furthermore, we investigated the behavioral effects of long-term administration of D-serine added to the drinking water. Elevated brain D-serine levels in SrrTg mice resulted in specific behavioral phenotypes in the forced swim, novelty suppression of feeding and olfactory bulbectomy paradigms that are indicative of a reduced proneness towards depression-related behavior. Chronic dietary D-serine supplement mimics the depression-related behavioral phenotype observed in SrrTg mice. Our results suggest that D-serine supplementation may improve mood disorders. PMID:23805296

  4. Paradoxical roles of serine racemase and D-serine in the G93A mSOD1 mouse model of ALS

    PubMed Central

    Thompson, Misty; Marecki, John C.; Marinesco, Stephane; Labrie, Viviane; Roder, John C.; Barger, Steven W.; Crow, John P.

    2012-01-01

    D-serine is an endogenous neurotransmitter that binds to the NMDA receptor, thereby increasing the affinity for glutamate, and the potential for excitotoxicity. The primary source of D-serine in vivo is enzymatic racemization by serine racemase (SR). Regulation of D-serine in vivo is poorly understood, but is thought to involve a combination of controlled production, synaptic reuptake by transporters, and intracellular degradation by D-amino acid oxidase (DAO). However, SR itself possesses a well-characterized eliminase activity which effectively degrades D-serine as well. D-serine is increased two-fold in spinal cords of G93A SOD1 mice – the standard model of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). ALS mice with SR disruption show earlier symptom onset, but survive longer (progression phase is slowed), in an SR-dependent manner. Paradoxically, administration of D-serine to ALS mice dramatically lowers cord levels of D-serine, leading to changes in onset and survival very similar to SR deletion. D-serine treatment also increases cord levels of the transporter Asc-1. Although the mechanism by which SOD1 mutations increases D-serine is not known, these results strongly suggest that SR and D-serine are fundamentally involved in both the presymptomatic and progression phases of disease, and offer a direct link between mutant SOD1 and a glial-derived toxic mediator. PMID:22117694

  5. D-serine transporter in Staphylococcus saprophyticus identified.

    PubMed

    Marlinghaus, Lennart; Huß, Melanie; Korte-Berwanger, Miriam; Sakinc-Güler, Türkan; Gatermann, Sören G

    2016-07-01

    Among staphylococci Staphylococcus saprophyticus is the only species that is typically uropathogenic and an important cause of urinary tract infections in young women. The amino acid D-serine occurs in relatively high concentrations in human urine and has a bacteriostatic or toxic effect on many bacteria. In uropathogenic Escherichia coli and S. saprophyticus, the amino acid regulates the expression of virulence factors and can be used as a nutrient. The ability of uropathogens to respond to or to metabolize D-serine has been suggested as a factor that enables colonization of the urinary tract. Until now nothing is known about D-serine transport in S. saprophyticus We generated mutants of putative transporter genes in S. saprophyticus 7108 that show homology to the D-serine transporter cycA of E. coli and tested them in a D-serine depletion assay to analyze the D-serine uptake rate of the cells. The mutant of SPP1070 showed a strong decrease in D-serine uptake. Therefore, SSP1070 was identified as a major D-serine transporter in S. saprophyticus 7108 and was named D-serine transporter A (DstA). D-serine caused a prolonged lag phase of S. saprophyticus in a chemically defined medium. This negative effect was dependent on the presence of DstA. PMID:27252156

  6. D-Serine and Glycine Differentially Control Neurotransmission during Visual Cortex Critical Period

    PubMed Central

    Meunier, Claire N. J.; Dallérac, Glenn; Le Roux, Nicolas; Sacchi, Silvia; Levasseur, Grégoire; Amar, Muriel; Pollegioni, Loredano; Mothet, Jean-Pierre; Fossier, Philippe

    2016-01-01

    N-methyl-D-aspartate receptors (NMDARs) play a central role in synaptic plasticity. Their activation requires the binding of both glutamate and d-serine or glycine as co-agonist. The prevalence of either co-agonist on NMDA-receptor function differs between brain regions and remains undetermined in the visual cortex (VC) at the critical period of postnatal development. Here, we therefore investigated the regulatory role that d-serine and/or glycine may exert on NMDARs function and on synaptic plasticity in the rat VC layer 5 pyramidal neurons of young rats. Using selective enzymatic depletion of d-serine or glycine, we demonstrate that d-serine and not glycine is the endogenous co-agonist of synaptic NMDARs required for the induction and expression of Long Term Potentiation (LTP) at both excitatory and inhibitory synapses. Glycine on the other hand is not involved in synaptic efficacy per se but regulates excitatory and inhibitory neurotransmission by activating strychnine-sensitive glycine receptors, then producing a shunting inhibition that controls neuronal gain and results in a depression of synaptic inputs at the somatic level after dendritic integration. In conclusion, we describe for the first time that in the VC both D-serine and glycine differentially regulate somatic depolarization through the activation of distinct synaptic and extrasynaptic receptors. PMID:27003418

  7. D-serine in the developing human central nervous system.

    PubMed

    Fuchs, Sabine A; Dorland, Lambertus; de Sain-van der Velden, Monique G; Hendriks, Margriet; Klomp, Leo W J; Berger, Ruud; de Koning, Tom J

    2006-10-01

    To elucidate the role of D-serine in human central nervous system, we analyzed D-serine, L-serine, and glycine concentrations in cerebrospinal fluid of healthy children and children with a defective L-serine biosynthesis (3-phosphoglycerate dehydrogenase deficiency). Healthy children showed high D-serine concentrations immediately after birth, both absolutely and relative to glycine and L-serine, declining to low values at infancy. D-Serine concentrations were almost undetectable in untreated 3-phosphoglycerate dehydrogenase-deficient patients. In one patient treated prenatally, D-serine concentration was nearly normal at birth and the clinical phenotype was normal. These observations suggest a pivotal role for D-serine in normal and aberrant human brain development. PMID:17068790

  8. Modulation of glycine sites enhances social memory in rats using PQQ combined with d-serine.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Xingqin; Liu, Dong; Zhang, Rongjun; Peng, Ying; Qin, Xiaofeng; Mao, Shishi

    2016-07-15

    The aim of study was to investigate the effects of pyrroloquinoline quinone (PQQ) combined with d-serine on the modulation of glycine sites in the brain of rats using social recognition test. Rats were divided into seven groups (n=10) and given repeated intraperitoneal (ip) injections of saline, MK-801 (0.5mg/kg), clozapine (1mg/kg), haloperidol (0.1mg/kg), d-serine (0.8g/kg), PQQ (2.0μg/kg), or d-serine (0.4g/kg) combined with PQQ (1.0μg/kg) for seven days. A social recognition test, including assessment of time-dependent memory impairment, was performed. A non-competitive NMDA receptor antagonist, MK-801, significantly impaired social memory, and this impairment was significantly repaired with an atypical antipsychotic (clozapine) but not with a typical antipsychotic (haloperidol). Likewise, d-serine combined with PQQ significantly improved MK-801-disrupted cognition in naïve rats, whereas haloperidol was ineffective. The present results show that the co-agonist NMDA receptor treated with PQQ and d-serine enhances social memory and may be an effective approach for treating the cognitive dysfunction observed in schizophrenic patients. PQQ stimulates glycine modulatory sites by which it may antagonize indirectly by removing glycine from the synaptic cleft or by binding the unsaturated site with d-serine in the brain, providing the insights into future research of central nervous system and drug discovery. PMID:27109337

  9. Contributions of the D-serine pathway to schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Labrie, Viviane; Wong, Albert H C; Roder, John C

    2012-03-01

    The glutamate neurotransmitter system is one of the major candidate pathways for the pathophysiology of schizophrenia, and increased understanding of the pharmacology, molecular biology and biochemistry of this system may lead to novel treatments. Glutamatergic hypofunction, particularly at the NMDA receptor, has been hypothesized to underlie many of the symptoms of schizophrenia, including psychosis, negative symptoms and cognitive impairment. This review will focus on D-serine, a co-agonist at the NMDA receptor that in combination with glutamate, is required for full activation of this ion channel receptor. Evidence implicating D-serine, NMDA receptors and related molecules, such as D-amino acid oxidase (DAO), G72 and serine racemase (SRR), in the etiology or pathophysiology of schizophrenia is discussed, including knowledge gained from mouse models with altered D-serine pathway genes and from preliminary clinical trials with D-serine itself or compounds modulating the D-serine pathway. Abnormalities in D-serine availability may underlie glutamatergic dysfunction in schizophrenia, and the development of new treatments acting through the D-serine pathway may significantly improve outcomes for many schizophrenia patients. PMID:21295046

  10. The N-methyl D-aspartate receptor glycine site and D-serine metabolism: an evolutionary perspective.

    PubMed Central

    Schell, Michael J

    2004-01-01

    The N-methyl D-aspartate (NMDA) type of glutamate receptor requires two distinct agonists to operate. Glycine is assumed to be the endogenous ligand for the NMDA receptor glycine site, but this notion has been challenged by the discovery of high levels of endogenous d-serine in the mammalian forebrain. I have outlined an evolutionary framework for the appearance of a glycine site in animals and the metabolic events leading to high levels of D-serine in brain. Sequence alignments of the glycine-binding regions, along with the scant experimental data available, suggest that the properties of invertebrate NMDA receptor glycine sites are probably different from those in vertebrates. The synthesis of D-serine in brain is due to a pyridoxal-5'-phosphate (B(6))-requiring serine racemase in glia. Although it remains unknown when serine racemase first evolved, data concerning the evolution of B(6) enzymes, along with the known occurrences of serine racemases in animals, point to D-serine synthesis arising around the divergence time of arthropods. D-Serine catabolism occurs via the ancient peroxisomal enzyme d-amino acid oxidase (DAO), whose ontogenetic expression in the hindbrain of mammals is delayed until the postnatal period and absent from the forebrain. The phylogeny of D-serine metabolism has relevance to our understanding of brain ontogeny, schizophrenia and neurotransmitter dynamics. PMID:15306409

  11. The role of D-serine in peripheral tissues.

    PubMed

    Montesinos Guevara, Camila; Mani, Ali R

    2016-06-01

    A considerable level of D-serine (a free D-amino acid) was discovered, surprisingly, in the mammalian brain in the early 1990s. Since then, D-serine has been considered to be a co-agonist of glutamate at the glycine site of NMDA receptors. D-serine is synthetized by racemization of L-serine in most neural and non-neural cells, and modulates a variety of physiological functions in mammals. In addition to the central nervous system, NMDA receptors have an important function in the modulation of physiological processes in peripheral tissues. Thus, investigations on the functions of D-serine in the peripheral nervous system, as well as the visceral organs, have gained attention in recent years. In this review we summarize the current knowledge on the role of D-serine in the kidneys, skeletal system, skin as well as on the non-adrenergic, non-cholinergic transmission within the autonomic nervous system. PMID:27038518

  12. ACTIVATION OF A CRYPTIC D-SERINE DEAMINASE (DSD) GENE FROM PSEUDOMONAS CEPACIA 17616

    EPA Science Inventory

    D-serine inhibits growth of P. cepacia 17616; however, resistant mutants able to express an ordinarily cryptic D-serine deaminase (dsd) gene were isolated readily. The resistant strains formed high levels of a D-serine deaminase active on D-threonine as well as D-serine. IS eleme...

  13. Modulation of the dimer interface at ionotropic glutamate-like receptor δ2 by D-serine and extracellular calcium

    PubMed Central

    Hansen, Kasper B.; Naur, Peter; Kurtkaya, Natalie L.; Kristensen, Anders S.; Gajhede, Michael; Kastrup, Jette S.; Traynelis, Stephen F.

    2009-01-01

    GluRδ2 is a member of the iGluR family, but despite a prominent role in cerebellar synaptic plasticity, this receptor does not appear to function as an ion channel. Endogenous ligands that modulate the activity of native GluRδ2 in the cerebellum have not been identified, but two candidate modulators are D-serine and extracellular calcium. Taking advantage of known crystal structures and spontaneously active GluRδ2 receptors containing the lurcher mutation (GluRδ2Lc), we investigated the mechanism by which calcium and D-serine regulate the activity of GluRδ2Lc. Our data suggest that calcium binding stabilizes the dimer interface formed between two agonist binding domains and increases GluRδ2Lc currents. The data further suggests that D-serine binding induces rearrangements at the dimer interface to diminish GluRδ2Lc currents by a mechanism that resembles desensitization at AMPA and kainate receptors. Thus, we propose that calcium and D-serine binding have opposing effects on the stability of the dimer interface. Furthermore, the effects of calcium are observed at concentrations that are within the physiological range, suggesting that the ability of native GluRδ2 to respond to ligand binding may be modulated by extracellular calcium. These findings place GluRδ2 among AMPA and kainate receptors, where the dimer interface is not only a biologically important site for functional regulation, but also an important target for exogenous and endogenous ligands that modulate receptor function. PMID:19176800

  14. The effect of D-serine administration on cognition and mood in older adults

    PubMed Central

    Madeira, Caroline; Vargas-Lopes, Charles; Marques, Priscila; Dantas, Camila; Manhães, Alex C.; Leite, Homero; Panizzutti, Rogerio

    2016-01-01

    Background D-serine is an endogenous co-agonist of the N-Methyl D-Aspartate Receptor (NMDAR) that plays a crucial role in cognition including learning processes and memory. Decreased D-serine levels have been associated with age-related decline in mechanisms of learning and memory in animal studies. Here, we asked whether D-serine administration in older adults improves cognition. Results D-serine administration improved performance in the Groton Maze learning test of spatial memory and learning and problem solving (F(3, 38)= 4.74, p = 0.03). Subjects that achieved higher increases in plasma D-serine levels after administration improved more in test performance (r2=−0.19 p = 0.009). D-serine administration was not associated with any significant changes in the other cognitive tests or in the mood of older adults (p > 0.05). Methods Fifty healthy older adults received D-serine and placebo in a randomized, double blind, placebo-controlled, crossover design study. We studied the effect of D-serine administration on the performance of cognitive tests and an analogue mood scale. We also collected blood samples to measure D-serine, L-serine, glutamate and glutamine levels. Conclusions D-serine administration may be a strategy to improve spatial memory, learning and problem solving in healthy older adults. Future studies should evaluate the impact of long-term D-serine administration on cognition in older adults. PMID:26933803

  15. Evaluation of oxidative stress in D-serine induced nephrotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Orozco-Ibarra, Marisol; Medina-Campos, Omar Noel; Sánchez-González, Dolores Javier; Martínez-Martínez, Claudia María; Floriano-Sánchez, Esaú; Santamaría, Abel; Ramirez, Victoria; Bobadilla, Norma A; Pedraza-Chaverri, José

    2007-01-01

    It has been suggested that oxidative stress is involved in d-serine-induced nephrotoxicity. The purpose of this study was to assess if oxidative stress is involved in this experimental model using several approaches including (a) the determination of several markers of oxidative stress and the activity of some antioxidant enzymes in kidney and (b) the use of compounds with antioxidant or prooxidant effects. Rats were sacrificed at several periods of time (from 3 to 24h) after a single i.p. injection of d-serine (400mg/kg). Control rats were injected with l-serine (400mg/kg) and sacrificed 24h after. The following markers were used to assess the temporal aspects of renal damage: (a) urea nitrogen (BUN) and creatinine in blood serum, (b) kidney injury molecule (KIM-1) mRNA levels, and (c) tubular necrotic damage. In addition, creatinine clearance, proteinuria, and urinary excretion of N-acetyl-beta-d-glucosaminidase (NAG) were measured 24h after d-serine injection. Protein carbonyl content, malondialdehyde (MDA), 4-hydroxy-2-nonenal (4-HNE), fluorescent products of lipid peroxidation, reactive oxygen species (ROS), glutathione (GSH) content, and heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) expression were measured as markers of oxidative stress in the kidney. Additional experiments were performed using the following compounds with antioxidant or pro-oxidant effects before d-serine injection: (a) alpha-phenyl-tert-butyl-nitrone (PBN), a spin trapping agent; (b) 5,10,15,20-tetrakis (4-sulfonatophenyl) porphyrinato iron(III) (FeTPPS), a soluble complex able to metabolize peroxynitrite; (c) aminotriazole (ATZ), a catalase (CAT) inhibitor; (d) stannous chloride (SnCl(2)), an HO-1 inductor; (e) tin mesoporphyrin (SnMP), an HO inhibitor. In the time-course study, serum creatinine and BUN increased significantly on 15-24 and 20-24h, respectively, and KIM-1 mRNA levels increased significantly on 6-24h. Histological analyses revealed tubular necrosis at 12h. The activity of antioxidant enzymes

  16. Participation of D-serine in the development and reproduction of the silkworm Bombyx mori.

    PubMed

    Tanigawa, Minoru; Suzuki, Chihiro; Niwano, Kimio; Kanekatsu, Rensuke; Tanaka, Hiroyuki; Horiike, Kihachiro; Hamase, Kenji; Nagata, Yoko

    2016-04-01

    The silkworm Bombyx mori contains high concentrations of free D-serine, an optical isomer of L-serine. To elucidate its function, we first investigated the localization of D-serine in various organs of silkworm larvae, pupae, and adult moths. Using immunohistochemical analysis with an anti-D-serine antibody, we found D-serine in the microvilli of midgut goblet and cylindrical cells and in peripheral matrix components of testicular and ovarian cells. By spectrophotometric analysis, D-serine was also found in the hemolymph and fat body. D-Alanine was not detected in the various organs by immunohistochemistry. Serine racemase, which catalyzes the inter-conversion of L- and D-serine, was found to co-localize with D-serine, and D-serine production from L-serine by intrinsic serine racemase was suggested. O-Phospho-L-serine is an inhibitor of serine racemase, and it was administered to the larvae to reduce the D-serine level. This reagent decreased the midgut caspase-3 level and caused a delay in spermatogenesis and oogenesis. The reagent also decreased mature sperm and egg numbers, suggesting D-serine participation in these processes. D-Serine administration induced an increase in pyruvate levels in testis, midgut, and fat body, indicating conversion of D-serine to pyruvate. On the basis of these results, together with our previous investigation of ATP biosynthesis in testis, we consider the possible involvement of D-serine in ATP synthesis for metamorphosis and reproduction. PMID:26828952

  17. d-serine levels in Alzheimer's disease: implications for novel biomarker development

    PubMed Central

    Madeira, C; Lourenco, M V; Vargas-Lopes, C; Suemoto, C K; Brandão, C O; Reis, T; Leite, R E P; Laks, J; Jacob-Filho, W; Pasqualucci, C A; Grinberg, L T; Ferreira, S T; Panizzutti, R

    2015-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a severe neurodegenerative disorder still in search of effective methods of diagnosis. Altered levels of the NMDA receptor co-agonist, d-serine, have been associated with neurological disorders, including schizophrenia and epilepsy. However, whether d-serine levels are deregulated in AD remains elusive. Here, we first measured D-serine levels in post-mortem hippocampal and cortical samples from nondemented subjects (n=8) and AD patients (n=14). We next determined d-serine levels in experimental models of AD, including wild-type rats and mice that received intracerebroventricular injections of amyloid-β oligomers, and APP/PS1 transgenic mice. Finally, we assessed d-serine levels in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) of 21 patients with a diagnosis of probable AD, as compared with patients with normal pressure hydrocephalus (n=9), major depression (n=9) and healthy controls (n=10), and results were contrasted with CSF amyloid-β/tau AD biomarkers. d-serine levels were higher in the hippocampus and parietal cortex of AD patients than in control subjects. Levels of both d-serine and serine racemase, the enzyme responsible for d-serine production, were elevated in experimental models of AD. Significantly, d-serine levels were higher in the CSF of probable AD patients than in non-cognitively impaired subject groups. Combining d-serine levels to the amyloid/tau index remarkably increased the sensitivity and specificity of diagnosis of probable AD in our cohort. Our results show that increased brain and CSF d-serine levels are associated with AD. CSF d-serine levels discriminated between nondemented and AD patients in our cohort and might constitute a novel candidate biomarker for early AD diagnosis. PMID:25942042

  18. D-Serine Is a Substrate for Neutral Amino Acid Transporters ASCT1/SLC1A4 and ASCT2/SLC1A5, and Is Transported by Both Subtypes in Rat Hippocampal Astrocyte Cultures

    PubMed Central

    Foster, Alan C.; Farnsworth, Jill; Lind, Genevieve E.; Li, Yong-Xin; Yang, Jia-Ying; Dang, Van; Penjwini, Mahmud; Viswanath, Veena; Staubli, Ursula; Kavanaugh, Michael P.

    2016-01-01

    N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptors play critical roles in synaptic transmission and plasticity. Activation of NMDA receptors by synaptically released L-glutamate also requires occupancy of co-agonist binding sites in the tetrameric receptor by either glycine or D-serine. Although D-serine appears to be the predominant co-agonist at synaptic NMDA receptors, the transport mechanisms involved in D-serine homeostasis in brain are poorly understood. In this work we show that the SLC1 amino acid transporter family members SLC1A4 (ASCT1) and SLC1A5 (ASCT2) mediate homo- and hetero-exchange of D-serine with physiologically relevant kinetic parameters. In addition, the selectivity profile of D-serine uptake in cultured rat hippocampal astrocytes is consistent with uptake mediated by both ASCT1 and ASCT2. Together these data suggest that SLC1A4 (ASCT1) may represent an important route of Na-dependent D-serine flux in the brain that has the ability to regulate extracellular D-serine and thereby NMDA receptor activity. PMID:27272177

  19. D-Serine and Serine Racemase Are Associated with PSD-95 and Glutamatergic Synapse Stability.

    PubMed

    Lin, Hong; Jacobi, Ariel A; Anderson, Stewart A; Lynch, David R

    2016-01-01

    D-serine is an endogenous coagonist at the glycine site of synaptic NMDA receptors (NMDARs), synthesized by serine racemase (SR) through conversion of L-serine. It is crucial for synaptic plasticity and is implicated in schizophrenia. Our previous studies demonstrated specific loss of SR, D-serine-responsive synaptic NMDARs, and glutamatergic synapses in cortical neurons lacking α7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptors, which promotes glutamatergic synapse formation and maturation during development. We thus hypothesize that D-serine and SR (D-serine/SR) are associated with glutamatergic synaptic development. Using morphological and molecular studies in cortical neuronal cultures, we demonstrate that D-serine/SR are associated with PSD-95 and NMDARs in postsynaptic neurons and with glutamatergic synapse stability during synaptic development. Endogenous D-serine and SR colocalize with PSD-95, but not presynaptic vesicular glutamate transporter 1 (VGLUT1), in glutamatergic synapses of cultured cortical neurons. Low-density astrocytes in cortical neuronal cultures lack SR expression but contain enriched D-serine in large vesicle-like structures, suggesting possible synthesis of D-serine in postsynaptic neurons and storage in astrocytes. More interestingly, endogenous D-serine and SR colocalize with PSD-95 in the postsynaptic terminals of glutamatergic synapses during early and late synaptic development, implicating involvement of D-serine/SR in glutamatergic synaptic development. Exogenous application of D-serine enhances the interactions of SR with PSD-95 and NR1, and increases the number of VGLUT1- and PSD-95-positive glutamatergic synapses, suggesting that exogenous D-serine enhances postsynaptic SR/PSD-95 signaling and stabilizes glutamatergic synapses during cortical synaptic development. This is blocked by NMDAR antagonist 2-amino-5-phosphonopentanoic acid (AP5) and 7-chlorokynurenic acid (7-CK), a specific antagonist at the glycine site of NMDARs, demonstrating

  20. D-Serine and Serine Racemase Are Associated with PSD-95 and Glutamatergic Synapse Stability

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Hong; Jacobi, Ariel A.; Anderson, Stewart A.; Lynch, David R.

    2016-01-01

    D-serine is an endogenous coagonist at the glycine site of synaptic NMDA receptors (NMDARs), synthesized by serine racemase (SR) through conversion of L-serine. It is crucial for synaptic plasticity and is implicated in schizophrenia. Our previous studies demonstrated specific loss of SR, D-serine-responsive synaptic NMDARs, and glutamatergic synapses in cortical neurons lacking α7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptors, which promotes glutamatergic synapse formation and maturation during development. We thus hypothesize that D-serine and SR (D-serine/SR) are associated with glutamatergic synaptic development. Using morphological and molecular studies in cortical neuronal cultures, we demonstrate that D-serine/SR are associated with PSD-95 and NMDARs in postsynaptic neurons and with glutamatergic synapse stability during synaptic development. Endogenous D-serine and SR colocalize with PSD-95, but not presynaptic vesicular glutamate transporter 1 (VGLUT1), in glutamatergic synapses of cultured cortical neurons. Low-density astrocytes in cortical neuronal cultures lack SR expression but contain enriched D-serine in large vesicle-like structures, suggesting possible synthesis of D-serine in postsynaptic neurons and storage in astrocytes. More interestingly, endogenous D-serine and SR colocalize with PSD-95 in the postsynaptic terminals of glutamatergic synapses during early and late synaptic development, implicating involvement of D-serine/SR in glutamatergic synaptic development. Exogenous application of D-serine enhances the interactions of SR with PSD-95 and NR1, and increases the number of VGLUT1- and PSD-95-positive glutamatergic synapses, suggesting that exogenous D-serine enhances postsynaptic SR/PSD-95 signaling and stabilizes glutamatergic synapses during cortical synaptic development. This is blocked by NMDAR antagonist 2-amino-5-phosphonopentanoic acid (AP5) and 7-chlorokynurenic acid (7-CK), a specific antagonist at the glycine site of NMDARs, demonstrating

  1. Pharmacokinetics of Oral d-Serine in d-Amino Acid Oxidase Knockout Mice

    PubMed Central

    Rais, Rana; Thomas, Ajit G.; Wozniak, Krystyna; Wu, Ying; Jaaro-Peled, Hanna; Sawa, Akira; Strick, Christine A.; Engle, Sandra J.; Brandon, Nicholas J.; Rojas, Camilo; Slusher, Barbara S.

    2012-01-01

    d-Amino acid oxidase (DAAO) catalyzes the oxidative deamination of d-amino acids including d-serine, a full agonist at the glycine modulatory site of the N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) receptor. To evaluate the significance of DAAO-mediated metabolism in the pharmacokinetics of oral d-serine, plasma d-serine levels were measured in both wild-type mice and transgenic mice lacking DAAO. Although d-serine levels were rapidly diminished in wild-type mice (t½ = 1.2 h), sustained drug levels over the course of 4 h (t½ > 10 h) were observed in mice lacking DAAO. Coadministration of d-serine with 6-chlorobenzo[d]isoxazol-3-ol (CBIO), a small-molecule DAAO inhibitor, in wild-type mice resulted in the enhancement of plasma d-serine levels, although CBIO seems to have only temporary effects on the plasma d-serine levels due to glucuronidation of the key hydroxyl group. These findings highlight the predominant role of DAAO in the clearance of d-serine from the systemic circulation. Thus, a potent DAAO inhibitor with a longer half-life should be capable of maintaining high plasma d-serine levels over a sustained period of time and might have therapeutic implications for the treatment of schizophrenia. PMID:22837388

  2. Transport of D-serine via the amino acid transporter ATB(0,+) expressed in the colon.

    PubMed

    Hatanaka, Takahiro; Huang, Wei; Nakanishi, Takeo; Bridges, Christy C; Smith, Sylvia B; Prasad, Puttur D; Ganapathy, Malliga E; Ganapathy, Vadivel

    2002-02-22

    D-Serine, synthesized endogenously in the brain, is an important modulator of glutamatergic neurotransmission. Since colonic bacteria produce D-serine, we asked the question whether there are transport mechanisms in the colon that might make this exogenously produced D-serine available to the host. Here we identify for the first time an amino acid transporter in the intestine for high-affinity active transport of D-serine. This transporter, called ATB(0,+), is a Na(+)- and Cl(-)-coupled transporter for L-enantiomers of neutral and cationic amino acids. Here we demonstrate that ATB(0,+) is also capable of mediating the Na(+)- and Cl(-)-coupled transport of D-serine. The affinity of ATB(0,+) for L-serine and D-serine is similar, the K(t) value for the two enantiomers being approximately 150 microM. In addition to D-serine, ATB(0,+) transports D-alanine, D-methionine, D-leucine, and D-tryptophan. However, several other neutral and cationic amino acids that are transportable substrates for ATB(0,+) as L-enantiomers are not transported when presented as D-enantiomers. ATB(0,+) is expressed in the intestinal tract, interestingly not in the proximal intestine but in the distal intestine. Expression is most predominant in the colon where the transporter is localized to the luminal membrane of colonocytes, making this transporter uniquely suitable for absorption of bacteria-derived D-serine. PMID:11846403

  3. The Nature of D-Serine-Induced Nephrotoxicity

    PubMed Central

    Ganote, Charles E.; Peterson, Darryl R.; Carone, Frank A.

    1974-01-01

    Renal structural changes were studied sequentially between 1 hour and 6 days in rats treated with D-serine. Extensive necrosis of proximal straight tubules was rapid in onset and was followed by complete tubular regeneration 6 days post-treatment. The apparent progression of cellular changes was initial shrinkage, followed either by swelling and loss of apical cytoplasm or immediate lysis of cytoplasmic and nuclear contents. Tubular damage left only the basement membrane as a barrier between interstitial and luminal fluids. In similarly treated rats, proteinuria and glucosuria developed at the onset of tubular necrosis and disappeared when the tubules were completely relined by epithelium suggesting that they are due to diffusion of protein and glucose from interstitium into tubular fluid across the denuded basement membranes and that epithelial cells, under normal conditions, act as a barrier to diffusion of certain substances between the interstitium and tubular fluid. ImagesFig 10Fig 11Fig 1Fig 2Fig 3Fig 12Fig 13Fig 14Fig 15Fig 4Fig 5Fig 6Fig 7Fig 8Fig 9 PMID:4447130

  4. Enantioselective inhibition of D-serine transport by (S)-ketamine

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Nagendra S; Bernier, Michel; Camandola, Simonetta; Khadeer, Mohammed A; Moaddel, Ruin; Mattson, Mark P; Wainer, Irving W

    2015-01-01

    Background and Purpose Patients with major depressive disorder receiving racemic ketamine, (R,S)-ketamine, experience transient increases in Clinician-Administered Dissociative States Scale scores and a coincident drop in plasma d-serine levels. The results suggest that (R,S)-ketamine produces an immediate, concentration-dependent pharmacological effect on d-serine plasma concentrations. One potential source of this effect is (R,S)-ketamine-induced inhibition of the transporter ASCT2, which regulates intracellular d-serine concentrations. In this study, we tested this hypothesis by examining the effect of (S)- and (R)-ketamine on ASCT2-mediated transport of d-serine in PC-12 and 1321N1 cells and primary neuronal cells in culture. Experimental Approach Intracellular and extracellular d-serine levels were determined using capillary electrophoresis–laser-induced fluorescence and liquid chromatography–mass spectrometry respectively. Expression of ASCT2, Asc-1 and serine racemase was determined utilizing Western blotting. Key Results (S)-Ketamine produced a concentration-dependent increase in intracellular d-serine and reduced extracellular d-serine accumulation. In contrast, (R)-ketamine decreased both intracellular and extracellular d-serine levels. The ASCT2 inhibitor, benzyl-d-serine (BDS), and ASCT2 gene knockdown mimicked the action of (S)-ketamine on d-serine in PC-12 cells, while the Asc-1 agonist d-isoleucine reduced intracellular d-serine and increased extracellular d-serine accumulation. This response to d-isoleucine was not affected by BDS or (S)-ketamine. Primary cultures of rat neuronal cells expressed ASCT2 and were responsive to (S)-ketamine and BDS. (S)- and (R)-ketamine increased the expression of monomeric serine racemase in all the cells studied, with (S)-ketamine having the greatest effect. Conclusions and Implications (S)-Ketamine decreased cellular export of d-serine via selective inhibition of ASCT2, and this could represent a possible source

  5. D-Serine and D-Cycloserine Reduce Compulsive Alcohol Intake in Rats.

    PubMed

    Seif, Taban; Simms, Jeffrey A; Lei, Kelly; Wegner, Scott; Bonci, Antonello; Messing, Robert O; Hopf, F Woodward

    2015-09-01

    There is considerable interest in NMDAR modulators to enhance memory and treat neuropsychiatric disorders such as addiction, depression, and schizophrenia. D-serine and D-cycloserine, the NMDAR activators at the glycine site, are of particular interest because they have been used in humans without serious adverse effects. Interestingly, D-serine also inhibits some NMDARs active at hyperpolarized potentials (HA-NMDARs), and we previously found that HA-NMDARs within the nucleus accumbens core (NAcore) are critical for promoting compulsion-like alcohol drinking, where rats consume alcohol despite pairing with an aversive stimulus such as quinine, a paradigm considered to model compulsive aspects of human alcohol use disorders (AUDs). Here, we examined the impact of D-serine and D-cycloserine on this aversion-resistant alcohol intake (that persists despite adulteration with quinine) and consumption of quinine-free alcohol. Systemic D-serine reduced aversion-resistant alcohol drinking, without altering consumption of quinine-free alcohol or saccharin with or without quinine. Importantly, D-serine within the NAcore but not the dorsolateral striatum also selectively reduced aversion-resistant alcohol drinking. In addition, D-serine inhibited EPSCs evoked at -70 mV in vitro by optogenetic stimulation of mPFC-NAcore terminals in alcohol-drinking rats, similar to reported effects of the NMDAR blocker AP5. Further, D-serine preexposure occluded AP5 inhibition of mPFC-evoked EPSCs, suggesting that D-serine reduced EPSCs by inhibiting HA-NMDARs. Systemic D-cycloserine also selectively reduced intake of quinine-adulterated alcohol, and D-cycloserine inhibited NAcore HA-NMDARs in vitro. Our results indicate that HA-NMDAR modulators can reduce aversion-resistant alcohol drinking, and support testing of D-serine and D-cycloserine as immediately accessible, FDA-approved drugs to treat AUDs. PMID:25801502

  6. D-serine regulates cerebellar LTD and motor coordination through the δ2 glutamate receptor.

    PubMed

    Kakegawa, Wataru; Miyoshi, Yurika; Hamase, Kenji; Matsuda, Shinji; Matsuda, Keiko; Kohda, Kazuhisa; Emi, Kyoichi; Motohashi, Junko; Konno, Ryuichi; Zaitsu, Kiyoshi; Yuzaki, Michisuke

    2011-05-01

    D-serine (D-Ser) is an endogenous co-agonist for NMDA receptors and regulates neurotransmission and synaptic plasticity in the forebrain. D-Ser is also found in the cerebellum during the early postnatal period. Although D-Ser binds to the δ2 glutamate receptor (GluD2, Grid2) in vitro, its physiological significance has remained unclear. Here we show that D-Ser serves as an endogenous ligand for GluD2 to regulate long-term depression (LTD) at synapses between parallel fibers and Purkinje cells in the immature cerebellum. D-Ser was released mainly from Bergmann glia after the burst stimulation of parallel fibers in immature, but not mature, cerebellum. D-Ser rapidly induced endocytosis of AMPA receptors and mutually occluded LTD in wild-type, but not Grid2-null, Purkinje cells. Moreover, mice expressing mutant GluD2 in which the binding site for D-Ser was disrupted showed impaired LTD and motor dyscoordination during development. These results indicate that glial D-Ser regulates synaptic plasticity and cerebellar functions by interacting with GluD2. PMID:21460832

  7. CSF d-serine concentrations are similar in Alzheimer's disease, other dementias, and elderly controls.

    PubMed

    Biemans, Elisanne A L M; Verhoeven-Duif, Nanda M; Gerrits, Johan; Claassen, Jurgen A H R; Kuiperij, H Bea; Verbeek, Marcel M

    2016-06-01

    Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) levels of d-serine were recently reported as a potential new biomarker for Alzheimer's disease (AD), showing a perfect distinction between AD patients and healthy controls. In this study, we aimed to confirm these results and extend these previous findings to dementia with Lewy bodies and frontotemporal dementia. d-Serine levels in CSF of 29 AD patients, 8 dementia with Lewy bodies patients, 14 frontotemporal dementia patients, and 28 nondemented controls were measured using ultra-high-performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry. In contrast to previous findings, in our study CSF d-serine levels were only slightly increased in AD patients compared with controls. CSF d-serine in AD did not differ from other dementias and was also not correlated to mini-mental state examination-scores. Owing to the large overlap of d-serine levels, we conclude that CSF d-serine is neither a suitable biomarker for AD nor for cognitive decline. PMID:27143438

  8. Ketamine Metabolites Enantioselectively Decrease Intracellular D-Serine Concentrations in PC-12 Cells

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Nagendra S.; Rutkowska, Ewelina; Plazinska, Anita; Khadeer, Mohammed; Moaddel, Ruin; Jozwiak, Krzysztof; Bernier, Michel; Wainer, Irving W.

    2016-01-01

    D-Serine is an endogenous NMDA receptor co-agonist that activates synaptic NMDA receptors modulating neuronal networks in the cerebral cortex and plays a key role in long-term potentiation of synaptic transmission. D-serine is associated with NMDA receptor neurotoxicity and neurodegeneration and elevated D-serine concentrations have been associated with Alzheimer’s and Parkinsons’ diseases and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. Previous studies have demonstrated that the ketamine metabolites (rac)-dehydronorketamine and (2S,6S)-hydroxynorketamine decrease intracellular D-serine concentrations in a concentration dependent manner in PC-12 cells. In the current study, PC-12 cells were incubated with a series of ketamine metabolites and the IC50 values associated with attenuated intracellular D-serine concentrations were determined. The results demonstrate that structural and stereochemical features of the studied compounds contribute to the magnitude of the inhibitory effect with (2S,6S)-hydroxynorketamine and (2R,6R)-hydroxynorketamine displaying the most potent inhibition with IC50 values of 0.18 ± 0.04 nM and 0.68 ± 0.09 nM. The data was utilized to construct a preliminary 3D-QSAR/pharmacophore model for use in the design of new and more efficient modulators of D-serine. PMID:27096720

  9. In Vivo d-Serine Hetero-Exchange through Alanine-Serine-Cysteine (ASC) Transporters Detected by Microelectrode Biosensors

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    d-Serine, a co-agonist of N-methyl d-aspartate (NMDA) receptors, has been implicated in neurological and psychiatric disorders such as cerebral ischemia, lateral amyotrophic sclerosis, or schizophrenia. d-Serine signaling represents an important pharmacological target for treating these diseases; however, the biochemical mechanisms controlling extracellular d-serine levels in vivo are still unclear. d-Serine heteroexchange through small neutral amino acid transporters has been shown in cell cultures and brain slices and could provide a biochemical mechanism for the control of d-serine extracellular concentration in vivo. Alternatively, exocytotic d-serine release has also been proposed. In this study, the dynamics of d-serine release and clearance were explored in vivo on a second-by-second time scale using microelectrode biosensors. The rate of d-serine clearance in the rat frontal cortex after a microionophoretic injection revealed a transporter-mediated uptake mechanism. d-Serine uptake was blocked by small neutral l-amino acids, implicating alanine-serine-cysteine (ASC) transporters, in particular high affinity Asc-1 and low affinity ASCT2 transporters. Interestingly, changes in alanine, serine, or threonine levels resulted in d-serine release through ASC transporters. Asc-1, but not ASCT2, appeared to release d-serine in response to changes in amino acid concentrations. Finally, neuronal silencing by tetrodotoxin increased d-serine extracellular concentration by an ASC-transporter-dependent mechanism. Together, these results indicate that d-serine heteroexchange through ASC transporters is present in vivo and may constitute a key component in the regulation of d-serine extracellular concentration. PMID:23581544

  10. Dynamic regulation of d-serine release in the vertebrate retina

    PubMed Central

    Gustafson, Eric G; Stevens, Eric S; Miller, Robert F

    2015-01-01

    The present study aimed to investigate the functional properties of NMDA receptor coagonist release and to specifically evaluate whether light-evoked release mechanisms contribute to the availability of the coagonist d-serine. Two different methods were involved in our approach: (i) whole-cell recordings from identified retinal ganglion cells in the tiger salamander were used to study light adaptation with positive and negative contrast stimuli over a range of ± 1 log unit against a steady background illumination and (ii) the mechanisms for intensity encoding to a range of light intensities covering 6 log10 units were investigated. This latter study employed extracellular recordings of the proximal negative field potential, pharmacologically manipulated to generate a pure NMDA mediated response. For the adaptation study, we examined the light-evoked responses under control conditions, followed by light stimuli presented in the presence of d-serine, followed by light stimulation in the presence of dichlorokynurenic acid to block the coagonist site of NMDA receptors. For the brightness encoding studies, we examined the action of d-serine on each intensity used and then applied the enzyme d-serine deaminase to remove significant levels of d-serine. These studies provided new insights into the mechanisms that regulate coagonist availability in the vertebrate retina. Our results strongly support the idea that light-evoked coagonist release, a major component of which is d-serine, is needed to provide the full range of coagonist availability for optimal activation of NMDA receptors. PMID:25480802

  11. D-serine in the midbrain periaqueductal gray contributes to morphine tolerance in rats

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Song; Sun, Mengjie; Li, Youyan

    2016-01-01

    Background The N-methyl-D-aspartate subtype of glutamate receptor plays a critical role in morphine tolerance. D-serine, a co-agonist of N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor, participates in many physiological and pathophysiological processes via regulating N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor activation. The purinergic P2X7 receptor activation can induce the D-serine release in the central nervous system. This study aimed to investigate the role of the ventrolateral midbrain periaqueductal gray D-serine in the mechanism of morphine tolerance in rats. The development of morphine tolerance was induced in normal adult male Sprague–Dawley rats through subcutaneous injection of morphine (10 mg/kg). The analgesic effect of morphine (5 mg/kg, i.p.) was assessed by measuring mechanical withdrawal thresholds in rats with an electronic von Frey anesthesiometer. The D-serine concentration and serine racemase expression levels in the ventrolateral midbrain periaqueductal gray were evaluated through enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and Western blot analysis, respectively. The effects of intra-ventrolateral midbrain periaqueductal gray injections of the D-serine degrading enzyme D-amino acid oxidase and antisense oligodeoxynucleotide targeting the P2X7 receptor on chronic morphine-treated rats were also explored. Results We found that repeated morphine administrations decreased the antinociceptive potency of morphine evidenced by the percent changes in mechanical pain threshold in rats. By contrast, the D-serine contents and the expression levels of the serine racemase protein were upregulated in the ventrolateral midbrain periaqueductal gray in morphine-tolerant rats. The development of morphine tolerance was markedly alleviated by intra-ventrolateral midbrain periaqueductal gray injections of D-amino acid oxidase or antisense oligodeoxynucleotide targeting the P2X7 receptor. Conclusions Our data indicate that the development of antinociceptive tolerance to morphine is partially

  12. The role of D-serine as co-agonist of NMDA receptors in the nucleus accumbens: relevance to cocaine addiction.

    PubMed

    D'Ascenzo, Marcello; Podda, Maria Vittoria; Grassi, Claudio

    2014-01-01

    Cocaine addiction is characterized by compulsive drug use despite adverse consequences and high rate of relapse during periods of abstinence. Increasing consensus suggests that addiction to drugs of abuse usurps learning and memory mechanisms normally related to natural rewards, ultimately producing long-lasting neuroadaptations in the mesocorticolimbic system. This system, formed in part by the ventral tegmental area and nucleus accumbens (NAc), has a central role in the development and expression of addictive behaviors. In addition to a broad spectrum of changes that affect morphology and function of NAc excitatory circuits in cocaine-treated animals, impaired N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor (NMDAR)-dependent synaptic plasticity is a typical feature. D-serine, a D-amino acid that has been found at high levels in mammalian brain, binds with high affinity the co-agonist site of NMDAR and mediates, along with glutamate, several important processes including synaptic plasticity. Here we review recent literature focusing on cocaine-induced impairment in synaptic plasticity mechanisms in the NAc and on the fundamental role of D-serine as co-agonist of NMDAR in functional and dysfunctional synaptic plasticity within this nucleus. The emerging picture is that reduced D-serine levels play a crucial role in synaptic plasticity relevant to cocaine addiction. This finding opens new perspectives for therapeutic approaches to treat this addictive state. PMID:25076900

  13. The role of D-serine as co-agonist of NMDA receptors in the nucleus accumbens: relevance to cocaine addiction

    PubMed Central

    D’Ascenzo, Marcello; Podda, Maria Vittoria; Grassi, Claudio

    2014-01-01

    Cocaine addiction is characterized by compulsive drug use despite adverse consequences and high rate of relapse during periods of abstinence. Increasing consensus suggests that addiction to drugs of abuse usurps learning and memory mechanisms normally related to natural rewards, ultimately producing long-lasting neuroadaptations in the mesocorticolimbic system. This system, formed in part by the ventral tegmental area and nucleus accumbens (NAc), has a central role in the development and expression of addictive behaviors. In addition to a broad spectrum of changes that affect morphology and function of NAc excitatory circuits in cocaine–treated animals, impaired N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor (NMDAR)-dependent synaptic plasticity is a typical feature. D-serine, a D-amino acid that has been found at high levels in mammalian brain, binds with high affinity the co-agonist site of NMDAR and mediates, along with glutamate, several important processes including synaptic plasticity. Here we review recent literature focusing on cocaine-induced impairment in synaptic plasticity mechanisms in the NAc and on the fundamental role of D-serine as co-agonist of NMDAR in functional and dysfunctional synaptic plasticity within this nucleus. The emerging picture is that reduced D-serine levels play a crucial role in synaptic plasticity relevant to cocaine addiction. This finding opens new perspectives for therapeutic approaches to treat this addictive state. PMID:25076900

  14. The Cryptic dsdA Gene Encodes a Functional D-Serine Dehydratase in Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1.

    PubMed

    Li, Guoqing; Lu, Chung-Dar

    2016-06-01

    D-Serine, an important neurotransmitter, also contributes to bacterial adaptation and virulence in humans. It was reported that Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1 can grow on D-serine as the sole nitrogen source, and growth was severely reduced in the dadA mutant devoid of the D-alanine dehydrogenase with broad substrate specificity. In this study, the dsdA gene (PA3357) encoding a putative D-serine dehydratase was subjected to further characterization. Growth on D-serine as the sole source of nitrogen was retained in the ∆dsdA mutant and was abolished completely in the ∆dadA and ∆dadA-∆dsdA mutants. However, when complemented by dsdA on a plasmid, the double mutant was able to grow on D-serine as the sole source of carbon and nitrogen, supporting the proposed biochemical function of DsdA in the conversion of D-serine into pyruvate and ammonia. Among D- and L-amino acids tested, only D-serine and D-threonine could serve as the substrates of DsdA, and the Km of DsdA with D-serine was calculated to be 330 μM. Comparative genomics revealed that this cryptic dsdA gene was highly conserved in strains of P. aeruginosa, and that most strains of Pseudomonas putida possess putative dsdCAX genes encoding a transcriptional regulator DsdC and a D-serine transporter DsdX as in enteric bacteria. In conclusion, this study supports the presence of a cryptic dsdA gene encoding a functional D-serine dehydratase in P. aeruginosa, and the absence of dsdA expression in response to exogenous D-serine might be due to the loss of regulatory elements for gene activation during evolution. PMID:26957519

  15. Nuclear Compartmentalization of Serine Racemase Regulates D-Serine Production: IMPLICATIONS FOR N-METHYL-D-ASPARTATE (NMDA) RECEPTOR ACTIVATION.

    PubMed

    Kolodney, Goren; Dumin, Elena; Safory, Hazem; Rosenberg, Dina; Mori, Hisashi; Radzishevsky, Inna; Radzishevisky, Inna; Wolosker, Herman

    2015-12-25

    D-Serine is a physiological co-agonist that activates N-methyl D-aspartate receptors (NMDARs) and is essential for neurotransmission, synaptic plasticity, and behavior. D-Serine may also trigger NMDAR-mediated neurotoxicity, and its dysregulation may play a role in neurodegeneration. D-Serine is synthesized by the enzyme serine racemase (SR), which directly converts L-serine to D-serine. However, many aspects concerning the regulation of D-serine production under physiological and pathological conditions remain to be elucidated. Here, we investigate possible mechanisms regulating the synthesis of D-serine by SR in paradigms relevant to neurotoxicity. We report that SR undergoes nucleocytoplasmic shuttling and that this process is dysregulated by several insults leading to neuronal death, typically by apoptotic stimuli. Cell death induction promotes nuclear accumulation of SR, in parallel with the nuclear translocation of GAPDH and Siah proteins at an early stage of the cell death process. Mutations in putative SR nuclear export signals (NESs) elicit SR nuclear accumulation and its depletion from the cytosol. Following apoptotic insult, SR associates with nuclear GAPDH along with other nuclear components, and this is accompanied by complete inactivation of the enzyme. As a result, extracellular D-serine concentration is reduced, even though extracellular glutamate concentration increases severalfold. Our observations imply that nuclear translocation of SR provides a fail-safe mechanism to prevent or limit secondary NMDAR-mediated toxicity in nearby synapses. PMID:26553873

  16. The host metabolite D-serine contributes to bacterial niche specificity through gene selection

    PubMed Central

    Connolly, James PR; Goldstone, Robert J; Burgess, Karl; Cogdell, Richard J; Beatson, Scott A; Vollmer, Waldemar; Smith, David GE; Roe, Andrew J

    2015-01-01

    Escherichia coli comprise a diverse array of both commensals and niche-specific pathotypes. The ability to cause disease results from both carriage of specific virulence factors and regulatory control of these via environmental stimuli. Moreover, host metabolites further refine the response of bacteria to their environment and can dramatically affect the outcome of the host–pathogen interaction. Here, we demonstrate that the host metabolite, D-serine, selectively affects gene expression in E. coli O157:H7. Transcriptomic profiling showed exposure to D-serine results in activation of the SOS response and suppresses expression of the Type 3 Secretion System (T3SS) used to attach to host cells. We also show that concurrent carriage of both the D-serine tolerance locus (dsdCXA) and the locus of enterocyte effacement pathogenicity island encoding a T3SS is extremely rare, a genotype that we attribute to an ‘evolutionary incompatibility' between the two loci. This study demonstrates the importance of co-operation between both core and pathogenic genetic elements in defining niche specificity. PMID:25526369

  17. A Highly Conserved Bacterial D-Serine Uptake System Links Host Metabolism and Virulence.

    PubMed

    Connolly, James P R; Gabrielsen, Mads; Goldstone, Robert J; Grinter, Rhys; Wang, Dai; Cogdell, Richard J; Walker, Daniel; Smith, David G E; Roe, Andrew J

    2016-01-01

    The ability of any organism to sense and respond to challenges presented in the environment is critically important for promoting or restricting colonization of specific sites. Recent work has demonstrated that the host metabolite D-serine has the ability to markedly influence the outcome of infection by repressing the type III secretion system of enterohaemorrhagic Escherichia coli (EHEC) in a concentration-dependent manner. However, exactly how EHEC monitors environmental D-serine is not understood. In this work, we have identified two highly conserved members of the E. coli core genome, encoding an inner membrane transporter and a transcriptional regulator, which collectively help to "sense" levels of D-serine by regulating its uptake from the environment and in turn influencing global gene expression. Both proteins are required for full expression of the type III secretion system and diversely regulated prophage-encoded effector proteins demonstrating an important infection-relevant adaptation of the core genome. We propose that this system acts as a key safety net, sampling the environment for this metabolite, thereby promoting colonization of EHEC to favorable sites within the host. PMID:26727373

  18. A Highly Conserved Bacterial D-Serine Uptake System Links Host Metabolism and Virulence

    PubMed Central

    Connolly, James P. R.; Gabrielsen, Mads; Goldstone, Robert J.; Grinter, Rhys; Wang, Dai; Cogdell, Richard J.; Walker, Daniel; Smith, David G. E.; Roe, Andrew J.

    2016-01-01

    The ability of any organism to sense and respond to challenges presented in the environment is critically important for promoting or restricting colonization of specific sites. Recent work has demonstrated that the host metabolite D-serine has the ability to markedly influence the outcome of infection by repressing the type III secretion system of enterohaemorrhagic Escherichia coli (EHEC) in a concentration-dependent manner. However, exactly how EHEC monitors environmental D-serine is not understood. In this work, we have identified two highly conserved members of the E. coli core genome, encoding an inner membrane transporter and a transcriptional regulator, which collectively help to “sense” levels of D-serine by regulating its uptake from the environment and in turn influencing global gene expression. Both proteins are required for full expression of the type III secretion system and diversely regulated prophage-encoded effector proteins demonstrating an important infection-relevant adaptation of the core genome. We propose that this system acts as a key safety net, sampling the environment for this metabolite, thereby promoting colonization of EHEC to favorable sites within the host. PMID:26727373

  19. Tryptophanase-catalyzed L-tryptophan synthesis from D-serine in the presence of diammonium hydrogen phosphate.

    PubMed

    Shimada, Akihiko; Ozaki, Haruka; Saito, Takeshi; Noriko, Fujii

    2009-06-01

    Tryptophanase, an enzyme with extreme absolute stereospecificity for optically active stereoisomers, catalyzes the synthesis of l-tryptophan from l-serine and indole through a beta-substitution mechanism of the ping-pong type, and has no activity on d-serine. We previously reported that tryptophanase changed its stereospecificity to degrade d-tryptophan in highly concentrated diammonium hydrogen phosphate, (NH(4))(2)HPO(4) solution. The present study provided the same stereospecific change seen in the d-tryptophan degradation reaction also occurs in tryptophan synthesis from d-serine. Tryptophanase became active to d-serine to synthesize l-tryptophan in the presence of diammonium hydrogen phosphate. This reaction has never been reported before. d-serine seems to undergo beta-replacement via an enzyme-bonded alpha-aminoacylate intermediate to yield l-tryptophan. PMID:19582219

  20. Crystal Structure of Serine Racemase that Produces Neurotransmitter d-Serine for Stimulation of the NMDA Receptor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goto, Masaru

    d-Serine is an endogenous coagonist for the N-methyl-d-aspartate receptor and is involved in excitatory neurotransmission in the brain. Mammalian pyridoxal 5’-phosphate-dependent serine racemase, which is localized in the mammalian brain, catalyzes the racemization of l-serine to yield d-serine and vice versa. We have determined the structures of three forms of the mammalian enzyme homolog from Schizosaccharomyces pombe. Lys57 and Ser82 located on the protein and solvent sides, respectively, with respect to the cofactor plane, are acid-base catalysts that shuttle protons to the substrate. The modified enzyme, which has a unique lysino-d-alanyl residue at the active site, also binds the substrate serine in the active site, suggesting that the lysino-d-alanyl residue acts as a catalytic base in the same manner as Lys57 of the wild type enzyme.

  1. D-cycloserine, sarcosine and D-serine diminish the expression of cocaine-induced conditioned place preference.

    PubMed

    Yang, Fu-Yung; Lee, Yung-Shuan; Cherng, Chianfang G; Cheng, Ling-Yi; Chang, Wan-Ting; Chuang, Jia-Ying; Kao, Gour-Shenq; Yu, Lung

    2013-06-01

    Reactivation of cocaine-associated memories plays a critical role in reinstating the cocaine-seeking behavior and causing relapse. Cocaine-induced conditioned place preference (CPP) was used as a behavioral paradigm indicative of cocaine-associated memory and repeated cocaine-free preference tests served as a behavioral procedure to retrieve such a memory in this study. Since D-cycloserine was reported to eradicate drug-associated memories, two other N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor agonists were assessed for their efficacy on facilitating the extinction of cocaine-induced CPP. Although D-cycloserine (30 mg/kg) abolished cocaine (10 mg/kg)-induced CPP, sarcosine (300 and 600 mg/kg) and D-serine (600 mg/kg) diminished the expression of such a cocaine memory. Sarcosine (600 mg/kg) and D-serine (600 mg/kg) did not affect the storage of this cocaine memory. It was of interest to note that D-cycloserine facilitated the extinction of cocaine-induced CPP in a fast and early-onset manner, while sarcosine and D-serine decreased cocaine-induced CPP expression in a delay-onset manner. D-cycloserine (30 mg/kg), D-serine (600 mg/kg) and sarcosine (600 mg/kg) did not affect the consolidation of cocaine (5 mg/kg)-induced CPP. Finally, sarcosine (at 600 mg/kg/day for 3 consecutive days) and D-serine (at 600 mg/kg/day for 3 consecutive days) did not produce observable aversive effect associated with their administration in a conditioned place aversion paradigm. Likewise, a similar dosing regimen of sarcosine or D-serine did not cause evident activity-impairing effect. In addition to D-cycloserine treatment, our results indicate that long-term treatment with D-serine and sarcosine may afford a therapeutic advance in suppressing the expression of cocaine-associated memory. PMID:21106609

  2. Control of Appetite and Food Preference by NMDA Receptor and Its Co-Agonist d-Serine

    PubMed Central

    Sasaki, Tsutomu; Matsui, Sho; Kitamura, Tadahiro

    2016-01-01

    Obesity causes a significant negative impact on health of human beings world-wide. The main reason for weight gain, which eventually leads to obesity, is excessive ingestion of energy above the body’s homeostatic needs. Therefore, the elucidation of detailed mechanisms for appetite control is necessary to prevent and treat obesity. N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) receptor is a post-synaptic glutamate receptor and is important for excitatory neurotransmission. It is expressed throughout the nervous system, and is important for long-term potentiation. It requires both ligand (glutamate) and co-agonist (d-serine or glycine) for efficient opening of the channel to allow calcium influx. d-serine is contained in fermented foods and marine invertebrates, and brain d-serine level is maintained by synthesis in vivo and supply from food and gut microbiota. Although the NMDA receptor has been reported to take part in the central regulation of appetite, the role of d-serine had not been addressed. We recently reported that exogenous d-serine administration can suppress appetite and alter food preference. In this review, we will discuss how NMDA receptor and its co-agonist d-seine participate in the control of appetite and food preference, and elaborate on how this system could possibly be manipulated to suppress obesity. PMID:27399680

  3. Control of Appetite and Food Preference by NMDA Receptor and Its Co-Agonist d-Serine.

    PubMed

    Sasaki, Tsutomu; Matsui, Sho; Kitamura, Tadahiro

    2016-01-01

    Obesity causes a significant negative impact on health of human beings world-wide. The main reason for weight gain, which eventually leads to obesity, is excessive ingestion of energy above the body's homeostatic needs. Therefore, the elucidation of detailed mechanisms for appetite control is necessary to prevent and treat obesity. N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) receptor is a post-synaptic glutamate receptor and is important for excitatory neurotransmission. It is expressed throughout the nervous system, and is important for long-term potentiation. It requires both ligand (glutamate) and co-agonist (d-serine or glycine) for efficient opening of the channel to allow calcium influx. d-serine is contained in fermented foods and marine invertebrates, and brain d-serine level is maintained by synthesis in vivo and supply from food and gut microbiota. Although the NMDA receptor has been reported to take part in the central regulation of appetite, the role of d-serine had not been addressed. We recently reported that exogenous d-serine administration can suppress appetite and alter food preference. In this review, we will discuss how NMDA receptor and its co-agonist d-seine participate in the control of appetite and food preference, and elaborate on how this system could possibly be manipulated to suppress obesity. PMID:27399680

  4. D-Serine facilitates the effectiveness of extinction to reduce drug-primed reinstatement of cocaine-induced conditioned place preference.

    PubMed

    Hammond, Sherri; Seymour, Claire M; Burger, Ashley; Wagner, John J

    2013-01-01

    Addiction is a disease that is characterized by compulsive drug-seeking and use despite negative health and social consequences. One obstacle in treating addiction is a high susceptibility for relapse which persists despite prolonged periods of abstinence. Relapse can be triggered by drug predictive stimuli such as environmental context and drug associated cues, as well as the addictive drug itself. The conditioned place preference (CPP) behavioral model is a useful paradigm for studying the ability of these drug predictive stimuli to reinstate drug-seeking behavior. The present study investigated the dose-dependent effects of D-serine (10 mg/kg, 30 mg/kg and 100 mg/kg) on extinction training and drug-primed reinstatement in cocaine-conditioned rats. In the first experiment, D-serine had no effect on the acquisition or development of cocaine-induced locomotor sensitization or CPP. In the second experiment, D-serine treatment resulted in significantly decreased time spent in the drug-paired compartment following completion of an extinction protocol. A cocaine-primed reinstatement test indicated that the combination of extinction training along with D-serine treatment resulted in a significant reduction of drug-seeking behavior. The third experiment assessed D-serine's long-term effects to diminish drug-primed reinstatement. D-serine treatment given during extinction was effective in reducing drug-seeking for more than four weeks of abstinence after the last cocaine exposure. These findings demonstrate that D-serine may be an effective adjunct therapeutic agent along with cognitive behavioral therapy for the treatment of cocaine addiction. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled 'Cognitive Enhancers'. PMID:22728761

  5. Phosphoserine phosphatase activity is elevated and correlates negatively with plasma d-serine concentration in patients with schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Ozeki, Yuji; Sekine, Masae; Fujii, Kumiko; Watanabe, Takashi; Okayasu, Hiroaki; Takano, Yumiko; Shinozaki, Takahiro; Aoki, Akiko; Akiyama, Kazufumi; Homma, Hiroshi; Shimoda, Kazutaka

    2016-03-30

    The pathophysiology of schizophrenia may involve N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor (NMDAR) hypofunction. D-3serine and glycine are endogenous l-serine-derived NMDAR co-agonists. We hypothesized that the l-serine synthesis pathway could be involved in schizophrenia. We measured the activity of phosphoserine phosphatase (PSP), a rate-limiting enzyme in l-serine synthesis, in peripheral blood mononuclear cells of 54 patients with schizophrenia and 49 normal control subjects. Plasma amino acid (l-serine, d-serine, glycine, glutamine, and glutamate) levels were measured by high performance liquid chromatography. Peripheral blood mRNA expression levels of PHGDH, PSAT1, PSP, and SR, determined by quantitative real-time PCR were compared between patients and controls. PSP activity was higher in patients than in controls, especially in male patients. In male patients, the plasma l-serine concentration was higher than that in controls. In patients, PSP activity was negatively correlated with plasma d-serine and glycine levels. Furthermore, PSP activity was positively correlated with plasma l-serine concentration. These results were statistically significant only in male patients. PSP, PSAT1, and PHGDH mRNA levels were lower in patients than in controls, except when the PHGDH expression level was compared with ACTB expression. In summary, we found the l-serine synthesis system to be altered in patients with schizophrenia, especially in male patients. PMID:26804975

  6. Expression of a Codon-Optimized dsdA Gene in Tobacco Plastids and Rice Nucleus Confers D-Serine Tolerance

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yanmei; Wang, Rui; Hu, Zongliang; Li, Hongcai; Lu, Shizhan; Zhang, Juanjuan; Lin, Yongjun; Zhou, Fei

    2016-01-01

    D-serine is toxic to plants. D-serine ammonia lyase, which is encoded by the dsdA gene, can attenuate this toxicity with high specificity. In the present study, we explored the function of codon-optimized dsdA with tobacco plastids and rice nuclear transformation system. It was shown that dsdA gene was site-specifically integrated into the tobacco plastid genome and displayed a high level of expression. Genetic analysis of the progenies showed that dsdA gene is maternally inherited and confers sufficient D-serine resistance in tobacco. The effective screening concentrations of D-serine for seed germination, callus regeneration and foliar spray were 10, 30, and 75 mM, respectively. In addition, calluses from homozygous transgenic rice lines also showed significant tolerance to D-serine (up to 75 mM). Our study proves the feasibility of using dsdA gene as a selectable marker in both plastid and nuclear transformation systems. PMID:27242842

  7. Expression of a Codon-Optimized dsdA Gene in Tobacco Plastids and Rice Nucleus Confers D-Serine Tolerance.

    PubMed

    Li, Yanmei; Wang, Rui; Hu, Zongliang; Li, Hongcai; Lu, Shizhan; Zhang, Juanjuan; Lin, Yongjun; Zhou, Fei

    2016-01-01

    D-serine is toxic to plants. D-serine ammonia lyase, which is encoded by the dsdA gene, can attenuate this toxicity with high specificity. In the present study, we explored the function of codon-optimized dsdA with tobacco plastids and rice nuclear transformation system. It was shown that dsdA gene was site-specifically integrated into the tobacco plastid genome and displayed a high level of expression. Genetic analysis of the progenies showed that dsdA gene is maternally inherited and confers sufficient D-serine resistance in tobacco. The effective screening concentrations of D-serine for seed germination, callus regeneration and foliar spray were 10, 30, and 75 mM, respectively. In addition, calluses from homozygous transgenic rice lines also showed significant tolerance to D-serine (up to 75 mM). Our study proves the feasibility of using dsdA gene as a selectable marker in both plastid and nuclear transformation systems. PMID:27242842

  8. Efficacy of glutamate modulators in tic suppression: A double-blind, randomized control trial of D-serine and riluzole in Tourette Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Lemmon, Monica E.; Grados, Marco; Kline, Tina; Thompson, Carol B.; Ali, Syed F.; Singer, Harvey S.

    2015-01-01

    Background It has been hypothesized that glutamatergic transmission may be altered in Tourette syndrome (TS). In this study, we explored the efficacy of a glutamate agonist (D-serine) and antagonist (riluzole) as tic-suppressing agents in children with TS. Methods We performed a parallel 3-arm, 8-week, double-blind, randomized placebo-controlled treatment study in children with TS. Each child received 6 weeks of treatment with D-serine (maximum dose 30 mg/kg/day), riluzole (maximum dose 200 mg/day), or placebo, followed by a 2-week taper. The primary outcome measure was effective tic suppression as determined by the differences in the Yale Global Tic Severity Scale score (YGTSS); specifically, the Total Tic score (TTS) and the combined score (TTS + global impairment) between treatment arms after 6 weeks of treatment. Mann-Whitney U tests were performed to analyze differences between each group and the placebo group. Results Twenty-four patients (males = 21, ages 9-18) enrolled in the study and one patient dropped out prior to completion. Combined YGTSS and TTS scores improved in all groups. The 6-week mean percent improvement of the riluzole (n=10), D-serine (n=9), and placebo (n=5) groups in the combined YGTSS were 43.7, 39.5, and 30.2 percent and for TTS were 38.0, 25.0, and 34.0 percent, respectively. There were no significant differences in YGTSS or TTS, respectively, between the riluzole and placebo (p = 0.35, 0.85) or D-serine and placebo (p = 0.50, 0.69) groups. Conclusion Tics diminished by comparable percentages in the riluzole, D-serine, and placebo groups. These preliminary data suggest that D-serine and riluzole are not effective in tic suppression. PMID:26002052

  9. TRPA1 Channels Are Regulators of Astrocyte Basal Calcium Levels and Long-Term Potentiation via Constitutive d-Serine Release

    PubMed Central

    Shigetomi, Eiji; Jackson-Weaver, Olan; Huckstepp, Robert T.

    2013-01-01

    Astrocytes are found throughout the brain where they make extensive contacts with neurons and synapses. Astrocytes are known to display intracellular Ca2+ signals and release signaling molecules such as d-serine into the extracellular space. However, the role(s) of astrocyte Ca2+ signals in hippocampal long-term potentiation (LTP), a form of synaptic plasticity involved in learning and memory, remains unclear. Here, we explored a recently discovered novel TRPA1 channel-mediated transmembrane Ca2+ flux pathway in astrocytes. Specifically, we determined whether block or genetic deletion of TRPA1 channels affected LTP of Schaffer collateral to CA1 pyramidal neuron synapses. Using pharmacology, TRPA1−/− mice, imaging, electrophysiology, and d-serine biosensors, our data indicate that astrocyte TRPA1 channels contribute to basal Ca2+ levels and are required for constitutive d-serine release into the extracellular space, which contributes to NMDA receptor-dependent LTP. The findings have broad relevance for the study of astrocyte–neuron interactions by demonstrating how TRPA1 channel-mediated fluxes contribute to astrocyte basal Ca2+ levels and neuronal function via constitutive d-serine release. PMID:23761909

  10. Prebiotic feeding elevates central brain derived neurotrophic factor, N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor subunits and D-serine.

    PubMed

    Savignac, Helene M; Corona, Giulia; Mills, Henrietta; Chen, Li; Spencer, Jeremy P E; Tzortzis, George; Burnet, Philip W J

    2013-12-01

    The influence of the gut microbiota on brain chemistry has been convincingly demonstrated in rodents. In the absence of gut bacteria, the central expression of brain derived neurotropic factor, (BDNF), and N-methyl-d-aspartate receptor (NMDAR) subunits are reduced, whereas, oral probiotics increase brain BDNF, and impart significant anxiolytic effects. We tested whether prebiotic compounds, which increase intrinsic enteric microbiota, also affected brain BDNF and NMDARs. In addition, we examined whether plasma from prebiotic treated rats released BDNF from human SH-SY5Y neuroblastoma cells, to provide an initial indication of mechanism of action. Rats were gavaged with fructo-oligosaccharides (FOS), galacto-oligosaccharides (GOS) or water for five weeks, prior to measurements of brain BDNF, NMDAR subunits and amino acids associated with glutamate neurotransmission (glutamate, glutamine, and serine and alanine enantiomers). Prebiotics increased hippocampal BDNF and NR1 subunit expression relative to controls. The intake of GOS also increased hippocampal NR2A subunits, and frontal cortex NR1 and d-serine. Prebiotics did not alter glutamate, glutamine, l-serine, l-alanine or d-alanine concentrations in the brain, though GOSfeeding raised plasma d-alanine. Elevated levels of plasma peptide YY (PYY) after GOS intake was observed. Plasma from GOS rats increased the release of BDNF from SH-SY5Y cells, but not in the presence of PYY antisera. The addition of synthetic PYY to SH-SY5Y cell cultures, also elevated BDNF secretion. We conclude that prebiotic-mediated proliferation of gut microbiota in rats, like probiotics, increases brain BDNF expression, possibly through the involvement of gut hormones. The effect of GOS on components of central NMDAR signalling was greater than FOS, and may reflect the proliferative potency of GOS on microbiota. Our data therefore, provide a sound basis to further investigate the utility of prebiotics in the maintenance of brain health and

  11. A novel Na(+) -Independent alanine-serine-cysteine transporter 1 inhibitor inhibits both influx and efflux of D-Serine.

    PubMed

    Sakimura, Katsuya; Nakao, Kenji; Yoshikawa, Masato; Suzuki, Motohisa; Kimura, Haruhide

    2016-10-01

    NMDA receptor dysfunctions are hypothesized to underlie the pathophysiology of schizophrenia, and treatment with D-serine (D-Ser), an NMDA receptor coagonist, may improve the clinical symptoms of schizophrenia. Thus, upregulating the synaptic D-Ser level is a novel strategy for schizophrenia treatment. Na(+) -independent alanine-serine-cysteine transporter 1 (asc-1) is a transporter responsible for regulating the extracellular D-Ser levels in the brain. In this study, we discovered a novel asc-1 inhibitor, (+)-amino(1-(3,5-dichlorophenyl)-3,5-dimethyl-1H-pyrazol-4-yl)acetic acid (ACPP), and assessed its pharmacological profile. ACPP inhibited the D-[(3) H]Ser uptake in human asc-1-expressing CHO cells and rat primary neurons with IC50 values of 0.72 ± 0.13 and 0.89 ± 0.30 μM, respectively. In accordance with the lower asc-1 expression levels in astrocytes, ACPP did not inhibit D-Ser uptake in rat primary astrocytes. In a microdialysis study, ACPP dose dependently decreased the extracellular D-Ser levels in the rat hippocampus under the same conditions in which the asc-1 inhibitor S-methyl-L-cysteine (SMLC) increased it. To obtain insights into this difference, we conducted a D-[(3) H]Ser efflux assay using asc-1-expressing CHO cells. ACPP inhibited D-[(3) H]Ser efflux, whereas SMLC increased it. These results suggest that ACPP is a novel inhibitor of asc-1. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27302861

  12. The Postnatal Development of d-Serine in the Retinas of Two Mouse Strains, Including a Mutant Mouse with a Deficiency in d-Amino Acid Oxidase and a Serine Racemase Knockout Mouse

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    d-Serine, an N-methyl d-aspartate receptor coagonist, and its regulatory enzymes, d-amino acid oxidase (DAO; degradation) and serine racemase (SR; synthesis), have been implicated in crucial roles of the developing central nervous system, yet the functional position that they play in regulating the availability of d-serine throughout development of the mammalian retina is not well-known. Using capillary electrophoresis and a sensitive method of enantiomeric amino acid separation, we were able to determine total levels of d-serine at specific ages during postnatal development of the mouse retina in two different strains of mice, one of which contained a loss-of-function point mutation for DAO while the other was a SR knockout line. Each mouse line was tested against conspecific wild type (WT) mice for each genetic strain. The universal trend in all WT and transgenic mice was a large amount of total retinal d-serine at postnatal age 2 (P2), followed by a dramatic decrease as the mice matured into adulthood (P70–80). SR knockout mice retinas had 41% less d-serine than WT retinas at P2, and 10 times less as an adult. DAO mutant mice retinas had significantly elevated levels of d-serine when compared to WT retinas at P2 (217%), P4 (223%), P8 (194%), and adulthood (227%). PMID:25083578

  13. Alterations in the motor cortical and striatal glutamatergic system and D-serine levels in the bilateral 6-hydroxydopamine rat model for Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    El Arfani, Anissa; Albertini, Giulia; Bentea, Eduard; Demuyser, Thomas; Van Eeckhaut, Ann; Smolders, Ilse; Massie, Ann

    2015-09-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is hallmarked by progressive degeneration of the substantia nigra pars compacta (SNc) neurons and is associated with aberrant glutamatergic activity. However, studies on the glutamatergic system in the motor cortex and striatum, two motor loop-related areas, are lacking in the clinically relevant bilateral SNc 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) rat model, and therefore led to the rationale behind the present investigations. Using Western blotting, the expression levels of the glial glutamate transporters, GLT-1 and GLAST, as well as xCT, the specific subunit of system xc(-), and the vesicular glutamate transporters, VGLUT1 and 2 were investigated at two different time points (1 week and 2 weeks) post-lesion. In addition, the total content of glutamate was measured. Moreover, the total D-serine levels were, to the best of our knowledge, studied for the first time in these two PD-related areas in the bilateral 6-OHDA rat model. In the motor cortex, no significant changes were observed in the different glutamate transporter expression levels in the bilaterally-lesioned rats. In the striatum, GLAST expression was significantly decreased at both time points whereas VGLUT1 and 2 expressions were significantly decreased 2 weeks after bilateral 6-OHDA lesion. Interestingly, bilateral 6-OHDA SNc lesion resulted in an enhancement of the total d-serine content in both motor cortex and striatum at 1 week post-lesion suggesting its possible involvement in the pathophysiology of PD. In conclusion, this study demonstrates disturbed glutamate and D-serine regulation in the bilateral SNc-lesioned brain which could contribute to the behavioral impairments in PD. PMID:26172319

  14. Spinal sigma-1 receptor activation increases the production of D-serine in astrocytes which contributes to the development of mechanical allodynia in a mouse model of neuropathic pain.

    PubMed

    Moon, Ji-Young; Choi, Sheu-Ran; Roh, Dae-Hyun; Yoon, Seo-Yeon; Kwon, Soon-Gu; Choi, Hoon-Seong; Kang, Suk-Yun; Han, Ho-Jae; Kim, Hyun-Woo; Beitz, Alvin J; Oh, Seog-Bae; Lee, Jang-Hern

    2015-10-01

    We have previously demonstrated that activation of the spinal sigma-1 receptor (Sig-1R) plays an important role in the development of mechanical allodynia (MA) via secondary activation of the N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) receptor. Sig-1Rs have been shown to localize to astrocytes, and blockade of Sig-1Rs inhibits the pathologic activation of astrocytes in neuropathic mice. However, the mechanism by which Sig-1R activation in astrocytes modulates NMDA receptors in neurons is currently unknown. d-serine, synthesized from l-serine by serine racemase (Srr) in astrocytes, is an endogenous co-agonist for the NMDA receptor glycine site and can control NMDA receptor activity. Here, we investigated the role of d-serine in the development of MA induced by spinal Sig-1R activation in chronic constriction injury (CCI) mice. The production of d-serine and Srr expression were both significantly increased in the spinal cord dorsal horn post-CCI surgery. Srr and d-serine were only localized to astrocytes in the superficial dorsal horn, while d-serine was also localized to neurons in the deep dorsal horn. Moreover, we found that Srr exists in astrocytes that express Sig-1Rs. The CCI-induced increase in the levels of d-serine and Srr was attenuated by sustained intrathecal treatment with the Sig-1R antagonist, BD-1047 during the induction phase of neuropathic pain. In behavioral experiments, degradation of endogenous d-serine with DAAO, or selective blockade of Srr by LSOS, effectively reduced the development of MA, but not thermal hyperalgesia in CCI mice. Finally, BD-1047 administration inhibited the development of MA and this inhibition was reversed by intrathecal treatment with exogenous d-serine. These findings demonstrate for the first time that the activation of Sig-1Rs increases the expression of Srr and d-serine in astrocytes. The increased production of d-serine induced by CCI ultimately affects dorsal horn neurons that are involved in the development of MA in neuropathic

  15. Brain-specific Phgdh deletion reveals a pivotal role for L-serine biosynthesis in controlling the level of D-serine, an N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor co-agonist, in adult brain.

    PubMed

    Yang, Jung Hoon; Wada, Akira; Yoshida, Kazuyuki; Miyoshi, Yurika; Sayano, Tomoko; Esaki, Kayoko; Kinoshita, Masami O; Tomonaga, Shozo; Azuma, Norihiro; Watanabe, Masahiko; Hamase, Kenji; Zaitsu, Kiyoshi; Machida, Takeo; Messing, Albee; Itohara, Shigeyoshi; Hirabayashi, Yoshio; Furuya, Shigeki

    2010-12-31

    In mammalian brain, D-serine is synthesized from L-serine by serine racemase, and it functions as an obligatory co-agonist at the glycine modulatory site of N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA)-selective glutamate receptors. Although diminution in D-serine level has been implicated in NMDA receptor hypofunction, which is thought to occur in schizophrenia, the source of the precursor L-serine and its role in D-serine metabolism in adult brain have yet to be determined. We investigated whether L-serine synthesized in brain via the phosphorylated pathway is essential for D-serine synthesis by generating mice with a conditional deletion of D-3-phosphoglycerate dehydrogenase (Phgdh; EC 1.1.1.95). This enzyme catalyzes the first step in L-serine synthesis via the phosphorylated pathway. HPLC analysis of serine enantiomers demonstrated that both L- and D-serine levels were markedly decreased in the cerebral cortex and hippocampus of conditional knock-out mice, whereas the serine deficiency did not alter protein expression levels of serine racemase and NMDA receptor subunits in these regions. The present study provides definitive proof that L-serine-synthesized endogenously via the phosphorylated pathway is a key rate-limiting factor for maintaining steady-state levels of D-serine in adult brain. Furthermore, NMDA-evoked transcription of Arc, an immediate early gene, was diminished in the hippocampus of conditional knock-out mice. Thus, this study demonstrates that in mature neuronal circuits L-serine availability determines the rate of D-serine synthesis in the forebrain and controls NMDA receptor function at least in the hippocampus. PMID:20966073

  16. Fractalkine (CX3CL1) enhances hippocampal N-methyl-d-aspartate receptor (NMDAR) function via d-serine and adenosine receptor type A2 (A2AR) activity

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background N-Methyl-d-aspartate receptors (NMDARs) play fundamental roles in basic brain functions such as excitatory neurotransmission and learning and memory processes. Their function is largely regulated by factors released by glial cells, including the coagonist d-serine. We investigated whether the activation of microglial CX3CR1 induces the release of factors that modulate NMDAR functions. Methods We recorded the NMDAR component of the field excitatory postsynaptic potentials (NMDA-fEPSPs) elicited in the CA1 stratum radiatum of mouse hippocampal slices by Shaffer collateral stimulation and evaluated d-serine content in the extracellular medium of glial primary cultures by mass spectrometry analysis. Results We demonstrated that CX3CL1 increases NMDA-fEPSPs by a mechanism involving the activity of the adenosine receptor type A2 (A2AR) and the release of the NMDAR coagonist d-serine. Specifically (1) the selective A2AR blocker 7-(2-phenylethyl)-5-amino-2-(2-furyl)-pyrazolo-[4,3-e]-1,2,4-triazolo[1,5-c]pyrimidine (SCH58261) and the genetic ablation of A2AR prevent CX3CL1 action while the A2AR agonist 5-(6-amino-2-(phenethylthio)-9H-purin-9-yl)-N-ethyl-3,4-dihydroxytetrahydrofuran-2-carboxamide (VT7) mimics CX3CL1 effect, and (2) the selective blocking of the NMDAR glycine (and d-serine) site by 5,7-dicholorokynurenic acid (DCKA), the enzymatic degradation of d-serine by d-amino acid oxidase (DAAO) and the saturation of the coagonist site by d-serine, all block the CX3CL1 effect. In addition, mass spectrometry analysis demonstrates that stimulation of microglia and astrocytes with CX3CL1 or VT7 increases d-serine release in the extracellular medium. Conclusions CX3CL1 transiently potentiates NMDAR function though mechanisms involving A2AR activity and the release of d-serine. PMID:23981568

  17. The amino-terminal domain of glutamate receptor {delta}2 triggers presynaptic differentiation

    SciTech Connect

    Uemura, Takeshi; Mishina, Masayoshi

    2008-12-26

    Glutamate receptor (GluR) {delta}2 selectively expressed in cerebellar Purkinje cells plays key roles in synapse formation, long-term depression and motor learning. We propose that GluR{delta}2 regulates synapse formation by making a physical linkage between the active zone and postsynaptic density. To examine the issue, GluR{delta}2-transfected 293T cells were cultured with cerebellar neurons. We found numerous punctate signals for presynaptic markers on the surface of 293T cells expressing GluR{delta}2. The presynaptic specializations induced by GluR{delta}2 were capable of exo- and endocytosis as indicated by FM1-43 dye labeling. Replacement of the extracellular N-terminal domain (NTD) of GluR{delta}2 with that of the AMPA receptor GluR{alpha}1 abolished the inducing activity. The NTD of GluR{delta}2 fused to the immunoglobulin constant region successfully induced the accumulation of presynaptic specializations on the surface of beads bearing the fusion protein. These results suggest that GluR{delta}2 triggers presynaptic differentiation by direct interaction with presynaptic components through the NTD.

  18. The inverse link between genetic risk for schizophrenia and migraine through NMDA (N-methyl-D-aspartate) receptor activation via D-serine.

    PubMed

    Van der Auwera, Sandra; Teumer, Alexander; Hertel, Johannes; Homuth, Georg; Völker, Uwe; Lucht, Michael J; Degenhardt, Franziska; Schulze, Thomas; Rietschel, Marcella; Nöthen, Markus M; John, Ulrich; Nauck, Matthias; Grabe, Hans Jörgen

    2016-09-01

    Schizophrenia has a considerable genetic background. Epidemiological studies suggest an inverse clinical association between schizophrenia and migraine. However, it is unclear to what extent this inverse comorbidity can be explained by genetic mechanisms or by schizophrenia-related behavioral factors. For both disorders hypotheses of glutamate N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor dysfunction have been developed in the past. We hypothesized that both conditions share common genetic factors with inverse effects, primary in the glutamatergic system and genes involved in NMDA activation. Data from the population based Study of Health in Pomerania (N=3973) were used. Based on the results from the recent genome-wide association study for schizophrenia, we calculated polygenic scores (PRS) for subsets of SNPs with different p-value cutoffs and for biological sub-entities. These scores were tested for an association of distinct biological pathways with migraine. The PRS for schizophrenia was inversely associated with migraine in our sample. This association was exclusively based on the genome-wide hits and on single nucleotide polymorphisms near or within genes encoding proteins involved in glutamatergic neurotransmission. This association could be attributed to a single intronic variant rs4523957 in SRR encoding serine-racemase. Additional expression quantitative trait loci analyses of functional variants in SRR and gene-by-gene interaction analyses further supported the validity of this finding. SRR represents the rate limiting enzyme for the synthesis of D-serine, an important co-agonist of the NMDA receptor. According to our results, a decreased versus increased activation of NMDA receptors may play a role in the etiology of schizophrenia, as well as in migraine. PMID:27394076

  19. Urinary loss of glucose, phosphate, and protein by diffusion into proximal straight tubules injured by D-serine and maleic acid

    SciTech Connect

    Carone, F.A.; Nakamura, S.; Goldman, B.

    1985-06-01

    In several models of acute renal failure leakage of glomerular filtrate out of the tubule is an important pathogenetic mechanism; however, bidirectional diffusion of solute to account for certain pathophysiologic features of acute renal failure has received meager attention. Using micropuncture and clearance methods, the authors assessed sequentially leakage of solutes and inulin across proximal straight tubules (PST) injured by two nephrotoxins. In d-serine-treated rats with extensive necrosis of PST, the basis for glucosuria and tubular leakage of inulin was studied. Glucose absorption by the proximal convoluted tubule and glucose delivery to the PST were normal, but glucose delivery to the distal tubule was increased nearly 8-fold, indicating diffusion of glucose from interstitial to tubular luminal fluid across the necrotic PST. Total kidney inulin clearance was greatly reduced, but single nephron glomerular filtration rate, based on proximal convoluted tubule samples, was normal, indicating tubular loss of inulin. Urinary recovery of (/sup 14/C)inulin infused into tubular lumina revealed that proximal convoluted tubule and distal tubule were impermeable to inulin and that inulin diffused out of the necrotic PST. The progressive return over 6 days of tubular impermeability for inulin correlated with relining of PST with new cells. In maleic acid-treated rats the site and extent of tubular necrosis and the nature of urinary loss of solutes were studied. Microdissection revealed that maleic acid caused limited necrosis of PST which averaged 7.4% of total proximal tubular length. Increased urinary excretion of protein, phosphate, and glucose and increased tubular permeability to microinfused (/sup 14/C)inulin occurred with the onset of PST necrosis, and return of these abnormalities to normal correlated with the degree of cellular repair of the PST.

  20. Online high-precision delta(2)H and delta(18)O analysis in water by pyrolysis.

    PubMed

    Lu, Feng H

    2009-10-01

    A method for online simultaneous delta(2)H and delta(18)O analysis in water by high-temperature conversion is presented. Water is injected by using a syringe into a high-temperature carbon reactor and converted into H(2) and CO, which are separated by gas chromatography (GC) and carried by helium to the isotope ratio mass spectrometer for hydrogen and oxygen isotope analysis. A series of experiments was conducted to evaluate several issues such as sample size, temperature and memory effects. The delta(2)H and delta(18)O values in multiple water standards changed consistently as the reactor temperature increased from 1150 to 1480 degrees C. The delta(18)O in water can be measured at a lower temperature (e.g. 1150 degrees C) although the precision was relatively poor at temperatures <1300 degrees C. Memory effects exist for delta(2)H and delta(18)O between two waters, and can be reduced (to <1%) with proper measures. The injection of different amounts of water may affect the isotope ratio results. For example, in contrast to small injections (100 nL or less) from small syringes (e.g. 1.2 microL), large injections (1 microL or more) from larger syringes (e.g. 10 microL) with dilution produced asymmetric peaks and shifts of isotope ratios, e.g. 4 per thousand for delta(2)H and 0.4 per thousand for delta(18)O, probably resulting from isotope fractionation during dilution via the ConFlo interface. This method can be used to analyze nanoliter samples of water (e.g. 30 nL) with good precision of 0.5 per thousand for delta(2)H and 0.1 per thousand for delta(18)O. This is important for geosciences; for instance, fluid inclusions in ancient minerals may be analyzed for delta(2)H and delta(18)O to help understand the formation environments. PMID:19714707

  1. Triazolines XIII: delta 2-1,2,3-triazolines, a new class of anticonvulsants.

    PubMed

    Kadaba, P K

    1984-06-01

    A series of 1,5-diaryl-delta 2-1,2,3-triazolines has been synthesized and evaluated for the first time as potential anticonvulsant agents using the standard subcutaneous pentylenetetrazol seizure threshold and maximal electroshock seizure tests. Out of the 31 triazolines that were screened, 11 exhibited moderate anticonvulsant activity; 9 of the compounds afforded protection against pentylenetetrazol-induced seizures, while two antagonized electrically induced convulsions. PMID:6737279

  2. Phosphorylation of delta2 glutamate receptors at serine 945 is not required for cerebellar long-term depression.

    PubMed

    Nakagami, Ryoichi; Kohda, Kazuhisa; Kakegawa, Wataru; Kondo, Tetsuro; Kato, Nobumasa; Yuzaki, Michisuke

    2008-06-01

    Long-term depression (LTD) of synaptic transmission at parallel fiber (PF)-Purkinje cell synapses is thought to regulate motor learning and memory formation in the cerebellum. Neuronal activity-evoked protein kinase C (PKC) activation is required for the induction of LTD. In addition, the delta2 glutamate receptor (GluRdelta2), which is predominantly expressed at PF-Purkinje cell synapses, is indispensable for the induction of LTD; however, the mechanisms by which GluRdelta2 regulates LTD and its relationship with PKC activation remain elusive. Interestingly, GluRdelta2 is phosphorylated by PKC on serine 945 (Ser945) near its C-terminus and a postsynaptic protein S-SCAM, which could potentially regulate glutamate receptor trafficking and synaptic plasticity, binds to the extreme C-terminus of GluRdelta2 in a phosphorylation-dependent manner on Ser945. Here, using a Sindbis-based virus expression approach, we show that a mutant GluRdelta2, in which alanine replaced Ser945 and did not undergo PKC phosphorylation, was normally localized at the postsynaptic sites of PF-Purkinje cell synapses. In addition, like wild-type GluRdelta2, the phosphorylation-disrupted GluRdelta2 successfully rescued abrogated LTD in GluRdelta2-null Purkinje cells. These results indicate that Ser945, a major PKC phosphorylation site of of GluRdelta2, may not play a crucial role in induction of LTD in the cerebellum. PMID:18677091

  3. Determination of the delta(2H/1H)of Water: RSIL Lab Code 1574

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Revesz, Kinga; Coplen, Tyler B.

    2008-01-01

    Reston Stable Isotope Laboratory (RSIL) lab code 1574 describes a method used to determine the relative hydrogen isotope-ratio delta(2H,1H), abbreviated hereafter as d2H of water. The d2H measurement of water also is a component of the National Water Quality Laboratory (NWQL) schedules 1142 and 1172. The water is collected unfiltered in a 60-mL glass bottle and capped with a Polyseal cap. In the laboratory, the water sample is equilibrated with gaseous hydrogen using a platinum catalyst (Horita, 1988; Horita and others, 1989; Coplen and others, 1991). The reaction for the exchange of one hydrogen atom is shown in equation 1.

  4. V gamma 9 V delta 2 T cell cytotoxicity against tumor cells is enhanced by monoclonal antibody drugs--rituximab and trastuzumab.

    PubMed

    Tokuyama, Hirotake; Hagi, Tomomi; Mattarollo, Stephen R; Morley, Jacqueline; Wang, Qiao; So, Hang-Fai; Fai-So, Hang; Moriyasu, Fuminori; Nieda, Mie; Nicol, Andrew J

    2008-06-01

    V gamma 9 V delta 2 T cells exert potent cytotoxicity toward various tumor cells and adoptive transfer of V gamma 9 V delta 2 T cells is an attractive proposition for cell based immunotherapy. V gamma 9 V delta 2 T cells expanded in the presence of Zoledronate and IL-2 express CD16 (Fc gamma RIII), which raises the possibility that V gamma 9 V delta 2 T cells could be used in conjunction with tumor targeting monoclonal antibody drugs to increase antitumor cytotoxicity by antibody dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC). Cytotoxic activity against CD20-positive B lineage lymphoma or chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) and HER2-positive breast cancer cells was assessed in the presence of rituximab and trastuzumab, respectively. Cytotoxicity of V gamma 9 V delta 2 T cells against CD20-positive targets was higher when used in combination with rituximab. Similarly, V gamma 9 V delta 2 T cells used in combination with trastuzumab resulted in greater cytotoxicity against HER2-positive cells in comparison with either agent alone and this effect was restricted to the CD16(+)V gamma 9 V delta 2 T cell population. Our results show that CD16(+)V gamma 9 V delta 2 T cells recognize monoclonal antibody coated tumor cells via CD16 and exert ADCC similar to that observed with NK cells, even when target cells are relatively resistant to monoclonal antibodies or V gamma 9 V delta 2 T cells alone. Combination therapy involving ex vivo expanded CD16(+)V gamma 9 V delta 2 T cells and monoclonal antibodies may enhance the clinical outcomes for patients treated with monoclonal antibody therapy. PMID:18307255

  5. The hydrological response of heavy clay grassland soils to rainfall in south-west England using delta2H.

    PubMed

    Granger, Steven J; Bol, Roland; Meier-Augenstein, Wolfram; Leng, Melanie J; Kemp, Helen F; Heaton, Tim H E; White, Sue M

    2010-03-15

    Stable isotopes of water have been previously used in catchment studies to separate rain-event water from pre-event groundwater. However, there are a lack of studies at the smaller scale looking at the separation of event water from pre-event water. This is particularly relevant for heavy clay soil systems through which the movement of water is uncertain but is thought to be rainwater-dominated. The data presented here were collected at a rural site in the south-west of England. The historic rainfall at the site was isotopically varied but similar to the global meteoric water line, with annual weighted means of -37 per thousand for delta(2)H and -5.7 per thousand for delta(18)O and with no seasonal variation. Drainage was sampled from the inter-flow (surface runoff + lateral through-flow) and drain-flow (55 cm deep mole drains) pathways of two 1 ha lysimeters during two rainfall events, which had delta(2)H values of -68 per thousand and -92 per thousand, respectively. The delta(2)H values of the lysimeter drainage water suggest that there was no contribution of event water during the first, small discharge (Q) event; however, the second larger event did show isotopic variation in delta(2)H values negatively related to Q indicating that rainwater was contributing to Q. A hydrograph separation indicated that only 49-58% of the inter-flow and 18-25% of the drain-flow consisted of event water. This was surprising given that these soil types are considered retentive of soil water. More work is needed on heavy clay soils to understand better the nature of water movement from these systems. PMID:20127906

  6. Does cigarette smoking affect the diagnostic reliability of hemoglobin alpha 2 delta 2 (HbA2)?

    PubMed

    Tarazi, Issa S; Sirdah, Mahmoud M; El Jeadi, Hesham; Al Haddad, Rami M

    2008-01-01

    Quantitation of hemoglobin alpha 2 delta 2 (HbA2) is a basic and confirmatory test in diagnosing the carrier state of beta-thalassemia. The present study was designed to investigate the effect of cigarette smoking on the diagnostic reliability of HbA2. A total of 2,867 (654 smokers and 2,213 never smokers) male subjects were involved in the present study. The subjects were categorized into three groups according to their laboratory findings: beta-thalassemia minor, iron deficient, and normal groups. Complete blood count (CBC) parameters and HbA2 levels were compared between smokers and never smokers of each group according to the independent-samples t-test using the SPSS program, significance results were reported at P<0.05. The results showed a significant increase in red blood cell (RBC) mass (RBC count and hematocrit [Hct]) and Hb concentration in smokers of all groups; however, no significant differences were reported in the HbA2 level between smokers and never smokers in all groups. It was concluded that cigarette smoking does not affect the diagnostic reliability of the HbA2 test. PMID:18348310

  7. Treatment methods for the determination of delta2H and delta18O of hair keratin by continuous-flow isotope-ratio mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Bowen, Gabriel J; Chesson, Lesley; Nielson, Kristine; Cerling, Thure E; Ehleringer, James R

    2005-01-01

    The structural proteins that comprise approximately 90% of animal hair have the potential to record environmentally and physiologically determined variation in delta2H and delta18O values of body water. Broad, systematic, geospatial variation in stable hydrogen and oxygen isotopes of environmental water and the capacity for rapid, precise measurement via methods such as high-temperature conversion elemental analyzer/isotope ratio mass spectrometry (TC/EA-IRMS) make these isotope systems particularly well suited for applications requiring the geolocation of hair samples. In order for such applications to be successful, however, methods must exist for the accurate determination of hair delta2H and delta18O values reflecting the primary products of biosynthesis. Here, we present the results of experiments designed to examine two potential inaccuracies affecting delta2H and delta18O measurements of hair: the contribution of non-biologic hydrogen and oxygen to samples in the form of sorbed molecular water, and the exchange of hydroxyl-bound hydrogen between hair keratin and ambient water vapor. We show that rapid sorption of molecular water from the atmosphere can have a substantial effect on measured delta2H and delta18O values of hair (comprising approximately 7.7% of the measured isotopic signal for H and up to approximately 10.6% for O), but that this contribution can be effectively removed through vacuum-drying of samples for 6 days. Hydrogen exchange between hair keratin and ambient vapor is also rapid (reaching equilibrium within 3-4 days), with 9-16% of the total hydrogen available for exchange at room temperature. Based on the results of these experiments, we outline a recommended sample treatment procedure for routine measurement of delta2H and delta18O in mammal hair. PMID:16047316

  8. Establishing a chromium-reactor design for measuring delta2H values of solid polyhalogenated compounds using direct elemental analysis and stable isotope ratio mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Armbruster, Wolfgang; Lehnert, Katja; Vetter, Walter

    2006-01-01

    2H/1H isotope ratios of polyhalogenated compounds were determined by elemental analysis and isotope ratio mass spectrometry (EA-IRMS). Initial measurements with standard EA-IRMS equipment, which used high-temperature pyrolysis to convert the organic compounds into hydrogen, did not achieve significant signals for polychlorinated pesticides and related compounds, presumably due to the formation of HCl instead of hydrogen. To reverse this problematic reaction, a chromium reactor was incorporated into the element analyzer system, which scavenged Cl, forming chromium chloride and releasing hydrogen again in the form of H2. The optimized system therefore allowed the delta2H values of polyhalogenated compounds to be determined. A quality assurance program was developed based on several parameters. (i) Each compound was analyzed using a sequence of five injections, where the first measurement was discarded. (ii) Recovery of H (when calculated relative to acetanilide) had to be >90% for all replicates in a sequence. (iii) All delta-values within a sequence had to vary by less than 10/1000. (iv) Results had to be reproducible on another day with a different sample scheme. Once this reproducibility had been established, variabilities in the delta2H values of organohalogen standards were investigated using the technique. The highest delta2H value of +75/1000 was found for o,p'-DDD, whereas the strongest depletion in deuterium was found for Melipax (-181/1000). The most important results for comparable compounds were as follows. DDT-related compounds gave delta2H values of between +59 and +75/1000 (technical DDT, o,p'- and p,p'-DDD) or in the range of approximately -1/1000, indicative of the different sources/methods of producing this compound. Four HCH isomers from the same supplier showed relatively similar hydrogen isotope distributions, whereas two lindane (gamma-HCH) standards from other sources had 39/1000 less deuterium. This difference is likely due to different

  9. Rational drug design and the discovery of the delta2-1,2,3-triazolines, a unique class of anticonvulsant and antiischemic agents.

    PubMed

    Kadaba, Pankaja K

    2003-10-01

    The delta(2)- 1,2,3- triazoline anticonvulsants (TRs) may be considered as representing a unique class of "built-in" heterocyclic prodrugs where the active "structure element" is an integral part of the ring system and can be identified only by a knowledge of their chemical reactivity and metabolism. Investigations on the metabolism and pharmacology of a lead triazoline, ADD17014 suggest that the triazolines function as "prodrugs" and exert their anticonvulsant activity by impairing excitatory amino acid (EAA) L-Glutamate (L-Glu) neurotransmission via a unique "dual-action" mechanism. While an active primary beta-amino alcohol metabolite from the parent prodrug acts as an N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA)/MK -801 receptor antagonist, the parent triazoline impairs the presynaptic release of L-Glu. Various pieces of theoretical reasoning and experimental evidence have led to the clucidation of the dual-action mechanism. Based on the unique chemistry of the triazolines, and their metabolic pathways, biotransformation products of TRs were predicted to be the beta-amino alcohols V and VA, the alpha-amino acid VI, the triazole VII, the aziridine VIII and the ketimine IX. In vivo and in vitro pharmacological studies of the TR and potential metabolites, along with a full quantitative urinary metabolic profiling of TR indicated the primary beta-amino alcohol V as the active species. It was the only compound that inhibited the specific binding of [3H]MK-801 to the MK-801 site, 56% at 10 micro M drug concentration, but itself had no anticonvulsant activity, suggesting TR acted as a prodrug. Three metabolites were identified; V was the most predominant (45.7 +/- 7.6) % of administered drug, with lesser amounts of VA, (17.3 +/- 5.1) % and very minor amounts of aziridine VIII (4.0 +/- 0.02)%. Since only VIII can yield VA, its formation indicated that the biotransformation of TR occurred, at least in part, through aziridine. No amino acid metabolite was detected, which implied that no

  10. On the calibration of continuous, high-precision delta18O and delta2H measurements using an off-axis integrated cavity output spectrometer.

    PubMed

    Wang, Lixin; Caylor, Kelly K; Dragoni, Danilo

    2009-02-01

    The (18)O and (2)H of water vapor serve as powerful tracers of hydrological processes. The typical method for determining water vapor delta(18)O and delta(2)H involves cryogenic trapping and isotope ratio mass spectrometry. Even with recent technical advances, these methods cannot resolve vapor composition at high temporal resolutions. In recent years, a few groups have developed continuous laser absorption spectroscopy (LAS) approaches for measuring delta(18)O and delta(2)H which achieve accuracy levels similar to those of lab-based mass spectrometry methods. Unfortunately, most LAS systems need cryogenic cooling and constant calibration to a reference gas, and have substantial power requirements, making them unsuitable for long-term field deployment at remote field sites. A new method called Off-Axis Integrated Cavity Output Spectroscopy (OA-ICOS) has been developed which requires extremely low-energy consumption and neither reference gas nor cryogenic cooling. In this report, we develop a relatively simple pumping system coupled to a dew point generator to calibrate an ICOS-based instrument (Los Gatos Research Water Vapor Isotope Analyzer (WVIA) DLT-100) under various pressures using liquid water with known isotopic signatures. Results show that the WVIA can be successfully calibrated using this customized system for different pressure settings, which ensure that this instrument can be combined with other gas-sampling systems. The precisions of this instrument and the associated calibration method can reach approximately 0.08 per thousand for delta(18)O and approximately 0.4 per thousand for delta(2)H. Compared with conventional mass spectrometry and other LAS-based methods, the OA-ICOS technique provides a promising alternative tool for continuous water vapor isotopic measurements in field deployments. PMID:19142848

  11. A novel protein complex linking the delta 2 glutamate receptor and autophagy: implications for neurodegeneration in lurcher mice.

    PubMed

    Yue, Zhenyu; Horton, Antony; Bravin, Monica; DeJager, Philip L; Selimi, Fekrije; Heintz, Nathaniel

    2002-08-29

    Autophagy is a pathway for bulk degradation of subcellular constituents that is hyperactivated in many neurodegenerative conditions. It has been considered a second form of programmed cell death. Death of cerebellar Purkinje cells in lurcher animals is due to a mutation in GluRdelta2 that results in its constitutive activation. Here we have identified protein interactions between GluRdelta2, a novel isoform of a PDZ domain-containing protein (nPIST) that binds to this receptor, and Beclin1. nPIST and Beclin1 can synergize to induce autophagy. GluRdelta2(Lc), but not GluRdelta2(wt), can also induce autophagy. Furthermore, dying lurcher Purkinje cells contain morphological hallmarks of autophagic death in vivo. These results provide strong evidence that a direct link exists between GluRdelta2(Lc) receptor and stimulation of the autophagic pathway in dying lurcher Purkinje cells. PMID:12372286

  12. Opposite role of delta 1- and delta 2-opioid receptors activated by endogenous or exogenous opioid agonists on the endogenous cholecystokinin system: further evidence for delta-opioid receptor heterogeneity.

    PubMed

    Noble, F; Fournie-Zaluski, M C; Roques, B P

    1996-12-01

    Using the mouse caudate-putamen, where delta-opioid receptor subtypes have been shown to regulate adenylyl cyclase activity, we show in this study that endogenous enkephalins inhibit enzyme activity through activation of delta 1- and delta 2-opioid receptors. Thus, naltriben or 7-benzylidenenaltrexone as well as the delta-selective antagonist naltrindole (mixed delta 1 and delta 2 antagonist) antagonized inhibition of adenylyl cyclase activity induced by methionine- or leucine-enkephalin, while the micro-antagonist D-Phe-Cys-Tyr-D-Trp-Orn-Thr-Pen-Thr-NH2 (CTOP) was without effect. Furthermore, we have previously shown that activation of delta-opioid receptors increases cholecystokinin release in the central nervous system, resulting in a potentiation of micro-opioid antinociceptive responses, and the respective role of delta 1- and delta 2-opioid receptors in this facilitatory effect has now been evaluated. Activation of delta 2-opioid receptors, either by endogenous enkephalins protected from catabolism by the complete enkephalin-degrading enzyme inhibitor N-((R,S)-2-benzyl-3((S)(2-amino-4-methyl-thio) butyldithio)-1-oxopropyl)-L-phenyl-alanine benzyl ester (RB 101), or by the delta 2-selective agonist Tyr-D-Ser(O-tert-butyl)-Gly-Phe-Leu-Thr(O-tert-butyl) (BUBU), potentiated micro-opioid antinociceptive responses in the hot-plate test in mice. This effect was antagonized by a selective cholecystokinin-A antagonist. Activation of delta 1-opioid receptors by endogenous opioid peptides decreased the micro-opioid responses. These results suggest that stimulation of delta 2-opioid receptors potentiates micro-opioid analgesia in the hot-plate test in mice through an increase in endogenous cholecystokinin release, while activation of delta 1-opioid receptors could decrease it. Thus, the pre-existing physiological balance between opioid and cholecystokinin systems seems to be modulated in opposite directions depending on whether delta 1- or delta 2-opioid receptors are

  13. Determination of D-serine in human serum by LC-MS/MS using a triazole-bonded column after pre-column derivatization with (S)-4-(3-isothiocyanatopyrrolidin-1-yl)-7- (N, N-dimethylaminosulfonyl)-2,1,3-benzoxadiazole.

    PubMed

    Sakamoto, Tatsuya; Kuwabara, Ryousuke; Takahashi, Shuhei; Onozato, Mayu; Ichiba, Hideaki; Iizuka, Hideaki; Fukushima, Takeshi

    2016-01-01

    An LC-MS/MS-based method for determining D-serine (Ser), an endogenous co-agonist of the N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor, in human serum, was developed and validated using a triazole-bonded silica-packed column after pre-column fluorescence derivatization with a chiral labeling reagent, (S)-4-(3-isothiocyanatopyrrolidin-1-yl)-7-(N,N-dimethylaminosulfonyl)-2,1,3-benzoxadiazole. Enantiomeric separation of the D- and L-Ser derivatives occurred in the triazole-bonded column (R s: 1.85) with CH3CN/100 mM HCO2NH4 in H2O (95.5:4.5) as the mobile phase with isocratic elution. The ln(capacity factor of D-Ser) in the van't Hoff plot gradually decreased with the inverse of temperature, suggesting enhanced hydrophilic interactions with the triazole-bonded stationary phase with increasing column temperature, owing to decrease in the partition coefficient to the mobile phase. Multiple reaction monitoring (m/z 457.10 > 409.00) by triple quadrupole mass spectrometry was used for quantifying D-Ser in human serum. The presence of D-Ser in the serum was confirmed by treatment with commercial D-amino acid oxidase. A linear calibration curve was constructed in the D-Ser concentration range of 0.5-5.0 μM (r (2) = 0.999, n = 3) using D-homoserine as the internal standard. The precision and recovery values were adequate for quantification. The detection limit for D-Ser was 1.1 fmol/injection (signal-to-noise ratio = 3), owing to the high CH3CN content in the mobile phase. The proposed LC-MS/MS method showed few fluctuations in the retention times of D- and L-Ser, and R s was stable until the 40th injection of serum without column washing, and thus can be useful for D-Ser determination in human serum in clinical research. PMID:26542833

  14. Kinetics of thermal rearrangements in the Delta2-Thujene system: a full quadrisection of a perturbed bicyclo[3.1.0]hex-2-ene.

    PubMed

    Doering, William von E; Zhang, Ting-Hu; Schmidt, Eckhart K G

    2006-07-21

    Further insight into the behavior of suppositional diradicals in a caldera is sought in the thermal rearrangements among the four "Delta2-thujenes", two 1-isopropyl-4-methylbicyclo[3.1.0]hex-2-enes [(-)-cis-1 and (+)-trans-2] and two isomers, exo- and endo-3-isopropyl-6-methylbicyclo[3.1.0]hex-2-ene [(+)-exo-3 and (-)-endo-4]. Optically pure trans-3-isopropyl-5-vinylcyclopentene (5) is the final, strongly thermochemically favored product, the result of an intramolecular homodienyl shift of a methyl hydrogen atom in (-)-endo-4. The set of twelve specific rate constants, four sets of three each, that define the interrelations among the four isomers has been extracted from data acquired starting from each isomer. An attractive mechanistic hypothesis involving an intermediate diradical of iso conformation, common, for example, to both (-)-cis-1 and (+)-exo-3 (as educts), that proceeds to an anticonformer common to both (+)-trans-2 and (-)-endo-4 does not lead to a satisfactory rationalization of the product distribution. Addition of a second mechanistic conceptual scheme, that of a diradical-in-transit behaving as if there were a measure of continuous bonding (for example, (+)-trans-2 proceeding directly to (-)-cis-1), improves agreement with experiment. Over a 30 degrees C range of temperature, there is no credible change in product distribution. PMID:16839150

  15. Binding Procurement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rao, Gopalakrishna M.; Vaidyanathan, Hari

    2007-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation reviews the use of the binding procurement process in purchasing Aerospace Flight Battery Systems. NASA Engineering and Safety Center (NESC) requested NASA Aerospace Flight Battery Systems Working Group to develop a set of guideline requirements document for Binding Procurement Contracts.

  16. Domain swapping in the low-similarity isomerase/hydratase superfamily: the crystal structure of rat mitochondrial Delta3, Delta2-enoyl-CoA isomerase.

    PubMed

    Hubbard, Paul A; Yu, Wenfeng; Schulz, Horst; Kim, Jung-Ja P

    2005-06-01

    Two monofunctional Delta(3), Delta(2)-enoyl-CoA isomerases, one in mitochondria (mECI) and the other in both mitochondria and peroxisomes (pECI), belong to the low-similarity isomerase/hydratase superfamily. Both enzymes catalyze the movement of a double bond from C3 to C2 of an unsaturated acyl-CoA substrate for re-entry into the beta-oxidation pathway. Mutagenesis has shown that Glu165 of rat mECI is involved in catalysis; however, the putative catalytic residue in yeast pECI, Glu158, is not conserved in mECI. To elucidate whether Glu165 of mECI is correctly positioned for catalysis, the crystal structure of rat mECI has been solved. Crystal packing suggests the enzyme is trimeric, in contrast to other members of the superfamily, which appear crystallographically to be dimers of trimers. The polypeptide fold of mECI, like pECI, belongs to a subset of this superfamily in which the C-terminal domain of a given monomer interacts with its own N-terminal domain. This differs from that of crotonase and 1,4-dihydroxy-2-naphtoyl-CoA synthase, whose C-terminal domains are involved in domain swapping with an adjacent monomer. The structure confirms Glu165 as the putative catalytic acid/base, positioned to abstract the pro-R proton from C2 and reprotonate at C4 of the acyl chain. The large tunnel-shaped active site cavity observed in the mECI structure explains the relative substrate promiscuity in acyl-chain length and stereochemistry. Comparison with the crystal structure of pECI suggests the catalytic residues from both enzymes are spatially conserved but not in their primary structures, providing a powerful reminder of how catalytic residues cannot be determined solely by sequence alignments. PMID:15883186

  17. Histidine 121 of staphylococcal nuclease. Correction of the H sup. delta. 2 sup 1 H NMR assignment and reinterpretation of the role this residue plays in conformation heterogeneity of the protein

    SciTech Connect

    Hinck, A.P.; Loh, S.N.; Wang, Jinfeng; Markley, J.L. )

    1990-12-05

    Heteronuclear two-dimensional NMR studies of wild-type staphylococcal nuclease containing histidine residues uniformly labeled with carbon-13 (26% isotope) have led to full analysis of the aromatic parts of the histidine {sup 1}H and {sup 13}C spin systems. The {sup 1}H{sup {delta}2} and {sup 13}C{sup {delta}2} resonances of His{sup 121} were found to be split as the result of the N{sub al} {r equilibrium} N{sub a2} conformational equilibrium described previously and attributed to cis-trans isomerism about the Lys{sup 116}-Pro{sup 117} peptide bond (N{sub al}, cis; N{sub a2}, trans). The relative intensities of the pair of {sup 1}H{sup {epsilon}1} peaks from the same residue. A soluble-mutant enzyme (nuclease G79S + H124L), which exhibited a drastically altered (N{sub a1}) to (N{sub a2}) ratio, provided additional evidence that the pair of {sup 1}H{sup {delta}2} peaks and the pair of {sup 1}H{sup {epsilon}1} peaks of His{sup 121} report on the same conformational equilibrium (N{sub a1} {r equilibrium} N{sub a2}). The unusual chemical shift of the {sup 1}H{sup {delta}2} of His{sup 121} is attributed to diamagnetic shielding by the aromatic ring of Tyr{sup 91} as verified by ring-current calculations based on two X-ray structures for wild-type staphylococcal nuclease.

  18. Effects of recharge and discharge on delta2H and delta18O composition and chloride concentration of high arsenic/fluoride groundwater from the Datong Basin, northern China.

    PubMed

    Xie, Xianjun; Wang, Yanxin; Su, Chunli; Duan, Mengyu

    2013-02-01

    To better understand the effects of recharge and discharge on the hydrogeochemistry of high levels of arsenic (As) and fluoride (F) in groundwater, environmental isotopic composition (delta2H and delta18O) and chloride (Cl) concentrations were analyzed in 29 groundwater samples collected from the Datong Basin. High arsenic groundwater samples (As > 50 micog/L) were found to be enriched in lighter isotopic composition that ranged from -92 to -78 per thousand for deuterium (delta2H) and from -12.5 to -9.9 per thousand for oxygen-18 (delta18O). High F-containing groundwater (F > 1 mg/L) was relatively enriched in heavier isotopic composition and varied from -90 to -57 per thousand and from -12.2 to -6.7 per thousand for delta2H and delta18O, respectively. High chloride concentrations and delta18O values were primarily measured in groundwater samples from the northern and southwestern portions of the study area, indicating the effect of evaporation on groundwater. The observation of relatively homogenized and low delta18O values and chloride concentrations in groundwater samples from central part of the Datong Basin might be a result of fast recharge by irrigation returns, which suggests that irrigation using arsenic-contaminated groundwater affected the occurrence of high arsenic-containing groundwater in the basin. PMID:23472327

  19. Triazolines--XXVII. delta2-1,2,3-triazoline anticonvulsants: novel 'built-in' heterocyclic prodrugs with a unique 'dual-action' mechanism for impairing excitatory amino acid L-glutamate neurotransmission.

    PubMed

    Kadaba, P K; Stevenson, P J; P-Nnane, I; Damani, L A

    1996-02-01

    The delta2-1,2,3-triazoline anticonvulsants (1) may be considered as representing a unique class of 'built-in' heterocyclic prodrugs where the active 'structure element' is an integral part of the ring system and can be identified only by a knowledge of their chemical reactivity and metabolism. Investigations on the metabolism and pharmacology of a lead triazoline, ADD17014 (1a), suggest that the triazolines function as 'prodrugs' and exert their anticonvulsant activity by impairing excitatory amino acid (EAA) L-glutamate (L-Glu) neurotransmission via a unique 'dual-action' mechanism. While an active beta-amino alcohol metabolite, 2a, from the parent prodrug acts as an N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA)/MK-801 receptor antagonist, the parent triazoline impairs the presynaptic release of L-Glu. Various pieces of theoretical reasoning and experimental evidence led to the elucidation of the dual-action mechanism. Based on the unique chemistry of the triazolines, the potential metabolic pathways and biotransformation products of 1a were predicted to be the beta-amino alcohols 2a and 2a', the alpha-amino acid 3a, the triazole 4a, the aziridine 5a, and the ketimine 6a. In vivo and in vitro pharmacological studies of 1a and potential metabolities, along with a full quantitative urinary metabolic profiling of 1a, indicated the beta-amino alcohol 2a as the active species. It was the only compound that inhibited the specific binding of [3H]MK-801 to the MK-801 site, 56% at 10 microM drug concentration, but itself had no anticonvulsant activity, suggesting 1a acted as a prodrug. Three metabolites were identified; 2a was the most predominant, with lesser amounts of 2a', and very minor amounts of aziridine 5a. Since only 5a can yield 2a', its formation indicated that the biotransformation of 1a occurred, at least in part, through 5a. No amino acid metabolite 3a was detected, which implied that no in vivo oxidation of 2a or oxidative biotransformation of 1a or 5a by hydroxylation at

  20. Diversity in junctional sequences associated with the common human V gamma 9 and V delta 2 gene segments in normal blood and lung compared with the limited diversity in a granulomatous disease

    PubMed Central

    1990-01-01

    The T cell receptor (TCR) junctional regions (N regions) of the common human V gamma 9 and V delta 2 gene segments were sequenced from the blood and lung of normal individuals (195 transcripts) and a group of individuals with sarcoidosis (220 transcripts), a granulomatous disease in which increased numbers of V gamma 9+ gamma/delta + T cells are often observed. In normal individuals, the vast majority (86%) of blood V gamma 9 transcripts used the J gamma P gene segment. In contrast to this restriction of J region usage, there was a large diversity of the junctional region, with less than 20% of blood V gamma 9 junctional regions showing identical sequences for any one normal individual. For the blood V delta 2 transcripts in normal individuals, there was restriction of J region usage, with 93% using J delta 1. The junctional regions were even more diverse than for V gamma 9, with a unique sequence observed in each transcript examined. Compared with blood, sequences from the normal lung showed a small increase in identical junctional regions, particularly in one individual where 46% of V gamma 9 transcripts examined were identical, suggesting a response of some gamma/delta T cells to antigens found in the lung in the normal state. In marked contrast to normals, some individuals with sarcoidosis had large numbers of V gamma 9 transcripts, as well as V delta 2 transcripts, sharing identical sequences. For V gamma 9 blood transcripts, two individuals showed 84 and 56% of junctional region sequences to be identical, respectively. Similarly, blood V delta 2 transcripts showed 43, 33, and 25% identical junctional region sequences in three individuals. In the sarcoid patient with the most striking over-representation of blood V gamma 9 junctional sequences, lung V gamma 9 transcripts showed increased (67%) use of the same junctional region sequence as in blood. This limited diversity of TCR junctional regions among some individuals with sarcoidosis suggests a response from

  1. Influence of different organic fertilizers on quality parameters and the delta(15)N, delta(13)C, delta(2)H, delta(34)S, and delta(18)O values of orange fruit (Citrus sinensis L. Osbeck).

    PubMed

    Rapisarda, Paolo; Camin, Federica; Fabroni, Simona; Perini, Matteo; Torrisi, Biagio; Intrigliolo, Francesco

    2010-03-24

    To investigate the influence of different types of fertilizers on quality parameters, N-containing compounds, and the delta(15)N, delta(13)C, delta(2)H, delta (34)S, and delta(18)O values of citrus fruit, a study was performed on the orange fruit cv. 'Valencia late' (Citrus sinensis L. Osbeck), which was harvested in four plots (three organic and one conventional) located on the same farm. The results demonstrated that different types of organic fertilizers containing the same amount of nitrogen did not effect important changes in orange fruit quality parameters. The levels of total N and N-containing compounds such as synephrine in fruit juice were not statistically different among the different treatments. The delta(15)N values of orange fruit grown under fertilizer derived from animal origin as well as from vegetable compost were statistically higher than those grown with mineral fertilizer. Therefore, delta(15)N values can be used as an indicator of citrus fertilization management (organic or conventional), because even when applied organic fertilizers are of different origins, the natural abundance of (15)N in organic citrus fruit remains higher than in conventional ones. These treatments also did not effect differences in the delta(13)C, delta(2)H, delta(34)S, and delta(18)O values of fruit. PMID:20184327

  2. Dermal absorption of the insecticide lindane (1 delta, 2 delta, 3 beta, 4 delta, 5 delta, 6 beta-hexachlorocyclohexane) in rats and rhesus monkeys: Effect of anatomical site

    SciTech Connect

    Moody, R.P.; Ritter, L. )

    1989-01-01

    Dermal absorption of the insecticide lindane (1 delta, 2 delta, 3 beta, 4 delta, 5 delta, 6 beta-hexachlorocyclohexane) was determined in rats and rhesus monkeys. Lindane is in widespread use as a 1% cream or lotion scabicide formulation and as a 1% miticide shampoo for body lice control in humans. Results obtained following our in vivo dermal absorption procedure demonstrated that 18 +/- 4.1%, 34 +/- 5.2%, and 54 +/- 26.3% of the applied dose was absorbed following topical applications at a rate of 1.5 micrograms/cm2 (6.2 micrograms/100 microliters of acetone) of the 14C-labeled pesticide to 4.2-cm2 regions of the forearm (n = 8), forehead (n = 7), and palm (n = 4) of rhesus monkeys, respectively. Dose sites were washed with soapy water 24 h posttreatment. Comparative studies in rats (n = 5) dosed middorsally demonstrated 31 +/- 9.5% absorption. Statistical analysis of the 14C excretion kinetics demonstrated slower clearance of lindane from rats than monkey forearm, forehead, or palm. Intramuscular (im) injections of 14C-lindane gave 52 +/- 7.1% recovery in monkey (n = 8) and 64 +/- 5.9% in rats (n = 5), suggesting body storage of this lipophilic chemical.

  3. Methoxy-poly(ethylene glycol) modified poly(L-lactide) enhanced cell affinity of human bone marrow stromal cells by the upregulation of 1-cadherin and delta-2-catenin.

    PubMed

    Mao, Xueli; Chen, Zetao; Ling, Junqi; Quan, Jingjing; Peng, Hui; Xiao, Yin

    2014-01-01

    Poly(L-lactide) (PLLA), a versatile biodegradable polymer, is one of the most commonly-used materials for tissue engineering applications. To improve cell affinity for PLLA, poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) was used to develop diblock copolymers. Human bone marrow stromal cells (hBMSCs) were cultured on MPEG-b-PLLA copolymer films to determine the effects of modification on the attachment and proliferation of hBMSC. The mRNA expression of 84 human extracellular matrix (ECM) and adhesion molecules was analyzed using RT-qPCR to understand the underlying mechanisms. It was found that MPEG-b-PLLA copolymer films significantly improved cell adhesion, extension, and proliferation. This was found to be related to the significant upregulation of two adhesion genes, CDH1 and CTNND2, which encode 1-cadherin and delta-2-catenin, respectively, two key components for the cadherin-catenin complex. In summary, MPEG-b-PLLA copolymer surfaces improved initial cell adhesion by stimulation of adhesion molecule gene expression. PMID:24834434

  4. Delta 2 Explosion Plume Analysis Report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Evans, Randolph J.

    2000-01-01

    A Delta II rocket exploded seconds after liftoff from Cape Canaveral Air Force Station (CCAFS) on 17 January 1997. The cloud produced by the explosion provided an opportunity to evaluate the models which are used to track potentially toxic dispersing plumes and clouds at CCAFS. The primary goal of this project was to conduct a case study of the dispersing cloud and the models used to predict the dispersion resulting from the explosion. The case study was conducted by comparing mesoscale and dispersion model results with available meteorological and plume observations. This study was funded by KSC under Applied Meteorology Unit (AMU) option hours. The models used in the study are part of the Eastern Range Dispersion Assessment System (ERDAS) and include the Regional Atmospheric Modeling System (RAMS), HYbrid Particle And Concentration Transport (HYPACT), and Rocket Exhaust Effluent Dispersion Model (REEDM). The primary observations used for explosion cloud verification of the study were from the National Weather Service's Weather Surveillance Radar 1988-Doppler (WSR-88D). Radar reflectivity measurements of the resulting cloud provided good estimates of the location and dimensions of the cloud over a four-hour period after the explosion. The results indicated that RAMS and HYPACT models performed reasonably well. Future upgrades to ERDAS are recommended.

  5. Protein Binding Pocket Dynamics.

    PubMed

    Stank, Antonia; Kokh, Daria B; Fuller, Jonathan C; Wade, Rebecca C

    2016-05-17

    The dynamics of protein binding pockets are crucial for their interaction specificity. Structural flexibility allows proteins to adapt to their individual molecular binding partners and facilitates the binding process. This implies the necessity to consider protein internal motion in determining and predicting binding properties and in designing new binders. Although accounting for protein dynamics presents a challenge for computational approaches, it expands the structural and physicochemical space for compound design and thus offers the prospect of improved binding specificity and selectivity. A cavity on the surface or in the interior of a protein that possesses suitable properties for binding a ligand is usually referred to as a binding pocket. The set of amino acid residues around a binding pocket determines its physicochemical characteristics and, together with its shape and location in a protein, defines its functionality. Residues outside the binding site can also have a long-range effect on the properties of the binding pocket. Cavities with similar functionalities are often conserved across protein families. For example, enzyme active sites are usually concave surfaces that present amino acid residues in a suitable configuration for binding low molecular weight compounds. Macromolecular binding pockets, on the other hand, are located on the protein surface and are often shallower. The mobility of proteins allows the opening, closing, and adaptation of binding pockets to regulate binding processes and specific protein functionalities. For example, channels and tunnels can exist permanently or transiently to transport compounds to and from a binding site. The influence of protein flexibility on binding pockets can vary from small changes to an already existent pocket to the formation of a completely new pocket. Here, we review recent developments in computational methods to detect and define binding pockets and to study pocket dynamics. We introduce five

  6. Evolving nucleotide binding surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kieber-Emmons, T.; Rein, R.

    1981-01-01

    An analysis is presented of the stability and nature of binding of a nucleotide to several known dehydrogenases. The employed approach includes calculation of hydrophobic stabilization of the binding motif and its intermolecular interaction with the ligand. The evolutionary changes of the binding motif are studied by calculating the Euclidean deviation of the respective dehydrogenases. Attention is given to the possible structural elements involved in the origin of nucleotide recognition by non-coded primordial polypeptides.

  7. The Arginine Residue within the C-Terminal Active Core of Bombyx mori Pheromone Biosynthesis-Activating Neuropeptide is Essential for Receptor Binding and Activation

    PubMed Central

    Kawai, Takeshi; Lee, Jae Min; Nagata, Koji; Matsumoto, Shogo; Tanokura, Masaru; Nagasawa, Hiromichi

    2012-01-01

    In most lepidopteran insects, the biosynthesis of sex pheromones is regulated by pheromone biosynthesis-activating neuropeptide (PBAN). Bombyx mori PBAN (BomPBAN) consists of 33 amino acid residues and contains a C-terminus FSPRLamide motif as the active core. Among neuropeptides containing the FXPRLamide motif, the arginine (Arg, R) residue at the second position from the C-terminus is highly conserved across several neuropeptides, which can be designated as RXamide peptides. The purpose of this study was to clarify the role of the Arg residue in the BomPBAN active core. We synthesized 10-residue peptides corresponding to the C-terminal part of BomPBAN with a series of replacements at the second position from the C-terminus, termed the C2 position, and measured their efficacy in stimulating Ca2+ influx in insect cells expressing a fluorescent PBAN receptor chimera (PBANR–EGFP) using the fluorescent Ca2+ indicator, Fura Red–AM. The PBAN analogs with the C2 position replaced with alanine (Ala, A), aspartic acid (Asp, D), serine (Ser, S), or l-2-aminooctanoic acid (Aoc) decreased PBAN-like activity. RC2A (SKTRYFSPALamide) and RC2D (SKTRYFSPDLamide) had the lowest activity and could not inhibit the activity of PBAN C10 (SKTRYFSPRLamide). We also prepared Rhodamine Red-labeled peptides of the PBAN analogs and examined their ability to bind PBANR. In contrast to Rhodamine Red-PBAN C10 at 100 nM, none of the synthetic analogs exhibited PBANR binding at the same concentration. Taken together, our results demonstrate that the C2 Arg residue in BomPBAN is essential for PBANR binding and activation. PMID:22654866

  8. Melanin-binding radiopharmaceuticals

    SciTech Connect

    Packer, S; Fairchild, R G; Watts, K P; Greenberg, D; Hannon, S J

    1980-01-01

    The scope of this paper is limited to an analysis of the factors that are important to the relationship of radiopharmaceuticals to melanin. While the authors do not attempt to deal with differences between melanin-binding vs. melanoma-binding, a notable variance is assumed. (PSB)

  9. Positron binding to molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Danielson, J. R.

    2011-05-01

    While there is theoretical evidence that positrons can bind to atoms, calculations for molecules are much less precise. Unfortunately, there have been no measurements of positron-atom binding, due primarily to the difficulty in forming positron-atom bound states in two-body collisions. In contrast, positrons attach to molecules via Feshbach resonances (VFR) in which a vibrational mode absorbs the excess energy. Using a high-resolution positron beam, this VFR process has been studied to measure binding energies for more than 40 molecules. New measurements will be described in two areas: positron binding to relatively simple molecules, for which theoretical calculations appear to be possible; and positron binding to molecules with large permanent dipole moments, which can be compared to analogous, weakly bound electron-molecule (negative-ion) states. Binding energies range from 75 meV for CS2 (no dipole moment) to 180 meV for acetonitrile (CH3CN). Other species studied include aldehydes and ketones, which have permanent dipole moments in the range 2.5 - 3.0 debye. The measured binding energies are surprisingly large (by a factor of 10 to 100) compared to those for the analogous negative ions, and these differences will be discussed. New theoretical calculations for positron-molecule binding are in progress, and a recent result for acetonitrile will be discussed. This ability to compare theory and experiment represents a significant step in attempts to understand positron binding to matter. In collaboration with A. C. L. Jones, J. J. Gosselin, and C. M. Surko, and supported by NSF grant PHY 07-55809.

  10. Metallochaperones: bind and deliver

    SciTech Connect

    Rosenzweig, A.C.

    2010-03-08

    Metallochaperones deliver metal ions directly to target proteins via specific protein-protein interactions. Recent research has led to a molecular picture of how some metallochaperones bind metal ions, recognize their partner proteins, and accomplish metal ion transfer.

  11. Inhibition of selectin binding

    DOEpatents

    Nagy, Jon O.; Spevak, Wayne R.; Dasgupta, Falguni; Bertozzi, Caroline

    1999-01-01

    This invention provides compositions for inhibiting the binding between two cells, one expressing P- or L-selectin on the surface and the other expressing the corresponding ligand. A covalently crosslinked lipid composition is prepared having saccharides and acidic group on separate lipids. The composition is then interposed between the cells so as to inhibit binding. Inhibition can be achieved at an effective oligosaccharide concentration as low as 10.sup.6 fold below that of the free saccharide. Since selectins are involved in recruiting cells to sites of injury, these composition scan be used to palliate certain inflammatory and immunological conditions.

  12. Inhibition of selectin binding

    DOEpatents

    Nagy, Jon O.; Spevak, Wayne R.; Dasgupta, Falguni; Bertozzi, Carolyn

    1999-10-05

    This invention provides a system for inhibiting the binding between two cells, one expressing P- or L-selectin on the surface and the other expressing the corresponding ligand. A covalently crosslinked lipid composition is prepared having saccharides and acidic group on separate lipids. The composition is then interposed between the cells so as to inhibit binding. Inhibition can be achieved at an effective oligosaccharide concentration as low as 10.sup.6 fold below that of the free saccharide. Since selectins are involved in recruiting cells to sites of injury, this system can be used to palliate certain inflammatory and immunological conditions.

  13. Inhibition of selectin binding

    DOEpatents

    Nagy, Jon O.; Spevak, Wayne R.; Dasgupta, Falguni; Bertozzi, Caroline

    2001-10-09

    This invention provides compositions for inhibiting the binding between two cells, one expressing P- or L-selectin on the surface and the other expressing the corresponding ligand. A covalently crosslinked lipid composition is prepared having saccharides and acidic group on separate lipids. The composition is then interposed between the cells so as to inhibit binding. Inhibition can be achieved at an effective oligosaccharide concentration as low as 10.sup.6 fold below that of the free saccharide. Since selectins are involved in recruiting cells to sites of injury, these composition scan be used to palliate certain inflammatory and immunological conditions.

  14. Cellulose binding domain proteins

    DOEpatents

    Shoseyov, O.; Shpiegl, I.; Goldstein, M.; Doi, R.

    1998-11-17

    A cellulose binding domain (CBD) having a high affinity for crystalline cellulose and chitin is disclosed, along with methods for the molecular cloning and recombinant production. Fusion products comprising the CBD and a second protein are likewise described. A wide range of applications are contemplated for both the CBD and the fusion products, including drug delivery, affinity separations, and diagnostic techniques. 16 figs.

  15. Cellulose binding domain proteins

    DOEpatents

    Shoseyov, Oded; Shpiegl, Itai; Goldstein, Marc; Doi, Roy

    1998-01-01

    A cellulose binding domain (CBD) having a high affinity for crystalline cellulose and chitin is disclosed, along with methods for the molecular cloning and recombinant production thereof. Fusion products comprising the CBD and a second protein are likewise described. A wide range of applications are contemplated for both the CBD and the fusion products, including drug delivery, affinity separations, and diagnostic techniques.

  16. MD-2 binds cholesterol.

    PubMed

    Choi, Soo-Ho; Kim, Jungsu; Gonen, Ayelet; Viriyakosol, Suganya; Miller, Yury I

    2016-02-19

    Cholesterol is a structural component of cellular membranes, which is transported from liver to peripheral cells in the form of cholesterol esters (CE), residing in the hydrophobic core of low-density lipoprotein. Oxidized CE (OxCE) is often found in plasma and in atherosclerotic lesions of subjects with cardiovascular disease. Our earlier studies have demonstrated that OxCE activates inflammatory responses in macrophages via toll-like receptor-4 (TLR4). Here we demonstrate that cholesterol binds to myeloid differentiation-2 (MD-2), a TLR4 ancillary molecule, which is a binding receptor for bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and is indispensable for LPS-induced TLR4 dimerization and signaling. Cholesterol binding to MD-2 was competed by LPS and by OxCE-modified BSA. Furthermore, soluble MD-2 in human plasma and MD-2 in mouse atherosclerotic lesions carried cholesterol, the finding supporting the biological significance of MD-2 cholesterol binding. These results help understand the molecular basis of TLR4 activation by OxCE and mechanisms of chronic inflammation in atherosclerosis. PMID:26806306

  17. Sequential memory: Binding dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Afraimovich, Valentin; Gong, Xue; Rabinovich, Mikhail

    2015-10-01

    Temporal order memories are critical for everyday animal and human functioning. Experiments and our own experience show that the binding or association of various features of an event together and the maintaining of multimodality events in sequential order are the key components of any sequential memories—episodic, semantic, working, etc. We study a robustness of binding sequential dynamics based on our previously introduced model in the form of generalized Lotka-Volterra equations. In the phase space of the model, there exists a multi-dimensional binding heteroclinic network consisting of saddle equilibrium points and heteroclinic trajectories joining them. We prove here the robustness of the binding sequential dynamics, i.e., the feasibility phenomenon for coupled heteroclinic networks: for each collection of successive heteroclinic trajectories inside the unified networks, there is an open set of initial points such that the trajectory going through each of them follows the prescribed collection staying in a small neighborhood of it. We show also that the symbolic complexity function of the system restricted to this neighborhood is a polynomial of degree L - 1, where L is the number of modalities.

  18. Sequential memory: Binding dynamics.

    PubMed

    Afraimovich, Valentin; Gong, Xue; Rabinovich, Mikhail

    2015-10-01

    Temporal order memories are critical for everyday animal and human functioning. Experiments and our own experience show that the binding or association of various features of an event together and the maintaining of multimodality events in sequential order are the key components of any sequential memories-episodic, semantic, working, etc. We study a robustness of binding sequential dynamics based on our previously introduced model in the form of generalized Lotka-Volterra equations. In the phase space of the model, there exists a multi-dimensional binding heteroclinic network consisting of saddle equilibrium points and heteroclinic trajectories joining them. We prove here the robustness of the binding sequential dynamics, i.e., the feasibility phenomenon for coupled heteroclinic networks: for each collection of successive heteroclinic trajectories inside the unified networks, there is an open set of initial points such that the trajectory going through each of them follows the prescribed collection staying in a small neighborhood of it. We show also that the symbolic complexity function of the system restricted to this neighborhood is a polynomial of degree L - 1, where L is the number of modalities. PMID:26520084

  19. Library Binding Manual. Revised Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lakhanpal, S. K.

    This procedural manual is designed to be used in bindery sections in public, university and special libraries. It briefly discusses these general matters: administrative control; selection of a binder; when and what to bind; conventional binding; routines; missing issues; schedule for shipments; temporary binding; rare books, maps and newspapers;…

  20. Alcohol binding to liposomes by 2H NMR and radiolabel binding assays: does partitioning describe binding?

    PubMed Central

    Dubey, A K; Eryomin, V A; Taraschi, T F; Janes, N

    1996-01-01

    Implicit within the concept of membrane-buffer partition coefficients of solutes is a nonspecific solvation mechanism of solute binding. However, (2)H NMR studies of the binding of (2)H(6)-ethanol and [1-(2)H(2)] n-hexanol to phosphatidylcholine vesicles have been interpreted as evidence for two distinct alcohol binding modes. One binding mode was reported to be at the membrane surface. The second mode was reported to be within the bilayer interior. An examination of the (2)H NMR binding studies, together with direct radiolabel binding assays, shows that other interpretations of the data are more plausible. The results are entirely consistent with partitioning (nonspecific binding) as the sole mode of alcohol binding to liposomes, in accord with our previous thermodynamic interpretation of alcohol action in phosphatidylcholine liposomes. PMID:9172754

  1. Carboplatin binding to histidine

    SciTech Connect

    Tanley, Simon W. M.; Diederichs, Kay; Kroon-Batenburg, Loes M. J.; Levy, Colin; Schreurs, Antoine M. M.; Helliwell, John R.

    2014-08-29

    An X-ray crystal structure showing the binding of purely carboplatin to histidine in a model protein has finally been obtained. This required extensive crystallization trials and various novel crystal structure analyses. Carboplatin is a second-generation platinum anticancer agent used for the treatment of a variety of cancers. Previous X-ray crystallographic studies of carboplatin binding to histidine (in hen egg-white lysozyme; HEWL) showed the partial conversion of carboplatin to cisplatin owing to the high NaCl concentration used in the crystallization conditions. HEWL co-crystallizations with carboplatin in NaBr conditions have now been carried out to confirm whether carboplatin converts to the bromine form and whether this takes place in a similar way to the partial conversion of carboplatin to cisplatin observed previously in NaCl conditions. Here, it is reported that a partial chemical transformation takes place but to a transplatin form. Thus, to attempt to resolve purely carboplatin binding at histidine, this study utilized co-crystallization of HEWL with carboplatin without NaCl to eliminate the partial chemical conversion of carboplatin. Tetragonal HEWL crystals co-crystallized with carboplatin were successfully obtained in four different conditions, each at a different pH value. The structural results obtained show carboplatin bound to either one or both of the N atoms of His15 of HEWL, and this particular variation was dependent on the concentration of anions in the crystallization mixture and the elapsed time, as well as the pH used. The structural details of the bound carboplatin molecule also differed between them. Overall, the most detailed crystal structure showed the majority of the carboplatin atoms bound to the platinum centre; however, the four-carbon ring structure of the cyclobutanedicarboxylate moiety (CBDC) remained elusive. The potential impact of the results for the administration of carboplatin as an anticancer agent are described.

  2. Cold Spots in Protein Binding.

    PubMed

    Shirian, Jason; Sharabi, Oz; Shifman, Julia M

    2016-09-01

    Understanding the energetics and architecture of protein-binding interfaces is important for basic research and could potentially facilitate the design of novel binding domains for biotechnological applications. It is well accepted that a few key residues at binding interfaces (binding hot spots) are responsible for contributing most to the free energy of binding. In this opinion article, we introduce a new concept of 'binding cold spots', or interface positions occupied by suboptimal amino acids. Such positions exhibit a potential for affinity enhancement through various mutations. We give several examples of cold spots from different protein-engineering studies and argue that identification of such positions is crucial for studies of protein evolution and protein design. PMID:27477052

  3. Calcium binding in alpha-amylases: an X-ray diffraction study at 2.1-A resolution of two enzymes from Aspergillus.

    PubMed

    Boel, E; Brady, L; Brzozowski, A M; Derewenda, Z; Dodson, G G; Jensen, V J; Petersen, S B; Swift, H; Thim, L; Woldike, H F

    1990-07-01

    X-ray diffraction analysis (at 2.1-A resolution) of an acid alpha-amylase from Aspergillus niger allowed a detailed description of the stereochemistry of the calcium-binding sites. The primary site (which is essential in maintaining proper folding around the active site) contains a tightly bound Ca2+ with an unusually high number of eight ligands (O delta 1 and O delta 2 of Asp175, O delta of Asn121, main-chain carbonyl oxygens of Glu162 and Glu210, and three water molecules). A secondary binding site was identified at the bottom of the substrate binding cleft; it involves the residues presumed to play a catalytic role (Asp206 and Glu230). This explains the inhibitory effect of calcium observed at higher concentrations. Neutral Aspergillus oryzae (TAKA) alpha-amylase was also refined in a new crystal at 2.1-A resolution. The structure of this homologous (over 80%) enzyme and additional kinetic studies support all the structural conclusions regarding both calcium-binding sites. PMID:2207069

  4. Quarkonium binding and entropic force

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Satz, Helmut

    2015-05-01

    A bound state represents a balance between repulsive kinetic and attractive potential energy. In a hot quark-gluon plasma, the interaction potential experiences medium effects. Color screening modifies the attractive binding force between the quarks, while the increase of entropy with separation gives rise to a growing repulsion. We study the role of these phenomena for in-medium binding and dissociation. It is found that the relevant potential for binding is the free energy ; with increasing separation, further binding through the internal energy is compensated by repulsive entropic effects.

  5. Identification of consensus binding sites clarifies FMRP binding determinants.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Bart R; Chopra, Pankaj; Suhl, Joshua A; Warren, Stephen T; Bassell, Gary J

    2016-08-19

    Fragile X mental retardation protein (FMRP) is a multifunctional RNA-binding protein with crucial roles in neuronal development and function. Efforts aimed at elucidating how FMRP target mRNAs are selected have produced divergent sets of target mRNA and putative FMRP-bound motifs, and a clear understanding of FMRP's binding determinants has been lacking. To clarify FMRP's binding to its target mRNAs, we produced a shared dataset of FMRP consensus binding sequences (FCBS), which were reproducibly identified in two published FMRP CLIP sequencing datasets. This comparative dataset revealed that of the various sequence and structural motifs that have been proposed to specify FMRP binding, the short sequence motifs TGGA and GAC were corroborated, and a novel TAY motif was identified. In addition, the distribution of the FCBS set demonstrates that FMRP preferentially binds to the coding region of its targets but also revealed binding along 3' UTRs in a subset of target mRNAs. Beyond probing these putative motifs, the FCBS dataset of reproducibly identified FMRP binding sites is a valuable tool for investigating FMRP targets and function. PMID:27378784

  6. Reversible calcitonin binding to solubilized sheep brain binding sites.

    PubMed Central

    Sexton, P M; Schneider, H G; D'Santos, C S; Mendelsohn, F A; Kemp, B E; Moseley, J M; Martin, T J; Findlay, D M

    1991-01-01

    In this study we have solubilized and characterized binding sites for calcitonin (CT) from sheep brainstem. Autoradiography of 125I-labelled salmon CT (125I-sCT) binding to sheep diencephalon revealed a similar pattern of binding to that seen in other species, although the extent of distribution was greater in the sheep. CT binding activity could be extracted from membranes with either CHAPS or digitonin, but not with beta-octyl glucoside, 125I-sCT binding was saturable, with a dissociation constant for CHAPS-solubilized membranes of 2.8 +/- 0.5 nM and a maximum binding site concentration of 6.2 +/- 1.6 pmol/mg of protein. In competition binding studies, various CTs and their analogues demonstrated a similar rank order of potency to that seen in other CT receptor systems, Optimal binding occurred in the pH range 6.5-7.5, and was decreased in the presence of NaCl concentrations greater than 200 mM. In contrast with most other CT receptor binding systems, in which binding is poorly reversible, the binding of 125I-sCT to sheep brain binding sites underwent substantial dissociation upon addition of excess unlabelled sCT, with 40% and 46% dissociation after 2 h at 4 degree C in particulate and solubilized membranes respectively. Photoaffinity labelling of the binding site with the biologically active analogue 125I-[Arg11,18,4-azidobenzoyl-Lys14]sCT and analysis on SDS/PAGE under reducing conditions revealed a specific protein band of Mr approximately solubilized and particulate brain membranes. This is in accordance with the molecular size of CT receptors in other tissues where two species of receptor have been identified. one of Mr approximately 71,000 and another of Mr approximately 88,000. These results demonstrate the presence of high concentrations of CT binding sites in sheep brain which display different kinetic properties to those of CT receptors found in other tissues. Images Fig. 1. Fig. 6. PMID:1846527

  7. Binding Energy and Enzymatic Catalysis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hansen, David E.; Raines, Ronald T.

    1990-01-01

    Discussed is the fundamental role that the favorable free energy of binding of the rate-determining transition state plays in catalysis. The principle that all of the catalytic factors discussed are realized by the use of this binding energy is reviewed. (CW)

  8. Cholinergic influences on feature binding.

    PubMed

    Botly, Leigh C P; De Rosa, Eve

    2007-04-01

    The binding problem refers to the fundamental challenge of the central nervous system to integrate sensory information registered by multiple brain regions to form a unified neural representation of a stimulus. Human behavioral, neuropsychological, and functional neuroimaging evidence suggests a fundamental role for attention in feature binding; however, its neurochemical basis is currently unknown. This study examined whether acetylcholine (ACh), a neuromodulator that has been implicated in attentional processes, plays a critical role in feature binding. Using a within-subjects pharmacological design and the cholinergic muscarinic antagonist scopolamine, the present experiments demonstrate, in a rat model, a critical role for the cortical muscarinic cholinergic system in feature binding. Specifically, ACh and the attentional resources that it supports are essential for the initial feature binding process but are not required to maintain neural representations of bound stimuli. PMID:17469916

  9. Cooperative binding: a multiple personality.

    PubMed

    Martini, Johannes W R; Diambra, Luis; Habeck, Michael

    2016-06-01

    Cooperative binding has been described in many publications and has been related to or defined by several different properties of the binding behavior of the ligand to the target molecule. In addition to the commonly used Hill coefficient, other characteristics such as a sigmoidal shape of the overall titration curve in a linear plot, a change of ligand affinity of the other binding sites when a site of the target molecule becomes occupied, or complex roots of the binding polynomial have been used to define or to quantify cooperative binding. In this work, we analyze how the different properties are related in the most general model for binding curves based on the grand canonical partition function and present several examples which highlight differences between the cooperativity characterizing properties which are discussed. Our results mainly show that among the presented definitions there are not two which fully coincide. Moreover, this work poses the question whether it can make sense to distinguish between positive and negative cooperativity based on the macroscopic binding isotherm only. This article shall emphasize that scientists who investigate cooperative effects in biological systems could help avoiding misunderstandings by stating clearly which kind of cooperativity they discuss. PMID:26319983

  10. (/sup 3/)tetrahydrotrazodone binding. Association with serotonin binding sites

    SciTech Connect

    Kendall, D.A.; Taylor, D.P.; Enna, S.J.

    1983-05-01

    High (17 nM) and low (603 nM) affinity binding sites for (/sup 3/)tetrahydrotrazodone ((/sup 3/) THT), a biologically active analogue of trazodone, have been identified in rat brain membranes. The substrate specificity, concentration, and subcellular and regional distributions of these sites suggest that they may represent a component of the serotonin transmitter system. Pharmacological analysis of (/sup 3/)THT binding, coupled with brain lesion and drug treatment experiments, revealed that, unlike other antidepressants, (/sup 3/) THT does not attach to either a biogenic amine transporter or serotonin binding sites. Rather, it would appear that (/sup 3/)THT may be an antagonist ligand for the serotonin binding site. This probe may prove of value in defining the mechanism of action of trazodone and in further characterizing serotonin receptors.

  11. Benzodiazepine binding to bovine retina.

    PubMed

    Osborne, N N

    1980-02-01

    [3H]Diazepam binds to membrane preparations of the retina, suggesting that benzodiazepine receptors exist in this tissue. The binding characteristics are similar to those known to occur in the brain, with affinity constants in the same range. Unlike the finding in the brain, [3H]diazepam binding in the retina is not stimulated by GABA and other GABA agonists. These findings indicate that benzodiazepine receptors may have a more general function and not only be associated with anxiety or emotional behaviour. PMID:6302572

  12. Mercury binding on activated carbon

    SciTech Connect

    Bihter Padak; Michael Brunetti; Amanda Lewis; Jennifer Wilcox

    2006-11-15

    Density functional theory has been employed for the modeling of activated carbon (AC) using a fused-benzene ring cluster approach. Oxygen functional groups have been investigated for their promotion of effective elemental mercury binding on AC surface sites. Lactone and carbonyl functional groups yield the highest mercury binding energies. Further, the addition of halogen atoms has been considered to the modeled surface, and has been found to increase the AC's mercury adsorption capacity. The mercury binding energies increase with the addition of the following halogen atoms, F {gt} Cl {gt} Br {gt} I, with the fluorine addition being the most promising halogen for increasing mercury adsorption.

  13. Superresolution microscopy with transient binding.

    PubMed

    Molle, Julia; Raab, Mario; Holzmeister, Susanne; Schmitt-Monreal, Daniel; Grohmann, Dina; He, Zhike; Tinnefeld, Philip

    2016-06-01

    For single-molecule localization based superresolution, the concentration of fluorescent labels has to be thinned out. This is commonly achieved by photophysically or photochemically deactivating subsets of molecules. Alternatively, apparent switching of molecules can be achieved by transient binding of fluorescent labels. Here, a diffusing dye yields bright fluorescent spots when binding to the structure of interest. As the binding interaction is weak, the labeling is reversible and the dye ligand construct diffuses back into solution. This approach of achieving superresolution by transient binding (STB) is reviewed in this manuscript. Different realizations of STB are discussed and compared to other localization-based superresolution modalities. We propose the development of labeling strategies that will make STB a highly versatile tool for superresolution microscopy at highest resolution. PMID:26773299

  14. When is protein binding important?

    PubMed

    Heuberger, Jules; Schmidt, Stephan; Derendorf, Hartmut

    2013-09-01

    The present paper is an ode to a classic citation by Benet and Hoener (2002. Clin Pharm Ther 71(3):115-121). The now classic paper had a huge impact on drug development and the way the issue of protein binding is perceived and interpreted. Although the authors very clearly pointed out the limitations and underlying assumptions for their delineations, these are too often overlooked and the classic paper's message is misinterpreted by broadening to cases that were not intended. Some members of the scientific community concluded from the paper that protein binding is not important. This was clearly not intended by the authors, as they finished their paper with a paragraph entitled: "When is protein binding important?" Misinterpretation of the underlying assumptions in the classic work can result in major pitfalls in drug development. Therefore, we revisit the topic of protein binding with the intention of clarifying when clinically relevant changes should be considered during drug development. PMID:23650013

  15. Cholesterol binding to ion channels

    PubMed Central

    Levitan, Irena; Singh, Dev K.; Rosenhouse-Dantsker, Avia

    2014-01-01

    Numerous studies demonstrated that membrane cholesterol is a major regulator of ion channel function. The goal of this review is to discuss significant advances that have been recently achieved in elucidating the mechanisms responsible for cholesterol regulation of ion channels. The first major insight that comes from growing number of studies that based on the sterol specificity of cholesterol effects, show that several types of ion channels (nAChR, Kir, BK, TRPV) are regulated by specific sterol-protein interactions. This conclusion is supported by demonstrating direct saturable binding of cholesterol to a bacterial Kir channel. The second major advance in the field is the identification of putative cholesterol binding sites in several types of ion channels. These include sites at locations associated with the well-known cholesterol binding motif CRAC and its reversed form CARC in nAChR, BK, and TRPV, as well as novel cholesterol binding regions in Kir channels. Notably, in the majority of these channels, cholesterol is suggested to interact mainly with hydrophobic residues in non-annular regions of the channels being embedded in between transmembrane protein helices. We also discuss how identification of putative cholesterol binding sites is an essential step to understand the mechanistic basis of cholesterol-induced channel regulation. Clearly, however, these are only the first few steps in obtaining a general understanding of cholesterol-ion channels interactions and their roles in cellular and organ functions. PMID:24616704

  16. Water binding in legume seeds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vertucci, C. W.; Leopold, A. C.

    1987-01-01

    The physical status of water in seeds has a pivotal role in determining the physiological reactions that can take place in the dry state. Using water sorption isotherms from cotyledon and axis tissue of five leguminous seeds, the strength of water binding and the numbers of binding sites have been estimated using van't Hoff analyses and the D'Arcy/Watt equation. These parameters of water sorption are calculated for each of the three regions of water binding and for a range of temperatures. Water sorption characteristics are reflective of the chemical composition of the biological materials as well as the temperature at which hydration takes place. Changes in the sorption characteristics with temperature and hydration level may suggest hydration-induced structural changes in cellular components.

  17. Computational Prediction of RNA-Binding Proteins and Binding Sites

    PubMed Central

    Si, Jingna; Cui, Jing; Cheng, Jin; Wu, Rongling

    2015-01-01

    Proteins and RNA interaction have vital roles in many cellular processes such as protein synthesis, sequence encoding, RNA transfer, and gene regulation at the transcriptional and post-transcriptional levels. Approximately 6%–8% of all proteins are RNA-binding proteins (RBPs). Distinguishing these RBPs or their binding residues is a major aim of structural biology. Previously, a number of experimental methods were developed for the determination of protein–RNA interactions. However, these experimental methods are expensive, time-consuming, and labor-intensive. Alternatively, researchers have developed many computational approaches to predict RBPs and protein–RNA binding sites, by combining various machine learning methods and abundant sequence and/or structural features. There are three kinds of computational approaches, which are prediction from protein sequence, prediction from protein structure, and protein-RNA docking. In this paper, we review all existing studies of predictions of RNA-binding sites and RBPs and complexes, including data sets used in different approaches, sequence and structural features used in several predictors, prediction method classifications, performance comparisons, evaluation methods, and future directions. PMID:26540053

  18. Unusual monoclonal DNA binding immunoglobulin.

    PubMed

    Sawada, S; Iijima, S; Kuwana, K; Nishinarita, S; Takeuchi, J; Shida, M; Karasaki, M; Amaki, I

    1983-03-01

    The monoclonal antibodies directed against DNA were produced by somatic cell hybridization with parental cells (SP-2) and spleen cells from nonimmunized autoimmune MRL/lpr mice. The immunoglobulins were recovered from the culture supernatant from hybridoma by a solid immunoadsorbent and antibody immunoprecipitation. The results from the specificities of DNA binding monoclonal immunoglobulins suggest that the antibodies to DNA have the antibody combining sites for both epitope of double stranded helix and base of DNA and support the concept of the multiple antigen binding potentials of the hybridoma autoantibodies. PMID:6857646

  19. RNA Bind-n-Seq: Measuring the Binding Affinity Landscape of RNA-Binding Proteins.

    PubMed

    Lambert, Nicole J; Robertson, Alex D; Burge, Christopher B

    2015-01-01

    RNA-binding proteins (RBPs) coordinate post-transcriptional control of gene expression, often through sequence-specific recognition of primary transcripts or mature messenger RNAs. Hundreds of RBPs are encoded in the human genome, most with undefined or incompletely defined biological roles. Understanding the function of these factors will require the identification of each RBP's distinct RNA binding specificity. RNA Bind-n-Seq (RBNS) is a high-throughput, cost-effective in vitro method capable of resolving sequence and secondary structure preferences of RBPs. Dissociation constants can also be inferred from RBNS data when provided with additional experimental information. Here, we describe the experimental procedures to perform RBNS and discuss important parameters of the method and ways that the experiment can be tailored to the specific RBP under study. Additionally, we present the conceptual framework and execution of the freely available RBNS computational pipeline and describe the outputs of the pipeline. Different approaches to quantify binding specificity, quality control metrics, and estimation of binding constants are also covered. PMID:26068750

  20. Synthetic heparin-binding growth factor analogs

    DOEpatents

    Pena, Louis A.; Zamora, Paul; Lin, Xinhua; Glass, John D.

    2007-01-23

    The invention provides synthetic heparin-binding growth factor analogs having at least one peptide chain that binds a heparin-binding growth factor receptor, covalently bound to a hydrophobic linker, which is in turn covalently bound to a non-signaling peptide that includes a heparin-binding domain. The synthetic heparin-binding growth factor analogs are useful as soluble biologics or as surface coatings for medical devices.

  1. Al(+)-ligand binding energies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sodupe, M.; Bauschlicher, Charles W., Jr.

    1991-01-01

    Ab initio calculations are used to optimize the structure and determine the binding energies of Al(+) to a series of ligands. For Al(+)-CN, the bonding was found to have a large covalent component. For the remaining ligands, the bonding is shown to be electrostatic in origin. The results obtained for Al(+) are compared with those previously reported for Mg(+).

  2. Cellulose binding domain fusion proteins

    DOEpatents

    Shoseyov, O.; Yosef, K.; Shpiegl, I.; Goldstein, M.A.; Doi, R.H.

    1998-02-17

    A cellulose binding domain (CBD) having a high affinity for crystalline cellulose and chitin is disclosed, along with methods for the molecular cloning and recombinant production. Fusion products comprising the CBD and a second protein are likewise described. A wide range of applications are contemplated for both the CBD and the fusion products, including drug delivery, affinity separations, and diagnostic techniques. 16 figs.

  3. Cellulose binding domain fusion proteins

    DOEpatents

    Shoseyov, Oded; Shpiegl, Itai; Goldstein, Marc A.; Doi, Roy H.

    1998-01-01

    A cellulose binding domain (CBD) having a high affinity for crystalline cellulose and chitin is disclosed, along with methods for the molecular cloning and recombinant production thereof. Fusion products comprising the CBD and a second protein are likewise described. A wide range of applications are contemplated for both the CBD and the fusion products, including drug delivery, affinity separations, and diagnostic techniques.

  4. Positive Emotion Facilitates Audiovisual Binding

    PubMed Central

    Kitamura, Miho S.; Watanabe, Katsumi; Kitagawa, Norimichi

    2016-01-01

    It has been shown that positive emotions can facilitate integrative and associative information processing in cognitive functions. The present study examined whether emotions in observers can also enhance perceptual integrative processes. We tested 125 participants in total for revealing the effects of emotional states and traits in observers on the multisensory binding between auditory and visual signals. Participants in Experiment 1 observed two identical visual disks moving toward each other, coinciding, and moving away, presented with a brief sound. We found that for participants with lower depressive tendency, induced happy moods increased the width of the temporal binding window of the sound-induced bounce percept in the stream/bounce display, while no effect was found for the participants with higher depressive tendency. In contrast, no effect of mood was observed for a simple audiovisual simultaneity discrimination task in Experiment 2. These results provide the first empirical evidence of a dependency of multisensory binding upon emotional states and traits, revealing that positive emotions can facilitate the multisensory binding processes at a perceptual level. PMID:26834585

  5. Hebrew as a Binding Force.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fischler, Ben-Zion

    1990-01-01

    The role of the Hebrew language as a cohesive force and the history of modern Hebrew instruction are chronicled. It is proposed that despite the scattering of its speakers and periods of use only as a literary or business language, Hebrew has been a binding force for the Jewish people. It was with considerable struggle that Hebrew gained…

  6. Protein binding assay for hyaluronate

    SciTech Connect

    Lacy, B.E.; Underhill, C.B.

    1986-11-01

    A relatively quick and simple assay for hyaluronate was developed using the specific binding protein, hyaluronectin. The hyaluronectin was obtained by homogenizing the brains of Sprague-Dawley rats, and then centrifuging the homogenate. The resulting supernatant was used as a source of crude hyaluronectin. In the binding assay, the hyaluronectin was mixed with (/sup 3/H)hyaluronate, followed by an equal volume of saturated (NH/sub 4/)/sub 2/SO/sub 4/, which precipitated the hyaluronectin and any (/sup 3/H)hyaluronate associated with it, but left free (/sup 3/H)hyaluronate in solution. The mixture was then centrifuged, and the amount of bound (/sup 3/H)hyaluronate in the precipitate was determined. Using this assay, the authors found that hyaluronectin specifically bound hyaluronate, since other glycosaminoglycans failed to compete for the binding protein. In addition, the interaction between hyaluronectin and hyaluronate was of relatively high affinity, and the size of the hyaluronate did not appear to substantially alter the amount of binding. To determine the amount of hyaluronate in an unknown sample, they used a competition assay in which the binding of a set amount of (/sup 3/H)hyaluronate was blocked by the addition of unlabeled hyaluronate. By comparing the degree of competition of the unknown samples with that of known amounts of hyaluronate, it was possible to determine the amount of hyaluronate in the unknowns. They have found that this method is sensitive to 1 ..mu..g or less of hyaluronate, and is unaffected by the presence of proteins.

  7. The prion protein binds thiamine.

    PubMed

    Perez-Pineiro, Rolando; Bjorndahl, Trent C; Berjanskii, Mark V; Hau, David; Li, Li; Huang, Alan; Lee, Rose; Gibbs, Ebrima; Ladner, Carol; Dong, Ying Wei; Abera, Ashenafi; Cashman, Neil R; Wishart, David S

    2011-11-01

    Although highly conserved throughout evolution, the exact biological function of the prion protein is still unclear. In an effort to identify the potential biological functions of the prion protein we conducted a small-molecule screening assay using the Syrian hamster prion protein [shPrP(90-232)]. The screen was performed using a library of 149 water-soluble metabolites that are known to pass through the blood-brain barrier. Using a combination of 1D NMR, fluorescence quenching and surface plasmon resonance we identified thiamine (vitamin B1) as a specific prion ligand with a binding constant of ~60 μM. Subsequent studies showed that this interaction is evolutionarily conserved, with similar binding constants being seen for mouse, hamster and human prions. Various protein construct lengths, both with and without the unstructured N-terminal region in the presence and absence of copper, were examined. This indicates that the N-terminus has no influence on the protein's ability to interact with thiamine. In addition to thiamine, the more biologically abundant forms of vitamin B1 (thiamine monophosphate and thiamine diphosphate) were also found to bind the prion protein with similar affinity. Heteronuclear NMR experiments were used to determine thiamine's interaction site, which is located between helix 1 and the preceding loop. These data, in conjunction with computer-aided docking and molecular dynamics, were used to model the thiamine-binding pharmacophore and a comparison with other thiamine binding proteins was performed to reveal the common features of interaction. PMID:21848803

  8. Mg(+)-ligand binding energies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bauschlicher, Charles W., Jr.; Partridge, Harry

    1991-01-01

    Ab initio calculations are used to optimize the structures and determine the binding energies of Mg(+) to a series of ligands. Mg(+) bonds electrostatically with benzene, acetone, H2, CO, and NH3 and a self-consistent-field treatment gives a good description of the bonding. The bonding in MgCN(+) and MgCH3(+) is largely covalent and a correlated treatment is required.

  9. Anion binding in biological systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feiters, Martin C.; Meyer-Klaucke, Wolfram; Kostenko, Alexander V.; Soldatov, Alexander V.; Leblanc, Catherine; Michel, Gurvan; Potin, Philippe; Küpper, Frithjof C.; Hollenstein, Kaspar; Locher, Kaspar P.; Bevers, Loes E.; Hagedoorn, Peter-Leon; Hagen, Wilfred R.

    2009-11-01

    We compare aspects of biological X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) studies of cations and anions, and report on some examples of anion binding in biological systems. Brown algae such as Laminaria digitata (oarweed) are effective accumulators of I from seawater, with tissue concentrations exceeding 50 mM, and the vanadate-containing enzyme haloperoxidase is implicated in halide accumulation. We have studied the chemical state of iodine and its biological role in Laminaria at the I K edge, and bromoperoxidase from Ascophyllum nodosum (knotted wrack) at the Br K edge. Mo is essential for many forms of life; W only for certain archaea, such as Archaeoglobus fulgidus and the hyperthermophilic archaeon Pyrococcus furiosus, and some bacteria. The metals are bound and transported as their oxo-anions, molybdate and tungstate, which are similar in size. The transport protein WtpA from P. furiosus binds tungstate more strongly than molybdate, and is related in sequence to Archaeoglobus fulgidus ModA, of which a crystal structure is known. We have measured A. fulgidus ModA with tungstate at the W L3 (2p3/2) edge, and compared the results with the refined crystal structure. XAS studies of anion binding are feasible even if only weak interactions are present, are biologically relevant, and give new insights in the spectroscopy.

  10. Erythropoietin binding protein from mammalian serum

    DOEpatents

    Clemons, G.K.

    1997-04-29

    Purified mammalian erythropoietin binding-protein is disclosed, and its isolation, identification, characterization, purification, and immunoassay are described. The erythropoietin binding protein can be used for regulation of erythropoiesis by regulating levels and half-life of erythropoietin. A diagnostic kit for determination of level of erythropoietin binding protein is also described. 11 figs.

  11. Erythropoietin binding protein from mammalian serum

    DOEpatents

    Clemons, Gisela K.

    1997-01-01

    Purified mammalian erythropoietin binding-protein is disclosed, and its isolation, identification, characterization, purification, and immunoassay are described. The erythropoietin binding protein can be used for regulation of erythropoiesis by regulating levels and half-life of erythropoietin. A diagnostic kit for determination of level of erythropoietin binding protein is also described.

  12. Feature-Based Binding and Phase Theory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Antonenko, Andrei

    2012-01-01

    Current theories of binding cannot provide a uniform account for many facts associated with the distribution of anaphors, such as long-distance binding effects and the subject-orientation of monomorphemic anaphors. Further, traditional binding theory is incompatible with minimalist assumptions. In this dissertation I propose an analysis of…

  13. Evolution of Protein-binding DNA Sequences through Competitive Binding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Weiqun; Gerland, Ulrich; Hwa, Terence; Levine, Herbert

    2002-03-01

    The dynamics of in vitro DNA evolution controlled via competitive binding of DNA sequences to proteins has been explored in a recent serial transfer experiment footnote B. Dubertret, S.Liu, Q. Ouyang, A. Libchaber, Phys. Rev. Lett. 86, 6022 (2001).. Motivated by the experiment, we investigate a continuum model for this evolution process in various parameter regimes. We establish a self-consistent mean-field evolution equation, determine its dynamical properties and finite population size corrections. In addition, we discuss the experimental implications of our results.

  14. Localization of the chaperone binding site

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boyle, D.; Gopalakrishnan, S.; Takemoto, L.; Spooner, B. S. (Principal Investigator)

    1993-01-01

    The hypothesis derived from models of the multi-oligomeric chaperone complex suggests that partially denatured proteins bind in a central cavity in the aggregate. To test this hypothesis, the molecular chaperone, alpha crystallin, was bound to partially denatured forms of gamma crystallin, and the binding site was visualized by immunogold localization. In an alternative approach, gold particles were directly complexed with gamma crystallin, followed by binding to the alpha crystallin aggregate. In both cases, binding was localized to the central region of the aggregate, confirming for the first time that partially denatured proteins do indeed bind to a central region of the molecular chaperone aggregate.

  15. Synthetic heparin-binding factor analogs

    DOEpatents

    Pena, Louis A.; Zamora, Paul O.; Lin, Xinhua; Glass, John D.

    2010-04-20

    The invention provides synthetic heparin-binding growth factor analogs having at least one peptide chain, and preferably two peptide chains branched from a dipeptide branch moiety composed of two trifunctional amino acid residues, which peptide chain or chains bind a heparin-binding growth factor receptor and are covalently bound to a non-signaling peptide that includes a heparin-binding domain, preferably by a linker, which may be a hydrophobic linker. The synthetic heparin-binding growth factor analogs are useful as pharmaceutical agents, soluble biologics or as surface coatings for medical devices.

  16. Unraveling determinants of transcription factor binding outside the core binding site.

    PubMed

    Levo, Michal; Zalckvar, Einat; Sharon, Eilon; Dantas Machado, Ana Carolina; Kalma, Yael; Lotam-Pompan, Maya; Weinberger, Adina; Yakhini, Zohar; Rohs, Remo; Segal, Eran

    2015-07-01

    Binding of transcription factors (TFs) to regulatory sequences is a pivotal step in the control of gene expression. Despite many advances in the characterization of sequence motifs recognized by TFs, our ability to quantitatively predict TF binding to different regulatory sequences is still limited. Here, we present a novel experimental assay termed BunDLE-seq that provides quantitative measurements of TF binding to thousands of fully designed sequences of 200 bp in length within a single experiment. Applying this binding assay to two yeast TFs, we demonstrate that sequences outside the core TF binding site profoundly affect TF binding. We show that TF-specific models based on the sequence or DNA shape of the regions flanking the core binding site are highly predictive of the measured differential TF binding. We further characterize the dependence of TF binding, accounting for measurements of single and co-occurring binding events, on the number and location of binding sites and on the TF concentration. Finally, by coupling our in vitro TF binding measurements, and another application of our method probing nucleosome formation, to in vivo expression measurements carried out with the same template sequences serving as promoters, we offer insights into mechanisms that may determine the different expression outcomes observed. Our assay thus paves the way to a more comprehensive understanding of TF binding to regulatory sequences and allows the characterization of TF binding determinants within and outside of core binding sites. PMID:25762553

  17. Infinite sets and double binds.

    PubMed

    Arden, M

    1984-01-01

    There have been many attempts to bring psychoanalytical theory up to date. This paper approaches the problem by discussing the work of Gregory Bateson and Ignacio Matte-Blanco, with particular reference to the use made by these authors of Russell's theory of logical types. Bateson's theory of the double bind and Matte-Blanco's bilogic are both based on concepts of logical typing. It is argued that the two theories can be linked by the idea that neurotic symptoms are based on category errors in thinking. Clinical material is presented from the analysis of a middle-aged woman. The intention is to demonstrate that the process of making interpretations can be thought of as revealing errors in thinking. Changes in the patient's inner world are then seen to be the result of clarifying childhood experiences based on category errors. Matte-Blanco's theory of bilogic and infinite experiences is a re-evaluation of the place of the primary process in mental life. It is suggested that a combination of bilogic and double bind theory provides a possibility of reformulating psychoanalytical theory. PMID:6544755

  18. Comparing binding site information to binding affinity reveals that Crp/DNA complexes have several distinct binding conformers

    PubMed Central

    Holmquist, Peter C.; Holmquist, Gerald P.; Summers, Michael L.

    2011-01-01

    We show that the cAMP receptor protein (Crp) binds to DNA as several different conformers. This situation has precluded discovering a high correlation between any sequence property and binding affinity for proteins that bend DNA. Experimentally quantified affinities of Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 cAMP receptor protein (SyCrp1), the Escherichia coli Crp (EcCrp, also CAP) and DNA were analyzed to mathematically describe, and make human-readable, the relationship of DNA sequence and binding affinity in a given system. Here, sequence logos and weight matrices were built to model SyCrp1 binding sequences. Comparing the weight matrix model to binding affinity revealed several distinct binding conformations. These Crp/DNA conformations were asymmetrical (non-palindromic). PMID:21586590

  19. Receptor-binding sites: bioinformatic approaches.

    PubMed

    Flower, Darren R

    2006-01-01

    It is increasingly clear that both transient and long-lasting interactions between biomacromolecules and their molecular partners are the most fundamental of all biological mechanisms and lie at the conceptual heart of protein function. In particular, the protein-binding site is the most fascinating and important mechanistic arbiter of protein function. In this review, I examine the nature of protein-binding sites found in both ligand-binding receptors and substrate-binding enzymes. I highlight two important concepts underlying the identification and analysis of binding sites. The first is based on knowledge: when one knows the location of a binding site in one protein, one can "inherit" the site from one protein to another. The second approach involves the a priori prediction of a binding site from a sequence or a structure. The full and complete analysis of binding sites will necessarily involve the full range of informatic techniques ranging from sequence-based bioinformatic analysis through structural bioinformatics to computational chemistry and molecular physics. Integration of both diverse experimental and diverse theoretical approaches is thus a mandatory requirement in the evaluation of binding sites and the binding events that occur within them. PMID:16671408

  20. Nucleotide-binding mechanisms in pseudokinases

    PubMed Central

    Hammarén, Henrik M.; Virtanen, Anniina T.; Silvennoinen, Olli

    2015-01-01

    Pseudokinases are classified by the lack of one or several of the highly conserved motifs involved in nucleotide (nt) binding or catalytic activity of protein kinases (PKs). Pseudokinases represent ∼10% of the human kinome and they are found in all evolutionary classes of kinases. It has become evident that pseudokinases, which were initially considered somewhat peculiar dead kinases, are important components in several signalling cascades. Furthermore, several pseudokinases have been linked to human diseases, particularly cancer, which is raising interest for therapeutic approaches towards these proteins. The ATP-binding pocket is a well-established drug target and elucidation of the mechanism and properties of nt binding in pseudokinases is of significant interest and importance. Recent studies have demonstrated that members of the pseudokinase family are very diverse in structure as well as in their ability and mechanism to bind nts or perform phosphoryl transfer reactions. This diversity also precludes prediction of pseudokinase function, or the importance of nt binding for said function, based on primary sequence alone. Currently available data indicate that ∼40% of pseudokinases are able to bind nts, whereas only few are able to catalyse occasional phosphoryl transfer. Pseudokinases employ diverse mechanisms to bind nts, which usually occurs at low, but physiological, affinity. ATP binding serves often a structural role but in most cases the functional roles are not precisely known. In the present review, we discuss the various mechanisms that pseudokinases employ for nt binding and how this often low-affinity binding can be accurately analysed. PMID:26589967

  1. Synthetic LPS-Binding Polymer Nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Tian

    Lipopolysaccharide (LPS), one of the principal components of most gram-negative bacteria's outer membrane, is a type of contaminant that can be frequently found in recombinant DNA products. Because of its strong and even lethal biological effects, selective LPS removal from bioproducts solution is of particular importance in the pharmaceutical and health care industries. In this thesis, for the first time, a proof-of-concept study on preparing LPS-binding hydrogel-like NPs through facile one-step free-radical polymerization was presented. With the incorporation of various hydrophobic (TBAm), cationic (APM, GUA) monomers and cross-linkers (BIS, PEG), a small library of NPs was constructed. Their FITC-LPS binding behaviors were investigated and compared with those of commercially available LPS-binding products. Moreover, the LPS binding selectivity of the NPs was also explored by studying the NPs-BSA interactions. The results showed that all NPs obtained generally presented higher FITC-LPS binding capacity in lower ionic strength buffer than higher ionic strength. However, unlike commercial poly-lysine cellulose and polymyxin B agarose beads' nearly linear increase of FITC-LPS binding with particle concentration, NPs exhibited serious aggregation and the binding quickly saturated or even decreased at high particle concentration. Among various types of NPs, higher FITC-LPS binding capacity was observed for those containing more hydrophobic monomers (TBAm). However, surprisingly, more cationic NPs with higher content of APM exhibited decreased FITC-LPS binding in high ionic strength conditions. Additionally, when new cationic monomer and cross-linker, GUA and PEG, were applied to replace APM and BIS, the obtained NPs showed improved FITC-LPS binding capacity at low NP concentration. But compared with APM- and BIS-containing NPs, the FITC-LPS binding capacity of GUA- and PEG-containing NPs saturated earlier. To investigate the NPs' binding to proteins, we tested the NPs

  2. Hemoglobin binding to deglycosylated haptoglobin.

    PubMed

    Kaartinen, V; Mononen, I

    1988-04-14

    The carbohydrate portion of polymeric haptoglobin was gradually removed by exoglycosidases in order to investigate its role in complex formation between haptoglobin and hemoglobin. Total removal of sialic acid diminished the haptoglobin-hemoglobin complex formation 15%. Removal of about 25% of the galactose residues from asialohaptoglobin, i.e., about 40% of the total weight of the carbohydrate moiety, totally inhibited the ability of haptoglobin to form complex with hemoglobin and react with haptoglobin-specific antibodies. Liberation of further galactose residues resulted in slow precipitation of the protein. Removal of a similar part of the carbohydrate moiety from haptoglobin-hemoglobin complex did not liberate hemoglobin from it, and the complex reacted with haptoglobin antibodies. The combined data indicate that the carbohydrate portion is essential for the functionally active form of polymeric haptoglobin to complex with hemoglobin, but it hardly has any direct role in the binding event, and other factors are responsible for the stability of the complex. PMID:3128331

  3. DNA Binding Hydroxyl Radical Probes

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Vicky J; Konigsfeld, Katie M; Aguilera, Joe A; Milligan, Jamie R

    2011-01-01

    The hydroxyl radical is the primary mediator of DNA damage by the indirect effect of ionizing radiation. It is a powerful oxidizing agent produced by the radiolysis of water and is responsible for a significant fraction of the DNA damage associated with ionizing radiation. There is therefore an interest in the development of sensitive assays for its detection. The hydroxylation of aromatic groups to produce fluorescent products has been used for this purpose. We have examined four different chromophores which produce fluorescent products when hydroxylated. Of these, the coumarin system suffers from the fewest disadvantages. We have therefore examined its behavior when linked to a cationic peptide ligand designed to bind strongly to DNA. PMID:22125376

  4. An RNA motif that binds ATP

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sassanfar, M.; Szostak, J. W.

    1993-01-01

    RNAs that contain specific high-affinity binding sites for small molecule ligands immobilized on a solid support are present at a frequency of roughly one in 10(10)-10(11) in pools of random sequence RNA molecules. Here we describe a new in vitro selection procedure designed to ensure the isolation of RNAs that bind the ligand of interest in solution as well as on a solid support. We have used this method to isolate a remarkably small RNA motif that binds ATP, a substrate in numerous biological reactions and the universal biological high-energy intermediate. The selected ATP-binding RNAs contain a consensus sequence, embedded in a common secondary structure. The binding properties of ATP analogues and modified RNAs show that the binding interaction is characterized by a large number of close contacts between the ATP and RNA, and by a change in the conformation of the RNA.

  5. Secretin: specific binding to rat brain membranes

    SciTech Connect

    Fremeau, R.T. Jr.; Jensen, R.T.; Charlton, C.G.; Miller, R.L.; O'Donohue, T.L.; Moody, T.W.

    1983-08-01

    The binding of (/sup 125/I)secretin to rat brain membranes was investigated. Radiolabeled secretin bound with high affinity (KD . 0.2 nM) to a single class of noninteracting sites. Binding was specific, saturable, and reversible. Regional distribution studies indicated that the specific binding was greatest in the cerebellum, intermediate in the cortex, thalamus, striatum, hippocampus, and hypothalamus, and lowest in the midbrain and medulla/pons. Pharmacological studies indicated that only secretin, but not other peptides, inhibits binding of (/sup 125/I)secretin with high affinity. Also, certain guanine nucleotides inhibited high affinity binding. These data indicate that rat brain membranes possess high affinity binding sites specific for secretin and that with the use of (/sup 125/I) secretin the kinetics, stoichiometry, specificity, and distribution of secretin receptors can be directly investigated.

  6. Binding of TH-iloprost to rat gastric mucosa: a pitfall in performing radioligand binding assays

    SciTech Connect

    Beinborn, M.; Kromer, W.; Staar, U.; Sewing, K.F.

    1985-09-01

    Binding of TH-iloprost was studied in a 20,000 x g sediment of the rat gastric mucosa. When pH in both test tubes for total and non-specific binding was kept identical, no displaceable binding of iloprost could be detected. When no care was taken to keep the pH identical in corresponding test tubes of the binding assay, changes in pH simulated specific and displaceable binding of iloprost. Therefore it is concluded that - in contrast to earlier reports - it is not possible to demonstrate specific iloprost binding using the given method.

  7. Calcium-binding proteins and development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beckingham, K.; Lu, A. Q.; Andruss, B. F.; McIntire, L. V. (Principal Investigator)

    1998-01-01

    The known roles for calcium-binding proteins in developmental signaling pathways are reviewed. Current information on the calcium-binding characteristics of three classes of cell-surface developmental signaling proteins (EGF-domain proteins, cadherins and integrins) is presented together with an overview of the intracellular pathways downstream of these surface receptors. The developmental roles delineated to date for the universal intracellular calcium sensor, calmodulin, and its targets, and for calcium-binding regulators of the cytoskeleton are also reviewed.

  8. Binding Efficiency of Protein-Protein Complexes

    PubMed Central

    Day, Eric S.; Cote, Shaun M.; Whitty, Adrian

    2012-01-01

    We examine the relationship between binding affinity and interface size for reversible protein-protein interactions (PPI), using cytokines from the tumor necrosis factor (TNF) superfamily and their receptors as a test case. Using surface plasmon resonance, we measured single-site binding affinities for the large receptor TNFR1 binding to its ligands TNFα (KD = 1.4 ± 0.4 nM) and lymphotoxin-α (KD = 50 ± 10 nM), and also for the small receptor Fn14 binding to TWEAK (KD = 70 ± 10 nM). We additionally assembled data for all other TNF/TNFR family complexes for which reliable single site binding affinities have been reported. We used these values to calculate the binding efficiency – defined as binding energy per Å2 of surface area buried at the contact interface – for the nine of these complexes for which co-crystal structures are available, and compared the results to those for a set of 144 protein-protein complexes with published affinity values. The results show that the most efficient PPI complexes generate ~20 cal.mol−1/Å2 of binding energy. A minimum contact area of ~500 Å2 is required for a stable complex, required to generate sufficient interaction energy to pay the entropic cost of co-localizing two proteins from 1 M solution. The most compact and efficient TNF/TNFR complex was BAFF/BR3, which achieved ~80% of the maximum achievable binding efficiency. Other small receptors also gave high binding efficiencies, while the larger receptors generated only 44-49% of this limit despite interacting primarily through just a single small domain. The results provide new insight into how much binding energy can be generated by a PPI interface of a given size, and establish a quantitative method to predict how large a natural or engineered contact interface must be to achieve a given level of binding affinity. PMID:23088250

  9. Mutated Leguminous Lectin Containing a Heparin-Binding like Motif in a Carbohydrate-Binding Loop Specifically Binds to Heparin

    PubMed Central

    Abo, Hirohito; Soga, Keisuke; Tanaka, Atsuhiro; Tateno, Hiroaki; Hirabayashi, Jun; Yamamoto, Kazuo

    2015-01-01

    We previously introduced random mutations in the sugar-binding loops of a leguminous lectin and screened the resulting mutated lectins for novel specificities using cell surface display. Screening of a mutated peanut agglutinin (PNA), revealed a mutated PNA with a distinct preference for heparin. Glycan microarray analyses using the mutated lectin fused to the Fc region of human immunoglobulin, revealed that a particular sulfated glycosaminoglycan (GAG), heparin, had the highest binding affinity for mutated PNA among 97 glycans tested, although wild-type PNA showed affinity towards Galβ1-3GalNAc and similar galactosylated glycans. Further analyses of binding specificity using an enzyme-linked immunoadsorbent assay demonstrated that the mutated PNA specifically binds to heparin, and weakly to de-2-O-sulfated heparin, but not to other GAG chains including de-6-O-sulfated and de-N-sulfated heparins. The mutated PNA had six amino acid substitutions within the eight amino acid-long sugar-binding loop. In this loop, the heparin-binding like motif comprised three arginine residues at positions 124, 128, and 129, and a histidine at position 125 was present. Substitution of each arginine or histidine residue to alanine reduced heparin-binding ability, indicating that all of these basic amino acid residues contributed to heparin binding. Inhibition assay demonstrated that heparin and dextran sulfate strongly inhibited mutated PNA binding to heparin in dose-dependent manner. The mutated PNA could distinguish between CHO cells and proteoglycan-deficient mutant cells. This is the first report establishing a novel leguminous lectin that preferentially binds to highly sulfated heparin and may provide novel GAG-binding probes to distinguish between heterogeneous GAG repeating units. PMID:26714191

  10. Evolution of Protein Binding Modes in Homooligomers

    PubMed Central

    Dayhoff, Judith E.; Shoemaker, Benjamin A.; Bryant, Stephen H.; Panchenko, Anna R.

    2009-01-01

    The evolution of protein interactions cannot be deciphered without a detailed analysis of interaction interfaces and binding modes. We performed a large-scale study of protein homooligomers in terms of their symmetry, interface sizes, and conservation of binding modes. We also focused specifically on the evolution of protein binding modes from nine families of homooligomers and mapped 60 different binding modes and oligomerization states onto the phylogenetic trees of these families. We observed a significant tendency for the same binding modes to be clustered together and conserved within clades on phylogenetic trees; this trend is especially pronounced for close homologs with 70% sequence identity or higher. Some binding modes are conserved among very distant homologs, pointing to their ancient evolutionary origin, while others are very specific for a certain phylogenetic group. Moreover, we found that the most ancient binding modes have a tendency to involve symmetrical (isologous) homodimer binding arrangements with larger interfaces, while recently evolved binding modes more often exhibit asymmetrical arrangements and smaller interfaces. PMID:19879880

  11. Radiation abolishes inducer binding to lactose repressor.

    PubMed

    Gillard, Nathalie; Spotheim-Maurizot, Mélanie; Charlier, Michel

    2005-04-01

    The lactose operon functions under the control of the repressor-operator system. Binding of the repressor to the operator prevents the expression of the structural genes. This interaction can be destroyed by the binding of an inducer to the repressor. If ionizing radiations damage the partners, a dramatic dysfunction of the regulation system may be expected. We showed previously that gamma irradiation hinders repressor-operator binding through protein damage. Here we show that irradiation of the repressor abolishes the binding of the gratuitous inducer isopropyl-1-beta-D-thiogalactoside (IPTG) to the repressor. The observed lack of release of the repressor from the complex results from the loss of the ability of the inducer to bind to the repressor due to the destruction of the IPTG binding site. Fluorescence measurements show that both tryptophan residues located in or near the IPTG binding site are damaged. Since tryptophan damage is strongly correlated with the loss of IPTG binding ability, we conclude that it plays a critical role in the effect. A model was built that takes into account the kinetic analysis of damage production and the observed protection of its binding site by IPTG. This model satisfactorily accounts for the experimental results and allows us to understand the radiation-induced effects. PMID:15799700

  12. Fundamental considerations in ski binding analysis.

    PubMed

    Mote, C D; Hull, M L

    1976-01-01

    1. The static adjustment of a ski binding by hand or by available machines is only an adjustment and is neither a static nor a dynamic evaluation of the binding design. Bindings of different design with identical static adjustments will perform differently in environments in which the forces are static or dynamic. 2. The concept of binding release force is a useful measure of binding adjustment, but it is inappropriate as a criterion for binding evaluation. First, it does not direct attention toward the injury causing mechanism, strain, or displacement in the leg. Second, it is only part of the evaluation in dynamic problems. 3. The binding release decision in present bindings is displacement controlled. The relative displacement of the boot and ski is the system variable. For any specified relative displacement the binding force can be any of an infinite number of possibilities determined by the loading path. 4. The response of the leg-ski system to external impulses applied to the ski is independent of the boot-ski relative motion as long as the boot recenters quickly in the binding. Response is dependent upon the external impulse plus system inertia, damping and stiffness. 5. When tested under half sinusoidal forces applied to a test ski, all bindings will demonstrate static and impulse loading regions. In the static region the force drives the binding to a relative release displacement. In the impulse region the initial velocity of the ski drives the binding to a release displacement. 6. The transition between the static and impulse loading regions is determined by the binding's capacity to store and dissipate energy along the principal loading path. Increased energy capacity necessitates larger external impulses to produce release. 7. In all bindings examined to date, the transmitted leg displacement or strain at release under static loading exceeds leg strain under dynamic or impact loading. Because static loading is responsible for many injuries, a skier

  13. Lack of [3H]quinuclidinyl benzylate binding to biologically relevant binding sites on mononuclear cells.

    PubMed

    Adams, E M; Lubrano, T M; Gordon, J; Fields, J Z

    1992-09-01

    We analyzed the binding characteristics of [3H]quinuclidinyl benzylate ([3H]QNB), a muscarinic cholinergic ligand, to rat and human mononuclear cells (MNC). Under various assay conditions, atropine-sensitive, saturable binding occurred with an apparent Kd of 10 nM. Conditions which disrupted the MNC membrane reduced total binding and eliminated specific binding. Muscarinic agonists were unable to inhibit [3H]QNB binding to MNC at concentrations up to 10(-2) M. Stereoisomers dexetimide and levetimide were equipotent inhibitors of binding (IC50 2 x 10(-5) M). We conclude that, although atropine-sensitive binding of [3H]QNB to MNC occurs, the binding is not consistent with the presence of a biologically relevant muscarinic cholinergic receptor. PMID:1392105

  14. New DNA-binding radioprotectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, Roger

    The normal tissue damage associated with cancer radiotherapy has motivated the development at Peter Mac of a new class of DNA-binding radioprotecting drugs that could be applied top-ically to normal tissues at risk. Methylproamine (MP), the lead compound, reduces radiation induced cell kill at low concentrations. For example, experiments comparing the clonogenic survival of transformed human keratinocytes treated with 30 micromolar MP before and dur-ing various doses of ionising radiation, with the radiation dose response for untreated cells, indicate a dose reduction factor (DRF) of 2. Similar survival curve experiments using various concentrations of MP, with parallel measurements of uptake of MP into cell nuclei, have en-abled the relationship between drug uptake and extent of radioprotection to be established. Radioprotection has also been demonstrated after systemic administration to mice, for three different endpoints, namely lung, jejunum and bone marrow (survival at 30 days post-TBI). The results of pulse radiolysis studies indicated that the drugs act by reduction of transient radiation-induced oxidative species on DNA. This hypothesis was substantiated by the results of experiments in which MP radioprotection of radiation-induced DNA double-strand breaks, assessed as -H2AX foci, in the human keratinocyte cell line. For both endpoints, the extent of radioprotection increased with MP concentration up to a maximal value. These results are consistent with the hypothesis that radioprotection by MP is mediated by attenuation of the extent of initial DNA damage. However, although MP is a potent radioprotector, it becomes cytotoxic at higher concentrations. This limitation has been addressed in an extensive program of lead optimisation and some promising analogues have emerged from which the next lead will be selected. Given the clinical potential of topical radioprotection, the new analogues are being assessed in terms of delivery to mouse oral mucosa. This is

  15. Methods for Improving Aptamer Binding Affinity.

    PubMed

    Hasegawa, Hijiri; Savory, Nasa; Abe, Koichi; Ikebukuro, Kazunori

    2016-01-01

    Aptamers are single stranded oligonucleotides that bind a wide range of biological targets. Although aptamers can be isolated from pools of random sequence oligonucleotides using affinity-based selection, aptamers with high affinities are not always obtained. Therefore, further refinement of aptamers is required to achieve desired binding affinities. The optimization of primary sequences and stabilization of aptamer conformations are the main approaches to refining the binding properties of aptamers. In particular, sequence optimization using combined in silico sequence recombinations and in vitro functional evaluations is effective for the improvement of binding affinities, however, the binding affinities of aptamers are limited by the low hydrophobicity of nucleic acids. Accordingly, introduction of hydrophobic moieties into aptamers expands the diversity of interactions between aptamers and targets. Moreover, construction of multivalent aptamers by connecting aptamers that recognize distinct epitopes is an attractive approach to substantial increases in binding affinity. In addition, binding affinities can be tuned by optimizing the scaffolds of multivalent constructs. In this review, we summarize the various techniques for improving the binding affinities of aptamers. PMID:27043498

  16. Multiple instance learning of Calmodulin binding sites

    PubMed Central

    Minhas, Fayyaz ul Amir Afsar; Ben-Hur, Asa

    2012-01-01

    Motivation: Calmodulin (CaM) is a ubiquitously conserved protein that acts as a calcium sensor, and interacts with a large number of proteins. Detection of CaM binding proteins and their interaction sites experimentally requires a significant effort, so accurate methods for their prediction are important. Results: We present a novel algorithm (MI-1 SVM) for binding site prediction and evaluate its performance on a set of CaM-binding proteins extracted from the Calmodulin Target Database. Our approach directly models the problem of binding site prediction as a large-margin classification problem, and is able to take into account uncertainty in binding site location. We show that the proposed algorithm performs better than the standard SVM formulation, and illustrate its ability to recover known CaM binding motifs. A highly accurate cascaded classification approach using the proposed binding site prediction method to predict CaM binding proteins in Arabidopsis thaliana is also presented. Availability: Matlab code for training MI-1 SVM and the cascaded classification approach is available on request. Contact: fayyazafsar@gmail.com or asa@cs.colostate.edu PMID:22962461

  17. Backbone Dynamics Of Intracellular Lipid Binding Proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gutiérrez-González, Luis H.

    2005-04-01

    The family of intracellular lipid binding proteins (iLBPs) comprises a group of homologous 14-15 kDa proteins that specifically bind and facilitate the transport of fatty acids, bile acids, retinoids or eicosanoids. Members of this family include several types of fatty acid binding proteins (FABPs), ileal lipid binding protein, cellular retinoic acid binding proteins and cellular retinoid binding proteins. As a contribution to understanding the structure-function relationship in this protein family, the solution structure and backbone dynamics of human epidermal-type FABP (E-FABP) determined by NMR spectroscopy are reported. Moreover, hydrogen/deuterium exchange experiments indicated a direct correlation between the stability of the hydrogen-bonding network in the β-sheet structure and the conformational exchange in the millisecond-to-microsecond time range. The features of E-FABP backbone dynamics discussed in the present study are compared with those obtained for other phylogenetically related proteins. A strong interdependence with the overall protein stability and possibly also with the ligand-binding affinity for members of the lipid-binding protein family is shown.

  18. Biodiscovery of aluminum binding peptides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adams, Bryn L.; Sarkes, Deborah A.; Finch, Amethist S.; Hurley, Margaret M.; Stratis-Cullum, Dimitra

    2013-05-01

    Cell surface peptide display systems are large and diverse libraries of peptides (7-15 amino acids) which are presented by a display scaffold hosted by a phage (virus), bacteria, or yeast cell. This allows the selfsustaining peptide libraries to be rapidly screened for high affinity binders to a given target of interest, and those binders quickly identified. Peptide display systems have traditionally been utilized in conjunction with organic-based targets, such as protein toxins or carbon nanotubes. However, this technology has been expanded for use with inorganic targets, such as metals, for biofabrication, hybrid material assembly and corrosion prevention. While most current peptide display systems employ viruses to host the display scaffold, we have recently shown that a bacterial host, Escherichia coli, displaying peptides in the ubiquitous, membrane protein scaffold eCPX can also provide specific peptide binders to an organic target. We have, for the first time, extended the use of this bacterial peptide display system for the biodiscovery of aluminum binding 15mer peptides. We will present the process of biopanning with macroscopic inorganic targets, binder enrichment, and binder isolation and discovery.

  19. Haptenation: Chemical Reactivity and Protein Binding

    PubMed Central

    Chipinda, Itai; Hettick, Justin M.; Siegel, Paul D.

    2011-01-01

    Low molecular weight chemical (LMW) allergens are commonly referred to as haptens. Haptens must complex with proteins to be recognized by the immune system. The majority of occupationally related haptens are reactive, electrophilic chemicals, or are metabolized to reactive metabolites that form covalent bonds with nucleophilic centers on proteins. Nonelectrophilic protein binding may occur through disulfide exchange, coordinate covalent binding onto metal ions on metalloproteins or of metal allergens, themselves, to the major histocompatibility complex. Recent chemical reactivity kinetic studies suggest that the rate of protein binding is a major determinant of allergenic potency; however, electrophilic strength does not seem to predict the ability of a hapten to skew the response between Th1 and Th2. Modern proteomic mass spectrometry methods that allow detailed delineation of potential differences in protein binding sites may be valuable in predicting if a chemical will stimulate an immediate or delayed hypersensitivity. Chemical aspects related to both reactivity and protein-specific binding are discussed. PMID:21785613

  20. Nonphysiological binding of ethylene by plants.

    PubMed

    Abeles, F B

    1984-03-01

    Ethylene binding to seedling tissue of Vicia faba, Phaseolus vulgaris, Glycine max, and Triticum aestivum was demonstrated by determining transit time required for ethylene to move through a glass tube filled with seedling tissue. Transit time for ethylene was greater than that for methane indicating that these tissues had an affinity for ethylene. However, the following observations suggest that the binding was not physiological. Inhibitors of ethylene action such as Ag(+) ions and CO(2) did not decrease binding. Mushrooms which have no known sites of ethylene action also demonstrated ethylene binding. The binding of acetylene, propylene, ethylene, propane, and ethane more closely followed their solubility in water than any known physiological activity. PMID:16663455

  1. Nonphysiological Binding of Ethylene by Plants

    PubMed Central

    Abeles, Fred B.

    1984-01-01

    Ethylene binding to seedling tissue of Vicia faba, Phaseolus vulgaris, Glycine max, and Triticum aestivum was demonstrated by determining transit time required for ethylene to move through a glass tube filled with seedling tissue. Transit time for ethylene was greater than that for methane indicating that these tissues had an affinity for ethylene. However, the following observations suggest that the binding was not physiological. Inhibitors of ethylene action such as Ag+ ions and CO2 did not decrease binding. Mushrooms which have no known sites of ethylene action also demonstrated ethylene binding. The binding of acetylene, propylene, ethylene, propane, and ethane more closely followed their solubility in water than any known physiological activity. PMID:16663455

  2. Ethylene binding site affinity in ripening apples

    SciTech Connect

    Blankenship, S.M. . Dept. of Horticultural Science); Sisler, E.C. )

    1993-09-01

    Scatchard plots for ethylene binding in apples (Malus domestica Borkh.), which were harvested weekly for 5 weeks to include the ethylene climacteric rise, showed C[sub 50] values (concentration of ethylene needed to occupy 50% of the ethylene binding sites) of 0.10, 0.11, 0.34, 0.40, and 0.57 [mu]l ethylene/liter[sup [minus]1], respectively, for each of the 5 weeks. Higher ethylene concentrations were required to saturate the binding sites during the climacteric rise than at other times. Diffusion of [sup 14]C-ethylene from the binding sites was curvilinear and did not show any indication of multiple binding sites. Ethylene was not metabolized by apple tissue.

  3. Follitropin receptors contain cryptic ligand binding sites.

    PubMed

    Lin, Win; Bernard, Michael P; Cao, Donghui; Myers, Rebecca V; Kerrigan, John E; Moyle, William R

    2007-01-01

    Human choriogonadotropin (hCG) and follitropin (hFSH) have been shown to contact different regions of the extracellular domains of G-protein coupled lutropin (LHR) and follitropin (FSHR) receptors. We report here that hCG and hFSH analogs interact with different regions of an FSHR/LHR chimera having only two unique LHR residues and that binds both hormones with high affinity. hCG and hFSH analogs dock with this receptor chimera in a manner similar to that in which they bind LHR and FSHR, respectively. This shows that although the FSHR does not normally bind hCG, it contains a cryptic lutropin binding site that has the potential to recognize hCG in a manner similar to the LHR. The presence of this cryptic site may explain why equine lutropins bind many mammalian FSHR and why mutations in the transmembrane domain distant from the extracellular domain enable the FSHR to bind hCG. The leucine-rich repeat domain (LRD) of the FSHR also appears to contain a cryptic FSH binding site that is obscured by other parts of the extracellular domain. This will explain why contacts seen in crystals of hFSH complexed with an LRD fragment of the human FSHR are hard to reconcile with the abilities of FSH analogs to interact with membrane G-protein coupled FSHR. We speculate that cryptic lutropin binding sites in the FSHR, which are also likely to be present in thyrotropin receptors (TSHR), permit the physiological regulation of ligand binding specificity. Cryptic FSH binding sites in the LRD may enable alternate spliced forms of the FSHR to interact with FSH. PMID:17059863

  4. Systematic Functional Analysis of Bicaudal-D Serine Phosphorylation and Intragenic Suppression of a Female Sterile Allele of BicD

    PubMed Central

    Koch, Rafael; Ledermann, Romana; Urwyler, Olivier; Heller, Manfred; Suter, Beat

    2009-01-01

    Protein phosphorylation is involved in posttranslational control of essentially all biological processes. Using mass spectrometry, recent analyses of whole phosphoproteomes led to the identification of numerous new phosphorylation sites. However, the function of most of these sites remained unknown. We chose the Drosophila Bicaudal-D protein to estimate the importance of individual phosphorylation events. Being involved in different cellular processes, BicD is required for oocyte determination, for RNA transport during oogenesis and embryogenesis, and for photoreceptor nuclei migration in the developing eye. The numerous roles of BicD and the available evidence for functional importance of BicD phosphorylation led us to identify eight phosphorylation sites of BicD, and we tested a total of 14 identified and suspected phosphoserine residues for their functional importance in vivo in flies. Surprisingly, all these serines turned out to be dispensable for providing sufficient basal BicD activity for normal growth and development. However, in a genetically sensitized background where the BicDA40V protein variant provides only partial activity, serine 103 substitutions are not neutral anymore, but show surprising differences. The S103D substitution completely inactivates the protein, whereas S103A behaves neutral, and the S103F substitution, isolated in a genetic screen, restores BicDA40V function. Our results suggest that many BicD phosphorylation events may either be fortuitous or play a modulating function as shown for Ser103. Remarkably, amongst the Drosophila serines we found phosphorylated, Ser103 is the only one that is fully conserved in mammalian BicD. PMID:19234596

  5. Improving Binding Affinity and Selectivity of Computationally Designed Ligand-Binding Proteins Using Experiments.

    PubMed

    Tinberg, Christine E; Khare, Sagar D

    2016-01-01

    The ability to de novo design proteins that can bind small molecules has wide implications for synthetic biology and medicine. Combining computational protein design with the high-throughput screening of mutagenic libraries of computationally designed proteins is emerging as a general approach for creating binding proteins with programmable binding modes, affinities, and selectivities. The computational step enables the creation of a binding site in a protein that otherwise does not (measurably) bind the intended ligand, and targeted mutagenic screening allows for validation and refinement of the computational model as well as provides orders-of-magnitude increases in the binding affinity. Deep sequencing of mutagenic libraries can provide insights into the mutagenic binding landscape and enable further affinity improvements. Moreover, in such a combined computational-experimental approach where the binding mode is preprogrammed and iteratively refined, selectivity can be achieved (and modulated) by the placement of specified amino acid side chain groups around the ligand in defined orientations. Here, we describe the experimental aspects of a combined computational-experimental approach for designing-using the software suite Rosetta-proteins that bind a small molecule of choice and engineering, using fluorescence-activated cell sorting and high-throughput yeast surface display, high affinity and ligand selectivity. We illustrated the utility of this approach by performing the design of a selective digoxigenin (DIG)-binding protein that, after affinity maturation, binds DIG with picomolar affinity and high selectivity over structurally related steroids. PMID:27094290

  6. Bacterial periplasmic sialic acid-binding proteins exhibit a conserved binding site

    SciTech Connect

    Gangi Setty, Thanuja; Cho, Christine; Govindappa, Sowmya; Apicella, Michael A.; Ramaswamy, S.

    2014-07-01

    Structure–function studies of sialic acid-binding proteins from F. nucleatum, P. multocida, V. cholerae and H. influenzae reveal a conserved network of hydrogen bonds involved in conformational change on ligand binding. Sialic acids are a family of related nine-carbon sugar acids that play important roles in both eukaryotes and prokaryotes. These sialic acids are incorporated/decorated onto lipooligosaccharides as terminal sugars in multiple bacteria to evade the host immune system. Many pathogenic bacteria scavenge sialic acids from their host and use them for molecular mimicry. The first step of this process is the transport of sialic acid to the cytoplasm, which often takes place using a tripartite ATP-independent transport system consisting of a periplasmic binding protein and a membrane transporter. In this paper, the structural characterization of periplasmic binding proteins from the pathogenic bacteria Fusobacterium nucleatum, Pasteurella multocida and Vibrio cholerae and their thermodynamic characterization are reported. The binding affinities of several mutations in the Neu5Ac binding site of the Haemophilus influenzae protein are also reported. The structure and the thermodynamics of the binding of sugars suggest that all of these proteins have a very well conserved binding pocket and similar binding affinities. A significant conformational change occurs when these proteins bind the sugar. While the C1 carboxylate has been identified as the primary binding site, a second conserved hydrogen-bonding network is involved in the initiation and stabilization of the conformational states.

  7. The TRPV5/6 calcium channels contain multiple calmodulin binding sites with differential binding properties.

    PubMed

    Kovalevskaya, Nadezda V; Bokhovchuk, Fedir M; Vuister, Geerten W

    2012-06-01

    The epithelial Ca(2+) channels TRPV5/6 (transient receptor potential vanilloid 5/6) are thoroughly regulated in order to fine-tune the amount of Ca(2+) reabsorption. Calmodulin has been shown to be involved into calcium-dependent inactivation of TRPV5/6 channels by binding directly to the distal C-terminal fragment of the channels (de Groot et al. in Mol Cell Biol 31:2845-2853, 12). Here, we investigate this binding in detail and find significant differences between TRPV5 and TRPV6. We also identify and characterize in vitro four other CaM binding fragments of TRPV5/6, which likely are also involved in TRPV5/6 channel regulation. The five CaM binding sites display diversity in binding modes, binding stoichiometries and binding affinities, which may fine-tune the response of the channels to varying Ca(2+)-concentrations. PMID:22354706

  8. Thermodynamic binding constants for gallium transferrin

    SciTech Connect

    Harris, W.R.; Pecoraro, V.L.

    1983-01-18

    Gallium-67 is widely used as an imaging agent for tumors and inflammatory abscesses. It is well stablished that Ga/sup 3 +/ travels through the circulatory system bound to the serum iron transport protein transferrin and that this protein binding is an essential step in tumor localization. However, there have been conflicting reports on the magnitude of the gallium-transferrin binding constants. Therefore, thermodynamic binding constants for gallium complexation at the two specific metal binding sites of human serum transferrin at pH 7.4 and 5 mM NaHCO/sub 3/ have been determined by UV difference spectroscopy. The conditional constants calculated for 27 mM NaHCO/sub 3/ are log K/sub 1/* = 20.3 and log K/sub 2/* = 19.3. These results are discussed in relation to the thermodynamics of transferrin binding of Fe/sup 3 +/ and to previous reports on gallium binding. The strength of transferrin complexation is also compared to that of a series of low molecular weight ligands by using calculated pM values (pM = -log (Ga(H/sub 2/O)/sub 6/)) to express the effective binding strength at pH 7.4.

  9. Copper(II) binding properties of hepcidin.

    PubMed

    Kulprachakarn, Kanokwan; Chen, Yu-Lin; Kong, Xiaole; Arno, Maria C; Hider, Robert C; Srichairatanakool, Somdet; Bansal, Sukhvinder S

    2016-06-01

    Hepcidin is a peptide hormone that regulates the homeostasis of iron metabolism. The N-terminal domain of hepcidin is conserved amongst a range of species and is capable of binding Cu(II) and Ni(II) through the amino terminal copper-nickel binding motif (ATCUN). It has been suggested that the binding of copper to hepcidin may have biological relevance. In this study we have investigated the binding of Cu(II) with model peptides containing the ATCUN motif, fluorescently labelled hepcidin and hepcidin using MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry. As with albumin, it was found that tetrapeptide models of hepcidin possessed a higher affinity for Cu(II) than that of native hepcidin. The log K 1 value of hepcidin for Cu(II) was determined as 7.7. Cu(II) binds to albumin more tightly than hepcidin (log K 1 = 12) and in view of the serum concentration difference of albumin and hepcidin, the bulk of kinetically labile Cu(II) present in blood will be bound to albumin. It is estimated that the concentration of Cu(II)-hepcidin will be less than one femtomolar in normal serum and thus the binding of copper to hepcidin is unlikely to play a role in iron homeostasis. As with albumin, small tri and tetra peptides are poor models for the metal binding properties of hepcidin. PMID:26883683

  10. Calmodulin Binding Proteins and Alzheimer's Disease.

    PubMed

    O'Day, Danton H; Eshak, Kristeen; Myre, Michael A

    2015-01-01

    The small, calcium-sensor protein, calmodulin, is ubiquitously expressed and central to cell function in all cell types. Here the literature linking calmodulin to Alzheimer's disease is reviewed. Several experimentally-verified calmodulin-binding proteins are involved in the formation of amyloid-β plaques including amyloid-β protein precursor, β-secretase, presenilin-1, and ADAM10. Many others possess potential calmodulin-binding domains that remain to be verified. Three calmodulin binding proteins are associated with the formation of neurofibrillary tangles: two kinases (CaMKII, CDK5) and one protein phosphatase (PP2B or calcineurin). Many of the genes recently identified by genome wide association studies and other studies encode proteins that contain putative calmodulin-binding domains but only a couple (e.g., APOE, BIN1) have been experimentally confirmed as calmodulin binding proteins. At least two receptors involved in calcium metabolism and linked to Alzheimer's disease (mAchR; NMDAR) have also been identified as calmodulin-binding proteins. In addition to this, many proteins that are involved in other cellular events intimately associated with Alzheimer's disease including calcium channel function, cholesterol metabolism, neuroinflammation, endocytosis, cell cycle events, and apoptosis have been tentatively or experimentally verified as calmodulin binding proteins. The use of calmodulin as a potential biomarker and as a therapeutic target is discussed. PMID:25812852

  11. Human liver aldehyde dehydrogenase: coenzyme binding

    SciTech Connect

    Kosley, L.L.; Pietruszko, R.

    1987-05-01

    The binding of (U-/sup 14/C) NAD to mitochondrial (E2) and cytoplasmin(E1) aldehyde dehydrogenase was measured by gel filtration and sedimentation techniques. The binding data for NAD and (E1) yielded linear Scatchard plots giving a dissociation constant of 25 (+/- 8) uM and the stoichiometry of 2 mol of NAD bound per mol of E1. The binding data for NAD and (E2) gave nonlinear Scatchard plots. The binding of NADH to E2 was measured via fluorescence enhancement; this could not be done with E1 because there was no signal. The dissociation constant for E2 by this technique was 0.7 (+/- 0.4) uM and stoichiometry of 1.0 was obtained. The binding of (U-/sup 14/C) NADH to (E1) and (E2) was also measured by the sedimentation technique. The binding data for (E1) and NADH gave linear Scatchard plots giving a dissociation constant of 13 (+/- 6) uM and the stoichiometry of 2.0. The binding data for NADH to (E2) gave nonlinear Scatchard plots. With (E1), the dissociation constants for both NAD and NADH are similar to those determined kinetically, but the stoichiometry is only half of that found by stopped flow technique. With (E2) the dissociation constant by fluorometric procedure was 2 orders of magnitude less than that from catalytic reaction.

  12. Transcription factor binding energy vs. biological function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Djordjevic, M.; Grotewold, E.

    2007-03-01

    Transcription factors (TFs) are proteins that bind to DNA and regulate expression of genes. Identification of transcription factor binding sites within the regulatory segments of genomic DNA is an important step towards understanding of gene regulatory networks. Recent theoretical advances that we developed [1,2], allow us to infer TF-DNA interaction parameters from in-vitro selection experiments [3]. We use more than 6000 binding sequences [3], assembled under controlled conditions, to obtain protein-DNA interaction parameters for a mammalian TF with up to now unprecedented accuracy. Can one accurately identify biologically functional TF binding sites (i.e. the binding sites that regulate gene expression), even with the best possible protein-DNA interaction parameters? To address this issue we i) compare our prediction of protein binding with gene expression data, ii) use evolutionary comparison between related mammalian genomes. Our results strongly suggest that in a genome there exists a large number of randomly occurring high energy binding sites that are not biologically functional. [1] M Djordjevic, submitted to Biomol. Eng. [2] M. Djordjevic and A. M. Sengupta, Phys. Biol. 3: 13, 2006. [3] E. Roulet et al., Nature Biotech. 20: 831, 2002.

  13. DNA Triplexes That Bind Several Cofactor Molecules.

    PubMed

    Vollmer, Sven; Richert, Clemens

    2015-12-14

    Cofactors are critical for energy-consuming processes in the cell. Harnessing such processes for practical applications requires control over the concentration of cofactors. We have recently shown that DNA triplex motifs with a designed binding site can be used to capture and release nucleotides with low micromolar dissociation constants. In order to increase the storage capacity of such triplex motifs, we have explored the limits of ligand binding through designed cavities in the oligopurine tract. Oligonucleotides with up to six non-nucleotide bridges between purines were synthesized and their ability to bind ATP, cAMP or FAD was measured. Triplex motifs with several single-nucleotide binding sites were found to bind purines more tightly than triplexes with one large binding site. The optimized triplex consists of 59 residues and four C3-bridges. It can bind up to four equivalents of ligand with apparent Kd values of 52 µM for ATP, 9 µM for FAD, and 2 µM for cAMP. An immobilized version fuels bioluminescence via release of ATP at body temperature. These results show that motifs for high-density capture, storage and release of energy-rich biomolecules can be constructed from synthetic DNA. PMID:26561335

  14. Improved flow cytometer measurement of binding assays

    DOEpatents

    Saunders, G.C.

    1984-05-30

    The invention relates to a method of measuring binding assays carried out with different size particles wherein the binding assay sample is run through a flow cytometer without separating the sample from the marking agent. The amount of a binding reactant present in a sample is determined by providing particles with a coating of binder and also a known quantity of smaller particles with a coating of binder reactant. The binding reactant is the same as the binding reactant present in the sample. The smaller particles also contain a fluorescent chemical. The particles are combined with the sample and the binding reaction is allowed to occur for a set length of time followed by combining the smaller particles with the mixture of the particles and the sample produced and allowing the binding reactions to proceed to equilibrium. The fluorescence and light scatter of the combined mixture is then measured as the combined mixture passes through a flow cytometer equipped with a laser to bring about fluorescence, and the number and strength of fluorescent events are compared. A similar method is also provided for determining the amount of antigen present in the sample by providing spheres with an antibody coating and some smaller spheres with an antigen coating. (LEW)

  15. Binding of perlecan to transthyretin in vitro.

    PubMed Central

    Smeland, S; Kolset, S O; Lyon, M; Norum, K R; Blomhoff, R

    1997-01-01

    Transthyretin is one of two specific proteins involved in the transport of thyroid hormones in plasma; it possesses two binding sites for serum retinol-binding protein. In the present study we demonstrate that transthyretin also interacts in vitro with [35S]sulphate-labelled material from the medium of HepG2 cells. By using the same strategy as for purifying serum retinol-binding protein, [35S]sulphate-labelled medium was specifically eluted from a transthyretin-affinity column. Ion-exchange chromatography showed that the material was highly polyanionic, and its size and alkali susceptibility suggested that it was a proteoglycan. Structural analyses with chondroitinase ABC lyase and nitrous acid revealed that approx. 20% was chondroitin sulphate and 80% heparan sulphate. Immunoprecipitation showed that the [35S]sulphate-labelled material contained perlecan. Further analysis by binding studies revealed specific and saturable binding of 125I-transthyretin to perlecan-enriched Matrigel. Because inhibition of sulphation by treating HepG2 cells with sodium chlorate increased the affinity of the perlecan for transthyretin, and [3H]heparin was not retained by the transthyretin affinity column, the binding is probably mediated by the core protein and is not a protein-glycosaminoglycan interaction. Because perlecan is released from transthyretin in water, the binding might be due to hydrophobic interactions. PMID:9307034

  16. Lipopolysaccharides of Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae bind pig hemoglobin.

    PubMed Central

    Bélanger, M; Bégin, C; Jacques, M

    1995-01-01

    A previous study indicated that lipopolysaccharides (LPS) extracted from Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae bind two low-molecular-mass proteins, of approximately 10 and 11 kDa, present in porcine respiratory tract secretions (M. Bélanger, D. Dubreuil, and M. Jacques, Infect. Immun. 62:868-873, 1994). In the present study, we determined the N-terminal amino acid sequences of these two proteins, which revealed high homology with the alpha and beta chains of pig hemoglobin. Some isolates of A. pleuropneumoniae were able to use hemoglobin from various animal species as well as other heme compounds as sole sources of iron for growth, while other isolates were unable to use them. Immunoelectron microscopy showed binding of pig hemoglobin at the surface of all A. pleuropneumoniae isolates as well as labeling of outer membrane blebs. We observed, using Western blotting (immunoblotting), that the lipid A-core region of LPS of all isolates was binding pig hemoglobin. Furthermore, lipid A obtained after acid hydrolysis of LPS extracted from A. pleuropneumoniae was able to bind pig hemoglobin and this binding was completely abolished by preincubation of lipid A with polymyxin B but was not inhibited by preincubation with glucosamines. Fatty acids constituting the lipid A of A. pleuropneumoniae, namely, dodecanoic acid, tetradecanoic acid, 3-hydroxytetradecanoic acid, hexadecanoic acid, and octadecanoic acid, were also binding pig hemoglobin. Our results indicate that LPS of all A. pleuropneumoniae isolates tested bind pig hemoglobin and that lipid A is involved in this binding. Our results also indicate that some A. pleuropneumoniae isolates are, in addition, able to use hemoglobin for growth. Binding of hemoglobin to LPS might represent an important means by which A. pleuropneumoniae acquires iron in vivo from hemoglobin released from erythrocytes lysed by the action of its hemolysins. PMID:7822035

  17. Relativistic corrections to the triton binding energy

    SciTech Connect

    Sammarruca, F.; Xu, D.P.; Machleidt, R. )

    1992-11-01

    The influence of relativity on the triton binding energy is investigated. The relativistic three-dimensional version of the Bethe-Salpeter equation proposed by Blankenbecler and Sugar (BbS) is used. Relativistic (nonseparable) one-boson-exchange potentials (constructed in the BbS framework) are employed for the two-nucleon interaction. In a 34-channel Faddeev calculation, it is found that relativistic effects increase the triton binding energy by about 0.2 MeV. Including charge dependence (besides relativity), the final triton binding energy predictions are 8.33 and 8.16 MeV for the Bonn A and B potentials, respectively.

  18. α-Enolase binds to RNA.

    PubMed

    Hernández-Pérez, Liliana; Depardón, Francisco; Fernández-Ramírez, Fernando; Sánchez-Trujillo, Alejandra; Bermúdez-Crúz, Rosa María; Dangott, Lawrence; Montañez, Cecilia

    2011-09-01

    To detect proteins binding to CUG triplet repeats, we performed magnetic bead affinity assays and North-Western analysis using a (CUG)(10) ssRNA probe and either nuclear or total extracts from rat L6 myoblasts. We report the isolation and identification by mass spectrometry and immunodetection of α-enolase, as a novel (CUG)n triplet repeat binding protein. To confirm our findings, rat recombinant α-enolase was cloned, expressed and purified; the RNA binding activity was verified by electrophoretic mobility shift assays using radiolabeled RNA probes. Enolase may play other roles in addition to its well described function in glycolysis. PMID:21621582

  19. Muscarine binding sites in bovine adrenal medulla.

    PubMed

    Barron, B A; Murrin, L C; Hexum, T D

    1986-03-18

    The presence of muscarinic binding sites in the bovine adrenal medulla was investigated using [3H]QNB and the bovine adrenal medulla. Scatchard analysis combined with computer analysis yielded data consistent with a two binding site configuration. KDs of 0.15 and 14 nM and Bmax s of 29 and 210 fmol/mg protein, respectively, were observed. Displacement of [3H]QNB by various cholinergic agents is, in order of decreasing potency: QNB, dexetimide, atropine, scopolamine, imipramine, desipramine, oxotremorine, pilocarpine, acetylcholine, methacholine and carbachol. These results demonstrate the presence of more than one muscarine binding site in the bovine adrenal gland. PMID:3709656

  20. Measuring Binding Affinity of Protein-Ligand Interaction Using Spectrophotometry: Binding of Neutral Red to Riboflavin-Binding Protein

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chenprakhon, Pirom; Sucharitakul, Jeerus; Panijpan, Bhinyo; Chaiyen, Pimchai

    2010-01-01

    The dissociation constant, K[subscript d], of the binding of riboflavin-binding protein (RP) with neutral red (NR) can be determined by titrating RP to a fixed concentration of NR. Upon adding RP to the NR solution, the maximum absorption peak of NR shifts to 545 nm from 450 nm for the free NR. The change of the absorption can be used to determine…

  1. Two nucleotide binding sites modulate ( sup 3 H) glyburide binding to rat cortex membranes

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, D.E.; Gopalakrishnan, M.; Triggle, D.J.; Janis, R.A. State Univ. of New York, Buffalo )

    1991-03-11

    The effects of nucleotides on the binding of the ATP-dependent K{sup +}-channel antagonist ({sup 3}H)glyburide (GLB) to rat cortex membranes were examined. Nucleotide triphosphates (NTPs) and nucleotide diphosphate (NDPs) inhibited the binding of GLB. This effect was dependent on the presence of dithiothreitol (DTT). Inhibition of binding by NTPs, with the exception of ATP{gamma}S, was dependent on the presence of Mg{sup 2+}. GLB binding showed a biphasic response to ADP: up to 3 mM, ADP inhibited binding, and above this concentration GLB binding increased rapidly, and was restored to normal levels by 10 mM ADP. In the presence of Mg{sup 2+}, ADP did not stimulate binding. Saturation analysis in the presence of Mg{sup 2+} and increasing concentrations of ADP showed that ADP results primarily in a change of the B{sub max} for GLB binding. The differential effects of NTPS and NDPs indicate that two nucleotide binding sites regulate GLB binding.

  2. Ligand Binding to Macromolecules: Allosteric and Sequential Models of Cooperativity.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hess, V. L.; Szabo, Attila

    1979-01-01

    A simple model is described for the binding of ligands to macromolecules. The model is applied to the cooperative binding by hemoglobin and aspartate transcarbamylase. The sequential and allosteric models of cooperative binding are considered. (BB)

  3. Lamin-Binding Proteins in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    PubMed

    Dobrzynska, Agnieszka; Askjaer, Peter; Gruenbaum, Yosef

    2016-01-01

    The nuclear lamina, composed of lamins and numerous lamin-associated proteins, is required for mechanical stability, mechanosensing, chromatin organization, developmental gene regulation, mRNA transcription, DNA replication, nuclear assembly, and nuclear positioning. Mutations in lamins or lamin-binding proteins cause at least 18 distinct human diseases that affect specific tissues such as muscle, adipose, bone, nerve, or skin, and range from muscular dystrophies to lipodystrophy, peripheral neuropathy, or accelerated aging. Caenorhabditis elegans has unique advantages in studying lamin-binding proteins. These advantages include the low complexity of genes encoding lamin and lamin-binding proteins, advanced transgenic techniques, simple application of RNA interference, sophisticated genetic strategies, and a large collection of mutant lines. This chapter provides detailed and comprehensive protocols for the genetic and phenotypic analysis of lamin-binding proteins in C. elegans. PMID:26778571

  4. Binding of ATP to the progesterone receptor.

    PubMed Central

    Moudgil, V K; Toft, D O

    1975-01-01

    The possible interaction of progesterone--receptor complexes with nucleotides was tested by affinity chromatography. The cytosol progesterone receptor from hen oviduct was partially purified by ammonium sulfate precipitation before use. When progesterone was bound to the receptor, the resulting complex could be selectively adsorbed onto columns of ATP-Sepharose. This interaction was reversible and of an ionic nature since it could be disrupted by high-salt conditions. A competitive binding assay was used to test the specificity of receptor binding to several other nucleotides, including ADP, AMP, and cAMP. A clear specificity for binding ATP was evident from these studies. When ATP was added to receptor preparations, the nucleotide did not affect the sedimentation properties or hormone binding characteristics of the receptor. Although the function of ATP remains unknown, these studies indicate a role of this nucleotide in some aspect of hormone receptor activity. PMID:165493

  5. Universal binding energy relations in metallic adhesion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ferrante, J.; Smith, J. R.; Rose, J. H.

    1981-01-01

    Scaling relations which map metallic adhesive binding energy onto a single universal binding energy curve are discussed in relation to adhesion, friction, and wear in metals. The scaling involved normalizing the energy to the maximum binding energy and normalizing distances by a suitable combination of Thomas-Fermi screening lengths. The universal curve was found to be accurately represented by E*(A*)= -(1+beta A) exp (-Beta A*) where E* is the normalized binding energy, A* is the normalized separation, and beta is the normalized decay constant. The calculated cohesive energies of potassium, barium, copper, molybdenum, and samarium were also found to scale by similar relations, suggesting that the universal relation may be more general than for the simple free electron metals.

  6. Structure and Function of Lipopolysaccharide Binding Protein

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schumann, Ralf R.; Leong, Steven R.; Flaggs, Gail W.; Gray, Patrick W.; Wright, Samuel D.; Mathison, John C.; Tobias, Peter S.; Ulevitch, Richard J.

    1990-09-01

    The primary structure of lipopolysaccharide binding protein (LBP), a trace plasma protein that binds to the lipid A moiety of bacterial lipopolysaccharides (LPSs), was deduced by sequencing cloned complementary DNA. LBP shares sequence identity with another LPS binding protein found in granulocytes, bactericidal/permeability-increasing protein, and with cholesterol ester transport protein of the plasma. LBP may control the response to LPS under physiologic conditions by forming high-affinity complexes with LPS that bind to monocytes and macrophages, which then secrete tumor necrosis factor. The identification of this pathway for LPS-induced monocyte stimulation may aid in the development of treatments for diseases in which Gram-negative sepsis or endotoxemia are involved.

  7. Human Frataxin: Iron And Ferrochelatase Binding Surface

    SciTech Connect

    Bencze, K.Z.; Yoon, T.; Millan-Pacheco, C.; Bradley, P.B.; Pastor, N.; Cowan, J.A.; Stemmler, T.L.

    2009-06-02

    The coordinated iron structure and ferrochelatase binding surface of human frataxin have been characterized to provide insight into the protein's ability to serve as the iron chaperone during heme biosynthesis.

  8. Hardware device binding and mutual authentication

    SciTech Connect

    Hamlet, Jason R; Pierson, Lyndon G

    2014-03-04

    Detection and deterrence of device tampering and subversion by substitution may be achieved by including a cryptographic unit within a computing device for binding multiple hardware devices and mutually authenticating the devices. The cryptographic unit includes a physically unclonable function ("PUF") circuit disposed in or on the hardware device, which generates a binding PUF value. The cryptographic unit uses the binding PUF value during an enrollment phase and subsequent authentication phases. During a subsequent authentication phase, the cryptographic unit uses the binding PUF values of the multiple hardware devices to generate a challenge to send to the other device, and to verify a challenge received from the other device to mutually authenticate the hardware devices.

  9. Exciton Binding Energy of Monolayer WS2

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Bairen; Chen, Xi; Cui, Xiaodong

    2015-01-01

    The optical properties of monolayer transition metal dichalcogenides (TMDC) feature prominent excitonic natures. Here we report an experimental approach to measuring the exciton binding energy of monolayer WS2 with linear differential transmission spectroscopy and two-photon photoluminescence excitation spectroscopy (TP-PLE). TP-PLE measurements show the exciton binding energy of 0.71 ± 0.01 eV around K valley in the Brillouin zone. PMID:25783023

  10. Bilirubin Binding Capacity in the Preterm Neonate.

    PubMed

    Amin, Sanjiv B

    2016-06-01

    Total serum/plasma bilirubin (TB), the biochemical measure currently used to evaluate and manage hyperbilirubinemia, is not a useful predictor of bilirubin-induced neurotoxicity in premature infants. Altered bilirubin-albumin binding in premature infants limits the usefulness of TB in premature infants. In this article, bilirubin-albumin binding, a modifying factor for bilirubin-induced neurotoxicity, in premature infants is reviewed. PMID:27235205

  11. DNA-aptamers binding aminoglycoside antibiotics.

    PubMed

    Nikolaus, Nadia; Strehlitz, Beate

    2014-01-01

    Aptamers are short, single stranded DNA or RNA oligonucleotides that are able to bind specifically and with high affinity to their non-nucleic acid target molecules. This binding reaction enables their application as biorecognition elements in biosensors and assays. As antibiotic residues pose a problem contributing to the emergence of antibiotic-resistant pathogens and thereby reducing the effectiveness of the drug to fight human infections, we selected aptamers targeted against the aminoglycoside antibiotic kanamycin A with the aim of constructing a robust and functional assay that can be used for water analysis. With this work we show that aptamers that were derived from a Capture-SELEX procedure targeting against kanamycin A also display binding to related aminoglycoside antibiotics. The binding patterns differ among all tested aptamers so that there are highly substance specific aptamers and more group specific aptamers binding to a different variety of aminoglycoside antibiotics. Also the region of the aminoglycoside antibiotics responsible for aptamer binding can be estimated. Affinities of the different aptamers for their target substance, kanamycin A, are measured with different approaches and are in the micromolar range. Finally, the proof of principle of an assay for detection of kanamycin A in a real water sample is given. PMID:24566637

  12. Molecular design of substrate binding sites

    SciTech Connect

    Shelnutt, J.A.; Hobbs, J.D.

    1991-12-31

    Computer-aided molecular design methods were used to tailor binding sites for small substrate molecules, including CO{sub 2} and methane. The goal is to design a cavity, adjacent to a catalytic metal center, into which the substrate will selectively bind through only non-bonding interactions with the groups lining the binding pocket. Porphyrins are used as a basic molecular structure, with various substituents added to construct the binding pocket. The conformations of these highly-substituted porphyrins are predicted using molecular mechanics calculations with a force field that gives accurate predictions for metalloporhyrins. Dynamics and energy-minimization calculations of substrate molecules bound to the cavity indicate high substrate binding affinity. The size, shape and charge-distribution of groups surrounding the cavity provide molecular selectivity. Specifically, calculated binding energies of methane, benzene, dichloromethane, CO{sub 2} and chloroform vary by about 10 kcal/mol for metal octaethyl-tetraphenylporphyrins (OETPPs) with chloroform, dichloromethane, and CO{sub 2} having the lowest. Significantly, a solvent molecule is found in the cavity in the X-ray structures of Co- and CuOETPP crystals obtained from dichloromethane. 5 refs., 3 figs., 3 tabs.

  13. Molecular design of substrate binding sites

    SciTech Connect

    Shelnutt, J.A.; Hobbs, J.D.

    1991-01-01

    Computer-aided molecular design methods were used to tailor binding sites for small substrate molecules, including CO{sub 2} and methane. The goal is to design a cavity, adjacent to a catalytic metal center, into which the substrate will selectively bind through only non-bonding interactions with the groups lining the binding pocket. Porphyrins are used as a basic molecular structure, with various substituents added to construct the binding pocket. The conformations of these highly-substituted porphyrins are predicted using molecular mechanics calculations with a force field that gives accurate predictions for metalloporhyrins. Dynamics and energy-minimization calculations of substrate molecules bound to the cavity indicate high substrate binding affinity. The size, shape and charge-distribution of groups surrounding the cavity provide molecular selectivity. Specifically, calculated binding energies of methane, benzene, dichloromethane, CO{sub 2} and chloroform vary by about 10 kcal/mol for metal octaethyl-tetraphenylporphyrins (OETPPs) with chloroform, dichloromethane, and CO{sub 2} having the lowest. Significantly, a solvent molecule is found in the cavity in the X-ray structures of Co- and CuOETPP crystals obtained from dichloromethane. 5 refs., 3 figs., 3 tabs.

  14. Anion binding to the ubiquitin molecule.

    PubMed Central

    Makhatadze, G. I.; Lopez, M. M.; Richardson, J. M.; Thomas, S. T.

    1998-01-01

    Effects of different salts (NaCl, MgCl2, CaCl2, GdmCl, NaBr, NaClO4, NaH2PO4, Na2SO4) on the stability of the ubiquitin molecule at pH 2.0 have been studied by differential scanning calorimetry, circular dichroism, and Tyr fluorescence spectroscopies. It is shown that all of the salts studied significantly increase the thermostability of the ubiquitin molecule, and that this stabilization can be interpreted in terms of anion binding. Estimated thermodynamic parameters of binding for Cl- show that this binding is relatively weak (Kd = 0.15 M) and is characterized by a negative enthalpy of -15 kJ/mol per site. Particularly surprising was the observed stabilizing effect of GdmCl through the entire concentration range studied (0.01-2 M), however, to a lesser extent than stabilization by NaCl. This stabilizing effect of GdmCl appears to arise from the binding of Cl- ions. Analysis of the observed changes in the stability of the ubiquitin molecule in the presence of GdmCl can be adequately described by combining the thermodynamic model of denaturant binding with Cl- binding effects. PMID:9541401

  15. Folding and binding energy of a calmodulin-binding cell antiproliferative peptide.

    PubMed

    Almudallal, Ahmad M; Saika-Voivod, Ivan; Stewart, John M

    2015-09-01

    We carry out a computational study of a calmodulin-binding peptide shown to be effective in reducing cell proliferation. We find several folded states for two short variants of different length of the peptide and determine the location of the binding site on calmodulin, the binding free energy for the different conformers and structural details that play a role in optimal binding. Binding to a hydrophobic pocket in calmodulin occurs via an anchoring phenylalanine residue of the natively disordered peptide, and is enhanced when a neighbouring hydrophobic residue acts as a co-anchor. The shorter sequence possesses better binding to calmodulin, which is encouraging in terms of the development of non-peptide analogues as therapeutic agents. PMID:26310499

  16. Theoretical studies of binding of mannose-binding protein to monosaccharides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aida-Hyugaji, Sachiko; Takano, Keiko; Takada, Toshikazu; Hosoya, Haruo; Kojima, Naoya; Mizuochi, Tsuguo; Inoue, Yasushi

    2004-11-01

    Binding properties of mannose-binding protein (MBP) to monosaccharides are discussed based on ab initio molecular orbital calculations for cluster models constructed. The calculated binding energies indicate that MBP has an affinity for N-acetyl- D-glucosamine, D-mannose, L-fucose, and D-glucose rather than D-galactose and N-acetyl- D-galactosamine, which is consistent with the biochemical experimental results. Electrostatic potential surfaces at the binding site of four monosaccharides having binding properties matched well with that of MBP. A vacant frontier orbital was found to be localized around the binding site of MBP, suggesting that MBP-monosaccharide interaction may occur through electrostatic and orbital interactions.

  17. Fucose-binding Lotus tetragonolobus lectin binds to human polymorphonuclear leukocytes and induces a chemotactic response.

    PubMed

    VanEpps, D E; Tung, K S

    1977-09-01

    Fucose-binding L. tetragonolobus lectin to the surface of human polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMN) and induces a chemotactic response. Both surface binding and chemotaxis are inhibited by free fucose but not by fructose, mannose, or galactose. The lectin-binding sites on PMN are unrelated to the A, B, or O blood group antigen. Utilization of this lectin should be a useful tool in isolating PMN membrane components and in analyzing the mechanism of neutrophil chemotaxis. PMID:330752

  18. Leukocyte Protease Binding to Nucleic Acids Promotes Nuclear Localization and Cleavage of Nucleic Acid Binding Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, Marshall P.; Whangbo, Jennifer; McCrossan, Geoffrey; Deutsch, Aaron; Martinod, Kimberly; Walch, Michael; Lieberman, Judy

    2014-01-01

    Killer lymphocyte granzyme (Gzm) serine proteases induce apoptosis of pathogen-infected cells and tumor cells. Many known Gzm substrates are nucleic acid binding proteins, and the Gzms accumulate in the target cell nucleus by an unknown mechanism. Here we show that human Gzms bind to DNA and RNA with nanomolar affinity. Gzms cleave their substrates most efficiently when both are bound to nucleic acids. RNase treatment of cell lysates reduces Gzm cleavage of RNA binding protein (RBP) targets, while adding RNA to recombinant RBP substrates increases in vitro cleavage. Binding to nucleic acids also influences Gzm trafficking within target cells. Pre-incubation with competitor DNA and DNase treatment both reduce Gzm nuclear localization. The Gzms are closely related to neutrophil proteases, including neutrophil elastase (NE) and cathepsin G (CATG). During neutrophil activation, NE translocates to the nucleus to initiate DNA extrusion into neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs), which bind NE and CATG. These myeloid cell proteases, but not digestive serine proteases, also bind DNA strongly and localize to nuclei and NETs in a DNA-dependent manner. Thus, high affinity nucleic acid binding is a conserved and functionally important property specific to leukocyte serine proteases. Furthermore, nucleic acid binding provides an elegant and simple mechanism to confer specificity of these proteases for cleavage of nucleic acid binding protein substrates that play essential roles in cellular gene expression and cell proliferation. PMID:24771851

  19. Radiation inactivation reveals discrete cation binding sites that modulate dihydropyridine binding sites

    SciTech Connect

    Bolger, G.T.; Skolnick, P.; Kempner, E.S. )

    1989-08-01

    In low ionic strength buffer (5 mM Tris.HCl), the binding of (3H) nitrendipine to dihydropyridine calcium antagonist binding sites of mouse forebrain membranes is increased by both Na{sup +} and Ca{sup 2+}. Radiation inactivation was used to determine the target size of ({sup 3}H)nitrendipine binding sites in 5 mM Tris.HCl buffer, in the presence and absence of these cations. After irradiation, ({sup 3}H) nitrendipine binding in buffer with or without Na+ was diminished, due to a loss of binding sites and also to an increase in Kd. After accounting for radiation effects on the dissociation constant, the target size for the nitrendipine binding site in buffer was 160-170 kDa and was 170-180 kDa in the presence of sodium. In the presence of calcium ions, ({sup 3}H)nitrendipine binding showed no radiation effects on Kd and yielded a target size of 150-170 kDa. These findings suggest, as in the case of opioid receptors, the presence of high molecular weight membrane components that modulate cation-induced alterations in radioligand binding to dihydropyridine binding sites.

  20. RNA binding protein and binding site useful for expression of recombinant molecules

    DOEpatents

    Mayfield, Stephen

    2000-01-01

    The present invention relates to a gene expression system in eukaryotic and prokaryotic cells, preferably plant cells and intact plants. In particular, the invention relates to an expression system having a RB47 binding site upstream of a translation initiation site for regulation of translation mediated by binding of RB47 protein, a member of the poly(A) binding protein family. Regulation is further effected by RB60, a protein disulfide isomerase. The expression system is capable of functioning in the nuclear/cytoplasm of cells and in the chloroplast of plants. Translation regulation of a desired molecule is enhanced approximately 100 fold over that obtained without RB47 binding site activation.

  1. RNA binding protein and binding site useful for expression of recombinant molecules

    DOEpatents

    Mayfield, Stephen P.

    2006-10-17

    The present invention relates to a gene expression system in eukaryotic and prokaryotic cells, preferably plant cells and intact plants. In particular, the invention relates to an expression system having a RB47 binding site upstream of a translation initiation site for regulation of translation mediated by binding of RB47 protein, a member of the poly(A) binding protein family. Regulation is further effected by RB60, a protein disulfide isomerase. The expression system is capable of functioning in the nuclear/cytoplasm of cells and in the chloroplast of plants. Translation regulation of a desired molecule is enhanced approximately 100 fold over that obtained without RB47 binding site activation.

  2. Crystal Structure of the Botulinum Neurotoxin Type G Binding Domain: Insight into Cell Surface Binding

    SciTech Connect

    Stenmark, Pål; Dong, Min; Dupuy, Jérôme; Chapman, Edwin R.; Stevens, Raymond C.

    2011-11-02

    Botulinum neurotoxins (BoNTs) typically bind the neuronal cell surface via dual interactions with both protein receptors and gangliosides. We present here the 1.9-{angstrom} X-ray structure of the BoNT serotype G (BoNT/G) receptor binding domain (residues 868-1297) and a detailed view of protein receptor and ganglioside binding regions. The ganglioside binding motif (SxWY) has a conserved structure compared to the corresponding regions in BoNT serotype A and BoNT serotype B (BoNT/B), but several features of interactions with the hydrophilic face of the ganglioside are absent at the opposite side of the motif in the BoNT/G ganglioside binding cleft. This may significantly reduce the affinity between BoNT/G and gangliosides. BoNT/G and BoNT/B share the protein receptor synaptotagmin (Syt) I/II. The Syt binding site has a conserved hydrophobic plateau located centrally in the proposed protein receptor binding interface (Tyr1189, Phe1202, Ala1204, Pro1205, and Phe1212). Interestingly, only 5 of 14 residues that are important for binding between Syt-II and BoNT/B are conserved in BoNT/G, suggesting that the means by which BoNT/G and BoNT/B bind Syt diverges more than previously appreciated. Indeed, substitution of Syt-II Phe47 and Phe55 with alanine residues had little effect on the binding of BoNT/G, but strongly reduced the binding of BoNT/B. Furthermore, an extended solvent-exposed hydrophobic loop, located between the Syt binding site and the ganglioside binding cleft, may serve as a third membrane association and binding element to contribute to high-affinity binding to the neuronal membrane. While BoNT/G and BoNT/B are homologous to each other and both utilize Syt-I/Syt-II as their protein receptor, the precise means by which these two toxin serotypes bind to Syt appears surprisingly divergent.

  3. Recent improvements to Binding MOAD: a resource for protein-ligand binding affinities and structures.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, Aqeel; Smith, Richard D; Clark, Jordan J; Dunbar, James B; Carlson, Heather A

    2015-01-01

    For over 10 years, Binding MOAD (Mother of All Databases; http://www.BindingMOAD.org) has been one of the largest resources for high-quality protein-ligand complexes and associated binding affinity data. Binding MOAD has grown at the rate of 1994 complexes per year, on average. Currently, it contains 23,269 complexes and 8156 binding affinities. Our annual updates curate the data using a semi-automated literature search of the references cited within the PDB file, and we have recently upgraded our website and added new features and functionalities to better serve Binding MOAD users. In order to eliminate the legacy application server of the old platform and to accommodate new changes, the website has been completely rewritten in the LAMP (Linux, Apache, MySQL and PHP) environment. The improved user interface incorporates current third-party plugins for better visualization of protein and ligand molecules, and it provides features like sorting, filtering and filtered downloads. In addition to the field-based searching, Binding MOAD now can be searched by structural queries based on the ligand. In order to remove redundancy, Binding MOAD records are clustered in different families based on 90% sequence identity. The new Binding MOAD, with the upgraded platform, features and functionalities, is now equipped to better serve its users. PMID:25378330

  4. Folding funnels, binding funnels, and protein function.

    PubMed Central

    Tsai, C. J.; Kumar, S.; Ma, B.; Nussinov, R.

    1999-01-01

    Folding funnels have been the focus of considerable attention during the last few years. These have mostly been discussed in the general context of the theory of protein folding. Here we extend the utility of the concept of folding funnels, relating them to biological mechanisms and function. In particular, here we describe the shape of the funnels in light of protein synthesis and folding; flexibility, conformational diversity, and binding mechanisms; and the associated binding funnels, illustrating the multiple routes and the range of complexed conformers. Specifically, the walls of the folding funnels, their crevices, and bumps are related to the complexity of protein folding, and hence to sequential vs. nonsequential folding. Whereas the former is more frequently observed in eukaryotic proteins, where the rate of protein synthesis is slower, the latter is more frequent in prokaryotes, with faster translation rates. The bottoms of the funnels reflect the extent of the flexibility of the proteins. Rugged floors imply a range of conformational isomers, which may be close on the energy landscape. Rather than undergoing an induced fit binding mechanism, the conformational ensembles around the rugged bottoms argue that the conformers, which are most complementary to the ligand, will bind to it with the equilibrium shifting in their favor. Furthermore, depending on the extent of the ruggedness, or of the smoothness with only a few minima, we may infer nonspecific, broad range vs. specific binding. In particular, folding and binding are similar processes, with similar underlying principles. Hence, the shape of the folding funnel of the monomer enables making reasonable guesses regarding the shape of the corresponding binding funnel. Proteins having a broad range of binding, such as proteolytic enzymes or relatively nonspecific endonucleases, may be expected to have not only rugged floors in their folding funnels, but their binding funnels will also behave similarly

  5. Predicting Ca(2+)-binding sites in proteins.

    PubMed Central

    Nayal, M; Di Cera, E

    1994-01-01

    The coordination shell of Ca2+ ions in proteins contains almost exclusively oxygen atoms supported by an outer shell of carbon atoms. The bond-strength contribution of each ligating oxygen in the inner shell can be evaluated by using an empirical expression successfully applied in the analysis of crystals of metal oxides. The sum of such contributions closely approximates the valence of the bound cation. When a protein is embedded in a very fine grid of points and an algorithm is used to calculate the valence of each point representing a potential Ca(2+)-binding site, a typical distribution of valence values peaked around 0.4 is obtained. In 32 documented Ca(2+)-binding proteins, containing a total of 62 Ca(2+)-binding sites, a very small fraction of points in the distribution has a valence close to that of Ca2+. Only 0.06% of the points have a valence > or = 1.4. These points share the remarkable tendency to cluster around documented Ca2+ ions. A high enough value of the valence is both necessary (58 out of 62 Ca(2+)-binding sites have a valence > or = 1.4) and sufficient (87% of the grid points with a valence > or = 1.4 are within 1.0 A from a documented Ca2+ ion) to predict the location of bound Ca2+ ions. The algorithm can also be used for the analysis of other cations and predicts the location of Mg(2+)- and Na(+)-binding sites in a number of proteins. The valence is, therefore, a tool of pinpoint accuracy for locating cation-binding sites, which can also be exploited in engineering high-affinity binding sites and characterizing the linkage between structural components and functional energetics for molecular recognition of metal ions by proteins. Images Fig. 4 PMID:8290605

  6. Mannose-binding geometry of pradimicin A.

    PubMed

    Nakagawa, Yu; Doi, Takashi; Taketani, Takara; Takegoshi, K; Igarashi, Yasuhiro; Ito, Yukishige

    2013-08-01

    Pradimicins (PRMs) and benanomicins are the only family of non-peptidic natural products with lectin-like properties, that is, they recognize D-mannopyranoside (Man) in the presence of Ca(2+) ions. Coupled with their unique Man binding ability, they exhibit antifungal and anti-HIV activities through binding to Man-containing glycans of pathogens. Notwithstanding the great potential of PRMs as the lectin mimics and therapeutic leads, their molecular basis of Man recognition has yet to be established. Their aggregate-forming propensity has impeded conventional interaction analysis in solution, and the analytical difficulty is exacerbated by the existence of two Man binding sites in PRMs. In this work, we investigated the geometry of the primary Man binding of PRM-A, an original member of PRMs, by the recently developed analytical strategy using the solid aggregate composed of the 1:1 complex of PRM-A and Man. Evaluation of intermolecular distances by solid-state NMR spectroscopy revealed that the C2-C4 region of Man is in close contact with the primary binding site of PRM-A, while the C1 and C6 positions of Man are relatively distant. The binding geometry was further validated by co-precipitation experiments using deoxy-Man derivatives, leading to the proposal that PRM-A binds not only to terminal Man residues at the non-reducing end of glycans, but also to internal 6-substituted Man residues. The present study provides new insights into the molecular basis of Man recognition and glycan specificity of PRM-A. PMID:23832850

  7. Evidence for chemoreceptors with bimodular ligand-binding regions harboring two signal-binding sites

    PubMed Central

    Pineda-Molina, Estela; Reyes-Darias, José-Antonio; Lacal, Jesús; Ramos, Juan L.; García-Ruiz, Juan Manuel; Gavira, Jose A.; Krell, Tino

    2012-01-01

    Chemoreceptor-based signaling is a central mechanism in bacterial signal transduction. Receptors are classified according to the size of their ligand-binding region. The well-studied cluster I proteins have a 100- to 150-residue ligand-binding region that contains a single site for chemoattractant recognition. Cluster II receptors, which contain a 220- to 300-residue ligand-binding region and which are almost as abundant as cluster I receptors, remain largely uncharacterized. Here, we report high-resolution structures of the ligand-binding region of the cluster II McpS chemotaxis receptor (McpS-LBR) of Pseudomonas putida KT2440 in complex with different chemoattractants. The structure of McpS-LBR represents a small-molecule binding domain composed of two modules, each able to bind different signal molecules. Malate and succinate were found to bind to the membrane-proximal module, whereas acetate binds to the membrane-distal module. A structural alignment of the two modules revealed that the ligand-binding sites could be superimposed and that amino acids involved in ligand recognition are conserved in both binding sites. Ligand binding to both modules was shown to trigger chemotactic responses. Further analysis showed that McpS-like receptors were found in different classes of proteobacteria, indicating that this mode of response to different carbon sources may be universally distributed. The physiological relevance of the McpS architecture may lie in its capacity to respond with high sensitivity to the preferred carbon sources malate and succinate and, at the same time, mediate lower sensitivity responses to the less preferred but very abundant carbon source acetate. PMID:23112148

  8. Molecular interactions and metal binding in the theophylline-binding core of an RNA aptamer.

    PubMed Central

    Zimmermann, G R; Wick, C L; Shields, T P; Jenison, R D; Pardi, A

    2000-01-01

    An RNA aptamer containing a 15-nt binding site shows high affinity and specificity for the bronchodilator theophylline. A variety of base modifications or 2' deoxyribose substitutions in binding-site residues were tested for theophyllinebinding affinity and the results were compared with the previously determined three-dimensional structure of the RNA-theophylline complex. The RNA-theophylline complex contains a U6-A28-U23 base triple, and disruption of this A28-U23 Hoogsteen-pair by a 7-deaza, 2'-deoxy A28 mutant reduces theophylline binding >45-fold at 25 degrees C. U24 is part of a U-turn in the core of the RNA, and disruption of this U-turn motif by a 2'-deoxy substitution of U24 also reduces theophylline binding by >90-fold. Several mutations outside the "conserved core" of the RNA aptamer showed reduced binding affinity, and these effects could be rationalized by comparison with the three-dimensional structure of the complex. Divalent ions are absolutely required for high-affinity theophylline binding. High-affinity binding was observed with 5 mM Mg2+, Mn2+, or Co2+ ions, whereas little or no significant binding was observed for other divalent or lanthanide ions. A metal-binding site in the core of the complex was revealed by paramagnetic Mn2+-induced broadening of specific RNA resonances in the NMR spectra. When caffeine is added to the aptamer in tenfold excess, the NMR spectra show no evidence for binding in the conserved core and instead the drug stacks on the terminal helix. The lack of interaction between caffeine and the theophylline-binding site emphasizes the extreme molecular discrimination of this RNA aptamer. PMID:10836787

  9. Promoter-distal RNA polymerase II binding discriminates active from inactive CCAAT/ enhancer-binding protein beta binding sites

    PubMed Central

    Savic, Daniel; Roberts, Brian S.; Carleton, Julia B.; Partridge, E. Christopher; White, Michael A.; Cohen, Barak A.; Cooper, Gregory M.; Gertz, Jason; Myers, Richard M.

    2015-01-01

    Transcription factors (TFs) bind to thousands of DNA sequences in mammalian genomes, but most of these binding events appear to have no direct effect on gene expression. It is unclear why only a subset of TF bound sites are actively involved in transcriptional regulation. Moreover, the key genomic features that accurately discriminate between active and inactive TF binding events remain ambiguous. Recent studies have identified promoter-distal RNA polymerase II (RNAP2) binding at enhancer elements, suggesting that these interactions may serve as a marker for active regulatory sequences. Despite these correlative analyses, a thorough functional validation of these genomic co-occupancies is still lacking. To characterize the gene regulatory activity of DNA sequences underlying promoter-distal TF binding events that co-occur with RNAP2 and TF sites devoid of RNAP2 occupancy using a functional reporter assay, we performed cis-regulatory element sequencing (CRE-seq). We tested more than 1000 promoter-distal CCAAT/enhancer-binding protein beta (CEBPB)-bound sites in HepG2 and K562 cells, and found that CEBPB-bound sites co-occurring with RNAP2 were more likely to exhibit enhancer activity. CEBPB-bound sites further maintained substantial cell-type specificity, indicating that local DNA sequence can accurately convey cell-type–specific regulatory information. By comparing our CRE-seq results to a comprehensive set of genome annotations, we identified a variety of genomic features that are strong predictors of regulatory element activity and cell-type–specific activity. Collectively, our functional assay results indicate that RNAP2 occupancy can be used as a key genomic marker that can distinguish active from inactive TF bound sites. PMID:26486725

  10. Ag(I)-binding to phytochelatins.

    PubMed

    Mehra, R K; Tran, K; Scott, G W; Mulchandani, P; Saini, S S

    1996-02-01

    Phytochelatins (PCs) are glutathione-derived peptides with the general structure (gamma-Glu-Cys)nGly, where n varies from 2 to 11. A variety of metal ions such as Cu(II), Cd(II), Pb(II), Zn(II), and Ag(I) induce PC synthesis in plants and some yeasts. It has generally been assumed that the inducer metals also bind PCs. However, very little information is available on the binding of metals other than Cu(I) and Cd(II) to PCs. In this paper, we describe the Ag(I)-binding characteristics of PCs with the structure (gamma-Glu-Cys)2Gly, (gamma-Glu-Cys)3Gly, and (gamma-Glu-Cys)4Gly. The Ag(I)-binding stoichiometries of these three peptides were determined by (i) UV/VIS spectrophotometry, (ii) luminescence spectroscopy at 77 K, and (iii) reverse-phase HPLC. The three techniques yielded similar results. ApoPCs exhibit featureless absorption in the 220-340 nm range. The binding of Ag(I) to PCs induced the appearance of specific absorption shoulders. The titration end point was indicated by the flattening of the characteristic absorption shoulders. Similarly, luminescence at 77 K due to Ag(I)-thiolate clusters increased with the addition of graded Ag(I) equivalents. The luminescence declined when Ag(I) equivalents in excess of the saturating amounts were added to the peptides. At neutral pH, (gamma-Glu-Cys)2Gly, (gamma-Glu-Cys)3Gly, and (gamma-Glu-Cys)4Gly bind 1.0, 1.5, and 4.0 equivalents of Ag(I), respectively. The Ag(I)-binding capacity of (gamma-Glu-Cys)2Gly and (gamma-Glu-Cys)3Gly was increased at pH 5.0 and below so that Ag(I)/-SH ratio approached 1.0. A similar pH-dependent binding of Ag(I) to glutathione was also observed. The increased Ag(I)-binding to PCs at lower pH is of physiological significance as these peptides accumulate in acidic vacuoles. We also report lifetime data on Ag(I)-PCs. The relatively long decay-times (approximately 0.1-0.3 msec) accompanied with a large Stokes shift in the emission band are indicative of spin-forbidden phosphorescence. PMID

  11. Conformational heterogeneity of the calmodulin binding interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shukla, Diwakar; Peck, Ariana; Pande, Vijay S.

    2016-04-01

    Calmodulin (CaM) is a ubiquitous Ca2+ sensor and a crucial signalling hub in many pathways aberrantly activated in disease. However, the mechanistic basis of its ability to bind diverse signalling molecules including G-protein-coupled receptors, ion channels and kinases remains poorly understood. Here we harness the high resolution of molecular dynamics simulations and the analytical power of Markov state models to dissect the molecular underpinnings of CaM binding diversity. Our computational model indicates that in the absence of Ca2+, sub-states in the folded ensemble of CaM's C-terminal domain present chemically and sterically distinct topologies that may facilitate conformational selection. Furthermore, we find that local unfolding is off-pathway for the exchange process relevant for peptide binding, in contrast to prior hypotheses that unfolding might account for binding diversity. Finally, our model predicts a novel binding interface that is well-populated in the Ca2+-bound regime and, thus, a candidate for pharmacological intervention.

  12. C60 fullerene binding to DNA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alshehri, Mansoor H.; Cox, Barry J.; Hill, James M.

    2014-09-01

    Fullerenes have attracted considerable attention in various areas of science and technology. Owing to their exceptional physical, chemical, and biological properties, they have many applications, particularly in cosmetic and medical products. Using the Lennard-Jones 6-12 potential function and the continuum approximation, which assumes that intermolecular interactions can be approximated by average atomic surface densities, we determine the binding energies of a C60 fullerene with respect to both single-strand and double-strand DNA molecules. We assume that all configurations are in a vacuum and that the C60 fullerene is initially at rest. Double integrals are performed to determine the interaction energy of the system. We find that the C60 fullerene binds to the double-strand DNA molecule, at either the major or minor grooves, with binding energies of -4.7 eV or -2.3 eV, respectively, and that the C60 molecule binds to the single-strand DNA molecule with a binding energy of -1.6 eV. Our results suggest that the C60 molecule is most likely to be linked to the major groove of the dsDNA molecule.

  13. Conformational heterogeneity of the calmodulin binding interface

    PubMed Central

    Shukla, Diwakar; Peck, Ariana; Pande, Vijay S.

    2016-01-01

    Calmodulin (CaM) is a ubiquitous Ca2+ sensor and a crucial signalling hub in many pathways aberrantly activated in disease. However, the mechanistic basis of its ability to bind diverse signalling molecules including G-protein-coupled receptors, ion channels and kinases remains poorly understood. Here we harness the high resolution of molecular dynamics simulations and the analytical power of Markov state models to dissect the molecular underpinnings of CaM binding diversity. Our computational model indicates that in the absence of Ca2+, sub-states in the folded ensemble of CaM's C-terminal domain present chemically and sterically distinct topologies that may facilitate conformational selection. Furthermore, we find that local unfolding is off-pathway for the exchange process relevant for peptide binding, in contrast to prior hypotheses that unfolding might account for binding diversity. Finally, our model predicts a novel binding interface that is well-populated in the Ca2+-bound regime and, thus, a candidate for pharmacological intervention. PMID:27040077

  14. Improved flow cytometer measurement of binding assays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saunders, G. C.

    1984-05-01

    A method of measuring binding assays is carried out with different size particles wherein the binding assay sample is run through a flow cytometer without separating the sample from the marking agent. The amount of a binding reactant present in a sample is determined by providing particles with a coating of binder and also known quantity of smaller particles with a coating of binder reactant. The smaller particles also contain a fluorescent chemical. The particles are combined with the sample and the binding reaction is allowed to occur for a set length of time followed by combining the smaller particles with the mixture of the particles and the sample produced and allowing the binding reactions to proceed to equilibrium. The fluorescence and light scatter of the combined mixture is then measured as the combined mixture passes through a flow cytometer equipped with a laser to bring about fluorescence, and the number of fluorescent events are compared. A similar method is also provided for determining the amount of antigen present in the sample by providing spheres with an antibody coating and some smaller spheres with an antigen coating.

  15. Stretching DNA to quantify nonspecific protein binding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goyal, Sachin; Fountain, Chandler; Dunlap, David; Family, Fereydoon; Finzi, Laura

    2012-07-01

    Nonspecific binding of regulatory proteins to DNA can be an important mechanism for target search and storage. This seems to be the case for the lambda repressor protein (CI), which maintains lysogeny after infection of E. coli. CI binds specifically at two distant regions along the viral genome and induces the formation of a repressive DNA loop. However, single-molecule imaging as well as thermodynamic and kinetic measurements of CI-mediated looping show that CI also binds to DNA nonspecifically and that this mode of binding may play an important role in maintaining lysogeny. This paper presents a robust phenomenological approach using a recently developed method based on the partition function, which allows calculation of the number of proteins bound nonspecific to DNA from measurements of the DNA extension as a function of applied force. This approach was used to analyze several cycles of extension and relaxation of λ DNA performed at several CI concentrations to measure the dissociation constant for nonspecific binding of CI (˜100 nM), and to obtain a measurement of the induced DNA compaction (˜10%) by CI.

  16. DNA Binding to the Silica Surface.

    PubMed

    Shi, Bobo; Shin, Yun Kyung; Hassanali, Ali A; Singer, Sherwin J

    2015-08-27

    We investigate the DNA-silica binding mechanism using molecular dynamics simulations. This system is of technological importance, and also of interest to explore how negatively charged DNA can bind to a silica surface, which is also negatively charged at pH values above its isoelectric point near pH 3. We find that the two major binding mechanisms are attractive interactions between DNA phosphate and surface silanol groups and hydrophobic bonding between DNA base and silica hydrophobic region. Umbrella sampling and the weighted histogram analysis method (WHAM) are used to calculate the free energy surface for detachment of DNA from a binding configuration to a location far from the silica surface. Several factors explain why single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) has been observed to be more strongly attracted to silica than double-stranded (dsDNA): (1) ssDNA is more flexible and therefore able to maximize the number of binding interactions. (2) ssDNA has free unpaired bases to form hydrophobic attachment to silica while dsDNA has to break hydrogen bonds with base partners to get free bases. (3) The linear charge density of dsDNA is twice that of ssDNA. We devise a procedure to approximate the atomic forces between biomolecules and amorphous silica to enable large-scale biomolecule-silica simulations as reported here. PMID:25966319

  17. Peptide binding at the GLP-1 receptor.

    PubMed

    Mann, R; Nasr, N; Hadden, D; Sinfield, J; Abidi, F; Al-Sabah, S; de Maturana, R López; Treece-Birch, J; Willshaw, A; Donnelly, D

    2007-08-01

    The receptor for GLP-1 [glucagon-like peptide-1-(7-36)-amide] is a member of the 'Family B' of GPCRs (G-protein-coupled receptors) comprising an extracellular N-terminal domain containing six conserved cysteine residues (the N-domain) and a core domain (or J-domain) comprising the seven transmembrane helices and interconnecting loop regions. According to the two-domain model for peptide binding, the N-domain is primarily responsible for providing most of the peptide binding energy, whereas the core domain is responsible for binding the N-terminal region of the peptide agonists and transmitting the signal to the intracellular G-protein. Two interesting differences between the binding properties of two GLP-1 receptor agonists, GLP-1 and EX-4 (exendin-4), can be observed. First, while GLP-1 requires its full length to maintain high affinity, the eight N-terminal residues of EX-4 can be removed with little reduction in affinity. Secondly, EX-4 (but not GLP-1) can bind to the fully isolated N-domain of the receptor with an affinity matching that of the full-length receptor. In order to better understand these differences, we have studied the interaction between combinations of full-length or truncated ligands with full-length or truncated receptors. PMID:17635131

  18. Binding of Dissolved Strontium by Micrococcus luteus

    PubMed Central

    Faison, Brendlyn D.; Cancel, Carmen A.; Lewis, Susan N.; Adler, Howard I.

    1990-01-01

    Resting cells of Micrococcus luteus have been shown to remove strontium (Sr) from dilute aqueous solutions of SrCl2 at pH 7. Loadings of 25 mg of Sr per g of cell dry weight were achieved by cells exposed to a solution containing 50 ppm (mg/liter) of Sr. Sr binding occurred in the absence of nutrients and did not require metabolic activity. Initial binding was quite rapid (<0.5 h), although a slow, spontaneous release of Sr was observed over time. Sr binding was inhibited in the presence of polyvalent cations but not monovalent cations. Ca and Sr were bound preferentially over all other cations tested. Sr-binding activity was localized on the cell envelope and was sensitive to various chemical and physical pretreatments. Bound Sr was displaced by divalent ions or by H+. Other monovalent ions were less effective. Bound Sr was also removed by various chelating agents. It was concluded that Sr binding by M. luteus is a reversible equilibrium process. Both ion exchange mediated by acidic cell surface components and intracellular uptake may be involved in this activity. PMID:16348370

  19. Predicting tissue specific transcription factor binding sites

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Studies of gene regulation often utilize genome-wide predictions of transcription factor (TF) binding sites. Most existing prediction methods are based on sequence information alone, ignoring biological contexts such as developmental stages and tissue types. Experimental methods to study in vivo binding, including ChIP-chip and ChIP-seq, can only study one transcription factor in a single cell type and under a specific condition in each experiment, and therefore cannot scale to determine the full set of regulatory interactions in mammalian transcriptional regulatory networks. Results We developed a new computational approach, PIPES, for predicting tissue-specific TF binding. PIPES integrates in vitro protein binding microarrays (PBMs), sequence conservation and tissue-specific epigenetic (DNase I hypersensitivity) information. We demonstrate that PIPES improves over existing methods on distinguishing between in vivo bound and unbound sequences using ChIP-seq data for 11 mouse TFs. In addition, our predictions are in good agreement with current knowledge of tissue-specific TF regulation. Conclusions We provide a systematic map of computationally predicted tissue-specific binding targets for 284 mouse TFs across 55 tissue/cell types. Such comprehensive resource is useful for researchers studying gene regulation. PMID:24238150

  20. Aminoglycoside binding to Oxytricha Nova Telomeric DNA

    PubMed Central

    Ranjan, Nihar; Andreasen, Katrine F.; Kumar, Sunil; Hyde-volpe, David; Arya, Dev P.

    2012-01-01

    Telomeric DNA sequences have been at the center stage of drug design for cancer treatment in recent years. The ability of these DNA structures to form four stranded nucleic acid structures, called G-quadruplexes, has been perceived as target for inhibiting telomerase activity vital for the longevity of cancer cells. Being highly diverse in structural forms, these G-quadruplexes are subjects of detailed studies of ligand–DNA interactions of different classes, which will pave the way for logical design of more potent ligands in future. The binding of aminoglycosides were investigated with Oxytricha Nova quadruplex forming DNA sequence (GGGGTTTTGGGG)2. Isothermal Titration calorimetry (ITC) determined ligand to quadruplex binding ratio shows 1:1 neomycin:quadruplex binding with association constants (Ka ) ~ 105M−1 while paromomycin was found to have a two-fold weaker affinity than neomycin. The CD titration experiments with neomycin resulted in minimal changes in the CD signal. FID assays, performed to determine the minimum concentration required to displace half of the fluorescent probe bound, showed neomycin as the best of the all aminoglycosides studied for quadruplex binding. Initial NMR footprint suggests that ligand-DNA interactions occur in the wide groove of the quadruplex. Computational docking studies also indicate that aminoglycosides bind in the wide groove of the quadruplex. PMID:20886815

  1. Binding of dissolved strontium by Micrococcus luteus

    SciTech Connect

    Faison, B.D.; Cancel, C.A.; Lewis, S.N.; Adler, H.I. )

    1990-12-01

    Resting cells of Micrococcus luteus have been shown to remove strontium (Sr) from dilute aqueous solutions of SrCl{sub 2} at pH 7. Loadings of 25 mg of Sr per g of cell dry weight were achieved by cells exposed to a solution containing 50 ppm (mg/liter) of Sr. Sr binding occurred in the absence of nutrients and did not require metabolic activity. Initial binding was quite rapid (<0.5 h), although a slow, spontaneous release of Sr was observed over time. Sr binding was inhibited in the presence of polyvalent cations but not monovalent cations. Ca and Sr were bound preferentially over all other cations tested. Sr-binding activity was localized on the cell envelope and was sensitive to various chemical and physical pretreatments. Bound Sr was displaced by divalent ions or by H{sup +}. Other monovalent ions were less effective. Bound Sr was also removed by various chelating agents. It was concluded that Sr binding by M. luteus is a reversible equilibrium process. Both ion exchange mediated by acidic cell surface components and intracellular uptake may be involved in this activity.

  2. Ancestral Protein Reconstruction Yields Insights into Adaptive Evolution of Binding Specificity in Solute-Binding Proteins.

    PubMed

    Clifton, Ben E; Jackson, Colin J

    2016-02-18

    The promiscuous functions of proteins are an important reservoir of functional novelty in protein evolution, but the molecular basis for binding promiscuity remains elusive. We used ancestral protein reconstruction to experimentally characterize evolutionary intermediates in the functional expansion of the polar amino acid-binding protein family, which has evolved to bind a variety of amino acids with high affinity and specificity. High-resolution crystal structures of an ancestral arginine-binding protein in complex with l-arginine and l-glutamine show that the promiscuous binding of l-glutamine is enabled by multi-scale conformational plasticity, water-mediated interactions, and selection of an alternative conformational substate productive for l-glutamine binding. Evolution of specialized glutamine-binding proteins from this ancestral protein was achieved by displacement of water molecules from the protein-ligand interface, reducing the entropic penalty associated with the promiscuous interaction. These results provide a structural and thermodynamic basis for the co-option of a promiscuous interaction in the evolution of binding specificity. PMID:26853627

  3. Quantification of Cooperativity in Heterodimer-DNA Binding Improves the Accuracy of Binding Specificity Models.

    PubMed

    Isakova, Alina; Berset, Yves; Hatzimanikatis, Vassily; Deplancke, Bart

    2016-05-01

    Many transcription factors (TFs) have the ability to cooperate on DNA elements as heterodimers. Despite the significance of TF heterodimerization for gene regulation, a quantitative understanding of cooperativity between various TF dimer partners and its impact on heterodimer DNA binding specificity models is still lacking. Here, we used a novel integrative approach, combining microfluidics-steered measurements of dimer-DNA assembly with mechanistic modeling of the implicated protein-protein-DNA interactions to quantitatively interrogate the cooperative DNA binding behavior of the adipogenic peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ (PPARγ):retinoid X receptor α (RXRα) heterodimer. Using the high throughput MITOMI (mechanically induced trapping of molecular interactions) platform, we derived equilibrium DNA binding data for PPARγ, RXRα, as well as the PPARγ:RXRα heterodimer to more than 300 target DNA sites and variants thereof. We then quantified cooperativity underlying heterodimer-DNA binding and derived an integrative heterodimer DNA binding constant. Using this cooperativity-inclusive constant, we were able to build a heterodimer-DNA binding specificity model that has superior predictive power than the one based on a regular one-site equilibrium. Our data further revealed that individual nucleotide substitutions within the target site affect the extent of cooperativity in PPARγ:RXRα-DNA binding. Our study therefore emphasizes the importance of assessing cooperativity when generating DNA binding specificity models for heterodimers. PMID:26912662

  4. Binding of the Ah receptor to receptor binding factors in chromatin.

    PubMed

    Dunn, R T; Ruh, T S; Ruh, M F

    1993-03-01

    Dioxin induces biological responses through interaction with a specific intracellular receptor, the Ah receptor, and the subsequent interaction of the Ah receptor with chromatin. We report the binding of the Ah receptor, partially purified from rabbit liver, to receptor binding factors in chromatin. Rabbit liver chromatin proteins (CP) were isolated by adsorption of chromatin to hydroxylapatite followed by sequential extraction with 1-8 M GdnHCl. To assay for receptor binding a portion of each CP fraction was reconstituted to rabbit double-stranded DNA using a reverse gradient dialysis of 7.5 to 0 M GdnHCl. These reconstituted nucleoacidic proteins were then examined for binding to [3H]-2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin ([3H]TCDD)-receptor complexes by the streptomycin filter assay. Prior to the binding assay, [3H]TCDD-receptor complexes were partially purified by step elution from DEAE-cellulose columns. CP fractions 2, 5, and 7 were found to bind to the Ah receptor with high affinity. Scatchard analysis yielded Kd values in the nanomolar range. Competition with 2-fold excess unlabeled TCDD-receptor complexes was demonstrated, and binding was reduced markedly when the receptor was prepared in the presence of 10 mM molybdate. Such chromatin receptor binding factors (RBFs) may participate in the interaction of receptor with specific DNA sequences resulting in modulation of specific gene expression. PMID:8384852

  5. Selective polyamine-binding proteins. Spermine binding by an androgen-sensitive phosphoprotein.

    PubMed

    Liang, T; Mezzetti, G; Chen, C; Liao, S

    1978-09-01

    Rat ventral prostate contains an acidic protein which can bind spermine selectively. The relative binding affinities of various aliphatic amines for the protein are, in decreasing order, spermine greater than thermine greater than greater than putrecine greater than 1,10-diaminodecane, cadaverine and 1,12-diaminododecane. The binding protein has an isoelectric point at pH 4.3 and a sedimentation coefficient of 3 S. Its molecular weight is approx. 30 000. Histones and nuclear chromatin preparations of the prostate can interact with the binding protein. The spermine-binding activity of the purified prostate protein can be inactivated by treatment with intestinal alkaline phosphatases. The phosphatase treated preparation can then be reactivated by beef heart protein kinase in the presence of cyclic AMP and ATP. The spermine-binding activity of the prostate cytosol protein fraction decreases after castration, but increases very rapidly after the castrated rats are injected with 5alpha-dihydrotestosterone. This finding raises the possibility that, in the postate, certain androgen actions may be dependent on the androgen-induced increase in the acidic protein binding of polyamines and their translocation to a functional cellular site such as nuclear chromatin. In the prostate cytosol, spermine also binds to 4-S tRNAs and to a unique RNA which has a sedimentation coefficient of 1.5 S. PMID:28786

  6. Binding dynamics and energetic insight into the molecular forces driving nucleotide binding by guanylate kinase.

    PubMed

    Kandeel, Mahmoud; Kitade, Yukio

    2011-01-01

    Plasmodium deoxyguanylate pathways are an attractive area of investigation for future metabolic and drug discovery studies due to their unique substrate specificities. We investigated the energetic contribution to guanylate kinase substrate binding and the forces underlying ligand recognition. In the range from 20 to 35°C, the thermodynamic profiles displayed marked decrease in binding enthalpy, while the free energy of binding showed little changes. GMP produced a large binding heat capacity change of -356 cal mol(-1) K(-1), indicating considerable conformational changes upon ligand binding. Interestingly, the calculated ΔCp was -32 cal mol(-1) K(-1), indicating that the accessible surface area is not the central change in substrate binding, and that other entropic forces, including conformational changes, are more predominant. The thermodynamic signature for GMP is inconsistent with rigid-body association, while dGMP showed more or less rigid-body association. These binding profiles explain the poor catalytic efficiency and low affinity for dGMP compared with GMP. At low temperature, the ligands bind to the receptor site under the effect of hydrophobic forces. Interestingly, by increasing the temperature, the entropic forces gradually vanish and proceed to a nonfavorable contribution, and the interaction occurs mainly through bonding, electrostatic forces, and van der Waals interactions. PMID:21360614

  7. Estrophilin immunoreactivity versus estrogen receptor binding activity in meningiomas: evidence for multiple estrogen binding sites

    SciTech Connect

    Lesch, K.P.; Schott, W.; Gross, S.

    1987-09-01

    The existence of estrogen receptors in human meningiomas has long been a controversial issue. This may be explained, in part, by apparent heterogeneity of estrogen binding sites in meningioma tissue. In this study, estrogen receptors were determined in 58 meningiomas with an enzyme immunoassay using monoclonal antibodies against human estrogen receptor protein (estrophilin) and with a sensitive radioligand binding assay using /sup 125/I-labeled estradiol (/sup 125/I-estradiol) as radioligand. Low levels of estrophilin immunoreactivity were found in tumors from 62% of patients, whereas radioligand binding activity was demonstrated in about 46% of the meningiomas examined. In eight (14%) tissue samples multiple binding sites for estradiol were observed. The immunoreactive binding sites correspond to the classical, high affinity estrogen receptors: the Kd for /sup 125/I-estradiol binding to the receptor was approximately 0.2 nM and the binding was specific for estrogens. The second, low affinity class of binding sites considerably influenced measurement of the classical receptor even at low ligand concentrations. The epidemiological and clinical data from patients with meningiomas, and the existence of specific estrogen receptors confirmed by immunochemical detection, may be important factors in a theory of oncogenesis.

  8. Natural ligand binding and transfer from liver fatty acid binding protein (LFABP) to membranes.

    PubMed

    De Gerónimo, Eduardo; Hagan, Robert M; Wilton, David C; Córsico, Betina

    2010-09-01

    Liver fatty acid-binding protein (LFABP) is distinctive among fatty acid-binding proteins because it binds more than one molecule of long-chain fatty acid and a variety of diverse ligands. Also, the transfer of fluorescent fatty acid analogues to model membranes under physiological ionic strength follows a different mechanism compared to most of the members of this family of intracellular lipid binding proteins. Tryptophan insertion mutants sensitive to ligand binding have allowed us to directly measure the binding affinity, ligand partitioning and transfer to model membranes of natural ligands. Binding of fatty acids shows a cooperative mechanism, while acyl-CoAs binding presents a hyperbolic behavior. Saturated fatty acids seem to have a stronger partition to protein vs. membranes, compared to unsaturated fatty acids. Natural ligand transfer rates are more than 200-fold higher compared to fluorescently-labeled analogues. Interestingly, oleoyl-CoA presents a markedly different transfer behavior compared to the rest of the ligands tested, probably indicating the possibility of specific targeting of ligands to different metabolic fates. PMID:20541621

  9. Quantification of Cooperativity in Heterodimer-DNA Binding Improves the Accuracy of Binding Specificity Models*

    PubMed Central

    Isakova, Alina; Berset, Yves; Hatzimanikatis, Vassily; Deplancke, Bart

    2016-01-01

    Many transcription factors (TFs) have the ability to cooperate on DNA elements as heterodimers. Despite the significance of TF heterodimerization for gene regulation, a quantitative understanding of cooperativity between various TF dimer partners and its impact on heterodimer DNA binding specificity models is still lacking. Here, we used a novel integrative approach, combining microfluidics-steered measurements of dimer-DNA assembly with mechanistic modeling of the implicated protein-protein-DNA interactions to quantitatively interrogate the cooperative DNA binding behavior of the adipogenic peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ (PPARγ):retinoid X receptor α (RXRα) heterodimer. Using the high throughput MITOMI (mechanically induced trapping of molecular interactions) platform, we derived equilibrium DNA binding data for PPARγ, RXRα, as well as the PPARγ:RXRα heterodimer to more than 300 target DNA sites and variants thereof. We then quantified cooperativity underlying heterodimer-DNA binding and derived an integrative heterodimer DNA binding constant. Using this cooperativity-inclusive constant, we were able to build a heterodimer-DNA binding specificity model that has superior predictive power than the one based on a regular one-site equilibrium. Our data further revealed that individual nucleotide substitutions within the target site affect the extent of cooperativity in PPARγ:RXRα-DNA binding. Our study therefore emphasizes the importance of assessing cooperativity when generating DNA binding specificity models for heterodimers. PMID:26912662

  10. Characterization of DNA Binding and Retinoic Acid Binding Properties of Retinoic Acid Receptor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Na; Schule, Roland; Mangelsdorf, David J.; Evans, Ronald M.

    1991-05-01

    High-level expression of the full-length human retinoic acid receptor (RAR) α and the DNA binding domain of the RAR in Escherichia coli was achieved by using a T7 RNA polymerase-directed expression system. After induction, full-length RAR protein was produced at an estimated level of 20% of the total bacterial proteins. Both intact RAR molecules and the DNA binding domain bind to the cognate DNA response element with high specificity in the absence of retinoic acid. However, this binding is enhanced to a great extent upon the addition of eukaryotic cell extracts. The factor responsible for this enhancement is heat-sensitive and forms a complex with RAR that binds to DNA and exhibits a distinct migration pattern in the gel-mobility-shift assay. The interaction site of the factor with RAR is localized in the 70-amino acid DNA binding region of RAR. The hormone binding ability of the RARα protein was assayed by a charcoal absorption assay and the RAR protein was found to bind to retinoic acid with a K_d of 2.1 x 10-10 M.

  11. Opioid binding sites in the guinea pig and rat kidney: Radioligand homogenate binding and autoradiography

    SciTech Connect

    Dissanayake, V.U.; Hughes, J.; Hunter, J.C. )

    1991-07-01

    The specific binding of the selective {mu}-, {delta}-, and {kappa}-opioid ligands (3H)(D-Ala2,MePhe4,Gly-ol5)enkephalin ((3H) DAGOL), (3H)(D-Pen2,D-Pen5)enkephalin ((3H)DPDPE), and (3H)U69593, respectively, to crude membranes of the guinea pig and rat whole kidney, kidney cortex, and kidney medulla was investigated. In addition, the distribution of specific 3H-opioid binding sites in the guinea pig and rat kidney was visualized by autoradiography. Homogenate binding and autoradiography demonstrated the absence of {mu}- and {kappa}-opioid binding sites in the guinea pig kidney. No opioid binding sites were demonstrable in the rat kidney. In the guinea pig whole kidney, cortex, and medulla, saturation studies demonstrated that (3H)DPDPE bound with high affinity (KD = 2.6-3.5 nM) to an apparently homogeneous population of binding sites (Bmax = 8.4-30 fmol/mg of protein). Competition studies using several opioid compounds confirmed the nature of the {delta}-opioid binding site. Autoradiography experiments demonstrated that specific (3H)DPDPE binding sites were distributed radially in regions of the inner and outer medulla and at the corticomedullary junction of the guinea pig kidney. Computer-assisted image analysis of saturation data yielded KD values (4.5-5.0 nM) that were in good agreement with those obtained from the homogenate binding studies. Further investigation of the {delta}-opioid binding site in medulla homogenates, using agonist ((3H)DPDPE) and antagonist ((3H)diprenorphine) binding in the presence of Na+, Mg2+, and nucleotides, suggested that the {delta}-opioid site is linked to a second messenger system via a GTP-binding protein. Further studies are required to establish the precise localization of the {delta} binding site in the guinea pig kidney and to determine the nature of the second messenger linked to the GTP-binding protein in the medulla.

  12. The receptor binding domain of botulinum neurotoxin serotype C binds phosphoinositides.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yanfeng; Varnum, Susan M

    2012-03-01

    Botulinum neurotoxins (BoNTs) are the most toxic proteins known for humans and animals with an extremely low LD(50) of ∼1 ng/kg. BoNTs generally require a protein and a ganglioside on the cell membrane surface for binding, which is known as a "dual receptor" mechanism for host intoxication. Recent studies have suggested that in addition to gangliosides, other membrane lipids such as phosphoinositides may be involved in the interactions with the receptor binding domain (HCR) of BoNTs for better membrane penetration. Using two independent lipid-binding assays, we tested the interactions of BoNT/C-HCR with lipids in vitro domain. BoNT/C-HCR was found to bind negatively charged phospholipids, preferentially phosphoinositides in both assays. Interactions with phosphoinositides may facilitate tighter binding between neuronal membranes and BoNT/C. PMID:22120109

  13. Presence of a highly efficient binding to bacterial contamination can distort data from binding studies

    SciTech Connect

    Balcar, V.J. )

    1990-12-01

    {sup 3}HGABA at low concentrations (5-10 nM) was bound by what appeared to be a GABA receptor binding site in bacterial contamination originating from a batch of distilled water. Under experimental conditions similar to those usually employed in {sup 3}HGABA binding studies, the apparent binding displayed a very high specific component and a high efficiency in terms of {sup 3}HGABA bound per mg of protein. The binding was blocked by muscimol but not by isoguvacine, SR95531 and nipecotic acid. These characteristics suggest that the presence of such spurious binding in the experiments using 3H-labeled ligands in brain homogenates may not always be very obvious and, moreover, it can result in subtle, but serious, distortions of data from such studies, which may not be immediately recognized.

  14. How Trp repressor binds to its operator.

    PubMed Central

    Staacke, D; Walter, B; Kisters-Woike, B; von Wilcken-Bergmann, B; Müller-Hill, B

    1990-01-01

    We propose that the generally accepted model of a single Trp repressor dimer binding to a center of symmetry in the natural trp operator (Otwinowski et al., 1988) is wrong. We show here that the Trp repressor binds to a sequence whose center is located four base pairs either to the right or to the left of the central axis of symmetry that was previously identified. We show that: (i) the oligonucleotide used by Otwinowski et al. is not retarded by the Trp repressor in a mobility shift assay under conditions wherein a shorter oligonucleotide carrying our consensus sequence is retarded, (ii) that methylation protection experiments on the full natural operator sequence and the short oligonucleotide protect similar patterns and (iii) that by varying every base in the shorter oligonucleotide, we can demonstrate an optimal sequence for Trp repressor binding. Images Fig. 3. Fig. 4. PMID:2189726

  15. Binding in short-term visual memory.

    PubMed

    Wheeler, Mary E; Treisman, Anne M

    2002-03-01

    The integration of complex information in working memory, and its effect on capacity, shape the limits of conscious cognition. The literature conflicts on whether short-term visual memory represents information as integrated objects. A change-detection paradigm using objects defined by color with location or shape was used to investigate binding in short-term visual memory. Results showed that features from the same dimension compete for capacity, whereas features from different dimensions can be stored in parallel. Binding between these features can occur, but focused attention is required to create and maintain the binding over time, and this integrated format is vulnerable to interference. In the proposed model, working memory capacity is limited both by the independent capacity of simple feature stores and by demands on attention networks that integrate this distributed information into complex but unified thought objects. PMID:11900102

  16. Binding of calcium and carbonate to polyacrylates.

    PubMed

    Tribello, Gareth A; Liew, CheeChin; Parrinello, Michele

    2009-05-21

    Polyacrylate molecules can be used to slow the growth of calcium carbonate. However, little is known about the mechanism by which the molecules impede the growth rate. A recent computational study (Bulo et al. Macromolecules 2007, 40, 3437) used metadynamics to investigate the binding of calcium to polyacrylate chains and has thrown some light on the coiling and precipitation of these polymers. We extend these simulations to examine the binding of calcium and carbonate to polyacrylate chains. We show that calcium complexed with both carbonate and polyacrylate is a very stable species. The free energies of calcium-carbonate-polyacrylate complexes, with different polymer configurations, are calculated, and differences in the free energy of the binding of carbonate are shown to be due to differences in the amount of steric hindrance about the calcium, which prevents the approach of the carbonate ion. PMID:19400592

  17. Flow cytometer measurement of binding assays

    DOEpatents

    Saunders, George C.

    1987-01-01

    A method of measuring the result of a binding assay that does not require separation of fluorescent smaller particles is disclosed. In a competitive binding assay the smaller fluorescent particles coated with antigen compete with antigen in the sample being analyzed for available binding sites on larger particles. In a sandwich assay, the smaller, fluorescent spheres coated with antibody attach themselves to molecules containing antigen that are attached to larger spheres coated with the same antibody. The separation of unattached, fluorescent smaller particles is made unnecessary by only counting the fluorescent events triggered by the laser of a flow cytometer when the event is caused by a particle with a light scatter measurement within a certain range corresponding to the presence of larger particles.

  18. [Water binding of adsorptive immobilized lipases].

    PubMed

    Loose, S; Meusel, D; Muschter, A; Ruthe, B

    1990-01-01

    It is supposed that not only the total water content of lipase preparations but more their state of water binding is of technological importance in enzymatic interesterification reactions in systems nearly free from water. The isotherms at 65 degrees C of two microbial lipases immobilized on various adsorbents as well as different adsorbents themselves are shown. The water binding capacity in the range of water content of technological interest decreases from the anion exchange resin Amberlyst A 21 via nonpolar adsorbent Amberlite XAD-2 to kieselguhr Celite 545. It is demonstrated that water binding by lipases is depending on temperature but is also affected by adsorptive immobilization. Adsorptive immobilized lipases show hysteresis, which is very important for preparing a definite water content of the enzyme preparations. PMID:2325750

  19. DNA Origami Seesaws as Comparative Binding Assay.

    PubMed

    Nickels, Philipp C; Høiberg, Hans C; Simmel, Stephanie S; Holzmeister, Phil; Tinnefeld, Philip; Liedl, Tim

    2016-06-16

    The application of commonly used force spectroscopy in biological systems is often limited by the need for an invasive tether connecting the molecules of interest to a bead or cantilever tip. Here we present a DNA origami-based prototype in a comparative binding assay. It has the advantage of in situ readout without any physical connection to the macroscopic world. The seesaw-like structure has a lever that is able to move freely relative to its base. Binding partners on each side force the structure into discrete and distinguishable conformations. Model experiments with competing DNA hybridisation reactions yielded a drastic shift towards the conformation with the stronger binding interaction. With reference DNA duplexes of tuneable length on one side, this device can be used to measure ligand interactions in comparative assays. PMID:27038073

  20. Conformation-controlled binding kinetics of antibodies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galanti, Marta; Fanelli, Duccio; Piazza, Francesco

    2016-01-01

    Antibodies are large, extremely flexible molecules, whose internal dynamics is certainly key to their astounding ability to bind antigens of all sizes, from small hormones to giant viruses. In this paper, we build a shape-based coarse-grained model of IgG molecules and show that it can be used to generate 3D conformations in agreement with single-molecule Cryo-Electron Tomography data. Furthermore, we elaborate a theoretical model that can be solved exactly to compute the binding rate constant of a small antigen to an IgG in a prescribed 3D conformation. Our model shows that the antigen binding process is tightly related to the internal dynamics of the IgG. Our findings pave the way for further investigation of the subtle connection between the dynamics and the function of large, flexible multi-valent molecular machines.

  1. Druggability of methyl-lysine binding sites.

    PubMed

    Santiago, C; Nguyen, K; Schapira, M

    2011-12-01

    Structural modules that specifically recognize--or read--methylated or acetylated lysine residues on histone peptides are important components of chromatin-mediated signaling and epigenetic regulation of gene expression. Deregulation of epigenetic mechanisms is associated with disease conditions, and antagonists of acetyl-lysine binding bromodomains are efficacious in animal models of cancer and inflammation, but little is known regarding the druggability of methyl-lysine binding modules. We conducted a systematic structural analysis of readers of methyl marks and derived a predictive druggability landscape of methyl-lysine binding modules. We show that these target classes are generally less druggable than bromodomains, but that some proteins stand as notable exceptions. PMID:22146969

  2. Conformation-controlled binding kinetics of antibodies.

    PubMed

    Galanti, Marta; Fanelli, Duccio; Piazza, Francesco

    2016-01-01

    Antibodies are large, extremely flexible molecules, whose internal dynamics is certainly key to their astounding ability to bind antigens of all sizes, from small hormones to giant viruses. In this paper, we build a shape-based coarse-grained model of IgG molecules and show that it can be used to generate 3D conformations in agreement with single-molecule Cryo-Electron Tomography data. Furthermore, we elaborate a theoretical model that can be solved exactly to compute the binding rate constant of a small antigen to an IgG in a prescribed 3D conformation. Our model shows that the antigen binding process is tightly related to the internal dynamics of the IgG. Our findings pave the way for further investigation of the subtle connection between the dynamics and the function of large, flexible multi-valent molecular machines. PMID:26755272

  3. Mercury-binding proteins of Mytilus edulis

    SciTech Connect

    Roesijadi, G.; Morris, J.E.; Calabrese, A.

    1981-11-01

    Mytilus edulis possesses low molecular weight, mercury-binding proteins. The predominant protein isolated from gill tissue is enriched in cysteinyl residues (8%) and possesses an amino acid composition similar to cadmium-binding proteins of mussels and oysters. Continuous exposure of mussels to 5 ..mu..g/l mercury results in spillover of mercury from these proteins to high molecular weight proteins. Antibodies to these proteins have been isolated, and development of immunoassays is presently underway. Preliminary studies to determine whether exposure of adult mussels to mercury will result in induction of mercury-binding proteins in offspring suggest that such proteins occur in larvae although additional studies are indicated for a conclusive demonstration.

  4. Binding kinetics of lock and key colloids.

    PubMed

    Colón-Meléndez, Laura; Beltran-Villegas, Daniel J; van Anders, Greg; Liu, Jun; Spellings, Matthew; Sacanna, Stefano; Pine, David J; Glotzer, Sharon C; Larson, Ronald G; Solomon, Michael J

    2015-05-01

    Using confocal microscopy and first passage time analysis, we measure and predict the rates of formation and breakage of polymer-depletion-induced bonds between lock-and-key colloidal particles and find that an indirect route to bond formation is accessed at a rate comparable to that of the direct formation of these bonds. In the indirect route, the pocket of the lock particle is accessed by nonspecific bonding of the key particle with the lock surface, followed by surface diffusion leading to specific binding in the pocket of the lock. The surprisingly high rate of indirect binding is facilitated by its high entropy relative to that of the pocket. Rate constants for forward and reverse transitions among free, nonspecific, and specific bonds are reported, compared to theoretical values, and used to determine the free energy difference between the nonspecific and specific binding states. PMID:25956122

  5. Conformation-controlled binding kinetics of antibodies

    PubMed Central

    Galanti, Marta; Fanelli, Duccio; Piazza, Francesco

    2016-01-01

    Antibodies are large, extremely flexible molecules, whose internal dynamics is certainly key to their astounding ability to bind antigens of all sizes, from small hormones to giant viruses. In this paper, we build a shape-based coarse-grained model of IgG molecules and show that it can be used to generate 3D conformations in agreement with single-molecule Cryo-Electron Tomography data. Furthermore, we elaborate a theoretical model that can be solved exactly to compute the binding rate constant of a small antigen to an IgG in a prescribed 3D conformation. Our model shows that the antigen binding process is tightly related to the internal dynamics of the IgG. Our findings pave the way for further investigation of the subtle connection between the dynamics and the function of large, flexible multi-valent molecular machines. PMID:26755272

  6. BINOCh: binding inference from nucleosome occupancy changes

    PubMed Central

    Meyer, Clifford A.; He, Housheng H.; Brown, Myles; Liu, X. Shirley

    2011-01-01

    Summary: Transcription factor binding events are frequently associated with a pattern of nucleosome occupancy changes in which nucleosomes flanking the binding site increase in occupancy, while those in the vicinity of the binding site itself are displaced. Genome-wide information on enhancer proximal nucleosome occupancy can be readily acquired using ChIP-seq targeting enhancer-related histone modifications such as H3K4me2. Here, we present a software package, BINOCh that allows biologists to use such data to infer the identity of key transcription factors that regulate the response of a cell to a stimulus or determine a program of differentiation. Availability: The BINOCh open source Python package is freely available at http://liulab.dfci.harvard.edu/BINOCh under the FreeBSD license. Contact: cliff@jimmy.harvard.edu; xsliu@jimmy.harvard.edu Supplementary information: Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online. PMID:21551136

  7. Calcium binding in pigmented and albino eyes.

    PubMed Central

    Dräger, U C

    1985-01-01

    The localization of calcium binding sites in eyes was determined autoradiographically after extracting endogenous Ca from tissue sections and replacing it with 45Ca. The strongest labeling was associated with pigmented tissues due to the high concentration of melanin, which was shown to bind Ca effectively and in a pH-dependent fashion. The second strongest binding was over the tapetum lucidum of the cat eye, and moderate labeling was associated with eye muscles and epithelium and endothelium of the cornea. The neural retina was generally more lightly labeled than the surrounding tissue of the eye; here the plexiform layers stood out in comparison to the nuclear layers, as did a band located internal to the photoreceptor outer segments. The possibility that the Ca buffering capacity of melanin may represent the common denominator for the various neurological defects found in hypopigmentation mutants is discussed. Images PMID:3863122

  8. Lipid binding capacity of spider hemocyanin.

    PubMed

    Cunningham, M; Gómez, C; Pollero, R

    1999-09-01

    The spider hemocyanin capacity to bind different lipid classes was evaluated by measuring some binding kinetic parameters. A very high lipoprotein (VHDL) which contains hemocyanin, was isolated from Polybetes pythagoricus hemolymph plasma and delipidated. Hemocyanin was bound separately to labelled palmitic acid, phosphatidylcholine, cholesterol, and triolein resulting in several artificial lipoprotein structures. It was possible to corroborate in vitro the lipid-hemocyanin interactions which had been previously observed and, consequently, the apolipoprotein role played by the respiratory pigment of spiders. Lipoproteins were analysed by gel filtration chromatography, and three subfractions with different hemocyanin structures were obtained. The four lipid classes were only bound to the hexameric structure (420 Kda), possibly to low polarity sites. Upon radioactivity measurements of the protein-associated lipids, maximal binding ratios (Mr), dissociation constants (Kd), and the maximal binding effectiveness at low lipid concentrations (Eo) were calculated. Lipid/protein ratios were increased proportionally to each available lipid concentration, following a hyperbolic binding model. Values of saturation, affinity, and maximal binding efficiency to hemocyanin were found to be different for each lipid class assayed. The highest lipid/protein ratio (41.5) was obtained with the free fatty acid and the lowest (7.2) with triolein. Phosphatidylcholine and cholesterol showed the highest relative affinities for hemocyanin (Kd = 63 x 10(-5) M and 74 x 10(-5) M, respectively). Phosphatidylcholine at low concentrations, similar to the physiological ones, presented the highest Eo value. Maximal lipid/protein ratios reached in vitro, were greater than those in P. pythagoricus VHDL, pointing out that hemocyanin could play the apolipoprotein role even under physiological conditions with a very high plasma lipid concentration. J. Exp. Zool. 284:368-373, 1999. PMID:10451413

  9. Oxygen binding by single crystals of hemoglobin.

    PubMed

    Rivetti, C; Mozzarelli, A; Rossi, G L; Henry, E R; Eaton, W A

    1993-03-23

    Reversible oxygen binding curves for single crystals of hemoglobin in the T quaternary structure have been measured using microspectrophotometry. Saturations were determined from complete visible spectra measured with light linearly polarized parallel to the a and c crystal axes. Striking differences were observed between the binding properties of hemoglobin in the crystal and those of hemoglobin in solution. Oxygen binding to the crystal is effectively noncooperative, the Bohr effect is absent, and there is no effect of chloride ion. Also, the oxygen affinity is lower than that of the T quaternary structure in solution. The absence of the Bohr effect supports Perutz's hypothesis on the key role of the salt bridges, which are known from X-ray crystallography to remain intact upon oxygenation. The low affinity and absence of the Bohr effect can be explained by a generalization of the MWC-PSK model (Monod, Wyman, & Changeux, 1965; Perutz, 1970; Szabo & Karplus, 1972) in which both high- and low-affinity tertiary conformations, with broken and unbroken salt bridges, respectively, are populated in the T quaternary structure. Because the alpha and beta hemes make different projections onto the two crystal axes, separate binding curves for the alpha and beta subunits could be calculated from the two measured binding curves. The approximately 5-fold difference between the oxygen affinities of the alpha and beta subunits is much smaller than that predicted from the crystallographic study of Dodson, Liddington, and co-workers, which suggested that oxygen binds only to the alpha hemes.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:8457555

  10. Mucin Binding Reduces Colistin Antimicrobial Activity

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Johnny X.; Blaskovich, Mark A. T.; Pelingon, Ruby; Ramu, Soumya; Kavanagh, Angela; Elliott, Alysha G.; Butler, Mark S.

    2015-01-01

    Colistin has found increasing use in treating drug-resistant bacterial lung infections, but potential interactions with pulmonary biomolecules have not been investigated. We postulated that colistin, like aminoglycoside antibiotics, may bind to secretory mucin in sputum or epithelial mucin that lines airways, reducing free drug levels. To test this hypothesis, we measured binding of colistin and other antibiotics to porcine mucin, a family of densely glycosylated proteins used as a surrogate for human sputum and airway mucin. Antibiotics were incubated in dialysis tubing with or without mucin, and concentrations of unbound antibiotics able to penetrate the dialysis tubing were measured over time using liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS). The percentage of antibiotic measured in the dialysate after 4 h in the presence of mucin, relative to the amount without mucin, was 15% for colistin, 16% for polymyxin B, 19% for tobramycin, 52% for ciprofloxacin, and 78% for daptomycin. Antibiotics with the strongest mucin binding had an overall polybasic positive charge, whereas those with comparatively little binding were less basic. When comparing MICs measured with or without added mucin, colistin and polymyxin B showed >100-fold increases in MICs for multiple Gram-negative bacteria. Preclinical evaluation of mucin binding should become a standard procedure when considering the potential pulmonary use of new or existing antibiotics, particularly those with a polybasic overall charge. In the airways, mucin binding may reduce the antibacterial efficacy of inhaled or intravenously administered colistin, and the presence of sub-MIC effective antibiotic concentrations could result in the development of antibiotic resistance. PMID:26169405