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Sample records for demyelinating disease masquerading

  1. Fulminant Demyelinating Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Rahmlow, Megan R.; Kantarci, Orhun

    2013-01-01

    Fulminant demyelinating disease is a heading that covers acute disseminated encephalomyelitis and its variant acute hemorrhagic leukoencephalitis (Hurst disease), severe relapses of multiple sclerosis (MS), variants of MS (tumefactive MS, Marburg variant, Balo concentric sclerosis, myelinoclastic diffuse sclerosis), and neuromyelitis optica-spectrum disorders associated with aquaporin autoimmunity. These categories of inflammatory demyelinating disease often prompt hospital admission and many necessitate intensive care monitoring due to the aggressive nature of the illness and associated neurologic morbidity. In this review, we highlight the discriminating clinical, radiographic, and pathologic features of these disorders. Acute management is often accomplished with use of high-dose intravenous steroids and plasma exchange. Aggressive disease may respond to immunosuppression. Prognosis for recovery varies among the disorders but most patients improve. Factors influencing outcome are also discussed. PMID:23983890

  2. Neuroradiological evaluation of demyelinating disease

    PubMed Central

    Tillema, Jan-Mendelt

    2013-01-01

    Central nervous system inflammatory demyelinating disease can affect patients across the life span. Consensus definitions and criteria of all of the different acquired demyelinating diseases that fall on this spectrum have magnetic resonance imaging criteria. The advances of both neuroimaging techniques and important discoveries in immunology have produced an improved understanding of these conditions and classification. Neuroimaging plays a central role in the accurate diagnosis, prognosis, disease monitoring and research efforts that are being undertaken in this disease. This review focuses on the imaging spectrum of acquired demyelinating disease. PMID:23858328

  3. The great masquerader: Behcet's disease.

    PubMed

    Nordstrom, Edra; Fischer, Monika

    2014-01-01

    This report describes the case of a 44-year-old Caucasian woman of Northern European descent with a medical history of pyoderma gangrenosum, chronic abdominal pain and erythema nodosum which required intermittent use of high-dose steroids that failed to improve her symptoms. The patient was initially diagnosed with Crohn's disease and most recently with sclerosing mesenteritis. She presented to the hospital with worsening abdominal pain. She was found to have recurrent painful aphthous oral, genital and perianal ulcers and a clinical diagnosis of Behçet's disease was made. Her hospitalisation was complicated by haemoptysis, and bronchoscopy revealed alveolar haemorrhage. Treatment was initiated with three days of pulse intravenous solumedrol 1 g/day and cyclophosphamide at 700 mg/m(2). The case had a favourable outcome despite the initial diagnostic challenges. This report emphasises that systemic diseases, including Behçet's disease, can have variable presentations and can be frequently misdiagnosed. PMID:24748137

  4. [Demyelinating diseases in children with acute neurological symptoms].

    PubMed

    Olofsson, Isa Amalie; Skov, Liselotte; Miranda, Maria Jose

    2015-12-01

    Demyelinating diseases in children is a broad group of illnesses, which affect the central nervous system. Demyelinating diseases can be monophasic or chronic and comprise acute disseminated encephalomyelitis, optic neuritis, transverse myelitis, multiple sclerosis and neuromyelitis optica. Demyelinating diseases are rare, but it is important for the physician to recognize these diseases, as well as to understand the differential diagnoses. This review summarizes the current knowledge of demyelinating disorders in children, focusing on an approach to diagnosis and management. PMID:26651911

  5. Paediatric UK demyelinating disease longitudinal study (PUDDLS)

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background There is evidence that at least 5% of Multiple sclerosis (MS) cases manifest in childhood. Children with MS present with a demyelinating episode involving single or multiple symptoms prior to developing a second event (usually within two years) to then meet criteria for diagnosis. There is evidence from adult cohorts that the incidence and sex ratios of MS are changing and that children of immigrants have a higher risk for developing MS. A paediatric population should reflect the vanguard of such changes and may reflect trends yet to be observed in adult cohorts. Studying a paediatric population from the first demyelinating event will allow us to test these hypotheses, and may offer further valuable insights into the genetic and environmental interactions in the pathogenesis of MS. Methods/Design The Paediatric UK Demyelinating Disease Longitudinal Study (PUDDLS) is a prospective longitudinal observational study which aims to determine the natural history, predictors and outcomes of childhood CNS inflammatory demyelinating diseases. PUDDLS will involve centres in the UK, and will establish a cohort of children affected with a first CNS inflammatory demyelinating event for long-term follow up by recruiting for approximately 5 years. PUDDLS will also establish a biological sample archive (CSF, serum, and DNA), allowing future hypothesis driven research. For example, the future discovery of a biomarker will allow validation within this dataset for the evaluation of novel biomarkers. Patients will also be requested to consent to be contacted in the future. A secondary aim is to collaborate internationally with the International Paediatric Multiple Sclerosis Study Group when future collaborative studies are proposed, whilst sharing a minimal anonymised dataset. PUDDLS is the second of two jointly funded studies. The first (UCID-SS) is an epidemiological surveillance study that already received ethical approvals, and started on the 1st September 2009. There is

  6. Immunopathophysiology of pediatric CNS inflammatory demyelinating diseases.

    PubMed

    Bar-Or, Amit; Hintzen, Rogier Q; Dale, Russell C; Rostasy, Kevin; Brück, Wolfgang; Chitnis, Tanuja

    2016-08-30

    Elucidating pathophysiologic mechanisms underlying the spectrum of pediatric-onset CNS demyelinating diseases, particularly those that may distinguish multiple sclerosis (MS) from other entities, promises to both improve diagnostics and guide more-informed therapeutic decisions. Observations that pediatric- and adult-onset MS share the same genetic and environmental risk factors support the view that these conditions represent essentially the same illness manifesting at different ages. Nonetheless, special consideration must be given when CNS inflammation manifests in early life, at a time when multiple organs (including immune and nervous systems) are actively maturing. CSF analysis in pediatric-onset MS points to chronic CNS inflammation, supported by observations from limited pathologic material available for study. Emerging results implicate abnormalities in both effector and regulatory T cell subsets, and potentially immune senescence, in children with MS. Although CNS-directed antibodies (including antibodies recognizing myelin antigens; Kir4.1) can be documented in pediatric-onset MS, their pathophysiologic significance (as in adults) remains unclear. This is in contrast to the presence of serum and/or CSF antibodies recognizing aquaporin-4, which, when measured using validated cell-based assays, supports the diagnosis of a neuromyelitis optica spectrum disorder, distinct from MS. Presence of anti-myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein antibodies documented with similar cell-based assays may also be associated with pathophysiologically distinct disease phenotypes in children. The substantial impact of pediatric-onset MS on normal brain development and function underscores the importance of elucidating both the immunobiology and neurobiology of disease. Ongoing efforts are aimed at developing and validating biological measures that define pathophysiologically distinct monophasic and chronic forms of pediatric CNS demyelination. PMID:27572856

  7. Acute Demyelinating Disease after Oral Therapy with Herbal Extracts

    PubMed Central

    Kostianovsky, Alex; Maskin, Patricio; Noriega, María M.; Soler, Cristina; Bonelli, Ignacio; Riley, Claire S.; O'Connor, Kevin C.; Saubidet, Cristi´n López; Alvarez, Paulino A.

    2011-01-01

    Central nervous system demyelinating processes such as multiple sclerosis and acute disseminated encephalomyelitis constitute a group of diseases not completely understood in their physiopathology. Environmental and toxic insults are thought to play a role in priming autoimmunity. The aim of the present report is to describe a case of acute demyelinating disease with fatal outcome occurring 15 days after oral exposure to herbal extracts. PMID:21738505

  8. Oligodendrocyte ablation as a tool to study demyelinating diseases

    PubMed Central

    Pajoohesh-Ganji, Ahdeah; Miller, Robert H.

    2016-01-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is an autoimmune mediated neurodegenerative disease characterized by demyelination and oligodendrocyte (OL) loss in the central nervous system and accompanied by local inflammation and infiltration of peripheral immune cells. Although many risk factors and symptoms have been identified in MS, the pathology is complicated and the cause remains unknown. It is also unclear whether OL apoptosis precedes the inflammation or whether the local inflammation is the cause of OL death and demyelination. This review briefly discusses several models that have been developed to specifically ablate oligodendrocytes in an effort to separate the effects of demyelination from inflammation. PMID:27482202

  9. Oligodendrocyte ablation as a tool to study demyelinating diseases.

    PubMed

    Pajoohesh-Ganji, Ahdeah; Miller, Robert H

    2016-06-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is an autoimmune mediated neurodegenerative disease characterized by demyelination and oligodendrocyte (OL) loss in the central nervous system and accompanied by local inflammation and infiltration of peripheral immune cells. Although many risk factors and symptoms have been identified in MS, the pathology is complicated and the cause remains unknown. It is also unclear whether OL apoptosis precedes the inflammation or whether the local inflammation is the cause of OL death and demyelination. This review briefly discusses several models that have been developed to specifically ablate oligodendrocytes in an effort to separate the effects of demyelination from inflammation. PMID:27482202

  10. Fulminant Demyelinating Diseases of the Central Nervous System.

    PubMed

    Bevan, Carolyn J; Cree, Bruce A

    2015-12-01

    Fulminant demyelinating diseases of the central nervous system include acute disseminated encephalomyelitis, the related acute hemorrhagic leukoencephalitis, multiple sclerosis variants, neuromyelitis optica spectrum disorders, and idiopathic transverse myelitis. These syndromes are often managed with similar acute treatments including high-dose corticosteroids and plasmapheresis; however, long-term management varies. Although the prognosis of fulminant demyelinating disease was historically poor, outcomes today may be improved due to earlier diagnosis, rapid implementation of anti-inflammatory therapies such as high-dose corticosteroids and plasmapheresis, and improved supportive care. PMID:26595866

  11. Movement disorders in multiple sclerosis and other demyelinating diseases.

    PubMed

    Mehanna, Raja; Jankovic, Joseph

    2013-05-15

    Multiple sclerosis is an autoimmune inflammatory demyelinating disease of the central nervous system characterized by dissemination of the lesions in time and space. While tremor is frequently seen in patients with multiple sclerosis, other movement disorders such as parkinsonism, dystonia, chorea, ballism, paroxysmal dystonia, paroxysmal chorea, myoclonus, tourettism, restless leg syndrome and hemifacial spasm are less frequently reported. In this systematic review of the literature, we describe the different movement disorders reported in patients with multiple sclerosis and attempt to characterize their relation with the underlying demyelinating process. We also summarize the reports of movement disorders described in other demyelinating diseases such as neuromyelitis optica, acute disseminated encephalomyelitis and central pontine myelinolysis. PMID:23522528

  12. Huntington’s disease masquerading as spinocerebellar ataxia

    PubMed Central

    Rodríguez-Quiroga, Sergio Alejandro; Gonzalez-Morón, Dolores; Garretto, Nelida; Kauffman, Marcelo Andres

    2013-01-01

    Huntington’s disease (HD) is a neurodegenerative disorder of the central nervous system characterised by the presence of choreic abnormal movements, behavioural or psychiatric disturbances and dementia. Noteworthy, despite atypical motor symptoms other than chorea have been reported as initial presentation in some patients, a very few number of HD patients, presenting at onset mostly cerebellar dysfunction masquerading dominant spinocerebellar ataxias (SCA), were occasionally reported. We report the case of a 42-year-old man with a 5-year history of gait disturbance, dysarthria and cognitive impairment and familial antecedents of dementia and movement disorders. Initially the clinical picture suggested the diagnosis of a dominant SCA, but finally a diagnosis of HD was made based on the molecular evidence of abnormal 39 Cytosine-Adenine-Guanine (CAG) repeats in exon 1 of Huntingtin gene. The authors highlight the importance of suspecting HD in the aetiology of spinocerebellar ataxias when dementia is a prominent feature in the proband or their family. PMID:23853009

  13. Autoantibodies to tetraspanins (CD9, CD81 and CD82) in demyelinating diseases.

    PubMed

    Miyaji, Kazuki; Paul, Friedemann; Shahrizaila, Nortina; Umapathi, Thirugnanam; Yuki, Nobuhiro

    2016-02-15

    Tetraspanin family proteins, CD9, CD81 and CD82 are expressed in the oligodendrocytes and Schwann cells. We investigated autoantibodies to tetraspanin proteins in patients with demyelinating diseases. Sera were collected from 119 multiple sclerosis patients, 19 neuromyelitis optica, 42 acute inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy, 23 chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy and 13 acute motor axonal neuropathy as well as 55 healthy controls. Few multiple sclerosis and acute inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy patients had autoantibodies that were weakly reactive to CD9 or CD81 but the significance is unclear. It is unlikely that these autoantibodies are pathogenic or serve as potential biomarkers in demyelinating diseases. PMID:26857499

  14. FLT PET/CT in a Case of Demyelinating Disease.

    PubMed

    Nikaki, Alexandra; Prassopoulos, Vasilios; Efthimiadou, Roxani; Tsougos, Ioannis; Georgoulias, Panagiotis

    2016-07-01

    A 32-year-old woman, with spare previous medical history, presented with neurological symptoms of numbness and diplopia. The patient underwent brain MRI, which revealed a lesion of abnormal signal in the midbrain that could be attributed to subacute stroke; however, consecutive MRIs revealed multiple lesions of abnormal signal pointing to demyelinating disease. During symptoms investigation and MRI findings assessment, the patient underwent a FLT PET/CT examination, which revealed lesions of increased FLT uptake, probably indicating active disease and blood-brain barrier disruption. PMID:27088385

  15. Tumefactive demyelinating disease with isolated spinal cord involvement

    PubMed Central

    Kirsch, Claudia F

    2014-01-01

    Tumefactive multiple sclerosis (TMS) is an unusual variant of demyelinating disease. TMS has a variable and unknown progression and presents with features similar to a neoplasm making the determination a diagnostic challenge to clinicians. This report presents one of the very few reported cases of isolated spinal cord TMS, and the second case to describe TMS of the lower spinal cord, given that the lesions are typically cervical. This case study presents a diagnostic approach based on clinical, laboratory, and imaging characteristics, as well as sheds some light on the response to therapy and disease evolution. PMID:25298871

  16. Deimination restores inner retinal visual function in murine demyelinating disease

    PubMed Central

    Enriquez-Algeciras, Mabel; Ding, Di; Mastronardi, Fabrizio G.; Marc, Robert E.; Porciatti, Vittorio; Bhattacharya, Sanjoy K.

    2013-01-01

    Progressive loss of visual function frequently accompanies demyelinating diseases such as multiple sclerosis (MS) and is hypothesized to be the result of damage to the axons and soma of neurons. Here, we show that dendritic impairment is also involved in these diseases. Deimination, a posttranslational modification, was reduced in the retinal ganglion cell layer of MS patients and in a transgenic mouse model of MS (ND4 mice). Reduced deimination accompanied a decrease in inner retinal function in ND4 mice, indicating loss of vision. Local restoration of deimination dramatically improved retinal function and elongation of neurites in isolated neurons. Further, neurite length was decreased by downregulation of deimination or siRNA knockdown of the export-binding protein REF, a primary target for deimination in these cells. REF localized to dendrites and bound selective mRNAs and translation machinery to promote protein synthesis. Thus, protein deimination and dendritic outgrowth play key roles in visual function and may be a general feature of demyelinating diseases. PMID:23281397

  17. Demyelination and axonal preservation in a transgenic mouse model of Pelizaeus-Merzbacher disease

    PubMed Central

    Edgar, Julia M; McCulloch, Mailis C; Montague, Paul; Brown, Angus M; Thilemann, Sebastian; Pratola, Laura; Gruenenfelder, Fredrik I; Griffiths, Ian R; Nave, Klaus-Armin

    2010-01-01

    It is widely thought that demyelination contributes to the degeneration of axons and, in combination with acute inflammatory injury, is responsible for progressive axonal loss and persistent clinical disability in inflammatory demyelinating disease. In this study we sought to characterize the relationship between demyelination, inflammation and axonal transport changes using a Plp1-transgenic mouse model of Pelizaeus-Merzbacher disease. In the optic pathway of this non-immune mediated model of demyelination, myelin loss progresses from the optic nerve head towards the brain, over a period of months. Axonal transport is functionally perturbed at sites associated with local inflammation and ‘damaged’ myelin. Surprisingly, where demyelination is complete, naked axons appear well preserved despite a significant reduction of axonal transport. Our results suggest that neuroinflammation and/or oligodendrocyte dysfunction are more deleterious for axonal health than demyelination per se, at least in the short term. PMID:20091761

  18. SURF1 deficiency causes demyelinating Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease

    PubMed Central

    Ghezzi, Daniele; Chassagne, Maïté; Mayençon, Martine; Padet, Sylvie; Melchionda, Laura; Rouvet, Isabelle; Lannes, Béatrice; Bozon, Dominique; Latour, Philippe; Zeviani, Massimo; Mousson de Camaret, Bénédicte

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To investigate whether mutations in the SURF1 gene are a cause of Charcot-Marie-Tooth (CMT) disease. Methods: We describe 2 patients from a consanguineous family with demyelinating autosomal recessive CMT disease (CMT4) associated with the homozygous splice site mutation c.107-2A>G in the SURF1 gene, encoding an assembly factor of the mitochondrial respiratory chain complex IV. This observation led us to hypothesize that mutations in SURF1 might be an unrecognized cause of CMT4, and we investigated SURF1 in a total of 40 unrelated patients with CMT4 after exclusion of mutations in known CMT4 genes. The functional impact of c.107-2A>G on splicing, amount of SURF1 protein, and on complex IV activity and assembly was analyzed. Results: Another patient with CMT4 was found to harbor 2 additional SURF1 mutations. All 3 patients with SURF1-associated CMT4 presented with severe childhood-onset neuropathy, motor nerve conduction velocities <25 m/s, and lactic acidosis. Two patients had brain MRI abnormalities, including putaminal and periaqueductal lesions, and developed cerebellar ataxia years after polyneuropathy. The c.107-2A>G mutation produced no normally spliced transcript, leading to SURF1 absence. However, complex IV remained partially functional in muscle and fibroblasts. Conclusions: We found SURF1 mutations in 5% of families (2/41) presenting with CMT4. SURF1 should be systematically screened in patients with childhood-onset severe demyelinating neuropathy and additional features such as lactic acidosis, brain MRI abnormalities, and cerebellar ataxia developing years after polyneuropathy. PMID:24027061

  19. Iron and copper in progressive demyelination--New lessons from Skogholt's disease.

    PubMed

    Aspli, Klaus Thanke; Flaten, Trond Peder; Roos, Per M; Holmøy, Trygve; Skogholt, Jon H; Aaseth, Jan

    2015-01-01

    The pathophysiological mechanisms of progressive demyelinating disorders including multiple sclerosis are incompletely understood. Increasing evidence indicates a role for trace metals in the progression of several neurodegenerative disorders. The study of Skogholt disease, a recently discovered demyelinating disease affecting both the central and peripheral nervous system, might shed some light on the mechanisms underlying demyelination. Cerebrospinal fluid iron and copper concentrations are about four times higher in Skogholt patients than in controls. The transit into cerebrospinal fluid of these elements from blood probably occurs in protein bound form. We hypothesize that exchangeable fractions of iron and copper are further transferred from cerebrospinal fluid into myelin, thereby contributing to the pathogenesis of demyelination. Free or weakly bound iron and copper ions may exert their toxic action on myelin by catalyzing production of oxygen radicals. Similarities to demyelinating processes in multiple sclerosis and other myelinopathies are discussed. PMID:25563774

  20. Clinical and Pharmacological Aspects of Inflammatory Demyelinating Diseases in Childhood: An Update

    PubMed Central

    Spalice, Alberto; Parisi, Pasquale; Papetti, Laura; Nicita, Francesco; Ursitti, Fabiana; Del Balzo, Francesca; Properzi, Enrico; Verrotti, Alberto; Ruggieri, Martino; Iannetti, Paola

    2010-01-01

    Inflammatory demyelinating diseases comprise a spectrum of disorders affecting the myelin of the central and peripheral nervous system. These diseases can usually be differentiated on the basis of clinical, radiological, laboratory and pathological findings. Recent studies have contributed to current awareness that inflammatory demyelinating diseases are not restricted to the adult age group, but are more common in pediatric age than previously believed. Some of pediatric inflammatory demyelinating diseases carry an unfavorable long-term prognosis but appropriate treatments can improve the outcome. The possibility of physical and cognitive disability resulting from these diseases, highlights the urgent need for therapeutic strategies for neurorehabilitation, neuroregeneration, and neurorepair. This review discusses characteristics of primary demyelinating diseases more frequently observed in childhood, focusing on epidemiology, clinical aspects and treatments. PMID:21119885

  1. Clinical and pharmacological aspects of inflammatory demyelinating diseases in childhood: an update.

    PubMed

    Spalice, Alberto; Parisi, Pasquale; Papetti, Laura; Nicita, Francesco; Ursitti, Fabiana; Del Balzo, Francesca; Properzi, Enrico; Verrotti, Alberto; Ruggieri, Martino; Iannetti, Paola

    2010-06-01

    Inflammatory demyelinating diseases comprise a spectrum of disorders affecting the myelin of the central and peripheral nervous system. These diseases can usually be differentiated on the basis of clinical, radiological, laboratory and pathological findings. Recent studies have contributed to current awareness that inflammatory demyelinating diseases are not restricted to the adult age group, but are more common in pediatric age than previously believed. Some of pediatric inflammatory demyelinating diseases carry an unfavorable long-term prognosis but appropriate treatments can improve the outcome. The possibility of physical and cognitive disability resulting from these diseases, highlights the urgent need for therapeutic strategies for neurorehabilitation, neuroregeneration, and neurorepair. This review discusses characteristics of primary demyelinating diseases more frequently observed in childhood, focusing on epidemiology, clinical aspects and treatments. PMID:21119885

  2. [Development and regeneration of oligodendrocytes: therapeutic perspectives in demyelinating diseases].

    PubMed

    Dubois-Dalcq, M

    2005-01-01

    The function of the central nervous system (CNS) is in great part depending on glial cells as, for instance, radial glial cells give rise to cortical neurons, and oligodendrocytes synthesize an immense specialized membrane that enwraps axons to make myelin internodes. Myelin allows fast saltatory conduction of action potentials along myelinated nerve tracts and assures the survival of axons. Oligodendrocytes precursors (OP) emerge during development, first in the spinal cord and later in the telencephalon from multipotential neural precursors in germinative zones around the cerebral ventricles. Morphogens and specific growth factors stimulate the growth, migration and survival of OPs toward axons, culminating in myelination. Such precursors can be isolated from human brain and persist in the adult CNS, allowing some degree of remyelination in the course of a demyelinating disease caused by an infectious agent or inflammation such as multiple sclerosis (MS). These remyelinating cells can recapitulate some molecular events of myelination while new OPs are generated by neural stem cells in the subventricular zones and niches. This natural repair process often decreases with time in man, raising questions about the appropriateness of rodent animal models where remyelination is robust. The challenge today in MS is to develop a pharmacology of myelin repair by endogenous precursors which, if successful, might be more likely to result in clinical benefits than transplantation of myelin-forming cells, shown to be so efficient in rodent models. PMID:16768245

  3. Imaging in Pediatric Demyelinating and Inflammatory Diseases of Brain- Part 2.

    PubMed

    Sudhakar, Sniya Valsa; Muthusamy, Karthik; Mani, Sunithi; Gibikote, Sridhar; Shroff, Manohar

    2016-09-01

    Imaging plays an important role in diagnosis, management, prognostication and follow up of pediatric demyelinating and inflammatory diseases of brain and forms an integral part of the diagnostic criteria. This article reviews the spectrum of aquaporinopathies with an in-depth discussion on present criteria and differentiation from other demyelinating diseases with clinical vignettes for illustration; the latter part of article deals with the spectrum of CNS vasculitis. PMID:27130513

  4. Chronic Inflammatory Demyelinating Polyneuropathy Following Anti-TNF-α Therapy With Infliximab for Crohn's Disease.

    PubMed

    Kamel, Amir Y; Concepcion, Orestes; Schlachterman, Alexander; Glover, Sarah; Forsmark, Christopher Y

    2016-04-01

    We present a 29-year-old male with Crohn's disease who developed chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy (CIDP) related to infliximab therapy. He developed lower extremity weakness and dysesthesia 3 weeks after a fourth infliximab dose. Laboratory examination revealed an elevated cerebrospinal fluid protein without pleocytosis. The patient initially responded to plasmapheresis therapy with marked symptomatic improvement, but relapsed and was refractory to subsequent treatments with plasmaphereisis, intravenous immunoglobulin, and glucocorticoids. While a causal relationship between infliximab and CIDP cannot be proven, clinicians should monitor Crohn's disease patients who are receiving TNF-α antagonists for neurologic symptoms suggestive of demyelinating disease. PMID:27144200

  5. Chronic Inflammatory Demyelinating Polyneuropathy Following Anti-TNF-α Therapy With Infliximab for Crohn's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Concepcion, Orestes; Schlachterman, Alexander; Glover, Sarah; Forsmark, Christopher Y.

    2016-01-01

    We present a 29-year-old male with Crohn's disease who developed chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy (CIDP) related to infliximab therapy. He developed lower extremity weakness and dysesthesia 3 weeks after a fourth infliximab dose. Laboratory examination revealed an elevated cerebrospinal fluid protein without pleocytosis. The patient initially responded to plasmapheresis therapy with marked symptomatic improvement, but relapsed and was refractory to subsequent treatments with plasmaphereisis, intravenous immunoglobulin, and glucocorticoids. While a causal relationship between infliximab and CIDP cannot be proven, clinicians should monitor Crohn's disease patients who are receiving TNF-α antagonists for neurologic symptoms suggestive of demyelinating disease. PMID:27144200

  6. Imaging in Pediatric Demyelinating and Inflammatory Diseases of the Brain- Part 1.

    PubMed

    Sudhakar, Sniya Valsa; Muthusamy, Karthik; Mani, Sunithi; Gibikote, Sridhar; Shroff, Manohar

    2016-09-01

    Imaging plays an important role in the diagnosis, management, prognostication and follow up of pediatric demyelinating and inflammatory diseases of the brain and forms an integral part of the diagnostic criteria. Conventional and advanced MR imaging is the first and only reliable imaging modality. This article reviews the typical and atypical imaging features of common and some uncommon demyelinating and inflammatory diseases with emphasis on the criteria for categorization. Imaging protocols and the role of advanced imaging techniques are also covered appropriately. PMID:26634264

  7. IgG4 disease: The great masquerader.

    PubMed

    Yadav, Divya; Liu, Xiuli; Chahal, Prabhleen

    2016-06-01

    Systemic IgG4 disease can have a wide spectrum of clinical presentation, which can mimic several other disease entities. In this report, we describe a series of two patients with IgG4-related disease who were referred to us initially with the diagnosis of acute cholecystitis and the second patient with metastatic pancreatic adenocarcinoma with peritoneal metastasis respectively. PMID:26164258

  8. Pain and spinal cord imaging measures in children with demyelinating disease

    PubMed Central

    Barakat, Nadia; Gorman, Mark P.; Benson, Leslie; Becerra, Lino; Borsook, David

    2015-01-01

    Pain is a significant problem in diseases affecting the spinal cord, including demyelinating disease. To date, studies have examined the reliability of clinical measures for assessing and classifying the severity of spinal cord injury (SCI) and also to evaluate SCI-related pain. Most of this research has focused on adult populations and patients with traumatic injuries. Little research exists regarding pediatric spinal cord demyelinating disease. One reason for this is the lack of reliable and useful approaches to measuring spinal cord changes since currently used diagnostic imaging has limited specificity for quantitative measures of demyelination. No single imaging technique demonstrates sufficiently high sensitivity or specificity to myelin, and strong correlation with clinical measures. However, recent advances in diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) and magnetization transfer imaging (MTI) measures are considered promising in providing increasingly useful and specific information on spinal cord damage. Findings from these quantitative imaging modalities correlate with the extent of demyelination and remyelination. These techniques may be of potential use for defining the evolution of the disease state, how it may affect specific spinal cord pathways, and contribute to the management of pediatric demyelination syndromes. Since pain is a major presenting symptom in patients with transverse myelitis, the disease is an ideal model to evaluate imaging methods to define these regional changes within the spinal cord. In this review we summarize (1) pediatric demyelinating conditions affecting the spinal cord; (2) their distinguishing features; and (3) current diagnostic and classification methods with particular focus on pain pathways. We also focus on concepts that are essential in developing strategies for the detection, monitoring, treatment and repair of pediatric myelitis. PMID:26509120

  9. Therapeutic Approach to the Management of Pediatric Demyelinating Disease: Multiple Sclerosis and Acute Disseminated Encephalomyelitis.

    PubMed

    Brenton, J Nicholas; Banwell, Brenda L

    2016-01-01

    Acquired pediatric demyelinating diseases manifest acutely with optic neuritis, transverse myelitis, acute disseminated encephalomyelitis, or with various other acute deficits in focal or polyfocal areas of the central nervous system. Patients may experience a monophasic illness (as in the case of acute disseminated encephalomyelitis) or one that may manifest as a chronic, relapsing disease [e.g., multiple sclerosis (MS)]. The diagnosis of pediatric MS and other demyelinating disorders of childhood has been facilitated by consensus statements regarding diagnostic definitions. Treatment of pediatric MS has been modeled after data obtained from clinical trials in adult-onset MS. There are now an increasing number of new therapeutic agents for MS, and many will be formally studied for use in pediatric patients. There are important efficacy and safety concerns regarding the use of these therapies in children and young adults. This review will discuss acute management as well as chronic immunotherapies in acquired pediatric demyelination. PMID:26496907

  10. The great masquerader: Behçet's disease

    PubMed Central

    Nordstrom, Edra; Fischer, Monika

    2014-01-01

    This report describes the case of a 44-year-old Caucasian woman of Northern European descent with a medical history of pyoderma gangrenosum, chronic abdominal pain and erythema nodosum which required intermittent use of high-dose steroids that failed to improve her symptoms. The patient was initially diagnosed with Crohn's disease and most recently with sclerosing mesenteritis. She presented to the hospital with worsening abdominal pain. She was found to have recurrent painful aphthous oral, genital and perianal ulcers and a clinical diagnosis of Behçet's disease was made. Her hospitalisation was complicated by haemoptysis, and bronchoscopy revealed alveolar haemorrhage. Treatment was initiated with three days of pulse intravenous solumedrol 1 g/day and cyclophosphamide at 700 mg/m2. The case had a favourable outcome despite the initial diagnostic challenges. This report emphasises that systemic diseases, including Behçet's disease, can have variable presentations and can be frequently misdiagnosed. PMID:24748137

  11. The road to remyelination in demyelinating diseases: current status and prospects for clinical treatment.

    PubMed

    Wootla, Bharath; Watzlawik, Jens O; Denic, Aleksandar; Rodriguez, Moses

    2013-06-01

    Within CNS disorders, demyelinating diseases are among the most devastating and cost intensive due to long-term disabilities affecting relatively young patients. Multiple sclerosis, a chronic inflammatory demyelinating disease in which the persistent inhibitory microenvironment of the resident oligodendrocyte precursor cells abrogates regeneration of myelin sheaths, is the most prominent disease in the spectrum of demyelinating diseases. The essential goal is to stimulate creation of new myelin sheaths on the demyelinated axons, leading to restoration of saltatory conduction and resolving functional deficits. The past few decades witnessed significant efforts to understand the cellular interactions at the lesion site with studies suggesting efficient remyelination as a prerequisite for functional repair. Despite its proven efficacy in experimental models, immunosuppression has not had profound clinical consequences in multiple sclerosis, which argued for a paradigm shift in the design of therapeutics aiming to achieve remyelination. For example, targeting oligodendrocytes themselves may drive remyelination in the CNS. This group and others have demonstrated that natural autoreactive antibodies directed at oligodendrocyte progenitors participate in remyelination. Accordingly, the authors developed a recombinant autoreactive natural human IgM antibody with therapeutic potential for remyelination. PMID:23730884

  12. Progressive wheeze: atrial myxoma masquerading as chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    PubMed

    Sinha, Aish; Apps, Andrew; Liong, Wei Chuen; Firoozan, Soroosh

    2015-01-01

    Atrial myxoma, the commonest primary cardiac neoplasm, presents with symptoms of heart failure, embolic phenomena or constitutional upset. We present an atypical case, with wheeze and symptomatic exacerbations typical of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. With no early clinical evidence of heart failure, the patient was managed with inhaled steroids and bronchodilators, with little relief. Only when the patient was in extremis requiring intubation, due to respiratory failure, did clinical evidence of left heart failure become apparent, with echocardiography demonstrating a massive left atrial myxoma obstructing the mitral valve annulus. Following successful surgical resection, the patient's symptoms fully abated. This case highlights the importance of considering cardiac wheeze in those initially managed as obstructive airway disease not responding in a typical fashion to initial bronchodilator therapy, and particularly in those with rapidly progressive symptoms. Such patients should be referred early for cardiac imaging. The excellent prognosis and quick recovery after timely surgical resection of a myxoma are also highlighted. PMID:26206781

  13. Uncommon Presentation of Isolated Jejunal Lymphoma Masquerading as Crohn's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Sattavan, Swati; Aggarwal, Lalit; Dikshit, Priyadarshi

    2016-01-01

    Primary gastrointestinal lymphoma is a rare entity, commonly involving stomach, small bowel, and colorectum. The usual location for small bowel B cell lymphoma is distal ileum due to abundant lymphoid tissue. We are reporting the case of a 53-year-old lady presumptively diagnosed as Crohn's disease on clinical and radiological grounds but histopathologically proven to be an unusual variant of isolated primary non-Hodgkin's lymphoma. PMID:27313941

  14. How not to miss autoinflammatory diseases masquerading as urticaria.

    PubMed

    Krause, K; Grattan, C E; Bindslev-Jensen, C; Gattorno, M; Kallinich, T; de Koning, H D; Lachmann, H J; Lipsker, D; Navarini, A A; Simon, A; Traidl-Hoffmann, C; Maurer, M

    2012-12-01

    Urticarial skin reactions are one of the most frequent problems seen by allergists and clinical immunologists in daily practice. The most common reason for recurrent wheals is spontaneous urticaria. There are, however, several less common diseases that present with urticarial rash, such as urticarial vasculitis and autoinflammatory disorders. The latter include cryopyrin-associated periodic syndrome and Schnitzler's syndrome, both rare and disabling conditions mediated by increased interleukin-1 secretion. Apart from the urticarial rash, patients are suffering from a variety of systemic symptoms including recurrent fever attacks, arthralgia or arthritis and fatigue. Autoinflammatory diseases are often associated with a diagnostic delay of many years and do not respond to antihistamines and other treatments of urticaria. Also, the chronic inflammation may lead to long-term complications such as amyloidosis. It is therefore important not to miss these diseases when diagnosing and treating patients with chronic recurrent urticarial rash. Here, we present clinical clues and tips that can help to identify autoinflammatory disorders in patients presenting with chronic urticarial rash and discuss their clinical picture and management. PMID:22978406

  15. Tumors masquerading in patients with thyroid eye disease.

    PubMed

    Griepentrog, Gregory J; Burkat, Cat N; Kikkawa, Don O; Lucarelli, Mark J

    2013-08-01

    Thyroid eye disease (TED) is the most common cause of proptosis in adults. The external manifestations of TED are characteristic and the diagnosis is typically made without imaging. Although there are multiple descriptions of primary and secondary orbital tumors initially mistaken for TED in the literature, there are limited reports detailing the findings of patients with long-standing TED whom developed an orbital tumor at a later date. Herein, we present a 6-year retrospective multi-center report of three patients with long-standing TED who developed an initially unsuspected orbital or cavernous sinus tumor. PMID:23662589

  16. Loss of Myelin Basic Protein Function Triggers Myelin Breakdown in Models of Demyelinating Diseases.

    PubMed

    Weil, Marie-Theres; Möbius, Wiebke; Winkler, Anne; Ruhwedel, Torben; Wrzos, Claudia; Romanelli, Elisa; Bennett, Jeffrey L; Enz, Lukas; Goebels, Norbert; Nave, Klaus-Armin; Kerschensteiner, Martin; Schaeren-Wiemers, Nicole; Stadelmann, Christine; Simons, Mikael

    2016-07-12

    Breakdown of myelin sheaths is a pathological hallmark of several autoimmune diseases of the nervous system. We employed autoantibody-mediated animal models of demyelinating diseases, including a rat model of neuromyelitis optica (NMO), to target myelin and found that myelin lamellae are broken down into vesicular structures at the innermost region of the myelin sheath. We demonstrated that myelin basic proteins (MBP), which form a polymer in between the myelin membrane layers, are targeted in these models. Elevation of intracellular Ca(2+) levels resulted in MBP network disassembly and myelin vesiculation. We propose that the aberrant phase transition of MBP molecules from their cohesive to soluble and non-adhesive state is a mechanism triggering myelin breakdown in NMO and possibly in other demyelinating diseases. PMID:27346352

  17. Absence of Multiple Sclerosis and Demyelinating Diseases among Lacandonians, a Pure Amerindian Ethnic Group in Mexico

    PubMed Central

    Flores, Jose; González, Silvia; Morales, Ximena; Yescas, Petra; Ochoa, Adriana; Corona, Teresa

    2012-01-01

    Multiple Sclerosis (MS) is a highly polymorphic disease characterized by different neurologic signs and symptoms. In MS, racial and genetic factors may play an important role in the geographic distribution of this disease. Studies have reported the presence of several protective alleles against the development of autoimmune disorders. In the case of MS, however, they help define MS as a complex disease, and confirm the importance of environmental agents as an independent variable not associated with ethnicity. We carried out an on-site epidemiological study to confirm the absence of MS or NMO among Lacandonians, a pure Amerindian ethnic group in Mexico. We administered a structured interview to 5,372 Lacandonians to assess by family background any clinical data consistent with the presence of a prior demyelinating event. Every participating subject underwent a comprehensive neurological examination by a group of three members of the research team with experience in the diagnosis and treatment of demyelinating disorders to detect clinical signs compatible with a demyelinating disease. We did not find any clinical signs compatible with multiple sclerosis among study participants. PMID:22973516

  18. Absence of Multiple Sclerosis and Demyelinating Diseases among Lacandonians, a Pure Amerindian Ethnic Group in Mexico.

    PubMed

    Flores, Jose; González, Silvia; Morales, Ximena; Yescas, Petra; Ochoa, Adriana; Corona, Teresa

    2012-01-01

    Multiple Sclerosis (MS) is a highly polymorphic disease characterized by different neurologic signs and symptoms. In MS, racial and genetic factors may play an important role in the geographic distribution of this disease. Studies have reported the presence of several protective alleles against the development of autoimmune disorders. In the case of MS, however, they help define MS as a complex disease, and confirm the importance of environmental agents as an independent variable not associated with ethnicity. We carried out an on-site epidemiological study to confirm the absence of MS or NMO among Lacandonians, a pure Amerindian ethnic group in Mexico. We administered a structured interview to 5,372 Lacandonians to assess by family background any clinical data consistent with the presence of a prior demyelinating event. Every participating subject underwent a comprehensive neurological examination by a group of three members of the research team with experience in the diagnosis and treatment of demyelinating disorders to detect clinical signs compatible with a demyelinating disease. We did not find any clinical signs compatible with multiple sclerosis among study participants. PMID:22973516

  19. Extranodal Rosai–Dorfman disease: a rare soft tissue neoplasm masquerading as a sarcoma

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Rosai–Dorfman disease (RDD) is a rare proliferative histiocytic disorder of unknown etiology. RDD typically presents with generalized lymphadenopathy and polymorphic histiocytic infiltration of the lymph node sinuses; however, occurrences of extranodal soft tissue RDD may rarely occur when masquerading as a soft tissue sarcoma. Materials and methods A comprehensive search of all published cases of soft tissue RDD without associated lymphadenopathy was conducted using PubMed and Google Scholar for the years 1988 to 2011. Ophthalmic RDD was excluded. Results Thirty-six cases of extranodal soft tissue RDD, including the current one, have been reported since 1988. Anatomical distribution varied among patients. Four (11.1%) patients presented with bilateral lesions in the same anatomic region. Pain was the most common symptom in six (16.8%) patients. Sixteen (41.6%) patients were managed surgically, of which one (2.8%) case experienced recurrence of disease. Conclusion RDD is a rare inflammatory non-neoplastic process that should be considered in the differential diagnosis of a soft tissue tumor. Thus, differentiation of extranodal RDD from more common soft tissue tumors such as soft tissue sarcoma or inflammatory myofibroblastic tumor is often difficult and typically requires definitive surgical excision with histopathological examination. While the optimal treatment for extranodal RDD remains ill-defined and controversial, surgical excision is typically curative. PMID:23497062

  20. Environmental and genetic factors in pediatric inflammatory demyelinating diseases.

    PubMed

    Waubant, Emmanuelle; Ponsonby, Anne-Louise; Pugliatti, Maura; Hanwell, Heather; Mowry, Ellen M; Hintzen, Rogier Q

    2016-08-30

    The onset of multiple sclerosis (MS) occurs in childhood in about 5% of all patients with MS. The disease in adults has a complex genetic and environmental inheritability. One of the main risk factors, also confirmed in pediatric MS, is HLA DRB1*1501 In addition to genetic factors, a large part of disease susceptibility in adults is conferred by environmental risk factors such as low vitamin D status, exposure to cigarette smoking, and remote Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) infection. In children, both exposure to cigarette smoking and prior EBV infection have been reported consistently as risk factors for MS. The role of vitamin D remains to be confirmed in this age category. Finally, although very likely critical in disease processes, few gene-environment interactions and epigenetic changes have been reported for adult and pediatric MS susceptibility. Of interest, some of the risk factors for MS have also been associated with disease course modification, such as low 25(OH) vitamin D serum levels in pediatric and adult MS. Age is also a clear disease modifier of clinical, CSF, and MRI phenotype in children with the disease. Finally, although much has yet to be unraveled regarding molecular processes at play in MS, there is a larger gap in our knowledge of genetic and environmental risk factors for pediatric neuromyelitis optica spectrum disorders and acute disseminated encephalomyelitis and only collaborative studies will answer those questions. PMID:27572857

  1. Healing Sacral Fracture Masquerading as Metastatic Bone Disease on a 68Ga-PSMA PET/CT.

    PubMed

    Gykiere, Pieterjan; Goethals, Lode; Everaert, Hendrik

    2016-07-01

    Prostate-specific membrane antigen (PSMA) is a cell surface glycoprotein, which is frequently overexpressed on prostate cancer cells. A Ga-PSMA PET/CT can be used for early detection of lymph node or bone metastases after radical prostatectomy when there is biochemical recurrence. This report describes PSMA uptake in a healing fracture masquerading as metastatic bone disease in a patient with a history of prostate adenocarcinoma. Clinicians reporting Ga-PSMA PET/CT should be aware of this potential important pitfall. PMID:27055135

  2. [A case of asymmetric demyelinating neuropathy in a patient with chronic graft-versus-host disease].

    PubMed

    Matsumoto, Hideyuki; Seki, Naoko; Yamamoto, Tomotaka; Oshima, Kumi; Asai, Takashi; Motokura, Toru; Ugawa, Yoshikazu; Goto, Jun; Tsuji, Shoji

    2005-10-01

    A 47-year-old man, who suffered from acute lymphocytic leukemia at 45 years old and was treated with hematopoietic stem cell transplantation at 46 years old after the induction of complete remission by the standard chemotherapy, developed the symptoms of chronic graft-versus-host disease (cGVHD) such as dry eyes, dry mouth, skin thickening, skin scaling, skin pigmentation and impaired liver function. He was admitted to our hospital because of the acute development of diplopia and weakness of his left upper extremity accompanying with the exacerbation of other symptoms of cGVHD. Neurological examinations revealed the right abducens nerve palsy and asymmetric muscular weakness of the extremities; the proximal part of the left upper extremity and the distal part of the right upper extremity were markedly involved. Neurophysiological studies including magnetic motor root stimulation revealed demyelinating neuropathy specifically involving the motor nerves. On the basis of these findings, a diagnosis of peripheral neuropathy associated with cGVHD was made. Nighteen reports are available on peripheral neuropathy in cGVHD patients, but to date little is known about the pathophysiology of this condition. Most of those patients have been diagnosed as having symmetric demyelinating polyneuropathy, such as Guillain-Barré syndrome or chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy. In this study, contrary to previous reports, the asymmetric involvement of motor nerves is noteworthy. Accumulation and further analyses of the cases like the present case are necessary to elucidate the pathogenesis of peripheral neuropathy in cGVHD. PMID:16318371

  3. Directional diffusivity as a magnetic resonance (MR) biomarker in demyelinating disease

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benzinger, Tammie L. S.; Cross, Anne H.; Xu, Junqian; Naismith, Robert; Sun, Shu-Wei; Song, Sheng-Kwei

    2007-09-01

    Directional diffusivities derived from diffusion tensor magnetic resonance imaging (DTI) measurements describe water movement parallel to (λ ||, axial diffusivity) and perpendicular to (λ⊥radial diffusivity) axonal tracts. λ || and λ⊥ have been shown to differentially detect axon and myelin abnormalities in several mouse models of central nervous system white matter pathology in our laboratory. These models include experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE), (1) myelin basic protein mutant mice with dysmyelination and intact axons, (2) cuprizone-induced demyelination, and remyelination, with reversible axon injury (2, 3) and a model of retinal ischemia in which retinal ganglion cell death is followed by Wallerian degeneration of optic nerve, with axonal injury preceding demyelination. (4) Decreased λ|| correlates with acute axonal injury and increased λ⊥ indicates myelin damage. (4) More recently, we have translated this approach to human MR, investigating acute and chronic optic neuritis in adults with multiple sclerosis, brain lesions in adults with multiple sclerosis, and acute disseminated encephalomyelitis (ADEM) in children. We are also investigating the use of this technique to probe the underlying structural change of the cervical spinal cord in acute and chronic T2- hyperintense lesions in spinal stenosis, trauma, and transverse myelitis. In each of these demyelinating diseases, the discrimination between axonal and myelin injury which we can achieve has important prognostic and therapeutic implications. For those patients with myelin injury but intact axons, early, directed drug therapy has the potential to prevent progression to axonal loss and permanent disability.

  4. Masquerades of myocardial infarction.

    PubMed Central

    Bean, W. B.

    1976-01-01

    I summarize these observations in Figure 1. It represents every person in a hypothetical population who has myocardial infarction. A large but unknown number, some believe almost half, never get help. Mobile coronary care units are reducing this group, but so far only a little. When the diagnosis is not understood the disease is not recognized. Then come discovery and popularization. Hereafter masquerades hide some cases and the diagnosis is missed. Somewhere fairly early the diagnostic fad leads to false positive diagnosis. As new techniques are discovered, perfected and mastered, false positive errors and masquerades leading to oversights diminish but still exist. All the skill and technical virtuosity in the world will not be applied if we do not think of the disease. When we think of it, even obscure cases may be resolved easily. PMID:960416

  5. Physiological Dynamics in Demyelinating Diseases: Unraveling Complex Relationships through Computer Modeling

    PubMed Central

    Coggan, Jay S.; Bittner, Stefan; Stiefel, Klaus M.; Meuth, Sven G.; Prescott, Steven A.

    2015-01-01

    Despite intense research, few treatments are available for most neurological disorders. Demyelinating diseases are no exception. This is perhaps not surprising considering the multifactorial nature of these diseases, which involve complex interactions between immune system cells, glia and neurons. In the case of multiple sclerosis, for example, there is no unanimity among researchers about the cause or even which system or cell type could be ground zero. This situation precludes the development and strategic application of mechanism-based therapies. We will discuss how computational modeling applied to questions at different biological levels can help link together disparate observations and decipher complex mechanisms whose solutions are not amenable to simple reductionism. By making testable predictions and revealing critical gaps in existing knowledge, such models can help direct research and will provide a rigorous framework in which to integrate new data as they are collected. Nowadays, there is no shortage of data; the challenge is to make sense of it all. In that respect, computational modeling is an invaluable tool that could, ultimately, transform how we understand, diagnose, and treat demyelinating diseases. PMID:26370960

  6. Tangier's disease: An uncommon cause of facial weakness and non-length dependent demyelinating neuropathy

    PubMed Central

    Nagappa, Madhu; Taly, Arun B.; Mahadevan, Anita; Pooja, M.; Bindu, P. S.; Chickabasaviah, Y. T.; Gayathri, N.; Sinha, Sanjib

    2016-01-01

    Tangier disease is an autosomal recessive disorder characterized by an abnormal accumulation of cholesterol esters in various organs secondary to adenotriphosphate binding cassette transporter A-1 (ABCA-1) transporter deficiency and disrupted reverse cholesterol transport. It causes neuropathy in half of the affected individuals. We present the clinical, electrophysiological, and histopathological findings in a middle aged gentleman of Tangier disease who was initially misdiagnosed leprosy and treated with antileprosy drugs. The presence of a demyelinating neuropathy on electrophysiology in a patient with predominant upper limb involvement and facial diplegia should raise the suspicion of Tangier disease. The characteristic lipid profile of Tangier disease was noted in this patient viz. extremely low high density lipoprotein (HDL), elevated triglyceride (TG), and reduced apolipoprotein A1. Estimation of serum lipids should form a part of routine evaluation in order to avoid misdiagnosis. PMID:27011649

  7. One calcitriol dose transiently increases Helios+ FoxP3+ T cells and ameliorates autoimmune demyelinating disease.

    PubMed

    Nashold, Faye E; Nelson, Corwin D; Brown, Lauren M; Hayes, Colleen E

    2013-10-15

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is an incurable inflammatory demyelinating disease. We investigated one calcitriol dose plus vitamin D3 (calcitriol/+D) as a demyelinating disease treatment in experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE). Evidence that calcitriol-vitamin D receptor pathway deficits may promote MS, and data showing calcitriol enhancement of autoimmune T cell apoptosis provided the rationale. Whereas vitamin D3 alone was ineffective, calcitriol/+D transiently increased central nervous system (CNS) Helios(+)FoxP3(+) T cells and sustainably decreased CNS T cells, pathology, and neurological deficits in mice with EAE. Calcitriol/+D, which was more effective than methylprednisolone, has potential for reversing inflammatory demyelinating disease safely and cost-effectively. PMID:23968560

  8. From fish to man: understanding endogenous remyelination in CNS demyelinating diseases

    PubMed Central

    Dubois-Dalcq, Monique; Williams, Anna; Stadelmann, Christine; Stankoff, Bruno; Zalc, Bernard; Lubetzki, Catherine

    2008-01-01

    In the central nervous system (CNS) of man, evolutionary pressure has preserved some capability for remyelination while axonal regeneration is very limited. In contrast, two efficient programmes of regeneration exist in the adult fish CNS, neurite regrowth and remyelination. The rapidity of CNS remyelination is critical since it not only restores fast conduction of nerve impulses but also maintains axon integrity. If myelin repair fails, axons degenerate, leading to increased disability. In the human CNS demyelinating disease Multiple Sclerosis (MS), remyelination often takes place in the midst of inflammation. Here, we discuss recent studies that address the innate repair capabilities of the axon-glia unit from fish to man. We propose that expansion of this research field will help find ways to maintain or enhance spontaneous remyelination in man. PMID:18474520

  9. Demyelinizing Neurological Disease after Treatment with Tumor Necrosis Factor-α Antagonists

    PubMed Central

    Bruè, Claudia; Mariotti, Cesare; Rossiello, Ilaria; Saitta, Andrea; Giovannini, Alfonso

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Demyelinizing neurological disease is a rare complication after treatment with tumor necrosis factor (TNF)α antagonists. We report on a case of multiple sclerosis after TNFα antagonist treatment and discuss its differential diagnosis. Methods This is an observational case study. Results A 48-year-old male was referred to Ophthalmology in January 2015 for an absolute scotoma in the superior quadrant of the visual field in his right eye. Visual acuity was 20/50 in the right eye and 20/20 in the left. Fundus examination was unremarkable bilaterally. Spectral domain optical coherence tomography revealed a normal macular retina structure. Visual field examination revealed a superior hemianopsia in the right eye. Head magnetic resonance imaging showed findings compatible with optic neuritis. The visual evoked potentials confirmed the presence of optic neuritis. The patient had been under therapy with adalimumab since January 2014, for Crohn's disease. Suspension of adalimumab was recommended, and it was substituted with tapered deltacortene, from 1 mg/kg/day. After 1 month, the scotoma was resolved completely. Conclusions TNFα antagonists can provide benefit to patients with inflammatory autoimmune diseases. However, they can also be associated with severe adverse effects. Therefore, adequate attention should be paid to neurological abnormalities in patients treated with TNFα antagonists. PMID:27504093

  10. Molecular mimicry as an inducing trigger for CNS autoimmune demyelinating disease.

    PubMed

    Chastain, Emily M L; Miller, Stephen D

    2012-01-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is an autoimmune disease of the central nervous system (CNS) that affects about 0.1% of the worldwide population. This deleterious disease is marked by infiltration of myelin-specific T cells that attack the protective myelin sheath that surrounds CNS nerve axons. Upon demyelination, saltatory nerve conduction is disrupted, and patients experience neurologic deficiencies. The exact cause for MS remains unknown, although most evidence supports the hypothesis that both genetic and environmental factors contribute to disease development. Epidemiologic evidence supports a role for environmental pathogens, such as viruses, as potentially key contributors to MS induction. Pathogens can induce autoimmunity via several well-studied mechanisms with the most postulated being molecular mimicry. Molecular mimicry occurs when T cells specific for peptide epitopes derived from pathogens cross-react with self-epitopes, leading to autoimmune tissue destruction. In this review, we discuss an in vivo virus-induced mouse model of MS developed in our laboratory, which has contributed greatly to our understanding of the mechanisms underlying molecular mimicry-induced CNS autoimmunity. PMID:22168423

  11. Antibodies to MOG in adults with inflammatory demyelinating disease of the CNS

    PubMed Central

    Woodhall, Mark R.; Kim, Ji-Sun; Kim, Seong-Joon; Park, Kyung Seok; Vincent, Angela; Lee, Kwang-Woo

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the clinical relevance of myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein antibody (MOG-Ab) in a cohort of adults with inflammatory demyelinating disease (IDD) of the CNS. Methods: Live cell-based assays for MOG-Ab (IgG1 subset) and antibody to aquaporin-4 (AQP4-Ab) were performed in a cohort of 270 adult patients with IDD and 72 controls. Patients were first grouped by positive antibody result as MOG-Ab or AQP4-Ab, and the remainder were grouped by published diagnostic criteria. Results: Seventeen patients with IDD (6.3%) had MOG-Abs and 49 patients (18.1%) had AQP4-Abs; none had both antibodies. The MOG-Ab patients predominantly manifested with isolated symptoms of optic neuritis (83%). One-third of these patients experienced relapses, which involved only the optic nerve, and all relapsed within 1 year of disease onset. At onset, MRI in the MOG-Ab group uniquely demonstrated perineural enhancement, extending to the soft tissues around the optic nerves (33%). Although about 30% of MOG-Ab patients had brain MRI lesions, they had fewer periventricular lesions than the 26 patients with relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis (MS); none of these lesions were ovoid or perpendicular to the ventricle. Moreover, MOG-Ab patients did not meet the diagnostic criteria for definite neuromyelitis optica (NMO) and had less spinal cord involvement than the AQP4-Ab group. Four patients (23.5%) had poor visual outcomes (<0.2) or paraplegia. Conclusions: MOG-Abs may be a disease-specific biomarker in adult patients with IDD who have a disease distinct from NMO or MS. The radiologic as well as clinical manifestations of MOG-Ab patients can be useful in their differential diagnosis. PMID:26516628

  12. Consensus Statement on medication use in multiple sclerosis by the Spanish Society of Neurology's study group for demyelinating diseases.

    PubMed

    García-Merino, A; Fernández, O; Montalbán, X; de Andrés, C; Oreja-Guevara, C; Rodríguez-Antigüedad, A; Arbizu, T

    2013-01-01

    Treatments for multiple sclerosis therapy are rapidly evolving. It is believed that new drugs will be approved in the near future, thereby changing current indications for treatment. In this context, the Spanish Society of Neurology's study group on demyelinating diseases, which evaluates medication use in MS, has decided to draw up a consensus statement on the current indications and guidelines for multiple sclerosis treatment. PMID:23643683

  13. Characteristics of demyelinating Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease with concurrent diabetes mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Zhiliang; Wu, Xiaohua; Xie, Huijun; Han, Ying; Guan, Yangtai; Qin, Yong; Zheng, Huimin; Jiang, Jianming; Niu, Zhenmin

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease (CMT) is the most common type of inherited peripheral neuropathy and has a high degree of genetic heterogeneity. CMT with concurrent diabetes mellitus (DM) is rare. The purpose of this study is to explore the genetic, clinical and pathological characteristics of the patients with CMT and concurrent DM. Methods: We investigated gene mutations (the peripheral myelin protein 22 gene, myelin protein zero gene, lipopolysaccharide-induced tumor necrosis factor-α factor gene, early growth response gene and the neurofilament light chain gene loci) of a relatively large and typical Chinese family with CMT1 and concurrent DM2. From the literature, we also retrieved all reported families and single cases with CMT and concurrent DM. We comprehensively analyzed the characteristics of total 33 patients with CMT and concurrent DM, and further compared these characteristics with those of patients of diabetic peripheral neuropathy (DPN). Results: Patients with CMT and concurrent DM had some relatively independent characteristics and pathogenic mechanisms. So we designated that kind of characteristic demyelinating CMT which accompanies DM as Yu-Xie syndrome (YXS), a new specific clinical subtype of CMT. Conclusion: CMT is an etiologic factor of DM, even though the intrinsic association between CMT and DM still remains further exploration. PMID:25120817

  14. Molecular Biology, Epidemiology, and Pathogenesis of Progressive Multifocal Leukoencephalopathy, the JC Virus-Induced Demyelinating Disease of the Human Brain

    PubMed Central

    Ferenczy, Michael W.; Marshall, Leslie J.; Nelson, Christian D. S.; Atwood, Walter J.; Nath, Avindra; Khalili, Kamel

    2012-01-01

    Summary: Progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy (PML) is a debilitating and frequently fatal central nervous system (CNS) demyelinating disease caused by JC virus (JCV), for which there is currently no effective treatment. Lytic infection of oligodendrocytes in the brain leads to their eventual destruction and progressive demyelination, resulting in multiple foci of lesions in the white matter of the brain. Before the mid-1980s, PML was a relatively rare disease, reported to occur primarily in those with underlying neoplastic conditions affecting immune function and, more rarely, in allograft recipients receiving immunosuppressive drugs. However, with the onset of the AIDS pandemic, the incidence of PML has increased dramatically. Approximately 3 to 5% of HIV-infected individuals will develop PML, which is classified as an AIDS-defining illness. In addition, the recent advent of humanized monoclonal antibody therapy for the treatment of autoimmune inflammatory diseases such as multiple sclerosis (MS) and Crohn's disease has also led to an increased risk of PML as a side effect of immunotherapy. Thus, the study of JCV and the elucidation of the underlying causes of PML are important and active areas of research that may lead to new insights into immune function and host antiviral defense, as well as to potential new therapies. PMID:22763635

  15. Recurrent asymptomatic demyelinating disease following 13-cis-retinoic acid exposure

    PubMed Central

    Okuda, Darin T; Prados, Michael D

    2009-01-01

    We report a case of multifocal demyelination within the central nervous system in a patient being treated for a left hemispheric gemnistocytic astrocytoma with radiation therapy and chemotherapy, comprising temozolomide (360 mg/day—days 1–5 every 28 days) and 13-cis-retinoic acid (100 mg/m2/day—separated into two doses administered every 12 h on days 1 through 21 every 28 days). Five months into her first round of chemotherapy, brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) demonstrated multifocal regions of T2 prolongation with associated gadolinium enhancement within the right cerebral hemisphere. Spectroscopic data were consistent with demyelination rather than neoplasia. Despite the incidentally identified radiological progression, new neurological symptoms were not described. Interval resolution of the demyelinating lesions was observed in the years following the discontinuance of her chemotherapy regimen with reactivation of the previously observed lesions and the development of new T2 foci 6 months into her second round of re-treatment for tumour progression 5 years later. PMID:21901115

  16. A Herpes Simplex Virus-Derived Replicative Vector Expressing LIF Limits Experimental Demyelinating Disease and Modulates Autoimmunity

    PubMed Central

    Nygårdas, Michaela; Paavilainen, Henrik; Müther, Nadine; Nagel, Claus-Henning; Röyttä, Matias; Sodeik, Beate; Hukkanen, Veijo

    2013-01-01

    Herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) has properties that can be exploited for the development of gene therapy vectors. The neurotropism of HSV enables delivery of therapeutic genes to the nervous system. Using a bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC), we constructed an HSV-1(17+)-based replicative vector deleted of the neurovirulence gene γ134.5, and expressing leukemia inhibitory factor (LIF) as a transgene for treatment of experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE). EAE is an inducible T-cell mediated autoimmune disease of the central nervous system (CNS) and is used as an animal model for multiple sclerosis. Demyelination and inflammation are hallmarks of both diseases. LIF is a cytokine that has the potential to limit demyelination and oligodendrocyte loss in CNS autoimmune diseases and to affect the T-cell mediated autoimmune response. In this study SJL/J mice, induced for EAE, were treated with a HSV-LIF vector intracranially and the subsequent changes in disease parameters and immune responses during the acute disease were investigated. Replicating HSV-LIF and its DNA were detected in the CNS during the acute infection, and the vector spread to the spinal cord but was non-virulent. The HSV-LIF significantly ameliorated the EAE and contributed to a higher number of oligodendrocytes in the brains when compared to untreated mice. The HSV-LIF therapy also induced favorable changes in the expression of immunoregulatory cytokines and T-cell population markers in the CNS during the acute disease. These data suggest that BAC-derived HSV vectors are suitable for gene therapy of CNS disease and can be used to test the therapeutic potential of immunomodulatory factors for treatment of EAE. PMID:23700462

  17. Autoimmune demyelination in the central nervous system.

    PubMed

    Tabira, T

    1988-01-01

    Autoimmune demyelination was studied in EAE induced by active challenge or by transfer of effector T-cell lines or clones specific for myelin basic protein or proteolipid apoprotein. The following points became clear: (1) Proteolipid apoprotein is responsible for widespread demyelination; (2) demyelination is more significant in EAE with a more chronic disease process; (3) a single T-cell clone can mediate significant demyelination without the aid of recipient-derived T-cell populations; (4) the difference in vulnerability between axons and myelin may account for the T-cell-mediated demyelination; and (5) effector T-cell clones can be activated by allogeneic antigens. PMID:2462801

  18. Kikuchi-Fujimoto Disease, the Masquerading Menace: A Rare Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Kataria, Rohit; Rao, Pankaj; Kachhawa, Dilip; Jain, Vinod K; Tuteja, Rajat K; Vijayvargiya, Manish

    2016-01-01

    Kikuchi-Fujimoto disease (KFD) or histiocytic necrotizing lymphadenitis is a rare, benign, self-limiting disease with unknown etiology characterized by regional lymphadenopathy. A 30-year-old female presented with fever, weakness, multiple joint pain, oral ulcers, erythematous facial rashes, hemorrhagic crusting on both lips, and cervical lymphadenopathy of 2-month duration. Clinically, the disease was mimicking systemic lupus erythematosus, but immunofluorescence was negative for it. Lymph node biopsy suggested a diagnosis of KFD. PMID:27293275

  19. Dimethyl fumarate suppresses Theiler's murine encephalomyelitis virus-induced demyelinating disease by modifying the Nrf2-Keap1 pathway.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Kunitoshi; Tomiki, Hiroki; Inaba, Yuji; Ichikawa, Motoki; Kim, Byung S; Koh, Chang-Sung

    2015-07-01

    Dimethyl fumarate (DMF) is a modifier of the nuclear factor (erythroid-derived 2)-2 (Nrf2)-kelch-like ECH-associated protein 1 (Keap1) pathway. DMF treatment in the effector phase significantly suppressed the development of Theiler's murine encephalomyelitis virus-induced demyelinating disease (TMEV-IDD) both clinically and histologically. DMF treatment leads to an enhanced Nrf2 antioxidant response in TMEV-IDD mice. DMF treatment in the effector phase significantly suppressed the level of IL-17A mRNA. DMF is known to inhibit differentiation of T helper 17 (Th17) cells via suppressing NF-κB. Taken together, our data suggest that DMF treatment in the effector phase may suppress TMEV-IDD not only via enhancing the antioxidant response but also via suppressing IL-17A. PMID:25721871

  20. Early Motor Unit Disease Masquerading as Psychogenic Breathy Dysphonia: A Clinical Case Presentation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aronson, Arnold E.

    1971-01-01

    Presented is a study of a 20-year-old girl with mild, breathy dysphonia, previously diagnosed as psychogenic. In actuality, her voice change was a sign of early myasthenia gravis. It is pointed out that voice changes can be a first and only sign of early neurologic disease. (Author/KW)

  1. Masquerading acidosis after cardiopulmonary bypass: a case of propionic acidemia and congenital heart disease.

    PubMed

    Palermo, Robert A; Monge, Michael C; Charrow, Joel; Costello, John M; Epting, Conrad L

    2015-04-01

    We report the case of a child with both propionic acidemia and cyanotic congenital heart disease. The presence of an underlying inborn error of metabolism confounded the management of this patient in the postoperative period, resulting in therapeutic misdirection until the true etiology of hyperlactemia was recognized. PMID:25870350

  2. Epistaxis in end stage liver disease masquerading as severe upper gastrointestinal hemorrhage

    PubMed Central

    Camus, Marine; Jensen, Dennis M; Matthews, Jason D; Ohning, Gordon V; Kovacs, Thomas O; Jutabha, Rome; Ghassemi, Kevin A; Machicado, Gustavo A; Dulai, Gareth S

    2014-01-01

    AIM: To describe the prevalence, diagnosis, treatment, and outcomes of end stage liver disease (ESLD) patients with severe epistaxis thought to be severe upper gastrointestinal hemorrhage (UGIH). METHODS: This observational single center study included all consecutive patients with ESLD and epistaxis identified from consecutive subjects hospitalized with suspected UGIH and prospectively enrolled in our databases of severe UGIH between 1998 and 2011. RESULTS: A total of 1249 patients were registered for severe UGIH in the data basis, 461 (36.9%) were cirrhotics. Epistaxis rather than UGIH was the bleeding source in 20 patients. All patients had severe coagulopathy. Epistaxis was initially controlled in all cases. Fifteen (75%) subjects required posterior nasal packing and 2 (10%) embolization in addition to correction of coagulopathy. Five (25%) patients died in the hospital, 12 (60%) received orthotopic liver transplantation (OLT), and 3 (15%) were discharged without OLT. The mortality rate was 63% in patients without OLT. CONCLUSION: Severe epistaxis in patients with ESLD is (1) a diagnosis of exclusion that requires upper endoscopy to exclude severe UGIH; and (2) associated with a high mortality rate in patients not receiving OLT. PMID:25320538

  3. Central nervous system demyelinating diseases and recombinant hepatitis B vaccination: a critical systematic review of scientific production.

    PubMed

    Martínez-Sernández, V; Figueiras, A

    2013-08-01

    The etiology of multiple sclerosis has not yet been fully described. A potential link between the recombinant hepatitis B vaccine and an increased risk of onset or exacerbation of multiple sclerosis emerged in the mid-1990s, leading to several spontaneous reports and studies investigating this association. We conducted a critical systematic review aimed at assessing whether hepatitis B vaccination increases the risk of onset or relapse of multiple sclerosis and other central nervous system demyelinating diseases. MEDLINE and EMBASE were used as data sources, and the search covered the period between 1981 and 2011. Twelve references met the inclusion criteria. No significant increased risk of onset or relapse of the diseases considered was associated with hepatitis B vaccination, except in one study. Most studies included in this review displayed methodological limitations and heterogeneity among them, which rendered it impossible to draw robust conclusions about the safety of hepatitis B vaccination in healthy subjects and patients with multiple sclerosis. Therefore, on the basis of current data there is no need to modify the vaccination recommendations; however, there is a need to improve the quality of observational studies with emphasis on certain considerations that are discussed in this review. PMID:23086181

  4. Increased interleukin-6 correlates with myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein antibodies in pediatric monophasic demyelinating diseases and multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Horellou, Philippe; Wang, Min; Keo, Vixra; Chrétien, Pascale; Serguera, Ché; Waters, Patrick; Deiva, Kumaran

    2015-12-15

    Acquired demyelinating syndromes (ADS) in children evolve either as a monophasic disease diagnosed as acute demyelinating encephalomyelitis (ADEM), transverse myelitis (TM) or optic neuritis (ON), or a multiphasic one with several relapses most often leading to the diagnosis of multiple sclerosis (MS) or neuromyelitis optica (NMO). These neuroinflammatory disorders are increasingly associated with autoantibodies against proteins such as aquaporin-4 in rare instances, and more frequently against myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein (MOG). Recently, in adult NMO patients, C5a levels were shown to be elevated in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) during acute exacerbation. We investigated the CSF levels of anaphylatoxins and pro-inflammatory cytokines, and plasma MOG antibodies in onset samples from children with ADS. Thirty four children presenting with a first episode of ADS, 17 with monophasic ADS (9 with ADEM, 4 with TM and 4 with ON) and 17 with MS, who had paired blood and CSF samples at onset were included and compared to 12 patients with other non-inflammatory neurological disorders (OND). Cytokines and anaphylatoxins in CSF were measured by Cytometric Bead Array immunoassay. MOG antibody titers in plasma were tested by flow cytometry using a stable cell line expressing full-length human MOG. We found a significant increase in C5a levels in the CSF of patients with monophasic ADS (n=17) compared to OND (n=12, p=0.0036) and to MS (n=17, p=0.0371). The C5a levels in MS were higher than in OND without reaching significance (p=0.2). CSF IL-6 levels were significantly increased in monophasic ADS compared to OND (p=0.0027) and to MS (p=0.0046). MOG antibody plasma levels were significantly higher in monophasic ADS (p<0.0001) and, to a lesser extent, in MS compared to OND (p=0.0023). Plasma MOG antibodies and CSF IL-6 levels were significantly correlated (r=0.51, p=0.018). CSF C5a and IL-6 levels are increased in monophasic ADS but not in MS when compared to OND, suggesting

  5. Diagnostic value of aquaporin 4 antibody in assessing idiopathic inflammatory demyelinating central nervous system diseases in Egyptian patients.

    PubMed

    Kishk, Nirmeen A; Abokrysha, Noha T; Rashed, Laila; Ahmed, Nagwa

    2015-04-01

    Neuromyelitis optica immunoglobulin G (NMO-IgG) binds selectively to aquaporin 4 (AQP4). We aimed to evaluate the frequency of AQP4 antibody in Egyptian patients. We retrospectively evaluated 39 consecutive Egyptian patients with suspected idiopathic inflammatory demyelinating central nervous system disease (IIDCD) who visited the multiple sclerosis clinic at Kaser Al-Aini Hospital. The patients were diagnosed with NMO, other NMO spectrum disorders, or multiple sclerosis using the respective current diagnostic criteria. For the anti-AQP4 antibody assays, serum samples from all patients and 16 healthy matched controls were evaluated. The coded sera were tested for AQP4 antibody using an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay kit. The relations between the clinical diagnosis and the AQP4 antibody serologic status were studied. Among the 39 patients, 21 (53.85%) were AQP4 antibody-positive. NMO spectrum disorders patients had a significantly higher level of AQP4 antibody compared with MS patients and controls (p<0.001). Only eight patients (36.36%) met the Wingerchuk 2006 criteria for NMO diagnosis excluding AQP4 antibody-seropositive status. AQP4 antibody was highly prevalent (almost 54%) in Egyptian IIDCD patients. Our research revealed that we must maintain a high index of suspicion for NMO spectrum disorders. PMID:25677878

  6. Lethal acute demyelinization with encephalo-myelitis as a complication of cured Cushing's disease.

    PubMed

    Chevalier, N; Hieronimus, S; Vandenbos, F; Delmont, E; Cua, E; Cherick, F; Paquis, P; Michiels, J-F; Fenichel, P; Brucker-Davis, F

    2010-12-01

    Cushing's disease is usually associated with higher mortality rate, especially from cardiovascular causes. Development or exacerbation of autoimmune or inflammatory diseases is known to occur in patients with hypercortisolism after cure. We report for the first time a 34-year old woman with a psychiatric background, who developed four months after the surgical cure of Cushing's disease an acute disseminated encephalomyelitis (ADEM) presenting initially as a psychiatric illness. We hypothesize that the recent correction of hypercortisolism triggered ADEM and that the atypical presentation, responsible for diagnosis delay, led to the death of this patient. PMID:20850107

  7. Prolonged gray matter disease without demyelination caused by Theiler's murine encephalomyelitis virus with a mutation in VP2 puff B.

    PubMed

    Tsunoda, I; Wada, Y; Libbey, J E; Cannon, T S; Whitby, F G; Fujinami, R S

    2001-08-01

    Theiler's murine encephalomyelitis virus (TMEV) is divided into two subgroups based on neurovirulence. During the acute phase, DA virus infects cells in the gray matter of the central nervous system (CNS). Throughout the chronic phase, DA virus infects glial cells in the white matter, causing demyelinating disease. Although GDVII virus also infects neurons in the gray matter, infected mice developed a severe polioencephalomyelitis, and no virus is detected in the white matter or other areas in the CNS in rare survivors. Several sequence differences between the two viruses are located in VP2 puff B and VP1 loop II, which are located near each other, close to the proposed receptor binding site. We constructed a DA virus mutant, DApBL2M, which has the VP1 loop II of GDVII virus and a mutation at position 171 in VP2 puff B. While DApBL2M virus replicated less efficiently than DA virus during the acute phase, DApBL2M-induced acute polioencephalitis was comparable to that in DA virus infection. Interestingly, during the chronic phase, DApBL2M caused prolonged gray matter disease in the brain without white matter involvement in the spinal cord. This is opposite what is observed during wild-type DA virus infection. Our study is the first to demonstrate that conformational differences via interaction of VP2 puff B and VP1 loop II between GDVII and DA viruses can play an important role in making the transition of infection from the gray matter in the brain to the spinal cord white matter during TMEV infection. PMID:11462022

  8. In vivo and in vitro models of demyelinating disease. XVII. The infectious process in athymic rats inoculated with JHM virus.

    PubMed

    Sorensen, O; Saravani, A; Dales, S

    1987-02-01

    Wistar Lewis (WL), Long Evans (LE) and other rat strains develop complete resistance to CNS disease when inoculated intracerebrally with murine hepatitis JHM virus (JHMV) after the 10th day of age. Two types of studies were conducted to ascertain the involvement of the cellular immune system in development of resistance. Immunosuppression of WL rats with cyclosporin A (CsA) following onset of the age-related resistance demonstrated that this drug was partially able to abrogate resistance. In the other studies nude (rnu/rnu) rats, their heterozygous (rnu/+) litter mates and genetically related LE rats of various ages were challenged with JHMV. The rnu/+ and LE animals became completely resistant before the age of weaning, whereas some rnu/rnu rats, challenged as late as 70 days of age, showed disease symptoms--albeit after a long latent period. These observations indicated that the cellular immune system plays an important role in suppressing the disease process in the CNS. When the infection of nude rats was initiated on or after the 15th day of life, the histological lesions were generally small and present in both grey and white matter but were seldom seen in the spinal cord. Mononuclear infiltrates were evident throughout the CNS. In some nude rats there was massive mononuclear cell infiltration towards the meningies and into ventricular spaces. By contrast in mu/+, LE and WL rats with late-onset disease symptoms, demyelinating-type lesions were confined to the white matter and only minor infiltration of mononuclear cells was evident. JHMV RNA was detectable by dot-blotting analysis in the CNS of both paralysed and asymptomatic rnu/rnu and rnu/+ rats, but less RNA was usually detected in heterozygous animals. In-situ hybridization with cDNA probes for JHMV RNA showed that neurons in the hippocampus and cerebellum, as well as cells in the white matter, were frequently infected. The present data indicate that in the rat T cells have an important function in

  9. Greater auricular nerve masquerading as lymph node.

    PubMed

    Saxena, Shilpi; Deb, Prabal; Nijhawan, Vijay Shrawan; Kharayat, Veena; Verma, Rajesh

    2015-01-01

    Hansen's disease is on the verge of being eliminated from India and often missed by clinicians due to low index of suspicion. We present an unusual case in which greater auricular nerve thickening masqueraded as enlarged lymph node in the neck. The patient was referred for fine needle aspiration cytology, which revealed epithelioid cell granulomas suggestive of Hansen's disease. Further clinical examination and investigations including the skin biopsy confirmed the disease, highlighting the role of pathologist in the management of such unusual presentation of a common disease. PMID:26229249

  10. Greater auricular nerve masquerading as lymph node

    PubMed Central

    Saxena, Shilpi; Deb, Prabal; Nijhawan, Vijay Shrawan; Kharayat, Veena; Verma, Rajesh

    2015-01-01

    Hansen's disease is on the verge of being eliminated from India and often missed by clinicians due to low index of suspicion. We present an unusual case in which greater auricular nerve thickening masqueraded as enlarged lymph node in the neck. The patient was referred for fine needle aspiration cytology, which revealed epithelioid cell granulomas suggestive of Hansen's disease. Further clinical examination and investigations including the skin biopsy confirmed the disease, highlighting the role of pathologist in the management of such unusual presentation of a common disease. PMID:26229249

  11. Tumefactive Demyelinating Lesions in Multiple Sclerosis and Associated Disorders.

    PubMed

    Frederick, Meredith C; Cameron, Michelle H

    2016-03-01

    Tumefactive demyelinating lesions are rare consequences of central nervous system (CNS) idiopathic inflammatory demyelinating diseases. Tumefactive demyelinating lesions pose a diagnostic challenge because they can mimic tumors and abscesses and because they can be caused by a heterogeneous range of disorders. This article reviews the recent literature on the clinical presentation; radiographic features; prognosis; and management of tumefactive demyelinating lesions in multiple sclerosis, acute demyelinating encephalomyelitis, neuromyelitis optica, and the rare variants of multiple sclerosis including Schilder's disease, Marburg acute multiple sclerosis, and Balo's concentric sclerosis. PMID:26847090

  12. Demyelinizing neurological disease after treatment with tumor necrosis factor alpha-inhibiting agents in a rheumatological outpatient clinic: description of six cases.

    PubMed

    Theibich, Ali; Dreyer, Lene; Magyari, Melinda; Locht, Henning

    2014-05-01

    Biological treatment with inhibitors of the pro-inflammatory cytokine TNF-alpha has dramatically improved the disease course of several chronic rheumatologic conditions. Adverse events (AEs) are primarily infections and hypersensitivity reactions. Demyelinizing neurological symptoms resembling multiple sclerosis (MS) have been described as a rare AE. During about 10-year use of anti TNF-alpha, the Danish Medicines Agency has recorded eight cases of MS like AEs. The objective of this study was to estimate the incidence of demyelinizing AEs both in the central and peripheral nervous system after treatment with anti TNF-alpha in a cohort of patients from a large rheumatologic outpatient clinic in Copenhagen. In a 4-year period from January 2008 to December 2011, approximately 550 patients annually were undergoing treatment with anti TNF-alpha inhibitors in our department. We collected data on all patients who developed neurological symptoms during this time period. We found six patients with signs of demyelinizing neurological disorders: four resembling MS, one MS-like condition, and one multifocal motor neuropathy. During a relatively short time period, we found a remarkably high number of neurological demyelinizing AEs probably linked to anti TNF-alpha treatment. The AEs were not associated with a single anti TNF-alpha agent and were thus presumably a class effect. The data presented suggest that neurological AEs may be underreported. We advocate that physicians handling patients during treatment with TNF inhibitors are aware of this potentially serious AE and report these events to the proper medical authorities. PMID:24202614

  13. [Masquerading bundle branch block].

    PubMed

    Kukla, Piotr; Baranchuk, Adrian; Jastrzębski, Marek; Bryniarski, Leszek

    2014-01-01

    We here describe a surface 12-lead electrocardiogram (ECG) of a 72-year-old female with a prior history of breast cancer and chemotherapy-induced cardiomyopathy. An echocardiogram revealed left ventricular dysfunction, ejection fraction of 23%, with mild enlarged left ventricle. The 12-lead ECG showed atrial fibrillation with a mean heart rate of about 100 bpm, QRS duration 160 ms, QT interval 400 ms, right bundle branch block (RBBB) and left anterior fascicular block (LAFB). The combination of RBBB features in the precordial leads and LAFB features in the limb leads is known as ''masquerading bundle branch block''. In most cases of RBBB and LAFB, the QRS axis deviation is located between - 80 to -120 degrees. Rarely, when predominant left ventricular forces are present, the QRS axis deviation is near about -90 degrees, turning the pattern into an atypical form. In a situation of RBBB associated with LAFB, the S wave can be absent or very small in lead I. Such a situation is the result of not only purely LAFB but also with left ventricular hypertrophy and/or focal block due to scar (extensive anterior myocardial infarction) or fibrosis (cardiomyopathy). Sometimes, this specific ECG pattern is mistaken for LBBB. RBBB with LAFB may imitate LBBB either in the limb leads (known as 'standard masquerading' - absence of S wave in lead I), or in the precordial leads (called 'precordial masquerading' - absence of S wave in leads V₅ and V₆). Our ECG showed both these types of masquerading bundle branch block - absence of S wave in lead I and in leads V₅ and V₆. PMID:24469750

  14. TNFR2 Deficiency Acts in Concert with Gut Microbiota To Precipitate Spontaneous Sex-Biased Central Nervous System Demyelinating Autoimmune Disease.

    PubMed

    Miller, Patrick G; Bonn, Michael B; Franklin, Craig L; Ericsson, Aaron C; McKarns, Susan C

    2015-11-15

    TNF-α antagonists provide benefit to patients with inflammatory autoimmune disorders such as Crohn's disease, rheumatoid arthritis, and ankylosing spondylitis. However, TNF antagonism unexplainably exacerbates CNS autoimmunity, including multiple sclerosis and neuromyelitis optica. The underlying mechanisms remain enigmatic. We demonstrate that TNFR2 deficiency results in female-biased spontaneous autoimmune CNS demyelination in myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein-specific 2D2 TCR transgenic mice. Disease in TNFR2(-/-) 2D2 mice was associated with CNS infiltration of T and B cells as well as increased production of myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein-specific IL-17, IFN-γ, and IgG2b. Attenuated disease in TNF(-/-) 2D2 mice relative to TNFR2(-/-) 2D2 mice identified distinctive roles for TNFR1 and TNFR2. Oral antibiotic treatment eliminated spontaneous autoimmunity in TNFR2(-/-) 2D2 mice to suggest role for gut microbiota. Illumina sequencing of fecal 16S rRNA identified a distinct microbiota profile in male TNFR2(-/-) 2D2 that was associated with disease protection. Akkermansia muciniphila, Sutterella sp., Oscillospira sp., Bacteroides acidifaciens, and Anaeroplasma sp. were selectively more abundant in male TNFR2(-/-) 2D2 mice. In contrast, Bacteroides sp., Bacteroides uniformis, and Parabacteroides sp. were more abundant in affected female TNFR2(-/-) 2D2 mice, suggesting a role in disease causation. Overall, TNFR2 blockade appears to disrupt commensal bacteria-host immune symbiosis to reveal autoimmune demyelination in genetically susceptible mice. Under this paradigm, microbes likely contribute to an individual's response to anti-TNF therapy. This model provides a foundation for host immune-microbiota-directed measures for the prevention and treatment of CNS-demyelinating autoimmune disorders. PMID:26475926

  15. Inflammatory demyelinating neuropathies.

    PubMed

    Muley, Suraj Ashok; Parry, Gareth J

    2009-05-01

    Early and effective treatment of chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy (CIDP) is important to minimize axonal degeneration that occurs secondary to demyelination. The disease course is invariably chronic, so long-term treatment is often required, and adverse effects and costs are important considerations in devising a treatment plan. CIDP responds to prednisone, but long-term treatment can result in significant adverse effects. Azathioprine, mycophenolate mofetil, and cyclosporine can be used as steroid-sparing agents and may facilitate more rapid and successful tapering of prednisone. Intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIg) and plasma exchange are also effective in the treatment of CIDP and can be used in patients who are unresponsive to prednisone or develop steroid-related adverse effects. IVIg may also be used as a first-line treatment, but its cost can be a limiting factor. A few uncontrolled studies have suggested that pulsed weekly methylprednisolone is both effective and well tolerated in the long-term treatment of CIDP. Treatments based on rituximab or cyclophosphamide have also been used in resistant disease. Variants of CIDP have been described on the basis of their association with specific antibodies or immunoglobulins and their response to specific immunomodulatory treatments. Multifocal motor neuropathy with conduction block responds to IVIg in the majority of patients. However, weakness may slowly worsen over time, and some patients become unresponsive. Anecdotal reports suggest that rituximab may be useful in patients who develop progressive disease. Placebo-controlled trials in anti-myelin-associated glycoprotein neuropathy suggest that rituximab is effective and, with a combination of prednisone and cyclophosphamide, numbness and strength may improve. Other treatments that may be effective include plasma exchange and IVIg. Treatment is generally started with prednisone, IVIg, or plasma exchange. Rituximab and cyclophosphamide are used only

  16. Chronic Inflammatory Demyelinating Polyneuropathy

    PubMed Central

    Dimachkie, Mazen M.; Barohn, Richard J.

    2014-01-01

    Opinion statement Chronic Inflammatory polyneuropathies are an important group of neuromuscular disorders that present chronically and progress over more than 8 weeks, being referred to as chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy (CIDP). Despite tremendous progress in elucidating disease pathogenesis, the exact triggering event remains unknown. Our knowledge regarding diagnosis and management of CIDP and its variants continues to expand, resulting in improved opportunities for identification and treatment. Most clinical neurologists will be involved in the management of patients with these disorders, and should be familiar with available therapies for CIDP. We review the distinctive clinical, laboratory, and electro-diagnostic features that aid in diagnosis. We emphasize the importance of clinical patterns that define treatment responsiveness and the most appropriate therapies in order to improve prognosis. PMID:23564314

  17. Gliopathy of Demyelinating and Non-Demyelinating Strains of Mouse Hepatitis Virus

    PubMed Central

    Kenyon, Lawrence C.; Biswas, Kaushiki; Shindler, Kenneth S.; Nabar, Manasi; Stout, Marjorie; Hingley, Susan T.; Grinspan, Judith B.; Das Sarma, Jayasri

    2015-01-01

    Demyelination in the central nervous system induced by neurovirulent strains of Mouse Hepatitis Virus (MHV) is mediated by the viral spike glycoprotein, but it is not clear whether the mechanism of this disease pathology involves direct viral infection of oligodendrocytes. Detailed studies of glial cell tropism of MHV are presented, demonstrating that direct MHV infection of oligodendrocytes differs between demyelinating (RSA59) and non-demyelinating (RSMHV2) viral strains both in vitro and in vivo. Our results indicate that direct injury of mature oligodendrocytes is an important mechanism of virus-induced demyelination. In vivo, RSA59 infection was identified in spinal cord gray and white matter, but infected oligodendrocytes were restricted to white matter. In contrast, RSMHV2 infection was restricted to gray matter neurons and was not localized to oligodendrocytes. In vitro, RSA59 can infect both oligodendrocyte precursors and differentiated oligodendrocytes, whereas RSMHV2 can infect oligodendrocyte precursors but not differentiated oligodendrocytes. Viral spreading through axonal means to white matter and release of the demyelinating strain MHV at the nerve end is critical for oligodendrocytes infection and subsequent demyelination. Understanding the mechanisms by which known viruses effect demyelination in this animal model has important therapeutic implications in the treatment of human demyelinating disease. PMID:26733813

  18. Primary Cutaneous Plasmacytosis: Masquerading as Hidradenitis Suppurativa

    PubMed Central

    Goyal, Tarang; Varshney, Anupam; Zawar, Vijay; Sharma, Veena

    2016-01-01

    Isolated cutaneous plasmacytosis (CP) is a rare entity with few cases reported in world literature. CP masquerading as hidradenitis suppurativa like presentation is a unique case with some features differentiating it clinically from it which were further confirmed by histopathology and immunostaining. Our case showed hyperplasia of mature plasma cells and polyclonal hypergammaglobulinemia, immunostaining for CD138 positivity and kappa: lambda ratio more than 3:1. Extensive clinical and laboratory investigations failed to reveal any underlying pathology, presence of any underlying disease accompanying the hypergammaglobulinemia and/or plasma cell proliferation. PMID:27057027

  19. Primary Cutaneous Plasmacytosis: Masquerading as Hidradenitis Suppurativa.

    PubMed

    Goyal, Tarang; Varshney, Anupam; Zawar, Vijay; Sharma, Veena

    2016-01-01

    Isolated cutaneous plasmacytosis (CP) is a rare entity with few cases reported in world literature. CP masquerading as hidradenitis suppurativa like presentation is a unique case with some features differentiating it clinically from it which were further confirmed by histopathology and immunostaining. Our case showed hyperplasia of mature plasma cells and polyclonal hypergammaglobulinemia, immunostaining for CD138 positivity and kappa: lambda ratio more than 3:1. Extensive clinical and laboratory investigations failed to reveal any underlying pathology, presence of any underlying disease accompanying the hypergammaglobulinemia and/or plasma cell proliferation. PMID:27057027

  20. Atypical inflammatory demyelinating syndromes of the CNS.

    PubMed

    Hardy, Todd A; Reddel, Stephen W; Barnett, Michael H; Palace, Jacqueline; Lucchinetti, Claudia F; Weinshenker, Brian G

    2016-08-01

    Atypical inflammatory demyelinating syndromes are rare disorders that differ from multiple sclerosis owing to unusual clinical or MRI findings or poor response to treatments used for multiple sclerosis. These syndromes include neuromyelitis optica spectrum disorder, acute disseminated encephalomyelitis, tumefactive demyelination, Baló's concentric sclerosis, Schilder's disease, and Marburg's multiple sclerosis. The overlapping features of these syndromes with multiple sclerosis and with each other complicate diagnosis and their categorisation as distinct or related conditions. Recognition of these syndromes is crucial because they differ from multiple sclerosis and other demyelinating and non-demyelinating conditions in their prognosis and treatment. Advances in MRI, pathology, and immunobiology are needed to increase understanding of these syndromes, including the extent to which some of them represent distinct entities, and to assist with improvements in their diagnosis and management. PMID:27478954

  1. Association Between the Single Nucleotide Polymorphism and the Level of Aquaporin-4 Protein Expression in Han and Minority Chinese with Inflammatory Demyelinating Diseases of the Central Nervous System.

    PubMed

    Chu, Lan; Dai, Qingqing; Xu, Zhu; He, Dian; Wang, Hao; Wang, Qingsong; Zhang, Yifan; Zhu, Yingwu; Li, Yuan; Cai, Gang; Slavica, Krantic; Allan, Kermode

    2016-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine whether or not aquaporin-4 (AQP4) gene mutations are related to the pathogenesis of inflammatory demyelinating diseases in the central nervous system. Polymorphisms of AQP4 exons 1-5 were determined by sequencing DNA from 67 patients with central nervous system inflammatory demyelinating diseases, including neuromyelitis optica (NMO), multiple sclerosis, recurrent or simultaneous bilateral optic neuritis, and longitudinally extensive transverse myelitis. A plasmid with the identified new missense mutation was constructed, and human embryonic kidney cells (HEK293A) were transfected with either the pEGFP-N1-AQP4-M23 vector (bearing the identified mutated cDNA sequence) or with the plasmid bearing the wild-type AQP4 gene sequence. AQP4 protein expression was analyzed in both experimental groups using Western Blot analysis following protein extraction from transfected cells. A synonymous mutation (rs1839318) was detected on exon 3, and an additional synonymous mutation was detected on the exon 2-2 (rs72557968). Most importantly, a new missense mutation was detected on exon 2-1. According to Western blot analysis, the mutated cDNA sequence yielded increased AQP4 protein expression in comparison with the wild-type cDNA sequence (P < 0.05). AQP4 gene mutations are uncommon, occurring in only 3 out of 67 patients. Although it is possible that the mutations contributed to an increased risk of inflammatory central nervous system disease in these individuals, it is unlikely that mutations are a significant contributor to most patients with NMO spectrum disorders in China. PMID:25895050

  2. Blocking mitochondrial calcium release in Schwann cells prevents demyelinating neuropathies

    PubMed Central

    Berthelot, Jade; Jiner, Jennifer; Perrin-Tricaud, Claire; Fernando, Ruani; Chrast, Roman; Lenaers, Guy

    2016-01-01

    Schwann cells produce myelin sheath around peripheral nerve axons. Myelination is critical for rapid propagation of action potentials, as illustrated by the large number of acquired and hereditary peripheral neuropathies, such as diabetic neuropathy or Charcot-Marie-Tooth diseases, that are commonly associated with a process of demyelination. However, the early molecular events that trigger the demyelination program in these diseases remain unknown. Here, we used virally delivered fluorescent probes and in vivo time-lapse imaging in a mouse model of demyelination to investigate the underlying mechanisms of the demyelination process. We demonstrated that mitochondrial calcium released by voltage-dependent anion channel 1 (VDAC1) after sciatic nerve injury triggers Schwann cell demyelination via ERK1/2, p38, JNK, and c-JUN activation. In diabetic mice, VDAC1 activity was altered, resulting in a mitochondrial calcium leak in Schwann cell cytoplasm, thereby priming the cell for demyelination. Moreover, reduction of mitochondrial calcium release, either by shRNA-mediated VDAC1 silencing or pharmacological inhibition, prevented demyelination, leading to nerve conduction and neuromuscular performance recovery in rodent models of diabetic neuropathy and Charcot-Marie-Tooth diseases. Therefore, this study identifies mitochondria as the early key factor in the molecular mechanism of peripheral demyelination and opens a potential opportunity for the treatment of demyelinating peripheral neuropathies. PMID:26878172

  3. Molecular Disruptions of the Panglial Syncytium Block Potassium Siphoning and Axonal Saltatory Conduction: Pertinence to Neuromyelitis Optica and other Demyelinating Diseases of the Central Nervous System

    PubMed Central

    Rash, John E.

    2009-01-01

    The panglial syncytium maintains ionic conditions required for normal neuronal electrical activity in the central nervous system (CNS). Vital among these homeostatic functions is “potassium siphoning”, a process originally proposed to explain astrocytic sequestration and long-distance disposal of K+ released from unmyelinated axons during each action potential. Fundamentally different, more efficient processes are required in myelinated axons, where axonal K+ efflux occurs exclusively beneath and enclosed within the myelin sheath, precluding direct sequestration of K+ by nearby astrocytes. Molecular mechanisms for entry of excess K+ and obligatorily-associated osmotic water from axons into innermost myelin are not well characterized, whereas at the output end, axonally-derived K+ and associated osmotic water are known to be expelled by Kir4.1 and aquaporin-4 channels concentrated in astrocyte endfeet that surround capillaries and that form the glia limitans. Between myelin (input end) and astrocyte endfeet (output end) is a vast network of astrocyte “intermediaries” that are strongly inter-linked, including with myelin, by abundant gap junctions that disperse excess K+ and water throughout the panglial syncytium, thereby greatly reducing K+-induced osmotic swelling of myelin. Here, I review original reports that established the concept of potassium siphoning in unmyelinated CNS axons, summarize recent revolutions in our understanding of K+ efflux during axonal saltatory conduction, then describe additional components required by myelinated axons for a newly-described process of voltage-augmented “dynamic” potassium siphoning. If any of several molecular components of the panglial syncytium are compromised, K+ siphoning is blocked, myelin is destroyed, and axonal saltatory conduction ceases. Thus, a common thread linking several CNS demyelinating diseases is the disruption of potassium siphoning/water transport within the panglial syncytium. Continued

  4. Molecular disruptions of the panglial syncytium block potassium siphoning and axonal saltatory conduction: pertinence to neuromyelitis optica and other demyelinating diseases of the central nervous system.

    PubMed

    Rash, J E

    2010-07-28

    The panglial syncytium maintains ionic conditions required for normal neuronal electrical activity in the central nervous system (CNS). Vital among these homeostatic functions is "potassium siphoning," a process originally proposed to explain astrocytic sequestration and long-distance disposal of K(+) released from unmyelinated axons during each action potential. Fundamentally different, more efficient processes are required in myelinated axons, where axonal K(+) efflux occurs exclusively beneath and enclosed within the myelin sheath, precluding direct sequestration of K(+) by nearby astrocytes. Molecular mechanisms for entry of excess K(+) and obligatorily-associated osmotic water from axons into innermost myelin are not well characterized, whereas at the output end, axonally-derived K(+) and associated osmotic water are known to be expelled by Kir4.1 and aquaporin-4 channels concentrated in astrocyte endfeet that surround capillaries and that form the glia limitans. Between myelin (input end) and astrocyte endfeet (output end) is a vast network of astrocyte "intermediaries" that are strongly inter-linked, including with myelin, by abundant gap junctions that disperse excess K(+) and water throughout the panglial syncytium, thereby greatly reducing K(+)-induced osmotic swelling of myelin. Here, I review original reports that established the concept of potassium siphoning in unmyelinated CNS axons, summarize recent revolutions in our understanding of K(+) efflux during axonal saltatory conduction, then describe additional components required by myelinated axons for a newly-described process of voltage-augmented "dynamic" potassium siphoning. If any of several molecular components of the panglial syncytium are compromised, K(+) siphoning is blocked, myelin is destroyed, and axonal saltatory conduction ceases. Thus, a common thread linking several CNS demyelinating diseases is the disruption of potassium siphoning/water transport within the panglial syncytium

  5. Acute Monocytic Leukemia Masquerading Behçet's Disease-Like Illness at Onset in an Elderly Female.

    PubMed

    Koba, Shigeru; Sekioka, Toshio; Takeda, Sorou; Miyagawa-Hayashino, Aya; Nishimura, Keisuke; Imashuku, Shinsaku

    2016-01-01

    A previously healthy 74-year-old Japanese female was hospitalized with fever and high C-reactive protein. She developed palatal herpangina-like aphthous ulcers, localized intestinal wall thickening, terminal ileum ulcers, and an erythematous acneiform rash; thus Behçet's disease-like illness was suspected. Significant peripheral blood acute monocytosis developed during her hospitalization and acute monocytic leukemia (FAB M5b) with normal karyotype was diagnosed. By immunostaining, the infiltrating cells in the skin and the terminal ileum were identified as monocytic leukemic cells. This case exhibited a unique initial presentation of Behçet's disease-like illness associated with acute monocytic leukemia. PMID:27610252

  6. Acute Monocytic Leukemia Masquerading Behçet's Disease-Like Illness at Onset in an Elderly Female

    PubMed Central

    Koba, Shigeru; Sekioka, Toshio; Takeda, Sorou; Miyagawa-Hayashino, Aya; Nishimura, Keisuke

    2016-01-01

    A previously healthy 74-year-old Japanese female was hospitalized with fever and high C-reactive protein. She developed palatal herpangina-like aphthous ulcers, localized intestinal wall thickening, terminal ileum ulcers, and an erythematous acneiform rash; thus Behçet's disease-like illness was suspected. Significant peripheral blood acute monocytosis developed during her hospitalization and acute monocytic leukemia (FAB M5b) with normal karyotype was diagnosed. By immunostaining, the infiltrating cells in the skin and the terminal ileum were identified as monocytic leukemic cells. This case exhibited a unique initial presentation of Behçet's disease-like illness associated with acute monocytic leukemia. PMID:27610252

  7. Aquaporin-4 Immuneglobulin G Testing in 36 Consecutive Jamaican Patients with Inflammatory Central Nervous System Demyelinating Disease

    PubMed Central

    Sandy, Sherri; Seemungal, Terence A.R.; Ali, Amza

    2014-01-01

    Epidemiological studies of neuromyelitis optica (NMO) in Jamaica are lacking. Here we reviewed the clinical records of 700 patients undergoing neurological evaluation at the Kingston Public Hospital, the largest tertiary institution in Jamaica over a 4 month period. We investigated the diagnostic utility of Aquaporin-4 ImmuneglobulinG (AQP4-IgG) testing in 36 consecutive patients with a diagnosis of an inflammatory demyelinating disorder (IDD) of the central nervous system (CNS). Patients were classified into 3 categories: i) NMO, n=10; ii) multiple sclerosis (MS), n=14 and iii) unclassified IDD (n=12). All sera were tested for AQP-IgG status by cell binding assay (Euroimmun). No MS cases were positive. Ninety per cent of NMO cases were positive. Four of 12 patients with unclassified IDD tested positive for AQP4-IgG. AQP4-IgG seropositivity was associated with a lower socioeconomic status, higher EDSS (P=0.04) and lower pulmonary function than the seronegative cases (P=0.007). Aquaporin-4 autoimmunity may account for a significant proportion of Jamaican CNS IDDs. PMID:25309712

  8. Polycyclic Annular Lesion Masquerading as Lupus Erythematosus and Emerging as Tinea Faciei Incognito

    PubMed Central

    Kye, Heesang; Kim, Dai Hyun; Seo, Soo Hong; Ahn, Hyo Hyun; Kye, Young Chul

    2015-01-01

    Tinea incognito is a dermatophytic infection induced by immunosuppressive agents that lacks the classic features of a typical fungal infection. Although the treatment of tinea incognito is simple and relatively easy, its clinical manifestation varies and can masquerade as various skin disorders, causing misdiagnosis and thus preventing prompt and appropriate treatment. Here, we report an interesting case of tinea incognito occurring after topical steroid administration in an immunosuppressed patient with dermatitis artefacta. A 40-year-old female patient who had been taking systemic glucocorticoid for 4 years for chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy presented with itching multiple erythematous erosive lesions on the face and upper chest for 2 months. Initial biopsy produced nonspecific findings. The skin lesion was aggravated and became polycyclic and erythematous; after azathioprine was added, her chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy became aggravated. A second biopsy confirmed hyphae in the cornified layer. Complete remission was achieved after admonishing oral terbinafine and topical amorolfine. PMID:26082592

  9. Polycyclic Annular Lesion Masquerading as Lupus Erythematosus and Emerging as Tinea Faciei Incognito.

    PubMed

    Kye, Heesang; Kim, Dai Hyun; Seo, Soo Hong; Ahn, Hyo Hyun; Kye, Young Chul; Choi, Jae Eun

    2015-06-01

    Tinea incognito is a dermatophytic infection induced by immunosuppressive agents that lacks the classic features of a typical fungal infection. Although the treatment of tinea incognito is simple and relatively easy, its clinical manifestation varies and can masquerade as various skin disorders, causing misdiagnosis and thus preventing prompt and appropriate treatment. Here, we report an interesting case of tinea incognito occurring after topical steroid administration in an immunosuppressed patient with dermatitis artefacta. A 40-year-old female patient who had been taking systemic glucocorticoid for 4 years for chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy presented with itching multiple erythematous erosive lesions on the face and upper chest for 2 months. Initial biopsy produced nonspecific findings. The skin lesion was aggravated and became polycyclic and erythematous; after azathioprine was added, her chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy became aggravated. A second biopsy confirmed hyphae in the cornified layer. Complete remission was achieved after admonishing oral terbinafine and topical amorolfine. PMID:26082592

  10. A New Model of Cuprizone-Mediated Demyelination/Remyelination

    PubMed Central

    Sachs, Hilary H.; Bercury, Kathryn K.; Popescu, Daniela C.; Narayanan, S. Priya

    2014-01-01

    In the central nervous system, demyelinating diseases, such as multiple sclerosis, result in devastating long-term neurologic damage, in part because of the lack of effective remyelination in the adult human brain. One model used to understand the mechanisms regulating remyelination is cuprizone-induced demyelination, which allows investigation of remyelination mechanisms in adult animals following toxin-induced demyelination. Unfortunately, the degree of demyelination in the cuprizone model can vary, which complicates understanding the process of remyelination. Previous work in our laboratory demonstrated that the Akt/mTOR pathway regulates active myelination. When given to young postnatal mice, the mTOR inhibitor, rapamycin, inhibits active myelination. In the current study, the cuprizone model was modified by the addition of rapamycin during cuprizone exposure. When administered together, cuprizone and rapamycin produced more complete demyelination and provided a longer time frame over which to investigate remyelination than treatment with cuprizone alone. The consistency in demyelination will allow a better understanding of the mechanisms initiating remyelination. Furthermore, the slower rate of remyelination provides a longer window of time in which to investigate the diverse contributing factors that regulate remyelination. This new model of cuprizone-induced demyelination could potentially aid in identification of new therapeutic targets to enhance remyelination in demyelinating diseases. PMID:25290063

  11. A new model of cuprizone-mediated demyelination/remyelination.

    PubMed

    Sachs, Hilary H; Bercury, Kathryn K; Popescu, Daniela C; Narayanan, S Priya; Macklin, Wendy B

    2014-01-01

    In the central nervous system, demyelinating diseases, such as multiple sclerosis, result in devastating long-term neurologic damage, in part because of the lack of effective remyelination in the adult human brain. One model used to understand the mechanisms regulating remyelination is cuprizone-induced demyelination, which allows investigation of remyelination mechanisms in adult animals following toxin-induced demyelination. Unfortunately, the degree of demyelination in the cuprizone model can vary, which complicates understanding the process of remyelination. Previous work in our laboratory demonstrated that the Akt/mTOR pathway regulates active myelination. When given to young postnatal mice, the mTOR inhibitor, rapamycin, inhibits active myelination. In the current study, the cuprizone model was modified by the addition of rapamycin during cuprizone exposure. When administered together, cuprizone and rapamycin produced more complete demyelination and provided a longer time frame over which to investigate remyelination than treatment with cuprizone alone. The consistency in demyelination will allow a better understanding of the mechanisms initiating remyelination. Furthermore, the slower rate of remyelination provides a longer window of time in which to investigate the diverse contributing factors that regulate remyelination. This new model of cuprizone-induced demyelination could potentially aid in identification of new therapeutic targets to enhance remyelination in demyelinating diseases. PMID:25290063

  12. Aggregation of MBP in chronic demyelination

    PubMed Central

    Frid, Kati; Einstein, Ofira; Friedman-Levi, Yael; Binyamin, Orli; Ben-Hur, Tamir; Gabizon, Ruth

    2015-01-01

    Objectives Misfolding of key disease proteins to an insoluble state is associated with most neurodegenerative conditions, such as prion, Parkinson, and Alzheimer’s diseases. In this work, and by studying animal models of multiple sclerosis, we asked whether this is also the case for myelin basic protein (MBP) in the late and neurodegenerative phases of demyelinating diseases. Methods To this effect, we tested whether MBP, an essential myelin component, present prion-like properties in animal models of MS, as is the case for Cuprizone-induced chronic demyelination or chronic phases of Experimental Autoimmune Encephalomyelitis (EAE). Results We show here that while total levels of MBP were not reduced following extensive demyelination, part of these molecules accumulated thereafter as aggregates inside oligodendrocytes or around neuronal cells. In chronic EAE, MBP precipitated concomitantly with Tau, a marker of diverse neurodegenerative conditions, including MS. Most important, analysis of fractions from Triton X-100 floatation gradients suggest that the lipid composition of brain membranes in chronic EAE differs significantly from that of naïve mice, an effect which may relate to oxidative insults and subsequently prevent the appropriate insertion and compaction of new MBP in the myelin sheath, thereby causing its misfolding and aggregation. Interpretation Prion-like aggregation of MBP following chronic demyelination may result from an aberrant lipid composition accompanying this pathological status. Such aggregation of MBP may contribute to neuronal damage that occurs in the progressive phase of MS. PMID:26273684

  13. Ultrasound of Inherited vs. Acquired Demyelinating Polyneuropathies

    PubMed Central

    Zaidman, Craig M.; Harms, Matthew B.; Pestronk, Alan

    2013-01-01

    Introduction We compared features of nerve enlargement in inherited and acquired demyelinating neuropathies using ultrasound. Methods We measured median and ulnar nerve cross-sectional areas in proximal and distal regions in 128 children and adults with inherited (Charcot-Marie Tooth-1 (CMT-1) (n=35)) and acquired (Chronic Inflammatory Demyelinating Polyneuropathy (CIDP) (n=55), Guillaine-Barre Syndrome (GBS) (n=21) and Multifocal Motor Neuropathy (MMN) (n=17)) demyelinating neuropathies. We classified nerve enlargement by degree and number of regions affected. We defined patterns of nerve enlargement as: none- no enlargement; mild-nerves enlarged but never more than twice normal; regional- nerves normal at at least one region and enlarged more than twice normal at atleast one region; diffuse- nerves enlarged at all four regions with atleast one region more than twice normal size. Results Nerve enlargement was commonly diffuse (89%) and generally more than twice normal size in CMT-1, but not (p<0.001) in acquired disorders which mostly had either no, mild or regional nerve enlargement (CIDP (64%), GBS (95%), and MMN (100%)). In CIDP, subjects treated within three months of disease onset had less nerve enlargement than those treated later. Discussion Ultrasound identified patterns of diffuse nerve enlargement can be used to screen patients suspected of having CMT-1. Normal, mildly, or regionally enlarged nerves in demyelinating polyneuropathy suggests an acquired etiology. Early treatment in CIDP may impede nerve enlargement. PMID:24101129

  14. Initial analysis of non-typical Leber hereditary optic neuropathy (LHON) at onset and late developing demyelinating disease in Italian patients by SSCP and automated DNA sequence analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Sartore, M.; Semeraro, A.; Fortina, P.

    1994-09-01

    LHON is a mitochondrial genetic disease characterized by maternal inheritance and late onset of blindness caused by bilateral retinal degeneration. A number of molecular defects are known affecting expression of seven mitochondrial genes encoding subunits of respiratory chain complex I, III and IV. We screened genomic DNA from Italian patients for seven of the known point mutations in the ND-1, ND-4 and ND-6 subunits of complex I by PCR followed by SSCP and restriction enzyme digestion. Most of the patients had nonfamilial bilateral visual loss with partial or no recovery and normal neurological examination. Fundoscopic examination revealed that none of the patients had features typical of LHON. Nine of 21 patients (43%) showed multifocal CNS demyelination on MRI. Our results show aberrant SSCP patterns for a PCR product from the ND-4 subunit in one affected child and his mother. Sfa NI and Mae III digestions suggested the absence of a previously defined LHON mutation, and automated DNA sequence analysis revealed two A to G neutral sequence polymorphisms in the third position of codons 351 and 353. In addition, PCR products from the same two samples and an unrelated one showed abnormal SSCP patterns for the ND-1 subunit region of complex I due to the presence of a T to C change at nt 4,216 which was demonstrated after Nla III digestion of PCR products and further confirmed by DNA sequence analysis. Our results indicate that additional defects are present in the Italian population, and identification of abnormal SSCP patterns followed by targeted automated DNA sequence analysis is a reasonable strategy for delineation of new LHON mutations.

  15. Mitochondrial immobilization mediated by syntaphilin facilitates survival of demyelinated axons

    PubMed Central

    Ohno, Nobuhiko; Chiang, Hao; Mahad, Don J.; Kidd, Grahame J.; Liu, LiPing; Ransohoff, Richard M.; Sheng, Zu-Hang; Komuro, Hitoshi; Trapp, Bruce D.

    2014-01-01

    Axonal degeneration is a primary cause of permanent neurological disability in individuals with the CNS demyelinating disease multiple sclerosis. Dysfunction of axonal mitochondria and imbalanced energy demand and supply are implicated in degeneration of chronically demyelinated axons. The purpose of this study was to define the roles of mitochondrial volume and distribution in axonal degeneration following acute CNS demyelination. We show that the axonal mitochondrial volume increase following acute demyelination of WT CNS axons does not occur in demyelinated axons deficient in syntaphilin, an axonal molecule that immobilizes stationary mitochondria to microtubules. These findings were supported by time-lapse imaging of WT and syntaphilin-deficient axons in vitro. When demyelinated, axons deficient in syntaphilin degenerate at a significantly greater rate than WT axons, and this degeneration can be rescued by reducing axonal electrical activity with the Na+ channel blocker flecainide. These results support the concept that syntaphilin-mediated immobilization of mitochondria to microtubules is required for the volume increase of axonal mitochondria following acute demyelination and protects against axonal degeneration in the CNS. PMID:24958879

  16. Regulatory and T Effector Cells Have Overlapping Low to High Ranges in TCR Affinities for Self during Demyelinating Disease.

    PubMed

    Hood, Jennifer D; Zarnitsyna, Veronika I; Zhu, Cheng; Evavold, Brian D

    2015-11-01

    Having regulatory T cells (Tregs) with the same Ag specificity as the responding conventional T cells is thought to be important in maintaining peripheral tolerance. It has been demonstrated that during experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis there are myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein (MOG)--specific Tregs that infiltrate into the CNS. However, the affinity of naturally occurring polyclonal Tregs for any self-antigen, let alone MOG, has not been analyzed in the periphery or at the site of autoimmune disease. Utilizing the highly sensitive micropipette adhesion frequency assay, which allows one to determine on a single-cell basis the affinity and frequency of polyclonal Ag-specific T cells directly ex vivo, we demonstrate that at peak disease MOG-specific Tregs were progressively enriched in the draining cervical lymph nodes and CNS as compared with spleen. These frequencies were greater than the frequencies measured by tetramer analysis, indicative of the large fraction of lower affinity T cells that comprise the MOG-specific conventional T cell (Tconv) and Treg response. Of interest, the self-reactive CD4(+) Tconvs and Tregs displayed overlapping affinities for MOG in the periphery, yet in the CNS, the site of neuroinflammation, Tconvs skew toward higher affinities. Most of the MOG-specific Tregs in the CNS possessed the methylation signature associated with thymic-derived Tregs. These findings indicate that thymic-derived Treg affinity range matches that of their Tconvs in the periphery and suggest a change in TCR affinity as a potential mechanism for autoimmune progression and escape from immune regulation. PMID:26385521

  17. Cytokine-Neuroantigen Fusion Proteins as a New Class of Tolerogenic, Therapeutic Vaccines for Treatment of Inflammatory Demyelinating Disease in Rodent Models of Multiple Sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Mannie, Mark D.; Blanchfield, J. Lori; Islam, S. M. Touhidul; Abbott, Derek J.

    2012-01-01

    Myelin-specific induction of tolerance represents a promising means to modify the course of autoimmune inflammatory demyelinating diseases such as multiple sclerosis (MS). Our laboratory has focused on a novel preclinical strategy for the induction of tolerance to the major encephalitogenic epitopes of myelin that cause experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) in rats and mice. This novel approach is based on the use of cytokine-NAg (neuroantigen) fusion proteins comprised of the native cytokine fused either with or without a linker to a NAg domain. Several single-chain cytokine-NAg fusion proteins were tested including GMCSF-NAg, IFNbeta-NAg, NAgIL16, and IL2-NAg. These cytokine-NAg vaccines were tolerogenic, therapeutic vaccines that had tolerogenic activity when given as pre-treatments before encephalitogenic immunization and also were effective as therapeutic interventions during the effector phase of EAE. The rank order of inhibitory activity was as follows: GMCSF-NAg, IFNbeta-NAg > NAgIL16 > IL2-NAg > MCSF-NAg, IL4-NAg, IL-13-NAg, IL1RA-NAg, and NAg. Several cytokine-NAg fusion proteins exhibited antigen-targeting activity. High affinity binding of the cytokine domain to specific cytokine receptors on particular subsets of APC resulted in the concentrated uptake of the NAg domain by those APC which in turn facilitated the enhanced processing and presentation of the NAg domain on cell surface MHC class II glycoproteins. For most cytokine-NAg vaccines, the covalent linkage of the cytokine domain and NAg domain was required for inhibition of EAE, thereby indicating that antigenic targeting of the NAg domain to APC was also required in vivo for tolerogenic activity. Overall, these studies introduced a new concept of cytokine-NAg fusion proteins as a means to induce tolerance and to inhibit the effector phase of autoimmune disease. The approach has broad application for suppressive vaccination as a therapy for autoimmune diseases such as MS

  18. Pathogenesis and molecular biology of progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy, the JC virus-induced demyelinating disease of the human brain.

    PubMed Central

    Major, E O; Amemiya, K; Tornatore, C S; Houff, S A; Berger, J R

    1992-01-01

    disease, for which no consensus of antiviral therapy exists, may yield to innovative treatment protocols. Images PMID:1310438

  19. Demyelinative chiamal lesions.

    PubMed

    Spector, R H; Glaser, J S; Schatz, N J

    1980-12-01

    To clarify the clinical syndrome of demyelinative chiasmal involvement, six case histories were analyzed and the literature was reviewed. This entitity is characterized by especial predilection for women in the third to fifth decades; visual deficites of a chiasmal pattern that may be modest to marked, with a generallly good prognosis for functional recovery; and other signs and symptoms, not necessarily severe, of scattered lesions of the neuraxis. Neuroradiological studies, especially laminography of the sellar area and computerized tomography, must be employed to rule out a suprasellar mass lesion. The efficacy of systemic corticosteroid therapy is moot, but it seems reasonable to use such agents during acute stages, especially where vision is severely reduced on both sides. PMID:7447764

  20. Primary angiitis of central nervous system: The story of a great masquerader.

    PubMed

    Bajaj, Bhupender Kumar; Pandey, Shweta; Ramanujam, Bhargavi; Wadhwa, Ankur

    2015-01-01

    Primary angiitis of central nervous system (PACNS) is characterized by non-caseating granulomatous angiitis restricted to CNS. The condition often masquerades as migraine, stroke, epilepsy, dementia, demyelinating disorder and CNS infection. The protean manifestations frequently lead to misdiagnoses. We present a case of a young male from rural background that remained undiagnosed for years as the possibility of PACNS was not considered. He had history suggestive of migraine-like headaches followed by seizures. Subsequently, he developed rapidly progressive dementia and two episodes of hemorrhagic strokes over a short period. The diagnosis was finally clinched by the absence of evidence of systemic vasculitis and the presence of characteristic non-caseating granuloma around vessels of duramater and cerebral parenchyma on brain biopsy. He was started on pulse therapy with intravenous cyclophosphamide and methylprednisolone. The current literature about the condition and its management is reviewed in this report. PMID:26167025

  1. Chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy.

    PubMed

    Mathey, Emily K; Pollard, John D

    2013-10-15

    Chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy (CIDP) is the commonest treatable neuropathy in the western world. Untreated it may result in severe disability but if diagnosed and treated early there is effective treatment for the majority of patients. Typical CIDP is readily recognised but the diagnosis of other subgroups can be more challenging. The pathology of polyradiculoneuropathies such as CIDP characteristically affects the most proximal regions of the peripheral nervous system, nerve roots and major plexuses. It is important to test these regions with electrodiagnostic studies since routine neurophysiology may not encounter regions of pathology. Although accepted as an autoimmune disorder with an underlying immunopathology involving T cell and B cell responses, there is no agreement on major target antigens; however recent studies have highlighted a role for molecules in non compact myelin which play an essential role in the formation and maintenance of the nodal structures and hence in the function of ion channels central to saltatory conduction. Controlled trials have proven the efficacy of corticosteroid, intravenous immunoglobulin and plasma exchange in the short term and intravenous immunoglobulin also in the long term. Immunosuppressive agents are widely used but their efficacy has not been proven in controlled trials. Recent trials have shown the importance of attempting treatment withdrawal in patients apparently in remission to conserve treatments that are very expensive and in short supply, since a significant proportion of patients may enter long lasting remission following short term therapy. For the relatively small group of patients who do not respond to these first line therapies new agents including monoclonal antibodies may have a role. PMID:23146613

  2. Inflammatory demyelination and neurodegeneration in early multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Charil, Arnaud; Filippi, Massimo

    2007-08-15

    A number of recent magnetic resonance imaging studies have challenged the classical view of multiple sclerosis (MS) as a "two-stage" disease where an early inflammatory demyelinating phase with focal macroscopic lesions formed in the white matter (WM) of the central nervous system is followed by a late neurodegenerative phase, which is believed to be a mere consequence of repeated inflammatory insults and irreversible demyelination. These studies have consistently shown the presence of diffuse normal-appearing WM damage, marked gray matter involvement and significant cortical functional reorganization, as well as the occurrence of the neurodegenerative component of MS from the earliest clinical stages of the disease with only a partial relation to MRI markers of inflammatory demyelination. The present review argues that MS can no longer be viewed as a "two-stage" disease, which suggests that the two pathological components are dissociated in time, but rather as a "simultaneous two-component" disease, where the relative contributions of the various pathological processes of the disease to the development of "fixed" disability, their relationship and their evolution over time need to be clarified. This new view of MS should inform the development of future research protocols to define its actual physiopathology and prompt the institution of early treatment which should ideally target not only inflammatory demyelination, but also the neurodegenerative aspects of the disease, as well as promote neuroprotection and enhance reparative mechanisms and adaptive functional reorganization of the cortex. PMID:17397873

  3. Multifocal Motor Neuropathy, Multifocal Acquired Demyelinating Sensory and Motor Neuropathy and Other Chronic Acquired Demyelinating Polyneuropathy Variants

    PubMed Central

    Barohn, Richard J.; Katz, Jonathan

    2014-01-01

    Chronic acquired demyelinating neuropathies (CADP) are an important group of immune neuromuscular disorders affecting myelin. These are distinct from chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy (CIDP). Classically, CIDP is characterized by proximal and distal weakness, large fiber sensory loss, elevated cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) protein content, demyelinating changes nerve conduction studies or nerve biopsy, and response to immunomodulating treatment. In this chapter we discuss CADP with emphasis on multifocal motor neuropathy (MMN), multifocal acquired demyelinating sensory and motor neuropathy (MADSAM), distal acquired demyelinating symmetric (DADS) neuropathy and conclude with less common variants. While each of these entities has distinctive laboratory and electrodiagnostic features that aid in their diagnosis, clinical characteristics are of paramount importance in diagnosing specific conditions and determining the most appropriate therapies. Unlike CIDP, MMN is typically asymmetric and affects only the motor nerve fibers. MMN is a rare disease that presents chronically, over several years of progression affecting the arms are more commonly than the legs. Men are more likely than women to develop MMN. MADSAM should be suspected in patients who have weakness and loss of sensation in primarily one arm or leg which progresses slowly over several months to years. It is important in patient with multifocal demyelinating clinical presentation to distinguish MMN from MADSAM since corticosteroids are not effective in MMN where the mainstay of therapy is intravenous gammaglobulin (IVIg). DADS can be subdivided into DADS-M (associated woth M-protein) and DADS-I which is idioapthic. While DADS-I patients respond somewhat to immunotherapy, DADS-M patients present with distal predominant sensorimotor demyelinating neuropathy phenotype and are notoriously refractory to immunotherapies regardless of antibodies to myelin-associated glycoprotein (MAG). Our knowledge

  4. Quantifying Demyelination in NK venom treated nerve using its electric circuit model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Das, H. K.; Das, D.; Doley, R.; Sahu, P. P.

    2016-03-01

    Reduction of myelin in peripheral nerve causes critical demyelinating diseases such as chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy, Guillain-Barre syndrome, etc. Clinical monitoring of these diseases requires rapid and non-invasive quantification of demyelination. Here we have developed formulation of nerve conduction velocity (NCV) in terms of demyelination considering electric circuit model of a nerve having bundle of axons for its quantification from NCV measurements. This approach has been validated and demonstrated with toad nerve model treated with crude Naja kaouthia (NK) venom and also shows the effect of Phospholipase A2 and three finger neurotoxin from NK-venom on peripheral nerve. This opens future scope for non-invasive clinical measurement of demyelination.

  5. Quantifying Demyelination in NK venom treated nerve using its electric circuit model.

    PubMed

    Das, H K; Das, D; Doley, R; Sahu, P P

    2016-01-01

    Reduction of myelin in peripheral nerve causes critical demyelinating diseases such as chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy, Guillain-Barre syndrome, etc. Clinical monitoring of these diseases requires rapid and non-invasive quantification of demyelination. Here we have developed formulation of nerve conduction velocity (NCV) in terms of demyelination considering electric circuit model of a nerve having bundle of axons for its quantification from NCV measurements. This approach has been validated and demonstrated with toad nerve model treated with crude Naja kaouthia (NK) venom and also shows the effect of Phospholipase A2 and three finger neurotoxin from NK-venom on peripheral nerve. This opens future scope for non-invasive clinical measurement of demyelination. PMID:26932543

  6. Quantifying Demyelination in NK venom treated nerve using its electric circuit model

    PubMed Central

    Das, H. K.; Das, D.; Doley, R.; Sahu, P. P.

    2016-01-01

    Reduction of myelin in peripheral nerve causes critical demyelinating diseases such as chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy, Guillain-Barre syndrome, etc. Clinical monitoring of these diseases requires rapid and non-invasive quantification of demyelination. Here we have developed formulation of nerve conduction velocity (NCV) in terms of demyelination considering electric circuit model of a nerve having bundle of axons for its quantification from NCV measurements. This approach has been validated and demonstrated with toad nerve model treated with crude Naja kaouthia (NK) venom and also shows the effect of Phospholipase A2 and three finger neurotoxin from NK-venom on peripheral nerve. This opens future scope for non-invasive clinical measurement of demyelination. PMID:26932543

  7. Nocardia farcinica Meningitis Masquerading as Central Nervous System Metastasis in a Child With Cerebellar Pilocytic Astrocytoma.

    PubMed

    Davis, Jennifer; Kreppel, Andrew J; Brady, Rebecca C; Jones, Blaise; Stevenson, Charles B; Fouladi, Maryam; Hummel, Trent R

    2015-08-01

    Juvenile pilocytic astrocytoma, the most common pediatric central nervous system (CNS) neoplasm, characteristically displays an indolent growth pattern and rarely demonstrates metastatic dissemination. Reports of infections mimicking CNS metastatic disease are also rare and can impact treatment. We report the youngest known case of a child with a CNS Nocardia farcinica infection who had a known cerebellar pilocytic astrocytoma, review other infections that may masquerade as CNS neoplasms, and discuss N. farcinica CNS infections. PMID:26181420

  8. Early and widespread injury of astrocytes in the absence of demyelination in acute haemorrhagic leukoencephalitis.

    PubMed

    Robinson, Christopher A; Adiele, Reginald C; Tham, Mylyne; Lucchinetti, Claudia F; Popescu, Bogdan F G H

    2014-01-01

    Acute hemorrhagic leukoencephalitis (AHL) is a fulminant demyelinating disease of unknown etiology. Most cases are fatal within one week from onset. AHL pathology varies with the acuteness of disease. Hemorrhages, vessel fibrinoid necrosis, perivascular fibrin exudation, edema and neutrophilic inflammation are early features, while perivascular demyelination, microglial foci and myelin-laden macrophages appear later. Reactive astrocytosis is not present in early hemorrhagic non-demyelinated lesions, but is seen in older lesions. This case report presents the pathology of an AHL case with fulminant course and fatal outcome within 48 hours from presentation. Severe hemorrhages, edema and neutrophilic inflammation in the absence of circumscribed perivascular demyelination affected the temporal neocortex and white matter, hippocampus, cerebellar cortex and white matter, optic chiasm, mammillary bodies, brainstem, cranial nerve roots and leptomeninges. Perivascular end-feet and parenchymal processes of astrocytes exhibited impressive swelling in haemorrhagic but non-demyelinated white matter regions. Astrocytes were dystrophic and displayed degenerating processes. Astrocytic swellings and remnants were immunoreactive for aquaporin-4, aquaporin-1 and glial fibrillary acidic protein. These morphological changes of astrocytes consistent with injury were also observed in haemorrhagic and normal appearing cortex. Our findings reinforce that perivascular demyelination is not present early in AHL. This is the first study that highlights the early and widespread astrocytic injury in the absence of demyelination in AHL, suggesting that, similarly to neuromyelitis optica and central pontine myelinolysis, demyelination in AHL is secondary to astrocyte injury. PMID:24887055

  9. Theiler's Virus Infection: Pathophysiology of Demyelination and Neurodegeneration

    PubMed Central

    Sato, Fumitaka; Tanaka, Hiroki; Hasanovic, Faris; Tsunoda, Ikuo

    2010-01-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) has been suggested to be an autoimmune demyelinating disease of the central nervous system (CNS), whose primary target is either myelin itself, or myelin-forming cells, the oligodendrocytes. Although axonal damage occurs in MS, it is regarded as a secondary event to the myelin damage. Here, the lesion develops from the myelin (outside) to the axons (inside) “Outside-In model”. The Outside-In model has been supported by an autoimmune model for MS, experimental autoimmune (allergic) encephalomyelitis (EAE). However, recently, 1) EAE-like disease has also been shown to be induced by immune responses against axons, and 2) immune responses against axons and neurons as well as neurodegeneration independent of inflammatory demyelination have been reported in MS, which can not be explained by the Outside-In model. Theiler's murine encephalomyelitis virus (TMEV)-induced demyelinating disease (TMEV-IDD) is a viral model for MS. In TMEV infection, axonal injury precedes demyelination, where the lesion develops from the axons (inside) to the myelin (outside) “Inside-Out model”. The initial axonal damage could result in the release of neuroantigens, inducing autoimmune responses against myelin antigens, which potentially attack the myelin from outside the nerve fiber. Thus, the Inside-Out and Outside-In models can make a “vicious” immunological cycle or initiate an immune cascade. PMID:20537875

  10. Influence of laser irradiation on demyelination of nervous fibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Melnik, Nataly O.; Plaksij, Yu. S.; Mamilov, Serge A.

    2000-11-01

    Problem demyelinating diseases from actual in modern of neurology. Main disease of this group - multiple sclerosis, which morphological manifestation is the process demyelineation - disintegration of myelin, which covers axial cylinders of nervous filaments. The outcome of such damage is violation of realization of nervous impulses, dissonance of implement and coordination functions. Most typical the feature of a multiple sclerosis is origin of repeated remissions, which compact with indication remyelination. In development of disease the large role is played by modifications of immunological of a reactivity of an organism. The purpose of the title is development of new methods of treatment of a multiple sclerosis because of lasertherapy. For thsi purpose the influence of a laser exposure on demyelination and remyelination processes will be investigated, is investigated pathological fabrics at microscopic and submicroscopic levels. The study of proceses demyelination and remyelination will be conducted on experimental animals (rats), which are sick experimental allergic encephalomyelitis (EAE), that is the most adequate model of a multiple sclerosis. The patients' EAE animals will be subjected to treatment by a laser exposure. For want of it there will be determinate optimum lengths of waves, dozes and modes of laser radiation.

  11. Nail psoriasis masqueraded by secondary infection with Rhodotorula mucilaginosa.

    PubMed

    Martini, K; Müller, H; Huemer, H P; Höpfl, R

    2013-11-01

    A 38-year-old man presented with whitish nail changes on all fingers as the sole symptom. The condition had developed within a few days and led to dystrophy of the proximal part of the nail plates. As microscopic examination of nail scrapings demonstrated budding hyphae and the patient working as a teacher reported frequent use of a wet sponge, antifungal therapy was initiated. Subsequent cultures and molecular typing identified Rhodotorula mucilaginosa (formerly R. rubra). This environmental yeast was repeatedly isolated despite of therapy with itraconazole. As no improvement was achieved and testing of the biological activity of the fungus revealed only marginal keratolytic activity, it was considered as a coloniser of a destructed nail matrix. Finally, a biopsy of the nail bed confirmed the diagnosis of nail psoriasis, which rapidly responded to treatment with acitretin and topical calcipotriol/betamethasone cream. Fungal growth in destructed nails masqueraded the underlying disease and may have triggered the psoriatic nail reaction. PMID:23691938

  12. Alteration of synaptic connectivity of oligodendrocyte precursor cells following demyelination

    PubMed Central

    Sahel, Aurélia; Ortiz, Fernando C.; Kerninon, Christophe; Maldonado, Paloma P.; Angulo, María Cecilia; Nait-Oumesmar, Brahim

    2015-01-01

    Oligodendrocyte precursor cells (OPCs) are a major source of remyelinating oligodendrocytes in demyelinating diseases such as Multiple Sclerosis (MS). While OPCs are innervated by unmyelinated axons in the normal brain, the fate of such synaptic contacts after demyelination is still unclear. By combining electrophysiology and immunostainings in different transgenic mice expressing fluorescent reporters, we studied the synaptic innervation of OPCs in the model of lysolecithin (LPC)-induced demyelination of corpus callosum. Synaptic innervation of reactivated OPCs in the lesion was revealed by the presence of AMPA receptor-mediated synaptic currents, VGluT1+ axon-OPC contacts in 3D confocal reconstructions and synaptic junctions observed by electron microscopy. Moreover, 3D confocal reconstructions of VGluT1 and NG2 immunolabeling showed the existence of glutamatergic axon-OPC contacts in post-mortem MS lesions. Interestingly, patch-clamp recordings in LPC-induced lesions demonstrated a drastic decrease in spontaneous synaptic activity of OPCs early after demyelination that was not caused by an impaired conduction of compound action potentials. A reduction in synaptic connectivity was confirmed by the lack of VGluT1+ axon-OPC contacts in virtually all rapidly proliferating OPCs stained with EdU (50-ethynyl-20-deoxyuridine). At the end of the massive proliferation phase in lesions, the proportion of innervated OPCs rapidly recovers, although the frequency of spontaneous synaptic currents did not reach control levels. In conclusion, our results demonstrate that newly-generated OPCs do not receive synaptic inputs during their active proliferation after demyelination, but gain synapses during the remyelination process. Hence, glutamatergic synaptic inputs may contribute to inhibit OPC proliferation and might have a physiopathological relevance in demyelinating disorders. PMID:25852473

  13. Intrathecal gene therapy rescues a model of demyelinating peripheral neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Kagiava, Alexia; Sargiannidou, Irene; Theophilidis, George; Karaiskos, Christos; Richter, Jan; Bashiardes, Stavros; Schiza, Natasa; Nearchou, Marianna; Christodoulou, Christina; Scherer, Steven S; Kleopa, Kleopas A

    2016-04-26

    Inherited demyelinating peripheral neuropathies are progressive incurable diseases without effective treatment. To develop a gene therapy approach targeting myelinating Schwann cells that can be translatable, we delivered a lentiviral vector using a single lumbar intrathecal injection and a myelin-specific promoter. The human gene of interest, GJB1, which is mutated in X-linked Charcot-Marie-Tooth Disease (CMT1X), was delivered intrathecally into adult Gjb1-null mice, a genetically authentic model of CMT1X that develops a demyelinating peripheral neuropathy. We obtained widespread, stable, and cell-specific expression of connexin32 in up to 50% of Schwann cells in multiple lumbar spinal roots and peripheral nerves. Behavioral and electrophysiological analysis revealed significantly improved motor performance, quadriceps muscle contractility, and sciatic nerve conduction velocities. Furthermore, treated mice exhibited reduced numbers of demyelinated and remyelinated fibers and fewer inflammatory cells in lumbar motor roots, as well as in the femoral motor and sciatic nerves. This study demonstrates that a single intrathecal lentiviral gene delivery can lead to Schwann cell-specific expression in spinal roots extending to multiple peripheral nerves. This clinically relevant approach improves the phenotype of an inherited neuropathy mouse model and provides proof of principle for treating inherited demyelinating neuropathies. PMID:27035961

  14. Securing iris recognition systems against masquerade attacks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galbally, Javier; Gomez-Barrero, Marta; Ross, Arun; Fierrez, Julian; Ortega-Garcia, Javier

    2013-05-01

    A novel two-stage protection scheme for automatic iris recognition systems against masquerade attacks carried out with synthetically reconstructed iris images is presented. The method uses different characteristics of real iris images to differentiate them from the synthetic ones, thereby addressing important security flaws detected in state-of-the-art commercial systems. Experiments are carried out on the publicly available Biosecure Database and demonstrate the efficacy of the proposed security enhancing approach.

  15. Intrahepatic Cholangiocarcinoma Masquerading as Liver Abscess

    PubMed Central

    Shah, Vinit; Arora, Anil; Tyagi, Pankaj; Sharma, Praveen; Bansal, Naresh; Singla, Vikas; Bansal, Rinkesh K.; Gupta, Varun; Kumar, Ashish

    2015-01-01

    Malignancy masquerading as liver abscess, and presenting with fever, is mainly described in patients with colorectal cancers with liver metastasis. Primary liver tumors such as hepatocellular carcinoma or intrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma presenting as non-resolving liver abscess is extremely uncommon and carries a dismal prognosis. We present a rare case of non-resolving liver abscess as a presenting manifestation of intrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma. PMID:25941437

  16. Aquaporin-4 autoimmunity masquerading as a brainstem tumor.

    PubMed

    Lim, Byung Chan; Chae, Jong Hee; Kim, Seung-Ki; Park, Sung-Hye; Wang, Kyu-Chang; Lee, Ji Yeoun; Phi, Ji Hoon

    2014-09-01

    Brainstem glioma is a highly devastating disease, and any mass-like lesion in the brainstem can raise suspicion of this diagnosis. However, other inflammatory, demyelinating, or degenerative diseases can mimic brainstem glioma in clinical presentation and imaging features. Therefore, diagnosis based solely on imaging is often insufficient for brainstem lesions and may lead to incorrect diagnosis and treatment. This case report is the first description of central nervous system aquaporin-4 (AQP4) autoimmunity confined mainly to the brainstem. It demonstrates the wide spectrum of neuroinflammatory diseases in children and highlights the utility of surgical biopsy for suspicious brainstem lesions with atypical imaging features for glioma. PMID:25014325

  17. Density-dependent predation influences the evolution and behavior of masquerading prey.

    PubMed

    Skelhorn, John; Rowland, Hannah M; Delf, Jon; Speed, Michael P; Ruxton, Graeme D

    2011-04-19

    Predation is a fundamental process in the interaction between species, and exerts strong selection pressure. Hence, anti-predatory traits have been intensively studied. Although it has long been speculated that individuals of some species gain protection from predators by sometimes almost-uncanny resemblances to uninteresting objects in the local environment (such as twigs or stones), demonstration of antipredatory benefits to such "masquerade" have only very recently been demonstrated, and the fundamental workings of this defensive strategy remain unclear. Here we use laboratory experiments with avian predators and twig-mimicking caterpillars as masqueraders to investigate (i) the evolutionary dynamics of masquerade; and (ii) the behavioral adaptations associated with masquerade. We show that the benefit of masquerade declines as the local density of masqueraders relative to their models (twigs, in our system) increases. This occurs through two separate mechanisms: increasing model density both decreased predators' motivation to search for masqueraders, and made masqueraders more difficult to detect. We further demonstrated that masquerading organisms have evolved complex microhabitat selection strategies that allow them to best exploit the density-dependent properties of masquerade. Our results strongly suggest the existence of opportunity costs associated with masquerade. Careful evaluation of such costs will be vital to the development of a fuller understanding of both the distribution of masquerade across taxa and ecosystems, and the evolution of the life history strategies of masquerading prey. PMID:21464318

  18. Demyelination increases axonal stationary mitochondrial size and the speed of axonal mitochondrial transport

    PubMed Central

    Kiryu-Seo, Sumiko; Ohno, Nobuhiko; Kidd, Grahame J.; Komuro, Hitoshi; Trapp, Bruce D.

    2010-01-01

    Axonal degeneration contributes to permanent neurological disability in inherited and acquired diseases of myelin. Mitochondrial dysfunction has been proposed as a major contributor to this axonal degeneration. It remains to be determined, however, if myelination, demyelination or remyelination alter the size and distribution of axonal mitochondrial stationary sites or the rates of axonal mitochondrial transport. Using live myelinated rat dorsal root ganglion (DRG) cultures, we investigated whether myelination and lysolecithin-induced demyelination affect axonal mitochondria. Myelination increased the size of axonal stationary mitochondrial sites by 2.3 fold. Following demyelination, the size of axonal stationary mitochondrial sites was increased by an additional 2.2 fold and the transport velocity of motile mitochondria was increased by 47%. These measures returned to the levels of myelinated axons following remyelination. Demyelination induced activating transcription factor (ATF) 3 in DRG neurons. Knockdown of neuronal ATF3 by shRNA abolished the demyelination-induced increase in axonal mitochondrial transport and increased nitrotyrosine immunoreactivity in axonal mitochondria, suggesting that neuronal ATF3 expression and increased mitochondrial transport protect demyelinated axons from oxidative damage. In response to insufficient ATP production, demyelinated axons increase the size of stationary mitochondrial sites and thereby balance ATP production with the increased energy needs of nerve conduction. PMID:20463228

  19. Periaxin mutations cause a broad spectrum of demyelinating neuropathies.

    PubMed

    Takashima, Hiroshi; Boerkoel, Cornelius F; De Jonghe, Peter; Ceuterick, Chantal; Martin, Jean-Jacques; Voit, Thomas; Schröder, J-Michael; Williams, Anna; Brophy, Peter J; Timmerman, Vincent; Lupski, James R

    2002-06-01

    Previous studies have demonstrated that apparent loss-of-function mutations in the periaxin gene cause autosomal recessive Dejerine-Sottas neuropathy or severe demyelinating Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease. In this report, we extend the associated phenotypes with the identification of two additional families with novel periaxin gene mutations (C715X and R82fsX96) and provide detailed neuropathology. Each patient had marked sensory involvement; two siblings with a homozygous C715X mutation had much worse sensory impairment than motor impairment. Despite early disease onset, these siblings with the C715X mutation had relatively slow disease progression and adult motor impairment typical of classic demyelinating Charcot-Marie-Tooth neuropathy. In contrast, a patient with the homozygous R82fsX96 mutation had a disease course consistent with Dejerine-Sottas neuropathy. The neuropathology of patients in both families was remarkable for demyelination, onion bulb and occasional tomacula formation with focal myelin thickening, abnormalities of the paranodal myelin loops, and focal absence of paranodal septate-like junctions between the terminal loops and axon. Our study indicates a prominent sensory neuropathy resulting from periaxin gene mutations and suggests a role for the carboxyl terminal domain of the periaxin protein. PMID:12112076

  20. Cervical demyelinating lesion presenting with choreoathetoid movements and dystonia.

    PubMed

    de Pasqua, Silvia; Cevoli, Sabina; Calbucci, Fabio; Liguori, Rocco

    2016-09-15

    Pseudoathetosis and dystonia are rare manifestations of spinal cord disease that have been already reported in lesions involving the posterior columns at the cervical level. We report two patients with a cervical demyelinating lesion at C3-C4 level presenting with hand dystonia and pseudoathetoid movements. The movement disorder disappeared after steroid treatment. The cases we described highlight the importance of identifying secondary causes of movement disorders that can be reversible with appropriate therapy. PMID:27538633

  1. An unusual demyelinating neuropathy in a patient with Waardenburg's syndrome.

    PubMed

    Jacobs, J M; Wilson, J

    1992-01-01

    We present clinical and laboratory data from a patient with Waardenburg's syndrome type II comprising iris heterochromia and deafness, complicated by Hirschsprung's disease--a known association--and an unusual demyelinating peripheral neuropathy--a unique association. The neuropathy is characterised by excessive focal folding of myelin sheaths. It is our view that, although both disorders could represent the consequences of neural crest embryopathy, it is more likely that they are associated by chance. PMID:1636383

  2. Oxidative Stress and Neurobiology of Demyelination.

    PubMed

    Ljubisavljevic, Srdjan

    2016-01-01

    Despite a large amount of research which aims at defining the pathophysiology of human demyelination (i.e., multiple sclerosis), etiological bases of disease have been unknown so far. The point of intersection of all assumed etiological factors, which are mainly based upon immunological cascades, is neuroinflammation. The precise definition of the place and role of all pathogenetic factors in the occurrence and development of the disease is of crucial importance for understanding the clinical nature and for finding more effective therapeutic options. There are few studies whose results give more precise data about the role and the importance of other factors in neuroinflammation, besides immunological ones, with regard to clinical and paraclinical correlates of the disease. The review integrates results found in previously performed studies which have evaluated oxidative stress participation in early and late neuroinflammation. The largest number of studies indicates that the use of antioxidants affects the change of neuroinflammation course under experimental conditions, which is reflected in the reduction of the severity and the total reversibility in clinical presentation of the disease, the faster achieving of remission, and the delayed and slow course of neuroinflammation. Therapies based on the knowledge of redox biology targeting free radical generation hold great promise in modulation of the neuroinflammation and its clinical presentations. PMID:25502298

  3. Auraptene induces oligodendrocyte lineage precursor cells in a cuprizone-induced animal model of demyelination.

    PubMed

    Nakajima, Mitsunari; Shimizu, Risei; Furuta, Kohei; Sugino, Mami; Watanabe, Takashi; Aoki, Rui; Okuyama, Satoshi; Furukawa, Yoshiko

    2016-05-15

    We investigated the effects of auraptene on mouse oligodendroglial cell lineage in an animal model of demyelination induced by cuprizone. Auraptene, a citrus coumarin, was intraperitoneally administered to mice fed the demyelinating agent cuprizone. Immunohistochemical analysis of the corpus callosum and/or Western blotting analysis of brain extracts revealed that cuprizone reduced immunoreactivity for myelin-basic protein, a marker of myelin, whereas it increased immunoreactivity to platelet derived-growth factor receptor-α, a marker of oligodendrocyte precursor cells. Administration of auraptene enhanced the immunoreactivity to oligodendrocyte transcription factor 2, a marker of oligodendrocyte precursor cells and oligodendrocyte lineage precursor cells, but had no effect on immunoreactivity to myelin-basic protein or platelet-derived growth factor receptor-α. These findings suggest that auraptene promotes the production of oligodendrocyte lineage precursor cells in an animal model of demyelination and may be useful for individuals with demyelinating diseases. PMID:26944297

  4. Chronic demyelinating peripheral neuropathy in cerebrotendinous xanthomatosis.

    PubMed

    Argov, Z; Soffer, D; Eisenberg, S; Zimmerman, Y

    1986-07-01

    Three siblings with chemically proved cerebrotendinous xanthomatosis presented with typical neurological manifestations of dementia and spinocerebellar disorder. Electrodiagnostic tests revealed demyelinating neuropathy in all three. Sural nerve biopsies showed loss of myelinated large fibers, marked Schwann cell proliferation, and onion bulb formation. Teased-fiber preparations confirmed the occurrence of segmental demyelination and remyelination. We suggest that demyelinating neuropathy is part of the neurological spectrum of cerebrotendinous xanthomatosis and should be considered in the differential diagnosis of a recessively inherited motor and sensory neuropathy. PMID:3017187

  5. Radial Diffusivity Predicts Demyelination in ex-vivo Multiple Sclerosis Spinal Cords

    PubMed Central

    Klawiter, Eric C.; Schmidt, Robert E.; Trinkaus, Kathryn; Liang, Hsiao-Fang; Budde, Matthew D.; Naismith, Robert T.; Song, Sheng-Kwei; Cross, Anne H.; Benzinger, Tammie L.

    2011-01-01

    Objective Correlation of diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) with histochemical staining for demyelination and axonal damage in multiple sclerosis (MS) ex vivo human cervical spinal cords. Background In MS, demyelination, axonal degeneration, and inflammation contribute to disease pathogenesis to variable degrees. Based upon in vivo animal studies with acute injury and histopathologic correlation, we hypothesized that DTI can differentiate between axonal and myelin pathologies within humans. Methods DTI was performed at 4.7 Tesla on 9 MS and 5 normal control fixed cervical spinal cord blocks following autopsy. Sections were then stained for Luxol fast blue (LFB), Bielschowsky silver, and hematoxylin and eosin (H&E). Regions of interest (ROIs) were graded semi-quantitatively as normal myelination, mild (<50%) demyelination, or moderate-severe (>50%) demyelination. Corresponding axonal counts were manually determined on Bielschowsky silver. ROIs were mapped to co-registered DTI parameter slices. DTI parameters evaluated included standard quantitative assessments of apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC), relative anisotropy (RA), axial diffusivity and radial diffusivity. Statistical correlations were made between histochemical gradings and DTI parameters using linear mixed models. Results: Within ROIs in MS subjects, increased radial diffusivity distinguished worsening severities of demyelination. Relative anisotropy was decreased in the setting of moderate-severe demyelination compared to normal areas and areas of mild demyelination. Radial diffusivity, ADC, and RA became increasingly altered within quartiles of worsening axonal counts. Axial diffusivity did not correlate with axonal density (p=0.091). Conclusions Increased radial diffusivity can serve as a surrogate for demyelination. However, radial diffusivity was also altered with axon injury, suggesting that this measure is not pathologically specific within chronic human MS tissue. We propose that radial diffusivity

  6. Nogo Receptor Inhibition Enhances Functional Recovery following Lysolecithin-Induced Demyelination in Mouse Optic Chiasm

    PubMed Central

    Pourabdolhossein, Fereshteh; Mozafari, Sabah; Morvan-Dubois, Ghislaine; Mirnajafi-Zadeh, Javad; Lopez-Juarez, Alejandra; Pierre-Simons, Jacqueline; Demeneix, Barbara A.; Javan, Mohammad

    2014-01-01

    Background Inhibitory factors have been implicated in the failure of remyelination in demyelinating diseases. Myelin associated inhibitors act through a common receptor called Nogo receptor (NgR) that plays critical inhibitory roles in CNS plasticity. Here we investigated the effects of abrogating NgR inhibition in a non-immune model of focal demyelination in adult mouse optic chiasm. Methodology/Principal Findings A focal area of demyelination was induced in adult mouse optic chiasm by microinjection of lysolecithin. To knock down NgR levels, siRNAs against NgR were intracerebroventricularly administered via a permanent cannula over 14 days, Functional changes were monitored by electrophysiological recording of latency of visual evoked potentials (VEPs). Histological analysis was carried out 3, 7 and 14 days post demyelination lesion. To assess the effect of NgR inhibition on precursor cell repopulation, BrdU was administered to the animals prior to the demyelination induction. Inhibition of NgR significantly restored VEPs responses following optic chiasm demyelination. These findings were confirmed histologically by myelin specific staining. siNgR application resulted in a smaller lesion size compared to control. NgR inhibition significantly increased the numbers of BrdU+/Olig2+ progenitor cells in the lesioned area and in the neurogenic zone of the third ventricle. These progenitor cells (Olig2+ or GFAP+) migrated away from this area as a function of time. Conclusions/Significance Our results show that inhibition of NgR facilitate myelin repair in the demyelinated chiasm, with enhanced recruitment of proliferating cells to the lesion site. Thus, antagonizing NgR function could have therapeutic potential for demyelinating disorders such as Multiple Sclerosis. PMID:25184636

  7. Influenza Vaccine-Induced CNS Demyelination in a 50-Year-Old Male

    PubMed Central

    Sacheli, Aaron; Bauer, Raymond

    2014-01-01

    Patient: Male, 50 Final Diagnosis: Acute post-vaccination CNS demyelinating disorder Symptoms: Blurred vision • hemiparesis • hemiplegia • hypertonia • itching • paresthesia Medication: — Clinical Procedure: MRI Specialty: Neurology Objective: Rare disease Background: There are several categories of primary inflammatory demyelinating disorders, which comprise clinically similar neurologic sequelae. Of interest, clinically isolated syndrome (CIS) and acute disseminated encephalomyelitis (ADEM) are 2 demyelinating conditions of the central nervous system (CNS), whose clinical similarity pose a significant challenge to definitive diagnosis. Yet, both remain important clinical considerations in patients with neurologic signs and symptoms in the context of recent vaccination. Case Report: We report a case of a 50-year-old Caucasian male with a course of progressive, focal, neurologic deficits within 24 h after receiving the influenza vaccine. Subsequent work-up revealed the possibility of an acute central nervous system (CNS) demyelinating episode secondary to the influenza vaccine, best described as either CIS or ADEM. Conclusions: Case reports of CNS demyelination following vaccinations have been previously noted, most often occurring in the context of recent influenza vaccination. This report serves to document a case of CNS demyelination occurring 24 h after influenza vaccination in a middle-aged patient, and will describe some salient features regarding the differential diagnosis of CIS and ADEM, as well as their potential management. PMID:25175754

  8. Local overexpression of interleukin-11 in the central nervous system limits demyelination and enhances remyelination.

    PubMed

    Maheshwari, Anurag; Janssens, Kris; Bogie, Jeroen; Van Den Haute, Chris; Struys, Tom; Lambrichts, Ivo; Baekelandt, Veerle; Stinissen, Piet; Hendriks, Jerome J A; Slaets, Helena; Hellings, Niels

    2013-01-01

    Demyelination is one of the pathological hallmarks of multiple sclerosis (MS). To date, no therapy is available which directly potentiates endogenous remyelination. Interleukin-11 (IL-11), a member of the gp130 family of cytokines, is upregulated in MS lesions. Systemic IL-11 treatment was shown to ameliorate clinical symptoms in experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE), an animal model of MS. IL-11 modulates immune cells and protects oligodendrocytes in vitro. In this study, the cuprizone-induced demyelination mouse model was used to elucidate effects of IL-11 on de- and remyelination, independent of the immune response. Prophylactic-lentiviral- (LV-) mediated overexpression of IL-11 in mouse brain significantly limited acute demyelination, which was accompanied with the preservation of CC1(+) mature oligodendrocytes (OLs) and a decrease in microglial activation (Mac-2(+)). We further demonstrated that IL-11 directly reduces myelin phagocytosis in vitro. When IL-11 expressing LV was therapeutically applied in animals with extensive demyelination, a significant enhancement of remyelination was observed as demonstrated by Luxol Fast Blue staining and electron microscopy imaging. Our results indicate that IL-11 promotes maturation of NG2(+) OPCs into myelinating CC1(+) OLs and may thus explain the enhanced remyelination. Overall, we demonstrate that IL-11 is of therapeutic interest for MS and other demyelinating diseases by limiting demyelination and promoting remyelination. PMID:23818742

  9. Local Overexpression of Interleukin-11 in the Central Nervous System Limits Demyelination and Enhances Remyelination

    PubMed Central

    Maheshwari, Anurag; Janssens, Kris; Bogie, Jeroen; Van Den Haute, Chris; Struys, Tom; Lambrichts, Ivo; Baekelandt, Veerle; Stinissen, Piet; Hendriks, Jerome J. A.; Hellings, Niels

    2013-01-01

    Demyelination is one of the pathological hallmarks of multiple sclerosis (MS). To date, no therapy is available which directly potentiates endogenous remyelination. Interleukin-11 (IL-11), a member of the gp130 family of cytokines, is upregulated in MS lesions. Systemic IL-11 treatment was shown to ameliorate clinical symptoms in experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE), an animal model of MS. IL-11 modulates immune cells and protects oligodendrocytes in vitro. In this study, the cuprizone-induced demyelination mouse model was used to elucidate effects of IL-11 on de- and remyelination, independent of the immune response. Prophylactic-lentiviral- (LV-) mediated overexpression of IL-11 in mouse brain significantly limited acute demyelination, which was accompanied with the preservation of CC1+ mature oligodendrocytes (OLs) and a decrease in microglial activation (Mac-2+). We further demonstrated that IL-11 directly reduces myelin phagocytosis in vitro. When IL-11 expressing LV was therapeutically applied in animals with extensive demyelination, a significant enhancement of remyelination was observed as demonstrated by Luxol Fast Blue staining and electron microscopy imaging. Our results indicate that IL-11 promotes maturation of NG2+ OPCs into myelinating CC1+ OLs and may thus explain the enhanced remyelination. Overall, we demonstrate that IL-11 is of therapeutic interest for MS and other demyelinating diseases by limiting demyelination and promoting remyelination. PMID:23818742

  10. The topograpy of demyelination and neurodegeneration in the multiple sclerosis brain

    PubMed Central

    Haider, Lukas; Hametner, Simon; Höftberger, Romana; Bagnato, Francesca; Grabner, Günther; Trattnig, Siegfried; Pfeifenbring, Sabine; Brück, Wolfgang

    2016-01-01

    Multiple sclerosis is a chronic inflammatory disease with primary demyelination and neurodegeneration in the central nervous system. In our study we analysed demyelination and neurodegeneration in a large series of multiple sclerosis brains and provide a map that displays the frequency of different brain areas to be affected by these processes. Demyelination in the cerebral cortex was related to inflammatory infiltrates in the meninges, which was pronounced in invaginations of the brain surface (sulci) and possibly promoted by low flow of the cerebrospinal fluid in these areas. Focal demyelinated lesions in the white matter occurred at sites with high venous density and additionally accumulated in watershed areas of low arterial blood supply. Two different patterns of neurodegeneration in the cortex were identified: oxidative injury of cortical neurons and retrograde neurodegeneration due to axonal injury in the white matter. While oxidative injury was related to the inflammatory process in the meninges and pronounced in actively demyelinating cortical lesions, retrograde degeneration was mainly related to demyelinated lesions and axonal loss in the white matter. Our data show that accumulation of lesions and neurodegeneration in the multiple sclerosis brain does not affect all brain regions equally and provides the pathological basis for the selection of brain areas for monitoring regional injury and atrophy development in future magnetic resonance imaging studies. PMID:26912645

  11. The topograpy of demyelination and neurodegeneration in the multiple sclerosis brain.

    PubMed

    Haider, Lukas; Zrzavy, Tobias; Hametner, Simon; Höftberger, Romana; Bagnato, Francesca; Grabner, Günther; Trattnig, Siegfried; Pfeifenbring, Sabine; Brück, Wolfgang; Lassmann, Hans

    2016-03-01

    Multiple sclerosis is a chronic inflammatory disease with primary demyelination and neurodegeneration in the central nervous system. In our study we analysed demyelination and neurodegeneration in a large series of multiple sclerosis brains and provide a map that displays the frequency of different brain areas to be affected by these processes. Demyelination in the cerebral cortex was related to inflammatory infiltrates in the meninges, which was pronounced in invaginations of the brain surface (sulci) and possibly promoted by low flow of the cerebrospinal fluid in these areas. Focal demyelinated lesions in the white matter occurred at sites with high venous density and additionally accumulated in watershed areas of low arterial blood supply. Two different patterns of neurodegeneration in the cortex were identified: oxidative injury of cortical neurons and retrograde neurodegeneration due to axonal injury in the white matter. While oxidative injury was related to the inflammatory process in the meninges and pronounced in actively demyelinating cortical lesions, retrograde degeneration was mainly related to demyelinated lesions and axonal loss in the white matter. Our data show that accumulation of lesions and neurodegeneration in the multiple sclerosis brain does not affect all brain regions equally and provides the pathological basis for the selection of brain areas for monitoring regional injury and atrophy development in future magnetic resonance imaging studies. PMID:26912645

  12. Analysis of the host transcriptome from demyelinating spinal cord of murine coronavirus-infected mice.

    PubMed

    Elliott, Ruth; Li, Fan; Dragomir, Isabelle; Chua, Ming Ming W; Gregory, Brian D; Weiss, Susan R

    2013-01-01

    Persistent infection of the mouse central nervous system (CNS) with mouse hepatitis virus (MHV) induces a demyelinating disease pathologically similar to multiple sclerosis and is therefore used as a model system. There is little information regarding the host factors that correlate with and contribute to MHV-induced demyelination. Here, we detail the genes and pathways associated with MHV-induced demyelinating disease in the spinal cord. High-throughput sequencing of the host transcriptome revealed that demyelination is accompanied by numerous transcriptional changes indicative of immune infiltration as well as changes in the cytokine milieu and lipid metabolism. We found evidence that a Th1-biased cytokine/chemokine response and eicosanoid-derived inflammation accompany persistent MHV infection and that antigen presentation is ongoing. Interestingly, increased expression of genes involved in lipid transport, processing, and catabolism, including some with known roles in neurodegenerative diseases, coincided with demyelination. Lastly, expression of several genes involved in osteoclast or bone-resident macrophage function, most notably TREM2 and DAP12, was upregulated in persistently infected mouse spinal cord. This study highlights the complexity of the host antiviral response, which accompany MHV-induced demyelination, and further supports previous findings that MHV-induced demyelination is immune-mediated. Interestingly, these data suggest a parallel between bone reabsorption by osteoclasts and myelin debris clearance by microglia in the bone and the CNS, respectively. To our knowledge, this is the first report of using an RNA-seq approach to study the host CNS response to persistent viral infection. PMID:24058676

  13. Vitamin D and estrogen synergy in Vdr-expressing CD4(+) T cells is essential to induce Helios(+)FoxP3(+) T cells and prevent autoimmune demyelinating disease.

    PubMed

    Spanier, Justin A; Nashold, Faye E; Mayne, Christopher G; Nelson, Corwin D; Hayes, Colleen E

    2015-09-15

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a neurodegenerative disease resulting from an autoimmune attack on the axon-myelin unit. A female MS bias becomes evident after puberty and female incidence has tripled in the last half-century, implicating a female sex hormone interacting with a modifiable environmental factor. These aspects of MS suggest that many female MS cases may be preventable. Mechanistic knowledge of this hormone-environment interaction is needed to devise strategies to reduce female MS risk. We previously demonstrated that vitamin D3 (D3) deficiency increases and D3 supplementation decreases experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) risk in a female-biased manner. We also showed that D3 acts in an estrogen (E2)-dependent manner, since ovariectomy eliminated and E2 restored D3-mediated EAE protection. Here we probed the hypothesis that E2 and D3 interact synergistically within CD4(+) T cells to control T cell fate and prevent demyelinating disease. The E2 increased EAE resistance in wild-type (WT) but not T-Vdr(0) mice lacking Vdr gene function in CD4(+) T cells, so E2 action depended entirely on Vdr(+)CD4(+) T cells. The E2 levels were higher in WT than T-Vdr(0) mice, suggesting the Vdr(+)CD4(+) T cells produced E2 or stimulated its production. The E2 decreased Cyp24a1 and increased Vdr transcripts in T cells, prolonging the calcitriol half-life and increasing calcitriol responsiveness. The E2 also increased CD4(+)Helios(+)FoxP3(+) T regulatory (Treg) cells in a Vdr-dependent manner. Thus, CD4(+) T cells have a cooperative amplification loop involving E2 and calcitriol that promotes CD4(+)Helios(+)FoxP3(+) Treg cell development and is disrupted when the D3 pathway is impaired. The global decline in population D3 status may be undermining a similar cooperative E2-D3 interaction controlling Treg cell differentiation in women, causing a breakdown in T cell self tolerance and a rise in MS incidence. PMID:26298324

  14. Dark photons as fractional cosmic neutrino masquerader

    SciTech Connect

    Ng, Kin-Wang; Tu, Huitzu; Yuan, Tzu-Chiang E-mail: huitzu@phys.sinica.edu.tw

    2014-09-01

    Recently, Weinberg proposed a Higgs portal model with a spontaneously broken global U(1) symmetry in which Goldstone bosons may be masquerading as fractional cosmic neutrinos. We extend the model by gauging the U(1) symmetry. This gives rise to the so-called dark photon and dark Higgs. The dark photons can constitute about 0.912 (0.167) to the effective number of light neutrino species if they decouple from the thermal bath before the pions become non-relativistic and after (before) the QCD transition. Restriction on the parameter space of the portal coupling and the dark Higgs mass is obtained from the freeze-out condition of the dark photons. Combining with the collider data constraints on the invisible width of the standard model Higgs requires the dark Higgs mass to be less than a few GeV.

  15. Primary Vitreoretinal Lymphoma Masquerading as Refractory Retinitis

    PubMed Central

    Zloto, Ofira; Elkader, Amir E. Abd; Fabian, Ido Didi; Vishnevskia-Dai, Vicktoria

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To report a case of a patient with primary vitreoretinal lymphoma masquerading as retinitis. Methods Retrospective review of the patient's clinical, histopathological and imaging records. Results Cytopathology was negative for malignancy, and preliminary polymerase chain reaction results supported the diagnosis of varicella zoster virus retinitis. Therefore, the patient was treated with antiviral therapy. However, under this treatment, the retinitis progressed. As a result, primary vitreoretinal lymphoma was suspected, and empirical treatment with intravitreal methotrexate injections was started. Under this treatment, the ocular features improved. Five months after initial ocular presentation and ocular resolution, the patient presented with central nervous system lymphoma. Conclusion This case should raise the awareness of the variable clinical presentations, the challenging diagnosis and treatment of primary vitreoretinal lymphoma. All cases should be continuously systemically evaluated. PMID:26557084

  16. Multifocal brain radionecrosis masquerading as tumor dissemination

    SciTech Connect

    Safdari, H.; Boluix, B.; Gros, C.

    1984-01-01

    The authors report on an autopsy-proven case of multifocal widespread radionecrosis involving both cerebral hemispheres and masquerading as tumor dissemination on a CT scan done 13 months after complete resection of an oligodendroglioma followed by radiation therapy. This case demonstrates that radiation damage may be present in a CT scan as a multifocal, disseminated lesion. Since the survival of brain-tumor patients who have undergone radiation therapy is prolonged by aggressive therapy, the incidence and variability of radiation-induced complications in such cases is likely to increase. For similar reasons, the radionecrosis in such cases should be taken into consideration. A short review of the CT scan findings and diagnostic and therapeutic considerations in a case of widespread radionecrosis is presented. The need for appropriate diagnosis and subsequent life-saving management is emphasized.

  17. A comparative study of experimental mouse models of central nervous system demyelination.

    PubMed

    Dumitrascu, O M; Mott, K R; Ghiasi, H

    2014-06-01

    Several mouse models of multiple sclerosis (MS) are now available. We have established a mouse model, in which ocular infection with a recombinant HSV-1 that expresses murine interleukin (IL)-2 constitutively (HSV-IL-2) causes central nervous system demyelination in different strains of mice. This model differs from most other models, in which it represents a mixture of viral and immune triggers. In the present study, we directly compared MOG35-55, MBP35-47 and PLP190-209 models of experimental autoimmune encephalitis with our HSV-IL-2-induced MS model. Mice with HSV-IL-2- and myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein (MOG)-induced demyelinating diseases demonstrated a similar pattern and distribution of demyelination in their brain, spinal cord (SC) and optic nerves (ONs). In contrast, no demyelination was detected in the ONs of myelin basic protein (MBP)- and proteolipid protein (PLP)-injected mice. Interferon-β (IFN-β) injections significantly reduced demyelination in brains of all groups, in the SCs of the MOG and MBP groups, and completely blocked it in the SCs of the PLP and HSV-IL-2 groups as well as in ONs of MOG and HSV-IL-2 groups. In contrast to IFN-β treatment, IL-12p70 protected the HSV-IL-2 group from demyelination, whereas IL-4 was not effective at all in preventing demyelination. MOG-injected mice showed clinical signs of paralysis and disease-related mortality, whereas mice in the other treatment groups did not. Collectively, the results indicate that the HSV-IL-2 model and the MOG model complement each other and, together, provide unique insights into the heterogeneity of human MS. PMID:24718267

  18. A comparative study of experimental mouse models of central nervous system demyelination

    PubMed Central

    Dumitrascu, Oana M.; Mott, Kevin R.; Ghiasi, Homayon

    2014-01-01

    Several mouse models of multiple sclerosis (MS) are now available. We have established a mouse model, in which ocular infection with a recombinant HSV-1 that expresses murine IL-2 constitutively (HSV-IL-2) causes CNS demyelination in different strains of mice. This model differs from most other models in that it represents a mixture of viral and immune triggers. In the present study, we directly compared MOG35–55, MBP35–47, and PLP190–209 models of EAE with our HSV-IL-2-induced MS model. Mice with HSV-IL-2-induced and MOG-induced demyelinating diseases demonstrated a similar pattern and distribution of demyelination in their brain, spinal cord, and optic nerves. In contrast, no demyelination was detected in the optic nerves of MBP- and PLP-injected mice. IFN-β injections significantly reduced demyelination in brains of all groups, in the spinal cords of the MOG and MBP groups, and completely blocked it in the spinal cords of the PLP and HSV-IL-2 groups as well as in optic nerves of MOG and HSV-IL-2 groups. In contrast to IFN-β treatment, IL-12p70 protected the HSV-IL-2 group from demyelination, while IL-4 was not effective at all in preventing demyelination. MOG-injected mice showed clinical signs of paralysis and disease-related mortality whereas mice in the other treatment groups did not. Collectively, the results indicate that the HSV-IL-2 model and the MOG model complement each other and, together, provide unique insights into the heterogeneity of human MS. PMID:24718267

  19. Gut Commensalism, Cytokines, and Central Nervous System Demyelination

    PubMed Central

    Ochoa-Repáraz, Javier; Kasper, Lloyd H.

    2014-01-01

    There is increasing support for the importance of risk factors such as genetic makeup, obesity, smoking, vitamin D insufficiency, and antibiotic exposure contributing to the development of autoimmune diseases, including human multiple sclerosis (MS). Perhaps the greatest environmental risk factor associated with the development of immune-mediated conditions is the gut microbiome. Microbial and helminthic agents are active participants in shaping the immune systems of their hosts. This concept is continually reinforced by studies in the burgeoning area of commensal-mediated immunomodulation. The clinical importance of these findings for MS is suggested by both their participation in disease and, perhaps of greater clinical importance, attenuation of disease severity. Observations made in murine models of central nervous system demyelinating disease and a limited number of small studies in human MS suggest that immune homeostasis within the gut microbiome may be of paramount importance in maintaining a disease-free state. This review describes three immunological factors associated with the gut microbiome that are central to cytokine network activities in MS pathogenesis: T helper cell polarization, T regulatory cell function, and B cell activity. Comparisons are drawn between the regulatory mechanisms attributed to first-line therapies and those described in commensal-mediated amelioration of central nervous system demyelination. PMID:25084177

  20. Gut commensalism, cytokines, and central nervous system demyelination.

    PubMed

    Telesford, Kiel; Ochoa-Repáraz, Javier; Kasper, Lloyd H

    2014-08-01

    There is increasing support for the importance of risk factors such as genetic makeup, obesity, smoking, vitamin D insufficiency, and antibiotic exposure contributing to the development of autoimmune diseases, including human multiple sclerosis (MS). Perhaps the greatest environmental risk factor associated with the development of immune-mediated conditions is the gut microbiome. Microbial and helminthic agents are active participants in shaping the immune systems of their hosts. This concept is continually reinforced by studies in the burgeoning area of commensal-mediated immunomodulation. The clinical importance of these findings for MS is suggested by both their participation in disease and, perhaps of greater clinical importance, attenuation of disease severity. Observations made in murine models of central nervous system demyelinating disease and a limited number of small studies in human MS suggest that immune homeostasis within the gut microbiome may be of paramount importance in maintaining a disease-free state. This review describes three immunological factors associated with the gut microbiome that are central to cytokine network activities in MS pathogenesis: T helper cell polarization, T regulatory cell function, and B cell activity. Comparisons are drawn between the regulatory mechanisms attributed to first-line therapies and those described in commensal-mediated amelioration of central nervous system demyelination. PMID:25084177

  1. Increased levels of myelin basic protein transcripts in virus-induced demyelination.

    PubMed

    Kristensson, K; Holmes, K V; Duchala, C S; Zeller, N K; Lazzarini, R A; Dubois-Dalcq, M

    In multiple sclerosis, a demyelinating disease of young adults, there is a paucity of myelin repair in the central nervous system (CNS) which is necessary for the restoration of fast saltatory conduction in axons. Consequently, this relapsing disease often causes marked disability. In similar diseases of small rodents, however, remyelination can be quite extensive, as in the demyelinating disease caused by the A59 strain of mouse hepatitis virus (MHV-A59), a coronavirus of mice. To investigate when and where oligodendrocytes are first triggered to repair CNS myelin in such disease, we have used a complementary DNA probe specific for one major myelin protein gene, myelin basic protein (MBP), which hybridizes with the four forms of MBP messenger RNA in rodents. Using Northern blot and in situ hybridization techniques, we previously found that MBP mRNA is first detected at about 5 days after birth, peaks at 18 days and progressively decreases to 25% of the peak levels in the adult. We now report that in spinal cord sections of adult animals with active demyelination and inflammatory cells, in situ hybridization reveals a dramatic increase in probe binding to MBP-specific mRNA at 2-3 weeks after virus inoculation and before remyelination can be detected by morphological methods. This increase of MBP-specific mRNA is found at the edge of the demyelinating area and extends into surrounding areas of normal-appearing white matter. Thus, in situ hybridization with myelin-specific probes appears to be a useful method for detecting the timing, intensity and location of myelin protein gene reactivation preceding remyelination. This method could be used to elucidate whether such a reactivation occurs in multiple sclerosis brain tissue. Our results suggest that in mice, glial cells react to a demyelinating process with widespread MBP mRNA synthesis which may be triggered by a diffusible factor released in the demyelinated areas. PMID:2426599

  2. The Effect of Melatonin on Behavioral, Molecular, and Histopathological Changes in Cuprizone Model of Demyelination.

    PubMed

    Vakilzadeh, Gelareh; Khodagholi, Fariba; Ghadiri, Tahereh; Ghaemi, Amir; Noorbakhsh, Farshid; Sharifzadeh, Mohammad; Gorji, Ali

    2016-09-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is an autoimmune, demyelinating disease of the central nervous system. The protective effects of melatonin (MLT) on various neurodegenerative diseases, including MS, have been suggested. In the present study, we examined the effect of MLT on demyelination, apoptosis, inflammation, and behavioral dysfunctions in the cuprizone toxic model of demyelination. C57BL/6J mice were fed a chaw containing 0.2 % cuprizone for 5 weeks and received two doses of MLT (50 and 100 mg/kg) intraperitoneally for the last 7 days of cuprizone diet. Administration of MLT improved motor behavior deficits induced by cuprizone diet. MLT dose-dependently decreased the mean number of apoptotic cells via decreasing caspase-3 and Bax as well as increasing Bcl-2 levels. In addition, MLT significantly enhanced nuclear factor-κB activation and decreased heme oxygenase-1 level. However, MLT had no effect on interleukin-6 and myelin protein production. Our data revealed that MLT improved neurological deficits and enhanced cell survival but was not able to initiate myelin production in the cuprizone model of demyelination. These findings may be important for the design of potential MLT therapy in demyelinating disorders, such as MS. PMID:26310973

  3. Oesophageal rupture masquerading as STEMI.

    PubMed

    Skaug, Brian; Taylor, Kenneth R; Chandrasekaran, Somya

    2016-01-01

    A 67-year-old man presented to the emergency department, with acute onset of chest pain. Based on ECG changes suggestive of ST elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI), he was taken emergently to the cardiac catheterisation laboratory for coronary angiography. There he was found to have only non-obstructive coronary disease. Subsequent physical examination and review of his chest radiograph revealed subcutaneous emphysema, and CT scan revealed a distal oesophageal rupture and pneumomediastinum. After stabilisation in the intensive care unit (ICU), he was taken to the operating room for thoracotomy, chest tube placement and stenting of his oesophagus. He survived the incident and, after several weeks of ICU stay, recovered to a large extent. His case highlights the importance of considering oesophageal rupture in the differential diagnosis for acute onset of chest pain. PMID:27068730

  4. Treatment of chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy with methotrexate

    PubMed Central

    Fialho, D; Chan, Y‐C; Allen, D C; Reilly, M M; Hughes, R A C

    2006-01-01

    We discovered many reports of other immunosuppressive drugs being used in adults with chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy (CIDP) but none of methotrexate. As weekly low dose oral methotrexate is safe, effective, and well tolerated in other diseases, we treated 10 patients with otherwise treatment resistant CIDP. Seven showed improvement in strength by at least two points on the MRC sum score and three worsened. Only two showed an improvement in disability and both were also receiving corticosteroids. We discuss the difficulty of detecting an improvement in treatment resistant CIDP and propose methotrexate as a suitable agent for testing in a randomised trial. PMID:16543541

  5. When DLB, PD, and PSP masquerade as MSA

    PubMed Central

    Koga, Shunsuke; Aoki, Naoya; Uitti, Ryan J.; van Gerpen, Jay A.; Cheshire, William P.; Josephs, Keith A.; Wszolek, Zbigniew K.; Langston, J. William

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To determine ways to improve diagnostic accuracy of multiple system atrophy (MSA), we assessed the diagnostic process in patients who came to autopsy with antemortem diagnosis of MSA by comparing clinical and pathologic features between those who proved to have MSA and those who did not. We focus on likely explanations for misdiagnosis. Methods: This is a retrospective review of 134 consecutive patients with an antemortem clinical diagnosis of MSA who came to autopsy with neuropathologic evaluation of the brain. Of the 134 patients, 125 had adequate medical records for review. Clinical and pathologic features were compared between patients with autopsy-confirmed MSA and those with other pathologic diagnoses, including dementia with Lewy bodies (DLB), Parkinson disease (PD), and progressive supranuclear palsy (PSP). Results: Of the 134 patients with clinically diagnosed MSA, 83 (62%) had the correct diagnosis at autopsy. Pathologically confirmed DLB was the most common misdiagnosis, followed by PSP and PD. Despite meeting pathologic criteria for intermediate to high likelihood of DLB, several patients with DLB did not have dementia and none had significant Alzheimer-type pathology. Autonomic failure was the leading cause of misdiagnosis in DLB and PD, and cerebellar ataxia was the leading cause of misdiagnosis in PSP. Conclusions: The diagnostic accuracy for MSA was suboptimal in this autopsy study. Pathologically confirmed DLB, PD, and PSP were the most common diseases to masquerade as MSA. This has significant implications not only for patient care, but also for research studies in MSA cases that do not have pathologic confirmation. PMID:26138942

  6. Unusual basal ganglia lesions in a diabetic uraemic patient proven to be demyelination: first pathological observation

    PubMed Central

    Tajima, Yasutaka; Mito, Yasunori; Yanai, Mituru; Fukazawa, Yu-ichiro

    2012-01-01

    A 64-year-old man suffering from diabetes mellitus and chronic renal failure was admitted to our hospital because of consciousness disturbance and parkinsonism. Cranial MRI showed very characteristic features involving the bilateral basal ganglia. Subsequent postmortem examinations demonstrated demyelination in the affected areas. These myelin destruction patterns were quite similar to those of central pontine myelinolysis. However, rapid correction of hyponatraemia was ruled out in this patient. Therefore, a new demyelinating brain disease associated with diabetes mellitus and chronic renal failure was suggested. PMID:22948993

  7. Contactin 1 IgG4 associates to chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy with sensory ataxia

    PubMed Central

    Miura, Yumako; Devaux, Jérôme J.; Fukami, Yuki; Manso, Constance; Belghazi, Maya; Wong, Anna Hiu Yi

    2015-01-01

    A Spanish group recently reported that four patients with chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy carrying IgG4 autoantibodies against contactin 1 showed aggressive symptom onset and poor response to intravenous immunoglobulin. We aimed to describe the clinical and serological features of Japanese chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy patients displaying the anti-contactin 1 antibodies. Thirteen of 533 (2.4%) patients with chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy had anti-contactin 1 IgG4 whereas neither patients from disease or normal control subjects did (P = 0.02). Three of 13 (23%) patients showed subacute symptom onset, but all of the patients presented with sensory ataxia. Six of 10 (60%) anti-contactin 1 antibody-positive patients had poor response to intravenous immunoglobulin, whereas 8 of 11 (73%) antibody-positive patients had good response to corticosteroids. Anti-contactin 1 IgG4 antibodies are a possible biomarker to guide treatment option. PMID:25808373

  8. Cervical Perineural Cyst Masquerading as a Cervical Spinal Tumor

    PubMed Central

    Joshi, Vijay P; Zanwar, Atul; Karande, Anuradha

    2014-01-01

    Tarlov (perineural) cysts of the nerve roots are common and usually incidental findings during magnetic resonance imaging of the lumbosacral spine. There are only a few case reports where cervical symptomatic perineural cysts have been described in the literature. We report such a case where a high cervical perineural cyst was masquerading as a cervical spinal tumor. PMID:24761204

  9. Cervical perineural cyst masquerading as a cervical spinal tumor.

    PubMed

    Joshi, Vijay P; Zanwar, Atul; Karande, Anuradha; Agrawal, Amit

    2014-04-01

    Tarlov (perineural) cysts of the nerve roots are common and usually incidental findings during magnetic resonance imaging of the lumbosacral spine. There are only a few case reports where cervical symptomatic perineural cysts have been described in the literature. We report such a case where a high cervical perineural cyst was masquerading as a cervical spinal tumor. PMID:24761204

  10. In vitro analysis of the oligodendrocyte lineage in mice during demyelination and remyelination

    SciTech Connect

    Armstrong, R.; Friedrich, V.L. Jr.; Holmes, K.V.; Dubois-Dalcq, M. )

    1990-09-01

    A demyelinating disease induced in C57B1/6N mice by intracranial injection of a coronavirus (murine hepatitis virus strain A59) is followed by functional recovery and efficient CNS myelin repair. To study the biological properties of the cells involved in this repair process, glial cells were isolated and cultured from spinal cords of these young adult mice during demyelination and remyelination. Using three-color immunofluorescence combined with (3H)thymidine autoradiography, we have analyzed the antigenic phenotype and mitotic potential of individual glial cells. We identified oligodendrocytes with an antibody to galactocerebroside, astrocytes with an antibody to glial fibrillary acidic protein, and oligodendrocyte-type 2 astrocyte (O-2A) progenitor cells with the O4 antibody. Cultures from demyelinated tissue differed in several ways from those of age-matched controls: first, the total number of O-2A lineage cells was strikingly increased; second, the O-2A population consisted of a higher proportion of O4-positive astrocytes and cells of mixed oligodendrocyte-astrocyte phenotype; and third, all the cell types within the O-2A lineage showed enhanced proliferation. This proliferation was not further enhanced by adding PDGF, basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF), or insulin-like growth factor I (IGF-I) to the defined medium. However, bFGF and IGF-I seemed to influence the fate of O-2A lineage cells in cultures of demyelinated tissue. Basic FGF decreased the percentage of cells expressing galactocerebroside. In contrast, IGF-I increased the relative proportion of oligodendrocytes. Thus, O-2A lineage cells from adult mice display greater phenotypic plasticity and enhanced mitotic potential in response to an episode of demyelination. These properties may be linked to the efficient remyelination achieved in this demyelinating disease.

  11. Vesicular demyelination induced by raised intracellular calcium.

    PubMed

    Smith, K J; Hall, S M; Schauf, C L

    1985-11-01

    Incubation of nerve with high concentrations of the divalent cation ionophore A23187 produces myelin vesiculation (Schlaepfer 1977). This observation has now been extended using segments of rat ventral or dorsal root incubated with high (19 microM, 10 micrograms/ml) or low (1-1.5 microM) concentrations of A23187, or another divalent ionophore, ionomycin. Low concentrations of A23187 induced no vesiculation within a 2-h period. However, subsequent incubation of these roots in fresh, ionophore-free medium for 20 h, resulted in a prominent vesicular demyelination at the Schmidt-Lanterman incisures and paranodes of many fibres. At this time (22 h) the Schwann cells associated with some demyelinating internodes appeared vital upon ultrastructural examination: the cells also excluded the nuclear dye nigrosin. High concentrations of A23187 induced a similar vesicular demyelination in affected fibres within only 15-20 min. While the Schwann cells continued to exclude nigrosin for a further 4 h, their ultrastructural appearance indicated that they were probably in the early stages of necrosis. Incubation of moribund root with the ionophore produced no myelin vesiculation. At all ionophore concentrations, the myelin vesiculation was dependent upon the presence of extracellular Ca2+, and could be modulated in severity by varying this concentration. Other divalent cations (Ba2+, Co2+, Mg2+, Mn2+, Ni2+, Sr2+) could not substitute for Ca2+. The vesiculation induced by A23187 could be entirely prevented by the addition of Zn2+ (greater than or equal to 1 microM), Ni2+ (greater than or equal to 1-10 microM), Co2+ (greater than or equal to 100 microM) or Mn2+ (greater than or equal to 100 microM) to the bathing medium. A23187 applied to only part of an isolated internode resulted in a localization of the myelin disruption to that region. Ionomycin (greater than or equal to 1 microM), an ionophore with a greater selectivity for Ca2+ than A23187, also induced a prompt Ca2+-dependent

  12. Mitochondria as crucial players in demyelinated axons: lessons from neuropathology and experimental demyelination.

    PubMed

    Campbell, Graham R; Mahad, Don J

    2011-01-01

    Mitochondria are the most efficient producers of energy in the form of ATP. Energy demands of axons, placed at relatively great distances from the neuronal cell body, are met by mitochondria, which when functionally compromised, produce reactive oxygen species (ROS) in excess. Axons are made metabolically efficient by myelination, which enables saltatory conduction. The importance of mitochondria for maintaining the structural integrity of myelinated axons is illustrated by neuroaxonal degeneration in primary mitochondrial disorders. When demyelinated, the compartmentalisation of ion channels along axons is disrupted. The redistribution of electrogenic machinery is thought to increase the energy demand of demyelinated axons. We review related studies that focus on mitochondria within unmyelinated, demyelinated and dysmyelinated axons in the central nervous system. Based on neuropathological observations we propose the increase in mitochondrial presence within demyelinated axons as an adaptive process to the increased energy need. An increased presence of mitochondria would also increase the capacity to produce deleterious agents such as ROS when functionally compromised. Given the lack of direct evidence of a beneficial or harmful effect of mitochondrial changes, the precise role of increased mitochondrial presence within axons due to demyelination needs to be further explored in experimental demyelination in-vivo and in-vitro. PMID:21331147

  13. Differences in Membrane Properties in Simulated Cases of Demyelinating Neuropathies: Internodal Focal Demyelinations without Conduction Block

    PubMed Central

    Daskalova, M. S.; Alexandrov, A. S.

    2006-01-01

    The membrane properties (intracellular, extracellular, electrotonic potentials, strength-duration time constants, rheobasic currents and recovery cycles), which can now be measured in healthy subjects and patients with demyelinating neuropathies, are investigated in simulated cases of focal reduction (70%) of the myelin sheath in one, two and three successive internodal segments along the length of human motor fibres. The internodally focally demyelinated cases (termed as IFD1, IFD2 and IFD3, respectively) are simulated using our previous double cable model of the fibres. The results show that the intracellular potentials are with reduced amplitude and slowed conduction velocity in the vicinity of demyelinated segments, however the segmental conduction block is not achieved. The radial decline of the extracellular potential amplitudes slightly increases with the increase of the radial distance and demyelination. In contrast, the electrotonic potentials, strength-duration time constants and rheobases are normal. In the recovery cycles, the refractoriness, supernormality and less late subnormality are close to the normal, showing that the pathology is relatively minor. The obtained abnormalities in the potentials and excitability properties provide new information about the pathophysiology of the demyelinated human motor axons and can be observed in vivo in patients with acquired demyelinating neuropathies. PMID:19669452

  14. Differences in Membrane Properties in Simulated Cases of Demyelinating Neuropathies: Internodal Focal Demyelinations with Conduction Block

    PubMed Central

    Daskalova, M. S.; Alexandrov, A. S.

    2006-01-01

    The aim of this study is to investigate the membrane properties (potentials and axonal excitability indices) in the case of myelin wrap reduction (96%) in one, two and three consecutive internodes along the length of human motor nerve fibre. The internodally focally demyelinated cases (termed as IFD1, IFD2 and IFD3, respectively, with one, two and three demyelinated internodes are simulated using our previous double cable model of the fibre. The progressively greater increase of focal loss of myelin lamellae blocks the invasion of the intracellular potentials into the demyelinated zones. For all investigated cases, the radial decline of the extracellular potential amplitudes increases with the increase of the radial distance and demyelination, whereas the electrotonic potentials show a decrease in the slow part of the depolarizing and hyperpolarizing responses. The time constants are shorter and the rheobases higher for the IFD2 and IFD3 cases than for the normal case. In the recovery cycles, the same cases have less refractoriness, greater supernormality and less late subnormality than the normal case. The simulated membrane abnormalities can be observed in vivo in patients with demyelinating forms of Guillain-Barré syndrome. The study provides new information about the pathophysiology of acquired demyelinating neuropathies. PMID:19669456

  15. Spatio-Temporal Patterns of Demyelination and Remyelination in the Cuprizone Mouse Model.

    PubMed

    Tagge, Ian; O'Connor, Audrey; Chaudhary, Priya; Pollaro, Jim; Berlow, Yosef; Chalupsky, Megan; Bourdette, Dennis; Woltjer, Randy; Johnson, Mac; Rooney, William

    2016-01-01

    Cuprizone administration in mice provides a reproducible model of demyelination and spontaneous remyelination, and has been useful in understanding important aspects of human disease, including multiple sclerosis. In this study, we apply high spatial resolution quantitative MRI techniques to establish the spatio-temporal patterns of acute demyelination in C57BL/6 mice after 6 weeks of cuprizone administration, and subsequent remyelination after 6 weeks of post-cuprizone recovery. MRI measurements were complemented with Black Gold II stain for myelin and immunohistochemical stains for associated tissue changes. Gene expression was evaluated using the Allen Gene Expression Atlas. Twenty-five C57BL/6 male mice were split into control and cuprizone groups; MRI data were obtained at baseline, after 6 weeks of cuprizone, and 6 weeks post-cuprizone. High-resolution (100 μm isotropic) whole-brain coverage magnetization transfer ratio (MTR) parametric maps demonstrated concurrent caudal-to-rostral and medial-to-lateral gradients of MTR decrease within corpus callosum (CC) that correlated well with demyelination assessed histologically. Our results show that demyelination was not limited to the midsagittal line of the corpus callosum, and also that opposing gradients of demyelination occur in the lateral and medial CC. T2-weighted MRI gray/white matter contrast was strong at baseline, weak after 6 weeks of cuprizone treatment, and returned to a limited extent after recovery. MTR decreases during demyelination were observed throughout the brain, most clearly in callosal white matter. Myelin damage and repair appear to be influenced by proximity to oligodendrocyte progenitor cell populations and exhibit an inverse correlation with myelin basic protein gene expression. These findings suggest that susceptibility to injury and ability to repair vary across the brain, and whole-brain analysis is necessary to accurately characterize this model. Whole-brain parametric mapping

  16. Spatio-Temporal Patterns of Demyelination and Remyelination in the Cuprizone Mouse Model

    PubMed Central

    Tagge, Ian; O’Connor, Audrey; Chaudhary, Priya; Pollaro, Jim; Berlow, Yosef; Chalupsky, Megan; Bourdette, Dennis; Woltjer, Randy; Johnson, Mac; Rooney, William

    2016-01-01

    Cuprizone administration in mice provides a reproducible model of demyelination and spontaneous remyelination, and has been useful in understanding important aspects of human disease, including multiple sclerosis. In this study, we apply high spatial resolution quantitative MRI techniques to establish the spatio-temporal patterns of acute demyelination in C57BL/6 mice after 6 weeks of cuprizone administration, and subsequent remyelination after 6 weeks of post-cuprizone recovery. MRI measurements were complemented with Black Gold II stain for myelin and immunohistochemical stains for associated tissue changes. Gene expression was evaluated using the Allen Gene Expression Atlas. Twenty-five C57BL/6 male mice were split into control and cuprizone groups; MRI data were obtained at baseline, after 6 weeks of cuprizone, and 6 weeks post-cuprizone. High-resolution (100μm isotropic) whole-brain coverage magnetization transfer ratio (MTR) parametric maps demonstrated concurrent caudal-to-rostral and medial-to-lateral gradients of MTR decrease within corpus callosum (CC) that correlated well with demyelination assessed histologically. Our results show that demyelination was not limited to the midsagittal line of the corpus callosum, and also that opposing gradients of demyelination occur in the lateral and medial CC. T2-weighted MRI gray/white matter contrast was strong at baseline, weak after 6 weeks of cuprizone treatment, and returned to a limited extent after recovery. MTR decreases during demyelination were observed throughout the brain, most clearly in callosal white matter. Myelin damage and repair appear to be influenced by proximity to oligodendrocyte progenitor cell populations and exhibit an inverse correlation with myelin basic protein gene expression. These findings suggest that susceptibility to injury and ability to repair vary across the brain, and whole-brain analysis is necessary to accurately characterize this model. Whole-brain parametric mapping across

  17. Promotion of Remyelination by Sulfasalazine in a Transgenic Zebrafish Model of Demyelination

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Suhyun; Lee, Yun-Il; Chang, Ki-Young; Lee, Dong-Won; Cho, Sung Chun; Ha, Young Wan; Na, Ji Eun; Rhyu, Im Joo; Park, Sang Chul; Park, Hae-Chul

    2015-01-01

    Most of the axons in the vertebrate nervous system are surrounded by a lipid-rich membrane called myelin, which promotes rapid conduction of nerve impulses and protects the axon from being damaged. Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a chronic demyelinating disease of the CNS characterized by infiltration of immune cells and progressive damage to myelin and axons. One potential way to treat MS is to enhance the endogenous remyelination process, but at present there are no available treatments to promote remyelination in patients with demyelinating diseases. Sulfasalazine is an anti-inflammatory and immune-modulating drug that is used in rheumatology and inflammatory bowel disease. Its anti-inflammatory and immunomodulatory properties prompted us to test the ability of sulfasalazine to promote remyelination. In this study, we found that sulfasalazine promotes remyelination in the CNS of a transgenic zebrafish model of NTR/MTZ-induced demyelination. We also found that sulfasalazine treatment reduced the number of macrophages/microglia in the CNS of demyelinated zebrafish larvae, suggesting that the acceleration of remyelination is mediated by the immunomodulatory function of sulfasalazine. Our data suggest that temporal modulation of the immune response by sulfasalazine can be used to overcome MS by enhancing myelin repair and remyelination in the CNS. PMID:26549504

  18. Chronic Inflammatory Demyelinating Polyneuropathy (CIDP)

    MedlinePlus

    ... and legs, loss of deep tendon reflexes (areflexia), fatigue, and abnormal sensations. CIDP is closely related to Guillain-Barre syndrome and it is considered the chronic counterpart of that acute disease. Is there any ...

  19. Intravenous Administration of Human ES-derived Neural Precursor Cells Attenuates Cuprizone-induced CNS Demyelination

    PubMed Central

    Crocker, Stephen J.; Bajpai, Ruchi; Moore, Craig S.; Frausto, Ricardo F.; Brown, Graham D.; Pagarigan, Roberto R.; Whitton, J. Lindsay; Terskikh, Alexey V.

    2011-01-01

    Aims Previous studies have demonstrated the therapeutic potential for human embryonic stem cell-derived neural precursor cells (hES-NPCs) in autoimmune and genetic animal models of demyelinating diseases. Herein, we tested whether intravenous (i.v) administration of hES-NPCs would impact central nervous system (CNS) demyelination in a cuprizone model of demyelination. Methods C57Bl/6 mice were fed cuprizone (0.2%) for two weeks and then separated into two groups that either received an i.v. injection of hES-NPCs or i.v. administration of media without these cells. After an additional two weeks of dietary cuprizone treatment, CNS tissues were analyzed for detection of transplanted cells and differences in myelination in the region of the corpus callosum (CC). Results Cuprizone-induced demyelination in the CC was significantly reduced in mice treated with hES-NPCs compared with cuprizone-treated controls that did not receive stem cells. hES-NPCs were identified within the brain tissues of treated mice and revealed migration of transplanted cells into the CNS. A limited number of human cells were found to express the mature oligodendrocyte marker, O1, or the astrocyte marker, GFAP. Reduced apoptosis and attenuated microglial and astrocytic responses were also observed in the CC of hES-NPC-treated mice. Conclusions These findings indicated that systemically-administered hES-NPCs migrated from circulation into a demyelinated lesion within the CNS and effectively reduced demyelination. Observed reductions in astrocyte and microglial responses, and (c) the benefit of hES-NPC treatment in this model of myelin injury was not obviously accountable to tissue replacement by exogenously administered cells. PMID:21276029

  20. Olig2-expressing progenitor cells preferentially differentiate into oligodendrocytes in cuprizone-induced demyelinated lesions.

    PubMed

    Islam, Mohammad Shyful; Tatsumi, Kouko; Okuda, Hiroaki; Shiosaka, Sadao; Wanaka, Akio

    2009-01-01

    Many oligodendrocyte progenitor cells (OPCs) are found in acute or chronic demyelinated area, but not all of them differentiate efficiently into mature oligodendrocytes in the demyelinated central nervous system (CNS). Recent studies have shown that the basic helix-loop-helix transcription factor Olig2, which stimulates OPCs to differentiate into oligodendrocyte, is strongly up-regulated in many pathological conditions including acute or chronic demyelinating lesions in the adult CNS. Despite their potential role in the treatment of demyelinating diseases, the long-term fate of these up-regulated Olig2 cells has not been identified due to the lack of stable labeling methods. To trace their fate we have used double-transgenic mice, in which we were able to label Olig2-positive cells conditionally with green fluorescent protein (GFP). Demyelination was induced in these mice by feeding cuprizone, a copper chelator. After 6 weeks of cuprizone exposure, GFP-positive (GFP(+)) cells were processed for a second labeling with antibodies to major neural cell markers APC (mature oligodendrocyte marker), GFAP (astrocyte marker), NeuN (neuron marker), Iba1 (microglia marker) and NG2 proteoglycan (oligodendrocyte progenitor marker). More than half of the GFP(+) cells in the external capsule showed co-localization with NG2 proteoglycan. While the percentages of NG2-positive (NG2(+)) and APC-positive (APC(+)) oligodendrocyte lineage cells in cuprizone-treated mice were significantly higher than those in the normal diet group, no significant difference was observed for GFAP-positive (GFAP(+)) astrocytic lineage cells. Our data therefore provide direct evidence that proliferation and differentiation of local and/or recruited Olig2 progenitors contribute to remyelination in demyelinated lesions. PMID:19070638

  1. Pediatric acquired CNS demyelinating syndromes: Features associated with multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Hintzen, Rogier Q; Dale, Russell C; Neuteboom, Rinze F; Mar, Soe; Banwell, Brenda

    2016-08-30

    Approximately one-third of children with an acquired demyelinating syndrome (ADS) will be diagnosed with multiple sclerosis (MS), either at onset according to the 2010 McDonald criteria, or on the basis of clinical or MRI evidence of relapsing disease, in the majority of patients within 2-4 years. ADS in adolescents, female patients, and patients with polyfocal deficits is associated with the highest likelihood of MS, while children with acute disseminated encephalomyelitis, those with documented preceding infection, and ADS presentation in young children more commonly portends a monophasic outcome. While pediatric MS associates with similar genetic risk alleles as have been documented in adult-onset MS, such associations are not diagnostically valuable at the individual level. The presence of antibodies directed against aquaporin-4 strongly supports a diagnosis of neuromyelitis optica, and should be assayed in children manifesting with severe optic neuritis, longitudinally extensive myelitis, or brainstem/hypothalamic syndromes. Further research will determine whether other antibody signatures are indicative of relapsing demyelination distinct from MS. PMID:27572864

  2. Phosphatidic acid mediates demyelination in Lpin1 mutant mice

    PubMed Central

    Nadra, Karim; de Preux Charles, Anne-Sophie; Médard, Jean-Jacques; Hendriks, William T.; Han, Gil-Soo; Grès, Sandra; Carman, George M.; Saulnier-Blache, Jean-Sébastien; Verheijen, Mark H.G.; Chrast, Roman

    2008-01-01

    Lipids play crucial roles in many aspects of glial cell biology, affecting processes ranging from myelin membrane biosynthesis to axo-glial interactions. In order to study the role of lipid metabolism in myelinating glial cells, we specifically deleted in Schwann cells the Lpin1 gene, which encodes the Mg2+-dependent phosphatidate phosphatase (PAP1) enzyme necessary for normal triacylglycerol biosynthesis. The affected animals developed pronounced peripheral neuropathy characterized by myelin degradation, Schwann cell dedifferentiation and proliferation, and a reduction in nerve conduction velocity. The observed demyelination is mediated by endoneurial accumulation of the substrate of the PAP1 enzyme, phosphatidic acid (PA). In addition, we show that PA is a potent activator of the MEK–Erk pathway in Schwann cells, and that this activation is required for PA-induced demyelination. Our results therefore reveal a surprising role for PA in Schwann cell fate determination and provide evidence of a direct link between diseases affecting lipid metabolism and abnormal Schwann cell function. PMID:18559480

  3. Sphenoid sinus organized hematoma with cranial neuropathies masquerading as a malignancy: A case report

    PubMed Central

    LIN, YU-HSUAN; WANG, PO-CHIN; LIN, YAOH-SHIANG

    2016-01-01

    Sinonasal organized hematoma (SNOH) is rarely encountered in clinical practice. The disease demonstrates a high tendency for occurrence in East Asian individuals, and in the majority of cases, is located in the maxillary sinus. The current report presents the case of an 81-year-old female who developed a space-occupying lesion, which masqueraded as a skull base malignancy, following surgery for the treatment of isolated sphenoid sinus aspergilloma. Subsequent endoscopic endonasal surgery confirmed the diagnosis of an OH of the sphenoid sinus. The patient recovered from all neurological deficits within two months, with the exception of the loss of visual perception. Although SNOH presents a diagnostic challenge, when physicians possess knowledge of its typical imaging features, this facilitates the achievement of a correct diagnosis and the prescription of optimal treatment. PMID:27284357

  4. A novel model of demyelination and remyelination in a GFP-transgenic zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Fang, Yangwu; Lei, Xudan; Li, Xiang; Chen, Yanan; Xu, Fei; Feng, Xizeng; Wei, Shihui; Li, Yuhao

    2014-01-01

    Demyelinating diseases consist of a variety of autoimmune conditions in which the myelin sheath is damaged due to genetic and/or environmental factors. During clinical treatment, some patients undergo partial remyelination, especially during the early disease stages. However, the mechanisms that regulate demyelination remain unclear. The myelin structure, myelin formation and myelin-related gene expression are highly conserved between mammals and zebrafish. Therefore, the zebrafish is an ideal model organism to study myelination. In this study, we generated a transgenic zebrafish Tg(mbp:nfsB-egfp) expressing a fusion protein composed of enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) and NTR from the myelin basic protein (mbp) promoter. Tg(mbp:nfsB-egfp) expressed NTR-EGFP reproducibly and hereditarily in oligodendrocytes along the spinal cord. Treatment of zebrafish larvae Tg(mbp:nfsB-egfp) with metronidazole (Mtz) resulted in the selective ablation of oligodendrocytes and led to demyelination, accompanied by behavioral changes, including decreased total movement distance, velocity, total movement time and fast movement time. After withdrawal of Mtz for a seven day recovery period, the expression of EGFP and MBP protein was observed again which indicates remyelination. Additionally, locomotor capacity was restored. Collectively, Tg(mbp:nfsB-egfp), a heritable and stable transgenic line, provides a novel, powerful tool to study the mechanisms of demyelination and remyelination. PMID:25527642

  5. Skin-derived neural precursors competitively generate functional myelin in adult demyelinated mice

    PubMed Central

    Mozafari, Sabah; Laterza, Cecilia; Roussel, Delphine; Bachelin, Corinne; Marteyn, Antoine; Deboux, Cyrille; Martino, Gianvito; Evercooren, Anne Baron-Van

    2015-01-01

    Induced pluripotent stem cell–derived (iPS-derived) neural precursor cells may represent the ideal autologous cell source for cell-based therapy to promote remyelination and neuroprotection in myelin diseases. So far, the therapeutic potential of reprogrammed cells has been evaluated in neonatal demyelinating models. However, the repair efficacy and safety of these cells has not been well addressed in the demyelinated adult CNS, which has decreased cell plasticity and scarring. Moreover, it is not clear if these induced pluripotent–derived cells have the same reparative capacity as physiologically committed CNS-derived precursors. Here, we performed a side-by-side comparison of CNS-derived and skin-derived neural precursors in culture and following engraftment in murine models of adult spinal cord demyelination. Grafted induced neural precursors exhibited a high capacity for survival, safe integration, migration, and timely differentiation into mature bona fide oligodendrocytes. Moreover, grafted skin–derived neural precursors generated compact myelin around host axons and restored nodes of Ranvier and conduction velocity as efficiently as CNS-derived precursors while outcompeting endogenous cells. Together, these results provide important insights into the biology of reprogrammed cells in adult demyelinating conditions and support use of these cells for regenerative biomedicine of myelin diseases that affect the adult CNS. PMID:26301815

  6. Autoimmune antigenic targets at the node of Ranvier in demyelinating disorders.

    PubMed

    Stathopoulos, Panos; Alexopoulos, Harry; Dalakas, Marinos C

    2015-03-01

    Mounting evidence suggests that autoantibodies contribute to the pathogenesis of demyelination in the PNS and CNS. Rapid reversal of electrophysiological blockade after plasmapheresis or intravenous immunoglobulin treatment for acute or chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy is more likely to result from removal or neutralization of an antibody that impairs saltatory conduction than from remyelination. Although up to 30% of patients with acute or chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy harbour autoantibodies, specific antigens have been identified in no more than 13% of cases. To date, autoantigens identified at the node of Ranvier include neurofascin 186, gliomedin and possibly moesin in the nodal domain, and contactin-1, Caspr1 and neurofascin 155 in the paranodal domain. In some patients with multiple sclerosis, paranodal CNPase and juxtaparanodal contactin-2 trigger a humoral response. This Review explores the molecular anatomy of the node of Ranvier, focusing on proteins with extracellular domains that could serve as antigens. The clinical implications of node-specific antibody responses are addressed, and the best approaches to identify antibodies that target nodal proteins are highlighted. Also discussed are the roles of these antibodies as either secondary, disease-exacerbating responses, or as a primary effector mechanism that defines demyelination or axonal degeneration at the node, identifies disease subtypes or determines response to treatments. PMID:25623793

  7. TREM2 sustains microglial expansion during aging and response to demyelination.

    PubMed

    Poliani, Pietro Luigi; Wang, Yaming; Fontana, Elena; Robinette, Michelle L; Yamanishi, Yoshinori; Gilfillan, Susan; Colonna, Marco

    2015-05-01

    Microglia contribute to development, homeostasis, and immunity of the CNS. Like other tissue-resident macrophage populations, microglia express the surface receptor triggering receptor expressed on myeloid cells 2 (TREM2), which binds polyanions, such as dextran sulphate and bacterial LPS, and activates downstream signaling cascades through the adapter DAP12. Individuals homozygous for inactivating mutations in TREM2 exhibit demyelination of subcortical white matter and a lethal early onset dementia known as Nasu-Hakola disease. How TREM2 deficiency mediates demyelination and disease is unknown. Here, we addressed the basis for this genetic association using Trem2(-/-) mice. In WT mice, microglia expanded in the corpus callosum with age, whereas aged Trem2(-/-) mice had fewer microglia with an abnormal morphology. In the cuprizone model of oligodendrocyte degeneration and demyelination, Trem2(-/-) microglia failed to amplify transcripts indicative of activation, phagocytosis, and lipid catabolism in response to myelin damage. As a result, Trem2(-/-) mice exhibited impaired myelin debris clearance, axonal dystrophy, oligodendrocyte reduction, and persistent demyelination after prolonged cuprizone treatment. Moreover, myelin-associated lipids robustly triggered TREM2 signaling in vitro, suggesting that TREM2 may directly sense lipid components exposed during myelin damage. We conclude that TREM2 is required for promoting microglial expansion during aging and microglial response to insults of the white matter. PMID:25893602

  8. Role of glial cells in innate immunity and their role in CNS demyelination.

    PubMed

    Sriram, Subramaniam

    2011-10-28

    The adaptive and innate arms of the immune system are the two pillars of host defense against environmental pathogens. Multiple sclerosis (MS) is an inflammatory demyelinating disease of the CNS which is considered to be autoimmune and is thought to result from breakdown in the usual checks and balances of the adaptive immune response. The major pathological outcome of the disease is "the MS plaque" a unique feature of CNS demyelination characterized by the destruction of oligodendrocytes with loss of myelin and underlying axons. The MS plaque is not seen in other inflammatory disorders of the CNS. The prevailing opinion suggests that MS is mediated by the activation of an adaptive immune response which targets neural antigens. Currently, the role of an innate immune in the development of the lesions in MS has remained unclear. We explore the potential cellular elements of the innate immune system and in particular glial cells, which are likely candidates in inducing the specific pathological picture that is evident in MS. Activated microglia and the release of molecules which are detrimental to oligodendrocyte have been suggested as mechanisms by which innate immunity causes demyelination in MS. However a microglia/macrophage centric model does not explain the specificity of lesion development in MS. We propose that activation pathways of receptors of the innate immune system present on oligodendrocytes and astrocytes rather than microglia are central to the pathogenesis of demyelination seen in MS. PMID:21907419

  9. Uveal Melanoma in the Peripheral Choroid Masquerading as Chronic Uveitis

    PubMed Central

    Feng, Lei; Zhu, Jiang; Gao, Tao; Li, Baizhou; Yang, Yabo

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Purpose To describe a case of uveal melanoma in the peripheral choroid masquerading as chronic uveitis and to raise awareness about malignant masquerade syndromes. Case Report A 36-year-old Chinese woman presented from an outside ophthalmologist with a 6-month history of unilateral chronic uveitis unresponsive to medical therapy in the left eye. She was found to have a uveal melanoma in the retinal periphery and underwent successful enucleation of her left eye. The histopathological diagnosis confirmed the clinical diagnosis. Conclusions When uveal melanoma presents in an atypical way, the diagnosis is more difficult. This case highlights the uncommon presentations of malignant melanoma of the choroid. It provides valuable information on how peripheral uveal melanoma can present with clinical signs consistent with an anterior uveitis. PMID:25036546

  10. Pleomorphic adenoma of the frontal sinus masquerading as a mucocele.

    PubMed

    Chew, Yok Kuan; Brito-Mutunayagam, Sushil; Chong, Aun Wee; Prepageran, Narayanan; Chandran, Patricia Ann; Khairuzzana, Baharudin; Lingham, Omkara Rubini

    2015-12-01

    Pleomorphic adenoma is the most common type of benign salivary gland tumor. It can also be found in the larynx, ear, neck, and nasal septum. It is rarely found in the maxillary sinus, and it has never been reported in the frontal sinus. We report a case of pleomorphic adenoma of the frontal sinus that masqueraded as a mucocele. We discuss the clinical presentation, diagnosis, and treatment of this patient, and we review the literature. PMID:26670764

  11. Hes3 expression in the adult mouse brain is regulated during demyelination and remyelination.

    PubMed

    Toutouna, Louiza; Nikolakopoulou, Polyxeni; Poser, Steven W; Masjkur, Jimmy; Arps-Forker, Carina; Troullinaki, Maria; Grossklaus, Sylvia; Bosak, Viktoria; Friedrich, Ulrike; Ziemssen, Tjalf; Bornstein, Stefan R; Chavakis, Triantafyllos; Androutsellis-Theotokis, Andreas

    2016-07-01

    Hes3 is a component of the STAT3-Ser/Hes3 Signaling Axis controlling the growth and survival of neural stem cells and other plastic cells. Pharmacological activation of this pathway promotes neuronal rescue and behavioral recovery in models of ischemic stroke and Parkinson's disease. Here we provide initial observations implicating Hes3 in the cuprizone model of demyelination and remyelination. We focus on the subpial motor cortex of mice because we detected high Hes3 expression. This area is of interest as it is impacted both in human demyelinating diseases and in the cuprizone model. We report that Hes3 expression is reduced at peak demyelination and is partially restored within 1 week after cuprizone withdrawal. This raises the possibility of Hes3 involvement in demyelination/remyelination that may warrant additional research. Supporting a possible role of Hes3 in the maintenance of oligodendrocyte markers, a Hes3 null mouse strain shows lower levels of myelin basic protein in undamaged adult mice, compared to wild-type controls. We also present a novel method for culturing the established oligodendrocyte progenitor cell line oli-neu in a manner that maintains Hes3 expression as well as its self-renewal and differentiation potential, offering an experimental tool to study Hes3. Based upon this approach, we identify a Janus kinase inhibitor and dbcAMP as powerful inducers of Hes3 gene expression. We provide a new biomarker and cell culture method that may be of interest in demyelination/remyelination research. PMID:27018293

  12. Changed distribution of sodium channels along demyelinated axons.

    PubMed

    England, J D; Gamboni, F; Levinson, S R; Finger, T E

    1990-09-01

    Voltage-gated sodium channels are largely localized to the nodes of Ranvier in myelinated axons, providing a physiological basis for saltatory conduction. What happens to these channels in demyelinated axons is not known with certainty. Experimentally demyelinated axons were examined by using a well-characterized, polyclonal antibody directed against sodium channels. Immunocytochemical and radioimmunoassay data were consistent with the distribution of an increased number of sodium channels along segments of previously internodal axon. These findings affirm the plasticity of sodium channels in demyelinated axolemma and may be relevant to understanding how axons recover conduction after demyelination. PMID:2168559

  13. CXCR4 Signaling Regulates Remyelination by Endogenous Oligodendrocyte Progenitor Cells in a Viral Model of Demyelination

    PubMed Central

    CARBAJAL, KEVIN S.; MIRANDA, JUAN L.; TSUKAMOTO, MICHELLE R.; LANE, THOMAS E.

    2016-01-01

    Following intracranial infection with the neurotropic JHM strain of mouse hepatitis virus (JHMV), susceptible mice will develop widespread myelin destruction that results in pathological and clinical outcomes similar to those seen in humans with the demyelinating disease Multiple Sclerosis (MS). Partial remyelination and clinical recovery occurs during the chronic phase following control of viral replication yet the signaling mechanisms regulating these events remain enigmatic. Here we report the kinetics of proliferation and maturation of oligodendrocyte progenitor cells (OPCs) within the spinal cord following JHMV-induced demyelination and that CXCR4 signaling contributes to the maturation state of OPCs. Following treatment with AMD3100, a specific inhibitor of CXCR4, mice recovering from widespread demyelination exhibit a significant (P < 0.01) increase in the number of OPCs and fewer (P < 0.05) mature oligodendrocytes compared with HBSS-treated animals. These results suggest that CXCR4 signaling is required for OPCs to mature and contribute to remyelination in response to JHMV-induced demyelination. To assess if this effect is reversible and has potential therapeutic benefit, we pulsed mice with AMD3100 and then allowed them to recover. This treatment strategy resulted in increased numbers of mature oligodendrocytes, enhanced remyelination, and improved clinical outcome. These findings highlight the possibility to manipulate OPCs in order to increase the pool of remyelination-competent cells that can participate in recovery. PMID:21830237

  14. FGF2 and FGFR1 signaling regulate functional recovery following cuprizone demyelination.

    PubMed

    Mierzwa, Amanda J; Zhou, Yong-Xing; Hibbits, Norah; Vana, Adam C; Armstrong, Regina C

    2013-08-26

    In demyelinating diseases, such as multiple sclerosis, remyelination offers the potential to recover function of viable denuded axons by restoring saltatory conduction and/or protecting from further damage. Mice with genetic reduction of fibroblast growth factor 2 (Fgf2) or Fgf receptor 1 (Fgfr1) exhibit dramatically improved remyelination following experimental demyelination with cuprizone. The current studies are the first to test neurobehavioral outcomes with these gene deletions that improved remyelination. The cuprizone protocols used did not produce overt abnormalities but did reduce bilateral sensorimotor coordination (complex wheel task) and increase sociability (two chamber apparatus with novel mouse). A significant effect of genotype was observed on the complex wheel task but not in the sociability apparatus. Specifically, complex wheel velocities for Fgf2 nulls improved significantly after removal of cuprizone from the diet. This improvement in Fgf2 null mice occurred following either acute (6 weeks) or chronic (12 weeks) demyelination. Plp/CreERT:Fgfr1(fl/fl) mice administered tamoxifen at 10 weeks of cuprizone treatment to induce Fgfr1 knockdown also showed improved recovery of running velocities on the complex wheels. Therefore, constitutive deletion of Fgf2 or Fgfr1 knockdown in oligodendrocyte lineage cells is sufficient to overcome impairment of sensorimotor coordination after cuprizone demyelination. PMID:23684572

  15. Oligodendrocyte Lineage Cells in Chronic Demyelination of Multiple Sclerosis Optic Nerve.

    PubMed

    Jennings, Alison Ruth; Carroll, William M

    2015-09-01

    Reports that chronically demyelinated multiple sclerosis brain and spinal cord lesions contained immature oligodendrocyte lineage cells have generated major interest aimed at the potential for promotion of endogenous repair. Despite the prominence of the optic nerve as a lesion site and its importance in clinical disease assessment, no detailed studies of multiple sclerosis-affected optic nerve exist. This study aims to provide insight into the cellular pathology of chronic demyelination in multiple sclerosis through direct morphological and immunohistochemical analysis of optic nerve in conjunction with observations from an experimental cat optic nerve model of successful remyelination. Myelin staining was followed by immunohistochemistry to differentially label neuroglia. Digitally immortalized sections were then analyzed to generate quantification data and antigenic phenotypes including maturational stages within the oligodendrocyte lineage. It was found that some chronically demyelinated multiple sclerosis optic nerve lesions contained oligodendroglial cells and that heterogeneity existed in the presence of myelin sheaths, oligodendrocyte maturational stages and extent of axonal investment. The findings advance our understanding of oligodendrocyte activity in chronically demyelinated human optic nerve and may have implications for studies aimed at enhancement of endogenous repair in multiple sclerosis. PMID:25175564

  16. Promoting remyelination: utilizing a viral model of demyelination to assess cell-based therapies

    PubMed Central

    Marro, Brett S; Blanc, Caroline A; Loring, Jeanne F; Cahalan, Michael D; Lane, Thomas E

    2014-01-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a chronic inflammatory disease of the CNS. While a broad range of therapeutics effectively reduce the incidence of focal white matter inflammation and plaque formation for patients with relapse-remitting forms of MS, a challenge within the field is to develop therapies that allow for axonal protection and remyelination. In the last decade, growing interest has focused on utilizing neural precursor cells (NPCs) to promote remyelination. To understand how NPCs function in chronic demyelinating environments, several excellent pre-clinical mouse models have been developed. One well accepted model is infection of susceptible mice with neurotropic variants of mouse hepatitis virus (MHV) that undergo chronic demyelination exhibiting clinical and histopathologic similarities to MS patients. Combined with the possibility that an environmental agent such as a virus could trigger MS, the MHV model of demyelination presents a relevant mouse model to assess the therapeutic potential of NPCs transplanted into an environment in which inflammatory-mediated demyelination is established. PMID:25245576

  17. [Subcutaneous immunoglobulin. Treatment in chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculo-neuropathy].

    PubMed

    Nogués, Martín A; Varela, Francisco J; Seminario, Gisela; Insúa, María C; Bezrodnik, Liliana

    2016-01-01

    Chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy (CIDP) is an acquired disease that may affect nerve roots and peripheral nerves. Despite its low incidence, diagnosis is particularly important because there are different effective treatments. Human immunoglobulin is one of the mainstays of the treatment. Although there are few studies up to date, subcutaneous immunoglobulin (IgSC) has been proposed as an alternative to intravenous administration with similar efficacy. We present three cases with definite CIDP, classified according to the European Federation of Neurological Societies / Peripheral Nerve, Society (EFNS /PNS) criteria in which was used SCIgG as a treatment after success with the intravenous route. The Overall Neuropathy Limitations Scale (ONLS) was used to estimate the changes in the muscular strength before and after treatment. PMID:26826992

  18. Molecular Mechanisms of Inherited Demyelinating Neuropathies

    PubMed Central

    SCHERER, STEVEN S.; WRABETZ, LAWRENCE

    2008-01-01

    The past 15 years have witnessed the identification of more than 25 genes responsible for inherited neuropathies in humans, many associated with primary alterations of the myelin sheath. A remarkable body of work in patients, as well as animal and cellular models, has defined the clinical and molecular genetics of these illnesses and shed light on how mutations in associated genes produce the heterogeneity of dysmyelinating and demyelinating phenotypes. Here, we review selected recent developments from work on the molecular mechanisms of these disorders and their implications for treatment strategies. PMID:18803325

  19. Demyelination induces transport of ribosome-containing vesicles from glia to axons: evidence from animal models and MS patient brains.

    PubMed

    Shakhbazau, Antos; Schenk, Geert J; Hay, Curtis; Kawasoe, Jean; Klaver, Roel; Yong, V Wee; Geurts, Jeroen J G; van Minnen, Jan

    2016-06-01

    Glial cells were previously proven capable of trafficking polyribosomes to injured axons. However, the occurrence of such transfer in the general pathological context, such as demyelination-related diseases, needs further evidence. Since this may be a yet unidentified universal contributor to axonal survival, we study putative glia-axonal ribosome transport in response to demyelination in animal models and patients in both peripheral and central nervous system. In the PNS we investigate whether demyelination in a rodent model has the potential to induce ribosome transfer. We also probe the glia-axonal ribosome supply by implantation of transgenic Schwann cells engineered to produce fluorescent ribosomes in the same demyelination model. We furthermore examine the presence of axonal ribosomes in mouse experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE), a well-established model for multiple sclerosis (MS), and in human MS autopsy brain material. We provide evidence for increased axonal ribosome content in a pharmacologically demyelinated sciatic nerve, and demonstrate that at least part of these ribosomes originate in the transgenic Schwann cells. In the CNS one of the hallmarks of MS is demyelination, which is associated with severe disruption of oligodendrocyte-axon interaction. Here, we provide evidence that axons from spinal cords of EAE mice, and in the MS human brain contain an elevated amount of axonal ribosomes compared to controls. Our data provide evidence that increased axonal ribosome content in pathological axons is at least partly due to glia-to-axon transfer of ribosomes, and that demyelination in the PNS and in the CNS is one of the triggers capable to initiate this process. PMID:27115494

  20. Anti-MOG antibody: The history, clinical phenotype, and pathogenicity of a serum biomarker for demyelination.

    PubMed

    Ramanathan, Sudarshini; Dale, Russell C; Brilot, Fabienne

    2016-04-01

    Myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein (MOG) is a protein exclusively expressed on the surface of oligodendrocytes and myelin in the central nervous system. MOG has been identified as a putative candidate autoantigen and autoantibody target in demyelination for almost three decades, with extensive literature validating its role in murine models of experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis. Seminal studies using murine anti-MOG antibodies have highlighted the fact that antibodies that target epitopes of native MOG in its conformational state, rather than linearized or denature`d MOG, are biologically relevant. However, the relevance of anti-MOG antibodies in humans has been difficult to decipher over the years due to varying methods of detection as well as the fact that it was assumed that these antibodies would be clinically associated with multiple sclerosis. There is now international consensus that anti-MOG antibodies are important in both pediatric and adult demyelination, and the clinical association of MOG antibody-associated demyelination has been refined to include acute disseminated encephalomyelitis, relapsing and bilateral optic neuritis, and transverse myelitis. Anti-MOG antibodies are now thought not to be associated with multiple sclerosis in adults. Patients with MOG antibody-associated demyelination appear to have a unique clinical, radiological, and therapeutic profile, which represents a major advance in their diagnosis and management. It is imperative to understand whether anti-MOG antibodies are indeed pathogenic, and if so, their mechanisms of action. As it has become apparent that there are differences in MOG epitope binding between species, translation of animal studies to human demyelination should be analyzed in this context. Further work is required to identify the specific epitope binding sites in human disease and pathogenic mechanisms of anti-MOG antibodies, as well optimal therapeutic strategies to improve prognosis and minimize

  1. MNGIE neuropathy: five cases mimicking chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy.

    PubMed

    Bedlack, Richard S; Vu, Tuan; Hammans, Simon; Sparr, Steven A; Myers, Bennett; Morgenlander, Joel; Hirano, Michio

    2004-03-01

    We report five patients with mitochondrial neurogastrointestinal encephalomyopathy (MNGIE) who had demyelinating peripheral neuropathy. The MNGIE neuropathy had clinical and electrodiagnostic features typical of acquired, rather than inherited, etiologies. In fact, three patients were actually treated for chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy (CIDP). We discuss findings that may help distinguish patients with MNGIE from those with CIDP. PMID:14981734

  2. Protective Effect of a cAMP Analogue on Behavioral Deficits and Neuropathological Changes in Cuprizone Model of Demyelination.

    PubMed

    Vakilzadeh, Gelareh; Khodagholi, Fariba; Ghadiri, Tahereh; Darvishi, Marzieh; Ghaemi, Amir; Noorbakhsh, Farshid; Gorji, Ali; Sharifzadeh, Mohammad

    2015-08-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is an inflammatory demyelinating disease that leads to neuronal cell loss. Cyclic AMP and its analogs are well known to decrease inflammation and apoptosis. In the present study, we examined the effects of bucladesine, a cell-permeable analogue of cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP), on myelin proteins (PLP, PMP-22), inflammation, and apoptotic, as well as anti-apoptotic factors in cuprizone model of demyelination. C57BL/6J mice were fed with chow containing 0.2% copper chelator cuprizone or vehicle by daily oral gavage for 5 weeks to induce reversible demyelination predominantly of the corpus callosum. Bucladesine was administered intraperitoneally at different doses (0.24, 0.48, or 0.7 μg/kg body weight) during the last 7 days of 5-week cuprizone treatment. Bucladesine exhibited a protective effect on myelination. Furthermore, bucladesine significantly decreased the production of interleukin-6 pro-inflammatory mediator as well as nuclear factor-κB activation and reduced the mean number of apoptotic cells compared to cuprizone-treated mice. Bucladesine also decreased production of caspase-3 as well as Bax and increased Bcl-2 levels. Our data revealed that enhancement of intracellular cAMP prevents demyelination and plays anti-inflammatory and anti-apoptotic properties in mice cuprizone model of demyelination. This suggests the modulation of intracellular cAMP as a potential target for treatment of MS. PMID:25128030

  3. Myelin Loss Does Not Lead to Axonal Degeneration in a Long-Lived Model of Chronic Demyelination

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Chelsey M.; Cooksey, Elizabeth; Duncan, Ian D.

    2014-01-01

    Current dogma suggests that chronically demyelinated axons are at risk for degeneration, with axonal loss resulting in permanent disability in myelin disease. However, the trophic role of the myelin sheath in long-term axonal survival is incompletely understood. Previous observations of the effect of dysmyelination or demyelination on axonal survival in the myelin mutants has been limited because of their short life span. In this study, we used the Long–Evans shaker (les) rat, which can live up to 9 months, to study axonal health and survival after chronic demyelination. At 2 weeks, ~29% of medium and ~47% of large fiber axons are myelinated in les spinal cord. However, by 3 months, no medium and ~<1% of large-diameter axons retain myelin. After demyelination, axons have a reduced-caliber, abnormal neurofilament distribution and an increase in mitochondrial number. However, there are no signs of axonal degeneration in les rats up to 9 months. Instead, there is a profound increase in oligodendrocytes, which were found to express BDNF, NT-3, and IGF-1. Importantly, this study provides in vivo evidence that mature glial cells produce various neurotrophic factors that may aid in the survival of axons after chronic demyelination. PMID:23392698

  4. Oligodendrocyte death results in immune-mediated CNS demyelination

    PubMed Central

    Traka, Maria; Podojil, Joseph R; McCarthy, Derrick P; Miller, Stephen D; Popko, Brian

    2016-01-01

    Although multiple sclerosis is a common neurological disorder, the origin of the autoimmune response against myelin, which is the characteristic feature of the disease, remains unclear. To investigate whether oligodendrocyte death could cause this autoimmune response, we examined the oligodendrocyte ablation Plp1-CreERT;ROSA26-eGFP-DTA (DTA) mouse model. Approximately 30 weeks after recovering from oligodendrocyte loss and demyelination, DTA mice develop a fatal secondary disease characterized by extensive myelin and axonal loss. Strikingly, late-onset disease was associated with increased numbers of T lymphocytes in the CNS and myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein (MOG)-specific T cells in lymphoid organs. Transfer of T cells derived from DTA mice to naive recipients resulted in neurological defects that correlated with CNS white matter inflammation. Furthermore, immune tolerization against MOG ameliorated symptoms. Overall, these data indicate that oligodendrocyte death is sufficient to trigger an adaptive autoimmune response against myelin, suggesting that a similar process can occur in the pathogenesis of multiple sclerosis. PMID:26656646

  5. Retained strabismus suture material masquerading as nonspecific orbital inflammation.

    PubMed

    Callahan, Alison B; Scofield, Stacy M; Gallin, Pamela F; Kazim, Michael

    2016-06-01

    We report a case of orbital myositis of the superior rectus muscle-levator complex masquerading as nonspecific orbital inflammation but corresponding in location to a known braided polyester "chicken suture" placed 20 years earlier during strabismus surgery. The orbital inflammation was refractory to oral steroids but resolved promptly on surgical removal of the suture material. Although suture material is known to cause foreign body granulomatous reactions, to our knowledge this is the first reported case of a deep, diffuse orbital inflammation attributable to chicken suture placed during strabismus surgery. PMID:27112911

  6. Idiopathic subvalvular aortic aneurysm masquerading as acute coronary syndrome.

    PubMed

    Natarajan, Balaji; Ramanathan, Sundar; Subramaniam, Natarajan; Janardhanan, Rajesh

    2016-01-01

    Subvalvular aneurysms are the least common type of left ventricular (LV) aneurysms and can be fatal. Subaortic LV aneurysms are much rarer than submitral LV aneurysms and mostly reported in infancy. They can be congenital or acquired secondary to infections, cardiac surgery or trauma. Here, we report a unique presentation of a large, idiopathic subaortic aneurysm in an adult masquerading as an acute coronary syndrome. Diagnosis was made with the help of a CT aortography. Aneurysm was surgically resected with good results. This case highlights the clinical presentation and management of subaortic aneurysms, an important differential for congenital aortic malformations. PMID:27591034

  7. Extracellular potentials of myelinated and demyelinated human motor nerve fibres.

    PubMed

    Stephanova, D I; Daskalova, M

    2003-12-01

    The extracellular potentials of myelinated and demyelinated human motor nerve fibres in an unbounded volume conductor are studied. Using our previous double-cable models of normal and demyelinated human fibres, the spatial and temporal intracellular potentials are calculated in the cases of point polarization and adaptation of the fibres. The intracellular potentials are then used as input to a line source model that allows to calculate the corresponding spatial and temporal extracellular potentials at various radial distances in the surrounding volume conductor. Four fibre demyelinations (termed as internodal focal\\systematic and paranodal focal\\systematic demyelinations, respectively) are studied. In all investigated cases, the radial decline of the peak-to-peak amplitude of the extracellular potential depends on the radial distance of the field point and increases with the increase of the distance. The results are consistent with the interpretation that the considerably different spatial and temporal distributions of the extracellular potentials depend not only on the cable properties of the fibres, but on the methods of fibre stimulation. In the case of fibre adaptation, the temporal extracellular potentials in the normal and demyelinated cases correspond well with electromyograms (EMGs) from healthy subjects and patients with demyelinated disorders as reported in the literature. Simulation results indicate that the models used are rather promising tools in studying the main properties of compound action potentials in patients with demyelinated disorders which up till now have not been sufficiently well understood. PMID:14717030

  8. Desert hedgehog is a mediator of demyelination in compression neuropathies.

    PubMed

    Jung, James; Frump, Derek; Su, Jared; Wang, Weiping; Mozaffar, Tahseen; Gupta, Ranjan

    2015-09-01

    The secreted protein desert hedgehog (dhh) controls the formation of the nerve perineurium during development and is a key component of Schwann cells that ensures peripheral nerve survival. We postulated that dhh may play a critical role in maintaining myelination and investigated its role in demyelination-induced compression neuropathies by using a post-natal model of a chronic nerve injury in wildtype and dhh(-/-) mice. We evaluated demyelination using electrophysiological, morphological, and molecular approaches. dhh transcripts and protein are down-regulated early after injury in wild-type mice, suggesting an intimate relationship between the hedgehog pathway and demyelination. In dhh(-/-) mice, nerve injury induced more prominent and severe demyelination relative to their wild-type counterparts, suggesting a protective role of dhh. Alterations in nerve fiber characteristics included significant decreases in nerve conduction velocity, increased myelin debris, and substantial decreases in internodal length. Furthermore, in vitro studies showed that dhh blockade via either adenovirus-mediated (shRNA) or pharmacological inhibition both resulted in severe demyelination, which could be rescued by exogenous Dhh. Exogenous Dhh was protective against this demyelination and maintained myelination at baseline levels in a custom in vitro bioreactor to applied biophysical forces to myelinated DRG/Schwann cell co-cultures. Together, these results demonstrate a pivotal role for dhh in maintaining myelination. Furthermore, dhh signaling reveals a potential target for therapeutic intervention to prevent and treat demyelination of peripheral nerves in compression neuropathies. PMID:25936873

  9. Multifocal inflammatory demyelination in a patient with rheumatoid arthritis and treatment complications.

    PubMed

    Lu, Jian-Qiang; Ringrose, Jennifer; Gross, Donald; Emery, Derek; Blevins, Gregg; Power, Christopher

    2016-08-15

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and multiple sclerosis (MS) are both autoimmune diseases that share similar pathogenesis, but the development of MS in RA patients without the treatment of anti-tumor necrosis factor-alpha is rarely reported, which might be attributed to the use of other medications with potential immunosuppressive effects in the treatment of RA. Since MS can be clinically silent and autopsy examination of the central nervous system in RA patients is rarely described, the association of MS with RA may be possibly under-recognized. We report an autopsy case revealing multifocal inflammatory demyelination in a RA patient who had a prolonged use of methotrexate and hydroxychloroquine resulting in hydroxychloroquine-induced myopathies and heart failure. The neuropathological features of this case are consistent with MS, although there are some altered inflammatory demyelinating features such as relatively smaller lesions and less infiltration of inflammatory cells, particularly T-cells. Our present case, in combination with literature review, suggests that the RA treatment especially with hydroxychloroquine and methotrexate is likely to alter the characteristics of inflammatory demyelination and disease course. PMID:27423608

  10. Intraventricular injections of mesenchymal stem cells activate endogenous functional remyelination in a chronic demyelinating murine model

    PubMed Central

    Cruz-Martinez, P; González-Granero, S; Molina-Navarro, M M; Pacheco-Torres, J; García-Verdugo, J M; Geijo-Barrientos, E; Jones, J; Martinez, S

    2016-01-01

    Current treatments for demyelinating diseases are generally only capable of ameliorating the symptoms, with little to no effect in decreasing myelin loss nor promoting functional recovery. Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) have been shown by many researchers to be a potential therapeutic tool in treating various neurodegenerative diseases, including demyelinating disorders. However, in the majority of the cases, the effect was only observed locally, in the area surrounding the graft. Thus, in order to achieve general remyelination in various brain structures simultaneously, bone marrow-derived MSCs were transplanted into the lateral ventricles (LVs) of the cuprizone murine model. In this manner, the cells may secrete soluble factors into the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and boost the endogenous oligodendrogenic potential of the subventricular zone (SVZ). As a result, oligodendrocyte progenitor cells (OPCs) were recruited within the corpus callosum (CC) over time, correlating with an increased myelin content. Electrophysiological studies, together with electron microscopy (EM) analysis, indicated that the newly formed myelin correctly enveloped the demyelinated axons and increased signal transduction through the CC. Moreover, increased neural stem progenitor cell (NSPC) proliferation was observed in the SVZ, possibly due to the tropic factors released by the MSCs. In conclusion, the findings of this study revealed that intraventricular injections of MSCs is a feasible method to elicit a paracrine effect in the oligodendrogenic niche of the SVZ, which is prone to respond to the factors secreted into the CSF and therefore promoting oligodendrogenesis and functional remyelination. PMID:27171265

  11. An uncommon cause of bifacial weakness and non-length-dependent demyelinating neuropathy

    PubMed Central

    Nagappa, Madhu; Taly, Arun B.; Mahadevan, Anita; Pooja, Mailankody; Bindu, Parayil Sankaran; Chickabasaviah, Yasha T.; Gayathri, Narayanappa; Sinha, Sanjib

    2015-01-01

    Tangier disease is a rare metabolic disorder that causes neuropathy in half of the affected individuals. We present the clinical, electrophysiological, and histopathological findings in a middle-aged gentleman of Tangier disease who was initially diagnosed as leprosy and treated with antileprosy drugs. The presence of a demyelinating electrophysiology in a patient with predominant upper limb involvement and facial diplegia should raise the suspicion of Tangier disease. Estimation of serum lipids should form a part of routine evaluation in order to avoid misdiagnosis. PMID:26713019

  12. Acute paretic syndrome in juvenile White Leghorn chickens resembles late stages of acute inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathies in humans

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Sudden limb paresis is a common problem in White Leghorn flocks, affecting about 1% of the chicken population before achievement of sexual maturity. Previously, a similar clinical syndrome has been reported as being caused by inflammatory demyelination of peripheral nerve fibres. Here, we investigated in detail the immunopathology of this paretic syndrome and its possible resemblance to human neuropathies. Methods Neurologically affected chickens and control animals from one single flock underwent clinical and neuropathological examination. Peripheral nervous system (PNS) alterations were characterised using standard morphological techniques, including nerve fibre teasing and transmission electron microscopy. Infiltrating cells were phenotyped immunohistologically and quantified by flow cytometry. The cytokine expression pattern was assessed by quantitative real-time PCR (qRT-PCR). These investigations were accomplished by MHC genotyping and a PCR screen for Marek's disease virus (MDV). Results Spontaneous paresis of White Leghorns is caused by cell-mediated, inflammatory demyelination affecting multiple cranial and spinal nerves and nerve roots with a proximodistal tapering. Clinical manifestation coincides with the employment of humoral immune mechanisms, enrolling plasma cell recruitment, deposition of myelin-bound IgG and antibody-dependent macrophageal myelin-stripping. Disease development was significantly linked to a 539 bp microsatellite in MHC locus LEI0258. An aetiological role for MDV was excluded. Conclusions The paretic phase of avian inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuritis immunobiologically resembles the late-acute disease stages of human acute inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy, and is characterised by a Th1-to-Th2 shift. PMID:20109187

  13. Cuprizone-induced demyelination and demyelination-associated inflammation result in different proton magnetic resonance metabolite spectra

    PubMed Central

    Praet, Jelle; Orije, Jasmien; Kara, Firat; Guglielmetti, Caroline; Santermans, Eva; Daans, Jasmijn; Hens, Niel; Verhoye, Marleen; Berneman, Zwi; Ponsaerts, Peter; Van der Linden, Annemie

    2015-01-01

    Conventional MRI is frequently used during the diagnosis of multiple sclerosis but provides only little additional pathological information. Proton MRS (1H-MRS), however, provides biochemical information on the lesion pathology by visualization of a spectrum of metabolites. In this study we aimed to better understand the changes in metabolite concentrations following demyelination of the white matter. Therefore, we used the cuprizone model, a well-established mouse model to mimic type III human multiple sclerosis demyelinating lesions. First, we identified CX3CL1/CX3CR1 signaling as a major regulator of microglial activity in the cuprizone mouse model. Compared with control groups (heterozygous CX3CR1+/− C57BL/6 mice and wild type CX3CR1+/+ C57BL/6 mice), microgliosis, astrogliosis, oligodendrocyte cell death and demyelination were shown to be highly reduced or absent in CX3CR1−/− C57BL/6 mice. Second, we show that 1H-MRS metabolite spectra are different when comparing cuprizone-treated CX3CR1−/− mice showing mild demyelination with cuprizone-treated CX3CR1+/+ mice showing severe demyelination and demyelination-associated inflammation. Following cuprizone treatment, CX3CR1+/+ mice show a decrease in the Glu, tCho and tNAA concentrations as well as an increased Tau concentration. In contrast, following cuprizone treatment CX3CR1−/− mice only showed a decrease in tCho and tNAA concentrations. Therefore, 1H-MRS might possibly allow us to discriminate demyelination from demyelination-associated inflammation via changes in Tau and Glu concentration. In addition, the observed decrease in tCho concentration in cuprizone-induced demyelinating lesions should be further explored as a possible diagnostic tool for the early identification of human MS type III lesions. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:25802215

  14. Chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy: from pathology to phenotype

    PubMed Central

    Mathey, Emily K; Park, Susanna B; Hughes, Richard A C; Pollard, John D; Armati, Patricia J; Barnett, Michael H; Taylor, Bruce V; Dyck, P James B; Kiernan, Matthew C; Lin, Cindy S-Y

    2015-01-01

    Chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy (CIDP) is an inflammatory neuropathy, classically characterised by a slowly progressive onset and symmetrical, sensorimotor involvement. However, there are many phenotypic variants, suggesting that CIDP may not be a discrete disease entity but rather a spectrum of related conditions. While the abiding theory of CIDP pathogenesis is that cell-mediated and humoral mechanisms act together in an aberrant immune response to cause damage to peripheral nerves, the relative contributions of T cell and autoantibody responses remain largely undefined. In animal models of spontaneous inflammatory neuropathy, T cell responses to defined myelin antigens are responsible. In other human inflammatory neuropathies, there is evidence of antibody responses to Schwann cell, compact myelin or nodal antigens. In this review, the roles of the cellular and humoral immune systems in the pathogenesis of CIDP will be discussed. In time, it is anticipated that delineation of clinical phenotypes and the underlying disease mechanisms might help guide diagnostic and individualised treatment strategies for CIDP. PMID:25677463

  15. Overlapping demyelinating syndromes and anti-NMDA receptor encephalitis

    PubMed Central

    Titulaer, Maarten J.; Höftberger, Romana; Iizuka, Takahiro; Leypoldt, Frank; McCracken, Lindsey; Cellucci, Tania; Benson, Leslie A.; Shu, Huidy; Irioka, Takashi; Hirano, Makito; Singh, Gagandeep; Calvo, Alvaro Cobo; Kaida, Kenichi; Morales, Pamela S.; Wirtz, Paul W.; Yamamoto, Tomotaka; Reindl, Markus; Rosenfeld, Myrna R.; Graus, Francesc; Saiz, Albert; Dalmau, Josep

    2014-01-01

    Objective To report the clinical, radiological, and immunological association of demyelinating disorders with anti-N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor (NMDAR) encephalitis. Methods Clinical and radiological analysis of a cohort of 691 patients with anti-NMDAR encephalitis. Determination of antibodies to NMDAR, aquaporin-4 (AQP4) and myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein (MOG) was performed using brain immunohistochemistry and cell-based assays. Results Twenty-three of 691 patients with anti-NMDAR encephalitis had prominent MRI and/or clinical features of demyelination. Group 1 included 12 patients in whom anti-NMDAR encephalitis was preceded or followed by independent episodes of NMO-spectrum disorder (5 cases, 4 anti-AQP4-positive), or brainstem or multifocal demyelinating syndromes (7 cases, all anti-MOG-positive). Group 2 included 11 patients in whom anti-NMDAR encephalitis occurred simultaneously with MRI and symptoms compatible with demyelination (5 AQ4-positive, 2 MOG-positive). Group 3 (136 controls) included 50 randomly selected patients with typical anti-NMDAR encephalitis, 56 with NMO, and 30 with multiple sclerosis: NMDAR-antibodies were detected only in the 50 anti-NMDAR patients, MOG-antibodies in 3/50 anti-NMDAR and 1/56 NMO patients, and AQP4-antibodies in 48/56 NMO and 1/50 anti-NMDAR patients (p<0.0001 for all comparisons with Groups 1 and 2). Most patients improved with immunotherapy, but compared with anti-NMDAR encephalitis the demyelinating episodes required more intensive therapy and resulted in more residual deficits. Only 1/23 NMDAR patients with signs of demyelination had ovarian teratoma compared with 18/50 anti-NMDAR controls (p=0.011) Interpretation Patients with anti-NMDAR encephalitis may develop concurrent or separate episodes of demyelinating disorders, and conversely patients with NMO or demyelinating disorders with atypical symptoms (e.g., dyskinesias, psychosis) may have anti-NMDAR encephalitis. PMID:24700511

  16. Chronic Inflammatory Demyelinating Polyradiculoneuropathy: From Bench to Bedside

    PubMed Central

    Peltier, Amanda C.; Donofrio, Peter D.

    2015-01-01

    Chronic Inflammatory Demyelinating Polyradiculoneuropathy (CIDP) is the most common treatable chronic autoimmune neuropathy. Multiple diagnostic criteria have been established, with the primary goal of identifying neurophysiologic hallmarks of acquired demyelination. Treatment modalities have expanded to include numerous immuno-modulatory therapies, although the best evidence continues to be for corticosteroids, plasma exchange, and intravenous immunoglobulins (IVIg). This review describes the pathology, epidemiology, pathogenesis, diagnosis, and treatment of CIDP. PMID:23117943

  17. Nuclear export inhibitors avert progression in preclinical models of inflammatory demyelination.

    PubMed

    Haines, Jeffery D; Herbin, Olivier; de la Hera, Belén; Vidaurre, Oscar G; Moy, Gregory A; Sun, Qingxiang; Fung, Ho Yee Joyce; Albrecht, Stefanie; Alexandropoulos, Konstantina; McCauley, Dilara; Chook, Yuh Min; Kuhlmann, Tanja; Kidd, Grahame J; Shacham, Sharon; Casaccia, Patrizia

    2015-04-01

    Axonal damage has been associated with aberrant protein trafficking. We examined a newly characterized class of compounds that target nucleo-cytoplasmic shuttling by binding to the catalytic groove of the nuclear export protein XPO1 (also known as CRM1, chromosome region maintenance protein 1). Oral administration of reversible CRM1 inhibitors in preclinical murine models of demyelination significantly attenuated disease progression, even when started after the onset of paralysis. Clinical efficacy was associated with decreased proliferation of immune cells, characterized by nuclear accumulation of cell cycle inhibitors, and preservation of cytoskeletal integrity even in demyelinated axons. Neuroprotection was not limited to models of demyelination, but was also observed in another mouse model of axonal damage (that is, kainic acid injection) and detected in cultured neurons after knockdown of Xpo1, the gene encoding CRM1. A proteomic screen for target molecules revealed that CRM1 inhibitors in neurons prevented nuclear export of molecules associated with axonal damage while retaining transcription factors modulating neuroprotection. PMID:25706475

  18. Correlation Between Daam2 Expression Changes and Demyelination in Guillain-Barre Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Cui, Quanquan; Xie, Peng

    2016-07-01

    Wnt signaling has been implicated in developmental and regenerative myelination of the CNS and PNS. The present translational investigation was undertaken to assess whether a soluble factor like Wnt may be responsible for the critically important skeletal muscle neuromuscular junction-Schwann cell communication. Specifically, three key aspects were examined: (a) whether the expression of Daam2, disheveled-associated activator of morphogenesis, a key Wnt signaling downstream effector, and PIP5K is changed in the demyelinating conditions and under different stages of progress of clinical recovery of patients with Guillain-Barre syndrome; (b) whether critical protein interactions of Daam2 with disheveled and Arf6 are changed; and (c) whether expression of c-Jun/Krox, a key negative regulator of remyelination, is changed. Daam2 was elevated in acute presentation in GB syndrome. Reduction occurred with clinical improvement of the patients. With progressive clinical improvement, c-Jun/Krox expression significantly reduced with time. Wnt signaling likely causes immediate early gene activation and transcriptional shutdown of factors critical for formation and maintenance of myelination. Whether the findings of the present study are specific to pathophysiology of demyelination in acute infectious polyradiculopathy and multiple sclerosis or a generalized aspect of demyelinating diseases merits to be examined in future studies. PMID:26293489

  19. Occurrence and long-term outcome of tumefactive demyelinating lesions in multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Totaro, Rocco; Di Carmine, C; Splendiani, A; Torlone, S; Patriarca, L; Carrocci, C; Sciamanna, S; Marini, C; Carolei, A

    2016-07-01

    Although tumefactive multiple sclerosis is a well recognized variant of multiple sclerosis, prognostic uncertainty still exists about long term prognosis. The aim of this study was to estimate the occurrence and long term outcome of tumefactive demyelinating lesions (TDLs) in a cohort of multiple sclerosis patients. We reviewed brain MRI of 443 patients referred to our MS clinic. All patients meeting the McDonald criteria for multiple sclerosis and showing at least one TDL were included. Kaplan-Meier estimates of disease-free survival in patient cohort were compared with control group without TDLs using a log-rank test. Seven cases with TDLs were identified (occurrence 1.58 %). Tumefactive demyelinating lesion recurrence was 16.6 %. Cumulative proportion of patients free from clinical relapse and from new T2 lesions was lower in the control group although not reaching statistical significance (30 vs 50 %; P = 0.666 and 21.7 vs 33.3 %; P = 0.761, respectively). Disability progression analysis showed a not significant trend towards lower probability of remaining progression free for TDL patients (50 vs 61 %; P = 0.295). Occurrence of tumefactive demyelinating lesions in our cohort was higher than those reported in other studies. Overall, TDLs were not predictive of poor outcome in terms of disability progression. PMID:27083895

  20. Peripheral mechanisms of neuropathic pain – involvement of lysophosphatidic acid receptor-mediated demyelination

    PubMed Central

    Ueda, Hiroshi

    2008-01-01

    Recent advances in pain research provide a clear picture for the molecular mechanisms of acute pain; substantial information concerning plasticity that occurs during neuropathic pain has also become available. The peripheral mechanisms responsible for neuropathic pain are found in the altered gene/protein expression of primary sensory neurons. With damage to peripheral sensory fibers, a variety of changes in pain-related gene expression take place in dorsal root ganglion neurons. These changes, or plasticity, might underlie unique neuropathic pain-specific phenotype modifications – decreased unmyelinated-fiber functions, but increased myelinated A-fiber functions. Another characteristic change is observed in allodynia, the functional change of tactile to nociceptive perception. Throughout a series of studies, using novel nociceptive tests to characterize sensory-fiber or pain modality-specific nociceptive behaviors, it was demonstrated that communication between innocuous and noxious sensory fibers might play a role in allodynia mechanisms. Because neuropathic pain in peripheral and central demyelinating diseases develops as a result of aberrant myelination in experimental animals, demyelination seems to be a key mechanism of plasticity in neuropathic pain. More recently, we discovered that lysophosphatidic acid receptor activation initiates neuropathic pain, as well as possible peripheral mechanims of demyelination after nerve injury. These results lead to further hypotheses of physical communication between innocuous Aβ- and noxious C- or Aδ-fibers to influence the molecular mechanisms of allodynia. PMID:18377664

  1. A Unified Frequency Domain Model to Study the Effect of Demyelination on Axonal Conduction

    PubMed Central

    Chaubey, Saurabh; Goodwin, Shikha J.

    2016-01-01

    Multiple sclerosis is a disease caused by demyelination of nerve fibers. In order to determine the loss of signal with the percentage of demyelination, we need to develop models that can simulate this effect. Existing time-based models does not provide a method to determine the influences of demyelination based on simulation results. Our goal is to develop a system identification approach to generate a transfer function in the frequency domain. The idea is to create a unified modeling approach for neural action potential propagation along the length of an axon containing number of Nodes of Ranvier (N). A system identification approach has been used to identify a transfer function of the classical Hodgkin–Huxley equations for membrane voltage potential. Using this approach, we model cable properties and signal propagation along the length of the axon with N node myelination. MATLAB/Simulink platform is used to analyze an N node-myelinated neuronal axon. The ability to transfer function in the frequency domain will help reduce effort and will give a much more realistic feel when compared to the classical time-based approach. Once a transfer function is identified, the conduction as a cascade of each linear time invariant system-based transfer function can be modeled. Using this approach, future studies can model the loss of myelin in various parts of nervous system. PMID:27103847

  2. A Unified Frequency Domain Model to Study the Effect of Demyelination on Axonal Conduction.

    PubMed

    Chaubey, Saurabh; Goodwin, Shikha J

    2016-01-01

    Multiple sclerosis is a disease caused by demyelination of nerve fibers. In order to determine the loss of signal with the percentage of demyelination, we need to develop models that can simulate this effect. Existing time-based models does not provide a method to determine the influences of demyelination based on simulation results. Our goal is to develop a system identification approach to generate a transfer function in the frequency domain. The idea is to create a unified modeling approach for neural action potential propagation along the length of an axon containing number of Nodes of Ranvier (N). A system identification approach has been used to identify a transfer function of the classical Hodgkin-Huxley equations for membrane voltage potential. Using this approach, we model cable properties and signal propagation along the length of the axon with N node myelination. MATLAB/Simulink platform is used to analyze an N node-myelinated neuronal axon. The ability to transfer function in the frequency domain will help reduce effort and will give a much more realistic feel when compared to the classical time-based approach. Once a transfer function is identified, the conduction as a cascade of each linear time invariant system-based transfer function can be modeled. Using this approach, future studies can model the loss of myelin in various parts of nervous system. PMID:27103847

  3. Tamoxifen accelerates the repair of demyelinated lesions in the central nervous system

    PubMed Central

    Gonzalez, Ginez A.; Hofer, Matthias P.; Syed, Yasir A.; Amaral, Ana I.; Rundle, Jon; Rahman, Saifur; Zhao, Chao; Kotter, Mark R. N.

    2016-01-01

    Enhancing central nervous system (CNS) myelin regeneration is recognized as an important strategy to ameliorate the devastating consequences of demyelinating diseases such as multiple sclerosis. Previous findings have indicated that myelin proteins, which accumulate following demyelination, inhibit remyelination by blocking the differentiation of rat oligodendrocyte progenitor cells (OPCs) via modulation of PKCα. We therefore screened drugs for their potential to overcome this differentiation block. From our screening, tamoxifen emerges as a potent inducer of OPC differentiation in vitro. We show that the effects of tamoxifen rely on modulation of the estrogen receptors ERα, ERβ, and GPR30. Furthermore, we demonstrate that administration of tamoxifen to demyelinated rats in vivo accelerates remyelination. Tamoxifen is a well-established drug and is thus a promising candidate for a drug to regenerate myelin, as it will not require extensive safety testing. In addition, Tamoxifen plays an important role in biomedical research as an activator of inducible genetic models. Our results highlight the importance of appropriate controls when using such models. PMID:27554391

  4. Lesion Expansion in Experimental Demyelination Animal Models and Multiple Sclerosis Lesions.

    PubMed

    Große-Veldmann, René; Becker, Birte; Amor, Sandra; van der Valk, Paul; Beyer, Cordian; Kipp, Markus

    2016-09-01

    Gray matter pathology is an important aspect of multiple sclerosis (MS) pathogenesis and disease progression. In a recent study, we were able to demonstrate that the higher myelin content in the white matter parts of the brain is an important variable in the neuroinflammatory response during demyelinating events. Whether higher white matter myelination contributes to lesion development and progression is not known. Here, we compared lesion size of intra-cortical vs. white matter MS lesions. Furthermore, dynamics of lesion development was compared in the cuprizone and lysophosphatidylcholine models. We provide clear evidence that in the human brain, white matter lesions are significantly increased in size as compared to intra-cortical gray matter lesions. In addition, studies using the cuprizone mouse model revealed that the autonomous progression of white matter lesions is more severe compared to that in the gray matter. Focal demyelination revealed that the application of equal amounts of lysophosphatidylcholine results in more severe demyelination in the white compared to the gray matter. In summary, lesion progression is most intense in myelin-rich white matter regions, irrespective of the initial lesion trigger mechanism. A better understanding of myelin debris-triggered lesion expansion will pave the way for the development of new protective strategies in the future. PMID:26363796

  5. Thyroid hormone alleviates demyelination induced by cuprizone through its role in remyelination during the remission period.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Mao; Zhan, Xiao L; Ma, Zi Y; Chen, Xing S; Cai, Qi Y; Yao, Zhong X

    2015-09-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a disease induced by demyelination in the central nervous system, and the remission period of MS is crucial for remyelination. In addition, abnormal levels of thyroid hormone (TH) have been identified in MS. However, in the clinic, insufficient attention has been paid to the role of TH in the remission period. Indeed, TH not only functions in the development of the brain but also affects myelination. Therefore, it is necessary to observe the effect of TH on remyelination during this period. A model of demyelination induced by cuprizone (CPZ) was used to observe the function of TH in remyelination during the remission period of MS. Through weighing and behavioral tests, we found that TH improved the physical symptoms of mice impaired by CPZ. Supplementation of TH led to the repair of myelin as detected by immunohistochemistry and western blot. In addition, a sufficient TH supply resulted in an increase in myelinated axons without affecting myelin thickness and g ratio in the corpus callosum, as detected by electron microscopy. Double immunostaining with myelin basic protein and neurofilament 200 (NF200) showed that the CPZ-induced impairment of axons was alleviated by TH. Conversely, insufficient TH induced by 6-propyl-2-thiouracil resulted in the enlargement of mitochondria. Furthermore, we found that an adequate supply of TH promoted the proliferation and differentiation of oligodendrocyte lineage cells by immunofluorescence, which was beneficial to remyelination. Further, we found that TH reduced the number of astrocytes without affecting microglia. Conclusively, it was shown that TH alleviated demyelination induced by CPZ by promoting the development of oligodendrocyte lineage cells and remyelination. The critical time for remyelination is the remission period of MS. TH plays a significant role in alleviating demyelination during the remission period in the clinical treatment of MS. PMID:25577802

  6. Ligation of the Jugular Veins Does Not Result in Brain Inflammation or Demyelination in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Wojtkiewicz, Gregory R.; Pulli, Benjamin; Iwamoto, Yoshiko; Ueno, Takuya; Waterman, Peter; Truelove, Jessica; Oklu, Rahmi; Chen, John W.

    2012-01-01

    An alternative hypothesis has been proposed implicating chronic cerebrospinal venous insufficiency (CCSVI) as a potential cause of multiple sclerosis (MS). We aimed to evaluate the validity of this hypothesis in a controlled animal model. Animal experiments were approved by the institutional animal care committee. The jugular veins in SJL mice were ligated bilaterally (n = 20), and the mice were observed for up to six months after ligation. Sham-operated mice (n = 15) and mice induced with experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (n = 8) were used as negative and positive controls, respectively. The animals were evaluated using CT venography and 99mTc-exametazime to assess for structural and hemodynamic changes. Imaging was performed to evaluate for signs of blood-brain barrier (BBB) breakdown and neuroinflammation. Flow cytometry and histopathology were performed to assess inflammatory cell populations and demyelination. There were both structural changes (stenosis, collaterals) in the jugular venous drainage and hemodynamic disturbances in the brain on Tc99m-exametazime scintigraphy (p = 0.024). In the JVL mice, gadolinium MRI and immunofluorescence imaging for barrier molecules did not reveal evidence of BBB breakdown (p = 0.58). Myeloperoxidase, matrix metalloproteinase, and protease molecular imaging did not reveal signs of increased neuroinflammation (all p>0.05). Flow cytometry and histopathology also did not reveal increase in inflammatory cell infiltration or population shifts. No evidence of demyelination was found, and the mice remained without clinical signs. Despite the structural and hemodynamic changes, we did not identify changes in the BBB permeability, neuroinflammation, demyelination, or clinical signs in the JVL group compared to the sham group. Therefore, our murine model does not support CCSVI as a cause of demyelinating diseases such as multiple sclerosis. PMID:22457780

  7. Challenges in the treatment of chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy.

    PubMed

    Guimarães-Costa, R; Iancu Ferfoglia, R; Viala, K; Léger, J-M

    2014-10-01

    Chronic idiopathic demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy (CIDP) is a rare disease, the most frequent one within the spectrum of the so-called "chronic immune-mediated neuropathies". Challenges in the treatment of CIDP firstly concern its diagnosis, which may be difficult, mainly for the atypical forms. Secondly, challenges encompass the choice of the first-line treatment, such as corticosteroids, intravenous immunoglobulins (IVIg), and plasma exchanges (PE) that have been proven as efficacious by several randomized controlled trials (RCT). Recent reports have focused on both different regimens of corticosteroids, and the occurrence of relapses following treatment with either corticosteroids or IVIg. These data may be helpful for the choice of the first-line treatment and may result in changing the guidelines for treatment of CIDP in clinical practice. The third and more difficult challenge is to manage long-term treatment for CIDP, since no immunomodulatory treatment has to date been proven as efficacious in this situation. Lastly, challenges in the treatment concern the choice of the best outcome measure for CIDP in RCT and clinical practice. The aim of this article is to overview the results of the more recently reported published trials for CIDP, and to give some insights for the current and future management of CIDP. PMID:25200479

  8. Disparate Effects of Mesenchymal Stem Cells in Experimental Autoimmune Encephalomyelitis and Cuprizone-Induced Demyelination

    PubMed Central

    Glenn, Justin D.; Smith, Matthew D.; Kirby, Leslie A.; Baxi, Emily G.; Whartenby, Katharine A

    2015-01-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are pleiotropic cells with potential therapeutic benefits for a wide range of diseases. Because of their immunomodulatory properties they have been utilized to treat autoimmune diseases such as multiple sclerosis (MS), which is characterized by demyelination. The microenvironment surrounding MSCs is thought to affect their differentiation and phenotype, which could in turn affect the efficacy. We thus sought to dissect the potential for differential impact of MSCs on central nervous system (CNS) disease in T cell mediated and non-T cell mediated settings using the MOG35–55 experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) and cuprizone-mediated demyelination models, respectively. As the pathogeneses of MS and EAE are thought to be mediated by IFNγ-producing (TH1) and IL-17A-producing (TH17) effector CD4+ T cells, we investigated the effect of MSCs on the development of these two key pathogenic cell groups. Although MSCs suppressed the activation and effector function of TH17 cells, they did not affect TH1 activation, but enhanced TH1 effector function and ultimately produced no effect on EAE. In the non- T cell mediated cuprizone model of demyelination, MSC administration had a positive effect, with an overall increase in myelin abundance in the brain of MSC-treated mice compared to controls. These results highlight the potential variability of MSCs as a biologic therapeutic tool in the treatment of autoimmune disease and the need for further investigation into the multifaceted functions of MSCs in diverse microenvironments and the mechanisms behind the diversity. PMID:26407166

  9. Delayed phlegmon with gallstone fragments masquerading as soft tissue sarcoma

    PubMed Central

    Goodman, Laura F.; Bateni, Cyrus P.; Bishop, John W.; Canter, Robert J.

    2016-01-01

    Complications from lost gallstones after cholecystectomy are rare but varied from simple perihepatic abscess to empyema and expectoration of gallstones. Gallstone complications have been reported in nearly every organ system, although reports of malignant masquerade of retained gallstones are few. We present the case of an 87-year-old woman with a flank soft tissue tumor 4 years after laparoscopic cholecystectomy. The initial clinical, radiographic and biopsy findings were consistent with soft tissue sarcoma (STS), but careful review of her case in multidisciplinary conference raised the suspicion for retained gallstones rather than STS. The patient was treated with incisional biopsy/drainage of the mass, and gallstones were retrieved. The patient recovered completely without an extensive resectional procedure, emphasizing the importance of multidisciplinary sarcoma care to optimize outcomes for potential sarcoma patients. PMID:27333918

  10. Identifying and quantifying recurrent novae masquerading as classical novae

    SciTech Connect

    Pagnotta, Ashley; Schaefer, Bradley E.

    2014-06-20

    Recurrent novae (RNe) are cataclysmic variables with two or more nova eruptions within a century. Classical novae (CNe) are similar systems with only one such eruption. Many of the so-called CNe are actually RNe for which only one eruption has been discovered. Since RNe are candidate Type Ia supernova progenitors, it is important to know whether there are enough in our Galaxy to provide the supernova rate, and therefore to know how many RNe are masquerading as CNe. To quantify this, we collected all available information on the light curves and spectra of a Galactic, time-limited sample of 237 CNe and the 10 known RNe, as well as exhaustive discovery efficiency records. We recognize RNe as having (1) outburst amplitude smaller than 14.5 – 4.5 × log (t {sub 3}), (2) orbital period >0.6 days, (3) infrared colors of J – H > 0.7 mag and H – K > 0.1 mag, (4) FWHM of Hα > 2000 km s{sup –1}, (5) high excitation lines, such as Fe X or He II near peak, (6) eruption light curves with a plateau, and (7) white dwarf mass greater than 1.2 M {sub ☉}. Using these criteria, we identify V1721 Aql, DE Cir, CP Cru, KT Eri, V838 Her, V2672 Oph, V4160 Sgr, V4643 Sgr, V4739 Sgr, and V477 Sct as strong RN candidates. We evaluate the RN fraction among the known CNe using three methods to get 24% ± 4%, 12% ± 3%, and 35% ± 3%. With roughly a quarter of the 394 known Galactic novae actually being RNe, there should be approximately a hundred such systems masquerading as CNe.

  11. Cerebrospinal fluid data compilation and knowledge-based interpretation of bacterial, viral, parasitic, oncological, chronic inflammatory and demyelinating diseases. Diagnostic patterns not to be missed in neurology and psychiatry.

    PubMed

    Reiber, Hansotto

    2016-04-01

    The analysis of intrathecal IgG, IgA and IgM synthesis in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and evaluation in combined quotient diagrams provides disease-related patterns. The compilation with complementary parameters (barrier function, i.e., CSF flow rate, cytology, lactate, antibodies) in a cumulative CSF data report allows a knowledge-based interpretation and provides analytical and medical plausibility for the quality assessment in CSF laboratories. The diagnostic relevance is described for neurological and psychiatric diseases, for which CSF analysis can't be replaced by other diagnostic methods without loss of information. Dominance of intrathecal IgM, IgA or three class immune responses give a systematic approach for Facial nerve palsy, Neurotrypanosomiasis, Opportunistic diseases, lymphoma, Neurotuberculosis, Adrenoleucodystrophy or tumor metastases. Particular applications consider the diagnostic power of the polyspecific antibody response (MRZ-antibodies) in multiple sclerosis, a CSF-related systematic view on differential diagnostic of psychiatric diseases and the dynamics of brain- derived compared to blood-derived molecules in CSF for localization of paracytes. PMID:27097008

  12. Botfly infestation (myiasis) masquerading as furunculosis.

    PubMed

    Gewirtzman, A; Rabinovitz, H

    1999-02-01

    With air travel so prevalent, diseases endemic to certain regions may appear anywhere. The botfly (Dermatobia hominis) is not native to North America. We describe a case of a young boy and his father who presented with furunculosis secondary to infestation with the botfly. The infected patients live in South Florida and had been vacationing in Central America. Standard surgical treatment as well as multiple native remedies are described. PMID:10071732

  13. Disseminated nocardiosis masquerading as metastatic malignancy

    PubMed Central

    Arjun, Rajalakshmi; Padmanabhan, Arjun; Reddy Attunuru, Bhanu Prakash; Gupta, Prerna

    2016-01-01

    Nocardiosis is an uncommon gram-positive bacterial infection caused by aerobic actinomycetes of the genus Nocardia. It can be localized or systemic and is regarded as an opportunistic infection that is commonly seen in immunocompromised hosts. We report a case of disseminated nocardiosis caused by Nocardia cyriacigeorgica in a patient with underlying malignancy in whom the clinical presentation was highly suggestive of a metastatic disease. PMID:27578940

  14. Diagnosis and treatment of chronic acquired demyelinating polyneuropathies.

    PubMed

    Latov, Norman

    2014-08-01

    Chronic neuropathies are operationally classified as primarily demyelinating or axonal, on the basis of electrodiagnostic or pathological criteria. Demyelinating neuropathies are further classified as hereditary or acquired-this distinction is important, because the acquired neuropathies are immune-mediated and, thus, amenable to treatment. The acquired chronic demyelinating neuropathies include chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy (CIDP), neuropathy associated with monoclonal IgM antibodies to myelin-associated glycoprotein (MAG; anti-MAG neuropathy), multifocal motor neuropathy (MMN), and POEMS syndrome. They have characteristic--though overlapping--clinical presentations, are mediated by distinct immune mechanisms, and respond to different therapies. CIDP is the default diagnosis if the neuropathy is demyelinating and no other cause is found. Anti-MAG neuropathy is diagnosed on the basis of the presence of anti-MAG antibodies, MMN is characterized by multifocal weakness and motor conduction blocks, and POEMS syndrome is associated with IgG or IgA λ-type monoclonal gammopathy and osteosclerotic myeloma. The correct diagnosis, however, can be difficult to make in patients with atypical or overlapping presentations, or nondefinitive laboratory studies. First-line treatments include intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIg), corticosteroids or plasmapheresis for CIDP; IVIg for MMN; rituximab for anti-MAG neuropathy; and irradiation or chemotherapy for POEMS syndrome. A correct diagnosis is required for choosing the appropriate treatment, with the aim of preventing progressive neuropathy. PMID:24980070

  15. Scrub typhus masquerading as acute pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Chaturvedi, Amit; Gupta, Monica; Bhardwaj, Shweta; Handa, Dipti

    2016-01-01

    The clinical spectrum of scrub typhus ranges from mild to fatal depending on the virulence of bacterial strain, susceptibility of the host and promptness with which treatment is started. We report a case of a 14-year-old child with scrub typhus who developed acute pancreatitis. On serological confirmation, doxycycline therapy was started. The patient responded well and had no complications on follow-up. This case report highlights the importance of recognising an uncommon presentation of this common tropical disease, and its prompt diagnosis and early treatment for prevention of serious complications of the condition. PMID:27161204

  16. Acute myeloid leukemia masquerading as hepatocellular carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Abu-Zeinah, Ghaith F.; Weisman, Paul; Ganesh, Karuna; Katz, Seth S.; Dogan, Ahmet; Abou-Alfa, Ghassan K.; Stein, Eytan M.; Jarnagin, William; Mauro, Michael J.

    2016-01-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is often diagnosed on the basis of high quality imaging without a biopsy in the cirrhotic liver. This is a case of a 64-year-old Caucasian man with no history of liver disease or cirrhosis that presented with fatigue, weight loss, and abdominal distension and was found to have a large, isolated liver mass with arterial enhancement and portal venous washout on triple-phase computed tomography (CT) suspicious for HCC. The patient was initially referred for a surgical evaluation. Meanwhile, he developed fevers, pancytopenia, and worsening back pain, and a subsequent spinal MRI revealed a heterogeneous bone marrow signal suspicious for metastatic disease. A bone marrow biopsy that followed was diffusely necrotic. A core biopsy of the patient’s liver mass was then performed and was diagnostic of acute monocytic-monoblastic leukemia. Findings from peripheral flow cytometry and a repeat bone marrow biopsy were also consistent with this diagnosis, and induction chemotherapy with cytarabine and idarubicin was initiated. This case describes a rare presentation of myeloid sarcoma (MS) as an isolated, hypervascular liver mass that mimics HCC in its radiographic appearance. Due to the broad differential for a liver mass, a confirmatory biopsy should routinely be considered prior to surgical intervention. PMID:27284485

  17. Acute myeloid leukemia masquerading as hepatocellular carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Abu-Zeinah, Ghaith F; Weisman, Paul; Ganesh, Karuna; Katz, Seth S; Dogan, Ahmet; Abou-Alfa, Ghassan K; Stein, Eytan M; Jarnagin, William; Mauro, Michael J; Harding, James J

    2016-06-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is often diagnosed on the basis of high quality imaging without a biopsy in the cirrhotic liver. This is a case of a 64-year-old Caucasian man with no history of liver disease or cirrhosis that presented with fatigue, weight loss, and abdominal distension and was found to have a large, isolated liver mass with arterial enhancement and portal venous washout on triple-phase computed tomography (CT) suspicious for HCC. The patient was initially referred for a surgical evaluation. Meanwhile, he developed fevers, pancytopenia, and worsening back pain, and a subsequent spinal MRI revealed a heterogeneous bone marrow signal suspicious for metastatic disease. A bone marrow biopsy that followed was diffusely necrotic. A core biopsy of the patient's liver mass was then performed and was diagnostic of acute monocytic-monoblastic leukemia. Findings from peripheral flow cytometry and a repeat bone marrow biopsy were also consistent with this diagnosis, and induction chemotherapy with cytarabine and idarubicin was initiated. This case describes a rare presentation of myeloid sarcoma (MS) as an isolated, hypervascular liver mass that mimics HCC in its radiographic appearance. Due to the broad differential for a liver mass, a confirmatory biopsy should routinely be considered prior to surgical intervention. PMID:27284485

  18. B Cell, Th17, and Neutrophil Related Cerebrospinal Fluid Cytokine/Chemokines Are Elevated in MOG Antibody Associated Demyelination

    PubMed Central

    Kothur, Kavitha; Wienholt, Louise; Tantsis, Esther M; Earl, John; Bandodkar, Sushil; Prelog, Kristina; Tea, Fiona; Ramanathan, Sudarshini; Brilot, Fabienne; Dale, Russell C.

    2016-01-01

    Background Myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein antibody (MOG Ab) associated demyelination represents a subgroup of autoimmune demyelination that is separate from multiple sclerosis and aquaporin 4 IgG-positive NMO, and can have a relapsing course. Unlike NMO and MS, there is a paucity of literature on immunopathology and CSF cytokine/chemokines in MOG Ab associated demyelination. Aim To study the differences in immunopathogenesis based on cytokine/chemokine profile in MOG Ab-positive (POS) and -negative (NEG) groups. Methods We measured 34 cytokines/chemokines using multiplex immunoassay in CSF collected from paediatric patients with serum MOG Ab POS [acute disseminated encephalomyelitis (ADEM = 8), transverse myelitis (TM = 2) n = 10] and serum MOG Ab NEG (ADEM = 5, TM = 4, n = 9) demyelination. We generated normative data using CSF from 20 non-inflammatory neurological controls. Results The CSF cytokine and chemokine levels were higher in both MOG Ab POS and MOG Ab NEG demyelination groups compared to controls. The CSF in MOG Ab POS patients showed predominant elevation of B cell related cytokines/chemokines (CXCL13, APRIL, BAFF and CCL19) as well as some of Th17 related cytokines (IL-6 AND G-CSF) compared to MOG Ab NEG group (all p<0.01). In addition, patients with elevated CSF MOG antibodies had higher CSF CXCL13, CXCL12, CCL19, IL-17A and G-CSF than patients without CSF MOG antibodies. Conclusion Our findings suggest that MOG Ab POS patients have a more pronounced CNS inflammatory response with elevation of predominant humoral associated cytokines/chemokines, as well as some Th 17 and neutrophil related cytokines/chemokines suggesting a differential inflammatory pathogenesis associated with MOG antibody seropositivity. This cytokine/chemokine profiling provides new insight into disease pathogenesis, and improves our ability to monitor inflammation and response to treatment. In addition, some of these molecules may represent potential immunomodulatory targets

  19. Combination therapy of Lovastatin and Rolipram Provides Neuroprotection and Promotes Neurorepair in Inflammatory Demyelination Model of Multiple Sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Paintlia, Ajaib S; Paintlia, Manjeet K; Singh, Inderjit; Skoff, Robert B; Singh, Avtar K

    2009-01-01

    Drug combination therapies for central nervous system (CNS) demyelination diseases including multiple sclerosis (MS) are gaining momentum over monotherapy. Over the past decade, both in vitro and in vivo studies established that statins (HMG-CoA reductase inhibitors) and rolipram (phosphodiesterase-4 inhibitor; blocks the degradation of intracellular cyclic AMP) can prevent the progression of MS in affected individuals via different mechanisms of action. In the present study, we evaluated the effectiveness of lovastatin and rolipram in combination therapy to promote neurorepair in an inflammatory CNS demyelination model of MS, experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE). Combination treatment with suboptimal doses of these drugs in an established case of EAE (clinical disease score ≥2.0) significantly attenuated the infiltration of inflammatory cells and protected myelin sheath and axonal integrity in the CNS. It was accompanied with elevated level of cyclic AMP and activation of its associated protein kinase A. Interestingly, combination treatment with these drugs impeded neurodegeneration and promoted neurorepair in established EAE animals (clinical disease score ≥3.5) as verified by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction, immunohistochemistry, and electron microscopic analyses. These effects of combination therapy were minimal and/or absent with either drug alone in these settings. Together, these data suggest that combination therapy with lovastatin and rolipram has the potential to provide neuroprotection and promote neurorepair in MS, and may have uses in other related CNS demyelinating diseases. PMID:18720408

  20. Accumulation of Extracellular Matrix in Advanced Lesions of Canine Distemper Demyelinating Encephalitis.

    PubMed

    Seehusen, Frauke; Al-Azreg, Seham A; Raddatz, Barbara B; Haist, Verena; Puff, Christina; Spitzbarth, Ingo; Ulrich, Reiner; Baumgärtner, Wolfgang

    2016-01-01

    In demyelinating diseases, changes in the quality and quantity of the extracellular matrix (ECM) may contribute to demyelination and failure of myelin repair and axonal sprouting, especially in chronic lesions. To characterize changes in the ECM in canine distemper demyelinating leukoencephalitis (DL), histochemical and immunohistochemical investigations of formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded cerebella using azan, picrosirius red and Gomori`s silver stain as well as antibodies directed against aggrecan, type I and IV collagen, fibronectin, laminin and phosphacan showed alterations of the ECM in CDV-infected dogs. A significantly increased amount of aggrecan was detected in early and late white matter lesions. In addition, the positive signal for collagens I and IV as well as fibronectin was significantly increased in late lesions. Conversely, the expression of phosphacan was significantly decreased in early and more pronounced in late lesions compared to controls. Furthermore, a set of genes involved in ECM was extracted from a publically available microarray data set and was analyzed for differential gene expression. Gene expression of ECM molecules, their biosynthesis pathways, and pro-fibrotic factors was mildly up-regulated whereas expression of matrix remodeling enzymes was up-regulated to a relatively higher extent. Summarized, the observed findings indicate that changes in the quality and content of ECM molecules represent important, mainly post-transcriptional features in advanced canine distemper lesions. Considering the insufficiency of morphological regeneration in chronic distemper lesions, the accumulated ECM seems to play a crucial role upon regenerative processes and may explain the relatively small regenerative potential in late stages of this disease. PMID:27441688

  1. Combined central and peripheral demyelination: Clinical features, diagnostic findings, and treatment.

    PubMed

    Cortese, A; Franciotta, D; Alfonsi, E; Visigalli, N; Zardini, E; Diamanti, L; Prunetti, P; Osera, C; Gastaldi, M; Berzero, G; Pichiecchio, A; Piccolo, G; Lozza, A; Piscosquito, G; Salsano, E; Ceroni, M; Moglia, A; Bono, G; Pareyson, D; Marchioni, E

    2016-04-15

    Combined central and peripheral demyelination (CCPD) is rare, and current knowledge is based on case reports and small case series. The aim of our study was to describe the clinical features, diagnostic results, treatment and outcomes in a large cohort of patients with CCPD. Thirty-one patients entered this retrospective, observational, two-center study. In 20 patients (65%) CCPD presented, after an infection, as myeloradiculoneuropathy, encephalopathy, cranial neuropathy, length-dependent peripheral neuropathy, or pseudo-Guillain-Barré syndrome. Demyelinating features of peripheral nerve damage fulfilling European Federation of Neurological Societies/Peripheral Nerve Society (EFNS/PNS) electrodiagnostic criteria for CIDP were found in 23 patients (74%), and spatial dissemination of demyelinating lesions on brain MRI fulfilling the 2010 McDonald criteria for multiple sclerosis (MS) in 11 (46%). Two thirds of the patients had a relapsing or progressive disease course, usually related to the appearance of new spinal cord lesions or worsening of the peripheral neuropathy, and showed unsatisfactory responses to high-dose corticosteroids and intravenous immunoglobulins. The clinical presentation of CCPD was severe in 22 patients (71%), who were left significantly disabled. Our data suggest that CCPD has heterogeneous features and shows frequent post-infectious onset, primary peripheral nervous system or central nervous system involvement, a monophasic or chronic disease course, inadequate response to treatments, and a generally poor outcome. We therefore conclude that the current diagnostic criteria for MS and CIDP may not fully encompass the spectrum of possible manifestations of CCPD, whose pathogenesis remains largely unknown. PMID:27000248

  2. Time-Dependent Progression of Demyelination and Axonal Pathology in MP4-Induced Experimental Autoimmune Encephalomyelitis

    PubMed Central

    Stormanns, Eva R.; Recks, Mascha S.; Kuerten, Stefanie

    2015-01-01

    Background Multiple sclerosis (MS) is an autoimmune disease of the central nervous system (CNS) characterized by inflammation, demyelination and axonal pathology. Myelin basic protein/proteolipid protein (MBP-PLP) fusion protein MP4 is capable of inducing chronic experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) in susceptible mouse strains mirroring diverse histopathological and immunological hallmarks of MS. Limited availability of human tissue underscores the importance of animal models to study the pathology of MS. Methods Twenty-two female C57BL/6 (B6) mice were immunized with MP4 and the clinical development of experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) was observed. Methylene blue-stained semi-thin and ultra-thin sections of the lumbar spinal cord were assessed at the peak of acute EAE, three months (chronic EAE) and six months after onset of EAE (long-term EAE). The extent of lesional area and inflammation were analyzed in semi-thin sections on a light microscopic level. The magnitude of demyelination and axonal damage were determined using electron microscopy. Emphasis was put on the ventrolateral tract (VLT) of the spinal cord. Results B6 mice demonstrated increasing demyelination and severe axonal pathology in the course of MP4-induced EAE. In addition, mitochondrial swelling and a decrease in the nearest neighbor neurofilament distance (NNND) as early signs of axonal damage were evident with the onset of EAE. In semi-thin sections we observed the maximum of lesional area in the chronic state of EAE while inflammation was found to a similar extent in acute and chronic EAE. In contrast to the well-established myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein (MOG) model, disease stages of MP4-induced EAE could not be distinguished by assessing the extent of parenchymal edema or the grade of inflammation. Conclusions Our results complement our previous ultrastructural studies of B6 EAE models and suggest that B6 mice immunized with different antigens constitute

  3. Accumulation of Extracellular Matrix in Advanced Lesions of Canine Distemper Demyelinating Encephalitis

    PubMed Central

    Seehusen, Frauke; Al-Azreg, Seham A.; Raddatz, Barbara B.; Haist, Verena; Puff, Christina; Spitzbarth, Ingo; Ulrich, Reiner; Baumgärtner, Wolfgang

    2016-01-01

    In demyelinating diseases, changes in the quality and quantity of the extracellular matrix (ECM) may contribute to demyelination and failure of myelin repair and axonal sprouting, especially in chronic lesions. To characterize changes in the ECM in canine distemper demyelinating leukoencephalitis (DL), histochemical and immunohistochemical investigations of formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded cerebella using azan, picrosirius red and Gomori`s silver stain as well as antibodies directed against aggrecan, type I and IV collagen, fibronectin, laminin and phosphacan showed alterations of the ECM in CDV-infected dogs. A significantly increased amount of aggrecan was detected in early and late white matter lesions. In addition, the positive signal for collagens I and IV as well as fibronectin was significantly increased in late lesions. Conversely, the expression of phosphacan was significantly decreased in early and more pronounced in late lesions compared to controls. Furthermore, a set of genes involved in ECM was extracted from a publically available microarray data set and was analyzed for differential gene expression. Gene expression of ECM molecules, their biosynthesis pathways, and pro-fibrotic factors was mildly up-regulated whereas expression of matrix remodeling enzymes was up-regulated to a relatively higher extent. Summarized, the observed findings indicate that changes in the quality and content of ECM molecules represent important, mainly post-transcriptional features in advanced canine distemper lesions. Considering the insufficiency of morphological regeneration in chronic distemper lesions, the accumulated ECM seems to play a crucial role upon regenerative processes and may explain the relatively small regenerative potential in late stages of this disease. PMID:27441688

  4. Inducible Expression of CXCL1 within the Central Nervous System Amplifies Viral-Induced Demyelination

    PubMed Central

    Marro, Brett S.; Grist, Jonathan J.

    2016-01-01

    The functional role of the ELR+ chemokine CXCL1 in host defense and disease following infection of the CNS with the neurotropic JHM strain of mouse hepatitis virus (JHMV) was examined. Mice in which expression of CXCL1 is under the control of a tetracycline-inducible promoter active within glial fibrillary acidic protein–positive cells were generated and this allowed for selectively increasing CNS expression of CXCL1 in response to JHMV infection and evaluating the effects on neuroinflammation, control of viral replication, and demyelination. Inducible expression of CNS-derived CXCL1 resulted in increased levels of CXCL1 protein within the serum, brain, and spinal cord that correlated with increased frequency of Ly6G+CD11b+ neutrophils present within the CNS. Elevated levels of CXCL1 did not influence the generation of virus-specific T cells, and there was no difference in control of JHMV replication compared with control mice, indicating that T cell infiltration into the CNS is CXCL1-independent. Sustained CXCL1 expression within the CNS resulted in increased mortality that correlated with elevated neutrophil infiltration, diminished numbers of mature oligodendrocytes, and an increase in the severity of demyelination. Neutrophil ablation in CXCL1-transgenic mice reduced the severity of demyelination in mice, arguing for a role for these cells in white matter damage. Collectively, these findings illustrate that sustained CXCL1 expression amplifies the severity of white matter damage and that neutrophils can contribute to this process in a model of viral-induced neurologic disease. PMID:26773148

  5. Inducible Expression of CXCL1 within the Central Nervous System Amplifies Viral-Induced Demyelination.

    PubMed

    Marro, Brett S; Grist, Jonathan J; Lane, Thomas E

    2016-02-15

    The functional role of the ELR(+) chemokine CXCL1 in host defense and disease following infection of the CNS with the neurotropic JHM strain of mouse hepatitis virus (JHMV) was examined. Mice in which expression of CXCL1 is under the control of a tetracycline-inducible promoter active within glial fibrillary acidic protein-positive cells were generated and this allowed for selectively increasing CNS expression of CXCL1 in response to JHMV infection and evaluating the effects on neuroinflammation, control of viral replication, and demyelination. Inducible expression of CNS-derived CXCL1 resulted in increased levels of CXCL1 protein within the serum, brain, and spinal cord that correlated with increased frequency of Ly6G(+)CD11b(+) neutrophils present within the CNS. Elevated levels of CXCL1 did not influence the generation of virus-specific T cells, and there was no difference in control of JHMV replication compared with control mice, indicating that T cell infiltration into the CNS is CXCL1-independent. Sustained CXCL1 expression within the CNS resulted in increased mortality that correlated with elevated neutrophil infiltration, diminished numbers of mature oligodendrocytes, and an increase in the severity of demyelination. Neutrophil ablation in CXCL1-transgenic mice reduced the severity of demyelination in mice, arguing for a role for these cells in white matter damage. Collectively, these findings illustrate that sustained CXCL1 expression amplifies the severity of white matter damage and that neutrophils can contribute to this process in a model of viral-induced neurologic disease. PMID:26773148

  6. Experimental Demyelination and Remyelination of Murine Spinal Cord by Focal Injection of Lysolecithin

    PubMed Central

    Keough, Michael B.; Jensen, Samuel K.; Yong, V. Wee

    2015-01-01

    Multiple sclerosis is an inflammatory demyelinating disease of the central nervous system characterized by plaque formation containing lost oligodendrocytes, myelin, axons, and neurons. Remyelination is an endogenous repair mechanism whereby new myelin is produced subsequent to proliferation, recruitment, and differentiation of oligodendrocyte precursor cells into myelin-forming oligodendrocytes, and is necessary to protect axons from further damage. Currently, all therapeutics for the treatment of multiple sclerosis target the aberrant immune component of the disease, which reduce inflammatory relapses but do not prevent progression to irreversible neurological decline. It is therefore imperative that remyelination-promoting strategies be developed which may delay disease progression and perhaps reverse neurological symptoms. Several animal models of demyelination exist, including experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis and curprizone; however, there are limitations in their use for studying remyelination. A more robust approach is the focal injection of toxins into the central nervous system, including the detergent lysolecithin into the spinal cord white matter of rodents. In this protocol, we demonstrate that the surgical procedure involved in injecting lysolecithin into the ventral white matter of mice is fast, cost-effective, and requires no additional materials than those commercially available. This procedure is important not only for studying the normal events involved in the remyelination process, but also as a pre-clinical tool for screening candidate remyelination-promoting therapeutics. PMID:25867716

  7. Mast cell activation syndrome masquerading as agranulocytosis.

    PubMed

    Afrin, Lawrence B

    2012-01-01

    Acquired agranulocytosis is a rare, life-threatening disorder. The few known causes/associations usually are readily identifiable (e.g., drug reaction, Felty syndrome, megaloblastosis, large granular lymphocytic leukemia, etc.). We report a novel association with mast cell disease. A 61-year-old morbidly obese man developed rheumatoid arthritis unresponsive to several medications. Agranulocytosis developed shortly after sulfasalazine was started but did not improve when the drug was soon stopped. Other symptoms across many systems developed including hives and presyncope. Marrow aspiration and biopsy showed only neutropenia. Serum tryptase was mildly elevated; urinary prostaglandin D2 was markedly elevated. Other causes were not found. Mast cell activation syndrome (MCAS) was diagnosed. Oral antihistamines, montelukast, and cromolyn were unhelpful; aspirin was initially felt contraindicated. Imatinib immediately increased neutrophils from 0% to 25% but did not help symptoms; subsequent addition of aspirin increased neutrophils further and abated symptoms. Different presentations of different MCAS patients reflect elaboration of different mediators likely consequent to different Kit mutations. Mast cells (MCs) help regulate adipocytes, and adipocytes can inhibit granulopoiesis; thus, a Kit-mutated MC clone may have directly and/or indirectly driven agranulocytosis. MCAS should be considered in otherwise idiopathic agranulocytosis presenting with comorbidities best explained by MC mediator release. PMID:22338992

  8. Rare adipose disorders (RADs) masquerading as obesity

    PubMed Central

    Herbst, Karen L

    2012-01-01

    Rare adipose disorders (RADs) including multiple symmetric lipomatosis (MSL), lipedema and Dercum's disease (DD) may be misdiagnosed as obesity. Lifestyle changes, such as reduced caloric intake and increased physical activity are standard care for obesity. Although lifestyle changes and bariatric surgery work effectively for the obesity component of RADs, these treatments do not routinely reduce the abnormal subcutaneous adipose tissue (SAT) of RADs. RAD SAT likely results from the growth of a brown stem cell population with secondary lymphatic dysfunction in MSL, or by primary vascular and lymphatic dysfunction in lipedema and DD. People with RADs do not lose SAT from caloric limitation and increased energy expenditure alone. In order to improve recognition of RADs apart from obesity, the diagnostic criteria, histology and pathophysiology of RADs are presented and contrasted to familial partial lipodystrophies, acquired partial lipodystrophies and obesity with which they may be confused. Treatment recommendations focus on evidence-based data and include lymphatic decongestive therapy, medications and supplements that support loss of RAD SAT. Associated RAD conditions including depression, anxiety and pain will improve as healthcare providers learn to identify and adopt alternative treatment regimens for the abnormal SAT component of RADs. Effective dietary and exercise regimens are needed in RAD populations to improve quality of life and construct advanced treatment regimens for future generations. PMID:22301856

  9. [Jawbone metastasis masquerading as dental pain].

    PubMed

    Goldman, Y; Yarom, N

    2016-01-01

    Metastases to the oral cavity are rare. However, in 25% of cases, oral symptoms will be the first sign of metastatic disease. The incidence of jaws metastases is twice as high as the incidence of metastases to the soft tissues of the oral cavity. In some cases, jaws metastases can mimic dental or periodontal pain. We report a case of a 67 year old female who was referred to our clinic because of severe pain on her left posterior mandible which was not relieved by endodontic treatment of the first and second molar. She was diagnosed with breast cancer in 2005 and had been treated with surgery, chemotherapy and radiotherapy. Seven years later, lung metastases were found and she was treated with chemotherapy. Later on, brain metastases developed which had been treated with radiotherapy. On presentation, she complained of pain on the posterior left mandible which was accompanied by a burning sensation of the lower left lip and chin. CT scan revealed a soft tissue mass perforating the lingual and buccal plates of the posterior left mandible, which was compatible with a diagnosis of metastasis. Radiotherapy rapidly relieved the pain. Unfortunately, the patient passed away one month later. Dentists should be able to recognize the signs and symptoms associated with metastases to the jaws and should include it in the differential diagnosis, especially in patients with oncologic background. PMID:27295929

  10. Rare adipose disorders (RADs) masquerading as obesity.

    PubMed

    Herbst, Karen L

    2012-02-01

    Rare adipose disorders (RADs) including multiple symmetric lipomatosis (MSL), lipedema and Dercum's disease (DD) may be misdiagnosed as obesity. Lifestyle changes, such as reduced caloric intake and increased physical activity are standard care for obesity. Although lifestyle changes and bariatric surgery work effectively for the obesity component of RADs, these treatments do not routinely reduce the abnormal subcutaneous adipose tissue (SAT) of RADs. RAD SAT likely results from the growth of a brown stem cell population with secondary lymphatic dysfunction in MSL, or by primary vascular and lymphatic dysfunction in lipedema and DD. People with RADs do not lose SAT from caloric limitation and increased energy expenditure alone. In order to improve recognition of RADs apart from obesity, the diagnostic criteria, histology and pathophysiology of RADs are presented and contrasted to familial partial lipodystrophies, acquired partial lipodystrophies and obesity with which they may be confused. Treatment recommendations focus on evidence-based data and include lymphatic decongestive therapy, medications and supplements that support loss of RAD SAT. Associated RAD conditions including depression, anxiety and pain will improve as healthcare providers learn to identify and adopt alternative treatment regimens for the abnormal SAT component of RADs. Effective dietary and exercise regimens are needed in RAD populations to improve quality of life and construct advanced treatment regimens for future generations. PMID:22301856

  11. HAART toxicity masquerading as a surgical abdomen

    PubMed Central

    Feghali, Anthony; Wang, Yi; Irizarry, Evelyn; Lueders, Meno

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Intussusception is a rare disease in adults and poses a challenge to identify and manage. In adults, surgical resection is the preferred treatment since half are due to malignancy. This case reveals an association between highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) and intussusception. Presentation of case A 44 year-old female with history of HIV on highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) presented with 3 month history of epigastric pain, nausea, emesis, weight loss, and lactic acidosis. CT of abdomen showed two small bowel intussusceptions and pericolic fat infiltration. A diagnosis of mitochondrial toxicity secondary to HAART medication was made. HAART medication was discontinued with resolution of symptoms. Further work-up to exclude a mechanical cause for her symptoms including colonoscopy, small bowel follow through, esophagogastroduodenoscopy, and repeat CT were performed. All established an absence of malignancy and intussusception. Discussion Mitochondrial toxicity (MT) is a well-known complication of HAART. A hallmark of MT is lactic acidosis which when untreated can be fatal. Although MT is known to cause gastrointestinal symptoms, intussusception has not been previously reported. In our patient with MT, prolonged usage of HAART medication resulted in severe gastrointestinal symptoms and intussusception mimicking a surgical abdomen. Laparotomy has been recommended on adult patients with intussusceptions because of the high likelihood of identifying a pathologic lesion. The doctrine of adult intussusception is to operate for concern of malignancy. Conclusion Surgeons, gastroenterologist and internist caring for patients on HAART therapy must be aware of the possibility of MT when evaluating HIV patients for possible surgical abdomen. PMID:26686487

  12. The neural androgen receptor: a therapeutic target for myelin repair in chronic demyelination.

    PubMed

    Hussain, Rashad; Ghoumari, Abdel M; Bielecki, Bartosz; Steibel, Jérôme; Boehm, Nelly; Liere, Philippe; Macklin, Wendy B; Kumar, Narender; Habert, René; Mhaouty-Kodja, Sakina; Tronche, François; Sitruk-Ware, Regine; Schumacher, Michael; Ghandour, M Said

    2013-01-01

    Myelin regeneration is a major therapeutic goal in demyelinating diseases, and the failure to remyelinate rapidly has profound consequences for the health of axons and for brain function. However, there is no efficient treatment for stimulating myelin repair, and current therapies are limited to anti-inflammatory agents. Males are less likely to develop multiple sclerosis than females, but often have a more severe disease course and reach disability milestones at an earlier age than females, and these observations have spurred interest in the potential protective effects of androgens. Here, we demonstrate that testosterone treatment efficiently stimulates the formation of new myelin and reverses myelin damage in chronic demyelinated brain lesions, resulting from the long-term administration of cuprizone, which is toxic for oligodendrocytes. In addition to the strong effect of testosterone on myelin repair, the number of activated astrocytes and microglial cells returned to low control levels, indicating a reduction of neuroinflammatory responses. We also identify the neural androgen receptor as a novel therapeutic target for myelin recovery. After the acute demyelination of cerebellar slices in organotypic culture, the remyelinating actions of testosterone could be mimicked by 5α-dihydrotestosterone, a metabolite that is not converted to oestrogens, and blocked by the androgen receptor antagonist flutamide. Testosterone treatment also failed to promote remyelination after chronic cuprizone-induced demyelination in mice with a non-functional androgen receptor. Importantly, testosterone did not stimulate the formation of new myelin sheaths after specific knockout of the androgen receptor in neurons and macroglial cells. Thus, the neural brain androgen receptor is required for the remyelination effect of testosterone, whereas the presence of the receptor in microglia and in peripheral tissues is not sufficient to enhance remyelination. The potent synthetic

  13. Saltatory conduction precedes remyelination in axons demyelinated with lysophosphatidyl choline.

    PubMed

    Smith, K J; Bostock, H; Hall, S M

    1982-04-01

    The changing electrical and morphological properties of demyelinating and remyelinating nerve fibres have been studied in rat ventral roots after intrathecal injection of lysophosphatidyl choline (LPC). The spatial distribution of electrical excitability within the lesion has been studied in undissected single fibres using high-resolution longitudinal current analysis. The distribution of excitability has been correlated with the ultrastructure of the fibres and with the distribution of the surrounding Schwann cells. Demyelinated axolemma was initially not excited, but conduction across demyelinated internodes appeared progressively from the 4th day after LPC injection. Conduction was never continuous, but proceeded via new foci of inward membrane current as early as 4 days after LPC injection, i.e. 3 days before the onset of remyelination. It is suggested that these foci (termed phi-nodes to distinguish them from the nodes of Ranvier distributed along myelinated nerve fibres) are precursors of nodes of Ranvier, and may indicate aggregates of sodium channels which form along the demyelinated axolemma prior to remyelination. PMID:6804606

  14. Immune-mediated demyelination--immunopathological basis for electrophysiological changes.

    PubMed

    Saida, T; Saida, K

    1982-01-01

    A focal immune-mediated demyelinating lesion of peripheral nerve was produced by intraneural injection of antiserum to galactocerebroside, a major glycosphingolipid hapten common in CNS and PNS myelin. This model provides an excellent system for correlative studies of physiological and pathological alterations in the processes of demyelination, because the time course of such changes is predictable from animal to animal. Twenty minutes after antiserum injection, Schwann cells showed focal cytoplasmic outpouching and their external mesaxons opened. Between 1 and 8 h after injection "melting," splitting, vesiculation and vacuolation of myelin became increasingly prominent at paranodal regions and Schmidt-Lantermann clefts, with concomitant degenerative changes in Schwann cell cytoplasm. Disruption of myelin in the paranodal region with detachment of the outermost paranodal myelin loops from paranodal axon resulted in an increase in nodal surface area. This seems to be the most critical anatomical alteration responsible for the early changes in propagation of nerve impulses in this antibody-mediated demyelinating lesion. Between 8 h and 3 days axons became demyelinated progressively over several internodes by macrophage phagocytosis. The onset of clinical and saltatory conduction recovery from the lesion corresponded to the appearance of 2-8 myelin lamellae around each remyelinating axon. PMID:6962042

  15. 17 β-estradiol Protects Male Mice from Cuprizone-induced Demyelination and Oligodendrocyte Loss

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, Lorelei C; Puranam, Kasturi; Gilmore, Wendy; Ting, Jenny P-Y.; Matsushima, G.K.

    2010-01-01

    In addition to regulating reproductive functions in the brain and periphery, estrogen has trophic and neuroprotective functions in the central nervous system (CNS). Estrogen administration has been demonstrated to provide protection in several animal models of CNS disorders, including stroke, brain injury, epilepsy, Parkinson’s disease, Alzheimer’s disease, age-related cognitive decline and multiple sclerosis. Here, we use a model of toxin-induced oligodendrocyte death which results in demyelination, reactive gliosis, recruitment of oligodendrocyte precursor cells and subsequent remyelination to study the potential benefit of 17β-estradiol (E2) administration in male mice. The results indicate that E2 partially ameliorates loss of oligodendrocytes and demyelination in the corpus callosum. This protection is accompanied by a delay in microglia accumulation as well as reduced mRNA expression of the pro-inflammatory cytokine, tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNFα), and insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1). E2 did not significantly alter the accumulation of astrocytes or oligodendrocyte precursor cells, or remyelination. These data obtained from a toxin-induced, T cell-independent model using male mice provide an expanded view of the beneficial effects of estrogen on oligodendrocyte and myelin preservation. PMID:20347981

  16. Sphingosine-1-phosphate receptor antagonism enhances proliferation and migration of engrafted neural progenitor cells in a model of viral-induced demyelination.

    PubMed

    Blanc, Caroline A; Grist, Jonathan J; Rosen, Hugh; Sears-Kraxberger, Ilse; Steward, Oswald; Lane, Thomas E

    2015-10-01

    The oral drug FTY720 affects sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P) signaling on targeted cells that bear the S1P receptors S1P1, S1P3, S1P4, and S1P5. We examined the effect of FTY720 treatment on the biology of mouse neural progenitor cells (NPCs) after transplantation in a viral model of demyelination. Intracerebral infection with the neurotropic JHM strain of mouse hepatitis virus (JHMV) resulted in an acute encephalomyelitis, followed by demyelination similar in pathology to the human demyelinating disease, multiple sclerosis. We have previously reported that intraspinal transplantation of mouse NPCs into JHMV-infected animals resulted in selective colonization of demyelinated lesions, preferential differentiation into oligodendroglia accompanied by axonal preservation, and increased remyelination. Cultured NPCs expressed transcripts for S1P receptors S1P1, S1P2, S1P3, S1P4, and S1P5. FTY720 treatment of cultured NPCs resulted in increased mitogen-activated protein kinase phosphorylation and migration after exposure to the chemokine CXCL12. Administration of FTY720 to JHMV-infected mice resulted in enhanced migration and increased proliferation of transplanted NPCs after spinal cord engraftment. FTY720 treatment did not improve clinical disease, diminish neuroinflammation or the severity of demyelination, nor increase remyelination. These findings argue that FTY720 treatment selectively increases NPC proliferation and migration but does not either improve clinical outcome or enhance remyelination after transplantation into animals in which immune-mediated demyelination is initiated by the viral infection of the central nervous system. PMID:26435414

  17. Treatment of Chronic Inflammatory Demyelinating Polyneuropathy: From Molecular Bases to Practical Considerations

    PubMed Central

    Ripellino, Paolo; Fleetwood, Thomas; Cantello, Roberto; Comi, Cristoforo

    2014-01-01

    Chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy (CIDP) is an autoimmune disease of the peripheral nervous system, in which both cellular and humoral immune responses are involved. The disease is clinically heterogeneous with some patients displaying pure motor form and others also showing a variable degree of sensory dysfunction; disease evolution may also differ from patient to patient, since monophasic, progressive, and relapsing forms are reported. Underlying such clinical variability there is probably a broad spectrum of molecular dysfunctions that are and will be the target of therapeutic strategies. In this review we first explore the biological bases of current treatments and subsequently we focus on the practical management that must also take into account pharmacoeconomic issues. PMID:24527207

  18. Warning leak of intracranial aneurysm masquerading as sinus node dysfunction: A case report

    PubMed Central

    Bisht, Devendra Singh; Garg, Nitin

    2015-01-01

    We describe the successful endovascular repair of an intracranial aneurysm causing subarachnoid hemorrhage in a 62-year-old man, who was initially diagnosed and treated as a case of symptomatic sinus bradycardia. The aim of this report and following discussion is to discuss the subtle warning signs of intracranial aneurysm that may masquerade as sinus node dysfunction. PMID:27489696

  19. AngioVac extraction of intra-atrial hepatoma masquerading as PICC-associated thrombus

    PubMed Central

    Abboud, Samir; Raparia, Kirtee; Ubago, Julianne M.; Resnick, Scott

    2016-01-01

    Thrombus associated with peripherally inserted central catheterization is not uncommon. Treatment is typically conservative; however, more aggressive therapies can be considered in patients with tenuous medical condition. The authors present a patient with metastatic hepatocellular carcinoma masquerading as peripherally inserted central catheter-associated intra-atrial thrombus, subsequently removed via vacuum-assisted mechanical thrombectomy. PMID:26509915

  20. AngioVac extraction of intra-atrial hepatoma masquerading as PICC-associated thrombus.

    PubMed

    Abboud, Samir; Raparia, Kirtee; Ubago, Julianne M; Resnick, Scott

    2016-01-01

    Thrombus associated with peripherally inserted central catheterization is not uncommon. Treatment is typically conservative; however, more aggressive therapies can be considered in patients with tenuous medical condition. The authors present a patient with metastatic hepatocellular carcinoma masquerading as peripherally inserted central catheter-associated intra-atrial thrombus, subsequently removed via vacuum-assisted mechanical thrombectomy. PMID:26509915

  1. Organ-Specific Protective Role of NKT Cells in Virus-Induced Inflammatory Demyelination and Myocarditis Depends on Mouse Strain

    PubMed Central

    Kawai, Eiichiro; Sato, Fumitaka; Omura, Seiichi; Martinez, Nicholas E.; Reddy, Pratap C.; Taniguchi, Masaru; Tsunoda, Ikuo

    2014-01-01

    Theiler’s murine encephalomyelitis virus (TMEV) can induce demyelination or myocarditis in susceptible mouse strains. A deficiency of NKT cells exacerbated TMEV-induced demyelinating disease (TMEV-IDD) in SJL/J and BALB/c mice. In C57BL/6 background, however, NKT-cell-deficient Jαt 18 KO mice remained as resistant to TMEV-IDD as wild-type mice. Echocardiography and histology showed that Jα18 KO mice developed more severe myocarditis (greater T cell infiltration and fibrosis) than wild-type mice, suggesting a protective role of NKT cells in myocarditis in C57BL/6 mice. Jα18 KO mice had higher cardiac viral RNA and anti-viral antibody titers, but had lower lymphoproliferation and IL-4 and IL-10 production. PMID:25434008

  2. Crypsis via leg clustering: twig masquerading in a spider

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Shichang; Mao, Kuei-Kai; Lin, Po-Ting; Ho, Chiu-Ju; Hung, Wei; Piorkowski, Dakota; Liao, Chen-Pan; Tso, I-Min

    2015-01-01

    The role of background matching in camouflage has been extensively studied. However, contour modification has received far less attention, especially in twig-mimicking species. Here, we studied this deceptive strategy by revealing a special masquerade tactic, in which the animals protract and cluster their legs linearly in the same axis with their bodies when resting, using the spider Ariamnes cylindrogaster as a model. We used cardboard papers to construct dummies resembling spiders in appearance and colour. To differentiate the most important factors in the concealment effect, we manipulated body size (long or short abdomen) and resting postures (leg clustered or spread) of the dummies and recorded the responses of predators to different dummy types in the field. The results showed that dummies with clustered legs received significantly less attention from predators, regardless of the body length. Thus, we conclude that A. cylindrogaster relies on the resting posture rather than body size for predator avoidance. This study provides, to the best of our knowledge, empirical evidence for the first time that twig-mimicking species can achieve effective camouflage by contour modification. PMID:26064622

  3. Anaphylaxis to protamine masquerading as an insulin allergy.

    PubMed

    Kim, R

    1993-01-01

    This is the case of a 62-year-old man referred for the evaluation of insulin allergy. This patient had reacted to the subcutaneous injection of Novolin 70/30 (Squibb, Princeton, N.J.) and Humulin NPH (Eli Lilly, Indianapolis, Ind.). These reactions were characterized by the immediate onset of diffuse pruritic urticaria and angioedema with progression to hypotension as well as a local reaction. Past history also included anaphylactic shock after intravenous administration of protamine sulfate used for heparin reversal during arterial bypass surgery. Immediate hypersensitivty skin testing to protamine containing (NPH) insulin and protamine sulfate USP were strongly positive, while Lente insulin (Eli Lilly, Indianapolis, Ind.) and controls were negative. RAST tests revealed the titers > 24 ng/ml of protamine specific IgE with 98 percent inhibition and 1163 ng/ml of protamine specific IgG with 29 percent inhibition, while levels of insulin specific antibodies were negligible. Subsequently, the patient was treated with non-protamine containing insulin preparation, Lente insulin, without further incident. This study confirms the diagnosis of Type I hypersensitivity to protamine sulfate masquerading as insulin allergy. PMID:8454092

  4. Salicylate intolerance: a masquerader of multiple adverse drug reactions

    PubMed Central

    Fernando, Suran Loshana; Clarke, Lesley R

    2009-01-01

    A female in her early 50s presented with a long-standing history of episodic urticaria and angioedema. She also reported urticarial reactions after ingestion of aspirin, prednisone and multiple antibiotics. These medications were all taken during upper respiratory tract infections. An elimination diet followed by a series of open challenges to food chemicals demonstrated an urticarial eruption following the ingestion of mints, which contain high levels of salicylates. A double-blinded placebo-controlled challenge to salicylate confirmed her sensitivity and explained her reaction to aspirin. The patient informed her treating physician of her copious ingestion of mints during upper respiratory tract infections. Drug hypersensitivity to antibiotics and prednisone was excluded on the basis of negative radioallergosorbent tests (RASTs) and/or absent skin-test responses and/or tolerance to oral challenges. This patient had a salicylate intolerance that caused her episodic urticaria and angioedema, and also masqueraded as a drug allergy due to the concurrent ingestion of mints. PMID:21918670

  5. Crypsis via leg clustering: twig masquerading in a spider.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Shichang; Mao, Kuei-Kai; Lin, Po-Ting; Ho, Chiu-Ju; Hung, Wei; Piorkowski, Dakota; Liao, Chen-Pan; Tso, I-Min

    2015-03-01

    The role of background matching in camouflage has been extensively studied. However, contour modification has received far less attention, especially in twig-mimicking species. Here, we studied this deceptive strategy by revealing a special masquerade tactic, in which the animals protract and cluster their legs linearly in the same axis with their bodies when resting, using the spider Ariamnes cylindrogaster as a model. We used cardboard papers to construct dummies resembling spiders in appearance and colour. To differentiate the most important factors in the concealment effect, we manipulated body size (long or short abdomen) and resting postures (leg clustered or spread) of the dummies and recorded the responses of predators to different dummy types in the field. The results showed that dummies with clustered legs received significantly less attention from predators, regardless of the body length. Thus, we conclude that A. cylindrogaster relies on the resting posture rather than body size for predator avoidance. This study provides, to the best of our knowledge, empirical evidence for the first time that twig-mimicking species can achieve effective camouflage by contour modification. PMID:26064622

  6. Recurrent angio-fibroma of breast masquerading as phyllodes tumor.

    PubMed

    Chaurasia, Jai K; Alam, Feroz; Shadan, Mariam; Naim, Mohammed

    2015-01-01

    A young Indian female presented with a recurring tumor in the right breast masquerading as phyllodes tumor. Patient had history of five times excision and recurrences of the tumor, diagnosed as fibrous phyllodes of the breast. Presently, a well-circumscribed tumor of about 10 cm size, comprising of benign fibrous-angiomatous tissue with evidence of foci of pyogenic vasculitis was observed. Immuno-histochemical markers for the myo-epithelial and epithelial elements excluded the possibility of fibrous phyllodes, inflammatory myofibroblastic tumor, desmoid fibromatosis, and metaplastic carcinoma. The present findings were diagnostic of an inflammatory angio-fibroma of the right breast, not reported in the earlier literature. The observations indicated that the female breast may be susceptible to spontaneous productive and common-antibiotic-resistant focal septic vascular inflammation giving rise to angio-fibromatous proliferation producing a well-defined tumor mass in the breast, distinguishable from the other breast lesions by the connective tissue stains and immuno-histochemical markers. PMID:26458623

  7. Mucocele After Orbital Fracture Repair Masquerading as Optic Neuritis.

    PubMed

    Park, Jongyeop; Kim, Jinhyun; Choi, Jinsu; Kim, Hochang

    2016-06-01

    The authors report a patient of mucocele formation after orbital wall fracture repair masquerading as optic neuritis.A 38-year-old man with a history of medial orbital wall fracture repair with an alloplastic implant 10 years previously, presented with left visual disturbance and mild ocular pain with movement of the left eye of 3-day duration, and a relative afferent papillary defect in his left eye. He reported having cold symptoms 2 weeks before presentation. His symptoms were typical of retrobulbar optic neuritis. Under suspicion of optic neuritis, computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging were performed and revealed a large cyst in the sphenoid sinus and ethmoid sinus, just behind the alloplastic implant, that was compressing the medial rectus muscle and optic nerve of the left eye. The patient underwent endoscopic marsupialization of the cyst. Subsequent histologic examinations revealed a cyst lined with ciliated pseudostratified columnar epithelium. The patient had an uncomplicated postoperative course and the visual disturbance resolved. For patients who present solely with optic neuropathy after orbital fracture repair, it is important to be vigilant of potentially rare cause, mucocele formation. PMID:27171955

  8. Disruption of neurofascin localization reveals early changes preceding demyelination and remyelination in multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Howell, O W; Palser, A; Polito, A; Melrose, S; Zonta, B; Scheiermann, C; Vora, A J; Brophy, P J; Reynolds, R

    2006-12-01

    Saltatory conduction in the nervous system is enabled through the intimate association between the leading edge of the myelin sheath and the axonal membrane to demarcate the node of Ranvier. The 186 kDa neuron specific isoform of the adhesion molecule neurofascin (Nfasc186) is required for the clustering of voltage gated Na+ channels at the node, whilst the 155 kDa glial specific isoform (Nfasc155) is required for the assembly of correct paranodal junctions. In order to understand the relationship between these vital structures and how they are affected in multiple sclerosis we have examined the expression of Nfasc155 and Nfasc186 in areas of inflammation, demyelination and remyelination from post-mortem brains. Fourteen cases of neuropathologically confirmed multiple sclerosis (8 female and 6 male; post-mortem delay 7-24 h; age 37-77 years; and disease duration 15-40 years), comprising 20 tissue blocks with 32 demyelinating or remyelinating lesions, were used in this study. A significant early alteration in Nfasc155+ paranodal structures occurs within and adjacent to actively demyelinating white matter lesions that are associated with damaged axons. Shaker-type Kv1.2 channels, normally located distally to the paranode, overlapped with the disrupted Nfasc155+ structures. In the absence of Nfasc155, Kv1.2 channels abutted normally clustered Nfasc186+ nodes, indicating that complete disruption of the paranodal structure and movement of Kv1.2 channels precede alterations at the node itself. Within areas of partial remyelination, a number of atypical triple-Nfasc155+ structures were noted that may represent transient oligodendrocyte-axonal contacts during the process of myelin repair or aberrant interactions. Within shadow plaques discretely clustered Na+v, Nfasc186+ and Nfasc155+ domains indicated the restoration of normal nodal architecture. The alterations in oligodendrocyte Nfasc155 expression that accompany inflammation and demyelination suggest an ongoing

  9. TREM2 regulates microglial cell activation in response to demyelination in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Cantoni, Claudia; Bollman, Bryan; Licastro, Danilo; Xie, Mingqiang; Mikesell, Robert; Schmidt, Robert; Yuede, Carla M.; Galimberti, Daniela; Olivecrona, Gunilla; Klein, Robyn S.; Cross, Anne H.; Otero, Karel; Piccio, Laura

    2015-01-01

    Microglia are phagocytic cells that survey the brain and perform neuroprotective functions in response to tissue damage, but their activating receptors are largely unknown. Triggering receptor expressed on myeloid cells 2 (TREM2) is a microglial immunoreceptor whose loss-of-function mutations in humans cause presenile dementia, while genetic variants are associated with increased risk of neurodegenerative diseases. In myeloid cells, TREM2 has been involved in the regulation of phagocytosis, cell proliferation and inflammatory responses in vitro. However, it is unknown how TREM2 contributes to microglia function in vivo. Here, we identify a critical role for TREM2 in the activation and function of microglia during cuprizone (CPZ)-induced demyelination. TREM2-deficient (TREM2−/−) mice had defective clearance of myelin debris and more axonal pathology, resulting in impaired clinical performances compared to wild-type (WT) mice. TREM2−/− microglia proliferated less in areas of demyelination and were less activated, displaying a more resting morphology and decreased expression of the activation markers MHC II and inducible nitric oxide synthase as compared to WT. Mechanistically, gene expression and ultrastructural analysis of microglia suggested a defect in myelin degradation and phagosome processing during CPZ intoxication in TREM2−/− microglia. These findings place TREM2 as a key regulator of microglia activation in vivo in response to tissue damage. PMID:25631124

  10. Ozone Therapy in Ethidium Bromide-Induced Demyelination in Rats: Possible Protective Effect.

    PubMed

    Salem, Neveen A; Assaf, Naglaa; Ismail, Manal F; Khadrawy, Yasser A; Samy, Mohga

    2016-08-01

    Multiple sclerosis, an autoimmune inflammatory disease of the central nervous system, is characterized by excessive demyelination. The study aimed to investigate the possible protective effect of ozone (O3) therapy in ethidium bromide (EB)-induced demyelination in rats either alone or in combination with corticosteroids in order to decrease the dose of steroid therapy. Rats were divided into Group (1) normal control rats received saline, Group (2) Sham-operated rats received saline, Group (3) Sham-operated rats received vehicle (oxygen), Group (4) EB-treated rats received EB, Group (5) EB-treated rats received O3, Group (6) EB-treated rats received methylprednisolone (MP), and Group (7) EB-treated rats received half the dose of MP concomitant with O3. EB-treated rats showed a significant increase in the number of footfalls in the grid walk test, decreased brain GSH, and paraoxonase-1 enzyme activity, whereas brain MDA, TNF-α, IL-1β, INF-γ, Cox-2 immunoreactivity, and p53 protein levels were increased. A significant decline in brain serotonin, dopamine, norepinephrine, and MBP immunoreactivity was also reported. Significant improvement of the above-mentioned parameters was demonstrated with the administration of either MP or O3, whereas best amelioration was achieved by combining half the dose of MP with ozone. PMID:26467344