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Sample records for dendritic cell-mediated induction

  1. Polypropylene Sulfide Nanoparticle p24 Vaccine Promotes Dendritic Cell-Mediated Specific Immune Responses against HIV-1.

    PubMed

    Caucheteux, Stephan M; Mitchell, John P; Ivory, Matthew O; Hirosue, Sachiko; Hakobyan, Svetlana; Dolton, Garry; Ladell, Kristin; Miners, Kelly; Price, David A; Kan-Mitchell, June; Sewell, Andrew K; Nestle, Frank; Moris, Arnaud; Karoo, Richard O; Birchall, James C; Swartz, Melody A; Hubbel, Jeffrey A; Blanchet, Fabien P; Piguet, Vincent

    2016-06-01

    Delivery of vaccine formulations into the dermis using antigen-coated microneedle patches is a promising and safe approach because of efficient antigen delivery and safety. We evaluated an intradermal vaccine using HIV-1 p24 Gag peptide-conjugated polypropylene sulfide nanoparticles to induce immunity against HIV-1. This peptide-conjugated polypropylene sulfide nanoparticle formulation did not accelerate the maturation of blood- or skin-derived subsets of dendritic cells, either generated in vitro or purified ex vivo, despite efficient uptake in the absence of adjuvant. Moreover, dendritic cell-mediated capture of particulate antigen in this form induced potent HIV-1-specific CD4(+) T-cell responses, as well as B-cell-mediated antibody production. Nanoparticle-based intradermal antigen delivery may therefore provide a new option in the global effort to develop an effective vaccine against HIV-1. PMID:26896775

  2. Apoptotic cells induce dendritic cell-mediated suppression via interferon-γ-induced IDO

    PubMed Central

    Williams, Charlotte A; Harry, Rachel A; McLeod, Julie D

    2008-01-01

    Dendritic cells (DC) are sensitive to their local environment and are affected by proximal cell death. This study investigated the modulatory effect of cell death on DC function. Monocyte-derived DC exposed to apoptotic Jurkat or primary T cells failed to induce phenotypic maturation of the DC and were unable to support CD4+ allogeneic T-cell proliferation compared with DC exposed to lipopolysaccharide (LPS) or necrotic cells. Apoptotic cells coincubated with LPS- or necrotic cell-induced mature DC significantly suppressed CD80, CD86 and CD83 and attenuated LPS-induced CD4+ T-cell proliferation. Reduced levels of interleukin-12 (IL-12), IL-10, IL-6, tumour necrosis factor-α and interferon-γ (IFN-γ) were found to be concomitant with the suppressive activity of apoptotic cells upon DC. Furthermore, intracellular staining confirmed IFN-γ expression by DC in association with apoptotic environments. The specific generation of IFN-γ by DC within apoptotic environments is suggestive of an anti-inflammatory role by the induction of indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase (IDO). Both neutralization of IFN-γ and IDO blockade demonstrated a role for IFN-γ and IDO in the suppression of CD4+ T cells. Moreover, we demonstrate that IDO expression within the DC was found to be IFN-γ-dependent. Blocking transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β) also produced a partial release in T-cell proliferation. Our study strongly suggests that apoptosis-induced DC suppression is not an immunological null event and two prime mediators underpinning these functional effects are IFN-γ-induced IDO and TGF-β. PMID:18067553

  3. Role of Glycosphingolipids in Dendritic Cell-Mediated HIV-1 Trans-infection

    PubMed Central

    Puryear, Wendy Blay

    2013-01-01

    Glycosphingolipids (GSLs) are components of the cell membrane that comprise a membrane bound lipid, ceramide, coupled to an extracellular carbohydrate. GSLs impact numerous aspects of membrane biology, including membrane fluidity, curvature, and organization. The role of these molecules in both chronic inflammation and infectious disease and underlying pathogenic mechanisms are just starting to be recognized. As a component of the cell membrane, GSLs are also incorporated into lipid bilayers of diverse enveloped viruses as they bud out from the host cell and can go on to have a significant influence on viral pathogenesis. Dendritic cell (DC) subsets located in the peripheral mucosal tissues are proposed to be one of the earliest cell types that encounter transmitted viruses and help initiate adaptive immune responses against the invading pathogen by interacting with T cells. In turn, viruses, as obligatory intracellular parasites, rely on host cells for completing their replication cycle, and not surprisingly, HIV has evolved to exploit DC biology for the initial transmission event as well as for its dissemination and propagation within the infected host. In this review, we describe the mechanisms by which GSLs impact DC-mediated HIV trans-infection by either modulating virus infectivity, serving as a direct virus particle-associated host-derived ligand for specific interactions with DCs, or modulating the T cell membrane in such a way as to impact viral entry and thereby productive infection of CD4+ T cells. PMID:22975874

  4. Dendritic cell based immunotherapy using tumor stem cells mediates potent antitumor immune responses.

    PubMed

    Dashti, Amir; Ebrahimi, Marzieh; Hadjati, Jamshid; Memarnejadian, Arash; Moazzeni, Seyed Mohammad

    2016-04-28

    Cancer stem cells (CSCs) are demonstrated to be usually less sensitive to conventional methods of cancer therapies, resulting in tumor relapse. It is well-known that an ideal treatment would be able to selectively target and kill CSCs, so as to avoid the tumor reversion. The aim of our present study was to evaluate the effectiveness of a dendritic cell (DC) based vaccine against CSCs in a mouse model of malignant melanoma. C57BL/6 mouse bone marrow derived DCs pulsed with a murine melanoma cell line (B16F10) or CSC lysates were used as a vaccine. Immunization of mice with CSC lysate-pulsed DCs was able to induce a significant prophylactic effect by a higher increase in lifespan and obvious depression of tumor growth in tumor bearing mice. The mice vaccinated with DCs loaded with CSC-lysate were revealed to produce specific cytotoxic responses to CSCs. The proliferation assay and cytokine (IFN-γ and IL-4) secretion of mice vaccinated with CSC lysate-pulsed DCs also showed more favorable results, when compared to those receiving B16F10 lysate-pulsed DCs. These findings suggest a potential strategy to improve the efficacy of DC-based immunotherapy of cancers. PMID:26803056

  5. Role of dendritic cell-mediated abnormal immune response in visceral hypersensitivity

    PubMed Central

    Li, Meng; Zhang, Lu; Lu, Bin; Chen, Zhe; Chu, Li; Meng, Lina; Fan, Yihong

    2015-01-01

    The role of dendritic cells (DCs) in irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is unclear. This study tested the hypothesis that intestinal DCs induced visceral hypersensitivity in IBS rats through mast cell (MC) activation. The IBS rat model was established by combining colorectal distension with restraint stress. The number of CD103-positive cells in colon was higher in the IBS group. Expression of PAR-2, IL-4 and IL-9 in the colonic mucosa was higher in the IBS group. Mesenteric lymph node DCs (MLNDCs) and splenic CD4+/CD8+ T cells were isolated and purified by a magnetic labeling-based technique; they were cultured alone or co-cultured (T4+DC/T8+DC). The coculture of MLNDCs and CD4+ T cells had the highest IL-4 secretion in the IBS group, while IL-9 expression was higher in the cultures containing CD8+ T cells. Our findings indicate that an increased number of DCs in the colon stimulated CD4+ T cells to secrete high levels of IL-4, which led to the activation of MCs and subsequently resulted in visceral hypersensitivity. PMID:26550249

  6. In vitro enhancement of dendritic cell-mediated anti-glioma immune response by graphene oxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Wei; Li, Zhongjun; Duan, Jinhong; Wang, Chen; Fang, Ying; Yang, Xian-Da

    2014-06-01

    Malignant glioma has extremely poor prognosis despite combination treatments with surgery, radiation, and chemotherapy. Dendritic cell (DC)-based immunotherapy may potentially serve as an adjuvant treatment of glioma, but its efficacy generally needs further improvement. Here we explored whether graphene oxide (GO) nanosheets could modulate the DC-mediated anti-glioma immune response in vitro, using the T98G human glioma cell line as the study model. Pulsing DCs with a glioma peptide antigen (Ag) generated a limited anti-glioma response compared to un-pulsed DCs. Pulsing DCs with GO alone failed to produce obvious immune modulation effects. However, stimulating DCs with a mixture of GO and Ag (GO-Ag) significantly enhanced the anti-glioma immune reaction ( p < 0.05). The secretion of interferon gamma (IFN-γ) by the lymphocytes was also markedly boosted by GO-Ag. Additionally, the anti-glioma immune response induced by GO-Ag appeared to be target-specific. Furthermore, at the concentration used in this study, GO exhibited a negligible effect on the viability of the DCs. These results suggested that GO might have potential utility for boosting a DC-mediated anti-glioma immune response.

  7. Induction and identification of rabbit peripheral blood derived dendritic cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Jing; Yang, FuYuan; Chen, WenLi

    2012-03-01

    Purpose: To study a method of the induction of dendritic cells (DCs) from rabbit peripheral blood. Methods: Peripheral blood cells were removed from rabbit, filtered through nylon mesh. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) were isolated from the blood cells by Ficoll-Hypaque centrifugation (density of 1.077g/cm3).To obtain DCs, PBMC were cultured in RPMI1640 medium containing 10% fetal calf serum, 50U/mL penicillin and streptomycin, referred to subsequently as complete medium, at 37°C in 5% CO2 atmosphere for 4 hours. Nonadherent cells were aspirated, adherent cells were continued incubated in complete medium, supplemented with granulocyte/macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF, 50ng/ml),and interleukin 4 (IL-4, 50ng/ml) for 9 days. Fluorescein labeled antibodies(anti-CD14, anti-HLA-DR, anti-CD86) were used to sign cells cultured for 3,6,9 days respectively, Then flow cytometry was performed. Results: Ratio of anti-HLA-DR and anti-CD86 labeled cells increased with induction time extension, in contrast with anti-CD14. Conclusion: Dendritic cells can be effectively induced by the method of this experiment, cell maturation status increased with induction time extension.

  8. Soluble β-glucan from Grifola frondosa induces tumor regression in synergy with TLR9 agonist via dendritic cell-mediated immunity.

    PubMed

    Masuda, Yuki; Nawa, Daiki; Nakayama, Yoshiaki; Konishi, Morichika; Nanba, Hiroaki

    2015-12-01

    The maturation of dendritic cells into more-immunostimulatory dendritic cells by stimulation with different combinations of immunologic agents is expected to provide efficient, adoptive immunotherapy against cancer. Soluble β-glucan maitake D-fraction, extracted from the maitake mushroom Grifola frondosa, acts as a potent immunotherapeutic agent, eliciting innate and adoptive immune responses, thereby contributing to its antitumor activity. Here, we evaluated the efficacy of maitake D-fraction, in combination with a Toll-like receptor agonist, to treat tumors in a murine model. Our results showed that maitake D-fraction, in combination with the Toll-like receptor 9 agonist, cytosine-phosphate-guanine oligodeoxynucleotide, synergistically increased the expression of dendritic cell maturation markers and interleukin-12 production in dendritic cells, but it did not increase interleukin-10 production, generating strong effector dendritic cells with an augmented capacity for efficiently priming an antigen-specific, T helper 1-type T cell response. Maitake D-fraction enhances cytosine-phosphate-guanine oligodeoxynucleotide-induced dendritic cell maturation and cytokine responses in a dectin-1-dependent pathway. We further showed that a combination therapy using cytosine-phosphate-guanine oligodeoxynucleotide and maitake D-fraction was highly effective, either as adjuvants for dendritic cell vaccination or by direct administration against murine tumor. Therapeutic responses to direct administration were associated with increased CD11c(+) dendritic cells in the tumor site and the induction of interferon-γ-producing CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cells. Our results indicate that maitake D-fraction and cytosine-phosphate-guanine oligodeoxynucleotide synergistically activated dendritic cells, resulting in tumor regression via an antitumor T helper cell 1-type response. Our findings provide the basis for a potent antitumor therapy using a novel combination of immunologic agents for

  9. Systemic induction of cells mediating antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity following administration of interleukin 2.

    PubMed

    Eisenthal, A; Rosenberg, S A

    1989-12-15

    We have previously demonstrated that incubation of murine cells in vitro in interleukin 2 (IL-2) induced antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC) and that these cells were derived from the NK/LAK, FcR+ cell population. In the present study we show that in vivo administration of IL-2 to mice induces cells which exhibit ADCC activity in the peritoneal cavity, liver, lungs, and to a lesser degree in the bone marrow, spleen, mesenteric lymph nodes, and thymus. A gradual increase in ADCC activity and the number of Fc-receptor-positive cells was seen 1 to 3 days after starting IL-2 treatment. The cells mediating ADCC are closely related to LAK cells since they expressed Thy1.2 antigens and are derived from asialo GM1-positive, Lyt2/L3T4-negative, radiosensitive cells. These results demonstrate that IL-2 can systemically induce cells with ADCC activity and that this ability may be useful in the establishment of therapeutic models against disseminated cancer when combined with specific antitumor monoclonal antibodies. PMID:2573425

  10. Dendritic Cell-Mediated T Cell Proliferation -A Functional Bioindicator of Inflammatory Source-Specific Particulate Matter

    EPA Science Inventory

    Previously we found that dendritic cells (DC) were sensitive functional bioindicators of ambient PM (APM) exposure mediating Th2-allergic inflammation in the draining lymph nodes. Here, the ability of bone-marrow-derived DC (DC) and putative BM-derived basophils (Ba) to present a...

  11. Tolerogenic Dendritic Cells for Regulatory T Cell Induction in Man

    PubMed Central

    Raker, Verena K.; Domogalla, Matthias P.; Steinbrink, Kerstin

    2015-01-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs) are highly specialized professional antigen-presenting cells that regulate immune responses, maintaining the balance between tolerance and immunity. Mechanisms via which they can promote central and peripheral tolerance include clonal deletion, the inhibition of memory T cell responses, T cell anergy, and induction of regulatory T cells (Tregs). These properties have led to the analysis of human tolerogenic DCs as a therapeutic strategy for the induction or re-establishment of tolerance. In recent years, numerous protocols for the generation of human tolerogenic DCs have been developed and their tolerogenic mechanisms, including induction of Tregs, are relatively well understood. Phase I trials have been conducted in autoimmune disease, with results that emphasize the feasibility and safety of treatments with tolerogenic DCs. Therefore, the scientific rationale for the use of tolerogenic DCs therapy in the fields of transplantation medicine and allergic and autoimmune diseases is strong. This review will give an overview on efforts and protocols to generate human tolerogenic DCs with focus on IL-10-modulated DCs as inducers of Tregs and discuss their clinical applications and challenges faced in further developing this form of immunotherapy. PMID:26617604

  12. Human monocytes undergo functional re-programming during differentiation to dendritic cell mediated by human extravillous trophoblasts

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Lei; Shao, Qianqian; Zhang, Yun; Zhang, Lin; He, Ying; Wang, Lijie; Kong, Beihua; Qu, Xun

    2016-01-01

    Maternal immune adaptation is required for a successful pregnancy to avoid rejection of the fetal–placental unit. Dendritic cells within the decidual microenvironment lock in a tolerogenic profile. However, how these tolerogenic DCs are induced and the underlying mechanisms are largely unknown. In this study, we show that human extravillous trophoblasts redirect the monocyte-to-DC transition and induce regulatory dendritic cells. DCs differentiated from blood monocytes in the presence of human extravillous trophoblast cell line HTR-8/SVneo displayed a DC-SIGN+CD14+CD1a− phenotype, similar with decidual DCs. HTR8-conditioned DCs were unable to develop a fully mature phenotype in response to LPS, and altered the cytokine secretory profile significantly. Functionally, conditioned DCs poorly induced the proliferation and activation of allogeneic T cells, whereas promoted CD4+CD25+Foxp3+ Treg cells generation. Furthermore, the supernatant from DC and HTR-8/SVneo coculture system contained significant high amount of M-CSF and MCP-1. Using neutralizing antibodies, we discussed the role of M-CSF and MCP-1 during monocyte-to-DCs differentiation mediated by extravillous trophoblasts. Our data indicate that human extravillous trophoblasts play an important role in modulating the monocyte-to-DC differentiation through M-CSF and MCP-1, which facilitate the establishment of a tolerogenic microenvironment at the maternal–fetal interface. PMID:26857012

  13. Human monocytes undergo functional re-programming during differentiation to dendritic cell mediated by human extravillous trophoblasts.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Lei; Shao, Qianqian; Zhang, Yun; Zhang, Lin; He, Ying; Wang, Lijie; Kong, Beihua; Qu, Xun

    2016-01-01

    Maternal immune adaptation is required for a successful pregnancy to avoid rejection of the fetal-placental unit. Dendritic cells within the decidual microenvironment lock in a tolerogenic profile. However, how these tolerogenic DCs are induced and the underlying mechanisms are largely unknown. In this study, we show that human extravillous trophoblasts redirect the monocyte-to-DC transition and induce regulatory dendritic cells. DCs differentiated from blood monocytes in the presence of human extravillous trophoblast cell line HTR-8/SVneo displayed a DC-SIGN(+)CD14(+)CD1a(-) phenotype, similar with decidual DCs. HTR8-conditioned DCs were unable to develop a fully mature phenotype in response to LPS, and altered the cytokine secretory profile significantly. Functionally, conditioned DCs poorly induced the proliferation and activation of allogeneic T cells, whereas promoted CD4(+)CD25(+)Foxp3(+) Treg cells generation. Furthermore, the supernatant from DC and HTR-8/SVneo coculture system contained significant high amount of M-CSF and MCP-1. Using neutralizing antibodies, we discussed the role of M-CSF and MCP-1 during monocyte-to-DCs differentiation mediated by extravillous trophoblasts. Our data indicate that human extravillous trophoblasts play an important role in modulating the monocyte-to-DC differentiation through M-CSF and MCP-1, which facilitate the establishment of a tolerogenic microenvironment at the maternal-fetal interface. PMID:26857012

  14. Role of Dendritic Cells in the Induction of Lymphocyte Tolerance

    PubMed Central

    Osorio, Fabiola; Fuentes, Camila; López, Mercedes N.; Salazar-Onfray, Flavio; González, Fermín E.

    2015-01-01

    The ability of dendritic cells (DCs) to trigger tolerance or immunity is dictated by the context in which an antigen is encountered. A large body of evidence indicates that antigen presentation by steady-state DCs induces peripheral tolerance through mechanisms such as the secretion of soluble factors, the clonal deletion of autoreactive T cells, and feedback control of regulatory T cells. Moreover, recent understandings on the function of DC lineages and the advent of murine models of DC depletion have highlighted the contribution of DCs to lymphocyte tolerance. Importantly, these findings are now being applied to human research in the contexts of autoimmune diseases, allergies, and transplant rejection. Indeed, DC-based immunotherapy research has made important progress in the area of human health, particularly in regards to cancer. A better understanding of several DC-related aspects including the features of DC lineages, milieu composition, specific expression of surface molecules, the control of signaling responses, and the identification of competent stimuli able to trigger and sustain a tolerogenic outcome will contribute to the success of DC-based immunotherapy in the area of lymphocyte tolerance. This review will discuss the latest advances in the biology of DC subtypes related to the induction of regulatory T cells, in addition to presenting current ex vivo protocols for tolerogenic DC production. Particular attention will be given to the molecules and signals relevant for achieving an adequate tolerogenic response for the treatment of human pathologies. PMID:26539197

  15. Toll-like receptor activation enhances cell-mediated immunity induced by an antibody vaccine targeting human dendritic cells

    PubMed Central

    Ramakrishna, Venky; Vasilakos, John P; Tario, Joseph D; Berger, Marc A; Wallace, Paul K; Keler, Tibor

    2007-01-01

    Previously, we have successfully targeted the mannose receptor (MR) expressed on monocyte-derived dendritic cells (DCs) using a fully human MR-specific antibody, B11, as a vehicle to deliver whole protein tumor antigens such as the human chorionic gonadotropin hormone (hCGβ). Since MRs play a role in bridging innate immunity with adaptive immunity we have explored several toll-like receptor (TLR)-specific ligands that may synergize with MR targeting and be applicable as adjuvants in the clinic. We demonstrate that antigen-specific helper and cytolytic T cells from both healthy donors and cancer patients were effectively primed with B11-hCGβ-treated autologous DCs when a combination of one or several TLR ligands is used. Specifically, concomitant signaling of DCs via TLR3 with dsRNA (poly I:C) and DC TLR 7/8 with Resiquimod (R-848), respectively, elicited efficient antigen presentation-mediated by MR-targeting. We demonstrate that MR and TLRs contribute towards maturation and activation of DCs by a mechanism that may be driven by a combination of adjuvant and antibody vaccines that specifically deliver antigenic targets to DCs. PMID:17254349

  16. C-type lectin-like receptor LOX-1 promotes dendritic cell-mediated class-switched B cell responses.

    PubMed

    Joo, HyeMee; Li, Dapeng; Dullaers, Melissa; Kim, Tae-Whan; Duluc, Dorothee; Upchurch, Katherine; Xue, Yaming; Zurawski, Sandy; Le Grand, Roger; Liu, Yong-Jun; Kuroda, Marcelo; Zurawski, Gerard; Oh, SangKon

    2014-10-16

    Lectin-like oxidized low-density lipoprotein receptor-1 (LOX-1) is a pattern-recognition receptor for a variety of endogenous and exogenous ligands. However, LOX-1 function in the host immune response is not fully understood. Here, we report that LOX-1 expressed on dendritic cells (DCs) and B cells promotes humoral responses. On B cells LOX-1 signaling upregulated CCR7, promoting cellular migration toward lymphoid tissues. LOX-1 signaling on DCs licensed the cells to promote B cell differentiation into class-switched plasmablasts and led to downregulation of chemokine receptor CXCR5 and upregulation of chemokine receptor CCR10 on plasmablasts, enabling their exit from germinal centers and migration toward local mucosa and skin. Finally, we found that targeting influenza hemagglutinin 1 (HA1) subunit to LOX-1 elicited HA1-specific protective antibody responses in rhesus macaques. Thus, LOX-1 expressed on B cells and DC cells has complementary functions to promote humoral immune responses. PMID:25308333

  17. Exercise-induced stress inhibits both the induction and elicitation phases of in vivo T-cell-mediated immune responses in humans.

    PubMed

    Harper Smith, Adam D; Coakley, Sarah L; Ward, Mark D; Macfarlane, Andrew W; Friedmann, Peter S; Walsh, Neil P

    2011-08-01

    Little is known about the influence of exercise on induction and elicitation phases of in vivo immunity in humans. We used experimental contact-hypersensitivity, a clinically relevant in vivo measure of T cell-mediated immunity, to investigate the effects of exercise on induction and elicitation phases of immune responses to a novel antigen. The effects of 2 h-moderate-intensity-exercise upon the induction (Study One) and elicitation of in vivo immune memory (Study Two) to diphenylcyclopropenone (DPCP) were examined. Study One: matched, healthy males were randomly-assigned to exercise (N=16) or control (N=16) and received a primary DPCP exposure (sensitization), 20 min after either 2 h running at 60% V O(2peak) (EX) or 2 h seated rest (CON). Four weeks later, participants received a low, dose-series DPCP challenge (elicitation) on their upper inner arm, which was read at 24 and 48 h as clinical score, oedema (skinfold thickness) and redness (erythema). Study Two: pilot; 13 healthy males were sensitized to DPCP. Elicitation challenges were repeated every 4 weeks until responses reached a reproducible plateau. Then, N=9 from the pilot study completed both EX and CON trials in a randomized order. Elicitation challenges were applied and evaluated as in Study One. Results demonstrate that exercise-induced stress significantly impairs both the induction (oedema -53% at 48 h; P<0.001) and elicitation (oedema -19% at 48 h; P<0.05) phases of the in vivo T-cell-mediated immune response. These findings demonstrate that prolonged moderate-intensity exercise impairs the induction and elicitation phases of in vivo T-cell-mediated immunity. Moreover, the induction component of new immune responses appears more sensitive to systemic-stress-induced modulation than the elicitation component. PMID:21362469

  18. Computational implications of cooperative plasticity induction at nearby dendritic sites.

    PubMed

    Morita, Kenji

    2009-01-01

    Recent studies have revealed that plasticity is not regulated independently at individual synapses but rather that there is cooperativity or associativity between nearby synapses in the dendritic tree of individual cortical pyramidal cells. Here, I summarize experimental results regarding such cooperative plasticity and its underlying mechanisms and consider their computational implications. PMID:19126862

  19. Molecular Mechanisms of Induction of Tolerant and Tolerogenic Intestinal Dendritic Cells in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Steimle, Alex; Frick, Julia-Stefanie

    2016-01-01

    How does the host manage to tolerate its own intestinal microbiota? A simple question leading to complicated answers. In order to maintain balanced immune responses in the intestine, the host immune system must tolerate commensal bacteria in the gut while it has to simultaneously keep the ability to fight pathogens and to clear infections. If this tender equilibrium is disturbed, severe chronic inflammatory reactions can result. Tolerogenic intestinal dendritic cells fulfil a crucial role in balancing immune responses and therefore creating homeostatic conditions and preventing from uncontrolled inflammation. Although several dendritic cell subsets have already been characterized to play a pivotal role in this process, less is known about definite molecular mechanisms of how intestinal dendritic cells are converted into tolerogenic ones. Here we review how gut commensal bacteria interact with intestinal dendritic cells and why this bacteria-host cell interaction is crucial for induction of dendritic cell tolerance in the intestine. Hereby, different commensal bacteria can have distinct effects on the phenotype of intestinal dendritic cells and these effects are mainly mediated by impacting toll-like receptor signalling in dendritic cells. PMID:26981546

  20. Induction of Potent Humoral and Cell-Mediated Immune Responses by Attenuated Vaccinia Virus Vectors with Deleted Serpin Genes

    PubMed Central

    Legrand, Fatema A.; Verardi, Paulo H.; Jones, Leslie A.; Chan, Kenneth S.; Peng, Yue; Yilma, Tilahun D.

    2004-01-01

    Vaccinia virus (VV) has been effectively utilized as a live vaccine against smallpox as well as a vector for vaccine development and immunotherapy. Increasingly there is a need for a new generation of highly attenuated and efficacious VV vaccines, especially in light of the AIDS pandemic and the threat of global bioterrorism. We therefore developed recombinant VV (rVV) vaccines that are significantly attenuated and yet elicit potent humoral and cell-mediated immune responses. B13R (SPI-2) and B22R (SPI-1) are two VV immunomodulating genes with sequence homology to serine protease inhibitors (serpins) that possess antiapoptotic and anti-inflammatory properties. We constructed and characterized rVVs that have the B13R or B22R gene insertionally inactivated (vΔB13R and vΔB22R) and coexpress the vesicular stomatitis virus glycoprotein (v50ΔB13R and v50ΔB22R). Virulence studies with immunocompromised BALB/cBy nude mice indicated that B13R or B22R gene deletion decreases viral replication and significantly extends time of survival. Viral pathogenesis studies in immunocompetent CB6F1 mice further demonstrated that B13R or B22R gene inactivation diminishes VV virulence, as measured by decreased levels of weight loss and limited viral spread. Finally, rVVs with B13R and B22R deleted elicited potent humoral, T-helper, and cytotoxic T-cell immune responses, revealing that the observed attenuation did not reduce immunogenicity. Therefore, inactivation of immunomodulating genes such as B13R or B22R represents a general method for enhancing the safety of rVV vaccines while maintaining a high level of immunogenicity. Such rVVs could serve as effective vectors for vaccine development and immunotherapy. PMID:14990697

  1. Induction of primary, antiviral cytotoxic, and proliferative responses with antigens administered via dendritic cells.

    PubMed Central

    Nair, S; Babu, J S; Dunham, R G; Kanda, P; Burke, R L; Rouse, B T

    1993-01-01

    Cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTL) play an essential role in recovery from viral infections, but induction of CTL responses with nonreplicating antigens is difficult to achieve. Exogenous antigens, such as viral proteins and peptides, normally induce CD4+ T-cell responses unless appropriately delivered to the major histocompatibility complex class I antigen presentation pathway. In vitro studies performed to address this issue revealed a similar scenario, and primary CTL induction with nonreplicating antigens has rarely been reported. This study demonstrated primary antiviral CTL induction in vitro with exogenous antigens delivered in vivo to dendritic cells. This study also evaluated the efficacy of glycoprotein B peptide (free or encapsulated in liposomes), peptide-tripalmitoyl-S-glyceryl cysteinyl conjugate (acylpeptide), and glycoprotein B protein encapsulated in pH-sensitive liposomes as antigen delivery vehicles. Our results show that higher levels of cytotoxicity against herpes simplex virus type 1 resulted from exposure of dendritic cells to peptide-tripalmitoyl-S-glyceryl cysteinyl in liposomes. Macrophages treated in a similar manner were not effective stimulators for primary CTL induction. Our data have relevance to the understanding of mechanisms of antigen processing and presentation and the design of antiviral vaccines. PMID:8510217

  2. Differential regulation of phagosome maturation in macrophages and dendritic cells mediated by Rho GTPases and ezrin–radixin–moesin (ERM) proteins

    PubMed Central

    Erwig, Lars-Peter; McPhilips, Kathleen A.; Wynes, Murray W.; Ivetic, Alexander; Ridley, Anne J.; Henson, Peter M.

    2006-01-01

    Deletion of apoptotic cells from tissues involves their phagocytosis by macrophages, dendritic cells, and tissue cells. Although much attention has been focused on the participating ligands, receptors, and mechanisms of uptake, little is known of the disposition of the ingested cell within the phagosome. Here we show that uptake of apoptotic cells by macrophages or fibroblasts results in rapid phagosome maturation, whereas macrophage phagosomes containing Ig-opsonized target cells mature at a slower rate. The early maturation was shown to depend on activation of Rho acting through Rho kinase on ezrin–radixin–moesin proteins. Blockade of Rho signaling or inhibition of moesin both delayed maturation rates to those seen with opsonized targets. By contrast, phagosome maturation in dendritic cells was slower, similar between apoptotic and opsonized target cells, and unaffected by Rho inhibition. These observations have direct implications for the clearance of dying cells and the roles played by different phagocytes in antigen digestion and presentation. PMID:16908865

  3. Cord Blood Stem Cell-Mediated Induction of Apoptosis in Glioma Downregulates X-Linked Inhibitor of Apoptosis Protein (XIAP)

    PubMed Central

    Dasari, Venkata Ramesh; Velpula, Kiran Kumar; Kaur, Kiranpreet; Fassett, Daniel; Klopfenstein, Jeffrey D.; Dinh, Dzung H.; Gujrati, Meena; Rao, Jasti S.

    2010-01-01

    Background XIAP (X-linked inhibitor of apoptosis protein) is one of the most important members of the apoptosis inhibitor family. XIAP is upregulated in various malignancies, including human glioblastoma. It promotes invasion, metastasis, growth and survival of malignant cells. We hypothesized that downregulation of XIAP by human umbilical cord blood mesenchymal stem cells (hUCBSC) in glioma cells would cause them to undergo apoptotic death. Methodology/Principal Findings We observed the effect of hUCBSC on two malignant glioma cell lines (SNB19 and U251) and two glioma xenograft cell lines (4910 and 5310). In co-cultures of glioma cells with hUCBSC, proliferation of glioma cells was significantly inhibited. This is associated with increased cytotoxicity of glioma cells, which led to glioma cell death. Stem cells induced apoptosis in glioma cells, which was evaluated by TUNEL assay, FACS analyses and immunoblotting. The induction of apoptosis is associated with inhibition of XIAP in co-cultures of hUCBSC. Similar results were obtained by the treatment of glioma cells with shRNA to downregulate XIAP (siXIAP). Downregulation of XIAP resulted in activation of caspase-3 and caspase-9 to trigger apoptosis in glioma cells. Apoptosis is characterized by the loss of mitochondrial membrane potential and upregulation of mitochondrial apoptotic proteins Bax and Bad. Cell death of glioma cells was marked by downregulation of Akt and phospho-Akt molecules. We observed similar results under in vivo conditions in U251- and 5310-injected nude mice brains, which were treated with hUCBSC. Under in vivo conditions, Smac/DIABLO was found to be colocalized in the nucleus, showing that hUCBSC induced apoptosis is mediated by inhibition of XIAP and activation of Smac/DIABLO. Conclusions/Significance Our results indicate that downregulation of XIAP by hUCBSC treatment induces apoptosis, which led to the death of the glioma cells and xenograft cells. This study demonstrates the therapeutic

  4. Role of dendritic cells in the induction of regulatory T cells

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs) play a key role in initiating immune responses and maintaining immune tolerance. In addition to playing a role in thymic selection, DCs play an active role in tolerance under steady state conditions through several mechanisms which are dependent on IL-10, TGF-β, retinoic acid, indoleamine-2,3,-dioxygenase along with vitamin D. Several of these mechanisms are employed by DCs in induction of regulatory T cells which are comprised of Tr1 regulatory T cells, natural and inducible foxp3+ regulatory T cells, Th3 regulatory T cells and double negative regulatory T cells. It appears that certain DC subsets are highly specialized in inducing regulatory T cell differentiation and in some tissues the local microenvironment plays a role in driving DCs towards a tolerogenic response. In this review we discuss the recent advances in our understanding of the mechanisms underlying DC driven regulatory T cell induction. PMID:21711933

  5. PI3Kγ Is Critical for Dendritic Cell-Mediated CD8+ T Cell Priming and Viral Clearance during Influenza Virus Infection

    PubMed Central

    Nobs, Samuel Philip; Schneider, Christoph; Heer, Alex Kaspar; Huotari, Jatta; Helenius, Ari; Kopf, Manfred

    2016-01-01

    Phosphoinositide-3-kinases have been shown to be involved in influenza virus pathogenesis. They are targeted directly by virus proteins and are essential for efficient viral replication in infected lung epithelial cells. However, to date the role of PI3K signaling in influenza infection in vivo has not been thoroughly addressed. Here we show that one of the PI3K subunits, p110γ, is in fact critically required for mediating the host’s antiviral response. PI3Kγ deficient animals exhibit a delayed viral clearance and increased morbidity during respiratory infection with influenza virus. We demonstrate that p110γ is required for the generation and maintenance of potent antiviral CD8+ T cell responses through the developmental regulation of pulmonary cross-presenting CD103+ dendritic cells under homeostatic and inflammatory conditions. The defect in lung dendritic cells leads to deficient CD8+ T cell priming, which is associated with higher viral titers and more severe disease course during the infection. We thus identify PI3Kγ as a novel key host protective factor in influenza virus infection and shed light on an unappreciated layer of complexity concerning the role of PI3K signaling in this context. PMID:27030971

  6. Virus Particle Release from Glycosphingolipid-Enriched Microdomains Is Essential for Dendritic Cell-Mediated Capture and Transfer of HIV-1 and Henipavirus

    PubMed Central

    Akiyama, Hisashi; Miller, Caitlin; Patel, Hiren V.; Hatch, Steven C.; Archer, Jacob; Ramirez, Nora-Guadalupe P.

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) exploits dendritic cells (DCs) to promote its transmission to T cells. We recently reported that the capture of HIV-1 by mature dendritic cells (MDCs) is mediated by an interaction between the glycosphingolipid (GSL) GM3 on virus particles and CD169/Siglec-1 on MDCs. Since HIV-1 preferentially buds from GSL-enriched lipid microdomains on the plasma membrane, we hypothesized that the virus assembly and budding site determines the ability of HIV-1 to interact with MDCs. In support of this hypothesis, mutations in the N-terminal basic domain (29/31KE) or deletion of the membrane-targeting domain of the HIV-1 matrix (MA) protein that altered the virus assembly and budding site to CD63+/Lamp-1-positive intracellular compartments resulted in lower levels of virion incorporation of GM3 and attenuation of virus capture by MDCs. Furthermore, MDC-mediated capture and transmission of MA mutant viruses to T cells were decreased, suggesting that HIV-1 acquires GSLs via budding from the plasma membrane to access the MDC-dependent trans infection pathway. Interestingly, MDC-mediated capture of Nipah and Hendra virus (recently emerged zoonotic paramyxoviruses) M (matrix) protein-derived virus-like particles that bud from GSL-enriched plasma membrane microdomains was also dependent on interactions between virion-incorporated GSLs and CD169. Moreover, capture and transfer of Nipah virus envelope glycoprotein-pseudotyped lentivirus particles by MDCs were severely attenuated upon depletion of GSLs from virus particles. These results suggest that GSL incorporation into virions is critical for the interaction of diverse enveloped RNA viruses with DCs and that the GSL-CD169 recognition nexus might be a conserved viral mechanism of parasitization of DC functions for systemic virus dissemination. IMPORTANCE Dendritic cells (DCs) can capture HIV-1 particles and transfer captured virus particles to T cells without establishing productive

  7. A novel dendritic cell-targeted lentiviral vector, encoding Ag85A-ESAT6 fusion gene of Mycobacterium tuberculosis, could elicit potent cell-mediated immune responses in mice.

    PubMed

    Shakouri, Mehdi; Moazzeni, Seyed Mohammad; Ghanei, Mostafa; Arashkia, Arash; Etemadzadeh, Mohammad Hossein; Azadmanesh, Kayhan

    2016-07-01

    Tuberculosis (TB) is an infectious disease caused by Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb), leading to high mortality worldwide. It is well-established that cellular immunity plays a critical role to control Mtb infection. Dendritic Cells (DCs) are potent antigen presenting cells, which play an important role to prime cell-mediated immune responses. In vivo targeting of DCs has been shown to induce both strong cellular immunity and protection against tumor challenges. The aim of the present study was not only to assess the immunizing potential of a novel DC-targeted recombinant lentivirus expressing fusion antigen Ag85A-ESAT6 of Mtb, but also to compare it with a recombinant lentivirus with broad cellular tropism expressing the same antigen in mice. The findings demonstrated that our novel recombinant DC-targeted lentivector was able to successfully transduce and express the fusion antigen Ag85A-E6 in vitro and in vivo. Moreover, a single footpad injection of targeted lentivectors could elicit strong T-helper 1 (Th1) immunity against the above mentioned antigen, as indicated by the specific high-level production of IFN-γ and IL-2 using spleen lymphocytes and lymphoproliferative responses. Despite of these promising results, more attempts are required to elucidate the protective and therapeutic efficacy of this approach in future. PMID:27267270

  8. B cells activated in lymph nodes in response to ultraviolet irradiation or by interleukin-10 inhibit dendritic cell induction of immunity.

    PubMed

    Byrne, Scott N; Halliday, Gary M

    2005-03-01

    Ultraviolet (UV) radiation suppresses systemic immunity. We explored these cellular mechanisms by exposing mice to systemically immunosuppressive doses of UV radiation and then analyzing cell phenotype and function in the lymphoid organs. Although UV radiation increased total cell number in the draining lymph nodes (DLN), it did not alter the activation state of dendritic cells (DC). Rather, UV radiation selectively activated lymph node B cells, with these cells being larger and expressing higher levels of both anti-major histocompatibility complex II and B220 but not co-stimulatory molecules. This phenotype resembled that of a B cell geared toward immune tolerance. To test whether UV radiation-activated B cells were responsible for immunosuppression, DC and B cells were conjugated to antigen ex vivo and transferred into naive hosts. Although DC by themselves activated T cells, when the B cells from UV radiation-irradiated mice were co-injected with DC, they suppressed DC activation of immunity. Interleukin (IL)-10-activated B cells also suppressed DC induction of immunity, suggesting that IL-10 may be involved in this suppressive effect of UV radiation. These results demonstrate a new mechanism of UV radiation immunosuppression whereby UV radiation activates B cells in the skin-DLN that can suppress DC activation of T cell-mediated immunity. PMID:15737198

  9. Regulatory T-Cell-Mediated Suppression of Conventional T-Cells and Dendritic Cells by Different cAMP Intracellular Pathways

    PubMed Central

    Rueda, Cesar M.; Jackson, Courtney M.; Chougnet, Claire A.

    2016-01-01

    Regulatory T-cells (Tregs) mediate their suppressive action by acting directly on conventional T-cells (Tcons) or dendritic cells (DCs). One mechanism of Treg suppression is the increase of cyclic adenosine 3′,5′-monophosphate (cAMP) levels in target cells. Tregs utilize cAMP to control Tcon responses, such as proliferation and cytokine production. Tregs also exert their suppression on DCs, diminishing DC immunogenicity by downmodulating the expression of costimulatory molecules and actin polymerization at the immunological synapse. The Treg-mediated usage of cAMP occurs through two major mechanisms. The first involves the Treg-mediated influx of cAMP in target cells through gap junctions. The second is the conversion of adenosine triphosphate into adenosine by the ectonucleases CD39 and CD73 present on the surface of Tregs. Adenosine then binds to receptors on the surface of target cells, leading to increased intracellular cAMP levels in these targets. Downstream, cAMP can activate the canonical protein kinase A (PKA) pathway and the exchange protein activated by cyclic AMP (EPAC) non-canonical pathway. In this review, we discuss the most recent findings related to cAMP activation of PKA and EPAC, which are implicated in Treg homeostasis as well as the functional alterations induced by cAMP in cellular targets of Treg suppression. PMID:27313580

  10. Natural Killer Cell-Mediated Control of Infections Requires Production of Interleukin 15 by Type I IFN-Triggered Dendritic Cells

    PubMed Central

    Lucas, Mathias; Schachterle, William; Oberle, Karin; Aichele, Peter; Diefenbach, Andreas

    2007-01-01

    Summary Following infections, natural killer (NK) cells acquire effector functions presumably by interacting with accessory cells. The cellular and molecular signals required for NK cell priming in vivo remain poorly defined. Using a mouse model for the inducible ablation of dendritic cells (DC), we show that the in vivo priming of NK cell responses to viral and bacterial pathogens depended on the presence of CD11chigh DC. Following peripheral TLR stimulation, priming of NK cells required their recruitment to local lymph nodes and interaction with DC leading to the emergence of effector NK cells in the periphery. NK cell priming depended on the recognition of type I IFN signals by DC and the subsequent production and trans-presentation of IL-15 by DC to resting NK cells. CD11chigh DC-derived IL-15 was necessary and sufficient for the priming of NK cells. Our data define a unique in vivo role of DC for the priming of NK cells, revealing a striking and previously unappreciated homology to T lymphocytes of the adaptive immune system. PMID:17398124

  11. Anti-CD40 antibody and toll-like receptor 3 ligand restore dendritic cell-mediated anti-tumor immunity suppressed by morphine

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Ming-Cheng; Chen, Yu-Li; Chiang, Ying-Cheng; Cheng, Ya-Jung; Jen, Yu-Wei; Chen, Chi-An; Cheng, Wen-Fang; Sun, Wei-Zen

    2016-01-01

    The influence of morphine on host immunity and the underlying mechanism are still unclear. In the current study, we investigated the influence of morphine on dendritic cells (DCs), its possible mechanism of action, and the molecules that could reverse these effects. Morphine suppressed DC maturation, antigen presenting abilities, and the ability to activate antigen-specific CD8+ T cells. Morphine-treated DCs also secreted higher concentrations of IL-10, but lower IL-6 and TNF-α. Morphine-treated DCs showed decreased ERK1/2 phosphorylation and reduced p38 dephosphorylation. The in vivo administration of immuno-modulators, anti-CD40 Ab and TLR3 ligand-poly(I:C), enhanced antigen-specific immunity, promoted the anti-tumor effects, and prolonged the survival of morphine-treated, tumor-bearing mice by promoting the maturation and function of BMM-derived DCs by enhancing ERK1/2 phosphorylation and p38 dephosphorylation. We concluded that morphine can inhibit DC-mediated anti-tumor immunity by suppressing DC maturation and function. Immuno-modulators, such as anti-CD40 Abs and TLR agonists, can restore the DC-mediated anti-tumor immunity. Use of immuno-modulators could serve as a useful approach to overcome the immunocompromised state generated by morphine. PMID:27186393

  12. Dendritic cell-mediated survival signals in Eμ-Myc B-cell lymphoma depend on the transcription factor C/EBPβ.

    PubMed

    Rehm, Armin; Gätjen, Marcel; Gerlach, Kerstin; Scholz, Florian; Mensen, Angela; Gloger, Marleen; Heinig, Kristina; Lamprecht, Björn; Mathas, Stephan; Bégay, Valérie; Leutz, Achim; Lipp, Martin; Dörken, Bernd; Höpken, Uta E

    2014-01-01

    The capacity of dendritic cells (DCs) to regulate tumour-specific adaptive immune responses depends on their proper differentiation and homing status. Whereas DC-associated tumour-promoting functions are linked to T-cell tolerance and formation of an inflammatory milieu, DC-mediated direct effects on tumour growth have remained unexplored. Here we show that deletion of DCs substantially delays progression of Myc-driven lymphomas. Lymphoma-exposed DCs upregulate immunomodulatory cytokines, growth factors and the CCAAT/enhancer-binding protein β (C/EBPβ). Moreover, Eμ-Myc lymphomas induce the preferential translation of the LAP/LAP* isoforms of C/EBPβ. C/EBPβ(-/-) DCs are unresponsive to lymphoma-associated cytokine changes and in contrast to wild-type DCs, they are unable to mediate enhanced Eμ-Myc lymphoma cell survival. Antigen-specific T-cell proliferation in lymphoma-bearing mice is impaired; however, this immune suppression is reverted by the DC-restricted deletion of C/EBPβ. Thus, we show that C/EBPβ-controlled DC functions are critical steps for the creation of a lymphoma growth-promoting and -immunosuppressive niche. PMID:25266931

  13. CD117+ Dendritic and Mast Cells Are Dependent on RasGRP4 to Function as Accessory Cells for Optimal Natural Killer Cell-Mediated Responses to Lipopolysaccharide

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Saijun; Tanaka, Kumiko; O’Keeffe, Meredith; Qi, Miao; El-Assaad, Fatima; Weaver, James C.; Chen, Gang; Weatherall, Christopher; Wang, Ying; Giannakopoulos, Bill; Chen, Liming; Yu, DeMint; Hamilton, Matthew J.; Wensing, Lislaine A.; Stevens, Richard L.; Krilis, Steven A.

    2016-01-01

    Ras guanine nucleotide-releasing protein-4 (RasGRP4) is an evolutionarily conserved calcium-regulated, guanine nucleotide exchange factor and diacylglycerol/phorbol ester receptor. While an important intracellular signaling protein for CD117+ mast cells (MCs), its roles in other immune cells is less clear. In this study, we identified a subset of in vivo-differentiated splenic CD117+ dendritic cells (DCs) in wild-type (WT) C57BL/6 mice that unexpectedly contained RasGRP4 mRNA and protein. In regard to the biologic significance of these data to innate immunity, LPS-treated splenic CD117+ DCs from WT mice induced natural killer (NK) cells to produce much more interferon-γ (IFN-γ) than comparable DCs from RasGRP4-null mice. The ability of LPS-responsive MCs to cause NK cells to increase their expression of IFN-γ was also dependent on this intracellular signaling protein. The discovery that RasGRP4 is required for CD117+ MCs and DCs to optimally induce acute NK cell-dependent immune responses to LPS helps explain why this signaling protein has been conserved in evolution. PMID:26982501

  14. What are the molecules involved in regulatory T-cells induction by dendritic cells in cancer?

    PubMed

    Ramos, Rodrigo Nalio; de Moraes, Cristiano Jacob; Zelante, Bruna; Barbuto, José Alexandre M

    2013-01-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs) are essential for the maintenance of homeostasis in the organism, and they do that by modulating lymphocyte priming, expansion, and response patterns according to signals they receive from the environment. The induction of suppressive lymphocytes by DCs is essential to hinder the development of autoimmune diseases but can be reverted against homeostasis when in the context of neoplasia. In this setting, the induction of suppressive or regulatory T cells contributes to the establishment of a state of tolerance towards the tumor, allowing it to grow unchecked by an otherwise functional immune system. Besides affecting its local environment, tumor also has been described as potent sources of anti-inflammatory/suppressive factors, which may act systemically, generating defects in the differentiation and maturation of immune cells, far beyond the immediate vicinity of the tumor mass. Cytokines, as IL-10 and TGF-beta, as well as cell surface molecules like PD-L1 and ICOS seem to be significantly involved in the redirection of DCs towards tolerance induction, and recent data suggest that tumor cells may, indeed, modulate distinct DCs subpopulations through the involvement of these molecules. It is to be expected that the identification of such molecules should provide molecular targets for more effective immunotherapeutic approaches to cancer. PMID:23762097

  15. Intestinal dendritic cells survey circulatory antigens prior to induction of CD8+ T cells

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Sun Young; Song, Joo-Hye; Guleng, Bayasi; Cotoner, Carmen Alonso; Arihiro, Seiji; Zhao, Yun; Chiang, Hao-Sen; O'Keeffe, Michael; Liao, Gongxian; Karp, Christopher L.; Kweon, Mi-Na; Sharpe, Arlene H.; Bhan, Atul; Terhorst, Cox; Reinecker, Hans-Christian

    2013-01-01

    Circulatory antigens transit through the small intestine via the fenestrated capillaries in the lamina propria prior to entering into the draining lymphatics. But whether or how this process controls mucosal immune responses remains unknown. Here we demonstrate that dendritic cells (DCs) of the lamina propria can sample and process both circulatory and luminal antigens. Surprisingly, antigen cross-presentation by resident CX3CR1+ DCs induced differentiation of precursor cells into CD8+ T cells that expressed interleukin-10 (IL-10), IL-13 and IL-9 and could migrate into adjacent compartments. We conclude that lamina propria CX3CR1+ DCs facilitate the surveillance of circulatory antigens and act as a conduit for the processing of self- and intestinally-absorbed-antigens, leading to the induction of CD8+ T cells, that partake in the control of T cell activation during mucosal immune responses. PMID:23246312

  16. Induction of CD4+ Regulatory and Polarized Effector/helper T Cells by Dendritic Cells

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs) are considered to play major roles during the induction of T cell immune responses as well as the maintenance of T cell tolerance. Naive CD4+ T cells have been shown to respond with high plasticity to signals inducing their polarization into effector/helper or regulatory T cells. Data obtained from in vitro generated bone-marrow (BM)-derived DCs as well as genetic mouse models revealed an important but not exclusive role of DCs in shaping CD4+ T cell responses. Besides the specialization of some conventional DC subsets for the induction of polarized immunity, also the maturation stage, activation of specialized transcription factors and the cytokine production of DCs have major impact on CD4+ T cells. Since in vitro generated BM-DCs show a high diversity to shape CD4+ T cells and their high similarity to monocyte-derived DCs in vivo, this review reports data mainly on BM-DCs in this process and only touches the roles of transcription factors or of DC subsets, which have been discussed elsewhere. Here, recent findings on 1) the conversion of naive into anergic and further into Foxp3− regulatory T cells (Treg) by immature DCs, 2) the role of RelB in steady state migratory DCs (ssmDCs) for conversion of naive T cells into Foxp3+ Treg, 3) the DC maturation signature for polarized Th2 cell induction and 4) the DC source of IL-12 for Th1 induction are discussed. PMID:26937228

  17. TLR5 mediates CD172α+ intestinal lamina propria dendritic cell induction of Th17 cells

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Han; Chen, Feidi; Wu, Wei; Cao, Anthony T; Xue, Xiaochang; Yao, Suxia; Evans-Marin, Heather L; Li, Yan-Qing; Cong, Yingzi

    2016-01-01

    Multiple mechanisms exist in regulation of host responses to massive challenges from microbiota to maintain immune homeostasis in the intestines. Among these is the enriched Th17 cells in the intestines, which regulates intestinal homeostasis through induction of antimicrobial peptides and secretory IgA among others. However, the means by which Th17 cells develop in response to microbiota is still not completely understood. Although both TLR5 and CD172α+ lamina propria dendritic cells (LPDC) have been shown to promote Th17 cell development, it is still unclear whether TLR5 mediates the CD172α+LPDC induction of Th17 cells. By using a microbiota antigen-specific T cell reporter mouse system, we demonstrated that microbiota antigen-specific T cells developed into Th17 cells in the intestinal LP, but not in the spleen when transferred into TCRβxδ−/− mice. LPDCs expressed high levels of TLR5, and most CD172α+LPDCs also co-expressed TLR5. LPDCs produced high levels of IL-23, IL-6 and TGFβ when stimulated with commensal flagellin and promoted Th17 cell development when cultured with full-length CBir1 flagellin but not CBir1 peptide. Wild-type CD172α+, but not CD172α−, LPDCs induced Th17 cells, whereas TLR5-deficient LPDC did not induce Th17 cells. Our data thereby demonstrated that TLR5 mediates CD172α+LPDC induction of Th17 cells in the intestines. PMID:26907705

  18. AIRE is not essential for the induction of human tolerogenic dendritic cells.

    PubMed

    Crossland, Katherine L; Abinun, Mario; Arkwright, Peter D; Cheetham, Timothy D; Pearce, Simon H; Hilkens, Catharien M U; Lilic, Desa

    2016-06-01

    Loss-of-function mutations of the Autoimmune Regulator (AIRE) gene results in organ-specific autoimmunity and disease Autoimmune Polyendocrinopathy type 1 (APS1)/Autoimmune Polyendocrinopathy Candidiasis Ectodermal Dystrophy (APECED). The AIRE protein is crucial in the induction of central tolerance, promoting ectopic expression of tissue-specific antigens in medullary thymic epithelial cells and enabling removal of self-reactive T-cells. AIRE expression has recently been detected in myeloid dendritic cells (DC), suggesting AIRE may have a significant role in peripheral tolerance. DC stimulation of T-cells is critical in determining the initiation or lack of an immune response, depending on the pattern of costimulation and cytokine production by DCs, defining immunogenic/inflammatory (inflDC) and tolerogenic (tolDC) DC. In AIRE-deficient patients and healthy controls, we validated the role of AIRE in the generation and function of monocyte-derived inflDC and tolDCs by determining mRNA and protein expression of AIRE and comparing activation markers (HLA-DR/DP/DQ,CD83,CD86,CD274(PDL-1),TLR-2), cytokine production (IL-12p70,IL-10,IL-6,TNF-α,IFN-γ) and T-cell stimulatory capacity (mixed lymphocyte reaction) of AIRE+ and AIRE- DCs. We show for the first time that: (1) tolDCs from healthy individuals express AIRE; (2) AIRE expression is not significantly higher in tolDC compared to inflDC; (3) tolDC can be generated from APECED patient monocytes and (4) tolDCs lacking AIRE retain the same phenotype and reduced T-cell stimulatory function. Our findings suggest that AIRE does not have a role in the induction and function of monocyte-derived tolerogenic DC in humans, but these findings do not exclude a role for AIRE in peripheral tolerance mediated by other cell types. PMID:26912174

  19. Suppression of antigen-specific adaptive immunity by IL-37 via induction of tolerogenic dendritic cells

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Yuchun; Cai, Xiangna; Liu, Sucai; Wang, Sen; Nold-Petry, Claudia A.; Nold, Marcel F.; Bufler, Philip; Norris, David; Dinarello, Charles A.; Fujita, Mayumi

    2014-01-01

    IL-1 family member IL-37 limits innate inflammation in models of colitis and LPS-induced shock, but a role in adaptive immunity remains unknown. Here, we studied mice expressing human IL-37b isoform (IL-37tg) subjected to skin contact hypersensitivity (CHS) to dinitrofluorobenzene. CHS challenge to the hapten was significantly decreased in IL-37tg mice compared with wild-type (WT) mice (−61%; P < 0.001 at 48 h). Skin dendritic cells (DCs) were present and migrated to lymph nodes after antigen uptake in IL-37tg mice. When hapten-sensitized DCs were adoptively transferred to WT mice, antigen challenge was greatly impaired in mice receiving DCs from IL-37tg mice compared with those receiving DCs from WT mice (−60%; P < 0.01 at 48 h). In DCs isolated from IL-37tg mice, LPS-induced increase of MHC II and costimulatory molecule CD40 was reduced by 51 and 31%, respectively. In these DCs, release of IL-1β, IL-6, and IL-12 was reduced whereas IL-10 secretion increased (37%). Consistent with these findings, DCs from IL-37tg mice exhibited a lower ability to stimulate syngeneic and allogeneic naive T cells as well as antigen-specific T cells and displayed enhanced induction of T regulatory (Treg) cells (86%; P < 0.001) in vitro. Histological analysis of CHS skin in mice receiving hapten-sensitized DCs from IL-37tg mice revealed a marked reduction in CD8+ T cells (−74%) but an increase in Treg cells (2.6-fold). Together, these findings reveal that DCs expressing IL-37 are tolerogenic, thereby impairing activation of effector T-cell responses and inducing Treg cells. IL-37 thus emerges as an inhibitor of adaptive immunity. PMID:25294929

  20. In situ induction of dendritic cell–based T cell tolerance in humanized mice and nonhuman primates

    PubMed Central

    Jung, Kyeong Cheon; Jeon, Yoon Kyung; Ban, Young Larn; Min, Hye Sook; Kim, Eun Ji; Kim, Ju Hyun; Kang, Byung Hyun; Bae, Youngmee; Yoon, Il-Hee; Kim, Yong-Hee; Lee, Jae-Il; Kim, Jung-Sik; Shin, Jun-Seop; Yang, Jaeseok; Kim, Sung Joo; Rostlund, Emily; Muller, William A.

    2011-01-01

    Induction of antigen-specific T cell tolerance would aid treatment of diverse immunological disorders and help prevent allograft rejection and graft versus host disease. In this study, we establish a method of inducing antigen-specific T cell tolerance in situ in diabetic humanized mice and Rhesus monkeys receiving porcine islet xenografts. Antigen-specific T cell tolerance is induced by administration of an antibody ligating a particular epitope on ICAM-1 (intercellular adhesion molecule 1). Antibody-mediated ligation of ICAM-1 on dendritic cells (DCs) led to the arrest of DCs in a semimature stage in vitro and in vivo. Ablation of DCs from mice completely abrogated anti–ICAM-1–induced antigen-specific T cell tolerance. T cell responses to unrelated antigens remained unaffected. In situ induction of DC-mediated T cell tolerance using this method may represent a potent therapeutic tool for preventing graft rejection. PMID:22025302

  1. Ubiquitous Over-Expression of Chromatin Remodeling Factor SRG3 Ameliorates the T Cell-Mediated Exacerbation of EAE by Modulating the Phenotypes of both Dendritic Cells and Macrophages.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sung Won; Park, Hyun Jung; Jeon, Sung Ho; Lee, Changjin; Seong, Rho Hyun; Park, Se-Ho; Hong, Seokmann

    2015-01-01

    Although SWI3-related gene (SRG3), a chromatin remodeling factor, is critical for various biological processes including early embryogenesis and thymocyte development, it is unclear whether SRG3 is involved in the differentiation of CD4+ T cells, the key mediator of adaptive immune responses. Because it is known that experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) development is determined by the activation of CD4+ T helper cells, here, we investigated the role of SRG3 in EAE development using SRG3 transgenic mouse models exhibiting two distinct SRG3 expression patterns: SRG3 expression driven by either the CD2 or β-actin promoter. We found that the outcome of EAE development was completely different depending on the expression pattern of SRG3. The specific over-expression of SRG3 using the CD2 promoter facilitated EAE via the induction of Th1 and Th17 cells, whereas the ubiquitous over-expression of SRG3 using the β-actin promoter inhibited EAE by promoting Th2 differentiation and suppressing Th1 and Th17 differentiation. In addition, the ubiquitous over-expression of SRG3 polarized CD4+ T cell differentiation towards the Th2 phenotype by converting dendritic cells (DCs) or macrophages to Th2 types. SRG3 over-expression not only reduced pro-inflammatory cytokine production by DCs but also shifted macrophages from the inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS)-expressing M1 phenotype to the arginase-1-expressing M2 phenotype during EAE. In addition, Th2 differentiation in β-actin-SRG3 Tg mice during EAE was associated with an increase in the basophil and mast cell populations and in IL4 production. Furthermore, the increased frequency of Treg cells in the spinal cord of β-actin-SRG3 Tg mice might induce the suppression of and accelerate the recovery from EAE symptoms. Taken together, our results provide the first evidence supporting the development of a new therapeutic strategy for EAE involving the modulation of SRG3 expression to induce M2 and Th2 polarization

  2. Exploring the induction of preproinsulin-specific Foxp3(+) CD4(+) Treg cells that inhibit CD8(+) T cell-mediated autoimmune diabetes by DNA vaccination.

    PubMed

    Stifter, Katja; Schuster, Cornelia; Schlosser, Michael; Boehm, Bernhard Otto; Schirmbeck, Reinhold

    2016-01-01

    DNA vaccination is a promising strategy to induce effector T cells but also regulatory Foxp3(+) CD25(+) CD4(+) Treg cells and inhibit autoimmune disorders such as type 1 diabetes. Little is known about the antigen requirements that facilitate priming of Treg cells but not autoreactive effector CD8(+) T cells. We have shown that the injection of preproinsulin (ppins)-expressing pCI/ppins vector into PD-1- or PD-L1-deficient mice induced K(b)/A12-21-monospecific CD8(+) T cells and autoimmune diabetes. A pCI/ppinsΔA12-21 vector (lacking the critical K(b)/A12-21 epitope) did not induce autoimmune diabetes but elicited a systemic Foxp3(+) CD25(+) Treg cell immunity that suppressed diabetes induction by a subsequent injection of the diabetogenic pCI/ppins. TGF-β expression was significantly enhanced in the Foxp3(+) CD25(+) Treg cell population of vaccinated/ppins-primed mice. Ablation of Treg cells in vaccinated/ppins-primed mice by anti-CD25 antibody treatment abolished the protective effect of the vaccine and enabled diabetes induction by pCI/ppins. Adoptive transfer of Treg cells from vaccinated/ppins-primed mice into PD-L1(-/-) hosts efficiently suppressed diabetes induction by pCI/ppins. We narrowed down the Treg-stimulating domain to a 15-residue ppins76-90 peptide. Vaccine-induced Treg cells thus play a crucial role in the control of de novo primed autoreactive effector CD8(+) T cells in this diabetes model. PMID:27406624

  3. Exploring the induction of preproinsulin-specific Foxp3+ CD4+ Treg cells that inhibit CD8+ T cell-mediated autoimmune diabetes by DNA vaccination

    PubMed Central

    Stifter, Katja; Schuster, Cornelia; Schlosser, Michael; Boehm, Bernhard Otto; Schirmbeck, Reinhold

    2016-01-01

    DNA vaccination is a promising strategy to induce effector T cells but also regulatory Foxp3+ CD25+ CD4+ Treg cells and inhibit autoimmune disorders such as type 1 diabetes. Little is known about the antigen requirements that facilitate priming of Treg cells but not autoreactive effector CD8+ T cells. We have shown that the injection of preproinsulin (ppins)-expressing pCI/ppins vector into PD-1- or PD-L1-deficient mice induced Kb/A12-21-monospecific CD8+ T cells and autoimmune diabetes. A pCI/ppinsΔA12-21 vector (lacking the critical Kb/A12-21 epitope) did not induce autoimmune diabetes but elicited a systemic Foxp3+ CD25+ Treg cell immunity that suppressed diabetes induction by a subsequent injection of the diabetogenic pCI/ppins. TGF-β expression was significantly enhanced in the Foxp3+ CD25+ Treg cell population of vaccinated/ppins-primed mice. Ablation of Treg cells in vaccinated/ppins-primed mice by anti-CD25 antibody treatment abolished the protective effect of the vaccine and enabled diabetes induction by pCI/ppins. Adoptive transfer of Treg cells from vaccinated/ppins-primed mice into PD-L1−/− hosts efficiently suppressed diabetes induction by pCI/ppins. We narrowed down the Treg-stimulating domain to a 15-residue ppins76–90 peptide. Vaccine-induced Treg cells thus play a crucial role in the control of de novo primed autoreactive effector CD8+ T cells in this diabetes model. PMID:27406624

  4. Induction of Indoleamine 2, 3-Dioxygenase in Human Dendritic Cells by a Cholera Toxin B Subunit—Proinsulin Vaccine

    PubMed Central

    Mbongue, Jacques C.; Nicholas, Dequina A.; Zhang, Kangling; Kim, Nan-Sun; Hamilton, Brittany N.; Larios, Marco; Zhang, Guangyu; Umezawa, Kazuo; Firek, Anthony F.; Langridge, William H. R.

    2015-01-01

    Dendritic cells (DC) interact with naïve T cells to regulate the delicate balance between immunity and tolerance required to maintain immunological homeostasis. In this study, immature human dendritic cells (iDC) were inoculated with a chimeric fusion protein vaccine containing the pancreatic β-cell auto-antigen proinsulin linked to a mucosal adjuvant the cholera toxin B subunit (CTB-INS). Proteomic analysis of vaccine inoculated DCs revealed strong up-regulation of the tryptophan catabolic enzyme indoleamine 2, 3-dioxygenase (IDO1). Increased biosynthesis of the immunosuppressive enzyme was detected in DCs inoculated with the CTB-INS fusion protein but not in DCs inoculated with proinsulin, CTB, or an unlinked combination of the two proteins. Immunoblot and PCR analyses of vaccine treated DCs detected IDO1mRNA by 3 hours and IDO1 protein synthesis by 6 hours after vaccine inoculation. Determination of IDO1 activity in vaccinated DCs by measurement of tryptophan degradation products (kynurenines) showed increased tryptophan cleavage into N-formyl kynurenine. Vaccination did not interfere with monocytes differentiation into DC, suggesting the vaccine can function safely in the human immune system. Treatment of vaccinated DCs with pharmacological NF-κB inhibitors ACHP or DHMEQ significantly inhibited IDO1 biosynthesis, suggesting a role for NF-κB signaling in vaccine up-regulation of dendritic cell IDO1. Heat map analysis of the proteomic data revealed an overall down-regulation of vaccinated DC functions, suggesting vaccine suppression of DC maturation. Together, our experimental data indicate that CTB-INS vaccine induction of IDO1 biosynthesis in human DCs may result in the inhibition of DC maturation generating a durable state of immunological tolerance. Understanding how CTB-INS modulates IDO1 activity in human DCs will facilitate vaccine efficacy and safety, moving this immunosuppressive strategy closer to clinical applications for prevention of type 1

  5. Induction of indoleamine 2, 3-dioxygenase in human dendritic cells by a cholera toxin B subunit-proinsulin vaccine.

    PubMed

    Mbongue, Jacques C; Nicholas, Dequina A; Zhang, Kangling; Kim, Nan-Sun; Hamilton, Brittany N; Larios, Marco; Zhang, Guangyu; Umezawa, Kazuo; Firek, Anthony F; Langridge, William H R

    2015-01-01

    Dendritic cells (DC) interact with naïve T cells to regulate the delicate balance between immunity and tolerance required to maintain immunological homeostasis. In this study, immature human dendritic cells (iDC) were inoculated with a chimeric fusion protein vaccine containing the pancreatic β-cell auto-antigen proinsulin linked to a mucosal adjuvant the cholera toxin B subunit (CTB-INS). Proteomic analysis of vaccine inoculated DCs revealed strong up-regulation of the tryptophan catabolic enzyme indoleamine 2, 3-dioxygenase (IDO1). Increased biosynthesis of the immunosuppressive enzyme was detected in DCs inoculated with the CTB-INS fusion protein but not in DCs inoculated with proinsulin, CTB, or an unlinked combination of the two proteins. Immunoblot and PCR analyses of vaccine treated DCs detected IDO1mRNA by 3 hours and IDO1 protein synthesis by 6 hours after vaccine inoculation. Determination of IDO1 activity in vaccinated DCs by measurement of tryptophan degradation products (kynurenines) showed increased tryptophan cleavage into N-formyl kynurenine. Vaccination did not interfere with monocytes differentiation into DC, suggesting the vaccine can function safely in the human immune system. Treatment of vaccinated DCs with pharmacological NF-κB inhibitors ACHP or DHMEQ significantly inhibited IDO1 biosynthesis, suggesting a role for NF-κB signaling in vaccine up-regulation of dendritic cell IDO1. Heat map analysis of the proteomic data revealed an overall down-regulation of vaccinated DC functions, suggesting vaccine suppression of DC maturation. Together, our experimental data indicate that CTB-INS vaccine induction of IDO1 biosynthesis in human DCs may result in the inhibition of DC maturation generating a durable state of immunological tolerance. Understanding how CTB-INS modulates IDO1 activity in human DCs will facilitate vaccine efficacy and safety, moving this immunosuppressive strategy closer to clinical applications for prevention of type 1

  6. Selective induction of cell-mediated immunity and protection of rhesus macaques from chronic SHIV{sub KU2} infection by prophylactic vaccination with a conserved HIV-1 envelope peptide-cocktail

    SciTech Connect

    Nehete, Pramod N.; Nehete, Bharti P.; Hill, Lori; Manuri, Pallavi R.; Baladandayuthapani, Veerabhadran; Feng Lei; Simmons, Johnny; Sastry, K. Jagannadha

    2008-01-05

    Infection of Indian-origin rhesus macaques by the simian human immunodeficiency virus (SHIV) is considered to be a suitable preclinical model for directly testing efficacy of vaccine candidates based on the HIV-1 envelope. We used this model for prophylactic vaccination with a peptide-cocktail comprised of highly conserved HIV-1 envelope sequences immunogenic/antigenic in macaques and humans. Separate groups of macaques were immunized with the peptide-cocktail by intravenous and subcutaneous routes using autologous dendritic cells (DC) and Freund's adjuvant, respectively. The vaccine elicited antigen specific IFN-{gamma}-producing cells and T-cell proliferation, but not HIV-neutralizing antibodies. The vaccinated animals also exhibited efficient cross-clade cytolytic activity against target cells expressing envelope proteins corresponding to HIV-1 strains representative of multiple clades that increased after intravenous challenge with pathogenic SHIV{sub KU2}. Virus-neutralizing antibodies were either undetectable or present only transiently at low levels in the control as well as vaccinated monkeys after infection. Significant control of plasma viremia leading to undetectable levels was achieved in majority of vaccinated monkeys compared to mock-vaccinated controls. Monkeys vaccinated with the peptide-cocktail using autologous DC, compared to Freund's adjuvant, and the mock-vaccinated animals, showed significantly higher IFN-{gamma} production, higher levels of vaccine-specific IFN-{gamma} producing CD4{sup +} cells and significant control of plasma viremia. These results support DC-based vaccine delivery and the utility of the conserved HIV-1 envelope peptide-cocktail, capable of priming strong cell-mediated immunity, for potential inclusion in HIV vaccination strategies.

  7. Prominent role for plasmacytoid dendritic cells in mucosal T cell-independent IgA induction.

    PubMed

    Tezuka, Hiroyuki; Abe, Yukiko; Asano, Jumpei; Sato, Taku; Liu, Jiajia; Iwata, Makoto; Ohteki, Toshiaki

    2011-02-25

    Although both conventional dendritic cells (cDCs) and plasmacytoid dendritic cells (pDCs) are present in the gut-associated lymphoid tissues (GALT), the roles of pDCs in the gut remain largely unknown. Here we show a critical role for pDCs in T cell-independent (TI) IgA production by B cells in the GALT. When pDCs of the mesenteric lymph nodes (MLNs) and Peyer's patches (PPs) (which are representative GALT) were cultured with naive B cells to induce TI IgA class switch recombination (CSR), IgA production was substantially higher than in cocultures of these cells with cDCs. IgA production was dependent on APRIL and BAFF production by pDCs. Importantly, pDC expression of APRIL and BAFF was dependent on stromal cell-derived type I IFN signaling under steady-state conditions. Our findings provide insight into the molecular basis of pDC conditioning to induce mucosal TI IgA production, which may lead to improvements in vaccination strategies and treatment for mucosal-related disorders. PMID:21333555

  8. CpG-B Oligodeoxynucleotides Inhibit TLR-Dependent and -Independent Induction of Type I IFN in Dendritic Cells

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yi C.; Gray, Reginald C.; Hardy, Gareth A. D.; Kuchtey, John; Abbott, Derek W.; Emancipator, Steven N.; Harding, Clifford V.

    2010-01-01

    CpG oligodeoxynucleotides (ODNs) signal through TLR9 to induce type I IFN (IFN-αβ) in dendritic cells (DCs). CpG-A ODNs are more efficacious than CpG-B ODNs for induction of IFN-αβ. Because IFN-αβ may contribute to autoimmunity, it is important to identify mechanisms to inhibit induction of IFN-αβ. In our studies, CpG-B ODN inhibited induction of IFN-αβ by CpG-A ODN, whereas induction of TNF-α and IL-12p40 by CpG-A ODN was not affected. CpG-B inhibition of IFN-αβ was observed in FLT3 ligand-induced murine DCs, purified murine myeloid DCs, plasmacytoid DCs, and human PBMCs. CpG-B ODN inhibited induction of IFN-αβ by agonists of multiple receptors, including MyD88-dependent TLRs (CpG-AODN signaling via TLR9, or R837 or Sendai virus signaling via TLR7) and MyD88-independent receptors (polyinosinic:polycytidylic acid signaling via TLR3 or ds break-DNA signaling via a cytosolic pathway). CpG-B ODN did not inhibit the IFN-αβ positive feedback loop second-wave IFN-αβ, because IFN-αβ–induced expression of IFN-αβ was unaffected, and CpG-B inhibition of IFN-αβ was manifested in IFN-αβR−/− DCs, which lack the positive feedback mechanism. Rather, CpG-B ODN inhibited early TLR-induced first wave IFN-α4 and IFN-β. Chromatin immunoprecipitation revealed that association of IFN regulatory factor 1 with the IFN-α4 and IFN-β promoters was induced by CpG-A ODN but not CpG-B ODN. Moreover, CpG-A–induced association of IFN regulatory factor 1 with these promoters was inhibited by CpG-B ODN. Our studies demonstrate a novel mechanism of transcriptional regulation of first-wave IFN-αβ that selectively inhibits induction of IFN-αβ downstream of multiple receptors and may provide targets for future therapeutic inhibition of IFN-αβ expression in vivo. PMID:20181884

  9. From The Cover: Induction of antiviral immunity requires Toll-like receptor signaling in both stromal and dendritic cell compartments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sato, Ayuko; Iwasaki, Akiko

    2004-11-01

    Pattern recognition by Toll-like receptors (TLRs) is known to be important for the induction of dendritic cell (DC) maturation. DCs, in turn, are critically important in the initiation of T cell responses. However, most viruses do not infect DCs. This recognition system poses a biological problem in ensuring that most viral infections be detected by pattern recognition receptors. Furthermore, it is unknown what, if any, is the contribution of TLRs expressed by cells that are infected by a virus, versus TLRs expressed by DCs, in the initiation of antiviral adaptive immunity. Here we address these issues using a physiologically relevant model of mucosal infection with herpes simplex virus type 2. We demonstrate that innate immune recognition of viral infection occurs in two distinct stages, one at the level of the infected epithelial cells and the other at the level of the noninfected DCs. Importantly, both TLR-mediated recognition events are required for the induction of effector T cells. Our results demonstrate that virally infected tissues instruct DCs to initiate the appropriate class of effector T cell responses and reveal the critical importance of the stromal cells in detecting infectious agents through their own pattern recognition receptors. mucosal immunity | pattern recognition | viral infection

  10. Induction of T helper 3 regulatory cells by dendritic cells infected with porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus

    SciTech Connect

    Silva-Campa, Erika; Flores-Mendoza, Lilian; Resendiz, Monica; Pinelli-Saavedra, Araceli; Mata-Haro, Veronica; Mwangi, Waithaka; Hernandez, Jesus

    2009-05-10

    Delayed development of virus-specific immune response has been observed in pigs infected with the porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV). Several studies support the hypothesis that the PRRSV is capable of modulating porcine immune system, but the mechanisms involved are yet to be defined. In this study, we evaluated the induction of T regulatory cells by PRRSV-infected dendritic cells (DCs). Our results showed that PRRSV-infected DCs significantly increased Foxp3{sup +}CD25{sup +} T cells, an effect that was reversible by IFN-alpha treatment, and this outcome was reproducible using two distinct PRRSV strains. Analysis of the expressed cytokines suggested that the induction of Foxp3{sup +}CD25{sup +} T cells is dependent on TGF-beta but not IL-10. In addition, a significant up-regulation of Foxp3 mRNA, but not TBX21 or GATA3, was detected. Importantly, our results showed that the induced Foxp3{sup +}CD25{sup +} T cells were able to suppress the proliferation of PHA-stimulated PBMCs. The T cells induced by the PRRSV-infected DCs fit the Foxp3{sup +}CD25{sup +} T helper 3 (Th3) regulatory cell phenotype described in the literature. The induction of this cell phenotype depended, at least in part, on PRRSV viability because IFN-alpha treatment or virus inactivation reversed these effects. In conclusion, this data supports the hypothesis that the PRRSV succeeds to establish and replicate in porcine cells early post-infection, in part, by inducing Th3 regulatory cells as a mechanism of modulating the porcine immune system.

  11. Induction of ALDH activity in intestinal dendritic cells by Lactobacillus plantarum NRIC0380.

    PubMed

    Yoshida, Tadashi; Enomoto, Mai; Nakayama, Sayuri; Adachi, Yu; Fujiwara, Wataru; Sugiyama, Hisashi; Shimojoh, Manabu; Okada, Sanae; Hattori, Makoto

    2013-01-01

    Lactic acid bacteria have been reported to have various immune-regulating activities. We also found in the previous study that the oral administration of heat-killed Lactobacillus plantarum NRIC0380 induced CD4(+)CD25(+)Foxp3(+) cells (Treg cells). We examine in this present study the influence of NRIC0380 on the function of intestinal dendritic cells (DCs) in vitro and in vivo. The aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH) activity was significantly induced in DCs obtained from the mesenteric lymph node (MLN) by culturing with NRIC0380. The oral administration of NRIC0380 also significantly increased ALDH-positive DCs in MLN. NRIC0380 significantly enhanced the production of TGF-β from MLN cells in vitro. These effects were not apparent in cells from the Peyer's patch (PP) and spleen (SPL). NRIC0380 also significantly enhanced the expression of B7-H1 on DCs of all organs in vitro. The effects of NRIC0380 on DCs, especially those located in MLN, might be involved in its function to induce Treg cells. PMID:24018660

  12. Dectin-1-activated dendritic cells trigger potent antitumour immunity through the induction of Th9 cells.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yinghua; Chu, Xiao; Chen, Jintong; Wang, Ying; Gao, Sujun; Jiang, Yuxue; Zhu, Xiaoqing; Tan, Guangyun; Zhao, Wenjie; Yi, Huanfa; Xu, Honglin; Ma, Xingzhe; Lu, Yong; Yi, Qing; Wang, Siqing

    2016-01-01

    Dectin-1 signalling in dendritic cells (DCs) has an important role in triggering protective antifungal Th17 responses. However, whether dectin-1 directs DCs to prime antitumour Th9 cells remains unclear. Here, we show that DCs activated by dectin-1 agonists potently promote naive CD4(+) T cells to differentiate into Th9 cells. Abrogation of dectin-1 in DCs completely abolishes their Th9-polarizing capability in response to dectin-1 agonist curdlan. Notably, dectin-1 stimulation of DCs upregulates TNFSF15 and OX40L, which are essential for dectin-1-activated DC-induced Th9 cell priming. Mechanistically, dectin-1 activates Syk, Raf1 and NF-κB signalling pathways, resulting in increased p50 and RelB nuclear translocation and TNFSF15 and OX40L expression. Furthermore, immunization of tumour-bearing mice with dectin-1-activated DCs induces potent antitumour response that depends on Th9 cells and IL-9 induced by dectin-1-activated DCs in vivo. Our results identify dectin-1-activated DCs as a powerful inducer of Th9 cells and antitumour immunity and may have important clinical implications. PMID:27492902

  13. Dectin-1-activated dendritic cells trigger potent antitumour immunity through the induction of Th9 cells

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Yinghua; Chu, Xiao; Chen, Jintong; Wang, Ying; Gao, Sujun; Jiang, Yuxue; Zhu, Xiaoqing; Tan, Guangyun; Zhao, Wenjie; Yi, Huanfa; Xu, Honglin; Ma, Xingzhe; Lu, Yong; Yi, Qing; Wang, Siqing

    2016-01-01

    Dectin-1 signalling in dendritic cells (DCs) has an important role in triggering protective antifungal Th17 responses. However, whether dectin-1 directs DCs to prime antitumour Th9 cells remains unclear. Here, we show that DCs activated by dectin-1 agonists potently promote naive CD4+ T cells to differentiate into Th9 cells. Abrogation of dectin-1 in DCs completely abolishes their Th9-polarizing capability in response to dectin-1 agonist curdlan. Notably, dectin-1 stimulation of DCs upregulates TNFSF15 and OX40L, which are essential for dectin-1-activated DC-induced Th9 cell priming. Mechanistically, dectin-1 activates Syk, Raf1 and NF-κB signalling pathways, resulting in increased p50 and RelB nuclear translocation and TNFSF15 and OX40L expression. Furthermore, immunization of tumour-bearing mice with dectin-1-activated DCs induces potent antitumour response that depends on Th9 cells and IL-9 induced by dectin-1-activated DCs in vivo. Our results identify dectin-1-activated DCs as a powerful inducer of Th9 cells and antitumour immunity and may have important clinical implications. PMID:27492902

  14. CD47 Blockade Triggers T cell-mediated Destruction of Immunogenic Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Xiaojuan; Pu, Yang; Cron, Kyle; Deng, Liufu; Kline, Justin; Frazier, William A.; Xu, Hairong; Peng, Hua; Fu, Yang-Xin; Xu, Meng Michelle

    2015-01-01

    Macrophage phagocytosis of tumor cells mediated by CD47-specific blocking antibodies has been proposed to be the major effector mechanism in xenograft models. Using syngeneic immunocompetent tumor models, we reveal that in the therapeutic effects of CD47 blockade depend on dendritic cell (DC) but not macrophage cross-priming of T cell responses in immunocompetent mice. The therapeutic effects of anti-CD47 antibody therapy were abrogated in T cell-deficient mice. In addition, the anti-tumor effects of CD47 blockade required expression of the cytosolic DNA sensor STING, but neither MyD88 nor TRIF, in CD11c+ cells, suggesting that cytosolic sensing of DNA from tumor cells is enhanced by anti-CD47 treatment, further bridging the innate and adaptive responses. Notably, the timing of administration of standard chemotherapy markedly impacted the induction of anti-tumor T cell responses by CD47 blockade. Together, our findings indicate that CD47 blockade drives T cell-mediated elimination of immunogenic tumors. PMID:26322579

  15. Lentiviral vectors for induction of self-differentiation and conditional ablation of dendritic cells.

    PubMed

    Pincha, M; Salguero, G; Wedekind, D; Sundarasetty, B S; Lin, A; Kasahara, N; Brugman, M H; Jirmo, A C; Modlich, U; Gutzmer, R; Büsche, G; Ganser, A; Stripecke, R

    2011-08-01

    Development of lentiviral vectors (LVs) in the field of immunotherapy and immune regeneration will strongly rely on biosafety of the gene transfer. We demonstrated previously the feasibility of ex vivo genetic programming of mouse bone marrow precursors with LVs encoding granulocyte macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) and interleukin-4 (IL-4), which induced autonomous differentiation of long-lived dendritic cells (DCs), referred to as self-differentiated myeloid-derived antigen-presenting-cells reactive against tumors (SMART-DCs). Here, LV biosafety was enhanced by using a DC-restricted and physiological promoter, the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) II promoter, and including co-expression of the herpes simplex virus-thymidine kinase (sr39HSV-TK) conditional suicide gene. Tricistronic vectors co-expressing sr39HSV-TK, GM-CSF and IL-4 transcriptionally regulated by the MHCII promoter or the ubiquitous cytomegalovirus (CMV) promoter were compared. Despite the different gene transfer effects, such as the kinetics, levels of transgene expression and persistency of integrated vector copies, both vectors induced highly viable SMART-DCs, which persisted for at least 70 days in vivo and could be ablated with the pro-drug Ganciclovir (GCV). SMART-DCs co-expressing the tyrosine-related protein 2 melanoma antigen administered subcutaneously generated antigen-specific, anti-melanoma protective and therapeutic responses in the mouse B16 melanoma model. GCV administration after immunotherapy did not abrogate DC vaccination efficacy. This demonstrates proof-of-principle of genetically programmed DCs that can be ablated pharmacologically. PMID:21412283

  16. Induction of maturation of human blood dendritic cell precursors by measles virus is associated with immunosuppression.

    PubMed

    Schnorr, J J; Xanthakos, S; Keikavoussi, P; Kämpgen, E; ter Meulen, V; Schneider-Schaulies, S

    1997-05-13

    As well as inducing a protective immune response against reinfection, acute measles is associated with a marked suppression of immune functions against superinfecting agents and recall antigens, and this association is the major cause of the current high morbidity and mortality rate associated with measles virus (MV) infections. Dendritic cells (DCs) are antigen-presenting cells crucially involved in the initiation of primary and secondary immune responses, so we set out to define the interaction of MV with these cells. We found that both mature and precursor human DCs generated from peripheral blood monocytic cells express the major MV protein receptor CD46 and are highly susceptible to infection with both MV vaccine (ED) and wild-type (WTF) strains, albeit with different kinetics. Except for the down-regulation of CD46, the expression pattern of functionally important surface antigens on mature DCs was not markedly altered after MV infection. However, precursor DCs up-regulated HLA-DR, CD83, and CD86 within 24 h of WTF infection and 72 h after ED infection, indicating their functional maturation. In addition, interleukin 12 synthesis was markedly enhanced after both ED and WTF infection in DCs. On the other hand, MV-infected DCs strongly interfered with mitogen-dependent proliferation of freshly isolated peripheral blood lymphocytes in vitro. These data indicate that the differentiation of effector functions of DCs is not impaired but rather is stimulated by MV infection. Yet, mature, activated DCs expressing MV surface antigens do give a negative signal to inhibit lymphocyte proliferation and thus contribute to MV-induced immunosuppression. PMID:9144236

  17. DNA vaccination strategy targets epidermal dendritic cells, initiating their migration and induction of a host immune response.

    PubMed

    Smith, Trevor Rf; Schultheis, Katherine; Kiosses, William B; Amante, Dinah H; Mendoza, Janess M; Stone, John C; McCoy, Jay R; Sardesai, Niranjan Y; Broderick, Kate E

    2014-01-01

    The immunocompetence and clinical accessibility of dermal tissue offers an appropriate and attractive target for vaccination. We previously demonstrated that pDNA injection into the skin in combination with surface electroporation (SEP), results in rapid and robust expression of the encoded antigen in the epidermis. Here, we demonstrate that intradermally EP-enhanced pDNA vaccination results in the rapid induction of a host humoral immune response. In the dermally relevant guinea pig model, we used high-resolution laser scanning confocal microscopy to observe direct dendritic cell (DC) transfections in the epidermis, to determine the migration kinetics of these cells from the epidermal layer into the dermis, and to follow them sequentially to the immediate draining lymph nodes. Furthermore, we delineate the relationship between the migration of directly transfected epidermal DCs and the generation of the host immune response. In summary, these data indicate that direct presentation of antigen to the immune system by DCs through SEP-based in vivo transfection in the epidermis, is related to the generation of a humoral immune response. PMID:26052522

  18. DNA vaccination strategy targets epidermal dendritic cells, initiating their migration and induction of a host immune response

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Trevor RF; Schultheis, Katherine; Kiosses, William B; Amante, Dinah H; Mendoza, Janess M; Stone, John C; McCoy, Jay R; Sardesai, Niranjan Y; Broderick, Kate E

    2014-01-01

    The immunocompetence and clinical accessibility of dermal tissue offers an appropriate and attractive target for vaccination. We previously demonstrated that pDNA injection into the skin in combination with surface electroporation (SEP), results in rapid and robust expression of the encoded antigen in the epidermis. Here, we demonstrate that intradermally EP-enhanced pDNA vaccination results in the rapid induction of a host humoral immune response. In the dermally relevant guinea pig model, we used high-resolution laser scanning confocal microscopy to observe direct dendritic cell (DC) transfections in the epidermis, to determine the migration kinetics of these cells from the epidermal layer into the dermis, and to follow them sequentially to the immediate draining lymph nodes. Furthermore, we delineate the relationship between the migration of directly transfected epidermal DCs and the generation of the host immune response. In summary, these data indicate that direct presentation of antigen to the immune system by DCs through SEP-based in vivo transfection in the epidermis, is related to the generation of a humoral immune response. PMID:26052522

  19. Sequestration of inhaled particulate antigens by lung phagocytes. A mechanism for the effective inhibition of pulmonary cell-mediated immunity.

    PubMed Central

    MacLean, J. A.; Xia, W.; Pinto, C. E.; Zhao, L.; Liu, H. W.; Kradin, R. L.

    1996-01-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs) have emerged as the dominant antigen-presenting cells (APCs) of the lung, playing a vital role in the induction of cell-mediated immunity to inhaled antigens. We have previously demonstrated that an airway challenge with the soluble antigen hen egg lysozyme yields rapid acquisition of specific antigen-presenting cell activity by purified pulmonary DCs and a cell-mediated immune response in the lung upon secondary challenge. To examine how a particulate antigen leads to a cell-mediated response in vivo, graded concentrations of heat-killed Listeria (HKL) were injected intratracheally into Lewis rats. The bacteria were rapidly ingested by lung macrophages and polymorphonuclear leukocytes. The ability of purified pulmonary DCs pulsed in vivo by an airway challenge with HKL to subsequently stimulate HKL-specific responses ex vivo showed a threshold response, requiring a dose in excess of 10(9) organisms/rat. By contrast, all dosages of HKL yielded specific sensitization of lymphocytes in the draining bilar nodes. Pulmonary DCs purified from rats after a secondary in vivo airway challenge with HKL at day 14 were ineffective antigen-presenting cells except at high dosages of antigen. The generation of cell-mediated pulmonary inflammation paralleled the antigen-presenting cell activity of pulmonary DCs and was observed only at high antigen dosages. Hen egg lysozyme immobilized onto polystyrene beads and injected intratracheally yielded comparable results to those observed with HKL. We suggest that a pulmonary cellular immune response is generated to an inhaled particulate antigen when the protective phagocytic capacities of the lung are exceeded and antigen is able to interact directly with interstitial DCs. The diversion of particulate antigens by pulmonary phagocytes may help to limit undesirable pulmonary inflammation while allowing the generation of antigen-specific immune lymphocytes in vivo. Images Figure 2 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 7 Figure 9

  20. Cetuximab ± chemotherapy enhances dendritic cell-mediated phagocytosis of colon cancer cells and ignites a highly efficient colon cancer antigen-specific cytotoxic T-cell response in vitro.

    PubMed

    Correale, P; Botta, C; Cusi, M G; Del Vecchio, M T; De Santi, M M; Gori Savellini, G; Bestoso, E; Apollinari, S; Mannucci, S; Marra, M; Abbruzzese, A; Aquino, A; Turriziani, M; Bonmassar, L; Caraglia, M; Tagliaferri, P

    2012-04-01

    Cetuximab is a human/mouse chimeric IgG1 monoclonal antibody (mAb) to epidermal growth factor receptor, approved for colorectal carcinoma treatment in combination with chemotherapy. The immune-mediated effects elicited by its human fraction of crystallization moiety might critically contribute to the overall anti-tumor effectiveness of the antibody. We therefore investigated cetuximab ability to promote colon cancer cell opsonization and phagocytosis by human dendritic cells (DCs) that are subsequently engaged in antigen-cross presentation to cytotoxic T-lymphocyte (CTL) precursors. Human colon cancer cell lines were evaluated for susceptibility to DC-mediated phagocytosis before and after treatment with chemotherapy ± cetuximab in vitro. Human DCs loaded with control or drug-treated cetuximab-coated colon cancer cells were used to in vitro generate cytotoxic T cell clones from peripheral blood mononuclear cells of human leucocyte antigen-A(*)02.01(+) donors. T-cell cultures were characterized for immune-phenotype and tumor-antigen specific CTL activity. The results confirmed that treatment of tumor cells with irinotecan + L-folinate + 5-flurouracil (ILF) or with gemcitabine + ILF increased tumor antigen expression. Moreover, malignant cells exposed to chemotherapy and cetuximab were highly susceptible to phagocytosis by human DCs and were able to promote their activation. The consequent DC-mediated cross-priming of antigens derived from mAb-covered/drug-treated cancer cells elicited a robust CTL anti-tumor response. On the basis of our data, we suggest a possible involvement of CTL-dependent immunity in cetuximab anti-cancer effects. PMID:21618510

  1. Synergy between rapamycin and FLT3 ligand enhances plasmacytoid dendritic cell–dependent induction of CD4+CD25+FoxP3+ Treg

    PubMed Central

    Biswas, Moanaro; Sarkar, Debalina; Kumar, Sandeep R. P.; Nayak, Sushrusha; Rogers, Geoffrey L.; Markusic, David M.; Liao, Gongxian; Terhorst, Cox

    2015-01-01

    CD4+CD25+FoxP3+ regulatory T cells (Treg) are critical elements for maintaining immune tolerance, for instance to exogenous antigens that are introduced during therapeutic interventions such as cell/organ transplant or gene/protein replacement therapy. Coadministration of antigen with rapamycin simultaneously promotes deletion of conventional CD4+ T cells and induction of Treg. Here, we report that the cytokine FMS-like receptor tyrosine kinase ligand (Flt3L) enhances the in vivo effect of rapamycin. This occurs via selective expansion of plasmacytoid dendritic cells (pDCs), which further augments the number of Treg. Whereas in conventional DCs, rapamycin effectively blocks mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) 1 signaling induced by Flt3L, increased mTOR1 activity renders pDCs more resistant to inhibition by rapamycin. Consequently, Flt3L and rapamycin synergistically promote induction of antigen-specific Treg via selective expansion of pDCs. This concept is supported by the finding that Treg induction is abrogated upon pDC depletion. The combination with pDCs and rapamycin is requisite for Flt3L/antigen-induced Treg induction because Flt3L/antigen by itself fails to induce Treg. As coadministering Flt3L, rapamycin, and antigen blocked CD8+ T-cell and antibody responses in models of gene and protein therapy, we conclude that the differential effect of rapamycin on DC subsets can be exploited for improved tolerance induction. PMID:25833958

  2. Topical vaccination with functionalized particles targeting dendritic cells.

    PubMed

    Baleeiro, Renato B; Wiesmüller, Karl-Heinz; Reiter, Yoran; Baude, Barbara; Dähne, Lars; Patzelt, Alexa; Lademann, Jürgen; Barbuto, José A; Walden, Peter

    2013-08-01

    Needle-free vaccination, for reasons of safety, economy, and convenience, is a central goal in vaccine development, but it also needs to meet the immunological requirements for efficient induction of prophylactic and therapeutic immune responses. Combining the principles of noninvasive delivery to dendritic cells (DCs) through skin and the immunological principles of cell-mediated immunity, we developed microparticle-based topical vaccines. We show here that the microparticles are efficient carriers for coordinated delivery of the essential vaccine constituents to DCs for cross-presentation of the antigens and stimulation of T-cell responses. When applied to the skin, the microparticles penetrate into hair follicles and target the resident DCs, the immunologically most potent cells and site for induction of efficient immune responses. The microparticle vaccine principle can be applied to different antigen formats such as peptides and proteins, or nucleic acids coding for the antigens. PMID:23426134

  3. Manipulation of dendritic cell functions by human cytomegalovirus.

    PubMed

    Sinclair, John

    2008-01-01

    Dendritic cells are the most potent antigen-presenting cells of the mammalian immune system and are central to the initiation and maintenance of the adaptive immune response. They are crucial for the presentation of antigen to T cells and B cells, as well as the induction of chemokines and proinflammatory cytokines, which orchestrate the balance of the cell-mediated (Th1) and antibody (Th2) response. This ability of dendritic cells to present antigen and release chemokines and cytokines also bridges the innate and adaptive immune responses by driving T cell activation. These cells thus possess key immunological functions that make them the front line of defence for the targeting and clearance of any invading pathogen and, as such, they underpin the host immune response to infection. For efficient infection, invading pathogens often need to overcome these sentinel immune functions. It is therefore not surprising that pathogens have evolved numerous mechanisms to target dendritic cell functions directly or indirectly during infection, and at least one herpesvirus--human cytomegalovirus--has evolved a life cycle that hijacks dendritic cells for its long-term persistence in the infected host. PMID:19025715

  4. A Human Trypanosome Suppresses CD8+ T Cell Priming by Dendritic Cells through the Induction of Immune Regulatory CD4+ Foxp3+ T Cells

    PubMed Central

    Ersching, Jonatan; Basso, Alexandre Salgado; Kalich, Vera Lucia Garcia; Bortoluci, Karina Ramalho

    2016-01-01

    Although CD4+ Foxp3+ T cells are largely described in the regulation of CD4+ T cell responses, their role in the suppression of CD8+ T cell priming is much less clear. Because the induction of CD8+ T cells during experimental infection with Trypanosoma cruzi is remarkably delayed and suboptimal, we raised the hypothesis that this protozoan parasite actively induces the regulation of CD8+ T cell priming. Using an in vivo assay that eliminated multiple variables associated with antigen processing and dendritic cell activation, we found that injection of bone marrow-derived dendritic cells exposed to T. cruzi induced regulatory CD4+ Foxp3+ T cells that suppressed the priming of transgenic CD8+ T cells by peptide-loaded BMDC. This newly described suppressive effect on CD8+ T cell priming was independent of IL-10, but partially dependent on CTLA-4 and TGF-β. Accordingly, depletion of Foxp3+ cells in mice infected with T. cruzi enhanced the response of epitope-specific CD8+ T cells. Altogether, our data uncover a mechanism by which T. cruzi suppresses CD8+ T cell responses, an event related to the establishment of chronic infections. PMID:27332899

  5. A Human Trypanosome Suppresses CD8+ T Cell Priming by Dendritic Cells through the Induction of Immune Regulatory CD4+ Foxp3+ T Cells.

    PubMed

    Ersching, Jonatan; Basso, Alexandre Salgado; Kalich, Vera Lucia Garcia; Bortoluci, Karina Ramalho; Rodrigues, Maurício M

    2016-06-01

    Although CD4+ Foxp3+ T cells are largely described in the regulation of CD4+ T cell responses, their role in the suppression of CD8+ T cell priming is much less clear. Because the induction of CD8+ T cells during experimental infection with Trypanosoma cruzi is remarkably delayed and suboptimal, we raised the hypothesis that this protozoan parasite actively induces the regulation of CD8+ T cell priming. Using an in vivo assay that eliminated multiple variables associated with antigen processing and dendritic cell activation, we found that injection of bone marrow-derived dendritic cells exposed to T. cruzi induced regulatory CD4+ Foxp3+ T cells that suppressed the priming of transgenic CD8+ T cells by peptide-loaded BMDC. This newly described suppressive effect on CD8+ T cell priming was independent of IL-10, but partially dependent on CTLA-4 and TGF-β. Accordingly, depletion of Foxp3+ cells in mice infected with T. cruzi enhanced the response of epitope-specific CD8+ T cells. Altogether, our data uncover a mechanism by which T. cruzi suppresses CD8+ T cell responses, an event related to the establishment of chronic infections. PMID:27332899

  6. The Dark Side of Dendritic Cells: Development and Exploitation of Tolerogenic Activity That Favor Tumor Outgrowth and Immune Escape

    PubMed Central

    Seliger, Barbara; Massa, Chiara

    2013-01-01

    Dendritic cells (DC) play a central role in the regulation of the immune responses by providing the information needed to decide between tolerance, ignorance, or active responses. For this reason different therapies aim at manipulating DC to obtain the desired response, such as enhanced cell-mediated toxicity against tumor and infected cells or the induction of tolerance in autoimmunity and transplantation. In the last decade studies performed in these settings have started to identify (some) molecules/factors involved in the acquisition of a tolerogenic DC phenotype as well as the underlying mechanisms of their regulatory function on different immune cell populations. PMID:24348482

  7. Cell mediated immune regulation in autoimmunity.

    PubMed

    Gillissen, G; Pusztai-Markos, Z

    1979-01-01

    Autoimmunity is the term for the immune conditions characterized by a specific humoral or cell mediated response to the body's own tissues. The termination of the natural state of self tolerance may lead to immunopathological manifestations with clinical consequences, i.e. autoimmune diseases. In a very general sense, one may classify autoimmune diseases into two groups with respect to the underlying mechanism: 1. There are autoimmune diseases which develop in the presence of a normal intact regulation mechanism. 2. Another group whose development must be understood on the basis of a cellular dysfunction. In the first case, dequestered or semi-sequestered autoantigens are liberated as a consequence of exogenic influences inducing the sensitization of immunocompetent cells. The immune system then reacts with these autoantigens in the same way as with foreign substances. This kind of autoimmune disease will, however, not be dealt with here. In the second case, autoantigens are normally, i.e. in healthy individuals, accessible to the immunocompetent cells. To understand the reason for the development of an autoimmune reaction one must first clarify the mechanism of self tolerance. Then one must examine the way in which a break of this physiological state takes place. One of the major unanswered questions is the relative importance of antibody-mediated and cell-mediated immune mechanisms in the onset and further development of autoimmune diseases. Recently it has been suggested that a dysfunction at the cellular level might represent the basic cause which induces the termination of selftolerance. Most of the conceptions about the mechanism by which autoimmune diseases are triggered were gained through experiments with animals. It is, however, difficult to use these experimental results to explain human diseases; in humans many questions are still open. Undoubtedly, the mechanisms of induction and maintenance of self tolerance and also the ways in which autoimmune

  8. Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus shows poor replication but significant induction of antiviral responses in human monocyte-derived macrophages and dendritic cells.

    PubMed

    Tynell, Janne; Westenius, Veera; Rönkkö, Esa; Munster, Vincent J; Melén, Krister; Österlund, Pamela; Julkunen, Ilkka

    2016-02-01

    In this study we assessed the ability of Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus (MERS-CoV) to replicate and induce innate immunity in human monocyte-derived macrophages and dendritic cells (MDDCs), and compared it with severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus (SARS-CoV). Assessments of viral protein and RNA levels in infected cells showed that both viruses were impaired in their ability to replicate in these cells. Some induction of IFN-λ1, CXCL10 and MxA mRNAs in both macrophages and MDDCs was seen in response to MERS-CoV infection, but almost no such induction was observed in response to SARS-CoV infection. ELISA and Western blot assays showed clear production of CXCL10 and MxA in MERS-CoV-infected macrophages and MDDCs. Our data suggest that SARS-CoV and MERS-CoV replicate poorly in human macrophages and MDDCs, but MERS-CoV is nonetheless capable of inducing a readily detectable host innate immune response. Our results highlight a clear difference between the viruses in activating host innate immune responses in macrophages and MDDCs, which may contribute to the pathogenesis of infection. PMID:26602089

  9. Induction of hippocampal long-term potentiation increases the morphological dynamics of microglial processes and prolongs their contacts with dendritic spines.

    PubMed

    Pfeiffer, Thomas; Avignone, Elena; Nägerl, U Valentin

    2016-01-01

    Recently microglia, the resident immune cells of the brain, have been recognized as multi-tasking talents that are not only essential in the diseased brain, but also actively contribute to synaptic circuit remodeling during normal brain development. It is well established that microglia dynamically scan their environment and thereby establish transient physical contacts with neuronal synapses, which may allow them to sense and influence synaptic function. However, it is unknown whether and how the morphological dynamics of microglia and their physical interactions with synapses are affected by the induction of synaptic plasticity in the adult brain. To this end, we characterized the morphological dynamics of microglia and their interactions with synapses before and after the induction of synaptic plasticity (LTP) in the hippocampus by time-lapse two-photon imaging and electrophysiological recordings in acute brain slices. We demonstrate that during hippocampal LTP microglia alter their morphological dynamics by increasing the number of their processes and by prolonging their physical contacts with dendritic spines. These effects were absent in the presence of an NMDA receptor antagonist. Taken together, this altered behavior could reflect an active microglial involvement in circuit remodeling during activity-dependent synaptic plasticity in the healthy adult brain. PMID:27604518

  10. Induction of hippocampal long-term potentiation increases the morphological dynamics of microglial processes and prolongs their contacts with dendritic spines

    PubMed Central

    Pfeiffer, Thomas; Avignone, Elena; Nägerl, U. Valentin

    2016-01-01

    Recently microglia, the resident immune cells of the brain, have been recognized as multi-tasking talents that are not only essential in the diseased brain, but also actively contribute to synaptic circuit remodeling during normal brain development. It is well established that microglia dynamically scan their environment and thereby establish transient physical contacts with neuronal synapses, which may allow them to sense and influence synaptic function. However, it is unknown whether and how the morphological dynamics of microglia and their physical interactions with synapses are affected by the induction of synaptic plasticity in the adult brain. To this end, we characterized the morphological dynamics of microglia and their interactions with synapses before and after the induction of synaptic plasticity (LTP) in the hippocampus by time-lapse two-photon imaging and electrophysiological recordings in acute brain slices. We demonstrate that during hippocampal LTP microglia alter their morphological dynamics by increasing the number of their processes and by prolonging their physical contacts with dendritic spines. These effects were absent in the presence of an NMDA receptor antagonist. Taken together, this altered behavior could reflect an active microglial involvement in circuit remodeling during activity-dependent synaptic plasticity in the healthy adult brain. PMID:27604518

  11. Human Dendritic Cells exhibit a pronounced type I IFN signature following Leishmania major infection that is required for IL-12 induction1.

    PubMed Central

    Favila, Michelle A.; Geraci, Nicholas S.; Zeng, Erliang; Harker, Brent; Condon, David; Cotton, Rachel N.; Jayakumar, Asha; Tripathi, Vinita; McDowell, Mary Ann

    2014-01-01

    Leishmania major infected human dendritic cells (DCs) exhibit a marked induction of IL-12, ultimately promoting a robust Th1-mediated response associated with parasite killing and protective immunity. The host cell transcription machinery associated with the specific IL-12 induction observed during L. major infection remains to be thoroughly elucidated. In this study, we utilized Affymetrix Genechips to globally assess the host cell genes and pathways associated with early L. major infection in human myeloid-derived DCs. Our data revealed 728 genes were significantly differentially expressed and molecular signaling pathway revealed that the type I IFN pathway was significantly enriched. Addition of a neutralizing type I IFN decoy receptor blocked the expression of IRF7 and IL-12p40 during DC infection, indicating the L. major induced expression of IL-12p40 is dependent upon the type I IFN signaling pathway. In stark contrast, IL-12p40 expression is not elicited by Leishmania donovani, the etiological agent of deadly visceral leishmaniasis. Therefore, we examined the gene expression profile for several IFN response genes in L. major versus L. donovani DC infections. Our data revealed that L. major, but not L. donovani, induces expression of IRF2, IRF7, and IFIT5, implicating the regulation of type I IFN associated signaling pathways as mediating factors toward the production of IL-12. PMID:24808365

  12. Leptin deficiency impairs maturation of dendritic cells and enhances induction of regulatory T and Th17 cells

    PubMed Central

    Moraes-Vieira, Pedro M.M.; Larocca, Rafael A.; Bassi, Enio J.; Peron, Jean Pierre S.; Andrade-Oliveira, Vinícius; Wasinski, Frederick; Araujo, Ronaldo; Thornley, Thomas; Quintana, Francisco J.; Basso, Alexandre S.; Strom, Terry B.; Câmara, Niels O.S.

    2016-01-01

    Leptin is an adipose-secreted hormone that plays an important role in both metabolism and immunity. Leptin has been shown to induce Th1-cell polarization and inhibit Th2-cell responses. Additionally, leptin induces Th17-cell responses, inhibits regulatory T (Treg) cells and modulates autoimmune diseases. Here, we investigated whether leptin mediates its activity on T cells by influencing dendritic cells (DCs) to promote Th17 and Treg-cell immune responses in mice. We observed that leptin deficiency (i) reduced the expression of DC maturation markers, (ii) decreased DC production of IL-12, TNF-α, and IL-6, (iii) increased DC production of TGF-β, and (iv) limited the capacity of DCs to induce syngeneic CD4+ T-cell proliferation. As a consequence of this unique phenotype, DCs generated under leptin-free conditions induced Treg or TH17 cells more efficiently than DCs generated in the presence of leptin. These data indicate important roles for leptin in DC homeostasis and the initiation and maintenance of inflammatory and regulatory immune responses by DCs. PMID:24271843

  13. Oxaliplatin regulates expression of stress ligands in ovarian cancer cells and modulates their susceptibility to natural killer cell-mediated cytotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Siew, Yin-Yin; Neo, Soek-Ying; Yew, Hui-Chuing; Lim, Shun-Wei; Ng, Yi-Cheng; Lew, Si-Min; Seetoh, Wei-Guang; Seow, See-Voon; Koh, Hwee-Ling

    2015-12-01

    Selected cytotoxic chemicals can provoke the immune system to recognize and destroy malignant tumors. Most of the studies on immunogenic cell death are focused on the signals that operate on a series of receptors expressed by dendritic cells to induce tumor antigen-specific T-cell responses. Here, we explored the effects of oxaliplatin, an immunogenic cell death inducer, on the induction of stress ligands and promotion of natural killer (NK) cell-mediated cytotoxicity in human ovarian cancer cells. The results indicated that treatment of tumor cells with oxaliplatin induced the production of type I interferons and chemokines and enhanced the expression of major histocompatibility complex class I-related chains (MIC) A/B, UL16-binding protein (ULBP)-3, CD155 and TNF-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL)-R1/R2. Furthermore, oxaliplatin but not cisplatin treatment enhanced susceptibility of ovarian cancer cells to NK cell-mediated cytolysis. In addition, activated NK cells completely abrogated the growth of cancer cells that were pretreated with oxaliplatin. However, cancer cells pretreated with the same concentration of oxaliplatin alone were capable of potentiating regrowth over a period of time. These results suggest an advantage in combining oxaliplatin and NK cell-based therapy in the treatment of ovarian cancer. Further investigation on such potential combination therapy is warranted. PMID:26138671

  14. The Vaccine Adjuvant Chitosan Promotes Cellular Immunity via DNA Sensor cGAS-STING-Dependent Induction of Type I Interferons.

    PubMed

    Carroll, Elizabeth C; Jin, Lei; Mori, Andres; Muñoz-Wolf, Natalia; Oleszycka, Ewa; Moran, Hannah B T; Mansouri, Samira; McEntee, Craig P; Lambe, Eimear; Agger, Else Marie; Andersen, Peter; Cunningham, Colm; Hertzog, Paul; Fitzgerald, Katherine A; Bowie, Andrew G; Lavelle, Ed C

    2016-03-15

    The cationic polysaccharide chitosan is an attractive candidate adjuvant capable of driving potent cell-mediated immunity, but the mechanism by which it acts is not clear. We show that chitosan promotes dendritic cell maturation by inducing type I interferons (IFNs) and enhances antigen-specific T helper 1 (Th1) responses in a type I IFN receptor-dependent manner. The induction of type I IFNs, IFN-stimulated genes and dendritic cell maturation by chitosan required the cytoplasmic DNA sensor cGAS and STING, implicating this pathway in dendritic cell activation. Additionally, this process was dependent on mitochondrial reactive oxygen species and the presence of cytoplasmic DNA. Chitosan-mediated enhancement of antigen specific Th1 and immunoglobulin G2c responses following vaccination was dependent on both cGAS and STING. These findings demonstrate that a cationic polymer can engage the STING-cGAS pathway to trigger innate and adaptive immune responses. PMID:26944200

  15. Induction of Tolerogenic Dendritic Cells by a PEGylated TLR7 Ligand for Treatment of Type 1 Diabetes.

    PubMed

    Hayashi, Tomoko; Yao, Shiyin; Crain, Brian; Promessi, Victor J; Shyu, Luke; Sheng, Caroline; Kang, McNancy; Cottam, Howard B; Carson, Dennis A; Corr, Maripat

    2015-01-01

    Autoimmune diabetes mellitus (DM) results from the destruction of pancreatic islet cells by activated T lymphocytes, which have been primed by activated dendritic cells (DC). Individualized therapy with ex vivo DC manipulation and reinfusion has been proposed as a treatment for DM, but this treatment is limited by cost, and requires specialized facilities. A means of in situ modulation of the DC phenotype in the host would be more accessible. Here we report a novel innate immune modulator, 1Z1, generated by conjugating a TLR7 ligand to six units of polyethylene glycol (PEG), which skews DC phenotype in vivo. 1Z1 was less potent in inducing cytokine production by DC than the parent ligand in vitro and in vivo. In addition, this drug only modestly increased DC surface expression of activation markers such as MHC class II, CD80, and CD86; however, the expression of negative regulatory molecules, such as programmed death ligand 1 (PD-L1), and interleukin-1 receptor-associated kinase M (IRAK-M) were markedly increased. In vivo transfer of 1Z1 treated DC into prediabetic NOD mice delayed pancreatic insulitis. Daily administration of 1Z1 effectively prevented the clinical onset of hyperglycemia and reduced histologic islet inflammation. Daily treatment with 1Z1 increased PD-L1 expression in the CD11c(+) population in peri-pancreatic lymph nodes; however, it did not induce an increase in regulatory T cells. Pharmaceutical modulation of DC maturation and function in situ, thus represents an opportunity to treat autoimmune disease. PMID:26076454

  16. Hepatic stellate cells undermine the allostimulatory function of liver myeloid dendritic cells via STAT3-dependent induction of IDO

    PubMed Central

    Sumpter, Tina L.; Dangi, Anil; Matta, Benjamin M.; Huang, Chao; Stolz, Donna B.; Vodovotz, Yoram; Thomson, Angus W.; Gandhi, Chandrashekhar R.

    2012-01-01

    Hepatic stellate cells (HSCs) are critical for hepatic wound repair and tissue remodeling. They also produce cytokines and chemokines that may contribute to the maintenance of hepatic immune homeostasis and the inherent tolerogenicity of the liver. The functional relationship between HSCs and the professional migratory APCs in the liver, i.e. dendritic cells (DCs), has not been evaluated. Here, we report that murine liver DCs co-localize with HSCs in vivo under normal, steady-state conditions, and cluster with HSCs in vitro. In vitro, HSCs secrete high levels of DC chemoattractants, such as MIP1α and MCP-1, as well as cytokines that modulate DC activation, including TNFα, IL-6 and IL-1β. Culture of HSCs with conventional liver myeloid (m) DCs resulted in increased IL-6 and IL-10 secretion compared to that of either cell population alone. Co-culture also resulted in enhanced expression of co-stimulatory (CD80, CD86) and co-inhibitory (B7-H1) molecules on mDCs. HSC-induced mDC maturation required cell-cell contact and could be blocked, in part, by neutralizing MIP1α or MCP-1. HSC-induced mDC maturation was dependent on activation of STAT3 in mDCs and in part on HSC-secreted IL-6. Despite up-regulation of co-stimulatory molecules, mDCs conditioned by HSCs demonstrated impaired ability to induce allogeneic T cell proliferation, which was independent of B7-H1, but dependent upon HSC-induced STAT3 activation and subsequent up-regulation of IDO. In conclusion, by promoting IDO expression, HSCs may act as potent regulators of liver mDCs and function to maintain hepatic homeostasis and tolerogenicity. PMID:22962681

  17. Stimulation of dendritic cell maturation and induction of apoptosis in lymphoma cells by a stable lectin from buckwheat seeds.

    PubMed

    Bai, C Z; Ji, H J; Feng, M L; Hao, X L; Zhong, Q M; Cui, X D; Wang, Z H

    2015-01-01

    The present study aims to purify and characterize lectin from tartary buckwheat seeds and study its properties as well as biological activities to determine its possible biomedical applications in promoting maturation and proliferation of peripheral blood DCs derived from healthy donors and to study the effect of inducing apoptosis in human leukemia U937 cells. A novel tartary buckwheat lectin (TBL) protein, purified from tartary buckwheat seeds, showed a single band with a molecular mass of 65 kDa in SDS-PAGE. The purified TBL hemagglutinated both human and animal erythrocytes and showed preference for blood type O and the rabbit blood type. TBL is active at up to 60°C, and it is acid- and alkali-stable. TBL (25 μg/mL) combined with 5 x 10(-5) M rhIL-4 promotes maturation and proliferation of peripheral blood dendritic cells (DCs), which is stronger than that promoted by rhTNF-α (20 ng/mL). Exposure of DCs to 50 μg/mL TBL for 48 h resulted in extensive upregulation of maturation markers CD83 and CD40. These TBL-DCs were capable of producing several pro-inflammatory cytokines such as interleukin-10 (IL-10) and interleukin-12 (IL-12). The results of the treatment of human leukemia U937 cells with TBL in doses of 12.5, 25, 50, and 100 μg/mL showed that tartary buckwheat-derived lectin induces apoptosis in a dose-dependent manner. Our results encourage the use of tartary buckwheat and tartary buckwheat-derived lectins as immunopotentiating foods, targeted to strengthen immune responses and display a potential dietary supplement for cancer prevention. PMID:25867364

  18. Extranodal induction of therapeutic immunity in the tumor microenvironment after intratumoral delivery of Tbet gene-modified dendritic cells

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Lu; Taylor, Jennifer L.; Sabins, Nina Chi; Lowe, Devin B.; Qu, Yanyan; You, Zhaoyang; Storkus, Walter J.

    2013-01-01

    Murine dendritic cells (DC) transduced to express the Type-1 transactivator T-bet (i.e. mDC.Tbet) and delivered intratumorally (i.t.) as a therapy are superior to control wild-type DC in slowing the growth of established subcutaneous (s.c.) MCA205 sarcomas in vivo. Optimal anti-tumor efficacy of mDC.Tbet-based gene therapy was dependent on host NK cells and CD8+ T cells, and required mDC.Tbet expression of MHC class I molecules, but was independent of the capacity of the injected mDC.Tbet to produce pro-inflammatory cytokines (IL-12 family members or IFN-γ) or to migrate to tumor-draining lymph nodes (TDLN) based on CCR7 ligand chemokine recruitment. Conditional (CD11c-DTR) or genetic (BATF3−/−) deficiency in host antigen crosspresenting DC did not diminish the therapeutic action of i.t.-delivered wild-type mDC.Tbet. Interestingly, we observed that i.t delivery of mDC.Tbet (versus control mDC.Null) promoted the acute infiltration of NK cells and naïve CD45RB+ T cells into the tumor microenvironment (TME) in association with elevated expression of NK- and T cell-recruiting chemokines by mDC.Tbet. When taken together, our data support a paradigm for extranodal (cross)priming of therapeutic Type-1 immunity in the TME after i.t. delivery of mDC.Tbet-based gene therapy. PMID:23846252

  19. Suppression of allergic inflammation by allergen-DNA-modified dendritic cells depends on the induction of Foxp3+ Regulatory T cells.

    PubMed

    Wu, Kui; Bi, Yuttian; Sun, Kun; Xia, Junbo; Wang, Yan; Wang, Changzheng

    2008-02-01

    CD4(+)CD25(+)Foxp3(+)Regulatory T cells (Tregs) play important roles in regulating allergic inflammation. To analyse if allergen-DNA-modified dendritic cells (DC) can suppress allergic responses and what roles Treg cells play in DC-based allergen-specific immunotherapy. Immature DC were transfected with retrovirus encoding Der p2 DNA, and administered to mice that sensitized and challenged with Der p2 protein. After Treg cells were depleted with anti-CD25 mAb, mice were re-challenged to observe the airway inflammation, and Treg cells in spleen CD4(+) T cells. And responses of spleen CD4(+) T cells to Der p2 were determined. Co-culture of naïve CD4(+) T cells with allergen-modified DC induced Foxp3+ Tregs. Sensitized and challenged mice developed allergic airway inflammation and Th2 responses, and decreased Foxp3(+) Tregs. Treatment with allergen-modified-DC suppressed airway inflammation and Th2 responses, and increased IL-10 and IFN-gamma production and Foxp3(+) Tregs significantly; and eliminated the responses of CD4(+) T cells to allergen. Administration of anit-CD25 mAb eliminated all the effects of modified-DC except for the increasing of IFN-gamma. Allergen-modified DC can induce immune tolerance to allergens and reverse the established Th2 responses induced by allergen, with dependence on the induction of Foxp3(+) Tregs. PMID:18201369

  20. Induction of Cytomegalovirus-Specific T Cell Responses in Healthy Volunteers and Allogeneic Stem Cell Recipients Using Vaccination With Messenger RNA–Transfected Dendritic Cells

    PubMed Central

    Van Craenenbroeck, Amaryllis H.; Smits, Evelien L.J.; Anguille, Sébastien; Van de Velde, Ann; Stein, Barbara; Braeckman, Tessa; Van Camp, Kirsten; Nijs, Griet; Ieven, Margareta; Goossens, Herman; Berneman, Zwi N.; Van Tendeloo, Viggo F.I.; Verpooten, Gert A.; Van Damme, Pierre; Cools, Nathalie

    2015-01-01

    Background Infection with human cytomegalovirus (CMV) is a significant cause of morbidity and mortality in solid organ and hematopoietic stem cell transplant (HSCT) recipients. Methods The present study explored the safety, feasibility, and immunogenicity of CMV pp65 messenger RNA–loaded autologous monocyte-derived dendritic cells (DC) as a cellular vaccine for active immunization in healthy volunteers and allogeneic HSCT recipients. Four CMV-seronegative healthy volunteers and three allogeneic HSCT recipients were included in the study. Four clinical-grade autologous monocyte-derived DC vaccines were prepared after a single leukapheresis procedure and administered intradermally at a weekly interval. Results De novo induction of CMV-specific T-cell responses was detected in three of four healthy volunteers without serious adverse events. Of the HSCT recipients, none developed CMV disease and one of two patients displayed a remarkable threefold increase in CMV pp65-specific T cells on completion of the DC vaccination trial. Conclusion In conclusion, our DC vaccination strategy induced or expanded a CMV-specific cellular response in four of six efficacy-evaluable study subjects, providing a base for its further exploration in larger cohorts. PMID:25050468

  1. TLR2 dependent induction of vitamin A metabolizing enzymes in dendritic cells promotes T regulatory responses and inhibits TH-17 mediated autoimmunity

    PubMed Central

    Manicassamy, Santhakumar; Ravindran, Rajesh; Deng, Jiusheng; Oluoch, Herold; Denning, Timothy L; Kasturi, Sudhir Pai; Rosenthal, Kristen M.; Evavold, Brian D.; Pulendran, Bali

    2009-01-01

    Immune sensing of a microbe occurs via multiple receptors. How signals from different receptors are coordinated to yield a specific immune response is poorly understood. We demonstrate that the different pathogen recognition receptors, TLR2 and dectin-1, recognizing the same microbial stimulus, stimulate distinct innate and adaptive responses. TLR2 signaling induced splenic dendritic cells (DCs) to express the retinoic acid (RA) metabolizing enzyme Raldh2 and IL-10, and to metabolize vitamin A and stimulate Foxp3+ T regulatory cells (Treg cells). RA acted on DCs to induce Socs3 expression, which suppressed activation of p38 MAPK and pro-inflammatory cytokines. Consistent with this, TLR2 signaling induced Treg cells, and suppressed IL-23 and TH-17/ TH-1 mediated autoimmune responses in vivo. In contrast, dectin-1 signaling mostly induced IL-23 and pro-inflammatory cytokines, and augmented TH-17/ TH-1 mediated autoimmune responses in vivo. These data define a new mechanism for the systemic induction of RA and immune suppression against autoimmunity. PMID:19252500

  2. Toll-like receptor 2-dependent induction of vitamin A-metabolizing enzymes in dendritic cells promotes T regulatory responses and inhibits autoimmunity.

    PubMed

    Manicassamy, Santhakumar; Ravindran, Rajesh; Deng, Jiusheng; Oluoch, Herold; Denning, Timothy L; Kasturi, Sudhir Pai; Rosenthal, Kristen M; Evavold, Brian D; Pulendran, Bali

    2009-04-01

    Immune sensing of a microbe occurs via multiple receptors. How signals from different receptors are coordinated to yield a specific immune response is poorly understood. We show that two pathogen recognition receptors, Toll-like receptor 2 (TLR2) and dectin-1, recognizing the same microbial stimulus, stimulate distinct innate and adaptive responses. TLR2 signaling induced splenic dendritic cells (DCs) to express the retinoic acid metabolizing enzyme retinaldehyde dehydrogenase type 2 and interleukin-10 (IL-10) and to metabolize vitamin A and stimulate Foxp3(+) T regulatory cells (T(reg) cells). Retinoic acid acted on DCs to induce suppressor of cytokine signaling-3 expression, which suppressed activation of p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase and proinflammatory cytokines. Consistent with this finding, TLR2 signaling induced T(reg) cells and suppressed IL-23 and T helper type 17 (T(H)17) and T(H)1-mediated autoimmune responses in vivo. In contrast, dectin-1 signaling mostly induced IL-23 and proinflammatory cytokines and augmented T(H)17 and T(H)1-mediated autoimmune responses in vivo. These data define a new mechanism for the systemic induction of retinoic acid and immune suppression against autoimmunity. PMID:19252500

  3. CD8α+β− and CD8α+β+ plasmacytoid dendritic cells induce Foxp3+ regulatory T cells and prevent the induction of airway hyperreactivity

    PubMed Central

    Lombardi, Vincent; Speak, Anneliese O.; Kerzerho, Jérôme; Szely, Natacha; Akbari, Omid

    2012-01-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs) control the balance between protection against pathogens and tolerance to innocuous or self-antigens. Here, we demonstrate for the first time that mouse plasmacytoid DCs (pDCs) can be segregated into three distinct populations, exhibiting phenotypic and functional differences, according to their surface expression of CD8α or CD8β as CD8α−β−, CD8α+β− or CD8α+β+. In a mouse model of lung inflammation, adoptive transfer of CD8α+β− or CD8α+β+ pDCs prevents the development of airway hyperreactivity. The tolerogenic features of these subsets are associated with increased production of retinoic acid, which leads to the enhanced induction of Foxp3+ regulatory T cells compared to CD8α−β− pDCs. Our data thus identify subsets of pDCs with potent tolerogenic functions that may contribute to the maintenance of tolerance in mucosal sites such as the lungs. PMID:22472775

  4. Identification of GLA/SE as an effective adjuvant for the induction of robust humoral and cell-mediated immune responses to EBV-gp350 in mice and rabbits.

    PubMed

    Heeke, Darren S; Lin, Rui; Rao, Eileen; Woo, Jennifer C; McCarthy, Michael P; Marshall, Jason D

    2016-05-17

    Childhood infection with Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) is often asymptomatic and may result in mild flu-like symptoms, but exposure during adolescence and young adulthood can lead to acute infectious mononucleosis (AIM) with a pathology characterized by swollen lymph nodes, sore throat, and severe fatigue lasting weeks or months. A vaccine targeting the envelope glycoprotein gp350 adjuvanted with aluminum hydroxide complexed with the TLR4 agonist monophosphoryl lipid A (MPLA) achieved a 78% reduction in AIM incidence in a small phase II trial of college-age individuals, but development of this vaccine was halted by the manufacturer. Here, we report the evaluation in mice and rabbits of an EBV-gp350 vaccine combined with an adjuvant composed of the synthetic TLR4 agonist glucopyranosyl lipid A (GLA) integrated into stable emulsion (SE). In mice, GLA/SE-adjuvanted gp350 generated high IgG titers (both IgG1 and IgG2a/c subtypes), elevated EBV-neutralizing antibody titers, and robust poly-functional anti-gp350 CD4(+) T cell responses. In addition, GLA/SE routinely demonstrated superior performance over aluminum hydroxide in all immunological readouts, including induction of durable neutralizing antibody titers out to at least 1 year post-vaccination. Both components of the GLA/SE adjuvant were found to be required to get optimal responses in both arms of the immune response: specifically, SE for neutralizing antibodies and GLA for induction of T cell responses. Furthermore, this vaccine also elicited high neutralizing antibody titers in a second species, rabbit. These promising results suggest that clinical development of a vaccine comprised of EBV-gp350 plus GLA/SE has the potential to prevent AIM in post-adolescents. PMID:27085175

  5. Lnk/Sh2b3 controls the production and function of dendritic cells and regulates the induction of IFN-γ-producing T cells.

    PubMed

    Mori, Taizo; Iwasaki, Yukiko; Seki, Yoichi; Iseki, Masanori; Katayama, Hiroko; Yamamoto, Kazuhiko; Takatsu, Kiyoshi; Takaki, Satoshi

    2014-08-15

    Dendritic cells (DCs) are proficient APCs that play crucial roles in the immune responses to various Ags and pathogens and polarize Th cell immune responses. Lnk/SH2B adaptor protein 3 (Sh2b3) is an intracellular adaptor protein that regulates B lymphopoiesis, megakaryopoiesis, and expansion of hematopoietic stem cells by constraining cytokine signals. Recent genome-wide association studies have revealed a link between polymorphism in this adaptor protein and autoimmune diseases, including type 1 diabetes and celiac disease. We found that Lnk/Sh2b3 was also expressed in DCs and investigated its role in the production and function of DC lineage cells. In Lnk(-/-) mice, DC numbers were increased in the spleen and lymph nodes, and growth responses of bone marrow-derived DCs to GM-CSF were augmented. Mature DCs from Lnk(-/-) mice were hypersensitive and showed enhanced responses to IL-15 and GM-CSF. Compared to normal DCs, Lnk(-/-) DCs had enhanced abilities to support the differentiation of IFN-γ-producing Th1 cells from naive CD4(+) T cells. This was due to their elevated expression of IL-12Rβ1 and increased production of IFN-γ. Lnk(-/-) DCs supported the appearance of IFN-γ-producing T cells even under conditions in which normal DCs supported induction of regulatory T cells. These results indicated that Lnk/Sh2b3 plays a regulatory role in the expansion of DCs and might influence inflammatory immune responses in peripheral lymphoid tissues. PMID:25024389

  6. Imperatorin exerts antiallergic effects in Th2-mediated allergic asthma via induction of IL-10-producing regulatory T cells by modulating the function of dendritic cells.

    PubMed

    Lin, Chu-Lun; Hsiao, George; Wang, Ching-Chiung; Lee, Yueh-Lun

    2016-08-01

    Imperatorin is a furanocoumarin compound which exists in many medicinal herbs and possesses various biological activities. Herein, we investigated the antiallergic effects of imperatorin in asthmatic mice and explored the immunomodulatory actions of imperatorin on immune cells. We used a murine model of ovalbumin (OVA)-induced asthma to evaluate the therapeutic potential of imperatorin. Additionally, bone marrow-derived dendritic cells (DCs; BMDCs) were used to clarify whether imperatorin exerts an antiallergic effect through altering the ability of DCs to regulate T cells. Oral administration of imperatorin to OVA-sensitized and -challenged mice decreased serum OVA-specific immunoglobulin E (IgE) production, attenuated the airway hyperresponsiveness (AHR), and alleviated airway inflammation in a dose-dependent manner. Notably, secretions of Th2 cytokines and chemokines were reduced, and numbers of interleukin (IL)-10-producing regulatory T cells (Tregs) increased in imperatorin-treated mice. Imperatorin inhibited proinflammatory cytokines and IL-12 production but enhanced IL-10 secretion by lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-stimulated BMDCs. Compared to fully mature DCs, imperatorin-treated DCs expressed high levels of the inducible costimulatory ligand (ICOSL) and Jagged1 molecules, and had the regulatory capacity to promote the generation of IL-10-producing CD4(+) T cells in vitro. Additionally, imperatorin directly suppressed activated CD4(+) T-cell proliferation and cytokine production. Imperatorin may possess therapeutic potential against Th2-mediated allergic asthma not only via stimulating DC induction of Tregs but also via direct inhibition of Th2 cell activation. These findings provide new insights into how imperatorin affects the Th2 immune response and the development of imperatorin as a Treg-type immunomodulatory agent to treat allergic asthma. PMID:27185659

  7. A novel dendritic cell-based immunization approach for the induction of durable Th1-polarized anti-HER-2/neu responses in women with early breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Koski, Gary K.; Koldovsky, Ursula; Xu, Shuwen; Mick, Rosemarie; Sharma, Anupama; Fitzpatrick, Elizabeth; Weinstein, Susan; Nisenbaum, Harvey; Levine, Bruce L; Fox, Kevin; Zhang, Paul; Czerniecki, Brian J

    2011-01-01

    Twenty-seven subjects with HER-2/neu over-expressing ductal carcinoma in situ of the breast were enrolled in a neoadjuvant immunization trial for safety and immunogenicity of DC1-polarized dendritic cells (DC1) pulsed with six HER-2/neu promiscuous MHC class II-binding peptides, plus two additional HLA-A2.1 class I-binding peptides. DC1 were generated with IFN-γ plus a special clinical-grade bacterial endotoxin (LPS) and administered directly into groin lymph nodes four times at weekly intervals prior to scheduled surgical resection of DCIS. Subjects were monitored for the induction of new or enhanced anti-peptide reactivity by IFN-γ ELIspot and ELISA assays performed on Th cells obtained from peripheral blood or excised sentinel lymph nodes. Responses by CTL against HLA-A2.1-binding peptides were measured using peptide-pulsed T2 target cells or HER-2/neu-expressing or non-expressing tumor cell lines. DC1 showed surface phenotype indistinct from “gold standard” inflammatory cocktail-activated DC, but displayed a number of distinguishing functional characteristics including the secretion of soluble factors and enhanced “killer DC” capacity against tumor cells in vitro. Post-immunization, we observed sensitization of Th cells to at least 1 class II peptide in 22 of 25 (88%, 95% exact CI 68.8 – 97.5%) evaluable subjects, while eleven of 13 (84.6%, 95% exact CI 64 – 99.8%) HLA-A2.1 subjects were successfully sensitized to class I peptides. Perhaps most importantly, anti-HER-2/neu peptide responses were observed up to 52 months post-immunization. These data show even in the presence of early breast cancer such DC1 are potent inducers of durable type I-polarized immunity, suggesting potential clinical value for development of cancer immunotherapy. PMID:22130160

  8. Influenza virus-infected dendritic cells stimulate strong proliferative and cytolytic responses from human CD8+ T cells.

    PubMed Central

    Bhardwaj, N; Bender, A; Gonzalez, N; Bui, L K; Garrett, M C; Steinman, R M

    1994-01-01

    Antigen-specific, CD8+, cytolytic T lymphocytes (CTLs) could potentially provide resistance to several infectious and malignant diseases. However, the cellular requirements for the generation of specific CTLs in human lymphocyte cultures are not well defined, and repetitive stimulation with antigen is often required. We find that strong CD8+ CTL responses to influenza virus can be generated from freshly isolated blood T cells, as long as dendritic cells are used as antigen presenting cells (APCs). Small numbers of dendritic cells (APC:T cell ratio of 1:50-1:100) induce these CTL responses from most donors in 7 d of culture, but monocytes are weak or inactive. Whereas both dendritic cells and monocytes are infected with influenza virus, the former serve as effective APCs for the induction of CD8+ T cells while the latter act as targets for the CTLs that are induced. The strong CD8+ response to influenza virus-infected dendritic cells is accompanied by extensive proliferation of the CD8+ T cells, but the response can develop in the apparent absence of CD4+ helpers or exogenous lymphokines. CD4+ influenza virus-specific CTLs can also be induced by dendritic cells, but the cultures initially must be depleted of CD8+ cells. These findings should make it possible to use dendritic cells to generate human, antigen-specific, CD8+ CTLs to other targets. The results illustrate the principle that efficient T cell-mediated responses develop in two stages: an afferent limb in which dendritic cells are specialized APCs and an efferent limb in which the primed T cells carry out an immune response to many types of presenting cells. Images PMID:8040335

  9. [Production of a dialysable transfer factor of cell mediated immunity by lymphoblastoid cells in continuous proliferation].

    PubMed

    Goust, J M; Viza, D; Moulias, R; Trejdosiewicz, L; Lesourd, B; Marescot, M R; Prévot, A

    1975-01-20

    Four lymphoblastoid cell lines tested in this work contain normally a dialysable moiety having by ultraviolet spectroscopy, column chromatography (Biogel P 10) and chemically the same properties than human dialysable Transfer Factor (TFd), but unable to transfer cell mediated immune response against common antigens. Two of them are able to do so after incubation with minimal amounts of TFd. Production of a molecule identical to human TFd is possible in some lymphoblastoid cell lines after induction with TFd. PMID:808340

  10. Dendritic Ion Channel Trafficking and Plasticity

    PubMed Central

    Shah, Mala M.; Hammond, Rebecca S.; Hoffman, Dax

    2010-01-01

    Dendrites, the elaborate processes emerging from neuronal cell bodies, receive most excitatory synaptic inputs. Voltage- and calcium-gated ion channels are abundant in dendrites and modify the shape, propagation and integration of synaptic signals. These ion channels also determine intrinsic dendritic excitability and are therfore important for the induction and manifestation of Hebbian and non-Hebbian plasticity. Revealingly, dendritic channels have distinct expression patterns and biophysical properties from those present in other neuronal compartments. Recent evidence suggests that dendritic ion channels are locally regulated, perhaps contributing to different forms of plasticity. In this review, we will discuss the implications of regulating dendritic ion channel function and trafficking in the context of plasticity and information processing. PMID:20363038

  11. RAT BLADDER CELL-MEDIATED MUTAGENESIS OF CHINESE HAMSTER V79 CELLS AND METABOLISM OF BENZO(A)PYRENE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Primary rat bladder epithelial cells were coculivated with Chinese hamster V79 cells in the presence of carcinogens, and the induction of 6-thioguanine resistance in the V79 cells was used as a marker of cell-mediated mutagenesis. The carcinogens dimethylnitrosamine, 7, 12-dimeth...

  12. Regulation of Th2 Cell Immunity by Dendritic Cells

    PubMed Central

    Na, Hyeongjin

    2016-01-01

    Th2 cell immunity is required for host defense against helminths, but it is detrimental in allergic diseases in humans. Unlike Th1 cell and Th17 cell subsets, the mechanism by which dendritic cells modulate Th2 cell responses has been obscure, in part because of the inability of dendritic cells to provide IL-4, which is indispensable for Th2 cell lineage commitment. In this regard, immune cells other than dendritic cells, such as basophils and innate lymphoid cells, have been suggested as Th2 cell inducers. More recently, multiple independent researchers have shown that specialized subsets of dendritic cells mediate Th2 cell responses. This review will discuss the current understanding related to the regulation of Th2 cell responses by dendritic cells and other immune cells. PMID:26937227

  13. Electric Pulse Stimulation of Myotubes as an In Vitro Exercise Model: Cell-Mediated and Non-Cell-Mediated Effects

    PubMed Central

    Evers-van Gogh, Inkie J.A.; Alex, Sheril; Stienstra, Rinke; Brenkman, Arjan B.; Kersten, Sander; Kalkhoven, Eric

    2015-01-01

    Regular exercise has emerged as one of the best therapeutic strategies to prevent and treat type-2-diabetes. Exercise-induced changes in the muscle secretome, consisting of myokines and metabolites, may underlie the inter-organ communication between muscle and other organs. To investigate this crosstalk, we developed an in vitro system in which mouse C2C12 myotubes underwent electric pulse stimulation (EPS) to induce contraction. Subsequently the effects of EPS-conditioned media (EPS-CM) on hepatocytes were investigated. Here, we demonstrate that EPS-CM induces Metallothionein 1/2 and Slc30a2 gene expression and reduces Cyp2a3 gene expression in rat hepatocytes. When testing EPS-CM that was generated in the absence of C2C12 myotubes (non-cell EPS-CM) no decrease in Cyp2a3 expression was detected. However, similar inductions in hepatic Mt1/2 and Slc30a2 expression were observed. Non-cell EPS-CM were also applied to C2C12 myotubes and compared to C2C12 myotubes that underwent EPS: here changes in AMPK phosphorylation and myokine secretion largely depended on EPS-induced contraction. Taken together, these findings indicate that EPS can alter C2C12 myotube function and thereby affect gene expression in cells subjected to EPS-CM (Cyp2a3). However, EPS can also generate non-cell-mediated changes in cell culture media, which can affect gene expression in cells subjected to EPS-CM too. While EPS clearly represents a valuable tool in exercise research, care should be taken in experimental design to control for non-cell-mediated effects. PMID:26091097

  14. IGRP and insulin vaccination induce CD8+ T cell-mediated autoimmune diabetes in the RIP-CD80GP mouse.

    PubMed

    Fuchs, Y F; Adler, K; Lindner, A; Karasinsky, A; Wilhelm, C; Weigelt, M; Balke, H; Förtsch, K; Mortler-Hildebrandt, L F; Harlan, D M; Pechhold, K; Ziegler, A-G; Bonifacio, E

    2014-05-01

    Autoimmune diabetes is characterized by autoantigen-specific T cell-mediated destruction of pancreatic islet beta cells, and CD8(+) T cells are key players during this process. We assessed whether the bitransgenic RIP-CD80 x RIP-LCMV-GP (RIP-CD80GP) mice may be a versatile antigen-specific model of inducible CD8(+) T cell-mediated autoimmune diabetes. Antigen-encoding DNA, peptide-loaded dendritic cells and antigen plus incomplete Freund's adjuvant were used for vaccination. Of 14 pancreatic proteins tested by DNA vaccination, murine pre-proinsulin 2 (100% of mice; median time after vaccination, 60 days) and islet-specific glucose-6-phosphatase catalytic subunit-related protein (IGRP) (77%, 58 days) could induce diabetes. Vaccination with DNA encoding for zinc transporter 8, Ia-2, Ia-2β, glutamic acid decarboxylase 67 (Gad67), chromogranin A, insulinoma amyloid polypeptide and homeobox protein Nkx-2.2 induced diabetes development in 25-33% of mice. Vaccination with DNA encoding for Gad65, secretogranin 5, pancreas/duodenum homeobox protein 1 (Pdx1), carboxyl ester lipase, glucagon and control hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg) induced diabetes in <20% of mice. Diabetes induction efficiency could be increased by DNA vaccination with a vector encoding a ubiquitin-antigen fusion construct. Diabetic mice had florid T cell islet infiltration. CD8(+) T cell targets of IGRP were identified with a peptide library-based enzyme-linked immunospot assay, and diabetes could also be induced by vaccination with major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I-restricted IGRP peptides loaded on mature dendritic cells. Vaccination with antigen plus incomplete Freund's adjuvant, which can prevent diabetes in other models, led to rapid diabetes development in the RIP-CD80GP mouse. We conclude that RIP-CD80GP mice are a versatile model of antigen specific autoimmune diabetes and may complement existing mouse models of autoimmune diabetes for evaluating CD8(+) T cell

  15. Dendrite inhibitor

    DOEpatents

    Miller, William E.

    1989-01-01

    An apparatus for removing dendrites or other crystalline matter from the surface of a liquid in a matter transport process, and an electrolytic cell including such an apparatus. A notch may be provided to allow continuous exposure of the liquid surface, and a bore may be further provided to permit access to the liquid.

  16. Dendrite inhibitor

    DOEpatents

    Miller, W.E.

    1988-06-07

    An apparatus for removing dendrites or other crystalline matter from the surface of a liquid in a matter transport process, and an electrolytic cell including such an apparatus. A notch may be provided to allow continuous exposure of the liquid surface, and a bore may be further provided to permit access to the liquid. 2 figs.

  17. Dendritic cells in asthma.

    PubMed

    van Helden, Mary J; Lambrecht, Bart N

    2013-12-01

    The lungs are constantly exposed to antigens, most of which are non-pathogenic and do not require the induction of an immune response. Dendritic cells (DCs) are situated at the basolateral site of the lungs and continuously scan the environment to detect the presence of pathogens and subsequently initiate an immune response. They are a heterogeneous population of antigen-presenting cells that exert specific functions. Compelling evidence is now provided that DCs are both sufficient and necessary to induce allergic responses against several inhaled harmless allergens. How various DC subsets exactly contribute to the induction of allergic asthma is currently a subject of intense investigation. We here review the current progress in this field. PMID:24455765

  18. Mast Cell-Mediated Mechanisms of Nociception

    PubMed Central

    Aich, Anupam; Afrin, Lawrence B.; Gupta, Kalpna

    2015-01-01

    Mast cells are tissue-resident immune cells that release immuno-modulators, chemo-attractants, vasoactive compounds, neuropeptides and growth factors in response to allergens and pathogens constituting a first line of host defense. The neuroimmune interface of immune cells modulating synaptic responses has been of increasing interest, and mast cells have been proposed as key players in orchestrating inflammation-associated pain pathobiology due to their proximity to both vasculature and nerve fibers. Molecular underpinnings of mast cell-mediated pain can be disease-specific. Understanding such mechanisms is critical for developing disease-specific targeted therapeutics to improve analgesic outcomes. We review molecular mechanisms that may contribute to nociception in a disease-specific manner. PMID:26690128

  19. Cell-mediated immunity in anorexia nervosa.

    PubMed Central

    Cason, J; Ainley, C C; Wolstencroft, R A; Norton, K R; Thompson, R P

    1986-01-01

    Twelve patients with anorexia nervosa were studied for cell-mediated immunity in terms of delayed hypersensitivity reactions to recall antigens, lymphocyte transformation responses to T-cell mitogens, and numbers of circulating leucocytes and T-cell subpopulations. Compared to controls, all patients had reduced cutaneous reactions and four were anergic. There was a mild leucopenia in patients and both T4+ and T3+ numbers were slightly reduced. Mean peak transformation responses for patients were slightly lower than controls for phytohaemagglutinin, but not for concanavalin A; however, patients required greater doses of mitogens to elicit peak transformation responses. Plasmas from patients did not contain inhibitors of transformation responses. We conclude that there are functional cellular abnormalities associated with the under-nutrition of anorexia nervosa. PMID:3742879

  20. Cell-mediated immunity in epidermodysplasia verruciformis.

    PubMed

    Gliński, W; Jablonska, S; Langner, A; Obalek, S; Haftek, M; Proniewska, M

    1976-01-01

    Investigations were performed in 6 cases of epidermodysplasia verruciformis and 2 healthy family members. Nonspecific cell-mediated immunity (CMI) was studied by measuring response to phytohemagglutinin (PHA) and concanavalin A (Con A), percentrages of E- and EAC-rosette-forming lymphocytes, bacterial skin tests, and allergic reactions to dinitrochloro-benzene (DNCB). Impairment of CMI was manifested by reduction in the percentage of E rosettes, and lowered response to PHA, and- to a lesser degree- to Con A. The immune response to DNCB sensitization was invariably negative. Impairment of CMI was greater in cases of long duration and with extensive lesions. The cases of similar duration and extent of lesions, which never showed tendency to tumor formation, were not different in CMI in comparison with cases with numerous tumors. Only in cases with very advanced tumors CMI was impaired parallel to the gravity of the patient's general condition. PMID:1017532

  1. Carbonic anhydrase enzymes regulate mast cell-mediated inflammation.

    PubMed

    Henry, Everett K; Sy, Chandler B; Inclan-Rico, Juan M; Espinosa, Vanessa; Ghanny, Saleena S; Dwyer, Daniel F; Soteropoulos, Patricia; Rivera, Amariliz; Siracusa, Mark C

    2016-08-22

    Type 2 cytokine responses are necessary for the development of protective immunity to helminth parasites but also cause the inflammation associated with allergies and asthma. Recent studies have found that peripheral hematopoietic progenitor cells contribute to type 2 cytokine-mediated inflammation through their enhanced ability to develop into mast cells. In this study, we show that carbonic anhydrase (Car) enzymes are up-regulated in type 2-associated progenitor cells and demonstrate that Car enzyme inhibition is sufficient to prevent mouse mast cell responses and inflammation after Trichinella spiralis infection or the induction of food allergy-like disease. Further, we used CRISPR/Cas9 technology and illustrate that genetically editing Car1 is sufficient to selectively reduce mast cell development. Finally, we demonstrate that Car enzymes can be targeted to prevent human mast cell development. Collectively, these experiments identify a previously unrecognized role for Car enzymes in regulating mast cell lineage commitment and suggest that Car enzyme inhibitors may possess therapeutic potential that can be used to treat mast cell-mediated inflammation. PMID:27526715

  2. Dendrite Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    Dr. Donald Gilles, the Discipline Scientist for Materials Science in NASA's Microgravity Materials Science and Applications Department, demonstrates to Carl Dohrman a model of dendrites, the branch-like structures found in many metals and alloys. Dohrman was recently selected by the American Society for Metals International as their 1999 ASM International Foundation National Merit Scholar. The University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign freshman recently toured NASA's materials science facilities at the Marshall Space Flight Center.

  3. Protein Kinase M[Zeta] Is Essential for the Induction and Maintenance of Dopamine-Induced Long-Term Potentiation in Apical CA1 Dendrites

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Navakkode, Sheeja; Sajikumar, Sreedharan; Sacktor, Todd Charlton; Frey, Julietta U.

    2010-01-01

    Dopaminergic D1/D5-receptor-mediated processes are important for certain forms of memory as well as for a cellular model of memory, hippocampal long-term potentiation (LTP) in the CA1 region of the hippocampus. D1/D5-receptor function is required for the induction of the protein synthesis-dependent maintenance of CA1-LTP (L-LTP) through activation…

  4. Nocardia farcinica Activates Human Dendritic Cells and Induces Secretion of Interleukin-23 (IL-23) Rather than IL-12p70

    PubMed Central

    Eisenblätter, Martin; Buchal, Ariane; Gayum, Hermine; Jasny, Edith; Renner Viveros, Pablo; Ulrichs, Timo; Schneider, Thomas; Schumann, Ralf R.; Zweigner, Janine

    2012-01-01

    Studying the interaction of dendritic cells (DCs) with bacteria controlled by T-cell-mediated immune responses may reveal novel adjuvants for the induction of cellular immunity. Murine studies and the observation that nocardias infect predominantly immunosuppressed patients have suggested that these bacteria may possess an adjuvant potential. Moreover, adjuvants on the basis of the nocardial cell wall have been applied in clinical studies. Since the handling of adjuvants by DCs may determine the type of immune responses induced by a vaccine, the present study aimed at investigating the interaction of immature human monocyte-derived DCs with live or inactivated Nocardia farcinica in vitro and determining the cellular phenotypic changes as well as alterations in characteristic functions, such as phagocytosis, induction of T-cell proliferation, and cytokine secretion. Human DCs ingested N. farcinica and eradicated the bacterium intracellularly. DCs exposed to inactivated N. farcinica were activated, i.e., they developed a mature phenotype, downregulated their phagocytic capacity, and stimulated allogeneic T cells in mixed leukocyte reactions. Soluble factors were not involved in this process. To elucidate the potential adjuvant effect of N. farcinica on the induction of T-cell-mediated immune responses, we characterized the cytokines produced by nocardia-exposed DCs and detected substantial amounts of tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) and interleukin-12 p40 (IL-12p40). However, nocardia-treated DCs secreted only small amounts of IL-12p70, which were significantly smaller than the amounts of IL-23. Thus, N. farcinica activates DCs, but adjuvants based on this bacterium may have only a limited capacity to induce Th1 immune responses. PMID:22988018

  5. Induction of CML28-specific cytotoxic T cell responses using co-transfected dendritic cells with CML28 DNA vaccine and SOCS1 small interfering RNA expression vector

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou Hongsheng; Zhang Donghua . E-mail: hanson2008@gmail.com; Wang Yaya; Dai Ming; Zhang Lu; Liu Wenli; Liu Dan; Tan Huo; Huang Zhenqian

    2006-08-18

    CML28 is an attractive target for antigen-specific immunotherapy. SOCS1 represents an inhibitory control mechanism for DC antigen presentation and the magnitude of adaptive immunity. In this study, we evaluated the potential for inducing CML28-specific cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTL) responses by dendritic cells (DCs)-based vaccination. We constructed a CML28 DNA vaccine and a SOCS1 siRNA vector and then cotransfect monocyte-derived DCs. Flow cytometry analysis showed gene silencing of SOCS1 resulted in higher expressions of costimulative moleculars in DCs. Mixed lymphocyte reaction (MLR) indicated downregulation of SOCS1 stronger capability to stimulate proliferation of responder cell in DCs. The CTL assay revealed transfected DCs effectively induced autologous CML28-specific CTL responses and the lytic activities induced by SOCS1-silenced DCs were significantly higher compared with those induced by SOCS1-expressing DCs. These results in our study indicates gene silencing of SOCS1 remarkably enhanced the cytotoxicity efficiency of CML28 DNA vaccine in DCs.

  6. Uptake of synthetic naked RNA by skin-resident dendritic cells via macropinocytosis allows antigen expression and induction of T-cell responses in mice.

    PubMed

    Selmi, Abderraouf; Vascotto, Fulvia; Kautz-Neu, Kordula; Türeci, Özlem; Sahin, Ugur; von Stebut, Esther; Diken, Mustafa; Kreiter, Sebastian

    2016-09-01

    Intradermal administration of antigen-encoding RNA has entered clinical testing for cancer vaccination. However, insight into the underlying mechanism of RNA uptake, translation and antigen presentation is still limited. Utilizing pharmacologically optimized naked RNA, the dose-response kinetics revealed a rise in reporter signal with increasing RNA amounts and a prolonged RNA translation of reporter protein up to 30 days after intradermal injection. Dendritic cells (DCs) in the dermis were shown to engulf RNA, and the signal arising from the reporter RNA was significantly diminished after DC depletion. Macropinocytosis was relevant for intradermal RNA uptake and translation in vitro and in vivo. By combining intradermal RNA vaccination and inhibition of macropinocytosis, we show that effective priming of antigen-specific CD8(+) T-cells also relies on this uptake mechanism. This report demonstrates that direct antigen translation by dermal DCs after intradermal naked RNA vaccination is relevant for efficient priming of antigen-specific T-cells. PMID:27422115

  7. Induction of TRAIL- and TNF-α-dependent Apoptosis in Human Monocyte-derived Dendritic Cells by Microfilariae of Brugia Malayi1

    PubMed Central

    Semnani, Roshanak Tolouei; Venugopal, Priyanka Goel; Mahapatra, Lily; Skinner, Jason; Meylan, Francoise; Chien, Daniel; Dorward, David; Chaussabel, Damien; Siegel, Richard M.; Nutman, Thomas B.

    2013-01-01

    Dysregulation of professional APC has been postulated as a major mechanism underlying Ag-specific T cell hyporesponsiveness in patients with patent filarial infection. To address the nature of this dysregulation, dendritic cells (DC) and macrophages (MΦ) generated from elutriated monocytes were exposed to live microfilariae (mf), the parasite stage that circulates in blood and is responsible for most immune dysregulation in filarial infections. DC exposed to mf for 24–96 h showed a marked increase in cell death and caspase-positive cells compared with unexposed DC, while mf exposure did not induce apoptosis in MΦ. Interestingly, 48 h exposure of DC to mf induced mRNA expression of the pro-apoptotic gene TRAIL and both mRNA and protein expression of TNF-α. mAb to TRAIL-R2, TNF-R1, or TNF-α partially reversed mf-induced cell death in DC, as did knocking down the receptor for TRAIL-R2 using small interfering RNA. Mf also induced gene expression of BH3-interacting domain death agonist (Bid) and protein expression of cytochrome c in DC; mf-induced cleavage of Bid could be shown to induce release of cytochrome c, leading to activation of caspase 9. Our data suggest that mf induce DC apoptosis in a TRAIL- and TNF-α-dependent fashion. PMID:18981128

  8. A dominant role for the methyl-CpG-binding protein Mbd2 in controlling Th2 induction by dendritic cells

    PubMed Central

    Cook, Peter C.; Owen, Heather; Deaton, Aimée M.; Borger, Jessica G.; Brown, Sheila L.; Clouaire, Thomas; Jones, Gareth-Rhys; Jones, Lucy H.; Lundie, Rachel J.; Marley, Angela K.; Morrison, Vicky L.; Phythian-Adams, Alexander T.; Wachter, Elisabeth; Webb, Lauren M.; Sutherland, Tara E.; Thomas, Graham D.; Grainger, John R.; Selfridge, Jim; McKenzie, Andrew N. J.; Allen, Judith E.; Fagerholm, Susanna C.; Maizels, Rick M.; Ivens, Alasdair C.; Bird, Adrian; MacDonald, Andrew S.

    2015-01-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs) direct CD4+ T-cell differentiation into diverse helper (Th) subsets that are required for protection against varied infections. However, the mechanisms used by DCs to promote Th2 responses, which are important both for immunity to helminth infection and in allergic disease, are currently poorly understood. We demonstrate a key role for the protein methyl-CpG-binding domain-2 (Mbd2), which links DNA methylation to repressive chromatin structure, in regulating expression of a range of genes that are associated with optimal DC activation and function. In the absence of Mbd2, DCs display reduced phenotypic activation and a markedly impaired capacity to initiate Th2 immunity against helminths or allergens. These data identify an epigenetic mechanism that is central to the activation of CD4+ T-cell responses by DCs, particularly in Th2 settings, and reveal methyl-CpG-binding proteins and the genes under their control as possible therapeutic targets for type-2 inflammation. PMID:25908537

  9. Foxa2 programs Th2 cell-mediated innate immunity in the developing lung.

    PubMed

    Chen, Gang; Wan, Huajing; Luo, Fengming; Zhang, Liqian; Xu, Yan; Lewkowich, Ian; Wills-Karp, Marsha; Whitsett, Jeffrey A

    2010-06-01

    After birth, the respiratory tract adapts to recurrent exposures to pathogens, allergens, and toxicants by inducing the complex innate and acquired immune systems required for pulmonary homeostasis. In this study, we show that Foxa2, expressed selectively in the respiratory epithelium, plays a critical role in regulating genetic programs influencing Th2 cell-mediated pulmonary inflammation. Deletion of the Foxa2 gene, encoding a winged helix/forkhead box transcription factor that is selectively expressed in respiratory epithelial cells, caused spontaneous pulmonary eosinophilic inflammation and goblet cell metaplasia. Loss of Foxa2 induced the recruitment and activation of myeloid dendritic cells and Th2 cells in the lung, causing increased production of Th2 cytokines and chemokines. Loss of Foxa2-induced expression of genes regulating Th2 cell-mediated inflammation and goblet cell differentiation, including IL-13, IL-4, eotaxins, thymus and activation-regulated chemokine, Il33, Ccl20, and SAM pointed domain-containing Ets transcription factor. Pulmonary inflammation and goblet cell differentiation were abrogated by treatment of neonatal Foxa2(Delta/Delta) mice with mAb against IL-4Ralpha subunit. The respiratory epithelium plays a central role in the regulation of Th2-mediated inflammation and innate immunity in the developing lung in a process regulated by Foxa2. PMID:20483781

  10. Dendritic Cell Internalization of Foot-and-Mouth Disease Virus: Influence of Heparan Sulfate Binding on Virus Uptake and Induction of the Immune Response▿

    PubMed Central

    Harwood, Lisa J.; Gerber, Heidi; Sobrino, Francisco; Summerfield, Artur; McCullough, Kenneth C.

    2008-01-01

    Dendritic cells (DC), which are essential for inducing and regulating immune defenses and responses, represent the critical target for vaccines against pathogens such as foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV). Although it is clear that FMDV enters epithelial cells via integrins, little is known about FMDV interaction with DC. Accordingly, DC internalization of FMDV antigen was analyzed by comparing vaccine virus dominated by heparan sulfate (HS)-binding variants with FMDV lacking HS-binding capacity. The internalization was most efficient with the HS-binding virus, employing diverse endocytic pathways. Moreover, internalization relied primarily on HS binding. Uptake of non-HS-binding virus by DC was considerably less efficient, so much so that it was often difficult to detect virus interacting with the DC. The HS-binding FMDV replicated in DC, albeit transiently, which was demonstrable by its sensitivity to cycloheximide treatment and the short duration of infectious virus production. There was no evidence that the non-HS-binding virus replicated in the DC. These observations on virus replication may be explained by the activities of viral RNA in the DC. When DC were transfected with infectious RNA, only 1% of the translated viral proteins were detected. Nevertheless, the transfected cells, and DC which had internalized live virus, did present antigen to lymphocytes, inducing an FMDV-specific immunoglobulin G response. These results demonstrate that DC internalization of FMDV is most efficient for vaccine virus with HS-binding capacity, but HS binding is not an exclusive requirement. Both non-HS-binding virus and infectious RNA interacting with DC induce specific immune responses, albeit less efficiently than HS-binding virus. PMID:18448534

  11. Preferential induction of CD4+ T cell responses through in vivo targeting of antigen to dendritic cell-associated C-type lectin-1.

    PubMed

    Carter, Robert W; Thompson, Clare; Reid, Delyth M; Wong, Simon Y C; Tough, David F

    2006-08-15

    Targeting of Ags and therapeutics to dendritic cells (DCs) has immense potential for immunotherapy and vaccination. Because DCs are heterogeneous, optimal targeting strategies will require knowledge about functional specialization among DC subpopulations and identification of molecules for targeting appropriate DCs. We characterized the expression of a fungal recognition receptor, DC-associated C-type lectin-1 (Dectin-1), on mouse DC subpopulations and investigated the ability of an anti-Dectin-1 Ab to deliver Ag for the stimulation of immune responses. Dectin-1 was shown to be expressed on CD8alpha-CD4-CD11b+ DCs found in spleen and lymph nodes and dermal DCs present in skin and s.c. lymph nodes. Injection of Ag-anti-Dectin-1 conjugates induced CD4+ and CD8+ T cell and Ab responses at low doses where free Ag failed to elicit a response. Notably, qualitatively different immune responses were generated by targeting Ag to Dectin-1 vs CD205, a molecule expressed on CD8alpha+CD4-CD11b- DCs, dermal DCs, and Langerhans cells. Unlike anti-Dectin-1, anti-CD205 conjugates failed to elicit an Ab response. Moreover, when conjugates were injected i.v., anti-Dectin-1 stimulated a much stronger CD4+ T cell response and a much weaker CD8+ T cell response than anti-CD205. The results reveal Dectin-1 as a potential targeting molecule for immunization and have implications for the specialization of DC subpopulations. PMID:16887988

  12. Cell-mediated immune deficiency in Hodgkin's disease.

    PubMed

    Kumar, R K; Penny, R

    1982-10-01

    Disturbances of the immune system frequently accompany the development of lymphomas in man. In the early stages of non-Hodgkin's lymphomas, abnormalities of immunological function are usually minimal, but impairment of both antibody- and cell-mediated immunity is often noted in advanced disease. In contrast, while antibody-mediated immune responses in patients with Hodgkin's disease usually remain intact until late in the course of the illness, cell-mediated immune dysfunction is an early and consistent feature. Here Rakesh Kumar and Ronald Penny discuss the abnormalities of cell-mediated immunity in Hodgkin's disease. PMID:25290229

  13. B-Cell-Mediated Strategies to Fight Chronic Allograft Rejection

    PubMed Central

    Dalloul, Ali

    2013-01-01

    Solid organs have been transplanted for decades. Since the improvement in graft selection and in medical and surgical procedures, the likelihood of graft function after 1 year is now close to 90%. Nonetheless even well-matched recipients continue to need medications for the rest of their lives hence adverse side effects and enhanced morbidity. Understanding Immune rejection mechanisms, is of increasing importance since the greater use of living-unrelated donors and genetically unmatched individuals. Chronic rejection is devoted to T-cells, however the role of B-cells in rejection has been appreciated recently by the observation that B-cell depletion improve graft survival. By contrast however, B-cells can be beneficial to the grafted tissue. This protective effect is secondary to either the secretion of protective antibodies or the induction of B-cells that restrain excessive inflammatory responses, chiefly by local provision of IL-10, or inhibit effector T-cells by direct cellular interactions. As a proof of concept B-cell-mediated infectious transplantation tolerance could be achieved in animal models, and evidence emerged that the presence of such B-cells in transplanted patients correlate with a favorable outcome. Among these populations, regulatory B-cells constitute a recently described population. These cells may develop as a feedback mechanism to prevent uncontrolled reactivity to antigens and inflammatory stimuli. The difficult task for the clinician, is to quantify the respective ratios and functions of “tolerant” vs. effector B-cells within a transplanted organ, at a given time point in order to modulate B-cell-directed therapy. Several receptors at the B-cell membrane as well as signaling molecules, can now be targeted for this purpose. Understanding the temporal expansion of regulatory B-cells in grafted patients and the stimuli that activate them will help in the future to implement specific strategies aimed at fighting chronic allograft

  14. Cell-mediated immunity in experimental Nocardia asteroides infection.

    PubMed Central

    Sundararaj, T; Agarwal, S C

    1977-01-01

    Experimental mycetoma-like lesions developed in guinea pigs after subcutaneous injection of Nocardia asteroides. Although delayed hypersensitivity appeared earlier, increased macrophage migration inhibition and microbicidal activity appeared after 7 weeks. When the lesions healed, high cell-mediated immunity was present. Cell-mediated immunity was transferred to normal recipient guinea pigs from healed donor guinea pigs by spleen cell transfer. Recipient guinea pigs showed marked protection against challenge with N. asteroides. PMID:321348

  15. TLR7 and TLR8 ligands and antiphospholipid antibodies show synergistic effects on the induction of IL-1beta and caspase-1 in monocytes and dendritic cells.

    PubMed

    Hurst, Julia; Prinz, Nadine; Lorenz, Mareike; Bauer, Stefan; Chapman, Joab; Lackner, Karl J; von Landenberg, Philipp

    2009-01-01

    TLRs represent the first line of defense against invading pathogens in the innate immune system. Certain cytokines are important mediators and essentially necessary to assure an appropriately regulated immune response. Recent data gave initial evidence that IL-1beta is one of the most relevant members of these regulating cytokines. We investigated the induction of IL-1beta production in monocytes and pDCs stimulated with ligands for TLR7 and TLR8 and with antiphospholipid antibodies (aPL). Using human monocytes and pDCs for stimulation with specific TLR7 and TLR8 ligands such as resiquimod (R848) and single stranded RNA (RNA42) as well as with a human monoclonal aPL HL5B resulted in a specific upregulation of IL-1beta mRNA and protein in these cells. Determination of expression-levels using real-time RT-PCR showed significantly augmented TLR-dependent IL-1beta and caspase-1 expression. This increase could be substantially enhanced by adding the monoclonal aPL HL5B. To demonstrate the direct dependency between TLR stimulation and IL-1beta production, specific TLR inhibitors were applied and the IL-1beta and caspase-1 secretion could be explicitly decreased. The respective protein levels were determined using Western Blot, FACS analysis or ELISA assays. In conclusion we demonstrated that the downstream signaling pathway of TLR7 and TLR8 in monocytes and pDCs after stimulation with specific ligands included not only the secretion of cytokines such as TNFalpha and IL-1beta but as well the activation of necessary regulating proteins like caspase-1. APL seem to enforce this process hinting that endogenous stimulation of TLRs in the Antiphospholipid Syndrome (APS) patients resulted in enhanced secretion of proinflammatory cytokines. PMID:19249118

  16. Dendritic microstructure in argon atomized superalloy powders

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tewari, S. N.; Kumar, Mahundra

    1986-01-01

    The dendritic microstructure of atomized nickel base superalloy powders (Ni-20 pct Cr, NIMONIC-80A, ASTROALOY, and ZHS6-K) was studied. Prealloyed vacuum induction melted ingots were argon-atomized, the powders were cooled to room temperature, and various powder-size fractions were examined by optical metallography. Linear correlations were obtained for the powder size dependence of the secondary dendrite arm spacing, following the expected d-alpha (R) to the m power dependence on the particle size for all four superalloy compositions. However, the Ni-20 pct Cr alloy, which had much coarser arm spacing as compared to the other three alloys, had a much larger value of m.

  17. Induction of an antitumor response using dendritic cells transfected with DNA constructs encoding the HLA-A*02:01-restricted epitopes of tumor-associated antigens in culture of mononuclear cells of breast cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Sennikov, Sergey Vital'evich; Shevchenko, Julia Alexandrovna; Kurilin, Vasilii Vasil'evich; Khantakova, Julia Nikolaevna; Lopatnikova, Julia Anatol'evna; Gavrilova, Elena Vasil'evna; Maksyutov, Rinat Amirovich; Bakulina, Anastasiya Yur'evna; Sidorov, Sergey Vasil'evich; Khristin, Alexander Alexandrovich; Maksyutov, Amir Zakievich

    2016-02-01

    Advances in oncoimmunology related to the definition of the basic mechanisms of the formation of antitumor immune response, as well as the opening of tumor-associated antigens recognized by immune cells, allowed to start developing ways to influence the effector cells of the immune system to generate effective antitumor cytotoxic response. We investigated the possibility to stimulate an antitumor response in a culture of mononuclear cells of breast cancer patients by dendritic cells transfected with HLA-A*02:01-restricted DNA constructs. We isolated dendritic cells from peripheral blood monocytes and delivered our constructs to these cells by magnetic transfection. Additionally, a series of experiments with loading of dendritic cells with autologous tumor cell lysate antigens was conducted. We have shown that dendritic cells transfected with the HLA-A*02:01-restricted DNA constructs are effective in inducing an antitumor response in a culture of mononuclear cells of breast cancer patients. Dendritic cells transfected with DNA constructor dendritic cells loaded with lysate antigens revealed a comparable stimulated cytotoxic response of mononuclear cells to these two ways of antigen delivery. We conclude that using DNA constructs in conjunction with patient stratification by HLA type allows the application of transfected DCs as an effective method to stimulate antitumor immunity in vitro. PMID:26590947

  18. Isothermal Dendritic Growth Experiment - PVA Dendrites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    The Isothermal Dendritic Growth Experiment (IDGE), flown on three Space Shuttle missions, is yielding new insights into virtually all industrially relevant metal and alloy forming operations. IDGE used transparent organic liquids that form dendrites (treelike structures) similar to those inside metal alloys. Comparing Earth-based and space-based dendrite growth velocity, tip size and shape provides a better understanding of the fundamentals of dentritic growth, including gravity's effects. Shalowgraphic images of pivalic acid (PVA) dendrites forming from the melt show the subtle but distinct effects of gravity-driven heat convection on dentritic growth. In orbit, the dendrite grows as its latent heat is liberated by heat conduction. This yields a blunt dendrite tip. On Earth, heat is carried away by both conduction and gravity-driven convection. This yields a sharper dendrite tip. In addition, under terrestrial conditions, the sidebranches growing in the direction of gravity are augmented as gravity helps carry heat out of the way of the growing sidebranches as opposed to microgravity conditions where no augmentation takes place. IDGE was developed by Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute and NASA/Glenn Research Center. Advanced follow-on experiments are being developed for flight on the International Space Station. Photo Credit: NASA/Glenn Research Center

  19. Detection of cell mediated immune response to avian influenza viruses

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In birds, lymphomyeloid tissues develop from epithelial (Bursa of Fabricus or thymus) or mesenchymal tissue which are populated by heamatopoietic stem cells. These stem cells develop directly into immunologically competent B (bursa) and T (thymus) cells. Cell-mediated immunity (CMI) is a part of the...

  20. EFFECTS OF ENVIRONMENTAL CONTAMINANTS ON CELL MEDIATED IMMUNITY

    EPA Science Inventory

    The effect of lead and cadmium on cell-mediated immunity was studied in peritoneal macrophages, B-, and T-lymphocytes of mice. Lead and cadmium were administered in drinking water for 10 weeks in short-term experiments and up to 18 months to deal with immune responses in aged mic...

  1. Free dendritic growth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glicksman, M. E.

    1984-01-01

    Free dendritic growth refers to the unconstrained development of crystals within a supercooled melt, which is the classical 'dendrite problem'. Great strides have been taken in recent years in both the theoretical understanding of dendritic growth and its experimental status. The development of this field will be sketched, showing that transport theory and interfacial thermodynamics (capillarity theory) were sufficient ingredients to develop a truly predictive model of dendrite formation. The convenient, but incorrect, notion of 'maximum velocity' was used for many years to estimate the behavior of dendritic transformations until supplanted by modern dynamic stability theory. The proper combinations of transport theory and morphological stability seem to able to predict the salient aspects of dendritic growth, especially in the neighborhood of the tip. The overall development of cast microstructures, such as equiaxed zone formation, rapidly solidified microstructures, etc., also seems to contain additional non-deterministic features which lie outside the current theories discussed here.

  2. Self-adjuvanting influenza candidate vaccine presenting epitopes for cell-mediated immunity on a proteinaceous multivalent nanoplatform.

    PubMed

    Szurgot, Inga; Szolajska, Ewa; Laurin, David; Lambrecht, Benedicte; Chaperot, Laurence; Schoehn, Guy; Chroboczek, Jadwiga

    2013-09-13

    We exploit the features of a virus-like particle, adenoviral dodecahedron (Ad Dd), for engineering a multivalent vaccination platform carrying influenza epitopes for cell-mediated immunity. The delivery platform, Ad Dd, is a proteinaceous, polyvalent, and biodegradable nanoparticle endowed with remarkable endocytosis activity that can be engineered to carry 60 copies of a peptide. Influenza M1 is the most abundant influenza internal protein with the conserved primary structure. Two different M1 immunodominant epitopes were separately inserted in Dd external positions without destroying the particles' dodecahedric structure. Both kinds of DdFluM1 obtained through expression in baculovirus system were properly presented by human dendritic cells triggering efficient activation of antigen-specific T cells responses. Importantly, the candidate vaccine was able to induce cellular immunity in vivo in chickens. These results warrant further investigation of Dd as a platform for candidate vaccine, able to stimulate cellular immune responses. PMID:23880363

  3. Enhancement of antibody-dependent cell mediated cytotoxicity: a new era in cancer treatment

    PubMed Central

    Rajasekaran, Narendiran; Chester, Cariad; Yonezawa, Atsushi; Zhao, Xing; Kohrt, Holbrook E

    2015-01-01

    The therapeutic efficacy of some anti-tumor monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) depends on the capacity of the mAb to recognize the tumor-associated antigen and induce cytotoxicity via a network of immune effector cells. This process of antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity (ADCC) against tumor cells is triggered by the interaction of the fragment crystallizable (Fc) portion of the mAb with the Fc receptors on effector cells like natural killer cells, macrophages, γδ T cells, and dendritic cells. By augmenting ADCC, the antitumor activity of mAbs can be significantly increased. Currently, identifying and developing therapeutic agents that enhance ADCC is a growing area of research. Combining existing tumor-targeting mAbs and ADCC-promoting agents that stimulate effector cells will translate to greater clinical responses. In this review, we discuss strategies for enhancing ADCC and emphasize the potential of combination treatments that include US Food and Drug Administration-approved mAbs and immunostimulatory therapeutics.

  4. Effect of space flight on cell-mediated immunity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mandel, A. D.; Balish, E.

    1977-01-01

    The cell-mediated immune response to Listeria monocytogenes was studied in rats subjected to 20 days of flight aboard the Soviet biosatellite Kosmos 7820. Groups of rats were immunized with 1,000,000 formalin-killed Listeria suspended in Freunds Complete Adjuvant, 5 days prior to flight. Immunized rats subjected to the same environmental factors as the flight rats, except flight itself, and immunized and nonimmunized rats held in a normal animal colony served as controls. Following recovery, lymphocyte cultures were harvested from spleens of all rats, cultured in vitro in the presence of L. monocytogenes antigens, Phytohemagglutinin, Conconavlin A, or purified protein derivative (PPD), and measured for their uptake of H-3-thymidine. Although individual rats varied considerably, all flight and immunized control rats gave a blastogenic response to the Listeria antigens and PPD. With several mitogens, the lymphocytes of flight rats showed a significantly increased blastogenic response over the controls. The results of this study do not support a hypothesis of a detrimental effect of space flight on cell-mediated immunity. The data suggest a possible suppressive effect of stress and gravity on an in vitro correlate of cell-mediated immunity.

  5. Cimetidine modulates the antigen presenting capacity of dendritic cells from colorectal cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Kubota, T; Fujiwara, H; Ueda, Y; Itoh, T; Yamashita, T; Yoshimura, T; Okugawa, K; Yamamoto, Y; Yano, Y; Yamagishi, H

    2002-04-22

    Cimetidine, a H(2) receptor antagonist, has been reported to improve survival in gastrointestinal cancer patients. These effects have largely been attributed to the enhancing effects of cimetidine on the host's antitumour cell-mediated immune response, such as inhibition of suppressor T lymphocyte activity, stimulation of natural killer cell activity and increase of interleukin-2 production from helper T lymphocytes. We conducted an in vitro study on the effects of cimetidine on differentiation and antigen presenting capacity of monocyte-derived dendritic cells from advanced colorectal cancer patients and normal controls. As a result, an investigation of expression of surface molecules associated with dendritic cells by flow cytometric analyses showed that cimetidine had no enhancing effect on differentiation of dendritic cells from cancer patients and normal controls. An investigation of [(3)H]thymidine incorporation by allogeneic mixed lymphocyte reactions revealed that cimetidine increased the antigen presenting capacity of dendritic cells from both materials. Moreover, a higher antigen presenting capacity was observed in advanced cancer patients compared to normal controls. These effects might be mediated via specific action of cimetidine and not via H(2) receptors because famotidine did not show similar effects. Our results suggest that cimetidine may enhance the host's antitumour cell-mediated immunity by improving the suppressed dendritic cells function of advanced cancer patients. PMID:11953882

  6. Cord blood T cells mediate enhanced antitumor effects compared with adult peripheral blood T cells.

    PubMed

    Hiwarkar, Prashant; Qasim, Waseem; Ricciardelli, Ida; Gilmour, Kimberly; Quezada, Sergio; Saudemont, Aurore; Amrolia, Persis; Veys, Paul

    2015-12-24

    Unrelated cord blood transplantation (CBT) without in vivo T-cell depletion is increasingly used to treat high-risk hematologic malignancies. Following T-replete CBT, naïve CB T cells undergo rapid peripheral expansion with memory-effector differentiation. Emerging data suggest that unrelated CBT, particularly in the context of HLA mismatch and a T-replete graft, may reduce leukemic relapse. To study the role of CB T cells in mediating graft-versus-tumor responses and dissect the underlying immune mechanisms for this, we compared the ability of HLA-mismatched CB and adult peripheral blood (PB) T cells to eliminate Epstein-Barr virus (EBV)-driven human B-cell lymphoma in a xenogeneic NOD/SCID/IL2rg(null) mouse model. CB T cells mediated enhanced tumor rejection compared with equal numbers of PB T cells, leading to improved survival in the CB group (P < .0003). Comparison of CB T cells that were autologous vs allogeneic to the lymphoma demonstrated that this antitumor effect was mediated by alloreactive rather than EBV-specific T cells. Analysis of tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes demonstrated that CB T cells mediated this enhanced antitumor effect by rapid infiltration of the tumor with CCR7(+)CD8(+) T cells and prompt induction of cytotoxic CD8(+) and CD4(+) T-helper (Th1) T cells in the tumor microenvironment. In contrast, in the PB group, this antilymphoma effect is impaired because of delayed tumoral infiltration of PB T cells and a relative bias toward suppressive Th2 and T-regulatory cells. Our data suggest that, despite being naturally programmed toward tolerance, reconstituting T cells after unrelated T-replete CBT may provide superior Tc1-Th1 antitumor effects against high-risk hematologic malignancies. PMID:26450984

  7. Dendritic cells in lung immunopathology.

    PubMed

    Cook, Peter C; MacDonald, Andrew S

    2016-07-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs) lie at the heart of the innate immune system, specialised at recognising danger signals in many forms including foreign material, infection or tissue damage and initiating powerful adaptive immune and inflammatory responses. In barrier sites such as the lung, the instrumental role that DCs play at the interface between the environment and the host places them in a pivotal position in determining the severity of inflammatory disease. The past few years has seen a significant increase in our fundamental understanding of the subsets of DCs involved in pulmonary immunity, as well as the mechanisms by which they are activated and which they may use to coordinate downstream inflammation and pathology. In this review, we will summarise current understanding of the multi-faceted role that DCs play in the induction, maintenance and regulation of lung immunopathology, with an emphasis on allergic pulmonary disease. PMID:27256370

  8. The PD-L1/CD86 ratio is increased in dendritic cells co-infected with porcine circovirus type 2 and porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus, and the PD-L1/PD-1 axis is associated with anergy, apoptosis, and the induction of regulatory T-cells in porcine lymphocytes.

    PubMed

    Richmond, O; Cecere, T E; Erdogan, E; Meng, X J; Piñeyro, P; Subramaniam, S; Todd, S M; LeRoith, T

    2015-11-18

    Porcine circovirus type 2 (PCV2) and porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV) continue to have a negative economic impact on global swine production operations. Host immune modulations that potentiate disease during PCV2 and/or PRRSV infections are important areas of ongoing research. In this study, we evaluated the expression levels of PD-L1, CD86, and IL-10 in order to phenotype dendritic cells following viral infection with PCV2b and/or PRRSV. The results showed that the inhibitory marker PD-L1 was significantly increased in monocyte derived dendritic cells (MoDC) in both singular PCV2 infection and PCV2/PRRSV co-infections. MoDC expression of stimulatory marker CD86 was significantly increased during singular PCV2 infections, while it was significantly decreased in the treatment groups co-infected with both PCV2 and PRRSV. IL-10 production was highest among MoDCs that were co-infected with PCV2 and PRRSV. These results indicate that dendritic cells develop a regulatory phenotype following PCV2/PRRSV co-infections. We further investigated the role of the PD-L1/PD-1 axis in lymphocyte anergy, apoptosis, and the induction of regulatory T-cells in porcine mononuclear cell populations. Lymphocyte populations with normal PD-1 expression had higher percentages of anergic, apoptotic lymphocytes and CD4(+)CD25(HIGH)FoxP3(+) regulatory T-cells when compared to a PD-1 deficient lymphocyte population. These results implicate the PD-L1/PD-1 axis in negative regulation of lymphocyte responses in pigs. PMID:26446939

  9. How Does Ionizing Irradiation Contribute to the Induction of Anti-Tumor Immunity?

    PubMed Central

    Rubner, Yvonne; Wunderlich, Roland; Rühle, Paul-Friedrich; Kulzer, Lorenz; Werthmöller, Nina; Frey, Benjamin; Weiss, Eva-Maria; Keilholz, Ludwig; Fietkau, Rainer; Gaipl, Udo S.

    2012-01-01

    Radiotherapy (RT) with ionizing irradiation is commonly used to locally attack tumors. It induces a stop of cancer cell proliferation and finally leads to tumor cell death. During the last years it has become more and more evident that besides a timely and locally restricted radiation-induced immune suppression, a specific immune activation against the tumor and its metastases is achievable by rendering the tumor cells visible for immune attack. The immune system is involved in tumor control and we here outline how RT induces anti-inflammation when applied in low doses and contributes in higher doses to the induction of anti-tumor immunity. We especially focus on how local irradiation induces abscopal effects. The latter are partly mediated by a systemic activation of the immune system against the individual tumor cells. Dendritic cells are the key players in the initiation and regulation of adaptive anti-tumor immune responses. They have to take up tumor antigens and consecutively present tumor peptides in the presence of appropriate co-stimulation. We review how combinations of RT with further immune stimulators such as AnnexinA5 and hyperthermia foster the dendritic cell-mediated induction of anti-tumor immune responses and present reasonable combination schemes of standard tumor therapies with immune therapies. It can be concluded that RT leads to targeted killing of the tumor cells and additionally induces non-targeted systemic immune effects. Multimodal tumor treatments should therefore tend to induce immunogenic tumor cell death forms within a tumor microenvironment that stimulates immune cells. PMID:22848871

  10. Taxifolin glycoside inhibits dendritic cell responses stimulated by lipopolysaccharide and lipoteichoic acid.

    PubMed

    Kim, Yun Jeong; Choi, Sun Eun; Lee, Min Won; Lee, Chung Soo

    2008-11-01

    Antigen-presenting dendritic cells may play an important role in the pathogenesis of atopic dermatitis. Taxifolin is demonstrated to have anti-inflammatory effects. The present study was designed to assess the effect of taxifolin glycoside against stimulated responses of dendritic cells isolated from mouse bone marrow and spleen. Dendritic cells exposed to lipopolysaccharide, lipoteichoic acid or interleukin (IL)-1beta exhibited increased production of IL-12 p70 and tumour necrosis factor alpha, increased formation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and nitric oxide (NO), and elevation of intracellular Ca2+ levels. Treatment with taxifolin glycoside inhibited responses stimulated by the microbial products or IL-1beta in dendritic cells in a dose-dependent manner. Taxifolin glycoside had a significant inhibitory effect on the production of cytokines, formation of ROS and NO, and change in intracellular Ca2+ levels in dendritic cells of bone marrow and spleen. The results show that taxifolin glycoside seems to inhibit the dendritic cell responses stimulated by microbial products and IL-1beta, suggesting that taxifolin glycoside may exert an inhibitory effect against dendritic-cell-mediated immune responses. PMID:18957167

  11. The Exonuclease Domain of Lassa Virus Nucleoprotein Is Involved in Antigen-Presenting-Cell-Mediated NK Cell Responses

    PubMed Central

    Russier, Marion; Reynard, Stéphanie; Carnec, Xavier

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Lassa virus is an Old World Arenavirus which causes Lassa hemorrhagic fever in humans, mostly in West Africa. Lassa fever is an important public health problem, and a safe and effective vaccine is urgently needed. The infection causes immunosuppression, probably due to the absence of activation of antigen-presenting cells (dendritic cells and macrophages), low type I interferon (IFN) production, and deficient NK cell function. However, a recombinant Lassa virus carrying D389A and G392A substitutions in the nucleoprotein that abolish the exonuclease activity and IFN activation loses its inhibitory activity and induces strong type I IFN production by dendritic cells and macrophages. We show here that during infection by this mutant Lassa virus, antigen-presenting cells trigger efficient human NK cell responses in vitro, including production of IFN-γ and cytotoxicity. NK cell activation involves close contact with both antigen-presenting cells and soluble factors. We report that infected dendritic cells and macrophages express the NKG2D ligands major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I-related chains A and B and that they may produce interleukin-12 (IL-12), IL-15, and IL-18, all involved in NK cell functions. NK cell degranulation is significantly increased in cocultures, suggesting that NK cells seem to kill infected dendritic cells and macrophages. This work confirms the inhibitory function of Lassa virus nucleoprotein. Importantly, we demonstrate for the first time that Lassa virus nucleoprotein is involved in the inhibition of antigen-presenting cell-mediated NK cell responses. IMPORTANCE The pathogenesis and immune responses induced by Lassa virus are poorly known. Recently, an exonuclease domain contained in the viral nucleoprotein has been shown to be able to inhibit the type I IFN response by avoiding the recognition of viral RNA by cell sensors. Here, we studied the responses of NK cells to dendritic cells and macrophages infected with a

  12. Dendritic Growth Investigators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    Representatives of NASA materials science experiments supported the NASA exhibit at the Rernselaer Polytechnic Institute's Space Week activities, April 5 through 11, 1999. From left to right are: Angie Jackman, project manager at NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center for dendritic growth experiments; Dr. Martin Glicksman of Rennselaer Polytechnic Instutute, Troy, NY, principal investigator on the Isothermal Dendritic Growth Experiment (IDGE) that flew three times on the Space Shuttle; and Dr. Matthew Koss of College of the Holy Cross in Worcester, MA, a co-investigator on the IDGE and now principal investigator on the Transient Dendritic Solidification Experiment being developed for the International Space Station (ISS). The image at far left is a dendrite grown in Glicksman's IDGE tests aboard the Shuttle. Glicksman is also principal investigator for the Evolution of Local Microstructures: Spatial Instabilities of Coarsening Clusters.

  13. Induction of antigen-specific immunity by pH-sensitive carbonate apatite as a potent vaccine carrier

    SciTech Connect

    Hebishima, Takehisa; Tada, Seiichi; Takeshima, Shin-nosuke; Akaike, Toshihiro; Ito, Yoshihiro; Aida, Yoko

    2011-12-02

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer To develop effective vaccine, we examined the effects of CO{sub 3}Ap as an antigen carrier. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer OVA contained in CO{sub 3}Ap was taken up by BMDCs more effectively than free OVA. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer OVA-immunized splenocytes was activated by OVA contained in CO{sub 3}Ap effectively. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer OVA contained in CO{sub 3}Ap induced strong OVA-specific immune responses to C57BL/6 mice. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer CO{sub 3}Ap is promising antigen carrier for the achievement of effective vaccine. -- Abstract: The ability of carbonate apatite (CO{sub 3}Ap) to enhance antigen-specific immunity was examined in vitro and in vivo to investigate its utility as a vaccine carrier. Murine bone marrow-derived dendritic cells took up ovalbumin (OVA) containing CO{sub 3}Ap more effectively than free OVA. Interestingly, mice immunized with OVA-containing CO{sub 3}Ap produced OVA-specific antibodies more effectively than mice immunized with free OVA. Furthermore, immunization of C57BL/6 mice with OVA-containing CO{sub 3}Ap induced the proliferation and antigen-specific production of IFN-{gamma} by splenocytes more strongly than immunization with free OVA. Moreover, no significant differences were detected in the induction of delayed-type hypersensitivity responses, an immune reaction involving an antigen-specific, cell-mediated immune response between OVA-containing CO{sub 3}Ap and OVA-containing alumina salt (Alum), suggesting that CO{sub 3}Ap induced cell-mediated immune response to the same degree as Alum, which is commonly used for clinical applications. This study is the first to demonstrate the induction of antigen-specific immune responses in vivo by CO{sub 3}Ap.

  14. On the dendrites and dendritic transitions in undercooled germanium

    SciTech Connect

    Lau, C.F.; Kui, H.W. . Dept. of Physics)

    1993-07-01

    Undercooled molten Ge was allowed to solidify at initial bulk undercoolings, [Delta]T, from 10 to 200C under dehydrated boron oxide flux. It turned out that in addition to the (211) twin dendrite found by Billig and the (100) twin-free dendrite discovered by Devaud and Turnbill, there is a third novel twin dendrite, the (110) twin dendrite. The twin planes in a (110) dendrite always appear in multiple numbers and the orientation is (111). These different kinds of dendrites exist at different initial interfacial undercoolings and the transition temperatures for (110) to (211), (211) to (100) are [Delta]T = 61 and 93C, respectively.

  15. Isothermal Dendritic Growth Experiment - SCN Dendrites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1995-01-01

    The Isothermal Dendritic Growth Experiment (IDGE), flown on three Space Shuttle missions, is yielding new insights into virtually all industrially relevant metal and alloy forming operations. IDGE used transparent organic liquids that form dendrites (treelike structures) similar to the crystals that form inside metal alloys. Comparing Earth-based and space-based dentrite growth velocity, tip size and shape provid a better understanding of the fundamentals of dentritic growth, including gravity's effects. These shadowgraphic images show succinonitrile (SCN) dentrites growing in a melt (liquid). The space-grown crystals also have cleaner, better defined sidebranches. IDGE was developed by Rensselaer Polytechnic Institude (RPI) and NASA/ Glenn Research Center(GRC). Advanced follow-on experiments are being developed for flight on the International Space Station. Photo gredit: NASA/Glenn Research Center

  16. Enterovirus-71 Virus-Like Particles Induce the Activation and Maturation of Human Monocyte-Derived Dendritic Cells through TLR4 Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Yu-Li; Hu, Yu-Chen; Liang, Cheng-Chao; Lin, Shih-Yeh; Liang, Yu-Chih; Yuan, Hui-Ping; Chiang, Bor-Luen

    2014-01-01

    Enterovirus 71 (EV71) causes seasonal epidemics of hand-foot-and-mouth disease and has a high mortality rate among young children. We recently demonstrated potent induction of the humoral and cell-mediated immune response in monkeys immunized with EV71 virus-like particles (VLPs), with a morphology resembling that of infectious EV71 virions but not containing a viral genome, which could potentially be safe as a vaccine for EV71. To elucidate the mechanisms through which EV71 VLPs induce cell-mediated immunity, we studied the immunomodulatory effects of EV71 VLPs on human monocyte-derived dendritic cells (DCs), which bind to and incorporate EV71 VLPs. DC treatment with EV71 VLPs enhanced the expression of CD80, CD86, CD83, CD40, CD54, and HLA-DR on the cell surface; increased the production of interleukin (IL)-12 p40, IL-12 p70, and IL-10 by DCs; and suppressed the capacity of DCs for endocytosis. Treatment with EV71 VLPs also enhanced the ability of DCs to stimulate naïve T cells and induced secretion of interferon (IFN)-γ by T cells and Th1 cell responses. Neutralization with antibodies against Toll-like receptor (TLR) 4 suppressed the capacity of EV71 VLPs to induce the production of IL-12 p40, IL-12 p70, and IL-10 by DCs and inhibited EV71 VLPs binding to DCs. Our study findings clarified the important role for TLR4 signaling in DCs in response to EV71 VLPs and showed that EV71 VLPs induced inhibitor of kappaB alpha (IκBα) degradation and nuclear factor of kappaB (NF-κB) activation. PMID:25360749

  17. Sensitivity of Dendritic Cells to Microenvironment Signals

    PubMed Central

    Motta, Juliana Maria; Rumjanek, Vivian Mary

    2016-01-01

    Dendritic cells are antigen-presenting cells capable of either activating the immune response or inducing and maintaining immune tolerance. They do this by integrating stimuli from the environment and changing their functional status as a result of plasticity. The modifications suffered by these cells have consequences in the way the organism may respond. In the present work two opposing situations known to affect dendritic cells are analyzed: tumor growth, leading to a microenvironment that favors the induction of a tolerogenic profile, and organ transplantation, which leads to a proinflammatory profile. Lessons learned from these situations may help to understand the mechanisms of modulation resulting not only from the above circumstances, but also from other pathologies. PMID:27088097

  18. Lid for improved dendritic web growth

    DOEpatents

    Duncan, Charles S.; Kochka, Edgar L.; Piotrowski, Paul A.; Seidensticker, Raymond G.

    1992-03-24

    A lid for a susceptor in which a crystalline material is melted by induction heating to form a pool or melt of molten material from which a dendritic web of essentially a single crystal of the material is pulled through an elongated slot in the lid and the lid has a pair of generally round openings adjacent the ends of the slot and a groove extends between each opening and the end of the slot. The grooves extend from the outboard surface of the lid to adjacent the inboard surface providing a strip contiguous with the inboard surface of the lid to produce generally uniform radiational heat loss across the width of the dendritic web adjacent the inboard surface of the lid to reduce thermal stresses in the web and facilitate the growth of wider webs at a greater withdrawal rate.

  19. Establishment of Stable, Cell-Mediated Immunity that Makes "Susceptible" Mice Resistant to Leishmania major

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bretscher, Peter A.; Wei, Guojian; Menon, Juthika N.; Bielefeldt-Ohmann, Helle

    1992-07-01

    Cell-mediated, but not antibody-mediated, immune responses protect humans against certain pathogens that produce chronic diseases such as leishmaniasis. Effective vaccination against such pathogens must therefore produce an immunological "imprint" so that stable, cell-mediated immunity is induced in all individuals after natural infection. BALB/c mice "innately susceptible" to Leishmania major produce antibodies after substantial infection. In the present study, "susceptible" mice injected with a small number of parasites mounted a cell-mediated response and acquired resistance to a larger, normally pathogenic, challenge. This vaccination strategy may be applicable in diseases in which protection is dependent on cell-mediated immunity.

  20. Immunosuppressive human anti-CD83 monoclonal antibody depletion of activated dendritic cells in transplantation.

    PubMed

    Seldon, T A; Pryor, R; Palkova, A; Jones, M L; Verma, N D; Findova, M; Braet, K; Sheng, Y; Fan, Y; Zhou, E Y; Marks, J D; Munro, T; Mahler, S M; Barnard, R T; Fromm, P D; Silveira, P A; Elgundi, Z; Ju, X; Clark, G J; Bradstock, K F; Munster, D J; Hart, D N J

    2016-03-01

    Current immunosuppressive/anti-inflammatory agents target the responding effector arm of the immune response and their nonspecific action increases the risk of infection and malignancy. These effects impact on their use in allogeneic haematopoietic cell transplantation and other forms of transplantation. Interventions that target activated dendritic cells (DCs) have the potential to suppress the induction of undesired immune responses (for example, graft versus host disease (GVHD) or transplant rejection) and to leave protective T-cell immune responses intact (for example, cytomegalovirus (CMV) immunity). We developed a human IgG1 monoclonal antibody (mAb), 3C12, specific for CD83, which is expressed on activated but not resting DC. The 3C12 mAb and an affinity improved version, 3C12C, depleted CD83(+) cells by CD16(+) NK cell-mediated antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity, and inhibited allogeneic T-cell proliferation in vitro. A single dose of 3C12C prevented human peripheral blood mononuclear cell-induced acute GVHD in SCID mouse recipients. The mAb 3C12C depleted CMRF-44(+)CD83(bright) activated DC but spared CD83(dim/-) DC in vivo. It reduced human T-cell activation in vivo and maintained the proportion of CD4(+) FoxP3(+) CD25(+) Treg cells and also viral-specific CD8(+) T cells. The anti-CD83 mAb, 3C12C, merits further evaluation as a new immunosuppressive agent in transplantation. PMID:26286117

  1. Depressed cell-mediated immunity in coeliac disease.

    PubMed Central

    Scott, B B; Losowsky, M S

    1976-01-01

    Fourteen coeliac patients on a gluten free diet (GFD) and 10 on a normal diet were studied by lymphocyte transformation in response to PHA to assess the integrity of cell-mediated immunity (CMI). Transformation was depressed in the majority taking a normal diet, with improvement after a GFD. In some patients the depression may have been due to a serum factor, as transformation was more nearly normal when the lymphocytes were cultured in pooled AB serum than in their own serum. There was no correlation between transformation and nutritional deficiencies. Mantoux tests were performed in some of these and other coeliac patients and there was a very significant reduction in the incidence of positive tests compared with controls. These findings provide evidence of depressed CMI in coeliac patients taking a normal diet with improvement on a GFD and may be of relevance to the high risk of malignancy in coeliac disease, further strengthening the case for a strict GFD. PMID:1087262

  2. Nonspecific cell-mediated immunity in patients with epidermodysplasia verruciformis.

    PubMed

    Pereira de Oliveira, Walmar Roncalli; Carrasco, Solange; Neto, Cyro Festa; Rady, Peter; Tyring, Stephen K

    2003-03-01

    Epidermodysplasia verruciformis (EV) is a rare disease that usually begins in childhood and is characterized by a generalized infection by human papilloma virus (HPV), frequent associations with cutaneous carcinomas, and abnormalities of cell-mediated immunity (CMI). We studied nonspecific CMI in 13 patients with EV by bacterial skin tests, allergic reactions to dinitrochlorobenzene (DNCB), measurement of responses to phytohemagglutinin (PHA), and quantification of T lymphocytes and T lymphocytes subsets in peripheral blood. Impairment of CMI was manifested by the cutaneous anergy to a variety of common skin antigens and, by the reduction of the lymphocyte transformation to PHA. There were no correlation between the severity of cases and abnormalities of CMI in our patients, however; the impairment of CMI was lower in cases of short duration, suggesting that the impairment of CMI in EV might reflect a long period of disease. PMID:12692356

  3. Effect of carrageenan on the induction of cell-mediated cytotoxic responses in vivo.

    PubMed Central

    Sakemi, T; Kuroiwa, A; Nomoto, K

    1980-01-01

    Carrageenan (CAR), a sulphated polygalactose having macrophage toxic properties, elicited a suppression of primary cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL) responses against allogeneic tumour cells in the spleen when the tumour cells (EL-4 tumour cells, H-2b) were administered subcutaneously to AKR mice. When the allogeneic tumour cells were administered intravenously to AKR mice, no CTL responses to the alloantigens were detected in the spleen, but were detected in the peritoneal exudate cells, and CAR treatment suppressed the responses. On the other hand, in vitro secondary CTL responses of cells from alloantigen-primed mice were markedly enhanced by the pre-treatment of such mice with CAR. These results may suggest that two steps, macrophage-dependent and independent, are involved in the development of CTL responses in vivo. PMID:6969217

  4. Maternal immunity enhances Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae vaccination induced cell-mediated immune responses in piglets

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Passively acquired maternal derived immunity (MDI) is a double-edged sword. Maternal derived antibody-mediated immunity (AMI) and cell-mediated immunity (CMI) are critical immediate defenses for the neonate; however, MDI may interfere with the induction of active immunity in the neonate, i.e. passive interference. The effect of antigen-specific MDI on vaccine-induced AMI and CMI responses to Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae (M. hyopneumoniae) was assessed in neonatal piglets. To determine whether CMI and AMI responses could be induced in piglets with MDI, piglets with high and low levels of maternal M. hyopneumoniae-specific immunity were vaccinated against M. hyopneumoniae at 7 d of age. Piglet M. hyopneumoniae-specific antibody, lymphoproliferation, and delayed type hypersensitivity (DTH) responses were measured 7 d and 14 d post vaccination. Results Piglets with M. hyopneumoniae-specific MDI failed to show vaccine-induced AMI responses; there was no rise in M. hyopneumoniae antibody levels following vaccination of piglets in the presence of M. hyopneumoniae-specific MDI. However, piglets with M. hyopneumoniae-specific MDI had primary (antigen-specific lymphoproliferation) and secondary (DTH) M. hyopneumoniae-specific CMI responses following vaccination. Conclusions In this study neonatal M. hyopneumoniae-specific CMI was not subject to passive interference by MDI. Further, it appears that both maternal derived and endogenous CMI contribute to M. hyopneumoniae-specific CMI responses in piglets vaccinated in the face of MDI. PMID:24903770

  5. Dendritic Polymers for Theranostics

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Yuan; Mou, Quanbing; Wang, Dali; Zhu, Xinyuan; Yan, Deyue

    2016-01-01

    Dendritic polymers are highly branched polymers with controllable structures, which possess a large population of terminal functional groups, low solution or melt viscosity, and good solubility. Their size, degree of branching and functionality can be adjusted and controlled through the synthetic procedures. These tunable structures correspond to application-related properties, such as biodegradability, biocompatibility, stimuli-responsiveness and self-assembly ability, which are the key points for theranostic applications, including chemotherapeutic theranostics, biotherapeutic theranostics, phototherapeutic theranostics, radiotherapeutic theranostics and combined therapeutic theranostics. Up to now, significant progress has been made for the dendritic polymers in solving some of the fundamental and technical questions toward their theranostic applications. In this review, we briefly summarize how to control the structures of dendritic polymers, the theranostics-related properties derived from their structures and their theranostics-related applications. PMID:27217829

  6. Regulation of NKT cell-mediated immune responses to tumours and liver inflammation by mitochondrial PGAM5-Drp1 signalling

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Young Jun; Bang, Bo-Ram; Han, Kyung Ho; Hong, Lixin; Shim, Eun-Jin; Ma, Jianhui; Lerner, Richard A.; Otsuka, Motoyuki

    2015-01-01

    The receptor-interacting protein kinase 3 (RIPK3) plays crucial roles in programmed necrosis and innate inflammatory responses. However, a little is known about the involvement of RIPK3 in NKT cell-mediated immune responses. Here, we demonstrate that RIPK3 plays an essential role in NKT cell function via activation of the mitochondrial phosphatase phosphoglycerate mutase 5 (PGAM5). RIPK3-mediated activation of PGAM5 promotes the expression of cytokines by facilitating nuclear translocation of NFAT and dephosphorylation of dynamin-related protein 1 (Drp1), a GTPase is essential for mitochondrial homoeostasis. Ripk3−/− mice show reduced NKT cell responses to metastatic tumour cells, and both deletion of RIPK3 and pharmacological inhibition of Drp1 protects mice from NKT cell-mediated induction of acute liver damage. Collectively, the results identify a crucial role for RIPK3-PGAM5-Drp1/NFAT signalling in NKT cell activation, and further suggest that RIPK3-PGAM5 signalling may mediate crosstalk between mitochondrial function and immune signalling. PMID:26381214

  7. Safety and tolerability of allogeneic dendritic cell vaccination with induction of Wilms tumor 1-specific T cells in a pediatric donor and pediatric patient with relapsed leukemia: a case report and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Saito, Shoji; Yanagisawa, Ryu; Yoshikawa, Kentaro; Higuchi, Yumiko; Koya, Terutsugu; Yoshizawa, Kiyoshi; Tanaka, Miyuki; Sakashita, Kazuo; Kobayashi, Takashi; Kurata, Takashi; Hirabayashi, Koichi; Nakazawa, Yozo; Shiohara, Masaaki; Yonemitsu, Yoshikazu; Okamoto, Masato; Sugiyama, Haruo; Koike, Kenichi; Shimodaira, Shigetaka

    2015-03-01

    A 15-year-old girl with acute lymphoblastic leukemia received allogeneic dendritic cell vaccination, pulsed with Wilms tumor 1 (WT1) peptide, after her third hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT). The vaccines were generated from the third HSCT donor, who was her younger sister, age 12 years. The patient received 14 vaccines and had no graft-versus-host disease or systemic adverse effect, aside from grade 2 skin reaction at the injection site. WT1-specific immune responses were detected after vaccination by both WT1-tetramer analysis and enzyme-linked immunosorbent spot assay. This strategy may be safe, tolerable and even feasible for patients with a relapse after HSCT. PMID:25484308

  8. Lithium Dendrite Formation

    SciTech Connect

    2015-03-06

    Scientists at the Department of Energy’s Oak Ridge National Laboratory have captured the first real-time nanoscale images of lithium dendrite structures known to degrade lithium-ion batteries. The ORNL team’s electron microscopy could help researchers address long-standing issues related to battery performance and safety. Video shows annular dark-field scanning transmission electron microscopy imaging (ADF STEM) of lithium dendrite nucleation and growth from a glassy carbon working electrode and within a 1.2M LiPF6 EC:DM battery electrolyte.

  9. Stability of dendritic arrays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Warren, James A.; Langer, J. S.

    1990-01-01

    An approximate method for studying steady-state properties and linear stability of the dendritic arrays that are formed in directional solidification of alloys is proposed. This analysis is valid at high growth rates where the primary spacing between dendrites is larger than the velocity-dependent solutal diffusion length. A neutral stability boundary is computed and it is found that, in the situations where the results should be valid, the experimental data of Somboonsuk, et al. (1984) lie in the stable region, well away from the boundary.

  10. Isothermal Dendritic Growth Experiment Video

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    This video, captured during the Isothermal Dendritic Growth Experiment (IDGE) flown on STS-87 as a part of the fourth United States Microgravity payload, shows the growth of a dendrite, and the surface solidification that occurred on the front and back windows of the growth chamber. Dendrites are tiny, tree like structures that form as metals solidify.

  11. The unfolded protein response is required for dendrite morphogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Xing; Howell, Audrey S; Dong, Xintong; Taylor, Caitlin A; Cooper, Roshni C; Zhang, Jianqi; Zou, Wei; Sherwood, David R; Shen, Kang

    2015-01-01

    Precise patterning of dendritic fields is essential for the formation and function of neuronal circuits. During development, dendrites acquire their morphology by exuberant branching. How neurons cope with the increased load of protein production required for this rapid growth is poorly understood. Here we show that the physiological unfolded protein response (UPR) is induced in the highly branched Caenorhabditis elegans sensory neuron PVD during dendrite morphogenesis. Perturbation of the IRE1 arm of the UPR pathway causes loss of dendritic branches, a phenotype that can be rescued by overexpression of the ER chaperone HSP-4 (a homolog of mammalian BiP/ grp78). Surprisingly, a single transmembrane leucine-rich repeat protein, DMA-1, plays a major role in the induction of the UPR and the dendritic phenotype in the UPR mutants. These findings reveal a significant role for the physiological UPR in the maintenance of ER homeostasis during morphogenesis of large dendritic arbors. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.06963.001 PMID:26052671

  12. Diverse HLA-I Peptide Repertoires of the APC Lines MUTZ3-Derived Immature and Mature Dendritic Cells and THP1-Derived Macrophages.

    PubMed

    Nyambura, Lydon Wainaina; Jarmalavicius, Saulius; Baleeiro, Renato Brito; Walden, Peter

    2016-09-15

    Dendritic cells (DCs) and macrophages are specialized APCs that process and present self-Ags for induction of tolerance and foreign Ags to initiate T cell-mediated immunity. Related to differentiation states they have specific phenotypes and functions. However, the impact of these differentiations on Ag processing and presentation remains poorly defined. To gain insight into this, we analyzed and compared the HLA-I peptidomes of MUTZ3-derived human immature and mature DC lines and THP1-derived macrophages by liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry. We found that the HLA-I peptidomes were heterogeneous and individualized and were dominated by nonapeptides with similar HLA-I binding affinities and anchor residues. MUTZ3-derived DCs and THP1-derived macrophages were able to sample peptides from source proteins of almost all subcellular locations and were involved in various cellular functions in similar proportion, with preference to proteins involved in cell communication, signal transduction, protein metabolism, and transcription factor/regulator activity. PMID:27543614

  13. Tolerogenic nanoparticles inhibit T cell-mediated autoimmunity through SOCS2.

    PubMed

    Yeste, Ada; Takenaka, Maisa C; Mascanfroni, Ivan D; Nadeau, Meghan; Kenison, Jessica E; Patel, Bonny; Tukpah, Ann-Marcia; Babon, Jenny Aurielle B; DeNicola, Megan; Kent, Sally C; Pozo, David; Quintana, Francisco J

    2016-01-01

    Type 1 diabetes (T1D) is a T cell-dependent autoimmune disease that is characterized by the destruction of insulin-producing β cells in the pancreas. The administration to patients of ex vivo-differentiated FoxP3(+) regulatory T (Treg) cells or tolerogenic dendritic cells (DCs) that promote Treg cell differentiation is considered a potential therapy for T1D; however, cell-based therapies cannot be easily translated into clinical practice. We engineered nanoparticles (NPs) to deliver both a tolerogenic molecule, the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) ligand 2-(1'H-indole-3'-carbonyl)-thiazole-4-carboxylic acid methyl ester (ITE), and the β cell antigen proinsulin (NPITE+Ins) to induce a tolerogenic phenotype in DCs and promote Treg cell generation in vivo. NPITE+Ins administration to 8-week-old nonobese diabetic mice suppressed autoimmune diabetes. NPITE+Ins induced a tolerogenic phenotype in DCs, which was characterized by a decreased ability to activate inflammatory effector T cells and was concomitant with the increased differentiation of FoxP3(+) Treg cells. The induction of a tolerogenic phenotype in DCs by NPs was mediated by the AhR-dependent induction of Socs2, which resulted in inhibition of nuclear factor κB activation and proinflammatory cytokine production (properties of tolerogenic DCs). Together, these data suggest that NPs constitute a potential tool to reestablish tolerance in T1D and potentially other autoimmune disorders. PMID:27330188

  14. Transport Processes in Dendritic Crystallization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glicksman, M. E.

    1984-01-01

    Free dentritic growth refers to the unconstrained development of crystals within a supercooled melt, which is the classical dendrite problem. The development of theoretical understanding of dendritic growth and its experimental status is sketched showing that transport theory and interfacial thermodynamics (capillarity theory) are insufficient ingredients to develop a truly predictive model of dendrite formation. The convenient, but incorrect, notion of maximum velocity was used for many years to estimate the behavior of dendritic transformations until supplanted by modern dynamic stability theory. The proper combinations of transport theory and morphological stability seem to be able to predict the salient aspects of dendritic growth, especially in the neighborhood of the tip.

  15. Dendritic cell interactions with Histoplasma and Paracoccidioides.

    PubMed

    Thind, Sharanjeet K; Taborda, Carlos P; Nosanchuk, Joshua D

    2015-01-01

    Fungi are among the most common microbes encountered by humans. More than 100, 000 fungal species have been described in the environment to date, however only a few species cause disease in humans. Fungal infections are of particular importance to immunocompromised hosts in whom disease is often more severe, especially in those with impaired cell-mediated immunity such as individuals with HIV infection, hematologic malignancies, or those receiving TNF-α inhibitors. Nevertheless, environmental disturbances through natural processes or as a consequence of deforestation or construction can expose immunologically competent people to a large number of fungal spores resulting in asymptomatic acquisition to life-threatening disease. In recent decades, the significance of the innate immune system and more importantly the role of dendritic cells (DC) have been found to play a fundamental role in the resolution of fungal infections, such as in dimorphic fungi like Histoplasma and Paracoccidioides. In this review article the general role of DCs will be illustrated as the bridge between the innate and adaptive immune systems, as well as their specific interactions with these 2 dimorphic fungi. PMID:25933034

  16. Modification of dendritic development.

    PubMed

    Feria-Velasco, Alfredo; del Angel, Alma Rosa; Gonzalez-Burgos, Ignacio

    2002-01-01

    Since 1890 Ramón y Cajal strongly defended the theory that dendrites and their processes and spines had a function of not just nutrient transport to the cell body, but they had an important conductive role in neural impulse transmission. He extensively discussed and supported this theory in the Volume 1 of his extraordinary book Textura del Sistema Nervioso del Hombre y de los Vertebrados. Also, Don Santiago significantly contributed to a detailed description of the various neural components of the hippocampus and cerebral cortex during development. Extensive investigation has been done in the last Century related to the functional role of these complex brain regions, and their association with learning, memory and some limbic functions. Likewise, the organization and expression of neuropsychological qualities such as memory, exploratory behavior and spatial orientation, among others, depend on the integrity and adequate functional activity of the cerebral cortex and hippocampus. It is known that brain serotonin synthesis and release depend directly and proportionally on the availability of its precursor, tryptophan (TRY). By using a chronic TRY restriction model in rats, we studied their place learning ability in correlation with the dendritic spine density of pyramidal neurons in field CA1 of the hippocampus during postnatal development. We have also reported alterations in the maturation pattern of the ability for spontaneous alternation and task performance evaluating short-term memory, as well as adverse effects on the density of dendritic spines of hippocampal CA1 field pyramidal neurons and on the dendritic arborization and the number of dendritic spines of pyramidal neurons from the third layer of the prefrontal cortex using the same model of TRY restriction. The findings obtained in these studies employing a modified Golgi method, can be interpreted as a trans-synaptic plastic response due to understimulation of serotoninergic receptors located in the

  17. Lung Regeneration: Endogenous and Exogenous Stem Cell Mediated Therapeutic Approaches.

    PubMed

    Akram, Khondoker M; Patel, Neil; Spiteri, Monica A; Forsyth, Nicholas R

    2016-01-01

    The tissue turnover of unperturbed adult lung is remarkably slow. However, after injury or insult, a specialised group of facultative lung progenitors become activated to replenish damaged tissue through a reparative process called regeneration. Disruption in this process results in healing by fibrosis causing aberrant lung remodelling and organ dysfunction. Post-insult failure of regeneration leads to various incurable lung diseases including chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis. Therefore, identification of true endogenous lung progenitors/stem cells, and their regenerative pathway are crucial for next-generation therapeutic development. Recent studies provide exciting and novel insights into postnatal lung development and post-injury lung regeneration by native lung progenitors. Furthermore, exogenous application of bone marrow stem cells, embryonic stem cells and inducible pluripotent stem cells (iPSC) show evidences of their regenerative capacity in the repair of injured and diseased lungs. With the advent of modern tissue engineering techniques, whole lung regeneration in the lab using de-cellularised tissue scaffold and stem cells is now becoming reality. In this review, we will highlight the advancement of our understanding in lung regeneration and development of stem cell mediated therapeutic strategies in combating incurable lung diseases. PMID:26797607

  18. Lung Regeneration: Endogenous and Exogenous Stem Cell Mediated Therapeutic Approaches

    PubMed Central

    Akram, Khondoker M.; Patel, Neil; Spiteri, Monica A.; Forsyth, Nicholas R.

    2016-01-01

    The tissue turnover of unperturbed adult lung is remarkably slow. However, after injury or insult, a specialised group of facultative lung progenitors become activated to replenish damaged tissue through a reparative process called regeneration. Disruption in this process results in healing by fibrosis causing aberrant lung remodelling and organ dysfunction. Post-insult failure of regeneration leads to various incurable lung diseases including chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis. Therefore, identification of true endogenous lung progenitors/stem cells, and their regenerative pathway are crucial for next-generation therapeutic development. Recent studies provide exciting and novel insights into postnatal lung development and post-injury lung regeneration by native lung progenitors. Furthermore, exogenous application of bone marrow stem cells, embryonic stem cells and inducible pluripotent stem cells (iPSC) show evidences of their regenerative capacity in the repair of injured and diseased lungs. With the advent of modern tissue engineering techniques, whole lung regeneration in the lab using de-cellularised tissue scaffold and stem cells is now becoming reality. In this review, we will highlight the advancement of our understanding in lung regeneration and development of stem cell mediated therapeutic strategies in combating incurable lung diseases. PMID:26797607

  19. Natural killer cell mediated cytotoxic responses in the Tasmanian devil.

    PubMed

    Brown, Gabriella K; Kreiss, Alexandre; Lyons, A Bruce; Woods, Gregory M

    2011-01-01

    The Tasmanian devil (Sarcophilus harrisii), the world's largest marsupial carnivore, is under threat of extinction following the emergence of an infectious cancer. Devil facial tumour disease (DFTD) is spread between Tasmanian devils during biting. The disease is consistently fatal and devils succumb without developing a protective immune response. The aim of this study was to determine if Tasmanian devils were capable of forming cytotoxic antitumour responses and develop antibodies against DFTD cells and foreign tumour cells. The two Tasmanian devils immunised with irradiated DFTD cells did not form cytotoxic or humoral responses against DFTD cells, even after multiple immunisations. However, following immunisation with xenogenic K562 cells, devils did produce cytotoxic responses and antibodies against this foreign tumour cell line. The cytotoxicity appeared to occur through the activity of natural killer (NK) cells in an antibody dependent manner. Classical NK cell responses, such as innate killing of DFTD and foreign cancer cells, were not observed. Cells with an NK-like phenotype comprised approximately 4 percent of peripheral blood mononuclear cells. The results of this study suggest that Tasmanian devils have NK cells with functional cytotoxic pathways. Although devil NK cells do not directly recognise DFTD cancer cells, the development of antibody dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity presents a potential pathway to induce cytotoxic responses against the disease. These findings have positive implications for future DFTD vaccine research. PMID:21957452

  20. Cell-mediated immunity in the course of cervical ectropion.

    PubMed

    De Luca Brunori, I; Facchini, V; Filippeschi, M; Battini, L; Giusti, G; Romani, L; Scida, P; Urbano, M

    1994-01-01

    In the present study we evaluated cellular immunitary response in course of asymptomatic ectropion. Biopsies of the injured and healthy zones of the exocervix were carried out. All biopsies were examined by an immuno-histo-chemical method (Avidin-Biotin Complex, ABC) with monoclonal antibodies, in order to phenotype T lymphocytic subpopulations, in particular T helper lymphocytes (CD4), T suppressor lymphocytes (CD8) and Langerhans cells (CD1), which are basic elements of the monocytic-macrophagic series. Our preliminary findings showed a reduction of CD4, CD8 and CD1 lymphocytic subpopulations in ectropion zones, while these subpopulations are normally present in healthy zones of the exocervix. These findings support the hypothesis that, in ectropion, as in HPV infections and in CIN, a localized immuno-deficiency may appear and depress immuno-surveillance and cell-mediated response. In conclusion, it may be supposed that ectropion represents a non-stable lesion, which therefore needs suitable therapeutic intervention. PMID:7915218

  1. Protection in antibody- and T cell-mediated autoimmune diseases by antiinflammatory IgG Fcs requires type II FcRs.

    PubMed

    Fiebiger, Benjamin M; Maamary, Jad; Pincetic, Andrew; Ravetch, Jeffrey V

    2015-05-01

    The antiinflammatory activity of intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIG) is dependent on the presence of sialic acid in the core IgG fragment crystallizable domain (Fc) glycan, resulting in increased conformational flexibility of the CH2 domain with corresponding modulation of Fc receptor (FcR) binding specificity from type I to type II receptors. Sialylated IgG Fc (sFc) increases the activation threshold of innate effector cells to immune complexes by stimulating the up-regulation of the inhibitory receptor FcγRIIB. We have found that the structural alterations induced by sialylation can be mimicked by specific amino acid modifications to the CH2 domain. An IgG Fc variant with a point mutation at position 241 (F→A) exhibits antiinflammatory activity even in the absence of sialylation. F241A and sFc protect mice from arthritis in the K/BxN-induced model and, in the T cell-mediated experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) mouse model, suppress disease by specifically activating regulatory T cells (Treg cells). Protection by these antiinflammatory Fcs in both antibody- and T cell-mediated autoimmune diseases required type II FcRs and the induction of IL-33. These results further clarify the mechanism of action of IVIG in both antibody- and T cell-mediated inflammatory diseases and demonstrate that Fc variants that mimic the structural alterations induced by sialylation, such as F241A, can be promising therapeutic candidates for the treatment of various autoimmune disorders. PMID:25870292

  2. Protection in antibody- and T cell-mediated autoimmune diseases by antiinflammatory IgG Fcs requires type II FcRs

    PubMed Central

    Fiebiger, Benjamin M.; Maamary, Jad; Pincetic, Andrew; Ravetch, Jeffrey V.

    2015-01-01

    The antiinflammatory activity of intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIG) is dependent on the presence of sialic acid in the core IgG fragment crystallizable domain (Fc) glycan, resulting in increased conformational flexibility of the CH2 domain with corresponding modulation of Fc receptor (FcR) binding specificity from type I to type II receptors. Sialylated IgG Fc (sFc) increases the activation threshold of innate effector cells to immune complexes by stimulating the up-regulation of the inhibitory receptor FcγRIIB. We have found that the structural alterations induced by sialylation can be mimicked by specific amino acid modifications to the CH2 domain. An IgG Fc variant with a point mutation at position 241 (F→A) exhibits antiinflammatory activity even in the absence of sialylation. F241A and sFc protect mice from arthritis in the K/BxN-induced model and, in the T cell-mediated experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) mouse model, suppress disease by specifically activating regulatory T cells (Treg cells). Protection by these antiinflammatory Fcs in both antibody- and T cell-mediated autoimmune diseases required type II FcRs and the induction of IL-33. These results further clarify the mechanism of action of IVIG in both antibody- and T cell-mediated inflammatory diseases and demonstrate that Fc variants that mimic the structural alterations induced by sialylation, such as F241A, can be promising therapeutic candidates for the treatment of various autoimmune disorders. PMID:25870292

  3. Cell-mediated immune responses to respiratory syncytial virus infection

    PubMed Central

    Geevarghese, Bessey; Weinberg, Adriana

    2014-01-01

    We evaluated the cell-mediated immune (CMI) response to RSV acute infection including the magnitude, kinetics and correlates with morbidity and age. Twenty-nine RSV-infected patients with mean ± SD age of 15 ± 14 months were enrolled during their first week of disease. Th1, Th2, Th9, Th17 and Th22 responses were measured at entry and 2 and 6 weeks later. All subjects were hospitalized for a median (range) of 5 (3–11) days. RSV-specific effector and memory Th1 CMI measured by lymphocyte proliferation and IFNγ ELISPOT significantly increased over time (P ≤ 0.03). In contrast, Th22 responses decreased over time (P ≤ 0.03). Other changes did not reach statistical significance. The severity of RSV disease measured by the length of hospitalization positively correlated with the magnitude of Th9, Th22 and TNFα inflammatory responses (rho ≥ 0.4; P ≤ 0.04) and negatively with memory CMI (rho = –0.45; P = 0.04). The corollary of this observation is that robust Th1 and/or low Th9, Th22, and TNFα inflammatory responses may be associated with efficient clearance of RSV infection and therefore desirable characteristics of an RSV vaccine. Young age was associated with low memory and effector Th1 responses (rho ≥ 0.4; P ≤ 0.04) and high Th2, Th9, Th17, Th22 and TNFα inflammatory responses (rho ≤ –0.4; P ≤ 0.04), indicating that age at vaccination may be a major determinant of the CMI response pattern. PMID:24513666

  4. Silicon dendritic web material

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meier, D. L.; Campbell, R. B.; Sienkiewicz, L. J.; Rai-Choudhury, P.

    1982-01-01

    The development of a low cost and reliable contact system for solar cells and the fabrication of several solar cell modules using ultrasonic bonding for the interconnection of cells and ethylene vinyl acetate as the potting material for module encapsulation are examined. The cells in the modules were made from dendritic web silicon. To reduce cost, the electroplated layer of silver was replaced with an electroplated layer of copper. The modules that were fabricated used the evaporated Ti, Pd, Ag and electroplated Cu (TiPdAg/Cu) system. Adherence of Ni to Si is improved if a nickel silicide can be formed by heat treatment. The effectiveness of Ni as a diffusion barrier to Cu and the ease with which nickel silicide is formed is discussed. The fabrication of three modules using dendritic web silicon and employing ultrasonic bonding for interconnecting calls and ethylene vinyl acetate as the potting material is examined.

  5. A Truncated form of CD200 (CD200S) Expressed on Glioma Cells Prolonged Survival in a Rat Glioma Model by Induction of a Dendritic Cell-Like Phenotype in Tumor-Associated Macrophages12

    PubMed Central

    Kobayashi, Kana; Yano, Hajime; Umakoshi, Akihiro; Matsumoto, Shirabe; Mise, Ayano; Funahashi, Yu; Ueno, Yoshitomo; Kamei, Yoshiaki; Takada, Yasutsugu; Kumon, Yoshiaki; Ohnishi, Takanori; Tanaka, Junya

    2016-01-01

    CD200 induces immunosuppression in myeloid cells expressing its receptor CD200R, which may have consequences for tumor immunity. We found that human carcinoma tissues express not only full-length CD200 (CD200L) but also its truncated form, CD200S. Although CD200S is reported to antagonize the immunosuppressive actions of CD200L, the role of CD200S in tumor immunity has never been investigated. We established rat C6 glioma cell lines that expressed either CD200L or CD200S; the original C6 cell line did not express CD200 molecules. The cell lines showed no significant differences in growth. Upon transplantation into the neonatal Wistar rat forebrain parenchyma, rats transplanted with C6-CD200S cells survived for a significantly longer period than those transplanted with the original C6 and C6-CD200L cells. The C6-CD200S tumors were smaller than the C6-CD200L or C6-original tumors, and many apoptotic cells were found in the tumor cell aggregates. Tumor-associated macrophages (TAMs) in C6-CD200S tumors displayed dendritic cell (DC)-like morphology with multiple processes and CD86 expression. Furthermore, CD3+, CD4+ or CD8+ cells were more frequently found in C6-CD200S tumors, and the expression of DC markers, granzyme, and perforin was increased in C6-CD200S tumors. Isolated TAMs from original C6 tumors were co-cultured with C6-CD200S cells and showed increased expression of DC markers. These results suggest that CD200S activates TAMs to become DC-like antigen presenting cells, leading to the activation of CD8+ cytotoxic T lymphocytes, which induce apoptotic elimination of tumor cells. The findings on CD200S action may provide a novel therapeutic modality for the treatment of carcinomas. PMID:27108386

  6. Activation of dendritic cells and induction of T cell responses by HPV 16 L1/E7 chimeric virus-like particles are enhanced by CpG ODN or sorbitol.

    PubMed

    Freyschmidt, Eva-Jasmin; Alonso, Angel; Hartmann, Gunther; Gissmann, Lutz

    2004-08-01

    Chimeric human papillomavirus-like particles, consisting of human papillomavirus (HPV) 16 L1-E7 fusion proteins [HPV 16 L1/E7 chimeric virus-like particles (CVLP)], are a vaccine candidate for treatment and prevention of cervical cancer. Although in preclinical studies CVLPs were shown to induce neutralizing antibodies and L1- and E7-specific T cell responses, the results of a recent clinical trial emphasized the need of improved immunogenicity of CVLPs. Here we studied the interaction of HPV 16 L1/E7 CVLPs with mouse bone marrow-derived dendritic cells (BMDCs) activated with different immune adjuvants. We found that lipopolysaccharides (LPS), unmethylated CpG motifs (CpG ODN) and sorbitol enhanced CVLP-induced stimulation of C57BL/6 mouse BMDCs as revealed by increased levels of CD40, CD80, MHC II and CD54 at the cell surface. CpG ODN and sorbitol also enhanced the presentation of Db-restricted cytotoxic T lymphocyte epitopes to HPV 16 L1- or E7-specific T lymphocytes after loading of CVLPs onto BMDCs. Treatment of BMDCs with CpG ODN in combination with CVLPs improved in vitro priming of naive T lymphocytes by CVLP-loaded BMDCs. In vivo, CVLP-loaded BMDCs were more immunogenic as compared with injection of CVLPs alone. CpG ODN and sorbitol further enhanced priming of antigen-specific T cell responses. Our data demonstrate that CpG ODN- or sorbitol-activated BMDCs substantially increase the immunogenicity of CVLPs. Implementing our results in clinical trial protocols may lead to improved activity of therapeutic HPV vaccines for the treatment of HPV-induced cancer. PMID:15456078

  7. Selective dendritic susceptibility to bioenergetic, excitotoxic and redox perturbations in cortical neurons☆

    PubMed Central

    Hasel, Philip; Mckay, Sean; Qiu, Jing; Hardingham, Giles E.

    2015-01-01

    Neurodegenerative and neurological disorders are often characterised by pathological changes to dendrites, in advance of neuronal death. Oxidative stress, energy deficits and excitotoxicity are implicated in many such disorders, suggesting a potential vulnerability of dendrites to these situations. Here we have studied dendritic vs. somatic responses of primary cortical neurons to these types of challenges in real-time. Using a genetically encoded indicator of intracellular redox potential (Grx1-roGFP2) we found that, compared to the soma, dendritic regions exhibited more dramatic fluctuations in redox potential in response to sub-lethal ROS exposure, and existed in a basally more oxidised state. We also studied the responses of dendritic and somatic regions to excitotoxic NMDA receptor activity. Both dendritic and somatic regions experienced similar increases in cytoplasmic Ca2+. Interestingly, while mitochondrial Ca2+ uptake and initial mitochondrial depolarisation were similar in both regions, secondary delayed mitochondrial depolarisation was far weaker in dendrites, potentially as a result of less NADH depletion. Despite this, ATP levels were found to fall faster in dendritic regions. Finally we studied the responses of dendritic and somatic regions to energetically demanding action potential burst activity. Burst activity triggered PDH dephosphorylation, increases in oxygen consumption and cellular NADH:NAD ratio. Compared to somatic regions, dendritic regions exhibited a smaller degree of mitochondrial Ca2+ uptake, lower fold-induction of NADH and larger reduction in ATP levels. Collectively, these data reveal that dendritic regions of primary neurons are vulnerable to greater energetic and redox fluctuations than the cell body, which may contribute to disease-associated dendritic damage. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: 13th European Symposium on Calcium. PMID:25541281

  8. Immunotherapy with myeloid cells for tolerance induction

    PubMed Central

    Rodriguez-García, Mercedes; Boros, Peter; Bromberg, Jonathan S.; Ochando, Jordi C.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose of review Understanding the interplay between myeloid dendritic cells and T cells under tolerogenic conditions, and whether their interactions induce the development of antigen-specific regulatory T cells (Tregs) is critical to uncover the mechanisms involved in the induction of indefinite allograft survival. Recent findings Myeloid dendritic cell–T-cell interactions are seminal events that determine the outcome of the immune response, and multiple in-vitro protocols suggest the generation of tolerogenic myeloid dendritic cells that modulate T-cell responses, and determine the outcome of the immune response to an allograft following adoptive transfer. We believe that identifying specific conditions that lead to the generation of tolerogenic myeloid dendritic cells and Tregs are critical for the manipulation the immune response towards the development of transplantation tolerance. Summary We summarize recent findings regarding specific culture conditions that generate tolerogenic myeloid dendritic cells that induce T-cell hyporesponsiveness and Treg development, and represents a novel immunotherapeutic approach to promote the induction of indefinite graft survival prolongation. The interpretations presented here illustrate that different mechanisms govern the generation tolerogenic myeloid dendritic cells, and we discuss the concomitant therapeutic implications. PMID:20616727

  9. Web-dendritic ribbon growth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hilborn, R. B., Jr.; Faust, J. W., Jr.

    1976-01-01

    A web furnace was constructed for pulling dendritic-web samples. The effect of changes in the furnace thermal geometry on the growth of dendritic-web was studied. Several attempts were made to grow primitive dendrites for use as the dendritic seed crystals for web growth and to determine the optimum twin spacing in the dendritic seed crystal for web growth. Mathematical models and computer programs were used to determine the thermal geometries in the susceptor, crucible melt, meniscus, and web. Several geometries were determined for particular furnace geometries and growth conditions. The information obtained was used in conjunction with results from the experimental growth investigations in order to achieve proper conditions for sustained pulling of two dendrite web ribbons. In addition, the facilities for obtaining the following data were constructed: twin spacing, dislocation density, web geometry, resistivity, majority charge carrier type, and minority carrier lifetime.

  10. Kupffer cell-mediated exacerbation of methimazole-induced acute liver injury in rats.

    PubMed

    Akai, Sho; Uematsu, Yasuaki; Tsuneyama, Koichi; Oda, Shingo; Yokoi, Tsuyoshi

    2016-05-01

    Methimazole (MTZ), an anti-thyroid drug, is known to cause liver injury in humans. It has been demonstrated that MTZ-induced liver injury in Balb/c mice is accompanied by T helper (Th) 2 cytokine-mediated immune responses; however, there is little evidence for immune responses associated with MTZ-induced liver injury in rats. To investigate species differences in MTZ-induced liver injury, we administered MTZ with a glutathione biosynthesis inhibitor, L-buthionine-S,R-sulfoximine (BSO), to F344 rats and subsequently observed an increase in plasma alanine aminotransferase (ALT) and high-mobility group box 1 (HMGB1), which are associated with hepatic lesions. The hepatic mRNA expression of innate immune-related genes significantly increased in BSO- and MTZ-treated rats, but the change in Th2-related genes was not much greater than the change observed in the previous mouse study. Moreover, an increase in Kupffer cells and an induction of the phosphorylation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK)/c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) proteins were accompanied by an increase in Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) expression, indicating that Kupffer cell activation occurs through HMGB1-TLR4 signaling. To elucidate the mechanism of liver injury in rats, gadolinium chloride, which inactivates the function of Kupffer cells, was administered before BSO and MTZ administration. The gadolinium chloride treatment significantly suppressed the increased ALT, which was accompanied by decreased hepatic mRNA expression related to innate immune responses and ERK/JNK phosphorylation. In conclusion, Kupffer cell-mediated immune responses are crucial factors for the exacerbation of MTZ-induced liver injury in rats, indicating apparent species differences in the immune-mediated exacerbation of liver injury between mice and rats. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:26177832

  11. IDGE: Isothermal Dendritic Growth Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    The Isothermal Dendritic Growth Experiment (IDGE) flew on STS-62 to study the microscopic, tree-like structures (dendrites) that form within metals as they solidify from molten materials. The size, shape, and orientation of these dendrites affect the strength and usefulness of metals. Data from this experiment will be used to test and improve the mathematical models that support the industrial production of metals.

  12. Shared signaling systems in myeloid cell-mediated muscle regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Tidball, James G.; Dorshkind, Kenneth; Wehling-Henricks, Michelle

    2014-01-01

    Much of the focus in muscle regeneration has been placed on the identification and delivery of stem cells to promote regenerative capacity. As those efforts have advanced, we have learned that complex features of the microenvironment in which regeneration occurs can determine success or failure. The immune system is an important contributor to that complexity and can determine the extent to which muscle regeneration succeeds. Immune cells of the myeloid lineage play major regulatory roles in tissue regeneration through two general, inductive mechanisms: instructive mechanisms that act directly on muscle cells; and permissive mechanisms that act indirectly to influence regeneration by modulating angiogenesis and fibrosis. In this article, recent discoveries that identify inductive actions of specific populations of myeloid cells on muscle regeneration are presented, with an emphasis on how processes in muscle and myeloid cells are co-regulated. PMID:24595286

  13. Micronutrient supplementation and T-cell mediated immune responses in patients with tuberculosis in Tanzania

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Limited studies exist regarding whether incorporating micronutrient supplements during tuberculosis (TB) treatment may improve cell-mediated immune response. We examine the effect of micronutrient supplementation on lymphocyte proliferation response to mycobacteria or T cell mitogens in a randomize...

  14. Monocytic suppressive cells mediate cardiovascular transplantation tolerance in mice

    PubMed Central

    Garcia, Mercedes Rodriguez; Ledgerwood, Levi; Yang, Yu; Xu, Jiangnan; Lal, Girdhari; Burrell, Bryna; Ma, Ge; Hashimoto, Daigo; Li, Yansui; Boros, Peter; Grisotto, Marcos; van Rooijen, Nico; Matesanz, Rafael; Tacke, Frank; Ginhoux, Florent; Ding, Yaozhong; Chen, Shu-Hsia; Randolph, Gwendalyn; Merad, Miriam; Bromberg, Jonathan S.; Ochando, Jordi C.

    2010-01-01

    One of the main unresolved questions in solid organ transplantation is how to establish indefinite graft survival that is free from long-term treatment with immunosuppressive drugs and chronic rejection (i.e., the establishment of tolerance). The failure to achieve this goal may be related to the difficulty in identifying the phenotype and function of the cell subsets that participate in the induction of tolerance. To address this issue, we investigated the suppressive roles of recipient myeloid cells that may be manipulated to induce tolerance to transplanted hearts in mice. Using depleting mAbs, clodronate-loaded liposomes, and transgenic mice specific for depletion of CD11c+, CD11b+, or CD115+ cells, we identified a tolerogenic role for CD11b+CD115+Gr1+ monocytes during the induction of tolerance by costimulatory blockade with CD40L-specific mAb. Early after transplantation, Gr1+ monocytes migrated from the bone marrow into the transplanted organ, where they prevented the initiation of adaptive immune responses that lead to allograft rejection and participated in the development of Tregs. Our results suggest that mobilization of bone marrow CD11b+CD115+Gr1+ monocytes under sterile inflammatory conditions mediates the induction of indefinite allograft survival. We propose that manipulating the common bone marrow monocyte progenitor could be a useful clinical therapeutic approach for inducing transplantation tolerance. PMID:20551515

  15. Induction of antigen-specific cytotoxic T-cell response by dendritic cells generated from ecto-mesenchymal stem cells infected with an adenovirus containing the MAGE-D4a gene

    PubMed Central

    HU, SHIJIE; LI, BING; SHEN, XUEFENG; ZHANG, RUI; GAO, DAKUAN; GUO, QINGDONG; JIN, YAN; FEI, ZHOU

    2016-01-01

    The present study aimed to investigate the feasibility of using ecto-mesenchymal stem cell (EMSC)-derived dendritic cells (DCs) for glioma immunotherapy following infection by a recombinant adenovirus containing the melanoma-associated antigen D4a (MAGE-D4a) gene. The ex vivo cultured EMSCs were infected by the adenoviral plasmid containing MAGE-D4a (pAd/MAGE-D4a). Efficiency of transfection was evaluated through the detection of green fluorescent protein-marked MAGE-D4a. The MAGE-EMSCs were induced to differentiate into DCs, termed as MAGE-EMSCs-DCs. The morphology was subsequently analyzed under a microscope, and methyl thiazolyl tetrazolium (MTT) and interferon-γ (IFN-γ) assays were performed to analyze the cytotoxicity of the MAGE-EMSC-DCs on the human glioma U251 cell line. Following purification by magnetic-activated cell sorting, the EMSCs grew into swirls, with a long spindle shape and were fibroblast-like. The gene transfected with recombinant adenovirus vectors maintained high and stable expression levels of MAGE-D4a, and its efficiency was increased in a multiplicity of infection-dependent manner. The results of the MTT assay indicated that the T cells, primed by the recombinant MAGE-D4a-infected EMSC-DCs in vitro, recognized MAGE-D4a-expressing tumor cell lines in a human leukocyte antigen class I-restricted manner, and evoked a higher cytotoxic T cell (CTL) response. The CTL response induced by the MAGE-EMSC-DCs, co-cultured with the U251 cells for 24 h, produced 765.0 pg/ml IFN-γ, which was significantly greater when compared to the control wells. T lymphocytes stimulated by MAGE-EMSC-DCs evoke a higher CTL response to human glioma cell lines, and may serve as a promising therapeutic modality for the treatment of MAGE-D4a-expressing glioma. PMID:27073570

  16. Organ-derived dendritic cells have differential effects on alloreactive T cells

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Theo D.; Terwey, Theis H.; Zakrzewski, Johannes L.; Suh, David; Kochman, Adam A.; Chen, Megan E.; King, Chris G.; Borsotti, Chiara; Grubin, Jeremy; Smith, Odette M.; Heller, Glenn; Liu, Chen; Murphy, George F.; Alpdogan, Onder

    2008-01-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs) are considered critical for the induction of graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) after bone marrow transplantation (BMT). In addition to their priming function, dendritic cells have been shown to induce organ-tropism through induction of specific homing molecules on T cells. Using adoptive transfer of CFSE-labeled cells, we first demonstrated that alloreactive T cells differentially up-regulate specific homing molecules in vivo. Host-type dendritic cells from the GVHD target organs liver and spleen or skin- and gut-draining lymph nodes effectively primed naive allogeneic T cells in vitro with the exception of liver-derived dendritic cells, which showed less stimulatory capacity. Gut-derived dendritic cells induced alloreactive donor T cells with a gut-homing phenotype that caused increased GVHD mortality and morbidity compared with T cells stimulated with dendritic cells from spleen, liver, and peripheral lymph nodes in an MHC-mismatched murine BMT model. However, in vivo analysis demonstrated that the in vitro imprinting of homing molecules on alloreactive T cells was only transient. In conclusion, organ-derived dendritic cells can efficiently induce specific homing molecules on alloreactive T cells. A gut-homing phenotype correlates with increased GVHD mortality and morbidity after murine BMT, underlining the importance of the gut in the pathophysiology of GVHD. PMID:18178870

  17. Self-Antigen Presentation by Dendritic Cells in Autoimmunity

    PubMed Central

    Hopp, Ann-Katrin; Rupp, Anne; Lukacs-Kornek, Veronika

    2014-01-01

    The operation of both central and peripheral tolerance ensures the prevention of autoimmune diseases. The maintenance of peripheral tolerance requires self-antigen presentation by professional antigen presenting cells (APCs). Dendritic cells (DCs) are considered as major APCs involved in this process. The current review discusses the role of DCs in autoimmune diseases, the various factors involved in the induction and maintenance of tolerogenic DC phenotype, and pinpoints their therapeutic capacity as well as potential novel targets for future clinical studies. PMID:24592266

  18. Dendritic Alloy Solidification Experiment (DASE)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beckermann, C.; Karma, A.; Steinbach, I.; deGroh, H. C., III

    2001-01-01

    A space experiment, and supporting ground-based research, is proposed to study the microstructural evolution in free dendritic growth from a supercooled melt of the transparent model alloy succinonitrile-acetone (SCN-ACE). The research is relevant to equiaxed solidification of metal alloy castings. The microgravity experiment will establish a benchmark for testing of equiaxed dendritic growth theories, scaling laws, and models in the presence of purely diffusive, coupled heat and solute transport, without the complicating influences of melt convection. The specific objectives are to: determine the selection of the dendrite tip operating state, i.e. the growth velocity and tip radius, for free dendritic growth of succinonitrile-acetone alloys; determine the growth morphology and sidebranching behavior for freely grown alloy dendrites; determine the effects of the thermal/solutal interactions in the growth of an assemblage of equiaxed alloy crystals; determine the effects of melt convection on the free growth of alloy dendrites; measure the surface tension anisotropy strength of succinon itrile -acetone alloys establish a theoretical and modeling framework for the experiments. Microgravity experiments on equiaxed dendritic growth of alloy dendrites have not been performed in the past. The proposed experiment builds on the Isothermal Dendritic Growth Experiment (IDGE) of Glicksman and coworkers, which focused on the steady growth of a single crystal from pure supercooled melts (succinonitrile and pivalic acid). It also extends the Equiaxed Dendritic Solidification Experiment (EDSE) of the present investigators, which is concerned with the interactions and transients arising in the growth of an assemblage of equiaxed crystals (succinonitrile). However, these experiments with pure substances are not able to address the issues related to coupled heat and solute transport in growth of alloy dendrites.

  19. Interference with intraepithelial TNF-α signaling inhibits CD8(+) T-cell-mediated lung injury in influenza infection.

    PubMed

    Srikiatkhachorn, Anon; Chintapalli, Jyothi; Liu, Jun; Jamaluddin, Mohammad; Harrod, Kevin S; Whitsett, Jeffrey A; Enelow, Richard I; Ramana, Chilakamarti V

    2010-12-01

    CD8(+) T-cell-mediated pulmonary immunopathology in respiratory virus infection is mediated in large part by antigen-specific TNF-α expression by antiviral effector T cells, which results in epithelial chemokine expression and inflammatory infiltration of the lung. To further define the signaling events leading to lung epithelial chemokine production in response to CD8(+) T-cell antigen recognition, we expressed the adenoviral 14.7K protein, a putative inhibitor of TNF-α signaling, in the distal lung epithelium, and analyzed the functional consequences. Distal airway epithelial expression of 14.7K resulted in a significant reduction in lung injury resulting from severe influenza pneumonia. In vitro analysis demonstrated a significant reduction in the expression of an important mediator of injury, CCL2, in response to CD8(+) T-cell recognition, or to TNF-α. The inhibitory effect of 14.7K on CCL2 expression resulted from attenuation of NF-κB activity, which was independent of Iκ-Bα degradation or nuclear translocation of the p65 subunit. Furthermore, epithelial 14.7K expression inhibited serine phosphorylation of Akt, GSK-3β, and the p65 subunit of NF-κB, as well as recruitment of NF-κB for DNA binding in vivo. These results provide insight into the mechanism of 14.7K inhibition of NF-κB activity, as well as further elucidate the mechanisms involved in the induction of T-cell-mediated immunopathology in respiratory virus infection. PMID:21142450

  20. Interference with Intraepithelial TNF-α Signaling Inhibits CD8+ T-Cell-Mediated Lung Injury in Influenza Infection

    PubMed Central

    Srikiatkhachorn, Anon; Chintapalli, Jyothi; Liu, Jun; Jamaluddin, Mohammad; Harrod, Kevin S.; Whitsett, Jeffrey A.; Enelow, Richard I.

    2010-01-01

    Abstract CD8+ T-cell-mediated pulmonary immunopathology in respiratory virus infection is mediated in large part by antigen-specific TNF-α expression by antiviral effector T cells, which results in epithelial chemokine expression and inflammatory infiltration of the lung. To further define the signaling events leading to lung epithelial chemokine production in response to CD8+ T-cell antigen recognition, we expressed the adenoviral 14.7K protein, a putative inhibitor of TNF-α signaling, in the distal lung epithelium, and analyzed the functional consequences. Distal airway epithelial expression of 14.7K resulted in a significant reduction in lung injury resulting from severe influenza pneumonia. In vitro analysis demonstrated a significant reduction in the expression of an important mediator of injury, CCL2, in response to CD8+ T-cell recognition, or to TNF-α. The inhibitory effect of 14.7K on CCL2 expression resulted from attenuation of NF-κB activity, which was independent of Iκ-Bα degradation or nuclear translocation of the p65 subunit. Furthermore, epithelial 14.7K expression inhibited serine phosphorylation of Akt, GSK-3β, and the p65 subunit of NF-κB, as well as recruitment of NF-κB for DNA binding in vivo. These results provide insight into the mechanism of 14.7K inhibition of NF-κB activity, as well as further elucidate the mechanisms involved in the induction of T-cell-mediated immunopathology in respiratory virus infection. PMID:21142450

  1. Targeting Dendritic Cells in vivo for Cancer Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Caminschi, Irina; Maraskovsky, Eugene; Heath, William Ross

    2012-01-01

    Monoclonal antibodies that recognize cell surface molecules have been used deliver antigenic cargo to dendritic cells (DC) for induction of immune responses. The encouraging anti-tumor immunity elicited using this immunization strategy suggests its suitability for clinical trials. This review discusses the complex network of DC, the functional specialization of DC subsets, the immunological outcomes of targeting different DC subsets and their cell surface receptors, and the requirements for the induction of effective anti-tumor CD4 and CD8 T cell responses that can recognize tumor-specific antigens. Finally, we review preclinical experiments and the progress toward targeting human DC in vivo. PMID:22566899

  2. Labor Induction

    MedlinePlus

    ... QUESTIONS FAQ154 LABOR, DELIVERY, AND POSTPARTUM CARE Labor Induction • What is labor induction? • Why is labor induced? • What is the Bishop ... oxytocin? • What are the risks associated with labor induction? • Is labor induction always effective? • Glossary What is ...

  3. Follicular Dendritic Cell Sarcoma

    PubMed Central

    Udayakumar, Achandira M.; Al-Bahri, Maiya; Burney, Ikram A.; Al-Haddabi, Ibrahim

    2015-01-01

    Follicular dendritic cell sarcoma (FDCS) is a rare neoplasm with a non-specific and insidious presentation further complicated by the difficult diagnostic and therapeutic assessment. It has a low to intermediate risk of recurrence and metastasis. Unlike other soft tissue sarcomas or histiocytic and dendritic cell neoplasms, cytogenetic studies are very limited in FDCS cases. Although no specific chromosomal marker has yet been established, complex aberrations and different ploidy types have been documented. We report the case of a 39-year-old woman with FDCS who presented to the Sultan Qaboos University Hospital in Muscat, Oman, in February 2013. Ultrastructural, immunophenotypical and histological findings are reported. In addition, karyotypic findings showed deletions of the chromosomes 1p, 3q, 6q, 7q, 8q and 11q. To the best of the authors’ knowledge, these have not been reported previously in this tumour. Techniques such as spectral karyotyping may help to better characterise chromosomal abnormalities in this type of tumour. PMID:26355964

  4. Development of dendrite polarity in Drosophila neurons

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Drosophila neurons have dendrites that contain minus-end-out microtubules. This microtubule arrangement is different from that of cultured mammalian neurons, which have mixed polarity microtubules in dendrites. Results To determine whether Drosophila and mammalian dendrites have a common microtubule organization during development, we analyzed microtubule polarity in Drosophila dendritic arborization neuron dendrites at different stages of outgrowth from the cell body in vivo. As dendrites initially extended, they contained mixed polarity microtubules, like mammalian neurons developing in culture. Over a period of several days this mixed microtubule array gradually matured to a minus-end-out array. To determine whether features characteristic of dendrites were localized before uniform polarity was attained, we analyzed dendritic markers as dendrites developed. In all cases the markers took on their characteristic distribution while dendrites had mixed polarity. An axonal marker was also quite well excluded from dendrites throughout development, although this was perhaps more efficient in mature neurons. To confirm that dendrite character could be acquired in Drosophila while microtubules were mixed, we genetically disrupted uniform dendritic microtubule organization. Dendritic markers also localized correctly in this case. Conclusions We conclude that developing Drosophila dendrites initially have mixed microtubule polarity. Over time they mature to uniform microtubule polarity. Dendrite identity is established before the mature microtubule arrangement is attained, during the period of mixed microtubule polarity. PMID:23111238

  5. Comparative dendritic cell biology of veterinary mammals.

    PubMed

    Summerfield, Artur; Auray, Gael; Ricklin, Meret

    2015-01-01

    Dendritic cells (DC) have a main function in innate immunity in that they sense infections and environmental antigens at the skin and mucosal surfaces and thereby critically influence decisions about immune activation or tolerance. As professional antigen-presenting cells, they are essential for induction of adaptive immune responses. Consequently, knowledge on this cell type is required to understand the immune systems of veterinary mammals, including cattle, sheep, pigs, dogs, cats, and horses. Recent ontogenic studies define bona fide DC as an independent lineage of hematopoietic cells originating from a common precursor. Distinct transcription factors control the development into the two subsets of classical DC and plasmacytoid DC. These DC subsets express a distinguishable transcriptome, which differs from that of monocyte-derived DC. Using a comparative approach based on phenotype and function, this review attempts to classify DC of veterinary mammals and to describe important knowledge gaps. PMID:25387110

  6. Alarmins Link Neutrophils and Dendritic Cells

    PubMed Central

    Yang, De; de la Rosa, Gonzalo; Tewary, Poonam; Oppenheim, Joost J.

    2009-01-01

    Neutrophils are the first major population of leukocyte to infiltrate infected or injured tissues and are crucial for initiating host innate defense and adaptive immunity. Although the contribution of neutrophils to innate immune defense is mediated predominantly by phagocytosis and killing of microorganisms, neutrophils also participate in the induction of adaptive immune responses. At sites of infection and/or injury, neutrophils release numerous mediators upon degranulation or death, among these are alarmins which have a characteristic dual capacity to mobilize and activate antigen-presenting cells. We describe here how alarmins released by neutrophil degranulation and/or death can link neutrophils to dendritic cells by promoting their recruitment and activation, resulting in the augmentation of innate and adaptive immune responses. PMID:19699678

  7. Suppression of cell-mediated immunity after infection with attenuated rubella virus.

    PubMed Central

    Ganguly, R; Cusumano, C L; Waldman, R H

    1976-01-01

    The effects of attenuated rubella virus infection upon cell-mediated immunity of human volunteers were studied. The volunteers received the vaccine either by nose drops or by the subcutaneous route. Changes in cell-mediated immunity in terms of delayed cutaneous sensitivity to recall antigens, phytohemagglutination stimulation, and spontaneous migration inhibitory factor-like activity were studied at various time periods after infection. Spontaneous migration inhibitory factor-like activity was studied on supernatants of the lymphocytes obtained from the volunteers and incubated for 72 h in the absence of any antigens. A significant proportion of the volunteers showed suppression of one or more parameters of cell-medicated immunity tested by week 2 of infection compared to the control; however, there was no correlation between suppression of the various parameters studied. No difference was noticed in the incidence of cell-mediated immunity suppression between nose drops and subcutaneous route groups. PMID:770329

  8. Siglecs as targets for therapy in immune cell mediated disease

    PubMed Central

    O’Reilly, Mary K.; Paulson, James C.

    2010-01-01

    The sialic acid-binding immunoglobulin-like lectins (siglecs) comprise a family of receptors that are differentially expressed on leukocytes and other immune cells. The restricted expression of several siglecs to one or a few cell types makes them attractive targets for cell-directed therapies. The anti-CD33 (Siglec-3) antibody Gemtuzumab (Mylotarg™) is approved for treatment of acute myeloid leukemia (AML), and antibodies targeting CD22 (Siglec-2) are currently in clinical trials for treatment of B cell non-Hodgkins lymphomas and autoimmune diseases. Because siglecs are endocytic receptors, they are well suited for a ‘Trojan horse’ strategy, whereby therapeutic agents conjugated to an antibody, or multimeric glycan ligand, bind to the siglec and are efficiently carried into the cell. Although the rapid internalization of unmodified siglec antibodies reduces their utility for induction of antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC) or complement-mediated cytotoxicity (CDC), antibody binding of Siglec-8, Siglec-9, and CD22 have been demonstrated to induce apoptosis of eosinophils, neutrophils, and depletion of B cells, respectively. Here we review the properties of siglecs that make them attractive for cell-targeted therapies. PMID:19359050

  9. Paneth cell-mediated multiorgan dysfunction after acute kidney injury

    PubMed Central

    Park, Sang Won; Kim, Mihwa; Kim, Joo Yun; Ham, Ahrom; Brown, Kevin M.; Mori-Akiyama, Yuko; Ouellette, André J.; D’Agati, Vivette D.; Lee, H. Thomas

    2012-01-01

    Acute kidney injury (AKI) is frequently complicated by extra-renal multi-organ injury including intestinal and hepatic dysfunction. In this study, we hypothesized that a discrete intestinal source of pro-inflammatory mediators drives multi-organ injury in response to AKI. After induction of AKI in mice by renal ischemia-reperfusion or bilateral nephrectomy, small intestinal Paneth cells increased the synthesis and release of IL-17A in conjunction with severe intestinal apoptosis and inflammation. We also detected significantly increased IL-17A in portal and systemic circulation after AKI. Intestinal macrophages appear to transport released Paneth cell granule constituents induced by AKI, away from the base of the crypts into the liver. Genetic or pharmacologic depletion of Paneth cells decreased small intestinal IL-17A secretion and plasma IL-17A levels significantly and attenuated intestinal, hepatic, and renal injury after AKI. Similarly, portal delivery of IL-17A in macrophage depleted mice decreased markedly, and intestinal, hepatic, and renal injury following AKI was attenuated without affecting intestinal IL-17A generation. In conclusion, AKI induces IL-17A synthesis and secretion by Paneth cells to initiate intestinal and hepatic injury by hepatic and systemic delivery of IL-17A by macrophages. Modulation of Paneth cell dysregulation may have therapeutic implications by reducing systemic complications arising from AKI. PMID:23109723

  10. Assessing humoral and cell-mediated immune response in Hawaiian green turtles, Chelonia mydas

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Work, T.M.; Balazs, G.H.; Rameyer, R.A.; Chang, S.P.; Berestecky, J.

    2000-01-01

    Seven immature green turtles, Chelonia mydas, captured from Kaneohe Bay on the island of Oahu were used to evaluate methods for assessing their immune response. Two turtles each were immunized intramuscularly with egg white lysozyme (EWL) in Freunda??s complete adjuvant, Gerbu, or ISA-70; a seventh turtle was immunized with saline only and served as a control. Humoral immune response was measured with an indirect enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Cell-mediated immune response was measured using in vitro cell proliferation assays (CPA) using whole blood or peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBM) cultured with concanavalin A (ConA), phytohaemagglutinin (PHA), or soluble egg EWL antigen. All turtles, except for one immunized with Gerbu and the control, produced a detectable humoral immune response by 6 weeks which persisted for at least 14 weeks after a single immunization. All turtles produced an anamnestic humoral immune response after secondary immunization. Antigen specific cell-mediated immune response in PBM was seen in all turtles either after primary or secondary immunization, but it was not as consistent as humoral immune response; antigen specific cell-mediated immune response in whole blood was rarely seen. Mononuclear cells had significantly higher stimulation indices than whole blood regardless of adjuvant, however, results with whole blood had lower variability. Both Gerbu and ISA-70 appeared to potentiate the cell-mediated immune response when PBM or whole blood were cultured with PHA. This is the first time cell proliferation assays have been compared between whole blood and PBM for reptiles. This is also the first demonstration of antigen specific cell-mediated response in reptiles. Cell proliferation assays allowed us to evaluate the cell-mediated immune response of green turtles. However, CPA may be less reliable than ELISA for detecting antigen specific immune response. Either of the three adjuvants appears suitable to safely elicit a

  11. Cell mediated immunity to corn starch in starch-induced granulomatous peritonitis.

    PubMed

    Goodacre, R L; Clancy, R L; Davidson, R A; Mullens, J E

    1976-03-01

    Two patients with histologically diagnosed starch induced granulomatous peritonitis (SGP) have been shown to have cell mediated immunity to corn starch using the techniques of macrophage migration inhibition and lymphocyte DNA synthesis. Control groups of normal subjects, patients with uncomplicated laparotomy, and patients with Crohn's disease were negative in both tests. Lymphocytes from two patients with band adhesions, one of whom had biopsy evidence of a granulomatous reaction to starch, were sensitized to starch. Cell mediated immunity to starch may contribute to the pathogenesis of SGP, and some band adhesions may be a chronic low grade manifestation of this disorder. PMID:1269987

  12. Can dendritic cells see light?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Aaron C.-H.; Huang, Ying-Ying; Sharma, Sulbha K.; Hamblin, Michael R.

    2010-02-01

    There are many reports showing that low-level light/laser therapy (LLLT) can enhance wound healing, upregulate cell proliferation and has anti-apoptotic effects by activating intracellular protective genes. In the field of immune response study, it is not known with any certainty whether light/laser is proinflammatory or anti-inflammatory. Increasingly in recent times dendritic cells have been found to play an important role in inflammation and the immunological response. In this study, we try to look at the impact of low level near infrared light (810-nm) on murine bone-marrow derived dendritic cells. Changes in surface markers, including MHC II, CD80 and CD11c and the secretion of interleukins induced by light may provide additional evidence to reveal the mystery of how light affects the maturation of dendritic cells as well how these light-induced mature dendritic cells would affect the activation of adaptive immune response.

  13. Optimal Current Transfer in Dendrites

    PubMed Central

    Bird, Alex D.

    2016-01-01

    Integration of synaptic currents across an extensive dendritic tree is a prerequisite for computation in the brain. Dendritic tapering away from the soma has been suggested to both equalise contributions from synapses at different locations and maximise the current transfer to the soma. To find out how this is achieved precisely, an analytical solution for the current transfer in dendrites with arbitrary taper is required. We derive here an asymptotic approximation that accurately matches results from numerical simulations. From this we then determine the diameter profile that maximises the current transfer to the soma. We find a simple quadratic form that matches diameters obtained experimentally, indicating a fundamental architectural principle of the brain that links dendritic diameters to signal transmission. PMID:27145441

  14. Transient Dendritic Solidification Experiment (TDSE)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    The Transient Dendritic Solidification Expepriment (TDSE) is being developed as a candidate for flight aboard the International Space Station. TDSE will study the growth of dendrites (treelike crystalline structures) in a transparent material (succinonitrile or SCN) that mimics the behavior of widely used iron-based metals. Basic work by three Space Shuttle missions of the Isothermal Dendritic Growth Expepriment (IDGE) is yielding new insights into virtually all industrially relevant metal and alloy forming operations. The TDSE is similar to IDGE, but will maintain a constant temperature while varying pressure on the dendrites. Shown here is an exploded view of major elements of TDSE. A similar view is available with labels. The principal investigator is Matthew Koss of College of the Holy Cross in Worcester, MA. Photo credit: NASA/Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC)

  15. Transient Dendritic Solidification Experiment (TDSE)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    The Transient Dendritic Solidification Experiment (TDSE) is being developed as a candidate for flight aboard the International Space Station. TDSE will study the growth of dendrites (treelike crystalline structures) in a transparent material (succinonitrile or SCN) that mimics the behavior or widely used iron-based metals. Basic work by three Space Shuttle missions of the Isothermal Dendritic Growth Experiment (IDGE) is yielding new insights into virtually all industrially relevant metal and alloy forming operations. The TDSE is similar to IDGE, but will maintain a constant temperature while varying pressure on the dendrites. Shown here is an exploded view of major elements of the TDSE. A similar view is availble without labels. The principal investigator is Matthew Koss of College of the Holy Cross in Worcester, MA. Photo credit: NASA/Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC)

  16. Chimeric NK-receptor–bearing T cells mediate antitumor immunotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Tong; Lemoi, Bethany A.; Sentman, Charles L.

    2005-01-01

    NKG2D is an activating cell-surface receptor expressed on natural killer (NK) cells and some T-cell subsets. Its ligands are primarily expressed on tumor cells. The aim of this study was to determine whether chimeric NK-receptor—bearing T cells would directly kill tumor cells and lead to induction of host immunity against tumors. Chimeric NK receptors were produced by linking NKG2D or DNAX activating protein of 10 kDa (Dap10) to the cytoplasmic portion of the CD3ζ chain. Our results showed that chimeric (ch) NKG2D-bearing T cells responded to NKG2D-ligand–bearing tumor cells (RMA/Rae-1β, EG7) but not to wild-type tumor cells (RMA). This response was dependent upon ligand expression on the target cells but not on expression of major histocompatibility complex (MHC) molecules, and the response could be blocked by anti-NKG2D antibodies. These T cells produced large amounts of T-helper 1 (Th1) cytokines and proinflammatory chemokines and killed ligand–expressing tumor cells. Adoptive transfer of chNKG2D-bearing T cells inhibited RMA/Rae-1β tumor growth in vivo. Moreover, mice that had remained tumor-free were resistant to subsequent challenge with the wild-type RMA tumor cells, suggesting the generation of immunity against other tumor antigens. Taken together, our findings indicate that modification of T cells with chimeric NKG2D receptors represents a promising approach for immunotherapy against cancer. PMID:15890688

  17. Genetic Adjuvantation of Recombinant MVA with CD40L Potentiates CD8 T Cell Mediated Immunity

    PubMed Central

    Lauterbach, Henning; Pätzold, Juliane; Kassub, Ronny; Bathke, Barbara; Brinkmann, Kay; Chaplin, Paul; Suter, Mark; Hochrein, Hubertus

    2013-01-01

    Modified vaccinia Ankara (MVA) is a safe and promising viral vaccine vector that is currently investigated in several clinical and pre-clinical trials. In contrast to inactivated or sub-unit vaccines, MVA is able to induce strong humoral as well as cellular immune responses. In order to further improve its CD8 T cell inducing capacity, we genetically adjuvanted MVA with the coding sequence of murine CD40L, a member of the tumor necrosis factor superfamily. Immunization of mice with this new vector led to strongly enhanced primary and memory CD8 T cell responses. Concordant with the enhanced CD8 T cell response, we could detect stronger activation of dendritic cells and higher systemic levels of innate cytokines (including IL-12p70) early after immunization. Interestingly, acquisition of memory characteristics (i.e., IL-7R expression) was accelerated after immunization with MVA-CD40L in comparison to non-adjuvanted MVA. Furthermore, the generated cytotoxic T-lymphocytes (CTLs) also showed improved functionality as demonstrated by intracellular cytokine staining and in vivo killing activity. Importantly, the superior CTL response after a single MVA-CD40L immunization was able to protect B cell deficient mice against a fatal infection with ectromelia virus. Taken together, we show that genetic adjuvantation of MVA can change strength, quality, and functionality of innate and adaptive immune responses. These data should facilitate a rational vaccine design with a focus on rapid induction of large numbers of CD8 T cells able to protect against specific diseases. PMID:23986761

  18. Blastic plasmacytoid dendritic cell neoplasm: diagnostic criteria and therapeutical approaches.

    PubMed

    Pagano, Livio; Valentini, Caterina G; Grammatico, Sara; Pulsoni, Alessandro

    2016-07-01

    Blastic plasmacytoid dendritic cell neoplasm (BPDCN) is a rare haematological malignancy derived from the precursors of plamacytoid dendritic cells, with an aggressive clinical course and high frequency of cutaneous and bone marrow involvement. Neoplastic cells express CD4, CD43 (also termed SPN), CD45RA and CD56 (also termed NCAM1), as well as the plasmacytoid dendritic cell-associated antigens CD123 (also termed IL3RA), BDCA-2 (also termed CD303, CLEC4E) TCL1 and CTLA1 (also termed GZMB). The median survival is only a few months as the tumour exhibits a progressive course despite initial response to chemotherapy. The best modality of treatment remains to be defined. Generally, patients receive acute leukaemia-like induction, according to acute myeloid leukaemia (AML)-type or acute lymphoid leukaemia (ALL)-type regimens. The frequent neuromeningeal involvement indicates systematic pre-emptive intrathecal chemotherapy in addition to intensive chemotherapy. Allogeneic haematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT), particularly when performed in first remission, may improve the survival. Preliminary data suggest a potential role for immunomodulatory agents and novel targeted drugs. Herein epidemiology, clinical manifestations, diagnosis and management of BPDCN will be presented. In detail, this review focuses on the therapeutic aspects of BPDCN, proposing a treatment algorithm for the management of the disease, including induction chemotherapy, allogeneic HSCT and intrathecal prophylaxis at different steps of treatment, according to compliance, biological and clinical characteristics of patients. PMID:27264021

  19. Intestinal immune homeostasis is regulated by the crosstalk between epithelial cells and dendritic cells.

    PubMed

    Rimoldi, Monica; Chieppa, Marcello; Salucci, Valentina; Avogadri, Francesca; Sonzogni, Angelica; Sampietro, Gianluca M; Nespoli, Angelo; Viale, Giuseppe; Allavena, Paola; Rescigno, Maria

    2005-05-01

    The control of damaging inflammation by the mucosal immune system in response to commensal and harmful ingested bacteria is unknown. Here we show epithelial cells conditioned mucosal dendritic cells through the constitutive release of thymic stromal lymphopoietin and other mediators, resulting in the induction of 'noninflammatory' dendritic cells. Epithelial cell-conditioned dendritic cells released interleukins 10 and 6 but not interleukin 12, and they promoted the polarization of T cells toward a 'classical' noninflammatory T helper type 2 response, even after exposure to a T helper type 1-inducing pathogen. This control of immune responses seemed to be lost in patients with Crohn disease. Thus, the intimate interplay between intestinal epithelial cells and dendritic cells may help to maintain gut immune homeostasis. PMID:15821737

  20. Tolerance Induction in Liver.

    PubMed

    Karimi, M H; Geramizadeh, B; Malek-Hosseini, S A

    2015-01-01

    Liver is an exclusive anatomical and immunological organ that displays a considerable tolerance effect. Liver allograft acceptance is shown to occur spontaneously within different species. Although in human transplant patients tolerance is rarely seen, the severity level and cellular mechanisms of transplant rejection vary. Non-paranchymal liver cells, including Kupffer cells, liver sinusoidal endothelial cells, hepatic stellate cells, and resident dendritic cells may participate in liver tolerogenicity. The mentioned cells secret anti-inflammatory cytokines such as TGF-β and IL-10 and express negative co-stimulatory molecules like PD-L1 to mediate immunosuppression. Other mechanisms such as microchimerism, soluble major histocompatibility complex and regulatory T cells may take part in tolerance induction. Understanding the mechanisms involved in liver transplant rejection/tolerance helps us to improve therapeutic options to induce hepatic tolerance. PMID:26082828

  1. Regulation of dendritic calcium release in striatal spiny projection neurons.

    PubMed

    Plotkin, Joshua L; Shen, Weixing; Rafalovich, Igor; Sebel, Luke E; Day, Michelle; Chan, C Savio; Surmeier, D James

    2013-11-01

    The induction of corticostriatal long-term depression (LTD) in striatal spiny projection neurons (SPNs) requires coactivation of group I metabotropic glutamate receptors (mGluRs) and L-type Ca(2+) channels. This combination leads to the postsynaptic production of endocannabinoids that act presynaptically to reduce glutamate release. Although the necessity of coactivation is agreed upon, why it is necessary in physiologically meaningful settings is not. The studies described here attempt to answer this question by using two-photon laser scanning microscopy and patch-clamp electrophysiology to interrogate the dendritic synapses of SPNs in ex vivo brain slices from transgenic mice. These experiments revealed that postsynaptic action potentials induce robust ryanodine receptor (RYR)-dependent Ca(2+)-induced-Ca(2+) release (CICR) in SPN dendritic spines. Depolarization-induced opening of voltage-gated Ca(2+) channels was necessary for CICR. CICR was more robust in indirect pathway SPNs than in direct pathway SPNs, particularly in distal dendrites. Although it did not increase intracellular Ca(2+) concentration alone, group I mGluR activation enhanced CICR and slowed Ca(2+) clearance, extending the activity-evoked intraspine transient. The mGluR modulation of CICR was sensitive to antagonism of inositol trisphosphate receptors, RYRs, src kinase, and Cav1.3 L-type Ca(2+) channels. Uncaging glutamate at individual spines effectively activated mGluRs and facilitated CICR induced by back-propagating action potentials. Disrupting CICR by antagonizing RYRs prevented the induction of corticostriatal LTD with spike-timing protocols. In contrast, mGluRs had no effect on the induction of long-term potentiation. Taken together, these results make clearer how coactivation of mGluRs and L-type Ca(2+) channels promotes the induction of activity-dependent LTD in SPNs. PMID:23966676

  2. Integrin CD11b positively regulates TLR4-induced signalling pathways in dendritic cells but not in macrophages

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ling, Guang Sheng; Bennett, Jason; Woollard, Kevin J.; Szajna, Marta; Fossati-Jimack, Liliane; Taylor, Philip R.; Scott, Diane; Franzoso, Guido; Cook, H. Terence; Botto, Marina

    2014-01-01

    Tuned and distinct responses of macrophages and dendritic cells to Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) activation induced by lipopolysaccharide (LPS) underpin the balance between innate and adaptive immunity. However, the molecule(s) that confer these cell-type-specific LPS-induced effects remain poorly understood. Here we report that the integrin αM (CD11b) positively regulates LPS-induced signalling pathways selectively in myeloid dendritic cells but not in macrophages. In dendritic cells, which express lower levels of CD14 and TLR4 than macrophages, CD11b promotes MyD88-dependent and MyD88-independent signalling pathways. In particular, in dendritic cells CD11b facilitates LPS-induced TLR4 endocytosis and is required for the subsequent signalling in the endosomes. Consistent with this, CD11b deficiency dampens dendritic cell-mediated TLR4-triggered responses in vivo leading to impaired T-cell activation. Thus, by modulating the trafficking and signalling functions of TLR4 in a cell-type-specific manner CD11b fine tunes the balance between adaptive and innate immune responses initiated by LPS.

  3. Integrin CD11b positively regulates TLR4-induced signalling pathways in dendritic cells but not in macrophages.

    PubMed

    Ling, Guang Sheng; Bennett, Jason; Woollard, Kevin J; Szajna, Marta; Fossati-Jimack, Liliane; Taylor, Philip R; Scott, Diane; Franzoso, Guido; Cook, H Terence; Botto, Marina

    2014-01-01

    Tuned and distinct responses of macrophages and dendritic cells to Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) activation induced by lipopolysaccharide (LPS) underpin the balance between innate and adaptive immunity. However, the molecule(s) that confer these cell-type-specific LPS-induced effects remain poorly understood. Here we report that the integrin α(M) (CD11b) positively regulates LPS-induced signalling pathways selectively in myeloid dendritic cells but not in macrophages. In dendritic cells, which express lower levels of CD14 and TLR4 than macrophages, CD11b promotes MyD88-dependent and MyD88-independent signalling pathways. In particular, in dendritic cells CD11b facilitates LPS-induced TLR4 endocytosis and is required for the subsequent signalling in the endosomes. Consistent with this, CD11b deficiency dampens dendritic cell-mediated TLR4-triggered responses in vivo leading to impaired T-cell activation. Thus, by modulating the trafficking and signalling functions of TLR4 in a cell-type-specific manner CD11b fine tunes the balance between adaptive and innate immune responses initiated by LPS. PMID:24423728

  4. Allogeneic cell-mediated immunotherapy for breast cancer after autologous stem cell transplantation: a clinical pilot study.

    PubMed

    Or, R; Ackerstein, A; Nagler, A; Kapelushnik, J; Naparstek, E; Samuel, S; Amar, A; Bruatbar, C; Slavin, S

    1998-03-01

    Allogeneic cell therapy (allo-CT) is emerging as an effective treatment for patients relapsing after allogeneic bone marrow transplantation (BMT), indicating that tumor cells resisting chemoradiotherapy may still respond to immunocompetent allogeneic lymphocytes. We investigated possible graft-versus-tumor (GVT) effects in six patients with metastatic breast cancer that would be comparable to the graft-versus-leukemia (GVL) phenomenon occurring after allogeneic BMT in hematologic malignancies. The patients were cytoreduced with high-dose chemotherapy and autologous stem cell transplantation (ASCT), and were treated ambulatory with allo-CT consisting of adoptive transfer of HLA-matched donor peripheral blood lymphocytes (PBL) activated in vivo with human recombinant interleukin-2 (rIL-2). If no graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) developed, allo-CT was augmented with infusion of donor PBL, preactivated in vitro with rIL-2. Treatment was well tolerated, with low therapy-related toxicity in all patients. Two patients developed signs and symptoms compatible with GVHD grade I-II, one of whom shows no evidence of disease at more than 34 months out. In the remaining patients, progression-free survival following allo-CT ranged between 7 and 13 months. Allogeneic cell-mediated, cytokine-activated immunotherapy might be utilized for induction of GVT in metastatic breast cancer. A search for techniques to boost chimerism without severe GVHD is indicated. PMID:9557210

  5. Temporal coherency between receptor expression, neural activity and AP-1-dependent transcription regulates Drosophila motoneuron dendrite development

    PubMed Central

    Vonhoff, Fernando; Kuehn, Claudia; Blumenstock, Sonja; Sanyal, Subhabrata; Duch, Carsten

    2013-01-01

    Neural activity has profound effects on the development of dendritic structure. Mechanisms that link neural activity to nuclear gene expression include activity-regulated factors, such as CREB, Crest or Mef2, as well as activity-regulated immediate-early genes, such as fos and jun. This study investigates the role of the transcriptional regulator AP-1, a Fos-Jun heterodimer, in activity-dependent dendritic structure development. We combine genetic manipulation, imaging and quantitative dendritic architecture analysis in a Drosophila single neuron model, the individually identified motoneuron MN5. First, Dα7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) and AP-1 are required for normal MN5 dendritic growth. Second, AP-1 functions downstream of activity during MN5 dendritic growth. Third, using a newly engineered AP-1 reporter we demonstrate that AP-1 transcriptional activity is downstream of Dα7 nAChRs and Calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII) signaling. Fourth, AP-1 can have opposite effects on dendritic development, depending on the timing of activation. Enhancing excitability or AP-1 activity after MN5 cholinergic synapses and primary dendrites have formed causes dendritic branching, whereas premature AP-1 expression or induced activity prior to excitatory synapse formation disrupts dendritic growth. Finally, AP-1 transcriptional activity and dendritic growth are affected by MN5 firing only during development but not in the adult. Our results highlight the importance of timing in the growth and plasticity of neuronal dendrites by defining a developmental period of activity-dependent AP-1 induction that is temporally locked to cholinergic synapse formation and dendritic refinement, thus significantly refining prior models derived from chronic expression studies. PMID:23293292

  6. CALORIE RESTRICTION ENHANCES T CELL MEDIATED IMMUNE RESPONSE IN OVERWEIGHT MEN AND WOMEN

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    It is well known that dietary energy restriction prolongs lifespan and enhances immune responsiveness in a wide range of laboratory animals. However, information on the applicability of these results to humans is limited. In this study we examined the effects of calorie restriction on T cell mediate...

  7. Genetic diversity predicts pathogen resistance and cell-mediated immunocompetence in house finches

    PubMed Central

    Hawley, Dana M; Sydenstricker, Keila V; Kollias, George V; Dhondt, André A

    2005-01-01

    Evidence is accumulating that genetic variation within individual hosts can influence their susceptibility to pathogens. However, there have been few opportunities to experimentally test this relationship, particularly within outbred populations of non-domestic vertebrates. We performed a standardized pathogen challenge in house finches (Carpodacus mexicanus) to test whether multilocus heterozygosity across 12 microsatellite loci predicts resistance to a recently emerged strain of the bacterial pathogen, Mycoplasma gallisepticum (MG). We simultaneously tested whether the relationship between heterozygosity and pathogen susceptibility is mediated by differences in cell-mediated or humoral immunocompetence. We inoculated 40 house finches with MG under identical conditions and assayed both humoral and cell-mediated components of the immune response. Heterozygous house finches developed less severe disease when infected with MG, and they mounted stronger cell-mediated immune responses to phytohaemagglutinin. Differences in cell-mediated immunocompetence may, therefore, partly explain why more heterozygous house finches show greater resistance to MG. Overall, our results underscore the importance of multilocus heterozygosity for individual pathogen resistance and immunity. PMID:17148199

  8. KERATINOCYTE CELL-MEDIATED MUTAGENESIS ASSAY: CORRELATION WITH IN VIVO TUMOR STUDIES

    EPA Science Inventory

    A murine keratinocyte cell-mediated mutagenesis assay was characterized and examined as an in vitro model system for studying the biotransformation of promutagens/procarcinogens by mouse skin. The assay used living cultured newborn SENCAR keratinocytes for the metabolic activatio...

  9. Ex vivo recovery and activation of dysfunctional, anergic, monocyte-derived dendritic cells from patients with operable breast cancer: critical role of IFN-alpha

    PubMed Central

    Satthaporn, Sukchai; Aloysius, Mark M; Robins, Richard A; Verma, Chandan; Chuthapisith, Suebwong; Mckechnie, Alasdair J; El-Sheemy, Mohamad; Vassanasiri, Wichai; Valerio, David; Clark, David; Jibril, Jibril A; Eremin, Oleg

    2008-01-01

    Background Dendritic cells (DCs) play a crucial role in initiating effective cell-mediated immune responses, but are dysfunctional and anergic in breast cancer. Reversal of this dysfunction and establishment of optimal DC function is a key prerequisite for the induction of effective anti-cancer immune responses. Results Peripheral blood DCs (PBDCs) and lymph node DCs (LNDCs) generated in vitro from adherent cultures of peripheral blood monocytes (PBMs) and lymph node monocytes (LNMs), respectively, using the 4 cytokine conditioned medium (CCM) (GM-CSF+IL-4+TNF-α+IFN-α) or 3 CCM (GM-CSF+IL-4+TNF-α) demonstrated a significantly higher degree of recovery and functional capacity in a mixed lymphocyte DC reaction (MLDCR, p < 0.001), expressed significantly higher levels of HLA-DR, CD86, compared with 2 CCM (GM-CSF+IL-4) or medium alone generated DCs from PBMs and LNMs (p < 0.001). The PBDCs generated with 3 CCM or 4 CCM showed a significantly (p < 0.001) enhanced macropinocytotic capability (dextran particles) and induced increased production and secretion of interleukin-12p40 (IL-12p40) in vitro (p < 0.001), compared with PBDCs generated from monocytes using 2 CCM or medium alone. Lipopolysaccharide (LPS) stimulation of PBDCs generated with 4 CCM demonstrated enhanced secretion of IL-6 but not IL-12p70, compared with control DCs unstimulated with LPS (p < 0.001). Conclusion Dysfunctional and anergic PBDCs and LNDCs from patients with operable breast cancer can be optimally reversed by ex vivo culturing of precursor adherent monocytes using a 4 CCM containing IFN-α. Maximal immunophenotypic recovery and functional reactivation of DCs is seen in the presence of IFN-α. However, 4 CCM containing IFN-α generated-PBDCs, do not produce and secrete IL-12p70 in vitro. PMID:18588665

  10. The effect of stable macromolecular complexes of ionic polyphosphazene on HIV Gag antigen and on activation of human dendritic cells and presentation to T-cells.

    PubMed

    Palmer, Christine D; Ninković, Jana; Prokopowicz, Zofia M; Mancuso, Christy J; Marin, Alexander; Andrianov, Alexander K; Dowling, David J; Levy, Ofer

    2014-10-01

    Neonates and infants are susceptible to infection due to distinct immune responses in early life. Therefore, development of vaccine formulation and delivery systems capable of activating human newborn leukocytes is of global health importance. Poly[di(carboxylatophenoxy)phosphazene] (PCPP) belongs to a family of ionic synthetic polyphosphazene polyelectrolyte compounds that can form non-covalent interactions with protein antigens and demonstrate adjuvant activity in animals and in human clinical trials. However, little is known about their ability to activate human immune cells. In this study, we characterized the effects of PCPP alone or in combination with a model antigen (recombinant HIV-Gag (Gag)), on the maturation, activation and antigen presentation by human adult and newborn dendritic cells (DCs) in vitro. PCPP treatment induced DC activation as assessed by upregulation of co-stimulatory molecules and cytokine production. Studies benchmarking PCPP to Alum, the most commonly used vaccine adjuvant, demonstrated that both triggered cell death and release of danger signals in adult and newborn DCs. When complexed with Gag antigen, PCPP maintained its immunostimulatory characteristics while permitting internalization and presentation of Gag by DCs to HIV-Gag-specific CD4(+) T cell clones. The PCPP vaccine formulation outlined here has intrinsic adjuvant activity, can facilitate effective delivery of antigen to DCs, and may be advantageous for induction of beneficial T cell-mediated immunity. Moreover, polyphosphazenes can further reduce cost of vaccine production and distribution through their dose-sparing and antigen-stabilizing properties, thus potentially eliminating the need for cold chain distribution. PMID:25023392

  11. Dendritic cells and anergic type I NKT cells play a crucial role in sulfatide-mediated immune regulation in experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis

    PubMed Central

    Maricic, Igor; Halder, Ramesh; Bischof, Felix; Kumar, Vipin

    2014-01-01

    CD1d-restricted NKT cells can be divided into two groups: type I NKT cells utilize a semi-invariant TCR whereas type II express a relatively diverse set of TCRs. A major subset of type II NKT cells recognizes myelin-derived sulfatides and is selectively enriched in the central nervous system tissue during experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE). We have shown that activation of sulfatide-reactive type II NKT cells by sulfatide prevents induction of EAE. Here we have addressed the mechanism of regulation as well as whether a single immunodominant form of synthetic sulfatide can treat ongoing chronic and relapsing EAE in SJL/J mice. We have shown that the activation of sulfatide-reactive type II NKT cells leads to a significant reduction in the frequency and effector function of PLP139-151/I-As–tetramer+ cells in lymphoid and CNS tissues. In addition, type I NKT cells and dendritic cells in the periphery as well as CNS-resident microglia are inactivated following sulfatide administration, and mice deficient in type I NKT cells are not protected from disease. Moreover tolerized DCs from sulfatide-treated animals can adoptively transfer protection into naive mice. Treatment of SJL/J mice with a synthetic cis-tetracosenoyl sulfatide, but not αGalCer, reverses ongoing chronic and relapsing EAE. Our data highlight a novel immune regulatory pathway involving NKT subset interactions leading to inactivation of type I NKT cells, DCs, and microglial cells in suppression of autoimmunity. Since CD1 molecules are non-polymorphic, the sulfatide-mediated immune regulatory pathway can be targeted for development of non-HLA-dependent therapeutic approaches to T cell-mediated autoimmune diseases. PMID:24973441

  12. Cell-Mediated Immune Function and Cytokine Regulation During Space Flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sams, Clarence F.; Pierson, Duane L.; Paloski, W. H. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    The changes in immune function which occur during space flight potentially expose the crews to an increased risk for development of illness. Decreased cellular immune function has been repeatedly documented after space flight and confirmed during flight by in vivo delayed-type hypersensitivity testing. However, correlation of immune changes with a clinically significant risk factor has not yet been performed. Our hypothesis is that space flight induces a decrease in cell-mediated immune function accompanied by a shift from a type 1 cytokine pattern (favoring cell-mediated immunity) to a type 2 cytokine pattern (favoring humoral immunity). We further hypothesize that reactivation of latent viruses will occur during space flight in association with the decreased cellular immunity. To test these hypotheses, we will determine the effects of space flight on cell-mediated immunity and viral reactivation. We will utilize delayed-type hypersensitivity testing as an in vivo measure of integrated cell-mediated immune function. The production of cytokines and immunoregulatory factors by lymphocytes and monocytes will be measured to determine whether changes in cytokine patterns are associated with the space flight-induced immune dysregulation. Correlation of antigen-specific immune changes with reactivation of latent herpes viruses will be determined by measuring peripheral levels of viral (CMV, VZV, EBV) antigen-specific T cells and comparing to the levels of EBV-infected B-cells by fluorescence in situ hybridization and flow cytometry. A comparison of cell-mediated immune function, cytokine regulation and viral reactivation will provide new insights into crew member health risks during flight.

  13. HIV is trapped and masked in the cytoplasm of lymph node follicular dendritic cells.

    PubMed Central

    Tacchetti, C.; Favre, A.; Moresco, L.; Meszaros, P.; Luzzi, P.; Truini, M.; Rizzo, F.; Grossi, C. E.; Ciccone, E.

    1997-01-01

    To gain further insight into the pathogenesis of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection, lymph nodes from seven asymptomatic HIV+ subjects were analyzed during the latent phase of disease. Both ultrastructural and immunohistochemical analyses revealed that, in all of the cases, plasma cells producing IgM/gamma were present in germinal centers. Secreted immunoglobulins formed extracellular deposits mimicking the follicular dendritic cell network. Immunoglobulin produced by germinal center plasma cells are specific for HIV because they bind the HIV env protein gp 120. Plasma cells producing antibodies with the same specificity were also abundant in the extrafollicular regions of lymph nodes. During the latent phase of infection, the virus largely accumulates within the germinal centers. Therefore, extracellular immunoglobulin may form immune complexes, as shown by the presence of HIV-specific antibodies, HIV particles, and complement components C3c, C3d, and C1q in the interdendritic spaces. When the ultrastructural localization of HIV in germinal centers was analyzed, abundant virus particles were found in the interdendritic spaces. In addition to this extracellular localization of HIV, receptor-mediated endocytosis of viral particles by follicular dendritic cells was observed. Complete HIV particles were found within the endosomal compartment of the follicular dendritic cells and, as complete viral particles, free in the cytoplasm, indicating that the virus may escape from the endocytic compartment. As the virus is abundant in the cytoplasm, this event leads to formation of a hidden reservoir within follicular dendritic cells. In this location, HIV escapes recognition by cytotoxic T lymphocytes. In contrast, virus budding indicating a productive infection of follicular dendritic cells that would render them susceptible to T-cell-mediated lysis has been seldom observed. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 PMID:9033269

  14. Lysophosphatidic acid induces osteocyte dendrite outgrowth

    SciTech Connect

    Karagiosis, Sue A.; Karin, Norm J.

    2007-05-25

    A method was developed to measure dendrite formation in bone cells. Lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) was found to stimulate dendrite outgrowth. It is postulated that LPA plays a role in regulating the osteocyte network in vivo.

  15. Mechanisms and Function of Dendritic Exocytosis

    PubMed Central

    Kennedy, Matthew J.; Ehlers, Michael D.

    2011-01-01

    Summary Dendritic exocytosis is required for a broad array of neuronal functions including retrograde signaling, neurotransmitter release, synaptic plasticity, and establishment of neuronal morphology. While the details of synaptic vesicle exocytosis from presynaptic terminals have been intensely studied for decades, the mechanisms of dendritic exocytosis are only now emerging. Here we review the molecules and mechanisms of dendritic exocytosis, and discuss how exocytosis from dendrites influences neuronal function and circuit plasticity. PMID:21382547

  16. An Inverse Approach for Elucidating Dendritic Function

    PubMed Central

    Torben-Nielsen, Benjamin; Stiefel, Klaus M.

    2010-01-01

    We outline an inverse approach for investigating dendritic function–structure relationships by optimizing dendritic trees for a priori chosen computational functions. The inverse approach can be applied in two different ways. First, we can use it as a “hypothesis generator” in which we optimize dendrites for a function of general interest. The optimization yields an artificial dendrite that is subsequently compared to real neurons. This comparison potentially allows us to propose hypotheses about the function of real neurons. In this way, we investigated dendrites that optimally perform input-order detection. Second, we can use it as a “function confirmation” by optimizing dendrites for functions hypothesized to be performed by classes of neurons. If the optimized, artificial, dendrites resemble the dendrites of real neurons the artificial dendrites corroborate the hypothesized function of the real neuron. Moreover, properties of the artificial dendrites can lead to predictions about yet unmeasured properties. In this way, we investigated wide-field motion integration performed by the VS cells of the fly visual system. In outlining the inverse approach and two applications, we also elaborate on the nature of dendritic function. We furthermore discuss the role of optimality in assigning functions to dendrites and point out interesting future directions. PMID:21258425

  17. Directing dendritic cell immunotherapy towards successful cancer treatment

    PubMed Central

    Sabado, Rachel Lubong; Bhardwaj, Nina

    2010-01-01

    The use of dendritic cells (DCs) for tumor immunotherapy represents a powerful approach for harnessing the patient's own immune system to eliminate tumor cells. However, suboptimal conditions for generating potent immunostimulatory DCs, as well as the induction of tolerance and suppression mediated by the tumors and its microenvironment have contributed to limited success. Combining DC vaccines with new approaches that enhance immunogenicity and overcome the regulatory mechanisms underlying peripheral tolerance may be the key to achieving effective and durable anti-tumor immune responses that translate to better clinical outcomes. PMID:20473346

  18. The role of T-cell-mediated mechanisms in virus infections of the nervous system.

    PubMed

    Dörries, R

    2001-01-01

    during or shortly after exerting their effector functions. The clinical consequences and the influence of the effector phase on the further course of the infection depends on the balance and fine-tuning of the contributing lymphoid cell populations. Generally, any delay in the recruitment of effector lymphocytes to the tissue or an unbalanced combination of lymphocyte subsets allows the virus to spread in the CNS, which in turn will cause severe immune-mediated tissue effects as well as disease. If either too late or partially deficient, the immune system response may contribute to a lethal outcome or cause autosensitization to brain-specific antigens by epitope spreading to the antigen-presenting system in peripheral lymphoid tissue. This could form the basis for subsequent booster reactions of autosensitized CD4+ T cells--a process that finally will end in an inflammatory autoimmune reaction, which in humans we call multiple sclerosis. In contrast, a rapid and specific local response in the brain tissue will result in efficient limitation of viral spread and thereby a subclinical immune system-mediated termination of the infection. After clearance of virus-infected cells, downsizing of the local response probably occurs via self-elimination of the contributing T cell populations and/or by so far unidentified signal pathways. However, much of this is highly speculative, and more data have to be collected to make decisive conclusions regarding this matter. Several strategies have been developed by viruses to escape T cell-mediated eradication, including interference with the MHC class I presentation pathway of the host cell or "hiding" in cells which lack MHC class I expression. This may result in life-long persistence of the virus in the brain, a state which probably is actively controlled by T lymphocytes. Under severe immunosuppression, however, reactivation of viral replication can occur, which is a lethal threat to the host. PMID:11417137

  19. A Novel Form of Local Plasticity in Tuft Dendrites of Neocortical Somatosensory Layer 5 Pyramidal Neurons.

    PubMed

    Sandler, Maya; Shulman, Yoav; Schiller, Jackie

    2016-06-01

    Tuft dendrites of layer 5 pyramidal neurons form a separate biophysical and processing compartment. Presently, little is known about plasticity mechanisms in this isolated compartment. Here, we describe a novel form of plasticity in which unpaired low-frequency (0.1 Hz) stimulation of tuft inputs resulted in prolonged transient (86.3 ± 7.3 min) potentiation of EPSPs (286.1% ± 30.5%) and enhanced local excitability that enabled more-efficient back-propagation of axo-somatic action potentials and dendritic calcium spikes selectively into the activated dendritic segments. This plasticity was exclusive to tuft dendrites and did not occur in basal dendrites. Induction of this plasticity depended on activation of Kv4.2 potassium and NMDAR channels, internalization of membrane proteins, and insertion of AMPAR. This unique form of tuft plasticity increases proximal-distal electrical coupling of activated tuft dendrites and opens a prolonged time window for binding and storing feedforward and feedback information in a branch-specific manner. PMID:27210551

  20. Effect of disodium cromoglycate on mast cell-mediated immediate-type allergic reactions.

    PubMed

    Shin, Hye-Young; Kim, Jung-Sook; An, Nyeon-Hyoung; Park, Rae-Kil; Kim, Hyung-Min

    2004-04-23

    We investigated the effect of disodium cromoglycate (DSCG) on mast cell-mediated immediate-type hypersensitivity. DSCG inhibited systemic allergic reaction induced by compound 48/80 dose-dependently. Passive cutaneous anaphylaxis was inhibited by 71.6% by oral administration of DSCG (1 g/kg). When DSCG was pretreated at concentration rang from 0.01-1000 g/kg, the serum histamine levels were reduced in a dose dependent manner. DSCG also significantly inhibited histamine release from rat peritoneal mast cell (RPMC) by compound 48/80. We confirmed that DSCG inhibited compound 48/80-induced degranulation of RPMC by alcian blue/nuclear fast red staining. In addition, DSCG showed a significant inhibitory effect on anti-dinitrophenyl IgE-mediated tumor necrosis factor-alpha production. These results indicate that DSCG inhibits mast cell-mediated immediate-type allergic reaction. PMID:15050425

  1. Effect of microencapsulated ampicillin on cell-mediated immune responses in mice.

    PubMed

    Barsoum, I S; Kopydlowski, K M; Burge, J R; Setterstrom, J A

    1997-11-01

    The effects of free ampicillin, microencapsulated ampicillin anhydrate (MEAA) and antibiotic-free microspheres on the cell-mediated immune response in Balb/c mice were measured by lymphoproliferation assay, delayed-type hypersensitivity (DTH) and cytokine production. Injection into mice for seven consecutive days with equivalent subcutaneous doses of ampicillin, MEAA or placebo microspheres did not produce any consistent change in lymphocyte proliferation nor did it affect DTH responses or interleukin-2 production. Although the production of interleukin-4 in mice treated with ampicillin or MEAA increased compared with the control mice, this increase was not statistically significant. These results indicate that ampicillin and MEAA have similar effects on cell-mediated immunity in mice. PMID:9421323

  2. Challenges and Opportunities for T-Cell-Mediated Strategies to Eliminate HIV Reservoirs

    PubMed Central

    Brockman, Mark A.; Jones, R. Brad; Brumme, Zabrina L.

    2015-01-01

    HIV’s ability to establish latent reservoirs of reactivation-competent virus is the major barrier to cure. “Shock and kill” methods consisting of latency-reversing agents (LRAs) followed by elimination of reactivating cells through cytopathic effects are under active development. However, the clinical efficacy of LRAs remains to be established. Moreover, recent studies indicate that reservoirs may not be reduced efficiently by either viral cytopathic or CD8+ T-cell-mediated mechanisms. In this perspective, we highlight challenges to T-cell-mediated elimination of HIV reservoirs, including characteristics of responding T cells, aspects of the cellular reservoirs, and properties of the latent virus itself. We also discuss potential strategies to overcome these challenges by targeting the antiviral activity of T cells toward appropriate viral antigens following latency. PMID:26483795

  3. Intrinsic and extrinsic mechanisms of dendritic morphogenesis.

    PubMed

    Dong, Xintong; Shen, Kang; Bülow, Hannes E

    2015-01-01

    The complex, branched morphology of dendrites is a cardinal feature of neurons and has been used as a criterion for cell type identification since the beginning of neurobiology. Regulated dendritic outgrowth and branching during development form the basis of receptive fields for neurons and are essential for the wiring of the nervous system. The cellular and molecular mechanisms of dendritic morphogenesis have been an intensely studied area. In this review, we summarize the major experimental systems that have contributed to our understandings of dendritic development as well as the intrinsic and extrinsic mechanisms that instruct the neurons to form cell type-specific dendritic arbors. PMID:25386991

  4. Wiring dendrites in layers and columns.

    PubMed

    Luo, Jiangnan; McQueen, Philip G; Shi, Bo; Lee, Chi-Hon; Ting, Chun-Yuan

    2016-06-01

    The most striking structure in the nervous system is the complex yet stereotyped morphology of the neuronal dendritic tree. Dendritic morphologies and the connections they make govern information flow and integration in the brain. The fundamental mechanisms that regulate dendritic outgrowth and branching are subjects of extensive study. In this review, we summarize recent advances in the molecular and cellular mechanisms for routing dendrites in layers and columns, prevalent organizational structures in the brain. We highlight how dendritic patterning influences the formation of synaptic circuits. PMID:27315108

  5. Advanced dendritic web growth development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hopkins, R. H.

    1985-01-01

    A program to develop the technology of the silicon dendritic web ribbon growth process is examined. The effort is being concentrated on the area rate and quality requirements necessary to meet the JPL/DOE goals for terrestrial PV applications. Closed loop web growth system development and stress reduction for high area rate growth is considered.

  6. DENDRITIC POLYMERS AS FIRE SUPPRESSANTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    This report describes an evaluation of the applicability of one of the latest advances in polymer technology (dendritic polymers) to suppressing fires, one of the greatest survivability threats to military personnel and vehicles. Certain types of alkali and transition metal compl...

  7. Activation of cell-mediated immunity by Morinda citrifolia fruit extract and its constituents.

    PubMed

    Murata, Kazuya; Abe, Yumi; Futamura-Masudaa, Megumi; Uwaya, Akemi; Isami, Fumiyuki; Matsuda, Hideaki

    2014-04-01

    Morinda citrifolia, commonly known as noni, is a traditional natural medicine in French Polynesia and Hawaii. Functional foods derived from M. citrifolia fruit have been marketed to help prevent diseases and promote good health. The objective of this study was to assess the effects of M. citrifolia fruit on cell-mediated immunity. In the picryl chloride-induced contact dermatitis test, M. citrifolia fruit extract (Noni-ext) inhibited the suppression of cell-mediated immunity by immunosuppressive substances isolated from freeze-dried ascites of Ehrlich carcinoma-bearing mice (EC-sup). In addition, Noni-ext inhibited reduction of IL-2 production in EC-sup-treated mice and activated natural killer cells in normal mice. These results suggest that Noni-ext has multiple effects on the recovery of cell-mediated immunity. Furthermore, we investigated the active principles of Noni-ext and identified an iridoid glycoside, deacetylasperulosidic acid. Oral administration of deacetylasperulosidic acid inhibited the reduction of ear swelling, and also cancelled the suppression of IL-2 production along with the activation of natural killer cells in the same manner as that of Noni-ext. PMID:24868850

  8. Curculigoside augments cell-mediated immune responses in metastatic tumor-bearing animals.

    PubMed

    Murali, Vishnu Priya; Kuttan, Girija

    2016-08-01

    A positive modulation of immune system is necessary for preparing the body to fight against malignant tumor cells. In the present study, the stimulatory effect of Curculigoside on cell-mediated immune response against the metastasis of B16F10 melanoma cells was analyzed in C57BL/6 mice. Curculigoside is a phenolic glucoside present in the plant Curculigo orchioides Gaertn. (Family - Amaryllidaceae). Administration of Curculigoside enhanced the natural killer (NK) cell activity, antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity and complement-mediated cytotoxicity in metastatic tumor-bearing animals, when compared to the untreated control animals. The compound was also found to be effective in reducing the levels of proinflammatory cytokines such as TNF-α, IL-1β, IL-6 and GM-CSF during metastasis. Besides these, levels of TH1 cytokines, such as IL-2 and IFN-γ, were significantly enhanced (p < 0.001) by Curculigoside administration and thereby reduces the metastatic lung colony formation along with an increased lifespan of the experimental animals. These studies provide an evidence for the stimulation of cell-mediated immune responses by Curculigoside against B16F10-induced metastatic tumor progression in experimental animals. PMID:27228189

  9. Loss of PTEN promotes resistance to T cell-mediated immunotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Peng, Weiyi; Chen, Jie Qing; Liu, Chengwen; Malu, Shruti; Creasy, Caitlin; Tetzlaff, Michael T; Xu, Chunyu; McKenzie, Jodi A; Zhang, Chunlei; Liang, Xiaoxuan; Williams, Leila J; Deng, Wanleng; Chen, Guo; Mbofung, Rina; Lazar, Alexander J; Torres-Cabala, Carlos A; Cooper, Zachary A; Chen, Pei-Ling; Tieu, Trang N; Spranger, Stefani; Yu, Xiaoxing; Bernatchez, Chantale; Forget, Marie-Andree; Haymaker, Cara; Amaria, Rodabe; McQuade, Jennifer L; Glitza, Isabella C; Cascone, Tina; Li, Haiyan S; Kwong, Lawrence N; Heffernan, Timothy P; Hu, Jianhua; Bassett, Roland L; Bosenberg, Marcus W; Woodman, Scott E; Overwijk, Willem W; Lizée, Gregory; Roszik, Jason; Gajewski, Thomas F; Wargo, Jennifer A; Gershenwald, Jeffrey E; Radvanyi, Laszlo; Davies, Michael A; Hwu, Patrick

    2015-01-01

    T cell-mediated immunotherapies are promising cancer treatments. However, most patients still fail to respond to these therapies. The molecular determinants of immune resistance are poorly understood. We show that loss of PTEN in tumor cells in preclinical models of melanoma inhibits T cell-mediated tumor killing and decreases T cell trafficking into tumors. In patients, PTEN loss correlates with decreased T cell infiltration at tumor sites, reduced likelihood of successful T cell expansion from resected tumors, and inferior outcomes with PD-1 inhibitor therapy. PTEN loss in tumor cells increased the expression of immunosuppressive cytokines, resulting in decreased T cell infiltration in tumors, and inhibited autophagy, which decreased T cell-mediated cell death. Treatment with a selective PI3Kβ inhibitor improved the efficacy of both anti-PD-1 and anti-CTLA4 antibodies in murine models. Together these findings demonstrate that PTEN loss promotes immune resistance and support the rationale to explore combinations of immunotherapies and PI3K-AKT pathway inhibitors. PMID:26645196

  10. Induction of foetal haemoglobin synthesis in erythroid progenitor stem cells: mediated by water-soluble components of Terminalia catappa.

    PubMed

    Aimola, I A; Inuwa, H M; Nok, A J; Mamman, A I

    2014-06-01

    Current novel therapeutic agents for the treatment of sickle cell anaemia (SCA) focus on increasing foetal haemoglobin (HbF) levels in SCA patients. Unfortunately, the only approved HbF-inducing agent, hydroxyurea, has long-term unpredictable side effects. Studies have shown the potential of plant compounds to modulate HbF synthesis in primary erythroid progenitor stem cells. We isolated a novel HbF-inducing Terminalia catappa distilled water active fraction (TCDWF) from Terminalia catappa leaves that induced the commitment of erythroid progenitor stem cells to the erythroid lineage and relatively higher HbF synthesis of 9.2- and 6.8-fold increases in both erythropoietin (EPO)-independent and EPO-dependent progenitor stem cells respectively. TCDWF was differentially cytotoxic to EPO-dependent and EPO-independent erythroid progenitor stem cell cultures as revealed by lactate dehydrogenase release from the cells. TCDWF demonstrated a protective effect on EPO-dependent and not EPO-independent progenitor cells. TCDWF induced a modest increase in caspase 3 activity in EPO-independent erythroid progenitor stem cell cultures compared with a significantly higher (P˂0.05) caspase 3 activity in EPO-dependent ones. The results demonstrate that TCDWF may hold promising HbF-inducing compounds, which work synergistically, and suggest a dual modulatory effect on erythropoiesis inherent in this active fraction. PMID:24470326

  11. Recombinant Listeria monocytogenes as a Live Vaccine Vehicle for the Induction of Protective Anti-Viral Cell-Mediated Immunity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Hao; Slifka, Mark K.; Matloubian, Mehrdad; Jensen, Eric R.; Ahmed, Rafi; Miller, Jeff F.

    1995-04-01

    Listeria monocytogenes (LM) is a Gram-positive bacterium that is able to enter host cells, escape from the endocytic vesicle, multiply within the cytoplasm, and spread directly from cell to cell without encountering the extracellular milieu. The ability of LM to gain access to the host cell cytosol allows proteins secreted by the bacterium to efficiently enter the pathway for major histocompatibility complex class I antigen processing and presentation. We have established a genetic system for expression and secretion of foreign antigens by recombinant strains, based on stable site-specific integration of expression cassettes into the LM genome. The ability of LM recombinants to induce protective immunity against a heterologous pathogen was demonstrated with lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus (LCMV). LM strains expressing the entire LCMV nucleoprotein or an H-2L^d-restricted nucleoprotein epitope (aa 118-126) were constructed. Immunization of mice with LM vaccine strains conferred protection against challenge with virulent strains of LCMV that otherwise establish chronic infection in naive adult mice. In vivo depletion of CD8^+ T cells from vaccinated mice abrogated their ability to clear viral infection, showing that protective anti-viral immunity was due to CD8^+ T cells.

  12. Costimulatory Molecules on Immunogenic Versus Tolerogenic Human Dendritic Cells

    PubMed Central

    Hubo, Mario; Trinschek, Bettina; Kryczanowsky, Fanny; Tuettenberg, Andrea; Steinbrink, Kerstin; Jonuleit, Helmut

    2013-01-01

    Dendritic cells (DC) are sentinels of immunity, essential for homeostasis of T cell-dependent immune responses. Both functions of DC, initiation of antigen-specific T cell immunity and maintenance of tissue-specific tolerance originate from distinct stages of differentiation, immunogenic versus tolerogenic. Dependent on local micro milieu and inflammatory stimuli, tissue resident immature DC with functional plasticity differentiate into tolerogenic or immunogenic DC with stable phenotypes. They efficiently link innate and adaptive immunity and are ideally positioned to modify T cell-mediated immune responses. Since the T cell stimulatory properties of DC are significantly influenced by their expression of signal II ligands, it is critical to understand the impact of distinct costimulatory pathways on DC function. This review gives an overview of functional different human DC subsets with unique profiles of costimulatory molecules and outlines how different costimulatory pathways together with the immunosuppressive cytokine IL-10 bias immunogenic versus tolerogenic DC functions. Furthermore, we exemplarily describe protocols for the generation of two well-defined monocyte-derived DC subsets for their clinical use, immunogenic versus tolerogenic. PMID:23565116

  13. Type 1 diabetes genetic susceptibility and dendritic cell function: potential targets for treatment.

    PubMed

    Hotta-Iwamura, Chie; Tarbell, Kristin V

    2016-07-01

    Type 1 diabetes is an autoimmune disease that results from the defective induction or maintenance of T cell tolerance against islet β cell self-antigens. Under steady-state conditions, dendritic cells with tolerogenic properties are critical for peripheral immune tolerance. Tolerogenic dendritic cells can induce T cell anergy and deletion and, in some contexts, induce or expand regulatory T cells. Dendritic cells contribute to both immunomodulatory effects and triggering of pathogenesis in type 1 diabetes. This immune equilibrium is affected by both genetic and environmental factors that contribute to the development of type 1 diabetes. Genome-wide association studies and disease association studies have identified >50 polymorphic loci that lend susceptibility or resistance to insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus. In parallel, diabetes susceptibility regions known as insulin-dependent diabetes loci have been identified in the nonobese diabetic mouse, a model for human type 1 diabetes, providing a better understanding of potential immunomodulatory factors in type 1 diabetes risk. Most genetic candidates have annotated immune cell functions, but the focus has been on changes to T and B cells. However, it is likely that some of the genomic susceptibility in type 1 diabetes directly interrupts the tolerogenic potential of dendritic cells in the pathogenic context of ongoing autoimmunity. Here, we will review how gene polymorphisms associated with autoimmune diabetes may influence dendritic cell development and maturation processes that could lead to alterations in the tolerogenic function of dendritic cells. These insights into potential tolerogenic and pathogenic roles for dendritic cells have practical implications for the clinical manipulation of dendritic cells toward tolerance to prevent and treat type 1 diabetes. PMID:26792821

  14. Induction voidmeter

    DOEpatents

    Anderson, Thomas T.; Roop, Conard J.; Schmidt, Kenneth J.; Brewer, John

    1986-01-01

    An induction voidmeter for detecting voids in a conductive fluid may comprise: a four arm bridge circuit having two adjustable circuit elements connected as opposite arms of said bridge circuit, an input branch, and an output branch; two induction coils, bifilarly wound together, connected as the remaining two opposing arms of said bridge circuit and positioned such that the conductive fluid passes through said coils; applying an AC excitation signal to said input branch; and detecting the output signal generated in response to said excitation signal across said output branch. The induction coils may be located outside or inside a non-magnetic pipe containing the conductive fluid.

  15. Induction voidmeter

    DOEpatents

    Anderson, T.T.; Roop, C.J.; Schmidt, K.J.; Brewer, J.

    1983-12-21

    An induction voidmeter for detecting voids in a conductive fluid may comprise: a four arm bridge circuit having two adjustable circuit elements connected as opposite arms of said bridge, an input branch, and an output branch; two induction coils, bifilarly wound together, connected as the remaining two opposing arms of said bridge circuit and positioned such that the conductive fluid passes through said coils; means for applying an AC excitation signal to said input branch; and means for detecting the output signal generated in response to said excitation signal across said output branch. The induction coils may be located outside or inside a non-magnetic pipe containing the conductive fluid.

  16. Dendrite engineering on xenon crystals.

    PubMed

    Fell, Marco; Bilgram, Jörg

    2007-06-01

    The experimental work presented focuses on transient growth, morphological transitions, and control of xenon dendrites. Dendritic free growth is perturbed by two different mechanisms: Shaking and heating up to the melting temperature. Spontaneous and metastable multitip configurations are stabilized, coarsening is reduced, leading to a denser sidebranch growth, and a periodic tip splitting is found during perturbation by shaking. On the other hand, heating leads to controlled sidebranching and characteristic transitions of the tip shape. A deterministic behavior is found besides the random-noise-driven growth. The existence of a limit cycle is supported by the findings. Together the two perturbation mechanisms allow a "dendrite engineering"--i.e., a reproducible controlling of the crystal shape during its growth. The tip splitting for dendritic free growth is found not to be a splitting of the tip in two; rather, the respective growth velocities of the main tip and the fins change. The latter then surpass the main tip and develop into new tips. The occurrence of three- and four-tip configurations is explained with this mechanism. Finite-element calculations of the heat flow and the convective flow in the growth vessel show that the idea of a single axisymmetric toroidal convection roll across the whole growth vessel has to be dropped. The main effect of convection under Earth's gravity is the compression of the diffusive temperature field around the downward-growing tip. A model to explain the symmetry of dendritic crystals--e.g., snow crystals--is developed, based on the interaction of crystal shape and heat flow in the crystal. PMID:17677269

  17. Protective cell-mediated immunity by DNA vaccination against Papillomavirus L1 capsid protein in the Cottontail Rabbit Papillomavirus model.

    PubMed

    Hu, Jiafen; Cladel, Nancy M; Budgeon, Lynn R; Reed, Cynthia A; Pickel, Martin D; Christensen, Neil D

    2006-01-01

    Papillomavirus major capsid protein L1 has successfully stimulated protective immunity against virus infection by induction of neutralizing antibodies in animal models and in clinical trials. However, the potential impact of L1-induced protective cell-mediated immune (CMI) responses is difficult to measure in vivo because of the coincidence of anti-L1 antibody. In this study, we tested the hypothesis that L1 could activate CMI, using the Cottontail Rabbit Papillomavirus (CRPV)-rabbit model. A unique property of this model is that infections can be initiated with viral DNA, thus bypassing all contributions to protection via neutralizing anti-L1 antibody. DNA vaccines containing either CRPV L1, or subfragments of L1 (amino-terminal two-thirds of L1 [L1N] and the carboxylterminal two-thirds of L1 [L1C]), were delivered intracutaneously into rabbits, using a gene gun. After three booster immunizations, the rabbits were challenged with several viral DNA constructs: wild-type CRPV, CRPV L1ATGko (an L1 ATG knockout mutation), and CRPV-ROPV hybrid (CRPV with a replacement L1 from Rabbit Oral Papillomavirus). Challenge of L1 DNA-vaccinated rabbits with wild-type CRPV resulted in significantly fewer papillomas when compared with challenge with CRPV L1ATGko DNA. Significantly smaller papillomas were found in CRPV L1-, L1N-, and L1C-vaccinated rabbits. In addition, rabbits vaccinated with either L1 or L1N grew significantly fewer and smaller papillomas when challenged with CRPV-ROPV hybrid DNA. Therefore, CRPV L1 DNA vaccination induced CMI responses to CRPV DNA infections that can contribute to protective immunity. Cross-protective immunity against CRPV L1 and ROPV L1 was elicited in these CRPV L1- and subfragment-vaccinated rabbits. PMID:16987067

  18. Follicular dendritic cells in health and disease

    PubMed Central

    El Shikh, Mohey Eldin M.; Pitzalis, Costantino

    2012-01-01

    Follicular dendritic cells (FDCs) are unique immune cells that contribute to the regulation of humoral immune responses. These cells are located in the B-cell follicles of secondary lymphoid tissues where they trap and retain antigens (Ags) in the form of highly immunogenic immune complexes (ICs) consisting of Ag plus specific antibody (Ab) and/or complement proteins. FDCs multimerize Ags and present them polyvalently to B-cells in periodically arranged arrays that extensively crosslink the B-cell receptors for Ag (BCRs). FDC-FcγRIIB mediates IC periodicity, and FDC-Ag presentation combined with other soluble and membrane bound signals contributed by FDCs, like FDC-BAFF, -IL-6, and -C4bBP, are essential for the induction of the germinal center (GC) reaction, the maintenance of serological memory, and the remarkable ability of FDC-Ags to induce specific Ab responses in the absence of cognate T-cell help. On the other hand, FDCs play a negative role in several disease conditions including chronic inflammatory diseases, autoimmune diseases, HIV/AIDS, prion diseases, and follicular lymphomas. Compared to other accessory immune cells, FDCs have received little attention, and their functions have not been fully elucidated. This review gives an overview of FDC structure, and recapitulates our current knowledge on the immunoregulatory functions of FDCs in health and disease. A better understanding of FDCs should permit better regulation of Ab responses to suit the therapeutic manipulation of regulated and dysregulated immune responses. PMID:23049531

  19. Follicular dendritic cells in health and disease.

    PubMed

    El Shikh, Mohey Eldin M; Pitzalis, Costantino

    2012-01-01

    Follicular dendritic cells (FDCs) are unique immune cells that contribute to the regulation of humoral immune responses. These cells are located in the B-cell follicles of secondary lymphoid tissues where they trap and retain antigens (Ags) in the form of highly immunogenic immune complexes (ICs) consisting of Ag plus specific antibody (Ab) and/or complement proteins. FDCs multimerize Ags and present them polyvalently to B-cells in periodically arranged arrays that extensively crosslink the B-cell receptors for Ag (BCRs). FDC-FcγRIIB mediates IC periodicity, and FDC-Ag presentation combined with other soluble and membrane bound signals contributed by FDCs, like FDC-BAFF, -IL-6, and -C4bBP, are essential for the induction of the germinal center (GC) reaction, the maintenance of serological memory, and the remarkable ability of FDC-Ags to induce specific Ab responses in the absence of cognate T-cell help. On the other hand, FDCs play a negative role in several disease conditions including chronic inflammatory diseases, autoimmune diseases, HIV/AIDS, prion diseases, and follicular lymphomas. Compared to other accessory immune cells, FDCs have received little attention, and their functions have not been fully elucidated. This review gives an overview of FDC structure, and recapitulates our current knowledge on the immunoregulatory functions of FDCs in health and disease. A better understanding of FDCs should permit better regulation of Ab responses to suit the therapeutic manipulation of regulated and dysregulated immune responses. PMID:23049531

  20. Phenotype and function of nasal dendritic cells

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Haekyung; Ruane, Darren; Law, Kenneth; Ho, Yan; Garg, Aakash; Rahman, Adeeb; Esterházy, Daria; Cheong, Cheolho; Goljo, Erden; Sikora, Andrew G.; Mucida, Daniel; Chen, Benjamin; Govindraj, Satish; Breton, Gaëlle; Mehandru, Saurabh

    2015-01-01

    Intranasal vaccination generates immunity across local, regional and distant sites. However, nasal dendritic cells (DC), pivotal for the induction of intranasal vaccine- induced immune responses, have not been studied in detail. Here, using a variety of parameters, we define nasal DCs in mice and humans. Distinct subsets of “classical” DCs, dependent on the transcription factor zbtb46 were identified in the murine nose. The murine nasal DCs were FLT3 ligand-responsive and displayed unique phenotypic and functional characteristics including the ability to present antigen, induce an allogeneic T cell response and migrate in response to LPS or live bacterial pathogens. Importantly, in a cohort of human volunteers, BDCA-1+ DCs were observed to be the dominant nasal DC population at steady state. During chronic inflammation, the frequency of both BDCA-1+ and BDCA-3hi DCs was reduced in the nasal tissue, associating the loss of these immune sentinels with chronic nasal inflammation. The present study is the first detailed description of the phenotypic, ontogenetic and functional properties of nasal DCs and will inform the design of preventative immunization strategies as well as therapeutic modalities against chronic rhinosinusitis. PMID:25669151

  1. Microtubule nucleation and organization in dendrites.

    PubMed

    Delandre, Caroline; Amikura, Reiko; Moore, Adrian W

    2016-07-01

    Dendrite branching is an essential process for building complex nervous systems. It determines the number, distribution and integration of inputs into a neuron, and is regulated to create the diverse dendrite arbor branching patterns characteristic of different neuron types. The microtubule cytoskeleton is critical to provide structure and exert force during dendrite branching. It also supports the functional requirements of dendrites, reflected by differential microtubule architectural organization between neuron types, illustrated here for sensory neurons. Both anterograde and retrograde microtubule polymerization occur within growing dendrites, and recent studies indicate that branching is enhanced by anterograde microtubule polymerization events in nascent branches. The polarities of microtubule polymerization events are regulated by the position and orientation of microtubule nucleation events in the dendrite arbor. Golgi outposts are a primary microtubule nucleation center in dendrites and share common nucleation machinery with the centrosome. In addition, pre-existing dendrite microtubules may act as nucleation sites. We discuss how balancing the activities of distinct nucleation machineries within the growing dendrite can alter microtubule polymerization polarity and dendrite branching, and how regulating this balance can generate neuron type-specific morphologies. PMID:27097122

  2. In silico investigation into dendritic cell regulation of CD8Treg mediated killing of Th1 cells in murine experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis has been used extensively as an animal model of T cell mediated autoimmunity. A down-regulatory pathway through which encephalitogenic CD4Th1 cells are killed by CD8 regulatory T cells (Treg) has recently been proposed. With the CD8Treg cells being primed by dendritic cells, regulation of recovery may be occuring around these antigen presenting cells. CD4Treg cells provide critical help within this process, by licensing dendritic cells to prime CD8Treg cells, however the spatial and temporal aspects of this help in the CTL response is currently unclear. Results We have previously developed a simulator of experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (ARTIMMUS). We use ARTIMMUS to perform novel in silico experimentation regarding the priming of CD8Treg cells by dendritic cells, and the resulting CD8Treg mediated killing of encephalitogenic CD4Th1 cells. Simulations using dendritic cells that present antigenic peptides in a mutually exclusive manner (either MBP or TCR-derived, but not both) suggest that there is no significant reliance on dendritic cells that can prime both encephalitogenic CD4Th1 and Treg cells. Further, in silico experimentation suggests that dynamics of CD8Treg priming are significantly influenced through their spatial competition with CD4Treg cells and through the timing of Qa-1 expression by dendritic cells. Conclusion There is no requirement for the encephalitogenic CD4Th1 cells and cytotoxic CD8Treg cells to be primed by the same dendritic cells. We conjecture that no significant portion of CD4Th1 regulation by Qa-1 restricted CD8Treg cells occurs around individual dendritic cells, and as such, that CD8Treg mediated killing of CD4Th1 cells occurring around dendritic cells is not critical for recovery from the murine autoimmune disease. Furthermore, the timing of the CD4Treg licensing of dendritic cells and the spatial competition between CD4Treg and CD8Treg cells around the dendritic cell is

  3. Temporal synchrony and gamma to theta power conversion in the dendrites of CA1 pyramidal neurons

    PubMed Central

    Vaidya, Sachin P.; Johnston, Daniel

    2014-01-01

    Timing is a crucial aspect of synaptic integration. For pyramidal neurons that integrate thousands of synaptic inputs spread across hundreds of microns, it is thus a challenge to maintain the timing of incoming inputs at the axo-somatic integration site. Here we show that pyramidal neurons in the rodent hippocampus use a gradient of inductance in the form of HCN channels as an active mechanism to counteract location-dependent temporal differences of dendritic inputs at the soma. Using simultaneous multi-site whole cell recordings complemented by computational modeling, we find that this intrinsic biophysical mechanism produces temporal synchrony of rhythmic inputs in the theta and gamma frequency ranges across wide regions of the dendritic tree. While gamma and theta oscillations are known to synchronize activity across space in neuronal networks, our results identify a novel mechanism by which this synchrony extends to activity within single pyramidal neurons with complex dendritic arbors. PMID:24185428

  4. A case of fatal idiopathic enteritis and multiple opportunistic infections associated with dendritic cell deficiencies.

    PubMed

    Lord, James D; Chen, Janice; Kozarek, Richard A

    2013-03-01

    We present a case of an adult patient with new-onset severe, idiopathic, protein-wasting enteropathy, in whom an extensive immunological workup was performed. We found a lack of dendritic cell (DC) subsets in the blood and bowel, as well as elevated circulating TGF-beta levels and decreased numbers of circulating FOXP3+ regulatory T cells with diminished CTLA4 expression. She failed to respond to glucocorticoids and infliximab, and instead developed a constellation of opportunistic infections, including CMV ileitis, Mucormycosis, and Pneumocystis carinii pneumonia, and ultimately passed away. While the cause of her lack of DCs is unknown, this data suggests a key role for these cells in both regulating mucosal immunity and promoting effective cell-mediated immunity against pathogens in humans. PMID:23539396

  5. Method of inhibiting dislocation generation in silicon dendritic webs

    DOEpatents

    Spitznagel, John A.; Seidensticker, Raymond G.; McHugh, James P.

    1990-11-20

    A method of tailoring the heat balance of the outer edge of the dendrites adjacent the meniscus to produce thinner, smoother dendrites, which have substantially less dislocation sources contiguous with the dendrites, by changing the view factor to reduce radiation cooling or by irradiating the dendrites with light from a quartz lamp or a laser to raise the temperature of the dendrites.

  6. C-type lectin-like molecule-1 (CLL1)-targeted TRAIL augments the tumoricidal activity of granulocytes and potentiates therapeutic antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity

    PubMed Central

    Wiersma, Valerie R; de Bruyn, Marco; Shi, Ce; Gooden, Marloes JM; Wouters, Maartje CA; Samplonius, Douwe F; Hendriks, Djoke; Nijman, Hans W; Wei, Yunwei; Zhou, Jin; Helfrich, Wijnand; Bremer, Edwin

    2015-01-01

    The therapeutic effect of anti-cancer monoclonal antibodies stems from their capacity to opsonize targeted cancer cells with subsequent phagocytic removal, induction of antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity (ADCC) or induction of complement-mediated cytotoxicity (CDC). The major immune effector cells involved in these processes are natural killer (NK) cells and granulocytes. The latter and most prevalent blood cell population contributes to phagocytosis, but is not effective in inducing ADCC. Here, we report that targeted delivery of the tumoricidal protein tumor necrosis factor-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL) to granulocyte marker C-type lectin-like molecule-1 (CLL1), using fusion protein CLL1:TRAIL, equips granulocytes with high levels of TRAIL. Upon CLL1-selective binding of this fusion protein, granulocytes acquire additional TRAIL-mediated cytotoxic activity that, importantly, potentiates antibody-mediated cytotoxicity of clinically used therapeutic antibodies (e.g., rituximab, cetuximab). Thus, CLL1:TRAIL could be used as an adjuvant to optimize the clinical potential of anticancer antibody therapy by augmenting tumoricidal activity of granulocytes. PMID:25760768

  7. Usp18 Driven Enforced Viral Replication in Dendritic Cells Contributes to Break of Immunological Tolerance in Autoimmune Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Dong-Er; Iliakis, George; Xu, Haifeng C.; Häussinger, Dieter; Recher, Mike; Löhning, Max

    2013-01-01

    Infection with viruses carrying cross-reactive antigens is associated with break of immunological tolerance and induction of autoimmune disease. Dendritic cells play an important role in this process. However, it remains unclear why autoimmune-tolerance is broken during virus infection, but usually not during exposure to non-replicating cross-reactive antigens. Here we show that antigen derived from replicating virus but not from non-replicating sources undergoes a multiplication process in dendritic cells in spleen and lymph nodes. This enforced viral replication was dependent on Usp18 and was essential for expansion of autoreactive CD8+ T cells. Preventing enforced virus replication by depletion of CD11c+ cells, genetically deleting Usp18, or pharmacologically inhibiting of viral replication blunted the expansion of autoreactive CD8+ T cells and prevented autoimmune diabetes. In conclusion, Usp18-driven enforced viral replication in dendritic cells can break immunological tolerance and critically influences induction of autoimmunity. PMID:24204252

  8. Thermosolutal convection during dendritic solidification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heinrich, J. C.; Nandapurkar, P.; Poirier, D. R.; Felicelli, S.

    1989-01-01

    This paper presents a mathematical model for directional solidification of a binary alloy including a dendritic region underlying an all-liquid region. It is assumed initially that there exists a nonconvecting state with planar isotherms and isoconcentrates solidifying at a constant velocity. The stability of this system has been analyzed and nonlinear calculations are performed that show the effect of convection in the solidification process when the system is unstable. Results of calculations for various cases defined by the initial temperature gradient at the dendrite tips and varying strength of the gravitational field are presented for systems involving lead-tin alloys. The results show that the systems are stable for a gravitational constant of 0.0001 g(0) and that convection can be suppressed by appropriate choice of the container's size for higher values of the gravitational constant. It is also concluded that for the lead-tin systems considered, convection in the mushy zone is not significant below the upper 20 percent of the dendritic zone, if al all.

  9. Annealing kinetics of electrodeposited lithium dendrites.

    PubMed

    Aryanfar, Asghar; Cheng, Tao; Colussi, Agustin J; Merinov, Boris V; Goddard, William A; Hoffmann, Michael R

    2015-10-01

    The densifying kinetics of lithium dendrites is characterized with effective activation energy of Ea ≈ 6 - 7 kcal mol(-1) in our experiments and molecular dynamics computations. We show that heating lithium dendrites for 55 °C reduces the representative dendrites length λ¯(T,t) up to 36%. NVT reactive force field simulations on three-dimensional glass phase dendrites produced by our coarse grained Monte Carlo method reveal that for any given initial dendrite morphology, there is a unique stable atomic arrangement for a certain range of temperature, combined with rapid morphological transition (∼10 ps) within quasi-stable states involving concurrent bulk and surface diffusions. Our results are useful for predicting the inherent structural characteristics of lithium dendrites such as dominant coordination number. PMID:26450322

  10. Transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) inhibits cortical dendrites.

    PubMed

    Murphy, Sean C; Palmer, Lucy M; Nyffeler, Thomas; Müri, René M; Larkum, Matthew E

    2016-01-01

    One of the leading approaches to non-invasively treat a variety of brain disorders is transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS). However, despite its clinical prevalence, very little is known about the action of TMS at the cellular level let alone what effect it might have at the subcellular level (e.g. dendrites). Here, we examine the effect of single-pulse TMS on dendritic activity in layer 5 pyramidal neurons of the somatosensory cortex using an optical fiber imaging approach. We find that TMS causes GABAB-mediated inhibition of sensory-evoked dendritic Ca(2+) activity. We conclude that TMS directly activates fibers within the upper cortical layers that leads to the activation of dendrite-targeting inhibitory neurons which in turn suppress dendritic Ca(2+) activity. This result implies a specificity of TMS at the dendritic level that could in principle be exploited for investigating these structures non-invasively. PMID:26988796