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Sample records for dense fluid shockwaves

  1. Characterization of warm dense matter (WDM) from high intensity laser driven shockwaves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krauland, Christine; Wei, Mingsheng; Santos, Joao; Belancourt, Patrick; Theobald, Wolfgang; Keiter, Paul; Beg, Farhat

    2015-11-01

    Understanding the transport physics of an intense relativistic electron beam in various plasma regimes is crucial for many high-energy-density applications, such as fast heating for advanced ICF schemes and ion sources. Most short pulse laser-matter interaction experiments for electron transport studies have been performed with initially cold targets where the resistivity is far from that in warm dense and hot dense plasmas. In order to extend fast electron transport and energy coupling studies in pre-assembled plasmas, we must first characterize those regime possibilities. We present initial experiments conducted on the OMEGA EP laser (~ 1014 W/cm2) to characterize WDM created from the shock compression of low density (ρ0 ~ 330 mg/cc) CRF foams and solid Al foil targets. In foam targets, imaging x-ray Thomson scattering is used to measure spatial profiles of the temperature, ionization state and relative material density. The ASBO diagnostic and radiation hydrodynamics simulations deduce shock pressure in Al targets of various thicknesses. Details of the experiment and available data will be presented. The work was funded by the US DOE/NNSA NLUF Program.

  2. Phase boundary of hot dense fluid hydrogen

    PubMed Central

    Ohta, Kenji; Ichimaru, Kota; Einaga, Mari; Kawaguchi, Sho; Shimizu, Katsuya; Matsuoka, Takahiro; Hirao, Naohisa; Ohishi, Yasuo

    2015-01-01

    We investigated the phase transformation of hot dense fluid hydrogen using static high-pressure laser-heating experiments in a laser-heated diamond anvil cell. The results show anomalies in the heating efficiency that are likely to be attributed to the phase transition from a diatomic to monoatomic fluid hydrogen (plasma phase transition) in the pressure range between 82 and 106 GPa. This study imposes tighter constraints on the location of the hydrogen plasma phase transition boundary and suggests higher critical point than that predicted by the theoretical calculations. PMID:26548442

  3. Packing frustration in dense confined fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nygârd, Kim; Sarman, Sten; Kjellander, Roland

    2014-09-01

    Packing frustration for confined fluids, i.e., the incompatibility between the preferred packing of the fluid particles and the packing constraints imposed by the confining surfaces, is studied for a dense hard-sphere fluid confined between planar hard surfaces at short separations. The detailed mechanism for the frustration is investigated via an analysis of the anisotropic pair distributions of the confined fluid, as obtained from integral equation theory for inhomogeneous fluids at pair correlation level within the anisotropic Percus-Yevick approximation. By examining the mean forces that arise from interparticle collisions around the periphery of each particle in the slit, we calculate the principal components of the mean force for the density profile - each component being the sum of collisional forces on a particle's hemisphere facing either surface. The variations of these components with the slit width give rise to rather intricate changes in the layer structure between the surfaces, but, as shown in this paper, the basis of these variations can be easily understood qualitatively and often also semi-quantitatively. It is found that the ordering of the fluid is in essence governed locally by the packing constraints at each single solid-fluid interface. A simple superposition of forces due to the presence of each surface gives surprisingly good estimates of the density profiles, but there remain nontrivial confinement effects that cannot be explained by superposition, most notably the magnitude of the excess adsorption of particles in the slit relative to bulk.

  4. Prediction of viscosity of dense fluid mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Royal, Damian D.; Vesovic, Velisa; Trusler, J. P. Martin; Wakeham, William. A.

    The Vesovic-Wakeham (VW) method of predicting the viscosity of dense fluid mixtures has been improved by implementing new mixing rules based on the rigid sphere formalism. The proposed mixing rules are based on both Lebowitz's solution of the Percus-Yevick equation and on the Carnahan-Starling equation. The predictions of the modified VW method have been compared with experimental viscosity data for a number of diverse fluid mixtures: natural gas, hexane + hheptane, hexane + octane, cyclopentane + toluene, and a ternary mixture of hydrofluorocarbons (R32 + R125 + R134a). The results indicate that the proposed improvements make possible the extension of the original VW method to liquid mixtures and to mixtures containing polar species, while retaining its original accuracy.

  5. Dense colloidal fluids form denser amorphous sediments

    PubMed Central

    Liber, Shir R.; Borohovich, Shai; Butenko, Alexander V.; Schofield, Andrew B.; Sloutskin, Eli

    2013-01-01

    We relate, by simple analytical centrifugation experiments, the density of colloidal fluids with the nature of their randomly packed solid sediments. We demonstrate that the most dilute fluids of colloidal hard spheres form loosely packed sediments, where the volume fraction of the particles approaches in frictional systems the random loose packing limit, φRLP = 0.55. The dense fluids of the same spheres form denser sediments, approaching the so-called random close packing limit, φRCP = 0.64. Our experiments, where particle sedimentation in a centrifuge is sufficiently rapid to avoid crystallization, demonstrate that the density of the sediments varies monotonically with the volume fraction of the initial suspension. We reproduce our experimental data by simple computer simulations, where structural reorganizations are prohibited, such that the rate of sedimentation is irrelevant. This suggests that in colloidal systems, where viscous forces dominate, the structure of randomly close-packed and randomly loose-packed sediments is determined by the well-known structure of the initial fluids of simple hard spheres, provided that the crystallization is fully suppressed. PMID:23530198

  6. Shock-induced bubble jetting into a viscous fluid with application to tissue injury in shock-wave lithotripsy

    PubMed Central

    Freund, J. B.; Shukla, R. K.; Evan, A. P.

    2009-01-01

    Shock waves in liquids are known to cause spherical gas bubbles to rapidly collapse and form strong re-entrant jets in the direction of the propagating shock. The interaction of these jets with an adjacent viscous liquid is investigated using finite-volume simulation methods. This configuration serves as a model for tissue injury during shock-wave lithotripsy, a medical procedure to remove kidney stones. In this case, the viscous fluid provides a crude model for the tissue. It is found that for viscosities comparable to what might be expected in tissue, the jet that forms upon collapse of a small bubble fails to penetrate deeply into the viscous fluid “tissue.” A simple model reproduces the penetration distance versus viscosity observed in the simulations and leads to a phenomenological model for the spreading of injury with multiple shocks. For a reasonable selection of a single efficiency parameter, this model is able to reproduce in vivo observations of an apparent 1000-shock threshold before wide-spread tissue injury occurs in targeted kidneys and the approximate extent of this injury after a typical clinical dose of 2000 shock waves. PMID:19894850

  7. An efficient fully atomistic potential model for dense fluid methane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Chuntao; Ouyang, Jie; Zhuang, Xin; Wang, Lihua; Li, Wuming

    2016-08-01

    A fully atomistic model aimed to obtain a general purpose model for the dense fluid methane is presented. The new optimized potential for liquid simulation (OPLS) model is a rigid five site model which consists of five fixed point charges and five Lennard-Jones centers. The parameters in the potential model are determined by a fit of the experimental data of dense fluid methane using molecular dynamics simulation. The radial distribution function and the diffusion coefficient are successfully calculated for dense fluid methane at various state points. The simulated results are in good agreement with the available experimental data shown in literature. Moreover, the distribution of mean number hydrogen bonds and the distribution of pair-energy are analyzed, which are obtained from the new model and other five reference potential models. Furthermore, the space-time correlation functions for dense fluid methane are also discussed. All the numerical results demonstrate that the new OPLS model could be well utilized to investigate the dense fluid methane.

  8. Three lectures: NEMD, SPAM, and shockwaves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoover, Wm. G.; Hoover, Carol G.

    2011-03-01

    We discuss three related subjects well suited to graduate research. The first, Nonequilibrium molecular dynamics or "NEMD", makes possible the simulation of atomistic systems driven by external fields, subject to dynamic constraints, and thermostated so as to yield stationary nonequilibrium states. The second subject, Smooth Particle Applied Mechanics or "SPAM", provides a particle method, resembling molecular dynamics, but designed to solve continuum problems. The numerical work is simplified because the SPAM particles obey ordinary, rather than partial, differential equations. The interpolation method used with SPAM is a powerful interpretive tool converting point particle variables to twice-differentiable field variables. This interpolation method is vital to the study and understanding of the third research topic we discuss, strong shockwaves in dense fluids. Such shockwaves exhibit stationary far-from-equilibrium states obtained with purely reversible Hamiltonian mechanics. The SPAM interpolation method, applied to this molecular dynamics problem, clearly demonstrates both the tensor character of kinetic temperature and the time-delayed response of stress and heat flux to the strain rate and temperature gradients. The dynamic Lyapunov instability of the shockwave problem can be analyzed in a variety of ways, both with and without symmetry in time. These three subjects suggest many topics suitable for graduate research in nonlinear nonequilibrium problems.

  9. Halide based shock-wave treatment of fluid-rich natural phases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schlothauer, T.; Schimpf, C.; Brendler, E.; Keller, K.; Kroke, E.; Heide, G.

    2015-11-01

    For the synthesis of high pressure phases from natural minerals and the shock wave treatment of fluid bearing phases a halide based method was developed. The experiments were performed in the pressure range between 25 and 162 GPa with a success rate for the new method of 100% for the new method. Based on the Impedance Corrected Sample Recovery Capsule under avoiding the adiabatic decompression a direct comparison between different loading paths and sample holder geometries is possible. The recovered samples show neither indications of melting in the case of kaolinite and very limited degassing in the case of carbonates. The recovery of amorphous water bearing Al-Si-phases with Aluminum in four-, five- and six-fold coordination was possible. The samples were analyzed with scanning electron microscopy, x-ray diffraction, nuclear-magnetic-resonance- and infra-red-spectroscopy and the results were directly compared.

  10. Modeling anomalous diffusion of dense fluids in carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Gerald; Hadjiconstantinou, Nicolas

    2015-11-01

    Molecular diffusive mechanisms exhibited under nanoconfinement can differ considerably from the Fickian self-diffusion expected in a bulk fluid. We propose a theoretical description of this phenomenon in a nanofluidic system of considerable interest - namely, a dense fluid confined within a carbon nanotube (CNT). We show that the anomalous diffusion reported in the literature is closely related to the fluid layering widely observed in this system and recently theoretically described [Wang and Hadjiconstantinou, Physics of Fluids, 052006, 2015]. In particular, we find that the key to describing the anomalous molecular diffusion (within sufficiently large CNTs) lies in recognizing that the diffusion mechanism is spatially dependent: while fluid in the center of the nanotube (at least three molecular diameters away from the wall) exhibits Fickian diffusion, fluid near the CNT wall can demonstrate non-Fickian diffusive behavior. The previously reported anomalous diffusive behavior can be reproduced, to a good approximation level, by appropriately combining the bulk and near-wall behavior to form a model for the overall diffusion rate within the nanotube. Such models produce results in quantitative agreement with molecular dynamics simulations.

  11. High frequency flow-structural interaction in dense subsonic fluids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, Baw-Lin; Ofarrell, J. M.

    1995-01-01

    Prediction of the detailed dynamic behavior in rocket propellant feed systems and engines and other such high-energy fluid systems requires precise analysis to assure structural performance. Designs sometimes require placement of bluff bodies in a flow passage. Additionally, there are flexibilities in ducts, liners, and piping systems. A design handbook and interactive data base have been developed for assessing flow/structural interactions to be used as a tool in design and development, to evaluate applicable geometries before problems develop, or to eliminate or minimize problems with existing hardware. This is a compilation of analytical/empirical data and techniques to evaluate detailed dynamic characteristics of both the fluid and structures. These techniques have direct applicability to rocket engine internal flow passages, hot gas drive systems, and vehicle propellant feed systems. Organization of the handbook is by basic geometries for estimating Strouhal numbers, added mass effects, mode shapes for various end constraints, critical onset flow conditions, and possible structural response amplitudes. Emphasis is on dense fluids and high structural loading potential for fatigue at low subsonic flow speeds where high-frequency excitations are possible. Avoidance and corrective measure illustrations are presented together with analytical curve fits for predictions compiled from a comprehensive data base.

  12. Glass transition of dense fluids of hard and compressible spheres.

    PubMed

    Berthier, Ludovic; Witten, Thomas A

    2009-08-01

    We use computer simulations to study the glass transition of dense fluids made of polydisperse repulsive spheres. For hard particles, we vary the volume fraction, phi , and use compressible particles to explore finite temperatures, T>0 . In the hard sphere limit, our dynamic data show evidence of an avoided mode-coupling singularity near phi(MCT) is approximately 0.592; they are consistent with a divergence of equilibrium relaxation times occurring at phi(0) is approximately 0.635, but they leave open the existence of a finite temperature singularity for compressible spheres at volume fraction phi>phi(0). Using direct measurements and a scaling procedure, we estimate the equilibrium equation of state for the hard sphere metastable fluid up to phi(0), where pressure remains finite, suggesting that phi(0) corresponds to an ideal glass transition. We use nonequilibrium protocols to explore glassy states above phi(0) and establish the existence of multiple equations of state for the unequilibrated glass of hard spheres, all diverging at different densities in the range phi in [0.642, 0.664]. Glassiness thus results in the existence of a continuum of densities where jamming transitions can occur. PMID:19792128

  13. Minimal continuum theories of structure formation in dense active fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dunkel, Jörn; Heidenreich, Sebastian; Bär, Markus; Goldstein, Raymond E.

    2013-04-01

    Self-sustained dynamical phases of living matter can exhibit remarkable similarities over a wide range of scales, from mesoscopic vortex structures in microbial suspensions and motility assays of biopolymers to turbulent large-scale instabilities in flocks of birds or schools of fish. Here, we argue that, in many cases, the phenomenology of such active states can be efficiently described in terms of fourth- and higher-order partial differential equations. Structural transitions in these models can be interpreted as Landau-type kinematic transitions in Fourier (wavenumber) space, suggesting that microscopically different biological systems can share universal long-wavelength features. This general idea is illustrated through numerical simulations for two classes of continuum models for incompressible active fluids: a Swift-Hohenberg-type scalar field theory, and a minimal vector model that extends the classical Toner-Tu theory and appears to be a promising candidate for the quantitative description of dense bacterial suspensions. We discuss how microscopic symmetry-breaking mechanisms can enter macroscopic continuum descriptions of collective microbial motion near surfaces, and conclude by outlining future applications.

  14. Shockwave Consolidation of Nanostructured Thermoelectric Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prasad, Narasimha S.; Taylor, Patrick; Nemir, David

    2014-01-01

    Nanotechnology based thermoelectric materials are considered attractive for developing highly efficient thermoelectric devices. Nano-structured thermoelectric materials are predicted to offer higher ZT over bulk materials by reducing thermal conductivity and increasing electrical conductivity. Consolidation of nano-structured powders into dense materials without losing nanostructure is essential towards practical device development. Using the gas atomization process, amorphous nano-structured powders were produced. Shockwave consolidation is accomplished by surrounding the nanopowder-containing tube with explosives and then detonating. The resulting shock wave causes rapid fusing of the powders without the melt and subsequent grain growth. We have been successful in generating consolidated nano-structured bismuth telluride alloy powders by using the shockwave technique. Using these consolidated materials, several types of thermoelectric power generating devices have been developed. Shockwave consolidation is anticipated to generate large quantities of nanostructred materials expeditiously and cost effectively. In this paper, the technique of shockwave consolidation will be presented followed by Seebeck Coefficient and thermal conductivity measurements of consolidated materials. Preliminary results indicate a substantial increase in electrical conductivity due to shockwave consolidation technique.

  15. Transport theory for the Lennard-Jones dense fluid

    SciTech Connect

    Karkheck, J.; Stell, G.; Xu, J.

    1988-11-01

    A kinetic theory for a fluid of particles interacting via a pair potential with hard-core plus truncated tail is described and used to derive a transport theory for the Lennard-Jones fluid as well as the square-well fluid. Numerical results for shear viscosity, thermal conductivity, and the self-diffusion coefficient are given for the Lennard-Jones fluid and compared with simulation and experimental results. Our Lennard-Jones theory proves quantitatively useful over a wide range of states.

  16. The Chelyabinsk airburst shockwave

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Popova, O.; Shuvalov, V.; Rybnov, Y.; Jenniskens, P.; Kharlamov, V.; Usoltseva, O.; Glazachev, D.; Podobnaya, E.; Dyagilev, R.; Trubetskaya, I.

    2014-07-01

    The Chelyabinsk airburst of 15 February 2013 was exceptional because of the large kinetic energy of the impacting body and because the airburst that was generated created significant damage and injuries in a densely populated area. The butterfly-shape of the damaged area (Popova et al., 2013) is explained from the fact that the energy was deposited over a range of altitudes. Some uncertainty remains about the source energy of the airburst, because it is not known precisely at what pressure glass is expected to break. Reasonable results were obtained for energies of 300--520 kt TNT and over pressures of 500--1000 Pa, assuming that the time dependence of the energy release followed the meteor lightcurve (Popova et al. 2013). Additional information about the airburst characteristics may be extracted from the arrival times of the shockwave at various locations and from pressure records. Arrival times of the shock wave were derived from video observations. From the analysis of these shock wave arrival times, a range of altitudes of energy deposition was derived (Popova et al. 2013). The observed arrival times were compared with model estimates, taking into account the real wind and atmospheric conditions. Results of the numerical simulations were compared with recorded sound signals, which were often quite complex. Borovicka et al. (2013) suggested that subsequent acoustic arrivals corresponded to separate fragmentation events. This hypothesis is tested. There were no instrumental records of overpressure in the damaged area. However, seismic records exist from locations surrounding a coal mine at Korkino, situated in the damage area close to the meteoroid trajectory, almost immediately below the region of highest energy deposition. Its seismic control system to monitor land slides recorded the blast wave from the meteoroid entry indirectly due to coupling to the ground. This is the only instrumental record of the airburst close to the meteoroid trajectory. An analysis

  17. Inhomogeneous quasistationary state of dense fluids of inelastic hard spheres.

    PubMed

    Fouxon, Itzhak

    2014-05-01

    We study closed dense collections of freely cooling hard spheres that collide inelastically with constant coefficient of normal restitution. We find inhomogeneous states (ISs) where the density profile is spatially nonuniform but constant in time. The states are exact solutions of nonlinear partial differential equations that describe the coupled distributions of density and temperature valid when inelastic losses of energy per collision are small. The derivation is performed without modeling the equations' coefficients that are unknown in the dense limit (such as the equation of state) using only their scaling form specific for hard spheres. Thus the IS is the exact state of this dense many-body system. It captures a fundamental property of inelastic collections of particles: the possibility of preserving nonuniform temperature via the interplay of inelastic cooling and heat conduction that generalizes previous results. We perform numerical simulations to demonstrate that arbitrary initial state evolves to the IS in the limit of long times where the container has the geometry of the channel. The evolution is like a gas-liquid transition. The liquid condenses in a vanishing part of the total volume but takes most of the mass of the system. However, the gaseous phase, which mass grows only logarithmically with the system size, is relevant because its fast particles carry most of the energy of the system. Remarkably, the system self-organizes to dissipate no energy: The inelastic decay of energy is a power law [1+t/t(c)](-2), where t(c) diverges in the thermodynamic limit. This is reinforced by observing that for supercritical systems the IS coincide in most of the space with the steady states of granular systems heated at one of the walls. We discuss the relation of our results to the recently proposed finite-time singularity in other container's geometries. PMID:25353790

  18. Stepwise shockwave velocity determinator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roth, Timothy E.; Beeson, Harold

    1992-01-01

    To provide an uncomplicated and inexpensive method for measuring the far-field velocity of a surface shockwave produced by an explosion, a stepwise shockwave velocity determinator (SSVD) was developed. The velocity determinator is constructed of readily available materials and works on the principle of breaking discrete sensors composed of aluminum foil contacts. The discrete sensors have an average breaking threshold of approximately 7 kPa. An incremental output step of 250 mV is created with each foil contact breakage and is logged by analog-to-digital instrumentation. Velocity data obtained from the SSVD is within approximately 11 percent of the calculated surface shockwave velocity of a muzzle blast from a 30.06 rifle.

  19. Dynamics of dense granular flows of small-and-large-grain mixtures in an ambient fluid.

    PubMed

    Meruane, C; Tamburrino, A; Roche, O

    2012-08-01

    Dense grain flows in nature consist of a mixture of solid constituents that are immersed in an ambient fluid. In order to obtain a good representation of these flows, the interaction mechanisms between the different constituents of the mixture should be considered. In this article, we study the dynamics of a dense granular flow composed of a binary mixture of small and large grains immersed in an ambient fluid. In this context, we extend the two-phase approach proposed by Meruane et al. [J. Fluid Mech. 648, 381 (2010)] to the case of flowing dense binary mixtures of solid particles, by including in the momentum equations a constitutive relation that describes the interaction mechanisms between the solid constituents in a dense regime. These coupled equations are solved numerically and validated by comparing the numerical results with experimental measurements of the front speed of gravitational granular flows resulting from the collapse, in ambient air or water, of two-dimensional granular columns that consisted of mixtures of small and large spherical particles of equal mass density. Our results suggest that the model equations include the essential features that describe the dynamics of grains flows of binary mixtures in an ambient fluid. In particular, it is shown that segregation of small and large grains can increase the front speed because of the volumetric expansion of the flow. This increase in flow speed is damped by the interaction forces with the ambient fluid, and this behavior is more pronounced in water than in air. PMID:23005858

  20. Local shear viscosity of strongly inhomogeneous dense fluids: from the hard-sphere to the Lennard-Jones fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoang, Hai; Galliero, Guillaume

    2013-12-01

    This work aims at providing a tractable approach to model the local shear viscosity of strongly inhomogeneous dense fluids composed of spherical molecules, in which the density variations occur on molecular distance. The proposed scheme, which relies on the local density average model, has been applied to the quasi-hard-sphere, the Week-Chandler-Andersen and the Lennard-Jones fluids. A weight function has been developed to deal with the hard-sphere fluid given the specificities of momentum exchange. To extend the approach to the smoothly repulsive potential, we have taken into account that the non-local contributions to the viscosity due to the interactions of particles separated by a given distance are temperature dependent. Then, using a simple perturbation scheme, the approach is extended to the Lennard-Jones fluids. It is shown that the viscosity profiles of inhomogeneous dense fluids deduced from this approach are consistent with those directly computed by non-equilibrium molecular dynamics simulations.

  1. Predicting the Anomalous Density of a Dense Fluid Confined within a Carbon Nanotube

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Gerald; Hadjiconstantinou, Nicolas

    2014-11-01

    The equilibrium density of fluids under nanoconfinement can be substantially smaller than their bulk density. Understanding the physical basis for and magnitude of these anomalous densities is key to many nanoengineering applications, such as constructing a sub-continuum model of nanoscale fluid flow. We provide here a theoretical description of this phenomenon in the most frequently, perhaps, studied system - a dense fluid confined within a carbon nanotube (CNT). We show that the reduced density is primarily due to repulsive interactions between the fluid and the CNT, which modify the fluid structure near the fluid-CNT interface and lead to a ``stand-off'' distance between the two materials. Using a mean-field approach to describe the energetic landscape near the CNT wall, we obtain closed-form analytical results describing the length scales associated with the layered fluid. Combined with empirical knowledge of the layered-fluid density, these results allow us to derive a prediction for the equilibrium fluid density as a function of the CNT radius that is in excellent agreement with molecular dynamics simulations. We also show how aspects of this theory can be extended to describe water confined within CNTs and find good agreement with results from the literature.

  2. Shock waves and double layers in electron degenerate dense plasma with viscous ion fluids

    SciTech Connect

    Mamun, A. A.; Zobaer, M. S.

    2014-02-15

    The properties of ion-acoustic shock waves and double layers propagating in a viscous degenerate dense plasma (containing inertial viscous ion fluid, non-relativistic and ultra-relativistic degenerate electron fluid, and negatively charged stationary heavy element) is investigated. A new nonlinear equation (viz. Gardner equation with additional dissipative term) is derived by the reductive perturbation method. The properties of the ion-acoustic shock waves and double layers are examined by the analysis of the shock and double layer solutions of this new equation (we would like to call it “M-Z equation”). It is found that the properties of these shock and double layer structures obtained from this analysis are significantly different from those obtained from the analysis of standard Gardner or Burgers’ equation. The implications of our results to dense plasmas in astrophysical objects (e.g., non-rotating white dwarf stars) are briefly discussed.

  3. Shock waves and double layers in electron degenerate dense plasma with viscous ion fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mamun, A. A.; Zobaer, M. S.

    2014-02-01

    The properties of ion-acoustic shock waves and double layers propagating in a viscous degenerate dense plasma (containing inertial viscous ion fluid, non-relativistic and ultra-relativistic degenerate electron fluid, and negatively charged stationary heavy element) is investigated. A new nonlinear equation (viz. Gardner equation with additional dissipative term) is derived by the reductive perturbation method. The properties of the ion-acoustic shock waves and double layers are examined by the analysis of the shock and double layer solutions of this new equation (we would like to call it "M-Z equation"). It is found that the properties of these shock and double layer structures obtained from this analysis are significantly different from those obtained from the analysis of standard Gardner or Burgers' equation. The implications of our results to dense plasmas in astrophysical objects (e.g., non-rotating white dwarf stars) are briefly discussed.

  4. Flushing of a dense fluid from an urban canyon part 1: Steady state measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaye, Nigel; Baratian, Zahra

    2011-11-01

    We consider the role of buoyancy on the vertical transport of a dense gas due to a horizontal wind flow above a street canyon. The density of the pollutant suppresses vertical mixing as the turbulent shear flow at the top of the canyon must do work to raise the dense gas up above the canyon top. We present results of a series of experiments to measure the rate of removal of a dense miscible fluid from a two dimensional square canyon open at the top. The cavity is formed by square blocks up- and down-stream. Dense fluid is introduced at a constant rate at the base of the cavity and is removed by mixing with the flow passing over the top of the cavity. Two different steady flows are observed. For higher Richardson numbers, a two layer stratification develops in which there is a relatively sharp interface. In this case the mixing is parameterized in terms of an entrainment velocity across the interface that is a function of the Richardson number and the fractional depth of the interface below the cavity top. For lower Richardson numbers no interface is observed and the buoyancy increases linearly with height above the cavity base. We also found a range of Richardson numbers for which both steady stratifications are possible and for which the steady flow depends on the initial conditions.

  5. Rheology of dense suspensions of non colloidal spheres in yield-stress fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guazzelli, Elisabeth; Dagois-Bohy, Simon; Hormozi, Sarah; Pouliquen, Olivier; Aix-Marseille Université, Cnrs, Iusti Umr 7343 Team; Department Of Mechanical Engineering, Ohio University Team

    2015-11-01

    Pressure-imposed rheometry is used to study the rheological properties of suspensions of non colloidal spheres in yield stress fluids. Accurate measurements for both the shear stress and particle normal stress are obtained in the dense regime. The rheological measurements are favourably compared to a model based on scaling arguments and homogenisation methods. The detailed account of this study can be found in. ANR-13-IS09-0005-01, Etudes et Productions Schlumberger, NSERC Postdoctoral Fellowships Program PDF-439036-2013.

  6. Gelling behavior of 12-hydroxystearic acid in organic fluids and dense CO{sub 2}

    SciTech Connect

    Gullapalli, P.; Tsau, J.S.; Heller, J.P.

    1995-11-01

    This paper presents the gelation results of a variety of organic fluids and supercritical carbon dioxide with 12-hydroxystearic acid (HSA). At low concentration (0.75 wt%), HSA caused thermoreversible gelation of a variety of organic fluids such as aliphatic, alicyclic, aromatic hydrocarbon liquids, chlorinated fluids, and mixture such as Soltrol-130. As low as 0.75 wt% of HSA also gelled high pressure solutions of dense CO{sub 2} and the selected organic fluids such as alcohols and chlorinated fluids. In the absence of any cosolvent, HSA was insoluble in dense CO{sub 2} at 1,800 psig and 34 C. However, with 10--15% ethanol, HSA was found to be totally soluble in CO{sub 2} at the above experimental conditions. Results indicate the mixture of HSA/ethanol or chloroform gels CO{sub 2}. The ungelled mixture of HSA/cosolvent and CO{sub 2} is clear whereas it turns to translucent or opaque when it gels. Viscosity measurements were made of mixtures of HSA with ethanol in dense CO{sub 2} at 1,800 psig between 21 to 34 C, using a high pressure capillary viscometer equipped with a sapphire cell for visual observations. These showed that the gelation of CO{sub 2} with HSA depends on the temperature and concentration of both HSA and cosolvents, which affect the gel temperature (T{sub g}) and viscosity of CO{sub 2}. The presence of cosolvent enhances the solubility of HSA in CO{sub 2} and increases its viscosity.

  7. A consistent calculation of the chemical potential for dense simple fluids.

    PubMed

    Bomont, Jean-Marc

    2006-05-28

    A general method to calculate the excess chemical potential betamuex, that is based on the Kirkwood coupling parameter's dependence of the correlation functions, is presented. The expression for the one particle bridge function B(1)r is derived for simple fluids with spherical interactions. Only the knowledge of the bridge function B(2)r is required. The accuracy of our approach is illustrated for a dense hard sphere fluid. As far as B(2)r is considered as exact, B(1)r is found to be, at high densities, the normalized bridge function -B(2)rB(2)(r=0). This expression ensures a consistent calculation of the excess chemical potential by satisfying implicitly the Gibbs-Duhem constraint. Only the pressure-consistency condition is necessary to calculate the structural and thermodynamic properties of the fluid. PMID:16774388

  8. Atomization and dense-fluid breakup regimes in liquid rocket engines

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Oefelein, Joseph; Dahms, Rainer Norbert Uwe

    2015-04-20

    Until recently, modern theory has lacked a fundamentally based model to predict the operating pressures where classical sprays transition to dense-fluid mixing with diminished surface tension. In this paper, such a model is presented to quantify this transition for liquid-oxygen–hydrogen and n-decane–gaseous-oxygen injection processes. The analysis reveals that respective molecular interfaces break down not necessarily because of vanishing surface tension forces but instead because of the combination of broadened interfaces and a reduction in mean free molecular path. When this occurs, the interfacial structure itself enters the continuum regime, where transport processes rather than intermolecular forces dominate. Using this model,more » regime diagrams for the respective systems are constructed that show the range of operating pressures and temperatures where this transition occurs. The analysis also reveals the conditions where classical spray dynamics persists even at high supercritical pressures. As a result, it demonstrates that, depending on the composition and temperature of the injected fluids, the injection process can exhibit either classical spray atomization, dense-fluid diffusion-dominated mixing, or supercritical mixing phenomena at chamber pressures encountered in state-of-the-art liquid rocket engines.« less

  9. Atomization and dense-fluid breakup regimes in liquid rocket engines

    SciTech Connect

    Oefelein, Joseph; Dahms, Rainer Norbert Uwe

    2015-04-20

    Until recently, modern theory has lacked a fundamentally based model to predict the operating pressures where classical sprays transition to dense-fluid mixing with diminished surface tension. In this paper, such a model is presented to quantify this transition for liquid-oxygen–hydrogen and n-decane–gaseous-oxygen injection processes. The analysis reveals that respective molecular interfaces break down not necessarily because of vanishing surface tension forces but instead because of the combination of broadened interfaces and a reduction in mean free molecular path. When this occurs, the interfacial structure itself enters the continuum regime, where transport processes rather than intermolecular forces dominate. Using this model, regime diagrams for the respective systems are constructed that show the range of operating pressures and temperatures where this transition occurs. The analysis also reveals the conditions where classical spray dynamics persists even at high supercritical pressures. As a result, it demonstrates that, depending on the composition and temperature of the injected fluids, the injection process can exhibit either classical spray atomization, dense-fluid diffusion-dominated mixing, or supercritical mixing phenomena at chamber pressures encountered in state-of-the-art liquid rocket engines.

  10. The dissociation and equation of state of dense fluid oxygen at high pressures and high temperatures.

    PubMed

    Chen, Q F; Cai, L C; Zhang, Y; Gu, Y J

    2008-03-14

    The dissociation, pressure, and internal energy of dense fluid oxygen at high temperatures and densities have been calculated from the free-energy functions using the self-consistent fluid variational theory. In this paper, we focused on a mixture of oxygen atoms and molecules, and investigated the phenomenon of pressure dissociation at finite temperature. The single-shock Hugoniot derived from this equation of state agrees well with gas-gun experiments for pressure versus density. The equation of state and dissociation degree are predicted in the ranges of temperature of 5000-16,000 K and density of 0.1-4.5 g/cm(3). These data are formulated in the analytical forms of dissociation degree-density-temperature and pressure-density-temperature equation of state. PMID:18345911

  11. A New Unsteady Model for Dense Cloud Cavitation in Cryogenic Fluids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hosangadi, A.; Ahuja, V.

    2005-01-01

    A new unsteady, cavitation model is presented wherein the phase change process (bubble growth/collapse) is coupled to the acoustic field in a cryogenic fluid. It predicts the number density and radius of bubbles in vapor clouds by tracking both the aggregate surface area and volume fraction of the cloud. Hence, formulations for the dynamics of individual bubbles (e.g. Rayleigh-Plesset equation) may be integrated within the macroscopic context of a dense vapor cloud i.e. a cloud that occupies a significant fraction of available volume and contains numerous bubbles. This formulation has been implemented within the CRUNCH CFD, which has a compressible real fluid formulation, a multi-element, unstructured grid framework, and has been validated extensively for liquid rocket turbopump inducers. Detailed unsteady simulations of a cavitating ogive in liquid nitrogen are presented where time-averaged mean cavity pressure and temperature depressions due to cavitation are compared with experimental data. The model also provides the spatial and temporal history of the bubble size distribution in the vapor clouds that are shed, an important physical parameter that is difficult to measure experimentally and is a significant advancement in the modeling of dense cloud cavitation.

  12. Numerical Simulation of Low-Density Shock-Wave Interactions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glass, Christopher E.

    1999-01-01

    Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) numerical simulations of low-density shock-wave interactions for an incident shock impinging on a cylinder have been performed. Flow-field density gradient and surface pressure and heating define the type of interference pattern and corresponding perturbations. The maximum pressure and heat transfer level and location for various interaction types (i.e., shock-wave incidence with respect to the cylinder) are presented. A time-accurate solution of the Type IV interference is employed to demonstrate the establishment and the steadiness of the low-density flow interaction.

  13. A Supernova's Shockwaves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2007-01-01

    Supernovae are the explosive deaths of the universe's most massive stars. In death, these volatile creatures blast tons of energetic waves into the cosmos, destroying much of the dust surrounding them.

    This false-color composite from NASA's Spitzer Space Telescope and NASA's Chandra X-ray Observatory shows the remnant of one such explosion. The remnant, called N132D, is the wispy pink shell of gas at the center of this image. The pinkish color reveals a clash between the explosion's high-energy shockwaves and surrounding dust grains.

    In the background, small organic molecules called polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons are shown as tints of green. The blue spots represent stars in our galaxy along this line of sight.

    N132D is located 163,000 light-years away in a neighboring galaxy called, the Large Magellanic Cloud.

    In this image, infrared light at 4.5 microns is mapped to blue, 8.0 microns to green and 24 microns to red. Broadband X-ray light is mapped purple. The infrared data were taken by Spitzer's infrared array camera and multiband imaging photometer, while the X-ray data were captured by Chandra.

  14. Dynamic response and stability of a flapping foil in a dense and viscous fluid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chae, Eun Jung; Akcabay, Deniz Tolga; Young, Yin Lu

    2013-10-01

    It is important to understand and accurately predict the static and dynamic response and stability of flexible hydro/aero lifting bodies to ensure their structural safety, to facilitate the design/optimization of new/existing concepts, and to test the feasibility of using advanced materials. The present study investigates the influence of solid-to-fluid added mass ratio (sqrt{μ _b}) and viscous effects on the fluid-structure interaction (FSI) response and stability of a flapping foil in incompressible and turbulent flows using a recently presented efficient and stable numerical algorithm in time-domain, which couples an unsteady Reynolds Average Navier-Stokes solver with a two degrees-of freedom structural model. The new numerical coupling method is able to stably and accurately simulate the FSI behavior of light foils in dense fluids: a limit which is known to be numerically difficult to study with classical FSI coupling methods. The studied FSI responses include static/dynamic divergence and flutter instabilities, which are compared with inviscid, linear potential theory predictions obtained with both time and frequency domain formulations, as well as with several published experimental data. In general, the results show that the critical reduced flutter velocities and reduced divergence velocities both decrease as sqrt{μ _b} decreases, and are captured with good accuracy using the viscous FSI solver for a wide range of relative mass ratios that are typical to air/hydrofoils. The comparative analyses showed that the classic frequency-domain linear potential theory is severely unconservative for predicting the flutter velocity for cases with sqrt{μ _b}<3: this includes the typical operating conditions of most marine and biomedical lifting devices, where the fluid forces are comparable to the solid forces, and strong nonlinear interactions may develop. In addition, the viscous FSI solver is shown to correctly predict the experimentally reported critical

  15. Numerical study of long-time dynamics and ergodic-nonergodic transitions in dense simple fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCowan, David D.

    2015-08-01

    Since the mid-1980s, mode-coupling theory (MCT) has been the de facto theoretic description of dense fluids and the transition from the fluid state to the glassy state. MCT, however, is limited by the approximations used in its construction and lacks an unambiguous mechanism to institute corrections. We use recent results from a new theoretical framework—developed from first principles via a self-consistent perturbation expansion in terms of an effective two-body potential—to numerically explore the kinetics of systems of classical particles, specifically hard spheres governed by Smoluchowski dynamics. We present here a full solution for such a system to the kinetic equation governing the density-density time correlation function and show that the function exhibits the characteristic two-step decay of supercooled fluids and an ergodic-nonergodic transition to a dynamically arrested state. Unlike many previous numerical studies—and in stark contrast to experiment—we have access to the full time and wave-number range of the correlation function with great precision and are able to track the solution unprecedentedly close to the transition, covering nearly 15 decades in scaled time. Using asymptotic approximation techniques analogous to those developed for MCT, we fit the solution to predicted forms and extract critical parameters. We find complete qualitative agreement with known glassy behavior (e.g. power-law divergence of the α -relaxation time scale in the ergodic phase and square-root growth of the glass form factors in the nonergodic phase), as well as some limited quantitative agreement [e.g. the transition at packing fraction η*=0.60149761 (10 ) ] , consistent with previous static solutions under this theory and with comparable colloidal suspension experiments. However, most importantly, we establish that this new theory is able to reproduce the salient features seen in other theories, experiments, and simulations but has the advantages of being

  16. Shock-wave surfing

    SciTech Connect

    Laurence, Stuart J; Deiterding, Ralf

    2011-01-01

    A phenomenon referred to as shock-wave surfing , in which a body moves in such a way as to follow the shock wave generated by another upstream body, is investigated numerically and theoretically. This process can lead to the downstream body accumulating a significantly higher lateral velocity than would otherwise be possible, and thus is of importance in situations such as meteoroid fragmentation, in which the fragment separation behaviour following disruption is determined to a large extent by aerodynamic effects. The surfing effect is first investigated in the context of interactions between a sphere and a planar oblique shock. Numerical simulations are performed and a simple theoretical model is developed to determine the forces acting on the sphere. A phase-plane description is employed to elucidate features of the system dynamics. The theoretical model is then generalised to the more complex situation of aerodynamic interactions between two spheres, and, through comparisons with further computations, is shown to adequately predict, in particular, the final separation velocity of the surfing sphere in initially touching configurations. Both numerical simulations and theory indicate a strong influence of the body radius ratio on the separation process and predict a critical radius ratio for initially touching fragments that delineates entrainment of the smaller fragment within the larger fragment s shock from expulsion; this critical ratio also results in the most extended surfing. Further, these results show that an earlier prediction for the separation velocity to scale with the square root of the radius ratio does not accurately describe the separation behaviour. The theoretical model is then employed to investigate initial configurations with varying relative sphere positions and initial velocities. A phase-space description is also shown to be useful in elucidating the dynamics of the sphere-sphere system. With regard to meteoroid fragmentation, it is shown

  17. Quantum molecular dynamics study of expanded beryllium: Evolution from warm dense matter to atomic fluid

    PubMed Central

    Li, Dafang; Liu, Haitao; Zeng, Siliang; Wang, Cong; Wu, Zeqing; Zhang, Ping; Yan, Jun

    2014-01-01

    By performing quantum molecular dynamics (QMD) simulations, we investigate the equation of states, electrical and optical properties of the expanded beryllium at densities two to one-hundred lower than the normal solid density, and temperatures ranging from 5000 to 30000 K. With decreasing the density of Be, the optical response evolves from the one characteristic of a simple metal to the one of an atomic fluid. By fitting the optical conductivity spectra with the Drude-Smith model, it is found that the conducting electrons become localized at lower densities. In addition, the negative derivative of the electrical resistivity on temperature at density about eight lower than the normal solid density demonstrates that the metal to nonmetal transition takes place in the expanded Be. To interpret this transition, the electronic density of states is analyzed systematically. Furthermore, a direct comparison of the Rosseland opacity obtained by using QMD and the standard opacity code demonstrates that QMD provides a powerful tool to validate plasma models used in atomic physics approaches in the warm dense matter regime. PMID:25081816

  18. Tables of equation-of-state, thermodynamic properties, and shock Hugoniot for hot dense fluid deuterium

    SciTech Connect

    Zaghloul, Mofreh R.

    2015-11-15

    We present computational results and tables of the equation-of-state, thermodynamic properties, and shock Hugoniot for hot dense fluid deuterium. The present results are generated using a recently developed chemical model that takes into account different high density effects such as Coulomb interactions among charged particles, partial degeneracy, and intensive short range hard core repulsion. Internal partition functions are evaluated in a statistical-mechanically consistent way implementing recent developments in the literature. The shock Hugoniot curve derived from the present tables is overall in reasonable agreement with the Hugoniot derived from the Nova-laser shock wave experiments on liquid deuterium, showing that deuterium has a significantly higher compressibility than predicted by the SESAME tables or by Path Integral Monte Carlo calculations. Computational results are presented as surface plots for the dissociated fraction, degree of ionization, pressure, and specific internal energy for densities ranging from 0.0001 to 40 g/cm{sup 3} and temperatures from 2000 to ∼10{sup 6 }K. Tables for values of the above mentioned quantities in addition to the specific heat at constant pressure, c{sub p}, ratio of specific heats, c{sub p}/c{sub v}, sound speed and Hugoniot curve (for a specific initial state) are presented for practical use.

  19. Shockwave Engine: Wave Disk Engine

    SciTech Connect

    2010-01-14

    Broad Funding Opportunity Announcement Project: MSU is developing a new engine for use in hybrid automobiles that could significantly reduce fuel waste and improve engine efficiency. In a traditional internal combustion engine, air and fuel are ignited, creating high-temperature and high-pressure gases which expand rapidly. This expansion of gases forces the engine’s pistons to pump and powers the car. MSU’s engine has no pistons. It uses the combustion of air and fuel to build up pressure within the engine, generating a shockwave that blasts hot gas exhaust into the blades of the engine’s rotors causing them to turn, which generates electricity. MSU’s redesigned engine would be the size of a cooking pot and contain fewer moving parts—reducing the weight of the engine by 30%. It would also enable a vehicle that could use 60% of its fuel for propulsion.

  20. Measurements of Grain Motion in a Dense, Three-Dimensional Granular Fluid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Xiaoyu; Huan, Chao; Candela, D.; Mair, R. W.; Walsworth, R. L.

    2002-01-01

    We have used an NMR technique to measure the short-time, three-dimensional displacement of grains in a system of mustard seeds vibrated vertically at 15g. The technique averages over a time interval in which the grains move ballistically, giving a direct measurement of the granular temperature profile. The dense, lower portion of the sample is well described by a recent hydrodynamic theory for inelastic hard spheres. Near the free upper surface the mean free path is longer than the particle diameter and the hydrodynamic description fails.

  1. Measurements of Grain Motion in a Dense, Three-Dimensional Granular Fluid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Xiaoyu; Huan, Chao; Candela, D.; Mair, R. W.; Walsworth, R. L.

    2002-03-01

    We have used NMR to measure the short-time, three-dimensional displacement of grains in a system of mustard seeds vibrated vertically at 15g. The measurements are in the ballistic regime, giving direct access to the granular temperature profile. The data are compared to a recent hydrodynamic theory developed for high density granular flows. We find that the hydrodynamic theory works well for the dense, lower portion of the sample but breaks down near the free surface, where the mean free path becomes long.

  2. A two-phase solid/fluid model for dense granular flows including dilatancy effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mangeney, Anne; Bouchut, Francois; Fernandez-Nieto, Enrique; Koné, El-Hadj; Narbona-Reina, Gladys

    2016-04-01

    Describing grain/fluid interaction in debris flows models is still an open and challenging issue with key impact on hazard assessment [{Iverson et al.}, 2010]. We present here a two-phase two-thin-layer model for fluidized debris flows that takes into account dilatancy effects. It describes the velocity of both the solid and the fluid phases, the compression/dilatation of the granular media and its interaction with the pore fluid pressure [{Bouchut et al.}, 2016]. The model is derived from a 3D two-phase model proposed by {Jackson} [2000] based on the 4 equations of mass and momentum conservation within the two phases. This system has 5 unknowns: the solid and fluid velocities, the solid and fluid pressures and the solid volume fraction. As a result, an additional equation inside the mixture is necessary to close the system. Surprisingly, this issue is inadequately accounted for in the models that have been developed on the basis of Jackson's work [{Bouchut et al.}, 2015]. In particular, {Pitman and Le} [2005] replaced this closure simply by imposing an extra boundary condition at the surface of the flow. When making a shallow expansion, this condition can be considered as a closure condition. However, the corresponding model cannot account for a dissipative energy balance. We propose here an approach to correctly deal with the thermodynamics of Jackson's model by closing the mixture equations by a weak compressibility relation following {Roux and Radjai} [1998]. This relation implies that the occurrence of dilation or contraction of the granular material in the model depends on whether the solid volume fraction is respectively higher or lower than a critical value. When dilation occurs, the fluid is sucked into the granular material, the pore pressure decreases and the friction force on the granular phase increases. On the contrary, in the case of contraction, the fluid is expelled from the mixture, the pore pressure increases and the friction force diminishes. To

  3. Transport properties of dense fluid mixtures using nonequilibrium molecular dynamics. [Viscosity and thermal conductivity of continuous, or polydisperse mixtures

    SciTech Connect

    Murad, S.

    1990-09-01

    This progress report covers research carried out during the period September 15, 1987--September 15, 1990. The main emphasis of the work was on dense fluid mixtures, although in some cases work had to be done on pure fluids before we could study mixtures in a meaningful way. A summary of our results is given. (1) An algorithm was developed and used to calculate the viscosity and thermal conductivity of continuous, or polydisperse mixtures with various distributions (e.g. linear, several gaussian distributions including unsymmetric, etc.) using nonequilibrium molecular dynamics (NEMD). (2) A method was developed to calculate the thermal conductivity of nonspherical (rigid) molecules using NEMD. (3) The NEMD method for thermal conductivity of nonspherical molecules was used to have a careful look at the contributions due to internal rotational degrees of freedom in linear compounds such as chlorine, nitrogen, etc. (4) It has long been speculated that polar fluids exhibit heat induced birefringence, i.e., the molecules will tend to align themselves along the direction of an external heat field. Using nonequilibrium molecular dynamics we were able to conclusively confirm this. (5) We completed a preliminary study of the viscosity of homonuclear diatomics and their mixtures (e.g. N{sub 2}, Cl{sub 2}, etc.). (6) We completed a study of the various flexibility (vibrational) effects, such as bond bending, bond stretching etc., on linear and nonlinear model triatomics. To examine these effects in our preliminary study, we looked at the pressure second virial coefficients.

  4. Dynamic compression of dense oxide (Gd3Ga5O12) from 0.4 to 2.6 TPa: Universal Hugoniot of fluid metals

    PubMed Central

    Ozaki, N.; Nellis, W. J.; Mashimo, T.; Ramzan, M.; Ahuja, R.; Kaewmaraya, T.; Kimura, T.; Knudson, M.; Miyanishi, K.; Sakawa, Y.; Sano, T.; Kodama, R.

    2016-01-01

    Materials at high pressures and temperatures are of great current interest for warm dense matter physics, planetary sciences, and inertial fusion energy research. Shock-compression equation-of-state data and optical reflectivities of the fluid dense oxide, Gd3Ga5O12 (GGG), were measured at extremely high pressures up to 2.6 TPa (26 Mbar) generated by high-power laser irradiation and magnetically-driven hypervelocity impacts. Above 0.75 TPa, the GGG Hugoniot data approach/reach a universal linear line of fluid metals, and the optical reflectivity most likely reaches a constant value indicating that GGG undergoes a crossover from fluid semiconductor to poor metal with minimum metallic conductivity (MMC). These results suggest that most fluid compounds, e.g., strong planetary oxides, reach a common state on the universal Hugoniot of fluid metals (UHFM) with MMC at sufficiently extreme pressures and temperatures. The systematic behaviors of warm dense fluid would be useful benchmarks for developing theoretical equation-of-state and transport models in the warm dense matter regime in determining computational predictions. PMID:27193942

  5. Dynamic compression of dense oxide (Gd3Ga5O12) from 0.4 to 2.6 TPa: Universal Hugoniot of fluid metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ozaki, N.; Nellis, W. J.; Mashimo, T.; Ramzan, M.; Ahuja, R.; Kaewmaraya, T.; Kimura, T.; Knudson, M.; Miyanishi, K.; Sakawa, Y.; Sano, T.; Kodama, R.

    2016-05-01

    Materials at high pressures and temperatures are of great current interest for warm dense matter physics, planetary sciences, and inertial fusion energy research. Shock-compression equation-of-state data and optical reflectivities of the fluid dense oxide, Gd3Ga5O12 (GGG), were measured at extremely high pressures up to 2.6 TPa (26 Mbar) generated by high-power laser irradiation and magnetically-driven hypervelocity impacts. Above 0.75 TPa, the GGG Hugoniot data approach/reach a universal linear line of fluid metals, and the optical reflectivity most likely reaches a constant value indicating that GGG undergoes a crossover from fluid semiconductor to poor metal with minimum metallic conductivity (MMC). These results suggest that most fluid compounds, e.g., strong planetary oxides, reach a common state on the universal Hugoniot of fluid metals (UHFM) with MMC at sufficiently extreme pressures and temperatures. The systematic behaviors of warm dense fluid would be useful benchmarks for developing theoretical equation-of-state and transport models in the warm dense matter regime in determining computational predictions.

  6. Dynamic compression of dense oxide (Gd3Ga5O12) from 0.4 to 2.6 TPa: Universal Hugoniot of fluid metals.

    PubMed

    Ozaki, N; Nellis, W J; Mashimo, T; Ramzan, M; Ahuja, R; Kaewmaraya, T; Kimura, T; Knudson, M; Miyanishi, K; Sakawa, Y; Sano, T; Kodama, R

    2016-01-01

    Materials at high pressures and temperatures are of great current interest for warm dense matter physics, planetary sciences, and inertial fusion energy research. Shock-compression equation-of-state data and optical reflectivities of the fluid dense oxide, Gd3Ga5O12 (GGG), were measured at extremely high pressures up to 2.6 TPa (26 Mbar) generated by high-power laser irradiation and magnetically-driven hypervelocity impacts. Above 0.75 TPa, the GGG Hugoniot data approach/reach a universal linear line of fluid metals, and the optical reflectivity most likely reaches a constant value indicating that GGG undergoes a crossover from fluid semiconductor to poor metal with minimum metallic conductivity (MMC). These results suggest that most fluid compounds, e.g., strong planetary oxides, reach a common state on the universal Hugoniot of fluid metals (UHFM) with MMC at sufficiently extreme pressures and temperatures. The systematic behaviors of warm dense fluid would be useful benchmarks for developing theoretical equation-of-state and transport models in the warm dense matter regime in determining computational predictions. PMID:27193942

  7. Dynamic compression of dense oxide (Gd3Ga5O12) from 0.4 to 2.6 TPa: Universal Hugoniot of fluid metals

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Ozaki, N.; Nellis, W. J.; Mashimo, T.; Ramzan, M.; Ahuja, R.; Kaewmaraya, T.; Kimura, T.; Knudson, M.; Miyanishi, K.; Sakawa, Y.; et al

    2016-05-19

    Materials at high pressures and temperatures are of great current interest for warm dense matter physics, planetary sciences, and inertial fusion energy research. Shock-compression equation-of-state data and optical reflectivities of the fluid dense oxide, Gd3Ga5O12 (GGG), were measured at extremely high pressures up to 2.6 TPa (26 Mbar) generated by high-power laser irradiation and magnetically-driven hypervelocity impacts. Above 0.75 TPa, the GGG Hugoniot data approach/reach a universal linear line of fluid metals, and the optical reflectivity most likely reaches a constant value indicating that GGG undergoes a crossover from fluid semiconductor to poor metal with minimum metallic conductivity (MMC). Thesemore » results suggest that most fluid compounds, e.g., strong planetary oxides, reach a common state on the universal Hugoniot of fluid metals (UHFM) with MMC at sufficiently extreme pressures and temperatures. Lastly, the systematic behaviors of warm dense fluid would be useful benchmarks for developing theoretical equation-of-state and transport models in the warm dense matter regime in determining computational predictions.« less

  8. On axial temperature gradients due to large pressure drops in dense fluid chromatography.

    PubMed

    Colgate, Sam O; Berger, Terry A

    2015-03-13

    The effect of energy degradation (Degradation is the creation of net entropy resulting from irreversibility.) accompanying pressure drops across chromatographic columns is examined with regard to explaining axial temperature gradients in both high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) and supercritical fluid chromatography (SFC). The observed effects of warming and cooling can be explained equally well in the language of thermodynamics or fluid dynamics. The necessary equivalence of these treatments is reviewed here to show the legitimacy of using whichever one supports the simpler determination of features of interest. The determination of temperature profiles in columns by direct application of the laws of thermodynamics is somewhat simpler than applying them indirectly by solving the Navier-Stokes (NS) equations. Both disciplines show that the preferred strategy for minimizing the reduction in peak quality caused by temperature gradients is to operate columns as nearly adiabatically as possible (i.e. as Joule-Thomson expansions). This useful fact, however, is not widely familiar or appreciated in the chromatography community due to some misunderstanding of the meaning of certain terms and expressions used in these disciplines. In fluid dynamics, the terms "resistive heating" or "frictional heating" have been widely used as synonyms for the dissipation function, Φ, in the NS energy equation. These terms have been widely used by chromatographers as well, but often misinterpreted as due to friction between the mobile phase and the column packing, when in fact Φ describes the increase in entropy of the system (dissipation, ∫TdSuniv>0) due to the irreversible decompression of the mobile phase. Two distinctly different contributions to the irreversibility are identified; (1) ΔSext, viscous dissipation of work done by the external surroundings driving the flow (the pump) contributing to its warming, and (2) ΔSint, entropy change accompanying decompression of

  9. Simple and accurate theory for strong shock waves in a dense hard-sphere fluid.

    PubMed

    Montanero, J M; López de Haro, M; Santos, A; Garzó, V

    1999-12-01

    Following an earlier work by Holian et al. [Phys. Rev. E 47, R24 (1993)] for a dilute gas, we present a theory for strong shock waves in a hard-sphere fluid described by the Enskog equation. The idea is to use the Navier-Stokes hydrodynamic equations but taking the temperature in the direction of shock propagation rather than the actual temperature in the computation of the transport coefficients. In general, for finite densities, this theory agrees much better with Monte Carlo simulations than the Navier-Stokes and (linear) Burnett theories, in contrast to the well-known superiority of the Burnett theory for dilute gases. PMID:11970718

  10. Criticality and characteristic neutronic analysis of a transient-state shockwave in a pulsed spherical gaseous uranium-hexafluoride reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boles, Jeremiah Thomas

    The purpose of this study is to analyze the theoretical criticality of a spherical uranium-hexafluoride reactor with a transient, pulsed shockwave emanating from the center of the sphere in an outward-radial direction. This novel nuclear reactor design, based upon pulsed fission in a spherical enclosure is proposed for possible use in direct energy conversion, where the energy from fission products is captured through the use of electrostatic fields or through induction. An analysis of the dynamic behavior of the shockwave in this reactor is the subject of this thesis. As a shockwave travels through a fluid medium, the characteristics of the medium will change across the shockwave boundary. Pressure, temperature, and density are all affected by the shockwave. Changes in these parameters will affect the neutronic characteristics of a fissile medium. If the system is initially in a subcritical state, the increases in pressure, temperature, and density, all brought about by the introduction of the shockwave, will increase the reactivity of the nuclear system, creating a brief super critical state that will return to a subcritical state after the shockwave dissipates. Two major problems are required to be solved for this system. One is the effects of the shockwave on the gas, and the second is the resulting effects on system criticality. These problems are coupled due to the unique nature of the speed of the expanding shockwave in the uranium-hexafluoride medium and the energy imparted to the system by the shockwave with respect to the fissile uranium-hexafluoride. Using compressible flow and shockwave theories, this study determines the properties of the gaseous medium for reference points before, during, and behind the shockwave as it passes through the fissile medium. These properties include pressure changes, temperature changes, and density changes that occur to the system. Using the parameters calculated from the shockwave, the neutron transport equation is

  11. A Class of Super Dense Stars Models Using Charged Analogues of Hajj-Boutros Type Relativistic Fluid Solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pant, Neeraj; Pradhan, N.; Murad, Mohammad Hassan

    2014-11-01

    We present a spherically symmetric solution of the general relativistic field equations in isotropic coordinates for perfect charged fluid, compatible with a super dense star modeling. The solution is well behaved for all the values of Schwarzschild parameter u lying in the range 0 < u < 0.1727 for the maximum value of charge parameter K = 0.08163. The maximum mass of the fluid distribution is calculated by using stellar surface density as ρ b = 4.6888×1014g cm-3. Corresponding to K = 0.08 and u max = 0.1732, the resulting well behaved solution has a maximum mass M = 0.9324 M ⊙ and radius R = 8.00 and by assuming ρ b = 2×1014g cm-3 the solution results a stellar configuration with maximum mass M = 1.43 M ⊙ and radius R b = 12.25 km. The maximum mass is found increasing with increasing K up to 0.08. The well behaved class of relativistic stellar models obtained in this work might has astrophysical significance in the study of internal structure of compact star such as neutron star or self-bound strange quark star like Her X-1.

  12. Quantum fluid model of coherent stimulated radiation by a dense relativistic cold electron beam

    SciTech Connect

    Monteiro, L. F.; Serbeto, A.; Tsui, K. H.; Mendonça, J. T.; Galvão, R. M. O.

    2013-07-15

    Using a quantum fluid model, the linear dispersion relation for FEL pumped by a short wavelength laser wiggler is deduced. Subsequently, a new quantum corrected resonance condition is obtained. It is shown that, in the limit of low energy electron beam and low frequency pump, the quantum recoil effect can be neglected, recovering the classical FEL resonance condition, k{sub s}=4k{sub w}γ{sup 2}. On the other hand, for short wavelength and high energy electron beam, the quantum recoil effect becomes strong and the resonance condition turns into k{sub s}=2√(k{sub w}/λ{sub c})γ{sup 3/2}, with λ{sub c} being the reduced Compton wavelength. As a result, a set of nonlinear coupled equations, which describes the quantum FEL dynamics as a three-wave interaction, is obtained. Neglecting wave propagation effects, this set of equations is solved numerically and results are presented.

  13. Cavitation in ultrasound and shockwave therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colonius, Tim

    2014-11-01

    Acoustic waves, especially high-intensity ultrasound and shock waves, are used for medical imaging and intra- and extra-corporeal manipulation of cells, tissue, and urinary calculi. Waves are currently used to treat kidney stone disease, plantar fasciitis, and bone nonunion, and they are being investigated as a technique to ablate cancer tumors and mediate drug delivery. In many applications, acoustic waves induce the expansion and collapse of preexisting or newly cavitating bubbles whose presence can either mediate the generation of localized stresses or lead to collateral damage, depending on how effectively they can be controlled. We describe efforts aimed at simulating the collapse of bubbles, both individually and in clusters, with the aim to characterize the induced mechanical stresses and strains. To simulate collapse of one or a few bubbles, compressible Euler and Navier-Stokes simulations of multi-component materials are performed with WENO-based shock and interface capturing schemes. Repetitive insonification generates numerous bubbles that are difficult to resolve numerically. Such clouds are also important in traditional engineering applications such as caveating hydrofoils. Models that incorporate the dynamics of an unresolved dispersed phase consisting of the bubble cloud are also developed. The results of several model problems including bubble collapse near rigid surfaces, bubble collapse near compliant surfaces and in small capillaries are analyzed. The results are processed to determine the potential for micron-sized preexisting gas bubbles to damage capillaries. The translation of the fundamental fluid dynamics into improvements in the design and clinical application of shockwave lithotripters will be discussed. NIH Grant PO1-DK043881.

  14. Thermodynamics and phase separation of dense fully-ionized hydrogen-helium fluid mixtures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stevenson, D. J.

    1975-01-01

    The free energy of a hydrogen-helium fluid mixture is evaluated for the temperatures and densities appropriate to the deep interior of a giant planet such as Jupiter. The electrons are assumed to be fully pressure-ionized and degenerate. In this regime, an appropriate first approximation to the ionic distribution functions can be found by assuming hard sphere interactions. Corrections to this approximation are incorporated by means of the perturbation theory of Anderson and Chandler. Approximations for the three-body interactions and the nonlinear response of the electron gas to the ions are included. It is predicted that a hydrogen-helium mixture, containing 10% by number of helium ions, separates into hydrogen-rich and helium-rich phases below about 8000 K, at the pressures relevant to Jupiter (4-40 Megabars). It is also predicted that the alloy occupies less volume per ion than the separated phases. The equations of state and other thermodynamic derivatives are tabulated. Implications of these results are discussed.

  15. International Shock-Wave Database: Current Status

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levashov, Pavel

    2013-06-01

    Shock-wave and related dynamic material response data serve for calibrating, validating, and improving material models over very broad regions of the pressure-temperature-density phase space. Since the middle of the 20th century vast amount of shock-wave experimental information has been obtained. To systemize it a number of compendiums of shock-wave data has been issued by LLNL, LANL (USA), CEA (France), IPCP and VNIIEF (Russia). In mid-90th the drawbacks of the paper handbooks became obvious, so the first version of the online shock-wave database appeared in 1997 (http://www.ficp.ac.ru/rusbank). It includes approximately 20000 experimental points on shock compression, adiabatic expansion, measurements of sound velocity behind the shock front and free-surface-velocity for more than 650 substances. This is still a useful tool for the shock-wave community, but it has a number of serious disadvantages which can't be easily eliminated: (i) very simple data format for points and references; (ii) minimalistic user interface for data addition; (iii) absence of history of changes; (iv) bad feedback from users. The new International Shock-Wave database (ISWdb) is intended to solve these and some other problems. The ISWdb project objectives are: (i) to develop a database on thermodynamic and mechanical properties of materials under conditions of shock-wave and other dynamic loadings, selected related quantities of interest, and the meta-data that describes the provenance of the measurements and material models; and (ii) to make this database available internationally through the Internet, in an interactive form. The development and operation of the ISWdb is guided by an advisory committee. The database will be installed on two mirrored web-servers, one in Russia and the other in USA (currently only one server is available). The database provides access to original experimental data on shock compression, non-shock dynamic loadings, isentropic expansion, measurements of sound

  16. Causality violation, gravitational shockwaves and UV completion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hollowood, Timothy J.; Shore, Graham M.

    2016-03-01

    The effective actions describing the low-energy dynamics of QFTs involving gravity generically exhibit causality violations. These may take the form of superluminal propagation or Shapiro time advances and allow the construction of "time machines", i.e. spacetimes admitting closed non-spacelike curves. Here, we discuss critically whether such causality violations may be used as a criterion to identify unphysical effective actions or whether, and how, causality problems may be resolved by embedding the action in a fundamental, UV complete QFT. We study in detail the case of photon scattering in an Aichelburg-Sexl gravitational shockwave background and calculate the phase shifts in QED for all energies, demonstrating their smooth interpolation from the causality-violating effective action values at low-energy to their manifestly causal high-energy limits. At low energies, these phase shifts may be interpreted as backwards-in-time coordinate jumps as the photon encounters the shock wavefront, and we illustrate how the resulting causality problems emerge and are resolved in a two-shockwave time machine scenario. The implications of our results for ultra-high (Planck) energy scattering, in which graviton exchange is modelled by the shockwave background, are highlighted.

  17. Fast atoms and negative chain-cluster fragments from laser-induced Coulomb explosions in a super-fluid film of ultra-dense deuterium D(-1)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andersson, Patrik U.; Holmlid, Leif

    2012-10-01

    Fragments from laser-induced Coulomb explosions (CE) in a thin super-fluid film of ultra-dense deuterium D(-1) on a vertical surface are now observed by both negative and positive time-of-flight mass spectrometry. The so-called normal phase of the super-fluid is probably associated with D4 clusters and gives only neutral atomic fragments with a kinetic energy from the CE of 945 eV. The super-fluid phase is associated with long chain clusters D2N with N deuteron pairs and gives cluster fragments by CE mainly with a kinetic energy of 315 eV from the central cleavage in a neutral, positive or negative form. This indicates that the chain clusters are standing perpendicularly to the surface. The fragment charge state is influenced by the external field, which indicates efficient charge transfer processes.

  18. Well-posed two-temperature constitutive equations for stable dense fluid shock waves using molecular dynamics and generalizations of Navier-Stokes-Fourier continuum mechanics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoover, Wm. G.; Hoover, Carol G.

    2010-04-01

    Guided by molecular dynamics simulations, we generalize the Navier-Stokes-Fourier constitutive equations and the continuum motion equations to include both transverse and longitudinal temperatures. To do so we partition the contributions of the heat transfer, the work done, and the heat flux vector between the longitudinal and transverse temperatures. With shockwave boundary conditions time-dependent solutions of these equations converge to give stationary shockwave profiles. The profiles include anisotropic temperature and can be fitted to molecular dynamics results, demonstrating the utility and simplicity of a two-temperature description of far-from-equilibrium states.

  19. Minimizing masses in explosively driven two-shockwave physics applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buttler, William; Cherne, Frank; Furlanetto, Michael; Payton, Jeremy; Stone, Joseph; Tabaka, Leonard; Vincent, Samuel

    2015-06-01

    We have experimentally investigated different two-shockwave high-explosives (HE) physics package designs to maximize the variability of the second shockwave peak stress, while minimizing the total HE load of the physics tool. A critical requirement is to also have a large radial diameter of the second shockwave to maintain its value as an HE driven two-shockwave drive. We have previously shown that we could vary the peak-stress of the second-shockwave with a 76 mm diameter HE lens driving different composite boosters of PBX 9501 and TNT. Here we report on our results with a 56- and 50-mm diameter HE lens driving Baritol. The results indicate that the 56-mm diameter HE lens works well, as does the Baritol, giving total HE loads of about 250 mg TNT equivalent explosives.

  20. Simulation of shock-induced bubble collapse with application to vascular injury in shockwave lithotripsy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coralic, Vedran

    Shockwave lithotripsy is a noninvasive medical procedure wherein shockwaves are repeatedly focused at the location of kidney stones in order to pulverize them. Stone comminution is thought to be the product of two mechanisms: the propagation of stress waves within the stone and cavitation erosion. However, the latter mechanism has also been implicated in vascular injury. In the present work, shock-induced bubble collapse is studied in order to understand the role that it might play in inducing vascular injury. A high-order accurate, shock- and interface-capturing numerical scheme is developed to simulate the three-dimensional collapse of the bubble in both the free-field and inside a vessel phantom. The primary contributions of the numerical study are the characterization of the shock-bubble and shock-bubble-vessel interactions across a large parameter space that includes clinical shockwave lithotripsy pressure amplitudes, problem geometry and tissue viscoelasticity, and the subsequent correlation of these interactions to vascular injury. Specifically, measurements of the vessel wall pressures and displacements, as well as the finite strains in the fluid surrounding the bubble, are utilized with available experiments in tissue to evaluate damage potential. Estimates are made of the smallest injurious bubbles in the microvasculature during both the collapse and jetting phases of the bubble's life cycle. The present results suggest that bubbles larger than one micrometer in diameter could rupture blood vessels under clinical SWL conditions.

  1. Some aspects of shock-wave research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glass, I. I.

    1986-01-01

    The major portion of the paper is devoted to a specific shock-wave research problem, namely, pseudostationary oblique shock-wave reflections in perfect and imperfect gases. Consideration is given to what has been achieved to date by using two- and three-shock theory to predict what type of reflection results when a planar shock wave M(S), in a shock tube, collides with a sharp compressive wedge of angle, theta(W). Expermental (interferometric and other optical) data are presented in (M(S), theta(W))-plots for argon, nitrogen, oxygen, air, carbon-dioxide, Freon-12 and sulfurhexafluoride, in order to check the validity of the analytically predicted regions and transition lines of the four types of reflection. Some disagreements are noted and discussed. The present interferometric isopycnic data are also compared with state-of-the-art computational results from a solution of the inviscid Euler equations using a CRAY I computer. Good agreement was obtained; it would be important, however, to obtain new data by solving the Navier-Stokes equations, as well as the rate equations for imperfect-gas excitations, in order to judge the improvement obtained with real-flow interferograms.

  2. Influence of shockwave profile on ejecta

    SciTech Connect

    Zellner, Michael B; Dimonte, Guy; Germann, Tim C; Hammerberg, James E; Rigg, Paulo A; Buttler, William T; Stevens, Gerald D; Turley, William D

    2009-01-01

    This effort investigates the relation between shock-pulse shape and the amount of micron-scale fragments ejected (ejecta) upon shock release at the metal/vacuum interface of shocked Sn targets. Two shock-pulse shapes are considered: a supported shock created by impacting a Sn target with a sabot that was accelerated using a powder gun; and an unsupported or Taylor shockwave, created by detonation of high explosive that was press-fit to the front-side of the Sn target. Ejecta production at the back-side or free-side of the Sn coupons were characterized through use of piezoelectric pins. Assay foils, optical shadowgraphy, and x-ray attenuation.

  3. Shock-wave properties of brittle solids

    SciTech Connect

    Grady, D.E.

    1995-10-01

    Extensive experimental investigation in the form of large-amplitude, nonlinear wave-profile measurements which manifest the shock strength and equation-of-state properties of brittle solids has been performed. Brittle materials for which a base of dynamic property data is available include Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}, AlN, B{sub 4}C, CaCO{sub 3}, SiC, Si{sub 3}N{sub 4}, SiO{sub 2} (quartz and glass), TiB{sub 2}, WC and ZrO{sub 2}. Planar impact methods and velocity interferometry diagnostics have been used exclusively to provide the high-resolution shock-profile data. These wave-profile data are providing engineering dynamic strength and equation-of-state properties as well as controlled, shock-induced motion histories for the validation of theoretical and Computational models. Of equal importance, such data are providing a window into the physics of a newly emerging understanding of the compression and deformation behavior of high-strength brittle solids. When considered along with a rich assortment of strength and deformation data in the literature, a systematic assessment of this shock-wave data lends strong support for failure waves and concomitant high-confinement dilatancy as a general mechanism of inelastic deformation in the shock compression of ceramics. Phase transformation in selected brittle solids appears to be a critical state phenomenon strongly controlled by kinetics. The risetime and structure of deformation shock waves in brittle solids are controlled by viscous effects which at present are still poorly understood. The shockwave data also suggest that both crystalline plasticity and brittle fracture may play important and interconnected roles in the dynamic failure process.

  4. On-sun first operation of a 150 kWth pilot solar receiver using dense particle suspension as heat transfer fluid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    López, Inmaculada Pérez; Benoit, Hadrien; Gauthier, Daniel; Sans, Jean-Louis; Guillot, Emmanuel; Cavaillé, Roland; Mazza, German; Flamant, Gilles

    2016-05-01

    A 50-150 kWth pilot solar rig comprising the key equipments of a real plant and that uses silicon carbide Dense Particles Suspension as the heat transfer fluid has been tested at the 1 MW solar furnace at Odeillo-Font Romeu, France. The tests were carried out under large ranges of operating parameters and controlling the mass flow rate when higher temperature was required and when changes on DNI (direct normal irradiation) occurred. This paper presents experimental results on particle outlet temperature, dynamic response of the system to solid mass flow rate and solar power variations, and receiver thermal efficiency (η). Mean and maximum particles' temperature up to 585°C and 720°C respectively was reached. The receiver thermal efficiency was measured in the range 50-90%.

  5. Vlasov-Fokker-Planck Simulation of a Collisional Ion-Electron Shockwave

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taitano, William; Knoll, Dana; Prinja, Anil

    2012-10-01

    There has been recent increased interest in a range of kinetic plasma physics phenomena which may be important in simulating ICF pellet performance. [1] have numerically demonstrated the limitations of the classic Spitzer, Braginski fluid closures in collisional plasmas for shockwave problems. [1] has shown the importance of modeling kinetic effects for scale lengths of shockwave much larger than the ion collision mean free path. In [1], the ions were modeled kinetically using the Fokker-Planck approximation while the electrons were modeled as a fluid. An investigation of a full kinetic treatment of electron with collision is computationally intractable with standard explicit schemes due to collision CFL limitation that requires resolving the electron-electron collision timescale. [2] has developed a new, fully implicit and discretely consistent moment based accelerator method to solve the full ion-electron kinetic Vlasov-Ampere system. A similar moment based accelerator will be extended to a collisionless shock problem in order to accelerate the Fokker-Planck collision source in the kinetic equations. In the presentation, we provide some preliminary results. [4pt] [1] M. Casanova and O. Larroche, Phys. Rev. Let. 67-(16), 1991. [0pt] [2] W.T. Taitano et al. SISC in review.

  6. Shock-wave boundary layer interactions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Delery, J.; Marvin, J. G.; Reshotko, E.

    1986-01-01

    Presented is a comprehensive, up-to-date review of the shock-wave boundary-layer interaction problem. A detailed physical description of the phenomena for transonic and supersonic speed regimes is given based on experimental observations, correlations, and theoretical concepts. Approaches for solving the problem are then reviewed in depth. Specifically, these include: global methods developed to predict sudden changes in boundary-layer properties; integral or finite-difference methods developed to predict the continuous evolution of a boundary-layer encountering a pressure field induced by a shock wave; coupling methods to predict entire flow fields; analytical methods such as multi-deck techniques; and finite-difference methods for solving the time-dependent Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes equations used to predict the development of entire flow fields. Examples are presented to illustrate the status of the various methods and some discussion is devoted to delineating their advantages and shortcomings. Reference citations for the wide variety of subject material are provided for readers interested in further study.

  7. Time Resolved Shadowgraph Images of Silicon during Laser Ablation:Shockwaves and Particle Generation

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, C.Y.; Mao, X.L.; Greif, R.; Russo, R.E.

    2006-05-06

    Time resolved shadowgraph images were recorded of shockwaves and particle ejection from silicon during laser ablation. Particle ejection and expansion were correlated to an internal shockwave resonating between the shockwave front and the target surface. The number of particles ablated increased with laser energy and was related to the crater volume.

  8. Interaction of lithotripter shockwaves with single inertial cavitation bubbles.

    PubMed

    Klaseboer, Evert; Fong, Siew Wan; Turangan, Cary K; Khoo, Boo Cheong; Szeri, Andrew J; Calvisi, Michael L; Sankin, Georgy N; Zhong, Pei

    2007-01-01

    The dynamic interaction of a shockwave (modelled as a pressure pulse) with an initially spherically oscillating bubble is investigated. Upon the shockwave impact, the bubble deforms non-spherically and the flow field surrounding the bubble is determined with potential flow theory using the boundary-element method (BEM). The primary advantage of this method is its computational efficiency. The simulation process is repeated until the two opposite sides of the bubble surface collide with each other (i.e. the formation of a jet along the shockwave propagation direction). The collapse time of the bubble, its shape and the velocity of the jet are calculated. Moreover, the impact pressure is estimated based on water-hammer pressure theory. The Kelvin impulse, kinetic energy and bubble displacement (all at the moment of jet impact) are also determined. Overall, the simulated results compare favourably with experimental observations of lithotripter shockwave interaction with single bubbles (using laser-induced bubbles at various oscillation stages). The simulations confirm the experimental observation that the most intense collapse, with the highest jet velocity and impact pressure, occurs for bubbles with intermediate size during the contraction phase when the collapse time of the bubble is approximately equal to the compressive pulse duration of the shock wave. Under this condition, the maximum amount of energy of the incident shockwave is transferred to the collapsing bubble. Further, the effect of the bubble contents (ideal gas with different initial pressures) and the initial conditions of the bubble (initially oscillating vs. non-oscillating) on the dynamics of the shockwave-bubble interaction are discussed. PMID:19018296

  9. Use of a multichannel collimator for structural investigation of low-Z dense liquids in a diamond anvil cell: Validation on fluid H{sub 2} up to 5 GPa

    SciTech Connect

    Weck, Gunnar; Spaulding, Dylan; Loubeyre, Paul; Garbarino, Gaston; Mezouar, Mohamed; Ninet, Sandra; Datchi, Frederic

    2013-06-15

    We report the first application of a multichannel collimator (MCC) to perform quantitative structure factor measurements of dense low-Z fluids in a diamond anvil cell (DAC) using synchrotron x-ray diffraction. The MCC design, initially developed for the Paris-Edinburgh large volume press geometry, has been modified for use with diamond anvil cells. A good selectivity of the diffracted signal of the dense fluid sample is obtained due to a large rejection of the Compton diffusion from the diamond anvils. The signal to background ratio is significantly improved. We modify previously developed analytical techniques for quantitative measurement of the structure factor of fluids in DACs [J. H. Eggert, G. Weck, P. Loubeyre, and M. Mezouar, Phys. Rev. B 65, 174105 (2002)] to account for the contribution of the MCC. We present experimental results on liquids argon and hydrogen at 296 K to validate our method and test its limits, respectively.

  10. Developing Multimedia Courseware for the Internet's Java versus Shockwave.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Majchrzak, Tina L.

    1996-01-01

    Describes and compares two methods for developing multimedia courseware for use on the Internet: an authoring tool called Shockwave, and an object-oriented language called Java. Topics include vector graphics, browsers, interaction with network protocols, data security, multithreading, and computer languages versus development environments. (LRW)

  11. Quantitative Assessment of Shockwave Lithotripsy Accuracy and the Effect of Respiratory Motion*

    PubMed Central

    Bailey, Michael R.; Shah, Anup R.; Hsi, Ryan S.; Paun, Marla; Harper, Jonathan D.

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Background and Purpose Effective stone comminution during shockwave lithotripsy (SWL) is dependent on precise three-dimensional targeting of the shockwave. Respiratory motion, imprecise targeting or shockwave alignment, and stone movement may compromise treatment efficacy. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the accuracy of shockwave targeting during SWL treatment and the effect of motion from respiration. Patients and Methods Ten patients underwent SWL for the treatment of 13 renal stones. Stones were targeted fluoroscopically using a Healthtronics Lithotron (five cases) or Dornier Compact Delta II (five cases) shockwave lithotripter. Shocks were delivered at a rate of 1 to 2 Hz with ramping shockwave energy settings of 14 to 26 kV or level 1 to 5. After the low energy pretreatment and protective pause, a commercial diagnostic ultrasound (US) imaging system was used to record images of the stone during active SWL treatment. Shockwave accuracy, defined as the proportion of shockwaves that resulted in stone motion with shockwave delivery, and respiratory stone motion were determined by two independent observers who reviewed the ultrasonographic videos. Results Mean age was 51±15 years with 60% men, and mean stone size was 10.5±3.7 mm (range 5–18 mm). A mean of 2675±303 shocks was delivered. Shockwave-induced stone motion was observed with every stone. Accurate targeting of the stone occurred in 60%±15% of shockwaves. Conclusions US imaging during SWL revealed that 40% of shockwaves miss the stone and contribute solely to tissue injury, primarily from movement with respiration. These data support the need for a device to deliver shockwaves only when the stone is in target. US imaging provides real-time assessment of stone targeting and accuracy of shockwave delivery. PMID:22471349

  12. Chaotic dynamics in dense fluids

    SciTech Connect

    Posch, H.A.; Hoover, W.G.

    1987-09-01

    We present calculations of the full spectra of Lyapunov exponents for 8- and 32-particle systems with periodic boundary conditions and interacting with the repulsive part of a Lennard-Jones potential both in equilibrium and nonequilibrium steady states. Lyapunov characteristic exponents lambda/sub n/ describe the mean exponential rates of divergence and convergence of neighbouring trajectories in phase-space. They are useful in characterizing the stochastic properties of a dynamical system. A new algorithm for their calculation is presented which incorporates ideas from control theory and constraint nonequilibrium molecular dynamics. 4 refs., 1 fig.

  13. Interaction of lithotripter shockwaves with single inertial cavitation bubbles

    PubMed Central

    Klaseboer, Evert; Fong, Siew Wan; Turangan, Cary K.; Khoo, Boo Cheong; Szeri, Andrew J.; Calvisi, Michael L.; Sankin, Georgy N.; Zhong, Pei

    2008-01-01

    The dynamic interaction of a shockwave (modelled as a pressure pulse) with an initially spherically oscillating bubble is investigated. Upon the shockwave impact, the bubble deforms non-spherically and the flow field surrounding the bubble is determined with potential flow theory using the boundary-element method (BEM). The primary advantage of this method is its computational efficiency. The simulation process is repeated until the two opposite sides of the bubble surface collide with each other (i.e. the formation of a jet along the shockwave propagation direction). The collapse time of the bubble, its shape and the velocity of the jet are calculated. Moreover, the impact pressure is estimated based on water-hammer pressure theory. The Kelvin impulse, kinetic energy and bubble displacement (all at the moment of jet impact) are also determined. Overall, the simulated results compare favourably with experimental observations of lithotripter shockwave interaction with single bubbles (using laser-induced bubbles at various oscillation stages). The simulations confirm the experimental observation that the most intense collapse, with the highest jet velocity and impact pressure, occurs for bubbles with intermediate size during the contraction phase when the collapse time of the bubble is approximately equal to the compressive pulse duration of the shock wave. Under this condition, the maximum amount of energy of the incident shockwave is transferred to the collapsing bubble. Further, the effect of the bubble contents (ideal gas with different initial pressures) and the initial conditions of the bubble (initially oscillating vs. non-oscillating) on the dynamics of the shockwave–bubble interaction are discussed. PMID:19018296

  14. The TOPSHOCK study: Effectiveness of radial shockwave therapy compared to focused shockwave therapy for treating patellar tendinopath - design of a randomised controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Patellar tendinopathy is a chronic overuse injury of the patellar tendon that is especially prevalent in people who are involved in jumping activities. Extracorporeal Shockwave Therapy is a relatively new treatment modality for tendinopathies. It seems to be a safe and promising part of the rehabilitation program for patellar tendinopathy. Extracorporeal Shockwave Therapy originally used focused shockwaves. Several years ago a new kind of shockwave therapy was introduced: radial shockwave therapy. Studies that investigate the effectiveness of radial shockwave therapy as treatment for patellar tendinopathy are scarce. Therefore the aim of this study is to compare the effectiveness of focussed shockwave therapy and radial shockwave therapy as treatments for patellar tendinopathy. Methods/design The TOPSHOCK study (Tendinopathy Of Patella SHOCKwave) is a two-armed randomised controlled trial in which the effectiveness of focussed shockwave therapy and radial shockwave therapy are directly compared. Outcome assessors and patients are blinded as to which treatment is given. Patients undergo three sessions of either focused shockwave therapy or radial shockwave therapy at 1-week intervals, both in combination with eccentric decline squat training. Follow-up measurements are scheduled just before treatments 2 and 3, and 1, 4, 7 and 12 weeks after the final treatment. The main outcome measure is the Dutch VISA-P questionnaire, which asks for pain, function and sports participation in subjects with patellar tendinopathy. Secondary outcome measures are pain determined with a VAS during ADL, sports and decline squats, rating of subjective improvement and overall satisfaction with the treatment. Patients will also record their sports activities, pain during and after these activities, and concurrent medical treatment on a weekly basis in a web-based diary. Results will be analysed according to the intention-to-treat principle. Discussion The TOPSHOCK study is the

  15. Extracorporeal shockwave therapy for avascular necrosis of femoral head.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ching-Jen; Cheng, Jai-Hong; Huang, Chung-Cheng; Yip, Han-Kan; Russo, Sergio

    2015-12-01

    The etiology of osteonecrosis of the femoral head (ONFH) is multifactorial. Treatment of ONFH is disease stage dependent. For early stages, femoral head preservation procedures are preferred including core decompression, muscle pedicle grafting and de-rotational osteotomy. Core decompression with bone grafting is considered the gold standard. However, the results are inconsistence and unpredictable. An effective non-invasive method of treatment is imperative. Recently, extracorporeal shockwave therapy (ESWT) has shown beneficial effects in ONFH. ESWT improves pain and function of the hip and regression of the ONFH lesion. ESWT is more effective than core decompression with or without bone grafting, cocktail therapy that combined HBO, ESWT and oral alendronate is shown effective for patients with early osteonecrosis. The purpose of the article is to review, update and summarize the clinical treatment of ONFH using shockwave therapy. PMID:26188081

  16. Efficacy of Extracorporeal Shockwave Therapy in Frozen Shoulder

    PubMed Central

    Vahdatpour, Babak; Taheri, Parisa; Zade, Abolghasem Zare; Moradian, Saeed

    2014-01-01

    Background: Frozen shoulder has always been considered important because of the impact on the quality-of-life and long period of illness. Therefore, the use of noninvasive and safe techniques that can speed up the healing process of the disease is important. Methods: This study was a randomized clinical trial study on patients suffering from frozen shoulder who were referred to Isfahan University of Medical Sciences hospitals in 2011 and 2012. A total of 36 patients were enrolled in the study. Eligible patients were allocated into two groups. Intervention group received extracorporeal shockwave therapy (ESWT) once a week for 4 weeks. The control group received sham shockwave therapy once a week for 4 weeks. On the follow-up period, changes in individual performance and the amount of pain and disability were assessed by the Shoulder Pain and Disability Index (SPADI) questionnaire and the range of motion changes were assessed by a goniometer. Data obtained were analyzed using SPSS software. Results: Variance analysis revealed a difference in the mean pain and disability score of the SPADI questionnaire, flexion, extension, and abduction, external rotation of involved shoulder between two groups before and after the shockwave therapy (P < 0.05). Improvement was more satisfactory in the intervention group, but the mean internal rotation did not differ significantly in two groups (P > 0.05). Conclusions: The use of ESWT seems to have positive effects on treatment, quicker return to daily activities, and quality-of-life improvement on frozen shoulder. PMID:25104999

  17. International Shock-Wave Database: Systematization of Experimental Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levashov, Pavel R.; Khishchenko, Konstantin V.; Lomonosov, Igor V.; Minakov, Dmitry V.; Zakharenkov, Alexey S.

    2011-06-01

    In this work, we announce the creation of the International Shock-Wave Database (ISWDB). Shock-wave and related dynamic material response data serve for calibrating, validating, and improving material models over very broad regions of the pressure-temperature-density phase space. Our objectives are (i) to develop a database on thermodynamic and mechanical properties of materials under conditions of shock wave and other dynamic loadings, selected related quantities of interest, and the meta-data that describes the provenance of the measurements and material models, and (ii) to make this database available internationally thru the Internet, in an interactive form. The development and operation of the ISWDB will be guided by input from a steering committee. The database will be installed on two mirrored web-servers, one in Russia and the other in USA. The database will provide access to original experimental data on shock compression, non-shock dynamic loadings, isentropic expansion, measurements of sound speed in the Hugoniot state, and time-dependent free-surface or window-interface velocity profiles. We believe that the ISWDB will be a useful tool for the shock-wave community.

  18. Shock-wave studies: modeling the giant planets

    SciTech Connect

    Ross, M.

    1981-07-20

    The giant planets - Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus, and Neptune - differ markedly from the inner, or terrestrial, planets. Observations of their average density, gravitational moments, and atmospheric composition have enabled astrophysicists to draw some conclusions as to their structure, but efforts have been hampered by a lack of accurate data on the chemical, physical, and thermodynamic properties of constituent materials at the extremely high temperatures and pressures characteristic of planetary interiors. Shock-wave experiments conducted recently at LLNL have provided more accurate equations of state and electrical conductivities for many of these materials, and these have led to improved structural models of the giant planets.

  19. Renal milk of calcium: contraindication to extracorporeal shockwave lithotripsy.

    PubMed

    Heidenreich, A; Vorreuther, R; Krug, B; Moul, J W; Engelmann, U H

    1996-01-01

    Renal milk-of-calcium (MOC) cysts are rare findings, with only approximately 60 cases reported in the literature. The diagnosis depends on the demonstration of the typical "half-moon" configuration on horizontal beam radiography; classical ultrasound finding is a gravity-dependent, echogenic shadowy material in a renal cyst. The importance of the MOC syndrome lies in its recognition and differentiation from a renal stone in order to avoid unwarranted surgery or extracorporeal shock-wave lithotripsy (ESWL). We have encountered five patients with renal MOC and present the typical clinical and radiological features in order to facilitate differential diagnosis. PMID:9118405

  20. Shockwave Processing of Composite Boron and Titanium Nitride Powders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beason, Matthew T.; Gunduz, I. Emre; Mukasyan, Alexander S.; Son, Steven F.

    2015-06-01

    Shockwave processing of powders has been shown to initiate reactions between condensed phase reactants. It has been observed that these reactions can occur at very short timescales, resulting in chemical reactions occurring at a high pressure state. These reactions have the potential to produce metastable phases. Kinetic limitations prevent gaseous reactants from being used in this type of synthesis reaction. To overcome this limitation, a solid source of gaseous reactants must be used. An example of this type of reaction is the nitrogen exchange reaction (e.g. B + TiN, B + Si3N4 etc.). In these reactions nitrogen is ``carried'' by a material that can be then reduced by the second reactant. This work explores the possibility of using nitrogen exchange reactions to synthesize the cubic phase of boron nitride (c-BN) through shockwave processing of ball milled mixtures of boron and titanium nitride. The heating from the passage of the shock wave (pore collapse, plastic work, etc.) combined with thermochemical energy from the reaction may provide a means to synthesize c-BN. This material is based upon work supported by the Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration, under Award Number(s) DE-NA0002377. National Defense Science & Engineering Graduate Fellowship (NDSEG), 32 CFR 168a.

  1. Extracorporeal shockwave lithotripsy of gallstones. Possibilities and limitations.

    PubMed Central

    Vergunst, H; Terpstra, O T; Brakel, K; Laméris, J S; van Blankenstein, M; Schröder, F H

    1989-01-01

    Recently extracorporeal shockwave lithotripsy (ESWL) has been introduced as a nonoperative treatment for gallstone disease. Except for lung damage, no significant adverse effects of ESWL of gallbladder stones have been observed in animals. In clinical use ESWL of gallbladder stones is now confined to 15% to 30% of symptomatic patients. To achieve complete stone clearance, ESWL of gallbladder stones must be supplemented by an adjuvant therapy. ESWL of bile duct stones is highly effective and can be considered in patients in whom primary endoscopic or surgical stone removal fails. Second generation lithotriptors allow anesthesia-free (outpatient) treatments, but the clinical experience with most of these ESWL devices is still limited. The likelihood of gallbladder stone recurrence is a major disadvantage of ESWL treatment, which raises the issue of cost-effectiveness. ESWL for cholelithiasis is a promising treatment modality with good short-term and unknown long-term results. PMID:2684058

  2. Laser Shockwave Technique For Characterization Of Nuclear Fuel Plate Interfaces

    SciTech Connect

    James A. Smith; Barry H. Rabin; Mathieu Perton; Daniel Lévesque; Jean-Pierre Monchalin; Martin Lord

    2012-07-01

    The US National Nuclear Security Agency is tasked with minimizing the worldwide use of high-enriched uranium. One aspect of that effort is the conversion of research reactors to monolithic fuel plates of low-enriched uranium. The manufacturing process includes hot isostatic press bonding of an aluminum cladding to the fuel foil. The Laser Shockwave Technique (LST) is here evaluated for characterizing the interface strength of fuel plates using depleted Uranium/Mo foils. LST is a non-contact method that uses lasers for the generation and detection of large amplitude acoustic waves and is therefore well adapted to the quality assurance of this process. Preliminary results show a clear signature of well-bonded and debonded interfaces and the method is able to classify/rank the bond strength of fuel plates prepared under different HIP conditions.

  3. Laser shockwave technique for characterization of nuclear fuel plate interfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Perton, M.; Levesque, D.; Monchalin, J.-P.; Lord, M.; Smith, J. A.; Rabin, B. H.

    2013-01-25

    The US National Nuclear Security Agency is tasked with minimizing the worldwide use of high-enriched uranium. One aspect of that effort is the conversion of research reactors to monolithic fuel plates of low-enriched uranium. The manufacturing process includes hot isostatic press bonding of an aluminum cladding to the fuel foil. The Laser Shockwave Technique (LST) is here evaluated for characterizing the interface strength of fuel plates using depleted Uranium/Mo foils. LST is a non-contact method that uses lasers for the generation and detection of large amplitude acoustic waves and is therefore well adapted to the quality assurance of this process. Preliminary results show a clear signature of well-bonded and debonded interfaces and the method is able to classify/rank the bond strength of fuel plates prepared under different HIP conditions.

  4. Shockwave-Driven, Supersonic Kelvin-Helmholtz Instability Experiment on OMEGA-EP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wan, Wesley; Malamud, Guy; di Stefano, Carlos; Kuranz, Carolyn; Drake, R. Paul

    2013-10-01

    Hydrodynamic instabilities are commonly encountered in a variety of high-energy-density systems, including fusion experiments and various astrophysical processes. Shear flow at a fluid interface gives rise to the Kelvin-Helmholtz instability, which then results in mixing between the layers. This talk will cover a recent experiment performed at the OMEGA-EP facility that studied the dampening of the Kelvin-Helmholtz instability as a result of compressibility effects in a high convective Mach number regime. A laser-driven shockwave was used to create shear flow between a low-density foam and high-density plastic. The instability growth was assisted by seeded, single-mode perturbations of varied wavelengths. Our primary diagnostic was x-ray radiography. This work is funded by the NNSA-DS and SC-OFES Joint Program in High-Energy-Density Laboratory Plasmas, grant number DE-FG52-09NA29548, and by the National Laser User Facility Program, grant number DE-NA0000850, with additional support provided under Cooperative Agreement No. DE-FC52-08NA28302 through the Laboratory for Laser Energetics, University of Rochester.

  5. Shock-induced bubble collapse in a vessel: Implications for vascular injury in shockwave lithotripsy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coralic, Vedran; Colonius, Tim

    2014-11-01

    In shockwave lithotripsy, shocks are repeatedly focused on kidney stones so to break them. The process leads to cavitation in tissue, which leads to hemorrhage. We hypothesize that shock-induced collapse (SIC) of preexisting bubbles is a potential mechanism for vascular injury. We study it numerically with an idealized problem consisting of the three-dimensional SIC of an air bubble immersed in a cylindrical water column embedded in gelatin. The gelatin is a tissue simulant and can be treated as a fluid due to fast time scales and small spatial scales of collapse. We thus model the problem as a compressible multicomponent flow and simulate it with a shock- and interface-capturing numerical method. The method is high-order, conservative and non-oscillatory. Fifth-order WENO is used for spatial reconstruction and an HLLC Riemann solver upwinds the fluxes. A third-order TVD-RK scheme evolves the solution. We evaluate the potential for injury in SIC for a range of pressures, bubble and vessel sizes, and tissue properties. We assess the potential for injury by comparing the finite strains in tissue, obtained by particle tracking, to ultimate strains from experiments. We conclude that SIC may contribute to vascular rupture and discuss the smallest bubble sizes needed for injury. This research was supported by NIH Grant No. 2PO1DK043881 and utilized XSEDE, which is supported by NSF Grant No. OCI-1053575.

  6. Developing A Laser Shockwave Model For Characterizing Diffusion Bonded Interfaces

    SciTech Connect

    James A. Smith; Jeffrey M. Lacy; Barry H. Rabin

    2014-07-01

    12. Other advances in QNDE and related topics: Preferred Session Laser-ultrasonics Developing A Laser Shockwave Model For Characterizing Diffusion Bonded Interfaces 41st Annual Review of Progress in Quantitative Nondestructive Evaluation Conference QNDE Conference July 20-25, 2014 Boise Centre 850 West Front Street Boise, Idaho 83702 James A. Smith, Jeffrey M. Lacy, Barry H. Rabin, Idaho National Laboratory, Idaho Falls, ID ABSTRACT: The US National Nuclear Security Agency has a Global Threat Reduction Initiative (GTRI) which is assigned with reducing the worldwide use of high-enriched uranium (HEU). A salient component of that initiative is the conversion of research reactors from HEU to low enriched uranium (LEU) fuels. An innovative fuel is being developed to replace HEU. The new LEU fuel is based on a monolithic fuel made from a U-Mo alloy foil encapsulated in Al-6061 cladding. In order to complete the fuel qualification process, the laser shock technique is being developed to characterize the clad-clad and fuel-clad interface strengths in fresh and irradiated fuel plates. The Laser Shockwave Technique (LST) is being investigated to characterize interface strength in fuel plates. LST is a non-contact method that uses lasers for the generation and detection of large amplitude acoustic waves to characterize interfaces in nuclear fuel plates. However the deposition of laser energy into the containment layer on specimen’s surface is intractably complex. The shock wave energy is inferred from the velocity on the backside and the depth of the impression left on the surface from the high pressure plasma pulse created by the shock laser. To help quantify the stresses and strengths at the interface, a finite element model is being developed and validated by comparing numerical and experimental results for back face velocities and front face depressions with experimental results. This paper will report on initial efforts to develop a finite element model for laser

  7. Shock-wave measurement using a calibrated interferometric fiber-tip sensor.

    PubMed

    Koch, C; Molkenstruck, W; Reibold, R

    1997-01-01

    The results of shock-wave measurements using a calibrated fiber-tip sensor based on a Michelson interferometer are presented. A transfer function, obtained by an independent experiment that describes the properties of the sensor system, was used to correct the measured shock-wave data in the Fourier frequency domain. The phase of the transfer function was determined from its amplitude by a fitting procedure using minimum-phase terms. As an example of application, the acoustic output field of an electromagnetic lithotriptor was investigated, and the shock-wave source was reliably characterized. The measured data provide a basis for estimating the hazard to which a patient is exposed during shock-wave treatment and for optimizing a lithotriptor system to produce a sharply localized and effective acoustic field. PMID:9372574

  8. Shockwave treatment for musculoskeletal diseases and bone consolidation: qualitative analysis of the literature.

    PubMed

    Kertzman, Paulo; Lenza, Mario; Pedrinelli, André; Ejnisman, Benno

    2015-01-01

    Shockwave treatment is an option within orthopedics. The exact mechanism through which shockwaves function for treating musculoskeletal diseases is unknown. The aim of this study was to make a qualitative analysis on the effectiveness of shockwave treatment among patients with musculoskeletal pathological conditions and pseudarthrosis. Searches were conducted in the Cochrane Library, Medline and Lilacs databases. Thirty-nine studies that reported using shockwave treatment for musculoskeletal diseases were found. Their results varied greatly, as did the types of protocol used. The studies that evaluated the effectiveness of shockwave treatment for lateral epicondylitis, shoulder tendinopathy, knee osteoarthrosis, femoral head osteonecrosis and trochanteric bursitis reported inconsistent results for most of their patients. Those that evaluated patients with calcifying tendinopathy, plantar fasciitis, Achilles tendinopathy, patellar tendinopathy and pseudarthrosis showed benefits. Shockwave treatment is a safe and non-invasive method for chronic cases in which conventional techniques have been unsatisfactory and should be used in association with other treatment methods for tendinopathy. Further quality studies are needed. PMID:26229889

  9. Shockwave treatment for musculoskeletal diseases and bone consolidation: qualitative analysis of the literature☆

    PubMed Central

    Kertzman, Paulo; Lenza, Mario; Pedrinelli, André; Ejnisman, Benno

    2015-01-01

    Shockwave treatment is an option within orthopedics. The exact mechanism through which shockwaves function for treating musculoskeletal diseases is unknown. The aim of this study was to make a qualitative analysis on the effectiveness of shockwave treatment among patients with musculoskeletal pathological conditions and pseudarthrosis. Searches were conducted in the Cochrane Library, Medline and Lilacs databases. Thirty-nine studies that reported using shockwave treatment for musculoskeletal diseases were found. Their results varied greatly, as did the types of protocol used. The studies that evaluated the effectiveness of shockwave treatment for lateral epicondylitis, shoulder tendinopathy, knee osteoarthrosis, femoral head osteonecrosis and trochanteric bursitis reported inconsistent results for most of their patients. Those that evaluated patients with calcifying tendinopathy, plantar fasciitis, Achilles tendinopathy, patellar tendinopathy and pseudarthrosis showed benefits. Shockwave treatment is a safe and non-invasive method for chronic cases in which conventional techniques have been unsatisfactory and should be used in association with other treatment methods for tendinopathy. Further quality studies are needed. PMID:26229889

  10. Dense suspension splash

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dodge, Kevin M.; Peters, Ivo R.; Ellowitz, Jake; Schaarsberg, Martin H. Klein; Jaeger, Heinrich M.; Zhang, Wendy W.

    2014-11-01

    Impact of a dense suspension drop onto a solid surface at speeds of several meters-per-second splashes by ejecting individual liquid-coated particles. Suppression or reduction of this splash is important for thermal spray coating and additive manufacturing. Accomplishing this aim requires distinguishing whether the splash is generated by individual scattering events or by collective motion reminiscent of liquid flow. Since particle inertia dominates over surface tension and viscous drag in a strong splash, we model suspension splash using a discrete-particle simulation in which the densely packed macroscopic particles experience inelastic collisions but zero friction or cohesion. Numerical results based on this highly simplified model are qualitatively consistent with observations. They also show that approximately 70% of the splash is generated by collective motion. Here an initially downward-moving particle is ejected into the splash because it experiences a succession of low-momentum-change collisions whose effects do not cancel but instead accumulate. The remainder of the splash is generated by scattering events in which a small number of high-momentum-change collisions cause a particle to be ejected upwards. Current Address: Physics of Fluids Group, University of Twente, P.O. Box 217, 7500 AE Enschede, The Netherlands.

  11. DISPERSION OF DENSE GAS RELEASES IN A WIND TUNNEL

    EPA Science Inventory

    The paper documents two dense gas projects undertaken at the US EPA Fluid Modeling Facility. The study investigated the basic nature of the transport and dispersion of a dense gas plume in a simulated neutral atmospheric boundary layer. The two dense gas releases were CO2 and SF6...

  12. Dynamics of plasma expansion and shockwave formation in femtosecond laser-ablated aluminum plumes in argon gas at atmospheric pressures

    SciTech Connect

    Miloshevsky, Alexander; Harilal, Sivanandan S.; Miloshevsky, Gennady Hassanein, Ahmed

    2014-04-15

    Plasma expansion with shockwave formation during laser ablation of materials in a background gasses is a complex process. The spatial and temporal evolution of pressure, temperature, density, and velocity fields is needed for its complete understanding. We have studied the expansion of femtosecond (fs) laser-ablated aluminum (Al) plumes in Argon (Ar) gas at 0.5 and 1 atmosphere (atm). The expansion of the plume is investigated experimentally using shadowgraphy and fast-gated imaging. The computational fluid dynamics (CFD) modeling is also carried out. The position of the shock front measured by shadowgraphy and fast-gated imaging is then compared to that obtained from the CFD modeling. The results from the three methods are found to be in good agreement, especially during the initial stage of plasma expansion. The computed time- and space-resolved fields of gas-dynamic parameters have provided valuable insights into the dynamics of plasma expansion and shockwave formation in fs-pulse ablated Al plumes in Ar gas at 0.5 and 1 atm. These results are compared to our previous data on nanosecond (ns) laser ablation of Al [S. S. Harilal et al., Phys. Plasmas 19, 083504 (2012)]. It is observed that both fs and ns plumes acquire a nearly spherical shape at the end of expansion in Ar gas at 1 atm. However, due to significantly lower pulse energy of the fs laser (5 mJ) compared to pulse energy of the ns laser (100 mJ) used in our studies, the values of pressure, temperature, mass density, and velocity are found to be smaller in the fs laser plume, and their time evolution occurs much faster on the same time scale. The oscillatory shock waves clearly visible in the ns plume are not observed in the internal region of the fs plume. These experimental and computational results provide a quantitative understanding of plasma expansion and shockwave formation in fs-pulse and ns-pulse laser ablated Al plumes in an ambient gas at atmospheric pressures.

  13. Dynamics of plasma expansion and shockwave formation in femtosecond laser-ablated aluminum plumes in argon gas at atmospheric pressures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miloshevsky, Alexander; Harilal, Sivanandan S.; Miloshevsky, Gennady; Hassanein, Ahmed

    2014-04-01

    Plasma expansion with shockwave formation during laser ablation of materials in a background gasses is a complex process. The spatial and temporal evolution of pressure, temperature, density, and velocity fields is needed for its complete understanding. We have studied the expansion of femtosecond (fs) laser-ablated aluminum (Al) plumes in Argon (Ar) gas at 0.5 and 1 atmosphere (atm). The expansion of the plume is investigated experimentally using shadowgraphy and fast-gated imaging. The computational fluid dynamics (CFD) modeling is also carried out. The position of the shock front measured by shadowgraphy and fast-gated imaging is then compared to that obtained from the CFD modeling. The results from the three methods are found to be in good agreement, especially during the initial stage of plasma expansion. The computed time- and space-resolved fields of gas-dynamic parameters have provided valuable insights into the dynamics of plasma expansion and shockwave formation in fs-pulse ablated Al plumes in Ar gas at 0.5 and 1 atm. These results are compared to our previous data on nanosecond (ns) laser ablation of Al [S. S. Harilal et al., Phys. Plasmas 19, 083504 (2012)]. It is observed that both fs and ns plumes acquire a nearly spherical shape at the end of expansion in Ar gas at 1 atm. However, due to significantly lower pulse energy of the fs laser (5 mJ) compared to pulse energy of the ns laser (100 mJ) used in our studies, the values of pressure, temperature, mass density, and velocity are found to be smaller in the fs laser plume, and their time evolution occurs much faster on the same time scale. The oscillatory shock waves clearly visible in the ns plume are not observed in the internal region of the fs plume. These experimental and computational results provide a quantitative understanding of plasma expansion and shockwave formation in fs-pulse and ns-pulse laser ablated Al plumes in an ambient gas at atmospheric pressures.

  14. Exact black holes and gravitational shockwaves on codimension-2 branes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaloper, Nemanja; Kiley, Derrick

    2006-03-01

    We derive exact gravitational fields of a black hole and a relativistic particle stuck on a codimension-2 brane in D dimensions when gravity is ruled by the bulk D-dimensional Einstein-Hilbert action. The black hole is locally the higher-dimensional Schwarzschild solution, which is threaded by a tensional brane yielding a deficit angle and includes the first explicit example of a `small' black hole on a tensional 3-brane. The shockwaves allow us to study the large distance limits of gravity on codimension-2 branes. In an infinite locally flat bulk, they extinguish as 1/rD-4, i.e. as 1/r2 on a 3-brane in 6D, manifestly displaying the full dimensionality of spacetime. We check that when we compactify the bulk, this special case correctly reduces to the 4D Aichelburg-Sexl solution at large distances. Our examples show that gravity does not really obstruct having general matter stress-energy on codimension-2 branes, although its mathematical description may be more involved.

  15. Unsteady relativistic shock-wave diffraction by cylinders and spheres.

    PubMed

    Tsai, I-Nan; Huang, Juan-Chen; Tsai, Shang-Shi; Yang, J Y

    2012-02-01

    The unsteady relativistic shock-wave diffraction patterns generated by a relativistic blast wave impinging on a circular cylinder and a sphere are numerically simulated using some high-resolution relativistic kinetic beam schemes in a general coordinate system for solving the relativistic Euler equations of gas dynamics. The diffraction patterns are followed through about 6 radii of travel of the incident shock past the body. The complete diffraction patterns, including regular reflection, transition from regular to Mach reflection, slip lines, and the complex shock-on-shock interaction at the wake region resulting from the Mach shocks collision behind the body are reported in detail. Computational results of several incident shock Mach numbers covering the near ultrarelativistic limit are studied. Various contours of flow properties including the Lorentz factor and velocity streamline plots are also presented to add a better understanding of the complex diffraction phenomena. The three-dimensional relieving effects of the sphere cases are evident and can be quantitatively evaluated as compared with the corresponding cylinder cases. PMID:22463327

  16. Shock-Wave Acceleration of Protons on OMEGA EP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haberberger, D.; Froula, D. H.; Pak, A.; Link, A.; Patel, P.; Fiuza, F.; Tochitsky, S.; Joshi, C.

    2015-11-01

    Recent experimental results using shock-wave acceleration (SWA) driven by a CO2 laser in a H2 gas-jet plasma have shown the possibility of producing proton beams with energy spreads <10% and with energies of up to 20 MeV using a modest peak laser power of 4 TW. Here we propose the investigation of the scaling of the SWA mechanism to higher laser powers using the 1- μm OMEGA EP Laser System at the Laboratory for Laser Energetics. The required tailored plasma profile is created by expanding a CH target using the thermal x-ray emission from a UV ablated material. The desired characteristics optimal for SWA are met: (a) peak plasma density is overcritical for the 1- μm main pulse and (b) the plasma profile exponentially decays over a long scale length on the rear side. Results will be shown using a 4 ω probe to experimentally characterize the plasma density profile. Scaling from simulations of the SWA mechanism shows that ion energies in the range of 100 MeV/amu are achievable with a focused a0 of 5 from the OMEGA EP Laser System. This material is based upon work supported by the Department of Energy National Nuclear Security Administration under Award Number DE-NA0001944.

  17. Developing a laser shockwave model for characterizing diffusion bonded interfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Lacy, Jeffrey M. Smith, James A. Rabin, Barry H.

    2015-03-31

    The US National Nuclear Security Agency has a Global Threat Reduction Initiative (GTRI) with the goal of reducing the worldwide use of high-enriched uranium (HEU). A salient component of that initiative is the conversion of research reactors from HEU to low enriched uranium (LEU) fuels. An innovative fuel is being developed to replace HEU in high-power research reactors. The new LEU fuel is a monolithic fuel made from a U-Mo alloy foil encapsulated in Al-6061 cladding. In order to support the fuel qualification process, the Laser Shockwave Technique (LST) is being developed to characterize the clad-clad and fuel-clad interface strengths in fresh and irradiated fuel plates. LST is a non-contact method that uses lasers for the generation and detection of large amplitude acoustic waves to characterize interfaces in nuclear fuel plates. However, because the deposition of laser energy into the containment layer on a specimen's surface is intractably complex, the shock wave energy is inferred from the surface velocity measured on the backside of the fuel plate and the depth of the impression left on the surface by the high pressure plasma pulse created by the shock laser. To help quantify the stresses generated at the interfaces, a finite element method (FEM) model is being utilized. This paper will report on initial efforts to develop and validate the model by comparing numerical and experimental results for back surface velocities and front surface depressions in a single aluminum plate representative of the fuel cladding.

  18. Developing a laser shockwave model for characterizing diffusion bonded interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lacy, Jeffrey M.; Smith, James A.; Rabin, Barry H.

    2015-03-01

    The US National Nuclear Security Agency has a Global Threat Reduction Initiative (GTRI) with the goal of reducing the worldwide use of high-enriched uranium (HEU). A salient component of that initiative is the conversion of research reactors from HEU to low enriched uranium (LEU) fuels. An innovative fuel is being developed to replace HEU in high-power research reactors. The new LEU fuel is a monolithic fuel made from a U-Mo alloy foil encapsulated in Al-6061 cladding. In order to support the fuel qualification process, the Laser Shockwave Technique (LST) is being developed to characterize the clad-clad and fuel-clad interface strengths in fresh and irradiated fuel plates. LST is a non-contact method that uses lasers for the generation and detection of large amplitude acoustic waves to characterize interfaces in nuclear fuel plates. However, because the deposition of laser energy into the containment layer on a specimen's surface is intractably complex, the shock wave energy is inferred from the surface velocity measured on the backside of the fuel plate and the depth of the impression left on the surface by the high pressure plasma pulse created by the shock laser. To help quantify the stresses generated at the interfaces, a finite element method (FEM) model is being utilized. This paper will report on initial efforts to develop and validate the model by comparing numerical and experimental results for back surface velocities and front surface depressions in a single aluminum plate representative of the fuel cladding.

  19. High-efficiency shock-wave generator for extracorporeal lithotripsy.

    PubMed

    Broyer, P; Cathignol, D; Theillère, Y; Mestas, J L

    1996-09-01

    In extracorporeal lithotripsy, the electro-acoustic efficiency of electrohydraulic generators is limited by the inductance of the electrical discharge circuit. A new shock-wave generator is described that uses a coaxial discharge line enabling electro-acoustic efficiency to be greatly increased. The line is built using a para-electric ceramic with a relative dielectric constant of 1700, manufactured for use in high-voltage impulse mode. A coaxial spark gap, with minimal inductance, has been developed to obtain the triggered breakdown of the discharge line. Shock waves are created with a coaxial electrode plugged directly into the spark gap and immersed in an electrolyte of degassed saline. Electrode gap and electrolyte resistivity are adjusted to match the resistivity of the electrolyte volume between the underwater electrodes to the characteristic impedance of the line. The discharge line generates in the medium a rectangular current pulse with an amplitude of about 6000 A and a rise time of 50 ns. Compared with conventional generators, measurements of the expansive peak pressure pulse show an increase of 105% at 10 kV, 86.5% at 12 kV and 34.5% at 14 kV charging voltage. Electro-acoustic efficiency is found to be 11% instead of 5.5% for a conventional discharge circuit. PMID:8945854

  20. Shockwave Absorption using Network-forming Ionic glass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Jaejun; Yang, Ke; Moore, Jeffrey; Sottos, Nancy; MURI SWED Collaboration

    2015-06-01

    Network-forming ionic glasses composed of di-ammonium cations and citrate anions exhibit significant potential for dissipation of shock wave energy. The long alkyl side chains in the di-ammonium cation form a soft matrix, while the negatively charged heads of anions segregate into hard nanophase domains. Similar to polyurea, which has microphase separation of soft and hard domains, we hypothesize that shock wave dissipation of the ionic glass occurs by bond breaking in the hard domains and/or pressure-induced phase transition. By employing size-tunable alkyl side chains in the cations, we examine the effect of the relative soft domain size on energy dissipation. A series of thin film (ca. 50 μm) ionic glass specimens are subjected to laser-induced compressive stress waves and the transmitted response measured interferometrically. Structural changes of the ionic glass due to shock wave impact are characterized by x-ray diffraction. When compared directly to polyurea films of identical thickness and geometry, the ionic glass showed superior shock-wave mitigating performance. ONR MURI program.

  1. [A 10-month experience with extracorporeal shockwave therapy of urolithiasis].

    PubMed

    García Sisamón, F; Ferrer Roda, J; Tudela Bañuls, O; Ferrer Bosch, L

    1990-01-01

    From November 1987 treatment of urinary lithiasis regardless location was initiated in our Service of extracorporal renal lithofragmentation using shockwaves. Up until August 1988 (10 months), 411 patients have been treated representing a total of 590 lithiasis and 699 sessions on which the present communication is based; treatment included calculus of various chemical composition, as well as different sizes and locations. Also the relationship between sex, age, number of waves, use of analgesia, hospital stay, etc, has been considered. Results obtained after a 2.5 months follow-up are: 60.34% fragments-free and 39.41% in expulsion stage. Monotherapy was chosen in 98% cases and multiple drug therapy in the remaining 2%. There has been no case of complementary open surgical therapy. Thus, we consider extracorporal renal lithofragmentation as the ideal treatment for urinary lithiasis, as long as the indication is correct. And we believe it to be the ideal treatment since it is a simple procedure, highly effective and with few complications. PMID:2239390

  2. Unsteady relativistic shock-wave diffraction by cylinders and spheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsai, I.-Nan; Huang, Juan-Chen; Tsai, Shang-Shi; Yang, J. Y.

    2012-02-01

    The unsteady relativistic shock-wave diffraction patterns generated by a relativistic blast wave impinging on a circular cylinder and a sphere are numerically simulated using some high-resolution relativistic kinetic beam schemes in a general coordinate system for solving the relativistic Euler equations of gas dynamics. The diffraction patterns are followed through about 6 radii of travel of the incident shock past the body. The complete diffraction patterns, including regular reflection, transition from regular to Mach reflection, slip lines, and the complex shock-on-shock interaction at the wake region resulting from the Mach shocks collision behind the body are reported in detail. Computational results of several incident shock Mach numbers covering the near ultrarelativistic limit are studied. Various contours of flow properties including the Lorentz factor and velocity streamline plots are also presented to add a better understanding of the complex diffraction phenomena. The three-dimensional relieving effects of the sphere cases are evident and can be quantitatively evaluated as compared with the corresponding cylinder cases.

  3. Extended asymmetric hot region formation due to shockwave interactions following void collapse in shocked high explosive

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Shan, Tzu -Ray; Wixom, Ryan R.; Thompson, Aidan P.

    2016-08-11

    In both continuum hydrodynamics simulations and also multimillion atom reactive molecular dynamics simulations of shockwave propagation in single crystal pentaerythritol tetranitrate (PETN) containing a cylindrical void, we observed the formation of an initial radially symmetric hot spot. By extending the simulation time to the nanosecond scale, however, we observed the transformation of the small symmetric hot spot into a longitudinally asymmetric hot region extending over a much larger volume. Performing reactive molecular dynamics shock simulations using the reactive force field (ReaxFF) as implemented in the LAMMPS molecular dynamics package, we showed that the longitudinally asymmetric hot region was formed bymore » coalescence of the primary radially symmetric hot spot with a secondary triangular hot zone. We showed that the triangular hot zone coincided with a double-shocked region where the primary planar shockwave was overtaken by a secondary cylindrical shockwave. The secondary cylindrical shockwave originated in void collapse after the primary planar shockwave had passed over the void. A similar phenomenon was observed in continuum hydrodynamics shock simulations using the CTH hydrodynamics package. Furthermore, the formation and growth of extended asymmetric hot regions on nanosecond timescales has important implications for shock initiation thresholds in energetic materials.« less

  4. Extended asymmetric hot region formation due to shockwave interactions following void collapse in shocked high explosive

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shan, Tzu-Ray; Wixom, Ryan R.; Thompson, Aidan P.

    2016-08-01

    In both continuum hydrodynamics simulations and also multimillion atom reactive molecular dynamics simulations of shockwave propagation in single crystal pentaerythritol tetranitrate (PETN) containing a cylindrical void, we observed the formation of an initial radially symmetric hot spot. By extending the simulation time to the nanosecond scale, however, we observed the transformation of the small symmetric hot spot into a longitudinally asymmetric hot region extending over a much larger volume. Performing reactive molecular dynamics shock simulations using the reactive force field (ReaxFF) as implemented in the LAMMPS molecular dynamics package, we showed that the longitudinally asymmetric hot region was formed by coalescence of the primary radially symmetric hot spot with a secondary triangular hot zone. We showed that the triangular hot zone coincided with a double-shocked region where the primary planar shockwave was overtaken by a secondary cylindrical shockwave. The secondary cylindrical shockwave originated in void collapse after the primary planar shockwave had passed over the void. A similar phenomenon was observed in continuum hydrodynamics shock simulations using the CTH hydrodynamics package. The formation and growth of extended asymmetric hot regions on nanosecond timescales has important implications for shock initiation thresholds in energetic materials.

  5. A cumulative shear mechanism for tissue damage initiation in shock-wave lithotripsy

    PubMed Central

    Freund, Jonathan B.; Colonius, Tim; Evan, Andrew P.

    2007-01-01

    Evidence suggests that inertial cavitation plays an important role in the renal injury incurred during shock-wave lithotripsy. However, it is unclear how tissue damage is initiated, and significant injury typically occurs only after a sufficient dose of shock waves. While it has been suggested that shock-induced shearing might initiate injury, estimates indicate that individual shocks do not produce sufficient shear to do so. In this paper, we hypothesize that the cumulative shear of the many shocks is damaging. This mechanism depends upon whether there is sufficient time between shocks for tissue to relax to its unstrained state. We investigate the mechanism with a physics-based simulation model wherein the the basement membranes that define the tubules and vessels in the inner medulla are represented as elastic shells surrounded by viscous fluid. Material properties are estimated from in vitro tests of renal basement membranes and documented mechanical properties of cells and extracellular gels. Estimates for the net shear deformation from a typical lithotripter shock (~ 0.1%) are found from a separate dynamic shock simulation. The results suggest that the larger interstitial volume (~ 40%) near the papilla tip gives the tissue there a relaxation time comparable to clinical shock delivery rates (~ 1Hz), thus allowing shear to accumulate. Away from the papilla tip, where the interstitial volume is smaller (≲ 20%), the model tissue relaxes completely before the next shock would be delivered. Implications of the model are that slower delivery rates and broader focal zones should both decrease injury, consistent with some recent observations. PMID:17507147

  6. 1D GAS-DYNAMIC SIMULATION OF SHOCK-WAVE PROCESSES VIA INTERNET

    SciTech Connect

    Khishchenko, K. V.; Levashov, P. R.; Povarnitsyn, M. E.; Zakharenkov, A. S.

    2009-12-28

    We present a Web-interface for 1D simulation of different shock-wave experiments. The choosing of initial parameters, the modeling itself and output data treatment can be made directly via the Internet. The interface is based upon the expert system on shock-wave data and equations of state and contains both the Eulerian and Lagrangian Godunov hydrocodes. The availability of equations of state for a broad set of substances makes this system a useful tool for planning and interpretation of shock-wave experiments. As an example of simulation with the system, results of modeling of multistep shock loading of potassium between polytetrafluoroethylene and stainless steel plates are presented in comparison with experimental data from Shakhray et al.(2005).

  7. Improving the antioxidant functionality of Citrus junos Tanaka (yuzu) fruit juice by underwater shockwave pretreatment.

    PubMed

    Kuraya, Eisuke; Nakada, Shina; Touyama, Akiko; Itoh, Shigeru

    2017-02-01

    Citrus junos Tanaka (yuzu) has a strong characteristic aroma, and hence, yuzu juice is used in a number of Japanese foods. We herein evaluated the functional compounds of yuzu juice to investigate whether underwater shockwave pretreatment affects its functionality. Employing the shockwave pretreatment at an increased discharge and energy of 3.5kV and 4.9kJ, respectively, resulted in an increase in the flavanone glycoside content and oxygen radical absorbance capacity (ORAC). The ORAC value of yuzu juice cultivated in Rikuzentakata increased approximately 1.7 times upon underwater shockwave pretreatment. The treatment method proposed herein exhibited reliable and good performance for the extraction of functional and antioxidant chemicals in yuzu fruits, and was comparable with traditional squeezing methods. The high applicability and reliability of this technique for improving the antioxidant functionality of yuzu fruit juice was demonstrated, confirming the potential for application to a wide range of food extraction processes. PMID:27596400

  8. D Gas-Dynamic Simulation of Shock-Wave Processes via Internet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khishchenko, K. V.; Levashov, P. R.; Povarnitsyn, M. E.; Zakharenkov, A. S.

    2009-12-01

    We present a Web-interface for 1D simulation of different shock-wave experiments. The choosing of initial parameters, the modeling itself and output data treatment can be made directly via the Internet. The interface is based upon the expert system on shock-wave data and equations of state and contains both the Eulerian and Lagrangian Godunov hydrocodes. The availability of equations of state for a broad set of substances makes this system a useful tool for planning and interpretation of shock-wave experiments. As an example of simulation with the system, results of modeling of multistep shock loading of potassium between polytetrafluoroethylene and stainless steel plates are presented in comparison with experimental data from Shakhray et al. (2005).

  9. Molecular changes after shockwave therapy in osteoarthritic knee in rats

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, C.-J.; Sun, Y.-C.; Wu, C.-T.; Weng, L.-H.; Wang, F.-S.

    2016-01-01

    This study investigated the molecular changes of DKK-1, MMP13, Wnt-5a and \\upbeta -catenin after extracorporeal shockwave therapy (ESWT) in anterior cruciate ligament transected (ACLT) osteoarthritic (OA) knee in rats. 27 male Spraque-Dawley rats were divided into three groups. Group I was the control one and received sham knee arthrotomy but no ACLT or ESWT. Group II underwent ACLT, but no ESWT. Group III underwent ACLT and received ESWT. The animals were killed at 12 weeks, and the harvested knee specimens were subjected to histopathological examination and immunohistochemical analysis. Radiographs of the knees were obtained at 0 and 12 weeks. At 12 weeks, radiographs of group II showed more arthritic changes with formation of osteochondral fragments, whereas very subtle arthritis was noted in groups I and III. In histopathological examination, group II showed a significant increase of Mankin score and a decrease of subchondral bone as compared to groups I and III. Group III showed a significant decrease of Mankin score and an increase of subchondral bone, with the data comparable to group I. In immunohistochemical analysis, group II showed significant increases of DKK-1 and MMP13 and decreases of Wnt-5a and \\upbeta -catenin in articular cartilage and subchondral bone as compared to groups I and III. Group III showed significant decreases of DKK-1 and MMP13 and increases of Wnt-5a and \\upbeta -catenin, with the data comparable to group I. In conclusion, the application of ESWT causes molecular changes that are consistent with the improvement in subchondral bone remodeling and chondroprotective effect in ACLT OA knees in rats.

  10. [THE BONE DEFECT HEALING UNDER THE INFLUENCE OF RADIAL EXTRACORPOREAL SHOCK-WAVE THERAPY IN EXPERIMENT].

    PubMed

    Gertsen, G I; Se-Fey; Ostapchuk, R M; Lesovoy, A V; Zherebchuk, V V

    2016-03-01

    In experiment on 24 rabbits the processes of reparative osteogenesis in perforated defect of proximal tibial metaphysis under the influence of extracorporeal shock-wave therapy were studied. In accordance to data of clinical, roentgenological and morphological investiagations, conducted in terms 5, 15, 30 and 45 days of observation, there was established, that under the influence of extracorporeal shock-wave therapy in the bone marrow in the traumatic region a vasodilatation, as well as the blood cells exit from capillaries and sinusoid vessels with creation of massive regions of osseous endostal regenerate, guaranteeing the tibial integrity restoration, occurs. PMID:27514097

  11. Mach reflection in a warm dense plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Foster, J. M.; Rosen, P. A.; Wilde, B. H.; Hartigan, P.; Perry, T. S.

    2010-11-15

    The phenomenon of irregular shock-wave reflection is of importance in high-temperature gas dynamics, astrophysics, inertial-confinement fusion, and related fields of high-energy-density science. However, most experimental studies of irregular reflection have used supersonic wind tunnels or shock tubes, and few or no data are available for Mach reflection phenomena in the plasma regime. Similarly, analytic studies have often been confined to calorically perfect gases. We report the first direct observation, and numerical modeling, of Mach stem formation for a warm, dense plasma. Two ablatively driven aluminum disks launch oppositely directed, near-spherical shock waves into a cylindrical plastic block. The interaction of these shocks results in the formation of a Mach-ring shock that is diagnosed by x-ray backlighting. The data are modeled using radiation hydrocodes developed by AWE and LANL. The experiments were carried out at the University of Rochester's Omega laser [J. M. Soures, R. L. McCrory, C. P. Verdon et al., Phys. Plasmas 3, 2108 (1996)] and were inspired by modeling [A. M. Khokhlov, P. A. Hoeflich, E. S. Oran et al., Astrophys J. 524, L107 (1999)] of core-collapse supernovae that suggest that in asymmetric supernova explosion significant mass may be ejected in a Mach-ring formation launched by bipolar jets.

  12. Ariel's Densely Pitted Surface

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1986-01-01

    This mosaic of the four highest-resolution images of Ariel represents the most detailed Voyager 2 picture of this satellite of Uranus. The images were taken through the clear filter of Voyager's narrow-angle camera on Jan. 24, 1986, at a distance of about 130,000 kilometers (80,000 miles). Ariel is about 1,200 km (750 mi) in diameter; the resolution here is 2.4 km (1.5 mi). Much of Ariel's surface is densely pitted with craters 5 to 10 km (3 to 6 mi) across. These craters are close to the threshold of detection in this picture. Numerous valleys and fault scarps crisscross the highly pitted terrain. Voyager scientists believe the valleys have formed over down-dropped fault blocks (graben); apparently, extensive faulting has occurred as a result of expansion and stretching of Ariel's crust. The largest fault valleys, near the terminator at right, as well as a smooth region near the center of this image, have been partly filled with deposits that are younger and less heavily cratered than the pitted terrain. Narrow, somewhat sinuous scarps and valleys have been formed, in turn, in these young deposits. It is not yet clear whether these sinuous features have been formed by faulting or by the flow of fluids.

    JPL manages the Voyager project for NASA's Office of Space Science.

  13. Vibrational spectroscopy in high temperature dense fluids

    SciTech Connect

    Moore, D.S.; Schmidt, S.C.

    1992-01-01

    Coherent anti-Stokes Raman spectroscopy (CARS) in conjunction with a two-stage light-gas gun has been used to obtain vibrational spectra of shock-compressed liquid N{sub 2}, O{sub 2}, CO, and their mixtures, as well as liquid N{sub 2}O. The experimental spectra are compared to spectra calculated using a semiclassical model for CARS intensities to obtain vibrational frequencies, peak Raman susceptibilities, and linewidths. The derived spectroscopic parameters suggest thermal equilibrium of the vibrational populations is established in less than a few nanoseconds after shock passage. Vibrational temperatures obtained are compared to those derived from equation-of-state calculations. The variation of the vibrational frequency shift at pressure with species concentration in mixtures is investigated.

  14. Extracorporeal shockwave therapy promotes chondrogenesis in cartilage tissue engineering: A hypothesis based on previous evidence.

    PubMed

    Ji, Qiaodan; He, Chengqi

    2016-06-01

    The dearth of intrinsic regenerative capacity of articular cartilage makes it a challenge to deal with the cartilage defects. Among all the recommended clinical options, cartilage tissue engineering (CTE) which is highlighted of dominant features and less drawbacks for functional cartilage restoration, has been emphasized recently. Shock waves, a mode of therapeutic mechanical forces, utilized in extracorporeal shockwave therapy (ESWT), is hypothesized to enhance proliferation, chondrogenic differentiation, and cartilage extracellular matrix production of target cells seeded on bioactive scaffolds. The hypothesis is firstly based on cellular mechanotransduction by which cells convent the shockwave mechanical signals into biochemical responses via integrins, iron channels, cytoskeletal filaments, growth factor receptors and nuclei. Secondly, by modulating gene expression and up-regulating the release of various growth factors which are of vital importance in three-dimensional cartilage culture environment, ESWT holds a promising potential to favor the cell sources (e.g. chondrocytes and stem cells) to mimic the optimal functional cartilage. In all, on the basis of cellular mechanotransduction and previous evidence, the hypothesis is developed to support the beneficial effects of ESWT on chondrogenesis in CTE. If this hypothesis is confirmed, shockwaves may allow a better success in combination with other stimulating factors for cartilage repair. There is a paucity of studies investigating the assistant role of shockwave stimulation in CTE. Further research is required to elucidate the mechanisms, and explore effectiveness and appropriate protocols of this novel stimulative factor in cartilage tissue engineering. PMID:27142133

  15. Ultrafast Time Response Pressure-Sensitive Paint for Unsteady Shock-Wave Research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Numata, Daiju; Asai, Keisuke

    Pressure-Sensitive Paint (PSP) is an optical pressure measurement technique widely used in aerodynamic experiments, and has been applied to unsteady shock-wave phenomena [1, 2]. However, one of the largest problems to apply PSP to high-speed and unsteady phenomena is the response time of PSP.

  16. Analysis of flexible substrates for clinical translation of laser-generated shockwave therapy

    PubMed Central

    Francis, Nathan C.; Kassam, Imara; Nowroozi, Bryan; Grundfest, Warren S.; Taylor, Zach D.

    2015-01-01

    Bacteria biofilms in chronically infected wounds significantly increase the burden of healthcare costs and resources for patients and clinics. Because biofilms are such an effective barrier to standard antibiotic treatment, new methods of therapy need to be developed to combat these infections. Our group has demonstrated the potential of using Laser Generated Shockwaves as a potential therapy to mechanically disrupt the bacterial biofilms covering the wound. Previous studies have used rigid silica glass as the shockwave propagation medium, which is not compatible with the intended clinical application. This paper describes the exploration of five candidate flexible plastic films to replace the glass substrate. Each material measured 0.254 mm thick and was used to generate shockwaves of varying intensities. Shockwave characterization was performed using a high-speed Michelson displacement interferometer and peak stress values obtained in the flexible substrates were compared to glass using one-way nested Analysis of Variance and Tukey HSD post-hoc analysis. Results demonstrate statistically significant differences between substrate material and indicate that polycarbonate achieves the highest peak stress for a given laser fluence suggesting that it is optimal for clinical applications. PMID:25798307

  17. Shock-wave sensitivity of a TATB-based plasticized explosive

    SciTech Connect

    Aminov, Y.A.; Vershinin, A.V.; Es`kov, N.S.

    1995-07-01

    The results of numerical modelling of experiments on the investigation of shock-wave sensitivity of a TATB-based explosive are presented. A model for the macrokinetics of decomposition of the explosive has been constructed within the framework of a hypothesis of hot spots.

  18. Atoms in dense plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    More, R.M.

    1986-01-01

    Recent experiments with high-power pulsed lasers have strongly encouraged the development of improved theoretical understanding of highly charged ions in a dense plasma environment. This work examines the theory of dense plasmas with emphasis on general rules which govern matter at extreme high temperature and density. 106 refs., 23 figs.

  19. The development and performance of a message-passing version of the PAGOSA shock-wave physics code

    SciTech Connect

    Gardner, D.R.; Vaughan, C.T.

    1997-10-01

    A message-passing version of the PAGOSA shock-wave physics code has been developed at Sandia National Laboratories for multiple-instruction, multiple-data stream (MIMD) computers. PAGOSA is an explicit, Eulerian code for modeling the three-dimensional, high-speed hydrodynamic flow of fluids and the dynamic deformation of solids under high rates of strain. It was originally developed at Los Alamos National Laboratory for the single-instruction, multiple-data (SIMD) Connection Machine parallel computers. The performance of Sandia`s message-passing version of PAGOSA has been measured on two MIMD machines, the nCUBE 2 and the Intel Paragon XP/S. No special efforts were made to optimize the code for either machine. The measured scaled speedup (computational time for a single computational node divided by the computational time per node for fixed computational load) and grind time (computational time per cell per time step) show that the MIMD PAGOSA code scales linearly with the number of computational nodes used on a variety of problems, including the simulation of shaped-charge jets perforating an oil well casing. Scaled parallel efficiencies for MIMD PAGOSA are greater than 0.70 when the available memory per node is filled (or nearly filled) on hundreds to a thousand or more computational nodes on these two machines, indicating that the code scales very well. Thus good parallel performance can be achieved for complex and realistic applications when they are first implemented on MIMD parallel computers.

  20. Advancement of Shock-wave Induced Spraying Process through the Study of Gas and Particle Flow Fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karimi Esfahani, Mohammad

    This research advances the knowledge of the working principles of the Shock-wave Induced Spraying Process (SISP), a thermal spray material deposition technique. Pulses created by a fast acting valve pass through a heated line increasing energy content and interacting with metered batches of heated or non-heated powder introduced into the line. The powder is accelerated to high velocities before bonding to the substrate upon impact. Advantages over other cold spray processes include cost savings and a more effective transfer of thermal energy to the powder. The shock-wave occurring near the substrate in other cold spray processes is avoided. The SISP flow field is resolved by using a computational model. The two-dimensional model accounts for the valve, gas heater, a tapered nozzle at the tip of the device, and preheating of the powder. It is implemented with a commercial computational fluid dynamics code. Comparisons are made with one-dimensional predictions, and measurements of pressure and temperature. Particle flow predictions are validated using particle velocity and adhesion measurements. A flow region of both high temperature and velocity gas, favorable to material deposition, forms which is not present in comparable steady-state cold spray processes. Increasing gas pressure increases the gas speed, while increasing temperature increases speed and temperature of this region. Using helium results in greater energy levels but for shorter periods of time. This indicates the need for a powder feeder which places particles in the flow at correct instants and durations of time. The effects of particle flow parameters on system performance are examined. It is found that the device must be operated at very high main heater and powder heater temperatures: 900 °C and 700 °C respectively to achieve a coating with stainless steel using nitrogen as the driving gas. It is also shown that a heater length range of 0.9 m to 1.4 m results in the greatest likelihood of

  1. Effects of extracorporeal shockwave therapy on nanostructural and biomechanical responses in the collagenase-induced Achilles tendinitis animal model.

    PubMed

    Yoo, Seung Don; Choi, Samjin; Lee, Gi-Ja; Chon, Jinmann; Jeong, Yong Seol; Park, Hun-Kuk; Kim, Hee-Sang

    2012-11-01

    The aim of this study was to quantitatively investigate the effects of extracorporeal shockwave therapy (ESWT) on the nanostructure and adhesion force of collagen fibrils in a rat model of collagenase-induced Achilles tendinitis (CIAT) using histology and atomic force microscopy. A total of 45 rats were divided into experimental groups of three rats each: a control group, 27 CIAT rats with nine time points, and 15 ESWT rats with five time points. Progressive changes in nanostructure including the fibrillary diameter and D-periodicity, and biomechanical properties including the fibrillary adhesion forces in each healing phase were investigated over a 5-week period after collagenase injection. On postoperative day 3, CIAT rats showed granulomatous tissue associated with subacute inflammation, and a deterioration in nanostructure and mechanical properties compared to controls. On postoperative day 12, the ESWT group showed increased vascularity, fibroblastic activity, lymphocyte and plasma cell infiltration, dense histocytes, and disorganization of the fibers compared to the CIAT group. The ESWT group showed and improvement in nanostructure and mechanical properties compared to controls, while the CIAT group showed a deterioration in nanostructure and mechanical properties compared to controls. On postoperative day 26, the ESWT group showed 30% inflamed tissue and 70% fibrotic tissue, while the CIAT group showed chronic inflammation. By the end of the experiments, in both groups the changes had reversed and the tissues were similar in appearance to those in the control group. Following ESWT the deformed and irregular collagen network returned to a well-aligned normal collagen network nanostructure. These results suggest that ESWT may promote the healing response in Achilles tendinitis. PMID:22274874

  2. New developments in shockwave technology intended for meat tenderization: Opportunities and challenges. A review.

    PubMed

    Bolumar, Tomas; Enneking, Mathias; Toepfl, Stefan; Heinz, Volker

    2013-12-01

    Meat tenderness is an important quality parameter determining consumer acceptance and price. Meat tenderness is difficult to ensure in the global meat chain because the production systems are not always aiming at this purpose (ex.: cattle derived from milk production) and by the existence within the carcass of "tough" primals. Different methods can be used by the meat industry to improve meat tenderness each with its advantages and drawbacks. The application of hydrodynamic pressure or shockwaves has showed outstanding improvements by reducing the Warner Bratzler Shear Force by 25% or more. However, the technology has not penetrated into the market as first systems were based on the use of explosives and further developments seemed to lack the robustness to fulfill industrial requirements. The present paper describes the main challenges to construct a prototype for the continuous treatment of meat by shockwaves based on electrical discharges under water. Finally, improvements on the tenderness of meat by using the novel prototype are presented. PMID:23660173

  3. Shock-wave equation-of-state studies at Los Alamos

    SciTech Connect

    Morris, C.E.

    1990-01-01

    A history of the shock-wave equation-of-state (EOS) studies at Los Alamos is given. Particular emphasis is placed on the pioneering research in the 1950s where many of the experimental techniques and methods of analysis were developed, which we now take for granted. A brief review of shock-wave physics is given, which illustrates important hydrodynamic and thermodynamic concepts. Recent studies on the EOS of Ti are presented with emphasis on the {alpha}-to-{omega} phase transition. VISAR wave profiles on polycrystalline Ni and single-crystal Ni are presented to determine the strengths of these materials at pressure. Low-density polystyrene foam Hugoniot experiments are described and results analyzed. 21 refs., 14 figs.

  4. Investigation into low-temperatures influence on high explosive compounds sensitivity to shock-wave impacts

    SciTech Connect

    Averin, A.N.; Alekseev, A.V.; Batalov, S.V.; Loboiko, B.G.; Litvinov, B.V.; Sumin, V.D.; Filin, V.P.; Yagnakov, A.N.

    1996-05-01

    Study of shock-wave sensitivity of explosives under various temperatures is of great significance for correct analysis of safe application of different industrial processes, technologies, as well as for correct understanding of explosion initiation mechanism in (explosives). Currently, the influence of low, ({minus}100{degree}C{hor_ellipsis}{minus}200{degree}C) temperatures on explosive sensitivity to weak shock waves is poorly studied. This paper gives experimental results on the influence of low temperatures on the sensitivity of HMX{emdash}based explosives to weak shock-waves. In the present paper an attempt is made to experimentally determine dependence of HMX{emdash}based explosive sensitivity to weak shock waves on temperatures. The original technique of the experiment is presented in the report. {copyright} {ital 1996 American Institute of Physics.}

  5. Shock-Wave and Plasma-Pinch Mechanisms of Galactic Cosmic-Ray Production

    SciTech Connect

    Trubnikov, B.A.

    2005-07-01

    Based on recent discoveries, we show that it is appropriate to complement the standard shock-wave model for the production of galactic cosmic rays by a plasma-pinch model. The latter describes well the production of high-energy cosmic rays, yields a simple formula for their intensity, and allows the threshold pattern of the knee-type kink in the secondary particle spectrum and a number of unusual phenomena observed above the threshold to be explained.

  6. Nonlinear Acoustics in Fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lauterborn, Werner; Kurz, Thomas; Akhatov, Iskander

    At high sound intensities or long propagation distances at in fluids sufficiently low damping acoustic phenomena become nonlinear. This chapter focuses on nonlinear acoustic wave properties in gases and liquids. The origin of nonlinearity, equations of state, simple nonlinear waves, nonlinear acoustic wave equations, shock-wave formation, and interaction of waves are presented and discussed. Tables are given for the nonlinearity parameter B/A for water and a range of organic liquids, liquid metals and gases. Acoustic cavitation with its nonlinear bubble oscillations, pattern formation and sonoluminescence (light from sound) are modern examples of nonlinear acoustics. The language of nonlinear dynamics needed for understanding chaotic dynamics and acoustic chaotic systems is introduced.

  7. Shockwaves and deep inelastic scattering within the gauge/gravity duality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Avsar, E.; Iancu, E.; McLerran, L.; Triantafyllopoulos, D. N.

    2009-11-01

    Within the gauge/gravity correspondence, we discuss the general formulation of the shockwave metric which is dual to a `nucleus' described by the strongly-coupled Script N = 4 SYM theory in the limit where the number of colors Nc is arbitrarily large. We emphasize that the `nucleus' must possess Nc2 degrees of freedom per unit volume, so like a finite-temperature plasma, in order for a supergravity description to exist. We critically reassess previous proposals for introducing transverse inhomogeneity in the shockwave and formulate a new proposal in that sense, which involves no external source but requires the introduction of an `infrared' cutoff which mimics confinement. This cutoff however plays no role when the shockwave is probed by a highly virtual projectile, so like in deep inelastic scattering. We consider two such projectiles, the dilaton and the Script R-current, and compute the respective structure functions including unitarity corrections. We find that there are no leading-twist contributions to the structure functions at high virtuality, meaning that there are no point-like constituents in the strongly coupled `nucleus'. In the black-disk regime at low virtuality, the structure functions are suggestive of parton saturation with occupation numbers of order one. The saturation momentum Qs grows with the energy like Qs2 ~ 1/x (with x the Bjorken variable), which is the hallmark of graviton exchanges and is also necessary for the fulfillment of the energy-momentum sum rules.

  8. International shock-wave database project : report of the requirements workshop.

    SciTech Connect

    Aidun, John Bahram; Lomonosov, Igor V.; Levashov, Pavel R.

    2012-03-01

    We report on the requirements workshop for a new project, the International Shock-Wave database (ISWdb), which was held October 31 - November 2, 2011, at GSI, Darmstadt, Germany. Participants considered the idea of this database, its structure, technical requirements, content, and principles of operation. This report presents the consensus conclusions from the workshop, key discussion points, and the goals and plan for near-term and intermediate-term development of the ISWdb. The main points of consensus from the workshop were: (1) This international database is of interest and of practical use for the shock-wave and high pressure physics communities; (2) Intermediate state information and off-Hugoniot information is important and should be included in ISWdb; (3) Other relevant high pressure and auxiliary data should be included to the database, in the future; (4) Information on the ISWdb needs to be communicated, broadly, to the research community; and (5) Operating structure will consist of an Advisory Board, subject-matter expert Moderators to vet submitted data, and the database Project Team. This brief report is intended to inform the shock-wave research community and interested funding agencies about the project, as its success, ultimately, depends on both of these groups finding sufficient value in the database to use it, contribute to it, and support it.

  9. Molecular and Cellular Effects of In Vitro Shockwave Treatment on Lymphatic Endothelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Hackl, Matthias; Weihs, Anna M.; Rünzler, Dominik; Skalicky, Susanna; Karbiener, Michael; Scheideler, Marcel; Pröll, Johannes; Gabriel, Christian; Schweighofer, Bernhard; Gröger, Marion; Spittler, Andreas; Grillari, Johannes; Redl, Heinz

    2014-01-01

    Extracorporeal shockwave treatment was shown to improve orthopaedic diseases and wound healing and to stimulate lymphangiogenesis in vivo. The aim of this study was to investigate in vitro shockwave treatment (IVSWT) effects on lymphatic endothelial cell (LEC) behavior and lymphangiogenesis. We analyzed migration, proliferation, vascular tube forming capability and marker expression changes of LECs after IVSWT compared with HUVECs. Finally, transcriptome- and miRNA analyses were conducted to gain deeper insight into the IVSWT-induced molecular mechanisms in LECs. The results indicate that IVSWT-mediated proliferation changes of LECs are highly energy flux density-dependent and LEC 2D as well as 3D migration was enhanced through IVSWT. IVSWT suppressed HUVEC 3D migration but enhanced vasculogenesis. Furthermore, we identified podoplaninhigh and podoplaninlow cell subpopulations, whose ratios changed upon IVSWT treatment. Transcriptome- and miRNA analyses on these populations showed differences in genes specific for signaling and vascular tissue. Our findings help to understand the cellular and molecular mechanisms underlying shockwave-induced lymphangiogenesis in vivo. PMID:25502694

  10. Characterization of acoustic shockwaves generated by exposure to nanosecond electrical pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roth, Caleb C.; Maswadi, Saher; Ibey, Bennett L.; Beier, Hope T.; Glickman, Randolph D.

    2014-03-01

    Despite 30 years of research, the mechanism behind the induced breakdown of plasma membranes by electrical pulses, termed electroporation, remains unknown. Current theories treat the interaction between the electrical field and the membrane as an entirely electrical event pointing to multiple plausible mechanisms. By investigating the biophysical interaction between plasma membranes and nanosecond electrical pulses (nsEP), we may have identified a non-electric field driven mechanism, previously unstudied in nsEP, which could be responsible for nanoporation of plasma membranes. In this investigation, we use a non-contact optical technique, termed probe beam deflection technique (PBDT), to characterize acoustic shockwaves generated by nsEP traveling through tungsten wire electrodes. We conclude these acoustic shockwaves are the result of the nsEP exposure imparting electrohydraulic forces on the buffer solution. When these acoustic shockwaves occur in close proximity to lipid bilayer membranes, it is possible that they impart a sufficient amount of mechanical stress to cause poration of that membrane. This research establishes for the first time that nsEP discharged in an aqueous medium generate measureable pressure waves of a magnitude capable of mechanical deformation and possibly damage to plasma membranes. These findings provide a new insight into the longunanswered question of how electric fields cause the breakdown of plasma membranes.

  11. Dissipation of Molecular Cloud Turbulence by Magnetohydrodynamic Shockwaves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lehmann, Andrew; Wardle, Mark

    2015-08-01

    The character of star formation is intimately related to the supersonic magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) turbulent dynamics of the giant molecular clouds in which stars form. A significant amount of the turbulent energy dissipates in low velocity shock waves. These shocks cause molecular line cooling of the compressed and heated gas, and so their radiative signatures probe the nature of the turbulence. In MHD fluids the three distinct families of shocks—fast, intermediate and slow—differ in how they compress and heat the molecular gas, and so observational differences between them may also distinguish driving modes of turbulent regions.Here we use a two-fluid model to compare the characteristics of one-dimensional fast and slow MHD shocks. Fast MHD shocks are magnetically driven, forcing ion species to stream through the neutral gas ahead of the shock front. This magnetic precursor heats the gas sufficiently to create a large, warm transition zone where all the fluid variables only weakly change in the shock front. In contrast, slow MHD shocks are driven by gas pressure where neutral species collide with ion species in a thin hot slab that closely resembles an ordinary gas dynamic shock.We computed observational diagnostics for fast and slow shocks at velocities vs = 2-4 km/s and preshock Hydrogen nuclei densities n(H) = 102-4 cm-3. We followed the abundances of molecules relevant for a simple oxygen chemistry and include cooling by CO, H2 and H2O. Estimates of intensities of CO rotational lines show that high-J lines, above J = 6→5, are more strongly excited in slow MHD shocks. We discuss how these shocks could help interpret recently observed anomalously strong mid- and high-J CO lines emitted by warm gas in the Milky Way and external galaxies, and implications for simulations of MHD turbulence.

  12. Shock-wave proton acceleration from a hydrogen gas jet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cook, Nathan; Pogorelsky, Igor; Polyanskiy, Mikhail; Babzien, Marcus; Tresca, Olivier; Maharjan, Chakra; Shkolnikov, Peter; Yakimenko, Vitaly

    2013-04-01

    Typical laser acceleration experiments probe the interaction of intense linearly-polarized solid state laser pulses with dense metal targets. This interaction generates strong electric fields via Transverse Normal Sheath Acceleration and can accelerate protons to high peak energies but with a large thermal spectrum. Recently, the advancement of high pressure amplified CO2 laser technology has allowed for the creation of intense (10^16 Wcm^2) pulses at λ˜10 μm. These pulses may interact with reproducible, high rep. rate gas jet targets and still produce plasmas of critical density (nc˜10^19 cm-3), leading to the transference of laser energy via radiation pressure. This acceleration mode has the advantage of producing narrow energy spectra while scaling well with pulse intensity. We observe the interaction of an intense CO2 laser pulse with an overdense hydrogen gas jet. Using two pulse optical probing in conjunction with interferometry, we are able to obtain density profiles of the plasma. Proton energy spectra are obtained using a magnetic spectrometer and scintillating screen.

  13. Robustness versus accuracy in shock-wave computations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gressier, Jérémie; Moschetta, Jean-Marc

    2000-06-01

    Despite constant progress in the development of upwind schemes, some failings still remain. Quirk recently reported (Quirk JJ. A contribution to the great Riemann solver debate. International Journal for Numerical Methods in Fluids 1994; 18: 555-574) that approximate Riemann solvers, which share the exact capture of contact discontinuities, generally suffer from such failings. One of these is the odd-even decoupling that occurs along planar shocks aligned with the mesh. First, a few results on some failings are given, namely the carbuncle phenomenon and the kinked Mach stem. Then, following Quirk's analysis of Roe's scheme, general criteria are derived to predict the odd-even decoupling. This analysis is applied to Roe's scheme (Roe PL, Approximate Riemann solvers, parameters vectors, and difference schemes, Journal of Computational Physics 1981; 43: 357-372), the Equilibrium Flux Method (Pullin DI, Direct simulation methods for compressible inviscid ideal gas flow, Journal of Computational Physics 1980; 34: 231-244), the Equilibrium Interface Method (Macrossan MN, Oliver. RI, A kinetic theory solution method for the Navier-Stokes equations, International Journal for Numerical Methods in Fluids 1993; 17: 177-193) and the AUSM scheme (Liou MS, Steffen CJ, A new flux splitting scheme, Journal of Computational Physics 1993; 107: 23-39). Strict stability is shown to be desirable to avoid most of these flaws. Finally, the link between marginal stability and accuracy on shear waves is established. Copyright

  14. Chelyabinsk airburst shockwave characteristics from Korkino coal mine seismic records

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Popova, Olga; Rybnov, Yurij; Shuvalov, Valery; Jenniskens, Peter; Kharlamov, Vladimir; Usoltseva, Olga; Dyagilev, Ruslan

    The Chelyabinsk airburst of 15 February 2013, was exceptional because of the large kinetic energy of the impacting body and the airburst that was generated, creating significant damage and injuries in a densely populated area. The butterfly-shape of the damaged area (Popova et al., 2013) was explained from the fact that the energy was deposited over a range of altitudes. Some uncertainty remains about the source energy because it is not known precisely at what pressure glass is expected to break. Reasonable results were obtained for energies of 300-520 kt TNT and over pressures of 500-1000 Pa under assumption that energy release follows the light curve (Popova et al., 2013). There were no any instrumental records of overpressure in the damaged area. However, the coal mine at Korkino is situated in the damage area close to the meteoroid trajectory, almost immediately below the region of highest energy deposition. Its seismic control system with three-component geophones 3G4.5 recorded the blast wave from the meteoroid entry indirectly from its coupling to the ground. This is the only instrumental record of the airburst close to the meteoroid trajectory. Analysis of these records is presented, which allowed us to determine the source location and strength. The direction of the blast wave arrival coincides with the shortest distance to the trajectory. The amplitude of shock wave is evaluated and the measured values are in agreement with estimates of the source energy based on our numerical modeling of the glass damage area. Popova O.,Jenniskens P., Emel’yanenko V. et al. (the Chelyabinsk Airburst Consortium) Chelyabinsk Airburst, Damage Assessment, Meteorite Recovery, and Characterization, Science, 2013, 342, 1069-1073

  15. Numerical Investigation of Entrainment of Turbulent Dense Currents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhaganaagar, Kiran; Nayamatulla, Manjure

    2016-04-01

    Entrainment in dense overflows has fundamental importance for understanding the transport of densest water in the ocean. Estimation of entrainment is extremely challenging and to-date we do not have a fundamental framework that parameterizes entrainment. A highly accurate direct numerical simulation and large eddy simulation solvers have been developed to simulate dense currents over range of smooth- and rough-surfaces. Simulations have been performed for both lock-exchange currents and constant flux currents. A mathematical framework has been developed to estimate entrainment of 2-D and 3-D dense currents. Entrainment has been calculated from first-principles as the relative change in the volume of the dense current in time with respect to the buoyancy forcing that drives the dense current. A combination of threshold method, wherein the height of current is evaluated as height corresponding to the specified threshold value and sorting method, wherein, the mixed fluid is sorted into bins ranging from dense fluid at the bottom to ambient fluid at the top has been used to evaluate the interface between the dense and ambient fluid. Entrainment is sensitive to the method of evaluation of the interface height. Finally, we obtained the dependency of entrainment parameter on non-dimensional parameters. Analysis has demonstrated lock-exchange currents have less mixing and entrainment for same Reynolds number and Froude's number than constant flux currents. The differences exist due to differences in nature of Kelvin-Helmholtz instabilities and lobe-cleft currents. Rough-bottom surfaces introduces additional dynamics of the dense currents. The spacing between the roughness elements has demonstrated to be important metric in entrainment parameters for lock-exchange currents. Densely spaced (D-type) currents travel slower as roughness causes hindrance on density current propagation due to enhanced drag and produces additional eddies and instabilities compared to sparsely

  16. Application of CHAD hydrodynamics to shock-wave problems

    SciTech Connect

    Trease, H.E.; O`Rourke, P.J.; Sahota, M.S.

    1997-12-31

    CHAD is the latest in a sequence of continually evolving computer codes written to effectively utilize massively parallel computer architectures and the latest grid generators for unstructured meshes. Its applications range from automotive design issues such as in-cylinder and manifold flows of internal combustion engines, vehicle aerodynamics, underhood cooling and passenger compartment heating, ventilation, and air conditioning to shock hydrodynamics and materials modeling. CHAD solves the full unsteady Navier-Stoke equations with the k-epsilon turbulence model in three space dimensions. The code has four major features that distinguish it from the earlier KIVA code, also developed at Los Alamos. First, it is based on a node-centered, finite-volume method in which, like finite element methods, all fluid variables are located at computational nodes. The computational mesh efficiently and accurately handles all element shapes ranging from tetrahedra to hexahedra. Second, it is written in standard Fortran 90 and relies on automatic domain decomposition and a universal communication library written in standard C and MPI for unstructured grids to effectively exploit distributed-memory parallel architectures. Thus the code is fully portable to a variety of computing platforms such as uniprocessor workstations, symmetric multiprocessors, clusters of workstations, and massively parallel platforms. Third, CHAD utilizes a variable explicit/implicit upwind method for convection that improves computational efficiency in flows that have large velocity Courant number variations due to velocity of mesh size variations. Fourth, CHAD is designed to also simulate shock hydrodynamics involving multimaterial anisotropic behavior under high shear. The authors will discuss CHAD capabilities and show several sample calculations showing the strengths and weaknesses of CHAD.

  17. Laser-induced shockwave paired with FRET: a method to study cell signaling.

    PubMed

    Gomez-Godinez, Veronica; Preece, Daryl; Shi, Linda; Khatibzadeh, Nima; Rosales, Derrick; Pan, Yijia; Lei, Lie; Wang, Yingxiao; Berns, Michael W

    2015-03-01

    Cells within the body are subject to various forces; however, the details concerning the way in which cells respond to mechanical stimuli are not well understood. We demonstrate that laser-induced shockwaves (LIS) combined with biosensors based on fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) is a promising new approach to study biological processes in single live cells. As "proof-of-concept," using a FRET biosensor, we show that in response to LIS, cells release intracellular calcium. With the parameters used, cells retain their morphology and remain viable. LIS combined with FRET permits observation of the cells immediate response to a sudden shear force. PMID:25639252

  18. Working mechanism of extracorporeal shockwave therapy in non-urological disciplines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schaden, Wolfgang

    2005-04-01

    For 32 years of extracorporeal shockwave lithotripsy (ESWL) only the mechanical strength of shockwaves were of clinical interest. For use in orthopaedics, the absence of dangerous long term effects (malignant degeneration, etc.) is the only important message. The mechanical model tries to explain the effect of shock waves by the provocation of microleasions in the tissue stimulating repairing processes. First doubts on this mechanical model came up when Schaden (2001) could show, that less energy is more efficient in the treatment of non-unions. Due to the basic research of the last years knowledge increased about the microbiological effects. Under the influence of shock waves the change of permeability of cell membranes and the liberation of free radicals was reported. Also the production of nitric oxide (NO) and different growth factors like vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), bone morphogenetic proteins (BMP), transforming growth factor-beta 1 (TGF-b1), insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I) etc. was observed. The biological model tries to explain the effect of shock waves by stimulating the ingrowth of blood vessels and liberation of growth factors. Under the influence of shock waves, biological tissues seem to be able to produce important substances to initiate healing processes.

  19. Generation of Shock-Wave Disturbances at Plasma-Vapor Bubble Oscillation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuznetsova, N. S.; Yudin, A. S.; Voitenko, N. V.

    2015-11-01

    The complex physical and mathematical model describing all steps of plasma-vapor bubble evolution in the system of the water-ground condensed media is presented. Discharge circuit operation, discharge plasma channel expansion, its transformation into the vapor-plasma bubble and its pulsation, pressure wave generation and propagation of the mechanical stress waves in the ground are self-consistently considered in the model. The model allows investigation of the basic laws of stored energy transformation into the discharge plasma channel, next to the plasma-vapor bubble and transformation of this energy to the energy of pressure wave compressing the surrounding ground. Power characteristics of wave disturbances generated by gas-vapor bubble oscillation in liquid depending on the circuit parameters are analyzed for the prediction of the ground boundary displacement. The dynamics of the shock-wave propagation in water-ground condensed media depending on the rate of the plasma channel energy release is investigated. Simulation of the shock-wave phenomena at a plasma-vapor bubble oscillation in condensed media consecutively describes the physical processes underlying technology for producing piles by electro-discharge stuffing. The quantitative model verified by physical experimental tests will allow optimization of pulse generator parameters and electrode system construction of high-voltage equipment.

  20. Shock-wave measurements of solids using the long-pulsed laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uchino, Mazakazu; Kaetsu, Masahide; Mashimo, Tsutomu

    1997-05-01

    The optical measurement system using long-pulsed lasers were constructed for shock-wave measurements and spectroscopy under shock compression of solids. We have produced two types of long-pulsed lasers with no Q-switch for such purposes: Nd:YAG frequency-double laser using an intracavity KTP crystal, and dye laser using a rhodamine 6G. They consisted of doubled-elliptical pump cavity, two zenon flash lamps, and a high-voltage electrical-pulse source. The former one can be used as a light source for a Fabry-Perot type Interferometer (FPI), and the latter one can be used as a constant light source for a luminescence or an absorption spectroscopy and for the inclined-mirror method. The inclined-mirror Hugoniot measurements of some materials were performed by using the long-pulsed dye laser and the mirror- rotating type streak camera. The time resolution was increased by using a narrow width slit and the laser. The velocity-interferometer system for shock-wave measurements using a FPI and the time-resolved optical spectroscopy system using a spectrometer were constructed combined with the Nd:YAG frequency-doubled laser and the dye laser, respectively, and with an image-converter streak camera.

  1. Experimental study of pulsed power driven radiative shockwaves in noble gases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skidmore, J.; Lebedev, S.; Suzuki-Vidal, F.; Bland, S.; Swadling, G.; Burdiak, G.; Hall, G.; Patankar, S.; de Grouchy, P.; Suttle, L.; Bennett, M.; Pickworth, L.; Khoory, E.; Smith, R.; Rodriguez, R.; Gil, J.

    2013-10-01

    The use of plastic disks coated with a thin film of Aluminium has been investigated as a control mechanism for the shockwave formed from a radial foil z-pinch in the presence of an ambient medium. Experiments were carried out on the MAGPIE (1.4 MA, 250 ns rise time) facility at Imperial College London. The configuration produces a strong radiative shockwave driven with constant velocity (>25 km/s) for long time (>400 ns) and spatial scales (cm). Experimental results demonstrate scaling of shock compression opposite to that found in 1D radiation hydrodynamic simulations. Evidence of a thermal instability in the post-shock cooling region is linked to a decrease in compression for higher atomic masses due to increased radiative cooling. Increases in post-shock temperature and ionization have been measured with decreased radial distance from a strongly cooling hydrodynamic jet. Regions of observed thermal instability for Xenon and Krypton agree with those expected from evaluation of theoretical cooling functions. Institute of Shock Physics, Imperial College London.

  2. Results of a supersonic, single-mode, shockwave-driven Kelvin-Helmholtz instability experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wan, W. C.; Malamud, G.; di Stefano, C. A.; Trantham, M. R.; Klein, S. R.; Shimony, A.; Shvarts, D.; Kuranz, C. C.; Drake, R. P.

    2014-10-01

    The Kelvin-Helmholtz instability is a hydrodynamic process that causes mixing at an interface with shear flow. It is prevalent in many high-energy-density systems such as fusion research, core-collapse supernovae, and protoplanetary disks. Although it is common to simplify the Euler equations by assuming incompressibility, this assumption does not account for the inhibited growth rate found in supersonic flows. Here, we present the first laboratory observations of single-mode, compressible Kelvin-Helmholtz instability growth. This experiment was performed at the OMEGA-EP facility using three beams stitched into a 28 ns square pulse to sustain a shockwave in low-density foam. The shockwave generated shear along the interface between the foam and a high-density plastic, seeded with a precisely machined single-mode sinusoidal perturbation. The system was diagnosed using radiography with a spherically bent crystal. This work is funded by the U.S. Department of Energy, through the NNSA-DS and SC-OFES Joint Program in High-Energy-Density Laboratory Plasmas, Grant Number DE-NA0001840, the National Laser User Facility Program, Grant Number DE-NA0000850, and the Laboratory for Laser Energetics, University of Rochester by the NNSA/OICF under Cooperative Agreement No. DE-FC52-08NA28302.

  3. Large-Eddy Simulation of Shock-Wave Boundary Layer Interaction and its Control Using Sparkjet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Guang; Yao, Yufeng; Fang, Jian; Gan, Tian; Lu, Lipeng

    2016-06-01

    Large-eddy simulation (LES) of an oblique shock-wave generated by an 8° sharp wedge impinging onto a spatially-developing Mach 2.3 turbulent boundary layer and their interactions has been carried out in this study. The Reynolds number based on the incoming flow property and the boundary layer displacement thickness at the impinging point without shock-wave is 20,000. The detailed numerical approaches are described and the inflow turbulence is generated using the digital filter method to avoid artificial temporal or streamwise periodicity. Numerical results are compared with the available wind tunnel PIV measurements of the same flow conditions. Further LES study on the control of flow separation due to the strong shock-viscous interaction is also conducted by using an active control actuator “SparkJet” concept. The single-pulsed characteristics of the control device are obtained and compared with the experiments. Instantaneous flowfield shows that the “SparkJet” promotes the flow mixing in the boundary layer and enhances its ability to resist the flow separation. The time and spanwise averaged skin friction coefficient distribution demonstrates that the separation bubble length is reduced by maximum 35% with the control exerted.

  4. Reduction of tissue injury in shock-wave lithotripsy by using an acoustic diode.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Songlin; Dreyer, Thomas; Liebler, Marko; Riedlinger, Rainer; Preminger, Glenn M; Zhong, Pei

    2004-05-01

    An acoustic diode (AD) was constructed of two acoustic transparent membranes with good initial contact to allow the transmission of the positive pressure of lithotripter shock wave at an almost unaltered level, yet attenuate significantly its negative pressure, was fabricated. It was evaluated systematically on a Dornier HM-3 lithotripter to assess its application potential to reduce vascular injury without compromising stone fragmentation efficiency during shock-wave lithotripsy. By inserting the AD, the maximum compressive pressure, maximum tensile pressure and tensile duration of the lithotripter shock wave were formed to drop from 49.7 to 47.8 MPa, -7.5 to -7.0 MPa and 6.0 to 5.1 micros, respectively. Damage of a 0.2-mm inner diameter vessel phantom (cellulose hollow fiber) was reduced from rupture after 31 +/- 11 shocks to no rupture after 100 shocks. Maximum bubble size in free-field, maximum dilation of the vessel phantom wall and bubble collapse time became smaller with the use of the AD. However, stone fragmentation showed similar results without a statistically significant difference between the case with and without the AD. All these evidences suggest that the use of an acoustic diode may be a feasible approach to reduce tissue injury without compromising stone comminution in shock-wave lithotripsy. PMID:15183234

  5. Explosively driven two-shockwave tools with application to ejecta formation at the Los Alamos National Laboratory Proton Radiography Facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buttler, William

    2013-06-01

    We present the development of an explosively driven physics tool to generate two mostly uniaxial shockwaves. The tool is being used to extend single shockwave ejecta models to a subsequent shockwave event separated by a time interval on the order of a few microseconds. We explore the possibility of varying the amplitude of both the first and second shockwaves, and we apply the tool in experimental geometries on Sn with a surface roughness of Ra = 0 . 8 μ m. We then evaluate the tool further at the Los Alamos National Laboratory Proton Radiography (pRad) Facility in an application to Sn with larger scale perturbations of wavelength 550 μ m, and various amplitudes that gave wave-number amplitude products of η0 2 π / λ = { 3 / 4 , 1 / 2 , 1 / 4 , 1 / 8 } , where the perturbation amplitude is η0, and the wave-number k = 2 π / λ . The pRad data and velocimetry imply it should be possible to develop a second shock ejecta model based on unstable Richtmyer-Meshkov physics. In collaboration with David Oro, Fesseha Mariam, Alexander Saunders, Malcolm Andrews, Frank Cherne, James Hammerberg. Robert Hixson, Christopher Morris, Russell Olson, Dean Preston, Joseph Stone, Dale Tupa, and Wendy Vogan-McNeil, Los Alamos National Laboratory,

  6. Warm dense crystallography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valenza, Ryan A.; Seidler, Gerald T.

    2016-03-01

    The intense femtosecond-scale pulses from x-ray free electron lasers (XFELs) are able to create and interrogate interesting states of matter characterized by long-lived nonequilibrium semicore or core electron occupancies or by the heating of dense phases via the relaxation cascade initiated by the photoelectric effect. We address here the latter case of "warm dense matter" (WDM) and investigate the observable consequences of x-ray heating of the electronic degrees of freedom in crystalline systems. We report temperature-dependent density functional theory calculations for the x-ray diffraction from crystalline LiF, graphite, diamond, and Be. We find testable, strong signatures of condensed-phase effects that emphasize the importance of wide-angle scattering to study nonequilibrium states. These results also suggest that the reorganization of the valence electron density at eV-scale temperatures presents a confounding factor to achieving atomic resolution in macromolecular serial femtosecond crystallography (SFX) studies at XFELs, as performed under the "diffract before destroy" paradigm.

  7. DENSE MEDIUM CYCLONE OPTIMIZATON

    SciTech Connect

    Gerald H. Luttrell; Chris J. Barbee; Peter J. Bethell; Chris J. Wood

    2005-06-30

    Dense medium cyclones (DMCs) are known to be efficient, high-tonnage devices suitable for upgrading particles in the 50 to 0.5 mm size range. This versatile separator, which uses centrifugal forces to enhance the separation of fine particles that cannot be upgraded in static dense medium separators, can be found in most modern coal plants and in a variety of mineral plants treating iron ore, dolomite, diamonds, potash and lead-zinc ores. Due to the high tonnage, a small increase in DMC efficiency can have a large impact on plant profitability. Unfortunately, the knowledge base required to properly design and operate DMCs has been seriously eroded during the past several decades. In an attempt to correct this problem, a set of engineering tools have been developed to allow producers to improve the efficiency of their DMC circuits. These tools include (1) low-cost density tracers that can be used by plant operators to rapidly assess DMC performance, (2) mathematical process models that can be used to predict the influence of changes in operating and design variables on DMC performance, and (3) an expert advisor system that provides plant operators with a user-friendly interface for evaluating, optimizing and trouble-shooting DMC circuits. The field data required to develop these tools was collected by conducting detailed sampling and evaluation programs at several industrial plant sites. These data were used to demonstrate the technical, economic and environmental benefits that can be realized through the application of these engineering tools.

  8. Al 1s-2p Absorption Spectroscopy of Shock-Wave Heating and Compression in Laser-Driven Planar Foil

    SciTech Connect

    Sawada, H.; Regan, S.P.; Radha, P.B.; Epstein, R.; Li, D.; Goncharov, V.N.; Hu, S.X.; Meyerhofer, D.D.; Delettrez, J.A.; Jaanimagi, P.A.; Smalyuk, V.A.; Boehly, T.R.; Sangster, T.C.; Yaakobi, B.; Mancini, R.C.

    2009-05-19

    Time-resolved Al 1s-2p absorption spectroscopy is used to diagnose direct-drive, shock-wave heating and compression of planar targets having nearly Fermi-degenerate plasma conditions (Te ~ 10–40 eV, rho ~ 3–11 g/cm^3) on the OMEGA Laser System [T. R. Boehly et al., Opt. Commun. 133, 495 (1997)]. A planar plastic foil with a buried Al tracer layer was irradiated with peak intensities of 10^14–10^15 W/cm^2 and probed with the pseudocontinuum M-band emission from a point-source Sm backlighter in the range of 1.4–1.7 keV. The laser ablation process launches 10–70 Mbar shock waves into the CH/Al/CH target. The Al 1s-2p absorption spectra were analyzed using the atomic physic code PRISMSPECT to infer Te and rho in the Al layer, assuming uniform plasma conditions during shock-wave heating, and to determine when the heat front penetrated the Al layer. The drive foils were simulated with the one-dimensional hydrodynamics code LILAC using a flux-limited (f =0.06 and f =0.1) and nonlocal thermal-transport model [V. N. Goncharov et al., Phys. Plasmas 13, 012702 (2006)]. The predictions of simulated shock-wave heating and the timing of heat-front penetration are compared to the observations. The experimental results for a wide variety of laser-drive conditions and buried depths have shown that the LILAC predictions using f = 0.06 and the nonlocal model accurately model the shock-wave heating and timing of the heat-front penetration while the shock is transiting the target. The observed discrepancy between the measured and simulated shock-wave heating at late times of the drive can be explained by the reduced radiative heating due to lateral heat flow in the corona.

  9. Minimum radius of chondrules formed through the shock-wave heating events.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miura, H.; Nakamoto, T.

    Most of chondritic meteorites that fall onto the Earth contain spherical igneous rocks, which have a typical size distribution between about ten microns to a few mm. These are named chondrules. They are considered to have formed through flash heating events in the solar nebula; precursor dust particles were heated and melted, and cooled again to solidify in a short period of time. The characteristic size distribution of chondrule is expected to have a relation to the chondrule formation mechanism. We report that chondrules formed through the shock-wave heating events have minimum size below which no chondrule exists. The shock wave heating is one of the most popular mechanisms for chondrule formation. For example, Iida et al. (2001) numerically simulated the postshock region taking into account many physical and chemical processes and showed that precursor particles can form chondrules if the shock meets a certain density and velocity conditions. They also showed that the formed chondrules in the postshock region are exposed by the hot gas in that region until the gas cools by emission of radiation. The duration of the phase is about a few hundreds seconds for a typical shock wave. In this phase, the temperature of the chondrule is kept very high (more than 1500 K) by the thermal conduction with the hot gas. Then, it is naturally expected that the evaporation from the surface of the chondrule should take place and the radius of the chondrule should shrink. Small chondrules may vanish in the postshock hot gas region. We performed numerical simulations of chondrule formation and evaporation with a shock-wave heating model. And we found that precursor particles with various radii can form chondrules once, but only large particles whose initial radii are larger than about 10 microns can survive in the postshock hot gas. Moreover, the final radii of survived particles are larger than about 10 microns for typical shock velocity vs and gas number density npre (vs = 5 - 30

  10. Extracorporeal shockwave therapy for Peyronie's disease does not correct penile deformity.

    PubMed

    Strebel, R T; Suter, S; Sautter, T; Hauri, D

    2004-10-01

    To evaluate whether extracorporeal shockwave therapy (ESWT) offers an effective treatment for the main complications of Peyronie's disease (PD), that is, penile deformity and angulation, painful erection and most importantly unsatisfied sexual intercourse. From September 1999 to January 2001, 52 patients with PD were treated with ESWT. Pain during erection was assessed with a visual analogue scale. Penile deviation was determined by photographs with a goniometer. Five treatment sessions were performed at weekly intervals. Each consisted of 3000 shockwaves with an emission frequency of 120 shockwaves/min and a mean intensity of 0.17 mJ/mm(2). A Storz Minilith SL 1 with integrated inline ultrasound probe was used. In all, 52 patients were evaluated 6 weeks after ESWT for early follow-up. Before ESWT intercourse was difficult or impossible for 40 men; 29 patients suffered mainly from penile deformity, 14 from painful erection and eight mainly from loss of distal rigidity. A total of 30 patients mentioned painful erection before treatment. In 28 patients (93%) pain reduction was achieved. A total relief of pain was observed in 19 patients (63%). Mean pain score dropped from 4.2 to 1.3 in patients who suffered predominantly from painful erections. Intercourse satisfaction improved in 11 patients after therapy. Mean angulation before (40 degrees ) and after (37 degrees ) ESWT did not change significantly. Late follow-up after 11.1 months (4-17 months) could be completed in 36 patients. In total, 19 men reported that ESWT improved their PD. Of these, 16 noted no change. Only one of the patients noticed a worsening of his disease during or after treatment. Complication rate was low with only minor side effects such as minimal skin bruising; one urethral bleeding occurred. ESWT did reduce pain during erection in patients suffering mainly from painful erection due to PD. However, penile angulation did not improve significantly in our setup and thus intercourse difficulties

  11. Impact-activated solidification of dense suspensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Waitukaitis, Scott

    2013-03-01

    Shear-thickening, non-Newtonian fluids have typically been investigated under steady-state conditions. This approach has produced two pictures for suspension response to imposed forcing. In the weak shear-thickening picture, the response is typically attributed to the hydrodynamic interactions giving rise to hydroclusters, small groups of particles interacting through lubrication forces. At the other end of the spectrum, in the discontinuous shear-thickening regime, the response can be seen as a system-wide jamming that is ultimately limited in strength by the system boundaries. While these steady-state pictures have proven extremely useful, some of the most interesting phenomena associated with dense suspensions is transient and local in character. A prototypical example is the extraordinarily large impact resistance of dense suspensions such as cornstarch and water. When poked lightly these materials respond like a fluid, but when punched or kicked they seem to temporarily ``solidify'' and provide enormous resistance to the motion of the impacting object. Using an array of experimental techniques, including high-speed video, embedded force and acceleration sensing, and x-ray imaging, we are able to investigate the dynamic details this process as it unfolds. We find that an impacting object drives the rapid growth of a jammed, solid-like region directly below the impact site. Being coupled to the surrounding fluid by grain-mediated lubrication forces, this creates substantial peripheral flow and ultimately leads to the sudden extraction of the impactor's momentum. With a simple jamming picture to describe the solidification and an added mass model to explain the force on the rod, we are able to predict the forces on the impactor quantitatively. These findings highlight the importance of the non-equilibrium character of dense suspensions near jamming and might serve as a bridge between the weak and discontinuous shear-thickening pictures.

  12. Dense Hypervelocity Plasma Jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Witherspoon, F. Douglas; Case, Andrew; Phillips, Michael W.

    2006-10-01

    High velocity dense plasma jets are under continued experimental development for a variety of fusion applications including refueling, disruption mitigation, rotation drive, and magnetized target fusion. The technical goal is to accelerate plasma slugs of density >10^17 cm-3 and total mass >100 micrograms to velocities >200 km/s. The approach utilizes symmetrical injection of very high density plasma into a coaxial EM accelerator having a tailored cross-section geometry to prevent formation of the blow-by instability. Injected plasma is generated by electrothermal capillary discharges using either cylindrical capillaries or a newer toroidal spark gap arrangement that has worked at pressures as low as 3.5 x10-6 Torr in bench tests. Experimental plasma data will be presented for a complete 32 injector accelerator system recently built for driving rotation in the Maryland MCX experiment which utilizes the cylindrical capillaries, and also for a 50 spark gap test unit currently under construction.

  13. Particle-based simulations of bilayer membranes: self-assembly, structural analysis, and shock-wave damage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steinhauser, Martin O.; Schindler, Tanja

    2016-08-01

    We report on the results of particle-based, coarse-grained molecular dynamics simulations of amphiphilic lipid molecules in aqueous environment where the membrane structures at equilibrium are subsequently exposed to strong shock waves, and their damage is analyzed. The lipid molecules self-assemble from unbiased random initial configurations to form stable bilayer membranes, including closed vesicles. During self-assembly of lipid molecules, we observe several stages of clustering, starting with many small clusters of lipids, gradually merging together to finally form one single bilayer membrane. We find that the clustering of lipids sensitively depends on the hydrophobic interaction h_c of the lipid tails in our model and on temperature T of the system. The self-assembled bilayer membranes are quantitatively analyzed at equilibrium with respect to their degree of order and their local structure. We also show that—by analyzing the membrane fluctuations and using a linearized theory— we obtain area compression moduli K_A and bending stiffnesses κ_B for our bilayer membranes which are within the experimental range of in vivo and in vitro measurements of biological membranes. We also discuss the density profile and the pair correlation function of our model membranes at equilibrium which has not been done in previous studies of particle-based membrane models. Furthermore, we present a detailed phase diagram of our lipid model that exhibits a sol-gel transition between quasi-solid and fluid domains, and domains where no self-assembly of lipids occurs. In addition, we present in the phase diagram the conditions for temperature T and hydrophobicity h_c of the lipid tails of our model to form closed vesicles. The stable bilayer membranes obtained at equilibrium are then subjected to strong shock waves in a shock tube setup, and we investigate the damage in the membranes due to their interaction with shock waves. Here, we find a transition from self

  14. Relativistic Modelling of Stable Anisotropic Super-Dense Star

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maurya, S. K.; Gupta, Y. K.; Jasim, M. K.

    2015-08-01

    In the present article we have obtained new set of exact solutions of Einstein field equations for anisotropic fluid spheres by using the Herrera et al. [1] algorithm. The anisotropic fluid solutions so obtained join continuously to the Schwarzschild exterior solution across the pressure-free boundary. It is observed that most of the new anisotropic solutions are well-behaved and are used to construct the super-dense star models such as neutron stars and pulsars.

  15. Shock-wave compression of silica gel as a model material for comets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arasuna, Akane; Okuno, Masayuki; Chen, Liliang; Mashimo, Tsutomu; Okudera, Hiroki; Mizukami, Tomoyuki; Arai, Shoji

    2016-07-01

    A shock-wave compression experiment using synthesized silica gel was investigated as a model for a comet impact event on the Earth's surface. The sample shocked at 20.7 GPa showed considerable structural changes, a release of water molecules, and the dehydration of silanol (Si-OH) that led to the formation of a new Si-O-Si network structure containing larger rings (e.g., six-membered ring of SiO4 tetrahedra). The high aftershock temperature at 20.7 GPa, which could be close to 800 °C, influenced the sample structure. However, some silanols, which were presumed to be the mutually hydrogen-bonded silanol group, remained at pressures >20.7 GPa. This type of silanol along with a small number of water molecules may remain even after shock compression at 30.9 GPa, although the intermediate structure of the sample recovered was similar to that of silica glass.

  16. CHARADE: A characteristic code for calculating rate-dependent shock-wave response

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, J.N.; Tonks, D.L.

    1991-01-01

    In this report we apply spatially one-dimensional methods and simple shock-tracking techniques to the solution of rate-dependent material response under flat-plate-impact conditions. This method of solution eliminates potential confusion of material dissipation with artificial dissipative effects inherent in finite-difference codes, and thus lends itself to accurate calculation of elastic-plastic deformation, shock-to-detonation transition in solid explosives, and shock-induced structural phase transformation. Equations are presented for rate-dependent thermoelastic-plastic deformation for (100) planar shock-wave propagation in materials of cubic symmetry (or higher). Specific numerical calculations are presented for polycrystalline copper using the mechanical threshold stress model of Follansbee and Kocks with transition to dislocation drag. A listing of the CHARADE (for characteristic rate dependence) code and sample input deck are given. 26 refs., 11 figs.

  17. Study of shockwave method for diagnosing the radiation fields of laser-driven gold hohlraums

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yongsheng; Lan, Ke; Huo, Wenyi; Lai, Dongxian; Gao, Yaoming; Pei, Wenbing

    2013-11-01

    Besides the routinely used broad-band x-ray spectrometer (Dante or SXS), ablative shock-wave method is often used to diagnose the radiation fields of laser-driven Hohlraums. The x-ray ablation process of Aluminum and Titanium is studied numerically with a 1-D radiation hydrodynamic code RDMG [F. Tinggui et al., Chin. J. Comput. Phys. 16, 199 (1999)], based on which a new scaling relation of the equivalent radiation temperature with the ablative shock velocity in Aluminum plates is proposed, and a novel method is developed for determining simultaneously the radiation temperature and the M-band (2-4 keV) fraction in laser-driven gold Hohlraums.

  18. Shock-wave compression of silica gel as a model material for comets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arasuna, Akane; Okuno, Masayuki; Chen, Liliang; Mashimo, Tsutomu; Okudera, Hiroki; Mizukami, Tomoyuki; Arai, Shoji

    2016-03-01

    A shock-wave compression experiment using synthesized silica gel was investigated as a model for a comet impact event on the Earth's surface. The sample shocked at 20.7 GPa showed considerable structural changes, a release of water molecules, and the dehydration of silanol (Si-OH) that led to the formation of a new Si-O-Si network structure containing larger rings (e.g., six-membered ring of SiO4 tetrahedra). The high aftershock temperature at 20.7 GPa, which could be close to 800 °C, influenced the sample structure. However, some silanols, which were presumed to be the mutually hydrogen-bonded silanol group, remained at pressures >20.7 GPa. This type of silanol along with a small number of water molecules may remain even after shock compression at 30.9 GPa, although the intermediate structure of the sample recovered was similar to that of silica glass.

  19. Relationship among shock-wave velocity, particle velocity, and adiabatic exponent for dry air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, In H.; Hong, Sang H.; Jhung, Kyu S.; Oh, Ki-Hwan; Yoon, Yo K.

    1991-07-01

    Using the results of the detailed numerical calculations, it is shown that the relationship between the shock-wave velocity U sub s and the particle velocity U sub p for shock-compressed dry air can be represented accurately by the linear relation U sub s = a(P0) + b(P0)U sub p in a wide range of U sub p (U sub p = 2 to 9 ) km/s and initial pressure P0 = 10 to the -6th to 1 atm, where a and b are given by the cubic polynomials of log10P0. Based on the linear U sub s - U sub p relation, an analytic expression has been obtained for the adiabatic exponent gamma as a function of particle velocity.

  20. Constitutive model used in computer simulation of time-resolved, shock-wave data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steinberg, D. J.

    1986-10-01

    A constitutive model was designed for use with high-speed, hydrodynamic computer codes. The model, valid at high-deformation rates, accounts for pressure and temperature dependence of the yield strength and shear modulus, work hardening, pressure-dependent melting, Bauschinger and strain-rate effects, and spall. There are a minimum number of parameters needed to implement the model, and most can be determined without recourse to shock-wave data. At Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, we assembled a library of these material properties for 44 metals, alloys, mixtures, and compounds. Shock and release data from plate-impact experiments for Be, U, Ta, Cu, 1100-0, and 6061-T6 al, with peak stresses from 6.4 to 230 GPa, are successfully compared against calculations.

  1. Quantum molecular dynamics simulation of shock-wave experiments in aluminum

    SciTech Connect

    Minakov, D. V.; Khishchenko, K. V.; Fortov, V. E.; Levashov, P. R.

    2014-06-14

    We present quantum molecular dynamics calculations of principal, porous, and double shock Hugoniots, release isentropes, and sound velocity behind the shock front for aluminum. A comprehensive analysis of available shock-wave data is performed; the agreement and discrepancies of simulation results with measurements are discussed. Special attention is paid to the melting region of aluminum along the principal Hugoniot; the boundaries of the melting zone are estimated using the self-diffusion coefficient. Also, we make a comparison with a high-quality multiphase equation of state for aluminum. Independent semiempirical and first-principle models are very close to each other in caloric variables (pressure, density, particle velocity, etc.) but the equation of state gives higher temperature on the principal Hugoniot and release isentropes than ab initio calculations. Thus, the quantum molecular dynamics method can be used for calibration of semiempirical equations of state in case of lack of experimental data.

  2. Fluid imbalance

    MedlinePlus

    ... up in the body. This is called fluid overload (volume overload). This can lead to edema (excess fluid in ... Water imbalance; Fluid imbalance - dehydration; Fluid buildup; Fluid overload; Volume overload; Loss of fluids; Edema - fluid imbalance; ...

  3. Safety and efficacy of low intensity shockwave (LISW) treatment in patients with erectile dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Ruffo, A.; Capece, M.; Prezioso, D.; Romeo, G.; Illiano, E.; Romis, L.; Lauro, G. Di; Iacono, F.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT The primary goal in the management strategy of a patient with ED would be to determine its etiology and cure it when possible, and not just to treat the symptoms alone. One of the new therapeutic strategies is the use of low intensity extracorporeal shockwave (LISW) therapy. The mechanism of shockwave therapy is not completely clear. It is suggested that LISW induces neovascularization and improvement of cavernosal arterial flow which can lead to an improvement of erectile function by releasing NO, VEGF and PCNA. Materials and Methods: 31 patients between February and June 2013 with mild to severe ED and non-Phosphodiesterase 5 inhibitors responders were enrolled. Patients underwent four weekly treatment sessions. During each session 3600 shocks at 0.09mJ/ mm2 were given, 900 shocks at each anatomical area (right and left corpus cavernosum, right and left crus). Improvement of the erectile function was evaluated using the International Index of Erectile Function (IIEF-EF), the Sexual Encounter Profile (SEP) diaries (SEP-Questions 2 and 3) and Global Assessment Questions (GAQ-Q1 and GAQ-Q2). Results: At 3-month follow-up IIEF-EF scores improved from 16.54±6.35 at baseline to 21.03±6.38. Patients answering ‘yes’ to the SEP-Q2 elevated from 61% to 89% and from 32% to 62% in the SEP-Q3. A statistically significant improvement was reported to the Global Assessment Questions (GAQ-Q1 and GAQ-Q2). Conclusion: In conclusion, we can affirm that LISW is a confirmed therapeutic approach to erectile dysfunction that definitely needs more long-term trials to be clarified and further verified. PMID:26689523

  4. Extracorporeal shockwave therapy (ESWT) ameliorates healing of tibial fracture non-union unresponsive to conventional therapy.

    PubMed

    Haffner, Nicolas; Antonic, Vlado; Smolen, Daniel; Slezak, Paul; Schaden, Wolfgang; Mittermayr, Rainer; Stojadinovic, Alexander

    2016-07-01

    Tibial non-unions are common cause of demanding revision surgeries and are associated with a significant impact on patients' quality of life and health care costs. Extracorporeal shockwave therapy (ESWT) has been shown to improve osseous healing in vitro and in vivo. The main objective of present study was to evaluate the efficacy of ESWT in healing of tibial non-unions unresponsive to previous surgical and non-surgical measures. A retrospective multivariant analysis of a prospective open, single-centre, clinical trial of tibia non-union was conducted. 56 patients with 58 eligible fractures who met the FDA criteria were included. All patients received 3000-4000 impulses of electrohydraulic shockwaves at an energy flux density of 0.4mJ/mm(2) (-6dB). On average patients underwent 1.9 times (±1.3SD) surgical interventions prior to ESWT displaying the rather negatively selected cohort and its limited therapy responsiveness. In 88.5% of patients receiving ESWT complete bone healing was observed after six months irrespective of underlying pathology. The multivariant analysis showed that time of application is important for therapy success. Patients achieving healing received ESWT earlier: mean number of days between last surgical intervention and ESWT (healed - 355.1 days±167.4SD vs. not healed - 836.7 days±383.0SD; p<0.0001). ESWT proved to be a safe, effective and non-invasive treatment modality in tibial non-unions recalcitrant to standard therapies. The procedure is well tolerated, time-saving, lacking side effects, with potential to significantly decrease health care costs. Thus, in our view, ESWT should be considered the treatment of first choice in established tibial non-unions. PMID:27158008

  5. Shock-wave compression and release of aluminum/ceramic composites

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, J.N.; Hixson, R.S.; Gray, G.T. III )

    1994-11-15

    Several composite materials consisting of ceramic particles embedded in a 6061-T6 aluminum matrix have been studied under conditions of shock-wave compression and release, including spallation. The 6061-T6 matrix represents a material for which high-rate shock-wave response has been extremely well characterized for thermoelastic-plastic deformation. The ceramic particles (alumina and mullite) are also well characterized, particularly in the elastic regime. Experimental tests consist of quasistatic, uniaxial-stress compression of both virgin and shock-recovered samples as well as time-resolved velocity interferometer measurements under conditions of flat-plate impact. The latter tests were performed with lithium fluoride windows for transmitted wave studies and free surfaces for spallation measurement. Theoretical analysis of the data is carried out with a pseudodissipation model originated by Barker [J. Composite Mat. [bold 5], 140 (1971)] for application to elastic deformation of layered composites and generalized here to include thermoelastic-plastic properties of the constituents. For a pseudodissipative model to apply to composite material response, significant geometrical randomization must be present in the composite structure; this is something that all commercially produced composites naturally possess. Randomization produces mechanical energy traps, which convert some fraction of regular, directed motion into random elastic vibrations behind the shock front. Within a few microseconds (depending on the pinned dislocation segment density) this macroscale, continuum vibrational energy is converted to heat by means of the anelastic properties of the metal matrix. The use of pseudodissipation as a means of representing dispersive composite material behavior is thus placed on a more secure physical foundation.

  6. Geometrical Optics of Dense Aerosols

    SciTech Connect

    Hay, Michael J.; Valeo, Ernest J.; Fisch, Nathaniel J.

    2013-04-24

    Assembling a free-standing, sharp-edged slab of homogeneous material that is much denser than gas, but much more rare ed than a solid, is an outstanding technological challenge. The solution may lie in focusing a dense aerosol to assume this geometry. However, whereas the geometrical optics of dilute aerosols is a well-developed fi eld, the dense aerosol limit is mostly unexplored. Yet controlling the geometrical optics of dense aerosols is necessary in preparing such a material slab. Focusing dense aerosols is shown here to be possible, but the nite particle density reduces the eff ective Stokes number of the flow, a critical result for controlled focusing. __________________________________________________

  7. Rheology of Dense Granular Mixtures and Slurries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tewoldebrhan, Bereket Yohannes

    Dense granular flows, characterized by multiple contacts between grains, are common in many industrial processes and natural events, such as debris flows. Understanding the characteristics of these flows is crucial to predict quantities such as bedrock erosion and distance traveled by debris flows. However, the rheological properties of these flows are complicated due to wide particle size distribution and presence of interstitial fluids. Models for dense sheared granular materials indicate that their rheological properties depend on particle size, but the representative particle size for mixtures is not obvious. Using the discrete element method (DEM) we study sheared granular binary mixtures in a Couette cell to determine the relationship and rheological parameters such as stress and effective coefficient of friction and particle size distribution. The results indicate that the stress does not depend monotonically on the average particle size as it does in models derived from simple dimensional consideration. The stress has an additional dependence on a measure of the effective free volume per particle that is adapted from an expression for packing of monosized particles near the jammed state. The effective friction also has a complicated dependence on particle size distribution. For these systems of relatively hard particles, these relationships are governed largely by the ratio between average collision times and mean-free-path times. The characteristics of shallow free surface flows, important for applications such as debris flows, are different from confined systems. To address this, we also study shallow granular flows in a rotating drum. The stress at the boundary, height profiles and segregation patterns from DEM simulations are quantitatively similar to the results obtained from physical experiments of shallow granular flows in rotating drums. Individual particle-bed impacts rather than enduring contacts dominate the largest forces on the drum bed, which

  8. Dense Hypervelocity Plasma Jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Case, Andrew; Witherspoon, F. Douglas; Messer, Sarah; Bomgardner, Richard; Phillips, Michael; van Doren, David; Elton, Raymond; Uzun-Kaymak, Ilker

    2007-11-01

    We are developing high velocity dense plasma jets for fusion and HEDP applications. Traditional coaxial plasma accelerators suffer from the blow-by instability which limits the mass accelerated to high velocity. In the current design blow-by is delayed by a combination of electrode shaping and use of a tailored plasma armature created by injection of a high density plasma at a few eV generated by arrays of capillary discharges or sparkgaps. Experimental data will be presented for a complete 32 injector gun system built for driving rotation in the Maryland MCX experiment, including data on penetration of the plasma jet through a magnetic field. We present spectroscopic measurements of plasma velocity, temperature, and density, as well as total momentum measured using a ballistic pendulum. Measurements are in agreement with each other and with time of flight data from photodiodes and a multichannel PMT. Plasma density is above 10^15 cm-3, velocities range up to about 100 km/s. Preliminary results from a quadrature heterodyne HeNe interferometer are consistent with these results.

  9. Application systems for the intracorporal laser-induced shockwave lithotripsy using the Nd:YAG Q-switched laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frank, Klaus H.; Eichenlaub, M.; Hessel, Stefan F. F.; Wondrazek, Fritz

    1990-06-01

    For the laser-induced shockwave lithotripsy the electromagnetic energy of a laser light pulse is converted intracorporally into the acoustic energy of a shock wave. The lithotriptor is based on a specially developed, Q-switched Nd:YAG laser whose high power light pulses (70 mJ, 25 ns) are coupled into a flexible quartz fiber of 600 pim core diameter. Using focussing elements energy densities higher than 6 1O J m2 can be achieved resulting in an optical breakdown in water followed by a shock wave. As a result of different absorption mechanisms the breakdown threshold can be decreased by placing a metallic target into the laser beam. The different shockwave formations of such optomechanical transducers have been measured. First clinical applications have been performed.

  10. Estimating the pressure of laser-induced plasma shockwave by stimulated Raman shift of lattice translational modes

    SciTech Connect

    Li Zhanlong; Shan Xiaoning; Li Zuowei; Zhou Mi; Men Zhiwei; Cao Junsheng; Wang Yiding; Sun Chenglin

    2012-07-09

    The current paper investigates stimulated Raman scattering (SRS) when laser-induced plasma is formed in heavy water by focusing an intense pulsed 532 nm Nd:YAG laser beam at room temperature. An unexpected low-frequency SRS line attributed to the lattice translational modes of ice-VII (D{sub 2}O) is observed. The pressure of the plasma shockwave is estimated using low-frequency SRS line shift.

  11. Meso-scale Computational Investigation of Shock-Wave Attenuation by Trailing Release Wave in Different Grades of Polyurea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grujicic, Mica; Snipes, J. S.; Ramaswami, S.; Yavari, R.; Ramasubramanian, M. K.

    2014-01-01

    Over the past several years, considerable research efforts have been made toward investigating polyurea, a segmented thermoplastic elastomer, and particularly its shock-mitigation capacity, i.e., an ability to attenuate and disperse shock-waves. These research efforts have clearly established that the shock-mitigation capacity of polyurea is closely related to its chemistry, processing route, and the resulting microstructure. Polyurea typically possesses a nano-segregated microstructure consisting of (high glass transition temperature, T g) hydrogen-bonded discrete hard domains and a (low T g) contiguous soft matrix. While the effect of polyurea microstructure on its shock-mitigation capacity is well-established, it is not presently clear what microstructure-dependent phenomena and processes control its shock-mitigation capacity. To help identify these phenomena and processes, meso-scale simulations of the formation of nano-segregated microstructure and its interaction with a leading shock-wave and a trailing release-wave is analyzed in the present work. The results obtained revealed that shock-induced hard-domain densification makes an important contribution to the superior shock-mitigation capacity of polyurea, and that the extent of densification is a sensitive function of the polyurea soft-segment molecular weight. In particular, the ability of release-waves to capture and neutralize shock-waves has been found to depend strongly on the extent of shock-induced hard-domain densification and, thus, on the polyurea soft-segment molecular weight.

  12. Shockwave-Induced Plasticity Via Large-Scale Nonequilibrium Molecular Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holian, Brad Lee

    1997-07-01

    In nonequilibrium molecular-dynamics (MD) simulations of shock waves in single crystals, carried out in 1979 at Los Alamos,(B.L. Holian and G.K. Straub, Phys. Rev. Lett. 43), 1598 (1979). we discovered that, above a threshold strength, strongly shocked crystals deform in a very simple way. Rather than experiencing massive deformation, a simple slippage occurs at the shock front, relieving the peak shear stress, and leaving behind a stacking fault. We realized, of course, that real materials could yield at much lower thresholds, and speculated then that pre-existing defects could nucleate plastic flow at lower shock strengths than those characteristic of pure single crystals. (Historical note: at about the same time as our earliest dynamical shockwave simulations, Mogilevsky, working independently in the Soviet Union, carried out relaxation MD calculations under uniaxial strain, and observed spontaneous production of dislocations.(M.A. Mogilevsky, in Shock Waves and High Strain Rate Phenomena in Metals) (Plenum, New York, 1981), p.531.) Further Los Alamos calculations, carried out nearly a decade later in five-times larger systems (up to 10,000 atoms), confirmed this observation and quantified the threshold strength, namely the yield strength of the perfect crystal.(B.L. Holian, Phys. Rev. A 37), 2562 (1988); for a review, see B.L. Holian, Shock Waves 5, 149 (1995). Subsequently, Zaretskii and co-workers,(E.B. Zaretskii, G.I. Kanel, P.A. Mogilevskii, and V.E. Fortov, Sov. Phys. Dokl. 36), 76 (1991). using x-ray diffraction of shocked single crystals, confirmed our MD observations of stacking faults produced by shockwave passage. With the advent of massively parallel computers, we have recently studied systems with over six-times larger cross-sectional area and four-times longer distance of run to the steady state (approximately 270,000 atoms). We have seen that the increased cross-section allows the system to slip along both available forward slip systems, in

  13. Al 1s-2p absorption spectroscopy of shock-wave heating and compression in laser-driven planar foil

    SciTech Connect

    Sawada, H.; Regan, S. P.; Radha, P. B.; Epstein, R.; Li, D.; Goncharov, V. N.; Hu, S. X.; Meyerhofer, D. D.; Delettrez, J. A.; Jaanimagi, P. A.; Smalyuk, V. A.; Boehly, T. R.; Sangster, T. C.; Yaakobi, B.; Mancini, R. C.

    2009-05-15

    Time-resolved Al 1s-2p absorption spectroscopy is used to diagnose direct-drive, shock-wave heating and compression of planar targets having nearly Fermi-degenerate plasma conditions (T{sub e}{approx}10-40 eV, {rho}{approx}3-11 g/cm{sup 3}) on the OMEGA Laser System [T. R. Boehly et al., Opt. Commun. 133, 495 (1997)]. A planar plastic foil with a buried Al tracer layer was irradiated with peak intensities of 10{sup 14}-10{sup 15} W/cm{sup 2} and probed with the pseudocontinuum M-band emission from a point-source Sm backlighter in the range of 1.4-1.7 keV. The laser ablation process launches 10-70 Mbar shock waves into the CH/Al/CH target. The Al 1s-2p absorption spectra were analyzed using the atomic physic code PRISMSPECT to infer T{sub e} and {rho} in the Al layer, assuming uniform plasma conditions during shock-wave heating, and to determine when the heat front penetrated the Al layer. The drive foils were simulated with the one-dimensional hydrodynamics code LILAC using a flux-limited (f=0.06 and f=0.1) and nonlocal thermal-transport model [V. N. Goncharov et al., Phys. Plasmas 13, 012702 (2006)]. The predictions of simulated shock-wave heating and the timing of heat-front penetration are compared to the observations. The experimental results for a wide variety of laser-drive conditions and buried depths have shown that the LILAC predictions using f=0.06 and the nonlocal model accurately model the shock-wave heating and timing of the heat-front penetration while the shock is transiting the target. The observed discrepancy between the measured and simulated shock-wave heating at late times of the drive can be explained by the reduced radiative heating due to lateral heat flow in the corona.

  14. Abruptly changing patterns of diffusion and use of extracorporeal shock-wave renal lithotripsy.

    PubMed

    Bloom, B S; Hillman, A L; Schwartz, J S

    1991-07-01

    Early diffusion and use of extracorporeal shock-wave lithotripsy (ESWL) was found by a 1986 survey of the first 84 operational renal lithotripters in the United States to be similar to that of other equipment-embodied technologies. Resurvey in 1988 of this cohort of units found that clinical indications for ESWL treatment--stone size and location--expanded greatly. Professional fees for ESWL services remained essentially constant, while technical component charges increased 21.0%. Volume of procedures declined by 19.8% among the most productive units, and by 34.4% among the least productive study units; the previously noted approximate fourfold difference remained unchanged between most and least productive units. ESWL patterns of diffusion were comparable to other equipment-embodied diagnostic technology (magnetic resonance imaging [MRI] and computed tomography [CT]) during the first few years of clinical availability. ESWL growth slowed sooner than that of CT and MRI following their introduction into clinical practice, declining in the fourth to fifth year of use following rapid expansion in the first 2 years of availability. While clinical indications for both ESWL and imaging technologies expanded over time, CT and MRI experienced continued growth beyond that of ESWL at the same points of their respective life cycles. In the market areas of the 84 study units, the use of ESWL declined even with expanded indications for treatment, perhaps due to faster expansion of number of units than growth of clinical indications for treatment. PMID:2063841

  15. Radial extracorporeal shock-wave therapy in rotator cuff calcific tendinosis

    PubMed Central

    Mangone, Giuseppe; Veliaj, Altin; Postiglione, Marco; Viliani, Tamara; Pasquetti, Pietro

    2010-01-01

    The objective of the study is to evaluate the effectiveness of Radial Extracorporeal Shock-wave Therapy (RESWT) compared with High Power LASER Therapy (HPLT) for the treatment of patients with Rotator Cuff Calcific Tendinosis (RCCT). RCCT is widely diffused, it is painful and invalidating. It is an important public health problem with social and economic implications. The most common therapeutic approach is a physiotherapic one. Both HPLT and RESWT give positive results. There is a debate on which is to be preferred. Therefore there is need to obtain scientific evidence to support either case. An observational study was carried out in the period between October 2008 and September 2009 in our outpatient clinic with 62 patients, divided into 3 groups: group A 36 patients treated only with RESWT, group B 26 patients treated only with HPLT and group C 16 patients with only short term improvement with HPLT retreated with RESWT. Patients were evaluated with Constant-Murley scale before and after treatment (immediately, 1 month and 3 months) for mean constant score, pain and range of movement. Data were examined statistically with SPSS. Criteria for inclusion and exclusion were defined. Patients treated with HPLT have shown good clinical results but have returned to original syndrome 1 month after treatment. RESWT has given improvement after treatment extended in time (3 months) in terms of pain and recover of functionality with a limited number of applications. The evidence collected indicates that RESWT is the method of choice. PMID:22460011

  16. Prostaglandin E2 and Connexin 43 crosstalk in the osteogenesis induced by extracorporeal shockwave.

    PubMed

    Chen, Youbin; Xu, Jiankun; Liao, Haojie; Ma, Zebin; Zhang, Yuantao; Chen, Hongjiang; Huang, Zhonglian; Hu, Jun

    2016-09-01

    As a type of mechanical stimulation, extracorporeal shockwave (ESW) has been widely used in the clinic to treat bone fracture delayed union and non-unions. A large number of studies have shown beneficial effects of ESW in promoting fracture healing by inducing bone regeneration; however, the underlying mechanisms remain unclear. ESW has been shown to induce the production of prostaglandin E2 (PGE2), which is essential for gap junction intercellular communication in response to mechanical stress. Among the 19 known gap junction subunits, connexin43 (Cx43) is the most prevalent for mediating the response of mechanical stress. However, to our knowledge, the effect of ESW on Cx43 expression has not been reported before. Herein, we propose that a crosstalk between PGE2 and Cx43 is involved in the enhancement of osteogenesis induced by ESW. We review the currently available data to propose an unrevealed, but important mechanism via which ESW treatment affects osteogenic differentiation of bone marrow stromal cells. PMID:27515217

  17. Impact of ureteric stent on outcome of extracorporeal shockwave lithotripsy: A propensity score analysis

    PubMed Central

    Gołąb, Adam; Słojewski, Marcin

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Extracorporeal shockwave lithotripsy (SWL) is one of the most frequently performed procedures in patients with urolithiasis. For ureter-localized stones, SWL is often preceded by a double J stent insertion. However, fear of serious complications, including sepsis associated with stents, is often expressed. The following study assessed the impact of stent insertions on the results of SWL in patients with ureteric stones. Material and methods The study group consisted of 411 ureteric stone patients who were treated with SWL from January 2010 to December 2014. In 60 cases, treatment was preceded by ureteric stent insertion. A propensity scoring system was used to pair non-stented patients with the stented group. Success rates were assessed and compared using the chi-squared test. Multivariate logistic regression analysis was used to evaluate the influence of particular variables on the stone-free rate. Results The overall success rate was 82.2%. After matching, the success rate of the stented group was not significantly different from the control group (85.0% vs. 83.3% respectively, p = 0.80). The mean number of sessions was higher in the stented group (1.88 per patient). Stones located in the lower part of the ureter have the greatest chance of being successfully treated. Conclusions The double J stent has no influence on the outcome of SWL treatment. In view of the greater likelihood of having additional sessions, this approach should be reserved for selected cases. PMID:27551556

  18. In vitro sonoluminescence and sonochemistry studies with an electrohydraulic shock-wave lithotripter.

    PubMed

    Matula, Thomas J; Hilmo, Paul R; Bailey, Michael R; Crum, Lawrence A

    2002-09-01

    Sonoluminescence and sonochemistry from a cavitation field generated by an electrohydraulic shock-wave lithotripter were investigated as functions of spark discharge voltage (13 to 21 kV) and pulse-repetition frequency (PRF) (0.5 to 2.0 Hz). Sonochemical activity, measured with an iodide dosimeter, increased with both voltage and PRF. Sonoluminescence was measured in an acoustically matched light-tight box. The envelope of the light intensity was measured in a temporally gated region extending from the initial arrival of the shock wave (resulting in bubble compression) to the final inertial collapse of the bubble cloud, which follows hundreds of micros after passage of the shock wave. The initial compression resulted in greater sonoluminescence emissions, suggesting that the initial bubble compression due to the leading positive pressure spike from the lithotripter generated higher temperatures than the inertial collapse of the bubble. These unexpected results are consistent with some recent calculations in which the vapor pressure of the liquid limits compressional heating. PMID:12401391

  19. Spectroscopic diagnostics of plume rebound and shockwave dynamics of confined aluminum laser plasma plumes

    SciTech Connect

    Yeates, P.; Kennedy, E. T.

    2011-06-15

    Generation and expansion dynamics of aluminum laser plasma plumes generated between parallel plates of varying separation ({Delta}Z = 2.0, 3.2, 4.0, and 5.6 mm), which confined plume expansion normal to the ablation surface, were diagnosed. Space and time resolved visible emission spectroscopy in the spectral range {lambda} = 355-470 nm and time gated visible imaging were employed to record emission spectra and plume dynamics. Space and time resolved profiles of N{sub e} (the electron density), T{sub e} (the electron temperature), and T{sub ionz} (the ionization temperature) were compared for different positions in the plasma plume. Significant modifications of the profiles of the above parameters were observed for plasma-surface collisions at the inner surface of the front plate, which formed a barrier to the free expansion of the plasma plume generated by the laser light on the surface of the back plate. Shockwave generation at the collision interface resulted in delayed compression of the low-density plasma plume near the inner ablation surface, at late stages in the plasma history. Upon exiting the cavity formed by the two plates, through an aperture in the front plate, the plasma plume underwent a second phase of free expansion.

  20. Laser-induced shock-wave lithotripsy of canine urocystoliths and nephroliths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woods, J. P.; Bartels, Kenneth E.; Stair, Ernest L.; Schafer, Steven A.; Nordquist, Robert E.

    1997-05-01

    Urolithiasis is a common disease affecting dogs which can sometimes be treated with dietary and medical protocols. In many cases, however, medical management cannot be employed because the dietary restrictions are contraindicated, effective medical dissolution protocols for the calculi (uroliths) do not exist, or obstruction by the calculi may result in deterioration of renal function during the time required for medical dissolution. At present, the management of medically untreatable calculi has been surgical removal which may result in temporary but dramatic decrease in renal function, irreversible loss of damaged nephrons, and significant risk, particularly for bilateral or recurrent nephroliths. An innovative technique for the removal of these uroliths would involve laser lithotripsy which transforms light energy into acoustical energy generating a shock wave sufficient to fragment stones (photoacoustic ablation). The laser is transmitted via quartz fibers which are small and flexible and can be used under direct vision through endoscopes resulting in effective fragmentation with little surrounding tissue damage. Lasers are becoming increasingly more utilized in veterinary medicine, in contrast to the limited availability of other non-invasive methods of treatment of nephroliths (i.e. extracorporeal shock-wave lithotripsy).

  1. Use of the Hugoniot elastic limit in laser shockwave experiments to relate velocity measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, James A.; Lacy, Jeffrey M.; Lévesque, Daniel; Monchalin, Jean-Pierre; Lord, Martin

    2016-02-01

    The US National Nuclear Security Agency has a Global Threat Reduction Initiative (GTRI) with the goal of reducing the worldwide use of high-enriched uranium (HEU). A salient component of that initiative is the conversion of research reactors from HEU to low enriched uranium (LEU) fuels. An innovative fuel is being developed to replace HEU in high-power research reactors. The new LEU fuel is a monolithic fuel made from a U-Mo alloy foil encapsulated in Al-6061 cladding. In order to support the fuel qualification process, the Laser Shockwave Technique (LST) is being developed to characterize the clad-clad and fuel-clad interface strengths in fresh and irradiated fuel plates. This fuel-cladding interface qualification will ensure the survivability of the fuel plates in the harsh reactor environment even under abnormal operating conditions. One of the concerns of the project is the difficulty of calibrating and standardizing the laser shock technique. An analytical study under development and experimental testing supports the hypothesis that the Hugoniot Elastic Limit (HEL) in materials can be a robust and simple benchmark to compare stresses generated by different laser shock systems.

  2. Dislocation-kinetic analysis of FCC and BCC crystal spallation under shock-wave loading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malygin, G. A.; Ogarkov, S. L.; Andriyash, A. V.

    2015-09-01

    Within the dislocation-kinetic model of the formation and propagation of shock waves in crystals under their intense shock-wave loading, the crystal spallation mechanism at micro- and macrolevels has been discussed taking into account published empirical data. It has been shown that the spallation time t f for Cu, Ni, α-Fe, and Ta crystals in the time interval of 10-6-10-9 s at the macroscopic level changes with variations in the wave pressure σ as , where = is the plastic strain rate according to the Swegle-Grady relation; K f , K σ, and ɛ f = K f K σ ≈ 3-5% are the pressure-independent spallation coefficients and strain, respectively; and E is the Young's modulus. At the microlevel, the dislocation-kinetic calculation of plastic zones around pore nuclei as stress concentrators and plastic strain localization regions at the shock wave front has been performed. It has been shown that the pore coalescence and spall fracture formation result from the superposition of shear stresses and plastic deformations in interpore spacings when the latter decrease to a size of the order of two pore sizes.

  3. Development of a new diagnostic sensor for extra-corporeal shock-wave lithotripsy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fedele, F.; Coleman, A. J.; Leighton, T. G.; White, P. R.; Hurrell, A. M.

    2004-01-01

    Extracorporeal shock-wave lithotripsy is the leading technique used in urology for the non-invasive treatment of kidney and ureteric stones. The stone is comminuted by thousands of ultrasound shocks, into fragments small enough to be naturally passed. Since the technique was introduced in the 1980 different generations of lithotripters have been developed. Nevertheless the alignment systems (x-ray, ultrasound) still have some limitations (indeed, the tighter focusing of newer lithotripter reduces the tolerance for misalignment) and there is no capability for on-line monitoring of the degree of fragmentation of the stone. There is 50% incidence of re-treatments, possibly due to these deficiencies. The objective of this research is to design a new passive acoustic sensor, exploiting the secondary acoustic emission generated during the treatment, which could be used as a diagnostic device for lithotripsy. With a passive cylindrical cavitation detector, developed by the National Physical Laboratory, it was possible to detect these emissions in a laboratory lithotripter, and it was shown that they contain information on the degree of stone fragmentation and stone location. This information could be used to perform the desired monitoring and to improve the stone targeting. In collaboration with Precision Acoustic Ltd, some clinical prototypes were developed and tested to verify the relevance of these preliminary results. Clinical results are presented.

  4. Shockwave-induced plasticity via large-scale nonequilibrium molecular dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Holian, B.L.

    1998-07-01

    Nonequilibrium molecular-dynamics (MD) simulations of shock waves in single crystals have shown that, above a threshold strength, strongly shocked crystals deform in a very simple way. Rather than experiencing massive deformation, a simple slippage occurs at the shock front, relieving the peak shear stress, and leaving behind a stacking fault. Later calculations quantified the apparent threshold strength, namely the yield strength of the perfect crystal. Subsequently, pulsed x-ray experiments on shocked single crystals showed relative shifts in diffraction peaks, confirming our MD observations of stacking faults produced by shockwave passage. With the advent of massively parallel computers, we have been able to simulate shock waves in 10-million atom crystals with cross-sectional dimensions of 100{times}100 fcc unit cells (compared to earlier 6{times}6 systems). We have seen that the increased cross-section allows the system to slip along all of the available {l_brace}111{r_brace} slip planes, in different places along the now non-planar shock front. These simulations conclusively eliminate the worry that the kind of slippage we have observed is somehow an artifact of transverse periodic boundary conditions. Thus, future simulations are much more likely to show that weak-shock plasticity is nucleated by pre-existing extended defects embedded in the sample. {copyright} {ital 1998 American Institute of Physics.}

  5. Effect of shockwave curvature on run distance observed with a modified wedge test

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Richard; Dorgan, Robert J.; Sutherland, Gerrit; Benedetta, Ashley; Milby, Christopher

    2012-03-01

    The effect of wave curvature on shock initiation in PBXN-110 was investigated using a modified wedge test configuration. Various widths of PBXN-110 donor slabs were used to define the shockwave curvature introduced to wedge samples of the same explosive. The donor slabs were initiated with line-wave generators so that the shock from the donor would be the same shape, magnitude and duration across the entire input surface of the wedge. The shock parameters were varied for a given donor with PMMA spacers placed between the donor and the wedge sample. A high-speed electronic framing camera was used to observe where initiation occurred along the face of the wedge. Initiation always occurred at the center of the shock front instead of along the sides like that reported by others using a much smaller test format. Results were compared to CTH calculations to indicate if there were effects associated with highly curved shock fronts that could not be adequately predicted. The run distance predicted in CTH for a 50.8 mm wide donor slab (low curvature) compared favorably with experimental results. However, results from thinner donor slabs (higher curvature) indicate a more sensitive behavior than the simulations predicted.

  6. Effect of Shockwave Curvature on Run Distance Observed with a Modified Wedge Test

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Richard; Dorgan, Robert; Sutherland, Gerrit; Benedetta, Ashley; Milby, Christopher

    2011-06-01

    The effect of wave curvature on shock initiation in PBXN-110 was investigated using a modified wedge test configuration. Various thicknesses of PBXN-110 donor slabs were used to define the shockwave curvature introduced to wedge samples of the same explosive. The donor slabs were initiated with line-wave generators so that the introduced shock would be the same shape, magnitude and duration across the entire input surface of the wedge. The shock parameters were varied for a given donor thickness via different widths of PMMA spacers placed between the donor and the wedge. A framing camera was used to observe where initiation occurred along the face of the wedge. Initiation always occurred at the center of the shock front instead of the sides like that reported by others using a much smaller test format. Results were compared to CTH calculations to indicate if there were effects associated with highly curved shock fronts that could not be adequately predicted. The run distance predicted in CTH for a 50.8 mm thick donor slab (low curvature) compared favorably with experimental results. However, results from thinner donor slabs (higher curvature) indicate a more sensitive behavior than the simulations predicted.

  7. Calibration of Wire-Like Manganin Gauges for Use in Planar Shock-Wave Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chapman, David; Proud, William

    2009-06-01

    Peizoresistive gauges have been used extensively for many decades as in-material stress transducers during shock wave experiments. Manganin demonstrates a high piezoresistive response which is relatively temperature independent. As such manganin gauges have been widely calibrated by many authors for use during shock-wave experiments. The precise calibration has been demonstrated to depend on both the chemical composition and mechanical history of the manganin, and on the geometry of the gauge. The research presented in this paper refers to the calibration of a commercially available manganin gauge, Micro-measurements J2M-SS-580SF-025, generally referred to as the T-gauge owing to its geometry. The T-gauge has seen widespread use as a pressure transducer to measure lateral stress during plate-impact experiments. It has been previously proposed that T-gauges have a similar response to the grid foil-like manganin gauges extensively calibrated by Rosenberg et. al.. However, recently it has been suggested that they in fact behave in a wire-like manner. The results presented here demonstrate that the gauges behaviour is wire-like when mounted to measure longitudinal stress. A modified calibration can be applied successfully to convert the relative resistance change to the stress normal to the gauge element. These results have important ramifications for the reduction of lateral stress measurements previously made using the T-gauge.

  8. Calibration of Wire-Like Manganin Gauges for Use in Planar Shock-Wave Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chapman, David J.; Braithwaite, Christopher H.; Proud, William G.

    2009-12-01

    Piezoresistive gauges have been used extensively for many decades as in-material stress transducers during shock wave experiments. Manganin demonstrates a high piezoresistive response which is relatively temperature independent. As such manganin gauges have been widely calibrated by many authors for use during shock-wave experiments. The precise calibration has been demonstrated to depend on both the chemical composition and mechanical history of the manganin, and on the geometry of the gauge. The research presented in this paper refers to the calibration of a commercially available manganin gauge, Micro-measurements J2M-SS-580SF-025, generally referred to as the T-gauge owing to its geometry. The T-gauge has seen widespread use as a pressure transducer to measure lateral stress during plate-impact experiments. It has been previously proposed that T-gauges have a similar response to the grid foil-like manganin gauges extensively calibrated by Rosenberg et al. However, recently it has been suggested that they in fact behave in a wire-like manner. The results presented here demonstrate that the gauges' behaviour is wire-like when mounted to measure longitudinal stress. A modified calibration can be applied successfully to convert the relative resistance change to the stress normal to the gauge element. These results have important ramifications for the reduction of lateral stress measurements previously made using the T-gauge.

  9. Shooter position estimation with muzzle blast and shockwave measurements from separate locations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grasing, David

    2016-05-01

    There are two acoustical events associated with small arms fire: the muzzle blast (created by bullets being expelled from the barrel of the weapon), and the shockwave (created by bullets which exceed the speed of sound). Assuming the ballistics of a round are known, the times and directions of arrival of the acoustic events furnish sufficient information to determine the origin of the shot. Existing methods tacitly assume that it is a single sensor which makes measurements of the times and direction of arrival. If the sensor is located past the point where the bullet goes transonic or if the sensor is far off the axis of the shot line a single sensor localization become highly inaccurate due to the ill-conditioning of the localization problem. In this paper, a more general approach is taken which allows for localizations from measurements made at separate locations. There are considerable advantages to this approach, the most noteworthy of which is the improvement in localization accuracy due to the improvement in the conditioning of the problem. Additional benefits include: the potential to locate in cases where a single sensor has insufficient information, furnishing high quality initialization to data fusion algorithms, and the potential to identify the round from a set of possible rounds.

  10. Constitutive relations for steady, dense granular flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vescovi, D.; Berzi, D.; di Prisco, C. G.

    2011-12-01

    In the recent past, the flow of dense granular materials has been the subject of many scientific works; this is due to the large number of natural phenomena involving solid particles flowing at high concentration (e.g., debris flows and landslides). In contrast with the flow of dilute granular media, where the energy is essentially dissipated in binary collisions, the flow of dense granular materials is characterized by multiple, long-lasting and frictional contacts among the particles. The work focuses on the mechanical response of dry granular materials under steady, simple shear conditions. In particular, the goal is to obtain a complete rheology able to describe the material behavior within the entire range of concentrations for which the flow can be considered dense. The total stress is assumed to be the linear sum of a frictional and a kinetic component. The frictional and the kinetic contribution are modeled in the context of the critical state theory [8, 10] and the kinetic theory of dense granular gases [1, 3, 7], respectively. In the critical state theory, the granular material approaches a certain attractor state, independent on the initial arrangement, characterized by the capability of developing unlimited shear strains without any change in the concentration. Given that a disordered granular packing exists only for a range of concentration between the random loose and close packing [11], a form for the concentration dependence of the frictional normal stress that makes the latter vanish at the random loose packing is defined. In the kinetic theory, the particles are assumed to interact through instantaneous, binary and uncorrelated collisions. A new state variable of the problem is introduced, the granular temperature, which accounts for the velocity fluctuations. The model has been extended to account for the decrease in the energy dissipation due to the existence of correlated motion among the particles [5, 6] and to deal with non

  11. Statistical mechanics of dense granular media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nicodemi, M.; Coniglio, A.; de Candia, A.; Fierro, A.; Ciamarra, M. Pica; Tarzia, M.

    2005-12-01

    We discuss some recent results on Statistical Mechanics approach to dense granular media. In particular, by analytical mean field investigation we derive the phase diagram of monodisperse and bydisperse granular assemblies. We show that "jamming" corresponds to a phase transition from a "fluid" to a "glassy" phase, observed when crystallization is avoided. The nature of such a "glassy" phase turns out to be the same found in mean field models for glass formers. This gives quantitative evidence to the idea of a unified description of the "jamming" transition in granular media and thermal systems, such as glasses. We also discuss mixing/segregation transitions in binary mixtures and their connections to phase separation and "geometric" effects.

  12. Statistical mechanics of dense granular media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coniglio, A.; Fierro, A.; Nicodemi, M.; Pica Ciamarra, M.; Tarzia, M.

    2005-06-01

    We discuss some recent results on the statistical mechanics approach to dense granular media. In particular, by analytical mean field investigation we derive the phase diagram of monodisperse and bidisperse granular assemblies. We show that 'jamming' corresponds to a phase transition from a 'fluid' to a 'glassy' phase, observed when crystallization is avoided. The nature of such a 'glassy' phase turns out to be the same as found in mean field models for glass formers. This gives quantitative evidence for the idea of a unified description of the 'jamming' transition in granular media and thermal systems, such as glasses. We also discuss mixing/segregation transitions in binary mixtures and their connections to phase separation and 'geometric' effects.

  13. Solids flow rate measurement in dense slurries

    SciTech Connect

    Porges, K.G.; Doss, E.D.

    1993-09-01

    Accurate and rapid flow rate measurement of solids in dense slurries remains an unsolved technical problem, with important industrial applications in chemical processing plants and long-distance solids conveyance. In a hostile two-phase medium, such a measurement calls for two independent parameter determinations, both by non-intrusive means. Typically, dense slurries tend to flow in laminar, non-Newtonian mode, eliminating most conventional means that usually rely on calibration (which becomes more difficult and costly for high pressure and temperature media). These issues are reviewed, and specific solutions are recommended in this report. Detailed calculations that lead to improved measuring device designs are presented for both bulk density and average velocity measurements. Cross-correlation, chosen here for the latter task, has long been too inaccurate for practical applications. The cause and the cure of this deficiency are discussed using theory-supported modeling. Fluid Mechanics are used to develop the velocity profiles of laminar non-Newtonian flow in a rectangular duct. This geometry uniquely allows the design of highly accurate `capacitive` devices and also lends itself to gamma transmission densitometry on an absolute basis. An absolute readout, though of less accuracy, is also available from a capacitive densitometer and a pair of capacitive sensors yields signals suitable for cross-correlation velocity measurement.

  14. Continuum equations for dense shallow granular flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumaran, Viswanathan

    2015-11-01

    Simplified equations are derived for a granular flow in the `dense' limit where the volume fraction is close to that for dynamical arrest, and the `shallow' limit where the stream-wise length for flow development (L) is large compared to the cross-stream height (h). In the dense limit, the equations are simplified by taking advantage of the power-law divergence of the pair distribution function χ proportional to (ϕad - ϕ) - α, where ϕ is the volume fraction, and ϕad is the volume fraction for arrested dynamics. When the height h is much larger than the conduction length, the energy equation reduces to an algebraic balance between the rates of production and dissipation of energy, and the stress is proportional to the square of the strain rate (Bagnold law). The analysis reveals important differences between granular flows and the flows of Newtonian fluids. One important difference is that the Reynolds number (ratio of inertial and viscous terms) turns out to depend only on the layer height and Bagnold coefficients, and is independent of the flow velocity, because both the inertial terms in the conservation equations and the divergence of the stress depend on the square of the velocity/velocity gradients.

  15. Times Scales in Dense Granular Material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Duan

    2005-07-01

    Forces in dense granular material are transmitted through particle contacts. The evolution of the contact stress is directly related to dynamical interaction forces between particles. Since particle contacts in a dense granular material are random, a statistical method is employed to describe and model their motions. It is found that the time scales of particle contacts determinate stress relaxation and the fluid- like or solid-like behavior of the material. Numerical simulations are performed to calculate statistical properties of particle interactions. Using results from the numerical simulations we examine the relationship between the averaged local deformation field and the macroscopic deformation field. We also examine the relationship between the averaged local interaction force and the averaged stress field in the material. Validities of the Voigt and the Reuss assumptions are examined; and extensions to these assumptions are studied. Numerical simulations show that tangential frictions between particles significantly increase the contact stress, while the direct contribution of the tangential force to the stress is small. This puzzling observation can be explained by dependency of the relaxation time on the tangential friction.

  16. Quantum molecular dynamics simulations of dense matter

    SciTech Connect

    Collins, L.; Kress, J.; Troullier, N.; Lenosky, T.; Kwon, I.

    1997-12-31

    The authors have developed a quantum molecular dynamics (QMD) simulation method for investigating the properties of dense matter in a variety of environments. The technique treats a periodically-replicated reference cell containing N atoms in which the nuclei move according to the classical equations-of-motion. The interatomic forces are generated from the quantum mechanical interactions of the (between?) electrons and nuclei. To generate these forces, the authors employ several methods of varying sophistication from the tight-binding (TB) to elaborate density functional (DF) schemes. In the latter case, lengthy simulations on the order of 200 atoms are routinely performed, while for the TB, which requires no self-consistency, upwards to 1000 atoms are systematically treated. The QMD method has been applied to a variety cases: (1) fluid/plasma Hydrogen from liquid density to 20 times volume-compressed for temperatures of a thousand to a million degrees Kelvin; (2) isotopic hydrogenic mixtures, (3) liquid metals (Li, Na, K); (4) impurities such as Argon in dense hydrogen plasmas; and (5) metal/insulator transitions in rare gas systems (Ar,Kr) under high compressions. The advent of parallel versions of the methods, especially for fast eigensolvers, presage LDA simulations in the range of 500--1000 atoms and TB runs for tens of thousands of particles. This leap should allow treatment of shock chemistry as well as large-scale mixtures of species in highly transient environments.

  17. Population kinetics in dense plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Schlanges, M.; Bornath, T.; Prenzel, R.; Kremp, D.

    1996-07-01

    Starting from quantum kinetic equations, rate equations for the number densities of the different atomic states and equations for the energy density are derived which are valid for dense nonideal plasmas. Statistical expressions are presented for the rate coefficients taking into account many-body effects as dynamical screening, lowering of the ionization energy and Pauli-blocking. Based on these generalized expressions, the coefficients of impact ionization, three-body recombination, excitation and deexcitation are calculated for nonideal hydrogen and carbon plasmas. As a result, higher ionization and recombination rates are obtained in the dense plasma region. The influence of the many-body effects on the population kinetics, including density and temperature relaxation, is shown then for a dense hydrogen plasma. {copyright} {ital 1996 American Institute of Physics.}

  18. Shock-wave heating model for chondrule formation: Hydrodynamic simulation of molten droplets exposed to gas flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miura, Hitoshi; Nakamoto, Taishi

    2007-05-01

    Millimeter-sized, spherical silicate grains abundant in chondritic meteorites, which are called as chondrules, are considered to be a strong evidence of the melting event of the dust particles in the protoplanetary disk. One of the most plausible scenarios is that the chondrule precursor dust particles are heated and melt in the high-velocity gas flow (shock-wave heating model). We developed the non-linear, time-dependent, and three-dimensional hydrodynamic simulation code for analyzing the dynamics of molten droplets exposed to the gas flow. We confirmed that our simulation results showed a good agreement in a linear regime with the linear solution analytically derived by Sekyia et al. [Sekyia, M., Uesugi, M., Nakamoto, T., 2003. Prog. Theor. Phys. 109, 717-728]. We found that the non-linear terms in the hydrodynamical equations neglected by Sekiya et al. [Sekiya, M., Uesugi, M., Nakamoto, T., 2003. Prog. Theor. Phys. 109, 717-728] can cause the cavitation by producing negative pressure in the droplets. We discussed that the fragmentation through the cavitation is a new mechanism to determine the upper limit of chondrule sizes. We also succeeded to reproduce the fragmentation of droplets when the gas ram pressure is stronger than the effect of the surface tension. Finally, we compared the deformation of droplets in the shock-wave heating with the measured data of chondrules and suggested the importance of other effects to deform droplets, for example, the rotation of droplets. We believe that our new code is a very powerful tool to investigate the hydrodynamics of molten droplets in the framework of the shock-wave heating model and has many potentials to be applied to various problems.

  19. Extracorporeal shockwave therapy in osteoporotic osteoarthritis of the knee in rats: an experiment in animals

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Introduction This study investigated the effectiveness of extracorporeal shockwave therapy (ESWT) in osteoporotic (OP) osteoarthritis (OA) of rat knee. Methods Fifty-six rats were divided into seven groups including sham, OA, OP, OA + OP, OA + ESWT, OP + ESWT, and OA + OP + ESWT groups. The evaluations included gross pathology, bone mineral density (BMD), micro-computed tomography (micro-CT) scan, bone-strength test, histopathologic examination, and immunohistochemical analysis. Results On gross pathology, group OA + OP showed larger areas of osteoarthritic changes than did groups OA and OP, as compared with the sham group. BMD and bone strength significantly decreased in groups OA, OP, and OA + OP relative to the sham group, and ESWT significantly improved BMD and bone-strength changes. On micro-CT scan, the subchondral plate thickness significantly decreased, and the bone porosity increased in groups OA, OP, and OA + OP, and ESWT significantly improved the changes in subchondral-plate thickness and bone porosity. In histopathologic examination, Mankin score and safranin O score significantly increased in groups OA and group OA + OP, but not in group OP relative to the sham group, and ESWT significantly improved the changes. In immunohistochemical analysis, Dickkopf-1 (DKK-1) significantly increased, but vessel endothelial growth factor (VEGF), proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA), and bone morphogenetic protein 2 (BMP-2) decreased in groups OA, OP, and OA + OP relative to the sham group, and ESWT significantly reversed the changes. Conclusions Osteoporosis increased the severity of cartilage damage in osteoarthritis of the knee. ESWT showed effectiveness in the reduction of osteoporotic osteoarthritis of the knee in rats. PMID:24994452

  20. A Theoretical Investigation of Radial Lateral Wells with Shockwave Completion in Shale Gas Reservoirs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shan, Jia

    As its role in satisfying the energy demand of the U.S. and as a clean fuel has become more significant than ever, the shale gas production in the U.S. has gained increasing momentum over recent years. Thus, effective and environmentally friendly methods to extract shale gas are critical. Hydraulic fracturing has been proven to be efficient in the production of shale gas. However, environmental issues such as underground water contamination and high usage of water make this technology controversial. A potential technology to eliminate the environmental issues concerning water usage and contamination is to use blast fracturing, which uses explosives to create fractures. It can be further aided by HEGF and multi-pulse pressure loading technology, which causes less crushing effect near the wellbore and induces longer fractures. Radial drilling is another relatively new technology that can bypass damage zones due to drilling and create a larger drainage area through drilling horizontal wellbores. Blast fracturing and radial drilling both have the advantage of cost saving. The successful combination of blast fracturing and radial drilling has a great potential for improving U.S. shale gas production. An analytical productivity model was built in this study, considering linear flow from the reservoir rock to the fracture face, to analyze factors affecting shale gas production from radial lateral wells with shockwave completion. Based on the model analyses, the number of fractures per lateral is concluded to be the most effective factor controlling the productivity index of blast-fractured radial lateral wells. This model can be used for feasibility studies of replacing hydraulic fracturing by blast fracturing in shale gas well completions. Prediction of fracture geometry is recommended for future studies.

  1. Previous shock-wave lithotripsy treatment does not impact the outcomes of flexible ureterorenoscopy

    PubMed Central

    Yürük, Emrah; Binbay, Murat; Akman, Tolga; Özgör, Faruk; Berberoğlu, Yalçın; Müslümanoğlu, Ahmet Yaser

    2014-01-01

    Objective: Shock-wave lithotripsy (SWL) is the first-line treatment for the active removal of small and medium-sized kidney stones. Flexible ureterorenoscopy (fURS) is recommended after failed SWL treatment. The aim of this retrospective analysis is to evaluate whether prior unsuccessful SWL treatments affect the outcomes of fURS. Material and methods: Data from 206 patients who underwent fURS for the treatment of renal stones between September 2009 and January 2011 were collected, and the patients were divided into two groups according to their previous SWL treatment. The patient demographics, stone characteristics, operation and fluoroscopy times, stone-free rates and complications were compared. Results: Of the patients, 114 (55.3%) did not undergo SWL prior to fURS (Group 1), whereas 92 (44.6%) completed a minimum of 3 sessions of SWL and waited at least 2 weeks before the fURS operation (Group 2). Although the mean stone number was higher in Group 2, this difference was not significant (p=0.06). The mean operation (p=0.12) and fluoroscopy times (p=0.69) were similar between the groups. The mean operation time per mm2 stone and fluoroscopy time per mm2 stone were not significantly different (p=0.64 and p=0.76, respectively). The length of the hospitalization and the overall complication rates were similar. After the third postoperative month, the stone-free rates were not different between the groups (82.5% and 86.9%, respectively, p=0.38). Conclusion: The stone-free and complication rates of fURS were not affected by previous SWL therapy. PMID:26328180

  2. Clinical experience with shock-wave lithotripsy using the Siemens Modularis Vario lithotripter

    PubMed Central

    Hassouna, Mohamed E.; Oraby, Samir; Sameh, Wael; El-Abbady, Ahmed

    2011-01-01

    Purpose To assess the effectiveness of a lithotripter (Modularis Vario; Siemens, AG Healthcare, Munich, Germany) in the management of renal and ureteric stones. Patients and methods In all, 1146 adult patients with renal or ureteric stones were treated at one urological centre using the latest model of the Modularis Vario lithotripter. The effectiveness of lithotripsy and re-treatment rate were assessed. Data were obtained on stone location, stone size, shock wave usage, success rate, and complications. Results Between May 2007 and November 2009, 698 patients with renal stones and 448 with ureteric stones underwent extracorporeal shock-wave lithotripsy (ESWL). The mean (SD) renal stone size was 12.8 (3.8) mm; a mean of 1.36 sessions was required, with a mean (SD) number of 3744 (1961) shocks delivered per renal stone. After 3 months, the success rate defined as the patient being stone-free or with residual fragments of <4 mm; for renal stones the rate was 91.1%, with a 6.9% complication rate in the form of steinstrasse and severe renal colic. The mean (SD) ureteric stone size was 10.4 (2.7) mm. A mean of 1.37 sessions was required, with a mean (SD) of 4551 (2467) shocks delivered for each ureteric stone. The success rate for ureteric stones was 89.5%, with a 5.6% complication rate. The overall efficiency quotient was 0.66. Conclusion The Siemens Modularis Vario lithotripter is a safe and effective machine for treating renal and ureteric stones. PMID:26579276

  3. Can stone density on plain radiography predict the outcome of extracorporeal shockwave lithotripsy for ureteral stones?

    PubMed Central

    Lim, Ki Hong; Jung, Jin-Hee; Kwon, Jae Hyun; Lee, Yong Seok; Bae, Jungbum; Cho, Min Chul; Lee, Kwang Soo

    2015-01-01

    Purpose The objective was to determine whether stone density on plain radiography (kidney-ureter-bladder, KUB) could predict the outcome of extracorporeal shockwave lithotripsy (ESWL) for ureteral stones. Materials and Methods A total of 223 patients treated by ESWL for radio-opaque ureteral stones of 5 to 20 mm were included in this retrospective study. All patients underwent routine blood and urine analyses, plain radiography (KUB), and noncontrast computed tomography (NCCT) before ESWL. Demographic, stone, and radiological characteristics on KUB and NCCT were analyzed. The patients were categorized into two groups: lower-density (LD) group (radiodensity less than or equal to that of the 12th rib, n=163) and higher-density (HD) group (radiodensity greater than that of the 12th rib, n=60). Stone-free status was assessed by KUB every week after ESWL. A successful outcome was defined as stone free within 1 month after ESWL. Results Mean stone size in the LD group was significantly smaller than that in the HD group (7.5±1.4 mm compared with 9.9±2.9 mm, p=0.002). The overall success rates in the LD and HD groups were 82.1% and 60.0%, respectively (p=0.007). The mean duration of stone-free status and average number of SWL sessions required for success in the two groups were 21.7 compared with 39.2 days and 1.8 compared with 2.3, respectively (p<0.05). On multivariate logistic analysis, stone size and time to ESWL since colic and radiodensity of the stone on KUB were independent predictors of successful ESWL. Conclusions Our data suggest that larger stone size, longer time to ESWL, and ureteral stones with a radiodensity greater than that of the 12th rib may be at a relatively higher risk of ESWL failure 1 month after the procedure. PMID:25598937

  4. Experimental studies of hypersonic shock-wave boundary-layer interactions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lu, Frank K.

    1992-01-01

    Two classes of shock-wave boundary-layer interactions were studied experimentally in a shock tunnel in which a low Reynolds number, turbulent flow at Mach 8 was developed on a cold, flat test surface. The two classes of interactions were: (1) a swept interaction generated by a wedge ('fin') mounted perpendicularly on the flat plate; and (2) a two-dimensional, unseparated interaction induced by a shock impinging near an expansion corner. The swept interaction, with wedge angles of 5-20 degrees, was separated and there was also indication that the strongest interactions prossessed secondary separation zones. The interaction spread out extensively from the inviscid shock location although no indication of quasi-conical symmetry was evident. The surface pressure from the upstream influence to the inviscid shock was relatively low compared to the inviscid downstream value but it rose rapidly past the inviscid shock location. However, the surface pressure did not reach the downstream inviscid value and reasons were proposed for this anomalous behavior compared to strongly separated, supersonic interactions. The second class of interactions involved weak shocks impinging near small expansion corners. As a prelude to studying this interaction, a hypersonic similarity parameter was identified for the pure, expansion corner flow. The expansion corner severely damped out surface pressure fluctuations. When a shock impinged upstream of the corner, no significant changes to the surface pressure were found as compared to the case when the shock impinged on a flat plate. But, when the shock impinged downstream of the corner, a close coupling existed between the two wave systems, unlike the supersonic case. This close coupling modified the upstream influence. Regardless of whether the shock impinged ahead or behind the corner, the downstream region was affected by the close coupling between the shock and the expansion. Not only was the mean pressure distribution modified but the

  5. Structure, phase content and mechanical properties of aluminium with hard particles after shock-wave compaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kulkov, S.; Vorozhtsov, S.; Turuntaev, I.

    2015-04-01

    The possibilities to combine metal and metal oxide powders in various compositions open a broad range of mechanical and thermal behavior. When using in nanostructured components the resulting materials might exhibit even more interesting properties, like product effectiveness, tensile strength, wear resistance, endurance and corrosion resistance. Intermetallics like TiAl could be obtained as TiAlx in a quality similar to that obtained from melting where only eutectic mixture can be produced. Similar effects are possible when compacting nanoceramic powders whereas these can be combined with intermetallics. Currently, it is very difficult to produce wires and special shaped parts from high temperature superconducting materials. The compacting by explosives could solve this problem.The present paper uses explosion compacting of Al nanoparticles to create nanocomposite with increased physico-mechanical properties. Russian civil explosive Uglenit was chosen as high energy material (HEM) for shock-wave compaction. The different schemes and conditions were suggested to run the explosion process. Al nanoparticles as produced by electric wire explosion contain 8-10% of aluminum oxide. That aluminum oxide can serve as strengthening material in the final nanocomposite which may be generated in various compositions by explosive compacting. Further modifications of nanocomposites were obtained when including nanodiamonds into the mixture with aluminum nanoparticles with different percentages. The addition of nanodiamonds results in a substantial strengthening effect. The experiments with compacting aluminum nanoparticles by explosives are described in detail including the process variations and conditions. The physico-mechanical properties of the nanocomposites are determined and discussed by considering the applied conditions. Especially, microstructure and phases of the obtained nanocomposites are analyzed by X-ray diffraction.

  6. Effect of High Shock Number on Acute Complication Development After Extracorporeal Shockwave Lithotripsy

    PubMed Central

    Hadj-Moussa, Miriam

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Purpose We assessed whether high shock number is associated with higher rates of acute complication development after extracorporeal shockwave lithotripsy (SWL). Patients and Methods A retrospective chart review of 372 patients who underwent 436 SWL procedures at 24 kV using a Medstone STS-T lithotripter (Medstone International Inc., Aliso Viejo, CA) was conducted. Complications occurred within 4 weeks of SWL. Treatments were split into three cohorts based on shock number (<2400, 2401–4000, and >4000). Postoperative sequelae of patients who were stone free and those with residual stone were studied separately. Chi-square tests were used to evaluate the relationship between shock number cohort and postoperative complication development. Results SWL treatments recorded for each cohort were 158 (37.4%), 145 (34.4%), and 119 (28.2%), respectively. The short-term complication rate when SWL was successful was 8.3% overall. Complication rate for each cohort was 9.5% (11), 7.8% (5), and 7.2% (7), respectively. When SWL was successful, statistical analysis revealed no significant difference between complication rates and shock number cohort (P=0.63). Complications in patients with a residual stone occurred after 41.4% of treatments and trended upward with shock number cohort, but did not reach statistical significance (P=0.84). Conclusions At high voltage, high shock number was not shown to cause higher rates of short-term postoperative complications, as experienced by patients, when SWL was successful or resulted in a residual stone, yet complication rates associated with residual stone burden were approximately five times as common. Forgoing a higher shock number in the presence of a residual stone may therefore increase the risks of sequelae immediately after SWL. PMID:23537270

  7. Enhanced Productivity of Chemical Processes Using Dense Fluidized Beds

    SciTech Connect

    Sibashis Banerjee; Alvin Chen; Rutton Patel; Dale Snider; Ken Williams; Timothy O'Hern; Paul Tortora

    2008-02-29

    The work detailed in this report addresses Enabling Technologies within Computational Technology by integrating a “breakthrough” particle-fluid computational technology into traditional Process Science and Engineering Technology. The work completed under this DOE project addresses five major development areas 1) gas chemistry in dense fluidized beds 2) thermal cracking of liquid film on solids producing gas products 3) liquid injection in a fluidized bed with particle-to-particle liquid film transport 4) solid-gas chemistry and 5) first level validation of models. Because of the nature of the research using tightly coupled solids and fluid phases with a Lagrangian description of the solids and continuum description of fluid, the work provides ground-breaking advances in reactor prediction capability. This capability has been tested against experimental data where available. The commercial product arising out of this work is called Barracuda and is suitable for a wide (dense-to-dilute) range of industrial scale gas-solid flows with and without reactions. Commercial applications include dense gas-solid beds, gasifiers, riser reactors and cyclones.

  8. Method for dense packing discovery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kallus, Yoav; Elser, Veit; Gravel, Simon

    2010-11-01

    The problem of packing a system of particles as densely as possible is foundational in the field of discrete geometry and is a powerful model in the material and biological sciences. As packing problems retreat from the reach of solution by analytic constructions, the importance of an efficient numerical method for conducting de novo (from-scratch) searches for dense packings becomes crucial. In this paper, we use the divide and concur framework to develop a general search method for the solution of periodic constraint problems, and we apply it to the discovery of dense periodic packings. An important feature of the method is the integration of the unit-cell parameters with the other packing variables in the definition of the configuration space. The method we present led to previously reported improvements in the densest-known tetrahedron packing. Here, we use the method to reproduce the densest-known lattice sphere packings and the best-known lattice kissing arrangements in up to 14 and 11 dimensions, respectively, providing numerical evidence for their optimality. For nonspherical particles, we report a dense packing of regular four-dimensional simplices with density ϕ=128/219≈0.5845 and with a similar structure to the densest-known tetrahedron packing.

  9. Beyond the pseudo-time-dependent approach: chemical models of dense core precursors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hassel, G. E.; Herbst, E.; Bergin, E. A.

    2010-06-01

    Context. Chemical models of dense cloud cores often utilize the so-called pseudo-time-dependent approximation, in which the physical conditions are held fixed and uniform as the chemistry occurs. In this approximation, the initial abundances chosen, which are totally atomic in nature except for molecular hydrogen, are artificial. A more detailed approach to the chemistry of dense cold cores should include the physical evolution during their early stages of formation. Aims: Our major goal is to investigate the initial synthesis of molecular ices and gas-phase molecules as cold molecular gas begins to form behind a shock in the diffuse interstellar medium. The abundances calculated as the conditions evolve can then be utilized as reasonable initial conditions for a theory of the chemistry of dense cores. Methods: Hydrodynamic shock-wave simulations of the early stages of cold core formation are used to determine the time-dependent physical conditions for a gas-grain chemical network. We follow the cold post-shock molecular evolution of ices and gas-phase molecules as the visual extinction increases with time to AV ≈ 3. (Note that instead of an equal sign, the approximately equal sign should remain.) At higher extinction, self-gravity becomes important. Results: As the newly condensed gas enters its cool post-shock phase, a large amount of CO is produced in the gas. As the CO forms, water ice is produced on grains, while accretion of CO produces CO ice. The production of CO2 ice from CO occurs via several surface mechanisms, while the production of CH4 ice is slowed by gas-phase conversion of C into CO.

  10. Use of shock-wave heating for faster and safer ablation of tissue volumes in high intensity focused ultrasound therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khokhlova, V.; Yuldashev, P.; Sinilshchikov, I.; Partanen, A.; Khokhlova, T.; Farr, N.; Kreider, W.; Maxwell, A.; Sapozhnikov, O.

    2015-10-01

    Simulation of enhanced heating of clinically relevant tissue volumes using nonlinear ultrasound waves generated by a multi-element HIFU phased array were conducted based on the combined Westervelt and bio-heat equations. A spatial spectral approach using the fast Fourier transform algorithm and a corresponding analytic solution to the bioheat equation were used to optimize temperature modeling in tissue. Localized shock-wave heating within a much larger treated tissue volume and short, single HIFU pulses within a much longer overall exposure time were accounted for in the algorithm. Separation of processes with different time and spatial scales made the calculations faster and more accurate. With the proposed method it was shown that for the same time-average power, the use of high peak power pulsing schemes that produce high-amplitude shocks at the focus result in faster tissue heating compared to harmonic, continuous-wave sonications. Nonlinear effects can significantly accelerate volumetric heating while also permitting greater spatial control to reduce the impact on surrounding tissues. Such studies can be further used to test and optimize various steering trajectories of shock-wave sonications for faster and more controlled treatment of tissue volumes.

  11. Warm Dense Matter: An Overview

    SciTech Connect

    Kalantar, D H; Lee, R W; Molitoris, J D

    2004-04-21

    This document provides a summary of the ''LLNL Workshop on Extreme States of Materials: Warm Dense Matter to NIF'' which was held on 20, 21, and 22 February 2002 at the Wente Conference Center in Livermore, CA. The warm dense matter regime, the transitional phase space region between cold material and hot plasma, is presently poorly understood. The drive to understand the nature of matter in this regime is sparking scientific activity worldwide. In addition to pure scientific interest, finite temperature dense matter occurs in the regimes of interest to the SSMP (Stockpile Stewardship Materials Program). So that obtaining a better understanding of WDM is important to performing effective experiments at, e.g., NIF, a primary mission of LLNL. At this workshop we examined current experimental and theoretical work performed at, and in conjunction with, LLNL to focus future activities and define our role in this rapidly emerging research area. On the experimental front LLNL plays a leading role in three of the five relevant areas and has the opportunity to become a major player in the other two. Discussion at the workshop indicated that the path forward for the experimental efforts at LLNL were two fold: First, we are doing reasonable baseline work at SPLs, HE, and High Energy Lasers with more effort encouraged. Second, we need to plan effectively for the next evolution in large scale facilities, both laser (NIF) and Light/Beam sources (LCLS/TESLA and GSI) Theoretically, LLNL has major research advantages in areas as diverse as the thermochemical approach to warm dense matter equations of state to first principles molecular dynamics simulations. However, it was clear that there is much work to be done theoretically to understand warm dense matter. Further, there is a need for a close collaboration between the generation of verifiable experimental data that can provide benchmarks of both the experimental techniques and the theoretical capabilities. The conclusion of this

  12. Slightly focused high-energy shockwave therapy: a potential adjuvant treatment for osteoporotic fracture

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Xiao-Feng; Huang, Hai-Ming; Li, Xiao-Lin; Liu, Ge-Jun; Zhang, Hui

    2015-01-01

    Slightly focused high-energy shockwave (HESW) therapy is characterized by a wide focal area, a large therapy zone, easy positioning and less pain during treatment. The objective of this study was to perform for the first time an in vivo test of the slightly focused HESWs for osteoporotic fractures. Bilateral proximal tibial osteotomies were made in 30 ovariectomized (OVX) Sprague-Dawley rats and secured with internal fixation. The osteotomy site in the left tibia was subsequently treated with slightly focused HESWs with the energy flux density of 0.26 mj/mm2, shock repetition frequency of 1 Hz and 2000 shocks (OVX + HESW group). The contralateral right tibia was not treated and served as the control (OVX group). Roentgenographic examination 2, 4, 6, and 8 weeks after osteotomy showed that HESW treatment accelerated tibia fracture healing in osteoporotic rats. Histological examination 2, 4, and 8 weeks after HESW treatment showed a greater inflammatory reaction in the OVX + HESW group, with more mature collagen and trabeculae than in the OVX group. Micro computer tomography (Micro-CT) scanning after 4 and 8 weeks showed that bone volume (BV), bone volume/tissue volume (BV/TV), mean trabecular thickness (Tb.Th), and mean trabecular number (Tb.N) were about 45.0% and 33.1%, 18.4% and 20.1%, 38.2% and 20.9%, 26.7% and 28.4%, respectively, higher in the treatment group than in the control group (P < 0.05); and the mean trabecular separation (Tb.Sp) was about 16.7% and 27.3% lower in the treatment group (P < 0.05). Four and eight weeks after HESW treatment, the maximum compressive callus endurance was about 72.3% and 25.5%, respectively, higher in the treatment group than in the control group (P < 0.05). These results show that slightly focused HESW therapy has a beneficial effect on osteoporotic tibial fracture healing. Slightly focused HESWs could increase callus endurance, induce bone formation, and improve trabecular bone microarchitecture and biomechanical

  13. Shock-wave lithotripsy in the elderly: Safety, efficacy and special considerations

    PubMed Central

    Philippou, Prodromos; Lamrani, D.; Moraitis, Konstantinos; Wazait, Hassan; Masood, Junaid; Buchholz, Noor

    2011-01-01

    Purpose Shock-wave lithotripsy (SWL) for elderly patients can be challenging. Patients often have a long-standing complex stone burden and significant comorbidities. We report a cohort of patients aged ⩾70 years who were treated by SWL, with special attention to treatment outcomes, complications and the need for adjuvant procedures. Patients and methods Over a period of 4 years, 2311 patients were treated with SWL in a tertiary referral centre. Among these patients, 137 were aged ⩾70 years (5.9%). Patient and stone data were obtained from an electronic database and the patients’ electronic medical records were reviewed. Results During the pre-procedural assessment, 29 patients (21.2%) were considered to be at high anaesthetic risk, due their comorbidities (American Society of Anesthesiology score 3+). In terms of stone burden, 16 stones (11.7%) were located in the distal ureter (mean stone diameter 7.9 mm) and 28 (20.4%) were in the proximal ureter (mean diameter 10.1 mm). In the kidney, 54 stones (39.4%) were in the renal pelvis, upper or mid calyx (mean diameter 10.6 mm), while 39 stones (28.5%) were in the lower calyx (mean diameter 10.1 mm). The median (range) number of SWL sessions per patient was 2.0 (1–3). The overall stone-free rate achieved by SWL alone was 63.5% (65.9% for ureteric stones and 62.4% for renal stones). In total, 38 patients (27.7%) had an adjuvant procedure to achieve stone clearance (ureteroscopy in 23, PCNL in 14 and laparoscopic ureterolithotomy in one case). Apart from six cases (4.3%) of ureteric obstruction due to steinstrasse, there were no severe complications noted. Conclusions The management of elderly patients presenting with urolithiasis is challenging, due to the presence of significant comorbidities. Careful assessment of an integrated management plan for geriatric patients with urolithiasis is essential, and SWL still remains a safe and efficient first-line tool in well-selected cases. PMID:26579264

  14. Boundary Preserving Dense Local Regions.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jaechul; Grauman, Kristen

    2015-05-01

    We propose a dense local region detector to extract features suitable for image matching and object recognition tasks. Whereas traditional local interest operators rely on repeatable structures that often cross object boundaries (e.g., corners, scale-space blobs), our sampling strategy is driven by segmentation, and thus preserves object boundaries and shape. At the same time, whereas existing region-based representations are sensitive to segmentation parameters and object deformations, our novel approach to robustly sample dense sites and determine their connectivity offers better repeatability. In extensive experiments, we find that the proposed region detector provides significantly better repeatability and localization accuracy for object matching compared to an array of existing feature detectors. In addition, we show our regions lead to excellent results on two benchmark tasks that require good feature matching: weakly supervised foreground discovery and nearest neighbor-based object recognition. PMID:26353319

  15. Dense, finely, grained composite materials

    DOEpatents

    Dunmead, Stephen D.; Holt, Joseph B.; Kingman, Donald D.; Munir, Zuhair A.

    1990-01-01

    Dense, finely grained composite materials comprising one or more ceramic phase or phase and one or more metallic and/or intermetallic phase or phases are produced by combustion synthesis. Spherical ceramic grains are homogeneously dispersed within the matrix. Methods are provided, which include the step of applying mechanical pressure during or immediately after ignition, by which the microstructures in the resulting composites can be controllably selected.

  16. [IMPACT OF RADIAL SHOCK-WAVE THERAPY OF A LOW FREQUENCY ON METABOLIC PROCESSES IN THE BONE TISSUE IN TRAUMATIC TIBIAL DEFECTS IN EXPERIMENT].

    PubMed

    Magomedov, A M; Gertsen, G I; Fey, Se; Kuzub, T A; Krinitskaya, O F

    2016-04-01

    Results of investigations on impact of radial shock-wave therapy of low frequency on metabolism of the main protein of the bone tissue (collagen) as well as on the enzymes activity, taking part in a catabolic phase of the protein metabolism, were studied. Changes in content of glycosaminoglycans under impact of the therapy in experimental animals were studied. PMID:27434960

  17. Dense periodic packings of tori

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gabbrielli, Ruggero; Jiao, Yang; Torquato, Salvatore

    2014-02-01

    Dense packings of nonoverlapping bodies in three-dimensional Euclidean space R3 are useful models of the structure of a variety of many-particle systems that arise in the physical and biological sciences. Here we investigate the packing behavior of congruent ring tori in R3, which are multiply connected nonconvex bodies of genus 1, as well as horn and spindle tori. Specifically, we analytically construct a family of dense periodic packings of unlinked tori guided by the organizing principles originally devised for simply connected solid bodies [22 Torquato and Jiao, Phys. Rev. E 86, 011102 (2012), 10.1103/PhysRevE.86.011102]. We find that the horn tori as well as certain spindle and ring tori can achieve a packing density not only higher than that of spheres (i.e., π /√18 =0.7404...) but also higher than the densest known ellipsoid packings (i.e., 0.7707...). In addition, we study dense packings of clusters of pair-linked ring tori (i.e., Hopf links), which can possess much higher densities than corresponding packings consisting of unlinked tori.

  18. Anisotropic de Gennes Narrowing in Confined Fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nygârd, Kim; Buitenhuis, Johan; Kagias, Matias; Jefimovs, Konstantins; Zontone, Federico; Chushkin, Yuriy

    2016-04-01

    The collective diffusion of dense fluids in spatial confinement is studied by combining high-energy (21 keV) x-ray photon correlation spectroscopy and small-angle x-ray scattering from colloid-filled microfluidic channels. We find the structural relaxation in confinement to be slower compared to the bulk. The collective dynamics is wave vector dependent, akin to the de Gennes narrowing typically observed in bulk fluids. However, in stark contrast to the bulk, the structure factor and de Gennes narrowing in confinement are anisotropic. These experimental observations are essential in order to develop a microscopic theoretical description of collective diffusion of dense fluids in confined geometries.

  19. Hugoniot measurements of double-shocked precompressed dense xenon plasmas.

    PubMed

    Zheng, J; Chen, Q F; Gu, Y J; Chen, Z Y

    2012-12-01

    The current partially ionized plasmas models for xenon show substantial differences since the description of pressure and thermal ionization region becomes a formidable task, prompting the need for an improved understanding of dense xenon plasmas behavior at above 100 GPa. We performed double-shock compression experiments on dense xenon to determine accurately the Hugoniot up to 172 GPa using a time-resolved optical radiation method. The planar strong shock wave was produced using a flyer plate impactor accelerated up to ∼6 km/s with a two-stage light-gas gun. The time-resolved optical radiation histories were acquired by using a multiwavelength channel optical transience radiance pyrometer. Shock velocity was measured and mass velocity was determined by the impedance-matching methods. The experimental equation of state of dense xenon plasmas are compared with the self-consistent fluid variational calculations of dense xenon in the region of partial ionization over a wide range of pressures and temperatures. PMID:23368058

  20. Constructing Dense Graphs with Unique Hamiltonian Cycles

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lynch, Mark A. M.

    2012-01-01

    It is not difficult to construct dense graphs containing Hamiltonian cycles, but it is difficult to generate dense graphs that are guaranteed to contain a unique Hamiltonian cycle. This article presents an algorithm for generating arbitrarily large simple graphs containing "unique" Hamiltonian cycles. These graphs can be turned into dense graphs…

  1. Amniotic fluid

    MedlinePlus

    Amniotic fluid is a clear, slightly yellowish liquid that surrounds the unborn baby (fetus) during pregnancy. It is ... in the womb, the baby floats in the amniotic fluid. The amount of amniotic fluid is greatest at ...

  2. Probing cold dense nuclear matter.

    PubMed

    Subedi, R; Shneor, R; Monaghan, P; Anderson, B D; Aniol, K; Annand, J; Arrington, J; Benaoum, H; Benmokhtar, F; Boeglin, W; Chen, J-P; Choi, Seonho; Cisbani, E; Craver, B; Frullani, S; Garibaldi, F; Gilad, S; Gilman, R; Glamazdin, O; Hansen, J-O; Higinbotham, D W; Holmstrom, T; Ibrahim, H; Igarashi, R; de Jager, C W; Jans, E; Jiang, X; Kaufman, L J; Kelleher, A; Kolarkar, A; Kumbartzki, G; Lerose, J J; Lindgren, R; Liyanage, N; Margaziotis, D J; Markowitz, P; Marrone, S; Mazouz, M; Meekins, D; Michaels, R; Moffit, B; Perdrisat, C F; Piasetzky, E; Potokar, M; Punjabi, V; Qiang, Y; Reinhold, J; Ron, G; Rosner, G; Saha, A; Sawatzky, B; Shahinyan, A; Sirca, S; Slifer, K; Solvignon, P; Sulkosky, V; Urciuoli, G M; Voutier, E; Watson, J W; Weinstein, L B; Wojtsekhowski, B; Wood, S; Zheng, X-C; Zhu, L

    2008-06-13

    The protons and neutrons in a nucleus can form strongly correlated nucleon pairs. Scattering experiments, in which a proton is knocked out of the nucleus with high-momentum transfer and high missing momentum, show that in carbon-12 the neutron-proton pairs are nearly 20 times as prevalent as proton-proton pairs and, by inference, neutron-neutron pairs. This difference between the types of pairs is due to the nature of the strong force and has implications for understanding cold dense nuclear systems such as neutron stars. PMID:18511658

  3. Probing Cold Dense Nuclear Matter

    SciTech Connect

    Subedi, Ramesh; Shneor, R.; Monaghan, Peter; Anderson, Bryon; Aniol, Konrad; Annand, John; Arrington, John; Benaoum, Hachemi; Benmokhtar, Fatiha; Bertozzi, William; Boeglin, Werner; Chen, Jian-Ping; Choi, Seonho; Cisbani, Evaristo; Craver, Brandon; Frullani, Salvatore; Garibaldi, Franco; Gilad, Shalev; Gilman, Ronald; Glamazdin, Oleksandr; Hansen, Jens-Ole; Higinbotham, Douglas; Holmstrom, Timothy; Ibrahim, Hassan; Igarashi, Ryuichi; De Jager, Cornelis; Jans, Eddy; Jiang, Xiaodong; Kaufman, Lisa; Kelleher, Aidan; Kolarkar, Ameya; Kumbartzki, Gerfried; LeRose, John; Lindgren, Richard; Liyanage, Nilanga; Margaziotis, Demetrius; Markowitz, Pete; Marrone, Stefano; Mazouz, Malek; Meekins, David; Michaels, Robert; Moffit, Bryan; Perdrisat, Charles; Piasetzky, Eliazer; Potokar, Milan; Punjabi, Vina; Qiang, Yi; Reinhold, Joerg; Ron, Guy; Rosner, Guenther; Saha, Arunava; Sawatzky, Bradley; Shahinyan, Albert; Sirca, Simon; Slifer, Karl; Solvignon, Patricia; Sulkosky, Vince; Sulkosky, Vincent; Sulkosky, Vince; Sulkosky, Vincent; Urciuoli, Guido; Voutier, Eric; Watson, John; Weinstein, Lawrence; Wojtsekhowski, Bogdan; Wood, Stephen; Zheng, Xiaochao; Zhu, Lingyan

    2008-06-01

    The protons and neutrons in a nucleus can form strongly correlated nucleon pairs. Scattering experiments, in which a proton is knocked out of the nucleus with high-momentum transfer and high missing momentum, show that in carbon-12 the neutron-proton pairs are nearly 20 times as prevalent as proton-proton pairs and, by inference, neutron-neutron pairs. This difference between the types of pairs is due to the nature of the strong force and has implications for understanding cold dense nuclear systems such as neutron stars.

  4. Magnetoacoustic solitons in dense astrophysical electron-positron-ion plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hussain, S.; Mahmood, S.; Mushtaq, A.

    2013-08-01

    Nonlinear magnetoacoustic waves in dense electron-positron-ion plasmas are investigated by using three fluid quantum magnetohydrodynamic model. The quantum mechanical effects of electrons and positrons are taken into account due to their Fermionic nature (to obey Fermi statistics) and quantum diffraction effects (Bohm diffusion term) in the model. The reductive perturbation method is employed to derive the Korteweg-de Vries (KdV) equation for low amplitude magnetoacoustic soliton in dense electron-positron-ion plasmas. It is found that positron concentration has significant impact on the phase velocity of magnetoacoustic wave and on the formation of single pulse nonlinear structure. The numerical results are also illustrated by taking into account the plasma parameters of the outside layers of white dwarfs and neutron stars/pulsars.

  5. Oblique impact of dense granular sheets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ellowitz, Jake; Guttenberg, Nicholas; Jaeger, Heinrich M.; Nagel, Sidney R.; Zhang, Wendy W.

    2013-11-01

    Motivated by experiments showing impacts of granular jets with non-circular cross sections produce thin ejecta sheets with anisotropic shapes, we study what happens when two sheets containing densely packed, rigid grains traveling at the same speed collide asymmetrically. Discrete particle simulations and a continuum frictional fluid model yield the same steady-state solution of two exit streams emerging from incident streams. When the incident angle Δθ is less than Δθc =120° +/-10° , the exit streams' angles differ from that measured in water sheet experiments. Below Δθc , the exit angles from granular and water sheet impacts agree. This correspondence is surprising because 2D Euler jet impact, the idealization relevant for both situations, is ill posed: a generic Δθ value permits a continuous family of solutions. Our finding that granular and water sheet impacts evolve into the same member of the solution family suggests previous proposals that perturbations such as viscous drag, surface tension or air entrapment select the actual outcome are not correct. Currently at Department of Physics, University of Oregon, Eugene, OR 97403.

  6. Modeling the multiphase flow in a dense medium cyclone

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, B.; Chu, K.W.; Yu, A.B.; Vince, A.

    2009-04-15

    A mathematical model is proposed to describe the multiphase flow in a dense-medium cyclone (DMC). In this model, the volume of fluid multiphase model is first used to determine the shape and position of the air core, and then the mixture multiphase model is employed to describe the flow of the dense medium (comprising finely ground magnetite in water) and the air core, where the turbulence is described by the Reynolds stress model. The results of fluid flow are finally used in the simulation of coal particle flow described by the stochastic Lagrangian particle tracking model. The validity of the proposed approach is verified by the reasonably good agreement between the measured and predicted results under different conditions. The flow features in a DMC are then examined in terms of factors such as flow field, pressure drop, particle trajectories, and separation efficiency. The results are used to explain the key characteristics of flow in DMCs, such as the origin of a short-circuit flow, the flow pattern, and the motion of coal particles. Moreover, the so-called surging phenomenon is examined in relation to the instability of fluid flow. The model offers a convenient method to investigate the effects of variables related to geometrical and operational conditions on the performance of DMCs.

  7. Magnetism in Dense Quark Matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferrer, Efrain J.; de la Incera, Vivian

    We review the mechanisms via which an external magnetic field can affect the ground state of cold and dense quark matter. In the absence of a magnetic field, at asymptotically high densities, cold quark matter is in the Color-Flavor-Locked (CFL) phase of color superconductivity characterized by three scales: the superconducting gap, the gluon Meissner mass, and the baryonic chemical potential. When an applied magnetic field becomes comparable with each of these scales, new phases and/or condensates may emerge. They include the magnetic CFL (MCFL) phase that becomes relevant for fields of the order of the gap scale; the paramagnetic CFL, important when the field is of the order of the Meissner mass, and a spin-one condensate associated to the magnetic moment of the Cooper pairs, significant at fields of the order of the chemical potential. We discuss the equation of state (EoS) of MCFL matter for a large range of field values and consider possible applications of the magnetic effects on dense quark matter to the astrophysics of compact stars.

  8. Ionic Transport Coefficients of Dense Plasmas without Molecular Dynamics.

    PubMed

    Daligault, Jérôme; Baalrud, Scott D; Starrett, Charles E; Saumon, Didier; Sjostrom, Travis

    2016-02-19

    We present a theoretical model that allows a fast and accurate evaluation of ionic transport properties of realistic plasmas spanning from warm and dense to hot and dilute conditions, including mixtures. This is achieved by combining a recent kinetic theory based on effective interaction potentials with a model for the equilibrium radial density distribution based on an average atom model and the integral equations theory of fluids. The model should find broad use in applications where nonideal plasma conditions are traversed, including inertial confinement fusion, compact astrophysical objects, solar and extrasolar planets, and numerous present-day high energy density laboratory experiments. PMID:26943540

  9. Ionic Transport Coefficients of Dense Plasmas without Molecular Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daligault, Jérôme; Baalrud, Scott D.; Starrett, Charles E.; Saumon, Didier; Sjostrom, Travis

    2016-02-01

    We present a theoretical model that allows a fast and accurate evaluation of ionic transport properties of realistic plasmas spanning from warm and dense to hot and dilute conditions, including mixtures. This is achieved by combining a recent kinetic theory based on effective interaction potentials with a model for the equilibrium radial density distribution based on an average atom model and the integral equations theory of fluids. The model should find broad use in applications where nonideal plasma conditions are traversed, including inertial confinement fusion, compact astrophysical objects, solar and extrasolar planets, and numerous present-day high energy density laboratory experiments.

  10. Transonic flows of dense gases over finite wings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cinnella, P.

    2008-04-01

    Transonic inviscid flows of dense gases of the Bethe-Zel'dovich-Thompson (BZT) type over finite wings are numerically investigated. BZT gases are fluids of the retrograde type (i.e., that superheat when expanded), which exhibit a region of negative values of the fundamental derivative of gas dynamics Γ. As a consequence, they display, in the transonic and supersonic regime, nonclassical gas dynamic behaviors, such as rarefaction shock waves and mixed shock/fan waves. The peculiar properties of BZT fluids have received increased interest in recent years because of their possible application in energy-conversion cycles. The present research aims at providing insight about the transonic aerodynamics of BZT fluids past finite wings, roughly representative of isolated turbine blades with infinite tip leakage. This represents an important step toward the design of advanced turbine blades by using organic working fluids. An investigation of the flow patterns and aerodynamic performance for several choices of the upstream thermodynamic conditions is provided, and the advantages of using BZT working fluids instead of classical ones are discussed.

  11. DPIS for warm dense matter

    SciTech Connect

    Kondo, K.; Kanesue, T.; Horioka, K.; Okamura, M.

    2010-05-23

    Warm Dense Matter (WDM) offers an challenging problem because WDM, which is beyond ideal plasma, is in a low temperature and high density state with partially degenerate electrons and coupled ions. WDM is a common state of matter in astrophysical objects such as cores of giant planets and white dwarfs. The WDM studies require large energy deposition into a small target volume in a shorter time than the hydrodynamical time and need uniformity across the full thickness of the target. Since moderate energy ion beams ({approx} 0.3 MeV/u) can be useful tool for WDM physics, we propose WDM generation using Direct Plasma Injection Scheme (DPIS). In the DPIS, laser ion source is connected to the Radio Frequency Quadrupole (RFQ) linear accelerator directly without the beam transport line. DPIS with a realistic final focus and a linear accelerator can produce WDM.

  12. Uniformly dense polymeric foam body

    DOEpatents

    Whinnery, Jr., Leroy

    2003-07-15

    A method for providing a uniformly dense polymer foam body having a density between about 0.013 g/cm.sup.3 to about 0.5 g/cm.sup.3 is disclosed. The method utilizes a thermally expandable polymer microsphere material wherein some of the microspheres are unexpanded and some are only partially expanded. It is shown that by mixing the two types of materials in appropriate ratios to achieve the desired bulk final density, filling a mold with this mixture so as to displace all or essentially all of the internal volume of the mold, heating the mold for a predetermined interval at a temperature above about 130.degree. C., and then cooling the mold to a temperature below 80.degree. C. the molded part achieves a bulk density which varies by less then about .+-.6% everywhere throughout the part volume.

  13. Dense inhibitory connectivity in neocortex

    PubMed Central

    Fino, Elodie; Yuste, Rafael

    2011-01-01

    Summary The connectivity diagram of neocortical circuits is still unknown, and there are conflicting data as to whether cortical neurons are wired specifically or not. To investigate the basic structure of cortical microcircuits, we use a novel two-photon photostimulation technique that enables the systematic mapping of synaptic connections with single-cell resolution. We map the inhibitory connectivity between upper layers somatostatin-positive GABAergic interneurons and pyramidal cells in mouse frontal cortex. Most, and sometimes all, inhibitory neurons are locally connected to every sampled pyramidal cell. This dense inhibitory connectivity is found at both young and mature developmental ages. Inhibitory innervation of neighboring pyramidal cells is similar, regardless of whether they are connected among themselves or not. We conclude that local inhibitory connectivity is promiscuous, does not form subnetworks and can approach the theoretical limit of a completely connected synaptic matrix. PMID:21435562

  14. Viscoelastic behavior of dense microemulsions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cametti, C.; Codastefano, P.; D'arrigo, G.; Tartaglia, P.; Rouch, J.; Chen, S. H.

    1990-09-01

    We have performed extensive measurements of shear viscosity, ultrasonic absorption, and sound velocity in a ternary system consisting of water-decane-sodium di(2-ethylhexyl)sulfo- succinate(AOT), in the one-phase region where it forms a water-in-oil microemulsion. We observe a rapid increase of the static shear viscosity in the dense microemulsion region. Correspondingly the sound absorption shows unambiguous evidence of a viscoelastic behavior. The absorption data for various volume fractions and temperatures can be reduced to a universal curve by scaling both the absorption and the frequency by the measured static shear viscosity. The sound absorption can be interpreted as coming from the high-frequency tail of the viscoelastic relaxation, describable by a Cole-Cole relaxation formula with unusually small elastic moduli.

  15. The performance of dense medium processes

    SciTech Connect

    Horsfall, D.W.

    1993-12-31

    Dense medium washing in baths and cyclones is widely carried out in South Africa. The paper shows the reason for the preferred use of dense medium processes rather than gravity concentrators such as jigs. The factors leading to efficient separation in baths are listed and an indication given of the extent to which these factors may be controlled and embodied in the deployment of baths and dense medium cyclones in the planning stages of a plant.

  16. Special Features of the Mechanical Characteristics of Al-Al2O3 Composites Produced By Explosive Compaction of Powders Under Shock-Wave Deformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhukov, I. A.; Garkushin, G. V.; Vorozhtsov, S. A.; Khrustalyov, A. P.; Razorenov, S. V.; Kvetinskaya, A. V.; Promakhov, V. V.; Zhukov, A. S.

    2016-01-01

    The results obtained from investigations into the special features inherent in the mechanical characteristics (Hugoniot elastic limit and spall strength) observed under shock-wave loading of Al-Al2O3 composite samples produced by an explosive powder compaction technique are presented. Embedding 10 wt.% of aluminum oxide in the aluminum matrix has been found to increase the Hugoniot elastic limit as opposed to the commercialgrade AD1(Al 1013) aluminum alloy.

  17. Amniotic fluid

    MedlinePlus

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/002220.htm Amniotic fluid To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Amniotic fluid is a clear, slightly yellowish liquid that surrounds ...

  18. Percolation in dense storage arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirkpatrick, Scott; Wilcke, Winfried W.; Garner, Robert B.; Huels, Harald

    2002-11-01

    As computers and their accessories become smaller, cheaper, and faster the providers of news, retail sales, and other services we now take for granted on the Internet have met their increasing computing needs by putting more and more computers, hard disks, power supplies, and the data communications linking them to each other and to the rest of the wired world into ever smaller spaces. This has created a new and quite interesting percolation problem. It is no longer desirable to fix computers, storage or switchgear which fail in such a dense array. Attempts to repair things are all too likely to make problems worse. The alternative approach, letting units “fail in place”, be removed from service and routed around, means that a data communications environment will evolve with an underlying regular structure but a very high density of missing pieces. Some of the properties of this kind of network can be described within the existing paradigm of site or bond percolation on lattices, but other important questions have not been explored. I will discuss 3D arrays of hundreds to thousands of storage servers (something which it is quite feasible to build in the next few years), and show that bandwidth, but not percolation fraction or shortest path lengths, is the critical factor affected by the “fail in place” disorder. Redundancy strategies traditionally employed in storage systems may have to be revised. Novel approaches to routing information among the servers have been developed to minimize the impact.

  19. Hydrocarbon conversion-regeneration process using dilute and dense beds

    SciTech Connect

    Bartholic, D.B.; Barger, D.F.

    1989-07-25

    This patent describes an improvement in a hydrocarbon conversion process wherein a hydrocarbon feed is converted to lower boiling products in a reactor by contacting the same at elevated temperatures with fluid solid material to form the lower boiling products wherein spent solid material containing coke from the reactor is separated from reaction products and stripped of volatile hydrocarbons in a stripping zone, stripped material is regenerated with an oxygen-containing gas in a regeneration zone and hot freshly regenerated fluid solid material returned to the reactor. The improvement comprises carrying out both conversion and regeneration at gas velocities greater than 3 1/2 ft. per second sufficient to achieve a dilute phase entrained solids zone, passing the solid material and gases from both the reactor and regeneration zone through cyclone preseparators for rapid disengagement and removal of greater than 80% solids from gases and returning the solid material without vapors to a dense bed contained in a vessel other than the regenerator or reactor. The pressure at the inlet to the preseparators being substantially the same as the pressure in the vessel containing the dense bed of solid material.

  20. Fluid Mechanics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Drazin, Philip

    1987-01-01

    Outlines the contents of Volume II of "Principia" by Sir Isaac Newton. Reviews the contributions of subsequent scientists to the physics of fluid dynamics. Discusses the treatment of fluid mechanics in physics curricula. Highlights a few of the problems of modern research in fluid dynamics. Shows that problems still remain. (CW)

  1. Selective structuring of multi-layer functional thin films using a laser-induced shockwave delamination process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ehrhardt, M.; Lorenz, P.; Bayer, L.; Molpeceres, C.; Ramirez, C. Antonio Herrera; Zimmer, K.

    2016-03-01

    The laser assisted micro structuring of thin films especially for electronic applications without influence the functionality of the multi-layer system e.g. due to melting products is a challenge for the laser micro machining techniques. The P2 scribing of copper indium gallium selenide (CIGS) solar cells on stainless steel carrier foil was studied using shockwave- induced film delamination (SWIFD) patterning. The delamination process is induced by a shock wave generated by the laser ablation of the rear side of the carrier foil. In the present study UV nanosecond laser pulses provided by a KrF excimer laser were used to induce the SWIFD process. The morphology and size of the achieved thin-film structures were studied in dependence on various laser irradiation parameters by optical and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Furthermore, the materials composition after the laser patterning was analyzed by energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX). The temporal sequences of processes involved in the SWIFD process were analyzed with high speed shadowgraph experiments. The results of the present study shows that in dependence on the laser parameter used a large process window exist in which the CIGS thin film can be removed from the substrate without visible thermal modification of the CIGS thin film.

  2. High-Speed Synchrotron X-ray Imaging Studies of the Ultrasound Shockwave and Enhanced Flow during Metal Solidification Processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, Dongyue; Lee, Tung Lik; Khong, Jia Chuan; Connolley, Thomas; Fezzaa, Kamel; Mi, Jiawei

    2015-07-01

    The highly dynamic behavior of ultrasonic bubble implosion in liquid metal, the multiphase liquid metal flow containing bubbles and particles, and the interaction between ultrasonic waves and semisolid phases during solidification of metal were studied in situ using the complementary ultrafast and high-speed synchrotron X-ray imaging facilities housed, respectively, at the Advanced Photon Source, Argonne National Laboratory, US, and Diamond Light Source, UK. Real-time ultrafast X-ray imaging of 135,780 frames per second revealed that ultrasonic bubble implosion in a liquid Bi-8 wt pctZn alloy can occur in a single wave period (30 kHz), and the effective region affected by the shockwave at implosion was 3.5 times the original bubble diameter. Furthermore, ultrasound bubbles in liquid metal move faster than the primary particles, and the velocity of bubbles is 70 ~ 100 pct higher than that of the primary particles present in the same locations close to the sonotrode. Ultrasound waves can very effectively create a strong swirling flow in a semisolid melt in less than one second. The energetic flow can detach solid particles from the liquid-solid interface and redistribute them back into the bulk liquid very effectively.

  3. Focal Adhesion Kinase Signaling Mediated the Enhancement of Osteogenesis of Human Mesenchymal Stem Cells Induced by Extracorporeal Shockwave

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Jun; Liao, Haojie; Ma, Zebin; Chen, Hongjiang; Huang, Zhonglian; Zhang, Yuantao; Yu, Menglei; Chen, Youbin; Xu, Jiankun

    2016-01-01

    Extracorporeal shockwave (ESW) has been shown of great potential in promoting the osteogenesis of bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (BMSCs), but it is unknown whether this osteogenic promotion effect can also be achieved in other MSCs (i.e., tendon-derived stem cells (TDSCs) and adipose-derived stem cells (ADSCs)). In the current study, we aimed not only to compare the osteogenic effects of BMSCs induced by ESW to those of TDSCs and ADSCs; but also to investigate the underlying mechanisms. We show here that ESW (0.16 mj/mm2) significantly promoted the osteogenic differentiation in all the tested types of MSCs, accompanied with the downregulation of miR-138, but the activation of FAK, ERK1/2, and RUNX2. The enhancement of osteogenesis in these MSCs was consistently abolished when the cells were pretreated with one of the following conditions: overexpression of miR-138, FAK knockdown using specific siRNA, and U0126, implying that all of these elements are indispensable for mediating the effect of ESW. Moreover, our study provides converging genetic and molecular evidence that the miR-138-FAK-ERK1/2-RUNX2 machinery can be generally activated in ESW-preconditioned MSCs, suggesting that ESW may be a promising therapeutic strategy for the enhancement of osteogenesis of MSCs, regardless of their origins. PMID:26863924

  4. Focal Adhesion Kinase Signaling Mediated the Enhancement of Osteogenesis of Human Mesenchymal Stem Cells Induced by Extracorporeal Shockwave

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Jun; Liao, Haojie; Ma, Zebin; Chen, Hongjiang; Huang, Zhonglian; Zhang, Yuantao; Yu, Menglei; Chen, Youbin; Xu, Jiankun

    2016-02-01

    Extracorporeal shockwave (ESW) has been shown of great potential in promoting the osteogenesis of bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (BMSCs), but it is unknown whether this osteogenic promotion effect can also be achieved in other MSCs (i.e., tendon-derived stem cells (TDSCs) and adipose-derived stem cells (ADSCs)). In the current study, we aimed not only to compare the osteogenic effects of BMSCs induced by ESW to those of TDSCs and ADSCs; but also to investigate the underlying mechanisms. We show here that ESW (0.16 mj/mm2) significantly promoted the osteogenic differentiation in all the tested types of MSCs, accompanied with the downregulation of miR-138, but the activation of FAK, ERK1/2, and RUNX2. The enhancement of osteogenesis in these MSCs was consistently abolished when the cells were pretreated with one of the following conditions: overexpression of miR-138, FAK knockdown using specific siRNA, and U0126, implying that all of these elements are indispensable for mediating the effect of ESW. Moreover, our study provides converging genetic and molecular evidence that the miR-138-FAK-ERK1/2-RUNX2 machinery can be generally activated in ESW-preconditioned MSCs, suggesting that ESW may be a promising therapeutic strategy for the enhancement of osteogenesis of MSCs, regardless of their origins.

  5. Incident shock-wave characteristics in air, argon, carbon dioxide, and helium in a shock tube with unheated helium driver

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, C. G., III; Jones, J. J.

    1975-01-01

    Incident shock-wave velocities were measured in the Langley 6-inch expansion tube, operated as a shock tube, with air, argon, carbon dioxide, and helium as test gases. Unheated helium was used as the driver gas and most data were obtained at pressures of approximately 34 and 54 MN/sq m. A range of pressure ratio across the diaphragm was obtained by varying the quiescent test-gas pressure, for a given driver pressure, from 0.0276 to 34.5 kN/sq m. Single- and double-diaphragm modes of operation were employed and diaphragms of various materials tested. Shock velocity was determined from microwave interferometer measurements, response of pressure transducers positioned along interferometer measurements, response of pressure transducers positioned along the driven section (time-of-arrival gages), and to a lesser extent, measured tube-wall pressure. Velocities obtained from these methods are compared and limitations of the methods discussed. The present results are compared with theory and the effects of diaphragm mode (single or double diaphragm), diaphragm material, heating of the driver gas upon pressurization of the driver section, diaphragm opening time, interface mixing, and two-dimensional (nonplanar) flow are discussed.

  6. Quantification of the Range of Motion of Kidney and Ureteral Stones During Shockwave Lithotripsy in Conscious Patients.

    PubMed

    Harrogate, Suzanne R; Yick, L M Shirley; Williams, James C; Cleveland, Robin O; Turney, Benjamin W

    2016-04-01

    Effective shockwave lithotripsy requires accurate targeting of the stone throughout the course of treatment. Stone movement secondary to respiratory movement can make this more difficult. In vitro work has shown that stone motion outside the focal region reduces the efficacy of stone fragmentation; however, there are few clinical data on the degree of stone movement in patients during treatment. To investigate this, X-ray fluoroscopic images of the kidney and ureteral stones at the upper and lower limits of the normal respiratory cycle were acquired during shock wave lithotripsy of 58 conscious patients, and stone excursion was calculated from these images. In addition, the respiration rate and patient perceived pain were recorded during the course of the treatment. It was found that stone motion secondary to respiration was 7.7 ± 2.9 mm for kidney stones and 3.6 ± 2.1 mm for ureteral stones-less than has been reported in studies with anesthetized patients. There was no significant change of motion over the course of treatment although pain was found to increase. These data suggest that stone motion in conscious patients is less than in anesthetized patients. Furthermore, it suggests that lithotripters with focal regions of 8 mm or greater should not suffer from a marked drop in fragmentation efficiency due to stone motion. PMID:26756226

  7. Characterization of Bond Strength of U-Mo Fuel Plates Using the Laser Shockwave Technique: Capabilities and Preliminary Results

    SciTech Connect

    J. A. Smith; D. L. Cottle; B. H. Rabin

    2013-09-01

    This report summarizes work conducted to-date on the implementation of new laser-based capabilities for characterization of bond strength in nuclear fuel plates, and presents preliminary results obtained from fresh fuel studies on as-fabricated monolithic fuel consisting of uranium-10 wt.% molybdenum alloys clad in 6061 aluminum by hot isostatic pressing. Characterization involves application of two complementary experimental methods, laser-shock testing and laser-ultrasonic imaging, collectively referred to as the Laser Shockwave Technique (LST), that allows the integrity, physical properties and interfacial bond strength in fuel plates to be evaluated. Example characterization results are provided, including measurement of layer thicknesses, elastic properties of the constituents, and the location and nature of generated debonds (including kissing bonds). LST provides spatially localized, non-contacting measurements with minimum specimen preparation, and is ideally suited for applications involving radioactive materials, including irradiated materials. The theoretical principles and experimental approaches employed in characterizing nuclear fuel plates are described, and preliminary bond strength measurement results are discussed, with emphasis on demonstrating the capabilities and limitations of these methods. These preliminary results demonstrate the ability to distinguish bond strength variations between different fuel plates. Although additional development work is necessary to validate and qualify the test methods, these results suggest LST is viable as a method to meet fuel qualification requirements to demonstrate acceptable bonding integrity.

  8. Extracorporeal shock-wave lithotripsy with MPL9000 for the treatment of urinary stones in pediatric patients.

    PubMed

    Zanetti, G; Montanari, E; Guarneri, A; Seveso, M; Trinchieri, A; Rovera, F; Austoni, E; Pisani, E

    1993-12-01

    Extracorporeal shock-wave lithotripsy (ESWL) is now applied as the treatment of choice in most cases of urinary stones. Its acceptance in pediatry, however has been only gradual despite numerous positive studies. We report on fourteen young patients (mean age: 9.7 years) who were all treated by ESWL with the MPL9000 lithotriptor for renal stones. Each patient received an average of 1440 shocks with generator energy set at 14.4 Kv. Six of these patients required either analgosedation or anesthesia. No observable complications of treatment occurred. At one-month follow up, the kidneys of twelve patients were found to be stone-free, while two still presented fragments that could pass spontaneously. At three-month follow-up, thirteen patients were stone-free and a single patient retained some fragments. From this data we infer that ESWL with the MPL9000 lithotriptor may be used safety and efficiently to treat urolithiasis in younger patients. PMID:8312950

  9. Nanoscaled SiCN-composite powders with different structures by shock-wave pyrolysis of organic precursors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drost, H.; Friedrich, M.; Mohr, R.; Gey, E.

    1997-02-01

    Nanoscaled SiCN-composite powders were formed by shock-wave pyrolysis of hexamethyldisilazane (HMDS) and tetramethylsilane (TMS) with NH 3-additions at temperatures of 800-2000°C and reaction times in the range of 0.5 to 2 ms. The powders were analysed by FTIR, XRD, and elementary analysis. The structure, the properties, and the behaviour of the powders have proved to depend significantly on the pyrolytic conditions. In general, from HMDS by pyrolysis a real metastable-bonded complex consisting of SiC-, SiN-, and CN-bonds is formed. While the powder particle-size (5 to 75 nm) and the crystalline content (< 10%) are changed by the pyrolysis temperature, the stoichiometric composition can be affected by the amount of N-additions to the system. Thus, a N-content in the powder up to 28 wt.% can be achieved leading partially to an incorporation of N-atoms into the SiC lattice instead of C-atoms and a formation of a SiCN-network. At small NH 3-additions and corresponding small N-contents in the powders noticeable crystalline SiC portions are formed. A formation of crystalline Si 3N 4 as well as SiC phases can be observed when the composite powders are heated up to 1400°C.

  10. CFD model for large hazardous dense cloud spread predictions, with particular reference to Bhopal disaster

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mishra, Kirti Bhushan

    2015-09-01

    A volumetric source based CFD (Computational Fluid Dynamics) model for estimating the wind and gravity driven spread of an elevated released dense hazardous cloud on a flat terrain without and with obstacles is demonstrated. The model considers the development of a worst-case scenario similar to that occurred at Bhopal. Fully developed clouds of a dense gas having different densities, under ABL (Atmospheric Boundary Layer) with calm ground wind conditions are first obtained. These clouds are then allowed to spread under ABL with different ground wind speeds and gravity conditions. The developed model is validated by performing the grid independent study, the fluid dynamical evidences, post-disaster facts, the downwind MIC (Methyl Isocynate) concentrations estimated by earlier models and experiments on dense plume trajectories. It is shown that in case of an active dispersion under calm wind conditions the lateral spread would prevail over the downwind spread. The presence of a dense medium behaves like a weak porous media and initiates turbulence at much smaller downwind distances than that normally would occur without the dense medium. The safety distances from toxic exposures of MIC are predicted by specifying an isosurface of a minimum concentration above the ground surface. Discrepancies in near-field predictions still exist. However, the far-field predictions agree well with data published before.

  11. Atomic Transitions in Dense Plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murillo, Michael Sean

    Motivation for the study of hot, dense ( ~solid density) plasmas has historically been in connection with stellar interiors. In recent years, however, there has been a growing interest in such plasmas due to their relevance to short wavelength (EUV and x-ray) lasers, inertial confinement fusion, and optical harmonic generation. In constrast to the stellar plasmas, these laboratory plasmas are typically composed of high-z elements and are not in thermal equilibrium. Descriptions of nonthermal plasma experiments must necessarily involve the consideration of the various atomic processes and the rates at which they occur. Traditionally, the rates of collisional atomic processes are calculated by considering a binary collision picture. For example, a single electron may be taken to collisionally excite an ion. A cross section may be defined for this process and, multiplying by a flux, the rate may be obtained. In a high density plasma this binary picture clearly breaks down as the electrons no longer act independently of each other. The cross section is ill-defined in this regime and another approach is needed to obtain rates. In this thesis an approach based on computing rates without recourse to a cross section is presented. In this approach, binary collisions are replaced by stochastic density fluctuations. It is then these density fluctuations which drive transitions in the ions. Furthermore, the oscillator strengths for the transitions are computed in screened Coulomb potentials which reflect the average polarization of the plasma near the ion. Numerical computations are presented for the collisional ionization rate. The effects of screening in the plasma -ion interaction are investigated for He^+ ions in a plasma near solid density. It is shown that dynamic screening plays an important role in this process. Then, density effects in the oscillator strength are explored for both He^+ and Ar^{+17}. Approximations which introduce a nonorthogonality between the initial

  12. Visualization of shock-wave formation processes during shock reflection at obstacles with multiple steps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kobayashi, Susumu; Adachi, Takashi

    According to standard textbooks on compressible fluid dynamics, a shock wave is formed by an accumulation of compression waves. However, the process by which an accumulated compression wave grows into a shock wave has never been visualized. In the present paper, the authors tried to visualize this process using a model wedge with multiple steps. This model is useful for generating a series of compression waves and can simulate a compression process that occurs in a shock tube. By estimating the triple-point trajectory angle, we demonstrated visually that an accumulated compression wave grows into a shock wave. Further reflection experiments over a rough-surface wedge confirmed the tendency for the triple point trajectory angle χ to reach the asymptotic value χs in the end.

  13. Spacer fluids

    SciTech Connect

    Wilson, W.N.; Bradshaw, R.D.; Wilton, B.S.; Carpenter, R.B.

    1992-05-19

    This patent describes a method for cementing a wellbore penetrating an earth formation into which a conduit extends, the wellbore having a space occupied by a drilling fluid. It comprises displacing the drilling fluid from the space with a spacer fluid comprising: sulfonated styrene-maleic anhydride copolymer, bentonite, welan gum, surfactant and a weighting agent; and displacing the spacer composition and filling the wellbore space with a settable cement composition.

  14. Coupled modes in magnetized dense plasma with relativistic-degenerate electrons

    SciTech Connect

    Khan, S. A.

    2012-01-15

    Low frequency electrostatic and electromagnetic waves are investigated in ultra-dense quantum magnetoplasma with relativistic-degenerate electron and non-degenerate ion fluids. The dispersion relation is derived for mobile as well as immobile ions by employing hydrodynamic equations for such plasma under the influence of electromagnetic forces and pressure gradient of relativistic-degenerate Fermi gas of electrons. The result shows the coexistence of shear Alfven and ion modes with relativistically modified dispersive properties. The relevance of results to the dense degenerate plasmas of astrophysical origin (for instance, white dwarf stars) is pointed out with brief discussion on ultra-relativistic and non-relativistic limits.

  15. Neutrino Propagation in Dense Magnetized Matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arbuzova, E. V.; Lobanov, A. E.; Murchikova, E. M.

    2009-01-01

    We obtained a complete system of solutions of the Dirac-Pauli equation for a massive neutrino interacting with dense matter and strong electromagnetic field. We demonstrated that these solutions can describe precession of the neutrino spin.

  16. Wide Variation Seen in 'Dense' Breast Diagnoses

    MedlinePlus

    ... defined mammography patients' breasts as dense. Higher breast density is a risk factor for breast cancer, experts ... could have implications for the so-called breast density notification laws that have been passed in about ...

  17. Dissociation energy of molecules in dense gases

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kunc, J. A.

    1992-01-01

    A general approach is presented for calculating the reduction of the dissociation energy of diatomic molecules immersed in a dense (n = less than 10 exp 22/cu cm) gas of molecules and atoms. The dissociation energy of a molecule in a dense gas differs from that of the molecule in vacuum because the intermolecular forces change the intramolecular dynamics of the molecule, and, consequently, the energy of the molecular bond.

  18. Magnetic Phases in Dense Quark Matter

    SciTech Connect

    Incera, Vivian de la

    2007-10-26

    In this paper I discuss the magnetic phases of the three-flavor color superconductor. These phases can take place at different field strengths in a highly dense quark system. Given that the best natural candidates for the realization of color superconductivity are the extremely dense cores of neutron stars, which typically have very large magnetic fields, the magnetic phases here discussed could have implications for the physics of these compact objects.

  19. Dense loading of catalyst improves hydrotreater performance

    SciTech Connect

    Nooy, F.M.

    1984-11-12

    This paper discusses the advantages of increased capacity and improved catalyst/oil contact in existing hydrotreating units. The similarities between catalyst loading and other material processes are reviewed. Catalyst bed activity is examined. Dense loading systems are reviewed in detail. Over the last years, many refiners have gained experience with the benefits of dense loading techniques, and these techniques are gaining more and more acceptance.

  20. Dynamical theory of dense groups of galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mamon, Gary A.

    1990-01-01

    It is well known that galaxies associate in groups and clusters. Perhaps 40% of all galaxies are found in groups of 4 to 20 galaxies (e.g., Tully 1987). Although most groups appear to be so loose that the galaxy interactions within them ought to be insignificant, the apparently densest groups, known as compact groups appear so dense when seen in projection onto the plane of the sky that their members often overlap. These groups thus appear as dense as the cores of rich clusters. The most popular catalog of compact groups, compiled by Hickson (1982), includes isolation among its selection critera. Therefore, in comparison with the cores of rich clusters, Hickson's compact groups (HCGs) appear to be the densest isolated regions in the Universe (in galaxies per unit volume), and thus provide in principle a clean laboratory for studying the competition of very strong gravitational interactions. The $64,000 question here is then: Are compact groups really bound systems as dense as they appear? If dense groups indeed exist, then one expects that each of the dynamical processes leading to the interaction of their member galaxies should be greatly enhanced. This leads us to the questions: How stable are dense groups? How do they form? And the related question, fascinating to any theorist: What dynamical processes predominate in dense groups of galaxies? If HCGs are not bound dense systems, but instead 1D change alignments (Mamon 1986, 1987; Walke & Mamon 1989) or 3D transient cores (Rose 1979) within larger looser systems of galaxies, then the relevant question is: How frequent are chance configurations within loose groups? Here, the author answers these last four questions after comparing in some detail the methods used and the results obtained in the different studies of dense groups.

  1. Fabric variables in dense sheared suspensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Radjai, Farhang; Amarsid, Lhassan; Delenne, Jean-Yves

    The rheology of granular flows and dense suspensions can be described in terms of their effective shear and bulk viscosities as a function of packing fraction. Using stress partition and equivalence between frictional and viscous descriptions in the dense state, we show that the effective viscosities can be expressed in terms of the force-network anisotropy. This is supported by our extensive DEM-LBM simulations for a broad range of inertial and viscous parameters.

  2. METHOD OF PRODUCING DENSE CONSOLIDATED METALLIC REGULUS

    DOEpatents

    Magel, T.T.

    1959-08-11

    A methcd is presented for reducing dense metal compositions while simultaneously separating impurities from the reduced dense metal and casting the reduced parified dense metal, such as uranium, into well consolidated metal ingots. The reduction is accomplished by heating the dense metallic salt in the presence of a reducing agent, such as an alkali metal or alkaline earth metal in a bomb type reacting chamber, while applying centrifugal force on the reacting materials. Separation of the metal from the impurities is accomplished essentially by the incorporation of a constricted passageway at the vertex of a conical reacting chamber which is in direct communication with a collecting chamber. When a centrifugal force is applled to the molten metal and slag from the reduction in a direction collinear with the axis of the constricted passage, the dense molten metal is forced therethrough while the less dense slag is retained within the reaction chamber, resulting in a simultaneous separation of the reduced molten metal from the slag and a compacting of the reduced metal in a homogeneous mass.

  3. Nanoscale Fluid Flows in the Vicinity of Patterned Surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cieplak, Marek; Koplik, Joel; Banavar, Jayanth R.

    2006-03-01

    Molecular dynamics simulations of dense and rarefied fluids comprising small chain molecules in chemically patterned nanochannels predict a novel switching from Poiseuille to plug flow along the channel. We also demonstrate behavior akin to the lotus effect for a nanodrop on a chemically patterned substrate. Our results show that one can control and exploit the behavior of fluids at the nanoscale using chemical patterning.

  4. Isotope systematics and shock-wave metamorphism: II. U-Pb and Rb-Sr in naturally shocked rocks; the Haughton Impact Structure, Canada

    SciTech Connect

    Schaerer, U. ); Deutsch, A. )

    1990-12-01

    Minerals and whole rocks from crystalline fragments collected in the allochthonous polymict breccia of the 23-Ma-old Haughton impact crater on Devon Island (Arctic Canada) were analyzed for U-Pb, K, and Rb-Sr in order to constrain degrees of shock-wave induced perturbations in these systems. The results show that shock-wave metamorphism at {ge}50 GPa with onset of total melting does not significantly affect the U-Pb chronometers in monazite and zircon. Monazite preserved its age of crystallization during high-grade metamorphism at 1928.2 (+2.1/{minus}2.0) Ma (2 {sigma}-errors) as dated by the upper intercept of 2-9% discordant monazites. The same analyses yield a lower intercept age of 277.5 (+35.1/{minus}35.0) Ma in the concordia diagram, demonstrating that discordancy is not a direct effect of shock-wave metamorphism but a product of time integrated Pb-diffusion prior to the impact event, which occurred 23 Ma ago. This constrains maximal shock-induced Pb-loss to less than 3% including possible alteration-related Pb diffusion from the shock damaged grains. In 1903.1 (+1.4/{minus}1.1) Ma old monazite from an unshocked reference gneiss, recent Pb-loss also reaches 3% corroborating the occurrence of weak alteration-related U/Pb fractionation. The data substantiate that U-Pb discordance patterns are not a reliable chronometer to data impact events.

  5. The effects of shockwave profile shape and shock obliquity on spallation in Cu and Ta: kinetic and stress-state effects on damage evolution(u)

    SciTech Connect

    Gray, George T

    2010-12-14

    Widespread research over the past five decades has provided a wealth of experimental data and insight concerning shock hardening and the spallation response of materials subjected to square-topped shock-wave loading profiles. Less quantitative data have been gathered on the effect of direct, in-contact, high explosive (HE)-driven Taylor wave (or triangular-wave) loading profile shock loading on the shock hardening, damage evolution, or spallation response of materials. Explosive loading induces an impulse dubbed a 'Taylor Wave'. This is a significantly different loading history than that achieved by a square-topped impulse in terms of both the pulse duration at a fixed peak pressure, and a different unloading strain rate from the peak Hugoniot state achieved. The goal of this research is to quantify the influence of shockwave obliquity on the spallation response of copper and tantalum by subjecting plates of each material to HE-driven sweeping detonation-wave loading and quantify both the wave propagation and the post-mortem damage evolution. This talk will summarize our current understanding of damage evolution during sweeping detonation-wave spallation loading in Cu and Ta and show comparisons to modeling simulations. The spallation responses of Cu and Ta are both shown to be critically dependent on the shockwave profile and the stress-state of the shock. Based on variations in the specifics of the shock drive (pulse shape, peak stress, shock obliquity) and sample geometry in Cu and Ta, 'spall strength' varies by over a factor of two and the details of the mechanisms of the damage evolution is seen to vary. Simplistic models of spallation, such as P{sub min} based on 1-D square-top shock data lack the physics to capture the influence of kinetics on damage evolution such as that operative during sweeping detonation loading. Such considerations are important for the development of predictive models of damage evolution and spallation in metals and alloys.

  6. Clinical Nomograms to Predict Stone-Free Rates after Shock-Wave Lithotripsy: Development and Internal-Validation

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jung Kwon; Ha, Seung Beom; Jeon, Chan Hoo; Oh, Jong Jin; Cho, Sung Yong; Oh, Seung-June; Kim, Hyeon Hoe; Jeong, Chang Wook

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Shock-wave lithotripsy (SWL) is accepted as the first line treatment modality for uncomplicated upper urinary tract stones; however, validated prediction models with regards to stone-free rates (SFRs) are still needed. We aimed to develop nomograms predicting SFRs after the first and within the third session of SWL. Computed tomography (CT) information was also modeled for constructing nomograms. Materials and Methods From March 2006 to December 2013, 3028 patients were treated with SWL for ureter and renal stones at our three tertiary institutions. Four cohorts were constructed: Total-development, Total-validation, CT-development, and CT-validation cohorts. The nomograms were developed using multivariate logistic regression models with selected significant variables in a univariate logistic regression model. A C-index was used to assess the discrimination accuracy of nomograms and calibration plots were used to analyze the consistency of prediction. Results The SFR, after the first and within the third session, was 48.3% and 68.8%, respectively. Significant variables were sex, stone location, stone number, and maximal stone diameter in the Total-development cohort, and mean Hounsfield unit (HU) and grade of hydronephrosis (HN) were additional parameters in the CT-development cohort. The C-indices were 0.712 and 0.723 for after the first and within the third session of SWL in the Total-development cohort, and 0.755 and 0.756, in the CT-development cohort, respectively. The calibration plots showed good correspondences. Conclusions We constructed and validated nomograms to predict SFR after SWL. To the best of our knowledge, these are the first graphical nomograms to be modeled with CT information. These may be useful for patient counseling and treatment decision-making. PMID:26890006

  7. The efficacy of ultrasound-guided extracorporeal shockwave therapy in patients with cervical spondylosis and nuchal ligament calcification.

    PubMed

    Lin, Tz-Yan; Chen, Jing-Ting; Chen, Yu-Yu; Chen, Tien-Wen; Lee, Chia-Ling; Chen, Chia-Hsin; Huang, Mao-Hsiung

    2015-07-01

    We investigated the effects of extracorporeal shockwave therapy (ESWT) on the rehabilitation of cervical spondylosis with nuchal ligament (NL) calcification under X-ray and ultrasound guidance. Sixty patients with cervical spondylosis and calcification of NL were selected and randomly assigned to three groups: A, B, and C. Patients in Group A received rehabilitation with 20 minutes of hot packs and underwent 15 minutes of intermittent cervical traction three times/week for 6 weeks. Patients in Group B received the same rehabilitation as those in Group A and ESWT (2000 impulses, 0.27 mJ/mm(2)) over the calcified NL guided by X-ray image. Patients in Group C received the same treatment as those in Group B, but the ESWT was guided by musculoskeletal sonography. The therapeutic effects were evaluated by: changes in range of motion (ROM) of the cervical spine including flexion, extension, lateral bending, and rotation; visual analog pain scale; and Neck Disability Index before and after treatment and at follow up 3 months later. We found a significant reduction in pain in each treated group after treatment and at follow up. However, patients in Groups B and C showed more improvements in ROM and neck pain relief after treatment and a decrease in Neck Disability Index. Furthermore, patients in Group C showed better cervical ROM at follow up than Group B. ESWT is an adjuvant treatment in the management of cervical spondylosis with calcification of NL and ultrasound-guided ESWT results in more functional improvements. PMID:26162813

  8. Percutaneous nephrolithotomy vs. extracorporeal shockwave lithotripsy for treating a 20–30 mm single renal pelvic stone

    PubMed Central

    Hassan, Mohammed; El-Nahas, Ahmed R.; Sheir, Khaled Z.; El-Tabey, Nasr A.; El-Assmy, Ahmed M.; Elshal, Ahmed M.; Shokeir, Ahmed A.

    2015-01-01

    Objective To compare the efficacy, safety and cost of extracorporeal shockwave lithotripsy (ESWL) and percutaneous nephrolithotomy (PNL) for treating a 20–30 mm single renal pelvic stone. Patients and methods The computerised records of patients who underwent PNL or ESWL for a 20–30 mm single renal pelvic stone between January 2006 and December 2012 were reviewed retrospectively. Patients aged <18 years who had a branched stone, advanced hydronephrosis, a solitary kidney, anatomical renal abnormality, or had a surgical intervention within the past 6 months were excluded. The study included 337 patients with a mean (SD, range) age of 49.3 (12.2, 20–81) years. The patients’ criteria (age, sex, body mass index) and the stone characteristics (side, stone length, surface area, attenuation value and skin-to-stone distance) were compared between the groups. The re-treatment rate, the need for secondary procedures, success rate, complications and the total costs were calculated and compared. Results In all, 167 patients were treated by ESWL and 170 by PNL. The re-treatment rate (75% vs. 5%), the need for secondary procedures (25% vs. 4.7%) and total number of procedures (three vs. one) were significantly higher in the ESWL group (P < 0.001). The success rate was significantly higher in the PNL group (95% vs. 75%, P < 0.001), as was the complication rate (13% vs. 6.6%, P = 0.050). The total costs of primary and secondary procedures were significantly higher for PNL (US$ 1120 vs. 490; P < 0.001). Conclusions PNL was more effective than ESWL for treating a single renal pelvic stone of 20–30 mm. However, ESWL was associated with fewer complications and a lower cost. PMID:26413350

  9. Integral equation model for warm and hot dense mixtures.

    PubMed

    Starrett, C E; Saumon, D; Daligault, J; Hamel, S

    2014-09-01

    In a previous work [C. E. Starrett and D. Saumon, Phys. Rev. E 87, 013104 (2013)] a model for the calculation of electronic and ionic structures of warm and hot dense matter was described and validated. In that model the electronic structure of one atom in a plasma is determined using a density-functional-theory-based average-atom (AA) model and the ionic structure is determined by coupling the AA model to integral equations governing the fluid structure. That model was for plasmas with one nuclear species only. Here we extend it to treat plasmas with many nuclear species, i.e., mixtures, and apply it to a carbon-hydrogen mixture relevant to inertial confinement fusion experiments. Comparison of the predicted electronic and ionic structures with orbital-free and Kohn-Sham molecular dynamics simulations reveals excellent agreement wherever chemical bonding is not significant. PMID:25314550

  10. Quantum molecular dynamics study of warm dense iron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Cong; Wang, Zhe-Bin; Chen, Qi-Feng; Zhang, Ping

    2014-02-01

    The equation of state, the self-diffusion coefficient and viscosity of fluid iron in the warm dense regime at densities from 12.5 to 25.0g/cm3, and temperatures from 0.5 to 15.0 eV have been calculated via quantum molecular dynamics simulations. The principal Hugoniot is in good agreement with nuclear explosive experiments up to ˜50Mbar but predicts lower pressures compared with high intensity laser results. The self-diffusion coefficient and viscosity have been simulated and have been compared with the one-component plasma model. The Stokes-Einstein relationship, defined by connections between the viscosity and the self-diffusion coefficient, has been determined and has been found to be fairly well described by classical predictions.

  11. Jamming under rapid pulling in dense granular suspensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Majumdar, Sayantan; Peters, Ivo R.; Jaeger, Heinrich

    2015-03-01

    It requires a lot of force to quickly pull out an object immersed in a bath of dense granular suspension like corn starch in water. To understand such striking force response, we experimentally measure the normal force required for pulling out a cylindrical rod vertically from the suspension at a controlled pulling velocity. We observe that for slow pulling velocities the force response is similar to that of highly viscous fluids but above a certain threshold velocity the force show a diverging behavior soon after the initial viscous-like response. The time delay between the initial viscous-like and the diverging force response crucially depends on the proximity of the container walls from the initial contact region of the pulling rod with the suspension. We use in-situ X-ray radiography techniques to map out the local velocity profiles inside the suspension using metallic tracer particles which reveals that the force divergence takes place under pulling when the motion inside the suspension extends up to the container walls. Although the exact mechanism remains to be explained, our experiments suggest that both the magnitude and the delay in force response under pulling are reminiscent of dynamic jamming under impact in dense granular suspensions. S.M. acknowledges support from a Kadanoff-Rice Post Doctoral fellowship from MRSEC, University of Chicago

  12. Fluid flow into vertical fractures from a point source

    SciTech Connect

    Clark, P.E.; Zhu, Q.

    1995-03-01

    Flow into a fracture from a point source recently has been the focus of attention in the petroleum industry. The suggestion has been made that, in this flow configuration, convection (gravity-driven flow) would dominate Stokes`-type settling for determining final proppant distribution. The theory is that when a dense fluid flows into a fracture filled with a less dense fluid from a point source, the density of the fluid will force it to the bottom of the fracture. This clearly happens when the two fluids have low viscosity. However, viscosity of both the fluid in the fracture and the displacing fluid and nonuniformities in the fracture influence displacement process significantly. Results presented in this study clearly show the effects of viscosity and fracture nonuniformity on the convective settling mechanism.

  13. Anisotropic de Gennes Narrowing in Confined Fluids.

    PubMed

    Nygård, Kim; Buitenhuis, Johan; Kagias, Matias; Jefimovs, Konstantins; Zontone, Federico; Chushkin, Yuriy

    2016-04-22

    The collective diffusion of dense fluids in spatial confinement is studied by combining high-energy (21 keV) x-ray photon correlation spectroscopy and small-angle x-ray scattering from colloid-filled microfluidic channels. We find the structural relaxation in confinement to be slower compared to the bulk. The collective dynamics is wave vector dependent, akin to the de Gennes narrowing typically observed in bulk fluids. However, in stark contrast to the bulk, the structure factor and de Gennes narrowing in confinement are anisotropic. These experimental observations are essential in order to develop a microscopic theoretical description of collective diffusion of dense fluids in confined geometries. PMID:27152823

  14. Numerical Simulation of Fluid Mud Gravity Currents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yilmaz, N. A.; Testik, F. Y.

    2011-12-01

    Fluid mud bottom gravity currents are simulated numerically using a commercial computational fluid dynamics software, ANSYS-Fluent. In this study, Eulerian-Eulerian multi-fluid method is selected since this method treats all phases in a multiphase system as interpenetrated continua. There are three different phases in the computational model constructed for this study: water, fluid mud, and air. Water and fluid mud are defined as two miscible fluids and the mass and momentum transfers between these two phases are taken into account. Fluid mud, which is a dense suspension of clay particles and water, is defined as a single-phase non-Newtonian fluid via user-defined-functions. These functions define the physical characteristics (density, viscosity, etc.) of the fluid mud and these characteristics vary with changing suspension concentration due to mass transfer between the fluid mud and the water phase. Results of this two-dimensional numerical model are verified with data obtained from experiments conducted in a laboratory flume with a lock-release set-up. Numerical simulations are currently being conducted to elucidate turbulent entrainment of ambient water into fluid mud gravity currents. This study is motivated by coastal dredge disposal operations.

  15. Evidence for CO2-rich fluids in rocks from the type charnockite area near Pallavaram, Tamil Nadu

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hansen, E.; Hunt, W.; Jacob, S. C.; Morden, K.; Reddi, R.; Tacy, P.

    1988-01-01

    Fluid inclusion and mineral chemistry data was presented for samples from the type charnockite area near Pallavaram (Tamil Nadu, India). The results indicate the presence of a dense CO2 fluid phase, but the data cannot distinguish between influx of this fluid from elsewhere or localized migration of CO2-rich fluids associated with dehydration melting.

  16. Dense Plasma Focus - From Alternative Fusion Source to Versatile High Energy Density Plasma Source for Plasma Nanotechnology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rawat, R. S.

    2015-03-01

    The dense plasma focus (DPF), a coaxial plasma gun, utilizes pulsed high current electrical discharge to heat and compress the plasma to very high density and temperature with energy densities in the range of 1-10 × 1010 J/m3. The DPF device has always been in the company of several alternative magnetic fusion devices as it produces intense fusion neutrons. Several experiments conducted on many different DPF devices ranging over several order of storage energy have demonstrated that at higher storage energy the neutron production does not follow I4 scaling laws and deteriorate significantly raising concern about the device's capability and relevance for fusion energy. On the other hand, the high energy density pinch plasma in DPF device makes it a multiple radiation source of ions, electron, soft and hard x-rays, and neutrons, making it useful for several applications in many different fields such as lithography, radiography, imaging, activation analysis, radioisotopes production etc. Being a source of hot dense plasma, strong shockwave, intense energetic beams and radiation, etc, the DPF device, additionally, shows tremendous potential for applications in plasma nanoscience and plasma nanotechnology. In the present paper, the key features of plasma focus device are critically discussed to understand the novelties and opportunities that this device offers in processing and synthesis of nanophase materials using, both, the top-down and bottom-up approach. The results of recent key experimental investigations performed on (i) the processing and modification of bulk target substrates for phase change, surface reconstruction and nanostructurization, (ii) the nanostructurization of PLD grown magnetic thin films, and (iii) direct synthesis of nanostructured (nanowire, nanosheets and nanoflowers) materials using anode target material ablation, ablated plasma and background reactive gas based synthesis and purely gas phase synthesis of various different types of

  17. Fluid inflation

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, X.; Firouzjahi, H.; Namjoo, M.H.; Sasaki, M. E-mail: firouz@ipm.ir E-mail: misao@yukawa.kyoto-u.ac.jp

    2013-09-01

    In this work we present an inflationary mechanism based on fluid dynamics. Starting with the action for a single barotropic perfect fluid, we outline the procedure to calculate the power spectrum and the bispectrum of the curvature perturbation. It is shown that a perfect barotropic fluid naturally gives rise to a non-attractor inflationary universe in which the curvature perturbation is not frozen on super-horizon scales. We show that a scale-invariant power spectrum can be obtained with the local non-Gaussianity parameter f{sub NL} = 5/2.

  18. Fluid Shifts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stenger, M.; Hargens, A.; Dulchavsky, S.; Ebert, D.; Lee, S.; Lauriie, S.; Garcia, K.; Sargsyan, A.; Martin, D.; Ribeiro, L.; Lui, J.; Macias, B.; Arbeille, P.; Danielson, R.; Chang, D.; Johnston, S.; Ploutz-Snyder, R.; Smith, S.

    2016-01-01

    NASA is focusing on long-duration missions on the International Space Station (ISS) and future exploration-class missions beyond low-Earth orbit. Visual acuity changes observed after short-duration missions were largely transient, but more than 50% of ISS astronauts experienced more profound, chronic changes with objective structural and functional findings such as papilledema and choroidal folds. Globe flattening, optic nerve sheath dilation, and optic nerve tortuosity also are apparent. This pattern is referred to as the visual impairment and intracranial pressure (VIIP) syndrome. VIIP signs and symptoms, as well as postflight lumbar puncture data, suggest that elevated intracranial pressure (ICP) may be associated with the spaceflight-induced cephalad fluid shifts, but this hypothesis has not been tested. The purpose of this study is to characterize fluid distribution and compartmentalization associated with long-duration spaceflight, and to correlate these findings with vision changes and other elements of the VIIP syndrome. We also seek to determine whether the magnitude of fluid shifts during spaceflight, as well as the VIIP-related effects of those shifts, is predicted by the crewmember's preflight conditions and responses to acute hemodynamic manipulations (such as head-down tilt). Lastly, we will evaluate the patterns of fluid distribution in ISS astronauts during acute reversal of fluid shifts through application of lower body negative pressure (LBNP) interventions to characterize and explain general and individual responses. METHODS: We will examine a variety of physiologic variables in 10 long-duration ISS crewmembers using the test conditions and timeline presented in the Figure below. Measures include: (1) fluid compartmentalization (total body water by D2O, extracellular fluid by NaBr, intracellular fluid by calculation, plasma volume by CO rebreathe, interstitial fluid by calculation); (2) forehead/eyelids, tibia, calcaneus tissue thickness (by

  19. Fluid Shifts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stenger, Michael B.; Hargens, Alan R.; Dulchavsky, Scott A.; Ebert, Douglas J.; Lee, Stuart M. C.; Laurie, Steven S.; Garcia, Kathleen M.; Sargsyan, Ashot E.; Martin, David S.; Liu, John; Macias, Brandon R.; Arbeille, Philippe; Danielson, Richard; Chang, Douglas; Gunga, Hanns-Christian; Johnston, Smith L.; Westby, Christian M.; Ploutz-Snyder, Robert J.; Smith, Scott M.

    2016-01-01

    We hypothesize that microgravity-induced cephalad fluid shifts elevate intracranial pressure (ICP) and contribute to VIIP. We will test this hypothesis and a possible countermeasure in ISS astronauts.

  20. Coalescence preference in densely packed microbubbles

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Yeseul; Lim, Su Jin; Gim, Bopil; Weon, Byung Mook

    2015-01-13

    A bubble merged from two parent bubbles with different size tends to be placed closer to the larger parent. This phenomenon is known as the coalescence preference. Here we demonstrate that the coalescence preference can be blocked inside a densely packed cluster of bubbles. We utilized high-speed high-resolution X-ray microscopy to clearly visualize individual coalescence events inside densely packed microbubbles with a local packing fraction of ~40%. Thus, the surface energy release theory predicts an exponent of 5 in a relation between the relative coalescence position and the parent size ratio, whereas our observation for coalescence in densely packed microbubbles shows a different exponent of 2. We believe that this result would be important to understand the reality of coalescence dynamics in a variety of packing situations of soft matter.

  1. Coalescence preference in densely packed microbubbles

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Kim, Yeseul; Lim, Su Jin; Gim, Bopil; Weon, Byung Mook

    2015-01-13

    A bubble merged from two parent bubbles with different size tends to be placed closer to the larger parent. This phenomenon is known as the coalescence preference. Here we demonstrate that the coalescence preference can be blocked inside a densely packed cluster of bubbles. We utilized high-speed high-resolution X-ray microscopy to clearly visualize individual coalescence events inside densely packed microbubbles with a local packing fraction of ~40%. Thus, the surface energy release theory predicts an exponent of 5 in a relation between the relative coalescence position and the parent size ratio, whereas our observation for coalescence in densely packed microbubblesmore » shows a different exponent of 2. We believe that this result would be important to understand the reality of coalescence dynamics in a variety of packing situations of soft matter.« less

  2. Supplemental screening sonography in dense breasts.

    PubMed

    Berg, Wendie A

    2004-09-01

    In single-center trials across 42,838 examinations, 150 (0.35%) cancers were identified only sonographically in average-risk women. Over 90% of the 126 women with sonographically depicted cancers had dense or heterogeneously dense parenchyma. Of the 150 cancers, 141 (94%) were invasive, with a mean size of 9 to 11 mm across the series. Over 90% were node-negative. A3-year multicenter trial of screening sonography in high-risk women, blinded to the results of mammography, opened for enrollment April 2004,funded by the Avon Foundation and National Cancer Institute through the American College of Radiology Imaging Network (ACRIN Protocol 6666). If the trial is successful,the results will provide a rational basis for supplemental screening sonography in women with dense breasts. PMID:15337420

  3. [Metabolic syndrome and small dense LDL].

    PubMed

    Yoshino, Gen

    2006-12-01

    Due to the recent westernization of our lifestyle, it is speculated that the prevalence of metabolic syndrome in the young generation will increase in Japan. Different from Western populations, because of our lifestyle as "farmers" from ancient times, excess energy has been stored outside of the body, and the accumulation of visceral fat might have serious adverse effects on glucose and lipid metabolism. Therefore, we must carefully diagnose and treat patients with metabolic syndrome, which is diagnosed based on the existence of visceral obesity. On the other hand, much attention has been paid recently to the atherogenicity of small dense LDL. In this chapter I will introduce a newly established method for estimating the plasma concentration of small dense LDL-cholesterol. Furthermore, the relationship between subclinical atherosclerosis and small dense LDL in metabolic syndrome will be discussed. PMID:17265899

  4. Coalescence preference in densely packed microbubbles

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Yeseul; Lim, Su Jin; Gim, Bopil; Weon, Byung Mook

    2015-01-01

    A bubble merged from two parent bubbles with different size tends to be placed closer to the larger parent. This phenomenon is known as the coalescence preference. Here we demonstrate that the coalescence preference can be blocked inside a densely packed cluster of bubbles. We utilized high-speed high-resolution X-ray microscopy to clearly visualize individual coalescence events inside densely packed microbubbles with a local packing fraction of ~40%. The surface energy release theory predicts an exponent of 5 in a relation between the relative coalescence position and the parent size ratio, whereas our observation for coalescence in densely packed microbubbles shows a different exponent of 2. We believe that this result would be important to understand the reality of coalescence dynamics in a variety of packing situations of soft matter. PMID:25583640

  5. Wellbore fluid

    SciTech Connect

    Swanson, B.L.

    1984-06-19

    The water loss properties of well completion and well workover fluids are improved by the addition of an effective amount of at least one adjuvant selected from (1) sodium carbonate with either sodium bicarbonate or an organic polycarboxylic acid or polycarboxylic acid anhydride or (2) sodium bicarbonate alone. In another embodiment, the adjuvants are added to stabilize water loss control agents in wellbore fluids, especially at elevated temperatures.

  6. Fluid Shifts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stenger, M. B.; Hargens, A.; Dulchavsky, S.; Ebert, D.; Lee, S.; Laurie, S.; Garcia, K.; Sargsyan, A.; Martin, D.; Lui, J.; Macias, B.; Arbeille, P.; Danielson, R.; Chang, D.; Gunga, H.; Johnston, S.; Westby, C.; Ribeiro, L.; Ploutz-Snyder, R.; Smith, S.

    2015-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Mechanisms responsible for the ocular structural and functional changes that characterize the visual impairment and intracranial pressure (ICP) syndrome (VIIP) are unclear, but hypothesized to be secondary to the cephalad fluid shift experienced in spaceflight. This study will relate the fluid distribution and compartmentalization associated with long-duration spaceflight with VIIP symptoms. We also seek to determine whether the magnitude of fluid shifts during spaceflight, as well as the VIIP-related effects of those shifts, can be predicted preflight with acute hemodynamic manipulations, and also if lower body negative pressure (LBNP) can reverse the VIIP effects. METHODS: Physiologic variables will be examined pre-, in- and post-flight in 10 International Space Station crewmembers including: fluid compartmentalization (D2O and NaBr dilution); interstitial tissue thickness (ultrasound); vascular dimensions and dynamics (ultrasound and MRI (including cerebrospinal fluid pulsatility)); ocular measures (optical coherence tomography, intraocular pressure, ultrasound); and ICP measures (tympanic membrane displacement, otoacoustic emissions). Pre- and post-flight measures will be assessed while upright, supine and during 15 deg head-down tilt (HDT). In-flight measures will occur early and late during 6 or 12 month missions. LBNP will be evaluated as a countermeasure during HDT and during spaceflight. RESULTS: The first two crewmembers are in the preflight testing phase. Preliminary results characterize the acute fluid shifts experienced from upright, to supine and HDT postures (increased stroke volume, jugular dimensions and measures of ICP) which are reversed with 25 millimeters Hg LBNP. DISCUSSION: Initial results indicate that acute cephalad fluid shifts may be related to VIIP symptoms, but also may be reversible by LBNP. The effect of a chronic fluid shift has yet to be evaluated. Learning Objectives: Current spaceflight VIIP research is described

  7. Electrorheological fluids

    SciTech Connect

    Halsey, T.C.; Martin, J.E.

    1993-10-01

    An electrorheological fluid is a substance whose form changes in the presence of electric fields. Depending on the strength of the field to which it is subjected, an electrorheological fluid can run freely like water, ooze like honey or solidify like gelatin. Indeed, the substance can switch from ne state to another within a few milliseconds. Electrorheological fluids are easy to make; they consist of microscopic particles suspended in an insulating liquid. Yet they are not ready for most commercial applications. They tend to suffer from a number of problems, including structural weakness as solids, abrasiveness as liquids and chemical breakdown, especially at high temperatures. Automotive engineers could imagine, for instance, constructing an electrorheological clutch. It was also hoped that electrorheological fluids would lead to valveless hydraulic systems, in which solidifying fluid would shut off flow through a thin section of pipe. Electrorheological fluids also offer the possibility of a shock absorber that provides response times of milliseconds and does not require mechanical adjustments. 3 refs.

  8. Dense packing: surgical indications and technical considerations.

    PubMed

    Farjo, Bessam; Farjo, Nilofer

    2013-08-01

    Dense packing is the philosophy of fitting more than 30 to 35 follicular unit grafts per square centimeter in one operation. The aim is to produce a more even, consistent, and natural looking flow of hair after just one procedure. Although desirable in principle, not all patients are suitable candidates nor is it possible to achieve in certain patients (eg, coarse or curly hair). Patients who have sufficient donor availability, reasonably stable hair loss, and high hair-to-skin color ratios are the ideal candidates. The authors highlight their philosophies and strategies for dense packing. PMID:24017984

  9. The Galactic Dense Gas Distribution and Properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glenn, Jason

    2015-08-01

    As the nearest spiral galaxy, the Milky Way provides a foundation for understanding galactic astrophysics. However, our position within the Galactic plane makes it challenging to decipher the detailed disk structure. The Galactic distribution of dense gas is relatively poorly known; thus, it is difficult to assess models of galaxy evolution by comparison to the Milky Way. Furthermore, fundamental aspects of star formation remain unknown, such as why the stellar and star cluster initial mass functions appear to be ubiquitous.Sub/millimeter dust continuum surveys, coupled with molecular gas surveys, are revealing the 3D distribution and properties of dense, star-forming gas throughout the disk. Here we report on the use of BGPS and Hi-GAL. BGPS is a 1.1 mm survey of the 1st Galactic quadrant and some lines of sight in the 2nd quadrant, totalling 200 deg2. We developed a technique using the Galactic rotation curve to derive distance probability density functions (DPDFs) to molecular cloud structures identified with continuum surveys. DPDFs combine vLSR measures from dense gas tracers and 13CO with distance discriminators, such as 8 μm extinction, HI self absorption, and (l, b, vLSR) associations with objects of known distances. Typical uncertainties are σdist ≤ 1 kpc for 1,710 BGPS objects with well-constrained distances.From DPDFs we derived the dense gas distribution and the dense gas mass function. We find evidence for dense gas in and between putative spiral arms. A log-normal distribution describes the mass function, which ranges from cores to clouds, but is primarily comprised of clumps. High-mass power laws do not fit the entire data set well, although power-law behavior emerges for sources nearer than 6.5 kpc (α = 2.0±0.1) and for objects between 2 kpc and 10 kpc (α = 1.9±0.1). The power law indices are generally between those of GMC and the stellar IMF. We have begun to apply this approach to the Hi-GAL (70 - 500 μm). With coverage of the entire

  10. Isotope systematics and shock-wave metamorphism: I. U-Pb in zircon, titanite, and monazite, shocked experimentally up to 59 GPa

    SciTech Connect

    Deutsch, A. ); Schaerer, U. )

    1990-12-01

    This study reports the first U-Pb isotope analyses on experimentally shocked zircon, titanite, and monazite extracted from Proterozoic granitoid rocks. In all three types of minerals, shock-waves produce drastic changes in the crystal lattices, causing strong lowering of birefringence, turbidization, and decolorization of the individual grains. Moreover, X-ray patterns indicate transition of the crystals into polycrystalline aggregates of <10{sup {minus}5} mm block-size. Precisely dated grains with concordant or nearly concordant ages were embedded in KBr and shocked at 35, 47.5, and 59 GPa. U-Pb isotope analyses on these grains show that shock metamorphism does not fractionate Pb isotopes within the analytical precision of {plus minus}0.1%. As far as chemical fractionation is concerned, there is no difference in degree of concordancy between shocked and unshocked monazite, and small degrees (<2%) of relative U/Pb fractionation in shocked zircon and titanite are due to time-integrated Pb-loss and not to the shock experiment. In consequence, the data document that shock-wave metamorphism alone does not measurably effect the U-Pb chronometer, questioning the view that lower intercept ages of discordant U-Pb data reflect shock-induced re-equilibration of the chronometer in moderately to highly shocked, rapidly cooling rocks.

  11. The pulsed dye laser versus the Q-switched Nd:YAG laser in laser-induced shock-wave lithotripsy.

    PubMed

    Thomas, S; Pensel, J; Engelhardt, R; Meyer, W; Hofstetter, A G

    1988-01-01

    To date, there are two fairly well-established alternatives for laser-induced shock-wave lithotripsy in clinical practice. The Q-switched Nd:YAG laser is distinguished by the high-stone selectivity of its coupler systems. The necessity of a coupler system and its fairly small conversion rate of light energy into mechanical energy present serious drawbacks. Furthermore, the minimal outer diameter of the transmission system is 1.8 mm. The pulsed-dye laser can be used with a highly flexible and uncomplicated 200-micron fiber. However, the laser system itself is more complicated than the Q-switched Nd:YAG laser and requires a great deal of maintenance. Biological evaluation of damage caused by direct irradiation shows that both laser systems produce minor damage of different degrees. YAG laser lithotripsy with the optomechanical coupler was assessed in 31 patients with ureteral calculi. The instability and limited effectiveness of the fiber application system necessitated auxiliary lithotripsy methods in 14 cases. Dye-laser lithotripsy is currently being tested in clinical application. Further development, such as systems for blind application or electronic feedback mechanisms to limit adverse tissue effects, have yet to be optimized. Nevertheless, laser-induced shock-wave lithotripsy has the potential to become a standard procedure in the endourologic management of stone disease. PMID:2902500

  12. Stable solitary waves in super dense plasmas at external magnetic fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghaani, Azam; Javidan, Kurosh; Sarbishaei, Mohsen

    2015-07-01

    Propagation of localized waves in a Fermi-Dirac distributed super dense matter at the presence of strong external magnetic fields is studied using the reductive perturbation method. We have shown that stable solitons can be created in such non-relativistic fluids in the presence of an external magnetic field. Such solitary waves are governed by the Zakharov-Kuznetsov (ZK) equation. Properties of solitonic solutions are studied in media with different values of background mass density and strength of magnetic field.

  13. Simulation of Droplet Generation in a Non-Newtonian Dense Granular Suspension

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mårtensson, Gustaf; Svensson, Martin; Mark, Andreas; Edelvik, Fredrik

    2015-11-01

    As with the jet printing of dyes and other low-viscosity fluids, the jetting of dense fluid suspensions is dependent on the repeatable break-off of the fluid filament into well-formed droplets. It is well known that the break-off of dense suspensions is dependent on the volume fraction of the solid phase, particle size and morphology, fluid phase viscosity et cetera, see for example van Deen et al. (2013). The purpose of this study is to propose a novel simulation framework and to show that it captures the main effects such as droplet shape, volume and speed in a cylindrical duct test configuration. The granular suspension is modelled as a mixed single phase suspension, where the local thermodynamic properties are determined by the mixture level. The simulations are performed with IBOFlow, a multiphase flow solver, coupled with LaStFEM, a large strain FEM solver. To study how the droplet generation is affected by the acceleration of the fluid, simulations are performed for a series of actuation profiles. The simulation results were compared to experimental data obtained from an industrial jetting head. The simulations exhibit qualitative agreement with the experimental data. A sensitivity to the inlet boundary condition with respect to the resulting droplet speed was observed. Thanks to Swedish Research Council (Grant 2010-4334).

  14. Fluid Management System (FMS) fluid systems overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baird, R. S.

    1990-01-01

    Viewgraphs on fluid management system (FMS) fluid systems overview are presented. Topics addressed include: fluid management system description including system requirements (integrated nitrogen system, integrated water system, and integrated waste gas system) and physical description; and fluid management system evolution.

  15. New investigations on shock-wave synthesized high-pressure phases in the system Si-Al-O-N

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schlothauer, T.; Greif, A.; Keller, K.; Schwarz, M. R.; Kroke, E.; Heide, G.

    2012-12-01

    The shock-wave synthesis of nanostructured high-pressure phases at a gram-scale permits the analysis of spinel type nitrides with different chemical composition using methods not suitable for microgram amounts of material. Methods with a significant mass loss through the analytical process like TG-MS or FT-IR or bulk methods at the g-scale like 29Si-MAS-NMR or neutron diffraction were used. The synthesis of pure high-pressure modifications (gamma-phases) of different SiAlON-compounds using amorphous H-bearing precursors at pressures of 30-40 GPa is a necessary prerequisite for precise determinations of crystal chemical features. Etching with HF is a well-known method to purify the high-pressure nitrides (Sekine 2002). The etched parts were analyzed by neutron diffraction, TG-MS, and carrier gas hot extraction (CGHE). Volatile elements like H2 and Cl2, as well as non-stoichiometric oxygen and nitrogen, and NOx, H2O are enriched in the disordered rims. This degassing process ends at temperatures of approximately 600°C, while the spinel structure remains well preserved up to 1300°C. Under these conditions the gamma-phases stay unchanged under air, argon and vacuum. Furthermore chlorine, an important impurity of the H-bearing precursors neither influences the synthesized products nor the synthesis process itself. IR-spectroscopy of gamma-Si3(O,N)4 shows that peak shifts of octahedral lattice vibrations (≈ 680 cm-1) and both tetrahedral vibrations (ny3 and ny4) (Jeanloz 1980, Preudhomme & Tarte 1971) to higher frequencies with decreasing oxygen content occur. This effect is also visible in samples contaminated with impurities of low pressure modifications. The more complex structure of gamma-SiAlON and the simultaneously exchange of the cation- and the anion-positions prevents the appearance of this important feature. Yet to be synthesized pure gamma-SiAlON using similar H-bearing precursors is necessary to resolve its structure. Sekine, T., H. He, T. Kobayashi, K

  16. Bonding and structure in dense multi-component molecular mixtures.

    PubMed

    Meyer, Edmund R; Ticknor, Christopher; Bethkenhagen, Mandy; Hamel, Sebastien; Redmer, Ronald; Kress, Joel D; Collins, Lee A

    2015-10-28

    We have performed finite-temperature density functional theory molecular dynamics simulations on dense methane, ammonia, and water mixtures (CH4:NH3:H2O) for various compositions and temperatures (2000 K ≤ T ≤ 10,000 K) that span a set of possible conditions in the interiors of ice-giant exoplanets. The equation-of-state, pair distribution functions, and bond autocorrelation functions (BACF) were used to probe the structure and dynamics of these complex fluids. In particular, an improvement to the choice of the cutoff in the BACF was developed that allowed analysis refinements for density and temperature effects. We note the relative changes in the nature of these systems engendered by variations in the concentration ratios. A basic tenet emerges from all these comparisons that varying the relative amounts of the three heavy components (C,N,O) can effect considerable changes in the nature of the fluid and may in turn have ramifications for the structure and composition of various planetary layers. PMID:26520533

  17. Bonding and structure in dense multi-component molecular mixtures

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Meyer, Edmund R.; Ticknor, Christopher; Bethkenhagen, Mandy; Hamel, Sebastien; Redmer, Ronald; Kress, Joel D.; Collins, Lee A.

    2015-10-30

    We have performed finite-temperature density functional theory molecular dynamics simulations on dense methane, ammonia, and water mixtures (CH4:NH3:H2O) for various compositions and temperatures (2000 K ≤ T ≤ 10000 K) that span a set of possible conditions in the interiors of ice-giant exoplanets. The equation-of-state, pair distribution functions, and bond autocorrelation functions (BACF) were used to probe the structure and dynamics of these complex fluids. In particular, an improvement to the choice of the cutoff in the BACF was developed that allowed analysis refinements for density and temperature effects. We note the relative changes in the nature of these systemsmore » engendered by variations in the concentration ratios. As a result, a basic tenet emerges from all these comparisons that varying the relative amounts of the three heavy components (C,N,O) can effect considerable changes in the nature of the fluid and may in turn have ramifications for the structure and composition of various planetary layers.« less

  18. Bonding and structure in dense multi-component molecular mixtures

    SciTech Connect

    Meyer, Edmund R.; Ticknor, Christopher; Bethkenhagen, Mandy; Hamel, Sebastien; Redmer, Ronald; Kress, Joel D.; Collins, Lee A.

    2015-10-30

    We have performed finite-temperature density functional theory molecular dynamics simulations on dense methane, ammonia, and water mixtures (CH4:NH3:H2O) for various compositions and temperatures (2000 K ≤ T ≤ 10000 K) that span a set of possible conditions in the interiors of ice-giant exoplanets. The equation-of-state, pair distribution functions, and bond autocorrelation functions (BACF) were used to probe the structure and dynamics of these complex fluids. In particular, an improvement to the choice of the cutoff in the BACF was developed that allowed analysis refinements for density and temperature effects. We note the relative changes in the nature of these systems engendered by variations in the concentration ratios. As a result, a basic tenet emerges from all these comparisons that varying the relative amounts of the three heavy components (C,N,O) can effect considerable changes in the nature of the fluid and may in turn have ramifications for the structure and composition of various planetary layers.

  19. Coalescence preference in dense packing of bubbles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Yeseul; Gim, Bopil; Gim, Bopil; Weon, Byung Mook

    2015-11-01

    Coalescence preference is the tendency that a merged bubble from the contact of two original bubbles (parent) tends to be near to the bigger parent. Here, we show that the coalescence preference can be blocked by densely packing of neighbor bubbles. We use high-speed high-resolution X-ray microscopy to clearly visualize individual coalescence phenomenon which occurs in micro scale seconds and inside dense packing of microbubbles with a local packing fraction of ~40%. Previous theory and experimental evidence predict a power of -5 between the relative coalescence position and the parent size. However, our new observation for coalescence preference in densely packed microbubbles shows a different power of -2. We believe that this result may be important to understand coalescence dynamics in dense packing of soft matter. This work (NRF-2013R1A22A04008115) was supported by Mid-career Researcher Program through NRF grant funded by the MEST and also was supported by Ministry of Science, ICT and Future Planning (2009-0082580) and by Basic Science Research Program through the National Research Foundation of Korea (NRF) funded by the Ministry and Education, Science and Technology (NRF-2012R1A6A3A04039257).

  20. Dense high temperature ceramic oxide superconductors

    DOEpatents

    Landingham, R.L.

    1993-10-12

    Dense superconducting ceramic oxide articles of manufacture and methods for producing these articles are described. Generally these articles are produced by first processing these superconducting oxides by ceramic processing techniques to optimize materials properties, followed by reestablishing the superconducting state in a desired portion of the ceramic oxide composite.

  1. Dense high temperature ceramic oxide superconductors

    DOEpatents

    Landingham, Richard L.

    1993-01-01

    Dense superconducting ceramic oxide articles of manufacture and methods for producing these articles are described. Generally these articles are produced by first processing these superconducting oxides by ceramic processing techniques to optimize materials properties, followed by reestablishing the superconducting state in a desired portion of the ceramic oxide composite.

  2. The Southern California Dense GPS Geodetic Array

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Webb, F.

    1994-01-01

    The Southern California Earthquake Center is coordinating a effort by scientists at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, the U.S. Geological Survey, and various academic institutions to establish a dense 250 station, continuously recording GPS geodetic array in southern California for measuring crustal deformation associated with slip on the numerous faults that underlie the major metropolitan areas of southern california.

  3. Preparation of a dense, polycrystalline ceramic structure

    DOEpatents

    Cooley, Jason; Chen, Ching-Fong; Alexander, David

    2010-12-07

    Ceramic nanopowder was sealed inside a metal container under a vacuum. The sealed evacuated container was forced through a severe deformation channel at an elevated temperature below the melting point of the ceramic nanopowder. The result was a dense nanocrystalline ceramic structure inside the metal container.

  4. DENSE NONAQUEOUS PHASE LIQUIDS -- A WORKSHOP SUMMARY

    EPA Science Inventory

    site characterization, and, therefore, DNAPL remediation, can be expected. Dense nonaqueous phase liquids (DNAPLs) in the subsurface are long-term sources of ground-water contamination, and may persist for centuries before dissolving completely in adjacent ground water. In respo...

  5. The Distribution of YSO Masses in Dense Hubs and Less Dense Filaments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirk, Helen; Myers, P.

    2010-01-01

    Dense "hubs" and less dense radiating "filaments" are common features of nearby star-forming regions and infrared dark clouds. Cores and young stars are more concentrated in such hubs than in their radiating filaments. Accreting protostars may gain less mass in such low-density filaments, since low-density gas takes longer to accrete, and since the accretion must draw gas from a greater distance in filamentary geometry. We present an investigation of the mass distributions of YSOs in dense clusters and low-density filaments in the nearest molecular clouds, to test whether YSO masses depend on environment density and geometry. HK is supported by an NSERC PDF.

  6. Fluid Shifts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stenger, Michael; Hargens, A.; Dulchavsky, S.; Ebert, D.; Lee, S.; Sargsyan, A.; Martin, D.; Lui, J.; Macias, B.; Arbeille, P.; Platts, S.

    2014-01-01

    NASA is focusing on long-duration missions on the International Space Station (ISS) and future exploration-class missions beyond low Earth orbit. Visual acuity changes observed after short-duration missions were largely transient, but more than 30% of ISS astronauts experience more profound, chronic changes with objective structural and functional findings such as papilledema and choroidal folds. Globe flattening, optic nerve sheath dilation, and optic nerve tortuosity also are apparent. This pattern is referred to as the visual impairment and intracranial pressure (VIIP) syndrome. VIIP signs and symptoms, as well as postflight lumbar puncture data, suggest that elevated intracranial pressure (ICP) may be associated with the space flight-induced cephalad fluid shifts, but this hypothesis has not been tested. The purpose of this study is to characterize fluid distribution and compartmentalization associated with long-duration space flight, and to correlate these findings with vision changes and other elements of the VIIP syndrome. We also seek to determine whether the magnitude of fluid shifts during space flight, as well as the VIIP-related effects of those shifts, is predicted by the crewmember's pre-flight condition and responses to acute hemodynamic manipulations (such as head-down tilt). Lastly, we will evaluate the patterns of fluid distribution in ISS astronauts during acute reversal of fluid shifts through application of lower body negative pressure (LBNP) interventions to characterize and explain general and individual responses. We will examine a variety of physiologic variables in 10 long-duration ISS crewmembers using the test conditions and timeline presented in the Figure below. Measures include: (1) fluid compartmentalization (total body water by D2O, extracellular fluid by NaBr, intracellular fluid by calculation, plasma volume by CO rebreathe, interstitial fluid by calculation); (2) forehead/eyelids, tibia, calcaneus tissue thickness (by ultrasound

  7. Fluid enhancement of particle transport in nanochannels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Zhigang; Drazer, German

    2006-11-01

    We investigate the effect that fluid density has on the mobility of a spherical nanoparticle moving through a cylindrical nanochannel. The solid nanoparticle, the channel wall, and the fluid are described at the molecular level, and we use molecular dynamics simulations to study their behavior. We consider densities ranging from a few fluid molecules to a relatively dense fluid inside the channel. The inhomogeneous distribution of the fluid molecules inside the channel results in the competition of two effects as the fluid density is increased. The fluid molecules adsorb on the channel surface, and thus reduce the friction with the wall and enhance the mobility of the particle. On the other hand, the addition of fluid molecules increases the viscous drag on the particle and thus reduces its mobility. The outcome of these competing effects depends on the strength of the interaction between the atoms in the particle and those in the wall. We examine three different cases, i.e., intermediate, strong, and weak interaction energies. For an intermediate interaction, two distinct peaks are observed in the mobility of the particle as the first two adsorbed fluid layers form. On the other hand, a monotonously increasing mobility is found for a strong interaction energy, and a nearly constant mobility is observed for a weak interaction.

  8. A new approach to understanding Warm Dense Matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    More, Richard

    2008-11-01

    The physical state of matter at density ˜ 1 g/cm^3 and temperature ˜ 1 eV - called Warm Dense Matter (WDM) -- has been a misty island in the phase plane describing the structure of matter. Logical approaches (starting from hot solids, dense chemically-reacting fluids, low-temperature plasmas or release from shock-compressed solids) reach a barrier in the WDM range beyond which the theories do not converge and fail to describe the strongly interacting mix of atoms, molecules, ions and semi-free electrons. This talk will describe the most challenging scientific questions for WDM and will sketch a new approach, based on a high-density version of the Saha (chemical-equilibrium) method. The advantage of the new method is that it incorporates a great deal of existing experimental data in a coherent thermodynamic structure. The method can be tested against quantum molecular dynamics, which has provided surprising ideas about the importance of dimers (weakly bound molecules) and the metal-insulator transition in WDM. On the experimental side, good results require rapid heating to produce the desired conditions, along with rapid diagnostics to acquire data, before the sample has time to disassemble. While electrical heating is relatively slow and laser heating is inherently non-uniform, new heating technologies such as intense pulsed ion-beam and x-ray deposition can be faster and more homogeneous. Recent progress on developing experiments using these methods will be presented. This work was done in collaboration with Dr. M. P. Desjarlais of the Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, NM.

  9. The kinetic chemistry of dense interstellar clouds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Graedel, T. E.; Langer, W. D.; Frerking, M. A.

    1982-01-01

    A model of the time-dependent chemistry of dense interstellar clouds is formulated to study the dominant chemical processes in carbon and oxygen isotope fractionation, the formation of nitrogen-containing molecules, and the evolution of product molecules as a function of cloud density and temperature. The abundances of the dominant isotopes of the carbon- and oxygen-bearing molecules are calculated. The chemical abundances are found to be quite sensitive to electron concentration since the electron concentration determines the ratio of H3(+) to He(+), and the electron density is strongly influenced by the metals abundance. For typical metal abundances and for H2 cloud density not less than 10,000 molecules/cu cm, nearly all carbon exists as CO at late cloud ages. At high cloud density, many aspects of the chemistry are strongly time dependent. Finally, model calculations agree well with abundances deduced from observations of molecular line emission in cold dense clouds.

  10. Hydrodynamic stellar interactions in dense star clusters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rasio, Frederic A.

    1993-01-01

    Highly detailed HST observations of globular-cluster cores and galactic nuclei motivate new theoretical studies of the violent dynamical processes which govern the evolution of these very dense stellar systems. These processes include close stellar encounters and direct physical collisions between stars. Such hydrodynamic stellar interactions are thought to explain the large populations of blue stragglers, millisecond pulsars, X-ray binaries, and other peculiar sources observed in globular clusters. Three-dimensional hydrodynamics techniques now make it possible to perform realistic numerical simulations of these interactions. The results, when combined with those of N-body simulations of stellar dynamics, should provide for the first time a realistic description of dense star clusters. Here I review briefly current theoretical work on hydrodynamic stellar interactions, emphasizing its relevance to recent observations.

  11. Dense hadronic matter in holographic QCD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Keun-Young; Sin, Sang-Jin; Zahed, Ismail

    2013-10-01

    We provide a method to study hadronic matter at finite density in the context of the Sakai-Sugimoto model. We introduce the baryon chemical potential through the external U(1) v gauge field in the induced (DBI plus CS) action on the D8-probe-brane, where baryons are skyrmions. Vector dominance is manifest at finite density. We derive the effect of the baryon density on the energy density, and on the dispersion relations of pions and vector mesons at large N c . The energy density asymptotes are constant at large density, suggesting that dense matter at large N c freezes, with the pion velocity dropping to zero. Holographic dense matter enforces exactly the tenets of vector dominance and efficiently screens vector mesons. At the freezing point, the ρ — ππ coupling vanishes with a finite rho mass of about 20% its vacuum value.

  12. Active fluidization in dense glassy systems.

    PubMed

    Mandal, Rituparno; Bhuyan, Pranab Jyoti; Rao, Madan; Dasgupta, Chandan

    2016-07-20

    Dense soft glasses show strong collective caging behavior at sufficiently low temperatures. Using molecular dynamics simulations of a model glass former, we show that the incorporation of activity or self-propulsion, f0, can induce cage breaking and fluidization, resulting in the disappearance of the glassy phase beyond a critical f0. The diffusion coefficient crosses over from being strongly to weakly temperature dependent as f0 is increased. In addition, we demonstrate that activity induces a crossover from a fragile to a strong glass and a tendency of active particles to cluster. Our results are of direct relevance to the collective dynamics of dense active colloidal glasses and to recent experiments on tagged particle diffusion in living cells. PMID:27380935

  13. Fluid/Structure Interaction Computational Investigation of Blast-Wave Mitigation Efficacy of the Advanced Combat Helmet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grujicic, M.; Bell, W. C.; Pandurangan, B.; Glomski, P. S.

    2011-08-01

    To combat the problem of traumatic brain injury (TBI), a signature injury of the current military conflicts, there is an urgent need to design head protection systems with superior blast/ballistic impact mitigation capabilities. Toward that end, the blast impact mitigation performance of an advanced combat helmet (ACH) head protection system equipped with polyurea suspension pads and subjected to two different blast peak pressure loadings has been investigated computationally. A fairly detailed (Lagrangian) finite-element model of a helmet/skull/brain assembly is first constructed and placed into an Eulerian air domain through which a single planar blast wave propagates. A combined Eulerian/Lagrangian transient nonlinear dynamics computational fluid/solid interaction analysis is next conducted in order to assess the extent of reduction in intra-cranial shock-wave ingress (responsible for TBI). This was done by comparing temporal evolutions of intra-cranial normal and shear stresses for the cases of an unprotected head and the helmet-protected head and by correlating these quantities with the three most common types of mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI), i.e., axonal damage, contusion, and subdural hemorrhage. The results obtained show that the ACH provides some level of protection against all investigated types of mTBI and that the level of protection increases somewhat with an increase in blast peak pressure. In order to rationalize the aforementioned findings, a shockwave propagation/reflection analysis is carried out for the unprotected head and helmet-protected head cases. The analysis qualitatively corroborated the results pertaining to the blast-mitigation efficacy of an ACH, but also suggested that there are additional shockwave energy dissipation phenomena which play an important role in the mechanical response of the unprotected/protected head to blast impact.

  14. Dense matter theory: A simple classical approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Savić, P.; Čelebonović, V.

    1994-07-01

    In the sixties, the first author and by P. Savić and R. Kašanin started developing a mean-field theory of dense matter. It is based on the Coulomb interaction, supplemented by a microscopic selection rule and a set of experimentally founded postulates. Applications of the theory range from the calculation of models of planetary internal structure to DAC experiments.

  15. Oxygen ion-conducting dense ceramic

    DOEpatents

    Balachandran, Uthamalingam; Kleefisch, Mark S.; Kobylinski, Thaddeus P.; Morissette, Sherry L.; Pei, Shiyou

    1998-01-01

    Preparation, structure, and properties of mixed metal oxide compositions and their uses are described. Mixed metal oxide compositions of the invention have stratified crystalline structure identifiable by means of powder X-ray diffraction patterns. In the form of dense ceramic membranes, the present compositions demonstrate an ability to separate oxygen selectively from a gaseous mixture containing oxygen and one or more other volatile components by means of ionic conductivities.

  16. Computer codes for dispersion of dense gas

    SciTech Connect

    Weber, A.H.; Watts, J.R.

    1982-02-01

    Two models for describing the behavior of dense gases have been adapted for specific applications at the Savannah River Plant (SRP) and have been programmed on the IBM computer. One of the models has been used to predict the effect of a ruptured H/sub 2/S storage tank at the 400 Area. The other model has been used to simulate the effect of an unignited release of H/sub 2/S from the 400-Area flare tower.

  17. Shear dispersion in dense granular flows

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Christov, Ivan C.; Stone, Howard A.

    2014-04-18

    We formulate and solve a model problem of dispersion of dense granular materials in rapid shear flow down an incline. The effective dispersivity of the depth-averaged concentration of the dispersing powder is shown to vary as the Péclet number squared, as in classical Taylor–Aris dispersion of molecular solutes. An extension to generic shear profiles is presented, and possible applications to industrial and geological granular flows are noted.

  18. Computational electromagnetics and parallel dense matrix computations

    SciTech Connect

    Forsman, K.; Kettunen, L.; Gropp, W.; Levine, D.

    1995-06-01

    We present computational results using CORAL, a parallel, three-dimensional, nonlinear magnetostatic code based on a volume integral equation formulation. A key feature of CORAL is the ability to solve, in parallel, the large, dense systems of linear equations that are inherent in the use of integral equation methods. Using the Chameleon and PSLES libraries ensures portability and access to the latest linear algebra solution technology.

  19. Dense Molecular Gas in Centaurus A

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wild, Wolfgang; Eckart, Andreas

    1999-10-01

    Centaurus A (NGC 5128) is the closest radio galaxy, and its molecular interstellar medium has been studied extensively in recent years. However, these studies used mostly molecular lines tracing low to medium density gas (see e.g. Eckart et al. 1990. Wild et al. 1997). The amount and distribution of the dense component remained largely unknown. We present spectra of the HCN(1-0) emission - which traces dense (n(H2) > 104 cm-3) molecular gas - at the center and along the prominent dust lane at offset positions +/- 60" and +/- 100", as well as single CS(2-1) and CS(3-2) spectra, observed with the SEST on La Silla, Chile. At the central position, the integrated intensity ratio I(HCN)/I(CO) peaks at 0.064, and decreases to somewhat equal to 0.02 to 0.04 in the dust lane. Based on the line luminosity ratio L(HCN)/L(CO) we estimate that there is a significant amount of dense gas in Centaurus A. The fraction of dense molecular gas as well as the star formation efficiency LFIR/LCO towards the center of Cen A is comparable to ultra-luminous infrared galaxies, and falls in between the values for ULIRGs and normal galaxies for positions in the dust lane. Details will be published in Wild & Eckart (A&A, in prep.). Eckart et al. 1990, ApJ 363, 451 Rydbeck et al. 1993, Astr.Ap. (Letters) 270, L13. Wild, W., Eckart, A. & Wiklind, T. 1997, Astr.Ap. 322, 419.

  20. Structures for dense, crack free thin films

    DOEpatents

    Jacobson, Craig P.; Visco, Steven J.; De Jonghe, Lutgard C.

    2011-03-08

    The process described herein provides a simple and cost effective method for making crack free, high density thin ceramic film. The steps involve depositing a layer of a ceramic material on a porous or dense substrate. The deposited layer is compacted and then the resultant laminate is sintered to achieve a higher density than would have been possible without the pre-firing compaction step.

  1. A State-of-the-Knowledge Review on Pseudo-Steady Shock-Wave Reflections and their Transition Criteria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ben-Dor, G.

    2006-07-01

    The distinguished philosopher Ernst Mach published the first known paper on the phenomenon of planar shock-wave reflections over straight wedges over 125 years ago in 1878. In his publication he presented two wave configurations that could result from this reflection process, a regular reflection (RR) and a configuration that was later named after him and called Mach reflection (MR) in the early 1940s. In 1945, Smith reported on an additional wave configuration, which had a reflected shock wave that was slightly different from that of the just-mentioned Mach reflection. Smith (OSRD Rep. 6271, Off. Sci. Res. Dev., 1945) did not ascribe any special importance to the wave configuration that he observed. The wave configuration that was observed and reported by Smith (OSRD Rep. 6271, Off. Sci. Res. Dev., 1945) was recognized as an independent one only about 5 years later when White (Tech. Rep. II-10, Princeton Univ. Dept. Phys., 1951) reported on the discovery of a new wave configuration that was named double-Mach reflections (DMR) because it had similar features to that of the Mach reflection wave configuration but all the features were doubled. For this reason the Mach reflection wave configuration has been re-named single-Mach reflection (SMR). (Until the late 1970s it was called simple-Mach reflection although nothing is simple about it.). The discovery of the double-Mach reflection revealed that the wave configuration that was first observed by Smith was an intermediate wave configuration between the SMR and the DMR wave configurations. For this reason it was named transitional-Mach reflection (TMR) (Until the early 1980s it was called complex-Mach reflection although it is not the most complex one.). Since the discovery of the DMR many investigations were aimed at elucidating the exact transition criteria between the above-mentioned four different wave configurations as well as some additional configurations and sub-configurations that were discovered later. In

  2. Multishock Compression Properties of Warm Dense Argon.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Jun; Chen, Qifeng; Yunjun, Gu; Li, Zhiguo; Shen, Zhijun

    2015-01-01

    Warm dense argon was generated by a shock reverberation technique. The diagnostics of warm dense argon were performed by a multichannel optical pyrometer and a velocity interferometer system. The equations of state in the pressure-density range of 20-150 GPa and 1.9-5.3 g/cm(3) from the first- to fourth-shock compression were presented. The single-shock temperatures in the range of 17.2-23.4 kK were obtained from the spectral radiance. Experimental results indicates that multiple shock-compression ratio (ηi = ρi/ρ0) is greatly enhanced from 3.3 to 8.8, where ρ0 is the initial density of argon and ρi (i = 1, 2, 3, 4) is the compressed density from first to fourth shock, respectively. For the relative compression ratio (ηi' = ρi/ρi-1), an interesting finding is that a turning point occurs at the second shocked states under the conditions of different experiments, and ηi' increases with pressure in lower density regime and reversely decreases with pressure in higher density regime. The evolution of the compression ratio is controlled by the excitation of internal degrees of freedom, which increase the compression, and by the interaction effects between particles that reduce it. A temperature-density plot shows that current multishock compression states of argon have distributed into warm dense regime. PMID:26515505

  3. Dense spray evaporation as a mixing process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Rivas, A.; Villermaux, E.

    2016-05-01

    We explore the processes by which a dense set of small liquid droplets (a spray) evaporates in a dry, stirred gas phase. A dense spray of micron-sized liquid (water or ethanol) droplets is formed in air by a pneumatic atomizer in a closed chamber. The spray is conveyed in ambient air as a plume whose extension depends on the relative humidity of the diluting medium. Standard shear instabilities develop at the plume edge, forming the stretched lamellar structures familiar with passive scalars. Unlike passive scalars however, these lamellae vanish in a finite time, because individual droplets evaporate at their border in contact with the dry environment. Experiments demonstrate that the lifetime of an individual droplet embedded in a lamellae is much larger than expected from the usual d2 law describing the fate of a single drop evaporating in a quiescent environment. By analogy with the way mixing times are understood from the convection-diffusion equation for passive scalars, we show that the lifetime of a spray lamellae stretched at a constant rate γ is tv=1/γ ln(1/+ϕ ϕ ) , where ϕ is a parameter that incorporates the thermodynamic and diffusional properties of the vapor in the diluting phase. The case of time-dependent stretching rates is examined too. A dense spray behaves almost as a (nonconserved) passive scalar.

  4. Numerical modeling for dilute and dense sprays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, C. P.; Kim, Y. M.; Shang, H. M.; Ziebarth, J. P.; Wang, T. S.

    1992-01-01

    We have successfully implemented a numerical model for spray-combustion calculations. In this model, the governing gas-phase equations in Eulerian coordinate are solved by a time-marching multiple pressure correction procedure based on the operator-splitting technique. The droplet-phase equations in Lagrangian coordinate are solved by a stochastic discrete particle technique. In order to simplify the calculation procedure for the circulating droplets, the effective conductivity model is utilized. The k-epsilon models are utilized to characterize the time and length scales of the gas phase in conjunction with turbulent modulation by droplets and droplet dispersion by turbulence. This method entails random sampling of instantaneous gas flow properties and the stochastic process requires a large number of computational parcels to produce the satisfactory dispersion distributions even for rather dilute sprays. Two major improvements in spray combustion modelings were made. Firstly, we have developed a probability density function approach in multidimensional space to represent a specific computational particle. Secondly, we incorporate the Taylor Analogy Breakup (TAB) model for handling the dense spray effects. This breakup model is based on the reasonable assumption that atomization and drop breakup are indistinguishable processes within a dense spray near the nozzle exit. Accordingly, atomization is prescribed by injecting drops which have a characteristic size equal to the nozzle exit diameter. Example problems include the nearly homogeneous and inhomogeneous turbulent particle dispersion, and the non-evaporating, evaporating, and burning dense sprays. Comparison with experimental data will be discussed in detail.

  5. Hybrid-Based Dense Stereo Matching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chuang, T. Y.; Ting, H. W.; Jaw, J. J.

    2016-06-01

    Stereo matching generating accurate and dense disparity maps is an indispensable technique for 3D exploitation of imagery in the fields of Computer vision and Photogrammetry. Although numerous solutions and advances have been proposed in the literature, occlusions, disparity discontinuities, sparse texture, image distortion, and illumination changes still lead to problematic issues and await better treatment. In this paper, a hybrid-based method based on semi-global matching is presented to tackle the challenges on dense stereo matching. To ease the sensitiveness of SGM cost aggregation towards penalty parameters, a formal way to provide proper penalty estimates is proposed. To this end, the study manipulates a shape-adaptive cross-based matching with an edge constraint to generate an initial disparity map for penalty estimation. Image edges, indicating the potential locations of occlusions as well as disparity discontinuities, are approved by the edge drawing algorithm to ensure the local support regions not to cover significant disparity changes. Besides, an additional penalty parameter 𝑃𝑒 is imposed onto the energy function of SGM cost aggregation to specifically handle edge pixels. Furthermore, the final disparities of edge pixels are found by weighting both values derived from the SGM cost aggregation and the U-SURF matching, providing more reliable estimates at disparity discontinuity areas. Evaluations on Middlebury stereo benchmarks demonstrate satisfactory performance and reveal the potency of the hybrid-based dense stereo matching method.

  6. Automated building extraction using dense elevation matrices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bendett, A. A.; Rauhala, Urho A.; Pearson, James J.

    1997-02-01

    The identification and measurement of buildings in imagery is important to a number of applications including cartography, modeling and simulation, and weapon targeting. Extracting large numbers of buildings manually can be time- consuming and expensive, so the automation of the process is highly desirable. This paper describes and demonstrates such an automated process for extracting rectilinear buildings from stereo imagery. The first step is the generation of a dense elevation matrix registered to the imagery. In the examples shown, this was accomplished using global minimum residual matching (GMRM). GMRM automatically removes y- parallax from the stereo imagery and produces a dense matrix of x-parallax values which are proportional to the local elevation, and, of course, registered to the imagery. The second step is to form a joint probability distribution of the image gray levels and the corresponding height values from the elevation matrix. Based on the peaks of that distribution, the area of interest is segmented into feature and non-feature areas. The feature areas are further refined using length, width and height constraints to yield promising building hypotheses with their corresponding vertices. The gray shade image is used in the third step to verify the hypotheses and to determine precise edge locations corresponding to the approximate vertices and satisfying appropriate orthogonality constraints. Examples of successful application of this process to imagery are presented, and extensions involving the use of dense elevation matrices from other sources are possible.

  7. Dense Correspondences across Scenes and Scales.

    PubMed

    Tau, Moria; Hassner, Tal

    2016-05-01

    We seek a practical method for establishing dense correspondences between two images with similar content, but possibly different 3D scenes. One of the challenges in designing such a system is the local scale differences of objects appearing in the two images. Previous methods often considered only few image pixels; matching only pixels for which stable scales may be reliably estimated. Recently, others have considered dense correspondences, but with substantial costs associated with generating, storing and matching scale invariant descriptors. Our work is motivated by the observation that pixels in the image have contexts-the pixels around them-which may be exploited in order to reliably estimate local scales. We make the following contributions. (i) We show that scales estimated in sparse interest points may be propagated to neighboring pixels where this information cannot be reliably determined. Doing so allows scale invariant descriptors to be extracted anywhere in the image. (ii) We explore three means for propagating this information: using the scales at detected interest points, using the underlying image information to guide scale propagation in each image separately, and using both images together. Finally, (iii), we provide extensive qualitative and quantitative results, demonstrating that scale propagation allows for accurate dense correspondences to be obtained even between very different images, with little computational costs beyond those required by existing methods. PMID:26336115

  8. Change of the kinetics of shock-wave deformation and fracture of VT1-0 titanium as a result of annealing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kanel, G. I.; Razorenov, S. V.; Garkushin, G. V.; Pavlenko, A. V.; Malyugina, S. N.

    2016-06-01

    The paper presents the results of measurements of shock-wave compression profiles of VT1-0 titanium samples after rolling and in the annealed state. In the experiments, the pressure of shock compression and distance passed by the wave before emerging to the sample surface were varied. From measurements of the elastic precursor decay and compression rate in a plastic shock wave of different amplitudes, the plastic strain and the corresponding shear stresses in the initial and subsequent stages of high-rate deformation in an elastoplastic shock wave are determined. It is found that the reduction in the dislocation density as a result of annealing reduces the hardness of the material but significantly increases its dynamic yield strengh, corresponding to the strain rate above 104 s-1. With a reduction in the strain rate, this anomalous difference in the flow stresses is leveled off.

  9. CONDENSED MATTER: STRUCTURE, MECHANICAL AND THERMAL PROPERTIES: Numerical Simulation of Wave Propagation and Phase Transition of Tin under Shock-Wave Loading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Hai-Feng; Liu, Hai-Feng; Zhang, Guang-Cai; Zhao, Yan-Hong

    2009-06-01

    We undertake a numerical simulation of shock experiments on tin reported in the literature, by using a multiphase equation of state (MEOS) and a multiphase Steinberg Guinan (MSG) constitutive model for tin in the β, γ and liquid phases. In the MSG model, the Bauschinger effect is considered to better describe the unloading behavior. The phase diagram and Hugoniot of tin are calculated by MEOS, and they agree well with the experimental data. Combined with the MEOS and MSG models, hydrodynamic computer simulations are successful in reproducing the measured velocity profile of the shock wave experiment. Moreover, by analyzing the mass fraction contour as well as stress and temperature profiles of each phase for tin, we further discuss the complex behavior of tin under shock-wave loading.

  10. Ground Measurements of Airplane Shock-Wave Noise at Mach Numbers to 2.0 and at Altitudes to 60,000 Feet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lina, Lindsay J.; Maglieri, Domenic J.

    1960-01-01

    The intensity of shock-wave noise at the ground resulting from flights at Mach numbers to 2.0 and altitudes to 60,000 feet was measured. Meagurements near the ground track for flights of a supersonic fighter and one flight of a supersonic bomber are presented. Level cruising flight at an altitude of 60,000 feet and a Mach number of 2.0 produced sonic booms which were considered to be tolerable, and it is reasonable t o expect that cruising flight at higher altitudes will produce booms of tolerable intensity for airplanes of the size and weight of the test airplanes. The measured variation of sonic-boom intensity with altitude was in good agreement with the variation calculated by an equation given in NASA Technical Note D-48. The effect of Mach number on the ground overpressure is small between Mach numbers of 1.4 and 2.0, a result in agreement with the theory. No amplification of the shock-wave overpressures due to refraction effects was apparent near the cutoff Mach number. A method for estimating the effect of fligh-path angle on cutoff Mach number is shown. Experimental results indicate agreement with the method, since a climb maneuver produced booms of a much decreased intensity as compared with the intensity of those measured in level flight at about the same altitude and Mach number. Comparison of sound pressure levels for the fighter and bomber airp lanes indicated little effect of either airplane size or weight at an altitude of 40,000 feet.

  11. Estimating model parameters for an impact-produced shock-wave simulation: Optimal use of partial data with the extended Kalman filter

    SciTech Connect

    Kao, Jim . E-mail: kao@lanl.gov; Flicker, Dawn; Ide, Kayo; Ghil, Michael

    2006-05-20

    This paper builds upon our recent data assimilation work with the extended Kalman filter (EKF) method [J. Kao, D. Flicker, R. Henninger, S. Frey, M. Ghil, K. Ide, Data assimilation with an extended Kalman filter for an impact-produced shock-wave study, J. Comp. Phys. 196 (2004) 705-723.]. The purpose is to test the capability of EKF in optimizing a model's physical parameters. The problem is to simulate the evolution of a shock produced through a high-speed flyer plate. In the earlier work, we have showed that the EKF allows one to estimate the evolving state of the shock wave from a single pressure measurement, assuming that all model parameters are known. In the present paper, we show that imperfectly known model parameters can also be estimated accordingly, along with the evolving model state, from the same single measurement. The model parameter optimization using the EKF can be achieved through a simple modification of the original EKF formalism by including the model parameters into an augmented state variable vector. While the regular state variables are governed by both deterministic and stochastic forcing mechanisms, the parameters are only subject to the latter. The optimally estimated model parameters are thus obtained through a unified assimilation operation. We show that improving the accuracy of the model parameters also improves the state estimate. The time variation of the optimized model parameters results from blending the data and the corresponding values generated from the model and lies within a small range, of less than 2%, from the parameter values of the original model. The solution computed with the optimized parameters performs considerably better and has a smaller total variance than its counterpart using the original time-constant parameters. These results indicate that the model parameters play a dominant role in the performance of the shock-wave hydrodynamic code at hand.

  12. Fluid extraction

    DOEpatents

    Wai, Chien M.; Laintz, Kenneth E.

    1999-01-01

    A method of extracting metalloid and metal species from a solid or liquid material by exposing the material to a supercritical fluid solvent containing a chelating agent is described. The chelating agent forms chelates that are soluble in the supercritical fluid to allow removal of the species from the material. In preferred embodiments, the extraction solvent is supercritical carbon dioxide and the chelating agent is a fluorinated .beta.-diketone. In especially preferred embodiments the extraction solvent is supercritical carbon dioxide, and the chelating agent comprises a fluorinated .beta.-diketone and a trialkyl phosphate, or a fluorinated .beta.-diketone and a trialkylphosphine oxide. Although a trialkyl phosphate can extract lanthanides and actinides from acidic solutions, a binary mixture comprising a fluorinated .beta.-diketone and a trialkyl phosphate or a trialkylphosphine oxide tends to enhance the extraction efficiencies for actinides and lanthanides. The method provides an environmentally benign process for removing contaminants from industrial waste without using acids or biologically harmful solvents. The method is particularly useful for extracting actinides and lanthanides from acidic solutions. The chelate and supercritical fluid can be regenerated, and the contaminant species recovered, to provide an economic, efficient process.

  13. River Inflows into Lakes: Basin Temperature Profiles Driven By Peeling Detrainment from Dense Underflows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hogg, C. A. R.; Huppert, H. E.; Imberger, J.; Dalziel, S. B.

    2014-12-01

    Dense gravity currents from river inflows feed fluid into confined basins in lakes. Large inflows can influence temperature profiles in the basins. Existing parameterisations of the circulation and mixing of such inflows are often based on the entrainment of ambient fluid into the underflowing gravity currents. However, recent observations have suggested that uni-directional entrainment into a gravity current does not fully describe the transfer between such gravity currents and the ambient water. Laboratory experiments visualised peeling detrainment from the gravity current occurring when the ambient fluid was stratified. A theoretical model of the observed peeling detrainment was developed to predict the temperature profile in the basin. This new model gives a better approximation of the temperature profile observed in the experiments than the pre-existing entraining model. The model can now be developed such that it integrates into operational models of lake basins.

  14. Metalized Heterogeneous Detonation and Dense Reactive Particle Flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Fan

    2011-06-01

    A metalized explosive system comprises a condensed-phase explosive and a large quantity of reactive metal particles, in an attempt to exploit the high energy content of the particles through their rapid combustion. Detonation in such heterogeneous matter and subsequent reaction of the metal particles under strong shock conditions constitute a new area in the dynamics and combustion of dense particle flow, which is characterized by a large number of particle interactions through shocked interstitial fluid or direct inelastic collisions. Progress in the fundamentals of this field is reviewed with an emphasis on particle aspects in three parts: detonation-particle interactions, particle ignition and reaction, and dynamic instabilities of particles. The paper begins with the unique characteristics of the subject heterogeneous detonation including the breakdown of the CJ detonation and detonation shock interaction effects on wave velocity, critical failure diameter, momentum transfer and morphology of particles. Secondly, the concept of a critical diameter for particle ignition, shocked particle reaction mechanism, multiple heat release history and aerodynamic secondary fragmentation combustion are described. Thirdly, particle dynamic instabilities lead to clustering, collisions and coherent jet structure and influence not only the aerodynamic trajectories but also the particle-gas mixing and subsequent energy release. Their mechanisms are revealed through the role of stochastic particle interactions with shock waves and fluid vorticity and turbulence on the formation of the trajectory instabilities of the particles. A hybrid detonation mode is finally invoked to exploit the energy release limit of metal particles. The paper is portrayed in a large number of experiments combined with meso-scale modeling and theoretical explanation.

  15. Grain Growth and Silicates in Dense Clouds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pendeleton, Yvonne J.; Chiar, J. E.; Ennico, K.; Boogert, A.; Greene, T.; Knez, C.; Lada, C.; Roellig, T.; Tielens, A.; Werner, M.; Whittet, D.

    2006-01-01

    Interstellar silicates are likely to be a part of all grains responsible for visual extinction (Av) in the diffuse interstellar medium (ISM) and dense clouds. A correlation between Av and the depth of the 9.7 micron silicate feature (measured as optical depth, tau(9.7)) is expected if the dust species are well 'mixed. In the di&se ISM, such a correlation is observed for lines of sight in the solar neighborhood. A previous study of the silicate absorption feature in the Taurus dark cloud showed a tendency for the correlation to break down at high Av (Whittet et al. 1988, MNRAS, 233,321), but the scatter was large. We have acquired Spitzer Infrared Spectrograph data of several lines of sight in the IC 5 146, Barnard 68, Chameleon I and Serpens dense clouds. Our data set spans an Av range between 2 and 35 magnitudes. All lines of sight show the 9.7 micron silicate feature. The Serpens data appear to follow the diffuse ISM correlation line whereas the data for the other clouds show a non-linear correlation between the depth of the silicate feature relative to Av, much like the trend observed in the Taurus data. In fact, it appears that for visual extinctions greater than about 10 mag, tau(9.7) begins to level off. This decrease in the growth of the depth of the 9.7 micron feature with increasing Av could indicate the effects of grain growth in dense clouds. In this poster, we explore the possibility that grain growth causes an increase in opacity (Av) without causing a corresponding increase in tau(9.7).

  16. Multishock Compression Properties of Warm Dense Argon

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Jun; Chen, Qifeng; Yunjun, Gu; Li, Zhiguo; Shen, Zhijun

    2015-01-01

    Warm dense argon was generated by a shock reverberation technique. The diagnostics of warm dense argon were performed by a multichannel optical pyrometer and a velocity interferometer system. The equations of state in the pressure-density range of 20–150 GPa and 1.9–5.3 g/cm3 from the first- to fourth-shock compression were presented. The single-shock temperatures in the range of 17.2–23.4 kK were obtained from the spectral radiance. Experimental results indicates that multiple shock-compression ratio (ηi = ρi/ρ0) is greatly enhanced from 3.3 to 8.8, where ρ0 is the initial density of argon and ρi (i = 1, 2, 3, 4) is the compressed density from first to fourth shock, respectively. For the relative compression ratio (ηi’ = ρi/ρi-1), an interesting finding is that a turning point occurs at the second shocked states under the conditions of different experiments, and ηi’ increases with pressure in lower density regime and reversely decreases with pressure in higher density regime. The evolution of the compression ratio is controlled by the excitation of internal degrees of freedom, which increase the compression, and by the interaction effects between particles that reduce it. A temperature-density plot shows that current multishock compression states of argon have distributed into warm dense regime. PMID:26515505

  17. Dense Subgraph Partition of Positive Hypergraphs.

    PubMed

    Liu, Hairong; Latecki, Longin Jan; Yan, Shuicheng

    2015-03-01

    In this paper, we present a novel partition framework, called dense subgraph partition (DSP), to automatically, precisely and efficiently decompose a positive hypergraph into dense subgraphs. A positive hypergraph is a graph or hypergraph whose edges, except self-loops, have positive weights. We first define the concepts of core subgraph, conditional core subgraph, and disjoint partition of a conditional core subgraph, then define DSP based on them. The result of DSP is an ordered list of dense subgraphs with decreasing densities, which uncovers all underlying clusters, as well as outliers. A divide-and-conquer algorithm, called min-partition evolution, is proposed to efficiently compute the partition. DSP has many appealing properties. First, it is a nonparametric partition and it reveals all meaningful clusters in a bottom-up way. Second, it has an exact and efficient solution, called min-partition evolution algorithm. The min-partition evolution algorithm is a divide-and-conquer algorithm, thus time-efficient and memory-friendly, and suitable for parallel processing. Third, it is a unified partition framework for a broad range of graphs and hypergraphs. We also establish its relationship with the densest k-subgraph problem (DkS), an NP-hard but fundamental problem in graph theory, and prove that DSP gives precise solutions to DkS for all kin a graph-dependent set, called critical k-set. To our best knowledge, this is a strong result which has not been reported before. Moreover, as our experimental results show, for sparse graphs, especially web graphs, the size of critical k-set is close to the number of vertices in the graph. We test the proposed partition framework on various tasks, and the experimental results clearly illustrate its advantages. PMID:26353260

  18. Drilling fluid

    SciTech Connect

    Russell, J.A.; Patel, B.B.

    1987-11-03

    A drilling fluid additive mixture is described consisting essentially of a sulfoalkylated tannin in admixture with a non-sulfoalkylated alkali-solubilized lignite wherein the weight ratio of the sulfoalkylated tannin to the non-sulfoalkylated lignite is in the range from about 2:1 to about 1:1. The sulfoalkylated tannin has been sulfoalkylated with at least one -(C(R-)/sub 2/-SO/sub 3/M side chain, wherein each R is selected from the group consisting of hydrogen and alkyl radicals containing from 1 to about 5 carbon atoms, and M is selected from the group consisting of ammonium and the alkali metals.

  19. Cerebrospinal fluid.

    PubMed

    Jerrard, D A; Hanna, J R; Schindelheim, G L

    2001-08-01

    A quick and accurate diagnosis of maladies affecting the central nervous system (CNS) is imperative. Procurement and analysis of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) are paramount in helping the clinician determine a patient's clinical condition. Various staining methods, measurement of white blood cell counts, glucose and protein levels, recognition of xanthochromia, and microbiologic studies are CSF parameters that are collectively important in the ultimate determination by a clinician of the presence or absence of a catastrophic CNS condition. Many of these CNS parameters have significant limitations that should be recognized to minimize under treating patients with catastrophic illness. PMID:11489408

  20. Peritoneal Fluid Analysis

    MedlinePlus

    ... limited. Home Visit Global Sites Search Help? Peritoneal Fluid Analysis Share this page: Was this page helpful? Formal name: Peritoneal Fluid Analysis Related tests: Pleural Fluid Analysis , Pericardial Fluid ...

  1. Pleural Fluid Analysis Test

    MedlinePlus

    ... limited. Home Visit Global Sites Search Help? Pleural Fluid Analysis Share this page: Was this page helpful? Formal name: Pleural Fluid Analysis Related tests: Pericardial Fluid Analysis , Peritoneal Fluid ...

  2. Dense optical-electrical interface module

    SciTech Connect

    Paul Chang

    2000-12-21

    The DOIM (Dense Optical-electrical Interface Modules) is a custom-designed optical data transmission module employed in the upgrade of Silicon Vertex Detector of CDF experiment at Fermilab. Each DOIM module consists of a transmitter (TX) converting electrical differential input signals to optical outputs, a middle segment of jacketed fiber ribbon cable, and a receiver (RX) which senses the light inputs and converts them back to electrical signals. The targeted operational frequency is 53 MHz, and higher rate is achievable. This article outlines the design goals, implementation methods, production test results, and radiation hardness tests of these modules.

  3. Electrical and thermal conductivities in dense plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Faussurier, G. Blancard, C.; Combis, P.; Videau, L.

    2014-09-15

    Expressions for the electrical and thermal conductivities in dense plasmas are derived combining the Chester-Thellung-Kubo-Greenwood approach and the Kramers approximation. The infrared divergence is removed assuming a Drude-like behaviour. An analytical expression is obtained for the Lorenz number that interpolates between the cold solid-state and the hot plasma phases. An expression for the electrical resistivity is proposed using the Ziman-Evans formula, from which the thermal conductivity can be deduced using the analytical expression for the Lorenz number. The present method can be used to estimate electrical and thermal conductivities of mixtures. Comparisons with experiment and quantum molecular dynamics simulations are done.

  4. Molecular dynamics simulations of dense plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Collins, L.A.; Kress, J.D.; Kwon, I.; Lynch, D.L.; Troullier, N.

    1993-12-31

    We have performed quantum molecular dynamics simulations of hot, dense plasmas of hydrogen over a range of temperatures(0.1-5eV) and densities(0.0625-5g/cc). We determine the forces quantum mechanically from density functional, extended Huckel, and tight binding techniques and move the nuclei according to the classical equations of motion. We determine pair-correlation functions, diffusion coefficients, and electrical conductivities. We find that many-body effects predominate in this regime. We begin to obtain agreement with the OCP and Thomas-Fermi models only at the higher temperatures and densities.

  5. Gravity-driven dense granular flows

    SciTech Connect

    ERTAS,DENIZ; GREST,GARY S.; HALSEY,THOMAS C.; DEVINE,DOV; SILBERT,LEONARDO E.

    2000-03-29

    The authors report and analyze the results of numerical studies of dense granular flows in two and three dimensions, using both linear damped springs and Hertzian force laws between particles. Chute flow generically produces a constant density profile that satisfies scaling relations suggestive of a Bagnold grain inertia regime. The type for force law has little impact on the behavior of the system. Failure is not initiated at the surface, consistent with the absence of surface flows and different principal stress directions at vs. below the surface.

  6. Numerical study of ion acoustic shock waves in dense quantum plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Hanif, M.; Mirza, Arshad M.; Ali, S.; Mukhtar, Q.

    2014-03-15

    Two fluid quantum hydrodynamic equations are solved numerically to investigate the propagation characteristics of ion acoustic shock waves in an unmagnetized dense quantum plasma, whose constituents are the electrons and ions. For this purpose, we employ the standard finite difference Lax Wendroff and relaxation methods, to examine the quantum effects on the profiles of shock potential, the electron/ion number densities, and velocity even for quantum parameter at H = 2. The effects of the latter vanish in a weakly non-linear limit while obeying the KdV theory. It is shown that the evolution of the wave depends sensitively on the plasma density and the quantum parameter. Numerical results reveal that the kinks or oscillations are pronounced for large values of quantum parameter, especially at H = 2. Our results should be important to understand the shock wave excitations in dense quantum plasmas, white dwarfs, neutron stars, etc.

  7. Equation of state of dense neon and krypton plasmas in the partial ionization regime

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Q. F. Zheng, J.; Gu, Y. J.; Li, Z. G.

    2015-12-15

    The compression behaviors of dense neon and krypton plasmas over a wide pressure-temperature range are investigated by self-consistent fluid variational theory. The ionization degree and equation of state of dense neon and krypton are calculated in the density-temperature range of 0.01–10 g/cm{sup 3} and 4–50 kK. A region of thermodynamic instability is found which is related to the plasma phase transition. The calculated shock adiabat and principal Hugoniot of liquid krypton are in good agreement with available experimental data. The predicted results of shock-compressed liquid neon are presented, which provide a guide for dynamical experiments or numerical first-principle calculations aimed at studying the compression properties of liquid neon in the partial ionization regime.

  8. Control of density fluctuations in atomistic-continuum simulations of dense liquids.

    PubMed

    Kotsalis, E M; Walther, J H; Koumoutsakos, P

    2007-07-01

    We present a control algorithm to eliminate spurious density fluctuations associated with the coupling of atomistic and continuum descriptions for dense liquids. A Schwartz domain decomposition algorithm is employed to couple molecular dynamics for the simulation of the atomistic system with a continuum solver for the simulation of the Navier-Stokes equations. The lack of periodic boundary conditions in the molecular dynamics simulations hinders the proper accounting for the virial pressure leading to spurious density fluctuations at the continuum-atomistic interface. An ad hoc boundary force is usually employed to remedy this situation. We propose the calculation of this boundary force using a control algorithm that explicitly cancels the density fluctuations. The results demonstrate that the present approach outperforms state-of-the-art algorithms. The conceptual and algorithmic simplicity of the method makes it suitable for any type of coupling between atomistic and continuum descriptions of dense fluids. PMID:17677596

  9. Scaling Behavior and Segment Concentration Profile of Densely Grafted Polymer Brushes Swollen in Vapor.

    PubMed

    Sun, Liang; Akgun, Bulent; Hu, Renfeng; Browning, James F; Wu, David T; Foster, Mark D

    2016-06-01

    The scaling of the thickness, hs, of a densely grafted polymer brush of chain length N and grafting density σ swollen in vapor agrees quantitatively with the scaling reported by Kuhl et al. for densely grafted brushes swollen in liquid. Deep in the brush, next to the substrate, the shape of the segment concentration profile is the same whether the brush is swollen by liquid or by vapor. Differences in the segment concentration profile are manifested primarily in the swollen brush interface with the surrounding fluid. The interface of the polymer brush swollen in vapor is much more abrupt than that of the same brush swollen in liquid. This has implications for the compressibility of the swollen brush surface and for fluctuations at that surface. PMID:27172089

  10. Monte Carlo simulations of ionization potential depression in dense plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stransky, M.

    2016-01-01

    A particle-particle grand canonical Monte Carlo model with Coulomb pair potential interaction was used to simulate modification of ionization potentials by electrostatic microfields. The Barnes-Hut tree algorithm [J. Barnes and P. Hut, Nature 324, 446 (1986)] was used to speed up calculations of electric potential. Atomic levels were approximated to be independent of the microfields as was assumed in the original paper by Ecker and Kröll [Phys. Fluids 6, 62 (1963)]; however, the available levels were limited by the corresponding mean inter-particle distance. The code was tested on hydrogen and dense aluminum plasmas. The amount of depression was up to 50% higher in the Debye-Hückel regime for hydrogen plasmas, in the high density limit, reasonable agreement was found with the Ecker-Kröll model for hydrogen plasmas and with the Stewart-Pyatt model [J. Stewart and K. Pyatt, Jr., Astrophys. J. 144, 1203 (1966)] for aluminum plasmas. Our 3D code is an improvement over the spherically symmetric simplifications of the Ecker-Kröll and Stewart-Pyatt models and is also not limited to high atomic numbers as is the underlying Thomas-Fermi model used in the Stewart-Pyatt model.

  11. Probing Dynamical Heterogeneity in Dense Colloidal Suspensions with Depletion Attraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, Zachery; Hogan, Gregory; Gratale, Matthew; Yodh, Arjun G.; Habdas, Piotr

    We directly observe the particle dynamics in dense colloidal suspensions. Using depletion attraction, we vary inter particle potential to study the reentrant glass transition. Confocal microscopy and particle tracking allow us to follow particle trajectories over time. By varying inter particle attraction strength for a fixed volume fraction of colloidal suspensions, we observe three qualitatively different states. Mean square displacement and long time diffusion constant vary with the depletant concentration and indicate a glass state for low attraction strengths, ergodic liquid state for moderate attraction strengths, and attractive arrested state for the highest attraction strengths. Variance in the self overlap function gives the four point susceptibility, a measure of dynamical heterogeneity over a range of length scales and lag times. Results show that the lag times corresponding to the most heterogeneous dynamics are longer for arrested states than for fluid states. The length scale that maximizes four point susceptibility across a range of attraction strengths exhibits a reentrant glass behavior similar to that of the long time diffusion constant. Z.B., G.H., and P.H. acknowledge financial support of the NSF RUI-1306990. M.G. and A.G.Y. acknowledge financial support of the NSF Grant DMR-1205463, NSF MRSEC Grant DMR-1120901, and NASA Grant NNX08AO0G.

  12. Nonlinear nanostructures in dense quantum plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Shukla, P. K.; Eliasson, B.

    2009-10-08

    Dense quantum plasmas are ubiquitous in compact astrophysical objects (e.g. the interior of white dwarf stars, in magnetars, etc.), in semiconductors and micro-mechanical systems, as well as in the next generation intense laser-solid density plasma interaction experiments. In contrast to classical plasmas, one encounters extremely high plasma density and low temperature in dense quantum plasmas. In the latter, the electrons and positrons obey the Fermi-Dirac statistics, and there are new forces associated with i) quantum statistical electron and positron pressures, ii) electron and positron tunneling through the Bohm potential, and iii) electron and positron spin-1/2. Inclusion of these quantum forces gives rise to very high-frequency plasma waves (e.g. in the x-ray regime) at nanoscales. Our objective here is to present nonlinear equations that depict the localization of electron plasma waves in the form of a quantum electron hole and quantum vortex, as well as the trapping of intense electromagnetic waves into a quantum electron hole. Our simulation results reveal that these nonlinear nanostructures are quite robust. Hence, they can be explored for the purpose of transferring localized electrostatic and electromagnetic energies over nanoscales.

  13. Super-resolution without dense flow.

    PubMed

    Su, Heng; Wu, Ying; Zhou, Jie

    2012-04-01

    Super-resolution is a widely applied technique that improves the resolution of input images by software methods. Most conventional reconstruction-based super-resolution algorithms assume accurate dense optical flow fields between the input frames, and their performance degrades rapidly when the motion estimation result is not accurate enough. However, optical flow estimation is usually difficult, particularly when complicated motion is presented in real-world videos. In this paper, we explore a new way to solve this problem by using sparse feature point correspondences between the input images. The feature point correspondences, which are obtained by matching a set of feature points, are usually precise and much more robust than dense optical flow fields. This is because the feature points represent well-selected significant locations in the image, and performing matching on the feature point set is usually very accurate. In order to utilize the sparse correspondences in conventional super-resolution, we extract an adaptive support region with a reliable local flow field from each corresponding feature point pair. The normalized prior is also proposed to increase the visual consistency of the reconstructed result. Extensive experiments on real data were carried out, and results show that the proposed algorithm produces high-resolution images with better quality, particularly in the presence of large-scale or complicated motion fields. PMID:22027381

  14. Dense circumnuclear molecular gas in starburst galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Green, C.-E.; Cunningham, M. R.; Green, J. A.; Dawson, J. R.; Jones, P. A.; López-Sánchez, Á. R.; Verdes-Montenegro, L.; Henkel, C.; Baan, W. A.; Martín, S.

    2016-04-01

    We present results from a study of the dense circumnuclear molecular gas of starburst galaxies. The study aims to investigate the interplay between starbursts, active galactic nuclei and molecular gas. We characterize the dense gas traced by HCN, HCO+ and HNC and examine its kinematics in the circumnuclear regions of nine starburst galaxies observed with the Australia Telescope Compact Array. We detect HCN (1-0) and HCO+ (1-0) in seven of the nine galaxies and HNC (1-0) in four. Approximately 7 arcsec resolution maps of the circumnuclear molecular gas are presented. The velocity-integrated intensity ratios, HCO+ (1-0)/HCN (1-0) and HNC (1-0)/HCN (1-0), are calculated. Using these integrated intensity ratios and spatial intensity ratio maps, we identify photon-dominated regions (PDRs) in NGC 1097, NGC 1365 and NGC 1808. We find no galaxy which shows the PDR signature in only one part of the observed nuclear region. We also observe unusually strong HNC emission in NGC 5236, but it is not strong enough to be consistent with X-ray-dominated region chemistry. Rotation curves are derived for five of the galaxies and dynamical mass estimates of the inner regions of three of the galaxies are made.

  15. Symmetry energy in cold dense matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeong, Kie Sang; Lee, Su Houng

    2016-01-01

    We calculate the symmetry energy in cold dense matter both in the normal quark phase and in the 2-color superconductor (2SC) phase. For the normal phase, the thermodynamic potential is calculated by using hard dense loop (HDL) resummation to leading order, where the dominant contribution comes from the longitudinal gluon rest mass. The effect of gluonic interaction on the symmetry energy, obtained from the thermodynamic potential, was found to be small. In the 2SC phase, the non-perturbative BCS paring gives enhanced symmetry energy as the gapped states are forced to be in the common Fermi sea reducing the number of available quarks that can contribute to the asymmetry. We used high density effective field theory to estimate the contribution of gluon interaction to the symmetry energy. Among the gluon rest masses in 2SC phase, only the Meissner mass has iso-spin dependence although the magnitude is much smaller than the Debye mass. As the iso-spin dependence of gluon rest masses is even smaller than the case in the normal phase, we expect that the contribution of gluonic interaction to the symmetry energy in the 2SC phase will be minimal. The different value of symmetry energy in each phase will lead to different prediction for the particle yields in heavy ion collision experiment.

  16. Dynamics of Kr in dense clathrate hydrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klug, D. D.; Tse, J. S.; Zhao, J. Y.; Sturhahn, W.; Alp, E. E.; Tulk, C. A.

    2011-05-01

    The dynamics of Kr atoms as guests in dense clathrate hydrate structures are investigated using site specific Kr83 nuclear resonant inelastic x-ray scattering (NRIXS) spectroscopy in combination with molecular dynamics simulations. The dense structure H hydrate and filled-ice structures are studied at high pressures in a diamond anvil high-pressure cell. The dynamics of Kr in the structure H clathrate hydrate quench recovered at 77 K is also investigated. The Kr phonon density of states obtained from the experimental NRIXS data are compared with molecular dynamics simulations. The temperature and pressure dependence of the phonon spectra provide details of the Kr dynamics in the clathrate hydrate cages. Comparison with the dynamics of Kr atoms in the low-pressure structure II obtained previously was made. The Lamb-Mossbauer factor obtained from NRIXS experiments and molecular dynamics calculations are in excellent agreement and are shown to yield unique information on the strength and temperature dependence of guest-host interactions.

  17. Nuclear quantum dynamics in dense hydrogen

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Dongdong; Sun, Huayang; Dai, Jiayu; Chen, Wenbo; Zhao, Zengxiu; Hou, Yong; Zeng, Jiaolong; Yuan, Jianmin

    2014-01-01

    Nuclear dynamics in dense hydrogen, which is determined by the key physics of large-angle scattering or many-body collisions between particles, is crucial for the dynamics of planet's evolution and hydrodynamical processes in inertial confinement confusion. Here, using improved ab initio path-integral molecular dynamics simulations, we investigated the nuclear quantum dynamics regarding transport behaviors of dense hydrogen up to the temperatures of 1 eV. With the inclusion of nuclear quantum effects (NQEs), the ionic diffusions are largely higher than the classical treatment by the magnitude from 20% to 146% as the temperature is decreased from 1 eV to 0.3 eV at 10 g/cm3, meanwhile, electrical and thermal conductivities are significantly lowered. In particular, the ionic diffusion is found much larger than that without NQEs even when both the ionic distributions are the same at 1 eV. The significant quantum delocalization of ions introduces remarkably different scattering cross section between protons compared with classical particle treatments, which explains the large difference of transport properties induced by NQEs. The Stokes-Einstein relation, Wiedemann-Franz law, and isotope effects are re-examined, showing different behaviors in nuclear quantum dynamics. PMID:24968754

  18. Thomson scattering in warm dense matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thiele, R.; Bornath, T.; F"Austlin, R. R.; Fortmann, C.; Glenzer, S.; Gregori, G.; Holst, B.; Tschentscher, T.; Schwarz, V.; Redmer, R.

    2009-11-01

    Free electron lasers employing scattering of high-brilliant, coherent photons in the extreme ultraviolet (VUV), e.g. at FLASH (DESY Hamburg) or LCLS (Stanford), allow for a systematic study of basic plasma properties in the region of warm dense matter (WDM). WDM is characterized by condensed matter-like densities and temperatures of several eV. Collective Thomson scattering with VUV or x-ray has demonstrated its capacity for robust measurements of the free electron density and temperature in WDM. Collective excitations like plasmons (``electron feature'') appear as maxima in the scattering signal. The respective frequencies can be related to the free electron density. Furthermore, the asymmetry of the red- and blue shifted plasmon intensity gives the electron temperature due to detailed balance. We treat collective Thomson scattering in the Born-Mermin-approximation which includes collisions and present a generalized Gross-Bohm dispersion for plasmas. The influence of plasma inhomogeneities on the scattering spectrum is studied by comparing density and temperature averaged scattering signals with calculations assuming homogeneous targets. For the ``ion feature,'' results of semi-classical hypernetted chain (HNC) calculations and of quantum molecular dynamics simulations are shown for dense beryllium.

  19. Testing ergodicity in dense granular systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Guo-Jie; Blawzdziewicz, Jerzy; O'Hern, Corey

    2008-03-01

    The Edwards' entropy formalism provides a statistical mechanical framework for describing dense granular systems. Experiments on vibrated granular columns and numerical simulations of quasi- static shear flow of dense granular systems have provided indirect evidence that the Edwards' theory may accurately describe certain aspects of these systems. However, a fundamental assumption of the Edwards' description---that all mechanically stable (MS) granular packings at a given packing fraction and externally imposed stress are equally accessible---has not been explicitly tested. We investigate this assumption by generating all mechanically stable hard disk packings in small bidisperse systems using a protocol where we successively compress or decompress the system followed by energy minimization. We then apply quasi-static shear flow at zero pressure to these MS packings and record the MS packings that occur during the shear flow. We generate a complete library of the allowed MS packings at each value of shear strain and determine the frequency with which each MS packing occurs. We find that the MS packings do not occur with equal probability at any value of shear strain. In fact, in small systems we find that the evolution becomes periodic with a period that grows with system-size. Our studies show that ergodicity can be improved by either adding random fluctuations to the system or increasing the system size.

  20. Probing the Physical Structures of Dense Filaments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Di

    2015-08-01

    Filament is a common feature in cosmological structures of various scales, ranging from dark matter cosmic web, galaxy clusters, inter-galactic gas flows, to Galactic ISM clouds. Even within cold dense molecular cores, filaments have been detected. Theories and simulations with (or without) different combination of physical principles, including gravity, thermal balance, turbulence, and magnetic field, can reproduce intriguing images of filaments. The ubiquity of filaments and the similarity in simulated ones make physical parameters, beyond dust column density, a necessity for understanding filament evolution. I report three projects attempting to measure physical parameters of filaments. We derive the volume density of a dense Taurus filament based on several cyanoacetylene transitions observed by GBT and ART. We measure the gas temperature of the OMC 2-3 filament based on combined GBT+VLA ammonia images. We also measured the sub-millimeter polarization vectors along OMC3. These filaments were found to be likely a cylinder-type structure, without dynamic heating, and likely accreting mass along the magnetic field lines.

  1. A pilot scale ultrasonic system to enhance extraction processes with dense gases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riera, E.; Blasco, M.; Tornero, A.; Casas, E.; Roselló, C.; Simal, S.; Acosta, V. M.; Gallego-Juárez, J. A.

    2012-05-01

    The use of dense gases (supercritical fluids) as extracting agents has been attracting wide interest for years. In particular, supercritical carbon dioxide is considered nowadays as a green and very useful solvent. Nevertheless, the extraction process has a slow dynamics. Power ultrasound represents an efficient way for accelerating and enhancing the kinetics of the process by producing strong agitation and turbulence, compressions and decompressions, and heating in the media. For this purpose, a device prototype for using ultrasound in supercritical media was developed, tested and validated in extraction processes of oil from grounded almonds (55% oil content, wet basis and 3-4 mm particle size) in a 5 L extraction unit. An amount of 1500 g of grounded almonds was placed in a cylindrical basket during the trials inside the dense gas extractor (DGE) where solvent was introduced at different flow rates, pressures and temperatures. In all cases the ultrasonic energy confirmed the enhancement and acceleration of the almond oil extraction kinetics using supercritical CO2. Presently the power ultrasound effect in such a process is being deeply analyzed in a 5 L extraction unit before scaling-up a new ultrasonic system. This technology, still under development, has been designed for a bigger dense gas pilot-plant consisting of two extractors (20 L capacity), two separation units and has the possibility of operating at a pressure up to 50 MPa. The goal of this work is to study the effect of high-power ultrasound coupled to dense gas extraction inside the basket with the product, and to present a prototype for the use of power ultrasound in extraction processes with dense gases inside a new 20 L extractor unit.

  2. Gyroelastic fluids

    SciTech Connect

    Kerbel, G.D.

    1981-01-20

    A study is made of a scale model in three dimensions of a guiding center plasma within the purview of gyroelastic (also known as finite gyroradius-near theta pinch) magnetohydrodynamics. The (nonlinear) system sustains a particular symmetry called isorrhopy which permits the decoupling of fluid modes from drift modes. Isorrhopic equilibria are analyzed within the framework of geometrical optics resulting in (local) dispersion relations and ray constants. A general scheme is developed to evolve an arbitrary linear perturbation of a screwpinch equilibrium as an invertible integral transform (over the complete set of generalized eigenfunctions defined naturally by the equilibrium). Details of the structure of the function space and the associated spectra are elucidated. Features of the (global) dispersion relation owing to the presence of gyroelastic stabilization are revealed. An energy principle is developed to study the stability of the tubular screwpinch.

  3. TRIGGERING COLLAPSE OF THE PRESOLAR DENSE CLOUD CORE AND INJECTING SHORT-LIVED RADIOISOTOPES WITH A SHOCK WAVE. I. VARIED SHOCK SPEEDS

    SciTech Connect

    Boss, Alan P.; Keiser, Sandra A.; Ipatov, Sergei I.; Myhill, Elizabeth A.; Vanhala, Harri A. T. E-mail: keiser@dtm.ciw.ed E-mail: elizabeth.myhill@marymount.ed

    2010-01-10

    The discovery of decay products of a short-lived radioisotope (SLRI) in the Allende meteorite led to the hypothesis that a supernova shock wave transported freshly synthesized SLRI to the presolar dense cloud core, triggered its self-gravitational collapse, and injected the SLRI into the core. Previous multidimensional numerical calculations of the shock-cloud collision process showed that this hypothesis is plausible when the shock wave and dense cloud core are assumed to remain isothermal at approx10 K, but not when compressional heating to approx1000 K is assumed. Our two-dimensional models with the FLASH2.5 adaptive mesh refinement hydrodynamics code have shown that a 20 km s{sup -1} shock front can simultaneously trigger collapse of a 1 M{sub sun} core and inject shock wave material, provided that cooling by molecular species such as H{sub 2}O, CO, and H{sub 2} is included. Here, we present the results for similar calculations with shock speeds ranging from 1 km s{sup -1} to 100 km s{sup -1}. We find that shock speeds in the range from 5 km s{sup -1} to 70 km s{sup -1} are able to trigger the collapse of a 2.2 M{sub sun} cloud while simultaneously injecting shock wave material: lower speed shocks do not achieve injection, while higher speed shocks do not trigger sustained collapse. The calculations continue to support the shock-wave trigger hypothesis for the formation of the solar system, though the injection efficiencies in the present models are lower than desired.

  4. Parkfield seismicity: Fluid-driven?

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, P.A.; McEvilly, T.V.

    1995-07-10

    Characteristics of microearthquake occurrence along the locked-to-creeping transition of the San Andreas fault at Parkfield in central California are reviewed for evidence that fault zone fluids play a critical role in slip dynamics there. Previous studies at Parkfield have defined a low-velocity, anisotropic, attenuating fault zone and a high V{sub P}/V{sub S} ratio in the nucleation zone of the repeating M 6 earthquakes. Most of the ongoing seismicity is organized into a temporally-evolving checkerboard pattern of alternating high and low seismic slip regions divided on the fault zone at 3-6 km spacings. Much of the seismicity is further confined to a few hundred small (20-30 m radius) cells of densely clustered microearthquakes that exhibit periodic recurrence. Space-time development of small (tens to hundreds of meters), transient (minutes to days) earthquake sequences reveals diffusivelike outward spreading along the fault zone. There is some evidence for anomalous source mechanisms in sequence-initiating events, possibly indicative of hydraulic fracturing. The data are consistent with a model in which some microearthquake clusters and confined sequences occur by the cyclic pressurization of fluid within localized patches of the fault zone. The consequent modulation of the effective normal stress leads to fluid-driven slip manifested both as the highly periodic earthquake clusters and as localized earthquake sequences observed at Parkfield. 53 refs., 8 figs., 1 tab.

  5. Fluid channeling system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, Donald Y. (Inventor); Hitch, Bradley D. (Inventor)

    1994-01-01

    A fluid channeling system includes a fluid ejector, a heat exchanger, and a fluid pump disposed in series flow communication The ejector includes a primary inlet for receiving a primary fluid, and a secondary inlet for receiving a secondary fluid which is mixed with the primary fluid and discharged therefrom as ejector discharge. Heat is removed from the ejector discharge in the heat exchanger, and the heat exchanger discharge is compressed in the fluid pump and channeled to the ejector secondary inlet as the secondary fluid In an exemplary embodiment, the temperature of the primary fluid is greater than the maximum operating temperature of a fluid motor powering the fluid pump using a portion of the ejector discharge, with the secondary fluid being mixed with the primary fluid so that the ejector discharge temperature is equal to about the maximum operating temperature of the fluid motor.

  6. Femtosecond Population Inversion and Stimulated Emission of Dense Dirac Fermions in Graphene

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Tianqi; Luo, Liang; Hupalo, Myron; Zhang, Jian; Tringides, Michael; Schmalian, Joerg; Wang, Jigang

    2012-04-16

    We show that strongly photoexcited graphene monolayers with 35 fs pulses quasi-instantaneously build up a broadband, inverted Dirac fermion population. Optical gain emerges and directly manifests itself via a negative conductivity at the near-infrared region for the first 200 fs, where stimulated emission completely compensates absorption loss in the graphene layer. Our experiment-theory comparison with two distinct electron and hole chemical potentials reproduce absorption saturation and gain at 40 fs, revealing, particularly, the evolution of the transient state from a hot classical gas to a dense quantum fluid with increasing the photoexcitation.

  7. Collective excitations in 2D hard-disc fluid.

    PubMed

    Huerta, Adrian; Bryk, Taras; Trokhymchuk, Andrij

    2015-07-01

    Collective dynamics of a two-dimensional (2D) hard-disc fluid was studied by molecular dynamics simulations in the range of packing fractions that covers states up to the freezing. Some striking features concerning collective excitations in this system were observed. In particular, the short-wavelength shear waves while being absent at low packing fractions were observed in the range of high packing fractions, just before the freezing transition in a 2D hard-disc fluid. In contrast, the so-called "positive sound dispersion" typically observed in dense Lennard-Jones-like fluids, was not detected for the 2D hard-disc fluid. The ratio of specific heats in the 2D hard-disc fluid shows a monotonic increase with density approaching the freezing, resembling in this way the similar behavior in the vicinity of the Widom line in the case of supercritical fluids. PMID:25595625

  8. Oxygen ion-conducting dense ceramic

    DOEpatents

    Balachandran, Uthamalingam; Kleefisch, Mark S.; Kobylinski, Thaddeus P.; Morissette, Sherry L.; Pei, Shiyou

    1996-01-01

    Preparation, structure, and properties of mixed metal oxide compositions containing at least strontium, cobalt, iron and oxygen are described. The crystalline mixed metal oxide compositions of this invention have, for example, structure represented by Sr.sub..alpha. (Fe.sub.1-x Co.sub.x).sub..alpha.+.beta. O.sub..delta. where x is a number in a range from 0.01 to about 1, .alpha. is a number in a range from about 1 to about 4, .beta. is a number in a range upward from 0 to about 20, and .delta. is a number which renders the compound charge neutral, and wherein the composition has a non-perovskite structure. Use of the mixed metal oxides in dense ceramic membranes which exhibit oxygen ionic conductivity and selective oxygen separation, are described as well as their use in separation of oxygen from an oxygen-containing gaseous mixture.

  9. Oxygen ion-conducting dense ceramic

    DOEpatents

    Balachandran, Uthamalingam; Kleefisch, Mark S.; Kobylinski, Thaddeus P.; Morissette, Sherry L.; Pei, Shiyou

    1997-01-01

    Preparation, structure, and properties of mixed metal oxide compositions containing at least strontium, cobalt, iron and oxygen are described. The crystalline mixed metal oxide compositions of this invention have, for example, structure represented by Sr.sub..alpha. (Fe.sub.1-x Co.sub.x).sub..alpha.+.beta. O.sub..delta. where x is a number in a range from 0.01 to about 1, .alpha. is a number in a range from about 1 to about 4, .beta. is a number in a range upward from 0 to about 20, and .delta. is a number which renders the compound charge neutral, and wherein the composition has a non-perovskite structure. Use of the mixed metal oxides in dense ceramic membranes which exhibit oxygen ionic conductivity and selective oxygen separation, are described as well as their use in separation of oxygen from an oxygen-containing gaseous mixture.

  10. Ion beam driven warm dense matter experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bieniosek, F. M.; Ni, P. A.; Leitner, M.; Roy, P. K.; More, R.; Barnard, J. J.; Kireeff Covo, M.; Molvik, A. W.; Yoneda, H.

    2007-11-01

    We report plans and experimental results in ion beam-driven warm dense matter (WDM) experiments. Initial experiments at LBNL are at 0.3-1 MeV K+ beam (below the Bragg peak), increasing toward the Bragg peak in future versions of the accelerator. The WDM conditions are envisioned to be achieved by combined longitudinal and transverse neutralized drift compression to provide a hot spot on the target with a beam spot size of about 1 mm, and pulse length about 1-2 ns. The range of the beams in solid matter targets is about 1 micron, which can be lengthened by using porous targets at reduced density. Initial experiments include an experiment to study transient darkening at LBNL; and a porous target experiment at GSI heated by intense heavy-ion beams from the SIS 18 storage ring. Further experiments will explore target temperature and other properties such as electrical conductivity to investigate phase transitions and the critical point.

  11. Granular flow model for dense planetary rings

    SciTech Connect

    Borderies, N.; Goldreich, P.; Tremaine, S.

    1985-09-01

    In the present study of the viscosity of a differentially rotating particle disk, in the limiting case where the particles are densely packed and their collective behavior resembles that of a liquid, the pressure tensor is derived from both the equations of hydrodynamics and a simple kinetic model of collisions due to Haff (1983). Density waves and narrow circular rings are unstable if the liquid approximation applies, and the consequent nonlinear perturbations may generate splashing of the ring material in the vertical direction. These results are pertinent to the origin of the ellipticities of ringlets, the nonaxisymmetric features near the outer edge of the Saturn B ring, and unexplained residuals in kinematic models of the Saturn and Uranus rings. 24 references.

  12. Nonplanar electrostatic shock waves in dense plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Masood, W.; Rizvi, H.

    2010-02-15

    Two-dimensional quantum ion acoustic shock waves (QIASWs) are studied in an unmagnetized plasma consisting of electrons and ions. In this regard, a nonplanar quantum Kadomtsev-Petviashvili-Burgers (QKPB) equation is derived using the small amplitude perturbation expansion method. Using the tangent hyperbolic method, an analytical solution of the planar QKPB equation is obtained and subsequently used as the initial profile to numerically solve the nonplanar QKPB equation. It is observed that the increasing number density (and correspondingly the quantum Bohm potential) and kinematic viscosity affect the propagation characteristics of the QIASW. The temporal evolution of the nonplanar QIASW is investigated both in Cartesian and polar planes and the results are discussed from the numerical stand point. The results of the present study may be applicable in the study of propagation of small amplitude localized electrostatic shock structures in dense astrophysical environments.

  13. Infrared and Submilllimeter Studies of Dense Cores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bourke, Tyler L.

    2014-07-01

    Dense Cores are the birthplace of stars, and so understanding their structure and evolution is key to understanding star formation. Information on the density, temperature, and motions within cores are needed to describe these properties, and are obtained through continuum and line observations at far infrared and submm/mm wavelengths. Recent observations of dust emission with Herschel and molecular line observations with single-dish telescopes and interferometers provide the wavelength coverage and resolution to finally map core properties without appealing to spherical simplifications. Although large scale Herschel observations reveal numerous filaments in molecular clouds which are well described by cylindrical geometries, cores are still modeled as spherical entities. A few examples of other core geometries exist in the literature, and the wealth of new data on cloud filaments demand that non-spherical models receive more attention in future studies. This talk will examine the evidence for non-spherical cores and their connection to the filaments from which they form.

  14. Plasmon resonance in warm dense matter.

    PubMed

    Thiele, R; Bornath, T; Fortmann, C; Höll, A; Redmer, R; Reinholz, H; Röpke, G; Wierling, A; Glenzer, S H; Gregori, G

    2008-08-01

    Collective Thomson scattering with extreme ultraviolet light or x rays is shown to allow for a robust measurement of the free electron density in dense plasmas. Collective excitations like plasmons appear as maxima in the scattering signal. Their frequency position can directly be related to the free electron density. The range of applicability of the standard Gross-Bohm dispersion relation and of an improved dispersion relation in comparison to calculations based on the dielectric function in random phase approximation is investigated. More important, this well-established treatment of Thomson scattering on free electrons is generalized in the Born-Mermin approximation by including collisions. We show that, in the transition region from collective to noncollective scattering, the consideration of collisions is important. PMID:18850950

  15. Plasmon resonance in warm dense matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thiele, R.; Bornath, T.; Fortmann, C.; Höll, A.; Redmer, R.; Reinholz, H.; Röpke, G.; Wierling, A.; Glenzer, S. H.; Gregori, G.

    2008-08-01

    Collective Thomson scattering with extreme ultraviolet light or x rays is shown to allow for a robust measurement of the free electron density in dense plasmas. Collective excitations like plasmons appear as maxima in the scattering signal. Their frequency position can directly be related to the free electron density. The range of applicability of the standard Gross-Bohm dispersion relation and of an improved dispersion relation in comparison to calculations based on the dielectric function in random phase approximation is investigated. More important, this well-established treatment of Thomson scattering on free electrons is generalized in the Born-Mermin approximation by including collisions. We show that, in the transition region from collective to noncollective scattering, the consideration of collisions is important.

  16. Performance Evaluation of Dense Gas Dispersion Models.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Touma, Jawad S.; Cox, William M.; Thistle, Harold; Zapert, James G.

    1995-03-01

    This paper summarizes the results of a study to evaluate the performance of seven dense gas dispersion models using data from three field experiments. Two models (DEGADIS and SLAB) are in the public domain and the other five (AIRTOX, CHARM, FOCUS, SAFEMODE, and TRACE) are proprietary. The field data used are the Desert Tortoise pressurized ammonia releases, Burro liquefied natural gas spill tests, and the Goldfish anhydrous hydrofluoric acid spill experiments. Desert Tortoise and Goldfish releases were simulated as horizontal jet releases, and Burro as a liquid pool. Performance statistics were used to compare maximum observed concentrations and plume half-width to those predicted by each model. Model performance varied and no model exhibited consistently good performance across all three databases. However, when combined across the three databases, all models performed within a factor of 2. Problems encountered are discussed in order to help future investigators.

  17. Earthquake source inversion with dense networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Somala, S.; Ampuero, J. P.; Lapusta, N.

    2012-12-01

    (since the bulk properties are not known at higher frequencies), add noise of the desired level, and then apply our inversion approach. The results indicate that dense networks (e.g., 1-km spacing) produce sharper images of the considered sources than sparse networks (e.g., 10-20 km spacing), with better amplitude recovery and better resolution with depth. This is true even when noiseless sparse networks are compared with noisy dense networks, provided that the standard deviations of noise do not exceed ~1% of the maximum earthquake source amplitude (e.g., 1 cm/s noise for 1 m/s Haskell source). Substantial qualitative improvements arise when features of relatively narrow spatial extent are included in the source, in which case the dense networks can reproduce the features whereas the sparse networks cannot. We will report on our current efforts to mathematically quantify the differences between the inversions of sparse and dense data and to incorporate the effect of errors in the bulk velocity model.

  18. Kaon condensation in dense stellar matter

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Chang-Hwan; Rho, M. |

    1995-03-01

    This article combines two talks given by the authors and is based on Works done in collaboration with G.E. Brown and D.P. Min on kaon condensation in dense baryonic medium treated in chiral perturbation theory using heavy-baryon formalism. It contains, in addition to what was recently published, astrophysical backgrounds for kaon condensation discussed by Brown and Bethe, a discussion on a renormalization-group analysis to meson condensation worked out together with H.K. Lee and S.J. Sin, and the recent results of K.M. Westerberg in the bound-state approach to the Skyrme model. Negatively charged kaons are predicted to condense at a critical density 2 {approx_lt} {rho}/{rho}o {approx_lt} 4, in the range to allow the intriguing new phenomena predicted by Brown and Bethe to take place in compact star matter.

  19. Engineered circuit QED with dense resonant modes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilhelm, Frank; Egger, Daniel

    2013-03-01

    In circuit quantum electrodynamics even in the ultrastrong coupling regime, strong quasi-resonant interaction typically involves only one mode of the resonator as the mode spacing is comparable to the frequency of the mode. We are going to present an engineered hybrid transmission line consisting of a left-handed and a right-handed portion that has a low-frequency van-Hove singularity hence showing a dense mode spectrum at an experimentally accessible point. This gives rise to strong multi-mode coupling and can be utilized in multiple ways to create strongly correlated microwave photons. Supported by DARPA through the QuEST program and by NSERC Discovery grants

  20. Coherent neutrino interactions in a dense medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kiers, Ken; Weiss, Nathan

    1997-11-01

    Motivated by the effect of matter on neutrino oscillations (the MSW effect) we study in more detail the propagation of neutrinos in a dense medium. The dispersion relation for massive neutrinos in a medium is known to have a minimum at nonzero momentum p~GFρ/2. We study in detail the origin and consequences of this dispersion relation for both Dirac and Majorana neutrinos both in a toy model with only neutral currents and a single neutrino flavor and in a realistic ``standard model'' with two neutrino flavors. We find that for a range of neutrino momenta near the minimum of the dispersion relation, Dirac neutrinos are trapped by their coherent interactions with the medium. This effect does not lead to the trapping of Majorana neutrinos.

  1. Supernovae in dense and dusty environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kankare, Erkki

    2013-02-01

    In this doctoral thesis supernovae in dense and dusty environments are studied, with an emphasis on core-collapse supernovae. The articles included in the thesis aim to increase our understanding of supernovae interacting with the circumstellar material and their place in stellar evolution. The results obtained have also importance in deriving core-collapse supernova rates with reliable extinction corrections, which are directly related to star formation rates and galaxy evolution. In other words, supernovae are used as a tool in the research of both stellar and galaxy evolution, both of which can be considered as fundamental basics for our understanding of the whole Universe. A detailed follow-up study of the narrow-line supernova 2009kn is presented in paper I, and its similarity to another controversial transient, supernova 1994W, is shown. These objects are clearly strongly interacting with relatively dense circumstellar matter, however their physical origin is quite uncertain. In paper I different explosion models are discussed. Discoveries from a search programme for highly obscured supernovae in dusty luminous infrared galaxies are presented in papers II and III. The search was carried out using laser guide star adaptive optics monitoring at near-infrared wavelengths. By comparing multi-band photometric follow-up observations to template light curves, the likely types and the host galaxy extinctions for the four supernovae discovered were derived. The optical depth of normal spiral galaxy disks were studied statistically and reported in paper IV. This is complementary work to studies such as the one presented in paper V, where the missing fractions of core-collapse supernovae were derived for both normal spiral galaxies and luminous infrared galaxies, to be used for correcting supernova rates both locally and as a function of redshift.

  2. Dense LU Factorization on Multicore Supercomputer Nodes

    SciTech Connect

    Lifflander, Jonathan; Miller, Phil; Venkataraman, Ramprasad; Arya, Anshu; Jones, Terry R; Kale, Laxmikant V

    2012-01-01

    Dense LU factorization is a prominent benchmark used to rank the performance of supercomputers. Many implementations, including the reference code HPL, use block-cyclic distributions of matrix blocks onto a two-dimensional process grid. The process grid dimensions drive a trade-off between communication and computation and are architecture- and implementation-sensitive. We show how the critical panel factorization steps can be made less communication-bound by overlapping asynchronous collectives for pivot identification and exchange with the computation of rank-k updates. By shifting this trade-off, a modified block-cyclic distribution can beneficially exploit more available parallelism on the critical path, and reduce panel factorization's memory hierarchy contention on now-ubiquitous multi-core architectures. The missed parallelism in traditional block-cyclic distributions arises because active panel factorization, triangular solves, and subsequent broadcasts are spread over single process columns or rows (respectively) of the process grid. Increasing one dimension of the process grid decreases the number of distinct processes in the other dimension. To increase parallelism in both dimensions, periodic 'rotation' is applied to the process grid to recover the row-parallelism lost by a tall process grid. During active panel factorization, rank-1 updates stream through memory with minimal reuse. In a column-major process grid, the performance of this access pattern degrades as too many streaming processors contend for access to memory. A block-cyclic mapping in the more popular row-major order does not encounter this problem, but consequently sacrifices node and network locality in the critical pivoting steps. We introduce 'striding' to vary between the two extremes of row- and column-major process grids. As a test-bed for further mapping experiments, we describe a dense LU implementation that allows a block distribution to be defined as a general function of block

  3. Optimization of crystal nucleation close to a metastable fluid-fluid phase transition

    PubMed Central

    Wedekind, Jan; Xu, Limei; Buldyrev, Sergey V.; Stanley, H. Eugene; Reguera, David; Franzese, Giancarlo

    2015-01-01

    The presence of a metastable fluid-fluid critical point is thought to dramatically influence the crystallization pathway, increasing the nucleation rate by many orders of magnitude over the predictions of classical nucleation theory. We use molecular dynamics simulations to study the kinetics of crystallization in the vicinity of this metastable critical point and throughout the metastable fluid-fluid phase diagram. To quantitatively understand how the fluid-fluid phase separation affects the crystal nucleation, we evaluate accurately the kinetics and reconstruct the thermodynamic free-energy landscape of crystal formation. Contrary to expectations, we find no special advantage of the proximity of the metastable critical point on the crystallization rates. However, we find that the ultrafast formation of a dense liquid phase causes the crystallization to accelerate both near the metastable critical point and almost everywhere below the fluid-fluid spinodal line. These results unveil three different scenarios for crystallization that could guide the optimization of the process in experiments PMID:26095898

  4. Thermophysical Properties of Fluids and Fluid Mixtures

    SciTech Connect

    Sengers, Jan V.; Anisimov, Mikhail A.

    2004-05-03

    The major goal of the project was to study the effect of critical fluctuations on the thermophysical properties and phase behavior of fluids and fluid mixtures. Long-range fluctuations appear because of the presence of critical phase transitions. A global theory of critical fluctuations was developed and applied to represent thermodynamic properties and transport properties of molecular fluids and fluid mixtures. In the second phase of the project, the theory was extended to deal with critical fluctuations in complex fluids such as polymer solutions and electrolyte solutions. The theoretical predictions have been confirmed by computer simulations and by light-scattering experiments. Fluctuations in fluids in nonequilibrium states have also been investigated.

  5. Fluid sampling tool

    DOEpatents

    Garcia, Anthony R.; Johnston, Roger G.; Martinez, Ronald K.

    2000-01-01

    A fluid-sampling tool for obtaining a fluid sample from a container. When used in combination with a rotatable drill, the tool bores a hole into a container wall, withdraws a fluid sample from the container, and seals the borehole. The tool collects fluid sample without exposing the operator or the environment to the fluid or to wall shavings from the container.

  6. Joint fluid Gram stain

    MedlinePlus

    Gram stain of joint fluid ... A sample of joint fluid is needed. The fluid sample is sent to a lab where a small drop is placed in a ... on how to prepare for the removal of joint fluid, see joint fluid aspiration .

  7. Development and evaluation of a dense gas plume model

    SciTech Connect

    Matthias, C.S.

    1994-12-31

    The dense gas plume model (continuous release) described in this paper has been developed using the same principles as for a dense gas puff model (instantaneous release). It is a box model for which the main goal is to predict the height H, width W, and maximum concentration C{sub b} for a steady dense plume. A secondary goal is to distribute the mass more realistically by empirically attaching Gaussian distributions in the horizontal and vertical directions. For ease of reference, the models and supporting programs will be referred to as DGM (Dense Gas Models).

  8. Ciliary fluid transport enhanced by viscoelastic fluid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Hanliang; Kanso, Eva

    2015-11-01

    Motile cilia encounter complex, non-Newtonian fluids as they beat to gain self-propulsion of cells, transport fluids, and mix particles. Recently there have been many studies on swimming in complex fluids, both experimentally and theoretically. However the role of the non-Newtonian fluid in the ciliary transport system remains largely unknown. Here we use a one-way-coupled immersed boundary method to evaluate the impacts of viscoelastic fluid (Oldroyd-B fluid) on the fluid transport generated by an array of rabbit tracheal cilia beating in a channel at low Reynolds number. Our results show that the viscoelasticity could enhance the fluid transport generated by the rabbit tracheal cilia beating pattern and the flow is sensitive to the Deborah number in the range we investigate.

  9. Bonding changes in hot fluid hydrogen at megabar pressures

    PubMed Central

    Subramanian, Natarajan; Goncharov, Alexander F.; Struzhkin, Viktor V.; Somayazulu, Maddury; Hemley, Russell J.

    2011-01-01

    Raman spectroscopy in laser-heated diamond anvil cells has been employed to probe the bonding state and phase diagram of dense hydrogen up to 140 GPa and 1,500 K. The measurements were made possible as a result of the development of new techniques for containing and probing the hot, dense fluid, which is of fundamental importance in physics, planetary science, and astrophysics. A pronounced discontinuous softening of the molecular vibron was found at elevated temperatures along with a large broadening and decrease in intensity of the roton bands. These phenomena indicate the existence of a state of the fluid having significantly modified intramolecular bonding. The results are consistent with the existence of a pressure-induced transformation in the fluid related to the presence of a temperature maximum in the melting line as a function of pressure. PMID:21447715

  10. Nonlinear magnetosonic waves in dense plasmas with non-relativistic and ultra-relativistic degenerate electrons

    SciTech Connect

    Hussain, S.; Mahmood, S.; Rehman, Aman-ur-

    2014-11-15

    Linear and nonlinear propagation of magnetosonic waves in the perpendicular direction to the ambient magnetic field is studied in dense plasmas for non-relativistic and ultra-relativistic degenerate electrons pressure. The sources of nonlinearities are the divergence of the ions and electrons fluxes, Lorentz forces on ions and electrons fluids and the plasma current density in the system. The Korteweg-de Vries equation for magnetosonic waves propagating in the perpendicular direction of the magnetic field is derived by employing reductive perturbation method for non-relativistic as well as ultra-relativistic degenerate electrons pressure cases in dense plasmas. The plots of the magnetosonic wave solitons are also shown using numerical values of the plasma parameters such a plasma density and magnetic field intensity of the white dwarfs from literature. The dependence of plasma density and magnetic field intensity on the magnetosonic wave propagation is also pointed out in dense plasmas for both non-relativistic and ultra-relativistic degenerate electrons pressure cases.

  11. Osteointegration of biomimetic apatite coating applied onto dense and porous metal implants in femurs of goats.

    PubMed

    Barrère, F; van der Valk, C M; Meijer, G; Dalmeijer, R A J; de Groot, K; Layrolle, P

    2003-10-15

    Biomimetic calcium phosphate (Ca-P) coatings were applied onto dense titanium alloy (Ti6Al4V) and porous tantalum (Ta) cylinders by immersion into simulated body fluid at 37 degrees C and then at 50 degrees C for 24 h. As a result, a homogeneous bone-like carbonated apatitic (BCA) coating, 30 microm thick was deposited on the entire surface of the dense and porous implants. Noncoated and BCA-coated implants were press-fit implanted in the femoral diaphysis of 14 adult female goats. Bone contact was measured after implantation for 6, 12, and 24 weeks, and investigated by histology and backscattered electron microscopy (BSEM). After 6 weeks, bone contact of the BCA-coated Ti6Al4V implants was about 50%. After 12 and 24 weeks, bone contact was lower in comparison with the 6-week implantations at, respectively 24 and 39%. Regarding the BCA-coated porous Ta implants, bone contacts were 17, 30, and 18% after 6, 12, and 24 weeks, respectively. However, bone contact was always found significantly higher for BCA-coated dense Ti6Al4V and porous Ta cylinders than the corresponding noncoated implants. The results of this study show that the BCA coating enhances the bone integration as compared to the noncoated implants. PMID:14528464

  12. A predictive, size-dependent continuum model for dense granular flows

    PubMed Central

    Henann, David L.; Kamrin, Ken

    2013-01-01

    Dense granular materials display a complicated set of flow properties, which differentiate them from ordinary fluids. Despite their ubiquity, no model has been developed that captures or predicts the complexities of granular flow, posing an obstacle in industrial and geophysical applications. Here we propose a 3D constitutive model for well-developed, dense granular flows aimed at filling this need. The key ingredient of the theory is a grain-size-dependent nonlocal rheology—inspired by efforts for emulsions—in which flow at a point is affected by the local stress as well as the flow in neighboring material. The microscopic physical basis for this approach borrows from recent principles in soft glassy rheology. The size-dependence is captured using a single material parameter, and the resulting model is able to quantitatively describe dense granular flows in an array of different geometries. Of particular importance, it passes the stringent test of capturing all aspects of the highly nontrivial flows observed in split-bottom cells—a geometry that has resisted modeling efforts for nearly a decade. A key benefit of the model is its simple-to-implement and highly predictive final form, as needed for many real-world applications. PMID:23536300

  13. Evidence for effectiveness of Extracorporal Shock-Wave Therapy (ESWT) to treat calcific and non-calcific rotator cuff tendinosis--a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Huisstede, Bionka M A; Gebremariam, Lukas; van der Sande, Renske; Hay, Elaine M; Koes, Bart W

    2011-10-01

    Extracorporeal shock-wave therapy (ESWT) is suggested as a treatment alternative for calcific and non-calcific rotator cuff tendinosis (RC-tendinosis), which may decrease the need for surgery. In this study we assessed the evidence for effectiveness of ESWT for these disorders. The Cochrane Library, PubMed, Embase, Pedro, and Cinahl were searched for relevant systematic reviews and RCTs. Two reviewers independently extracted data and assessed the methodological quality. Seventeen RCTs (11 calcific, 6 non-calcific) were included. For calcific RC-tendinosis, strong evidence was found for effectiveness in favour of high-ESWT versus low-ESWT in short-term. Moderate evidence was found in favour of high-ESWT versus placebo in short-, mid- and long-term and versus low-ESWT in mid- and long-term. Moreover, high-ESWT was more effective (moderate evidence) with focus on calcific deposit versus focus on tuberculum major in short- and long-term. RSWT was more effective (moderate evidence) than placebo in mid-term. For non-calcific RC-tendinosis, no strong or moderate evidence was found in favour of low-, mid- or high-ESWT versus placebo, each other, or other treatments. This review shows that only high-ESWT is effective for treating calcific RC-tendinosis. No evidence was found for the effectiveness of ESWT to treat non-calcific RC-tendinosis. PMID:21396877

  14. Stone heterogeneity index as the standard deviation of Hounsfield units: A novel predictor for shock-wave lithotripsy outcomes in ureter calculi.

    PubMed

    Lee, Joo Yong; Kim, Jae Heon; Kang, Dong Hyuk; Chung, Doo Yong; Lee, Dae Hun; Do Jung, Hae; Kwon, Jong Kyou; Cho, Kang Su

    2016-01-01

    We investigated whether stone heterogeneity index (SHI), which a proxy of such variations, was defined as the standard deviation of a Hounsfield unit (HU) on non-contrast computed tomography (NCCT), can be a novel predictor for shock-wave lithotripsy (SWL) outcomes in patients with ureteral stones. Medical records were obtained from the consecutive database of 1,519 patients who underwent the first session of SWL for urinary stones between 2005 and 2013. Ultimately, 604 patients with radiopaque ureteral stones were eligible for this study. Stone related variables including stone size, mean stone density (MSD), skin-to-stone distance, and SHI were obtained on NCCT. Patients were classified into the low and high SHI groups using mean SHI and compared. One-session success rate in the high SHI group was better than in the low SHI group (74.3% vs. 63.9%, P = 0.008). Multivariate logistic regression analyses revealed that smaller stone size (OR 0.889, 95% CI: 0.841-0.937, P < 0.001), lower MSD (OR 0.995, 95% CI: 0.994-0.996, P < 0.001), and higher SHI (OR 1.011, 95% CI: 1.008-1.014, P < 0.001) were independent predictors of one-session success. The radiologic heterogeneity of urinary stones or SHI was an independent predictor for SWL success in patients with ureteral calculi and a useful clinical parameter for stone fragility. PMID:27035621

  15. Cardiac shockwave therapy improves myocardial function in patients with refractory coronary artery disease by promoting VEGF and IL-8 secretion to mediate the proliferation of endothelial progenitor cells

    PubMed Central

    CAI, HONG-YAN; LI, LIN; GUO, TAO; WANG, YU; MA, TIE-KUN; XIAO, JIAN-MING; ZHAO, LING; FANG, YIN; YANG, PING; ZHAO, HU

    2015-01-01

    Cardiac shockwave therapy (CSWT) is a potential and effective remedy to promote revascularization in the ischemic myocardium of patients with refractory coronary heart disease (CHD). The technique is both safe and non-invasive; however, the underlying molecular mechanism remains unclear. The aim of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of CSWT in treating CHD patients and investigate a potential mechanism. A total of 26 patients with CHD were enrolled in the study, and CSWT was performed over a 3-month period. The efficacy of CSWT was assessed using several clinical parameters. Peripheral blood (PB) was collected prior to and following treatment. The number of circulating endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs) in the PB was counted using a flow cytometer, and the levels of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), interleukin-8 (IL-8), stromal cell-derived factor 1 and matrix metalloproteinase 9 in the PB were analyzed. Mononuclear cells were isolated from the PB and cultured in vitro. The EPCs and EPC-colony forming units (EPC-CFUs) in the PB mononuclear cell culture were counted using an inverted phase contrast microscope. Following CSWT, the tested clinical parameters were significantly improved. The levels of circulating EPCs, VEGF and IL-8 in the PB were significantly increased, as were the EPCs and EPC-CFUs from the PB mononuclear cell culture. We suggest that EPC proliferation, mediated by VEGF and IL-8 secretion, may be among the potential mechanisms associated with CSWT. PMID:26668649

  16. Fluid Inclusion Gas Analysis

    DOE Data Explorer

    Dilley, Lorie

    2013-01-01

    Fluid inclusion gas analysis for wells in various geothermal areas. Analyses used in developing fluid inclusion stratigraphy for wells and defining fluids across the geothermal fields. Each sample has mass spectrum counts for 180 chemical species.

  17. Synovial fluid analysis

    MedlinePlus

    Joint fluid analysis; Joint fluid aspiration ... El-Gabalawy HS. Synovial fluid analysis, synovial biopsy, and synovial pathology. In: Firestein GS, Budd RC, Gabriel SE, McInnes IB, O'Dell JR, eds. Kelly's Textbook of ...

  18. Pleural fluid Gram stain

    MedlinePlus

    Gram stain of pleural fluid ... lungs fill a person's chest with air. If fluid builds up in the space outside the lungs ... chest, it can cause many problems. Removing the fluid can relieve a person's breathing problems and help ...

  19. Pericardial fluid culture

    MedlinePlus

    Culture - pericardial fluid ... the heart (the pericardium). A small amount of fluid is removed. You may have an ECG and ... x-ray after the test. Sometimes the pericardial fluid is taken during open heart surgery. The sample ...

  20. Pleural fluid culture

    MedlinePlus

    Culture - pleural fluid ... is used to get a sample of pleural fluid. The sample is sent to a laboratory and ... the chest wall into the pleural space. As fluid drains into a collection bottle, you may cough ...

  1. An experimental study of dense aerosol aggregations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dhaubhadel, Rajan

    We demonstrated that an aerosol can gel. This gelation was then used for a one-step method to produce an ultralow density porous carbon or silica material. This material was named an aerosol gel because it was made via gelation of particles in the aerosol phase. The carbon and silica aerosol gels had high specific surface area (200--350 sq m2/g for carbon and 300--500 sq m2/g for silica) and an extremely low density (2.5--6.0 mg/cm3), properties similar to conventional aerogels. Key aspects to form a gel from an aerosol are large volume fraction, ca. 10-4 or greater, and small primary particle size, 50 nm or smaller, so that the gel time is fast compared to other characteristic times. Next we report the results of a study of the cluster morphology and kinetics of a dense aggregating aerosol system using the small angle light scattering technique. The soot particles started as individual monomers, ca. 38 nm radius, grew to bigger clusters with time and finally stopped evolving after spanning a network across the whole system volume. This spanning is aerosol gelation. The gelled system showed a hybrid morphology with a lower fractal dimension at length scales of a micron or smaller and a higher fractal dimension at length scales greater than a micron. The study of the kinetics of the aggregating system showed that when the system gelled, the aggregation kernel homogeneity lambda attained a value 0.4 or higher. The magnitude of the aggregation kernel showed an increase with increasing volume fraction. We also used image analysis technique to study the cluster morphology. From the digitized pictures of soot clusters the cluster morphology was determined by two different methods: structure factor and perimeter analysis. We find a hybrid, superaggregate morphology characterized by a fractal dimension of Df ≈ to 1.8 between the monomer size, ca. 50 nm, and 1 mum micron and Df ≈ to 2.6 at larger length scales up to ˜ 10 mum. The superaggregate morphology is a

  2. A quest for super dense aluminium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fiquet, G.; Narayana, C.; Bellin, C.; Shukla, A.; Esteve, I.; Mezouar, N.

    2013-12-01

    The extreme pressure phase diagram of materials is important not only for understanding the interiors of planets or stars, but also for the fundamental understanding of the relation between crystal structure and electronic structure. Structural transitions induced by extreme pressure are governed by the deformation of valence electron charge density which bears the brunt of increasing compression while the relative volume occupied by the nearly incompressible ionic core electrons increases. At extreme pressures common materials are expected to transform into new dense phases with extremely compact atomic arrangements that may also have unusual physical properties. In this report, we present new experiments carried out on aluminium. A simple system like Al is not only important as a benchmark for theory, but can also be used as a standard for pressures in the TPa range and beyond which are targeted at new dynamic compression facilities such as the National Ignition Facility (NIF) at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory in the US or Laser Mégajoule (LMJ) in Bordeaux in France. For aluminium, first principle calculations have consistently predicted a phase transition sequence from fcc to hcp and hcp to bcc in a pressure range below 0.5 TPa [Tambe et al., Phys. Rev. B 77, 172102, 2008]. The hcp phase was identified at 217 GPa in a recent experiment [Akahama et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 96, 45505, 2006] but the detection of the predicted bcc phase has been hampered by the difficulty of routine static high pressure experiments beyond 350 GPa. Here, we report on the overcoming of this obstacle and the detection of all the structural phase transitions predicted in Al by achieving a pressure in excess of 500 GPa in the static regime in a diamond-anvil cell. In particular, using X-ray diffraction at the high-pressure beamline ID27 at the European Synchrotron Radiation Facility (ESRF), we find a bcc super-dense phase of aluminium at a pressure of 380 GPa. In this report

  3. Terrestrial atmospheric effects induced by counterstreaming dense interstellar cloud material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yeghikyan, A.; Fahr, H.

    The Solar System during its life has encountered more than 10 times with dense interstellar clouds with particle concentrations about 10(8)-10(9) m(-3) and more suppressing the heliopause to dimensions smaller than 1 AU and bringing the Earth in immediate contact with the interstellar matter. For cloud's concentration greater than of 10(8) m(-3), the flow material at the Earth, completely shielded from solar wind protons would be only subject to solar photoionization processes. Previously published results were limited to consideration of processes outside of the accretion radius and have not been taken into account the photoionization. We have developed a 2D-2-fluid gasdynamical numerical code to describe the behavior of the incoming neutral matter near the Earth, taken into account both the photoionization and the gravity of the Sun. Increased neutral hydrogen fluxes ranging from 10(13) to 10(16) m(-2)s(-1) would cause an alteration of the terrestrial atmosphere. During immersion in the cloud the total incident flux of neutral hydrogen onto the terrestrial atmosphere in the steady state would be balanced by the upward escape flux of hydrogen and the downward flux of water, which is the product of hydrogen-oxygen chemistry via even-odd reaction schemes. In that case hydrogen acts as a catalyst for the destruction of oxygen atoms and causes the ozone concentration to diminish pronouncedly above 50 km from a factor of 1.5 at the stratopause to about a factor of 1000 and more at the mesopause. Thus, depending on the encounter parameters the large mixing ratio of hydrogen decreases the ozon concentration in the mesosphere and triggers an ice age of relatively long duration.

  4. Dynamic aerofracture or hydrofracture of dense granular packing: pressure and viscosity control of the fracture patterns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niebling, Michael J.; Toussaint, Renaud; Flekkøy, Eirik G.; Jørgen Måløy, Knut

    2013-04-01

    Stress induced by fluid or gases can cause diverse materials to break and fracture. Such hydraulic fractures are a natural and common phenomenon in the field of volcanism and are artificially initiated to enhance the recovery of natural gas and mineral oil by fracturing the reservoir rock with pressurized fluids. A procedure also known as fracking. Recently a new perspective on hydrofractures was added with the storage of supercritical CO2. In this respect two scenarios are considered. First it is one option to inject CO2 into existing hydrofractures, and second the injection of the CO2 can create additional fractures. The typical components for such fractures are a porous material and a compressible gas. The dynamics of such fractures and displacement patterns are simulated and studied in a rectangular Hele-Shaw cell filled with a dense but permeable two-dimensional granular layer. The model used, mixing highly deformable solid and fluid components, can simulate sedimentation problems [1,2], as well as hydrofracture or aerofracture ones. The emerging displacement patterns and fractures variate according to the properties of the injected fluid or gas and the characteristics of the granular phase [3]. The physics behind these variations is discussed and explained. The role of the fluid viscosity and system size shows to lead to a transition from fracturing to compaction, depending on the dynamics of convection versus diffusion of overpressure. The dependence of the obtained patterns on the injection pressure is also explored [4]. References: [1] Niebling, M.J., E.G. Flekkøy, K.J. Måløy, R. Toussaint, Sedimentation instabilities: impact of the fluid compressibility and viscosity, Phys. Rev. E 82, 051302, 2010. doi: 10.1103/PhysRevE.82.051302 [2] Niebling, M.J., E.G. Flekkøy, K.J. Måløy, R. Toussaint, Mixing of a granular layer falling through a fluid, Phys. Rev. E 82, 011301 (2010) doi: 10.1103/PhysRevE.82.011301 [3] Niebling, M., R. Toussaint, E.G. Flekk

  5. Reentrant Phase Diagram of Network Fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Russo, J.; Tavares, J. M.; Teixeira, P. I. C.; Telo da Gama, M. M.; Sciortino, F.

    2011-02-01

    We introduce a microscopic model for particles with dissimilar patches which displays an unconventional “pinched” phase diagram, similar to the one predicted by Tlusty and Safran in the context of dipolar fluids [Science 290, 1328 (2000)SCIEAS0036-807510.1126/science.290.5495.1328]. The model—based on two types of patch interactions, which account, respectively, for chaining and branching of the self-assembled networks—is studied both numerically via Monte Carlo simulations and theoretically via first-order perturbation theory. The dense phase is rich in junctions, while the less-dense phase is rich in chain ends. The model provides a reference system for a deep understanding of the competition between condensation and self-assembly into equilibrium-polymer chains.

  6. Fluid sampling device

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Studenick, D. K. (Inventor)

    1977-01-01

    An inlet leak is described for sampling gases, more specifically, for selectively sampling multiple fluids. This fluid sampling device includes a support frame. A plurality of fluid inlet devices extend through the support frame and each of the fluid inlet devices include a longitudinal aperture. An opening device that is responsive to a control signal selectively opens the aperture to allow fluid passage. A closing device that is responsive to another control signal selectively closes the aperture for terminating further fluid flow.

  7. Dense heteroclinic tangencies near a Bykov cycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Labouriau, Isabel S.; Rodrigues, Alexandre A. P.

    2015-12-01

    This article presents a mechanism for the coexistence of hyperbolic and non-hyperbolic dynamics arising in a neighbourhood of a Bykov cycle where trajectories turn in opposite directions near the two nodes - we say that the nodes have different chirality. We show that in the set of vector fields defined on a three-dimensional manifold, there is a class where tangencies of the invariant manifolds of two hyperbolic saddle-foci occur densely. The class is defined by the presence of the Bykov cycle, and by a condition on the parameters that determine the linear part of the vector field at the equilibria. This has important consequences: the global dynamics is persistently dominated by heteroclinic tangencies and by Newhouse phenomena, coexisting with hyperbolic dynamics arising from transversality. The coexistence gives rise to linked suspensions of Cantor sets, with hyperbolic and non-hyperbolic dynamics, in contrast with the case where the nodes have the same chirality. We illustrate our theory with an explicit example where tangencies arise in the unfolding of a symmetric vector field on the three-dimensional sphere.

  8. Understanding shape entropy through local dense packing

    PubMed Central

    van Anders, Greg; Klotsa, Daphne; Ahmed, N. Khalid; Engel, Michael; Glotzer, Sharon C.

    2014-01-01

    Entropy drives the phase behavior of colloids ranging from dense suspensions of hard spheres or rods to dilute suspensions of hard spheres and depletants. Entropic ordering of anisotropic shapes into complex crystals, liquid crystals, and even quasicrystals was demonstrated recently in computer simulations and experiments. The ordering of shapes appears to arise from the emergence of directional entropic forces (DEFs) that align neighboring particles, but these forces have been neither rigorously defined nor quantified in generic systems. Here, we show quantitatively that shape drives the phase behavior of systems of anisotropic particles upon crowding through DEFs. We define DEFs in generic systems and compute them for several hard particle systems. We show they are on the order of a few times the thermal energy (kBT) at the onset of ordering, placing DEFs on par with traditional depletion, van der Waals, and other intrinsic interactions. In experimental systems with these other interactions, we provide direct quantitative evidence that entropic effects of shape also contribute to self-assembly. We use DEFs to draw a distinction between self-assembly and packing behavior. We show that the mechanism that generates directional entropic forces is the maximization of entropy by optimizing local particle packing. We show that this mechanism occurs in a wide class of systems and we treat, in a unified way, the entropy-driven phase behavior of arbitrary shapes, incorporating the well-known works of Kirkwood, Onsager, and Asakura and Oosawa. PMID:25344532

  9. Dense ceramic membranes for methane conversion

    SciTech Connect

    Balachandran, U.; Mieville, R.L.; Ma, B.; Udovich, C.A.

    1996-05-01

    This report focuses on a mechanism for oxygen transport through mixed- oxide conductors as used in dense ceramic membrane reactors for the partial oxidation of methane to syngas (CO and H{sub 2}). The in-situ separation of O{sub 2} from air by the membrane reactor saves the costly cryogenic separation step that is required in conventional syngas production. The mixed oxide of choice is SrCo{sub 0.5}FeO{sub x}, which exhibits high oxygen permeability and has been shown in previous studies to possess high stability in both oxidizing and reducing conditions; in addition, it can be readily formed into reactor configurations such as tubes. An understanding of the electrical properties and the defect dynamics in this material is essential and will help us to find the optimal operating conditions for the conversion reactor. In this paper, we discuss the conductivities of the SrFeCo{sub 0.5}O{sub x} system that are dependent on temperature and partial pressure of oxygen. Based on the experimental results, a defect model is proposed to explain the electrical properties of this system. The oxygen permeability of SrFeCo{sub 0.5}O{sub x} is estimated by using conductivity data and is compared with that obtained from methane conversion reaction.

  10. A new rheology for dense granular flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jop, Pierre

    2005-11-01

    Recent experiments and numerical simulations of dry and dense granular flows suggest that a simple rheological description, in terms of a shear rate dependent friction coefficient, may be sufficient to capture the major flow properties [1,2]. In this work we generalize this approach by proposing a tensorial form of this rheology leading to 3D hydrodynamic equations for granular flows. We show that quantitative predictions can be obtained with this model by studying the flow of grains on a pile confined between two lateral walls. In this configuration we have experimentally measured the free surface velocity profile, the flowing thickness for different flow rates and channel widths. The results are compared with numerical simulations of the hydrodynamic model and quantitative agreement is observed. This study strongly supports the relevance of the proposed rheology. 1. F. da Cruz, S. Emam, M. Prochnow, J.-N. Roux and F. Chevoir, cond-mat/ 0503682 (2005)2. G.D.R. Midi, EPJE14 367-371 (2004)

  11. The lifetime of evaporating dense sprays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Rivas, Alois; Villermaux, Emmanuel

    2015-11-01

    We study the processes by which a set of nearby liquid droplets (a spray) evaporates in a gas phase whose relative humidity (vapor concentration) is controlled at will. A dense spray of micron-sized water droplets is formed in air by a pneumatic atomizer and conveyed through a nozzle in a closed chamber whose vapor concentration has been pre-set to a controlled value. The resulting plume extension depends on the relative humidity of the diluting medium. When the spray plume is straight and laminar, droplets evaporate at its edge where the vapor is saturated, and diffuses through a boundary layer developing around the plume. We quantify the shape and length of the plume as a function of the injecting, vapor diffusion, thermodynamic and environment parameters. For higher injection Reynolds numbers, standard shear instabilities distort the plume into stretched lamellae, thus enhancing the diffusion of vapor from their boundary towards the diluting medium. These lamellae vanish in a finite time depending on the intensity of the stretching, and relative humidity of the environment, with a lifetime diverging close to the equilibrium limit, when the plume develops in an medium saturated in vapor. The dependences are described quantitatively.

  12. Particular Properties of Dense Supernova Matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takatsuka, T.; Nishizaki, S.; Hiura, J.

    1994-10-01

    Dense supernova matter composed of n, p, e-, e+, νe and bar{ν}e is investigated in detail by solving self-consistently a set of finite-temperature Hartree-Fock equations with an effective nucleon interaction. The effective interaction includes a phenomenological three-nucleon interaction to assure the saturation property of symmetric nuclear matter. Results of thermodynamic quantities and mixing ratios of respective components are analyzed and tabulated for wide region of density (ρ = (1 - 6)ρ0) and temperature (T = (10 - 40) MeV) by choosing the lepton fraction Yl = (0.3, 0.35, 0.4). We discuss particular properties of the matter such as the constancy of composition, the large proton fraction expressed by Yp =~ (2/3)Yl + 0.05 and the stiffened equation of state, and also discuss remarkable features of hot neutron stars at birth such as the fat density profile and the increasing temperature toward the center. It is shown that these features are caused essentially by the effects of neutrino trapping to generate the high and constant lepton fraction and isentropic nature, the effects which are absent in neutron star matter.

  13. New source of dense, cryogenic positron plasmas.

    PubMed

    Jørgensen, L V; Amoretti, M; Bonomi, G; Bowe, P D; Canali, C; Carraro, C; Cesar, C L; Charlton, M; Doser, M; Fontana, A; Fujiwara, M C; Funakoshi, R; Genova, P; Hangst, J S; Hayano, R S; Kellerbauer, A; Lagomarsino, V; Landua, R; Lodi Rizzini, E; Macrì, M; Madsen, N; Mitchard, D; Montagna, P; Rotondi, A; Testera, G; Variola, A; Venturelli, L; van der Werf, D P; Yamazaki, Y

    2005-07-01

    We have developed a new method, based on the ballistic transfer of preaccumulated plasmas, to obtain large and dense positron plasmas in a cryogenic environment. The method involves transferring plasmas emanating from a region with a low magnetic field (0.14 T) and relatively high pressure (10(-9) mbar) into a 15 K Penning-Malmberg trap immersed in a 3 T magnetic field with a base pressure better than 10(-13) mbar. The achieved positron accumulation rate in the high field cryogenic trap is more than one and a half orders of magnitude higher than the previous most efficient UHV compatible scheme. Subsequent stacking resulted in a plasma containing more than 1.2 x 10(9) positrons, which is a factor 4 higher than previously reported. Using a rotating wall electric field, plasmas containing about 20 x 10(6) positrons were compressed to a density of 2.6 x 10(10) cm(-3). This is a factor of 6 improvement over earlier measurements. PMID:16090691

  14. Borehole stability in densely welded tuffs

    SciTech Connect

    Fuenkajorn, K.; Daemen, J.J.K.

    1992-07-01

    The stability of boreholes, or more generally of underground openings (i.e. including shafts, ramps, drifts, tunnels, etc.) at locations where seals or plugs are to be placed is an important consideration in seal design for a repository (Juhlin and Sandstedt, 1989). Borehole instability or borehole breakouts induced by stress redistribution could negate the effectiveness of seals or plugs. Breakout fractures along the wall of repository excavations or exploratory holes could provide a preferential flowpath for groundwater or gaseous radionuclides to bypass the plugs. After plug installation, swelling pressures exerted by a plug could induce radial cracks or could open or widen preexisting cracks in the rock at the bottom of the breakouts where the tangential compressive stresses have been released by the breakout process. The purpose of the work reported here is to determine experimentally the stability of a circular hole in a welded tuff sample subjected to various external boundary loads. Triaxial and biaxial borehole stability tests have been performed on densely welded Apache Leap tuff samples and Topopah Spring tuff samples. The nominal diameter of the test hole is 13.3 or 14.4 mm for triaxial testing, and 25.4 mm for biaxial testing. The borehole axis is parallel to one of the principal stress axes. The boreholes are drilled through the samples prior to applying external boundary loads. The boundary loads are progressively increased until breakouts occur or until the maximum load capacity of the loading system has been reached. 74 refs.

  15. Proton Stopping Power in Warm Dense Hydrogen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Higginson, Drew; Chen, Sophia; Atzeni, Stefano; Gauthier, Maxence; Mangia, Feliciana; Marquès, Jean-Raphaël; Riquier, Raphaël; Fuchs, Julien

    2013-10-01

    Warm dense matter (WDM) research is fundamental to many fields of physics including fusion sciences, and astrophysical phenomena. In the WDM regime, particle stopping-power differs significantly from cold matter and ideal plasma due to free electron contributions, plasma correlation effects and electron degeneracy. The creation of WDM with temporal duration consistent with the particles probes is difficult to achieve experimentally. The short-pulse laser platform allows for the production of WDM along with relatively short bunches of protons compatible of such measurements, however, until recently, the intrinsic broadband proton spectrum was not well suited to investigate the stopping power directly. This difficulty has been overcome using a novel magnetic particle selector (ΔE/E = 10%) to select protons (in the range 100-1000 keV) as demonstrated with the ELFIE laser in LULI, France. These protons bunches probe high-density (5 × 1020 cm-3) gases (H, He) heated by a nanosecond laser to reach estimated temperatures above 100 eV. Measurement of the proton energy loss within the heated gas allows the stopping power to be determined quantitatively. The experimental results in cold matter are compared to preexisting models to give credibility to the measurement technique. The results from heated matter show that the stopping power of 450 keV protons is dramatically reduced within heated hydrogen plasma.

  16. Order and instabilities in dense bacterial colonies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsimring, Lev

    2012-02-01

    The structure of cell colonies is governed by the interplay of many physical and biological factors, ranging from properties of surrounding media to cell-cell communication and gene expression in individual cells. The biomechanical interactions arising from the growth and division of individual cells in confined environments are ubiquitous, yet little work has focused on this fundamental aspect of colony formation. By combining experimental observations of growing monolayers of non-motile strain of bacteria Escherichia coli in a shallow microfluidic chemostat with discrete-element simulations and continuous theory, we demonstrate that expansion of a dense colony leads to rapid orientational alignment of rod-like cells. However, in larger colonies, anisotropic compression may lead to buckling instability which breaks perfect nematic order. Furthermore, we found that in shallow cavities feedback between cell growth and mobility in a confined environment leads to a novel cell streaming instability. Joint work with W. Mather, D. Volfson, O. Mondrag'on-Palomino, T. Danino, S. Cookson, and J. Hasty (UCSD) and D. Boyer, S. Orozco-Fuentes (UNAM, Mexico).

  17. Inference by replication in densely connected systems.

    PubMed

    Neirotti, Juan P; Saad, David

    2007-10-01

    An efficient Bayesian inference method for problems that can be mapped onto dense graphs is presented. The approach is based on message passing where messages are averaged over a large number of replicated variable systems exposed to the same evidential nodes. An assumption about the symmetry of the solutions is required for carrying out the averages; here we extend the previous derivation based on a replica-symmetric- (RS)-like structure to include a more complex one-step replica-symmetry-breaking-like (1RSB-like) ansatz. To demonstrate the potential of the approach it is employed for studying critical properties of the Ising linear perceptron and for multiuser detection in code division multiple access (CDMA) under different noise models. Results obtained under the RS assumption in the noncritical regime give rise to a highly efficient signal detection algorithm in the context of CDMA; while in the critical regime one observes a first-order transition line that ends in a continuous phase transition point. Finite size effects are also observed. While the 1RSB ansatz is not required for the original problems, it was applied to the CDMA signal detection problem with a more complex noise model that exhibits RSB behavior, resulting in an improvement in performance. PMID:17995074

  18. Understanding shape entropy through local dense packing.

    PubMed

    van Anders, Greg; Klotsa, Daphne; Ahmed, N Khalid; Engel, Michael; Glotzer, Sharon C

    2014-11-11

    Entropy drives the phase behavior of colloids ranging from dense suspensions of hard spheres or rods to dilute suspensions of hard spheres and depletants. Entropic ordering of anisotropic shapes into complex crystals, liquid crystals, and even quasicrystals was demonstrated recently in computer simulations and experiments. The ordering of shapes appears to arise from the emergence of directional entropic forces (DEFs) that align neighboring particles, but these forces have been neither rigorously defined nor quantified in generic systems. Here, we show quantitatively that shape drives the phase behavior of systems of anisotropic particles upon crowding through DEFs. We define DEFs in generic systems and compute them for several hard particle systems. We show they are on the order of a few times the thermal energy ([Formula: see text]) at the onset of ordering, placing DEFs on par with traditional depletion, van der Waals, and other intrinsic interactions. In experimental systems with these other interactions, we provide direct quantitative evidence that entropic effects of shape also contribute to self-assembly. We use DEFs to draw a distinction between self-assembly and packing behavior. We show that the mechanism that generates directional entropic forces is the maximization of entropy by optimizing local particle packing. We show that this mechanism occurs in a wide class of systems and we treat, in a unified way, the entropy-driven phase behavior of arbitrary shapes, incorporating the well-known works of Kirkwood, Onsager, and Asakura and Oosawa. PMID:25344532

  19. Droplet formation and scaling in dense suspensions

    PubMed Central

    Miskin, Marc Z.; Jaeger, Heinrich M.

    2012-01-01

    When a dense suspension is squeezed from a nozzle, droplet detachment can occur similar to that of pure liquids. While in pure liquids the process of droplet detachment is well characterized through self-similar profiles and known scaling laws, we show here the simple presence of particles causes suspensions to break up in a new fashion. Using high-speed imaging, we find that detachment of a suspension drop is described by a power law; specifically we find the neck minimum radius, rm, scales like near breakup at time τ = 0. We demonstrate data collapse in a variety of particle/liquid combinations, packing fractions, solvent viscosities, and initial conditions. We argue that this scaling is a consequence of particles deforming the neck surface, thereby creating a pressure that is balanced by inertia, and show how it emerges from topological constraints that relate particle configurations with macroscopic Gaussian curvature. This new type of scaling, uniquely enforced by geometry and regulated by the particles, displays memory of its initial conditions, fails to be self-similar, and has implications for the pressure given at generic suspension interfaces. PMID:22392979

  20. Activated Dynamics in Dense Model Nanocomposites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Shijie; Schweizer, Kenneth

    The nonlinear Langevin equation approach is applied to investigate the ensemble-averaged activated dynamics of small molecule liquids (or disconnected segments in a polymer melt) in dense nanocomposites under model isobaric conditions where the spherical nanoparticles are dynamically fixed. Fully thermalized and quenched-replica integral equation theory methods are employed to investigate the influence on matrix dynamics of the equilibrium and nonequilibrium nanocomposite structure, respectively. In equilibrium, the miscibility window can be narrow due to depletion and bridging attraction induced phase separation which limits the study of activated dynamics to regimes where the barriers are relatively low. In contrast, by using replica integral equation theory, macroscopic demixing is suppressed, and the addition of nanoparticles can induce much slower activated matrix dynamics which can be studied over a wide range of pure liquid alpha relaxation times, interfacial attraction strengths and ranges, particle sizes and loadings, and mixture microstructures. Numerical results for the mean activated relaxation time, transient localization length, matrix elasticity and kinetic vitrification in the nanocomposite will be presented.

  1. Kinetic Simulations of Dense Plasma Focus Breakdown

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmidt, A.; Higginson, D. P.; Jiang, S.; Link, A.; Povilus, A.; Sears, J.; Bennett, N.; Rose, D. V.; Welch, D. R.

    2015-11-01

    A dense plasma focus (DPF) device is a type of plasma gun that drives current through a set of coaxial electrodes to assemble gas inside the device and then implode that gas on axis to form a Z-pinch. This implosion drives hydrodynamic and kinetic instabilities that generate strong electric fields, which produces a short intense pulse of x-rays, high-energy (>100 keV) electrons and ions, and (in deuterium gas) neutrons. A strong factor in pinch performance is the initial breakdown and ionization of the gas along the insulator surface separating the two electrodes. The smoothness and isotropy of this ionized sheath are imprinted on the current sheath that travels along the electrodes, thus making it an important portion of the DPF to both understand and optimize. Here we use kinetic simulations in the Particle-in-cell code LSP to model the breakdown. Simulations are initiated with neutral gas and the breakdown modeled self-consistently as driven by a charged capacitor system. We also investigate novel geometries for the insulator and electrodes to attempt to control the electric field profile. The initial ionization fraction of gas is explored computationally to gauge possible advantages of pre-ionization which could be created experimentally via lasers or a glow-discharge. Prepared by LLNL under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  2. Dense Hypervelocity Plasma Jets for Fusion Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Witherspoon, F. Douglas; Thio, Y. C. Francis

    2005-10-01

    High velocity dense plasma jets are being developed for a variety of fusion applications, including refueling, disruption mitigation, High Energy Density Plasmas, magnetized target/magneto-inertial fusion, injection of angular momentum into centrifugally confined mirrors, and others. The technical goal is to accelerate plasma blobs of density >10^17 cm-3 and total mass >100 micrograms to velocities >200 km/s. The approach utilizes symmetrical injection of very high density plasma into a coaxial EM accelerator having a tailored cross-section that prevents formation of the blow-by instability. AFRL MACH2 modeling identified 2 electrode configurations that produce the desired plasma jet parameters. The injected plasma is generated by up to 64 radially oriented capillary discharges arranged uniformly around the circumference of an angled annular injection section. Initial experimental results are presented in which 8 capillaries are fired in parallel with jitter of ˜100 ns. Current focus is on higher voltage operation to reduce jitter to a few 10's of ns, and development of a suite of optical and spectroscopic plasma diagnostics.

  3. Thermochemistry of dense hydrous magnesium silicates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bose, Kunal; Burnley, Pamela; Navrotsky, Alexandra

    1994-01-01

    Recent experimental investigations under mantle conditions have identified a suite of dense hydrous magnesium silicate (DHMS) phases that could be conduits to transport water to at least the 660 km discontinuity via mature, relatively cold, subducting slabs. Water released from successive dehydration of these phases during subduction could be responsible for deep focus earthquakes, mantle metasomatism and a host of other physico-chemical processes central to our understanding of the earth's deep interior. In order to construct a thermodynamic data base that can delineate and predict the stability ranges for DHMS phases, reliable thermochemical and thermophysical data are required. One of the major obstacles in calorimetric studies of phases synthesized under high pressure conditions has been limitation due to the small (less than 5 mg) sample mass. Our refinement of calorimeter techniques now allow precise determination of enthalpies of solution of less than 5 mg samples of hydrous magnesium silicates. For example, high temperature solution calorimetry of natural talc (Mg(0.99) Fe(0.01)Si4O10(OH)2), periclase (MgO) and quartz (SiO2) yield enthalpies of drop solution at 1044 K to be 592.2 (2.2), 52.01 (0.12) and 45.76 (0.4) kJ/mol respectively. The corresponding enthalpy of formation from oxides at 298 K for talc is minus 5908.2 kJ/mol agreeing within 0.1 percent to literature values.

  4. Superconductivity in dense carbon-based materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Siyu; Liu, Hanyu; Naumov, Ivan I.; Meng, Sheng; Li, Yinwei; Tse, John S.; Yang, Bai; Hemley, Russell J.

    2016-03-01

    Guided by a simple strategy in search of new superconducting materials, we predict that high-temperature superconductivity can be realized in classes of high-density materials having strong sp3 chemical bonding and high lattice symmetry. We examine in detail sodalite carbon frameworks doped with simple metals such as Li, Na, and Al. Though such materials share some common features with doped diamond, their doping level is not limited, and the density of states at the Fermi level in them can be as high as that in the renowned Mg B2 . Together with other factors, this boosts the superconducting temperature (Tc) in the materials investigated to higher levels compared to doped diamond. For example, the Tc of sodalitelike Na C6 is predicted to be above 100 K. This phase and a series of other sodalite-based superconductors are predicted to be metastable phases but are dynamically stable. Owing to the rigid carbon framework of these and related dense carbon materials, these doped sodalite-based structures could be recoverable as potentially useful superconductors.

  5. Elemental nitrogen partitioning in dense interstellar clouds

    PubMed Central

    Daranlot, Julien; Hincelin, Ugo; Bergeat, Astrid; Costes, Michel; Loison, Jean-Christophe; Wakelam, Valentine; Hickson, Kevin M.

    2012-01-01

    Many chemical models of dense interstellar clouds predict that the majority of gas-phase elemental nitrogen should be present as N2, with an abundance approximately five orders of magnitude less than that of hydrogen. As a homonuclear diatomic molecule, N2 is difficult to detect spectroscopically through infrared or millimeter-wavelength transitions. Therefore, its abundance is often inferred indirectly through its reaction product N2H+. Two main formation mechanisms, each involving two radical-radical reactions, are the source of N2 in such environments. Here we report measurements of the low temperature rate constants for one of these processes, the N + CN reaction, down to 56 K. The measured rate constants for this reaction, and those recently determined for two other reactions implicated in N2 formation, are tested using a gas-grain model employing a critically evaluated chemical network. We show that the amount of interstellar nitrogen present as N2 depends on the competition between its gas-phase formation and the depletion of atomic nitrogen onto grains. As the reactions controlling N2 formation are inefficient, we argue that N2 does not represent the main reservoir species for interstellar nitrogen. Instead, elevated abundances of more labile forms of nitrogen such as NH3 should be present on interstellar ices, promoting the eventual formation of nitrogen-bearing organic molecules. PMID:22689957

  6. Inference by replication in densely connected systems

    SciTech Connect

    Neirotti, Juan P.; Saad, David

    2007-10-15

    An efficient Bayesian inference method for problems that can be mapped onto dense graphs is presented. The approach is based on message passing where messages are averaged over a large number of replicated variable systems exposed to the same evidential nodes. An assumption about the symmetry of the solutions is required for carrying out the averages; here we extend the previous derivation based on a replica-symmetric- (RS)-like structure to include a more complex one-step replica-symmetry-breaking-like (1RSB-like) ansatz. To demonstrate the potential of the approach it is employed for studying critical properties of the Ising linear perceptron and for multiuser detection in code division multiple access (CDMA) under different noise models. Results obtained under the RS assumption in the noncritical regime give rise to a highly efficient signal detection algorithm in the context of CDMA; while in the critical regime one observes a first-order transition line that ends in a continuous phase transition point. Finite size effects are also observed. While the 1RSB ansatz is not required for the original problems, it was applied to the CDMA signal detection problem with a more complex noise model that exhibits RSB behavior, resulting in an improvement in performance.

  7. Neutrino ground state in a dense star

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kiers, Ken; Tytgat, Michel H. G.

    1998-05-01

    It has recently been argued that long range forces due to the exchange of massless neutrinos give rise to a very large self-energy in a dense, finite-ranged, weakly charged medium. Such an effect, if real, would destabilize a neutron star. To address this issue we have studied the related problem of a massless neutrino field in the presence of an external, static electroweak potential of finite range. To be precise, we have computed to one loop the exact vacuum energy for the case of a spherical square well potential of depth α and radius R. For small wells, the vacuum energy is reliably determined by a perturbative expansion in the external potential. For large wells, however, the perturbative expansion breaks down. A manifestation of this breakdown is that the vacuum carries a non-zero neutrino charge. The energy and neutrino charge of the ground state are, to a good approximation for large wells, those of a neutrino condensate with chemical potential μ=α. Our results demonstrate explicitly that long-range forces due to the exchange of massless neutrinos do not threaten the stability of neutron stars.

  8. Bicontinuous Fluid Structure with Low Cohesive Energy: Molecular Basis for Exceptionally Low Interfacial Tension of Complex Coacervate Fluids.

    PubMed

    Huang, Kuo-Ying; Yoo, Hee Young; Jho, YongSeok; Han, Songi; Hwang, Dong Soo

    2016-05-24

    An exceptionally low interfacial tension of a dense fluid of concentrated polyelectrolyte complexes, phase-separated from a biphasic fluid known as complex coacervates, represents a unique and highly sought-after materials property that inspires novel applications from superior coating to wet adhesion. Despite extensive studies and broad interest, the molecular and structural bases for the unique properties of complex coacervates are unclear. Here, a microphase-separated complex coacervate fluid generated by mixing a recombinant mussel foot protein-1 (mfp-1) as the polycation and hyaluronic acid (HA) as the polyanion at stoichiometric ratios was macroscopically phase-separated into a dense complex coacervate and a dilute supernatant phase to enable separate characterization of the two fluid phases. Surprisingly, despite up to 4 orders of magnitude differing density of the polyelectrolytes, the diffusivity of water in these two phases was found to be indistinguishable. The presence of unbound, bulk-like, water in the dense fluid can be reconciled with a water population that is only weakly perturbed by the polyelectrolyte interface and network. This hypothesis was experimentally validated by cryo-TEM of the macroscopically phase-separated dense complex coacervate phase that was found to be a bicontinuous and biphasic nanostructured network, in which one of the phases was confirmed by staining techniques to be water and the other polyelectrolyte complexes. We conclude that a weak cohesive energy between water-water and water-polyelectrolytes manifests itself in a bicontinuous network, and is responsible for the exceptionally low interfacial energy of this complex fluid phase with respect to virtually any surface within an aqueous medium. PMID:27152954

  9. Frontiers the Physics of Dense Matter for Neutron Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steiner, Andrew W.

    2016-04-01

    Neutron stars are an excellent laboratory for nuclear physics. They probe the nucleon-nucleon interaction, the structure of nuclei, and the nature of dense QCD in ways which complement current experimental efforts. This article very briefly summarizes some of the current frontiers in neutron stars and dense matter with an emphasis on how our understanding might be improved in the near future.

  10. The chemistry of phosphorus in dense interstellar clouds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thorne, L. R.; Anicich, V. G.; Prasad, S. S.; Huntress, W. T., Jr.

    1984-01-01

    Laboratory experiments show that the ion-molecule chemistry of phosphorus is significantly different from that of nitrogen in dense interstellar clouds. The PH3 molecule is not readily formed by gas-phase, ion-molecule reactions in these regions. Laboratory results used in a simple kinetic model indicate that the most abundant molecule containing phosphorus in dense clouds is PO.

  11. Propagation of neutrinos in hot and dense media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masood, Samina

    2016-03-01

    We study the propagation of neutrinos in hot and dense media of stellar systems as well as in the very early universe. Our emphasis is on the study of the basic properties of neutrinos with tiny mass and their interactions with the hot and dense media. We also discuss the relevance of our results to astrophysics and cosmology.

  12. Mining connected global and local dense subgraphs for bigdata

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Bo; Shen, Haiying

    2016-01-01

    The problem of discovering connected dense subgraphs of natural graphs is important in data analysis. Discovering dense subgraphs that do not contain denser subgraphs or are not contained in denser subgraphs (called significant dense subgraphs) is also critical for wide-ranging applications. In spite of many works on discovering dense subgraphs, there are no algorithms that can guarantee the connectivity of the returned subgraphs or discover significant dense subgraphs. Hence, in this paper, we define two subgraph discovery problems to discover connected and significant dense subgraphs, propose polynomial-time algorithms and theoretically prove their validity. We also propose an algorithm to further improve the time and space efficiency of our basic algorithm for discovering significant dense subgraphs in big data by taking advantage of the unique features of large natural graphs. In the experiments, we use massive natural graphs to evaluate our algorithms in comparison with previous algorithms. The experimental results show the effectiveness of our algorithms for the two problems and their efficiency. This work is also the first that reveals the physical significance of significant dense subgraphs in natural graphs from different domains.

  13. Dense fibrillar collagen is a master activator of invadopodia

    PubMed Central

    Artym, Vira V.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Tumor stroma is characterized by abnormal accumulation of dense fibrillar collagen, which promotes tumor progression and metastasis. However, the effect of desmoplastic collagen on cells has been unclear. Our recent findings demonstrate that dense fibrillar collagen activates a novel phosphosignaling mechanism for robust induction of invadopodia in tumor cells and normal fibroblasts. PMID:27314068

  14. A New Unsteady Model for Dense Cloud Cavitation in Cryogenic Fluids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hosangadi, Ashvin; Ahuja, Vineet

    2005-01-01

    Contents include the following: Background on thermal effects in cavitation. Physical properties of hydrogen. Multi-phase cavitation with thermal effect. Solution procedure. Cavitation model overview. Cavitation source terms. New cavitation model. Source term for bubble growth. One equation les model. Unsteady ogive simulations: liquid nitrogen. Unsteady incompressible flow in a pipe. Time averaged cavity length for NACA15 flowfield.

  15. Coal-fluid properties with an emphasis on dense phase. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Klinzing, G.E.

    1985-04-01

    Many fossil fuel energy processes depend on the movement of solids by pneumatic transport. Despite the considerable amount of work reported in the literature on pneumatic transport, the design of new industrial systems for new products continues to rely to a great extent on empiricism. A pilot-scale test facility has been constructed at Pittsburgh Energy Technology Center (PETC), equipped with modern sophisticated measuring techniques (such as Pressure Transducers, Auburn Monitors and Micro Motion Mass Flow Meters) and an automatic computer-controlled data acquisition system to study the effects of particle pneumatic transport. Pittsburgh Seam and Montana Rosebud coals of varying size consist and moisture content were tested in the atmospheric and pressurized coal flow test loops (AP/CFTL and HP/CFTL) at PETC. The system parameters included conveying gas velocity, injector tank pressure, screw conveyor speed, pipe radius and pipe bends. In this report, results from the coal flow tests were presented and analyzed. Existing theories and correlations on two phase flows were reviewed. Experimental data were compared with values calculated from empirically or theoretically derived equations available in the literature and new correlations were proposed, when applicable, to give a better interpretation of the data and a better understanding of the various flow regimes involved in pneumatic transport. 55 refs., 56 figs., 6 tabs.

  16. Brazil-nut effect versus reverse Brazil-nut effect in a moderately dense granular fluid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garzó, Vicente

    2008-08-01

    A segregation criterion based on the inelastic Enskog kinetic equation is derived to show the transition between the Brazil-nut effect (BNE) and the reverse Brazil-nut effect (RBNE) by varying the different parameters of the system. In contrast to previous theoretical attempts, the approach is not limited to the near-elastic case, takes into account the influence of both thermal gradients and gravity, and applies for moderate densities. The form of the phase diagrams for the BNE-RBNE transition depends sensitively on the value of gravity relative to the thermal gradient, so that it is possible to switch between both states for given values of the mass and size ratios, the coefficients of restitution, and the solid volume fraction. In particular, the influence of collisional dissipation on segregation becomes more important when the thermal gradient dominates over gravity than in the opposite limit. The present analysis extends previous results derived in the dilute limit case and is consistent with the findings of some recent experimental results.

  17. Two Rab2 interactors regulate dense-core vesicle maturation.

    PubMed

    Ailion, Michael; Hannemann, Mandy; Dalton, Susan; Pappas, Andrea; Watanabe, Shigeki; Hegermann, Jan; Liu, Qiang; Han, Hsiao-Fen; Gu, Mingyu; Goulding, Morgan Q; Sasidharan, Nikhil; Schuske, Kim; Hullett, Patrick; Eimer, Stefan; Jorgensen, Erik M

    2014-04-01

    Peptide neuromodulators are released from a unique organelle: the dense-core vesicle. Dense-core vesicles are generated at the trans-Golgi and then sort cargo during maturation before being secreted. To identify proteins that act in this pathway, we performed a genetic screen in Caenorhabditis elegans for mutants defective in dense-core vesicle function. We identified two conserved Rab2-binding proteins: RUND-1, a RUN domain protein, and CCCP-1, a coiled-coil protein. RUND-1 and CCCP-1 colocalize with RAB-2 at the Golgi, and rab-2, rund-1, and cccp-1 mutants have similar defects in sorting soluble and transmembrane dense-core vesicle cargos. RUND-1 also interacts with the Rab2 GAP protein TBC-8 and the BAR domain protein RIC-19, a RAB-2 effector. In summary, a pathway of conserved proteins controls the maturation of dense-core vesicles at the trans-Golgi network. PMID:24698274

  18. ISCFD Nagoya 1989 - International Symposium on Computational Fluid Dynamics, 3rd, Nagoya, Japan, Aug. 28-31, 1989, Technical Papers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Recent advances in computational fluid dynamics are discussed in reviews and reports. Topics addressed include large-scale LESs for turbulent pipe and channel flows, numerical solutions of the Euler and Navier-Stokes equations on parallel computers, multigrid methods for steady high-Reynolds-number flow past sudden expansions, finite-volume methods on unstructured grids, supersonic wake flow on a blunt body, a grid-characteristic method for multidimensional gas dynamics, and CIC numerical simulation of a wave boundary layer. Consideration is given to vortex simulations of confined two-dimensional jets, supersonic viscous shear layers, spectral methods for compressible flows, shock-wave refraction at air/water interfaces, oscillatory flow in a two-dimensional collapsible channel, the growth of randomness in a spatially developing wake, and an efficient simplex algorithm for the finite-difference and dynamic linear-programming method in optimal potential control.

  19. Dust charging in the dense Enceladus torus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yaroshenko, Victoria; Lühr, Hermann; Morfill, Gregor

    2013-04-01

    The key parameter of the dust-plasma interactions is the charge carried by a dust particle. The grain electrostatic potential is usually calculated from the so called orbit-motion limited (OML) model [1]. It is valid for a single particle immersed into collisionless plasmas with Maxwellian electron and ion distributions. Apparently, such a parameter regime cannot be directly applied to the conditions relevant for the Enceladus dense neutral torus and plume, where the plasma is multispecies and multistreaming, the dust density is high, sometimes even exceeding the plasma number density. We have examined several new factors which can significantly affect the grain charging in the dust loaded plasma of the Enceladus torus and in the plume region and which, to our knowledge, have not been investigated up to now for such plasma environments. These include: (a) influence of the multispecies plasma composition, namely the presence of two electron populations with electron temperatures ranging from a few eV up to a hundred eV [2], a few ion species (e.g. corotating water group ions, and protons, characterized by different kinetic temperatures), as well as cold nonthermalized new-born water group ions which move with Kepler velocity [3]; (b) effect of the ion-neutral collisions on the dust charging in the dense Enceladus torus and in the plume; (c) effect of high dust density, when a grain cannot be considered as an isolated particle any more (especially relevant for the plume region, where the average negative dust charge density according to Cassini measurements is of the order or even exceeds the plasma number density [4,5]). It turns out that in this case, the electrostatic potential and respective dust charge cannot be deduced from the initial OML formalism and there is a need to incorporate the effect of dust density into plasma fluxes flowing to the grain surface to calculate the grain equilibrium charge; (e) since the dust in the planetary rings comes in a wide

  20. SUPPORTED DENSE CERAMIC MEMBRANES FOR OXYGEN SEPARATION

    SciTech Connect

    Timothy L. Ward

    2003-03-01

    This project addresses the need for reliable fabrication methods of supported thin/thick dense ceramic membranes for oxygen separation. Some ceramic materials that possess mixed conductivity (electronic and ionic) at high temperature have the potential to permeate oxygen with perfect selectivity, making them very attractive for oxygen separation and membrane reactor applications. In order to maximize permeation rates at the lowest possible temperatures, it is desirable to minimize diffusional limitations within the ceramic by reducing the thickness of the ceramic membrane, preferably to thicknesses of 10 {micro}m or thinner. It has proven to be very challenging to reliably fabricate dense, defect-free ceramic membrane layers of such thickness. In this project we are investigating the use of ultrafine SrCo{sub 0.5}FeO{sub x} (SCFO) powders produced by aerosol pyrolysis to fabricate such supported membranes. SrCo{sub 0.5}FeO{sub x} is a ceramic composition that has been shown to have desirable oxygen permeability, as well as good chemical stability in the reducing environments that are encountered in some important applications. Our approach is to use a doctor blade procedure to deposit pastes prepared from the aerosol-derived SCFO powders onto porous SCFO supports. We have previously shown that membrane layers deposited from the aerosol powders can be sintered to high density without densification of the underlying support. However, these membrane layers contained large-scale cracks and open areas, making them unacceptable for membrane purposes. In the past year, we have refined the paste formulations based on guidance from the ceramic tape casting literature. We have identified a multicomponent organic formulation utilizing castor oil as dispersant in a solvent of mineral spirits and isopropanol. Other additives were polyvinylbutyral as binder and dibutylphthalate as plasticizer. The nonaqueous formulation has superior wetting properties with the powder, and

  1. Polarimetric active imaging in dense fog

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bernier, Robert; Cao, Xiaoying; Tremblay, Grégoire; Roy, Gilles

    2015-10-01

    Operation under degraded visual environment (DVE) presents important strategic advantages. 3D mapping has been performed under DVE and good quality images have been obtained through DVE with active imaging systems. In these applications, the presence of fog clouds degrades the quality of the remotely sensed signal or even renders the operation totally impossible. In view of making the active imaging method more robust against dense fog, the use of polarimetry is herein studied. Spherical particles typical of fog do not depolarize incident polarized light in the backscattering (180°) direction. So, in principle, there should be less dazzling caused by aerosols for active imaging systems operating using the secondary polarization. However, strong depolarization still occurs at angles close to 180°. The greater the ratio of size to wavelength, the closer to 180° will the depolarization occur. When the cloud optical depth is small, the major scattering events seen by an active camera are the single backscattering events. However, when the optical depth of the cloud is higher than 1, multiple scattering becomes more important and causes depolarization due to the backscattering around 180°. The physics of this process will be discussed. Experimental results supporting the analysis will be presented. Those experimental results were obtained under controlled environment using the DRDC-Valcartier aerosol chamber. The experimental method herein proposed is based upon the use of ICCD range gated cameras wherein gate width and gate location may be varied on the fly. The optimal conditions for the use of these devices in view of obtaining the best image contrast are experimentally studied and reported in this paper.

  2. Dense Molecular Cores Being Externally Heated

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Gwanjeong; Lee, Chang Won; Gopinathan, Maheswar; Jeong, Woong-Seob; Kim, Mi-Ryang

    2016-06-01

    We present results of our study of eight dense cores, previously classified as starless, using infrared (3–160 μm) imaging observations with the AKARI telescope and molecular line (HCN and N2H+) mapping observations with the KVN telescope. Combining our results with the archival IR to millimeter continuum data, we examined the starless nature of these eight cores. Two of the eight cores are found to harbor faint protostars having luminosities of ∼0.3–4.4 L ⊙. The other six cores are found to remain starless and probably are in a dynamically transitional state. The temperature maps produced using multi-wavelength images show an enhancement of about 3–6 K toward the outer boundary of these cores, suggesting that they are most likely being heated externally by nearby stars and/or interstellar radiation fields. Large virial parameters and an overdominance of red asymmetric line profiles over the cores may indicate that the cores are set into either an expansion or an oscillatory motion, probably due to the external heating. Most of the starless cores show a coreshine effect due to the scattering of light by the micron-sized dust grains. This may imply that the age of the cores is of the order of ∼105 years, which is consistent with the timescale required for the cores to evolve into an oscillatory stage due to external perturbation. Our observational results support the idea that the external feedback from nearby stars and/or interstellar radiation fields may play an important role in the dynamical evolution of the cores.

  3. The chemistry of dense interstellar clouds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Irvine, W. M.

    1991-01-01

    The basic theme of this program is the study of molecular complexity and evolution in interstellar and circumstellar clouds incorporating the biogenic elements. Recent results include the identification of a new astronomical carbon-chain molecule, C4Si. This species was detected in the envelope expelled from the evolved star IRC+10216 in observations at the Nobeyama Radio Observatory in Japan. C4Si is the carrier of six unidentified lines which had previously been observed. This detection reveals the existence of a new series of carbon-chain molecules, C sub n Si (n equals 1, 2, 4). Such molecules may well be formed from the reaction of Si(+) with acetylene and acetylene derivatives. Other recent research has concentrated on the chemical composition of the cold, dark interstellar clouds, the nearest dense molecular clouds to the solar system. Such regions have very low kinetic temperatures, on the order of 10 K, and are known to be formation sites for solar-type stars. We have recently identified for the first time in such regions the species of H2S, NO, HCOOH (formic acid). The H2S abundance appears to exceed that predicted by gas-phase models of ion-molecule chemistry, perhaps suggesting the importance of synthesis on grain surfaces. Additional observations in dark clouds have studied the ratio of ortho- to para-thioformaldehyde. Since this ratio is expected to be unaffected by both radiative and ordinary collisional processes in the cloud, it may well reflect the formation conditions for this molecule. The ratio is observed to depart from that expected under conditions of chemical equilibrium at formation, perhaps reflecting efficient interchange between cold dust grains in the gas phase.

  4. Model For Dense Molecular Cloud Cores

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Doty, Steven D.; Neufeld, David A.

    1997-01-01

    We present a detailed theoretical model for the thermal balance, chemistry, and radiative transfer within quiescent dense molecular cloud cores that contain a central protostar. In the interior of such cores, we expect the dust and gas temperatures to be well coupled, while in the outer regions CO rotational emissions dominate the gas cooling and the predicted gas temperature lies significantly below the dust temperature. Large spatial variations in the gas temperature are expected to affect the gas phase chemistry dramatically; in particular, the predicted water abundance varies by more than a factor of 1000 within cloud cores that contain luminous protostars. Based upon our predictions for the thermal and chemical structure of cloud cores, we have constructed self-consistent radiative transfer models to compute the line strengths and line profiles for transitions of (12)CO, (13)CO, C(18)O, ortho- and para-H2(16)O, ortho- and para-H2(18)O, and O I. We carried out a general parameter study to determine the dependence of the model predictions upon the parameters assumed for the source. We expect many of the far-infrared and submillimeter rotational transitions of water to be detectable either in emission or absorption with the use of the Infrared Space Observatory (ISO) and the Submillimeter Wave Astronomy Satellite. Quiescent, radiatively heated hot cores are expected to show low-gain maser emission in the 183 GHz 3(sub 13)-2(sub 20) water line, such as has been observed toward several hot core regions using ground-based telescopes. We predict the (3)P(sub l) - (3)P(sub 2) fine-structure transition of atomic oxygen near 63 micron to be in strong absorption against the continuum for many sources. Our model can also account successfully for recent ISO observations of absorption in rovibrational transitions of water toward the source AFGL 2591.

  5. Fluid mechanics in fluids at rest.

    PubMed

    Brenner, Howard

    2012-07-01

    Using readily available experimental thermophoretic particle-velocity data it is shown, contrary to current teachings, that for the case of compressible flows independent dye- and particle-tracer velocity measurements of the local fluid velocity at a point in a flowing fluid do not generally result in the same fluid velocity measure. Rather, tracer-velocity equality holds only for incompressible flows. For compressible fluids, each type of tracer is shown to monitor a fundamentally different fluid velocity, with (i) a dye (or any other such molecular-tagging scheme) measuring the fluid's mass velocity v appearing in the continuity equation and (ii) a small, physicochemically and thermally inert, macroscopic (i.e., non-Brownian), solid particle measuring the fluid's volume velocity v(v). The term "compressibility" as used here includes not only pressure effects on density, but also temperature effects thereon. (For example, owing to a liquid's generally nonzero isobaric coefficient of thermal expansion, nonisothermal liquid flows are to be regarded as compressible despite the general perception of liquids as being incompressible.) Recognition of the fact that two independent fluid velocities, mass- and volume-based, are formally required to model continuum fluid behavior impacts on the foundations of contemporary (monovelocity) fluid mechanics. Included therein are the Navier-Stokes-Fourier equations, which are now seen to apply only to incompressible fluids (a fact well-known, empirically, to experimental gas kineticists). The findings of a difference in tracer velocities heralds the introduction into fluid mechanics of a general bipartite theory of fluid mechanics, bivelocity hydrodynamics [Brenner, Int. J. Eng. Sci. 54, 67 (2012)], differing from conventional hydrodynamics in situations entailing compressible flows and reducing to conventional hydrodynamics when the flow is incompressible, while being applicable to both liquids and gases. PMID:23005525

  6. Fluid transport container

    DOEpatents

    DeRoos, Bradley G.; Downing, Jr., John P.; Neal, Michael P.

    1995-01-01

    An improved fluid container for the transport, collection, and dispensing of a sample fluid that maintains the fluid integrity relative to the conditions of the location at which it is taken. More specifically, the invention is a fluid sample transport container that utilizes a fitment for both penetrating and sealing a storage container under controlled conditions. Additionally, the invention allows for the periodic withdrawal of portions of the sample fluid without contamination or intermixing from the environment surrounding the sample container.

  7. Fluid transport container

    DOEpatents

    DeRoos, B.G.; Downing, J.P. Jr.; Neal, M.P.

    1995-11-14

    An improved fluid container for the transport, collection, and dispensing of a sample fluid that maintains the fluid integrity relative to the conditions of the location at which it is taken. More specifically, the invention is a fluid sample transport container that utilizes a fitting for both penetrating and sealing a storage container under controlled conditions. Additionally, the invention allows for the periodic withdrawal of portions of the sample fluid without contamination or intermixing from the environment surrounding the sample container. 13 figs.

  8. Stone heterogeneity index as the standard deviation of Hounsfield units: A novel predictor for shock-wave lithotripsy outcomes in ureter calculi

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Joo Yong; Kim, Jae Heon; Kang, Dong Hyuk; Chung, Doo Yong; Lee, Dae Hun; Do Jung, Hae; Kwon, Jong Kyou; Cho, Kang Su

    2016-01-01

    We investigated whether stone heterogeneity index (SHI), which a proxy of such variations, was defined as the standard deviation of a Hounsfield unit (HU) on non-contrast computed tomography (NCCT), can be a novel predictor for shock-wave lithotripsy (SWL) outcomes in patients with ureteral stones. Medical records were obtained from the consecutive database of 1,519 patients who underwent the first session of SWL for urinary stones between 2005 and 2013. Ultimately, 604 patients with radiopaque ureteral stones were eligible for this study. Stone related variables including stone size, mean stone density (MSD), skin-to-stone distance, and SHI were obtained on NCCT. Patients were classified into the low and high SHI groups using mean SHI and compared. One-session success rate in the high SHI group was better than in the low SHI group (74.3% vs. 63.9%, P = 0.008). Multivariate logistic regression analyses revealed that smaller stone size (OR 0.889, 95% CI: 0.841–0.937, P < 0.001), lower MSD (OR 0.995, 95% CI: 0.994–0.996, P < 0.001), and higher SHI (OR 1.011, 95% CI: 1.008–1.014, P < 0.001) were independent predictors of one-session success. The radiologic heterogeneity of urinary stones or SHI was an independent predictor for SWL success in patients with ureteral calculi and a useful clinical parameter for stone fragility. PMID:27035621

  9. Insights in the laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy signal generation underwater using dual pulse excitation — Part I: Vapor bubble, shockwaves and plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lazic, V.; Laserna, J. J.; Jovicevic, S.

    2013-04-01

    Plasma and vapor bubble formation and evolution after a nanosecond laser pulse delivered to aluminum targets inside water were studied by fast photography. This technique was also applied to monitor the plasma produced by a second laser pulse and for different interpulse delays. The bubble growth was evident only after 3 μs from the first laser pulse and the bubble shape changed during expansion and collapse cycles. The evolution and propagation of the initial shockwave and its reflections both from the back sample surface and cell walls were detected by Schlieren photography. The primary plasma develops in two phases: violent particle expulsion and ionization during the first μs, followed by slow plasma growth from the ablation crater into the evolving vapor bubble. The shape of the secondary plasma strongly depends on the inner bubble pressure whereas the particle expulsion into the expanded bubble is much less evident. Both the primary and secondary plasma have similar duration of about 30 μs. Detection efficiency of the secondary plasma is much reduced by light refraction at the curved bubble-water interface, which behaves as a negative lens; this leads to an apparent reduction of the plasma dimensions. Defocusing power of the bubble lens increases with its expansion due to the lowering of the vapor's refraction index with respect to that of the surrounding liquid (Lazic et al., 2012 [1]). Smell's reflections of secondary plasma radiation at the expanded bubble wall redistribute the detected intensity on a wavelength-dependent way and allow gathering of the emission also from the external plasma layer that otherwise, would not enter into the optical system.

  10. Dynamics and evolution of dense stellar systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fregeau, John M.

    2004-10-01

    The research presented in this thesis comprises a theoretical study of several aspects relating to the dynamics and evolution of dense stellar systems such as globular clusters. First, I present the results of a study of mass segregation in two-component star clusters, based on a large number of numerical N-body simulations using our Monte-Carlo code. Heavy objects, which could represent stellar remnants such as neutron stars or black holes, exhibit behavior that is in quantitative agreement with simple analytical arguments. Light objects, which could represent free-floating planets or brown dwarfs, are predominantly lost from the cluster, as expected from simple analytical arguments, but may remain in the halo in larger numbers than expected. Using a recent null detection of planetary-mass microlensing events in M22, I find an upper limit of ˜25% at the 63% confidence level for the current mass fraction of M22 in the form of very low-mass objects. Turning to more realistic clusters, I present a study of the evolution of clusters containing primordial binaries, based on an enhanced version of the Monte-Carlo code that treats binary interactions via cross sections and analytical prescriptions. All models exhibit a long-lived “binary burning” phase lasting many tens of relaxation times. The structural parameters of the models during this phase match well those of most observed Galactic globular clusters. At the end of this phase, clusters that have survived tidal disruption undergo deep core collapse, followed by gravothermal oscillations. The results clearly show that the presence of even a small fraction of binaries in a cluster is sufficient to support the core against collapse significantly beyond the normal core collapse time predicted without the presence of binaries. For tidally truncated systems, collapse is delayed sufficiently that the cluster will undergo complete tidal disruption before core collapse. Moving a step beyond analytical prescriptions, I

  11. Measuring Wind Ventilation of Dense Surface Snow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drake, S. A.; Huwald, H.; Selker, J. S.; Higgins, C. W.; Lehning, M.; Thomas, C. K.

    2014-12-01

    Wind ventilation enhances exposure of suspended, canopy-captured and corniced snow to subsaturated air and can significantly increase sublimation rate. Although sublimation rate may be high for highly ventilated snow this snow regime represents a small fraction snow that resides in a basin potentially minimizing its influence on snow mass balance. In contrast, the vast majority of a seasonal snowpack typically resides as poorly ventilated surface snow. The sublimation rate of surface snow is often locally so small as to defy direct measurement but regionally pervasive enough that the integrated mass loss of frozen water across a basin may be significant on a seasonal basis. In a warming climate, sublimation rate increases even in subfreezing conditions because the equilibrium water vapor pressure over ice increases exponentially with temperature. To better understand the process of wintertime surface snow sublimation we need to quantify the depth to which turbulent and topographically driven pressure perturbations effect air exchange within the snowpack. Hypothetically, this active layer depth increases the effective ventilated snow surface area, enhancing sublimation above that given by a plane, impermeable snow surface. We designed and performed a novel set of field experiments at two sites in the Oregon Cascades during the 2014 winter season to examine the spectral attenuation of pressure perturbations with depth for dense snow as a function of turbulence intensity and snow permeability. We mounted a Campbell Scientific Irgason Integrated CO2 and H2O Open Path Gas Analyzer and 3-D Sonic Anemometer one meter above the snow to capture mean and turbulent wind forcing and placed outlets of four high precision ParoScientific 216B-102 pressure transducers at different depths to measure the depth-dependent pressure response to wind forcing. A GPS antenna captured data acquisition time with sufficient precision to synchronize a Campbell Scientific CR-3000 acquiring

  12. SUPPORTED DENSE CERAMIC MEMBRANES FOR OXYGEN SEPARATION

    SciTech Connect

    Timothy L. Ward

    2000-06-30

    . This successfully reduced cracking, however the films retained open porosity. The investigation of this concept will be continued in the final year of the project. Investigation of a metal organic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD) method for defect mending in dense membranes was also initiated. An appropriate metal organic precursor (iron tetramethylheptanedionate) was identified whose deposition can be controlled by access to oxygen at temperatures in the 280-300 C range. Initial experiments have deposited iron oxide, but only on the membrane surface; thus refinement of this method will continue.

  13. Unified inference for sparse and dense longitudinal models.

    PubMed

    Kim, Seonjin; Zhao, Zhibiao

    2013-03-01

    In longitudinal data analysis, statistical inference for sparse data and dense data could be substantially different. For kernel smoothing estimate of the mean function, the convergence rates and limiting variance functions are different under the two scenarios. The latter phenomenon poses challenges for statistical inference as a subjective choice between the sparse and dense cases may lead to wrong conclusions. We develop self-normalization based methods that can adapt to the sparse and dense cases in a unified framework. Simulations show that the proposed methods outperform some existing methods. PMID:24966413

  14. Velocity fluctuations in dense granular flows.

    PubMed

    Drozd, John J; Denniston, Colin

    2008-10-01

    We use simulations to investigate velocity fluctuations in dry granular flow. Our system is comprised of mono- and polydisperse sets of spherical grains falling down a vertical chute under the influence of gravity. We find three different classes of velocity distributions depending on factors such as the local density. The class of the velocity distribution depends on whether the grains are in a free-fall, fluid, or glassy state. The analytic form of the distributions match those that have been found by other authors in fairly diverse systems. Here, we have all three present in a single system in steady state. Power-law tails that match recent experiments are also found but in a transition area suggesting they may be an artifact of crossover from one class of velocity distribution to another. We find evidence that the transition from one class to another may correspond to a second order dynamical phase transition in the limit that the vertical flow speed goes to zero. PMID:18999415

  15. Size segregation in dense, dry, inclined flows of binary granular mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Larcher, Michele; Jenkins, James T.

    2013-04-01

    the simulation are not so small, we expect qualitative, rather than quantitative, agreement. A more complicated segregation theory is expected to provide improved results, but at the cost of the loss of transparency the present theory provides. References: 1. J. M. N. T. Gray & C. Ancey, "Multi-component particle-size segregation in shallow granular avalanches," J. Fluid Mech. 678, 535-588 (2011). 2. V. Garzo & J. W. Dufty, "Dense fluid transport for inelastic hard spheres," Phys. Rev. E 59, 5895-5911 (1999). 3. J. T. Jenkins & D. Berzi, "Dense inclined flows of inelastic spheres: Tests of an extension of kinetic theory," Gran. Mat. 12, 151-158 (2010). 4. J. T. Jenkins, J. T. & C. Zhang, "Kinetic theory for identical, frictional, nearly elastic spheres", Phys. Fluids 14, 12281235 (2002). 5. B. Ö. Arnarson & J. T. Jenkins, "Binary mixtures of inelastic spheres: simplified constitutive theory," Phys. Fluids 16, 4543-4550 (2004). 6. A.Tripathi & D. V. Khakhar, "Rheology of binary mixtures in the dense flow regime," Phys. Fluids 23, 113302 (2011).

  16. Neutrino spin dynamics in dense matter and electromagnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arbuzova, E. V.; Lobanov, A. E.; Murchikova, E. M.

    2009-01-01

    A complete set of solutions to the Dirac-Pauli equation is derived for a massive neutrino that interacts with dense matter and a strong electromagnetic field. It is shown that these solutions may describe neutrino spin precession.

  17. Ion-ion dynamic structure factor of warm dense mixtures.

    PubMed

    Gill, N M; Heinonen, R A; Starrett, C E; Saumon, D

    2015-06-01

    The ion-ion dynamic structure factor of warm dense matter is determined using the recently developed pseudoatom molecular dynamics method [Starrett et al., Phys. Rev. E 91, 013104 (2015)]. The method uses density functional theory to determine ion-ion pair interaction potentials that have no free parameters. These potentials are used in classical molecular dynamics simulations. This constitutes a computationally efficient and realistic model of dense plasmas. Comparison with recently published simulations of the ion-ion dynamic structure factor and sound speed of warm dense aluminum finds good to reasonable agreement. Using this method, we make predictions of the ion-ion dynamical structure factor and sound speed of a warm dense mixture-equimolar carbon-hydrogen. This material is commonly used as an ablator in inertial confinement fusion capsules, and our results are amenable to direct experimental measurement. PMID:26172810

  18. Fabrication, Properties and Applications of Dense Hydroxyapatite: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Prakasam, Mythili; Locs, Janis; Salma-Ancane, Kristine; Loca, Dagnija; Largeteau, Alain; Berzina-Cimdina, Liga

    2015-01-01

    In the last five decades, there have been vast advances in the field of biomaterials, including ceramics, glasses, glass-ceramics and metal alloys. Dense and porous ceramics have been widely used for various biomedical applications. Current applications of bioceramics include bone grafts, spinal fusion, bone repairs, bone fillers, maxillofacial reconstruction, etc. Amongst the various calcium phosphate compositions, hydroxyapatite, which has a composition similar to human bone, has attracted wide interest. Much emphasis is given to tissue engineering, both in porous and dense ceramic forms. The current review focusses on the various applications of dense hydroxyapatite and other dense biomaterials on the aspects of transparency and the mechanical and electrical behavior. Prospective future applications, established along the aforesaid applications of hydroxyapatite, appear to be promising regarding bone bonding, advanced medical treatment methods, improvement of the mechanical strength of artificial bone grafts and better in vitro/in vivo methodologies to afford more particular outcomes. PMID:26703750

  19. Ion-ion dynamic structure factor of warm dense mixtures

    SciTech Connect

    Gill, N. M.; Heinonen, R. A.; Starrett, C. E.; Saumon, D.

    2015-06-25

    In this study, the ion-ion dynamic structure factor of warm dense matter is determined using the recently developed pseudoatom molecular dynamics method [Starrett et al., Phys. Rev. E 91, 013104 (2015)]. The method uses density functional theory to determine ion-ion pair interaction potentials that have no free parameters. These potentials are used in classical molecular dynamics simulations. This constitutes a computationally efficient and realistic model of dense plasmas. Comparison with recently published simulations of the ion-ion dynamic structure factor and sound speed of warm dense aluminum finds good to reasonable agreement. Using this method, we make predictions of the ion-ion dynamical structure factor and sound speed of a warm dense mixture—equimolar carbon-hydrogen. This material is commonly used as an ablator in inertial confinement fusion capsules, and our results are amenable to direct experimental measurement.

  20. VOLUMETRIC LOCALISATION OF DENSE BREAST TISSUE USING BREAST TOMOSYNTHESIS DATA.

    PubMed

    Dustler, M; Petersson, H; Timberg, P

    2016-06-01

    This study attempted to use combined data from reconstructed digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT) volumes and density estimation of projection images to localise dense tissue inside the breast, using the assumption that the breast can be treated as consisting of only two types of tissue: fibroglandular (dense) and adipose (fatty). To be able to verify results, software breast phantoms generated using fractal Perlin noise were employed. Projection images were created using the PENELOPE Monte Carlo package. Dense tissue volume was estimated from the central projection image. The density image was used to determine the number of dense voxels at each pixel location, which were then placed using the DBT image as a template. The method proved capable of accurately determining the composition of 75±5 % of voxels. PMID:26922782

  1. Fabrication, Properties and Applications of Dense Hydroxyapatite: A Review.

    PubMed

    Prakasam, Mythili; Locs, Janis; Salma-Ancane, Kristine; Loca, Dagnija; Largeteau, Alain; Berzina-Cimdina, Liga

    2015-01-01

    In the last five decades, there have been vast advances in the field of biomaterials, including ceramics, glasses, glass-ceramics and metal alloys. Dense and porous ceramics have been widely used for various biomedical applications. Current applications of bioceramics include bone grafts, spinal fusion, bone repairs, bone fillers, maxillofacial reconstruction, etc. Amongst the various calcium phosphate compositions, hydroxyapatite, which has a composition similar to human bone, has attracted wide interest. Much emphasis is given to tissue engineering, both in porous and dense ceramic forms. The current review focusses on the various applications of dense hydroxyapatite and other dense biomaterials on the aspects of transparency and the mechanical and electrical behavior. Prospective future applications, established along the aforesaid applications of hydroxyapatite, appear to be promising regarding bone bonding, advanced medical treatment methods, improvement of the mechanical strength of artificial bone grafts and better in vitro/in vivo methodologies to afford more particular outcomes. PMID:26703750

  2. Ion-ion dynamic structure factor of warm dense mixtures

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Gill, N. M.; Heinonen, R. A.; Starrett, C. E.; Saumon, D.

    2015-06-25

    In this study, the ion-ion dynamic structure factor of warm dense matter is determined using the recently developed pseudoatom molecular dynamics method [Starrett et al., Phys. Rev. E 91, 013104 (2015)]. The method uses density functional theory to determine ion-ion pair interaction potentials that have no free parameters. These potentials are used in classical molecular dynamics simulations. This constitutes a computationally efficient and realistic model of dense plasmas. Comparison with recently published simulations of the ion-ion dynamic structure factor and sound speed of warm dense aluminum finds good to reasonable agreement. Using this method, we make predictions of the ion-ionmore » dynamical structure factor and sound speed of a warm dense mixture—equimolar carbon-hydrogen. This material is commonly used as an ablator in inertial confinement fusion capsules, and our results are amenable to direct experimental measurement.« less

  3. A REAL-TIME MEASURING DEVICE FOR DENSE PARTICULATE SYSTEMS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report describes the design and performance of an instrument, based on the concept of instantaneous intensity ratio, for measuring particle size distributions of dense particulate matter. The method involves simultaneously measuring the intensity of light scattered by a parti...

  4. Effects of a Regional Aquifer on the Evolution of a Dense CO2-Charged Brine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maskell, A.; Daniels, K.; Bickle, M. J.; Pegler, S.

    2015-12-01

    Carbon Capture and Storage (CCS) within geological reservoirs is recognised as an important solution to combat the observed changes in the Earth's climate attributed to the release of carbon dioxide (CO2) and other greenhouse gases into the atmosphere. Such storage must be long-term and secure thus the ability to model the fate of CO2 and CO2-charged brines as they migrate within through geological carbon storage reservoirs is critical to obtaining regulatory approval. However, the complexities of flow in natural heterogeneous reservoirs make it essential to test model results against observations of real systems; this can be difficult due to their inaccessibility and the expense of gathering adequate data. At Green River, CO2 and CO2-charged brines leak into overlying aquifers during migration to the surface through the Little Grand Fault. As the CO2-charged brine leaks it forms a series of gravity currents and mixes with the formation fluids. Downhole fluid samples from the upper aquifer of the Navajo Sandstone suggest that regional aquifer flow and sedimentological heterogeneities have a large impact on the evolution and mixing of the CO2-charged plume1. Theoretical studies show that by imposing a regional background flow we alter the dynamics and evolution of a dense plume. To test the theory, a series of laboratory experiments were conducted; a constant flux of a denser brine solution was released from a point source at the base of a porous medium filled with flowing fresh water. We present here the theory and laboratory experiments and compare these findings to the vertical variation of conservative tracers, i.e. Na and Cl, within the formation fluids of the Navajo Sandstone. 1) Kampman, N., Maskell, A. and others, 2014. Drilling and sampling a natural CO2 reservoir: Implications for fluid flow and CO2-fluid-rock reactions during CO2 migration through the overburden. Chemical Geology 369, 51-82.

  5. SUPPORTED DENSE CERAMIC MEMBRANES FOR OXYGEN SEPARATION

    SciTech Connect

    Timothy L. Ward

    2002-07-01

    Mixed-conducting ceramics have the ability to conduct oxygen with perfect selectivity at elevated temperatures, making them extremely attractive as membrane materials for oxygen separation and membrane reactor applications. While the conductivity of these materials can be quite high at elevated temperatures (typically 800-1000 C), much higher oxygen fluxes, or, alternatively, equivalent fluxes at lower temperatures, could be provided by supported thin or thick film membrane layers. Based on that motivation, the objective of this project was to explore the use of ultrafine aerosol-derived powder of a mixed-conducting ceramic material for fabrication of supported thick-film dense membranes. The project focused on the mixed-conducting ceramic composition SrCo{sub 0.5}FeO{sub x} (SCFO) because of the desirable permeability and stability of that material, as reported in the literature. Appropriate conditions to produce the submicron SrCo{sub 0.5}FeO{sub x} powder using aerosol pyrolysis were determined. Porous supports of the same composition were produced by partial sintering of a commercially obtained powder that possessed significantly larger particle size than the aerosol-derived powder. The effects of sintering conditions (temperature, atmosphere) on the porosity and microstructure of the porous discs were studied, and a standard support fabrication procedure was adopted. Subsequently, a variety of paste and slurry formulations were explored utilizing the aerosol-derived SCFO powder. These formulations were applied to the porous SCFO support by a doctor blade or spin coating procedure. Sintering of the supported membrane layer was then conducted, and additional layers were deposited and sintered in some cases. The primary characterization methods were X-ray diffraction and scanning electron microscopy, and room-temperature nitrogen permeation was used to assess defect status of the membranes.We found that non-aqueous paste/slurry formulations incorporating

  6. Relating quantum discord with the quantum dense coding capacity

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Xin; Qiu, Liang Li, Song; Zhang, Chi; Ye, Bin

    2015-01-15

    We establish the relations between quantum discord and the quantum dense coding capacity in (n + 1)-particle quantum states. A necessary condition for the vanishing discord monogamy score is given. We also find that the loss of quantum dense coding capacity due to decoherence is bounded below by the sum of quantum discord. When these results are restricted to three-particle quantum states, some complementarity relations are obtained.

  7. Measurement of Electron-Ion Relaxation in Warm Dense Copper.

    PubMed

    Cho, B I; Ogitsu, T; Engelhorn, K; Correa, A A; Ping, Y; Lee, J W; Bae, L J; Prendergast, D; Falcone, R W; Heimann, P A

    2016-01-01

    Experimental investigation of electron-ion coupling and electron heat capacity of copper in warm and dense states are presented. From time-resolved x-ray absorption spectroscopy, the temporal evolution of electron temperature is obtained for non-equilibrium warm dense copper heated by an intense femtosecond laser pulse. Electron heat capacity and electron-ion coupling are inferred from the initial electron temperature and its decrease over 10 ps. Data are compared with various theoretical models. PMID:26733236

  8. Measurement of Electron-Ion Relaxation in Warm Dense Copper

    PubMed Central

    Cho, B. I.; Ogitsu, T.; Engelhorn, K.; Correa, A. A.; Ping, Y.; Lee, J. W.; Bae, L. J.; Prendergast, D.; Falcone, R. W.; Heimann, P. A.

    2016-01-01

    Experimental investigation of electron-ion coupling and electron heat capacity of copper in warm and dense states are presented. From time-resolved x-ray absorption spectroscopy, the temporal evolution of electron temperature is obtained for non-equilibrium warm dense copper heated by an intense femtosecond laser pulse. Electron heat capacity and electron-ion coupling are inferred from the initial electron temperature and its decrease over 10 ps. Data are compared with various theoretical models. PMID:26733236

  9. Measurement of electron-ion relaxation in warm dense copper

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Cho, B. I.; Ogitsu, T.; Engelhorn, K.; Correa, A. A.; Ping, Y.; Lee, J. W.; Bae, L. J.; Prendergast, D.; Falcone, R. W.; Heimann, P. A.

    2016-01-06

    Experimental investigation of electron-ion coupling and electron heat capacity of copper in warm and dense states are presented. From time-resolved x-ray absorption spectroscopy, the temporal evolution of electron temperature is obtained for non-equilibrium warm dense copper heated by an intense femtosecond laser pulse. Electron heat capacity and electron-ion coupling are inferred from the initial electron temperature and its decrease over 10 ps. As a result, data are compared with various theoretical models.

  10. Electron-ion temperature equilibration in warm dense tantalum

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Doppner, T; LePape, S.; Ma, T.; Pak, A.; Hartley, N. J.; Peters, L.; Gregori, G.; Belancourt, P.; Drake, R. P.; Chapman, D. A.; et al

    2014-11-05

    We present measurements of electron-ion temperature equilibration in proton-heated tantalum, under warm dense matter conditions. Our results agree with theoretical predictions for metals calculated using input data from ab initio simulations. Furthermore, the fast relaxation observed in the experiment contrasts with much longer equilibration times found in proton heated carbon, indicating that the energy flow pathways in warm dense matter are far from being fully understood.

  11. Electron-ion temperature equilibration in warm dense tantalum

    SciTech Connect

    Doppner, T; LePape, S.; Ma, T.; Pak, A.; Hartley, N. J.; Peters, L.; Gregori, G.; Belancourt, P.; Drake, R. P.; Chapman, D. A.; Richardson, S.; Gericke, D. O.; Glenzer, S. H.; Khaghani, D.; Neumayer, P.; Vorberger, J.; White, T. G.

    2014-11-05

    We present measurements of electron-ion temperature equilibration in proton-heated tantalum, under warm dense matter conditions. Our results agree with theoretical predictions for metals calculated using input data from ab initio simulations. Furthermore, the fast relaxation observed in the experiment contrasts with much longer equilibration times found in proton heated carbon, indicating that the energy flow pathways in warm dense matter are far from being fully understood.

  12. Evaluation of Visual Characteristic in Dense Fog using Landolt Ring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamaguchi, Tomoya; Takamatsu, Mamoru; Nakashima, Yoshio

    Our visual characteristics are affected by various visual environments. In this experiment, we examine how things look in a dense fog. Namely, 4 subjects evaluated their eyesight in a fog of four kinds of particle diameters using colored-landolt ring. Yellow color was given the best eyesight in a dense fog. In other words, under such visual environment, yellow visibility was the best. This tendency was remarkable as the diameter of a fog particle became small.

  13. Relating quantum discord with the quantum dense coding capacity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xin; Qiu, Liang; Li, Song; Zhang, Chi; Ye, Bin

    2015-01-01

    We establish the relations between quantum discord and the quantum dense coding capacity in ( n + 1)-particle quantum states. A necessary condition for the vanishing discord monogamy score is given. We also find that the loss of quantum dense coding capacity due to decoherence is bounded below by the sum of quantum discord. When these results are restricted to three-particle quantum states, some complementarity relations are obtained.

  14. Environmentally safe fluid extractor

    DOEpatents

    Sungaila, Zenon F.

    1993-07-06

    An environmentally safe fluid extraction device for use in mobile laboratory and industrial settings comprising a pump, compressor, valving system, waste recovery tank, fluid tank, and a exhaust filtering system.

  15. Environmentally safe fluid extractor

    DOEpatents

    Sungaila, Zenon F.

    1993-01-01

    An environmentally safe fluid extraction device for use in mobile laboratory and industrial settings comprising a pump, compressor, valving system, waste recovery tank, fluid tank, and a exhaust filtering system.

  16. Peritoneal fluid culture

    MedlinePlus

    Culture - peritoneal fluid ... sent to the laboratory for Gram stain and culture. The sample is checked to see if bacteria ... based on more than just the peritoneal fluid culture (which may be negative even if you have ...

  17. Pleural fluid analysis

    MedlinePlus

    ... of fluid that has collected in the pleural space. This is the space between the lining of the outside of the ... the chest. When fluid collects in the pleural space, the condition is called pleural effusion .

  18. Peritoneal fluid analysis

    MedlinePlus

    ... at fluid that has built up in the space in the abdomen around the internal organs. This area is called the peritoneal space. ... sample of fluid is removed from the peritoneal space using a needle and syringe. Your health care ...

  19. Pleural fluid smear

    MedlinePlus

    ... the fluid that has collected in the pleural space. This is the space between the lining of the outside of the ... the chest. When fluid collects in the pleural space, the condition is called pleural effusion .

  20. Amniotic fluid (image)

    MedlinePlus

    Amniotic fluid surrounds the growing fetus in the womb and protects the fetus from injury and temperature changes. ... of fetal movement and permits musculoskeletal development. The amniotic fluid can be withdrawn in a procedure called amniocentsis ...

  1. Electric fluid pump

    DOEpatents

    Van Dam, Jeremy Daniel; Turnquist, Norman Arnold; Raminosoa, Tsarafidy; Shah, Manoj Ramprasad; Shen, Xiaochun

    2015-09-29

    An electric machine is presented. The electric machine includes a hollow rotor; and a stator disposed within the hollow rotor, the stator defining a flow channel. The hollow rotor includes a first end portion defining a fluid inlet, a second end portion defining a fluid outlet; the fluid inlet, the fluid outlet, and the flow channel of the stator being configured to allow passage of a fluid from the fluid inlet to the fluid outlet via the flow channel; and wherein the hollow rotor is characterized by a largest cross-sectional area of hollow rotor, and wherein the flow channel is characterized by a smallest cross-sectional area of the flow channel, wherein the smallest cross-sectional area of the flow channel is at least about 25% of the largest cross-sectional area of the hollow rotor. An electric fluid pump and a power generation system are also presented.

  2. Amniotic fluid (image)

    MedlinePlus

    Amniotic fluid surrounds the growing fetus in the womb and protects the fetus from injury and temperature changes. It ... fetal movement and permits musculoskeletal development. The amniotic fluid can be withdrawn in a procedure called amniocentsis ...

  3. Fluid and Electrolyte Balance

    MedlinePlus

    ... They are in your blood, urine and body fluids. Maintaining the right balance of electrolytes helps your ... them from the foods you eat and the fluids you drink. Levels of electrolytes in your body ...

  4. Fluid sampling tool

    DOEpatents

    Johnston, Roger G.; Garcia, Anthony R. E.; Martinez, Ronald K.

    2001-09-25

    The invention includes a rotatable tool for collecting fluid through the wall of a container. The tool includes a fluid collection section with a cylindrical shank having an end portion for drilling a hole in the container wall when the tool is rotated, and a threaded portion for tapping the hole in the container wall. A passageway in the shank in communication with at least one radial inlet hole in the drilling end and an opening at the end of the shank is adapted to receive fluid from the container. The tool also includes a cylindrical chamber affixed to the end of the shank opposite to the drilling portion thereof for receiving and storing fluid passing through the passageway. The tool also includes a flexible, deformable gasket that provides a fluid-tight chamber to confine kerf generated during the drilling and tapping of the hole. The invention also includes a fluid extractor section for extracting fluid samples from the fluid collecting section.

  5. Fluid force transducer

    DOEpatents

    Jendrzejczyk, Joseph A.

    1982-01-01

    An electrical fluid force transducer for measuring the magnitude and direction of fluid forces caused by lateral fluid flow, includes a movable sleeve which is deflectable in response to the movement of fluid, and a rod fixed to the sleeve to translate forces applied to the sleeve to strain gauges attached to the rod, the strain gauges being connected in a bridge circuit arrangement enabling generation of a signal output indicative of the magnitude and direction of the force applied to the sleeve.

  6. Collective excitations in soft-sphere fluids.

    PubMed

    Bryk, Taras; Gorelli, Federico; Ruocco, Giancarlo; Santoro, Mario; Scopigno, Tullio

    2014-10-01

    Despite that the thermodynamic distinction between a liquid and the corresponding gas ceases to exist at the critical point, it has been recently shown that reminiscence of gaslike and liquidlike behavior can be identified in the supercritical fluid region, encoded in the behavior of hypersonic waves dispersion. By using a combination of molecular dynamics simulations and calculations within the approach of generalized collective modes, we provide an accurate determination of the dispersion of longitudinal and transverse collective excitations in soft-sphere fluids. Specifically, we address the decreasing rigidity upon density reduction along an isothermal line, showing that the positive sound dispersion, an excess of sound velocity over the hydrodynamic limit typical for dense liquids, displays a nonmonotonic density dependence strictly correlated to that of thermal diffusivity and kinematic viscosity. This allows rationalizing recent observation parting the supercritical state based on the Widom line, i.e., the extension of the coexistence line. Remarkably, we show here that the extremals of transport properties such as thermal diffusivity and kinematic viscosity provide a robust definition for the boundary between liquidlike and gaslike regions, even in those systems without a liquid-gas binodal line. Finally, we discuss these findings in comparison with recent results for Lennard-Jones model fluid and with the notion of the "rigid-nonrigid" fluid separation lines. PMID:25375488

  7. Particle Formation and Product Formulation Using Supercritical Fluids.

    PubMed

    Knez, Željko; Knez Hrnčič, Maša; Škerget, Mojca

    2015-01-01

    Traditional methods for solids processing involve either high temperatures, necessary for melting or viscosity reduction, or hazardous organic solvents. Owing to the negative impact of the solvents on the environment, especially on living organisms, intensive research has focused on new, sustainable methods for the processing of these substances. Applying supercritical fluids for particle formation may produce powders and composites with special characteristics. Several processes for formation and design of solid particles using dense gases have been studied intensively. The unique thermodynamic and fluid-dynamic properties of supercritical fluids can be used also for impregnation of solid particles or for the formation of solid powderous emulsions and particle coating, e.g., for formation of solids with unique properties for use in different applications. We give an overview of the application of sub- and supercritical fluids as green processing media for particle formation processes and present recent advances and trends in development. PMID:26091976

  8. Static spherically-symmetric perfect fluids with pressure equal to energy density

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yadav, R. B. S.; Saini, S. L.

    1991-12-01

    An exact, static, and spherically-symmetric solution is presented of Einstein's field equations for a homogeneous perfect fluid core surrounded by a field of Zel'dovich's fluid which is asymptotically homaloidal. The equation of state for the fluid is taken as p = p, which describes several important cases, e.g., radiation, relativistic degenerate Fermi gas, and probably very dense baryon matter. If the fluid satisfies p = p and if in addition its motion is irrotational, then such a source has the same stress energy tensor as that of a massless scalar field.

  9. Fluid/Solid Boundary Conditions in Non-Isothermal Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rosner, Daniel E.

    1999-01-01

    The existing theoretical research concerned with thermal creep at fluid/solid interfaces is briefly reviewed, and the importance of microgravity-based experimental data is then discussed. It is noted that the ultimate goal of this research is a rational molecular level theory that predicts the dependence of a dimensionless thermal creep coefficient, Ctc, on relevant dimensionless parameters describing the way fluid molecules interact with the solid surface and how they interact among themselves. The discussion covers thermophoresis of isolated solid spheres and aggregates in gases; solid sphere thermophoresis in liquids and dense vapors; thermophoresis of small immiscible liquid droplets; and applications of the direct simulation Monte Carlo method.

  10. Three body dynamics in dense gravitational systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moody, Kenneth

    galactic black hole binaries as a background source. I also found that the binaries are ejected from the cluster with, for the most part, a velocity just above the escape speed of the cluster which is a few tens of km/sec. These gravitational wave sources are thus constrained in their host galaxies as the galactic escape velocity is some hundreds of km/sec which only a very few binaries achieve in special cases. I studied the effect of the Kozai mechanism on two pulsars, one in the globular cluster M4, and the other J1903+0327. The M4 pulsar pulsar was found to have an unusually large orbital eccentricity, given that it is in a binary with a period of nearly 200 days. This unusual behavior led to the conclusion that a planet-like third body of much less than a solar mass was orbiting the binary. I used my own code to integrate the secular evolution equations with a broad set of initial conditions to determine the first detailed properties of the third body; namely that the mass of the planet is about that of Jupiter. The second pulsar J1903+0327 consists of a 2.15ms pulsar and a near solar mass companion in an e = 0.44 orbit. A preliminary study of this pulsar showed that the high eccentricity can be reproduced by my models, and there are three candidate clusters from which this pulsar could have originated. My third project was a study of the effect of a planet at 50 AU on the inner solar system. The origin of this planet is assumed to be from an exchange with another solar system in the early stages of the sun's life while it was still in the dense star forming region where it was born. Similar studies have been done with the exchange of stars among binaries by Malmberg et al. (2007b). The exchange once again allows the Kozai effect to bring about drastic change in the inner system. A planet is chosen as the outer object as, unlike a stellar companion, it would remain unseen by current radial velocity and direct observation methods, although it could be detected by

  11. Numerical simulation of dense gas flows on unstructured grids with an implicit high resolution upwind Euler solver

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colonna, P.; Rebay, S.

    2004-11-01

    The study of the dense gas flows which occur in many technological applications demands for fluid dynamic simulation tools incorporating complex thermodynamic models that are not usually available in commercial software. Moreover, the software mentioned can be used to study very interesting phenomena that usually go under the name of non-classical gasdynamics, which are theoretically predicted for high molecular weight fluids in the superheated region, close to saturation. This paper presents the numerical methods and models implemented in a computer code named zFlow which is capable of simulating inviscid dense gas flows in complex geometries. A detailed description of the space discretization method used to approximate the Euler equations on unstructured grids and for general equations of state, and a summary of the thermodynamic functions required by the mentioned formulation are also given. The performance of the code is demonstrated by presenting two applications, the calculation of the transonic flow around an airfoil computed with both the ideal gas and a complex equation of state and the simulation of the non-classical phenomena occurring in a supersonic flow between two staggered sinusoidal blades. Non-classical effects are simulated in a supersonic flow of a siloxane using a Peng-Robinson-type equation of state. Siloxanes are a class of substances used as working fluids in organic Rankine cycles turbines.

  12. Fluid Movement and Creativity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Slepian, Michael L.; Ambady, Nalini

    2012-01-01

    Cognitive scientists describe creativity as fluid thought. Drawing from findings on gesture and embodied cognition, we hypothesized that the physical experience of fluidity, relative to nonfluidity, would lead to more fluid, creative thought. Across 3 experiments, fluid arm movement led to enhanced creativity in 3 domains: creative generation,…

  13. Aqueous drilling fluids containing fluid loss additives

    SciTech Connect

    Bardoliwalla, D.F.; Villa, J.L.

    1987-03-03

    This patent describes an aqueous clay containing drilling fluid having present in an amount sufficient to reduce fluid loss of the drilling fluid, a copolymer of (1) from about 80% to about 98% by weight of acrylic acid and (2) from about 2% to about 20% by weight of itaconic acid. The copolymer has a weight average molecular weight of between about 50,000 to about 1,000,000, being in its free acid or partially or completely neutralized salt form and being at least water dispersible.

  14. Reflector for efficient coupling of a laser beam to air or other fluids

    DOEpatents

    Kare, Jordin T.

    1992-01-01

    A reflector array is disclosed herein that provides a controlled region or regions of plasma breakdowns from a laser beam produced at a remotely-based laser source. The plasma may be applied to produce thrust to propel a spacecraft, or to diagnose a laser beam, or to produce shockwaves. The spacecraft propulsion system comprises a reflector array attached to the vehicle. The reflector array comprises a plurality of reflectors spaced apart on a reflective surface, with each reflector acting as an independent focusing mirror. The reflectors are spaced closely together to form a continuous or partially-continuous surface. The reflector array may be formed from a sheet of reflective material, such as copper or aluminum. In operation, a beam of electromagnetic energy, such as a laser beam, is directed at the reflectors which focus the reflected electromagnetic energy at a plurality of regions off the surface. The energy concentrated in the focal region causes a breakdown of the air or other fluid in the focal region, creating a plasma. Electromagnetic energy is absorbed in the plasma and it grows in volume, compressing and heating the adjacent fluid thereby providing thrust. Laser pulses may be applied repetitively. After each such thrust pulse, fresh air can be introduced next to the surface either laterally, or through a perforated surface. If air or some other gas or vapor is supplied, for example from a tank carried on board a vehicle, this invention may also be used to provide thrust in a vacuum environment.

  15. Oxygen chemistry of shocked interstellar clouds. III - Sulfur and oxygen species in dense clouds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leen, T. M.; Graff, M. M.

    1988-01-01

    The chemical evolution of oxygen and sulfur species in shocked dense clouds is studied. Reaction rate constants for several important neutral reactions are examined, and revised values are suggested. The one-fluid magnetohydrodynamic shock structure and postshock chemical evolution are calculated for shocks of velocity v(s) = 10 km/s through clouds of initial number density n(0) = 100,000/cu cm and of molecule/atom ratios H2/H = 10, 1000, and 100,000 with most sulfur contained initially in molecules SO2 and SO. Abundances of SO2, SO, CS, and OCS remain near their preshock values, except in clouds containing substantial amounts of atomic hydrogen, where significant destruction of sulfur-oxygen species occurs. Abundances of shock-enhanced molecules HS and H2O are sensitive to the molecule/atom ratio. Nonthermal oxygen-hydrogen chemistry has a minor effect on oxygen-sulfur molecules in the case H2/H = 10.

  16. Temperature and density dependence of XANES spectra in warm dense aluminum plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Recoules, V.; Mazevet, S.

    2009-08-01

    Using ab initio molecular-dynamics simulations combined with linear-response theory, we calculate the density and temperature dependence of the x-ray absorption near-edge structure (XANES) of a dense aluminum plasma. At solid density and for temperatures increasing up to 6 eV, we see that the XANES spectrum loses its well-known room-temperature structure, first due to melting and second due to loss of correlation in the liquid. Similarly, as the density decreases and the system evolves from a liquid to a plasma, the XANES spectrum becomes less structured. As the density is further lowered and the system turns into an atomic fluid, a pre-edge forms as the 3p state becomes bound. We suggest that direct measurements of the XANES spectra in this density region is a unique opportunity to validate pressure ionization models routinely used in plasma physics modeling.

  17. Molecular dynamics of immiscible fluids in chemically patterned nanochannels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cieplak, Marek; Banavar, Jayanth R.

    2008-03-01

    Molecular dynamics simulations of chain molecules are used to elucidate physical phenomena involved in flows of dense immiscible fluids in nanochannels. We first consider a force driven flow in which the channel walls are homogeneous and wetting to one fluid and nonwetting to the other fluid. The coating of the walls by the wetting fluid provides a fluctuating surface that confines the flow of the nonwetting fluid. The resulting dissipation yields stationary Poiseuille-like flows in contrast to the accelerating nature of flow in the absence of the coating. We then consider walls consisting of patches whose wetting preferences to a fluid alternate along the walls. In the resulting flow, the immiscible components exhibit periodic structures in their velocity fields such that the crests are located at the wettability steps in contrast to the behavior of a single fluid for which the crest occurs in the wetting region. We demonstrate that for a single fluid, the modulated velocity field scales with the size of the chain molecules.

  18. An incompressible two-dimensional multiphase particle-in-cell model for dense particle flows

    SciTech Connect

    Snider, D.M.; O`Rourke, P.J.; Andrews, M.J.

    1997-06-01

    A two-dimensional, incompressible, multiphase particle-in-cell (MP-PIC) method is presented for dense particle flows. The numerical technique solves the governing equations of the fluid phase using a continuum model and those of the particle phase using a Lagrangian model. Difficulties associated with calculating interparticle interactions for dense particle flows with volume fractions above 5% have been eliminated by mapping particle properties to a Eulerian grid and then mapping back computed stress tensors to particle positions. This approach utilizes the best of Eulerian/Eulerian continuum models and Eulerian/Lagrangian discrete models. The solution scheme allows for distributions of types, sizes, and density of particles, with no numerical diffusion from the Lagrangian particle calculations. The computational method is implicit with respect to pressure, velocity, and volume fraction in the continuum solution thus avoiding courant limits on computational time advancement. MP-PIC simulations are compared with one-dimensional problems that have analytical solutions and with two-dimensional problems for which there are experimental data.

  19. Slow dynamics in dense oil-water emulsions studied using dynamic light scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Medebach, Martin; Dulle, Martin; Glatter, Otto

    2009-12-01

    The 3D-echo-DLS (dynamic light scattering) flat cell light scattering instrument (3D-echo-DLS-FCLSI) presents the possibility of measuring slow dynamics of turbid and concentrated colloidal systems. It combines a modified 3D-DLS component and an echo-DLS component with the flat cell light scattering instrument. While the 3D-DLS suppresses multiple scattering, the echo-DLS allows measurements of slow dynamics or even on non-ergodic systems. The advantage of the thin flat cell is that it increases the transmission and reduces multiple scattering; i.e., singly scattered light that is required by the 3D-DLS is still available from dense turbid systems. In the first part of this contribution the 3D-echo-DLS-FCLSI is introduced and the instrumental performance is presented. The second part of the paper is concerned with the ageing behavior of dense fluids in a flat cell, and with confinement effects. Here, we show that ageing is strongly influenced by the process of filling of the flat cell. In some cases complementary methods can be utilized to measure special properties of the system; e.g., the multispeckle method is most appropriate for measuring heterogeneity effects. In the last part of the paper we compare glass transition measurements of an index-matched emulsion carried out using the 3D-echo-DLS-FCLSI and using the multispeckle instrument. We still find an α-relaxation in the glassy state.

  20. Experimentally validated 3-D simulation of shock waves generated by dense explosives in confined complex geometries.

    PubMed

    Rigas, Fotis; Sklavounos, Spyros

    2005-05-20

    Accidental blast wave generation and propagation in the surroundings poses severe threats for people and property. The prediction of overpressure maxima and its change with time at specified distances can lead to useful conclusions in quantitative risk analysis applications. In this paper, the use of a computational fluid dynamics (CFD) code CFX-5.6 on dense explosive detonation events is described. The work deals with the three-dimensional simulation of overpressure wave propagation generated by the detonation of a dense explosive within a small-scale branched tunnel. It also aids at validating the code against published experimental data as well as to study the way that the resulting shock wave propagates in a confined space configuration. Predicted overpressure histories were plotted and compared versus experimental measurements showing a reasonably good agreement. Overpressure maxima and corresponding times were found close to the measured ones confirming that CFDs may constitute a useful tool in explosion hazard assessment procedures. Moreover, it was found that blast wave propagates preserving supersonic speed along the tunnel accompanied by high overpressure levels, and indicating that space confinement favors the formation and maintenance of a shock rather than a weak pressure wave. PMID:15885402