Science.gov

Sample records for dense graded aggregates

  1. An experimental study of dense aerosol aggregations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dhaubhadel, Rajan

    We demonstrated that an aerosol can gel. This gelation was then used for a one-step method to produce an ultralow density porous carbon or silica material. This material was named an aerosol gel because it was made via gelation of particles in the aerosol phase. The carbon and silica aerosol gels had high specific surface area (200--350 sq m2/g for carbon and 300--500 sq m2/g for silica) and an extremely low density (2.5--6.0 mg/cm3), properties similar to conventional aerogels. Key aspects to form a gel from an aerosol are large volume fraction, ca. 10-4 or greater, and small primary particle size, 50 nm or smaller, so that the gel time is fast compared to other characteristic times. Next we report the results of a study of the cluster morphology and kinetics of a dense aggregating aerosol system using the small angle light scattering technique. The soot particles started as individual monomers, ca. 38 nm radius, grew to bigger clusters with time and finally stopped evolving after spanning a network across the whole system volume. This spanning is aerosol gelation. The gelled system showed a hybrid morphology with a lower fractal dimension at length scales of a micron or smaller and a higher fractal dimension at length scales greater than a micron. The study of the kinetics of the aggregating system showed that when the system gelled, the aggregation kernel homogeneity lambda attained a value 0.4 or higher. The magnitude of the aggregation kernel showed an increase with increasing volume fraction. We also used image analysis technique to study the cluster morphology. From the digitized pictures of soot clusters the cluster morphology was determined by two different methods: structure factor and perimeter analysis. We find a hybrid, superaggregate morphology characterized by a fractal dimension of Df ≈ to 1.8 between the monomer size, ca. 50 nm, and 1 mum micron and Df ≈ to 2.6 at larger length scales up to ˜ 10 mum. The superaggregate morphology is a

  2. Comparative Aggregate Patterns of Grade Retention Rates.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morris, Don R.

    A search for patterns in grade retention rates across grades 1-12 to construct simulation research models is described in this paper. Aggregate data from Shepard and Smith (1989) on grade retention rates from 12 American states for the year 1979-80 and from 11 states for 1985-86 were examined for across-grade patterns, supplemented by Dade County…

  3. Sticky Particles: Modeling Rigid Aggregates in Dense Planetary Rings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perrine, Randall P.; Richardson, D. C.; Scheeres, D. J.

    2008-09-01

    We present progress on our study of planetary ring dynamics. We use local N-body simulations to examine small patches of dense rings in which self-gravity and mutual collisions dominate the dynamics of the ring material. We use the numerical code pkdgrav to model the motions of 105-7 ring particles, using a sliding patch model with modified periodic boundary conditions. The exact nature of planetary ring particles is not well understood. If covered in a frost-like layer, such irregular surfaces may allow for weak cohesion between colliding particles. Thus we have recently added new functionality to our model, allowing "sticky particles” to lock into rigid aggregates while in a rotating reference frame. This capability allows particles to adhere to one another, forming irregularly shaped aggregates that move as rigid bodies. (The bonds between particles can subsequently break, given sufficient stress.) These aggregates have greater strength than gravitationally bound "rubble piles,” and are thus able to grow larger and survive longer under similar stresses. This new functionality allows us to explore planetary ring properties and dynamics in a new way, by self-consistently forming (and destroying) non-spherical aggregates and moonlets via cohesive forces, while in a rotating frame, subjected to planetary tides. (We are not aware of any similar implementations in other existing models.) These improvements allow us to study the many effects that particle aggregation may have on the rings, such as overall ring structure; wake formation; equilibrium properties of non-spherical particles, like pitch angle, orientation, shape, size distribution, and spin; and the surface properties of the ring material. We present test cases and the latest results from this new model. This work is supported by a NASA Earth and Space Science Fellowship.

  4. Properties of concrete blocks prepared with low grade recycled aggregates.

    PubMed

    Poon, Chi-Sun; Kou, Shi-cong; Wan, Hui-wen; Etxeberria, Miren

    2009-08-01

    Low grade recycled aggregates obtained from a construction waste sorting facility were tested to assess the feasibility of using these in the production of concrete blocks. The characteristics of the sorted construction waste are significantly different from that of crushed concrete rubbles that are mostly derived from demolition waste streams. This is due to the presence of higher percentages of non-concrete components (e.g. >10% soil, brick, tiles etc.) in the sorted construction waste. In the study reported in this paper, three series of concrete block mixtures were prepared by using the low grade recycled aggregates to replace (i) natural coarse granite (10mm), and (ii) 0, 25, 50, 75 and 100% replacement levels of crushed stone fine (crushed natural granite <5mm) in the concrete blocks. Test results on properties such as density, compressive strength, transverse strength and drying shrinkage as well as strength reduction after exposure to 800 degrees C are presented below. The results show that the soil content in the recycled fine aggregate was an important factor in affecting the properties of the blocks produced and the mechanical strength deceased with increasing low grade recycled fine aggregate content. But the higher soil content in the recycled aggregates reduced the reduction of compressive strength of the blocks after exposure to high temperature due probably to the formation of a new crystalline phase. The results show that the low grade recycled aggregates obtained from the construction waste sorting facility has potential to be used as aggregates for making non-structural pre-cast concrete blocks. PMID:19398196

  5. Structure and flow of dense suspensions of protein fractal aggregates in comparison with microgels.

    PubMed

    Inthavong, Walailuk; Kharlamova, Anna; Chassenieux, Christophe; Nicolai, Taco

    2016-03-14

    Solutions of the globular whey protein β-lactoglobulin (β-lg) were heated at different protein concentrations leading to the formation of polydisperse fractal aggregates with different average sizes. The structure of the solutions was analyzed with light scattering as a function of the protein concentration. The osmotic compressibility and the dynamic correlation length decreased with increasing concentration and became independent of the aggregate size in dense suspensions. The results obtained for different aggregate sizes could be superimposed after normalizing the concentration with the overlap concentration. Dense suspensions of fractal protein aggregates are strongly interpenetrated and can be visualized as an ensemble of fractal 'blobs'. The viscosity of the heated β-lg solutions increased extremely sharply above 80 g L(-1) and diverged at 98 g L(-1), mainly due to the sharply increasing aggregate size. At a fixed aggregate size, the viscosity increased initially exponentially with increasing concentration and then diverged. The increase was stronger when the aggregates were larger, but the dependence of the viscosity on the aggregate size was weaker than that of the osmotic compressibility and the dynamic correlation length. The concentration dependence of the viscosity of solutions of fractal β-lg aggregates is much stronger than that of homogeneous β-lg microgels. The behavior of fractal aggregates formed by whey protein isolates was similar. PMID:26864954

  6. Efficient Online Aggregates in Dense-Region-Based Data Cube Representations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haddadin, Kais; Lauer, Tobias

    In-memory OLAP systems require a space-efficient representation of sparse data cubes in order to accommodate large data sets. On the other hand, most efficient online aggregation techniques, such as prefix sums, are built on dense array-based representations. These are often not applicable to real-world data due to the size of the arrays which usually cannot be compressed well, as most sparsity is removed during pre-processing. A possible solution is to identify dense regions in a sparse cube and only represent those using arrays, while storing sparse data separately, e.g. in a spatial index structure. Previous dense-region-based approaches have concentrated mainly on the effectiveness of the dense-region detection (i.e. on the space-efficiency of the result). However, especially in higher-dimensional cubes, data is usually more cluttered, resulting in a potentially large number of small dense regions, which negatively affects query performance on such a structure. In this paper, our focus is not only on space-efficiency but also on time-efficiency, both for the initial dense-region extraction and for queries carried out in the resulting hybrid data structure. We describe two methods to trade available memory for increased aggregate query performance. In addition, optimizations in our approach significantly reduce the time to build the initial data structure compared to former systems. Also, we present a straightforward adaptation of our approach to support multi-core or multi-processor architectures, which can further enhance query performance. Experiments with different real-world data sets show how various parameter settings can be used to adjust the efficiency and effectiveness of our algorithms.

  7. Does Aggregate School-Wide Achievement Mediate Fifth Grade Outcomes for Former Early Childhood Education Participants?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Curenton, Stephanie M.; Dong, Nianbo; Shen, Xiangjin

    2015-01-01

    This study used a multilevel mediation model to test the theory that former early childhood education (ECE) attendees' 5th grade achievement is mediated by the aggregate school-wide achievement of their elementary school. Aggregate school-wide achievement was defined as the percentage of 5th graders in a school who were at/above academic…

  8. Aggregate assesment and durability evaluation of optimized graded concrete in the state of Oklahoma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghaeezadeh, Ashkan

    This research is a part of a larger project that emphasizes on creating a more scientific approach to designing concrete mixtures for concrete pavements that use less cement and more aggregate which is called optimized graded concrete. The most challenging obstacle in optimized mixtures is reaching enough workability so that one doesn't have to add more cement or super-plasticizer to reach the desired level of flowability. Aggregate gradation and characteristics have found to be very important when it comes to the workabaility of optimized graded concrete. In this research a new automated method of aggregate assessment was used to compare the shape and the surface of different aggregates as well as their influence on the concrete flowability. At the end, the performance of optimized graded concrete against drying shrinkage and freezing and thawing condition were investigated.

  9. Does aggregate school-wide achievement mediate fifth grade outcomes for former early childhood education participants?

    PubMed

    Curenton, Stephanie M; Dong, Nianbo; Shen, Xiangjin

    2015-07-01

    This study used a multilevel mediation model to test the theory that former early childhood education (ECE) attendees' 5th grade achievement is mediated by the aggregate school-wide achievement of their elementary school. Aggregate school-wide achievement was defined as the percentage of 5th graders in a school who were at/above academic proficiency in reading or math. Research questions were: (a) Do ECE program participants have better achievement at 5th grade compared with their matched peers who did not participate in an ECE program?; and (b) Is the association between ECE attendance and 5th grade academic performance mediated by school-wide achievement? Results indicated that children who attended prekindergarten (pre-K) and child care outperformed their matched peers who had not attended ECE programs; conversely, those children who did not attend ECE actually outperformed their Head Start counterparts. Mediation analyses indicated that aggregate school-wide achievement at 5th grade partially mediated the association between former ECE attendance and 5th grade performance; however, these mediated effects were small. Overall, the size of the total effects of ECE and the 5th grade academic outcomes were consistent with prior studies. This research confirms the long-term effects of pre-K and child care until 5th grade. PMID:26098581

  10. Dense and sparse aggregations in complex motion: Video coupled with simulation modeling

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In censuses of aggregations composed of highly mobile animals, the link between image processing technology and simulation modeling remains relatively unexplored despite demonstrated ecological needs for abundance and density assessments. We introduce a framework that connects video censusing with ...

  11. Short- and long-range topological correlations in two-dimensional aggregation of dense colloidal suspensions.

    PubMed

    Fernández-Toledano, J C; Moncho-Jordá, A; Martínez-López, F; González, A E; Hidalgo-Alvarez, R

    2005-04-01

    We have studied the average properties and the topological correlations of computer-simulated two-dimensional (2D) aggregating systems at different initial surface packing fractions. For this purpose, the centers of mass of the growing clusters have been used to build the Voronoi diagram, where each cell represents a single cluster. The number of sides (n) and the area (A) of the cells are related to the size of the clusters and the number of nearest neighbors, respectively. We have focused our paper in the study of the topological quantities derived from number of sides, n , and we leave for a future work the study of the dependence of these magnitudes on the area of the cells, A . In this work, we go beyond the adjacent cluster correlations and explore the organization of the whole system of clusters by dividing the space in concentric layers around each cluster: the shell structure. This method allows us to analyze the time behavior of the long-range intercluster correlations induced by the aggregation process. We observed that kinetic and topological properties are intimately connected. Particularly, we found a continuous ordering of the shell structure from the earlier stages of the aggregation process, where clusters positions approach a hexagonal distribution in the plane. For long aggregation times, when the dynamic scaling regime is achieved, the short- and long-range topological properties reached a final stationary state. This ordering is stronger for high particle densities. Comparison between simulation and theoretical data points out the fact that 2D colloidal aggregation in the absence of interactions (diffusion-limited cluster aggregation regimen) is only able to produce short-range cluster-cluster correlations. Moreover, we showed that the correlation between adjacent clusters verifies the Aboav-Weaire law, while all the topological properties for nonadjacent clusters are mainly determined by only two parameters: the second central moment of number

  12. Dense-body aggregates as plastic structures supporting tension in smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jie; Herrera, Ana M; Paré, Peter D; Seow, Chun Y

    2010-11-01

    The wall of hollow organs of vertebrates is a unique structure able to generate active tension and maintain a nearly constant passive stiffness over a large volume range. These properties are predominantly attributable to the smooth muscle cells that line the organ wall. Although smooth muscle is known to possess plasticity (i.e., the ability to adapt to large changes in cell length through structural remodeling of contractile apparatus and cytoskeleton), the detailed structural basis for the plasticity is largely unknown. Dense bodies, one of the most prominent structures in smooth muscle cells, have been regarded as the anchoring sites for actin filaments, similar to the Z-disks in striated muscle. Here, we show that the dense bodies and intermediate filaments formed cable-like structures inside airway smooth muscle cells and were able to adjust the cable length according to cell length and tension. Stretching the muscle cell bundle in the relaxed state caused the cables to straighten, indicating that these intracellular structures were connected to the extracellular matrix and could support passive tension. These plastic structures may be responsible for the ability of smooth muscle to maintain a nearly constant tensile stiffness over a large length range. The finding suggests that the structural plasticity of hollow organs may originate from the dense-body cables within the smooth muscle cells. PMID:20709732

  13. Management of pulpal floor perforation and grade II Furcation involvement using mineral trioxide aggregate and platelet rich fibrin: A clinical report

    PubMed Central

    Bains, Rhythm; Bains, Vivek K.; Loomba, Kapil; Verma, Kavita; Nasir, Afreena

    2012-01-01

    To report the management of an iatrogenic perforation of pulpal floor in the furcation of mandibular first molar, using Mineral Trioxide Aggregate (MTA) and platelet rich fibrin (PRF). Unpredictable endodontic root/pulp chamber floor perforations resulting in unacceptable high rate of clinical failure has now been a lesser threat with the advent of new technologies and biocompatible materials that utilize the applications of basic research along with tissue engineering concept in clinical practice. Present case report illustrates the use of MTA and platelet rich fibrin (PRF) for the repair of the perforation defect and regeneration of the lost periodontium in furcation area. Although, histologic events and reaction of MTA with PRF is not studied so far, however, the autologous and biocompatible nature of the components used for present treatment modalities seems to be beneficial for the long term clinical results obtained in our case. PMID:23230369

  14. Construction aggregates

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Tepordei, V.V.

    1995-01-01

    Part of the 1994 Industrial Minerals Review. The production, consumption, and applications of construction aggregates are reviewed. In 1994, the production of construction aggregates, which includes crushed stone and construction sand and gravel combined, increased 7.7 percent to 2.14 Gt compared with the previous year. These record production levels are mostly a result of funding for highway construction work provided by the Intermodal Surface Transportation Efficiency Act of 1991. Demand is expected to increase for construction aggregates in 1995.

  15. Weighted aggregation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Feiveson, A. H. (Principal Investigator)

    1979-01-01

    The use of a weighted aggregation technique to improve the precision of the overall LACIE estimate is considered. The manner in which a weighted aggregation technique is implemented given a set of weights is described. The problem of variance estimation is discussed and the question of how to obtain the weights in an operational environment is addressed.

  16. Lysozyme-mediated aggregation and lysis of the periodontal microorganism Capnocytophaga gingivalis 2010.

    PubMed

    Iacono, V J; Zove, S M; Grossbard, B L; Pollock, J J; Fine, D H; Greene, L S

    1985-02-01

    The ability of lysozyme to aggregate and lyse the gram-negative capnophilic periodontal microorganism Capnocytophaga gingivalis 2010 was monitored optically at 540 nm. Both hen egg white and chromatographically purified human lysozymes had significant but similar aggregation potentials for both logarithmic- and stationary-phase bacteria. In general, an increase in enzyme concentration resulted in a graded increase in both the initial and maximum changes in turbidity which occurred during the reaction period. The greatest change in turbidity occurred within the initial minutes of interaction of lysozyme and the cells, and the extent of aggregation paralleled a rapid depletion of lysozyme by the suspensions during the first minute of its incubation with the bacteria. Interestingly, the muramidase inhibitors N-acetyl-D-glucosamine and histamine did not block aggregation, whereas maleylation of lysozyme completely inhibited its aggregating ability. Demaleylation, however, restored aggregation activity comparable to the native enzyme, indicating that maleylated lysozyme retained its integrity and that aggregation was primarily dependent on charge. The addition of up to physiological concentrations of NaHCO3 and NaCl to cell aggregates resulted in varying degrees of deaggregation and lysis. Surprisingly, ultrastructural analysis of lysozyme-treated cells revealed morphological changes with or without the addition of salt. Damage appeared to occur at the blunted polar end of the cells where there was a large spherical outpouching bordered by a damaged cell envelope. Damaged cells uniformly contained dense granular cytoplasmic debris. In effect, the cationic enzyme lysed C. gingivalis 2010, which was not apparent in the spectrophotometric assay. The paradoxical finding that during bacterial aggregation there was lysis may be of significance to the further elucidation of lysozyme's antibacterial role in the gingival sulcus. PMID:3967924

  17. Construction aggregates

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Langer, W.H.; Tepordei, V.V.; Bolen, W.P.

    2000-01-01

    Construction aggregates consist primarily of crushed stone and construction sand and gravel. Total estimated production of construction aggregates increased in 1999 by about 2% to 2.39 Gt (2.64 billion st) compared with 1998. This record production level continued an expansion that began in 1992. By commodities, crushed stone production increased 3.3%, while sand and gravel production increased by about 0.5%.

  18. Construction aggregates

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Tepordei, V.V.

    1994-01-01

    Part of a special section on industrial minerals in 1993. The 1993 production of construction aggregates increased 6.3 percent over the 1992 figure, to reach 2.01 Gt. This represents the highest estimated annual production of combined crushed stone and construction sand and gravel ever recorded in the U.S. The outlook for construction aggregates and the issues facing the industry are discussed.

  19. Hybrid-Based Dense Stereo Matching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chuang, T. Y.; Ting, H. W.; Jaw, J. J.

    2016-06-01

    Stereo matching generating accurate and dense disparity maps is an indispensable technique for 3D exploitation of imagery in the fields of Computer vision and Photogrammetry. Although numerous solutions and advances have been proposed in the literature, occlusions, disparity discontinuities, sparse texture, image distortion, and illumination changes still lead to problematic issues and await better treatment. In this paper, a hybrid-based method based on semi-global matching is presented to tackle the challenges on dense stereo matching. To ease the sensitiveness of SGM cost aggregation towards penalty parameters, a formal way to provide proper penalty estimates is proposed. To this end, the study manipulates a shape-adaptive cross-based matching with an edge constraint to generate an initial disparity map for penalty estimation. Image edges, indicating the potential locations of occlusions as well as disparity discontinuities, are approved by the edge drawing algorithm to ensure the local support regions not to cover significant disparity changes. Besides, an additional penalty parameter 𝑃𝑒 is imposed onto the energy function of SGM cost aggregation to specifically handle edge pixels. Furthermore, the final disparities of edge pixels are found by weighting both values derived from the SGM cost aggregation and the U-SURF matching, providing more reliable estimates at disparity discontinuity areas. Evaluations on Middlebury stereo benchmarks demonstrate satisfactory performance and reveal the potency of the hybrid-based dense stereo matching method.

  20. Atoms in dense plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    More, R.M.

    1986-01-01

    Recent experiments with high-power pulsed lasers have strongly encouraged the development of improved theoretical understanding of highly charged ions in a dense plasma environment. This work examines the theory of dense plasmas with emphasis on general rules which govern matter at extreme high temperature and density. 106 refs., 23 figs.

  1. Construction aggregates

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Tepordei, V.V.

    1993-01-01

    Part of a special section on the market performance of industrial minerals in 1992. Production of construction aggregates increased by 4.6 percent in 1992. This increase was due, in part, to the increased funding for transportation and infrastructure projects. The U.S. produced about 1.05 Gt of crushed stone and an estimated 734 Mt of construction sand and gravel in 1992. Demand is expected to increase by about 5 percent in 1993.

  2. Construction aggregates

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Tepordei, V.V.

    1996-01-01

    Part of the Annual Commodities Review 1995. Production of construction aggregates such as crushed stone and construction sand and gravel showed a marginal increase in 1995. Most of the 1995 increases were due to funding for highway construction work. The major areas of concern to the industry included issues relating to wetlands classification and the classification of crystalline silica as a probable human carcinogen. Despite this, an increase in demand is anticipated for 1996.

  3. Construction aggregates

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Nelson, T.I.; Bolen, W.P.

    2007-01-01

    Construction aggregates, primarily stone, sand and gravel, are recovered from widespread naturally occurring mineral deposits and processed for use primarily in the construction industry. They are mined, crushed, sorted by size and sold loose or combined with portland cement or asphaltic cement to make concrete products to build roads, houses, buildings, and other structures. Much smaller quantities are used in agriculture, cement manufacture, chemical and metallurgical processes, glass production and many other products.

  4. Taurine and platelet aggregation

    SciTech Connect

    Nauss-Karol, C.; VanderWende, C.; Gaut, Z.N.

    1986-03-01

    Taurine is a putative neurotransmitter or neuromodulator. The endogenous taurine concentration in human platelets, determined by amino acid analysis, is 15 ..mu..M/g. In spite of this high level, taurine is actively accumulated. Uptake is saturable, Na/sup +/ and temperature dependent, and suppressed by metabolic inhibitors, structural analogues, and several classes of centrally active substances. High, medium and low affinity transport processes have been characterized, and the platelet may represent a model system for taurine transport in the CNS. When platelets were incubated with /sup 14/C-taurine for 30 minutes, then resuspended in fresh medium and reincubated for one hour, essentially all of the taurine was retained within the cells. Taurine, at concentrations ranging from 10-1000 ..mu..M, had no effect on platelet aggregation induced by ADP or epinephrine. However, taurine may have a role in platelet aggregation since 35-39% of the taurine taken up by human platelets appears to be secreted during the release reaction induced by low concentrations of either epinephrine or ADP, respectively. This release phenomenon would imply that part of the taurine taken up is stored directly in the dense bodies of the platelet.

  5. Construction aggregates

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bolen, W.P.; Tepordei, V.V.

    2001-01-01

    The estimated production during 2000 of construction aggregates, crushed stone, and construction sand and gravel increased by about 2.6% to 2.7 Gt (3 billion st), compared with 1999. The expansion that started in 1992 continued with record production levels for the ninth consecutive year. By commodity, construction sand and gravel production increased by 4.5% to 1.16 Gt (1.28 billion st), while crushed stone production increased by 1.3% to 1.56 Gt (1.72 billion st).

  6. ITRI Informational Text Reading Inventory: Grade 3 Teacher Guide

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Center for Innovation in Assessment (NJ1), 2013

    2013-01-01

    The Grade 3 Informational Text Reading Inventory (ITRI) was developed to address the specific reading challenges that grade 3 students encounter as they move from reading largely narrative textbooks in grade 2 to being expected to read and comprehend more dense and content-driven text in grade 3. This booklet contains all of the information…

  7. Dense suspension splash

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dodge, Kevin M.; Peters, Ivo R.; Ellowitz, Jake; Schaarsberg, Martin H. Klein; Jaeger, Heinrich M.; Zhang, Wendy W.

    2014-11-01

    Impact of a dense suspension drop onto a solid surface at speeds of several meters-per-second splashes by ejecting individual liquid-coated particles. Suppression or reduction of this splash is important for thermal spray coating and additive manufacturing. Accomplishing this aim requires distinguishing whether the splash is generated by individual scattering events or by collective motion reminiscent of liquid flow. Since particle inertia dominates over surface tension and viscous drag in a strong splash, we model suspension splash using a discrete-particle simulation in which the densely packed macroscopic particles experience inelastic collisions but zero friction or cohesion. Numerical results based on this highly simplified model are qualitatively consistent with observations. They also show that approximately 70% of the splash is generated by collective motion. Here an initially downward-moving particle is ejected into the splash because it experiences a succession of low-momentum-change collisions whose effects do not cancel but instead accumulate. The remainder of the splash is generated by scattering events in which a small number of high-momentum-change collisions cause a particle to be ejected upwards. Current Address: Physics of Fluids Group, University of Twente, P.O. Box 217, 7500 AE Enschede, The Netherlands.

  8. Warm dense crystallography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valenza, Ryan A.; Seidler, Gerald T.

    2016-03-01

    The intense femtosecond-scale pulses from x-ray free electron lasers (XFELs) are able to create and interrogate interesting states of matter characterized by long-lived nonequilibrium semicore or core electron occupancies or by the heating of dense phases via the relaxation cascade initiated by the photoelectric effect. We address here the latter case of "warm dense matter" (WDM) and investigate the observable consequences of x-ray heating of the electronic degrees of freedom in crystalline systems. We report temperature-dependent density functional theory calculations for the x-ray diffraction from crystalline LiF, graphite, diamond, and Be. We find testable, strong signatures of condensed-phase effects that emphasize the importance of wide-angle scattering to study nonequilibrium states. These results also suggest that the reorganization of the valence electron density at eV-scale temperatures presents a confounding factor to achieving atomic resolution in macromolecular serial femtosecond crystallography (SFX) studies at XFELs, as performed under the "diffract before destroy" paradigm.

  9. DENSE MEDIUM CYCLONE OPTIMIZATON

    SciTech Connect

    Gerald H. Luttrell; Chris J. Barbee; Peter J. Bethell; Chris J. Wood

    2005-06-30

    Dense medium cyclones (DMCs) are known to be efficient, high-tonnage devices suitable for upgrading particles in the 50 to 0.5 mm size range. This versatile separator, which uses centrifugal forces to enhance the separation of fine particles that cannot be upgraded in static dense medium separators, can be found in most modern coal plants and in a variety of mineral plants treating iron ore, dolomite, diamonds, potash and lead-zinc ores. Due to the high tonnage, a small increase in DMC efficiency can have a large impact on plant profitability. Unfortunately, the knowledge base required to properly design and operate DMCs has been seriously eroded during the past several decades. In an attempt to correct this problem, a set of engineering tools have been developed to allow producers to improve the efficiency of their DMC circuits. These tools include (1) low-cost density tracers that can be used by plant operators to rapidly assess DMC performance, (2) mathematical process models that can be used to predict the influence of changes in operating and design variables on DMC performance, and (3) an expert advisor system that provides plant operators with a user-friendly interface for evaluating, optimizing and trouble-shooting DMC circuits. The field data required to develop these tools was collected by conducting detailed sampling and evaluation programs at several industrial plant sites. These data were used to demonstrate the technical, economic and environmental benefits that can be realized through the application of these engineering tools.

  10. Dense Hypervelocity Plasma Jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Witherspoon, F. Douglas; Case, Andrew; Phillips, Michael W.

    2006-10-01

    High velocity dense plasma jets are under continued experimental development for a variety of fusion applications including refueling, disruption mitigation, rotation drive, and magnetized target fusion. The technical goal is to accelerate plasma slugs of density >10^17 cm-3 and total mass >100 micrograms to velocities >200 km/s. The approach utilizes symmetrical injection of very high density plasma into a coaxial EM accelerator having a tailored cross-section geometry to prevent formation of the blow-by instability. Injected plasma is generated by electrothermal capillary discharges using either cylindrical capillaries or a newer toroidal spark gap arrangement that has worked at pressures as low as 3.5 x10-6 Torr in bench tests. Experimental plasma data will be presented for a complete 32 injector accelerator system recently built for driving rotation in the Maryland MCX experiment which utilizes the cylindrical capillaries, and also for a 50 spark gap test unit currently under construction.

  11. Science Equity in Third Grade

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kohlhaas, Kay; Lin, Hsin-Hui; Chu, Kwang-Lee

    2010-01-01

    The earliest national accountability tests occur at the fourth-grade level and the outcomes are aggregated. This national study exposes the depth of science education inequities a full year earlier by disaggregating third graders' demographic data with the science performance. A full 3-way ANOVA model was applied to test the 3 main effects…

  12. Geometrical Optics of Dense Aerosols

    SciTech Connect

    Hay, Michael J.; Valeo, Ernest J.; Fisch, Nathaniel J.

    2013-04-24

    Assembling a free-standing, sharp-edged slab of homogeneous material that is much denser than gas, but much more rare ed than a solid, is an outstanding technological challenge. The solution may lie in focusing a dense aerosol to assume this geometry. However, whereas the geometrical optics of dilute aerosols is a well-developed fi eld, the dense aerosol limit is mostly unexplored. Yet controlling the geometrical optics of dense aerosols is necessary in preparing such a material slab. Focusing dense aerosols is shown here to be possible, but the nite particle density reduces the eff ective Stokes number of the flow, a critical result for controlled focusing. __________________________________________________

  13. Compatibility of Medical-Grade Polymers with Dense CO2

    PubMed Central

    Jiménez, A; Thompson, G L; Matthews, M A; Davis, T A; Crocker, K; Lyons, J S; Trapotsis, A

    2009-01-01

    This study reports the effect of exposure to liquid carbon dioxide on the mechanical properties of selected medical polymers. The tensile strengths and moduli of fourteen polymers are reported. Materials were exposed to liquid CO2, or CO2 + trace amounts of aqueous H2O2, at 6.5 MPa and ambient temperature. Carbon dioxide uptake, swelling, and distortion were observed for the more amorphous polymers while polymers with higher crystallinity showed little effect from CO2 exposure. Changes in tensile strength were not statistically significant for most plastics, and most indicated good tolerance to liquid CO2. These results are relevant to evaluating the potential of liquid CO2-based sterilization technology. PMID:19756235

  14. Ariel's Densely Pitted Surface

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1986-01-01

    This mosaic of the four highest-resolution images of Ariel represents the most detailed Voyager 2 picture of this satellite of Uranus. The images were taken through the clear filter of Voyager's narrow-angle camera on Jan. 24, 1986, at a distance of about 130,000 kilometers (80,000 miles). Ariel is about 1,200 km (750 mi) in diameter; the resolution here is 2.4 km (1.5 mi). Much of Ariel's surface is densely pitted with craters 5 to 10 km (3 to 6 mi) across. These craters are close to the threshold of detection in this picture. Numerous valleys and fault scarps crisscross the highly pitted terrain. Voyager scientists believe the valleys have formed over down-dropped fault blocks (graben); apparently, extensive faulting has occurred as a result of expansion and stretching of Ariel's crust. The largest fault valleys, near the terminator at right, as well as a smooth region near the center of this image, have been partly filled with deposits that are younger and less heavily cratered than the pitted terrain. Narrow, somewhat sinuous scarps and valleys have been formed, in turn, in these young deposits. It is not yet clear whether these sinuous features have been formed by faulting or by the flow of fluids.

    JPL manages the Voyager project for NASA's Office of Space Science.

  15. Dense Hypervelocity Plasma Jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Case, Andrew; Witherspoon, F. Douglas; Messer, Sarah; Bomgardner, Richard; Phillips, Michael; van Doren, David; Elton, Raymond; Uzun-Kaymak, Ilker

    2007-11-01

    We are developing high velocity dense plasma jets for fusion and HEDP applications. Traditional coaxial plasma accelerators suffer from the blow-by instability which limits the mass accelerated to high velocity. In the current design blow-by is delayed by a combination of electrode shaping and use of a tailored plasma armature created by injection of a high density plasma at a few eV generated by arrays of capillary discharges or sparkgaps. Experimental data will be presented for a complete 32 injector gun system built for driving rotation in the Maryland MCX experiment, including data on penetration of the plasma jet through a magnetic field. We present spectroscopic measurements of plasma velocity, temperature, and density, as well as total momentum measured using a ballistic pendulum. Measurements are in agreement with each other and with time of flight data from photodiodes and a multichannel PMT. Plasma density is above 10^15 cm-3, velocities range up to about 100 km/s. Preliminary results from a quadrature heterodyne HeNe interferometer are consistent with these results.

  16. A new mechanism for dendritic pattern formation in dense systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oikawa, Noriko; Kurita, Rei

    2016-06-01

    Patterns are often formed when particles cluster: Since patterns reflect the connectivity of different types of material, the emergence of patterns affects the physical and chemical properties of systems and shares a close relationship to their macroscopic functions. A radial dendritic pattern (RDP) is observed in many systems such as snow crystals, polymer crystals and biological systems. Although most of these systems are considered as dense particle suspensions, the mechanism of RDP formation in dense particle systems is not yet understood. It should be noted that the diffusion limited aggregation model is not applicable to RDP formation in dense systems, but in dilute particle systems. Here, we propose a simple model that exhibits RDP formation in a dense particle system. The model potential for the inter-particle interaction is composed of two parts, a repulsive and an attractive force. The repulsive force is applied to all the particles all the time and the attractive force is exerted only among particles inside a circular domain, which expands at a certain speed as a wave front propagating from a preselected centre. It is found that an RDP is formed if the velocity of the wave front that triggers the attractive interaction is of the same order of magnitude as the time scale defined by the aggregation speed.

  17. A new mechanism for dendritic pattern formation in dense systems.

    PubMed

    Oikawa, Noriko; Kurita, Rei

    2016-01-01

    Patterns are often formed when particles cluster: Since patterns reflect the connectivity of different types of material, the emergence of patterns affects the physical and chemical properties of systems and shares a close relationship to their macroscopic functions. A radial dendritic pattern (RDP) is observed in many systems such as snow crystals, polymer crystals and biological systems. Although most of these systems are considered as dense particle suspensions, the mechanism of RDP formation in dense particle systems is not yet understood. It should be noted that the diffusion limited aggregation model is not applicable to RDP formation in dense systems, but in dilute particle systems. Here, we propose a simple model that exhibits RDP formation in a dense particle system. The model potential for the inter-particle interaction is composed of two parts, a repulsive and an attractive force. The repulsive force is applied to all the particles all the time and the attractive force is exerted only among particles inside a circular domain, which expands at a certain speed as a wave front propagating from a preselected centre. It is found that an RDP is formed if the velocity of the wave front that triggers the attractive interaction is of the same order of magnitude as the time scale defined by the aggregation speed. PMID:27353447

  18. A new mechanism for dendritic pattern formation in dense systems

    PubMed Central

    Oikawa, Noriko; Kurita, Rei

    2016-01-01

    Patterns are often formed when particles cluster: Since patterns reflect the connectivity of different types of material, the emergence of patterns affects the physical and chemical properties of systems and shares a close relationship to their macroscopic functions. A radial dendritic pattern (RDP) is observed in many systems such as snow crystals, polymer crystals and biological systems. Although most of these systems are considered as dense particle suspensions, the mechanism of RDP formation in dense particle systems is not yet understood. It should be noted that the diffusion limited aggregation model is not applicable to RDP formation in dense systems, but in dilute particle systems. Here, we propose a simple model that exhibits RDP formation in a dense particle system. The model potential for the inter-particle interaction is composed of two parts, a repulsive and an attractive force. The repulsive force is applied to all the particles all the time and the attractive force is exerted only among particles inside a circular domain, which expands at a certain speed as a wave front propagating from a preselected centre. It is found that an RDP is formed if the velocity of the wave front that triggers the attractive interaction is of the same order of magnitude as the time scale defined by the aggregation speed. PMID:27353447

  19. Growth hormone aggregates in the rat adenohypophysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Farrington, M.; Hymer, W. C.

    1990-01-01

    Although it has been known for some time that GH aggregates are contained within the rat anterior pituitary gland, the role that they might play in pituitary function is unknown. The present study examines this issue using the technique of Western blotting, which permitted visualization of 11 GH variants with apparent mol wt ranging from 14-88K. Electroelution of the higher mol wt variants from gels followed by their chemical reduction with beta-mercaptoethanol increased GH immunoassayability by about 5-fold. With the blot procedure we found 1) that GH aggregates greater than 44K were associated with a 40,000 x g sedimentable fraction; 2) that GH aggregates were not present in glands from thyroidectomized rats, but were in glands from the thyroidectomized rats injected with T4; 3) that GH aggregates were uniquely associated with a heavily granulated somatotroph subpopulation isolated by density gradient centrifugation; and 4) that high mol wt GH forms were released from the dense somatotrophs in culture, since treatment of the culture medium with beta-mercaptoethanol increased GH immunoassayability by about 5-fold. Taken together, the results show that high mol wt GH aggregates are contained in secretory granules of certain somatotrophs and are also released in aggregate form from these cells in vitro.

  20. Aggregation of organic matter by pelagic tunicates

    SciTech Connect

    Pomeroy, L.R.; Deibel, D.

    1980-07-01

    Three genera of pelagic tunicates were fed concentrates of natural seston and an axenic diatom culture. Fresh and up to 4-day-old feces resemble flocculent organic aggregates containing populations of microorganisms, as described from highly productive parts of the ocean, and older feces resemble the nearly sterile flocculent aggregates which are ubiquitous in surface waters. Fresh feces consist of partially digested phytoplankton and other inclusions in an amorphous gelatinous matrix. After 18 to 36 h, a population of large bacteria develops in the matrix and in some of the remains of phytoplankton contained in the feces. From 48 to 96 h, protozoan populations arise which consume the bacteria and sometimes the remains of the phytoplankton in the feces. Thereafter only a sparse population of microorganisms remains, and the particles begin to fragment. Water samples taken in or below dense populations of salps and doliolids contained greater numbers of flocculent aggregates than did samples from adjacent stations.

  1. Platelet aggregation test

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003669.htm Platelet aggregation test To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. The platelet aggregation blood test checks how well platelets , a ...

  2. Thermodynamics of Protein Aggregation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Osborne, Kenneth L.; Barz, Bogdan; Bachmann, Michael; Strodel, Birgit

    Amyloid protein aggregation characterizes many neurodegenerative disorders, including Alzheimer's, Parkinson's, and Creutz- feldt-Jakob disease. Evidence suggests that amyloid aggregates may share similar aggregation pathways, implying simulation of full-length amyloid proteins is not necessary for understanding amyloid formation. In this study we simulate GNNQQNY, the N-terminal prion-determining domain of the yeast protein Sup35 to investigate the thermodynamics of structural transitions during aggregation. We use a coarse-grained model with replica-exchange molecular dynamics to investigate the association of 3-, 6-, and 12-chain GNNQQNY systems and we determine the aggregation pathway by studying aggregation states of GN- NQQNY. We find that the aggregation of the hydrophilic GNNQQNY sequence is mainly driven by H-bond formation, leading to the formation of /3-sheets from the very beginning of the assembly process. Condensation (aggregation) and ordering take place simultaneously, which is underpinned by the occurrence of a single heat capacity peak only.

  3. Platelet aggregation test

    MedlinePlus

    The platelet aggregation blood test checks how well platelets , a part of blood, clump together and cause blood to clot. ... Decreased platelet aggregation may be due to: Autoimmune ... Fibrin degradation products Inherited platelet function defects ...

  4. Aggregation behavior of the southern chinch bug (Hemiptera: Blissidae)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The southern chinch bug, Blissus insularis Barber, forms dense, multigenerational aggregations in St. Augustinegrass lawns leading to grass death from sap feeding. We conducted several bioassays to better understand the signals responsible for the formation and maintenance of southern chinch bug ag...

  5. Study of colloidal particle Brownian aggregation by low-coherence fiber optic dynamic light scattering.

    PubMed

    Xia, Hui; Pang, Ru Yi; Zhang, Rui; Miao, Cai Xia; Wu, Xiao Yun; Hou, Xue Shun; Zhong, Cheng

    2012-06-15

    The aggregation kinetics of particles in dense polystyrene latex suspensions is studied by low-coherence fiber optic dynamic light scattering. Low-coherence fiber optic dynamic light scattering is used to measure the hydrodynamic radius of the aggregates. The aggregation kinetics data obtained can be fitted into a single exponential function, which is the characteristic of slow aggregation. It is found that the aggregation rate of particles increased with higher electrolyte levels and with larger particle concentrations. The experimental results can be explained by use of the Derjaruin-Landau-Verwey-Overbeer (DLVO) theory. PMID:22446146

  6. Population kinetics in dense plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Schlanges, M.; Bornath, T.; Prenzel, R.; Kremp, D.

    1996-07-01

    Starting from quantum kinetic equations, rate equations for the number densities of the different atomic states and equations for the energy density are derived which are valid for dense nonideal plasmas. Statistical expressions are presented for the rate coefficients taking into account many-body effects as dynamical screening, lowering of the ionization energy and Pauli-blocking. Based on these generalized expressions, the coefficients of impact ionization, three-body recombination, excitation and deexcitation are calculated for nonideal hydrogen and carbon plasmas. As a result, higher ionization and recombination rates are obtained in the dense plasma region. The influence of the many-body effects on the population kinetics, including density and temperature relaxation, is shown then for a dense hydrogen plasma. {copyright} {ital 1996 American Institute of Physics.}

  7. Aggregations in Flatworms.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Liffen, C. L.; Hunter, M.

    1980-01-01

    Described is a school project to investigate aggregations in flatworms which may be influenced by light intensity, temperature, and some form of chemical stimulus released by already aggregating flatworms. Such investigations could be adopted to suit many educational levels of science laboratory activities. (DS)

  8. Method for dense packing discovery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kallus, Yoav; Elser, Veit; Gravel, Simon

    2010-11-01

    The problem of packing a system of particles as densely as possible is foundational in the field of discrete geometry and is a powerful model in the material and biological sciences. As packing problems retreat from the reach of solution by analytic constructions, the importance of an efficient numerical method for conducting de novo (from-scratch) searches for dense packings becomes crucial. In this paper, we use the divide and concur framework to develop a general search method for the solution of periodic constraint problems, and we apply it to the discovery of dense periodic packings. An important feature of the method is the integration of the unit-cell parameters with the other packing variables in the definition of the configuration space. The method we present led to previously reported improvements in the densest-known tetrahedron packing. Here, we use the method to reproduce the densest-known lattice sphere packings and the best-known lattice kissing arrangements in up to 14 and 11 dimensions, respectively, providing numerical evidence for their optimality. For nonspherical particles, we report a dense packing of regular four-dimensional simplices with density ϕ=128/219≈0.5845 and with a similar structure to the densest-known tetrahedron packing.

  9. Colloidal aggregation in polymer blends.

    PubMed

    Benhamou, M; Ridouane, H; Hachem, E-K; Derouiche, A; Rahmoune, M

    2005-06-22

    We consider here a low-density assembly of colloidal particles immersed in a critical polymer mixture of two chemically incompatible polymers. We assume that, close to the critical point of the free mixture, the colloids prefer to be surrounded by one polymer (critical adsorption). As result, one is assisted to a reversible colloidal aggregation in the nonpreferred phase, due the existence of a long-range attractive Casimir force between particles. This aggregation is a phase transition driving the colloidal system from dilute to dense phases, as the usual gas-liquid transition. We are interested in a quantitative investigation of the phase diagram of the immersed colloids. We suppose that the positions of particles are disordered, and the disorder is quenched and follows a Gaussian distribution. To apprehend the problem, use is made of the standard phi(4) theory, where the field phi represents the composition fluctuation (order parameter), combined with the standard cumulant method. First, we derive the expression of the effective free energy of colloids and show that this is of Flory-Huggins type. Second, we find that the interaction parameter u between colloids is simply a linear combination of the isotherm compressibility and specific heat of the free mixture. Third, with the help of the derived effective free energy, we determine the complete shape of the phase diagram (binodal and spinodal) in the (Psi,u) plane, with Psi as the volume fraction of immersed colloids. The continuous "gas-liquid" transition occurs at some critical point K of coordinates (Psi(c) = 0.5,u(c) = 2). Finally, we emphasize that the present work is a natural extension of that, relative to simple liquid mixtures incorporating colloids. PMID:16035822

  10. Charged Dust Aggregate Interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matthews, Lorin; Hyde, Truell

    2015-11-01

    A proper understanding of the behavior of dust particle aggregates immersed in a complex plasma first requires a knowledge of the basic properties of the system. Among the most important of these are the net electrostatic charge and higher multipole moments on the dust aggregate as well as the manner in which the aggregate interacts with the local electrostatic fields. The formation of elongated, fractal-like aggregates levitating in the sheath electric field of a weakly ionized RF generated plasma discharge has recently been observed experimentally. The resulting data has shown that as aggregates approach one another, they can both accelerate and rotate. At equilibrium, aggregates are observed to levitate with regular spacing, rotating about their long axis aligned parallel to the sheath electric field. Since gas drag tends to slow any such rotation, energy must be constantly fed into the system in order to sustain it. A numerical model designed to analyze this motion provides both the electrostatic charge and higher multipole moments of the aggregate while including the forces due to thermophoresis, neutral gas drag, and the ion wakefield. This model will be used to investigate the ambient conditions leading to the observed interactions. This research is funded by NSF Grant 1414523.

  11. Aggregate and the environment

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Langer, William H.; Drew, Lawrence J.; Sachs, J.S.

    2004-01-01

    This book is designed to help you understand our aggregate resources-their importance, where they come from, how they are processed for our use, the environmental concerns related to their mining and processing, how those concerns are addressed, and the policies and regulations designed to safeguard workers, neighbors, and the environment from the negative impacts of aggregate mining. We hope this understanding will help prepare you to be involved in decisions that need to be made-individually and as a society-to be good stewards of our aggregate resources and our living planet.

  12. Warm Dense Matter: An Overview

    SciTech Connect

    Kalantar, D H; Lee, R W; Molitoris, J D

    2004-04-21

    This document provides a summary of the ''LLNL Workshop on Extreme States of Materials: Warm Dense Matter to NIF'' which was held on 20, 21, and 22 February 2002 at the Wente Conference Center in Livermore, CA. The warm dense matter regime, the transitional phase space region between cold material and hot plasma, is presently poorly understood. The drive to understand the nature of matter in this regime is sparking scientific activity worldwide. In addition to pure scientific interest, finite temperature dense matter occurs in the regimes of interest to the SSMP (Stockpile Stewardship Materials Program). So that obtaining a better understanding of WDM is important to performing effective experiments at, e.g., NIF, a primary mission of LLNL. At this workshop we examined current experimental and theoretical work performed at, and in conjunction with, LLNL to focus future activities and define our role in this rapidly emerging research area. On the experimental front LLNL plays a leading role in three of the five relevant areas and has the opportunity to become a major player in the other two. Discussion at the workshop indicated that the path forward for the experimental efforts at LLNL were two fold: First, we are doing reasonable baseline work at SPLs, HE, and High Energy Lasers with more effort encouraged. Second, we need to plan effectively for the next evolution in large scale facilities, both laser (NIF) and Light/Beam sources (LCLS/TESLA and GSI) Theoretically, LLNL has major research advantages in areas as diverse as the thermochemical approach to warm dense matter equations of state to first principles molecular dynamics simulations. However, it was clear that there is much work to be done theoretically to understand warm dense matter. Further, there is a need for a close collaboration between the generation of verifiable experimental data that can provide benchmarks of both the experimental techniques and the theoretical capabilities. The conclusion of this

  13. Impact of aggregate size and structure on the photocatalytic properties of TiO2 and ZnO nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Jassby, David; Farner Budarz, Jeffrey; Wiesner, Mark

    2012-07-01

    Aggregation of photocatalytic semiconductors was determined to reduce the generation of free hydroxyl radicals in aqueous suspensions in a fashion dependent on aggregate size and structure. Static light scattering measurements were used to follow temporal changes in the fractal dimension of aggregating TiO(2) and ZnO nanoparticles. At length scales comparable to nanoparticle size, the structure of aggregated TiO(2) nanoparticles was independent of particle stability and the associated aggregation rate, consistent with the fused nature of TiO(2) primary particles in the initial suspension. In contrast, ZnO aggregates were characterized by smaller fractal dimensions when ionic strength, and the resulting aggregation rate, were increased. The photocatalytic activity of ZnO and TiO(2) in generating free hydroxyl radicals varied with aggregate structure and size, consistent with theory that predicts reduced reactivity as aggregates become larger and more dense. PMID:22225505

  14. Protein Colloidal Aggregation Project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oliva-Buisson, Yvette J. (Compiler)

    2014-01-01

    To investigate the pathways and kinetics of protein aggregation to allow accurate predictive modeling of the process and evaluation of potential inhibitors to prevalent diseases including cataract formation, chronic traumatic encephalopathy, Alzheimer's Disease, Parkinson's Disease and others.

  15. Assessing relationships among properties of demolished concrete, recycled aggregate and recycled aggregate concrete using regression analysis.

    PubMed

    Tam, Vivian W Y; Wang, K; Tam, C M

    2008-04-01

    Recycled demolished concrete (DC) as recycled aggregate (RA) and recycled aggregate concrete (RAC) is generally suitable for most construction applications. Low-grade applications, including sub-base and roadwork, have been implemented in many countries; however, higher-grade activities are rarely considered. This paper examines relationships among DC characteristics, properties of their RA and strength of their RAC using regression analysis. Ten samples collected from demolition sites are examined. The results show strong correlation among the DC samples, properties of RA and RAC. It should be highlighted that inferior quality of DC will lower the quality of RA and thus their RAC. Prediction of RAC strength is also formulated from the DC characteristics and the RA properties. From that, the RAC performance from DC and RA can be estimated. In addition, RAC design requirements can also be developed at the initial stage of concrete demolition. Recommendations are also given to improve the future concreting practice. PMID:17764837

  16. Boundary Preserving Dense Local Regions.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jaechul; Grauman, Kristen

    2015-05-01

    We propose a dense local region detector to extract features suitable for image matching and object recognition tasks. Whereas traditional local interest operators rely on repeatable structures that often cross object boundaries (e.g., corners, scale-space blobs), our sampling strategy is driven by segmentation, and thus preserves object boundaries and shape. At the same time, whereas existing region-based representations are sensitive to segmentation parameters and object deformations, our novel approach to robustly sample dense sites and determine their connectivity offers better repeatability. In extensive experiments, we find that the proposed region detector provides significantly better repeatability and localization accuracy for object matching compared to an array of existing feature detectors. In addition, we show our regions lead to excellent results on two benchmark tasks that require good feature matching: weakly supervised foreground discovery and nearest neighbor-based object recognition. PMID:26353319

  17. Dense, finely, grained composite materials

    DOEpatents

    Dunmead, Stephen D.; Holt, Joseph B.; Kingman, Donald D.; Munir, Zuhair A.

    1990-01-01

    Dense, finely grained composite materials comprising one or more ceramic phase or phase and one or more metallic and/or intermetallic phase or phases are produced by combustion synthesis. Spherical ceramic grains are homogeneously dispersed within the matrix. Methods are provided, which include the step of applying mechanical pressure during or immediately after ignition, by which the microstructures in the resulting composites can be controllably selected.

  18. Dense periodic packings of tori

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gabbrielli, Ruggero; Jiao, Yang; Torquato, Salvatore

    2014-02-01

    Dense packings of nonoverlapping bodies in three-dimensional Euclidean space R3 are useful models of the structure of a variety of many-particle systems that arise in the physical and biological sciences. Here we investigate the packing behavior of congruent ring tori in R3, which are multiply connected nonconvex bodies of genus 1, as well as horn and spindle tori. Specifically, we analytically construct a family of dense periodic packings of unlinked tori guided by the organizing principles originally devised for simply connected solid bodies [22 Torquato and Jiao, Phys. Rev. E 86, 011102 (2012), 10.1103/PhysRevE.86.011102]. We find that the horn tori as well as certain spindle and ring tori can achieve a packing density not only higher than that of spheres (i.e., π /√18 =0.7404...) but also higher than the densest known ellipsoid packings (i.e., 0.7707...). In addition, we study dense packings of clusters of pair-linked ring tori (i.e., Hopf links), which can possess much higher densities than corresponding packings consisting of unlinked tori.

  19. Constructing Dense Graphs with Unique Hamiltonian Cycles

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lynch, Mark A. M.

    2012-01-01

    It is not difficult to construct dense graphs containing Hamiltonian cycles, but it is difficult to generate dense graphs that are guaranteed to contain a unique Hamiltonian cycle. This article presents an algorithm for generating arbitrarily large simple graphs containing "unique" Hamiltonian cycles. These graphs can be turned into dense graphs…

  20. Copepod Aggregations: Influences of Physics and Collective Behavior

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flierl, Glenn R.; Woods, Nicholas W.

    2015-02-01

    Dense copepod aggregations form in Massachusetts Bay and provide an important resource for right whales. We re-examine the processes which might account for the high concentrations, investigating both horizontally convergent flow, which can increase the density of depth-keeping organisms, and social behavior. We argue that the two act in concert: social behavior creates small dense patches (on the scale of a few sensing radii); physical stirring brings them together so that they merge into aggregations with larger scales; it also moves them into areas of physical convergence which retain the increasingly large patch. But the turbulence can also break this apart, suggesting that the overall high density in the convergence zone will not be uniform but will instead be composed of multiple transient patches (which are still much larger than the sensing scale).

  1. Aggregate of nanoparticles: rheological and mechanical properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yu; Wu, Xiaojun; Yang, Wei; Zhai, Yuanming; Xie, Banghu; Yang, Mingbo

    2011-12-01

    The understanding of the rheological and mechanical properties of nanoparticle aggregates is important for the application of nanofillers in nanocompoistes. In this work, we report a rheological study on the rheological and mechanical properties of nano-silica agglomerates in the form of gel network mainly constructed by hydrogen bonds. The elastic model for rubber is modified to analyze the elastic behavior of the agglomerates. By this modified elastic model, the size of the network mesh can be estimated by the elastic modulus of the network which can be easily obtained by rheology. The stress to destroy the aggregates, i.e., the yield stress ( σ y ), and the elastic modulus ( G') of the network are found to be depended on the concentration of nano-silica ( ϕ, wt.%) with the power of 4.02 and 3.83, respectively. Via this concentration dependent behavior, we can extrapolate two important mechanical parameters for the agglomerates in a dense packing state ( ϕ = 1): the shear modulus and the yield stress. Under large deformation (continuous shear flow), the network structure of the aggregates will experience destruction and reconstruction, which gives rise to fluctuations in the viscosity and a shear-thinning behavior.

  2. Probing cold dense nuclear matter.

    PubMed

    Subedi, R; Shneor, R; Monaghan, P; Anderson, B D; Aniol, K; Annand, J; Arrington, J; Benaoum, H; Benmokhtar, F; Boeglin, W; Chen, J-P; Choi, Seonho; Cisbani, E; Craver, B; Frullani, S; Garibaldi, F; Gilad, S; Gilman, R; Glamazdin, O; Hansen, J-O; Higinbotham, D W; Holmstrom, T; Ibrahim, H; Igarashi, R; de Jager, C W; Jans, E; Jiang, X; Kaufman, L J; Kelleher, A; Kolarkar, A; Kumbartzki, G; Lerose, J J; Lindgren, R; Liyanage, N; Margaziotis, D J; Markowitz, P; Marrone, S; Mazouz, M; Meekins, D; Michaels, R; Moffit, B; Perdrisat, C F; Piasetzky, E; Potokar, M; Punjabi, V; Qiang, Y; Reinhold, J; Ron, G; Rosner, G; Saha, A; Sawatzky, B; Shahinyan, A; Sirca, S; Slifer, K; Solvignon, P; Sulkosky, V; Urciuoli, G M; Voutier, E; Watson, J W; Weinstein, L B; Wojtsekhowski, B; Wood, S; Zheng, X-C; Zhu, L

    2008-06-13

    The protons and neutrons in a nucleus can form strongly correlated nucleon pairs. Scattering experiments, in which a proton is knocked out of the nucleus with high-momentum transfer and high missing momentum, show that in carbon-12 the neutron-proton pairs are nearly 20 times as prevalent as proton-proton pairs and, by inference, neutron-neutron pairs. This difference between the types of pairs is due to the nature of the strong force and has implications for understanding cold dense nuclear systems such as neutron stars. PMID:18511658

  3. Probing Cold Dense Nuclear Matter

    SciTech Connect

    Subedi, Ramesh; Shneor, R.; Monaghan, Peter; Anderson, Bryon; Aniol, Konrad; Annand, John; Arrington, John; Benaoum, Hachemi; Benmokhtar, Fatiha; Bertozzi, William; Boeglin, Werner; Chen, Jian-Ping; Choi, Seonho; Cisbani, Evaristo; Craver, Brandon; Frullani, Salvatore; Garibaldi, Franco; Gilad, Shalev; Gilman, Ronald; Glamazdin, Oleksandr; Hansen, Jens-Ole; Higinbotham, Douglas; Holmstrom, Timothy; Ibrahim, Hassan; Igarashi, Ryuichi; De Jager, Cornelis; Jans, Eddy; Jiang, Xiaodong; Kaufman, Lisa; Kelleher, Aidan; Kolarkar, Ameya; Kumbartzki, Gerfried; LeRose, John; Lindgren, Richard; Liyanage, Nilanga; Margaziotis, Demetrius; Markowitz, Pete; Marrone, Stefano; Mazouz, Malek; Meekins, David; Michaels, Robert; Moffit, Bryan; Perdrisat, Charles; Piasetzky, Eliazer; Potokar, Milan; Punjabi, Vina; Qiang, Yi; Reinhold, Joerg; Ron, Guy; Rosner, Guenther; Saha, Arunava; Sawatzky, Bradley; Shahinyan, Albert; Sirca, Simon; Slifer, Karl; Solvignon, Patricia; Sulkosky, Vince; Sulkosky, Vincent; Sulkosky, Vince; Sulkosky, Vincent; Urciuoli, Guido; Voutier, Eric; Watson, John; Weinstein, Lawrence; Wojtsekhowski, Bogdan; Wood, Stephen; Zheng, Xiaochao; Zhu, Lingyan

    2008-06-01

    The protons and neutrons in a nucleus can form strongly correlated nucleon pairs. Scattering experiments, in which a proton is knocked out of the nucleus with high-momentum transfer and high missing momentum, show that in carbon-12 the neutron-proton pairs are nearly 20 times as prevalent as proton-proton pairs and, by inference, neutron-neutron pairs. This difference between the types of pairs is due to the nature of the strong force and has implications for understanding cold dense nuclear systems such as neutron stars.

  4. Improving Grading Consistency through Grade Lift Reporting

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Millet, Ido

    2010-01-01

    We define Grade Lift as the difference between average class grade and average cumulative class GPA. This metric provides an assessment of how lenient the grading was for a given course. In 2006, we started providing faculty members individualized Grade Lift reports reflecting their position relative to an anonymously plotted school-wide…

  5. Technology meets aggregate

    SciTech Connect

    Wilson, C.; Swan, C.

    2007-07-01

    New technology carried out at Tufts University and the University of Massachusetts on synthetic lightweight aggregate has created material from various qualities of fly ash from coal-fired power plants for use in different engineered applications. In pilot scale manufacturing tests an 'SLA' containing 80% fly ash and 20% mixed plastic waste from packaging was produced by 'dry blending' mixed plastic with high carbon fly ash. A trial run was completed to produce concrete masonry unit (CMU) blocks at a full-scale facility. It has been shown that SLA can be used as a partial substitution of a traditional stone aggregate in hot asphalt mix. 1 fig., 2 photos.

  6. Ontogeny of the serotonergic projection to rat neocortex: transient expression of a dense innervation to primary sensory areas

    SciTech Connect

    D'Amato, R.J.; Blue, M.E.; Largent, B.L.; Lynch, D.R.; Ledbetter, D.J.; Molliver, M.E.; Snyder, S.H.

    1987-06-01

    The development of serotonergic innervation to rat cerebral cortex was characterized by immunohistochemical localization of serotonin combined with autoradiographic imaging of serotonin-uptake sites. In neonatal rat, a transient, dense, serotonergic innervation appears in all primary sensory areas of cortex. In somatosensory cortex, dense patches of serotonergic innervation are aligned with specialized cellular aggregates called barrels. The dense patches are not apparent after 3 weeks of age, and the serotonergic innervation becomes more uniform in adult neocortex. This precocious neonatal serotonergic innervation may play a transient physiologic role in sensory areas of cortex or may exert a trophic influence on the development of cortical circuitry and thalamocortical connections.

  7. Magnetism in Dense Quark Matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferrer, Efrain J.; de la Incera, Vivian

    We review the mechanisms via which an external magnetic field can affect the ground state of cold and dense quark matter. In the absence of a magnetic field, at asymptotically high densities, cold quark matter is in the Color-Flavor-Locked (CFL) phase of color superconductivity characterized by three scales: the superconducting gap, the gluon Meissner mass, and the baryonic chemical potential. When an applied magnetic field becomes comparable with each of these scales, new phases and/or condensates may emerge. They include the magnetic CFL (MCFL) phase that becomes relevant for fields of the order of the gap scale; the paramagnetic CFL, important when the field is of the order of the Meissner mass, and a spin-one condensate associated to the magnetic moment of the Cooper pairs, significant at fields of the order of the chemical potential. We discuss the equation of state (EoS) of MCFL matter for a large range of field values and consider possible applications of the magnetic effects on dense quark matter to the astrophysics of compact stars.

  8. Aggregates, broccoli and cauliflower

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grey, Francois; Kjems, Jørgen K.

    1989-09-01

    Naturally grown structures with fractal characters like broccoli and cauliflower are discussed and compared with DLA-type aggregates. It is suggested that the branching density can be used to characterize the growth process and an experimental method to determine this parameter is proposed.

  9. Defensive allomones function as aggregation pheromones in diapausing Ladybird Beetles, Hippodamia convergens.

    PubMed

    Wheeler, Christopher A; Cardé, Ring T

    2013-06-01

    Identification of the stimuli responsible for the formation of an aggregation can be used to distinguish between social and non-social aggregations and help in the process of identifying the adaptive benefits of the gregarious behavior. The convergent ladybird beetle, Hippodamia convergens, forms dense aggregations during winter diapause. The mechanisms of conspecific attraction and hibernacula site selection of H. convergens are not well understood. In laboratory and field bioassays, we evaluated the role of three defensive compounds in the formation of H. convergens aggregations. Diapausing H. convergens aggregated within the section of an arena exposed to alkylmethoxypyrazines. 2-Isobutyl-3-methoxypyrazine (IBMP) caused the strongest aggregative effect. Beetles also aggregated to some doses of 2-sec-butyl-3-methoxypyrazine, but appeared to be repelled at higher doses. A third constituent, 2-isopropyl-3-methoxypyrazine, generally had little effect on the distribution of beetles, although the highest dose tested was repellent. Beetles also aggregated to a blend of these alkylmethoxypyrazines at their natural ratio. During fall migration to overwintering sites, more beetles aggregated in artificial hibernacula baited with IBMP, confirming its function as an aggregation pheromone. These three pyrazines also function as warning odors that, in conjunction with other aposematic displays (contrasting red and black coloration, gregarious behavior, reflex bleeding), contribute to the multi-modal, anti-predatory defense of coccinellid beetles and some other arthropods. Confirmation of the role of some alkylmethoxypyrazines in coccinellid aggregations suggests that these defensive allomones have been co-opted for intraspecific communication. PMID:23657436

  10. Uniformly dense polymeric foam body

    DOEpatents

    Whinnery, Jr., Leroy

    2003-07-15

    A method for providing a uniformly dense polymer foam body having a density between about 0.013 g/cm.sup.3 to about 0.5 g/cm.sup.3 is disclosed. The method utilizes a thermally expandable polymer microsphere material wherein some of the microspheres are unexpanded and some are only partially expanded. It is shown that by mixing the two types of materials in appropriate ratios to achieve the desired bulk final density, filling a mold with this mixture so as to displace all or essentially all of the internal volume of the mold, heating the mold for a predetermined interval at a temperature above about 130.degree. C., and then cooling the mold to a temperature below 80.degree. C. the molded part achieves a bulk density which varies by less then about .+-.6% everywhere throughout the part volume.

  11. DPIS for warm dense matter

    SciTech Connect

    Kondo, K.; Kanesue, T.; Horioka, K.; Okamura, M.

    2010-05-23

    Warm Dense Matter (WDM) offers an challenging problem because WDM, which is beyond ideal plasma, is in a low temperature and high density state with partially degenerate electrons and coupled ions. WDM is a common state of matter in astrophysical objects such as cores of giant planets and white dwarfs. The WDM studies require large energy deposition into a small target volume in a shorter time than the hydrodynamical time and need uniformity across the full thickness of the target. Since moderate energy ion beams ({approx} 0.3 MeV/u) can be useful tool for WDM physics, we propose WDM generation using Direct Plasma Injection Scheme (DPIS). In the DPIS, laser ion source is connected to the Radio Frequency Quadrupole (RFQ) linear accelerator directly without the beam transport line. DPIS with a realistic final focus and a linear accelerator can produce WDM.

  12. Dense inhibitory connectivity in neocortex

    PubMed Central

    Fino, Elodie; Yuste, Rafael

    2011-01-01

    Summary The connectivity diagram of neocortical circuits is still unknown, and there are conflicting data as to whether cortical neurons are wired specifically or not. To investigate the basic structure of cortical microcircuits, we use a novel two-photon photostimulation technique that enables the systematic mapping of synaptic connections with single-cell resolution. We map the inhibitory connectivity between upper layers somatostatin-positive GABAergic interneurons and pyramidal cells in mouse frontal cortex. Most, and sometimes all, inhibitory neurons are locally connected to every sampled pyramidal cell. This dense inhibitory connectivity is found at both young and mature developmental ages. Inhibitory innervation of neighboring pyramidal cells is similar, regardless of whether they are connected among themselves or not. We conclude that local inhibitory connectivity is promiscuous, does not form subnetworks and can approach the theoretical limit of a completely connected synaptic matrix. PMID:21435562

  13. Viscoelastic behavior of dense microemulsions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cametti, C.; Codastefano, P.; D'arrigo, G.; Tartaglia, P.; Rouch, J.; Chen, S. H.

    1990-09-01

    We have performed extensive measurements of shear viscosity, ultrasonic absorption, and sound velocity in a ternary system consisting of water-decane-sodium di(2-ethylhexyl)sulfo- succinate(AOT), in the one-phase region where it forms a water-in-oil microemulsion. We observe a rapid increase of the static shear viscosity in the dense microemulsion region. Correspondingly the sound absorption shows unambiguous evidence of a viscoelastic behavior. The absorption data for various volume fractions and temperatures can be reduced to a universal curve by scaling both the absorption and the frequency by the measured static shear viscosity. The sound absorption can be interpreted as coming from the high-frequency tail of the viscoelastic relaxation, describable by a Cole-Cole relaxation formula with unusually small elastic moduli.

  14. The performance of dense medium processes

    SciTech Connect

    Horsfall, D.W.

    1993-12-31

    Dense medium washing in baths and cyclones is widely carried out in South Africa. The paper shows the reason for the preferred use of dense medium processes rather than gravity concentrators such as jigs. The factors leading to efficient separation in baths are listed and an indication given of the extent to which these factors may be controlled and embodied in the deployment of baths and dense medium cyclones in the planning stages of a plant.

  15. Grading More Accurately

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rom, Mark Carl

    2011-01-01

    Grades matter. College grading systems, however, are often ad hoc and prone to mistakes. This essay focuses on one factor that contributes to high-quality grading systems: grading accuracy (or "efficiency"). I proceed in several steps. First, I discuss the elements of "efficient" (i.e., accurate) grading. Next, I present analytical results…

  16. Photophoretic force on aggregate grains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matthews, Lorin S.; Kimery, Jesse B.; Wurm, Gerhard; de Beule, Caroline; Kuepper, Markus; Hyde, Truell W.

    2016-01-01

    The photophoretic force may impact planetary formation by selectively moving solid particles based on their composition and structure. This generates collision velocities between grains of different sizes and sorts the dust in protoplanetary discs by composition. This numerical simulation studied the photophoretic force acting on fractal dust aggregates of μm-scale radii. Results show that aggregates tend to have greater photophoretic drift velocities than spheres of similar mass or radii, though with a greater spread in the velocity. While the drift velocities of compact aggregates continue to increase as the aggregates grow larger in size, fluffy aggregates have drift velocities which are relatively constant with size. Aggregates formed from an initially polydisperse size distribution of dust grains behave differently from aggregates formed from a monodisperse population, having smaller drift velocities with directions which deviate substantially from the direction of illumination. Results agree with microgravity experiments which show the difference of photophoretic forces with aggregation state.

  17. High Modulus Asphalt Concrete with Dolomite Aggregates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haritonovs, V.; Tihonovs, J.; Smirnovs, J.

    2015-11-01

    Dolomite is one of the most widely available sedimentary rocks in the territory of Latvia. Dolomite quarries contain about 1,000 million tons of this material. However, according to Latvian Road Specifications, this dolomite cannot be used for average and high intensity roads because of its low quality, mainly, its LA index (The Los Angeles abrasion test). Therefore, mostly the imported magmatic rocks (granite, diabase, gabbro, basalt) or imported dolomite are used, which makes asphalt expensive. However, practical experience shows that even with these high quality materials roads exhibit rutting, fatigue, and thermal cracks. The aim of the research is to develop a high performance asphalt concrete for base and binder courses using only locally available aggregates. In order to achieve resistance against deformations at a high ambient temperature, a hard grade binder was used. Workability, fatigue and thermal cracking resistance, as well as sufficient water resistance is achieved by low porosity (3-5%) and higher binder content compared to traditional asphalt mixtures. The design of the asphalt includes a combination of empirical and performance based tests, which in laboratory circumstances allow simulating traffic and environmental loads. High performance AC 16 base asphalt concrete was created using local dolomite aggregate with polymer modified (PMB 10/40-65) and hard grade (B20/30) bitumen. The mixtures were specified based on fundamental properties in accordance with EN 13108-1 standard.

  18. Proteins aggregation and human diseases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Chin-Kun

    2015-04-01

    Many human diseases and the death of most supercentenarians are related to protein aggregation. Neurodegenerative diseases include Alzheimer's disease (AD), Huntington's disease (HD), Parkinson's disease (PD), frontotemporallobar degeneration, etc. Such diseases are due to progressive loss of structure or function of neurons caused by protein aggregation. For example, AD is considered to be related to aggregation of Aβ40 (peptide with 40 amino acids) and Aβ42 (peptide with 42 amino acids) and HD is considered to be related to aggregation of polyQ (polyglutamine) peptides. In this paper, we briefly review our recent discovery of key factors for protein aggregation. We used a lattice model to study the aggregation rates of proteins and found that the probability for a protein sequence to appear in the conformation of the aggregated state can be used to determine the temperature at which proteins can aggregate most quickly. We used molecular dynamics and simple models of polymer chains to study relaxation and aggregation of proteins under various conditions and found that when the bending-angle dependent and torsion-angle dependent interactions are zero or very small, then protein chains tend to aggregate at lower temperatures. All atom models were used to identify a key peptide chain for the aggregation of insulin chains and to find that two polyQ chains prefer anti-parallel conformation. It is pointed out that in many cases, protein aggregation does not result from protein mis-folding. A potential drug from Chinese medicine was found for Alzheimer's disease.

  19. Percolation in dense storage arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirkpatrick, Scott; Wilcke, Winfried W.; Garner, Robert B.; Huels, Harald

    2002-11-01

    As computers and their accessories become smaller, cheaper, and faster the providers of news, retail sales, and other services we now take for granted on the Internet have met their increasing computing needs by putting more and more computers, hard disks, power supplies, and the data communications linking them to each other and to the rest of the wired world into ever smaller spaces. This has created a new and quite interesting percolation problem. It is no longer desirable to fix computers, storage or switchgear which fail in such a dense array. Attempts to repair things are all too likely to make problems worse. The alternative approach, letting units “fail in place”, be removed from service and routed around, means that a data communications environment will evolve with an underlying regular structure but a very high density of missing pieces. Some of the properties of this kind of network can be described within the existing paradigm of site or bond percolation on lattices, but other important questions have not been explored. I will discuss 3D arrays of hundreds to thousands of storage servers (something which it is quite feasible to build in the next few years), and show that bandwidth, but not percolation fraction or shortest path lengths, is the critical factor affected by the “fail in place” disorder. Redundancy strategies traditionally employed in storage systems may have to be revised. Novel approaches to routing information among the servers have been developed to minimize the impact.

  20. Protein Aggregates May Differ in Water Entrapment but Are Comparable in Water Confinement.

    PubMed

    Urbonaite, V; de Jongh, H H J; van der Linden, E; Pouvreau, L

    2015-10-14

    Aggregate size and density are related to gel morphology. In the context of the water distribution in complex food systems, in this study, it was aimed to investigate whether protein aggregates varying in size and density differ in entrapped and confined water. Heat-set soy protein aggregates (1%, v/v) prepared in the presence of 3.5 mM divalent salts increased in size and decreased in apparent density following the salt type order MgSO4, MgCl2, CaSO4, and CaCl2. In the absence of applied (centrifugal) forces, larger and less dense aggregates entrap more water. When force is applied from larger and more deformable aggregates, more water can be displaced. Entrapped water of ∼8-13 g of water/g of protein is associated with (pelleted) aggregates, of which approximately 4.5-8.5 g of water/g of protein is not constrained in exchangeability with the solvent. The amount of confined water within aggregates was found to be independent of the aggregate density and accounted for ∼3.5 g of water/g of protein. Confined water in aggregates is hindered in its diffusion because of physical structure constraints and, therefore, not directly exchangeable with the solvent. These insights in the protein aggregate size and deformability in relation to water entrapment and confinement could be used to tune water holding on larger length scales when force is applied. PMID:26416128

  1. Dynamics of fire ant aggregations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tennenbaum, Michael; Hu, David; Fernandez-Nieves, Alberto

    Fire ant aggregations are an inherently active system. Each ant harvests its own energy and can convert it into motion. The motion of individual ants contributes non-trivially to the bulk material properties of the aggregation. We have measured some of these properties using plate-plate rheology, where the response to an applied external force or deformation is measured. In this talk, we will present data pertaining to the aggregation behavior in the absence of any external force. We quantify the aggregation dynamics by monitoring the rotation of the top plate and by measuring the normal force. We then compare the results with visualizations of 2D aggregations.

  2. The effect of particle aggregate shape on ultrasonic anisotropy in concentrated magnetic fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hornowski, T.; Józefczak, A.; Kołodziejczyk, B.; Timko, M.; Skumiel, A.; Rajnak, M.

    2015-05-01

    The effect of aggregate shape on the ultrasonic anisotropy in magnetic fluid was studied. Experimental results were compared with the theory of Ahuja and Hendee. Analysis of experimental results in terms of the theoretical model show the formation of ellipsoidal aggregates composed of several particles. The chain-like aggregates (h = b/a >> 1 a and b being minor and major axis lengths, respectively) are most conspicuous in diluted ferrofluids while dense ferrofluids are characterized by a more homogeneous drop-like (h = b/a > 1) structure. This finding is supported by some theoretical simulations.

  3. Sizing highly-ordered buckyball-shaped aggregates of colloidal nanoparticles by light extinction spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Onofri, F. R. A.; Barbosa, S.; Touré, O.; Woźniak, M.; Grisolia, C.

    2013-09-01

    We produced self-assembled, densely-packed and highly-ordered aggregates of silica nanoparticles arranged in a rather regular hexagonal-pentagonal surface lattice. To investigate the formation of these aggregates, produced by means of a spray drying method, we developed a light extinction setup and all related models. It is shown that with a geodesic dome model, to describe their morphology, and a T-matrix method to calculate their extinction cross sections, the size distribution and concentration of these flowing aggregates may be recovered from the inversion of transmission spectra.

  4. Microstructural analysis of Iberian expanded clay aggregates.

    PubMed

    Bogas, J Alexandre; Mauricio, António; Pereira, M F C

    2012-10-01

    This article presents a detailed study of the microstructure of Iberian expanded clay lightweight aggregates (LWA). Other than more commonly used mercury porosimetry (MP) and water absorption methods, the experimental study involves optical microscopy, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and microtomography (μ-CT). Pore connectivity and how it is deployed are shown to some degree, and the pore size spectrum is estimated. LWA are in general characterized by a dense outer shell up to 200 μm thick, encasing an inner cellular structure of 10-100 times bigger pore size. Aggregate pore sizes may span from some hundreds of nanometers up to over 1 mm, though the range of 1-25 μm is more typical. A noteworthy fraction of these pores is closed, and they are mainly up to 1 μm. It is also shown that macropore spatial arrangement is affected by the manufacturing process. A step forward is given to understanding how the outer shell and the inner pore network influence the mechanical and physical LWA properties, particularly the density and water absorption. The joint consideration of μ-CT and SEM seems to be the most appropriate methodology to study LWA microstructure. MP analysis is likely to distort LWA pore spectrum assessment. PMID:23031601

  5. Interstellar Dust Charging in Dense Molecular Clouds: Cosmic Ray Effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivlev, A. V.; Padovani, M.; Galli, D.; Caselli, P.

    2015-10-01

    The local cosmic-ray (CR) spectra are calculated for typical characteristic regions of a cold, dense molecular cloud to investigate two mechanisms of dust charging that have, thus far, been neglected: the collection of suprathermal CR electrons and protons by grains and photoelectric emission from grains due to the UV radiation generated by CRs. These two mechanisms add to the conventional charging by ambient plasma, produced in the cloud by CRs. We show that the CR-induced photoemission can dramatically modify the charge distribution function for submicron grains. We demonstrate the importance of the obtained results for dust coagulation: while the charging by ambient plasma alone leads to a strong Coulomb repulsion between grains and inhibits their further coagulation, the combination with the photoemission provides optimum conditions for the growth of large dust aggregates in a certain region of the cloud, corresponding to the densities n({{{H}}}2) between ˜104 and ˜106 cm-3. The charging effect of CRs is of a generic nature, and is therefore expected to operate not only in dense molecular clouds but also in the upper layers and the outer parts of protoplanetary disks.

  6. Aggregation-structure-elasticity relationship of gels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Hang-Shing

    Aerogel is a mesoporous, low-density material which is desirable for applications like thermal insulation and low-k interlayer dielectric. However, its lack of mechanical integrity hinders its development. Experiments have shown that aerogels exhibit a scaling relationship E ∝ rho m between modulus E and density rho, with the exponent m usually between 3 and 4. The objective of the dissertation is to use computer modeling to understand how the random aggregation process accounts for the fractal structure and the compliant nature of aerogels. Model gels were created by the diffusion-limited cluster-cluster aggregation (DLCA), which simulates random aggregation leading to the sol-gel transition. Then each resulting structure was modeled as an elastic beam network and numerically compressed using the finite element method (FEM). Analyses showed that the DLCA gels reproduced the scaling relationship after trimming the non-contributive dangling branches from the mechanically efficient looped networks. The dangling bond deflection (DEF) model was therefore developed to model the random rotational movement of the dangling branches and the subsequent loop structure formation. Model gels with extensive loops and negligible dangling branches were simulated by combining the DLCA and DEF models. Representation of the aerogel networks by the DLCADEF models was validated for the resemblance of the fractal geometry and elastic behavior. The lack of mechanical integrity in aerogels is a natural consequence of the random aggregation and the resulting fractal structure. Fractal clusters are created in the early stage of aggregation, each of which is characterized by a dense core and sparse perimeter. These clusters grow in size until they percolate at the gel point by knitting together at the perimeters. The gel structure possesses a "blob-and-link" architecture, with the blobs representing the rigid cores of the fractal clusters, and the links corresponding to the tenuous chains

  7. Transient magnetic birefringence for determining magnetic nanoparticle diameters in dense, highly light scattering media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Köber, Mariana; Moros, Maria; Grazú, Valeria; de la Fuente, Jesus M.; Luna, Mónica; Briones, Fernando

    2012-04-01

    The increasing use of biofunctionalized magnetic nanoparticles in biomedical applications calls for further development of characterization tools that allow for determining the interactions of the nanoparticles with the biological medium in situ. In cell-incubating conditions, for example, nanoparticles may aggregate and serum proteins adsorb on the particles, altering the nanoparticles’ performance and their interaction with cell membranes. In this work we show that the aggregation of spherical magnetite nanoparticles can be detected with high sensitivity in dense, highly light scattering media by making use of magnetically induced birefringence. Moreover, the hydrodynamic particle diameter distribution of anisometric nanoparticle aggregates can be determined directly in these media by monitoring the relaxation time of the magnetically induced birefringence. As a proof of concept, we performed measurements on nanoparticles included in an agarose gel, which scatters light in a similar way as a more complex biological medium but where particle-matrix interactions are weak. Magnetite nanoparticles were separated by agarose gel electrophoresis and the hydrodynamic diameter distribution was determined in situ. For the different particle functionalizations and agarose concentrations tested, we could show that gel electrophoresis did not yield a complete separation of monomers and small aggregates, and that the electrophoretic mobility of the aggregates decreased linearly with the hydrodynamic diameter. Furthermore, the rotational particle diffusion was not clearly affected by nanoparticle-gel interactions. The possibility to detect nanoparticle aggregates and their hydrodynamic diameters in complex scattering media like cell tissue makes transient magnetic birefringence an interesting technique for biological applications.

  8. Transient magnetic birefringence for determining magnetic nanoparticle diameters in dense, highly light scattering media.

    PubMed

    Köber, Mariana; Moros, Maria; Grazú, Valeria; de la Fuente, Jesus M; Luna, Mónica; Briones, Fernando

    2012-04-20

    The increasing use of biofunctionalized magnetic nanoparticles in biomedical applications calls for further development of characterization tools that allow for determining the interactions of the nanoparticles with the biological medium in situ. In cell-incubating conditions, for example, nanoparticles may aggregate and serum proteins adsorb on the particles, altering the nanoparticles' performance and their interaction with cell membranes. In this work we show that the aggregation of spherical magnetite nanoparticles can be detected with high sensitivity in dense, highly light scattering media by making use of magnetically induced birefringence. Moreover, the hydrodynamic particle diameter distribution of anisometric nanoparticle aggregates can be determined directly in these media by monitoring the relaxation time of the magnetically induced birefringence. As a proof of concept, we performed measurements on nanoparticles included in an agarose gel, which scatters light in a similar way as a more complex biological medium but where particle-matrix interactions are weak. Magnetite nanoparticles were separated by agarose gel electrophoresis and the hydrodynamic diameter distribution was determined in situ. For the different particle functionalizations and agarose concentrations tested, we could show that gel electrophoresis did not yield a complete separation of monomers and small aggregates, and that the electrophoretic mobility of the aggregates decreased linearly with the hydrodynamic diameter. Furthermore, the rotational particle diffusion was not clearly affected by nanoparticle-gel interactions. The possibility to detect nanoparticle aggregates and their hydrodynamic diameters in complex scattering media like cell tissue makes transient magnetic birefringence an interesting technique for biological applications. PMID:22456180

  9. Making Graphene Resist Aggregation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Jiayan

    Graphene-based sheets have stimulated great interest in many scientific disciplines and shown promise for wide potential applications. Among various ways of creating single atomic layer carbon sheets, a promising route for bulk production is to first chemically exfoliate graphite powders to graphene oxide (GO) sheets, followed by reduction to form chemically modified graphene (CMG). Due to the strong van der Waals attraction between graphene sheets, CMG tends to aggregate. The restacking of sheets is largely uncontrollable and irreversible, thus it reduces their processability and compromises properties such as accessible surface area. Strategies based on colloidal chemistry have been applied to keep CMG dispersed in solvents by introducing electrostatic repulsion to overcome the van der Waals attraction or adding spacers to increase the inter-sheet spacing. In this dissertation, two very different ideas that can prevent CMG aggregation without extensively modifying the material or introducing foreign spacer materials are introduced. The van der Waals potential decreases with reduced overlapping area between sheets. For CMG, reducing the lateral dimension from micrometer to nanometer scale should greatly enhance their colloidal stability with additional advantages of increased charge density and decreased probability to interact. The enhanced colloidal stability of GO and CMG nanocolloids makes them especially promising for spectroscopy based bio-sensing applications. For potential applications in a compact bulk solid form, the sheets were converted into paper-ball like structure using capillary compression in evaporating aerosol droplets. The crumpled graphene balls are stabilized by locally folded pi-pi stacked ridges, and do not unfold or collapse during common processing steps. They can tightly pack without greatly reducing the surface area. This form of graphene leads to scalable performance in energy storage. For example, planer sheets tend to aggregate and

  10. Structure of Viral Aggregates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barr, Stephen; Luijten, Erik

    2010-03-01

    The aggregation of virus particles is a particular form of colloidal self-assembly, since viruses of a give type are monodisperse and have identical, anisotropic surface charge distributions. In small-angle X-ray scattering experiments, the Qbeta virus was found to organize in different crystal structures in the presence of divalent salt and non-adsorbing polymer. Since a simple isotropic potential cannot explain the occurrence of all observed phases, we employ computer simulations to investigate how the surface charge distribution affects the virus interactions. Using a detailed model of the virus particle, we find an asymmetric ion distribution around the virus which gives rise to the different phases observed.

  11. Spreading and spontaneous motility of multicellular aggregates on soft substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brochard-Wyart, Françoise

    2013-03-01

    We first describe the biomechanics of multicellular aggregates, a model system for tissues and tumors. We first characterize the tissue mechanical properties (surface tension, elasticity, viscosity) by a new pipette aspiration technique. The aggregate exhibits a viscoelastic response but, unlike an inert fluid, we observe aggregate reinforcement with pressure, which for a narrow range of pressures results in pulsed contractions or shivering. We interpret this reinforcement as a mechanosensitive active response of the acto-myosin cortex. Such an active behavior has previously been found to cause tissue pulsation during dorsal closure of Drosophila embryo. We then describe the spreading of aggregates on rigid glass substrates, varying both intercellular and substrate adhesion. We find both partial and complete wetting regimes. For the dynamics, we find a universal spreading law at short time, analogous to that of a viscoelastic drop. At long time, we observe, for strong substrate adhesion, a precursor film spreading around the aggregate. Depending on aggregate cohesion, this precursor film can be a dense cellular monolayer (liquid state) or consist of individual cells escaping from the aggregate body (gas state). The transition from liquid to gas state appears also to be present in the progression of a tumor from noninvasive to metastatic, known as the epithelial-mesenchymal transition. Finally, we describe the effect of the substrate rigidity on the phase diagram of wetting. On soft gels decorated with fibronectin and strongly cohesive aggregates, we have observed a wetting transition induced by the substrate rigidity: on ultra soft gels, below an elastic modulus Ec the aggregates do not spread, whereas above Ec we observe a precursor film expending with a diffusive law. The diffusion coefficient D(E) present a maximum for E =Em. A maximum of mobility versus the substrate rigidity had also been observed for single cells. Near Em, we observe a new phenomenon: a cell

  12. Asterisk Grade Study Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kokorsky, Eileen A.

    A study was conducted at Passaic County Community College (PCCC) to investigate the operation of a grading system which utilized an asterisk (*) grade to indicate progress in a course until a letter grade was assigned. The study sought to determine the persistence of students receiving the "*" grade, the incidence of cases of students receiving…

  13. Plus and Minus Grading.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Farland, Ronnald; Cepeda, Rita

    The current official policy of the California community colleges on grading prohibits the use of plus and minus symbols to modify a standard letter grade. Plus and minus grades may influence a student's grade point average (GPA) either through statistical effects or psychological effects on teachers and students. At its fall 1985 session, and…

  14. Grading. Research Brief

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walker, Karen

    2006-01-01

    What do grades mean? Is there a commonly understood and acceptable definition for what a grade stands? The current grading system is approximately 100 years old. In the 1700s, students were given feedback but not grades. In 1780, Yale University began using a 4.0 system that is similar to the current system. In the 1830s, Harvard University…

  15. The ABCC4 membrane transporter modulates platelet aggregation.

    PubMed

    Cheepala, Satish B; Pitre, Aaron; Fukuda, Yu; Takenaka, Kazumasa; Zhang, Yuanyuan; Wang, Yao; Frase, Sharon; Pestina, Tamara; Gartner, T Kent; Jackson, Carl; Schuetz, John D

    2015-11-12

    Controlling the activation of platelets is a key strategy to mitigate cardiovascular disease. Previous studies have suggested that the ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporter, ABCC4, functions in platelet-dense granules. Using plasma membrane biotinylation and super-resolution microscopy, we demonstrate that ABCC4 is primarily expressed on the plasma membrane of both mouse and human platelets. Platelets lacking ABCC4 have unchanged dense-granule function, number, and volume, but harbor a selective impairment in collagen-induced aggregation. Accordingly, Abcc4 knockout (KO) platelet attachment to a collagen substratum was also faulty and associated with elevated intracellular cyclic AMP (cAMP) and reduced plasma membrane localization of the major collagen receptor, GPVI. In the ferric-chloride vasculature injury model, Abcc4 KO mice exhibited markedly impaired thrombus formation. The attenuation of platelet aggregation by the phosphodiesterase inhibitor EHNA (a non-ABCC4 substrate), when combined with Abcc4 deficiency, illustrated a crucial functional interaction between phosphodiesterases and ABCC4. This was extended in vivo where EHNA dramatically prolonged the bleeding time, but only in Abcc4 KO mice. Further, we demonstrated in human platelets that ABCC4 inhibition, when coupled with phosphodiesterase inhibition, strongly impaired platelet aggregation. These findings have important clinical implications because they directly highlight an important relationship between ABCC4 transporter function and phosphodiesterases in accounting for the cAMP-directed activity of antithrombotic agents. PMID:26405223

  16. Atomic Transitions in Dense Plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murillo, Michael Sean

    Motivation for the study of hot, dense ( ~solid density) plasmas has historically been in connection with stellar interiors. In recent years, however, there has been a growing interest in such plasmas due to their relevance to short wavelength (EUV and x-ray) lasers, inertial confinement fusion, and optical harmonic generation. In constrast to the stellar plasmas, these laboratory plasmas are typically composed of high-z elements and are not in thermal equilibrium. Descriptions of nonthermal plasma experiments must necessarily involve the consideration of the various atomic processes and the rates at which they occur. Traditionally, the rates of collisional atomic processes are calculated by considering a binary collision picture. For example, a single electron may be taken to collisionally excite an ion. A cross section may be defined for this process and, multiplying by a flux, the rate may be obtained. In a high density plasma this binary picture clearly breaks down as the electrons no longer act independently of each other. The cross section is ill-defined in this regime and another approach is needed to obtain rates. In this thesis an approach based on computing rates without recourse to a cross section is presented. In this approach, binary collisions are replaced by stochastic density fluctuations. It is then these density fluctuations which drive transitions in the ions. Furthermore, the oscillator strengths for the transitions are computed in screened Coulomb potentials which reflect the average polarization of the plasma near the ion. Numerical computations are presented for the collisional ionization rate. The effects of screening in the plasma -ion interaction are investigated for He^+ ions in a plasma near solid density. It is shown that dynamic screening plays an important role in this process. Then, density effects in the oscillator strength are explored for both He^+ and Ar^{+17}. Approximations which introduce a nonorthogonality between the initial

  17. Thermochromism of a poly(phenylene vinylene): untangling the roles of polymer aggregate and chain conformation.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chun-Chih; Gao, Yuan; Shreve, Andrew P; Zhong, Chang; Wang, Leeyih; Mudalige, Kumara; Wang, Hsing-Lin; Cotlet, Mircea

    2009-12-17

    We report reversible thermochromism of a conjugated polymer, poly{2,5-bis[3-(N,N-diethylamino)-1-oxapropyl]-1,4-phenylenevinylene} (DAO-PPV), in diluted solutions of toluene and 1,2-dichlorobenzene. By means of temperature- and solvent-dependent steady-state spectroscopy, picosecond time-resolved photoluminescence spectroscopy, and dynamic light scattering, we provide new insights into the role of polymer aggregates in defining the thermochromic behavior of PPVs. We find DAO-PPV to exhibit a low temperature state with vibronically structured red visible absorption and emission spectra. Structurally, this low temperature state is a densely packed and disordered polymer aggregate, which contains a fraction of well-ordered, packed polymer chains. These ordered regions serve as low energy trap sites for the more disordered regions in the aggregate, thus regulating the final emission of the aggregate and imposing a vibronically resolved emission spectrum, which is usually associated with emission from one or a few chromophores. The high temperature state of DAO-PPV is a loose aggregate, with structureless absorption and emission spectra in the green visible range. Structurally, the loose aggregate is a well-solvated aggregate retaining the physical dimension of the dense aggregate but for which interchain interactions are diminished with the increase of temperature. As a result, the spectroscopic behavior of the loose aggregate is very similar if not identical to that of the single polymer chain. Increased solubility untangles polymer aggregates into single, dispersed, polymer chains, as we demonstrate here for DAO-PPV in 1,2-dichlorobenzene and at high temperature. PMID:19928846

  18. Holographic characterization of protein aggregates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Chen; Zhong, Xiao; Ruffner, David; Stutt, Alexandra; Philips, Laura; Ward, Michael; Grier, David

    Holographic characterization directly measures the size distribution of subvisible protein aggregates in suspension and offers insights into their morphology. Based on holographic video microscopy, this analytical technique records and interprets holograms of individual aggregates in protein solutions as they flow down a microfluidic channel, without requiring labeling or other exceptional sample preparation. The hologram of an individual protein aggregate is analyzed in real time with the Lorenz-Mie theory of light scattering to measure that aggregate's size and optical properties. Detecting, counting and characterizing subvisible aggregates proceeds fast enough for time-resolved studies, and lends itself to tracking trends in protein aggregation arising from changing environmental factors. No other analytical technique provides such a wealth of particle-resolved characterization data in situ. Holographic characterization promises accelerated development of therapeutic protein formulations, improved process control during manufacturing, and streamlined quality assurance during storage and at the point of use. Mrsec and MRI program of the NSF, Spheryx Inc.

  19. Aggregation dynamics of rigid polyelectrolytes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tom, Anvy Moly; Rajesh, R.; Vemparala, Satyavani

    2016-01-01

    Similarly charged polyelectrolytes are known to attract each other and aggregate into bundles when the charge density of the polymers exceeds a critical value that depends on the valency of the counterions. The dynamics of aggregation of such rigid polyelectrolytes are studied using large scale molecular dynamics simulations. We find that the morphology of the aggregates depends on the value of the charge density of the polymers. For values close to the critical value, the shape of the aggregates is cylindrical with height equal to the length of a single polyelectrolyte chain. However, for larger values of charge, the linear extent of the aggregates increases as more and more polymers aggregate. In both the cases, we show that the number of aggregates decrease with time as power laws with exponents that are not numerically distinguishable from each other and are independent of charge density of the polymers, valency of the counterions, density, and length of the polyelectrolyte chain. We model the aggregation dynamics using the Smoluchowski coagulation equation with kernels determined from the molecular dynamics simulations and justify the numerically obtained value of the exponent. Our results suggest that once counterions condense, effective interactions between polyelectrolyte chains short-ranged and the aggregation of polyelectrolytes are diffusion-limited.

  20. Neutrino Propagation in Dense Magnetized Matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arbuzova, E. V.; Lobanov, A. E.; Murchikova, E. M.

    2009-01-01

    We obtained a complete system of solutions of the Dirac-Pauli equation for a massive neutrino interacting with dense matter and strong electromagnetic field. We demonstrated that these solutions can describe precession of the neutrino spin.

  1. Wide Variation Seen in 'Dense' Breast Diagnoses

    MedlinePlus

    ... defined mammography patients' breasts as dense. Higher breast density is a risk factor for breast cancer, experts ... could have implications for the so-called breast density notification laws that have been passed in about ...

  2. Magnetic Phases in Dense Quark Matter

    SciTech Connect

    Incera, Vivian de la

    2007-10-26

    In this paper I discuss the magnetic phases of the three-flavor color superconductor. These phases can take place at different field strengths in a highly dense quark system. Given that the best natural candidates for the realization of color superconductivity are the extremely dense cores of neutron stars, which typically have very large magnetic fields, the magnetic phases here discussed could have implications for the physics of these compact objects.

  3. Dense loading of catalyst improves hydrotreater performance

    SciTech Connect

    Nooy, F.M.

    1984-11-12

    This paper discusses the advantages of increased capacity and improved catalyst/oil contact in existing hydrotreating units. The similarities between catalyst loading and other material processes are reviewed. Catalyst bed activity is examined. Dense loading systems are reviewed in detail. Over the last years, many refiners have gained experience with the benefits of dense loading techniques, and these techniques are gaining more and more acceptance.

  4. Dynamical theory of dense groups of galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mamon, Gary A.

    1990-01-01

    It is well known that galaxies associate in groups and clusters. Perhaps 40% of all galaxies are found in groups of 4 to 20 galaxies (e.g., Tully 1987). Although most groups appear to be so loose that the galaxy interactions within them ought to be insignificant, the apparently densest groups, known as compact groups appear so dense when seen in projection onto the plane of the sky that their members often overlap. These groups thus appear as dense as the cores of rich clusters. The most popular catalog of compact groups, compiled by Hickson (1982), includes isolation among its selection critera. Therefore, in comparison with the cores of rich clusters, Hickson's compact groups (HCGs) appear to be the densest isolated regions in the Universe (in galaxies per unit volume), and thus provide in principle a clean laboratory for studying the competition of very strong gravitational interactions. The $64,000 question here is then: Are compact groups really bound systems as dense as they appear? If dense groups indeed exist, then one expects that each of the dynamical processes leading to the interaction of their member galaxies should be greatly enhanced. This leads us to the questions: How stable are dense groups? How do they form? And the related question, fascinating to any theorist: What dynamical processes predominate in dense groups of galaxies? If HCGs are not bound dense systems, but instead 1D change alignments (Mamon 1986, 1987; Walke & Mamon 1989) or 3D transient cores (Rose 1979) within larger looser systems of galaxies, then the relevant question is: How frequent are chance configurations within loose groups? Here, the author answers these last four questions after comparing in some detail the methods used and the results obtained in the different studies of dense groups.

  5. Dissociation energy of molecules in dense gases

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kunc, J. A.

    1992-01-01

    A general approach is presented for calculating the reduction of the dissociation energy of diatomic molecules immersed in a dense (n = less than 10 exp 22/cu cm) gas of molecules and atoms. The dissociation energy of a molecule in a dense gas differs from that of the molecule in vacuum because the intermolecular forces change the intramolecular dynamics of the molecule, and, consequently, the energy of the molecular bond.

  6. Fabric variables in dense sheared suspensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Radjai, Farhang; Amarsid, Lhassan; Delenne, Jean-Yves

    The rheology of granular flows and dense suspensions can be described in terms of their effective shear and bulk viscosities as a function of packing fraction. Using stress partition and equivalence between frictional and viscous descriptions in the dense state, we show that the effective viscosities can be expressed in terms of the force-network anisotropy. This is supported by our extensive DEM-LBM simulations for a broad range of inertial and viscous parameters.

  7. METHOD OF PRODUCING DENSE CONSOLIDATED METALLIC REGULUS

    DOEpatents

    Magel, T.T.

    1959-08-11

    A methcd is presented for reducing dense metal compositions while simultaneously separating impurities from the reduced dense metal and casting the reduced parified dense metal, such as uranium, into well consolidated metal ingots. The reduction is accomplished by heating the dense metallic salt in the presence of a reducing agent, such as an alkali metal or alkaline earth metal in a bomb type reacting chamber, while applying centrifugal force on the reacting materials. Separation of the metal from the impurities is accomplished essentially by the incorporation of a constricted passageway at the vertex of a conical reacting chamber which is in direct communication with a collecting chamber. When a centrifugal force is applled to the molten metal and slag from the reduction in a direction collinear with the axis of the constricted passage, the dense molten metal is forced therethrough while the less dense slag is retained within the reaction chamber, resulting in a simultaneous separation of the reduced molten metal from the slag and a compacting of the reduced metal in a homogeneous mass.

  8. Thermal Conductivity of Powder Aggregates and Porous Compacts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montes, J. M.; Cuevas, F. G.; Cintas, J.; Muñoz, S.

    2012-12-01

    A new equation for calculating the thermal conductivity of metal powder aggregates and sintered metal powder compacts is proposed. In this equation, the effective conductivity of the powder system is a function of the conductivity of the fully dense material, the porosity of the system, and the tap porosity of the starting powder. The new equation is applicable to powder systems, from the tap porosity to zero porosity, as well as to consolidated powders. The proposed equation has been experimentally validated by fitting to data from other authors. The results confirm a good agreement with theoretical predictions.

  9. Gelation in Aerosols; Non-Mean-Field Aggregation and Kinetics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sorensen, C. M.; Chakrabarti, A.

    2008-01-01

    Nature has many examples of systems of particles suspended in a fluid phase; colloids when in a liquid, aerosols when in a gas. These systems are inherently unstable since if the particles can come together, van der Waals forces will keep them together. In this work we studied the aggregation kinetics of particulate systems, most often aerosols. The emphasis of our work was to study dense systems and systems that gel since previous work had not considered these. Our work obtained a number of significant discoveries and results which are reported here.

  10. Topics in Probabilistic Judgment Aggregation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wang, Guanchun

    2011-01-01

    This dissertation is a compilation of several studies that are united by their relevance to probabilistic judgment aggregation. In the face of complex and uncertain events, panels of judges are frequently consulted to provide probabilistic forecasts, and aggregation of such estimates in groups often yield better results than could have been made…

  11. Mineral of the month: aggregates

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Tepordei, Valentin V.

    2005-01-01

    Natural aggregates, consisting of crushed stone, and sand and gravel, are a major contributor to economic health, and have an amazing variety of uses. Aggregates are among the most abundant mineral resources and are major basic raw materials used by construction, agriculture and other industries that employ complex chemical and metallurgical processes.

  12. Peptide aggregation in neurodegenerative disease.

    PubMed

    Murphy, Regina M

    2002-01-01

    In the not-so-distant past, insoluble aggregated protein was considered as uninteresting and bothersome as yesterday's trash. More recently, protein aggregates have enjoyed considerable scientific interest, as it has become clear that these aggregates play key roles in many diseases. In this review, we focus attention on three polypeptides: beta-amyloid, prion, and huntingtin, which are linked to three feared neurodegenerative diseases: Alzheimer's, "mad cow," and Huntington's disease, respectively. These proteins lack any significant primary sequence homology, yet their aggregates possess very similar features, specifically, high beta-sheet content, fibrillar morphology, relative insolubility, and protease resistance. Because the aggregates are noncrystalline, secrets of their structure at nanometer resolution are only slowly yielding to X-ray diffraction, solid-state NMR, and other techniques. Besides structure, the aggregates may possess similar pathways of assembly. Two alternative assembly pathways have been proposed: the nucleation-elongation and the template-assisted mode. These two modes may be complementary, not mutually exclusive. Strategies for interfering with aggregation, which may provide novel therapeutic approaches, are under development. The structural similarities between protein aggregates of dissimilar origin suggest that therapeutic strategies successful against one disease may have broad utility in others. PMID:12117755

  13. Floating mucus aggregates derived from benthic microorganisms on rocky intertidal reefs: Potential as food sources for benthic animals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tamura, Y.; Tsuchiya, M.

    2011-09-01

    Mucus films, flocs or foams consisting of fine sand, algae and detritus frequently occur in the surface waters of rocky intertidal reef flats during incoming tide. These masses are referred to as mucus aggregates. We examined the developmental process of mucus aggregates and their abundance, distribution, migration and trophic composition. The trophic composition of mucus aggregates was then compared to those of sediments to evaluate their potential nutritional value for benthic animals. The organic matter content, chlorophyll a concentration, microalgal density and bacteria-derived fatty acid contents of mucus aggregates were higher than those observed in sediment, suggesting that mucus aggregates contain not only high levels of organic matter but also dense concentrations of microalgae and bacteria; therefore, mucus aggregates may serve as a qualitatively more energetic food source for benthic fauna compared to sediments. Benthic diatoms were the most abundant organisms in mucus aggregates. Large numbers of diatoms were trapped in fine mineral particles and mucilage-like strings, suggesting that a portion of the mucus is secreted by these benthic microalgae. Mucus aggregate accounted for only 0.01-3.9% of the daily feeding requirements of the dominant detritivore, Ophiocoma scolopendrina (Echinodermata: Ophiuroidea) over the entire sampling area. In contrast, for the species population on the back reef, where mucus aggregates ultimately accumulate, mucus aggregates provided from 0.4 to 113.3% of food for this species. These results suggest that mucus aggregate availability varies spatiotemporally and that they do not always provide adequate food sources for O. scolopendrina populations.

  14. Mechanics of fire ant aggregations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tennenbaum, Michael; Liu, Zhongyang; Hu, David; Fernandez-Nieves, Alberto

    2016-01-01

    Fire ants link their bodies to form aggregations; these can adopt a variety of structures, they can drip and spread, or withstand applied loads. Here, by using oscillatory rheology, we show that fire ant aggregations are viscoelastic. We find that, at the lowest ant densities probed and in the linear regime, the elastic and viscous moduli are essentially identical over the spanned frequency range, which highlights the absence of a dominant mode of structural relaxation. As ant density increases, the elastic modulus rises, which we interpret by alluding to ant crowding and subsequent jamming. When deformed beyond the linear regime, the aggregation flows, exhibiting shear-thinning behaviour with a stress load that is comparable to the maximum load the aggregation can withstand before individual ants are torn apart. Our findings illustrate the rich, collective mechanical behaviour that can arise in aggregations of active, interacting building blocks.

  15. Mechanics of fire ant aggregations.

    PubMed

    Tennenbaum, Michael; Liu, Zhongyang; Hu, David; Fernandez-Nieves, Alberto

    2016-01-01

    Fire ants link their bodies to form aggregations; these can adopt a variety of structures, they can drip and spread, or withstand applied loads. Here, by using oscillatory rheology, we show that fire ant aggregations are viscoelastic. We find that, at the lowest ant densities probed and in the linear regime, the elastic and viscous moduli are essentially identical over the spanned frequency range, which highlights the absence of a dominant mode of structural relaxation. As ant density increases, the elastic modulus rises, which we interpret by alluding to ant crowding and subsequent jamming. When deformed beyond the linear regime, the aggregation flows, exhibiting shear-thinning behaviour with a stress load that is comparable to the maximum load the aggregation can withstand before individual ants are torn apart. Our findings illustrate the rich, collective mechanical behaviour that can arise in aggregations of active, interacting building blocks. PMID:26501413

  16. Molecular aggregation of humic substances

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wershaw, R. L.

    1999-01-01

    Humic substances (HS) form molecular aggregates in solution and on mineral surfaces. Elucidation of the mechanism of formation of these aggregates is important for an understanding of the interactions of HS in soils arid natural waters. The HS are formed mainly by enzymatic depolymerization and oxidation of plant biopolymers. These reactions transform the aromatic and lipid plant components into amphiphilic molecules, that is, molecules that consist of separate hydrophobic (nonpolar) and hydrophilic (polar) parts. The nonpolar parts of the molecules are composed of relatively unaltered segments of plant polymers and the polar parts of carboxylic acid groups. These amphiphiles form membrane-like aggregates on mineral surfaces and micelle-like aggregates in solution. The exterior surfaces of these aggregates are hydrophilic, and the interiors constitute separate hydrophobic liquid-like phases.

  17. Imbibition kinetics of spherical aggregates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hébraud, Pascal; Lootens, Didier; Debacker, Alban

    The imbibition kinetics of a millimeter-sized aggregate of 300 nm diameter colloidal particles by a wetting pure solvent is studied. Three successive regimes are observed : in the first one, the imbibition proceeds by compressing the air inside the aggregate. Then, the solvent stops when the pressure of the compressed air is equal to the Laplace pressure at the meniscus of the wetting solvent in the porous aggregate. The interface is pinned and the aggregate slowly degases, up to a point where the pressure of the entrapped air stops decreasing and is controlled by the Laplace pressure of small bubbles. Depending on the curvature of the bubble, the system may then be in an unstable state. The imbibition then starts again, but with an inner pressure in equilibrium with these bubbles. This last stage leads to the complete infiltration of the aggregate.

  18. Immunogenicity of Therapeutic Protein Aggregates.

    PubMed

    Moussa, Ehab M; Panchal, Jainik P; Moorthy, Balakrishnan S; Blum, Janice S; Joubert, Marisa K; Narhi, Linda O; Topp, Elizabeth M

    2016-02-01

    Therapeutic proteins have a propensity for aggregation during manufacturing, shipping, and storage. The presence of aggregates in protein drug products can induce adverse immune responses in patients that may affect safety and efficacy, and so it is of concern to both manufacturers and regulatory agencies. In this vein, there is a lack of understanding of the physicochemical determinants of immunological responses and a lack of standardized analytical methods to survey the molecular properties of aggregates associated with immune activation. In this review, we provide an overview of the basic immune mechanisms in the context of interactions with protein aggregates. We then critically examine the literature with emphasis on the underlying immune mechanisms as they relate to aggregate properties. Finally, we highlight the gaps in our current understanding of this issue and offer recommendations for future research. PMID:26869409

  19. Gleason grading system

    MedlinePlus

    ... medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000920.htm Gleason grading system To use the sharing features on this page, ... score of between 5 and 7. Gleason Grading System Sometimes, it can be hard to predict how ...

  20. Perspectives on Preference Aggregation.

    PubMed

    Regenwetter, Michel

    2009-07-01

    For centuries, the mathematical aggregation of preferences by groups, organizations, or society itself has received keen interdisciplinary attention. Extensive theoretical work in economics and political science throughout the second half of the 20th century has highlighted the idea that competing notions of rational social choice intrinsically contradict each other. This has led some researchers to consider coherent democratic decision making to be a mathematical impossibility. Recent empirical work in psychology qualifies that view. This nontechnical review sketches a quantitative research paradigm for the behavioral investigation of mathematical social choice rules on real ballots, experimental choices, or attitudinal survey data. The article poses a series of open questions. Some classical work sometimes makes assumptions about voter preferences that are descriptively invalid. Do such technical assumptions lead the theory astray? How can empirical work inform the formulation of meaningful theoretical primitives? Classical "impossibility results" leverage the fact that certain desirable mathematical properties logically cannot hold in all conceivable electorates. Do these properties nonetheless hold true in empirical distributions of preferences? Will future behavioral analyses continue to contradict the expectations of established theory? Under what conditions do competing consensus methods yield identical outcomes and why do they do so? PMID:26158988

  1. Bias in Grading

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Malouff, John

    2008-01-01

    Bias in grading can be conscious or unconscious. The author describes different types of bias, such as those based on student attractiveness or performance in prior courses, and a variety of methods of reducing bias, including keeping students anonymous during grading and using detailed criteria for subjective grading.

  2. [Grading of prostate cancer].

    PubMed

    Kristiansen, G; Roth, W; Helpap, B

    2016-07-01

    The current grading of prostate cancer is based on the classification system of the International Society of Urological Pathology (ISUP) following a consensus conference in Chicago in 2014. The foundations are based on the frequently modified grading system of Gleason. This article presents a brief description of the development to the current ISUP grading system. PMID:27393141

  3. Grade-A Perfect

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Joseph

    2004-01-01

    Despite the wealth of information available, there is no consensus on best practices for grading. In this article, the author identifies four key philosophical questions that should guide the development of a teacher's grading system and provides tips that can help principals guide teachers in developing a grading system. (Contains 1 figure.)

  4. General Graded Response Model.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Samejima, Fumiko

    This paper describes the graded response model. The graded response model represents a family of mathematical models that deal with ordered polytomous categories, such as: (1) letter grading; (2) an attitude survey with "strongly disagree, disagree, agree, and strongly agree" choices; (3) partial credit given in accord with an individual's degree…

  5. Redesigning Grading--Districtwide

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Townsley, Matt

    2014-01-01

    In the first years of his career as a high school math teacher, Matt Townsley was bothered by the fact that his grades penalized students for not learning content quickly. A student could master every standard, but low quiz grades and homework assignments they didn't complete because they didn't understand would lower their final grade,…

  6. Emulsions stabilised by whey protein microgel particles: towards food-grade Pickering emulsions.

    PubMed

    Destribats, Mathieu; Rouvet, Martine; Gehin-Delval, Cécile; Schmitt, Christophe; Binks, Bernard P

    2014-09-28

    We have investigated a new class of food-grade particles, whey protein microgels, as stabilisers of triglyceride-water emulsions. The sub-micron particles stabilized oil-in-water emulsions at all pH with and without salt. All emulsions creamed but exhibited exceptional resistance to coalescence. Clear correlations exist between the properties of the microgels in aqueous dispersion and the resulting emulsion characteristics. For conditions in which the particles were uncharged, fluid emulsions with relatively large drops were stabilised, whereas emulsions stabilized by charged particles contained smaller flocculated drops. A combination of optical microscopy of the drops and spectrophotometry of the resolved aqueous phase allowed us to estimate the interfacial adsorption densities of the particles using the phenomenon of limited coalescence. We deduce two classes of particle arrangement. Complete adsorption of the particles was obtained when they were neutral or when their charges were screened by salt resulting in at least one particle monolayer at the interface. By contrast, only around 50% of the particles adsorbed when they were charged with emulsion drops being covered by less than half a monolayer. These findings were supported by direct visualization of drop interfaces using cryo-scanning electron microscopy. Uncharged particles were highly aggregated and formed a continuous 2-D network at the interface. Otherwise particles organized as individual aggregates separated by particle-free regions. In this case, we suggest that some particles spread at the interface leading to the formation of a continuous protein membrane. Charged particles displayed the ability to bridge opposing interfaces of neighbouring drops to form dense particle disks protecting drops against coalescence; this is the main reason for the flocculation and stability of emulsions containing sparsely covered drops. PMID:24675994

  7. Coalescence preference in densely packed microbubbles

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Yeseul; Lim, Su Jin; Gim, Bopil; Weon, Byung Mook

    2015-01-01

    A bubble merged from two parent bubbles with different size tends to be placed closer to the larger parent. This phenomenon is known as the coalescence preference. Here we demonstrate that the coalescence preference can be blocked inside a densely packed cluster of bubbles. We utilized high-speed high-resolution X-ray microscopy to clearly visualize individual coalescence events inside densely packed microbubbles with a local packing fraction of ~40%. The surface energy release theory predicts an exponent of 5 in a relation between the relative coalescence position and the parent size ratio, whereas our observation for coalescence in densely packed microbubbles shows a different exponent of 2. We believe that this result would be important to understand the reality of coalescence dynamics in a variety of packing situations of soft matter. PMID:25583640

  8. Supplemental screening sonography in dense breasts.

    PubMed

    Berg, Wendie A

    2004-09-01

    In single-center trials across 42,838 examinations, 150 (0.35%) cancers were identified only sonographically in average-risk women. Over 90% of the 126 women with sonographically depicted cancers had dense or heterogeneously dense parenchyma. Of the 150 cancers, 141 (94%) were invasive, with a mean size of 9 to 11 mm across the series. Over 90% were node-negative. A3-year multicenter trial of screening sonography in high-risk women, blinded to the results of mammography, opened for enrollment April 2004,funded by the Avon Foundation and National Cancer Institute through the American College of Radiology Imaging Network (ACRIN Protocol 6666). If the trial is successful,the results will provide a rational basis for supplemental screening sonography in women with dense breasts. PMID:15337420

  9. Coalescence preference in densely packed microbubbles

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Yeseul; Lim, Su Jin; Gim, Bopil; Weon, Byung Mook

    2015-01-13

    A bubble merged from two parent bubbles with different size tends to be placed closer to the larger parent. This phenomenon is known as the coalescence preference. Here we demonstrate that the coalescence preference can be blocked inside a densely packed cluster of bubbles. We utilized high-speed high-resolution X-ray microscopy to clearly visualize individual coalescence events inside densely packed microbubbles with a local packing fraction of ~40%. Thus, the surface energy release theory predicts an exponent of 5 in a relation between the relative coalescence position and the parent size ratio, whereas our observation for coalescence in densely packed microbubbles shows a different exponent of 2. We believe that this result would be important to understand the reality of coalescence dynamics in a variety of packing situations of soft matter.

  10. Coalescence preference in densely packed microbubbles

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Kim, Yeseul; Lim, Su Jin; Gim, Bopil; Weon, Byung Mook

    2015-01-13

    A bubble merged from two parent bubbles with different size tends to be placed closer to the larger parent. This phenomenon is known as the coalescence preference. Here we demonstrate that the coalescence preference can be blocked inside a densely packed cluster of bubbles. We utilized high-speed high-resolution X-ray microscopy to clearly visualize individual coalescence events inside densely packed microbubbles with a local packing fraction of ~40%. Thus, the surface energy release theory predicts an exponent of 5 in a relation between the relative coalescence position and the parent size ratio, whereas our observation for coalescence in densely packed microbubblesmore » shows a different exponent of 2. We believe that this result would be important to understand the reality of coalescence dynamics in a variety of packing situations of soft matter.« less

  11. [Metabolic syndrome and small dense LDL].

    PubMed

    Yoshino, Gen

    2006-12-01

    Due to the recent westernization of our lifestyle, it is speculated that the prevalence of metabolic syndrome in the young generation will increase in Japan. Different from Western populations, because of our lifestyle as "farmers" from ancient times, excess energy has been stored outside of the body, and the accumulation of visceral fat might have serious adverse effects on glucose and lipid metabolism. Therefore, we must carefully diagnose and treat patients with metabolic syndrome, which is diagnosed based on the existence of visceral obesity. On the other hand, much attention has been paid recently to the atherogenicity of small dense LDL. In this chapter I will introduce a newly established method for estimating the plasma concentration of small dense LDL-cholesterol. Furthermore, the relationship between subclinical atherosclerosis and small dense LDL in metabolic syndrome will be discussed. PMID:17265899

  12. Dense packing: surgical indications and technical considerations.

    PubMed

    Farjo, Bessam; Farjo, Nilofer

    2013-08-01

    Dense packing is the philosophy of fitting more than 30 to 35 follicular unit grafts per square centimeter in one operation. The aim is to produce a more even, consistent, and natural looking flow of hair after just one procedure. Although desirable in principle, not all patients are suitable candidates nor is it possible to achieve in certain patients (eg, coarse or curly hair). Patients who have sufficient donor availability, reasonably stable hair loss, and high hair-to-skin color ratios are the ideal candidates. The authors highlight their philosophies and strategies for dense packing. PMID:24017984

  13. The Galactic Dense Gas Distribution and Properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glenn, Jason

    2015-08-01

    As the nearest spiral galaxy, the Milky Way provides a foundation for understanding galactic astrophysics. However, our position within the Galactic plane makes it challenging to decipher the detailed disk structure. The Galactic distribution of dense gas is relatively poorly known; thus, it is difficult to assess models of galaxy evolution by comparison to the Milky Way. Furthermore, fundamental aspects of star formation remain unknown, such as why the stellar and star cluster initial mass functions appear to be ubiquitous.Sub/millimeter dust continuum surveys, coupled with molecular gas surveys, are revealing the 3D distribution and properties of dense, star-forming gas throughout the disk. Here we report on the use of BGPS and Hi-GAL. BGPS is a 1.1 mm survey of the 1st Galactic quadrant and some lines of sight in the 2nd quadrant, totalling 200 deg2. We developed a technique using the Galactic rotation curve to derive distance probability density functions (DPDFs) to molecular cloud structures identified with continuum surveys. DPDFs combine vLSR measures from dense gas tracers and 13CO with distance discriminators, such as 8 μm extinction, HI self absorption, and (l, b, vLSR) associations with objects of known distances. Typical uncertainties are σdist ≤ 1 kpc for 1,710 BGPS objects with well-constrained distances.From DPDFs we derived the dense gas distribution and the dense gas mass function. We find evidence for dense gas in and between putative spiral arms. A log-normal distribution describes the mass function, which ranges from cores to clouds, but is primarily comprised of clumps. High-mass power laws do not fit the entire data set well, although power-law behavior emerges for sources nearer than 6.5 kpc (α = 2.0±0.1) and for objects between 2 kpc and 10 kpc (α = 1.9±0.1). The power law indices are generally between those of GMC and the stellar IMF. We have begun to apply this approach to the Hi-GAL (70 - 500 μm). With coverage of the entire

  14. An online detection system for aggregate sizes and shapes based on digital image processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Jianhong; Chen, Sijia

    2016-07-01

    Traditional aggregate size measuring methods are time-consuming, taxing, and do not deliver online measurements. A new online detection system for determining aggregate size and shape based on a digital camera with a charge-coupled device, and subsequent digital image processing, have been developed to overcome these problems. The system captures images of aggregates while falling and flat lying. Using these data, the particle size and shape distribution can be obtained in real time. Here, we calibrate this method using standard globules. Our experiments show that the maximum particle size distribution error was only 3 wt%, while the maximum particle shape distribution error was only 2 wt% for data derived from falling aggregates, having good dispersion. In contrast, the data for flat-lying aggregates had a maximum particle size distribution error of 12 wt%, and a maximum particle shape distribution error of 10 wt%; their accuracy was clearly lower than for falling aggregates. However, they performed well for single-graded aggregates, and did not require a dispersion device. Our system is low-cost and easy to install. It can successfully achieve online detection of aggregate size and shape with good reliability, and it has great potential for aggregate quality assurance.

  15. Development of construction materials using nano-silica and aggregates recycled from construction and demolition waste.

    PubMed

    Mukharjee, Bibhuti Bhusan; Barai, Sudhirkumar V

    2015-06-01

    The present work addresses the development of novel construction materials utilising commercial grade nano-silica and recycled aggregates retrieved from construction and demolition waste. For this, experimental work has been carried out to examine the influence of nano-silica and recycled aggregates on compressive strength, modulus of elasticity, water absorption, density and volume of voids of concrete. Fully natural and recycled aggregate concrete mixes are designed by replacing cement with three levels (0.75%, 1.5% and 3%) of nano-silica. The results of the present investigation depict that improvement in early days compressive strength is achieved with the incorporation of nano-silica in addition to the restoration of reduction in compressive strength of recycled aggregate concrete mixes caused owing to the replacement of natural aggregates by recycled aggregates. Moreover, the increase in water absorption and volume of voids with a reduction of bulk density was detected with the incorporation of recycled aggregates in place of natural aggregates. However, enhancement in density and reduction in water absorption and volume of voids of recycled aggregate concrete resulted from the addition of nano-silica. In addition, the results of the study reveal that nano-silica has no significant effect on elastic modulus of concrete. PMID:25986048

  16. Aggregate breakdown of nanoparticulate titania

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Venugopal, Navin

    Six nanosized titanium dioxide powders synthesized from a sulfate process were investigated. The targeted end-use of this powder was for a de-NOx catalyst honeycomb monolith. Alteration of synthesis parameters had resulted principally in differences in soluble ion level and specific surface area of the powders. The goal of this investigation was to understand the role of synthesis parameters in the aggregation behavior of these powders. Investigation via scanning electron microscopy of the powders revealed three different aggregation iterations at specific length scales. Secondary and higher order aggregate strength was investigated via oscillatory stress rheometry as a means of simulating shear conditions encountered during extrusion. G' and G'' were measured as a function of the applied oscillatory stress. Oscillatory rheometry indicated a strong variation as a function of the sulfate level of the particles in the viscoelastic yield strengths. Powder yield stresses ranged from 3.0 Pa to 24.0 Pa of oscillatory stress. Compaction curves to 750 MPa found strong similarities in extrapolated yield point of stage I and II compaction for each of the powders (at approximately 500 MPa) suggesting that the variation in sulfate was greatest above the primary aggregate level. Scanning electron microscopy of samples at different states of shear in oscillatory rheometry confirmed the variation in the linear elastic region and the viscous flow regime. A technique of this investigation was to approach aggregation via a novel perspective: aggregates are distinguished as being loose open structures that are highly disordered and stochastic in nature. The methodology used was to investigate the shear stresses required to rupture the various aggregation stages encountered and investigate the attempt to realign the now free-flowing constituents comprising the aggregate into a denser configuration. Mercury porosimetry was utilized to measure the pore size of the compact resulting from

  17. Monosized aggregates -- A new model

    SciTech Connect

    Gopal, M.

    1997-08-01

    For applications requiring colloidal particles, it is desirable that they be monosized to better control the structure and the properties. In a number of systems, the monosized particles come together to form aggregates that are also monosized. A model is presented here to explain the formation of these monosized aggregates. This is of particular importance in the fields of ceramics, catalysis, pigments, pharmacy, photographic emulsions, etc.

  18. Measurement of dispersion of nanoparticles in a dense suspension by high-sensitivity low-coherence dynamic light scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishii, Katsuhiro; Nakamura, Sohichiro; Sato, Yuki

    2014-08-01

    High-sensitivity low-coherence DLS apply to measurement of particle size distribution of pigments suspended in a ink. This method can be apply to extremely dense and turbid media without dilution. We show the temporal variation of particle size distribution of thixotropy and sedimentary pigments due to aggregation, agglomerate, and sedimentation. Moreover, we demonstrate the influence of dilution of ink to particle size distribution.

  19. Modifiers of mutant huntingtin aggregation

    PubMed Central

    Teuling, Eva; Bourgonje, Annika; Veenje, Sven; Thijssen, Karen; de Boer, Jelle; van der Velde, Joeri; Swertz, Morris; Nollen, Ellen

    2011-01-01

    Protein aggregation is a common hallmark of a number of age-related neurodegenerative diseases, including Alzheimer’s, Parkinson’s, and polyglutamine-expansion disorders such as Huntington’s disease, but how aggregation-prone proteins lead to pathology is not known. Using a genome-wide RNAi screen in a C. elegans-model for polyglutamine aggregation, we previously identified 186 genes that suppress aggregation. Using an RNAi screen for human orthologs of these genes, we here present 26 human genes that suppress aggregation of mutant huntingtin in a human cell line. Among these are genes that have not been previously linked to mutant huntingtin aggregation. They include those encoding eukaryotic translation initiation, elongation and translation factors, and genes that have been previously associated with other neurodegenerative diseases, like the ATP-ase family gene 3-like 2 (AFG3L2) and ubiquitin-like modifier activating enzyme 1 (UBA1). Unravelling the role of these genes will broaden our understanding of the pathogenesis of Huntington’s disease. PMID:21915392

  20. Kinetic model for erythrocyte aggregation.

    PubMed

    Bertoluzzo, S M; Bollini, A; Rasia, M; Raynal, A

    1999-01-01

    It is well known that light transmission through blood is the most widely utilized method for the study of erythrocyte aggregation. The curves obtained had been considered empirically as exponential functions. In consequence, the process becomes characterized by an only parameter that varies with all the process factors without discrimination. In the present paper a mathematical model for RBC aggregation process is deduced in accordance with von Smoluchowski's theory about the kinetics of colloidal particles agglomeration. The equation fitted the experimental pattern of the RBC suspension optical transmittance closely and contained two parameters that estimate the most important characteristics of the aggregation process separately, i.e., (1) average size of rouleaux at equilibrium and (2) aggregation rate. The evaluation of the method was assessed by some factors affecting erythrocyte aggregation, such as temperature, plasma dilutions, Dextran 500, Dextran 70 and PVP 360, at different media concentrations, cellular membrane alteration by the alkylating agent TCEA, and decrease of medium osmolarity. Results were interpreted considering the process characteristics estimated by the parameters, and there were also compared with similar studies carried out by other authors with other methods. This analysis allowed us to conclude that the equation proposed is reliable and useful to study erythrocyte aggregation. PMID:10660481

  1. Model for amorphous aggregation processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stranks, Samuel D.; Ecroyd, Heath; van Sluyter, Steven; Waters, Elizabeth J.; Carver, John A.; von Smekal, Lorenz

    2009-11-01

    The amorphous aggregation of proteins is associated with many phenomena, ranging from the formation of protein wine haze to the development of cataract in the eye lens and the precipitation of recombinant proteins during their expression and purification. While much literature exists describing models for linear protein aggregation, such as amyloid fibril formation, there are few reports of models which address amorphous aggregation. Here, we propose a model to describe the amorphous aggregation of proteins which is also more widely applicable to other situations where a similar process occurs, such as in the formation of colloids and nanoclusters. As first applications of the model, we have tested it against experimental turbidimetry data of three proteins relevant to the wine industry and biochemistry, namely, thaumatin, a thaumatinlike protein, and α -lactalbumin. The model is very robust and describes amorphous experimental data to a high degree of accuracy. Details about the aggregation process, such as shape parameters of the aggregates and rate constants, can also be extracted.

  2. Glycation precedes lens crystallin aggregation

    SciTech Connect

    Swamy, M.S.; Perry, R.E.; Abraham, E.C.

    1987-05-01

    Non-enzymatic glycosylation (glycation) seems to have the potential to alter the structure of crystallins and make them susceptible to thiol oxidation leading to disulfide-linked high molecular weight (HMW) aggregate formation. They used streptozotocin diabetic rats during precataract and cataract stages and long-term cell-free glycation of bovine lens crystallins to study the relationship between glycation and lens crystallin aggregation. HMW aggregates and other protein components of the water-soluble (WS) and urea-soluble (US) fractions were separated by molecular sieve high performance liquid chromatography. Glycation was estimated by both (/sup 3/H)NaBH/sub 4/ reduction and phenylboronate agarose affinity chromatography. Levels of total glycated protein (GP) in the US fractions were about 2-fold higher than in the WS fractions and there was a linear increase in GP in both WS and US fractions. This increase was parallelled by a corresponding increase in HMW aggregates. Total GP extracted by the affinity method from the US fraction showed a predominance of HMW aggregates and vice versa. Cell-free glycation studies with bovine crystallins confirmed the results of the animals studies. Increasing glycation caused a corresponding increase in protein insolubilization and the insoluble fraction thus formed also contained more glycated protein. It appears that lens protein glycation, HMW aggregate formation, and protein insolubilization are interrelated.

  3. A Simple Alternative to Grading

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Potts, Glenda

    2010-01-01

    In this article, the author investigates whether an alternative grading system (contract grading) would yield the same final grades as traditional grading (letter grading), and whether or not it would be accepted by students. The author states that this study demonstrated that contract grading was widely, and for the most part, enthusiastically…

  4. The Southern California Dense GPS Geodetic Array

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Webb, F.

    1994-01-01

    The Southern California Earthquake Center is coordinating a effort by scientists at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, the U.S. Geological Survey, and various academic institutions to establish a dense 250 station, continuously recording GPS geodetic array in southern California for measuring crustal deformation associated with slip on the numerous faults that underlie the major metropolitan areas of southern california.

  5. Coalescence preference in dense packing of bubbles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Yeseul; Gim, Bopil; Gim, Bopil; Weon, Byung Mook

    2015-11-01

    Coalescence preference is the tendency that a merged bubble from the contact of two original bubbles (parent) tends to be near to the bigger parent. Here, we show that the coalescence preference can be blocked by densely packing of neighbor bubbles. We use high-speed high-resolution X-ray microscopy to clearly visualize individual coalescence phenomenon which occurs in micro scale seconds and inside dense packing of microbubbles with a local packing fraction of ~40%. Previous theory and experimental evidence predict a power of -5 between the relative coalescence position and the parent size. However, our new observation for coalescence preference in densely packed microbubbles shows a different power of -2. We believe that this result may be important to understand coalescence dynamics in dense packing of soft matter. This work (NRF-2013R1A22A04008115) was supported by Mid-career Researcher Program through NRF grant funded by the MEST and also was supported by Ministry of Science, ICT and Future Planning (2009-0082580) and by Basic Science Research Program through the National Research Foundation of Korea (NRF) funded by the Ministry and Education, Science and Technology (NRF-2012R1A6A3A04039257).

  6. Dense high temperature ceramic oxide superconductors

    DOEpatents

    Landingham, R.L.

    1993-10-12

    Dense superconducting ceramic oxide articles of manufacture and methods for producing these articles are described. Generally these articles are produced by first processing these superconducting oxides by ceramic processing techniques to optimize materials properties, followed by reestablishing the superconducting state in a desired portion of the ceramic oxide composite.

  7. Dense high temperature ceramic oxide superconductors

    DOEpatents

    Landingham, Richard L.

    1993-01-01

    Dense superconducting ceramic oxide articles of manufacture and methods for producing these articles are described. Generally these articles are produced by first processing these superconducting oxides by ceramic processing techniques to optimize materials properties, followed by reestablishing the superconducting state in a desired portion of the ceramic oxide composite.

  8. DENSE NONAQUEOUS PHASE LIQUIDS -- A WORKSHOP SUMMARY

    EPA Science Inventory

    site characterization, and, therefore, DNAPL remediation, can be expected. Dense nonaqueous phase liquids (DNAPLs) in the subsurface are long-term sources of ground-water contamination, and may persist for centuries before dissolving completely in adjacent ground water. In respo...

  9. Preparation of a dense, polycrystalline ceramic structure

    DOEpatents

    Cooley, Jason; Chen, Ching-Fong; Alexander, David

    2010-12-07

    Ceramic nanopowder was sealed inside a metal container under a vacuum. The sealed evacuated container was forced through a severe deformation channel at an elevated temperature below the melting point of the ceramic nanopowder. The result was a dense nanocrystalline ceramic structure inside the metal container.

  10. Effects of soil aggregates on debris-flow mobilization: Results from ring-shear experiments

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Iverson, Neal R.; Mann, Janet E.; Iverson, Richard M.

    2010-01-01

    Rates and styles of landslide motion are sensitive to pore-water pressure changes caused by changes in soil porosity accompanying shear deformation. Soil may either contract or dilate upon shearing, depending upon whether its initial porosity is greater or less, respectively, than a critical-state porosity attained after sufficiently high strain. We observed complications in this behavior, however, during rate-controlled (0.02 m s−1) ring-shear experiments conducted on naturally aggregated dense loamy sand at low confining stresses (10.6 and 40 kPa). The aggregated soil first dilated and then contracted to porosities less than initial values, whereas the same soil with its aggregates destroyed monotonically dilated. We infer that aggregates persisted initially during shear and caused dilation before their eventual breakdown enabled net contraction. An implication of this contraction, demonstrated in experiments in which initial soil porosity was varied, is that the value of porosity distinguishing initially contractive from dilative behavior can be significantly larger than the critical-state porosity, which develops only after disaggregation ceases at high strains. In addition, post-dilative contraction may produce excess pore pressures, thereby reducing frictional strength and facilitating debris-flow mobilization. We infer that results of triaxial tests, which generally produce strains at least a factor of ∼ 4 smaller than those we observed at the inception of post-dilative contraction, do not allow soil contraction to be ruled out as a mechanism for debris-flow mobilization in dense soils containing aggregates.

  11. Ash Aggregates in Proximal Settings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Porritt, L. A.; Russell, K.

    2012-12-01

    Ash aggregates are thought to have formed within and been deposited by the eruption column and plume and dilute density currents and their associated ash clouds. Moist, turbulent ash clouds are considered critical to ash aggregate formation by facilitating both collision and adhesion of particles. Consequently, they are most commonly found in distal deposits. Proximal deposits containing ash aggregates are less commonly observed but do occur. Here we describe two occurrences of vent proximal ash aggregate-rich deposits; the first within a kimberlite pipe where coated ash pellets and accretionary lapilli are found within the intra-vent sequence; and the second in a glaciovolcanic setting where cored pellets (armoured lapilli) occur within <1 km of the vent. The deposits within the A418 pipe, Diavik Diamond Mine, Canada, are the residual deposits within the conduit and vent of the volcano and are characterised by an abundance of ash aggregates. Coated ash pellets are dominant but are followed in abundance by ash pellets, accretionary lapilli and rare cored pellets. The coated ash pellets typically range from 1 - 5 mm in diameter and have core to rim ratios of approximately 10:1. The formation and preservation of these aggregates elucidates the style and nature of the explosive phase of kimberlite eruption at A418 (and other pipes?). First, these pyroclasts dictate the intensity of the kimberlite eruption; it must be energetic enough to cause intense fragmentation of the kimberlite to produce a substantial volume of very fine ash (<62 μm). Secondly, the ash aggregates indicate the involvement of moisture coupled with the presence of dilute expanded eruption clouds. The structure and distribution of these deposits throughout the kimberlite conduit demand that aggregation and deposition operate entirely within the confines of the vent; this indicates that aggregation is a rapid process. Ash aggregates within glaciovolcanic sequences are also rarely documented. The

  12. The Distribution of YSO Masses in Dense Hubs and Less Dense Filaments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirk, Helen; Myers, P.

    2010-01-01

    Dense "hubs" and less dense radiating "filaments" are common features of nearby star-forming regions and infrared dark clouds. Cores and young stars are more concentrated in such hubs than in their radiating filaments. Accreting protostars may gain less mass in such low-density filaments, since low-density gas takes longer to accrete, and since the accretion must draw gas from a greater distance in filamentary geometry. We present an investigation of the mass distributions of YSOs in dense clusters and low-density filaments in the nearest molecular clouds, to test whether YSO masses depend on environment density and geometry. HK is supported by an NSERC PDF.

  13. Crystal aggregation in kidney stones; a polymer aggregation problem?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wesson, J.; Beshensky, A.; Viswanathan, P.; Zachowicz, W.; Kleinman, J.

    2008-03-01

    Kidney stones most frequently form as aggregates of calcium oxalate monohydrate (COM) crystals with organic layers between them, and the organic layers contain principally proteins. The pathway leading to the formation of these crystal aggregates in affected people has not been identified, but stone forming patients are thought to have a defect in the structure or distribution of urinary proteins, which normally protect against stone formation. We have developed two polyelectrolyte models that will induce COM crystal aggregation in vitro, and both are consistent with possible urinary protein compositions. The first model was based on mixing polyanionic and polycationic proteins, in portions such that the combined protein charge is near zero. The second model was based on reducing the charge density on partially charged polyanionic proteins, specifically Tamm-Horsfall protein, the second most abundant protein in urine. Both models demonstrated polymer phase separation at solution conditions where COM crystal aggregation was observed. Correlation with data from other bulk crystallization measurements suggest that the anionic side chains form critical binding interactions with COM surfaces that are necessary along with the phase separation process to induce COM crystal aggregation.

  14. ULTRASONICALLY-ENHANCED DENSE-MEDIUM CYCLONING FOR FINE COAL AND COAL REFUSE IMPOUNDMENT MATERIALS

    SciTech Connect

    Dr. Mark S. Klima; Dr. Barbara J. Arnold

    2001-08-01

    The Pennsylvania State University, its project team (Typlex, Inc., DAGER, Inc., and PrepTech, Inc.), and advisory committee members have demonstrated the application of ultrasonic energy during dense-medium cyclining and subsequent recovery of fine coal and coal refuse impoundment materials. The results will help to extend the range of conventional dense-medium cyclining to sizes now typically cleaned in relatively inefficient water-only cyclone and spiral concentrators circuits. This technology also provides a potential approach to produce ultra-clean material as would be used for feedstocks for premium carbon products. This report describes Phase I of the project, which involved laboratory testing of dense-medium cyclining and subsequent medium recovery, with and without ultrasonic treatment, along with fundamental dispersion testing. Dense-medium cycloning was conducted with a 76.2-mm (3-in.) diameter cyclone under various conditions including magnetite grade, medium relative density, inlet pressure, cyclone geometry, and feed coal. Dense-medium recovery testing was carried out with a 305-mm (12-in.) diameter x 152-mm (6-in.) wide wet-drum magnetic separator using the cyclone clean coal and refuse products as the feed material. Fundamental testing of dispersion/reagglomeration phenomena was conducted with coal/clay mixtures. In almost all cases, the dense-medium cyclone was capable of achieving separations down to approximately 0.037 mm. Ultrasonic treatment had a slight effect on reducing the ash content of the clean coal. It was also found that ultrasonic treatment improved the purity of the magnetic fraction during wet-drum magnetic separation. The treatment was particularly beneficial for the cyclone overflow material. The fundamental testing indicated that agitation after ultrasonic treatment is necessary to disperse fine particles and to prevent agglomeration.

  15. An Unprecedented Aggregation of Whale Sharks, Rhincodon typus, in Mexican Coastal Waters of the Caribbean Sea

    PubMed Central

    de la Parra Venegas, Rafael; Hueter, Robert; González Cano, Jaime; Tyminski, John; Gregorio Remolina, José; Maslanka, Mike; Ormos, Andrea; Weigt, Lee; Carlson, Bruce; Dove, Alistair

    2011-01-01

    Whale sharks, Rhincodon typus, are often perceived as solitary behemoths that live and feed in the open ocean. To the contrary, evidence is accumulating that they are gregarious and form seasonal aggregations in some coastal waters. One such aggregation occurs annually north of Cabo Catoche, off Isla Holbox on the Yucatán Peninsula of Mexico. Here we report a second, much denser aggregation of whale sharks (dubbed “the Afuera”) that occurs east of the tip of the Yucatán Peninsula in the Caribbean Sea. The 2009 Afuera event comprised the largest aggregation of whale sharks ever reported, with up to 420 whale sharks observed in a single aerial survey, all gathered in an elliptical patch of ocean approximately 18 km2. Plankton studies indicated that the sharks were feeding on dense homogenous patches of fish eggs, which DNA barcoding analysis identified as belonging to little tunny, Euthynnus alletteratus. This contrasts with the annual Cabo Catoche aggregation nearby, where prey consists mostly of copepods and sergestid shrimp. Increased sightings at the Afuera coincide with decreased sightings at Cabo Catoche, and both groups have the same sex ratio, implying that the same animals are likely involved in both aggregations; tagging data support this idea. With two whale shark aggregation areas, high coastal productivity and a previously-unknown scombrid spawning ground, the northeastern Yucatán marine region is a critical habitat that deserves more concerted conservation efforts. PMID:21559508

  16. An unprecedented aggregation of whale sharks, Rhincodon typus, in Mexican coastal waters of the Caribbean Sea.

    PubMed

    de la Parra Venegas, Rafael; Hueter, Robert; González Cano, Jaime; Tyminski, John; Gregorio Remolina, José; Maslanka, Mike; Ormos, Andrea; Weigt, Lee; Carlson, Bruce; Dove, Alistair

    2011-01-01

    Whale sharks, Rhincodon typus, are often perceived as solitary behemoths that live and feed in the open ocean. To the contrary, evidence is accumulating that they are gregarious and form seasonal aggregations in some coastal waters. One such aggregation occurs annually north of Cabo Catoche, off Isla Holbox on the Yucatán Peninsula of Mexico. Here we report a second, much denser aggregation of whale sharks (dubbed "the Afuera") that occurs east of the tip of the Yucatán Peninsula in the Caribbean Sea. The 2009 Afuera event comprised the largest aggregation of whale sharks ever reported, with up to 420 whale sharks observed in a single aerial survey, all gathered in an elliptical patch of ocean approximately 18 km(2). Plankton studies indicated that the sharks were feeding on dense homogenous patches of fish eggs, which DNA barcoding analysis identified as belonging to little tunny, Euthynnus alletteratus. This contrasts with the annual Cabo Catoche aggregation nearby, where prey consists mostly of copepods and sergestid shrimp. Increased sightings at the Afuera coincide with decreased sightings at Cabo Catoche, and both groups have the same sex ratio, implying that the same animals are likely involved in both aggregations; tagging data support this idea. With two whale shark aggregation areas, high coastal productivity and a previously-unknown scombrid spawning ground, the northeastern Yucatán marine region is a critical habitat that deserves more concerted conservation efforts. PMID:21559508

  17. Composition, Buoyancy Regulation and Fate of Ice Algal Aggregates in the Central Arctic Ocean

    PubMed Central

    Fernández-Méndez, Mar; Wenzhöfer, Frank; Peeken, Ilka; Sørensen, Heidi L.; Glud, Ronnie N.; Boetius, Antje

    2014-01-01

    Sea-ice diatoms are known to accumulate in large aggregates in and under sea ice and in melt ponds. There is recent evidence from the Arctic that such aggregates can contribute substantially to particle export when sinking from the ice. The role and regulation of microbial aggregation in the highly seasonal, nutrient- and light-limited Arctic sea-ice ecosystem is not well understood. To elucidate the mechanisms controlling the formation and export of algal aggregates from sea ice, we investigated samples taken in late summer 2011 and 2012, during two cruises to the Eurasian Basin of the Central Arctic Ocean. Spherical aggregates densely packed with pennate diatoms, as well as filamentous aggregates formed by Melosira arctica showed sign of different stages of degradation and physiological stoichiometries, with carbon to chlorophyll a ratios ranging from 110 to 66700, and carbon to nitrogen molar ratios of 8–35 and 9–40, respectively. Sub-ice algal aggregate densities ranged between 1 and 17 aggregates m−2, maintaining an estimated net primary production of 0.4–40 mg C m−2 d−1, and accounted for 3–80% of total phototrophic biomass and up to 94% of local net primary production. A potential factor controlling the buoyancy of the aggregates was light intensity, regulating photosynthetic oxygen production and the amount of gas bubbles trapped within the mucous matrix, even at low ambient nutrient concentrations. Our data-set was used to evaluate the distribution and importance of Arctic algal aggregates as carbon source for pelagic and benthic communities. PMID:25208058

  18. Composition, buoyancy regulation and fate of ice algal aggregates in the Central Arctic Ocean.

    PubMed

    Fernández-Méndez, Mar; Wenzhöfer, Frank; Peeken, Ilka; Sørensen, Heidi L; Glud, Ronnie N; Boetius, Antje

    2014-01-01

    Sea-ice diatoms are known to accumulate in large aggregates in and under sea ice and in melt ponds. There is recent evidence from the Arctic that such aggregates can contribute substantially to particle export when sinking from the ice. The role and regulation of microbial aggregation in the highly seasonal, nutrient- and light-limited Arctic sea-ice ecosystem is not well understood. To elucidate the mechanisms controlling the formation and export of algal aggregates from sea ice, we investigated samples taken in late summer 2011 and 2012, during two cruises to the Eurasian Basin of the Central Arctic Ocean. Spherical aggregates densely packed with pennate diatoms, as well as filamentous aggregates formed by Melosira arctica showed sign of different stages of degradation and physiological stoichiometries, with carbon to chlorophyll a ratios ranging from 110 to 66700, and carbon to nitrogen molar ratios of 8-35 and 9-40, respectively. Sub-ice algal aggregate densities ranged between 1 and 17 aggregates m(-2), maintaining an estimated net primary production of 0.4-40 mg C m(-2) d(-1), and accounted for 3-80% of total phototrophic biomass and up to 94% of local net primary production. A potential factor controlling the buoyancy of the aggregates was light intensity, regulating photosynthetic oxygen production and the amount of gas bubbles trapped within the mucous matrix, even at low ambient nutrient concentrations. Our data-set was used to evaluate the distribution and importance of Arctic algal aggregates as carbon source for pelagic and benthic communities. PMID:25208058

  19. Fractal Aggregates in Tennis Ball Systems

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sabin, J.; Bandin, M.; Prieto, G.; Sarmiento, F.

    2009-01-01

    We present a new practical exercise to explain the mechanisms of aggregation of some colloids which are otherwise not easy to understand. We have used tennis balls to simulate, in a visual way, the aggregation of colloids under reaction-limited colloid aggregation (RLCA) and diffusion-limited colloid aggregation (DLCA) regimes. We have used the…

  20. Aggregated Recommendation through Random Forests

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Aggregated recommendation refers to the process of suggesting one kind of items to a group of users. Compared to user-oriented or item-oriented approaches, it is more general and, therefore, more appropriate for cold-start recommendation. In this paper, we propose a random forest approach to create aggregated recommender systems. The approach is used to predict the rating of a group of users to a kind of items. In the preprocessing stage, we merge user, item, and rating information to construct an aggregated decision table, where rating information serves as the decision attribute. We also model the data conversion process corresponding to the new user, new item, and both new problems. In the training stage, a forest is built for the aggregated training set, where each leaf is assigned a distribution of discrete rating. In the testing stage, we present four predicting approaches to compute evaluation values based on the distribution of each tree. Experiments results on the well-known MovieLens dataset show that the aggregated approach maintains an acceptable level of accuracy. PMID:25180204

  1. Aggregated recommendation through random forests.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Heng-Ru; Min, Fan; He, Xu

    2014-01-01

    Aggregated recommendation refers to the process of suggesting one kind of items to a group of users. Compared to user-oriented or item-oriented approaches, it is more general and, therefore, more appropriate for cold-start recommendation. In this paper, we propose a random forest approach to create aggregated recommender systems. The approach is used to predict the rating of a group of users to a kind of items. In the preprocessing stage, we merge user, item, and rating information to construct an aggregated decision table, where rating information serves as the decision attribute. We also model the data conversion process corresponding to the new user, new item, and both new problems. In the training stage, a forest is built for the aggregated training set, where each leaf is assigned a distribution of discrete rating. In the testing stage, we present four predicting approaches to compute evaluation values based on the distribution of each tree. Experiments results on the well-known MovieLens dataset show that the aggregated approach maintains an acceptable level of accuracy. PMID:25180204

  2. Aggregation operations for multiaspect fuzzy soft sets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sulaiman, Nor Hashimah; Mohamad, Daud

    2015-10-01

    Multiaspect fuzzy soft set (MAFSS) is one of the generalized forms of fuzzy soft sets. In this paper, we introduce two types of aggregation operations for MAFSSs, namely the weighted arithmetic mean (WAM)-based MAFSS aggregation, and the ordered weighted aggregation (OWA)-based MAFSS aggregation. The applicability of the two MAFSS-aggregation operations is illustrated with numerical examples in group decision making.

  3. Dense hadronic matter in holographic QCD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Keun-Young; Sin, Sang-Jin; Zahed, Ismail

    2013-10-01

    We provide a method to study hadronic matter at finite density in the context of the Sakai-Sugimoto model. We introduce the baryon chemical potential through the external U(1) v gauge field in the induced (DBI plus CS) action on the D8-probe-brane, where baryons are skyrmions. Vector dominance is manifest at finite density. We derive the effect of the baryon density on the energy density, and on the dispersion relations of pions and vector mesons at large N c . The energy density asymptotes are constant at large density, suggesting that dense matter at large N c freezes, with the pion velocity dropping to zero. Holographic dense matter enforces exactly the tenets of vector dominance and efficiently screens vector mesons. At the freezing point, the ρ — ππ coupling vanishes with a finite rho mass of about 20% its vacuum value.

  4. The kinetic chemistry of dense interstellar clouds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Graedel, T. E.; Langer, W. D.; Frerking, M. A.

    1982-01-01

    A model of the time-dependent chemistry of dense interstellar clouds is formulated to study the dominant chemical processes in carbon and oxygen isotope fractionation, the formation of nitrogen-containing molecules, and the evolution of product molecules as a function of cloud density and temperature. The abundances of the dominant isotopes of the carbon- and oxygen-bearing molecules are calculated. The chemical abundances are found to be quite sensitive to electron concentration since the electron concentration determines the ratio of H3(+) to He(+), and the electron density is strongly influenced by the metals abundance. For typical metal abundances and for H2 cloud density not less than 10,000 molecules/cu cm, nearly all carbon exists as CO at late cloud ages. At high cloud density, many aspects of the chemistry are strongly time dependent. Finally, model calculations agree well with abundances deduced from observations of molecular line emission in cold dense clouds.

  5. Hydrodynamic stellar interactions in dense star clusters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rasio, Frederic A.

    1993-01-01

    Highly detailed HST observations of globular-cluster cores and galactic nuclei motivate new theoretical studies of the violent dynamical processes which govern the evolution of these very dense stellar systems. These processes include close stellar encounters and direct physical collisions between stars. Such hydrodynamic stellar interactions are thought to explain the large populations of blue stragglers, millisecond pulsars, X-ray binaries, and other peculiar sources observed in globular clusters. Three-dimensional hydrodynamics techniques now make it possible to perform realistic numerical simulations of these interactions. The results, when combined with those of N-body simulations of stellar dynamics, should provide for the first time a realistic description of dense star clusters. Here I review briefly current theoretical work on hydrodynamic stellar interactions, emphasizing its relevance to recent observations.

  6. Active fluidization in dense glassy systems.

    PubMed

    Mandal, Rituparno; Bhuyan, Pranab Jyoti; Rao, Madan; Dasgupta, Chandan

    2016-07-20

    Dense soft glasses show strong collective caging behavior at sufficiently low temperatures. Using molecular dynamics simulations of a model glass former, we show that the incorporation of activity or self-propulsion, f0, can induce cage breaking and fluidization, resulting in the disappearance of the glassy phase beyond a critical f0. The diffusion coefficient crosses over from being strongly to weakly temperature dependent as f0 is increased. In addition, we demonstrate that activity induces a crossover from a fragile to a strong glass and a tendency of active particles to cluster. Our results are of direct relevance to the collective dynamics of dense active colloidal glasses and to recent experiments on tagged particle diffusion in living cells. PMID:27380935

  7. Molecular Aggregation in Disodium Cromoglycate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Gautam; Agra-Kooijman, D.; Collings, P. J.; Kumar, Satyendra

    2012-02-01

    Details of molecular aggregation in the mesophases of the anti-asthmatic drug disodium cromoglycate (DSCG) have been studied using x-ray synchrotron scattering. The results show two reflections, one at wide angles corresponding to π-π stacking (3.32 å) of molecules, and the other at small angles which is perpendicular to the direction of molecular stacking and corresponds to the distance between the molecular aggregates. The latter varies from 35 - 41 å in the nematic (N) phase and 27 -- 32 å in the columnar (M) phase. The temperature evolution of the stack height, positional order correlations in the lateral direction, and orientation order parameter were determined in the N, M, and biphasic regions. The structure of the N and M phases and the nature of the molecular aggregation, together with their dependence on temperature and concentration, will be presented.

  8. Evaporation effects in elastocapillary aggregation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vella, Dominic; Hadjittofis, Andreas; Singh, Kiran; Lister, John

    2015-11-01

    We consider the effect of evaporation on the aggregation of a number of elastic objects due to a liquid's surface tension. In particular, we consider an array of spring-block elements in which the gaps between blocks are filled by thin liquid films that evaporate during the course of an experiment. Using lubrication theory to account for the fluid flow within the gaps, we study the dynamics of aggregation. We find that a non-zero evaporation rate causes the elements to aggregate more quickly and, indeed, to contact within finite time. However, we also show that the number of elements within each cluster decreases as the evaporation rate increases. We explain these results quantitatively by comparison with the corresponding two-body problem and discuss their relevance for controlling pattern formation in carbon nanotube forests.

  9. Are Math Grades Cyclical?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Adams, Gerald J.; Dial, Micah

    1998-01-01

    The cyclical nature of mathematics grades was studied for a cohort of elementary school students from a large metropolitan school district in Texas over six years (average cohort size of 8495). The study used an autoregressive integrated moving average (ARIMA) model. Results indicate that grades do exhibit a significant cyclical pattern. (SLD)

  10. [Grading of neuroendocrine tumors].

    PubMed

    Saeger, W; Schnabel, P A; Komminoth, P

    2016-07-01

    The current WHO classification of neuroendocrine tumors (NET) differentiates between typical carcinoids (low grade NET), atypical carcinoids (intermediate grade NET) and small cell and large cell carcinomas (high grade NET) according to the prognosis. Neuroendocrine neoplasms (NEN) of the gastrointestinal tract and the pancreas are graded in an identical way. Together with the TNM system this enables a preoperative estimation of the prognosis in biopsies and fine needle aspirates. Well-differentiated tumors are graded into G1 tumors by the number of mitoses, <2 per 10 high-power fields (HPF) and the Ki-67 (index <3 %) and G2 tumors (2-20 mitoses/10 HPF, Ki-67 3-20 %). Discrepancies between the number of mitoses and the Ki-67 index are not uncommon and in these cases the higher value of the two should be applied. The more differentiated tumors of the G3 type have to be differentiated from undifferentiated carcinomas of the small cell type and large cell type with a much poorer prognosis. Prognosis relevant grading of thyroid cancers is achieved by special subtyping so that the G1-G3 system is not applicable. The rare cancers of the parathyroid gland and of the pituitary gland are not graded. Adrenal tumors also have no grading system. The prognosis is dependent on the Ki-67 index and with some reservations on the established scoring systems. PMID:27379621

  11. Grading Exceptional Learners

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jung, Lee Ann; Guskey, Thomas R.

    2010-01-01

    Teachers often grapple with the challenge of giving report card grades to students with learning disabilities and English language learners. The authors offer a five-step model that "offers a fair, accurate, and legal way to adapt the grading process for exceptional learners." The model begins with a high-quality reporting system for all students…

  12. Third Grade Reading Policies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rose, Stephanie

    2012-01-01

    In 2012, 14 states passed legislation geared toward improving 3rd-grade literacy through identification, intervention, and/or retention initiatives. Today, a total of 32 states and the District of Columbia have policies in statute aimed at improving 3rd-grade reading proficiency. The majority of these states require early assessment and…

  13. Making Grading Work.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lotto, Edward; Smith, Bruce

    Two teachers have developed a procedure for grading student compositions that seems fairer to both them and their students. The students are given a choice of which papers they wish to submit for grading, and when they do submit work, the papers are identified by a number only (chosen by the student and indexed in a class card file). Each teacher…

  14. Beef grading by ultrasound

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gammell, P. M.

    1981-01-01

    Reflections in ultrasonic A-scan signatures of beef carcasses indicate USDA grade. Since reflections from within muscle are determined primarily by fat/muscle interface, richness of signals is direct indication of degree of marbling and quality. Method replaces subjective sight and feel tests by individual graders and is applicable to grade analysis of live cattle.

  15. Grain Grading and Handling.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rendleman, Matt; Legacy, James

    This publication provides an introduction to grain grading and handling for adult students in vocational and technical education programs. Organized in five chapters, the booklet provides a brief overview of the jobs performed at a grain elevator and of the techniques used to grade grain. The first chapter introduces the grain industry and…

  16. Classroom: Efficient Grading

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shaw, David D.; Pease, Leonard F., III.

    2014-01-01

    Grading can be accelerated to make time for more effective instruction. This article presents specific time management strategies selected to decrease administrative time required of faculty and teaching assistants, including a multiple answer multiple choice interface for exams, a three-tier grading system for open ended problem solving, and a…

  17. Controlling Grade Inflation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stanoyevitch, Alexander

    2008-01-01

    In this article concerning grade inflation, the author restricts his attention to the college and university level, although many of the tools and ideas developed here should be useful for high schools as well. The author considers the relationships between grades instructors assign and scores they receive on end-of-the semester student…

  18. Grades out, Badges in

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Young, Jeffrey R.

    2012-01-01

    Grades are broken. Students grub for them, pick classes where good ones come easily, and otherwise hustle to win the highest scores for the least learning. As a result, college grades are inflated to the point of meaninglessness--especially to employers who want to know which diploma-holder is best qualified for their jobs. An alternative is to…

  19. The Grades Game

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fleenor, Andy; Lamb, Sarah; Anton, Jennifer; Stinson, Todd; Donen, Tony

    2011-01-01

    It can be quite alarming (and eye-opening) to see exactly how many of the grades students receive are based on their behaviors rather than their learning. Students should be assessed on what they know and can use rather than on their behavior. The reality, unfortunately, is that the opposite is often the case. Grades for students who work hard are…

  20. Are Grades Undermining Motivation?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Berliner, David; Casanova, Ursula

    1988-01-01

    A study of fifth and sixth grade public school students in Israel suggests that grades and other norm-referenced methods are less effective than task-involving evaluation methods in enhancing student performance, interest, and motivation. This article consists of two commentaries on the findings, with suggestions for implementing task-involving…

  1. Determining Faculty Grading Variation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Demerjian, Marlene D.

    A study was undertaken at the College of the Canyons, in California, to assess the variation of grades given by mathematics instructors teaching intermediate algebra. A sample was drawn from all instructors who taught Math 070 repeatedly from fall 1990 to fall 1994, resulting in the examination of the grades of at least 200 students from classes…

  2. Dense Molecular Gas in Centaurus A

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wild, Wolfgang; Eckart, Andreas

    1999-10-01

    Centaurus A (NGC 5128) is the closest radio galaxy, and its molecular interstellar medium has been studied extensively in recent years. However, these studies used mostly molecular lines tracing low to medium density gas (see e.g. Eckart et al. 1990. Wild et al. 1997). The amount and distribution of the dense component remained largely unknown. We present spectra of the HCN(1-0) emission - which traces dense (n(H2) > 104 cm-3) molecular gas - at the center and along the prominent dust lane at offset positions +/- 60" and +/- 100", as well as single CS(2-1) and CS(3-2) spectra, observed with the SEST on La Silla, Chile. At the central position, the integrated intensity ratio I(HCN)/I(CO) peaks at 0.064, and decreases to somewhat equal to 0.02 to 0.04 in the dust lane. Based on the line luminosity ratio L(HCN)/L(CO) we estimate that there is a significant amount of dense gas in Centaurus A. The fraction of dense molecular gas as well as the star formation efficiency LFIR/LCO towards the center of Cen A is comparable to ultra-luminous infrared galaxies, and falls in between the values for ULIRGs and normal galaxies for positions in the dust lane. Details will be published in Wild & Eckart (A&A, in prep.). Eckart et al. 1990, ApJ 363, 451 Rydbeck et al. 1993, Astr.Ap. (Letters) 270, L13. Wild, W., Eckart, A. & Wiklind, T. 1997, Astr.Ap. 322, 419.

  3. Computational electromagnetics and parallel dense matrix computations

    SciTech Connect

    Forsman, K.; Kettunen, L.; Gropp, W.; Levine, D.

    1995-06-01

    We present computational results using CORAL, a parallel, three-dimensional, nonlinear magnetostatic code based on a volume integral equation formulation. A key feature of CORAL is the ability to solve, in parallel, the large, dense systems of linear equations that are inherent in the use of integral equation methods. Using the Chameleon and PSLES libraries ensures portability and access to the latest linear algebra solution technology.

  4. Computer codes for dispersion of dense gas

    SciTech Connect

    Weber, A.H.; Watts, J.R.

    1982-02-01

    Two models for describing the behavior of dense gases have been adapted for specific applications at the Savannah River Plant (SRP) and have been programmed on the IBM computer. One of the models has been used to predict the effect of a ruptured H/sub 2/S storage tank at the 400 Area. The other model has been used to simulate the effect of an unignited release of H/sub 2/S from the 400-Area flare tower.

  5. Shear dispersion in dense granular flows

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Christov, Ivan C.; Stone, Howard A.

    2014-04-18

    We formulate and solve a model problem of dispersion of dense granular materials in rapid shear flow down an incline. The effective dispersivity of the depth-averaged concentration of the dispersing powder is shown to vary as the Péclet number squared, as in classical Taylor–Aris dispersion of molecular solutes. An extension to generic shear profiles is presented, and possible applications to industrial and geological granular flows are noted.

  6. Structures for dense, crack free thin films

    DOEpatents

    Jacobson, Craig P.; Visco, Steven J.; De Jonghe, Lutgard C.

    2011-03-08

    The process described herein provides a simple and cost effective method for making crack free, high density thin ceramic film. The steps involve depositing a layer of a ceramic material on a porous or dense substrate. The deposited layer is compacted and then the resultant laminate is sintered to achieve a higher density than would have been possible without the pre-firing compaction step.

  7. Dense matter theory: A simple classical approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Savić, P.; Čelebonović, V.

    1994-07-01

    In the sixties, the first author and by P. Savić and R. Kašanin started developing a mean-field theory of dense matter. It is based on the Coulomb interaction, supplemented by a microscopic selection rule and a set of experimentally founded postulates. Applications of the theory range from the calculation of models of planetary internal structure to DAC experiments.

  8. Oxygen ion-conducting dense ceramic

    DOEpatents

    Balachandran, Uthamalingam; Kleefisch, Mark S.; Kobylinski, Thaddeus P.; Morissette, Sherry L.; Pei, Shiyou

    1998-01-01

    Preparation, structure, and properties of mixed metal oxide compositions and their uses are described. Mixed metal oxide compositions of the invention have stratified crystalline structure identifiable by means of powder X-ray diffraction patterns. In the form of dense ceramic membranes, the present compositions demonstrate an ability to separate oxygen selectively from a gaseous mixture containing oxygen and one or more other volatile components by means of ionic conductivities.

  9. Global kinetic analysis of seeded BSA aggregation.

    PubMed

    Sahin, Ziya; Demir, Yusuf Kemal; Kayser, Veysel

    2016-04-30

    Accelerated aggregation studies were conducted around the melting temperature (Tm) to elucidate the kinetics of seeded BSA aggregation. Aggregation was tracked by SEC-HPLC and intrinsic fluorescence spectroscopy. Time evolution of monomer, dimer and soluble aggregate concentrations were globally analysed to reliably deduce mechanistic details pertinent to the process. Results showed that BSA aggregated irreversibly through both sequential monomer addition and aggregate-aggregate interactions. Sequential monomer addition proceeded only via non-native monomers, starting to occur only by 1-2°C below the Tm. Aggregate-aggregate interactions were the dominant mechanism below the Tm due to an initial presence of small aggregates that acted as seeds. Aggregate-aggregate interactions were significant also above the Tm, particularly at later stages of aggregation when sequential monomer addition seemed to cease, leading in some cases to insoluble aggregate formation. The adherence (or non-thereof) of the mechanisms to Arrhenius kinetics were discussed alongside possible implications of seeding for biopharmaceutical shelf-life and spectroscopic data interpretation, the latter of which was found to often be overlooked in BSA aggregation studies. PMID:26970282

  10. Numerical modeling for dilute and dense sprays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, C. P.; Kim, Y. M.; Shang, H. M.; Ziebarth, J. P.; Wang, T. S.

    1992-01-01

    We have successfully implemented a numerical model for spray-combustion calculations. In this model, the governing gas-phase equations in Eulerian coordinate are solved by a time-marching multiple pressure correction procedure based on the operator-splitting technique. The droplet-phase equations in Lagrangian coordinate are solved by a stochastic discrete particle technique. In order to simplify the calculation procedure for the circulating droplets, the effective conductivity model is utilized. The k-epsilon models are utilized to characterize the time and length scales of the gas phase in conjunction with turbulent modulation by droplets and droplet dispersion by turbulence. This method entails random sampling of instantaneous gas flow properties and the stochastic process requires a large number of computational parcels to produce the satisfactory dispersion distributions even for rather dilute sprays. Two major improvements in spray combustion modelings were made. Firstly, we have developed a probability density function approach in multidimensional space to represent a specific computational particle. Secondly, we incorporate the Taylor Analogy Breakup (TAB) model for handling the dense spray effects. This breakup model is based on the reasonable assumption that atomization and drop breakup are indistinguishable processes within a dense spray near the nozzle exit. Accordingly, atomization is prescribed by injecting drops which have a characteristic size equal to the nozzle exit diameter. Example problems include the nearly homogeneous and inhomogeneous turbulent particle dispersion, and the non-evaporating, evaporating, and burning dense sprays. Comparison with experimental data will be discussed in detail.

  11. Multishock Compression Properties of Warm Dense Argon.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Jun; Chen, Qifeng; Yunjun, Gu; Li, Zhiguo; Shen, Zhijun

    2015-01-01

    Warm dense argon was generated by a shock reverberation technique. The diagnostics of warm dense argon were performed by a multichannel optical pyrometer and a velocity interferometer system. The equations of state in the pressure-density range of 20-150 GPa and 1.9-5.3 g/cm(3) from the first- to fourth-shock compression were presented. The single-shock temperatures in the range of 17.2-23.4 kK were obtained from the spectral radiance. Experimental results indicates that multiple shock-compression ratio (ηi = ρi/ρ0) is greatly enhanced from 3.3 to 8.8, where ρ0 is the initial density of argon and ρi (i = 1, 2, 3, 4) is the compressed density from first to fourth shock, respectively. For the relative compression ratio (ηi' = ρi/ρi-1), an interesting finding is that a turning point occurs at the second shocked states under the conditions of different experiments, and ηi' increases with pressure in lower density regime and reversely decreases with pressure in higher density regime. The evolution of the compression ratio is controlled by the excitation of internal degrees of freedom, which increase the compression, and by the interaction effects between particles that reduce it. A temperature-density plot shows that current multishock compression states of argon have distributed into warm dense regime. PMID:26515505

  12. Dense spray evaporation as a mixing process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Rivas, A.; Villermaux, E.

    2016-05-01

    We explore the processes by which a dense set of small liquid droplets (a spray) evaporates in a dry, stirred gas phase. A dense spray of micron-sized liquid (water or ethanol) droplets is formed in air by a pneumatic atomizer in a closed chamber. The spray is conveyed in ambient air as a plume whose extension depends on the relative humidity of the diluting medium. Standard shear instabilities develop at the plume edge, forming the stretched lamellar structures familiar with passive scalars. Unlike passive scalars however, these lamellae vanish in a finite time, because individual droplets evaporate at their border in contact with the dry environment. Experiments demonstrate that the lifetime of an individual droplet embedded in a lamellae is much larger than expected from the usual d2 law describing the fate of a single drop evaporating in a quiescent environment. By analogy with the way mixing times are understood from the convection-diffusion equation for passive scalars, we show that the lifetime of a spray lamellae stretched at a constant rate γ is tv=1/γ ln(1/+ϕ ϕ ) , where ϕ is a parameter that incorporates the thermodynamic and diffusional properties of the vapor in the diluting phase. The case of time-dependent stretching rates is examined too. A dense spray behaves almost as a (nonconserved) passive scalar.

  13. Automated building extraction using dense elevation matrices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bendett, A. A.; Rauhala, Urho A.; Pearson, James J.

    1997-02-01

    The identification and measurement of buildings in imagery is important to a number of applications including cartography, modeling and simulation, and weapon targeting. Extracting large numbers of buildings manually can be time- consuming and expensive, so the automation of the process is highly desirable. This paper describes and demonstrates such an automated process for extracting rectilinear buildings from stereo imagery. The first step is the generation of a dense elevation matrix registered to the imagery. In the examples shown, this was accomplished using global minimum residual matching (GMRM). GMRM automatically removes y- parallax from the stereo imagery and produces a dense matrix of x-parallax values which are proportional to the local elevation, and, of course, registered to the imagery. The second step is to form a joint probability distribution of the image gray levels and the corresponding height values from the elevation matrix. Based on the peaks of that distribution, the area of interest is segmented into feature and non-feature areas. The feature areas are further refined using length, width and height constraints to yield promising building hypotheses with their corresponding vertices. The gray shade image is used in the third step to verify the hypotheses and to determine precise edge locations corresponding to the approximate vertices and satisfying appropriate orthogonality constraints. Examples of successful application of this process to imagery are presented, and extensions involving the use of dense elevation matrices from other sources are possible.

  14. Dense Correspondences across Scenes and Scales.

    PubMed

    Tau, Moria; Hassner, Tal

    2016-05-01

    We seek a practical method for establishing dense correspondences between two images with similar content, but possibly different 3D scenes. One of the challenges in designing such a system is the local scale differences of objects appearing in the two images. Previous methods often considered only few image pixels; matching only pixels for which stable scales may be reliably estimated. Recently, others have considered dense correspondences, but with substantial costs associated with generating, storing and matching scale invariant descriptors. Our work is motivated by the observation that pixels in the image have contexts-the pixels around them-which may be exploited in order to reliably estimate local scales. We make the following contributions. (i) We show that scales estimated in sparse interest points may be propagated to neighboring pixels where this information cannot be reliably determined. Doing so allows scale invariant descriptors to be extracted anywhere in the image. (ii) We explore three means for propagating this information: using the scales at detected interest points, using the underlying image information to guide scale propagation in each image separately, and using both images together. Finally, (iii), we provide extensive qualitative and quantitative results, demonstrating that scale propagation allows for accurate dense correspondences to be obtained even between very different images, with little computational costs beyond those required by existing methods. PMID:26336115

  15. Environmentalism and natural aggregate mining

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Drew, L.J.; Langer, W.H.; Sachs, J.S.

    2002-01-01

    Sustaining a developed economy and expanding a developing one require the use of large volumes of natural aggregate. Almost all human activity (commercial, recreational, or leisure) is transacted in or on facilities constructed from natural aggregate. In our urban and suburban worlds, we are almost totally dependent on supplies of water collected behind dams and transported through aqueducts made from concrete. Natural aggregate is essential to the facilities that produce energy-hydroelectric dams and coal-fired powerplants. Ironically, the utility created for mankind by the use of natural aggregate is rarely compared favorably with the environmental impacts of mining it. Instead, the empty quarries and pits are seen as large negative environmental consequences. At the root of this disassociation is the philosophy of environmentalism, which flavors our perceptions of the excavation, processing, and distribution of natural aggregate. The two end-member ideas in this philosophy are ecocentrism and anthropocentrism. Ecocentrism takes the position that the natural world is a organism whose arteries are the rivers-their flow must not be altered. The soil is another vital organ and must not be covered with concrete and asphalt. The motto of the ecocentrist is "man must live more lightly on the land." The anthropocentrist wants clean water and air and an uncluttered landscape for human use. Mining is allowed and even encouraged, but dust and noise from quarry and pit operations must be minimized. The large volume of truck traffic is viewed as a real menace to human life and should be regulated and isolated. The environmental problems that the producers of natural aggregate (crushed stone and sand and gravel) face today are mostly difficult social and political concerns associated with the large holes dug in the ground and the large volume of heavy truck traffic associated with quarry and pit operations. These concerns have increased in recent years as society's demand for

  16. Five Obstacles to Grading Reform

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Guskey, Thomas R.

    2011-01-01

    Educators seeking to reform grading must combat five long-held traditions that stand as formidable obstacles to change: (1) Grades should provide the basis for differentiating students; (2) grade distributions should resemble a bell-shaped curve; (3) grades should be based on students' standing among classmates; (4) poor grades prompt students to…

  17. Paperless Grades and Faculty Development.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hardy, James C.; Jones, Dennis; Turner, Sandy

    2003-01-01

    Provides overview of process of switching from paper-based grade reporting to computer-based grading. Authors found that paperless grading decreased number of errors, made student access more immediate, and reduced costs incurred by purchasing and storing grade-scanning sheets. Authors also argue that direct entry grading encourages faculty to…

  18. Influence of aggregate sizes and microstructures on bioremediation assessment of field-contaminated soils in pilot-scale biopiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, W.; Akbari, A.; Frigon, D.; Ghoshal, S.

    2011-12-01

    concentrations in macro-aggregates over time in the nutrient-amended biopile suggested increased microbial abundance in macro-aggregates, attributable to higher C16-C34 hydrocarbon biodegradation. In meso-aggregates, the change in protein concentrations was insignificant. Terminal Restriction Fragment Length Polymorphism (T-RFLP) found similar shifts in the microbial community irrespective of the aggregate size or the nutrient amendment suggesting that the enhanced biodegradation in macro-aggregates is due to metabolic stimulation and not microbial selection. The pore structures of macro- and meso-aggregates were characterized by N2 adsorption and non-invasive micro X-ray CT images. The macro-aggregates had significantly larger surface areas (3.7-5.3 vs. 0.76-1.1 m2 g-1) and pore volumes (12000 vs. 3200 mm3 g-1) compared to those of densely clustered meso-aggregates. Macro-aggregates in the biopiles thus had more porous structures and provided more favourable conditions for hydrocarbon biodegradation. Based on these results, we propose a conceptual model for aggregate formation which identifies diffusion through loose macro-aggregates or dense meso-aggregates as the controlling factor for bioavailability of petroleum hydrocarbons in microbial habitats.

  19. Functionally graded boron carbide

    SciTech Connect

    Petrovic, J.J.; McClellan, K.J.; Kise, C.D.; Hoover, R.C.; Scarborough, W.K.

    1998-12-31

    Lightweight body armor is important for the protection of US soldiers in the field. Here, fabrication techniques were developed for producing graded porosity B{sub 4}C, and for producing aluminum-B{sub 4}C and epoxy-B{sub 4}C functionally graded materials. The key fabrication aspect was obtaining the graded porosity B{sub 4}C. The feasibility of producing graded porosity B{sub 4}C using a grading of carbon densification aid produced from a gradient of furfuryl alcohol carbon precursor was demonstrated. This approach is quite promising, but it was not optimized in the present investigation. Graded porosity B{sub 4}C materials were produced by a layering approach using different size distributions of B{sub 4}C powders in the green state, and then densifying the layered assembly by hot pressing at 1,900 C. The hardness of uninfiltrated graded B{sub 4}C, aluminum infiltrated B{sub 4}C, and epoxy infiltrated B{sub 4}C was observed to be similar.

  20. [Grading of lung cancer].

    PubMed

    Bohle, R M; Schnabel, P A

    2016-07-01

    In comparison with other tumor entities there is no common generally accepted grading system for lung cancer with clearly defined criteria and clinical relevance. In the recent fourth edition of the World Health Organization (WHO) classification from 2015 of tumors of the lungs, pleura, thymus and heart, there is no generally applicable grading for pulmonary adenocarcinomas, squamous cell carcinomas or rarer forms of carcinoma. Since the new IASLC/ATS/ERS classification of adenocarcinomas published in 2011, 5 different subtypes with significantly different prognosis are proposed. This results in an architectural (histologic) grading, which is usually applied to resection specimens. For squamous cell carcinoma the number of different histological subtypes in the new WHO classification was reduced compared to earlier versions but without a common grading system. In recent publications nesting and budding were proposed as the main (histologic) criteria for a grading of squamous cell carcinomas. The grading of neuroendocrine tumors (NET) of the lungs in comparison with NET in other organs is presented in a separate article in this issue. Certain rare tumor types are high grade per definition: small cell, large cell and pleomorphic carcinomas, carcinosarcomas and pulmonary blastomas. In the future it is to be expected that these developments will be further refined, e. g. by adding further subtypes for adenocarcinomas and cytologic and/or nuclear criteria for adenocarcinoma and/or squamous cell carcinomas. PMID:27356985

  1. Nebraska Science Standards: Grades K-12

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nebraska Department of Education, 2010

    2010-01-01

    This publication presents the Nebraska Science Standards for Grades K-12. The standards are presented according to the following grades: (1) Grades K-2; (2) Grades 3-5; (3) Grades 6-8; and (4) Grades 9-12.

  2. Mesoscale Simulation of Asphaltene Aggregation.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jiang; Ferguson, Andrew L

    2016-08-18

    Asphaltenes constitute a heavy aromatic crude oil fraction with a propensity to aggregate and precipitate out of solution during petroleum processing. Aggregation is thought to proceed according to the Yen-Mullins hierarchy, but the molecular mechanisms underlying mesoscopic assembly remain poorly understood. By combining coarse-grained molecular models parametrized using all-atom data with high-performance GPU hardware, we have performed molecular dynamics simulations of the aggregation of hundreds of asphaltenes over microsecond time scales. Our simulations reveal a hierarchical self-assembly mechanism consistent with the Yen-Mullins model, but the details are sensitive and depend on asphaltene chemistry and environment. At low concentrations asphaltenes exist predominantly as dispersed monomers. Upon increasing concentration, we first observe parallel stacking into 1D rod-like nanoaggregates, followed by the formation of clusters of nanoaggregates associated by offset, T-shaped, and edge-edge stacking. Asphaltenes possessing long aliphatic side chains cannot form nanoaggregate clusters due to steric repulsions between their aliphatic coronae. At very high concentrations, we observe a porous percolating network of rod-like nanoaggregates suspended in a sea of interpenetrating aliphatic side chains with a fractal dimension of ∼2. The lifetime of the rod-like aggregates is described by an exponential distribution reflecting a dynamic equilibrium between coagulation and fragmentation. PMID:27455391

  3. RAGG - R EPISODIC AGGREGATION PACKAGE

    EPA Science Inventory

    The RAGG package is an R implementation of the CMAQ episodic model aggregation method developed by Constella Group and the Environmental Protection Agency. RAGG is a tool to provide climatological seasonal and annual deposition of sulphur and nitrogen for multimedia management. ...

  4. DISPERSION OF DENSE GAS RELEASES IN A WIND TUNNEL

    EPA Science Inventory

    The paper documents two dense gas projects undertaken at the US EPA Fluid Modeling Facility. The study investigated the basic nature of the transport and dispersion of a dense gas plume in a simulated neutral atmospheric boundary layer. The two dense gas releases were CO2 and SF6...

  5. An Aggregation Advisor for Ligand Discovery.

    PubMed

    Irwin, John J; Duan, Da; Torosyan, Hayarpi; Doak, Allison K; Ziebart, Kristin T; Sterling, Teague; Tumanian, Gurgen; Shoichet, Brian K

    2015-09-10

    Colloidal aggregation of organic molecules is the dominant mechanism for artifactual inhibition of proteins, and controls against it are widely deployed. Notwithstanding an increasingly detailed understanding of this phenomenon, a method to reliably predict aggregation has remained elusive. Correspondingly, active molecules that act via aggregation continue to be found in early discovery campaigns and remain common in the literature. Over the past decade, over 12 thousand aggregating organic molecules have been identified, potentially enabling a precedent-based approach to match known aggregators with new molecules that may be expected to aggregate and lead to artifacts. We investigate an approach that uses lipophilicity, affinity, and similarity to known aggregators to advise on the likelihood that a candidate compound is an aggregator. In prospective experimental testing, five of seven new molecules with Tanimoto coefficients (Tc's) between 0.95 and 0.99 to known aggregators aggregated at relevant concentrations. Ten of 19 with Tc's between 0.94 and 0.90 and three of seven with Tc's between 0.89 and 0.85 also aggregated. Another three of the predicted compounds aggregated at higher concentrations. This method finds that 61 827 or 5.1% of the ligands acting in the 0.1 to 10 μM range in the medicinal chemistry literature are at least 85% similar to a known aggregator with these physical properties and may aggregate at relevant concentrations. Intriguingly, only 0.73% of all drug-like commercially available compounds resemble the known aggregators, suggesting that colloidal aggregators are enriched in the literature. As a percentage of the literature, aggregator-like compounds have increased 9-fold since 1995, partly reflecting the advent of high-throughput and virtual screens against molecular targets. Emerging from this study is an aggregator advisor database and tool ( http://advisor.bkslab.org ), free to the community, that may help distinguish between

  6. Applicability of the DMSO (dimethyl sulfoxide) aggregate degradation test to determine moisture-induced distress in asphalt-concrete mixes. Final report, June 1986-June 1987

    SciTech Connect

    Heinicke, J.J.; Vinson, T.S.; Wilson, J.E.

    1987-06-01

    A laboratory investigation was conducted to evaluate the effectiveness of the dimethyl sulfoxide accelerated weathering test (DMSO test) to predict moisture-induced distress in asphalt-concrete mixtures. Asphalt-concrete specimens were fabricated using aggregates from three quarries. The specimens were conditioned using vacuum saturation and a series of five freeze/thaw cycles. The resilient modulus (M{sub r}) was obtained before and after each conditioning cycle and the Index of Retained Resilient Modulus (IRM{sub r}) was determined. The results indicate the DMSO test may be used to identify the potential for moisture-induced distress in asphalt-concrete mixtures. However, no correlation was determined between the DMSO test results and the IRM{sub r} or fatigue life test results. The strain and temperature dependencies of the M{sub r} were determined for a dense-graded asphalt-concrete mixture. It was concluded that constant stress testing may result in a misinterpretation of the IRM{sub r} and tests conducted within the currently accepted temperature range may result in a plus or minus 20% deviation in the IRM{sub r}. In an accompanying analytical program, the effect of diametral test boundary conditions on the measured value of M{sub r} was evaluated using two- and three-dimensional finite element models. The results indicate that the resilient modulus diametral test is adequately represented by elastic theory and an assumed plane stress condition.

  7. Fast community detection based on sector edge aggregation metric model in hyperbolic space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Zuxi; Li, Qingguang; Xiong, Wei; Jin, Fengdong; Wu, Yao

    2016-06-01

    By studying the edge aggregation characteristic of nodes in hyperbolic space, Sector Edge Aggregation Metric (SEAM) model is proposed and theoretically proved in this paper. In hyperbolic disk SEAM model determines the minimum angular range of a sector which possesses the maximal edge aggregation of nodes. The set of nodes within such sector has dense internal links, which corresponds with the characteristic of community structure. Based on SEAM model, we propose a fast community detection algorithm called Greedy Optimization Modularity Algorithm (GOMA) which employs greedy optimization strategy and hyperbolic coordinates. GOMA firstly divides initial communities according to the quantitative results of sector edge aggregation given by SEAM and the nodes' hyperbolic coordinates, then based on greedy optimization strategy, only merges the two angular neighboring communities in hyperbolic disk to optimize the network modularity function, and consequently obtains high-quality community detection. The strategies of initial community partition and merger in hyperbolic space greatly improve the speed of searching the most optimal modularity. Experimental results indicate that GOMA is able to detect out high-quality community structure in synthetic and real networks, and performs better when applied to the large-scale and dense networks with strong clustering.

  8. Image-Guided Non-Local Dense Matching with Three-Steps Optimization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Xu; Zhang, Yongjun; Yue, Zhaoxi

    2016-06-01

    This paper introduces a new image-guided non-local dense matching algorithm that focuses on how to solve the following problems: 1) mitigating the influence of vertical parallax to the cost computation in stereo pairs; 2) guaranteeing the performance of dense matching in homogeneous intensity regions with significant disparity changes; 3) limiting the inaccurate cost propagated from depth discontinuity regions; 4) guaranteeing that the path between two pixels in the same region is connected; and 5) defining the cost propagation function between the reliable pixel and the unreliable pixel during disparity interpolation. This paper combines the Census histogram and an improved histogram of oriented gradient (HOG) feature together as the cost metrics, which are then aggregated based on a new iterative non-local matching method and the semi-global matching method. Finally, new rules of cost propagation between the valid pixels and the invalid pixels are defined to improve the disparity interpolation results. The results of our experiments using the benchmarks and the Toronto aerial images from the International Society for Photogrammetry and Remote Sensing (ISPRS) show that the proposed new method can outperform most of the current state-of-the-art stereo dense matching methods.

  9. Highly magnetizable superparamagnetic colloidal aggregates with narrowed size distribution from ferrofluid emulsion.

    PubMed

    Lobaz, Volodymyr; Klupp Taylor, Robin N; Peukert, Wolfgang

    2012-05-15

    The formation of spherical superparamagnetic colloidal aggregates of magnetite nanoparticles by emulsification of a ferrofluid and subsequent solvent evaporation has been systematically studied. The colloidal aggregates occur as a dense sphere with magnetite nanoparticles randomly packed and preserved particle-particle separation due to chemisorbed oleic acid. The voids between nanoparticles are filled with solvent and free oleic acid. The latter was found to influence the formation of colloidal aggregates and their surface properties. The choice of surfactant, whether low molecular weight or polymeric, was shown to lead to the colloidal aggregates having tailored interfacial behavior. Magnetization measurements at ambient temperature revealed that the magnetite colloidal aggregates preserve the superparamagnetic properties of the starting nanoparticle units and show high saturation magnetization values up to 57 emu/g. The size distribution of magnetite nanoparticle colloidal aggregates produced by such an approach was found to be a function of emulsion droplet breakup-coalescence and stabilization kinetics and therefore is influenced by the emulsification process conditions and concentrations of the emulsion compounds. PMID:22365838

  10. Soft electrostatic repulsion in particle monolayers at liquid interfaces: surface pressure and effect of aggregation.

    PubMed

    Kralchevsky, Peter A; Danov, Krassimir D; Petkov, Plamen V

    2016-07-28

    Non-densely packed interfacial monolayers from charged micrometre-sized colloid particles find applications for producing micropatterned surfaces. The soft electrostatic repulsion between the particles in a monolayer on an air/water (or oil/water) interface is mediated by the non-polar fluid, where Debye screening is absent and the distances between the particles are considerably greater than their diameters. Surface pressure versus area isotherms were measured at the air/water interface. The experiments show that asymptotically the surface pressure is inversely proportional to the third power of the interparticle distance. A theoretical model is developed that predicts not only the aforementioned asymptotic law but also the whole surface pressure versus area dependence. An increase in the surface pressure upon aggregation of charged particles in the interfacial monolayers is experimentally established. This effect is explained by the developed theoretical model, which predicts that the surface pressure should linearly increase with the square root of the particle mean aggregation number. The effect of added electrolyte on the aggregation is also investigated. The data lead to the conclusion that 'limited aggregation' exists in the monolayers of charged particles. In brief, the stronger electrostatic repulsion between the bigger aggregates leads to a higher barrier to their coalescence that, in turn, prevents any further aggregation, i.e. negative feedback is present.This article is part of the themed issue 'Soft interfacial materials: from fundamentals to formulation'. PMID:27298437

  11. Features of self-aggregation of C60 molecules in toluene prepared by different methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Makhmanov, Urol; Ismailova, Oksana; Kokhkharov, Abdulmutallib; Zakhidov, Erkin; Bakhramov, Sagdilla

    2016-05-01

    Structural and dimensional features of C60 aggregates in toluene solution prepared in two different ways - equilibrium and strongly non-equilibrium - were studied by high-resolution transmission electron microscopy and atomic-force microscopy methods. It was found that in solutions prepared by the non-equilibrium method (stirring of solution of C60 by a mechanical rotator), large quasispherical aggregates (with a diameter of up to ∼ 380 ± 20 nm) of nanoporous structure with fractal size D ≈ 2.13 were synthesized. In the case of solutions C60, which were prepared by the equilibrium method (without the use of external mechanical influences on solution), the formation of densely packed monomolecular fullerene aggregates with a diameter of not more than 50 nm was observed.

  12. Impact-activated solidification of dense suspensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Waitukaitis, Scott

    2013-03-01

    Shear-thickening, non-Newtonian fluids have typically been investigated under steady-state conditions. This approach has produced two pictures for suspension response to imposed forcing. In the weak shear-thickening picture, the response is typically attributed to the hydrodynamic interactions giving rise to hydroclusters, small groups of particles interacting through lubrication forces. At the other end of the spectrum, in the discontinuous shear-thickening regime, the response can be seen as a system-wide jamming that is ultimately limited in strength by the system boundaries. While these steady-state pictures have proven extremely useful, some of the most interesting phenomena associated with dense suspensions is transient and local in character. A prototypical example is the extraordinarily large impact resistance of dense suspensions such as cornstarch and water. When poked lightly these materials respond like a fluid, but when punched or kicked they seem to temporarily ``solidify'' and provide enormous resistance to the motion of the impacting object. Using an array of experimental techniques, including high-speed video, embedded force and acceleration sensing, and x-ray imaging, we are able to investigate the dynamic details this process as it unfolds. We find that an impacting object drives the rapid growth of a jammed, solid-like region directly below the impact site. Being coupled to the surrounding fluid by grain-mediated lubrication forces, this creates substantial peripheral flow and ultimately leads to the sudden extraction of the impactor's momentum. With a simple jamming picture to describe the solidification and an added mass model to explain the force on the rod, we are able to predict the forces on the impactor quantitatively. These findings highlight the importance of the non-equilibrium character of dense suspensions near jamming and might serve as a bridge between the weak and discontinuous shear-thickening pictures.

  13. Grain Growth and Silicates in Dense Clouds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pendeleton, Yvonne J.; Chiar, J. E.; Ennico, K.; Boogert, A.; Greene, T.; Knez, C.; Lada, C.; Roellig, T.; Tielens, A.; Werner, M.; Whittet, D.

    2006-01-01

    Interstellar silicates are likely to be a part of all grains responsible for visual extinction (Av) in the diffuse interstellar medium (ISM) and dense clouds. A correlation between Av and the depth of the 9.7 micron silicate feature (measured as optical depth, tau(9.7)) is expected if the dust species are well 'mixed. In the di&se ISM, such a correlation is observed for lines of sight in the solar neighborhood. A previous study of the silicate absorption feature in the Taurus dark cloud showed a tendency for the correlation to break down at high Av (Whittet et al. 1988, MNRAS, 233,321), but the scatter was large. We have acquired Spitzer Infrared Spectrograph data of several lines of sight in the IC 5 146, Barnard 68, Chameleon I and Serpens dense clouds. Our data set spans an Av range between 2 and 35 magnitudes. All lines of sight show the 9.7 micron silicate feature. The Serpens data appear to follow the diffuse ISM correlation line whereas the data for the other clouds show a non-linear correlation between the depth of the silicate feature relative to Av, much like the trend observed in the Taurus data. In fact, it appears that for visual extinctions greater than about 10 mag, tau(9.7) begins to level off. This decrease in the growth of the depth of the 9.7 micron feature with increasing Av could indicate the effects of grain growth in dense clouds. In this poster, we explore the possibility that grain growth causes an increase in opacity (Av) without causing a corresponding increase in tau(9.7).

  14. Multishock Compression Properties of Warm Dense Argon

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Jun; Chen, Qifeng; Yunjun, Gu; Li, Zhiguo; Shen, Zhijun

    2015-01-01

    Warm dense argon was generated by a shock reverberation technique. The diagnostics of warm dense argon were performed by a multichannel optical pyrometer and a velocity interferometer system. The equations of state in the pressure-density range of 20–150 GPa and 1.9–5.3 g/cm3 from the first- to fourth-shock compression were presented. The single-shock temperatures in the range of 17.2–23.4 kK were obtained from the spectral radiance. Experimental results indicates that multiple shock-compression ratio (ηi = ρi/ρ0) is greatly enhanced from 3.3 to 8.8, where ρ0 is the initial density of argon and ρi (i = 1, 2, 3, 4) is the compressed density from first to fourth shock, respectively. For the relative compression ratio (ηi’ = ρi/ρi-1), an interesting finding is that a turning point occurs at the second shocked states under the conditions of different experiments, and ηi’ increases with pressure in lower density regime and reversely decreases with pressure in higher density regime. The evolution of the compression ratio is controlled by the excitation of internal degrees of freedom, which increase the compression, and by the interaction effects between particles that reduce it. A temperature-density plot shows that current multishock compression states of argon have distributed into warm dense regime. PMID:26515505

  15. Dense Subgraph Partition of Positive Hypergraphs.

    PubMed

    Liu, Hairong; Latecki, Longin Jan; Yan, Shuicheng

    2015-03-01

    In this paper, we present a novel partition framework, called dense subgraph partition (DSP), to automatically, precisely and efficiently decompose a positive hypergraph into dense subgraphs. A positive hypergraph is a graph or hypergraph whose edges, except self-loops, have positive weights. We first define the concepts of core subgraph, conditional core subgraph, and disjoint partition of a conditional core subgraph, then define DSP based on them. The result of DSP is an ordered list of dense subgraphs with decreasing densities, which uncovers all underlying clusters, as well as outliers. A divide-and-conquer algorithm, called min-partition evolution, is proposed to efficiently compute the partition. DSP has many appealing properties. First, it is a nonparametric partition and it reveals all meaningful clusters in a bottom-up way. Second, it has an exact and efficient solution, called min-partition evolution algorithm. The min-partition evolution algorithm is a divide-and-conquer algorithm, thus time-efficient and memory-friendly, and suitable for parallel processing. Third, it is a unified partition framework for a broad range of graphs and hypergraphs. We also establish its relationship with the densest k-subgraph problem (DkS), an NP-hard but fundamental problem in graph theory, and prove that DSP gives precise solutions to DkS for all kin a graph-dependent set, called critical k-set. To our best knowledge, this is a strong result which has not been reported before. Moreover, as our experimental results show, for sparse graphs, especially web graphs, the size of critical k-set is close to the number of vertices in the graph. We test the proposed partition framework on various tasks, and the experimental results clearly illustrate its advantages. PMID:26353260

  16. Assigning Grades More Fairly

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cheshier, Stephen R.

    1975-01-01

    Describes a simplified method for converting raw scores to standard scores and transforming them to "T-scores" for easy comparison of performance. Obtaining letter grades from T-scores is discussed. A reading list is included. (GH)

  17. Dense optical-electrical interface module

    SciTech Connect

    Paul Chang

    2000-12-21

    The DOIM (Dense Optical-electrical Interface Modules) is a custom-designed optical data transmission module employed in the upgrade of Silicon Vertex Detector of CDF experiment at Fermilab. Each DOIM module consists of a transmitter (TX) converting electrical differential input signals to optical outputs, a middle segment of jacketed fiber ribbon cable, and a receiver (RX) which senses the light inputs and converts them back to electrical signals. The targeted operational frequency is 53 MHz, and higher rate is achievable. This article outlines the design goals, implementation methods, production test results, and radiation hardness tests of these modules.

  18. Phase boundary of hot dense fluid hydrogen

    PubMed Central

    Ohta, Kenji; Ichimaru, Kota; Einaga, Mari; Kawaguchi, Sho; Shimizu, Katsuya; Matsuoka, Takahiro; Hirao, Naohisa; Ohishi, Yasuo

    2015-01-01

    We investigated the phase transformation of hot dense fluid hydrogen using static high-pressure laser-heating experiments in a laser-heated diamond anvil cell. The results show anomalies in the heating efficiency that are likely to be attributed to the phase transition from a diatomic to monoatomic fluid hydrogen (plasma phase transition) in the pressure range between 82 and 106 GPa. This study imposes tighter constraints on the location of the hydrogen plasma phase transition boundary and suggests higher critical point than that predicted by the theoretical calculations. PMID:26548442

  19. Electrical and thermal conductivities in dense plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Faussurier, G. Blancard, C.; Combis, P.; Videau, L.

    2014-09-15

    Expressions for the electrical and thermal conductivities in dense plasmas are derived combining the Chester-Thellung-Kubo-Greenwood approach and the Kramers approximation. The infrared divergence is removed assuming a Drude-like behaviour. An analytical expression is obtained for the Lorenz number that interpolates between the cold solid-state and the hot plasma phases. An expression for the electrical resistivity is proposed using the Ziman-Evans formula, from which the thermal conductivity can be deduced using the analytical expression for the Lorenz number. The present method can be used to estimate electrical and thermal conductivities of mixtures. Comparisons with experiment and quantum molecular dynamics simulations are done.

  20. Gravity-driven dense granular flows

    SciTech Connect

    ERTAS,DENIZ; GREST,GARY S.; HALSEY,THOMAS C.; DEVINE,DOV; SILBERT,LEONARDO E.

    2000-03-29

    The authors report and analyze the results of numerical studies of dense granular flows in two and three dimensions, using both linear damped springs and Hertzian force laws between particles. Chute flow generically produces a constant density profile that satisfies scaling relations suggestive of a Bagnold grain inertia regime. The type for force law has little impact on the behavior of the system. Failure is not initiated at the surface, consistent with the absence of surface flows and different principal stress directions at vs. below the surface.

  1. Molecular dynamics simulations of dense plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Collins, L.A.; Kress, J.D.; Kwon, I.; Lynch, D.L.; Troullier, N.

    1993-12-31

    We have performed quantum molecular dynamics simulations of hot, dense plasmas of hydrogen over a range of temperatures(0.1-5eV) and densities(0.0625-5g/cc). We determine the forces quantum mechanically from density functional, extended Huckel, and tight binding techniques and move the nuclei according to the classical equations of motion. We determine pair-correlation functions, diffusion coefficients, and electrical conductivities. We find that many-body effects predominate in this regime. We begin to obtain agreement with the OCP and Thomas-Fermi models only at the higher temperatures and densities.

  2. Aggregation of metallochlorophylls - Examination by spectroscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boucher, L. J.; Katz, J. J.

    1969-01-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance measurements determine which metallochlorophylls, besides magnesium-containing chlorophylls, possess coordination aggregation properties. Infrared spectroscopy reveals that only zinc pheophytin and zinc methyl pheophorbide showed significant coordination aggregation, whereas divalent nickel and copper did not.

  3. Oligomeric baroeffect and gas aggregation states

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Noever, David A.

    1992-01-01

    The baroeffect is analyzed to include a gas that aggregates into higher-order polymers or oligomers. The resulting pressure change is found to vary independently of the molecular weight of the gas components and to depend only on the aggregation or oligomeric order of the gas. With increasing aggregation, diffusive slip velocities are found to increase. The calculations are extended to include general counterdiffusion of two distinct aggregation states (k-, j-mer) for the gas, and the pressure change is derived as a function that is independent of both molecular weight and the absolute aggregation. The only parameter that determines the baroeffect is the ratio of aggregated states, beta = k/j. For gases that reversibly aggregate, possible oscillatory behavior and complex dynamics for pressure are discussed. Gas aggregation may play a role for low-temperature crystal-growth conditions in which vapor concentrations of one (or more) species are high.

  4. Improving Semi-Global Matching: Cost Aggregation and Confidence Measure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    d'Angelo, Pablo

    2016-06-01

    Digital elevation models are one of the basic products that can be generated from remotely sensed imagery. The Semi Global Matching (SGM) algorithm is a robust and practical algorithm for dense image matching. The connection between SGM and Belief Propagation was recently developed, and based on that improvements such as correction of over-counting the data term, and a new confidence measure have been proposed. Later the MGM algorithm has been proposed, it aims at improving the regularization step of SGM, but has only been evaluated on the Middlebury stereo benchmark so far. This paper evaluates these proposed improvements on the ISPRS satellite stereo benchmark, using a Pleiades Triplet and a Cartosat-1 Stereo pair. The over-counting correction slightly improves matching density, at the expense of adding a few outliers. The MGM cost aggregation shows leads to a slight increase of accuracy.

  5. How Consistent Are Course Grades? An Examination of Differential Grading

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rauschenberg, Samuel

    2014-01-01

    Differential grading occurs when students in courses with the same content and curriculum receive inconsistent grades across teachers, schools, or districts. It may be due to many factors, including differences in teacher grading standards, district grading policies, student behavior, teacher stereotypes, teacher quality, and curriculum adherence.…

  6. The Meaning of College Grades in Three Grading Systems.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eiszler, Charles F.

    1983-01-01

    To determine if college students (n=345) attribute different meanings to specific grades (depending on the nature of the grading system used), three grading systems were compared: competitive, mastery, and growth. In addition, students were asked to rate the meaning of a specific grade ("A,""B," or "C") in the context of one of the three grading…

  7. 7 CFR 810.105 - Grades and grade requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) GRAIN INSPECTION, PACKERS AND STOCKYARD ADMINISTRATION (FEDERAL GRAIN INSPECTION SERVICE), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE OFFICIAL UNITED STATES STANDARDS FOR GRAIN General Provisions Grades, Grade Requirements, and Grade Designations § 810.105 Grades and...

  8. 7 CFR 810.105 - Grades and grade requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) GRAIN INSPECTION, PACKERS AND STOCKYARD ADMINISTRATION (FEDERAL GRAIN INSPECTION SERVICE), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE OFFICIAL UNITED STATES STANDARDS FOR GRAIN General Provisions Grades, Grade Requirements, and Grade Designations § 810.105 Grades and...

  9. Symmetry energy in cold dense matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeong, Kie Sang; Lee, Su Houng

    2016-01-01

    We calculate the symmetry energy in cold dense matter both in the normal quark phase and in the 2-color superconductor (2SC) phase. For the normal phase, the thermodynamic potential is calculated by using hard dense loop (HDL) resummation to leading order, where the dominant contribution comes from the longitudinal gluon rest mass. The effect of gluonic interaction on the symmetry energy, obtained from the thermodynamic potential, was found to be small. In the 2SC phase, the non-perturbative BCS paring gives enhanced symmetry energy as the gapped states are forced to be in the common Fermi sea reducing the number of available quarks that can contribute to the asymmetry. We used high density effective field theory to estimate the contribution of gluon interaction to the symmetry energy. Among the gluon rest masses in 2SC phase, only the Meissner mass has iso-spin dependence although the magnitude is much smaller than the Debye mass. As the iso-spin dependence of gluon rest masses is even smaller than the case in the normal phase, we expect that the contribution of gluonic interaction to the symmetry energy in the 2SC phase will be minimal. The different value of symmetry energy in each phase will lead to different prediction for the particle yields in heavy ion collision experiment.

  10. Dynamics of Kr in dense clathrate hydrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klug, D. D.; Tse, J. S.; Zhao, J. Y.; Sturhahn, W.; Alp, E. E.; Tulk, C. A.

    2011-05-01

    The dynamics of Kr atoms as guests in dense clathrate hydrate structures are investigated using site specific Kr83 nuclear resonant inelastic x-ray scattering (NRIXS) spectroscopy in combination with molecular dynamics simulations. The dense structure H hydrate and filled-ice structures are studied at high pressures in a diamond anvil high-pressure cell. The dynamics of Kr in the structure H clathrate hydrate quench recovered at 77 K is also investigated. The Kr phonon density of states obtained from the experimental NRIXS data are compared with molecular dynamics simulations. The temperature and pressure dependence of the phonon spectra provide details of the Kr dynamics in the clathrate hydrate cages. Comparison with the dynamics of Kr atoms in the low-pressure structure II obtained previously was made. The Lamb-Mossbauer factor obtained from NRIXS experiments and molecular dynamics calculations are in excellent agreement and are shown to yield unique information on the strength and temperature dependence of guest-host interactions.

  11. Nuclear quantum dynamics in dense hydrogen

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Dongdong; Sun, Huayang; Dai, Jiayu; Chen, Wenbo; Zhao, Zengxiu; Hou, Yong; Zeng, Jiaolong; Yuan, Jianmin

    2014-01-01

    Nuclear dynamics in dense hydrogen, which is determined by the key physics of large-angle scattering or many-body collisions between particles, is crucial for the dynamics of planet's evolution and hydrodynamical processes in inertial confinement confusion. Here, using improved ab initio path-integral molecular dynamics simulations, we investigated the nuclear quantum dynamics regarding transport behaviors of dense hydrogen up to the temperatures of 1 eV. With the inclusion of nuclear quantum effects (NQEs), the ionic diffusions are largely higher than the classical treatment by the magnitude from 20% to 146% as the temperature is decreased from 1 eV to 0.3 eV at 10 g/cm3, meanwhile, electrical and thermal conductivities are significantly lowered. In particular, the ionic diffusion is found much larger than that without NQEs even when both the ionic distributions are the same at 1 eV. The significant quantum delocalization of ions introduces remarkably different scattering cross section between protons compared with classical particle treatments, which explains the large difference of transport properties induced by NQEs. The Stokes-Einstein relation, Wiedemann-Franz law, and isotope effects are re-examined, showing different behaviors in nuclear quantum dynamics. PMID:24968754

  12. Thomson scattering in warm dense matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thiele, R.; Bornath, T.; F"Austlin, R. R.; Fortmann, C.; Glenzer, S.; Gregori, G.; Holst, B.; Tschentscher, T.; Schwarz, V.; Redmer, R.

    2009-11-01

    Free electron lasers employing scattering of high-brilliant, coherent photons in the extreme ultraviolet (VUV), e.g. at FLASH (DESY Hamburg) or LCLS (Stanford), allow for a systematic study of basic plasma properties in the region of warm dense matter (WDM). WDM is characterized by condensed matter-like densities and temperatures of several eV. Collective Thomson scattering with VUV or x-ray has demonstrated its capacity for robust measurements of the free electron density and temperature in WDM. Collective excitations like plasmons (``electron feature'') appear as maxima in the scattering signal. The respective frequencies can be related to the free electron density. Furthermore, the asymmetry of the red- and blue shifted plasmon intensity gives the electron temperature due to detailed balance. We treat collective Thomson scattering in the Born-Mermin-approximation which includes collisions and present a generalized Gross-Bohm dispersion for plasmas. The influence of plasma inhomogeneities on the scattering spectrum is studied by comparing density and temperature averaged scattering signals with calculations assuming homogeneous targets. For the ``ion feature,'' results of semi-classical hypernetted chain (HNC) calculations and of quantum molecular dynamics simulations are shown for dense beryllium.

  13. Solids flow rate measurement in dense slurries

    SciTech Connect

    Porges, K.G.; Doss, E.D.

    1993-09-01

    Accurate and rapid flow rate measurement of solids in dense slurries remains an unsolved technical problem, with important industrial applications in chemical processing plants and long-distance solids conveyance. In a hostile two-phase medium, such a measurement calls for two independent parameter determinations, both by non-intrusive means. Typically, dense slurries tend to flow in laminar, non-Newtonian mode, eliminating most conventional means that usually rely on calibration (which becomes more difficult and costly for high pressure and temperature media). These issues are reviewed, and specific solutions are recommended in this report. Detailed calculations that lead to improved measuring device designs are presented for both bulk density and average velocity measurements. Cross-correlation, chosen here for the latter task, has long been too inaccurate for practical applications. The cause and the cure of this deficiency are discussed using theory-supported modeling. Fluid Mechanics are used to develop the velocity profiles of laminar non-Newtonian flow in a rectangular duct. This geometry uniquely allows the design of highly accurate `capacitive` devices and also lends itself to gamma transmission densitometry on an absolute basis. An absolute readout, though of less accuracy, is also available from a capacitive densitometer and a pair of capacitive sensors yields signals suitable for cross-correlation velocity measurement.

  14. Testing ergodicity in dense granular systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Guo-Jie; Blawzdziewicz, Jerzy; O'Hern, Corey

    2008-03-01

    The Edwards' entropy formalism provides a statistical mechanical framework for describing dense granular systems. Experiments on vibrated granular columns and numerical simulations of quasi- static shear flow of dense granular systems have provided indirect evidence that the Edwards' theory may accurately describe certain aspects of these systems. However, a fundamental assumption of the Edwards' description---that all mechanically stable (MS) granular packings at a given packing fraction and externally imposed stress are equally accessible---has not been explicitly tested. We investigate this assumption by generating all mechanically stable hard disk packings in small bidisperse systems using a protocol where we successively compress or decompress the system followed by energy minimization. We then apply quasi-static shear flow at zero pressure to these MS packings and record the MS packings that occur during the shear flow. We generate a complete library of the allowed MS packings at each value of shear strain and determine the frequency with which each MS packing occurs. We find that the MS packings do not occur with equal probability at any value of shear strain. In fact, in small systems we find that the evolution becomes periodic with a period that grows with system-size. Our studies show that ergodicity can be improved by either adding random fluctuations to the system or increasing the system size.

  15. Nonlinear nanostructures in dense quantum plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Shukla, P. K.; Eliasson, B.

    2009-10-08

    Dense quantum plasmas are ubiquitous in compact astrophysical objects (e.g. the interior of white dwarf stars, in magnetars, etc.), in semiconductors and micro-mechanical systems, as well as in the next generation intense laser-solid density plasma interaction experiments. In contrast to classical plasmas, one encounters extremely high plasma density and low temperature in dense quantum plasmas. In the latter, the electrons and positrons obey the Fermi-Dirac statistics, and there are new forces associated with i) quantum statistical electron and positron pressures, ii) electron and positron tunneling through the Bohm potential, and iii) electron and positron spin-1/2. Inclusion of these quantum forces gives rise to very high-frequency plasma waves (e.g. in the x-ray regime) at nanoscales. Our objective here is to present nonlinear equations that depict the localization of electron plasma waves in the form of a quantum electron hole and quantum vortex, as well as the trapping of intense electromagnetic waves into a quantum electron hole. Our simulation results reveal that these nonlinear nanostructures are quite robust. Hence, they can be explored for the purpose of transferring localized electrostatic and electromagnetic energies over nanoscales.

  16. Super-resolution without dense flow.

    PubMed

    Su, Heng; Wu, Ying; Zhou, Jie

    2012-04-01

    Super-resolution is a widely applied technique that improves the resolution of input images by software methods. Most conventional reconstruction-based super-resolution algorithms assume accurate dense optical flow fields between the input frames, and their performance degrades rapidly when the motion estimation result is not accurate enough. However, optical flow estimation is usually difficult, particularly when complicated motion is presented in real-world videos. In this paper, we explore a new way to solve this problem by using sparse feature point correspondences between the input images. The feature point correspondences, which are obtained by matching a set of feature points, are usually precise and much more robust than dense optical flow fields. This is because the feature points represent well-selected significant locations in the image, and performing matching on the feature point set is usually very accurate. In order to utilize the sparse correspondences in conventional super-resolution, we extract an adaptive support region with a reliable local flow field from each corresponding feature point pair. The normalized prior is also proposed to increase the visual consistency of the reconstructed result. Extensive experiments on real data were carried out, and results show that the proposed algorithm produces high-resolution images with better quality, particularly in the presence of large-scale or complicated motion fields. PMID:22027381

  17. Dense circumnuclear molecular gas in starburst galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Green, C.-E.; Cunningham, M. R.; Green, J. A.; Dawson, J. R.; Jones, P. A.; López-Sánchez, Á. R.; Verdes-Montenegro, L.; Henkel, C.; Baan, W. A.; Martín, S.

    2016-04-01

    We present results from a study of the dense circumnuclear molecular gas of starburst galaxies. The study aims to investigate the interplay between starbursts, active galactic nuclei and molecular gas. We characterize the dense gas traced by HCN, HCO+ and HNC and examine its kinematics in the circumnuclear regions of nine starburst galaxies observed with the Australia Telescope Compact Array. We detect HCN (1-0) and HCO+ (1-0) in seven of the nine galaxies and HNC (1-0) in four. Approximately 7 arcsec resolution maps of the circumnuclear molecular gas are presented. The velocity-integrated intensity ratios, HCO+ (1-0)/HCN (1-0) and HNC (1-0)/HCN (1-0), are calculated. Using these integrated intensity ratios and spatial intensity ratio maps, we identify photon-dominated regions (PDRs) in NGC 1097, NGC 1365 and NGC 1808. We find no galaxy which shows the PDR signature in only one part of the observed nuclear region. We also observe unusually strong HNC emission in NGC 5236, but it is not strong enough to be consistent with X-ray-dominated region chemistry. Rotation curves are derived for five of the galaxies and dynamical mass estimates of the inner regions of three of the galaxies are made.

  18. Quantum molecular dynamics simulations of dense matter

    SciTech Connect

    Collins, L.; Kress, J.; Troullier, N.; Lenosky, T.; Kwon, I.

    1997-12-31

    The authors have developed a quantum molecular dynamics (QMD) simulation method for investigating the properties of dense matter in a variety of environments. The technique treats a periodically-replicated reference cell containing N atoms in which the nuclei move according to the classical equations-of-motion. The interatomic forces are generated from the quantum mechanical interactions of the (between?) electrons and nuclei. To generate these forces, the authors employ several methods of varying sophistication from the tight-binding (TB) to elaborate density functional (DF) schemes. In the latter case, lengthy simulations on the order of 200 atoms are routinely performed, while for the TB, which requires no self-consistency, upwards to 1000 atoms are systematically treated. The QMD method has been applied to a variety cases: (1) fluid/plasma Hydrogen from liquid density to 20 times volume-compressed for temperatures of a thousand to a million degrees Kelvin; (2) isotopic hydrogenic mixtures, (3) liquid metals (Li, Na, K); (4) impurities such as Argon in dense hydrogen plasmas; and (5) metal/insulator transitions in rare gas systems (Ar,Kr) under high compressions. The advent of parallel versions of the methods, especially for fast eigensolvers, presage LDA simulations in the range of 500--1000 atoms and TB runs for tens of thousands of particles. This leap should allow treatment of shock chemistry as well as large-scale mixtures of species in highly transient environments.

  19. Continuum equations for dense shallow granular flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumaran, Viswanathan

    2015-11-01

    Simplified equations are derived for a granular flow in the `dense' limit where the volume fraction is close to that for dynamical arrest, and the `shallow' limit where the stream-wise length for flow development (L) is large compared to the cross-stream height (h). In the dense limit, the equations are simplified by taking advantage of the power-law divergence of the pair distribution function χ proportional to (ϕad - ϕ) - α, where ϕ is the volume fraction, and ϕad is the volume fraction for arrested dynamics. When the height h is much larger than the conduction length, the energy equation reduces to an algebraic balance between the rates of production and dissipation of energy, and the stress is proportional to the square of the strain rate (Bagnold law). The analysis reveals important differences between granular flows and the flows of Newtonian fluids. One important difference is that the Reynolds number (ratio of inertial and viscous terms) turns out to depend only on the layer height and Bagnold coefficients, and is independent of the flow velocity, because both the inertial terms in the conservation equations and the divergence of the stress depend on the square of the velocity/velocity gradients.

  20. Times Scales in Dense Granular Material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Duan

    2005-07-01

    Forces in dense granular material are transmitted through particle contacts. The evolution of the contact stress is directly related to dynamical interaction forces between particles. Since particle contacts in a dense granular material are random, a statistical method is employed to describe and model their motions. It is found that the time scales of particle contacts determinate stress relaxation and the fluid- like or solid-like behavior of the material. Numerical simulations are performed to calculate statistical properties of particle interactions. Using results from the numerical simulations we examine the relationship between the averaged local deformation field and the macroscopic deformation field. We also examine the relationship between the averaged local interaction force and the averaged stress field in the material. Validities of the Voigt and the Reuss assumptions are examined; and extensions to these assumptions are studied. Numerical simulations show that tangential frictions between particles significantly increase the contact stress, while the direct contribution of the tangential force to the stress is small. This puzzling observation can be explained by dependency of the relaxation time on the tangential friction.

  1. Probing the Physical Structures of Dense Filaments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Di

    2015-08-01

    Filament is a common feature in cosmological structures of various scales, ranging from dark matter cosmic web, galaxy clusters, inter-galactic gas flows, to Galactic ISM clouds. Even within cold dense molecular cores, filaments have been detected. Theories and simulations with (or without) different combination of physical principles, including gravity, thermal balance, turbulence, and magnetic field, can reproduce intriguing images of filaments. The ubiquity of filaments and the similarity in simulated ones make physical parameters, beyond dust column density, a necessity for understanding filament evolution. I report three projects attempting to measure physical parameters of filaments. We derive the volume density of a dense Taurus filament based on several cyanoacetylene transitions observed by GBT and ART. We measure the gas temperature of the OMC 2-3 filament based on combined GBT+VLA ammonia images. We also measured the sub-millimeter polarization vectors along OMC3. These filaments were found to be likely a cylinder-type structure, without dynamic heating, and likely accreting mass along the magnetic field lines.

  2. Protein aggregation in salt solutions

    PubMed Central

    Kastelic, Miha; Kalyuzhnyi, Yurij V.; Hribar-Lee, Barbara; Dill, Ken A.; Vlachy, Vojko

    2015-01-01

    Protein aggregation is broadly important in diseases and in formulations of biological drugs. Here, we develop a theoretical model for reversible protein–protein aggregation in salt solutions. We treat proteins as hard spheres having square-well-energy binding sites, using Wertheim’s thermodynamic perturbation theory. The necessary condition required for such modeling to be realistic is that proteins in solution during the experiment remain in their compact form. Within this limitation our model gives accurate liquid–liquid coexistence curves for lysozyme and γ IIIa-crystallin solutions in respective buffers. It provides good fits to the cloud-point curves of lysozyme in buffer–salt mixtures as a function of the type and concentration of salt. It than predicts full coexistence curves, osmotic compressibilities, and second virial coefficients under such conditions. This treatment may also be relevant to protein crystallization. PMID:25964322

  3. Mineral resource of the month: aggregates

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Willett, Jason C.

    2012-01-01

    Crushed stone and construction sand and gravel, the two major types of natural aggregates, are among the most abundant and accessible natural resources on the planet. The earliest civilizations used aggregates for various purposes, mainly construction. Today aggregates provide the basic raw materials for the foundation of modern society.

  4. Aggregated Authentication (AMAC) Using Universal Hash Functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Znaidi, Wassim; Minier, Marine; Lauradoux, Cédric

    Aggregation is a very important issue to reduce the energy consumption in Wireless Sensors Networks (WSNs). There is currently a lack of cryptographic primitives for authentication of aggregated data. The theoretical background for Aggregated Message Authentication Codes (AMACs) has been proposed by Chan and Castelluccia at ISIT 08.

  5. 28 CFR 2.5 - Sentence aggregation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Sentence aggregation. 2.5 Section 2.5 Judicial Administration DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE PAROLE, RELEASE, SUPERVISION AND RECOMMITMENT OF PRISONERS... aggregation. When multiple sentences are aggregated by the Bureau of Prisons pursuant to 18 U.S.C. 4161...

  6. Cytotoxic effects of aggregated nanomaterials.

    PubMed

    Soto, Karla; Garza, K M; Murr, L E

    2007-05-01

    This study deals with cytotoxicity assays performed on an array of commercially manufactured inorganic nanoparticulate materials, including Ag, TiO(2), Fe(2)O(3), Al(2)O(3), ZrO(2), Si(3)N(4), naturally occurring mineral chrysotile asbestos and carbonaceous nanoparticulate materials such as multiwall carbon nanotube aggregates and black carbon aggregates. The nanomaterials were characterized by TEM, as the primary particles, aggregates or long fiber dimensions ranged from 2nm to 20microm. Cytotoxicological assays of these nanomaterials were performed utilizing a murine alveolar macrophage cell line and human macrophage and epithelial lung cell lines as comparators. The nanoparticulate materials exhibited varying degrees of cytoxicity for all cell lines and the general trends were similar for both the murine and human macrophage cell lines. These findings suggest that representative cytotoxic responses for humans might be obtained by nanoparticulate exposures to simple murine macrophage cell line assays. Moreover, these results illustrate the utility in performing rapid in vitro assays for cytotoxicity assessments of nanoparticulate materials as a general inquiry of potential respiratory health risks in humans. PMID:17275430

  7. Aggregation of Heterogeneously Charged Colloids.

    PubMed

    Dempster, Joshua M; Olvera de la Cruz, Monica

    2016-06-28

    Patchy colloids are attractive as programmable building blocks for metamaterials. Inverse patchy colloids, in which a charged surface is decorated with patches of the opposite charge, are additionally noteworthy as models for heterogeneously charged biological materials such as proteins. We study the phases and aggregation behavior of a single charged patch in an oppositely charged colloid with a single-site model. This single-patch inverse patchy colloid model shows a large number of phases when varying patch size. For large patch sizes we find ferroelectric crystals, while small patch sizes produce cross-linked gels. Intermediate values produce monodisperse clusters and unusual worm structures that preserve finite ratios of area to volume. The polarization observed at large patch sizes is robust under extreme disorder in patch size and shape. We examine phase-temperature dependence and coexistence curves and find that large patch sizes produce polarized liquids, in contrast to mean-field predictions. Finally, we introduce small numbers of unpatched charged colloids. These can either suppress or encourage aggregation depending on their concentration and the size of the patches on the patched colloids. These effects can be exploited to control aggregation and to measure effective patch size. PMID:27253725

  8. Catastrophic Collapse of Particulate Clouds: Implications From Aggregation Experiments in the USML-1 and USML-2 Glovebox. Experiment 35

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marshall, John; Freund, Friedemann; Sauke, Todd; Freund, Minoru

    1998-01-01

    Experiments with electrostatic aggregation of well-dispersed (nominally, mono-dispersed), freely suspended particles in the United States Microgravity Laboratory (USML) Glovebox have determined that filamentary aggregates are a universal product of grain interactions in relatively dense particulate clouds. Aggregate growth from the experimental particle clouds primarily involves dipole-dipole interactions for nonconducting materials; dipole interactions account for both attraction between grains as well as the cohesive force that maintains the integrity of the filamentary structures. When a cloud undergoes a turbulent-to-quiescent transition after damping of fluid and ballistic grain motions, aggregation occurs almost instantaneously and the cloud is transformed into a population of "heavier" clusters of material with organized electrical structures. This abrupt transformation could initiate catastrophic gravitational collapse of certain regions of particulate clouds, thus controlling the longevity and fate of cloud systems as diverse as protoplanetary dust disks and volcanic eruption plumes.

  9. Aggregation and Aggregate Carbon in a Forested Southeastern Coastal Plain Spodosol

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Soil aggregation is influenced by the soil environment and is a factor in soil carbon sequestration. Sandy Coastal Plain soils often do not have the clay to promote aggregation nor have been considered soils with high levels of aggregation. This study was conducted to examine the aggregate morpholog...

  10. Teachers' Experiences of Unfair Grading

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alm, Fredrik; Colnerud, Gunnel

    2015-01-01

    Grading is often perceived as one of a teacher's most difficult tasks. Despite most teachers endeavoring to grade their students as objectively as possible, many students feel that they are subject to unfair grading. The aim of this study is to describe what it is about a teacher's grading that contributes to the perception of unfairness. This…