Science.gov

Sample records for dense star polymer

  1. Small cell foams containing a modified dense star polymer or dendrimer as a nucleating agent

    DOEpatents

    Hedstrand, D.M.; Tomalia, D.A.

    1995-02-28

    A small cell foam having a modified dense star polymer or dendrimer is described. This modified dense star polymer or dendrimer has a highly branched interior of one monomeric composition and an exterior structure of a different monomeric composition capable of providing a hydrophobic outer shell and a particle diameter of from about 5 to about 1,000 nm with a matrix polymer.

  2. Small cell foams containing a modified dense star polymer or dendrimer as a nucleating agent

    DOEpatents

    Hedstrand, David M.; Tomalia, Donald A.

    1995-01-01

    A small cell foam having a modified dense star polymer or dendrimer is described. This modified dense star polymer or dendrimer has a highly branched interior of one monomeric composition and an exterior structure of a different monomeric composition capable of providing a hydrophobic outer shell and a particle diameter of from about 5 to about 1,000 nm with a matrix polymer.

  3. Star Polymers.

    PubMed

    Ren, Jing M; McKenzie, Thomas G; Fu, Qiang; Wong, Edgar H H; Xu, Jiangtao; An, Zesheng; Shanmugam, Sivaprakash; Davis, Thomas P; Boyer, Cyrille; Qiao, Greg G

    2016-06-22

    Recent advances in controlled/living polymerization techniques and highly efficient coupling chemistries have enabled the facile synthesis of complex polymer architectures with controlled dimensions and functionality. As an example, star polymers consist of many linear polymers fused at a central point with a large number of chain end functionalities. Owing to this exclusive structure, star polymers exhibit some remarkable characteristics and properties unattainable by simple linear polymers. Hence, they constitute a unique class of technologically important nanomaterials that have been utilized or are currently under audition for many applications in life sciences and nanotechnologies. This article first provides a comprehensive summary of synthetic strategies towards star polymers, then reviews the latest developments in the synthesis and characterization methods of star macromolecules, and lastly outlines emerging applications and current commercial use of star-shaped polymers. The aim of this work is to promote star polymer research, generate new avenues of scientific investigation, and provide contemporary perspectives on chemical innovation that may expedite the commercialization of new star nanomaterials. We envision in the not-too-distant future star polymers will play an increasingly important role in materials science and nanotechnology in both academic and industrial settings. PMID:27299693

  4. Cooling of dense stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tsuruta, S.

    1972-01-01

    Cooling rates were calculated for neutron stars of about one solar mass and 10 km radius, with magnetic fields from zero to about 10 to the 14th power gauss, for extreme cases of maximum and zero superfluidity. The results show that most pulsars are so cold that thermal ionization of surface atoms would be negligible. Nucleon superfluidity and crystallization of heavy nuclei were treated quantitatively, and more realistic hadron star models were chosen. Cooling rates were calculated for a stable hyperon star near the maximum mass limit, a medium weight neutron star, and a light neutron star with neutron-rich heavy nuclei near the minimum mass limit. Results show that cooling rates are a sensitive function of density. The Crab and Vela pulsars are considered, as well as cooling of a massive white dwarf star.

  5. Hydrodynamic stellar interactions in dense star clusters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rasio, Frederic A.

    1993-01-01

    Highly detailed HST observations of globular-cluster cores and galactic nuclei motivate new theoretical studies of the violent dynamical processes which govern the evolution of these very dense stellar systems. These processes include close stellar encounters and direct physical collisions between stars. Such hydrodynamic stellar interactions are thought to explain the large populations of blue stragglers, millisecond pulsars, X-ray binaries, and other peculiar sources observed in globular clusters. Three-dimensional hydrodynamics techniques now make it possible to perform realistic numerical simulations of these interactions. The results, when combined with those of N-body simulations of stellar dynamics, should provide for the first time a realistic description of dense star clusters. Here I review briefly current theoretical work on hydrodynamic stellar interactions, emphasizing its relevance to recent observations.

  6. Neutrino ground state in a dense star

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kiers, Ken; Tytgat, Michel H. G.

    1998-05-01

    It has recently been argued that long range forces due to the exchange of massless neutrinos give rise to a very large self-energy in a dense, finite-ranged, weakly charged medium. Such an effect, if real, would destabilize a neutron star. To address this issue we have studied the related problem of a massless neutrino field in the presence of an external, static electroweak potential of finite range. To be precise, we have computed to one loop the exact vacuum energy for the case of a spherical square well potential of depth α and radius R. For small wells, the vacuum energy is reliably determined by a perturbative expansion in the external potential. For large wells, however, the perturbative expansion breaks down. A manifestation of this breakdown is that the vacuum carries a non-zero neutrino charge. The energy and neutrino charge of the ground state are, to a good approximation for large wells, those of a neutrino condensate with chemical potential μ=α. Our results demonstrate explicitly that long-range forces due to the exchange of massless neutrinos do not threaten the stability of neutron stars.

  7. Frontiers the Physics of Dense Matter for Neutron Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steiner, Andrew W.

    2016-04-01

    Neutron stars are an excellent laboratory for nuclear physics. They probe the nucleon-nucleon interaction, the structure of nuclei, and the nature of dense QCD in ways which complement current experimental efforts. This article very briefly summarizes some of the current frontiers in neutron stars and dense matter with an emphasis on how our understanding might be improved in the near future.

  8. Star polymer unimicelles on graphene oxide flakes.

    PubMed

    Choi, Ikjun; Kulkarni, Dhaval D; Xu, Weinan; Tsitsilianis, Constantinos; Tsukruk, Vladimir V

    2013-08-01

    We report the interfacial assembly of amphiphilic heteroarm star copolymers (PSnP2VPn and PSn(P2VP-b-PtBA)n (n = 28 arms)) on graphene oxide flakes at the air-water interface. Adsorption, spreading, and ordering of star polymer micelles on the surface of the basal plane and edge of monolayer graphene oxide sheets were investigated on a Langmuir trough. This interface-mediated assembly resulted in micelle-decorated graphene oxide sheets with uniform spacing and organized morphology. We found that the surface activity of solvated graphene oxide sheets enables star polymer surfactants to subsequently adsorb on the presuspended graphene oxide sheets, thereby producing a bilayer complex. The positively charged heterocyclic pyridine-containing star polymers exhibited strong affinity onto the basal plane and edge of graphene oxide, leading to a well-organized and long-range ordered discrete micelle assembly. The preferred binding can be related to the increased conformational entropy due to the reduction of interarm repulsion. The extent of coverage was tuned by controlling assembly parameters such as concentration and solvent polarity. The polymer micelles on the basal plane remained incompressible under lateral compression in contrast to ones on the water surface due to strongly repulsive confined arms on the polar surface of graphene oxide and a preventive barrier in the form of the sheet edges. The densely packed biphasic tile-like morphology was evident, suggesting the high interfacial stability and mechanically stiff nature of graphene oxide sheets decorated with star polymer micelles. This noncovalent assembly represents a facile route for the control and fabrication of graphene oxide-inclusive ultrathin hybrid films applicable for layered nanocomposites. PMID:23883114

  9. Dense Gas-Star Systems: Evolution of Supermassive Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amaro-Seoane, P.; Spurzem, R.

    In the 60s and 70s super-massive central objects (from now onwards SMOs) were thought to be the main source of active galactic nuclei (AGNs) characteristics (luminosities of L ≅1012 Lodot). The release of gravitational binding energy by the accretion of material on to an SMO in the range of 107 - 109 Modot has been suggested to be the primary powerhouse (Lynden-Bell 1969). That rather exotic idea in early time has become common sense nowadays. Not only our own galaxy harbours a few million-solar mass black hole (Genzel 2001) but also many of other non-active galaxies show kinematic and gas-dynamic evidence of these objects (Magorrian et al. 1998) The concept of central super-massive stars (SMSs henceforth) (cal M ≥ 5 × 104 Modot, where cal M is the mass of the SMS) embedded in dense stellar systems was suggested as a possible explanation for high- energy emissions phenomena occurring in AGNs and quasars (Vilkoviski 1976, Hara 1978), such as X-ray emissions (Bahcall and Ostriker, 1975). SMSs and super-massive black holes (SMBHs) are two possibilities to explain the nature of SMOs, and SMSs may be an intermediate step towards the formation of SMBHs (Rees 1984). In this paper we give the equations that describe the dynamics of such a dense star-gas system which are the basis for the code that will be used in a prochain future to simulate this scenario. We also briefly draw the mathematical fundamentals of the code.

  10. Multiarm Star Polymers as Model Soft Colloids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vlassopoulos, Dimitris

    2010-03-01

    Over the last decade, star polymers emerged as a useful model colloids that interpolate between polymers and hard sphere colloids. Together with microgels, they represent two benchmark soft colloidal systems, their internal structure being the key difference. Indeed, in the case of stars with open structure, the arms can interpenetrate in dense suspensions. The latter feature, that can be probed experimentally, is responsible for a number of interesting structural and dynamic properties of star polymers that set them apart from microgels. In this talk we present the basic properties of star polymers and focus on their extraordinary behavior in the highly concentrated regime, which is typically glassy. Our rheological and scattering experiments demonstrate unique features of the star glasses. Here we discuss two major ones: (i) Aging after pre-shear (the so-called rejuvenation) proceeds via a two-step process, associated with a fast arm engagement and a slow cooperative (cage) rearrangement. Remarkably, at extremely long times a steady state is observed and the terminal time in these systems can be experimentally accessible (and hence tailored at molecular level), as a consequence of the arms fluctuations. (ii) Multiple glassy states can be obtained when mixing stars with polymers or with other stars. Simultaneous theoretical and simulations work suggests that the softness is at the core of this unexpected behavior where depletion gives rise to glass melting and eventually re-entrant glasses are formed. Construction of a state diagram suggests kinetic pathways for tailoring the flow of soft colloids. These examples outline the importance of particle architecture on colloidal properties. Stars are a representative of a large class of hairy particles. The parallel important developments in mode coupling theory and its verses provide much needed predictive tools and rationalization for a number of phenomena such as those discussed here, as well as the complex

  11. Photoluminescence of Conjugated Star Polymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferguson, J. B.; Prigodin, N. V.; Epstein, A. J.; Wang, F.

    2000-10-01

    Higher dimensionality "star" polymers provide new properties beyond those found in their linear analogs. They have been used to improving electronic properties for nonlinear optics through exciton transfer and molecular antenna structures for example (M. Kawa, J. M. J. Frechet, Chem. Mater. 10, 286 (1998).). We report on photoluminescence properties of star polymers with a hyperbranched core (both hyperbranched phenlyene and hyperbranched triphenylamine) and polyhexylthiophene arms. The arm is a conjugated oligomer of polythiophene that has been investigated extensively for metallic like conductivity when doped as well as utilized in field effect transistors in its undoped form (A. Tsumara, H. Koezuka, T. Ando, Appl. Phys. Lett. 49, 1210 (1986).). The cores are respectively, a nonconjugated polymer in the case of hyperbranched phenlyene and a conjugated polymer in the case of hyperbranched triphenylamine. The photoluminesce spectrum (λ_max at 575 nm) is identical for both star polymers with the two electronically different hyperbranched cores and for linear polythiophene alone. We conclude the wave functions of the core and arms do not strongly interact to form states different from their individual states and excitons formed on the hyperbranched cores migrate to the lower bandgap polythiophene before recombining.

  12. Pulsar-irradiated stars in dense globular clusters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tavani, Marco

    1992-01-01

    We discuss the properties of stars irradiated by millisecond pulsars in 'hard' binaries of dense globular clusters. Irradiation by a relativistic pulsar wind as in the case of the eclipsing millisecond pulsar PSR 1957+20 alter both the magnitude and color of the companion star. Some of the blue stragglers (BSs) recently discovered in dense globular clusters can be irradiated stars in binaries containing powerful millisecond pulsars. The discovery of pulsar-driven orbital modulations of BS brightness and color with periods of a few hours together with evidence for radio and/or gamma-ray emission from BS binaries would valuably contribute to the understanding of the evolution of collapsed stars in globular clusters. Pulsar-driven optical modulation of cluster stars might be the only observable effect of a new class of binary pulsars, i.e., hidden millisecond pulsars enshrouded in the evaporated material lifted off from the irradiated companion star.

  13. Bottle-brush polymers as an intermediate between star and cylindrical polymers.

    PubMed

    Denesyuk, N A

    2003-09-01

    We present a theoretical study of a single bottle-brush molecule, which consists of multiarmed polymer stars grafted densely onto a stiff backbone. Mean-field approximation and a variational approach are used to calculate the dominant trajectories of the grafted chains, the shape of the molecule, and the segment density distribution around the backbone. All these properties are calculated for an arbitrary relationship between the size of the backbone and that of a grafted star. Hence cylindrical comb copolymer brushes and spherically symmetric polymer stars are considered as the limiting cases of the present problem. PMID:14524794

  14. Bottle-brush polymers as an intermediate between star and cylindrical polymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Denesyuk, N. A.

    2003-09-01

    We present a theoretical study of a single bottle-brush molecule, which consists of multiarmed polymer stars grafted densely onto a stiff backbone. Mean-field approximation and a variational approach are used to calculate the dominant trajectories of the grafted chains, the shape of the molecule, and the segment density distribution around the backbone. All these properties are calculated for an arbitrary relationship between the size of the backbone and that of a grafted star. Hence cylindrical comb copolymer brushes and spherically symmetric polymer stars are considered as the limiting cases of the present problem.

  15. Hyperbranched polymer stars with Gaussian chain statistics revisited.

    PubMed

    Polińska, P; Gillig, C; Wittmer, J P; Baschnagel, J

    2014-02-01

    Conformational properties of regular dendrimers and more general hyperbranched polymer stars with Gaussian statistics for the spacer chains between branching points are revisited numerically. We investigate the scaling for asymptotically long chains especially for fractal dimensions df = 3 (marginally compact) and df = 2.5 (diffusion limited aggregation). Power-law stars obtained by imposing the number of additional arms per generation are compared to truly self-similar stars. We discuss effects of weak excluded-volume interactions and sketch the regime where the Gaussian approximation should hold in dense solutions and melts for sufficiently large spacer chains. PMID:24574057

  16. Relativistic Modelling of Stable Anisotropic Super-Dense Star

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maurya, S. K.; Gupta, Y. K.; Jasim, M. K.

    2015-08-01

    In the present article we have obtained new set of exact solutions of Einstein field equations for anisotropic fluid spheres by using the Herrera et al. [1] algorithm. The anisotropic fluid solutions so obtained join continuously to the Schwarzschild exterior solution across the pressure-free boundary. It is observed that most of the new anisotropic solutions are well-behaved and are used to construct the super-dense star models such as neutron stars and pulsars.

  17. New Molecular Theory for Dense, Thin Polymer Films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freed, Karl

    2015-03-01

    The development of a molecular theory for dense polymer systems ranks among the most challenging problems in the statistical mechanics of complex matter. These difficulties become compounded when considering the influence of molecular details on thermodynamic properties of thin polymer films, properties deviating from those of the bulk phases. A new theory of dense polymer films is developed as a significant generalization of methods used to devise the lattice cluster theory, an extension of Flory-Huggins theory that include details of monomer structure and short range correlations (neglected in FH theory) and that has successfully been applied to a wide range of polymer systems. The new theory incorporates the essential ``transport'' constraints of Helfand and focuses on the strict imposition of excluded volume constraints, appropriate to dense polymer systems, rather than the maintenance of chain connectivity as appropriate for lower densities and implemented in self-consistent theories of polymer adsorption at interfaces. The theory is illustrated by presenting examples of the computed density and chain end profiles for free standing films as a function of bulk density, chain length, temperature, and chain semi-flexibility.

  18. Formation and evolution of black holes in dense star clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goswami, Sanghamitra

    Using supercomputer simulations combining stellar dynamics and stellar evolution, we have studied various problems related to the existence of black holes in dense star clusters. We consider both stellar and intermediate-mass black holes, and we focus on massive, dense star clusters, such as old globular clusters and young, so called "super star clusters." The first problem concerns the formation of intermediate-mass black holes in young clusters through the runaway collision instability. A promising mechanism to form intermediate-mass black holes (IMBHs) is runaway mergers in dense star clusters, where main-sequence stars collide re- peatedly and form a very massive star (VMS), which then collapses to a black hole (BH). Here we study the effects of primordial mass segregation and the importance of the stellar initial mass function (IMF) on the runaway growth of VMSs using a dynamical Monte Carlo code to model systems with N as high as 10^6 stars. Our Monte Carlo code includes an explicittreatment of all stellar collisions. We place special emphasis on the possibility of top-heavy IMFs, as observed in some very young massive clusters. We find that both primordial mass segregation and the shape of the IMF affect the rate of core collapse of star clusters and thus the time of the runaway. When we include primordial mass segregation we generally see a decrease in core collapse time (tcc). Although for smaller degrees of primordial mass segregation this decrease in tcc is mostly due to the change in the density profile of the cluster, for highly mass-segregated (primordial) clusters, it is the increase in the average mass in the core which reduces the central relaxation time, decreasing tcc. Finally, flatter IMFs generally increase the average mass in the whole cluster, which increases tcc. For the range of IMFs investigated in this thesis, this increase in tcc is to some degree balanced by stellar collisions, which accelerate core collapse. Thus there is no

  19. Dense molecular gas tracers in high mass star formation regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Hong-Jun; Gao, Yu; Wu, Jing-Wen

    2016-02-01

    We report the FCRAO observations that mapped HCN (1-0), CS (2-1), HNC (1-0) and HCO+ (1-0) in ten high-mass star forming cores associated with water masers. We present velocity integrated intensity maps of the four lines for these dense cores, compare their line profiles, and derive physical properties of these cores. We find that these four tracers identify areas with similar properties in these massive dense cores, and in most cases, the emissions of HCN and HCO+ are stronger than those of HNC and CS. We also use the line ratios of HCO+/HCN, HNC/HCN and HNC/HCO+ as the diagnostics to explore the environment of these high-mass star forming regions, and find that most of the cores agree with the model that photodominated regions dominate the radiation field, except for W44, for which the radiation field is similar to an X-ray dominated region.

  20. Super-Massive Stars: Dense Star-Gas Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amaro-Seoane, Pau; Spurzem, Rainer; Just, Andreas

    We use a gaseous model and a semi-analytical approach to study the evolution of a super-massive central gaseous object (a super-massive star, {SMS} from now on) in an AGN and its evolution by interactions with the surrounding stellar system. Our future work in this field is outlined, which aims at a more detailed study of energy flows in the interstellar medium, stellar evolution and the relation between QSOs and galaxy formation.

  1. Lattice cluster theory for dense, thin polymer films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freed, Karl F.

    2015-04-01

    While the application of the lattice cluster theory (LCT) to study the miscibility of polymer blends has greatly expanded our understanding of the monomer scale molecular details influencing miscibility, the corresponding theory for inhomogeneous systems has not yet emerged because of considerable technical difficulties and much greater complexity. Here, we present a general formulation enabling the extension of the LCT to describe the thermodynamic properties of dense, thin polymer films using a high dimension, high temperature expansion. Whereas the leading order of the LCT for bulk polymer systems is essentially simple Flory-Huggins theory, the highly non-trivial leading order inhomogeneous LCT (ILCT) for a film with L layers already involves the numerical solution of 3(L - 1) coupled, highly nonlinear equations for the various density profiles in the film. The new theory incorporates the essential "transport" constraints of Helfand and focuses on the strict imposition of excluded volume constraints, appropriate to dense polymer systems, rather than the maintenance of chain connectivity as appropriate for lower densities and as implemented in self-consistent theories of polymer adsorption at interfaces. The ILCT is illustrated by presenting examples of the computed profiles of the density, the parallel and perpendicular bonds, and the chain ends for free standing and supported films as a function of average film density, chain length, temperature, interaction with support, and chain stiffness. The results generally agree with expected general trends.

  2. Lattice cluster theory for dense, thin polymer films

    SciTech Connect

    Freed, Karl F.

    2015-04-07

    While the application of the lattice cluster theory (LCT) to study the miscibility of polymer blends has greatly expanded our understanding of the monomer scale molecular details influencing miscibility, the corresponding theory for inhomogeneous systems has not yet emerged because of considerable technical difficulties and much greater complexity. Here, we present a general formulation enabling the extension of the LCT to describe the thermodynamic properties of dense, thin polymer films using a high dimension, high temperature expansion. Whereas the leading order of the LCT for bulk polymer systems is essentially simple Flory-Huggins theory, the highly non-trivial leading order inhomogeneous LCT (ILCT) for a film with L layers already involves the numerical solution of 3(L − 1) coupled, highly nonlinear equations for the various density profiles in the film. The new theory incorporates the essential “transport” constraints of Helfand and focuses on the strict imposition of excluded volume constraints, appropriate to dense polymer systems, rather than the maintenance of chain connectivity as appropriate for lower densities and as implemented in self-consistent theories of polymer adsorption at interfaces. The ILCT is illustrated by presenting examples of the computed profiles of the density, the parallel and perpendicular bonds, and the chain ends for free standing and supported films as a function of average film density, chain length, temperature, interaction with support, and chain stiffness. The results generally agree with expected general trends.

  3. Massive Star Formation: Characterising Infall and Outflow in dense cores.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akhter, Shaila; Cunningham, Maria; Harvey-Smith, Lisa; Jones, Paul Andrew; Purcell, Cormac; Walsh, Andrew John

    2015-08-01

    Massive stars are some of the most important objects in the Universe, shaping the evolution of galaxies, creating chemical elements, and hence shaping the evolution of the Universe. However, the processes by which they form, and how they shape their environment during their birth processes, are not well understood. We are using NH3 data from the "The H2O Southern Galactic Plane Survey" (HOPS) to define the positions of dense cores/clumps of gas in the southern Galactic plane that are likely to form stars. Due to its effective critical density, NH3 can detect massive star forming regions effectively compared to other tracers. We did a comparative study with different methods for finding clumps and found Fellwalker as the best. We found ~ 10% of the star forming clumps with multiple components and ~ 90% clumps with single component along the line of sight. Then, using data from the "The Millimetre Astronomy Legacy Team 90 GHz" (MALT90) survey, we search for the presence of infall and outflow associated with these cores. We will subsequently use the "3D Molecular Line Radiative Transfer Code" (MOLLIE) to constrain properties of the infall and outflow, such as velocity and mass flow. The aim of the project is to determine how common infall and outflow are in star forming cores, hence providing valuable constraints on the timescales and physical process involved in massive star formation.

  4. Cooling compact stars and phase transitions in dense QCD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sedrakian, Armen

    2016-03-01

    We report new simulations of cooling of compact stars containing quark cores and updated fits to the Cas A fast cooling data. Our model is built on the assumption that the transient behaviour of the star in Cas A is due to a phase transition within the dense QCD matter in the core of the star. Specifically, the fast cooling is attributed to an enhancement in the neutrino emission triggered by a transition from a fully gapped, two-flavor, red-green color-superconducting quark condensate to a superconducting crystalline or an alternative gapless, color-superconducting phase. The blue-colored condensate is modeled as a Bardeen-Cooper-Schrieffer (BCS)-type color superconductor with spin-one pairing order parameter. We study the sensitivity of the fits to the phase transition temperature, the pairing gap of blue quarks and the timescale characterizing the phase transition (the latter modelled in terms of a width parameter). Relative variations in these parameter around their best-fit values larger than 10-3 spoil the fit to the data. We confirm the previous finding that the cooling curves show significant variations as a function of compact star mass, which allows one to account for dispersion in the data on the surface temperatures of thermally emitting neutron stars.

  5. Surface wave excitations and backflow effect over dense polymer brushes.

    PubMed

    Biagi, Sofia; Rovigatti, Lorenzo; Sciortino, Francesco; Misbah, Chaouqi

    2016-01-01

    Polymer brushes are being increasingly used to tailor surface physicochemistry for diverse applications such as wetting, adhesion of biological objects, implantable devices and much more. Here we perform Dissipative Particle Dynamics simulations to study the behaviour of dense polymer brushes under flow in a slit-pore channel. We discover that the system displays flow inversion at the brush interface for several disconnected ranges of the imposed flow. We associate such phenomenon to collective polymer dynamics: a wave propagating on the brush surface. The relation between the wavelength, the amplitude and the propagation speed of the flow-generated wave is consistent with the solution of the Stokes equations when an imposed traveling wave is assumed as the boundary condition (the famous Taylor's swimmer). PMID:26975329

  6. Surface wave excitations and backflow effect over dense polymer brushes

    PubMed Central

    Biagi, Sofia; Rovigatti, Lorenzo; Sciortino, Francesco; Misbah, Chaouqi

    2016-01-01

    Polymer brushes are being increasingly used to tailor surface physicochemistry for diverse applications such as wetting, adhesion of biological objects, implantable devices and much more. Here we perform Dissipative Particle Dynamics simulations to study the behaviour of dense polymer brushes under flow in a slit-pore channel. We discover that the system displays flow inversion at the brush interface for several disconnected ranges of the imposed flow. We associate such phenomenon to collective polymer dynamics: a wave propagating on the brush surface. The relation between the wavelength, the amplitude and the propagation speed of the flow-generated wave is consistent with the solution of the Stokes equations when an imposed traveling wave is assumed as the boundary condition (the famous Taylor’s swimmer). PMID:26975329

  7. Surface wave excitations and backflow effect over dense polymer brushes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biagi, Sofia; Rovigatti, Lorenzo; Sciortino, Francesco; Misbah, Chaouqi

    2016-03-01

    Polymer brushes are being increasingly used to tailor surface physicochemistry for diverse applications such as wetting, adhesion of biological objects, implantable devices and much more. Here we perform Dissipative Particle Dynamics simulations to study the behaviour of dense polymer brushes under flow in a slit-pore channel. We discover that the system displays flow inversion at the brush interface for several disconnected ranges of the imposed flow. We associate such phenomenon to collective polymer dynamics: a wave propagating on the brush surface. The relation between the wavelength, the amplitude and the propagation speed of the flow-generated wave is consistent with the solution of the Stokes equations when an imposed traveling wave is assumed as the boundary condition (the famous Taylor’s swimmer).

  8. Method for forming a uniformly dense polymer foam body

    SciTech Connect

    Whinnery, Jr., Leroy

    2002-01-01

    A method for providing a uniformly dense polymer foam body having a density between about 0.013 .sup.g /.sub.cm.sup..sub.3 to about 0.5 .sup.g /.sub.cm.sup..sub.3 is disclosed. The method utilizes a thermally expandable polymer microballoon material wherein some of the microballoons are unexpanded and some are only partially expanded. It is shown that by mixing the two types of materials in appropriate ratios to achieve the desired bulk final density, filling a mold with this mixture so as to displace all or essentially all of the internal volume of the mold, heating the mold for a predetermined interval at a temperature above about 130.degree. C., and then cooling the mold to a temperature below 80.degree. C. the molded part achieves a bulk density which varies by less then about .+-.6% everywhere throughout the part volume.

  9. Hydrophilic polymer composites synthesized by electrospinning under dense carbon dioxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wahyudiono, Okamoto, Koichi; Machmudah, Siti; Kanda, Hideki; Goto, Motonobu

    2015-12-01

    Electrospinning technique is feasible in some applications, it has attracted more attention in recent years. Various polymers have been successfully electrospun into ultrafine fibers in solvent solution and some in melt form. In this work, polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP) as a hydrophilic polymer would be synthesized by electrospinning under dense carbon dioxide (CO2). The experiments were performed at 40 °C and ˜ 5 MPa. During the electrospinning process, the applied voltage was 10-17 kV and the distance of nozzle and collector was 8 cm. The concentration of PVP solution as a major component was 4 wt%. The results showed that the fibers surface morphology from PVP which blended with poly L-lactide acid (PLLA) were smooth with hollow core fibers at 5 MPa. At the same conditions, PVP-carbon nanotube was also successfully generated into electrospun fiber products with diameter ˜ 2 μm.

  10. Star polymers rupture induced by constant forces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    García, N. A.; Febbo, M.; Vega, D. A.; Milchev, A.

    2014-10-01

    In this work, we study the breakage process of an unknotted three-arm star-shaped polymer when it is pulled from its free ends by a constant force. The star polymer configuration is described through an array of monomers coupled by anharmonic bonds, while the rupture process is tracked in three-dimensional space by means of Langevin Molecular Dynamics simulations. The interaction between monomers is described by a Morse potential, while a Weeks-Chandler-Anderson energetic contribution accounts for the excluded volume interaction. We explore the effect of the molecular architecture on the distributions of rupture times over a broad interval of pulling forces and star configurations. It was found that the rupture time distribution of the individual star arms is strongly affected by the star configuration imposed by the pulling forces and the length of the arms. We also observed that for large pulling forces the rupture time distributions resemble the dominant features observed for linear polymer chains. The model introduced here provides the basic ingredients to describe the effects of tensile forces on stress-induced degradation of branched macromolecules and polymer networks.

  11. STAR FORMATION IN THE TAURUS FILAMENT L 1495: FROM DENSE CORES TO STARS

    SciTech Connect

    Schmalzl, Markus; Kainulainen, Jouni; Henning, Thomas; Launhardt, Ralf; Quanz, Sascha P.; Alves, Joao; Goodman, Alyssa A.; Pineda, Jaime E.; Roman-Zuniga, Carlos G.

    2010-12-10

    We present a study of dense structures in the L 1495 filament in the Taurus Molecular Cloud and examine its star-forming properties. In particular, we construct a dust extinction map of the filament using deep near-infrared observations, exposing its small-scale structure in unprecedented detail. The filament shows highly fragmented substructures and a high mass-per-length value of M{sub line} = 17 M{sub sun} pc{sup -1}, reflecting star-forming potential in all parts of it. However, a part of the filament, namely B 211, is remarkably devoid of young stellar objects. We argue that in this region the initial filament collapse and fragmentation is still taking place and star formation is yet to occur. In the star-forming part of the filament, we identify 39 cores with masses from 0.4 to 10 M{sub sun} and preferred separations in agreement with the local Jeans length. Most of these cores exceed the Bonnor-Ebert critical mass, and are therefore likely to collapse and form stars. The dense core mass function follows a power law with exponent {Gamma} = 1.2 {+-} 0.2, a form commonly observed in star-forming regions.

  12. Polymer Film Surface Fluctuation Dynamics in the Limit of Very Dense Branching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foster, Mark; Liu, Boxi; Narayanan, Suresh; Wu, David T.

    2013-03-01

    The surface height fluctuations of melt films of densely branched comb polystyrenes of thicknesses greater than 55nm and at temperatures more than 23 C above the Tg , bulk can be rationalized using the hydrodynamic continuum theory (HCT) known to describe melts of unentangled linear and cyclic chains. Film viscosities (ηXPCS) for three combs inferred from fits of the HCT to X-ray Photon Correlation Spectroscopy (XPCS) data are the same as bulk viscosities (ηbulk) measured with rheometry. For the comb most like a star polymer and the comb closest to showing bulk entanglement behavior, ηXPCS is greater than ηbulk. However, the values of ηXPCS -ηbulk are much smaller than those seen for less densely branched polystyrenes. We conjecture that the smaller magnitude of ηXPCS -ηbulk for the densely grafted combs is due to a lack of interpenetration of the side chains when branching is very dense. While data of relaxation time versus T for cyclic chains virtually collapse to a single curve when Tg , bulk is accounted for, that is not the case for combs. Tg , bulk and specific chain architecture both play important roles in determining the surface fluctuations. Acknowledgements: NSF CBET 0730692, CBET-0731319, DURIP W911NF-09-1-0122.

  13. Scaling model for symmetric star polymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramachandran, Ram; Rai, Durgesh K.; Beaucage, Gregory

    2010-03-01

    Neutron scattering data from symmetric star polymers with six poly (urethane-ether) arms, chemically bonded to a C-60 molecule are fitted using a new scaling model and scattering function. The new scaling function can describe both good solvent and theta solvent conditions as well as resolve deviations in chain conformation due to steric interactions between star arms. The scaling model quantifies the distinction between invariant topological features for this star polymer and chain tortuosity which changes with goodness of solvent and steric interaction. Beaucage G, Phys. Rev. E 70 031401 (2004).; Ramachandran R, et al. Macromolecules 41 9802-9806 (2008).; Ramachandran R, et al. Macromolecules, 42 4746-4750 (2009); Rai DK et al. Europhys. Lett., (Submitted 10/2009).

  14. Barrier crossing by a star polymer.

    PubMed

    Debnath, Ananya; Sebastian, K L

    2007-11-01

    We analyze the dynamics of a star polymer of F arms trapped in a double well potential. Initially the molecule is confined to one of the minima and can cross over the barrier to the other side. We use the continuum version of the Rouse-Ham model and calculate the rate of crossing using the multidimensional approach due to Langer [Ann. Phys. (N.Y.) 54, 258 (1969)]. Finding the transition state for the process is shown to be equivalent to the solution of Newton's equations for F independent particles, moving in an inverted potential. For each star polymer, there is a critical barrier top curvature, below which the star crosses over in coiled conformation. The value of the critical curvature is determined by the first Rouse mode of the star. If the curvature is greater than this critical value, the saddle point for the crossing is a stretched conformation of the star. For the coiled transition state, the activation energy is proportional to the total arm length of the star. For the stretched transition state, as one increases the length of an arm of the star, the activation energy at first increases and then decreases. This results from the fact that in the stretched state, only one arm of the polymer is stretched across the top of the barrier, while others need not be. We calculate the rate by expanding the energy around the saddle up to second order in the fluctuations. As we use the continuum model, there are infinite modes for the polymer and, consequently, the prefactor has infinite products. We show that these infinite products can be reduced to a simple expression, and evaluated easily. However, the rate diverges near NTc due to the multifurcation, which results in more than one unstable mode. The cure for this divergence is to keep terms up to fourth order in the expansion of energy for these modes. Performing this, we have calculated the rate as a function of the length of the star. It is found that the rate has a nonmonotonic dependence on the length

  15. Motions and Initial Conditions in Star-Forming Dense Cores

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Myers, Philip C.

    2001-01-01

    Under this grant in the past year we have pursued spectral-line observations of star-forming regions over size scales from 0.01 pc to 0.5 pc. Our main goal has been to measure the systematic and turbulent motions of condensing and collapsing gas. In this area, our results include (1) in 67 starless dense cores, some 19 show clear evidence of spatially extended inward motions, with typical line-of-sight inward speed 0.05-0.09 km s(sup -1) and with typical plane-of-the-sky extent 0.1-0.3 pc, (2) In some 40 nearby regions with embedded groups and clusters, we see extended infall asymmetry in lines of CS and HCO(+) clearly in 4 regions and less clearly in 4 others, (3) Using finer resolution (15 arcsec or 0.01-0.02 pc) and lines tracing higher density, we see spatial concentration of infall asymmetry near the protostars in NGC 1333 IRS 4A and B, L483, and L1251B, and with still finer resolution (2 arcsec or 0.003 pc or 600 AU) we detect inverse P Cyg profiles, indicating absorption of continuum emission from the protostellar envelope by infalling gas in NGC 1333 IRS 4A and 4B. Further, at high resolution we identify regions of stellar mass and low turbulence ("kernels") which are good candidates to become the next generation of stars in embedded clusters. In addition we have completed a survey for the OH Zeeman effect in absorption against nearby H II regions, indicating that the large-scale magnetic field may be nearly critical if it typically threads a flattened structure. We have also developed a model of spatially extended infall motions based on dissipation of turbulence in a magnetized, selfgravitating layer. In the following we describe some of these results in more detail.

  16. Polymer quantum effects on compact stars models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chacón-Acosta, Guillermo; Hernandez-Hernandez, Héctor H.

    2015-03-01

    In this work we study a completely degenerate Fermi gas at zero temperature by a semiclassical approximation for a Hamiltonian that arises in polymer quantum mechanics. Polymer quantum systems are quantum mechanical models quantized in a similar way as in loop quantum gravity, allowing the study of the discreteness of space and other features of the loop quantization in a simplified way. We obtain the polymer modified thermodynamical properties for this system by noticing that the corresponding Fermi energy is exactly the same as if one directly polymerizes the momentum pF. We also obtain the expansion of the corresponding thermodynamical variables in terms of small values of the polymer length scale λ. We apply these results to study a simple model of a compact one-dimensional star where the gravitational collapse is supported by electron degeneracy pressure. As a consequence, polymer corrections to the mass of the object are found. By using bounds for the polymer length found in Bose-Einstein condensates experiments we compute the modification in the mass of the compact object due to polymer effects of order 10-8. This result is similar to the other order found by different approaches such as generalized uncertainty principle (GUP), and that certainly is within the error reported in typical measurements of white dwarf masses.

  17. Influence of Molecular Solvation on the Conformation of Star Polymers

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Xin; Porcar, L.; Sanchez-Diaz, Luis E; Do, Changwoo; Liu, Yun; Smith, Gregory Scott; Hong, Kunlun; Chen, Wei-Ren

    2014-01-01

    We have used neutron scattering to investigate the influence of concentration on the conformation of a star polymer. By varying the contrast between the solvent and isotopically labeled stars, we obtain the distributions of polymer and solvent within a star polymer from analysis of scattering data. A correlation between the local desolvation and the inward folding of star branches is discovered. From the perspective of thermodynamics, we find an analogy between the mechanism of polymer localization driven by solvent depletion and that of the hydrophobic collapse of polymers in solutions.

  18. Connecting the Dense Gas and Young Stars in the CARMA Large Area Star Formation Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mundy, Lee G.; Storm, Shaye; Looney, Leslie; Lee, Katherine I.; Fernandez Lopez, Manuel; Ostriker, Eve C.; Chen, Che-Yu; CLASSy Team

    2016-01-01

    The CARMA Large Area Star Formation Survey (CLASSy) imaged the dense gas structure and kinematics in five, roughly 1 pc scale regions in the Serpens and Perseus clouds with 7" angular resolution. The spatial distribution and Class of the young stellar population (YSOs) is available for these regions from the Spitzer c2d and Gould Belt surveys, with added sources from the Herschel 70 micron images. Together, these datasets allow us to compare, for the first time at similar spatial resolutions, the distributions of the dense gas and YSOs over regions containing up to 90 identified YSOs. This enables a detailed look at the separation between YSOs and the nearest dense gas peak and a measure of overall relationship between the YSO and dense gas distributions. We find that most Class 0 YSOs are forming in the highest column density regions: leaves in the dendrogram analysis utilized by CLASSy. In Serpens and Perseus, we find that 29% and 38%, respectively, of the leaves have identified embedded YSOs. Class 1 sources are less confined to leaf locations; Class II sources are distributed throughout regions, mostly away from hierarchical peaks. This trend could be due to a modest (0.1 km/sec) velocity difference between YSOs and their natal cores, or due to the YSOs consuming or dispersing their natal cores.

  19. Interfacial Micellar Structures from Novel Amphiphilic Star Polymers

    SciTech Connect

    Genson, Kirsten L.; Hoffman, Joshua; Teng, Jing; Zubarev, Eugene R.; Vaknin, David; Tsukruk, Vladimir V.

    2010-11-10

    An amphiphilic heteroarm star polymer containing 12 alternating hydrophobic/hydrophilic arms of polystyrene (PS) and poly(acrylic acid) (PAA) connected to a well-defined rigid aromatic core was studied at the air-water and the air-solid interfaces. At the air-water interface, the molecules spontaneously form pancakelike micellar aggregates which measure up to several microns in diameter and 5 nm in thickness. Upon reduction of the surface area per molecule to 7 nm2, the two-dimensional micelles merged into a dense monolayer. We suggest that confined phase separation of dissimilar polymer arms occurred upon their segregation on the opposite sides of the rigid disklike aromatic core, forcing the rigid cores to adopt a face-on orientation with respect to the interface. Upon transfer onto solid supports the PS chains face the air-film interface making it completely hydrophobic, and the PAA chains were found to collapse and form a thin flattened underlayer. This study points toward new strategies to create large 2D microstructures with facial amphiphilicity and suggests a profound influence of star molecular architecture on the self-assembly of amphiphiles at the air-water interface.

  20. Star Formation and Dense Gas in Galaxy Mergers from the VIXENS Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heiderman, Amanda L.; VIXENS Team

    2016-01-01

    We present our λ= 3 mm IRAM and NRO single dish line survey for a sample of 15 interacting galaxies in the VIRUS-P Investigation of the eXtreme ENvironments of Starbursts (VIXENS) survey. Our sample of merging galaxies range from early to late interaction stages (close pairs to merger remnants, respectively). A variety of molecular lines are detected including dense gas tracers HCN, HCO+, HNC, CS, CN (and others) as well as 12CO and 13CO. We compare the dense gas fractions with 12CO and 13CO as well as star formation efficiencies defined by infrared-to-dense gas tracer luminosity ratio and discuss trends with interaction stage. We also investigate relations between star formation and dense gas content in our merger sample and compare them to non-interacting star forming galaxies and Galactic star forming regions in the Milky Way.

  1. Flow-induced translocation of star polymers through a nanopore.

    PubMed

    Ding, Mingming; Duan, Xiaozheng; Shi, Tongfei

    2016-03-01

    We study the flow-induced translocation of the star polymers through a nanopore using a hybrid simulation method that incorporates a lattice-Boltzmann approach for the fluid into a molecular dynamics model for the polymer. Our simulation demonstrates the existence of an optimal forward arm number of the star polymers captured by the nanopore, and illustrates its significance in determining the critical velocity flux of the star polymer translocation through the nanopore. Importantly, we find that the critical velocity flux of the star polymers is independent of the arm polymerization degree, but exhibits a linear dependence on the arm number. Based on previous scaling arguments and our simulation results, we conclude a linear dependence of the critical velocity flux on the arm number of the star polymers, which can successfully describe the dynamics of the star polymer translocation. Our simulation results rationalize the experimental results for the dependence of the critical velocity flux on the arm polymerization degree and the arm number of the star polymers, which provide new insights for the characterization and the purification of the star polymers. PMID:26879130

  2. Massive Infrared-Quiet Dense Cores: Unveiling the Initial Conditions of High-Mass Star Formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Motte, F.; Bontemps, S.; Schneider, N.; Schilke, P.; Menten, K. M.

    2008-05-01

    As Th. Henning said at the conference, cold precursors of high-mass stars are now ``hot topics''. We here propose some observational criteria to identify massive infrared-quiet dense cores which can host the high-mass analogs of Class~0 protostars and pre-stellar condensations. We also show how far-infrared to millimeter imaging surveys of entire complexes forming OB stars are starting to unveil the initial conditions of high-mass star formation.

  3. Scattering from Star Polymers including Excluded Volume Effects

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Li, Xin; Do, Changwoo; Liu, Yun; Hong, Kunlun; Smith, Greg; Chen, Wei-Ren

    2014-01-01

    In this work we present a new model for the form factor of a star polymer consisting of self-avoiding branches. This new model incorporates excluded volume effects and is derived from the two point correlation function for a star polymer.. We compare this model to small angle neutron scattering (SANS) measurements from polystyrene (PS) stars immersed in a good solvent, tetrahydrofuran (THF). It is shown that this model provides a good description of the scattering signature originating from the excluded volume effect and it explicitly elucidates the connection between the global conformation of a star polymer and the local stiffnessmore » of its constituent branch.« less

  4. A scattering function of star polymers including excluded volume effects

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Li, Xin; Do, Changwoo; Liu, Yun; Sánchez-Diáz, Luis; Smith, Gregory; Chen, Wei-Ren

    2014-11-04

    In this work we present a new model for the form factor of a star polymer consisting of self-avoiding branches. This new model incorporates excluded volume effects and is derived from the two point correlation function for a star polymer.. We compare this model to small angle neutron scattering (SANS) measurements from polystyrene (PS) stars immersed in a good solvent, tetrahydrofuran (THF). It is shown that this model provides a good description of the scattering signature originating from the excluded volume effect and it explicitly elucidates the connection between the global conformation of a star polymer and the local stiffnessmore » of its constituent branch.« less

  5. A scattering function of star polymers including excluded volume effects

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Xin; Do, Changwoo; Liu, Yun; Sánchez-Diáz, Luis; Smith, Gregory; Chen, Wei-Ren

    2014-11-04

    In this work we present a new model for the form factor of a star polymer consisting of self-avoiding branches. This new model incorporates excluded volume effects and is derived from the two point correlation function for a star polymer.. We compare this model to small angle neutron scattering (SANS) measurements from polystyrene (PS) stars immersed in a good solvent, tetrahydrofuran (THF). It is shown that this model provides a good description of the scattering signature originating from the excluded volume effect and it explicitly elucidates the connection between the global conformation of a star polymer and the local stiffness of its constituent branch.

  6. Structure, Motion, and Evolution of Star-Forming Dense Cores

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Myers, Philip C.

    2003-01-01

    We have pursued spectral-line observations of star-forming regions over size scales from 0.01 pc to 0.5 pc. Our main goal has been to measure the systematic and turbulent motions of condensing and collapsing gas.

  7. Interactions Between Forming Stars and Dense Gas in a Small Low Mass Cluster

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ladd, Edwin F.; Wong, T.; Bourke, T. L.; Thompson, K. L.

    2011-05-01

    We present observations of dense gas and outflow activity in the Cederblad 110 region of the Chamaleleon I Dark Cloud. The region contains eight forming low mass stars in evolutionary stages ranging from Class 0 to Class II/III crowded into a 0.2 pc region with high surface density (Σ_YSO 150 pc^-2). The analysis of our N2H+ (J=1-0) maps indicates the presence of 15 solar masses of dense (n 10^5 cm^-3) gas in this region, much of which is unstable against gravitational collapse. The most unstable material is located near the Class 0 source MMS 1. Smaller column densities of more stable dense gas are found toward the region's Class I sources. Little or no dense gas is colocated with the Class II and III sources in the region. The outflow from the Class I source IRS 4 is interacting with the dense core associated with MMS 1. The molecular component of the outflow appears to be deflected by the densest part of the core, after which it plows through some of the lower column density portions of the core. The working surface at the head of the outflow lobe can be seen in the enhanced velocity dispersion of the dense gas. The Class III source IRS 2 may also be influencing the dense gas in the region. A dust temperature gradient across the core is consistent with warming from the 3.4 Lo source, and a sharp gradient in dense gas column density may be caused by winds from this source. Taken together, our data indicate that this region has been producing several young stars in the recent past, and that sources which began forming first are interacting with the remaining dense gas in the region, thereby influencing current and future star formation activity.

  8. Compatibility of Medical-Grade Polymers with Dense CO2

    PubMed Central

    Jiménez, A; Thompson, G L; Matthews, M A; Davis, T A; Crocker, K; Lyons, J S; Trapotsis, A

    2009-01-01

    This study reports the effect of exposure to liquid carbon dioxide on the mechanical properties of selected medical polymers. The tensile strengths and moduli of fourteen polymers are reported. Materials were exposed to liquid CO2, or CO2 + trace amounts of aqueous H2O2, at 6.5 MPa and ambient temperature. Carbon dioxide uptake, swelling, and distortion were observed for the more amorphous polymers while polymers with higher crystallinity showed little effect from CO2 exposure. Changes in tensile strength were not statistically significant for most plastics, and most indicated good tolerance to liquid CO2. These results are relevant to evaluating the potential of liquid CO2-based sterilization technology. PMID:19756235

  9. Variations in the Star Formation Efficiency of the Dense Molecular Gas across the Disks of Star-forming Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Usero, Antonio; Leroy, Adam K.; Walter, Fabian; Schruba, Andreas; García-Burillo, Santiago; Sandstrom, Karin; Bigiel, Frank; Brinks, Elias; Kramer, Carsten; Rosolowsky, Erik; Schuster, Karl-Friedrich; de Blok, W. J. G.

    2015-10-01

    We present a new survey of HCN(1-0) emission, a tracer of dense molecular gas, focused on the little-explored regime of normal star-forming galaxy disks. Combining HCN, CO, and infrared (IR) emission, we investigate the role of dense gas in star formation, finding systematic variations in both the apparent dense gas fraction (traced by the HCN-to-CO ratio) and the apparent star formation efficiency of dense gas (traced by the IR-to-HCN ratio). The latter may be unexpected, given the recent popularity of gas density threshold models to explain star formation scaling relations. Our survey used the IRAM 30 m telescope to observe HCN(1-0), CO(1-0), and several other emission lines across 29 nearby disk galaxies whose CO(2-1) emission has previously been mapped by the HERACLES survey. We detected HCN in 48 out of 62 observed positions. Because our observations achieve a typical resolution of ˜1.5 kpc and span a range of galaxies and galactocentric radii (56% lie at {r}{gal}\\gt 1 kpc), we are able to investigate the properties of the dense gas as a function of local conditions in a galaxy disk. We focus on how the ratios IR-to-CO, HCN-to-CO, and IR-to-HCN (observational cognates of the star formation efficiency, dense gas fraction, and dense gas star formation efficiency) depend on the stellar surface density, {{{Σ }}}{star}, and the molecular-to-atomic gas ratio, {{{Σ }}}{mol}/{{{Σ }}}{atom}. The HCN-to-CO ratio is low, often ˜1/30, and correlates tightly with both the molecular-to-atomic ratio and the stellar mass surface density across a range of 2.1 dex (factor of ≈125) in both parameters. Thus for the assumption of fixed CO-to-H2 and HCN-to-dense gas conversion factors, the dense gas fraction depends strongly on location in the disk, being higher in the high surface density, highly molecular parts of galaxies. At the same time, the IR-to-HCN ratio (closely related to the star formation efficiency of dense molecular gas) decreases systematically with these

  10. Compatibilization of polymer blends with star polymers containing a gamma-cyclodextrin core and polystyrene arms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balik, C. M.; Tonelli, A. E.; Libert, Ryan

    2012-02-01

    Cyclodextrins (CDs) are cyclic starch molecules having a hollow central cavity which can be threaded by a polymer to form an inclusion compound. This characteristic is exploited in a new type of compatibilizer: a star polymer with a gamma-CD (g-CD) core and polystyrene (PS) arms (CD-star). The mechanism of compatibilization involves threading of the CD core by a second polymer and solubilization of the threading polymer into a PS matrix by the PS star arms. In principle, the same CD-star polymer can be used to compatibilize blends of several different polymers with PS, provided that the second polymer is able to thread the CD core. We have taken the first step toward demonstrating the generality of this approach by producing compatibilized blends of PS with poly(dimethyl siloxane) (PDMS) or poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) using the same CD-star polymer. Thin spun-cast films of these blends exhibit a nanoscale level of mixing, while spun-cast films of the same blends without CD-star exhibit large-scale phase separation. The number of CD-star molecules that must be threaded onto the polymer chain to achieve compatibilization is larger for PMMA than for PDMS.

  11. Collision--induced absorption in dense atmospheres of cool stars

    SciTech Connect

    Borysow, Aleksandra; Joergensen, Uffe Graae

    1999-04-01

    In the atmosphere of the Sun the major interaction between the matter and the radiation is through light absorption by ions (predominantly the negative ion of hydrogen atoms), neutral atoms and a small amount of polar molecules. The majority of stars in the universe are, however, cooler and denser than our Sun, and for a large fraction of these, the above absorption processes are very weak. Here, collision-induced absorption (CIA) becomes the dominant opacity source. The radiation is absorbed during very short mutual passages ('collisions') of two non-polar molecules (and/or atoms), while their electric charge distributions are temporarily distorted which gives rise to a transient dipole moment. We present here a review of the present-day knowledge about the impact of collision-induced absorption processes on the structure and the spectrum of such stars.

  12. Characteristics of main chain decomposable STAR polymer for EUV resist

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iwashita, Jun; Hirayama, Taku; Takagi, Isamu; Matsuzawa, Kensuke; Suzuki, Kenta; Yoshizawa, Sachiko; Konno, Kenri; Yahagi, Masahito; Sato, Kazufumi; Tagawa, Seiichi; Enomoto, Kazuyuki; Oshima, Akihiro

    2011-04-01

    The concept of nonlinear acid diffusion coefficient would be emphasized to achieve better latent image quality, resulting in better lithographic performance. Focusing on realizing the concept, we previously reported about a main chain decomposable star shaped polymer (STAR polymer).STAR polymer consists of a core unit and several arm units which connect to the core unit with easily acid cleavable bonding. (Fig.1) The main chain decomposition system is ideal to achieve promoted acid diffusion at exposed area because it accompanies great molecular weight reduction at exposed area. The significance of the STAR system had been confirmed for partially protected poly(p-hydroxystyrene) (PHS) considering arm length and core structure. Employing p-hydroxy-α-methylstylene (PHOMS) for arm structure, novel STAR polymer with appropriate glass transition temperature (Tg) could be realized. (Fig.2) Poly PHOMS is known to undergo acid-catalyzed decomposition from the polymer end. Lithographic performance comparison between the STAR polymer and the linear polymer as a control using a Micro Exposure Tool (MET) would be exhibited. Thermal property change with exposure and dissolution charactersitic will be also discussed. Moreover main chain decomposition mechanism was investigated with flood EB irradiation.

  13. Structure, Motion, and Evolution of Star-Forming Dense Cores

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Myers, Philip C.

    2002-01-01

    Under this grant in the past year we have pursued spectral-line observations of star-forming regions over size scales from 0.01 pc to 0.5 pc. Our main goal has been to measure the systematic and turbulent motions of condensing and collapsing gas. The following summary is excerpted from our recent application for a new three-year grant, submitted in June, 2002.

  14. Dense baryonic matter: Constraints from recent neutron star observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hell, Thomas; Weise, Wolfram

    2014-10-01

    Updated constraints from neutron star masses and radii impose stronger restrictions on the equation of state for baryonic matter at high densities and low temperatures. The existence of 2M⊙ neutron stars rules out many soft equations of state with prominent "exotic" compositions. The present work reviews the conditions required for the pressure as a function of baryon density to satisfy these constraints. Several scenarios for sufficiently stiff equations of state are evaluated. The common starting point is a realistic description of both nuclear and neutron matter based on a chiral effective field theory approach to the nuclear many-body problem. Possible forms of hybrid matter featuring a quark core in the center of the star are discussed using a three-flavor Polyakov-Nambu-Jona-Lasinio model. It is found that a conventional equation of state based on nuclear chiral dynamics meets the astrophysical constraints. Hybrid matter generally turns out to be too soft unless additional strongly repulsive correlations, e.g., through vector current interactions between quarks, are introduced. The extent to which strangeness can accumulate in the equation of state is also discussed.

  15. Entropy-induced separation of star polymers in porous media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blavats'Ka, V.; von Ferber, C.; Holovatch, Yu.

    2006-09-01

    We present a quantitative picture of the separation of star polymers in a solution where part of the volume is influenced by a porous medium. To this end, we study the impact of long-range-correlated quenched disorder on the entropy and scaling properties of f -arm star polymers in a good solvent. We assume that the disorder is correlated on the polymer length scale with a power-law decay of the pair correlation function g(r)˜r-a . Applying the field-theoretical renormalization group approach we show in a double expansion in ɛ=4-d and δ=4-a that there is a range of correlation strengths δ for which the disorder changes the scaling behavior of star polymers. In a second approach we calculate for fixed space dimension d=3 and different values of the correlation parameter a the corresponding scaling exponents γf that govern entropic effects. We find that γf-1 , the deviation of γf from its mean field value is amplified by the disorder once we increase δ beyond a threshold. The consequences for a solution of diluted chain and star polymers of equal molecular weight inside a porous medium are that star polymers exert a higher osmotic pressure than chain polymers and in general higher branched star polymers are expelled more strongly from the correlated porous medium. Surprisingly, polymer chains will prefer a stronger correlated medium to a less or uncorrelated medium of the same density while the opposite is the case for star polymers.

  16. Entropy-induced separation of star polymers in porous media

    SciTech Connect

    Blavats'ka, V.; Ferber, C. von; Holovatch, Yu.

    2006-09-15

    We present a quantitative picture of the separation of star polymers in a solution where part of the volume is influenced by a porous medium. To this end, we study the impact of long-range-correlated quenched disorder on the entropy and scaling properties of f-arm star polymers in a good solvent. We assume that the disorder is correlated on the polymer length scale with a power-law decay of the pair correlation function g(r){approx}r{sup -a}. Applying the field-theoretical renormalization group approach we show in a double expansion in {epsilon}=4-d and {delta}=4-a that there is a range of correlation strengths {delta} for which the disorder changes the scaling behavior of star polymers. In a second approach we calculate for fixed space dimension d=3 and different values of the correlation parameter a the corresponding scaling exponents {gamma}{sub f} that govern entropic effects. We find that {gamma}{sub f}-1, the deviation of {gamma}{sub f} from its mean field value is amplified by the disorder once we increase {delta} beyond a threshold. The consequences for a solution of diluted chain and star polymers of equal molecular weight inside a porous medium are that star polymers exert a higher osmotic pressure than chain polymers and in general higher branched star polymers are expelled more strongly from the correlated porous medium. Surprisingly, polymer chains will prefer a stronger correlated medium to a less or uncorrelated medium of the same density while the opposite is the case for star polymers.

  17. STELLAR COLLISIONS AND BLUE STRAGGLER STARS IN DENSE GLOBULAR CLUSTERS

    SciTech Connect

    Chatterjee, Sourav; Rasio, Frederic A.; Sills, Alison; Glebbeek, Evert

    2013-11-10

    Blue straggler stars (BSSs) are abundantly observed in all Galactic globular clusters (GGCs) where data exist. However, observations alone cannot reveal the relative importance of various formation channels or the typical formation times for this well-studied population of anomalous stars. Using a state-of-the-art Hénon-type Monte Carlo code that includes all relevant physical processes, we create 128 models with properties typical of the observed GGCs. These models include realistic numbers of single and binary stars, use observationally motivated initial conditions, and span large ranges in central density, concentration, binary fraction, and mass. Their properties can be directly compared with those of observed GGCs. We can easily identify the BSSs in our models and determine their formation channels and birth times. We find that for central densities above ∼10{sup 3} M{sub ☉} pc{sup –3}, the dominant formation channel is stellar collisions, while for lower density clusters, mass transfer in binaries provides a significant contribution (up to 60% in our models). The majority of these collisions are binary-mediated, occurring during three-body and four-body interactions. As a result, a strong correlation between the specific frequency of BSSs and the binary fraction in a cluster can be seen in our models. We find that the number of BSSs in the core shows only a weak correlation with the collision rate estimator Γ traditionally used by observers, in agreement with the latest Hubble Space Telescope Advanced Camera for Surveys data. Using an idealized 'full mixing' prescription for collision products, our models indicate that the BSSs observed today may have formed several Gyr ago. However, denser clusters tend to have younger (∼1 Gyr) BSSs.

  18. Gas-star-interaction in Dense Galactic Nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Just, A.; Amaro-Seoane, P.

    The precursor of a Supermassive Black Hole in the center of a galaxy may be described by a `supermassive star' (SMS) at the center of the galaxy. This is a strongly condensed gas cloud in the center of the central stellar component. The stability and evolution of the SMS depend essentially on the energetic interaction with the stellar component. The structure of the loss-cone (i.e. the part of phase space with stellar orbits crossing the SMS) and the total energy transfer rate to the SMS were recently studied in detail by Amaro-Seoane & Spurzem (2001, astro-ph/0105251, MNRAS in press). They used an estimate of the total cross section of each star when moving through the SMS resulting in a heating rate per dynamical time-scale. This point of view is reasonable for investigating the evolution of the stellar component as a function of radius. For an analysis of the structure and evolution of the SMS itself (i.e. the gaseous component) it is necessary to look on the radial dependance of the energy deposition due to the star-gas interaction. This can be done also semi-analytical in a statistical way by using the dynamical friction concept including a gaseous component (see Just, Kegel & Deiss, 1986, A&A 164, 337). From this the local heating rate of the gas can be estimated and the influence of this (dissipational) process on the stability of the SMS can be investigated. We compute the relevant time-scales as a function of radius for a SMS in the relevant mass range (103 dots 107 Msolar). In the regime of heating time-scales comparable to the evolution time of the SMS we will consider the question of stabilisation against core collapse (resulting in a delay of subsequent formation of a Supermassive Black Hole with the effect of a higher Black Hole mass?).

  19. Are superluminous supernovae and long GRBs the products of dynamical processes in young dense star clusters?

    SciTech Connect

    Van den Heuvel, E. P. J.; Portegies Zwart, S. F.

    2013-12-20

    Superluminous supernovae (SLSNe) occur almost exclusively in small galaxies (Small/Large Magellanic Cloud (SMC/LMC)-like or smaller), and the few SLSNe observed in larger star-forming galaxies always occur close to the nuclei of their hosts. Another type of peculiar and highly energetic supernovae are the broad-line Type Ic SNe (SN Ic-BL) that are associated with long-duration gamma-ray bursts (LGRBs). Also these have a strong preference for occurring in small (SMC/LMC-like or smaller) star-forming galaxies, and in these galaxies LGRBs always occur in the brightest spots. Studies of nearby star-forming galaxies that are similar to the hosts of LGRBs show that these brightest spots are giant H II regions produced by massive dense young star clusters with many hundreds of O- and Wolf-Rayet-type stars. Such dense young clusters are also found in abundance within a few hundred parsecs from the nucleus of larger galaxies like our own. We argue that the SLSNe and the SNe Ic-BL/LGRBs are exclusive products of two types of dynamical interactions in dense young star clusters. In our model the high angular momentum of the collapsing stellar cores required for the engines of an SN Ic-BL results from the post-main-sequence mergers of dynamically produced cluster binaries with almost equal-mass components. The merger produces a critically rotating single helium star with sufficient angular momentum to produce an LGRB; the observed 'metal aversion' of LGRBs is a natural consequence of the model. We argue that, on the other hand, SLSNe could be the products of runaway multiple collisions in dense clusters, and we present (and quantize) plausible scenarios of how the different types of SLSNe can be produced.

  20. Are Superluminous Supernovae and Long GRBs the Products of Dynamical Processes in Young Dense Star Clusters?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van den Heuvel, E. P. J.; Portegies Zwart, S. F.

    2013-12-01

    Superluminous supernovae (SLSNe) occur almost exclusively in small galaxies (Small/Large Magellanic Cloud (SMC/LMC)-like or smaller), and the few SLSNe observed in larger star-forming galaxies always occur close to the nuclei of their hosts. Another type of peculiar and highly energetic supernovae are the broad-line Type Ic SNe (SN Ic-BL) that are associated with long-duration gamma-ray bursts (LGRBs). Also these have a strong preference for occurring in small (SMC/LMC-like or smaller) star-forming galaxies, and in these galaxies LGRBs always occur in the brightest spots. Studies of nearby star-forming galaxies that are similar to the hosts of LGRBs show that these brightest spots are giant H II regions produced by massive dense young star clusters with many hundreds of O- and Wolf-Rayet-type stars. Such dense young clusters are also found in abundance within a few hundred parsecs from the nucleus of larger galaxies like our own. We argue that the SLSNe and the SNe Ic-BL/LGRBs are exclusive products of two types of dynamical interactions in dense young star clusters. In our model the high angular momentum of the collapsing stellar cores required for the engines of an SN Ic-BL results from the post-main-sequence mergers of dynamically produced cluster binaries with almost equal-mass components. The merger produces a critically rotating single helium star with sufficient angular momentum to produce an LGRB; the observed "metal aversion" of LGRBs is a natural consequence of the model. We argue that, on the other hand, SLSNe could be the products of runaway multiple collisions in dense clusters, and we present (and quantize) plausible scenarios of how the different types of SLSNe can be produced.

  1. Motions and Initial Conditions in Star-Forming Dense Cores

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Myers, Philip C.

    2004-01-01

    The main focus was the study of star-forming regions through high spectral- and spatial resolution observations of mm-wavelength lines, and through models of the observations. The main accomplishments were a) demonstration that more than 15 starless cores show substantial evidence of extended inward motion at about half the sound speed; b) observations of infall asymmetry in several cores, in lines of N2H(+) and DCO(+), low- depletion tracers of the "inner core"; c) observation of "infall asymmetry" of spectral lines over approx. 0.5 pc in the NGC1333 cluster-forming region; d) observations indicating that cores are nearly at rest with respect to their envelopes; and e) development of analytic, power-series solutions to the equations of motions for condensing 1-D systems (layers, cylinders and spheres).

  2. Constraining the State of Ultra-dense Matter with the Neutron Star Interior Composition Explorer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bogdanov, Slavko

    2016-04-01

    [This presentation is submitted on behalf of the entire NICER Science Team] The state of cold matter at densities exceeding those of atomic nuclei remains one of the principal outstanding problems in modern physics. Neutron stars provide the only known setting in the universe where these physical conditions can be explored. Thermal X-ray radiation from the physical surface of a neutron star can serve as a powerful tool for probing the poorly understood behavior of the matter in the dense stellar interior. For instance, realistic modeling of the thermal X-ray modulations observed from rotation-powered millisecond pulsars can produce stringent constraints on the neutron star mass-radius relation, and by extension the state of supra-nuclear matter. I will describe the prospects for precision neutron star equation of state constraints with millisecond pulsars using the forthcoming Neutron Star Interior Composition Explorer (NICER) X-ray timing mission.

  3. The rate and latency of star formation in dense, massive clumps in the Milky Way

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heyer, M.; Gutermuth, R.; Urquhart, J. S.; Csengeri, T.; Wienen, M.; Leurini, S.; Menten, K.; Wyrowski, F.

    2016-04-01

    Context. Newborn stars form within the localized, high density regions of molecular clouds. The sequence and rate at which stars form in dense clumps and the dependence on local and global environments are key factors in developing descriptions of stellar production in galaxies. Aims: We seek to observationally constrain the rate and latency of star formation in dense massive clumps that are distributed throughout the Galaxy and to compare these results to proposed prescriptions for stellar production. Methods: A sample of 24 μm-based Class I protostars are linked to dust clumps that are embedded within molecular clouds selected from the APEX Telescope Large Area Survey of the Galaxy. We determine the fraction of star-forming clumps, f∗, that imposes a constraint on the latency of star formation in units of a clump's lifetime. Protostellar masses are estimated from models of circumstellar environments of young stellar objects from which star formation rates are derived. Physical properties of the clumps are calculated from 870 μm dust continuum emission and NH3 line emission. Results: Linear correlations are identified between the star formation rate surface density, ΣSFR, and the quantities ΣH2/τff and ΣH2/τcross, suggesting that star formation is regulated at the local scales of molecular clouds. The measured fraction of star forming clumps is 23%. Accounting for star formation within clumps that are excluded from our sample due to 24 μm saturation, this fraction can be as high as 31%, which is similar to previous results. Dense, massive clumps form primarily low mass (<1-2 M⊙) stars with emergent 24 μm fluxes below our sensitivity limit or are incapable of forming any stars for the initial 70% of their lifetimes. The low fraction of star forming clumps in the Galactic center relative to those located in the disk of the Milky Way is verified. Full Tables 2-4 are only available at the CDS via anonymous ftp to http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (ftp://130

  4. THE NEUTRON STAR MASS-RADIUS RELATION AND THE EQUATION OF STATE OF DENSE MATTER

    SciTech Connect

    Steiner, Andrew W.; Brown, Edward F.; Lattimer, James M. E-mail: ebrown@pa.msu.edu

    2013-03-01

    The equation of state (EOS) of dense matter has been a long-sought goal of nuclear physics. EOSs generate unique mass versus radius (M-R) relations for neutron stars, the ultra-dense remnants of stellar evolution. In this work, we determine the neutron star mass-radius relation and, based on recent observations of both transiently accreting and bursting sources, we show that the radius of a 1.4 solar mass neutron star lies between 10.4 and 12.9 km, independent of assumptions about the composition of the core. We show, for the first time, that these constraints remain valid upon removal from our sample of the most extreme transient sources or of the entire set of bursting sources; our constraints also apply even if deconfined quark matter exists in the neutron star core. Our results significantly constrain the dense matter EOS and are furthermore consistent with constraints from both heavy-ion collisions and theoretical studies of neutron matter. We predict a relatively weak dependence of the symmetry energy on the density and a value for the neutron skin thickness of lead which is less than 0.20 fm, results that are testable in forthcoming experiments.

  5. Temperature-induced crystallization in concentrated suspensions of multiarm star polymers: A molecular dynamics study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rissanou, Anastassia N.; Yiannourakou, Marianna; Economou, Ioannis G.; Bitsanis, Ioannis A.

    2006-01-01

    In this work, we study temperature-induced crystallization in dense suspensions of multiarm star polymers. This is a continuation of a previous study, which identified and studied the emergence of "glassy" amorphous states, in accordance with experimental observations. We performed molecular dynamics simulations on two types of star polymers: 128-arm stars and 64-arm stars dissolved in n-decane in the temperature range of 20-60 °C. These supramolecules are modeled as "soft spheres" interacting via a theoretically developed potential of mean field. Both systems attain a crystalline structure with the characteristics of a face-centered-cubic (fcc) crystal beyond a certain temperature. Kinetics is sensitive on initial configuration. Interestingly, kinetic trapping in "temporary" energy wells leads to highly crystalline structures, yet less ordered than their genuine equilibrium fcc structure. This complication illustrates the difficulty in reaching the equilibrium state, which is crystalline at high temperatures. A structural analysis of the final conformations is presented. The effect of size dispersity and star functionality of soft spheres on microstructure is also examined. Both factors influence crystallization and their effect is quantified by our study.

  6. Wavelength selective polymer network formation of end-functional star polymers.

    PubMed

    Kaupp, Michael; Hiltebrandt, Kai; Trouillet, Vanessa; Mueller, Patrick; Quick, Alexander S; Wegener, Martin; Barner-Kowollik, Christopher

    2016-01-31

    A wavelength selective technique for light-induced network formation based on two photo-active moieties, namely ortho-methylbenzaldehyde and tetrazole is introduced. The network forming species are photo-reactive star polymers generated via reversible activation fragmentation chain transfer (RAFT) polymerization, allowing the network to be based on almost any vinylic monomer. Direct laser writing (DLW) allows to form any complex three-dimensional structure based on the photo-reactive star polymers. PMID:26687371

  7. Star polymer synthesis viaλ-orthogonal photochemistry.

    PubMed

    Hiltebrandt, Kai; Kaupp, Michael; Molle, Edgar; Menzel, Jan P; Blinco, James P; Barner-Kowollik, Christopher

    2016-08-01

    We introduce a light induced sequence enabling λ-orthogonal star polymer formation via an arms-first approach, based on an α,ω-functional polymer carrying tetrazole and o-methyl benzaldehyde moieties, which upon irradiation can readily undergo cycloaddition with a trifunctional maleimide core. Depending on the wavelength, the telechelic strand can be attached to the core at either photo-reactive end. PMID:27378494

  8. Scaling Behavior and Segment Concentration Profile of Densely Grafted Polymer Brushes Swollen in Vapor.

    PubMed

    Sun, Liang; Akgun, Bulent; Hu, Renfeng; Browning, James F; Wu, David T; Foster, Mark D

    2016-06-01

    The scaling of the thickness, hs, of a densely grafted polymer brush of chain length N and grafting density σ swollen in vapor agrees quantitatively with the scaling reported by Kuhl et al. for densely grafted brushes swollen in liquid. Deep in the brush, next to the substrate, the shape of the segment concentration profile is the same whether the brush is swollen by liquid or by vapor. Differences in the segment concentration profile are manifested primarily in the swollen brush interface with the surrounding fluid. The interface of the polymer brush swollen in vapor is much more abrupt than that of the same brush swollen in liquid. This has implications for the compressibility of the swollen brush surface and for fluctuations at that surface. PMID:27172089

  9. Tacticity control in the synthesis of poly(lactic acid) polymer stars with dipentaerythritol cores.

    PubMed

    Shaver, Michael P; Cameron, Donald J A

    2010-12-13

    The synthesis of a family of polymer stars with arms of varied tacticities is discussed. The effect of polymer tacticity on the physical properties of these polymer stars is presented. Dipentaerythritol cores support six poly(lactic acid) (PLA) arms. Lewis acidic tin and aluminum catalysts control the polymerization to afford polymer stars of variable tacticity. The analysis of these polymers by NMR spectroscopy, thermogravimetric analysis, powder X-ray diffraction, and differential scanning calorimetry reveals the effects of tacticity control on the physical properties of the polymer stars. Preliminary decomposition studies suggest that the biodegradation profile of a polymer star may also be tuned by stereochemical control. This is the first systematic altering of tacticity in PLA polymer stars, showing that polymer tacticity can have a great impact on star properties. PMID:21033736

  10. Thermodynamic instabilities in dense asymmetric nuclear matter and in compact stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lavagno, A.; Drago, A.; Pagliara, G.; Pigato, D.

    2014-07-01

    We investigate the presence of thermodynamic instabilities in compressed asymmetric baryonic matter, reachable in high energy heavy ion collisions, and in the cold β-stable compact stars. To this end we study the relativistic nuclear equation of state with the inclusion of Δ-isobars and require the global conservation of baryon and electric charge numbers. Similarly to the low density nuclear liquid-gas phase transition, we show that a phase transition can occur in dense asymmetric nuclear matter and it is characterized by both mechanical instability (fluctuations on the baryon density) and by chemical-diffusive instability (fluctuations on the electric charge concentration). Such thermodynamic instabilities can imply a very different electric charge fraction Z/A in the coexisting phases during the phase transition and favoring an early formation of Δ- particles with relevant phenomenological consequences in the physics of the protoneutron stars and compact stars. Finally, we discuss the possible co-existence of very compact and very massive compact stars in terms of two separate families: compact hadronic stars and very massive quark stars.

  11. Amylose-Based Cationic Star Polymers for siRNA Delivery

    PubMed Central

    Nishimura, Tomoki; Umezaki, Kaori; Mukai, Sada-atsu; Sawada, Shin-ichi; Akiyoshi, Kazunari

    2015-01-01

    A new siRNA delivery system using a cationic glyco-star polymer is described. Spermine-modified 8-arm amylose star polymer (with a degree of polymerization of approximately 60 per arm) was synthesized by chemoenzymatic methods. The cationic star polymer effectively bound to siRNA and formed spherical complexes with an average hydrodynamic diameter of 230 nm. The cationic 8-arm star polymer complexes showed superior cellular uptake characteristics and higher gene silencing effects than a cationic 1-arm polymer. These results suggest that amylose-based star polymers are a promising nanoplatform for glycobiomaterials. PMID:26539548

  12. Neutron star merger, gravitational waves, and the dense matter equation of state

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sekiguchi, Yuichiro

    2014-09-01

    The equation of state of dense matter that determines properties of the neutron star also characterizes the dynamics and gravitational waveforms emitted during binary neutron-star mergers. Understanding the effects of the equation of state on them requires numerical-relativity simulations of the mergers and a number of strategies for extracting information of equation of sate from gravitational waves have been proposed. Furthermore, recent numerical-relativity simulations also clarified that the neutron-star equation of state has a significant impact on the r-process nucleosynthesis which proceeds in the neutron-rich ejecta of the mergers. The r-process in the mergers has been accumulated wide interests both as a possible origin of heavy nuclei and a promising electro-magnetic counterpart to gravitational waves. I will review these topics and discuss possible feedbacks to the nuclear physics. The equation of state of dense matter that determines properties of the neutron star also characterizes the dynamics and gravitational waveforms emitted during binary neutron-star mergers. Understanding the effects of the equation of state on them requires numerical-relativity simulations of the mergers and a number of strategies for extracting information of equation of sate from gravitational waves have been proposed. Furthermore, recent numerical-relativity simulations also clarified that the neutron-star equation of state has a significant impact on the r-process nucleosynthesis which proceeds in the neutron-rich ejecta of the mergers. The r-process in the mergers has been accumulated wide interests both as a possible origin of heavy nuclei and a promising electro-magnetic counterpart to gravitational waves. I will review these topics and discuss possible feedbacks to the nuclear physics. Supported by the JSPS Grant-in-Aid for Scientific Research (24244028, 25103510), Scientific Research on Innovative Area (20105004), and HPCI Strategic Program.

  13. Biodegradable star polymers functionalized with beta-cyclodextrin inclusion complexes.

    PubMed

    Setijadi, Eki; Tao, Lei; Liu, Jingquan; Jia, Zhongfan; Boyer, Cyrille; Davis, Thomas P

    2009-09-14

    Three-armed biodegradable star polymers made from polystyrene (polySt) and poly (polyethylene glycol) acrylate (polyPEG-A) were synthesized via a "core first" methodology using a trifunctional RAFT agent, created by attaching RAFT agents to a core via their R-groups. The resultant three-armed polymeric structures were well-defined, with polydispersity indices less than 1.2. Upon aminolysis and further reaction with dithiodipyridine (DTDP), these three-armed polymers could be tailored with sulfhydryl and pyridyldisulfide (PDS) end functionalities, available for further reaction with any free-sulfhydryl group containing precursors to form disulfide linkages. Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) confirmed that more than 98% of the polymer arms retained integral trithiocarbonate active sites after polymerization. Intradisulfide linkages between the core and the arms conferred biodegradability on the star architectures. Subsequently, the arm-termini were attached to cholesterol also via disulfide linkages. The cholesterol terminated arms were then used to form supramolecular structures via inclusion complex formation with beta-cyclodextrin (beta-CD). The star architectures were found to degrade rapidly on treatment with DL-dithiothereitol (DTT). The star polymers and supramolecular structures were characterized using gel permation chromatography (GPC), static light scattering (SLS), 2D NMR, and fluorescence spectroscopy. PMID:19663421

  14. Excluded-volume interaction induced stiffness of comb polymer with densely grafted side-chains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiu, Feng

    2014-03-01

    Excluded-volume interaction has been widely recognized to cause expansion of polymer chain at large length scale. However, its effect on chain conformations at small length scale has been studied to less extent. Here we consider a comb polymer with its backbone densely grafted by side-chains as a model system. The method analogue to solving the electrostatic persistence length problem for either rigid or flexible polyelectrolytes is employed. For comb polymers with rigid backbone near the rod limit, the excluded-volume interaction induced persistence length scales linearly with the volume of the side-chain. While for flexible backbone, the persistence length depends on the side-chain volume more weakly. Field theoretic method that is relevant to address this problem is also explored and discussed. Work supported by NSFC.

  15. Measuring the neutron star radius to constrain the dense-matter equation of state.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guillot, Sebastien; Servillat, Mathieu; Webb, Natalie; Rutledge, Robert E.

    2014-08-01

    A physical understanding of the behaviour of cold ultra-dense matter - at and above nuclear density - can only be achieved by the study of neutron stars, and the thermal emission from quiescent low-mass X-ray binaries inside globular clusters have proven very useful for that purpose. The recent ~2M⊙ mass measurements suggest that strange quark matter and hyperons/kaons condensate equations of states (EoS) are disfavoured, in favour of hadronic "normal matter" EoSs. Over much of the neutron star mass-radius parameter space, "normal matter" EoSs produce lines of quasi-constant radii (within the measurement uncertainties, of about 10%). We present a simultaneous spectral analysis of several globular cluster quiescent low-mass X-ray binaries where we require the radius to be the same among all neutron stars analyzed. The Markov-Chain Monte-Carlo method and the Bayesian approach developed in this analysis permits including uncertainties in the distance, in the hydrogen column density, and possible contributions to the spectra due to un-modelled spectrally hard components. Our results suggest a neutron star radius much smaller than previously reported, with a value RNS = 9.1±1.4 km, at 90% confidence, using conservative assumptions, which suggests that neutron star matter is best described by the softest "normal matter" equations of state.

  16. Stability of β-equilibrated dense matter and core-crust transition in neutron stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Atta, Debasis; Basu, D. N.

    2014-09-01

    The stability of the β-equilibrated dense nuclear matter is analyzed with respect to the thermodynamic stability conditions. Based on the density dependent M3Y effective nucleon-nucleon interaction, the effects of the nuclear incompressibility on the proton fraction in neutron stars and the location of the inner edge of their crusts and core-crust transition density and pressure are investigated. The high-density behavior of symmetric and asymmetric nuclear matter satisfies the constraints from the observed flow data of heavy-ion collisions. The neutron star properties studied using β-equilibrated neutron star matter obtained from this effective interaction for a pure hadronic model agree with the recent observations of the massive compact stars. The density, pressure, and proton fraction at the inner edge separating the liquid core from the solid crust of neutron stars are determined to be ρt=0.0938 fm-3, Pt=0.5006 MeV fm-3, and xp (t)=0.0308, respectively.

  17. Evolution of dense rotating star clusters in the cores of early galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Girash, J.

    1996-12-01

    We present simulations of the evolution of dense star clusters integrated using a two-dimensional Fokker-Planck approach. Effects of initial rotation, ellipticity, and stellar mergers are included. When an instability criterion is satisfied (Trot/|W| > alpha , where alpha is the stability parameter), a non-axisymmetric component of the potential is applied to model the formation of a stellar bar. Results are interpreted with a view to describing the formation of a massive ( ~ 10(3) M_sun) object near the cluster center which could evolve into the seed black hole of an AGN or quasar.

  18. The Dynamical Evolution of Stellar-Mass Black Holes in Dense Star Clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morscher, Maggie

    Globular clusters are gravitationally bound systems containing up to millions of stars, and are found ubiquitously in massive galaxies, including the Milky Way. With densities as high as a million stars per cubic parsec, they are one of the few places in the Universe where stars interact with one another. They therefore provide us with a unique laboratory for studying how gravitational interactions can facilitate the formation of exotic systems, such as X-ray binaries containing black holes, and merging double black hole binaries, which are produced much less efficiently in isolation. While telescopes can provide us with a snapshot of what these dense clusters look like at present, we must rely on detailed numerical simulations to learn about their evolution. These simulations are quite challenging, however, since dense star clusters are described by a complicated set of physical processes occurring on many different length and time scales, including stellar and binary evolution, weak gravitational scattering encounters, strong resonant binary interactions, and tidal stripping by the host galaxy. Until very recently, it was not possible to model the evolution of systems with millions of stars, the actual number contained in the largest clusters, including all the relevant physics required describe these systems accurately. The Northwestern Group's Henon Monte Carlo code, CMC, which has been in development for over a decade, is a powerful tool that can be used to construct detailed evolutionary models of large star clusters. With its recent parallelization, CMC is now capable of addressing a particularly interesting unsolved problem in astrophysics: the dynamical evolution of stellar black holes in dense star clusters. Our current understanding of the stellar initial mass function and massive star evolution suggests that young globular clusters may have formed hundreds to thousands of stellar-mass black holes, the remnants of stars with initial masses from 20 - 100

  19. Peptidomimetic Star Polymers for Targeting Biological Ion Channels.

    PubMed

    Chen, Rong; Lu, Derong; Xie, Zili; Feng, Jing; Jia, Zhongfan; Ho, Junming; Coote, Michelle L; Wu, Yingliang; Monteiro, Michael J; Chung, Shin-Ho

    2016-01-01

    Four end-functionalized star polymers that could attenuate the flow of ionic currents across biological ion channels were first de novo designed computationally, then synthesized and tested experimentally on mammalian K+ channels. The 4-arm ethylene glycol conjugate star polymers with lysine or a tripeptide attached to the end of each arm were specifically designed to mimic the action of scorpion toxins on K+ channels. Molecular dynamics simulations showed that the lysine side chain of the polymers physically occludes the pore of Kv1.3, a target for immuno-suppression therapy. Two of the compounds tested were potent inhibitors of Kv1.3. The dissociation constants of these two compounds were computed to be 0.1 μM and 0.7 μM, respectively, within 3-fold to the values derived from subsequent experiments. These results demonstrate the power of computational methods in molecular design and the potential of star polymers as a new infinitely modifiable platform for ion channel drug discovery. PMID:27007701

  20. Peptidomimetic Star Polymers for Targeting Biological Ion Channels

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Rong; Lu, Derong; Xie, Zili; Feng, Jing; Jia, Zhongfan; Ho, Junming; Coote, Michelle L.; Wu, Yingliang; Monteiro, Michael J.; Chung, Shin-Ho

    2016-01-01

    Four end-functionalized star polymers that could attenuate the flow of ionic currents across biological ion channels were first de novo designed computationally, then synthesized and tested experimentally on mammalian K+ channels. The 4-arm ethylene glycol conjugate star polymers with lysine or a tripeptide attached to the end of each arm were specifically designed to mimic the action of scorpion toxins on K+ channels. Molecular dynamics simulations showed that the lysine side chain of the polymers physically occludes the pore of Kv1.3, a target for immuno-suppression therapy. Two of the compounds tested were potent inhibitors of Kv1.3. The dissociation constants of these two compounds were computed to be 0.1 μM and 0.7 μM, respectively, within 3-fold to the values derived from subsequent experiments. These results demonstrate the power of computational methods in molecular design and the potential of star polymers as a new infinitely modifiable platform for ion channel drug discovery. PMID:27007701

  1. The neutron star radius and the dense-matter equation of state

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guillot, Sebastien; Servillat, M.; Webb, N.; Rutledge, R. E.

    2014-01-01

    A physical understanding of the behaviour of cold ultra-dense matter - at and above nuclear density - can only be achieved by the study of neutron stars, and the thermal emission from quiescent low-mass X-ray binaries inside globular clusters have proven very useful for that purpose. The recent 1.97±0.04 Msun measurement for the radio pulsar PSR 1614-2230 suggests that strange quark matter and hyperons/kaons condensate equations of states (EoS) are disfavoured, in favour of hadronic "normal matter" EoSs. Over much of the neutron star mass-radius parameter space, "normal matter" EoSs produce lines of quasi-constant radii (within the measurement uncertainties, of about 10%). We present a simultaneous spectral analysis of several globular cluster quiescent low-mass X-ray binaries where we require the radius to be the same among all neutron stars analyzed. The Markov-Chain Monte-Carlo method and the Bayesian approach developed in this analysis permits including uncertainties in the distance, in the hydrogen column density, and possible contributions to the spectra due to un-modelled spectrally hard components. Our results suggest a neutron star radius much smaller than previously reported, with a value Rns = 9.1±1.4 km, at 90% confidence, using conservative assumptions, which suggests that neutron start matter is best described by the softest "normal matter" equations of state.

  2. Pressure-induced amorphization of a dense coordination polymer and its impact on proton conductivity

    SciTech Connect

    Umeyama, Daiki; Hagi, Keisuke; Ogiwara, Naoki; Horike, Satoshi E-mail: kitagawa@icems.kyoto-u.ac.jp; Tassel, Cedric; Kageyama, Hiroshi; Higo, Yuji; Kitagawa, Susumu E-mail: kitagawa@icems.kyoto-u.ac.jp

    2014-12-01

    The proton conductivity of a dense coordination polymer (CP) was investigated under high-pressure conditions. Impedance measurements under high pressures revealed that the proton conductivity of the CP decreased more than 1000-fold at pressures of 3–7 GPa and that the activation energy for proton conduction almost doubled compared with that at ambient pressure. A synchrotron X-ray study under high pressure identified the amorphization process of the CP during compression, which rationally explains the decrease in conductivity and increase in activation energy. This phenomenon is categorized as reversible pressure-induced amorphization of a dense CP and is regarded as a demonstration of the coupling of the mechanical and electrical properties of a CP.

  3. THE AGE, STELLAR CONTENT, AND STAR FORMATION TIMESCALE OF THE B59 DENSE CORE

    SciTech Connect

    Covey, K. R.; Lada, C. J.; Muench, A. A.; Forbrich, J.; Ascenso, J.; Roman-Zuniga, C.

    2010-10-20

    We have investigated the stellar content of Barnard 59 (B59), the most active star-forming core in the Pipe Nebula. Using the SpeX spectrograph on the NASA Infrared Telescope Facility, we obtained moderate resolution, near-infrared (NIR) spectra for 20 candidate young stellar objects (YSOs) in B59 and a representative sample of NIR and mid-IR bright sources distributed throughout the Pipe. Measuring luminosity and temperature sensitive features in these spectra, we identified likely background giant stars and measured each star's spectral type, extinction, and NIR continuum excess. To measure B59's age, we place its candidate YSOs in the Hertzsprung-Russell diagram and compare their location to YSOs in several well-studied star-forming regions, as well as predictions of pre-main-sequence (PMS) evolutionary models. We find that B59 is composed of late-type (K4-M6) low-mass (0.9-0.1 M{sub sun}) YSOs whose median stellar age is comparable to, if not slightly older than, that of YSOs within the {rho} Oph, Taurus, and Chameleon star-forming regions. Deriving absolute age estimates from PMS models computed by D'Antona et al., and accounting only for statistical uncertainties, we measure B59's median stellar age to be 2.6 {+-} 0.8 Myr. Including potential systematic effects increases the error budget for B59's median (DM98) stellar age to 2.6{sup +4.1}{sub -2.6} Myr. We also find that the relative age orderings implied by PMS evolutionary tracks depend on the range of stellar masses sampled, as model isochrones possess significantly different mass dependences. The maximum likelihood median stellar age we measure for B59, and the region's observed gas properties, suggests that the B59 dense core has been stable against global collapse for roughly six dynamical timescales and is actively forming stars with a star formation efficiency per dynamical time of {approx}6%. While the {approx}150% uncertainties associated with our age measurement propagate directly into these

  4. Star/linear polymer topology transformation facilitated by mechanical linking of polymer chains.

    PubMed

    Aoki, Daisuke; Uchida, Satoshi; Takata, Toshikazu

    2015-06-01

    Topology transformation of a star polymer to a linear polymer is demonstrated for the first time. A three-armed star polymer possessing a mechanical linking of two polymer chains was synthesized by the living ring-opening polymerization of δ-valerolactone initiated by a pseudo[2]rotaxane having three hydroxy groups as the initiator sites on the wheel component and at both axle termini. The polymerization was followed by the propagation end-capping reaction with a bulky isocyanate not only to prevent the wheel component deslippage but also to introduce the urethane moiety at the axle terminal. The resulting rotaxane-linked star polymer with a fixed rotaxane linkage based on the ammonium/crown ether interaction was subjected to N-acetylation of the ammonium moiety, which liberated the components from the interaction to move the wheel component to the urethane terminal as the interaction site, eventually affording the linear polymer. The physical property change caused by the present topology transformation was confirmed by the hydrodynamic volume and viscosity. PMID:25892579

  5. A novel geometric embedding algorithm for efficiently generating dense polymer structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Müller, M.; Nievergelt, J.; Santos, S.; Suter, U. W.

    2001-06-01

    A new algorithm for generating starting polymer structures for molecular simulations (e.g., MD) in dense phase is presented. The algorithm yields structures that fulfill to a large extent rotational isomeric state (RIS) probabilities and avoid atomic overlap. The heuristic search bases on the new parallel-rotation (ParRot) technique. We tested the performance of the algorithm on two polymeric systems: Atomistic polyethylene and polystyrene. The algorithm permits to tackle the problem of packing chains into large boxes of size up to 50 Å in a couple of hours on common workstations. Moreover, our packing algorithm is applicable for general polymer systems. The algorithm requires CPU effort scaling with a power 2.8 in the chain length, and with a power 1.5 in the number of chains.

  6. Parallelized event chain algorithm for dense hard sphere and polymer systems

    SciTech Connect

    Kampmann, Tobias A. Boltz, Horst-Holger; Kierfeld, Jan

    2015-01-15

    We combine parallelization and cluster Monte Carlo for hard sphere systems and present a parallelized event chain algorithm for the hard disk system in two dimensions. For parallelization we use a spatial partitioning approach into simulation cells. We find that it is crucial for correctness to ensure detailed balance on the level of Monte Carlo sweeps by drawing the starting sphere of event chains within each simulation cell with replacement. We analyze the performance gains for the parallelized event chain and find a criterion for an optimal degree of parallelization. Because of the cluster nature of event chain moves massive parallelization will not be optimal. Finally, we discuss first applications of the event chain algorithm to dense polymer systems, i.e., bundle-forming solutions of attractive semiflexible polymers.

  7. Dense Gas Fraction and Star-formation Efficiency Variations in the Antennae Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bigiel, F.; Leroy, A. K.; Blitz, L.; Bolatto, A. D.; da Cunha, E.; Rosolowsky, E.; Sandstrom, K.; Usero, A.

    2015-12-01

    We use the Combined Array for Research in Millimeter-wave Astronomy (CARMA) millimeter interferometer to map the Antennae Galaxies (NGC 4038/39), tracing the bulk of the molecular gas via the 12CO(1-0) line and denser molecular gas via the high density transitions HCN(1-0), HCO+(1-0), CS(2-1), and HNC(1-0). We detect bright emission from all tracers in both the two nuclei and three locales in the overlap region between the two nuclei. These three overlap region peaks correspond to previously identified "supergiant molecular clouds." We combine the CARMA data with Herschel infrared (IR) data to compare observational indicators of the star formation efficiency (star formation rate/H2 ∝ IR/CO), dense gas fraction (HCN/CO), and dense gas star formation efficiency (IR/HCN). Regions within the Antennae show ratios consistent with those seen for entire galaxies, but these ratios vary by up to a factor of six within the galaxy. The five detected regions vary strongly in both their integrated intensities and these ratios. The northern nucleus is the brightest region in millimeter-wave line emission, while the overlap region is the brightest part of the system in the IR. We combine the CARMA and Herschel data with ALMA CO data to report line ratio patterns for each bright point. CO shows a declining spectral line energy distribution, consistent with previous studies. HCO+ (1-0) emission is stronger than HCN (1-0) emission, perhaps indicating either more gas at moderate densities or higher optical depth than is commonly seen in more advanced mergers.

  8. Structure and rheology of star polymers in confined geometries: a mesoscopic simulation study.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Feiwo; Goujon, Florent; Mendonça, Ana C F; Malfreyt, Patrice; Tildesley, Dominic J

    2015-11-28

    Mesoscopic simulations of star polymer melts adsorbed onto solid surfaces are performed using the dissipative particle dynamics (DPD) method. A set of parameters is developed to study the low functionality star polymers under shear. The use of a new bond-angle potential between the arms of the star creates more rigid chains and discriminates between different functionalities at equilibrium, but still allows the polymers to deform appropriately under shear. The rheology of the polymer melts is studied by calculating the kinetic friction and viscosity and there is good agreement with experimental properties of these systems. The study is completed with predictive simulations of star polymer solutions in an athermal solvent. PMID:26435466

  9. Properties of hadron matter. II - Dense baryon matter and neutron stars.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leung, Y. C.; Wang, C. G.

    1971-01-01

    In this article we have provided certain details of a nuclear-matter computation, based on the Brueckner-Bethe-Goldstone theory of nuclear reaction, which leads to an equation of state for matter in the density region of 10 to 500 trillion g/cu cm. We also explore the possibilities that at very high baryon densities or for very short baryon separations, the net baryon-baryon interaction may be negligible so that the results of dynamical models, like the statistical bootstrap model and the dual-resonance model, may be applicable to the study of dense baryon matter. Several plausible equations of state are constructed, and their effect on the limiting mass of the neutron star is examined.

  10. Properties of dense cores in clustered massive star-forming regions at high angular resolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sánchez-Monge, Álvaro; Palau, Aina; Fontani, Francesco; Busquet, Gemma; Juárez, Carmen; Estalella, Robert; Tan, Jonathan C.; Sepúlveda, Inma; Ho, Paul T. P.; Zhang, Qizhou; Kurtz, Stan

    2013-07-01

    We aim at characterizing dense cores in the clustered environments associated with intermediate-/high-mass star-forming regions. For this, we present a uniform analysis of Very Large Array NH3 (1,1) and (2,2) observations towards a sample of 15 intermediate-/high-mass star-forming regions, where we identify a total of 73 cores, classify them as protostellar, quiescent starless, or perturbed starless, and derive some physical properties. The average sizes and ammonia column densities of the total sample are ˜0.06 pc and ˜1015 cm-2, respectively, with no significant differences between the starless and protostellar cores, while the linewidth and rotational temperature of quiescent starless cores are smaller, ˜1.0 km s-1 and 16 K, than linewidths and temperatures of protostellar (˜1.8 km s-1 and 21 K), and perturbed starless (˜1.4 km s-1 and 19 K) cores. Such linewidths and temperatures for these quiescent starless cores in the surroundings of intermediate-/high-mass stars are still significantly larger than the typical linewidths and rotational temperatures measured in starless cores of low-mass star-forming regions, implying an important non-thermal component. We confirm at high angular resolutions (spatial scales ˜0.05 pc) the correlations previously found with single-dish telescopes (spatial scales ≳ 0.1 pc) between the linewidth and the rotational temperature of the cores, as well as between the rotational temperature and the linewidth with respect to the bolometric luminosity. In addition, we find a correlation between the temperature of each core and the incident flux from the most massive star in the cluster, suggesting that the large temperatures measured in the starless cores of our sample could be due to heating from the nearby massive star. A simple virial equilibrium analysis seems to suggest a scenario of a self-similar, self-gravitating, turbulent, virialized hierarchy of structures from clumps (˜0.1-10 pc) to cores (˜0.05 pc). A closer

  11. A novel parallel-rotation algorithm for atomistic Monte Carlo simulation of dense polymer systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santos, S.; Suter, U. W.; Müller, M.; Nievergelt, J.

    2001-06-01

    We develop and test a new elementary Monte Carlo move for use in the off-lattice simulation of polymer systems. This novel Parallel-Rotation algorithm (ParRot) permits moving very efficiently torsion angles that are deeply inside long chains in melts. The parallel-rotation move is extremely simple and is also demonstrated to be computationally efficient and appropriate for Monte Carlo simulation. The ParRot move does not affect the orientation of those parts of the chain outside the moving unit. The move consists of a concerted rotation around four adjacent skeletal bonds. No assumption is made concerning the backbone geometry other than that bond lengths and bond angles are held constant during the elementary move. Properly weighted sampling techniques are needed for ensuring detailed balance because the new move involves a correlated change in four degrees of freedom along the chain backbone. The ParRot move is supplemented with the classical Metropolis Monte Carlo, the Continuum-Configurational-Bias, and Reptation techniques in an isothermal-isobaric Monte Carlo simulation of melts of short and long chains. Comparisons are made with the capabilities of other Monte Carlo techniques to move the torsion angles in the middle of the chains. We demonstrate that ParRot constitutes a highly promising Monte Carlo move for the treatment of long polymer chains in the off-lattice simulation of realistic models of dense polymer systems.

  12. THE GREEN BANK TELESCOPE MAPS THE DENSE, STAR-FORMING GAS IN THE NEARBY STARBURST GALAXY M82

    SciTech Connect

    Kepley, Amanda A.; Frayer, David; Leroy, Adam K.; Usero, Antonio; Walter, Fabian

    2014-01-01

    Observations of the Milky Way and nearby galaxies show that dense molecular gas correlates with recent star formation, suggesting that the formation of this gas phase may help regulate star formation. A key test of this idea requires wide-area, high-resolution maps of dense molecular gas in galaxies to explore how local physical conditions drive dense gas formation, but these observations have been limited because of the faintness of dense gas tracers like HCN and HCO{sup +}. Here we demonstrate the power of the Robert C. Byrd Green Bank Telescope (GBT)—the largest single-dish millimeter radio telescope—for mapping dense gas in galaxies by presenting the most sensitive maps yet of HCN and HCO{sup +} in the starburst galaxy M82. The HCN and HCO{sup +} in the disk of this galaxy correlates with both recent star formation and more diffuse molecular gas and shows kinematics consistent with a rotating torus. The HCO{sup +} emission extending to the north and south of the disk is coincident with the outflow previously identified in CO and traces the eastern edge of the hot outflowing gas. The central starburst region has a higher ratio of star formation to dense gas than the outer regions, pointing to the starburst as a key driver of this relationship. These results establish that the GBT can efficiently map the dense molecular gas at 90 GHz in nearby galaxies, a capability that will increase further with the 16 element feed array under construction.

  13. First-Passage Time in Entangled Star Polymers Melts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Jing; Zhu, Jian; Wang, Zuowei; Likhtman, Alexei

    2015-03-01

    For a single star polymer in a melt of extremely long linear chains, the stress of star polymer relaxes by arm-retraction in which the star arms explore new configurations by withdrawing along their tubes and stretching out towards a new direction. Pearson and Helfand proposed that the arm in the tube can be represented as a harmonic spring with an applied thermal tension such that the arm-end feels an entropic force if it fluctuates away from its equilibrium position. We have investigated the first-passage(FP) time of the destruction of tube segments by representing the arm as a one-dimensional Rouse chain. In contrast, we found that the disengagement of a tube segment is getting faster with more Rouse modes added in, which means the FP problem has to be modelled by a multi-dimensional Kramer's problem. We found a new way of solving the multi-dimensional FP problem by projecting the problem along the most probable trajectory termed ``minimal action trajectory'' and correcting it by entropy term. In addition, we performed direct and forward-flux simulations of Rouse chains of different lengths. A good agreement between the analytical calculations and simulations was achieved for both discrete and continuous Rouse chains.

  14. Noncrystalline Condensation of Densely Dissolved Optically Nonlinear Organic Compound in Polymer Matrices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hiraga, Takashi; Tanaka, Norio; Hayamizu, Kikuko; Mito, Akihiro; Takarada, Shigeru; Yamasaki, Yuuichi; Nakamura, Michie; Hoshino, Nobuo; Moriya, Tetsuo

    1993-04-01

    Optical properties and condensed states of the densely dissolved optically nonlinear organic compound in polymer matrices were investigated by means of optical measurements, structural analysis and pressure tuning spectroscopy. In the investigation of the absorption peak wavelength, 2-methyl-4-nitroaniline (MNA) in poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) exhibited characteristics intermediate between the crystal and the MNA dissolved in solvents, i.e., noncrystalline condensation. This result was consistent with those of X-ray diffraction analysis, second- and third-harmonics generation, IR absorption and 13C-NMR spectroscopies. It has also been revealed that such a system provides the most suitable measuring method of the third optical nonlinear constant for a variety of compounds.

  15. Synthesis of Maleimide-End Functionalized Star Polymers and Multimeric Protein-Polymer Conjugates

    PubMed Central

    Tao, Lei; Kaddis, Catherine S.; Loo, Rachel R. Ogorzalek; Grover, Gregory N.; Loo, Joseph A.; Maynard, Heather D.

    2011-01-01

    Protein-polymer conjugates exhibit superior properties to unmodified proteins, generating a high demand for these materials in the fields of medicine, biotechnology, and nanotechnology. Multimeric conjugates are predicted to surpass the activity of monomeric conjugates. Herein, we report a straightforward method to synthesize multimeric polymer-conjugates. Four armed poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) (pNIPAAm) was synthesized by reversible addition-fragmentation chain transfer (RAFT) polymerization in the presence of a tetra-functionalized trithiocarbonate chain transfer agent (CTA). The polymer molecular weight, architecture and polydispersity index (PDI) were verified by gel permeation chromatography (GPC), dynamic light scattering gel permeation chromatography (DLS-GPC), and matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight (MALDI-TOF) mass spectrometry. This approach afforded well-defined polymers (PDI's < 1.06) and the ability to target various molecular weights. Maleimide functional groups were introduced at the chain ends by heating the polymers in the presence of a furan-protected azo-initiator. This allowed for site-specific conjugation of V131C T4 lysozyme to the polymers to generate multimeric protein-polymer conjugates. MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry, electrospray ionization gas-phase electrophoretic-mobility macromolecule analysis (ESI-GEMMA), gel electrophoresis, and liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) of the trypsin digests demonstrated that multimeric protein-polymer conjugates had formed. This simple strategy provides ready access to star protein-polymer conjugates for application in the fields of drug discovery, drug delivery, and nanotechnology. PMID:21544227

  16. Rapid cellular internalization of multifunctional star polymers prepared by atom transfer radical polymerization.

    PubMed

    Cho, Hong Y; Gao, Haifeng; Srinivasan, Abiraman; Hong, Joanna; Bencherif, Sidi A; Siegwart, Daniel J; Paik, Hyun-Jong; Hollinger, Jeffrey O; Matyjaszewski, Krzysztof

    2010-09-13

    Poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) star polymers containing GRGDS (Gly-Arg-Gly-Asp-Ser) peptide sequences on the star periphery were synthesized by atom transfer radical polymerization (ATRP) of poly(ethylene glycol) methyl ether methacrylate (PEGMA), GRGDS modified poly(ethylene glycol) acrylate (GRGDS-PEG-Acryl), fluorescein o-methacrylate (FMA), and ethylene glycol dimethacrylate (EGDMA) via an "arm-first" method. Star polymers were approximately 20 nm in diameter, as measured by dynamic light scattering and atomic force microscopy. Conjugation of FMA to the stars was confirmed by fluorescence microscopy, and successful attachment of GRGDS segments to the star periphery was confirmed by (1)H NMR spectroscopy. Both fluorescent PEG star polymers with and without peripheral GRGDS peptide segments were cultured with MC3T3-E1.4 cells. These star polymers were biocompatible with ≥ 90% cell viability after 24 h of incubation. Cellular uptake of PEG star polymers in MC3T3-E1.4 cells was observed by confocal microscopy. Rapid uptake of PEG star polymers with GRGDS peptides (∼ 100% of FITC-positive cells in 15 min measured by flow cytometry) was observed, suggesting enhanced delivery potential of these functional star polymers. PMID:20831270

  17. Molecular systems under shock compression into the dense plasma regime: carbon dioxide and hydrocarbon polymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mattsson, Thomas R.; Cochrane, Kyle R.; Root, Seth; Carpenter, John H.

    2013-10-01

    Density Functional Theory (DFT) has proven remarkably accurate in predicting properties of matter under shock compression into the dense plasma regime. Materials where chemistry plays a role are of interest for many applications, including planetary science and inertial confinement fusion (ICF). As examples of systems where chemical reactions are important, and demonstration of the high fidelity possible for these both structurally and chemically complex systems, we will discuss shock- and re-shock of liquid carbon dioxide (CO2) in the range 100 to 800 GPa and shock compression of hydrocarbon polymers, including GDP (glow discharge polymer) which is used as an ablator in laser ICF experiments. Experimental results from Sandia's Z machine validate the DFT simulations at extreme conditions and the combination of experiment and DFT provide reliable data for evaluating existing and constructing future wide-range equations of state models for molecular compounds. Sandia National Laboratories is a multi-program laboratory managed and operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Company, for the U.S. Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under contract DE-AC04-94AL85000.

  18. From gas to stars in energetic environments: dense gas clumps in the 30 Doradus region within the Large Magellanic Cloud

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, Crystal N.; Meier, David S.; Ott, Jürgen; Hughes, Annie; Wong, Tony; Looney, Leslie; Henkel, Christian; Chen, Rosie; Indebetouw, Remy; Muller, Erik; Pineda, Jorge L.; Seale, Jonathan

    2014-09-20

    We present parsec-scale interferometric maps of HCN(1-0) and HCO{sup +}(1-0) emission from dense gas in the star-forming region 30 Doradus, obtained using the Australia Telescope Compact Array. This extreme star-forming region, located in the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC), is characterized by a very intense ultraviolet ionizing radiation field and sub-solar metallicity, both of which are expected to impact molecular cloud structure. We detect 13 bright, dense clumps within the 30 Doradus-10 giant molecular cloud. Some of the clumps are aligned along a filamentary structure with a characteristic spacing that is consistent with formation via varicose fluid instability. Our analysis shows that the filament is gravitationally unstable and collapsing to form stars. There is a good correlation between HCO{sup +} emission in the filament and signatures of recent star formation activity including H{sub 2}O masers and young stellar objects (YSOs). YSOs seem to continue along the same direction of the filament toward the massive compact star cluster R136 in the southwest. We present detailed comparisons of clump properties (masses, linewidths, and sizes) in 30Dor-10 to those in other star forming regions of the LMC (N159, N113, N105, and N44). Our analysis shows that the 30Dor-10 clumps have similar masses but wider linewidths and similar HCN/HCO{sup +} (1-0) line ratios as clumps detected in other LMC star-forming regions. Our results suggest that the dense molecular gas clumps in the interior of 30Dor-10 are well shielded against the intense ionizing field that is present in the 30 Doradus region.

  19. Utilization of star-shaped polymer architecture in the creation of high-density polymer brush coatings for the prevention of platelet and bacteria adhesion

    PubMed Central

    Totani, Masayasu; Terada, Kayo; Terashima, Takaya; Kim, Ill Yong; Ohtsuki, Chikara; Xi, Chuanwu; Tanihara, Masao

    2014-01-01

    We demonstrate utilization of star-shaped polymers as high-density polymer brush coatings and their effectiveness to inhibit the adhesion of platelets and bacteria. Star polymers consisting of poly(2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate) (PHEMA) and/or poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA), were synthesized using living radical polymerization with a ruthenium catalyst. The polymer coatings were prepared by simple drop casting of the polymer solution onto poly(ethylene terephthalate) (PET) surfaces and then dried. Among the star polymers prepared in this study, the PHEMA star polymer (star-PHEMA) and the PHEMA/PMMA (mol. ratio of 71/29) heteroarm star polymer (star-H71M29) coatings showed the highest percentage of inhibition against platelet adhesion (78–88% relative to noncoated PET surface) and Escherichia coli (94–97%). These coatings also showed anti-adhesion activity against platelets after incubation in Dulbecco's phosphate buffered saline or surfactant solution for 7 days. In addition, the PMMA component of the star polymers increased the scratch resistance of the coating. These results indicate that the star-polymer architecture provides high polymer chain density on PET surfaces to prevent adhesion of platelets and bacteria, as well as coating stability and physical durability to prevent exposure of bare PET surfaces. The star polymers provide a simple and effective approach to preparing anti-adhesion polymer coatings on biomedical materials against the adhesion of platelets and bacteria. PMID:25485105

  20. Utilization of star-shaped polymer architecture in the creation of high-density polymer brush coatings for the prevention of platelet and bacteria adhesion.

    PubMed

    Totani, Masayasu; Ando, Tsuyoshi; Terada, Kayo; Terashima, Takaya; Kim, Ill Yong; Ohtsuki, Chikara; Xi, Chuanwu; Kuroda, Kenichi; Tanihara, Masao

    2014-09-01

    We demonstrate utilization of star-shaped polymers as high-density polymer brush coatings and their effectiveness to inhibit the adhesion of platelets and bacteria. Star polymers consisting of poly(2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate) (PHEMA) and/or poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA), were synthesized using living radical polymerization with a ruthenium catalyst. The polymer coatings were prepared by simple drop casting of the polymer solution onto poly(ethylene terephthalate) (PET) surfaces and then dried. Among the star polymers prepared in this study, the PHEMA star polymer (star-PHEMA) and the PHEMA/PMMA (mol. ratio of 71/29) heteroarm star polymer (star-H71M29) coatings showed the highest percentage of inhibition against platelet adhesion (78-88% relative to noncoated PET surface) and Escherichia coli (94-97%). These coatings also showed anti-adhesion activity against platelets after incubation in Dulbecco's phosphate buffered saline or surfactant solution for 7 days. In addition, the PMMA component of the star polymers increased the scratch resistance of the coating. These results indicate that the star-polymer architecture provides high polymer chain density on PET surfaces to prevent adhesion of platelets and bacteria, as well as coating stability and physical durability to prevent exposure of bare PET surfaces. The star polymers provide a simple and effective approach to preparing anti-adhesion polymer coatings on biomedical materials against the adhesion of platelets and bacteria. PMID:25485105

  1. SANS structural characterization of fullerenol-derived star polymers in solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeng, U.-S.; Lin, T.-L.; Wang, L. Y.; Chiang, L. Y.; Ho, D. L.; Han, C. C.

    We have studied the chain conformations of fullerenol-derived star polymers in two organic solvents using small-angle neutron scattering (SANS). The SANS results indicate that the six poly(urethane-ether) arms, chemically bonded on the fullerenol of the C60-based star polymer, have a Gaussian chain conformation in toluene. However, these arms exhibit a pronounced excluded-volume effect in dimethylformamide solutions. We use a scattering model, with the polydispersity of the polymer taken into account, and a fractal model to extract the radius of gyration Rg values and the persistence lengths of the C60-star polymers in these two organic solutions.

  2. Star polymers with a cationic core prepared by ATRP for cellular nucleic acids delivery.

    PubMed

    Cho, Hong Y; Averick, Saadyah E; Paredes, Eduardo; Wegner, Katarzyna; Averick, Amram; Jurga, Stefan; Das, Subha R; Matyjaszewski, Krzysztof

    2013-05-13

    Poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG)-based star polymers with a cationic core were prepared by atom transfer radical polymerization (ATRP) for in vitro nucleic acid (NA) delivery. The star polymers were synthesized by ATRP of 2-(dimethylamino)ethyl methacrylate (DMAEMA) and ethylene glycol dimethacrylate (EGDMA). Star polymers were characterized by gel permeation chromatography, zeta potential, and dynamic light scattering. These star polymers were combined with either plasmid DNA (pDNA) or short interfering RNA (siRNA) duplexes to form polyplexes for intracellular delivery. These polyplexes with either siRNA or pDNA were highly effective in NA delivery, particularly at relatively low star polymer weight or molar ratios, highlighting the importance of NA release in efficient delivery systems. PMID:23560989

  3. Thermodynamic instabilities in warm and dense asymmetric nuclear matter and in compact stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lavagno, A.; Gervino, G.; Pigato, D.

    2016-01-01

    We investigate the possible thermodynamic instability in a warm and dense nuclear medium where a phase transition from nucleonic matter to resonance-dominated Δ-matter can take place. Such a phase transition is characterized by both mechanical instability (fluctuations on the baryon density) and by chemical-diffusive instability (fluctuations on the isospin concentration) in asymmetric nuclear matter. Similarly to the liquid-gas phase transition, the nucleonic and the Δ-matter phase have a different isospin density in the mixed phase. In the liquid-gas phase transition, the process of producing a larger neutron excess in the gas phase is referred to as isospin fractionation. A similar effects can occur in the nucleon- Δmatter phase transition due essentially to a Δ- excess in the Δ-matter phase in asymmetric nuclear matter. In this context we also discuss the relevance of Δ-isobar degrees of freedom in the bulk properties and in the maximum mass of compact stars.

  4. Role of hydrophilicity and length of diblock arms for determining star polymer physical properties.

    PubMed

    Felberg, Lisa E; Brookes, David H; Head-Gordon, Teresa; Rice, Julia E; Swope, William C

    2015-01-22

    We present a molecular simulation study of star polymers consisting of 16 diblock copolymer arms bound to a small adamantane core by varying both arm length and the outer hydrophilic block when attached to the same hydrophobic block of poly-δ-valerolactone. Here we consider two biocompatible star polymers in which the hydrophilic block is composed of polyethylene glycol (PEG) or polymethyloxazoline (POXA) in addition to a polycarbonate-based polymer with a pendant hydrophilic group (PC1). We find that the different hydrophilic blocks of the star polymers show qualitatively different trends in their interactions with aqueous solvent, orientational time correlation functions, and orientational correlation between pairs of monomers of their polymeric arms in solution, in which we find that the PEG polymers are more thermosensitive compared with the POXA and PC1 star polymers over the physiological temperature range we have investigated. PMID:25254622

  5. Unusual microscopic dynamics in melts of star-like polymer grafted nanoparticles and their binary mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Basu, Jaydeep; Srivastava, S.; C, Sivasurender; Kandar, A.; C, Sarika; Narayanan, S.; Sandy, A.

    2010-03-01

    Star polymers have attracted wide attention due to their fascinating structural, dynamical and rheological behavior including observation of multiple glassy states in concentrated solutions [1]. We have shown recently [2] that the microscopic dynamics in melts of a novel type of star-like polymers created by grafting of linear polymer chains on nanoparticle surfaces shows an unusual dynamical arrest in the case of low number, f, of grafted chains as opposed to that predicted and observed so far for both melts and solutions of star polymers. Here we extend our studies further to include similar star polymers with large range of f and their binary mixtures. Remarkably we find that the structural relaxation times of the star polymers becomes smaller with increasing arm number upto a certain value above which the relaxation time increases with f. Further, in binary mixtures of star polymers of two different sizes the relaxation time decreases dramatically with very low added small star fraction but shows dynamical arrest at significantly higher fraction of smaller stars. Reference: 1. C. Mayer et al Nature Materials 7, 780 (2008); 2. A. K. Kandar et al, J Chem Phys 130, 121102 (2009)

  6. Ammonia capture in porous organic polymers densely functionalized with Brønsted acid groups.

    PubMed

    Van Humbeck, Jeffrey F; McDonald, Thomas M; Jing, Xiaofei; Wiers, Brian M; Zhu, Guangshan; Long, Jeffrey R

    2014-02-12

    The elimination of specific environmental and industrial contaminants, which are hazardous at only part per million to part per billion concentrations, poses a significant technological challenge. Adsorptive materials designed for such processes must be engendered with an exceptionally high enthalpy of adsorption for the analyte of interest. Rather than relying on a single strong interaction, the use of multiple chemical interactions is an emerging strategy for achieving this requisite physical parameter. Herein, we describe an efficient, catalytic synthesis of diamondoid porous organic polymers densely functionalized with carboxylic acids. Physical parameters such as pore size distribution, application of these materials to low-pressure ammonia adsorption, and comparison with analogous materials featuring functional groups of varying acidity are presented. In particular, BPP-5, which features a multiply interpenetrated structure dominated by <6 Å pores, is shown to exhibit an uptake of 17.7 mmol/g at 1 bar, the highest capacity yet demonstrated for a readily recyclable material. A complementary framework, BPP-7, features slightly larger pore sizes, and the resulting improvement in uptake kinetics allows for efficient adsorption at low pressure (3.15 mmol/g at 480 ppm). Overall, the data strongly suggest that the spatial arrangement of acidic sites allows for cooperative behavior, which leads to enhanced NH3 adsorption. PMID:24456083

  7. The Dense Filamentary Giant Molecular Cloud G23.0-0.4: Birthplace of Ongoing Massive Star Formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, Yang; Zhang, Shaobo; Shao, Xiangjun; Yang, Ji

    2015-10-01

    We present observations of 1.5 square degree maps of the 12CO, 13CO, and C18O (J = 1 - 0) emission toward the complex region of the supernova remnant (SNR) W41 and SNR G22.7-0.2. A massive (˜ 5× {10}5 {M}⊙ ), large (˜84 × 15 pc), and dense (˜103 cm-3) giant molecular cloud (GMC), G23.0-0.4 with {V}{LSR} ˜ 77 km s-1, is found to be adjacent to the two SNRs. The GMC displays a filamentary structure approximately along the Galactic plane. The filamentary structure of the dense molecular gas, traced by C18O (J = 1 - 0) emission, is also coincident well with the distribution of the dust-continuum emission in the direction. Two dense massive MC clumps, two 6.7 GHz methanol masers, and one H ii/SNR complex, associated with the 77 km s-1 GMC G23.0-0.4, are aligned along the filamentary structure, indicating the star-forming activity within the GMC. These sources have periodic projected spacing of 0.°18-0.°26 along the giant filament, which is consistent with the theoretical predictions of 0.°22. This indicates that the turbulence seems to dominate the fragmentation process of the dense gaseous filament on a large scale. The established 4.4 kpc distance of the GMC and the long dense filament traced by C18O emission, together with the rich massive star-formation groups in the nearby region, suggest that G23.0-0.4 is probably located at the near side of the Scutum-Centaurus arm in the first quadrant. Considering the large scale and the elongation structure along the Galactic plane, we speculate that the dense filamentary GMC is related to the spiral density wave of the Milky Way.

  8. Dense Gas and Star Formation Along the Major Axis of M33 (HERM33ES)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buchbender, C.; Kramer, C.; Rosolowsky, E.

    2011-05-01

    Using the IRAM 30m telescope we observed and detected HCN and HCO^+ 1-0 towards 6 positions along the major axis of the nearby spiral galaxy M33, at radial distances of up to 3.4 kpc. M33, viewed at an intermediate inclination from a distance of 840 kpc, is an ideal source to study these molecules in an environment not affected by an active galactic nucleus (AGN). Unlike the Galaxy, which is seen edge-on, M33's inclination of 56 degrees allows to determine precise positions and velocities inside its large scale disk. Furthermore, at this distance M33 is still near enough that individual giant molecular clouds (GMCs) can be resolved by the 28" beam of the IRAM 30m at the frequencies of HCN and HCO^+, which translates to 114 pc spatial resolution. HCN, HCO^+, and 13CO were observed at an RMS level of about 0.7 mK at 2 km/s resolution. Additionally, the frequencies of the isotopmeres of HCN and HCO^+, HNC and HOC^+ also fall within the bandwidth of our observation setup. By stacking all observed spectra, paying the price of losing the positional information, we could lower the baseline RMS even further to 0.27 mK and detected HNC and HOC^+ as well as CCH at a very low level of ≈ 3 σ. Having high critical densities they trace the dense gas and thus also star formation (SF). HCN shows a tight correlation with SF that holds for galactic GMCs to the nuclear environment of distant star-burst (SB) galaxies as has been shown by Gao & Solomon 2004 and Wu et al. 2005. Furthermore, the ratio of HCO^+ to HCN is a popular tool in extra-galactic astronomy to investigate the predominant radiation mechanism (X-Ray - AGN , UV - SB) in galactic nuclei. Interestingly, we find HCN-to-HCO^+ ratios in the range of 0.7-2.8. This includes typical values found towards AGN and SB dominated galactic nuclei suggesting that on local scale this interpretation does not hold, since M33 is neither dominated by intense X-ray radiation nor by the influence of a nearby AGN. These observations are

  9. The EMPIRE Survey: Systematic Variations in the Dense Gas Fraction and Star Formation Efficiency from Full-disk Mapping of M51

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bigiel, Frank; Leroy, Adam K.; Jiménez-Donaire, Maria J.; Pety, Jérôme; Usero, Antonio; Cormier, Diane; Bolatto, Alberto; Garcia-Burillo, Santiago; Colombo, Dario; González-García, Manuel; Hughes, Annie; Kepley, Amanda A.; Kramer, Carsten; Sandstrom, Karin; Schinnerer, Eva; Schruba, Andreas; Schuster, Karl; Tomicic, Neven; Zschaechner, Laura

    2016-05-01

    We present the first results from the EMPIRE survey, an IRAM large program that is mapping tracers of high-density molecular gas across the disks of nine nearby star-forming galaxies. Here, we present new maps of the 3 mm transitions of HCN, HCO+, and HNC across the whole disk of our pilot target, M51. As expected, dense gas correlates with tracers of recent star formation, filling the “luminosity gap” between Galactic cores and whole galaxies. In detail, we show that both the fraction of gas that is dense, {f}{dense} traced by HCN/CO, and the rate at which dense gas forms stars, {{SFE}}{dense} traced by IR/HCN, depend on environment in the galaxy. The sense of the dependence is that high-surface-density, high molecular gas fraction regions of the galaxy show high dense gas fractions and low dense gas star formation efficiencies. This agrees with recent results for individual pointings by Usero et al. but using unbiased whole-galaxy maps. It also agrees qualitatively with the behavior observed contrasting our own Solar Neighborhood with the central regions of the Milky Way. The sense of the trends can be explained if the dense gas fraction tracks interstellar pressure but star formation occurs only in regions of high density contrast.

  10. Molecular and Atomic Line Surveys of Galaxies. I. The Dense, Star-Forming Gas Phase as a Beacon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geach, James E.; Papadopoulos, Padelis P.

    2012-10-01

    We predict the space density of molecular gas reservoirs in the universe and place a lower limit on the number counts of carbon monoxide (CO), hydrogen cyanide (HCN) molecular, and [C II] atomic emission lines in blind redshift surveys in the submillimeter-centimeter spectral regime. Our model uses (1) recently available HCN spectral line energy distributions (SLEDs) of local luminous infrared galaxies (LIRGs, L IR > 1011 L ⊙), (2) a value for epsilonsstarf = SFR/M dense(H2) provided by new developments in the study of star formation feedback on the interstellar medium, and (3) a model for the evolution of the infrared luminosity density. Minimal "emergent" CO SLEDs from the dense gas reservoirs expected in all star-forming systems in the universe are then computed from the HCN SLEDs since warm, HCN-bright gas will necessarily be CO-bright, with the dense star-forming gas phase setting an obvious minimum to the total molecular gas mass of any star-forming galaxy. We include [C II] as the most important of the far-infrared cooling lines. Optimal blind surveys with the Atacama Large Millimeter Array (ALMA) could potentially detect very distant (z ~ 10-12) [C II] emitters in the >=ULIRG galaxy class at a rate of ~0.1-1 hr-1 (although this prediction is strongly dependent on the star formation and enrichment history at this early epoch), whereas the (high-frequency) Square Kilometer Array will be capable of blindly detecting z > 3 low-J CO emitters at a rate of ~40-70 hr-1. The [C II] line holds special promise for detecting metal-poor systems with extensive reservoirs of CO-dark molecular gas where detection rates with ALMA can reach up to 2-7 hr-1 in Bands 4-6.

  11. MOLECULAR AND ATOMIC LINE SURVEYS OF GALAXIES. I. THE DENSE, STAR-FORMING GAS PHASE AS A BEACON

    SciTech Connect

    Geach, James E.; Papadopoulos, Padelis P. E-mail: padelis@mpifr-bonn.mpg.de

    2012-10-01

    We predict the space density of molecular gas reservoirs in the universe and place a lower limit on the number counts of carbon monoxide (CO), hydrogen cyanide (HCN) molecular, and [C II] atomic emission lines in blind redshift surveys in the submillimeter-centimeter spectral regime. Our model uses (1) recently available HCN spectral line energy distributions (SLEDs) of local luminous infrared galaxies (LIRGs, L{sub IR} > 10{sup 11} L{sub Sun }), (2) a value for {epsilon}{sub *} = SFR/M{sub dense}(H{sub 2}) provided by new developments in the study of star formation feedback on the interstellar medium, and (3) a model for the evolution of the infrared luminosity density. Minimal 'emergent' CO SLEDs from the dense gas reservoirs expected in all star-forming systems in the universe are then computed from the HCN SLEDs since warm, HCN-bright gas will necessarily be CO-bright, with the dense star-forming gas phase setting an obvious minimum to the total molecular gas mass of any star-forming galaxy. We include [C II] as the most important of the far-infrared cooling lines. Optimal blind surveys with the Atacama Large Millimeter Array (ALMA) could potentially detect very distant (z {approx} 10-12) [C II] emitters in the {>=}ULIRG galaxy class at a rate of {approx}0.1-1 hr{sup -1} (although this prediction is strongly dependent on the star formation and enrichment history at this early epoch), whereas the (high-frequency) Square Kilometer Array will be capable of blindly detecting z > 3 low-J CO emitters at a rate of {approx}40-70 hr{sup -1}. The [C II] line holds special promise for detecting metal-poor systems with extensive reservoirs of CO-dark molecular gas where detection rates with ALMA can reach up to 2-7 hr{sup -1} in Bands 4-6.

  12. Conformation-dependent translocation of a star polymer through a nanochannel

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Zhu; Liu, Jiannan; Xiao, Mengying; Wang, Rong; Chen, Yeng-Long

    2014-01-01

    The translocation process of star polymers through a nanochannel is investigated by dissipative particle dynamics simulations. The translocation process is strongly influenced by the star arm arrangement as the polymer enters the channel, and a scaling relation between the translocation time τ and the total number of beads Ntot is obtained. Qualitative agreements are found with predictions of the nucleation and growth model for linear block co-polymer translocation. In the intermediate stage where the center of the star polymer is at the channel entrance, the translocation time is found to have power law-dependence on the number of arms outside the channel and very weakly dependent on the number of arms in the channel. Increasing the total number of star arms also increases the star translocation time. PMID:25332744

  13. Star Forming Dense Cloud Cores in the TeV -ray SNR RX J1713.7-3946

    SciTech Connect

    Sano, H.; Sato, J.; Yamamoto, H.; Hayakawa, T.; Torii, K.; Moribe, N.; Kawamura, A.; Okuda, T.; Mizuno, N.; Onishi, T.; Maezawa, H.; Inoue, T.; Inutsuka, S.; Tanaka, T.; Mizuno, A.; Ogawa, H.; Stutzki, J.; Bertoldi, F.; Anderl, S.; Bronfman, L.; Koo, B.C.

    2010-10-27

    RX J1713.7-3946 is one of the TeV {gamma}-ray supernova remnants (SNRs) emitting synchrotron X rays. The SNR is associated with molecular gas located at {approx}1 kpc. We made new molecular observations toward the dense cloud cores, peaks A, C and D, in the SNR in the {sup 12}CO(J=2-1) and {sup 13}CO(J=2-1) transitions at angular resolution of 90 degrees. The most intense core in {sup 13}CO, peak C, was also mapped in the {sup 12}CO(J=4-3) transition at angular resolution of 38 degrees. Peak C shows strong signs of active star formation including bipolar outflow and a far-infrared protostellar source and has a steep gradient with a r{sup -2.2 {+-} 0.4} variation in the average density within radius r. Peak C and the other dense cloud cores are rim-brightened in synchrotron X rays, suggesting that the dense cloud cores are embedded within or on the outer boundary of the SNR shell. This confirms the earlier suggestion that the X rays are physically associated with the molecular gas (Fukui et al. 2003). We present a scenario where the densest molecular core, peak C, survived against the blast wave and is now embedded within the SNR. Numerical simulations of the shock-cloud interaction indicate that a dense clump can indeed survive shock erosion, since shock propagation speed is stalled in the dense clump. Additionally, the shock-cloud interaction induces turbulence and magnetic field amplification around the dense clump that may facilitate particle acceleration in the lower-density inter-clump space leading to the enhanced synchrotron X rays around dense cores.

  14. Photo-cross-linkable thermoresponsive star polymers designed for control of cell-surface interactions.

    PubMed

    Park, Sangwoo; Cho, Hong Yul; Yoon, Jeong Ae; Kwak, Yungwan; Srinivasan, Abiraman; Hollinger, Jeffrey O; Paik, Hyun-jong; Matyjaszewski, Krzysztof

    2010-10-11

    Star polymers with thermoresponsive arms, consisting of 2-(2-methoxyethoxy)ethyl methacrylate (MEO₂MA) and oligo(ethylene glycol) methacrylate with ~4 ethylene oxide units (OEOMA₃₀₀, M(n) = 300), were synthesized via atom transfer radical polymerization (ATRP). 25% of the arms contained benzophenone chain-end functionality at the star periphery. A mixture of linear poly(MEO₂MA-co-OEOMA₃₀₀)-Br macroinitiators without and with benzophenone end-group macroinitiators were (MI and Bzp-MI, respectively) cross-linked with ethylene glycol dimethacrylate to form star polymers. Formation of star polymers was monitored by GPC, and the presence of benzophenone functionality in the stars was confirmed by ¹H NMR. The UV-vis spectroscopy revealed that the star polymers exhibit the low critical solution temperature (LCST) at 27 °C, slightly lower than LCST of either MI or Bzp-MI. Commercially available tissue culture grade polystyrene surface was modified by depositing a thin film of functionalized stars and UV cross-linking (λ = 365 nm). The star polymers covalently attached onto surfaces allowed a control of cell shrinkage and attachment in response to temperature changes. PMID:20839794

  15. THE GALACTIC CENTER CLOUD G0.253+0.016: A MASSIVE DENSE CLOUD WITH LOW STAR FORMATION POTENTIAL

    SciTech Connect

    Kauffmann, Jens; Pillai, Thushara; Zhang Qizhou

    2013-03-10

    We present the first interferometric molecular line and dust emission maps for the Galactic Center (GC) cloud G0.253+0.016, observed using CARMA and the SMA. This cloud is very dense, and concentrates a mass exceeding the Orion Molecular Cloud Complex (2 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 5} M{sub Sun }) into a radius of only 3 pc, but it is essentially starless. G0.253+0.016 therefore violates ''star formation laws'' presently used to explain trends in galactic and extragalactic star formation by a factor {approx}45. Our observations show a lack of dense cores of significant mass and density, thus explaining the low star formation activity. Instead, cores with low densities and line widths {approx}< 1 km s{sup -1}-probably the narrowest lines reported for the GC region to date-are found. Evolution over several 10{sup 5} yr is needed before more massive cores, and possibly an Arches-like stellar cluster, could form. Given the disruptive dynamics of the GC region, and the potentially unbound nature of G0.253+0.016, it is not clear that this evolution will happen.

  16. Application of scaling model to investigate solvent quality and functionality in star polymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rai, Durgesh; Beaucage, Gregory; Ramachandran, Ramanth; Ratkanthwar, Kedar; Hadjichristidis, Nikos; Kunlun, Hong; Uhrig, David; Tsou, Andy

    2014-03-01

    Symmetric star polymers serve as model systems to understand branching effects in long chain macromolecules. Generally, the solution properties of stars have been modeled based on ideal Gaussian statistics or using empirical approaches that incorporate fractal scaling neither of which provide satisfactory complete understanding of thermodynamic or structural details across different solvent quality and temperature ranges. A coupling of the unified scattering function with the RPA equation and Benoit's approach to model inter-arm and intra-arm interactions is proposed to analytically quantify thermodynamic effects along with topological variations using the proposed scaling model. Detailed topological quantification of star polymers systems have been able to describe both, good and theta solvent conditions along with effects of functionalities, as well as resolve deviations in chain conformations due to steric interactions between star arms. The scaling model quantifies the distinction between invariant topological features for star polymers and chain tortuosity, which changes with functionality as well as goodness of solvent and steric interactions.

  17. Dense gas without star formation: the kpc-sized turbulent molecular disk in 3C 326 N

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nesvadba, N. P. H.; Boulanger, F.; Lehnert, M. D.; Guillard, P.; Salome, P.

    2011-12-01

    We report the discovery of a 3 kpc disk of few 109 M⊙ of dense, warm H2 in the nearby radio galaxy 3C 326 N, which shows no signs of ongoing or recent star formation and falls a factor of 60 below the Schmidt-Kennicutt law. Our VLT/SINFONI imaging spectroscopy shows broad (FWHM ~ 500 km s-1) ro-vibrational H2 lines across the entire disk, with irregular profiles and line ratios consistent with shocks. The ratio of turbulent to gravitational energy suggests that the gas is highly turbulent and not gravitationally bound. In the absence of the driving by the jet, the short turbulent dissipation times indicate that the gas should collapse rapidly and form stars, at odds with the recent star-formation history. Motivated by hydrodynamic models of rapid H2 formation boosted by turbulent compression, we propose that the molecules formed from diffuse atomic gas in the turbulent jet cocoon. Since the gas is not self-gravitating, it cannot form molecular clouds or stars while the jet is active, and is likely to disperse and become atomic again after the nuclear activity ceases. We speculate that very low star-formation rates are to be expected under such conditions, provided that the large-scale turbulence controls the gas dynamics in molecular clouds. Our results illustrate that jets may create large molecular reservoirs as expected in "positive feedback" scenarios of AGN-triggered star formation, but that this alone is insufficient to trigger star formation. Based on observations carried out with the Very Large Telescope of ESO under program ID 385.B-0809.

  18. Structure and dynamical intra-molecular heterogeneity of star polymer melts above glass transition temperature.

    PubMed

    Chremos, Alexandros; Glynos, Emmanouil; Green, Peter F

    2015-01-28

    Structural and dynamical properties of star melts have been investigated with molecular dynamics simulations of a bead-spring model. Star polymers are known to be heterogeneous, but a systematic simulation study of their properties in melt conditions near the glass transition temperature was lacking. To probe their properties, we have expanded from linear to star polymers the applicability of Dobkowski's chain-length dependence correlation function [Z. Dobkowski, Eur. Polym. J. 18, 563 (1982)]. The density and the isokinetic temperature, based on the canonical definition of the laboratory glass-transition, can be described well by the correlation function and a subtle behavior manifests as the architecture becomes more complex. For linear polymer chains and low functionality star polymers, we find that an increase of the arm length would result in an increase of the density and the isokinetic temperature, but high functionality star polymers have the opposite behavior. The effect between low and high functionalities is more pronounced for short arm lengths. Complementary results such as the specific volume and number of neighbors in contact provide further insights on the subtle relation between structure and dynamics. The findings would be valuable to polymer, colloidal, and nanocomposites fields for the design of materials in absence of solution with the desired properties. PMID:25638003

  19. Open boundary molecular dynamics of sheared star-polymer melts.

    PubMed

    Sablić, Jurij; Praprotnik, Matej; Delgado-Buscalioni, Rafael

    2016-02-28

    Open boundary molecular dynamics (OBMD) simulations of a sheared star polymer melt under isothermal conditions are performed to study the rheology and molecular structure of the melt under a fixed normal load. Comparison is made with the standard molecular dynamics (MD) in periodic (closed) boxes at a fixed shear rate (using the SLLOD dynamics). The OBMD system exchanges mass and momentum with adjacent reservoirs (buffers) where the external pressure tensor is imposed. Insertion of molecules in the buffers is made feasible by implementing there a low resolution model (blob-molecules with soft effective interactions) and then using the adaptive resolution scheme (AdResS) to connect with the bulk MD. Straining with increasing shear stress induces melt expansion and a significantly different redistribution of pressure compared with the closed case. In the open sample, the shear viscosity is also a bit lowered but more stable against the viscous heating. At a given Weissenberg number, molecular deformations and material properties (recoverable shear strain and normal stress ratio) are found to be similar in both setups. We also study the modelling effect of normal and tangential friction between monomers implemented in a dissipative particle dynamics (DPD) thermostat. Interestingly, the tangential friction substantially enhances the elastic response of the melt due to a reduction of the kinetic stress viscous contribution. PMID:26820315

  20. N-Body interactions in soft-sphere coarse-grained models of star polymers.

    PubMed

    Pelissetto, Andrea

    2012-02-01

    We consider the coarse-grained approach in which star polymers are mapped onto atoms located at the centers of the stars interacting by means of ultrasoft potentials. We generalize the Witten-Pincus formula to all n-body potentials: in the good-solvent regime all potentials show an ultrasoft logarithmic divergence when the relative distance of all n stars goes to zero, with coefficients that can be related to the partition-function exponents γ(f). PMID:22463232

  1. A Class of Super Dense Stars Models Using Charged Analogues of Hajj-Boutros Type Relativistic Fluid Solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pant, Neeraj; Pradhan, N.; Murad, Mohammad Hassan

    2014-11-01

    We present a spherically symmetric solution of the general relativistic field equations in isotropic coordinates for perfect charged fluid, compatible with a super dense star modeling. The solution is well behaved for all the values of Schwarzschild parameter u lying in the range 0 < u < 0.1727 for the maximum value of charge parameter K = 0.08163. The maximum mass of the fluid distribution is calculated by using stellar surface density as ρ b = 4.6888×1014g cm-3. Corresponding to K = 0.08 and u max = 0.1732, the resulting well behaved solution has a maximum mass M = 0.9324 M ⊙ and radius R = 8.00 and by assuming ρ b = 2×1014g cm-3 the solution results a stellar configuration with maximum mass M = 1.43 M ⊙ and radius R b = 12.25 km. The maximum mass is found increasing with increasing K up to 0.08. The well behaved class of relativistic stellar models obtained in this work might has astrophysical significance in the study of internal structure of compact star such as neutron star or self-bound strange quark star like Her X-1.

  2. HUBBLE UNCOVERS MYSTERY OBJECTS IN THE DENSE CORE OF A NEARBY STAR CLUSTER

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    Piercing the heart of a glittering swarm of stars, NASA's sharp-eyed Hubble Space Telescope unveils the central region of the globular cluster M22, a 12- to 14-billion-year-old grouping of stars in the constellation Sagittarius. The telescope's view of the cluster's core measures 3.3 light-years across. The stars near the cluster's core are 100,000 times more numerous than those in the Sun's neighborhood. Buried in the glow of starlight are about six 'mystery objects,' which astronomers estimate are no larger than one quarter the mass of the giant planet Jupiter, the solar system's heftiest planet. The mystery objects are too far and dim for Hubble to see directly. Instead, the orbiting observatory detected these unseen celestial bodies by looking for their gravitational effects on the light from far distant stars. In this case, the stars are far beyond the cluster in the galactic bulge, about 30,000 light-years from Earth at the center of the Milky Way Galaxy. M22 is 8,500 light-years away. The invisible objects betrayed their presence by bending the starlight gravitationally and amplifying it, a phenomenon known as microlensing. From February 22 to June 15, 1999, Hubble's Wide Field and Planetary Camera 2 looked through this central region and monitored 83,000 stars. During that time the orbiting observatory recorded six unexpectedly brief microlensing events. In each case a background star jumped in brightness for less than 20 hours before dropping back to normal. These transitory spikes in brightness mean that the object passing in front of the star must have been much smaller than a normal star. Hubble also detected one clear microlensing event. In that observation a star appeared about 10 times brighter over an 18-day span before returning to normal. Astronomers traced the leap in brightness to a dwarf star in the cluster floating in front of the background star. The inset photo shows the entire globular cluster of about 10 million stars. M22 is about 60

  3. Control of Chemical, Thermal, and Gas Transport Properties in Dense Phosphazene Polymer Membranes.

    SciTech Connect

    Christopher J. Orme; Frederick F. Stewart; Mark L. Stone; Mason K. Harrup; Thomas A. Luther; Eric S. Peterson

    2005-10-01

    Polyphosphazenes are hybrid polymers having organic pendant groups attached to an inorganic backbone. Phosphazene polymers can be tailored to specific applications through the attachment of a variety of different pendant groups to the phosphazene backbone. Applications for which these polymers have proven useful include solid polymer electrolytes for batteries and fuel cells, as well as, membranes for gas and liquid separations. In past work, phosphazene polymers have been synthesized using mixtures of pendant groups with differing chemical affinities. Specific ratios of hydrophobic and hydrophilic pendant groups were placed on the phosphazene backbone with a goal of demonstrating control of solubility, and therefore chemical selectivity. In this work, a series of phosphazene homo-polymers were synthesized having varying amounts of hydrophobic and hydrophilic character on each individual pendant group. Polymers were synthesized having a hydrophilic portion next to the polymer backbone and the hydrophobic portion on the terminal end of the pendant group. The effects of these combined hydrophobic/hydrophilic pendant groups on polymer morphology and gas transport properties are presented. The following data will be addressed: thermal characterization, pure gas permeability on seven gases (Ar, H2, O2, N2, CO2, and CH4 ), and ideal selectivity for the gas pairs: O2/N2, H2/CO2, CO2/H2, CO2/CH4 and CO2/N2.

  4. GRAVITATIONAL CONUNDRUM? DYNAMICAL MASS SEGREGATION VERSUS DISRUPTION OF BINARY STARS IN DENSE STELLAR SYSTEMS

    SciTech Connect

    De Grijs, Richard; Li, Chengyuan; Zheng, Yong; Kouwenhoven, M. B. N.; Deng, Licai; Hu, Yi; Wicker, James E.

    2013-03-01

    Upon their formation, dynamically cool (collapsing) star clusters will, within only a few million years, achieve stellar mass segregation for stars down to a few solar masses, simply because of gravitational two-body encounters. Since binary systems are, on average, more massive than single stars, one would expect them to also rapidly mass segregate dynamically. Contrary to these expectations and based on high-resolution Hubble Space Telescope observations, we show that the compact, 15-30 Myr old Large Magellanic Cloud cluster NGC 1818 exhibits tantalizing hints at the {approx}> 2{sigma} level of significance (>3{sigma} if we assume a power-law secondary-to-primary mass-ratio distribution) of an increasing fraction of F-star binary systems (with combined masses of 1.3-1.6 M {sub Sun }) with increasing distance from the cluster center, specifically between the inner 10''-20'' (approximately equivalent to the cluster's core and half-mass radii) and the outer 60''-80''. If confirmed, then this will offer support for the theoretically predicted but thus far unobserved dynamical disruption processes of the significant population of 'soft' binary systems-with relatively low binding energies compared to the kinetic energy of their stellar members-in star clusters, which we have access to here by virtue of the cluster's unique combination of youth and high stellar density.

  5. Formation of massive black holes through runaway collisions in dense young star clusters.

    PubMed

    Zwart, Simon F Portegies; Baumgardt, Holger; Hut, Piet; Makino, Junichiro; McMillan, Stephen L W

    2004-04-15

    A luminous X-ray source is associated with MGG 11--a cluster of young stars approximately 200 pc from the centre of the starburst galaxy M 82 (refs 1, 2). The properties of this source are best explained by invoking a black hole with a mass of at least 350 solar masses (350 M(o)), which is intermediate between stellar-mass and supermassive black holes. A nearby but somewhat more massive cluster (MGG 9) shows no evidence of such an intermediate-mass black hole, raising the issue of just what physical characteristics of the clusters can account for this difference. Here we report numerical simulations of the evolution and motion of stars within the clusters, where stars are allowed to merge with each other. We find that for MGG 11 dynamical friction leads to the massive stars sinking rapidly to the centre of the cluster, where they participate in a runaway collision. This produces a star of 800-3,000 M(o) which ultimately collapses to a black hole of intermediate mass. No such runaway occurs in the cluster MGG 9, because the larger cluster radius leads to a mass segregation timescale a factor of five longer than for MGG 11. PMID:15085124

  6. Phase transition of a single star polymer: A Wang-Landau sampling study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Zilu; He, Xuehao

    2011-09-01

    Star polymers, as an important class of nonlinear macromolecules, process special thermodynamic properties for the existence of a common connecting point. The thermodynamic transitions of a single star polymer are systematically studied with the bond fluctuation model using Wang-Landau sampling techniques. A new analysis method employing the shape factor is proposed to locate the coil-globule (CG) and liquid-crystal (LC) transitions, which shows a higher efficiency and accuracy than the canonical specific heat function. The LC transition temperature is found to obey the identical scaling law as the linear polymers. However, the CG transition temperature shifts towards the LC transition with the increasing of the arm number. The reason is that for the star polymer a lower temperature is needed for the attractive force to overcome the excluded volume effect of the polymer chain because of its high arm density. This work clearly proves the structural distinction of the linear and star polymers can only affect the CG transition while has no influence on the LC transition.

  7. Phase transitions in dense matter and the maximum mass of neutron stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chamel, N.; Fantina, A. F.; Pearson, J. M.; Goriely, S.

    2013-05-01

    Context. The recent precise measurement of the mass of pulsar PSR J1614-2230, as well as observational indications of even more massive neutron stars, has revived the question of the composition of matter at the high densities prevailing inside neutron-star cores. Aims: We study the impact on the maximum possible neutron-star mass of an "exotic" core consisting of non-nucleonic matter. For this purpose, we study the occurrence of a first-order phase transition in nucleonic matter. Methods: Given the current lack of knowledge of non-nucleonic matter, we consider the stiffest possible equation of state subject only to the constraints of causality and thermodynamic stability. The case of a hadron-quark phase transition is discussed separately. The purely nucleonic matter is described using a set of unified equations of state that have been recently developed to permit a consistent treatment of both homogeneous and inhomogeneous phases. We then compute the mass-radius relation of cold nonaccreting neutron stars with and without exotic cores from the Tolman-Oppenheimer-Volkoff equations. Results: We find that even if there is a significant softening of the equation of state associated with the actual transition to an exotic phase, there can still be a stiffening at higher densities closer to the center of the star that is sufficient to increase the maximum possible mass. However, with quarks the maximum neutron-star mass is always reduced by assuming that the sound speed is limited by c/√3 as suggested by QCD calculations. In particular, by invoking such a phase transition, it becomes possible to support PSR J1614-2230 with a nucleonic equation of state that is soft enough to be compatible with the kaon and pion production in heavy-ion collisions.

  8. The equation of state of dense matter: from nuclear collisions to neutron stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burgio, G. F.

    2008-01-01

    The equation of state (EoS) of dense matter represents a central issue in the study of compact astrophysical objects and heavy ion reactions at intermediate and relativistic energies. We have derived a nuclear EoS with nucleons and hyperons within the Brueckner Hartree Fock approach, and joined it with quark matter EoS. For that, we have employed the MIT bag model, as well as the Nambu Jona-Lasinio and the color dielectric models, and found that the NS maximum masses are not larger than 1.7 solar masses. A comparison with available data supports the idea that dense matter EoS should be soft at low density and quite stiff at high density.

  9. A Unified Equation for the Reaction Rate in Dense Matter Stars

    SciTech Connect

    Gasques, L. R.; Wiescher, M.; Yakovlev, D. G.

    2007-10-26

    We analyze thermonuclear and pycnonuclear reaction rates in multi-component dense stellar plasma. First we describe calculations of the astrophysical S-factor at low energies using the Sao Paulo potential on the basis of the barrier penetration model. Then we present a simple phenomenological expression for a reaction rate. The expression contains several fit parameters which we adjust to reproduce the best microscopic calculations available in the literature.

  10. The Dense Matter Equation of State from Neutron Star Radius and Mass Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Özel, Feryal; Psaltis, Dimitrios; Güver, Tolga; Baym, Gordon; Heinke, Craig; Guillot, Sebastien

    2016-03-01

    We present a comprehensive study of spectroscopic radius measurements of twelve neutron stars obtained during thermonuclear bursts or in quiescence. We incorporate, for the first time, a large number of systematic uncertainties in the measurement of the apparent angular sizes, Eddington fluxes, and distances, in the composition of the interstellar medium, and in the flux calibration of X-ray detectors. We also take into account the results of recent theoretical calculations of rotational effects on neutron star radii, of atmospheric effects on surface spectra, and of relativistic corrections to the Eddington critical flux. We employ Bayesian statistical frameworks to obtain neutron star radii from the spectroscopic measurements as well as to infer the equation of state from the radius measurements. Combining these with the results of experiments in the vicinity of nuclear saturation density and the observations of ˜ 2 {M}⊙ neutron stars, we place strong and quantitative constraints on the properties of the equation of state between ≈ 2{--}8 times the nuclear saturation density. We find that around M=1.5{M}⊙ , the preferred equation of state predicts radii between 10.1 and 11.1 km. When interpreting the pressure constraints in the context of high density equations of state based on interacting nucleons, our results suggest a relatively weak contribution of the three-body interaction potential.

  11. Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Capelato, Hugo Vicente

    1999-01-01

    We will begin our study with a more or less superficial inspection of the "forest" of stars that we see in the skies. The first thing we notice is that, as sources of light, they are much weaker than the Sun. Second, their apparent colors vary; from a bluish-white in most of them to a reddish-yellow, which is rarer. There is also a third aspect, though it is not very obvious to the naked eye: most of the stars group themselves in small families of two, three or more members. A good example is the Alpha Centauri, the closest star to us, which, in fact, is a triple system of stars. Another is the group of 7 stars that make up the Pleiades, which will be discussed later on. In fact, almost half of the stars are double systems with only two members, called binary stars. Most of these double stars, though together, are separated by several astronomical units (one astronomical unit, AU, is the distance from Earth to the sun: see Chapter 1), and revolve around each other over periods of several years. And yet the revolutions of some binary stars, separated by much smaller distances, occur in only a few hours! These stars are so close to each other that they can share enveloping material. Often this exchange occurs in a somewhat violent manner. Local explosions may occur, expelling matter away from the system. In other binary systems, where one of the components is a very compact, dense star, companion material flows more calmly, making up a light disk around the compact star.

  12. Metal-Organic Polyhedral Core as a Versatile Scaffold for Divergent and Convergent Star Polymer Synthesis.

    PubMed

    Hosono, Nobuhiko; Gochomori, Mika; Matsuda, Ryotaro; Sato, Hiroshi; Kitagawa, Susumu

    2016-05-25

    We herein report the divergent and convergent synthesis of coordination star polymers (CSP) by using metal-organic polyhedrons (MOPs) as a multifunctional core. For the divergent route, copper-based great rhombicuboctahedral MOPs decorated with dithiobenzoate or trithioester chain transfer groups at the periphery were designed. Subsequent reversible addition-fragmentation chain transfer (RAFT) polymerization of monomers mediated by the MOPs gave star polymers, in which 24 polymeric arms were grafted from the MOP core. On the other hand, the convergent route provided identical CSP architectures by simple mixing of a macroligand and copper ions. Isophthalic acid-terminated polymers (so-called macroligands) immediately formed the corresponding CSPs through a coordination reaction with copper(II) ions. This convergent route enabled us to obtain miktoarm CSPs with tunable chain compositions through ligand mixing alone. This powerful method allows instant access to a wide variety of multicomponent star polymers that conventionally have required highly skilled and multistep syntheses. MOP-core CSPs are a new class of star polymer that can offer a design strategy for highly processable porous soft materials by using coordination nanocages as a building component. PMID:27119553

  13. Equation of state constraints for the cold dense matter inside neutron stars using the cooling tail method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nättilä, J.; Steiner, A. W.; Kajava, J. J. E.; Suleimanov, V. F.; Poutanen, J.

    2016-06-01

    The cooling phase of thermonuclear (type-I) X-ray bursts can be used to constrain neutron star (NS) compactness by comparing the observed cooling tracks of bursts to accurate theoretical atmosphere model calculations. By applying the so-called cooling tail method, where the information from the whole cooling track is used, we constrain the mass, radius, and distance for three different NSs in low-mass X-ray binaries 4U 1702-429, 4U 1724-307, and SAX J1810.8-260. Care is taken to use only the hard state bursts where it is thought that the NS surface alone is emitting. We then use a Markov chain Monte Carlo algorithm within a Bayesian framework to obtain a parameterized equation of state (EoS) of cold dense matter from our initial mass and radius constraints. This allows us to set limits on various nuclear parameters and to constrain an empirical pressure-density relationship for the dense matter. Our predicted EoS results in NS a radius between 10.5-12.8 km (95% confidence limits) for a mass of 1.4 M⊙, depending slightly on the assumed composition. Because of systematic errors and uncertainty in the composition, these results should be interpreted as lower limits for the radius.

  14. Constraining the Dense Matter Equation of State with ATHENA-WFI observations of Neutron Stars in Quiescent LMXBs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guillot, Sebastien; Oezel, F.

    2015-09-01

    The study of neutron star quiescent low-mass X-ray binaries (qLMXBs) will address one of the main science goals of the Athena x-ray observatory. The study of the soft X-ray thermal emission from the neutron star surface in qLMXBs is a crucial tool to place constrains on the dense matter equation of state. I will briefly review this method, its strength and current weaknesses and limitations, as well as the current constraints on the equation of state from qLMXBs. The superior sensitivity of Athena will permit the acquisition of unprecedentedly high signal-to-noise spectra from these sources. It has been demonstrated that a single qLMXB, even with high S/N, will not place useful constraints on the EoS. However, a combination of qLMXBs spectra has shown promises of obtaining tight constraints on the equation of state. I will discuss the expected prospects for observations of qLMXBs inside globular clusters -- those that Athena will be able to resolve. I will also present the constraints on the equation of state that Athena will be able to obtain from these qLMXBs and from a population of qLMXBs in the field of the Galaxy, with distance measurements provided by Gaia.

  15. Second-generation Stellar Disks in Dense Star Clusters and Cluster Ellipticities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mastrobuono-Battisti, Alessandra; Perets, Hagai B.

    2016-05-01

    Globular clusters (GCs) and nuclear star clusters (NSCs) are typically composed of several stellar populations, characterized by different chemical compositions. Different populations show different ages in NSCs, but not necessarily in GCs. The youngest populations in NSCs appear to reside in disk-like structures as observed in our Galaxy and in M31. Gas infall followed by formation of second-generation (SG) stars in GCs may similarly form disk-like structures in the clusters nuclei. Here we explore this possibility and follow the long-term evolution of stellar disks embedded in GCs, and study their effects on the evolution of the clusters. We study disks with different masses by means of detailed N-body simulations and explore their morphological and kinematic signatures on the GC structures. We find that as a SG disk relaxes, the old, first-generation stellar population flattens and becomes more radially anisotropic, making the GC structure become more elliptical. The SG stellar population is characterized by a lower velocity dispersion and a higher rotational velocity compared with the primordial older population. The strength of these kinematic signatures depends both on the relaxation time of the system and on the fractional mass of the SG disk. We therefore conclude that SG populations formed in flattened configurations will give rise to two systematic trends: (1) a positive correlation between GC ellipticity and fraction of SG population and (2) a positive correlation between GC relaxation time and ellipticity. Therefore, GC ellipticities and rotation could be related to the formation of SG stars and their initial configuration.

  16. Neutron stars, fast pulsars, supernovae and the equation of state of dense matter

    SciTech Connect

    Glendening, N.K.

    1989-06-01

    We discuss the prospects for obtaining constraints on the equation of state from astrophysical sources. Neutron star masses although few are known at present, provide a very direct constraint in as much as the connection to the equation of state involves only the assumption that Einstein's general theory of relativity is correct at the macroscopic scale. If the millisecond pulses briefly observed in the remnant of SN1987A can be attributed to uniform rotation of a pulsar, then a very severe constraint is placed on the equation of state. The theory again is very secure. The precise nature of the constraint is not yet understood, but it appears that the equation of state must be neither too soft nor stiff, and it may be that there is information not only on the stiffness of the equation of state but on its shape. Supernovae simulations involve such a plethora of physical processes including those involved in the evolution of the precollapse configuration, not all of them known or understood, that they provide no constraint at the present time. Not even the broad category of mechanism for the explosion is agreed upon (prompt shock, delayed shock, or nuclear explosion). In connection with very fast pulsars, we include some speculations on pure quark matter stars, and on possible scenarios for understanding the disappearance of the fast pulsar in SN1987A. 47 refs., 16 figs., 1 tab.

  17. HATS-4b: A dense hot Jupiter transiting a super metal-rich G star

    SciTech Connect

    Jordán, Andrés; Brahm, Rafael; Rabus, M.; Suc, V.; Espinoza, N.; Bakos, G. Á.; Penev, K.; Hartman, J. D.; Csubry, Z.; Bhatti, W.; De Val Borro, M.; Bayliss, D.; Zhou, G.; Mancini, L.; Mohler-Fischer, M.; Ciceri, S.; Csák, B.; Henning, T.; Sato, B.; Buchhave, L.; and others

    2014-08-01

    We report the discovery by the HATSouth survey of HATS-4b, an extrasolar planet transiting a V = 13.46 mag G star. HATS-4b has a period of P ≈ 2.5167 days, mass of M{sub p} ≈ 1.32 M {sub Jup}, radius of R{sub p} ≈ 1.02 R {sub Jup}, and density of ρ {sub p} = 1.55 ± 0.16 g cm{sup –3} ≈1.24 ρ{sub Jup}. The host star has a mass of 1.00 M {sub ☉}, a radius of 0.92 R {sub ☉}, and a very high metallicity [Fe/H]=0.43 ± 0.08. HATS-4b is among the densest known planets with masses between 1 and 2 M {sub J} and is thus likely to have a significant content of heavy elements of the order of 75 M {sub ⊕}. In this paper we present the data reduction, radial velocity measurements, and stellar classification techniques adopted by the HATSouth survey for the CORALIE spectrograph. We also detail a technique for simultaneously estimating vsin i and macroturbulence using high resolution spectra.

  18. An arm-first approach to cleavable mikto-arm star polymers by RAFT polymerization.

    PubMed

    Wei, Xiaohu; Moad, Graeme; Muir, Benjamin W; Rizzardo, Ezio; Rosselgong, Julien; Yang, Wantai; Thang, San H

    2014-04-01

    Redox-cleavable mikto-arm star polymers are prepared by an "arm-first" approach involving copolymerization of a dimethacrylate mediated by a mixture of macroRAFT agents. Thus, RAFT copolymerization of the monomers BMA, DMAEMA, and OEGMA, with the disulfide dimethacrylate cross-linker (DSDMA), bis(2-methacryloyl)oxyethyl disulfide, mediated by a 1:1:1 mixture of three macroRAFT agents with markedly different properties [hydrophilic, poly[oligo(ethylene glycol) methacrylate]-P(OEGMA)8-9 ; cationizable, poly[2-(dimethylamino)ethyl methacrylate]-P(DMAEMA); hydrophobic, poly(n-butyl methacrylate)-P(BMA)] provides low dispersity mikto-arm star polymers. Good control (Đ < 1.3) is observed for the target P(DMAEMA)/P(OEGMA)/P(BMA) (3:3:1) mikto-arm star, a double hydrophilic P(DMAEMA)/P(OEGMA) (3:3) mikto-arm star and a hydrophobic P(BMA) homo-arm star. However, Đ for the target mikto-arm stars increases with an increase in either the ratio [DSDMA]:[total macroRAFT] or the fraction of hydrophobic P(BMA) macroRAFT agent. The quaternized mikto-arm star in dilute aqueous solution shows a monomodal particle size distribution and an average size of ≈145 nm. PMID:24504709

  19. Equation of state of dense nuclear matter and an upper bound on neutron star masses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Negi, P. S.; Durgapal, M. C.

    2001-02-01

    We have discussed, in general, the important physical parameters, like maximum mass, radius, and the minimum rotation period of self-bound, causally consistent, and pulsationally stable neutron stars (Q-star models) by using a realistic stiff EOS (such that, the speed of sound, v~ P, or nP=K(E-E), where K<= 1 and n =1/(1-2N) where P and E represent respectively, the pressure and the energy-density, and E is the value of E at the surface (r = a) of the configuration) within the two constraints imposed by: (i) The minimum rotation period, P, for the pulsar known to date corresponds to 1.558 ms, and (ii) The maximum number density anywhere inside the structure for the models described as Q-stars cannot exceed ~ 1 nucleon/fm^3. By using the empirical formula given by Koranda, Stergioulas and Friedman (1997) (KSF-formula), and imposing constraint (i), we have obtained an upper bound of M ≅ 7.76 M radius a≅ 32.5 km, and the central energy-density around 2.17 × 10^14 g cm^-3 (for n =1.01). Constraint (ii) provides the minimum rotation period, P ~ 0.489 ms for the maximum mass M ~ 2.4 M_solar, and the central energy-density around 2.20 × 10^15 g cm^-3 (for n =1.01). The speed of sound at the centre of these models approaches ~ 99% of the speed of light `c' (in the vacuum) and vanishes at the surface of the configuration together with pressure. If we relax the maximum Kepler frequency imposed by the fastest rotating pulsar known to date (constraint (i)), in view of certain observational effects and theoretical evidences, and allow the present EOS to produce larger rotation rates than the 1.558 ms pulsar, the maximum mass of the non-rotating model drops down to a value ~ 7.2 M_solar. The higher values of masses (>= 7 M_solar) and radii (~ 31-32 km) obtained in this study imply that these models may represent the massive compact objects like Cyg X-1, Cyg XR-1, LMC X-3, and others which are known as black hole candidates (BHCs). This study also suggest that the strongest

  20. Quantification of interaction and topological parameters of polyisoprene star polymers under good solvent conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rai, Durgesh K.; Beaucage, Gregory; Ratkanthwar, Kedar; Beaucage, Peter; Ramachandran, Ramnath; Hadjichristidis, Nikos

    2016-05-01

    Mass fractal scaling, reflected in the mass fractal dimension df, is independently impacted by topology, reflected in the connectivity dimension c , and by tortuosity, reflected in the minimum dimension dmin. The mass fractal dimension is related to these other dimensions by df=c dmin . Branched fractal structures have a higher mass fractal dimension compared to linear structures due to a higher c , and extended structures have a lower dimension compared to convoluted self-avoiding and Gaussian walks due to a lower dmin. It is found, in this work, that macromolecules in thermodynamic equilibrium display a fixed mass fractal dimension df under good solvent conditions, regardless of chain topology. These equilibrium structures accommodate changes in chain topology such as branching c by a decrease in chain tortuosity dmin. Symmetric star polymers are used to understand the structure of complex macromolecular topologies. A recently published hybrid Unified scattering function accounts for interarm correlations in symmetric star polymers along with polymer-solvent interaction for chains of arbitrary scaling dimension. Dilute solutions of linear, three-arm and six-arm polyisoprene stars are studied under good solvent conditions in deuterated p -xylene. Reduced chain tortuosity can be viewed as steric straightening of the arms. Steric effects for star topologies are quantified, and it is found that steric straightening of arms is more significant for lower-molecular-weight arms. The observation of constant df is explained through a modification of Flory-Krigbaum theory for branched polymers.

  1. Effect of functionality on unentangled star polymers at equilibrium and under shear flow.

    PubMed

    Xu, Xiaolei; Chen, Jizhong

    2016-06-28

    The properties of unentangled star polymers with arm length Nf = 20 beads and functionality f (3 ≤ f ≤ 60) are investigated at equilibrium and under shear flow by coarse-grained molecular dynamics simulations. At equilibrium, the star polymer shows a crossover from a linear, freely penetrable, extremely soft object to a spherical, slightly hard object with an impenetrable center with increasing f. The results confirm that the arm relaxation is essentially independent of f and stars of large f form a liquid-like structure. In shear flow, the polymer deformation and alignment are calculated as well as the shear-induced rotational dynamics as function of shear rate. These properties are found to exhibit qualitative changes at an f-independent shear rate, γṗ, which is a consequence of competition between chain relaxation and imposed flow. Shear thinning is characterized by shear viscosity and normal stress differences. With increasing f, the critical shear rate for the onset of shear thinning decreases from γṗ for f = 3 to a smaller value. Our results also show that shear thinning of stars of large f arise from the collapse of liquid-like structures at low shear rates (γ̇≪γṗ), where chains have no deformation; at high shear rates (γ̇≫γṗ), shear thinning is mainly attributed to the chain stretching and orientation as linear polymers. PMID:27369542

  2. Effect of functionality on unentangled star polymers at equilibrium and under shear flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Xiaolei; Chen, Jizhong

    2016-06-01

    The properties of unentangled star polymers with arm length Nf = 20 beads and functionality f (3 ≤ f ≤ 60) are investigated at equilibrium and under shear flow by coarse-grained molecular dynamics simulations. At equilibrium, the star polymer shows a crossover from a linear, freely penetrable, extremely soft object to a spherical, slightly hard object with an impenetrable center with increasing f. The results confirm that the arm relaxation is essentially independent of f and stars of large f form a liquid-like structure. In shear flow, the polymer deformation and alignment are calculated as well as the shear-induced rotational dynamics as function of shear rate. These properties are found to exhibit qualitative changes at an f-independent shear rate, γ p ˙ , which is a consequence of competition between chain relaxation and imposed flow. Shear thinning is characterized by shear viscosity and normal stress differences. With increasing f, the critical shear rate for the onset of shear thinning decreases from γ p ˙ for f = 3 to a smaller value. Our results also show that shear thinning of stars of large f arise from the collapse of liquid-like structures at low shear rates ( γ ˙ ≪ γ p ˙), where chains have no deformation; at high shear rates ( γ ˙ ≫ γ p ˙), shear thinning is mainly attributed to the chain stretching and orientation as linear polymers.

  3. Partitioning of star branched polymers into pores at three chromatography conditions.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yongmei; Masur, Aaron; Zhu, Yutian; Ziebarth, Jesse

    2010-09-24

    The partitioning of star branched polymers into a slit pore at three different chromatography conditions, namely, size exclusion chromatography (SEC), liquid chromatography at the critical condition (LCCC), and liquid adsorption chromatography (LAC) have been investigated with lattice Monte Carlo simulations. Two different chain models are used: random walks (RW) that have no excluded volume interaction and self-avoiding walks (SAW) that have excluded volume interaction. The simulation data obtained for the two chain models are compared to illustrate the effect of excluded volume interactions on the partitioning of star branched polymers. The two most outstanding effects observed due to the introduction of excluded volume interactions are: (i) stars with a high number of arms can be excluded from the pore at condition corresponding to the LCCC of the linear polymers; (ii) the partition coefficient of stars in LAC mode is not dependent only on the total number of monomers on the chain. These effects illustrated by the current study should be taken into account when interpreting experimental chromatography data for branched polymers. PMID:20728895

  4. CARMA LARGE AREA STAR FORMATION SURVEY: STRUCTURE AND KINEMATICS OF DENSE GAS IN SERPENS MAIN

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Katherine I.; Storm, Shaye; Mundy, Lee G.; Teuben, Peter; Pound, Marc W.; Salter, Demerese M.; Chen, Che-Yu; Fernández-López, Manuel; Looney, Leslie W.; Segura-Cox, Dominique; Rosolowsky, Erik; Arce, Héctor G.; Plunkett, Adele L.; Ostriker, Eve C.; Shirley, Yancy L.; Kwon, Woojin; Kauffmann, Jens; Tobin, John J.; Volgenau, N. H.; Tassis, Konstantinos; and others

    2014-12-20

    We present observations of N{sub 2}H{sup +} (J = 1 → 0), HCO{sup +} (J = 1 → 0), and HCN (J = 1 → 0) toward the Serpens Main molecular cloud from the CARMA Large Area Star Formation Survey (CLASSy). We mapped 150 arcmin{sup 2} of Serpens Main with an angular resolution of ∼7''. The gas emission is concentrated in two subclusters (the NW and SE subclusters). The SE subcluster has more prominent filamentary structures and more complicated kinematics compared to the NW subcluster. The majority of gas in the two subclusters has subsonic to sonic velocity dispersions. We applied a dendrogram technique with N{sub 2}H{sup +}(1-0) to study the gas structures; the SE subcluster has a higher degree of hierarchy than the NW subcluster. Combining the dendrogram and line fitting analyses reveals two distinct relations: a flat relation between nonthermal velocity dispersion and size, and a positive correlation between variation in velocity centroids and size. The two relations imply a characteristic depth of 0.15 pc for the cloud. Furthermore, we have identified six filaments in the SE subcluster. These filaments have lengths of ∼0.2 pc and widths of ∼0.03 pc, which is smaller than a characteristic width of 0.1 pc suggested by Herschel observations. The filaments can be classified into two types based on their properties. The first type, located in the northeast of the SE subcluster, has larger velocity gradients, smaller masses, and nearly critical mass-per-unit-length ratios. The other type, located in the southwest of the SE subcluster, has the opposite properties. Several YSOs are formed along two filaments which have supercritical mass per unit length ratios, while filaments with nearly critical mass-per-unit-length ratios are not associated with YSOs, suggesting that stars are formed on gravitationally unstable filaments.

  5. Stars, dendrimers and hyperbranched polymers: Towards understanding structure-property relationships for single molecule constructs

    SciTech Connect

    Mathias, L.J.; Reichert, V.R.; Carothers, T.W.; Bozen, R.M.

    1993-12-31

    New families of tetrahedral core molecules for synthesizing star and hyperbranched polymers are based on new adamantane derivatives. Four-arm structures have been obtained that are capable of chain extension and thermal conversion to highly crosslinked materials. Hyperbranched and star polymers containing siloxysilane repeat units have also been made through polyaddition hydrosilation reactions with star nodes and A-B monomers or A-B{sub 3} monomers. Terminal functionalization has been demonstrated for a variety of reactive and interactive groups that offer possibilities for use in artificial blood and interfacial microreactors. Combination of rigid tetrahedral cores with start or hyperbranched arms should make available new families of materials for composite synthesis, fiber interphase, formation and impact modification.

  6. Faint disks around classical T Tauri stars: Small but dense enough to form planets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piétu, V.; Guilloteau, S.; Di Folco, E.; Dutrey, A.; Boehler, Y.

    2014-04-01

    Context. Most Class II sources (of nearby star-forming regions) are surrounded by disks with weak millimeter continuum emission. These "faint" disks may hold clues to the disk dissipation mechanism. However, the physical properties of protoplanetary disks have been directly constrained by imaging only the brightest sources. Aims: We attempt to determine the characteristics of such faint disks around classical T Tauri stars and to explore the link between disk faintness and the proposed disk dispersal mechanisms (accretion, viscous spreading, photo-evaporation, planetary system formation). Methods: We performed high angular resolution (0.3'') imaging of a small sample of disks (9 sources) with low 1.3 mm continuum flux (mostly <30 mJy) with the IRAM Plateau de Bure interferometer and simultaneously searched for 13CO (or CO) J = 2-1 line emission. Using a simple parametric disk model, we determined characteristic sizes for the disks in dust and gas, and we constrained surface densities in the central 50 AU. Results: All disks are much smaller than the bright disks imaged so far, both in continuum and 13CO lines (5 detections). In continuum, half of the disks are very small, with characteristic radii less than 10 AU, but still have high surface density values. Small sizes appear to be the main cause of the low disk luminosity. Direct evidence for grain growth is found for the three disks that are sufficiently resolved. Low continuum opacity is attested in only two systems, but we cannot firmly distinguish between a low gas surface density and a lower dust emissivity resulting from grain growth. Finally, we report a tentative discovery of a ~20 AU radius cavity in DS Tau, which with the (unresolved) "transition" disk of CX Tau, brings the proportion of "transitional" disks to a similar value to that of brighter sources. The existence of cavities cannot by itself explain their observed low mm flux. Conclusions: This study highlights a category of very compact dust disks

  7. Molecular emission in dense massive clumps from the star-forming regions S231-S235

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ladeyschikov, D. A.; Kirsanova, M. S.; Tsivilev, A. P.; Sobolev, A. M.

    2016-04-01

    The paper is concerned with the study of the star-forming regions S231-S235 in radio lines of molecules of the interstellar medium—carbon monoxide (CO), ammonia (NH3), cyanoacetylene (HC3N), in maser lines—methanol (CH3OH) and water vapor (H2O). The regions S231-S235 belong to the giant molecular cloudG174+2.5. The goal of this paper is to search for new sources of emission toward molecular clumps and to estimate their physical parameters from CO and NH3 molecular lines. We obtained new detections ofNH3 andHC3Nlines in the sources WB89673 and WB89 668 which indicates the presence of high-density gas. From the CO line, we derived sizes, column densities, and masses of molecular clumps. From the NH3 line, we derived gas kinetic temperatures and number densities in molecular clumps. We determined that kinetic temperatures and number densities of molecular gas are within the limits 16-30 K and 2.8-7.2 × 103 cm-3 respectively. The shock-tracing line of CH3OH molecule at a frequency of 36.2 GHz was detected in WB89 673 for the first time.

  8. Predicting water sorption and volume swelling in dense polymer systems via computer simulation.

    PubMed

    Hörstermann, Henning; Hentschke, Reinhard; Amkreutz, Marc; Hoffmann, Michael; Wirts-Rütters, Martin

    2010-12-30

    Atomistic model structures of amorphous polyamide 6 (PA-6) and of an adhesive system consisting of the diglycidyl ether of bisphenol A (DGEBA) as epoxy resin and isophorone diamine (IPD) as a curing agent are generated. For the adhesive, we use a new approach for the generation of the cross-linked polymer networks. It takes into account the chemical reaction kinetics of the curing reaction and, therefore, results in more realistic network structures. On the basis of the corresponding model structures, the equilibrium water content and the swelling ratio of amorphous PA-6 and of the DGEBA+IPD networks are calculated via computer simulation for different thermodynamic conditions. A hybrid method is used combining the molecular dynamics technique with an accelerated test particle insertion method. The results are in reasonable agreement with experiments and, in the case of the PA-6 system, with results obtained via other computer simulation methods. PMID:21141921

  9. Electrochemical Interrogation of G3-Poly(propylene thiophenoimine) Dendritic Star Polymer in Phenanthrene Sensing

    PubMed Central

    Makelane, Hlamulo R.; Tovide, Oluwakemi; Sunday, Christopher E.; Waryo, Tesfaye; Iwuoha, Emmanuel I.

    2015-01-01

    A novel dendritic star-copolymer, generation 3 poly(propylene thiophenoimine) (G3PPT)-co-poly(3-hexylthiophene) (P3HT) star co-polymer on gold electrode (i.e., Au|G3PPT-co-P3HT) was used as a sensor system for the determination of phenanthrene (PHE). The G3PPT-co-P3HT star co-polymer was synthesized via in situ electrochemical co-polymerization of generation 3 poly (propylene thiophenoimine) and poly (3-hexylthiophene) on gold electrode. 1HNMR spectroscopy was used to determine the regioregularity of the polymer composites, whereas Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and scanning electron microscopy were used to study their structural and morphological properties. Au|G3PPT-co-P3HT in the absence of PHE, exhibited reversible electrochemistry attributable to the oligo (thiophene) ‘pendants’ of the dendrimer. PHE produced an increase in the voltammetric signals (anodic currents) due to its oxidation on the dendritic material to produce catalytic current, thereby suggesting the suitability of the Au|G3PPT-co-P3HT electrode as a PHE sensor. The electrocatalysis of PHE was made possible by the rigid and planar oligo-P3HT species (formed upon the oxidation of the oligo (thiophene) pendants of the star-copolymer), which allowed the efficient capture (binding) and detection (electrocatalytic oxidation) of PHE molecules. PMID:26404296

  10. Fluorous microgel star polymers: selective recognition and separation of polyfluorinated surfactants and compounds in water.

    PubMed

    Koda, Yuta; Terashima, Takaya; Sawamoto, Mitsuo

    2014-11-01

    Immiscible with either hydrophobic or hydrophilic solvents, polyfluorinated compounds (PFCs) are generally "fluorous", some of which have widely been employed as surfactants and water/oil repellents. Given the prevailing concern about the environmental pollution and the biocontamination by PFCs, their efficient removal and recycle from industrial wastewater and products are critically required. This paper demonstrates that fluorous-core star polymers consisting of a polyfluorinated microgel core and hydrophilic PEG-functionalized arms efficiently and selectively capture PFCs in water into the cores by fluorous interaction. For example, with over 10 000 fluorine atoms in the core and approximately 100 hydrophilic arms, the fluorous stars remove perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA) and related PFCs in water from 10 ppm to as low as a parts per billion (ppb) level, or an over 98% removal. Dually functionalized microgel-core star polymers with perfluorinated alkanes and additional amino (or ammonium) groups cooperatively recognize PFOA or its ammonium salt and, in addition, release the guests upon external stimuli. The "smart" performance shows that the fluorous-core star polymers are promising PFC separation, recovery, and recycle materials for water purification toward sustainable society. PMID:25300369

  11. Synthesis and properties of polymeric cation conductors and amphiphilic star polymers

    SciTech Connect

    Zho, Guangbin

    1992-12-31

    Polymeric alkali ion conductors consisting of a comblike polysiloxane with oligo-oxyethylene side chains and pendant sulfonate groups were synthesized by the quantitative hydrosilylation of an allyl methoxy-polyethylene glycol and allyl glycidyl ether with polyhydrogenmethyl-siloxane, followed by the sulfonation of the epoxy group. The addition of Si-H is chiefly to the B-vinyl carbon and the sulfonation reaction is quantitative. DSC and conductivity measurements show that these materials are essentially amorphous and their cation conducting behavior can be interpreted by a VTF type equation. Due to the tightness of the alkali sulfonate ion pairs the conductivity of these polymers is low compared to that of dual polymer electrolytes containing LiClO{sub 4} or LiCF{sub 3}SO{sub 3} salt. However, conductivities of up to 10{sup {minus}5} S cm{sup {minus}1} at 25{degrees}C can be achieved by adding cation chelating ligands such as tetraethylene glycol. The effect of cation, temperature, ion content, glass transition temperature, and additives on the conductivity of these materials is discussed. Well-defined multifunctional isocyantes are obtained in high purity and quantitative yield by hydrosilylation of m-isopropenyl-{alpha}, {alpha}-dimethylbenzyl isocyanate (m-TMI) with cyclic and acyclic hydrogen-methylsiloxanes. The products were exclusively result from {beta}-addition of Si-H to the double bond in m-TMI. The polyisocyanates were reacted with methoxypolyethylene glycols (MPEG) and with nonlphenoxypolyethylene glycols (NPPEG) to yield amphiphilic star polymers with a precise number of arms. Amphiphilic star homopolmers made from MPEG form micelles in water. Star polymers with NPPEG arms in aqueous solutions separate into two phases of constant composition, the condensed phase being an associative network resembling a hydrogel. Surface tension, viscosities, cloud points, salt binding and solubilities were determined and compared with linear or star polymers.

  12. Intravaginal gene silencing using biodegradable polymer nanoparticles densely loaded with small-interfering RNA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woodrow, Kim A.; Cu, Yen; Booth, Carmen J.; Saucier-Sawyer, Jennifer K.; Wood, Monica J.; Mark Saltzman, W.

    2009-06-01

    Vaginal instillation of small-interfering RNA (siRNA) using liposomes has led to silencing of endogenous genes in the genital tract and protection against challenge from infectious disease. Although siRNA lipoplexes are easily formulated, several of the most effective transfection agents available commercially may be toxic to the mucosal epithelia and none are able to provide controlled or sustained release. Here, we demonstrate an alternative approach using nanoparticles composed entirely of FDA-approved materials. To render these materials effective for gene silencing, we developed novel approaches to load them with high amounts of siRNA. A single dose of siRNA-loaded nanoparticles to the mouse female reproductive tract caused efficient and sustained gene silencing. Knockdown of gene expression was observed proximal (in the vaginal lumen) and distal (in the uterine horns) to the site of topical delivery. In addition, nanoparticles penetrated deep into the epithelial tissue. This is the first report demonstrating that biodegradable polymer nanoparticles are effective delivery vehicles for siRNA to the vaginal mucosa.

  13. CARMA Large Area Star Formation Survey: project overview with analysis of dense gas structure and kinematics in Barnard 1

    SciTech Connect

    Storm, Shaye; Mundy, Lee G.; Lee, Katherine I.; Teuben, Peter; Pound, Marc W.; Salter, Demerese M.; Chen, Che-Yu; Gong, Hao; Fernández-López, Manuel; Looney, Leslie W.; Segura-Cox, Dominique M.; Rosolowsky, Erik; Arce, Héctor G.; Plunkett, Adele L.; Ostriker, Eve C.; Volgenau, Nikolaus H.; Shirley, Yancy L.; Tobin, John J.; Kwon, Woojin; Isella, Andrea; and others

    2014-10-20

    We present details of the CARMA Large Area Star Formation Survey (CLASSy), while focusing on observations of Barnard 1. CLASSy is a CARMA Key Project that spectrally imaged N{sub 2}H{sup +}, HCO{sup +}, and HCN (J = 1 → 0 transitions) across over 800 square arcminutes of the Perseus and Serpens Molecular Clouds. The observations have angular resolution near 7'' and spectral resolution near 0.16 km s{sup –1}. We imaged ∼150 square arcminutes of Barnard 1, focusing on the main core, and the B1 Ridge and clumps to its southwest. N{sub 2}H{sup +} shows the strongest emission, with morphology similar to cool dust in the region, while HCO{sup +} and HCN trace several molecular outflows from a collection of protostars in the main core. We identify a range of kinematic complexity, with N{sub 2}H{sup +} velocity dispersions ranging from ∼0.05 to 0.50 km s{sup –1} across the field. Simultaneous continuum mapping at 3 mm reveals six compact object detections, three of which are new detections. A new, non-binary dendrogram algorithm is used to analyze dense gas structures in the N{sub 2}H{sup +} position-position-velocity (PPV) cube. The projected sizes of dendrogram-identified structures range from about 0.01 to 0.34 pc. Size-linewidth relations using those structures show that non-thermal line-of-sight velocity dispersion varies weakly with projected size, while rms variation in the centroid velocity rises steeply with projected size. Comparing these relations, we propose that all dense gas structures in Barnard 1 have comparable depths into the sky, around 0.1-0.2 pc; this suggests that overdense, parsec-scale regions within molecular clouds are better described as flattened structures rather than spherical collections of gas. Science-ready PPV cubes for Barnard 1 molecular emission are available for download.

  14. A systematic procedure to build a relaxed dense-phase atomistic representation of a complex amorphous polymer using a coarse-grained modeling approach

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xianfeng; Latour, Robert A.

    2009-01-01

    A systematic procedure has been developed to construct a relaxed dense-phase atomistic structure of a complex amorphous polymer. The numerical procedure consists of (1) coarse graining the atomistic model of the polymer into a mesoscopic model based on an iterative algorithm for potential inversion from distribution functions of the atomistic model, (2) relaxation of the coarse grained chain using a molecular dynamics scheme, and (3) recovery of the atomistic structure by reverse mapping based on the superposition of atomistic counterparts on the corresponding coarse grained coordinates. These methods are demonstrated by their application to construct a relaxed, dense-phase model of poly(DTB succinate), which is an amorphous tyrosine-derived biodegradable polymer that is being developed for biomedical applications. Both static and dynamic properties from the coarse-grained and atomistic simulations are analyzed and compared. The coarse-grained model, which contains the essential features of the DTB succinate structure, successfully described both local and global structural properties of the atomistic chain. The effective speedup compared to the corresponding atomistic simulation is substantially above 102, thus enabling simulation times to reach well into the characteristic experimental regime. The computational approach for reversibly bridging between coarse-grained and atomistic models provides an efficient method to produce relaxed dense-phase all-atom molecular models of complex amorphous polymers that can subsequently be used to study and predict the atomistic-level behavior of the polymer under different environmental conditions in order to optimally design polymers for targeted applications. PMID:20161121

  15. High-Resolution Imaging of Dense Gas Structure and Kinematics in Nearby Molecular Clouds with the CARMA Large Area Star Formation Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Storm, Shaye

    This thesis utilizes new observations of dense gas in molecular clouds to develop an empirical framework for how clouds form structures which evolve into young cores and stars. Previous observations show the general turbulent and hierarchical nature of clouds. However, current understanding of the star formation pathway is limited by existing data that do not combine angular resolution needed to resolve individual cores with area coverage required to capture entire star-forming regions and with tracers that can resolve gas motions. The original contributions of this thesis to astrophysical research are the creation and analysis of the largest-area high-angular-resolution maps of dense gas in molecular clouds to-date, and the development of a non-binary dendrogram algorithm to quantify the hierarchical nature and three-dimensional morphology of cloud structure. I first describe the CARMA Large Area Star Formation Survey, which provides spectrally imaged N2H+, HCO+, and HCN (J = 1→0) emission across diverse regions of the Perseus and Serpens Molecular Clouds. I then present a detailed analysis of the Barnard 1 and L1451 regions in Perseus. A non-binary dendrogram analysis of Barnard 1 N2H emission and all L1451 emission shows that the most hierarchically complex gas corresponds with sub-regions actively forming young stars. I estimate the typical depth of molecular emission in each region using the spatial and kinematic properties of dendrogram-identified structures. Barnard 1 appears to be a sheet-like region at the largest scales with filamentary substructure, while the L1451 region is composed of more spatially distinct ellipsoidal structures. I then do a uniform comparison of the hierarchical structure and young stellar content of all five regions. The more evolved regions with the most young stellar objects (YSOs) and strongest emission have formed the most hierarchical levels. However, all regions show similar mean branching properties at each level

  16. Dense neutron star matter

    SciTech Connect

    Stone, J. R.

    2014-05-02

    The microscopic composition and properties of matter at super-saturation densities have been a subject of intense investigation for decades. The scarcity of experimental and observational data has lead to the necessary reliance on theoretical models. However, there remains great uncertainty in these models, which, of necessity, have to go beyond the over-simple assumption that high-density matter consists only of nucleons and leptons. Heavy strange baryons, mesons and quark matter in different forms and phases have to be included to fulfill basic requirements of fundamental laws of physics.

  17. Dense neutron star matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stone, J. R.

    2014-05-01

    The microscopic composition and properties of matter at super-saturation densities have been a subject of intense investigation for decades. The scarcity of experimental and observational data has lead to the necessary reliance on theoretical models. However, there remains great uncertainty in these models, which, of necessity, have to go beyond the over-simple assumption that high-density matter consists only of nucleons and leptons. Heavy strange baryons, mesons and quark matter in different forms and phases have to be included to fulfill basic requirements of fundamental laws of physics.

  18. STAR-FORMING DENSE CLOUD CORES IN THE TeV GAMMA-RAY SNR RX J1713.7-3946

    SciTech Connect

    Sano, H.; Sato, J.; Horachi, H.; Moribe, N.; Yamamoto, H.; Hayakawa, T.; Torii, K.; Kawamura, A.; Okuda, T.; Mizuno, N.; Onishi, T.; Inutsuka, S.; Matsumoto, H.; Maezawa, H.; Mizuno, A.; Inoue, T.; Tanaka, T.; Ogawa, H.; Stutzki, J.; Bertoldi, F.

    2010-11-20

    RX J1713.7-3946 is one of the TeV {gamma}-ray supernova remnants (SNRs) emitting synchrotron X-rays. The SNR is associated with molecular gas located at {approx}1 kpc. We made new molecular observations toward the dense cloud cores, peaks A, C, and D, in the SNR in the {sup 12}CO(J = 2-1) and {sup 13}CO(J = 2-1) transitions at an angular resolution of 90''. The most intense core in {sup 13}CO, peak C, was also mapped in the {sup 12}CO(J = 4-3) transition at an angular resolution of 38''. Peak C shows strong signs of active star formation including bipolar outflow and a far-infrared protostellar source, and has a steep gradient with a r {sup -2.2{+-}0.4} variation in the average density within radius r. Peak C and the other dense cloud cores are rim-brightened in synchrotron X-rays, suggesting that the dense cloud cores are embedded within or on the outer boundary of the SNR shell. This confirms the earlier suggestion that the X-rays are physically associated with the molecular gas. We present a scenario where the densest molecular core, peak C, survived the blast wave and is now embedded within the SNR. Numerical simulations of the shock-cloud interaction indicate that a dense clump can indeed survive shock erosion, since the shock propagation speed is stalled in the dense clump. Additionally, the shock-cloud interaction induces turbulence and magnetic field amplification around the dense clump that may facilitate particle acceleration in the lower-density inter-clump space leading to enhanced synchrotron X-rays around dense cores.

  19. Coarse-graining and phase behavior of model star polymer-colloid mixtures in solvents of varying quality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nikoubashman, Arash; Mahynski, Nathan A.; Capone, Barbara; Panagiotopoulos, Athanassios Z.; Likos, Christos N.

    2015-12-01

    We study the effective interactions and phase behavior of star polymer-colloid mixtures through theory and Monte Carlo simulations. We extend previous theoretical approaches for calculating the effective star-colloid pair potential to take into account attractive contributions, which become significant at worsening solvent conditions. In order to assess the validity of our simulation and theory, we compute the effective interactions via virtual move parallel tempering Monte Carlo simulations using a microscopic bead-spring model for the star polymer and achieve excellent agreement. Finally, we perform grand canonical Monte Carlo simulations of the coarse-grained systems to study the effect of solvent quality on the phase behavior.

  20. Aging and stiction dynamics in confined films of a star polymer melt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamada, Shinji

    2012-11-01

    rearrangements of the soft star-PIP spheres into dense packing between surfaces (analogous to the concept of a colloidal glass transition) are the major mechanism of the freezing transition (stiction) after aging. Interdigitation of PIP segments/chain ends between neighboring star molecules also contributes to the spike growth along with aging, and the melting transition on starting.

  1. Electrophoretic mobility of linear and star-branched DNA in semidilute polymer solutions.

    PubMed

    Saha, Sourav; Heuer, Daniel M; Archer, Lynden A

    2006-08-01

    Electrophoresis of large linear T2 (162 kbp) and 3-arm star-branched (N(Arm) = 48.5 kbp) DNA in linear polyacrylamide (LPA) solutions above the overlap concentration c* has been investigated using a fluorescence visualization technique that allows both the conformation and mobility mu of the DNA to be determined. LPA solutions of moderate polydispersity index (PI approximately 1.7-2.1) and variable polymer molecular weight Mw (0.59-2.05 MDa) are used as the sieving media. In unentangled semidilute solutions (c* < c < c(e)), we find that the conformational dynamics of linear and star-branched DNA in electric fields are strikingly different; the former migrating in predominantly U- or I-shaped conformations, depending on electric field strength E, and the latter migrating in a squid-like profile with the star-arms outstretched in the direction opposite to E and dragging the branch point through the sieving medium. Despite these visual differences, mu for linear and star-branched DNA of comparable size are found to be nearly identical in semidilute, unentangled LPA solutions. For LPA concentrations above the entanglement threshold (c > c(e)), the conformation of migrating linear and star-shaped DNA manifest only subtle changes from their unentangled solution features, but mu for the stars decreases strongly with increasing LPA concentration and molecular weight, while mu for linear DNA becomes nearly independent of c and Mw. These findings are discussed in the context of current theories for electrophoresis of large polyelectrolytes. PMID:16850503

  2. Telechelic Star Polymers as Self-Assembling Units from the Molecular to the Macroscopic Scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Capone, Barbara; Coluzza, Ivan; LoVerso, Federica; Likos, Christos N.; Blaak, Ronald

    2012-12-01

    By means of multiscale molecular simulations, we show that telechelic-star polymers are a simple, robust, and tunable system, which hierarchically self-assembles into soft-patchy particles and mechanically stabilizes selected, open crystalline structures. The self-aggregating patchy behavior can be fully controlled by the number of arms per star and by the fraction of attractive monomeric units at the free ends of the arms. Such self-assembled soft-patchy particles while forming, upon augmenting density, gel-like percolating networks, preserve properties as particle size, number, and arrangement of patches per particle. In particular, we demonstrate that the flexibility inherent in the soft-patchy particles brings forward a novel mechanism that leads to the mechanical stability of diamond and simple cubic crystals over a wide range of densities, and for molecular sizes ranging from about 10 nm up to the micrometer scale.

  3. Modulating Antimicrobial Activity and Mammalian Cell Biocompatibility with Glucosamine-Functionalized Star Polymers.

    PubMed

    Wong, Edgar H H; Khin, Mya Mya; Ravikumar, Vikashini; Si, Zhangyong; Rice, Scott A; Chan-Park, Mary B

    2016-03-14

    The development of novel reagents and antibiotics for combating multidrug resistance bacteria has received significant attention in recent years. In this study, new antimicrobial star polymers (14-26 nm in diameter) that consist of mixtures of polylysine and glycopolymer arms were developed and were shown to possess antimicrobial efficacy toward Gram positive bacteria including methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) and vancomycin-resistant Enterococcus (VRE) (with MIC values as low as 16 μg mL(-1)) while being non-hemolytic (HC50 > 10 000 μg mL(-1)) and exhibit excellent mammalian cell biocompatibility. Structure function analysis indicated that the antimicrobial activity and mammalian cell biocompatibility of the star nanoparticles could be optimized by modifying the molar ratio of polylysine to glycopolymers arms. The technology described herein thus represents an innovative approach that could be used to fight deadly infectious diseases. PMID:26859230

  4. Simulation of dilute solutions of linear and star-branched polymers by dissipative particle dynamics.

    PubMed

    Nardai, M M; Zifferer, G

    2009-09-28

    A most promising off-lattice technique in order to simulate not only static but in addition dynamic behavior of linear and star-branched chains is the dissipative particle dynamics (DPD) method. In this model the atomistic representation of polymer molecules is replaced by a (coarse-grained) equivalent chain consisting of beads which are repulsive for each other in order to mimic the excluded volume effect (successive beads in addition are linked by springs). Likewise solvent molecules are combined to beads which in turn are repulsive for each other as well as for the polymer segments. The system is relaxed by molecular dynamics solving Newton's laws under the influence of short ranged conservative forces (i.e., repulsion between nonbonded beads and a proper balance of repulsion and attraction between bonded segments) and dissipative forces due to friction between particles, the latter representing the thermostat in conjunction with proper random forces. A variation of the strength of the repulsion between different types of beads allows the simulation of any desired thermodynamic situation. Static and dynamic properties of isolated linear and star-branched chains embedded in athermal, exothermal, and endothermal solvent are presented and theta conditions are examined. The generally accepted scaling concept for athermal systems is fairly well reproduced by linear and star-branched DPD chains and theta conditions appear for a unique parameter independent of functionality as in the case of Monte Carlo simulations. Furthermore, the correspondence between DPD and Monte Carlo data referring to the shape of chains and stars is fairly well, too. For dilute solutions the Zimm behavior is expected for dynamic properties which is indeed realized in DPD systems. PMID:19791917

  5. Alcohol-soluble Star-shaped Oligofluorenes as Interlayer for High Performance Polymer Solar Cells

    PubMed Central

    Zou, Yang; He, Zhicai; Zhao, Baofeng; Liu, Yuan; Yang, Chuluo; Wu, Hongbin; Cao, Yong

    2015-01-01

    Two star-shaped oligofluorenes with hexakis(fluoren-2-yl)benzene as core are designed and sythesized for interfacial materials in polymer solar cell. Diethanolamino groups are attached to the side chain of fluorene units for T0-OH and T1-OH to enable the alcohol solubility, and additional hydrophobic n-hexyl chains are also grafted on the increased fluorene arms for T1-OH. In conventional device with PCDTBT/PC71BM as active layer, a 50% enhanced PCE is obtained by incorporating T0-OH and T1-OH as the interlayer compared with device without interlayer. By optimizing the active material with PTB7 and with the inverted device structure, a maximum PCE of 9.30% is achieved, which is among the highest efficiencies for PTB7 based polymer solar cells. The work function of modified electrode, the surface morphology and the suraface properties are systematically studied. By modifying the structures of the star-shaped molecules, a balance between the hydrophobic and hydrophilic property is finely tuned, and thus facilitate the interlayer for high performance of PSCs. PMID:26612688

  6. Particles without a Box: Brush-first Synthesis of Photodegradable PEG Star Polymers under Ambient Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Jenny; Gao, Angela Xiaodi; Johnson, Jeremiah A.

    2013-01-01

    Convenient methods for the rapid, parallel synthesis of diversely functionalized nanoparticles will enable discovery of novel formulations for drug delivery, biological imaging, and supported catalysis. In this report, we demonstrate parallel synthesis of brush-arm star polymer (BASP) nanoparticles by the "brush-first" method. In this method, a norbornene-terminated poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) macromonomer (PEG-MM) is first polymerized via ring-opening metathesis polymerization (ROMP) to generate a living brush macroinitiator. Aliquots of this initiator stock solution are added to vials that contain varied amounts of a photodegradable bis-norbornene crosslinker. Exposure to crosslinker initiates a series of kinetically-controlled brush+brush and star+star coupling reactions that ultimately yields BASPs with cores comprised of the crosslinker and coronas comprised of PEG. The final BASP size depends on the amount of crosslinker added. We carry out the synthesis of three BASPs on the benchtop with no special precautions to remove air and moisture. The samples are characterized by gel permeation chromatography (GPC); results agreed closely with our previous report that utilized inert (glovebox) conditions. Key practical features, advantages, and potential disadvantages of the brush-first method are discussed. PMID:24145552

  7. Biocompatible polyester macroligands: new subunits for the assembly of star-shaped polymers with luminescent and cleavable metal cores.

    PubMed

    Corbin, P S; Webb, M P; McAlvin, J E; Fraser, C L

    2001-01-01

    The synthesis of a series of star-shaped, biocompatible polyesters--polylactides (PLAs), polycaprolactones (PCLs), and various copolymer analogues--with either labile iron(II) tris-bipyridyl or luminescent ruthenium(II) tris-bipyridyl cores is described. These polymers were readily assembled by a convergent, metal-template-assisted approach that entailed the synthesis of bipyridine (bpy) ligands incorporating PLA- and PCL-containing arms and subsequent chelation of the "macroligands" to iron(II) or ruthenium(II). Specifically, the polyester macroligands bpyPLA(2) and bpyPCL(2) were prepared by a stannous octoate catalyzed ring-opening polymerization of DL- or L-lactide and epsilon-caprolactone, using bis(hydroxymethyl)-2,2'-bipyridine as the initiator. Copolymers bpy(PCL-PLA)(2) and bpy(PLA-PCL)(2) were generated in an analogous manner using bpyPLA(2) and bpyPCL(2) as macroinitiators. Polymers with narrow molecular weight distributions and with molecular weights close to values expected based upon monomer/initiator loading were produced. The macroligands were subsequently chelated to iron(II) to afford six-armed, iron-core star polymers, which were characterized by UV-vis and (1)H NMR spectroscopy. Estimated chelation efficiencies for formation of the star polymers (M(n) calcd: 20-240 kDa) were high, as determined by UV-vis spectral analysis. Within the molecular weight range investigated, differential scanning calorimetry and thermogravimetric analysis revealed that the small amounts of metal in the polyester stars and differences in polymer architecture had little effect on the thermal properties of the PLA/PCL materials. However, thin films of the red-violet colored iron-core stars exhibited reversible, thermochromic bleaching. Solutions and films of the polymers also responded (with color loss) to a variety of chemical stimuli (e.g., acid, base, peroxides, ammonia), thus revealing potential for use in diverse sensing applications. Likewise, the polyester

  8. Simultaneous nano- and micro-scale control of nanofibrous microspheres self-assembled from star-shaped polymers

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Zhanpeng; Marson, Ryan L.; Ge, Zhishen; Glotzer, Sharon C.; Ma, Peter X.

    2015-01-01

    The mechanism underlying the multi-scale self-assembly of star-shaped polymers into non-hollow, hollow, and spongy nanofibrous microspheres is reported. Star-shaped poly(L-lactic acid) polymers with varying arm-numbers and arm-lengths are synthesized, dissolved in tetrahydrofuran, emulsified in glycerol, and thermally-induced to phase separate, resulting in microspheres that are either smooth or fibrous on the nano-scale, and either non-hollow, hollow, or spongy on the micro-scale. Molecular architecture and the hydroxyl density are shown to control assembly and morphology at both nano- and micro-scales. Nanofibers form only when the arm length is sufficiently long, while an increase in hydroxyl density causes the microspheres to change from non-hollow to hollow to spongy. We demonstrate via both experiments of capping or doubling the hydroxyl end groups and dissipative particle dynamics simulations that the affinity of hydroxyl to glycerol is critical to stabilizing the micro-scale structure. A “phase diagram” was constructed for the six types of microspheres in relation to the molecular structures of the star-shaped polymers. The proposed mechanism explains how star-shaped polymers self-assemble into various microspheres, and guides us to simultaneously control both nano- and micro-features of the microspheres. PMID:26009995

  9. Biorenewable tough blends of polylactide and acrylated epoxidized soybean oil compatibilized by a polylactide star polymer

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Mauck, Sheli C.; Wang, Shu; Ding, Wenyue; Rohde, Brian J.; Fortune, C. Karen; Yang, Guozhen; Robertson, Megan L.; Ahn, Suk -Kyun

    2016-02-26

    Polylactide (PLA), a commercially available thermoplastic derived from plant sugars, finds applications in consumer products, disposable packaging, and textiles, among others. The widespread application of this material is limited by its brittleness, as evidenced by low tensile elongation at break, impact strength, and fracture toughness. Herein, a multifunctional vegetable oil, acrylated epoxidized soybean oil (AESO), was investigated as a biodegradable, renewable additive to improve the toughness of PLA. AESO was found to be a highly reactive oil, providing a dispersed phase with tunable properties in which the acrylate groups underwent cross-linking at the elevated temperatures required for processing the blends.more » Additionally, the presence of hydroxyl groups on AESO provided two routes for compatibilization of PLA/AESO blends: (1) reactive compatibilization through the transesterification of AESO and PLA and (2) synthesis of a PLA star polymer with an AESO core. The morphological, thermal, and mechanical behaviors of PLA/oil blends were investigated, in which the dispersed oil phase consisted of AESO, soybean oil (SYBO), or a 50/50 mixture of AESO/SYBO. The oil additives were found to toughen the PLA matrix, with significant enhancements in the elongation at break and tensile toughness values, while maintaining the glass transition temperature of neat PLA. Specifically, the blend containing PLA, AESO, SYBO, and the PLA star polymer was found to exhibit a uniform oil droplet size distribution with small average droplet size and interparticle distance, resulting in the greatest enhancements of PLA tensile properties with no observable plasticization.« less

  10. Probing star formation in the dense environments of z ˜ 1 lensing haloes aligned with dusty star-forming galaxies detected with the South Pole Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Welikala, N.; Béthermin, M.; Guery, D.; Strandet, M.; Aird, K. A.; Aravena, M.; Ashby, M. L. N.; Bothwell, M.; Beelen, A.; Bleem, L. E.; de Breuck, C.; Brodwin, M.; Carlstrom, J. E.; Chapman, S. C.; Crawford, T. M.; Dole, H.; Doré, O.; Everett, W.; Flores-Cacho, I.; Gonzalez, A. H.; González-Nuevo, J.; Greve, T. R.; Gullberg, B.; Hezaveh, Y. D.; Holder, G. P.; Holzapfel, W. L.; Keisler, R.; Lagache, G.; Ma, J.; Malkan, M.; Marrone, D. P.; Mocanu, L. M.; Montier, L.; Murphy, E. J.; Nesvadba, N. P. H.; Omont, A.; Pointecouteau, E.; Puget, J. L.; Reichardt, C. L.; Rotermund, K. M.; Scott, D.; Serra, P.; Spilker, J. S.; Stalder, B.; Stark, A. A.; Story, K.; Vanderlinde, K.; Vieira, J. D.; Weiß, A.

    2016-01-01

    We probe star formation in the environments of massive (˜1013 M⊙) dark matter haloes at redshifts of z ˜ 1. This star formation is linked to a submillimetre clustering signal which we detect in maps of the Planck High Frequency Instrument that are stacked at the positions of a sample of high redshift (z > 2) strongly lensed dusty star-forming galaxies (DSFGs) selected from the South Pole Telescope (SPT) 2500 deg2 survey. The clustering signal has submillimetre colours which are consistent with the mean redshift of the foreground lensing haloes (z ˜ 1). We report a mean excess of star formation rate (SFR) compared to the field, of (2700 ± 700) M⊙ yr-1 from all galaxies contributing to this clustering signal within a radius of 3.5 arcmin from the SPT DSFGs. The magnitude of the Planck excess is in broad agreement with predictions of a current model of the cosmic infrared background. The model predicts that 80 per cent of the excess emission measured by Planck originates from galaxies lying in the neighbouring haloes of the lensing halo. Using Herschel maps of the same fields, we find a clear excess, relative to the field, of individual sources which contribute to the Planck excess. The mean excess SFR compared to the field is measured to be (370 ± 40) M⊙ yr-1 per resolved, clustered source. Our findings suggest that the environments around these massive z ˜ 1 lensing haloes host intense star formation out to about 2 Mpc. The flux enhancement due to clustering should also be considered when measuring flux densities of galaxies in Planck data.

  11. Miktoarm star polymer based multifunctional traceable nanocarriers for efficient delivery of poorly water soluble pharmacological agents.

    PubMed

    Soliman, Ghareb M; Redon, Rocio; Sharma, Anjali; Mejía, Diana; Maysinger, Dusica; Kakkar, Ashok

    2014-09-01

    A versatile methodology to develop an inherently fluorescent and thus traceable multifunctional nanodelivery platform based on miktoarm polymers is reported. Miktoarm stars containing covalently linked tetraiodofluorescein dye, polyethylene glycol, and polycaprolactone self-assemble into micelles, and integrate multiple functions including fluorescent tags for imaging, a hydrophobic core for drug incorporation, and a hydrophilic corona for micelle stabilization. Curcumin, a pleiotropic but very poorly water-soluble drug, is loaded into these micelles with an efficiency of 25-60 wt%. It leads to a 25 000-fold increase in its aqueous solubility, and a sustained release over a period of 7 d. These micelles are rapidly internalized into murine J774A.1 macrophages, and accumulated into discrete cellular compartments, whereas the free and physically encapsulated dye is diffused in the cytoplasm. Curcumin-loaded micelles reduce lipopolysaccharide-induced nitric oxide release. The studies establish miktoarm star based nanocarriers as highly efficient in tracking their fate and expanding the scope of pharmacological agents with limited utility in experimental medicine. PMID:24903981

  12. ALMA Resolves the Properties of Star-forming Regions in a Dense Gas Disk at z ˜ 3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swinbank, A. M.; Dye, S.; Nightingale, J. W.; Furlanetto, C.; Smail, Ian; Cooray, A.; Dannerbauer, H.; Dunne, L.; Eales, S.; Gavazzi, R.; Hunter, T.; Ivison, R. J.; Negrello, M.; Oteo-Gomez, I.; Smit, R.; van der Werf, P.; Vlahakis, C.

    2015-06-01

    We exploit long baseline ALMA submillimeter observations of the lensed star-forming galaxy SDP 81 at z = 3.042 to investigate the properties of the interstellar medium (ISM) on scales of 50-100 pc. The kinematics of the 12CO gas within this system are well described by a rotationally supported disk with an inclination-corrected rotation speed, {{v}rot} = 320 ± 20 km s-1, and a dynamical mass of {{M}dyn} = (3.5 ± 1.0)× 1010 {{M}⊙ } within a radius of 1.5 kpc. The disk is gas-rich and unstable, with a Toomre parameter, Q = 0.30 ± 0.10, and so into star-forming regions with Jeans length {{L}J} ˜ 130 pc. We identify five star-forming regions within the ISM on these scales and show that their scaling relations between luminosity, line widths, and sizes are significantly offset from those typical of molecular clouds in local galaxies (Larson’s relations). These offsets are likely to be caused by the high external hydrostatic pressure for the ISM, {{P}tot}/{{k}B}˜ 40-20+30 × 107 K cm-3, which is ˜104× higher than the typical ISM pressure in the Milky Way. The physical conditions of the star-forming ISM and giant molecular clouds appear to be similar to those found in the densest environments in the local universe, such as those in the Galactic center.

  13. ON THE DYNAMICAL FORMATION OF VERY YOUNG, X-RAY EMITTING BLACK HOLE BINARIES IN DENSE STAR CLUSTERS

    SciTech Connect

    Garofali, Kristen; Converse, Joseph M.; Chandar, Rupali; Rangelov, Blagoy

    2012-08-10

    We recently discovered a population of very young ({tau} {approx}< 6-8 Myr), X-ray emitting black hole binaries (BHBs) in the nearby starburst galaxy NGC 4449. These BHBs are located within or near to very young star clusters, indicating that they form within the clusters, but that some fraction are dynamically ejected. Here we present results from a suite of N-body simulations of N = 16,384 ({approx}6000 M{sub Sun }) star clusters, similar to the masses of BHB hosts in NGC 4449, through the first 10 Myr of their lives. Our goal is to determine whether dynamical interactions are responsible for the observed population of BHBs in NGC 4449. Our simulations span a wide range of initial size and density profiles, both with and without primordial mass segregation, testing both realistic initial conditions and extreme ones. We find that clusters without primordial mass segregation only dynamically produce BHBs within 10 Myr when they are extremely compact and centrally concentrated. Preliminary results that include primordial binaries support this conclusion. The introduction of strong primordial mass segregation, however, greatly increases the rapidity with which the binaries form, although these are still not tight enough that they will emit X-rays. We conclude that X-ray emitting BHBs are unlikely to form dynamically in clusters of this mass under realistic conditions. Instead, they probably originate from binaries that contain two massive stars with small orbital separations, which are present from the cluster's birth.

  14. Compatibilization of polystyrene/poly(dimethylsiloxane) blends using star polymers containing a gamma-cyclodextrin core and polystyrene arms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Busche, Bradley James

    Star polymers containing a gamma-cyclodextrin (CD) core and polystyrene (PS) arms (CD-star) were successfully synthesized by atom transfer radical polymerization. These stars are the first of their kind containing a gamma-CD core. CD-stars made with twelve PS arms proved to be soluble in typical PS solvents. Control over CD-star arm length was achieved, as shown by nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and gel permeation chromatography (GPC) analysis. Rapidly stirred blends of polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) and PS prepared in chloroform with and without CD-star formed an emulsion. Adding CD-star to these turbid solutions resulted in clearing, whereas control solutions without CD-star remained turbid. Post-stirring, these clear solutions demonstrated excellent temporal stability illustrating their successful compatibilization. Characterization of these clear solutions by 2D-NMR revealed that CD-stars were threaded onto PDMS. This complexation formed a hybrid slip-ring copolymer with PDMS as the backbone and CD-star PS arms effectively acting as the grafts. Solution characterization via capillary viscometery, dynamic light scattering, and GPC showed traits similar to traditional graft copolymers. Films were made from the blended solutions by spin or solution casting. Spun-cast films prepared from compatibilized solutions exhibited homogeneous nanophase morphology, whereas non-compatibilized solutions displayed heterogeneous microphase morphology. Atomic force microscopy and scanning electron microscopy analyses of these films revealed PDMS phase domains measuring 50nm or less. However, solution cast films with subsequent compression molding showed macroscopic phase segregation for samples with or without CD-star. Significant loss of PDMS was observed during processing. Compositional analysis conducted by 1H-NMR revealed ˜80% PDMS retention for films with CD-star, whereas only ˜20% retention was observed for films without CD-star. This larger PDMS retention for samples with

  15. Charged-current weak interaction processes in hot and dense matter and its impact on the spectra of neutrinos emitted from protoneutron star cooling.

    PubMed

    Martínez-Pinedo, G; Fischer, T; Lohs, A; Huther, L

    2012-12-21

    We perform three-flavor Boltzmann neutrino transport radiation hydrodynamics simulations covering a period of 3 s after the formation of a protoneutron star in a core-collapse supernova explosion. Our results show that a treatment of charged-current neutrino interactions in hot and dense matter as suggested by Reddy et al. [Phys. Rev. D 58, 013009 (1998)] has a strong impact on the luminosities and spectra of the emitted neutrinos. When compared with simulations that neglect mean-field effects on the neutrino opacities, we find that the luminosities of all neutrino flavors are reduced while the spectral differences between electron neutrinos and antineutrinos are increased. Their magnitude depends on the equation of state and in particular on the symmetry energy at subnuclear densities. These modifications reduce the proton-to-nucleon ratio of the outflow, increasing slightly their entropy. They are expected to have a substantial impact on nucleosynthesis in neutrino-driven winds, even though they do not result in conditions that favor an r process. Contrary to previous findings, our results show that the spectra of electron neutrinos remain substantially different from those of other (anti)neutrino flavors during the entire deleptonization phase of the protoneutron star. The obtained luminosity and spectral changes are also expected to have important consequences for neutrino flavor oscillations and neutrino detection on Earth. PMID:23368446

  16. EARLY STAR-FORMING PROCESSES IN DENSE MOLECULAR CLOUD L328; IDENTIFICATION OF L328-IRS AS A PROTO-BROWN DWARF

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Chang Won; Kim, Mi-Ryang; Kim, Gwanjeong; Saito, Masao; Kurono, Yasutaka; Myers, Philip C.

    2013-11-01

    This paper presents the results of millimeter to sub-millimeter observations of CO, HCN, N{sub 2}H{sup +}, and HCO{sup +} lines in the dense molecular cloud L328, which harbors L328-IRS, a Very Low Luminosity Object (VeLLO). Our analysis of the line width finds that {sup 13}CO and N{sub 2}H{sup +} lines are broadened right over the smallest sub-core S2 where L328-IRS is located, while they are significantly narrower in other regions of L328. Thus, L328-IRS has a direct association with the sub-core. CO observations show a bipolar outflow from this VeLLO with an extent of ∼0.08 pc. The outflow momentum flux and efficiency are much less than those of low-mass protostars. The most likely mass accretion rate (∼3.6 × 10{sup –7} M{sub ☉} yr{sup –1}) inferred from the analysis of the CO outflow is an order of magnitude smaller than the canonical value for a protostar. If the main accretion lasts during the typical Class 0 period of a protostar, L328-IRS will accrete the mass of a brown dwarf, but not that of a star. Given that its envelope mass is small (∼0.09 M{sub ☉}) and 100% star formation rate is unlikely, we suggest that L328-IRS is likely a proto-brown dwarf. Inward motions are found in global scale in the L328 cloud and its sub-cores with a typical infall speed found in starless cores. L328 is found to be fairly well isolated from other nearby clouds and seems to be forming three sub-cores simultaneously through a gravitational fragmentation process. Altogether, these all leave L328-IRS as the best example supporting the idea that a brown dwarf forms like a normal star.

  17. CO J = 2-1 LINE EMISSION IN CLUSTER GALAXIES AT z {approx} 1: FUELING STAR FORMATION IN DENSE ENVIRONMENTS

    SciTech Connect

    Wagg, Jeff; Pope, Alexandra; Alberts, Stacey; Armus, Lee; Desai, Vandana; Brodwin, Mark; Bussmann, Robert S.; Dey, Arjun; Jannuzi, Buell; Le Floc'h, Emeric; Melbourne, Jason; Stern, Daniel

    2012-06-20

    We present observations of CO J = 2-1 line emission in infrared-luminous cluster galaxies at z {approx} 1 using the IRAM Plateau de Bure Interferometer. Our two primary targets are optically faint, dust-obscured galaxies (DOGs) found to lie within 2 Mpc of the centers of two massive (>10{sup 14} M{sub Sun }) galaxy clusters. CO line emission is not detected in either DOG. We calculate 3{sigma} upper limits to the CO J = 2-1 line luminosities, L'{sub CO} < 6.08 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 9} and <6.63 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 9} K km s{sup -1} pc{sup 2}. Assuming a CO-to-H{sub 2} conversion factor derived for ultraluminous infrared galaxies in the local universe, this translates to limits on the cold molecular gas mass of M{sub H{sub 2}}< 4.86 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 9} M{sub Sun} and M{sub H{sub 2}}< 5.30 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 9} M{sub Sun }. Both DOGs exhibit mid-infrared continuum emission that follows a power law, suggesting that an active galactic nucleus (AGN) contributes to the dust heating. As such, estimates of the star formation efficiencies in these DOGs are uncertain. A third cluster member with an infrared luminosity, L{sub IR} < 7.4 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 11} L{sub Sun }, is serendipitously detected in CO J = 2-1 line emission in the field of one of the DOGs located roughly two virial radii away from the cluster center. The optical spectrum of this object suggests that it is likely an obscured AGN, and the measured CO line luminosity is L'{sub CO} = (1.94 {+-} 0.35) Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 10} K km s{sup -1} pc{sup 2}, which leads to an estimated cold molecular gas mass M{sub H{sub 2}}= (1.55{+-}0.28) Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 10} M{sub Sun }. A significant reservoir of molecular gas in a z {approx} 1 galaxy located away from the cluster center demonstrates that the fuel can exist to drive an increase in star formation and AGN activity at the outskirts of high-redshift clusters.

  18. The Pharmacokinetics and Biodistribution of a 64 kDa PolyPEG Star Polymer After Subcutaneous and Pulmonary Administration to Rats.

    PubMed

    Khor, Song Yang; Hu, Jinming; McLeod, Victoria M; Quinn, John F; Porter, Christopher J H; Whittaker, Michael R; Kaminskas, Lisa M; Davis, Thomas P

    2016-01-01

    PolyPEG star polymers have potential utility as cost-effective polymeric drug delivery vehicles, and as such, it is important to develop an understanding of their biopharmaceutical behavior. Moreover, although a number of studies have evaluated the utility of PolyPEG stars in vitro, investigation of these novel materials in vivo has been limited. Herein, we evaluated the pharmacokinetics of a 64 kDa tritiated PEG-based star polymer after subcutaneous and pulmonary administration in rats. After subcutaneous administration, the star polymer showed near complete bioavailability (∼80%) and a similar organ biodistribution profile to the polymer after intravenous administration. After intratracheal instillation to the lungs, the star polymer showed limited bioavailability (∼3%), and most of the administered radiolabel was recovered in lung tissue and feces after 6 d. The data reported here suggest that star polymers display similar pharmaceutical behavior to PEGylated dendrimers after subcutaneous and inhaled delivery and may therefore be used as similar, but more cost-effective drug delivery vehicles. PMID:26852861

  19. HST Imaging of Dust Structures and Stars in the Ram Pressure Stripped Virgo Spirals NGC 4402 and NGC 4522: Stripped from the Outside In with Dense Cloud Decoupling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abramson, A.; Kenney, J.; Crowl, H.; Tal, T.

    2016-08-01

    We describe and constrain the origins of interstellar medium (ISM) structures likely created by ongoing intracluster medium (ICM) ram pressure stripping in two Virgo Cluster spirals, NGC 4522 and NGC 4402, using Hubble Space Telescope (HST) BVI images of dust extinction and stars, as well as supplementary H i, Hα, and radio continuum images. With a spatial resolution of ∼10 pc in the HST images, this is the highest-resolution study to date of the physical processes that occur during an ICM–ISM ram pressure stripping interaction, ram pressure stripping's effects on the multi-phase, multi-density ISM, and the formation and evolution of ram-pressure-stripped tails. In dust extinction, we view the leading side of NGC 4402 and the trailing side of NGC 4522, and so we see distinct types of features in both. In both galaxies, we identify some regions where dense clouds are decoupling or have decoupled and others where it appears that kiloparsec-sized sections of the ISM are moving coherently. NGC 4522 has experienced stronger, more recent pressure and has the “jellyfish” morphology characteristic of some ram-pressure-stripped galaxies. Its stripped tail extends up from the disk plane in continuous upturns of dust and stars curving up to ∼2 kpc above the disk plane. On the other side of the galaxy, there is a kinematically and morphologically distinct extraplanar arm of young, blue stars and ISM above a mostly stripped portion of the disk, and between it and the disk plane are decoupled dust clouds that have not been completely stripped. The leading side of NGC 4402 contains two kiloparsec-scale linear dust filaments with complex substructure that have partially decoupled from the surrounding ISM. NGC 4402 also contains long dust ridges, suggesting that large parts of the ISM are being pushed out at once. Both galaxies contain long ridges of polarized radio continuum emission indicating the presence of large-scale, ordered magnetic fields. We propose that

  20. HST Imaging of Dust Structures and Stars in the Ram Pressure Stripped Virgo Spirals NGC 4402 and NGC 4522: Stripped from the Outside In with Dense Cloud Decoupling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abramson, A.; Kenney, J.; Crowl, H.; Tal, T.

    2016-08-01

    We describe and constrain the origins of interstellar medium (ISM) structures likely created by ongoing intracluster medium (ICM) ram pressure stripping in two Virgo Cluster spirals, NGC 4522 and NGC 4402, using Hubble Space Telescope (HST) BVI images of dust extinction and stars, as well as supplementary H i, Hα, and radio continuum images. With a spatial resolution of ˜10 pc in the HST images, this is the highest-resolution study to date of the physical processes that occur during an ICM–ISM ram pressure stripping interaction, ram pressure stripping's effects on the multi-phase, multi-density ISM, and the formation and evolution of ram-pressure-stripped tails. In dust extinction, we view the leading side of NGC 4402 and the trailing side of NGC 4522, and so we see distinct types of features in both. In both galaxies, we identify some regions where dense clouds are decoupling or have decoupled and others where it appears that kiloparsec-sized sections of the ISM are moving coherently. NGC 4522 has experienced stronger, more recent pressure and has the “jellyfish” morphology characteristic of some ram-pressure-stripped galaxies. Its stripped tail extends up from the disk plane in continuous upturns of dust and stars curving up to ˜2 kpc above the disk plane. On the other side of the galaxy, there is a kinematically and morphologically distinct extraplanar arm of young, blue stars and ISM above a mostly stripped portion of the disk, and between it and the disk plane are decoupled dust clouds that have not been completely stripped. The leading side of NGC 4402 contains two kiloparsec-scale linear dust filaments with complex substructure that have partially decoupled from the surrounding ISM. NGC 4402 also contains long dust ridges, suggesting that large parts of the ISM are being pushed out at once. Both galaxies contain long ridges of polarized radio continuum emission indicating the presence of large-scale, ordered magnetic fields. We propose that magnetic

  1. Compatibilization of polystyrene and poly(dimethyl siloxane) with a star polymer having a γtcyclodextrin core and polystyrene arms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balik, C. M.; Tonelli, A. E.; Busche, Brad

    2010-03-01

    Cyclodextrins (CDs) are cyclic starch molecules having a hollow central cavity which can be threaded by a polymer to form an inclusion compound. This characteristic is exploited in a new type of compatibilizer: a star polymer with a γtCD core and polystyrene (PS) arms. Atom transfer radical polymerization is used to grow and control the size of the PS arms from brominated initiator sites on γtCD. Solutions and thin films of PS and poly(dimethyl siloxane) (PDMS) are compatibilized by this CD-star. The mechanism of compatibilization involves threading of the CD core by PDMS and solubilization of the resulting ``slip-ring graft copolymer'' via the PS star arms. Compatibilization of PS/PDMS in chloroform is visually observed when the initially turbid suspensions become clear solutions after addition of CD-star. Thin films spin-cast from these solutions exhibit a high degree of homogeneity and a nanoscale level of mixing. The solutions are characterized with NMR, dynamic light scattering and intrinsic viscosity measurements, and the thin films are characterized with optical and atomic force microscopy. Many different polymers are capable of threading the CD core, thus the same CD-star molecule could be used to compatibilize several different threading polymers with the same matrix polymer.

  2. Cyclodextrin-based star polymers as a versatile platform for nanochemotherapeutics: Enhanced entrapment and uptake of idarubicin.

    PubMed

    Nafee, N; Hirosue, M; Loretz, B; Wenz, G; Lehr, C-M

    2015-05-01

    A series of cyclodextrin-based star polymers were synthesized using β-cyclodextrin (CD) as hydrophilic core, methyl methacrylate (MMA) and tert-butyl acrylate (tBA) as hydrophobic arms. Star polymers, either homopolymers or random/block copolymers, showed narrow molecular weight distributions. Grafting hydrophobic arms created CD-based nanoparticles (CD-NPs) in the size range (130-200nm) with narrow PdI <0.15 and slightly negative ζ-potential. Particle surface could be modified with chitosan to impart a positive surface charge. Colloidal stability of CD-NPs was a function of pH as revealed by the pH-titration curves. CD-NPs were used as carrier for the chemotherapeutic drug idarubicin (encapsulation efficiency, EE ∼40%) ensuring prolonged release profile (∼80% after 48h). For cell-based studies, coumarin-6 was encapsulated as a fluorescent marker (EE ∼75%). Uptake studies carried out on A549 and Caco-2 cell lines proved the uptake of coumarin-loaded NPs as a function of time and preferential localization in the cytoplasm. Uptake kinetics revealed no saturation or plateau over 6h. Chitosan-modified NPs showed significantly improved, concentration-dependent cellular uptake. Meanwhile, CD-NPs were non-cytotoxic on both cell lines over the concentration range (0.25-3mg/ml) as studied by MTT and LDH assays. In conclusion, CD star polymers can be considered a versatile platform for a new class of biocompatible nanochemotherapy. PMID:25819363

  3. Facile Determination of Molecular Structure Trends in Amphiphilic Core Corona Star Polymer Synthesis via Dielectric Property Measurement.

    PubMed

    Hild, Frederic; Nguyen, Nam T; Deng, Eileen; Katrib, Juliano; Dimitrakis, Georgios; Lau, Phei-Li; Irvine, Derek J

    2016-08-01

    The use of dielectric property measurements to define specific trends in the molecular structures of poly(caprolactone) containing star polymers and/or the interbatch repeatability of the synthetic procedures used to generate them is demonstrated. The magnitude of the dielectric property value is shown to accurately reflect: (a) the number of functional groups within a series of materials with similar molecular size when no additional intermolecular order is present in the medium, (b) the polymer molecular size for a series of materials containing a fixed core material and so functional group number, and/or (c) the batch to batch repeatability of the synthesis method. The dielectric measurements are validated by comparison to spectroscopic/chromatographic data. PMID:27315130

  4. Molecular Differentiated Initiator Reactivity in the Synthesis of Poly(caprolactone)-Based Hydrophobic Homopolymer and Amphiphilic Core Corona Star Polymers.

    PubMed

    Deng, Eileen; Nguyen, Nam T; Hild, Frédéric; Hamilton, Ian E; Dimitrakis, Georgios; Kingman, Samuel W; Lau, Phei-Li; Irvine, Derek J

    2015-01-01

    Macromolecules that possess three-dimensional, branched molecular structures are of great interest because they exhibit significantly differentiated application performance compared to conventional linear (straight chain) polymers. This paper reports the synthesis of 3- and 4-arm star branched polymers via ring opening polymerisation (ROP) utilising multi-functional hydroxyl initiators and Sn(Oct)2 as precatalyst. The structures produced include mono-functional hydrophobic and multi-functional amphiphilic core corona stars. The characteristics of the synthetic process were shown to be principally dependent upon the physical/dielectric properties of the initiators used. ROP's using initiators that were more available to become directly involved with the Sn(Oct)₂ in the "in-situ" formation of the true catalytic species were observed to require shorter reaction times. Use of microwave heating (MWH) in homopolymer star synthesis reduced reaction times compared to conventional heating (CH) equivalents, this was attributed to an increased rate of "in-situ" catalyst formation. However, in amphiphilic core corona star formation, the MWH polymerisations exhibited slower propagation rates than CH equivalents. This was attributed to macro-structuring within the reaction medium, which reduced the potential for reaction. It was concluded that CH experiments were less affected by this macro-structuring because it was disrupted by the thermal currents/gradients caused by the conductive/convective heating mechanisms. These gradients are much reduced/absent with MWH because it selectively heats specific species simultaneously throughout the entire volume of the reaction medium. These partitioning problems were overcome by introducing additional quantities of the species that had been determined to selectively heat. PMID:26569198

  5. Hierarchical self-assembly of telechelic star polymers: from soft patchy particles to gels and diamond crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Capone, Barbara; Coluzza, Ivan; Blaak, Ronald; Lo Verso, Federica; Likos, Christos N.

    2013-09-01

    The design of self-assembling materials in the nanometer scale focuses on the fabrication of a class of organic and inorganic subcomponents that can be reliably produced on a large scale and tailored according to their vast applications for, e.g. electronics, therapeutic vectors and diagnostic imaging agent carriers, or photonics. In a recent publication (Capone et al 2012 Phys. Rev. Lett. 109 238301), diblock copolymer stars have been shown to be a novel system, which is able to hierarchically self-assemble first into soft patchy particles and thereafter into more complex structures, such as the diamond and cubic crystal. The self-aggregating single star patchy behavior is preserved from extremely low up to high densities. Its main control parameters are related to the architecture of the building blocks, which are the number of arms (functionality) and the fraction of attractive end-monomers. By employing a variety of computational and theoretical tools, ranging from the microscopic to the mesoscopic, coarse-grained level in a systematic fashion, we investigate the crossover between the formation of microstructure versus macroscopic phase separation, as well as the formation of gels and networks in these systems. We finally show that telechelic star polymers can be used as building blocks for the fabrication of open crystal structures, such as the diamond or the simple-cubic lattice, taking advantage of the strong correlation between single-particle patchiness and lattice coordination at finite densities.

  6. Nanoparticles based on star polymers as theranostic vectors: endosomal-triggered drug release combined with MRI sensitivity.

    PubMed

    Li, Yang; Duong, Hien T T; Laurent, Sophie; MacMillan, Alexandre; Whan, Renee Megan; Elst, Luce Vander; Muller, Robert N; Hu, Jinming; Lowe, Andrew; Boyer, Cyrille; Davis, Thomas P

    2015-01-01

    Dual-functional star polymers (diameters 15 nm) are synthesized producing nanoparticles with excellent colloidal stability in both water and serum. The nanoparticles are built with aldehyde groups in the core and activated esters in the arms. The different reactivity of the two functional groups to sequentially react with different amino compounds is exploited; doxorubicin (DOX) and 1-(5-amino-3-aza-2-oxypentyl)-4,7,10-tris(tert-butoxycarbonylmethyl)-1,4,7,10-tetraazacyclododecane (DO3A-tBu-NH2 )-a chelating agent effective for the complexation of Gadolinium ions (Gd). The activated ester group is employed to attach the DO3A chelating agent, while the aldehyde groups are exploited for DOX conjugation, providing a controlled release mechanism for DOX in acidic environments. DOX/Gd-loaded nanoparticles are rapidly taken up by MCF-7 breast cancer cells, subsequently releasing DOX as demonstrated using in vitro fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM). Endosomal, DOX release is observed, using a phasor plot representation of the fluorescence lifetime data, showing an increase of native DOX with time. The MRI properties of the stars are assessed and the relaxivity of Gd loaded in stars is three times higher than conventional organic Gd/DO3A complexes. The DOX/Gd-conjugated nanoparticles yield a similar IC50 to native DOX for breast cancer cell lines, confirming that DOX integrity is conserved during nanoparticle attachment and release. PMID:24985790

  7. Strong electroactive biodegradable shape memory polymer networks based on star-shaped polylactide and aniline trimer for bone tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Xie, Meihua; Wang, Ling; Ge, Juan; Guo, Baolin; Ma, Peter X

    2015-04-01

    Preparation of functional shape memory polymer (SMP) for tissue engineering remains a challenge. Here the synthesis of strong electroactive shape memory polymer (ESMP) networks based on star-shaped polylactide (PLA) and aniline trimer (AT) is reported. Six-armed PLAs with various chain lengths were chemically cross-linked to synthesize SMP. After addition of an electroactive AT segment into the SMP, ESMP was obtained. The polymers were characterized by (1)H NMR, GPC, FT-IR, CV, DSC, DMA, tensile test, and degradation test. The SMP and ESMP exhibited strong mechanical properties (modulus higher than GPa) and excellent shape memory performance: short recovery time (several seconds), high recovery ratio (over 94%), and high fixity ratio (almost 100%). Moreover, cyclic voltammetry test confirmed the electroactivity of the ESMP. The ESMP significantly enhanced the proliferation of C2C12 cells compared to SMP and linear PLA (control). In addition, the ESMP greatly improved the osteogenic differentiation of C2C12 myoblast cells compared to PH10 and PLA in terms of ALP enzyme activity, immunofluorescence staining, and relative gene expression by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR). These intelligent SMPs and electroactive SMP with strong mechanical properties, tunable degradability, good electroactivity, biocompatibility, and enhanced osteogenic differentiation of C2C12 cells show great potential for bone regeneration. PMID:25742188

  8. Polymers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tucker, David C.

    1986-01-01

    Presents an open-ended experiment which has students exploring polymer chemistry and reverse osmosis. This activity involves construction of a polymer membrane, use of it in a simple osmosis experiment, and application of its principles in solving a science-technology-society problem. (ML)

  9. Doxorubicin-loaded aromatic imine-contained amphiphilic branched star polymer micelles: synthesis, self-assembly, and drug delivery

    PubMed Central

    Qiu, Liang; Hong, Chun-Yan; Pan, Cai-Yuan

    2015-01-01

    Redox-and pH-sensitive branched star polymers (BSPs), BP(DMAEMA-co-MAEBA-co-DTDMA)(PMAIGP)ns, have been successively prepared by two steps of reversible addition–fragmentation chain transfer (RAFT) polymerization. The first step is RAFT polymerization of 2-(N,N-dimethylaminoethyl)methacrylate (DMAEMA) and p-(methacryloxyethoxy) benzaldehyde (MAEBA) in the presence of divinyl monomer, 2,2′-dithiodiethoxyl dimethacrylate (DTDMA). The resultant branched polymers were used as a macro-RAFT agent in the subsequent RAFT polymerization. After hydrolysis of the BSPs to form BP(DMAEMA-co-MAEBA-co-DTDMA)(PMAGP)ns (BSP-H), the anticancer drug doxorubicin (DOX) was covalently linked to branched polymer chains by reaction of primary amine of DOX and aldehyde groups in the polymer chains. Their compositions, structures, molecular weights, and molecular weight distributions were respectively characterized by nuclear magnetic resonance spectra and gel permeation chromatography measurements. The DOX-loaded micelles were fabricated by self-assembly of DOX-containing BSPs in water, which were characterized by transmission electron microscopy and dynamic light scattering. Aromatic imine linkage is stable in neutral water, but is acid-labile; controlled release of DOX from the BSP-H-DOX micelles was realized at pH values of 5 and 6, and at higher acidic solution, fast release of DOX was observed. In vitro cytotoxicity experiment results revealed low cytotoxicity of the BSPs and release of DOX from micelles in HepG2 and HeLa cells. Confocal laser fluorescence microscopy observations showed that DOX-loaded micelles have specific interaction with HepG2 cells. Thus, this type of BSP micelle is an efficient drug delivery system. PMID:26056444

  10. Doxorubicin-loaded aromatic imine-contained amphiphilic branched star polymer micelles: synthesis, self-assembly, and drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Qiu, Liang; Hong, Chun-Yan; Pan, Cai-Yuan

    2015-01-01

    Redox-and pH-sensitive branched star polymers (BSPs), BP(DMAEMA-co-MAEBA-co-DTDMA)(PMAIGP)(n)s, have been successively prepared by two steps of reversible addition-fragmentation chain transfer (RAFT) polymerization. The first step is RAFT polymerization of 2-(N,N-dimethylaminoethyl)methacrylate (DMAEMA) and p-(methacryloxyethoxy) benzaldehyde (MAEBA) in the presence of divinyl monomer, 2,2'-dithiodiethoxyl dimethacrylate (DTDMA). The resultant branched polymers were used as a macro-RAFT agent in the subsequent RAFT polymerization. After hydrolysis of the BSPs to form BP(DMAEMA-co-MAEBA-co-DTDMA)(PMAGP)(n)s (BSP-H), the anticancer drug doxorubicin (DOX) was covalently linked to branched polymer chains by reaction of primary amine of DOX and aldehyde groups in the polymer chains. Their compositions, structures, molecular weights, and molecular weight distributions were respectively characterized by nuclear magnetic resonance spectra and gel permeation chromatography measurements. The DOX-loaded micelles were fabricated by self-assembly of DOX-containing BSPs in water, which were characterized by transmission electron microscopy and dynamic light scattering. Aromatic imine linkage is stable in neutral water, but is acid-labile; controlled release of DOX from the BSP-H-DOX micelles was realized at pH values of 5 and 6, and at higher acidic solution, fast release of DOX was observed. In vitro cytotoxicity experiment results revealed low cytotoxicity of the BSPs and release of DOX from micelles in HepG2 and HeLa cells. Confocal laser fluorescence microscopy observations showed that DOX-loaded micelles have specific interaction with HepG2 cells. Thus, this type of BSP micelle is an efficient drug delivery system. PMID:26056444

  11. Properties of polystyrene/poly(dimethyl siloxane) blends partially compatibilized with star polymers containing a gamma-cyclodextrin core and polystyrene arms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balik, C. Maurice; Busche, Brad J.; Tonelli, Alan E.

    2011-03-01

    Cyclodextrins (CDs) are cyclic starch molecules having a hollow central cavity which can be threaded by a polymer to form an inclusion compound. This characteristic is exploited in a new type of compatibilizer: a star polymer with a gamma-CD (g-CD) core and polystyrene (PS) arms (CD-star). Spun-cast thin films of PS containing up 20 weight percent poly(dimethyl siloxane) (PDMS) are compatibilized by CD-star. The mechanism of compatibilization involves threading of the CD core by PDMS and solubilization of the resulting slip-ring graft copolymer via the PS star arms. Thin spun-cast films of these blends exhibit a a nanoscale level of mixing and remain well-mixed after annealing at 125 C for three days. In contrast, thicker solution-cast films of these blends exhibit larger-scale phase separation since the film solidification process occurs over a period of days rather than seconds. This allows some of the PDMS to de-thread from the CD-star and phase separate. However, DSC, DMA and PDMS leaching data show that PS and PDMS remain partially compatibilized in the solution-cast films.

  12. Mechanisms of the self-organization of star-shaped polymers with a varied structure of branching center based on fullerene C{sub 60} in solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Lebedev, V. T.; Toeroek, Gy.; Vinogradova, L. V.

    2011-12-15

    The self-organization of star-shaped polymers in toluene has been studied by small-angle neutron scattering. Polystyrene stars with a mono-C{sub 60} branching center are ordered into globular clusters ({approx}1700 nm in diameter), whereas stars with a double (C{sub 60}-C{sub 60}) center are ordered into anisotropic structures (superchains), which are linked (depending on the concentration) into triads (chain clusters {approx}2500 nm in diameter). On the contrary, heteroarm polystyrene and poly-2-vinylpyridine stars with a C{sub 60} center are weakly associated into dimers. Moderately polar stars with arms composed of polystyrene and diblock copolymer (poly-2-vinylpyridine-poly-tret-butyl methacrylate) form short chains composed of four macromolecules, while stars of higher polarity based on polystyrene and poly-tret-butyl methacrylate form clusters containing {approx}12 macromolecules {approx}50 nm in diameter. Thus, by varying the structure of the center and the arm polarity, one can control the modes of star structuring.

  13. Phase behavior of diblock copolymer/star-shaped polymer thin film mixtures.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Junnan; Sakellariou, Georgios; Green, Peter F

    2016-05-01

    We investigated the phase behavior of thin film, thickness h≈ 100 nm, mixtures of a polystyrene-b-poly(2-vinylpyridine) (PS-b-P2VP) diblock copolymer with star-shaped polystyrene (SPS) molecules of varying functionalities f, where 4 ≤f≤ 64, and molecular weights per arm Marm. The miscibility of the system and the surface composition varied appreciably with Marm and f. For large values of Marm, regardless of f, the miscibility of the system was qualitatively similar to that of linear chain PS/PS-b-P2VP mixtures - the copolymer chains aggregate to form micelles, each composed of an inner P2VP core and PS corona, which preferentially segregate to the free surface. On the other hand, for large f and small Marm, SPS molecules preferentially resided at the free surface. Moreover, blends containing SPS molecules with the highest values of f and lowest values of Marm were phase separated. These observations are rationalized in terms of competing entropic interactions and the dependence of the surface tension of the star-shaped molecules on Marm and f. PMID:27074835

  14. Drug-loaded pseudo-block copolymer micelles with a multi-armed star polymer as the micellar exterior

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Chen; Zhang, Peng; Zhang, Zhengkui; Yang, Chenchen; Zhang, Jialiang; Wu, Wei; Jiang, Xiqun

    2015-07-01

    Supramolecular constructed pseudo block copolymer micelles based on β-cyclodextrin terminated 4 and 7 armed star poly(N-vinylpyrrolidone) and adamantane terminated linear poly(ε-caprolactone) were prepared. The size, morphology, stability and protein adsorption were experimentally examined. The micelles with 7 armed PVP chains as the micellar exterior showed the lowest amount of protein adsorption and the best stability in media. When cabazitaxel, a new taxane, was loaded into the micelles, 14.4% drug loading content and 85% encapsulation efficacy were achieved. In vitro cytotoxicity studies demonstrated that the cabazitaxel-loaded micelles show significant cytotoxicity against drug-resistant A2780/T cell lines. Biodistribution studies showed that the micelles can almost double the content of cargo in tumor sites compared with the free cargo. In vivo antitumor activity examinations indicated that cabazitaxel-loaded micelles show superior antitumor activity over free paclitaxel and free cabazitaxel.Supramolecular constructed pseudo block copolymer micelles based on β-cyclodextrin terminated 4 and 7 armed star poly(N-vinylpyrrolidone) and adamantane terminated linear poly(ε-caprolactone) were prepared. The size, morphology, stability and protein adsorption were experimentally examined. The micelles with 7 armed PVP chains as the micellar exterior showed the lowest amount of protein adsorption and the best stability in media. When cabazitaxel, a new taxane, was loaded into the micelles, 14.4% drug loading content and 85% encapsulation efficacy were achieved. In vitro cytotoxicity studies demonstrated that the cabazitaxel-loaded micelles show significant cytotoxicity against drug-resistant A2780/T cell lines. Biodistribution studies showed that the micelles can almost double the content of cargo in tumor sites compared with the free cargo. In vivo antitumor activity examinations indicated that cabazitaxel-loaded micelles show superior antitumor activity over free

  15. Co-delivery of doxorubicin and tumor-suppressing p53 gene using a POSS-based star-shaped polymer for cancer therapy.

    PubMed

    Li, Yongmao; Xu, Bing; Bai, Tao; Liu, Wenguang

    2015-07-01

    In this work, a star-shaped polymer consisting of a cationic poly[2-(dimethylamino) ethyl methacrylate] (PDMAEMA) shell and a zwitterionic poly[N-(3-(methacryloylamino) propyl)-N,N-dimethyl-N-(3-sulfopropyl) ammonium hydroxide] (PMPD) corona was grafted from a polyhedral oligomeric silsesquioxanes (POSS)-based initiator via atomic transfer radical polymerization (ATRP). The reported star-shaped polymer could form stable micelles in aqueous solutions even in the presence of serum. In addition, anti-cancer drug doxorubicin and tumor-suppressing p53 gene were loaded in the process of micelle formation. The formed polyplex was biocompatible and highly efficient for both drug and gene delivery. Furthermore, the polyplex was able to cause a high apoptotic rate of tumor cells both in vitro and in vivo. This combination delivery strategy offers a promising method for cancer therapy and can be used for further clinical applications. PMID:25934448

  16. Nanofibrous hollow microspheres self-assembled from star-shaped polymers as injectable cell carriers for knee repair

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Xiaohua; Jin, Xiaobing; Ma, Peter X.

    2011-05-01

    To repair complexly shaped tissue defects, an injectable cell carrier is desirable to achieve an accurate fit and to minimize surgical intervention. However, the injectable carriers available at present have limitations, and are not used clinically for cartilage regeneration. Here, we report nanofibrous hollow microspheres self-assembled from star-shaped biodegradable polymers as an injectable cell carrier. The nanofibrous hollow microspheres, integrating the extracellular-matrix-mimicking architecture with a highly porous injectable form, were shown to efficiently accommodate cells and enhance cartilage regeneration, compared with control microspheres. The nanofibrous hollow microspheres also supported a significantly larger amount of, and higher-quality, cartilage regeneration than the chondrocytes-alone group in an ectopic implantation model. In a critical-size rabbit osteochondral defect-repair model, the nanofibrous hollow microspheres/chondrocytes group achieved substantially better cartilage repair than the chondrocytes-alone group that simulates the clinically available autologous chondrocyte implantation procedure. These results indicate that the nanofibrous hollow microspheres are an excellent injectable cell carrier for cartilage regeneration.

  17. Interactions between water soluble porphyrin-based star polymer and amino acids: Spectroscopic evidence of molecular binding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Angelini, Nicola; Micali, Norberto; Villari, Valentina; Mineo, Placido; Vitalini, Daniele; Scamporrino, Emilio

    2005-02-01

    Molecular interactions giving rise to stable complexes between an uncharged water soluble cobalt-porphyrin and amino acids are investigated by time-resolved fluorescence, uv-vis, and circular dichroism measurements. This metalloporphyrin seems to act, by means of the coordination site of the cobalt of the core, as a recognition host, preferentially, with amino acids possessing aromatic groups. The binding with aliphatic amino acids requires longer time scales to be efficient and likely involves a slow kinetic process. The experimental findings suggest that, besides the metal(host)-N(guest) coordination bond, which is the common requisite for all amino acids, a preferential interaction with aromatic groups exists there. The solubility in water of the molecule, guaranteed by the polyethylene glycol arms as peripheral substituents, in the absence of electric charges, allows for a more selective discrimination of the binding process with respect to other water-soluble charged porphyrins. The interest devoted to the porphyrin-based star polymer and its recognition properties is, therefore, founded on the potential use either in polymeric matrices for material science or in aqueous solution for bioscience.

  18. DENSE GAS TRACERS AND STAR FORMATION LAWS IN ACTIVE GALAXIES: APEX SURVEY OF HCN J = 4 → 3, HCO{sup +} J = 4 → 3, AND CS J = 7 → 6

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Zhi-Yu; Gao, Yu; Zhao, Yinghe; Wang, Junzhi

    2014-04-01

    We report HCN J = 4 → 3, HCO{sup +} J = 4 → 3, and CS J = 7 → 6 observations in 20 nearby star-forming galaxies with the Atacama Pathfinder EXperiment 12 m telescope. Combined with four HCN, three HCO{sup +}, and four CS detections from the literature, we probe the empirical link between the luminosity of molecular gas (L{sub gas}{sup ′}) and that of infrared emission (L {sub IR}), up to the highest gas densities (∼10{sup 6} cm{sup –3}) that have been probed so far. For nearby galaxies with large radii, we measure the IR luminosity within the submillimeter beam size (14''-18'') to match the molecular emission. We find linear slopes for L{sub CS} {sub J=7--6}{sup ′}-L {sub IR} and L{sub HCN} {sub J=4--3}{sup ′}-L {sub IR}, and a slightly super-linear slope for L{sub HCO{sup +}} {sub J=4--3}{sup ′}-L {sub IR}. The correlation of L{sub CS} {sub J=7--6}{sup ′}-L {sub IR} even extends over eight orders of luminosity magnitude down to Galactic dense cores, with a fit of log(L {sub IR}) =1.00(± 0.01) ×log(L{sub CS} {sub J=7--6}{sup ′}) + 4.03(± 0.04). Such linear correlations appear to hold for all densities >10{sup 4} cm{sup –3}, and indicate that star formation rate is not related to the free-fall timescale for dense molecular gas.

  19. Understanding the thermosensitivity of POEGA-based star polymers: LCST-type transition in water vs. UCST-type transition in ethanol.

    PubMed

    Hou, Lei; Chen, Qijing; An, Zesheng; Wu, Peiyi

    2016-02-28

    The lower critical solution temperature (LCST) transition in water and the upper critical solution temperature (UCST) transition in ethanol of poly(oligo(ethylene glycol) acrylate) (POEGA)-based core cross-linked star (CCS) polymers have been investigated and compared by employing turbidity, dynamic light scattering (DLS), (1)H NMR and FTIR measurements. Macroscopic phase transitions in water and in ethanol were observed to occur when passing through the transition temperature, as revealed by DLS and turbidity measurements. Analysis by IR indicated that the interactions between the polymer chains and solvent molecules in water are stronger than those in ethanol such that the CCS polymer arm chains in water adopt more extended conformations. Moreover, hydrophobic interaction among the aliphatic groups plays a predominant role in the LCST-type transition in water whereas weak solvation of the polymer chains results in the UCST-type transition in ethanol. Additionally, the LCST-type transition in water was observed to be much more abrupt and complete than the UCST-type transition in ethanol, as suggested by (1)H NMR and IR at the molecular level. Finally, an abnormal "forced hydration" phenomenon was observed during the LCST transition upon heating. This study provides a detailed understanding of the subtle distinctions between the thermal transitions of CCS polymers in two commonly used solvents, which may be useful to guide future materials design for a wide range of applications. PMID:26822827

  20. The Distribution of YSO Masses in Dense Hubs and Less Dense Filaments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirk, Helen; Myers, P.

    2010-01-01

    Dense "hubs" and less dense radiating "filaments" are common features of nearby star-forming regions and infrared dark clouds. Cores and young stars are more concentrated in such hubs than in their radiating filaments. Accreting protostars may gain less mass in such low-density filaments, since low-density gas takes longer to accrete, and since the accretion must draw gas from a greater distance in filamentary geometry. We present an investigation of the mass distributions of YSOs in dense clusters and low-density filaments in the nearest molecular clouds, to test whether YSO masses depend on environment density and geometry. HK is supported by an NSERC PDF.

  1. Asymmetric AB3 Miktoarm Star Polymers: Synthesis, Self-Assembly, and Study of Micelle Stability Using AF4 for Efficient Drug Delivery.

    PubMed

    Moquin, Alexandre; Sharma, Anjali; Cui, Yiming; Lau, Anthony; Maysinger, Dusica; Kakkar, Ashok

    2015-12-01

    A simple and versatile methodology, which employs a combination of ring-opening polymerization and alkyne-azide click chemistry to synthesize amphiphilic AB3 miktoarm stars, is reported. Their aqueous self-assembly behavior was studied using dynamic light scattering, fluorescence, and asymmetrical flow field-flow fractionation (AF4). AB3 miktoarm stars form micelles which incorporate curcumin with high efficiency, and significantly reduce the viability of glioblastoma cells in spheroids. We demonstrate that AF4 is an effective technique to determine the size distribution of self-assembled structures exposed to a biological medium. The ease, with which asymmetric AB3 miktoarm polymers are constructed, provides a platform that can be widely employed to deliver a variety of lipophilic drugs. PMID:26259625

  2. ALMA OBSERVATIONS OF WARM DENSE GAS IN NGC 1614—BREAKING OF THE STAR FORMATION LAW IN THE CENTRAL KILOPARSEC

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, C. K.; Cao, C.; Lu, N.; Diaz-Santos, T.; Zhao, Y.-H.; Mazzarella, J. M.; Appleton, P.; Armus, L.; Murphy, E. J.; Gao, Y.; Herrero-Illana, R.; Privon, G.; Evans, A. S.; König, S.; Aalto, S.; Charmandaris, V.; Chu, J.; Haan, S.; Inami, H.; and others

    2015-01-20

    We present ALMA Cycle-0 observations of the CO (6-5) line emission and of the 435 μm dust continuum emission in the central kiloparsec of NGC 1614, a local luminous infrared galaxy at a distance of 67.8 Mpc (1{sup ′′}=329 pc). The CO emission is well resolved by the ALMA beam (0.''26 × 0.''20) into a circumnuclear ring, with an integrated flux of f {sub CO(6-5)} = 898 (± 153) Jy km s{sup –1}, which is 63(± 12)% of the total CO (6-5) flux measured by Herschel. The molecular ring, located between 100 pcstar formation regions with Σ{sub SFR} ∼ 100 M {sub ☉} yr{sup –1} kpc{sup –2} and Σ{sub Gas}∼10{sup 4} M{sub ⊙} pc{sup −2}. The non-detections of the nucleus in both the CO (6-5) line emission and the 435 μm continuum rule out, with relatively high confidence, a Compton-thick active galactic nucleus in NGC 1614. Comparisons with radio continuum emission show a strong deviation from an expected local correlation between Σ{sub Gas} and Σ{sub SFR}, indicating a breakdown of the Kennicutt-Schmidt law on the linear scale of ∼100 pc.

  3. ALMA Observations of Warm Dense Gas in NGC 1614—Breaking of the Star Formation Law in the Central Kiloparsec

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, C. K.; Cao, C.; Lu, N.; Gao, Y.; Diaz-Santos, T.; Herrero-Illana, R.; Meijerink, R.; Privon, G.; Zhao, Y.-H.; Evans, A. S.; König, S.; Mazzarella, J. M.; Aalto, S.; Appleton, P.; Armus, L.; Charmandaris, V.; Chu, J.; Haan, S.; Inami, H.; Murphy, E. J.; Sanders, D. B.; Schulz, B.; van der Werf, P.

    2015-01-01

    We present ALMA Cycle-0 observations of the CO (6-5) line emission and of the 435 μm dust continuum emission in the central kiloparsec of NGC 1614, a local luminous infrared galaxy at a distance of 67.8 Mpc (1{\\prime \\prime }= 329 pc). The CO emission is well resolved by the ALMA beam (0.''26 × 0.''20) into a circumnuclear ring, with an integrated flux of f CO(6-5) = 898 (± 153) Jy km s-1, which is 63(± 12)% of the total CO (6-5) flux measured by Herschel. The molecular ring, located between 100 pc < r < 350 pc from the nucleus, looks clumpy and includes seven unresolved (or marginally resolved) knots with median velocity dispersion of ~40 km s-1. These knots are associated with strong star formation regions with ΣSFR ~ 100 M ⊙ yr-1 kpc-2 and Σ Gas˜ 104 {M}_⊙ pc-2. The non-detections of the nucleus in both the CO (6-5) line emission and the 435 μm continuum rule out, with relatively high confidence, a Compton-thick active galactic nucleus in NGC 1614. Comparisons with radio continuum emission show a strong deviation from an expected local correlation between ΣGas and ΣSFR, indicating a breakdown of the Kennicutt-Schmidt law on the linear scale of ~100 pc. The National Radio Astronomy Observatory is a facility of the National Science Foundation operated under cooperative agreement by Associated Universities, Inc.

  4. Magnetic Phases in Dense Quark Matter

    SciTech Connect

    Incera, Vivian de la

    2007-10-26

    In this paper I discuss the magnetic phases of the three-flavor color superconductor. These phases can take place at different field strengths in a highly dense quark system. Given that the best natural candidates for the realization of color superconductivity are the extremely dense cores of neutron stars, which typically have very large magnetic fields, the magnetic phases here discussed could have implications for the physics of these compact objects.

  5. CoRoT 101186644: A transiting low-mass dense M-dwarf on an eccentric 20.7-day period orbit around a late F-star. Discovered in the CoRoT lightcurves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tal-Or, L.; Mazeh, T.; Alonso, R.; Bouchy, F.; Cabrera, J.; Deeg, H. J.; Deleuil, M.; Faigler, S.; Fridlund, M.; Hébrard, G.; Moutou, C.; Santerne, A.; Tingley, B.

    2013-05-01

    We present the study of the CoRoT transiting planet candidate 101186644, also named LRc01_E1_4780. Analysis of the CoRoT lightcurve and the HARPS spectroscopic follow-up observations of this faint (mV = 16) candidate revealed an eclipsing binary composed of a late F-type primary (Teff = 6090 ± 200 K) and a low-mass, dense late M-dwarf secondary on an eccentric (e = 0.4) orbit with a period of ~20.7 days. The M-dwarf has a mass of 0.096 ± 0.011 M⊙, and a radius of 0.104-0.006+0.026 R⊙, which possibly makes it the smallest and densest late M-dwarf reported so far. Unlike the claim that theoretical models predict radii that are 5-15% smaller than measured for low-mass stars, this one seems to have a radius that is consistent and might even be below the radius predicted by theoretical models. Based on observations made with the 1-m telescope at the Wise Observatory, Israel, the Swiss 1.2-m Leonhard Euler telescope at La Silla Observatory, Chile, the IAC-80 telescope at the Observatory del Teide, Canarias, Spain, and the 3.6-m telescope at La Silla Observatory (ESO), Chile (program 184.C-0639).

  6. Effects of capillary pressure and use of polymer solutions on dense, non-aqueous-phase liquid retention and mobilization in a rough-walled fracture

    SciTech Connect

    Longino, B.L.; Kueper, B.H. . Dept. of Civil Engineering)

    1999-07-15

    In this laboratory study, perchloroethylene (PCE) was permitted to migrate through a horizontal rough-walled limestone fracture under controlled conditions to assess fracture retention capacity. Retention of immiscible-phase PCE in the absence of an applied wetting-phase hydraulic gradient varied between 11% and 26% of the fracture volume. A portion of this residual could be removed through water flooding; however, even at the maximum applied hydraulic gradient of 1.0, residual PCE remained in the fracture. The observed correlation of reduced residual saturation with capillary number (N[sub c]) demonstrated that this rough-walled fracture exhibited behavior similar to that of a porous medium under water-flooding conditions. For a given hydraulic gradient, polymer-enhanced floods (using xanthan gum) were not as successful as conventional water flooding at removing residual from the fracture. The traditional form of the capillary number became an increasingly poor predictor of mobilization behavior as the viscosity of the displacing phase was increased. Incorporation of ([mu][sub w]/[mu][sub nw])[sup [minus]0.5] into the traditional capillary number provided a more appropriate dimensionless group with which to correlate residual PCE saturation in the fracture as [mu][sub w] increased.

  7. Dibaryons in neutron stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Olinto, Angela V.; Haensel, Pawel; Frieman, Joshua A.

    1991-01-01

    The effects are studied of H-dibaryons on the structure of neutron stars. It was found that H particles could be present in neutron stars for a wide range of dibaryon masses. The appearance of dibaryons softens the equations of state, lowers the maximum neutron star mass, and affects the transport properties of dense matter. The parameter space is constrained for dibaryons by requiring that a 1.44 solar mass neutron star be gravitationally stable.

  8. A computational and experimental study of the linear and nonlinear response of a star polymer melt with a moderate number of unentangled arms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fitzgerald, Barry W.; Lentzakis, Helen; Sakellariou, Georgios; Vlassopoulos, Dimitris; Briels, Wim J.

    2014-09-01

    We present from simulations and experiments results on the linear and nonlinear rheology of a moderate functionality, low molecular weight unentangled polystyrene (PS) star melt. The PS samples were anionically synthesized and close to monodisperse while their moderate functionality ensures that they do not display a pronounced core effect. We employ a highly coarse-grained model known as Responsive Particle Dynamics where each star polymer is approximated as a point particle. The eliminated degrees of freedom are used in the definition of an appropriate free energy as well as describing the transient pair-wise potential between particles that accounts for the viscoelastic response. First we reproduce very satisfactorily the experimental moduli using simulation. We then consider the nonlinear response of the same polymer melts by implementing a start-up shear protocol for a wide range of shear rates. As in experiments, we observe the development of a stress overshoot with increasing shear rate followed by a steady-state shear stress. We also recover the shear-thinning nature of the melt, although we slightly overestimate the extent of shear-thinning with simulations. In addition, we study relaxations upon the removal of shear where we find encouraging agreement between experiments and simulations, a finding that corroborates our agreement for the linear rheology.

  9. Dynamics of microemulsions bridged with hydrophobically end-capped star polymers studied by neutron spin-echo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoffmann, I.; de Molina, Paula Malo; Farago, B.; Falus, P.; Herfurth, Christoph; Laschewsky, André; Gradzielski, M.

    2014-01-01

    The mesoscopic dynamical properties of oil-in-water microemulsions (MEs) bridged with telechelic polymers of different number of arms and with different lengths of hydrophobic stickers were studied with neutron spin-echo (NSE) probing the dynamics in the size range of individual ME droplets. These results then were compared to those of dynamicic light scattering (DLS) which allow to investigate the dynamics on a much larger length scale. Studies were performed as a function of the polymer concentration, number of polymer arms, and length of the hydrophobic end-group. In general it is observed that the polymer bridging has a rather small influence on the local dynamics, despite the fact that the polymer addition leads to an increase of viscosity by several orders of magnitude. In contrast to results from rheology and DLS, where the dynamics on much larger length and time scales are observed, NSE shows that the linear polymer is more efficient in arresting the motion of individual ME droplets. This finding can be explained by a simple simulation, merely by the fact that the interconnection of droplets becomes more efficient with a decreasing number of arms. This means that the dynamics observed on the short and on the longer length scale depend in an opposite way on the number of arms and hydrophobic stickers.

  10. Dynamics of microemulsions bridged with hydrophobically end-capped star polymers studied by neutron spin-echo

    SciTech Connect

    Hoffmann, I.; Malo de Molina, Paula; Gradzielski, M.; Farago, B.; Falus, P.; Herfurth, Christoph; Laschewsky, André

    2014-01-21

    The mesoscopic dynamical properties of oil-in-water microemulsions (MEs) bridged with telechelic polymers of different number of arms and with different lengths of hydrophobic stickers were studied with neutron spin-echo (NSE) probing the dynamics in the size range of individual ME droplets. These results then were compared to those of dynamicic light scattering (DLS) which allow to investigate the dynamics on a much larger length scale. Studies were performed as a function of the polymer concentration, number of polymer arms, and length of the hydrophobic end-group. In general it is observed that the polymer bridging has a rather small influence on the local dynamics, despite the fact that the polymer addition leads to an increase of viscosity by several orders of magnitude. In contrast to results from rheology and DLS, where the dynamics on much larger length and time scales are observed, NSE shows that the linear polymer is more efficient in arresting the motion of individual ME droplets. This finding can be explained by a simple simulation, merely by the fact that the interconnection of droplets becomes more efficient with a decreasing number of arms. This means that the dynamics observed on the short and on the longer length scale depend in an opposite way on the number of arms and hydrophobic stickers.

  11. Probing cold dense nuclear matter.

    PubMed

    Subedi, R; Shneor, R; Monaghan, P; Anderson, B D; Aniol, K; Annand, J; Arrington, J; Benaoum, H; Benmokhtar, F; Boeglin, W; Chen, J-P; Choi, Seonho; Cisbani, E; Craver, B; Frullani, S; Garibaldi, F; Gilad, S; Gilman, R; Glamazdin, O; Hansen, J-O; Higinbotham, D W; Holmstrom, T; Ibrahim, H; Igarashi, R; de Jager, C W; Jans, E; Jiang, X; Kaufman, L J; Kelleher, A; Kolarkar, A; Kumbartzki, G; Lerose, J J; Lindgren, R; Liyanage, N; Margaziotis, D J; Markowitz, P; Marrone, S; Mazouz, M; Meekins, D; Michaels, R; Moffit, B; Perdrisat, C F; Piasetzky, E; Potokar, M; Punjabi, V; Qiang, Y; Reinhold, J; Ron, G; Rosner, G; Saha, A; Sawatzky, B; Shahinyan, A; Sirca, S; Slifer, K; Solvignon, P; Sulkosky, V; Urciuoli, G M; Voutier, E; Watson, J W; Weinstein, L B; Wojtsekhowski, B; Wood, S; Zheng, X-C; Zhu, L

    2008-06-13

    The protons and neutrons in a nucleus can form strongly correlated nucleon pairs. Scattering experiments, in which a proton is knocked out of the nucleus with high-momentum transfer and high missing momentum, show that in carbon-12 the neutron-proton pairs are nearly 20 times as prevalent as proton-proton pairs and, by inference, neutron-neutron pairs. This difference between the types of pairs is due to the nature of the strong force and has implications for understanding cold dense nuclear systems such as neutron stars. PMID:18511658

  12. Probing Cold Dense Nuclear Matter

    SciTech Connect

    Subedi, Ramesh; Shneor, R.; Monaghan, Peter; Anderson, Bryon; Aniol, Konrad; Annand, John; Arrington, John; Benaoum, Hachemi; Benmokhtar, Fatiha; Bertozzi, William; Boeglin, Werner; Chen, Jian-Ping; Choi, Seonho; Cisbani, Evaristo; Craver, Brandon; Frullani, Salvatore; Garibaldi, Franco; Gilad, Shalev; Gilman, Ronald; Glamazdin, Oleksandr; Hansen, Jens-Ole; Higinbotham, Douglas; Holmstrom, Timothy; Ibrahim, Hassan; Igarashi, Ryuichi; De Jager, Cornelis; Jans, Eddy; Jiang, Xiaodong; Kaufman, Lisa; Kelleher, Aidan; Kolarkar, Ameya; Kumbartzki, Gerfried; LeRose, John; Lindgren, Richard; Liyanage, Nilanga; Margaziotis, Demetrius; Markowitz, Pete; Marrone, Stefano; Mazouz, Malek; Meekins, David; Michaels, Robert; Moffit, Bryan; Perdrisat, Charles; Piasetzky, Eliazer; Potokar, Milan; Punjabi, Vina; Qiang, Yi; Reinhold, Joerg; Ron, Guy; Rosner, Guenther; Saha, Arunava; Sawatzky, Bradley; Shahinyan, Albert; Sirca, Simon; Slifer, Karl; Solvignon, Patricia; Sulkosky, Vince; Sulkosky, Vincent; Sulkosky, Vince; Sulkosky, Vincent; Urciuoli, Guido; Voutier, Eric; Watson, John; Weinstein, Lawrence; Wojtsekhowski, Bogdan; Wood, Stephen; Zheng, Xiaochao; Zhu, Lingyan

    2008-06-01

    The protons and neutrons in a nucleus can form strongly correlated nucleon pairs. Scattering experiments, in which a proton is knocked out of the nucleus with high-momentum transfer and high missing momentum, show that in carbon-12 the neutron-proton pairs are nearly 20 times as prevalent as proton-proton pairs and, by inference, neutron-neutron pairs. This difference between the types of pairs is due to the nature of the strong force and has implications for understanding cold dense nuclear systems such as neutron stars.

  13. Uniformly dense polymeric foam body

    DOEpatents

    Whinnery, Jr., Leroy

    2003-07-15

    A method for providing a uniformly dense polymer foam body having a density between about 0.013 g/cm.sup.3 to about 0.5 g/cm.sup.3 is disclosed. The method utilizes a thermally expandable polymer microsphere material wherein some of the microspheres are unexpanded and some are only partially expanded. It is shown that by mixing the two types of materials in appropriate ratios to achieve the desired bulk final density, filling a mold with this mixture so as to displace all or essentially all of the internal volume of the mold, heating the mold for a predetermined interval at a temperature above about 130.degree. C., and then cooling the mold to a temperature below 80.degree. C. the molded part achieves a bulk density which varies by less then about .+-.6% everywhere throughout the part volume.

  14. Tension in Highly Branched Polymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rubinstein, Michael

    2012-02-01

    We propose a systematic method of designing branched macromolecules capable of building up high tension in their covalent bonds, which can be controlled by changing solvent quality. This tension is achieved exclusively due to intramolecular interactions by focusing lower tensions from its numerous branches to a particular section of the designed molecule. The simplest molecular architecture, which allows this tension amplification, is a so-called pom-pom macromolecule consisting of a relatively short linear spacer and two z-arm stars at its ends. Tension developed in the stars due to crowding of their branches is amplified by a factor of z and focused to the spacer. There are other highly branched macromolecules, such as molecular brushes - comb polymers with high density of side branches, that have similar focusing and amplification properties. In addition molecular brushes transmit tension along their backbone. Adsorption or grafting of these branched molecules on a substrate results in further increase in tension as compared to molecules in solution. Molecular architectures similar to pom-pom and molecular brushes with a high tension amplification parts can be used in numerous sensor applications. Unique conformations of molecular brushes in a pre-wetting layer allow direct visualization by atomic force microscope. Detailed images of individual molecules spreading along the surface enable critical evaluation of theories of chain dynamics in polymer monolayer. Strong spreading of densely branched macromolecules on a planar substrate can lead to high tension in the molecular backbone sufficient to break covalent bonds.

  15. Atoms in dense plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    More, R.M.

    1986-01-01

    Recent experiments with high-power pulsed lasers have strongly encouraged the development of improved theoretical understanding of highly charged ions in a dense plasma environment. This work examines the theory of dense plasmas with emphasis on general rules which govern matter at extreme high temperature and density. 106 refs., 23 figs.

  16. Drug-loaded pseudo-block copolymer micelles with a multi-armed star polymer as the micellar exterior.

    PubMed

    Xie, Chen; Zhang, Peng; Zhang, Zhengkui; Yang, Chenchen; Zhang, Jialiang; Wu, Wei; Jiang, Xiqun

    2015-08-01

    Supramolecular constructed pseudo block copolymer micelles based on β-cyclodextrin terminated 4 and 7 armed star poly(N-vinylpyrrolidone) and adamantane terminated linear poly(ε-caprolactone) were prepared. The size, morphology, stability and protein adsorption were experimentally examined. The micelles with 7 armed PVP chains as the micellar exterior showed the lowest amount of protein adsorption and the best stability in media. When cabazitaxel, a new taxane, was loaded into the micelles, 14.4% drug loading content and 85% encapsulation efficacy were achieved. In vitro cytotoxicity studies demonstrated that the cabazitaxel-loaded micelles show significant cytotoxicity against drug-resistant A2780/T cell lines. Biodistribution studies showed that the micelles can almost double the content of cargo in tumor sites compared with the free cargo. In vivo antitumor activity examinations indicated that cabazitaxel-loaded micelles show superior antitumor activity over free paclitaxel and free cabazitaxel. PMID:26144838

  17. The Galactic Dense Gas Distribution and Properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glenn, Jason

    2015-08-01

    As the nearest spiral galaxy, the Milky Way provides a foundation for understanding galactic astrophysics. However, our position within the Galactic plane makes it challenging to decipher the detailed disk structure. The Galactic distribution of dense gas is relatively poorly known; thus, it is difficult to assess models of galaxy evolution by comparison to the Milky Way. Furthermore, fundamental aspects of star formation remain unknown, such as why the stellar and star cluster initial mass functions appear to be ubiquitous.Sub/millimeter dust continuum surveys, coupled with molecular gas surveys, are revealing the 3D distribution and properties of dense, star-forming gas throughout the disk. Here we report on the use of BGPS and Hi-GAL. BGPS is a 1.1 mm survey of the 1st Galactic quadrant and some lines of sight in the 2nd quadrant, totalling 200 deg2. We developed a technique using the Galactic rotation curve to derive distance probability density functions (DPDFs) to molecular cloud structures identified with continuum surveys. DPDFs combine vLSR measures from dense gas tracers and 13CO with distance discriminators, such as 8 μm extinction, HI self absorption, and (l, b, vLSR) associations with objects of known distances. Typical uncertainties are σdist ≤ 1 kpc for 1,710 BGPS objects with well-constrained distances.From DPDFs we derived the dense gas distribution and the dense gas mass function. We find evidence for dense gas in and between putative spiral arms. A log-normal distribution describes the mass function, which ranges from cores to clouds, but is primarily comprised of clumps. High-mass power laws do not fit the entire data set well, although power-law behavior emerges for sources nearer than 6.5 kpc (α = 2.0±0.1) and for objects between 2 kpc and 10 kpc (α = 1.9±0.1). The power law indices are generally between those of GMC and the stellar IMF. We have begun to apply this approach to the Hi-GAL (70 - 500 μm). With coverage of the entire

  18. Magnetism in Dense Quark Matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferrer, Efrain J.; de la Incera, Vivian

    We review the mechanisms via which an external magnetic field can affect the ground state of cold and dense quark matter. In the absence of a magnetic field, at asymptotically high densities, cold quark matter is in the Color-Flavor-Locked (CFL) phase of color superconductivity characterized by three scales: the superconducting gap, the gluon Meissner mass, and the baryonic chemical potential. When an applied magnetic field becomes comparable with each of these scales, new phases and/or condensates may emerge. They include the magnetic CFL (MCFL) phase that becomes relevant for fields of the order of the gap scale; the paramagnetic CFL, important when the field is of the order of the Meissner mass, and a spin-one condensate associated to the magnetic moment of the Cooper pairs, significant at fields of the order of the chemical potential. We discuss the equation of state (EoS) of MCFL matter for a large range of field values and consider possible applications of the magnetic effects on dense quark matter to the astrophysics of compact stars.

  19. Multicompartmental Microcapsules from Star Copolymer Micelles

    SciTech Connect

    Choi, Ikjun; Malak, Sidney T.; Xu, Weinan; Heller, William T.; Tsitsilianis, Constantinos; Tsukruk, Vladimir V.

    2013-02-26

    We present the layer-by-layer (LbL) assembly of amphiphilic heteroarm pH-sensitive star-shaped polystyrene-poly(2-pyridine) (PSnP2VPn) block copolymers to fabricate porous and multicompartmental microcapsules. Pyridine-containing star molecules forming a hydrophobic core/hydrophilic corona unimolecular micelle in acidic solution (pH 3) were alternately deposited with oppositely charged linear sulfonated polystyrene (PSS), yielding microcapsules with LbL shells containing hydrophobic micelles. The surface morphology and internal nanopore structure of the hollow microcapsules were comparatively investigated for shells formed from star polymers with a different numbers of arms (9 versus 22) and varied shell thickness (5, 8, and 11 bilayers). The successful integration of star unimers into the LbL shells was demonstrated by probing their buildup, surface segregation behavior, and porosity. The larger arm star copolymer (22 arms) with stretched conformation showed a higher increment in shell thickness due to the effective ionic complexation whereas a compact, uniform grainy morphology was observed regardless of the number of deposition cycles and arm numbers. Small-angle neutron scattering (SANS) revealed that microcapsules with hydrophobic domains showed different fractal properties depending upon the number of bilayers with a surface fractal morphology observed for the thinnest shells and a mass fractal morphology for the completed shells formed with the larger number of bilayers. Moreover, SANS provides support for the presence of relatively large pores (about 25 nm across) for the thinnest shells as suggested from permeability experiments. The formation of robust microcapsules with nanoporous shells composed of a hydrophilic polyelectrolyte with a densely packed hydrophobic core based on star amphiphiles represents an intriguing and novel case of compartmentalized microcapsules with an ability to simultaneously store different hydrophilic, charged, and hydrophobic

  20. Polymersomes via Self-Assembly of Amphiphilic β-Cyclodextrin-Centered Triarm Star Polymers for Enhanced Oral Bioavailability of Water-Soluble Chemotherapeutics.

    PubMed

    Hu, Mengying; Shen, Yurun; Zhang, Lu; Qiu, Liyan

    2016-03-14

    To date, improving oral bioavailability of water-soluble drugs with poor membrane permeability is still challenging. An example of this includes doxorubicin hydrochloride (DOX·HCl), a widely used chemotherapeutic. We therefore developed a novel DOX·HCl-loaded polymersome (Ps-DOX·HCl) self-assembled by amphiphilic β-cyclodextrin-centered triarm star polymer (mPEG(2k)-PLA(3k))3-CD with the considerable drug loading capability. Using Madin-Darby canine kidney (MDCK) cells trans-well models, it was found that the cellular uptake and absorptive transport of DOX·HCl was significantly increased and the efflux was attenuated when delivered through polymersomes than free drugs. This phenomenon was further verified in mechanistic studies, which was attributed to the change in membrane transport pathway from paracellular route (free DOX·HCl) to active transcellular transport (drug-loaded polymersomes). Moreover, in vivo pharmacokinetic studies in mice demonstrated a significant increase in the oral bioavailability of Ps-DOX·HCl compared with free DOX·HCl (7.32-fold), as well as extended half-life (8.22-fold). This resulted in a substantial anticancer efficacy against mouse sarcoma 180 (S180) tumor in vivo. The cardiotoxicity, which is intrinsically induced by DOX·HCl, and toxicity toward gastrointestinal tissues were avoided according to histological studies. These findings indicate that (mPEG(2k)-PLA(3k))3-CD copolymer displays great potential as a vehicle for the effective oral delivery of water-soluble drugs with low permeability. PMID:26840277

  1. Efficient gene transfection in the neurotypic cells by star-shaped polymer consisting of β-cyclodextrin core and poly(amidoamine) dendron arms.

    PubMed

    Liang, Bing; Deng, Jun Jie; Yuan, Fang; Yang, Ning; Li, Wei; Yin, Jian Rui; Pu, Shu Xiang; Xie, Long Chang; Gao, Cong; Zhang, Li Ming

    2013-04-15

    In order to develop the effective vectors that had high gene transfection capability and low cytotoxicity in the neuronal cells, we tested the star-shaped polymer consisting of β-cyclodextrin core and poly(amidoamine) (PAMAM) dendron arms [β-CD-(D3)7] as the vector to transfect the human neuroblastoma SH-SY5Y cells. The physicochemical properties of the β-CD-(D3)7/plasmid DNA (pDNA) complexes were characterized by using gel electrophoresis, dynamic light scattering, transmission electron microscopy and zeta-potential experiments. Among the human neuroblastoma SH-SY5Y cells, β-CD-(D3)7/pDNA complex demonstrated a lower toxicity compared to those of PAMAM (G=4, with an ethylenediamine core)/pDNA complex. When the N/P ratio was over 20, it was observed that PAMAM had a faster increment in toxicity compared to β-CD-(D3)7. Fluorescent image, confocal microscopy image and flow cytometry showed that β-CD-(D3)7/pDNA complexes had significantly higher transgene activity than that of PAMAM/pDNA complexes. For example, the transfection efficiency was 20% and 7.5% for β-CD-(D3)7/pDNA and PAMAM/pDNA complexes, respectively. These results indicated that β-CD-(D3)7 might be a promising candidate for neurotypic cells gene delivery with the characteristics of good biocompatibility, relatively high gene transfection capability and potential in vivo gene delivery ability. PMID:23544527

  2. Stars and star systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martynov, D. Ia.

    Topics examined include close binary systems, supernovae and their remnants, variable stars, young star groups (e.g., clusters and associations), spherical star clusters, and planetary nebulae. Also considered are the interstellar medium and star formation, systems of galaxies, and current problems in cosmology.

  3. Chaotic Star Birth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Click on the image for Poster VersionClick on the image for IRAS 4B Inset

    Located 1,000 light years from Earth in the constellation Perseus, a reflection nebula called NGC 1333 epitomizes the beautiful chaos of a dense group of stars being born. Most of the visible light from the young stars in this region is obscured by the dense, dusty cloud in which they formed. With NASA's Spitzer Space Telescope, scientists can detect the infrared light from these objects. This allows a look through the dust to gain a more detailed understanding of how stars like our sun begin their lives.

    The young stars in NGC 1333 do not form a single cluster, but are split between two sub-groups. One group is to the north near the nebula shown as red in the image. The other group is south, where the features shown in yellow and green abound in the densest part of the natal gas cloud. With the sharp infrared eyes of Spitzer, scientists can detect and characterize the warm and dusty disks of material that surround forming stars. By looking for differences in the disk properties between the two subgroups, they hope to find hints of the star and planet formation history of this region.

    The knotty yellow-green features located in the lower portion of the image are glowing shock fronts where jets of material, spewed from extremely young embryonic stars, are plowing into the cold, dense gas nearby. The sheer number of separate jets that appear in this region is unprecedented. This leads scientists to believe that by stirring up the cold gas, the jets may contribute to the eventual dispersal of the gas cloud, preventing more stars from forming in NGC 1333.

    In contrast, the upper portion of the image is dominated by the infrared light from warm dust, shown as red.

  4. Sub-kiloparsec ALMA Imaging of Compact Star-forming Galaxies at z ~ 2.5: Revealing the Formation of Dense Galactic Cores in the Progenitors of Compact Quiescent Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barro, G.; Kriek, M.; Pérez-González, P. G.; Trump, J. R.; Koo, D. C.; Faber, S. M.; Dekel, A.; Primack, J. R.; Guo, Y.; Kocevski, D. D.; Muñoz-Mateos, J. C.; Rujoparkarn, W.; Seth, K.

    2016-08-01

    We present spatially resolved Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA) 870 μm dust continuum maps of six massive, compact, dusty star-forming galaxies at z ∼ 2.5. These galaxies are selected for their small rest-frame optical sizes ({r}{{e,F160W}}∼ 1.6 kpc) and high stellar mass densities that suggest that they are direct progenitors of compact quiescent galaxies at z ∼ 2. The deep observations yield high far-infrared (FIR) luminosities of {L}{{IR}}={10}12.3-12.8 {L}ȯ and star formation rates (SFRs) of SFR = 200–700 M ⊙ yr‑1, consistent with those of typical star-forming “main sequence” galaxies. The high spatial resolution (FWHM ∼ 0.″12–0.″18) ALMA and Hubble Space Telescope photometry are combined to construct deconvolved, mean radial profiles of their stellar mass and (UV+IR) SFR. We find that the dusty, nuclear IR–SFR overwhelmingly dominates the bolometric SFR up to r ∼ 5 kpc, by a factor of over 100× from the unobscured UV–SFR. Furthermore, the effective radius of the mean SFR profile ({r}{{e,SFR}}∼ 1 kpc) is ∼30% smaller than that of the stellar mass profile. The implied structural evolution, if such nuclear starburst last for the estimated gas depletion time of Δt = ±100 Myr, is a 4× increase of the stellar mass density within the central 1 kpc and a 1.6× decrease of the half-mass–radius. This structural evolution fully supports dissipation-driven, formation scenarios in which strong nuclear starbursts transform larger, star-forming progenitors into compact quiescent galaxies.

  5. Sub-kiloparsec ALMA Imaging of Compact Star-forming Galaxies at z ~ 2.5: Revealing the Formation of Dense Galactic Cores in the Progenitors of Compact Quiescent Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barro, G.; Kriek, M.; Pérez-González, P. G.; Trump, J. R.; Koo, D. C.; Faber, S. M.; Dekel, A.; Primack, J. R.; Guo, Y.; Kocevski, D. D.; Muñoz-Mateos, J. C.; Rujoparkarn, W.; Seth, K.

    2016-08-01

    We present spatially resolved Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA) 870 μm dust continuum maps of six massive, compact, dusty star-forming galaxies at z ˜ 2.5. These galaxies are selected for their small rest-frame optical sizes ({r}{{e,F160W}}˜ 1.6 kpc) and high stellar mass densities that suggest that they are direct progenitors of compact quiescent galaxies at z ˜ 2. The deep observations yield high far-infrared (FIR) luminosities of {L}{{IR}}={10}12.3-12.8 {L}ȯ and star formation rates (SFRs) of SFR = 200–700 M ⊙ yr‑1, consistent with those of typical star-forming “main sequence” galaxies. The high spatial resolution (FWHM ˜ 0.″12–0.″18) ALMA and Hubble Space Telescope photometry are combined to construct deconvolved, mean radial profiles of their stellar mass and (UV+IR) SFR. We find that the dusty, nuclear IR–SFR overwhelmingly dominates the bolometric SFR up to r ˜ 5 kpc, by a factor of over 100× from the unobscured UV–SFR. Furthermore, the effective radius of the mean SFR profile ({r}{{e,SFR}}˜ 1 kpc) is ˜30% smaller than that of the stellar mass profile. The implied structural evolution, if such nuclear starburst last for the estimated gas depletion time of Δt = ±100 Myr, is a 4× increase of the stellar mass density within the central 1 kpc and a 1.6× decrease of the half-mass–radius. This structural evolution fully supports dissipation-driven, formation scenarios in which strong nuclear starbursts transform larger, star-forming progenitors into compact quiescent galaxies.

  6. Cationic star-shaped polymer as an siRNA carrier for reducing MMP-9 expression in skin fibroblast cells and promoting wound healing in diabetic rats

    PubMed Central

    Li, Na; Luo, Heng-Cong; Yang, Chuan; Deng, Jun-Jie; Ren, Meng; Xie, Xiao-Ying; Lin, Diao-Zhu; Yan, Li; Zhang, Li-Ming

    2014-01-01

    Background Excessive expression of matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9) is deleterious to the cutaneous wound-healing process in the context of diabetes. The aim of the present study was to explore whether a cationic star-shaped polymer consisting of β-cyclodextrin (β-CD) core and poly(amidoamine) dendron arms (β-CD-[D3]7) could be used as the gene carrier of small interfering RNA (siRNA) to reduce MMP-9 expression for enhanced diabetic wound healing. Methods The cytotoxicity of β-CD-(D3)7 was investigated by 3-(4,5-Dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide assay (MMT) method in the rat CRL1213 skin fibroblast cell line. The transfection efficiency of β-CD-(D3)7/MMP-9-small interfering RNA (siRNA) complexes was determined by confocal microscopy and flow cytometry. Quantitative real time (RT) polymerase chain reaction was performed to measure the gene expression of MMP-9 after the transfection by β-CD-(D3)7/MMP-9-siRNA complexes. The β-CD-(D3)7/MMP-9-siRNA complexes were injected on the wounds of streptozocin-induced diabetic rats. Wound closure was measured on days 4 and 7 post-wounding. Results β-CD-(D3)7 exhibited low cytotoxicity in fibroblast cells, and easily formed the complexes with MMP-9-siRNA. The β-CD-(D3)7/MMP-9-siRNA complexes were readily taken up by fibroblast cells, resulting in the downregulation of MMP-9 gene expression (P<0.01). Animal experiments revealed that the treatment by β-CD-(D3)7/MMP-9-siRNA complexes enhanced wound closure in diabetic rats on day 7 post-wounding (P<0.05). Conclusion β-CD-(D3)7 may be used as an efficient carrier for the delivery of MMP-9-siRNA to reduce MMP-9 expression in skin fibroblast cells and promote wound healing in diabetic rats. PMID:25075185

  7. Introduction to neutron stars

    SciTech Connect

    Lattimer, James M.

    2015-02-24

    Neutron stars contain the densest form of matter in the present universe. General relativity and causality set important constraints to their compactness. In addition, analytic GR solutions are useful in understanding the relationships that exist among the maximum mass, radii, moments of inertia, and tidal Love numbers of neutron stars, all of which are accessible to observation. Some of these relations are independent of the underlying dense matter equation of state, while others are very sensitive to the equation of state. Recent observations of neutron stars from pulsar timing, quiescent X-ray emission from binaries, and Type I X-ray bursts can set important constraints on the structure of neutron stars and the underlying equation of state. In addition, measurements of thermal radiation from neutron stars has uncovered the possible existence of neutron and proton superfluidity/superconductivity in the core of a neutron star, as well as offering powerful evidence that typical neutron stars have significant crusts. These observations impose constraints on the existence of strange quark matter stars, and limit the possibility that abundant deconfined quark matter or hyperons exist in the cores of neutron stars.

  8. Infrared and Submilllimeter Studies of Dense Cores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bourke, Tyler L.

    2014-07-01

    Dense Cores are the birthplace of stars, and so understanding their structure and evolution is key to understanding star formation. Information on the density, temperature, and motions within cores are needed to describe these properties, and are obtained through continuum and line observations at far infrared and submm/mm wavelengths. Recent observations of dust emission with Herschel and molecular line observations with single-dish telescopes and interferometers provide the wavelength coverage and resolution to finally map core properties without appealing to spherical simplifications. Although large scale Herschel observations reveal numerous filaments in molecular clouds which are well described by cylindrical geometries, cores are still modeled as spherical entities. A few examples of other core geometries exist in the literature, and the wealth of new data on cloud filaments demand that non-spherical models receive more attention in future studies. This talk will examine the evidence for non-spherical cores and their connection to the filaments from which they form.

  9. Relaxation dynamics of branched polymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghosh, Arnav

    The Rouse model for star polymers was successfully derived by solving the differential equations governing the net force acting on each bead in a star polymer chain. As opposed to a linear polymer, where we have N unique roots for N beads, in the case of star polymers, there are only 2 Na+1 unique roots and all odd unique roots (except the last root corresponding to the branch point) starting with the first root have a multiplicity of f-1. The relaxation time of the pth unique Rouse mode of a star polymer varies as (2Na + 1)2/p2. Since alternate Rouse modes in a star polymer have a multiplicity of f-1, they add to the terminal modulus of the star polymers and the terminal modulus, G(tau) ends up being proportional to f-1 (besides being inversely proportional to N, which is also the case with linear polymers). A self-consistent theory for the relaxation of entangled star polymers was developed based on the work done by Colby and Rubinstein on linear blends. This theory considers the duality of relaxation dynamics (direct stress relaxation and indirect relaxation by release of constraints) and models the relaxation due to constraint release R(t) based on Dean's approach in solving the vibration frequencies of glassy chains with random spring constants. In our case, the mobilities of beads were considered to be random and based on the relative weight of the prefactor of a Maxwell function, a group of which was fitted to the stress relaxation function mu(t) of a star polymer (proposed and derived by Doi). The tube dilation model for star and comb polymers was investigated in detail and predictions compared to rheological data from polypropylene, polybutadiene and polystyrene comb polymers along with PEP star polymers. The relaxation time from the Tube Dilation Model was compared with the classical Tube Model and was shown to have an extra power dependence on the fraction of the comb backbone.

  10. Polyelectrolyte Stars and Cylindrical Brushes Made by ATRP: New Building Blocks in Nanotechnology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plamper, Felix; Xu, Youyong; Yuan, Jiayin; Ballauff, Matthias; Müller, Axel H. E.

    Star polymers and cylindrical polymer brushes (CPBs), i.e. polymers possessing side groups densely grafted from a linear main chain, have attracted considerable experimental and theoretical interest over the past decade, owing to their peculiar solution and bulk properties. We have used the grafting-from approach via ATRP to synthesize well-defined star polymers and core—shell CPBs with homopolymer and block copolymer side chains. The diblock copolymer side chains may include combinations of soft-hard, hydrophilic-hydrophobic and crystalline-amorphous block segments. In particular, we have been interested in polyelectrolyte blocks; then the polymers resemble intramolecular spherical and cylindrical micelles, respectively. Star polymers of poly(acrylic acid) (PAA) and poly(N,N-dimethylaminoethyl methacrylate) (DMAEMA) were made using sugar- or silsesquioxane-based ATRP initiators. Their LCST and UCST phase behaviour depends on pH, counterion charge, temperature, and light. PDMAEMA CPBs react in a similar way, and on addition of trivalent counterions they even form helical structures. We have also synthesized hybrid nanowires of semiconducting CdS and CdSe or nanomagnets of γ-Fe2O3 inside the PAA core of CPBs. Here, we present novel water-soluble and biocompatible silica nanowires based on CPBs. They have a core consisting of a silsesquioxane network of crosslinked poly(3-acryloylpropyl trimethoxysilane) (PAPTS) and a shell of poly(oligoe-thyleneglycol methacrylate) (POEGMA). Sequential ATRP of APTS and OEGMA initiated by a polyinitiator backbone (DP = 3,200) was carried out in benzene. Due to the cylindrical shape of the brushes the functional TMS moieties were arranged into a 1D manner and then crosslinked via alkaline condensation, rendering the rigid core—shell hybrid CPBs. Finally, uniform silica nanowires were achieved by the simultaneous removal of the hybrid CPB template via pyrolysis. The length as well as the diameter of silica nanowires are well-defined.

  11. Transiting exoplanets from the CoRoT space mission . XIII. CoRoT-13b: a dense hot Jupiter in transit around a star with solar metallicity and super-solar lithium content

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cabrera, J.; Bruntt, H.; Ollivier, M.; Díaz, R. F.; Csizmadia, Sz.; Aigrain, S.; Alonso, R.; Almenara, J.-M.; Auvergne, M.; Baglin, A.; Barge, P.; Bonomo, A. S.; Bordé, P.; Bouchy, F.; Carone, L.; Carpano, S.; Deleuil, M.; Deeg, H. J.; Dvorak, R.; Erikson, A.; Ferraz-Mello, S.; Fridlund, M.; Gandolfi, D.; Gazzano, J.-C.; Gillon, M.; Guenther, E. W.; Guillot, T.; Hatzes, A.; Havel, M.; Hébrard, G.; Jorda, L.; Léger, A.; Llebaria, A.; Lammer, H.; Lovis, C.; Mazeh, T.; Moutou, C.; Ofir, A.; von Paris, P.; Pätzold, M.; Queloz, D.; Rauer, H.; Rouan, D.; Santerne, A.; Schneider, J.; Tingley, B.; Titz-Weider, R.; Wuchterl, G.

    2010-11-01

    We announce the discovery of the transiting planet CoRoT-13b. Ground-based follow-up in CFHT and IAC80 confirmed CoRoT's observations. The mass of the planet was measured with the HARPS spectrograph and the properties of the host star were obtained analyzing HIRES spectra from the Keck telescope. It is a hot Jupiter-like planet with an orbital period of 4.04 days, 1.3 Jupiter masses, 0.9 Jupiter radii, and a density of 2.34 g cm-3. It orbits a G0V star with T_eff = 5 945 K, M* = 1.09 M⊙, R_* = 1.01 R⊙, solar metallicity, a lithium content of + 1.45 dex, and an estimated age of between 0.12 and 3.15 Gyr. The lithium abundance of the star is consistent with its effective temperature, activity level, and age range derived from the stellar analysis. The density of the planet is extreme for its mass, implies that heavy elements are present with a mass of between about 140 and 300 {M}⊕. The CoRoT space mission, launched on December 27th 2006, has been developed and is operated by CNES, with the contribution of Austria, Belgium, Brazil, ESA (RSSD and Science Programme), Germany and Spain. Part of the observations were obtained at the Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope (CFHT) which is operated by the National Research Council of Canada, the Institut National des Sciences de l'Univers of the Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique of France, and the University of Hawaii. Based on observations made with HARPS spectrograph on the 3.6-m European Organisation for Astronomical Research in the Southern Hemisphere telescope at La Silla Observatory, Chile (ESO program 184.C-0639). Based on observations made with the IAC80 telescope operated on the island of Tenerife by the Instituto de Astrofísica de Canarias in the Spanish Observatorio del Teide. Part of the data presented herein were obtained at the W. M. Keck Observatory, which is operated as a scientific partnership among the California Institute of Technology, the University of California and the National Aeronautics

  12. Dense cold matter

    SciTech Connect

    Stavinskiy, A. V.

    2015-07-15

    The possibility of studying matter at densities on the order of or higher than the neutron-star density in laboratory experiments is considered. For this, it is proposed to employ a rare kinematical trigger in collisions of relativistic ions. The expected properties of matter under such unusual conditions and a program for investigations into it are discussed, and a design of experimental setup for such investigations is proposed.

  13. Cooling of neutron stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pethick, C. J.

    1992-01-01

    It is at present impossible to predict the interior constitution of neutron stars based on theory and results from laboratory studies. It has been proposed that it is possible to obtain information on neutron star interiors by studying thermal radiation from their surfaces, because neutrino emission rates, and hence the temperature of the central part of a neutron star, depend on the properties of dense matter. The theory predicts that neutron stars cool relatively slowly if their cores are made up of nucleons, and cool faster if the matter is in an exotic state, such as a pion condensate, a kaon condensate, or quark matter. This view has recently been questioned by the discovery of a number of other processes that could lead to copious neutrino emission and rapid cooling.

  14. Dense suspension splash

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dodge, Kevin M.; Peters, Ivo R.; Ellowitz, Jake; Schaarsberg, Martin H. Klein; Jaeger, Heinrich M.; Zhang, Wendy W.

    2014-11-01

    Impact of a dense suspension drop onto a solid surface at speeds of several meters-per-second splashes by ejecting individual liquid-coated particles. Suppression or reduction of this splash is important for thermal spray coating and additive manufacturing. Accomplishing this aim requires distinguishing whether the splash is generated by individual scattering events or by collective motion reminiscent of liquid flow. Since particle inertia dominates over surface tension and viscous drag in a strong splash, we model suspension splash using a discrete-particle simulation in which the densely packed macroscopic particles experience inelastic collisions but zero friction or cohesion. Numerical results based on this highly simplified model are qualitatively consistent with observations. They also show that approximately 70% of the splash is generated by collective motion. Here an initially downward-moving particle is ejected into the splash because it experiences a succession of low-momentum-change collisions whose effects do not cancel but instead accumulate. The remainder of the splash is generated by scattering events in which a small number of high-momentum-change collisions cause a particle to be ejected upwards. Current Address: Physics of Fluids Group, University of Twente, P.O. Box 217, 7500 AE Enschede, The Netherlands.

  15. Warm dense crystallography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valenza, Ryan A.; Seidler, Gerald T.

    2016-03-01

    The intense femtosecond-scale pulses from x-ray free electron lasers (XFELs) are able to create and interrogate interesting states of matter characterized by long-lived nonequilibrium semicore or core electron occupancies or by the heating of dense phases via the relaxation cascade initiated by the photoelectric effect. We address here the latter case of "warm dense matter" (WDM) and investigate the observable consequences of x-ray heating of the electronic degrees of freedom in crystalline systems. We report temperature-dependent density functional theory calculations for the x-ray diffraction from crystalline LiF, graphite, diamond, and Be. We find testable, strong signatures of condensed-phase effects that emphasize the importance of wide-angle scattering to study nonequilibrium states. These results also suggest that the reorganization of the valence electron density at eV-scale temperatures presents a confounding factor to achieving atomic resolution in macromolecular serial femtosecond crystallography (SFX) studies at XFELs, as performed under the "diffract before destroy" paradigm.

  16. DENSE MEDIUM CYCLONE OPTIMIZATON

    SciTech Connect

    Gerald H. Luttrell; Chris J. Barbee; Peter J. Bethell; Chris J. Wood

    2005-06-30

    Dense medium cyclones (DMCs) are known to be efficient, high-tonnage devices suitable for upgrading particles in the 50 to 0.5 mm size range. This versatile separator, which uses centrifugal forces to enhance the separation of fine particles that cannot be upgraded in static dense medium separators, can be found in most modern coal plants and in a variety of mineral plants treating iron ore, dolomite, diamonds, potash and lead-zinc ores. Due to the high tonnage, a small increase in DMC efficiency can have a large impact on plant profitability. Unfortunately, the knowledge base required to properly design and operate DMCs has been seriously eroded during the past several decades. In an attempt to correct this problem, a set of engineering tools have been developed to allow producers to improve the efficiency of their DMC circuits. These tools include (1) low-cost density tracers that can be used by plant operators to rapidly assess DMC performance, (2) mathematical process models that can be used to predict the influence of changes in operating and design variables on DMC performance, and (3) an expert advisor system that provides plant operators with a user-friendly interface for evaluating, optimizing and trouble-shooting DMC circuits. The field data required to develop these tools was collected by conducting detailed sampling and evaluation programs at several industrial plant sites. These data were used to demonstrate the technical, economic and environmental benefits that can be realized through the application of these engineering tools.

  17. Extreme horizontal branch stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heber, U.

    A review is presented on the properties, origin and evolutionary links of hot subluminous stars which are generally believed to be extreme Horizontal Branch stars or closely related objects. They exist both in the disk and halo populations (globular clusters) of the Galaxy. Amongst the field stars a large fraction of sdBs are found to reside in close binaries. The companions are predominantly white dwarfs, but also low mass main sequence stars are quite common. Systems with sufficiently massive white dwarf companions may qualify as Supernova Ia progenitors. Recently evidence has been found that the masses of some unseen companions might exceed the Chandrasekhar mass, hence they must be neutron stars or black holes. Even a planet has recently been detected orbiting the pulsating sdB star V391 Peg. Quite to the opposite,in globular clusters, only very few sdB binaries amongst are found indicating that the dominant sdB formation processes is different in a dense environment. Binary population synthesis models identify three formation channels, (i) stable Roche lobe overflow, (ii) one or two common envelope ejection phases and (iii) the merger of two helium white dwarfs. The latter channel may explain the properties of the He-enriched subluminous O stars, the hotter sisters of the sdB stars, because their binary fraction is lower than that of the sdBs by a factor of ten or more. The rivaling ''late hot flasher'' scenario is also discussed. Pulsating subluminous B (sdB) stars play an important role for asteroseismology as this technique has already led to mass determinations for a handful of stars. A unique hyper-velocity sdO star moving so fast that it is unbound to the Galaxy has probably been ejected by the super-massive black hole in the Galactic centre.

  18. Young Stars in IC 2118

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spuck, Tim; Rebull, Luisa; Daou, Doris; Maranto, Tony; Roelofsen, Theresa; Sepulveda, Babs; Weehler, Cynthia

    2005-02-01

    IC 2118, the Witch Head Nebula (~210 parsecs), is region forming stars located near the supergiant star Rigel in the constellation Orion. Kun et al. (2004, A&A, 418, 89) have determined that IC 2118 is on the near side of the Orion-Eridanus Super Bubble and that stellar winds from the Orion OB1 association may be triggering new star formation in the nebula. We propose using IRAC and MIPS to reexamine a small dense region of this nebula where Kun et al. have spectroscopically identified three 2MASS sources as T Tauri stars embedded in the cloud. Previous all-sky surveys, including both IRAS and 2MASS, have included this region, but not to the resolution that Spitzer can provide, and there are few studies of this particular region in the literature. Our team proposes to use IRAC and MIPS observations to (1) investigate star formation, (2) look for likely cluster member stars with infrared excesses, and characterize this young star population by obtaining their colors and therefore estimates of masses and ages, (3) study the distribution of stars, their relationship to the ISM, and the possibilities of triggered star formation, (4) compare the young star population, distribution, and age to other similar sites of star formation, e.g., IC 1396 and (5) produce a dramatic image of the interstellar medium in the region surrounding IC 2118. Since this region is in the Orion constellation near the bright star Rigel, it provides additional appeal to students and the general public.

  19. Dense Hypervelocity Plasma Jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Witherspoon, F. Douglas; Case, Andrew; Phillips, Michael W.

    2006-10-01

    High velocity dense plasma jets are under continued experimental development for a variety of fusion applications including refueling, disruption mitigation, rotation drive, and magnetized target fusion. The technical goal is to accelerate plasma slugs of density >10^17 cm-3 and total mass >100 micrograms to velocities >200 km/s. The approach utilizes symmetrical injection of very high density plasma into a coaxial EM accelerator having a tailored cross-section geometry to prevent formation of the blow-by instability. Injected plasma is generated by electrothermal capillary discharges using either cylindrical capillaries or a newer toroidal spark gap arrangement that has worked at pressures as low as 3.5 x10-6 Torr in bench tests. Experimental plasma data will be presented for a complete 32 injector accelerator system recently built for driving rotation in the Maryland MCX experiment which utilizes the cylindrical capillaries, and also for a 50 spark gap test unit currently under construction.

  20. Dense Molecular Gas in Centaurus A

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wild, Wolfgang; Eckart, Andreas

    1999-10-01

    Centaurus A (NGC 5128) is the closest radio galaxy, and its molecular interstellar medium has been studied extensively in recent years. However, these studies used mostly molecular lines tracing low to medium density gas (see e.g. Eckart et al. 1990. Wild et al. 1997). The amount and distribution of the dense component remained largely unknown. We present spectra of the HCN(1-0) emission - which traces dense (n(H2) > 104 cm-3) molecular gas - at the center and along the prominent dust lane at offset positions +/- 60" and +/- 100", as well as single CS(2-1) and CS(3-2) spectra, observed with the SEST on La Silla, Chile. At the central position, the integrated intensity ratio I(HCN)/I(CO) peaks at 0.064, and decreases to somewhat equal to 0.02 to 0.04 in the dust lane. Based on the line luminosity ratio L(HCN)/L(CO) we estimate that there is a significant amount of dense gas in Centaurus A. The fraction of dense molecular gas as well as the star formation efficiency LFIR/LCO towards the center of Cen A is comparable to ultra-luminous infrared galaxies, and falls in between the values for ULIRGs and normal galaxies for positions in the dust lane. Details will be published in Wild & Eckart (A&A, in prep.). Eckart et al. 1990, ApJ 363, 451 Rydbeck et al. 1993, Astr.Ap. (Letters) 270, L13. Wild, W., Eckart, A. & Wiklind, T. 1997, Astr.Ap. 322, 419.

  1. Massive Compact Stars as Quark Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodrigues, Hilário; Barbosa Duarte, Sérgio; de Oliveira, José Carlos T.

    2011-03-01

    High-mass compact stars have been reported recently in the literature, providing strong constraints on the properties of the ultra dense matter beyond the saturation nuclear density. In view of these results, the calculations of quark star or hybrid star equilibrium structure must be compatible with the provided observational data. But since the equations of state used in describing quark matter are in general too soft in comparison with the equation of states used to describe the hadronic or nuclear matter, the calculated quark star models presented in the literature are in general not suitable to explain the stability of highly-compact massive objects. In this work, we present the calculations of a spherically symmetric quark star structure by using an equation of state that takes into account the superconducting color-flavor locked phase of the strange quark matter. In addition, some fundamental aspects of QCD (asymptotic freedom and confinement) are considered by means of a phenomenological description of the deconfined quark phase, the density-dependent quark mass model. The quark matter behavior introduced by this model stiffens the corresponding equation of state. We thus investigate the influence of this model on the mass-radius diagram of quark stars. We obtain massive quark stars due to the stiffness of the equation of state, when a reasonable parameterization of the color superconducting gap is used. Models of quark stars enveloped by a nucleonic crust composed of a nuclear lattice embedded in an electron gas, with nuclei close to neutron drip line, are also discussed.

  2. The physics of neutron stars.

    PubMed

    Lattimer, J M; Prakash, M

    2004-04-23

    Neutron stars are some of the densest manifestations of massive objects in the universe. They are ideal astrophysical laboratories for testing theories of dense matter physics and provide connections among nuclear physics, particle physics, and astrophysics. Neutron stars may exhibit conditions and phenomena not observed elsewhere, such as hyperon-dominated matter, deconfined quark matter, superfluidity and superconductivity with critical temperatures near 10(10) kelvin, opaqueness to neutrinos, and magnetic fields in excess of 10(13) Gauss. Here, we describe the formation, structure, internal composition, and evolution of neutron stars. Observations that include studies of pulsars in binary systems, thermal emission from isolated neutron stars, glitches from pulsars, and quasi-periodic oscillations from accreting neutron stars provide information about neutron star masses, radii, temperatures, ages, and internal compositions. PMID:15105490

  3. Geometrical Optics of Dense Aerosols

    SciTech Connect

    Hay, Michael J.; Valeo, Ernest J.; Fisch, Nathaniel J.

    2013-04-24

    Assembling a free-standing, sharp-edged slab of homogeneous material that is much denser than gas, but much more rare ed than a solid, is an outstanding technological challenge. The solution may lie in focusing a dense aerosol to assume this geometry. However, whereas the geometrical optics of dilute aerosols is a well-developed fi eld, the dense aerosol limit is mostly unexplored. Yet controlling the geometrical optics of dense aerosols is necessary in preparing such a material slab. Focusing dense aerosols is shown here to be possible, but the nite particle density reduces the eff ective Stokes number of the flow, a critical result for controlled focusing. __________________________________________________

  4. Novel polymers and method of preparing same

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hirshfield, S. M. (Inventor)

    1973-01-01

    Polymers are prepared with terminal functional groups by reacting a compound selected from the group consisting of lithium p-lithiophenoxide and tetrabutylammonium p-lithiophenoxide as an initiator with material such as butadiene. The resulting functionally terminated new polymers are then capable of reacting with coupling agents to form star polymers.

  5. Star formation in Galactic flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smilgys, Romas; Bonnell, Ian A.

    2016-06-01

    We investigate the triggering of star formation in clouds that form in Galactic scale flows as the interstellar medium passes through spiral shocks. We use the Lagrangian nature of smoothed particle hydrodynamics simulations to trace how the star-forming gas is gathered into self-gravitating cores that collapse to form stars. Large-scale flows that arise due to Galactic dynamics create shocks of the order of 30 km s-1 that compress the gas and form dense clouds (n > several × 102 cm-3) in which self-gravity becomes relevant. These large-scale flows are necessary for creating the dense physical conditions for gravitational collapse and star formation. Local gravitational collapse requires densities in excess of n > 103 cm-3 which occur on size scales of ≈1 pc for low-mass star-forming regions (M < 100 M⊙), and up to sizes approaching 10 pc for higher mass regions (M > 103 M⊙). Star formation in the 250 pc region lasts throughout the 5 Myr time-scale of the simulation with a star formation rate of ≈10-1 M⊙ yr-1 kpc-2. In the absence of feedback, the efficiency of the star formation per free-fall time varies from our assumed 100 per cent at our sink accretion radius to values of <10-3 at low densities.

  6. H-cluster stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lai, X. Y.; Gao, C. Y.; Xu, R. X.

    2013-06-01

    The study of dense matter at ultrahigh density has a very long history, which is meaningful for us to understand not only cosmic events in extreme circumstances but also fundamental laws of physics. It is well known that the state of cold matter at supranuclear density depends on the non-perturbative nature of quantum chromodynamics (QCD) and is essential for modelling pulsars. A so-called H-cluster matter is proposed in this paper as the nature of dense matter in reality. In compact stars at only a few nuclear densities but low temperature, quarks could be interacting strongly with each other there. That might render quarks grouped in clusters, although the hypothetical quark clusters in cold dense matter have not been confirmed due to the lack of both theoretical and experimental evidence. Motivated by recent lattice QCD simulations of the H-dibaryons (with structure uuddss), we therefore consider here a possible kind of quark clusters, H-clusters, that could emerge inside compact stars during their initial cooling as the dominant components inside (the degree of freedom could then be H-clusters there). Taking into account the in-medium stiffening effect, we find that at baryon densities of compact stars H-cluster matter could be more stable than nuclear matter. We also find that for the H-cluster matter with lattice structure, the equation of state could be so stiff that it would seem to be `superluminal' in the most dense region. However, the real sound speed for H-cluster matter is in fact difficult to calculate, so at this stage we do not put constraints on our model from the usual requirement of causality. We study the stars composed of H-clusters, i.e. H-cluster stars, and derive the dependence of their maximum mass on the in-medium stiffening effect, showing that the maximum mass could be well above 2 M⊙ as observed and that the resultant mass-radius relation fits the measurement of the rapid burster under reasonable parameters. Besides a general

  7. Ariel's Densely Pitted Surface

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1986-01-01

    This mosaic of the four highest-resolution images of Ariel represents the most detailed Voyager 2 picture of this satellite of Uranus. The images were taken through the clear filter of Voyager's narrow-angle camera on Jan. 24, 1986, at a distance of about 130,000 kilometers (80,000 miles). Ariel is about 1,200 km (750 mi) in diameter; the resolution here is 2.4 km (1.5 mi). Much of Ariel's surface is densely pitted with craters 5 to 10 km (3 to 6 mi) across. These craters are close to the threshold of detection in this picture. Numerous valleys and fault scarps crisscross the highly pitted terrain. Voyager scientists believe the valleys have formed over down-dropped fault blocks (graben); apparently, extensive faulting has occurred as a result of expansion and stretching of Ariel's crust. The largest fault valleys, near the terminator at right, as well as a smooth region near the center of this image, have been partly filled with deposits that are younger and less heavily cratered than the pitted terrain. Narrow, somewhat sinuous scarps and valleys have been formed, in turn, in these young deposits. It is not yet clear whether these sinuous features have been formed by faulting or by the flow of fluids.

    JPL manages the Voyager project for NASA's Office of Space Science.

  8. Dense Hypervelocity Plasma Jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Case, Andrew; Witherspoon, F. Douglas; Messer, Sarah; Bomgardner, Richard; Phillips, Michael; van Doren, David; Elton, Raymond; Uzun-Kaymak, Ilker

    2007-11-01

    We are developing high velocity dense plasma jets for fusion and HEDP applications. Traditional coaxial plasma accelerators suffer from the blow-by instability which limits the mass accelerated to high velocity. In the current design blow-by is delayed by a combination of electrode shaping and use of a tailored plasma armature created by injection of a high density plasma at a few eV generated by arrays of capillary discharges or sparkgaps. Experimental data will be presented for a complete 32 injector gun system built for driving rotation in the Maryland MCX experiment, including data on penetration of the plasma jet through a magnetic field. We present spectroscopic measurements of plasma velocity, temperature, and density, as well as total momentum measured using a ballistic pendulum. Measurements are in agreement with each other and with time of flight data from photodiodes and a multichannel PMT. Plasma density is above 10^15 cm-3, velocities range up to about 100 km/s. Preliminary results from a quadrature heterodyne HeNe interferometer are consistent with these results.

  9. ROSAT survey of emission from Be stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grady, Carol

    1993-01-01

    ROSAT pointed observations of bright, classical Be stars have demonstrated that detection of soft x-rays at a level expected for normal B stars of comparable T(sub eff) and luminosity is anti-correlated with the presence of episodes of enhanced mass ejection and formation of a dense, moderately ionized equatorial circumstellar disk. At epochs of lower than average disk column density, x-ray flaring has been detected in 2 Be stars, lambda Eri and pi Aqr.

  10. Neutron stars, strange stars, and the nuclear equation of state

    SciTech Connect

    Weber, F.; Glendenning, N.K.

    1992-11-02

    This article consists of three parts. In part one we review the present status of dense nuclear matter calculations, and introduce a representative collection of realistic nuclear equations of state which are derived for different assumptions about the physical behavior of dense matter (baryon population, pion condensation,.possible transition of baryon matter to quark matter). In part two we review recently performed non-rotating and rotating compact star calculations performed for these equations of state. The minimum stable rotational periods of compact stars, whose knowledge is of decisive importance for the interpretation of rapidly rotating pulsars, axe determined. For this purpose two different limits on stable rotation are studied: rotation at the general relativistic Kepler period (below which mass shedding at the star`s equator sets in), and, secondly, rotation at the gravitational radiation-reaction instability (at which emission of gravitational waves set in which slows the star down). Part three of this article deals with the properties of hypothetical strange stars. Specifically we investigate the amount of nuclear solid crust that can be carried by a rotating strange star, and answer the question whether such objects can give rise to the observed phenomena of pulsar glitches, which is at the present time the only astrophysical test of the strange-quark-matter hypothesis.

  11. Polymer films

    DOEpatents

    Granick, Steve; Sukhishvili, Svetlana A.

    2004-05-25

    A film contains a first polymer having a plurality of hydrogen bond donating moieties, and a second polymer having a plurality of hydrogen bond accepting moieties. The second polymer is hydrogen bonded to the first polymer.

  12. Polymer films

    DOEpatents

    Granick, Steve; Sukhishvili, Svetlana A.

    2008-12-30

    A film contains a first polymer having a plurality of hydrogen bond donating moieties, and a second polymer having a plurality of hydrogen bond accepting moieties. The second polymer is hydrogen bonded to the first polymer.

  13. Star Light, Star Bright.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Iadevaia, David G.

    1984-01-01

    Presents a technique for obtaining a rough measure of the brightness among different stars. Materials needed include a standard 35-mm camera, a plastic ruler, and a photo enlarger. Although a telescope can be used, it is not essential. (JN)

  14. Kaon condensation in dense stellar matter

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Chang-Hwan; Rho, M. |

    1995-03-01

    This article combines two talks given by the authors and is based on Works done in collaboration with G.E. Brown and D.P. Min on kaon condensation in dense baryonic medium treated in chiral perturbation theory using heavy-baryon formalism. It contains, in addition to what was recently published, astrophysical backgrounds for kaon condensation discussed by Brown and Bethe, a discussion on a renormalization-group analysis to meson condensation worked out together with H.K. Lee and S.J. Sin, and the recent results of K.M. Westerberg in the bound-state approach to the Skyrme model. Negatively charged kaons are predicted to condense at a critical density 2 {approx_lt} {rho}/{rho}o {approx_lt} 4, in the range to allow the intriguing new phenomena predicted by Brown and Bethe to take place in compact star matter.

  15. Ammonia and HC7 N Emission in Dense Cores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Candelaria, Tierra; Schnee, Scott; Devine, Katie; NRAO Team; The College of Idaho Team

    2015-04-01

    Dense cores represent the transition between the turbulent, diffuse ISM and protostars. Thus, understanding dense cores' chemical and physical properties provides valuable information about the early stages of low mass star formation. We present an analysis of 13 starless dense cores in the Taurus Molecular Cloud using new data taken with the Green Bank Telescope. Our observations consist of ammonia (NH3) (1,1) and (2,2) and HC7 N (J =21-20) emission. We present new detections of HC7 N (a carbon chain bearing species) in four cores and confirm detection in two cores. We also present temperature and velocity gradient maps. These results are the foundation of a more complete survey and illustrate an important relationship between ammonia and the carbon chain bearing species HC7 N.

  16. Ammonia and HC7N Emission in Starless Dense Cores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Candelaria, Tierra M.; Scott Schnee, Kathryn Devine, John Carpenter, Paola Caselli, Mario Tafalla, Youngmin Seo, Yancy Shirley, James Di Francesco, John Tobin, Shadi Chitsazzadeh, Sarah Sadavoy, Alyssa Goodman, Luca Ricci,; Shigehisa Takakuwa

    2015-01-01

    Dense cores represent the transition between the turbulent, diffuse ISM and protostars. Thus, understanding dense cores' chemical and physical properties provides valuable information about the early stages of low mass star formation. We present an analysis of 13 starless dense cores in the Taurus Molecular Cloud using new data taken with the Green Bank Telescope. Our observations consist of ammonia (NH3) (1,1) and (2,2) and HC7N (J=21-20) emission. We present new detections of HC7N (a carbon chain bearing species) in four cores and confirm detection in two cores. We also present temperature and velocity gradient maps. These results are the foundation of a more complete survey and illustrate an important relationship between ammonia and the carbon chain bearing species HC7N.

  17. Diffusion and Coulomb separation of ions in dense matter.

    PubMed

    Beznogov, M V; Yakovlev, D G

    2013-10-18

    We analyze diffusion equations in strongly coupled Coulomb mixtures of ions in dense stellar matter. Strong coupling of ions in the presence of gravitational forces and electric fields (induced by plasma polarization in the presence of gravity) produces a specific diffusion current which can separate ions with the same A/Z (mass to charge number) ratios but different Z. This Coulomb separation of ions can be important for the evolution of white dwarfs and neutron stars. PMID:24182248

  18. Diffusion and Coulomb Separation of Ions in Dense Matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beznogov, M. V.; Yakovlev, D. G.

    2013-10-01

    We analyze diffusion equations in strongly coupled Coulomb mixtures of ions in dense stellar matter. Strong coupling of ions in the presence of gravitational forces and electric fields (induced by plasma polarization in the presence of gravity) produces a specific diffusion current which can separate ions with the same A/Z (mass to charge number) ratios but different Z. This Coulomb separation of ions can be important for the evolution of white dwarfs and neutron stars.

  19. Nucleation of strange matter in dense stellar cores

    SciTech Connect

    Horvath, J.E. Sao Paulo, Sao Paulo ); Benvenuto, O.G. La Plata ); Vucetich, H. La Plata )

    1992-05-15

    We investigate the nucleation of strange quark matter inside hot, dense nuclear matter. Applying Zel'dovich's kinetic theory of nucleation we find a lower limit of the temperature {ital T} for strange-matter bubbles to appear, which happens to be satisfied inside the Kelvin-Helmholtz cooling era of a compact star life but not much after it. Our bounds thus suggest that a prompt conversion could be achieved, giving support to earlier expectations for nonstandard type-II supernova scenarios.

  20. Microporous polymer films and methods of their production

    DOEpatents

    Aubert, J.H.

    1995-06-06

    A process is described for producing thin microporous polymeric films for a variety of uses. The process utilizes a dense gas (liquefied gas or supercritical fluid) selected to combine with a solvent-containing polymeric film so that the solvent is dissolved in the dense gas, the polymer is substantially insoluble in the dense gas, and two phases are formed. A microporous film is obtained by removal of a dense gas-solvent phase. 9 figs.

  1. Supernovae in dense and dusty environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kankare, Erkki

    2013-02-01

    In this doctoral thesis supernovae in dense and dusty environments are studied, with an emphasis on core-collapse supernovae. The articles included in the thesis aim to increase our understanding of supernovae interacting with the circumstellar material and their place in stellar evolution. The results obtained have also importance in deriving core-collapse supernova rates with reliable extinction corrections, which are directly related to star formation rates and galaxy evolution. In other words, supernovae are used as a tool in the research of both stellar and galaxy evolution, both of which can be considered as fundamental basics for our understanding of the whole Universe. A detailed follow-up study of the narrow-line supernova 2009kn is presented in paper I, and its similarity to another controversial transient, supernova 1994W, is shown. These objects are clearly strongly interacting with relatively dense circumstellar matter, however their physical origin is quite uncertain. In paper I different explosion models are discussed. Discoveries from a search programme for highly obscured supernovae in dusty luminous infrared galaxies are presented in papers II and III. The search was carried out using laser guide star adaptive optics monitoring at near-infrared wavelengths. By comparing multi-band photometric follow-up observations to template light curves, the likely types and the host galaxy extinctions for the four supernovae discovered were derived. The optical depth of normal spiral galaxy disks were studied statistically and reported in paper IV. This is complementary work to studies such as the one presented in paper V, where the missing fractions of core-collapse supernovae were derived for both normal spiral galaxies and luminous infrared galaxies, to be used for correcting supernova rates both locally and as a function of redshift.

  2. Star-shaped polymers of bio-inspired algae core and poly(acrylamide) and poly(acrylic acid) as arms in dissolution of silica/silicate.

    PubMed

    Chauhan, Kalpana; Patiyal, Priyanka; Chauhan, Ghanshyam S; Sharma, Praveen

    2014-06-01

    Silica, in natural waters (due to weathering of rocks) decreases system performance in water processing industry due to scaling. In view of that, the present work involves the synthesis of novel green star shaped additives of algae core (a bio-inspired material as diatom maintains silicic acid equilibrium in sea water) as silica polymerization inhibitors. Star shaped materials with bio-inspired core and poly(acrylamide) [poly(AAm)] and poly(acrylic acid) [poly(AAc)] arms were synthesized by economical green approach. The proficiency was evaluated in 'mini lab' scale for the synthesized APAAm (Algae-g-poly(AAm)) and APAAc (Algae-g-poly(AAc)) dendrimers (star shaped) in colloidal silica mitigation/inhibition at 35 °C and 55 °C. Synthesized dendrimers were equally proficient in silica inhibition at 12 h and maintains ≥450 ppm soluble silica. However, APAAm dendrimers of generation 0 confirmed better results (≈300 ppm) in contrast to APAAc dendrimers in silica inhibition at 55 °C. Additionally, dendrimers also worked as a nucleator for heterogeneous polymerization to inhibit silica homo-polymerization. APAAm dendrimer test set showed no silica deposit for more than 10 days of inhibition. EDX characterization results support nucleator mechanism with Si content of 6.97%-10.98% by weight in silica deposits (SiO2-APAAm dendrimer composites). PMID:24681378

  3. Communication: When does a branched polymer become a particle?

    PubMed

    Chremos, Alexandros; Douglas, Jack F

    2015-09-21

    Polymer melts with topologically distinct molecular structures, namely, linear chain, ring, and star polymers, are investigated by molecular dynamics simulation. In particular, we determine the mean polymer size and shape, and glass transition temperature for each molecular topology. Both in terms of structure and dynamics, unknotted ring polymers behave similarly to star polymers with f ≈ 5-6 star arms, close to a configurational transition point between anisotropic chains to spherically symmetric particle-like structures. These counter-intuitive findings raise fundamental questions regarding the importance of free chain-ends and chain topology in the packing and dynamics of polymeric materials. PMID:26395679

  4. Nonlinear nanostructures in dense quantum plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Shukla, P. K.; Eliasson, B.

    2009-10-08

    Dense quantum plasmas are ubiquitous in compact astrophysical objects (e.g. the interior of white dwarf stars, in magnetars, etc.), in semiconductors and micro-mechanical systems, as well as in the next generation intense laser-solid density plasma interaction experiments. In contrast to classical plasmas, one encounters extremely high plasma density and low temperature in dense quantum plasmas. In the latter, the electrons and positrons obey the Fermi-Dirac statistics, and there are new forces associated with i) quantum statistical electron and positron pressures, ii) electron and positron tunneling through the Bohm potential, and iii) electron and positron spin-1/2. Inclusion of these quantum forces gives rise to very high-frequency plasma waves (e.g. in the x-ray regime) at nanoscales. Our objective here is to present nonlinear equations that depict the localization of electron plasma waves in the form of a quantum electron hole and quantum vortex, as well as the trapping of intense electromagnetic waves into a quantum electron hole. Our simulation results reveal that these nonlinear nanostructures are quite robust. Hence, they can be explored for the purpose of transferring localized electrostatic and electromagnetic energies over nanoscales.

  5. Shocks in Dense Clouds in the Vela Supernova Remnant: FUSE

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nichols, Joy; Sonneborn, George (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    We have obtained 8 LWRS FUSE spectra to study a recently identified interaction of the Vela supernova remnant with a dense cloud region along its western edge. The goal is to quantify the temperature, ionization, density, and abundance characteristics associated with this shock/dense cloud interface by means of UV absorption line studies. Our detection of high-velocity absorption line C I at +90 to +130 km/s with IUE toward a narrow region interior to the Vela SNR strongly suggests the Vela supernova remnant is interacting with a dense ISM or molecular cloud. The shock/dense cloud interface is suggested by (1) the rarity of detection of high-velocity C I seen in IUE spectra, (2) its very limited spatial distribution in the remnant, and (3) a marked decrease in X-ray emission in the region immediately west of the position of these stars where one also finds a 100 micron emission ridge in IRAS images. We have investigated the shock physics and general properties of this interaction region through a focussed UV absorption line study using FUSE spectra. We have FUSE data on OVI absorption lines observed toward 8 stars behind the Vela supernova remnant (SNR). We compare the OVI observations with IUE observations of CIV absorption toward the same stars. Most of the stars, which are all B stars, have complex continua making the extraction of absorption lines difficult. Three of the stars, HD 72088, HD 72089 and HD 72350, however, are rapid rotators (v sin i less than 100 km/s) making the derivation of absorption column densities much easier. We have measured OVI and CIV column densities for the "main component" (i.e. the low velocity component) for these stars. In addition, by removing the H2 line at 1032.35A (121.6 km/s relative to OVI), we find high velocity components of OVI at approximately 150 km/s that we attribute to the shock in the Vela SNR. The column density ratios and magnitudes are compared to both steady shock models and results of hydrodynamical SNR

  6. Interactions of complex polymers with nanoporous substrate.

    PubMed

    Ziebarth, Jesse D; Wang, Yongmei

    2016-06-28

    With the advance of polymer synthesis, polymers that possess unique architectures such as stars or cyclic chains, and unique chemical composition distributions such as block copolymers or statistical copolymers have become frequently encountered. Characterization of these complex polymer systems drives the development of interactive chromatography where the adsorption of polymers on the porous substrate in chromatography columns is finely tuned. Liquid Chromatography at the Critical Condition (LCCC) in particular makes use of the existence of the Critical Adsorption Point (CAP) of polymers on solid surfaces and has been successfully applied to characterization of complex polymer systems. Interpretation and understanding of chromatography behaviour of complex polymers in interactive chromatography motivates theoretical/computational studies on the CAP of polymers and partitioning of these complex polymers near the CAP. This review article covers the theoretical questions encountered in chromatographic studies of complex polymers. PMID:27263839

  7. Particular Properties of Dense Supernova Matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takatsuka, T.; Nishizaki, S.; Hiura, J.

    1994-10-01

    Dense supernova matter composed of n, p, e-, e+, νe and bar{ν}e is investigated in detail by solving self-consistently a set of finite-temperature Hartree-Fock equations with an effective nucleon interaction. The effective interaction includes a phenomenological three-nucleon interaction to assure the saturation property of symmetric nuclear matter. Results of thermodynamic quantities and mixing ratios of respective components are analyzed and tabulated for wide region of density (ρ = (1 - 6)ρ0) and temperature (T = (10 - 40) MeV) by choosing the lepton fraction Yl = (0.3, 0.35, 0.4). We discuss particular properties of the matter such as the constancy of composition, the large proton fraction expressed by Yp =~ (2/3)Yl + 0.05 and the stiffened equation of state, and also discuss remarkable features of hot neutron stars at birth such as the fat density profile and the increasing temperature toward the center. It is shown that these features are caused essentially by the effects of neutrino trapping to generate the high and constant lepton fraction and isentropic nature, the effects which are absent in neutron star matter.

  8. Neutron stars, strange stars, and the nuclear equation of state

    SciTech Connect

    Weber, F.; Glendenning, N.K.

    1992-11-02

    This article consists of three parts. In part one we review the present status of dense nuclear matter calculations, and introduce a representative collection of realistic nuclear equations of state which are derived for different assumptions about the physical behavior of dense matter (baryon population, pion condensation,.possible transition of baryon matter to quark matter). In part two we review recently performed non-rotating and rotating compact star calculations performed for these equations of state. The minimum stable rotational periods of compact stars, whose knowledge is of decisive importance for the interpretation of rapidly rotating pulsars, axe determined. For this purpose two different limits on stable rotation are studied: rotation at the general relativistic Kepler period (below which mass shedding at the star's equator sets in), and, secondly, rotation at the gravitational radiation-reaction instability (at which emission of gravitational waves set in which slows the star down). Part three of this article deals with the properties of hypothetical strange stars. Specifically we investigate the amount of nuclear solid crust that can be carried by a rotating strange star, and answer the question whether such objects can give rise to the observed phenomena of pulsar glitches, which is at the present time the only astrophysical test of the strange-quark-matter hypothesis.

  9. Origin of Neutron Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brecher, K.

    1999-12-01

    The origin of the concept of neutron stars can be traced to two brief, incredibly insightful publications. Work on the earlier paper by Lev Landau (Phys. Z. Sowjetunion, 1, 285, 1932) actually predated the discovery of neutrons. Nonetheless, Landau arrived at the notion of a collapsed star with the density of a nucleus (really a "nucleus star") and demonstrated (at about the same time as, and independent of, Chandrasekhar) that there is an upper mass limit for dense stellar objects of about 1.5 solar masses. Perhaps even more remarkable is the abstract of a talk presented at the December 1933 meeting of the American Physical Society published by Walter Baade and Fritz Zwicky in 1934 (Phys. Rev. 45, 138). It followed the discovery of the neutron by just over a year. Their report, which was about the same length as the present abstract: (1) invented the concept and word supernova; (2) suggested that cosmic rays are produced by supernovae; and (3) in the authors own words, proposed "with all reserve ... the view that supernovae represent the transitions from ordinary stars to neutron stars (italics), which in their final stages consist of extremely closely packed neutrons." The abstract by Baade and Zwicky probably contains the highest density of new, important (and correct) ideas in high energy astrophysics ever published in a single paper. In this talk, we will discuss some of the facts and myths surrounding these two publications.

  10. Young Massive Star Clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Portegies Zwart, Simon F.; McMillan, Stephen L. W.; Gieles, Mark

    2010-09-01

    Young massive clusters (YMCs) are dense aggregates of young stars that form the fundamental building blocks of galaxies. Several examples exist in the Milky Way Galaxy and the Local Group, but they are particularly abundant in starburst and interacting galaxies. The few YMCs that are close enough to resolve are of prime interest for studying the stellar mass function and the ecological interplay between stellar evolution and stellar dynamics. The distant unresolved clusters may be effectively used to study the star-cluster mass function, and they provide excellent constraints on the formation mechanisms of young cluster populations. YMCs are expected to be the nurseries for many unusual objects, including a wide range of exotic stars and binaries. So far only a few such objects have been found in YMCs, although their older cousins, the globular clusters, are unusually rich in stellar exotica. In this review, we focus on star clusters younger than ˜100 Myr, more than a few current crossing times old, and more massive than ˜104M⊙; the size of the cluster and its environment are considered less relevant as distinguishing parameters. We describe the global properties of the currently known young massive star clusters in the Local Group and beyond, and discuss the state of the art in observations and dynamical modeling of these systems. In order to make this review readable by observers, theorists, and computational astrophysicists, we also review the cross-disciplinary terminology.

  11. Strange stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alcock, Charles; Farhi, Edward; Olinto, Angela

    1986-01-01

    Strange matter, a form of quark matter that is postulated to be absolute stable, may be the true ground stage of the hadrons. If this hypothesis is correct, neutron stars may convert to 'strange stars'. The mass-radius relation for strange stars is very different from that of neutron stars; there is no minimum mass, and for mass of 1 solar mass or less, mass is proportional to the cube of the radius. For masses between 1 solar mass and 2 solar masses, the radii of strange stars are about 10 km, as for neutron stars. Strange stars may have an exposed quark surface, which is capable of radiating at rates greatly exceeding the Eddington limit, but has a low emissivity for X-ray photons. The stars may have a thin crust with the same composition as the preneutron drip outer layer of a conventional neutron star crust. Strange stars cool efficiently via neutrino emission.

  12. Stars and Star Myths.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eason, Oliver

    Myths and tales from around the world about constellations and facts about stars in the constellations are presented. Most of the stories are from Greek and Roman mythology; however, a few Chinese, Japanese, Polynesian, Arabian, Jewish, and American Indian tales are also included. Following an introduction, myths are presented for the following 32…

  13. Be Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peters, G.; Murdin, P.

    2000-11-01

    A Be star (pronounced `bee-ee' star) is a non-supergiant B-type star whose spectrum displays or has displayed one or more Balmer lines in emission and Be is the notation for the spectral classification of such a star (see also CLASSIFICATION OF STELLAR SPECTRA). `Classical' Be stars are believed to have acquired the circumstellar (CS) material that produces the Balmer emission through ejection of...

  14. The origin of OB runaway stars.

    PubMed

    Fujii, Michiko S; Portegies Zwart, Simon

    2011-12-01

    About 20% of all massive stars in the Milky Way have unusually high velocities, the origin of which has puzzled astronomers for half a century. We argue that these velocities originate from strong gravitational interactions between single stars and binaries in the centers of star clusters. The ejecting binary forms naturally during the collapse of a young (≤1 million years old) star cluster. This model replicates the key characteristics of OB runaways in our galaxy, and it explains the presence of runaway stars of ≥100 solar masses (M(⊙)) around young star clusters, such as R136 and Westerlund 2. The high proportion and the distributions in mass and velocity of runaways in the Milky Way are reproduced if the majority of massive stars are born in dense and relatively low-mass (5000 to 10,000 M(⊙)) clusters. PMID:22096104

  15. Balmer decrements of T Tau stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katysheva, N. A.

    1981-04-01

    The relative intensities of Balmer lines calculated on the basis of Sobolev's probability method (1947) and the observed decrements of T Tau stars in the catalog of Cohen and Kuhi (1979) are compared with spectral classes between K5 and M5. For the group of stars, G5-K5, studied by Grinin (1980), emission was found to be predominantly of an envelope type, with less of a part played by chromospheric radiation. In K5-M5 stars, however, the envelope makes a smaller contribution to the total radiation, and most of the emission arises in the dense gas at the surface of the star. A comparison of the Balmer decrements of T Tau stars of different spectral classes and flare stars shows that in a transition to stars of lower luminosity, the role of chromospheric radiation increases.

  16. MAGNETIC FIELD IN THE ISOLATED MASSIVE DENSE CLUMP IRAS 20126+4104

    SciTech Connect

    Shinnaga, Hiroko; Phillips, Thomas G.; Novak, Giles; Vaillancourt, John E.; Machida, Masahiro N.; Kataoka, Akimasa; Tomisaka, Kohji; Davidson, Jacqueline; Houde, Martin; Dowell, C. Darren; Leeuw, Lerothodi

    2012-05-10

    We measured polarized dust emission at 350 {mu}m toward the high-mass star-forming massive dense clump IRAS 20126+4104 using the SHARC II Polarimeter, SHARP, at the Caltech Submillimeter Observatory. Most of the observed magnetic field vectors agree well with magnetic field vectors obtained from a numerical simulation for the case when the global magnetic field lines are inclined with respect to the rotation axis of the dense clump. The results of the numerical simulation show that rotation plays an important role on the evolution of the massive dense clump and its magnetic field. The direction of the cold CO 1-0 bipolar outflow is parallel to the observed magnetic field within the dense clump as well as the global magnetic field, as inferred from optical polarimetry data, indicating that the magnetic field also plays a critical role in an early stage of massive star formation. The large-scale Keplerian disk of the massive (proto)star rotates in an almost opposite sense to the clump's envelope. The observed magnetic field morphology and the counterrotating feature of the massive dense clump system provide hints to constrain the role of magnetic fields in the process of high-mass star formation.

  17. Population kinetics in dense plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Schlanges, M.; Bornath, T.; Prenzel, R.; Kremp, D.

    1996-07-01

    Starting from quantum kinetic equations, rate equations for the number densities of the different atomic states and equations for the energy density are derived which are valid for dense nonideal plasmas. Statistical expressions are presented for the rate coefficients taking into account many-body effects as dynamical screening, lowering of the ionization energy and Pauli-blocking. Based on these generalized expressions, the coefficients of impact ionization, three-body recombination, excitation and deexcitation are calculated for nonideal hydrogen and carbon plasmas. As a result, higher ionization and recombination rates are obtained in the dense plasma region. The influence of the many-body effects on the population kinetics, including density and temperature relaxation, is shown then for a dense hydrogen plasma. {copyright} {ital 1996 American Institute of Physics.}

  18. Noncontractible loops in the dense O(n) loop model on the cylinder.

    PubMed

    Alcaraz, F C; Brankov, J G; Priezzhev, V B; Rittenberg, V; Rogozhnikov, A M

    2014-11-01

    A lattice model of critical dense polymers O(n) is considered for finite cylinder geometry. Due to the presence of noncontractible loops with a fixed fugacity ξ, the model at n=0 is a generalization of the critical dense polymers solved by Pearce, Rasmussen, and Villani. We found the free energy for any height N and circumference L of the cylinder. The density ρ of noncontractible loops is obtained for N→∞ and large L. The results are compared with those found for the anisotropic quantum chain with twisted boundary conditions. Using the latter method, we derived ρ for any O(n) model and an arbitrary fugacity. PMID:25493770

  19. Stars in the Tarantula Nebula

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    In the most active starburst region in the local universe lies a cluster of brilliant, massive stars, known to astronomers as Hodge 301. Hodge 301, seen in the lower right hand corner of this image, lives inside the Tarantula Nebula in our galactic neighbor, the Large Magellanic Cloud. This star cluster is not the brightest, or youngest, or most populous star cluster in the Tarantula Nebula, that honor goes to the spectacular R136. In fact, Hodge 301 is almost 10 times older than the young cluster R136. But age has its advantages; many of the stars in Hodge 301 are so old that they have exploded as supernovae. These exploded stars are blasting material out into the surrounding region at speeds of almost 200 miles per second. This high speed ejecta are plowing into the surrounding Tarantula Nebula, shocking and compressing the gas into a multitude of sheets and filaments, seen in the upper left portion of the picture. Hodge 301 contains three red supergiants - stars that are close to the end of their evolution and are about to go supernova, exploding and sending more shocks into the Tarantula. Also present near the center of the image are small, dense gas globules and dust columns where new stars are being formed today, as part of the overall ongoing star formation throughout the Tarantula region.

  20. Pulsating Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Catelan, M.; Smith, H. A.

    2015-03-01

    This book surveys our understanding of stars which change in brightness because they pulsate. Pulsating variable stars are keys to distance scales inside and beyond the Milky Way galaxy. They test our understanding not only of stellar pulsation theory but also of stellar structure and evolution theory. Moreover, pulsating stars are important probes of the formation and evolution of our own and neighboring galaxies. Our understanding of pulsating stars has greatly increased in recent years as large-scale surveys of pulsating stars in the Milky Way and other Local Group galaxies have provided a wealth of new observations and as space-based instruments have studied particular pulsating stars in unprecedented detail.

  1. Sleuthing the Isolated Compact Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drake, J. J.

    2004-08-01

    In the early 1990's, isolated thermally-emitting neutron stars accreting from the interstellar medium were predicted to show up in their thousands in the ROSAT soft X-ray all-sky survey. The glut of sources would provide unprecedented opportunities for probing the equation of state of ultra-dense matter. Only seven objects have been firmly identified to date. The reasons for this discrepency are discussed and recent high resolution X-ray spectroscopic observations of these objects are described. Spectra of the brightest of the isolated neutron star candidates, RX J1856.5-3754, continue to present interpretational difficulties for current neutron star model atmospheres and alternative models are briefly discussed. RX J1856.5-3754 remains a valid quark star candidate.

  2. Quantum crystals in neutron stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Canuto, V.; Chitre, S. M.

    1974-01-01

    Using the many-body techniques appropriate for quantum crystals it is shown that the deep interior of a neutron star is most likely an orderly arrangement of neutrons, protons and hyperons forming a solid. It is shown that a liquid or gas arrangement would produce higher energy. If so, a neutron star can be viewed as two solids (crust and core) permeated by a layer of ordinary or (perhaps) superfluid liquid. Astronomical evidence is in favor of such a structure: the sudden jumps in the periods of the Crab and Vela pulsars that differ by a factor of about 100 can be easily explained by the star-quake model. If the Crab is less massive than Vela (i.e., if it is not dense enough to have a solid core), the star-quakes take place in the crust whereas for Vela they occur in the core.

  3. Modes of clustered star formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pfalzner, S.; Kaczmarek, T.; Olczak, C.

    2012-09-01

    Context. The recent realization that most stars form in clusters, immediately raises the question of whether star and planet formation are influenced by the cluster environment. The stellar density in the most prevalent clusters is the key factor here. Whether dominant modes of clustered star formation exist is a fundamental question. Using near-neighbour searches in young clusters, Bressert and collaborators claim this not to be the case. They conclude that - at least in the solar neighbourhood - star formation is continuous from isolated to densely clustered environments and that the environment plays a minor role in star and planet formation. Aims: We investigate under which conditions near-neighbour searches in young clusters can distinguish between different modes of clustered star formation. Methods: Model star clusters with different memberships and density distributions are set up and near-neighbour searches are performed. We investigate the influence of the combination of different cluster modes, observational biases, and types of diagnostic on the results. Results: We find that the specific cluster density profile, the relative sample sizes, the limitations of the observation, and the choice of diagnostic method decide, whether modelled modes of clustered star formation are detected by near-neighbour searches. For density distributions that are centrally concentrated but span a wide density range (for example, King profiles), separate cluster modes are only detectable under ideal conditions (sample selection, completeness) if the mean density of the individual clusters differs by at least a factor of ~65. Introducing a central cut-off can lead to an underestimate of the mean density by more than a factor of ten especially in high density regions. The environmental effect on star and planet formation is similarly underestimated for half of the population in dense systems. Conclusions: Local surface-density distributions are a very useful tool for single

  4. Method for dense packing discovery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kallus, Yoav; Elser, Veit; Gravel, Simon

    2010-11-01

    The problem of packing a system of particles as densely as possible is foundational in the field of discrete geometry and is a powerful model in the material and biological sciences. As packing problems retreat from the reach of solution by analytic constructions, the importance of an efficient numerical method for conducting de novo (from-scratch) searches for dense packings becomes crucial. In this paper, we use the divide and concur framework to develop a general search method for the solution of periodic constraint problems, and we apply it to the discovery of dense periodic packings. An important feature of the method is the integration of the unit-cell parameters with the other packing variables in the definition of the configuration space. The method we present led to previously reported improvements in the densest-known tetrahedron packing. Here, we use the method to reproduce the densest-known lattice sphere packings and the best-known lattice kissing arrangements in up to 14 and 11 dimensions, respectively, providing numerical evidence for their optimality. For nonspherical particles, we report a dense packing of regular four-dimensional simplices with density ϕ=128/219≈0.5845 and with a similar structure to the densest-known tetrahedron packing.

  5. High mass stars: starbursts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    González Delgado, R. M.

    2006-08-01

    Starbursts are the preferred place where massive stars form; the main source of thermal and mechanical heating in the interstellar medium, and the factory where the heavy elements form. Thus, starbursts play an important role in the origin and evolution of galaxies. Starbursts are bright at ultraviolet (UV) wavelengths, and after the pioneering IUE program, high spatial and spectral resolution UV observations of local starburst galaxies, mainly taken with HST and FUSE, have made relevant contributions to the following issues: a) The determination of the initial mass function in violent star forming systems in low and high metallicity environments, and in dense (e.g. in stellar clusters) and diffuse environments. b) The modes of star formation: Starburst clusters are an important mode of star formation. c) The role of starbursts in AGN. d) The interaction between massive stars and the interstellar and intergalactic media. e) The contribution of starbursts to the reionization of the universe. Despite the very significant progress obtained over the past two decades of UV observations of starbursts, there are important problems that still need to be solved. High-spatial resolution UV observations of nearby starbursts are crucial to further progress in understanding the violent star formation processes in galaxies, the interaction between the stellar clusters and the interstellar medium, and the variation of the IMF. Thus, a new UV mission furnished with an intermediate spectral resolution long-slit spectrograph with high spatial resolution and high UV sensitivity is required to further progress in the study of starburst galaxies and their impact on the evolution of galaxies.

  6. Dense Molecular Cores Being Externally Heated

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Gwanjeong; Lee, Chang Won; Gopinathan, Maheswar; Jeong, Woong-Seob; Kim, Mi-Ryang

    2016-06-01

    We present results of our study of eight dense cores, previously classified as starless, using infrared (3–160 μm) imaging observations with the AKARI telescope and molecular line (HCN and N2H+) mapping observations with the KVN telescope. Combining our results with the archival IR to millimeter continuum data, we examined the starless nature of these eight cores. Two of the eight cores are found to harbor faint protostars having luminosities of ∼0.3–4.4 L ⊙. The other six cores are found to remain starless and probably are in a dynamically transitional state. The temperature maps produced using multi-wavelength images show an enhancement of about 3–6 K toward the outer boundary of these cores, suggesting that they are most likely being heated externally by nearby stars and/or interstellar radiation fields. Large virial parameters and an overdominance of red asymmetric line profiles over the cores may indicate that the cores are set into either an expansion or an oscillatory motion, probably due to the external heating. Most of the starless cores show a coreshine effect due to the scattering of light by the micron-sized dust grains. This may imply that the age of the cores is of the order of ∼105 years, which is consistent with the timescale required for the cores to evolve into an oscillatory stage due to external perturbation. Our observational results support the idea that the external feedback from nearby stars and/or interstellar radiation fields may play an important role in the dynamical evolution of the cores.

  7. The chemistry of dense interstellar clouds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Irvine, W. M.

    1991-01-01

    The basic theme of this program is the study of molecular complexity and evolution in interstellar and circumstellar clouds incorporating the biogenic elements. Recent results include the identification of a new astronomical carbon-chain molecule, C4Si. This species was detected in the envelope expelled from the evolved star IRC+10216 in observations at the Nobeyama Radio Observatory in Japan. C4Si is the carrier of six unidentified lines which had previously been observed. This detection reveals the existence of a new series of carbon-chain molecules, C sub n Si (n equals 1, 2, 4). Such molecules may well be formed from the reaction of Si(+) with acetylene and acetylene derivatives. Other recent research has concentrated on the chemical composition of the cold, dark interstellar clouds, the nearest dense molecular clouds to the solar system. Such regions have very low kinetic temperatures, on the order of 10 K, and are known to be formation sites for solar-type stars. We have recently identified for the first time in such regions the species of H2S, NO, HCOOH (formic acid). The H2S abundance appears to exceed that predicted by gas-phase models of ion-molecule chemistry, perhaps suggesting the importance of synthesis on grain surfaces. Additional observations in dark clouds have studied the ratio of ortho- to para-thioformaldehyde. Since this ratio is expected to be unaffected by both radiative and ordinary collisional processes in the cloud, it may well reflect the formation conditions for this molecule. The ratio is observed to depart from that expected under conditions of chemical equilibrium at formation, perhaps reflecting efficient interchange between cold dust grains in the gas phase.

  8. Massive Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Livio, Mario; Villaver, Eva

    2009-11-01

    Participants; Preface Mario Livio and Eva Villaver; 1. High-mass star formation by gravitational collapse of massive cores M. R. Krumholz; 2. Observations of massive star formation N. A. Patel; 3. Massive star formation in the Galactic center D. F. Figer; 4. An X-ray tour of massive star-forming regions with Chandra L. K. Townsley; 5. Massive stars: feedback effects in the local universe M. S. Oey and C. J. Clarke; 6. The initial mass function in clusters B. G. Elmegreen; 7. Massive stars and star clusters in the Antennae galaxies B. C. Whitmore; 8. On the binarity of Eta Carinae T. R. Gull; 9. Parameters and winds of hot massive stars R. P. Kudritzki and M. A. Urbaneja; 10. Unraveling the Galaxy to find the first stars J. Tumlinson; 11. Optically observable zero-age main-sequence O stars N. R. Walborn; 12. Metallicity-dependent Wolf-Raynet winds P. A. Crowther; 13. Eruptive mass loss in very massive stars and Population III stars N. Smith; 14. From progenitor to afterlife R. A. Chevalier; 15. Pair-production supernovae: theory and observation E. Scannapieco; 16. Cosmic infrared background and Population III: an overview A. Kashlinsky.

  9. STAR System.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Doverspike, James E.

    The STAR System is a developmental guidance approach to be used with elementary school children in the 5th or 6th grades. Two basic purposes underlie STAR: to increase learning potential and to enhance personal growth and development. STAR refers to 4 basic skills: sensory, thinking, adapting, and revising. Major components of the 4 skills are:…

  10. A new mechanism for dendritic pattern formation in dense systems

    PubMed Central

    Oikawa, Noriko; Kurita, Rei

    2016-01-01

    Patterns are often formed when particles cluster: Since patterns reflect the connectivity of different types of material, the emergence of patterns affects the physical and chemical properties of systems and shares a close relationship to their macroscopic functions. A radial dendritic pattern (RDP) is observed in many systems such as snow crystals, polymer crystals and biological systems. Although most of these systems are considered as dense particle suspensions, the mechanism of RDP formation in dense particle systems is not yet understood. It should be noted that the diffusion limited aggregation model is not applicable to RDP formation in dense systems, but in dilute particle systems. Here, we propose a simple model that exhibits RDP formation in a dense particle system. The model potential for the inter-particle interaction is composed of two parts, a repulsive and an attractive force. The repulsive force is applied to all the particles all the time and the attractive force is exerted only among particles inside a circular domain, which expands at a certain speed as a wave front propagating from a preselected centre. It is found that an RDP is formed if the velocity of the wave front that triggers the attractive interaction is of the same order of magnitude as the time scale defined by the aggregation speed. PMID:27353447

  11. A new mechanism for dendritic pattern formation in dense systems.

    PubMed

    Oikawa, Noriko; Kurita, Rei

    2016-01-01

    Patterns are often formed when particles cluster: Since patterns reflect the connectivity of different types of material, the emergence of patterns affects the physical and chemical properties of systems and shares a close relationship to their macroscopic functions. A radial dendritic pattern (RDP) is observed in many systems such as snow crystals, polymer crystals and biological systems. Although most of these systems are considered as dense particle suspensions, the mechanism of RDP formation in dense particle systems is not yet understood. It should be noted that the diffusion limited aggregation model is not applicable to RDP formation in dense systems, but in dilute particle systems. Here, we propose a simple model that exhibits RDP formation in a dense particle system. The model potential for the inter-particle interaction is composed of two parts, a repulsive and an attractive force. The repulsive force is applied to all the particles all the time and the attractive force is exerted only among particles inside a circular domain, which expands at a certain speed as a wave front propagating from a preselected centre. It is found that an RDP is formed if the velocity of the wave front that triggers the attractive interaction is of the same order of magnitude as the time scale defined by the aggregation speed. PMID:27353447

  12. A new mechanism for dendritic pattern formation in dense systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oikawa, Noriko; Kurita, Rei

    2016-06-01

    Patterns are often formed when particles cluster: Since patterns reflect the connectivity of different types of material, the emergence of patterns affects the physical and chemical properties of systems and shares a close relationship to their macroscopic functions. A radial dendritic pattern (RDP) is observed in many systems such as snow crystals, polymer crystals and biological systems. Although most of these systems are considered as dense particle suspensions, the mechanism of RDP formation in dense particle systems is not yet understood. It should be noted that the diffusion limited aggregation model is not applicable to RDP formation in dense systems, but in dilute particle systems. Here, we propose a simple model that exhibits RDP formation in a dense particle system. The model potential for the inter-particle interaction is composed of two parts, a repulsive and an attractive force. The repulsive force is applied to all the particles all the time and the attractive force is exerted only among particles inside a circular domain, which expands at a certain speed as a wave front propagating from a preselected centre. It is found that an RDP is formed if the velocity of the wave front that triggers the attractive interaction is of the same order of magnitude as the time scale defined by the aggregation speed.

  13. Metal-polymer composites comprising nanostructures and applications thereof

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Hsing-Lin; Jeon, Sea Ho; Mack, Nathan H.

    2011-08-02

    Metal-polymer composites, and methods of making and use thereof, said composites comprising a thermally-cured dense polyaniline substrate; an acid dopant; and, metal nanostructure deposits wherein the deposits have a morphology dependent upon the acid dopant.

  14. Metal-polymer composites comprising nanostructures and applications thereof

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Hsing-Lin; Jeon, Sea Ho; Mack, Nathan H.

    2012-04-03

    Metal-polymer composites, and methods of making and use thereof, said composites comprising a thermally-cured dense polyaniline substrate; an acid dopant; and, metal nanostructure deposits wherein the deposits have a morphology dependent upon the acid dopant.

  15. Microgravity Polymers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1986-01-01

    A one-day, interactive workshop considering the effects of gravity on polymer materials science was held in Cleveland, Ohio, on May 9, 1985. Selected programmatic and technical issues were reviewed to introduce the field to workshop participants. Parallel discussions were conducted in three disciplinary working groups: polymer chemistry, polymer physics, and polymer engineering. This proceedings presents summaries of the workshop discussions and conclusions.

  16. Jet-Induced Star Formation

    SciTech Connect

    van Breugel, W; Fragile, C; Anninos, P; Murray, S

    2003-12-16

    Jets from radio galaxies can have dramatic effects on the medium through which they propagate. We review observational evidence for jet-induced star formation in low ('FR-I') and high ('FR-II') luminosity radio galaxies, at low and high redshifts respectively. We then discuss numerical simulations which are aimed to explain a jet-induced starburst ('Minkowski's Object') in the nearby FR-I type radio galaxy NGC 541. We conclude that jets can induce star formation in moderately dense (10 cm{sup -3}), warm (10{sup 4} K) gas; that this may be more common in the dense environments of forming, active galaxies; and that this may provide a mechanism for 'positive' feedback from AGN in the galaxy formation process.

  17. Magnetoacoustic solitons in dense astrophysical electron-positron-ion plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hussain, S.; Mahmood, S.; Mushtaq, A.

    2013-08-01

    Nonlinear magnetoacoustic waves in dense electron-positron-ion plasmas are investigated by using three fluid quantum magnetohydrodynamic model. The quantum mechanical effects of electrons and positrons are taken into account due to their Fermionic nature (to obey Fermi statistics) and quantum diffraction effects (Bohm diffusion term) in the model. The reductive perturbation method is employed to derive the Korteweg-de Vries (KdV) equation for low amplitude magnetoacoustic soliton in dense electron-positron-ion plasmas. It is found that positron concentration has significant impact on the phase velocity of magnetoacoustic wave and on the formation of single pulse nonlinear structure. The numerical results are also illustrated by taking into account the plasma parameters of the outside layers of white dwarfs and neutron stars/pulsars.

  18. Understanding the star-forming environment in stellar clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Shiya

    The main goal of this thesis is to investigate the physical conditions of the star-forming environment in stellar clusters, especially for the formation of low-mass cluster members. Embedded, young, and intermediate-mass stellar clusters around Herbig Ae/Be stars are sampled. Mid- and near-infrared observations identifying young stars and millimeter interferometric observations probing dense molecular gas and dust continuum are presented. These observations are used to reveal the large-scale young stellar population around the vicinity where the sampled clusters form, probe the physical conditions of dense molecular clumps which are capable of forming individual low-mass cluster members, and examine the influence of the most massive star in the cluster on its siblings and natal cluster-forming cloud. This study shows that stars within the cluster tend to seem younger than those outside the cluster, suggesting a higher and continuous star-forming rate within the cluster than outside, or massive stars are initiated later than low-mass stars within the same cloud. A thorough investigation of young stars and dense gas toward the MWC 1080 cluster further suggests a domination of the most massive star in the cluster on both the natal cloud dispersal and its low-mass cluster members. As active outflows and winds from the Herbig Ae/Be stars increase the non-thermal motion in the cloud, low-mass cluster members are formed within denser and more turbulent cores, than isolated low-mass star-forming cores. In addition, the strong gas dispersal from the Herbig Ae/Be stars also helps the removal of the circumstellar material around nearby low-mass stars. This makes these low-mass cluster members appear older. In summary, this thesis provides the observational evidence showing how the most massive star in the cluster affects the formation and evolution of low-mass cluster members and the physical conditions of star formation in the cluster.

  19. Thermodynamics of solutions containing hyperbranched polymers

    SciTech Connect

    Mio, C.; Lue, L.; Prausnitz, J.

    1996-12-31

    Vapor-liquid equilibria (VLE) have been obtained for solutions of hyperbranched polymers in chloroform, acetone, cyclohexane, methanol, acetonitrile or n-propylamine in the range 35 to 80{degrees}C. Polymers with different branched structures were studied: star, comb and dendritic polymers. Data interpretation is based on the lattice cluster theory (LCT) of Freed and coworkers. Unlike the Flory-Huggins theory, LCT can predict the effect of molecular architecture on thermodynamic solution properties.

  20. CH Stars and Barium Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bond, H.; Sion, E.; Murdin, P.

    2000-11-01

    The classical barium (or `Ba II') stars are RED GIANT STARS whose spectra show strong absorption lines of barium, strontium and certain other heavy elements, as well as strong features due to carbon molecules. Together with the related class of CH stars, the Ba II stars were crucial in establishing the existence of neutron-capture reactions in stellar interiors that are responsible for the synt...

  1. Warm Dense Matter: An Overview

    SciTech Connect

    Kalantar, D H; Lee, R W; Molitoris, J D

    2004-04-21

    This document provides a summary of the ''LLNL Workshop on Extreme States of Materials: Warm Dense Matter to NIF'' which was held on 20, 21, and 22 February 2002 at the Wente Conference Center in Livermore, CA. The warm dense matter regime, the transitional phase space region between cold material and hot plasma, is presently poorly understood. The drive to understand the nature of matter in this regime is sparking scientific activity worldwide. In addition to pure scientific interest, finite temperature dense matter occurs in the regimes of interest to the SSMP (Stockpile Stewardship Materials Program). So that obtaining a better understanding of WDM is important to performing effective experiments at, e.g., NIF, a primary mission of LLNL. At this workshop we examined current experimental and theoretical work performed at, and in conjunction with, LLNL to focus future activities and define our role in this rapidly emerging research area. On the experimental front LLNL plays a leading role in three of the five relevant areas and has the opportunity to become a major player in the other two. Discussion at the workshop indicated that the path forward for the experimental efforts at LLNL were two fold: First, we are doing reasonable baseline work at SPLs, HE, and High Energy Lasers with more effort encouraged. Second, we need to plan effectively for the next evolution in large scale facilities, both laser (NIF) and Light/Beam sources (LCLS/TESLA and GSI) Theoretically, LLNL has major research advantages in areas as diverse as the thermochemical approach to warm dense matter equations of state to first principles molecular dynamics simulations. However, it was clear that there is much work to be done theoretically to understand warm dense matter. Further, there is a need for a close collaboration between the generation of verifiable experimental data that can provide benchmarks of both the experimental techniques and the theoretical capabilities. The conclusion of this

  2. Nuclear Physics for Compact Stars

    SciTech Connect

    Baldo, M.

    2009-05-04

    A brief overview is given of the different lines of research developed under the INFN project 'Compact Stellar Objects and Dense Hadronic Matter' (acronym CT51). The emphasis of the project is on the structure of Neutron Stars (NS) and related objects. Starting from crust, the different Nuclear Physics problems are described which are encountered going inside a NS down to its inner core. The theoretical challenges and the observational inputs are discussed in some detail.

  3. Dense gas in high-latitude molecular clouds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reach, William T.; Pound, Marc W.; Wilner, David J.; Lee, Youngung

    1995-01-01

    The nearby molecular clouds MBM 7, 12, 30, 32, 40, 41, and 55 were surveyed for tracers of dense gas, including the (1-0), (2-1), and (3-2) rotational lines of CS and the (1-0) lines of HCO(+) and HCN. MBM 7 and MBM 12 contain dense cores, while the other clouds contain little or no traces of dense gas. Comparison of the emission from dense gas tracers to that of (13)CO reveals that the former are more compact in angular size as well as line width. An extensive CS(2-1) survey of part of MBM 12 reveals that the emission is characterized by clumps on approximately 3 min scales as well as extended emission. Observations of the CS(1-0) and (3-2) lines using telescopes with matched beam sizes reveal that the volume density must be at least approximately 10(exp 4.5)/cc within the (3-2) emitting regions, which are approximately 0.03 pc in radius. Electron excitation of the CS rotational levels is ruled out (in the cores) by comparing the (3-2)/(1-0) line ratios with models including H2 and electron collisions. The volume density in the cores is substantially larger than in the portions of the cloud traced by CO emission. The density increases into the cores as r(exp -2), suggesting dynamical collapse. The masses of the cores are close to the virial mass, suggesting they are dynamically bound. The cores in MBM 7 and MBM 12 are thus likely to form stars; they are the nearest sites of star formation.

  4. Massive star birth: A crossroads of Astrophysics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cesaroni, R.; Felli, M.; Churchwell, E.; Walmsley, M.

    Massive stars, those with between 10 and 100 times the mass of the Sun, are among the rarest stars of all. They live fast and die young, but during their short lives produce the most dramatic effects on the surrounding interstellar medium in terms of dynamics, ionization, and chemical enrichment. Until a few decades ago massive star birth was literally shrouded in mystery, since these stars are born deep inside dense clouds of swirling dust and gas that obscures our view. At IAU S227, more than 200 of the world's leading astronomers presented a cornucopia of new results concerning the birth and infancy of massive stars. These proceedings show the achievements reached in this field, due to observations in the radio at mm and sub-mm wavelengths and in the infrared, and to theoretical models that simulate what happens in the cradle of a massive star.

  5. Activated Dynamics in Dense Model Nanocomposites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Shijie; Schweizer, Kenneth

    The nonlinear Langevin equation approach is applied to investigate the ensemble-averaged activated dynamics of small molecule liquids (or disconnected segments in a polymer melt) in dense nanocomposites under model isobaric conditions where the spherical nanoparticles are dynamically fixed. Fully thermalized and quenched-replica integral equation theory methods are employed to investigate the influence on matrix dynamics of the equilibrium and nonequilibrium nanocomposite structure, respectively. In equilibrium, the miscibility window can be narrow due to depletion and bridging attraction induced phase separation which limits the study of activated dynamics to regimes where the barriers are relatively low. In contrast, by using replica integral equation theory, macroscopic demixing is suppressed, and the addition of nanoparticles can induce much slower activated matrix dynamics which can be studied over a wide range of pure liquid alpha relaxation times, interfacial attraction strengths and ranges, particle sizes and loadings, and mixture microstructures. Numerical results for the mean activated relaxation time, transient localization length, matrix elasticity and kinetic vitrification in the nanocomposite will be presented.

  6. Interaction of fast magnetoacoustic solitons in dense plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Jahangir, R.; Saleem, Khalid; Masood, W.; Siddiq, M.; Batool, Nazia

    2015-09-15

    One dimensional propagation of fast magnetoacoustic solitary waves in dense plasmas with degenerate electrons is investigated in this paper in the small amplitude limit. In this regard, Korteweg deVries equation is derived and discussed using the plasma parameters that are typically found in white dwarf stars. The interaction of fast magnetoacoustic solitons is explored by using the Hirota bilinear formalism, which admits multi soliton solutions. It is observed that the values of the propagation vectors determine the interaction of solitary waves. It is further noted that the amplitude of the respective solitary waves remain unchanged after the interaction; however, they do experience a phase shift.

  7. Boundary Preserving Dense Local Regions.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jaechul; Grauman, Kristen

    2015-05-01

    We propose a dense local region detector to extract features suitable for image matching and object recognition tasks. Whereas traditional local interest operators rely on repeatable structures that often cross object boundaries (e.g., corners, scale-space blobs), our sampling strategy is driven by segmentation, and thus preserves object boundaries and shape. At the same time, whereas existing region-based representations are sensitive to segmentation parameters and object deformations, our novel approach to robustly sample dense sites and determine their connectivity offers better repeatability. In extensive experiments, we find that the proposed region detector provides significantly better repeatability and localization accuracy for object matching compared to an array of existing feature detectors. In addition, we show our regions lead to excellent results on two benchmark tasks that require good feature matching: weakly supervised foreground discovery and nearest neighbor-based object recognition. PMID:26353319

  8. Dense, finely, grained composite materials

    DOEpatents

    Dunmead, Stephen D.; Holt, Joseph B.; Kingman, Donald D.; Munir, Zuhair A.

    1990-01-01

    Dense, finely grained composite materials comprising one or more ceramic phase or phase and one or more metallic and/or intermetallic phase or phases are produced by combustion synthesis. Spherical ceramic grains are homogeneously dispersed within the matrix. Methods are provided, which include the step of applying mechanical pressure during or immediately after ignition, by which the microstructures in the resulting composites can be controllably selected.

  9. A nonlinear model for magnetoacoustic waves in dense dissipative plasmas with degenerate electrons

    SciTech Connect

    Masood, W.; Jahangir, R.; Siddiq, M.; Eliasson, B.

    2014-10-15

    The properties of nonlinear fast magnetoacoustic waves in dense dissipative plasmas with degenerate electrons are studied theoretically in the framework of the Zabolotskaya-Khokhlov (ZK) equation for small but finite amplitude excitations. Shock-like solutions of the ZK equation are obtained and are applied to parameters relevant to white dwarf stars.

  10. Dense periodic packings of tori

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gabbrielli, Ruggero; Jiao, Yang; Torquato, Salvatore

    2014-02-01

    Dense packings of nonoverlapping bodies in three-dimensional Euclidean space R3 are useful models of the structure of a variety of many-particle systems that arise in the physical and biological sciences. Here we investigate the packing behavior of congruent ring tori in R3, which are multiply connected nonconvex bodies of genus 1, as well as horn and spindle tori. Specifically, we analytically construct a family of dense periodic packings of unlinked tori guided by the organizing principles originally devised for simply connected solid bodies [22 Torquato and Jiao, Phys. Rev. E 86, 011102 (2012), 10.1103/PhysRevE.86.011102]. We find that the horn tori as well as certain spindle and ring tori can achieve a packing density not only higher than that of spheres (i.e., π /√18 =0.7404...) but also higher than the densest known ellipsoid packings (i.e., 0.7707...). In addition, we study dense packings of clusters of pair-linked ring tori (i.e., Hopf links), which can possess much higher densities than corresponding packings consisting of unlinked tori.

  11. Nonlinear electrostatic excitations in magnetized dense plasmas with nonrelativistic and ultra-relativistic degenerate electrons

    SciTech Connect

    Mahmood, S.; Sadiq, Safeer; Haque, Q.

    2013-12-15

    Linear and nonlinear electrostatic waves in magnetized dense electron-ion plasmas are studied with nonrelativistic and ultra-relativistic degenerate and singly, doubly charged helium (He{sup +}, He{sup ++}) and hydrogen (H{sup +}) ions, respectively. The dispersion relation of electrostatic waves in magnetized dense plasmas is obtained under both the energy limits of degenerate electrons. Using reductive perturbation method, the Zakharov-Kuznetsov equation for nonlinear propagation of electrostatic solitons in magnetized dense plasmas is derived for both nonrelativistic and ultra-relativistic degenerate electrons. It is found that variations in plasma density, magnetic field intensity, different mass, and charge number of ions play significant role in the formation of electrostatic solitons in magnetized dense plasmas. The numerical plots are also presented for illustration using the parameters of dense astrophysical plasma situations such as white dwarfs and neutron stars exist in the literature. The present investigation is important for understanding the electrostatic waves propagation in the outer periphery of compact stars which mostly consists of hydrogen and helium ions with degenerate electrons in dense magnetized plasmas.

  12. Constructing Dense Graphs with Unique Hamiltonian Cycles

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lynch, Mark A. M.

    2012-01-01

    It is not difficult to construct dense graphs containing Hamiltonian cycles, but it is difficult to generate dense graphs that are guaranteed to contain a unique Hamiltonian cycle. This article presents an algorithm for generating arbitrarily large simple graphs containing "unique" Hamiltonian cycles. These graphs can be turned into dense graphs…

  13. Constraining the Fraction of Dense Gas in the Galactic Center

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mills, Elisabeth A.; Ginsburg, Adam; Barnes, Jonathan; Morris, Mark; Wiesenfeld, Laurent; Faure, Alexandre

    2016-01-01

    The central 500 parsecs of the Milky Way-- the Central Molecular Zone or CMZ-- is one of the most extreme environments for molecular gas in our Galaxy. Recent studies have suggested that the star formation relations in this region are anomalous, with less star formation per unit dense (n > 10^4 cm^-3) gas than is seen elsewhere in the universe. While this would be an exciting result indicating that star formation may proceed differently as a function of environment, it must be verified that it is not an effect of either undercounting the amount of star formation, or overestimating the bulk gas density in this region. CMZ gas densities in particular have not been revisited in several decades, and have only been measured accurately for a small handful of clouds in this region. We address this deficiency by presenting updated gas densities for a sample of 10 of the most massive molecular clouds in the CMZ. We use the Robert C. Byrd Green Bank Telescope, MOPRA, and APEX to measure lines of HC3N from J = 3-2 to J=30-29, and then perform radiative transfer analysis to constrain gas densities. We find that typical gas densities are somewhat lower than previously indicated, and present the first constraints on the fraction of gas with n >10^5 cm^-3 for multiple clouds in this region.

  14. Dense cores in dark clouds. 10: Ammonia emission in the Perseus molecular cloud complex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ladd, E. F.; Myers, P. C.; Goodman, A. A.

    1994-09-01

    We present a survey for dense material around young IRAS sources in the Perseus molecular cloud complex in the NH3 (J, K)=(1,1) line at 1.3 cm. NH3 emission was detected in eight, and mapped in seven, out of 10 positions chosen for study. The dense cores found typically have lower masses and narrower line widths than cores previously studied in Perseus and are located near sources of lower luminosity. NH3 cores are found throughout the Perseus complex; however, much of the detected dense gas is concentrated into two filamentary 'ridges' located in the western part. As a group, NH3 cores in Perseus have a mean line width of 0.6 km/s, mean radius of 0.12 pc, mean kinetic temperature of 13 K, and mean mass of 9 solar mass. These mean values are larger than the mean values for NH3 cores with associated stars in Taurus, but smaller than the mean values for cores associated with stars in Orion A. Some of the cores in Perseus are 'thermally dominated', with thermal and nonthermal line widths similar to most Taurus cores, while others are 'nonthermally dominated' and are more similar to the cores in Orion A. We conclude that the Perseus complex is intermediate in its star-forming potential between the predominantly low-mass star-producing regions like Taurus and the regions capable of the producing high-mass stars such as Orion A.

  15. TESTING 24 {mu}m AND INFRARED LUMINOSITY AS STAR FORMATION TRACERS FOR GALACTIC STAR-FORMING REGIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Vutisalchavakul, Nalin; Evans, Neal J. II

    2013-03-10

    We have tested some relations for star formation rates used in extragalactic studies for regions within the Galaxy. In nearby molecular clouds, where the initial mass function is not fully sampled, the dust emission at 24 {mu}m greatly underestimates star formation rates (by a factor of 100 on average) when compared to star formation rates determined from counting young stellar objects. The total infrared emission does no better. In contrast, the total far-infrared method agrees within a factor of two on average with star formation rates based on radio continuum emission for massive, dense clumps that are forming enough massive stars to have L{sub TIR} exceed 10{sup 4.5} L{sub Sun }. The total infrared and 24 {mu}m also agree well with each other for both nearby, low-mass star-forming regions and the massive, dense clump regions.

  16. 3D numerical calculations and synthetic observations of magnetized massive dense core collapse and fragmentation.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Commerçon, B.; Hennebelle, P.; Levrier, F.; Launhardt, R.; Henning, Th.

    2012-03-01

    I will present radiation-magneto-hydrodynamics calculations of low-mass and massive dense core collapse, focusing on the first collapse and the first hydrostatic core (first Larson core) formation. The influence of magnetic field and initial mass on the fragmentation properties will be investigated. In the first part reporting low mass dense core collapse calculations, synthetic observations of spectral energy distributions will be derived, as well as classical observational quantities such as bolometric temperature and luminosity. I will show how the dust continuum can help to target first hydrostatic cores and to state about the nature of VeLLOs. Last, I will present synthetic ALMA observation predictions of first hydrostatic cores which may give an answer, if not definitive, to the fragmentation issue at the early Class 0 stage. In the second part, I will report the results of radiation-magneto-hydrodynamics calculations in the context of high mass star formation, using for the first time a self-consistent model for photon emission (i.e. via thermal emission and in radiative shocks) and with the high resolution necessary to resolve properly magnetic braking effects and radiative shocks on scales <100 AU (Commercon, Hennebelle & Henning ApJL 2011). In this study, we investigate the combined effects of magnetic field, turbulence, and radiative transfer on the early phases of the collapse and the fragmentation of massive dense cores (M=100 M_⊙). We identify a new mechanism that inhibits initial fragmentation of massive dense cores, where magnetic field and radiative transfer interplay. We show that this interplay becomes stronger as the magnetic field strength increases. We speculate that highly magnetized massive dense cores are good candidates for isolated massive star formation, while moderately magnetized massive dense cores are more appropriate to form OB associations or small star clusters. Finally we will also present synthetic observations of these

  17. Hypernuclei and the Hyperon Problem in Neutron Stars

    SciTech Connect

    Bedaque, Paulo

    2015-01-01

    The likely presence of $\\Lambda$ baryons in dense hadronic matter tends to soften the equation of state to an extend that the observed heaviest neutron stars are difficult to explain. We analyze this "hyperon problem" with a phenomenological approach. First, we review what can be learned about the interaction of $\\Lambda$ particle with dense matter from the observed hypernuclei and extend this phenomenological analysis to asymmetric matter. We add to this the current knowledge on non-strange dense matter, including its uncertainties, to conclude that the interaction between $\\Lambda$s and dense matter has to become repulsive at densities below three times the nuclear saturation density.

  18. A quest for super dense aluminium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fiquet, G.; Narayana, C.; Bellin, C.; Shukla, A.; Esteve, I.; Mezouar, N.

    2013-12-01

    The extreme pressure phase diagram of materials is important not only for understanding the interiors of planets or stars, but also for the fundamental understanding of the relation between crystal structure and electronic structure. Structural transitions induced by extreme pressure are governed by the deformation of valence electron charge density which bears the brunt of increasing compression while the relative volume occupied by the nearly incompressible ionic core electrons increases. At extreme pressures common materials are expected to transform into new dense phases with extremely compact atomic arrangements that may also have unusual physical properties. In this report, we present new experiments carried out on aluminium. A simple system like Al is not only important as a benchmark for theory, but can also be used as a standard for pressures in the TPa range and beyond which are targeted at new dynamic compression facilities such as the National Ignition Facility (NIF) at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory in the US or Laser Mégajoule (LMJ) in Bordeaux in France. For aluminium, first principle calculations have consistently predicted a phase transition sequence from fcc to hcp and hcp to bcc in a pressure range below 0.5 TPa [Tambe et al., Phys. Rev. B 77, 172102, 2008]. The hcp phase was identified at 217 GPa in a recent experiment [Akahama et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 96, 45505, 2006] but the detection of the predicted bcc phase has been hampered by the difficulty of routine static high pressure experiments beyond 350 GPa. Here, we report on the overcoming of this obstacle and the detection of all the structural phase transitions predicted in Al by achieving a pressure in excess of 500 GPa in the static regime in a diamond-anvil cell. In particular, using X-ray diffraction at the high-pressure beamline ID27 at the European Synchrotron Radiation Facility (ESRF), we find a bcc super-dense phase of aluminium at a pressure of 380 GPa. In this report

  19. Piezoelectric Polymers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harrison, J. S.; Ounaies, Z.; Bushnell, Dennis M. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The purpose of this review is to detail the current theoretical understanding of the origin of piezoelectric and ferroelectric phenomena in polymers; to present the state-of-the-art in piezoelectric polymers and emerging material systems that exhibit promising properties; and to discuss key characterization methods, fundamental modeling approaches, and applications of piezoelectric polymers. Piezoelectric polymers have been known to exist for more than forty years, but in recent years they have gained notoriety as a valuable class of smart materials.

  20. Discovery of dense absorbing clouds in Cygnus X-2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balucinska-Church, Monika; Schulz, Norbert S.; Church, Michael; Wilms, Joern; Hanke, Manfred

    We report results of several day-long observation of Cygnus X-2 using Chandra and XMM-Newton. The source displayed extensive dipping events in the lightcurve often seen before in the source and causing an additional track in the hardness-intensity Z-track diagram. For the first time we are able to investigate these events using both high efficiency CCD continuum spectra and highly-resolved grating data. In the XMM PN instrument, the dips are 30% deep and resemble those in the low mass X-ray binary dip sources. However, remarkably, in the Chandra HEG and MEG no absorption or edge features can be seen corresponding to expected increases of column density in excess of the interstellar column. Non-dip and dip PN spectra are fitted well with a model containing point-like blackbody emission which we associate with the neutron star plus Comptonized emission of the ADC which must be extended. Dipping can be explained without absorption of the blackbody emission, but by covering 40% of the extended ADC emission by dense absorber. In the covered fraction almost no flux remains and so no significant additional optical depths appear in the neutral K edges in the grating spectra. The dipping appears not to be explicable by absorption in the outer disk, but requires large, dense blobs of absorber that do not overlap the neutron star in the line-of-sight. The nature of these blobs is unknown.

  1. Quantum anomalies in dense matter

    SciTech Connect

    Son, D.T.; Zhitnitsky, Ariel R.

    2004-10-01

    We consider the effects of quantum anomalies involving the baryon current for high-density matter. In the effective Lagrangian, the anomaly terms describe the interaction of three light fields: the electromagnetic photons A{sub {mu}}, neutral light Nambu-Goldstone bosons ({pi}, {eta}, {eta}{sup '}), and the superfluid phonon. The anomaly induced interactions lead to a number of interesting phenomena which may have phenomenological consequences observable in neutron stars.

  2. Conformational properties of bottle-brush polymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Denesyuk, N. A.

    2003-05-01

    General and renormalized perturbation theories are used to study the conformational properties of a bottle-brush molecule, composed of multiarmed polymer stars grafted regularly onto a flexible backbone. The end-to-end distances of the backbone and of an arm of the middle star are calculated within the first order of perturbation theory. For the high grafting densities of stars, the calculated expressions are generalized with the help of the scaling arguments to give the equivalent power laws. According to these laws, the molecule may adopt a sequence of three different conformations (star-rod-coil) as the length of the backbone grows.

  3. Conformational properties of bottle-brush polymers.

    PubMed

    Denesyuk, N A

    2003-05-01

    General and renormalized perturbation theories are used to study the conformational properties of a bottle-brush molecule, composed of multiarmed polymer stars grafted regularly onto a flexible backbone. The end-to-end distances of the backbone and of an arm of the middle star are calculated within the first order of perturbation theory. For the high grafting densities of stars, the calculated expressions are generalized with the help of the scaling arguments to give the equivalent power laws. According to these laws, the molecule may adopt a sequence of three different conformations (star-rod-coil) as the length of the backbone grows. PMID:12786171

  4. Radio stars.

    PubMed

    Hjellming, R M; Wade, C M

    1971-09-17

    Up to the present time six classes of radio stars have been established. The signals are almost always very faint and drastically variable. Hence their discovery has owed as much to serendipity as to the highly sophisticated equipment and techniques that have been used. When the variations are regular, as with the pulsars, this characteristic can be exploited very successfully in the search for new objects as well as in the detailed study of those that are already known. The detection of the most erratically variable radio stars, the flare stars and the x-ray stars, is primarily a matter of luck and patience. In the case of the novas, one at least knows where and oughly when to look for radio emission. A very sensitive interferometer is clearly the best instrument to use in the initial detection of a radio star. The fact that weak background sources are frequently present makes it essential to prove that the position of a radio source agrees with that of a star to within a few arc seconds. The potential of radio astronomy for the study of radio stars will not be realized until more powerful instruments than those that are available today can be utilized. So far, we have been able to see only the most luminous of the radio stars. PMID:17836594

  5. The IRAM 30m Nearby Galaxy Dense Gas Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bigiel, Frank

    2015-08-01

    I will present work in progress from EMPIRE, a large program (~440 hr) with the EMIR receiver at the IRAM 30m telescope to map dense gas tracers (HCN, HCO+, HNC, N2H+, C2H etc.) as well as the optically thin 1-0 lines of 13CO and C18O for the first time systematically across the disks of 9 nearby spiral galaxies. Building on a large suite of available ancillary data from the radio to the UV, we will be able to study, among other things, dense gas fractions and star formation efficiencies and how they vary with environment within and among nearby disk galaxies. While the survey has only recently started, we have similar data from a pilot program in M51 as well as from an ancillary study with CARMA in the Antennae Galaxies. I will present results from these two studies, provide an outlook and show first data from EMPIRE, and place our work in context with other work, including existing studies of dense gas tracers in other galaxies as well as our HERACLES CO and THINGS HI surveys.

  6. The Proportion of Stars with Planets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woolfson, M. M.

    2016-04-01

    Estimates of the proportion of Sun-like stars with accompanying planets vary widely; the best present estimate is that it is about 0.34. The capture theory of planet formation involves an interaction between a condensed star and either a diffuse protostar or a high-density region in a dense embedded cluster. The protostar, or dense region, is tidally stretched into a filament that is gravitationally unstable and breaks up into a string of protoplanetary blobs, which subsequently collapse to form planets, some of which are captured by the star. A computational model, in which the passage of collapsing protostars, with initial radii 1000, 1500 and 2000 au, through a dense embedded cluster are followed, is used to estimate the proportion of protostars that would be disrupted to give planets, in environments with star number-densities in the range 5000-25,000 pc-3. It is concluded from the results that the capture theory might explain the presently-estimated proportion of stars with exoplanet companions, although other possible ways of producing exoplanets are not excluded.

  7. Dynamics and evolution of dense stellar systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fregeau, John M.

    2004-10-01

    The research presented in this thesis comprises a theoretical study of several aspects relating to the dynamics and evolution of dense stellar systems such as globular clusters. First, I present the results of a study of mass segregation in two-component star clusters, based on a large number of numerical N-body simulations using our Monte-Carlo code. Heavy objects, which could represent stellar remnants such as neutron stars or black holes, exhibit behavior that is in quantitative agreement with simple analytical arguments. Light objects, which could represent free-floating planets or brown dwarfs, are predominantly lost from the cluster, as expected from simple analytical arguments, but may remain in the halo in larger numbers than expected. Using a recent null detection of planetary-mass microlensing events in M22, I find an upper limit of ˜25% at the 63% confidence level for the current mass fraction of M22 in the form of very low-mass objects. Turning to more realistic clusters, I present a study of the evolution of clusters containing primordial binaries, based on an enhanced version of the Monte-Carlo code that treats binary interactions via cross sections and analytical prescriptions. All models exhibit a long-lived “binary burning” phase lasting many tens of relaxation times. The structural parameters of the models during this phase match well those of most observed Galactic globular clusters. At the end of this phase, clusters that have survived tidal disruption undergo deep core collapse, followed by gravothermal oscillations. The results clearly show that the presence of even a small fraction of binaries in a cluster is sufficient to support the core against collapse significantly beyond the normal core collapse time predicted without the presence of binaries. For tidally truncated systems, collapse is delayed sufficiently that the cluster will undergo complete tidal disruption before core collapse. Moving a step beyond analytical prescriptions, I

  8. Simulations of Polymer Translocation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vocks, H.

    2008-07-01

    simulations in which long polymers creep through tiny pores. In Chapter 3 we study pore blockage times for a translocating polymer of length N, driven by a field E across te pore. In three dimensions we find that the typical time the pore remains blocked during a translocation event scales as N^{1.37}/E We show that the scaling behavior stems from the polymer dynamics at the immediate vicinity of the pore -- in particular, the memory effects in the polymer chain tension imbalance across the pore. Chapter 4 studies the unbiased translocation of a polymer with length N, surrounded by equally long polymers, through a narrow pore in a membrane. We show that in dense polymeric systems a relaxation time exists that scales as N^{2.65}, much longer than the Rouse time N^2. If the polymers are well entangled, we find that the mean dwell times scales as N^{3.3}, while for shorter, less entangled polymers, we measure dwell times scaling as N^{2.7}. In Chapter 5 we study the translocation of an RNA molecule, pulled through a nanopore by an optical tweezer, as a method to determine its secondary structure. The resolution with which the elements of the secondary structure can be determined is limited by thermal fluctuations, ruling out single-nucleotide resolution under normal experimental conditions.

  9. Neutron stars as dark matter probes

    SciTech Connect

    Lavallaz, Arnaud de; Fairbairn, Malcolm

    2010-06-15

    We examine whether the accretion of dark matter onto neutron stars could ever have any visible external effects. Captured dark matter which subsequently annihilates will heat the neutron stars, although it seems the effect will be too small to heat close neutron stars at an observable rate while those at the galactic center are obscured by dust. Nonannihilating dark matter would accumulate at the center of the neutron star. In a very dense region of dark matter such as that which may be found at the center of the galaxy, a neutron star might accrete enough to cause it to collapse within a period of time less than the age of the Universe. We calculate what value of the stable dark matter-nucleon cross section would cause this to occur for a large range of masses.

  10. The use of azide-alkyne click chemistry in recent syntheses and applications of polytriazole-based nanostructured polymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Yi; Cao, Xiaosong; Gao, Haifeng

    2016-02-01

    The rapid development of efficient organic click coupling reactions has significantly facilitated the construction of synthetic polymers with sophisticated branched nanostructures. This Feature Article summarizes the recent progress in the application of efficient copper-catalyzed and copper-free azide-alkyne cycloaddition (CuAAC and CuFAAC) reactions in the syntheses of dendrimers, hyperbranched polymers, star polymers, graft polymers, molecular brushes, and cyclic graft polymers. Literature reports on the interesting properties and functions of these polytriazole-based nanostructured polymers are also discussed to illustrate their potential applications as self-healing polymers, adhesives, polymer catalysts, opto-electronic polymer materials and polymer carriers for drug and imaging molecules.

  11. COLLAPSE OF MASSIVE MAGNETIZED DENSE CORES USING RADIATION MAGNETOHYDRODYNAMICS: EARLY FRAGMENTATION INHIBITION

    SciTech Connect

    Commercon, Benoit; Henning, Thomas; Hennebelle, Patrick

    2011-11-20

    We report the results of radiation-magnetohydrodynamics calculations in the context of high-mass star formation, using for the first time a self-consistent model for photon emission (i.e., via thermal emission and in radiative shocks) and with the high resolution necessary to properly resolve magnetic braking effects and radiative shocks on scales <100 AU. We investigate the combined effects of magnetic field, turbulence, and radiative transfer on the early phases of the collapse and the fragmentation of massive dense cores. We identify a new mechanism that inhibits initial fragmentation of massive dense cores where magnetic field and radiative transfer interplay. We show that this interplay becomes stronger as the magnetic field strength increases. Magnetic braking is transporting angular momentum outward and is lowering the rotational support and is thus increasing the infall velocity. This enhances the radiative feedback owing to the accretion shock on the first core. We speculate that highly magnetized massive dense cores are good candidates for isolated massive star formation while moderately magnetized massive dense cores are more appropriate forming OB associations or small star clusters.

  12. Microwave Continuum Emission and Dense Gas Tracers in NGC 3627: Combining Jansky VLA and ALMA Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murphy, Eric J.; Dong, Dillon; Leroy, Adam K.; Momjian, Emmanuel; Condon, James J.; Helou, George; Meier, David S.; Ott, Jürgen; Schinnerer, Eva; Turner, Jean L.

    2015-11-01

    We present Karl G. Jansky Very Large Array Ka band (33 GHz) and Atacama Large Millimeter Array (ALMA) Band 3 (94.5 GHz) continuum images covering the nucleus and two extranuclear star-forming regions within the nearby galaxy NGC 3627 (M 66), observed as part of the Star Formation in Radio Survey. Both images achieve an angular resolution of ≲2″, allowing us to map radio spectral indices and estimate thermal radio fractions at a linear resolution of ≲90 pc. The thermal fraction at 33 GHz reaches unity at and around the peaks of each H ii region; the spectral index between 33 and 94.5 GHz additionally becomes both increasingly negative and positive away from the H ii region peaks, indicating an increase of non-thermal emission from diffusing cosmic-ray electrons and the possible presence of cold dust, respectively. While the ALMA observations were optimized for collecting continuum data, they also detected line emission from the J=1\\to 0 transitions of HCN and HCO+. The peaks of dense molecular gas traced by these two spectral lines are spatially offset from the peaks of the continuum emission for both extranuclear star-forming regions, indicating that our data reach an angular resolution at which one can spatially distinguish sites of recent star formation from the sites of future star formation. Finally, we find trends of decreasing dense gas fraction and velocity dispersion with increasing star formation efficiency among the regions observed, indicating that the dynamical state of the dense gas, rather than its abundance, plays a more significant role in the star formation process.

  13. DPIS for warm dense matter

    SciTech Connect

    Kondo, K.; Kanesue, T.; Horioka, K.; Okamura, M.

    2010-05-23

    Warm Dense Matter (WDM) offers an challenging problem because WDM, which is beyond ideal plasma, is in a low temperature and high density state with partially degenerate electrons and coupled ions. WDM is a common state of matter in astrophysical objects such as cores of giant planets and white dwarfs. The WDM studies require large energy deposition into a small target volume in a shorter time than the hydrodynamical time and need uniformity across the full thickness of the target. Since moderate energy ion beams ({approx} 0.3 MeV/u) can be useful tool for WDM physics, we propose WDM generation using Direct Plasma Injection Scheme (DPIS). In the DPIS, laser ion source is connected to the Radio Frequency Quadrupole (RFQ) linear accelerator directly without the beam transport line. DPIS with a realistic final focus and a linear accelerator can produce WDM.

  14. Dense inhibitory connectivity in neocortex

    PubMed Central

    Fino, Elodie; Yuste, Rafael

    2011-01-01

    Summary The connectivity diagram of neocortical circuits is still unknown, and there are conflicting data as to whether cortical neurons are wired specifically or not. To investigate the basic structure of cortical microcircuits, we use a novel two-photon photostimulation technique that enables the systematic mapping of synaptic connections with single-cell resolution. We map the inhibitory connectivity between upper layers somatostatin-positive GABAergic interneurons and pyramidal cells in mouse frontal cortex. Most, and sometimes all, inhibitory neurons are locally connected to every sampled pyramidal cell. This dense inhibitory connectivity is found at both young and mature developmental ages. Inhibitory innervation of neighboring pyramidal cells is similar, regardless of whether they are connected among themselves or not. We conclude that local inhibitory connectivity is promiscuous, does not form subnetworks and can approach the theoretical limit of a completely connected synaptic matrix. PMID:21435562

  15. Viscoelastic behavior of dense microemulsions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cametti, C.; Codastefano, P.; D'arrigo, G.; Tartaglia, P.; Rouch, J.; Chen, S. H.

    1990-09-01

    We have performed extensive measurements of shear viscosity, ultrasonic absorption, and sound velocity in a ternary system consisting of water-decane-sodium di(2-ethylhexyl)sulfo- succinate(AOT), in the one-phase region where it forms a water-in-oil microemulsion. We observe a rapid increase of the static shear viscosity in the dense microemulsion region. Correspondingly the sound absorption shows unambiguous evidence of a viscoelastic behavior. The absorption data for various volume fractions and temperatures can be reduced to a universal curve by scaling both the absorption and the frequency by the measured static shear viscosity. The sound absorption can be interpreted as coming from the high-frequency tail of the viscoelastic relaxation, describable by a Cole-Cole relaxation formula with unusually small elastic moduli.

  16. Water in dense molecular clouds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wannier, P. G.; Kuiper, T. B. H.; Frerking, M. A.; Gulkis, S.; Pickett, H. M.; Wilson, W. J.; Pagani, L.; Lecacheux, A.; Encrenaz, P.

    1991-01-01

    The G.P. Kuiper Airborne Observatory (KAO) was used to make initial observations of the half-millimeter ground-state transition of water in seven giant molecular clouds and in two late-type stars. No significant detections were made, and the resulting upper limits are significantly below those expected from other, indirect observations and from several theoretical models. The implied interstellar H2O/CO abundance is less than 0.003 in the cores of three giant molecular clouds. This value is less than expected from cloud chemistry models and also than estimates based on HDO and H3O(+) observations.

  17. Crystallization of dense neutron matter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Canuto, V.; Chitre, S. M.

    1974-01-01

    The equation of state for cold neutron matter at high density is studied in the t-matrix formulation, and it is shown that energetically it is convenient to have neutrons in a crystalline configuration rather than in a liquid state for values of the density exceeding 1600 Tg/cu cm. The study of the mechanical properties indicates that the system is stable against shearing stresses. A solid core in the deep interior of heavy neutron stars appears to offer the most plausible explanation of speed-ups observed in the Vela pulsar.

  18. Do Circumnuclear Dense Gas Disks Drive Mass Accretion onto Supermassive Black Holes?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Izumi, Takuma; Kawakatu, Nozomu; Kohno, Kotaro

    2016-08-01

    We present a positive correlation between the mass of dense molecular gas ({M}{{dense}}) of ∼100 pc scale circumnuclear disks (CNDs) and the black hole mass accretion rate ({\\dot{M}}{{BH}}) in a total of 10 Seyfert galaxies, based on data compiled from the literature and an archive (median aperture θ med = 220 pc). A typical {M}{{dense}} of CNDs is 107–8 {M}ȯ , estimated from the luminosity of the dense gas tracer, the HCN(1–0) emission line. Because dense molecular gas is the site of star formation, this correlation is virtually equivalent to the one between the nuclear star-formation rate and {\\dot{M}}{{BH}} revealed previously. Moreover, the {M}{{dense}}{--}{\\dot{M}}{{BH}} correlation was tighter for CND-scale gas than for the gas on kiloparsec or larger scales. This indicates that CNDs likely play an important role in fueling black holes, whereas greater than kiloparesec scale gas does not. To demonstrate a possible approach for studying the CND-scale accretion process with the Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array, we used a mass accretion model where angular momentum loss due to supernova explosions is vital. Based on the model prediction, we suggest that only the partial fraction of the mass accreted from the CND ({\\dot{M}}{{acc}}) is consumed as {\\dot{M}}{{BH}}. However, {\\dot{M}}{{acc}} agrees well with the total nuclear mass flow rate (i.e., {\\dot{M}}{{BH}} + outflow rate). Although these results are still tentative with large uncertainties, they support the view that star formation in CNDs can drive mass accretion onto supermassive black holes in Seyfert galaxies.

  19. Do Circumnuclear Dense Gas Disks Drive Mass Accretion onto Supermassive Black Holes?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Izumi, Takuma; Kawakatu, Nozomu; Kohno, Kotaro

    2016-08-01

    We present a positive correlation between the mass of dense molecular gas ({M}{{dense}}) of ˜100 pc scale circumnuclear disks (CNDs) and the black hole mass accretion rate ({\\dot{M}}{{BH}}) in a total of 10 Seyfert galaxies, based on data compiled from the literature and an archive (median aperture θ med = 220 pc). A typical {M}{{dense}} of CNDs is 107–8 {M}ȯ , estimated from the luminosity of the dense gas tracer, the HCN(1–0) emission line. Because dense molecular gas is the site of star formation, this correlation is virtually equivalent to the one between the nuclear star-formation rate and {\\dot{M}}{{BH}} revealed previously. Moreover, the {M}{{dense}}{--}{\\dot{M}}{{BH}} correlation was tighter for CND-scale gas than for the gas on kiloparsec or larger scales. This indicates that CNDs likely play an important role in fueling black holes, whereas greater than kiloparesec scale gas does not. To demonstrate a possible approach for studying the CND-scale accretion process with the Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array, we used a mass accretion model where angular momentum loss due to supernova explosions is vital. Based on the model prediction, we suggest that only the partial fraction of the mass accreted from the CND ({\\dot{M}}{{acc}}) is consumed as {\\dot{M}}{{BH}}. However, {\\dot{M}}{{acc}} agrees well with the total nuclear mass flow rate (i.e., {\\dot{M}}{{BH}} + outflow rate). Although these results are still tentative with large uncertainties, they support the view that star formation in CNDs can drive mass accretion onto supermassive black holes in Seyfert galaxies.

  20. Massive stars: Starbursts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    González Delgado, Rosa María

    2007-07-01

    Starbursts are the preferred place where massive stars form; the main source of thermal and mechanical heating in the interstellar medium, and the factory where the heavy elements form. Thus, starbursts play an important role in the origin and evolution of galaxies. Starbursts are bright at ultraviolet (UV) wavelengths, and after the pioneering IUE program, high spatial and spectral resolution UV observations of local starburst galaxies, mainly taken with HST and FUSE, have made relevant contributions to the following issues: a) The determination of the initial mass function (IMF) in violent star forming systems in low and high metallicity environments, and in dense (e.g. in stellar clusters) and diffuse environments: A Salpeter IMF with high-mass stars constrains well the UV properties. b) Stellar clusters are an important mode of star formation in starbursts. c) The role of starbursts in AGN: Nuclear starbursts can dominate the UV light in Seyfert 2 galaxies, having bolometric luminosities similar to the estimated bolometric luminosities of the obscured AGN. d) The interaction between massive stars and the interstellar medium: Outflows in cold, warm and coronal phases leave their imprints on the UV interstellar lines. Outflows of a few hundred km s%u22121 are ubiquitous phenomena in starbursts. Despite the very significant progress obtained over the past two decades of UV observations of starbursts, there are important problems that still need to be solved. High-spatial resolution UV observations of nearby starbursts are crucial to further progress in understanding the violent star formation processes in galaxies, the interaction between the stellar clusters and the interstellar medium, and the variation of the IMF. High-spatial resolution spectra are also needed to isolate the light from the center to the disk in UV luminous galaxies found by GALEX. Thus, a new UV mission furnished with an intermediate spectral resolution spectrograph with high spatial

  1. The performance of dense medium processes

    SciTech Connect

    Horsfall, D.W.

    1993-12-31

    Dense medium washing in baths and cyclones is widely carried out in South Africa. The paper shows the reason for the preferred use of dense medium processes rather than gravity concentrators such as jigs. The factors leading to efficient separation in baths are listed and an indication given of the extent to which these factors may be controlled and embodied in the deployment of baths and dense medium cyclones in the planning stages of a plant.

  2. Dense molecular clumps associated with the Large Magellanic Cloud supergiant shells LMC 4 and LMC 5

    SciTech Connect

    Fujii, Kosuke; Mizuno, Norikazu; Minamidani, Tetsuhiro; Onishi, Toshikazu; Muraoka, Kazuyuki; Kawamura, Akiko; Muller, Erik; Tatematsu, Ken'ichi; Hasegawa, Tetsuo; Miura, Rie E.; Ezawa, Hajime; Dawson, Joanne; Tosaki, Tomoka; Sakai, Takeshi; Tsukagoshi, Takashi; Tanaka, Kunihiko; Fukui, Yasuo

    2014-12-01

    We investigate the effects of supergiant shells (SGSs) and their interaction on dense molecular clumps by observing the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC) star-forming regions N48 and N49, which are located between two SGSs, LMC 4 and LMC 5. {sup 12}CO (J = 3-2, 1-0) and {sup 13}CO(J = 1-0) observations with the ASTE and Mopra telescopes have been carried out toward these regions. A clumpy distribution of dense molecular clumps is revealed with 7 pc spatial resolution. Large velocity gradient analysis shows that the molecular hydrogen densities (n(H{sub 2})) of the clumps are distributed from low to high density (10{sup 3}-10{sup 5} cm{sup –3}) and their kinetic temperatures (T {sub kin}) are typically high (greater than 50 K). These clumps seem to be in the early stages of star formation, as also indicated from the distribution of Hα, young stellar object candidates, and IR emission. We found that the N48 region is located in the high column density H I envelope at the interface of the two SGSs and the star formation is relatively evolved, whereas the N49 region is associated with LMC 5 alone and the star formation is quiet. The clumps in the N48 region typically show high n(H{sub 2}) and T {sub kin}, which are as dense and warm as the clumps in LMC massive cluster-forming areas (30 Dor, N159). These results suggest that the large-scale structure of the SGSs, especially the interaction of two SGSs, works efficiently on the formation of dense molecular clumps and stars.

  3. ATLASGAL: A Galaxy-wide sample of dense filamentary structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Guang-Xing; Urquhart, James S.; Leurini, Silvia; Csengeri, Timea; Wyrowski, Friedrich; Menten, Karl M.; Schuller, Frederic

    2016-06-01

    therefore with the direction of large-scale Galactic magnetic field. We find many examples where the dense filaments identified in ATLASGAL are associated with larger scale filamentary structures (~100 pc), and argue that this is likely to be common, and as such these may indicate a connection between large-scale Galactic dynamics and star formation. Conclusions: We have produced a large and Galaxy-wide catalogue of dense filamentary structures that are representative of a particular size and mass range not previously well studied in the literature. Analyses of the properties and distribution of these filaments reveals that they are correlated with the spiral arms and make a significant contribution to star formation in the Galaxy. Massive star formation is ongoing within ~20% of the filaments and is strongly correlated with the filaments with the largest mass-to-length ratios. The luminosity of the embedded sources has a similar distribution to the Galactic-wide samples of young massive stars and can therefore be considered to be representative. Full Tables 1 and 3 and the FITS files associated to Fig. 9 are only available at the CDS via anonymous ftp to http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (http://130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr/viz-bin/qcat?J/A+A/591/A5

  4. A Dynamical Gravitational Wave Source in a Dense Cluster

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hurley, Jarrod R.; Sippel, Anna C.; Tout, Christopher A.; Aarseth, Sverre J.

    2016-08-01

    Making use of a new N-body model to describe the evolution of a moderate-size globular cluster, we investigate the characteristics of the population of black holes within such a cluster. This model reaches core-collapse and achieves a peak central density typical of the dense globular clusters of the Milky Way. Within this high-density environment, we see direct confirmation of the merging of two stellar remnant black holes in a dynamically formed binary, a gravitational wave source. We describe how the formation, evolution, and ultimate ejection/destruction of binary systems containing black holes impacts the evolution of the cluster core. Also, through comparison with previous models of lower density, we show that the period distribution of black hole binaries formed through dynamical interactions in this high-density model favours the production of gravitational wave sources. We confirm that the number of black holes remaining in a star cluster at late times and the characteristics of the binary black hole population depend on the nature of the star cluster, critically on the number density of stars and by extension the relaxation timescale.

  5. Coupled modes in magnetized dense plasma with relativistic-degenerate electrons

    SciTech Connect

    Khan, S. A.

    2012-01-15

    Low frequency electrostatic and electromagnetic waves are investigated in ultra-dense quantum magnetoplasma with relativistic-degenerate electron and non-degenerate ion fluids. The dispersion relation is derived for mobile as well as immobile ions by employing hydrodynamic equations for such plasma under the influence of electromagnetic forces and pressure gradient of relativistic-degenerate Fermi gas of electrons. The result shows the coexistence of shear Alfven and ion modes with relativistically modified dispersive properties. The relevance of results to the dense degenerate plasmas of astrophysical origin (for instance, white dwarf stars) is pointed out with brief discussion on ultra-relativistic and non-relativistic limits.

  6. Star Cluster Buzzing With Pulsars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2005-01-01

    A dense globular star cluster near the center of our Milky Way Galaxy holds a buzzing beehive of rapidly-spinning millisecond pulsars, according to astronomers who discovered 21 new pulsars in the cluster using the National Science Foundation's 100-meter Robert C. Byrd Green Bank Telescope (GBT) in West Virginia. The cluster, called Terzan 5, now holds the record for pulsars, with 24, including three known before the GBT observations. Pulsar Diagram Pulsar Diagram: Click on image for more detail. "We hit the jackpot when we looked at this cluster," said Scott Ransom, an astronomer at the National Radio Astronomy Observatory in Charlottesville, VA. "Not only does this cluster have a lot of pulsars -- and we still expect to find more in it -- but the pulsars in it are very interesting. They include at least 13 in binary systems, two of which are eclipsing, and the four fastest-rotating pulsars known in any globular cluster, with the fastest two rotating nearly 600 times per second, roughly as fast as a household blender," Ransom added. Ransom and his colleagues reported their findings to the American Astronomical Society's meeting in San Diego, CA, and in the online journal Science Express. The star cluster's numerous pulsars are expected to yield a bonanza of new information about not only the pulsars themselves, but also about the dense stellar environment in which they reside and probably even about nuclear physics, according to the scientists. For example, preliminary measurements indicate that two of the pulsars are more massive than some theoretical models would allow. "All these exotic pulsars will keep us busy for years to come," said Jason Hessels, a Ph.D student at McGill University in Montreal. Globular clusters are dense agglomerations of up to millions of stars, all of which formed at about the same time. Pulsars are spinning, superdense neutron stars that whirl "lighthouse beams" of radio waves or light around as they spin. A neutron star is what is

  7. Hypervelocity Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, Warren R.

    2015-08-01

    Hypervelocity stars (HVSs) travel with such extreme velocities that dynamical ejection via gravitational interaction with a massive black hole (MBH) is their most likely origin. Observers have discovered dozens of unbound main-sequence stars since the first in 2005, and the velocities, stellar nature, spatial distribution, and overall numbers of unbound B stars in the Milky Way halo all fit an MBH origin. Theorists have proposed various mechanisms for ejecting unbound stars, and these mechanisms can be tested with larger and more complete samples. HVSs' properties are linked to the nature and environment of the Milky Way's MBH, and, with future proper motion measurements, their trajectories may provide unique probes of the dark matter halo that surrounds the Milky Way.

  8. Gravothermal Star Clusters - Theory and Computer Modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spurzem, Rainer

    2010-11-01

    In the George Darwin lecture, delivered to the British Royal Astronomical Society in 1960 by Viktor A. Ambartsumian he wrote on the evolution of stellar systems that it can be described by the "dynamic evolution of a gravitating gas" complemented by "a statistical description of the changes in the physical states of stars". This talk will show how this physical concept has inspired theoretical modeling of star clusters in the following decades up to the present day. The application of principles of thermodynamics shows, as Ambartsumian argued in his 1960 lecture, that there is no stable state of equilibrium of a gravitating star cluster. The trend to local thermodynamic equilibrium is always disturbed by escaping stars (Ambartsumian), as well as by gravothermal and gravogyro instabilities, as it was detected later. Here the state-of-the-art of modeling the evolution of dense stellar systems based on principles of thermodynamics and statistical mechanics (Fokker-Planck approximation) will be reviewed. Recent progress including rotation and internal correlations (primordial binaries) is presented. The models have also very successfully been used to study dense star clusters around massive black holes in galactic nuclei and even (in a few cases) relativistic supermassive dense objects in centres of galaxies (here again briefly touching one of the many research fields of V.A. Ambartsumian). For the modern present time of high-speed supercomputing, where we are tackling direct N-body simulations of star clusters, we will show that such direct modeling supports and proves the concept of the statistical models based on the Fokker-Planck theory, and that both theoretical concepts and direct computer simulations are necessary to support each other and make scientific progress in the study of star cluster evolution.

  9. STARS no star on Kauai

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, M.

    1993-04-01

    The island of Kuai, home to the Pacific Missile Range Facility, is preparing for the first of a series of Star Wars rocket launches expected to begin early this year. The Strategic Defense Initiative plans 40 launches of the Stategic Target System (STARS) over a 10-year period. The focus of the tests appears to be weapons and sensors designed to combat multiple-warhead ICBMs, which will be banned under the START II Treaty that was signed in January. The focus of this article is to express the dubious value of testing the STARS at a time when their application will not be an anticipated problem.

  10. Polymer Electrolytes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hallinan, Daniel T.; Balsara, Nitash P.

    2013-07-01

    This review article covers applications in which polymer electrolytes are used: lithium batteries, fuel cells, and water desalination. The ideas of electrochemical potential, salt activity, and ion transport are presented in the context of these applications. Potential is defined, and we show how a cell potential measurement can be used to ascertain salt activity. The transport parameters needed to fully specify a binary electrolyte (salt + solvent) are presented. We define five fundamentally different types of homogeneous electrolytes: type I (classical liquid electrolytes), type II (gel electrolytes), type III (dry polymer electrolytes), type IV (dry single-ion-conducting polymer electrolytes), and type V (solvated single-ion-conducting polymer electrolytes). Typical values of transport parameters are provided for all types of electrolytes. Comparison among the values provides insight into the transport mechanisms occurring in polymer electrolytes. It is desirable to decouple the mechanical properties of polymer electrolyte membranes from the ionic conductivity. One way to accomplish this is through the development of microphase-separated polymers, wherein one of the microphases conducts ions while the other enhances the mechanical rigidity of the heterogeneous polymer electrolyte. We cover all three types of conducting polymer electrolyte phases (types III, IV, and V). We present a simple framework that relates the transport parameters of heterogeneous electrolytes to homogeneous analogs. We conclude by discussing electrochemical stability of electrolytes and the effects of water contamination because of their relevance to applications such as lithium ion batteries.

  11. Polymer Chemistry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, Martha; Roberson, Luke; Caraccio, Anne

    2010-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation describes new technologies in polymer and material chemistry that benefits NASA programs and missions. The topics include: 1) What are Polymers?; 2) History of Polymer Chemistry; 3) Composites/Materials Development at KSC; 4) Why Wiring; 5) Next Generation Wiring Materials; 6) Wire System Materials and Integration; 7) Self-Healing Wire Repair; 8) Smart Wiring Summary; 9) Fire and Polymers; 10) Aerogel Technology; 11) Aerogel Composites; 12) Aerogels for Oil Remediation; 13) KSC's Solution; 14) Chemochromic Hydrogen Sensors; 15) STS-130 and 131 Operations; 16) HyperPigment; 17) Antimicrobial Materials; 18) Conductive Inks Formulations for Multiple Applications; and 19) Testing and Processing Equipment.

  12. Massive Protostars In Young Dense Clusters: Disk Disruption And Binary Capture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moeckel, Nickolas

    2007-12-01

    Massive stars are typically found in the centers of young, dense clusters. Encounters between massive protostars and their less-massive cluster siblings are frequent enough to impact their formation processes. We present the results of numerical studies concerning the interaction of a massive-star disk system and an impacting star, which suggest that disk-assisted capture can contribute significantly to the high multiplicity of massive stars. We discuss the results of N-body simulations of this process, as well as the observational clues that point to this scenario. A potential example of a capture process in Cepheus A is presented along with modeling of this system. This work was supported by NASA grant NNA04CC11A to the CU Center for Astrobiology.

  13. Thermal Spray Formation of Polymer Coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Coquill, Scott; Galbraith, Stephen L.; Tuss. Darren L.; Ivosevic, Milan

    2008-01-01

    This innovation forms a sprayable polymer film using powdered precursor materials and an in-process heating method. This device directly applies a powdered polymer onto a substrate to form an adherent, mechanically-sound, and thickness-regulated film. The process can be used to lay down both fully dense and porous, e.g., foam, coatings. This system is field-deployable and includes power distribution, heater controls, polymer constituent material bins, flow controls, material transportation functions, and a thermal spray apparatus. The only thing required for operation in the field is a power source. Because this method does not require solvents, it does not release the toxic, volatile organic compounds of previous methods. Also, the sprayed polymer material is not degraded because this method does not use hot combustion gas or hot plasma gas. This keeps the polymer from becoming rough, porous, or poorly bonded.

  14. A quest for rotating disks in high-mass star forming regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sánchez-Monge, Á.; Beltrán, M. T.; Cesaroni, R.

    2016-05-01

    We present ALMA observations towards two high-mass star forming regions. These reveal extended filamentary structures fragmenting into a number of dense cores. The detection of a multitude of lines from complex molecular species permits to study the physical and kinematic properties of three dense cores. Signposts of Keplerian rotation are identified and suggest the presence of disks rotating about stars with masses 4-18 M⊙. These results likely confirm that B-type stars form via disk-mediated accretion, and set the stage for the quest for similar structures toward the most massive O-type stars.

  15. Nearby regions of massive star formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bally, John; Cunningham, Nathaniel; Moeckel, Nickolas; Smith, Nathan

    Observations of the nearest regions of massive star formation such as Orion are reviewed. Early-type stars in the local OB associations, as well as their superbubbles and supershells provide a fossil record of massive star birth in the Solar vicinity over about the last 40 Myr. This record shows that most massive stars are born from dense, high-pressure, hot cores which spawn transient clusters that dissipate into the field soon after formation. A large fraction (15 to 30%) of massive stars are high-velocity runaways moving at more than 20 km s^{-1}. High-mass stars have a larger companion fraction than their lower-mass siblings. The Orion star forming complex contains the nearest site of on-going massive star formation. Studies of the Orion Nebula and the dense molecular cloud core located immediately behind the HII region provide our sharpest view of massive star birth. This region has formed a hierarchy of clusters within clusters. The Trapezium, OMC-1S, and OMC-1 regions represent three closely spaced sub-clusters within the more extended Orion Nebula Cluster. The oldest of these sub-clusters, which consists of the Trapezium stars, has completely emerged from its natal core. The OMC-1S and OMC-1 regions, are still highly embedded and forming clusters of additional moderate and high mass stars. Over a dozen YSOs embedded in OMC-1S are driving jets and outflows, many of which are injecting energy and momentum into the Orion Nebula. Recent proper motion measurements indicate that the Becklin-Neugebauer object is a high-velocity star moving away from the OMC1 core with a velocity of 30 km s^{-1}, making it the youngest high-velocity star known. Source I may be moving in the opposite direction with a velocity of about 12 km s^{-1}. The projected separation between source I and BN was less than few hundred AU about 500 years ago. The spectacular bipolar molecular outflow and system of shock-excited H_2 fingers emerging from OMC-1 has a dynamical age of about 1100

  16. Percolation in dense storage arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirkpatrick, Scott; Wilcke, Winfried W.; Garner, Robert B.; Huels, Harald

    2002-11-01

    As computers and their accessories become smaller, cheaper, and faster the providers of news, retail sales, and other services we now take for granted on the Internet have met their increasing computing needs by putting more and more computers, hard disks, power supplies, and the data communications linking them to each other and to the rest of the wired world into ever smaller spaces. This has created a new and quite interesting percolation problem. It is no longer desirable to fix computers, storage or switchgear which fail in such a dense array. Attempts to repair things are all too likely to make problems worse. The alternative approach, letting units “fail in place”, be removed from service and routed around, means that a data communications environment will evolve with an underlying regular structure but a very high density of missing pieces. Some of the properties of this kind of network can be described within the existing paradigm of site or bond percolation on lattices, but other important questions have not been explored. I will discuss 3D arrays of hundreds to thousands of storage servers (something which it is quite feasible to build in the next few years), and show that bandwidth, but not percolation fraction or shortest path lengths, is the critical factor affected by the “fail in place” disorder. Redundancy strategies traditionally employed in storage systems may have to be revised. Novel approaches to routing information among the servers have been developed to minimize the impact.

  17. Peering into a Star Factory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2000-09-01

    dense stellar clusters, located at large distances from the Sun. The earliest evolutionary stages of both low- and high-mass stars cannot be observed at visible wavelengths. This is due to the very heavy obscuration in that wavelength region by the dust in the parental molecular clouds. However, infrared and millimeter emission from these objects is able to penetrate the dust and thus allow us to investigate the complex processes that occur at the earliest phases of stellar evolution. A search for massive stars in the formation stage The best possible comprehension of this crucial stage of the stellar life cycle constitutes a key to the understanding of the formation and evolution of galaxies. And in this context, it is especially the massive stars with their powerful radiation fields, strong stellar winds and dramatic final interaction with the interstellar medium through supernova explosions that dominate the energetics of normal galaxies. Massive stars live much shorter (about 1 million years) than lighter solar-type stars (10 - 12,000 million years) and only they undergo such violent explosions at the end. A most challenging question in current astrophysics is therefore concerned with the nature of the various physical processes that take place during the formation of massive stars. It is for instance still unclear whether massive stars form like lower-mass stars of the solar type do, i.e., by accretion of gas from the surrounding cloud during a progressive contraction process, or if they are rather the results of stellar collisions in dense clusters. The only way to know is by finding the youngest massive stars and then to study them in detail by means of spectroscopic observations. At the same time, their immediate surroundings, e.g., the stellar population in the star-forming cluster of which they are members, must also be investigated before the full picture will emerge. Massive stars in Messier 17 ESO Press Photo 24b/00 ESO Press Photo 24b/00 [Preview; JPEG

  18. Galaxy Evolution Explorer Spies Band of Stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2007-01-01

    The Galaxy Evolution Explorer's ultraviolet eyes have captured a globular star cluster, called NGC 362, in our own Milky Way galaxy. In this new image, the cluster appears next to stars from a more distant neighboring galaxy, known as the Small Magellanic Cloud.

    Globular clusters are densely packed bunches of old stars scattered in galaxies throughout the universe. NGC 362, located 30,000 light-years away, can be spotted as the dense collection of mostly yellow-tinted stars surrounding a large white-yellow spot toward the top-right of this image. The white spot is actually the core of the cluster, which is made up of stars so closely packed together that the Galaxy Evolution Explorer cannot see them individually.

    The light blue dots surrounding the cluster core are called extreme horizontal branch stars. These stars used to be very similar to our sun and are nearing the end of their lives. They are very hot, with temperatures reaching up to about four times that of the surface of our sun (25,000 Kelvin or 45,500 degrees Fahrenheit).

    A star like our sun spends most of its life fusing hydrogen atoms in its core into helium. When the star runs out of hydrogen in its core, its outer envelope will expand. The star then becomes a red giant, which burns hydrogen in a shell surrounding its inner core. Throughout its life as a red giant, the star loses a lot of mass, then begins to burn helium at its core. Some stars will have lost so much mass at the end of this process, up to 85 percent of their envelopes, that most of the envelope is gone. What is left is a very hot ultraviolet-bright core, or extreme horizontal branch star.

    Blue dots scattered throughout the image are hot, young stars in the Small Magellanic Cloud, a satellite galaxy of the Milky Way located approximately 200,000 light-years away. The stars in this galaxy are much brighter intrinsically than extreme horizontal branch stars, but they appear just as bright because they are farther

  19. Polymer Informatics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adams, Nico

    Polymers are arguably the most important set of materials in common use. The increasing adoption of both combinatorial as well as high-throughput approaches, coupled with an increasing amount of interdisciplinarity, has wrought tremendous change in the field of polymer science. Yet the informatics tools required to support and further enhance these changes are almost completely absent. In the first part of the chapter, a critical analysis of the challenges facing modern polymer informatics is provided. It is argued, that most of the problems facing the field today are rooted in the current scholarly communication process and the way in which chemists and polymer scientists handle and publish data. Furthermore, the chapter reviews existing modes of representing and communicating polymer information and discusses the impact, which the emergence of semantic technologies will have on the way in which scientific and polymer data is published and transmitted. In the second part, a review of the use of informatics tools for the prediction of polymer properties and in silico design of polymers is offered.

  20. Polymers & People

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lentz, Linda; Robinson, Thomas; Martin, Elizabeth; Miller, Mary; Ashburn, Norma

    2004-01-01

    Each Tuesday during the fall of 2002, teams of high school students from three South Carolina counties conducted a four-hour polymer institute for their peers. In less than two months, over 300 students visited the Charleston County Public Library in Charleston, South Carolina, to explore DNA, nylon, rubber, gluep, and other polymers. Teams of…

  1. Search for OB stars running away from young star clusters. II. The NGC 6357 star-forming region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gvaramadze, V. V.; Kniazev, A. Y.; Kroupa, P.; Oh, S.

    2011-11-01

    Dynamical few-body encounters in the dense cores of young massive star clusters are responsible for the loss of a significant fraction of their massive stellar content. Some of the escaping (runaway) stars move through the ambient medium supersonically and can be revealed via detection of their bow shocks (visible in the infrared, optical or radio). In this paper, which is the second of a series of papers devoted to the search for OB stars running away from young ( ≲ several Myr) Galactic clusters and OB associations, we present the results of the search for bow shocks around the star-forming region NGC 6357. Using the archival data of the Midcourse Space Experiment (MSX) satellite and the Spitzer Space Telescope, and the preliminary data release of the Wide-Field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE), we discovered seven bow shocks, whose geometry is consistent with the possibility that they are generated by stars expelled from the young (~1-2 Myr) star clusters, Pismis 24 and AH03 J1725-34.4, associated with NGC 6357. Two of the seven bow shocks are driven by the already known OB stars, HD 319881 and [N78] 34. Follow-up spectroscopy of three other bow-shock-producing stars showed that they are massive (O-type) stars as well, while the 2MASS photometry of the remaining two stars suggests that they could be B0 V stars, provided that both are located at the same distance as NGC 6357. Detection of numerous massive stars ejected from the very young clusters is consistent with the theoretical expectation that star clusters can effectively lose massive stars at the very beginning of their dynamical evolution (long before the second mechanism for production of runaway stars, based on a supernova explosion in a massive tight binary system, begins to operate) and lends strong support to the idea that probably all field OB stars have been dynamically ejected from their birth clusters. A by-product of our search for bow shocks around NGC 6357 is the detection of three circular

  2. Star formation and extinct radioactivities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cameron, A. G. W.

    1984-01-01

    An assessment is made of the evidence for the existence of now-extinct radioactivities in primitive solar system material, giving attention to implications for the early stages of sun and solar system formation. The characteristics of possible disturbances in dense molecular clouds which can initiate the formation of cloud cores is discussed, with emphasis on these disturbances able to generate fresh radioactivities. A one-solar mass red giant star on the asymptotic giant branch appears to have been the best candidate to account for the short-lived extinct radioactivities in the early solar system.

  3. Heating and Cooling in Accreting Neutron Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cumming, Andrew

    2015-10-01

    Neutron stars in low mass X-ray binaries accrete enough mass over their lifetimes to replace their entire crust. The accreted matter undergoes a series of nuclear reactions in the crust as it is compressed by continued accretion to higher density. These reactions, which include electron captures, neutron emissions, and pycnonuclear reactions, heat the crust and core of the neutron star. In this talk I will discuss what we can learn from observations of transiently accreting neutron stars in quiescence, when accretion has turned off and we can see emission from the neutron star directly. The quiescent luminosity of these neutron stars constrains the neutrino emissivity in the neutron star core. In systems with long accretion outbursts, observations of thermal relaxation of the crust in quiescence enable, for the first time, constraints on the thermal conductivity and heat capacity of the crust. In this way, low mass X-ray binary neutron stars offer a remarkable chance to constrain the properties of dense neutron-rich matter, such as neutron superfluidity and pasta phases in the inner crust of neutron stars.

  4. The Star Formation Relation in Nearby Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schruba, Andreas

    2013-03-01

    I review observational studies of the large-scale star formation process in nearby galaxies. A wealth of new multi-wavelength data provide an unprecedented view on the interplay of the interstellar medium and (young) stellar populations on a few hundred parsec scale in 100+ galaxies of all types. These observations enable us to relate detailed studies of star formation in the Milky Way to the zoo of galaxies in the distant universe. Within the disks of spiral galaxies, recent star formation strongly scales with the local amount of molecular gas (as traced by CO) with a molecular gas depletion time of ˜2 Gyr. This is consistent with the picture that stars form in giant molecular clouds that have about universal properties. Galaxy centers and star-bursting galaxies deviate from this normal trend as they show enhanced star formation per unit gas mass suggesting systematic changes in the molecular gas properties and especially the dense gas fraction. In the outer disks of spirals and in dwarf galaxies, the decreasing availability of atomic gas inevitably limits the amount of star formation, though with large local variations. The critical step for the gas-stars cycle seems therefore to be the formation of a molecular gas phase, a process that shows complex dependencies on various environmental properties and is being investigated by intensive simulational work.

  5. Hunting for Shooting Stars in 30 Doradus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Mink, Selma E.; Lennon, D. J.; Sabbi, E.; Anderson, J.; Bedin, L. R.; Sohn, S.; van der Marel, R. P.; Walborn, N. R.; Bastian, N.; Bressert, E.; Crowther, P. A.; Evans, C. J.; Herrero, A.; Langer, N.; Sana, H.

    2012-01-01

    We are undertaking an ambitious proper motion survey of massive stars in the 30 Doradus region of the Large Magellanic Cloud using the unique capabilities of HST. We aim to derive the directions of motion of massive runaway stars, searching in particular for stars which have been ejected from the dense star cluster R136. These stars probe the dynamical processes in the core of the cluster. The core has been suggested as a formation site for very massive stars exceeding the canonical upper limit of the IMF. These are possible progenitors of intermediate-mass black holes. Furthermore, they provide insight about the origin of massive field stars, addressing open questions related to the poorly understood process of massive star formation. Some may originate from disrupted binary systems and bear the imprints of interaction with the original companion. They will end their life far away from their birth location as core collapse supernova or possibly even long gamma-ray bursts. Here we discuss the first epoch of observations, presenting a 16'x13' mosaic of the data, and initial results based on comparisons with archival data. SdM acknowledges the NASA Hubble Fellowship grant HST-HF-51270.01-A awarded by STScI, operated by AURA for NASA, contract NAS 5-26555.

  6. Really Hot Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2003-04-01

    " object (a white dwarf, a neutron star, or a black hole) and the other an "ordinary" star can produce an intense X-ray emission. This happens because the compact object is so dense and massive that it siphons off matter from its companion star - astronomers refer to this as an accretion process, sometimes also called "stellar cannibalism". When the "stolen" matter approaches the compact object, it gradually heats up and may reach temperatures of millions of degrees. It then emits X-rays. At the same time, ultraviolet radiation is also emitted, which may produce high excitation regions in the surrounding nebula. This scenario can also explain the association of HeII nebulae with ultraluminous X-ray sources in other galaxies. VLT observations of highly excited nebulae in the MCs Observations of a number of highly excited nebulae in the Magellanic Clouds were carried out by a team composed of Belgian and American astronomers [1] in January 2002, by means of the FORS1 multi-mode instrument at the 8.2-m VLT MELIPAL telescope. Detailed images were obtained through various special optical filters - they bring into light the complex structure of these nebulae and reveal for the first time the exact morphology of the high excitation zones. Some of exposures have been combined to produce the colour photos shown in PR Photos 09a-d/03. Here, the blue colour traces the exceptional HeII emission, whilst the red and green correspond to the more common nebular emissions from atomic hydrogen and doubly-ionized oxygen, respectively. All four nebulae shown were found to be associated with very hot stars. They carry rather prosaic names: BAT99-2 and BAT99-49, AB7 and N44C Star #2 [2]. The first three of these objects contain some of the highly evolved massive stars, of the so-called Wolf-Rayet (WR) type, while the fourth is an mid-age massive star, of type O. Massive stars, with masses more than 20 times that of the Sun, are very bright (100,000 to 10 million times brighter than the Sun

  7. Symbiotic stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kafatos, M.; Michalitsianos, A. G.

    1984-01-01

    The physical characteristics of symbiotic star systems are discussed, based on a review of recent observational data. A model of a symbiotic star system is presented which illustrates how a cool red-giant star is embedded in a nebula whose atoms are ionized by the energetic radiation from its hot compact companion. UV outbursts from symbiotic systems are explained by two principal models: an accretion-disk-outburst model which describes how material expelled from the tenuous envelope of the red giant forms an inwardly-spiralling disk around the hot companion, and a thermonuclear-outburst model in which the companion is specifically a white dwarf which superheats the material expelled from the red giant to the point where thermonuclear reactions occur and radiation is emitted. It is suspected that the evolutionary course of binary systems is predetermined by the initial mass and angular momentum of the gas cloud within which binary stars are born. Since red giants and Mira variables are thought to be stars with a mass of one or two solar mass, it is believed that the original cloud from which a symbiotic system is formed can consist of no more than a few solar masses of gas.

  8. Pervaporation properties of dense polyamide-6 membranes in separation of water-ethanol mixtures

    SciTech Connect

    Kujawski, W.; Waczynski, M.; Lasota, M.

    1996-04-01

    Several dense polyamide-6 membranes were prepared by casting 7 wt% and/or 10 wt% solutions of polymer in trifluoroethanol. The cast membranes were dried at different temperatures from 25 to 80{degrees}C. Sorption and pervaporation properties of PA-6 membranes in water-ethanol mixtures were obtained. The data obtained showed that water was preferentially sorbed into the membrane and transported through the membrane; however, the pervaporation selectivity factor {alpha}{sup PV} was close to unity at higher concentrations. The selectivity parameters in pervaporation were improved for membranes obtained from 10 wt% polymer and dried at higher temperatures.

  9. Gravitational Condensate Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mazur, P.; Mottola, E.

    The issue of the final state of the gravitational collapse will be addressed. Ishall present physical arguments to the effect that the remnant of the gravitationalcollapse of super-massive stars is a cold and dark super-dense object which isthermodynamically and dynamically stable: a Gravitational Condensate Star orQuasi Black Hole (QBH). A QBH is characterized by a huge, but not an infinite,surface redshift. This surface redshift depends universally on the total mass of aQBH and the proper thickness of a thin shell of an exotic matter described bythe Zel'dovich equation of state p = c2 . The velocity of sound in a thin shell isequal to the velocity of light. Hence, this thin shell replaces the event horizon of amathematical black hole ( = 0). Inside a thin shell the zero entropy gravitationalcondensate characterized by the cosmological equation of state p = -c2 resides.A QBH is described by a new static and spherically symmetric solution of Ein-stein's equations supplemented with the proper boundary conditions based on mi-crophysics considerations. The new solution has no singularities and no eventhorizons. Its entropy is maximized under small fluctuations and is given by thestandard hydrodynamic entropy of the thin shell which is proportional to the to-tal mass instead of the Bekenstein-Hawking entropy which is proportional to thesquare of the total mass. This resolves the paradox of an excessively high en-tropy of black holes as compared to their progenitors. The formation of such acold gravitational condensate stellar remnant very likely would require a violentcollapse process with an explosive output of energy. Some observational conse-quences of the formation of gravitational condensate stars will be described.

  10. Hadronic matter and rapidly rotating compact stars

    SciTech Connect

    Weber, F.; Kettner, C.; Glendenning, N.K.

    1994-03-01

    In part one of this paper the authors review the present status of neutron star matter calculations, and introduce a representative collection of realistic nuclear equations of state which are derived for different assumptions about the physical behavior of dense matter (baryon populations, pion condensation, possible transition of baryon matter to quark matter). Part two deals with the theoretical determination of the minimum possible rotational periods of neutron stars, performed in the framework of general relativity, whose knowledge serves to distinguish between pulsars that can be understood as rotating neutron stars and those that cannot. Likely candidates for the latter are hypothetical strange stars. Their properties are discussed in the third part of this contribution.

  11. Educational Applications of Star Formation Research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Waller, William; Clemens, Cathy; Green, Paul

    2005-07-01

    Research into the formation of stars involves many exciting physical processes -- from vast magnetized clouds collapsing under their own weight, to thermonuclear reactions igniting inside dense stellar cores, to powerful jets being shot from proto-planetary disks. Star formation research also touches on many aspects of the educational enterprise that is ongoing in schools, museums, and other community venues. In this presentation, we will (1) show how the science of star formation relates to the various learning goals and standards that currently underlie formal K-14 science and technology education, (2) describe the various opportunities that exist for space scientists to get involved in educational outreach, and (3) provide some examples of available resources that support educational outreach involving star formation.

  12. ON THE FORMATION OF GLYCOLALDEHYDE IN DENSE MOLECULAR CORES

    SciTech Connect

    Woods, Paul M.; Kelly, George; Viti, Serena; Slater, Ben; Brown, Wendy A.; Puletti, Fabrizio; Burke, Daren J.; Raza, Zamaan

    2012-05-01

    Glycolaldehyde is a simple monosaccharide sugar linked to prebiotic chemistry. Recently, it was detected in a molecular core in the star-forming region G31.41+0.31 at a reasonably high abundance. We investigate the formation of glycolaldehyde at 10 K to determine whether it can form efficiently under typical dense core conditions. Using an astrochemical model, we test five different reaction mechanisms that have been proposed in the astrophysical literature, finding that a gas-phase formation route is unlikely. Of the grain-surface formation routes, only two are efficient enough at very low temperatures to produce sufficient glycolaldehyde to match the observational estimates, with the mechanism culminating in CH{sub 3}OH + HCO being favored. However, when we consider the feasibility of these mechanisms from a reaction chemistry perspective, the second grain-surface route looks more promising, H{sub 3}CO + HCO.

  13. Stability of superfluid vortices in dense quark matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alford, Mark G.; Mallavarapu, S. Kumar; Vachaspati, Tanmay; Windisch, Andreas

    2016-04-01

    Superfluid vortices in the color-flavor-locked (CFL) phase of dense quark matter are known to be energetically disfavored relative to well-separated triplets of so-called semi-superfluid color flux tubes. However, the short-range interaction (metastable versus unstable) has not been established. In this paper we perform numerical calculations using the effective theory of the condensate field, mapping the regions in the parameter space of coupling constants where the vortices are metastable versus unstable. For the case of zero-gauge coupling we analytically identify a candidate for the unstable mode and show that it agrees well with the results of the numerical calculations. We find that in the region of the parameter space that seems likely to correspond to real-world CFL quark matter the vortices are unstable, indicating that if such matter exists in neutron star cores it is very likely to contain semi-superfluid color flux tubes rather than superfluid vortices.

  14. Hadronic Stars versus Hybrid stars: how can we identify them?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alford, Mark

    2014-09-01

    The properties of high-density hadronic matter have been investigated for some time to predict properties of neutron stars including mass/radius and the maximum mass of a neutron star. Recent results indicate the properties of dense hadronic matter up to several times saturation density may be strongly constrained by properties of three-nucleon interactions and hyperon-nucleon interactions. We review some of these results and their comparison to observations. At high pressure, nuclear matter will undergo a transition to quark matter, so sufficiently heavy neutron stars may really be ``hybrid stars'' with quark matter cores. We will discuss the ``Constant Sound Speed'' (CSS) parameterization of the quark matter EoS, and show how it provides a generic way of understanding the topology of the mass-radius relation, as well as more specific features like the maximum mass and typical radius. CSS provides a fairly general framework or language for comparing different quark matter models with each other and with data, and for expressing experimental constraints in model-independent terms.

  15. Dispersing nanoparticles in a polymer film via solvent evaporation

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Cheng, Shengfeng; Grest, Gary S.

    2016-05-19

    Large-scale molecular dynamics simulations are used to study the dispersion of nanoparticles (NPs) in a polymer film during solvent evaporation. As the solvent evaporates, a dense polymer-rich skin layer forms at the liquid/vapor interface, which is either NP rich or poor depending on the strength of the NP/polymer interaction. When the NPs are strongly wet by the polymer, the NPs accumulate at the interface and form layers. However, when the NPs are only partially wet by the polymer, most NPs are uniformly distributed in the bulk of the polymer film, with the dense skin layer serving as a barrier tomore » prevent the NPs from moving to the interface. Furthermore, our results point to a possible route to employ less favorable NP/polymer interactions and fast solvent evaporation to uniformly disperse NPs in a polymer film, contrary to the common belief that strong NP/polymer attractions are needed to make NPs well dispersed in polymer nanocomposites.« less

  16. Molecular dynamics for dense matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maruyama, Toshiki; Watanabe, Gentaro; Chiba, Satoshi

    2012-08-01

    We review a molecular dynamics method for nucleon many-body systems called quantum molecular dynamics (QMD), and our studies using this method. These studies address the structure and the dynamics of nuclear matter relevant to neutron star crusts, supernova cores, and heavy-ion collisions. A key advantage of QMD is that we can study dynamical processes of nucleon many-body systems without any assumptions about the nuclear structure. First, we focus on the inhomogeneous structures of low-density nuclear matter consisting not only of spherical nuclei but also of nuclear "pasta", i.e., rod-like and slab-like nuclei. We show that pasta phases can appear in the ground and equilibrium states of nuclear matter without assuming nuclear shape. Next, we show our simulation of compression of nuclear matter which corresponds to the collapsing stage of supernovae. With the increase in density, a crystalline solid of spherical nuclei changes to a triangular lattice of rods by connecting neighboring nuclei. Finally, we discuss fragment formation in expanding nuclear matter. Our results suggest that a generally accepted scenario based on the liquid-gas phase transition is not plausible at lower temperatures.

  17. Star block-copolymers: enzyme-inspired catalysts for oxidation of alcohols in water.

    PubMed

    Mugemana, Clément; Chen, Ba-Tian; Bukhryakov, Konstantin V; Rodionov, Valentin

    2014-07-25

    A number of fluorous amphiphilic star block-copolymers containing a tris(benzyltriazolylmethyl)amine motif have been prepared. These polymers assembled into well-defined nanostructures in water, and their mode of assembly could be controlled by changing the composition of the polymer. The polymers were used for enzyme-inspired catalysis of alcohol oxidation. PMID:24912078

  18. Chameleon stars

    SciTech Connect

    Dzhunushaliev, Vladimir; Folomeev, Vladimir; Singleton, Douglas

    2011-10-15

    We consider a gravitating spherically symmetric configuration consisting of a scalar field nonminimally coupled to ordinary matter in the form of a perfect fluid. For this system we find static, regular, asymptotically flat solutions for both relativistic and nonrelativistic cases. It is shown that the presence of the nonminimal interaction leads to substantial changes both in the radial matter distribution of the star and in the star's total mass. A simple stability test indicates that, for the choice of parameters used in the paper, the solutions are unstable.

  19. Three body dynamics in dense gravitational systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moody, Kenneth

    galactic black hole binaries as a background source. I also found that the binaries are ejected from the cluster with, for the most part, a velocity just above the escape speed of the cluster which is a few tens of km/sec. These gravitational wave sources are thus constrained in their host galaxies as the galactic escape velocity is some hundreds of km/sec which only a very few binaries achieve in special cases. I studied the effect of the Kozai mechanism on two pulsars, one in the globular cluster M4, and the other J1903+0327. The M4 pulsar pulsar was found to have an unusually large orbital eccentricity, given that it is in a binary with a period of nearly 200 days. This unusual behavior led to the conclusion that a planet-like third body of much less than a solar mass was orbiting the binary. I used my own code to integrate the secular evolution equations with a broad set of initial conditions to determine the first detailed properties of the third body; namely that the mass of the planet is about that of Jupiter. The second pulsar J1903+0327 consists of a 2.15ms pulsar and a near solar mass companion in an e = 0.44 orbit. A preliminary study of this pulsar showed that the high eccentricity can be reproduced by my models, and there are three candidate clusters from which this pulsar could have originated. My third project was a study of the effect of a planet at 50 AU on the inner solar system. The origin of this planet is assumed to be from an exchange with another solar system in the early stages of the sun's life while it was still in the dense star forming region where it was born. Similar studies have been done with the exchange of stars among binaries by Malmberg et al. (2007b). The exchange once again allows the Kozai effect to bring about drastic change in the inner system. A planet is chosen as the outer object as, unlike a stellar companion, it would remain unseen by current radial velocity and direct observation methods, although it could be detected by

  20. Discriminating strange star mergers from neutron star mergers by gravitational-wave measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Bauswein, A.; Oechslin, R.; Janka, H.-T.

    2010-01-15

    We perform three-dimensional relativistic hydrodynamical simulations of the coalescence of strange stars and explore the possibility to decide on the strange matter hypothesis by means of gravitational-wave measurements. Self-binding of strange quark matter and the generally more compact stars yield features that clearly distinguish strange star from neutron star mergers, e.g. hampering tidal disruption during the plunge of quark stars. Furthermore, instead of forming dilute halo structures around the remnant as in the case of neutron star mergers, the coalescence of strange stars results in a differentially rotating hypermassive object with a sharp surface layer surrounded by a geometrically thin, clumpy high-density strange quark matter disk. We also investigate the importance of including nonzero temperature equations of state in neutron star and strange star merger simulations. In both cases we find a crucial sensitivity of the dynamics and outcome of the coalescence to thermal effects, e.g. the outer remnant structure and the delay time of the dense remnant core to black hole collapse depend on the inclusion of nonzero temperature effects. For comparing and classifying the gravitational-wave signals, we use a number of characteristic quantities like the maximum frequency during inspiral or the dominant frequency of oscillations of the postmerger remnant. In general, these frequencies are higher for strange star mergers. Only for particular choices of the equation of state the frequencies of neutron star and strange star mergers are similar. In such cases additional features of the gravitational-wave luminosity spectrum like the ratio of energy emitted during the inspiral phase to the energy radiated away in the postmerger stage may help to discriminate coalescence events of the different types. If such characteristic quantities could be extracted from gravitational-wave signals, for instance with the upcoming gravitational-wave detectors, a decision on the

  1. The friendly stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, Martha Evans

    Describes prominent stars such as Vega, Arcturus, and Antares and means of identifying them, discusses the constellations in which they are located, and explains star names, stellar light, distances between stars, and types of stars.

  2. Overview of Warm Dense Matter Experiments at LCLS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galtier, Eric; Levy, Anna; Williams, Gareth; Fletcher, Luke; Dorchies, Fabien; Gaudin, Jérôme; Sperling, Philipp

    Warm Dense Matter (WDM) is found in numerous astrophysical systems, from giant planets to brown dwarves or cool dense stars. Being this intermediate regime where condensed matter or plasma theories do not apply, it can be produced in all laser-induced plasma experiments on Earth. As a consequence, understanding its properties is fundamental and the whole community is investigating this extreme state of matter. With the advent of the 4th generation of light sources, namely the Free Electron Lasers (FELs), a new way of producing and diagnosing WDM becomes available. In 2009, the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) at SLAC was the first FEL to produce X-ray photons to be used by the user community. Since then, various experiments took place at LCLS to produce and measure specific physical properties of WDM. In this talk, we will present an overview of key experiments performed at LCLS to study WDM. The LCLS has been used in a variety of configuration: as the main heating mechanism, as a probe or both at the same time. When used as a probe, high power lasers have been used to shock matter and excite it into the WDM regime. Finally, we will describe exciting perspectives on the WDM research, as the LCLS-II will become available in about 5 years.

  3. Organic molecules in the gas phase of dense interstellar clouds.

    PubMed

    Irvine, W M

    1995-03-01

    Since a previous COSPAR review on this subject, the number of molecular species identified by astronomers in dense interstellar clouds or in the envelopes expelled by evolved stars has grown from about eighty to approximately one hundred. Recent detections in stellar envelopes include the radical CP, the second phosphorus-containing astronomical molecule; SiN, the first astronomical molecule with a Si-N bond; and the HCCN radical. In the dense interstellar clouds recent detections or verifications of previous possible identifications include the H3O+ ion, which is a critical intermediary in the production of H2O and O2; the CCO radical, which is isoelectronic with HCCN; the SO+ ion, which appears to be diagnostic of shock chemistry; two new isomers of cyanoacetylene, HCCNC and CCCNH; and the two cumulenes H2C3 and H2C4. Some recent work is also described on the mapping of interstellar clouds in multiple molecular transitions in order to separate variations in chemical abundance from gradients in physical parameters. PMID:11539249

  4. Externally fed star formation: a numerical study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohammadpour, Motahareh; Stahler, Steven W.

    2013-08-01

    We investigate, through a series of numerical calculations, the evolution of dense cores that are accreting external gas up to and beyond the point of star formation. Our model clouds are spherical, unmagnetized configurations with fixed outer boundaries, across which gas enters subsonically. When we start with any near-equilibrium state, we find that the cloud's internal velocity also remains subsonic for an extended period, in agreement with observations. However, the velocity becomes supersonic shortly before the star forms. Consequently, the accretion rate building up the protostar is much greater than the benchmark value c_s^3/G, where cs is the sound speed in the dense core. This accretion spike would generate a higher luminosity than those seen in even the most embedded young stars. Moreover, we find that the region of supersonic infall surrounding the protostar races out to engulf much of the cloud, again in violation of the observations, which show infall to be spatially confined. Similar problematic results have been obtained by all other hydrodynamic simulations to date, regardless of the specific infall geometry or boundary conditions adopted. Low-mass star formation is evidently a quasi-static process, in which cloud gas moves inward subsonically until the birth of the star itself. We speculate that magnetic tension in the cloud's deep interior helps restrain the infall prior to this event.

  5. Magnetic fields and galactic star formation rates

    SciTech Connect

    Loo, Sven Van; Tan, Jonathan C.; Falle, Sam A. E. G.

    2015-02-10

    The regulation of galactic-scale star formation rates (SFRs) is a basic problem for theories of galaxy formation and evolution: which processes are responsible for making observed star formation rates so inefficient compared to maximal rates of gas content divided by dynamical timescale? Here we study the effect of magnetic fields of different strengths on the evolution of giant molecular clouds (GMCs) within a kiloparsec patch of a disk galaxy and resolving scales down to ≃0.5 pc. Including an empirically motivated prescription for star formation from dense gas (n{sub H}>10{sup 5} cm{sup −3}) at an efficiency of 2% per local free-fall time, we derive the amount of suppression of star formation by magnetic fields compared to the nonmagnetized case. We find GMC fragmentation, dense clump formation, and SFR can be significantly affected by the inclusion of magnetic fields, especially in our strongest investigated B-field case of 80 μG. However, our chosen kiloparsec-scale region, extracted from a global galaxy simulation, happens to contain a starbursting cloud complex that is only modestly affected by these magnetic fields and likely requires internal star formation feedback to regulate its SFR.

  6. The JCMT Gould Belt Survey: A First Look at Dense Cores in Orion B

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirk, H.; Di Francesco, J.; Johnstone, D.; Duarte-Cabral, A.; Sadavoy, S.; Hatchell, J.; Mottram, J. C.; Buckle, J.; Berry, D. S.; Broekhoven-Fiene, H.; Currie, M. J.; Fich, M.; Jenness, T.; Nutter, D.; Pattle, K.; Pineda, J. E.; Quinn, C.; Salji, C.; Tisi, S.; Hogerheijde, M. R.; Ward-Thompson, D.; Bastien, P.; Bresnahan, D.; Butner, H.; Chen, M.; Chrysostomou, A.; Coude, S.; Davis, C. J.; Drabek-Maunder, E.; Fiege, J.; Friberg, P.; Friesen, R.; Fuller, G. A.; Graves, S.; Greaves, J.; Gregson, J.; Holland, W.; Joncas, G.; Kirk, J. M.; Knee, L. B. G.; Mairs, S.; Marsh, K.; Matthews, B. C.; Moriarty-Schieven, G.; Mowat, C.; Rawlings, J.; Richer, J.; Robertson, D.; Rosolowsky, E.; Rumble, D.; Thomas, H.; Tothill, N.; Viti, S.; White, G. J.; Wouterloot, J.; Yates, J.; Zhu, M.

    2016-02-01

    We present a first look at the SCUBA-2 observations of three sub-regions of the Orion B molecular cloud: LDN 1622, NGC 2023/2024, and NGC 2068/2071, from the JCMT Gould Belt Legacy Survey. We identify 29, 564, and 322 dense cores in L1622, NGC 2023/2024, and NGC 2068/2071 respectively, using the SCUBA-2 850 μm map, and present their basic properties, including their peak fluxes, total fluxes, and sizes, and an estimate of the corresponding 450 μm peak fluxes and total fluxes, using the FellWalker source extraction algorithm. Assuming a constant temperature of 20 K, the starless dense cores have a mass function similar to that found in previous dense core analyses, with a Salpeter-like slope at the high-mass end. The majority of cores appear stable to gravitational collapse when considering only thermal pressure; indeed, most of the cores which have masses above the thermal Jeans mass are already associated with at least one protostar. At higher cloud column densities, above 1-2 × 1023 cm-2, most of the mass is found within dense cores, while at lower cloud column densities, below 1 × 1023 cm-2, this fraction drops to 10% or lower. Overall, the fraction of dense cores associated with a protostar is quite small (<8%), but becomes larger for the densest and most centrally concentrated cores. NGC 2023/2024 and NGC 2068/2071 appear to be on the path to forming a significant number of stars in the future, while L1622 has little additional mass in dense cores to form many new stars.

  7. Dense molecular cloud cores as a source of micrometer-sized grains in galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirashita, Hiroyuki; Asano, Ryosuke S.; Nozawa, Takaya; Li, Zhi-Yun; Liu, Ming-Chang

    2014-10-01

    Coreshine in dense molecular cloud cores (dense cores) is interpreted as evidence for micrometer-sized grains (referred to as very large grains, VLGs). VLGs may have a significant influence on the total dust amount and the extinction curve. We estimate the total abundance of VLGs in the Galaxy, assuming that dense cores are the site of VLG formation. We find that the VLG abundance relative to the total dust mass is roughly ϕVLG~0.01(1-ε)/ε((fVLG/0.5)(tshat/108 year), where ε is the star formation efficiency in dense cores, τSF is the timescale of gas consumption by star formation, fVLG is the fraction of dust mass eventually coagulated into VLGs in dense cores, and tshat is the lifetime of VLGs (determined by shattering). Adopting their typical values for the Galaxy, we obtain ϕVLG~0.02-0.09. This abundance is well below the value detected in the heliosphere by Ulysses and Galileo, which means that local enhancement of VLG abundance in the solar neighborhood is required if the VLGs originate from dense cores. We also show that the effects of VLGs on the extinction curve are negligible even with the upper value of the above range, ϕVLG~0.09. If we adopt an extreme value, ϕVLG~0.5, close to that inferred from the above spacecraft data, the extinction curve is still in the range of the variation in Galactic extinction curves, but is not typical of the diffuse ISM.

  8. Dense cores in Ophiuchus and Chamaeleon molecular clouds: detection and evolutionary trends

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benedettini, Milena; Burton, Michael; Busquet, Gemma; Caselli, Paola; Pezzuto, Stefano; Viti, Serena

    2012-04-01

    We propose to map the densest regions of the Ophiucus, Chamaeleon I and Chamaeleon III molecular clouds in high density tracers in order to derive the distribution of the dense cores and their evolutionary stage with the aim to study the core mass function and its relationship to the stellar initial mass function. Spectroscopic surveys of star forming regions in chemical species copiously produced in the first stages of star formation are essential to derive the kinematics and the physical conditions of the pre- and proto-stellar cores, as well as their evolutionary stage. A previous study of the Lupus molecular cloud carried out with Mopra has shown the high potential of the multi-line spectroscopic surveys in identifying the dense condensations and their evolutionary stage. We ask to observe several key species: HCN, HNC, HC3N, N2H+ and HCO+ whose chemical abundance ratios are good chemical clocks for the first stages of the star formation process. The Mopra antenna is ideal for observations at 3mm of the close-by, high southern declination Ophiucus and Chamaeleon clouds since the beam size at 90GHz corresponds to about 0.03pc, well-matched to sampling the dense cores with typical sizes of 0.1pc.

  9. Scale-invariant hidden local symmetry, topology change, and dense baryonic matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paeng, Won-Gi; Kuo, Thomas T. S.; Lee, Hyun Kyu; Rho, Mannque

    2016-05-01

    When scale symmetry is implemented into hidden local symmetry in low-energy strong interactions to arrive at a scale-invariant hidden local symmetric (HLS) theory, the scalar f0(500 ) may be interpreted as pseudo-Nambu-Goldstone (pNG) boson, i.e., dilaton, of spontaneously broken scale invariance, joining the pseudoscalar pNG bosons π and the matter fields V =(ρ ,ω ) as relevant degrees of freedom. Implementing the skyrmion-half-skyrmion transition predicted at large Nc in QCD at a density roughly twice the nuclear matter density found in the crystal simulation of dense skyrmion matter, we determine the intrinsically density-dependent "bare parameters" of the scale-invariant HLS Lagrangian matched to QCD at a matching scale ΛM. The resulting effective Lagrangian, with the parameters scaling with the density of the system, is applied to nuclear matter and dense baryonic matter relevant to massive compact stars by means of the double-decimation renormalization-group Vlow k formalism. We satisfactorily postdict the properties of normal nuclear matter and more significantly predict the equation of state of dense compact-star matter that quantitatively accounts for the presently available data coming from both the terrestrial and space laboratories. We interpret the resulting structure of compact-star matter as revealing how the combination of hidden-scale symmetry and hidden local symmetry manifests itself in compressed baryonic matter.

  10. Atomic Transitions in Dense Plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murillo, Michael Sean

    Motivation for the study of hot, dense ( ~solid density) plasmas has historically been in connection with stellar interiors. In recent years, however, there has been a growing interest in such plasmas due to their relevance to short wavelength (EUV and x-ray) lasers, inertial confinement fusion, and optical harmonic generation. In constrast to the stellar plasmas, these laboratory plasmas are typically composed of high-z elements and are not in thermal equilibrium. Descriptions of nonthermal plasma experiments must necessarily involve the consideration of the various atomic processes and the rates at which they occur. Traditionally, the rates of collisional atomic processes are calculated by considering a binary collision picture. For example, a single electron may be taken to collisionally excite an ion. A cross section may be defined for this process and, multiplying by a flux, the rate may be obtained. In a high density plasma this binary picture clearly breaks down as the electrons no longer act independently of each other. The cross section is ill-defined in this regime and another approach is needed to obtain rates. In this thesis an approach based on computing rates without recourse to a cross section is presented. In this approach, binary collisions are replaced by stochastic density fluctuations. It is then these density fluctuations which drive transitions in the ions. Furthermore, the oscillator strengths for the transitions are computed in screened Coulomb potentials which reflect the average polarization of the plasma near the ion. Numerical computations are presented for the collisional ionization rate. The effects of screening in the plasma -ion interaction are investigated for He^+ ions in a plasma near solid density. It is shown that dynamic screening plays an important role in this process. Then, density effects in the oscillator strength are explored for both He^+ and Ar^{+17}. Approximations which introduce a nonorthogonality between the initial

  11. Holographic Quark Matter and Neutron Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoyos, Carlos; Jokela, Niko; Rodríguez Fernández, David; Vuorinen, Aleksi

    2016-07-01

    We use a top-down holographic model for strongly interacting quark matter to study the properties of neutron stars. When the corresponding equation of state (EOS) is matched with state-of-the-art results for dense nuclear matter, we consistently observe a first-order phase transition at densities between 2 and 7 times the nuclear saturation density. Solving the Tolman-Oppenheimer-Volkov equations with the resulting hybrid EOSs, we find maximal stellar masses in excess of two solar masses, albeit somewhat smaller than those obtained with simple extrapolations of the nuclear matter EOSs. Our calculation predicts that no quark matter exists inside neutron stars.

  12. Why neutron stars have three hairs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stein, Leo; Yagi, Kent; Pappas, George; Yunes, Nicolas; Apostolatos, Theocharis

    2015-04-01

    Neutron stars have recently been found to enjoy a certain `baldness' in their multipolar structure which is independent of the equation of state (EoS) of dense nuclear matter. This is reminiscent of the black hole no-hair relations, and in stark contrast to regular stars. Why is this? Is it because realistic EoSs are sufficiently similar, or because GR effects are especially important, or because the nuclear matter is `cold'? We explore the physics behind these and more hypotheses, and give a convincing explanation for the true origin of the three-hair relations.

  13. Holographic Quark Matter and Neutron Stars.

    PubMed

    Hoyos, Carlos; Jokela, Niko; Rodríguez Fernández, David; Vuorinen, Aleksi

    2016-07-15

    We use a top-down holographic model for strongly interacting quark matter to study the properties of neutron stars. When the corresponding equation of state (EOS) is matched with state-of-the-art results for dense nuclear matter, we consistently observe a first-order phase transition at densities between 2 and 7 times the nuclear saturation density. Solving the Tolman-Oppenheimer-Volkov equations with the resulting hybrid EOSs, we find maximal stellar masses in excess of two solar masses, albeit somewhat smaller than those obtained with simple extrapolations of the nuclear matter EOSs. Our calculation predicts that no quark matter exists inside neutron stars. PMID:27472110

  14. Star Power

    SciTech Connect

    2014-10-17

    The U.S. Department of Energy's Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory has released ''Star Power,'' a new informational video that uses dramatic and beautiful images and thought-provoking interviews to highlight the importance of the Laboratory's research into magnetic fusion.

  15. Star Power

    ScienceCinema

    None

    2014-11-18

    The U.S. Department of Energy's Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory has released ''Star Power,'' a new informational video that uses dramatic and beautiful images and thought-provoking interviews to highlight the importance of the Laboratory's research into magnetic fusion.

  16. Star Numbers and Constellations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Francis, Richard L.

    1993-01-01

    A number for which the number of digits categorizes the number is called a star number. A set of star numbers having a designated property is called a constellation. Discusses nature and cardinality of constellations made up of star square, star prime, star abundant, and star deficient numbers. Presents five related problems for exploration. (MDH)

  17. Astrochemical diagnostics of star and planet formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caselli, Paola

    2016-06-01

    Stars like our Sun and planets like our Earth form out of diffuse interstellar material, which first accumulates to form molecular clouds and then it fragments into cold (~10 K) and dense (~105 H2 molecules per cc) cloud cores, the cradle of future stellar systems. The physical structure and chemical composition of these dense cores set the stage for the next steps: gravitational contraction and the formation of protostars and protoplanetary disks. Molecules are unique tracers of the dynamical evolution of interstellar clouds and astrochemistry is needed to guide and interpret our observations. In this talk I will review work done on the early stages of star and planet formation, underlying how astrochemical diagnostics have helped us to shed light on chemical and physical processes important to constraints theories and to find connections with our Solar System. ALMA results will be highlighted.

  18. STAR FORMATION RATES IN MOLECULAR CLOUDS AND THE NATURE OF THE EXTRAGALACTIC SCALING RELATIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Lada, Charles J.; Forbrich, Jan; Lombardi, Marco; Alves, Joao F. E-mail: jforbrich@cfa.harvard.edu E-mail: joao.alves@univie.ac.at

    2012-02-01

    In this paper, we investigate scaling relations between star formation rates and molecular gas masses for both local Galactic clouds and a sample of external galaxies. We specifically consider relations between the star formation rates and measurements of dense, as well as total, molecular gas masses. We argue that there is a fundamental empirical scaling relation that directly connects the local star formation process with that operating globally within galaxies. Specifically, the total star formation rate in a molecular cloud or galaxy is linearly proportional to the mass of dense gas within the cloud or galaxy. This simple relation, first documented in previous studies, holds over a span of mass covering nearly nine orders of magnitude and indicates that the rate of star formation is directly controlled by the amount of dense molecular gas that can be assembled within a star formation complex. We further show that the star formation rates and total molecular masses, characterizing both local clouds and galaxies, are correlated over similarly large scales of mass and can be described by a family of linear star formation scaling laws, parameterized by f{sub DG}, the fraction of dense gas contained within the clouds or galaxies. That is, the underlying star formation scaling law is always linear for clouds and galaxies with the same dense gas fraction. These considerations provide a single unified framework for understanding the relation between the standard (nonlinear) extragalactic Schmidt-Kennicutt scaling law, that is typically derived from CO observations of the gas, and the linear star formation scaling law derived from HCN observations of the dense gas.

  19. Organometallic Polymers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carraher, Charles E., Jr.

    1981-01-01

    Reactions utilized to incorporate a metal-containing moiety into a polymer chain (addition, condensation, and coordination) are considered, emphasizing that these reactions also apply to smaller molecules. (JN)

  20. Polymer flooding

    SciTech Connect

    Littmann, W.

    1988-01-01

    This book covers all aspects of polymer flooding, an enhanced oil recovery method using water soluble polymers to increase the viscosity of flood water, for the displacement of crude oil from porous reservoir rocks. Although this method is becoming increasingly important, there is very little literature available for the engineer wishing to embark on such a project. In the past, polymer flooding was mainly the subject of research. The results of this research are spread over a vast number of single publications, making it difficult for someone who has not kept up-to-date with developments during the last 10-15 years to judge the suitability of polymer flooding to a particular field case. This book tries to fill that gap. An indispensable book for reservoir engineers, production engineers and lab. technicians within the petroleum industry.

  1. Effect of Molecular Architecture on Polymer Melt Surface Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foster, Mark

    The dynamics of the thermally stimulated surface height fluctuations in a polymer melt dictate wetting, adhesion, and tribology at that surface. These surface fluctuations can be profoundly altered by tethering of the chains. One type of tethering is the tethering of one part of a molecule to another part of the same molecule. This tethering is found in both long chain branched polymers and in macrocycles. We have studied the surface fluctuations with X-ray Photon Correlation Spectroscopy for melts of well-defined, anionically polymerized polystyrenes of various architectures, including linear, 6 arm star, pom-pom, comb and cyclic architectures. For linear chains, the variation of surface relaxation time with in-plane scattering vector can be fit using a hydrodynamic continuum theory (HCT) of thermally stimulated capillary waves that knows nothing of the chain architecture. Assuming the theory is applicable, apparent viscosities of the films may then be inferred from the XPCS data. For unentangled linear chains, the viscosity inferred from XPCS data in this manner is the same as that measured by conventional bulk rheometry. The HCT does a reasonable job of describing the variation of relaxation time with scattering vector for long branched chains also, but only if a viscosity much larger than that of the bulk is assumed. The discrepancy between the viscosity inferred from surface relaxation times using the HCT and that derived from conventional rheometry grows larger as the bulk Tg is approached and is different for each long chain branched architecture. However, for densely branched combs and cyclic chains different behaviors are found. Acknowledgement: Thanks to NSF (CBET 0730692) and the Advanced Photon Source, supported by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Science, Office of Basic Energy Science, under Contract No. W-31-109-ENG-38.

  2. Unexplained Brightening of Unusual Star

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1997-01-01

    Recent observations with the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) have documented an unexpected and rapid, seven-fold brightening of an unusual double star at the centre of the impressive 47 Tucanae globular cluster in the southern sky. This is the first HST observation of such a rare phenomenon. The astronomers [1] who are involved in this observational program find that this event cannot be explained by any of the common processes known to occur in such stars. The cores of globular clusters Globular clusters are like huge swarms of stars, containing about one million suns, which move around in their common gravitational field. Most galaxies contain globular clusters; around 150 are known within the confines of our Galaxy, the Milky Way. Globular clusters change with time. In particular, at some stage in the life of a globular cluster, its central region will contract whereby the stars there move closer to each other. This phenomenon is referred to as core collapse [2]. Observations with the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) have revealed enormous central densities of the order of 30,000 stars per cubic light-year in clusters with fully collapsed cores; this is to be compared with the stellar density in the solar neighborhood of only 0.003 stars per cubic light-year [3]. Binary stars in globular clusters Binary (i.e., double) stars play an important role in the evolution of globular clusters: they can delay, halt, or even reverse the process of core collapse. In this dense stellar environment, close encounters between passing stars and binaries are relatively frequent. Such events may leave the binary stars more tightly bound, and at the same time speed up the motion of the stars involved, thereby counteracting the contraction of the core. The same close stellar encounters may also produce a diverse progeny of exotic objects. The centers of globular clusters contain blue stragglers (stars that ``look'' younger than they really are), millisecond pulsars (rapidly rotating, very

  3. Polymers All Around You!

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gertz, Susan

    Background information on natural polymers, synthetic polymers, and the properties of polymers is presented as an introduction to this curriculum guide. Details are provided on the use of polymer products in consumer goods, polymer recycling, polymer densities, the making of a polymer such as GLUEP, polyvinyl alcohol, dissolving plastics, polymers…

  4. Neutrino Propagation in Dense Magnetized Matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arbuzova, E. V.; Lobanov, A. E.; Murchikova, E. M.

    2009-01-01

    We obtained a complete system of solutions of the Dirac-Pauli equation for a massive neutrino interacting with dense matter and strong electromagnetic field. We demonstrated that these solutions can describe precession of the neutrino spin.

  5. Wide Variation Seen in 'Dense' Breast Diagnoses

    MedlinePlus

    ... defined mammography patients' breasts as dense. Higher breast density is a risk factor for breast cancer, experts ... could have implications for the so-called breast density notification laws that have been passed in about ...

  6. Phosphorus-bearing Molecules in Massive Dense Cores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fontani, F.; Rivilla, V. M.; Caselli, P.; Vasyunin, A.; Palau, A.

    2016-05-01

    Phosphorus is a crucial element for the development of life, but so far P-bearing molecules have been detected only in a few astrophysical objects; hence, its interstellar chemistry is almost totally unknown. Here, we show new detections of phosphorus nitride (PN) in a sample of dense cores in different evolutionary stages of the intermediate- and high-mass star formation process: starless, with protostellar objects, and with ultracompact H ii regions. All detected PN line widths are smaller than ≃5 km s‑1, and they arise from regions associated with kinetic temperatures smaller than 100 K. Because the few previous detections reported in the literature are associated with warmer and more turbulent sources, the results of this work show that PN can arise from relatively quiescent and cold gas. This information is challenging for theoretical models that invoke either high desorption temperatures or grain sputtering from shocks to release phosphorus into the gas phase. Derived column densities are of the order of 1011–12 cm‑2, marginally lower than the values derived in the few high-mass star-forming regions detected so far. New constraints on the abundance of phosphorus monoxide, the fundamental unit of biologically relevant molecules, are also given. Based on observations carried out with the IRAM-30 m Telescope. IRAM is supported by INSU/CNRS (France), MPG (Germany), and IGN (Spain).

  7. Field theoretic simulations of polymer nanocomposites

    SciTech Connect

    Koski, Jason; Chao, Huikuan; Riggleman, Robert A.

    2013-12-28

    Polymer field theory has emerged as a powerful tool for describing the equilibrium phase behavior of complex polymer formulations, particularly when one is interested in the thermodynamics of dense polymer melts and solutions where the polymer chains can be accurately described using Gaussian models. However, there are many systems of interest where polymer field theory cannot be applied in such a straightforward manner, such as polymer nanocomposites. Current approaches for incorporating nanoparticles have been restricted to the mean-field level and often require approximations where it is unclear how to improve their accuracy. In this paper, we present a unified framework that enables the description of polymer nanocomposites using a field theoretic approach. This method enables straightforward simulations of the fully fluctuating field theory for polymer formulations containing spherical or anisotropic nanoparticles. We demonstrate our approach captures the correlations between particle positions, present results for spherical and cylindrical nanoparticles, and we explore the effect of the numerical parameters on the performance of our approach.

  8. Dissociation energy of molecules in dense gases

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kunc, J. A.

    1992-01-01

    A general approach is presented for calculating the reduction of the dissociation energy of diatomic molecules immersed in a dense (n = less than 10 exp 22/cu cm) gas of molecules and atoms. The dissociation energy of a molecule in a dense gas differs from that of the molecule in vacuum because the intermolecular forces change the intramolecular dynamics of the molecule, and, consequently, the energy of the molecular bond.

  9. Dense loading of catalyst improves hydrotreater performance

    SciTech Connect

    Nooy, F.M.

    1984-11-12

    This paper discusses the advantages of increased capacity and improved catalyst/oil contact in existing hydrotreating units. The similarities between catalyst loading and other material processes are reviewed. Catalyst bed activity is examined. Dense loading systems are reviewed in detail. Over the last years, many refiners have gained experience with the benefits of dense loading techniques, and these techniques are gaining more and more acceptance.

  10. Dynamical theory of dense groups of galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mamon, Gary A.

    1990-01-01

    It is well known that galaxies associate in groups and clusters. Perhaps 40% of all galaxies are found in groups of 4 to 20 galaxies (e.g., Tully 1987). Although most groups appear to be so loose that the galaxy interactions within them ought to be insignificant, the apparently densest groups, known as compact groups appear so dense when seen in projection onto the plane of the sky that their members often overlap. These groups thus appear as dense as the cores of rich clusters. The most popular catalog of compact groups, compiled by Hickson (1982), includes isolation among its selection critera. Therefore, in comparison with the cores of rich clusters, Hickson's compact groups (HCGs) appear to be the densest isolated regions in the Universe (in galaxies per unit volume), and thus provide in principle a clean laboratory for studying the competition of very strong gravitational interactions. The $64,000 question here is then: Are compact groups really bound systems as dense as they appear? If dense groups indeed exist, then one expects that each of the dynamical processes leading to the interaction of their member galaxies should be greatly enhanced. This leads us to the questions: How stable are dense groups? How do they form? And the related question, fascinating to any theorist: What dynamical processes predominate in dense groups of galaxies? If HCGs are not bound dense systems, but instead 1D change alignments (Mamon 1986, 1987; Walke & Mamon 1989) or 3D transient cores (Rose 1979) within larger looser systems of galaxies, then the relevant question is: How frequent are chance configurations within loose groups? Here, the author answers these last four questions after comparing in some detail the methods used and the results obtained in the different studies of dense groups.

  11. Fabric variables in dense sheared suspensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Radjai, Farhang; Amarsid, Lhassan; Delenne, Jean-Yves

    The rheology of granular flows and dense suspensions can be described in terms of their effective shear and bulk viscosities as a function of packing fraction. Using stress partition and equivalence between frictional and viscous descriptions in the dense state, we show that the effective viscosities can be expressed in terms of the force-network anisotropy. This is supported by our extensive DEM-LBM simulations for a broad range of inertial and viscous parameters.

  12. The Transition from Diffuse to Dense Gas in Herschel Dust Emission Maps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goldsmith, Paul

    Dense cores in dark clouds are the sites where young stars form. These regions manifest as relatively small (<0.1pc) pockets of cold and dense gas. If we wish to understand the star formation process, we have to understand the physical conditions in dense cores. This has been a main aim of star formation research in the past decade. Today, we do indeed possess a good knowledge of the density and velocity structure of cores, as well as their chemical evolution and physical lifetime. However, we do not understand well how dense cores form out of the diffuse gas clouds surrounding them. It is crucial that we constrain the relationship between dense cores and their environment: if we only understand dense cores, we may be able to understand how individual stars form --- but we would not know how the star forming dense cores themselves come into existence. We therefore propose to obtain data sets that reveal both dense cores and the clouds containing them in the same map. Based on these maps, we will study how dense cores form out of their natal clouds. Since cores form stars, this knowledge is crucial for the development of a complete theoretical and observational understanding of the formation of stars and their planets, as envisioned in NASA's Strategic Science Plan. Fortunately, existing archival data allow to derive exactly the sort of maps we need for our analysis. Here, we describe a program that exclusively builds on PACS and SPIRE dust emission imaging data from the NASA-supported Herschel mission. The degree-sized wide-field Herschel maps of the nearby (<260pc) Polaris Flare and Aquila Rift clouds are ideal for our work. They permit to resolve dense cores (<0.1pc), while the maps also reveal large-scale cloud structure (5pc and larger). We will generate column density maps from these dust emission maps and then run a tree-based hierarchical multi-scale structure analysis on them. Only this procedure permits to exploit the full potential of the maps: we will

  13. Cygnus OB2: Star Formation Ugly Duckling Causes a Flap

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drake, Jeremy J.; Wright, Nicholas; Guarcello, Mario

    2015-08-01

    Cygnus OB2 is one of the largest known OB associations in our Galaxy, with a total stellar mass of 30,000 Msun and boasting an estimated 65 O-type stars and hundreds of OB stars. At a distance of only 1.4kpc, it is also the closest truly massive star forming region and provides a valuable testbed for star and planet formation theory. We have performed a deep stellar census using observations from X-ray to infrared, which has enabled studies of sub-structuring, mass segregation and dynamics, while infrared data reveal a story of protoplanetary disk attrition in an extremely harsh radiation environment. I will discuss how Cygnus OB2 challenges the idea that stars must form in dense, compact clusters, and demonstrates that stars as massive as 100 Msun can form in relatively low-density environments. Convincing evidence of disk photoevaporation poses a potential problem for planet formation and growth in starburst environments.

  14. On the massive star-forming capacity of molecular clouds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Franco, Jose; Shore, Steven N.; Tenorio-Tagle, Guillermo

    1994-01-01

    Assuming that photoionization is the self-limiting process for continued star formation, we estimate the maximum number of massive (OB) stars that can form within a molecular cloud. The most efficient cloud destruction mechanism in the early stages of H II region evolution is the evaporation of the cloud by stars located near the cloud boundary. The maximum number of OB stars is of order 1 per 10(exp 4) solar mass of average molecular gas, or 10 per 10(exp 4) solar mass of dense molecular gas. The resulting star-forming efficiencies within cloud complexes range from 2% to 16% depending on both the location of the stars in the cloud and the details of the initial mass function, with an overall value of about 5% for average molecular gas.

  15. METHOD OF PRODUCING DENSE CONSOLIDATED METALLIC REGULUS

    DOEpatents

    Magel, T.T.

    1959-08-11

    A methcd is presented for reducing dense metal compositions while simultaneously separating impurities from the reduced dense metal and casting the reduced parified dense metal, such as uranium, into well consolidated metal ingots. The reduction is accomplished by heating the dense metallic salt in the presence of a reducing agent, such as an alkali metal or alkaline earth metal in a bomb type reacting chamber, while applying centrifugal force on the reacting materials. Separation of the metal from the impurities is accomplished essentially by the incorporation of a constricted passageway at the vertex of a conical reacting chamber which is in direct communication with a collecting chamber. When a centrifugal force is applled to the molten metal and slag from the reduction in a direction collinear with the axis of the constricted passage, the dense molten metal is forced therethrough while the less dense slag is retained within the reaction chamber, resulting in a simultaneous separation of the reduced molten metal from the slag and a compacting of the reduced metal in a homogeneous mass.

  16. Hot and dense matter beyond relativistic mean field theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xilin; Prakash, Madappa

    2016-05-01

    Properties of hot and dense matter are calculated in the framework of quantum hadrodynamics by including contributions from two-loop (TL) diagrams arising from the exchange of isoscalar and isovector mesons between nucleons. Our extension of mean field theory (MFT) employs the same five density-independent coupling strengths which are calibrated using the empirical properties at the equilibrium density of isospin-symmetric matter. Results of calculations from the MFT and TL approximations are compared for conditions of density, temperature, and proton fraction encountered in the study of core-collapse supernovae, young and old neutron stars, and mergers of compact binary stars. The TL results for the equation of state (EOS) of cold pure neutron matter at sub- and near-nuclear densities agree well with those of modern quantum Monte Carlo and effective field-theoretical approaches. Although the high-density EOS in the TL approximation for cold and β -equilibrated neutron-star matter is substantially softer than its MFT counterpart, it is able to support a 2 M⊙ neutron star required by recent precise determinations. In addition, radii of 1.4 M⊙ stars are smaller by ˜1 km than those obtained in MFT and lie in the range indicated by analysis of astronomical data. In contrast to MFT, the TL results also give a better account of the single-particle or optical potentials extracted from analyses of medium-energy proton-nucleus and heavy-ion experiments. In degenerate conditions, the thermal variables are well reproduced by results of Landau's Fermi-liquid theory in which density-dependent effective masses feature prominently. The ratio of the thermal components of pressure and energy density expressed as Γth=1 +(Pth/ɛth) , often used in astrophysical simulations, exhibits a stronger dependence on density than on proton fraction and temperature in both MFT and TL calculations. The prominent peak of Γth at supranuclear density found in MFT is, however, suppressed in

  17. Single Molecule Dynamics of Branched DNA Polymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mai, Danielle; Sing, Charles; Schroeder, Charles

    This work focuses on extending the field of single polymer dynamics to topologically complex polymers. Here, we report the direct observation of DNA-based branched polymers. Recently, we recently demonstrated a two-step synthesis method to generate star, H-shaped, and comb polymers for single molecule visualization. Following synthesis, we use single-color or dual-color single molecule fluorescence microscopy to directly visualize branched polymer dynamics in flow, in particular tracking side branches and backbones independently. In this way, our imaging method allows for characterization of molecular properties, including quantification of polymer contour length and branch distributions. Moving beyond characterization, we use molecular rheology and single molecule techniques to study the dynamics of single branched polymers in flow. Here, we utilize precision microfluidics to directly observe branched DNA polymer conformations during transient stretching, steady-state extension, and relaxation from high stretch. We specifically measure backbone end-to-end distance as a function of time. Experiments and Brownian dynamics simulations show that branched polymer relaxation is a strong function of the number of branches and position of branch points along the main chain backbone.

  18. Deciphering the relationship among phosphate dynamics, electron-dense body and lipid accumulation in the green alga Parachlorella kessleri

    PubMed Central

    Ota, Shuhei; Yoshihara, Mai; Yamazaki, Tomokazu; Takeshita, Tsuyoshi; Hirata, Aiko; Konomi, Mami; Oshima, Kenshiro; Hattori, Masahira; Bišová, Kateřina; Zachleder, Vilém; Kawano, Shigeyuki

    2016-01-01

    Phosphorus is an essential element for life on earth and is also important for modern agriculture, which is dependent on inorganic fertilizers from phosphate rock. Polyphosphate is a biological polymer of phosphate residues, which is accumulated in organisms during the biological wastewater treatment process to enhance biological phosphorus removal. Here, we investigated the relationship between polyphosphate accumulation and electron-dense bodies in the green alga Parachlorella kessleri. Under sulfur-depleted conditions, in which some symporter genes were upregulated, while others were downregulated, total phosphate accumulation increased in the early stage of culture compared to that under sulfur-replete conditions. The P signal was detected only in dense bodies by energy dispersive X-ray analysis. Transmission electron microscopy revealed marked ultrastructural variations in dense bodies with and without polyphosphate. Our findings suggest that the dense body is a site of polyphosphate accumulation, and P. kessleri has potential as a phosphate-accumulating organism. PMID:27180903

  19. Deciphering the relationship among phosphate dynamics, electron-dense body and lipid accumulation in the green alga Parachlorella kessleri.

    PubMed

    Ota, Shuhei; Yoshihara, Mai; Yamazaki, Tomokazu; Takeshita, Tsuyoshi; Hirata, Aiko; Konomi, Mami; Oshima, Kenshiro; Hattori, Masahira; Bišová, Kateřina; Zachleder, Vilém; Kawano, Shigeyuki

    2016-01-01

    Phosphorus is an essential element for life on earth and is also important for modern agriculture, which is dependent on inorganic fertilizers from phosphate rock. Polyphosphate is a biological polymer of phosphate residues, which is accumulated in organisms during the biological wastewater treatment process to enhance biological phosphorus removal. Here, we investigated the relationship between polyphosphate accumulation and electron-dense bodies in the green alga Parachlorella kessleri. Under sulfur-depleted conditions, in which some symporter genes were upregulated, while others were downregulated, total phosphate accumulation increased in the early stage of culture compared to that under sulfur-replete conditions. The P signal was detected only in dense bodies by energy dispersive X-ray analysis. Transmission electron microscopy revealed marked ultrastructural variations in dense bodies with and without polyphosphate. Our findings suggest that the dense body is a site of polyphosphate accumulation, and P. kessleri has potential as a phosphate-accumulating organism. PMID:27180903

  20. Star Formation Laws, Rates, and Thresholds in Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Di Francesco, James

    2015-08-01

    It has been long recognized that stars form out of gas within the interstellar mediums of galaxies. Though earlier treatments focused on the relationship between star formation and the surface densities of available molecular gas in disks (e.g., the Kennicutt-Schmidt law), more recently the relevance of dense molecular gas within galaxies has become better appreciated. In this short review talk, I will provide an overview of how this shift in thinking in the last few years has occurred through observations. For example, strong correlations have been seen between the luminosities of HCN 1-0 (tracing dense gas) and infrared emission (tracing young stars) over nearly ten orders of magnitude. Also, the number of young stellar objects in nearby clouds seems to be related to the amount of mass in a cloud above a column density 'threshold' of Av ≈ 6 (surface density ≈ 120 Msun/pc2). Indeed, recent far-infrared/submillimetre continuum data of nearby molecular clouds from Herschel have shown strong links between star formation and filamentary structures in clouds above a critical mass per unit length of ~16 Msun/pc (Av ≈ 8), providing a possible origin of the observed 'threshold.' Also, the current star formation rate in a dense molecular cloud clump, as traced by the local number of Class 0 objects, appears to be highly correlated with the relative fraction of high column density material in the clump. Prospects for future exploration of star-formation thresholds will also be discussed.

  1. Converting neutron stars into strange stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Olinto, A. V.

    1991-01-01

    If strange matter is formed in the interior of a neutron star, it will convert the entire neutron star into a strange star. The proposed mechanisms are reviewed for strange matter seeding and the possible strange matter contamination of neutron star progenitors. The conversion process that follows seeding and the recent calculations of the conversion timescale are discussed.

  2. Numerical study of the properties of compact stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Negreiros, Rodrigo Picanco

    2009-10-01

    Compact stars are formed in catastrophic astrophysical events such as supernova explosions and binary stellar collisions. These objects permanently harbor compressed ultra-dense nuclear matter in their interiors. This key feature, together with the ongoing progress in observational astrophysics, make compact stars superb astrophysical laboratories for a wide range of intriguing physicals studies. Several such studies are performed in this thesis. The first activity concerns the widely unknown nuclear equation of state and the core composition of compact stars. Particular attention is paid to the possible presence of hyperons in the cores of neutron stars as well as to stars made of unconfined up, down and strange quarks (strange quark stars). The effects of ultra-strong electric fields on the surfaces of the latter is explored. The second activity aims at investigating the structure and stability of rapidly rotating compact stars. Special attention is paid to the maximal stable rotational frequencies of rotating compact stars. The third activity focuses on the thermal evolution of compact stars, driven by neutrino emission from their cores and by photon emission from the surfaces. It is show that the thermal behavior depends very strongly on the stellar core composition. Moreover, it is found that the thermal evolution of neutron stars is significantly different to that of strange quark stars. The studies performed in this thesis are key for our understanding of the thermal evolution of isolated rotating neutron stars, anomalous X-ray pulsars and soft gamma repeaters, and provide most valuable information about the phase diagram of isospin-asymmetric ultra-dense nuclear matter which can not be probed in high-energy collision experiments.

  3. Limiting Accretion onto Massive Stars by Fragmentation-Induced Starvation

    SciTech Connect

    Peters, Thomas; Klessen, Ralf S.; Mac Low, Mordecai-Mark; Banerjee, Robi; /ZAH, Heidelberg

    2010-08-25

    Massive stars influence their surroundings through radiation, winds, and supernova explosions far out of proportion to their small numbers. However, the physical processes that initiate and govern the birth of massive stars remain poorly understood. Two widely discussed models are monolithic collapse of molecular cloud cores and competitive accretion. To learn more about massive star formation, we perform simulations of the collapse of rotating, massive, cloud cores including radiative heating by both non-ionizing and ionizing radiation using the FLASH adaptive mesh refinement code. These simulations show fragmentation from gravitational instability in the enormously dense accretion flows required to build up massive stars. Secondary stars form rapidly in these flows and accrete mass that would have otherwise been consumed by the massive star in the center, in a process that we term fragmentation-induced starvation. This explains why massive stars are usually found as members of high-order stellar systems that themselves belong to large clusters containing stars of all masses. The radiative heating does not prevent fragmentation, but does lead to a higher Jeans mass, resulting in fewer and more massive stars than would form without the heating. This mechanism reproduces the observed relation between the total stellar mass in the cluster and the mass of the largest star. It predicts strong clumping and filamentary structure in the center of collapsing cores, as has recently been observed. We speculate that a similar mechanism will act during primordial star formation.

  4. LIMITING ACCRETION ONTO MASSIVE STARS BY FRAGMENTATION-INDUCED STARVATION

    SciTech Connect

    Peters, Thomas; Klessen, Ralf S.; Banerjee, Robi; Low, Mordecai-Mark Mac

    2010-12-10

    Massive stars influence their surroundings through radiation, winds, and supernova explosions far out of proportion to their small numbers. However, the physical processes that initiate and govern the birth of massive stars remain poorly understood. Two widely discussed models are monolithic collapse of molecular cloud cores and competitive accretion. To learn more about massive star formation, we perform and analyze simulations of the collapse of rotating, massive, cloud cores including radiative heating by both non-ionizing and ionizing radiation using the FLASH adaptive-mesh refinement code. These simulations show fragmentation from gravitational instability in the enormously dense accretion flows required to build up massive stars. Secondary stars form rapidly in these flows and accrete mass that would have otherwise been consumed by the massive star in the center, in a process that we term fragmentation-induced starvation. This explains why massive stars are usually found as members of high-order stellar systems that themselves belong to large clusters containing stars of all masses. The radiative heating does not prevent fragmentation, but does lead to a higher Jeans mass, resulting in fewer and more massive stars than would form without the heating. This mechanism reproduces the observed relation between the total stellar mass in the cluster and the mass of the largest star. It predicts strong clumping and filamentary structure in the center of collapsing cores, as has recently been observed. We speculate that a similar mechanism will act during primordial star formation.

  5. Investigations of carbon stars with Baldone Schmidt telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eglitis, I.; Kazina, E.

    2012-05-01

    Comparing star positions from the 2MASS catalog to those for all carbon stars from the CGCS, 6620 common objects (96%) have been found. Taking into account the results of research of C stars in the Large Magellanic Cloud, absolute magnitudes of R- and N- type stars, extinctions and distances for the sample stars have been calculated relying on a three-dimensional model of interstellar dust distribution. In a projection on the Galactic plane, the sample covers a region with 30 kpc radius around the Sun and demonstrates a large deficiency of carbon stars in the 50° sector towards the Galactic center and a moderate deficiency in the anticenter direction beyond 5 kpc. The two nearest spiral arms are evident as well as apparent voids at Galactic longitudes 65°, 80°, 260°, 280° beyond 1 kpc caused by dense dust clouds. The distribution of C-star color indices was investigated. A list of potential carbon stars was created. Spectral investigations of potential carbon stars with the Baldone Schmidt telescope equipped with a 4° objective prism was completed for δ>60° and now continues in the 55°<δ<60° zone. Our analysis of low-resolution spectra of 191 carbon stars shows that it is possible to determine effective temperatures of C stars with an accuracy of ± 350 K.

  6. SUBMILLIMETER OBSERVATIONS OF DENSE CLUMPS IN THE INFRARED DARK CLOUD G049.40-00.01

    SciTech Connect

    Kang, Miju; Choi, Minho; Bieging, John H.; Rho, Jeonghee; Tsai, Chao-Wei

    2011-12-20

    We obtained 350 and 850 {mu}m continuum maps of the infrared dark cloud G049.40-00.01. Twenty-one dense clumps were identified within G049.40-00.01 based on the 350 {mu}m continuum map with an angular resolution of about 9.''6. We present submillimeter continuum maps and report physical properties of the clumps. The masses of clumps range from 50 to 600 M{sub Sun }. About 70% of the clumps are associated with bright 24 {mu}m emission sources, and they may contain protostars. The two most massive clumps show extended, enhanced 4.5 {mu}m emission indicating vigorous star-forming activity. The clump-size-mass distribution suggests that many of them are forming high-mass stars. G049.40-00.01 contains numerous objects in various evolutionary stages of star formation, from pre-protostellar clumps to H II regions.

  7. Christmas star.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biała, J.

    There are continuous attempts to identify the legendary Christmas Star with a real astronomical event accompanying the birth of Jesus from Nazareth. Unfortunately, the date of birth is difficult to establish on the basis of historical records with better accuracy than a few years. During that period a number of peculiar astronomical events were observed and it seem to be impossible to identify the right one unambiguously.

  8. The role of interstellar filaments in shaping the IMF and regulating star formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    André, P.; Könyves, V.; Roy, A.

    2016-05-01

    We summarize the star formation scenario favored by Herschel studies of the nearest molecular clouds of the Galaxy which point to the key role of the quasi-universal filamentary structure pervading the cold ISM. This scenario provides new insight into the origin of the initial mass function and the regulation of star formation in dense gas.

  9. Symbiotic Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Munari, U.

    2012-06-01

    Symbiotic stars are interacting binary systems composed of a white dwarf (WD) accreting at high rate from a cool giant companion, which frequently fills its Roche lobe. The WD usually is extremely hot and luminous, and able to ionize a sizeable fraction of the cool giant wind, because it is believed the WD undergoes stable hydrogen nuclear burning on its surface of the material accreted from the companion. This leads to consider symbiotic stars as good candidates for the yet-to-be-identified progenitors of type Ia supernovae. Symbiotic stars display the simultaneous presence of many different types of variability, induced by the cool giant, the accreting WD, the circumstellar dust and ionized gas, with time scales ranging from seconds to decades. The long orbital periods (typically a couple of years) and complex outburst patterns, lasting from a few years to a century, make observations from professionals almost impossible to carry out, and open great opportunities to amateur astronomers to contribute fundamental data to science.

  10. Exceptional Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kulkarni, S. R.; Hansen, B.; van Kerkwijk, M.; Phinney, E. S.

    2005-12-01

    As part of our Interdisciplinary Scientist effort (PI, Kulkarni) for the Space Interferometry Mission (SIM) we proposed an investigation with SIM of a number of exceptional stars. With SIM we plan to observe dozens of nearby white dwarfs and search for planets surviving the evolution away from the main sequence as well as (newly formed) planets formed in the circumbinary disks of post-AGB binaries or as a result of white dwarf mergers. We propose to measure the proper motion of a sample of X-ray binaries and Be star binaries with the view of understanding the originof high latitude objects and inferring natal kicks and pre-supernova orbits. We plan to observe several compact object binaries to determine the mass of the compact star. Of particular importance is the proposed observation of SS 433 (for which we propose to use the spectrometer on SIM to measure the proper motion of the emission line clumps embedded in the relativistic jets). Separately we are investigating the issue of frame tie between SIM and the ecliptic frame (by observing binary millisecond pulsars with SIM; the position of these objects is very well determined by pulsar timing) and the degree to which highly precise visibility amplitude measurements can be inverted to infer binary parameters.

  11. Variational Theory of Hot Dense Matter

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mukherjee, Abhishek

    2009-01-01

    We develop a variational theory of hot nuclear matter in neutron stars and supernovae. It can also be used to study charged, hot nuclear matter which may be produced in heavy-ion collisions. This theory is a generalization of the variational theory of cold nuclear and neutron star matter based on realistic models of nuclear forces and pair…

  12. Unexplained Brightening of Unusual Star

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1997-01-01

    Recent observations with the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) have documented an unexpected and rapid, seven-fold brightening of an unusual double star at the centre of the impressive 47 Tucanae globular cluster in the southern sky. This is the first HST observation of such a rare phenomenon. The astronomers [1] who are involved in this observational program find that this event cannot be explained by any of the common processes known to occur in such stars. The cores of globular clusters Globular clusters are like huge swarms of stars, containing about one million suns, which move around in their common gravitational field. Most galaxies contain globular clusters; around 150 are known within the confines of our Galaxy, the Milky Way. Globular clusters change with time. In particular, at some stage in the life of a globular cluster, its central region will contract whereby the stars there move closer to each other. This phenomenon is referred to as core collapse [2]. Observations with the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) have revealed enormous central densities of the order of 30,000 stars per cubic light-year in clusters with fully collapsed cores; this is to be compared with the stellar density in the solar neighborhood of only 0.003 stars per cubic light-year [3]. Binary stars in globular clusters Binary (i.e., double) stars play an important role in the evolution of globular clusters: they can delay, halt, or even reverse the process of core collapse. In this dense stellar environment, close encounters between passing stars and binaries are relatively frequent. Such events may leave the binary stars more tightly bound, and at the same time speed up the motion of the stars involved, thereby counteracting the contraction of the core. The same close stellar encounters may also produce a diverse progeny of exotic objects. The centers of globular clusters contain blue stragglers (stars that ``look'' younger than they really are), millisecond pulsars (rapidly rotating, very

  13. Relativistic simulations of eccentric binary neutron star mergers: One-arm spiral instability and effects of neutron star spin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    East, William E.; Paschalidis, Vasileios; Pretorius, Frans; Shapiro, Stuart L.

    2016-01-01

    We perform general-relativistic hydrodynamical simulations of dynamical capture binary neutron star mergers, emphasizing the role played by the neutron star spin. Dynamical capture mergers may take place in globular clusters, as well as other dense stellar systems, where most neutron stars have large spins. We find significant variability in the merger outcome as a function of initial neutron star spin. For cases where the spin is aligned with the orbital angular momentum, the additional centrifugal support in the remnant hypermassive neutron star can prevent the prompt collapse to a black hole, while for antialigned cases the decreased total angular momentum can facilitate the collapse to a black hole. We show that even moderate spins can significantly increase the amount of ejected material, including the amount unbound with velocities greater than half the speed of light, leading to brighter electromagnetic signatures associated with kilonovae and interaction of the ejecta with the interstellar medium. Furthermore, we find that the initial neutron star spin can strongly affect the already rich phenomenology in the postmerger gravitational wave signatures that arise from the oscillation modes of the hypermassive neutron star. In several of our simulations, the resulting hypermassive neutron star develops the one-arm (m =1 ) spiral instability, the most pronounced cases being those with small but non-negligible neutron star spins. For long-lived hypermassive neutron stars, the presence of this instability leads to improved prospects for detecting these events through gravitational waves, and thus may give information about the neutron star equation of state.

  14. Characterizing star cluster formation with WISE: 652 newly found star clusters and candidates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Camargo, D.; Bica, E.; Bonatto, C.

    2016-01-01

    We report the discovery of 652 star clusters, stellar groups and candidates in the Milky Way with Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE). Most of the objects are projected close to Galactic plane and are embedded clusters. The present sample complements a similar study (Paper I) which provided 437 star clusters and alike. We find evidence that star formation processes span a wide range of sizes, from populous dense clusters to small compact embedded ones, sparse stellar groups or in relative isolation. The present list indicates multiple stellar generations during the embedded phase, with giant molecular clouds collapsing into several clumps composing an embedded cluster aggregate. We investigate the field star decontaminated colour-magnitude diagrams and radial density profiles of nine cluster candidates in the list, and derive their parameters, confirming them as embedded clusters.

  15. Antimocrobial Polymer

    DOEpatents

    McDonald, William F.; Huang, Zhi-Heng; Wright, Stacy C.

    2005-09-06

    A polymeric composition having antimicrobial properties and a process for rendering the surface of a substrate antimicrobial are disclosed. The composition comprises a crosslinked chemical combination of (i) a polymer having amino group-containing side chains along a backbone forming the polymer, (ii) an antimicrobial agent selected from quaternary ammonium compounds, gentian violet compounds, substituted or unsubstituted phenols, biguanide compounds, iodine compounds, and mixtures thereof, and (iii) a crosslinking agent containing functional groups capable of reacting with the amino groups. In one embodiment, the polymer is a polyamide formed from a maleic anhydride or maleic acid ester monomer and alkylamines thereby producing a polyamide having amino substituted alkyl chains on one side of the polyamide backbone; the crosslinking agent is a phosphine having the general formula (A)3P wherein A is hydroxyalkyl; and the antimicrobial agent is chlorhexidine, dimethylchlorophenol, cetyl pyridinium chloride, gentian violet, triclosan, thymol, iodine, and mixtures thereof.

  16. Antimicrobial Polymer

    DOEpatents

    McDonald, William F.; Wright, Stacy C.; Taylor, Andrew C.

    2004-09-28

    A polymeric composition having antimicrobial properties and a process for rendering the surface of a substrate antimicrobial are disclosed. The polymeric composition comprises a crosslinked chemical combination of (i) a polymer having amino group-containing side chains along a backbone forming the polymer, (ii) an antimicrobial agent selected from metals, metal alloys, metal salts, metal complexes and mixtures thereof, and (iii) a crosslinking agent containing functional groups capable of reacting with the amino groups. In one example embodiment, the polymer is a polyamide formed from a maleic anhydride or maleic acid ester monomer and alkylamines thereby producing a polyamide having amino substituted alkyl chains on one side of the polyamide backbone; the crosslinking agent is a phosphine having the general formula (A).sub.3 P wherein A is hydroxyalkyl; and the metallic antimicrobial agent is selected from chelated silver ions, silver metal, chelated copper ions, copper metal, chelated zinc ions, zinc metal and mixtures thereof.

  17. Polymer inflation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hassan, Syed Moeez; Husain, Viqar; Seahra, Sanjeev S.

    2015-03-01

    We consider the semiclassical dynamics of a free massive scalar field in a homogeneous and isotropic cosmological spacetime. The scalar field is quantized using the polymer quantization method assuming that it is described by a Gaussian coherent state. For quadratic potentials, the semiclassical equations of motion yield a universe that has an early "polymer inflation" phase which is generic and almost exactly de Sitter, followed by an epoch of slow-roll inflation. We compute polymer corrections to the slow-roll formalism, and discuss the probability of inflation in this model using a physical Hamiltonian arising from time gauge fixing. We also show how in this model, it is possible to obtain a significant amount of slow-roll inflation from sub-Planckian initial data, hence circumventing some of the criticisms of standard scenarios. These results show the extent to which a quantum gravity motivated quantization method affects early universe dynamics.

  18. Star-Shaped Polyacrylates: Highly Functionalized Architectures via CuAAC Click Conjugation.

    PubMed

    Lammens, Mieke; Fournier, David; Fijten, Martin W M; Hoogenboom, Richard; Prez, Filip Du

    2009-12-01

    Well-defined functional star-shaped polymer structures with up to 29 arms have been successfully synthesized by the combination of atom transfer radical polymerization (ATRP) and click chemistry. First, azide end-functionalized poly(isobornyl acrylate) (PiBA) star-shaped polymers were prepared by successive ATRP and bromine substitution. Subsequently, alkyne end-functionalized molecules and polymers were introduced onto the star-shaped PiBA bearing pendant azide moieties by copper-catalyzed azide-alkyne cycloaddition (CuAAC). The possibilities and limits for the CuAAC on such highly branched polyacrylates are described. PMID:21638494

  19. Star ratings. Stars of wonder.

    PubMed

    Dawes, David

    2002-09-12

    Analysis of trusts that changed their star-rating over the past two years indicates that a change of chief executive was not a significant factor. The length of time in post and the experience of the chief executive were also insignificant. This has serious implications for the theory behind franchising and the evaluation of franchised trusts. Holding chief executives to account for the organisation's performance within their first 12 months is unlikely to be effective. PMID:12357738

  20. Mixed-ionic and electronic conductivity in polymers

    SciTech Connect

    Ratner, M.A.; Shriver, D.F.

    1991-01-01

    The aim in this portion of the research is to prepare new electroactive films with high ion mobility, and to characterize the transport properties of these materials. The classic conducting polymers, polyacetylene, polythiophene, and polypyrrole have dense structures that prevent rapid redox switching because of the low diffusivity of ions. The objective is to modify the last two polymers with pendant polyethers, which should greatly improve ion transport.

  1. The Evolution of Massive Stars: a Selection of Facts and Questions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vanbeveren, D.

    In the present paper we discuss a selection of facts and questions related to observations and evolutionary calculations of massive single stars and massive stars in interacting binaries. We focus on the surface chemical abundances, the role of stellar winds, the early Be-stars, the high mass X-ray binaries and the effects of rotation on stellar evolution. Finally, we present an unconventionally formed object scenario (UFO-scenario) of WR binaries in dense stellar environments.

  2. Gluon Vortices and Induced Magnetic Field in Compact Stars

    SciTech Connect

    Ferrer, Efrain J.

    2007-10-26

    The natural candidates for the realization of color superconductivity are the extremely dense cores of compact stars, many of which have very large magnetic fields, especially the so called magnetars. In this paper we discuss how a color superconducting core can serve to generate and enhance the stellar magnetic field without appealing to a magnetohydrodynamic dynamo mechanism.

  3. Anisotropic stars with non-static conformal symmetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shee, Dibyendu; Rahaman, Farook; Guha, B. K.; Ray, Saibal

    2016-05-01

    We propose a model for relativistic compact star with anisotropy and analytically obtain exact spherically symmetric solutions which describe interior of the dense star admitting non-static conformal symmetry. Several features of the solutions, including drawbacks of the model, have been explored and discussed. For this purpose we have provided the energy conditions, TOV equation and other physical requirements and thus thoroughly have investigated stability, mass-radius relation and surface redshift of the model. It is observed that most of the features are well matched with the compact strange stars.

  4. Star-forming Substructure within Molecular Clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Di Francesco, James

    2013-03-01

    Wide-field far-infrared/submillimeter continuum maps of molecular clouds by the Herschel Space Observatory GBS and HOBYS surveys are revealing the star-forming substructures that lead to star formation in dense gas. In particular, these maps have revealed the central role in clouds of filaments, likely formed through turbulent motions. These filaments appear to be non-isothermal and fragment into cores only when their column densities exceed a stability threshold. Organizations of filament networks suggest the relative role of turbulence and gravity can be traced in different parts of a cloud, and filament intersections may lead to larger amounts of mass flow that form the precursors of high-mass stars or clusters.

  5. Detecting modified gravity in the stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakstein, Jeremy; Jain, Bhuvnesh; Vikram, Vinu

    2014-07-01

    Modified theories of gravity have received a renewed interest due to their ability to account for the cosmic acceleration. In order to satisfy the solar system tests of gravity, these theories need to include a screening mechanism that hides the modifications on small scales. One popular and well-studied theory is chameleon gravity. Our own galaxy is necessarily screened, but less dense dwarf galaxies may be unscreened and their constituent stars can exhibit novel features. In particular, unscreened stars are brighter, hotter and more ephemeral than screened stars in our own galaxy. They also pulsate with a shorter period. In this paper, we exploit these new features to constrain chameleon gravity to level three orders of magnitude lower the previous measurements. These constraints are currently the strongest in the literature.

  6. Coalescence preference in densely packed microbubbles

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Yeseul; Lim, Su Jin; Gim, Bopil; Weon, Byung Mook

    2015-01-13

    A bubble merged from two parent bubbles with different size tends to be placed closer to the larger parent. This phenomenon is known as the coalescence preference. Here we demonstrate that the coalescence preference can be blocked inside a densely packed cluster of bubbles. We utilized high-speed high-resolution X-ray microscopy to clearly visualize individual coalescence events inside densely packed microbubbles with a local packing fraction of ~40%. Thus, the surface energy release theory predicts an exponent of 5 in a relation between the relative coalescence position and the parent size ratio, whereas our observation for coalescence in densely packed microbubbles shows a different exponent of 2. We believe that this result would be important to understand the reality of coalescence dynamics in a variety of packing situations of soft matter.

  7. Coalescence preference in densely packed microbubbles

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Kim, Yeseul; Lim, Su Jin; Gim, Bopil; Weon, Byung Mook

    2015-01-13

    A bubble merged from two parent bubbles with different size tends to be placed closer to the larger parent. This phenomenon is known as the coalescence preference. Here we demonstrate that the coalescence preference can be blocked inside a densely packed cluster of bubbles. We utilized high-speed high-resolution X-ray microscopy to clearly visualize individual coalescence events inside densely packed microbubbles with a local packing fraction of ~40%. Thus, the surface energy release theory predicts an exponent of 5 in a relation between the relative coalescence position and the parent size ratio, whereas our observation for coalescence in densely packed microbubblesmore » shows a different exponent of 2. We believe that this result would be important to understand the reality of coalescence dynamics in a variety of packing situations of soft matter.« less

  8. Supplemental screening sonography in dense breasts.

    PubMed

    Berg, Wendie A

    2004-09-01

    In single-center trials across 42,838 examinations, 150 (0.35%) cancers were identified only sonographically in average-risk women. Over 90% of the 126 women with sonographically depicted cancers had dense or heterogeneously dense parenchyma. Of the 150 cancers, 141 (94%) were invasive, with a mean size of 9 to 11 mm across the series. Over 90% were node-negative. A3-year multicenter trial of screening sonography in high-risk women, blinded to the results of mammography, opened for enrollment April 2004,funded by the Avon Foundation and National Cancer Institute through the American College of Radiology Imaging Network (ACRIN Protocol 6666). If the trial is successful,the results will provide a rational basis for supplemental screening sonography in women with dense breasts. PMID:15337420

  9. [Metabolic syndrome and small dense LDL].

    PubMed

    Yoshino, Gen

    2006-12-01

    Due to the recent westernization of our lifestyle, it is speculated that the prevalence of metabolic syndrome in the young generation will increase in Japan. Different from Western populations, because of our lifestyle as "farmers" from ancient times, excess energy has been stored outside of the body, and the accumulation of visceral fat might have serious adverse effects on glucose and lipid metabolism. Therefore, we must carefully diagnose and treat patients with metabolic syndrome, which is diagnosed based on the existence of visceral obesity. On the other hand, much attention has been paid recently to the atherogenicity of small dense LDL. In this chapter I will introduce a newly established method for estimating the plasma concentration of small dense LDL-cholesterol. Furthermore, the relationship between subclinical atherosclerosis and small dense LDL in metabolic syndrome will be discussed. PMID:17265899

  10. Coalescence preference in densely packed microbubbles

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Yeseul; Lim, Su Jin; Gim, Bopil; Weon, Byung Mook

    2015-01-01

    A bubble merged from two parent bubbles with different size tends to be placed closer to the larger parent. This phenomenon is known as the coalescence preference. Here we demonstrate that the coalescence preference can be blocked inside a densely packed cluster of bubbles. We utilized high-speed high-resolution X-ray microscopy to clearly visualize individual coalescence events inside densely packed microbubbles with a local packing fraction of ~40%. The surface energy release theory predicts an exponent of 5 in a relation between the relative coalescence position and the parent size ratio, whereas our observation for coalescence in densely packed microbubbles shows a different exponent of 2. We believe that this result would be important to understand the reality of coalescence dynamics in a variety of packing situations of soft matter. PMID:25583640

  11. Binary stars.

    PubMed

    Paczynacuteski, B

    1984-07-20

    Most stars in the solar neighborhood are either double or multiple systems. They provide a unique opportunity to measure stellar masses and radii and to study many interesting and important phenomena. The best candidates for black holes are compact massive components of two x-ray binaries: Cygnus X-1 and LMC X-3. The binary radio pulsar PSR 1913 + 16 provides the best available evidence for gravitational radiation. Accretion disks and jets observed in close binaries offer a very good testing ground for models of active galactic nuclei and quasars. PMID:17749544

  12. STAR heavy flavor tracker

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiu, Hao

    2014-11-01

    Hadrons containing heavy quarks are a clean probe of the early dynamic evolution of the dense and hot medium created in high-energy nuclear collisions. To explore heavy quark production at RHIC, the Heavy Flavor Tracker (HFT) for the STAR experiment was built and installed in time for RHIC Run 14. The HFT consists of four layers of silicon detectors. The two outermost layers are silicon strip detectors and the two innermost layers are made from state-of-the-art ultra-thin CMOS Monolithic Active Pixel Sensors (MAPS). This is the first application of a CMOS MAPS detector in a collider experiment. The use of thin pixel sensors plus the use of carbon fiber supporting material limits the material budget to be only 0.4% radiation length per pixel detector layer, enabling the reconstruction of low pT heavy flavor hadrons. The status and performance of the HFT in the RHIC 200 GeV Au + Au run in 2014 are reported. Very good detector efficiency, hit residuals and track resolution (DCAs) were observed in the cosmic ray data and in the Au + Au data.

  13. Shaping the outflows of evolved stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohamed, Shazrene

    2015-08-01

    Both hot and cool evolved stars, e.g., red (super)giants and Wolf-Rayet stars, lose copious amounts of mass, momentum and mechanical energy through powerful, dense stellar winds. The interaction of these outflows with their surroundings results in highly structured and complex circumstellar environments, often featuring knots, arcs, shells and spirals. Recent improvements in computational power and techniques have led to the development of detailed, multi-dimensional simulations that have given new insight into the origin of these structures, and better understanding of the physical mechanisms driving their formation. In this talk, I will discuss three of the main mechanisms that shape the outflows of evolved stars:- interaction with the interstellar medium (ISM), i.e., wind-ISM interactions- interaction with a stellar wind, either from a previous phase of evolution or the wind from a companion star, i.e., wind-wind interactions- and interaction with a companion star that has a weak or insignicant outflow (e.g., a compact companion such as a neutron star or black hole), i.e., wind-companion interactions.I will also highlight the broader implications and impact of these stellar wind interactions for other phenomena, e.g, for symbiotic and X-ray binaries, supernovae and Gamma-ray bursts.

  14. An overview of STAR experimental results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Nu

    2014-11-01

    With large acceptance and excellent particle identification, STAR is one of the best mid-rapidity collider experiments for studying high-energy nuclear collisions. The STAR experiment provides full information on initial conditions, properties of the hot and dense medium as well as the properties at freeze-out. In Au+Au collisions at √{sNN} = 200 GeV, STAR's focus is on the nature of the sQGP produced at RHIC. In order to explore the properties of the QCD phase diagram, since 2010, the experiment has collected sizable data sets of Au+Au collisions at the lower collision energy region where the net-baryon density is large. At the 2014 Quark Matter Conference, the STAR experiment made 16 presentations that cover physics topics including collective dynamics, electromagnetic probes, heavy-flavor, initial state physics, jets, QCD phase diagram, thermodynamics and hadron chemistry, and future experimental facilities, upgrades, and instrumentation[1]. In this overview we will highlight a few results from the STAR experiment, especially those from the recent measurements of the RHIC beam energy scan program. At the end, instead of a summary, we will discuss STAR's near future physics programs at RHIC.

  15. How Galactic Environment Regulates Star Formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meidt, Sharon E.

    2016-02-01

    In a new simple model I reconcile two contradictory views on the factors that determine the rate at which molecular clouds form stars—internal structure versus external, environmental influences—providing a unified picture for the regulation of star formation in galaxies. In the presence of external pressure, the pressure gradient set up within a self-gravitating turbulent (isothermal) cloud leads to a non-uniform density distribution. Thus the local environment of a cloud influences its internal structure. In the simple equilibrium model, the fraction of gas at high density in the cloud interior is determined simply by the cloud surface density, which is itself inherited from the pressure in the immediate surroundings. This idea is tested using measurements of the properties of local clouds, which are found to show remarkable agreement with the simple equilibrium model. The model also naturally predicts the star formation relation observed on cloud scales and at the same time provides a mapping between this relation and the closer-to-linear molecular star formation relation measured on larger scales in galaxies. The key is that pressure regulates not only the molecular content of the ISM but also the cloud surface density. I provide a straightforward prescription for the pressure regulation of star formation that can be directly implemented in numerical models. Predictions for the dense gas fraction and star formation efficiency measured on large-scales within galaxies are also presented, establishing the basis for a new picture of star formation regulated by galactic environment.

  16. Eutactic star closest to a given star

    SciTech Connect

    Gomez, A.; Torres, M.; Aragon, J. L.

    2007-05-15

    A eutactic star is a set of M vectors in R{sup n} (M>n) that are projections of M orthogonal vectors in R{sup M}. Eutactic stars have remarkable properties that have been exploited in several fields such as crystallography, graph theory, wavelets, and quantum measurement theory. In this work we show that given an arbitrary star of vectors, there exists a closest eutactic star in the Frobenius norm. An algorithm for calculating this star is presented. Additionally, the distance between both stars provides a new measure of eutacticity.

  17. Polymer solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Krawczyk, Gerhard Erich; Miller, Kevin Michael

    2011-07-26

    There is provided a method of making a polymer solution comprising polymerizing one or more monomer in a solvent, wherein said monomer comprises one or more ethylenically unsaturated monomer that is a multi-functional Michael donor, and wherein said solvent comprises 40% or more by weight, based on the weight of said solvent, one or more multi-functional Michael donor.

  18. Polymer Science.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Frank, Curtis W.

    1979-01-01

    Described is a series of four graduate level courses in polymer science, offered or currently in preparation, at Stanford University. Course descriptions and a list of required and recommended texts are included. Detailed course outlines for two of the courses are presented. (BT)

  19. Functional polymers

    SciTech Connect

    Wegner, G.

    2000-01-01

    Improving the existing polymer materials and the designing of model polymers need fundamental insights into the structure and dynamics over a large range of length and time scales. Consequently, a host of quite different methods needs to be applied to gain insights into the molecular and supramolecular structures and interactions that determine the performance of these materials. Supramolecular structures derived from shape persistent (stiff) macromolecules are used as examples to demonstrate the correlation between chemical structure, order phenomena and performance in applications concerning advanced or developing technologies: organic light emitting diodes (OLEDs) and separator membranes in lithium based batteries and fuel cells. Polymers are also important as additives in the manufacture and the processing of other materials. The design of block copolymers to control the nucleation and growth of inorganic particles precipitating from aqueous solutions (mineralization) is discussed as well as the use of block copolymers to optimize the processing of ceramic pieces and objects. Finally, the modification of surfaces by polymers including aspects of biocompatibility is discussed. Some remarks concerning the importance of recent developments and advances in synthesis of macromolecular materials are also given.

  20. Rotational Velocities of B Stars in the Outer Galactic Disk

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garmany, Catharine D.; Glaspey, J. W.; Bensby, T.; Daflon, S.; Cunha, K.; Oey, M. S.; Wolff, S. C.

    2010-01-01

    Metallicity gradients in the Milky Way disk are important constraints to models of chemical evolution and galaxy formation. As part of a long term project to better constrain the galactic metallicity gradient (Daflon & Cunha) we have obtained spectra of early B stars in the outer disk with the Magellan 6.5m (Clay) and MIKE double echelle spectrograph. We present herein a preliminary analysis of the projected rotational velocities (v sin i), for 150 early B stars in the third galactic quadrant. The stars were selected from the Case-Hamburg Catalog of Luminous Stars (Reed, 2005). Distances have been computed from the reddening-free Q parameter and published Mv values. We use the spectral type information in the catalog to further refine distances of the non-main sequence B stars in our sample. We have followed the method described by Daflon et al (2007) to estimate v sin i for these stars from their He I lines. These stars are primarily field B stars, with galactocentric distances between 8 and 16 kpc, and most of them lie outside dense clusters and associations. Our analysis will address two questions: 1) Is there any evidence for a difference in mean rotation rate as a function of galactocentric distance and/or metallicity; and 2) Do these stars have on average low rotation rates, as seem to characterize stars in the field and in expanding associations near the Sun (Wolff, et al. 2007).

  1. Dense packing: surgical indications and technical considerations.

    PubMed

    Farjo, Bessam; Farjo, Nilofer

    2013-08-01

    Dense packing is the philosophy of fitting more than 30 to 35 follicular unit grafts per square centimeter in one operation. The aim is to produce a more even, consistent, and natural looking flow of hair after just one procedure. Although desirable in principle, not all patients are suitable candidates nor is it possible to achieve in certain patients (eg, coarse or curly hair). Patients who have sufficient donor availability, reasonably stable hair loss, and high hair-to-skin color ratios are the ideal candidates. The authors highlight their philosophies and strategies for dense packing. PMID:24017984

  2. Magnetic fields and massive star formation

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Qizhou; Keto, Eric; Ho, Paul T. P.; Ching, Tao-Chung; Chen, How-Huan; Qiu, Keping; Girart, Josep M.; Juárez, Carmen; Liu, Hauyu; Tang, Ya-Wen; Koch, Patrick M.; Rao, Ramprasad; Lai, Shih-Ping; Li, Zhi-Yun; Frau, Pau; Li, Hua-Bai; Padovani, Marco; Bontemps, Sylvain

    2014-09-10

    Massive stars (M > 8 M {sub ☉}) typically form in parsec-scale molecular clumps that collapse and fragment, leading to the birth of a cluster of stellar objects. We investigate the role of magnetic fields in this process through dust polarization at 870 μm obtained with the Submillimeter Array (SMA). The SMA observations reveal polarization at scales of ≲0.1 pc. The polarization pattern in these objects ranges from ordered hour-glass configurations to more chaotic distributions. By comparing the SMA data with the single dish data at parsec scales, we found that magnetic fields at dense core scales are either aligned within 40° of or perpendicular to the parsec-scale magnetic fields. This finding indicates that magnetic fields play an important role during the collapse and fragmentation of massive molecular clumps and the formation of dense cores. We further compare magnetic fields in dense cores with the major axis of molecular outflows. Despite a limited number of outflows, we found that the outflow axis appears to be randomly oriented with respect to the magnetic field in the core. This result suggests that at the scale of accretion disks (≲ 10{sup 3} AU), angular momentum and dynamic interactions possibly due to close binary or multiple systems dominate over magnetic fields. With this unprecedentedly large sample of massive clumps, we argue on a statistical basis that magnetic fields play an important role during the formation of dense cores at spatial scales of 0.01-0.1 pc in the context of massive star and cluster star formation.

  3. HUBBLE CAPTURES THE HEART OF STAR BIRTH

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    about 35,000 light-years across. The right-hand image, taken by WFPC2, provides a closer look at the flurry of star birth at the galaxy's core. The star clusters (blue) can be seen (and many more are likely obscured) amid thick lanes of gas and dust. This image shows that stars are often born in compact clusters within star bursts, and that dense gas and dust heavily obscures the star burst region. The brightest knot of star birth seen here is probably a giant cluster of stars, about 100 light-years in diameter, at the very center of the galaxy. The other star clusters are about 10 to 50 light-years in diameter. The entire star burst region shown here is about 3,000 light-years across. This galaxy is about 40 million light-years away in the southern constellation Columba. The observation was taken Aug. 14, 1997, and was the last of 13 Hubble Space Telescope amateur programs. Credits: Jim Flood, an amateur astronomer affiliated with Sperry Observatory at Union College in New Jersey, and Max Mutchler, a member of the Space Telescope Science Institute staff who volunteered to work with Jim.

  4. Method of Preparing Polymers with Low Melt Viscosity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jensen, Brian J. (Inventor)

    2001-01-01

    This invention is an improvement in standard polymerizations procedures, i.e., addition-type and step-growth type polymerizations, wherein monomers are reacted to form a growing polymer chain. The improvement includes employing an effective amount of a trifunctional monomer (such as a trifunctional amine anhydride, or phenol) in the polymerization procedure to form a mixture of polymeric materials consisting of branced polymers, star-shaped polymers, and linear polymers. This mixture of polymeric materials has a lower melt temperature and a lower melt viscosity than corresponding linear polymeric materials of equivalent molecular weight.

  5. Effective Field Theories for Hot and Dense Matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blaschke, D.

    2010-10-01

    The lecture is divided in two parts. The first one deals with an introduction to the physics of hot, dense many-particle systems in quantum field theory [1, 2]. The basics of the path integral approach to the partition function are explained for the example of chiral quark models. The QCD phase diagram is discussed in the meanfield approximation while QCD bound states in the medium are treated in the rainbow-ladder approximation (Gaussian fluctuations). Special emphasis is devoted to the discussion of the Mott effect, i.e. the transition of bound states to unbound, but resonant scattering states in the continnum under the influence of compression and heating of the system. Three examples are given: (1) the QCD model phase diagram with chiral symmetry ¨ restoration and color superconductivity [3], (2) the Schrodinger equation for heavy-quarkonia [4], and (2) Pions [5] as well as Kaons and D-mesons in the finite-temperature Bethe-Salpeter equation [6]. We discuss recent applications of this quantum field theoretical approach to hot and dense quark matter for a description of anomalous J/ψ supression in heavy-ion collisions [7] and for the structure and cooling of compact stars with quark matter interiors [8]. The second part provides a detailed introduction to the Polyakov-loop Nambu-Jona-Lasinio model [9] for thermodynamics and mesonic correlations [10] in the phase diagram of quark matter. Important relationships of low-energy QCD like the Gell-Mann-Oakes-Renner relation are generalized to finite temperatures. The effect of including the coupling to the Polyakov-loop potential on the phase diagram and mesonic correlations is discussed. An outlook is given to effects of nonlocality of the interactions [11] and of mesonic correlations in the medium [12] which go beyond the meanfield description.

  6. Star formation - An overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Evans, N. J., II

    1985-01-01

    Methods for studying star formation are reviewed. Stellar clusters and associations, as well as field stars, provide a fossil record of the star formation process. Regions of current star formation provide a series of snapshots of different epochs of star formation. A simplified picture of individual star formation as it was envisioned in the late 1970s is contrasted with the results of recent observations, in particular the outflow phenomenon.

  7. Undercover Stars Among Exoplanet Candidates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2005-03-01

    is only 16% larger than this giant planet! A Dense Star "Imagine that you add 95 times its own mass to Jupiter and nevertheless end up with a star that is only slightly larger", suggests Claudio Melo from ESO and member of the team of astronomers who made the study. "The object just shrinks to make room for the additional matter, becoming more and more dense." The density of such a star is more than 50 times the density of the Sun. "This result shows the existence of stars that look strikingly like planets, even from close by", emphasizes Frederic Pont of the Geneva Observatory (Switzerland). "Isn't it strange to imagine that even if we were to receive images from a future space probe approaching such an object at close range, it wouldn't be easy to discern whether it is a star or a planet?" As all stars, OGLE-TR-122b produces indeed energy in its interior by means of nuclear reactions. However, because of its low mass, this internal energy production is very small, especially compared to the energy produced by its solar-like companion star. Not less striking is the fact that exoplanets which are orbiting very close to their host star, the so-called "hot Jupiters", have radii which may be larger than the newly found star. The radius of exoplanet HD209458b, for example, is about 30% larger than that of Jupiter. It is thus substantially larger than OGLE-TR-122b! Masqueraders ESO PR Photo 06c/05 ESO PR Photo 06c/05 Comparison Between OGLE-TR-122b, Jupiter and the Sun [Preview - JPEG: 400 x 598 pix - 30k] [Normal - JPEG: 800 x 1196 pix - 350k] [HiRes - JPEG: 5000 x 3344 pix - 2.2M] Caption: ESO PR Photo 06c/05 is a comparison between the newly found low-mass star OGLE-TR-122b and the Sun and Jupiter. OGLE-TR-122b, while still 96 times as massive as Jupiter, is only 16% larger than this giant planet. It weighs 1/11th the mass of the Sun and has 1/8th of its diameter. (credits: Sun image: SOHO/ESA; Jupiter: Cassini/NASA/JPL/University of Arizona/ESA) This discovery also

  8. Equation of state of neutron star matter, limiting, rotational periods of fast pulsars, and the properties of strange stars

    SciTech Connect

    Weber, F. |; Glendenning, N.K.

    1993-10-25

    In this paper the following items will be treated: The present status of dense nuclear matter calculations and constraints on the behavior of the associated equation of state at high densities from data on rapidly rotating pulsars. Recent finding of the likely existence of a mixed phase of baryons and quarks forming a coulomb lattice in the dense cores of neutron stars. Review of important findings of recently performed calculations of rapidly rotating compact stars. These are constructed in the framework of general relativity theory for a representative collection of realistic nuclear equations of state. Establish the minimum-possible rotational periods of gravitationally bound neutron stars and self-bound strange stars. Its knowledge is of fundamental importance for the decision between pulsars that can be understood as rotating neutron stars and those that cannot (signature of hypothetical self-bound matter of which strange stars are the likely stellar candidates. Investigate the properties of sequences of strange stars. Specifically, we answer the question whether such objects can give rise to the observed phenomena of pulsar glitches, which is at the present time the only astrophysical test of the strange-quark-matter hypothesis.

  9. The dense gas mass fraction of molecular clouds in the Milky Way

    SciTech Connect

    Battisti, Andrew J.; Heyer, Mark H. E-mail: heyer@astro.umass.edu

    2014-01-10

    The mass fraction of dense gas within giant molecular clouds (GMCs) of the Milky Way is investigated using {sup 13}CO data from the Five College Radio Astronomy Observatory Galactic Plane Surveys and the Bolocam Galactic Plane Survey (BGPS) of 1.1 mm dust continuum emission. A sample of 860 compact dust sources are selected from the BGPS catalog and kinematically linked to 344 clouds of extended (>3') {sup 13}CO J = 1-0 emission. Gas masses are tabulated for the full dust source and subregions within the dust sources with mass surface densities greater than 200 M {sub ☉} pc{sup –2}, which are assumed to be regions of enhanced volume density. Masses of the parent GMCs are calculated assuming optically thin {sup 13}CO J = 1-0 emission and local thermodynamic equilibrium conditions. The mean fractional mass of dust sources to host GMC mass is 0.11{sub −0.06}{sup +0.12}. The high column density subregions comprise 0.07{sub −0.05}{sup +0.13} of the mass of the cloud. Owing to our assumptions, these values are upper limits to the true mass fractions. The fractional mass of dense gas is independent of GMC mass and gas surface density. The low dense gas mass fraction suggests that the formation of dense structures within GMCs is the primary bottleneck for star formation. The distribution of velocity differences between the dense gas and the low density material along the line of sight is also examined. We find a strong, centrally peaked distribution centered on zero velocity displacement. This distribution of velocity differences is modeled with radially converging flows toward the dense gas position that are randomly oriented with respect to the observed line of sight. These models constrain the infall velocities to be 2-4 km s{sup –1} for various flow configurations.

  10. Star accretion onto supermassive black holes in axisymmetric galactic nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhong, Shiyan; Berczik, Peter; Spurzem, Rainer

    2016-02-01

    Tidal Disruption (TD) of stars by supermassive central black holes from dense rotating star clusters is modeled by high-accuracy direct N-body simulation. We study the time evolution of the stellar tidal disruption rate and the origin of tidally disrupted stars. Compared with that in spherical systems, we found a higher TD rate in axisymmetric systems. The enhancement can be explained by an enlarged loss-cone in phase space which is raised from the fact that total angular momentum J is not conserved. As in the case of spherical systems, the distribution of the last apocenter distance of tidally accreted stars peaks at the classical critical radius. However, the angular distribution of the origin of the accreted stars reveals bimodal features. We show that the bimodal structure can be explained by the presence of two families of regular orbits, namely short axis tube and saucer orbits.

  11. Data Characterization Using Artificial-Star Tests: Performance Evaluation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Yi; Deng, Licai; de Grijs, Richard; Liu, Qiang

    2011-01-01

    Traditional artificial-star tests are widely applied to photometry in crowded stellar fields. However, to obtain reliable binary fractions (and their uncertainties) of remote, dense, and rich star clusters, one needs to recover huge numbers of artificial stars. Hence, this will consume much computation time for data reduction of the images to which the artificial stars must be added. In this article, we present a new method applicable to data sets characterized by stable, well-defined, point-spread functions, in which we add artificial stars to the retrieved-data catalog instead of to the raw images. Taking the young Large Magellanic Cloud cluster NGC 1818 as an example, we compare results from both methods and show that they are equivalent, while our new method saves significant computational time.

  12. A Review in Mixed Chemistry of Low Mass Evolved Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guzman-Ramirez, L.

    2015-12-01

    During the late stages of their evolution, Sun-like stars bring the products of nuclear burning to the surface. Although there is a chemical dichotomy between oxygen-rich and carbon-rich evolved stars, the dredge-up itself has never been directly observed. In the last three decades, however, a few stars have been shown to display both carbon- and oxygen-rich material in their circumstellar envelopes. These phenomena is seen in both Galactic Disk and Bulge planetary nebulae. For the Galactic Disk objects the mixed chemistry phenomenon is best explained through a recent dredge-up of carbon produced by nucleosynthesis inside the star during the Asymptotic Giant Branch that changed the surface chemistry of the star. On the contrary, we conclude that the mixed chemistry phenomenon occurring in the Galactic Bulge planetary nebulae is best explained through hydrocarbon chemistry in an ultraviolet (UV)-irradiated, dense torus.

  13. What the Spatial Distribution of Stars tells us about Star Formation and Massive Cluster Formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bressert, Eli; Bastian, N.; Testi, L.; Patience, J.; Longmore, S.

    2012-01-01

    We present a dissertation study on two recent results regarding the clustering properties of young stars. First, we discuss a global study of young stellar object (YSO) surface densities in star forming regions based on a comprehensive collection of Spitzer Space Telescope surveys, which encompasses nearly all star formation in the solar neighbourhood. It is shown that the distribution of YSO surface densities is a smooth distribution, being adequately described by a lognormal function from a few to 103 YSOs pc-2, with a peak at 22 YSOs pc-2 and a dispersion of 0.85. We find no evidence for multiple discrete modes of star-formation (e.g. clustered and distributed) and that not all stars form in clusters. A Herschel Space Observatory study confirms the YSO surface density results by observing and analyzing the prestellar core population in several star forming regions. Secondly, we propose that bound stellar clusters primarily form from dense clouds having escape speeds greater than the sound speed in photo-ionized gas. A list of giant molecular clumps with masses >103 M⊙ that have escape speeds greater than the sound speed in photo-ionized plasma is compiled from the Bolocam Galactic Plane Survey. In these clumps, radiative feedback in the form of gas ionization is bottled up, enabling star formation to proceed to sufficiently high efficiency so that the resulting star cluster remains bound even after gas removal. We present over ten candidates that will most likely form >103 M⊙ star clusters and two of them that are comparable to NGC 3603 (>104 M⊙). Thus, providing us with an outlook on the next generation of star clusters in the Milky Way and clues to the initial conditions of massive cluster formation.

  14. Polymer Energy Rechargeable System Battery Being Developed

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Manzo, Michelle A.

    2003-01-01

    Long description. Illustrations of discotic liquid crystals, rod-coil polymers, lithium-ion conducting channel dilithium phthalocyanine (Li2Pc) from top and side, novel star polyethylene oxide structures, composite polyethylene oxide materials (showing polyethylene oxide + lithium salt, carbon atoms and oxygen atoms), homopolyrotaxanes, and diblock copolymers In fiscal year 2000, NASA established a program to develop the next generation, lithium-based, polymer electrolyte batteries for aerospace applications. The goal of this program, known as Polymer Energy Rechargeable Systems (PERS), is to develop a space-qualified, advanced battery system embodying polymer electrolyte and lithium-based electrode technologies and to establish world-class domestic manufacturing capabilities for advanced batteries with improved performance characteristics that address NASA s future aerospace battery requirements.

  15. Coalescence preference in dense packing of bubbles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Yeseul; Gim, Bopil; Gim, Bopil; Weon, Byung Mook

    2015-11-01

    Coalescence preference is the tendency that a merged bubble from the contact of two original bubbles (parent) tends to be near to the bigger parent. Here, we show that the coalescence preference can be blocked by densely packing of neighbor bubbles. We use high-speed high-resolution X-ray microscopy to clearly visualize individual coalescence phenomenon which occurs in micro scale seconds and inside dense packing of microbubbles with a local packing fraction of ~40%. Previous theory and experimental evidence predict a power of -5 between the relative coalescence position and the parent size. However, our new observation for coalescence preference in densely packed microbubbles shows a different power of -2. We believe that this result may be important to understand coalescence dynamics in dense packing of soft matter. This work (NRF-2013R1A22A04008115) was supported by Mid-career Researcher Program through NRF grant funded by the MEST and also was supported by Ministry of Science, ICT and Future Planning (2009-0082580) and by Basic Science Research Program through the National Research Foundation of Korea (NRF) funded by the Ministry and Education, Science and Technology (NRF-2012R1A6A3A04039257).

  16. Dense high temperature ceramic oxide superconductors

    DOEpatents

    Landingham, R.L.

    1993-10-12

    Dense superconducting ceramic oxide articles of manufacture and methods for producing these articles are described. Generally these articles are produced by first processing these superconducting oxides by ceramic processing techniques to optimize materials properties, followed by reestablishing the superconducting state in a desired portion of the ceramic oxide composite.

  17. Dense high temperature ceramic oxide superconductors

    DOEpatents

    Landingham, Richard L.

    1993-01-01

    Dense superconducting ceramic oxide articles of manufacture and methods for producing these articles are described. Generally these articles are produced by first processing these superconducting oxides by ceramic processing techniques to optimize materials properties, followed by reestablishing the superconducting state in a desired portion of the ceramic oxide composite.

  18. The Southern California Dense GPS Geodetic Array

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Webb, F.

    1994-01-01

    The Southern California Earthquake Center is coordinating a effort by scientists at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, the U.S. Geological Survey, and various academic institutions to establish a dense 250 station, continuously recording GPS geodetic array in southern California for measuring crustal deformation associated with slip on the numerous faults that underlie the major metropolitan areas of southern california.

  19. Preparation of a dense, polycrystalline ceramic structure

    DOEpatents

    Cooley, Jason; Chen, Ching-Fong; Alexander, David

    2010-12-07

    Ceramic nanopowder was sealed inside a metal container under a vacuum. The sealed evacuated container was forced through a severe deformation channel at an elevated temperature below the melting point of the ceramic nanopowder. The result was a dense nanocrystalline ceramic structure inside the metal container.

  20. DENSE NONAQUEOUS PHASE LIQUIDS -- A WORKSHOP SUMMARY

    EPA Science Inventory

    site characterization, and, therefore, DNAPL remediation, can be expected. Dense nonaqueous phase liquids (DNAPLs) in the subsurface are long-term sources of ground-water contamination, and may persist for centuries before dissolving completely in adjacent ground water. In respo...

  1. The role of low-mass star clusters in forming the massive stars in DR 21

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rivilla, V. M.; Jiménez-Serra, I.; Martín-Pintado, J.; Sanz-Forcada, J.

    2014-01-01

    We have studied the young low-mass pre-main sequence (PMS) stellar population associated with the massive star-forming region DR 21 by using archival X-ray Chandra observations and by complementing them with existing optical and infrared (IR) surveys. The Chandra observations have revealed for the first time a new highly extincted population of PMS low-mass stars previously missed in observations at other wavelengths. The X-ray population exhibits three main stellar density peaks, coincident with the massive star-forming regions, being the DR 21 core the main peak. The cross-correlated X-ray/IR sample exhibits a radial `Spokes-like' stellar filamentary structure that extends from the DR 21 core towards the northeast. The near-IR data reveal a centrally peaked structure for the extinction, which exhibits its maximum in the DR 21 core and gradually decreases with the distance to the N-S cloud axis and to the cluster centre. We find evidence of a global mass segregation in the full low-mass stellar cluster, and of a stellar age segregation, with the youngest stars still embedded in the N-S cloud, and more evolved stars more spatially distributed. The results are consistent with the scenario where an elongated overall potential well created by the full low-mass stellar cluster funnels gas through filaments feeding stellar formation. Besides the full gravitational well, smaller scale local potential wells created by dense stellar sub-clusters of low-mass stars are privileged in the competition for the gas of the common reservoir, allowing the formation of massive stars. We also discuss the possibility that a stellar collision in the very dense stellar cluster revealed by Chandra in the DR 21 core is the origin of the large-scale and highly energetic outflow arising from this region.

  2. Spitzer Digs Up Hidden Stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2007-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] 3-Panel Version Figure 1 [figure removed for brevity, see original site] [figure removed for brevity, see original site] [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Visible Light Figure 2 Infrared (IRAC) Figure 3 Combined Figure 4

    Two rambunctious young stars are destroying their natal dust cloud with powerful jets of radiation, in an infrared image from NASA's Spitzer Space Telescope.

    The stars are located approximately 600 light-years away in a cosmic cloud called BHR 71. In visible light (left panel), BHR 71 is just a large black structure. The burst of yellow light toward the bottom of the cloud is the only indication that stars might be forming inside. In infrared light (center panel), the baby stars are shown as the bright yellow smudges toward the center. Both of these yellow spots have wisps of green shooting out of them. The green wisps reveal the beginning of a jet. Like a rainbow, the jet begins as green, then transitions to orange, and red toward the end. The combined visible-light and infrared composite (right panel) shows that a young star's powerful jet is responsible for the rupture at the bottom of the dense cloud in the visible-light image. Astronomers know this because burst of light in the visible-light image overlaps exactly with a jet spouting-out of the left star, in the infrared image.

    The jets' changing colors reveal a cooling effect, and may suggest that the young stars are spouting out radiation in regular bursts. The green tints at the beginning of the jet reveal really hot hydrogen gas, the orange shows warm gas, and the reddish wisps at the end represent the coolest gas. The fact that gas toward the beginning of the jet is hotter than gas near the middle suggests that the stars must give off regular bursts of energy -- and the material closest to the star is being heated by shockwaves from a recent stellar outburst. Meanwhile, the tints of orange reveal gas that is

  3. Cosmic-ray ionisation of dense molecular clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vaupre, Solenn

    2015-07-01

    Cosmic rays (CR) are of tremendous importance in the dynamical and chemical evolution of interstellar molecular clouds, where stars and planets form. CRs are likely accelerated in the shells of supernova remnants (SNR), thus molecular clouds nearby can be irradiated by intense fluxes of CRs. CR protons have two major effects on dense molecular clouds: 1) when they encounter the dense medium, high-energy protons (>280 MeV) create pions that decay into gamma-rays. This process makes SNR-molecular cloud associations intense GeV and/or TeV sources whose spectra mimic the CR spectrum. 2) at lower energies, CRs penetrate the cloud and ionise the gas, leading to the formation of molecular species characteristic of the presence of CRs, called tracers of the ionisation. Studying these tracers gives information on low-energy CRs that are unaccessible to any other observations. I studied the CR ionisation of molecular clouds next to three SNRs: W28, W51C and W44. These SNRs are known to be interacting with the nearby clouds, from the presence of shocked gas, OH masers and pion-decay induced gamma-ray emission. My work includes millimeter observations and chemical modeling of tracers of the ionisation in these dense molecular clouds. In these three regions, we determined an enhanced CR ionisation rate, supporting the hypothesis of an origin of the CRs in the SNR nearby. The evolution of the CR ionisation rate with the distance to the SNR brings valuable constraints on the propagation properties of low-energy CRs. The method used relies on observations of the molecular ions HCO+ and DCO+, which shows crucial limitations at high ionisation. Therefore, I investigated, both through modeling and observations, the chemical abundances of several other species to try and identity alternative tracers of the ionisation. In particular, in the W44 region, observations of N2H+ bring additional constraints on the physical conditions, volatile abundances in the cloud, and the ionisation

  4. Thermal properties of hot and dense matter with finite range interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Constantinou, Constantinos; Muccioli, Brian; Prakash, Madappa; Lattimer, James M.

    2015-08-01

    We explore the thermal properties of hot and dense matter using a model that reproduces the empirical properties of isospin symmetric and asymmetric bulk nuclear matter, optical-model fits to nucleon-nucleus scattering data, heavy-ion flow data in the energy range 0.5-2 GeV/A , and the largest well-measured neutron star mass of 2 M⊙ . This model, which incorporates finite range interactions through a Yukawa-type finite range force, is contrasted with a conventional zero range Skyrme model. Both models predict nearly identical zero-temperature properties at all densities and proton fractions, including the neutron star maximum mass, but differ in their predictions for heavy-ion flow data. We contrast their predictions of thermal properties, including their specific heats, and provide analytical formulas for the strongly degenerate and nondegenerate limits. We find significant differences in the results of the two models for quantities that depend on the density derivatives of nucleon effective masses. We show that a constant value for the ratio of the thermal components of pressure and energy density expressed as Γth=1 +(Pth/ɛth) , often used in simulations of proto-neutron stars and merging compact object binaries, fails to adequately describe results of either nuclear model. The region of greatest discrepancy extends from subsaturation densities to a few times the saturation density of symmetric nuclear matter. Our results suggest alternate approximations for the thermal properties of dense matter that are more realistic.

  5. Hypernuclei and the Hyperon Problem in Neutron Stars

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Bedaque, Paulo

    2015-01-01

    The likely presence ofmore » $$\\Lambda$$ baryons in dense hadronic matter tends to soften the equation of state to an extend that the observed heaviest neutron stars are difficult to explain. We analyze this "hyperon problem" with a phenomenological approach. First, we review what can be learned about the interaction of $$\\Lambda$$ particle with dense matter from the observed hypernuclei and extend this phenomenological analysis to asymmetric matter. We add to this the current knowledge on non-strange dense matter, including its uncertainties, to conclude that the interaction between $$\\Lambda$$s and dense matter has to become repulsive at densities below three times the nuclear saturation density.« less

  6. STAR-FORMING GALAXY EVOLUTION IN NEARBY RICH CLUSTERS

    SciTech Connect

    Tyler, K. D.; Rieke, G. H.; Bai, L.

    2013-08-20

    Dense environments are known to quench star formation in galaxies, but it is still unknown what mechanism(s) are directly responsible. In this paper, we study the star formation of galaxies in A2029 and compare it to that of Coma, combining indicators at 24 {mu}m, H{alpha}, and UV down to rates of 0.03 M{sub Sun} yr{sup -1}. We show that A2029's star-forming galaxies follow the same mass-SFR relation as the field. The Coma cluster, on the other hand, has a population of galaxies with star formation rates (SFRs) significantly lower than the field mass-SFR relation, indicative of galaxies in the process of being quenched. Over half of these galaxies also host active galactic nuclei. Ram-pressure stripping and starvation/strangulation are the most likely mechanisms for suppressing the star formation in these galaxies, but we are unable to disentangle which is dominating. The differences we see between the two clusters' populations of star-forming galaxies may be related to their accretion histories, with A2029 having accreted its star-forming galaxies more recently than Coma. Additionally, many early-type galaxies in A2029 are detected at 24 {mu}m and/or in the far-UV, but this emission is not directly related to star formation. Similar galaxies have probably been classified as star forming in previous studies of dense clusters, possibly obscuring some of the effects of the cluster environment on true star-forming galaxies.

  7. Arbitrary amplitude electrostatic wave propagation in a magnetized dense plasma containing helium ions and degenerate electrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahmood, S.; Sadiq, Safeer; Haque, Q.; Ali, Munazza Z.

    2016-06-01

    The obliquely propagating arbitrary amplitude electrostatic wave is studied in a dense magnetized plasma having singly and doubly charged helium ions with nonrelativistic and ultrarelativistic degenerate electrons pressures. The Fermi temperature for ultrarelativistic degenerate electrons described by N. M. Vernet [(Cambridge University Press, Cambridge, 2007), p. 57] is used to define ion acoustic speed in ultra-dense plasmas. The pseudo-potential approach is used to solve the fully nonlinear set of dynamic equations for obliquely propagating electrostatic waves in a dense magnetized plasma containing helium ions. The upper and lower Mach number ranges for the existence of electrostatic solitons are found which depends on the obliqueness of the wave propagation with respect to applied magnetic field and charge number of the helium ions. It is found that only compressive (hump) soliton structures are formed in all the cases and only subsonic solitons are formed for a singly charged helium ions plasma case with nonrelativistic degenerate electrons. Both subsonic and supersonic soliton hump structures are formed for doubly charged helium ions with nonrelativistic degenerate electrons and ultrarelativistic degenerate electrons plasma case containing singly as well as doubly charged helium ions. The effect of propagation direction on the soliton amplitude and width of the electrostatic waves is also presented. The numerical plots are also shown for illustration using dense plasma parameters of a compact star (white dwarf) from literature.

  8. Advanced Polymer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    In the mid-1980's, Langley developed a polyimide sulfone, combining desirable properties of two classes of polymers. Composites and other products made from polyimide sulfone can be used with solvents and corrosive fluids, are light weight, low cost and can be easily fabricated for a wide range of industrial uses. High Technology Systems, Inc. obtained a license for the polymer and was awarded a Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) contract for development in a powder form. Although its principal use is as a matrix resin for composites, the material can also be used as a high temperature structural adhesive for aircraft structures and as a coating for protection from heat and radiation for electronic components.

  9. NRO M 33 All-Disk Survey of Giant Molecular Clouds (NRO MAGiC). II Dense Gas Formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Onodera, Sachiko; Kuno, Nario; Tosaki, Tomoka; Muraoka, Kazuyuki; Miura, Rie E.; Kohno, Kotaro; Nakanishi, Kouichiro; Sawada, Tsuyoshi; Komugi, Shinya; Kaneko, Hiroyuki; Hirota, Akihiko; Kawabe, Ryohei

    2012-12-01

    We report the results of our observations of the 12 CO (J = 1-0) and 12 CO (J = 3-2) line emission of 74 major giant molecular clouds (GMCs) within the galactocentric distance of 5.1 kpc in the Local Group galaxy M 33. The observations have been conducted as part of the Nobeyama Radio Observatory M 33 All-disk survey of Giant Molecular Clouds project (NRO MAGiC). The spatial resolutions are 80 pc for 12 CO (J = 1-0) and 100 pc for 12 CO (J = 3-2). We detect 12 CO (J = 3-2) emission of 65 GMCs successfully. Furthermore, we find that the correlation between the surface density of the star formation rate, which is derived from a linear combination of Hα and 24 μ m emissions, and the 12 CO (J = 3-2) integrated intensity still holds at this scale. This result shows that the star-forming activity is closely associated with warm and dense gases that are traced with the 12 CO (J = 3-2) line, even in the scale of GMCs. We also find that the GMCs with a high star-forming activity tend to show a high integrated intensity ratio (R3-2/1-0). Moreover, we also observe a mass-dependent trend of R3-2/1- 0 for the GMCs with a low star-forming activity. From these results, we speculate that the R3-2/1-0 values of the GMCs with a low star-forming activity mainly depend on the dense gas fraction and not on the temperature, and therefore, the dense gas fraction increases with the mass of GMCs, at least in the GMCs with a low star-forming activity.

  10. Aqueous phase deposition of dense tin oxide films with nano-structured surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Masuda, Yoshitake Ohji, Tatsuki; Kato, Kazumi

    2014-06-01

    Dense tin oxide films were successfully fabricated in an aqueous solution. The pH of the solutions was controlled to pH 1.3 by addition of HCl. Precise control of solution condition and crystal growth allowed us to obtain dense tin oxide films. Concave–convex surface of fluorine-doped tin oxide (FTO) substrates was entirely-covered with the continuous films. The films were about 65 nm in thickness and had nano-structured surfaces. Morphology of the films was strikingly different from our previous reported nano-sheet assembled structures. The films were not removed from the substrates by strong water flow or air blow to show strong adhesion strength. The aqueous solution process can be applied to surface coating of various materials such as nano/micro-structured surfaces, particles, fibers, polymers, metals or biomaterials. - Graphical abstract: Dense tin oxide films of 65 nm were successfully fabricated in an aqueous solution. They had nano-structured surfaces. Concave-convex substrates were entirely-covered with the continuous films. - Highlights: • Dense tin oxide films of 65 nm were successfully fabricated in an aqueous solution. • They had nano-structured surfaces. • Concave–convex substrates were entirely-covered with the continuous films.

  11. Phthalocyanine polymers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Achar, B. N.; Fohlen, G. M.; Parker, J. A. (Inventor)

    1985-01-01

    A method of forming 4,4',4'',4''' -tetraamino phthalocyanines involves reducing 4,4',4'',4''' -tetranitro phthalocyanines, polymerizing the metal tetraamino phthalocyanines with a tetracarboxylic dianhydride (preferably aromatic) or copolymerizing with a tetracarboxylic dianhydride and a diamine (preferably also aromatic) to produce amic acids which are then dehydrocyclized to imides. Thermally and oxidatively stable polymers result which form tough, flexible films, varnishes, adhesives, and fibers.

  12. Periodic Polymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, Edwin

    2013-03-01

    Periodic polymers can be made by self assembly, directed self assembly and by photolithography. Such materials provide a versatile platform for 1, 2 and 3D periodic nano-micro scale composites with either dielectric or impedance contrast or both, and these can serve for example, as photonic and or phononic crystals for electromagnetic and elastic waves as well as mechanical frames/trusses. Compared to electromagnetic waves, elastic waves are both less complex (longitudinal modes in fluids) and more complex (longitudinal, transverse in-plane and transverse out-of-plane modes in solids). Engineering of the dispersion relation between wave frequency w and wave vector, k enables the opening of band gaps in the density of modes and detailed shaping of w(k). Band gaps can be opened by Bragg scattering, anti-crossing of bands and discrete shape resonances. Current interest is in our group focuses using design - modeling, fabrication and measurement of polymer-based periodic materials for applications as tunable optics and control of phonon flow. Several examples will be described including the design of structures for multispectral band gaps for elastic waves to alter the phonon density of states, the creation of block polymer and bicontinuous metal-carbon nanoframes for structures that are robust against ballistic projectiles and quasi-crystalline solid/fluid structures that can steer shock waves.

  13. Numerical study of ion acoustic shock waves in dense quantum plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Hanif, M.; Mirza, Arshad M.; Ali, S.; Mukhtar, Q.

    2014-03-15

    Two fluid quantum hydrodynamic equations are solved numerically to investigate the propagation characteristics of ion acoustic shock waves in an unmagnetized dense quantum plasma, whose constituents are the electrons and ions. For this purpose, we employ the standard finite difference Lax Wendroff and relaxation methods, to examine the quantum effects on the profiles of shock potential, the electron/ion number densities, and velocity even for quantum parameter at H = 2. The effects of the latter vanish in a weakly non-linear limit while obeying the KdV theory. It is shown that the evolution of the wave depends sensitively on the plasma density and the quantum parameter. Numerical results reveal that the kinks or oscillations are pronounced for large values of quantum parameter, especially at H = 2. Our results should be important to understand the shock wave excitations in dense quantum plasmas, white dwarfs, neutron stars, etc.

  14. Shock waves and double layers in electron degenerate dense plasma with viscous ion fluids

    SciTech Connect

    Mamun, A. A.; Zobaer, M. S.

    2014-02-15

    The properties of ion-acoustic shock waves and double layers propagating in a viscous degenerate dense plasma (containing inertial viscous ion fluid, non-relativistic and ultra-relativistic degenerate electron fluid, and negatively charged stationary heavy element) is investigated. A new nonlinear equation (viz. Gardner equation with additional dissipative term) is derived by the reductive perturbation method. The properties of the ion-acoustic shock waves and double layers are examined by the analysis of the shock and double layer solutions of this new equation (we would like to call it “M-Z equation”). It is found that the properties of these shock and double layer structures obtained from this analysis are significantly different from those obtained from the analysis of standard Gardner or Burgers’ equation. The implications of our results to dense plasmas in astrophysical objects (e.g., non-rotating white dwarf stars) are briefly discussed.

  15. Image restoration of R136 - The dense core of NGC 2070

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weir, N.; Djorgovski, S.; Meylan, G.

    1991-01-01

    We present results from the application of a new seeing deconvolution technique to images of the dense core of NGC 2070 = 30 Doradus (the controversial object R136a). We utilize a new maximum entropy algorithm capable of restoring images to very high resolution, even to subpixel accuracy. Images of the object in different colors, as well as comparisons with previous speckle results, have been used to check the validity of the results. Our images of R136 have an angular resolution approaching 0.2 arcsec, better than any direct images of this object published to date, and corroborate evidence that R136a is a dense star cluster core, rather than a single ultraluminous object.

  16. Ion acoustic solitons in dense magnetized plasmas with nonrelativistic and ultrarelativistic degenerate electrons and positrons

    SciTech Connect

    Sadiq, Safeer; Mahmood, S.; Haque, Q.; Ali, Munazza Zulfiqar

    2014-09-20

    The propagation of electrostatic waves in a dense magnetized electron-positron-ion (EPI) plasma with nonrelativistic and ultrarelativistic degenerate electrons and positrons is investigated. The linear dispersion relation is obtained for slow and fast electrostatic waves in the EPI plasma. The limiting cases for ion acoustic wave (slow) and ion cyclotron wave (fast) are also discussed. Using the reductive perturbation method, two-dimensional propagation of ion acoustic solitons is found for both the nonrelativistic and ultrarelativistic degenerate electrons and positrons. The effects of positron concentration, magnetic field, and mass of ions on ion acoustic solitons are shown in numerical plots. The proper form of Fermi temperature for nonrelativistic and ultrarelativistic degenerate electrons and positrons is employed, which has not been used in earlier published work. The present investigation is useful for the understanding of linear and nonlinear electrostatic wave propagation in the dense magnetized EPI plasma of compact stars. For illustration purposes, we have applied our results to a pulsar magnetosphere.

  17. Shock waves and double layers in electron degenerate dense plasma with viscous ion fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mamun, A. A.; Zobaer, M. S.

    2014-02-01

    The properties of ion-acoustic shock waves and double layers propagating in a viscous degenerate dense plasma (containing inertial viscous ion fluid, non-relativistic and ultra-relativistic degenerate electron fluid, and negatively charged stationary heavy element) is investigated. A new nonlinear equation (viz. Gardner equation with additional dissipative term) is derived by the reductive perturbation method. The properties of the ion-acoustic shock waves and double layers are examined by the analysis of the shock and double layer solutions of this new equation (we would like to call it "M-Z equation"). It is found that the properties of these shock and double layer structures obtained from this analysis are significantly different from those obtained from the analysis of standard Gardner or Burgers' equation. The implications of our results to dense plasmas in astrophysical objects (e.g., non-rotating white dwarf stars) are briefly discussed.

  18. O stars and Wolf-Rayet stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Conti, Peter S.; Underhill, Anne B.; Jordan, Stuart (Editor); Thomas, Richard (Editor)

    1988-01-01

    Basic information is given about O and Wolf-Rayet stars indicating how these stars are defined and what their chief observable properties are. Part 2 of the volume discussed four related themes pertaining to the hottest and most luminous stars. Presented are: an observational overview of the spectroscopic classification and extrinsic properties of O and Wolf-Rayet stars; the intrinsic parameters of luminosity, effective temperature, mass, and composition of the stars, and a discussion of their viability; stellar wind properties; and the related issues concerning the efforts of stellar radiation and wind on the immediate interstellar environment are presented.

  19. Synthesis and supramolecular assembly of biomimetic polymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marciel, Amanda Brittany

    A grand challenge in materials chemistry is the synthesis of macromolecules and polymers with precise shapes and architectures. Polymer microstructure and architecture strongly affect the resulting functionality of advanced materials, yet understanding the static and dynamic properties of these complex macromolecules in bulk has been difficult due to their inherit polydispersity. Single molecule studies have provided a wealth of information on linear flexible and semi-flexible polymers in dilute solutions. However, few investigations have focused on industrially relevant complex topologies (e.g., star, comb, hyperbranched polymers) in industrially relevant solution conditions (e.g., semi-dilute, concentrated). Therefore, from this perspective there is a strong need to synthesize precision complex architectures for bulk studies as well as complex architectures compatible with current single molecule techniques to study static and dynamic polymer properties. In this way, we developed a hybrid synthetic strategy to produce branched polymer architectures based on chemically modified DNA. Overall, this approach enables control of backbone length and flexibility, as well as branch grafting density and chemical identity. We utilized a two-step scheme based on enzymatic incorporation of non-natural nucleotides containing bioorthogonal dibenzocyclooctyne (DBCO) functional groups along the main polymer backbone, followed by copper-free "click" chemistry to graft synthetic polymer branches or oligonucleotide branches to the DNA backbone, thereby allowing for the synthesis of a variety of polymer architectures, including three-arm stars, H-polymers, graft block copolymers, and comb polymers for materials assembly and single molecule studies. Bulk materials properties are also affected by industrial processing conditions that alter polymer morphology. Therefore, in an alternative strategy we developed a microfluidic-based approach to assemble highly aligned synthetic

  20. Strange Stars : An interesting member of the compact object family

    SciTech Connect

    Bagchi, Manjari; Ray, Subharthi; Dey, Jishnu; Dey, Mira

    2008-01-10

    We have studied strange star properties both at zero temperature and at finite temperatures and searched signatures of strange stars in gamma-ray, x-ray and radio astronomy. We have a set of Equations of State (EoS) for strange quark matter (SQM) and solving the TOV equations, we get the structure of strange stars. The maximum mass for a strange star decreases with the increase of temperature, because at high temperatures, the EoS become softer. One important aspect of strange star is that, surface tension depends on the size and structure of the star and is significantly larger than the conventional values. Moment of inertia is another important parameter for compact stars as by comparing theoretical values with observed estimate, it is possible to constrain the dense matter Equation of State. We hope that this approach will help us to decide whether the members of the double pulsar system PSR J0737-3039 are neutron stars or strange stars.