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Sample records for densification

  1. Lunar regolith densification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ko, Hon-Yim; Sture, Stein

    1991-01-01

    Core tube samples of the lunar regolith obtained during the Apollo missions showed a rapid increase in the density of the regolith with depth. Various hypotheses have been proposed for the possible cause of this phenomenon, including the densification of the loose regolith material by repeated shaking from the seismic tremors which have been found to occur at regular monthly intervals when the moon and earth are closest to one another. A test bed was designed to study regolith densification. This test bed uses Minnesota Lunar Simulant (MLS) to conduct shaking experiments in the geotechnical centrifuge with an inflight shake table system. By reproducing realistic in-situ regolith properties, the experiment also serves to test penetrator concepts. The shake table system was designed and used for simulation experiments to study effects of earthquakes on terrestrial soil structures. It is mounted on a 15 g-ton geotechnical centrifuge in which the self-weight induced stresses are replicated by testing an n-th scale model in a gravity field which is n times larger than Earth's gravity. A similar concept applies when dealing with lunar prototypes, where the gravity ratio required for proper simulation of lunar gravity effects is that between the centrifugal acceleration and the lunar gravity. Records of lunar seismic tremors, or moonquakes, were obtained. While these records are being prepared for use as the input data to drive the shake table system, records from the El Centro earthquake of 1940 are being used to perform preliminary tests, using a soil container which was previously used for earthquake studies. This container has a laminar construction, with the layers free to slide on each other, so that the soil motion during the simulated earthquake will not be constrained by the otherwise rigid boundaries. The soil model is prepared by pluviating the MLS from a hopper into the laminar container to a depth of 6 in. The container is mounted on the shake table and the

  2. Snow Densification in Greenland (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morris, E.; Wingham, D.

    2010-12-01

    As part of the calibration and validation experiments for the radar altimeter carried by the ESA Cryosat-2 satellite, snow density profiles have been measured along the EGIG line from Spring 2004 to Summer 2010. Repeated measurements at the same site allow the development of the characteristic stratigraphy of the dry snow zone to be observed and the rate of densification to be measured directly. Densification rates below the surface layer are found to be compatible with a physics-based grain boundary sliding model (Alley, 1987) but near-surface rates are enhanced. Alley, R.B. (1987). Firn densification by grain-boundary sliding: A First Model. J. de. Physique 48 (Coll. C1, Suppl. No.3) 249-256.

  3. Propellant Densification for Shuttle: The SSME Perspective

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greene, William D.; Boxx, Dayna L.; Tiller, Bruce K. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The subject of cryogenic propellant densification as a potential upgrade to the Space Shuttle is a subject that has been raised on several occasions over the last decade. Due to advancements in densification technology made as a part of and in parallel to the X-33 project, the subject was raised and studied once again in May 2001. Across the Space Shuttle program people from many disciplines converged to discuss issues and perform trade studies to determine whether densified propellants was worth pursuing. This paper discusses one of these areas, specifically the Space Shuttle Main Engine (SSME). The effects of propellant densification on steady state performance are presented along with discussions of potential transient performance issues. Engine component redesign and retrofit issues are discussed as well the high level requirements to modify the ground test stands to accommodate propellant densification hardware and tanks. And finally, the matter of programmatic concerns enters the subject at hand as part of a discussion of SSME recertification requirements. In the end, potential benefits to SSME performance can be demonstrated and, subject to the densification scheme chosen, there does not appear to insurmountable technical obstacles.

  4. Task 4 supporting technology. Densification requirements definition and test objectives. Propellant densification requirements definition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lak, Tibor; Weeks, D. P.

    1995-01-01

    The primary challenge of the X-33 CAN is to build and test a prototype LO2 and LH2 densification ground support equipment (GSE) unit, and perform tank thermodynamic testing within the 15 month phase 1 period. The LO2 and LH2 propellant densification system will be scaled for the IPTD LO2 and LH2 tank configurations. The IPTD tanks were selected for the propellant technology demonstration because of the potential benefits to the phase 1 plan: tanks will be built in time to support thermodynamic testing; minimum cost; minimum schedule risk; future testing at MSFC will build on phase 1 data base; and densification system will be available to support X-33 and RLV engine test at IPTD. The objective of the task 1 effort is to define the preliminary requirements of the propellant densification GSE and tank recirculation system. The key densification system design parameters to be established in Task 1 are: recirculation flow rate; heat exchanger inlet temperature; heat exchanger outlet temperature; maximum heat rejection rate; vent flow rate (GN2 and GH2); densification time; and tank pressure level.

  5. Task 4 supporting technology. Densification requirements definition and test objectives. Propellant densification requirements definition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lak, Tibor; Weeks, D. P.

    1995-05-01

    The primary challenge of the X-33 CAN is to build and test a prototype LO2 and LH2 densification ground support equipment (GSE) unit, and perform tank thermodynamic testing within the 15 month phase 1 period. The LO2 and LH2 propellant densification system will be scaled for the IPTD LO2 and LH2 tank configurations. The IPTD tanks were selected for the propellant technology demonstration because of the potential benefits to the phase 1 plan: tanks will be built in time to support thermodynamic testing; minimum cost; minimum schedule risk; future testing at MSFC will build on phase 1 data base; and densification system will be available to support X-33 and RLV engine test at IPTD. The objective of the task 1 effort is to define the preliminary requirements of the propellant densification GSE and tank recirculation system. The key densification system design parameters to be established in Task 1 are: recirculation flow rate; heat exchanger inlet temperature; heat exchanger outlet temperature; maximum heat rejection rate; vent flow rate (GN2 and GH2); densification time; and tank pressure level.

  6. Densification of pond ash by blasting

    SciTech Connect

    Gandhi, S.R.; Dey, A.K.; Selvam, S.

    1999-10-01

    Fly ash from thermal power plants is disposed, in huge quantities in ash ponds, which occupy large land areas otherwise useful for agriculture, housing, or other development. For effective rehabilitation of ash ponds, densification of the slurry deposit is essential to increase the bearing capacity and to improve its resistance to liquefaction. Extensive field trials were carried out to evaluate the effectiveness of deep blasting for densification of deposited fly ash. Ninety explosions comprising 15 single blasts, with varying depths and quantities of charges, and 3 group blasts, each having 25 charges placed at various spacings, were carried out. The compaction achieved in terms of an increase in relative density was evaluated from surface settlement measurements. Extensive field monitoring was undertaken through pore-water pressure measurements, vibration measurements, penetration tests, and block vibration tests. For the average charge of 2--4 g of explosive per cubic meter of untreated deposit, the average relative density was found to improve from 50% to 56--58%. Analysis of the test results indicates that deep blasting may be an effective technique for modest compaction of loose fly ash deposits. The field testing program presented in this paper provides valuable information that can be used for planning blast densification of fly ash deposits.

  7. Enhanced densification of metal powders by transformation-mismatch plasticity

    SciTech Connect

    Schuh, C.; Noel, P.; Dunand, D.C.

    2000-05-11

    The densification of titanium powders is investigated in uniaxial die pressing experiments carried out isothermally at 980 C (in the {beta}-field of titanium) and during thermal cycling between 860 and 980 C (about the {alpha}/{beta} phase transformation of titanium). Thermal cycling is found to enhance densification kinetics through the emergence of transformation-mismatch plasticity (the mechanism responsible for transformation superplasticity) as a densification mechanism. The isothermal hot-pressing data compare favorably with existing models of powder densification, and these models are successfully adapted to the case of transformation-mismatch plasticity during thermal cycling. Similar conclusions are reached for the densification of titanium powders containing 1, 5, or 10 vol.% ZrO{sub 2} particles. However, the addition of ZrO{sub 2} hinders densification by dissolving in the titanium matrix during the hot-pressing procedure.

  8. Isothermal densification and metamorphism of new snow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schleef, S.; Loewe, H.; Schneebeli, M.

    2012-12-01

    The interplay between overburden stress and surface energy induced growth and coarsening is relevant for the densification of snow and porous ice at all densities. The densification of new snow is amenable to high precision experiments on short time scales. To this end we investigate the coupling of densification and metamorphism of new snow via time-lapse tomography experiments in the laboratory. We compare the evolution of density, strain, and specific surface area to previous long-time metamorphism experiments of snow and creep of polycrystalline ice. Experimental conditions are tailored to the requirements of time-lapse tomography and the measurements are conducted under nearly isothermal conditions at -20°C with a duration of two days. Images were taken with temporal resolution of a few hours which reveal precise details of the microstructure evolution due to sintering and compaction. We used different crystal shapes of natural new snow and snow samples obtained by sieving crystals grown in a snowmaker in the laboratory. To simulate the effect of overburden stress due to an overlying snowpack additional weights were applied to the sample. As expected we find an influence of the densification rate on initial density and overburden stress. We calculated strain rates and identified a transient creep behavior with a similar power law for all crystal types which substantially differs from the Andrade creep of polycrystalline ice. As a main result we found that the evolution of the specific surface area is independent of the density and follows a unique decay form for all measurements of each crystal type. The accuracy of the measurements allows to obtain a decay exponent for the SSA which is the same as previously obtained from the long-time regime during isothermal metamorphism after several months. Our preliminary results for all available types of new snow suggest a correlation between the initial density and SSA. We also find snow samples which coincide in

  9. Sol-gel synthesis and densification of aluminoborosilicate powders. Part 2: Densification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bull, Jeffrey; Selvaduray, Guna; Leiser, Daniel

    1992-01-01

    Aluminoborosilicate (ABS) powders, high in alumina content, were synthesized by the sol-gel process utilizing four different methods of synthesis. The effect of these methods on the densification behavior of ABS powder compacts was studied. Five regions of shrinkage in the temperature range 25-1184 C were identified. In these regions, the greatest shrinkage occurred between the gel-to-glass transition temperature (T sub g approximately equal to 835 C) and the crystallization transformation temperature (T sub t approximately equal 900 C). The dominant mechanism of densification in this range was found to be viscous sintering. ABS powders were amorphous to x-rays up to T sub t at which a multiphasic structure crystallized. No 2Al2O3.B2O3 was found in these powders as predicted in the phase diagram. Above T sub t, densification was the result of competing mechanisms including grain growth and boria fluxed viscous sintering. Apparent activation energies for densification in each region varied according to the method of synthesis.

  10. Characterization of CVI densification of ceramic composites

    SciTech Connect

    Starr, T.L.; Stock, S.R.; Lee, S.

    1995-05-01

    Ceramic matrix composites promise higher operating temperature and better thermodynamic efficiency in many enregy conversion systems. In particular, composites fabricated by the chemical vapor infiltration (CVI) process have excellent mechanical properties and, using the forced flow-thermal gradient variation, good processing economics in small scale demonstrations. Scale-up to larger, more complex shapes requires understanding of gas flow through the fiber preform and of the relationship between fiber architecture and densification behavior. This understanding is needed for design of preforms for optimum infiltration. The objective of this research is to observe the deposition of matrix material in the pores of a ceramic fiber preform at various stages of the CVI process. These observations allow us to relate local deposition rates in various regions of the composite to the connectivity of the surrounding network of porosity and to better model the relationship between gas transport and fiber architecture in CVI preforms. Our observation of the CVI process utilizes high resolution X-ray tomographic microscopy (XTM) in collaboration with Dr. John Kinney at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory with repeated imaging of a small preform specimens after various processing times. We use these images to determine geometry and dimensions of channels between and through layers in cloth lay-up preform during CVI densification and relate these to a transport model.

  11. Controlled densification of mullite for composite applications.

    SciTech Connect

    Cruse, T. A.

    1999-05-19

    As part of an effort to fabricate oxide-based fibrous monolithic ceramics, sintering of mullite has been examined. The effects of Y{sub 2}O{sub 3} additions on sinterability of sol-gel-derived mullite and on the resulting microstructure were evaluated over a range of compositions, sintering times, and temperatures. Electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction, differential thermal analysis, and density measurements indicated that the Y{sub 2}O{sub 3} additions promoted densification through formation of a Y-Si-Al-O liquid phase. This phase tended to solidify as a glass during normal processing, but could be crystallized by a two-step annealing process at 1300 and 1200 C. The four-point flexural strengths of mullite and mullite-5 Wt.% Y{sub 2}O{sub 3} were also examined.

  12. LIBRA: An inexpensive geodetic network densification system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fliegel, H. F.; Gantsweg, M.; Callahan, P. S.

    1975-01-01

    A description is given of the Libra (Locations Interposed by Ranging Aircraft) system, by which geodesy and earth strain measurements can be performed rapidly and inexpensively to several hundred auxiliary points with respect to a few fundamental control points established by any other technique, such as radio interferometry or satellite ranging. This low-cost means of extending the accuracy of space age geodesy to local surveys provides speed and spatial resolution useful, for example, for earthquake hazards estimation. Libra may be combined with an existing system, Aries (Astronomical Radio Interferometric Earth Surveying) to provide a balanced system adequate to meet the geophysical needs, and applicable to conventional surveying. The basic hardware design was outlined and specifications were defined. Then need for network densification was described. The following activities required to implement the proposed Libra system are also described: hardware development, data reduction, tropospheric calibrations, schedule of development and estimated costs.

  13. Densification and shape distortion in liquid-phase sintering

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, J.; German, R.M.

    1999-12-01

    Densification and dimensional control are important aspects of liquid-phase sintering. The capillary force and the solid bonding affect both densification and shape preservation. Capillarity, which is orientated isotropically, causes uniform shrinkage and holds grains together to preserve the component shape in the early stage of sintering. On the other hand, solid bonding resists viscous flow and inhibits densification and shape distortion. The capillary force decreases with densification and approaches zero as pores are eliminated. Thus, shape retention eventually requires solid-grain bonding. The solid-grain bonding provides compact rigidity, which is represented by compact strength. Shape distortion occurs when the compact loses its strength. For every situation, there is a critical compact strength above which no shape distortion occurs. Distortion in liquid-phase sintering indicates that the compact strength passed below a critical level.

  14. Enhanced Densification of SDC Barrier Layers

    SciTech Connect

    Hardy, John S.; Templeton, Jared W.; Lu, Zigui; Stevenson, Jeffry W.

    2011-09-12

    This technical report explores the Enhanced Densification of SCD Barrier Layers A samaria-doped ceria (SDC) barrier layer separates the lanthanum strontium cobalt ferrite (LSCF) cathode from the yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) electrolyte in a solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) to prevent the formation of electrically resistive interfacial SrZrO{sub 3} layers that arise from the reaction of Sr from the LSCF with Zr from the YSZ. However, the sintering temperature of this SDC layer must be limited to {approx}1200 C to avoid extensive interdiffusion between SDC and YSZ to form a resistive CeO{sub 2}-ZrO{sub 2} solid solution. Therefore, the conventional SDC layer is often porous and therefore not as impervious to Sr-diffusion as would be desired. In the pursuit of improved SOFC performance, efforts have been directed toward increasing the density of the SDC barrier layer without increasing the sintering temperature. The density of the SDC barrier layer can be greatly increased through small amounts of Cu-doping of the SDC powder together with increased solids loading and use of an appropriate binder system in the screen print ink. However, the resulting performance of cells with these barrier layers did not exhibit the expected increase in accordance with that achieved with the prototypical PLD SDC layer. It was determined by XRD that increased sinterability of the SDC also results in increased interdiffusivity between the SDC and YSZ, resulting in formation of a highly resistive solid solution.

  15. STS propellant densification feasibility study data book

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fazah, M. M.

    1994-01-01

    The feasibility of using densification or subcooling with respect to standard temperature propellants on the Space Transportation System (STS) in order to achieve a payload gain is discussed in this report. The objective is to determine the magnitude of the payload gain and to identify any system impacts to the space shuttle on either flight systems or ground systems. Results show that a payload benefit can be obtained by subcooling the liquid hydrogen (LH2) from a nominal temperature of 36.4 R to 28.5 R and by subcooling the liquid oxygen (LO2) from a nominal temperature of 164 R to either 132.1 R or 141.4 R. When the propellants are subcooled to 28.5 R and 132.1 R for the LH2 and LO2, respectively, a maximum payload gain of 7,324 lb can be achieved, and when the propellants are subcooled to 28.5 R and 141.5 R for the LH2 and LO2, respectively, a maximum payload gain of 6,841 lb can be achieved. If the LH2 is subcooled to 28.5 R while the LH2 and LO2 remains at the nominal conditions, a maximum payload gain of 1,303 lb can be achieved.

  16. Consolidation and densification methods for fibrous monolith processing

    DOEpatents

    Sutaria, Manish P.; Rigali, Mark J.; Cipriani, Ronald A.; Artz, Gregory J.; Mulligan, Anthony C.

    2006-06-20

    Methods for consolidation and densification of fibrous monolith composite structures are provided. Consolidation and densification of two- and three-dimensional fibrous monolith components having complex geometries can be achieved by pressureless sintering. The fibrous monolith composites are formed from filaments having at least a first material composition generally surrounded by a second material composition. The composites are sintered at a pressure of no more than about 30 psi to provide consolidated and densified fibrous monolith composites.

  17. Permeability during densification of viscous droplets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wadsworth, Fabian; Vasseur, Jérémie; Llewellin, Ed; Dobson, Katherine; Schauroth, Jenny; Heap, Michael; Farquharson, Jamie; Scheu, Bettina; Kendrick, Jackie; Lavallée, Yan; von Aulock, Felix; Dingwell, Donald B.

    2016-04-01

    Fragmentation of magma can yield a transiently granular material, which can subsequently weld back to a fluid-continuum. This process results in dramatic changes in the porosity of the material, which impacts its fluid permeability. We collate published data for the porosity and permeability of volcanic and synthetic materials which have undergone this process to different amounts. By discriminating data for which good microstructural information are provided, we use simple scaling arguments to collapse the data in both the still-granular, high porosity region, and the fluid-continuum low porosity region, such that a universal description can be provided. This allows us to describe the microstructural meaning of permeability scaling, and to infer the controls on the position of this transition between dominantly granular (dispersion) and dominantly fluid-continuum materials. Fractures in coherent magmas are thought to be a primary degassing pathway in high viscosity systems. As a specific application, we consider transiently granular magma being transported through and deposited in these fractures. We finally present a physical model for the kinetics of porosity changes in arrays of viscous droplets and compare this with our experimental data. The combination of the physical model for the evolution of porosity with the scaling between porosity and permeability permits us to describe the evolution of permeability during densification. We anticipate that this will be a useful tool for predicting the longevity of degassing pathways in granular filled cracks, both in conduits and shallow lava domes, as well as during the sedimentation of exceptionally hot ignimbrites undergoing compaction and welding.

  18. Effects of torrefaction and densification on switchgrass pyrolysis products

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Zixu; Sarkar, Madhura; Kumar, Ajay; Tumuluru, Jaya Shankar; Huhnke, Raymond L.

    2014-12-01

    Abstract The pyrolysis behaviors of four types of pretreated switchgrass (torrefied at 230 and 270 °C, densification, and torrefaction at 270 ºC followed by densification) were studied at three temperatures (500, 600, 700 ºC) using a pyroprobe attached to a gas chromatogram mass spectroscopy (Py-GC/MS). The torrefaction of switchgrass improved its oxygen to carbon ratio and energy content. Contents of anhydrous sugars and phenols in pyrolysis products of torrefied switchgrass were higher than those in pyrolysis products of raw switchgrass. As the torrefaction temperature increased from 230 to 270 °C, the contents of anhydrous sugars and phenols in pyrolysis products increased whereas content of guaiacols decreased. High pyrolysis temperature (600 and 700 °C as compared to 500 °C) enhanced decomposition of lignin and anhydrous sugars, leading to increase in phenols, aromatics and furans. Densification enhanced depolymerization of cellulose and hemicellulose during pyrolysis.

  19. Effects of torrefaction and densification on switchgrass pyrolysis products.

    PubMed

    Yang, Zixu; Sarkar, Madhura; Kumar, Ajay; Tumuluru, Jaya Shankar; Huhnke, Raymond L

    2014-12-01

    The pyrolysis behaviors of four types of pretreated switchgrass (torrefied at 230 and 270°C, densification, and torrefaction at 270°C followed by densification) were studied at three temperatures (500, 600, 700°C) using a pyroprobe attached to a gas chromatogram mass spectroscopy (Py-GC/MS). The torrefaction of switchgrass improved its oxygen to carbon ratio and energy content. Contents of anhydrous sugars and phenols in pyrolysis products of torrefied switchgrass were higher than those in pyrolysis products of raw switchgrass. As the torrefaction temperature increased from 230 to 270°C, the contents of anhydrous sugars and phenols in pyrolysis products increased whereas content of guaiacols decreased. High pyrolysis temperature (600 and 700°C as compared to 500°C) enhanced decomposition of lignin and anhydrous sugars, leading to increase in phenols, aromatics and furans. Densification enhanced depolymerization of cellulose and hemicellulose during pyrolysis. PMID:25463807

  20. Consolidation and densification methods for fibrous monolith processing

    DOEpatents

    Sutaria, Manish P.; Rigali, Mark J.; Cipriani, Ronald A.; Artz, Gregory J.; Mulligan, Anthony C.

    2004-05-25

    Methods for consolidation and densification of fibrous monolith composite structures are provided. Consolidation and densification of two- and three-dimensional fibrous monolith components having complex geometries can be achieved by pressureless sintering. The fibrous monolith composites are formed from filaments having at least a first material composition generally surrounded by a second material composition. The composites are sintered in an inert gas or nitrogen gas at a pressure of no more than about 30 psi to provide consolidated and densified fibrous monolith composites.

  1. Enhanced densification under shock compression in porous silicon

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Lane, J. Matthew; Thompson, Aidan Patrick; Vogler, Tracy

    2014-10-27

    Under shock compression, most porous materials exhibit lower densities for a given pressure than that of a full-dense sample of the same material. However, some porous materials exhibit an anomalous, or enhanced, densification under shock compression. The mechanism driving this behavior was not completely determined. We present evidence from atomistic simulation that pure silicon belongs to this anomalous class of materials and demonstrate the associated mechanisms responsible for the effect in porous silicon. Atomistic response indicates that local shear strain in the neighborhood of collapsing pores catalyzes a local solid-solid phase transformation even when bulk pressures are below the thermodynamicmore » phase transformation pressure. This metastable, local, and partial, solid-solid phase transformation, which accounts for the enhanced densification in silicon, is driven by the local stress state near the void, not equilibrium thermodynamics. This mechanism may also explain the phenomenon in other covalently bonded materials.« less

  2. Enhanced densification under shock compression in porous silicon

    SciTech Connect

    Lane, J. Matthew; Thompson, Aidan Patrick; Vogler, Tracy

    2014-10-27

    Under shock compression, most porous materials exhibit lower densities for a given pressure than that of a full-dense sample of the same material. However, some porous materials exhibit an anomalous, or enhanced, densification under shock compression. The mechanism driving this behavior was not completely determined. We present evidence from atomistic simulation that pure silicon belongs to this anomalous class of materials and demonstrate the associated mechanisms responsible for the effect in porous silicon. Atomistic response indicates that local shear strain in the neighborhood of collapsing pores catalyzes a local solid-solid phase transformation even when bulk pressures are below the thermodynamic phase transformation pressure. This metastable, local, and partial, solid-solid phase transformation, which accounts for the enhanced densification in silicon, is driven by the local stress state near the void, not equilibrium thermodynamics. This mechanism may also explain the phenomenon in other covalently bonded materials.

  3. Enhanced densification under shock compression in porous silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lane, J. Matthew D.; Thompson, Aidan P.; Vogler, Tracy J.

    2014-10-01

    Under shock compression, most porous materials exhibit lower densities for a given pressure than that of a full-dense sample of the same material. However, some porous materials exhibit an anomalous, or enhanced, densification under shock compression. We demonstrate a molecular mechanism that drives this behavior. We also present evidence from atomistic simulation that silicon belongs to this anomalous class of materials. Atomistic simulations indicate that local shear strain in the neighborhood of collapsing pores nucleates a local solid-solid phase transformation even when bulk pressures are below the thermodynamic phase transformation pressure. This metastable, local, and partial, solid-solid phase transformation, which accounts for the enhanced densification in silicon, is driven by the local stress state near the void, not equilibrium thermodynamics. This mechanism may also explain the phenomenon in other covalently bonded materials.

  4. Atomistic pathways of the pressure-induced densification of quartz

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, Yunfeng; Miranda, Caetano R.; Scandolo, Sandro

    2015-10-01

    When quartz is compressed at room temperature it retains its crystal structure at pressures well above its stability domain (0-2 GPa), and collapses into denser structures only when pressure reaches 20 GPa. Depending on the experimental conditions, pressure-induced densification can be accompanied by amorphization; by the formation of crystalline, metastable polymorphs; and can be preceded by the appearance of an intermediate phase, quartz II, with unknown structure. Based on molecular dynamic simulations, we show that this rich phenomenology can be rationalized through a unified theoretical framework of the atomistic pathways leading to densification. The model emphasizes the role played by the oxygen sublattice, which transforms from a bcc-like order in quartz into close-packed arrangements in the denser structures, through a ferroelastic instability of martensitic nature.

  5. A community firn densification and gas transport model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stevens, C.; Lundin, J.; Harris, P.; Leahy, W.; Waddington, E. D.

    2012-12-01

    Gas bubbles trapped in ice preserve a record of Earth's climate history. Interpretation of ice-core records is complicated by the difference in age (called delta age) between the gas trapped in bubbles and the ice enclosing the gas. Determining delta age requires understanding both densification of polar firn and gas transport through the firn. Independent models of firn densification and firn gas transport have been developed in the past by individual research groups. We are developing a web-based model of firn densification and gas transport that combines the best features of those models and is freely accessible to research teams. Users input site-specific data, and the model provides depth-density-age and delta-age results. In addition to the web-based model, state-of-the-art transient firn-densification and gas-transport models are in development. These models allow physical properties to evolve, which results in more accurate delta-age approximations at times of rapid climate change in the past. These community models will be downloadable as open-source code. They will provide a baseline to make intercomparisons between datasets or other models. The models are modular, allowing users to choose preferred physical models and physical processes to include, based on available pre-coded options. Alternatively, users can adapt the code to include new or different physics. Here, we present results from the web-based model and early stages of the transient models and compare with known firn-density and gas-concentration profiles.

  6. Effects of torrefaction and densification on switchgrass pyrolysis products

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Yang, Zixu; Sarkar, Madhura; Kumar, Ajay; Tumuluru, Jaya Shankar; Huhnke, Raymond L.

    2014-12-01

    Abstract The pyrolysis behaviors of four types of pretreated switchgrass (torrefied at 230 and 270 °C, densification, and torrefaction at 270 ºC followed by densification) were studied at three temperatures (500, 600, 700 ºC) using a pyroprobe attached to a gas chromatogram mass spectroscopy (Py-GC/MS). The torrefaction of switchgrass improved its oxygen to carbon ratio and energy content. Contents of anhydrous sugars and phenols in pyrolysis products of torrefied switchgrass were higher than those in pyrolysis products of raw switchgrass. As the torrefaction temperature increased from 230 to 270 °C, the contents of anhydrous sugars and phenols in pyrolysis productsmore » increased whereas content of guaiacols decreased. High pyrolysis temperature (600 and 700 °C as compared to 500 °C) enhanced decomposition of lignin and anhydrous sugars, leading to increase in phenols, aromatics and furans. Densification enhanced depolymerization of cellulose and hemicellulose during pyrolysis.« less

  7. Dynamic elastic moduli during isotropic densification of initially granular media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vasseur, Jérémie; Wadsworth, Fabian B.; Lavallée, Yan; Dingwell, Donald B.

    2016-03-01

    The elastic properties of homogeneous, isotropic materials are well constrained. However, in heterogeneous and evolving materials, these essential properties are less well-explored. During sintering of volcanic ash particles by viscous processes as well as during compaction and cementation of sediments, microstructure and porosity undergo changes that affect bulk dynamic elastic properties. Here using a model system of glass particles as an analogue for initially granular rock-forming materials, we have determined porosity and P-wave velocity during densification. Using these results, we test models for the kinetics of densification and the resultant evolution of the elastic properties to derive a quantitative description of the coupling between the kinetics of isotropic densification and the evolving dynamic elastic moduli. We demonstrate the power of the resultant model on a wide range of data for non-coherent sediments as well as sedimentary and volcanic rocks. We propose that such constraints be viewed as an essential ingredient of time-dependent models for the deformation of evolving materials in volcanoes and sedimentary basins.

  8. Frost Growth and Densification in Laminar Flow Over Flat Surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kandula, Max

    2011-01-01

    One-dimensional frost growth and densification in laminar flow over flat surfaces has been theoretically investigated. Improved representations of frost density and effective thermal conductivity applicable to a wide range of frost circumstances have been incorporated. The validity of the proposed model considering heat and mass diffusion in the frost layer is tested by a comparison of the predictions with data from various investigators for frost parameters including frost thickness, frost surface temperature, frost density and heat flux. The test conditions cover a range of wall temperature, air humidity ratio, air velocity, and air temperature, and the effect of these variables on the frost parameters has been exemplified. Satisfactory agreement is achieved between the model predictions and the various test data considered. The prevailing uncertainties concerning the role air velocity and air temperature on frost development have been elucidated. It is concluded that that for flat surfaces increases in air velocity have no appreciable effect on frost thickness but contribute to significant frost densification, while increase in air temperatures results in a slight increase the frost thickness and appreciable frost densification.

  9. Gasification performance of switchgrass pretreated with torrefaction and densification

    SciTech Connect

    Jaya Shankar Tumuluru; Various

    2014-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate gasification performance of four switchgrass pretreatments (torrefaction at 230 and 270 °C, densification, and combined torrefaction and densification) and three gasification temperatures (700, 800 and 900 °C). Gasification was performed in a fixed-bed externally heated reactor with air as an oxidizing agent. Switchgrass pretreatment and gasification temperature had significant effects on gasification performance such as gas yields, syngas lower heating value (LHV), and carbon conversion and cold gas efficiencies. With an increase in the gasification temperature, yields of H2 and CO, syngas LHV, and gasifier efficiencies increased whereas CH4, CO2 and N2 yields decreased. Among all switchgrass pretreatments, gasification performance of switchgrass with combined torrefaction and densification was the best followed by that of densified, raw and torrefied switchgrass. Gasification of combined torrefied and densified switchgrass resulted in the highest yields of H2 (0.03 kg/kg biomass) and CO (0.72 kg/kg biomass), highest syngas LHV (5.08 MJ m-3), CCE (92.53%), and CGE (68.40%) at the gasification temperature of 900 °C.

  10. Densification of nanocrystalline ITO powders in fast firing: effect of specimen mass and sintering atmosphere

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Bong-Chull; Lee, Joon-Hyung; Kim, Jeong-Joo . E-mail: jjkim@knu.ac.kr; Lee, Hee Young; Lee, Jai-Sung

    2005-02-15

    Nano-sized indium tin oxide (ITO) powders were prepared by a coprecipitation method, and the sintering characteristics in fast firing were examined. The mass of the specimen, sintering atmosphere and sintering temperature varied. Oxygen atmosphere promoted the densification in normal rate sintering, while oxygen inhibited the densification in fast firing. Fast firing severely retarded densification as the mass of the specimen and the sintering temperature increased. This was explained by differential densification, which could easily occur in conditions with a high densification rate and a high thermal gradient in the specimen, where the outer region of the specimen densifies much faster than the center. Once the highly densified outer skeleton is formed, the inside of the specimen is difficult to densify because the outer skeleton geometrically constrains densification.

  11. Propellant Densification for Launch Vehicles: Simulation and Testing 1999

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Knowles, Timothy E.; Tomisk, Thomas M.; Greene, William D.

    1999-01-01

    One of the many key technologies required to make single-stage to orbit an actuality, the technology of sub-cooling cryogenic propellants below their normal saturation temperatures and thereby making them more dense, is unquestionably on its way towards full and practical realization. The technology of Propellant Densification has been the subject of an extensive research and development program overseen by Lockheed Martin Michoud Space Systems and NASA Glenn Research Center over the past several years. This paper presents a status report of this research and development. Specifically examined within this paper is the status of the current and continuing efforts on the mathematical simulation of the in-tank propellant densification process currently baselined for the Lockheed Martin VentureStar Reusable Launch Vehicle (RLV). Keys to this modeling effort are an understanding and quantification of the effects of thermal stratification and the ability to capture the complex and unique multiple section tank geometries being proposed for future launch vehicles. A simulation that properly captures these phenomena has been developed by Lockheed Martin. Also discussed is the significant test program that has been undertaken in coordination with NASA Glenn Research Center. In this testing, the liquid hydrogen recirculation and densification process was simulated and the thermal stratification of the densified propellant was recorded throughout the tank. This testing marks the first time that such a process has been carried out within a multiple-lobe, flight-similar tank. The results from this testing have gone a long way towards grounding the mathematical models and towards demonstrating the readiness of the technology for near-term use. A further and even more ambitious test program examining the production and utilization of densified propellants is being planned for late-autumn 1999. An overview of these plans is presented.

  12. Evaluation of Liquefaction Susceptibility of Clean Sands after Blast Densification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vega Posada, Carlos Alberto

    The effect of earthquakes on infrastructure facilities is an important topic of interest in geotechnical research. A key design issue for such facilities is whether or not liquefaction will occur during an earthquake. The consequences of this type of ground failure are usually severe, resulting in severe damage to a facility and in some cases the loss of human life. One approach to minimize the effect of liquefaction is to improve the ground condition by controlled blasting. The main limitations of the blast densification technique are that the design is mostly empirical and verification studies of densification have resulted in contradictory results in some case studies. In such cases, even though the ground surface settles almost immediately after blasting, common verification tests such as the cone penetration test (CPT), standard penetration test (SPT), and shear wave velocity test (Vs) suggest that the soil mass has not been improved at all. This raises concerns regarding the future performance of the soil and casts doubts on whether or not the improved deposit is still susceptible to liquefaction. In this work, a blast densification program was implemented at the Oakridge Landfill located in Dorchester County, SC, to gain information regarding the condition of a loose sand deposit during and after each blast event. In addition, an extensive laboratory testing program was conducted on reconstituted sand specimens to evaluate the mechanical behavior of saturated and gassy, medium dense sands during monotonic and cyclic loading. The results from the field and laboratory program indicate that gas released during blasting can remain trapped in the soil mass for several years, and this gas greatly affects the mechanical behavior of the sand. Gas greatly increases the liquefaction resistance of the soil. If the gas remains in the sand over the life of a project, then it will maintain this increased resistance to liquefaction, whether or not the penetration

  13. Poisson's Ratio and the Densification of Glass under High Pressure

    SciTech Connect

    Rouxel, T.; Ji, H.; Hammouda, T.; Moreac, A.

    2008-06-06

    Because of a relatively low atomic packing density, (C{sub g}) glasses experience significant densification under high hydrostatic pressure. Poisson's ratio ({nu}) is correlated to C{sub g} and typically varies from 0.15 for glasses with low C{sub g} such as amorphous silica to 0.38 for close-packed atomic networks such as in bulk metallic glasses. Pressure experiments were conducted up to 25 GPa at 293 K on silica, soda-lime-silica, chalcogenide, and bulk metallic glasses. We show from these high-pressure data that there is a direct correlation between {nu} and the maximum post-decompression density change.

  14. Volcanic sintering: Timescales of viscous densification and strength recovery

    PubMed Central

    Vasseur, Jérémie; Wadsworth, Fabian B; Lavallée, Yan; Hess, Kai-Uwe; Dingwell, Donald B

    2013-01-01

    [1] Sintering and densification are ubiquitous processes influencing the emplacement of both effusive and explosive products of volcanic eruptions. Here we sinter ash-size fragments of a synthetic National Institute of Standards and Technology viscosity standard glass at temperatures at which the resultant melt has a viscosity of ∼108–109 Pa.s at 1bar to assess sintering dynamics under near-surface volcanic conditions. We track the strength recovery via uniaxial compressive tests. We observe that volcanic ash sintering is dominantly time dependent, temperature dependent, and grain size dependent and may thus be interpreted to be controlled by melt viscosity and surface tension. Sintering evolves from particle agglutination to viscous pore collapse and is accompanied by a reduction in connected porosity and an increase in isolated pores. Sintering and densification result in a nonlinear increase in strength. Micromechanical modeling shows that the pore-emanated crack model explains the strength of porous lava as a function of pore fraction and size. PMID:25821262

  15. Recent Advances and Applications in Cryogenic Propellant Densification Technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tomsik, Thomas M.

    2000-01-01

    This purpose of this paper is to review several historical cryogenic test programs that were conducted at the NASA Glenn Research Center (GRC), Cleveland, Ohio over the past fifty years. More recently these technology programs were intended to study new and improved denser forms of liquid hydrogen (LH2) and liquid oxygen (LO2) cryogenic rocket fuels. Of particular interest are subcooled cryogenic propellants. This is due to the fact that they have a significantly higher density (eg. triple-point hydrogen, slush etc.), a lower vapor pressure and improved cooling capacity over the normal boiling point cryogen. This paper, which is intended to be a historical technology overview, will trace the past and recent development and testing of small and large-scale propellant densification production systems. Densifier units in the current GRC fuels program, were designed and are capable of processing subcooled LH2 and L02 propellant at the X33 Reusable Launch Vehicle (RLV) scale. One final objective of this technical briefing is to discuss some of the potential benefits and application which propellant densification technology may offer the industrial cryogenics production and end-user community. Density enhancements to cryogenic propellants (LH2, LO2, CH4) in rocket propulsion and aerospace application have provided the opportunity to either increase performance of existing launch vehicles or to reduce the overall size, mass and cost of a new vehicle system.

  16. Application of densification process in organic waste management.

    PubMed

    Zafari, Abedin; Kianmehr, Mohammad Hossein

    2013-07-01

    Densification of biomass material that usually has a low density is good way of increasing density, reducing the cost of transportation, and simplifying the storage and distribution of this material. The current study was conducted to investigate the influence of raw material parameters (moisture content and particle size), and densification process parameters (piston speed and die length) on the density and durability of pellets from compost manure. A hydraulic press and a single pelleter were used to produce pellets in controlled conditions. Ground biomass samples were compressed with three levels of moisture content [35%, 40% and 45% (wet basis)], piston speed (2, 6 and 10 mm/s), die length (8, 10 and 12 mm) and particle size (0.3., 0.9 and 1.5 mm) to establish density and durability of pellets. A response surface methodology based on the Box Behnken design was used to study the responses pattern and to understand the influence of parameters. The results revealed that all independent variables have significant (P < 0.01) effects on studied responses in this research. PMID:23609176

  17. Volcanic sintering: Timescales of viscous densification and strength recovery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vasseur, Jérémie; Wadsworth, Fabian B.; Lavallée, Yan; Hess, Kai-Uwe; Dingwell, Donald B.

    2013-11-01

    Sintering and densification are ubiquitous processes influencing the emplacement of both effusive and explosive products of volcanic eruptions. Here we sinter ash-size fragments of a synthetic National Institute of Standards and Technology viscosity standard glass at temperatures at which the resultant melt has a viscosity of ˜108-109 Pa.s at 1bar to assess sintering dynamics under near-surface volcanic conditions. We track the strength recovery via uniaxial compressive tests. We observe that volcanic ash sintering is dominantly time dependent, temperature dependent, and grain size dependent and may thus be interpreted to be controlled by melt viscosity and surface tension. Sintering evolves from particle agglutination to viscous pore collapse and is accompanied by a reduction in connected porosity and an increase in isolated pores. Sintering and densification result in a nonlinear increase in strength. Micromechanical modeling shows that the pore-emanated crack model explains the strength of porous lava as a function of pore fraction and size.

  18. Experimental Studies of Liquefaction and Densification of Liquid Oxygen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Partridge, Jonathan Koert

    2010-01-01

    The propellant combination that offers optimum performance is very reactive with a low average molecular weight of the resulting combustion products. Propellant combinations such as oxygen and hydrogen meet the above criteria, however, the propellants in gaseous form require large propellant tanks due to the low density of gas. Thus, rocketry employs cryogenic refrigeration to provide a more dense propellant stored as a liquid. In addition to propellant liquefaction, cryogenic refrigeration can also conserve propellant and provide propellant subcooling and propellant densification. Previous studies analyzed vapor conditioning of a cryogenic propellant, with the vapor conditioning by either a heat exchanger position in the vapor or by using the vapor in a refrigeration cycle as the working fluid. This study analyzes the effects of refrigeration heat exchanger located in the liquid of the common propellant oxidizer, liquid oxygen. This study predicted and determined the mass condensation rate and heat transfer coefficient for liquid oxygen.

  19. Selective laser densification of lithium aluminosilicate glass ceramic tapes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zocca, Andrea; Colombo, Paolo; Günster, Jens; Mühler, Thomas; Heinrich, Jürgen G.

    2013-01-01

    Tapes, cast by blade deposition of a lithium aluminosilicate glass slurry, were sintered using a YAG-fiber laser, with the aim of finding suitable parameters for an additive manufacturing process based on layer-wise slurry deposition and selective laser densification. The influence of the laser parameters (output power and scan velocity) on the sintering was evaluated, by scanning electron microscopy and by X-ray diffraction, on the basis of the quality of the processed layer. Well densified samples could be obtained only in a small window of values for the output power and the scan velocity. The measurement of the width of a set of single scanned lines allowed also to estimate the minimum resolution of the system along the layer plane.

  20. Hydrogen confinement in carbon nanopores: extreme densification at ambient temperature.

    PubMed

    Gallego, Nidia C; He, Lilin; Saha, Dipendu; Contescu, Cristian I; Melnichenko, Yuri B

    2011-09-01

    In-situ small-angle neutron scattering studies of H(2) confined in small pores of polyfurfuryl alcohol-derived activated carbon at room temperature have provided for the first time its phase behavior in equilibrium with external H(2) at pressures up to 200 bar. The data were used to evaluate the density of the adsorbed fluid, which appears to be a function of both pore size and pressure and is comparable to the density of liquid H(2) in narrow nanopores at ∼200 bar. The surface-molecule interactions responsible for densification of H(2) within the pores create internal pressures that exceed the external gas pressure by a factor of up to ∼50, confirming the benefits of adsorptive storage over compressive storage. These results can be used to guide the development of new carbon adsorbents tailored for maximum H(2) storage capacities at near-ambient temperatures. PMID:21819066

  1. Hydrogen Confinement in Carbon Nanopores: Extreme Densification at Ambient Temperature

    SciTech Connect

    Gallego, Nidia C; He, Lilin; Saha, Dipendu; Contescu, Cristian I; Melnichenko, Yuri B

    2011-01-01

    In-situ small angle neutron scattering (SANS) studies of hydrogen confined in small pores of polyfurfuryl alcohol-derived activated carbon (PFAC) at room-temperature provided for the first time its phase behavior in equilibrium with external H2 at pressures up to 200 bar. The data was used to evaluate the density of the adsorbed fluid, which appears to be a function of both pore size and pressure, and approaches the liquid hydrogen density in narrow nanopores at 200 bar. The surface-molecule interactions responsible for densification of hydrogen within the pores create internal pressures which exceed by a factor of up to ~ 60 the external gas pressures, confirming the benefits of adsorptive over compressive storage. These results can be utilized to guide the development of new carbon adsorbents tailored for maximum hydrogen storage capacities at near ambient temperatures.

  2. SIRGAS: ITRF densification in Latin America and the Caribbean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brunini, C.; Costa, S.; Mackern, V.; Martínez, W.; Sánchez, L.; Seemüller, W.; da Silva, A.

    2009-04-01

    The continental reference frame of SIRGAS (Sistema de Referencia Geocéntrico para las Américas) is at present realized by the SIRGAS Continuously Operating Network (SIRGAS-CON) composed by about 200 stations distributed over all Latin America and the Caribbean. SIRGAS member countries are qualifying their national reference frames by installing continuously operating GNSS stations, which have to be consistently integrated into the continental network. As the number of these stations is rapidly increasing, the processing strategy of the SIRGAS-CON network was redefined during the SIRGAS 2008 General Meeting in May 2008. The new strategy relies upon the definition of two hierarchy levels: a) A core network (SIRGAS-CON-C) with homogeneous continental coverage and stabile site locations ensures the long-term stability of the reference frame and provides the primary link to the ITRS. Stations belonging to this network have been selected so that each country contributes with a number of stations defined according to its surface and guarantying that the selected stations are the best in operability, continuity, reliability, and geographical coverage. b) Several densification sub-networks (SIRGAS-CON-D) improve the accessibility to the reference frame. The SIRGAS-CON-D sub-networks shall correspond to the national reference frames, i.e., as an optimum there shall be as many sub-networks as countries in the region. The goal is that each country processes its own continuously stations following the SIRGAS processing guidelines, which are defined in accordance with the IERS and IGS standards and conventions. Since at present not all of the countries are operating a processing centre, the existing stations are classified in three densification networks (a Northern, a middle, and a Southern one), which are processed by three local processing centres until new ones are installed. As SIRGAS is defined as a densification of the ITRS, stations included in the core network, as

  3. The affect of densification and dehydroxylation on the mechanical properties of stoichiometric hydroxyapatite bioceramics

    SciTech Connect

    Laasri, S.; Taha, M.; Laghzizil, A.; Hlil, E.K.; Chevalier, J.

    2010-10-15

    This paper reports the effects of processing densification on the mechanical properties of hydroxyapatite bioceramics. Densification of synthetic hydroxyapatite is conducted in the range 1000-1300 {sup o}C. X-ray diffraction and SEM microscopy are used to check the microstructure transformations. Vickers hardness, toughness and Young's modulus are analyzed versus the density and grain size. The sintering temperature and the particle size influence strongly the densification and the resulting mechanical properties. In addition, the critical sintering temperature appears around 1200 {sup o}C and the declined strength at the temperature up to 1200 {sup o}C is found sensitive to the dehydroxylation process of hydroxyapatite.

  4. Full Densification of Molybdenum Powders Using Spark Plasma Sintering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mouawad, B.; Soueidan, M.; Fabrègue, D.; Buttay, C.; Bley, V.; Allard, B.; Morel, H.

    2012-09-01

    Pure molybdenum powder was sintered using spark plasma sintering (SPS) under various temperatures and holding times, under a pressure of 77 MPa and a heating rate at 700 K/min (700 °C/min). After sintering, a carbide layer was observed at the surface. The carbide layer thickness, the relative density of the sample as well as the microhardness, and the grain size of Mo were measured. The carbide thickness depends on time and temperature, and it was found that the carbide layer grows in a parabolic manner, with the activation energy of carbon diffusion in Mo being equal to 34 Kcal/mol. The densification of Mo is controlled mainly by the sintering temperature and the holding time. The molybdenum powder was successfully consolidated by SPS in short times. A relative density of 100 pct is achieved at a sintering temperature of 2123.15 K (1850 °C) and a holding time of 30 minutes. It was shown that the hardness decreases slightly with temperature and time. It should be related to the increase in grain size with the sintering temperature and time.

  5. Full Densification of Molybdenum Powders Using Spark Plasma Sintering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mouawad, B.; Soueidan, M.; Fabrègue, D.; Buttay, C.; Bley, V.; Allard, B.; Morel, H.

    2012-05-01

    Pure molybdenum powder was sintered using spark plasma sintering (SPS) under various temperatures and holding times, under a pressure of 77 MPa and a heating rate at 700 K/min (700 °C/min). After sintering, a carbide layer was observed at the surface. The carbide layer thickness, the relative density of the sample as well as the microhardness, and the grain size of Mo were measured. The carbide thickness depends on time and temperature, and it was found that the carbide layer grows in a parabolic manner, with the activation energy of carbon diffusion in Mo being equal to 34 Kcal/mol. The densification of Mo is controlled mainly by the sintering temperature and the holding time. The molybdenum powder was successfully consolidated by SPS in short times. A relative density of 100 pct is achieved at a sintering temperature of 2123.15 K (1850 °C) and a holding time of 30 minutes. It was shown that the hardness decreases slightly with temperature and time. It should be related to the increase in grain size with the sintering temperature and time.

  6. On the self-damping nature of densification in photonic sintering of nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    MacNeill, William; Choi, Chang-Ho; Chang, Chih-Hung; Malhotra, Rajiv

    2015-10-01

    Sintering of nanoparticle inks over large area-substrates is a key enabler for scalable fabrication of patterned and continuous films, with multiple emerging applications. The high speed and ambient condition operation of photonic sintering has elicited significant interest for this purpose. In this work, we experimentally characterize the temperature evolution and densification in photonic sintering of silver nanoparticle inks, as a function of nanoparticle size. It is shown that smaller nanoparticles result in faster densification, with lower temperatures during sintering, as compared to larger nanoparticles. Further, high densification can be achieved even without nanoparticle melting. Electromagnetic Finite Element Analysis of photonic heating is coupled to an analytical sintering model, to examine the role of interparticle neck growth in photonic sintering. It is shown that photonic sintering is an inherently self-damping process, i.e., the progress of densification reduces the magnitude of subsequent photonic heating even before full density is reached. By accounting for this phenomenon, the developed coupled model better captures the experimentally observed sintering temperature and densification as compared to conventional photonic sintering models. Further, this model is used to uncover the reason behind the experimentally observed increase in densification with increasing weight ratio of smaller to larger nanoparticles.

  7. On the self-damping nature of densification in photonic sintering of nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    MacNeill, William; Choi, Chang-Ho; Chang, Chih-Hung; Malhotra, Rajiv

    2015-01-01

    Sintering of nanoparticle inks over large area-substrates is a key enabler for scalable fabrication of patterned and continuous films, with multiple emerging applications. The high speed and ambient condition operation of photonic sintering has elicited significant interest for this purpose. In this work, we experimentally characterize the temperature evolution and densification in photonic sintering of silver nanoparticle inks, as a function of nanoparticle size. It is shown that smaller nanoparticles result in faster densification, with lower temperatures during sintering, as compared to larger nanoparticles. Further, high densification can be achieved even without nanoparticle melting. Electromagnetic Finite Element Analysis of photonic heating is coupled to an analytical sintering model, to examine the role of interparticle neck growth in photonic sintering. It is shown that photonic sintering is an inherently self-damping process, i.e., the progress of densification reduces the magnitude of subsequent photonic heating even before full density is reached. By accounting for this phenomenon, the developed coupled model better captures the experimentally observed sintering temperature and densification as compared to conventional photonic sintering models. Further, this model is used to uncover the reason behind the experimentally observed increase in densification with increasing weight ratio of smaller to larger nanoparticles. PMID:26443492

  8. A Technical Review on Biomass Processing: Densification, Preprocessing, Modeling and Optimization

    SciTech Connect

    Jaya Shankar Tumuluru; Christopher T. Wright

    2010-06-01

    It is now a well-acclaimed fact that burning fossil fuels and deforestation are major contributors to climate change. Biomass from plants can serve as an alternative renewable and carbon-neutral raw material for the production of bioenergy. Low densities of 40–60 kg/m3 for lignocellulosic and 200–400 kg/m3 for woody biomass limits their application for energy purposes. Prior to use in energy applications these materials need to be densified. The densified biomass can have bulk densities over 10 times the raw material helping to significantly reduce technical limitations associated with storage, loading and transportation. Pelleting, briquetting, or extrusion processing are commonly used methods for densification. The aim of the present research is to develop a comprehensive review of biomass processing that includes densification, preprocessing, modeling and optimization. The specific objective include carrying out a technical review on (a) mechanisms of particle bonding during densification; (b) methods of densification including extrusion, briquetting, pelleting, and agglomeration; (c) effects of process and feedstock variables and biomass biochemical composition on the densification (d) effects of preprocessing such as grinding, preheating, steam explosion, and torrefaction on biomass quality and binding characteristics; (e) models for understanding the compression characteristics; and (f) procedures for response surface modeling and optimization.

  9. Application of powder densification models to the consolidation processing of composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wadley, H. N. G.; Elzey, D. M.

    1991-01-01

    Unidirectional fiber reinforced metal matrix composite tapes (containing a single layer of parallel fibers) can now be produced by plasma deposition. These tapes can be stacked and subjected to a thermomechanical treatment that results in a fully dense near net shape component. The mechanisms by which this consolidation step occurs are explored, and models to predict the effect of different thermomechanical conditions (during consolidation) upon the kinetics of densification are developed. The approach is based upon a methodology developed by Ashby and others for the simpler problem of HIP of spherical powders. The complex problem is devided into six, much simpler, subproblems, and then their predicted contributions are added to densification. The initial problem decomposition is to treat the two extreme geometries encountered (contact deformation occurring between foils and shrinkage of isolated, internal pores). Deformation of these two geometries is modelled for plastic, power law creep and diffusional flow. The results are reported in the form of a densification map.

  10. Role of solubility and tungsten powder size on densification of tungsten-based composites

    SciTech Connect

    Griffo, A.; Liu, Y.; German, R.M.

    1994-10-19

    The densification behavior of new tungsten-based alloys was evaluated as a function of the solubility of tungsten in the liquid and the particle size of the tungsten powder. The matrix phase was a combination of nickel or iron, and an aluminide-based intermetallics, Ni3A1, Ni2Al3, and Fe3Al. The aluminides were used to lower the matrix solubility for tungsten to inhibit grain coarsening. In addition, the low solubility systems used two different tungsten powders to examine the role of powder size on densification. Dilatometric experiments were performed to determined the liquid formation temperatures and to study the densification dynamics. A low solubility matrix required higher sintering temperatures and smaller tungsten particles to achieve near full density.

  11. Densification characteristics of chromia/alumina castables by particle size distribution

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    The quality of the refractories applied on integrated gasification combined cycle should be a key factor that affects both the reliability and the economics of gasifier operation. To enhance the workability of chromia/alumina castables, three types of ultrafine alumina powder were added to improve the workability. Densification behavior of such castables in the presence of ultrafine alumina was assessed through the measurement of parameters like flow value, viscosity, bulk density, apparent porosity, and microstructure evaluation by an SEM study. It's proved that the specific surface area and particle size distribution of ultrafine powders in matrix parts greatly influence the densification behavior of these castables. PMID:22221548

  12. Microwave sintering versus conventional sintering of NiCuZn ferrites. Part I: Densification evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Jianhua; Ouyang, Chenxin; Xiao, Shumin; Gao, Yongyi

    2016-06-01

    This work reports the recent study on the microwave sintering (MS) versus conventional sintering (CS) of NiCuZn ferrites, with particular interests in the densification evolution. NiCuZn ferrite powders were synthesized through the solid state reaction route. Densification behaviors of ferrite samples under the two types of thermal sources were monitored in real-time. Meanwhile, the influences of additives (1 wt% BSZ glass or 1 wt% Bi2O3) on the densifications were also investigated. Both constant heating rate (CHR) and master sintering curve (MSC) models were used to evaluate the sintering activation energy (Q). Results demonstrated that the microwave-enhanced diffusion mainly occurs at the intermediate sintering stage. The Q-value estimated by MSC method agreed well with that from CHR method. With the influence of microwave electromagnetic field, the activation energy of NiCuZn ferrites was decreased by roughly 100-150 kJ/mol. In addition, doping a small amount of additives could improve densification degree and reduce the minimal energy to activate diffusion mechanisms.

  13. Performance Tests of a Liquid Hydrogen Propellant Densification Ground System for the X33/RLV

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tomsik, Thomas M.

    1997-01-01

    A concept for improving the performance of propulsion systems in expendable and single-stage-to-orbit (SSTO) launch vehicles much like the X33/RLV has been identified. The approach is to utilize densified cryogenic liquid hydrogen (LH2) and liquid oxygen (LOX) propellants to fuel the propulsion stage. The primary benefit for using this relatively high specific impulse densified propellant mixture is the subsequent reduction of the launch vehicle gross lift-off weight. Production of densified propellants however requires specialized equipment to actively subcool both the liquid oxygen and liquid hydrogen to temperatures below their normal boiling point. A propellant densification unit based on an external thermodynamic vent principle which operates at subatmospheric pressure and supercold temperatures provides a means for the LH2 and LOX densification process to occur. To demonstrate the production concept for the densification of the liquid hydrogen propellant, a system comprised of a multistage gaseous hydrogen compressor, LH2 recirculation pumps and a cryogenic LH2 heat exchanger was designed, built and tested at the NASA Lewis Research Center (LeRC). This paper presents the design configuration of the LH2 propellant densification production hardware, analytical details and results of performance testing conducted with the hydrogen densifier Ground Support Equipment (GSE).

  14. Bond-breaking mechanism of vitreous silica densification by IR femtosecond laser pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shcheblanov, Nikita S.; Povarnitsyn, Mikhail E.

    2016-04-01

    The densification of the vitreous silica (v-SiO2) due to laser irradiation appears reasonable to cause the change in refractive index. In this letter, the v-SiO2 densification under IR femtosecond laser irradiation is studied within molecular-dynamics simulation. The single- and multi-pulse interactions are explored numerically with an account of the bond-breaking mechanism. By analyzing the network at nanoscale, the nature of v-SiO2 densification is assigned to the reduction of major ring fractions of six- and seven-membered rings to minor fractions of three- and four-membered rings (related to D 2 and D 1 Raman signatures, respectively). The athermal behavior of v-SiO2 densification is disclosed at different degrees of ionization for both the single- and multi-pulse cases at sub-threshold regimes. The good agreement between calculated and measured D2 defect line and Si-O-Si angle changes argues in favor of the found mechanism.

  15. A Review on Biomass Densification Systems to Develop Uniform Feedstock Commodities for Bioenergy Application

    SciTech Connect

    Jaya Shankar Tumuluru; Christopher T. Wright; J. Richard Hess; Kevin L. Kenney

    2011-11-01

    Developing uniformly formatted, densified feedstock from lignocellulosic biomass is of interest to achieve consistent physical properties like size and shape, bulk and unit density, and durability, which significantly influence storage, transportation and handling characteristics, and, by extension, feedstock cost and quality. A variety of densification systems are considered for producing a uniform format feedstock commodity for bioenergy applications, including (a) baler, (b) pellet mill, (c) cuber, (d) screw extruder, (e) briquette press, (f) roller press, (g) tablet press, and (g) agglomerator. Each of these systems has varying impacts on feedstock chemical and physical properties, and energy consumption. This review discusses the suitability of these densification systems for biomass feedstocks and the impact these systems have on specific energy consumption and end product quality. For example, a briquette press is more flexible in terms of feedstock variables where higher moisture content and larger particles are acceptable for making good quality briquettes; or among different densification systems, a screw press consumes the most energy because it not only compresses but also shears and mixes the material. Pretreatment options like preheating, grinding, steam explosion, torrefaction, and ammonia fiber explosion (AFEX) can also help to reduce specific energy consumption during densification and improve binding characteristics. Binding behavior can also be improved by adding natural binders, such as proteins, or commercial binders, such as lignosulphonates. The quality of the densified biomass for both domestic and international markets is evaluated using PFI (United States Standard) or CEN (European Standard).

  16. The Influence of Simulated Home and Neighbourhood Densification on Perceived Liveability

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thomas, J. A.; Walton, D.; Lamb, S.

    2011-01-01

    This study experimentally manipulated neighbourhood density and home location to reveal the effect of these changes on perceived liveability. Two hypothetical scenarios were provided to 106 households using a Computer-Aided Personal Interview (CAPI). The first scenario examined a densification of the participant's current property, and the second…

  17. Effect of particle breakage on cyclic densification of ballast: A DEM approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thakur, P. K.; Vinod, J. S.; Indraratna, B.

    2010-06-01

    In this paper, an attempt has been made to investigate the effect of particle breakage on densification behaviour of ballast under cyclic loading using Discrete Element Method (DEM). Numerical simulations using PFC2D have been carried out on an assembly of angular particles with and without incorporation of particle breakage. Two-dimensional projection of angular ballast particles were simulated using clusters of bonded circular particles. Degradation of the bonds within a cluster was considered to represent particle breakage. Clump logic was used to make the cluster of particles unbreakable. DEM simulation results highlight that the particle breakage has a profound influence on the cyclic densification behaviour of ballast. The deformation behaviour exhibited by the assembly with breakage is in good agreement with the laboratory experiments. In addition, the evolution of particle displacement vectors clearly explains the breakage mechanism and associated deformations during cyclic loading.

  18. Silicon nitride-aluminum oxide solid solution (SiAION) formation and densification by pressure sintering

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yeh, H. C.; Sanders, W. A.; Fiyalko, J. L.

    1975-01-01

    Stirred-ball-mill-blended Si3N4 and Al2O3 powders were pressure sintered in order to investigate the mechanism of solid solution formation and densification in the Si3N4-Al2O3 system. Powder blends with Si3N4:Al2O3 mole ratios of 4:1, 3:2, and 2:3 were pressure sintered at 27.6-MN/sq m pressure at temperatures to 17000 C (3090 F). The compaction behavior of the powder blends during pressure sintering was determined by observing the density of the powder compact as a function of temperature and time starting from room temperature. This information, combined with the results of X-ray diffraction and metallographic analyses regarding solutioning and phase transformation phenomena in the Si3N4-Al2O3 system, was used to describe the densification behavior.

  19. The effect of powder sintering method on the densification and microstructure of pewter alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Firdaus Ariff, Tasnim; Gabbitas, Brian; Zhang, Deliang

    2009-08-01

    Pewter alloys made from tin, copper and antimony powders were sintered using microwave and conventional vacuum sintering. Three different compositions of the pewter alloy were used; 91Sn6Cu3Sb, 94Sn4Cu2Sb and 97Sn2Cu1Sb. The effect of densification and microstructure of the pewter alloys from varying sintering time and sintering mode were examined and compared. Samples were compacted at 40kN and sintered at 220°C. Samples in the conventional furnace were sintered 60 minutes and 120 minutes, while samples in the microwave furnace were sintered for 15 and 30 minutes. Samples sintered at longer sintering times resulted in higher density for both sintering methods. Microwave sintering produced samples with slightly smaller grain size than the conventionally sintered samples resulting in a better densification. There were no new phases formed from the sintering of pewter alloy.

  20. Pre-eutectic densification in MgF/sub 2/-CaF/sub 2/

    SciTech Connect

    Hu, S C; De Jonghe, L C

    1982-04-01

    Increased densification rates were found as much as 200/sup 0/C below the eutectic temperature (980/sup 0/C) for MgF/sub 2/ containing small amounts of CaF/sub 2/. Constant heating rate and constant temperature sintering data, as well as microstructural developments indicated that solid state grain-boundary transport rates had been enhanced by the eutectic forming additive. The effect saturated at about 1 wt % CaF/sub 2/. The results suggest that densification of ceramic powders could be favorably affected without a substantial increase in the grain growth rate, by the addition of small amounts of eutectic forming additives, and sintering below the eutectic temperature. 6 figures.

  1. Enhancing the tensile properties of continuous millimeter-scale carbon nanotube fibers by densification.

    PubMed

    Hill, Frances A; Havel, Timothy F; Hart, A John; Livermore, Carol

    2013-08-14

    This work presents a study of the tensile mechanical properties of millimeter-long fibers comprising carbon nanotubes (CNTs). These CNT fibers are made of aligned, loosely packed parallel networks of CNTs that are grown in and harvested from CNT forests without drawing or spinning. Unlike typical CNT yarn, the present fibers contain a large fraction of CNTs that span the fibers' entire gauge length. The fibers are densified after growth and network formation to study how increasing the degree of interaction among CNTs in a network by various methods influences and limits the mechanical behavior of macroscopic CNT materials, particularly for the case in which the continuity of a large fraction of CNTs across the gauge length prevents failure purely by slip. Densification is carried out using various combinations of capillary-driven densification, mechanical pressure, and twisting. All methods of densification increase the fiber density and modify the nanoscale order of the CNTs. The highest strength and stiffness values (1.8 and 88.7 N tex(-1), respectively) are observed for capillary-densified fibers, whereas the highest toughness values (94 J g(-1)) and maximum reversible energy density (1.35 kJ kg(-1) or 677 kJ m(-3)) are observed for fibers densified by mechanical pressure. The results suggest that the path to higher performance CNT materials may lie not only in the use of continuous and long CNTs but also in controlling their density and nanoscale ordering through modification of the as-grown networks, such as by capillary-driven densification. PMID:23876225

  2. Change in Firn Densification Rates to 80 m Depth Across the Percolation Zone of Western Greenland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, J. M.; Bradford, J. H.; Harper, J. T.; Pfeffer, T.; Humphrey, N. F.

    2008-12-01

    We conducted ground based georadar surveys at thirteen locations along a 70 km long transect of the EGIG line in the percolation zone of the western part of the Greenland Ice Sheet. The purpose of these surveys is both to gain an understanding of the hydrologic pathways of surface generated meltwater as well as to measure densification of the upper 80 m of the percolation zone, and how densification rates change with elevation. To determine the density of a layer we assume a lack of liquid water and use the CRIM equation to solve for overall density from electromagnetic (EM) velocity. In this study we used three methods to solve for the EM velocity 1) Common Mid-Point (CMP) reflection analysis solving for velocity with a ray-based model inversion technique, 2) multi-offset, single line acquisition solving for velocity with a reflection tomography inversion technique, and 3) impedance analysis of single offset data to determine radar velocity variation with depth along a single trace. We show that near surface density varies laterally over tens of meters and that density curves calculated from CMPs are representative of measured core densities. The CMP density curves are smoothed over depth and represent volumes that are orders of magnitude larger than traditional core density curves; therefore they may be better measures of densification rates for regions of the Ice Sheet. We also found that firn density increases at significantly higher rates at lower elevation sites and that the rates at lower sites deviate substantially from standard firn densification curves.

  3. Densification Kinetics and Structural Evolution During Microwave and Pressureless Sintering of 15 nm Titanium Nitride Powder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zgalat-Lozynskyy, Ostap; Ragulya, Andrey

    2016-02-01

    Microwave sintering (MWS) of commercially available 15-nm-size nanocrystalline TiN powder was studied. Densification kinetics and grain growth mechanisms of nano-TiN were evaluated using non-isothermal heating up to 1500 °C with variable heating rates. A true nanocrystalline ceramic with ~80-nm-size grains and 94.5 % theoretical density was obtained via MWS consolidation at 1400 °C. At higher temperatures, however, an uncontrolled grain growth and a formation of bimodal microstructure were noticed. A temperature dependence of grain growth suggested grain boundary sliding as a primary mechanism of densification below 1100-1200 °C. An activation energy of nano-TiN densification under MWS varied from 26 ± 3 kJ/mol at the initial stage of sintering (900-1200 °C) to 162 ± 22 kJ/mol at higher temperatures. In addition, a relationship coupling microstructural characteristics (grain size, grain boundary) with mechanical properties of titanium nitride ceramics obtained via both microwave and pressureless sintering techniques was discussed.

  4. Observation of Porosity Reduction in a Densification-Prone Test Fuel Rod: Data and Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Cunningham, M. E.; Daniel, J. L.; Lanning, D. D.

    1981-10-01

    Instrumented fuel assembly (IFA)-431 was irradiated in the Halden Boiling Water Reactor (HBWR) for the purpose of extending the steady-state data base. Rod 6 of this assembly began irradiation with UO{sub 2} fuel of 92% theoretical density (TD) that was unstable with respect to in-reactor densification. Thermal resintering tests resulted in a final density of 95.3% TD while post-irradiation examination (PIE) indicated a final density of 96.5% TD. Observed microstructural changes were consistent with published densification studies; there was a marked depletion of submicrometer diameter pores and total pore volume. However, grain size increased only slightly, indicating that internal pellet temperatures did not reach the 1875K applied in resintering tests. Oensification was observed to increase the temperatures in rod 6, but temperatures did not become as high as for a sibling rod that simulated instantaneous densification. Temperatures calculated with U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) fuel performance computer codes were generally higher than observed temperatures.

  5. Influence of Chemical Composition Variations on Densification During the Sintering of MOX Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vaudez, S.; Marlot, C.; Lechelle, J.

    2016-04-01

    The mixed uranium-plutonium oxide (MOX) fabrication process is based on the preparation of UO2 and PuO2 powders. The mixture is pelletized before being sintered at 1973 K (1700 °C) in a reducing atmosphere of Ar/4pctH2/H2O. This paper shows how the densification of MOX fuel is affected during sintering by the moisture content of the gas, the plutonium content of the fuel, and the carbon impurity content in the raw materials. MOX densification can be monitored through dilatometric measurements and gas releases can be continuously analyzed during sintering in terms of their quantity and quality. Variations in the oxygen content in the fuel can be continuously recorded by coupling the dilatometer furnace with an oxygen measurement at the gas outlet. Any carbon-bearing species released, such as CO, can be also linked to densification phenomena when a gas chromatograph is installed at the outlet of the dilatometer. Recommendations on the choice of sintering atmosphere that best optimizes the fuel characteristics have been given on the basis of the results reported in this paper.

  6. Densification mechanism of BaTiO3 films on Cu substrates fabricated by aerosol deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Hong-Ki; Lee, Seung-Hwan; Lee, Sung-Gap; Lee, Young-Hie

    2015-05-01

    In order to achieve the aerosol deposition (AD) process as a thin film deposition process, the densification mechanism of the AD process was investigated. BaTiO3 films with thicknesses of 0.2, 0.5, and 2 μm on Cu substrates were fabricated using the AD process at room temperature in order to investigate the densification mechanism according to the increased the film thickness; we also investigated the resulting properties, including the microstructure, the electrical properties, and the hardness. As a result, we confirmed that the enhanced hammering effect (which is a densification procedure that works by continuous impaction of ceramic particles onto pre-impacted particles), formed dense BaTiO3 films with greater hardness and decreased leakage current characteristics. Furthermore, we concluded that the BaTiO3 particles, which were sufficiently fractured due to the hammering effect, were important in fabricating the dense BaTiO3 thin films. Therefore, we suggested the two-step deposition method (deposition and etching).[Figure not available: see fulltext.

  7. Densification Process of OH Controlled Hydroxyapatite Ceramics by Spark Plasma Sintering

    SciTech Connect

    Kawagoe, D.; Koga, Y.; Ishida, E. H.; Ioku, K.

    2006-05-15

    Calcium hydroxyapatite, Ca10(PO4)6(OH)2:HA, is the inorganic principle component of natural bones and teeth. It has been already suggested that the amount of OH ion in the crystal structure of HA is closely related to the biocompatibility. The amount of OH ion in current HA, however, has not been controlled. In order to prepare more functional HA ceramics, the amount of OH ion must be controlled. In this study, HA ceramics with different OH amount were prepared from fine HA crystals by spark plasma sintering (SPS). In order to reveal the ideal sintering conditions for preparation of transparent ceramics, densification process on SPS was investigated. The samples were pressed uniaxialy under 60 MPa, and then they were heated by SPS at 800 deg. C, 900 deg. C and 1000 deg. C for 10 min with the heating rate of 25 deg. C{center_dot}min-1. The quantity of OH ion in HA ceramics sintered by SPS was decreased with increasing temperature of sintering. Transparent HA ceramics were prepared by SPS at 900 deg. C and 1000 deg. C. In analysis of the densification behavior during sintering of HA by SPS, dominant sintering mechanism was plastic flow of densification. Transparent ceramics should be the most suitable materials to investigate the interface between human cells and ceramics.

  8. Influence of Chemical Composition Variations on Densification During the Sintering of MOX Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vaudez, S.; Marlot, C.; Lechelle, J.

    2016-06-01

    The mixed uranium-plutonium oxide (MOX) fabrication process is based on the preparation of UO2 and PuO2 powders. The mixture is pelletized before being sintered at 1973 K (1700 °C) in a reducing atmosphere of Ar/4pctH2/H2O. This paper shows how the densification of MOX fuel is affected during sintering by the moisture content of the gas, the plutonium content of the fuel, and the carbon impurity content in the raw materials. MOX densification can be monitored through dilatometric measurements and gas releases can be continuously analyzed during sintering in terms of their quantity and quality. Variations in the oxygen content in the fuel can be continuously recorded by coupling the dilatometer furnace with an oxygen measurement at the gas outlet. Any carbon-bearing species released, such as CO, can be also linked to densification phenomena when a gas chromatograph is installed at the outlet of the dilatometer. Recommendations on the choice of sintering atmosphere that best optimizes the fuel characteristics have been given on the basis of the results reported in this paper.

  9. Experimental investigation of uranium dicarbide densification and the influence of free carbon diffusion

    SciTech Connect

    Chidester, K.M.

    1991-04-01

    Because UC{sub 2} fuel is being considered for space reactor applications, an investigation of process parameters and densification mechanisms for this fuel was conducted for the DOE. Uranium dicarbide feed powder was prepared by carbothermic reduction of uranium dicarbide and graphite at 2050 K in vacuum. Uranium dicarbide pellets were prepared by cold pressing at 110 MPa and sintering at 2370 K in contact with niobium, tantalum, or tungsten substrates in argon, argon-hydrogen, and vacuum atmospheres. Argon proved to be the most effective for sintering. A high density front was observed to move through the pellets, starting from the pellet-metal substrate interface. The primary factor controlling this phenomenon is the diffusion of carbon from the uranium dicarbide pellet into the metal substrate. When the carbon level reduces so that no free carbon is present, rapid densification of the uranium dicarbide occurs. The movement of the high density front can be predicted with carbon diffusion equations using the error function. The activation energy for the high density front movement was determined to be {minus}130 to {minus}180 Kcal/mole. An effective diffusion coefficient for carbon diffusion in UC{sub 2} and the movement of the densified region was measured at 8 {times} 10{sup {minus}7} cm{sup 2}/s. This technique can be used to control densification of uranium dicarbide and to control carbon level and grain size in sintered compacts. More information on the fundamental carbon transport mechanism is necessary for complete understanding of the phenomenon. 54 refs., 67 figs.

  10. Femtosecond laser-induced stress-free ultra-densification inside porous glass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Veiko, Vadim P.; Kudryashov, Sergey I.; Sergeev, Maksim M.; Zakoldaev, Roman A.; Danilov, Pavel A.; Ionin, Andrey A.; Antropova, Tatiana V.; Anfimova, Irina N.

    2016-05-01

    Unusually high densification  ⩽26% was obtained without lateral residual stresses within the laser beam waist inside porous glass during its multi-shot femtosecond laser irradiation, which may induce in the glass the related high refractive index change ~0.1. Corresponding laser irradiation regimes, resulting in such ultra-densification, decompaction and voids inside the glass, were revealed as a function of laser pulse energy and scanning rate, and were discussed in terms of thermal and hydrodynamic processes in the silica network.

  11. The 3D model: explaining densification and deformation mechanisms by using 3D parameter plots.

    PubMed

    Picker, Katharina M

    2004-04-01

    The aim of the study was to analyze very differently deforming materials using 3D parameter plots and consequently to gain deeper insights into the densification and deformation process described with the 3D model in order to define an ideal tableting excipient. The excipients used were dicalcium phosphate dihydrate (DCPD), sodium chloride (NaCl), microcrystalline cellulose (MCC), xylitol, mannitol, alpha-lactose monohydrate, maltose, hydroxypropyl methylcellulose (HPMC), sodium carboxymethylcellulose (NaCMC), cellulose acetate (CAC), maize starch, potato starch, pregelatinized starch, and maltodextrine. All of the materials were tableted to graded maximum relative densities (rhorel, max) using an eccentric tableting machine. The data which resulted, namely force, displacement, and time, were analyzed by the application of 3D modeling. Different particle size fractions of DCPD, CAC, and MCC were analyzed in addition. Brittle deforming materials such as DCPD exhibited a completely different 3D parameter plot, with low time plasticity, d, and low pressure plasticity, e, and a strong decrease in omega values when densification increased, in contrast to the plastically deforming MCC, which had much higher d, e, and omega values. e and omega values changed only slightly when densification increased for MCC. NaCl showed less of a decrease in omega values than DCPD did, and the d and e values were between those of MCC and DCPD. The sugar alcohols, xylitol and mannitol, behaved in a similar fashion to sodium chloride. This is also valid for the crystalline sugars, alpha-lactose monohydrate, and maltose. However, the sugars are more brittle than the sugar alcohols. The cellulose derivatives, HPMC, NaCMC, and CAC, are as plastic as MCC, however, their elasticity depends on substitution indicated by lower (more elastic) or higher (less elastic) omega values. The native starches, maize starch and potato starch, are very elastic, and pregelatinized starch and maltodextrine are

  12. Impact of densification on microstructure and transport properties of CaFe5O7

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delacotte, C.; Hébert, S.; Hardy, V.; Bréard, Y.; Maki, R.; Mori, T.; Pelloquin, D.

    2016-04-01

    Monophasic CaFe5O7 ceramic has been synthesized by solid state route. Its microstructural features have been studied by diffraction techniques and electron microscopy images before and after Spark Plasma Sintering (SPS) annealings. This work is completed by measurements of electrical and thermal properties. Especially, attention is focused around the structural and electronic transition at 360 K for which specific heat measurements have revealed a sharp peak. Densification by SPS techniques led to a significant improvement of electrical conductivity above 360 K.

  13. Multi-material laser densification (MMLD) of dental restorations: Process optimization and properties evaluation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xiaoxuan

    This Ph.D. thesis proposes to investigate the feasibility of laser-assisted dental restoration and to develop a fundamental understanding of the interaction between laser beam and dental materials. Traditional dental restorations are produced by the porcelain-fused-to-metal (PFM) process, in which a dental restoration is cast from a metallic alloy and then coated with dental porcelains by multiple furnace-firing processes. PFM method is labor-intensive and hence very expensive. In order to fabricate dental restoration units faster and more cost-effectively, the Solid Freeform Fabrication (SFF) technique has been employed in this study. In particular, a Multi-Material Laser Densification (MMLD) process has been investigated for its potential to fabricate artificial teeth automatically from 3-D computer dental tooth files. Based on the principle of SFF, the MMLD process utilizes a micro-extruder system to deliver commercial dental alloy and porcelain slurry in a computer-controlled pattern line by line and layer by layer. Instead of firing the artificial tooth/teeth in a furnace, the extruded dental materials are laser scanned to convert the loose powder to a fully dense body. Different laser densification parameters including the densification temperature, laser output power, laser beam size, line dimension, ratio of the beam size to line width, beam scanning rate, processing atmosphere and pressure, dental powder state (powder bed or slurry), powder particle size, etc. have been used to evaluate their effects on the microstructures and properties of the laser densified dental body, and hence to optimize MMLD conditions. Furthermore, laser-scanning induced phase transformations in dental porcelains have been studied because the transformations have great impact on coefficient of thermal expansion (CTE) of dental porcelains, which should match that of dental alloy substrate. Since a single dental material line delivered by the MMLD system functions as a "construction

  14. Influence of stress, temperature and crystal morphology on isothermal densification and specific surface area decrease of new snow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schleef, S.; Löwe, H.; Schneebeli, M.

    2014-10-01

    Laboratory-based, experimental data for the microstructural evolution of new snow are scarce, though applications would benefit from a quantitative characterization of the main influences. To this end, we have analyzed the metamorphism and concurrent densification of new snow under isothermal conditions by means of X-ray microtomography and compiled a comprehensive data set of 45 time series. In contrast to previous measurements on isothermal metamorphism on time scales of weeks to months, we analyzed the initial 24-48 h of snow evolution at a high temporal resolution of 3 hours. The data set comprised natural and laboratory-grown snow, and experimental conditions included systematic variations of overburden stress, temperature and crystal habit to address the main influences on specific surface area (SSA) decrease rate and densification rate in a snowpack. For all conditions, we found a linear relation between density and SSA, indicating that metamorphism has an immediate influence for the densification of new snow. The slope of the linear relation, however, depends on the other parameters which were analyzed individually to derive a best-fit parameterization for the SSA decrease rate and densification rate. In the investigated parameter range, we found that the initial value of the SSA constituted the main morphological influence on the SSA decrease rate. In turn, the SSA decrease rate constituted the main influence on the densification rate.

  15. Spark-Plasma Sintering of W-5.6Ni-1.4Fe Heavy Alloys: Densification and Grain Growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Ke; Li, Xiaoqiang; Qu, Shengguan; Li, Yuanyuan

    2013-02-01

    W-5.6Ni-1.4Fe heavy alloys were prepared by the method of spark-plasma sintering, and the densification and grain growth kinetics were analyzed as a function of various parameters such as sintering temperature and dwell duration. It is found that the local temperature gradient at the vicinity of the pores can cause the matrix phase melting or softening, resulting in a viscous layer coating the W particles and an improved solubility of W into the matrix phase. In the initial stage, particle rearrangement and neck formation and growth take place, and γ-(Ni, Fe) matrix phase has formed. Dissolution-precipitation and Ni-enhanced W grain boundary diffusion together with viscous process contribute to the simultaneous densification and grain growth in the intermediate stage. During the final stage, fast grain growth, controlled by both gas-phase diffusion and dissolution-precipitation mechanisms, dominates over the densification.

  16. Densification and coarsening during solid state sintering of ceramics: A review of the models. II - Grain growth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shaw, Nancy J.

    1989-01-01

    Two processes occur simultaneously during the sintering of a ceramic powder compact: densification and coarsening (or grain growth). Both processes have as their driving force the reduction of the excess free surface energy of the powder particles. Several different mechanisms of atom transport, operating concurrently or consecutively, may be responsible for the two processes. Algebraic, geometric and topological models have been proposed and refined in attempts to determine the mechanism, or mechanisms, responsible for densification under defined processing conditions. These efforts have met with varying degrees of success. Recently, it has become apparent that more attention must be paid to the coarsening processes during sintering. The models for both densification and coarsening during solid state sintering are reviewed with particular emphasis on their applicability to engineering ceramics.

  17. Densification route and mechanical properties of Si3N4-bioglass biocomposites.

    PubMed

    Amaral, M; Lopes, M A; Silva, R F; Santos, J D

    2002-02-01

    The processing route and the final microstructural and mechanical characteristics of a novel biomaterial composite are described. This new material is composed of 70 wt% Si3N4 ceramic phase and 30 wt% bioglass, the later performing as a liquid sintering aid system and simultaneously providing bioactivity characteristics to the composite. The conditions for fabrication of an almost fully dense material (approximately 98% of relative density) were pursued. Optimised parameters were 1350 degrees C-40 min-30 MPa by hot-pressing technique. The very fast densification rate of the process avoided the crystallisation of the bioglass intergranular phase and therefore its intrinsic properties were maintained. Also, the large amount of glassy phase assured the densification by liquid phase assisted grain rearrangement without Si3N4 phase transformation. The final mechanical properties of the Si3N4 bioglass were as follows: fracture toughness, K(IC) = 4.4 MPa m(1/2); Vickers hardness, Hv = 10.3 GPa; Young's modulus, E = 197 GPa; bending strength, sigma(g) = 383 MPa; Weibull modulus, m = 8.3. These values provide an attractive set of properties among other bioactive materials, namely by upgrading the main drawback of bioceramcs and bioglasses for high-load medical applications, which is the lack of satisfactory fracture toughness. PMID:11771704

  18. The densification of bio-char: Effect of pyrolysis temperature on the qualities of pellets.

    PubMed

    Hu, Qiang; Yang, Haiping; Yao, Dingding; Zhu, Danchen; Wang, Xianhua; Shao, Jingai; Chen, Hanping

    2016-01-01

    The densification of bio-chars pyrolyzed at different temperatures were investigated to elucidate the effect of temperature on the properties of bio-char pellets and determine the bonding mechanism of pellets. Optimized process conditions were obtained with 128MPa compressive pressure and 35% water addition content. Results showed that both the volume density and compressive strength of bio-char pellets initially decreased and subsequently increased, while the energy consumption increased first and then decreased, with the increase of pyrolysis temperature. The moisture adsorption of bio-char pellets was noticeably lower than raw woody shavings but had elevated than the corresponding char particles. Hydrophilic functional groups, particle size and binder were the main factors that contributed to the cementation of bio-char particles at different temperatures. The result indicated that pyrolysis of woody shavings at 550-650°C and followed by densification was suitable to form bio-char pellets for application as renewable biofuels. PMID:26524250

  19. Temperature and speed of testing influence on the densification and recovery of polyurethane foams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Apostol, Dragoş Alexandru; Constantinescu, Dan Mihai

    2013-02-01

    Polyurethane foams with densities of 35, 93, and 200 kg/m3 were tested in compression at three levels of temperatures as: -60 °C, 23 °C, and 80 °C. The influence of speed of testing from 2 mm/min up to 6 m/s (0.0014 to 545 s-1) on the response of the foams is analyzed. Testing is done separately on the rise direction and on the in-plane direction of the foams, and differences in their behavior are commented. With interpolation functions which approximate the plateau and densification region, the specific strain energy is calculated together with the energy efficiency and onset strain of densification. A Nagy-type phenomenological strain-rate-dependent model is proposed to generate engineering stress-strain curves and is validated through comparison with experimental stress-strain curves obtained at different speeds of testing. Starting from a reference experimental curve, two material parameters which are density and temperature dependent are established. Foam recovery for each density of the polyurethane foams is analyzed as a function of direction of testing, temperature, and speed of testing.

  20. GNSS-based densification of the ITRF velocity field through a collaborative approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Legrand, Juliette; Bruyninx, Carine; Craymer, Michael; Dawson, John; Griffiths, Jake; Kenyeres, Ambrus; Rebischung, Paul; Sánchez, Laura; Santamaría-Gómez, Alvaro; Saria, Elifuraha; Altamimi, Zuheir

    2015-04-01

    The objective of the IAG Working Group "Integration of Dense Velocity Fields in the ITRF" is to provide a GNSS-based dense, unified and reliable velocity field globally referenced in the ITRF (International Terrestrial Reference Frame) and useful for geodynamical and geophysical interpretations. The WG is embedded in IAG Sub-Commission 1.3 "Regional Reference Frames" where it coexists with the Regional Reference Frame Sub-Commissions AFREF (Africa), APREF (Asia & Pacific), EUREF (Europe), NAREF (North America), SCAR (Antarctica), SIRGAS (Latin America & Caribbean). These IAG Regional Reference Frame sub-commissions are responsible for providing GNSS-based densified weekly solutions for their region. To obtain such a densified velocity field, the WG combined the individual weekly solutions from 7 individual contributors (AFREF, APREF, EUREF, NAREF (NGS, GSB), SIRGAS, IGS) and then stacked these weekly combined solutions in order to derive a ITRF2008 densification as well as the associated residual position time series for more than 2800 sites. Here we present the latest densification results.

  1. THE EFFECT OF TEMPERATURE AND UNIAXIAL PRESSURE ON THE DENSIFICATION BEHAVIOR OF SILICA AEROGEL GRANULES

    SciTech Connect

    Matyas, Josef; Robinson, Matthew J.; Fryxell, Glen E.

    2012-10-01

    Materials are being developed in U.S. for the removal and immobilization of iodine from gaseous products of nuclear fuel reprocessing in support of the Fuel Cycle Technology Separations and Waste Forms Campaign. The silver-functionalized silica aerogel proved to be an excellent candidate for this treatment because of its high selectivity and sorption capacity for radioiodine and its possible conversion to a durable silica-based waste form. The present study investigated with nitrogen sorption and helium pycnometry the effect of pressureless isothermal sintering at temperatures of 900-1400°C for 2.5-90 min or isothermal hot-pressing at 1200°C for 2.5 min on densification of raw and silver-functionalized silica aerogel granules. Rapid sintering was observed at 1050 and 1200°C. Only 15 min of pressureless sintering at 1200°C resulted in almost complete densification. The macropores disappeared, surface area decreased from 1114 m2/g to 25 m2/g, pore volume from 7.41 cm3/g to 0.09 cm3/g, and adsorption pore size from 18.7 to 7 nm. The skeletal density of sintered granules was similar to the bulk density of amorphous silica (2.2 g/cm3). The hot-pressing accelerated the sintering process, decreasing significantly the pore size and volume.

  2. Simulation of the densification of real open-celled foam microstructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brydon, A. D.; Bardenhagen, S. G.; Miller, E. A.; Seidler, G. T.

    2005-12-01

    Ubiquitous in nature and finding applications in engineering systems, cellular solids are an increasingly important class of materials. Foams are an important subclass of cellular solids with applications as packing materials and energy absorbers due to their unique properties. A better understanding of foam mechanical properties and their dependence on microstructural details would facilitate manufacture of tailored materials and development of constitutive models for their bulk response. Numerical simulation of these materials, while offering great promise toward furthering understanding, has also served to convincingly demonstrate the inherent complexity and associated modeling challenges. The large range of deformations which foams are subjected to in routine engineering applications is a fundamental source of complication in modeling the details of foam deformation on the scale of foam struts. It requires accurate handling of large material deformations and complex contact mechanics, both well established numerical challenges. A further complication is the replication of complex foam microstructure geometry in numerical simulations. Here various advantages of certain particle methods, in particular their compatibility with the determination of three-dimensional geometry via X-ray microtomography, are exploited to simulate the compression of "real" foam microstructures into densification. With attention paid to representative volume element size, predictions are made regarding bulk response, dynamic effects, and deformed microstructural character, for real polymeric, open-cell foams. These predictions include a negative Poisson's ratio in the stress plateau, and increased difficulty in removing residual porosity during densification.

  3. Densification of silica glass induced by 0.8 and 1.5 {mu}m intense femtosecond laser pulses

    SciTech Connect

    Saliminia, A.; Nguyen, N.T.; Chin, S.L.; Vallee, R.

    2006-05-01

    We investigate the physical mechanisms responsible for waveguide formation in silica glass induced by 1 kHz intense femtosecond laser pulses from a Ti-sapphire laser at 0.8 {mu}m as well as from a femtosecond optical parametric amplifier at 1.5 {mu}m. It is demonstrated that the densification taking place at the irradiated region is the principal cause for refractive index change in the waveguides written with both 0.8 and 1.5 {mu}m pulses. The birefringence induced by the stress arising from such densification and its behavior against thermal annealing are also studied.

  4. Structural inhomogeneity and localization of densification in the liquid-phase sintering of tungsten-copper power mixtures

    SciTech Connect

    Skorokhod, V.V.; Panichkina, V.V.; Prokushev, N.K.

    1986-08-01

    The object of this work was to study the kinetics of liquid-phase sintering (LPS) of tungsten-20 vol.% copper composites of various origins and to find out which of the two factors - small particle size of tungsten powder or homogeneity of the composite - is the dominant one in their densification. The study was made of the densification of mixtures of four types shown. An REM-200 scanning electron microscope was used to study the structures of the compacts and also the specimens sintered at 1400/sup 0/C. The results of calculations of the phase interfaces and degrees of homogeneity of the mixtures are presented.

  5. Influence of stress, temperature and crystal habit on isothermal densification and specific surface area decrease of new snow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schleef, S.; Löwe, H.; Schneebeli, M.

    2014-03-01

    Laboratory-based, experimental data for the microstructural evolution of new snow is scarce, though applications would benefit from a quantitative characterization of the main mechanism underlying the initial microstructural changes. To this end we have analyzed the metamorphism and concurrent densification of new snow under isothermal conditions by means of X-ray microtomography and compiled a comprehensive data set of 45 time series covering the practically relevant short time behavior within the first 24-48 h in high temporal resolution. The data set comprises natural and laboratory grown snow and experimental conditions include systematic variations of overburden stress, temperature and crystal habit to address the main influences on specific surface area (SSA) decrease rate and densification rate in a natural snowpack. For all conditions we find a linear increase of the density with the SSA, indicating that metamorphism has a key influence for the densification of new snow. Corroborated by the analysis of the individual influences of external conditions we derive a best-fit parametrization for the SSA decrease rate and the densification rate as required for applications.

  6. Hot impact densification: a new method for producing high density ceramic pellets with close shape tolerances

    SciTech Connect

    Hrovat, M.; Huschka, H.; Muhling, G.; Rachor, L.; Zimmerman, H.

    1982-07-01

    Density and correct diameter of nuclear fuel pellets are usually achieved by sintering and subsequent circular grinding. Hot impact densification (HID) thermally squatted ceramic bodies can be directly high speed precision-molded in a cold die. For thermoshock-sensitive materials, a controlled cooling down procedure of some minutes is added. The feasibility of HID has been demonstrated on the laboratory scale on UO/sub 2/, UC, and some more materials at temperatures between 1700 and 2300/sup 0/C, pressures up to 800 N/mm/sup 2/. Shape tolerances are close, density can be exactly reproduced within a wide range. Tool wear seems to be no problem. Currently, a prototype facility for continuous performance is being developed.

  7. Effects of densification on fluorescence spectra and glass structure of Eu3+-doped borate glasses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soga, N.; Hirao, K.; Yoshimoto, M.; Yamamoto, H.

    1988-05-01

    Densified glass specimens of 90 B2O3ṡ10 Na2Oṡ1 Eu2O3 were obtained by applying hydrostatic pressure up to 6 GPa at various temperatures from 250 to 900 °C, and their densities and inhomogeneous bandwidths of Eu3+ fluorescence spectra were determined in order to follow a structural change taking place during densification. The results indicate that the role of hydrostatic pressure is first to eliminate the atomic scale voids usually appearing when quenched from high temperatures and then to increase the fluctuation of local fields around Eu3+ probably due to the distortion of glass network accompanied with a wide variation of bond length. The molecular dynamics simulation of the densified state was also carried out to support the above conclusion.

  8. Densification of silicon carbide using oxy-nitride additives for space-based telescope mirror applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, R. Suresh; Shukla, Anoop K.; Babu, Sankaranarayanan; Sivakumar, Dhenuvakonda; Gandhi, Ashutosh S.

    2011-07-01

    Densification behavior of alpha silicon carbide (SiC) during vacuum hot pressing was studied up to 1900ºC with sintering additives based on AlN and Y2O3 in different proportions. Near theoretical density was obtained with a total sintering additive content of < 4 vol.%. The microstructure of SiC sintered with AlN+Y2O3 revealed fine equiaxed grains against the additional elongated grains exhibited by SiC sintered with AlN alone. The SiC having high density exhibited very good strength, elastic modulus, high thermal conductivity, low coefficient of thermal expansion and excellent polishability for telescope mirror applications.

  9. A Collaborative Approach Toward the Densification of the ITRF Velocity Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Legrand, J.; Bruyninx, C.; Saria, E.; Griffiths, J.; Craymer, M. R.; Dawson, J. H.; Kenyeres, A.; Santamaria-Gomez, A.; Sanchez, L.; Altamimi, Z.

    2013-12-01

    The objective of the IAG Working Group 'Integration of Dense Velocity Fields in the ITRF' is to provide a GNSS-based dense, unified and reliable velocity field globally referenced in the ITRF (International Terrestrial Reference Frame) and useful for geodynamical and geophysical interpretations. The WG is embedded in IAG Sub-Commission 1.3 'Regional Reference Frames' where it coexists with the Regional Reference Frame Sub-Commissions AFREF (Africa), APREF (Asia & Pacific), EUREF (Europe), NAREF (North America), SCAR (Antarctica), SIRGAS (Latin America & Caribbean). These IAG Regional Reference Frame sub-commissions are responsible for providing GNSS-based densified weekly solutions for their region. To obtain such a densified velocity field, the WG combined the individual weekly solutions from 7 individual contributors (AFREF, APREF, EUREF, NAREF (NGS, GSB), SIRGAS, IGS) and then stacked these weekly combined solutions in order to derive a ITRF2008 densification as well as the associated residual position time series for more than 2000 sites.

  10. Densification effects of the carbon nanotube pillar array on field-emission properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Kuang-Yu; Chou, Chia-Hsin; Liao, Chan-Yu; Li, Yu-Ren; Cheng, Huang-Chung

    2016-06-01

    In this study, a simple densification method for carbon nanotube (CNT) pillars is proposed to achieve high-performance field emission characteristics and stable emission. Through capillary force during solution evaporation, the CNT density in each pillar can be increased by about six times without causing damage to the crystallinity of CNTs. The densified CNT pillars exhibit lower series resistance, sharper pillars, better contacts, higher thermal conductivity, and better mechanical stiffness than as-grown ones. Therefore, the threshold field of the field emitter with such CNT pillars of 50 µm height can be reduced to 1.98 V/µm, as compared with 2.2 V/µm for the undensified ones. Moreover, the fluctuation of field-emission current decreases from 15.5 to 9.4% after the stress tests at a field of 2 V/µm for 1800 s. These findings imply that the densified CNT pillars are promising for the field-emission applications.

  11. Influence of oxide-based sintering additives on densification and mechanical behavior of tricalcium phosphate (TCP).

    PubMed

    Bhatt, Himesh A; Kalita, Samar J

    2007-05-01

    In this research, we studied and analyzed the effects of four different oxide-based sintering additives on densification, mechanical behavior, biodegradation and biocompatibility of tricalcium phosphate (TCP) bioceramics. Selective sintering additives were introduced into pure TCP ceramics, in small quantities, through homogeneous mixing, using a mortar and pestle. The consequent powders of different compositions were pressed into cylindrical compacts, uniaxially and sintered at elevated temperatures, 1150 degrees C and 1250 degrees C, separately in a muffle furnace. X-ray powder diffraction technique was used to analyze the phase-purity of TCP after sintering. Hardness of these sintered specimens was evaluated using a Vickers hardness tester. Sintered cylindrical samples were tested under uniaxial compressive loading, as a function of composition to determine their failure strength. Biodegradation studies conducted using simulated body fluid under dynamic environment, revealed that these additives could control the rate of resorption and hardness degradation of TCP ceramics. PMID:17211718

  12. Regional Densification of the ITRF through the Integration of National Active GNSS Network Products

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kenyeres, Ambrus; Horvath, Tivadar; Stangl, Gunter; Garayt, Bruno; Hansen, Dionne; Valdes, Marcellino; Caporali, Alessandro; Figurski, Mariusz; Georgiev, Ivan; Droscak, Branislav; Franke, Peter; Jumare, Izolde; Nagl, Jaroslav; Pihlak, Priit; Huisman, Lennard

    2015-04-01

    The actual realization of the ITRS represents the most precise station positions and velocities at selected set of sites. The scientific and practical applications may require the access to the global 3D reference frame in a dense network without loss of consistency and reliability. Relying on the long term homogeneously analyzed data the dense national permanent GNSS networks shall be the ideal tool for such reference frame densification. In the frame of the ongoing EPN densification the national active networks are integrated and a homogeneous, dense position and velocity product is being derived based on the actual ITRS realization and using the EPN as backbone infrastructure. In order to minimize inconsistencies (e.g. site naming, discontinuities, constraint handling) the only way to get a uniform, homogeneous cumulative solution from national to global scales is the integration done relying on the weekly SINEX product level. The integration is being performed using the CATREF software (Altamimi et al, IGN) and based on the Minimum Constraint approach. The derived position and velocity product will be an essential material for various geokinematic studies (PGR, intraplate and plate boundary zone investigations), and also for the better definition and realization of ETRS89. This work is very well inline with the goals of relevant European initiatives in the frame of EPOS, EUREF (WG on Deformation Models), CEGRN, EUPOS, IAG (WG on Unified Dense Velocity Fields). The work is well in progress, up to 15 years of weekly SINEX files are already available and analyzed from 17 countries, and considering the countries in negotiation phase the full continental coverage will be reached within few years. The actual database contains more close to 3000 sites. In this presentation a status report is shown and the first version of the position/velocity product with related interpretation options are introduced as well.

  13. Fabrication, densification, and replica molding of 3D carbon nanotube microstructures.

    PubMed

    Copic, Davor; Park, Sei Jin; Tawfick, Sameh; De Volder, Michael; Hart, A John

    2012-01-01

    The introduction of new materials and processes to microfabrication has, in large part, enabled many important advances in microsystems, lab-on-a-chip devices, and their applications. In particular, capabilities for cost-effective fabrication of polymer microstructures were transformed by the advent of soft lithography and other micromolding techniques (1, 2), and this led a revolution in applications of microfabrication to biomedical engineering and biology. Nevertheless, it remains challenging to fabricate microstructures with well-defined nanoscale surface textures, and to fabricate arbitrary 3D shapes at the micro-scale. Robustness of master molds and maintenance of shape integrity is especially important to achieve high fidelity replication of complex structures and preserving their nanoscale surface texture. The combination of hierarchical textures, and heterogeneous shapes, is a profound challenge to existing microfabrication methods that largely rely upon top-down etching using fixed mask templates. On the other hand, the bottom-up synthesis of nanostructures such as nanotubes and nanowires can offer new capabilities to microfabrication, in particular by taking advantage of the collective self-organization of nanostructures, and local control of their growth behavior with respect to microfabricated patterns. Our goal is to introduce vertically aligned carbon nanotubes (CNTs), which we refer to as CNT "forests", as a new microfabrication material. We present details of a suite of related methods recently developed by our group: fabrication of CNT forest microstructures by thermal CVD from lithographically patterned catalyst thin films; self-directed elastocapillary densification of CNT microstructures; and replica molding of polymer microstructures using CNT composite master molds. In particular, our work shows that self-directed capillary densification ("capillary forming"), which is performed by condensation of a solvent onto the substrate with CNT

  14. Densification behavior, nanocrystallization, and mechanical properties of spark plasma sintered Fe-based bulk amorphous alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Ashish Kumar

    Fe-based amorphous alloys are gaining increasing attention due to their exceptional wear and corrosion resistance for potential structural applications. Two major challenges that are hindering the commercialization of these amorphous alloys are difficulty in processing of bulk shapes (diameter > 10 mm) and lack of ductility. Spark plasma sintering (SPS) is evolving as a promising technique for processing bulk shapes of amorphous and nanocrystalline materials. The objective of this work is to investigate densification behavior, nanocrystallization, and mechanical properties of SPS sintered Fe-based amorphous alloys of composition Fe48Cr15Mo14Y2C15B6. SPS processing was performed in three distinct temperature ranges of amorphous alloys: (a) below glass transition temperature (Tg), (b) between Tg and crystallization temperature (Tx), and (c) above Tx. Punch displacement data obtained during SPS sintering was correlated with the SPS processing parameters such as temperature, pressure, and sintering time. Powder rearrangement, plastic deformation below T g, and viscous flow of the material between Tg and Tx were observed as the main densification stages during SPS sintering. Micro-scale temperature distributions at the point of contact and macro-scale temperature distribution throughout the sample during SPS of amorphous alloys were modeled. The bulk amorphous alloys are expected to undergo structural relaxation and nanocrystallization during SPS sintering. X-ray diffraction (XRD), small angle neutron scattering (SANS), and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) was performed to investigate the evolution of nanocrystallites in SPS sintered Fe-based bulk amorphous alloys. The SANS analysis showed significant scattering for the samples sintered in the supercooled region indicating local structural and compositional changes with the profuse nucleation of nano-clusters (~4 nm). Compression tests and microhardness were performed on the samples sintered at different

  15. Particle interaction of lubricated or unlubricated binary mixtures according to their particle size and densification mechanism.

    PubMed

    Di Martino, Piera; Joiris, Etienne; Martelli, Sante

    2004-09-01

    The aim of this study is to assess an experimental approach for technological development of a direct compression formulation. A simple formula was considered composed by an active ingredient, a diluent and a lubricant. The active ingredient and diluent were selected as an example according to their typical densification mechanism: the nitrofurantoine, a fragmenting material, and the cellulose microcrystalline (Vivapur), which is a typical visco-elastic material, equally displaying good bind and disintegrant properties. For each ingredient, samples of different particle size distribution were selected. Initially, tabletability of pure materials was studied by a rotary press without magnesium stearate. Vivapur tabletability decreases with increase in particle size. The addition of magnesium stearate as lubricant decreases tabletability of Vivapur of greater particle size, while it kept unmodified that of Vivapur of lower particle size. Differences in tabletability can be related to differences in particle-particle interactions; for Vivapur of higher particle size (Vivapur 200, 102 and 101), the lower surface area develops lower surface available for bonds, while for Vivapur of lower particle size (99 and 105) the greater surface area allows high particle proximity favouring particle cohesivity. Nitrofurantoine shows great differences in compression behaviour according to its particle size distribution. Large crystals show poorer tabletability than fine crystals, further decreased by lubricant addition. The large crystals poor tabletability is due to their poor compactibility, in spite of high compressibility and plastic intrinsic deformability; in fact, in spite of the high densification tendency, the nature of the involved bonds is very weak. Nitrofurantoine samples were then mixed with Vivapurs in different proportions. Compression behaviour of binary mixes (tabletability and compressibility) was then evaluated according to diluents proportion in the mixes. The

  16. On the plastic deformation of soda-lime glass-a Cr3+ luminescence study of densification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perriot, A.; Barthel, E.; Kermouche, G.; Quérel, G.; Vandembroucq, D.

    2011-03-01

    Silicate glasses are known to experience anomalous plastic behavior at micron scales: (1) they exhibit densification when flowing plastically; and (2) hydrostatic pressure affects the yield point. We have previously shown that densification maps are useful to infer a reliable constitutive law for the plastic response of silicate glasses. It is shown here that for soda-lime glass Cr3+ luminescence microspectroscopy may be used for that purpose. We also show that the constitutive law we have previously developed for amorphous silica provides a qualitative description of normal glasses, although it is unable to account for the finer details. More work is needed to quantitatively model normal-glass plasticity at the continuum length-scale.

  17. Mathematical Model and Experimental Results for Cryogenic Densification and Sub-Cooling Using a Submerged Cooling Source

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Partridge, J. K.; Notardonato, W. U.; Johnson, W. L.; Tuttle, J. W.

    2011-01-01

    Among the many factors that determine overall rocket performance, propellant density is important because it affects the size of the rocket. Thus, in order to decrease the size of a rocket, it may be desirable to increase the density of propellants. This study analyzes the concept of increasing the propellant density by employing a cooling source submerged in the liquid propellant. A simple, mathematical model was developed to predict the rate of densification and the propellant temperature profile. The mathematical model is generic and applicable to multiple propellants. The densification rate was determined experimentally by submerging a cooling source in liquid oxygen at constant, positive pressure, and measuring the time rate of change in temperature with respect to vertical position. The results from the mathematical model provided a reasonable fit when compared to experimental results.

  18. Densification and residual stress induced by CO2 laser-based mitigation of SiO2 surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Feit, M D; Matthews, M J; Soules, T F; Stolken, J S

    2010-10-21

    Knowing the ultimate surface morphology resulting from CO{sub 2} laser mitigation of induced laser damage is important both for determining adequate treatment protocols, and for preventing deleterious intensification upon subsequent illumination of downstream optics. Physical effects such as evaporation, viscous flow and densification can strongly affect the final morphology of the treated site. Evaporation is a strong function of temperature and will play a leading role in determining pit shapes when the evaporation rate is large, both because of material loss and redeposition. Viscous motion of the hot molten material during heating and cooling can redistribute material due to surface tension gradients (Marangoni effect) and vapor recoil pressure effects. Less well known, perhaps, is that silica can densify as a result of structural relaxation, to a degree depending on the local thermal history. The specific volume shrinkage due to structural relaxation can be mistaken for material loss due to evaporation. Unlike evaporation, however, local density change can be reversed by post annealing. All of these effects must be taken into account to adequately describe the final morphology and optical properties of single and multiple-pass mitigation protocols. We have investigated, experimentally and theoretically, the significance of such densification on residual stress and under what circumstances it can compete with evaporation in determining the ultimate post treatment surface shape. In general, understanding final surface configurations requires taking all these factors including local structural relaxation densification, and therefore the thermal history, into account. We find that surface depressions due to densification can dominate surface morphology in the non-evaporative regime when peak temperatures are below 2100K.

  19. Improved progressive TIN densification filtering algorithm for airborne LiDAR data in forested areas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Xiaoqian; Guo, Qinghua; Su, Yanjun; Xue, Baolin

    2016-07-01

    Filtering of light detection and ranging (LiDAR) data into the ground and non-ground points is a fundamental step in processing raw airborne LiDAR data. This paper proposes an improved progressive triangulated irregular network (TIN) densification (IPTD) filtering algorithm that can cope with a variety of forested landscapes, particularly both topographically and environmentally complex regions. The IPTD filtering algorithm consists of three steps: (1) acquiring potential ground seed points using the morphological method; (2) obtaining accurate ground seed points; and (3) building a TIN-based model and iteratively densifying TIN. The IPTD filtering algorithm was tested in 15 forested sites with various terrains (i.e., elevation and slope) and vegetation conditions (i.e., canopy cover and tree height), and was compared with seven other commonly used filtering algorithms (including morphology-based, slope-based, and interpolation-based filtering algorithms). Results show that the IPTD achieves the highest filtering accuracy for nine of the 15 sites. In general, it outperforms the other filtering algorithms, yielding the lowest average total error of 3.15% and the highest average kappa coefficient of 89.53%.

  20. Crystallization kinetics and densification of YAG nanoparticles from various chelating agents

    SciTech Connect

    Hou, J.G.; Kumar, R.V.; Qu, Y.F.; Krsmanovic, Dalibor

    2009-08-05

    Yttrium aluminium garnet (YAG, Y{sub 3}Al{sub 5}O{sub 12}) nanoparticles were prepared using sonochemical sol-gel method with three different chelating agents and the effect of crystallization kinetics was investigated with differential scanning calorimetry-thermogravimetry (DSC-TG). The activation energy values of crystallization for the as-synthesized YAG nanoparticles using citric acid (CA), glycine (G) or a mixture of citric acid-glycine (CA-G), as chelating agents were found to be 160.5, 142.2 and 140.4 kJ mol{sup -1} and the corresponding Avarami constants were 2.2, 2.1 and 1.9, respectively. Samples produced with the mixed chelating agent under sonification, could be crystallized to single phase YAG nanoparticles (10-65 nm) after annealing at 1100 deg. C. Pellets made from the annealed YAG particles could be sintered to a relative density greater than 99% at 1500 deg. C with a grain size of 4.5 {mu}m, made up of secondary particles formed from primary nano-crystals within the grains. Grain size and relative density increased with different chelating agents from CA to G and CA-G in the increasing order when YAG samples were sintered. Grain growth and densification occurred at a relatively low temperature of 1500 deg. C as compared to over 1800 deg. C in solid-state reactions.

  1. Hierarchical densification and negative thermal expansion in Ce-based metallic glass under high pressure.

    PubMed

    Luo, Qiang; Garbarino, Gaston; Sun, Baoan; Fan, Dawei; Zhang, Yue; Wang, Zhi; Sun, Yajuan; Jiao, Jin; Li, Xiaodong; Li, Pengshan; Mattern, Norbert; Eckert, Jürgen; Shen, Jun

    2015-01-01

    The polyamorphsim in amorphous materials is one of the most fascinating topics in condensed matter physics. In amorphous metals, the nature of polyamorphic transformation is poorly understood. Here we investigate the structural evolution of a Ce-based metallic glass (MG) with pressure at room temperature (RT) and near the glass transition temperature by synchrotron X-ray diffraction, uncovering novel behaviours. The MG shows hierarchical densification processes at both temperatures, arising from the hierarchy of interatomic interactions. In contrast with a continuous and smooth process for the low- to medium-density amorphous state transformation at RT, a relatively abrupt and discontinuous transformation around 5.5 GPa is observed at 390 K, suggesting a possible weak first-order nature. Furthermore, both positive and abnormal-negative thermal expansion behaviours on medium-range order are observed in different pressure windows, which could be related to the low-energy vibrational motions and relaxation of the weakly linked solute-centred clusters. PMID:25641091

  2. Effect of Heating Rate on the Pressureless Sintering Densification of a Nickel-Based Superalloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levasseur, David; Brochu, Mathieu

    2016-05-01

    Pressureless sintering of Inconel 718 has important technological applications for the densification of metal injection molding or additive manufacturing of parts with powder/binder systems. The effect of heating rates ranging from 15 to 200 K/minute on the sintering behavior of fine (-325 mesh) Inconel 718 powders was studied using the master sintering curve (MSC) concept. A pressureless pulsed electric current sintering setup was used to heat samples. The temperature at the onset of sintering increased as the heating rate increased. The formation of a supersolidus liquid fraction was shifted toward higher temperatures for increased heating rates. The apparent activation energy of sintering was obtained by least squares fitting of the sintering data to the MSC and was in good agreement with the lattice diffusion activation energy of the alloying elements present in Inconel 718. The MSC followed different kinetics for low heating rates (≤50 K/minute) and high heating rates (≥75 K/minute), and these differences were related to liquation kinetics.

  3. Laser induced densification of cerium gadolinium oxide: Application to single-chamber solid oxide fuel cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mariño, Mariana; Rieu, Mathilde; Viricelle, Jean-Paul; Garrelie, Florence

    2016-06-01

    In single-chamber solid oxide fuel cells (SC-SOFC), anode and cathode are placed in a gas chamber where they are exposed to a fuel/air mixture. Similarly to conventional dual-chamber SOFC, the anode and the cathode are separated by an electrolyte. However, as in the SC-SOFC configuration the electrolyte does not play tightness role between compartments, this one can be a porous layer. Nevertheless, it is necessary to have a diffusion barrier to prevent the transportation of hydrogen produced locally at the anode to the cathode that reduces fuel cell performances. This study aims to obtain directly a diffusion barrier through the surface densification of the electrolyte Ce0.9Gd0.1O1.95 (CGO) by a laser treatment. KrF excimer laser and Yb fiber laser irradiations were used at different fluences and number of pulses to modify the density of the electrolyte coating. Microstructural characterizations confirmed the modifications on the surface of the electrolyte for appropriate experimental conditions showing either grain growth or densified but cracked surfaces. Gas permeation and electrical conductivities of the modified electrolyte were evaluated. Finally SC-SOFC performances were improved for the cells presenting grain growth at the electrolyte surface.

  4. Rural settlements dynamics and the prospects of densification strategy in rural Bangladesh.

    PubMed

    Alam, A F M Ashraful; Asad, Rumana; Enamul Kabir, Md

    2016-01-01

    Given the year on year decrease of rural farmland and various forms of land degradation through the intrusion of non-farm land uses, the government of Bangladesh has drafted the agrarian reform strategies, primarily to protect the agricultural land from encroachment, conversion, and indiscriminate use. The draft Agricultural Land Protection and Land Use Bill since its inception in 2011 is facing serious uncertainties of implementation due to its borrowed nature from the developed contexts and inadequacy to recognize the local complexities. With a particular focus on the densification component of the draft bill, a semester-long design studio was conducted in consultation with the existing villagers to explore the practicability of the draft bill in the villages of Tetultala and Chhoygharia in the south-western coastal Bangladesh. The findings from the two villages hint that in Bangladesh, the unique and evolving nature of rural settlements dynamics that are disintegrating the rural society from farming practices and the farmland, thereby, unsettling the traditional village-morphology. The settlements dynamics vary from those of the western context; hence, there is an emerging need to build locally situated knowledge towards a feasible rural land reform. PMID:27026946

  5. Frost Growth and Densification on a Flat Surface in Laminar Flow with Variable Humidity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kandula, M.

    2012-01-01

    Experiments are performed concerning frost growth and densification in laminar flow over a flat surface under conditions of constant and variable humidity. The flat plate test specimen is made of aluminum-6031, and has dimensions of 0.3 mx0.3 mx6.35 mm. Results for the first variable humidity case are obtained for a plate temperature of 255.4 K, air velocity of 1.77 m/s, air temperature of 295.1 K, and a relative humidity continuously ranging from 81 to 54%. The second variable humidity test case corresponds to plate temperature of 255.4 K, air velocity of 2.44 m/s, air temperature of 291.8 K, and a relative humidity ranging from 66 to 59%. Results for the constant humidity case are obtained for a plate temperature of 263.7 K, air velocity of 1.7 m/s, air temperature of 295 K, and a relative humidity of 71.6 %. Comparisons of the data with the author's frost model extended to accommodate variable humidity suggest satisfactory agreement between the theory and the data for both constant and variable humidity.

  6. Enhanced densification, strength and molecular mechanisms in shock compressed porous silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lane, J. Matthew D.; Vogler, Tracy J.

    2015-06-01

    In most porous materials, void collapse during shock compression couples mechanical energy to thermal energy. Increased temperature drives up pressures and lowers densities in the final Hugoniot states as compared to full-density samples. Some materials, however, exhibit an anomalous enhanced densification in their Hugoniot states when porosity is introduced. We have recently shown that silicon is such a material, and demonstrated a molecular mechanism for the effect using molecular simulation. We will review results from large-scale non-equilibrium molecular dynamics (NEMD) and Hugoniotstat simulations of shock compressed porous silicon, highlighting the mechanism by which porosity produces local shear which nucleate partial phase transition and localized melting at shock pressures below typical thresholds in these materials. Further, we will characterize the stress states and strength of the material as a function of porosity from 5 to 50 percent and with various porosity microstructures. Sandia National Laboratories is a multi program laboratory managed and operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation, for the U.S. Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under contract DE-AC04-94AL85000.

  7. [Densification of autotrophic bacteria sludge and its characteristics for wastewater treatment].

    PubMed

    Li, Zhi-hua; Guo, Qiang; Wu, Jie; Zhang, Ting; Tan, Zhou-quan; Liu, Fang; Wang, Xiao-chang

    2010-03-01

    Autotrophic granular sludge was developed in an SBR reactor using inorganic carbonal substrate. The variation of ammonia-oxidizing bacteria (AOB) and nitrite-oxidizing bacteria (NOB) during the densification process and their effects on granulation have been evaluated. It was found that the autotrophic bacteria granular sludge was compact with the density reached up to 1.06 g/mL, and the rod-like bacteria predominated in granules on the evidence of scanning electron microscopic (SEM) results. Ammonia, nitrite and nitrate in the effluent were 4.5-15.2 mg/L, 10.2-20.3 mg/L and 17.9-30.1 mg/L, respectively, and the ammonia removal efficiency was 78% -92%. By evaluating the profile of various types of nitrogen and their conversion rates, it was found that short settling time was the main factor that enriched the AOB at the beginning of this experiment, and the granulation did not correlate with AOB. On the contrary, nitrification rate well correlated with granulation, and evidence demonstrated that the formation of granulation was in favorate of immoblization of NOB and the metabolite of NOB stabilized granules, therefore granules and NOB mutually enhanced. Additionally, it was found that the autotrophic denitrification was gradually increased with the process of granulation. PMID:20358836

  8. Effect of the compaction platform on the densification parameters of tableting excipients with different deformation mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Rojas, John; Hernandez, Santiago

    2014-01-01

    Several compaction models have been attempted to explain the compression and compaction phenomena of excipients. However, the resulting parameters could be influenced by the compaction platform such as dwell time, compact mass, geometry and type of material. The goal of this study is to assess the effect of these variables on the densification parameters obtained from key models such as Heckel, non-linear Heckel, Kawakita, Carstensen, and Leuenberger. The relationship among the parameters derived was determined by employing a Principal Component Analysis. Results indicated that factors such as compact geometry, consolidation time and compact mass had a negligible impact on parameters such as tensile strength, yield pressure and compressibility. On the contrary, the excipient type had the largest influence on these parameters. Further, the Leuenberger (γ) and Carstensen (f) parameters were highly correlated and related to the excipient deformation mechanism. Sorbitol and PVP-k30 were the most highly compactable excipients and were characterized for having a low yield pressure (P(y)), compressibility (a), and critical porosity (ε(c)). The magnitude of these parameters was highly dependent on the consolidation behavior of each material. PMID:24583783

  9. Densification Kinetics and Structural Evolution During Microwave and Pressureless Sintering of 15 nm Titanium Nitride Powder.

    PubMed

    Zgalat-Lozynskyy, Ostap; Ragulya, Andrey

    2016-12-01

    Microwave sintering (MWS) of commercially available 15-nm-size nanocrystalline TiN powder was studied. Densification kinetics and grain growth mechanisms of nano-TiN were evaluated using non-isothermal heating up to 1500 °C with variable heating rates. A true nanocrystalline ceramic with ~80-nm-size grains and 94.5 % theoretical density was obtained via MWS consolidation at 1400 °C. At higher temperatures, however, an uncontrolled grain growth and a formation of bimodal microstructure were noticed. A temperature dependence of grain growth suggested grain boundary sliding as a primary mechanism of densification below 1100-1200 °C. An activation energy of nano-TiN densification under MWS varied from 26 ± 3 kJ/mol at the initial stage of sintering (900-1200 °C) to 162 ± 22 kJ/mol at higher temperatures. In addition, a relationship coupling microstructural characteristics (grain size, grain boundary) with mechanical properties of titanium nitride ceramics obtained via both microwave and pressureless sintering techniques was discussed. PMID:26909779

  10. The CEGRN 2011 Campaign and the densification of ETRF2000 in Central Europe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caporali, A.; Barlik, M.; Becker, M.; Gerhatova, L.; Grenerczy, G.; Hefty, J.; Krauss, A.; Legovini, P.; Medac, D.; Milev, G.; Mojzes, M.; Mulic, M.; Odalovic, O.; Rus, T.; Simek, J.; Sledzinski, J.; Stangl, G.; Stopar, B.; Vespe, F.; Virag, G.

    2012-04-01

    The CEGRN 2011 Campaign took place from 20 to 25 June 2011. It was a coordinated effort of 14 Central European Countries: Austria, Bosnia Herzegovina, Bulgaria, Croatia, Czech Republic, Germany, Hungary, Italy, Poland, Rumania, Serbia, Slovakia, Slovenia and Ukraine, with the involvement of some 85 stations. Data processing with state of the art software, and IGS08 orbits and antenna models according to the EPN standards is being completed by independent Analysis Centers in Austria, Hungary, Italy and Slovakia, with the Center in Graz acting as a Combination Center. The paper presents the results of the analysis and of the multiyear combination, with time series spanning a timeline of up to 17 years (1994-2011). Since all data up to and including the 2009 Campaign have been re-analysed with the reprocessed orbits and IGS05 antenna models, the derived velocity field represents a particularly valid example of evolution of the ITRF reference frame in Central Europe. The addition of the 2011 data set, based on IGS08, is not obvious. In a first step the solution, inclusive of the 2011 campaign, can be aligned to the EPN (European Permanent Network of EUREF) cumulative solution in ITRF2005 and can be transformed into the ETRF2000 frame. In a second step, the CEGRN campaigns are planned to be reprocessed with the IGS08 antenna models, provided the IGS and EPN reprocessing solutions (REPRO2) are available for the orbits. Once completed, a densification of the European regional velocity field will become available for both geodynamic studies and widespread dissemination of the ETRS89 standard of coordinates, in compliance with the EU Directive INSPIRE.

  11. Densification and depression in glass transition temperature in polystyrene thin films.

    PubMed

    Vignaud, G; S Chebil, M; Bal, J K; Delorme, N; Beuvier, T; Grohens, Y; Gibaud, A

    2014-10-01

    Ellipsometry and X-ray reflectivity were used to characterize the mass density and the glass transition temperature of supported polystyrene (PS) thin films as a function of their thickness. By measuring the critical wave vector (qc) on the plateau of total external reflection, we evidence that PS films get denser in a confined state when the film thickness is below 50 nm. Refractive indices (n) and electron density profiles measurements confirm this statement. The density of a 6 nm (0.4 gyration radius, Rg) thick film is 30% greater than that of a 150 nm (10Rg) film. A depression of 25 °C in glass transition temperature (Tg) was revealed as the film thickness is reduced. In the context of the free volume theory, this result seems to be in apparent contradiction with the fact that thinner films are denser. However, as the thermal expansion of thinner films is found to be greater than the one of thicker films, the increase in free volume is larger for thin films when temperature is raised. Therefore, the free volume reaches a critical value at a lower Tg for thinner films. This critical value corresponds to the onset of large cooperative movements of polymer chains. The link between the densification of ultrathin films and the drop in their Tg is thus reconciled. We finally show that at their respective Tg(h) all films exhibit a critical mass density of about 1.05 g/cm(3) whatever their thickness. The thickness dependent thermal expansion related to the free volume is consequently a key factor to understand the drop in the Tg of ultrathin films. PMID:25209183

  12. Densification and permeability reduction in hot-pressed calcite: A kinetic model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Wenlu; Evans, Brian; Bernabé, Yves

    1999-11-01

    Laboratory studies on hot isostatically pressed (HIP) calcite reveal that the evolution of porosity and permeability during mechanical compaction can be divided into two distinct regimes. At high porosities, permeability is related approximately to porosity raised to the third power. However, below a porosity called the crossover porosity, the power law relationship no longer applies, and permeability reduction is accelerated. At a porosity of ˜4%, permeability becomes too low to be measured, indicating that a percolation threshold has been reached. In previous studies the time evolutions of porosity and permeability were not predicted, and further, the crossover porosity was introduced as an empirical input parameter. In this study we developed a unified model combining crack healing with densification by power law creep to reproduce porosity evolution as a function of time. Both the healing and the creep are deterministically controlled by the pressure and temperature. Permeability can then be calculated by incorporating quantitative microstructural data (i.e., pore size distribution) into a three-dimensional cubic network model. We were able to reproduce the permeability-porosity relationship in hot-pressed calcite aggregates in both high- and low-porosity regimes. In particular, our model predicted a crossover porosity of ˜7% and a percolation threshold of ˜4%, both in a good agreement with the experimental data. However, we generally overestimated the absolute values of permeability. Because the model yielded correct absolute permeability values in the case when the pore size distribution was known, we suppose that at least part of the error arises from inadequate data for microstructure.

  13. Densification of molybdenum and molybdenum alloy powders using hot isostatic pressing. Final technical report

    SciTech Connect

    Barranco, J.; Ahmad, I.; Isserow, S.; Warenchak, R.

    1985-08-01

    This study was conducted to determine a superior erosion-resistant gun-barrel liner material with improved properties at higher temperatures. Four categories of powders were examined: 1. TZM spherical containing 0.5 titanium, 0.08 zirconium, and 0.02 carbon (wt. % nominally), balance molybdenum (Mo), produced by REP (Rotating Electrode Process), PREP (Plasma Rotating Electrode Process), and PMRS (Plasma Melted and Rapidly Solidified); 2. Mo reduced 2 and 5 microns; 3. Mo-0.1% cobalt, co-reduced; 4. Mo-5 wt. % alumina (A12O3), dispersion strengthened. Hot Isostatic Pressing (HIP) densification occurred at 15-30 Ksi, 1300-1600 C, for 1.5 to 3.0 hours. The TZM REP/PREP powders (220/74 microns) were not fully densified even at 1600 C, 30 Ksi, 3 hours. Point-particle contact prevented complete void elimination. TZM PMRS powder (24.7 microns) achieved 99% of theoretical density while maintaining a small grain size (10.4 ASTM eq.) Bend deflection and fracture energies were approximately three times those for PREP powder at a bend rupture strength of about 120 Ksi. Mo reduced and Mo-0.1% Co powders showed less (or the same) ductility with increasing HIP temperatures. Fractures were intergranular with decreased bend rupture and compression strength. The Mo-5A1/sub 2/O/sub 3/ powder maintained a fine grain size (13 ASTM eq.), but with fracture energies usually less than 0.6 in.-lbs. Included are results from bending and compression testing with metallographic and fracture mode interpretation.

  14. The Effect of High-Pressure Devitrification and Densification on Ballistic-Penetration Resistance of Fused Silica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grujicic, M.; Avuthu, V.; Snipes, J. S.; Ramaswami, S.; Galgalikar, R.

    2015-12-01

    Recent experimental and molecular-level computational analyses have indicated that fused silica, when subjected to pressures of several tens of GPa, can experience irreversible devitrification and densification. Such changes in the fused-silica molecular-level structure are associated with absorption and/or dissipation of the strain energy acquired by fused silica during high-pressure compression. This finding may have important practical consequences in applications for fused silica such as windshields and windows of military vehicles, portholes in ships, ground vehicles, spacecraft, etc. In the present work, our prior molecular-level computational results pertaining to the response of fused silica to high pressures (and shear stresses) are used to enrich a continuum-type constitutive model (that is, the so-called Johnson-Holmquist-2, JH2, model) for this material. Since the aforementioned devitrification and permanent densification processes modify the response of fused silica to the pressure as well as to the deviatoric part of the stress, changes had to be made in both the JH2 equation of state and the strength model. To assess the potential improvements in respect to the ballistic-penetration resistance of this material brought about by the fused-silica devitrification and permanent densification processes, a series of transient non-linear dynamics finite-element analyses of the transverse impact of a fused-silica test plate with a solid right-circular cylindrical steel projectile were conducted. The results obtained revealed that, provided the projectile incident velocity and, hence, the attendant pressure, is sufficiently high, fused silica can undergo impact-induced devitrification, which improves its ballistic-penetration resistance.

  15. Remote sensing of impervious surface growth: A framework for quantifying urban expansion and re-densification mechanisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shahtahmassebi, Amir Reza; Song, Jie; Zheng, Qing; Blackburn, George Alan; Wang, Ke; Huang, Ling Yan; Pan, Yi; Moore, Nathan; Shahtahmassebi, Golnaz; Sadrabadi Haghighi, Reza; Deng, Jing Song

    2016-04-01

    A substantial body of literature has accumulated on the topic of using remotely sensed data to map impervious surfaces which are widely recognized as an important indicator of urbanization. However, the remote sensing of impervious surface growth has not been successfully addressed. This study proposes a new framework for deriving and summarizing urban expansion and re-densification using time series of impervious surface fractions (ISFs) derived from remotely sensed imagery. This approach integrates multiple endmember spectral mixture analysis (MESMA), analysis of regression residuals, spatial statistics (Getis_Ord) and urban growth theories; hence, the framework is abbreviated as MRGU. The performance of MRGU was compared with commonly used change detection techniques in order to evaluate the effectiveness of the approach. The results suggested that the ISF regression residuals were optimal for detecting impervious surface changes while Getis_Ord was effective for mapping hotspot regions in the regression residuals image. Moreover, the MRGU outputs agreed with the mechanisms proposed in several existing urban growth theories, but importantly the outputs enable the refinement of such models by explicitly accounting for the spatial distribution of both expansion and re-densification mechanisms. Based on Landsat data, the MRGU is somewhat restricted in its ability to measure re-densification in the urban core but this may be improved through the use of higher spatial resolution satellite imagery. The paper ends with an assessment of the present gaps in remote sensing of impervious surface growth and suggests some solutions. The application of impervious surface fractions in urban change detection is a stimulating new research idea which is driving future research with new models and algorithms.

  16. Atomistic Origins of Densification in Oxide Melts in Earth's Mantle: Insights from Synchrotron X-ray Raman Scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, S.; Mao, H.; Eng, P.; Shu, J.; Lin, J.

    2008-12-01

    Whereas the structure of oxide melts at high pressure is essential for understanding chemical evolution of the Earth system in the magma ocean in the mantle, little is known about their liquid structures and the densification mechanism due to the inherent structural disorder and the lack of suitable experimental probes at high pressures. We have recently shown that x-ray Raman scattering combined with diamond anvil cell technique, can yield a new opportunity to study the bonding changes in amorphous systems at high pressure (e.g. Lee SK et al.. Phys. Rev. Lett. 2007, 98, 105502; Lee SK et al. Proc. Nat. Aca. Sci. 2008, 105, 7925). Here, we explore the pressure-induced structural changes in model oxide melt phases in mantle, such as borates, germanates, Na- and Mg- silicates up to 50 GPa using x-ray Raman scattering. The O-Kedge spectra for model oxide melts elucidate the marked difference in densification behavior with varying composition but all the oxide glasses studied here presents the first experimental evidence for the formation of the triply coordinate oxygen above 20 GPa. The increase in the fraction of the triply coordinated oxygen results in a reduced free volume needed to host elements that are more incompatible, leading to an increase in the crystal-melt partitioning coefficient of elements, such as radioactive nuclides thereby significantly affecting the process of the chemical differentiation in the Hadean magma oceans. Its formation can be an efficient densification mechanism in the oxide melt in Earth's mantle and explain the atomistic origin of the high-density Mg-silicate melts at the core-mantle boundary.

  17. Effect of the degree of microstructural Regularity of a porous powder solid on Its densification during sintering

    SciTech Connect

    Skorokhod, V.V.; Fridberg, I.D.; Panichking, V.V.

    1986-02-01

    A semiquantitative analysis is made, within the framework of a rheological approach, of the effect of microstructural regularity of a porous powder solid on the character of its sintering densification kinetics, and the results are compared of experiments on the sintering of various metal and oxide powders. Particular attention is given to possible changes in the structural regularity of sintering porous powder blanks due to variations in the particle size distribution and particle morphology of powders. Tungsten, nickel, and TL material were the powders used in the experiments.

  18. Low-temperature densification of ultrafine grained aluminum 6061-T6 by polymer bonding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Boumseock

    Ultrafine grained and nanocrytalline materials have many beneficial properties such as higher hardness, strength and wear resistance. A machining process has been developed as a new method to make nanostructured metals or alloys. Through the process, severe plastic deformation can be applied to metals or alloys and they become ultrafine grain and nanocrystalline in their structures. Because ultrafine grained alloys made by machining are made up to small chips, not bulk, to make bulk material, the alloy chips must be densified through processes such as sintering. Unfortunately, during the conventional sintering, the ultrafine grained alloys show grain growth at high rate and lose their hardness and strength. Therefore, low-temperature densification of ultrafine grained alloys has been pursued. In this thesis, ultrafine-grained (UFG) Al 6061-T6 particulate produced from machining chips have been consolidated and bonded using liquid epoxies that cure at 100?, below the coarsening temperature of the UFG structure. Two routes were explored---die-pressing premixed alloy particulate and epoxy and pressure infiltration of pre-pressed alloy particulate preforms. The effects of pressing pressure and epoxy viscosity were investigated. In order to reduce porosity and contamination, three treatments---application of pressure during curing of epoxy, the cleaning of the alloy powder with NaOH solution and degassing epoxy before pressing---were tried. In order to overcome limitation of diepressing, infiltration method was compared with die-pressing and the resulting properties of the composite discussed. Bond thickness between the alloy particles increases with the viscosity of the epoxies. In the hardness results by micro-indentor, the value of composite with more than 80% volume fraction of Al alloy chip (Va) was more than 120 kg/mm2. In those measurements, the hardness of the composite depends mainly on the volume fraction of Al alloy and was clearly influenced by the boundary

  19. Finite element modeling of dental restoration through multi-material laser densification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dai, Kun

    To provide guidance for intelligent selection of various parameters in the Multi-Material Laser Densification (MMLD) process for dental restorations, finite element modeling (FEM) has been carried out to investigate the MMLD process. These modeling investigations include the thermal analysis of the nominal surface temperature that should be adopted during experiments in order to achieve the desired microstructure; the effects of the volume shrinkage due to transformation from a powder compact to dense liquid on the temperature distribution and the size of the transformation zone; the evolution of transient temperature, transient stresses, residual stresses and distortions; and the effects of laser processing conditions, such as fabrication sequences, laser scanning patterns, component sizes, preheating temperatures, laser scanning rates, initial porosities, and thicknesses of each powder layer, on the final quality of the component fabricated via the MMLD process. The simulation results are compared with the experiments. It is found that the predicted temperature distribution matches the experiments very well. The nominal surface temperature applied on the dental porcelain body should be below 1273 K to prevent the forming of the un-desired microstructure (i.e., a leucite-free glassy phase). The simplified models that do not include the volume shrinkage effect provide good estimations of the temperature field and the size of the laser-densified body, although the shape of the laser-densified body predicted is different from that obtained in the experiment. It is also fount that warping and residual thermal stresses of the laser-densified component are more sensitive to the chamber preheating temperature and the thickness of each powder layer than to the laser scanning rate and the initial porosity of the powder layer. The major mechanism responsible for these phenomena is identified to be related to the change of the temperature gradient induced by these laser

  20. Effect of Heating Rate on Densification and Grain Growth During Spark Plasma Sintering of 93W-5.6Ni-1.4Fe Heavy Alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Ke; Li, Xiaoqiang; Qu, Shengguan; Li, Yuanyuan

    2013-09-01

    Blended 93W-5.6Ni-1.4Fe powders were sintered via the spark plasma sintering (SPS) technique using heating rates from 10 K min-1 to 380 K min-1 (10 °C min-1 to 380 °C min-1). The kinetics of densification and grain growth were analyzed to identify heating rate effects during the SPS of 93W-5.6Ni-1.4Fe powders. The activation energies for densification were calculated and compared with the experimental values for diffusion and other mass transport phenomena. The results show that for the slowly heated specimens [heating rate <100 K min-1 (100 °C min-1)], densification occurs mainly through dissolution-precipitation of W through the matrix phase and W grain boundary diffusion. The concurrent grain growth is dominated by surface diffusion at a low sintering temperature and by solution-reprecipitation and Ni-enhanced W grain boundary diffusion at a higher temperature. For the specimens sintered with heating rates higher than 100 K min-1 (100 °C min-1), the apparent activation energy value for the mechanism controlling densification is a strong function of the relative density, and fast densification controlled by multiple diffusion mechanisms and intensive viscous flow dominates over the grain growth. High SPS heating rate is favorable to obtain high density and fine-grained tungsten heavy alloys.

  1. Sub-micron fracture mechanism in silica-based glass activated by permanent densification from high-strain loading

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Wereszczak, Andrew A.; Waters, Shirley B.; Parten, Randy J.; Pye, L. David

    2016-04-26

    Several silica-based glasses were fractured at high strain energy via drop-weight testing on small specimens. A cylindrical specimen geometry was chosen to promote initially simple, axisymmetric, and uniform compressive loading. The imposed uniaxial compressive strain at impact was sufficiently high to qualitatively cause permanent densification. Produced fragments were collected for postmortem and a fraction of them, for all the silica-based glasses, consistently had distinct sub-micron-sized fractures (~ 300–1000 nm), designated here as “microkernels”, on their surfaces. They would most often appear as a sub-micron pore on the fragment - apparently if the microkernel had popped out as a consequence ofmore » the local crack plane running through it, tensile-strain release, and the associated formation of the fragment it was on. No fractographic evidence was found to show the microkernels were associated with local failure initiation. However, their positioning and habit sometimes suggested they were associated with localized crack branching and that they could have influenced secondary fracturing that occurred during overall crushing and comminution and associated fragment size and shape creation. Furthermore, the size range of these microkernels is much too small to affect structural flexure strength of these glasses for most applications but are of a size and concentration that may affect their ballistic, shock, crush, and comminution responses when permanent densification is concomitantly occurring.« less

  2. Controlling the oxygen potential to improve the densification and the solid solution formation of uranium-plutonium mixed oxides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berzati, Ségolène; Vaudez, Stéphane; Belin, Renaud C.; Léchelle, Jacques; Marc, Yves; Richaud, Jean-Christophe; Heintz, Jean-Marc

    2014-04-01

    Diffusion mechanisms occurring during the sintering of oxide ceramics are affected by the oxygen content of the atmosphere, as it imposes the nature and the concentration of structural defects in the material. Thus, the oxygen partial pressure, p(O2), of the sintering gas has to be precisely controlled, otherwise a large dispersion in various parameters, critical for the manufacturing of ceramics such as nuclear oxides fuels, is likely to occur. In the present work, the densification behaviour and the solid solution formation of a mixed uranium-plutonium oxide (MOX) were investigated. The initial mixture, composed of 70% UO2 + 30% PuO2, was studied at p(O2) ranging from 10-15 to 10-4 atm up to 1873 K both with dilatometry and in situ high temperature X-ray diffraction. This study has shown that the initial oxides UO2+x and PuO2-x first densify during heating and then the solid solution formation starts at about 200 K higher. The densification and the formation of the solid solution both occur at a lower temperature when p(O2) increases. Based on this result, it is possible to better define the sintering atmosphere, eventually leading to optimized parameters such as density, oxygen stoichiometry and cations homogenization of nuclear ceramics and of a wide range of industrial ceramic materials.

  3. Densification of Reaction Bonded Silicon Nitride with the Addition of Fine Si Powder Effects on the Sinterability and Mechanical Properties

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Sea-Hoon; Cho, Chun-Rae; Park, Young-Jo; Ko, Jae-Woong; Kim, Hai-Doo; Lin, Hua-Tay; Becher, Paul F

    2013-01-01

    The densification behavior and strength of sintered reaction bonded silicon nitrides (SRBSN) that contain Lu2O3-SiO2 additives were improved by the addition of fine Si powder. Dense specimens (relative density: 99.5%) were obtained by gas-pressure sintering (GPS) at 1850oC through the addition of fine Si. In contrast, the densification of conventional specimens did not complete at 1950oC. The fine Si decreased the onset temperature of shrinkage and increased the shrinkage rate because the additive helped the compaction of green bodies and induced the formation of fine Si3N4 particles after nitridation and sintering at and above 1600oC. The amount of residual SiO2 within the specimens was not strongly affected by adding fine Si powder because most of the SiO2 layer that had formed on the fine Si particles decomposed during nitridation. The maximum strength and fracture toughness of the specimens were 991 MPa and 8.0 MPa m1/2, respectively.

  4. Automatic image analysis methods for the determination of stereological parameters - application to the analysis of densification during solid state sintering of WC-Co compacts

    PubMed

    Missiaen; Roure

    2000-08-01

    Automatic image analysis methods which were used to determine microstructural parameters of sintered materials are presented. Estimation of stereological parameters at interfaces, when the system contains more than two phases, is particularly detailed. It is shown that the specific surface areas and mean curvatures of the various interfaces can be estimated in the numerical space of the images. The methods are applied to the analysis of densification during solid state sintering of WC-Co compacts. The microstructural evolution is commented on. Application of microstructural measurements to the analysis of densification kinetics is also discussed. PMID:10947907

  5. Liquid Oxygen Propellant Densification Unit Ground Tested With a Large-Scale Flight-Weight Tank for the X-33 Reusable Launch Vehicle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tomsik, Thomas M.

    2002-01-01

    Propellant densification has been identified as a critical technology in the development of single-stage-to-orbit reusable launch vehicles. Technology to create supercooled high-density liquid oxygen (LO2) and liquid hydrogen (LH2) is a key means to lowering launch vehicle costs. The densification of cryogenic propellants through subcooling allows 8 to 10 percent more propellant mass to be stored in a given unit volume, thereby improving the launch vehicle's overall performance. This allows for higher propellant mass fractions than would be possible with conventional normal boiling point cryogenic propellants, considering the normal boiling point of LO2 and LH2.

  6. Densification kinetics of glassy and crystalline volcanic ash and subsequent predictability associated with its fragmentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vasseur, Jeremie; Wadsworth, Fabian; Lavallée, Yan; Hess, Kai-Uwe; Dingwell, Donald

    2014-05-01

    consideration permitted us to explore the effect of sintering on the stress required for dynamic macroscopic failure of synthesized samples at conditions relevant to volcanic conduits. Sintering and densification results in a non linear increase in strength and micromechanical modelling shows that the pore-emanated crack model explains this trend as a function of pore fraction and size. We also assessed the ability of precursory microseismic signals to be used as a failure forecast proxy according to drastic changes in porosity (˜40 to 0%) and material strength (>102 MPa). Homogeneous single-phase liquids to heterogeneous multi-phase (pores in glasses, pores and crystals in other volcanic rocks) liquids display different microseismic patterns preceding bulk sample failure, somewhat mimicking the range of seismic precursory signals observed at volcanoes with magma of similar viscosity and mechanical characteristics. Defect-free glass for example will rapidly accumulate a huge amount of strain energy as it requires to exceed an elevated strength for failure (˜500-700 MPa) and suddenly release it via localised microfracturing. Microseismic acceleration associated with defect-poor rocks/magmas display trial or occasionally little forewarning with the implication that seismic-based failure prediction may be difficult to make in real-time monitoring.

  7. Volcanic sintering and densification of glassy and crystalline ash: Kinetics, strength recovery and seismogenicity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vasseur, J.; Wadsworth, F. B.; Lavallee, Y.; Hess, K.; Dingwell, D. B.

    2013-12-01

    consideration permitted us to explore the effect of sintering on the stress required for dynamic macroscopic failure of synthesized samples at conditions relevant to volcanic conduits. Sintering and densification results in a non linear increase in strength and micromechanical modelling shows that the pore-emanated crack model explains this trend as a function of pore fraction and size. We also assessed the ability of precursory microseismic signals to be used as a failure forecast proxy according to drastic changes in porosity (˜40 to 0%) and material strength (>100 MPa). Homogeneous single-phase liquids to heterogeneous multi-phase (pores in glasses, pores and crystals in other volcanic rocks) liquids display different microseismic patterns preceding bulk sample failure, somewhat mimicking the range of seismic precursory signals observed at volcanoes with magma of similar viscosity and mechanical characteristics. Defect-free glass for example will rapidly accumulate a huge amount of strain energy as it requires to exceed an elevated strength for failure (˜500-700 MPa) and suddenly release it via pervasing microfracturing. Associated microseismic acceleration will display almost no or very late forewarning and seismic-based failure prediction will be hard to make.

  8. The effects of sintering aids on defects, densification, and single crystal conversion of transparent neodymium:YAG ceramics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stevenson, Adam J.

    Nd:YAG transparent ceramics have the potential to replace Czochralski grown single crystals in high power laser applications. However, after more than 20 years of development, there has been only limited application of these potentially revolutionary materials. In order to improve the processing and properties of Nd:YAG transparent ceramics and facilitate increased adoption, this dissertation explores the effects of sintering aids on defects, densification and single crystal conversion (SCC) of Nd:YAG ceramics. To explore the role of SiO2 doping in densification and microstructure development of Nd:YAG transparent ceramics, 1 at% Nd:YAG powders were doped with 0.035--0.28 wt% SiO2 and vacuum sintered between 1484°C and 1750°C. 29Si magic-angle spinning nuclear magnetic resonance showed that Si4+ substitutes onto tetrahedrally coordinated Al 3+ sites at sintering temperatures ≥1600°C. High resolution transmission electron microscopy showed no grain boundary second phases for all silica levels in samples sintered at 1600--1750°C. Coarsening was limited by a solute drag mechanism as suggested by cubic grain growth kinetics and TEM energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy observations of increased Nd3+ concentration near grain boundaries. Increasing SiO 2 content increased both densification and grain growth rate and led to increasingly coarsening-dominated sintering trajectories. The average grain size could be controlled (2.8 microm--18 microm) in highly transparent ceramics using a combination of SiO2 content, sintering temperature, and sintering time. B2O3-SiO2 was shown to act as a transient liquid phase sintering aid that reduces the sintering temperature of Nd:YAG ceramics to 1600°C. 1 at% Nd:YAG ceramics were doped with 0.34--1.35 mol% B2O3-SiO2 and sintered between 1100°C and 1700°C. Dilatometric measurements showed that B2O 3-SiO2 additions increase the densification rate during intermediate stage sintering relative to SiO2 doped samples. B3+ content is

  9. The effect of volume phase changes, mass transport, sunlight penetration, and densification on the thermal regime of icy regoliths

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fanale, Fraser P.; Salvail, James R.; Matson, Dennis L.; Brown, Robert H.

    1990-01-01

    The present quantitative modeling of convective, condensational, and sublimational effects on porous ice crust volumes subjected to solar radiation encompasses the effect of such insolation's penetration of visible bandpass-translucent light, but opaque to the IR bandpass. Quasi-steady-state temperatures, H2O mass fluxes, and ice mass-density change rates are computed as functions of time of day and ice depth. When the effects of latent heat and mass transport are included in the model, the enhancement of near-surface temperature due to the 'solid-state greenhouse effect' is substantially diminished. When latent heat, mass transport, and densification effects are considered, however, a significant solid-state greenhouse effect is shown to be compatible with both morphological evidence for high crust strengths and icy shell decoupling from the lithosphere.

  10. The effect of pressureless densification on mechanical and tribological properties of fine-grained silicon nitride ceramics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pawlik, T.; Sopicka-Lizer, M.; Wieczorek, J.

    2012-05-01

    The paper presents a new economic method of silicon nitride ceramic preparation for high wear resistant applications as sealing valves or the brake pad lining. The excellent mechanical properties and wear resistance of the resultant ceramic were improved by reduction of silicon nitride grain size to the one-two micrometer level as a result of mechanochemical processing and special procedure of compact densification. All experiments were conducted on specimens prepared from α-Si3N4-AlN-Y2O3 powders with application of mechanochemical processing (MCP). The chosen specimens were tested for hardness, elastic modulus, bending strength and wear resistance. The results showed mechanical properties in the range of hot-pressed ceramics and superior wear resistance due to micrometer-sized β-Si3N4 grains.

  11. Controllable film densification and interface flatness for high-performance amorphous indium oxide based thin film transistors

    SciTech Connect

    Ou-Yang, Wei E-mail: TSUKAGOSHI.Kazuhito@nims.go.jp; Mitoma, Nobuhiko; Kizu, Takio; Gao, Xu; Lin, Meng-Fang; Tsukagoshi, Kazuhito E-mail: TSUKAGOSHI.Kazuhito@nims.go.jp; Nabatame, Toshihide

    2014-10-20

    To avoid the problem of air sensitive and wet-etched Zn and/or Ga contained amorphous oxide transistors, we propose an alternative amorphous semiconductor of indium silicon tungsten oxide as the channel material for thin film transistors. In this study, we employ the material to reveal the relation between the active thin film and the transistor performance with aid of x-ray reflectivity study. By adjusting the pre-annealing temperature, we find that the film densification and interface flatness between the film and gate insulator are crucial for achieving controllable high-performance transistors. The material and findings in the study are believed helpful for realizing controllable high-performance stable transistors.

  12. Simulation of the Densification of Semicrystalline Polymer Powders during the Selective Laser Sintering Process: Application to Nylon-12,

    SciTech Connect

    Dong, L.; Makradi, A.; Ahzi, Said; Remond, Y.; Sun, Xin

    2008-06-01

    The heating and densification processes of semi-crystalline polymer powders, during the selective laser sintering process, are simulated using the finite element method. Based on previously developed three-dimensional approach for the sintering of amorphous polymer powders, the modeling methodology is extended to semi-crystalline polymers by taking into account the effects of latent heat during melting. In these simulations, the temperature dependent thermal conductivity, specific heat, density and the effect of latent heat are computed then used as material constants for the integration of the heat equation. Results for temperature and density distribution using Nylon-12 powder are presented and discussed. The effects of processing parameters on the density distribution are also presented.

  13. Formulation, Pretreatment, and Densification Options to Improve Biomass Specifications for Co-Firing High Percentages with Coal

    SciTech Connect

    Jaya Shankar Tumuluru; J Richard Hess; Richard D. Boardman; Shahab Sokhansanj; Christopher T. Wright; Tyler L. Westover

    2012-06-01

    There is a growing interest internationally to use more biomass for power generation, given the potential for significant environmental benefits and long-term fuel sustainability. However, the use of biomass alone for power generation is subject to serious challenges, such as feedstock supply reliability, quality, and stability, as well as comparative cost, except in situations in which biomass is locally sourced. In most countries, only a limited biomass supply infrastructure exists. Alternatively, co-firing biomass alongwith coal offers several advantages; these include reducing challenges related to biomass quality, buffering the system against insufficient feedstock quantity, and mitigating the costs of adapting existing coal power plants to feed biomass exclusively. There are some technical constraints, such as low heating values, low bulk density, and grindability or size-reduction challenges, as well as higher moisture, volatiles, and ash content, which limit the co-firing ratios in direct and indirect co-firing. To achieve successful co-firing of biomass with coal, biomass feedstock specifications must be established to direct pretreatment options in order to modify biomass materials into a format that is more compatible with coal co-firing. The impacts on particle transport systems, flame stability, pollutant formation, and boiler-tube fouling/corrosion must also be minimized by setting feedstock specifications, which may include developing new feedstock composition by formulation or blending. Some of the issues, like feeding, co-milling, and fouling, can be overcome by pretreatment methods including washing/leaching, steam explosion, hydrothermal carbonization, and torrefaction, and densification methods such as pelletizing and briquetting. Integrating formulation, pretreatment, and densification will help to overcome issues related to physical and chemical composition, storage, and logistics to successfully co-fire higher percentages of biomass ( > 40

  14. Firn densification in a Late Noachian “icy highlands” Mars: Implications for ice sheet evolution and thermal response

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cassanelli, James P.; Head, James W.

    2015-06-01

    Recent modeling of a thicker early CO2 martian atmosphere and Late Noachian climate predicts that for pressures beyond a fraction of a bar, atmosphere-surface thermal coupling occurs, resulting in adiabatic cooling of high areas across Mars. This promotes the transport of water ice from relatively warmer low-lying areas to the highlands, where deposition and accumulation of water ice result in an "icy highlands" Late Noachian Mars. Deposits will remain stable in the highlands under nominal Late Noachian conditions, but the potential exists for punctuated heating by both top-down (e.g. impacts, volcanism) and bottom-up (e.g. elevated geothermal heat flux) processes. Important in understanding melt generation from these processes is the state of the accumulated snow and ice. Through modeling of the firn densification process in the "icy highlands" framework we assess: (1) the nature of snow accumulation and the physical growth and evolution of the predicted ice deposits, and (2) the implications for the thermal properties of the ice sheets and the response to heating events. Analysis of the firn densification process in the "icy highlands" context indicates that: (1) the upper layers of the ice sheet will be more vulnerable to melting from top-down heating processes because they are comprised of the least dense and least thermally conductive ice, and (2) even with a low thermal conductivity firn layer, basal melting is only likely to occur through a combination of top-down and bottom-up heating. This is because at the nominal mean annual surface temperatures and estimated effective thermal conductivities, the predicted ice sheet thicknesses do not produce enough basal warming to initiate melting for plausible geothermal heat fluxes. Variations in spin-axis/orbital parameters alone are not predicted to cause widespread ablation (melting and sublimation) of the icy highlands ice sheets.

  15. Gravity induced densification of floating crude oil by granular materials: Effect of particle size and surface morphology.

    PubMed

    Boglaienko, Daria; Tansel, Berrin

    2016-06-15

    Densification and sedimentation of floating crude oil to the bottom of water column reduces the radius of a spill and its mobility, preventing direct contamination of beaches, coastal flora and fauna. Performances of different natural granular materials were evaluated for capturing efficiency of floating fresh South Louisiana crude oil. The granular materials studied were quartz sand with medium (20-30mesh) and fine (40-100mesh) particle size, limestone with coarse (4-10mesh) and medium (16-40mesh) particle size, beach sand (20-80mesh), and clay (kaolin with ferric oxide; passing 200mesh). Beach sand (mixture of quartz and limestone 20-80mesh) and limestone (16-40mesh) demonstrated better performance for capture, densification and submergence of the crude oil among the materials evaluated. The behavior of granular particles with the hydrophobic phase can be classified as (1) immersion entrapment inside the hydrophobic phase (slurry), and (2) partial encapsulation of the hydrophobic phase by a single layer of particles (raft). With crude oil, the particles were primarily entrapped within the hydrophobic phase. Study of the effect of particle size and morphology (i.e., porosity) of the granular materials on capture performance showed that average surface pore size did not have a significant effect on aggregation with oil, however, higher capture efficiency was observed with materials of higher surface porosity (beach sand and limestone). The experiments revealed that there is a critical particle size range (passing 10mesh) which resulted in more effective aggregation of the granular materials with crude oil. PMID:26971215

  16. The effect of high-pressure devitrification and densification on ballistic-penetration resistance of fused silica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Avuthu, Vasudeva Reddy

    Despite the clear benefits offered by more advanced transparent materials, (e.g. transparent ceramics offer a very attractive combination of high stiffness and high hardness levels, highly-ductile transparent polymers provide superior fragment-containing capabilities, etc.), ballistic ceramic-glass like fused-silica remains an important constituent material in a majority of transparent impact-resistant structures (e.g. windshields and windows of military vehicles, portholes in ships, ground vehicles and spacecraft) used today. Among the main reasons for the wide-scale use of glass, the following three are most frequently cited: (i) glass-structure fabrication technologies enable the production of curved, large surface-area, transparent structures with thickness approaching several inches; (ii) relatively low material and manufacturing costs; and (iii) compositional modifications, chemical strengthening, and controlled crystallization have been demonstrated to be capable of significantly improving the ballistic properties of glass. In the present work, the potential of high-pressure devitrification and densification of fused-silica as a ballistic-resistance-enhancement mechanism is investigated computationally. In the first part of the present work, all-atom molecular-level computations are carried out to infer the dynamic response and material microstructure/topology changes of fused silica subjected to ballistic impact by a nanometer-sized hard projectile. The analysis was focused on the investigation of specific aspects of the dynamic response and of the microstructural changes such as the deformation of highly sheared and densified regions, and the conversion of amorphous fused silica to SiO2 crystalline allotropic modifications (in particular, alpha-quartz and stishovite). The microstructural changes in question were determined by carrying out a post-processing atom-coordination procedure. This procedure suggested the formation of high-density stishovite (and

  17. Network cation coordination in aluminoborosilicate and Mg- aluminosilicate glasses: pressure effects in recovered structural changes and densification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bista, S.; Stebbins, J. F.; Sisson, T. W.; Hankins, W. B.

    2015-12-01

    In this study, we compare the aluminum and boron coordination of glass samples recovered from piston-cylinder experiments carried out at 1 to 3 GPa and near to their ambient glass transition temperature (Tg), which we have found gives a more accurate picture of high pressure structural changes than experiments involving quenching from above the liquidus, as large pressure drops can occur in the latter. Aluminoborosilicate glasses with excess modifier (Ca, La and Y- aluminoborosilicate) quenched from melts at 1-3 GPa were studied with B-11 and Al-27 MAS NMR to assess relative effects on two different network cations. Structural changes in the Y-aluminoborosilicate are dramatic, going from mostly AlO4 at low pressure to mostly AlO5 and AlO6 at 3 GPa. Large increases in BO4 (vs. BO3) are also seen. Mg-aluminosilicate glasses, both tectosilicate (Mg2Al4Si6O20) and with excess modifier composition (Mg3Al2Si6O18) quenched from melts at 1-3 GPa pressure were studied with Al-27 MAS NMR. In contrast to our previous study (Bista et al., Am. Min., in press) of jadeite glass, where only 0.5% of fivefold aluminum was seen in glass recovered from 3 GPa, five and six fold aluminum species increase significantly with increasing pressure in both Mg aluminosilicate glass compositions studied here. We observe that the tectosilicate Mg aluminosilicate glass has more higher coordinated aluminum than the excess modifier containing composition in the pressure range in our study. In the previous study (Bista et al., in press) of jadeite and calcium aluminosilicate (Ca3Al2Si6O18) glasses, 6-8% densification was observed in glasses recovered from 3 GPa. In this study of Mg aluminosilicate glasses, we observe 12% densification in glasses recovered from 3 GPa. Both types of observation confirm that structural and density changes with pressure are enhanced by higher field strength modifier cations, and will be especially important in Mg- and Fe-rich mantle melts.

  18. On the Densification Behavior of (0.2, 0.5, and 1 Wt Pct) CNT-YSZ Ceramic Composites Processed via Spark Plasma Sintering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karanam, Abhinav; Bichler, Lukas; Fong, Randy

    2015-08-01

    Yttria-Stabilized Zirconia (YSZ) is a promising thermal insulating ceramic for high temperature applications due to its stability and chemical inertness. As was demonstrated with other technical ceramics ( e.g., Alumina), addition of Single-Wall Carbon Nanotubes (CNTs) to a ceramic matrix may significantly enhance its mechanical properties. In this work, 8 mol pct YSZ with 0.2, 0.5, and 1 wt pct CNT composites were fabricated via the spark plasma sintering process. The densification, Vicker's microhardness, specific gravity, and microstructure evolution of the composites were investigated. The results suggest that the addition of CNTs to YSZ hindered densification and grain growth during SPS processing leading to inhomogeneous grain size distribution. However, the CNTs had a profound impact on the hardness of the composite ceramics, with an increase from 697 HV (YSZ) to 1195 HV (1 wt pctCNT-YSZ).

  19. Characterization and densification studies on ThO 2-UO 2 pellets derived from ThO 2 and U 3O 8 powders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kutty, T. R. G.; Hegde, P. V.; Khan, K. B.; Jarvis, T.; Sengupta, A. K.; Majumdar, S.; Kamath, H. S.

    2004-12-01

    ThO2 containing around 2-3% 233UO2 is the proposed fuel for the forthcoming Indian Advanced Heavy Water Reactor (AHWR). This fuel is prepared by powder metallurgy technique using ThO2 and U3O8 powders as the starting material. The densification behaviour of the fuel was evaluated using a high temperature dilatometer in four different atmospheres Ar, Ar-8%H2, CO2 and air. Air was found to be the best medium for sintering among them. For Ar and Ar-8%H2 atmospheres, the former gave a slightly higher densification. Thermogravimetric studies carried out on ThO2-2%U3O8 granules in air showed a continuous decrease in weight up to 1500 °C. The effectiveness of U3O8 in enhancing the sintering of ThO2 has been established.

  20. Engineering strain, densification, order parameter and magnetic properties of FePt thin films by dense electronic excitations

    SciTech Connect

    Gupta, Rekha; Sehdev, Neeru; Annapoorni, S.; Asokan, K.; Kanjilal, D.

    2014-08-28

    FePt films prepared by DC sputtering on Si 〈100〉 substrates when annealed at 600 °C for 1 h exhibited a structurally ordered and magnetically hard L1{sub 0} phase. These FePt films were exposed to dense electronic excitations by using 100 MeV oxygen ions as a function of increasing fluences. Such excitations induce pressure and result in the enhancement of order parameter by increasing strain on the FePt films. Apart from this, the surface morphological images from field emission scanning electron microscopy reveal a densification of the films consequent to irradiation and are correlated with the details obtained from Rutherford back scattering analysis. The variation in the values of coercivity correlates well with the change in volume percentage of face centered tetragonal and face centered cubic phase. A coercivity of 14.7 kOe with order parameter 0.92 is achieved at a fluence of 5 × 10{sup 12} ions/cm{sup 2}. The theoretical simulation of the demagnetization curve shows a strong correlation of coercivity and order parameter between the experimentally obtained values with that of simulation. The effect of irradiation induced strain, the structural ordering and coercivity of FePt films as a function of fluences have been discussed.

  1. Mass densification and defect restoration in chemical vapor deposition silicon dioxide film using Ar plasma excited by microwave

    SciTech Connect

    Kawase, Kazumasa Motoya, Tsukasa; Uehara, Yasushi; Teramoto, Akinobu; Suwa, Tomoyuki; Ohmi, Tadahiro

    2014-09-01

    Silicon dioxide (SiO{sub 2}) films formed by chemical vapor deposition (CVD) have been treated with Ar plasma excited by microwave. The changes of the mass densities, carrier trap densities, and thicknesses of the CVD-SiO{sub 2} films with the Ar plasma treatments were investigated. The mass density depth profiles were estimated with X-Ray Reflectivity (XRR) analysis using synchrotron radiation. The densities of carrier trap centers due to defects of Si-O bond network were estimated with X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (XPS) time-dependent measurement. The changes of the thicknesses due to the oxidation of Si substrates were estimated with the XRR and XPS. The mass densities of the CVD-SiO{sub 2} films are increased by the Ar plasma treatments. The carrier trap densities of the films are decreased by the treatments. The thicknesses of the films are not changed by the treatments. It has been clarified that the mass densification and defect restoration in the CVD-SiO{sub 2} films are caused by the Ar plasma treatments without the oxidation of the Si substrates.

  2. Densification and Mechanical Properties of TiB2-SiC Nanocomposite with Silicon Carbaid as a Sintering Aid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alavi, Seyed Hashem; Baharvandi, Hamid Reza; Abdizadeh, Hossein

    In this study, titanium diboride (TiB2) with silicon carbaid (SiC) nano particles as a sintering aid was isostatic-pressed, then sintered at a temperature of 1800°C. The amount of SiC had a significant influence on the sinterability and mechanical properties of TiB2. When a small amount (10 wt%) of SiC was added, SiC reacted with titania (TiO2) that was present on the surface of TiB2 powder to form titanium carbaid (TiC) and amorphous silica (SiO2). Elimination of TiO2 suppressed the grain growth effectively, which led to an improvement in the densification of TiB2. Vickers hardness was enhanced remarkably through these improvements in the sinterability and microstructure. On the other hand, when a large amount (≥10 wt%) of SiC was added, the density and hardness were not improved much, presumably because of the extensive formation of SiC phase at the grain boundaries.

  3. Real-time assessment of granule densification in high shear wet granulation and application to scale-up of a placebo and a brivanib alaninate formulation.

    PubMed

    Narang, Ajit S; Sheverev, Valery A; Stepaniuk, Vadim; Badawy, Sherif; Stevens, Tim; Macias, Kevin; Wolf, Avi; Pandey, Preetanshu; Bindra, Dilbir; Varia, Sailesh

    2015-03-01

    Real-time monitoring and control of high shear wet granulation (HSWG) using process analytical technologies is crucial to process design, scale-up, and reproducible manufacture. Although significant progress has been made in real-time measurement of granule size distribution using focused beam reflectance measurement (FBRM), real-time in-line assessment of granule densification remains challenging. In this study, a drag force flow (DFF) sensor was developed and used to probe wet mass consistency in real-time. In addition, responses from FBRM and DFF sensors were compared to assess complementarity of information on granulation progress from the two probes. A placebo and a brivanib alaninate formulation were granulated with different concentrations of binder or water, respectively, while measuring granule size growth, densification, and DFF sensor response. The DFF sensor was able to quantitatively characterize with high resolution a response of wet mass consistency distinct from granule size distribution. The wet mass consistency parameter correlated well with granule densification, which was shown as a critical material attribute that correlated with tablet dissolution. In addition, application of DFF sensor to scale-up of granulation was demonstrated. These results showed the value of wet mass consistency measurement using DFF for WG monitoring and control. PMID:25470221

  4. Liquid Oxygen Propellant Densification Production and Performance Test Results With a Large-Scale Flight-Weight Propellant Tank for the X33 RLV

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tomsik, Thomas M.; Meyer, Michael L.

    2010-01-01

    This paper describes in-detail a test program that was initiated at the Glenn Research Center (GRC) involving the cryogenic densification of liquid oxygen (LO2). A large scale LO2 propellant densification system rated for 200 gpm and sized for the X-33 LO2 propellant tank, was designed, fabricated and tested at the GRC. Multiple objectives of the test program included validation of LO2 production unit hardware and characterization of densifier performance at design and transient conditions. First, performance data is presented for an initial series of LO2 densifier screening and check-out tests using densified liquid nitrogen. The second series of tests show performance data collected during LO2 densifier test operations with liquid oxygen as the densified product fluid. An overview of LO2 X-33 tanking operations and load tests with the 20,000 gallon Structural Test Article (STA) are described. Tank loading testing and the thermal stratification that occurs inside of a flight-weight launch vehicle propellant tank were investigated. These operations involved a closed-loop recirculation process of LO2 flow through the densifier and then back into the STA. Finally, in excess of 200,000 gallons of densified LO2 at 120 oR was produced with the propellant densification unit during the demonstration program, an achievement that s never been done before in the realm of large-scale cryogenic tests.

  5. Liquid propellant densification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lak, Tibor I. (Inventor); Petrilla, Steve P. (Inventor); Lozano, Martin E. (Inventor)

    1997-01-01

    Super cooling the cryogenic liquid propellant in a vehicle propellant tank densities the propellant allowing the vehicle propellant tank to carry more fuel in the same volume tank while lowering the vapor pressure and thus the tank operating pressure. Lowering the tank operating pressure reduces the stress and therefore allows the walls of the tank to be thinner. Both the smaller tank volume and thinner tank wall results in an overall smaller and lighter vehicle with increased payload capability. The cryogenic propellant can be supercooled well below the normal boiling point temperature level by transporting the liquid propellant from the vehicle tanks to a ground based cooling unit which utilizes a combination of heat exchanger and compressor. The compressor lowers the coolant fluid bath pressure resulting in a low temperature boiling liquid which is subsequently used to cool the recirculating liquid. The cooled propellant is then returned to the vehicle propellant tank. In addition to reducing the vehicle size and weight the invention also allows location of the vent valve on the ground, elimination of on-board recirculation pumps or bleed systems, smaller and lighter engine pumps and valves, lighter and more stable ullage gas, and significant reduction in tank fill operation. All of these mentioned attributes provide lower vehicle weight and cost.

  6. Cryogenic Propellant Densification Study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ewart, R. O.; Dergance, R. H.

    1978-01-01

    Ground and vehicle system requirements are evaluated for the use of densified cryogenic propellants in advanced space transportation systems. Propellants studied were slush and triple point liquid hydrogen, triple point liquid oxygen, and slush and triple point liquid methane. Areas of study included propellant production, storage, transfer, vehicle loading and system requirements definition. A savings of approximately 8.2 x 100,000 Kg can be achieved in single stage to orbit gross liftoff weight for a payload of 29,484 Kg by utilizing densified cryogens in place of normal boiling point propellants.

  7. Effects of Powder Attributes and Laser Powder Bed Fusion (L-PBF) Process Conditions on the Densification and Mechanical Properties of 17-4 PH Stainless Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Irrinki, Harish; Dexter, Michael; Barmore, Brenton; Enneti, Ravi; Pasebani, Somayeh; Badwe, Sunil; Stitzel, Jason; Malhotra, Rajiv; Atre, Sundar V.

    2016-03-01

    The effects of powders attributes (shape and size distribution) and critical processing conditions (energy density) on the densification and mechanical properties of laser powder bed fusion (L-PBF) 17-4 PH stainless steel were studied using four types of powders. The % theoretical density, ultimate tensile strength and hardness of both water- and gas-atomized powders increased with increased energy density. Gas-atomized powders showed superior densification and mechanical properties when processed at low energy densities. However, the % theoretical density and mechanical properties of water-atomized powders were comparable to gas-atomized powders when sintered at a high energy density of 104 J/mm3. An important result of this study was that, even at high % theoretical density (97% ± 1%), the properties of as-printed parts could vary over a relatively large range (UTS: 500-1100 MPa; hardness: 25-39 HRC; elongation: 10-25%) depending on powder characteristics and process conditions. The results also demonstrate the feasibility of using relatively inexpensive water-atomized powders as starting raw material instead of the typically used gas-atomized powders to fabricate parts using L-PBF techniques by sintering at high energy densities.

  8. The Impact of Densification by Means of Informal Shacks in the Backyards of Low-Cost Houses on the Environment and Service Delivery in Cape Town, South Africa

    PubMed Central

    Govender, Thashlin; Barnes, Jo M.; Pieper, Clarissa H.

    2011-01-01

    This paper investigates the state-sponsored low cost housing provided to previously disadvantaged communities in the City of Cape Town. The strain imposed on municipal services by informal densification of unofficial backyard shacks was found to create unintended public health risks. Four subsidized low-cost housing communities were selected within the City of Cape Town in this cross-sectional survey. Data was obtained from 1080 persons with a response rate of 100%. Illegal electrical connections to backyard shacks that are made of flimsy materials posed increased fire risks. A high proportion of main house owners did not pay for water but sold water to backyard dwellers. The design of state-subsidised houses and the unplanned housing in the backyard added enormous pressure on the existing municipal infrastructure and the environment. Municipal water and sewerage systems and solid waste disposal cannot cope with the increased population density and poor sanitation behaviour of the inhabitants of these settlements. The low-cost housing program in South Africa requires improved management and prudent policies to cope with the densification of state-funded low-cost housing settlements. PMID:21695092

  9. A comparison study on the densification behavior and mechanical properties of gelcast vs conventionally formed B{sub 4}C sintered conventionally and by microwaves

    SciTech Connect

    Menchhofer, P.A.; Kiggans, J.O.; Morrow, M.S.; Schechter, D.E.

    1996-06-01

    The utilization of microwave energy for reaching high temperatures necessary to densify B{sub 4}C powder is compared with conventional means of sintering by evaluating the mechanical properties after densification. Microwave energy has been shown to be an effective means for achieving high sintered densities, even though temperatures of {approximately} 2,250 C are required. In this study, green preforms of B{sub 4}C specimens were sintered by both conventional and microwave heating. This study also utilized an advanced forming method called ``Gelcasting`` developed at ORNL. Gelcasting is a fluid forming process whereby high solids suspensions of powders containing dissolved monomers are cast into a mold, then polymerized or ``gelled`` in situ. This investigation compares microstructures and mechanical properties of both Gelcast B{sub 4}C and ``conventionally`` die-pressed B{sub 4}C. The microstructures and final mechanical properties of B{sub 4}C specimens are discussed.

  10. Effects of cold high pressure densification on Cu sheathed Ba0.6K0.4Fe2As2 superconducting wire

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, Y.; Li, G. Z.; Yang, Y.; Kovacs, C. J.; Susner, M. A.; Sumption, M. D.; Sun, Y.; Zhuang, J. C.; Shi, Z. X.; Majoros, M.; Collings, E. W.

    2012-12-01

    Cu sheathed polycrystalline Ba0.6K0.4Fe2As2 superconducting wire was prepared by a two-step powder-in-tube method. A pressure of 2 GPa was applied to a short sample before heat treatment. Magnetization and transport measurements were performed to investigate the effects of cold high pressure densification on the microstructure and superconductivity. The cold pressed sample shows an improved self-field transport critical current density of 2.8 × 104 A/cm2 (Ic = 83 A) at 4.2 K, which is nearly as twice as the unpressed sample. However, both samples manifest pronounced weak-link behavior, suggesting the technique need to be further optimized. The comparison of properties between pressed and unpressed sample and related mechanism was discussed.

  11. Preparation of spherical ultrafine copper powder via hydrogen reduction-densification of Mg(OH)2-coated Cu2O powder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yue-jun; Zhou, Kang-gen

    2012-11-01

    A novel process was developed to produce spherical copper powder for multilayer ceramic capacitors (MLCC). Spherical ultrafine cuprous oxide (Cu2O) powder was prepared by glucose reduction of Cu(OH)2. The Cu2O particles were coated by Mg(OH)2 and reduced to metallic copper particles. At last, the copper particles were densified by high-temperature heat treatment. The products were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), tap density, and thermogravimetry (TG). It is found that the shape and size distribution of the copper powder are determined by the Cu2O powder and the copper particles do not agglomerate during high-temperature heat treatment because of the existence of Mg(OH)2 coating. After densification at high temperature, the particle tap density increases from 3.30 to 4.18 g/cm3 and the initial oxidation temperature rises from 125 to 150°C.

  12. Use of in-die powder densification parameters in the implementation of process analytical technologies for tablet production on industrial scale.

    PubMed

    Cespi, Marco; Perinelli, Diego R; Casettari, Luca; Bonacucina, Giulia; Caporicci, Giuseppe; Rendina, Filippo; Palmieri, Giovanni F

    2014-12-30

    The use of process analytical technologies (PAT) to ensure final product quality is by now a well established practice in pharmaceutical industry. To date, most of the efforts in this field have focused on development of analytical methods using spectroscopic techniques (i.e., NIR, Raman, etc.). This work evaluated the possibility of using the parameters derived from the processing of in-line raw compaction data (the forces and displacement of the punches) as a PAT tool for controlling the tableting process. To reach this goal, two commercially available formulations were used, changing the quantitative composition and compressing them on a fully instrumented rotary pressing machine. The Heckel yield pressure and the compaction energies, together with the tablets hardness and compaction pressure, were selected and evaluated as discriminating parameters in all the prepared formulations. The apparent yield pressure, as shown in the obtained results, has the necessary sensitivity to be effectively included in a PAT strategy to monitor the tableting process. Additional investigations were performed to understand the criticalities and the mechanisms beyond this performing parameter and the associated implications. Specifically, it was discovered that the efficiency of the apparent yield pressure depends on the nominal drug title, the drug densification mechanism and the error in pycnometric density. In this study, the potential of using some parameters derived from the compaction raw data has been demonstrated to be an attractive alternative and complementary method to the well established spectroscopic techniques to monitor and control the tableting process. The compaction data monitoring method is also easy to set up and very cost effective. PMID:25304091

  13. Ultrasonic sensing of powder densification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lu, Yichi; Wadley, Haydn N. G.; Parthasarathi, Sanjai

    1992-01-01

    An independent scattering theory has been applied to the interpretation of ultrasonic velocity measurements made on porous metal samples produced either by a cold or a high-temperature compaction process. The results suggest that the pores in both processes are not spherical, an aspect ration of 1:3 fitting best with the data for low (less than 4 percent) pore volume fractions. For the hot compacted powders, the pores are smooth due to active diffusional processes during processing. For these types of voids, the results can be extended to a pore fraction of 10 percent, at which point voids form an interconnected network that violates the model assumptions. The cold pressed samples are not as well predicted by the theory because of poor particle bonding.

  14. Gas-Solid Interactions During Nonisothermal Heat Treatment of a High-Strength CrMnCN Austenitic Steel Powder: Influence of Atmospheric Conditions and Heating Rate on the Densification Behavior

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krasokha, Nikolaj; Weber, Sebastian; Huth, Stephan; Zumsande, Kathrin; Theisen, Werner

    2012-11-01

    This work deals with gas-solid interactions between a high-alloyed steel powder and the surrounding atmosphere during continuous heating. It is motivated by the recently developed corrosion-resistant CrMnCN austenitic cast steels. Here, powder metallurgical processing would be desirable to manufacture highly homogeneous parts and/or novel corrosion-resistant metal-matrix composites. However, the successful use of this new production route calls for a comprehensive investigation of interactions between the sintering atmosphere and the metallic powder to prevent undesirable changes to the chemical composition, e.g., degassing of nitrogen or evaporation of manganese. In this study, dilatometric measurements combined with residual gas analysis, high-temperature X-ray diffraction (XRD) measurements, and thermodynamic equilibrium calculations provided detailed information about the influence of different atmospheric conditions on the microstructure, constitution, and densification behavior of a gas-atomized CrMnCN steel powder during continuous heating. Intensive desorption of nitrogen led to the conclusion that a vacuum atmosphere is not suitable for powder metallurgical (PM) processing. Exposure to an N2-containing atmosphere resulted in the formation of nitrides and lattice expansion. Experimental findings have shown that the N content can be controlled by the nitrogen partial pressure. Furthermore, the reduction of surface oxides because of a carbothermal reaction at elevated temperatures and the resulting enhancement of the powder's densification behavior are discussed in this work.

  15. Matlab based automatization of an inverse surface temperature modelling procedure for Greenland ice cores using an existing firn densification and heat diffusion model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Döring, Michael; Kobashi, Takuro; Kindler, Philippe; Guillevic, Myriam; Leuenberger, Markus

    2016-04-01

    In order to study Northern Hemisphere (NH) climate interactions and variability, getting access to high resolution surface temperature records of the Greenland ice sheet is an integral condition. For example, understanding the causes for changes in the strength of the Atlantic meridional overturning circulation (AMOC) and related effects for the NH [Broecker et al. (1985); Rahmstorf (2002)] or the origin and processes leading the so called Dansgaard-Oeschger events in glacial conditions [Johnsen et al. (1992); Dansgaard et al., 1982] demand accurate and reproducible temperature data. To reveal the surface temperature history, it is suitable to use the isotopic composition of nitrogen (δ15N) from ancient air extracted from ice cores drilled at the Greenland ice sheet. The measured δ15N record of an ice core can be used as a paleothermometer due to the nearly constant isotopic composition of nitrogen in the atmosphere at orbital timescales changes only through firn processes [Severinghaus et. al. (1998); Mariotti (1983)]. To reconstruct the surface temperature for a special drilling site the use of firn models describing gas and temperature diffusion throughout the ice sheet is necessary. For this an existing firn densification and heat diffusion model [Schwander et. al. (1997)] is used. Thereby, a theoretical δ15N record is generated for different temperature and accumulation rate scenarios and compared with measurement data in terms of mean square error (MSE), which leads finally to an optimization problem, namely the finding of a minimal MSE. The goal of the presented study is a Matlab based automatization of this inverse modelling procedure. The crucial point hereby is to find the temperature and accumulation rate input time series which minimizes the MSE. For that, we follow two approaches. The first one is a Monte Carlo type input generator which varies each point in the input time series and calculates the MSE. Then the solutions that fulfil a given limit

  16. Matlab based automatization of an inverse surface temperature modelling procedure for Greenland ice cores using an existing firn densification and heat diffusion model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Döring, Michael; Kobashi, Takuro; Kindler, Philippe; Guillevic, Myriam; Leuenberger, Markus

    2016-04-01

    In order to study Northern Hemisphere (NH) climate interactions and variability, getting access to high resolution surface temperature records of the Greenland ice sheet is an integral condition. For example, understanding the causes for changes in the strength of the Atlantic meridional overturning circulation (AMOC) and related effects for the NH [Broecker et al. (1985); Rahmstorf (2002)] or the origin and processes leading the so called Dansgaard-Oeschger events in glacial conditions [Johnsen et al. (1992); Dansgaard et al., 1982] demand accurate and reproducible temperature data. To reveal the surface temperature history, it is suitable to use the isotopic composition of nitrogen (δ15N) from ancient air extracted from ice cores drilled at the Greenland ice sheet. The measured δ15N record of an ice core can be used as a paleothermometer due to the nearly constant isotopic composition of nitrogen in the atmosphere at orbital timescales changes only through firn processes [Severinghaus et. al. (1998); Mariotti (1983)]. To reconstruct the surface temperature for a special drilling site the use of firn models describing gas and temperature diffusion throughout the ice sheet is necessary. For this an existing firn densification and heat diffusion model [Schwander et. al. (1997)] is used. Thereby, a theoretical δ15N record is generated for different temperature and accumulation rate scenarios and compared with measurement data in terms of mean square error (MSE), which leads finally to an optimization problem, namely the finding of a minimal MSE. The goal of the presented study is a Matlab based automatization of this inverse modelling procedure. The crucial point hereby is to find the temperature and accumulation rate input time series which minimizes the MSE. For that, we follow two approaches. The first one is a Monte Carlo type input generator which varies each point in the input time series and calculates the MSE. Then the solutions that fulfil a given limit

  17. Evaluation des apports solaires a l'echelle d'un quartier urbain en periode de chauffe selon sa typologie, son orientation et sa latitude dans un contexte de densification de la ville

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chenard, Laurent

    Mass urbanization is a major issue for town administrators. Population increase will have an impact on the quality of the environment for citizens. Government will have to take decisions to limit those effects. Green energies are part of the solution to reach fixed goals by the public administration for sustainable development. Passive solar energy is studied in this work in an urban canopy located in five different towns: San Francisco, Montreal, Bordeaux, Lyon and Stockholm. Passive solar energy is calculated in the heating season. Direct and diffuse solar radiation is considered by using the Perez model. Radiosity is not taken into account. Heating demand is calculated by the heating degree day method. Seven urban forms have been created to determine the amount of solar energy entering in every window of the urban canopy while taking into account urban context and forms. Optimal orientation of the canopy shows an increase of 5% of the passive solar radiation from original orientation, 180 degrees rotation from first orientation straight south. This value goes lower when stories are added to the urban context. A rotation of 90 degrees from the first orientation shows a decrease of 6 to 15% in solar passive gain. Densification of the urban canopy by adding stories to the buildings results in a loss up to 65% of the solar gain for the first story. It is showed that solar passive energy has a low ratio of 5% for space heating for old buildings, 1960 constructions. Today's buildings have a difference between passive solar energy and heating demand of 10 to 75% depending on the model and location.

  18. HIP densification project. Final CRADA report

    SciTech Connect

    Franco-Ferreira, E.A.; Finkelstein, W.

    1997-08-29

    An investigation was conducted to evaluate the use of HIPed aluminum castings as near-net-shape blanks for large electrostatic focusing electrodes in ion lithography machines. The electrodes must have very smooth finishes which are free of pores and other defects. This has heretofore been achieved by rough-machining the blanks out of large forged aluminum billets and final diamond-turning. The use of a near-net-shape casting for the blank was expected to save a significant amount of money and time. The test was conducted on a single cast blank which was supplied by the Partner in the HIPed and stress relieved condition. Rough machining and diamond turning operations conducted by LMES/ER revealed that the casting contained unacceptably large defects. The conclusion was reached that HIPed aluminum castings in the large sizes and of the quality levels required would probably be unobtainable in a cost-effective manner. An alternative approach, using ring forgings assembled by electron beam welding was proposed and investigated by LMES/ER. Although an electrode blank was not obtained, the study indicated that this approach would be successful and cost-effective.

  19. Cladding hull decontamination and densification process. Part 2. Densification by inductoslag melting

    SciTech Connect

    Nelson, R.G.; Montgomery, D.R.

    1980-04-01

    The Inductoslag melting process was developed to densify Zircaloy-4 cladding hulls. It is a cold crucible process that uses induction heating, a segmented water-cooled copper crucible, and a calcium fluoride flux. Metal and flux are fed into the furnace through the crucible, located at the top of the furnace, and the finished ingot is withdrawn from the bottom of the furnace. Melting rates of 40 to 50 kg/h are achieved, using 100 to 110 kW at an average energy use of 2.5 kWh/kg. The quality of ingots produced from factory supplied cladding tubing is sufficient to satisfy nuclear grade standards. An ingot of Zircaloy-4, made from melted cladding tubing that had been autoclaved to near reactor exposure and then descaled by the hydrogen fluoride decontamination process prior to Inductoslag melting, did not meet nuclear grade standards because the hydrogen, nitrogen, and hardness levels were too high. Melting development work is described that could possibly be used to test the capability of the Inductoslag process to satisfactorily melt a variety and mix of materials from LWR reprocessing, decontamination, and storage options. Results of experiments are also presented that could be used to improve remote operation of the melting process.

  20. APPARATUS FOR THE DENSIFICATION AND ENERGIZATION OF CHARGED PARTICLES

    DOEpatents

    Post, R.F.; Coensgen, F.H.

    1962-12-18

    This patent relates to a device for materially increasing the energy and density of a plasma to produce conditions commensurate with the establishment and promotion of controlled thermonuclear reactions. To this end the device employs three successive stages of magnetic compression, each stage having magnetic mirrors to compress a plasma, the mirrors being moveable to transfer the plasma to successive stages for further compression. Accordingly, a plasma introduced to the first stage is increased in density and energy in stepwide fashion by virtue of the magnetic compression in the successive stages such that the plasma upon reaching the last stage is of extremely high energy and density commensurate the plasma particles undergoing thermonuclear reactions. The principal novelty of the device resides in the provision of a unidirectional magnetic field which increases in stepwise fashion in coaxially communicating compression chambers of progressively decreasing lengths and diameters. Pulsed magnetic fields are superimposed upon the undirectional field and are manipulated to establish resultant magnetic compression fields which increase in intensity and progressively move, with respect to time, through the compression chambers in the direction of the smallest one thereof. The resultant field in the last compression chamber is hence of relatively high intensity, and the density and energy of the plasma confined therein are correspondingly high. (AEC)

  1. Synthesis and densification of lutetium pyrosilicate from lutetia and silica

    SciTech Connect

    Tripathi, Himansu S.; Sarin, Vinod K. . E-mail: sarin@bu.edu

    2007-02-15

    Cerium-doped lutetium pyrosilicate (Lu{sub 2}Si{sub 2}O{sub 7}:Ce) powder was synthesized by solid state reaction of Lu{sub 2}O{sub 3} and SiO{sub 2}. Stoichiometric mixtures of the starting materials were heat treated at various different temperatures and their phase contents were measured by XRD technique. It was found that the first step in the formation of Lu{sub 2}Si{sub 2}O{sub 7} (LPS) is the appearance of Lu{sub 2}SiO{sub 5} (LSO). This takes place at 1100 deg. C, fully 300 deg. C below the first appearance of LPS. Between 1400 and 1500 deg. C both LSO and LPS coexist in the calcined batch, but by 1550 deg. C all LSO is completely converted to LPS. LPS formation temperature does not have appreciable effect on the density of the hot pressed samples. Hot pressed samples obtained from powder synthesized at 1650 deg. C are nearly transparent, although the particle size of the starting powder is higher than that of the powder formed at lower temperatures.

  2. Densification of Herbaceous Bioenergy Feedstocks for Transportation and Handling

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A vital component of a sustainable bioconversion industry that continues to be conceptualized and addressed by many is the supply, collection, and delivery of lignocellulosic feedstocks --- the feedstock supply system --- to bioconversion facilities. Lindley and Backer (1994) identified that low bul...

  3. ELECTROKINETIC DENSIFICATION OF COAL FINES IN WASTE PONDS

    SciTech Connect

    E. James Davis

    1999-12-18

    The objective of this research was to demonstrate that electrokinetics can be used to remove colloidal coal and mineral particles from coal-washing ponds and lakes without the addition of chemical additives such as salts and polymeric flocculants. The specific objectives were: Design and develop a scaleable electrophoresis apparatus to clarify suspensions of colloidal coal and clay particles; Demonstrate the separation process using polluted waste water from the coal-washing facilities at the coal-fired power plants in Centralia, WA; Develop a mathematical model of the process to predict the rate of clarification and the suspension electrical properties needed for scale up.

  4. Densification of porous refractory substrates. [space shuttle orbiter tiles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ecord, G. M.; Schomburg, C. (Inventor)

    1982-01-01

    A hydrolyzed tetraethyl orthosilicate is applied to the surface of a porous refractory substrate following which the substrate is heated to a temperature and for a period of time sufficient to bond the silica released from the tetraethyl orthosilicate to the substrate. The surface is thus densified and strengthened.

  5. Modeling the densification of metal matrix composite monotape

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Elzey, D. M.; Wadley, H. N. G.

    1993-01-01

    We present a first model that enables prediction of the density (and its time evolution) of a monotape lay-up subjected to a hot isostatic or vacuum hot pressing consolidation cycle. Our approach is to break down the complicated (and probabilistic) consolidation problem into simple, analyzable parts and to combine them in a way that correctly represents the statistical aspects of the problem, the change in the problem's interior geometry, and the evolving contributions of the different deformation mechanisms. The model gives two types of output. One is in the form of maps showing the relative density dependence upon pressure, temperature, and time for step function temperature and pressure cycles. They are useful for quickly determining the best place to begin developing an optimized process. The second gives the evolution of density over time for any (arbitrary) applied temperature and pressure cycle. This has promise for refining process cycles and possibly for process control. Examples of the models application are given for Ti3Al + Nb, gamma TiAl, Ti6Al4V, and pure aluminum.

  6. Geospatial Modelling Approach for 3d Urban Densification Developments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koziatek, O.; Dragićević, S.; Li, S.

    2016-06-01

    With growing populations, economic pressures, and the need for sustainable practices, many urban regions are rapidly densifying developments in the vertical built dimension with mid- and high-rise buildings. The location of these buildings can be projected based on key factors that are attractive to urban planners, developers, and potential buyers. Current research in this area includes various modelling approaches, such as cellular automata and agent-based modelling, but the results are mostly linked to raster grids as the smallest spatial units that operate in two spatial dimensions. Therefore, the objective of this research is to develop a geospatial model that operates on irregular spatial tessellations to model mid- and high-rise buildings in three spatial dimensions (3D). The proposed model is based on the integration of GIS, fuzzy multi-criteria evaluation (MCE), and 3D GIS-based procedural modelling. Part of the City of Surrey, within the Metro Vancouver Region, Canada, has been used to present the simulations of the generated 3D building objects. The proposed 3D modelling approach was developed using ESRI's CityEngine software and the Computer Generated Architecture (CGA) language.

  7. Densification of powder metallurgy billets by a roll consolidation technique

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sellman, W. H.; Weinberger, W. R.

    1973-01-01

    Container design is used to convert partially densified powder metallurgy compacts into fully densified slabs in one processing step. Technique improves product yield, lowers costs and yields great flexibility in process scale-up. Technique is applicable to all types of fabricable metallic materials that are produced from powder metallurgy process.

  8. A REVIEW ON BIOMASS DENSIFICATION TECHNOLOGIE FOR ENERGY APPLICATION

    SciTech Connect

    JAYA SHANKAR TUMULURU; CHRISTOPHER T. WRIGHT

    2010-08-01

    The world is currently facing challenges to reduce the dependence on fossil fuels and to achieve a sustainable renewable supply. Renewable energies represent a diversity of energy sources that can help to maintain the equilibrium of different ecosystems. Among the various sources of renewable energy, biomass is finding more uses as it is considered carbon neutral since the carbondioxide released during its use is already part of the carbon cycle (Arias et al., 2008). Increasing the utilization of biomass for energy can help to reduce the negative CO2 impact on the environment and help to meet the targets established in the Kyoto Protocol (UN, 1998). Energy from biomass can be produced from different processes like thermochemical (combustion, gasification, and pyrolysis), biological (anaerobic digestion, fermentation) or chemical (esterification) where direct combustion can provide a direct near-term energy solution (Arias et al., 2008). Some of the inherent problems with raw biomass materials, like low bulk density, high moisture content, hydrophilic nature and low calorific value, limit the ease of use of biomass for energy purposes (Arias et al., 2008). In fact, due to its low energy density compared to fossil fuels, high volumes of biomass will be needed; adding to problems associated with storage, transportation and feed handling at a cogeneration plant. Furthermore, grinding biomass pulverizes, can be very costly and in some cases impractical. All of these drawbacks have given rise to the development of new technologies in order to increase the quality of biomass fuels. The purpose of the work is mainly in four areas 1) Overview of the torrefaction process and to do a literature review on i) Physical properties of torrefied raw material and torrefaction gas composition. 2) Basic principles in design of packed bed i) Equations governing the flow of material in packed bed ii) Equations governing the flow of the gases in packed bed iii) Effect of physical properties of the raw materials on the packed bed design 3) Design of packed bed torrefier of different capacities. 4) Development of an excel sheet for calculation of length and diameter of the packed bed column based on the design considerations.

  9. Energy densification of biomass-derived organic acids

    DOEpatents

    Wheeler, M. Clayton; van Walsum, G. Peter; Schwartz, Thomas J.; van Heiningen, Adriaan

    2013-01-29

    A process for upgrading an organic acid includes neutralizing the organic acid to form a salt and thermally decomposing the resulting salt to form an energy densified product. In certain embodiments, the organic acid is levulinic acid. The process may further include upgrading the energy densified product by conversion to alcohol and subsequent dehydration.

  10. Densification of nano-yttria powders for IR window applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Willingham, Charles B.; Wahl, Joseph M.; Hogan, Patrick K.; Kupferberg, Lenn C.; Wong, Thomas Y.; De, Alok M.

    2003-09-01

    Commerically available yttrium oxide nanopowders were evaluated as starting materials for preparation of transparent materials. The objective is an yttria optical ceramic exhibiting approximately one micrometer grain size to provide increased strength and thermal shock resistance. Three vendors were selected to provide nanoscale powders for testing and evaluation. They were compared to a conventional (5 μm) powder previously used to prepare optical quality ceramic yttria. While all of the selected nanopowders had impurity levels that were too high to allow processing to full transparency, two of the samples were processed to full density and moderate transparency was produced in one. In preparation for processing via Hot Isostatic Press (HIP) samples were sintered to a closed pore state at temperatures as low as 1400 °C, and with soak times as short as 12 minutes at 1550 °C. The use of ultrasonic attenuation as a technique for measuring particle size distributions in slurries was explored and found to be an invaluable tool when colloidally processing nanopowders. Finally, the areas most important for continued improvements were identified.

  11. Method and apparatus for in-situ densification of geomaterials for sealing applications

    DOEpatents

    Finley, R.E.; Zeuch, D.H.

    1997-04-22

    A method and apparatus is described for forming improved seals in boreholes formed in host rock by using the apparatus to introduce a feedstock into the borehole and simultaneously subjecting the introduced feedstock to both compressive and shear stresses until the borehole becomes filled and sealed. 3 figs.

  12. Densification of a powder-metal skeleton by transient liquid-phase infiltration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lorenz, Adam; Sachs, Emanuel; Kernan, Brian; Posco, Samuel Allen; Rafflenbful, Lukas

    2004-02-01

    Transient liquid-phase infiltration (TLI) is a new method for densifying a powder-metal skeleton that produces a final part of homogeneous composition without significant dimensional change, offering advantages over traditional infiltration and full-density sintering. Fabrication of direct metal parts with complex geometry is possible using TLI in conjunction with solid freeform fabrication (SFF) processes such as three-dimensional printing, which produce net-shape powder-metal skeletons directly from computer-aided design models. The TLI method uses an infiltrant material similar in composition to the skeleton, but also containing a melting-point depressant (MPD), which allows the liquid metal to fill the skeleton void space and later facilitates homogenization. The materials requirements for such a system are discussed, and four experimental material systems were developed with final compositions of approximately Ni-40 wt pct Cu, Ni-4 wt pct Si, Fe-3 wt pct Si, and Fe-12 wt pct Cr-1 wt pct C, with copper, silicon, and carbon serving as the MPDs. Infiltration techniques include gating the introduction of liquid, saturating the melt to prevent erosion, and controlling variations in bulk composition along the infiltration path. Infiltration lengths exceeded 200 mm in the two nickel systems and exceeded 100 mm in the two iron systems. After infiltration, various heat treatments were conducted and mechanical properties were tested, including the tensile, hardness, and impact strength.

  13. Does densification influence the steam pretreatment and enzymatic hydrolysis of softwoods to sugars?

    PubMed

    Kumar, Linoj; Tooyserkani, Zahra; Sokhansanj, Shahab; Saddler, Jack N

    2012-10-01

    The global trade in wood pellets continues to grow. However, their potential as a feedstock for large scale cellulosic ethanol production has not been evaluated. We anticipated that the reduced moisture content and pressure exerted on the wood biomass during the pelletisation process would result in some carbohydrate loss as well as making the biomass more recalcitrant to pretreatment and subsequent hydrolysis. However, when softwood chips and pellets were steam pretreated at medium severity, little hemicellulose loss occurred while more than two-thirds of the cellulose present in the cellulose rich water insoluble fractions were hydrolysed (at 20 FPU cellulase/g cellulose). In addition, prior steaming substantially reduced the particle size of the wood chips enabling direct pelletisation without the need for grinding. Surprisingly, it was also possible to apply a single steam pretreatment to facilitate both pelletisation and subsequent enzymatic hydrolysis without the need for a further pretreatment step. PMID:22858485

  14. Resistance to densification, tensile strength and capsule-filling performance of some pharmaceutical diluents.

    PubMed

    Nikolakakis, I; Aragon, O B; Malamataris, S

    1998-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare some indicators of capsule-filling performance, as measured by tapped density under different conditions, and elucidate possible quantitative relationships between variation of capsule fill-weight (%CV) and gravitational and inter-particle forces (attractive or frictional) derived from measurements of particle size, true density, low compression and tensile strength. Five common pharmaceutical diluents (lactose, maize starch, talc, Emcocel and Avicel) were investigated and two capsule-filling methods (pouring powder and dosator nozzle) were employed. It was found that for the pouring-type method the appropriateness of Hausner's ratio (HR), Carr's compressibility index (CC%) and Kawakita's constant (alpha) as indicators of capsule fill-weight variation decreases in the order alpha > CC% > HR; the appropriateness of these indicators also decreases with increasing cylinder size and with impact velocity during tapping. For the dosator-type method the appropriateness of the indicators decreases in the order HR > CC% > alpha, the opposite of that for the pouring-type method; the appropriateness of the indicators increases with decreasing cylinder size and impact velocity. The relationship between %CV and the ratio of inter-particle attractive to gravitational forces calculated from measurements of particle size and true density (Fvdw/Wp) was more significant for the pouring-type capsule-filling method. For the dosator-type method a significant relationship (1% level) was found between %CV and the product of Fvdw/Wp and a function expressing the increase, with packing density (p(f)), in the ratio of frictional to attractive inter-particle forces derived from compression (P) and tensile-strength (T) testing, d(log(P/T))/d(p(f)). The value of tapped density in predictions of capsule-filling performance is affected by the testing conditions in a manner depending on the filling method applied. For the pouring-type method predictions can be based on the ratio of attractive (inter-particle) to gravitational forces, whereas for the dosator-type method the contribution of frictional and attractive forces should, because of packing density change, also be taken into account. PMID:9720619

  15. Revisiting Dosing Regimen Using Pharmacokinetic/Pharmacodynamic Mathematical Modeling: Densification and Intensification of Combination Cancer Therapy.

    PubMed

    Meille, Christophe; Barbolosi, Dominique; Ciccolini, Joseph; Freyer, Gilles; Iliadis, Athanassios

    2016-08-01

    Controlling effects of drugs administered in combination is particularly challenging with a densified regimen because of life-threatening hematological toxicities. We have developed a mathematical model to optimize drug dosing regimens and to redesign the dose intensification-dose escalation process, using densified cycles of combined anticancer drugs. A generic mathematical model was developed to describe the main components of the real process, including pharmacokinetics, safety and efficacy pharmacodynamics, and non-hematological toxicity risk. This model allowed for computing the distribution of the total drug amount of each drug in combination, for each escalation dose level, in order to minimize the average tumor mass for each cycle. This was achieved while complying with absolute neutrophil count clinical constraints and without exceeding a fixed risk of non-hematological dose-limiting toxicity. The innovative part of this work was the development of densifying and intensifying designs in a unified procedure. This model enabled us to determine the appropriate regimen in a pilot phase I/II study in metastatic breast patients for a 2-week-cycle treatment of docetaxel plus epirubicin doublet, and to propose a new dose-ranging process. In addition to the present application, this method can be further used to achieve optimization of any combination therapy, thus improving the efficacy versus toxicity balance of such a regimen. PMID:26946136

  16. 3-D multilateration for measurement of earth crustal deformation and network densification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ong, K. M.

    1973-01-01

    Discussion of how range and range-difference data types can make possible precise three-dimensional measurement of ground station positions and the position of an artificial signal source, without explicit dependence upon the signal source trajectory. An effective strategy for such measurement is to combine the multilateration approach with a VLBI system using natural radio sources. The VLBI methods would provide a coarse grid of three-dimensional benchmark locations on a regional and global scale. Multilateration stations would then occupy these coarse grid locations and provide a means for highly portable, relatively low-cost units to then densify networks on a regional and local scale. Because a multilateration approach can make use of strong artificial radio sources, it makes possible the use of relatively low-cost, highly mobile stations. Such mobile stations are virtually essential for three dimensional surveying in heavily urbanized areas or in rugged terrain.

  17. Sol-gel synthesis and densification of aluminoborosilicate powders. Part 1: Synthesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bull, Jeffrey; Selvaduray, Guna; Leiser, Daniel

    1992-01-01

    Aluminoborosilicate powders high in alumina content were synthesized by the sol-gel process utilizing various methods of preparation. Properties and microstructural effects related to these syntheses were examined. After heating to 600 C for 2 h in flowing air, the powders were amorphous with the metal oxides comprising 87 percent of the weight and uncombusted organics the remainder. DTA of dried powders revealed a T(sub g) at approximately 835 C and an exotherm near 900 C due to crystallization. Powders derived from aluminum secbutoxide consisted of particles with a mean diameter 5 microns less than those from aluminum isopropoxide. Powders synthesized with aluminum isopropoxide produced agglomerates comprised of rod shaped particulates while powders made with the secbutoxide precursor produced irregular glassy shards. Compacts formed from these powders required different loadings for equivalent densities according to the method of synthesis.

  18. Method and apparatus for in-densification of geomaterials for sealing applications

    DOEpatents

    Finley, Ray E.; Zeuch, David H.

    1997-01-01

    A method and apparatus (10) for forming improved seals in boreholes (101) formed in host rock (100) by using the apparatus (10) to introduce a feedstock (60) into the borehole (101) and simultaneously subject the introduced feedstock to both compressive and shear stresses until the borehole becomes filled and sealed.

  19. Densification of chemical vapor deposition silicon dioxide film using oxygen radical oxidation

    SciTech Connect

    Kawase, Kazumasa; Uehara, Yasushi; Teramoto, Akinobu; Suwa, Tomoyuki; Hattori, Takeo; Ohmi, Tadahiro; Umeda, Hiroshi

    2012-02-01

    Silicon dioxide (SiO{sub 2}) films formed by chemical vapor deposition (CVD) were treated with oxygen radical oxidation using Ar/O{sub 2} plasma excited by microwave. The mass density depth profiles, carrier trap densities, and current-voltage characteristics of the radical-oxidized CVD-SiO{sub 2} films were investigated. The mass density depth profiles were estimated with x ray reflectivity measurement using synchrotron radiation of SPring-8. The carrier trap densities were estimated with x ray photoelectron spectroscopy time-dependent measurement. The mass densities of the radical-oxidized CVD-SiO{sub 2} films were increased near the SiO{sub 2} surface. The densities of the carrier trap centers in these films were decreased. The leakage currents of the metal-oxide-semiconductor capacitors fabricated by using these films were reduced. It is probable that the insulation properties of the CVD-SiO{sub 2} film are improved by the increase in the mass density and the decrease in the carrier trap density caused by the restoration of the Si-O network with the radical oxidation.

  20. Investigation of acceleration and densification of electrons utilizing travelling magnetic waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, K. W.; Kim, S. H.

    1988-04-01

    Experimental investigation of electron beam physics: naturally occurring and externally driven low frequency (6 to 500 KHz) diocotron oscillations are observed and the m = 1 rotating structure of these oscillations are measured by using electrostatic probes. Systematic analysis of the circuit system for the generation of a fast-rising pinching magnetic field: a circuit consisted of distributed circuit (transmission line) part and lumped circuit parts included a coil are systematically analyzed from the first principles of circuit. Computer code to calculate expediently the temporal profile of the pinching magnetic is developed. Theoretical study of acceleration of high-energy electron beams by a laser-light through net inverse bremsstrahlung in plasma fields: the absorption of the incident laser photons by net inverse bremsstrahlung can give rise to the dc ponderomotive force whose strength is far greater than the amplitude of the Lorentz force of the laser wave. Study of a soft X-ray free electron laser (FEL) scheme using a two-beam elliptical pill-box wake-field cavity: it is found that the scheme provides sufficient gain as a coherent radiation source down to the X-ray regime. Wake field acceleration research: the theoretical result from the modal analysis developed here agrees with the recent experiment in both profile (shape) and magnitude of the wake potential.

  1. Ensuring near-optimum homogeneity and densification levels in nano-reinforced ceramics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dassios, Konstantinos G.; Barkoula, Nektaria-Marianthi; Alafogianni, Panagiota; Bonnefont, Guillaume; Fantozzi, Gilbert; Matikas, Theodore E.

    2016-04-01

    The development of a new generation of high temperature ceramic materials for aerospace applications, reinforced at a scale closer to the molecular level and three orders of magnitude less than conventional fibrous reinforcements, by embedded carbon nanotubes, has recently emerged as a uniquely challenging scientific effort. The properties of such materials depend strongly on two main factors: i) the homogeneity of the dispersion of the hydrophobic medium throughout the ceramic volume and ii) the ultimate density of the resultant product after sintering of the green body at the high-temperatures and pressures required for ceramic consolidation. The present works reports the establishment of two independent experimental strategies which ensure achievement of near perfect levels of tube dispersion homogeneity and fully dense final products. The proposed methodologies are validated across non-destructive evaluation data of materials performance.

  2. Densification of chemical vapor deposition silicon dioxide film using oxygen radical oxidation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawase, Kazumasa; Teramoto, Akinobu; Umeda, Hiroshi; Suwa, Tomoyuki; Uehara, Yasushi; Hattori, Takeo; Ohmi, Tadahiro

    2012-02-01

    Silicon dioxide (SiO2) films formed by chemical vapor deposition (CVD) were treated with oxygen radical oxidation using Ar/O2 plasma excited by microwave. The mass density depth profiles, carrier trap densities, and current-voltage characteristics of the radical-oxidized CVD-SiO2 films were investigated. The mass density depth profiles were estimated with x ray reflectivity measurement using synchrotron radiation of SPring-8. The carrier trap densities were estimated with x ray photoelectron spectroscopy time-dependent measurement. The mass densities of the radical-oxidized CVD-SiO2 films were increased near the SiO2 surface. The densities of the carrier trap centers in these films were decreased. The leakage currents of the metal-oxide-semiconductor capacitors fabricated by using these films were reduced. It is probable that the insulation properties of the CVD-SiO2 film are improved by the increase in the mass density and the decrease in the carrier trap density caused by the restoration of the Si-O network with the radical oxidation.

  3. Optimization of Preprocessing and Densification of Sorghum Stover at Full-scale Operation

    SciTech Connect

    Neal A. Yancey; Jaya Shankar Tumuluru; Craig C. Conner; Christopher T. Wright

    2011-08-01

    Transportation costs can be a prohibitive step in bringing biomass to a preprocessing location or biofuel refinery. One alternative to transporting biomass in baled or loose format to a preprocessing location, is to utilize a mobile preprocessing system that can be relocated to various locations where biomass is stored, preprocess and densify the biomass, then ship it to the refinery as needed. The Idaho National Laboratory has a full scale 'Process Demonstration Unit' PDU which includes a stage 1 grinder, hammer mill, drier, pellet mill, and cooler with the associated conveyance system components. Testing at bench and pilot scale has been conducted to determine effects of moisture on preprocessing, crop varieties on preprocessing efficiency and product quality. The INLs PDU provides an opportunity to test the conclusions made at the bench and pilot scale on full industrial scale systems. Each component of the PDU is operated from a central operating station where data is collected to determine power consumption rates for each step in the process. The power for each electrical motor in the system is monitored from the control station to monitor for problems and determine optimal conditions for the system performance. The data can then be viewed to observe how changes in biomass input parameters (moisture and crop type for example), mechanical changes (screen size, biomass drying, pellet size, grinding speed, etc.,), or other variations effect the power consumption of the system. Sorgum in four foot round bales was tested in the system using a series of 6 different screen sizes including: 3/16 in., 1 in., 2 in., 3 in., 4 in., and 6 in. The effect on power consumption, product quality, and production rate were measured to determine optimal conditions.

  4. Chemically bonded ceramic matrix composites: Densification and conversion to diffusion bonding

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, B.R.; Guelguen, M.A.; Kriven, W.M.

    1995-10-01

    Chemically bonded ceramics appear to be a promising alternative route for near-net shape fabrication of multi-phase ceramic matrix composites (CMC`s). The hydraulic (and refractory) properties of fine mono-calcium aluminate (CaAl{sub 2}O{sub 4}) powders were used as the chemically bonding matrix phase, while calcia stabilized zirconia powders were the second phase material. Samples containing up to 70 wt% (55 vol%) zirconia have been successfully compacted and sintered. Various processing techniques were evaluated. Processing was optimized based on material properties, dilatometry and simultaneous thermal analysis (DTA/TGA). The physical characteristics of this novel CMC were characterized by hardness, density, and fracture toughness testing. Microstructures were evaluated by SEM and phase identification was verified using XRD.

  5. Cladding hull decontamination and densification process. Part 1. The prototype cladding hull decontamination system

    SciTech Connect

    Lambright, T.M.; Montgomery, D.R.

    1980-04-01

    A prototype system for decontaminating Zircaloy-4 cladding hulls has been assembled and tested at Pacific Northwest Laboratory. The decontamination process consists of treatment with a gaseous mixture of hydrogen fluoride (HF) and argon (Ar) followed by a dilute aqueous etch of ammonium oxalate, ammonium citrate, ammonium fluoride, and hydrogen peroxide. The continuous cleaning process described in this report successfully descaled small portions of most charges, but was unable to handle the original design capacity of 4 kg/hr because of problems in the following areas: control of HF reactor temperatures, regulation of HF and argon mixtures and flows, isolation of the HF reactor atmosphere from the aqueous washer/rinser atmosphere, regulation of undesirable side reactions, and control over hull transport through the system. Due to the limited time available to solve these problems, the system did not attain fully operational status. The work was performed with unirradiated hulls that simulated irradiated hulls. The system was not built to be remotely operable. The process chemistry and system equipment are described in this report with particular emphasis on critical operating areas. Recommendations for improved system operation are included.

  6. YAG laser surface densification of a zircon refractory by adding AlN nanoparticles

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, W.Y.; Wang, A.H. . E-mail: pmahwang@public.wh.hb.cn; Zeng, D.W.; Bai, Z.K.; Xie, C.S.; Song, W.L.; Zhu, X.C.

    2006-04-15

    A zircon refractory zirconium silicate was surface melted with a pulsed YAG laser to introduce AlN nanoparticles, with the aim of improving its surface density and modifying the corresponding microstructure. The microstructure and phase structure features of the refractory induced by the laser beam were studied by scanning transmission microscopy, incorporating energy dispersive X-ray and X-ray diffraction analysis. Results show that the addition of AlN nanoparticles into the refractory surface significantly reduced the laser beam energy required to melt the surface of the refractory. The laser-melted depth was increased with an increase of laser power from 133 to 200 W. The microstructure of the laser-treated zone with the addition of AlN nanoparticles has a much finer dendritic structure with undeveloped primary dendrite arms while without the addition of AlN nanoparticles, a coarser dendrite with much long primary dendrite arms was observed. The phase structure of the laser-treated layer with the addition of AlN nanoparticles was found to be composed of m-ZrO{sub 2}, c-ZrO{sub 2}, ZrSiO{sub 4} and H-AlN.

  7. Study of Material Densification of In718 in the Higher Throughput Parameter Regime

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cordner, Samuel

    2016-01-01

    Selective Laser Melting (SLM) is a powder bed fusion additive manufacturing process used increasingly in the aerospace industry to reduce the cost, weight, and fabrication time for complex propulsion components. Previous optimization studies for SLM using the Concept Laser M1 and M2 machines at NASA Marshall Space Flight Center have centered on machine default parameters. The objective of this project is to characterize how heat treatment affects density and porosity from a microscopic point of view. This is performs using higher throughput parameters (a previously unexplored region of the manufacturing operating envelope for this application) on material consolidation. Density blocks were analyzed to explore the relationship between build parameters (laser power, scan speed, and hatch spacing) and material consolidation (assessed in terms of density and porosity). The study also considers the impact of post-processing, specifically hot isostatic pressing and heat treatment, as well as deposition pattern on material consolidation in the higher energy parameter regime. Metallurgical evaluation of specimens will also be presented. This work will contribute to creating a knowledge base (understanding material behavior in all ranges of the AM equipment operating envelope) that is critical to transitioning AM from the custom low rate production sphere it currently occupies to the world of mass high rate production, where parts are fabricated at a rapid rate with confidence that they will meet or exceed all stringent functional requirements for spaceflight hardware. These studies will also provide important data on the sensitivity of material consolidation to process parameters that will inform the design and development of future flight articles using SLM.

  8. Impact of Mixed Feedstocks and Feedstock Densification on Ionic Liquid Pretreatment Efficiency

    SciTech Connect

    Jian Shi; Vicki S. Thompson; Neal A. Yancey; Vitalie Stavila; Blake A. Simmons; Seema Singh

    2013-01-01

    Background: Lignocellulosic biorefineries must be able to efficiently process the regional feedstocks that are available at cost-competitive prices year round. These feedstocks typically have low energy densities and vary significantly in composition. One potential solution to these issues is blending and/or densifying the feedstocks in order to create a uniform feedstock. Results/discussion: We have mixed four feedstocks - switchgrass, lodgepole pine, corn stover, and eucalyptus - in flour and pellet form and processed them using the ionic liquid 1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium acetate. Sugar yields from both the mixed flour and pelletized feedstocks reach 90% within 24 hours of saccharification. Conclusions: Mixed feedstocks, in either flour or pellet form, are efficiently processed using this pretreatment process, and demonstrate that this approach has significant potential.

  9. Oxidative torrefaction of biomass residues and densification of torrefied sawdust to pellets.

    PubMed

    Wang, Congwei; Peng, Jianghong; Li, Hui; Bi, Xiaotao T; Legros, Robert; Lim, C J; Sokhansanj, Shahab

    2013-01-01

    Oxidative torrefaction of sawdust with a carrier gas containing 3-6% O(2) was investigated in a TG and a fluidized bed reactor, with the properties of the torrefied sawdust and pellets compared with traditional torrefaction without any O(2), as well as the dry raw material. It is found that the oxidative torrefaction process produced torrefied sawdust and pellets of similar properties as normally torrefied sawdust and corresponding pellets, especially on the density, energy consumption for pelletization, higher heating value and energy yield. For moisture absorption and hardness of the torrefied pellets, the oxidative torrefaction process showed slightly poor but negligible performance. Therefore, it is feasible to use oxygen laden combustion flue gases as the carrier gas for torrefaction of biomass. Besides, torrefied sawdust can be made into dense and strong pellets of high hydrophobicity at a higher die temperature than normally used in the production of traditional control pellets. PMID:23131655

  10. Sintering boron carbide ceramics without grain growth by plastic deformation as the dominant densification mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Ji, Wei; Rehman, Sahibzada Shakir; Wang, Weimin; Wang, Hao; Wang, Yucheng; Zhang, Jinyong; Zhang, Fan; Fu, Zhengyi

    2015-01-01

    A new ceramic sintering approach employing plastic deformation as the dominant mechanism is proposed, at low temperature close to the onset point of grain growth and under high pressure. Based on this route, fully dense boron carbide without grain growth can be prepared at 1,675–1,700 °C and under pressure of (≥) 80 MPa in 5 minutes. The dense boron carbide shows excellent mechanical properties, including Vickers hardness of 37.8 GPa, flexural strength of 445.3 MPa and fracture toughness of 4.7 MPa•m0.5. Such a process should also facilitate the cost-effective preparation of other advanced ceramics for practical applications. PMID:26503706

  11. Spatiotemporal densification of river water level time series by multimission satellite altimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tourian, M. J.; Tarpanelli, A.; Elmi, O.; Qin, T.; Brocca, L.; Moramarco, T.; Sneeuw, N.

    2016-02-01

    Limitations of satellite radar altimetry for operational hydrology include its spatial and temporal sampling as well as measurement problems caused by local topography and heterogeneity of the reflecting surface. In this study, we develop an approach that eliminates most of these limitations to produce an approximately 3 day temporal resolution water level time series from the original typically (sub)monthly data sets for the Po River in detail, and for Congo, Mississippi, and Danube Rivers. We follow a geodetic approach by which, after estimating and removing intersatellite biases, all virtual stations of several satellite altimeters are connected hydraulically and statistically to produce water level time series at any location along the river. We test different data-selection strategies and validate our method against the extensive available in situ data over the Po River, resulting in an average correlation of 0.7, Root-Mean-Square Error of 0.8 m, bias of -0.4 m, and Nash-Sutcliffe Efficiency coefficient of 0.5. We validate the transferability of our method by applying it to the Congo, Mississippi, and Danube Rivers, which have very different geomorphological and climatic conditions. The methodology yields correlations above 0.75 and Nash-Sutcliffe coefficients of 0.84 (Congo), 0.34 (Mississippi), and 0.35 (Danube).

  12. A GPS Network Densification in Saudi Arabia in Support of Geophysical Investigations in the Region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Almuslmani, B.; Al-Motari, E.; Bingley, R. M.; Teferle, F. N.; Moore, T.

    2006-12-01

    Current investigations of the motions of the Arabian and its neighboring plates are primarily based on GPS measurements obtained in the surrounding areas of the Arabian plate, with few stations actually located on the Arabian plate itself in the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia. In order to advance the knowledge of the dynamics of the Arabian plate and its intra-plate deformations, the General Directorate of Military Survey (GDMS), through a collaboration with the Institute of Engineering Surveying and Space Geodesy (IESSG), densified the GPS network in Saudi Arabia, covering nearly two thirds of the tectonic plate. Since July 2002, a network of 32 GPS stations has been established at locations of the Saudi Arabia geodetic network. At all of these GPS stations a concrete pillar has been used as the monument and the locations have been selected in order to give the broadest distribution of observing sites. During 2005, 27 additional GPS stations in the Hejaz and Asser Mountains in the south-western part of Saudi Arabia, have been established, with the GDMS GPS network now comprising a total of 59 stations. In this presentation we will introduce the new GPS network in Saudi Arabia established by GDMS and will present the initial results from campaigns in March 2003 and March 2005. We show preliminary estimates of absolute and relative Arabian plate motions inferred from the GPS network and a detailed comparison of the results based on the Bernese GPS software versions 4.2 and 5.0.

  13. Microwave sintering of nanopowder ZnNb2O6: Densification, microstructure and microwave dielectric properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bafrooei, H. Barzegar; Nassaj, E. Taheri; Hu, C. F.; Huang, Q.; Ebadzadeh, T.

    2014-12-01

    High density ZnNb2O6 ceramics were successfully fabricated by microwave sintering of ZnO-Nb2O5 and ZnNb2O6 nanopowders. Phase formation, microstructure and microwave electrical properties of the microwave sintered (MS) and microwave reaction sintered (MRS) specimens were examined using X-ray diffraction, field emission scanning electron microscopy and microwave dielectric properties measurement. Specimens were sintered in a temperature range from 950 to 1075 °C for 30 min at an interval of 25 °C using a microwave furnace operated at 2.45 GHz frequency, 3 kW power. XRD pattern revealed the formation of pure columbite phase of ZnNb2O6. The SEM micrographs show grain growth and reduction in porosity of specimens with the increase in sintering temperature. Good combination of microwave dielectric properties (εr~23.6, Qf~64,300 GHz and τf~-66 ppm/°C and εr~24, Qf~75,800 GHz and τf~-64 ppm/°C) was obtained for MS- and MRS-prepared samples at 1000 °C and 1050 °C for 30 min, respectively.

  14. Densification of salt-occluded zeolite a powders to a leach-resistant monolith

    SciTech Connect

    Lewis, M.A.; Fischer, D.F.; Murhpy, C.D.

    1993-10-01

    Pyrochemical processing of spent fuel from the Integral Fast Reactor (IFR) yields a salt waste of LiCl-KCl that contains approximately 6 wt% fission products, primarily as CsCl and SrCl{sub 2}. Past work has shown that zeolite A will preferentially sorb cesium and strontium and will encapsulate the salt waste in a leach-resistant, radiation-resistant aluminosilicate matrix. However, a method is sill needed to convert the salt-occluded zeolite powders into a form suitable for geologic disposal. We are thus investigating a method that forms bonded zeolite by hot pressing a mixture of glass frit and salt-occluded zeolite powders at 990 K (717{degree}C) and 28 MPa. The leach resistance of the bonded zeolite was measured in static leach tests run for 28 days in 363 K (90{degree}C) deionized water. Normalized release rates of all elements in the bonded zeolite were low, <1 g/m{sup 2} d. Thus, the bonded zeolite may be a suitable waste form for IFR salt waste.

  15. Synthesis and densification of Ni{sub 3}(Si, Ti) intermetallics by hot isostatic pressing

    SciTech Connect

    Van Dyck, S.; Delaey, L.; Froyen, L.; Buekenhout, L.

    1996-12-31

    The production of complex parts from Ni{sub 3}(Si, Ti) intermetallic materials by reactive powder metallurgy offers significant advantages over more conventional processing techniques. The main problem associated with reactive powder metallurgy is controlling the exothermic reaction accompanying the synthesis of the intermetallic compound. The uncontrolled release of heat during the conversion of the reactants into nickel silicide leads to unacceptable deformation and melting of the part. The thermal evolution of a part during reactive synthesis of the intermetallic phase is described based on kinetic and heat transfer equations, giving the temperature and phase change as a function of the applied temperature cycle and the mass and size of the part under consideration. From this model, methods for controlling the exothermic reaction during synthesis are derived. When preparing nickel silicides by reactive powder metallurgy, the application of external pressure is required to eliminate porosity and to obtain good mechanical properties. The properties of materials produced by hot isostatic pressing, with different methods of reaction control, are compared to materials prepared from prealloyed powders. It is shown that by reactive HIP, materials can be obtained with a fracture strength exceeding 2,000 MPa.

  16. Correction and Densification of Uas-Based Photogrammetric Thermal Point Cloud

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akcay, O.; Erenoglu, R. C.; Erenoglu, O.

    2016-06-01

    Photogrammetric processing algorithms can suffer problems due to either the initial image quality (noise, low radiometric quality, shadows and so on) or to certain surface materials (shiny or textureless objects). This can result in noisy point clouds and/or difficulties in feature extraction. Specifically, dense point clouds which are generated with photogrammetric method using a lightweight thermal camera, are more noisy and sparse than the point clouds of high-resolution digital camera images. In this paper, new method which produces more reliable and dense thermal point cloud using the sparse thermal point cloud and high resolution digital point cloud was considered. Both thermal and digital images were obtained with UAS (Unmanned Aerial System) based lightweight Optris PI 450 and Canon EOS 605D camera images. Thermal and digital point clouds, and orthophotos were produced using photogrammetric methods. Problematic thermal point cloud was transformed to a high density thermal point cloud using image processing methods such as rasterizing, registering, interpolation and filling. The results showed that the obtained thermal point cloud - up to chosen processing parameters - was 87% more densify than the original point cloud. The second improvement was gained at the height accuracy of the thermal point cloud. New densified point cloud has more consistent elevation model while the original thermal point cloud shows serious deviations from the expected surface model.

  17. Characterization of pore evolution in ceramics during creep failure and densification. Final report, April 15, 1984--April 14, 1995

    SciTech Connect

    Page, R.A.; Chan, K.S.

    1995-04-01

    This research program was divided into two phases, one involving creep cavitation, the other cavity evolution during sintering. In the former, work was aimed at determining the effect of microstructure and stress state upon creep cavitation, while in the latter, the principal objective was the characterization of pore evolution during sintering. In order to meet these objectives, the creep cavitation portion of the program was centered around small-angle neutron scattering, supplemented by electron microscopy and precision density measurements. The neutron scattering measurements yielded cavity nucleation and growth rates, and average pore, size, distribution, and morphology. These data were used to evaluate current cavitation models, and to implement improved modelling efforts. Additionally, stereoimaging analysis was used to determine grain boundary sliding displacements, which appear to be the critical driving force responsible for cavity nucleation and early growth. Effort in the pore sintering phase focussed on characterization of pore evolution during intermediate and final stage sintering of alumina using both single and multiple scattering techniques. Electron microscopy, density measurements, and mercury intrusion porosimetry measurements complemented the scattering results. The effects of sintering trajectory, green state, powder morphology, and additives were evaluated. These results were compared to current sintering models.

  18. Granular encapsulation of light hydrophobic liquids (LHL) in LHL-salt water systems: Particle induced densification with quartz sand.

    PubMed

    Boglaienko, Daria; Tansel, Berrin; Sukop, Michael C

    2016-02-01

    Addition of granular materials to floating crude oil slicks can be effective in capturing and densifying the floating hydrophobic phase, which settles by gravity. Interaction of light hydrophobic liquids (LHL) with quartz sand was investigated in LHL-salt water systems. The LHLs studied were decane, tetradecane, hexadecane, benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, m-xylene, and 2-cholorotoluene. Experiments were conducted with fine quartz sand (passing sieve No. 40 with openings 0.425 mm). Each LHL was dyed with few crystals of Sudan IV dye for ease of visual observation. A volume of 0.5 mL of each LHL was added to 100 mL salt water (34 g/L). Addition of one gram of quartz sand to the floating hydrophobic liquid layer resulted in formation of sand-encapsulated globules, which settled due to increased density. All LHLs (except for a few globules of decane) formed globules covered with fine sand particles that were heavy enough to settle by gravity. The encapsulated globules were stable and retained their shape upon settling. Polarity of hydrophobic liquids as the main factor of aggregation with minerals was found to be insufficient to explain LHL aggregation with sand. Contact angle measurements were made by submerging a large quartz crystal with the LHL drop on its surface into salt water. A positive correlation was observed between the wetting angle of LHL and the LHL volume captured (r = 0.75). The dependence of the globule density on globule radius was analyzed in relation to the coverage (%) of globule surface (LHL-salt water interface) by fine quartz particles. PMID:26490430

  19. Influence of Boehmite Precursor on Aluminosilicate Aerogel Pore Structure, Phase Stability and Resistance to Densification at High Temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hurwitz, Frances I.; Guo, Haiquan; Newlin, Katy N.

    2011-01-01

    Aluminosilicate aerogels are of interest as constituents of thermal insulation systems for use at temperatures higher than those attainable with silica aerogels. It is anticipated that their effectiveness as thermal insulators will be influenced by their morphology, pore size distribution, physical and skeletal densities. The present study focuses on the synthesis of aluminosilicate aerogel from a variety of Boehmite (precursors as the Al source, and tetraethylorthosilicate (TEOS) as the Si source, and the influence of starting powder on pore structure and thermal stability.

  20. From simulation to implementation: low-cost densification of permanent GPS networks in support of geodetic applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, H.-Y.; Rizos, C.; Han, S.

    2001-10-01

    Permanent GPS networks have been established since the 1980s to support a variety of geodetic applications, ranging from local deformation monitoring to large-scale crustal motion measurement. Continuously operating GPS (CGPS) networks, consisting of geodetic-grade, dual-frequency receiver systems, generally support relative positioning to sub-centimetre accuracy, even for baselines up to several thousand kilometres in length. However, due to their comparatively high cost, the density of such GPS stations is rarely high enough to support all geodetic applications. For example, although the Geographical Survey Institute has established nearly 1000 permanent GPS stations across Japan, the average inter-station spacing is of the order of 30 km. This paper describes a method by which a sub-network of comparatively low-cost, single-frequency GPS receivers can be deployed to increase the density of typical CGPS networks. In this way it is possible to increase the spatial resolution of the measured ground deformation, while still maintaining the same level of precision as a CGPS network comprised entirely of dual-frequency GPS receivers. In order to reduce the system biases associated with single-frequency data processing, an innovative medium-range GPS positioning technique that combines the processing of single-frequency and dual-frequency data is proposed. Several data sets are analysed in order to address critical issues such as: 'Can the technique work equally well for different geographic locations across Asia, traversing large elevation changes, in various seasons?', 'Can the sub-network incorporate single-frequency receivers of different brands while maintaining similar levels of precision?', and 'Can the sub-network yield generally uniform high precision results for different baseline lengths?' The analyses undertaken by the authors confirm that the proposed technique can achieve relative accuracies similar to those obtained from dual-frequency, static positioning, over inter-station distances up to a few tens of kilometres, under a variety of operational environments. These investigations are a necessary first step in making this technique an operational reality.

  1. Microstructural study and densification analysis of hot work tool steel matrix composites reinforced with TiB{sub 2} particles

    SciTech Connect

    Fedrizzi, A.; Pellizzari, M.; Zadra, M.; Marin, E.

    2013-12-15

    Hot work tool steels are characterized by good toughness and high hot hardness but are less wear resistant than other tooling materials, such as high speed steel. Metal matrix composites show improved tribological behavior, but not much work has been done in the field of hot work tool steels. In this paper TiB{sub 2}-reinforced hot work tool steel matrix composites were produced by spark plasma sintering (SPS). Mechanical alloying (MA) was proposed as a suited process to improve the composite microstructure. Density measurements and microstructure confirmed that MA promotes sintering and produces a fine and homogeneous dispersion of reinforcing particles. X-ray diffraction patterns of the sintered composites highlighted the formation of equilibrium Fe{sub 2}B and TiC, as predicted by thermodynamic calculations using Thermo-Calc® software. Scanning electron microscopy as well as scanning Kelvin probe force microscopy highlighted the reaction of the steel matrix with TiB{sub 2} particles, showing the formation of a reaction layer at the TiB{sub 2}-steel interface. Phase investigations pointed out that TiB{sub 2} is not chemically stable in steel matrix because of the presence of carbon even during short time SPS. - Highlights: • TiB{sub 2} reinforced steel matrix composites were produced by spark plasma sintering. • TiB{sub 2} was successfully dispersed in the steel matrix by mechanical alloying. • Steel and TiB{sub 2} react during sintering forming equilibrium Fe{sub 2}B and TiC. • The new phases were investigated by means of AFM, Volta potential and XRD analyses.

  2. Simplicity in melt densification in multicomponent magmatic reservoirs in Earth’s interior revealed by multinuclear magnetic resonance

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Sung Keun

    2011-01-01

    Pressure-induced changes in properties of multicomponent silicate melts in magma oceans controlled chemical differentiation of the silicate earth and the composition of partial melts that might have formed hidden reservoirs. Although melt properties show complex pressure dependences, the melt structures at high pressure and the atomistic origins of these changes are largely unknown because of their complex pressure–composition dependence, intrinsic to multicomponent magmatic melts. Chemical constraints such as the nonbridging oxygen (NBO) content at 1 atm, rather than the structural parameters for melt polymerization, are commonly used to account for pressure-induced changes in the melt properties. Here, we show that the pressure-induced NBO fraction in diverse silicate melts show a simple and general trend where all the reported experimental NBO fractions at high pressure converge into a single decaying function. The pressure-induced changes in the NBO fraction account for and predict the silica content, nonlinear variations in entropy, and the transport properties of silicate melts in Earth’s mantle. The melt properties at high pressure are largely different from what can be predicted for silicate melts with a fixed NBO fraction at 1 atm. The current results with simplicity in melt polymerization at high pressure provide a molecular link to the chemical differentiation, possibly missing Si content in primary mantle through formation of hidden Si-rich mantle reservoirs.

  3. Direct observation of large shock impedance jump upon shock-induced densification of powdered materials confirmed by in situ shock pressure and particle velocity measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kobayashi, Takamichi

    2014-07-01

    Shock pressure and particle velocity measurements have been performed separately on a powdered material under a similar shock loading condition by employing time-resolved luminescence spectroscopy and velocity interferometry (VISAR). Shock pressure measurement adopts the pressure-shift characteristic of ruby crystal that is used as a window material. Exactly the same shock condition could be realized for the particle velocity measurement by using a sapphire crystal as a window. A good agreement between the results of two different measurements has been obtained and they indicate a 7 times or more increase in shock impedance of the powdered material.

  4. The effect of mixing methods and polymer infiltration and pyrolysis (PIP) cycles on the densification of silicon carbide inert matrix fuel through a polymer precursor route

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shih, Chunghao; Tulenko, J. S.; Baney, R. H.

    2011-12-01

    The effect of mixing methods on the fabrication of silicon carbide (SiC) inert matrix fuel through a polymer precursor route was investigated in order to break up the agglomerates of the SiC particles observed in earlier studies. It was found that a high energy shaker mill could effectively break up the agglomerates and thereby achieve a higher pellet density. Moreover, it was found that the pellet density depended less on the pressing pressure, when the particles are well mixed. SEM images showed cracks caused by the springback effect on pellets with a high cold pressing pressure of 600 MPa, but no signs of springback effect were observed for the 200 MPa pressed pellets. The polymer infiltration and pyrolysis (PIP) cycles were used to further increase the pellet density and close the open pores. The first PIP cycle was found to increase the theoretical density of the pellets from 81.2% to 86.0% and close ˜50% of the open pores. The pore size distribution showed that most of the remaining open pores had diameters smaller than 10 nm. The successive second PIP cycle is not as effective on either the density or the pore size distribution because the small pores present before the second PIP cycle made the infiltration process difficult.

  5. On the densification of cubic ZrO{sub 2} nanocondensates by capillarity force and turbostratic C–Si–H multiple shell

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Chao-Hsien; Chen, Shuei-Yuan; Shen, Pouyan

    2013-04-15

    A turbostratic C–Si–H lamellar phase with 0.35–0.39 nm interspacing and ZrO{sub 2} condensates having cubic (c), tetragonal and monoclinic structures stabilized by increasing particle size were synthesized by pulsed laser ablation on Zr plate in TEOS and characterized by X-ray/electron diffraction and optical spectroscopy. The c-ZrO{sub 2} phase ca. 10% denser than the ambient lattice was stabilized as 3–10 nm sized cubo-octahedral nanoparticles but as abnormal large-sized (up to 30 nm) ones when encapsulated by the C{sub 1−x}Si{sub x}:H multiple shell with defective graphite-like structure units to exert an effective compressive stress. The potential application of such core–shell nanostructure with enhanced binding of Zr and O ions and implication for natural dynamic occurrence of the C{sub 1−x}Si{sub x}:H phase are addressed. - Graphical abstract: Lattice image of a typical cubic-ZrO{sub 2} particle densified by the turbostratic Si{sub x}C{sub 1−x}:H shell. Highlights: ► Turbostratic C–Si–H lamellar phase and ZrO{sub 2} condensates were synthesized by PLA. ► The c-ZrO{sub 2} phase ca. 10% denser than the ambient lattice was stabilized as 3–10 nm. ► The c-ZrO{sub 2} particles up to 30 nm were densified when encapsulated by the C{sub 1−x}Si{sub x}:H multiple shell. ► Tight ion binding of the c-ZrO{sub 2} due to capillarity force and turbostratic shell.

  6. Effect of an organic additive on the rheology of an aluminous cement paste and consequences on the densification of the hardened material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El Hafiane, Y.; Smith, A.; Bonnet, J. P.; Tanouti, B.

    2005-03-01

    The material used in the present work is Secar 71 (Lafarge) mixed with water containing an organic additive (acetic acid noted HOAc). The rheological behavior of these pastes is studied. The best dispersion is obtained when the mass content of the additive with respect to the cement is equal to 0.5%. The microstructural characterizations of samples aged 4 days at 20° C and 95 % relative humidity reveal a significant increase in the density and a reduction in porosity for very small percentages of additive. The remarkable effect of the acetic acid on the microstructure of hardened material is correlated with its good dispersing action.

  7. Heat treatment of Na2O-CaO-P2O5-SiO2 bioactive glasses: densification processes and postsintering bioactivity.

    PubMed

    Sola, A; Bellucci, D; Raucci, M G; Zeppetelli, S; Ambrosio, L; Cannillo, V

    2012-02-01

    Because of their excellent bioactivity, bioactive glasses are increasingly diffused to produce biomedical devices for bone prostheses, to face the dysfunctions that may be caused by traumatic events, diseases, or even natural aging. However, several processing routes, such as the production of scaffolds or the deposition of coatings, include a thermal treatment to apply or sinter the glass. The exposure to high temperature may induce a devetrification phenomenon, altering the properties and, in particular, the bioactivity of the glass. The present contribution offers an overview of the thermal behavior and properties of two glasses belonging to the Na2O-CaO-P2O5-SiO2 system, to be compared to the standard 45S5 Bioglass(®). The basic goal is to understand the effect of both the original composition and the thermal treatment on the performance of the sintered glasses. The new glasses, the one (BG_Na) with a high content of Na2O, the other (BG_Ca) with a high content of CaO, were fully characterized and sintering tests were performed to define the most interesting firing cycles. The sintered samples, treated at 880°C and 800°C respectively, were investigated from a microstructural point of view and their mechanical properties were compared to those of the bulk (not sintered) glass counterparts. The effect of sintering was especially striking on the BG_Ca material, whose Vickers hardness increased from 598.9 ± 46.7 HV to 1053.4 ± 35.0 HV. The in vitro tests confirmed the ability of the glasses, both in bulk and sintered form, of generating a hydroxyapatite surface layer when immersed in a simulated body fluid. More accurate biological tests performed on the sintered glasses proved the high bioactivity of the CaO-rich composition even after a heat treatment. PMID:22052581

  8. Studies on densification, mechanical, micro-structural and structure–properties relationship of magnesium aluminate spinel refractory aggregates prepared from Indian magnesite

    SciTech Connect

    Ghosh, Chandrima; Ghosh, Arup; Haldar, Manas Kamal

    2015-01-15

    The present work intends to study the development of magnesium aluminate spinel aggregates from Indian magnesite in a single firing stage. The raw magnesite has been evaluated in terms of chemical analysis, differential thermal analysis, thermogravimetric analysis, infrared spectroscopy, and X-ray diffraction. The experimental batch containing Indian magnesite and calcined alumina has been sintered in the temperature range of 1550 °C–1700 °C. The sintered material has been characterized in terms of physico-chemical properties like bulk density, apparent porosity, true density, relative density and thermo-mechanical/mechanical properties like hot modulus of rupture, thermal shock resistance, cold modulus of rupture and structural properties by X-ray diffraction in terms of phase identification and evaluation of crystal structure parameters of corresponding phases by Rietveld analysis. The microstructures developed at different temperatures have been analyzed by field emission scanning electron microscope study and compositional analysis of the developed phase has been carried out by energy dispersive X-ray study. - Highlights: • The studies have been done to characterize the developed magnesium aluminate spinel. • The studies reveal correlation between refractory behavior of spinel and developed microstructures. • The studies show the values of lattice parameters of developed phases.

  9. Low-Temperature Densification of Lanthanum Strontium Manganite (La1-xSrxMnO3+δ), x=0.0-0.20

    SciTech Connect

    McCarthy, Benjamin P.; Pederson, Larry R.; Williford, Ralph E.; Zhou, Xiao Dong

    2009-08-31

    Intermediate-stage sintering of lanthanum strontium manganite (LSM, where Sr=0.00, 0.05, 0.10, 0.15, and 0.20) was shown in dilatometry studies to be accelerated when subjected to alternating flows of air and nitrogen. The extent of rate enhancement decreased with increased Sr content, and decreases with increased temperature, which coincides with diminished oxygen non-stoichiometry. Shrinkage rates were shown further to be sensitive to the difference in oxygen content in the alternating gas flows. Baseline air sintering rates were measured using stepwise isothermal dilatometry, from which kinetic parameters were calculated using the Makipirtti-Meng model. Activation energies for sintering in air were determined to be 255±26, 258±28, 308±32, 373±37, and 417±41 kJ/mol for Sr=0.0, 0.05, 0.10, 0.15, and 0.20, respectively. A diffusion-based model is proposed that is consistent with trends in accelerated shrinkage versus temperature. Transient cation vacancy gradients, which lead to higher cation mobility, were calculated from established oxygen diffusivities and oxygen non-stoichiometry as a function of temperature and time. A potential application of this approach is processing of LSM-based cathode-side contact pastes in solid oxide fuel cells.

  10. Grain growth, densification, and gyromagnetic properties of LiZnTi ferrites with H3BO3-Bi2O3-SiO2-ZnO glass addition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Tingchuan; Zhang, Huaiwu; Jia, Lijun; Li, Jie; Liao, Yulong; Jin, LiChuan; Su, Hua

    2014-05-01

    LiZnTi (Li0.43Zn0.27Ti0.13Fe2.17O4) ferrites doped with 0.35 wt. %-1.5 wt. % H3BO3-Bi2O3-SiO2-ZnO (BBSZ) were synthesized through a low temperature ceramic sintering process. The grain growth of LiZnTi ferrites was discussed by using the liquid phase sintering mechanism. BBSZ promoted grain growth via liquid phase sintering, and the optimum addition of BBSZ could reduce porosity of the sample. Meanwhile, selected parameters including saturation induction (BS), coercivity (HC) and ferromagnetic resonance line width (ΔH) were measured as functions of doping content, and their relationships with ferrite porosity and microstructure were also discussed. The LiZnTi ferrite samples containing x = 0.5, 0.65, and 0.8 sintered at 920 °C, 900 °C, and 880 °C, respectively, exhibited high BS and low ΔH values at 9.3 GHz. The addition of proper content of BBSZ can not only improve BS but also reduce HC and ferromagnetic resonance line width (ΔH) by low temperature (˜900 °C) liquid phase sintering.

  11. Crystallization, densification and dielectric properties of CaO–MgO–Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}–SiO{sub 2} glass with ZrO{sub 2} as nucleating agent

    SciTech Connect

    Hsiang, Hsing-I; Yung, Shi-Wen; Wang, Chung-Ching

    2014-12-15

    SEM micrographs for the pure CaO–MgO–Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}–SiO{sub 2} glass sintered at 850–1000 °C (a) 850 °C, (b) 900 °C, (c) 950 °C, (d) 1000 °C. - Highlights: • ZrO{sub 2} effects on the crystallization of LTCC glass system were investigated. • ZrO{sub 2} effects on the dielectric properties of LTCC glass system were investigated. • LTCC with a dielectric constant of 6.65 and a low dielectric loss can be obtained. - Abstract: The zirconium oxide effects on the crystallization and dielectric properties of CaO–MgO–Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}–SiO{sub 2} (CMAS) glass were investigated. The results showed that phyllosiloxide and anorthite crystallites were observed in sequence during sintering. For glass added with 8 wt% ZrO{sub 2}, homogeneously dispersed tetragonal ZrO{sub 2} crystallites were observed at 850 °C. The as-prepared CMAS glass–ceramics exhibited a dielectric constant of about 6–7 and a dielectric loss below 0.005 at 100 MHz. The dielectric properties of CMAS glass with 8 wt% ZrO{sub 2} sintered at 850 °C show a low dielectric constant of 6.65 and a dielectric loss tangent of about 2.5 × 10{sup −3}, which provides a promising candidate for LTCC applications.

  12. Forced chemical vapor infiltration of tubular geometries: Modeling, design, and scale-up

    SciTech Connect

    Stinton, D.P.; Besmann, T.M.; Matlin, W.M.; Starr, T.L.; Curtain, W.A.

    1995-10-01

    The development of thick-walled, tubular ceramic composites has involved investigations of different fiber architectures and fixturing to obtain optimal densification and mechanical properties. The current efforts entail modeling of the densification process in order to increase densification uniformity and decrease processing time. In addition, the process is being scaled to produce components with a 10 cm outer diameter.

  13. Effect of calcination on the sintering of gel-derived zirconia-toughened alumina

    SciTech Connect

    Exter, P. den; Winnubst, L.; Leuwerink, T.H.P.; Burggraaf, A.J. . Lab. of Inorganic Chemistry Materials Science and Catalysis)

    1994-09-01

    The densification behavior of ZrO[sub 2] (+3 mol% Y[sub 2]O[sub 3])/85 wt% Al[sub 2]O[sub 3] powder compacts, prepared by the hydrolysis of metal chlorides, can be characterized by a transition- and an [alpha]-alumina densification stage. The sintering behavior is strongly determined by the densification of the transition alumina aggregates. Intra-aggregate porosity, resulting from calcination at 800 C, partly persists during sintering and alumina phase transformation and negatively influences further macroscopic densification. Calcination at 1,200 C, however, densities the transition alumina aggregates prior to sintering and enables densification to almost full density (96%) within 2 h at 1,450 C, thus obtaining a microstructure with an alumina and a zirconia grain size of 1[mu]m and 0.3--0.4[mu]m, respectively.

  14. Sintering stress and microstructure in ceramic powder compacts

    SciTech Connect

    Chu, May-Ying California Univ., Berkeley, CA . Dept. of Materials Science and Mineral Engineering)

    1990-08-01

    The behavior of the sintering stress and microstructure during sintering is studied under various thermal and physical conditions. Specifically, the study includes sintering under isothermal or constant heating rate conditions; and altering the starting compact structure by pre-coarsening to increase the particle size, or by compaction to increase the starting density. Loading dilatometry is used to measure the ratio of the densification strain rate to the creep strain rate and the continuous shrinkage history of the systems. The data show that the ratio of the densification to the creep strain rate is remarkably constant within a wide temperature range for densification, from the earliest stages of densification to at least the onset of the final stage. As a consequence, the sintering stress, which is proportional to the strain rate ratio, is nearly independent of sintered density or of temperature. Analysis leads to a simple method for determining the simultaneous densification strain rate over the creep strain rate ratio. A rigorous densification strain rate equation is derived for a model system. The constant sintering stress allows progress on formulating a sintering equation to predict the densification behavior of powder compacts. Analysis of dilatometry data from compacts sintered at various heating rates, and of numerical computations, indicate the need to include separate coarsening processes with different activation energies. The same model is used to describe the differences in pore spacing evolution between pre-coarsened and as-received systems.

  15. Hardness of dense beta-Si3N4

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greskovich, C.; Yeh, H. C.

    1983-01-01

    The effects of small changes in the concentration of an oxygen content densification aid on the room temperature microhardness of hot isostatically pressed and sintered beta-Si3N4 ceramics are studied. The compositions studied were Si3N4 containing 7 wt. pct BeSiN2, a fixed nonoxide densification aid, and 1.9-3.7 wt. pct oxygen as a second, variable densification aid. A proportional relationship between high density and high oxygen content, regardless of heat treatment type, is noted.

  16. Lunar regolith and structure mechanics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barnes, Frank; Ko, Hon-Yim; Sture, Stein; Carter, Tyrone R.; Evenson, Kraig A.; Nathan, Mark P.; Perkins, Steve W.

    1991-01-01

    The topics are presented in viewgraph form and include the following: modeling of regolith-structure interaction in extraterrestrial constructed facilities; densification of lunar soil simulant; and vibration assisted penetration of lunar soil simulant.

  17. Determination of densified biomass mass properties using 3D laser scanning and image analysis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Biomass densification is viewed as the indispensable feedstock preprocessing operation for efficient transport, storage, material flow through machines, and handling activities. Accurate mass properties of densified biomass such as surface area, volume, and envelope density form fundamental data for...

  18. Mechanical Properties of Cellular Materials

    SciTech Connect

    Solem, J.C.; Dienes, J.K.

    1999-07-09

    The authors calculated the stress-strain relation for elastomeric foam from an ab initio theory, which shows that the plateau and densification regions should be described by a hyperbola. The theory seems to agree reasonably well with experiment.

  19. Application of 3D Scanned Imaging Methodology for Volume, Surface Area, and Envelope Density Evaluation of Densified Biomass

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Measurement of surface area, volume, and density is an essential for quantifying, evaluating, and designing the biomass densification, storage, and transport operations. Acquiring accurate and repeated measurements of these parameters for hygroscopic densified biomass are not straightforward and on...

  20. Estimating Volume of Martian Valleys Using Axelsson Algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jung, J. H.; Kim, C. J.; Heo, J.; Luo, W.

    2012-03-01

    A progressive TIN densification algorithm is adapted to estimate the volume martian valley networks (VN) based MOLA point data. This method can be used to estimate the global water inventory associated with VN.

  1. Comparison of the halving of tablets prepared with eccentric and rotary tablet presses.

    PubMed

    Sovány, T; Kása, P; Pintye-Hódi, K

    2009-01-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the densification of powder mixtures on eccentric and rotary tablet presses and to establish relationships with the halving properties of the resulting scored tablets. This is an important problem because the recent guidelines of EU require verification of the equal masses of tablet halves. The models of Walker, Heckel, and Kawakita were used to describe the powder densification on the two machines. The calculated parameters revealed that the shorter compression cycle of rotary machines results in poorer densification and lower tablet hardness at a given compression force. This is manifested in poorer halving properties, which are influenced mainly by the hardness. Better densification improves the halving even at lower tablet hardness. This demonstrates that these parameters can be good predictors of tablet halving properties. PMID:19381830

  2. Use of silicon in liquid sintered silicon nitrides and sialons

    DOEpatents

    Raj, R.; Baik, S.

    1984-12-11

    This invention relates to the production of improved high density nitrogen based ceramics by liquid-phase densification of silicon nitride or a compound of silicon-nitrogen-oxygen-metal, e.g. a sialon. In the process and compositions of the invention minor amounts of finely divided silicon are employed together with the conventional liquid phase producing additives to enhance the densification of the resultant ceramic. 4 figs.

  3. Use of silicon in liquid sintered silicon nitrides and sialons

    DOEpatents

    Raj, Rishi; Baik, Sunggi

    1984-12-11

    This invention relates to the production of improved high density nitrogen based ceramics by liquid-phase densification of silicon nitride or a compound of silicon-nitrogen-oxygen-metal, e.g. a sialon. In the process and compositions of the invention minor amounts of finely divided silicon are employed together with the conventional liquid phase producing additives to enhance the densification of the resultant ceramic.

  4. Use of free silicon in liquid phase sintering of silicon nitrides and sialons

    DOEpatents

    Raj, Rishi; Baik, Sunggi

    1985-11-12

    This invention relates to the production of improved high density nitrogen based ceramics by liquid-phase densification of silicon nitride or a compound of silicon-nitrogen-oxygen-metal, e.g. a sialon. In the process and compositions of the invention minor amounts of finely divided silicon are employed together with the conventional liquid phase producing additives to enhance the densification of the resultant ceramic.

  5. Use of free silicon in liquid phase sintering of silicon nitrides and sialons

    DOEpatents

    Raj, R.; Baik, S.

    1985-11-12

    This invention relates to the production of improved high density nitrogen based ceramics by liquid-phase densification of silicon nitride or a compound of silicon-nitrogen-oxygen-metal, e.g. a sialon. In the process and compositions of the invention minor amounts of finely divided silicon are employed together with the conventional liquid phase producing additives to enhance the densification of the resultant ceramic. 4 figs.

  6. Spark plasma sintering of monolithic silicon carbide and silicon carbide-graphene composite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharfuzzaman, Amin Mohammad

    Ball milled alpha -- SiC (2.73 microm) was consolidated rapidly using spark plasma sintering at 1800, 1900, and 2000 °C under 90 MPa pressure and 20 min of soaking time. Relatively high densification (>90% relative density) was achieved at 2000 °C. The densification stages were identified, and a three stage densification process was proposed. The formal densification study was performed using the model proposed by Ashby, and the dominant mechanism for densification was determined to be grain boundary accommodated diffusion controlled creep. The formal grain growth mechanism was also investigated, and similar result was found. The value of stress exponent was calculated as 1.1, and the activation energy needed for final stage densification was found to be ≈ 427 - 500 KJ/mol. Also, nano-grain clustering was identified as an auxiliary mechanism from microstructural analysis. The reinforcement of SiC was done with 1, 2, and 3 vol.% graphene. Mechanical characterizations were performed on the reinforced ceramics, and inter-granular fracture was seen. Graphene didn't cause any improvement in hardness of SiC, but showed substantial improvement in flexural strength. Graphene proved to be very useful in restraining grain growth, but decreased the density of monolithic SiC.

  7. Fabrication of Mechanically Tunable and Bioactive Metal Scaffolds for Biomedical Applications.

    PubMed

    Jung, Hyun-Do; Lee, Hyun; Kim, Hyoun-Ee; Koh, Young-Hag; Song, Juha

    2015-01-01

    Biometal systems have been widely used for biomedical applications, in particular, as load-bearing materials. However, major challenges are high stiffness and low bioactivity of metals. In this study, we have developed a new method towards fabricating a new type of bioactive and mechanically reliable porous metal scaffolds-densified porous Ti scaffolds. The method consists of two fabrication processes, 1) the fabrication of porous Ti scaffolds by dynamic freeze casting, and 2) coating and densification of the porous scaffolds. The dynamic freeze casting method to fabricate porous Ti scaffolds allowed the densification of porous scaffolds by minimizing the chemical contamination and structural defects. The densification process is distinctive for three reasons. First, the densification process is simple, because it requires a control of only one parameter (degree of densification). Second, it is effective, as it achieves mechanical enhancement and sustainable release of biomolecules from porous scaffolds. Third, it has broad applications, as it is also applicable to the fabrication of functionally graded porous scaffolds by spatially varied strain during densification. PMID:26709604

  8. Sintering behavior of doped ZnO powders for high field varistors

    SciTech Connect

    Ghirlanda, M.

    1990-08-01

    The sintering of ZnO varistor precursor powders, doped with Co, Mn and different concentrations of Bi and Al, is investigated and discussed in relation with sintering models. One purpose of the present study is to provide information valuable for the fabrication of high field varistors. As the fundamental parameter of these electronic components is the breakdown voltage per unit of thickness, which is determined by the number of grain boundaries per linear dimension, the grain size and the sintered density are crucial variables, and the sintering is a central step in the manufacturing of such varistors. Sintering experiments performed at constant heating rate in a loading dilatometer provide data on the densification and creep of the compacted powders. Another goal of the present study is to provide an experimental basis for the interpretation of the evolution of the ratio between densification rate and creep rate in terms of competition between densification and microstructure coarsening. This is accomplished by taking advantage of the variety of sintering behaviors that takes place in the system ZnO-Bi-Al: the comparison of these behaviors allows us to correlate the macroscopic sintering parameters to the evolution of the microstructure. It results that, while in non-doped powders densification and coarsening develop in a balanced way, resulting in the constancy of the ratio between densification rate and creep rate, the effect of the dopants on the sintering kinetics alters such a balance, leading this ratio to vary. 17 figs.

  9. The processing and potential applications of porous silicon

    SciTech Connect

    Syyuan Shieh.

    1992-07-01

    Stability of a cylindrical pore under the influence of surface energy is important for porous silicon (PS) processing in the integrated circuit industry. Once the zig-zag cylindrical pores of porous silicon or oxidized porous silicon (OPS) are unstable and breakup into rows of isolated spherical pores, oxidation of PS and densification/nitridation of OPS become difficult. Swing to difficulty transport of reactant gas (O{sub 2}, NH{sub 3}) or the trapped gas (for densification of OPS). A first order analysis of the stability of a cylindrical pore or cylinder is considered first. Growth of small sinusoidal perturbations by viscous flow or evaporation/condensation result in dependence of perturbation growth rate on perturbation wavelength. Rapid thermal oxidation (RTO) of porous silicon is proposed as an alternative for the tedious two-step 300 and 800C oxidation process. Transmission electron microscopy, energy dispersive spectroscopy ESCA are used for quality control. Also, rapid thermal nitridation of oxidized porous silicon in ammonia is proposed to enhance OPS resistance to HF solution. Pores breakup of OPS results in a trapped gas problem during densification. Wet helium is proposed as OPS densification ambient gas to shorten densification time. Finally, PS is proposed to be an extrinsic gettering center in silicon wafers. The suppression of oxidation-induced stacking faults is used to demonstrate the gettering ability. Possible mechanism is discussed.

  10. Rapid fabrication of ceramic composite tubes using chemical vapor infiltration

    SciTech Connect

    Starr, T.L.; Chiang, D.; Besmann, T.M.; Stinton, D.P.; McLaughlin, J.C.; Matlin, W.M.

    1996-06-01

    Ceramic composite tubes can be fabricated with silicon carbide matrix and Nicalon fiber reinforcement using forced flow-thermal gradient chemical vapor infiltration (FCVI). The process model GTCVI is used to design the equipment configuration and to identify conditions for rapid, uniform densification. The initial injector and mandrel design produced radial and longitudinal temperature gradients too large for uniform densification. Improved designs have been evaluated with the model. The most favorable approach utilizes a free-standing preform and an insulated water-cooled gas injector. Selected process conditions are based on the temperature limit of the fiber, matrix stoichiometry and reagent utilization efficiency. Model runs for a tube 12 inches long, 4 inches OD and 1/4 inch wall thickness show uniform densification in approximately 15 hours.

  11. Fabrication and characterization of Si3N4 ceramics without additives by high pressure hot pressing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shimada, M.; Tanaka, A.; Yamada, T.; Koizumi, M.

    1984-01-01

    High pressure hot-pressing of Si3N4 without additives was performed using various kinds of Si3N4 powder as starting materials, and the relation between densification and alpha-beta phase transformation was studied. The temperature dependences of Vickers microhardness and fracture toughness were also examined. Densification of Si3N4 was divided into three stages, and it was found that densification and phase transformation of Si3N4 under pressure were closely associated. The results of the temperature dependence of Vickers microhardness indicated that the high-temperature hardness was strongly influenced not only by the density and microstructure of sintered body but also by the purity of starting powder. The fracture toughness values of Si3N4 bodies without additives were 3.29-4.39 MN/m to the 3/2 power and independent of temperature up to 1400 C.

  12. Multi-particle FEM modeling on microscopic behavior of 2D particle compaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Y. X.; An, X. Z.; Zhang, Y. L.

    2015-03-01

    In this paper, the discrete random packing and various ordered packings such as tetragonal and hexagonal close packed structures generated by discrete element method and honeycomb, which is manually generated were input as the initial packing structures into the multi-particle finite element model (FEM) to study their densification during compaction, where each particle is discretized as a FEM mesh. The macro-property such as relative density and micro-properties such as local morphology, stress, coordination number and densification mechanism obtained from various initial packings are characterized and analyzed. The results show that the coupling of discrete feature in particle scale with the continuous FEM in macro-scale can effectively conquer the difficulties in traditional FEM modeling, which provides a reasonable way to reproduce the compaction process and identify the densification mechanism more accurately and realistically.

  13. Impact of Reducing Shallow Trench Isolation Mechanical Stress on Active Length for 40 nm n-Type Metal-Oxide-Semiconductor Field-Effect Transistors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Yao-Tsung; Wu, San-Lein; Lin, Hau-Yu; Kuo, Cheng-Wen; Chang, Shoou-Jinn; Hong, De-Gong; Wu, Chung-Yi; Huang, Cheng-Tung; Cheng, Osbert

    2011-04-01

    We report an improved densification annealing process for sub atmospheric chemical vapor deposition (SACVD)-based shallow trench isolation (STI) to enhance n-type metal-oxide-semiconductor field-effect transistor (nMOSFET) performance for 40 nm node and beyond. Experimental results show that this improved STI densification process leads to lower compressive stress in the small active area compared with the standard STI process. This is beneficial to electron mobility and leads to an enhancement of on-current (ION). Moreover, comparable drain induced barrier lowering (DIBL) and subthreshold swing (SS) characteristics for both devices indicate that the improved densification process would no significant influences on process variations or dopant diffusions. Hence, the improved STI process can be adopted in 40 nm complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor (CMOS) technology and beyond.

  14. Sintering aid for lanthanum chromite refractories

    DOEpatents

    Flandermeyer, Brian K.; Poeppel, Roger B.; Dusek, Joseph T.; Anderson, Harlan U.

    1988-01-01

    An electronically conductive interconnect layer for use in a fuel cell or other electrolytic device is formed with sintering additives to permit densification in a monolithic structure with the electrode materials. Additions including an oxide of boron and a eutectic forming composition of Group 2A metal fluorides with Group 3B metal fluorides and Group 2A metal oxides with Group 6B metal oxides lower the required firing temperature of lanthanum chromite to permit densification to in excess of 94% of theoretical density without degradation of electrode material lamina. The monolithic structure is formed by tape casting thin layers of electrode, interconnect and electrolyte materials and sintering the green lamina together under common densification conditions.

  15. Bloating in (Pb0.95Sn0.05Te)0.92(PbS)0.08-0.055%PbI2 Thermoelectric Specimens as a Result of Processing Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ni, Jennifer E.; Case, Eldon D.; Stewart, Ryan; Wu, Chun-I.; Hogan, Timothy P.; Kanatzidis, Mercouri G.

    2012-06-01

    Lead chalcogenides such as (Pb0.95Sn0.05Te)0.92(PbS)0.08-0.055%PbI2 have received attention due to their encouraging thermoelectric properties. For the hot pressing (HP) and pulsed electric current sintering (PECS) techniques used in this study, decomposition reactions can generate porosity (bloating). Porosity in turn can degrade electrical, thermal, and mechanical properties. In this study, microstructural observations (scanning electron microscopy) and room-temperature elasticity measurements (resonant ultrasound spectroscopy) were used to characterize bloating generated during post-densification anneals. Although every HP specimen bloated during post-densification annealing, no bloating was observed for the PECS specimens processed from dry milled only powders. The lack of bloating for the annealed PECS specimens may be related to the electrical discharge intrinsic in the PECS process, which reportedly cleans the powder particle surfaces during densification.

  16. Morphological and spectral study of the galaxies Kaz 69 and Kaz 460

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kazarian, M. A.; Karapetian, E. L.; Adibekyan, V. Zh.

    2007-10-01

    Morphological and spectral studies of the galaxies Kaz 69 and Kaz 460 are reported. The observations were made on the 2.6-m telescope at the Byurakan Observatory using the VAGR multiaperture spectrograph. Isophotes of monochromatic images of the Hα, [NII] λ6584, and [SII] λ6717 lines are constructed. Densifications I and II are found to rotate with north-south oriented axes of rotation. The two densifications (“knots”) have all the kinematic and spectral properties of individual galaxies. It is assumed that Kaz 139 and the densifications I and II were ejected from the nucleus of Kaz 460 at different times, with Kaz 139 probably having been ejected first, although they may all have been ejected simultaneously with different velocities. Along with Kaz 460, these objects form a physical group of galaxies and, at the same time, are a consequence of the activity of the nucleus of Kaz 460.

  17. Strategies for the deconvolution of hypertelescope images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aime, C.; Lantéri, H.; Diet, M.; Carlotti, A.

    2012-07-01

    Aims: We study the possibility of deconvolving hypertelescope images and propose a procedure that can be used provided that the densification factor is small enough to make the process reversible. Methods: We present the simulation of hypertelescope images for an array of cophased densified apertures. We distinguish between two types of aperture densification, one called FAD (full aperture densification) corresponding to Labeyrie's original technique, and the other FSD (full spectrum densification) corresponding to a densification factor twice as low. Images are compared to the Fizeau mode. A single image of the observed object is obtained in the hypertelescope modes, while in the Fizeau mode the response produces an ensemble of replicas of the object. Simulations are performed for noiseless images and in a photodetection regime. Assuming first that the point spread function (PSF) does not change much over the object extent, we use two classical techniques to deconvolve the images, namely the Richardson-Lucy and image space reconstruction algorithms. Results: Both algorithms fail to achieve satisfying results. We interpret this as meaning that it is inappropriate to deconvolve a relation that is not a convolution, even if the variation in the PSF is very small across the object extent. We propose instead the application of a redilution to the densified image prior to its deconvolution, i.e. to recover an image similar to the Fizeau observation. This inverse operation is possible only when the rate of densification is no more than in the FSD case. This being done, the deconvolution algorithms become efficient. The deconvolution brings together the replicas into a single high-quality image of the object. This is heuristically explained as an inpainting of the Fourier plane. This procedure makes it possible to obtain improved images while retaining the benefits of hypertelescopes for image acquisition consisting of detectors with a small number of pixels.

  18. Dilatometric study of U1-xAmxO2±δ and U1-xCexO2±δ reactive sintering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horlait, Denis; Feledziak, Alex; Lebreton, Florent; Clavier, Nicolas; Prieur, Damien; Dacheux, Nicolas; Delahaye, Thibaud

    2013-10-01

    In order to reduce the radiotoxicity of nuclear fuel waste, the transmutation of americium in U1-xAmxO2±δ dedicated fuels is considered. A convenient route to produce such fuels is reactive sintering from a UO2+δ/AmO2-δ green pellet, i.e., a single heat treatment during which both the densification and the formation of the U1-xAmxO2±δ solid solution occur. The mechanisms of such sintering are however barely known and require experimental data. In this aim, the densification through reactive sintering of a UO2+δ/AmO2-δ sample was monitored by dilatometry. The obtained results were compared to those reported for the formation of the U1-xAmxO2±δ solid solution monitored by in situ high-temperature X-ray diffraction. To assess the use of Ce as a substitute of Am, similar dilatometric studies were also carried out on UO2+δ/CeO2 pellets. Obtained results show that the use of a reactive sintering causes a delay in the densification process associated to the competition between solid solution formation and densification, which yields limitations in pellet final densities. The importance of redox behavior of Am (or Ce) on the achievement of solid solution formation and densification are also discussed, especially based on discrepancies in densification behavior between UO2+δ/AmO2-δ and UO2+δ/CeO2.

  19. Anomalous lattice expansion in yttria stabilized zirconia under simultaneous applied electric and thermal fields: A time-resolved in situ energy dispersive x-ray diffractometry study with an ultrahigh energy synchrotron probe

    SciTech Connect

    Akdogan, E. K.; Savkl Latin-Small-Letter-Dotless-I y Latin-Small-Letter-Dotless-I ld Latin-Small-Letter-Dotless-I z, I.; Bicer, H.; Paxton, W.; Toksoy, F.; Tsakalakos, T.; Zhong, Z.

    2013-06-21

    Nonisothermal densification in 8% yttria doped zirconia (8YSZ) particulate matter of 250 nm median particle size was studied under 215 V/cm dc electric field and 9 Degree-Sign C/min heating rate, using time-resolved in-situ high temperature energy dispersive x-ray diffractometry with a polychromatic 200 keV synchrotron probe. Densification occurred in the 876-905 Degree-Sign C range, which resulted in 97% of the theoretical density. No local melting at particle-particle contacts was observed in scanning electron micrographs, implying densification was due to solid state mass transport processes. The maximum current draw at 905 Degree-Sign C was 3 A, corresponding to instantaneous absorbed power density of 570 W/cm{sup 3}. Densification of 8YSZ was accompanied by anomalous elastic volume expansions of the unit cell by 0.45% and 2.80% at 847 Degree-Sign C and 905 Degree-Sign C, respectively. The anomalous expansion at 905 Degree-Sign C at which maximum densification was observed is characterized by three stages: (I) linear stage, (II) anomalous stage, and (III) anelastic recovery stage. The densification in stage I (184 s) and II (15 s) was completed in 199 s, while anelastic relaxation in stage III lasted 130 s. The residual strains ({epsilon}) at room temperature, as computed from tetragonal (112) and (211) reflections, are {epsilon}{sub (112)} = 0.05% and {epsilon}{sub (211)} = 0.13%, respectively. Time dependence of (211) and (112) peak widths ({beta}) show a decrease with both exhibiting a singularity at 905 Degree-Sign C. An anisotropy in (112) and (211) peak widths of {l_brace} {beta}{sub (112)}/{beta}{sub (211)}{r_brace} = (3:1) magnitude was observed. No phase transformation occurred at 905 Degree-Sign C as verified from diffraction spectra on both sides of the singularity, i.e., the unit cell symmetry remains tetragonal. We attribute the reduction in densification temperature and time to ultrafast ambipolar diffusion of species arising from the

  20. Sinter-forging characteristics of fine-grained zirconia

    SciTech Connect

    Panda, P.C.; Wang, J.; Raj, R.

    1988-12-01

    Powder preforms of zirconia, containing 2.85 mol% yttria, were sinter-forged in simple uniaxial compression at 1400/sup 0/C by applying constant displacement rates to the specimens. Shear and densification strains and the uniaxial stress were measured as a function of time. In contrast with alumina and silicon nitride, zirconia appears to densify by a dislocation mechanism. As a consequence, the densification rate is linked to the applied strain rather than to the applied hydrostatic pressure: the powder compact requires a critical amount of compressive strain to consolidate to full density, irrespective of the strain rate or the stress at which that strain is applied.

  1. Modeling the interaction of ultrasound with pores

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lu, Yichi; Wadley, Haydn N. G.; Parthasarathi, Sanjai

    1991-01-01

    Factors that affect ultrasonic velocity sensing of density during consolidation of metal powders are examined. A comparison is made between experimental results obtained during the final stage of densification and the predictions of models that assume either a spherical or a spheroidal pore shape. It is found that for measurements made at low frequencies during the final stage of densification, relative density (pore fraction) and pore shape are the two most important factors determining the ultrasonic velocity, the effect of pore size is negligible.

  2. Effect of milling and leaching on the structure of sintered silicon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yeh, H. C.; Glasgow, T. K.; Herbell, T. P.

    1980-01-01

    The effects of attrition milling and acid leaching on the sintering behavior and the resultant structures of two commercial silicon powders were investigated. Sintering was performed in He for 16 hours at 1200, 1250, and 1300 C. Compacts of as-received Si did not densify during sintering. Milling reduced the average particle size to below 0.5 microns and enhanced densification (1.75 g/cc). Leaching milled Si further enhanced densification (1.90 g/cc max.) and decreased structural coarsening. After sintering, the structure of the milled and leached powder compacts appears favorable for the production of reaction bonded silicon nitride.

  3. Microalloying of transition metal silicides by mechanical activation and field-activated reaction

    DOEpatents

    Munir, Zuhair A.; Woolman, Joseph N.; Petrovic, John J.

    2003-09-02

    Alloys of transition metal suicides that contain one or more alloying elements are fabricated by a two-stage process involving mechanical activation as the first stage and densification and field-activated reaction as the second stage. Mechanical activation, preferably performed by high-energy planetary milling, results in the incorporation of atoms of the alloying element(s) into the crystal lattice of the transition metal, while the densification and field-activated reaction, preferably performed by spark plasma sintering, result in the formation of the alloyed transition metal silicide. Among the many advantages of the process are its ability to accommodate materials that are incompatible in other alloying methods.

  4. Temperature dependence of inductively coupled plasma assisted growth of TiN thin films.

    SciTech Connect

    Meng, W. J.; Curtis, T. J.; Rehn, L. E.; Baldo, P. M.; Materials Science Division; Louisiana State Univ.

    1999-11-01

    The use of low pressure high density plasmas to assist the synthesis of ceramic thin film materials is in its infancy. Using an inductively coupled plasma assisted magnetron sputtering system, we examine the dependence of plasma-assisted growth of TiN thin films on growth temperature at different ratios of ion flux to neutral atom flux. Our results indicate that a temperature independent densification of TiN films occurs above a certain ion to neutral atom flux ratio. As an example of this temperature independent densification, we demonstrate the formation of dense B1 TiN crystalline thin films at growth temperatures down to {approx}100 K.

  5. Reaction synthesis of heat-resistant materials

    SciTech Connect

    Deevi, S.C.; Sikka, V.K.

    1995-12-31

    Exothermicity associated with the synthesis of aluminides can be utilized to obtain aluminides of transition metals. Combustion synthesis, extrusion, and hot pressing were utilized to obtain dense intermetallics and their composites. Composites were analyzed by X- ray diffraction and microscopy techniques, and tensile properties were measured on button-head and sheet specimens of intermetallics and their composites. Mechanical properties of intermetallics obtained by reaction synthesis and densification compare well with conventionally processed materials. Reaction-synthesis principles were also extended to weld overlays. Possible approaches to obtaining dense products by reaction synthesis and densification are summarized in a schematic illustration. 19 refs., 14 figs., 3 tabs.

  6. Photonic non-destructive measurement methods for investigating the evolution of polar firn and ice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Breton, Daniel James

    When snow falls on glaciers or ice sheets, it persists for many tens, hundreds and sometimes thousands of years before becoming ice. The granular material in between fresh snow and glacial ice is known as firn and is generally 50 to 100 m thick over polar ice sheets. The compaction mechanism of firn into ice (called densification) has important glaciological ramifications in determination of ice sheet stability and related sea level rise effects via remote sensing altimetry. Firn densification is also important for correctly interpreting ice core paleoclimate records, especially those analyzing gases trapped in air bubbles within the glacial ice. Densification is thought to depend strongly on microstructure: the sizes, shapes, orientations and inter-particle bonds of the ice grains that make up polar firn. Microstructure-dependent densification is poorly understood and occurs in the region where two-thirds of the overall densification takes place. This work focuses on developing non-destructive methods for simultaneously evaluating changes in both the bulk density and microstructure of polar firn to better understand structure- dependent densification processes. The first method is an automated density gauge which uses gamma-ray transmission methods to non-destructively produce high resolution (3.3 mm) and high precision (+/-4 kg m-3) density profiles of firn and ice cores. This instrument was used to collect a density profile for the first 160 m of the West Antarctic Ice Sheet Divide WDCO6A deep ice core. The second method involves optical scattering measurements on firn and ice cores to determine the important microstructural parameters of ice grain and air bubble size and air-ice interface surface area. These measurements are modeled using both Monte Carlo radiative transfer and ray-tracing geometric optics methods, and are then tested against experiment using digital photography of the WDC06A core. Combining the results of both bulk density and optical

  7. Processing of boron carbide-aluminum composites

    SciTech Connect

    Halverson, D.C. ); Pyzik, A.J.; Aksay, I.A. . Dept. of Materials Science and Engineering); Snowden, W.E. )

    1989-05-01

    The processing problems associated with boron carbide and the limitations of its mechanical properties can be significantly reduced when a metal phase (e.g., aluminum) is added. Lower densification temperatures and higher fracture toughness will result. Based on fundamental capillarity thermodynamics, reaction thermodynamics, and densification kinetics, we have established reliable criteria for fabricating B{sub 4}C-Al particulate composites. Because chemical reactions cannot be eliminated, it is necessary to process B{sub 4}C-Al by rapidly heating to near 1200{degrees} C (to ensure wetting) and subsequently heat-treating below 1200{degrees} C (for microstructural development).

  8. Cast iron freezing mechanisms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lillybeck, N. P.; Smith, James E., Jr.

    1987-01-01

    This task focused on liquid phase sintering and infiltration studies of refractory metals and metal composites. Particular emphases was placed on those powered metal compacts which produce liquid alloys in sintering. For this class of materials, heating to a two phase region causes the constituent components to react, forming an alloy liquid which must wet the solid phase. Densification is initially driven by the free energy effects which cause rapid rearrangement. Further densification occurs by evaporation and condensation, surface diffusion, bulk flow, and volume diffusion.

  9. Effects of various additives on sintering of aluminum nitride

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Komeya, K.; Inoue, H.; Tsuge, A.

    1982-01-01

    Effects of thirty additives on sintering A/N were investigated. The addition of alkali earth oxides and rare earth oxides gave fully densified aluminum nitride. This is due to the formation of nitrogen-containing aluminate liquid in the system aluminum nitride-alkali earth oxides or rare earth oxides. Microstructural studies of the sintered specimens with the above two types of additives suggested that the densification was due to the liquid phase sintering. Additions of silicon compounds resulted in poor densification by the formation of highly refractory compounds such as A/N polytypes.

  10. Effect of milling and leaching on the structure of sintered silicon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yeh, H. C.; Glascow, T. K.; Herbell, T. P.

    1980-01-01

    Sintering was performed in He for 16 hours at 1200, 1250, and 1300 C. Compacts of as-received Si did not densify during sintering. Milling reduced the average particle size to below 0.5 micrometer and enhanced densification (1.75 g/cc). Leaching milled Si further enhanced densification (1.90 g/cc max.) and decreased structural coarsening. After sintering, the structure of the milled and leached powder compacts appears favorable for the production of reaction bonded silicon nitride.