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Sample records for densities refractive indices

  1. Densities, Viscosities, Speeds of Sound, and Refractive Indices of Binary Mixtures of 2-Octanol with Chlorobenzenes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhatia, Subhash C.; Sangwan, Jasbir; Rani, Ruman; Bhatia, Rachna

    2011-10-01

    Densities, ρ, viscosities, η, speeds of sound, u, and refractive indices, n D, of binary liquid mixtures of 2-octanol with 1,2-dichlorobenzene, 1,3-dichlorobenzene, and 1,2,4-trichlorobenzene have been measured over the entire range of composition at 298.15 K, 303.15 K, and 308.15 K and at atmospheric pressure. From the experimental data of the density, speed of sound, viscosity, and refractive index, the values of the excess molar volume, V E, deviations in isentropic compressibility, Δ κ S , and deviations in molar refraction, Δ R have been calculated. The calculated excess and deviation functions have been analyzed in terms of molecular interactions and structural effects.

  2. Densities, Viscosities, Speeds of Sound, and Refractive Indices of Binary Mixtures of 2-Ethyl-1-hexanol with Benzene and Halobenzenes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhatia, Subhash C.; Sangwan, Jasbir; Rani, Ruman; Kiran, Vijay

    2013-11-01

    Densities, , viscosities, , speeds of sound, , and refractive indices, , of binary liquid mixtures of 2-ethyl-1-hexanol with benzene, chlorobenzene, and bromobenzene have been measured over the entire range of composition at 298.15 K, 303.15 K, and 308.15 K and at atmospheric pressure. From the experimental data of the density, speed of sound, viscosity, and refractive index, the values of the excess molar volume, , isentropic compressibility, , and deviations in molar refraction, , have been calculated. The viscosity data have been correlated using McAllister's three-body interaction model at different temperatures. The calculated excess and deviation functions have been analyzed in terms of molecular interactions and structural effects.

  3. Densities, Viscosities, Sound Speeds, Refractive Indices, and Excess Properties of Binary Mixtures of Isoamyl Alcohol with Some Alkoxyethanols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roy, Mahendra Nath; Sah, Radhey Shyam; Pradhan, Prasanna

    2010-02-01

    Densities and viscosities were measured for binary mixtures of isoamyl alcohol with 2-methoxyethanol, 2-ethoxyethanol, and 2-butoxyethanol over the entire range of composition at 303.15 K, 313.15 K, and 323.15K and ultrasonic speeds and refractive indices at 303.15 K under atmospheric pressure. From the experimental values of density, viscosity, ultrasonic speed, and refractive index, the values of excess molar volume ( V E), viscosity deviations (Δ η), deviations in isentropic compressibility (Δ K S ), and excess molar refraction (Δ R) have been calculated. The excess or deviation properties were found to be either negative or positive, depending on the molecular interactions and the nature of liquid mixtures.

  4. Densities, Viscosities, Speeds of Sound, and Refractive Indices of Binary Mixtures of 1-Decanol with Isomeric Chlorotoluenes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhatia, Subhash C.; Rani, Ruman; Sangwan, Jasbir; Bhatia, Rachna

    2011-06-01

    Densities, ρ, viscosities, η, speeds of sound, u, and refractive indices, n D, of binary liquid mixtures of 1-decanol with o-chlorotoluene, m-chlorotoluene, and p-chlorotoluene have been measured over the entire range of composition at 298.15 K, 303.15 K, and 308.15 K and at atmospheric pressure. From the experimental data of density, speed of sound, viscosity and refractive index, the values of the excess molar volume, V E, deviations in isentropic compressibility, Δ κ S , and deviations in molar refraction, Δ R, have been calculated. The calculated excess and deviation functions have been analyzed in terms of molecular interactions and structural effects.

  5. Indices of refraction for the HITRAN compilation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Massie, S. T.

    1994-01-01

    Indices of refraction of sulfuric acid solutions, water, and ice, which will become part of the HITRAN database, are discussed. Representative calculations are presented for the sulfate aerosol, to illustrate the broadband spectral features of i.r. aerosol extinction spectra. Values of the sulfuric acid mass density are used in an application of the Lorentz-Lorenz equation, which is used to estimate the sensitivity of extinction coefficients to temperature dependent refractive indices.

  6. Densities, Excess Molar Volumes, Viscosities, and Refractive Indices of Binary Mixtures of n-Butyl Acetate with 1-Chloroalkanes (C4-C8) at 298.15 K

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iloukhani, H.; Khanlarzadeh, K.; Rakhshi, M.

    2011-03-01

    Densities, viscosities, and refractive indices of binary mixtures of n-butyl acetate (1) +1-chlorobutane (2), +1-chloropentane (2), +1-chlorohexane (2), +1-chloroheptane (2), and +1-chlorooctane (2) were measured at 298.15 K for the liquid region and at ambient pressure for the whole composition range. The excess molar volumes V E were calculated from experimental densities. McAllister's three-body interaction, and Hind and Grunberg-Nissan models are used for correlating the viscosity of binary mixtures. The experimental data of binaries are analyzed to discuss the nature and strength of intermolecular interactions in these mixtures.

  7. Molecular interactions and structures in ethylene glycol-ethanol and ethylene glycol-water solutions at 303 K on densities, viscosities, and refractive indices data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deosarkar, S. D.; Ghatbandhe, A. S.

    2014-01-01

    Molecular interactions and structural fittings in binary ethylene glycol + ethanol (EGE, x EG = 0.4111-0.0418) and ethylene glycol + water (EGW, x EG = 0.1771-0.0133) mixtures were studied through the measurement of densities (ρ), viscosities (η), and refractive indices ( n D ) at 303.15 K. Excess viscosities (η E ), molar volumes ( V m ), excess molar volumes ( V {/m E }), and molar retractions ( R M ) of the both binary systems were computed from measured properties. The measured and computed properties have been used to understand the molecular interactions in unlike solvents and structural fittings in these binary mixtures.

  8. Densities, viscosities, and refractive indices of the binary liquid systems n-alkanes + isomers of hexane at 298.15 K

    SciTech Connect

    Aucejo, A.; Burguet, M.C.; Munoz, R.; Marques, J.L.

    1995-07-01

    In this paper the viscosities, densities, and refractive indices of nine binary liquid systems containing n-alkane + isomers of hexane have been determined at 298.15 K. The viscosity values were fitted to the McAllister three-body model and the Redlich-Kister-type equation. The results with these models agree with experimental data with an average absolute deviation of less than 0.6%. The nine binary liquid systems studied were hexadecane with 2-methylpentane, 3-methylpentane, 2,2-dimethylbutane, and 2,3-dimethylbutane; dodecane with 2-methylpentane, 2,2-dimethylbutane, and 2,3-dimethylbutane; and tetradecane with 2-methylpentane and 2,3-dimethylbutane.

  9. Refractive Indices of Gases at Microwave Frequencies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goodhead, D. T.; And Others

    1976-01-01

    Describes a simple microwave interferometer capable of measuring small phase shifts. Proposes laboratory exercises involving the use of the interferometer in the determination of refractive indices of gases and the analysis of the reflection in a test chamber. (Author/CP)

  10. The real part of the refractive indices and effective densities for chemically segregated ambient aerosols in Guangzhou measured by a single-particle aerosol mass spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Guohua; Bi, Xinhui; Qiu, Ning; Han, Bingxue; Lin, Qinhao; Peng, Long; Chen, Duohong; Wang, Xinming; Peng, Ping'an; Sheng, Guoying; Zhou, Zhen

    2016-03-01

    Knowledge on the microphysical properties of atmospheric aerosols is essential to better evaluate their radiative forcing. This paper presents an estimate of the real part of the refractive indices (n) and effective densities (ρeff) of chemically segregated atmospheric aerosols in Guangzhou, China. Vacuum aerodynamic diameter, chemical compositions, and light-scattering intensities of individual particles were simultaneously measured by a single-particle aerosol mass spectrometer (SPAMS) during the fall of 2012. On the basis of Mie theory, n at a wavelength of 532 nm and ρeff were estimated for 17 particle types in four categories: organics (OC), elemental carbon (EC), internally mixed EC and OC (ECOC), and Metal-rich. The results indicate the presence of spherical or nearly spherical shapes for the majority of particle types, whose partial scattering cross-section versus sizes were well fitted to Mie theoretical modeling results. While sharing n in a narrow range (1.47-1.53), majority of particle types exhibited a wide range of ρeff (0.87-1.51 g cm-3). The OC group is associated with the lowest ρeff (0.87-1.07 g cm-3), and the Metal-rich group with the highest ones (1.29-1.51 g cm-3). It is noteworthy that a specific EC type exhibits a complex scattering curve versus size due to the presence of both compact and irregularly shaped particles. Overall, the results on the detailed relationship between physical and chemical properties benefits future research on the impact of aerosols on visibility and climate.

  11. Densities, viscosities, refractive indices, and speeds of sound of the binary mixtures of bis(2-methoxyethyl) ether with nonane, decane, dodecane, tetradecane, and hexadecane at 298. 15, 308. 15, and 318. 15 K

    SciTech Connect

    Aminabhavi, T.M.; Gopalkrishna, B. . Dept. of Chemistry)

    1994-07-01

    Densities, viscosities, refractive indices, and speeds of sound for the boundary mixtures of bis(2-methoxyethyl) ether with nonane, decane, dodecane, tetradecane, and hexadecane have been measured at 298.15, 308.15, and 318.15 K over the entire range of mole fractions. From these results, the excess molar volumes and deviations in viscosity, refractivity, speed of sound, and isentropic compressibility have been calculated. These results are fitted to the Redlich-Kister polynomial relation to estimate the binary interaction parameters. The excess molar volumes and deviations in isentropic compressibility are positive, while the deviations in viscosity, speed of sound, and molar refractivity are negative. The results show a trend with the chain length of the alkanes.

  12. EDITORIAL: Sensitive structures: refractive indices in nanotechnology Sensitive structures: refractive indices in nanotechnology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Demming, Anna

    2012-12-01

    Refractive index effects using nanoscale systems are frequently applied in new imaging, sensing and even visibility cloaking technology. In this issue, researchers in Japan use simulations and experiments to describe the confinement of optical vortices in nanoscale fin structures and the sensitivity of these systems to the refractive index of the surrounding media [1]. The effects of refraction as light rays pass between different media were recorded as long ago as the first century AD, by Ptolemy [2]. Over the following centuries the phenomena inspired Ibn Sahl in 984 [3], Thomas Harriot in 1602 [4], Willebrord Snellius in 1621 [5] and Rene Descartes in 1637 [6] to independently derive the more accurate and elegant equation for refraction so familiar to us today. Recent studies of the interactions between light and matter continue to reveal a wealth of phenomena that originate in the effects of the refractive indices of materials. Nanostructures can be used to manipulate conditions that affect the refractive indices of materials, such as temperature. A E Aliev et al at the University of Texas reported a striking demonstration of temperature-dependent refractive index effects using a free-standing, highly aligned carbon nanotube aerogel sheet [7]. They used the extremely low thermal capacitance and high heat transfer ability of transparent carbon nanotube sheets to enable high-frequency modulation of the sheet temperature over an enormous temperature range. The resulting sharp, rapidly changing gradient of the refractive index in the surrounding liquid or gas makes objects seem to disappear and can be used for visibility cloaking. Light-matter interaction resonances, where light is confined at the nanoscale, can be extremely sensitive to changes in the refractive index of the surrounding media [8], even allowing single-molecule detection [9]. Plasmons, the collective oscillations of electrons in response to incident light, are a typical example. Researchers at Rice

  13. Measuring Variable Refractive Indices Using Digital Photos

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lombardi, S.; Monroy, G.; Testa, I.; Sassi, E.

    2010-01-01

    A new procedure for performing quantitative measurements in teaching optics is presented. Application of the procedure to accurately measure the rate of change of the variable refractive index of a water-denatured alcohol mixture is described. The procedure can also be usefully exploited for measuring the constant refractive index of distilled…

  14. EDITORIAL: Sensitive structures: refractive indices in nanotechnology Sensitive structures: refractive indices in nanotechnology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Demming, Anna

    2012-12-01

    Refractive index effects using nanoscale systems are frequently applied in new imaging, sensing and even visibility cloaking technology. In this issue, researchers in Japan use simulations and experiments to describe the confinement of optical vortices in nanoscale fin structures and the sensitivity of these systems to the refractive index of the surrounding media [1]. The effects of refraction as light rays pass between different media were recorded as long ago as the first century AD, by Ptolemy [2]. Over the following centuries the phenomena inspired Ibn Sahl in 984 [3], Thomas Harriot in 1602 [4], Willebrord Snellius in 1621 [5] and Rene Descartes in 1637 [6] to independently derive the more accurate and elegant equation for refraction so familiar to us today. Recent studies of the interactions between light and matter continue to reveal a wealth of phenomena that originate in the effects of the refractive indices of materials. Nanostructures can be used to manipulate conditions that affect the refractive indices of materials, such as temperature. A E Aliev et al at the University of Texas reported a striking demonstration of temperature-dependent refractive index effects using a free-standing, highly aligned carbon nanotube aerogel sheet [7]. They used the extremely low thermal capacitance and high heat transfer ability of transparent carbon nanotube sheets to enable high-frequency modulation of the sheet temperature over an enormous temperature range. The resulting sharp, rapidly changing gradient of the refractive index in the surrounding liquid or gas makes objects seem to disappear and can be used for visibility cloaking. Light-matter interaction resonances, where light is confined at the nanoscale, can be extremely sensitive to changes in the refractive index of the surrounding media [8], even allowing single-molecule detection [9]. Plasmons, the collective oscillations of electrons in response to incident light, are a typical example. Researchers at Rice

  15. Comment on "Refractive indices of biaxial crystals evaluated from the refractive indices ellipsoid equation"

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hernández-Rodríguez, Cecilio; Fragoso-López, Ana Belén

    2014-02-01

    In 2007 Yin, Zhang and Tian [1] [Yin et al., 2007] derived the expressions of the refractive indices of biaxial crystals evaluated from the refractive indices ellipsoid equation. In the past we have researched about the simultaneous measurement of birefringence and optical activity in different crystals [2] [Hernández-Rodríguez et al., 2000], [3] [Hernández-Rodríguez and Gómez-Garrido, 2000], [4] [Herreros-Cedrés et al., 2003], [5] [Herreros-Cedrés et al., 2005] and [6] [Herreros-Cedrés et al., 2007], and recently, when we used their methods for the study of nonlinear crystals such as KTiOAsO4 (KTA) and KTiOPO4 (KTP), we found some errors in some expressions in their paper which were used by other authors [7] [Gao et al., 2003].

  16. Removing singular refractive indices with sculpted surfaces

    PubMed Central

    Horsley, S. A. R.; Hooper, I. R.; Mitchell–Thomas, R. C.; Quevedo–Teruel, O.

    2014-01-01

    The advent of Transformation Optics established the link between geometry and material properties, and has resulted in a degree of control over electromagnetic fields that was previously impossible. For waves confined to a surface it is known that there is a simpler, but related, geometrical equivalence between the surface shape and the refractive index, and here we demonstrate that conventional devices possessing a singularity — that is, the requirement of an infinite refractive index — can be realised for waves confined to an appropriately sculpted surface. In particular, we redesign three singular omnidirectional devices: the Eaton lens, the generalized Maxwell Fish–Eye, and the invisible sphere. Our designs perfectly reproduce the behaviour of these singular devices, and can be achieved with simple isotropic media of low refractive index contrast. PMID:24786649

  17. Lens Design Using Group Indices of Refraction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vaughan, A. H.

    1995-01-01

    An approach to lens design is described in which the ratio of the group velocity to the speed of light (the group index) in glass is used, in conjunction with the more familiar phase index of refraction, to control certain chromatic properties of a system of thin lenses in contact. The first-order design of thin-lens systems is illustrated by examples incorporating the methods described.

  18. Interferometric Methods of Measuring Refractive Indices and Double-Refraction of Fibres.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hamza, A. A.; El-Kader, H. I. Abd

    1986-01-01

    Presents two methods used to measure the refractive indices and double-refraction of fibers. Experiments are described, with one involving the use of Pluta microscope in the double-beam interference technique, the other employing the multiple-beam technique. Immersion liquids are discussed that can be used in the experiments. (TW)

  19. Intermolecular interaction in plant oils from refractive and density measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andriyevsky, B.; Andriyevska, L.; Piecuch, T.

    2010-12-01

    Refractive indices n and density ρ of three plant oils (Anise, Nigelle, and Juniper berries) have been measured in the temperature range of 10-60°C. The model of the effective electric field E' acting on a molecule in the material, E' = E + x4π P, with the unlimited value of the coefficient of polarization input x has been applied to the analysis of the results obtained. The value x of the oils studied have been found to be in the range of 0.193-0.269, which is smaller than a similar value for water ( x water > 0.3), known as a strong polar liquid.

  20. Refractive Interstellar Scintillation for Flux Density Variations of Two Pulsars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Ai-Zhi; Wu, Xin-Ji; Esamdin, A.

    2003-08-01

    The flux density structure functions of PSRs B0525+21 and B2111+46 are calculated with the refractive interstellar scintillation (RISS) theory. The theoretical curves are in good agreement with observations [Astrophys. J. 539 (2000) 300] (hereafter S2000). The spectra of the electron density fluctuations both are of Kolmogorov spectra. We suggest that the flux density variations observed for these two pulsars are attributed to refractive interstellar scintillation, not to intrinsic variability.

  1. The density and refractive index of adsorbing protein layers.

    PubMed

    Vörös, Janos

    2004-07-01

    The structure of the adsorbing layers of native and denatured proteins (fibrinogen, gamma-immunoglobulin, albumin, and lysozyme) was studied on hydrophilic TiO(2) and hydrophobic Teflon-AF surfaces using the quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation and optical waveguide lightmode spectroscopy techniques. The density and the refractive index of the adsorbing protein layers could be determined from the complementary information provided by the two in situ instruments. The observed density and refractive index changes during the protein-adsorption process indicated the presence of conformational changes (e.g., partial unfolding) in general, especially upon contact with the hydrophobic surface. The structure of the formed layers was found to depend on the size of the proteins and on the experimental conditions. On the TiO(2) surface smaller proteins formed a denser layer than larger ones and the layer of unfolded proteins was less dense than that adsorbed from the native conformation. The hydrophobic surface induced denaturation and resulted in the formation of thin compact protein films of albumin and lysozyme. A linear correlation was found between the quartz crystal microbalance measured dissipation factor and the total water content of the layer, suggesting the existence of a dissipative process that is related to the solvent molecules present inside the adsorbed protein layer. Our measurements indicated that water and solvent molecules not only influence the 3D structure of proteins in solution but also play a crucial role in their adsorption onto surfaces. PMID:15240488

  2. Indications, results, and complications of refractive corneal surgery with lasers.

    PubMed

    Stevens, J D; Steele, A D

    1993-08-01

    Large numbers of patients are being treated for myopia, hyperopia, and astigmatism using the excimer laser. For many patients who are treated for myopia and hyperopia, the procedure is elective and these treatments remain investigational. The use of other lasers for refractive surgery is at an earlier stage, with human trials commencing for infrared lasers. Animal studies are being performed for pulsed picosecond and solid-state ultraviolet lasers. The indications for refractive treatment should be clearly defined, although the results of laser application remain the subject of investigation. Complications of laser application to the cornea occur in the immediate, short-term, and long-term posttreatment period. A continual improvement in refractive results along with a reduction in complications remains the goal of laser refractive research. PMID:10148871

  3. Indications, results, and complications of refractive corneal surgery with lasers.

    PubMed

    Brancato, R; Carones, F

    1994-08-01

    The applications of the current laser technology in refractive surgery have developed during the past year. Several techniques to correct ametropia with various laser sources have been proposed and investigated. To date, using the myopic photorefractive keratectomy excimer laser is the most common technique; it has already been performed on more than 100,000 eyes worldwide. Refractive results on large series of patients with long-term follow-up indicate that the technique is safe, effective, and highly predictable in the correction of low to moderate myopia. Concerns about the treatment of high myopia still arise, especially regarding regression toward myopia and stability of achieved refraction; multizone treatments have been proposed to reach better results. The correction of compound myopic astigmatism with the excimer laser seems to be promising, although long-term results on large series are still pending. Among the patients treated, very few complications occurred. We believe that laser technology will play the most important role in refractive surgery in the future. PMID:10147334

  4. Refractive indices of zinc sulfide and cryolite in multilayer stacks.

    PubMed

    Netterfield, R P

    1976-08-01

    The refractive indices at 633 nm of ZnS and cryolite in multilayer stacks have been determined in the vacuum environment by measurements of the transmittance extrema during deposition. Estimates of the inhomogeneity of index as a function of layer thickness are given. The method gives average index measurements: (1) every lambda/4 for the first ZnS layer, (2) for an initial thickness as small as lambda/16, and thereafter every lambda/4 for the second layer, cryolite. The results are used to monitor the layer thicknesses of ZnS-cryolite multilayer stacks by theoretically predicting the transmittances of the system at the termination of each layer. PMID:20165308

  5. Refractive indices of metal working fluid emulsion components

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glasse, Benjamin; Zerwas, Alexander; Guardani, Roberto; Fritsching, Udo

    2014-03-01

    Metal working fluids (MWF) used in machining processes are typically formulated as oil-in-water emulsions, consisting of an aqueous base with an emulsified oleous phase and additives. These emulsions degenerate over their lifetime leading to changed physical attributes, for instance increased droplet size or concentration. This temporal change may be monitored via optical measurement techniques, which require knowledge of the refractive index of the aqueous and oleous phases for the droplet size measurement. The optical dispersion of the aqueous phase is widely documented in the literature; however, there are no proper references available for the oleous phase for MWF. Thus, in this study the dependence of refractive indices on the wavelength of light of oils that are typically used for the formulation of MWF was determined. The measurements were performed using an Abbe refractometer at room temperature (22 ± 2 °C) in the visible light range at wavelengths between 430 and 680 nm. The results were fitted to the Cauchy dispersion equation describing the optical dispersion of the systems.

  6. Comparison of Methods for Predicting the Compositional Dependence of the Density and Refractive Index of Organic-Aqueous Aerosols.

    PubMed

    Cai, Chen; Miles, Rachael E H; Cotterell, Michael I; Marsh, Aleksandra; Rovelli, Grazia; Rickards, Andrew M J; Zhang, Yun-Hong; Reid, Jonathan P

    2016-08-25

    Representing the physicochemical properties of aerosol particles of complex composition is of crucial importance for understanding and predicting aerosol thermodynamic, kinetic, and optical properties and processes and for interpreting and comparing analysis methods. Here, we consider the representations of the density and refractive index of aqueous-organic aerosol with a particular focus on the dependence of these properties on relative humidity and water content, including an examination of the properties of solution aerosol droplets existing at supersaturated solute concentrations. Using bulk phase measurements of density and refractive index for typical organic aerosol components, we provide robust approaches for the estimation of these properties for aerosol at any intermediate composition between pure water and pure solute. Approximately 70 compounds are considered, including mono-, di- and tricarboxylic acids, alcohols, diols, nitriles, sulfoxides, amides, ethers, sugars, amino acids, aminium sulfates, and polyols. We conclude that the molar refraction mixing rule should be used to predict the refractive index of the solution using a density treatment that assumes ideal mixing or, preferably, a polynomial dependence on the square root of the mass fraction of solute, depending on the solubility limit of the organic component. Although the uncertainties in the density and refractive index predictions depend on the range of subsaturated compositional data available for each compound, typical errors for estimating the solution density and refractive index are less than ±0.1% and ±0.05%, respectively. Owing to the direct connection between molar refraction and the molecular polarizability, along with the availability of group contribution models for predicting molecular polarizability for organic species, our rigorous testing of the molar refraction mixing rule provides a route to predicting refractive indices for aqueous solutions containing organic molecules

  7. Optical constants of ammonium sulfate in the infrared. [stratospheric aerosol refractive and absorption indices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Downing, H. D.; Pinkley, L. W.; Sethna, P. P.; Williams, D.

    1977-01-01

    The infrared spectral reflectance at near normal incidence has been measured for 3.2 M, 2.4 M, and 1.6 M solutions of ammonium sulfate, an aerosol abundant in the stratosphere and also present in the troposphere. Kramers-Kronig analysis was used to determine values of the refractive and absorption indices from the measured spectral reflectance. A synthetic spectrum of crystalline ammonium sulfate was obtained by extrapolation of the absorption index obtained for the solution to the absorber number densities of the NH4 and SO4 ions characteristic of the crystal.

  8. Aqueous ammonium thiocyanate solutions as refractive index-matching fluids with low density and viscosity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borrero-Echeverry, D.; Morrison, B. C. A.

    2016-07-01

    We show that aqueous solutions of ammonium thiocyanate ({NH}4{SCN}) can be used to match the index of refraction of several transparent materials commonly used in experiments, while maintaining low viscosity and density compared to other common refractive index-matching liquids. We present empirical models for estimating the index of refraction, density, and kinematic viscosity of these solutions as a function of temperature and concentration. Finally, we summarize the chemical compatibility of ammonium thiocyanate with materials commonly used in apparatus.

  9. Construction of Lines of Constant Density and Constant Refractive Index for Ternary Liquid Mixtures.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tasic, Aleksandar Z.; Djordjevic, Bojan D.

    1983-01-01

    Demonstrates construction of density constant and refractive index constant lines in triangular coordinate system on basis of systematic experimental determinations of density and refractive index for both homogeneous (single-phase) ternary liquid mixtures (of known composition) and the corresponding binary compositions. Background information,…

  10. RELATIONSHIP OF FLY ASH COMPOSITION, REFRACTIVE INDEX, AND DENSITY TO IN-STACK OPACITY

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report gives results of an investigation of the refractive index, density, and composition of fly ash from coal-fired boilers, aimed at determining: (1) the interrelationship of refractive index and composition, and (2) the significance of ash properties on in-stack plume opa...

  11. The Temperature Changes of Refractive Indices and Thickness of Doped Triglycine Sulfate Crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurlyak, V. Yu.; Stadnyk, V. Y.; Gaba, V. M.; Kohut, Z. O.; Matviishyn, I. M.

    2016-07-01

    The temperature dependences of the optical path difference δΔi and the relative changes in the thickness δli/l of TGS crystals doped with L-threonine are studied. The temperature dependences of the relative changes in the refractive indices δni/(n - 1), coefficients of anisotropy for refractive indices, and linear expansion have been calculated. Characteristic minimum has been detected on these curves near the phase transition temperature.

  12. The effect of impurity on temperature variations in the refractive indices and thickness of TGS crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stadnyk, V. Yo.; Andriyevsky, B. V.; Gaba, V. M.; Kogut, Z. A.

    2016-06-01

    Temperature dependences of optical path difference δΔi and the relative changes in thickness δ l i/ l of TGS crystals doped with L-valine are studied. Temperature dependences of the relative changes in refractive indices δ n i/( n-1) are calculated. The anisotropy coefficients of refractive indices An-1(T) and linear expansion Aα(T) are calculated, and a characteristic minimum of these dependences is found near the phase transition temperature.

  13. Stratospheric aerosol acidity, density, and refractive index deduced from SAGE 2 and NMC temperature data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yue, G. K.; Poole, L. R.; Wang, P.-H.; Chiou, E. W.

    1994-01-01

    Water vapor concentrations obtained by the Stratospheric Aerosol and Gas Experiment 2 (SAGE 2) and collocated temperatures provided by the National Meteorological Center (NMC) from 1986 to 1990 are used to deduce seasonally and zonally averaged acidity, density, and refractive index of stratospheric aerosols. It is found that the weight percentage of sulfuric acid in the aerosols increases from about 60 just above the tropopause to about 86 at 35 km. The density increases from about 1.55 to 1.85 g/cu cm between the same altitude limits. Some seasonal variations of composition and density are evident at high latitudes. The refractive indices at 1.02, 0.694, and 0.532 micrometers increase, respectively, from about 1.425, 1.430, and 1.435 just above the tropopause to about 1.445, 1.455, and 1.458 at altitudes above 27 km, depending on the season and latitude. The aerosol properties presented can be used in models to study the effectiveness of heterogeneous chemistry, the mass loading of stratospheric aerosols, and the extinction and backscatter of aerosols at different wavelengths. Computed aerosol surface areas, rate coefficients for the heterogeneous reaction ClONO2 + H2O yields HOCl + HNO3 and aerosol mass concentrations before and after the Pinatubo eruption in June 1991 are shown as sample applications.

  14. Fiber-type sensor of refractive indices and concentration of liquids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Weigang; Xu, Zhaowen; Yang, Xiang-Peng; Kai, Guiyun; Yuan, Shou-Zhong; Dong, Xiaoyi

    2001-10-01

    A portable and practical fiber-type sensor, with which can determine the refractive index and the concentration of the liquid, has been designed and realized. The method combines simplicity of structure, facility of operation, wide range of measurement and low price. It can be used either by immersing the liquid or by pouring one drop of liquid into the sensing head. The measuring resolution of the refractive index is 1.41 X 10-4 for the refractive indices of 1.33 - 1.70, and the measuring resolution of the concentration is 2.67 X 10-4 for the salt solution and the sugar solution.

  15. Age-dependence of the average and equivalent refractive indices of the crystalline lens

    PubMed Central

    Charman, W. Neil; Atchison, David A.

    2013-01-01

    Lens average and equivalent refractive indices are required for purposes such as lens thickness estimation and optical modeling. We modeled the refractive index gradient as a power function of the normalized distance from lens center. Average index along the lens axis was estimated by integration. Equivalent index was estimated by raytracing through a model eye to establish ocular refraction, and then backward raytracing to determine the constant refractive index yielding the same refraction. Assuming center and edge indices remained constant with age, at 1.415 and 1.37 respectively, average axial refractive index increased (1.408 to 1.411) and equivalent index decreased (1.425 to 1.420) with age increase from 20 to 70 years. These values agree well with experimental estimates based on different techniques, although the latter show considerable scatter. The simple model of index gradient gives reasonable estimates of average and equivalent lens indices, although refinements in modeling and measurements are required. PMID:24466474

  16. Age-dependence of the average and equivalent refractive indices of the crystalline lens.

    PubMed

    Charman, W Neil; Atchison, David A

    2013-12-01

    Lens average and equivalent refractive indices are required for purposes such as lens thickness estimation and optical modeling. We modeled the refractive index gradient as a power function of the normalized distance from lens center. Average index along the lens axis was estimated by integration. Equivalent index was estimated by raytracing through a model eye to establish ocular refraction, and then backward raytracing to determine the constant refractive index yielding the same refraction. Assuming center and edge indices remained constant with age, at 1.415 and 1.37 respectively, average axial refractive index increased (1.408 to 1.411) and equivalent index decreased (1.425 to 1.420) with age increase from 20 to 70 years. These values agree well with experimental estimates based on different techniques, although the latter show considerable scatter. The simple model of index gradient gives reasonable estimates of average and equivalent lens indices, although refinements in modeling and measurements are required. PMID:24466474

  17. Spectral absorption coefficients and imaginary parts of refractive indices of Saharan dust during SAMUM-1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Müller, T.; Schladitz, A.; Massling, A.; Kaaden, N.; Kandler, K.; Wiedensohler, A.

    2009-02-01

    ABSTRACT During the SAMUM-1 experiment, absorption coefficients and imaginary parts of refractive indices of mineral dust particles were investigated in southern Morocco. Main absorbing constituents of airborne samples were identified to be iron oxide and soot. Spectral absorption coefficients were measured using a spectral optical absorption photometer (SOAP) in the wavelength range from 300 to 800 nm with a resolution of 50 nm. A new method that accounts for a loading-dependent correction of fibre filter based absorption photometers, was developed. The imaginary part of the refractive index was determined using Mie calculations from 350 to 800 nm. The spectral absorption coefficient allowed a separation between dust and soot absorption. A correlation analysis showed that the dust absorption coefficient is correlated (R2 up to 0.55) with the particle number concentration for particle diameters larger than 0.5 μm, whereas the coefficient of determination R2 for smaller particles is below 0.1. Refractive indices were derived for both the total aerosol and a dust aerosol that was corrected for soot absorption. Average imaginary parts of refractive indices of the entire aerosol are 7.4 × 10-3, 3.4 × 10-3 and 2.0 × 10-3 at wavelengths of 450, 550 and 650 nm. After a correction for the soot absorption, imaginary parts of refractive indices are 5.1 × 10-3, 1.6 × 10-3 and 4.5 × 10-4.

  18. Investigative Studies of Refractive Indices of Liquids and a Demonstration of Refraction by the Use of a Laser Pointer and a Lazy Susan

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wong, Siu Ling; Mak, Se-yuen

    2008-01-01

    We describe the design of a simple homemade apparatus for the measurement of the refractive indices of liquids and demonstration of refraction. A circular transparent plastic tank and a lazy Susan are held concentrically. A laser pointer is mounted on the lazy Susan with its laser beam pointing radially through the centre of the plastic tank.…

  19. Determination of the Dispersion of the Principal Refractive Indices for Birefringent Polypropylene Films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bezruchenko, V. S.; Murauski, An. A.; Muravsky, Al. A.

    2014-07-01

    We present a novel method for determining the dispersion of the refractive indices of birefringent films, based on treatment of transmission spectra, in which we observe interference of light. The dispersion curves n x (λ) and n y (λ) were determined by treatment of transmission spectra obtained for normal incidence of radiation on a P2-25 birefringent fi lm, and n z (λ) was determined for oblique incidence of radiation. From the results of determination of the dispersions of the principal refractive indices of a birefringent P2-25 polypropylene film (Mogilevkhimvolokno OAO, Belarus), we established that the sample is a negative biaxial retarder with N z = 2.9.

  20. Refractive indices in the whole transmission range of partially deuterated KDP crystals

    SciTech Connect

    Zhu, Lili; Zhang, Xiang; Xu, Mingxia; Liu, Baoan; Ji, Shaohua; Zhang, Lisong; Liu, Fafu; Wang, Zhengping E-mail: zpwang@sdu.edu.cn; Sun, Xun E-mail: zpwang@sdu.edu.cn; Zhou, Hailiang

    2013-11-15

    Refractive indices of partially deuterated potassium dihydrogen phosphate (DKDP) crystals with 55%, 70% and 80% deuterium contents were measured by auto-collimation method at 293 K between 0.254 to 1.529 μm. Dependence of refractive indices of DKDP on deuterium content show different trend in the infrared region as in uv-visible region. Dependence of n{sup 2} (the square of refractive index) on the mole fraction of deuterium shows a difference between pure KDP and partially deuterated KDP. The Sellmeier equations were obtained by the least square method. The non-critical phase matching angles calculated from the fitted formula were in good agreement with laser experiment results, by which the reliability of these Sellmeier equations was confirmed.

  1. Indication of advanced orthokeratology as an additional treatment after refractive surgeries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitsui, Iwane; Yamada, Yoshida

    2005-04-01

    Ortho-K was indicated for twenty-three eyes of thirteen patients after refractive surgeries such as RK(1) ,PRK(2), and LASIK(3). The average of their Uncorrective Visual Acuity (UCVA) after surgeries was 20/30 or worse, and mean spherical equivalent (SE) was -2.42D. They were followed at least two years wearing of Advanced Ortho-K lenses during night. The following studies were examined on their auto-refraction, auto-keratometry, uncorrected and corrected visual acuity, intra-ocular pressure, corneal endothelium, corneal thickness, corneal curvature, and corneal shape for more than two years. 95% of the patients improved in UCVA up to 20/20 or better, 86% of them improved up to 20/15 or better, and 76% of them improved up to 20/10. The mean SEs improved to -1.20+/-1.02D during six months, - 1.03+/-0.83D during one year, and -0.73+/-0.64D during two years. Astigmatism also slightly decreased. Ophthalmologic examinations showed no abnormalities including flap formation, intra-ocular pressure, and endothelium. Among the refractive surgeries as well as RK and PRK, LASIK has been most popularly spread all over the world. However, patient's quality of vision is not always satisfied during and/or after refractive surgeries, because of several complications such as instability of flap formation, unexpected keratoectasia, diffuse lamellar keratitis, epithelial ingrowth, irregularity of corneal surface which caused myopia regression. In such cases, additional surgical procedures should not be indicated easily. However, Ortho-K is safe and effective enough to correct refractive errors still remained or re-appeared after refractive surgeries. It enables to restore the corneal irregularity to the ideal shape.

  2. Passive device based on plastic optical fibers to determine the indices of refraction of liquids.

    PubMed

    Zubia, J; Garitaonaindía, G; Arrúe, J

    2000-02-20

    We have designed and measured a passive device based on plastic optical fibers (POF's) that one can use to determine the indices of refraction of liquids. A complementary software has also been designed to simulate the behavior of the device. We report on the theoretical model developed for the device, its implementation in a simulation software program, and the results of the simulation. A comparison of the experimental and calculated results is also shown and discussed. PMID:18337969

  3. GaAs Refractive Index Dependence On Carrier Density and Optimizing Terahertz Devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Christopher; Wu, Dong Ho; Graber, Benjamin

    GaAs is used for various applications, including high speed transistors, high-efficiency photovoltaic cells, electro-optics and terahertz (THz) emitters and detectors. To date, information on the refractive index of GaAs is available only over a limited wave spectrum of 0.2-17um, where the refractive index varies from 1.3 to 5.0. As detailed information on the refractive index of GaAs at THz frequencies is not available or inadequate for our effort to develop an improved GaAs-based THz emitter, we experimentally investigated the behavior of the refractive index of GaAs for different charge carrier densities, especially with or without the presence of surface plasma. Using a Time Domain THz Spectrometer, which is capable of measuring THz pulses containing a wave spectrum over 100-3000um with a time accuracy better than 6 femtoseconds, we measured the delay of THz pulses traversing through a GaAs substrate of known thickness while modulating the charge carrier concentration. From the experimental data we estimated the refractive index for THz frequencies to vary from 3.5 to 3.8 for different charge carrier concentrations. We will discuss details of our experiments and implications of our experimental results, especially for our GaAs-based THz devices.

  4. Airborne Lidar Point Cloud Density Indices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shih, P. T.; Huang, C.-M.

    2006-12-01

    Airborne lidar is useful for collecting a large volume and high density of points with three dimensional coordinates. Among these points are terrain points, as well as those points located aboveground. For DEM production, the density of the terrain points is an important quality index. While the penetration rate of laser points is dependent on the surface type characteristics, there are also different ways to present the point density. Namely, the point density could be measured by subdividing the surveyed area into cells, then computing the ratio of the number of points in each respective cell to its area. In this case, there will be one density value for each cell. The other method is to construct the TIN, and count the number of triangles in the cell, divided by the area of the cell. Aside from counting the number of triangles, the area of the largest, or the 95% ranking, triangle, could be used as an index as well. The TIN could also be replaced by Voronoi diagrams (Thiessen Polygon), and a polygon with even density could be derived from human interpretation. The nature of these indices is discussed later in this research paper. Examples of different land cover types: bare earth, built-up, low vegetation, low density forest, and high density forest; are extracted from point clouds collected in 2005 by ITRI under a contract from the Ministry of the Interior. It is found that all these indices are capable of reflecting the differences of the land cover type. However, further investigation is necessary to determine which the most descriptive one is.

  5. Volumetric Properties, Viscosities, and Refractive Indices of the Binary Systems 1-Butanol + PEG 200, + PEG 400, and + TEGDME

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Živković, N.; Šerbanović, S.; Kijevčanin, M.; Živković, E.

    2013-06-01

    Densities, viscosities, and refractive indices of three binary systems consisting of 1-butanol with polyethylene glycols of different molecular weights (PEG 200 and PEG 400) or tetraethylene glycol dimethyl ether (TEGDME) were measured at ten temperatures (288.15, 293.15, 298.15, 303.15, 308.15, 313.15, 318.15, 323.15, 328.15, and 333.15) K and atmospheric pressure. Densities of the selected binary mixtures were measured with an Anton Paar DMA 5000 digital vibrating U-tube densimeter, refractive indices were measured with an automatic Anton Paar RXA-156 refractometer, while for viscosity measurements, a digital Stabinger SVM 3000/G2 viscometer was used. From these data, excess molar volumes were calculated and fitted to the Redlich-Kister equation. The obtained results have been analyzed in terms of specific molecular interactions and mixing behavior between mixture components, as well as the influence of temperature on them. Viscosity data were also correlated by Grunberg-Nissan, Eyring-UNIQUAC, three-body McAlister, and Eyring-NRTL models.

  6. QSPR study on refractive indices of solvents commonly used in polymer chemistry using flexible molecular descriptors.

    PubMed

    Fioressi, S E; Bacelo, D E; Cui, W P; Saavedra, L M; Duchowicz, P R

    2015-06-01

    A predictive Quantitative Structure-Property Relationship (QSPR) for the refractive indices of 370 solvents commonly used in the processing and analysis of polymers is presented, using as chemical information descriptors the simplified molecular input line entry system (SMILES). The model employs a flexible molecular descriptor and a conformation-independent approach. Various well-known techniques, such as the use of an external test set of compounds, the cross-validation method, and Y-randomization were used to test and validate the established equations. The predicted values were finally compared with published results from the literature. The simple model proposed correlates the refractive index values with good accuracy, and it is not dependent on 3D-molecular geometries. PMID:26223885

  7. Binary and Ternary Mixtures of Biopolymers and Water: Viscosity, Refractive Index, and Density

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silva, Bárbara Louise L. D.; Costa, Bernardo S.; Garcia-Rojas, Edwin E.

    2016-08-01

    Biopolymers have been the focus of intense research because of their wide applicability. The thermophysical properties of solutions containing biopolymers have fundamental importance for engineering calculations, as well as for thermal load calculations, energy expenditure, and development of new products. In this work, the thermophysical properties of binary and ternary solutions of carboxymethylcellulose and/or high methoxylation pectin and water at different temperatures have been investigated taking into consideration different biopolymer concentrations. The experimental data related to the thermophysical properties were correlated to obtain empirical models that can describe the temperature-concentration combined effect on the density, refractive index, and dynamic viscosity. From data obtained from the experiments, the density, refractive index, and dynamic viscosity increase with increasing biopolymer concentration and decrease with increasing temperature. The polynomial models showed a good fit to the experimental data and high correlation coefficients (R2ge 0.98) for each studied system.

  8. Application of the discrete dipole approximation to very large refractive indices: Filtered coupled dipoles revived.

    PubMed

    Yurkin, Maxim A; Min, Michiel; Hoekstra, Alfons G

    2010-09-01

    We compared three formulations of the discrete dipole approximation (DDA) for simulation of light scattering by particles with refractive indices m=10+10i , 0.1+i , and 1.6+0.01i . These formulations include the filtered coupled dipoles (FCD), the lattice dispersion relation (LDR) and the radiative reaction correction. We compared the number of iterations required for the convergence of the iterative solver (proportional to simulation time) and the accuracy of final results. We showed that the LDR performance for m=10+10i is especially bad, while the FCD is a good option for all cases studied. Moreover, we analyzed the detailed structure of DDA errors and the spectrum of the DDA interaction matrix to understand the performance of the FCD. In particular, this spectrum, obtained with the FCD for particles smaller than the wavelength, falls into the bounds, physically implied for the spectrum of the infinite-dimensional integral scattering operator, contrary to two other DDA formulations. Finally, such extreme refractive indices can now be routinely simulated using modern desktop computers using the publicly available ADDA code, which includes an efficient implementation of the FCD. PMID:21230209

  9. Quantitative Mass Density Image Reconstructed from the Complex X-Ray Refractive Index.

    PubMed

    Mukaide, Taihei; Iida, Atsuo; Watanabe, Masatoshi; Takada, Kazuhiro; Noma, Takashi

    2015-01-01

    We demonstrate a new analytical X-ray computed tomography technique for visualizing and quantifying the mass density of materials comprised of low atomic number elements with unknown atomic ratios. The mass density was obtained from the experimentally observed ratio of the imaginary and real parts of the complex X-ray refractive index. An empirical linear relationship between the X-ray mass attenuation coefficient of the materials and X-ray energy was found for X-ray energies between 8 keV and 30 keV. The mass density image of two polymer fibers was quantified using the proposed technique using a scanning-type X-ray microbeam computed tomography system equipped with a wedge absorber. The reconstructed mass density agrees well with the calculated one. PMID:26114770

  10. Quantitative Mass Density Image Reconstructed from the Complex X-Ray Refractive Index

    PubMed Central

    Mukaide, Taihei; Iida, Atsuo; Watanabe, Masatoshi; Takada, Kazuhiro; Noma, Takashi

    2015-01-01

    We demonstrate a new analytical X-ray computed tomography technique for visualizing and quantifying the mass density of materials comprised of low atomic number elements with unknown atomic ratios. The mass density was obtained from the experimentally observed ratio of the imaginary and real parts of the complex X-ray refractive index. An empirical linear relationship between the X-ray mass attenuation coefficient of the materials and X-ray energy was found for X-ray energies between 8 keV and 30 keV. The mass density image of two polymer fibers was quantified using the proposed technique using a scanning-type X-ray microbeam computed tomography system equipped with a wedge absorber. The reconstructed mass density agrees well with the calculated one. PMID:26114770

  11. Computation of Mass Density Images from X-ray Refraction-Angle Images

    SciTech Connect

    Wernick,M.; Yang, Y.; Mondal, I.; Chapman, D.; Hasnah, M.; Parham, C.; Pisano, E.; Zhong, Z.

    2006-01-01

    In this paper, we investigate the possibility of computing quantitatively accurate images of mass density variations in soft tissue. This is a challenging task, because density variations in soft tissue, such as the breast, can be very subtle. Beginning from an image of refraction angle created by either diffraction-enhanced imaging (DEI) or multiple-image radiography (MIR), we estimate the mass-density image using a constrained least squares (CLS) method. The CLS algorithm yields accurate density estimates while effectively suppressing noise. Our method improves on an analytical method proposed by Hasnah et al (2005 Med. Phys. 32 549-52), which can produce significant artifacts when even a modest level of noise is present. We present a quantitative evaluation study to determine the accuracy with which mass density can be determined in the presence of noise. Based on computer simulations, we find that the mass-density estimation error can be as low as a few per cent for typical density variations found in the breast. Example images computed from less-noisy real data are also shown to illustrate the feasibility of the technique. We anticipate that density imaging may have application in assessment of water content of cartilage resulting from osteoarthritis, in evaluation of bone density, and in mammographic interpretation.

  12. Aqueous ammonium thiocyanate solutions as refractive index-matching fluids with low density and viscosity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morrison, Benjamin C.; Borrero-Echeverry, Daniel

    2015-11-01

    Index-matching fluids play an important role in many fluid dynamics experiments, particularly those involving particle tracking, as they can be used to minimize errors due to distortion from the refraction of light across interfaces of the apparatus. Common index-matching fluids, such as sodium iodide solutions or mineral oils, often have densities or viscosities very different from those of water. This can make them undesirable for use as a working fluid when using commercially available tracer particles or at high Reynolds numbers. A solution of ammonium thiocyanate (NH4SCN) can be used for index-matching common materials such as borosilicate glass and acrylic, and has material properties similar to those of water (ν ~ 1 . 6 cSt and ρ ~ 1 . 1 g/cc). We present an empirical model for predicting the refractive index of aqueous NH4SCN solutions as a function of temperature and NH4SCN concentration that allows experimenters to develop refractive index matching solutions for various common materials. This work was supported by the National Science Foundation (CBET-0853691) and by the James Borders Physics Student Fellowship at Reed College.

  13. Refractive indices of metastable and amorphous phases in Ne +-ion irradiated magnesium-aluminate spinel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Afanasyev-Charkin, I. V.; Cooke, D. W.; Ishimaru, M.; Bennett, B. L.; Gritsyna, V. T.; Williams, J. R.; Sickafus, K. E.

    2001-04-01

    Single-crystal MgAl 2O 4 was subjected to 180 keV Ne +-ion irradiation to fluences of (1, 5, and 10)×10 20 ions/m2. The metastable and amorphous phases induced by irradiation were studied using transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and optical transmission spectroscopy. The thicknesses of implantation-induced layer structures were obtained from TEM observations. This information was then used in conjunction with optical transmission results to deduce the refractive indices of individual structures. It was found that the lowest ion fluence produces a metastable layer with a reduced index of refraction ( n=1.70±0.005) relative to the pristine substrate ( n=1.72), whereas the intermediate fluence induces an amorphous region ( n=1.61±0.01) bounded by metastable regions. The effect of the highest fluence is to increase the thickness of the amorphous layer ( n=1.60±0.01) at the expense of the metastable regions.

  14. Structural properties of aqueous metoprolol succinate solutions. Density, viscosity, and refractive index at 311 K

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deosarkar, S. D.; Kalyankar, T. M.

    2013-06-01

    Density, viscosity and refractive index of aqueous solutions of metoprolol succinate of different concentrations (0.005-0.05 mol dm-3) were measured at 38°C. Apparent molar volume of resultant solutions were calculated and fitted to the Masson's equation and apparent molar volume at infinite dilution was determined graphically. Viscosity data of solutions has been fitted to the Jone-Dole equation and viscosity A- and B-coefficients were determined graphically. Physicochemical data obtained were discussed in terms of molecular interactions.

  15. Modulation instability in a zigzag array of nonlinear waveguides with alternating positive and negative refractive indices

    SciTech Connect

    Dovgiy, A A

    2014-12-31

    The modulation instability is analytically investigated in a zigzag array of tunnel-coupled optical waveguides with alternating refractive indices and Kerr nonlinearity. Particular solutions to a system of coupled nonlinear equations are found. They describe the propagation of electromagnetic waves that are uniform along the waveguide and their instability is studied. It is shown that the coupling coefficient between the waveguides, which are non-nearest neighbours, has a significant effect on the instability of the waves in question. When the coupling coefficient exceeds a certain threshold, the modulation instability disappears regardless of the radiation power. The influence of the ratio of the wave amplitudes in adjacent waveguides to the instability of the particular solutions is studied. Different variants of the nonlinear response in waveguides are considered. The studies performed present a new unusual type of the modulation instability in nonlinear periodic systems. (metamaterials)

  16. Nonlinear waves in an array of zigzag waveguides with alternating positive and negative refractive indices

    SciTech Connect

    Kazantseva, E V; Maimistov, A I

    2013-09-30

    Interaction of coupled waves propagating in a system of waveguides with alternating positive and negative refractive indices is studied theoretically. The zigzag configuration of the waveguides in the array allows communication not only between the nearest neighbours, but also with the waveguides beyond them. It is shown that the spectrum of linear waves in such a waveguide system has a bandgap. Partial solutions are found to the system of coupled waves corresponding to a stationary electromagnetic field pulse that propagates along the array of tunnel-coupled waveguides as a whole. Investigation of the interaction of nonlinear solitary waves has demonstrated numerically the stability of their relatively weak disturbances and collisions with each other. (nanogradient dielectric coatings and metamaterials)

  17. Low hazard refractive index and density-matched fluid for quantitative imaging of concentrated suspensions of particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, W.; Knapp, Y.; Deplano, V.

    2016-05-01

    A novel refractive index and density-matched liquid-solid suspension system taking into account chemical hazard and health concerns was developed and characterized. The solid phase is made of PMMA spheres, the refractive index of which being adapted with a mixture of 2,2'-thiodiethanol and phosphate-buffered saline (PBS), while the density is adapted with a mixture of PBS and glycerol. The proposed chemicals present low hazard characteristics in comparison with former solutions. Data collected from density and refractive index measurements of the solid phase and of the different fluid constituents are used to define a specific ternary mixture adapted to commercial grade micron-size particles. The defined mixture is validated in a micron-sized granular flow experiment. The described method can be applied to other low-density solids.

  18. Real refractive indices of infrared-characterized nitric-acid/ice films: Implications for optical measurements of polar stratospheric clouds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Middlebrook, Ann M.; Berland, Brian S.; George, Steven M.; Tolbert, Margaret A.; Toon, Owen B.

    1994-01-01

    The infrared spectra of nitric-acid/ice films representative of polar stratospheric clouds (PSCs) were collected with simultaneous optical interference measurements to determine the real refractive indices at lambda = 632 nm. Ice and amphorous nitric-acid/ice films were prepared by condensation of water and nitric acid vapors onto a wedged Al2O3 substrate. The real refractive indices of these films were determined from the optical interference of a reflected helium-neon laser during film growth. The indices of the amphorous films varied smoothly from n = 1.30 for ice to n = 1.49 for nitric acid, similar to observations in previous work. We were unable to obtain the refractive index of crystlline films during adsorption because of optical scattering caused by surface roughness. Therefore crystlline nitric acid hydrate films were prepared by annealing amphorous nitric-acid/ice films. Further heating caused desorption of the crystalline hydrate films. During desorption, the refractive indices for ice, NAM (nitric acid monohydrate), alpha- and beta-NAT (nitric acid trihydrate) films were measured using the optical interference technique. In agreement with earlier data, the real refractive indices for ice and NAM determined in desorption were n = 1.30 +/- 0.01 and n = 1.53 +/- 0.03, respectively. The real refractive indices for alpha- and beta-NAT were found to be n = 1.51 +/- 0.01 and n greater than or equal to 1.46, respectively. Our measurements also suggest that the shape of crystalline nitric acid particles may depend on whether they nucleate from the liquid or by vapor deposition. If confirmed by future studies, this observation may provide a means of distinguishing the nucleation mechanism of crystalline PSCs.

  19. Anisotropic light absorption, refractive indices, and orientational order parameter of unidirectionally aligned columnar liquid crystal films.

    PubMed

    Charlet, Emilie; Grelet, Eric

    2008-10-01

    The anisotropic optical properties of thermotropic columnar liquid crystals absorbing in the visible range are investigated for different discotic compounds unidirectionally oriented in open supported thin films. Two methods to monitor the alignment of columnar mesophases in thin films are reported, making possible to achieve either homeotropic anchoring (columns normal to the substrate) by a specific thermal annealing, or unidirectional planar orientation (columns parallel to the substrate) by using a rubbed Teflon coating. The columnar liquid crystal anchoring is found to depend on the nature of the compound, either parallel or perpendicular to the Teflon orientation. Based on this control of the mesophase alignment, the dichroic ratio and the orientational order parameter of oriented samples are measured, and a high order parameter of 0.9 is found in the case of parallel alignment. From the polarized absorption data of the columnar liquid crystal films, the light wavelength dependence of the birefringence and of the real and imaginary parts (refractive index and extinction coefficient, respectively) of the anisotropic optical indices are determined over the whole visible range. PMID:18999445

  20. Stability-indicating HPLC method for the determination of impurities in meprobamate with refractive index detection.

    PubMed

    Karthikeyan, K; Balaji, T S; Shanmugasundaram, P; Chandrasekara Pillai, K

    2010-03-01

    The purpose of this study is to develop and validate a simple, sensitive, and robust high-performance liquid chromagraphic (HPLC) method for the determination of impurities ca. 2-methyl-2-propyl-1,3-propane diol (MP0) and 2-hydroxymethyl-2-methyl pentyl carbamate (MP1) in meprobamate (MEP) drug substance with refractive index (RI) detection. This method utilizes a Zorbax Eclipse XDB C(18) HPLC column, a mobile phase of 80:20 (v/v) 10 mM KH(2)PO(4),-acetonitrile, respectively. The stability-indicating capability of the method has been established by performing stress studies under acidic, basic, oxidation, light, humidity, and thermal conditions. The major degradation products of acid and base hydrolysis are identified as MP0 and MP1. The recovery data obtained for impurities are between 96.0-109.8%. The detection and quantitation limits of this method ranges from 0.009 to 0.017 mg/mL and 0.029 to 0.055 mg/mL, respectively. The relative standard deviation (RSD) for the area at QL is less than 6.1%. Good linearity (r(2) > 0.99) and precision (RSD < 2.2%) have been obtained for MEP, MP0, and MP1. This method has been applied successfully to determine the content of impurities in MEP bulk drug. PMID:20223088

  1. Accurate Measurements of Refractive Indices for Dielectrics in an Undergraduate Optics Laboratory for Science and Engineering Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hsu, Wei-Tai; Bahrim, Cristian

    2009-01-01

    Based on our novel method recently published in the "Am. J. Phys." 77 337-43 (2009) for finding precise values of the indices of refraction for dielectrics from measurements of the polarized light reflected by the surface, in this paper we propose an improved technique for finding Brewster angles with a better precision, of 0.001 degrees, using…

  2. A convenient sol-gel approach to the preparation of nano-porous silica coatings with very low refractive indices.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yulu; Zhao, Chaoxia; Wang, Pingmei; Ye, Longqiang; Luo, Jianhui; Jiang, Bo

    2014-11-18

    Silica coatings with refractive indices as low as 1.10 were prepared via a one-step base-catalysed sol-gel process using methyltriethoxysilane and tetraethoxysilane as co-precursors. No expensive equipment was required and the method did not require etching or high-temperature calcination. PMID:25253239

  3. Complex refractive indices of aerosols retrieved by continuous wave-cavity ring down aerosol spectrometer.

    PubMed

    Lang-Yona, N; Rudich, Y; Segre, E; Dinar, E; Abo-Riziq, A

    2009-03-01

    The major uncertainties associated with the direct impact of aerosols on climate call for fast and accurate characterization of their optical properties. Cavity ring down (CRD) spectroscopy provides highly sensitive measurement of aerosols' extinction coefficients from which the complex refractive index (RI) of the aerosol may be retrieved accurately for spherical particles of known size and number density, thus it is possible to calculate the single scattering albedo and other atmospherically relevant optical parameters. We present a CRD system employing continuous wave (CW) single mode laser. The single mode laser and the high repetition rate obtained significantly improve the sensitivity and reliability of the system, compared to a pulsed laser CRD setup. The detection limit of the CW-CRD system is between 6.67 x 10(-10) cm(-1) for an empty cavity and 3.63 x 10(-9) cm(-1) for 1000 particles per cm(3) inside the cavity, at a 400 Hz sampling and averaging of 2000 shots for one sample measurement taken in 5 s. For typical pulsed-CRD, the detection limit for an empty cavity is less than 3.8 x 10(-9) cm(-1) for 1000 shots averaged over 100 s at 10 Hz. The system was tested for stability, accuracy, and RI retrievals for scattering and absorbing laboratory-generated aerosols. Specifically, the retrieved extinction remains very stable for long measurement times (1 h) with an order of magnitude change in aerosol number concentration. In addition, the optical cross section (sigma(ext)) of a 400 nm polystyrene latex sphere (PSL) was determined within 2% error compared to the calculated value based on Mie theory. The complex RI of PSL, nigrosin, and ammonium sulfate (AS) aerosols were determined by measuring the extinction efficiency (Q(ext)) as a function of the size parameter ((piD)/lambda) and found to be in very good agreement with literature values. A mismatch in the retrieved RI of Suwannee River fulvic acid (SRFA) compared to a previous study was observed and is

  4. Laboratory chamber measurements of the longwave extinction spectra and complex refractive indices of African and Asian mineral dusts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Di Biagio, C.; Formenti, P.; Styler, S. A.; Pangui, E.; Doussin, J.-F.

    2014-09-01

    In this study we present the first results from laboratory chamber experiments newly designed to investigate the longwave optical properties of mineral dust. Extinction spectra in the 2-16 µm range have been measured in situ (T = 293 K, RH < 2%) for polydispersed pure dust aerosols generated from natural parent soils from Tunisia, Niger, and the Gobi desert. Data are used in combination with particle size distributions to estimate the complex refractive index of each dust sample. Our results show that the magnitude and spectral dependence of the dust extinction and refractive indices differ according to particle mineralogy, suggesting the necessity for regionally resolved optical properties for modeling dust radiative effects in the longwave. The magnitude of extinction is controlled by the particle size distribution and remains significant down to low coarse particle concentrations, indicating that the longwave effect of mineral dust persists throughout long-range transport and is thus relevant at the global scale.

  5. The Effects of Experimental Conditions on the Refractive Index and Density of Low-temperature Ices: Solid Carbon Dioxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loeffler, M. J.; Moore, M. H.; Gerakines, P. A.

    2016-08-01

    We present the first study on the effects of the deposition technique on the measurements of the visible refractive index and the density of a low-temperature ice using solid carbon dioxide (CO2) at 14–70 K as an example. While our measurements generally agree with previous studies that show a dependence of index and density on temperature below 50 K, we also find that the measured values depend on the method used to create each sample. Below 50 K, we find that the refractive index varied by as much as 4% and the density by as much as 16% at a single temperature depending on the deposition method. We also show that the Lorentz–Lorenz approximation is valid for solid CO2 across the full 14–70 K temperature range, regardless of the deposition method used. Since the refractive index and density are important in calculations of optical constants and infrared (IR) band strengths of materials, our results suggest that the deposition method must be considered in cases where n vis and ρ are not measured in the same experimental setup where the IR spectral measurements are made.

  6. Moiré deflectometry using the Talbot-Lau interferometer as refraction diagnostic for High Energy Density plasmas at energies below 10 keV

    SciTech Connect

    Valdivia, M. P.; Stutman, D.; Finkenthal, M.

    2014-07-15

    The highly localized density gradients expected in High Energy Density (HED) plasma experiments can be characterized by x-ray phase-contrast imaging in addition to conventional attenuation radiography. Moiré deflectometry using the Talbot-Lau grating interferometer setup is an attractive HED diagnostic due to its high sensitivity to refraction induced phase shifts. We report on the adaptation of such a system for operation in the sub-10 keV range by using a combination of free standing and ultrathin Talbot gratings. This new x-ray energy explored matches well the current x-ray backlighters used for HED experiments, while also enhancing phase effects at lower electron densities. We studied the performance of the high magnification, low energy Talbot-Lau interferometer, for single image phase retrieval using Moiré fringe deflectometry. Our laboratory and simulation studies indicate that such a device is able to retrieve object electron densities from phase shift measurements. Using laboratory x-ray sources from 7 to 15 μm size we obtained accurate simultaneous measurements of refraction and attenuation for both sharp and mild electron density gradients.

  7. Moiré deflectometry using the Talbot-Lau interferometer as refraction diagnostic for High Energy Density plasmas at energies below 10 keV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valdivia, M. P.; Stutman, D.; Finkenthal, M.

    2014-07-01

    The highly localized density gradients expected in High Energy Density (HED) plasma experiments can be characterized by x-ray phase-contrast imaging in addition to conventional attenuation radiography. Moiré deflectometry using the Talbot-Lau grating interferometer setup is an attractive HED diagnostic due to its high sensitivity to refraction induced phase shifts. We report on the adaptation of such a system for operation in the sub-10 keV range by using a combination of free standing and ultrathin Talbot gratings. This new x-ray energy explored matches well the current x-ray backlighters used for HED experiments, while also enhancing phase effects at lower electron densities. We studied the performance of the high magnification, low energy Talbot-Lau interferometer, for single image phase retrieval using Moiré fringe deflectometry. Our laboratory and simulation studies indicate that such a device is able to retrieve object electron densities from phase shift measurements. Using laboratory x-ray sources from 7 to 15 μm size we obtained accurate simultaneous measurements of refraction and attenuation for both sharp and mild electron density gradients.

  8. Moiré deflectometry using the Talbot-Lau interferometer as refraction diagnostic for high energy density plasmas at energies below 10 keV.

    PubMed

    Valdivia, M P; Stutman, D; Finkenthal, M

    2014-07-01

    The highly localized density gradients expected in High Energy Density (HED) plasma experiments can be characterized by x-ray phase-contrast imaging in addition to conventional attenuation radiography. Moiré deflectometry using the Talbot-Lau grating interferometer setup is an attractive HED diagnostic due to its high sensitivity to refraction induced phase shifts. We report on the adaptation of such a system for operation in the sub-10 keV range by using a combination of free standing and ultrathin Talbot gratings. This new x-ray energy explored matches well the current x-ray backlighters used for HED experiments, while also enhancing phase effects at lower electron densities. We studied the performance of the high magnification, low energy Talbot-Lau interferometer, for single image phase retrieval using Moiré fringe deflectometry. Our laboratory and simulation studies indicate that such a device is able to retrieve object electron densities from phase shift measurements. Using laboratory x-ray sources from 7 to 15 μm size we obtained accurate simultaneous measurements of refraction and attenuation for both sharp and mild electron density gradients. PMID:25085141

  9. Scattering of light passing through a statistically rough interface between media with different refractive indices after laser correction of vision

    SciTech Connect

    Semchishen, A V; Seminogov, V N; Semchishen, V A

    2012-04-30

    Forward scattering of light passing through large-scale irregularities of the interface between two media having different refractive indices is considered. An analytical expression for the ratio of intensities of directional and diffusion components of scattered light in the far-field zone is derived. It is theoretically shown that the critical depth of possible interface relief irregularities, starting from which the intensity of the diffuse component in the passing light flow becomes comparable with the directional light component, responsible for the image formation on the eye retina, is 3 - 4 {mu}m, with the increase in the refractive index in the postoperational zone taken into account. These profile depth values agree with the experimentally measured ones and may affect the contrast sensitivity of vision.

  10. Antimony orthophosphate glasses with large nonlinear refractive indices, low two-photon absorption coefficients, and ultrafast response

    SciTech Connect

    Falcao-Filho, E.L.; Araujo, Cid B. de; Bosco, C.A.C.; Maciel, G.S.; Acioli, L.H.; Nalin, M.; Messaddeq, Y.

    2005-01-01

    Antimony glasses based on the composition Sb{sub 2}O{sub 3}-SbPO{sub 4} were prepared and characterized. The samples present high refractive index, good transmission from 380 to 2000 nm, and high thermal stability. The nonlinear refractive index, n{sub 2}, of the samples was studied using the optical Kerr shutter technique at 800 nm. The third-order correlation signals between pump and probe pulses indicate ultrafast response (<100 fs) for all compositions. Enhancement of n{sub 2} was observed by adding lead oxide to the Sb{sub 2}O{sub 3}-SbPO{sub 4} composition. Large values of n{sub 2}{approx_equal}10{sup -14} cm{sup 2}/W and negligible two-photon absorption coefficients (smaller than 0.01 cm/GW) were determined for all samples. The glass compositions studied present appropriate figure-of-merit for all-optical switching applications.

  11. Scattering of light passing through a statistically rough interface between media with different refractive indices after laser correction of vision

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Semchishen, A. V.; Seminogov, V. N.; Semchishen, V. A.

    2012-04-01

    Forward scattering of light passing through large-scale irregularities of the interface between two media having different refractive indices is considered. An analytical expression for the ratio of intensities of directional and diffusion components of scattered light in the far-field zone is derived. It is theoretically shown that the critical depth of possible interface relief irregularities, starting from which the intensity of the diffuse component in the passing light flow becomes comparable with the directional light component, responsible for the image formation on the eye retina, is 3 — 4 μm, with the increase in the refractive index in the postoperational zone taken into account. These profile depth values agree with the experimentally measured ones and may affect the contrast sensitivity of vision.

  12. Temperature dependence of nu3 and nu4 bandwidths and complex refractive indices for crystalline methane

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ngoh, M. A.; Khanna, R. K.; Fox, K.

    1993-01-01

    Infrared spectra of thin films of pure CH4 have been measured for a range of temperatures from 22 to 68 K. The bandwidth for the fundamental nu3 near 3000/cm varies from 12.7 to 33.2/cm, while that for nu4 near 1300/cm varies from 6.2 to 16.0/cm. The real and imaginary parts of the index of refraction also exhibit significant dependence on temperature. These broadband measurements at low temperatures are useful for an understanding of clouds and hazes in the atmosphere of Uranus, clouds and ices in the atmosphere of Titan, and ices on the surfaces of Pluto and Triton.

  13. Dependence on pressure of the refractive indices of wurtzite ZnO, GaN, and AlN

    SciTech Connect

    Goni, AR; Kaess, F; Reparaz, JS; Alonso, MI; Garriga, M; Callsen, G; Wagner, MR; Hoffmann, A; Sitar, Z

    2014-07-25

    We have measured both the ordinary and extraordinary refractive index of m-plane cuts of wurtzite ZnO, GaN, and AlN single crystals at room temperature and as a function of hydrostatic pressure up to 8 GPa. For that purpose we have developed an alternative optical interference method, called bisected-beam method, which leads, in general, to high contrast interference fringes. Its main feature, however, is to be particularly suitable for high pressure experiments with the diamond anvil cell, when the refractive index of the sample is low and similar to that of diamond and/or the pressure transmitting medium, as is the case here. For all three wide-gap materials we observe a monotonous decrease of the ordinary and extraordinary refractive indices with increasing pressure, being most pronounced for GaN, less marked for ZnO, and the smallest for AlN. The frequency dependence of the refractive indices was extrapolated to zero energy using a critical-point-plus-Lorentz-oscillator model of the ordinary and extraordinary dielectric function. In this way, we determined the variation with pressure of the electronic part (no-phonon contribution) of the static dielectric constant epsilon(infinity). Its volume derivative, r = d ln epsilon(infinity)/d ln V, serves as single scaling coefficient for comparison with experimental and/or theoretical results for other semiconductors, regarding the pressure effects on the dielectric properties. We have obtained an ordinary/extraordinary average value (r) over bar of 0.49(15) for ZnO, 1.22(9) for GaN, and 0.32(4) for AlN. With the values for the ordinary and extraordinary case being within experimental uncertainty, there is thus no apparent change in dielectric anisotropy under pressure for these wurtzite semiconductors. Results are discussed in terms of the pressure-dependent electronic band structure of the materials.

  14. Dependence on pressure of the refractive indices of wurtzite ZnO, GaN, and AlN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goñi, A. R.; Kaess, F.; Reparaz, J. S.; Alonso, M. I.; Garriga, M.; Callsen, G.; Wagner, M. R.; Hoffmann, A.; Sitar, Z.

    2014-07-01

    We have measured both the ordinary and extraordinary refractive index of m-plane cuts of wurtzite ZnO, GaN, and AlN single crystals at room temperature and as a function of hydrostatic pressure up to 8 GPa. For that purpose we have developed an alternative optical interference method, called bisected-beam method, which leads, in general, to high contrast interference fringes. Its main feature, however, is to be particularly suitable for high pressure experiments with the diamond anvil cell, when the refractive index of the sample is low and similar to that of diamond and/or the pressure transmitting medium, as is the case here. For all three wide-gap materials we observe a monotonous decrease of the ordinary and extraordinary refractive indices with increasing pressure, being most pronounced for GaN, less marked for ZnO, and the smallest for AlN. The frequency dependence of the refractive indices was extrapolated to zero energy using a critical-point-plus-Lorentz-oscillator model of the ordinary and extraordinary dielectric function. In this way, we determined the variation with pressure of the electronic part (no-phonon contribution) of the static dielectric constant ɛ∞. Its volume derivative, r =dlnɛ∞/dlnV, serves as single scaling coefficient for comparison with experimental and/or theoretical results for other semiconductors, regarding the pressure effects on the dielectric properties. We have obtained an ordinary/extraordinary average value r¯ of 0.49(15) for ZnO, 1.22(9) for GaN, and 0.32(4) for AlN. With the values for the ordinary and extraordinary case being within experimental uncertainty, there is thus no apparent change in dielectric anisotropy under pressure for these wurtzite semiconductors. Results are discussed in terms of the pressure-dependent electronic band structure of the materials.

  15. Simultaneous retrieval of effective refractive index and density from size distribution and light scattering data: weakly absorbing aerosol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kassianov, E.; Barnard, J.; Pekour, M.; Berg, L. K.; Shilling, J.; Flynn, C.; Mei, F.; Jefferson, A.

    2014-05-01

    We propose here a novel approach for retrieving in parallel the effective density and real refractive index of weakly absorbing aerosol from optical and size distribution measurements. Here we define "weakly absorbing" as aerosol single-scattering albedos that exceed 0.95 at 0.5 μm. The required optical measurements are the scattering coefficient and the hemispheric backscatter fraction, obtained in this work from an integrating nephelometer. The required size spectra come from a Scanning Mobility Particle Sizer and an Aerodynamic Particle Sizer. The performance of this approach is first evaluated using a sensitivity study with synthetically generated but measurement-related inputs. The sensitivity study reveals that the proposed approach is robust to random noise; additionally the uncertainties of the retrieval are almost linearly proportional to the measurement errors, and these uncertainties are smaller for the real refractive index than for the effective density. Next, actual measurements are used to evaluate our approach. These measurements include the optical, microphysical, and chemical properties of weakly absorbing aerosol which are representative of a variety of coastal summertime conditions observed during the Two-Column Aerosol Project (TCAP; http://campaign.arm.gov/tcap/). The evaluation includes calculating the root mean square error (RMSE) between the aerosol characteristics retrieved by our approach, and the same quantities calculated using the conventional volume mixing rule for chemical constituents. For dry conditions (defined in this work as relative humidity less than 55%) and sub-micron particles, a very good (RMSE ~ 3%) and reasonable (RMSE ~ 28%) agreement is obtained for the retrieved real refractive index (1.49 ± 0.02) and effective density (1.68 ± 0.21), respectively. Our approach permits discrimination between the retrieved aerosol characteristics of sub-micron and sub-10

  16. Simultaneous Retrieval of Effective Refractive Index and Density from Size Distribution and Light Scattering Data: Weakly-Absorbing Aerosol

    SciTech Connect

    Kassianov, Evgueni I.; Barnard, James C.; Pekour, Mikhail S.; Berg, Larry K.; Shilling, John E.; Flynn, Connor J.; Mei, Fan; Jefferson, Anne

    2014-10-01

    We propose here a novel approach for retrieving in parallel the effective density and real refractive index of weakly absorbing aerosol from optical and size distribution measurements. Here we define “weakly absorbing” as aerosol single-scattering albedos that exceed 0.95 at 0.5 um.The required optical measurements are the scattering coefficient and the hemispheric backscatter fraction, obtained in this work from an integrating nephelometer. The required size spectra come from a Scanning Mobility Particle Sizer and an Aerodynamic Particle Sizer. The performance of this approach is first evaluated using a sensitivity study with synthetically generated but measurement-related inputs. The sensitivity study reveals that the proposed approach is robust to random noise; additionally the uncertainties of the retrieval are almost linearly proportional to the measurement errors, and these uncertainties are smaller for the real refractive index than for the effective density. Next, actual measurements are used to evaluate our approach. These measurements include the optical, microphysical, and chemical properties of weakly absorbing aerosol which are representative of a variety of coastal summertime conditions observed during the Two-Column Aerosol Project (TCAP; http://campaign.arm.gov/tcap/). The evaluation includes calculating the root mean square error (RMSE) between the aerosol characteristics retrieved by our approach, and the same quantities calculated using the conventional volume mixing rule for chemical constituents. For dry conditions (defined in this work as relative humidity less than 55%) and sub-micron particles, a very good (RMSE~3%) and reasonable (RMSE~28%) agreement is obtained for the retrieved real refractive index (1.49±0.02) and effective density (1.68±0.21), respectively. Our approach permits discrimination between the retrieved aerosol characteristics of sub-micron and sub-10micron particles. The evaluation results also reveal that the

  17. Determination of zero incident angle by optical feedback effect and its applications in the measurement of refractive indices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xiao-Kang; Li, Run-Hua

    2009-11-01

    Prisms are involved in many instruments of measurements of refractive indices. The optical feedback effect in a semiconductor laser introduced by the reflection of a prism was applied to the determination of zero incident angle. Without any additional optical components or calibration setups the angular resolution reached 0.00074°. This approach was used in refractometers and prism coupling system. Prisms, water, wintergreen oil and a quartz plate were measured by total internal reflection technique and the optical feedback effect. In the measurement of prism, we proposed that the base angle of a detected prism should be appropriately prepared so as that the refractive index of an isosceles prism made of any material can be precisely measured. The results for a SrTiO3 prism with a base angle 30.0169 degree was 2.3780 at 659 nm. The measurements of water and wintergreen oil were performed by a reference prism made of SrTiO3. We found that the result for a quartz plate wouldn't be influenced by the index matching liquid between the plate and a reference prism, which was intentionally introduced, only if the index of the liquid was larger than that of the quartz. The refractive index of a polymer film was measured accurately and the maximum of deviation from mean was +/-0.0001.

  18. Measurements of refractive indices and thermo-optical coefficients using a white-light Michelson interferometer.

    PubMed

    Rocha, A C P; Silva, J R; Lima, S M; Nunes, L A O; Andrade, L H C

    2016-08-20

    A dispersive white-light Michelson interferometer was used to determine the wavelength dependence of the refractive index (n) in the visible range from 425 to 775 nm and the thermo-optical coefficient (dn/dT) of fused silica (FS) and borosilicate glass (BK7). For FS, the values obtained for n and dn/dT at 546 nm were 1.46079 and 11.3×10-6  K-1, respectively, while the values for BK7 glass were 1.51825 and 2.2×10-6  K-1, respectively, which is in good agreement with the literature. The accuracy of the methodology used for n was almost 10-6, enabling precise spectroscopic characterization of materials across a wide spectral range. PMID:27556983

  19. Infrared band extinctions and complex refractive indices of crystalline C2H2 and C4H2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khanna, R. K.; Ospina, Mario J.; Zhao, Guizhi

    1988-03-01

    Thermal IR absorption intensities are obtained for thin films of crystalline C2H2 and C4H2 at 70 K, and their n and k complex refractive indices are ascertained by separating true film absorption from interface reflection on the basis of an analysis of the transmission spectrum ratio for two sample thicknesses. This method significantly simplifies the n and k iteration process. The n and k values determined in the laboratory will in most cases reproduce a given sample thickness' observed transmission to within + or - 5 percent.

  20. Crystalline sulfur dioxide: Crystal field splittings, absolute band intensities, and complex refractive indices derived from infra-red spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khanna, R. K.; Zhao, Guizhi; Ospina, M. J.; Pearl, J. C.

    The infra-red absorption spectra of thin crystalline films of sulfur dioxide at 90 K are reported in the 2700-450 cm -1 region. The observed multiplicity of the bands in the regions of fundamental modes is attributed to crystal field effects, including factor group and LO—TO splittings, and naturally present minor 34S, 36S and 18O substituted isotopic species. Complex refractive indices determined by an iterative Kramers—Kronig analysis of the extinction data, and absolute band strengths derived from them, are also reported in this region.

  1. Infrared band extinctions and complex refractive indices of crystalline C2H2 and C4H2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Khanna, R. K.; Ospina, Mario J.; Zhao, Guizhi

    1988-01-01

    Thermal IR absorption intensities are obtained for thin films of crystalline C2H2 and C4H2 at 70 K, and their n and k complex refractive indices are ascertained by separating true film absorption from interface reflection on the basis of an analysis of the transmission spectrum ratio for two sample thicknesses. This method significantly simplifies the n and k iteration process. The n and k values determined in the laboratory will in most cases reproduce a given sample thickness' observed transmission to within + or - 5 percent.

  2. Simultaneous retrieval of effective refractive index and density from size distribution and light-scattering data: weakly absorbing aerosol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kassianov, E.; Barnard, J.; Pekour, M.; Berg, L. K.; Shilling, J.; Flynn, C.; Mei, F.; Jefferson, A.

    2014-10-01

    We propose here a novel approach for retrieving in parallel the effective density and real refractive index of weakly absorbing aerosol from optical and size distribution measurements. Here we define "weakly absorbing" as aerosol single-scattering albedos that exceed 0.95 at 0.5 μm. The required optical measurements are the scattering coefficient and the hemispheric backscatter fraction, obtained in this work from an integrating nephelometer. The required size spectra come from mobility and aerodynamic particle size spectrometers commonly referred to as a scanning mobility particle sizer and an aerodynamic particle sizer. The performance of this approach is first evaluated using a sensitivity study with synthetically generated but measurement-related inputs. The sensitivity study reveals that the proposed approach is robust to random noise; additionally the uncertainties of the retrieval are almost linearly proportional to the measurement errors, and these uncertainties are smaller for the real refractive index than for the effective density. Next, actual measurements are used to evaluate our approach. These measurements include the optical, microphysical, and chemical properties of weakly absorbing aerosol which are representative of a variety of coastal summertime conditions observed during the Two-Column Aerosol Project (TCAP; http://campaign.arm.gov/tcap/). The evaluation includes calculating the root mean square error (RMSE) between the aerosol characteristics retrieved by our approach, and the same quantities calculated using the conventional volume mixing rule for chemical constituents. For dry conditions (defined in this work as relative humidity less than 55%) and sub-micron particles, a very good (RMSE ~ 3%) and reasonable (RMSE ~ 28%) agreement is obtained for the retrieved real refractive index (1.49 ± 0.02) and effective density (1.68 ± 0.21), respectively. Our approach permits discrimination between the

  3. Concentration dependences of density, viscosity, refractive index, and other derived properties of metoclopramide aqueous solutions at 303.15 K

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sawale, R. T.; Deosarkar, S. D.; Kalyankar, T. M.

    2015-07-01

    Density ( ρ), viscosity ( η) and refractive index ( n D) of an antiemetic drug metoclopramide (4-amino-5-chloro- N-(2-(diethylamino)ethyl)-2-methoxybenzamide hydrochloride) solutions containing amino acids (glycine, D-alanine, L-cystine and L-histidine) were measured in the concentration range 0.01-0.17 mol/dm3 at 303.15 K. The apparent molar volume (φv) of this drug in aqueous amino acid solutions was calculated from the density data and fitted to the Massons relation, and the partial molar volume φ{v/0} of the drug was determined graphically. The partial molar volumes of transfer (Δtrφ{v/0}) of drug at infinite dilution from pure water to aqueous amino acid solutions were calculated and interpreted in terms of different interactions between the drug and amino acids.

  4. Near-field penetrating optical microscopy: A live cell nanoscale refractive index measurement technique for quantification of internal macromolecular density

    PubMed Central

    Strasser, Samantha Dale; Shekhawat, Gajendra; Rogers, Jeremy D.; Dravid, Vinayak P.; Taflove, Allen; Backman, Vadim

    2012-01-01

    Quantification of intracellular nanoscale macromolecular density distribution is a fundamental aspect to understanding cellular processes. We report a near-field penetrating optical microscopy (NPOM) technique to directly probe the internal nanoscale macromolecular density of biological cells through quantification of intracellular refractive index (RI). NPOM inserts a tapered optical fiber probe to successive depths into an illuminated sample. A 50 nm diameter probe-tip collects signal that exhibits a linear relationship with the sample RI at a spatial resolution of approximately 50 nm for biologically relevant measurements, one order-of-magnitude finer than the Abbe diffraction limit. Live and fixed cell data illustrate the mechanical ability of a 50 nm probe to penetrate biological samples. PMID:22344088

  5. Near-field penetrating optical microscopy: a live cell nanoscale refractive index measurement technique for quantification of internal macromolecular density.

    PubMed

    Strasser, Samantha Dale; Shekhawat, Gajendra; Rogers, Jeremy D; Dravid, Vinayak P; Taflove, Allen; Backman, Vadim

    2012-02-15

    Quantification of intracellular nanoscale macromolecular density distribution is a fundamental aspect to understanding cellular processes. We report a near-field penetrating optical microscopy (NPOM) technique to directly probe the internal nanoscale macromolecular density of biological cells through quantification of intracellular refractive index (RI). NPOM inserts a tapered optical fiber probe to successive depths into an illuminated sample. A 50 nm diameter probe tip collects signal that exhibits a linear relationship with the sample RI at a spatial resolution of approximately 50 nm for biologically relevant measurements, one order of magnitude finer than the Abbe diffraction limit. Live and fixed cell data illustrate the mechanical ability of a 50 nm probe to penetrate biological samples. PMID:22344088

  6. Statistical quality indicators for electron-density maps

    SciTech Connect

    Tickle, Ian J.

    2012-04-01

    A likelihood-based metric for scoring the local agreement of a structure model with the observed electron density is described. The commonly used validation metrics for the local agreement of a structure model with the observed electron density, namely the real-space R (RSR) and the real-space correlation coefficient (RSCC), are reviewed. It is argued that the primary goal of all validation techniques is to verify the accuracy of the model, since precision is an inherent property of the crystal and the data. It is demonstrated that the principal weakness of both of the above metrics is their inability to distinguish the accuracy of the model from its precision. Furthermore, neither of these metrics in their usual implementation indicate the statistical significance of the result. The statistical properties of electron-density maps are reviewed and an improved alternative likelihood-based metric is suggested. This leads naturally to a χ{sup 2} significance test of the difference density using the real-space difference density Z score (RSZD). This is a metric purely of the local model accuracy, as required for effective model validation and structure optimization by practising crystallographers prior to submission of a structure model to the PDB. A new real-space observed density Z score (RSZO) is also proposed; this is a metric purely of the model precision, as a substitute for other precision metrics such as the B factor.

  7. Statistical quality indicators for electron-density maps

    PubMed Central

    Tickle, Ian J.

    2012-01-01

    The commonly used validation metrics for the local agreement of a structure model with the observed electron density, namely the real-space R (RSR) and the real-space correlation coefficient (RSCC), are reviewed. It is argued that the primary goal of all validation techniques is to verify the accuracy of the model, since precision is an inherent property of the crystal and the data. It is demonstrated that the principal weakness of both of the above metrics is their inability to distinguish the accuracy of the model from its precision. Furthermore, neither of these metrics in their usual implementation indicate the statistical significance of the result. The statistical properties of electron-density maps are reviewed and an improved alternative likelihood-based metric is suggested. This leads naturally to a χ2 significance test of the difference density using the real-space difference density Z score (RSZD). This is a metric purely of the local model accuracy, as required for effective model validation and structure optimization by practising crystallographers prior to submission of a structure model to the PDB. A new real-space observed density Z score (RSZO) is also proposed; this is a metric purely of the model precision, as a substitute for other precision metrics such as the B factor. PMID:22505266

  8. Surrogate immiscible liquid pairs with refractive indexes matchable over a wide range of density and viscosity ratios

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saksena, Rajat; Christensen, Kenneth T.; Pearlstein, Arne J.

    2015-08-01

    In liquid-liquid flows, use of optical diagnostics is limited by interphase refractive index mismatch, which leads to optical distortion and complicates data interpretation, and sometimes also by opacity. Both problems can be eliminated using a surrogate pair of immiscible index-matched transparent liquids, whose density and viscosity ratios match corresponding ratios for the original liquid pair. We show that a wide range of density and viscosity ratios is accessible using aqueous solutions of 1,2-propanediol and CsBr (for which index, density, and viscosity are available), and solutions of light and heavy silicone oils and 1-bromooctane (for which we measured the same properties at 119 compositions). For each liquid phase, polynomials in the composition variables, least-squares fitted to index and density and to the logarithm of kinematic viscosity, were used to determine accessible density and viscosity ratios for each matchable index. Index-matched solution pairs can be prepared with density and viscosity ratios equal to those for water-liquid CO2 at 0 °C over a range of pressure (allowing water-liquid CO2 behavior at inconveniently high pressure to be simulated by 1-bar experiments), and for water-crude oil and water-trichloroethylene (avoiding opacity and toxicity problems, respectively), each over a range of temperature. For representative index-matched solutions, equilibration changes index, density, and viscosity only slightly, and mass spectrometry and elemental analysis show that no component of either phase has significant interphase solubility. Finally, procedures are described for iteratively reducing the residual index mismatch in surrogate solution pairs prepared on the basis of approximate polynomial fits to experimental data, and for systematically dealing with nonzero interphase solubility.

  9. Conjugated hyperbranched poly(aryleneethynylene)s: synthesis, photophysical properties, superquenching by explosive, photopatternability, and tunable high refractive indices.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Wang Zhang; Hu, Rongrong; Lam, Jacky W Y; Xie, Ni; Jim, Cathy K W; Tang, Ben Zhong

    2012-03-01

    Triphenylamine (TPA)-based conjugated hyperbranched poly(aryleneethynylene)s (PAEs), hb-P1/2, hb-P1/3, and hb-P1/4, were synthesized with high molecular weights and good solubilities through Sonogashira coupling reactions. These PAEs exhibited outstanding thermal stabilities and different emission behaviors. Tetraphenylethene (TPE)-containing hb-P1/2 fluoresced faintly in THF, although its light emission was enhanced by aggregate formation in aqueous media or in thin films, thereby exhibiting an aggregation-induced emission-enhancement (AIEE) effect. Whereas 1,1,2,3,4,5-hexaphenylsilole (HPS)-bearing hb-P1/3 showed no significant change in emission intensity with increasing water content in aqueous media, hb-P1/4, which consisted of TPA-fluorenone donor-acceptor groups, presented almost identical absorptions, but both positive and negative solvatochromic emissions in various solvents. A superquenching effect was observed in the picric-acid-detection process by using nanosuspensions of hb-P1/2. All of the polymers possessed good film formability. UV irradiation of the thin films induced simultaneous photobleaching and cross-linking, thus making them applicable in the fabrication of 2D and 3D patterns. Furthermore, the polymer films also showed high refractive indices, which were tunable upon exposure to UV light. PMID:22298493

  10. Complex refractive indices in the near-ultraviolet spectral region of biogenic secondary organic aerosol aged with ammonia

    SciTech Connect

    Flores, J. M.; Washenfelder, Rebecca; Adler, Gabriela; Lee, H-J; Segev, Lior; Laskin, Julia; Laskin, Alexander; Nizkorodov, Sergey; Brown, Steven; Rudich, Yinon

    2014-05-14

    Atmospheric absorption by brown carbon aerosol may play an important role in global radiative forcing. Brown carbon arises from both primary and secondary sources, but the mechanisms and reactions for the latter are highly uncertain. One proposed mechanism is the reaction of ammonia or amino acids with carbonyl products in secondary organic aerosol (SOA). We generated SOA in situ by reacting biogenic alkenes (α-pinene, limonene, and α-humulene) with excess ozone, humidifying the resulting aerosol, and reacting the humidified aerosol with gaseous ammonia. We determined the complex refractive indices (RI) in the 360 – 420 nm range for these aerosols using broadband cavity enhanced spectroscopy (BBCES). The average real part (n) of the measured spectral range of the NH3-aged α-pinene SOA increased from n = 1.50 (±0.01) for the unreacted SOA to n = 1.57 (± 0.01) after a 1.5h exposure to 1.9 ppm NH3; whereas,the imaginary component (k) remained below k < 0.001 (± 0.002). For the limonene and α-humulene SOA the real part did not change significantly, and we observed a small change in the imaginary component of the RI. The imaginary component increased from k = 0.0 to an average k= 0.029 (± 0.021) for α-humulene SOA, and from k < 0.001 (± 0.002) to an average k = 0.032 (±0.019) for limonene SOA after a 1.5 h exposure to 1.3 and 1.9 ppm of NH3, respectively. Collected filter samples of the aged and unreacted α-pinene SOA and limonene SOA were analyzed off-line with nanospray desorption electrospray ionization high resolution mass spectrometry (nano-DESI/HR-MS), and in-situ with a Time-of-Fligh Aerosol Mass Spectrometer, confirming that the SOA reacted and that various nitrogen-containing reaction products formed. If we assume that NH3 aging reactions scale linearly with time and concentration, then a 1.5 h reaction with 1 ppm NH3 in the laboratory is equivalent to 24 h reaction with 63 ppbv NH3, indicating that the observed aerosol absorption will be limited

  11. Benchmarking density functional perturbation theory to enable high-throughput screening of materials for dielectric constant and refractive index

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petousis, Ioannis; Chen, Wei; Hautier, Geoffroy; Graf, Tanja; Schladt, Thomas D.; Persson, Kristin A.; Prinz, Fritz B.

    2016-03-01

    We demonstrate a high-throughput density functional perturbation theory (DFPT) methodology capable of screening compounds for their dielectric properties. The electronic and ionic dielectric tensors are calculated for 88 compounds, where the eigenvalues of the total dielectric tensors are compared with single crystal and polycrystalline experimental values reported in the literature. We find that GGA/PBE has a smaller mean average deviation from experiments (MARD=16.2 %) when compared to LDA. The prediction accuracy of DFPT is lowest for compounds that exhibit complex structural relaxation effects (e.g., octahedra rotation in perovskites) and/or strong anharmonicity. Despite some discrepancies between DFPT results and reported experimental values, the high-throughput methodology is found to be useful in identifying interesting compounds by ranking. This is demonstrated by the high Spearman correlation factor (ρ =0.92 ). Finally, we demonstrate that DFPT provides a good estimate for the refractive index of a compound without calculating the frequency dependence of the dielectric matrix (MARD=5.7 %).

  12. Refractive errors in children.

    PubMed

    Tongue, A C

    1987-12-01

    Optical correction of refractive errors in infants and young children is indicated when the refractive errors are sufficiently large to cause unilateral or bilateral amblyopia, if they are impairing the child's ability to function normally, or if the child has accommodative strabismus. Screening for refractive errors is important and should be performed as part of the annual physical examination in all verbal children. Screening for significant refractive errors in preverbal children is more difficult; however, the red reflex test of Bruckner is useful for the detection of anisometropic refractive errors. The photorefraction test, which is an adaptation of Bruckner's red reflex test, may prove to be a useful screening device for detecting bilateral as well as unilateral refractive errors. Objective testing as well as subjective testing enables ophthalmologists to prescribe proper optical correction for refractive errors for infants and children of any age. PMID:3317238

  13. Modeling optical properties of human skin using Mie theory for particles with different size distributions and refractive indices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhandari, A.; Hamre, B.; Frette, Ø.; Stamnes, K.; Stamnes, J. J.

    2011-07-01

    We used size distributions of volume equivalent spherical particles with complex refractive index to model the inherent optical properties (IOPs) in four different layers of human skin at ten different wavelengths in the visible and near-infrared spectral bands. For each layer, we first computed the size-averaged absorption coefficient, scattering coefficient, and asymmetry factor for the collection of particles in a host medium using Mie theory and compared these IOPs in each layer with those obtained from a bio-optical model (BOM). This procedure was repeated, using an optimization scheme, until satisfactory agreement was obtained between the IOPs obtained from the particle size distribution and those given by the BOM. The size distribution as well as the complex refractive index of the particles, obtained from this modeling exercise, can be used to compute the phase matrix, which is an essential input to model polarized light transport in human skin tissue.

  14. Atmospheric refraction: a history

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lehn, Waldemar H.; van der Werf, Siebren

    2005-09-01

    We trace the history of atmospheric refraction from the ancient Greeks up to the time of Kepler. The concept that the atmosphere could refract light entered Western science in the second century B.C. Ptolemy, 300 years later, produced the first clearly defined atmospheric model, containing air of uniform density up to a sharp upper transition to the ether, at which the refraction occurred. Alhazen and Witelo transmitted his knowledge to medieval Europe. The first accurate measurements were made by Tycho Brahe in the 16th century. Finally, Kepler, who was aware of unusually strong refractions, used the Ptolemaic model to explain the first documented and recognized mirage (the Novaya Zemlya effect).

  15. Molecular hydrogen emission as a density and temperature indicator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xiang; Ferland, Gary J.; Baldwin, Jack A.; Loh, Edwin D.; Fabian, Andy C.; Williams, Robin

    2016-01-01

    Infrared observations have discovered a variety of objects, including filaments in the Crab Nebula and cool-core clusters of galaxies, where the 1-0 S(1) line is stronger than the infrared H I lines. A variety of processes could be responsible for this emission. Although many complete shock or PDR calculations of emission have been published, we know of no previous simple calculation that shows the emission spectrum and level populations of thermally excited low-density . We present a range of purely thermal collisional simulations, corresponding to constant gas kinetic temperature at different densities. We consider the cases where the collisions affecting H2 are predominantly with atomic or molecular hydrogen. The resulting level population (often called "excitation") diagrams show that excitation temperatures are sometimes lower than the gas kinetic temperature when the density is too low for the level populations to go to LTE. The atomic case goes to LTE at much lower densities than the molecular case due to larger collision rates. At low densities for the v=1 and 2 vibrational manifolds level populations are quasi-thermal, which could be misinterpreted as showing the gas is in LTE at high density. At low densities for the molecular case the level population diagrams are discontinuous between v=0 and 1 vibrational manifolds and between v=2, J=0, 1 and other higher J levels within the same vibrational manifold. These jumps could be used as density diagnostics. We show how much the H2 mass would be underestimated using the 1-0 S(1) line strength if the density is below that required for LTE. We give diagnostic diagrams showing level populations over a range of density and temperature. The density where the level populations are given by a Boltzmann distribution relative to the total molecular abundance (required to get the correct H2 mass), is shown for various cases. We discuss the implications of these results for the interpretation of H2 observations of the

  16. Probability density functions for use when calculating standardised drought indices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Svensson, Cecilia; Prosdocimi, Ilaria; Hannaford, Jamie

    2015-04-01

    Time series of drought indices like the standardised precipitation index (SPI) and standardised flow index (SFI) require a statistical probability density function to be fitted to the observed (generally monthly) precipitation and river flow data. Once fitted, the quantiles are transformed to a Normal distribution with mean = 0 and standard deviation = 1. These transformed data are the SPI/SFI, which are widely used in drought studies, including for drought monitoring and early warning applications. Different distributions were fitted to rainfall and river flow data accumulated over 1, 3, 6 and 12 months for 121 catchments in the United Kingdom. These catchments represent a range of catchment characteristics in a mid-latitude climate. Both rainfall and river flow data have a lower bound at 0, as rains and flows cannot be negative. Their empirical distributions also tend to have positive skewness, and therefore the Gamma distribution has often been a natural and suitable choice for describing the data statistically. However, after transformation of the data to Normal distributions to obtain the SPIs and SFIs for the 121 catchments, the distributions are rejected in 11% and 19% of cases, respectively, by the Shapiro-Wilk test. Three-parameter distributions traditionally used in hydrological applications, such as the Pearson type 3 for rainfall and the Generalised Logistic and Generalised Extreme Value distributions for river flow, tend to make the transformed data fit better, with rejection rates of 5% or less. However, none of these three-parameter distributions have a lower bound at zero. This means that the lower tail of the fitted distribution may potentially go below zero, which would result in a lower limit to the calculated SPI and SFI values (as observations can never reach into this lower tail of the theoretical distribution). The Tweedie distribution can overcome the problems found when using either the Gamma or the above three-parameter distributions. The

  17. Neural networks to estimate the water content of imidazolium-based ionic liquids using their refractive indices.

    PubMed

    Torrecilla, José S; Tortuero, César; Cancilla, John C; Díaz-Rodríguez, Pablo

    2013-11-15

    A non-linear model has been developed to estimate the water content of 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium tetrafluoroborate, 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium methylsulfate, and 1,3-dimethylimidazolium methylsulfate ionic liquids using their respective refractive index values. The experimental values measured to design the neural network (NN) model were registered at 298.15K. These were determined at different relative humidity values which ranged from 11.1% to 84.3%. The estimated results were compared with experimental measurements of water content obtained by the Karl Fischer technique, and the differences between the real and estimated values were less than 0.06% in the internal validation process. In addition, an external validation test was developed using bibliographical references. In this case, the mean prediction error was less than 5.4%. In light of these results, the NN model shows an acceptable goodness of fit, sufficient robustness, and a more than adequate predictive capacity to estimate the water content of the ILs through the analysis of their refractive index. PMID:24148382

  18. Refractive keratoplasty

    SciTech Connect

    Schwab, I.R. )

    1987-01-01

    This book contains 12 chapters. Some of the titles are: Perspectives on refractive surgery; Radial keratotomy; The refractive aspects of corneal transplantation; Wedge resection and relating incisions; Laser surgery of the cornea; and All plastic corneal lenses.

  19. Refraction test

    MedlinePlus

    ... purpose is to determine whether you have a refractive error (a need for glasses or contact lenses). ... glasses or contact lenses) is normal, then the refractive error is zero (plano) and your vision should ...

  20. Refractive Errors

    MedlinePlus

    ... and lens of your eye helps you focus. Refractive errors are vision problems that happen when the ... cornea, or aging of the lens. Four common refractive errors are Myopia, or nearsightedness - clear vision close ...

  1. Environmental Density vs. Colour Indices of the Low Redshifts Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dobrycheva, D. V.; Melnyk, O. V.; Vavilova, I. B.; Elyiv, A. A.

    2015-06-01

    We have used 3D Voronoi tessellation to determine the environmental density of galaxies from a sample of the SDSS DR9 survey (0.02 < z < 0.1 and mr < 17.7). The sample was divided into two groups: bright central galaxies with Mr < -20.7 (N ~ 120000) and faint satellite galaxies with Mr > -20.7 (N~140000). We characterized the environmental density of the galaxies by the inverse volume of a Voronoi cell. We confirmed a tendency for an evolutionary decrease in the relative number of early galaxy types (with quenched star formation) with increasing redshift. It was also shown that the higher the density of environment near a central galaxy, it is more likely that the central galaxy has an early morphological type. The fraction of early types among the central galaxies is higher (78%) that among the sample of satellite galaxies (26%). In addition, the higher fraction of the central early-type galaxies in the sample, the higher their share in the denser environments.

  2. Gradient Refractive Index Lenses.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morton, N.

    1984-01-01

    Describes the nature of gradient refractive index (GRIN) lenses, focusing on refraction in these materials, focal length of a thin Wood lens, and on manufacturing of such lenses. Indicates that GRIN lenses of small cross section are in limited production with applications suggested for optical communication and photocopying fields. (JN)

  3. Marine seismic refraction data indicate Mesozoic syn-rift volcanism and seafloor-spreading in the northwestern Gulf of Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eddy, Drew; van Avendonk, Harm; Christeson, Gail; Norton, Ian; Karner, Garry; Johnson, Chris; Kneller, Erik; Snedden, John

    2013-04-01

    The Gulf of Mexico is a small ocean basin that formed by continental rifting and seafloor-spreading between North America and the Yucatan Block during the Jurassic to early Cretaceous. The lack of good, deeply-penetrating geophysical data in the Gulf of Mexico has precluded prior reconstructions of the timing and location of the transition from rifting to seafloor-spreading, as well as the degree to which magmatism influenced these geological processes. To illuminate the deep structure of this enigmatic region, we acquired four marine seismic refraction profiles in the northern Gulf of Mexico from the shelf to deep water as part of the Fall 2010 Gulf of Mexico Basin Opening (GUMBO) project. Here, we present the data and resulting seismic velocity structures of two GUMBO profiles in the northwestern Gulf of Mexico. GUMBO Line 1 extends ~330 km offshore south Texas from Matagorda Island across Alaminos Canyon to the central Gulf. GUMBO Line 2 extends ~400 km from the shelf offshore western Louisiana across the Sigsbee Escarpment. On both lines, ocean-bottom seismometers at 10-km spacing recorded 150m-spaced airgun shots over offsets up to 80 km. We use travel times from these long-offset reflections and refractions to image seismic velocities in the sediments, crystalline crust, and upper mantle using a tomographic inversion. On average, seismic velocities increase with depth from 2 km/s near the seafloor to 5 km/s near the interpreted base of salt. On both profiles we observe a large amount of lateral heterogeneity in the sediments due to salt tectonics. The deeper seismic velocity structure along GUMBO Line 1 also exhibits substantial lateral heterogeneity (4.5 km/s to 7 km/s) that may be consistent with crystallization of thin, ultraslow-spreading oceanic crust alternating with emplacement of exhumed mantle lithosphere. If the basement here is indeed oceanic, the prominent magnetic anomaly along the Texas coastline may represent the expression of synrift volcanism

  4. Refractive Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Kellum, Keith

    2000-01-01

    The concept of surgically altering the eye to correct refractive errors has been considered for hundreds of years, but only in the past 60 years has interest grown considerably due to the development of modern refractive surgery techniques such as astigmatic keratotomies to correct astigmatism induced by cataract surgery and future technologies currently being investigated. Modern refractive surgery is more involved than setting the correct parameters on the laser. Patient selection and examination, proper technique, and postoperative follow-up for potential complications are essential for a successful refractive procedure. Critical evaluation of new techniques is vital to avoid the pitfall of overly exuberant enthusiasm for new and unproven methods of refractive surgery. Kellum K. Refractive surgery. The Ochsner Journal 2000; 2:164-167. PMID:21765686

  5. Comparison of refractive indices measured by m-lines and ellipsometry: application to polymer blend and ceramic thin films for gas sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wood, Thomas; Le Rouzo, Judikaël.; Flory, François; Coudray, Paul; Mastelaro, Valmor R.; Pelissari, Pedro; Zilio, Sérgio

    2012-10-01

    Two optical techniques, "m-lines" and spectroscopic ellipsometry, are compared for their suitability for obtaining the wavelength and temperature dispersion of the refractive index of thin film layers used in gas detector devices. Two types of materials often integrated into gas sensors are studied: a polymer organic-inorganic blend deposited by spin-coating typically used in near infra-red waveguides and the ceramic semiconductor SrTi1-xFexO3 (strontium titanate) doped with iron at concentrations x = 0.075 and 0.1 deposited by electron beam deposition. In this paper, we will compare the refractive index dispersion obtained by m-lines and ellipsometry, and comment on the differences between the measured parameters for the two materials. The chromatic dispersion will be represented by a three term Cauchy law. An intuitive method of verifying the measured indices using an integrating sphere and reflexion coefficient modelling techniques will also be demonstrated. Thermo-optic coefficients of the order of -1×10-4/K for both materials are reported, and very low chromatic dispersions are also measured thanks to the high sensitivity of the m-lines technique.

  6. Atmospheric microwave refractivity and refraction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yu, E.; Hodge, D. B.

    1980-01-01

    The atmospheric refractivity can be expressed as a function of temperature, pressure, water vapor content, and operating frequency. Based on twenty-year meteorological data, statistics of the atmospheric refractivity were obtained. These statistics were used to estimate the variation of dispersion, attenuation, and refraction effects on microwave and millimeter wave signals propagating along atmospheric paths. Bending angle, elevation angle error, and range error were also developed for an exponentially tapered, spherical atmosphere.

  7. Atmospheric refraction: a history.

    PubMed

    Lehn, Waldemar H; van der Werf, Siebren

    2005-09-20

    We trace the history of atmospheric refraction from the ancient Greeks up to the time of Kepler. The concept that the atmosphere could refract light entered Western science in the second century B.C. Ptolemy, 300 years later, produced the first clearly defined atmospheric model, containing air of uniform density up to a sharp upper transition to the ether, at which the refraction occurred. Alhazen and Witelo transmitted his knowledge to medieval Europe. The first accurate measurements were made by Tycho Brahe in the 16th century. Finally, Kepler, who was aware of unusually strong refractions, used the Ptolemaic model to explain the first documented and recognized mirage (the Novaya Zemlya effect). PMID:16201423

  8. Spectroscopic refractive indices of monoclinic single crystal and ceramic Lutetium oxyorthosilicate (LSO) from 200 to 850 nm

    SciTech Connect

    Jellison Jr, Gerald Earle; Specht, Eliot D; Boatner, Lynn A; Singh, David J; Melcher, Charles L

    2012-01-01

    The four real values of the dielectric function tensor of the monoclinic crystal Lu2SiO5 or lutetium oxyorthosilicate (LSO) have been determined using generalized ellipsometry from 200 to 850 nm. The three principal values are fit to the Sellmeier model, and they indicate that the band gap of LSO is less than ~9 eV. The off-diagonal element 12 is non-zero over the entire spectrum, but it is very close to zero for wavelengths longer than ~400 nm, indicating that structurally monoclinic LSO is nearly optically orthorhombic in this wavelength region. The spectroscopic dielectric functions of three isotropic ceramic LSO samples are presented, which are consistent with the dielectric functions of single-crystal LSO when the effects of porosity are included. As a comparison, the dielectric functions are also determined using relativistic electronic structure and optical calculations based on the recently developed potential functional of Tran and Blaha (Phys. Rev. Lett. 102, 226401 (2009).)

  9. Uncorrected refractive errors

    PubMed Central

    Naidoo, Kovin S; Jaggernath, Jyoti

    2012-01-01

    Global estimates indicate that more than 2.3 billion people in the world suffer from poor vision due to refractive error; of which 670 million people are considered visually impaired because they do not have access to corrective treatment. Refractive errors, if uncorrected, results in an impaired quality of life for millions of people worldwide, irrespective of their age, sex and ethnicity. Over the past decade, a series of studies using a survey methodology, referred to as Refractive Error Study in Children (RESC), were performed in populations with different ethnic origins and cultural settings. These studies confirmed that the prevalence of uncorrected refractive errors is considerably high for children in low-and-middle-income countries. Furthermore, uncorrected refractive error has been noted to have extensive social and economic impacts, such as limiting educational and employment opportunities of economically active persons, healthy individuals and communities. The key public health challenges presented by uncorrected refractive errors, the leading cause of vision impairment across the world, require urgent attention. To address these issues, it is critical to focus on the development of human resources and sustainable methods of service delivery. This paper discusses three core pillars to addressing the challenges posed by uncorrected refractive errors: Human Resource (HR) Development, Service Development and Social Entrepreneurship. PMID:22944755

  10. Uncorrected refractive errors.

    PubMed

    Naidoo, Kovin S; Jaggernath, Jyoti

    2012-01-01

    Global estimates indicate that more than 2.3 billion people in the world suffer from poor vision due to refractive error; of which 670 million people are considered visually impaired because they do not have access to corrective treatment. Refractive errors, if uncorrected, results in an impaired quality of life for millions of people worldwide, irrespective of their age, sex and ethnicity. Over the past decade, a series of studies using a survey methodology, referred to as Refractive Error Study in Children (RESC), were performed in populations with different ethnic origins and cultural settings. These studies confirmed that the prevalence of uncorrected refractive errors is considerably high for children in low-and-middle-income countries. Furthermore, uncorrected refractive error has been noted to have extensive social and economic impacts, such as limiting educational and employment opportunities of economically active persons, healthy individuals and communities. The key public health challenges presented by uncorrected refractive errors, the leading cause of vision impairment across the world, require urgent attention. To address these issues, it is critical to focus on the development of human resources and sustainable methods of service delivery. This paper discusses three core pillars to addressing the challenges posed by uncorrected refractive errors: Human Resource (HR) Development, Service Development and Social Entrepreneurship. PMID:22944755

  11. Assessment of the sensitivity of core / shell parameters derived using the single-particle soot photometer to density and refractive index

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taylor, J. W.; Allan, J. D.; Liu, D.; Flynn, M.; Weber, R.; Zhang, X.; Lefer, B. L.; Grossberg, N.; Flynn, J.; Coe, H.

    2015-04-01

    Black carbon (BC) is the dominant absorbing aerosol in the atmosphere, and plays an important role in climate and human health. The optical properties and cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) activity of soot depend on the amounts (both relative and absolute) of BC and non-refractory material in the particles. Mixing between these two components is often represented in models by a core / shell coated sphere. The single-particle soot photometer (SP2) is one of, if not the only, instrument capable of reporting distributions of both core size and coating thickness. Most studies combine the SP2's incandescence and 1064 nm scattering data to report coating properties, but to date there is no consistency in the assumed values of density and refractive index of the core that are used in these calculations, which can greatly affect the reported parameters such as coating thickness. Given that such data are providing an important constraint for model comparisons and comparison between large data sets, it is important that this lack of consistency is addressed. In this study we explore the sensitivity of the reported coatings to these parameters. An assessment of the coating properties of freshly emitted, thermodenuded ambient particles demonstrated that a core density of 1.8 g cm-3 and refractive index of (2.26-1.26i) were the most appropriate to use with ambient soot in the Los Angeles area. Using these parameters generated a distribution with median shell / core ratio of 1.02 ± 0.11, corresponding to a median absolute coating thickness of 2 ± 8 nm. The main source of statistical error in the single-particle data was random variation in the incandescence signals. Other than the sensitivity to core refractive index, the incandescence calibration was the main source of uncertainty when optically determining the average coatings. The refractive index of coatings was found to have only a minor influence. This work demonstrates that using this technique the SP2 can accurately

  12. On-the-fly cross flow laser guided separation of aerosol particles based on size, refractive index and density-theoretical analysis.

    PubMed

    Lall, A A; Terray, A; Hart, S J

    2010-12-20

    Laser separation of particles is achieved using forces resulting from the momentum exchange between particles and photons constituting the laser radiation. Particles can experience different optical forces depending on their size and/or optical properties, such as refractive index. Thus, particles can move at different speeds in the presence of an optical force, leading to spatial separations. In this paper, we present a theoretical analysis on laser separation of non-absorbing aerosol particles moving at speeds (1-10 cm/sec) which are several orders of magnitude greater than typical particle speeds used in previous studies in liquid medium. The calculations are presented for particle deflection by a loosely focused Gaussian 1064 nm laser, which simultaneously holds and deflects particles entrained in flow perpendicular to their direction of travel. The gradient force holds the particles against the viscous drag for a short period of time. The scattering force simultaneously pushes the particles, perpendicular to the flow, during this period. Our calculations show particle deflections of over 2500 µm for 15 µm aerosol particles, and a separation of over 1500 µm between 5 µm and 10 µm particles when the laser is operated at 10 W. We show that a separation of about 421 µm can be achieved between two particles of the same size (10 µm) but having a refractive index difference of 0.1. Density based separations are also possible. Two 10 µm particles with a density difference of 600 kg/m3 can be separated by 193 µm. Examples are shown for separation distances between polystyrene, poly(methylmethacrylate), silica and water particles. These large laser guided deflections represent a novel achievement for optical separation in the gas phase. PMID:21196954

  13. UV spectroscopy, refractive indices and elastic properties of the (76 - x) TeO2·9P2O5·15ZnO·xLiNbO3 glass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yousef, El Sayed; Al-Qaisi, Badriah

    2013-05-01

    Tellurite glass with composition (76 - x) TeO2·9P2O5·15ZnO·xLiNbO3 (where x = 12.5, 25, 30 and 35 in mol%) have been prepared by melt-quenching method. The optical properties of the glass were estimated by measuring UV-VIS spectroscopy and refractive indices at different wavelength. From the absorption edge studies, the optical energy gap (Eopt) and Urbach energy (ΔE) has been evaluated. Moreover mechanical properties with structural properties of the glasses were investigated by measuring both longitudinal and shear velocities by using the pulse-echo overlap technique at 5 MHz. The elastic moduli such as: longitudinal (λ), shear (μ), bulk (B) and Young's (Y) increase with the increase in LiNbO3 content in the prepared glasses matrix. The different physical parameters such as density, molar volume, oxygen molar volume, oxygen packing density, molar polarizability, Debye temperature, microhardness, Poisson's ratio, kinetic fragility and fractal bond connectivity have been computed and were found to depend on the glass composition.

  14. Sensitivity of condition indices to changing density in a white-tailed deer population

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sams, M.G.; Lochmiller, R.L.; Qualls, C.W., Jr.; Leslie, David M., Jr.

    1998-01-01

    The ways in which comprehensive condition profiles, incorporating morphometric, histologic, physiologic, and diet quality indices, responded to changes in density of a white-tailed deer (Odocoileus virginianus) population were examined. Changes in these condition indices were monitored in a northeastern Oklahoma deer herd as density declined from peaks of 80 and 72 deer/km2 in 1989 and 1990 (high-density) to lows of 39 and 41 deer/km2 in 1991 and 1992 (reduced-density), respectively. Compared to a reference population (6 deer/km2), deer sampled during high-density exhibited classic signs of nutritional stress such as low body and visceral organ masses (except elevated adrenal gland mass), low fecal nitrogen levels, reduced concentrations of serum albumin, elevated serum creatinine concentrations, and a high prevalence of parasitic infections. Although density declined by one half over the 4-yr study, gross indices of condition (in particular body mass and size) remained largely unchanged. However, selected organ masses, serum albumin and non-protein nitrogen constituents, and fecal nitrogen indices reflected improvements in nutritional status with reductions in density. Many commonly used indices of deer condition (fat reserves, hematocrit, total serum protein, and blood urea nitrogen) were not responsive to fluctuations in density. ?? Wildlife Disease Association 1998.

  15. Applications of the Conceptual Density Functional Theory Indices to Organic Chemistry Reactivity.

    PubMed

    Domingo, Luis R; Ríos-Gutiérrez, Mar; Pérez, Patricia

    2016-01-01

    Theoretical reactivity indices based on the conceptual Density Functional Theory (DFT) have become a powerful tool for the semiquantitative study of organic reactivity. A large number of reactivity indices have been proposed in the literature. Herein, global quantities like the electronic chemical potential μ, the electrophilicity ω and the nucleophilicity N indices, and local condensed indices like the electrophilic P k + and nucleophilic P k - Parr functions, as the most relevant indices for the study of organic reactivity, are discussed. PMID:27294896

  16. Cryogenic Refractive Indices of S-LAH55, S-LAH55V, S-LAH59, S-LAM3, S-NBM51, S-NPH2, S-PHM52, and S-TIH14 Glasses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, Kevin H.; Quijada, Manuel A.; Leviton, Doug

    2015-01-01

    The Transiting Exoplanet Survey Satellite (TESS) is an explorer-class planet finder, whose principal goal is to detect small planets with bright host starts in the solar neighborhood. The TESS payload consists of four identical cameras with seven optical elements each that include various types of Ohara glass substrates. The successful implementation both panchromatic and thermal lens assembly designs for these cameras requires a fairly accurate (up to 1E-6) knowledge of the temperature and wavelength dependence of the refractive index in the wavelength and temperature range of operation. Hence, this paper is devoted to report on measurements of the refractive index over the wavelength range of 0.42-1.15 um and temperature range of 110-310 K for the following Ohara glasses: S-LAH55, S-LAH55V, SLAH59, S-LAM3, S-NBM51, S-NPH2, S-PHM52, and S-TIH14. The measurements were performed utilizing the Cryogenic High Accuracy Refraction Measuring System (CHARMS) facility at NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center. A dense coverage of the absolute refractive index for the title substrates in the aforementioned wavelength and temperature ranges was used to determine the thermo-optic coefficient (dn/dT) and dispersion relation (dn/d lambda) as a function of wavelength and temperature. A comparison of the measured indices with literature values, specifically the temperature-dependent refractive indices of S-PHM52 and S-TIH14, will be presented.

  17. Multiple scattering induced negative refraction of matter waves

    PubMed Central

    Pinsker, Florian

    2016-01-01

    Starting from fundamental multiple scattering theory it is shown that negative refraction indices are feasible for matter waves passing a well-defined ensemble of scatterers. A simple approach to this topic is presented and explicit examples for systems of scatterers in 1D and 3D are stated that imply negative refraction for a generic incoming quantum wave packet. Essential features of the effective scattering field, densities and frequency spectrum of scatterers are considered. Additionally it is shown that negative refraction indices allow perfect transmission of the wave passing the ensemble of scatterers. Finally the concept of the superlens is discussed, since it is based on negative refraction and can be extended to matter waves utilizing the observations presented in this paper which thus paves the way to ‘untouchable’ quantum systems in analogy to cloaking devices for electromagnetic waves. PMID:26857266

  18. Multiple scattering induced negative refraction of matter waves.

    PubMed

    Pinsker, Florian

    2016-01-01

    Starting from fundamental multiple scattering theory it is shown that negative refraction indices are feasible for matter waves passing a well-defined ensemble of scatterers. A simple approach to this topic is presented and explicit examples for systems of scatterers in 1D and 3D are stated that imply negative refraction for a generic incoming quantum wave packet. Essential features of the effective scattering field, densities and frequency spectrum of scatterers are considered. Additionally it is shown that negative refraction indices allow perfect transmission of the wave passing the ensemble of scatterers. Finally the concept of the superlens is discussed, since it is based on negative refraction and can be extended to matter waves utilizing the observations presented in this paper which thus paves the way to 'untouchable' quantum systems in analogy to cloaking devices for electromagnetic waves. PMID:26857266

  19. Investigation of influences of the paraformaldehyde fixation and paraffin embedding removal process on refractive indices and scattering properties of epithelial cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, Jing-Wei; Hsu, Wei-Chen; Tjiu, Jeng-Wei; Chiang, Chun-Pin; Huang, Chao-Wei; Sung, Kung-Bin

    2014-07-01

    The scattering properties and refractive indices (RI) of tissue are important parameters in tissue optics. These parameters can be determined from quantitative phase images of thin slices of tissue blocks. However, the changes in RI and structure of cells due to fixation and paraffin embedding might result in inaccuracies in the estimation of the scattering properties of tissue. In this study, three-dimensional RI distributions of cells were measured using digital holographic microtomography to obtain total scattering cross sections (TSCS) of the cells based on the first-order Born approximation. We investigated the slight loss of dry mass and drastic shrinkage of cells due to paraformaldehyde fixation and paraffin embedding removal processes. We propose a method to compensate for the correlated changes in volume and RI of cells. The results demonstrate that the TSCS of live cells can be estimated using restored cells. The percentage deviation of the TSCS between restored cells and live cells was only -8%. Spatially resolved RI and scattering coefficients of unprocessed oral epithelium ranged from 1.35 to 1.39 and from 100 to 450 cm-1, respectively, estimated from paraffin-embedded oral epithelial tissue after restoration of RI and volume.

  20. Mass-specific optical absorption coefficients and imaginary part of the complex refractive indices of mineral dust components measured by a multi-wavelength photoacoustic spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Utry, N.; Ajtai, T.; Pintér, M.; Tombácz, E.; Illés, E.; Bozóki, Z.; Szabó, G.

    2015-01-01

    Mass-specific optical absorption coefficients (MACs) and the imaginary part (κ) of the refractive indices of various mineral dust components including silicate clays (illite, kaolin and bentonite), oxides (quartz, hematite and rutile), and carbonate (limestone) were determined at the wavelengths of 1064, 532, 355 and 266 nm. The MAC values were calculated from aerosol optical absorption coefficients measured by a multi-wavelength photoacoustic (PA) instrument, the mass concentration and the number size distribution of the generated aerosol samples as well as the size transfer functions of the measuring instruments. Values of κ were calculated from the measured and particle-loss-corrected data by using a Mie-theory-based retrieval algorithm. The determined values could be used for comparisons with calculated wavelength-dependent κ values typically deduced from bulk-phase measurements by using indirect measurement methods. Accordingly, the presented comparison of the measured and calculated aerosol optical absorption spectra revealed the strong need for standardized sample preparation and measurement methodology in case of bulk-phase measurements.

  1. Investigation of influences of the paraformaldehyde fixation and paraffin embedding removal process on refractive indices and scattering properties of epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Su, Jing-Wei; Hsu, Wei-Chen; Tjiu, Jeng-Wei; Chiang, Chun-Pin; Huang, Chao-Wei; Sung, Kung-Bin

    2014-01-01

    The scattering properties and refractive indices (RI) of tissue are important parameters in tissue optics. These parameters can be determined from quantitative phase images of thin slices of tissue blocks. However, the changes in RI and structure of cells due to fixation and paraffin embedding might result in inaccuracies in the estimation of the scattering properties of tissue. In this study, three-dimensional RI distributions of cells were measured using digital holographic microtomography to obtain total scattering cross sections (TSCS) of the cells based on the first-order Born approximation. We investigated the slight loss of dry mass and drastic shrinkage of cells due to paraformaldehyde fixation and paraffin embedding removal processes. We propose a method to compensate for the correlated changes in volume and RI of cells. The results demonstrate that the TSCS of live cells can be estimated using restored cells. The percentage deviation of the TSCS between restored cells and live cells was only −8%. Spatially resolved RI and scattering coefficients of unprocessed oral epithelium ranged from 1.35 to 1.39 and from 100 to 450 cm−1, respectively, estimated from paraffinembedded oral epithelial tissue after restoration of RI and volume. PMID:25069007

  2. Serengeti real estate: density vs. fitness-based indicators of lion habitat quality.

    PubMed

    Mosser, Anna; Fryxell, John M; Eberly, Lynn; Packer, Craig

    2009-10-01

    Habitat quality is typically inferred by assuming a direct relationship between consumer density and resource abundance, although it has been suggested that consumer fitness may be a more accurate measure of habitat quality. We examined density vs. fitness-based measures of habitat quality for lions in the Serengeti National Park, Tanzania. A 40-year average of female reproductive success (yearling cubs per female) was best explained by proximity to river confluences, whereas patterns of productivity (yearling cubs per km(2)) and adult female density (individuals per km(2)) were associated with more general measures of habitat quality and areas of shelter in poor habitat. This suggests that density may not accurately distinguish between high-quality 'source' areas and low-quality sites that merely provide refuges for effectively non-reproductive individuals. Our results indicate that density may be a misleading indicator of real estate value, particularly for populations that do not conform to an ideal free distribution. PMID:19708970

  3. Use of burrow entrances to indicate densities of Townsend's ground squirrels

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Van Horne, Beatrice; Schooley, R.L.; Knick, Steven T.; Olson, G.S.; Burnham, K.P.

    1997-01-01

    Counts of burrow entrances have been positively correlated with densities of semi-fossorial rodents and used as an index of densities. We evaluated their effectiveness in indexing densities of Townsend's ground squirrels (Spermophilus townsendii) in the Snake River Birds of Prey National Conservation Area (SRBOPNCA), Idaho, by comparing burrow entrance densities to densities of ground squirrels estimated from livetrapping in 2 consecutive years over which squirrel populations declined by >75%. We did not detect a consistent relation between burrow entrance counts and ground squirrel density estimates within or among habitat types. Scatter plots indicated that burrow entrances had little predictive power at intermediate densities. Burrow entrance counts did not reflect the magnitude of a between-year density decline. Repeated counts of entrances late in the squirrels' active season varied in a manner that would be difficult to use for calibration of transects sampled only once during this period. Annual persistence of burrow entrances varied between habitats. Trained observers were inconsistent in assigning active-inactive status to entrances. We recommend that burrow entrance counts not be used as measures or indices of ground squirrel densities in shrubsteppe habitats, and that the method be verified thoroughly before being used in other habitats.

  4. Method of producing optical quality glass having a selected refractive index

    DOEpatents

    Poco, John F.; Hrubesh, Lawrence W.

    2000-01-01

    Optical quality glass having a selected refractive index is produced by a two stage drying process. A gel is produced using sol-gel chemistry techniques and first dried by controlled evaporation until the gel volume reaches a pre-selected value. This pre-selected volume determines the density and refractive index of the finally dried gel. The gel is refilled with solvent in a saturated vapor environment, and then dried again by supercritical extraction of the solvent to form a glass. The glass has a refractive index less than the full density of glass, and the range of achievable refractive indices depends on the composition of the glass. Glasses having different refractive indices chosen from an uninterrupted range of values can be produced from a single precursor solution.

  5. Effects of prebiotic, protein level, and stocking density on performance, immunity, and stress indicators of broilers.

    PubMed

    Houshmand, M; Azhar, K; Zulkifli, I; Bejo, M H; Kamyab, A

    2012-02-01

    An experiment was conducted to determine the effects of period on the performance, immunity, and some stress indicators of broilers fed 2 levels of protein and stocked at a normal or high stocking density. Experimental treatments consisted of a 2 × 2 × 2 factorial arrangement with 2 levels of prebiotic (with or without prebiotic), 2 levels of dietary CP [NRC-recommended or low CP level (85% of NRC-recommended level)], and 2 levels of stocking density (10 birds/m(2) as the normal density or 16 birds/m(2) as the high density), for a total of 8 treatments. Each treatment had 5 replicates (cages). Birds were reared in 3-tiered battery cages with wire floors in an open-sided housing system under natural tropical conditions. Housing and general management practices were similar for all treatment groups. Starter and finisher diets in mash form were fed from 1 to 21 d and 22 to 42 d of age, respectively. Supplementation with a prebiotic had no significant effect on performance, immunity, and stress indicators (blood glucose, cholesterol, corticosterone, and heterophil:lymphocyte ratio). Protein level significantly influenced broiler performance but did not affect immunity or stress indicators (except for cholesterol level). The normal stocking density resulted in better FCR and also higher antibody titer against Newcastle disease compared with the high stocking density. However, density had no significant effect on blood levels of glucose, cholesterol, corticosterone, and the heterophil:lymphocyte ratio. Significant interactions between protein level and stocking density were observed for BW gain and final BW. The results indicated that, under the conditions of this experiment, dietary addition of a prebiotic had no significant effect on the performance, immunity, and stress indicators of broilers. PMID:22252353

  6. Facts about Refractive Errors

    MedlinePlus

    ... the lens can cause refractive errors. What is refraction? Refraction is the bending of light as it passes ... rays entering the eye, causing a more precise refraction or focus. In many cases, contact lenses provide ...

  7. A New Empirical Thermospheric Density Model JB2006 using New Solar Indices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bowman, Bruce R.; Tobiska, W. Kent; Marcos, Frank A.

    2006-01-01

    A new empirical atmospheric density model is developed using the CIRA72 (Jacchia 71) model as the basis for the diffusion equations. New solar indices based on orbit based sensor data are used for the solar irradiances in the extreme and far ultraviolet wavelengths. New exospheric temperature and semiannual density equations are employed to represent the major thermospheric density variations. Temperature correction equations are also developed for diurnal and latitudinal effects, and finally density correction factors are used for model corrections required at high altitude (1500-4000 km). The new model, Jacchia-Bowman 2006, is validated through comparisons of accurate daily density drag data previously computed for numerous satellite. For 400 km altitude the standard deviation of 16% for the standard Jacchia model is reduced to 10% for the new JB2006 model for periods of low geomagnetic storm activity.

  8. QPCR Determined Fecal Indicator Bacterial Densities in Marine Waters from Two Recreational Beaches

    EPA Science Inventory

    The use of real-time qPCR to determine fecal indicator bacteria (FIB) densities is currently being investigated by the U.S. EPA. The present recreational water quality guidelines, based on culturable FIB, prevent same day determinations of water quality whereas results from the ...

  9. Cryogenic Refractive Indices of S-LAH55, S-LAH55V, S-LAH59, S-LAM3, S-NBM51, S-NPH2, S-PHM52, and S-TIH14 Glasses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, Kevin H.; Quijada, Manuel A.; Leviton, Douglas B.

    2015-01-01

    The Transiting Exoplanet Survey Satellite (TESS) is an explorer-class planet finder, whose principal goal is to detect small planets with bright host starts in the solar neighborhood. The TESS payload consists of four identical cameras and a Data Handling Unit (DHU) fitted with CCD detectors and associated electronics. Each camera consist of a lens assembly with seven optical elements that include various types of Ohara glass substrates. The successful implementation of a panchromatic and a thermal lens assembly design for these cameras requires a fairly accurate (up to 0.000001 (1e-6)) knowledge of the temperature- and wavelength-dependent of the refractive index in the wavelength and temperature range of operation. Hence, this paper is devoted to report on measurements of the refractive index over the wavelength range of 0.42-1.15 micrometers and temperature range of 110-300 K for the following Ohara glasses: S-LAH55, S-LAH55V, S-LAH59, S-LAM3, S-NBM51, S-NPH2, S-PHM52, and S-TIH14. The measurements were performed utilizing the Cryogenic High Accuracy Refraction Measuring System (CHARMS) facility at NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center. A dense coverage of the absolute refractive index for all these substrates in the aforementioned wavelength and temperature ranges was used to determine the thermo-optic coefficient (dndT) and dispersion relation (dnd) as a function of wavelength and temperature. A comparison of the measured indices with literature values, specifically the temperature-dependent refractive indices of S-PHM52 and S-TIH14 reported by Yamamuro et al. [Yamamuro et al., Opt. Eng. 45(8), 083401 (2006)], will be presented.

  10. Effects of refractive index mismatch in optical CT imaging of polymer gel dosimeters

    SciTech Connect

    Manjappa, Rakesh; Makki S, Sharath; Kanhirodan, Rajan; Kumar, Rajesh

    2015-02-15

    Purpose: Proposing an image reconstruction technique, algebraic reconstruction technique-refraction correction (ART-rc). The proposed method takes care of refractive index mismatches present in gel dosimeter scanner at the boundary, and also corrects for the interior ray refraction. Polymer gel dosimeters with high dose regions have higher refractive index and optical density compared to the background medium, these changes in refractive index at high dose results in interior ray bending. Methods: The inclusion of the effects of refraction is an important step in reconstruction of optical density in gel dosimeters. The proposed ray tracing algorithm models the interior multiple refraction at the inhomogeneities. Jacob’s ray tracing algorithm has been modified to calculate the pathlengths of the ray that traverses through the higher dose regions. The algorithm computes the length of the ray in each pixel along its path and is used as the weight matrix. Algebraic reconstruction technique and pixel based reconstruction algorithms are used for solving the reconstruction problem. The proposed method is tested with numerical phantoms for various noise levels. The experimental dosimetric results are also presented. Results: The results show that the proposed scheme ART-rc is able to reconstruct optical density inside the dosimeter better than the results obtained using filtered backprojection and conventional algebraic reconstruction approaches. The quantitative improvement using ART-rc is evaluated using gamma-index. The refraction errors due to regions of different refractive indices are discussed. The effects of modeling of interior refraction in the dose region are presented. Conclusions: The errors propagated due to multiple refraction effects have been modeled and the improvements in reconstruction using proposed model is presented. The refractive index of the dosimeter has a mismatch with the surrounding medium (for dry air or water scanning). The algorithm

  11. Effects of stocking density on behavior, productivity, and comfort indices of lactating dairy cows.

    PubMed

    Wang, F X; Shao, D F; Li, S L; Wang, Y J; Azarfar, A; Cao, Z J

    2016-05-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the effects of different stocking densities of 82 (0.82 cows per freestall and feed bin), 100, and 129% on behavior, productivity, and comfort indices of lactating Holstein dairy cows. Twenty-seven lactating cows (15 primiparous and 12 multiparous) were assigned to 1 of the 3 treatments, which were balanced for parity, milk yield, days in milk, and body weight in a 3×3 Latin square design with 14-d periods. After 7 d of adaptation to the treatments, lying time and bouts were recorded at 1-min intervals for 3 d, DMI and feeding time were monitored electronically by feed bins, and rumination time was quantified at 2-h periods for 5 d during each period. The cow comfort index, stall standing index, stall perching index, and stall use index (SUI) were calculated using 10-min scan samples of video recording from d 8 to 10 of each period. Milk yield was recorded from d 8 to 12 and milk composition was determined from composite samples on d 12 in each period. Daily lying time, lying bouts, and bout duration did not differ among the stocking densities. The ratio of lying time ≥12 h/d (the number of cows with daily lying time ≥12 h/d divided by number of cows per pen) was higher for cows housed at 82% stocking density compared with those housed at 100% stocking density, with stocking density of 129% intermediate. Hourly lying time was lower at 100% stocking density compared with 82 and 129% stocking densities during the peak period (2300-0400 h), determined based on diurnal pattern of lying time. Daily dry matter intake, feeding time, and feeding rate were not affected by stocking density. After morning milking, dry matter intake and feeding time was reduced at 129 versus 82% stocking density during peak feeding time (0600-0800 h), determined based on diurnal patterns of feeding behavior. Stocking density had no effect on rumination time, milk yield and milk composition. The ratio of SUI ≥85% (mean of the number of SUI

  12. Amphipod densities and indices of wetland quality across the upper-Midwest, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Anteau, M.J.; Afton, A.D.

    2008-01-01

    Nutritional, behavioral, and diet data for lesser scaup (Aythya affinis [Eyton, 1838]) indicates that there has been a decrease in amphipod (Gammarus lacustris [G. O. Sars, 1863] and Hyalella azteca [Saussure, 1858]) density and wetland quality throughout the upper-Midwest, USA. Accordingly, we estimated densities of Gammarus and Hyalella in six eco-physiographic regions of Iowa, Minnesota, and North Dakota; 356 randomly selected semipermanent and permanent wetlands were sampled during springs 2004 and 2005. We also examined indices of wetland quality (e.g., turbidity, fish communities, aquatic vegetation) among regions in a random subset of these wetlands (n = 267). Gammarus and Hyalella were present in 19% and 54% of wetlands sampled, respectively. Gammarus and Hyalella densities in North Dakota were higher than those in Iowa and Minnesota. Although historical data are limited, our regional mean (1 to 12 m-3) amphipod densities (Gammarus + Hyalella) were markedly lower than any of the historical density estimates. Fish, important predators of amphipods, occurred in 31%-45% of wetlands in North Dakota, 84% of wetlands in the Red River Valley, and 74%-84% of wetlands in Iowa and Minnesota. Turbidity in wetlands of Minnesota Morainal (4.0 NTU geometric mean) and Red River Valley (6.1 NTU) regions appeared low relative to that of the rest of the upper-Midwest (13.2-17.5 NTU). We conclude that observed estimates of amphipods, fish, and turbidity are consistent with low wetland quality, which has resulted in lower food availability for various wildlife species, especially lesser scaup, which use these wetlands in the upper-Midwest. ?? 2008, The Society of Wetland Scientists.

  13. The Development of New Solar Indices for use in Thermospheric Density Modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tobiska, W. Kent; Bouwer, S. Dave; Bowman, Bruce R.

    2006-01-01

    New solar indices have been developed to improve thermospheric density modeling for research and operational purposes. Out of 11 new and 4 legacy indices and proxies, we have selected three (F10.7, S10.7, and M10.7) for use in the new JB2006 empirical thermospheric density model. In this work, we report on the development of these solar irradiance indices. The rationale for their use, their definitions, and their characteristics, including the ISO 21348 spectral category and sub-category, wavelength range, solar source temperature region, solar source feature, altitude region of terrestrial atmosphere absorption at unit optical depth, and terrestrial atmosphere thermal processes in the region of maximum energy absorption, are described. We also summarize for each solar index, the facility and instrument(s) used to observe the solar emission, the time frame over which the data exist, the measurement cadence, the data latency, and the research as well as operational availability. The new solar indices are provided in forecast (http://SpaceWx.com) as well as real-time and historical (http://sol.spacenvironment.net/jb2006/) time frames. We describe the forecast methodology, compare results with actual data for active and quiet solar conditions, and compare improvements in F10.7 forecasting with legacy High Accuracy Satellite Drag Model (HASDM) and NOAA SEC forecasts.

  14. The development of new solar indices for use in thermospheric density modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tobiska, W. Kent; Bouwer, S. Dave; Bowman, Bruce R.

    2008-03-01

    New solar indices have been developed to improve thermospheric density modeling for research and operational purposes. Out of 11 new and 4 legacy indices and proxies, we have selected 3 (F10.7, S10.7, and M10.7) for use in the new JB2006 empirical thermospheric density model. In this work, we report on the development of these solar irradiance indices. The rationale for their use, their definitions, and their characteristics, including the IS 21348:2007 spectral category and sub-category, wavelength range, solar source temperature region, solar source feature, altitude region of terrestrial atmosphere absorption at unit optical depth, and terrestrial atmosphere thermal processes in the region of maximum energy absorption, are described. We also summarize for each solar index the facility and instrument(s) used to observe the solar emission, the time frame over which the data exist, the measurement cadence, the data latency, and the research as well as operational availability. The new solar indices are provided in forecast as well as real time and historical time frames (http://SpaceWx.com JB2006 Quicklink). We describe the forecast methodology, compare results with actual data for active and quiet solar conditions, and compare improvements in F10.7 forecasting with legacy HASDM and NOAA SWPC forecasts.

  15. The dipole moment of the spin density as a local indicator for phase transitions

    PubMed Central

    Schmitz, D.; Schmitz-Antoniak, C.; Warland, A.; Darbandi, M.; Haldar, S.; Bhandary, S.; Eriksson, O.; Sanyal, B.; Wende, H.

    2014-01-01

    The intra-atomic magnetic dipole moment - frequently called 〈Tz〉 term - plays an important role in the determination of spin magnetic moments by x-ray absorption spectroscopy for systems with nonspherical spin density distributions. In this work, we present the dipole moment as a sensitive monitor to changes in the electronic structure in the vicinity of a phase transiton. In particular, we studied the dipole moment at the Fe2+ and Fe3+ sites of magnetite as an indicator for the Verwey transition by a combination of x-ray magnetic circular dichroism and density functional theory. Our experimental results prove that there exists a local change in the electronic structure at temperatures above the Verwey transition correlated to the known spin reorientation. Furthermore, it is shown that measurement of the dipole moment is a powerful tool to observe this transition in small magnetite nanoparticles for which it is usually screened by blocking effects in classical magnetometry. PMID:25041757

  16. Assessment of bone mineral density in the jaws and its relationship to radiomorphometric indices

    PubMed Central

    Gulsahi, A; Paksoy, CS; Ozden, S; Kucuk, NO; Cebeci, ARI; Genc, Y

    2010-01-01

    Objectives The aim of this study was to evaluate maxillary, mandibular and femoral neck bone mineral density using dual energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA) and to determine any correlation between the bone mineral density of the jaws and panoramic radiomorphometric indices. Methods 49 edentulous patients (18 males and 31 females) aged between 41 and 78 years (mean age 60.2 ± 11.04) were examined by panoramic radiography. Bone mineral density (BMD) of the jaws and femoral neck was measured with a DXA; bone mineral density was calculated at the anterior, premolar and molar regions of the maxilla and mandible. Results The mean maxillary molar BMD (0.45 g cm−2) was significantly greater than the maxillary anterior and premolar BMD (0.31 g cm−2, P < 0.05). Furthermore, the mean mandibular anterior and premolar BMD (1.39 g cm−2 and 1.28 g cm−2, respectively) was significantly greater than the mean mandibular molar BMD (1.09 g cm−2, P < 0.01). Although BMD in the maxillary anterior and premolar regions were correlated, BMD in all the mandibular regions were highly correlated. Maxillary and mandibular BMD were not correlated with femoral BMD. In addition, mandibular cortical index (MCI) classification, mental index (MI) or panoramic mandibular index (PMI) values were not significantly correlated with the maxillary and mandibular BMDs (P > 0.05). Conclusions The BMD in this study was highest in the mandibular anterior region and lowest in the maxillary anterior and premolar regions. The BMD of the jaws was not correlated with either femoral BMD or panoramic radiomorphometric indices. PMID:20587652

  17. Photon-Refracting Aerogel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rice, Daniel

    2012-10-01

    A threshold aerogel Cherenkov detector is being constructed at CUA to allow for the study of kaons in experiments at the Jefferson Laboratory. These subatomic particles move faster than light through the aerogel material, emitting Cherenkov radiation. Photomultiplier Tubes (PMTs) convert the photons from the Cherenkov radiation into electrons and multiply the electrons sufficiently to get a readable electronic signal, which can be analyzed. An important part of a threshold aerogel Cherenkov detector is its use of aerogel material of several refractive indices to cover the full dynamic range over which one wants to detect the particles of interest (in this case the kaon). Uniform coverage in refractive index is important as the location of the incoming particle will not be constant throughout the testing. In addition to testing for uniform coverage, we must also verify these refractive indices to ensure that the particles we are detecting are in fact kaons. The last test on the aerogel that needs to be performed is the measurement of transparency. Although aerogel is highly transparent, it is still necessary to find the amount of light being absorbed, reflected, or scattered versus how much will actually be measured by the PMTs used.

  18. Kernel Density Surface Modelling as a Means to Identify Significant Concentrations of Vulnerable Marine Ecosystem Indicators

    PubMed Central

    Kenchington, Ellen; Murillo, Francisco Javier; Lirette, Camille; Sacau, Mar; Koen-Alonso, Mariano; Kenny, Andrew; Ollerhead, Neil; Wareham, Vonda; Beazley, Lindsay

    2014-01-01

    The United Nations General Assembly Resolution 61/105, concerning sustainable fisheries in the marine ecosystem, calls for the protection of vulnerable marine ecosystems (VME) from destructive fishing practices. Subsequently, the Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO) produced guidelines for identification of VME indicator species/taxa to assist in the implementation of the resolution, but recommended the development of case-specific operational definitions for their application. We applied kernel density estimation (KDE) to research vessel trawl survey data from inside the fishing footprint of the Northwest Atlantic Fisheries Organization (NAFO) Regulatory Area in the high seas of the northwest Atlantic to create biomass density surfaces for four VME indicator taxa: large-sized sponges, sea pens, small and large gorgonian corals. These VME indicator taxa were identified previously by NAFO using the fragility, life history characteristics and structural complexity criteria presented by FAO, along with an evaluation of their recovery trajectories. KDE, a non-parametric neighbour-based smoothing function, has been used previously in ecology to identify hotspots, that is, areas of relatively high biomass/abundance. We present a novel approach of examining relative changes in area under polygons created from encircling successive biomass categories on the KDE surface to identify “significant concentrations” of biomass, which we equate to VMEs. This allows identification of the VMEs from the broader distribution of the species in the study area. We provide independent assessments of the VMEs so identified using underwater images, benthic sampling with other gear types (dredges, cores), and/or published species distribution models of probability of occurrence, as available. For each VME indicator taxon we provide a brief review of their ecological function which will be important in future assessments of significant adverse impact on these habitats here and

  19. Kernel density surface modelling as a means to identify significant concentrations of vulnerable marine ecosystem indicators.

    PubMed

    Kenchington, Ellen; Murillo, Francisco Javier; Lirette, Camille; Sacau, Mar; Koen-Alonso, Mariano; Kenny, Andrew; Ollerhead, Neil; Wareham, Vonda; Beazley, Lindsay

    2014-01-01

    The United Nations General Assembly Resolution 61/105, concerning sustainable fisheries in the marine ecosystem, calls for the protection of vulnerable marine ecosystems (VME) from destructive fishing practices. Subsequently, the Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO) produced guidelines for identification of VME indicator species/taxa to assist in the implementation of the resolution, but recommended the development of case-specific operational definitions for their application. We applied kernel density estimation (KDE) to research vessel trawl survey data from inside the fishing footprint of the Northwest Atlantic Fisheries Organization (NAFO) Regulatory Area in the high seas of the northwest Atlantic to create biomass density surfaces for four VME indicator taxa: large-sized sponges, sea pens, small and large gorgonian corals. These VME indicator taxa were identified previously by NAFO using the fragility, life history characteristics and structural complexity criteria presented by FAO, along with an evaluation of their recovery trajectories. KDE, a non-parametric neighbour-based smoothing function, has been used previously in ecology to identify hotspots, that is, areas of relatively high biomass/abundance. We present a novel approach of examining relative changes in area under polygons created from encircling successive biomass categories on the KDE surface to identify "significant concentrations" of biomass, which we equate to VMEs. This allows identification of the VMEs from the broader distribution of the species in the study area. We provide independent assessments of the VMEs so identified using underwater images, benthic sampling with other gear types (dredges, cores), and/or published species distribution models of probability of occurrence, as available. For each VME indicator taxon we provide a brief review of their ecological function which will be important in future assessments of significant adverse impact on these habitats here and elsewhere

  20. Urban Density Indices Using Mean Shift-Based Upsampled Elevetion Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Charou, E.; Gyftakis, S.; Bratsolis, E.; Tsenoglou, T.; Papadopoulou, Th. D.; Vassilas, N.

    2015-04-01

    Urban density is an important factor for several fields, e.g. urban design, planning and land management. Modern remote sensors deliver ample information for the estimation of specific urban land classification classes (2D indicators), and the height of urban land classification objects (3D indicators) within an Area of Interest (AOI). In this research, two of these indicators, Building Coverage Ratio (BCR) and Floor Area Ratio (FAR) are numerically and automatically derived from high-resolution airborne RGB orthophotos and LiDAR data. In the pre-processing step the low resolution elevation data are fused with the high resolution optical data through a mean-shift based discontinuity preserving smoothing algorithm. The outcome is an improved normalized digital surface model (nDSM) is an upsampled elevation data with considerable improvement regarding region filling and "straightness" of elevation discontinuities. In a following step, a Multilayer Feedforward Neural Network (MFNN) is used to classify all pixels of the AOI to building or non-building categories. For the total surface of the block and the buildings we consider the number of their pixels and the surface of the unit pixel. Comparisons of the automatically derived BCR and FAR indicators with manually derived ones shows the applicability and effectiveness of the methodology proposed.

  1. Refraction characteristics of phononic crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nemat-Nasser, Sia

    2015-08-01

    Some of the most interesting refraction properties of phononic crystals are revealed by examining the anti-plane shear waves in doubly periodic elastic composites with unit cells containing rectangular and/or elliptical multi-inclusions. The corresponding band structure, group velocity, and energy-flux vector are calculated using a powerful mixed variational method that accurately and efficiently yields all the field quantities over multiple frequency pass-bands. The background matrix and the inclusions can be anisotropic, each having distinct elastic moduli and mass densities. Equifrequency contours and energy-flux vectors are readily calculated as functions of the wave-vector components. By superimposing the energy-flux vectors on equifrequency contours in the plane of the wave-vector components, and supplementing this with a three-dimensional graph of the corresponding frequency surface, a wealth of information is extracted essentially at a glance. This way it is shown that a composite with even a simple square unit cell containing a central circular inclusion can display negative or positive energy and phase velocity refractions, or simply performs a harmonic vibration (standing wave), depending on the frequency and the wave-vector. Moreover, that the same composite when interfaced with a suitable homogeneous solid can display: (1) negative refraction with negative phase velocity refraction; (2) negative refraction with positive phase velocity refraction; (3) positive refraction with negative phase velocity refraction; (4) positive refraction with positive phase velocity refraction; or even (5) complete reflection with no energy transmission, depending on the frequency, and direction and the wavelength of the plane-wave that is incident from the homogeneous solid to the interface. For elliptical and rectangular inclusion geometries, analytical expressions are given for the key calculation quantities. Expressions for displacement, velocity, linear momentum

  2. Influence of wastewater disinfection on densities of culturable fecal indicator bacteria and genetic markers.

    PubMed

    Chern, Eunice C; Brenner, Kristen; Wymer, Larry; Haugland, Richard A

    2014-09-01

    The US Environmental Protection Agency has proposed the use of quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) as a rapid alternative analytical method for monitoring recreational water quality at beaches. For qPCR to be considered for other Clean Water Act purposes, such as inclusion in discharge permits and use in Total Maximum Daily Load calculations, it is necessary to understand how qPCR detectable genetic markers are influenced by wastewater disinfection. This study investigated genetic markers for Escherichia coli, Enterococcus, Clostridium spp., Bacteroides, total Bacteroidales, as well as the human-associated Bacteroides markers, HF183 and HumM2, to determine which, if any, were influenced by disinfection (chlorination or ultraviolet light) of effluents from secondary wastewater treatment in different seasons. The effects of disinfection on culturable enterococci, E. coli, Bacteroides, and C. perfringens were also compared to their associated genetic markers. Disinfection of secondary treatment effluents significantly reduced culturable fecal indicator bacteria (FIB) but not genetic marker densities. No significant differences were observed in the responses of FIB culture and genetic marker densities to type of disinfection (chlorination vs UV) or season. Results of this study provide evidence that qPCR may not be suitable for monitoring efficacy of wastewater disinfection on the inactivation of bacterial pathogens. PMID:25252344

  3. Refractive index of plant cell walls

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gausman, H. W.; Allen, W. A.; Escobar, D. E.

    1974-01-01

    Air was replaced with media of higher refractive indices by vacuum infiltration in leaves of cucumber, blackeye pea, tomato, and string bean plants, and reflectance of noninfiltrated and infiltrated leaves was spectrophotometrically measured. Infiltrated leaves reflected less light than noninfiltrated leaves over the 500-2500-nm wavelength interval because cell wall-air interfaces were partly eliminated. Minimal reflectance should occur when the average refractive index of plant cell walls was matched by the infiltrating fluid. Although refractive indices that resulted in minimal reflectance differed among the four plant genera, an average value of 1.425 approximates the refractive index of plant cell walls for the four plant genera.

  4. Behavior Problem Indices: The Differential Effects of Spatial Density on Low and High Scorers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Loo, Chalsa M.

    1978-01-01

    Examines the differential effects of spatial density of five-year-old children. Generally, normal children motorically adjusted to a high-density condition to a greater degree than children with behavior problems. Anxious and impulsive children were especially distressed by a high-density condition, compared to normals. (Author/MA)

  5. Refractive corneal surgery - discharge

    MedlinePlus

    Nearsightedness surgery - discharge; Refractive surgery - discharge; LASIK - discharge; PRK - discharge ... You had refractive corneal surgery to help improve your vision. This surgery uses a laser to reshape your cornea. It corrects ...

  6. Borehole density on the surface of living Porites corals as an indicator of sedimentation in Hong Kong.

    PubMed

    Xie, James Y; Wong, Jane C Y; Dumont, Clement P; Goodkin, Nathalie; Qiu, Jian-Wen

    2016-07-15

    Borehole density on the surface of Porites has been used as an indicator of water quality in the Great Barrier Reef. We assessed the relationship between borehole density on Porites and eight water quality parameters across 26 sites in Hong Kong. We found that total borehole densities on the surface of Porites at 16 of the studied sites were high (>1000individualsm(-2)), with polychaetes being the dominant bioeroders. Sedimentation rate was correlated positively with total borehole density and polychaete borehole density, with the latter relationship having a substantially higher correlation of determination. None of the environmental factors used were significantly correlated with bivalve borehole density. These results provide a baseline for assessing future changes in coral bioerosion in Hong Kong. This present study also indicates that polychaete boreholes can be used as a bioindicator of sedimentation in the South China Sea region where polychaetes are numerically dominant bioeroders. PMID:27179996

  7. Decay of aftershock density with distance indicates triggering by dynamic stress.

    PubMed

    Felzer, K R; Brodsky, E E

    2006-06-01

    The majority of earthquakes are aftershocks, yet aftershock physics is not well understood. Many studies suggest that static stress changes trigger aftershocks, but recent work suggests that shaking (dynamic stresses) may also play a role. Here we measure the decay of aftershocks as a function of distance from magnitude 2-6 mainshocks in order to clarify the aftershock triggering process. We find that for short times after the mainshock, when low background seismicity rates allow for good aftershock detection, the decay is well fitted by a single inverse power law over distances of 0.2-50 km. The consistency of the trend indicates that the same triggering mechanism is working over the entire range. As static stress changes at the more distant aftershocks are negligible, this suggests that dynamic stresses may be triggering all of these aftershocks. We infer that the observed aftershock density is consistent with the probability of triggering aftershocks being nearly proportional to seismic wave amplitude. The data are not fitted well by models that combine static stress change with the evolution of frictionally locked faults. PMID:16760974

  8. The Kohn-Sham kinetic energy density as indicator of the electron localization: atomic shell structure.

    PubMed

    Navarrete-López, Alejandra M; Garza, Jorge; Vargas, Rubicelia

    2008-03-14

    In this report, it is shown that the Kohn-Sham (KS) kinetic energy density (KED) contains the average local electrostatic potential (ALEP) and the average local ionization energy (ALIE); the shell structure in atomic systems is presented as one application of the KS-KED. By writing the KS-KED from the KS equations, this quantity was divided in three contributions: orbital, Coulomb, and exchange correlation. By studying several closed and open shell atoms, the shell structure was established by the maxima presented by the Coulomb contribution and the minima in the orbital contribution of the KS-KED. The exchange-correlation contribution to the KS-KED does not show maxima or minima, but this quantity shows bumps where the division between shells is expected. The results obtained in this work were compared with other shell structure indicators such as the electron localization function, the ALEP, the ALIE, and the radial distribution function. The most important result in this work is related to the fact that even when the ALEP and the ALIE functions were built with different arguments to each other, they are contained in the KS-KED. In this way, the KS-KED shows its importance to reveal the electron localization in atomic systems. PMID:18345880

  9. Decay of aftershock density with distance indicates triggering by dynamic stress

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Felzer, K.R.; Brodsky, E.E.

    2006-01-01

    The majority of earthquakes are aftershocks, yet aftershock physics is not well understood. Many studies suggest that static stress changes trigger aftershocks, but recent work suggests that shaking (dynamic stresses) may also play a role. Here we measure the decay of aftershocks as a function of distance from magnitude 2-6 mainshocks in order to clarify the aftershock triggering process. We find that for short times after the mainshock, when low background seismicity rates allow for good aftershock detection, the decay is well fitted by a single inverse power law over distances of 0.2-50 km. The consistency of the trend indicates that the same triggering mechanism is working over the entire range. As static stress changes at the more distant aftershocks are negligible, this suggests that dynamic stresses may be triggering all of these aftershocks. We infer that the observed aftershock density is consistent with the probability of triggering aftershocks being nearly proportional to seismic wave amplitude. The data are not fitted well by models that combine static stress change with the evolution of frictionally locked faults. ?? 2006 Nature Publishing Group.

  10. Refraction near the horizon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schaefer, Bradley E.; Liller, William

    1990-01-01

    Variations in astronomical refraction near the horizon are examined. Sunset timings, a sextant mounted on a tripod, and a temperature profile are utilized to derive the variations in refraction data, collected from 7 locations. It is determined that the refraction ranges from 0.234 to 1.678 deg with an rms deviation of 0.16, and it is observed that the variation is larger than previously supposed. Some applications for the variation of refraction value are discussed.

  11. Refractive surgery and strabismus.

    PubMed

    Kowal, Lionel; Battu, Ravindra; Kushner, Burton

    2005-02-01

    This review discusses the potential for strabismic complications after refractive surgery for hyperopia, myopia, anisomyopia, astigmatism and monovision, and how to avoid these complications. Guidelines are given for assessing patients with strabismus seeking refractive surgery. Screening tests are suggested that lead to stratification of refractive surgery patients into different risk groups each warranting a different intensity of evaluation. PMID:15670088

  12. Solar energetic particle track densities as an indicator of the origin of interplanetary dust

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blanford, George E.

    1994-01-01

    An examination of the relation of track densities from solar energetic particles in interplanetary dust grains (IDP's) to the orbital elements of source bodies is made and the positive and negative aspects of using track densities to determine the origin of IDP's are reported. It is found from calculations that predicted track densities for a particle of given size are related logarithmically to the minimum semimajor axis of the source body. Consequently, although track densities measurements may not be capable of distinguishing cometary from asteroidal sources, they should give information on the minimum semimajor axis of the originating bodies.

  13. Path Integrals for Electronic Densities, Reactivity Indices, and Localization Functions in Quantum Systems

    PubMed Central

    Putz, Mihai V.

    2009-01-01

    The density matrix theory, the ancestor of density functional theory, provides the immediate framework for Path Integral (PI) development, allowing the canonical density be extended for the many-electronic systems through the density functional closure relationship. Yet, the use of path integral formalism for electronic density prescription presents several advantages: assures the inner quantum mechanical description of the system by parameterized paths; averages the quantum fluctuations; behaves as the propagator for time-space evolution of quantum information; resembles Schrödinger equation; allows quantum statistical description of the system through partition function computing. In this framework, four levels of path integral formalism were presented: the Feynman quantum mechanical, the semiclassical, the Feynman-Kleinert effective classical, and the Fokker-Planck non-equilibrium ones. In each case the density matrix or/and the canonical density were rigorously defined and presented. The practical specializations for quantum free and harmonic motions, for statistical high and low temperature limits, the smearing justification for the Bohr’s quantum stability postulate with the paradigmatic Hydrogen atomic excursion, along the quantum chemical calculation of semiclassical electronegativity and hardness, of chemical action and Mulliken electronegativity, as well as by the Markovian generalizations of Becke-Edgecombe electronic focalization functions – all advocate for the reliability of assuming PI formalism of quantum mechanics as a versatile one, suited for analytically and/or computationally modeling of a variety of fundamental physical and chemical reactivity concepts characterizing the (density driving) many-electronic systems. PMID:20087467

  14. Refraction of coastal ocean waves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shuchman, R. A.; Kasischke, E. S.

    1981-01-01

    Refraction of gravity waves in the coastal area off Cape Hatteras, NC as documented by synthetic aperture radar (SAR) imagery from Seasat orbit 974 (collected on September 3, 1978) is discussed. An analysis of optical Fourier transforms (OFTs) from more than 70 geographical positions yields estimates of wavelength and wave direction for each position. In addition, independent estimates of the same two quantities are calculated using two simple theoretical wave-refraction models. The OFT results are then compared with the theoretical results. A statistical analysis shows a significant degree of linear correlation between the data sets. This is considered to indicate that the Seasat SAR produces imagery whose clarity is sufficient to show the refraction of gravity waves in shallow water.

  15. Developing a bubble number-density paleoclimatic indicator for glacier ice

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Spencer, M.K.; Alley, R.B.; Fitzpatrick, J.J.

    2006-01-01

    Past accumulation rate can be estimated from the measured number-density of bubbles in an ice core and the reconstructed paleotemperature, using a new technique. Density increase and grain growth in polar firn are both controlled by temperature and accumulation rate, and the integrated effects are recorded in the number-density of bubbles as the firn changes to ice. An empirical model of these processes, optimized to fit published data on recently formed bubbles, reconstructs accumulation rates using recent temperatures with an uncertainty of 41% (P < 0.05). For modern sites considered here, no statistically significant trend exists between mean annual temperature and the ratio of bubble number-density to grain number-density at the time of pore close-off; optimum modeled accumulation-rate estimates require an eventual ???2.02 ?? 0.08 (P < 0.05) bubbles per close-off grain. Bubble number-density in the GRIP (Greenland) ice core is qualitatively consistent with independent estimates for a combined temperature decrease and accumulation-rate increase there during the last 5 kyr.

  16. In vivo measurement of the shape of the tissue-refractive-index correlation function and its applicationto detection of colorectal field carcinogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Gomes, Andrew J.; Ruderman, Sarah; DelaCruz, Mart; Wali, Ramesh K.; Roy, Hemant K.

    2012-01-01

    Abstract. Polarization-gated spectroscopy is an established method to depth-selectively interrogate the structural properties of biological tissue. We employ this method in vivo in the azoxymethane (AOM)-treated rat model to monitor the morphological changes that occur in the field of a tumor during early carcinogenesis. The results demonstrate a statistically significant change in the shape of the refractive-index correlation function for AOM-treated rats versus saline-treated controls. Since refractive index is linearly proportional to mass density, these refractive-index changes can be directly linked to alterations in the spatial distribution patterns of macromolecular density. Furthermore, we found that alterations in the shape of the refractive-index correlation function shape were an indicator of both present and future risk of tumor development. These results suggest that noninvasive measurement of the shape of the refractive-index correlation function could be a promising marker of early cancer development. PMID:22559696

  17. A comparison of rapid and conventional measures of indicator bacteria as predictors of waterborne protozoan pathogen presence and density.

    PubMed

    Dorevitch, Samuel; Doi, Mary; Hsu, Fu-Chih; Lin, King-Teh; Roberts, Jennifer D; Liu, Li C; Gladding, Ross; Vannoy, Ember; Li, Hong; Javor, Margit; Scheff, Peter A

    2011-09-01

    E. coli and enterococci in recreational waters are monitored as indicators of fecal contamination, pathogen presence, and health risk. Quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) tests for fecal indicator bacteria can provide beach managers with same-day information about water quality, unlike culture methods which provide that information the following day. The abilities of qPCR measurements of indicator bacteria, as compared to culture measurements of indicator bacteria, as predictors of pathogen presence or density in surface waters are not well understood. The purpose of this study was to make such comparisons between water samples collected from Chicago area surface waters, including rivers, inland lakes, Lake Michigan, and the Chicago Area Waterways System, which is dominated by wastewater effluent. A total of 294 twenty-litre samples were collected and analyzed for Giardia and Cryptosporidium. qPCR and membrane filtration methods were used to quantify E. coli and enterococci. Correlation, logistic regression, and zero-inflated Poisson modeling were utilized to evaluate associations between indicators and parasites. qPCR and culture measures of the indicator bacteria were similar in their ability to predict parasite presence and density. Correlations between parasites and indicators were generally stronger at waters not dominated by effluent. Associations between indicator density and Giarida presence were observed more consistently than between indicator density and Cryptosporidium presence. Associations between enterococci and parasites were generally stronger than associations between E. coli and parasites. The use of qPCR monitoring in our setting would generate more timely results without compromising the ability to predict parasite presence or density. PMID:21826357

  18. Fully 3D refraction correction dosimetry system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manjappa, Rakesh; Sharath Makki, S.; Kumar, Rajesh; Mohan Vasu, Ram; Kanhirodan, Rajan

    2016-02-01

    The irradiation of selective regions in a polymer gel dosimeter results in an increase in optical density and refractive index (RI) at those regions. An optical tomography-based dosimeter depends on rayline path through the dosimeter to estimate and reconstruct the dose distribution. The refraction of light passing through a dose region results in artefacts in the reconstructed images. These refraction errors are dependant on the scanning geometry and collection optics. We developed a fully 3D image reconstruction algorithm, algebraic reconstruction technique-refraction correction (ART-rc) that corrects for the refractive index mismatches present in a gel dosimeter scanner not only at the boundary, but also for any rayline refraction due to multiple dose regions inside the dosimeter. In this study, simulation and experimental studies have been carried out to reconstruct a 3D dose volume using 2D CCD measurements taken for various views. The study also focuses on the effectiveness of using different refractive-index matching media surrounding the gel dosimeter. Since the optical density is assumed to be low for a dosimeter, the filtered backprojection is routinely used for reconstruction. We carry out the reconstructions using conventional algebraic reconstruction (ART) and refractive index corrected ART (ART-rc) algorithms. The reconstructions based on FDK algorithm for cone-beam tomography has also been carried out for comparison. Line scanners and point detectors, are used to obtain reconstructions plane by plane. The rays passing through dose region with a RI mismatch does not reach the detector in the same plane depending on the angle of incidence and RI. In the fully 3D scanning setup using 2D array detectors, light rays that undergo refraction are still collected and hence can still be accounted for in the reconstruction algorithm. It is found that, for the central region of the dosimeter, the usable radius using ART-rc algorithm with water as RI matched

  19. Fully 3D refraction correction dosimetry system.

    PubMed

    Manjappa, Rakesh; Makki, S Sharath; Kumar, Rajesh; Vasu, Ram Mohan; Kanhirodan, Rajan

    2016-02-21

    The irradiation of selective regions in a polymer gel dosimeter results in an increase in optical density and refractive index (RI) at those regions. An optical tomography-based dosimeter depends on rayline path through the dosimeter to estimate and reconstruct the dose distribution. The refraction of light passing through a dose region results in artefacts in the reconstructed images. These refraction errors are dependant on the scanning geometry and collection optics. We developed a fully 3D image reconstruction algorithm, algebraic reconstruction technique-refraction correction (ART-rc) that corrects for the refractive index mismatches present in a gel dosimeter scanner not only at the boundary, but also for any rayline refraction due to multiple dose regions inside the dosimeter. In this study, simulation and experimental studies have been carried out to reconstruct a 3D dose volume using 2D CCD measurements taken for various views. The study also focuses on the effectiveness of using different refractive-index matching media surrounding the gel dosimeter. Since the optical density is assumed to be low for a dosimeter, the filtered backprojection is routinely used for reconstruction. We carry out the reconstructions using conventional algebraic reconstruction (ART) and refractive index corrected ART (ART-rc) algorithms. The reconstructions based on FDK algorithm for cone-beam tomography has also been carried out for comparison. Line scanners and point detectors, are used to obtain reconstructions plane by plane. The rays passing through dose region with a RI mismatch does not reach the detector in the same plane depending on the angle of incidence and RI. In the fully 3D scanning setup using 2D array detectors, light rays that undergo refraction are still collected and hence can still be accounted for in the reconstruction algorithm. It is found that, for the central region of the dosimeter, the usable radius using ART-rc algorithm with water as RI matched

  20. Reduced Bone Density and Cortical Bone Indices in Female Adiponectin-Knockout Mice.

    PubMed

    Naot, Dorit; Watson, Maureen; Callon, Karen E; Tuari, Donna; Musson, David S; Choi, Ally J; Sreenivasan, Dharshini; Fernandez, Justin; Tu, Pao Ting; Dickinson, Michelle; Gamble, Greg D; Grey, Andrew; Cornish, Jillian

    2016-09-01

    A positive association between fat and bone mass is maintained through a network of signaling molecules. Clinical studies found that the circulating levels of adiponectin, a peptide secreted from adipocytes, are inversely related to visceral fat mass and bone mineral density, and it has been suggested that adiponectin contributes to the coupling between fat and bone. Our study tested the hypothesis that adiponectin affects bone tissue by comparing the bone phenotype of wild-type and adiponectin-knockout (APN-KO) female mice between the ages of 8-37 weeks. Using a longitudinal study design, we determined body composition and bone density using dual energy x-ray absorptiometry. In parallel, groups of animals were killed at different ages and bone properties were analyzed by microcomputed tomography, dynamic histomorphometry, 3-point bending test, nanoindentation, and computational modelling. APN-KO mice had reduced body fat and decreased whole-skeleton bone mineral density. Microcomputed tomography analysis identified reduced cortical area fraction and average cortical thickness in APN-KO mice in all the age groups and reduced trabecular bone volume fraction only in young APN-KO mice. There were no major differences in bone strength and material properties between the 2 groups. Taken together, our results demonstrate a positive effect of adiponectin on bone geometry and density in our mouse model. Assuming adiponectin has similar effects in humans, the low circulating levels of adiponectin associated with increased fat mass are unlikely to contribute to the parallel increase in bone mass. Therefore, adiponectin does not appear to play a role in the coupling between fat and bone tissue. PMID:27384302

  1. Anomalies of free mantle surface for Asia region as an indicator of subcrustal density inhomogeneities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Senachin, V. N.; Baranov, A. A.

    2009-04-01

    Free mantle surface (FMS) is one of the important characteristics of the isostatic state of the Earth. FMS shows the degree of uplifting of the crust about the normal level, which corresponds to the homogeneous upper mantle. The FMS anomaly study can provide important information about the different geodynamic processes that responsible for the density heterogeneities in the upper mantle and the changing isostatic state of the lithosphere. Investigations of the FMS (Artemjev et. al, 1986) revealed main dependencies for the depth of the FMS under the continents and oceans. For the continental lithosphere it was found that the FMS depth depends on the thickness of the crust. Subsequently, the same dependence was revealed for the oceanic lithosphere using CRUST 2.0 model for all Earth (Senachin, 2008). In this study we present the updated FMS anomaly map for the Central and Southern Asia calculated using the crustal model AsCRUST-08 (Baranov, 2008), which has the resolution of 1x1 degree. We used the Moho map and density for upper, middle, and lower layers of crystalline crust for calculating the FSM anomalies. The Southern and Central Asia is tectonically complex region characterized by the great collision between the Asian and Indian plates, anomalously thick uplifted crust, and the large extensional zones near the southern and eastern margins of Asia. The evolution of the entire region is also strongly related to the active subduction along the Pacific border. The crustal model AsCRUST-08 provides substantially more detailed FMS data for the Asia region. We can see anomalous uplifting of the FMS up to 3 km in the extensional zones (Red Sea) and in the deep seafloor areas. Arabian Peninsula has the FMS depth about 6 km, which can be attributed to rather high density of the upper mantle. For Tibet region we reveal quite complex dependence between the FMS depth and the thickness of the crust. The central part with crustal thickness more then 45 km has elevated FMS

  2. Density and Porosity of Shower Meteorites as Indicators of Meter-scale Asteroid Homogeneity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Macke, Robert; Britt, D.; Consolmagno, G.

    2008-09-01

    Meteorite showers containing multiple stones from the same event provide clues to the homogeneity of meteorite parent bodies over decimeter to meter scales. Small bodies that have been studied in detail show a high degree of surface mineralogical homogeneity in reflectance spectra (Abe et al., 2006a; Veverka et al., 2001) and no detectable large scale density variations (Abe et al., 2006b; Thomas et al., 2002). Large meteorite showers provide a direct sample of the possible variations in physical properties of small bodies. We present the results of density, porosity, and magnetic susceptibility measurements of at least ten stones each from seven meteorite showers in the collection at the Smithsonian Institution's National Museum of Natural History. This includes three carbonaceous chondrites (Allende, Murchison and Murray) and four ordinary chondrites. We find strong homogeneity within showers. For example, the mass-weighted average grain density of Allende we measured as 3.60 g/cm3, with individual stones ranging from 3.59 to 3.62 g/cm3 and typical uncertainties 0.03 or 0.04 g/cm3. Allende porosities averaged 18.8% and ranged from 17.8% to 19.5% with typical uncertainties of about 1.2%. We also studied one weathered find (Gold Basin) for clues regarding the uniformity of chondrite weathering. For five showers, we compare results with measurements made on additional stones at the Vatican Observatory and the American Museum of Natural History. This work was supported in part by a Smithsonian Institution Graduate Student Fellowship. Veverka, J. et al., 2001. Science 289, 2088. Abe S. et al., 2006b. Science 312, 1344. Abe M. et al., 2006a. Science 312, 1334. Thomas P. et al., 2002. Icarus 155, 18.

  3. Relation of initial spacing and relative stand density indices to stand characteristics in a Douglas-fir plantation spacing trial

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Curtis, Robert O.; Bansal, Sheel; Harrington, Constance A.

    2016-01-01

    This report presents updated information on a 1981 Douglas-fir (Pseudotsuga menziesii (Mirb.) Franco var. menziesii) plantation spacing trial at 33 years from planting. Stand statistics at the most recent measurement were compared for initial spacing of 1 through 6 meters and associated relative densities. There was no clear relationship of spacing to top height. Diameter, live crown ratio, and percent survival increased with spacing; basal area and relative density decreased with increase in spacing. Volume in trees ≥ 4 cm diameter was greatest at 2 m spacing, while utilizable volume (trees ≥20 cm dbh) was greatest at 4 m spacing. Live crown ratio decreased and total crown projectional area increased with increasing relative density indices. Total crown projectional area was more closely related to relative density than to basal area.

  4. Survival analysis for the missing censoring indicator model using kernel density estimation techniques.

    PubMed

    Subramanian, Sundarraman

    2006-01-01

    This article concerns asymptotic theory for a new estimator of a survival function in the missing censoring indicator model of random censorship. Specifically, the large sample results for an inverse probability-of-non-missingness weighted estimator of the cumulative hazard function, so far not available, are derived, including an almost sure representation with rate for a remainder term, and uniform strong consistency with rate of convergence. The estimator is based on a kernel estimate for the conditional probability of non-missingness of the censoring indicator. Expressions for its bias and variance, in turn leading to an expression for the mean squared error as a function of the bandwidth, are also obtained. The corresponding estimator of the survival function, whose weak convergence is derived, is asymptotically efficient. A numerical study, comparing the performances of the proposed and two other currently existing efficient estimators, is presented. PMID:18953423

  5. Decay of aftershock density with distance does not indicate triggering by dynamic stress

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Richards-Dinger, K.; Stein, R.S.; Toda, S.

    2010-01-01

    Resolving whether static or dynamic stress triggers most aftershocks and subsequent mainshocks is essential to understand earthquake interaction and to forecast seismic hazard. Felzer and Brodsky examined the distance distribution of earthquakes occurring in the first five minutes after 2 ≤ M  M  M ≥ 2 aftershocks showed a uniform power-law decay with slope −1.35 out to 50 km from the mainshocks. From this they argued that the distance decay could be explained only by dynamic triggering. Here we propose an alternative explanation for the decay, and subject their hypothesis to a series of tests, none of which it passes. At distances more than 300 m from the 2 ≤  M< 3 mainshocks, the seismicity decay 5 min before the mainshocks is indistinguishable from the decay five minutes afterwards, indicating that the mainshocks have no effect at distances outside their static triggering range. Omori temporal decay, the fundamental signature of aftershocks, is absent at distances exceeding 10 km from the mainshocks. Finally, the distance decay is found among aftershocks that occur before the arrival of the seismic wave front from the mainshock, which violates causality. We argue that Felzer and Brodsky implicitly assume that the first of two independent aftershocks along a fault rupture triggers the second, and that the first of two shocks in a creep- or intrusion-driven swarm triggers the second, when this need not be the case.

  6. Halogen bonding from a hard and soft acids and bases perspective: investigation by using density functional theory reactivity indices.

    PubMed

    Pinter, Balazs; Nagels, Nick; Herrebout, Wouter A; De Proft, Frank

    2013-01-01

    Halogen bonds between the trifluoromethyl halides CF(3)Cl, CF(3)Br and CF(3)I, and dimethyl ether, dimethyl sulfide, trimethylamine and trimethyl phosphine were investigated using Pearson's hard and soft acids and bases (HSAB) concept with conceptual DFT reactivity indices, the Ziegler-Rauk-type energy-decomposition analysis, the natural orbital for chemical valence (NOCV) framework and the non-covalent interaction (NCI) index. It is found that the relative importance of electrostatic and orbital (charge transfer) interactions varies as a function of both the donor and acceptor molecules. Hard and soft interactions were distinguished and characterised by atomic charges, electrophilicity and local softness indices. Dual-descriptor plots indicate an orbital σ hole on the halogen similar to the electrostatic σ hole manifested in the molecular electrostatic potential. The predicted high halogen-bond-acceptor affinity of N-heterocyclic carbenes was evidenced in the highest complexation energy for the hitherto unknown CF(3) I·NHC complex. The dominant NOCV orbital represents an electron-density deformation according to a n→σ*-type interaction. The characteristic signal found in the reduced density gradient versus electron-density diagram corresponds to the non-covalent interaction between contact atoms in the NCI plots, which is the manifestation of halogen bonding within the NCI theory. The unexpected C-X bond strengthening observed in several cases was rationalised within the molecular orbital framework. PMID:23169478

  7. Decay of aftershock density with distance does not indicate triggering by dynamic stress.

    PubMed

    Richards-Dinger, Keith; Stein, Ross S; Toda, Shinji

    2010-09-30

    Resolving whether static or dynamic stress triggers most aftershocks and subsequent mainshocks is essential to understand earthquake interaction and to forecast seismic hazard. Felzer and Brodsky examined the distance distribution of earthquakes occurring in the first five minutes after 2 ≤ M < 3 and 3 ≤ M < 4 mainshocks and found that their magnitude M ≥ 2 aftershocks showed a uniform power-law decay with slope -1.35 out to 50 km from the mainshocks. From this they argued that the distance decay could be explained only by dynamic triggering. Here we propose an alternative explanation for the decay, and subject their hypothesis to a series of tests, none of which it passes. At distances more than 300 m from the 2 ≤ M < 3 mainshocks, the seismicity decay 5 min before the mainshocks is indistinguishable from the decay five minutes afterwards, indicating that the mainshocks have no effect at distances outside their static triggering range. Omori temporal decay, the fundamental signature of aftershocks, is absent at distances exceeding 10 km from the mainshocks. Finally, the distance decay is found among aftershocks that occur before the arrival of the seismic wave front from the mainshock, which violates causality. We argue that Felzer and Brodsky implicitly assume that the first of two independent aftershocks along a fault rupture triggers the second, and that the first of two shocks in a creep- or intrusion-driven swarm triggers the second, when this need not be the case. PMID:20882015

  8. Seismic refraction exploration

    SciTech Connect

    Ruehle, W.H.

    1980-12-30

    In seismic exploration, refracted seismic energy is detected by seismic receivers to produce seismograms of subsurface formations. The seismograms are produced by directing seismic energy from an array of sources at an angle to be refracted by the subsurface formations and detected by the receivers. The directivity of the array is obtained by delaying the seismic pulses produced by each source in the source array.

  9. Nonlinear Refractive Properties

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vikram, Chandra S.; Witherow, William K.

    2001-01-01

    Using nonlinear refractive properties of a salt-water solution at two wavelengths, numerical analysis has been performed to extract temperature and concentration from interferometric fringe data. The theoretical study, using a commercially available equation solving software, starts with critical fringe counting needs and the role of nonlinear refractive properties in such measurements. Finally, methodology of the analysis, codes, fringe counting accuracy needs, etc. is described in detail.

  10. ON THE SOURCE OF ASTROMETRIC ANOMALOUS REFRACTION

    SciTech Connect

    Taylor, M. Suzanne; McGraw, John T.; Zimmer, Peter C.; Pier, Jeffrey R.

    2013-03-15

    More than a century ago, astronomers using transit telescopes to determine precise stellar positions were hampered by an unexplained periodic shifting of the stars they were observing. With the advent of CCD transit telescopes in the past three decades, this unexplained motion, termed 'anomalous refraction' by these early astronomers, is again being observed. Anomalous refraction is described as a low-frequency, large angular scale ({approx}2 Degree-Sign ) motion of the entire image plane with respect to the celestial coordinate system as observed and defined by astrometric catalogs. These motions, of typically several tenths of an arcsecond amplitude with timescales on the order of 10 minutes, are ubiquitous to ground-based drift-scan astrometric measurements regardless of location or telescopes used and have been attributed to the effect of tilting of equal-density layers of the atmosphere. The cause of this tilting has often been attributed to atmospheric gravity waves, but this cause has never been confirmed. Although theoretical models of atmospheric refraction show that atmospheric gravity waves are a plausible cause of anomalous refraction, an observational campaign specifically directed at defining this relationship provides clear evidence that anomalous refraction is not consistent with the passage of atmospheric gravity waves. The source of anomalous refraction is found to be meter-scale, slowly evolving quasi-coherent dynamical structures in the boundary layer below 60 m above ground level.

  11. On the sources of astrometric anomalous refraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taylor, M. Suzanne

    2009-06-01

    Over a century ago, astronomers using transit telescopes to determine precise stellar positions were hampered by an unexplained periodic shifting of the stars they were observing. With the advent of CCD transit telescopes in the past three decades, this unexplained motion, now known as "anomalous refraction," is again being observed. Anomalous refraction is described as a low frequency, large angular scale motion of the entire image plane with respect to the celestial coordinate system as observed and defined by previous astrometric catalogs. These motions of typically several tenths of an arcsecond with timescales on the order often minutes are ubiquitous to drift-scan ground-based astrometric measurements regardless of location or telescopes used and have been attributed to the effect of tilting of equal-density layers of the atmosphere. The cause of this tilting has often been attributed to atmospheric gravity waves, but never confirmed. Although theoretical models of atmospheric refraction show that atmospheric gravity waves are a plausible cause of anomalous refraction, an observational campaign specifically directed at defining this relationship provides clear evidence that anomalous refraction is not consistent with the passage of atmospheric gravity waves. The source of anomalous refraction is found to be meter scale slowly evolving coherent dynamical structures in the boundary-layer below 60 meters.

  12. Assumption-free estimation of the genetic contribution to refractive error across childhood

    PubMed Central

    St Pourcain, Beate; McMahon, George; Timpson, Nicholas J.; Evans, David M.; Williams, Cathy

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Studies in relatives have generally yielded high heritability estimates for refractive error: twins 75–90%, families 15–70%. However, because related individuals often share a common environment, these estimates are inflated (via misallocation of unique/common environment variance). We calculated a lower-bound heritability estimate for refractive error free from such bias. Methods Between the ages 7 and 15 years, participants in the Avon Longitudinal Study of Parents and Children (ALSPAC) underwent non-cycloplegic autorefraction at regular research clinics. At each age, an estimate of the variance in refractive error explained by single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) genetic variants was calculated using genome-wide complex trait analysis (GCTA) using high-density genome-wide SNP genotype information (minimum N at each age=3,404). Results The variance in refractive error explained by the SNPs (“SNP heritability”) was stable over childhood: Across age 7–15 years, SNP heritability averaged 0.28 (SE=0.08, p<0.001). The genetic correlation for refractive error between visits varied from 0.77 to 1.00 (all p<0.001) demonstrating that a common set of SNPs was responsible for the genetic contribution to refractive error across this period of childhood. Simulations suggested lack of cycloplegia during autorefraction led to a small underestimation of SNP heritability (adjusted SNP heritability=0.35; SE=0.09). To put these results in context, the variance in refractive error explained (or predicted) by the time participants spent outdoors was <0.005 and by the time spent reading was <0.01, based on a parental questionnaire completed when the child was aged 8–9 years old. Conclusions Genetic variation captured by common SNPs explained approximately 35% of the variation in refractive error between unrelated subjects. This value sets an upper limit for predicting refractive error using existing SNP genotyping arrays, although higher-density genotyping in

  13. On the effective refractive index of blood

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nahmad-Rohen, Alexander; Contreras-Tello, Humberto; Morales-Luna, Gesuri; García-Valenzuela, Augusto

    2016-01-01

    We calculated the real and imaginary parts of the effective refractive index {n}{eff} of blood as functions of wavelength from 400 to 800 nm; we employed van de Hulst’s theory, together with the anomalous diffraction approximation, for the calculation. We modelled blood as a mixture of plasma and erythrocytes. Our results indicate that erythrocyte orientation has a strong effect on {n}{eff}, making blood an optically anisotropic medium except when the erythrocytes are randomly oriented. In the case in which their symmetry axis is perpendicular to the wave vector, {n}{eff} equals the refractive index of plasma at certain wavelengths. Furthermore, the erythrocytes’ shape affects their contribution to {n}{eff} in an important way, implying that studies on the effective refractive index of blood should avoid approximating them as spheres or spheroids. Finally, the effective refractive index of blood predicted by van de Hulst’s theory is different from what would be obtained by averaging the refractive indices of its constituents weighted by volume; such a volume-weighted average is appropriate only for haemolysed blood. We then measured the real part of the refractive index of various blood solutions using two different experimental setups. One of the most important results of our expriment is that {n}{eff} is measurable to a good degree of precision even for undiluted blood, although not all measuring apparatuses are appropriate. The experimental data is self-consistent and in reasonable agreement with our theoretical calculations.

  14. Broadband giant-refractive-index material based on mesoscopic space-filling curves.

    PubMed

    Chang, Taeyong; Kim, Jong Uk; Kang, Seung Kyu; Kim, Hyowook; Kim, Do Kyung; Lee, Yong-Hee; Shin, Jonghwa

    2016-01-01

    The refractive index is the fundamental property of all optical materials and dictates Snell's law, propagation speed, wavelength, diffraction, energy density, absorption and emission of light in materials. Experimentally realized broadband refractive indices remain <40, even with intricately designed artificial media. Herein, we demonstrate a measured index >1,800 resulting from a mesoscopic crystal with a dielectric constant greater than three million. This gigantic enhancement effect originates from the space-filling curve concept from mathematics. The principle is inherently very broad band, the enhancement being nearly constant from zero up to the frequency of interest. This broadband giant-refractive-index medium promises not only enhanced resolution in imaging and raised fundamental absorption limits in solar energy devices, but also compact, power-efficient components for optical communication and increased performance in many other applications. PMID:27573337

  15. X-ray radiographic technique for measuring density uniformity of silica aerogel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tabata, Makoto; Hatakeyama, Yoshikiyo; Adachi, Ichiro; Morita, Takeshi; Nishikawa, Keiko

    2013-01-01

    This paper proposes a new X-ray radiographic technique for measuring density uniformity of silica aerogels used as radiator in proximity-focusing ring-imaging Cherenkov detectors. To obtain high performance in a large-area detector, a key characteristic of radiator is the density (i.e. refractive index) uniformity of an individual aerogel monolith. At a refractive index of n=1.05, our requirement for the refractive index uniformity in the transverse plane direction of an aerogel tile is |δ(n-1)/(n-1)|<4% in a focusing dual layer radiator (with different refractive indices) scheme. We applied the radiographic technique to evaluate the density uniformity of our original aerogels from a trial production and that of Panasonic products (SP-50) as a reference, and to confirm they have sufficient density uniformity within ±1% along the transverse plane direction. The measurement results show that the proposed technique can quantitatively estimate the density uniformity of aerogels.

  16. Negative refraction and superconductivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amariti, Antonio; Forcella, Davide; Mariotti, Alberto; Siani, Massimo

    2011-10-01

    We discuss exotic properties of charged hydrodynamical systems, in the broken superconducting phase, probed by electromagnetic waves. Motivated by general arguments from hydrodynamics, we observe that negative refraction, namely the propagation in opposite directions of the phase velocities and of the energy flux, is expected for low enough frequencies. We corroborate this general idea by analyzing a holographic superconductor in the AdS/CFT correspondence, where the response functions can be explicitly computed. We study the dual gravitational theory both in the probe and in the backreacted case. We find that, while in the first case the refractive index is positive at every frequency, in the second case there is negative refraction at low enough frequencies. This is in agreement with hydrodynamic considerations.

  17. Index of Refraction Measurements Using a Laser Distance Meter

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ochoa, Romulo; Fiorillo, Richard; Ochoa, Cris

    2014-01-01

    We present a simple method to determine the refractive indices of transparent media using a laser distance meter. Indices of refraction have been obtained by measuring the speed of light in materials. Some speed of light techniques use time-of-flight measurements in which pulses are emitted by lasers and the time interval is measured for the pulse…

  18. Negative refraction using Raman transitions and chirality

    SciTech Connect

    Sikes, D. E.; Yavuz, D. D.

    2011-11-15

    We present a scheme that achieves negative refraction with low absorption in far-off resonant atomic systems. The scheme utilizes Raman resonances and does not require the simultaneous presence of an electric-dipole transition and a magnetic-dipole transition near the same wavelength. We show that two interfering Raman tran-sitions coupled to a magnetic-dipole transition can achieve a negative index of refraction with low absorption through magnetoelectric cross-coupling. We confirm the validity of the analytical results with exact numerical simulations of the density matrix. We also discuss possible experimental implementations of the scheme in rare-earth metal atomic systems.

  19. Negative refraction using Raman transitions and chirality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sikes, D. E.; Yavuz, D. D.

    2011-11-01

    We present a scheme that achieves negative refraction with low absorption in far-off resonant atomic systems. The scheme utilizes Raman resonances and does not require the simultaneous presence of an electric-dipole transition and a magnetic-dipole transition near the same wavelength. We show that two interfering Raman tran-sitions coupled to a magnetic-dipole transition can achieve a negative index of refraction with low absorption through magnetoelectric cross-coupling. We confirm the validity of the analytical results with exact numerical simulations of the density matrix. We also discuss possible experimental implementations of the scheme in rare-earth metal atomic systems.

  20. Refraction corrections for surveying

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lear, W. M.

    1979-01-01

    Optical measurements of range and elevation angle are distorted by the earth's atmosphere. High precision refraction correction equations are presented which are ideally suited for surveying because their inputs are optically measured range and optically measured elevation angle. The outputs are true straight line range and true geometric elevation angle. The 'short distances' used in surveying allow the calculations of true range and true elevation angle to be quickly made using a programmable pocket calculator. Topics covered include the spherical form of Snell's Law; ray path equations; and integrating the equations. Short-, medium-, and long-range refraction corrections are presented in tables.

  1. Effect of dietary probiotic and high stocking density on the performance, carcass yield, gut microflora, and stress indicators of broilers.

    PubMed

    Cengiz, Özcan; Köksal, Bekir H; Tatlı, Onur; Sevim, Ömer; Ahsan, Umair; Üner, Aykut G; Ulutaş, Pınar A; Beyaz, Devrim; Büyükyörük, Sadık; Yakan, Akın; Önol, Ahmet G

    2015-10-01

    A study was carried out to evaluate the effect of dietary probiotic supplementation and stocking density on the performance, relative carcass yield, gut microflora, and stress markers of broilers. One-day-old Ross 308 male broiler chickens (n = 480) were allocated to 4 experimental groups for 42 d. Each treatment had 8 replicates of 15 chicks each. Two groups were subjected to a high stocking density (HSD) of 20 birds/m² and the other 2 groups were kept at low stocking density (LSD) of 10 birds/m². A basal diet supplemented with probiotic 1 and 0.5 g/kg of diet (in starter and finisher diets, respectively) was fed to 2 treatments, one with HSD and the other with LSD, thereby making a 2 × 2 factorial arrangement. There was no interaction between stocking density (LSD and HSD) and dietary probiotic (supplemented and unsupplemented) for all the variables. Feed intake and weight gain were significantly low and feed conversion ratio was poor in broilers at HSD. Dietary probiotic significantly enhanced the feed intake and weight gain in starter phase only. Dietary probiotic supplementation had no effect (P > 0.05) on total aerobs, Salmonella sp., and Lactobacilli populations in the intestines of broilers. However, HSD reduced the Lactobacilli population only (P < 0.05). Relative breast yields were significantly higher in broilers reared at LSD than HSD. Thigh meat yield was higher in broilers in HSD group compared to LSD. Dietary probiotic did not affect the relative carcass yield and weight of lymphoid organs. Serum malondialdehyde, corticosterone, nitric oxide, and plasma heterophil:lymphocyte ratio were not affected either by stocking density or dietary probiotic supplementation. In conclusion, HSD negatively affected the performance and intestinal Lactobacilli population of broilers only, whereas probiotic supplementation enhanced the performance of broilers during the starter phase only. Total aerobes, Salmonella, Lactobacilli carcass yield, and stress indicators

  2. Refraction corrections for surveying

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lear, W. M.

    1980-01-01

    Optical measurements of range and elevation angles are distorted by refraction of Earth's atmosphere. Theoretical discussion of effect, along with equations for determining exact range and elevation corrections, is presented in report. Potentially useful in optical site surveying and related applications, analysis is easily programmed on pocket calculator. Input to equation is measured range and measured elevation; output is true range and true elevation.

  3. Conceptualization of Light Refraction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sokolowski, Andrzej

    2013-01-01

    There have been a number of papers dealing quantitatively with light refraction. Yet the conceptualization of the phenomenon that sets the foundation for a more rigorous math analysis is minimized. The purpose of this paper is to fill that gap. (Contains 3 figures.)

  4. [Refractive development and form-deprivation induced myopic refractive error in CBA/CaJ mice].

    PubMed

    Li, Yun-Yun; Qian, Kang-Wei; Wu, Xiao-Hua; Zhou, Wei; Zhong, Yong-Mei; Weng, Shi-Jun

    2016-04-25

    Due to the advantages in genetic manipulation, mice have become one of the most commonly used mammalian models for the study of mechanisms underlying myopia development. However, the vast majority of laboratory mouse strains are incapable of synthesizing melatonin, a neurohormone that may play an important role in myopia generation in humans. The present study investigated refractive development profiles in the CBA/CaJ mouse, a strain proficient in melatonin, and determined whether and how its refractive development could be affected by form-deprivation. Eccentric infrared photoretinoscopy revealed that this animal could be stably refracted, and the refractive error underwent developmental changes, which increased with age in the hyperopic direction and eventually got stable approximately 9 weeks after birth. The absolute values of refractive error in CBA/CaJ mice were larger than those of age-matched C57BL/6 mice, whereas the time points when refractive error reached steady state were similar between the two strains. Five weeks of form-deprivation applied to 3-week-old CBA/CaJ mice by translucent occluder wear caused a significant myopic shift in refractive error, indicating that this strain could be adequately used as a myopia model. PMID:27108899

  5. Age-related shifts in the density and distribution of genetic marker water quality indicators in cow and calf feces.

    PubMed

    Shanks, Orin C; Kelty, Catherine A; Peed, Lindsay; Sivaganesan, Mano; Mooney, Thomas; Jenkins, Michael

    2014-03-01

    Calves make up about 16% of the current bovine population in the United States and can excrete high levels of human pathogens in their feces. We describe the density and distribution of genetic markers from 9 PCR- and real-time quantitative PCR-based assays, including CF128, CF193, CowM2, CowM3, GenBac3, Entero1, EC23S857, CampF2, and ttr-6, commonly used to help assess ambient surface water quality. Each assay was tested against a collection of 381 individual bovine fecal samples representing 31 mother and calf pairings collected over a 10-month time period from time of birth through weaning. Genetic markers reported to be associated with ruminant and/or bovine fecal pollution were virtually undetected in calves for up to 115 days from birth, suggesting that physiological changes in calf ruminant function impact host-associated genetic marker shedding. In addition, general fecal indicator markers for Bacteroidales, Escherichia coli, and Enterococcus spp. exhibited three separate trends across time, indicating that these bacteria respond differently to age-related physiological and dietary changes during calf development. The results of this study suggest that currently available PCR-based water quality indicator technologies can under- or overestimate fecal pollution originating from calves and identify a need for novel calf-associated source identification methods. PMID:24362434

  6. Water quality, weather and environmental factors associated with fecal indicator organism density in beach sand at two recreational marine beaches.

    PubMed

    Heaney, Christopher D; Exum, Natalie G; Dufour, Alfred P; Brenner, Kristen P; Haugland, Richard A; Chern, Eunice; Schwab, Kellogg J; Love, David C; Serre, Marc L; Noble, Rachel; Wade, Timothy J

    2014-11-01

    Recent studies showing an association between fecal indicator organisms (FIOs) in sand and gastrointestinal (GI) illness among beachgoers with sand contact have important public health implications because of the large numbers of people who recreate at beaches and engage in sand contact activities. Yet, factors that influence fecal pollution in beach sand remain unclear. During the 2007 National Epidemiological and Environmental Assessment of Recreational (NEEAR) Water Study, sand samples were collected at three locations (60 m apart) on weekend days (Sat, Sun) and holidays between June and September at two marine beaches - Fairhope Beach, AL and Goddard Beach, RI - with nearby publicly-owned treatment works (POTWs) outfalls. F(+) coliphage, enterococci, Bacteroidales, fecal Bacteroides spp., and Clostridium spp. were measured in sand using culture and qPCR-based calibrator-cell equivalent methods. Water samples were also collected on the same days, times and transects as the 144 sand samples and were assayed using the same FIO measurements. Weather and environmental data were collected at the time of sample collection. Mean FIO concentrations in sand varied over time, but not space. Enterococci CFU and CCE densities in sand were not correlated, although other FIOs in sand were. The strongest correlation between FIO density in sand and water was fecal Bacteroides CCE, followed by enterococci CFU, Clostridium spp. CCE, and Bacteroidales CCE. Overall, the factors associated with FIO concentrations in sand were related to the sand-water interface (i.e., sand-wetting) and included daily average densities of FIOs in water, rainfall, and wave height. Targeted monitoring that focuses on daily trends of sand FIO variability, combined with information about specific water quality, weather, and environmental factors may inform beach monitoring and management decisions to reduce microbial burdens in beach sand. The views expressed in this paper are those of the authors and do

  7. Water quality, weather and environmental factors associated with fecal indicator organism density in beach sand at two recreational marine beaches

    PubMed Central

    Heaney, Christopher D.; Exum, Natalie G.; Dufour, Alfred P.; Brenner, Kristen P.; Haugland, Richard A.; Chern, Eunice; Schwab, Kellogg J.; Love, David C.; Serre, Marc L.; Noble, Rachel; Wade, Timothy J.

    2015-01-01

    Recent studies showing an association between fecal indicator organisms (FIOs) in sand and gastrointestinal (GI) illness among beachgoers with sand contact have important public health implications because of the large numbers of people who recreate at beaches and engage in sand contact activities. Yet, factors that influence fecal pollution in beach sand remain unclear. During the 2007 National Epidemiological and Environmental Assessment of Recreational (NEEAR) Water Study, sand samples were collected at three locations (60 m apart) on weekend days (Sat, Sun) and holidays between June and September at two marine beaches — Fairhope Beach, AL and Goddard Beach, RI — with nearby publicly-owned treatment works (POTWs) outfalls. F+ coliphage, enterococci, Bacteroidales, fecal Bacteroides spp., and Clostridium spp. were measured in sand using culture and qPCR-based calibrator-cell equivalent methods. Water samples were also collected on the same days, times and transects as the 144 sand samples and were assayed using the same FIO measurements. Weather and environmental data were collected at the time of sample collection. Mean FIO concentrations in sand varied over time, but not space. Enterococci CFU and CCE densities in sand were not correlated, although other FIOs in sand were. The strongest correlation between FIO density in sand and water was fecal Bacteroides CCE, followed by enterococci CFU, Clostridium spp. CCE, and Bacteroidales CCE. Overall, the factors associated with FIO concentrations in sand were related to the sand–water interface (i.e., sand-wetting) and included daily average densities of FIOs in water, rainfall, and wave height. Targeted monitoring that focuses on daily trends of sand FIO variability, combined with information about specific water quality, weather, and environmental factors may inform beach monitoring and management decisions to reduce microbial burdens in beach sand. The views expressed in this paper are those of the authors

  8. Panoramic-Based Mandibular Indices and Bone Mineral Density of Femoral Neck and Lumbar Vertebrae in Women

    PubMed Central

    Marandi, S.; Bagherpour, A.; Imanimoghaddam, M.; Hatef, MR.; Haghighi, AR.

    2010-01-01

    Objective: The aim of this cross-sectional analytic study was to evaluate the diagnostic efficacy of panoramic-based indices of the mandible (Mental Index-MI, Mandibular Cortical Index-MCI and Panoramic Mandibular Index-PMI) and to determine their correlation with bone mineral density (BMD) of the femoral neck and lumbar vertebrae (L2-L4) in order to assess the possibility of using these parameters as indicators of osteoporosis. Materials and Methods: The mandibular indices of 67 women over 35 years old were measured from panoramic radiographs, and bone densitometry was performed in the femoral neck and lumbar vertebrae (L2-L4), using DXA (Dual Energy X-ray Absorptiometry) technique. The patients were divided into three categories of normal, osteopenic and osteoporotic in each skeletal region. One-way ANOVA and ROC curve analyses were applied. The results were considered statistically significant when the P-value was less than 0.05. Results: Comparing the mean BMD in the femoral neck in women between C1 and C3 subgroups of MCI, a significant difference was detected (P=0.04). The mean PMI in the three skeletal subgroups was not different according to the skeletal region (P>0.05). We found a significant difference in mean MI between normal and osteopenic subgroups in the femoral neck (P=0.042). Conclusion: Using radiomorphometric indices of the mandible (MCI-MI) may be useful in determining the skeletal status of the patients, but is not sufficient for precise evaluation. PMID:21998782

  9. REVEALING VELOCITY DISPERSION AS THE BEST INDICATOR OF A GALAXY's COLOR, COMPARED TO STELLAR MASS, SURFACE MASS DENSITY, OR MORPHOLOGY

    SciTech Connect

    Wake, David A.; Van Dokkum, Pieter G.; Franx, Marijn

    2012-06-01

    Using data of nearby galaxies from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey we investigate whether stellar mass (M{sub star}), central velocity dispersion ({sigma}), surface mass density ({Sigma}), or the Sersic n parameter is best correlated with a galaxy's rest-frame color. Specifically, we determine how the mean color of galaxies varies with one parameter when another is fixed. When M{sub star} is fixed we see that strong trends remain with all other parameters, whereas residual trends are weaker when {Sigma}, n, or {sigma} is fixed. Overall {sigma} is the best indicator of a galaxy's typical color, showing the largest residual color dependence when any of the other three parameters are fixed, and M{sub star} is the poorest. Other studies have indicated that both the central black hole mass and possibly host dark matter halo properties (mass or concentration) are also better correlated with {sigma} than with M{sub star}, {Sigma}, or n. Therefore, it could be the case that the strong correlation between color and {sigma} reflects an underlying relationship between a galaxy's star formation history and/or present star formation rate and the properties of its dark matter halo and/or the feedback from its central supermassive black hole.

  10. Fermat's principle and the formal equivalence of local light-ray rotation and refraction at the interface between homogeneous media with a complex refractive index ratio.

    PubMed

    Sundar, Bhuvanesh; Hamilton, Alasdair C; Courtial, Johannes

    2009-02-01

    We derive a formal description of local light-ray rotation in terms of complex refractive indices. We show that Fermat's principle holds, and we derive an extended Snell's law. The change in the angle of a light ray with respect to the normal of a refractive index interface is described by the modulus of the refractive index ratio; the rotation around the interface normal is described by the argument of the refractive index ratio. PMID:19183663

  11. How Common are Refractive Effects in Pulsar Scintillation?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stinebring, D. R.; Hole, K.; Foster, S. R.

    1998-05-01

    Refractive effects have been noticed in pulsar observations for more than twenty years, although they have not always been identified as such. These effects include pulsar flux variations on time scales of days to years, tilted scintles and fringe patterns in dynamic spectra, and elongation of VLBI images of pulsars. Of particular interest are those phenomena, such as fringing or multiple-imaging, that indicate an excess of fluctuation power at the refractive size scale compared to that expected from a Kolmogorov extrapolation from the diffractive size scale. The frequency of occurrence of such events has not been well characterized. Recently, Rickett, Lyne, and Gupta (1997, MNRAS, 287, 739) underscored the remarkable sensitivity of dynamic spectra observations for probing multiple-imaging effects. They found an instance of multiple imaging in which the flux density from the secondary ray path was only 0.0016 times the flux density of the primary ray path, and the separation between the ray directions was more than 10 times larger than the diffractive image size! How prevalent are such remarkable events? We have applied a similar secondary spectrum analysis to a data set of dynamic spectra obtained by one of us (RSF) in 1991-92 at the NRAO 42-m telescope. A total of 22 pulsars were observed at 8 quarterly epochs over these two years at both 800 MHz and 1330 MHz. We have analyzed these data paying particular attention to weak features in the secondary spectra. We will present the results of this analysis in an effort to quantify how often strong refractive effects are present in pulsar scintillation data.

  12. Refractive index change in dissociating shocked benzene

    SciTech Connect

    Erskine, D.J.

    1994-06-01

    A calculation is made of the refractive index of a shocked solution of hydrocarbon species and spheroidal carbon particles that would be the dissociation products of benzene. The results is evaluated for benzene shocked to 15 GPa, both for an arbitrary endpoint distribution of products and reactant, and for a specific endpoint distribution suggested by a statistical-mechanical calculation. In the case of diamond particles, the refractive index is predicted to decrease by a small amount (from 1.96 to 1.75) as the dissociation proceeds. In the case of graphite particles of large oblateness, the refractive index could increase significantly through the dissociation (from 1.96 to 2.75 for infinitely oblate platelets). Thus the measurement of the time dependent refractive index through the dissociation of shocked benzene can indicate the morphology of the carbon particulates as well as the time scale for this reaction. We propose using the refractive index as a measure of completion of the dissociation reaction. This would allow a determination of the instantaneous amount of carbon in particulate form, information which is valuable in conjunction with Mie scattering experiments for example.

  13. Refracting boundaries in thin film glass lightguides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turner, A. F.; Browning, S. D.

    1980-02-01

    The paper describes experimental studies of refraction at a straightline boundary between evaporated glass lightguides and evaporated thin film overlays of SbO3 with index 2.10. Attention is given to sample preparation, measurement procedures, and computations. It is noted that Snell's law gives the total change of mode indices on each side of the boundary are used.

  14. Lidar measurements of refractive propagation effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Philbrick, C. R.; Blood, D. W.

    1995-02-01

    A multi-wavelength Raman lidar has been developed and used to measure the profiles of atmospheric properties in the troposphere under a wide range of geophysical conditions. The instrument measures the two physical properties which contribute to the refractive index at radio frequencies, water vapor concentration profiles from vibrational Raman measurements and neutral density determined from rotational Raman temperature profiles and surface pressure. The LAMP lidar instrument is transportable and has been used to make measurements at several locations in addition to our local Penn State University site, including shipboard measurements between Arctic and Antarctic and in the coastal environment at Point Mugu, CA. Lidar measurements of the atmospheric refractive environment, which are of particular interest, were made during 1993 at Point Mugu, CA, including the period of Project VOCAR (Variability of Coastal Atmospheric Refractivity). Both the lidar and balloon tropospheric measurements have been used for analyses of the propagation conditions by employing th Navy's RPO, IREPS and EREPS PC programs and comparisons have been made with the measured propagation conditions. On the short term (hour-to-hour throughout the day), the lidar derived profiles permit the examination of refractive layer stratification for guided-wave mode propagation.

  15. Colored Flag by Double Refraction.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reid, Bill

    1994-01-01

    Describes various demonstrations that illustrate double refraction and rotation of the plane of polarization in stressed, transparent plastics, with the consequent production of colored designs. (ZWH)

  16. STARS: the Stellar Absorption and Refraction Sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yee, Jeng-Hwa; Morrison, Daniel; Murphy, Graham A.; Morgan, M. F.; Humm, David C.; Silverglate, Peter R.; Vervack, Ronald; Paxton, Larry J.

    2002-01-01

    The Stellar Absorption and Refraction Sensor (STARS) is a compact, large-aperture instrument that combines a UV-IR imaging spectrograph with a co-aligned visible-light imager to make simultaneous absorptive and refractive stellar occultation measurements. The absorption measurements provided by the spectrograph allow the determination of vertical profiles of atmospheric constituents. The coincident refraction observations made by the image yield high-precision measurements of atmospheric density, pressure, and temperature and provide independent knowledge of both the refracted light path and Rayleigh extinction, which are critical in reducing the uncertainty in the retrieved constituent profiles in the lower atmosphere. STARS employs a two-axis gimbaled telescope to acquire and track the star and a two-axis, high-precision, fast-steering mirror to correct for spacecraft jitter and maintain the star within the spectrograph field of view. The relative star position measured by the imager provides position feedback to the active tracking loop of the fast-steering mirror. With funding from NASA's Instrument Incubator Program, a laboratory facility has been developed to demonstrate the overall instrument performance and, in particular, its capability to acquire and track a setting, refracting, and scintillating star, to compensate for various degrees of platform jitter, and to provide the pointing knowledge required for accurate determination of the atmospheric quantities. The combination of built-in image tracking and motion compensation capabilities, small size, and limited spacecraft resource requirements makes STARS and its tracking mechanism suitable for deployment on existing and future commercial spacecraft platforms for applications that require high-precision pointing. In this paper, we present details of the instrument design and its expected performance based on our laboratory tests.

  17. CHARMS: The Cryogenic, High-Accuracy Refraction Measuring System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frey, Bradley; Leviton, Douglas

    2004-01-01

    The success of numerous upcoming NASA infrared (IR) missions will rely critically on accurate knowledge of the IR refractive indices of their constituent optical components at design operating temperatures. To satisfy the demand for such data, we have built a Cryogenic, High-Accuracy Refraction Measuring System (CHARMS), which, for typical 1R materials. can measure the index of refraction accurate to (+ or -) 5 x 10sup -3 . This versatile, one-of-a-kind facility can also measure refractive index over a wide range of wavelengths, from 0.105 um in the far-ultraviolet to 6 um in the IR, and over a wide range of temperatures, from 10 K to 100 degrees C, all with comparable accuracies. We first summarize the technical challenges we faced and engineering solutions we developed during the construction of CHARMS. Next we present our "first light," index of refraction data for fused silica and compare our data to previously published results.

  18. Comparison of capture-recapture and visual count indices of prairie dog densities in black-footed ferret habitat

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fagerstone, Kathleen A.; Biggins, Dean E.

    1986-01-01

    Black-footed ferrets (Mustela nigripes) are dependent on prairie dogs (Cynomys spp.) for food and on their burrows for shelter and rearing young. A stable prairie dog population may therefore be the most important factor determining the survival of ferrets. A rapid method of determining prairie dog density would be useful for assessing prairie dog density in colonies currently occupied by ferrets and for selecting prairie dog colonies in other areas for ferret translocation. This study showed that visual counts can provide a rapid density estimate. Visual counts of white-tailed prairie dogs (Cynomys leucurus) were significantly correlated (r = 0.95) with mark-recapture population density estimates on two study areas near Meeteetse, Wyoming. Suggestions are given for use of visual counts.

  19. Bone density of the arm and forearm as an age indicator in specimens of stranded striped dolphins (Stenella coeruleoalba).

    PubMed

    Guglielmini, Carlo; Zotti, Alessandro; Bernardini, Daniele; Pietra, Marco; Podestá, Michela; Cozzi, Bruno

    2002-07-01

    The age of odontocetes living in the wild is determined mainly by analysis of dentine layers in sections of the teeth. We examined a series of specimens from striped dolphins (Stenella coeruleoalba, Meyen, 1833) that had stranded along the Italian coast of the Mediterranean sea. The present study analyzes and describes bone density in the arm and forearm of the stranded specimens, and correlates the data with total body length of the animal and age as determined by the number of dentine layers in sections of the teeth. According to our model, age can be predicted on the basis of bone density and total body length of the stranded animal. This is the first study to use bone density as a biological parameter to understand the wear and tear of life in the sea. The results suggest that bone density is a new tool for recording age in wild odontocetes. PMID:12115272

  20. Regular shock refraction in planar ideal MHD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delmont, P.; Keppens, R.

    2010-03-01

    We study the classical problem of planar shock refraction at an oblique density discontinuity, separating two gases at rest, in planar ideal (magneto)hydrodynamics. In the hydrodynamical case, 3 signals arise and the interface becomes Richtmyer-Meshkov unstable due to vorticity deposition on the shocked contact. In the magnetohydrodynamical case, on the other hand, when the normal component of the magnetic field does not vanish, 5 signals will arise. The interface then typically remains stable, since the Rankine-Hugoniot jump conditions in ideal MHD do not allow for vorticity deposition on a contact discontinuity. We present an exact Riemann solver based solution strategy to describe the initial self similar refraction phase. Using grid-adaptive MHD simulations, we show that after reflection from the top wall, the interface remains stable.

  1. GRAVSAT/GEOPAUSE refraction study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Llewellyn, S. K.

    1977-01-01

    A ground station network tracked a high altitude spacecraft which in turn tracked a low orbiting satellite. Orbit data are relayed back to the ground stations. A refraction study was performed on this configuration to compute ionospheric and tropospheric refraction effects along the satellite and ground links.

  2. Is the decrease of the total electron energy density a covalence indicator in hydrogen and halogen bonds?

    PubMed

    Angelina, Emilio L; Duarte, Darío J R; Peruchena, Nélida M

    2013-05-01

    In this work, halogen bonding (XB) and hydrogen bonding (HB) complexes were studied with the aim of analyzing the variation of the total electronic energy density H(r b ) with the interaction strengthening. The calculations were performed at the MP2/6-311++G(2d,2p) level of approximation. To explain the nature of such interactions, the atoms in molecules theory (AIM) in conjunction with reduced variational space self-consistent field (RVS) energy decomposition analysis were carried out. Based on the local virial theorem, an equation to decompose the total electronic energy density H(r b ) in two energy densities, (-G(r b )) and 1/4∇(2)ρ(r b ), was derived. These energy densities were linked with the RVS interaction energy components. Through the connection between both decomposition schemes, it was possible to conclude that the decrease in H(r b ) with the interaction strengthening observed in the HB as well as the XB complexes, is mainly due to the increase in the attractive electrostatic part of the interaction energy and in lesser extent to the increase in its covalent character, as is commonly considered. PMID:23187685

  3. Comparison of atmospheric refraction at radar and optical wavelengths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kunz, Gerard; Heemskerk, Eric; van Eijk, Lex

    2005-10-01

    A study is carried out to classify possible combinations of refractivity conditions for RF and IR over a wide range of meteorological conditions using different micrometeorological bulk models. The calculated refractivity profiles are analyzed for evaporation duct height (EDH), mainly relevant for RF propagation, and for gradients of the modified refractivity at different heights, relevant for both RF and IR propagation. These refractivity gradients are a direct indicator for the occurrence of sub- or super refraction at the height of interest. The present study reveals that under humid and unstable conditions evaporation ducts are found at approximately 3+/-2 m above cold (5°C) waters and at approximately 8+/-5 m over warm waters (25°C). Under dry conditions, these duct heights are approximately 9+/-5 m and 20+/-10 m, respectively. Duct heights decrease with increasing wind speed. Under humid and near-neutral conditions, duct heights range from 1 to 25 m, and decrease with increasing air temperature and/or wind speed. On the other hand, for dry and near-neutral conditions, and also for neutral conditions, the duct height is not well defined. Values between 1 m and 100 m are found, with an irregular dependence on air temperature and wind speed. Reliable modeling of duct height under these conditions remains questionable due to a lack of vertical mixing in the surface layer. The paper also shows that all four combinations of RF and IR sub- and super-refraction can occur in the atmosphere. The occurrence of a specific combination depends predominantly on temperature and humidity, and to a relatively minor part on wind speed. The magnitude of refraction effects in the two spectral bands is not necessarily coupled but varies with environmental conditions and height. Sub-sub refraction is generally weak and occurs under neutral conditions or at large heights. Super-super refraction occurs under warm and dry conditions and can reach medium strengths. RF

  4. Spatial variation in density and size structure indicate habitat selection throughout life stages of two Southwestern Atlantic snappers.

    PubMed

    Aschenbrenner, Alexandre; Hackradt, Carlos Werner; Ferreira, Beatrice Padovani

    2016-02-01

    The early life history of Lutjanus alexandrei and Lutjanus jocu in Southwestern Atlantic is still largely unknown. Habitat use of different life stages (i.e. size categories and densities) of the Brazilian snapper (L. alexandrei) and dog snapper (L. jocu) was examined in a tropical portion of NE coast of Brazil. Visual surveys were conducted in different shallow habitats (mangroves and reefs). Both snapper species showed higher densities in early life stages in mangrove habitat, with a clear increase in fish size from mangrove to adjacent reefs. Post-settler individuals were exclusively found in mangroves for both species. Juveniles of L. alexandrei were also registered only in mangroves, while sub-adult individuals were associated with both mangrove and reef habitats. Mature individuals of L. alexandrei were only observed in reef habitats. Juvenile and sub-adult individuals of the dog snapper were both associated with mangrove and reef habitats, with high densities registered in mangroves. Mature individuals of L. jocu were not registered in the study area. This pattern suggests preference for mangrove habitat in early life stages for both species. Ontogenetic movement between habitats was also recorded. This pattern denotes habitat selection across different life cycle of both species. Such information highlights the importance of directing management and conservation efforts to these habitats to secure the continuity of contribution to adult populations. PMID:26599976

  5. The inverse problem of refraction travel times, part II: Quantifying refraction nonuniqueness using a three-layer model

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ivanov, J.; Miller, R.D.; Xia, J.; Steeples, D.

    2005-01-01

    . Insufficient a priori information during the inversion is the reason why refraction methods often may not produce desired results or even fail. This work also demonstrates that the application of the smoothing constraints, typical when solving ill-posed inverse problems, has a dual and contradictory role when applied to the ill-posed inverse problem of refraction travel times. This observation indicates that smoothing constraints may play such a two-fold role when applied to other inverse problems. Other factors that contribute to inverse-refraction-problem nonuniqueness are also considered, including indeterminacy, statistical data-error distribution, numerical error and instability, finite data, and model parameters. ?? Birkha??user Verlag, Basel, 2005.

  6. Control of silicon oxynitrides refractive index by reactive-assisted ion beam sputter deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ida, Michel; Chaton, Patrick; Rafin, B.

    1994-11-01

    This paper presents the properties of silicon oxynitrides obtained by reactive ion beam sputter deposition: Dual Ion Beam System. Control of refractive index was achieved by adjusting the process parameters as ion beam current, ion beam energy and reactive gas partial pressure of oxygen and nitrogen. The main difficulty was to achieve stoichiometric nitride, it has been shown that energetic ionized nitrogen was needed to obtain silicon nitride. The major parameter, to obtain variable compositions between silica and silicon nitride, was the oxygen partial pressure with a fixed nitrogen partial pressure. Optical constants in the visible range, refractive index and extinction coefficient, have been measured by spectrophotometry and spectroscopic ellipsometry. Stoichiometry, contamination and packing density have been measured by Rutherford Backscattering and Nuclear Reaction Analysis. The correlation between the film composition and optical constants is shown. Various test results indicate that silicon oxynitrides obtained by reactive assisted ion beam sputtering are high quality optical materials. These films are homogeneous isotropic, with a high packing density. The extinction coefficient is in the order of 10-4 after 300 degree(s)C annealing. All values of refractive index between 1.49 and 2.1 can be chosen.

  7. Crustal structure of the northern Gulf of Mexico from potential fields and seismic refraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Norton, I. O.; Van Avendonk, H. J.; Christeson, G. L.; Eddy, D. R.

    2013-12-01

    A recent seismic refraction program in the northern offshore Gulf of Mexico (US waters) has greatly enhanced understanding of the crustal structure of this previously poorly-known region. These data are the first to show how crustal thickness varies across this area. Interpretations of crustal types derived from the refraction data have helped to delineate regions of oceanic and extended continental crust, as well as regions of crustal thickening probably associated with synrift volcanism. Onshore, however, there is still a lack of refraction data so understanding of crustal structure and therefore extension history is poorly constrained. Potential field modeling can help address this issue. It is well know that gravity modeling by itself can yield many different interpretations of density distributions and hence crustal structure. Combined with refraction data these interpretations can be much better constrained. In this study crustal structure for the onshore northern Gulf of Mexico is derived from the offshore refraction data combined with regional gravity and magnetic data, along with EarthScope interpretations of crust thickness. The lack of observed rift faulting in deep seismic reflection data in the region has long been a puzzle, as the several hundreds of kilometers of extension implied by plate reconstructions should have resulted in extensive faulting. The potential field data does suggest the existence of deep grabens parallel to the coast, associated with large magnetic anomalies that may indicate a partly magmatic margin in agreement with some published interpretations. These new interpretations are used to build a model of crustal evolution of the Gulf of Mexico.

  8. Photoresist Exposure Parameter Extraction from Refractive Index Change during Exposure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sohn, Young-Soo; Sung, Moon-Gyu; Lee, Young-Mi; Lee, Eun-Mi; Oh, Jin-Kyung; Byun, Sung-Hwan; Jeong, Yeon-Un; Oh, Hye-Keun; An, Ilsin; Lee, Kun-Sang; Park, In-Ho; Cho, Joon-Yeon; Lee, Sang-Ho

    1998-12-01

    The refractive indices of photoresist are usually measured byan ellipsometer or spectrophotometer, but the values are limited to pre-exposure. It is known thatthe real and imaginary indices are changed during the exposure.But there is little report on these variations since itis difficult to measure this refractive index change at deep ultraviolet. The DillABC parameters show a significant variation with the resist and substrate thicknessas well as the experimental conditions.A method is suggested to extract the parameters from the refractive index changes.We can get the refractive index change and extract the Dill ABC exposure parameters from that.The multiple thin film interference calculation is used to fit the measured transmittance data.The results of our experiments and calculations for several resists including193 nm chemically amplified resists are compared with other methods.The results are agreed well with the full multilayer thin film simulation.

  9. Dielectric Optical-Controllable Magnifying Lens by Nonlinear Negative Refraction.

    PubMed

    Cao, Jianjun; Shang, Ce; Zheng, Yuanlin; Feng, Yaming; Chen, Xianfeng; Liang, Xiaogan; Wan, Wenjie

    2015-01-01

    A simple optical lens plays an important role for exploring the microscopic world in science and technology by refracting light with tailored spatially varying refractive indices. Recent advancements in nanotechnology enable novel lenses, such as, superlens and hyperlens, with sub-wavelength resolution capabilities by specially designed materials' refractive indices with meta-materials and transformation optics. However, these artificially nano- or micro-engineered lenses usually suffer high losses from metals and are highly demanding in fabrication. Here, we experimentally demonstrate, for the first time, a nonlinear dielectric magnifying lens using negative refraction by degenerate four-wave mixing in a plano-concave glass slide, obtaining magnified images. Moreover, we transform a nonlinear flat lens into a magnifying lens by introducing transformation optics into the nonlinear regime, achieving an all-optical controllable lensing effect through nonlinear wave mixing, which may have many potential applications in microscopy and imaging science. PMID:26149952

  10. Dielectric Optical-Controllable Magnifying Lens by Nonlinear Negative Refraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Jianjun; Shang, Ce; Zheng, Yuanlin; Feng, Yaming; Chen, Xianfeng; Liang, Xiaogan; Wan, Wenjie

    2015-07-01

    A simple optical lens plays an important role for exploring the microscopic world in science and technology by refracting light with tailored spatially varying refractive indices. Recent advancements in nanotechnology enable novel lenses, such as, superlens and hyperlens, with sub-wavelength resolution capabilities by specially designed materials’ refractive indices with meta-materials and transformation optics. However, these artificially nano- or micro-engineered lenses usually suffer high losses from metals and are highly demanding in fabrication. Here, we experimentally demonstrate, for the first time, a nonlinear dielectric magnifying lens using negative refraction by degenerate four-wave mixing in a plano-concave glass slide, obtaining magnified images. Moreover, we transform a nonlinear flat lens into a magnifying lens by introducing transformation optics into the nonlinear regime, achieving an all-optical controllable lensing effect through nonlinear wave mixing, which may have many potential applications in microscopy and imaging science.

  11. Dielectric Optical-Controllable Magnifying Lens by Nonlinear Negative Refraction

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Jianjun; Shang, Ce; Zheng, Yuanlin; Feng, Yaming; Chen, Xianfeng; Liang, Xiaogan; Wan, Wenjie

    2015-01-01

    A simple optical lens plays an important role for exploring the microscopic world in science and technology by refracting light with tailored spatially varying refractive indices. Recent advancements in nanotechnology enable novel lenses, such as, superlens and hyperlens, with sub-wavelength resolution capabilities by specially designed materials’ refractive indices with meta-materials and transformation optics. However, these artificially nano- or micro-engineered lenses usually suffer high losses from metals and are highly demanding in fabrication. Here, we experimentally demonstrate, for the first time, a nonlinear dielectric magnifying lens using negative refraction by degenerate four-wave mixing in a plano-concave glass slide, obtaining magnified images. Moreover, we transform a nonlinear flat lens into a magnifying lens by introducing transformation optics into the nonlinear regime, achieving an all-optical controllable lensing effect through nonlinear wave mixing, which may have many potential applications in microscopy and imaging science. PMID:26149952

  12. High refractive index photocurable resins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morford, Robert V.; Mercado, Ramil L.; Planje, Curtis E.; Flaim, Tony D.

    2005-04-01

    The performance of optoelectronic devices can be increased by incorporating a high refractive index layer into the system. This paper describes several potential high refractive index resin candidates. Our materials include the added advantages over other systems because the new materials are cationically photocurable and free flowing, have low shrinkage upon cure, have no (or little) volatile organic components, are applicable by a variety of methods (dip coating, roller coating, injection molding, or film casting), can be applied in a variety of thicknesses (10-100 m), are fast-curing, and possess robust physical properties. Particular attention focuses on the refractive index in the visible spectrum, light transmission, and formulation viscosity.

  13. Development of a contact lens for refracting aquatic animals.

    PubMed

    Spielman, S L; Gruber, S H

    1983-01-01

    Development of a new technique for refracting the eye of unwieldy and large aquatic organisms in air is presented. The technique employs a contact lens to simulate underwater conditions. Refraction is performed through a flat front surface with an ophthalmoscope or a streak retinoscope. Data from 11 carcharhinid sharks (four species) indicate that the smaller eyes of inshore species are defocused relative to the eyes of offshore species. PMID:6646759

  14. Designing refractive beam shapers via aberration theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laskin, Alexander; Shealy, David

    2014-10-01

    In this paper, we use aberration theory to design a refractive laser beam shaper in the configuration of two-aspheric lenses, whose analytical equations are known, but rather complicated. Specifically, we use results from third order aberration theory to obtain the parameters of the refracting laser beam shaper from the transverse aberration, which are then used as a starting point for further optimization by using optical design software. This approach was developed during the beginning of the twentieth century, works well for systems with a low numerical aperture, and allows one to define the following parameters of an optical system: radii of curvature, indices of refraction, thicknesses or air gaps, and conic constants of second order aspheric surfaces. We shall consider surfaces of the second-order spherical and conic sections and shall consider the example of designing of a two-lens beam shaper of the Keplerian 1-to-1 telescopic design providing a theoretical flat phase front and a flat-top irradiance profile of the output beam, where the ray mapping function from the input aperture to the output aperture is known from the literature. Explicit expression for third order longitudinal aberration and the Seidel coefficients are expressed in terms beam waist and input beam geometrical parameter, indices, lens radii and conic constants.

  15. Transverse chromatic aberration after corneal refractive surgery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anera, R. G.; Jiménez, J. R.; Jiménez del Barco, L.; Hita, E.

    2005-05-01

    An expression has been deduced theoretically from a schematic-eye model, for the transverse or lateral chromatic aberration (TCA) after refractive surgery. The aim was to investigate analytically how chromatic aberration varies after the emmetropization process. These changes in the TCA have been characterized from changes in corneal asphericity. The results indicate that TCA after refractive surgery diminishes as the degree of myopia increases, a trend contrary to that occurring with monochromatic aberrations, such as spherical or coma. These results can explain the fact that the real deterioration of the visual function under photopic conditions detected in those operated on for myopia is less than expected when only monochromatic aberrations are taken into account.

  16. [Complications of corneal lamellar refractive surgery].

    PubMed

    Kohnen, T; Remy, M

    2015-12-01

    Techniques available for corneal lamellar refractive surgery are laser-assisted in situ keratomileusis (LASIK) using a microkeratome or femtosecond laser incision followed by excimer laser corneal ablation, and femtosecond laser-assisted refractive lenticule extraction (ReLEx). These treatments are nowadays considered to be safe and effective standard procedures for surgical correction of mild to moderate ametropia. Possible complications include too small or decentered optical zones, intraoperative flap cutting errors and postoperative inflammation (e.g. diffuse lamellar keratitis, DLK), epithelial or flap folds, epithelial ingrowths or iatrogenic ectasia. The occurrence of complications may be significantly reduced by compliance to corresponding standards of indication and treatment that are based on current scientific knowledge. PMID:26613941

  17. Refraction effects and wavelength dependence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Claverie, J.; Dion, D.

    2006-09-01

    The performances of Electro-Optical (EO) systems such as visible or infrared cameras, lasers, operating within the Marine Surface Boundary Layer (MSBL), i.e. at heights up to a few tens of meters above the sea surface, are disturbed by various propagation mechanisms: molecular attenuation, aerosol extinction, refraction and turbulence. Refraction is responsible for focusing and defocusing of rays, detection range limitations, mirage formation and angular deviation. The refractive index depends on atmospheric pressure, air temperature and air humidity. Within the optical transmission bands, it also depends on the wavelength. In this paper, the results provided by two different formulations of the refractive index associated with the same ray tracing program are compared and discussed.

  18. Age-Related Shifts in the Density and Distribution of Genetic Marker Water Quality Indicators in Cow and Calf Feces

    EPA Science Inventory

    Recent studies have shown that different adult bovine animal feeding practices dramatically influence fecal indicator bacteria shedding, however very little is known about juvenile milk-fed calves. Calves (≤ 6 months of age) make up about 16% of the current bovine population in ...

  19. Water Quality, Weather and Environmental Factors Associated with Fecal Indicator Organism Density in Beach Sand at Two Recreational Marine Beaches

    EPA Science Inventory

    Recent studies showing an association between fecal indicator organisms (FIOs and gastrointestinal (GI) illness among beachgoers wit sand contact have important public health implicatons because of the large numbers of people who recreate at beaches and engage in sand contact act...

  20. Nonlinear refraction in vitreous humor.

    PubMed

    Rockwell, B A; Roach, W P; Rogers, M E; Mayo, M W; Toth, C A; Cain, C P; Noojin, G D

    1993-11-01

    We extend the application of the z-scan technique to determine the nonlinear refractive index (n(2)) for human and rabbit vitreous humor, water, and physiological saline. In these measurements there were nonlinear contributions to the measured signal from the aqueous samples and the quartz cell that held the sample. Measurements were made with 60-ps pulses at 532 nm. To our knowledge, this is the first measurement of the nonlinear refractive properties of biological material. PMID:19829406

  1. Ammonia Levels and Urine-Spot Characteristics as Cage-Change Indicators for High-Density Individually Ventilated Mouse Cages.

    PubMed

    Washington, Ida M; Payton, Mark E

    2016-01-01

    Mouse cage and bedding changes are potentially stressful to mice and are also labor- and resource-intensive. These changes are often performed on a calendar-based schedule to maintain a clean microenvironment and limit the concentrations of ammonia to which mice and workers are exposed. The current study sought to establish a performance-based approach to mouse cage-changing that uses urine spot characteristics as visual indicators of intracage ammonia levels. Colorimetric ammonia indicators were used to measure ammonia levels in individually-ventilated cages (IVC) housing male or female mice (n =5 per cage) of various strains at 1 to 16 d after cage change. Urine spot characteristics were correlated with ammonia levels to create a visual indicator of the cage-change criterion of 25 ppm ammonia. Results demonstrated a consistent increase in ammonia levels with days since cage change, with cages reaching the cage-change criterion at approximately 10 d for IVC containing male mice and 16 d for those with female mice. Ammonia levels were higher for male than female mice but were not correlated with mouse age. However, urine spot diameter, color, and edge characteristics were strongly correlated with ammonia levels. Husbandry practices based on using urine spot characteristics as indicators of ammonia levels led to fewer weekly cage changes and concomitant savings in labor and resources. Therefore, urine spot characteristics can be used as visual indicators of intracage ammonia levels for use of a performance (urine spot)-based approach to cage-changing frequency that maintains animal health and wellbeing. PMID:27177558

  2. Effects of combined sewer overflow and stormwater on indicator bacteria concentrations in the Tama River due to the high population density of Tokyo Metropolitan area.

    PubMed

    Ham, Young-Sik; Kobori, Hiromi; Takasago, Masahisa

    2009-05-01

    The indicator bacteria (standard plate count, total coliform, and fecal coliform bacteria) concentrations have been investigated using six ambient habitats (population density, percent sewer penetration, stream flow rate (m(3)/sec), percent residential area, percent forest area and percent agricultural area) in the Tama River basin in Tokyo, Japan during June 2003 to January 2005. The downstream and tributary Tama River showed higher concentrations of TC and FC bacteria than the upstream waters, which exceeded an environmental quality standard for rivers and a bathing water quality criterion. It was estimated that combined sewer overflow (CSO) and stormwater effluents contributed -4-23% to the indicator bacteria concentrations of the Tama River. The results of multiple regression analyses show that the indicator bacteria concentrations of Tama River basin are significantly affected by population density. It is concluded that the Tama River received a significant bacterial contamination load originating from the anthropogenic source. PMID:18484184

  3. Empirical estimates of cumulative refraction errors associated with procedurally constrained levelings based on the Gaithersburg-Tucson Refraction Tests of the National Geodetic Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castle, Robert O.; Gilmore, Thomas D.; Mark, Robert K.; Shaw, Roger H.

    1985-05-01

    Analyses of results of the National Geodetic Survey's leveling refraction tests indicate that the standard deviation about the mean (σ) for high-scale minus low-scale rod readings closely correlates with measured refraction error. Use of this relation in conjunction with values for σ obtained from routinely constrained surveys provides a basis for estimating the refraction error associated with levelings of stipulated order and class.

  4. Empirical estimates of cumulative refraction errors associated with procedurally constrained levelings based on the Gaithersburg- Tucson refraction tests of the National Geodetic Survey.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Castle, R.O.; Gilmore, T.D.; Mark, R.K.; Shaw, R.H.

    1985-01-01

    Analyses of results of the National Geodetic Survey's leveling refraction tests indicate that the standard deviation about the mean (sigma) for high-scale minus low-scale rod readings closely correlates with measured refraction error. Use of this relation in conjunction with values for sigma obtained from routinely constrainted surveys provides a basis for estimating the refraction error associated with levelings of stipulated order and class. -Authors

  5. Biexciton induced refractive index changes in a semiconductor quantum dot

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shojaei, S.

    2015-06-01

    We present a detailed theoretical study of linear and third order nonlinear refractive index changes in a optically driven disk-like GaN quantum dot. In our numerical calculations, we consider the three level system containing biexciton, exciton, and ground states and use the compact density matrix formalism and iterative method to obtain refractive index changes. Variational method through effective mass approximation are employed to calculate the ground state energy of biexciton and exciton states. The evolution of refractive index changes around one, two and three photon resonance is investigated and discussed for different quantum dot sizes and light intensities. Size-dependent three-photon nonlinear refractive index change versus incident photon energy compared to that of two-photon is obtained and analyzed. As main result, we found that around resonance frequency at exciton-biexciton transition the quantum confinement has great influence on the linear change in refractive index so that for very large quantum dots, it decreases. Moreover, it was found that third order refractive index changes for three photon process is strongly dependent on QD size and light intensity. Our study reveals that considering our simple model leads to results which are in good agreement with other rare numerical results. Comparison with experimental results has been done.

  6. Spatial and Temporal Heterogeneities of Aedes albopictus Density in La Reunion Island: Rise and Weakness of Entomological Indices

    PubMed Central

    Boyer, Sebastien; Foray, Coralie; Dehecq, Jean-Sebastien

    2014-01-01

    Following the 2006 Chikungunya disease in La Reunion, questions were raised concerning the monitoring survey of Aedes albopictus populations and the entomological indexes used to evaluate population abundance. The objectives of the present study were to determine reliable productivity indexes using a quantitative method to improve entomological surveys and mosquito control measures on Aedes albopictus. Between 2007 and 2011, 4 intervention districts, 24 cities, 990 areas and over 850,000 houses were used to fulfil those objectives. Four indexes including the classical Stegomyia index (House Index, Container Index, Breteau Index) plus an Infested Receptacle Index were studied in order to determine whether temporal (year, month, week) and/or spatial (districts, cities, areas) heterogeneities existed. Temporal variations have been observed with an increase of Ae. albopictus population density over the years, and a seasonality effect with a highest population during the hot and wet season. Spatial clustering was observed at several scales with an important autocorrelation at the area scale. Moreover, the combination among these results and the breeding site productivity obtained during these 5 years allowed us to propose recommendations to monitor Aedes albopictus by eliminating not the most finding sites but the most productive ones. As the other strategies failed in La Reunion, this new approach should should work better. PMID:24637507

  7. Spatial and temporal heterogeneities of Aedes albopictus density in La Reunion Island: rise and weakness of entomological indices.

    PubMed

    Boyer, Sebastien; Foray, Coralie; Dehecq, Jean-Sebastien

    2014-01-01

    Following the 2006 Chikungunya disease in La Reunion, questions were raised concerning the monitoring survey of Aedes albopictus populations and the entomological indexes used to evaluate population abundance. The objectives of the present study were to determine reliable productivity indexes using a quantitative method to improve entomological surveys and mosquito control measures on Aedes albopictus. Between 2007 and 2011, 4 intervention districts, 24 cities, 990 areas and over 850,000 houses were used to fulfil those objectives. Four indexes including the classical Stegomyia index (House Index, Container Index, Breteau Index) plus an Infested Receptacle Index were studied in order to determine whether temporal (year, month, week) and/or spatial (districts, cities, areas) heterogeneities existed. Temporal variations have been observed with an increase of Ae. albopictus population density over the years, and a seasonality effect with a highest population during the hot and wet season. Spatial clustering was observed at several scales with an important autocorrelation at the area scale. Moreover, the combination among these results and the breeding site productivity obtained during these 5 years allowed us to propose recommendations to monitor Aedes albopictus by eliminating not the most finding sites but the most productive ones. As the other strategies failed in La Reunion, this new approach should should work better. PMID:24637507

  8. Carbon Density Is an Indicator of Mass Accommodation Coefficient of Water on Organic-Coated Water Surface.

    PubMed

    Ergin, Gözde; Takahama, Satoshi

    2016-05-12

    The condensational growth of a water droplet follows water vapor accommodation and is described by the mass accommodation coefficient, α. To determine α for droplets coated by straight chain and branched alcohols, we perform molecular dynamics simulations with umbrella sampling and direct impinging. The free energy profiles of water from gas phase to bulk water coated by organic are estimated by the former method. These free energy profiles exhibit a barrier to accommodation in the monolayers containing alcohols with zero and one-level of branching. However, the barrier is not observed for monolayers containing alcohols with two-levels of branching. These profiles and friction coefficients estimated from simulation are used to calculate α from the transition state and Grote-Hynes theory. Results are compared with sticking probabilities estimated from direct impinging simulations, and their differences are interpreted through processes included in each theory. At a low surface coverage of these surface active molecules, the underlying bulk solution is exposed and the resistance to vapor accommodation is reduced. We estimate the carbon density in water surfaces coated by straight-chain alcohols, branched alcohols, and straight-chain fatty acids used in study by Takahama and Russell,1 and show that this quantity is related monotonically to the mass accommodation coefficient. PMID:27089481

  9. Evaluation of tumor angiogenesis measured with microvessel density (MVD) as a prognostic indicator in nasopharyngeal carcinoma: Results of RTOG 9505

    SciTech Connect

    Foote, Robert L. . E-mail: foote.robert@mayo.edu; Weidner, Noel; Harris, Jonathan; Hammond, Elizabeth; Lewis, Jean E.; Vuong, Te; Ang, K. Kian; Fu, Karen K.

    2005-03-01

    Purpose: The objective of this study was to evaluate tumor angiogenesis as measured by microvessel density (MVD) as an independent prognostic factor in patients with nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) treated with radiotherapy alone. Methods and materials: Eligible patients included those with NPC treated with radiotherapy. Paraffin blocks of the primary tumor had a hematoxylin and eosin-stained section prepared at the block face. One representative section for tumor was stained for factor VIII-related antigen using a standard immunoperoxidase staining technique. MVD was determined by light microscopy in areas of invasive tumor containing the highest numbers of capillaries and microvessels per area. Individual microvessel counts were made on a 200x field within the area of most intense tumor neovascularization. Results were expressed as the highest number of microvessels identified within any single 200x field. Using a breakpoint of MVD < 60 vs. {>=}60, the distributions between the two MVD groups were compared by the method of Gray. Overall survival rates were estimated by the Kaplan-Meier method and compared by the log-rank test. A multivariate Cox proportional hazard model was employed to examine the relationship between MVD and disease outcomes while adjusting for other concomitant variables. Results: One hundred sixty-six were eligible, of whom 123 had values determined for MVD. The MVD values ranged from 9 to 243 with a median of 70. In the multivariate analysis of overall survival, distant metastases, and local-regional failure, MVD did not significantly improve the model containing T stage, N stage, age, radiation dose, and World Health Organization class. Conclusions: We found no significant differences in overall survival, time to distant metastasis, or time to local-regional failure using a breakpoint of MVD < 60 vs. MVD {>=}60. The study was perhaps limited by the small size of the NPC samples.

  10. Tissue refractive index as marker of disease

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Zhuo; Tangella, Krishnarao; Balla, Andre; Popescu, Gabriel

    2011-11-01

    The gold standard in histopathology relies on manual investigation of stained tissue biopsies. A sensitive and quantitative method for in situ tissue specimen inspection is highly desirable, as it would allow early disease diagnosis and automatic screening. Here we demonstrate that quantitative phase imaging of entire unstained biopsies has the potential to fulfill this requirement. Our data indicates that the refractive index distribution of histopathology slides, which contains information about the molecular scale organization of tissue, reveals prostate tumors and breast calcifications. These optical maps report on subtle, nanoscale morphological properties of tissues and cells that cannot be recovered by common stains, including hematoxylin and eosin. We found that cancer progression significantly alters the tissue organization, as exhibited by consistently higher refractive index variance in prostate tumors versus normal regions. Furthermore, using the quantitative phase information, we obtained the spatially resolved scattering mean free path and anisotropy factor g for entire biopsies and demonstrated their direct correlation with tumor presence. In essence, our results show that the tissue refractive index reports on the nanoscale tissue architecture and, in principle, can be used as an intrinsic marker for cancer diagnosis.

  11. Determination of the index of refraction for [alpha]-NTO and DAAF using the Becke test

    SciTech Connect

    Oldenborg, M. R.; Peterson, P. D.; Lee, K. Y.

    2004-01-01

    NTO and DAAF are insensitive high explosives developed at Los Alamos National Laboratory. Both the defense and civilian sectors have particular interest in these types of materials for applications ranging from weapons to air bag design. The performance of explosives is highly dependent on particle size. Many common techniques for measuring particle size distributions require knowledge of the material's index of refraction. To-date the principle refractive indices of {alpha}-NTO and DAAF have not been determined. We present the three principle indices of refraction for the triclinic explosive {alpha}-NTO and an averaged index of refraction for DAAF found using the Becke Test. In addition, by comparing particle size distributions based on different refractive indices we show the importance of using the true index of refraction in measuring fine particles.

  12. The Predictive Power of Electronic Polarizability for Tailoring the Refractivity of High Index Glasses Optical Basicity Versus the Single Oscillator Model

    SciTech Connect

    McCloy, John S.; Riley, Brian J.; Johnson, Bradley R.; Schweiger, Michael J.; Qiao, Hong; Carlie, Nathan

    2010-06-01

    Four compositions of high density (~8 g/cm3) heavy metal oxide glasses composed of PbO, Bi2O3, and Ga2O3 were produced and refractivity parameters (refractive index and density) were computed and measured. Optical basicity was computed using three different models – average electronegativity, ionic-covalent parameter, and energy gap – and the basicity results were used to compute oxygen polarizability and subsequently refractive index. Refractive indices were measured in the visible and infrared at 0.633 μm, 1.55 μm, 3.39 μm, 5.35 μm, 9.29 μm, and 10.59 μm using a unique prism coupler setup, and data were fitted to the Sellmeier expression to obtain an equation of the dispersion of refractive index with wavelength. Using this dispersion relation, single oscillator energy, dispersion energy, and lattice energy were determined. Oscillator parameters were also calculated for the various glasses from their oxide values as an additional means of predicting index. Calculated dispersion parameters from oxides underestimate the index by 3 to 4%. Predicted glass index from optical basicity, based on component oxide energy gaps, underpredicts the index at 0.633 μm by only 2%, while other basicity scales are less accurate. The predicted energy gap of the glasses based on this optical basicity overpredicts the Tauc optical gap as determined by transmission measurements by 6 to 10%. These results show that for this system, density, refractive index in the visible, and energy gap can be reasonably predicted using only composition, optical basicity values for the constituent oxides, and partial molar volume coefficients. Calculations such as these are useful for a priori prediction of optical properties of glasses.

  13. Morphometric evaluation of the Afşin-Elbistan lignite basin using kernel density estimation and Getis-Ord's statistics of DEM derived indices, SE Turkey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarp, Gulcan; Duzgun, Sebnem

    2015-11-01

    A morphometric analysis of river network, basins and relief using geomorphic indices and geostatistical analyses of Digital Elevation Model (DEM) are useful tools for discussing the morphometric evolution of the basin area. In this study, three different indices including valley floor width to height ratio (Vf), stream gradient (SL), and stream sinuosity were applied to Afşin-Elbistan lignite basin to test the imprints of tectonic activity. Perturbations of these indices are usually indicative of differences in the resistance of outcropping lithological units to erosion and active faulting. To map the clusters of high and low indices values, the Kernel density estimation (K) and the Getis-Ord Gi∗ statistics were applied to the DEM-derived indices. The K method and Gi∗ statistic highlighting hot spots and cold spots of the SL index, the stream sinuosity and the Vf index values helped to identify the relative tectonic activity of the basin area. The results indicated that the estimation by the K and Gi∗ including three conceptualization of spatial relationships (CSR) for hot spots (percent volume contours 50 and 95 categorized as high and low respectively) yielded almost similar results in regions of high tectonic activity and low tectonic activity. According to the K and Getis-Ord Gi∗ statistics, the northern, northwestern and southern parts of the basin indicates a high tectonic activity. On the other hand, low elevation plain in the central part of the basin area shows a relatively low tectonic activity.

  14. Measuring the Terahertz Refractive Index of Boron-Doped Silicon Using a Photoconducting Antenna Terahertz Generator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McNamara, Brendan P.

    The frequency range commonly referred to as the terahertz gap occurs between the infrared and microwave regions of the electromagnetic spectrum. This range of frequencies is highly suited to investigating the free carrier interactions of materials, as the range is particularly sensitive to these interactions. Using terahertz time-domain spectroscopy (THz-TDS), it is possible to measure the effect these interactions have on a terahertz pulse and, using classical optical techniques, determine the terahertz refractive index of a given material, which is directly related to the free carrier spectrum of said material. Knowing the refractive index of a material in the THz range opens the possibility of future terahertz applications for said material, including a non-destructive dopant testing of silicon. In this work, a series of Silicon on Insulator (SOI) wafer samples are implanted with boron in a range of carrier concentrations. Using a photoconducting antenna (PCA), high-frequency laser pulses were converted to THz pulses and the complex terahertz refractive index of the samples was then measured in the 0.2-2 THz frequency range. This measurement is a direct examination of the free carrier spectrum through experimental methods. The results are compared with the predictions of the Drude model for the free carrier spectrum across this frequency range and are found to closely coincide at higher carrier concentrations, indicating that the behavior of free holes in p-type silicon can likely be described classically at high carrier densities, consistent with previous work on n-type silicon.

  15. Characterizing conical refraction optical tweezers.

    PubMed

    McDonald, C; McDougall, C; Rafailov, E; McGloin, D

    2014-12-01

    Conical refraction occurs when a beam of light travels through an appropriately cut biaxial crystal. By focusing the conically refracted beam through a high numerical aperture microscope objective, conical refraction optical tweezers can be created, allowing for particle manipulation in both Raman spots, and in the Lloyd/Poggendorff rings. We present a thorough quantification of the trapping properties of such a beam, focusing on the trap stiffness, and how this varies with trap power and trapped particle location. We show that the lower Raman spot can be thought of as a single-beam optical gradient force trap, while radiation pressure dominates in the upper Raman spot, leading to optical levitation rather than trapping. Particles in the Lloyd/Poggendorff rings experience a lower trap stiffness than particles in the lower Raman spot, but benefit from rotational control. PMID:25490654

  16. Total Negative Refraction: A New Frontier in Optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mascarenhas, Angelo

    2003-10-01

    We are all familiar with positive refraction, in which the incident and transmitted light through an interface of two media with different refractive indices are on opposite sides of the interface normal. If the refractive index is negative for one medium, the refracted light would remain on the same side of the interface normal as the incident light. There have been several recent experimental demonstrations of negative refraction but these are in a small band of microwave frequencies for materials made out of split rings and rods of copper, or photonic lattices. NREL scientists have discovered a new way to realize negative refraction using visible light and real crystals. This new method, utilizing a ferroelastic-twin domain boundary, is applicable to any frequency of the electromagnetic spectrum. The beauty of this new method is that it eliminates all reflection loss and so could be of enormous value for steering high power laser beams as well as electron beams in nano-electronic devices. This talk will present an overview of this exciting new phenomenon.

  17. The Optics of Refractive Substructure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, Michael D.; Narayan, Ramesh

    2016-08-01

    Newly recognized effects of refractive scattering in the ionized interstellar medium have broad implications for very long baseline interferometry (VLBI) at extreme angular resolutions. Building upon work by Blandford & Narayan, we present a simplified, geometrical optics framework, which enables rapid, semi-analytic estimates of refractive scattering effects. We show that these estimates exactly reproduce previous results based on a more rigorous statistical formulation. We then derive new expressions for the scattering-induced fluctuations of VLBI observables such as closure phase, and we demonstrate how to calculate the fluctuations for arbitrary quantities of interest using a Monte Carlo technique.

  18. Relationships among oil density, gross composition, and thermal maturity indicators in northeastern Williston basin oils and their significance for expulsion thresholds and migration pathways

    SciTech Connect

    Osadetz, K.G.; Snowdon, L.R.; Brooks, P.W. )

    1991-06-01

    Oil density ({degree}API), gross composition, and biological market thermal maturity variations in northeastern Williston basin have stratigraphic and geographic significance controlled by migration pathways and source rock composition as it affects hydrocarbon generation and expulsion characteristics. When the depth and density of oil pools is compared to relationships predicted using the correlation between source rock thermal maturity and oil density, several different migration pathways can be inferred. Winnipegosis source oils indicate four paths. Most small pinnacle reef pools are sourced locally, but larger coalesced reefs contain oils migrated long distances through the Lower Member Winnipegosis Formation. Among oils that have migrated past Prairie salts, both locally sourced oils, like those on the flank of the Hummingbird Trough, and more mature, longer migrated oils in Saskatchewan Group reservoirs can be identified. Bakken oils have the longest migration pathways, controlled primarily by a lowstand shoreline sandstone on the eastern side of the basin. Lodgepole-sourced oils dominate Madison Group plays. Northwest of Steelman field, oil density increases primarily due to thermal maturity differences but also because of increasing biodegradation and water-washing that affect the western edge of the play trend. Along the margin of the Hummingbird Trough are a number of deep, medium-gravity pools whose oil compositions are entirely attributable to low thermal maturity and local migration pathways.

  19. A refracting radio telescope. [using ionosphere as lens

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bernhardt, P.; Da Rosa, A. V.

    1977-01-01

    Observations of extraterrestrial radio sources at the lower end of the radio frequency spectrum are limited by reflection of waves from the topside ionosphere and by the large size of antenna apertures necessary for the realization of narrow beamwidths. The use of the ionosphere as a lens is considered. The lens is formed by the release of chemicals such as H2 and H2O at the F2-layer peak. These chemicals promote dissociative recombination of O(+) in the ionosphere resulting in a local reduction in plasma density. Gradients in electron density in the vicinity of the gas release tend to focus rays propagating through the depleted region. Preliminary calculations indicate that a lens capable of focusing cosmic radio waves in the 1 to 10 MHz frequency range may be produced by the release of 100 kg of H2 at the peak of the nighttime F layer. The beamwidth of a refracting radio telescope using this lens may be less than 1/5 degree.

  20. Atmospheric refraction effects on baseline error in satellite laser ranging systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Im, K. E.; Gardner, C. S.

    1982-01-01

    Because of the mathematical complexities involved in exact analyses of baseline errors, it is not easy to isolate atmospheric refraction effects; however, by making certain simplifying assumptions about the ranging system geometry, relatively simple expressions can be derived which relate the baseline errors directly to the refraction errors. The results indicate that even in the absence of other errors, the baseline error for intercontinental baselines can be more than an order of magnitude larger than the refraction error.

  1. Terahertz refractive index sensors using dielectric pipe waveguides.

    PubMed

    You, Borwen; Lu, Ja-Yu; Yu, Chin-Ping; Liu, Tze-An; Peng, Jin-Long

    2012-03-12

    A dielectric pipe waveguide is successfully demonstrated as a terahertz refractive index sensor for powder and liquid-vapor sensing. Without additional engineered structures, a simple pipe waveguide can act as a terahertz resonator based on anti-resonant reflecting guidance, forming multiple resonant transmission-dips. Loading various powders in the ring-cladding or inserting different vapors into the hollow core of the pipe waveguide leads to a significant shift of resonant frequency, and the spectral shift is related to the refractive-index change. The proven detection limit of molecular density could be reduced to 1.6nano-mole/mm3 and the highest sensitivity is demonstrated at around 22.2GHz/refractive-index-unit (RIU), which is comparable to the best THz molecular sensor [Appl. Phys. Lett. 95, 171113 (2009)]. PMID:22418463

  2. Temperature and density characteristics of the Helicity Injected Torus-II spherical tokamak indicating closed flux sustainment using coaxial helicity injection

    SciTech Connect

    Hamp, W. T.; Jarboe, T. R.; Nelson, B. A.; O'Neill, R. G.; Raman, R.; Redd, A. J.; Stewart, B. T.; Mueller, D.

    2008-08-15

    The electron temperature and density profiles of plasmas in the Helicity Injected Torus [HIT-II: T. R. Jarboe et al., Phys. Plasmas 5, 1807 (1998)] experiment are measured by multipoint Thomson scattering (MPTS). The HIT-II device is a small low-aspect-ratio tokamak (major radius 0.3 m, minor radius 0.2 m, toroidal field of up to 0.5 T), capable of inductive ohmic (OH) current drive, Coaxial Helicity Injection (CHI) current drive, or combinations of both. The temperature and density characteristics have been characterized by a ruby laser MPTS diagnostic at up to six locations within the plasma for a single diagnostic time per discharge. Observed hollow temperature profiles of CHI discharges are inconsistent with open flux only predictions for CHI and indicate a closed flux region during CHI current drive.

  3. Index of Refraction without Geometry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Farkas, N.; Henriksen, P. N.; Ramsier, R. D.

    2006-01-01

    This article presents several activities that permit students to determine the index of refraction of transparent solids and liquids using simple equipment without the need for geometrical relationships, special lighting or optical instruments. Graphical analysis of the measured data is shown to be a useful method for determining the index of…

  4. REFLECTION AND REFRACTION, VOLUME 2.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    KLAUS, DAVID J.; AND OTHERS

    THIS VOLUME 2 OF A TWO-VOLUME SET PROVIDES AUTOINSTRUCTION IN PHYSICS. THE UNITS COVERED IN THIS VOLUME ARE (1) REFLECTION OF LIGHT, (2) PHOTOMETRY, (3) POLARIZATION, (4) REFRACTION OF LIGHT, (5) SNELL'S LAW, (6) LENSES, FOCUS, AND FOCAL POINTS, (7) IMAGE FORMATION, AND (8) ABERRATIONS, THE EYE, AND MAGNIFICATION. THE INTRODUCTION AND UNITS ON…

  5. Refractive surgery: keratomileusis and keratophakia.

    PubMed

    Werner, D L

    1986-08-01

    This paper reviews the non-radial keratotomy surgeries that are being performed. The author reviews the literature and suggests an approach toward counseling patients who may be considering these approaches. The paucity of reported studies makes the choice of these alternate procedures somewhat risky, particularly in their refractive predictability. PMID:3528269

  6. Fiber optic refractive index monitor

    DOEpatents

    Weiss, Jonathan David

    2002-01-01

    A sensor for measuring the change in refractive index of a liquid uses the lowest critical angle of a normal fiber optic to achieve sensitivity when the index of the liquid is significantly less than the index of the fiber core. Another embodiment uses a liquid filled core to ensure that its index is approximately the same as the liquid being measured.

  7. Spatial variation of stratospheric aerosol acidity and model refractive index - Implications of recent results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Russell, P. B.; Hamill, P.

    1984-01-01

    Recent experimental results indicate that little or no solid ammonium sulfate is present in background stratospheric aerosols. Other results allow straightforward calculation of sulfuric acid/water droplet properties (acidity, specific gravity, refractive index) as functions of stratospheric temperature and humidity. These results are combined with a variety of latitudinal and seasonal temperature and humidity profiles to obtain corresponding profiles of droplet properties. These profiles are used to update a previous model of stratospheric aerosol refractive index. The new model retains the simplifying approximation of vertically constant refractive index in the inner stratosphere, but has sulfuric acid/water refractive index values that significantly exceed the previously used room temperature values. Mean conversion ratios (e.g., extinction-to-number, backscatter-to-volume) obtained using Mie scattering calculations with the new refractive indices are very similar to those obtained for the old indices, because the effects of deleting ammonium sulfate and increasing acid indices tend to cancel each other.

  8. Refractive Errors - Multiple Languages: MedlinePlus

    MedlinePlus

    ... Are Here: Home → Multiple Languages → All Health Topics → Refractive Errors URL of this page: https://www.nlm.nih. ... V W XYZ List of All Topics All Refractive Errors - Multiple Languages To use the sharing features on ...

  9. [Some physiological and biochemical indicators of underyearling Laxman's shrews (Sorex cecutiens Laxmann) and even-toothed shrews (Sorex isodon Turov) under conditions of different population densities].

    PubMed

    Kiselev, S V; Lazutkin, A N; Yamborko, A V

    2013-01-01

    Based on the results of a study conducted in 2006-2010 in the Buyunda River basin (a feeder of the Kolyma River), the influence of the population density of common shrews (Sorex) on some of the physiological and biochemical parameters (glycogen and lipids in the liver, the relative weight of the spleen, the white and brown adipose tissue cellularity of bone and brain tissue) was investigated. The content of energy reserve substances was correlated with the number of animals (fat deposits had a negative correlation; the glycogen content in the liver had a direct correlation). For the rest of the physiological-biochemical parameters, no significant correlation with the population density was detected, although for the content of brown fat and cellularity of bone marrow tissue in Sorex isodon, as well as the relative weight of the spleen in both species of shrews, a trend was observed. We suggest that the identified physiological changes indicate irregular feeding of animals in years with higher population densities. PMID:24459854

  10. Optical refractive index of massive particles and physical meanings of left-handed media [rapid communication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Jian Qi

    2005-09-01

    In this Letter the expression for the refractive index of de Broglie wave in the presence of a potential field is obtained and based on this, the physical meanings of negative index of refraction is revealed. We demonstrate that the electromagnetic wave propagation in a left-handed medium with negative refractive index behaves just like that of antiphotons, which is required of the complex vector field theory. It is believed that the complex vector field theory is helpful in considering the wave propagation and photonic band gap structures in the left-handed medium photonic crystals with a periodicity in negative and positive indices of refraction.

  11. Theoretical and Experimental Study of Long-Period Grating Refractive Index Sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nidhi; Kaler, R. S.; Kapur, Pawan

    2014-01-01

    This article presents the theoretical and experimental investigation of the response of long-period gratings as a refractive index sensor. Cladding modes are calculated, and results are compared with Optigrating 4.2.2 (Optiwave Systems Inc., Ottawa, Canada). The response has been checked for refractive indices ranging from 1 to 1.458. Theoretically simulated results are in accordance with the experimental results. It was found that the software package calculated values correctly up to the seventh decimal point. The ambient refractive index response of a long-period grating over a much wider index range has been modeled for values both less and more than the cladding refractive index.

  12. Measurement of the refractive index of human teeth by optical coherence tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meng, Zhuo; Yao, X. Steve; Yao, Hui; Liang, Yan; Liu, Tiegen; Li, Yanni; Wang, Guanhua; Lan, Shoufeng

    2009-05-01

    We describe a novel method based on optical coherence tomography (OCT) for the accurate measurement of the refractive index of in vitro human teeth. We obtain the refractive indices of enamel, dentin, and cementum to be 1.631+/-0.007, 1.540+/-0.013, and 1.582+/-0.010, respectively. The profile of the refractive index is readily obtained via an OCT B scan across a tooth. This method can be used to study the refractive index changes caused by dental decay and therefore has great potential for the clinical diagnosis of early dental caries.

  13. Effects of horizontal refractivity gradients on the accuracy of laser ranging to satellites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gardner, C. S.

    1976-01-01

    Numerous formulas have been developed to partially correct laser ranging data for the effects of atmospheric refraction. All the formulas assume the atmospheric refractivity profile is spherically symmetric. The effects of horizontal refractivity gradients are investigated by ray tracing through spherically symmetric and three-dimensional refractivity profiles. The profiles are constructed from radiosonde data. The results indicate that the horizontal gradients introduce an rms error of approximately 3 cm when the satellite is near 10 deg elevation. The error decreases to a few millimeters near zenith.

  14. Development of refraction and strabismus.

    PubMed

    Thorn, F

    2000-10-01

    Research on the etiology and causes of refractive errors has become a very active field of study during the past few years. Most of this research has focused on myopia. But hyperopia and astigmatism are also being examined both in comparison to myopia and in their own right. Animal models have also been developed for the study of experimentally induced myopia and hyperopia. These studies demonstrate the chain of neural and molecular events that occurs in induced myopia and hyperopia with increasing precision. In the future, these results may elucidate the mechanisms that underlie the refractive errors seen in human populations. Research into the development of strabismus has not progressed with the same vigor. The links among hyperopia, accommodative convergence, and strabismus are well established. Numerous neural, oculomotor, and subjective correlates of strabismus are now well established, but there has been a failure to develop the experimental paradigms needed to demonstrate the causal relations among these different factors. PMID:11148693

  15. Electro-refractive photonic device

    SciTech Connect

    Zortman, William A.; Watts, Michael R.

    2015-06-09

    The various technologies presented herein relate to phase shifting light to facilitate any of light switching, modulation, amplification, etc. Structures are presented where a second layer is juxtaposed between a first layer and a third layer with respective doping facilitating formation of p-n junctions at the interface between the first layer and the second layer, and between the second layer and the third layer. Application of a bias causes a carrier concentration change to occur at the p-n junctions which causes a shift in the effective refractive index per incremental change in an applied bias voltage. The effective refractive index enhancement can occur in both reverse bias and forward bias. The structure can be incorporated into a waveguide, an optical resonator, a vertical junction device, a horizontal junction device, a Mach-Zehnder interferometer, a tuneable optical filter, etc.

  16. Measuring the refractive index of thin transparent films using an extended cavity diode laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luetjen, Christopher; Hallsted, Jonathan; Kleinert, Michaela

    2013-12-01

    We report on a novel method for determining refractive indices of thin layers of liquids or gases, based on the use of extended cavity diode lasers. Measurements for air, water, and vegetable oil show excellent agreement with accepted values. Applications in determining the refractive index of thin optical coatings and biological cells are discussed.

  17. Measurement of Refractive Index Gradients by Deflection of a Laser Beam

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barnard, A. J.; Ahlborn, B.

    1975-01-01

    In this simple experiment for an undergraduate laboratory a laser beam is passed through the mixing zone of two liquids with different refractive indices. The spatial variation of the refractive index, at different times during the mixing, can be determined from the observed deflection of the beam. (Author)

  18. Empirical modelling to predict the refractive index of human blood.

    PubMed

    Yahya, M; Saghir, M Z

    2016-02-21

    Optical techniques used for the measurement of the optical properties of blood are of great interest in clinical diagnostics. Blood analysis is a routine procedure used in medical diagnostics to confirm a patient's condition. Measuring the optical properties of blood is difficult due to the non-homogenous nature of the blood itself. In addition, there is a lot of variation in the refractive indices reported in the literature. These are the reasons that motivated the researchers to develop a mathematical model that can be used to predict the refractive index of human blood as a function of concentration, temperature and wavelength. The experimental measurements were conducted on mimicking phantom hemoglobin samples using the Abbemat Refractometer. The results analysis revealed a linear relationship between the refractive index and concentration as well as temperature, and a non-linear relationship between refractive index and wavelength. These results are in agreement with those found in the literature. In addition, a new formula was developed based on empirical modelling which suggests that temperature and wavelength coefficients be added to the Barer formula. The verification of this correlation confirmed its ability to determine refractive index and/or blood hematocrit values with appropriate clinical accuracy. PMID:26807785

  19. Water absorption in a refractive index model for bacterial spores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siegrist, K. M.; Thrush, E.; Airola, M.; Carr, A. K.; Limsui, D. M.; Boggs, N. T.; Thomas, M. E.; Carter, C. C.

    2009-05-01

    The complexity of biological agents can make it difficult to identify the important factors impacting scattering characteristics among variables such as size, shape, internal structure and biochemical composition, particle aggregation, and sample additives. This difficulty is exacerbated by the environmentally interactive nature of biological organisms. In particular, bacterial spores equilibrate with environmental humidity by absorption/desorption of water which can affect both the complex refractive index and the size/shape distributions of particles - two factors upon which scattering characteristics depend critically. Therefore accurate analysis of experimental data for determination of refractive index must take account of particle water content. First, spectral transmission measurements to determine visible refractive index done on suspensions of bacterial spores must account for water (or other solvent) uptake. Second, realistic calculations of aerosol scattering cross sections should consider effects of atmospheric humidity on particle water content, size and shape. In this work we demonstrate a method for determining refractive index of bacterial spores bacillus atropheus (BG), bacillus thuringiensis (BT) and bacillus anthracis Sterne (BAs) which accounts for these effects. Visible index is found from transmission measurements on aqueous and DMSO suspensions of particles, using an anomalous diffraction approximation. A simplified version of the anomalous diffraction theory is used to eliminate the need for knowledge of particle size. Results using this approach indicate the technique can be useful in determining the visible refractive index of particles when size and shape distributions are not well known but fall within the region of validity of anomalous dispersion theory.

  20. Empirical modelling to predict the refractive index of human blood

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yahya, M.; Saghir, M. Z.

    2016-02-01

    Optical techniques used for the measurement of the optical properties of blood are of great interest in clinical diagnostics. Blood analysis is a routine procedure used in medical diagnostics to confirm a patient’s condition. Measuring the optical properties of blood is difficult due to the non-homogenous nature of the blood itself. In addition, there is a lot of variation in the refractive indices reported in the literature. These are the reasons that motivated the researchers to develop a mathematical model that can be used to predict the refractive index of human blood as a function of concentration, temperature and wavelength. The experimental measurements were conducted on mimicking phantom hemoglobin samples using the Abbemat Refractometer. The results analysis revealed a linear relationship between the refractive index and concentration as well as temperature, and a non-linear relationship between refractive index and wavelength. These results are in agreement with those found in the literature. In addition, a new formula was developed based on empirical modelling which suggests that temperature and wavelength coefficients be added to the Barer formula. The verification of this correlation confirmed its ability to determine refractive index and/or blood hematocrit values with appropriate clinical accuracy.

  1. Laser refractive tomography of phase objects

    SciTech Connect

    Raskovskaya, I L

    2013-06-30

    The principles are outlined of laser refractive tomography - a method for reconstructing the values of the refractive index in the cross sections of phase objects, which involves the use of three-dimensional refractive images (3D refractograms) of structured laser radiation. A simulation algorithm is realised and examples are provided of characteristic 3D refractograms obtained by solving the direct problem of refraction of structured radiation. A method was developed for reconstructing the values of refractive index under conditions of strong refraction, which is based on the visualisation of ray trajectories inside an optically inhomogeneous medium. A classification is made of possible approaches to the solution of the inverse problem of refraction based on the visualisation of ray trajectories. Examples are given of cross section reconstruction and quantitative diagnostics of phase objects. (laser imaging)

  2. Corneal polarimetry after LASIK refractive surgery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bueno, Juan M.; Berrio, Esther; Artal, Pablo

    2006-01-01

    Imaging polarimetry provides spatially resolved information on the polarization properties of a system. In the case of the living human eye, polarization could be related to the corneal biomechanical properties, which vary from the normal state as a result of surgery or pathologies. We have used an aberro-polariscope, which we recently developed, to determine and to compare the spatially resolved maps of polarization parameters across the pupil between normal healthy and post-LASIK eyes. The depolarization distribution is not uniform across the pupil, with post-surgery eyes presenting larger levels of depolarization. While retardation increases along the radius in normal eyes, this pattern becomes irregular after LASIK refractive surgery. The maps of slow axis also differ in normal and post-surgery eyes, with a larger disorder in post-LASIK eyes. Since these changes in polarization indicate subtle structural modifications of the cornea, this approach can be useful in a clinical environment to follow the biomechanical and optical changes of the cornea after refractive surgery or for the early diagnosis of different corneal pathologies.

  3. Refractive index measurements of double-cylinder structures found in natural spider silks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Little, Douglas J.; Kane, Deb M.

    2014-05-01

    The silks of Orb-Weaver spiders (family Araneidae) are emerging as fascinating optical materials due to their biocompatibility, ecological sustainability and mechanical robustness. Natural spider silks are mainly spun as double cylinders, with diameters ranging from 0.05 to 10 μm, depending on the species and maturity of the spider. This small size makes the silks difficult to characterize optically with traditional techniques. Here, we present a technique that is capable of measuring both the real and imaginary refractive index components of spider silks. This technique is also a new capability for characterizing micro-optics more generally. It is based on the measurement and analysis of refracted light through the spider silk, or micro-optic, while it is immersed in a liquid of known refractive index. It can be applied at any visible wavelength. Results at 540 nm are reported. Real refractive indices in the range of 1.54-1.58 were measured, consistent with previous studies of spider silks. Large silk-to-silk variability of the p-polarized refractive index was observed of around 0.015, while variability in the s-polarized refractive index was negligible. No discernible difference in the refractive indices of the two cylinders making up the double cylinder silk structure were observed. Measured imaginary refractive indices corresponded to an optical loss of around 14 dB/mm at 540 nm.

  4. Optical negative refraction by four-wave mixing in thin metallic nanostructures.

    PubMed

    Palomba, Stefano; Zhang, Shuang; Park, Yongshik; Bartal, Guy; Yin, Xiaobo; Zhang, Xiang

    2012-01-01

    The law of refraction first derived by Snellius and later introduced as the Huygens-Fermat principle, states that the incidence and refracted angles of a light wave at the interface of two different materials are related to the ratio of the refractive indices in each medium. Whereas all natural materials have a positive refractive index and therefore exhibit refraction in the positive direction, artificially engineered negative index metamaterials have been shown capable of bending light waves negatively. Such a negative refractive index is the key to achieving a perfect lens that is capable of imaging well below the diffraction limit. However, negative index metamaterials are typically lossy, narrow band, and require complicated fabrication processes. Recently, an alternative approach to obtain negative refraction from a very thin nonlinear film has been proposed and experimentally demonstrated in the microwave region. However, such approaches use phase conjugation, which makes optical implementations difficult. Here, we report a simple but different scheme to demonstrate experimentally nonlinear negative refraction at optical frequencies using four-wave mixing in nanostructured metal films. The refractive index can be designed at will by simply tuning the wavelengths of the interacting waves, which could have potential impact on many important applications, such as superlens imaging. PMID:22037671

  5. Optical negative refraction by four-wave mixing in thin metallic nanostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palomba, Stefano; Zhang, Shuang; Park, Yongshik; Bartal, Guy; Yin, Xiaobo; Zhang, Xiang

    2012-01-01

    The law of refraction first derived by Snellius and later introduced as the Huygens-Fermat principle, states that the incidence and refracted angles of a light wave at the interface of two different materials are related to the ratio of the refractive indices in each medium. Whereas all natural materials have a positive refractive index and therefore exhibit refraction in the positive direction, artificially engineered negative index metamaterials have been shown capable of bending light waves negatively. Such a negative refractive index is the key to achieving a perfect lens that is capable of imaging well below the diffraction limit. However, negative index metamaterials are typically lossy, narrow band, and require complicated fabrication processes. Recently, an alternative approach to obtain negative refraction from a very thin nonlinear film has been proposed and experimentally demonstrated in the microwave region. However, such approaches use phase conjugation, which makes optical implementations difficult. Here, we report a simple but different scheme to demonstrate experimentally nonlinear negative refraction at optical frequencies using four-wave mixing in nanostructured metal films. The refractive index can be designed at will by simply tuning the wavelengths of the interacting waves, which could have potential impact on many important applications, such as superlens imaging.

  6. Volumetric, Viscometric, Ultrasonic, and Refractive Index Properties of Liquid Mixtures of Benzene with Industrially Important Monomers at Different Temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ali, A.; Nabi, F.; Tariq, M.

    2009-04-01

    The densities, ρ, viscosities, η, ultrasonic speeds, u, and refractive indices, n D, of pure benzene, methyl acrylate (MA), ethyl acrylate (EA), butyl acrylate (BA), styrene (STY), and their binary liquid mixtures have been measured over the entire composition range at 298.15 K, 303.15 K, 308.15 K, and 313.15 K. The experimental data have been used to calculate excess molar volumes. Partial molar volumes of MA/EA/BA/STY in benzene at infinite dilution and at different temperatures have also been evaluated. The results were discussed in terms of molecular interactions prevailing in the mixtures.

  7. Effects of light refraction on the accuracy of camera calibration and reconstruction in underwater motion analysis.

    PubMed

    Kwon, Young-Hoo; Casebolt, Jeffrey B

    2006-01-01

    One of the most serious obstacles to accurate quantification of the underwater motion of a swimmer's body is image deformation caused by refraction. Refraction occurs at the water-air interface plane (glass) owing to the density difference. Camera calibration-reconstruction algorithms commonly used in aquatic research do not have the capability to correct this refraction-induced nonlinear image deformation and produce large reconstruction errors. The aim of this paper is to provide a through review of: the nature of the refraction-induced image deformation and its behaviour in underwater object-space plane reconstruction; the intrinsic shortcomings of the Direct Linear Transformation (DLT) method in underwater motion analysis; experimental conditions that interact with refraction; and alternative algorithms and strategies that can be used to improve the calibration-reconstruction accuracy. Although it is impossible to remove the refraction error completely in conventional camera calibration-reconstruction methods, it is possible to improve the accuracy to some extent by manipulating experimental conditions or calibration frame characteristics. Alternative algorithms, such as the localized DLT and the double-plane method are also available for error reduction. The ultimate solution for the refraction problem is to develop underwater camera calibration and reconstruction algorithms that have the capability to correct refraction. PMID:16521625

  8. Effects of light refraction on the accuracy of camera calibration and reconstruction in underwater motion analysis.

    PubMed

    Kwon, Young-Hoo; Casebolt, Jeffrey B

    2006-07-01

    One of the most serious obstacles to accurate quantification of the underwater motion of a swimmer's body is image deformation caused by refraction. Refraction occurs at the water-air interface plane (glass) owing to the density difference. Camera calibration-reconstruction algorithms commonly used in aquatic research do not have the capability to correct this refraction-induced nonlinear image deformation and produce large reconstruction errors. The aim of this paper is to provide a thorough review of: the nature of the refraction-induced image deformation and its behaviour in underwater object-space plane reconstruction; the intrinsic shortcomings of the Direct Linear Transformation (DLT) method in underwater motion analysis; experimental conditions that interact with refraction; and alternative algorithms and strategies that can be used to improve the calibration-reconstruction accuracy. Although it is impossible to remove the refraction error completely in conventional camera calibration-reconstruction methods, it is possible to improve the accuracy to some extent by manipulating experimental conditions or calibration frame characteristics. Alternative algorithms, such as the localized DLT and the double-plane method are also available for error reduction. The ultimate solution for the refraction problem is to develop underwater camera calibration and reconstruction algorithms that have the capability to correct refraction. PMID:16939159

  9. Refraction effects in soft x-ray multilayer blazed gratings.

    PubMed

    Voronov, D L; Salmassi, F; Meyer-Ilse, J; Gullikson, E M; Warwick, T; Padmore, H A

    2016-05-30

    A 2500 lines/mm Multilayer Blazed Grating (MBG) optimized for the soft x-ray wavelength range was fabricated and tested. The grating coated with a W/B4C multilayer demonstrated a record diffraction efficiency in the 2nd blazed diffraction order in the energy range from 500 to 1200 eV. Detailed investigation of the diffraction properties of the grating demonstrated that the diffraction efficiency of high groove density MBGs is not limited by the normal shadowing effects that limits grazing incidence x-ray grating performance. Refraction effects inherent in asymmetrical Bragg diffraction were experimentally confirmed for MBGs. The refraction affects the blazing properties of the MBGs and results in a shift of the resonance wavelength of the gratings and broadening or narrowing of the grating bandwidth depending on diffraction geometry. The true blaze angle of the MBGs is defined by both the real structure of the multilayer stack and by asymmetrical refraction effects. Refraction effects can be used as a powerful tool in providing highly efficient suppression of high order harmonics. PMID:27410064

  10. A Simple Theory to Predict Small Changes in Volume and Refractivity During Mixing of a Two-Component Liquid System.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aminabhavi, Tejraj M.

    1983-01-01

    Discusses a set of relations (addressing changes in volume and refractivity) for use in the study of binary systems. Suggests including such an experiment in undergraduate physical chemistry courses (measuring density/refractive index of pure compounds and their mixtures) to predict even small changes occurring during mixing process. (Author/JN)

  11. Diffractively Coupled, Refractively Guided Lasers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Katz, Joseph; Cser, Jim; Marshall, William K.

    1987-01-01

    Semiconductor-laser arrays more reliable, more powerful, and easier to make. Improved design intended to eliminate undesired electromagnetic modes and mode shifts sometimes occuring in gain-guided variety. Reflected from mirror/window at end of common resonator section of laser, energy refracted from each laser enters adjacent laser. Mutual coupling establishes phase relationships among lasers. Monolithic laser array made by standard epitaxial techniques. Made in part with polymeric materials to mitigate some deleterious effects of all-expitaxial processing. Potential applications include optical communications, ranging, printing, and recording.

  12. Auroral radar backscatter at off-perpendicular aspect angles due to enhanced ionospheric refraction

    SciTech Connect

    Uspensky, M.V.; Pivovarov, V.G.; Romanov, V.I.

    1994-09-01

    This paper studies the effect of ionospheric refraction upon auroral radar backscatter under conditions where the aspect angle appears far from ideal, i.e., when the unrefracted ray path trajectory is at least a few degrees from the perpendicular to the Earth`s magnetic field. It is found that wave trapping by curved electron density layers can cause ionospheric refraction as large as 20{degrees}, even at 150 MHz. This suggests that many so-called off-orthogonal VHF echoes are in reality due to backscattering at near-orthogonal aspect angles, the discrepancy arising from increased ionospheric refraction by curved or tilted layers. 28 refs., 3 figs.

  13. Automation, Operation, and Data Analysis in the Cryogenic, High Accuracy, Refraction Measuring System (CHARMS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frey, Bradley J.; Leviton, Douglas B.

    2005-01-01

    The Cryogenic High Accuracy Refraction Measuring System (CHARMS) at NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center has been enhanced in a number of ways in the last year to allow the system to accurately collect refracted beam deviation readings automatically over a range of temperatures from 15 K to well beyond room temperature with high sampling density in both wavelength and temperature. The engineering details which make this possible are presented. The methods by which the most accurate angular measurements are made and the corresponding data reduction methods used to reduce thousands of observed angles to a handful of refractive index values are also discussed.

  14. Automation, Operation, and Data Analysis in the Cryogenic, High Accuracy, Refraction Measuring System (CHARMS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frey, Bradley; Leviton, Duoglas

    2005-01-01

    The Cryogenic High Accuracy Refraction Measuring System (CHARMS) at NASA s Goddard Space Flight Center has been enhanced in a number of ways in the last year to allow the system to accurately collect refracted beam deviation readings automatically over a range of temperatures from 15 K to well beyond room temperature with high sampling density in both wavelength and temperature. The engineering details which make this possible are presented. The methods by which the most accurate angular measurements are made and the corresponding data reduction methods used to reduce thousands of observed angles to a handful of refractive index values are also discussed.

  15. Auroral radar backscatter at off-perpendicular aspect angles due to enhanced ionospheric refraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uspensky, M. V.; Williams, P. J. S.; Romanov, V. I.; Pivovarov, V. G.; Sofko, G. J.; Koehler, J. A.

    1994-09-01

    This paper studies the effect of ionospheric refraction upon auroral radar backscatter under conditions where the aspect angle appears far from ideal, i.e., when the unrefracted ray path trajectory is at least a few degrees from the perpendicular to the Earth's magnetic field. It is found that wave trapping by curved electron density layers can cause ionospheric refraction as large as 20 deg, even at 150 MHz. This suggests that many so-called off-orthogonal VHF echoes are in reality due to backscattering at near-orthogonal aspect angles, the discepancy arising from increased ionospheric refraction by curved or tilted layers.

  16. On a photonic density of states of cholesteric liquid crystal cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oganesyan, K. B.; Gevorgyan, A. H.; Kocharian, A. N.; Vardanyan, G. A.; Chilingaryan, Yu. S.; Santrosyan, E. A.; Rostovtsev, Y. V.

    2014-10-01

    The photonic densities of states (PDS) of the eigen polarizations (EPs) in a cholesteric liquid crystal (CLC) filled with the Fabry-Perot (FP) resonator are calculated. We obtained the dependences for the PDS on the FP resonator plates refractive indices. We showed, that the decrement and increment of the FP resonator plates refractive indices (started with the value, n = nm , where nm is the mean value of the CLC refractive index) lead to a sharp increase of the maximum PDS and, consequently, lead to a sharp decrement of the laser excitation threshold. The absorption and emission peculiarities of this system are investigated too. It is shown that the subject system can work as a low threshold laser.

  17. Peripheral refraction in normal infant rhesus monkeys

    PubMed Central

    Hung, Li-Fang; Ramamirtham, Ramkumar; Huang, Juan; Qiao-Grider, Ying; Smith, Earl L.

    2008-01-01

    Purpose To characterize peripheral refractions in infant monkeys. Methods Cross-sectional data for horizontal refractions were obtained from 58 normal rhesus monkeys at 3 weeks of age. Longitudinal data were obtained for both the vertical and horizontal meridians from 17 monkeys. Refractive errors were measured by retinoscopy along the pupillary axis and at eccentricities of 15, 30, and 45 degrees. Axial dimensions and corneal power were measured by ultrasonography and keratometry, respectively. Results In infant monkeys, the degree of radial astigmatism increased symmetrically with eccentricity in all meridians. There were, however, initial nasal-temporal and superior-inferior asymmetries in the spherical-equivalent refractive errors. Specifically, the refractions in the temporal and superior fields were similar to the central ametropia, but the refractions in the nasal and inferior fields were more myopic than the central ametropia and the relative nasal field myopia increased with the degree of central hyperopia. With age, the degree of radial astigmatism decreased in all meridians and the refractions became more symmetrical along both the horizontal and vertical meridians; small degrees of relative myopia were evident in all fields. Conclusions As in adult humans, refractive error varied as a function of eccentricity in infant monkeys and the pattern of peripheral refraction varied with the central refractive error. With age, emmetropization occurred for both central and peripheral refractive errors resulting in similar refractions across the central 45 degrees of the visual field, which may reflect the actions of vision-dependent, growth-control mechanisms operating over a wide area of the posterior globe. PMID:18487366

  18. Centration axis in refractive surgery.

    PubMed

    Arba Mosquera, Samuel; Verma, Shwetabh; McAlinden, Colm

    2015-01-01

    The human eye is an asymmetric optical system and the real cornea is not a rotationally symmetrical volume. Each optical element in the eye has its own optical and neural axes. Defining the optimum center for laser ablation is difficult with many available approaches. We explain the various centration approaches (based on these reference axes) in refractive surgery and review their clinical outcomes. The line-of-sight (LOS) (the line joining the entrance pupil center with the fixation point) is often the recommended reference axis for representing wavefront aberrations of the whole eye (derived from the definition of chief ray in geometrical optics); however pupil centration can be unstable and change with the pupil size. The corneal vertex (CV) represents a stable preferable morphologic reference which is the best approximate for alignment to the visual axis. However, the corneal light reflex can be considered as non-constant, but dependent on the direction of gaze of the eye with respect to the light source. A compromise between the pupil and CV centered ablations is seen in the form of an asymmetric offset where the manifest refraction is referenced to the CV while the higher order aberrations are referenced to the pupil center. There is a need for a flexible choice of centration in excimer laser systems to design customized and non-customized treatments optimally. PMID:26605360

  19. Statistical Analysis of Refractivity in UAE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al-Ansari, Kifah; Al-Mal, Abdulhadi Abu; Kamel, Rami

    2007-07-01

    This paper presents the results of the refractivity statistics in the UAE (United Arab Emirates) for a period of 14 years (1990-2003). Six sites have been considered using meteorological surface data (Abu Dhabi, Dubai, Sharjah, Al-Ain, Ras Al-Kaimah, and Al-Fujairah). Upper air (radiosonde) data were available at one site only, Abu Dhabi airport, which has been considered for the refractivity gradient statistics. Monthly and yearly averages are obtained for the two parameters, refractivity and refractivity gradient. Cumulative distributions are also provided.

  20. Material and Optical Densities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gluck, Paul

    2007-01-01

    The bending of a laser beam in a medium with a density and refractive index gradient in the same direction has been described previously. When a transparent container is half filled with a salt or sugar solution and an equal amount of water is floated on top of it, then diffusion will create a concentration gradient from top to bottom. A laser…

  1. Refractive index change during exposure for 193-nm chemically amplified resists

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oh, Hye-Keun; Sohn, Young-Soo; Sung, Moon-Gyu; Lee, Young-Mi; Lee, Eun-Mi; Byun, Sung Hwan; An, Ilsin; Lee, Kun-Sang; Park, In-Ho

    1999-06-01

    Some of the important areas to be improved for lithography simulation are getting correct exposure parameters and determining the change of refractive index. It is known that the real and imaginary refractive indices are changed during exposure. We obtained these refractive index changes during exposure for 193 nm chemically amplified resists. The variations of the transmittance as well as the resist thickness were measured during ArF excimer laser exposure. We found that the refractive index change is directly related to the concentration of the photo acid generator and de-protected resin. It is important to know the exact values of acid concentration from the exposure parameters since a small difference in acid concentration magnifies the variation in the amplified de-protection during post exposure bake. We developed and used a method to extract Dill ABC exposure parameters for 193 nm chemically amplified resist from the refractive index change upon exposure.

  2. Decoupling the refractive index from the electrical properties of transparent conducting oxides via periodic superlattices.

    PubMed

    Caffrey, David; Norton, Emma; Coileáin, Cormac Ó; Smith, Christopher M; Bulfin, Brendan; Farrell, Leo; Shvets, Igor V; Fleischer, Karsten

    2016-01-01

    We demonstrate an alternative approach to tuning the refractive index of materials. Current methodologies for tuning the refractive index of a material often result in undesirable changes to the structural or optoelectronic properties. By artificially layering a transparent conducting oxide with a lower refractive index material the overall film retains a desirable conductivity and mobility while acting optically as an effective medium with a modified refractive index. Calculations indicate that, with our refractive index change of 0.2, a significant reduction of reflective losses could be obtained by the utilisation of these structures in optoelectronic devices. Beyond this, periodic superlattice structures present a solution to decouple physical properties where the underlying electronic interaction is governed by different length scales. PMID:27623228

  3. Detection of analyte refractive index and concentration using liquid-core photonic Bragg fibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Jingwen; Qu, Hang; Skorobogatiy, Maksim

    2016-03-01

    We demonstrate detection of liquid analyte refractive index by using a hollow-core photonic Bragg fiber. We apply this fiber sensor to monitor concentrations of commercial cooling oil. The sensor operates on a spectral modality. Variation in the analyte refractive index modifies the bandgap guidance of a fiber, leading to spectral shifts in the fiber transmission spectrum. The sensitivity of the sensor to changes in the analyte refractive index filling in the fiber core is found to be 1460nm/Refractive index unit (RIU). By using the spectral modality and effective medium theory, we determine the concentrations of commercial fluid from the measured refractive indices with an accuracy of ~0.42%. The presented fiber sensor can be used for on-line monitoring of concentration of many industrial fluids and dilutions with sub-1%v accuracy.

  4. Refractive index determination using the central focal masking technique with dispersion colors.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wilcox, R.E.

    1983-01-01

    The procedures, precision, advantages and limitations of central focal masking ("dispersion staining'), a technique for determining the refractive indices of microfragments by the immersion method and for distinguishing between minerals in an immersion mount, are described. -J.A.Z.

  5. Influence of refraction index strength on the light propagation in dielectrics material with periodic refraction index

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hidayat, Arif; Latifah, Eny; Kurniati, Diana; Wisodo, Hari

    2016-04-01

    This study investigated the influence of refraction index strength on the light propagation in refraction index-varied dielectric material. This dielectric material served as photonic lattice. The behavior of light propagation influenced by variation of refraction index in photonic lattice was investigated. Modes of the guiding light were determined numerically using squared-operator iteration method. It was found that the greater the strength of refraction index, the smaller the guiding modes.

  6. The association of very low-density lipoprotein receptor (VLDLR) haplotypes with egg production indicates VLDLR is a candidate gene for modulating egg production.

    PubMed

    Wang, ZhePeng; Meng, GuoHua; Li, Na; Yu, MingFen; Liang, XiaoWei; Min, YuNa; Liu, FuZhu; Gao, YuPeng

    2016-01-01

    The very low-density lipoprotein receptor (VLDLR) transports egg yolk precursors into oocytes. However, our knowledge of the distribution patterns of VLDLR variants among breeds and their relationship to egg production is still incomplete. In this study, eight single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) that account for 87% of all VLDLR variants were genotyped in Nick Chick (NC, n=91), Lohmann Brown (LohB, n=50) and Lueyang (LY, n=381) chickens, the latter being an Chinese indigenous breed. Egg production by NC and LY chickens was recorded from 17 to 50 weeks. Only four similar haplotypes were found in NC and LohB, of which two accounted for 100% of all NC haplotypes and 92.5% of LohB haplotypes. In contrast, there was considerable haplotypic diversity in LY. Comparison of egg production in LY showed that hens with NC-like haplotypes had a significantly higher production (p < 0.05) than those without the haplotypes. However, VLDLR expression was not significantly different between the haplotypes. These findings indicate a divergence in the distribution of VLDLR haplotypes between selected and non-selected breeds and suggest that the near fixation of VLDLR variants in NC and LohB is compatible with signature of selection. These data also support VLDLR as a candidate gene for modulating egg production. PMID:27560838

  7. The association of very low-density lipoprotein receptor (VLDLR) haplotypes with egg production indicates VLDLR is a candidate gene for modulating egg production

    PubMed Central

    Wang, ZhePeng; Meng, GuoHua; Li, Na; Yu, MingFen; Liang, XiaoWei; Min, YuNa; Liu, FuZhu; Gao, YuPeng

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The very low-density lipoprotein receptor (VLDLR) transports egg yolk precursors into oocytes. However, our knowledge of the distribution patterns of VLDLR variants among breeds and their relationship to egg production is still incomplete. In this study, eight single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) that account for 87% of all VLDLR variants were genotyped in Nick Chick (NC, n=91), Lohmann Brown (LohB, n=50) and Lueyang (LY, n=381) chickens, the latter being an Chinese indigenous breed. Egg production by NC and LY chickens was recorded from 17 to 50 weeks. Only four similar haplotypes were found in NC and LohB, of which two accounted for 100% of all NC haplotypes and 92.5% of LohB haplotypes. In contrast, there was considerable haplotypic diversity in LY. Comparison of egg production in LY showed that hens with NC-like haplotypes had a significantly higher production (p < 0.05) than those without the haplotypes. However, VLDLR expression was not significantly different between the haplotypes. These findings indicate a divergence in the distribution of VLDLR haplotypes between selected and non-selected breeds and suggest that the near fixation of VLDLR variants in NC and LohB is compatible with signature of selection. These data also support VLDLR as a candidate gene for modulating egg production. PMID:27560838

  8. Strong refraction near the Venus surface - Effects observed by descent probes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Croft, T. A.

    1982-01-01

    The telemetry signals from Pioneer Venus probes indicated the strong downward refraction of radio waves. As the probes descended, the strength of the direct signal decreased because of absorption and refractive defocusing. During the last 30 km of descent there was a second measured component in addition to the direct signal. Strong atmospheric reaction is important in strengthening echoes that are scattered toward the earth. Such surface-reflected signals are good indicators of horizontal winds.

  9. Long-term flux density variations of pulsars: Theoretical structure functions and comparisons with observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, A. Z.; Wu, X. J.; Esamdin, A.

    2003-06-01

    By means of the refractive interstellar scintillation theory (RISS), the flux density structure functions of PSRs B1642-03, B0736-40, B0740-28 and B0329+54 are calculated and compared with the observations at 610 MHz by Stinebring et al. (\\cite{Stinebring00}, hereafter S2000). The theoretical results are in good agreement with observations and the spectra of the electron density fluctuation are all consistent with the Kolmogorov spectra. The theoretical modulation indices m are comparatively less sensitive to the distance H from the observer to the scattering screen but critically depend on the scattering strength line CN2. The structure function does not change remarkably with the variation of H if the scattering screen is closer to the pulsar than to the observer. The results in this paper indicate that the flux density variations observed for these four pulsars are due to a propagation effect (refractive scintillation), not to the intrinsic variability.

  10. Predictive value of lipoprotein indices for residual risk of acute myocardial infarction and sudden death in men with low-density lipoprotein cholesterol levels <120 mg/dl.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Fumitaka; Makita, Shinji; Onoda, Toshiyuki; Tanno, Kozo; Ohsawa, Masaki; Itai, Kazuyoshi; Sakata, Kiyomi; Omama, Shin-Ichi; Yoshida, Yuki; Ogasawara, Kuniaki; Ogawa, Akira; Ishibashi, Yasuhiro; Kuribayashi, Toru; Okayama, Akira; Nakamura, Motoyuki

    2013-10-15

    Several epidemiologic studies have demonstrated that plasma low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) profile is a key risk indicator for coronary heart disease (CHD). However, almost half of all patients with CHD have normal LDL-C levels. A total of 7,931 male subjects aged ≥40 years from the general population with no cardiovascular history and no use of lipid-lowering agents were followed for incidence of acute myocardial infarction (AMI) and sudden death. Of the 4,827 participants with LDL-C levels <120 mg/dl, 55 subjects had a first AMI/sudden death during an average of 5.5 years of follow-up. After adjustment for confounding factors, multiadjusted hazard ratios (HRs) were increased by 1 SD for non-high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (non-HDL-C; HR = 1.36, 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.02 to 1.81), total cholesterol (TC)/HDL-C ratio (HR = 1.40, 95% CI: 1.11 to 1.78) and LDL-C/HDL-C ratio (HR = 1.32, 95% CI: 1.02 to 1.73) but not for LDL-C (HR = 1.09, 95% CI: 0.82 to 1.44) and HDL-C (HR = 0.84, 95% CI: 0.68 to 1.04). When stratified as categorical variables on the basis of points with highest accuracy on receiver operating characteristic analysis, non-HDL-C levels >126 mg/dl (HR = 1.25, 95% CI: 1.03 to 1.51), TC/HDL-C ratio above 3.5 (HR = 1.22, 95% CI: 1.01 to 1.48) and LDL-C/HDL-C ratio >1.9 (HR = 1.25, 95% CI: 1.04 to 1.51) had increased multiadjusted HRs for AMI/sudden death. In conclusion, in men with LDL-C levels <120 mg/dl, non HDL-C, TC/HDL-C, and LDL-C/HDL-C ratios have predictive value for residual risk of AMI/sudden death. PMID:23831165

  11. Effect of parallel refraction on magnetospheric upper hybrid waves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Engel, J.; Kennel, C. F.

    1984-01-01

    Large amplitude (not less than 10 mV/m) electrostatic plasma waves near the upper hybrid (UH) frequency have been observed from 0 to 50 deg magnetic latitude (MLAT) during satellite plasma-pause crossings. A three-dimensional numerical ray-tracing calculation, based on an electron distribution measured during a GEOS 1 dayside intense upper-hybrid wave event, suggests how UH waves might achieve such large amplitudes away from the geomagnetic equator. Refractive effects largely control the wave amplification and, in particular, the unavoidable refraction due to parallel geomagnetic field gradients restricts growth to levels below those observed. However, a cold electron density gradient parallel to the field can lead to upper hybrid wave growth that can account for the observed emission levels.

  12. Refractive beryllium x-ray lens with variable focal length

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cederstroem, Bjoern; Danielsson, Mats; Lundqvist, Mats

    2001-01-01

    A refractive lens for hard X-rays comprising two saw-tooth profiles is presented. This lens has the same focusing properties as a parabolic compound refractive lens. One advantage is the remarkably low fabrication cost, since curved surfaces are replaced by planar ones. In addition, the focal length of the lens can be easily varied by adjusting the angle between the two halves. Since the index of refraction depends on the X-ray energy, the lens is chromatic and acts as a band- pass filter for a broad energy spectrum. Combined with the tunability of the focal length, this allows versatile spectral shaping of the X-ray beam. Calculations and numerical examples of the focusing properties are presented. Due to its low atomic number, beryllium is an excellent choice for refractive optics and a prototype in beryllium has been fabricated using diamond turning technique. Surface metrology shows a deviation from the ideal shape of about 400 nm rms, indicating a loss of intensity of between 20% and 50%, depending on the geometry an X-ray energy.

  13. Building achromatic refractive beam shapers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laskin, Alexander; Shealy, David

    2014-10-01

    Achromatic beam shapers can provide beam shaping in a certain spectral band and are very important for various laser techniques, such as, applications based on ultra-short pulse lasers with pulse width <100 fs, confocal microscopy, multicolour holography, life sciences fluorescence techniques, where several lasers in spectrum 405-650 nm are used simultaneously, for example 405-650 nm. Conditions of energy re-distribution and zero wave aberration are strictly fulfilled in ordinary plano-aspheric lens pair beam shapers for a definite wavelength only. Hence, these beam shapers work efficiently in relatively narrow, few nm spectrum. To provide acceptable beam quality for refractive beam shaping over a wide spectrum, an achromatizing design condition should be added. Consequently, the typical beam shaper design contains more than two-lenses, to avoid any damaging and other undesirable effects the lenses of beam shaper should be air-spaced. We suggest a two-step method of designing the beam shaper: 1) achromatizing of each plano-aspheric lens using a buried achromatizing surface ("chromatic radius"), then each beam shaper component presents a cemented doublet lens, 2) "splitting" the cemented lenses and realizing air-spaced lens design using optical systems design software. This method allows for using an achromatic design principle during the first step of the design, and then, refining the design by using optimization software. We shall present examples of this design procedure for an achromatic Keplerian beam shaper and for the design of an achromatic Galilean type of beam shaper. Experimental results of operation of refractive beam shapers will be presented as well.

  14. Ionospheric refraction correction in radio astronomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chai, Yan; Han, Wen-Jun

    1986-10-01

    Using Snell's law in polar coordinates, the ionospheric refraction effects on the declination and right ascension determination are discussed in this paper. A ray tracing method is also given. With the ionospheric data observed in Beijing, the correction of ionospheric refraction is estimated and some useful conclusions are drawn.

  15. Polymers for refractive index change in intraocular lenses: a novel approach for photoinduced tuning of focal length

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Träger, Jens; Kim, Hee-Cheol; Hampp, Norbert

    2006-02-01

    Before an intraocular lens (IOL) is implanted during cataract surgery, biometric data of the patient's eye have to be determined to calculate the thickness and shape of the IOL. In particular the postoperative anterior chamber depth is an important parameter to predict the correct shape of the IOL. This value, however, cannot be measured without significant uncertainities. We present a solution to this problem, describe novel polymers suitable for IOLs which refractive indices can be changed non-invasively in a photo-induced process. The focal length can be modified by about 2 D, which is sufficient to achive ideal acuteness of vision for almost all patients with implanted IOLs. The change in refractive index is accomplished by linking or cleaving bonds between a sufficiently large number of side groups of the polymer main chain in a photoinduced cyloaddition or cycloreversion, respectively. The photochemical reaction can also be triggered by a two-photon process (TPA) using a pulsed laser system, i.e. the energy required for bond breaking is provided by two photons in the visible range. Light in the UV as well as the visible range of the spectrum cannot induce undesired changes of the refractive index owing to the strong UV-absorption of the cornea and photon densities much too low for TPA, respectively. Due to the excellent spatial resolution that can be achieved with two-photon processes not only modification of the refractive index of the entire lens but also selectively in well defined areas is possible enabling the correction for aberrations such as astigmatism.

  16. Retinal Image Simulation of Subjective Refraction Techniques.

    PubMed

    Perches, Sara; Collados, M Victoria; Ares, Jorge

    2016-01-01

    Refraction techniques make it possible to determine the most appropriate sphero-cylindrical lens prescription to achieve the best possible visual quality. Among these techniques, subjective refraction (i.e., patient's response-guided refraction) is the most commonly used approach. In this context, this paper's main goal is to present a simulation software that implements in a virtual manner various subjective-refraction techniques--including Jackson's Cross-Cylinder test (JCC)--relying all on the observation of computer-generated retinal images. This software has also been used to evaluate visual quality when the JCC test is performed in multifocal-contact-lens wearers. The results reveal this software's usefulness to simulate the retinal image quality that a particular visual compensation provides. Moreover, it can help to gain a deeper insight and to improve existing refraction techniques and it can be used for simulated training. PMID:26938648

  17. Optical Evaluation of a Refractive Secondary Concentrator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jaworske, Donald A.; Wong, Wayne A.; Skowronski, Timothy J.

    1999-01-01

    Refractive secondary concentrators are being considered for solar thermal applications because of their ability to archive maximum efficiency through the use of total internal reflection for the concentration and distribution of solar energy. A prototype refractive secondary concentrator was built based on ray tracing analysis to demonstrate this collection and distribution concept. The design included a conical secondary concentrator and a faceted extractor. The objective of this effort was to functionally evaluate the performance of the refractive secondary concentrator/extractor prototype and to compare the results with modeling. Most of the light was found to exit the refractive secondary concentrator through the extractor. In addition, the degree of attenuation encountered by the light as it passed through the refractive secondary concentrator was of interest. Quantifying optical output and validating the modeling will provide further understanding of the efficiency of the prototype and will provide insight for additional design and materials selection activities.

  18. Retinal Image Simulation of Subjective Refraction Techniques

    PubMed Central

    Perches, Sara; Collados, M. Victoria; Ares, Jorge

    2016-01-01

    Refraction techniques make it possible to determine the most appropriate sphero-cylindrical lens prescription to achieve the best possible visual quality. Among these techniques, subjective refraction (i.e., patient’s response-guided refraction) is the most commonly used approach. In this context, this paper’s main goal is to present a simulation software that implements in a virtual manner various subjective-refraction techniques—including Jackson’s Cross-Cylinder test (JCC)—relying all on the observation of computer-generated retinal images. This software has also been used to evaluate visual quality when the JCC test is performed in multifocal-contact-lens wearers. The results reveal this software’s usefulness to simulate the retinal image quality that a particular visual compensation provides. Moreover, it can help to gain a deeper insight and to improve existing refraction techniques and it can be used for simulated training. PMID:26938648

  19. Refraction in electrically thin inhomogeneous media.

    PubMed

    Ruphuy, Miguel; Ramahi, Omar M

    2016-04-01

    This work presents a new formulation for refraction from flat electrically thin lenses and reflectors comprised of inhomogeneous material. Inhomogeneous electrically thin flat lenses and reflectors cannot make use of the Snell law since this classical formulation works solely at interfaces of planar homogeneous media. The refraction of a perpendicularly incident plane wave at a planar interface is physically explained through the phase advance of the rays within the medium. The Huygens principle is then used to construct the refracted wavefront. The formulation is validated using numerical full wave simulation for several examples where the refractive angle is predicted with good accuracy. Furthermore, the formulation gives a physical insight of the phenomenon of refraction from electrically thin inhomogeneous media. PMID:27140761

  20. Complex refractive index of Martian dust - Mariner 9 ultraviolet observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pang, K.; Ajello, J. M.; Hord, C. W.; Egan, W. G.

    1976-01-01

    Mariner 9 ultraviolet spectrometer observations of the 1971 dust clouds obscuring the surface of Mars have been analyzed by matching the observed dust phase function with Mie scattering calculations for size distributions of homogeneous and isotropic material. Preliminary results indicate an effective particle radius of not less than 0.2. The real component of the index of refraction is not less than 1.8 at both 268 and 305 nm; corresponding values for the imagery component are 0.02 and 0.01. These values are consistent with those found by Mead (1970) for the visible and near-visible wavelengths. The refractive index and the absorption coefficient increase rapidly with decreasing wavelength in going from the visible to the ultraviolet, indicating the presence of an ultraviolet absorption band which may shield organisms from ultraviolet irradiation.

  1. Ellipsometric study of molecular orientations of Thermomyces lanuginosus lipase at the air-water interface by simultaneous determination of refractive index and thickness.

    PubMed

    Muth, Marco; Schmid, Reiner P; Schnitzlein, Klaus

    2016-04-01

    Ellipsometric studies of very thin organic films suffer from the low refractive index contrast between layer and bulk substrate. We demonstrate that null ellipsometry can not only provide detailed information about the adsorption kinetics and surface excess values, but in addition on layer thicknesses with submonolayer resolution of a lipase from Thermomyces lanuginosus at the air-water interface. While measuring very close to the Brewster angle, refractive indices and layer-thicknesses can both be determined with a precision that is sufficiently high to make conclusions on the density and orientation of the molecules at the interface. The orientation was found to be concentration- and pH value-dependent. At the isoelectric point, the lipase was almost vertically oriented with respect to the surface, while for pure distilled water and low lipase concentration a rather horizontal alignment was found. Further experiments, varying the size of the interfacial area in a Langmuir trough, confirm the different layer structures. PMID:26735895

  2. Simulation of imperfections in plastic lenses - transferring local refractive index changes into surface shape modifications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arasa, Josep; Pizarro, Carles; Blanco, Patricia

    2016-06-01

    Injection molded plastic lenses have continuously improved their performance regarding optical quality and nowadays are as usual as glass lenses in image forming devices. However, during the manufacturing process unavoidable fluctuations in material density occur, resulting in local changes in the distribution of refractive index, which degrade the imaging properties of the polymer lens. Such material density fluctuations correlate to phase delays, which opens a path for their mapping. However, it is difficult to transfer the measured variations in refractive index into conventional optical simulation tool. Thus, we propose a method to convert the local variations in refractive index into local changes of one surface of the lens, which can then be described as a free-form surface, easy to introduce in conventional simulation tools. The proposed method was tested on a commercial gradient index (GRIN) lens for a set of six different object positions, using the MTF sagittal and tangential cuts to compare the differences between the real lens and a lens with homogenous refractive index, and the last surface converted into a free-form shape containing the internal refractive index changes. The same procedure was used to reproduce the local refractive index changes of an injected plastic lens with local index changes measured using an in-house built polariscopic arrangement, showing the capability of the method to provide successful results.

  3. Vacuum birefringence in strong magnetic fields: (II) Complex refractive index from the lowest Landau level

    SciTech Connect

    Hattori, Koichi; Itakura, Kazunori

    2013-07-15

    We compute the refractive indices of a photon propagating in strong magnetic fields on the basis of the analytic representation of the vacuum polarization tensor obtained in our previous paper. When the external magnetic field is strong enough for the fermion one-loop diagram of the polarization tensor to be approximated by the lowest Landau level, the propagating mode in parallel to the magnetic field is subject to modification: The refractive index deviates from unity and can be very large, and when the photon energy is large enough, the refractive index acquires an imaginary part indicating decay of a photon into a fermion–antifermion pair. We study dependences of the refractive index on the propagating angle and the magnetic-field strength. It is also emphasized that a self-consistent treatment of the equation which defines the refractive index is indispensable for accurate description of the refractive index. This self-consistent treatment physically corresponds to consistently including the effects of back reactions of the distorted Dirac sea in response to the incident photon. -- Highlights: •Vacuum birefringence and photon decay are described by the complex refractive index. •Resummed photon vacuum polarization tensor in the lowest Landau level is used. •Back reactions from the distorted Dirac sea are self-consistently taken into account. •Self-consistent treatment drastically changes structure in photon energy dependence. •Dependences on photon propagation angle and magnetic-field strength are presented.

  4. Discriminating between Cloudy, Hazy, and Clear Sky Exoplanets Using Refraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Misra, Amit K.; Meadows, Victoria S.

    2014-11-01

    We propose a method to distinguish between cloudy, hazy, and clear sky (free of clouds and hazes) exoplanet atmospheres that could be applicable to upcoming large aperture space- and ground-based telescopes such as the James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) and the European Extremely Large Telescope (E-ELT). These facilities will be powerful tools for characterizing transiting exoplanets, but only after a considerable amount of telescope time is devoted to a single planet. A technique that could provide a relatively rapid means of identifying haze-free targets (which may be more valuable targets for characterization) could potentially increase the science return for these telescopes. Our proposed method utilizes broadband observations of refracted light in the out-of-transit spectrum. Light refracted through an exoplanet atmosphere can lead to an increase of flux prior to ingress and subsequent to egress. Because this light is transmitted at pressures greater than those for typical cloud and haze layers, the detection of refracted light could indicate a cloud- or haze-free atmosphere. A detection of refracted light could be accomplished in <10 hr for Jovian exoplanets with JWST and <5 hr for super-Earths/mini-Neptunes with E-ELT. We find that this technique is most effective for planets with equilibrium temperatures between 200 and 500 K, which may include potentially habitable planets. A detection of refracted light for a potentially habitable planet would strongly suggest the planet was free of a global cloud or haze layer, and therefore a promising candidate for follow-up observations.

  5. DISCRIMINATING BETWEEN CLOUDY, HAZY, AND CLEAR SKY EXOPLANETS USING REFRACTION

    SciTech Connect

    Misra, Amit K.; Meadows, Victoria S.

    2014-11-01

    We propose a method to distinguish between cloudy, hazy, and clear sky (free of clouds and hazes) exoplanet atmospheres that could be applicable to upcoming large aperture space- and ground-based telescopes such as the James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) and the European Extremely Large Telescope (E-ELT). These facilities will be powerful tools for characterizing transiting exoplanets, but only after a considerable amount of telescope time is devoted to a single planet. A technique that could provide a relatively rapid means of identifying haze-free targets (which may be more valuable targets for characterization) could potentially increase the science return for these telescopes. Our proposed method utilizes broadband observations of refracted light in the out-of-transit spectrum. Light refracted through an exoplanet atmosphere can lead to an increase of flux prior to ingress and subsequent to egress. Because this light is transmitted at pressures greater than those for typical cloud and haze layers, the detection of refracted light could indicate a cloud- or haze-free atmosphere. A detection of refracted light could be accomplished in <10 hr for Jovian exoplanets with JWST and <5 hr for super-Earths/mini-Neptunes with E-ELT. We find that this technique is most effective for planets with equilibrium temperatures between 200 and 500 K, which may include potentially habitable planets. A detection of refracted light for a potentially habitable planet would strongly suggest the planet was free of a global cloud or haze layer, and therefore a promising candidate for follow-up observations.

  6. Temperature-dependent Refractive Index of Silicon and Germanium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frey, Bradley J.; Leviton, Douglas B.; Madison, Timothy J.

    2006-01-01

    Silicon and germanium are perhaps the two most well-understood semiconductor materials in the context of solid state device technologies and more recently micromachining and nanotechnology. Meanwhile, these two materials are also important in the field of infrared lens design. Optical instruments designed for the wavelength range where these two materials are transmissive achieve best performance when cooled to cryogenic temperatures to enhance signal from the scene over instrument background radiation. In order to enable high quality lens designs using silicon and germanium at cryogenic temperatures, we have measured the absolute refractive index of multiple prisms of these two materials using the Cryogenic, High-Accuracy Refraction Measuring System (CHARMS) at NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center, as a function of both wavelength and temperature. For silicon, we report absolute refractive index and thermo-optic coefficient (dn/dT) at temperatures ranging from 20 to 300 K at wavelengths from 1.1 to 5.6 pin, while for germanium, we cover temperatures ranging from 20 to 300 K and wavelengths from 1.9 to 5.5 microns. We compare our measurements with others in the literature and provide temperature-dependent Sellmeier coefficients based on our data to allow accurate interpolation of index to other wavelengths and temperatures. Citing the wide variety of values for the refractive indices of these two materials found in the literature, we reiterate the importance of measuring the refractive index of a sample from the same batch of raw material from which final optical components are cut when absolute accuracy greater than k5 x 10" is desired.

  7. Refractive scattering evidence from multifrequency scintillation spectra observed at auroral latitudes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Forte, B.

    2008-04-01

    During October 2003 major geomagnetic storm, intensity scintillations on radio signals at 150 MHz and 400 MHz transmitted coherently from Tsykada beacon satellites have been observed. Through the analysis of intensity fluctuation spectra, evidence of refractive scattering from large scale ionospheric irregularities in the spatial plasma density distribution is found. The events can indeed be explained by using the refractive scattering theory developed by Booker and MajidiAhi (1981). The presence of refractive scattering is particularly evident in strong scintillation events, where spectral saturation may well occur. The observed intensity spectra fit the shape of theoretical predictions of the refractive theory. This provides useful insights about spectral slope, Fresnel scale, and the scale of irregularities producing the observed intensity scintillations actually present in the ionosphere.

  8. Ray tracing evaluation of a technique for correcting the refraction errors in satellite tracking data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gardner, C. S.; Rowlett, J. R.; Hendrickson, B. E.

    1978-01-01

    Errors may be introduced in satellite laser ranging data by atmospheric refractivity. Ray tracing data have indicated that horizontal refractivity gradients may introduce nearly 3-cm rms error when satellites are near 10-degree elevation. A correction formula to compensate for the horizontal gradients has been developed. Its accuracy is evaluated by comparing it to refractivity profiles. It is found that if both spherical and gradient correction formulas are employed in conjunction with meteorological measurements, a range resolution of one cm or less is feasible for satellite elevation angles above 10 degrees.

  9. An examination of the southern California field test for the systematic accumulation of the optical refraction error in geodetic leveling.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Castle, R.O.; Brown, B.W., Jr.; Gilmore, T.D.; Mark, R.K.; Wilson, R.C.

    1983-01-01

    Appraisals of the two levelings that formed the southern California field test for the accumulation of the atmospheric refraction error indicate that random error and systematic error unrelated to refraction competed with the systematic refraction error and severely complicate any analysis of the test results. If the fewer than one-third of the sections that met less than second-order, class I standards are dropped, the divergence virtually disappears between the presumably more refraction contaminated long-sight-length survey and the less contaminated short-sight-length survey. -Authors

  10. Failure Analysis of Sapphire Refractive Secondary Concentrators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Salem, Jonathan A.; Quinn, George D.

    2009-01-01

    Failure analysis was performed on two sapphire, refractive secondary concentrators (RSC) that failed during elevated temperature testing. Both concentrators failed from machining/handling damage on the lens face. The first concentrator, which failed during testing to 1300 C, exhibited a large r-plane twin extending from the lens through much of the cone. The second concentrator, which was an attempt to reduce temperature gradients and failed during testing to 649 C, exhibited a few small twins on the lens face. The twins were not located at the origin, but represent another mode of failure that needs to be considered in the design of sapphire components. In order to estimate the fracture stress from fractographic evidence, branching constants were measured on sapphire strength specimens. The fractographic analysis indicated radial tensile stresses of 44 to 65 MPa on the lens faces near the origins. Finite element analysis indicated similar stresses for the first RSC, but lower stresses for the second RSC. Better machining and handling might have prevented the fractures, however, temperature gradients and resultant thermal stresses need to be reduced to prevent twinning.

  11. Negative refractive index, perfect lenses and checkerboards: Trapping and imaging effects in folded optical spaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guenneau, Sébastien; Ramakrishna, S. Anantha

    2009-06-01

    Newly discovered metamaterials have opened new vistas for better control of light via negative refraction, whereby light refracts in the "wrong" manner. These are dielectric and metallic composite materials structured at subwavelength lengthscales. Their building blocks consist of local resonators such as conducting thin bars and split rings driving the material parameters such as the dielectric permittivity and magnetic permeability to negative (complex) values. Combined together, these structural elements can bring about a (complex valued) negative effective refractive index for the Snell-Descartes law and result in negative refraction of radiation. Negative refractive index materials can support a host of surface plasmon states for both polarizations of light. This makes possible unique effects such as imaging with subwavelength image resolution through the Pendry-Veselago slab lens. Other geometries have also been investigated, such as cylindrical or spherical lenses that enable a magnification of images with subwavelength resolution. Superlenses of three-fold (equilateral triangle), four-fold (square) and six-fold (hexagonal) geometry allow for multiple images, respectively two, three, and five. Generalization to rectangular and triangular checkerboards consisting of alternating cells of positive and negative refractive index represents a very singular situation in which the density of modes diverges at the corners, with an infinity of images. Sine-cosecant anisotropic heterogeneous square and triangular checkerboards can be respectively mapped onto three-dimensional cubic and icosahedral corner lenses consisting of alternating positive and negative refractive regions. All such systems with corners between negative and positive refractive media display very singular behavior with the local density of states becoming infinitely large at the corner, in the limit of no dissipation. We investigate all of these, using the unifying viewpoint of transformation optics

  12. Negative Refraction experiments in Photonic Crystal prisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vodo, Plarenta; Parimi, Patanjali. V.; Lu, Wentao. T.; di Gennaro, Emiliano; Sridhar, Srinivas

    2004-03-01

    We have experimentally demonstrated negative refraction in metallic photonic crystal (PC) prisms [1]. The refracted fields in the parallel plate waveguide (PPW) are measured by an automated dipole antenna, which scans the desired area, while the free space (FS) measurements, performed in a anechoic chamber, are measured by a rectangular X-band horn that swings in an arc in far field area. Both TE and TM excitation modes are used in FS experiments. Numerical calculations of the band structure and equi-frequency surface simulations are used to determine frequency regions of negative refraction of the triangular lattice PC. Angle of refraction determined by theoretical simulations and experimental results, are in exceptional good agreement, yielding the negative refraction index. FS and PPW refraction experimental results agree remarkably with simulations. 1. "Negative Refraction and Left-handed electromagnetism in Microwave Photonic Crystals", P.V Parimi, W.T Lu, P.Vodo J. Sokoloff and S.Sridhar, cond-mat/0306109 (2003)

  13. How to incorporate generic refraction models into multistatic tracking algorithms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crouse, D. F.

    The vast majority of literature published on target tracking ignores the effects of atmospheric refraction. When refraction is considered, the solutions are generally tailored to a simple exponential atmospheric refraction model. This paper discusses how arbitrary refraction models can be incorporated into tracking algorithms. Attention is paid to multistatic tracking problems, where uncorrected refractive effects can worsen track accuracy and consistency in centralized tracking algorithms, and can lead to difficulties in track-to-track association in distributed tracking filters. Monostatic and bistatic track initialization using refraction-corrupted measurements is discussed. The results are demonstrated using an exponential refractive model, though an arbitrary refraction profile can be substituted.

  14. J. B. Biot and Refraction Calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Young, A. T.

    2000-12-01

    The Auer-Standish (AJ 119, 2472, 2000) algorithm, recommended in the revised Explanatory Supplement for calculating refraction in an arbitrary model atmosphere, was derived and used by J. B. Biot (Conn. des Tems pour l'An 1839) a century and a half earlier, using Newton's (wrong) emission theory, and the clumsy notation of Laplace's Mécanique Céleste, which Biot had proof-read. Newton, Laplace, and Biot all describe refraction in terms of the trajectories of ``luminous molecules'' attracted by a central force exerted by the atmosphere; this explains why Laplace considered refraction a topic in celestial mechanics. Fortunately for these authors, the only optics required is Snel's law of refraction, which was discovered before Newton's birth, and which Newton's corpuscular optics was rigged to reproduce. Thus Biot's ``derivation'' of the refractive invariant nr sin z by Laplace's method is a circular and unnecessary argument. While Auer & Standish were reinventing Biot's method, the historian D. T. Whiteside (Centaurus 24, 288, 1980) noticed the mathematical similarity of the refraction theories of Newton and Biot to modern ones, and rashly concluded that ``working astronomers still find computational advantage in maintaining the fiction of a Newtonian emission theory'' --- which is absurd nonsense! Despite being an emissionist, Biot understood atmospheric refraction much better than most astronomers do today: he knew why refraction is almost independent of atmospheric structure, except within a few degrees of the horizon, and that refraction at the horizon depends mostly on the local temperature gradient. His work --- together with that of Lord Rayleigh, who derived his eponymous scattering law from the elastic-solid theory of the luminiferous \\ae ther --- reminds us that a theory's correct results do not make it true. This work was supported by NSF grant ATM-9714357.

  15. Measurement of optical penetration depth and refractive index of human tissue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Shusen; Li, Hui; Li, Buhong

    2003-01-01

    Experimental techniques for measurement of optical penetration depth and refractive index of human tissue are presented, respectively. Optical penetration depth can be obtained from the measurement of the relative fluence-depth distribution inside the target tissue. The depth of normal and carcinomatous human lung tissues irradiated with the wavelengths of 406.7, 632.8 and 674.4 nm in vitro are respectively determined. In addition, a novel simple method based on total internal reflection for measuring the refractive index of biotissue in vivo is developed, and the refractive indices of skin from people of different age, sex and skin color are measured. Their refractive indices are almost same and the average is 1.533.

  16. Complex Refractive Index of Ammonium Nitrate in the 2-20 micron Spectral Range

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jarzembski, Maurice A.; Norman, Mark L.; Fuller, Kirk A.; Srivastava, Vandana; Cutten, Dean R.

    2002-01-01

    Using high resolution Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (FTIR) absorbance/transmittance spectral data for ammonium sulfate (AMS), calcium carbonate (CAC) and ammonium nitrate (AMN), comparisons were made with previously published complex refractive indices data for AMS and CAC to infer experimental parameters to determine the imaginary refractive index for AMN in the infrared wavelength range from 2 to 20 microns. Kramers-Kronig mathematical relations were applied to calculate the real refractive index for the three compositions. Excellent agreement for AMS and CAC with the published values was found, validating the complex refractive indices obtained for AMN. Backscatter calculations using a lognormal size distribution for AMS, AMN, and CAC aerosols were performed to show differences in their backscattered spectra.

  17. Atmospheric refraction errors in laser ranging systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gardner, C. S.; Rowlett, J. R.

    1976-01-01

    The effects of horizontal refractivity gradients on the accuracy of laser ranging systems were investigated by ray tracing through three dimensional refractivity profiles. The profiles were generated by performing a multiple regression on measurements from seven or eight radiosondes, using a refractivity model which provided for both linear and quadratic variations in the horizontal direction. The range correction due to horizontal gradients was found to be an approximately sinusoidal function of azimuth having a minimum near 0 deg azimuth and a maximum near 180 deg azimuth. The peak to peak variation was approximately 5 centimeters at 10 deg elevation and decreased to less than 1 millimeter at 80 deg elevation.

  18. Formation of bulk refractive index structures

    DOEpatents

    Potter, Jr., Barrett George; Potter, Kelly Simmons; Wheeler, David R.; Jamison, Gregory M.

    2003-07-15

    A method of making a stacked three-dimensional refractive index structure in photosensitive materials using photo-patterning where first determined is the wavelength at which a photosensitive material film exhibits a change in refractive index upon exposure to optical radiation, a portion of the surfaces of the photosensitive material film is optically irradiated, the film is marked to produce a registry mark. Multiple films are produced and aligned using the registry marks to form a stacked three-dimensional refractive index structure.

  19. Determination of Diameter and Index of Refraction of Textile Fibers by Laser Backscattering

    SciTech Connect

    H. Okuda; B. Stratton; L. Meixler; P. Efthimion; D.Mansfield

    2003-07-24

    A new method was developed to determine both diameters and indices of refraction and hence the birefringence of cylindrical textile and industrial fibers and bundles by measuring intensity patterns of the scattered light over an interval of scattering angles. The measured intensity patterns are compared with theoretical predictions (Mie theory) to determine fiber diameter and index of refraction. It is shown that the method is simple and accurate and may be useful as an on-line, noncontact diagnostic tool in real time.

  20. An interference refractometer to measure the pressure and temperature dependence of the refractive index of liquids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Appleby, Roger; James, David W.; Bowie, Carol A.

    The design of an interference refractometer, using laser radiation, to determine the pressure and temperature variation of refractive index is reported. The method does not attempt to determine the absolute refractive indices. The performance of the refractometer was tested using water and methanol. The results for a series of solutions of KBr in water are also reported and the results are compared with previous empirical estimates.

  1. Radiative transfer in nonuniformly refracting layered media: atmosphere-ocean system.

    PubMed

    Jin, Z; Stamnes, K

    1994-01-20

    We have applied the discrete-ordinate method to solve the radiative-transfer problem pertaining to a system consisting of two strata with different indices of refraction. The refraction and reflection at the interface are taken into account. The relevant changes (as compared with the standard problem with a constant index of refraction throughout the medium) in formulation and solution of the radiative-transfer equation, including the proper application of interface and boundary conditions, are described. Appropriate quadrature points (streams) and weights are chosen for the interface-continuity relations. Examples of radiative transfer in the coupled atmosphere-ocean system are provided. To take into account the region of total reflection in the ocean, additional angular quadrature points are required, compared with those used in the atmosphere and in the refractive region of the ocean that communicates directly with the atmosphere. To verify the model we have tested for energy conservation. We also discuss the effect of the number of streams assigned to the refractive region and the total reflecting region on the convergence. Our results show that the change in the index of refraction between the two strata significantly affects the radiation field. The radiative-transfer model we present is designed for application to the atmosphere-ocean system, but it can be applied to other systems that need to consider the change in the index of refraction between two strata. PMID:20862035

  2. Direct determination of the refractive index of natural multilayer systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshioka, Shinya; Kinoshita, Shuichi

    2011-05-01

    It is well known that the metal-like strong reflection observed in the elytra of some kinds of beetles is produced by multilayer thin-film interference. For the quantitative analyses of the structural colors in these elytra, it is necessary to know accurate values of the refractive indices of the materials that comprise the multilayer structure. However, index determination is not an easy task: The elytron surface is not flat but curved and usually contains many irregular bumps, which cause scattering loss. These structural characteristics prevent us from directly applying conventional optical techniques for index determination, such as ellipsometry, since these techniques require a perfectly specular surface. In this paper, we report a new experimental procedure that can directly determine the refractive indices of individual layers in natural multilayer systems. This procedure involves semi-frontal thin-sectioning of the sample and subsequent optical examinations using a microspectrophotometer. We demonstrate that the complex refractive index and its wavelength dependence can be successfully determined for one kind of beetle.

  3. Refractive index and birefringence of 2H silicon carbide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Powell, J. A.

    1972-01-01

    The refractive indices of 2H SiC were measured over the wavelength range 435.8 to 650.9 nm by the method of minimum deviation. At the wavelength lambda = 546.1 nm, the ordinary index n sub 0 was 2.6480 and the extraordinary index n sub e was 2.7237. The estimated error (standard deviation) in the measured values is 0.0006 for n sub 0 and 0.0009 for n sub e. The experimental data were curve fitted to the Cauchy equation for the index of refraction as a function of wavelength. The birefringence of 2H SiC was found to vary from 0.0719 at lambda = 650.9 nm to 0.0846 at lambda = 435.8 nm.

  4. Imaging based refractometer for hyperspectral refractive index detection

    SciTech Connect

    Baba, Justin S.; Boudreaux, Philip R.

    2015-11-24

    Refractometers for simultaneously measuring refractive index of a sample over a range of wavelengths of light include dispersive and focusing optical systems. An optical beam including the range of wavelengths is spectrally spread along a first axis and focused along a second axis so as to be incident to an interface between the sample and a prism at a range of angles of incidence including a critical angle for at least one wavelength. An imaging detector is situated to receive the spectrally spread and focused light from the interface and form an image corresponding to angle of incidence as a function of wavelength. One or more critical angles are identified and corresponding refractive indices are determined.

  5. The refractive index of relic gravitons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giovannini, Massimo

    2016-06-01

    The dynamical evolution of the refractive index of the tensor modes of the geometry produces a specific class of power spectra characterized by a blue (i.e. slightly increasing) slope which is directly determined by the competition of the slow-roll parameter and of the rate of variation of the refractive index. Throughout the conventional stages of the inflationary and post-inflationary evolution, the microwave background anisotropies measurements, the pulsar timing limits and the big-bang nucleosynthesis constraints set stringent bounds on the refractive index and on its rate of variation. Within the physically allowed region of the parameter space the cosmic background of relic gravitons leads to a potentially large signal for the ground-based detectors (in their advanced version) and for the proposed space-borne interferometers. Conversely, the lack of direct detection of the signal will set a qualitatively new bound on the dynamical variation of the refractive index.

  6. Nonlinear negative refraction by difference frequency generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Jianjun; Shen, Dongyi; Feng, Yaming; Wan, Wenjie

    2016-05-01

    Negative refraction has attracted much interest for its promising capability in imaging applications. Such an effect can be implemented by negative index meta-materials, however, which are usually accompanied by high loss and demanding fabrication processes. Recently, alternative nonlinear approaches like phase conjugation and four wave mixing have shown advantages of low-loss and easy-to-implement, but associated problems like narrow accepting angles can still halt their practical applications. Here, we demonstrate theoretically and experimentally a scheme to realize negative refraction by nonlinear difference frequency generation with wide tunability, where a thin Beta barium borate slice serves as a negative refraction layer bending the input signal beam to the idler beam at a negative angle. Furthermore, we realize optical focusing effect using such nonlinear negative refraction, which may enable many potential applications in imaging science.

  7. Refractive index measurement using comparative interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bojan, Mihaela; Apostol, D.; Damian, V.; Logofatu, P. C.; Garoi, F.; Iordache, Iuliana

    2007-05-01

    The refractive index of a material medium is an important optical parameter since it exhibits the optical properties of the material. The adulteration problem is increasing day by day and hence simple, automatic and accurate measurement of the refractive index of materials is of great importance these days. For solid thin films materials Abeles method was reconsidered. Quick, measurements of refractive index using simple techniques and refractometers can help controlling adulteration of liquids of common use to a greater extent. Very simple interferometric set-up using Fizeau fringe patterns compares the fringe pitch as obtained in a cell with two levels: one down level with the unknown refractive index liquids and the upper level with gas air. A CCD matrix and a PC can handle the data and produce the results up to for digits.

  8. Seismic refraction profile in coral sea basin.

    PubMed

    Shor, G G

    1967-11-17

    A refraction profile near the south edge of Coral Sea Basin shows sediments, "second layer," and oceanic crust all thicker than normal for an oceanic station; normal mantle lies at a depth of 19 kilometers. PMID:17753600

  9. Development of a subjective refraction simulator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perches, S.; Ares, J.; Collados, M. V.

    2013-11-01

    We have developed simulation software by Matlab (MathworksInc.) with a graphical interface designed for non-expert users. This simulator allows you to complete the process of subjective refraction starting from the aberrometry of the patients and analyse the influence of different factors during the exam. In addition to explain the graphical interface and its working, we show two examples about a complete process of subjective refraction with the influence of high order aberrations and without them showing the retinal image obtained in each step of the refraction process. When the Jackson Cross-Cylinder technique is made with this software, it becomes clear the difficulty of chosen between two images when high order aberrations are present. Therefore, the variability of response during the refraction can be a problem when the examiner has to reach an adequate optical prescription.

  10. REFractions: The Representing Equivalent Fractions Game

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tucker, Stephen I.

    2014-01-01

    Stephen Tucker presents a fractions game that addresses a range of fraction concepts including equivalence and computation. The REFractions game also improves students' fluency with representing, comparing and adding fractions.

  11. Age-Related Shifts in the Density and Distribution of Genetic Marker Water Quality Indicators in Cow and Calf Feces (Journal)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Calves (≤ 226 kg body mass) make up about 16% of the current bovine population in the United States and can excrete high levels of human pathogens. We describe the density and distribution of genetic markers from 11 PCR- and real-time quantitative PCR-based assays including CF...

  12. Two Color Interferometry with Nonlinear Refractive Properties

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vikram, Chandra S.; Witherow, William K.

    2002-01-01

    Using nonlinear refractive properties of salt-water solution at two wavelengths, numerical analysis has been performed to extract temperature and concentration from virtual interferometric fringe data. The theoretical study, using a commercially available equation solving tool, starts with critical fringe counting needs and the role of nonlinear refractive properties in such measurements. Finally, methodology of the analysis, developed codes, and fringe counting accuracy needs are described in detail.

  13. Classical gravity does not refract negatively.

    PubMed

    McCall, Martin W

    2007-03-01

    We appraise recent claims that classical gravitation can induce negative refraction of electromagnetic radiation in vacuum. By recasting the previous literature in covariant notation, we show that the criterion used hitherto for determining negative refraction in vacuum is inappropriate, and can even be satisfied by parametrized transformations in Minkowski spacetime. Using instead a covariantly acceptable definition, we find that in classical vacuum the power flux of a plane electromagnetic wave points in the direction of phase advance. PMID:17359145

  14. Reflective and refractive objects for mixed reality.

    PubMed

    Knecht, Martin; Traxler, Christoph; Winklhofer, Christoph; Wimmer, Michael

    2013-04-01

    In this paper, we present a novel rendering method which integrates reflective or refractive objects into a differential instant radiosity (DIR) framework usable for mixed-reality (MR) applications. This kind of objects are very special from the light interaction point of view, as they reflect and refract incident rays. Therefore they may cause high-frequency lighting effects known as caustics. Using instant-radiosity (IR) methods to approximate these high-frequency lighting effects would require a large amount of virtual point lights (VPLs) and is therefore not desirable due to real-time constraints. Instead, our approach combines differential instant radiosity with three other methods. One method handles more accurate reflections compared to simple cubemaps by using impostors. Another method is able to calculate two refractions in real-time, and the third method uses small quads to create caustic effects. Our proposed method replaces parts in light paths that belong to reflective or refractive objects using these three methods and thus tightly integrates into DIR. In contrast to previous methods which introduce reflective or refractive objects into MR scenarios, our method produces caustics that also emit additional indirect light. The method runs at real-time frame rates, and the results show that reflective and refractive objects with caustics improve the overall impression for MR scenarios. PMID:23428441

  15. Evaluation of patient visual comfort and repeatability of refractive values in non-presbyopic healthy eyes

    PubMed Central

    Segura, Francisco; Sanchez-Cano, Ana; Lopez de la Fuente, Carmen; Fuentes-Broto, Lorena; Pinilla, Isabel

    2015-01-01

    AIM To evaluate the intra-operator repeatability in healthy subjects using the WAM-5500 auto-kerato/refractometer and the iTrace aberrometer, to compare the refractive values and the subjective refraction obtained with both devices and to determine which of these three spherocylindrical corrections allows the subject to achieve the best visual comfort. METHODS Forty-two non-presbyopic healthy eyes of 42 subjects were enrolled in this prospective study. Refractive values were compared, evaluating the repeatability, the relationship between the methods and the best visual comfort obtained. RESULTS Sphere, cylinder and axis results showed good intraclass correlation coefficients (ICC); the highest ICC was obtained using the spherical refraction with the autorefractometer and the aberrometer, achieving levels of 0.999 and 0.998, respectively. The power vector (PV) was calculated for each refraction method, and the results indicated that there were no statistically significant differences between them (P>0.05). Direct comparison of PV measurements using the three methods showed that aberrometer refraction gave the highest values, followed by the subjective values; the autorefractometer gave the lowest values. The subjective method correction was most frequently chosen as the first selection. Equal values were found for the autorefractometer and the aberrometer as the second selection. CONCLUSION The iTrace aberrometer and the WAM-5500 auto-kerato/refractometer showed high levels of repeatability in healthy eyes. Refractive corrections with the aberrometer, the autorefractometer and subjective methods presented similar results, but spherocylindrical subjective correction was the most frequently selected option. These technologies can be used as complements in refractive evaluation, but they should not replace subjective refraction. PMID:26558222

  16. Prediction of Child Health by Household Density and Asset-Based Indices in Impoverished Indigenous Villages in Rural Panamá

    PubMed Central

    Halpenny, Carli M.; Koski, Kristine G.; Valdés, Victoria E.; Scott, Marilyn E.

    2012-01-01

    Chronic infection over a 16-month period and stunting of preschool children were compared between more spatially dense versus dispersed households in rural Panamá. Chronic protozoan infection was associated with higher household density, lower household wealth index, poor household water quality, yard defecation, and the practice of not washing hands with soap before eating. Models for chronic diarrhea confirmed the importance of household wealth, water quality, sanitation, and hygiene practices. Furthermore, chronic protozoan infection was an important predictor for low height-for-age, along with low household wealth index scores, but not household density. Thus, despite better access to health related infrastructure in the more densely populated households, chronic protozoan infection was more common, and was associated with higher rates of child stunting, compared with more dispersed households. PMID:22302864

  17. Sensitive Real-Time Monitoring of Refractive Indexes Using a Novel Graphene-Based Optical Sensor

    PubMed Central

    Xing, Fei; Liu, Zhi-Bo; Deng, Zhi-Chao; Kong, Xiang-Tian; Yan, Xiao-Qing; Chen, Xu-Dong; Ye, Qing; Zhang, Chun-Ping; Chen, Yong-Sheng; Tian, Jian-Guo

    2012-01-01

    Based on the polarization-sensitive absorption of graphene under conditions of total internal reflection, a novel optical sensor combining graphene and a microfluidic structure was constructed to achieve the sensitive real-time monitoring of refractive indexes. The atomic thickness and strong broadband absorption of graphene cause it to exhibit very different reflectivity for transverse electric and transverse magnetic modes in the context of a total internal reflection structure, which is sensitive to the media in contact with the graphene. A graphene refractive index sensor can quickly and sensitively monitor changes in the local refractive index with a fast response time and broad dynamic range. These results indicate that graphene, used in a simple and efficient total internal reflection structure and combined with microfluidic techniques, is an ideal material for fabricating refractive index sensors and biosensor devices, which are in high demand. PMID:23205270

  18. A single-element interferometer for measuring refractive index of transparent liquids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Tao; Feng, Guoying; Song, Zheyi; Zhou, Shouhuan

    2014-12-01

    A simple and stable method based on a single-element interferometer for accurately measuring refractive index of transparent liquids was demonstrated. The refractive index is measured by rotating a rectangular optical glass cell which contains sample liquid and air simultaneously, and by calculating interference fringe shift number which is detected from an interferogram. This method was successfully used to measure the refractive indices of various transparent liquids including distilled water, ethanol and NaCl-water and ethanol-water solutions at various concentrations. The temperature- dependent refractive index of distilled water was also measured. Furthermore, our method is simple to implement, vibration insensitive, and of high accuracy up to 10-4.

  19. Methods for Prediction of Refractive Index in Glasses for the Infrared

    SciTech Connect

    McCloy, John S.

    2011-06-14

    It is often useful to obtain custom glasses that meet particular requirements of refractive index and dispersion for high-end optical design and applications. In the case of infrared glasses, limited experimental data are available due to difficulties in processing of these glasses and also measuring refractive indices accurately. This paper proposes methods to estimate refractive index and dispersion as a function of composition for selected infrared-transmitting glasses. Methods for refractive index determination are reviewed and evaluated, including Gladstone-Dale, Wemple-DiDomenico single oscillator, Optical basicity, and Lorentz-Lorenz total polarizability. Various estimates for a set of PbO-Bi2O3-Ga2O3 (heavy metal oxide) and As-S (chalcogenide) glasses will be compared with measured values of index and dispersion.

  20. Improved Atmospheric Refraction Correction Models in Satellite Laser Ranging (SLR)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hulley, Glynn

    2004-03-01

    The primary source of unmodeled error in space geodetic techniques such as VLBI, GPS and SLR is atmospheric refraction. SLR uses lasers (532 nm) to measure very precise ranges from ground tracking stations to spaceborne geodetic satellites with accuracies at the millimeter level. Improved refraction modeling is essential in reducing errors in SLR measurements that study variations in the Earth's gravitational field and vertical crustal motion as well as monitoring sea-level rise, post-glacial rebound and earthquake predictions. The Marini and Murray model developed in the 1970's has primarily been used for data analysis, but recent work by Mendes et al., 2002 provides significant improvement in modeling the elevation dependency of the zenith atmospheric delay. The elevation dependency is modeled by what are known as mapping functions. Improvements in modeling the zenith delay itself where achieved by computing the group refractivity using a procedure described by Ciddor [1996] and by including the non-hydrostatic (wet) zenith delay. Two color SLR can also be used to determine the zenith delay by measuring the dispersive delay of two laser pulses each at a different wavelength. By comparing the Mendes and Marini Murray models to this experimental technique, one is able to evaluate the accuracy of the two models. We have found errors between the two models when compared to two color SLR at the centimeter level, which increases significantly at 355 nm, indicating the need for an improvement of existing dispersion formulae.

  1. Refraction-Enhanced X-ray Radiography for Inertial Confinement Fusion and Laser-Produced Plasma Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Koch, J A; Landen, O L; Kozioziemski, B J; Izumi, N; Dewald, E L; Salmonson, J D; Hammel, B A

    2008-08-26

    We explore various laser-produced plasma and inertial-confinement fusion (ICF) applications of phase-contrast x-ray radiography, and we show how the main features of these enhancements can be considered from a geometrical optics perspective as refraction enhancements. This perspective simplifies the analysis, and often permits simple analytical formulae to be derived that predict the enhancements. We explore a raytrace approach to various material interface applications, and we explore a more general example of refractive bending of x-rays by an implosion plasma. We find that refraction-enhanced x-ray radiography of implosions may provide a means to quantify density differences across shock fronts as well as density variations caused by local heating due to high-Z dopants. We also point out that refractive bending by implosions plasmas can blur fine radiograph features, and can also provide misleading contrast information in area-backlit pinhole imaging experiments unless its effects are taken into consideration.

  2. Design of acid-lead battery stage-of-charge detection system based on refractive index detection technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Junyao; Yang, Kecheng; Xia, Min; Li, Lei; Zeng, Xianjiang

    2015-10-01

    Based on optical total reflection critical Angle method, we have designed a refractive index measurement system. It adopted a divergent light source and a CCD camera as the occurrence and receiver of the signal. The divergent light source sent out a bunch of tapered beam, exposure to the interface of optical medium and sulfuric acid solution. Light intensity reflected from the interface could be detected by the CCD camera and then sent to the embedded system. In the DSP embedded system, we could obtain the critical edge position through the light intensity distribution curve and converted it to critical angle. Through experiment, we concluded the relation between liquid refractive index and the critical angle edge position. In this system, the detecting precision of the refractive index of sulfuric acid solution reached 10-4. Finally, through the conversion of the refractive index and density, we achieved high accuracy online measurement of electrolyte density in lead-acid battery.

  3. Refractive index of r-cut sapphire under shock pressure range 5 to 65 GPa

    SciTech Connect

    Cao, Xiuxia; Li, Jiabo; Li, Jun; Li, Xuhai; Xu, Liang; Wang, Yuan; Zhu, Wenjun; Meng, Chuanmin; Zhou, Xianming

    2014-09-07

    High-pressure refractive index of optical window materials not only can provide information on electronic polarizability and band-gap structure, but also is important for velocity correction in particle-velocity measurement with laser interferometers. In this work, the refractive index of r-cut sapphire window at 1550 nm wavelength was measured under shock pressures of 5–65 GPa. The refractive index (n) decreases linearly with increasing shock density (ρ) for shock stress above the Hugoniot elastic limit (HEL): n = 2.0485 (± 0.0197) − 0.0729 (± 0.0043)ρ, while n remains nearly a constant for elastic shocks. This behavior is attributed to the transition from elastic (below HEL) to heterogeneous plastic deformation (above HEL). Based on the obtained refractive index-density relationship, polarizability of the shocked sapphire was also obtained.

  4. Interferometric determination of refraction and dispersion of human blood-serum, saliva, sweat and urine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El-Zaiat, S. Y.

    2003-02-01

    Multiple-beam interference fringes of equal chromatic order are produced in air and liquid sample interferometric gaps. The two gaps are of the same thickness and simultaneously enclosed in a wedge interferometer. A single shot interferogram containing fringes in the two gaps is sufficient to deduce the needed experimental data. Locations of the fringe maxima, in the two gaps, are introduced in a non-numerical procedure for determining the gap thickness and the liquid-phase refractive indices across the visible spectrum. The method has been used for measuring the phase refractive indices of human blood-serum, saliva, sweat, urine and water liquids. A third-order polynomial dispersion relation is applied for fitting the measured phase indices. Group refractive indices have been derived and fitted to the same dispersion formula.

  5. Refractive error sensing from wavefront slopes.

    PubMed

    Navarro, Rafael

    2010-01-01

    The problem of measuring the objective refractive error with an aberrometer has shown to be more elusive than expected. Here, the formalism of differential geometry is applied to develop a theoretical framework of refractive error sensing. At each point of the pupil, the local refractive error is given by the wavefront curvature, which is a 2 × 2 symmetric matrix, whose elements are directly related to sphere, cylinder, and axis. Aberrometers usually measure the local gradient of the wavefront. Then refractive error sensing consists of differentiating the gradient, instead of integrating as in wavefront sensing. A statistical approach is proposed to pass from the local to the global (clinically meaningful) refractive error, in which the best correction is assumed to be the maximum likelihood estimation. In the practical implementation, this corresponds to the mode of the joint histogram of the 3 different elements of the curvature matrix. Results obtained both in computer simulations and with real data provide a close agreement and consistency with the main optical image quality metrics such as the Strehl ratio. PMID:21149305

  6. Refractive Secondary Concentrators for Solar Thermal Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wong, Wayne A.; Macosko, Robert P.

    1999-01-01

    The NASA Glenn Research Center is developing technologies that utilize solar energy for various space applications including electrical power conversion, thermal propulsion, and furnaces. Common to all of these applications is the need for highly efficient, solar concentration systems. An effort is underway to develop the innovative single crystal refractive secondary concentrator, which uses refraction and total internal reflection to efficiently concentrate and direct solar energy. The refractive secondary offers very high throughput efficiencies (greater than 90%), and when used in combination with advanced primary concentrators, enables very high concentration ratios (10,0(X) to 1) and very high temperatures (greater than 2000 K). Presented is an overview of the refractive secondary concentrator development effort at the NASA Glenn Research Center, including optical design and analysis techniques, thermal modeling capabilities, crystal materials characterization testing, optical coatings evaluation, and component testing. Also presented is a discussion of potential future activity and technical issues yet to be resolved. Much of the work performed to date has been in support of the NASA Marshall Space Flight Center's Solar Thermal Propulsion Program. The many benefits of a refractive secondary concentrator that enable efficient, high temperature thermal propulsion system designs, apply equally well to other solar applications including furnaces and power generation systems such as solar dynamics, concentrated thermal photovoltaics, and thermionics.

  7. [Refractive changes after Descemet membrane endothelial keratoplasty].

    PubMed

    Röck, T; Bartz-Schmidt, K U; Röck, D; Yoeruek, E

    2014-01-01

    Penetrating keratoplasty has different refractive disadvantages in contrast to posterior lamellar keratoplasty. For example, a decentered corneal trephination and a tilted trephination or unevenly tightened corneal sutures can cause an uncontrolled high astigmatism as well as a refractive change. Also the postoperative refraction may change over time as a result of wound healing, suture loosening or suture removal. The aim of this retrospective study was to investigate a possible refractive change after Descemet membrane endothelial keratoplasty (DMEK). A total of 139 pseudophakic eyes from 125 patients with endothelial decompensation had undergone DMEK surgery at the Tübingen Eye Clinic. After a mean postoperative time of 13.15 ± 2.98 months after DMEK discreet mean changes in the spherical equivalent of + 0.37 ± 0.87 diopters and the cylinder to - 0.45 ± 0.57 diopters were observed. The mean central corneal thickness decreased from 670 ± 70 µm to 544 ± 55 µm. In conclusion after DMEK a discreet induced hyperopic refractive shift due to the reversal of stromal swelling was observed. PMID:23989219

  8. SnO{sub 2} nanoparticles in silica: Nanosized tools for femtosecond-laser machining of refractive index patterns

    SciTech Connect

    Paleari, A.; Franchina, E.; Chiodini, N.; Lauria, A.; Bricchi, E.; Kazansky, P.G.

    2006-03-27

    We show that SnO{sub 2} nanoclusters in silica interact with ultrashort infrared laser pulses focused inside the material generating a hydrostatic compression and photoelastic response of the surrounding glass. This effect, together with the laser-induced nanocluster amorphization, gives rise to positive or negative refractive-index changes, up to 10{sup -2}, depending on the beam-power density. This result points out a wide tuning of the refractive index patterns obtainable in silica-based optical technology.

  9. Effect of hydrogenic impurity on linear and nonlinear optical absorption coefficients and refractive index changes in a quantum dot

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Kangxian; Zhang, Zhongmin; Mou, Sen; Xiao, Bo

    2015-05-01

    The analytical expressions of linear and nonlinear optical absorption coefficients and refractive index changes in a quantum dot with a hydrogenic impurity are obtained by using the compact-density-matrix approach and iterative method. The wave functions and the energy levels are obtained by using the variational method. Numerical results show that the optical absorption coefficients and refractive index changes are strongly affected by the hydrogenic impurity.

  10. Simultaneous measurement of refractive index and thickness of birefringent wave plates.

    PubMed

    Yeh, Yen-Liang

    2008-04-01

    A nondestructive measurement system based on a position sensing detector (PSD) and a laser interferometer for determining the thickness and refractive indices of birefringent optical wave plates has been developed. Unlike previous methods presented in the literature, the proposed metrology system allows the refractive index and thickness properties of the optical plate to be measured simultaneously. The experimental results obtained for the e-light and o-light refractive indices of a commercially available birefringent optical wave plate with refractive indices of n(o)=1.542972 and n(e)=1.552033 are found to be accurate to within 0.004132 and 0.000229, respectively. Furthermore, the experimentally derived value of the wave plate thickness deviates by no more than 0.9 microm from the analytically derived value of 453.95 microm. Overall, the experimental results confirm that the proposed metrology system provides a simple yet highly accurate means of obtaining simultaneous measurements of the refractive indices and thickness of birefringent optical wave plates. PMID:18382573

  11. Meterological correction of optical beam refraction

    SciTech Connect

    Lukin, V.P.; Melamud, A.E.; Mironov, V.L.

    1986-02-01

    At the present time laser reference systems (LRS's) are widely used in agrotechnology and in geodesy. The demands for accuracy in LRS's constantly increase, so that a study of error sources and means of considering and correcting them is of practical importance. A theoretical algorithm is presented for correction of the regular component of atmospheric refraction for various types of hydrostatic stability of the atmospheric layer adjacent to the earth. The algorithm obtained is compared to regression equations obtained by processing an experimental data base. It is shown that within admissible accuracy limits the refraction correction algorithm obtained permits construction of correction tables and design of optical systems with programmable correction for atmospheric refraction on the basis of rapid meteorological measurements.

  12. Refraction of microwave signals by water vapor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goldfinger, A. D.

    1980-01-01

    Tropospheric water vapor causes a refractive path length effect which is typically 5-10% of the 'dry' tropospheric effect and as large as several meters at elevation angles below 5 deg. The vertical water vapor profile is quite variable, and measurements of intensive atmospheric parameters such as temperature and humidity limited to the surface do not adequately predict the refractive effect. It is suggested that a water vapor refraction model that is a function of the amount of precipitable water alone can be successful at low elevation angles. From an extensive study of numerical ray tracings through radiosonde balloon data, such a model has been constructed. The model predicts the effect at all latitudes and elevation angles between 2 and 10 deg to an accuracy of better than 4% (11 cm at 3 deg elevation angle).

  13. Refraction by a spherical nematic bubble

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sherman, Richard David

    1989-08-01

    A formalism is developed to study refraction by a spherical nematic bubble. It is applicable to bubbles that are larger than light wavelengths, but smaller than the dimensions for excitation of director-fluctuation-induced scattering. The technique yields a nonlinear differential equation and an associated integral which govern the trajectory of a ray inside a nematic region for an arbitrary director configuration. Explicit solutions are provided for five simple interior arrangements-isotropic, onion skin, radial star, horizontal (bottle brush), and vertical. It is then demonstrated that for extraordinary-ordinary refractive-index difference small compared to either, interfacial refraction at the bubble surface is the dominant contribution; deviations from a rectilinear path are small. When ranked in terms of decreasing scattering effectiveness, the sequence is horizontal, onion, isotropic, radial, and vertical if the light is linearly polarized and coupling optimally to the extraordinary index component; for unpolarized incoherent light the order becomes isotropic, horizontal, onion, radial, and vertical.

  14. Seismic refraction analysis: the path forward

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Haines, Seth S.; Zelt, Colin; Doll, William

    2012-01-01

    Seismic Refraction Methods: Unleashing the Potential and Understanding the Limitations; Tucson, Arizona, 29 March 2012 A workshop focused on seismic refraction methods took place on 29 May 2012, associated with the 2012 Symposium on the Application of Geophysics to Engineering and Environmental Problems. This workshop was convened to assess the current state of the science and discuss paths forward, with a primary focus on near-surface problems but with an eye on all applications. The agenda included talks on these topics from a number of experts interspersed with discussion and a dedicated discussion period to finish the day. Discussion proved lively at times, and workshop participants delved into many topics central to seismic refraction work.

  15. Equivalent lenses of supersonic seeker's outflow refractive index field obtained by simulation and experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Qun; Jia, Hongguang; Xuan, Ming

    2008-12-01

    In order to decrease the aerodynamic drag of supersonic image guide missile and design a non-spherical dome, the outflow field of the missile's dome is simulated using FLUENT. Based on the simulated results, the accurate density field of the outflow field at all kinds of flight conditions is obtained, and then the refractive index field of the outflow field is gotten according to the Gladstone-Dale law. The results show that the shock wave induces the heterogeneity of the refractive index field and the turbulent causes distortion. The outflow field is divided into several zones which are taken as equivalent lenses for aberration analysis.

  16. Laser-ablation-induced refractive index fields studied using pulsed digital holographic interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amer, Eynas; Gren, Per; Sjödahl, Mikael

    2009-07-01

    Pulsed digital holographic interferometry has been used to investigate the plume and the shock wave generated in the ablation process of a Q-switched Nd-YAG ( λ=1064 nm and pulse duration=12 ns) laser pulse on a polycrystalline boron nitride (PCBN) target under atmospheric air pressure. A special setup based on two synchronised wavelengths from the same laser for simultaneous processing and measurement has been used. Digital holograms were recorded for different time delays using collimated laser light ( λ=532 nm) passed through the volume along the target. Numerical data of the integrated refractive index field were calculated and presented as phase maps showing the propagation of the shock wave and the plume generated by the process. Radon inversion has been used to estimate the 3D refractive index fields measured from the projections assuming rotational symmetry. The shock wave density has been calculated using the point explosion model and the shock wave condition equation and its behaviour with time at different power densities ranging from 1.4 to 9.1 GW/cm 2 is presented. Shock front densities have been calculated from the reconstructed refractive index fields using the Gladstone-Dale equation. A comparison of the shock front density calculated from the reconstructed data and that calculated using the point explosion model at different time delays has been done. The comparison shows quite good agreement between the model and the experimental data. Finally the reconstructed refractive index field has been used to estimate the electron number density distribution within the laser-induced plasma. The electron number density behaviour with distance from the target at different power densities and its behaviour with time are shown. The electron number densities are found to be in the order of 10 18 cm -3 and decay at a rate of 3×10 15 electrons/cm 3 ns.

  17. Modeling of mouse eye and errors in ocular parameters affecting refractive state

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bawa, Gurinder

    Rodents eye are particularly used to study refractive error state of an eye and development of refractive eye. Genetic organization of rodents is similar to that of humans, which makes them interesting candidates to be researched upon. From rodents family mice models are encouraged over rats because of availability of genetically engineered models. Despite of extensive work that has been performed on mice and rat models, still no one is able to quantify an optical model, due to variability in the reported ocular parameters. In this Dissertation, we have extracted ocular parameters and generated schematics of eye from the raw data from School of Medicine, Detroit. In order to see how the rays would travel through an eye and the defects associated with an eye; ray tracing has been performed using ocular parameters. Finally we have systematically evaluated the contribution of various ocular parameters, such as radii of curvature of ocular surfaces, thicknesses of ocular components, and refractive indices of ocular refractive media, using variational analysis and a computational model of the rodent eye. Variational analysis revealed that variation in all the ocular parameters does affect the refractive status of the eye, but depending upon the magnitude of the impact those parameters are listed as critical or non critical. Variation in the depth of the vitreous chamber, thickness of the lens, radius of the anterior surface of the cornea, radius of the anterior surface of the lens, as well as refractive indices for the lens and vitreous, appears to have the largest impact on the refractive error and thus are categorized as critical ocular parameters. The radii of the posterior surfaces of the cornea and lens have much smaller contributions to the refractive state, while the radii of the anterior and posterior surfaces of the retina have no effect on the refractive error. These data provide the framework for further refinement of the optical models of the rat and mouse

  18. Negative refraction without absorption via quantum coherence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fang, Ai-Ping; Ge, Wenchao; Wang, Meng; Li, Fu-li; Zubairy, M. Suhail

    2016-02-01

    Negative refraction of a probe field is studied in a dense gas consisting of cascade-type four-level atoms. By coupling the magnetic component of the probe field to a Λ scheme with initially prepared coherence in the two lower levels, strong negative permeability with minimal absorption can be obtained. The permittivity of the gas to the electric component of the probe field can be made negative by taking into account the local field effect of the dense atoms. Strong negative refraction with zero absorption can be achieved in a wide range of parameters in our scheme. A possible experimental realization is also discussed.

  19. A Liquid Prism for Refractive Index Studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Edmiston, Michael D.

    2001-11-01

    A hollow glass prism filled with liquid becomes a "liquid prism". A simple method for constructing hollow glass prisms is presented. A method is given for a demonstration that uses the liquid prism with a laser or laser pointer so the audience can observe differences in refractive index for various liquids. The demonstration provides a quick and easy determination of the sugar content of soft drinks and juices. The prism makes it easy to determine a numerical value for the refractive index of a liquid.

  20. Plasmonic crystal enhanced refractive index sensing

    SciTech Connect

    Stein, Benedikt; Devaux, Eloïse; Genet, Cyriaque Ebbesen, Thomas W.

    2014-06-23

    We demonstrate experimentally how the local anisotropy of the dispersion relation of surface plasmon modes propagating over periodic metal gratings can lead to an enhancement of the figure of merit of refractive index sensors. Exploiting the possibility to acquire defocused images of the Fourier space of a highly stable leakage radiation microscope, we report a twofold increase in sensing sensitivity close to the band gap of a one-dimensional plasmonic crystal where the anisotropy of the band structure is the most important. A practical sensing resolution of O(10{sup −6}) refractive index units is demonstrated.

  1. Refractive acoustic devices for airborne sound.

    PubMed

    Cervera, F; Sanchis, L; Sánchez-Pérez, J V; Martínez-Sala, R; Rubio, C; Meseguer, F; López, C; Caballero, D; Sánchez-Dehesa, J

    2002-01-14

    We show that a sonic crystal made of periodic distributions of rigid cylinders in air acts as a new material which allows the construction of refractive acoustic devices for airborne sound. It is demonstrated that, in the long-wave regime, the crystal has low impedance and the sound is transmitted at subsonic velocities. Here, the fabrication and characterization of a convergent lens are presented. Also, an example of a Fabry-Perot interferometer based on this crystal is analyzed. It is concluded that refractive devices based on sonic crystals behave in a manner similar to that of optical systems. PMID:11801014

  2. Compositional dependence of optical band gap and refractive index in lead and bismuth borate glasses

    SciTech Connect

    Mallur, Saisudha B.; Czarnecki, Tyler; Adhikari, Ashish; Babu, Panakkattu K.

    2015-08-15

    Highlights: • Refractive indices increase with increasing PbO/Bi{sub 2}O{sub 3} content. • Optical band gap arises due to direct forbidden transition. • Optical band gaps decrease with increasing PbO/Bi{sub 2}O{sub 3} content. • New empirical relation between the optical band gap and the refractive index. - Abstract: We prepared a series of lead and bismuth borate glasses by varying PbO/Bi{sub 2}O{sub 3} content and studied refractive index and optical band gap as a function of glass composition. Refractive indices were measured very accurately using a Brewster’s angle set up while the optical band gaps were determined by analyzing the optical absorption edge using the Mott–Davis model. Using the Lorentz–Lorentz method and the effective medium theory, we calculated the refractive indices and then compared them with the measured values. Bismuth borate glasses show better agreement between the calculated values of the refractive index and experimental values. We used a differential method based on Mott–Davis model to obtain the type of transition and optical band gap (E{sub opt}) which in turn was compared with the value of E{sub opt} obtained using the extinction coefficient. Our analysis shows that in both lead and bismuth borate glasses, the optical band gap arises due to direct forbidden transition. With increasing PbO/Bi{sub 2}O{sub 3} content, the absorption edge shifts toward longer wavelengths and the optical band gap decreases. This behavior can be explained in terms of changes to the Pb−O/Bi−O chemical bonds with glass composition. We obtained a new empirical relation between the optical band gap and the refractive index which can be used to accurately determine the electronic oxide polarizability in lead and bismuth oxide glasses.

  3. Constraining Subsurface Structure and Composition Using Seismic Refraction Surveys of Proglacial Valleys in the Cordillera Blanca, Peru

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glas, R. L.; Lautz, L.; McKenzie, J. M.; Mark, B. G.; Baker, E. A.; Aubry-Wake, C.; Somers, L. D.; Wigmore, O.

    2015-12-01

    As tropical glaciers rapidly recede in response to climate change, the storage and discharge of groundwater will play an increasing role in regulating river baseflow, particularly during the dry season, when stream flow is currently sustained predominantly by glacial melt. Little is understood regarding the hydrogeologic processes controlling base flow characteristics of low-gradient proglacial valleys of the Cordillera Blanca in Northwestern Peru, which has the world's highest density of tropical glaciers. To better understand the processes of groundwater storage and discharge in proglacial meadows, we completed seismic refraction surveys in three representative valleys of the Cordillera Blanca range: the Quilcayhuanca, Yanamarey, and Pachacoto valleys. The locations of survey transects were chosen based on locations of previous sediment core sampling, GPR lines, and quantification of groundwater-surface water interaction derived from dye and temperature tracing experiments. The seismic surveys consisted of 48 vertical component geophones with 2.5 m spacing. Across the three representative valleys a total of 15 surveys were conducted, covering a distance of 1800 m in cross, down, and oblique-valley directions. Preliminary interpretation of the seismic refraction data indicates a maximum imaging depth of 16 m below land surface, and a transition from glacio-lacustrine sediments to buried saturated talus at a depth of 6 m in the Quilcayhuanca valley. The organic-rich glacio-lacustrine sediments in the Yanamarey valley have seismic velocities ranging from 300 to 800 m/s and are >16 m in thickness at mid- valley. Weathered metasedimentary bedrock in the Pachacoto valley was imaged at ~5 m below the valley surface, exhibiting a p-wave velocity of 3400 m/s. The knowledge of hydrogeologic structure derived from seismic refraction surveys will provide crucial boundary conditions for future groundwater models of the valleys of the Cordillera Blanca.

  4. Characterization of a novel ultra low refractive index material for biosensor application.

    PubMed

    Memisevic, Jasenka; Korampally, Venumadhav; Gangopadhyay, Shubhra; Grant, Sheila A

    2009-08-18

    Nanoporous materials can provide significant benefits to the field of biosensors. Their size and porous structure makes them an ideal tool for improving sensor performance. This study characterized a novel ultra low index of refraction nanoporous organosilicate (NPO) material for use as an optical platform for fluorescence-based optical biosensors. While serving as the low index cladding material, the novel coating based on organosilicate nanoparticles also provides an opportunity for a high surface area coating that can be utilized for immobilizing biological probes. Biological molecules were immobilized onto NPO, which was spin-coated on silicon and glass substrates. The biological molecule was composed of Protein A conjugated to AlexaFluor 546 fluorophore and then immobilized onto the NPO substrate via silanization. Sample analysis consisted of spectrofluorometry, FT-IR spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy, contact angle measurement and ellipsometry. The results showed the presence of emission peaks at 574 nm, indicating that the immobilization of Protein A to the NPO material is possible. When compared to Si and glass substrates not coated with NPO, the results showed a 100X and 10X increase in packing density with the NPO coated films respectively. Ellipsometric analysis, FT-IR, contact angle, and SEM imaging of the surface immobilized NPO films suggested that while the surface modifications did induce some damage, it did not incur significant changes to its unique characteristics, i.e., pore structure, wettability and index of refraction. It was concluded that NPO films would be a viable sensor substrate to enhance sensitivity and improve sensor performance. PMID:20161155

  5. Effects of Long-Wavelength Lighting on Refractive Development in Infant Rhesus Monkeys

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Earl L.; Hung, Li-Fang; Arumugam, Baskar; Holden, Brien A.; Neitz, Maureen; Neitz, Jay

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Differences in the spectral composition of lighting between indoor and outdoor scenes may contribute to the higher prevalence of myopia in children who spend low amounts of time outdoors. Our goal was to determine whether environments dominated by long-wavelength light promote the development of myopia. Methods Beginning at 25 ± 2 days of age, infant monkeys were reared with long-wavelength-pass (red) filters in front of one (MRL, n = 6) or both eyes (BRL, n = 7). The filters were worn continuously until 146 ± 7 days of age. Refractive development, corneal power, and vitreous chamber depth were assessed by retinoscopy, keratometry, and ultrasonography, respectively. Control data were obtained from 6 monkeys reared with binocular neutral density (ND) filters and 33 normal monkeys reared with unrestricted vision under typical indoor lighting. Results At the end of the filter-rearing period, the median refractive error for the BRL monkeys (+4.25 diopters [D]) was significantly more hyperopic than that for the ND (+2.22 D; P = 0.003) and normal monkeys (+2.38 D; P = 0.0001). Similarly, the MRL monkeys exhibited hyperopic anisometropias that were larger than those in normal monkeys (+1.70 ± 1.55 vs. −0.013 ± 0.33 D, P < 0.0001). The relative hyperopia in the treated eyes was associated with shorter vitreous chambers. Following filter removal, the filter-reared monkeys recovered from the induced hyperopic errors. Conclusions The observed hyperopic shifts indicate that emmetropization does not necessarily target the focal plane that maximizes luminance contrast and that reducing potential chromatic cues can interfere with emmetropization. There was no evidence that environments dominated by long wavelengths necessarily promote myopia development. PMID:26447984

  6. Wave propagation in pulsar magnetospheres - Refraction of rays in the open flux zone

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barnard, J. J.; Arons, J.

    1986-01-01

    The propagation of waves through a relativistically outflowing electron-positron plasma in a very strong dipolar magnetic field, conditions expected in pulsar magnetospheres, is investigated. Halmilton's equations is derived for the propagation of rays through a plasma which is inhomogeneous in density, magnetic field directions, and Lorentz factor. These equations are solved for rays propagating through the plasmas outflowing along the 'open' dipolar field lines in which the density decreases inversely as the radius cubed and in the case where gradients transverse to the radial direction exist. In the radial case, the effects of refraction on pulse profiles, spectrum, and polarization are examined, and the effects of a transverse gradient are indicated. Attention is given to models in which the observed broad bandwidth in the radio emission has its origin in a radius to frequency map. Models with broad-band emission at a single radius are also studied. These are compared to observations of pulse width and pulse component separation as a function of frequency. The origin of 'orthogonal modes' is discussed.

  7. Meta-atom cluster acoustic metamaterial with broadband negative effective mass density

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Huaijun; Zhai, Shilong; Ding, Changlin; Liu, Song; Luo, Chunrong; Zhao, Xiaopeng

    2014-02-07

    We design a resonant meta-atom cluster, via which a two-dimensional (2D) acoustic metamaterial (AM) with broadband negative effective mass density from 1560 Hz to 5580 Hz is fabricated. Experimental results confirm that there is only weak interaction among the meta-atoms in the cluster. And then the meta-atoms in the cluster independently resonate, resulting in the cluster becoming equivalent to a broadband resonance unit. Extracted effective refractive indices from reflection and transmission measurements of the 2D AM appear to be negative from 1500 Hz to 5480 Hz. The broadband negative refraction has also been demonstrated by our further experiments. We expect that this meta-atom cluster AM will significantly contribute to the design of broadband negative effective mass density AM.

  8. Calculations of atmospheric refraction for spacecraft remote-sensing applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chu, W. P.

    1983-01-01

    Analytical solutions to the refraction integrals appropriate for ray trajectories along slant paths through the atmosphere are derived in this paper. This type of geometry is commonly encountered in remote-sensing applications utilizing an occultation technique. The solutions are obtained by evaluating higher-order terms from expansion of the refraction integral and are dependent on the vertical temperature distributions. Refraction parameters such as total refraction angles, air masses, and path lengths can be accurately computed. It is also shown that the method can be used for computing refraction parameters in astronomical refraction geometry for large zenith angles.

  9. Correction of satellite laser ranging for atmospheric refraction.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mironov, N. T.

    Atmospheric refraction causes significant errors in satellite laser ranging (SLR) systems. Numerous formulas have been developed to partially correct laser ranging data for the effects of atmospheric refraction. These formulas were derived under the assumption that atmospheric refraction is spherically symmetric. The accuracy of the Marini-Murray's spherical correction formula are checked. The residual errors in the spherical model are thought to be primarily caused by horizontal gradients in the refractivity. The effects of horizontal refractivity gradients are investigated by ray tracing through spherically symmetric and three-dimensional refractivity profiles.

  10. Joint analysis of refractions with surface waves: An inverse solution to the refraction-traveltime problem

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ivanov, J.; Miller, R.D.; Xia, J.; Steeples, D.; Park, C.B.

    2006-01-01

    We describe a possible solution to the inverse refraction-traveltime problem (IRTP) that reduces the range of possible solutions (nonuniqueness). This approach uses a reference model, derived from surface-wave shear-wave velocity estimates, as a constraint. The application of the joint analysis of refractions with surface waves (JARS) method provided a more realistic solution than the conventional refraction/tomography methods, which did not benefit from a reference model derived from real data. This confirmed our conclusion that the proposed method is an advancement in the IRTP analysis. The unique basic principles of the JARS method might be applicable to other inverse geophysical problems. ?? 2006 Society of Exploration Geophysicists.

  11. Index of Refraction Measurements and Window Corrections for PMMA under Shock Compression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chapman, David; Eakins, Daniel; Williamson, David; Proud, William

    2011-06-01

    Symmetric plate impact experiments were performed to investigate the change in the refractive index of PMMA under shock loading. Flyer and target geometries allowed the measurement of shock velocity, particle velocity, and refractive index in the shocked state, using the simultaneous application of VISAR (532 nm) and Het-V (1550 nm). The change in refractive index of PMMA as a function of density is generally considered to be well described by the Gladstone-Dale relationship, meaning that the ``apparent'' velocity measured by a laser velocity interferometer is the ``true'' velocity, and hence there is no window correction. The results presented characterise the accuracy of this assumption at peak stresses up to 2 GPa.

  12. Refractive Index Effects on Radiation in an Absorbing, Emitting, and Scattering Laminated Layer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Siegel, R.; Spuckler, C. M.

    1993-01-01

    A simple set of equations is derived for predicting temperature radiative energy flow in a two-region semitransparent laminated layer in the limit of zero heat conduction. The composite is heated on its two sides by unequal amounts of incident radiation. The two layers of the composite have different refractive indices, and each material absorbs, emits, and isotropically scatters radiation. The interfaces are diffuse, and all interface reflections are included. To illustrate the thermal behavior that is readily calculated from the equations, typical results an given for various optical thicknesses and refractive indices of the layers. Internal reflections have a substantial effect on the temperature distribution and radiative heat flow.

  13. Compound refractive X-ray lens

    DOEpatents

    Nygren, David R.; Cahn, Robert; Cederstrom, Bjorn; Danielsson, Mats; Vestlund, Jonas

    2000-01-01

    An apparatus and method for focusing X-rays. In one embodiment, his invention is a commercial-grade compound refractive X-ray lens. The commercial-grade compound refractive X-ray lens includes a volume of low-Z material. The volume of low-Z material has a first surface which is adapted to receive X-rays of commercially-applicable power emitted from a commercial-grade X-ray source. The volume of low-Z material also has a second surface from which emerge the X-rays of commercially-applicable power which were received at the first surface. Additionally, the commercial-grade compound refractive X-ray lens includes a plurality of openings which are disposed between the first surface and the second surface. The plurality of openings are oriented such that the X-rays of commercially-applicable power which are received at the first surface, pass through the volume of low-Z material and through the plurality openings. In so doing, the X-rays which emerge from the second surface are refracted to a focal point.

  14. A Mechanical Analogue of the Refracting Telescope

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vannoni, Maurizio; Molesini, Giuseppe; Sordini, Andrea; Straulino, Samuele

    2011-01-01

    The recent celebration of the discoveries made by Galileo four centuries ago has attracted new attention to the refracting telescope and to its use as an instrument for the observation of the night sky. This has offered the opportunity for addressing in the classroom the basic principles explaining the operation of the telescope. When doing so, a…

  15. Validation of Ray Tracing Code Refraction Effects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heath, Stephanie L.; McAninch, Gerry L.; Smith, Charles D.; Conner, David A.

    2008-01-01

    NASA's current predictive capabilities using the ray tracing program (RTP) are validated using helicopter noise data taken at Eglin Air Force Base in 2007. By including refractive propagation effects due to wind and temperature, the ray tracing code is able to explain large variations in the data observed during the flight test.

  16. Blending History with Physics: Acoustic Refraction.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ross, Charles D.

    2000-01-01

    Argues that the study of refraction of sound waves, although usually neglected, is an excellent ancillary to the normal optical approach in physics courses. Discusses the historical context of interest in the science behind outdoor sound propagation, particularly during the Civil War in the United States. (WRM)

  17. Pg shingles: preliminary results from the onshore GLIMPCE refraction experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mereu, R. F.; Epili, D.; Green, A. G.

    1990-02-01

    In 1986, a series of near vertical Seismic reflection lines and coincident Seismic refraction lines were recorded across the Great Lakes in the GLIMPCE experiment. From a refraction point of view this experiment was unique as this was the first time in North America that long range refraction lines up to 350 km were recorded with a trace spacing of less than 100 metres. The source of energy was a large air gun. Some preliminary results of the nature of the onshore recordings made by the University of Western Ontario are presented in this paper. Observations of many of the in-line profiles show that the character of the Pg crustal phase is not simple but has a "shingle-like" pattern which may be caused by wide-angle reflection effects from numerous long and short reflectors within the crust. Theoretical studies indicate that the amplitudes of the wide-angle reflected signals from thin high-velocity layers are in general much larger than those from thin low-velocity layers. Supercritical reflected waves are not possible from the top of a low-velocity layer. The closely spaced traces show in minute detail the manner in which one travel-time branch fades and the next one arrives. The results seem to indicate that the Pg phase in our data set has little direct wave component but, instead, is made up of a whole series of "shingled or fish-scaled" wide-angle reflection components, each with successively larger apparent velocities. These results are in agreement with the findings of the near-vertical reflection component of the experiment.

  18. Tropospheric wet refractivity tomography based on the BeiDou satellite system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xiaoying; Wang, Xianliang; Dai, Ziqiang; Ke, Fuyang; Cao, Yunchang; Wang, Feifei; Song, Lianchun

    2014-03-01

    This paper presents a novel approach for assessing the precision of the wet refractivity field using BDS (BeiDou navigation satellite system) simulations only, GPS, and BDS+GPS for the Shenzhen and Hongkong GNSS network. The simulations are carried out by adding artificial noise to a real observation dataset. Instead of using the d and s parameters computed from slant wet delay, as in previous studies, we employ the Bias and RMS parameters, computed from the tomography results of total voxels, in order to obtain a more direct and comprehensive evaluation of the precision of the refractivity field determination. The results show that: (1) the precision of tropospheric wet refractivity estimated using BDS alone (only 9 satellites used) is basically comparable to that of GPS; (2) BDS+GPS (as of current operation) may not be able to significantly improve the data's spatial density for the application of refractivity tomography; and (3) any slight increase in the precision of refractivity tomography, particularly in the lower atmosphere, bears great significance for any applications dependent on the Chinese operational meteorological service.

  19. Three-Dimensional Holographic Refractive-Index Measurement of Continuously Flowing Cells in a Microfluidic Channel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sung, Yongjin; Lue, Niyom; Hamza, Bashar; Martel, Joseph; Irimia, Daniel; Dasari, Ramachandra R.; Choi, Wonshik; Yaqoob, Zahid; So, Peter

    2014-02-01

    The refractive index of biological specimens is a source of intrinsic contrast that can be explored without any concerns of photobleaching or harmful effects caused by extra contrast agents. In addition, the refractive index contains rich information related to the metabolism of cells at the cellular and subcellular levels. Here, we report a no-moving-parts approach that provides three-dimensional refractive-index maps of biological samples continuously flowing in a microfluidic channel. Specifically, we use line illumination and off-axis digital holography to record the angular spectra of light scattered from flowing samples at high speed. Applying the scalar diffraction theory, we obtain accurate refractive-index maps of the samples from the measured spectra. Using this method, we demonstrate label-free three-dimensional imaging of live RKO human colon cancer cells and RPMI8226 multiple myeloma cells, and obtain the volume, dry mass, and density of these cells from the measured three-dimensional refractive-index maps. Our results show that the reported method, alone or in combination with the existing flow cytometry techniques, shows promise as a quantitative tool for stain-free characterization of a large number of cells.

  20. Trace element study of high- and low-refractive index Muong Nong-type tektites from Indochina

    SciTech Connect

    Glass, B.P.; Koeberl, C. Wien Universitaet, Vienna )

    1989-09-01

    Instrumental neutron activation analysis (INAA) was used to determine selected trace element concentrations for four Muong Nong-type tektites with high refractive indices and no relict mineral inclusions and one with low refractive index and relict inclusions, to determine if there are any systematic differences in trace element compositions between the two groups. The data were compared with published trace element data for sixteen Muong Nong-type tektites which have low refractive indices and, therefore, should contain relict inclusions. Except for Ta, which had lower concentrations in the high refractive index group, there is no consistent difference in trace element compositions between the two groups. These results are interpreted to indicate a single, slightly heterogeneous source for the Muong Nong-type tektites, rather than different source regions. 18 refs.

  1. Ultrafast refractive index control of a terahertz graphene metamaterial

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Seung Hoon; Choi, Jeongmook; Kim, Hyeon-Don; Choi, Hyunyong; Min, Bumki

    2013-01-01

    Modulation of the refractive index of materials is elementary, yet it is crucial for the manipulation of electromagnetic waves. Relying on the inherent properties of natural materials, it has been a long-standing challenge in device engineering to increase the index-modulation contrast. Here, we demonstrate a significant amount of ultrafast index modulation by optically exciting non-equilibrium Dirac fermions in the graphene layer integrated onto a high-index metamaterial. Furthermore, an extremely-large electrical modulation of refractive index up to Δn ~ −3.4 (at 0.69 THz) is achieved by electrical tuning of the density of the equilibrium Dirac fermion in the graphene metamaterial. This manifestation, otherwise remaining elusive in conventional semiconductor devices, fully exploits the characteristic ultrafast charge relaxation in graphene as well as the strong capacitive response of the metamaterial, both of which enable us to drastically increase the light-matter interaction of graphene and the corresponding index contrast in the graphene metamaterials. PMID:23823715

  2. Intraocular Pressure, Ethnicity, and Refractive Error

    PubMed Central

    Manny, Ruth E.; Mitchell, G. Lynn; Cotter, Susan A.; Jones-Jordan, Lisa A.; Kleinstein, Robert N.; Mutti, Donald O.; Twelker, J. Daniel; Zadnik, Karla

    2011-01-01

    Purpose The ethnically-diverse Collaborative Longitudinal Evaluation of Ethnicity and Refractive Error (CLEERE) Study cohort provides a unique opportunity to explore associations among intraocular pressure (IOP), ethnicity, and refractive error while adjusting for potential confounding variables. Methods Mixed linear models were used to examine the effect of age, refractive error (cycloplegic autorefraction), ethnicity, sex, and measurement protocol on IOP (Tono-pen) in 3,777 children, aged 6-14 years at their first CLEERE visit (1995-2009). Children who became myopic during follow-up were used to examine the relationship between time since myopia onset and IOP. Clinically meaningful differences in IOP were preset at > 2 mm Hg. Results IOP differed among refractive error categories with higher IOP in children with low/moderate myopia than those with high hyperopia (differences < 1 mm Hg). There was a statistically significant relationship between age and IOP that depended on ethnicity (interaction p<0.0001) and measurement protocol (interaction p<0.0001). The relationship between sex and IOP depended on measurement protocol (interaction p=0.0004). For children who became myopic during follow-up, the adjusted mean IOP showed a significant decline for only Asian (p=0.024) and White children (p=0.004). As with other statistically significant results, these changes in mean adjusted IOPs from two years before to two years after myopia onset were < 2 mm Hg. Conclusions Small but significant differences in IOP by refractive error category were found in this ethnically diverse cohort of children. Relationships between IOP and age, ethnicity, sex, and measurement protocol were complicated by significant interactions between these parameters. Longitudinal analysis of children before and after myopia onset showed changes in IOP over time that varied by ethnicity. Higher IOPs before and at myopia onset were not present in all ethnic groups, with differences before and after

  3. Refractive Turbulence, Transient Propagation Disturbances, and Space Situational Awareness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cote, O.; Wroblewski, D.; Hacker, J.

    This paper examines the proposition that mission limiting space situational awareness (SSA) has important and fundamental turbulence and propagation physics issues to be investigated. We propose to call these aspects, propagation situational awareness (PSA). Transient disturbances can be present in communication to and from ground stations and satellites and in the performance of ground based and space based optical and infra-red imaging and tracking systems. Propagation frequency is important in characterizing whether the source of the disturbance lay in the electron density fluctuations of ionosphere or the refractive turbulence of the neutral atmosphere. Over the past ten years high altitude airborne measurements of clear air and refractive turbulence were made in Australia to support design and performance evaluations of the Airborne Laser. More recently in collaboration with the Australian Defence Science & Technology Organization (DSTO) smaller aircraft were used to investigate the effect of ducting layers on the signal strength of an airborne emitter as a low cost simulation of potential for loss of track in the coverage pattern of an airborne radar. From 2002 onward we were also tasked to do fundamental investigations of clear air turbulence for flight safety evaluations of both manned and unmanned high altitude surveillance aircraft. These investigations covered a wide spread in frequency, from infra-red to microwave. Most of these investigations were confined to measurement days and altitudes where strong turbulence was expected. The decision to measure was based on predictions of the location of jet streams relative to the measurement area as well as bulk gradient Richardson (Ri) vertical profiles derived from radio sound measurements from stations surround the potential measurement location. We will show how all these analyses and decision aids, including the Ri profiles, can be used to estimate potential for propagation disturbances to SSA. Current DOD

  4. Dual-band quasi-zero refraction and negative refraction in coin-shaped metamaterial

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Min; Hou, Zhi-Ling; Liu, Ya-Min; Li, Zhong-Jun; Liu, Xingda; Fang, Hui-Min

    2015-05-01

    This paper demonstrates a metamaterial capable of realizing a dual-band quasi-zero refractive index and a negative refractive index, which consists of a coin-shaped slice and two parallel planar wires. The zero refractive index is achieved over a very wide frequency range. The bandwidth of the first band of the quasi-zero index can reach up to 3 GHz, and the width of the second band exhibiting low loss is 0.4 GHz. Between these two bands, the negative refractive index band is 9.0-13.9 GHz. The corresponding formulas of electric plasma frequency and magnetic plasma frequency are established, and the theoretical results agree well with the simulated results. The proposed metamaterial may have potential applications in multiband or broadband devices.

  5. Methods to retrieve the complex refractive index of aquatic suspended particles: going beyond simple shapes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sánchez, Albert-Miquel; Piera, Jaume

    2016-07-01

    The scattering properties of aquatic suspended particles have many optical applications. Several data inversion methods have been proposed to estimate important features of particles, such as their size distribution or their refractive index. Most of the proposed methods are based on the Lorenz-Mie theory to solve Maxwell's equations, where particles are considered homogeneous spheres. A generalization that allows consideration of more complex-shaped particles is the T-matrix method. Although this approach imposes some geometrical restrictions (particles must be rotationally symmetrical) it is applicable to many life forms of phytoplankton. In this paper, three different scenarios are considered in order to compare the performance of several inversion methods for retrieving refractive indices. The error associated with each method is discussed and analyzed. The results suggest that inverse methods using the T-matrix approach are useful to accurately retrieve the refractive indices of particles with complex shapes, such as for many phytoplankton organisms.

  6. Effect of 200 keV argon ion implantation on refractive index of polyethylene terepthlate (PET)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Rajiv; Chawla, Mahak; Rubi, Sharma, Annu; Aggarwal, Sanjeev; Kumar, Praveen; Kanjilal, D.

    2012-06-01

    In the present work, the effect of argon ion implantation has been studied on the refractive index of PET. The specimens were implanted at 200 keV with argon ions in the fluence range of 1×1015 to 1×1017 ions cm-2. The refractive indices have been found to increase with implantation dose and wavelength (in visible region) obtained by using UV-visible spectroscopy. Also a drastic decrease in optical band gap (from 3.63 eV to 1.48eV) and increase in Urbach energy (from 0.29 eV to 3.70 eV) with increase in implantation dose has been observed. The possible correlation between the changes observed in the refractive indices and the Urbachenergyhave been discussed.

  7. Design of Amphoteric Refraction Models Using WAVICA and RAYICA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Su, Richard

    2004-01-01

    The phenomenon of refraction of light is due to refractive index mismatches in two different media. However, to achieve this effect, a finite reflection loss is inevitable. A recent finding presented a unique type of interface, ferroelastic materials, that enables refraction without any reflection for either an electron or a light beam. This property is called total refraction. The same type of interface that yields total refraction can also yield amphoteric refraction, where the index of refraction can be either positive or negative depending on the incident angle. This interface could potentially be used to steer light without reflections which could have major applications in high power optics. My goal this summer is to first familiarize myself with the Mathematica software, especially the Wavica and Rayica packages. I will then model the amphoteric refraction by either modifying the Wavica and Rayica packages or using the built-in functions in these packages.

  8. Electrodynamics of moving media inducing positive and negative refraction

    SciTech Connect

    Grzegorczyk, Tomasz M.; Kong, Jin Au

    2006-07-15

    Negative refraction is a phenomenon that has been recently reported with left-handed media (either isotropic or not), photonic crystals, and rotated uniaxial media. In this Brief Report, we identify another origin of negative refraction, due to the motion of the transmitted medium parallel to the interface at which refraction occurs. Previous works in this domain have concentrated on media velocities that are above the Cerenkov limit, while we show here that negative refraction is in fact achievable at any velocities of the transmitted medium. A possible experimental implementation is proposed to verify this effect. Next, we consider an isotropic frequency-dispersive medium for which the index of refraction can take negative values, and we study the wave refraction phenomenon as a function of frequency and medium velocity. It is found that the motion of the medium induces a rotation of refraction, which can either enhance or attenuate the natural negative refraction of the medium.

  9. Automatic Refraction: How It Is Done: Some Clinical Results

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Safir, Aran; And Others

    1973-01-01

    Compaired are methods of determining visual refraction needs of young children or other unreliable observers by means of retinosocopy or the Opthalmetron, an automatic instrument which can be operated by a technician with no knowledge of refraction. (DB)

  10. Refractive eye surgery - what to ask your doctor

    MedlinePlus

    Refractive eye surgery helps improve nearsightedness, farsightedness, and astigmatism. Below are some questions you may want to ... What to ask your doctor about refractive eye surgery; ... ask your doctor; Laser-Assisted In Situ Keratomileusis - what to ...

  11. Is LASIK for Me? A Patient's Guide to Refractive Surgery

    MedlinePlus

    ... were developed with the help of the Federal Trade Commission and the American Society of Cataract and Refractive Surgery. For the complete guidelines, see: www.aao.org/about/policy/upload/Guidelines-for-Refractive-Surgery- Advertising-3-26- ...

  12. Contrast-enhanced refraction imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hall, Christopher J.; Rogers, Keith D.; Lewis, Rob A.; Menk, Ralf Hendrik; Arfelli, Fulvia; Siu, Karen K.; Benci, A.; Kitchen, M.; Pillon, Alessandra; Rigon, Luigi; Round, Andrew J.; Hufton, Alan P.; Evans, Andrew; Pinder, Sarah E.; Evans, S.

    2004-01-01

    An attempt has been made, for the first time, to extend the capabilities of diffraction enhanced imaging (DEI) using low concentrations of a contrast agent. A phantom has been constructed to accommodate a systematic series of diluted bromine deoxyuridase (BrDU) samples in liquid form. This was imaged using a conventional DEI arrangement and at a range of energies traversing the Br K-edge. The images were analyzed to provide a quantitative measure of contrast as a function of X-ray energy and (BrDU) concentration. The results indicate that the particular experimental arrangement was not optimized to exploit the potential of this contrast enhancement and several suggestions are discussed to improve this further.

  13. Low Scatter Edge Blackening Compounds For Refractive Optical Elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lewis, Isabella T.; Telkamp, Arthur R.; Ledebuhr, Arno G.

    1990-01-01

    Perkin-Elmer's Applied Optics Operation recently delivered several prototype wide-field-of-view (WFOV), F/2.8, 250 mm efl, near diffraction limited, concentric refractive lenses to Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL). In these lenses, special attention was paid to reducing stray light to allow viewing of very dim objects. Because of the very large FOV, the use of a long baffle to eliminate direct illumination of lens edges was not practical. With the existing relatively short baffle design, one-bounce stray light paths off the element edges are possible. The scattering off the inside edges thus had to be kept to an absolute minimum. While common means for blackening the edges of optical elements are easy to apply and quite cost effective for normal lens assemblies, their blackening effect is limited by the Fresnel reflection due to the index of refraction mismatch at the glass boundary. At high angles of incidence, total internal reflection (TIR) might occur ruining the effect of the blackening process. An index-matched absorbing medium applied to the edges of such elements is the most effective approach for reducing the amount of undesired light reflected or scattered off these edges. The presence of such a medium provides an extended path outside the glass boundary in which an absorptive non-scattering dye can be used to eliminate light that might otherwise have propagated to the focal plane. Perkin-Elmer and LLNL undertook a program to develop epoxy-based dye carrier compounds with refractive indices corresponding to the glass types used in the WFOV lens. This program involved the measuring of the refractive index of a number of epoxy compounds and catalysts, the experimental combination of epoxies to match our glass indices, and the identification of a suitable non-scattering absorptive dye. Measurements on these blacks showed Bidirectional Reflectance Distribution Functions (BRDFs) between 1.4 and 3.1 orders of magnitude lower than Perkin

  14. Optical Enhancement in Optoelectronic Devices Using Refractive Index Grading Layers.

    PubMed

    Lee, Illhwan; Park, Jae Yong; Gim, Seungo; Kim, Kisoo; Cho, Sang-Hwan; Choi, Chung Sock; Song, Seung-Yong; Lee, Jong-Lam

    2016-02-10

    We enhanced the optical transmittance of a multilayer barrier film by inserting a refractive index grading layer (RIGL). The result indicates that the Fresnel reflection, induced by the difference of refractive indices between Si(x)N(y) and SiO2, is reduced by the RIGL. To eliminate the Fresnel reflection while maintaining high transmittance, the optimized design of grading structures with the RIGL was conducted using an optical simulator. With the RIGL, we achieved averaged transmittance in the visible wavelength region by 89.6%. It is found that the optimized grading structure inserting the multilayer barrier film has a higher optical transmittance (89.6%) in the visible region than that of a no grading sample (82.6%). Furthermore, luminance is enhanced by 14.5% (from 10,190 to 11,670 cd m(-2) at 30 mA cm(-2)) when the grading structure is applied to organic light-emitting diodes. Finally, the results offer new opportunities in development of multilayer barrier films, which assist industrialization of very cost-effective flexible organic electronic devices. PMID:26800204

  15. Shuttle program: Computing atmospheric scale height for refraction corrections

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lear, W. M.

    1980-01-01

    Methods for computing the atmospheric scale height to determine radio wave refraction were investigated for different atmospheres, and different angles of elevation. Tables of refractivity versus altitude are included. The equations used to compute the refraction corrections are given. It is concluded that very accurate corrections are determined with the assumption of an exponential atmosphere.

  16. Density of the lunar interior.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gast, P. W.; Giuli, R. T.

    1972-01-01

    It is attempted to derive the constraints that can be placed on the density of the lunar interior. The moment of inertia of the moon and its mean density are being considered in the investigation together with the mass and density of the lunar crust that have been inferred from the seismic refraction data recorded by the passive seismometer. The calculations presented show that the density of the lunar interior can easily approach values as high as 3.5 for a fraction of the lunar mass which lies in the range from 1/2 to 2/3.

  17. A new target reconstruction method considering atmospheric refraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zuo, Zhengrong; Yu, Lijuan

    2015-12-01

    In this paper, a new target reconstruction method considering the atmospheric refraction is presented to improve 3D reconstruction accuracy in long rang surveillance system. The basic idea of the method is that the atmosphere between the camera and the target is partitioned into several thin layers radially in which the density is regarded as uniform; Then the reverse tracking of the light propagation path from sensor to target was carried by applying Snell's law at the interface between layers; and finally the average of the tracked target's positions from different cameras is regarded as the reconstructed position. The reconstruction experiments were carried, and the experiment results showed that the new method have much better reconstruction accuracy than the traditional stereoscopic reconstruction method.

  18. High Prevalence of Refractive Errors in 7 Year Old Children in Iran

    PubMed Central

    HASHEMI, Hassan; YEKTA, Abbasali; JAFARZADEHPUR, Ebrahim; OSTADIMOGHADDAM, Hadi; ETEMAD, Koorosh; ASHARLOUS, Amir; NABOVATI, Payam; KHABAZKHOOB, Mehdi

    2016-01-01

    Background: The latest WHO report indicates that refractive errors are the leading cause of visual impairment throughout the world. The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence of myopia, hyperopia, and astigmatism in 7 yr old children in Iran. Methods: In a cross-sectional study in 2013 with multistage cluster sampling, first graders were randomly selected from 8 cities in Iran. All children were tested by an optometrist for uncorrected and corrected vision, and non-cycloplegic and cycloplegic refraction. Refractive errors in this study were determined based on spherical equivalent (SE) cyloplegic refraction. Results: From 4614 selected children, 89.0% participated in the study, and 4072 were eligible. The prevalence rates of myopia, hyperopia and astigmatism were 3.04% (95% CI: 2.30–3.78), 6.20% (95% CI: 5.27–7.14), and 17.43% (95% CI: 15.39–19.46), respectively. Prevalence of myopia (P=0.925) and astigmatism (P=0.056) were not statistically significantly different between the two genders, but the odds of hyperopia were 1.11 (95% CI: 1.01–2.05) times higher in girls (P=0.011). The prevalence of with-the-rule astigmatism was 12.59%, against-the-rule was 2.07%, and oblique 2.65%. Overall, 22.8% (95% CI: 19.7–24.9) of the schoolchildren in this study had at least one type of refractive error. Conclusion: One out of every 5 schoolchildren had some refractive error. Conducting multicenter studies throughout the Middle East can be very helpful in understanding the current distribution patterns and etiology of refractive errors compared to the previous decade. PMID:27114984

  19. Refractive index measurement of the mouse crystalline lens using optical coherence tomography

    PubMed Central

    Chakraborty, Ranjay; Lacy, Kip D.; Tan, Christopher C.; Park, Han na; Pardue, Machelle T.

    2014-01-01

    In recent years, there has been a growing interest for using mouse models in refractive development and myopia research. The crystalline lens is a critical optical component of the mouse eye that occupies greater than 50% of the ocular space, and significant increases in thickness with age. However, changes in refractive index of the mouse crystalline lens are less known. In this study, we examined the changes in thickness and refractive index of the mouse crystalline lens for two different strains, wild-type (WT) and a nyx mutant (nob) over the course of normal visual development or after form deprivation. Refractive index and lens thickness measurements were made on ex vivo lens using spectral domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT). Comparison of refractive index measurements on 5 standard ball lenses using the SD-OCT and their known refractive indices (manufacturer provided) indicated good precision (intra-class correlation coefficient, 0.998 and Bland-Altman coefficient of repeatability, 0.116) of the SD-OCT to calculate mouse lens refractive index ex vivo. During normal visual development, lens thickness increased significantly with age for three different cohorts of mice, aged 4 (average thickness from both eyes; WT: 1.78 ± 0.03, nob: 1.79 ± 0.08 mm), 10 (WT: 2.02 ± 0.05, nob: 2.01 ± 0.04 mm) and 16 weeks (WT: 2.12 ± 0.06, nob: 2.09 ± 0.06 mm, p<0.001). Lens thickness was not significantly different between the two strains at any age (p=0.557). For mice with normal vision, refractive index for isolated crystalline lenses in nob mice was significantly greater than WT mice (mean for all ages; WT: 1.42 ± 0.01, nob: 1.44 ± 0.001, p<0.001). After 4 weeks of form deprivation to the right eye using a skull-mounted goggling apparatus, a thinning of the crystalline lens was observed in both right and left eyes of goggled animals compared to their naïve controls (average from both the right and the left eye) for both strains (p=0.052). In form deprived

  20. Refractive Error, Axial Length, and Relative Peripheral Refractive Error before and after the Onset of Myopia

    PubMed Central

    Mutti, Donald O.; Hayes, John R.; Mitchell, G. Lynn; Jones, Lisa A.; Moeschberger, Melvin L.; Cotter, Susan A.; Kleinstein, Robert N.; Manny, Ruth E.; Twelker, J. Daniel; Zadnik, Karla

    2009-01-01

    Purpose To evaluate refractive error, axial length, and relative peripheral refractive error before, during the year of, and after the onset of myopia in children who became myopic compared with emmetropes. Methods Subjects were 605 children 6 to 14 years of age who became myopic (at least −0.75 D in each meridian) and 374 emmetropic (between −0.25 D and + 1.00 D in each meridian at all visits) children participating between 1995 and 2003 in the Collaborative Longitudinal Evaluation of Ethnicity and Refractive Error (CLEERE) Study. Axial length was measured annually by A-scan ultrasonography. Relative peripheral refractive error (the difference between the spherical equivalent cycloplegic autorefraction 30° in the nasal visual field and in primary gaze) was measured using either of two autorefractors (R-1; Canon, Lake Success, NY [no longer manufactured] or WR 5100-K; Grand Seiko, Hiroshima, Japan). Refractive error was measured with the same autorefractor with the subjects under cycloplegia. Each variable in children who became myopic was compared to age-, gender-, and ethnicity-matched model estimates of emmetrope values for each annual visit from 5 years before through 5 years after the onset of myopia. Results In the sample as a whole, children who became myopic had less hyperopia and longer axial lengths than did emmetropes before and after the onset of myopia (4 years before through 5 years after for refractive error and 3 years before through 5 years after for axial length; P < 0.0001 for each year). Children who became myopic had more hyperopic relative peripheral refractive errors than did emmetropes from 2 years before onset through 5 years after onset of myopia (P < 0.002 for each year). The fastest rate of change in refractive error, axial length, and relative peripheral refractive error occurred during the year before onset rather than in any year after onset. Relative peripheral refractive error remained at a consistent level of hyperopia each

  1. Refractive index determination by coherence scanning interferometry.

    PubMed

    Yoshino, H; Kaminski, P M; Smith, R; Walls, J M; Mansfield, D

    2016-05-20

    Coherence scanning interferometry is established as a powerful noncontact, three-dimensional, metrology technique used to determine accurate surface roughness and topography measurements with subnanometer precision. The helical complex field (HCF) function is a topographically defined helix modulated by the electrical field reflectance, originally developed for the measurement of thin films. An approach to extend the capability of the HCF function to determine the spectral refractive index of a substrate or absorbing film has recently been proposed. In this paper, we confirm this new capability, demonstrating it on surfaces of silicon, gold, and a gold/palladium alloy using silica and zirconia oxide thin films. These refractive index dispersion measurements show good agreement with those obtained by spectroscopic ellipsometry. PMID:27411157

  2. Uncladded sensing fiber for refractive index measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhardwaj, V.; Gangwar, R. K.; Pathak, A. K.; Singh, V. K.

    2016-05-01

    The formation of chemically etched optical fiber for use in refractive index sensor is addressed. This presented design of a refractive index (RI) sensor is based on recording the power loss exhibited by radiation propagating through an etched multimode fiber (MMF) immersed in the liquid under study. The decreasing diameters of fibers are found to be strongly dependent on the temperature and etchant composition. This experiment was performed for different unclad etched fibers for same sensing length and the RI changes from 1.33 RIU to 1.38 RIU. When the multimode fiber (MMF) is etched for 12 hours the sensitivity of the sensor is approximately 204.25dBm/RIU, which is larger than without etched fiber having sensitivity 127.2dBm/RIU.

  3. [The deterioration of refractive accommodative esotropia].

    PubMed

    Yan, J; Yang, S; Wang, Y

    1995-09-01

    137 patients with refractive accommodative esotropia who were followed for at least 5 years were investigated. The results showed that in 23 of the 137 patients (16.8%) occurred the deterioration of esotropia that means esotropia can no longer be controlled by wearing a pair of complete corrective spectacles. The deterioration develops most likely in patients with delay of anti-accommodative therapy or with malfunction of binocular vision. The age of onset, refractive status and the visual acuity difference between bilateral eyes are not etiologic factors in the process of deterioration. We consider that early diagnosis of accommodative esotropia, timely prescription of optical correction and maintenance of normal binocular vision play important roles in preventing the deterioration. PMID:8706583

  4. Refractive scintillation in the interstellar medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coles, W. A.; Rickett, B. J.; Codona, J. L.; Frehlich, R. G.

    1987-04-01

    The slow variation in the apparent intensity of pulsars on time scales of days to months was recently shown to be due to a large-scale component of interstellar scintillation (Rickett, Coles, and Bourgois). These variations are greater than one would expect if the turbulence spectrum were a simple Kolmogorov power law. It is shown that this large-scale component can be greatly enhanced when the turbulence spectrum has a limiting "inner scale" of the order of 109m. The authors present a solution for the covariance of refractive scintillation of an extended source in an extended medium. The results show that refractive scintillations are also responsible for slow variations in "low-frequency variables".

  5. Neutrino refraction by the cosmic neutrino background

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Díaz, J. S.; Klinkhamer, F. R.

    2016-03-01

    We have determined the dispersion relation of a neutrino test particle propagating in the cosmic neutrino background. Describing the relic neutrinos and antineutrinos from the hot big bang as a dense medium, a matter potential or refractive index is obtained. The vacuum neutrino mixing angles are unchanged, but the energy of each mass state is modified. Using a matrix in the space of neutrino species, the induced potential is decomposed into a part which produces signatures in beta-decay experiments and another part which modifies neutrino oscillations. The low temperature of the relic neutrinos makes a direct detection extremely challenging. From a different point of view, the identified refractive effects of the cosmic neutrino background constitute an ultralow background for future experimental studies of nonvanishing Lorentz violation in the neutrino sector.

  6. Interpretation of data from uphole refraction surveys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Franklin, A. G.

    1980-06-01

    The conventional interpretation of the data from an uphole refraction survey is based on the similarity between a plot of contours drawn on uphole arrival times and a wave-front diagram, which shows successive positions of the wave front produced by a single shot location at the ground surface. However, the two are alike only when the ground consists solely of homogeneous strata, oriented either horizontally or vertically. In this report, the term 'Meissner diagram' is used for the plot of arrival times from the uphole refraction survey in order to maintain the distinction between it and a true wave-front diagram. Where departures from the case of homogeneous, horizontal strata exist, the interpretation of the Meissner diagram is not straightforward, although a partial interpretation in terms of a horizontally stratified system is usually possible. A systematic approach to the interpretation problem, making use of such a partial interpretation, is proposed.

  7. Autonomous satellite navigation by stellar refraction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gounley, R.; White, R.; Gai, E.

    1983-01-01

    This paper describes an error analysis of an autonomous navigator using refraction measurements of starlight passing through the upper atmosphere. The analysis is based on a discrete linear Kalman filter. The filter generated steady-state values of navigator performance for a variety of test cases. Results of these simulations show that in low-earth orbit position-error standard deviations of less than 0.100 km may be obtained using only 40 star sightings per orbit.

  8. Matched Index of Refraction Flow Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Mcllroy, Hugh

    2010-01-01

    What's 27 feet long, 10 feet tall and full of mineral oil (3000 gallons' worth)? If you said INL's Matched Index of Refraction facility, give yourself a gold star. Scientists use computers to model the inner workings of nuclear reactors, and MIR helps validate those models. INL's Hugh McIlroy explains in this video. You can learn more about INL energy research at the lab's facebook site http://www.facebook.com/idahonationallaboratory.

  9. Matched Index of Refraction Flow Facility

    ScienceCinema

    Mcllroy, Hugh

    2013-05-28

    What's 27 feet long, 10 feet tall and full of mineral oil (3000 gallons' worth)? If you said INL's Matched Index of Refraction facility, give yourself a gold star. Scientists use computers to model the inner workings of nuclear reactors, and MIR helps validate those models. INL's Hugh McIlroy explains in this video. You can learn more about INL energy research at the lab's facebook site http://www.facebook.com/idahonationallaboratory.

  10. Nonlinear refraction and reflection travel time tomography

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Zhang, Jiahua; ten Brink, U.S.; Toksoz, M.N.

    1998-01-01

    We develop a rapid nonlinear travel time tomography method that simultaneously inverts refraction and reflection travel times on a regular velocity grid. For travel time and ray path calculations, we apply a wave front method employing graph theory. The first-arrival refraction travel times are calculated on the basis of cell velocities, and the later refraction and reflection travel times are computed using both cell velocities and given interfaces. We solve a regularized nonlinear inverse problem. A Laplacian operator is applied to regularize the model parameters (cell slownesses and reflector geometry) so that the inverse problem is valid for a continuum. The travel times are also regularized such that we invert travel time curves rather than travel time points. A conjugate gradient method is applied to minimize the nonlinear objective function. After obtaining a solution, we perform nonlinear Monte Carlo inversions for uncertainty analysis and compute the posterior model covariance. In numerical experiments, we demonstrate that combining the first arrival refraction travel times with later reflection travel times can better reconstruct the velocity field as well as the reflector geometry. This combination is particularly important for modeling crustal structures where large velocity variations occur in the upper crust. We apply this approach to model the crustal structure of the California Borderland using ocean bottom seismometer and land data collected during the Los Angeles Region Seismic Experiment along two marine survey lines. Details of our image include a high-velocity zone under the Catalina Ridge, but a smooth gradient zone between. Catalina Ridge and San Clemente Ridge. The Moho depth is about 22 km with lateral variations. Copyright 1998 by the American Geophysical Union.

  11. Emerging Technology in Refractive Cataract Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Saraiva, João; Neatrour, Kristin; Waring IV, George O.

    2016-01-01

    Technology in cataract surgery is constantly evolving to meet the goals of both surgeons and patients. Recent major advances in refractive cataract surgery include innovations in preoperative and intraoperative diagnostics, femtosecond laser-assisted cataract surgery (FLACS), and a new generation of intraocular lenses (IOLs). This paper presents the latest technologies in each of these major categories and discusses how these contributions serve to improve cataract surgery outcomes in a safe, effective, and predictable manner. PMID:27433353

  12. Refraction effects of atmosphere on geodetic measurements to celestial bodies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Joshi, C. S.

    1973-01-01

    The problem is considered of obtaining accurate values of refraction corrections for geodetic measurements of celestial bodies. The basic principles of optics governing the phenomenon of refraction are defined, and differential equations are derived for the refraction corrections. The corrections fall into two main categories: (1) refraction effects due to change in the direction of propagation, and (2) refraction effects mainly due to change in the velocity of propagation. The various assumptions made by earlier investigators are reviewed along with the basic principles of improved models designed by investigators of the twentieth century. The accuracy problem for various quantities is discussed, and the conclusions and recommendations are summarized.

  13. Tissue Refractive Index Fluctuations Report on Cancer Development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Popescu, Gabriel

    2012-02-01

    The gold standard in histopathology relies on manual investigation of stained tissue biopsies. A sensitive and quantitative method for in situ tissue specimen inspection is highly desirable, as it will allow early disease diagnosis and automatic screening. Here we demonstrate that quantitative phase imaging of entire unstained biopsies has the potential to fulfill this requirement. Our data indicates that the refractive index distribution of histopathology slides, which contains information about the molecular scale organization of tissue, reveals prostate tumors. These optical maps report on subtle, nanoscale morphological properties of tissues and cells that cannot be recovered by common stains, including hematoxylin and eosin (H&E). We found that cancer progression significantly alters the tissue organization, as exhibited in our refractive index maps. Furthermore, using the quantitative phase information, we obtained the spatially resolved scattering mean free path and anisotropy factor g for entire biopsies and demonstrated their direct correlation with tumor presence. We found that these scattering parameters are able to distinguish between two adjacent grades, which is a difficult task and relevant for determining patient treatment. In essence, our results show that the tissue refractive index reports on the nanoscale tissue architecture and, in principle, can be used as an intrinsic marker for cancer diagnosis. [4pt] [1] Z. Wang, K. Tangella, A. Balla and G. Popescu, Tissue refractive index as marker of disease, Journal of Biomedical Optics, in press).[0pt] [2] Z. Wang, L. J. Millet, M. Mir, H. Ding, S. Unarunotai, J. A. Rogers, M. U. Gillette and G. Popescu, Spatial light interference microscopy (SLIM), Optics Express, 19, 1016 (2011).[0pt] [3] Z. Wang, D. L. Marks, P. S. Carney, L. J. Millet, M. U. Gillette, A. Mihi, P. V. Braun, Z. Shen, S. G. Prasanth and G. Popescu, Spatial light interference tomography (SLIT), Optics Express, 19, 19907-19918 (2011

  14. ABCD matrix for reflection and refraction of Gaussian beams at the surface of a parabola of revolution.

    PubMed

    Liu, Hongzhan; Liu, Liren; Xu, Rongwei; Luan, Zhu

    2005-08-10

    We report the formulation of an ABCD matrix for reflection and refraction of Gaussian light beams at the surface of a parabola of revolution that separate media of different refractive indices based on optical phase matching. The equations for the spot sizes and wave-front radii of the beams are also obtained by using theABCD matrix. With these matrices, we can more conveniently design and evaluate some special optical systems, including these kinds of elements. PMID:16114516

  15. Atmospheric refractivity corrections in satellite laser ranging

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abshire, J. B.; Gardner, C. S.

    1985-01-01

    Atmospheric refraction can cause significant errors in satellite laser ranging (SLR) systems. There are two techniques which can be used to correct for these errors. Atmospheric models based upon surface measurements of pressure, temperature, and relative humidity have been shown by ray tracing to be accurate to within a few centimeters at 20 deg elevation angle. The residual errors in the models are thought to be primarily caused by horizontal gradients in the refractivity. Although models have been developed to predict the gradient effects, initial studies show that they can be sensitive to local topographic effects. Atmospheric turbulence can introduce random fluctuations in the refractivity, but only introduces centimeter level errors at elevation angles below 10 deg. Pulsed two-color ranging systems can directly measure the atmospheric delay in satellite ranging. These systems require mode-locked multiple-frequency lasers and streak-camera-based receivers and currently appear capable of measuring the atmospheric delay with an accuracy of 0.5 cm or better.

  16. Compound Refractive Lenses for Thermal Neutron Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Gary, Charles K.

    2013-11-12

    This project designed and built compound refractive lenses (CRLs) that are able to focus, collimate and image using thermal neutrons. Neutrons are difficult to manipulate compared to visible light or even x rays; however, CRLs can provide a powerful tool for focusing, collimating and imaging neutrons. Previous neutron CRLs were limited to long focal lengths, small fields of view and poor resolution due to the materials available and manufacturing techniques. By demonstrating a fabrication method that can produce accurate, small features, we have already dramatically improved the focal length of thermal neutron CRLs, and the manufacture of Fresnel lens CRLs that greatly increases the collection area, and thus efficiency, of neutron CRLs. Unlike a single lens, a compound lens is a row of N lenslets that combine to produce an N-fold increase in the refraction of neutrons. While CRLs can be made from a variety of materials, we have chosen to mold Teflon lenses. Teflon has excellent neutron refraction, yet can be molded into nearly arbitrary shapes. We designed, fabricated and tested Teflon CRLs for neutrons. We demonstrated imaging at wavelengths as short as 1.26 ? with large fields of view and achieved resolution finer than 250 μm which is better than has been previously shown. We have also determined designs for Fresnel CRLs that will greatly improve performance.

  17. Refractive surgery: the future of perfect vision?

    PubMed

    Fong, C S

    2007-08-01

    The history of refractive eye surgery is recent, but has seen rapid advancement. Older technologies, such as radial keratectomy, had the problem of overcorrection and epithelial complications. Newer technologies, such as photorefractive keratectomy, laser-assisted in-situ keratomileusis (LASIK) and laser-assisted subepithelial keratomileusis (LASEK), which require the use of laser, has revolutionised eye surgery. However, there are complications, such as corneal hazing, postoperative pain, regression, and poorer correction for high myopes. If not contraindicated, wavefront analysis and femtosecond laser are useful adjuncts to laser photoablation for better visual results. Wavefront analysis improves the precision of laser photoablation by measuring the individual's wavefront aberrations, while femtosecond laser offers an instrument-free means of creating the corneal hinge. Lastly, implantation of intraocular lenses, with or without extraction of the crystalline lens, provides an alternative to laser photoablation for the treatment of high myopia. Clear lens exchange offers refractive correction to presbyopes and people with cataracts. However, complications, such as endothelial cell loss, cataract formation and retinal detachment, exist. In conclusion, refractive eye surgery provides an alternative to wearing spectacles or contact lenses. However, potential patients must be warned of the complications and long-term effects on the eyes. PMID:17657376

  18. Scanning focused refractive-index microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Teng-Qian; Ye, Qing; Wang, Xiao-Wan; Wang, Jin; Deng, Zhi-Chao; Mei, Jian-Chun; Zhou, Wen-Yuan; Zhang, Chun-Ping; Tian, Jian-Guo

    2014-07-01

    We present a novel scanning focused refractive-index microscopy (SFRIM) technique to obtain the refractive index (RI) profiles of objects. The method uses a focused laser as the light source, and combines the derivative total reflection method (DTRM), projection magnification, and scanning technique together. SFRIM is able to determine RIs with an accuracy of 0.002, and the central spatial resolution achieved is 1 µm, which is smaller than the size of the focal spot. The results of measurements carried out on cedar oil and a gradient-refractive-index (GRIN) lens agree well with theoretical expectations, verifying the accuracy of SFRIM. Furthermore, using SFRIM, to the best of our knowledge we have extracted for the first time the RI profile of a periodically modulated photosensitive gelatin sample. SFRIM is the first RI profile-resolved reflected light microscopy technique that can be applied to scattering and absorbing samples. SFRIM enables the possibility of performing RI profile measurements in a variety of applications, including optical waveguides, photosensitive materials and devices, photorefractive effect studies, and RI imaging in biomedical fields.

  19. Scanning focused refractive-index microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Teng-Qian; Ye, Qing; Wang, Xiao-Wan; Wang, Jin; Deng, Zhi-Chao; Mei, Jian-Chun; Zhou, Wen-Yuan; Zhang, Chun-Ping; Tian, Jian-Guo

    2014-01-01

    We present a novel scanning focused refractive-index microscopy (SFRIM) technique to obtain the refractive index (RI) profiles of objects. The method uses a focused laser as the light source, and combines the derivative total reflection method (DTRM), projection magnification, and scanning technique together. SFRIM is able to determine RIs with an accuracy of 0.002, and the central spatial resolution achieved is 1 µm, which is smaller than the size of the focal spot. The results of measurements carried out on cedar oil and a gradient-refractive-index (GRIN) lens agree well with theoretical expectations, verifying the accuracy of SFRIM. Furthermore, using SFRIM, to the best of our knowledge we have extracted for the first time the RI profile of a periodically modulated photosensitive gelatin sample. SFRIM is the first RI profile-resolved reflected light microscopy technique that can be applied to scattering and absorbing samples. SFRIM enables the possibility of performing RI profile measurements in a variety of applications, including optical waveguides, photosensitive materials and devices, photorefractive effect studies, and RI imaging in biomedical fields. PMID:25008374

  20. Scanning focused refractive-index microscopy.

    PubMed

    Sun, Teng-Qian; Ye, Qing; Wang, Xiao-Wan; Wang, Jin; Deng, Zhi-Chao; Mei, Jian-Chun; Zhou, Wen-Yuan; Zhang, Chun-Ping; Tian, Jian-Guo

    2014-01-01

    We present a novel scanning focused refractive-index microscopy (SFRIM) technique to obtain the refractive index (RI) profiles of objects. The method uses a focused laser as the light source, and combines the derivative total reflection method (DTRM), projection magnification, and scanning technique together. SFRIM is able to determine RIs with an accuracy of 0.002, and the central spatial resolution achieved is 1 µm, which is smaller than the size of the focal spot. The results of measurements carried out on cedar oil and a gradient-refractive-index (GRIN) lens agree well with theoretical expectations, verifying the accuracy of SFRIM. Furthermore, using SFRIM, to the best of our knowledge we have extracted for the first time the RI profile of a periodically modulated photosensitive gelatin sample. SFRIM is the first RI profile-resolved reflected light microscopy technique that can be applied to scattering and absorbing samples. SFRIM enables the possibility of performing RI profile measurements in a variety of applications, including optical waveguides, photosensitive materials and devices, photorefractive effect studies, and RI imaging in biomedical fields. PMID:25008374

  1. Advanced interferometric profile measurements through refractive media

    SciTech Connect

    Koev, Stephan T.; Ghodssi, Reza

    2008-09-15

    Optical profilers are valuable tools for the characterization of microelectromechanical systems (MEMSs). They use phase sifting interferometry (PSI) or vertical scanning interferometry to measure the topography of microscale structures with nanometer resolution. However, for many emerging MEMS applications, the sample needs to be imaged while placed in a liquid or in a package with a glass window. The increased refractive index of the transparent medium degrades the interference image contrast and prevents any measurement of the sample. We report on the modification of a Veeco NT1100 optical profiler to enable PSI measurements through refractive media. This approach can be applied to any other optical profiler with PSI capability. The modification consists in replacing the original illumination source with a custom-built narrow linewidth source, which increases the coherence length of the light and the contrast of the interference image. We present measurements taken with the modified configuration on samples covered with 3 mm water or 500 {mu}m glass, and we compare them to measurements of uncovered samples. We show that the measurement precision is only slightly reduced by the water and glass, and that it is still sufficiently high for typical MEMS applications. The described method can be readily used for measuring through other types and thicknesses of refractive materials.

  2. Seven-year incidence of uncorrected refractive error among an elderly Chinese population in Shihpai, Taiwan: The Shihpai Eye Study.

    PubMed

    Kuang, T-M; Tsai, S-Y; Liu, C J-L; Ko, Y-C; Lee, S-M; Chou, P

    2016-04-01

    PurposeTo report the 7-year incidence of uncorrected refractive error in a metropolitan Chinese elderly population.MethodsThe Shihpai Eye Study 2006 included 460/824 (55.8%) subjects (age range 72-94 years old) of 1361 participants in the 1999 baseline survey for a follow-up eye examination. Visual acuity was assessed using a Snellen chart, uncorrected refractive error was defined as presenting visual acuity (naked eye if without spectacles and with distance spectacles if worn) in the better eye of <6/12 that improved to no impairment (≥6/12) after refractive correction.ResultsThe 7-year incidence of uncorrected refractive error was 10.5% (95% confidence interval (CI): 7.6-13.4%). 92.7% of participants with uncorrection and 77.8% with undercorrection were able to improve at least two lines of visual acuity by refractive correction. In multivariate analysis controlling for covariates, uncorrected refractive error was significantly related to myopia (relative risk (RR): 3.15; 95% CI: 1.31-7.58) and living alone (RR: 2.94; 95% CI 1.14-7.53), whereas distance spectacles worn during examination was protective (RR: 0.35; 95% CI: 0.14-0.88).ConclusionOur study indicated that the incidence of uncorrected refractive error was high (10.5%) in this elderly Chinese population. Living alone and myopia are predisposing factors, whereas wearing distance spectacles at examination is protective. PMID:26795416

  3. Influence of saturation on the reflection and refraction at the interface between two semi-infinite poroelastic media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yeh, C.-L.; Lo, W.-C.; Jan, C.-D.; Lee, J.-W.

    2012-04-01

    Based on the theoretical model derived by Yeh et al. (2010), this study simulates and analyzes reflection and refraction of incident elastic waves on a plane interface between two semi-infinite poroelastic half-spaces saturated by two different fluid mixtures. The amplitude and energy ratios of reflected and refracted waves considering the effect of motional modes, inertial and viscous couplings are determined for the first time with respect to water saturation of an incident P1 wave (the first dilatational wave). A plot of amplitude and energy ratios of reflected and refracted waves as a function of water saturation using an illustrative example with Lincoln sand containing an air-water mixture in the lower half-space and Columbia fine sandy loam bearing an oil-water mixture in the upper half-space. Analytical results indicate that the amplitude and energy ratios have the same magnitude order as phase speed, and the ratios of refracted and reflected waves are markedly affected by different physical parameters. This study further elucidates the difference in reflection and refraction between the oblique (30°) and normal (0°) incidences at the interface. The normal incident case have similar trend with the oblique case but no reflected and refracted SV waves exist. The sum of the energy ratio under each degree of water saturation equals unity. Additionally, amplitude and energy ratios of reflected and refracted waves are affected significantly by degree of saturation.

  4. Refractive index of biotissue versus temperature condition at 632.8 nm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Hui; Lu, Zukang; Lin, Lei; Xie, Shusen

    1998-08-01

    An experimental apparatus is designed to determine the index of refraction of biological tissue using a laser beam and a prism in the familiar to a specular Fresnel reflection method in which the scattering effects are reduced to be disregarded. One of the advantages of the method is its high sensitivity to a small change in refractive index. A flat heater is contacted on the prism and a tiny heat electric couple is hold between a sample and the prism. The refractive indices of several porcine tissues have been measured over a temperature range of 20 to approximately 70 degrees Celsius. The index of refraction keeps stable levels below 36 degrees Celsius and above 60 degrees Celsius, respectively, but increases with an increase in temperature from 36 to 60 degrees Celsius. During a temperature descent after heating, the evolvement of refractive index is determined by the climax of temperature reached. The heating and cooling procedures are irreversible in optical property of tissue. Such results are consistent to the biological observation and can be explained by the cellular response to temperature. A knowledge of these properties is important for tissue optics and laser medicine.

  5. Estimation of volcanic ash refractive index from satellite infrared sounder data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishimoto, H.; Masuda, K.

    2014-12-01

    The properties of volcanic ash clouds (cloud height, optical depth, and effective radius of the particles) are planned to estimate from the data of the next Japanese geostationary meteorological satellite, Himawari 8/9. The volcanic ash algorithms, such as those proposed by NOAA/NESDIS and by EUMETSAT, are based on the infrared absorption properties of the ash particles, and the refractive index of a typical volcanic rock (i.e. andesite) has been used in the forward radiative transfer calculations. Because of a variety of the absorption properties for real volcanic ash particles at infrared wavelengths (9-13 micron), a large retrieval error may occur if the refractive index of the observed ash particles was different from that assumed in the retrieval algorithm. Satellite infrared sounder provides spectral information for the volcanic ash clouds. If we can estimate the refractive index of the ash particles from the infrared sounder data, a dataset of the optical properties for similar rock type of the volcanic ash can be prepared for the ash retrieval algorithms of geostationary/polar-orbiting satellites in advance. Furthermore, the estimated refractive index can be used for a diagnostic and a correction of the ash particle model in the retrieval algorithm within a period of the volcanic activities. In this work, optimal estimation of the volcanic ash parameters was conducted through the radiative transfer calculations for the window channels of the atmospheric infrared sounder (AIRS). The estimated refractive indices are proposed for the volcanic ash particles of some eruption events.

  6. Needle-probe system for the measurement of tissue refractive index

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zysk, Adam M.; Adie, Steven G.; Armstrong, Julian J.; Leigh, Matthew S.; Paduch, Alexandre; Nguyen, Freddy T.; Sampson, David D.; Boppart, Stephen A.

    2007-02-01

    Needle-based devices, which are in wide clinical use for needle biopsy procedures, may be augmented by suitable optical techniques for the localization and diagnosis of diseased tissue. Tissue refractive index is one optical contrast mechanism with diagnostic potential. In the case of mammary tissue, for example, recent research indicates that refractive index variations between tissue types may be useful for the identification of cancerous tissue. While many coherence-based forward-sensing devices have been developed to detect scattering changes, none have demonstrated refractive index measurement capabilities. We present a novel needle-based device that is capable of simultaneously measuring refractive index and scattering. Coupled to the sample arm of an optical coherence tomography system, the needle device detects the scattering response and optical pathlength through tissue residing in a fixed-width channel. Near-infrared measurements of tissues and materials with known optical properties using a prototype device will be presented. This work demonstrates the feasibility of integrated in vivo measurement of refractive index and scattering in conjunction with existing clinical needle-based devices.

  7. The effects of atmospheric refraction on the accuracy of laser ranging systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zanter, D. L.; Gardner, C. S.; Rao, N. N.

    1976-01-01

    Correction formulas derived by Saastamoinen and Marini, and the ray traces through the refractivity profiles all assume a spherically symmetric refractivity profile. The errors introduced by this assumption were investigated by ray tracing through three-dimensional profiles. The results of this investigation indicate that the difference between ray traces through the spherically symmetric and three-dimensional profiles is approximately three centimeters at 10 deg and decreases to less than one half of a centimeter at 80 deg. If the accuracy desired in future laser ranging systems is less than a few centimeters, Saastamoinen and Marini's formulas must be altered to account for the fact that the refractivity profile is not spherically symmetric.

  8. Determination of refractive properties of fluids for dual-wavelength interferometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vikram, Chandra S.; Witherow, William K.; Trolinger, James D.

    1992-01-01

    Methods to calculate the refractive properties of solutions at different wavelengths are described by using experimental data at just two wavelengths. The properties are the refractive index and its gradients with temperature and concentration. Cauchy's equation is used to determine the refractive indices. The gradients versus temperature and concentration are then determined by using the Murphy-Alpert and the Lorentz-Lorenz equation, respectively. Finally, the particular case of a triglycine sulfate aqueous solution is considered as an example. The approach should provide the desired information for fringe analysis when dual-wavelength holographic or other interferometry is used for solving heat and mass transfer problems in fluids during crystal-growth experiments.

  9. Fiber-optic epoxy composite cure sensor. I. Dependence of refractive index of an autocatalytic reaction epoxy system at 850 nm on temperature and extent of cure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lam, Kai-Yuen; Afromowitz, Martin A.

    1995-09-01

    We discuss the behavior of the refractive index of a typical epoxy-aromatic diamine system. Near 850 nm the index of refraction is found to be largely controlled by the density of the epoxy. Models are derived to describe its dependence on temperature and extent of cure. Within the range of temperatures studied, the refractive index decreases linearly with increasing temperature. In addition, as the epoxy is cured, the refractive index increases linearly with conversion to the gel point. >From then on, shrinkage in the volume of the epoxy is restricted by local viscosity. Therefore the linear relationship between the refractive index and the extent of cure does not hold beyond the gel point.

  10. Comparison of Aberrations After Standard and Customized Refractive Surgery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fang, L.; He, X.; Wang, Y.

    2013-09-01

    To detect possible differences in residual wavefront aberrations between standard and customized laser refractive surgery based onmathematical modeling, the residual optical aberrations after conventional and customized laser refractive surgery were compared accordingto the ablation profile with transition zone. The results indicated that ablation profile has a significant impact on the residual aberrations.The amount of residual aberrations for conventional correction is higher than that for customized correction. Additionally, the residualaberrations for high myopia eyes are markedly larger than those for moderate myopia eyes. For a 5 mm pupil, the main residual aberrationterm is coma and yet it is spherical aberration for a 7 mm pupil. When the pupil diameter is the same as optical zone or greater, themagnitudes of residual aberrations is obviously larger than that for a smaller pupil. In addition, the magnitudes of the residual fifth orsixth order aberrations are relatively large, especially secondary coma in a 6 mm pupil and secondary spherical aberration in a 7 mm pupil.Therefore, the customized ablation profile may be superior to the conventional correction even though the transition zone and treatmentdecentration are taken into account. However, the customized ablation profile will still induce significant amount of residual aberrations.

  11. Refractive index of erbium doped GaN thin films

    SciTech Connect

    Alajlouni, S.; Sun, Z. Y.; Li, J.; Lin, J. Y.; Jiang, H. X.; Zavada, J. M.

    2014-08-25

    GaN is an excellent host for erbium (Er) to provide optical emission in the technologically important as well as eye-safe 1540 nm wavelength window. Er doped GaN (GaN:Er) epilayers were synthesized on c-plane sapphire substrates using metal organic chemical vapor deposition. By employing a pulsed growth scheme, the crystalline quality of GaN:Er epilayers was significantly improved over those obtained by conventional growth method of continuous flow of reaction precursors. X-ray diffraction rocking curve linewidths of less than 300 arc sec were achieved for the GaN (0002) diffraction peak, which is comparable to the typical results of undoped high quality GaN epilayers and represents a major improvement over previously reported results for GaN:Er. Spectroscopic ellipsometry was used to determine the refractive index of the GaN:Er epilayers in the 1540 nm wavelength window and a linear dependence on Er concentration was found. The observed refractive index increase with Er incorporation and the improved crystalline quality of the GaN:Er epilayers indicate that low loss GaN:Er optical waveguiding structures are feasible.

  12. Quantum Enhancement of the Index of Refraction in a Bose-Einstein Condensate.

    PubMed

    Bons, P C; de Haas, R; de Jong, D; Groot, A; van der Straten, P

    2016-04-29

    We study the index of refraction of an ultracold bosonic gas in the dilute regime. Using phase-contrast imaging with light detuned from resonance by several tens of linewidths, we image a single cloud of ultracold atoms for 100 consecutive shots, which enables the study of the scattering rate as a function of temperature and density using only a single cloud. We observe that the scattering rate is increased below the critical temperature for Bose-Einstein condensation by a factor of 3 compared to the single-atom scattering rate. We show that current atom-light interaction models to second order of the density show a similar increase, where the magnitude of the effect depends on the model that is used to calculate the pair-correlation function. This confirms that the effect of quantum statistics on the index of refraction is dominant in this regime. PMID:27176521

  13. Quantum Enhancement of the Index of Refraction in a Bose-Einstein Condensate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bons, P. C.; de Haas, R.; de Jong, D.; Groot, A.; van der Straten, P.

    2016-04-01

    We study the index of refraction of an ultracold bosonic gas in the dilute regime. Using phase-contrast imaging with light detuned from resonance by several tens of linewidths, we image a single cloud of ultracold atoms for 100 consecutive shots, which enables the study of the scattering rate as a function of temperature and density using only a single cloud. We observe that the scattering rate is increased below the critical temperature for Bose-Einstein condensation by a factor of 3 compared to the single-atom scattering rate. We show that current atom-light interaction models to second order of the density show a similar increase, where the magnitude of the effect depends on the model that is used to calculate the pair-correlation function. This confirms that the effect of quantum statistics on the index of refraction is dominant in this regime.

  14. Effect of TiCl4 treatment on the refractive index of nanoporous TiO2 films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Jeeyoung; Lee, Myeongkyu

    2015-12-01

    We investigate the effect of TiCl4 treatment on the refractive index of a nanoporous TiO2 film. A nanoparticulate TiO2 film prepared on a glass substrate was immersed in a TiCl4 aqueous solution. The subsequent reaction of TiCl4 with H2O produces TiO2 and thus modifies the density and the refractive index of the film. With increasing TiCl4 concentration, the refractive index initially increased and then declined after being maximized (n = 2.02 at 633 nm) at 0.08 M concentration. A refractive index change as large as 0.45 could be obtained with the TiCl4 treatment, making it possible to achieve diffraction efficiency exceeding 80% in a diffraction grating-embedded TiO2 film. For high TiCl4 concentrations of 0.32 M and 0.64 M, the refractive index remained nearly unchanged. This was attributed to the limited permeability of high-viscosity TiCl4 solutions into the nanoporous films. The measured pore size distributions were in good agreement with the results of a diffraction analysis and refractive index measurement.

  15. The role of macromolecular crowding in the evolution of lens crystallins with high molecular refractive index

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Huaying; Magone, M. Teresa; Schuck, Peter

    2011-08-01

    Crystallins are present in the lens at extremely high concentrations in order to provide transparency and generate a high refractive power of the lens. The crystallin families prevalent in the highest density lens tissues are γ-crystallins in vertebrates and S-crystallins in cephalopods. As shown elsewhere, in parallel evolution, both have evolved molecular refractive index increments 5-10% above those of most proteins. Although this is a small increase, it is statistically very significant and can be achieved only by very unusual amino acid compositions. In contrast, such a molecular adaptation to aid in the refractive function of the lens did not occur in crystallins that are preferentially located in lower density lens tissues, such as vertebrate α-crystallin and taxon-specific crystallins. In the current work, we apply a model of non-interacting hard spheres to examine the thermodynamic contributions of volume exclusion at lenticular protein concentrations. We show that the small concentration decrease afforded by the higher molecular refractive index increment of crystallins can amplify nonlinearly to produce order of magnitude differences in chemical activities, and lead to reduced osmotic pressure and the reduced propensity for protein aggregation. Quantitatively, this amplification sets in only at protein concentrations as high as those found in hard lenses or the nucleus of soft lenses, in good correspondence to the observed crystallin properties in different tissues and different species. This suggests that volume exclusion effects provide the evolutionary driving force for the unusual refractive properties and the unusual amino acid compositions of γ-crystallins and S-crystallins.

  16. Optical detection enhancement in porous volumetric microfluidic capture elements using refractive index matching fluids.

    PubMed

    Wiederoder, M S; Peterken, L; Lu, A X; Rahmanian, O D; Raghavan, S R; DeVoe, D L

    2015-08-21

    Porous volumetric capture elements in microfluidic sensors are advantageous compared to planar capture surfaces due to higher reaction site density and decreased diffusion lengths that can reduce detection limits and total assay time. However a mismatch in refractive indices between the capture matrix and fluid within the porous interstices results in scattering of incident, reflected, or emitted light, significantly reducing the signal for optical detection. Here we demonstrate that perfusion of an index-matching fluid within a porous matrix minimizes scattering, thus enhancing optical signal by enabling the entire capture element volume to be probed. Signal enhancement is demonstrated for both fluorescence and absorbance detection, using porous polymer monoliths in a silica capillary and packed beds of glass beads within thermoplastic microchannels, respectively. Fluorescence signal was improved by a factor of 3.5× when measuring emission from a fluorescent compound attached directly to the polymer monolith, and up to 2.6× for a rapid 10 min direct immunoassay. When combining index matching with a silver enhancement step, a detection limit of 0.1 ng mL(-1) human IgG and a 5 log dynamic range was achieved. The demonstrated technique provides a simple method for enhancing optical sensitivity for a wide range of assays, enabling the full benefits of porous detection elements in miniaturized analytical systems to be realized. PMID:26160546

  17. Tailoring the index of refraction of nanocrystalline hafnium oxide thin films

    SciTech Connect

    Vargas, Mirella; Murphy, N. R.; Ramana, C. V.

    2014-03-10

    Hafnium oxide (HfO{sub 2}) films were grown by sputter-deposition by varying the growth temperature (T{sub s} = 25–700 °C). HfO{sub 2} films grown at T{sub s} < 200 °C were amorphous, while those grown at T{sub s} ≥ 200 °C were monoclinic, nanocrystalline with (1{sup ¯}11) texturing. X-ray reflectivity (XRR) analyses indicate that the film-density (ρ) increases with increasing T{sub s}. The index of refraction (n) profiles derived from spectroscopic ellipsometry analyses follow the Cauchy dispersion relation. Lorentz-Lorenz analysis (n{sub (λ)} = 550 nm) and optical-model adopted agree well with the XRR data/analyses. A direct T{sub s}-ρ-n relationship suggests that tailoring the optical quality is possible by tuning T{sub s} and the microstructure of HfO{sub 2} films.

  18. Optical detection enhancement in porous volumetric microfluidic capture elements using refractive index matching fluids

    PubMed Central

    Wiederoder, M. S.; Peterken, L.; Lu, A. X.; Rahmanian, O. D.; Raghavan, S. R.; DeVoe, D. L.

    2015-01-01

    Porous volumetric capture elements in microfluidic sensors are advantageous compared to planar capture surfaces due to higher reaction site density and decreased diffusion lengths that can reduce detection limits and total assay time. However a mismatch in refractive indices between the capture matrix and fluid within the porous interstices results in scattering of incident, reflected, or emitted light, significantly reducing the signal for optical detection. Here we demonstrate that perfusion of an index-matching fluid within a porous matrix minimizes scattering, thus enhancing optical signal by enabling the entire capture element volume to be probed. Signal enhancement is demonstrated for both fluorescence and absorbance detection, using porous polymer monoliths in a silica capillary and packed beds of glass beads within thermoplastic microchannels, respectively. Fluorescence signal was improved by a factor of 3.5× when measuring emission from a fluorescent compound attached directly to the polymer monolith, and up to 2.6× for a rapid 10 min direct immunoassay. When combining index matching with a silver enhancement step, a detection limit of 0.1 ng/mL human IgG and a 5 log dynamic range was achieved. The demonstrated technique provides a simple method for enhancing optical sensitivity for a wide range of assays, enabling the full benefits of porous detection elements in miniaturized analytical systems to be realized. PMID:26160546

  19. Terahertz subwavelength ribbon waveguide based plasmonic sensors for refractive index and thickness detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    You, Borwen; Lu, Ja-yu; Chang, Wei-Lun; Yu, Chin-Ping; Liu, Tze-An; Peng, Jin-Long

    2012-03-01

    A terahertz plasmonic waveguide sensor is experimentally demonstrated to utilize surface waves propagated in a onedimension metal grating that constructed on a plastic ribbon waveguide. The grating conformation couples evanescent waves of a subwavelength terahertz waveguide onto the metal surface and highly confines the extended powers within λ/22-range for the phase-matching condition. The confined terahertz waveguiding waves resemble surface plasmonpolaritons but transmit with almost zero dispersion when the coupled surface waves interfere along the metal grating. Based on the dispersion-free guidance, there is Bragg reflection dominated by grating periods and strongly dependent on the refractive index of surface plasmon-polaritions. We successfully detect different thicknesses of polyethylene layers covered on the metal grating with thickness resolution of 1μm when the effective waveguide indices are modified in the vicinity of the metal grating, corresponding to 0.01-index variation. Potentially, terahertz subwavelength ribbon waveguide based plasmonic sensors could be manipulated to detect molecules with extremely low-density or small thickness in the metal-dielectric interface for probing pollution particles and any label-free detection.

  20. The measurement of patient-reported outcomes of refractive surgery: the refractive status and vision profile.

    PubMed Central

    Schein, O D

    2000-01-01

    PURPOSE: To develop a questionnaire, the Refractive Status and Vision Profile (RSVP), to assess health-related quality of life associated with refractive error and its correction. METHODS: The published literature on patient report of visual and overall function was reviewed, and the RSVP was self-administered by 550 participants with refractive error. Cross-sectional validation was performed using standard psychometric techniques. The responsiveness of the RSVP to surgical intervention was assessed prospectively in a subset of 176 patients. The principal outcomes measures were scores on the overall RSVP scale (S) and on 8 RSVP subscales (functioning, driving, concern, expectations, symptoms, glare, optical problems, problems with corrective lenses). RESULTS: The RSVP (S) and its subscales demonstrated very good internal consistency (Cronbach's alpha, 0.70-0.93). S and several subscale scores were independently associated with satisfaction with vision and were more correlated with satisfaction with vision than with either visual acuity or refractive error. Higher refractive error was associated with lower scores on S and on 5 subscales. In the prospective surgical cohort, 15% of patients had some worsening in their total RSVP score; however, substantial variation was seen in the individual subscales where worsening ranged from 7% (problems with corrective lenses) to 41% (driving). The effect size (measure of responsiveness) of the RSVP and most of its subscales was very high. Approximately 14% of patients had significant worsening in 3 or more subscales, and this outcome was found to be independently associated with being dissatisfied with vision following surgery (OR, 5.84; 95% CI, 1.88, 8.13). CONCLUSIONS: The RSVP has been validated as a questionnaire that measures patient-reported quality of life related to refractive error and its correction. It is responsive to surgical intervention and provides important information regarding patient outcomes not available

  1. Two-dimensional refractive index profiling of optical fibers by modified refractive near-field technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El Sayed, A.; Pilz, Soenke; Ryser, Manuel; Romano, Valerio

    2016-02-01

    The refractive index distribution in the core-cladding region of an optical fiber plays an important role in determining the transmission and dispersion properties of the waveguide. The refracted near-field technique (RNF) is among the most widespread techniques used for measuring the refractive index profile of optical fibers and is based on illuminating the end-facet of a fiber with a focused beam whose vertex angle greatly exceeds the acceptance angle of the fiber, which is immersed in an index matching liquid. What one observes are then the refracted unguided rays rather than the guided rays. Nevertheless, the standard refracted near-field technique cannot be applied to a wide range of optical fibers e.g. if their shapes are not axially symmetric. In this work we demonstrate a modified method which allows 2-D imaging of the refractive index profile and thereby overcoming the axial symmetric limitation of the standard RNF. The new system is operating at 630 nm and based on the same principle of the RNF, but the optical path is reversed so that the light at the fiber end-facet is collected by an objective lens and detected by a CCD camera. The method does not require scanning over the fiber end-facet. Thus the system is faster and less sensitive to vibrations and external conditions compared to the standard RNF, furthermore it allows averaging to improve the signal to noise ratio. The spatial resolution of the system is determined by the numerical aperture of the objective and by the resolution of the CCD camera. To calibrate the setup, a reference multi-step index fiber provided by National Physical Laboratory was used.

  2. Weighted Essentially Non-Oscillatory Simulations and Modeling of Complex Hydrodynamic Flows Part 1. Regular Shock Refraction

    SciTech Connect

    Schilling, O; Latini, M

    2004-06-18

    Shock refraction is a fundamental shock phenomenon observed when shocks interact with a material interface separating gases with different properties. Following refraction, a transmitted shock enters the second gas and a reflected wave returns back into the first gas. In the case of regular shock refraction all waves meet at a single point called the triple-point, creating five different states for the two gases. Analytical methods based on shock polar analysis [9, 16] have been developed to determine the state of two ideal gases in each of the five refraction regions. Furthermore, shock refraction constitutes a basic example of complex hydrodynamic flows. For this reason, shock refraction is used in this report as one validation of the high-order accurate weighted essentially non-oscillatory (WENO) shock-capturing method, as implemented in the HOPE code. The following two-step validation process is adopted. First, analytical results are obtained for the normal and oblique shock refraction (with shock-interface angle {beta}{sub int} = 75) observed for a Ma = 1.2 shock. To validate the single-fluid and the two-fluid implementations of the WENO method, two pairs of gases, argon/xenon, having equal adiabatic exponents {gamma} and air(acetone)/sulfur hexafluoride, having different adiabatic exponents {gamma}, are considered. Both the light-to-heavy and heavy-to-light configurations are considered. Second, numerical simulations are performed using the fifth-order WENO method and values of the density, pressure, temperature, speed of sound, and flow velocity in each of the five refraction regions are compared with the analytical predictions from shock polar analysis. In all cases considered, excellent agreement between the simulation results and the analytical predictions was found. The results from this investigation suggest that the WENO method is a very useful numerical method for the simulation and modeling of complex hydrodynamic flows.

  3. Refraction of nonlinear beams by localized refractive index changes in nematic liquid crystals

    SciTech Connect

    Assanto, Gaetano; Minzoni, Antonmaria A.; Smyth, Noel F.; Worthy, Annette L.

    2010-11-15

    The propagation of solitary waves in nematic liquid crystals in the presence of localized nonuniformities is studied. These nonuniformities can be caused by external electric fields, other light beams, or any other mechanism which results in a modified director orientation in a localized region of the liquid-crystal cell. The net effect is that the solitary wave undergoes refraction and trajectory bending. A general modulation theory for this refraction is developed, and particular cases of circular, elliptical, and rectangular perturbations are considered. The results are found to be in excellent agreement with numerical solutions.

  4. Refraction of nonlinear beams by localized refractive index changes in nematic liquid crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Assanto, Gaetano; Minzoni, Antonmaria A.; Smyth, Noel F.; Worthy, Annette L.

    2010-11-01

    The propagation of solitary waves in nematic liquid crystals in the presence of localized nonuniformities is studied. These nonuniformities can be caused by external electric fields, other light beams, or any other mechanism which results in a modified director orientation in a localized region of the liquid-crystal cell. The net effect is that the solitary wave undergoes refraction and trajectory bending. A general modulation theory for this refraction is developed, and particular cases of circular, elliptical, and rectangular perturbations are considered. The results are found to be in excellent agreement with numerical solutions.

  5. Refractive index change and curvature in shock waves by angled beam refraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kiefer, J. H.; Manson, A. C.

    1981-09-01

    Observations of front geometry and refractive index jump across shock waves in rare gases have been made with a new particularly simple technique. The technique involves determination of the angular deflection of a narrow laser beam intersecting the shock front at a shallow angle. Measured refractive index jumps in rare gases are in excellent agreement with those calculated using Snell's law and ideal shock theory. The apparent shock curvature is in close accord with deBoer's theory for loading pressures below 20 Torr, but above this pressure there is evidence of an indentation near tube center.

  6. Planar scanning method for detecting refraction characteristics of two-dimensional photonic quasi-crystal wedge-shaped prisms.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jianjun; Tan, Wei; Liu, Exian; Hu, Haili; Fan, Zhigang; Zhang, Tianhua; Zhang, Xiong

    2016-05-01

    In this study, a planar scanning method is proposed. This novel method adapts two monitors moving along double planar tracks that can be used to detect refraction characteristics of two-dimensional (2D) photonic quasi-crystal (PQC) wedge-shaped prisms. Refraction of a decagonal Penrose-type PQC prism is analyzed for a given incident beam and two polarization modes at different incident positions in the prism using this method. Refraction from the prism is irregular, indicating that nonuniformity in the arrangement of scatterers in the prism causes Bragg-like scattering irregularities. Numerical results show that this method can be used for guiding the design of a 2D PQC prism and for the analysis of its refraction characteristics. PMID:27140896

  7. An extension of the Lighthill theory of jet noise to encompass refraction and shielding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ribner, Herbert S.

    1995-01-01

    A formalism for jet noise prediction is derived that includes the refractive 'cone of silence' and other effects; outside the cone it approximates the simple Lighthill format. A key step is deferral of the simplifying assumption of uniform density in the dominant 'source' term. The result is conversion to a convected wave equation retaining the basic Lighthill source term. The main effect is to amend the Lighthill solution to allow for refraction by mean flow gradients, achieved via a frequency-dependent directional factor. A general formula for power spectral density emitted from unit volume is developed as the Lighthill-based value multiplied by a squared 'normalized' Green's function (the directional factor), referred to a stationary point source. The convective motion of the sources, with its powerful amplifying effect, also directional, is already accounted for in the Lighthill format: wave convection and source convection are decoupled. The normalized Green's function appears to be near unity outside the refraction dominated 'cone of silence', this validates our long term practice of using Lighthill-based approaches outside the cone, with extension inside via the Green's function. The function is obtained either experimentally (injected 'point' source) or numerically (computational aeroacoustics). Approximation by unity seems adequate except near the cone and except when there are shrouding jets: in that case the difference from unity quantifies the shielding effect. Further extension yields dipole and monopole source terms (cf. Morfey, Mani, and others) when the mean flow possesses density gradients (e.g., hot jets).

  8. Multifrequency radiation diffusion equations for homogeneous, refractive, lossy media and their interface conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Shestakov, Aleksei I.

    2013-06-15

    We derive time-dependent multifrequency diffusion equations for homogeneous, refractive lossy media. The equations are applicable for a domain composed of several materials with distinct refractive indexes. In such applications, the fundamental radiation variable, the intensity I, is discontinuous across material interfaces. The diffusion equations evolve a variable ξ, the integral of I over all directions divided by the square of the refractive index. Attention is focused on boundary and internal interface conditions for ξ. For numerical solutions using finite elements, it is shown that at material interfaces, the usual diffusion coefficient 1/3κ of the multifrequency equation, where κ is the opacity, is modified by a tensor diffusion term consisting of integrals of the reflectivity. Numerical results are presented. For a single material simulation, the ξ equations yield the same result as diffusion equations that evolve the spectral radiation energy density. A second simulation solves a test problem that models radiation transport in a domain comprised of materials with different refractive indexes. Results qualitatively agree with those previously published.

  9. A Mechanical Analogue of the Refracting Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vannoni, Maurizio; Molesini, Giuseppe; Sordini, Andrea; Straulino, Samuele

    2011-04-01

    The recent celebration of the discoveries made by Galileo four centuries ago has attracted new attention to the refracting telescope and to its use as an instrument for the observation of the night sky.1 This has offered the opportunity for addressing in the classroom the basic principles explaining the operation of the telescope. When doing so, a key concept that is faced is magnification. In geometrical optics, the treatment of magnification is generally given in terms of light rays and first-order (Gaussian or paraxial) ray tracing. Computer programs are available with which the light path through the lenses and the whole telescope can be simulated.

  10. The Alvarez and Lohmann refractive lenses revisited.

    PubMed

    Barbero, Sergio

    2009-05-25

    Alvarez and Lohmann lenses are variable focus optical devices based on lateral shifts of two lenses with cubic-type surfaces. I analyzed the optical performance of these types of lenses computing the first order optical properties (applying wavefront refraction and propagation) without the restriction of the thin lens approximation, and the spot diagram using a ray tracing algorithm. I proposed an analytic and numerical method to select the most optimum coefficients and the specific configuration of these lenses. The results show that Lohmann composite lens is slightly superior to Alvarez one because the overall thickness and optical aberrations are smaller. PMID:19466190

  11. Prediction of refractive correction with radial keratotomy.

    PubMed

    Kremer, F B; Steer, R A

    1985-10-01

    Multiple regression analysis was employed to estimate the amount of preoperative correction required to achieve emmetropia in 129 spherical radial keratotomy procedures. Age, intraocular pressure, central corneal thickness, number of incisions, number of zones, and central optical zone size are variables that describe the amount of refractive correction required in order to achieve emmetropia. The surgical procedures from which these estimates are derived yield meaningful reductions in myopia. Recommendations for further research on the prediction of optimal response to radial keratotomy are included. PMID:4073725

  12. Femtosecond laser in refractive and cataract surgeries

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Han-Han; Hu, Ying; Cui, Hong-Ping

    2015-01-01

    In the past few years, 9 unique laser platforms have been brought to the market. As femtosecond (FS) laser-assisted ophthalmic surgery potentially improves patient safety and visual outcomes, this new technology indeed provides ophthalmologists a reliable new option. But this new technology also poses a range of new clinical and financial challenges for surgeons. We provide an overview of the evolution of FS laser technology for use in refractive and cataract surgeries. This review describes the available laser platforms and mainly focuses on discussing the development of ophthalmic surgery technologies. PMID:25938066

  13. Effects of refractive index on glories.

    PubMed

    Laven, Philip

    2008-12-01

    Atmospheric glories are caused by backscattering of sunlight from spherical droplets of water (e.g., from fog or clouds). But what would glories look like if they were caused by scattering from more exotic substances, such as clouds of ethane as found on Titan? Examining backscattering as a function of the refractive index n of spherical droplets leads to the surprising conclusion that a glory's appearance is almost independent of n (at least for 1.03

  14. An Approximate Analytic Expression for the Flux Density of Scintillation Light at the Photocathode

    SciTech Connect

    Braverman, Joshua B; Harrison, Mark J; Ziock, Klaus-Peter

    2012-01-01

    The flux density of light exiting scintillator crystals is an important factor affecting the performance of radiation detectors, and is of particular importance for position sensitive instruments. Recent work by T. Woldemichael developed an analytic expression for the shape of the light spot at the bottom of a single crystal [1]. However, the results are of limited utility because there is generally a light pipe and photomultiplier entrance window between the bottom of the crystal and the photocathode. In this study, we expand Woldemichael s theory to include materials each with different indices of refraction and compare the adjusted light spot shape theory to GEANT 4 simulations [2]. Additionally, light reflection losses from index of refraction changes were also taken into account. We found that the simulations closely agree with the adjusted theory.

  15. Radio jet refraction in galactic atmospheres with static pressure gradients

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Henriksen, R. N.; Vallee, J. P.; Bridle, A. H.

    1981-01-01

    A theory of double radio sources which have a 'Z' or 'S' morphology is proposed, based on the refraction of radio jets in the extended atmosphere of an elliptical galaxy. The model describes a collimated jet of supersonic material bending self-consistently under the influence of external static pressure gradients. Gravity and magnetic fields are neglected in the simplest case except insofar as they determine the static pressure distribution. The calculation is a straightforward extension of a method used to calculate a ram-pressure model for twin radio trails ('C' morphology). It may also be described as a continuous-jet version of a buoyancy model proposed in 1973. The model has the added virtue of invoking a galactic atmosphere similar to those already indicated by X-ray measurements of some other radio galaxies and by models for the collimation of other radio jets.

  16. Caustics in a field negatively refracted at a plane interface.

    PubMed

    Shendeleva, M L

    2008-03-01

    An electromagnetic field radiated by a line source situated near a plane interface between a medium with positive refractive index and a medium with negative refractive index is considered by using the geometrical optics approach. Rays and wave fronts of the refracted field are constructed using Fermat's principle. It is shown that the negatively refracted rays intersecting in pairs create 2-fold caustics that meet at a cusp point. The cusp of the caustic is directed towards the interface for |n| > 1 and away from the interface for |n| < 1, where n is the relative refractive index. It is also shown that wave fronts of the refracted field propagate towards the interface, in the direction from negative to positive optical path lengths. PMID:18331494

  17. Modeling of saturation and refraction in x-ray lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benredjem, D.; Kuba, J.; Möller, C.; Zabaydullin, O. Z.

    2003-04-01

    We model an experiment in which an iron slab target is irradiated by superimposing the six beams of the LULI facility onto a 22 mm×100 μm focal line. The driving laser is composed of two Gaussian pulses of 130-ps duration (full width at half maximum), preceded by a prepulse. A strong enhancement of the 3p-3s 0-1 x-ray line at 25.5 nm in neonlike iron was observed. Saturation is attained for plasma lengths near 1 cm. A ray-trace code working as a postprocessor to a hydroatomic code is used to model the x-ray laser beam refraction due to the variation of the electron density versus the distance to the target surface. Knowing the hydrodynamic conditions, i.e., electron density, and electron and ion temperatures, along the ray paths, the radiative transfer equation, and the population equations are solved self-consistently by using a Maxwell-Bloch approach. A more tractable approach, requiring also the intensity of saturation as a function of time and space, is also presented. In this case, calculation time is much less than in the Maxwell-Bloch approach.

  18. A Multi-D-Shaped Optical Fiber for Refractive Index Sensing

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Chien-Hsing; Tsao, Tzu-Chein; Tang, Jaw-Luen; Wu, Wei-Te

    2010-01-01

    A novel class of multi-D-shaped optical fiber suited for refractive index measurements is presented. The multi-D-shaped optical fiber was constructed by forming several D-sections in a multimode optical fiber at localized regions with femtosecond laser pulses. The total number of D-shaped zones fabricated could range from three to seven. Each D-shaped zone covered a sensor volume of 100 μm depth, 250 μm width, and 1 mm length. The mean roughness of the core surface obtained by the AFM images was 231.7 nm, which is relatively smooth. Results of the tensile test indicated that the fibers have sufficient mechanical strength to resist damage from further processing. The multi-D-shaped optical fiber as a high sensitive refractive-index sensor to detect changes in the surrounding refractive index was studied. The results for different concentrations of sucrose solution show that a resolution of 1.27 × 10−3–3.13 × 10−4 RIU is achieved for refractive indices in the range of 1.333 to 1.403, suggesting that the multi-D-shaped fibers are attractive for chemical, biological, and biochemical sensing with aqueous solutions. PMID:22399908

  19. Calculation of electron wave functions and refractive index of Ne

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Min; Liu, Wei; Zhang, Tao

    2008-10-01

    The radial wave functions of inner electron shell and outer electron shell of a Ne atom were obtained by the approximate analytical method and tested by calculating the ground state energy of the Ne atom. The equivalent volume of electron cloud and the refractive index of Ne were calculated. The calculated refractive index agrees well with the experimental result. Relationship between the refractive index and the wave function of Ne was discovered.

  20. Autonomous satellite navigation using starlight refraction angle measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ning, Xiaolin; Wang, Longhua; Bai, Xinbei; Fang, Jiancheng

    2013-05-01

    An on-board autonomous navigation capability is required to reduce the operation costs and enhance the navigation performance of future satellites. Autonomous navigation by stellar refraction is a type of autonomous celestial navigation method that uses high-accuracy star sensors instead of Earth sensors to provide information regarding Earth's horizon. In previous studies, the refraction apparent height has typically been used for such navigation. However, the apparent height cannot be measured directly by a star sensor and can only be calculated by the refraction angle and an atmospheric refraction model. Therefore, additional errors are introduced by the uncertainty and nonlinearity of atmospheric refraction models, which result in reduced navigation accuracy and reliability. A new navigation method based on the direct measurement of the refraction angle is proposed to solve this problem. Techniques for the determination of the refraction angle are introduced, and a measurement model for the refraction angle is established. The method is tested and validated by simulations. When the starlight refraction height ranges from 20 to 50 km, a positioning accuracy of better than 100 m can be achieved for a low-Earth-orbit (LEO) satellite using the refraction angle, while the positioning accuracy of the traditional method using the apparent height is worse than 500 m under the same conditions. Furthermore, an analysis of the factors that affect navigation accuracy, including the measurement accuracy of the refraction angle, the number of visible refracted stars per orbit and the installation azimuth of star sensor, is presented. This method is highly recommended for small satellites in particular, as no additional hardware besides two star sensors is required.

  1. Negative-Refraction Metamaterials: Fundamental Principles and Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eleftheriades, G. V.; Balmain, K. G.

    2005-06-01

    Learn about the revolutionary new technology of negative-refraction metamaterials Negative-Refraction Metamaterials: Fundamental Principles and Applications introduces artificial materials that support the unusual electromagnetic property of negative refraction. Readers will discover several classes of negative-refraction materials along with their exciting, groundbreaking applications, such as lenses and antennas, imaging with super-resolution, microwave devices, dispersion-compensating interconnects, radar, and defense. The book begins with a chapter describing the fundamentals of isotropic metamaterials in which a negative index of refraction is defined. In the following chapters, the text builds on the fundamentals by describing a range of useful microwave devices and antennas. Next, a broad spectrum of exciting new research and emerging applications is examined, including: Theory and experiments behind a super-resolving, negative-refractive-index transmission-line lens 3-D transmission-line metamaterials with a negative refractive index Numerical simulation studies of negative refraction of Gaussian beams and associated focusing phenomena Unique advantages and theory of shaped lenses made of negative-refractive-index metamaterials A new type of transmission-line metamaterial that is anisotropic and supports the formation of sharp steerable beams (resonance cones) Implementations of negative-refraction metamaterials at optical frequencies Unusual propagation phenomena in metallic waveguides partially filled with negative-refractive-index metamaterials Metamaterials in which the refractive index and the underlying group velocity are both negative This work brings together the best minds in this cutting-edge field. It is fascinating reading for scientists, engineers, and graduate-level students in physics, chemistry, materials science, photonics, and electrical engineering.

  2. Determination of refractive index by Moiré deflectometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmadi, Mohammad; Madanipour, Khosro; Javadianvarjovi, Soheila

    2015-06-01

    Determination of refractive index is an important characteristic of material which is crucial parameter for physicists and engineers. Moiré deflectometry technique is convenient, easy-aligning, nondestructive, non-contact and fairly accurate method for refractive index measurement of gas, liquid, solid. In this paper we investigate the theory of the technique and simulate some relations then finally measure refractive index of a glassy lamella, n=1.536.

  3. IOL Power Calculation after Corneal Refractive Surgery

    PubMed Central

    De Bernardo, Maddalena; Capasso, Luigi; Caliendo, Luisa; Rosa, Nicola

    2014-01-01

    Purpose. To describe the different formulas that try to overcome the problem of calculating the intraocular lens (IOL) power in patients that underwent corneal refractive surgery (CRS). Methods. A Pubmed literature search review of all published articles, on keyword associated with IOL power calculation and corneal refractive surgery, as well as the reference lists of retrieved articles, was performed. Results. A total of 33 peer reviewed articles dealing with methods that try to overcome the problem of calculating the IOL power in patients that underwent CRS were found. According to the information needed to try to overcome this problem, the methods were divided in two main categories: 18 methods were based on the knowledge of the patient clinical history and 15 methods that do not require such knowledge. The first group was further divided into five subgroups based on the parameters needed to make such calculation. Conclusion. In the light of our findings, to avoid postoperative nasty surprises, we suggest using only those methods that have shown good results in a large number of patients, possibly by averaging the results obtained with these methods. PMID:25136609

  4. The refractive index of reciprocal electromagnetic media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCall, Martin W.; Kinsler, Paul; Topf, Renè D. M.

    2016-04-01

    We study the electromagnetics of media described by identical inhomogeneous relative dielectric and magnetic tensors, {\\boldsymbol{ε }}={\\boldsymbol{μ }}. Such media occur generically as spatial transformation media, i.e. electromagnetic media that are defined by a deformation of space. We show that such media are completely described by a refractive index n({r},\\hat{{s}}) that depends on position {r} and direction \\hat{{s}}, but is independent of polarization. The phase surface is always ellipsoidal, and n({r},\\hat{{s}}) is therefore represented by the radius vector to the surface of the ellipsoid. We apply our method to calculate the angular dependence of the refractive index in the well-studied cylindrical cloak and to a new kind of structurally chiral medium induced by a twist deformation. By way of a simple example we also show that media for which {\\boldsymbol{ε }}={\\boldsymbol{μ }} do not in general preserve the impedance properties of vacuum. The implications of this somewhat surprising conclusion for the field of transformation optics are discussed.

  5. Application of Surface Time-Lapse Seismic Refraction Tomography (TLSRT) to Quantifying Changes in Saturation Within the Vadose Zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaines, D. P.; Baker, G. S.; Hubbard, S. S.; Watson, D.; Jardine, P.

    2009-05-01

    Seismic p-wave propagation velocity of a medium is a function of the effective elastic constants of the material, and has been previously demonstrated to be related to hydrologic parameters according to the Gassmann equation. Above the water table (i.e., in the vadose zone), seismic p-wave velocity is expected to vary linearly as a function of density. Similarly, bulk density is expected to vary linearly as a function of the porosity and the pore-fluid density, where the pore-fluid density is described as the weighted mean of the pore-fluid density and density of air, dependent upon the saturation. Thus, the equations for calculating a change in saturation given two successive seismic p-wave propagation velocity measurements at a coincident point in the vadose zone are straightforward, given a priori values for bulk density or porosity for the medium. In the absence of in situ information for a given medium, subsurface variations in density can be derived using the multi-channel analysis of shear waves (MASW) technique that yields estimates of s-wave propagation velocity (Vs). As Vs is a function of the shear modulus and density, and shear modulus is invariant due to saturation according the Gassmann equation, a direct estimate of density can be derived via MASW. Thus, using MASW to establish initial conditions, a direct measure of changes in vadose zone saturation can be estimated using time-lapse seismic refraction tomography (TLSRT). In order to validate the above approach to quantifying saturation in the vadose zone, an ephemeral perched water table at the Oak Ridge Field Research Center (ORFRC) located at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory in Tennessee was monitored using TLSRT and correlated with traditional point hydrologic measurements. From October 2007 through February 2009, 35 coincident datasets were acquired along a 100-m profile. The hydrologic measurements provide a binary measure of the existence of an elevated water table, and the TLSRT data

  6. Refractivity estimation from sea clutter: An invited review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karimian, Ali; Yardim, Caglar; Gerstoft, Peter; Hodgkiss, William S.; Barrios, Amalia E.

    2011-12-01

    Non-standard radio wave propagation in the atmosphere is caused by anomalous changes of the atmospheric refractivity index. In recent years, refractivity from clutter (RFC) has been an active field of research to complement traditional ways of measuring the refractivity profile in maritime environments which rely on direct sensing of the environmental parameters. Higher temporal and spatial resolution of the refractivity profile, together with a lower cost and convenience of operations have been the promising factors that brought RFC under consideration. Presented is an overview of the basic concepts, research and achievements in the field of RFC. Topics that require more attention in future studies also are discussed.

  7. Baseline peripheral refractive error and changes in axial refraction during one year in a young adult population

    PubMed Central

    Hartwig, Andreas; Charman, William Neil; Radhakrishnan, Hema

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To determine whether the initial characteristics of individual patterns of peripheral refraction relate to subsequent changes in refraction over a one-year period. Methods 54 myopic and emmetropic subjects (mean age: 24.9 ± 5.1 years; median 24 years) with normal vision were recruited and underwent conventional non-cycloplegic subjective refraction. Peripheral refraction was also measured at 5° intervals over the central 60° of horizontal visual field, together with axial length. After one year, measurements of subjective refraction and axial length were repeated on the 43 subjects who were still available for examination. Results In agreement with earlier studies, higher myopes tended to show greater relative peripheral hyperopia. There was, however, considerable inter-subject variation in the pattern of relative peripheral refractive error (RPRE) at any level of axial refraction. Across the group, mean one-year changes in axial refraction and axial length did not differ significantly from zero. There was no correlation between changes in these parameters for individual subjects and any characteristic of their RPRE. Conclusion No evidence was found to support the hypothesis that the pattern of RPRE is predictive of subsequent refractive change in this age group. PMID:26188389

  8. Imaginary refractive index and other microphysical properties of volcanic ash, Sarahan dust, and other mineral aerosols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rocha Lima, A.; Martins, J.; Krotkov, N. A.; Artaxo, P.; Todd, M.; Ben Ami, Y.; Dolgos, G.; Espinosa, R.

    2013-12-01

    Aerosol properties are essential to support remote sensing measurements, atmospheric circulation and climate models. This research aims to improve the understanding of the optical and microphysical properties of different types of aerosols particles. Samples of volcanic ash, Saharan dust and other mineral aerosols particles were analyzed by different techniques. Ground samples were sieved down to 45um, de-agglomerated and resuspended in the laboratory using a Fluidized Bed Aerosol Generator (FBAG). Particles were collected on Nuclepore filters into PM10, PM2.5, or PM1.0. and analyzed by different techniques, such as Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) for determination of size distribution and shape, spectral reflectance for determination of the optical absorption properties as a function of the wavelength, material density, and X-Ray fluorescence for the elemental composition. The spectral imaginary part of refractive index from the UV to the short wave infrared (SWIR) wavelength was derived empirically from the measurements of the spectral mass absorption coefficient, size distribution and density of the material. Some selected samples were also analyzed with the Polarized Imaging Nephelometer (PI-Neph) instrument for the characterization of the aerosol polarized phase function. This work compares results of the spectral refractive index of different materials obtained by our methodology with those available in the literature. In some cases there are significant differences both in magnitude and spectral dependence of the imaginary refractive index. These differences are evaluated and discussed in this work.

  9. Potential-Field and Seismic Reflection/Refraction Studies of the Eagle Rock and Raymond Faults in Arroyo Seco, Los Angeles County, California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scheirer, D. S.; Rymer, M. J.; Catchings, R. D.; Goldman, M.; Fuis, G. S.

    2010-12-01

    In August 2007, we acquired high-resolution gravity and seismic reflection and refraction data across the Eagle Rock and Raymond faults in the Arroyo Seco, located in Pasadena and South Pasadena, California. The studies were conducted to aid in understanding the seismic hazards of these faults in this urban setting, specifically to detect and determine the location of all faults passing through the area and to characterize their dip and possible structural connections. Gravity data were collected along a single ~3-km-long profile, with stations spaced every 25-m close to the fault traces and at greater intervals away from the fault traces. Gravity station elevations from Real-Time Kinematic GPS solutions, along with careful accounting for the gravity effects of the adjacent concrete drainage channel and of the walls of the arroyo, allow for the calculation of gravity anomalies that reflect sub-surface density contrasts across the Eagle Rock and Raymond faults. Seismic reflection and refraction data, including both P-wave and S-wave records, were collected along two profiles, a northern one crossing the Eagle Rock fault with a length of 1200 m, and a southern one crossing the Raymond fault with a length of 450 m. The seismic profiles coincided with the longer gravity profile along the floor of the Arroyo Seco. Seismic sources included Betsy-Seisgun shots, accelerated weight drops, and repeated sledge hammer impacts, and receivers were geophones spaced at a 5-m interval. S-waves were generated and recorded at a subset of sites on each of the seismic lines. Seismic reflection and refraction images indicate that both the Eagle Rock and Raymond faults are comprised of multiple, steeply-dipping fault strands. P- and S-wave seismic tomography of the uppermost 50-100 m show velocity variations that can be converted to likely density variations, which can in turn be subtracted from the density variation needed by the gravity anomaly analysis. This process of stripping off

  10. Measurements of the complex refractive index of volcanic ash at 450, 546.7, and 650 nm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ball, J. G. C.; Reed, B. E.; Grainger, R. G.; Peters, D. M.; Mather, T. A.; Pyle, D. M.

    2015-08-01

    The detection and quantification of volcanic ash is extremely important to the aviation industry, civil defense organizations, and those in peril from volcanic ashfall. To exploit the remote sensing techniques that are used to monitor a volcanic cloud and return information on its properties, the effective complex refractive index of the volcanic ash is required. This paper presents the complex refractive index determined in the laboratory at 450.0 nm, 546.7 nm, and 650.0 nm for volcanic ash samples from eruptions of Aso (Japan), Grímsvötn (Iceland), Chaitén (Chile), Etna (Italy), Eyjafjallajökull (Iceland), Tongariro (New Zealand), Askja (Iceland), Nisyros (Greece), Okmok (Alaska), Augustine (Alaska), and Spurr (Alaska). The Becke line method was used to measure the real part of the refractive index with an accuracy of 0.01. The values measured differed between eruptions and were in the range 1.51-1.63 at 450.0 nm, 1.50-1.61 at 546.7 nm, and 1.50-1.59 at 650.0 nm. A novel method is introduced to derive the imaginary part of the refractive index from the attenuation of light by ash. The method has a precision in the range 10-3-10-4. The values for the ash imaginary refractive index ranged 0.22-1.70 × 10-3 at 450.0 nm, 0.16-1.93 × 10-3 at 546.7 nm, and 0.15-2.08 × 10-3 at 650.0 nm. The accuracy of Becke and attenuation methods was assessed by measuring the complex refractive index of Hoya neutral density glass and found to have an accuracy of <0.01 and <2 × 10-5 for the real and imaginary parts of the refractive index, respectively.

  11. Microwave gain medium with negative refractive index

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ye, Dexin; Chang, Kihun; Ran, Lixin; Xin, Hao

    2014-12-01

    Artificial effective media are attractive because of the fantastic applications they may enable, such as super lensing and electromagnetic invisibility. However, the inevitable loss due to their strongly dispersive nature is one of the fundamental challenges preventing such applications from becoming a reality. In this study, we demonstrate an effective gain medium based on negative resistance, to overcompensate the loss of a conventional passive metamaterial, meanwhile keeping its original negative-index property. Energy conservation-based theory, full-wave simulation and experimental measurement show that a fabricated sample consisting of conventional sub-wavelength building blocks with embedded microwave tunnel diodes exhibits a band-limited Lorentzian dispersion simultaneously with a negative refractive index and a net gain. Our work provides experimental evidence to the assertion that a stable net gain in negative-index gain medium is achievable, proposing a potential solution for the critical challenge current metamateiral technology faces in practical applications.

  12. Time-driven superoscillations with negative refraction.

    PubMed

    Dubois, M; Bossy, E; Enoch, S; Guenneau, S; Lerosey, G; Sebbah, P

    2015-01-01

    The flat-lens concept based on negative refraction proposed by Veselago in 1968 has been mostly investigated in the monochromatic regime. It was recently recognized that time development of the superlensing effect discovered in 2000 by Pendry is yet to be assessed and may spring surprises: Time-dependent illumination could improve the spatial resolution of the focusing. We investigate dynamics of flexural wave focusing by a 45°-tilted square lattice of circular holes drilled in a duralumin plate. Time-resolved experiments reveal that the focused image shrinks with time below the diffraction limit, with a lateral resolution increasing from 0.8λ to 0.35λ, whereas focusing under harmonic excitation remains diffraction limited. Modal analysis reveals the role in pulse reconstruction of radiating lens resonances, which repeatedly self-synchronize at the focal spot to shape a superoscillating field. PMID:25615470

  13. Nanofocusing Parabolic Refractive X-Ray Lenses

    SciTech Connect

    Schroer, C.G.; Kuhlmann, M.; Hunger, U.T.; Guenzler, T.F.; Kurapova, O.; Feste, S.; Lengeler, B.; Drakopoulos, M.; Somogyi, A.; Simionovici, A. S.; Snigirev, A.; Snigireva, I.

    2004-05-12

    Parabolic refractive x-ray lenses with short focal distance can generate intensive hard x-ray microbeams with lateral extensions in the 100nm range even at short distance from a synchrotron radiation source. We have fabricated planar parabolic lenses made of silicon that have a focal distance in the range of a few millimeters at hard x-ray energies. In a crossed geometry, two lenses were used to generate a microbeam with a lateral size of 330nm by 110nm at 25keV in a distance of 41.8m from the synchrotron radiation source. First microdiffraction and fluorescence microtomography experiments were carried out with these lenses. Using diamond as lens material, microbeams with lateral size down to 20nm and below are conceivable in the energy range from 10 to 100keV.

  14. Concentration dependent refractive index of CO2/CH4 mixture in gaseous and supercritical phase.

    PubMed

    Giraudet, C; Marlin, L; Bégué, D; Croccolo, F; Bataller, H

    2016-04-01

    Carbon dioxide (CO2)/methane (CH4) binary mixtures are investigated at pressure values up to 20 MPa at 303 K in order to investigate the pressure dependence of the optical concentration contrast factor, ∂n/∂cP,T, through gaseous and supercritical phase. Refractive index is measured by means of a Michelson interferometer. Refractivities of the mixtures are found in good agreement with Lorentz-Lorenz predictions after density calculations by means of the AGA8-DC92 equation of state. Experimental polarizabilities of pure fluids are compared to quantum calculations of monomers and dimers for each pressure; it results that the quantity of dimers is small in the investigated thermodynamic conditions. Finally, by extending our experimental database with numerical simulations, we evidence that ∂n/∂cP,T presents a critical enhancement similar to heat capacity. PMID:27059567

  15. Three-dimensional shape measurement based on dual-refractive-index digital holography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cai, Xiao-ou; Hu, Feng-jun; Wang, Hui

    2015-09-01

    A novel phase-imaging method based on dual-refractive-index digital holography has been presented, which in principle can be arbitrarily large compared to the wavelength and does not involve the usual phase unwrapping by detection of phase discontinuity. The method consists of the generation and combination of two phase maps in a digital holography system by use of two separate refractive indexes which varies with the air density in an air chamber where a recorded 3D object is in. For example, we have reconstructed the surface of a remote control keypad of size 5 mm×5 mm and maximum axial depth 0.631 mm, and the experimental result shows that the proposed approach is feasible and effective.

  16. Concentration dependent refractive index of CO2/CH4 mixture in gaseous and supercritical phase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giraudet, C.; Marlin, L.; Bégué, D.; Croccolo, F.; Bataller, H.

    2016-04-01

    Carbon dioxide (CO2)/methane (CH4) binary mixtures are investigated at pressure values up to 20 MPa at 303 K in order to investigate the pressure dependence of the optical concentration contrast factor, (" separators=" ∂ n / ∂ c ) P , T , through gaseous and supercritical phase. Refractive index is measured by means of a Michelson interferometer. Refractivities of the mixtures are found in good agreement with Lorentz-Lorenz predictions after density calculations by means of the AGA8-DC92 equation of state. Experimental polarizabilities of pure fluids are compared to quantum calculations of monomers and dimers for each pressure; it results that the quantity of dimers is small in the investigated thermodynamic conditions. Finally, by extending our experimental database with numerical simulations, we evidence that (" separators=" ∂ n / ∂ c ) P , T presents a critical enhancement similar to heat capacity.

  17. Sensitive hydrogen peroxide content measurement technology using refractive-index-based optical device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Bao-jin; Ying, Chao-Fu; Ye, Hui-qun; Zhao, Yong; Liu, Yun-Tao

    2005-01-01

    Monitoring of water quality is essential to modern life. Not only is it a major factor in safeguarding public health, high quality freshwater is also a key input in agriculture and many industrial process. A preliminary prototype for hydrogen peroxide content in water is setup and introduced. Based on the detection of beam deviation due to the refractive index changes of the aqueous hydrogen peroxide solution, hydrogen peroxide content can be measured by a position-sensitive detector. Measurement principle is theoretically described. Experimental results indicate the feasibility of the developed system. Not like intensity-modulated refractive index sensor which necessitates a stable light source, this sensor exploits the beam deviation due to optical refraction at the receiving end face of the measurement cell, which is caused by changes in refractive index with different hydrogen peroxide content in water. Hydrogen peroxide content measurement resolution can reach about 0.01% within the measurement range from distilled water to hydrogen peroxide content of 30%.

  18. Correlation among auto-refractor, wavefront aberration, and subjective manual refraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Qi; Ren, Qiushi

    2005-01-01

    Three optometry methods which include auto-refractor, wavefront aberrometer and subjective manual refraction were studied and compared in measuring low order aberrations of 60 people"s 117 normal eyes. Paired t-test and linear regression were used to study these three methods" relationship when measuring myopia with astigmatism. In order to make the analysis more clear, we divided the 117 normal eyes into different groups according to their subjective manual refraction and redid the statistical analysis. Correlations among three methods show significant in sphere, cylinder and axis in all groups, with sphere"s correlation coefficients largest(R>0.98, P<0.01) and cylinder"s smallest (0.900.01). Auto-refractor had significant change from the other two methods when measuring cylinder (P<0.01). The results after grouping differed a little from the analysis among total people. Although three methods showed significant change from each other in certain parameters, the amplitude of these differences were not large, which indicated that the coherence of auto-refractor, wavefront aberrometer and subjective refraction is good. However, we suggested that wavefront aberration measurement could be a good starting point of optometry, subjective refraction is still necessary for refinement.

  19. Measuring the Refractive Index of Bovine Corneal Stromal Cells Using Quantitative Phase Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Gardner, Steven J.; White, Nick; Albon, Julie; Knupp, Carlo; Kamma-Lorger, Christina S.; Meek, Keith M.

    2015-01-01

    The cornea is the primary refractive lens in the eye and transmits >90% of incident visible light. It has been suggested that the development of postoperative corneal haze could be due to an increase in light scattering from activated corneal stromal cells. Quiescent keratocytes are thought to produce crystallins that match the refractive index of their cytoplasm to the surrounding extracellular material, reducing the amount of light scattering. To test this, we measured the refractive index (RI) of bovine corneal stromal cells, using quantitative phase imaging of live cells in vitro, together with confocal microscopy. The RI of quiescent keratocytes (RI = 1.381 ± 0.004) matched the surrounding matrix, thus supporting the hypothesis that keratocyte cytoplasm does not scatter light in the normal cornea. We also observed that the RI drops after keratocyte activation (RI = 1.365 ± 0.003), leading to a mismatch with the surrounding intercellular matrix. Theoretical scattering models showed that this mismatch would reduce light transmission in the cornea. We conclude that corneal transparency depends on the matching of refractive indices between quiescent keratocytes and the surrounding tissue, and that after surgery or wounding, the resulting RI mismatch between the activated cells and their surrounds significantly contributes to light scattering. PMID:26488650

  20. Design, Fabrication and Test of a High Efficiency Refractive Secondary Concentrator for Solar Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wong, Wayne A.; Geng, Steven M.; Castle, Charles H.; Macosko, Robert P.

    2000-01-01

    Common to many of the space applications that utilize solar thermal energy such as electric power conversion, thermal propulsion, and furnaces, is a need for highly efficient, solar concentration systems. An effort is underway to develop the refractive secondary concentrator, which uses refraction and total internal reflection to efficiently concentrate and direct solar energy. When used in combination with advanced primary concentrators, the refractive secondary concentrator enables very high system concentration ratios (10,000 to 1) and very high temperatures (greater than 2000 K). Presented is an overview of the effort at the NASA Glenn Research Center to evaluate the performance of a prototype single crystal sapphire refractive secondary concentrator and to compare the performance with analytical models. The effort involves the design and fabrication of a secondary concentrator, design and fabrication of a calorimeter and its support hardware, calibration of the calorimeter, testing of the secondary concentrator in NASA Glenn's Tank 6 solar thermal vacuum facility, and comparing the test results with predictions. Test results indicate an average throughput efficiency of 87%. It is anticipated that reduction of a known reflection loss with an anti-reflective coating would result in a secondary concentrator throughput efficiency of approximately 93%.

  1. Mathematics of Radiation Propagation in Planetary Atmospheres: Absorption, Refraction, Time Delay, Occultation, and Abel Inversion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huestis, D. L.

    Forward integration calculation of air mass, refraction, and time delay requires care even for very smooth model atmospheres. The literature abounds in examples of injudicious approximations, assumptions, transformations, variable substitutions, and failures to verify that the formulas work with unlimited accuracy for simple cases and also survive challenges from mathematically pathological but physically realizable cases. A few years ago we addressed the problem of evaluation of the Chapman function for attenuation along a straight line path in an exponential atmosphere. In this presentation we will describe issues and approaches for integration over light paths curved by refraction. The inverse problem, determining the altitude profile of mass density (index of refraction) or the concentration of an individual chemical species (absorption), from occultation data, also has its mathematically interesting (i.e., difficult) aspects. Now we automatically have noise and thus statistical analysis is just as important as calculus and numerical analysis. Here we will describe a new approach of least-squares fitting occultation data to an expansion over compact basis functions. This approach, which avoids numerical differentiation and singular integrals, was originally developed to analyze laboratory imaging data.Forward integration calculation of air mass, refraction, and time delay requires care even for very smooth model atmospheres. The literature abounds in examples of injudicious approximations, assumptions, transformations, variable substitutions, and failures to verify that the formulas work with unlimited accuracy for simple cases and also survive challenges from mathematically pathological but physically realizable cases. A few years ago we addressed the problem of evaluation of the Chapman function for attenuation along a straight line path in an exponential atmosphere. In this presentation we will describe issues and approaches for integration over light paths

  2. Engineer's Refractive Effects Prediction System (EREPS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hitney, Herbert V.

    1989-09-01

    In recent years, electromagnetic tactical decision aids were developed to assess environmental effects on the performance of operational systems such as shipboard radars. In general, these systems have performed well and are now routinely used by operational forces to optimize their use of sensors and deployment of forces. In many cases, the existing tactical decision aid software was taken and used to assess the performance of proposed new sensors. Since the original software was not designed for this purpose, many deficiencies in such a use were soon identified. For example, most engineers prefer to graphically compare performance results as a single design parameter, such as radar pulse length, is varied over a range of possible values. Also, in designing a new system, one is usually more interested in the long-term statistical performance than in single-event performance that the tactical decision aids are normally designed to assess. The Engineer's Refractive Effects Prediction System (EREPS) is a recent development effort tailored to engineering uses and based on the propagation models of the Integrated Refractive Effects Prediction System (IREPS). EREPS is hosted on IBM PC computers for maximum availability to the engineering community, and was developed using interactive graphics displays for optimum comparison studies. The models are designed in such a way as to give results within a few seconds to allow multiple design trade-off studies to be easily performed. EREPS Revision 1.00 was distributed to interested users in the summer of 1988 and is currently being revised for a summer 1989 distribution. Existing and planned capabilities will be presented along with some examples of applications.

  3. RBC indices

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003648.htm RBC indices To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Red blood cell (RBC) indices are part of the complete blood count ( ...

  4. Negative Refraction in a Uniaxial Absorbent Dielectric Material

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jen, Yi-Jun; Lakhtakia, Akhlesh; Yu, Ching-Wei; Lin, Chin-Te

    2009-01-01

    Refraction of light from an isotropic dielectric medium to an anisotropic dielectric material is a complicated phenomenon that can have several different characteristics not usually discussed in electromagnetics textbooks for undergraduate students. With a simple problem wherein the refracting material is uniaxial with its optic axis normal to the…

  5. Measurement of Refractive Index Using a Michelson Interferometer.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fendley, J. J.

    1982-01-01

    Describes a novel and simple method of measuring the refractive index of transparent plates using a Michelson interferometer. Since it is necessary to use a computer program when determining the refractive index, undergraduates could be given the opportunity of writing their own programs. (Author/JN)

  6. Modification of the DSN radio frequency angular tropospheric refraction model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berman, A. L.

    1977-01-01

    The previously derived DSN Radio Frequency Angular Tropospheric Refraction Model contained an assumption which was subsequently seen to be at a variance with the theoretical basis of angular refraction. The modification necessary to correct the model is minor in that the value of a constant is changed.

  7. Refraction in Terms of the Deviation of the Light.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goldberg, Fred M.

    1985-01-01

    Discusses refraction in terms of the deviation of light. Points out that in physics courses where very little mathematics is used, it might be more suitable to describe refraction entirely in terms of the deviation, rather than by introducing Snell's law. (DH)

  8. Comparison Between Radar and Automatic Weather Station Refractivity Variability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hallali, Ruben; Dalaudier, Francis; Parent du Chatelet, Jacques

    2016-08-01

    Weather radars measure changes in the refractive index of air in the atmospheric boundary layer. The technique uses the phase of signals from ground targets located around the radar to provide information on atmospheric refractivity related to meteorological quantities such as temperature, pressure and humidity. The approach has been successfully implemented during several field campaigns using operational S-band radars in Canada, UK, USA and France. In order to better characterize the origins of errors, a recent study has simulated temporal variations of refractivity based on Automatic Weather Station (AWS) measurements. This reveals a stronger variability of the refractivity during the summer and in the afternoon when the refractivity is the most sensitive to humidity, probably because of turbulence close to the ground. This raises the possibility of retrieving information on the turbulent state of the atmosphere from the variability in radar refractivity. An analysis based on a 1-year dataset from the operational C-band radar at Trappes (near Paris, France) and AWS refractivity variability measurements was used to measure those temporal and spatial variabilities. Particularly during summer, a negative bias increasing with range is observed between radar and AWS estimations, and is well explained by a model based on Taylor's hypotheses. The results demonstrate the possibility of establishing, depending on season, a quantitative and qualitative link between radar and AWS refractivity variability that reflects low-level coherent turbulent structures.

  9. Anterior segment surgery IOLs, lasers, and refractive keratoplasty

    SciTech Connect

    Stark, W.J.; Terry, A.C.; Maumenee, A.E.

    1987-01-01

    The contributors to this text combine their expertise to make this book available on intraocular lenses, refractive corneal surgery, and the use of the YAG laser. Included is information on; IOL power calculations; the use of the YAG laser; retinal damage by short wavelength light; reviews of corneal refractive surgery; possibilities for the medical prevention of cataracts; and more.

  10. String and Sticky Tape Experiments: Refractive Index of Liquids.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Edge, R. D., Ed.

    1979-01-01

    Describes a simple method of measuring the refractive index of a liquid using a paper cup, a liquid, a pencil, and a ruler. Uses the ratio between the actual depth and the apparent depth of the cup to calculate the refractive index. (GA)

  11. Surface refractivity measurements at NASA spacecraft tracking sites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schmid, P. E.

    1972-01-01

    High-accuracy spacecraft tracking requires tropospheric modeling which is generally scaled by either estimated or measured values of surface refractivity. This report summarizes the results of a worldwide surface-refractivity test conducted in 1968 in support of the Apollo program. The results are directly applicable to all NASA radio-tracking systems.

  12. Helping Secondary School Students Develop a Conceptual Understanding of Refraction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ashmann, Scott; Anderson, Charles W.; Boeckman, Heather

    2016-01-01

    Using real-world examples, ray diagrams, and a cognitive apprenticeship cycle, this paper focuses on developing students' conceptual (not mathematical) understanding of refraction. Refraction can be a difficult concept for students to comprehend if they do not have well-designed opportunities to practice explaining situations where reflection and…

  13. A covariant approach to the gravitational refractive index

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simaciu, I.; Ionescu-Pallas, N.

    A covariant formulation of the Maxwell's field equations in a gravitational field, based on the bimetric interpretation of general relativity Theory, is given. The purpose of the work is in adequate definition of the gravitational refractive index in agreement with both wave equations propagation and a relationship between refractive index and the Minkovskian tensor of gravitational permitivity.

  14. Determining the Thickness and Refractive Index of a Mirror

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Uysal, Ahmet

    2010-01-01

    When a laser beam reflects from a back surface glass mirror and falls on a screen, a pattern of discrete bright spots is created by partial reflection and refraction of the light at the air-glass interface and reflection at the mirror surface (Fig. 1). This paper explains how this phenomenon can be used to determine the refractive index and the…

  15. Atmospheric Refractive Electromagnetic Wave Bending and Propagation Delay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mangum, Jeffrey G.; Wallace, Patrick

    2015-01-01

    In this tutorial we summarize the physics and mathematics behind refractive electromagnetic wave bending and delay. Refractive bending and delay through the Earth's atmosphere at both radio/millimetric and optical/IR wavelengths are discussed, but with most emphasis on the former, and with Atacama Large Millimeter Array (ALMA) applications in mind. As modern astronomical measurements often require subarcsecond position accuracy, care is required when selecting refractive bending and delay algorithms. For the spherically-uniform model atmospheres generally used for all refractive bending and delay algorithms, positional accuracies lsim1'' are achievable when observing at zenith angles lsim75°. A number of computationally economical approximate methods for atmospheric refractive bending and delay calculation are presented, appropriate for astronomical observations under these conditions. For observations under more realistic atmospheric conditions, for zenith angles lsim75°, or when higher positional accuracy is required, more rigorous refractive bending and delay algorithms must be employed. For accurate calculation of the refractive bending, we recommend the Auer and Standish method, using numerical integration to ray-trace through a two-layer model atmosphere, with an atmospheric model determination of the atmospheric refractivity. For the delay calculation we recommend numerical integration through a model atmosphere.

  16. Comparison Between Radar and Automatic Weather Station Refractivity Variability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hallali, Ruben; Dalaudier, Francis; Parent du Chatelet, Jacques

    2016-03-01

    Weather radars measure changes in the refractive index of air in the atmospheric boundary layer. The technique uses the phase of signals from ground targets located around the radar to provide information on atmospheric refractivity related to meteorological quantities such as temperature, pressure and humidity. The approach has been successfully implemented during several field campaigns using operational S-band radars in Canada, UK, USA and France. In order to better characterize the origins of errors, a recent study has simulated temporal variations of refractivity based on Automatic Weather Station (AWS) measurements. This reveals a stronger variability of the refractivity during the summer and in the afternoon when the refractivity is the most sensitive to humidity, probably because of turbulence close to the ground. This raises the possibility of retrieving information on the turbulent state of the atmosphere from the variability in radar refractivity. An analysis based on a 1-year dataset from the operational C-band radar at Trappes (near Paris, France) and AWS refractivity variability measurements was used to measure those temporal and spatial variabilities. Particularly during summer, a negative bias increasing with range is observed between radar and AWS estimations, and is well explained by a model based on Taylor's hypotheses. The results demonstrate the possibility of establishing, depending on season, a quantitative and qualitative link between radar and AWS refractivity variability that reflects low-level coherent turbulent structures.

  17. Cylindrical radiant energy direction device with refractive medium

    DOEpatents

    Winston, Roland

    1978-01-01

    A device is provided for directing radiant energy and includes a refractive element and a reflective boundary. The reflective boundary is so contoured that incident energy directed thereto by the refractive element is directed to the exit surface thereof or onto the surface of an energy absorber positioned at the exit surface.

  18. Optical waveguiding properties and refractive index analysis of boron nitride (BN) thin films prepared by reactive ion plating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boudiombo, J.; Boudrioua, A.; Loulergue, J. C.; Malhouitre, S.; Machet, J.

    1998-05-01

    Thin films of hexagonal boron nitride (h-BN) have been prepared using a reactive ion plating process. Investigations of guiding and optical properties of films have been performed using m-line spectroscopy. Both ordinary and extraordinary refractive indices are, respectively, determined from TE and TM mode excitation. Furthermore, refractive index profile analysis using an improved inverse WKB method reveals a gradient-like behavior indicating an optical inhomogeneity of the deposited films along the thickness. An optical anisotropy study confirms the films uniaxial nature with a birefringence, Δ n, of about 0.11.

  19. The significance of ultra-refracted surface gravity waves on sheltered coasts, with application to San Francisco Bay

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hanes, D.M.; Erikson, L.H.

    2013-01-01

    Ocean surface gravity waves propagating over shallow bathymetry undergo spatial modification of propagation direction and energy density, commonly due to refraction and shoaling. If the bathymetric variations are significant the waves can undergo changes in their direction of propagation (relative to deepwater) greater than 90° over relatively short spatial scales. We refer to this phenomenon as ultra-refraction. Ultra-refracted swell waves can have a powerful influence on coastal areas that otherwise appear to be sheltered from ocean waves. Through a numerical modeling investigation it is shown that San Francisco Bay, one of the earth's largest and most protected natural harbors, is vulnerable to ultra-refracted ocean waves, particularly southwest incident swell. The flux of wave energy into San Francisco Bay results from wave transformation due to the bathymetry and orientation of the large ebb tidal delta, and deep, narrow channel through the Golden Gate. For example, ultra-refracted swell waves play a critical role in the intermittent closure of the entrance to Crissy Field Marsh, a small restored tidal wetland located on the sheltered north-facing coast approximately 1.5 km east of the Golden Gate Bridge.

  20. The significance of ultra-refracted surface gravity waves on sheltered coasts, with application to San Francisco Bay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hanes, D. M.; Erikson, L. H.

    2013-11-01

    Ocean surface gravity waves propagating over shallow bathymetry undergo spatial modification of propagation direction and energy density, commonly due to refraction and shoaling. If the bathymetric variations are significant the waves can undergo changes in their direction of propagation (relative to deepwater) greater than 90° over relatively short spatial scales. We refer to this phenomenon as ultra-refraction. Ultra-refracted swell waves can have a powerful influence on coastal areas that otherwise appear to be sheltered from ocean waves. Through a numerical modeling investigation it is shown that San Francisco Bay, one of the earth's largest and most protected natural harbors, is vulnerable to ultra-refracted ocean waves, particularly southwest incident swell. The flux of wave energy into San Francisco Bay results from wave transformation due to the bathymetry and orientation of the large ebb tidal delta, and deep, narrow channel through the Golden Gate. For example, ultra-refracted swell waves play a critical role in the intermittent closure of the entrance to Crissy Field Marsh, a small restored tidal wetland located on the sheltered north-facing coast approximately 1.5 km east of the Golden Gate Bridge.