Science.gov

Sample records for density dependent approach

  1. A consumer-resource approach to the density-dependent population dynamics of mutualism

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Holland, J. Nathaniel; DeAngelis, Donald L.

    2010-01-01

    Like predation and competition, mutualism is now recognized as a consumer resource (C-R) interaction, including, in particular, bi-directional (e.g., coral, plant- mycorrhizae) and uni-directional (e.g., ant-plant defense, plant-pollinator) C-R mutualisms. Here, we develop general theory for the density-dependent population dynamics of mutualism based on the C-R mechanism of interspecific interaction. To test the influence of C-R interactions on the dynamics and stability of bi- and uni-directional C-R mutualisms, we developed simple models that link consumer functional response of one mutualistic species with the resources supplied by another. Phase-plane analyses show that the ecological dynamics of C-R mutualisms are stable in general. Most transient behavior leads to an equilibrium of mutualistic coexistence, at which both species densities are greater than in the absence of interactions. However, due to the basic nature of C-R interactions, certain density-dependent conditions can lead to C-R dynamics characteristic of predator-prey interactions, in which one species overexploits and causes the other to go extinct. Consistent with empirical phenomena, these results suggest that the C-R interaction can provide a broad mechanism for understanding density-dependent population dynamics of mutualism. By unifying predation, competition, and mutualism under the common ecological framework of consumer-resource theory, we may also gain a better understanding of the universal features of interspecific interactions in general.

  2. Why Density Dependent Propulsion?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Robertson, Glen A.

    2011-01-01

    In 2004 Khoury and Weltman produced a density dependent cosmology theory they call the Chameleon, as at its nature, it is hidden within known physics. The Chameleon theory has implications to dark matter/energy with universe acceleration properties, which implies a new force mechanism with ties to the far and local density environment. In this paper, the Chameleon Density Model is discussed in terms of propulsion toward new propellant-less engineering methods.

  3. Electronic Excitations in Solution: The Interplay between State Specific Approaches and a Time-Dependent Density Functional Theory Description.

    PubMed

    Guido, Ciro A; Jacquemin, Denis; Adamo, Carlo; Mennucci, Benedetta

    2015-12-01

    We critically analyze the performances of continuum solvation models when coupled to time-dependent density functional theory (TD-DFT) to predict solvent effects on both absorption and emission energies of chromophores in solution. Different polarization schemes of the polarizable continuum model (PCM), such as linear response (LR) and three different state specific (SS) approaches, are considered and compared. We show the necessity of introducing a SS model in cases where large electron density rearrangements are involved in the excitations, such as charge-transfer transitions in both twisted and quadrupolar compounds, and underline the very delicate interplay between the selected polarization method and the chosen exchange-correlation functional. This interplay originates in the different descriptions of the transition and ground/excited state multipolar moments by the different functionals. As a result, the choice of both the DFT functional and the solvent polarization scheme has to be consistent with the nature of the studied electronic excitation. PMID:26642990

  4. Analytic derivative couplings in time-dependent density functional theory: Quadratic response theory versus pseudo-wavefunction approach

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Xing; Herbert, John M.

    2015-02-14

    We revisit the formalism for analytic derivative couplings between excited states in time-dependent density functional theory (TDDFT). We derive and implement these couplings using quadratic response theory, then numerically compare this response-theory formulation to couplings implemented previously based on a pseudo-wavefunction formalism and direct differentiation of the Kohn-Sham determinant. Numerical results, including comparison to full configuration interaction calculations, suggest that the two approaches perform equally well for many molecular systems, provided that the underlying DFT method affords accurate potential energy surfaces. The response contributions are found to be important for certain systems with high symmetry, but can be calculated with only a moderate increase in computational cost beyond what is required for the pseudo-wavefunction approach. In the case of spin-flip TDDFT, we provide a formal proof that the derivative couplings obtained using response theory are identical to those obtained from the pseudo-wavefunction formulation, which validates our previous implementation based on the latter formalism.

  5. Investigation of intense femto-second laser ionization and dissociation of methane with time-dependent density-functional approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Irani, E.; Sadighi-Bonabi, R.; Anvari, A.

    2014-06-01

    Three dimensional calculations of electronic dynamics of CH4 in a strong laser field are presented with time-dependent density-functional theory. Time evolution of dipole moment and electron localization function is presented. The dependence of dissociation rate on the laser characters is shown and optimal effective parameters are evaluated. The optimum field leads to 76% dissociation probability for GAUSSIAN envelope and 40 fs (FWHM) at 1016 W cm-2. The dissociation probability is calculated by optimum convolution of dual short pulses. By combining of field assisted dissociation process and Ehrenfest molecular dynamics, time variation of bond length, velocity and orientation effect are investigated.

  6. Time Dependent Density Functional Theory An introduction

    E-print Network

    Botti, Silvana

    Time Dependent Density Functional Theory An introduction Francesco Sottile LSI, Ecole Polytechnique (ETSF) Time Dependent Density Functional Theory Palaiseau, 7 February 2012 1 / 32 #12;Outline 1 Frontiers 4 Perspectives and Resources Francesco Sottile (ETSF) Time Dependent Density Functional Theory

  7. Kohn–Sham approach to quantum electrodynamical density-functional theory: Exact time-dependent effective potentials in real space

    PubMed Central

    Flick, Johannes; Ruggenthaler, Michael; Appel, Heiko; Rubio, Angel

    2015-01-01

    The density-functional approach to quantum electrodynamics extends traditional density-functional theory and opens the possibility to describe electron–photon interactions in terms of effective Kohn–Sham potentials. In this work, we numerically construct the exact electron–photon Kohn–Sham potentials for a prototype system that consists of a trapped electron coupled to a quantized electromagnetic mode in an optical high-Q cavity. Although the effective current that acts on the photons is known explicitly, the exact effective potential that describes the forces exerted by the photons on the electrons is obtained from a fixed-point inversion scheme. This procedure allows us to uncover important beyond-mean-field features of the effective potential that mark the breakdown of classical light–matter interactions. We observe peak and step structures in the effective potentials, which can be attributed solely to the quantum nature of light; i.e., they are real-space signatures of the photons. Our findings show how the ubiquitous dipole interaction with a classical electromagnetic field has to be modified in real space to take the quantum nature of the electromagnetic field fully into account. PMID:26627715

  8. Kohn-Sham approach to quantum electrodynamical density-functional theory: Exact time-dependent effective potentials in real space.

    PubMed

    Flick, Johannes; Ruggenthaler, Michael; Appel, Heiko; Rubio, Angel

    2015-12-15

    The density-functional approach to quantum electrodynamics extends traditional density-functional theory and opens the possibility to describe electron-photon interactions in terms of effective Kohn-Sham potentials. In this work, we numerically construct the exact electron-photon Kohn-Sham potentials for a prototype system that consists of a trapped electron coupled to a quantized electromagnetic mode in an optical high-Q cavity. Although the effective current that acts on the photons is known explicitly, the exact effective potential that describes the forces exerted by the photons on the electrons is obtained from a fixed-point inversion scheme. This procedure allows us to uncover important beyond-mean-field features of the effective potential that mark the breakdown of classical light-matter interactions. We observe peak and step structures in the effective potentials, which can be attributed solely to the quantum nature of light; i.e., they are real-space signatures of the photons. Our findings show how the ubiquitous dipole interaction with a classical electromagnetic field has to be modified in real space to take the quantum nature of the electromagnetic field fully into account. PMID:26627715

  9. Density Functional Approach Francesco Sottile

    E-print Network

    Botti, Silvana

    Density Functional Approach Francesco Sottile Ecole Polytechnique, Palaiseau - France European Theoretical Spectroscopy Facility (ETSF) 22 October 2010 #12;Density Functional Theory 1. Any observable of a quantum system can be obtained from the density of the system alone. = O[n] Hohenberg, P. and W. Kohn

  10. Density-dependent covariant energy density functionals

    SciTech Connect

    Lalazissis, G. A.

    2012-10-20

    Relativistic nuclear energy density functionals are applied to the description of a variety of nuclear structure phenomena at and away fromstability line. Isoscalar monopole, isovector dipole and isoscalar quadrupole giant resonances are calculated using fully self-consistent relativistic quasiparticle randomphase approximation, based on the relativistic Hartree-Bogoliubovmodel. The impact of pairing correlations on the fission barriers in heavy and superheavy nuclei is examined. The role of pion in constructing desnity functionals is also investigated.

  11. Fusion using time-dependent density-constrained DFT

    E-print Network

    R. Keser; A. S. Umar; V. E. Oberacker; J. A. Maruhn; P. -G. Reinhard

    2014-02-06

    We present results for calculating fusion cross-sections using a new microscopic approach based on a time-dependent density-constrained DFT calculations. The theory is implemented by using densities and other information obtained from TDDFT time-evolution of the nuclear system as constraint on the density for DFT calculations.

  12. Time Dependent Density Functional Theory An Introduction

    E-print Network

    Botti, Silvana

    Time Dependent Density Functional Theory An Introduction Francesco Sottile Laboratoire des Solides) Belfast, 29 Jun 2007 Time Dependent Density Functional Theory Francesco Sottile #12;Intro Formalism Linear Response Formalism 3 TDDFT in practice: The ALDA: Achievements and Shortcomings 4 Resources Time

  13. Fragment-Based Time-Dependent Density Functional Theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mosquera, Martín A.; Jensen, Daniel; Wasserman, Adam

    2013-07-01

    Using the Runge-Gross theorem that establishes the foundation of time-dependent density functional theory, we prove that for a given electronic Hamiltonian, choice of initial state, and choice of fragmentation, there is a unique single-particle potential (dubbed time-dependent partition potential) which, when added to each of the preselected fragment potentials, forces the fragment densities to evolve in such a way that their sum equals the exact molecular density at all times. This uniqueness theorem suggests new ways of computing the time-dependent properties of electronic systems via fragment-time-dependent density functional theory calculations. We derive a formally exact relationship between the partition potential and the total density, and illustrate our approach on a simple model system for binary fragmentation in a laser field.

  14. Fragment-based time-dependent density functional theory.

    PubMed

    Mosquera, Martín A; Jensen, Daniel; Wasserman, Adam

    2013-07-12

    Using the Runge-Gross theorem that establishes the foundation of time-dependent density functional theory, we prove that for a given electronic Hamiltonian, choice of initial state, and choice of fragmentation, there is a unique single-particle potential (dubbed time-dependent partition potential) which, when added to each of the preselected fragment potentials, forces the fragment densities to evolve in such a way that their sum equals the exact molecular density at all times. This uniqueness theorem suggests new ways of computing the time-dependent properties of electronic systems via fragment-time-dependent density functional theory calculations. We derive a formally exact relationship between the partition potential and the total density, and illustrate our approach on a simple model system for binary fragmentation in a laser field. PMID:23889390

  15. Density-dependent adjustment of inducible defenses

    PubMed Central

    Tollrian, Ralph; Duggen, Sonja; Weiss, Linda C.; Laforsch, Christian; Kopp, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Predation is a major factor driving evolution, and organisms have evolved adaptations increasing their survival chances. However, most defenses incur trade-offs between benefits and costs. Many organisms save costs by employing inducible defenses as responses to fluctuating predation risk. The level of defense often increases with predator densities. However, individual predation risk should not only depend on predator density but also on the density of conspecifics. If the predator has a saturating functional response one would predict a negative correlation between prey density and individual predation risk and hence defense expression. Here, we tested this hypothesis using six model systems, covering a taxonomic range from protozoa to rotifers and crustaceans. In all six systems, we found that the level of defense expression increased with predator density but decreased with prey density. In one of our systems, i.e. in Daphnia, we further show that the response to prey density is triggered by a chemical cue released by conspecifics and congeners. Our results indicate that organisms adjust the degree of defense to the acute predation risk, rather than merely to predators’ densities. Our study suggests that density-dependent defense expression reflects accurate predation-risk assessment and is a general principle in many inducible-defense systems. PMID:26235428

  16. The cosmological dependence of cluster density profiles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crone, Mary M.; Evrard, August E.; Richstone, Douglas O.

    1994-01-01

    We use N-body simulations to study the shape of mean cluster density and velocity profiles in the nonlinear regime formed via gravitational instability. The dependence of the final structure on both cosmology and initial density field is examined, using a grid of cosmologies and scale-free initial power spectra P(k) varies as k(exp n). Einstein-de Sitter, open (Omega(sub 0) = 0.2 and 0.1) and flat, low density (Omega(sub 0) = 0.2 lambda(sub 0) = 0.8) models are examined, with initial spectral indices n = -2, -1 and 0. For each model, we stack clusters in an appropriately scaled manner to define an average density profile in the nonlinear regime. The profiles are well fit by a power law rho(r) varies as r(exp -alpha) for radii whereat the local density contrast is between 100 and 3000. This covers 99% of the cluster volume. We find a clear trend toward steeper slopes (larger alphas) with both increasing n and decreasing Omega(sub 0). The Omega(sub 0) dependence is partially masked by the n dependence; there is degeneracy in the values of alpha between the Einstein-de Sitter and flat, low-density cosmologies. However, the profile slopes in the open models are consistently higher than the Omega = 1 values for the range of n examined. Cluster density profiles are thus potentially useful cosmological diagnostics. We find no evidence for a constant density core in any of the models, although the density profiles do tend to flatten at small radii. Much of the flattening is due to the force softening required by the simulations. An attempt is made to recover the unsoftened profiles assuming angular momentum invariance. The recovered profiles in Einstein-de Sitter cosmologies are consistent with a pure power law up to the highest density contrasts (10(exp 6)) accessible with our resolution. The low-density models show significant deviation from a power law above density contrasts approximately 10(exp 5). We interpret this curvature as reflecting the non-scale-invariant nature of the background cosmology in these models. These results are at the limit of our resolution and so should be tested in the future using simulations with larger numbers of particles. Such simulations will also provide insight on the broader problem of understanding, in a statistical sense, the full phase space structure of collapsed, cosmological halos.

  17. Central Density Dependent Anisotropic Compact Stars

    E-print Network

    Kalam, Mehedi; Hossein, Sk Monowar; Ray, Saibal

    2013-01-01

    Stars can be treated as self-gravitating fluid. In this connection, we propose a model for an anisotropic star under the relativistic framework of Krori-Barua (1975) spacetime. It is shown that the solutions are regular and singularity free. The uniqueness of the model is that interior physical properties of the star solely depend on the central density of the matter distribution.

  18. Central Density Dependent Anisotropic Compact Stars

    E-print Network

    Mehedi Kalam; Farook Rahaman; Sk. Monowar Hossein; Saibal Ray

    2012-12-27

    Stars can be treated as self-gravitating fluid. In this connection, we propose a model for an anisotropic star under the relativistic framework of Krori-Barua (1975) spacetime. It is shown that the solutions are regular and singularity free. The uniqueness of the model is that interior physical properties of the star solely depend on the central density of the matter distribution.

  19. Local density dependent potential for compressible mesoparticles

    E-print Network

    Gerome Faure; Jean-Bernard Maillet; Gabriel Stoltz

    2013-10-04

    We focus on finding a coarse grained description able to reproduce the thermodynamic behavior of a molecular system by using mesoparticles representing several molecules. Interactions between mesoparticles are modelled by an interparticle potential, and an additional internal equation of state is used to account for the thermic contribution of coarse grained internal degrees of freedom. Moreover, as strong non-equilibrium situations over a wide range of pressure and density are targeted, the internal compressibility of these mesoparticles has to be considered. This is done by introducing a dependence of the potential on the local environment of the mesoparticles, either by defining a spherical local density or by means of a Voronoi tessellation. As an example, a local density dependent potential is fitted to reproduce the Hugoniot curve of a model of nitromethane, where each mesoparticle represents one thousand molecules.

  20. Size-dependent density of zirconia nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Opalinska, Agnieszka; Dzwolak, Wojciech; Chudoba, Tadeusz; Presz, Adam; Lojkowski, Witold

    2015-01-01

    Summary The correlation between density and specific surface area of ZrO2 nanoparticles (NPs) was studied. The NPs were produced using a hydrothermal process involving microwave heating. The material was annealed at 1100 °C which resulted in an increase in the average grain size of the ZrO2 NPs from 11 to 78 nm and a decrease in the specific surface area from 97 to 15 m2/g. At the same time, the density increased from 5.22 g/m3 to 5.87 g/m3. This effect was interpreted to be the result of the presence of a hydroxide monolayer on the NP surface. A smaller ZrO2 grain size was correlated with a larger contribution of the low density surface layer to the average density. To prove the existence of such a layer, the material was synthesized using 50% heavy water. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) permitted the identification of the –OD groups created during synthesis. It was found that the –OD groups persisted on the ZrO2 surface even after annealing at 1100 °C. This hydroxide layer is responsible for the decrease in the average density of the NPs as their size decreases. This study of the correlation between particle size and density may be used to assess the quality of the NPs. In most cases, the technological aim is to avoid an amorphous layer and to obtain fully crystalline nanoparticles with the highest density possible. However, due to the effect of the surface layers, there is a maximum density which can be achieved for a given average NP diameter. The effect of the surface layer on the NP density becomes particularly evident for NPs smaller than 50 nm, and thus, the density of nanoparticles is size dependent. PMID:25671149

  1. Density functional approaches to atomic nuclei

    E-print Network

    Takashi Nakatsukasa

    2012-09-22

    Nuclear mean-field models are briefly reviewed to illustrate its foundation and necessity of state dependence in effective interactions. This state dependence is successfully taken into account by the density dependence, leading to the energy density functional. Recent results for photoabsorption cross sections in spherical and deformed Nd isotopes are shown.

  2. Partitioned density functional approach for a Lennard-Jones fluid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Shiqi

    2003-12-01

    The existing classical density functional approach for nonuniform Lennard-Jones fluid, which is based on dividing the Lennard-Jones interaction potential into a short-range, repulsive part, and a smoothly varying, long-range, attractive tail, was improved by dividing the bulk second-order direct correlation function into strongly density-depending short-range part and weakly density-depending long-range part. The latter is treated by functional perturbation expansion truncated at the lowest order whose accuracy depends on how weakly the long-range part depends on the bulk density. The former is treated by the truncated functional perturbation expansion which is rewritten in the form of the simple weighted density approximation and incorporates the omitted higher-order terms by applying Lagrangian theorem of differential calculus to the reformulated form. The two approximations are put into the density profile equation of the density functional theory formalism to predict the density distribution for Lennard-Jones fluid in contact with a hard wall or between two hard walls within the whole density range for reduced temperature T*=1.35 and a density point for reduced temperature T*=1. The present partitioned density functional theory performs much better than several previous density functional perturbation theory approaches and a recently proposed bridge density functional approximation.

  3. Variational minimization of orbital-density-dependent functionals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borghi, Giovanni; Park, Cheol-Hwan; Nguyen, Ngoc Linh; Ferretti, Andrea; Marzari, Nicola

    2015-04-01

    Orbital-density-dependent functionals, such as the Perdew-Zunger or the Koopmans-compliant functionals, are used to remove unphysical self-interaction energies and to restore missing piece-wise linearity in approximate formulations of density-functional theory (DFT). At variance with functionals of the total density, orbital-density-dependent functionals are typically not invariant with respect to unitary transformations of the occupied states. Such additional degrees of freedom require an extension of established approaches for direct minimization that preserve their numerical robustness and efficiency, and make it possible to apply these advanced electronic-structure functionals to large or complex systems. In this work we adapt the ensemble-DFT algorithm [N. Marzari, D. Vanderbilt, and M. C. Payne, Phys. Rev. Lett. 79, 1337 (1997), 10.1103/PhysRevLett.79.1337] to the case of orbital-density-dependent functionals, partitioning the variational problem into a nested loop of (i) minimizations with respect to unitary transformations at a fixed orbital manifold, that lead to a projected, unitary-covariant functional of the orbitals only that enforces the Pederson condition and (ii) variational optimization of the orbital manifold for this projected functional. We discuss in detail both general and functional-dependent trends and suggest a procedure to efficiently exploit the combination of the different minimization strategies. The overall formulation allows for a stable, robust, and efficient algorithm, yielding great improvements over conventional techniques.

  4. Shell Model Approach to Nuclear Level Density

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horoi, Mihai

    2000-04-01

    Nuclear level densities (NLD) are traditionally estimated using variations of Fermi Gas Formula (FGF) or combinatoric techniques. Recent investigations using Monte Carlo Shell Model (MCSM) techniques indicate that a shell model description of NLD may be an accurate and stable approach. Full shell model calculations of NLD are very difficult. We calculated the NLD for all nuclei in the sd shell and show that the results can be described by a single particle combinatoric model, which depends on two parameters similar to FGF. We further investigated other models and find that a sum of gaussians with means and variances given by French and Ratcliff averages (Phys. Rev. C 3, 94(1971)) is able to accurately describe shell model NLD, even when shell effects are present. The contribution of the spurious center-of-mass motion to the shell model NLD is also discussed.

  5. Evolution of density- and patch-size-dependent dispersal rates.

    PubMed Central

    Poethke, Hans Joachim; Hovestadt, Thomas

    2002-01-01

    Based on a marginal value approach, we derive a nonlinear expression for evolutionarily stable (ES) dispersal rates in a metapopulation with global dispersal. For the general case of density-dependent population growth, our analysis shows that individual dispersal rates should decrease with patch capacity and-beyond a certain threshold-increase with population density. We performed a number of spatially explicit, individual-based simulation experiments to test these predictions and to explore further the relevance of variation in the rate of population increase, density dependence, environmental fluctuations and dispersal mortality on the evolution of dispersal rates. They confirm the predictions of our analytical approach. In addition, they show that dispersal rates in metapopulations mostly depend on dispersal mortality and inter-patch variation in population density. The latter is dominantly driven by environmental fluctuations and the rate of population increase. These conclusions are not altered by the introduction of neighbourhood dispersal. With patch capacities in the order of 100 individuals, kin competition seems to be of negligible importance for ES dispersal rates except when overall dispersal rates are low. PMID:11916481

  6. Electron correlation of one-dimensional H{sub 2} in intense laser fields: Time-dependent extended Hartree-Fock and time-dependent density-functional-theory approaches

    SciTech Connect

    Nguyen, Nam A.; Bandrauk, Andre D.

    2006-03-15

    Ionization and high-order harmonic generation of the one-dimensional (1D) H{sub 2} molecule in intense ultrashort laser fields are investigated using several current approximations for electron dynamics. Single- and double-ionization probabilities are compared with exact results. It is found that for the ground state X {sup 1}{sigma}{sub g}{sup +}, time-dependent extended Hartree-Fock gives generally comparable results except in the plateau region. The adiabatic local density approximation and time-dependent optimized effective potential with self-interaction correction (TDKLI) methods underestimate the ionization probabilities with no plateau and knee for double ionization contrary to the exact results. For the triplet excited state A {sup 3}{sigma}{sub u}{sup +}, where exchange is important, the TDKLI results agree well with the exact results. The exact double-ionization probabilities suggest the need for accurate pair-correlation functions.

  7. Selective fishing induces density-dependent growth.

    PubMed

    Svedäng, Henrik; Hornborg, Sara

    2014-01-01

    Over the last decades, views on fisheries management have oscillated between alarm and trust in management progress. The predominant policy for remedying the world fishing crisis aims at maximum sustainable yield (MSY) by adjusting gear selectivity and fishing effort. Here we report a case study on how striving for higher yields from the Eastern Baltic cod stock by increasing selectivity has become exceedingly detrimental for its productivity. Although there is a successive increase in numbers of undersized fish, growth potential is severely reduced, and fishing mortality in fishable size has increased. Once density-dependent growth is introduced, the process is self-enforcing as long as the recruitment remains stable. Our findings suggest that policies focusing on maximum yield while targeting greater sizes are risky and should instead prioritize catch rates over yield. Disregarding the underlying population structure may jeopardize stock productivity, with dire consequences for the fishing industry and ecosystem structure and function. PMID:24920387

  8. Selective fishing induces density-dependent growth

    PubMed Central

    Svedäng, Henrik; Hornborg, Sara

    2014-01-01

    Over the last decades, views on fisheries management have oscillated between alarm and trust in management progress. The predominant policy for remedying the world fishing crisis aims at maximum sustainable yield (MSY) by adjusting gear selectivity and fishing effort. Here we report a case study on how striving for higher yields from the Eastern Baltic cod stock by increasing selectivity has become exceedingly detrimental for its productivity. Although there is a successive increase in numbers of undersized fish, growth potential is severely reduced, and fishing mortality in fishable size has increased. Once density-dependent growth is introduced, the process is self-enforcing as long as the recruitment remains stable. Our findings suggest that policies focusing on maximum yield while targeting greater sizes are risky and should instead prioritize catch rates over yield. Disregarding the underlying population structure may jeopardize stock productivity, with dire consequences for the fishing industry and ecosystem structure and function. PMID:24920387

  9. Temperature and density dependent solute vibrational relaxation in supercritical fluoroform

    E-print Network

    Fayer, Michael D.

    Temperature and density dependent solute vibrational relaxation in supercritical fluoroform D. J Received 29 November 2000; accepted 13 June 2001 Temperature- and density-dependent vibrational relaxation in reproducing the temperature- and density-dependent trends of the experimental data with a minimum

  10. Density-dependent diversification in North American wood warblers

    E-print Network

    Rabosky, Daniel L.

    Density-dependent diversification in North American wood warblers Daniel L. Rabosky1,2,* and Irby J diversification. This model predicts density-dependent declines in diversification rates, but has not been that distinguishes density dependence from alternative processes that also produce temporally declining

  11. Density-dependent mortality and the latitudinal gradient in species

    E-print Network

    Teskey, Robert O.

    .............................................................. Density-dependent mortality.B.) ............................................................................................................................................................................. Ecologists have long postulated that density-dependent mortality maintains high tree diversity in the tropics,2,7­9 . Agents of density-dependent mortality (such as host-specific predators, and pathogens) may be more

  12. Quasiparticle density-matrix representation of nonlinear time-dependent density-functional response functions

    E-print Network

    Mukamel, Shaul

    Quasiparticle density-matrix representation of nonlinear time-dependent density-functional response York 14627-0216 Received 14 October 2002; published 15 April 2003 The time-dependent density-electron density matrix in Liouville space. A collective-oscillator, quasi- particle, representation of the density

  13. Density-Dependent Metabolic Heterogeneity in Human Mesenchymal Stem Cells.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yijun; Muñoz, Nathalie; Bunnell, Bruce A; Logan, Timothy M; Ma, Teng

    2015-11-01

    Human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) are intrinsically heterogeneous and comprise subpopulations that differ in their proliferation, multi-potency, and functional properties, which are commonly demonstrated by culturing hMSCs at different plating densities. The objective of this study was to investigate the metabolic profiles of different subpopulations of hMSC by testing the hypothesis that the clonogenic hMSC subpopulation, which is selectively enriched in clonal density (CD) and low density (LD) culture (10 and 100 cells per square centimeter, respectively), possesses a metabolic phenotype that differs from that of hMSC in medium- or high-density (MD: 1,000 and HD: 3,000 cells per square centimeter, respectively). Cells at CD and LD conditions exhibited elevated expression of CD146 and colony forming unit-fibroblast compared with cells at MD- or HD. Global metabolic profiles revealed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry of cell extracts showed clear distinction between LD and HD cultures, and density-dependent differences in coupling of glycolysis to the TCA cycle. Metabolic inhibitors revealed density-dependent differences in glycolysis versus oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS) for ATP generation, in glutamine metabolism, in the dependence on the pentose phosphate pathway for maintaining cellular redox state, and sensitivity to exogenous reactive oxygen species. We also show that active OXPHOS is not required for proliferation in LD culture but that OXPHOS activity increases senescence in HD culture. Together, the results revealed heterogeneity in hMSC culture exists at the level of primary metabolism. The unique metabolic characteristics of the clonogenic subpopulation suggest a novel approach for optimizing in vitro expansion of hMSCs. Stem Cells 2015;33:3368-3381. PMID:26274841

  14. Excitation energies from range-separated time-dependent density and density matrix functional theory.

    PubMed

    Pernal, Katarzyna

    2012-05-14

    Time-dependent density functional theory (TD-DFT) in the adiabatic formulation exhibits known failures when applied to predicting excitation energies. One of them is the lack of the doubly excited configurations. On the other hand, the time-dependent theory based on a one-electron reduced density matrix functional (time-dependent density matrix functional theory, TD-DMFT) has proven accurate in determining single and double excitations of H(2) molecule if the exact functional is employed in the adiabatic approximation. We propose a new approach for computing excited state energies that relies on functionals of electron density and one-electron reduced density matrix, where the latter is applied in the long-range region of electron-electron interactions. A similar approach has been recently successfully employed in predicting ground state potential energy curves of diatomic molecules even in the dissociation limit, where static correlation effects are dominating. In the paper, a time-dependent functional theory based on the range-separation of electronic interaction operator is rigorously formulated. To turn the approach into a practical scheme the adiabatic approximation is proposed for the short- and long-range components of the coupling matrix present in the linear response equations. In the end, the problem of finding excitation energies is turned into an eigenproblem for a symmetric matrix. Assignment of obtained excitations is discussed and it is shown how to identify double excitations from the analysis of approximate transition density matrix elements. The proposed method used with the short-range local density approximation (srLDA) and the long-range Buijse-Baerends density matrix functional (lrBB) is applied to H(2) molecule (at equilibrium geometry and in the dissociation limit) and to Be atom. The method accounts for double excitations in the investigated systems but, unfortunately, the accuracy of some of them is poor. The quality of the other excitations is in general much better than that offered by TD-DFT-LDA or TD-DMFT-BB approximations if the range-separation parameter is properly chosen. The latter remains an open problem. PMID:22583275

  15. Density-matrix representation of nonadiabatic couplings in time-dependent density functional ,,TDDFT... theories

    E-print Network

    Mukamel, Shaul

    Density-matrix representation of nonadiabatic couplings in time-dependent density functional of a molecule are derived by representing the time-dependent density functional TDDFT equations in a form of classical dynamics for the Kohn-Sham KS single-electron density matrix. Applicability of Krylov

  16. Relativistic Coulomb excitation within Time Dependent Superfluid Local Density Approximation

    E-print Network

    I. Stetcu; C. Bertulani; A. Bulgac; P. Magierski; K. J. Roche

    2015-01-13

    Within the framework of the unrestricted time-dependent density functional theory, we present for the first time an analysis of the relativistic Coulomb excitation of the heavy deformed open shell nucleus $^{238}$U. The approach is based on Superfluid Local Density Approximation (SLDA) formulated on a spatial lattice that can take into account coupling to the continuum, enabling self-consistent studies of superfluid dynamics of any nuclear shape. We have computed the energy deposited in the target nucleus as a function of the impact parameter, finding it to be significantly larger than the estimate using the Goldhaber-Teller model. The isovector giant dipole resonance, the dipole pygmy resonance and giant quadrupole modes were excited during the process. The one body dissipation of collective dipole modes is shown to lead a damping width $\\Gamma_\\downarrow \\approx 0.4$ MeV and the number of pre-equilibrium neutrons emitted has been quantified.

  17. THE DEPENDENCE OF STAR FORMATION EFFICIENCY ON GAS SURFACE DENSITY

    SciTech Connect

    Burkert, Andreas; Hartmann, Lee E-mail: lhartm@umich.edu

    2013-08-10

    Studies by Lada et al. and Heiderman et al. have suggested that star formation mostly occurs above a threshold in gas surface density {Sigma} of {Sigma}{sub c} {approx} 120 M{sub Sun} pc{sup -2} (A{sub K} {approx} 0.8). Heiderman et al. infer a threshold by combining low-mass star-forming regions, which show a steep increase in the star formation rate per unit area {Sigma}{sub SFR} with increasing {Sigma}, and massive cores forming luminous stars which show a linear relation. We argue that these observations do not require a particular density threshold. The steep dependence of {Sigma}{sub SFR}, approaching unity at protostellar core densities, is a natural result of the increasing importance of self-gravity at high densities along with the corresponding decrease in evolutionary timescales. The linear behavior of {Sigma}{sub SFR} versus {Sigma} in massive cores is consistent with probing dense gas in gravitational collapse, forming stars at a characteristic free-fall timescale given by the use of a particular molecular tracer. The low-mass and high-mass regions show different correlations between gas surface density and the area A spanned at that density, with A {approx} {Sigma}{sup -3} for low-mass regions and A {approx} {Sigma}{sup -1} for the massive cores; this difference, along with the use of differing techniques to measure gas surface density and star formation, suggests that connecting the low-mass regions with massive cores is problematic. We show that the approximately linear relationship between dense gas mass and stellar mass used by Lada et al. similarly does not demand a particular threshold for star formation and requires continuing formation of dense gas. Our results are consistent with molecular clouds forming by galactic hydrodynamic flows with subsequent gravitational collapse.

  18. Statistical approach to nuclear level density

    SciTech Connect

    Sen'kov, R. A.; Horoi, M.; Zelevinsky, V. G.

    2014-10-15

    We discuss the level density in a finite many-body system with strong interaction between the constituents. Our primary object of applications is the atomic nucleus but the same techniques can be applied to other mesoscopic systems. We calculate and compare nuclear level densities for given quantum numbers obtained by different methods, such as nuclear shell model (the most successful microscopic approach), our main instrument - moments method (statistical approach), and Fermi-gas model; the calculation with the moments method can use any shell-model Hamiltonian excluding the spurious states of the center-of-mass motion. Our goal is to investigate statistical properties of nuclear level density, define its phenomenological parameters, and offer an affordable and reliable way of calculation.

  19. Elevational variation in density dependence in a subtropical forest

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Meng; Yu, Shixiao

    2014-01-01

    Density-dependent mortality has been recognized as an important mechanism that underpins tree species diversity, especially in tropical forests. However, few studies have attempted to explore how density dependence varies with spatial scale and even fewer have attempted to identify why there is scale-dependent differentiation. In this study, we explore the elevational variation in density dependence. Three 1-ha permanent plots were established at low and high elevations in the Heishiding subtropical forest, southern China. Using data from 1200 1 m2 seedling quadrats, comprising of 200 1 m2 quadrats located in each 1-ha plot, we examined the variation in density dependence between elevations using a generalized linear mixed model with crossed random effects. A greenhouse experiment also investigated the potential effects of the soil biota on density-dependent differentiation. Our results demonstrated that density-dependent seedling mortality can vary between elevations in subtropical forests. Species found at a lower elevation suffered stronger negative density dependence than those found at a higher elevation. The greenhouse experiment indicated that two species that commonly occur at both elevations suffered more from soilborne pathogens during seed germination and seedling growth when they grew at the lower elevation, which implied that soil pathogens may play a crucial role in density-dependent spatial variation. PMID:25165522

  20. Density-dependent growth in invasive Lionfish (Pterois volitans).

    PubMed

    Benkwitt, Cassandra E

    2013-01-01

    Direct demographic density dependence is necessary for population regulation and is a central concept in ecology, yet has not been studied in many invasive species, including any invasive marine fish. The red lionfish (Pterois volitans) is an invasive predatory marine fish that is undergoing exponential population growth throughout the tropical western Atlantic. Invasive lionfish threaten coral-reef ecosystems, but there is currently no evidence of any natural population control. Therefore, a manipulative field experiment was conducted to test for density dependence in lionfish. Juvenile lionfish densities were adjusted on small reefs and several demographic rates (growth, recruitment, immigration, and loss) were measured throughout an 8-week period. Invasive lionfish exhibited direct density dependence in individual growth rates, as lionfish grew slower at higher densities throughout the study. Individual growth in length declined linearly with increasing lionfish density, while growth in mass declined exponentially with increasing density. There was no evidence, however, for density dependence in recruitment, immigration, or loss (mortality plus emigration) of invasive lionfish. The observed density-dependent growth rates may have implications for which native species are susceptible to lionfish predation, as the size and type of prey that lionfish consume is directly related to their body size. The absence of density-dependent loss, however, contrasts with many native coral-reef fish species and suggests that for the foreseeable future manual removals may be the only effective local control of this invasion. PMID:23825604

  1. Density-Dependent Growth in Invasive Lionfish (Pterois volitans)

    PubMed Central

    Benkwitt, Cassandra E.

    2013-01-01

    Direct demographic density dependence is necessary for population regulation and is a central concept in ecology, yet has not been studied in many invasive species, including any invasive marine fish. The red lionfish (Pterois volitans) is an invasive predatory marine fish that is undergoing exponential population growth throughout the tropical western Atlantic. Invasive lionfish threaten coral-reef ecosystems, but there is currently no evidence of any natural population control. Therefore, a manipulative field experiment was conducted to test for density dependence in lionfish. Juvenile lionfish densities were adjusted on small reefs and several demographic rates (growth, recruitment, immigration, and loss) were measured throughout an 8-week period. Invasive lionfish exhibited direct density dependence in individual growth rates, as lionfish grew slower at higher densities throughout the study. Individual growth in length declined linearly with increasing lionfish density, while growth in mass declined exponentially with increasing density. There was no evidence, however, for density dependence in recruitment, immigration, or loss (mortality plus emigration) of invasive lionfish. The observed density-dependent growth rates may have implications for which native species are susceptible to lionfish predation, as the size and type of prey that lionfish consume is directly related to their body size. The absence of density-dependent loss, however, contrasts with many native coral-reef fish species and suggests that for the foreseeable future manual removals may be the only effective local control of this invasion. PMID:23825604

  2. Simulation of salt migrations in density dependent groundwater flow

    E-print Network

    Vuik, Kees

    Simulation of salt migrations in density dependent groundwater flow E.S. van Baaren Master's Thesis for the salt migration in the groundwater underneath the polders near the coast. The problem description of this thesis is to investigate the possibilities of modelling salt migrations in density dependent groundwater

  3. Skyrmion approach to finite density and temperature

    E-print Network

    Byung-Yoon Park; Vicente Vento

    2009-06-17

    We review an approach, developed over the past few years, to describe hadronic matter at finite density and temperature, whose underlying theoretical framework is the Skyrme model, an effective low energy theory rooted in large $N_c$ QCD. In this approach matter is described by various crystal structures of skyrmions, classical topological solitons carrying baryon number, from which conventional baryons appear by quantization. Chiral and scale symmetries play a crucial role in the dynamics as described by pion, dilaton and vector meson degrees of freedom. When compressed or heated skyrmion matter describes a rich phase diagram which has strong connections with the confinement/deconfinement phase transition.

  4. Density dependence of the nuclear symmetry energy: A microscopic perspective

    SciTech Connect

    Vidana, Isaac; Providencia, Constanca; Polls, Artur; Rios, Arnau

    2009-10-15

    We perform a systematic analysis of the density dependence of nuclear symmetry energy within the microscopic Brueckner-Hartree-Fock (BHF) approach using the realistic Argonne V18 nucleon-nucleon potential plus a phenomenological three-body force of Urbana type. Our results are compared thoroughly with those arising from several Skyrme and relativistic effective models. The values of the parameters characterizing the BHF equation of state of isospin asymmetric nuclear matter fall within the trends predicted by those models and are compatible with recent constraints coming from heavy ion collisions, giant monopole resonances, or isobaric analog states. In particular we find a value of the slope parameter L=66.5 MeV, compatible with recent experimental constraints from isospin diffusion, L=88{+-}25 MeV. The correlation between the neutron skin thickness of neutron-rich isotopes and the slope L and curvature K{sub sym} parameters of the symmetry energy is studied. Our BHF results are in very good agreement with the correlations already predicted by other authors using nonrelativistic and relativistic effective models. The correlations of these two parameters and the neutron skin thickness with the transition density from nonuniform to {beta}-stable matter in neutron stars are also analyzed. Our results confirm that there is an inverse correlation between the neutron skin thickness and the transition density.

  5. Regulation of Aedes aegypti Population Dynamics in Field Systems: Quantifying Direct and Delayed Density Dependence

    PubMed Central

    Walsh, Rachael K.; Aguilar, Cristobal L.; Facchinelli, Luca; Valerio, Laura; Ramsey, Janine M.; Scott, Thomas W.; Lloyd, Alun L.; Gould, Fred

    2013-01-01

    Transgenic strains of Aedes aegypti have been engineered to help control transmission of dengue virus. Although resources have been invested in developing the strains, we lack data on the ecology of mosquitoes that could impact the success of this approach. Although studies of intra-specific competition have been conducted using Ae. aegypti larvae, none of these studies examine mixed age cohorts at densities that occur in the field, with natural nutrient levels. Experiments were conducted in Mexico to determine the impact of direct and delayed density dependence on Ae. aegypti populations. Natural water, food, and larval densities were used to estimate the impacts of density dependence on larval survival, development, and adult body size. Direct and delayed density-dependent factors had a significant impact on larval survival, larval development, and adult body size. These results indicate that control methods attempting to reduce mosquito populations may be counteracted by density-dependent population regulation. PMID:23669230

  6. Prevalence and strength of density-dependent tree recruitment.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Kai; Woodall, Christopher W; Monteiro, Joao V D; Clark, James S

    2015-09-01

    Density dependence could maintain diversity in forests, but studies continue to disagree on its role. Part of the disagreement results from the fact that different studies have evaluated different responses (survival, recruitment, or growth) of different stages (seeds, seedlings, or adults) to different inputs (density of seedlings, density or distance to adults). Most studies are conducted on a single site and thus are difficult to generalize. Using USDA Forest Service's Forest Inventory and Analysis data, we analyzed over a million seedling-to-sapling recruitment observations of 50 species from the eastern United States, controlling for the effects of climate. We focused on the per-seedling recruitment rate, because it is most likely to promote diversity and to be identified in observational or experimental data. To understand the prevalence of density dependence, we quantified the number of species with significant positive or negative effects. To understand the strength of density dependence, we determined the magnitude of effects among con- and heterospecifics, and how it changes with overall species abundance. We found that density dependence is pervasive among the 50 species, as the majority of them have significant effects and mostly negative. Density-dependence effects are stronger from conspecific than heterospecfic adult neighbors, consistent with the predictions of the Janzen-Connell hypothesis. Contrary to recent reports, density-dependence effects are more negative for common than rare species, suggesting disproportionately stronger population regulation in common species. We conclude that density dependence is pervasive, and it is strongest from conspecific neighbors of common species. Our analysis provides direct evidence that density dependence reaulates opulation dynamics of tree species in eastern U.S. forests. PMID:26594690

  7. Constraints on the density dependence of the symmetry energy.

    PubMed

    Tsang, M B; Zhang, Yingxun; Danielewicz, P; Famiano, M; Li, Zhuxia; Lynch, W G; Steiner, A W

    2009-03-27

    Collisions involving 112Sn and 124Sn nuclei have been simulated with the improved quantum molecular dynamics transport model. The results of the calculations reproduce isospin diffusion data from two different observables and the ratios of neutron and proton spectra. By comparing these data to calculations performed over a range of symmetry energies at saturation density and different representations of the density dependence of the symmetry energy, constraints on the density dependence of the symmetry energy at subnormal density are obtained. The results from the present work are compared to constraints put forward in other recent analyses. PMID:19392271

  8. Density-dependent acoustic properties of PBX 9502

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, Geoffrey W; Thompson, Darla G; Deluca, Racci; Hartline, Ernest L; Hagelberg, Stephanie I

    2009-07-31

    We have measured the longitudinal and shear acoustic velocities of PBX 9502 as a function of density for die-pressed samples over the range 1.795 g/cc to 1.888 g/cc. The density dependence of the velocities is linear. Thermal cycling of PBX 9502 is known to induce irreversible volume growth. We have measured this volume growth dependence on density for a subset of the pressed parts and find that the most growth occurs for the samples with lowest initial density. The acoustic velocity changes due to the volume growth are significant and reflect damage in the samples.

  9. Extension and parameterization of high-order density dependence in Skyrme forces

    E-print Network

    Xueyu Xiong; Junchen Pei; Wenjun Chen

    2015-09-25

    The three-body force is indispensable in nuclear energy density functionals which leads to a single density dependent two-body term in the Hartree-Fock approach. We consider the possibility of higher-order density dependence in extended Skyrme forces. As a result, new extended Skyrme parametertizations based on the SLy4 force are obtained in which the high-order term is about 10$\\thicksim$40 percent of strength compared to the original term. This can substantially affect nuclear properties at the high density region in general ways.

  10. Time dependent density functional calculation of plasmon response in clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Feng; Zhang, Feng-Shou; Eric, Suraud

    2003-02-01

    We have introduced a theoretical scheme for the efficient description of the optical response of a cluster based on the time-dependent density functional theory. The practical implementation is done by means of the fully fledged time-dependent local density approximation scheme, which is solved directly in the time domain without any linearization. As an example we consider the simple Na2 cluster and compute its surface plasmon photoabsorption cross section, which is in good agreement with the experiments.

  11. Density dependence of symmetry free energy of hot nuclei

    E-print Network

    S. K. Samaddar; J. N. De; X. Vinas; M. Centelles

    2008-09-04

    The density and excitation energy dependence of symmetry energy and symmetry free energy for finite nuclei are calculated microscopically in a microcanonical framework taking into account thermal and expansion effects. A finite-range momentum and density dependent two-body effective interaction is employed for this purpose. The role of mass, isospin and equation of state (EoS) on these quantities is also investigated; our calculated results are in consonance with the available experimental data.

  12. Evolution of positive and negative density-dependent dispersal.

    PubMed

    Rodrigues, António M M; Johnstone, Rufus A

    2014-09-22

    Understanding the evolution of density-dependent dispersal strategies has been a major challenge for evolutionary ecologists. Some existing models suggest that selection should favour positive and others negative density-dependence in dispersal. Here, we develop a general model that shows how and why selection may shift from positive to negative density-dependence in response to key ecological factors, in particular the temporal stability of the environment. We find that in temporally stable environments, particularly with low dispersal costs and large group sizes, habitat heterogeneity selects for negative density-dependent dispersal, whereas in temporally variable environments, particularly with high dispersal costs and small group sizes, habitat heterogeneity selects for positive density-dependent dispersal. This shift reflects the changing balance between the greater competition for breeding opportunities in more productive patches, versus the greater long-term value of offspring that establish themselves there, the latter being very sensitive to the temporal stability of the environment. In general, dispersal of individuals out of low-density patches is much more sensitive to habitat heterogeneity than is dispersal out of high-density patches. PMID:25100700

  13. Dynamical instabilities in density-dependent hadronic relativistic models

    SciTech Connect

    Santos, A. M.; Brito, L.; Providencia, C.

    2008-04-15

    Unstable modes in asymmetric nuclear matter (ANM) at subsaturation densities are studied in the framework of relativistic mean-field density-dependent hadron models. The size of the instabilities that drive the system are calculated and a comparison with results obtained within the nonlinear Walecka model is presented. The distillation and antidistillation effects are discussed.

  14. Spatial variation and density-dependent dispersal in competitive coexistence.

    PubMed Central

    Amarasekare, Priyanga

    2004-01-01

    It is well known that dispersal from localities favourable to a species' growth and reproduction (sources) can prevent competitive exclusion in unfavourable localities (sinks). What is perhaps less well known is that too much emigration can undermine the viability of sources and cause regional competitive exclusion. Here, I investigate two biological mechanisms that reduce the cost of dispersal to source communities. The first involves increasing the spatial variation in the strength of competition such that sources can withstand high rates of emigration; the second involves reducing emigration from sources via density-dependent dispersal. I compare how different forms of spatial variation and modes of dispersal influence source viability, and hence source-sink coexistence, under dominance and pre-emptive competition. A key finding is that, while spatial variation substantially reduces dispersal costs under both types of competition, density-dependent dispersal does so only under dominance competition. For instance, when spatial variation in the strength of competition is high, coexistence is possible (regardless of the type of competition) even when sources experience high emigration rates; when spatial variation is low, coexistence is restricted even under low emigration rates. Under dominance competition, density-dependent dispersal has a strong effect on coexistence. For instance, when the emigration rate increases with density at an accelerating rate (Type III density-dependent dispersal), coexistence is possible even when spatial variation is quite low; when the emigration rate increases with density at a decelerating rate (Type II density-dependent dispersal), coexistence is restricted even when spatial variation is quite high. Under pre-emptive competition, density-dependent dispersal has only a marginal effect on coexistence. Thus, the diversity-reducing effects of high dispersal rates persist under pre-emptive competition even when dispersal is density dependent, but can be significantly mitigated under dominance competition if density-dependent dispersal is Type III rather than Type II. These results lead to testable predictions about source-sink coexistence under different regimes of competition, spatial variation and dispersal. They identify situations in which density-independent dispersal provides a reasonable approximation to species' dispersal patterns, and those under which consideration of density-dependent dispersal is crucial to predicting long-term coexistence. PMID:15306322

  15. Evolution of behavior by density-dependent natural selection

    SciTech Connect

    Pingzhong Guo; Mueller, L.D.; Ayala, F.J. )

    1991-12-01

    Theories of density-dependent natural selection predict that evolution should favor those genotypes with the highest per capita rates of population growth under the current density conditions. These theories are silent about the mechanisms that may give rise to these increases in density-dependent growth rates. The authors have observed the evolution of six populations of Drosophila melanogaster recently placed in crowded environments after nearly 200 generations at low-population density in the laboratory. After 25 generations in these crowded cultures all six populations showed the predicted increase in population growth rates at high-population density with the concomitant decrease in their growth rates at low densities. These changes in rates of population growth are accompanied by changes in the feeding and pupation behavior of the larvae: those populations that have evolve at high-population densities have higher feeding rates and are less likely to pupate on or near the food surface than populations maintained at low densities. A detailed understanding of the mechanisms by which populations evolve under density-dependent natural selection will provide a framework for understanding that nature of trade-offs in life history evolution.

  16. Anthropogenically-Mediated Density Dependence in a Declining Farmland Bird

    PubMed Central

    Dunn, Jenny C.; Hamer, Keith C.; Benton, Tim G.

    2015-01-01

    Land management intrinsically influences the distribution of animals and can consequently alter the potential for density-dependent processes to act within populations. For declining species, high densities of breeding territories are typically considered to represent productive populations. However, as density-dependent effects of food limitation or predator pressure may occur (especially when species are dependent upon separate nesting and foraging habitats), high territory density may limit per-capita productivity. Here, we use a declining but widespread European farmland bird, the yellowhammer Emberiza citrinella L., as a model system to test whether higher territory densities result in lower fledging success, parental provisioning rates or nestling growth rates compared to lower densities. Organic landscapes held higher territory densities, but nests on organic farms fledged fewer nestlings, translating to a 5 times higher rate of population shrinkage on organic farms compared to conventional. In addition, when parental provisioning behaviour was not restricted by predation risk (i.e., at times of low corvid activity), nestling provisioning rates were higher at lower territory densities, resulting in a much greater increase in nestling mass in low density areas, suggesting that food limitation occurred at high densities. These findings in turn suggest an ecological trap, whereby preferred nesting habitat does not provide sufficient food for rearing nestlings at high population density, creating a population sink. Habitat management for farmland birds should focus not simply on creating a high nesting density, but also on ensuring heterogeneous habitats to provide food resources in close proximity to nesting birds, even if this occurs through potentially restricting overall nest density but increasing population-level breeding success. PMID:26431173

  17. Multiphoton ionization and high-order harmonic generation of He, Ne, and Ar atoms in intense pulsed laser fields: Self-interaction-free time-dependent density-functional theoretical approach

    E-print Network

    Chu, Shih-I; Tong, Xiao-Min

    2001-06-12

    We present a detailed study of the multiphoton ionization and high-order harmonic generation (HHG) processes of rare-gas atoms (He, Ne, and Ar) in intense pulsed laser fields by means of a self-interaction-free time-dependent density...

  18. Female elk contacts are neither frequency nor density dependent

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cross, Paul C.; Creech, Tyler G.; Ebinger, Michael R.; Manlove, Kezia R.; Irvine, Kathryn M.; Henningsen, John C.; Rogerson, Jared D.; Scurlock, Brandon M.; Creely, Scott

    2013-01-01

    Identifying drivers of contact rates among individuals is critical to understanding disease dynamics and implementing targeted control measures. We studied the interaction patterns of 149 female elk (Cervus canadensis) distributed across five different regions of western Wyoming over three years, defining a contact as an approach within one body length (?2 m). Using hierarchical models that account for correlations within individuals, pairs, and groups, we found that pairwise contact rates within a group declined by a factor of three as group sizes increased 33-fold. Per capita contact rates, however, increased with group size according to a power function, such that female elk contact rates fell in between the predictions of density- or frequency-dependent disease models. We found similar patterns for the duration of contacts. Our results suggest that larger elk groups are likely to play a disproportionate role in the disease dynamics of directly transmitted infections in elk. Supplemental feeding of elk had a limited impact on pairwise interaction rates and durations, but per capita rates were more than two times higher on feeding grounds. Our statistical approach decomposes the variation in contact rate into individual, dyadic, and environmental effects, and provides insight into factors that may be targeted by disease control programs. In particular, female elk contact patterns were driven more by environmental factors such as group size than by either individual or dyad effects.

  19. Density Dependence of Transport Coefficients from Holographic Hydrodynamics

    E-print Network

    Xian-Hui Ge; Yoshinori Matsuo; Fu-Wen Shu; Sang-Jin Sin; Takuya Tsukioka

    2008-07-07

    We study the transport coefficients of Quark-Gluon-Plasma in finite temperature and finite baryon density. We use AdS/QCD of charged AdS black hole background with bulk-filling branes identifying the U(1) charge as the baryon number. We calculate the diffusion constant, the shear viscosity and the thermal conductivity to plot their density and temperature dependences. Hydrodynamic relations between those are shown to hold exactly. The diffusion constant and the shear viscosity are decreasing as a function of density for fixed total energy. For fixed temperature, the fluid becomes less diffusible and more viscous for larger baryon density.

  20. Transverse momentum dependent quark densities from Lattice QCD

    SciTech Connect

    Bernhard Musch,Philipp Hagler,John Negele,Andreas Schafer

    2011-02-01

    We study transverse momentum dependent parton distribution functions (TMDs) with non-local operators in lattice QCD, using MILC/LHPC lattices. Results obtained with a simpli?ed operator geometry show visible dipole de- formations of spin-dependent quark momentum densities. We discuss the basic concepts of the method, including renormalization of the gauge link, and an ex- tension to a more elaborate operator geometry that would allow us to analyze process-dependent TMDs such as the Sivers-function.

  1. Time-dependent density functional theory based Ehrenfest dynamics.

    PubMed

    Wang, Fan; Yam, Chi Yung; Hu, LiHong; Chen, GuanHua

    2011-07-28

    Time-dependent density functional theory based Ehrenfest dynamics with atom-centered basis functions is developed in present work. The equation of motion for electrons is formulated in terms of first-order reduced density matrix and an additional term arises due to the time-dependence of basis functions through their dependence on nuclear coordinates. This time-dependence of basis functions together with the imaginary part of density matrix leads to an additional term for nuclear force. The effects of the two additional terms are examined by studying the dynamics of H(2) and C(2)H(4), and it is concluded that the inclusion of these two terms is essential for correct electronic and nuclear dynamics. PMID:21806109

  2. Density dependence and the spread of anthelmintic resistance.

    PubMed

    Churcher, Thomas S; Basáñez, María-Gloria

    2008-03-01

    Variation in the strength of selection pressures acting upon different subpopulations may cause density-dependent regulatory processes to act differentially on particular genotypes and may influence the rate of selection of adaptive traits. Using host-helminth parasite systems as examples, we investigate the impact of different positive and negative density dependence on the potential spread of anthelmintic resistance. Following chemotherapy, the negative density-dependent processes restricting parasite population growth will be relaxed, increasing the genetic contribution of resistant parasites to the next generation. Simple deterministic models of directly transmitted nematodes that merge population dynamics and genetics show that the frequency of drug-resistant alleles may increase faster in species whose population size is down-regulated by density-dependent parasite fecundity than in species with density-dependent establishment or parasite mortality. A genetically structured population dynamics model of an indirectly transmitted nematode is used to highlight how population regulation will influence the resistance allele frequency in different parasite lifestages. Results indicate that surveys aimed at monitoring the evolution of drug resistance should consider carefully which life stage to sample, and the time following treatment samples should be collected. Anthelmintic resistance offers a good opportunity to apply fundamental evolutionary and ecological principles to the management of a potentially crucial public health problem. PMID:17983465

  3. A Wigner Monte Carlo approach to density functional theory

    SciTech Connect

    Sellier, J.M. Dimov, I.

    2014-08-01

    In order to simulate quantum N-body systems, stationary and time-dependent density functional theories rely on the capacity of calculating the single-electron wave-functions of a system from which one obtains the total electron density (Kohn–Sham systems). In this paper, we introduce the use of the Wigner Monte Carlo method in ab-initio calculations. This approach allows time-dependent simulations of chemical systems in the presence of reflective and absorbing boundary conditions. It also enables an intuitive comprehension of chemical systems in terms of the Wigner formalism based on the concept of phase-space. Finally, being based on a Monte Carlo method, it scales very well on parallel machines paving the way towards the time-dependent simulation of very complex molecules. A validation is performed by studying the electron distribution of three different systems, a Lithium atom, a Boron atom and a hydrogenic molecule. For the sake of simplicity, we start from initial conditions not too far from equilibrium and show that the systems reach a stationary regime, as expected (despite no restriction is imposed in the choice of the initial conditions). We also show a good agreement with the standard density functional theory for the hydrogenic molecule. These results demonstrate that the combination of the Wigner Monte Carlo method and Kohn–Sham systems provides a reliable computational tool which could, eventually, be applied to more sophisticated problems.

  4. Effect of the density dependent symmetry energy on fragmentation

    E-print Network

    Vinayak, Karan Singh

    2011-01-01

    The effect of the density dependence of symmetry energy on fragmentation is studied using isospin-dependent quantum molecular dynamics model(IQMD) Model. We have used the reduced isospin-dependent cross-section with soft equation of state to explain the experimental findings for the system 79_Au^197 + 79_Au^197 for the full colliding geometry. In addition to that we have tried to study the collective response of the momentum dependent interactions(MDI) and symmetry energy towards the multifragmentation

  5. Parity dependence of level densities in sup 49 V

    SciTech Connect

    York, B.W.

    1991-01-01

    In this research, we have studied {sup 48}Ti(p, p{sub 1}) and {sup 48}(p, p{sub 1}{gamma}) in an effort to determine the dependence of level densities on parity in the compound nucleus {sup 49}V. This nuclide was chosen because of the high level density of the {sup 49}V system (leading to good statistical accuracy) and because the target is zero spin (making the assignment of J easier). 5 refs., 3 figs.

  6. Time-dependent density functional theory for quantum transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwok, Yanho; Zhang, Yu; Chen, GuanHua

    2014-12-01

    The rapid miniaturization of electronic devices motivates research interests in quantum transport. Recently time-dependent quantum transport has become an important research topic. Here we review recent progresses in the development of time-dependent density-functional theory for quantum transport including the theoretical foundation and numerical algorithms. In particular, the reduced-single electron density matrix based hierarchical equation of motion, which can be derived from Liouville-von Neumann equation, is reviewed in details. The numerical implementation is discussed and simulation results of realistic devices will be given.

  7. Fitness and density-dependent population growth in Drosophila melanogaster

    SciTech Connect

    Mueller, L.D.; Ayala, F.J.

    1981-03-01

    The density-dependent rates of population growth were determined for 26 populations of Drosophila melanogaster maintained in the serial transfer system. Twenty-five populations were homozygous for an entire chromosome 2 sampled from nature; the other was a random heterozygous population. Rates of population growth around the carrying capacity cannot explain the large fitness depression of these lines. However, the homozygous lines show large differences in rates of population growth at low densities relative to the random heterozygous standard. The average relative fitness of the homozygous lines, as determined from the growth rates at the lowest density, is 0.51.

  8. Hartree Fock Calculations in the Density Matrix Expansion Approach

    E-print Network

    F. Hofmann; H. Lenske

    1997-05-28

    The density matrix expansion is used to derive a local energy density functional for finite range interactions with a realistic meson exchange structure. Exchange contributions are treated in a local momentum approximation. A generalized Slater approximation is used for the density matrix where an effective local Fermi momentum is chosen such that the next to leading order off-diagonal term is canceled. Hartree-Fock equations are derived incorporating the momentum structure of the underlying finite range interaction. For applications a density dependent effective interaction is determined from a G-matrix which is renormalized such that the saturation properties of symmetric nuclear matter are reproduced. Intending applications to systems far off stability special attention is paid to the low density regime and asymmetric nuclear matter. Results are compared to predictions obtained from Skyrme interactions. The ground state properties of stable nuclei are well reproduced without further adjustments of parameters. The potential of the approach is further exemplified in calculations for A=100...140 tin isotopes. Rather extended neutron skins are found beyond 130Sn corresponding to solid layers of neutron matter surrounding a core of normal composition.

  9. Density-dependent nest predation in waterfowl: the relative importance of nest density versus nest dispersion

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ackerman, Joshua T.; Ringelman, KM; Eadie, J.M.

    2012-01-01

    When nest predation levels are very high or very low, the absolute range of observable nest success is constrained (a floor/ceiling effect), and it may be more difficult to detect density-dependent nest predation. Density-dependent nest predation may be more detectable in years with moderate predation rates, simply because there can be a greater absolute difference in nest success between sites. To test this, we replicated a predation experiment 10 years after the original study, using both natural and artificial nests, comparing a year when overall rates of nest predation were high (2000) to a year with moderate nest predation (2010). We found no evidence for density-dependent predation on artificial nests in either year, indicating that nest predation is not density-dependent at the spatial scale of our experimental replicates (1-ha patches). Using nearest-neighbor distances as a measure of nest dispersion, we also found little evidence for “dispersion-dependent” predation on artificial nests. However, when we tested for dispersion-dependent predation using natural nests, we found that nest survival increased with shorter nearest-neighbor distances, and that neighboring nests were more likely to share the same nest fate than non-adjacent nests. Thus, at small spatial scales, density-dependence appears to operate in the opposite direction as predicted: closer nearest neighbors are more likely to be successful. We suggest that local nest dispersion, rather than larger-scale measures of nest density per se, may play a more important role in density-dependent nest predation.

  10. Evaporation Prescription for Time-Dependent Density Functional Calculations

    E-print Network

    Yoritaka Iwata; Sophia Heinz

    2012-09-25

    Collisions between $^{248}$Cm and $^{48}$Ca are systematically calculated by time-dependent density functional calculations with evaporation prescription. Depending on the incident energy and impact parameter, fusion, fusion-fission, and quasi-fission events are expected to appear. In this paper, the evaporation prescription is introduced, which is expected to be rather important to heavy-ion reactions producing superheavy nuclei, where the heavier total mass can be related to the higher total excitation energy.

  11. Multivariate Density Estimation: An SVM Approach

    E-print Network

    Mukherjee, Sayan

    1999-04-01

    We formulate density estimation as an inverse operator problem. We then use convergence results of empirical distribution functions to true distribution functions to develop an algorithm for multivariate density estimation. ...

  12. FITNESS AND DENSITY-DEPENDENT POPULATION GROWTH IN DROSOPHILA MELANOGASTER

    E-print Network

    Mueller, Laurence D.

    FITNESS AND DENSITY-DEPENDENT POPULATION GROWTH IN DROSOPHILA MELANOGASTER LAURENCE D. MUELLER of population growth were determined for 26 populations of Drosophila melanogaster maintained in the serial; the other was a random heterozygous population. Rates of population growth around the carrying capacity

  13. Time-dependent Partition Density-functional Theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mosquera, Martin; Wasserman, Adam

    2012-02-01

    We present an extension of time-dependent density functional theory that allows to partition the time-dependent external potential in terms of localized molecular fragment potentials. As a consequence, localized time-dependent densities arise for each molecular fragment. To enforce the condition that the sum of fragments must add up to the exact total density, a new quantity termed ``time-dependent partition potential'' is introduced. The Runge-Gross theorem is employed to show that there is a quasi one-to-one correspondence between the partition potential and the electronic density. The corresponding quantum-mechanical actions are derived by using the van Leeuwen's action and are used to derive a decomposition of the partition potential which allows for practical approximations. Linear response formulas are deduced to obtain the transition energies, and an approximation is suggested to obtain localized excitations in large molecular systems. Finally, numerical illustration of our theory is shown for one-dimensional fermions under the influence of a laser field.

  14. SHORT COMMUNICATION High temperature intensifies negative density dependence

    E-print Network

    Blouin-Demers, Gabriel

    thus modulate density-dependent processes in ectotherms. Therefore, models of pop- ulation growth for ectotherms should incorporate the effects of temperature. Introduction Competition is an important mechanism a limiting factor for all ectotherms, as they rely on environmental temperature to maintain internal body

  15. Linear-response thermal time-dependent density functional theory

    E-print Network

    Aurora Pribram-Jones; Paul E. Grabowski; Kieron Burke

    2015-09-10

    The van Leeuwen proof of linear-response time-dependent density functional theory (TDDFT) is generalized to thermal ensembles. This allows generalization to finite temperatures of the Gross-Kohn relation, the exchange-correlation kernel of TDDFT, and fluctuation dissipation theorem for DFT. This produces a natural method for generating new thermal exchange-correlation (XC) approximations.

  16. Selection on Gamete Recognition Proteins Depends on Sex, Density,

    E-print Network

    McQuade, D. Tyler

    Selection on Gamete Recognition Proteins Depends on Sex, Density, and Genotype Frequency Don R. Levitan* and David L. Ferrell* Gamete recognition proteins can evolve at astonishing rates and lie at the heart of reproductive isolation and speciation in diverse taxa. However, the source of selection driving

  17. Energy and Centrality Dependence of Rapidity Densities at RHIC

    E-print Network

    Xin-Nian Wang; Mikols Gyulassy

    2001-04-03

    The energy and centrality dependence of the charged multiplicity per participant nucleon is shown to be able to differentiate between final-state saturation and fixed scale pQCD models of initial entropy production in high-energy heavy-ion collisions. The energy dependence is shown to test the nuclear enhancement of the mini-jet component of the initial conditions, while the centrality dependence provides a key test of whether gluon saturation is reached at RHIC energies. HIJING model predicts that the rapidity density per participant increases with centrality, while the saturation model prediction is essentially independent of centrality.

  18. Two Approaches for Tomographic Density Imaging Using Inverse Scattering

    E-print Network

    Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, University of

    Two Approaches for Tomographic Density Imaging Using Inverse Scattering Roberto J. Lavarello for density imaging using inverse scattering were explored through simulations in order to evaluate], diffraction tomography [2], and inverse scattering methods [3] have been developed to reconstruct quantitative

  19. Density of biogas digestate depending on temperature and composition.

    PubMed

    Gerber, Mandy; Schneider, Nico

    2015-09-01

    Density is one of the most important physical properties of biogas digestate to ensure an optimal dimensioning and a precise design of biogas plant components like stirring devices, pumps and heat exchangers. In this study the density of biogas digestates with different compositions was measured using pycnometers at ambient pressure in a temperature range from 293.15 to 313.15K. The biogas digestates were taken from semi-continuous experiments, in which the marine microalga Nannochloropsis salina, corn silage and a mixture of both were used as feedstocks. The results show an increase of density with increasing total solid content and a decrease with increasing temperature. Three equations to calculate the density of biogas digestate were set up depending on temperature as well as on the total solid content, organic composition and elemental composition, respectively. All correlations show a relative deviation below 1% compared to experimental data. PMID:26026294

  20. Density-functional fidelity approach to quantum phase transitions

    E-print Network

    Shi-Jian Gu

    2008-09-23

    We propose a new approach to quantum phase transitions in terms of the density-functional fidelity, which measures the similarity between density distributions of two ground states in parameter space. The key feature of the approach, as we will show, is that the density-functional fidelity can be measured easily in experiments. Both the validity and versatility of the approach are checked by the Lipkin-Meshkov-Glick model and the one-dimensional Hubbard model.

  1. Phase behavior of density-dependent pair potentials.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Shiqi

    2008-03-14

    Phase diagram is calculated by a recently proposed third-order thermodynamic perturbation theory (TPT) for fluid phase and a recently proposed first-order TPT for solid phases; the underlying interparticle potential consists of a hard sphere repulsion and a perturbation tail of an attractive inverse power law type or Yukawa type whose range varies with bulk densities. It is found that besides usual phase transitions associated with density-independent potentials, the density dependence of the perturbation tail evokes some additional novel phase transitions including isostructural solid-solid transition and liquid-liquid transition. Novel triple points are also exhibited which includes stable fluid (vapor or liquid)-face-centered cubic(fcc)-fcc and liquid-liquid-fcc, metastable liquid-body-centered cubic(bcc)-bcc. It also is found that the phase diagram sensitively depends on the density dependence and the concrete mathematical form of the underlying potentials. Some of the disclosed novel transitions has been observed experimentally in complex fluids and molecular liquids, while others still remain to be experimentally verified. PMID:18345910

  2. Possible density dependent local variations in the IMF

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kavila, Indulekha; George, Babitha

    2015-08-01

    Variations in the IMF have been reported within open clusters (signifying mass segregation), between globular clusters, within galaxies and between galaxies. Most stars are considered to form in a clustered mode. However, the surface density of YSO's shows a wide range and it is also considered that stars form in the clustered mode only at the peaks of the surface density. The bound cluster formation efficiency in galaxies is observed to be correlated with the Star Formation Rate density which itself is seen to be correlated with the gas surface density by the Kennicutt Schmidt law.Observationally, dense cores in molecular clouds - which go on to produce stars - have a mass spectrum that is broadly consistent with a Salpeter slope of -1.35 at the high mass end. In simulations of clouds with Gaussian fluctuations it is seen that the mass spectrum of peaks which collapse are approximately log-normal, peaking roughly at the average Jeans' mass in the cloud. We explore a possible way in which the IMF could depend on the local gas density. The extent of the variations that can be caused by such a dependence is explored. The IMFs of the sample clusters that are generated are compared with the IMFs of observed clusters and also against radial trends reported in galaxies.

  3. Intraspecific variation in the strength of density dependence in aphid populations

    E-print Network

    Underwood, Nora

    independent density manipulations of milkweed aphids (Aphis nerii) in laboratory and field experiments syriaca, density dependence, density manipulation experiment, logistic population growth, milkweed, plant

  4. Density dependence of isospin observables in spinodal decomposition

    E-print Network

    M. Colonna; F. Matera

    2008-05-15

    Isotopic fluctuations in fragment formation are investigated in a quasi-analytical description of the spinodal decomposition scenario. By exploiting the fluctuation-dissipation relations the covariance matrix of density fluctuations is derived as a function of the wave vector for nuclear matter at given values of density, charge asymmetry, temperature, and of the time that the system spends in the instability region. Then density fluctuations in ordinary space are implemented with a Fourier transform performed in a finite cubic lattice. Inside this box, domains with different density coexist, from which clusters of nucleons eventually emerge. Within our approach, the isotopic distributions are determined by the N/Z ratio of the leading unstable isoscalarlike mode and by isovectorlike fluctuations present in the matter undergoing the spinodal decomposition. Hence the average value of the N/Z ratio of clusters and the width of the relative distribution reflect the properties of the symmetry energy. Generating a large number of events, these calculations allow a careful investigation of the cluster isotopic content as a function of the cluster density. A uniform decrease of the average charge asymmetry and of the width of the isotopic distributions with increasing density is observed. Finally we remark that the results essentially refer to the early break--up of the system.

  5. Excitons in Time-Dependent Density-Functional Theory.

    PubMed

    Ullrich, Carsten A; Yang, Zeng-hui

    2016-01-01

    This chapter gives an overview of the description of the optical and dielectric properties of bulk insulators and semiconductors in time-dependent density-functional theory (TDDFT), with an emphasis on excitons. We review the linear-response formalism for periodic solids, discuss excitonic exchange-correlation kernels, calculate exciton binding energies for various materials, and compare the treatment of excitons with TDDFT and with the Bethe-Salpeter equation. PMID:25805143

  6. Density Versions of Plunnecke Inequality Epsilon-Delta Approach

    E-print Network

    Jin, Renling

    Density Versions of Pl¨unnecke Inequality ­ Epsilon-Delta Approach Renling Jin Abstract We discuss whether Pl¨unnecke's inequality for Shnirel'man density with respect to Shnirel'man basis can be generalized to other densities with respect to other con- cepts of basis. We show behavioral disparities

  7. Effect of tensor force on density dependence of symmetry energy within the BHF Framework

    E-print Network

    Pei Wang; Wei Zuo

    2014-04-06

    The effect of tensor force on the density dependence of nuclear symmetry energy has been investigated within the framework of the Brueckner-Hartree-Fock approach. It is shown that the tensor force manifests its effect via the tensor $^3SD_1$ channel. The density dependence of symmetry energy $E_{sym}$ turns out to be determined essentially by the tensor force from the $\\pi$ meson and $\\rho$ meson exchanges via the $^3SD_1$ coupled channel. Increasing the strength of the tensor component due to the $\\rho$-meson exchange tends to enhance the repulsion of the equation of state of symmetric nuclear matter and leads to reduction of symmetry energy. The present results confirm the dominant role played by the tensor force in determining nuclear symmetry energy and its density dependence within the microscopic BHF framework.

  8. A Density Difference Based Analysis of Orbital--Dependent Exchange--Correlation Functionals

    E-print Network

    Grabowski, I; Fabiano, E; Smiga, S; Buksztel, A; Della Sala, F

    2013-01-01

    We present a density difference based analysis for a range of orbital--dependent Kohn--Sham functionals. Results for atoms, some members of the neon isoelectronic series and small molecules are reported and compared with ab initio wave-function calculations. Particular attention is paid to the quality of approximations to the exchange--only optimized effective potential (OEP) approach: we consider both the Localized Hartree Fock as well as the Krieger-Li-Iafrate methods. Analysis of density differences at the exchange--only level reveals the impact the approximations have on the resulting electronic densities. These differences are further quantified in terms of the ground state energies, frontier orbital energy differences and highest occupied orbital energies obtained. At the correlated level an OEP approach based on a perturbative second--order correlation energy expression is shown to deliver results comparable with those from traditional wave function approaches, making it suitable for use as a benchmark...

  9. Density Functional Theory Approach to Nuclear Fission

    E-print Network

    N. Schunck

    2013-01-20

    The Skyrme nuclear energy density functional theory (DFT) is used to model neutron-induced fission in actinides. This paper focuses on the numerical implementation of the theory. In particular, it reports recent advances in DFT code development on leadership class computers, and presents a detailed analysis of the numerical accuracy of DFT solvers for near-scission calculations.

  10. Does habitat quality affect density-dependent habitat selection by Tribolium castaneum?

    E-print Network

    Blouin-Demers, Gabriel

    Does habitat quality affect density-dependent habitat selection by Tribolium II. ABSTRACT Density-dependent habitat selection inherently relies on the relationship between population density and fitness in different habitats. Habitats

  11. Density-dependent dispersal and spatial population dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Ims, Rolf A; Andreassen, Harry P

    2005-01-01

    The synchronization of the dynamics of spatially subdivided populations is of both fundamental and applied interest in population biology. Based on theoretical studies, dispersal movements have been inferred to be one of the most general causes of population synchrony, yet no empirical study has mapped distance-dependent estimates of movement rates on the actual pattern of synchrony in species that are known to exhibit population synchrony. Northern vole and lemming species are particularly well-known for their spatially synchronized population dynamics. Here, we use results from an experimental study to demonstrate that tundra vole dispersal movements did not act to synchronize population dynamics in fragmented habitats. In contrast to the constant dispersal rate assumed in earlier theoretical studies, the tundra vole, and many other species, exhibit negative density-dependent dispersal. Simulations of a simple mathematical model, parametrized on the basis of our experimental data, verify the empirical results, namely that the observed negative density-dependent dispersal did not have a significant synchronizing effect. PMID:16024345

  12. Nuclear 'pasta' phase within density dependent hadronic models

    SciTech Connect

    Avancini, S. S.; Marinelli, J. R.; Menezes, D. P.; Moraes, M. M. W. de; Brito, L.; Providencia, C.; Santos, A. M.

    2009-03-15

    In the present paper, we investigate the onset of the 'pasta' phase with different parametrizations of the density dependent hadronic model and compare the results with one of the usual parametrizations of the nonlinear Walecka model. The influence of the scalar-isovector virtual {delta} meson is shown. At zero temperature, two different methods are used, one based on coexistent phases and the other on the Thomas-Fermi approximation. At finite temperature, only the coexistence phases method is used. npe matter with fixed proton fractions and in {beta} equilibrium are studied. We compare our results with restrictions imposed on the values of the density and pressure at the inner edge of the crust, obtained from observations of the Vela pulsar and recent isospin diffusion data from heavy-ion reactions, and with predictions from spinodal calculations.

  13. Limits for density dependent time inhomogeneous Markov processes.

    PubMed

    Smith, Andrew G

    2015-10-01

    A new functional law of large numbers to approximate a time inhomogeneous Markov process that is only density dependent in the limit as an index parameter goes to infinity is developed. This extends previous results by other authors to a broader class of Markov processes while relaxing some of the conditions required for those results to hold. This result is applied to a stochastic metapopulation model that accounts for spatial structure as well as within patch dynamics with the novel addition of time dependent dynamics. The resulting nonautonomous differential equation is analysed to provide conditions for extinction and persistence for a number of examples. This condition shows that the migration of a species will positively impact the reproduction in less populated areas while negatively impacting densely populated areas. PMID:26260102

  14. Stochastic seasonality and nonlinear density-dependent factors regulate population size in an African rodent

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Leirs, H.; Stenseth, N.C.; Nichols, J.D.; Hines, J.E.; Verhagen, R.; Verheyen, W.

    1997-01-01

    Ecology has long been troubled by the controversy over how populations are regulated. Some ecologists focus on the role of environmental effects, whereas others argue that density-dependent feedback mechanisms are central. The relative importance of both processes is still hotly debated, but clear examples of both processes acting in the same population are rare. Keyfactor analysis (regression of population changes on possible causal factors) and time-series analysis are often used to investigate the presence of density dependence, but such approaches may be biased and provide no information on actual demographic rates. Here we report on both density-dependent and density-independent effects in a murid rodent pest species, the multimammate rat Mastomys natalensis (Smith, 1834), using statistical capture-recapture models. Both effects occur simultaneously, but we also demonstrate that they do not affect all demographic rates in the same way. We have incorporated the obtained estimates of demographic rates in a population dynamics model and show that the observed dynamics are affected by stabilizing nonlinear density-dependent components coupled with strong deterministic and stochastic seasonal components.

  15. The current density in quantum electrodynamics in time-dependent external potentials and the Schwinger effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zahn, Jochen

    2015-11-01

    In the framework of quantum electrodynamics (QED) in external potentials, we introduce a method to compute the time-dependence of the expectation value of the current density for time-dependent homogeneous external electric fields. We apply it to the so-called Sauter pulse. For late times, our results agree with the asymptotic value due to electron-positron pair production. We correct a general expression derived by Serber for the expectation value of the current, linearized in the external field, and compare with our results for the Sauter pulse. Based on the properties of the current density, we argue that the appearance of enhanced quasi-particle densities at intermediate times in slowly varying sub-critical potentials is generic. Also an alternative approach, which circumvents these difficulties, is sketched.

  16. Hypernclear in the improved quark mass density- dependent model

    E-print Network

    Chen Wu; Yu-Gang Ma; Wei-Liang Qian; Ru-Keng Su

    2012-06-30

    The improved quark mass density- dependent model, which has been successfully used to describe the properties of both finite nuclei and bulk nuclear matter, is extended to include the strange quark. The parameters of the model are determined by the saturation properties of bulk matter. Then the given parameter set is employed to investigate both the properties of strange hadronic matter and those of $\\Lambda$ hypernuclei. Bulk strange hadronic matter consisting of nucleons, $\\Lambda$- hyperons and $\\Xi$- hyperons is studied under mean-field approximation. Among others, density dependence of the effective baryon mass, saturation properties and stability of the physical system are discussed. For single-$\\Lambda$ hypernuclei, single particle energies of $\\Lambda$ hyperon is evaluated. In particular, it is found that the present model produces a small spin-orbit interaction, which is in agreement with the experimental observations. The above results show that the present model can consistently describe the properties of strange hadronic matter, as well as those of single $\\Lambda$ hypernuclei within an uniform parameterization.

  17. Linear-response calculation in the time-dependent density functional theory

    SciTech Connect

    Nakatsukasa, Takashi; Inakura, Tsunenori; Avogadro, Paolo; Ebata, Shuichiro; Sato, Koichi; Yabana, Kazuhiro

    2012-11-12

    Linear response calculations based on the time-dependent density-functional theory are presented. Especially, we report results of the finite amplitude method which we have recently proposed as an alternative and feasible approach to the (quasiparticle-)random-phase approximation. Calculated properties of the giant resonances and low-energy E1 modes are discussed. We found a universal linear correlation between the low-energy E1 strength and the neutron skin thickness.

  18. The dependence of ZnO photoluminescence efficiency on excitation conditions and defect densities

    SciTech Connect

    Simmons, Jay G.; Liu, Jie; Foreman, John V.; Everitt, Henry O.

    2013-11-11

    The quantum efficiencies of both the band edge and deep-level defect emission from annealed ZnO powders were measured as a function of excitation fluence and wavelength from a tunable sub-picosecond source. A simple model of excitonic decay reproduces the observed excitation dependence of rate constants and associated trap densities for all radiative and nonradiative processes. The analysis explores how phosphor performance deteriorates as excitation fluence and energy increase, provides an all-optical approach for estimating the number density of defects responsible for deep-level emission, and yields new insights for designing efficient ZnO-based phosphors.

  19. Host selection by an insect herbivore with spatially variable density dependence.

    PubMed

    Wetzel, William C; Strong, Donald R

    2015-11-01

    Many species of phytophagous insects do not oviposit preferentially on plants that yield high offspring performance. One proposed explanation is that negatively density-dependent offspring performance would select for females that disperse eggs among plants to minimize competition. Recent work showing larval density dependence often varies substantially among plants suggests that ovipositing females should not only respond to the density of competitors but also to traits predictive of the strength of density dependence mediated by plants. In this study, we used field and greenhouse experiments to examine oviposition behavior in an insect herbivore that experiences density-dependent larval performance and variability in the strength of that density dependence among host-plant individuals. We found females moved readily among plants in the field and had strong preferences for plants that mediate weak offspring density dependence. Females, however, did not avoid plants with high densities of competitors, despite the fact that offspring performance declines steeply with density on most plants in natural populations. This means females minimize the effects of density dependence on their offspring by choosing plants that mediate only weak larval density dependence, not by choosing plants with low densities of competitors. Our results suggest that explaining the lack of positive preference-performance correlations in many systems may not be as simple as invoking density dependence. Resource selection behavior may depend not just on the presence or absence of density-dependent offspring performance but also on variation in the strength of offspring density dependence among sites within populations. PMID:26120095

  20. Current density partitioning in time-dependent current density functional theory

    SciTech Connect

    Mosquera, Martín A.; Wasserman, Adam; Department of Physics, Purdue University, West Lafayette, Indiana 47907

    2014-05-14

    We adapt time-dependent current density functional theory to allow for a fragment-based solution of the many-electron problem of molecules in the presence of time-dependent electric and magnetic fields. Regarding a molecule as a set of non-interacting subsystems that individually evolve under the influence of an auxiliary external electromagnetic vector-scalar potential pair, the partition 4-potential, we show that there are one-to-one mappings between this auxiliary potential, a sharply-defined set of fragment current densities, and the total current density of the system. The partition electromagnetic (EM) 4-potential is expressed in terms of the real EM 4-potential of the system and a gluing EM 4-potential that accounts for exchange-correlation effects and mutual interaction forces between fragments that are required to yield the correct electron dynamics. We prove the zero-force theorem for the fragmented system, establish a variational formulation in terms of action functionals, and provide a simple illustration for a charged particle in a ring.

  1. Time-dependent density functional theory for open quantum systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tempel, David; Aspuru-Guzik, Alan

    2012-02-01

    We present the extension of time-dependent density functional theory (TDDFT) to the realm of open quantum systems (OQS). OQS-TDDFT allows a first principles description of electronic systems undergoing non-unitary dynamics due to coupling with a bath, such as that arising from molecular vibrations, solvent degrees of freedom or photon modes of the electromagnetic field. We first prove extensions of the Runge-Gross and van Leeuwen theorems to OQS-TDDFT, which rigorously establish it as a formally exact theory. We then discuss development of approximate OQS-TDDFT functionals, exact conditions on these functionals, as well as future challenges. Finally, we will discuss the application of OQS-TDDFT in obtaining broadened absorption spectra.

  2. Time-dependent local density measurements in unsteady flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mckenzie, R. L.; Monson, D. J.; Exberger, R. J.

    1979-01-01

    A laser-induced fluorescence technique for measuring the relative time-dependent density fluctuations in unsteady or turbulent flows is demonstrated. Using a 1.5-W continuous-wave Kr(+) laser, measurements have been obtained in 0.1-mm-diameter by 1-mm-long sampling volumes in a Mach 3 flow of N2 seeded with biacetyl vapor. A signal amplitude resolution of 2% was achieved for a detection frequency bandwidth of 10 kHz. The measurement uncertainty was found to be dominated by noise behaving as photon statistical noise. The practical limits of signal-to-noise ratios have been characterized for a wide range of detection frequency bandwidths that encompasses those of interest in supersonic turbulence measurements.

  3. Time-dependent local density measurements in unsteady flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mckenzie, R. L.; Monson, D. J.; Exberger, R. J.

    1979-01-01

    A laser-induced fluorescence technique for measuring the relative time-dependent density fluctuations in unsteady or turbulent flows is demonstrated. Using a 1.5-W continuous-wave Kr(+) laser, measurements have been obtained in 0.1-mm diameter by 1-mm-long sampling volumes in a Mach 3 flow of N2 seeded with biacetyl vapor. A signal amplitude resolution of 2% was achieved for a detection frequency bandwidth of 10 kHz. The measurement uncertainty was found to be dominated by noise behaving as photon statistical noise. The practical limits of signal-to-noise ratios have been characterized for a wide range of detection frequency bandwidths that encompasses those of interest in supersonic turbulence measurements.

  4. Testing for predator dependence in predatorprey dynamics: a non-parametric approach

    E-print Network

    Jost, Christian

    Testing for predator dependence in predator­prey dynamics: a non-parametric approach Christian Jost response is a key element in all predator^prey interactions. Although functional responses are traditionally modelled as being a function of prey density only, evidence is accumulating that predator density

  5. Host immune responses are necessary for density dependence in nematode infections

    E-print Network

    Paterson, Steve

    parasitic nematodes and the diseases that they cause. These density-dependent effects have been hypothesized find that in nematode (Strongyloides ratti) infections, density-dependent effects on parasite, population dynamics, epidemiology, nematodes, parasites, ecology. INTRODUCTION Nematode infection

  6. Global fixed-point proof of time-dependent density-functional theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruggenthaler, M.; van Leeuwen, R.

    2011-07-01

    We reformulate the uniqueness and existence proofs of time-dependent density-functional theory. The central idea is to restate the fundamental one-to-one correspondence between densities and potentials as a global fixed-point question for potentials on a given time interval. We show that the unique fixed point, i.e. the unique potential generating a given density, is reached as the limiting point of an iterative procedure. The one-to-one correspondence between densities and potentials is a straightforward result provided that the response function of the divergence of the internal forces is bounded. The existence, i.e. the v-representability of a density, can be proven as well provided that the operator norms of the response functions of the members of the iterative sequence of potentials have an upper bound. The densities under consideration have second time-derivatives that are required to satisfy a condition slightly weaker than being square-integrable. This approach avoids the usual restrictions of Taylor-expandability in time of the uniqueness theorem by Runge and Gross (Phys. Rev. Lett., 52 (1984) 997) and of the existence theorem by van Leeuwen (Phys. Rev. Lett., 82 (1999) 3863). Owing to its generality, the proof not only answers basic questions in density-functional theory but also has potential implications in other fields of physics.

  7. The multi-configurational time-dependent Hartree approach revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manthe, Uwe

    2015-06-01

    The multi-configurational time-dependent Hartree (MCTDH) approach facilitates accurate high-dimensional quantum dynamics simulations. In the approach, the wavefunction is expanded in a direct product of self-adapting time-dependent single-particle functions (SPFs). The equations of motion for the expansion coefficients and the SPFs are obtained via the Dirac-Frenkel variational principle. While this derivation yields well-defined differential equations for the motion of occupied SPFs, singularities in the working equations resulting from unoccupied SPFs have to be removed by a regularization procedure. Here, an alternative derivation of the MCTDH equations of motion is presented. It employs an analysis of the time-dependence of the single-particle density matrices up to second order. While the analysis of the first order terms yields the known equations of motion for the occupied SPFs, the analysis of the second order terms provides new equations which allow one to identify optimal choices for the unoccupied SPFs. The effect of the optimal choice of the unoccupied SPFs on the structure of the MCTDH equations of motion and their regularization is discussed. Generalized equations applicable in the multi-layer MCTDH framework are presented. Finally, the effects resulting from the initial choice of the unoccupied SPFs are illustrated by a simple numerical example.

  8. Reduced Density Matrix Functional Theory (RDMFT) and Linear Response Time-Dependent RDMFT (TD-RDMFT).

    PubMed

    Pernal, Katarzyna; Giesbertz, Klaas J H

    2016-01-01

    Recent advances in reduced density matrix functional theory (RDMFT) and linear response time-dependent reduced density matrix functional theory (TD-RDMFT) are reviewed. In particular, we present various approaches to develop approximate density matrix functionals which have been employed in RDMFT. We discuss the properties and performance of most available density matrix functionals. Progress in the development of functionals has been paralleled by formulation of novel RDMFT-based methods for predicting properties of molecular systems and solids. We give an overview of these methods. The time-dependent extension, TD-RDMFT, is a relatively new theory still awaiting practical and generally useful functionals which would work within the adiabatic approximation. In this chapter we concentrate on the formulation of TD-RDMFT response equations and various adiabatic approximations. None of the adiabatic approximations is fully satisfactory, so we also discuss a phase-dependent extension to TD-RDMFT employing the concept of phase-including-natural-spinorbitals (PINOs). We focus on applications of the linear response formulations to two-electron systems, for which the (almost) exact functional is known. PMID:25971917

  9. Time-dependent density functional theory quantum transport simulation in non-orthogonal basis

    SciTech Connect

    Kwok, Yan Ho; Xie, Hang; Yam, Chi Yung; Chen, Guan Hua; Zheng, Xiao

    2013-12-14

    Basing on the earlier works on the hierarchical equations of motion for quantum transport, we present in this paper a first principles scheme for time-dependent quantum transport by combining time-dependent density functional theory (TDDFT) and Keldysh's non-equilibrium Green's function formalism. This scheme is beyond the wide band limit approximation and is directly applicable to the case of non-orthogonal basis without the need of basis transformation. The overlap between the basis in the lead and the device region is treated properly by including it in the self-energy and it can be shown that this approach is equivalent to a lead-device orthogonalization. This scheme has been implemented at both TDDFT and density functional tight-binding level. Simulation results are presented to demonstrate our method and comparison with wide band limit approximation is made. Finally, the sparsity of the matrices and computational complexity of this method are analyzed.

  10. Asymmetric nuclear matter studied by time-dependent local isospin density approximation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lipparini, Enrico; Pederiva, Francesco

    2013-08-01

    The dynamic response of asymmetric nuclear matter is studied by means of a time-dependent local isospin density approximation (TDLIDA) approach. Calculations are based on a local density energy functional derived by an auxiliary field diffusion Monte Carlo (AFDMC) calculation of bulk nuclear matter. Three types of excited states emerge: collective states, a continuum of quasiparticle-quasihole excitations and unstable solutions. These states are analyzed and discussed for different values of the nuclear density ? and isospin asymmetry ?=(N-Z)/A. An analytical expression of the compressibility as a function of ? and ? is derived which shows explicitly an instability of the neutron matter around ??0.09 fm-3 when a small fraction of protons are added to the system.

  11. Density Functional Approach to Regiochemistry, Activation Energy, and Hardness Profile in 1,3-Dipolar Cycloadditions

    E-print Network

    Nguyen, Minh Tho

    Density Functional Approach to Regiochemistry, Activation Energy, and Hardness Profile in 1 that the transition state with higher hardness is associated with lower activation energy. The hardness profile has proposition of his work is that the activation energy of a chemical reaction depends primarily

  12. Reassessing nuclear matter incompressibility and its density dependence

    E-print Network

    J. N. De; S. K. Samaddar; B. K. Agrawal

    2015-06-22

    Experimental giant monopole resonance energies are now known to constrain nuclear incompressibility of symmetric nuclear matter $K$ and its density slope $M$ at a particular value of sub-saturation density, the crossing density $\\rho_c$. Consistent with these constraints, we propose a reasonable way to construct a plausible equation of state of symmetric nuclear matter in a broad density region around the saturation density $\\rho_0$. Help of two additional empirical inputs, the value of $\\rho_0$ and that of the energy per nucleon $e(\\rho_0)$ are needed. The value of $K(\\rho_0)$ comes out to be $211.9\\pm 24.5$ MeV.

  13. Lambda matter in the effective density dependent mean-field model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petrík, K.; Gmuca, S.

    2013-11-01

    The density dependent relativistic hadron field (DDRHF) theory is introduced with various forms of the density dependence of the nuclear interaction to study the ? matter in the ?-equilibrium. Several new parametrizations are extracted from the Dirac-Brueckner-Hartree-Fock (DBHF) calculations. We have compared and analysed high density extrapolations of ? matter properties and shown that the choice of the density dependence has important effects on the structure of compact stars.

  14. Phenomenological approach for describing environment dependent growths

    E-print Network

    Dibyendu Biswas; Swarup Poria

    2014-12-22

    Different classes of phenomenological universalities of environment dependent growths have been proposed. The logistic as well as environment dependent West-type allometry based biological growth can be explained in this proposed framework of phenomenological description. It is shown that logistic and environment dependent West-type growths are phenomenologically identical in nature. However there is a difference between them in terms of coefficients involved in the phenomenological descriptions. It is also established that environment independent and enviornment dependent biological growth processes lead to the same West-type biological growth equation. Involuted Gompertz function, used to describe biological growth processes undergoing atrophy or a demographic and economic system undergoing involution or regression, can be addressed in this proposed environment dependent description. In addition, some other phenomenological descriptions have been examined in this proposed framework and graphical representations of variation of different parameters involved in the description are executed.

  15. Influence of boundary condition types on unstable density-dependent flow.

    PubMed

    Ataie-Ashtiani, Behzad; Simmons, Craig T; Werner, Adrian D

    2014-01-01

    Boundary conditions are required to close the mathematical formulation of unstable density-dependent flow systems. Proper implementation of boundary conditions, for both flow and transport equations, in numerical simulation are critical. In this paper, numerical simulations using the FEFLOW model are employed to study the influence of the different boundary conditions for unstable density-dependent flow systems. A similar set up to the Elder problem is studied. It is well known that the numerical simulation results of the standard Elder problem are strongly dependent on spatial discretization. This work shows that for the cases where a solute mass flux boundary condition is employed instead of a specified concentration boundary condition at the solute source, the numerical simulation results do not vary between different convective solution modes (i.e., plume configurations) due to the spatial discretization. Also, the influence of various boundary condition types for nonsource boundaries was studied. It is shown that in addition to other factors such as spatial and temporal discretization, the forms of the solute transport equation such as divergent and convective forms as well as the type of boundary condition employed in the nonsource boundary conditions influence the convective solution mode in coarser meshes. On basis of the numerical experiments performed here, higher sensitivities regarding the numerical solution stability are observed for the Adams-Bashford/Backward Trapezoidal time integration approach in comparison to the Euler-Backward/Euler-Forward time marching approach. The results of this study emphasize the significant consequences of boundary condition choice in the numerical modeling of unstable density-dependent flow. PMID:23659688

  16. Time-Dependent Density-Functional Theory for Trapped Strongly-Interacting Fermionic Atoms

    E-print Network

    Yeong E. Kim; Alexander L. Zubarev

    2004-06-24

    The dynamics of strongly interacting trapped dilute Fermi gases (dilute in the sense that the range of interatomic potential is small compared with inter-particle spacing) is investigated in a single-equation approach to the time-dependent density-functional theory. Our results are in good agreement with recent experimental data in the BCS-BEC crossover regime. It is also shown that the calculated corrections to the hydrodynamic approximation may be important even for systems with a rather large number of atoms.

  17. A real-space stochastic density matrix approach for density functional electronic structure.

    PubMed

    Beck, Thomas L

    2015-11-25

    The recent development of real-space grid methods has led to more efficient, accurate, and adaptable approaches for large-scale electrostatics and density functional electronic structure modeling. With the incorporation of multiscale techniques, linear-scaling real-space solvers are possible for density functional problems if localized orbitals are used to represent the Kohn-Sham energy functional. These methods still suffer from high computational and storage overheads, however, due to extensive matrix operations related to the underlying wave function grid representation. In this paper, an alternative stochastic method is outlined that aims to solve directly for the one-electron density matrix in real space. In order to illustrate aspects of the method, model calculations are performed for simple one-dimensional problems that display some features of the more general problem, such as spatial nodes in the density matrix. This orbital-free approach may prove helpful considering a future involving increasingly parallel computing architectures. Its primary advantage is the near-locality of the random walks, allowing for simultaneous updates of the density matrix in different regions of space partitioned across the processors. In addition, it allows for testing and enforcement of the particle number and idempotency constraints through stabilization of a Feynman-Kac functional integral as opposed to the extensive matrix operations in traditional approaches. PMID:25969148

  18. The dependence of cylindrical resonator natural frequencies on the fluid density

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rudachenko, V.; Filushin, V.; Korotchenko, T.

    2015-11-01

    The article examines the dependence of cylindrical resonator natural frequencies (sensitive element) on the density (mass) of different fluids flowing through it. The cylindrical resonators are being widely applied in automatic control systems of technological processes as oscillating transducer density meter. The article presents the experimental results that prove the dependence of natural frequencies and vibration amplitude on the fluid density.

  19. Density-dependent dispersal in the Glanville fritillary, Melitaea Karin Enfjall and Olof Leimar

    E-print Network

    Leimar, Olof

    Density-dependent dispersal in the Glanville fritillary, Melitaea cinxia Karin Enfja¨ll and Olof Leimar Enfja¨ll, K. and Leimar, O. 2005. Density-dependent dispersal in the Glanville fritillary or willingness to leave a given patch. One such factor is conspecific density, which may affect the per capita

  20. Mechanisms of density dependence in ducks: importance of space and per capita food.

    PubMed

    Nummi, Petri; Holopainen, Sari; Rintala, Jukka; Pöysä, Hannu

    2015-03-01

    The growth rate of populations usually varies over time, often in a density-dependent manner. Despite the large amount of literature on density dependence, relatively little is known of the mechanisms underlying the density-dependent processes affecting populations, especially per capita natality. We performed a 20-year study on the density dependence of brood production in two duck species differing in the stability of habitat use. Our study was conducted in a boreal watershed in southern Finland. We predicted that a diving duck common goldeneye Bucephala clangula, with more stable habitat use, would show stronger density dependence than a dabbling duck common teal Anas crecca. We investigated reproductive output in relation to the duck pair density per se as well as in relation to per capita food availability. As predicted, the reproductive output of the goldeneye showed a more density-dependent pattern than that of the teal. The number of goldeneye broods per pair decreased when the pair density increased. This was not the case with the teal. However, when the breeding success was measured by taking into account per capita food availability, both species showed density dependence. Our results imply that the occurrence of density dependent processes may vary even in sympatric ducks breeding in the same, relatively stable landscape. Our analysis also emphasizes that it is important to take into account per capita resource availability when studying the density dependence of breeding success. Both findings have important implications for the management and conservation of species. PMID:25398723

  1. Continuous Dependence on the Density for Stratified Steady Water Waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Robin Ming; Walsh, Samuel

    2015-07-01

    There are two distinct regimes commonly used to model traveling waves in stratified water: continuous stratification, where the density is smooth throughout the fluid, and layer-wise continuous stratification, where the fluid consists of multiple immiscible strata. The former is the more physically accurate description, but the latter is frequently more amenable to analysis and computation. By the conservation of mass, the density is constant along the streamlines of the flow; the stratification can therefore be specified by prescribing the value of the density on each streamline. We call this the streamline density function. Our main result states that, for every smoothly stratified periodic traveling wave in a certain small-amplitude regime, there is an L ? neighborhood of its streamline density function such that, for any piecewise smooth streamline density function in that neighborhood, there is a corresponding traveling wave solution. Moreover, the mapping from streamline density function to wave is Lipschitz continuous in a certain function space framework. As this neighborhood includes piecewise smooth densities with arbitrarily many jump discontinues, this theorem provides a rigorous justification for the ubiquitous practice of approximating a smoothly stratified wave by a layered one. We also discuss some applications of this result to the study of the qualitative features of such waves.

  2. Adaptive landscapes and density-dependent selection in declining salmonid populations: going beyond numerical responses to human disturbance

    PubMed Central

    Einum, Sigurd; Robertsen, Grethe; Fleming, Ian A

    2008-01-01

    Theory suggests an important role for population density in shaping adaptive landscapes through density-dependent selection. Here, we identify five methodological approaches for studying such selection, review the existing empirical evidence for it, and ask whether current declines in abundance can be expected to trigger evolutionary responses in salmonid fishes. Across taxa we find substantial amounts of evidence for population density influencing the location of adaptive peaks for a range of traits, and, in the presence of frequency dependence, changing the shape of selection (stabilizing versus disruptive). For salmonids, biological and theoretical considerations suggest that the optimal value of a number of traits associated with juvenile competitive ability (e.g. egg size, timing of emergence from nests, dominance ability), may depend on population density. For adults, more direct experimental and comparative evidence suggest that secondary sexual traits can be subject to density-dependent selection. There is also evidence that density affects the frequency-dependent selection likely responsible for the expression of alternative male reproductive phenotypes in salmon. Less is known however about the role of density in maintaining genetic variation among juveniles. Further efforts are required to elucidate the indirect evolutionary effects of declining population abundances, both in salmonids and in other anthropogenically challenged organisms. PMID:25567629

  3. Density functional and theoretical study of the temperature and pressure dependency of the plasmon energy of solids

    SciTech Connect

    Attarian Shandiz, M. Gauvin, R.

    2014-10-28

    The temperature and pressure dependency of the volume plasmon energy of solids was investigated by density functional theory calculations. The volume change of crystal is the major factor responsible for the variation of valence electron density and plasmon energy in the free electron model. Hence, to introduce the effect of temperature and pressure for the density functional theory calculations of plasmon energy, the temperature and pressure dependency of lattice parameter was used. Also, by combination of the free electron model and the equation of state based on the pseudo-spinodal approach, the temperature and pressure dependency of the plasmon energy was modeled. The suggested model is in good agreement with the results of density functional theory calculations and available experimental data for elements with the free electron behavior.

  4. Solvation force between tethered polyelectrolyte layers. A density functional approach

    E-print Network

    O. Pizio; A. Patrykiejew; S. Soko?owski; J. M. Ilnytskyi

    2012-10-08

    We use a version of the density functional theory to study the solvation force between two plates modified with a tethered layer of chains. The chains are built of tangentially jointed charged spherical segments. The plates are immersed in an electrolyte solution that involves cations, anions and solvent molecules. The latter molecules are modelled as hard spheres. We study the dependence of the solvation force and the structure of chains and of solute molecules on the grafting density, length of chains, architecture of the chains and on concentration of the solute.

  5. Spin-dependent localized Hartree-Fock density-functional calculation of singly, doubly, and triply excited and Rydberg states of He- and Li-like ions

    E-print Network

    Chu, Shih-I; Zhou, Zhongyuan

    2005-02-28

    A spin-dependent density-functional approach for the calculation of highly and multiply excited state of atomic system is proposed based on the localized Hartree-Fock density-functional method and Slater’s diagonal sum rule. In this approach...

  6. Relativistic Coulomb excitation within the time dependent superfluid local density approximation

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Stetcu, I.; Bertulani, C. A.; Bulgac, A.; Magierski, P.; Roche, K. J.

    2015-01-06

    Within the framework of the unrestricted time-dependent density functional theory, we present for the first time an analysis of the relativistic Coulomb excitation of the heavy deformed open shell nucleus 238U. The approach is based on the superfluid local density approximation formulated on a spatial lattice that can take into account coupling to the continuum, enabling self-consistent studies of superfluid dynamics of any nuclear shape. We compute the energy deposited in the target nucleus as a function of the impact parameter, finding it to be significantly larger than the estimate using the Goldhaber-Teller model. The isovector giant dipole resonance, themore »dipole pygmy resonance, and giant quadrupole modes are excited during the process. As a result, the one-body dissipation of collective dipole modes is shown to lead a damping width ???0.4 MeV and the number of preequilibrium neutrons emitted has been quantified.« less

  7. OIKOS 89: 295300. Copenhagen 2000 Density dependence in induced plant resistance to herbivore

    E-print Network

    Underwood, Nora

    OIKOS 89: 295­300. Copenhagen 2000 Density dependence in induced plant resistance to herbivore in induced plant resistance to herbivore damage: threshold, strength and genetic variation. ­ Oikos 89: 295­300. The density-dependent effect of induced plant resistance on herbivore populations depends on the relationship

  8. Exact conditions on the temperature dependence of density functionals

    E-print Network

    Burke, Kieron; Grabowski, Paul E; Pribram-Jones, Aurora

    2015-01-01

    Universal exact conditions guided the construction of most ground-state density functional approximations in use today. We derive the relation between the entropy and Mermin free energy density functionals for thermal density functional theory. Both the entropy and sum of kinetic and electron-electron repulsion functionals are shown to be monotonically increasing with temperature, while the Mermin functional is concave downwards. Analogous relations are found for both exchange and correlation. The importance of these conditions is illustrated in two extremes: the Hubbard dimer and the uniform gas.

  9. Density Dependent Functional Forms Drive Compensation in Populations Exposed to Stressors

    EPA Science Inventory

    The interaction between density dependence (DD) and environmental stressors can result in a compensatory or synergistic response in population growth, and population models that use density-independent demographic rates or generic DD functions may be introducing bias into managem...

  10. How important is self-consistency for the dDsC density dependent dispersion correction?

    SciTech Connect

    Brémond, Éric; Corminboeuf, Clémence; Golubev, Nikolay; Department of Chemistry, M. V. Lomonosov Moscow State University, Moscow 119991 ; Steinmann, Stephan N.

    2014-05-14

    The treatment of dispersion interactions is ubiquitous but computationally demanding for seamless ab initio approaches. A highly popular and simple remedy consists in correcting for the missing interactions a posteriori by adding an attractive energy term summed over all atom pairs to standard density functional approximations. These corrections were originally based on atom pairwise parameters and, hence, had a strong touch of empiricism. To overcome such limitations, we recently proposed a robust system-dependent dispersion correction, dDsC, that is computed from the electron density and that provides a balanced description of both weak inter- and intramolecular interactions. From the theoretical point of view and for the sake of increasing reliability, we here verify if the self-consistent implementation of dDsC impacts ground-state properties such as interaction energies, electron density, dipole moments, geometries, and harmonic frequencies. In addition, we investigate the suitability of the a posteriori scheme for molecular dynamics simulations, for which the analysis of the energy conservation constitutes a challenging tests. Our study demonstrates that the post-SCF approach in an excellent approximation.

  11. Determination of density and momentum dependence of nuclear symmetry potentials with asymmetric heavy ion reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Showalter, Rachel Hodges

    The nuclear symmetry energy, which is important for asymmetric nuclear systems including rare isotopes and neutron stars, has been studied through both experimental and theoretical approaches, spanning a range of densities from below and above normal nuclear matter density. In the past decade, significant constraints on the density dependence have been obtained in the subsaturation density region, from Heavy Ion Collision (HIC) experiments as well as experiments probing nuclear structure. On the other hand, very little has been determined about the symmetry energy at suprasaturation densities; experimentally, this density region is only accessible in HICs. It is therefore important to understand how to extract nuclear symmetry energy information from HIC at high energies where high density nuclear matter is created in a very brief instant. Symmetry energy constraints from HICs are determined by comparing experimental observables with those calculated using transport models. The goals of this dissertation are to identify the observables most sensitive to the symmetry energy strength, the effective mass splitting, and the in-medium nucleon-nucleon cross sections, sigmaNN, at the region just above saturation density which can be created with heavy ion beams available at NSCL. With better constraints in place, the predictive power of transport models will improve. Recent constraints from HIC experiments have relied on symmetric systems, which are predicted to be sensitive to both the density- and the momentum-dependence of the symmetry potentials. In the study of the nuclear equation of state, asymmetric systems have proven to be more effective at low energy in exploring sensitivities to nucleon-nucleon collisions, which is an important input to any transport model. In this work, particles that were emitted from Ca+Sn systems, with a 48Ca beam impinging on 112Sn or 124Sn targets are measured. The experimental data were compared to predictions from the Improved Molecular Dynamics model with Skyrme interactions (ImQMD-Sky). Four Skyrme parameter sets were chosen that span current constraints on the density dependence of the symmetry energy and on the nucleon effective mass splitting, m*n?m* p, which results from the momentum dependent interaction potentials. ImQMD-Sky calculations were repeated using an alternate form for sigma NN.. The yields and ratios of both free and coalescence invariant experimental spectra, constructed as a function of the transverse momentum, were contrasted to those simulated by ImQMD-Sky. To select the overlap region between beam and target nuclei, a mid-rapidity cut was taken in the analysis. The parameter sets included in this analysis did not show a significant sensitivity to the symmetry energy strength, but do suggest that the neutron-to-proton ratio bears a large sensitivity both to the nucleon effective mass splitting and the sigmaNN forms used in the calculations. Comparison to the measured coalescence invariant spectra suggests a better agreement with calculations employing effective masses that are greater for neutrons than for protons and a set of isospin-dependent sigma NN. The results in this analysis for the asymmetric Ca+Sn reaction are compared with previous results for a symmetric Sn+Sn reaction at 120 AMeV, which shows an opposite conclusion for low energy particles.

  12. Density matrix based time-dependent density functional theory and the solution of its linear response in real time domain.

    PubMed

    Wang, Fan; Yam, Chi Yung; Chen, GuanHua; Fan, Kangnian

    2007-04-01

    A density matrix based time-dependent density functional theory is extended in the present work. Chebyshev expansion is introduced to propagate the linear response of the reduced single-electron density matrix upon the application of a time-domain delta-type external potential. The Chebyshev expansion method is more efficient and accurate than the previous fourth-order Runge-Kutta method and removes a numerical divergence problem. The discrete Fourier transformation and filter diagonalization of the first-order dipole moment are implemented to determine the excited state energies. It is found that the filter diagonalization leads to highly accurate values for the excited state energies. Finally, the density matrix based time-dependent density functional is generalized to calculate the energies of singlet-triplet excitations. PMID:17430013

  13. Surface properties of liquid mercury: a comparison of density-dependent and density-independent force fields

    E-print Network

    A. Iakovlev; D. Bedrov; M. Müller

    2015-03-14

    Motivated by an experimental interest we investigate by the means of atomistic Molecular Dynamics simulation the ability of density-independent, empiric density-dependent, and recently proposed embedded-atom force fields for liquid mercury to predict the surface tension of the free surface of liquid mercury at the temperature of 293~K. The effect of the density dependence of the studied models on the liquid-vapor coexistence and surface tension is discussed in detail. In view of computational efficiency of the density-independent model we optimize its functional form to obtain higher surface tension values in order to improve agreement with experiment. The results are also corroborated by Monte Carlo simulations and semi-analytic estimations of the liquid-vapor coexistence density.

  14. Experimental Investigation of Density-Dependent Flow Behavior

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crockett, A.; Schultz, P.; Miller, C. T.

    2012-12-01

    Fluid flows in subsurface systems are often impacted by density and viscosity gradients; however, the mechanisms controlling the behavior of these systems have yet to be fully understood. An experimental study was conducted to provide a data set for further model validation. In this work, the influence of density and viscosity gradients on dispersion in porous media is investigated using calcium bromide solutions under stable displacements. Experiments were designed to understand the relationship between dispersion and density gradients from dilute to concentrated systems. Experiments were conducted in one-dimensional packed columns and length was varied from 60 to 90 cm. In both columns, a series of experiments was conducted with an initial mass fraction of zero and varying the incoming solution from mass fractions of 0.0001 to 0.5. Experiments showed that dispersion was reduced even at very low incoming mass fractions (e.g., 0.001).

  15. Volume dependence of two-dimensional large-N QCD with a nonzero density of baryons

    SciTech Connect

    Bringoltz, Barak

    2009-05-15

    We take a first step towards the solution of QCD in 1+1 dimensions at nonzero density. We regularize the theory in the UV by using a lattice and in the IR by putting the theory in a box of spatial size L. After fixing to axial gauge we use the coherent states approach to obtain the large-N classical Hamiltonian H that describes color neutral quark-antiquark pairs interacting with spatial Polyakov loops in the background of baryons. Minimizing H we get a regularized form of the 't Hooft equation that depends on the expectation values of the Polyakov loops. Analyzing the L dependence of this equation we show how volume independence, a la Eguchi and Kawai, emerges in the large-N limit, and how it depends on the expectation values of the Polyakov loops. We describe how this independence relies on the realization of translation symmetry, in particular, when the ground state contains a baryon crystal. Finally, we remark on the implications of our results on studying baryon density in large-N QCD within single-site lattice theories and on some general lessons concerning the way four-dimensional large-N QCD behaves in the presence of baryons.

  16. Density dependence, whitebark pine, and vital rates of grizzly bears

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    van Manen, Frank T.; Haroldson, Mark A.; Bjornlie, Daniel D; Ebinger, Michael R.; Thompson, Daniel J.; Costello, Cecily M; White, Gary C.

    2015-01-01

    Understanding factors influencing changes in population trajectory is important for effective wildlife management, particularly for populations of conservation concern. Annual population growth of the grizzly bear (Ursus arctos) population in the Greater Yellowstone Ecosystem, USA has slowed from 4.2–7.6% during 1983–2001 to 0.3–2.2% during 2002–2011. Substantial changes in availability of a key food source and bear population density have occurred. Whitebark pine (Pinus albicaulis), the seeds of which are a valuable but variable fall food for grizzly bears, has experienced substantial mortality primarily due to a mountain pine beetle (Dendroctonus ponderosae) outbreak that started in the early 2000s. Positive growth rates of grizzly bears have resulted in populations reaching high densities in some areas and have contributed to continued range expansion. We tested research hypotheses to examine if changes in vital rates detected during the past decade were more associated with whitebark pine decline or, alternatively, increasing grizzly bear density. We focused our assessment on known-fate data to estimate survival of cubs-of-the-year (cubs), yearlings, and independent bears (?2 yrs), and reproductive transition of females from having no offspring to having cubs. We used spatially and temporally explicit indices for grizzly bear density and whitebark pine mortality as individual covariates. Models indicated moderate support for an increase in survival of independent male bears over 1983–2012, whereas independent female survival did not change. Cub survival, yearling survival, and reproductive transition from no offspring to cubs all changed during the 30-year study period, with lower rates evident during the last 10–15 years. Cub survival and reproductive transition were negatively associated with an index of grizzly bear density, indicating greater declines where bear densities were higher. Our analyses did not support a similar relationship for the index of whitebark pine mortality. The results of our study support the interpretation that slowing of population growth during the last decade was associated more with increasing grizzly bear density than the decline in whitebark pine. Grizzly bear density and its potential effect on vital rates and population trajectory warrant consideration for management of the grizzly bear population in the Greater Yellowstone Ecosystem.

  17. TIME-DEPENDENT DENSITY FUNCTIONAL THEORY: HOW ACCURATE IS ALDA ?

    E-print Network

    Burke, Kieron

    ;erences are caused by "missing" peaks in the ALDA spectrum. ii #12; Table of Contents Abstract . . . . . . . . . . . . 7 1.2.3. The adiabatic local density approximation (ALDA) . . . . . . . . 9 1.2.4. Linear response . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 23 2.2.1. The generic run . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 24 Fourier analysis

  18. Transverse momentum dependent quark densities from Lattice QCD

    E-print Network

    Musch, B. U.

    We study transverse momentum dependent parton distribution functions (TMDs) with non?local operators in lattice QCD, using MILC?LHPC lattices. We discuss the basic concepts of the method, including renormalization of the ...

  19. Temperature and electron density dependence of spin relaxation in GaAs/AlGaAs quantum well

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Temperature and carrier density-dependent spin dynamics for GaAs/AlGaAs quantum wells (QWs) with different structural symmetries have been studied by using time-resolved Kerr rotation technique. The spin relaxation time is measured to be much longer for the symmetrically designed GaAs QW comparing with the asymmetrical one, indicating the strong influence of Rashba spin-orbit coupling on spin relaxation. D'yakonov-Perel' mechanism has been revealed to be the dominant contribution for spin relaxation in GaAs/AlGaAs QWs. The spin relaxation time exhibits non-monotonic-dependent behavior on both temperature and photo-excited carrier density, revealing the important role of non-monotonic temperature and density dependence of electron-electron Coulomb scattering. Our experimental observations demonstrate good agreement with recently developed spin relaxation theory based on microscopic kinetic spin Bloch equation approach. PMID:21711611

  20. High temperature intensifies negative density dependence of fitness in red flour beetles

    PubMed Central

    Halliday, William D; Thomas, Alison S; Blouin-Demers, Gabriel

    2015-01-01

    Competition for food, space, or other depletable resources has strong impacts on the fitness of organisms and can lead to a pattern known as negative density dependence, where fitness decreases as population density increases. Yet, many resources that have strong impacts on fitness are nondepletable (e.g., moisture or temperature). How do these nondepletable resources interact with depletable resources to modify negative density dependence? We tested the hypothesis that negative density dependence is modulated by temperature in red flour beetles and tested the prediction that the strength of negative density dependence should decrease as temperature decreases. We measured the number of eggs laid, offspring development time, and the number of offspring that reached maturity at three temperatures and two food treatment combinations as we simultaneously manipulated adult population density. We demonstrated that low temperatures weaken negative density dependence in the number of eggs laid; this pattern was most evident when food was abundant. Density had no effect on development time, but low temperatures increased development time. The percent of eggs that emerged as adults decreased with both density and temperature and increased with food. Temperature, an abiotic driver, can thus modulate density-dependent processes in ectotherms. Therefore, models of population growth for ectotherms should incorporate the effects of temperature. PMID:25798223

  1. From patterns to processes and back: analysing density-dependent responses to an abiotic stressor by statistical and mechanistic modelling

    PubMed Central

    Jannicke Moe, S; Kristoffersen, Anja B; Smith, Robert H; Stenseth, Nils Chr

    2005-01-01

    Our knowledge about population-level effects of abiotic stressors is limited, largely due to lack of appropriate time-series data. To analyse interactions between an abiotic stressor and density-dependent processes, we used experimental time-series data for stage-structured populations (the blowfly Lucilia sericata) exposed to the toxicant cadmium through 20 generations. Resource limitation results in competition both in the larval and the adult stages. The toxicant has only negative effects at the organism level, but nevertheless, there were positive population-level effects. These are necessarily indirect, and indicate overcompensatory density-dependent responses. A non-parametric model (generalized additive model) was used to investigate the density-dependent structures of the demographic rates, without making assumptions about the functional forms. The estimated structures were used to develop a parametric model, with which we analysed effects of the toxicant on density-dependent and density-independent components of the stage-specific demographic rates. The parameter estimates identified both synergistic and antagonistic density–toxicant interactions. It is noteworthy that the synergistic interaction occurred together with a net positive effect of the toxicant. Hence, the effects of such interactions should be considered together with the capacity for compensatory responses. The combination of the two modelling approaches provided new insight into mechanisms for compensatory responses to abiotic stressors. PMID:16191626

  2. OIKOS 103: 559565, 2003 Density dependent population growth of the two-spotted spider

    E-print Network

    Agrawal, Anurag

    OIKOS 103: 559­565, 2003 Density dependent population growth of the two-spotted spider mite. and Agrawal, A. A. 2003. Density dependent population growth of the two-spotted spider mite, Tetranychus that depress population growth, such as food deterioration or limitation. On large plants, spider mite

  3. Density dependence in insect performance within individual plants: induced resistance to Spodoptera exigua in tomato

    E-print Network

    Underwood, Nora

    by insect herbivores at the scale of single plants can be a function both of induced resistance in the plant1 Density dependence in insect performance within individual plants: induced resistance examined both net density dependence at the scale of single plants, and changes in plant quality

  4. Electronvibration coupling in time-dependent density-functional theory: Application to benzene

    E-print Network

    Bertsch George F.

    Electron­vibration coupling in time-dependent density-functional theory: Application to benzene G://jcp.aip.org/about/rights_and_permissions #12;Electron­vibration coupling in time-dependent density-functional theory: Application to benzene G for electron­vibration coupling, we apply it to the optical properties of the ­ * transitions in benzene

  5. Long-range excitations in time-dependent density functional theory Neepa T. Maitraa

    E-print Network

    Long-range excitations in time-dependent density functional theory Neepa T. Maitraa and David G Adiabatic time-dependent density functional theory fails for excitations of a heteroatomic molecule composed-correlation kernel is necessary for both local and charge-transfer excitations. The root of this is the static

  6. Density-dependent fitness benefits in quorum-sensing bacterial populations

    E-print Network

    West, Stuart

    Density-dependent fitness benefits in quorum-sensing bacterial populations Sophie E. Darcha beneficial at higher cell densities. However, this fundamental assumption has never been tested experimentally. Here, we directly test this by independently manipulating pop- ulation density and the induction

  7. Nuclear incompressibility using the density dependent M3Y effective interaction

    E-print Network

    D. N. Basu

    2003-08-27

    A density dependent M3Y effective nucleon-nucleon (NN) interaction which was based on the G-matrix elements of the Reid-Elliott NN potential has been used to determine the incompressibity of infinite nuclear matter. The nuclear interaction potential obtained by folding in the density distribution functions of two interacting nuclei with this density dependent M3Y effective interaction had been shown earlier to provide excellent descriptions for medium and high energy $\\alpha$ and heavy ion elastic scatterings as well as $\\alpha$ and heavy cluster radioactivities. The density dependent parameters have been chosen to reproduce the saturation energy per nucleon and the saturation density of spin and isospin symmetric cold infinite nuclear matter. The result of such calculations for nuclear incompressibility using the density dependent M3Y effective interaction based on the G-matrix elements of Reid-Elliott NN potential predicts a value of about 300 MeV for nuclear incompressibility.

  8. Modeling density dependent flow in the sedimentary basin of Thuringia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zech, A.; Zehner, B.; Fischer, T.; Kolditz, O.; Attinger, S.

    2012-04-01

    Salty groundwater reaching the surface or coming close to it is a phenomena that can be observed in many places of the Thuringian Basin. However, it is not obvious, why denser brine overlays lighter fresh water in this region. The hydrogeological processes which cause the rising of saltwater plumes from deeper geological layers to the surface are not yet fully understood. The goal of this modeling project is to investigate the mechanism of brine transport within the aquifers of sedimentary basins in general and of Thuringian Basin in particular. In this study we focus at investigating the fluid dynamics of the basin and how the fluid convection of the deep horizons interacts with groundwater flow near the surface. By gradually increasing the complexity of our model we analyze the major mechanism influencing the flow pattern: geology and hydraulic properties, fluid density differences caused by temperature and salt concentration gradients, fractures and faults as well as boundary conditions of the model, like inflow, outflow and groundwater recharge. For our numerical investigations we use a cross section of the Thuringian basin of approximately 80km length and maximal 800m height. The hydrogeological model is based on the major stratigraphical units from upper Perm (Zechstein) to upper Triassic (Keuper) with the lower Triassic (Bundsandstein) formations representing the main aquifer. The structural model as well as aquifer parameters are provided by geological partner groups of the University of Jena, Germany. To investigate hydrogeological scenarios we use the groundwater simulation program OpenGeoSys, which allows us to calculate thermally, hydrologically and chemically coupled processes. The challenge for us is to include density driven flow as a numerically very sensitive process on a grid that represents a large scale geologically realistic setting. With this work we contribute to the understanding of fluid convection processes influenced by density differences and local geological characteristics, especially for the local conditions in the sedimentary basin of Thuringia.

  9. Broadcasting but not receiving: density dependence considerations for SETI signals

    E-print Network

    Reginald D. Smith

    2010-02-07

    This paper develops a detailed quantitative model which uses the Drake equation and an assumption of an average maximum radio broadcasting distance by an communicative civilization to derive a minimum civilization density for contact between two civilizations to be probable in a given volume of space under certain conditions, the amount of time it would take for a first contact, and whether reciprocal contact is possible. Results show that under certain assumptions, a galaxy can be teeming with civilizations yet not have a guarantee of communication between any of them given either short lifetimes or small maximum distances for communication.

  10. Charge density-dependent strength of hydration and biological structure.

    PubMed Central

    Collins, K D

    1997-01-01

    Small ions of high charge density (kosmotropes) bind water molecules strongly, whereas large monovalent ions of low charge density (chaotropes) bind water molecules weakly relative to the strength of water-water interactions in bulk solution. The standard heat of solution of a crystalline alkali halide is shown here to be negative (exothermic) only when one ion is a kosmotrope and the ion of opposite charge is a chaotrope; this standard heat of solution is known to become proportionally more positive as the difference between the absolute heats of hydration of the corresponding gaseous anion and cation decreases. This suggests that inner sphere ion pairs are preferentially formed between oppositely charged ions with matching absolute enthalpies of hydration, and that biological organization arises from the noncovalent association of moieties with matching absolute free energies of solution, except where free energy is expended to keep them apart. The major intracellular anions (phosphates and carboxylates) are kosmotropes, whereas the major intracellular monovalent cations (K+; arg, his, and lys side chains) are chaotropes; together they form highly soluble, solvent-separated ion pairs that keep the contents of the cell in solution. PMID:8994593

  11. Density-dependence of functional spiking networks in vitro

    SciTech Connect

    Ham, Michael I; Gintautuas, Vadas; Rodriguez, Marko A; Bettencourt, Luis M A; Bennett, Ryan; Santa Maria, Cara L

    2008-01-01

    During development, the mammalian brain differentiates into specialized regions with unique functional abilities. While many factors contribute to this functional specialization, we explore the effect neuronal density can have on neuronal interactions. Two types of networks, dense (50,000 neurons and glia support cells) and sparse (12,000 neurons and glia support cells), are studied. A competitive first response model is applied to construct activation graphs that represent pairwise neuronal interactions. By observing the evolution of these graphs during development in vitro we observe that dense networks form activation connections earlier than sparse networks, and that link-!llltropy analysis of the resulting dense activation graphs reveals that balanced directional connections dominate. Information theoretic measures reveal in addition that early functional information interactions (of order 3) are synergetic in both dense and sparse networks. However, during development in vitro, such interactions become redundant in dense, but not sparse networks. Large values of activation graph link-entropy correlate strongly with redundant ensembles observed in the dense networks. Results demonstrate differences between dense and sparse networks in terms of informational groups, pairwise relationships, and activation graphs. These differences suggest that variations in cell density may result in different functional specialization of nervous system tissue also in vivo.

  12. The importance of spatial models for estimating the strength of density dependence.

    PubMed

    Thorson, James T; Skaug, Hans J; Kristensen, Kasper; Shelton, Andrew O; Ward, Eric J; Harms, John H; Benante, James A

    2015-05-01

    Identifying the existence and magnitude of density dependence is one of the oldest concerns in ecology. Ecologists have aimed to estimate density dependence in population and community data by fitting a simple autoregressive (Gompertz) model for density dependence to time series of abundance for an entire population. However, it is increasingly recognized that spatial heterogeneity in population densities has implications for population and community dynamics. We therefore adapt the Gompertz model to approximate, local densities over continuous space instead of population-wide abundance, and allow productivity to vary spatially using Gaussian random fields. We then show that the conventional (nonspatial) Gompertz model can result in biased estimates of density dependence (e.g., identifying oscillatory dynamics when not present) if densities vary spatially. By contrast, the spatial Gompertz model provides accurate and precise estimates of density dependence for a variety of simulation scenarios and data availabilities. These results are corroborated when comparing spatial and nonspatial models for data from 10 years and -100 sampling stations for three long-lived rockfishes (Sebastes spp.) off the California, USA coast. In this case, the nonspatial model estimates implausible oscillatory dynamics on an annual time scale, while the spatial model estimates strong autocorrelation and is supported by model selection tools. We conclude by discussing the importance of improved data archiving techniques, so that spatial models can be used to reexamine classic questions regarding the existence and magnitude of density. dependence in wild populations. PMID:26236835

  13. Nuclear Matter Studies with Density-dependent Meson-Nucleon Coupling Constants

    E-print Network

    M. K. Banerjee; J. A. Tjon

    1996-12-09

    Due to the internal structure of the nucleon, we should expect, in general, that the effective meson nucleon parameters may change in nuclear medium. We study such changes by using a chiral confining model of the nucleon. We use density-dependent masses for all mesons except the pion. Within a Dirac-Brueckner analysis, based on the relativistic covariant structure of the NN amplitude, we show that the effect of such a density dependence in the NN interaction on the saturation properties of nuclear matter, while not large, is quite significant. Due to the density dependence of the $g_{\\sigma NN}$, as predicted by the chiral confining model, we find, in particular, a looping behavior of the binding energy at saturation as a function of the saturation density. A simple model is described, which exhibits looping and which is shown to be mainly caused by the presence of a peak in the density dependence of the medium modified $\\sigma N$ coupling constant at low density. The effect of density dependence of the coupling constants and the meson masses tends to improve the results for $E/A$ and density of nuclear matter at saturation. From the present study we see that the relationship between binding energy and saturation density may not be as universal as found in nonrelativistic studies and that more model dependence is exhibited once medium modifications of the basic nuclear interactions are considered.

  14. Charge density dependent two-channel conduction in organic electric double layer transistors (EDLTs).

    PubMed

    Xie, Wei; Liu, Feilong; Shi, Sha; Ruden, P Paul; Frisbie, C Daniel

    2014-04-23

    A transport model based on hole-density-dependent trapping is proposed to explain the two unusual conductivity peaks at surface hole densities above 10(13) cm(-2) in rubrene electric double layer transistors (EDLTs). Hole transport in rubrene is described to occur via multiple percolation pathways, where conduction is dominated by transport in the free-site channel at low hole density, and in the trap-site channel at larger hole density. PMID:24496822

  15. Physical Origin of Density Dependent Force of the Skyrme Type within the Quark Meson Coupling Model

    E-print Network

    P. A. M. Guichon; H. H. Matevosyan; N. Sandulescu; A. W. Thomas

    2006-04-04

    A density dependent, effective nucleon-nucleon force of the Skyrme type is derived from the quark-meson coupling model -- a self-consistent, relativistic quark level description of nuclear matter. This new formulation requires no assumption that the mean scalar field is small and hence constitutes a significant advance over earlier work. The similarity of the effective interaction to the widely used SkM$^*$ force encourages us to apply it to a wide range of nuclear problems, beginning with the binding energies and charge distributions of doubly magic nuclei. Finding acceptable results in this conventional arena, we apply the same effective interaction, within the Hartree-Fock-Bogoliubov approach, to the properties of nuclei far from stability. The resulting two neutron drip lines and shell quenching are quite satisfactory. Finally, we apply the relativistic formulation to the properties of dense nuclear matter in anticipation of future application to the properties of neutron stars.

  16. Physical Origin of Density Dependent Force of the Skyrme Type within the Quark Meson Coupling Model

    SciTech Connect

    Pierre Guichon; Hrayr Matevosyan; N. Sandulescu; Anthony Thomas

    2006-03-17

    A density dependent, effective nucleon-nucleon force of the Skyrme type is derived from the quark-meson coupling model--a self-consistent, relativistic quark level description of nuclear matter. This new formulation requires no assumption that the mean scalar field is small and hence constitutes a significant advance over earlier work. The similarity of the effective interaction to the widely used SkM* force encourages us to apply it to a wide range of nuclear problems, beginning with the binding energies and charge distributions of doubly magic nuclei. Finding impressive results in this conventional arena, we apply the same effective interaction, within the Hartree-Fock-Bogoliubov approach, to the properties of nuclei far from stability. The resulting two neutron drip lines and shell quenching are quite satisfactory. Finally, we apply the relativistic formulation to the properties of dense nuclear matter in anticipation of future application to the properties of neutron stars.

  17. Density dependent effective interactions and recollections of the Rutgers-Princeton years

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuo, T. T. S.

    2015-02-01

    The density-dependent effective interactions given by the new Brown-Rho (new- BR) scalings and chiral three-nucleon force V3N are compared with the empirical density- dependent force of the Skyrme interactions. The new-BR scaling is based on a Skyrmion- half-Skyrmion model where nuclear matter is treated as a Skyrmion matter for density smaller than a transition density n1/2 ? 0.32 fm-3 while a half-Skyrmion matter for density greater. In this model, the meson mass, nucleon mass and meson-nucleon coupling are all scaled with density, making the resulting two-nucleon interaction density dependent. By integrating out a participating nucleon over the Fermi sea, Holt, Kaiser and Weise have obtained an effective three-nucleon force bar V3N which is also a density-dependent two-nucleon interaction. The equation of state for symmetric nuclear matter given by the new-BR-scaled V2N, bar V3N, and (unscaled-V2N + a Skyrme-type density-dependent force) are all found to be closely similar to each other.

  18. Estimation of density-dependent mortality of juvenile bivalves in the Wadden Sea.

    PubMed

    Andresen, Henrike; Strasser, Matthias; van der Meer, Jaap

    2014-01-01

    We investigated density-dependent mortality within the early months of life of the bivalves Macoma balthica (Baltic tellin) and Cerastoderma edule (common cockle) in the Wadden Sea. Mortality is thought to be density-dependent in juvenile bivalves, because there is no proportional relationship between the size of the reproductive adult stocks and the numbers of recruits for both species. It is not known however, when exactly density dependence in the pre-recruitment phase occurs and how prevalent it is. The magnitude of recruitment determines year class strength in bivalves. Thus, understanding pre-recruit mortality will improve the understanding of population dynamics. We analyzed count data from three years of temporal sampling during the first months after bivalve settlement at ten transects in the Sylt-Rømø-Bay in the northern German Wadden Sea. Analyses of density dependence are sensitive to bias through measurement error. Measurement error was estimated by bootstrapping, and residual deviances were adjusted by adding process error. With simulations the effect of these two types of error on the estimate of the density-dependent mortality coefficient was investigated. In three out of eight time intervals density dependence was detected for M. balthica, and in zero out of six time intervals for C. edule. Biological or environmental stochastic processes dominated over density dependence at the investigated scale. PMID:25105293

  19. Estimation of Density-Dependent Mortality of Juvenile Bivalves in the Wadden Sea

    PubMed Central

    Andresen, Henrike; Strasser, Matthias; van der Meer, Jaap

    2014-01-01

    We investigated density-dependent mortality within the early months of life of the bivalves Macoma balthica (Baltic tellin) and Cerastoderma edule (common cockle) in the Wadden Sea. Mortality is thought to be density-dependent in juvenile bivalves, because there is no proportional relationship between the size of the reproductive adult stocks and the numbers of recruits for both species. It is not known however, when exactly density dependence in the pre-recruitment phase occurs and how prevalent it is. The magnitude of recruitment determines year class strength in bivalves. Thus, understanding pre-recruit mortality will improve the understanding of population dynamics. We analyzed count data from three years of temporal sampling during the first months after bivalve settlement at ten transects in the Sylt-Rømø-Bay in the northern German Wadden Sea. Analyses of density dependence are sensitive to bias through measurement error. Measurement error was estimated by bootstrapping, and residual deviances were adjusted by adding process error. With simulations the effect of these two types of error on the estimate of the density-dependent mortality coefficient was investigated. In three out of eight time intervals density dependence was detected for M. balthica, and in zero out of six time intervals for C. edule. Biological or environmental stochastic processes dominated over density dependence at the investigated scale. PMID:25105293

  20. THE TIMING AND SIGNIFICANCE OF DENSITY-DEPENDENT AND DENSITy..INDEPENDENT MORTALITY OF AMERICAN SHAD,

    E-print Network

    - and postrecruitment mortality data for American shad, AloBa sapidiBsima, in the Connecticut River to estimate density. These data suggest that year-class strength of American shad in the Connecticut River is established after-recruitment and prerecruitment mortality data exist, is the American shad, Alosa sapidi88ima, an anadromous clupeid that spawns

  1. Time-dependent density-functional tight-binding method with the third-order expansion of electron density

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishimoto, Yoshio

    2015-09-01

    We develop a formalism for the calculation of excitation energies and excited state gradients for the self-consistent-charge density-functional tight-binding method with the third-order contributions of a Taylor series of the density functional theory energy with respect to the fluctuation of electron density (time-dependent density-functional tight-binding (TD-DFTB3)). The formulation of the excitation energy is based on the existing time-dependent density functional theory and the older TD-DFTB2 formulae. The analytical gradient is computed by solving Z-vector equations, and it requires one to calculate the third-order derivative of the total energy with respect to density matrix elements due to the inclusion of the third-order contributions. The comparison of adiabatic excitation energies for selected small and medium-size molecules using the TD-DFTB2 and TD-DFTB3 methods shows that the inclusion of the third-order contributions does not affect excitation energies significantly. A different set of parameters, which are optimized for DFTB3, slightly improves the prediction of adiabatic excitation energies statistically. The application of TD-DFTB for the prediction of absorption and fluorescence energies of cresyl violet demonstrates that TD-DFTB3 reproduced the experimental fluorescence energy quite well.

  2. Electron density dependence of impedance probe plasma potential measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walker, D. N.; Blackwell, D. D.; Amatucci, W. E.

    2015-08-01

    In earlier works, we used spheres of various sizes as impedance probes in demonstrating a method of determining plasma potential, ?p, when the probe radius is much larger than the Debye length, ?D. The basis of the method in those works [Walker et al., Phys. Plasmas 13, 032108 (2006); ibid. 15, 123506 (2008); ibid. 17, 113503 (2010)] relies on applying a small amplitude signal of fixed frequency to a probe in a plasma and, through network analyzer-based measurements, determining the complex reflection coefficient, ?, for varying probe bias, Vb. The frequency range of the applied signal is restricted to avoid sheath resonant effects and ion contributions such that ?pi ? ? ? ?pe, where ?pi is the ion plasma frequency and ?pe is the electron plasma frequency. For a given frequency and applied bias, both Re(Zac) and Im(Zac) are available from ?. When Re(Zac) is plotted versus Vb, a minimum predicted by theory occurs at ?p [Walker et al., Phys. Plasmas 17, 113503 (2010)]. In addition, Im(Zac) appears at, or very near, a maximum at ?p. As ne decreases and the sheath expands, the minimum becomes harder to discern. The purpose of this work is to demonstrate that when using network analyzer-based measurements, ? itself and Im(Zac) and their derivatives are useful as accompanying indicators to Re(Zac) in these difficult cases. We note the difficulties encountered by the most commonly used plasma diagnostic, the Langmuir probe. Spherical probe data is mainly used in this work, although we present limited data for a cylinder and a disk. To demonstrate the effect of lowered density as a function of probe geometry, we compare the cylinder and disk using only the indicator Re(Zac).

  3. Equation of state for nuclear matter based on density dependent effective interaction

    E-print Network

    D. N. Basu

    2004-10-10

    An interesting method of obtaining equation of state for nuclear matter, from a density dependent M3Y interaction, by minimizing the energy per nucleon is described. The density dependence parameters of the interaction are obtained by reproducing the saturation energy per nucleon and the saturation density of spin and isospin symmetric cold infinite nuclear matter. The nuclear matter equation of state thus obtained is then used to calculate the pressure, the energy density, the nuclear incompressibility and the velocity of sound in nuclear medium. The results obtained are in good agreement with experimental data and provide a unified description of radioactivity, scattering and nuclear matter.

  4. Density functional theory approach for calculation of dielectric properties of warm dense matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saitov, Ilnur

    2015-06-01

    The reflectivity of shocked xenon was measured in the experiments of Mintsev and Zaporoghets for wavelength 1064 nm. But there is no adequate theoretical explanation of these reflectivity results in the framework of the standard methods of nonideal plasma theory. The assumption of significant width to the shock front gives a good agreement with the experimental data. However, there are no evidences of this effect in the experiment. Reflectivity of shocked compressed xenon plasma is calculated in the framework of the density functional theory approach as in. Dependencies on the frequency of incident radiation and on the plasma density are analyzed. The Fresnel formula for the reflectivity is used. The longitudinal expression in the long wavelength limit is applied for the calculation of the imaginary part of the dielectric function. The real part of the dielectric function is calculated by means of the Kramers-Kronig transformation. The approach for the calculation of plasma frequency is developed.

  5. Density-dependent movement and the consequences of the Allee effect in the model organism Tetrahymena.

    PubMed

    Fronhofer, Emanuel A; Kropf, Tabea; Altermatt, Florian

    2015-05-01

    Movement and dispersal are critical processes for almost all organisms in natural populations. Understanding their causes and consequences is therefore of high interest. While both theoretical and empirical work suggest that dispersal, more exactly emigration, is plastic and may be a function of local population density, the functional relationship between the underlying movement strategies and population density has received less attention. We here present evidence for the shape of this reaction norm and are able to differentiate between three possible cues: the relative number of individuals, the presence of metabolites (chemical cues) and resource availability. We performed microcosm experiments with the ciliate model organism Tetrahymena in order to understand the plasticity of movement strategies with respect to local density while controlling for possible confounding effects mediated by the availability of different cues. In addition, we investigated how an Allee effect can influence movement and dispersal plasticity. Our findings suggest that movement strategies in Tetrahymena are plastic and density-dependent. The observed movement reaction norm was U-shaped. This may be due to an Allee effect which led to negative density dependence at low population densities and generally positive density dependence at high population densities due to local competition. This possibly adaptive density-dependent movement strategy was likely mediated by chemical cues. Our experimental work in highly controlled conditions indicates that both environmental cues as well as inherent population dynamics must be considered to understand movement and dispersal. PMID:25376344

  6. Attosecond time delay in valence photoionization and photorecombination of argon: A time-dependent local-density-approximation study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Magrakvelidze, Maia; Madjet, Mohamed El-Amine; Dixit, Gopal; Ivanov, Misha; Chakraborty, Himadri S.

    2015-06-01

    We determine and analyze the quantum phases and time delays in photoionization and photorecombination of valence 3 p and 3 s electrons of argon using the Kohn-Sham local-density-functional approach. The time-dependent local-density approximation is used to account for the electron correlation. Resulting attosecond Wigner-Smith time delays show very good agreement with the recent experiment on argon that measured the delay in 3 p photorecombination [S. B. Schoun et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 112, 153002 (2014), 10.1103/PhysRevLett.112.153002].

  7. ENTROPY, EXPONENTS AND INVARIANT DENSITIES FOR HYPERBOLIC SYSTEMS: DEPENDENCE AND COMPUTATION

    E-print Network

    Jenkinson, Oliver

    ENTROPY, EXPONENTS AND INVARIANT DENSITIES FOR HYPERBOLIC SYSTEMS: DEPENDENCE AND COMPUTATION) entropy on the underlying system. Secondly, we consider methods for efficient computation of (metric) entropy, and related quantities. 1. INTRODUCTION Dynamical systems are often characterized in terms

  8. Coarse-grained, density dependent implicit solvent model reliably reproduces behavior of a model surfactant system

    E-print Network

    Allen, Erik C.

    Density dependent, implicit solvent (DDIS) potentials, the generation of which has been described previously [ E. C. Allen and G. C. Rutledge, J. Chem. Phys. 128, 154115 (2008) ; E. C. Allen and G. C. Rutledge, J. Chem. ...

  9. New approaches to measuring biochar density and Catherine E. Brewer a,b,

    E-print Network

    Gonnermann, Helge

    New approaches to measuring biochar density and porosity Catherine E. Brewer a,b, *, Victoria J. Here, we report the use of two fast, simple density measurement techniques to characterize biochar density and porosity. We measured biochar skeletal density by helium pycnometry and envelope density

  10. Hybrid density functional theory meets quasiparticle calculations: A consistent electronic structure approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Atalla, Viktor; Yoon, Mina; Caruso, Fabio; Rinke, Patrick; Scheffler, Matthias

    2013-10-01

    We propose a scheme to obtain a system-dependent fraction of exact exchange (?) within the framework of hybrid density functional theory (DFT) that is consistent with the G0W0 approach, where G0 is the noninteracting Green function of the system and W0 the screened Coulomb interaction. We exploit the formally exact condition of exact DFT that the energy of the highest occupied molecular orbital corresponds to the ionization potential of a finite system. We identify the optimal ? value for which this statement is obeyed as closely as possible and thereby remove the starting point dependence from the G0W0 method. This combined approach is essential for describing electron transfer (as exemplified by the TTF/TCNQ dimer) and yields the vertical ionization potentials of the G2 benchmark set with a mean absolute percentage error of only ?3%.

  11. A metamaterial having a frequency dependent elasticity tensor and a zero effective mass density

    E-print Network

    Graeme Milton; Pierre Seppecher

    2011-05-04

    Within the context of linear elasticity we show that a two-terminal network of springs and masses, can respond exactly the same as a normal spring, but with a frequency dependent spring constant. As a consequence a network of such springs can have a frequency dependent effective elasticity tensor but zero effective mass density. The internal masses influence the elasticity tensor, but do not contribute to the effective mass density at any frequency.

  12. An Experimental Field Study of Delayed Density Dependence in Natural Populations of Aedes albopictus

    PubMed Central

    Walsh, Rachael K.; Bradley, Caitlin; Apperson, Charles S.; Gould, Fred

    2012-01-01

    Aedes albopictus, a species known to transmit dengue and chikungunya viruses, is primarily a container-inhabiting mosquito. The potential for pathogen transmission by Ae. albopictus has increased our need to understand its ecology and population dynamics. Two parameters that we know little about are the impact of direct density-dependence and delayed density-dependence in the larval stage. The present study uses a manipulative experimental design, under field conditions, to understand the impact of delayed density dependence in a natural population of Ae. albopictus in Raleigh, North Carolina. Twenty liter buckets, divided in half prior to experimentation, placed in the field accumulated rainwater and detritus, providing oviposition and larval production sites for natural populations of Ae. albopictus. Two treatments, a larvae present and larvae absent treatment, were produced in each bucket. After five weeks all larvae were removed from both treatments and the buckets were covered with fine mesh cloth. Equal numbers of first instars were added to both treatments in every bucket. Pupae were collected daily and adults were frozen as they emerged. We found a significant impact of delayed density-dependence on larval survival, development time and adult body size in containers with high larval densities. Our results indicate that delayed density-dependence will have negative impacts on the mosquito population when larval densities are high enough to deplete accessible nutrients faster than the rate of natural food accumulation. PMID:22563428

  13. Invasions with density-dependent ecological parameters Sanjeeva Balasuriya a,b,

    E-print Network

    Balasuriya, Sanjeeva

    Invasions with density-dependent ecological parameters Sanjeeva Balasuriya a,b,Ã a School to consumption, dispersal adaptation due to population pressure, biological control agents, and a range fauna and flora from invasive species. Factors influencing this include the species' range, density

  14. Plasma density inside a femtosecond laser filament in air: Strong dependence on external focusing

    E-print Network

    Becker, Andreas

    Plasma density inside a femtosecond laser filament in air: Strong dependence on external focusing strongly influences the plasma density and the diameter of femtosecond Ti-sapphire laser filaments generated in air. The control of plasma filament parameters is suitable for many applications such as remote

  15. Impacts of poor food availability on positive density dependence in a highly colonial seabird

    PubMed Central

    Ashbrook, Kate; Wanless, Sarah; Harris, Mike P.; Hamer, Keith C.

    2010-01-01

    For species with positive density dependence, costs and benefits of increasing density may depend on environmental conditions, but this has seldom been tested. By examining a colonial seabird (common guillemot) over a period of unprecedented poor food availability, we test two contrasting hypotheses suggesting that birds breeding at high density have: (i) greater leeway to increase foraging effort owing to more effective defence of unattended chicks against predators; and (ii) less leeway, owing to more attacks on unattended chicks by neighbouring adults. Supporting hypothesis 1, birds at high density increased provisioning rates and hence survival of chicks by foraging simultaneously with their partners, whereas at low density, unattended chicks were liable to be killed by predatory gulls and, unexpectedly, razorbills. Simultaneously, supporting hypothesis 2, heightened aggression towards unattended chicks at high density frequently resulted in infanticide, undermining benefits from collective defence against predators. Consequently, over 25 years, the magnitude of positive density dependence was independent of mean breeding success. These data indicate previously unsuspected trade-offs between costs and benefits of increasing density under changing environments. Previous generalizations about the importance of high density for reproductive success have so far remained robust, but such trade-offs could have unpredictable consequences for future population dynamics. PMID:20335206

  16. Dependence of the density limit on the toroidal magnetic field on FTU

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pucella, G.; Tudisco, O.; Apicella, M. L.; Apruzzese, G.; Artaserse, G.; Belli, F.; Bin, W.; Boncagni, L.; Botrugno, A.; Buratti, P.; Calabrò, G.; Castaldo, C.; Cianfarani, C.; Cocilovo, V.; Dimatteo, L.; Esposito, B.; Frigione, D.; Gabellieri, L.; Giovannozzi, E.; Granucci, G.; Marinucci, M.; Marocco, D.; Martines, E.; Mazzitelli, G.; Mazzotta, C.; Nowak, S.; Ramogida, G.; Romano, A.; Tuccillo, A. A.; Zeng, L.; Zuin, M.

    2013-02-01

    The capability of predicting the density limit of a magnetically confined burning plasma is of crucial importance to establish the ultimate performance of a fusion power plant. The Greenwald density limit, commonly used as an empirical scaling law, predicts that the maximum achievable central line-averaged density is given by the relation \\bar{n}_G = k \\bar{J} , where \\bar{J} is the average plasma current density and k is the plasma elongation. However, several experiments have pointed out that such a limit can be overcome in the presence of peaked density profiles. This paper proposes a new empirical scaling law for a limiter tokamak operating in the low-energy confinement mode (L-mode) concerning the case of peaked density profiles associated with the presence of multifaceted asymmetric radiation from the edges. This result is based on dedicated experiments performed on the Frascati Tokamak Upgrade (FTU) under extremely clean machine conditions (Zeff = 1.0-1.5), in which the high-density domain is explored in a wide range of values of plasma current (Ip = 500-900 kA) and toroidal magnetic field (BT = 4-8 T). It is found that the maximum achievable central line-averaged density essentially depends on the toroidal magnetic field only and does not depend on the average plasma current density: the behaviour is explained in terms of density profile peaking in the high-density domain. As a confirmation that the limit is an edge limit, it is also shown that a Greenwald-like scaling (i.e. depending on the current density) actually holds for the edge line-averaged density (at r/a ? 4/5).

  17. Time-dependent density functional theory for open systems with a positivity-preserving decomposition scheme for environment spectral functions.

    PubMed

    Wang, RuLin; Zheng, Xiao; Kwok, YanHo; Xie, Hang; Chen, GuanHua; Yam, ChiYung

    2015-04-14

    Understanding electronic dynamics on material surfaces is fundamentally important for applications including nanoelectronics, inhomogeneous catalysis, and photovoltaics. Practical approaches based on time-dependent density functional theory for open systems have been developed to characterize the dissipative dynamics of electrons in bulk materials. The accuracy and reliability of such approaches depend critically on how the electronic structure and memory effects of surrounding material environment are accounted for. In this work, we develop a novel squared-Lorentzian decomposition scheme, which preserves the positive semi-definiteness of the environment spectral matrix. The resulting electronic dynamics is guaranteed to be both accurate and convergent even in the long-time limit. The long-time stability of electronic dynamics simulation is thus greatly improved within the current decomposition scheme. The validity and usefulness of our new approach are exemplified via two prototypical model systems: quasi-one-dimensional atomic chains and two-dimensional bilayer graphene. PMID:25877567

  18. Time-dependent density functional theory for open systems with a positivity-preserving decomposition scheme for environment spectral functions

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, RuLin; Zheng, Xiao; Kwok, YanHo; Xie, Hang; Chen, GuanHua; Yam, ChiYung

    2015-04-14

    Understanding electronic dynamics on material surfaces is fundamentally important for applications including nanoelectronics, inhomogeneous catalysis, and photovoltaics. Practical approaches based on time-dependent density functional theory for open systems have been developed to characterize the dissipative dynamics of electrons in bulk materials. The accuracy and reliability of such approaches depend critically on how the electronic structure and memory effects of surrounding material environment are accounted for. In this work, we develop a novel squared-Lorentzian decomposition scheme, which preserves the positive semi-definiteness of the environment spectral matrix. The resulting electronic dynamics is guaranteed to be both accurate and convergent even in the long-time limit. The long-time stability of electronic dynamics simulation is thus greatly improved within the current decomposition scheme. The validity and usefulness of our new approach are exemplified via two prototypical model systems: quasi-one-dimensional atomic chains and two-dimensional bilayer graphene.

  19. Time-dependent density functional methods for Raman spectra in open-shell systems.

    PubMed

    Aquino, Fredy W; Schatz, George C

    2014-01-16

    We present an implementation of a time-dependent density functional theory (TD-DFT) linear response module in NWChem for unrestricted DFT calculations and apply it to the calculation of resonant Raman spectra in open-shell molecular systems using the short-time approximation. The new source code was validated and applied to simulate Raman spectra on several doublet organic radicals (e.g., benzyl, benzosemiquinone, TMPD, trans-stilbene anion and cation, and methyl viologen) and the metal complex copper phthalocyanine. We also introduce a divide-and-conquer approach for the evaluation of polarizabilities in relatively large systems (e.g., copper phthalocyanine). The implemented tool gives comparisons with experiment that are similar to what is commonly found for closed-shell systems, with good agreement for most features except for small frequency shifts, and occasionally large deviations for some modes that depend on the molecular system studied, experimental conditions not being accounted in the modeling such as solvation effects and extra solvent-based peaks, and approximations in the underlying theory. The approximations used in the quantum chemical modeling include (i) choice of exchange-correlation functional and basis set; (ii) harmonic approximation used in the frequency analysis to determine vibrational normal modes; and (iii) short-time approximation (omission of nuclear motion effects) used in calculating resonant Raman spectra. PMID:24380604

  20. Demographic variability and density-dependent dynamics of a free-ranging rhesus macaque population

    PubMed Central

    Hernández-Pacheco, Raisa; Rawlins, Richard G.; Kessler, Matthew J.; Williams, Lawrence E.; Ruiz-Maldonado, Tagrid M.; González-Martínez, Janis; Ruiz-Lambides, Angelina V.; Sabat, Alberto M.

    2014-01-01

    Density-dependence is hypothesized as the major mechanism of population regulation. However, the lack of long-term demographic data has hampered the use of density-dependent models in nonhuman primates. In this study, we make use of the long-term demographic data from Cayo Santiago’s rhesus macaques to parameterize and analyze both a density-independent and a density-dependent population matrix model, and compare their projections with the observed population changes. We also employ a retrospective analysis to determine how variance in vital rates, and covariance among them, contributed to the observed variation in long-term fitness across different levels of population density. The population exhibited negative density-dependence in fertility and the model incorporating this relationship accounted for 98% of the observed population dynamics. Variation in survival and fertility of sexually active individuals contributed the most to the variation in long-term fitness, while vital rates displaying high temporal variability exhibited lower sensitivities. Our findings are novel in describing density-dependent dynamics in a provisioned primate population, and in suggesting that selection is acting to lower the variance in the population growth rate by minimizing the variation in adult survival at high density. Because density-dependent mechanisms may become stronger in wild primate populations due to increasing habitat loss and food scarcity, our study demonstrates it is important to incorporate variation in population size, as well as demographic variability into population viability analyses for a better understanding of the mechanisms regulating the growth of primate populations. PMID:23847126

  1. Spatial, Temporal, and Density-Dependent Components of Habitat Quality for a Desert Owl

    PubMed Central

    Flesch, Aaron D.; Hutto, Richard L.; van Leeuwen, Willem J. D.; Hartfield, Kyle; Jacobs, Sky

    2015-01-01

    Spatial variation in resources is a fundamental driver of habitat quality but the realized value of resources at any point in space may depend on the effects of conspecifics and stochastic factors, such as weather, which vary through time. We evaluated the relative and combined effects of habitat resources, weather, and conspecifics on habitat quality for ferruginous pygmy-owls (Glaucidium brasilianum) in the Sonoran Desert of northwest Mexico by monitoring reproductive output and conspecific abundance over 10 years in and around 107 territory patches. Variation in reproductive output was much greater across space than time, and although habitat resources explained a much greater proportion of that variation (0.70) than weather (0.17) or conspecifics (0.13), evidence for interactions among each of these components of the environment was strong. Relative to habitat that was persistently low in quality, high-quality habitat buffered the negative effects of conspecifics and amplified the benefits of favorable weather, but did not buffer the disadvantages of harsh weather. Moreover, the positive effects of favorable weather at low conspecific densities were offset by intraspecific competition at high densities. Although realized habitat quality declined with increasing conspecific density suggesting interference mechanisms associated with an Ideal Free Distribution, broad spatial heterogeneity in habitat quality persisted. Factors linked to food resources had positive effects on reproductive output but only where nest cavities were sufficiently abundant to mitigate the negative effects of heterospecific enemies. Annual precipitation and brooding-season temperature had strong multiplicative effects on reproductive output, which declined at increasing rates as drought and temperature increased, reflecting conditions predicted to become more frequent with climate change. Because the collective environment influences habitat quality in complex ways, integrated approaches that consider habitat resources, stochastic factors, and conspecifics are necessary to accurately assess habitat quality. PMID:25786257

  2. Spatial, temporal, and density-dependent components of habitat quality for a desert owl.

    PubMed

    Flesch, Aaron D; Hutto, Richard L; van Leeuwen, Willem J D; Hartfield, Kyle; Jacobs, Sky

    2015-01-01

    Spatial variation in resources is a fundamental driver of habitat quality but the realized value of resources at any point in space may depend on the effects of conspecifics and stochastic factors, such as weather, which vary through time. We evaluated the relative and combined effects of habitat resources, weather, and conspecifics on habitat quality for ferruginous pygmy-owls (Glaucidium brasilianum) in the Sonoran Desert of northwest Mexico by monitoring reproductive output and conspecific abundance over 10 years in and around 107 territory patches. Variation in reproductive output was much greater across space than time, and although habitat resources explained a much greater proportion of that variation (0.70) than weather (0.17) or conspecifics (0.13), evidence for interactions among each of these components of the environment was strong. Relative to habitat that was persistently low in quality, high-quality habitat buffered the negative effects of conspecifics and amplified the benefits of favorable weather, but did not buffer the disadvantages of harsh weather. Moreover, the positive effects of favorable weather at low conspecific densities were offset by intraspecific competition at high densities. Although realized habitat quality declined with increasing conspecific density suggesting interference mechanisms associated with an Ideal Free Distribution, broad spatial heterogeneity in habitat quality persisted. Factors linked to food resources had positive effects on reproductive output but only where nest cavities were sufficiently abundant to mitigate the negative effects of heterospecific enemies. Annual precipitation and brooding-season temperature had strong multiplicative effects on reproductive output, which declined at increasing rates as drought and temperature increased, reflecting conditions predicted to become more frequent with climate change. Because the collective environment influences habitat quality in complex ways, integrated approaches that consider habitat resources, stochastic factors, and conspecifics are necessary to accurately assess habitat quality. PMID:25786257

  3. Role of prey and intraspecific density dependence on the population growth of an avian top predator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernandez-de-Simon, Javier; Díaz-Ruiz, Francisco; Cirilli, Francesca; Tortosa, Francisco S.; Villafuerte, Rafael; Ferreras, Pablo

    2014-10-01

    Exploring predator-prey systems in diverse ecosystems increases our knowledge about ecological processes. Predator population growth may be positive when conspecific density is low but predators also need areas with prey availability, associated with competition, which increases the risk of suffering losses but stabilises populations. We studied relationships between European rabbits Oryctolagus cuniculus (prey) and adult eagle owls Bubo bubo (predators) in south-western Europe. We assessed models explaining the predator population growth and stability. We estimated the abundance of rabbits and adult eagle owls during three years in eight localities of central-southern Spain. We explored models including rabbit and adult eagle owl abundance, accounting for yearly variations and including the locality as a random variable. We found that population growth of adult eagle owls was positive in situations with low conspecific abundance and tended to be negative but approaching equilibrium in situations of higher conspecific abundance. Population growth was also positively related to previous summer rabbit density when taking into account eagle owl conspecific abundance, possibly indicating that rabbits may support recruitment. Furthermore, abundance stability of adult eagle owls was positively related to previous winter-spring rabbit density, which could suggest predator population stabilisation through quick territory occupation in high-quality areas. These results exemplify the trade-off between prey availability and abundance of adult predators related to population growth and abundance stability in the eagle owl-rabbit system in south-western Europe. Despite rabbits have greatly declined during the last decades and eagle owls locally specialise on them, eagle owls currently have a favourable conservation status. As eagle owls are the only nocturnal raptor with such dependence on rabbits, this could point out that predators may overcome prey decreases in areas with favourable climate and prey in the absence of superior competitors with similar foraging mode.

  4. Combined effects of climate, predation, and density dependence on Greater and Lesser Scaup population dynamics.

    PubMed

    Ross, Beth E; Hooten, Mevin B; DeVink, Jean-Michel; Koons, David N

    2015-09-01

    An understanding of species relationships is critical in the management and conservation of populations facing climate change, yet few studies address how climate alters species interactions and other population drivers. We use a long-term, broad-scale data set of relative abundance to examine the influence of climate, predators, and density dependence on the population dynamics of declining scaup (Aythya) species within the core of their breeding range. The state-space modeling approach we use applies to a wide range of wildlife species, especially populations monitored over broad spatiotemporal extents. Using this approach, we found that immediate snow cover extent in the preceding winter and spring had the strongest effects, with increases in mean snow cover extent having a positive effect on the local surveyed abundance of scaup. The direct effects of mesopredator abundance on scaup population dynamics were weaker, but the results still indicated a potentil interactive process between climate and food web dynamics (mesopredators, alternative prey, and scaup). By considering climate variables and other potential effects on population dynamics, and using a rigorous estimation framework, we provide insight into complex ecological processes for guiding. conservation and policy actions aimed at mitigating and reversing the decline of scaup. PMID:26552268

  5. Comparison of real-time and linear-response time-dependent density functional theories for molecular chromophores ranging from sparse to high densities of states

    SciTech Connect

    Tussupbayev, Samat; Govind, Niranjan; Lopata, Kenneth A.; Cramer, Christopher J.

    2015-03-10

    We assess the performance of real-time time-dependent density functional theory (RT-TDDFT) for the calculation of absorption spectra of 12 organic dye molecules relevant to photovoltaics and dye sensitized solar cells with 8 exchange-correlation functionals (3 traditional, 3 global hybrids, and 2 range-separated hybrids). We compare the calculations with traditional linear-response (LR) TDDFT. In addition, we demonstrate the efficacy of the RT-TDDFT approach to calculate wide absorption spectra of two large chromophores relevant to photovoltaics and molecular switches.

  6. An evaluation of density-dependent and density-independent influences on population growth rates in Weddell seals

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rotella, J.J.; Link, W.A.; Nichols, J.D.; Hadley, G.L.; Garrott, R.A.; Proffitt, K.M.

    2009-01-01

    Much of the existing literature that evaluates the roles of density-dependent and density-independent factors on population dynamics has been called into question in recent years because measurement errors were not properly dealt with in analyses. Using state-space models to account for measurement errors, we evaluated a set of competing models for a 22-year time series of mark-resight estimates of abundance for a breeding population of female Weddell seals (Leptonychotes weddellii) studied in Erebus Bay, Antarctica. We tested for evidence of direct density dependence in growth rates and evaluated whether equilibrium population size was related to seasonal sea-ice extent and the Southern Oscillation Index (SOI). We found strong evidence of negative density dependence in annual growth rates for a population whose estimated size ranged from 438 to 623 females during the study. Based on Bayes factors, a density-dependence-only model was favored over models that also included en! vironmental covariates. According to the favored model, the population had a stationary distribution with a mean of 497 females (SD = 60.5), an expected growth rate of 1.10 (95% credible interval 1.08-1.15) when population size was 441 females, and a rate of 0.90 (95% credible interval 0.87-0.93) for a population of 553 females. A model including effects of SOI did receive some support and indicated a positive relationship between SOI and population size. However, effects of SOI were not large, and including the effect did not greatly reduce our estimate of process variation. We speculate that direct density dependence occurred because rates of adult survival, breeding, and temporary emigration were affected by limitations on per capita food resources and space for parturition and pup-rearing. To improve understanding of the relative roles of various demographic components and their associated vital rates to population growth rate, mark-recapture methods can be applied that incorporate both environmental covariates and the seal abundance estimates that were developed here. An improved understanding of why vital rates change with changing population abundance will only come as we develop a better understanding of the processes affecting marine food resources in the Southern Ocean.

  7. Sexual segregation in North American elk: the role of density dependence

    PubMed Central

    Stewart, Kelley M; Walsh, Danielle R; Kie, John G; Dick, Brian L; Bowyer, R Terry

    2015-01-01

    We investigated how density-dependent processes and subsequent variation in nutritional condition of individuals influenced both timing and duration of sexual segregation and selection of resources. During 1999–2001, we experimentally created two population densities of North American elk (Cervus elaphus), a high-density population at 20 elk/km2, and a low-density population at 4 elk/km2 to test hypotheses relative to timing and duration of sexual segregation and variation in selection of resources. We used multi-response permutation procedures to investigate patterns of sexual segregation, and resource selection functions to document differences in selection of resources by individuals in high- and low-density populations during sexual segregation and aggregation. The duration of sexual segregation was 2 months longer in the high-density population and likely was influenced by individuals in poorer nutritional condition, which corresponded with later conception and parturition, than at low density. Males and females in the high-density population overlapped in selection of resources to a greater extent than in the low-density population, probably resulting from density-dependent effects of increased intraspecific competition and lower availability of resources. PMID:25691992

  8. Time-Dependent Density-Functional Theory for Nonadiabatic Electronic Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krishna, Vinod

    2009-02-01

    We show that the time-dependent single electron, nuclear density matrix of an interacting electronic system coupled to nuclear degrees of freedom can be exactly reproduced by that of an electronic system with arbitrarily specified electron-electron interactions coupled to the same nuclear degrees of freedom, given the initial density matrix of the interacting system. This formalism enables the construction of rigorous time-dependent density-functional theories to study nonadiabatic electronic dynamics. We obtain the Runge-Gross and van Leeuwen theorems as special cases in the adiabatic limit.

  9. Dependence of the switching current density on the junction sizes in spin transfer torque

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    You, Chun-Yeol; Jung, Myung-Hwa

    2013-02-01

    We investigate the dependence of switching current density on the junction sizes in the in-plane spin transfer torque nanopillar structures by using micromagnetic simulations. While the macrospin model predicts weak dependence of switching current density on the junction sizes, we find that the switching current density is a sensitive function of the junction sizes. It can be explained with the complicated spin configurations and dynamics during the switching process. The detail spin configurations and dynamics are determined by spin wave excitation with the finite wave vector, which is related with the exchange coupling energy and junction shape.

  10. Density-dependent habitat selection by brown-headed cowbirds (Molothrus ater) in tallgrass prairie

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Jensen, W.E.; Cully, J.F., Jr.

    2005-01-01

    Local distributions of avian brood parasites among their host habitats may depend upon conspecific parasite density. We used isodar analysis to test for density-dependent habitat selection in brown-headed cowbirds (Molothrus ater) among tallgrass prairie adjacent to wooded edges, and prairie interior habitat (>100 m from wooded edges) with and without experimental perches. Eight study sites containing these three habitat treatments were established along a geographical gradient in cowbird abundance within the Flint Hills region of Eastern Kansas and Oklahoma, USA. The focal host species of our study, the dickcissel (Spiza americana), is the most abundant and preferred cowbird host in the prairie of this region. Cowbird relative abundance and cowbird:host abundance ratios were used as estimates of female cowbird density, whereas cowbird egg density was measured as parasitism frequency (percent of dickcissel nests parasitized), and parasitism intensity (number of cowbird eggs per parasitized nest). Geographical variation in cowbird abundance was independent of host abundance. Within study sites, host abundance was highest in wooded edge plots, intermediate in the experimental perch plots, and lowest in prairie interior. Cowbirds exhibited a pattern of density-dependent selection of prairie edge versus experimental perch and interior habitats. On sites where measures of cowbird density were lowest, all cowbird density estimates (female cowbirds and their eggs) were highest near (???100 m) wooded edges, where host and perch availability are highest. However, as overall cowbird density increased geographically, these density estimates increased more rapidly in experimental perch plots and prairie interiors. Variation in cowbird abundance and cowbird:host ratios suggested density-dependent cowbird selection of experimental perch over prairie interior habitat, but parasitism levels on dickcissel nests were similar among these two habitats at all levels of local cowbird parasitism. The density-dependent pattern of cowbird distribution among prairie edge and interior suggested that density effects on perceived cowbird fitness are greatest at wooded edges. A positive relationship between daily nest mortality rates of parasitized nests during the nestling period with parasitism intensity levels per nest suggested a density-dependent effect on cowbird reproductive success. However, this relationship was similar among habitats, such that all habitats should have been perceived as being equally suitable to cowbirds at all densities. Other unmeasured effects on cowbird habitat suitability (e.g., reduced cowbird success in edge-dwelling host nests, cowbird despotism at edges) might have affected cowbird habitat selection. Managers attempting to minimize cowbird parasitism on sensitive cowbird hosts should consider that hosts in otherwise less-preferred cowbird habitats (e.g., habitat interiors) are at greater risk of being parasitized where cowbirds become particularly abundant. ?? Springer-Verlag 2004.

  11. The dependence of Islamic and conventional stocks: A copula approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Razak, Ruzanna Ab; Ismail, Noriszura

    2015-09-01

    Recent studies have found that Islamic stocks are dependent on conventional stocks and they appear to be more risky. In Asia, particularly in Islamic countries, research on dependence involving Islamic and non-Islamic stock markets is limited. The objective of this study is to investigate the dependence between financial times stock exchange Hijrah Shariah index and conventional stocks (EMAS and KLCI indices). Using the copula approach and a time series model for each marginal distribution function, the copula parameters were estimated. The Elliptical copula was selected to present the dependence structure of each pairing of the Islamic stock and conventional stock. Specifically, the Islamic versus conventional stocks (Shariah-EMAS and Shariah-KLCI) had lower dependence compared to conventional versus conventional stocks (EMAS-KLCI). These findings suggest that the occurrence of shocks in a conventional stock will not have strong impact on the Islamic stock.

  12. Temperature dependence of vibrational lifetimes at the critical density in supercritical mixtures

    E-print Network

    Fayer, Michael D.

    Temperature dependence of vibrational lifetimes at the critical density in supercritical mixtures D measurements are reported for the temperature dependence of the vibrational lifetime, T1 , of the asymmetric CO the critical temperature to substantially higher temperatures. T1 is found initially to increase

  13. Density dependence of the s-wave repulsion in pionic atoms

    E-print Network

    E. Friedman

    2002-06-30

    Several mechanisms of density dependence of the s-wave repulsion in pionic atoms, beyond the conventional model, are tested by parameter fits to a large (106 points) set of data from $^{16}$O to $^{238}$U, including `deeply bound' states in $^{205}$Pb. Special attention is paid to the proper choice of nuclear density distributions. A density-dependent isovector scattering amplitude suggested recently by Weise to result from a density dependence of the pion decay constant is introduced and found to account for most of the so-called anomalous repulsion. The presence of such an effect might indicate partial chiral symmetry restoration in dense matter. The anomalous repulsion is fully accounted for when an additional relativistic impulse approximation term is included in the potential.

  14. Time-dependent first-principles approaches to PV materials

    SciTech Connect

    Miyamoto, Yoshiyuki

    2013-12-10

    Computational scheme for designing photovoltaic (PV) materials is presented. First-principles electron dynamics of photo-excitation and subsequent electron-hole splitting is performed based on the time-dependent density functional theory. Photo-induced enhancement of dipole moment was observed in a polar crystal and a donor-acceptor molecular pair. These experiences will pave a way to design PV material from first-principles simulations.

  15. Representing the thermal state in time-dependent density functional theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Modine, N. A.; Hatcher, R. M.

    2015-05-01

    Classical molecular dynamics (MD) provides a powerful and widely used approach to determining thermodynamic properties by integrating the classical equations of motion of a system of atoms. Time-Dependent Density Functional Theory (TDDFT) provides a powerful and increasingly useful approach to integrating the quantum equations of motion for a system of electrons. TDDFT efficiently captures the unitary evolution of a many-electron state by mapping the system into a fictitious non-interacting system. In analogy to MD, one could imagine obtaining the thermodynamic properties of an electronic system from a TDDFT simulation in which the electrons are excited from their ground state by a time-dependent potential and then allowed to evolve freely in time while statistical data are captured from periodic snapshots of the system. For a variety of systems (e.g., many metals), the electrons reach an effective state of internal equilibrium due to electron-electron interactions on a time scale that is short compared to electron-phonon equilibration. During the initial time-evolution of such systems following electronic excitation, electron-phonon interactions should be negligible, and therefore, TDDFT should successfully capture the internal thermalization of the electrons. However, it is unclear how TDDFT represents the resulting thermal state. In particular, the thermal state is usually represented in quantum statistical mechanics as a mixed state, while the occupations of the TDDFT wavefunctions are fixed by the initial state in TDDFT. We work to address this puzzle by (A) reformulating quantum statistical mechanics so that thermodynamic expectations can be obtained as an unweighted average over a set of many-body pure states and (B) constructing a family of non-interacting (single determinant) TDDFT states that approximate the required many-body states for the canonical ensemble.

  16. Density dependent growth in adult brown frogs Rana arvalis and Rana temporaria - A field experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loman, Jon; Lardner, Björn

    2009-11-01

    In species with complex life cycles, density regulation can operate on any of the stages. In frogs there are almost no studies of density effects on the performance of adult frogs in the terrestrial habitat. We therefore studied the effect of summer density on the growth rate of adult frogs during four years. Four 30 by 30 m plots in a moist meadow were used. In early summer, when settled after post-breeding migration, frogs ( Rana arvalis and Rana temporaria that have a very similar ecology and potentially compete) were enclosed by erecting a fence around the plots. Frogs were captured, measured, marked and partly relocated to create two high density and two low density plots. In early autumn the frogs were again captured and their individual summer growth determined. Growth effects were evaluated in relation to two density measures: density by design (high/low manipulation), and actual (numerical) density. R. arvalis in plots with low density by design grew faster than those in high density plots. No such effect was found for R. temporaria. For none of the species was growth related to actual summer density, determined by the Lincoln index and including the density manipulation. The result suggests that R. arvalis initially settled according to an ideal free distribution and that density had a regulatory effect (mediated through growth). The fact that there were no density effects on R. temporaria (and a significant difference in its response to that of R. arvalis) suggests it is a superior competitor to R. arvalis during the terrestrial phase. There were no density effects on frog condition index, suggesting that the growth rate modifications may actually be an adaptive trait of R. arvalis. The study demonstrates that density regulation may be dependent on resources in frogs' summer habitat.

  17. Evaluation of Fuel Benefits Depending on Continuous Descent Approach Procedures

    E-print Network

    Sun, Dengfeng

    1 Evaluation of Fuel Benefits Depending on Continuous Descent Approach Procedures Yi Cao, Li was simulated based on actual recorded traffic data. The fuel burn for the simulated traffic was estimated using the Base of Aircraft Data (BADA) Thrust Specific Fuel Consumption model and compared to a baseline

  18. Keystone and intraguild predation, intraspecific density dependence, and a guild of coexisting consumers.

    PubMed

    McPeek, Mark A

    2014-01-01

    Previous models of diamond-shaped and intraguild predation community modules have represented the essence of the trade-off necessary for a top predator to prevent competitive exclusion among a set of resource-limited consumers. However, at most two consumers can coexist in these models. In this article, I show how intraspecific density dependence in the consumers can permit many more than two consumers to coexist in these community modules. Moreover, responses of the community to removal of the top predator depend on the patterns of the strengths of species interactions relative to the strengths of intraspecific density dependence. If the consumers experience similar strengths of intraspecific density dependence, removing the top predator will in most cases have little effect on consumer species richness. A substantial reduction in consumer species richness with predator removal (i.e., the keystone predation effect) will typically occur only when the consumer that can support a population at the lowest resource abundance also (1) experiences substantially weaker intraspecific density dependence than other consumers and (2) experiences significantly higher levels of mortality from the predator. These results identify how intraspecific density dependence fosters the coexistence of multiple consumers in two important community modules and shapes the responses of these community modules to perturbations such as predator removal. PMID:24334745

  19. Ecological drivers of guanaco recruitment: variable carrying capacity and density dependence.

    PubMed

    Marino, Andrea; Pascual, Miguel; Baldi, Ricardo

    2014-08-01

    Ungulates living in predator-free reserves offer the opportunity to study the influence of food limitation on population dynamics without the potentially confounding effects of top-down regulation or livestock competition. We assessed the influence of relative forage availability and population density on guanaco recruitment in two predator-free reserves in eastern Patagonia, with contrasting scenarios of population density. We also explored the relative contribution of the observed recruitment to population growth using a deterministic linear model to test the assumption that the studied populations were closed units. The observed densities increased twice as fast as our theoretical populations, indicating that marked immigration has taken place during the recovery phase experienced by both populations, thus we rejected the closed-population assumption. Regarding the factors driving variation in recruitment, in the low- to medium-density setting, we found a positive linear relationship between recruitment and surrogates of annual primary production, whereas no density dependence was detected. In contrast, in the high-density scenario, both annual primary production and population density showed marked effects, indicating a positive relationship between recruitment and per capita food availability above a food-limitation threshold. Our results support the idea that environmental carrying capacity fluctuates in response to climatic variation, and that these fluctuations have relevant consequences for herbivore dynamics, such as amplifying density dependence in drier years. We conclude that including the coupling between environmental variability in resources and density dependence is crucial to model ungulate population dynamics; to overlook temporal changes in carrying capacity may even mask density dependence as well as other important processes. PMID:24899131

  20. Comparison of Real-Time and Linear-Response Time-Dependent Density Functional Theories for Molecular Chromophores Ranging from Sparse to High Densities of States.

    PubMed

    Tussupbayev, Samat; Govind, Niranjan; Lopata, Kenneth; Cramer, Christopher J

    2015-03-10

    We assess the performance of real-time time-dependent density functional theory (RT-TDDFT) for the calculation of absorption spectra of 12 organic dye molecules relevant to photovoltaics and dye-sensitized solar cells with 8 exchange-correlation functionals (3 traditional, 3 global hybrids, and 2 range-separated hybrids). We compare the calculations with traditional linear-response (LR) TDDFT and experimental spectra. In addition, we demonstrate the efficacy of the RT-TDDFT approach to calculate wide absorption spectra of two large chromophores relevant to photovoltaics and molecular switches. RT-TDDFT generally requires longer simulation times, compared to LR-TDDFT, for absorption spectra of small systems. However, it becomes more effective for the calculation of wide absorption spectra of large molecular complexes and systems with very high densities of states. PMID:26579760

  1. A comprehensive approach for the assessment of in-situ pavement density using GPR technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plati, Christina; Georgiou, Panos; Loizos, Andreas

    2013-04-01

    Proper construction of the asphalt pavement is a prerequisite to developing a long lasting roadway that does not require extensive future maintenance. This goal is achieved by verifying that design specifications are met through the use of quality assurance (QA) practices. The in-situ density is regarded as one of the most important controls used to ensure that a pavement being placed is of high quality because it is a good indicator of future performance. In-situ density is frequently assessed utilizing one or more of the following three methods: cores, nuclear density gauge measurements or non-nuclear density gauge measurements. Each of the above mentioned methods, however, have their distinct disadvantages. Cores, for example, are generally considered to be the most accurate means of measuring in-situ density, however, they are a time consuming and destructive test that introduces a defect into asphalt pavements. Because of the destructive nature associated with coring, contractors and agencies have alternatively used non-destructive nuclear and non-nuclear density gauges for quality control purposes. These instruments allow for a more rapid assessment of the in-situ density, allowing measurements to be taken even during the pavement's construction. The disadvantage of these gauges are that they provide density readings only at discrete locations of the asphalt pavement mat, while no consensus exists among pavement researchers on the proper correlation between the gauges and core density. In recent years, numerous alternative methods have been introduced for the assessment of in-situ density, both during asphalt pavement construction and afterwards. These methods include, amongst others, intelligent compaction, thermal imaging and ground penetrating radar (GPR). Among these methods, GPR has been defined as both a technically feasible and promising method for the nondestructive, rapid, and continuous evaluation of in-situ asphalt pavement density based on electromagnetic mixing (EM) theory, through the utilization of proper models. These models enable the prediction of asphalt mixture density dependent on its bulk dielectric constant as measured by the GPR, the dielectric properties of the asphalt mix materials, as well as other material information. The goal of the present study is to attempt to verify the prediction performance of various density models. To accomplish this goal GPR surveys were carried out in the field during asphalt pavement construction to evaluate the density results due to different compaction modes. The GPR data was analyzed to calculate the appropriate asphalt mix dielectric properties needed for the activation of the considered density prediction models. Predicted densities were compared with densities of the field cores extracted from the as-built asphalt pavement prior to trafficking. It was found that the predicted density values were significantly lower when compared to the ground truth data. A further investigation of the effect of temperature on GPR readings showed that GPR seems to overestimate the in-situ density. However, this approach could be used effectively to evaluate the performance of different compaction methods and set up the compaction pattern that is needed to achieve the desired asphalt pavement density.

  2. Density-dependent intraspecific aggression regulates survival in northern Yellowstone wolves (Canis lupus).

    PubMed

    Cubaynes, Sarah; MacNulty, Daniel R; Stahler, Daniel R; Quimby, Kira A; Smith, Douglas W; Coulson, Tim

    2014-11-01

    Understanding the population dynamics of top-predators is essential to assess their impact on ecosystems and to guide their management. Key to this understanding is identifying the mechanisms regulating vital rates. Determining the influence of density on survival is necessary to understand the extent to which human-caused mortality is compensatory or additive. In wolves (Canis lupus), empirical evidence for density-dependent survival is lacking. Dispersal is considered the principal way in which wolves adjust their numbers to prey supply or compensate for human exploitation. However, studies to date have primarily focused on exploited wolf populations, in which density-dependent mechanisms are likely weak due to artificially low wolf densities. Using 13 years of data on 280 collared wolves in Yellowstone National Park, we assessed the effect of wolf density, prey abundance and population structure, as well as winter severity, on age-specific survival in two areas (prey-rich vs. prey-poor) of the national park. We further analysed cause-specific mortality and explored the factors driving intraspecific aggression in the prey-rich northern area of the park. Overall, survival rates decreased during the study. In northern Yellowstone, density dependence regulated adult survival through an increase in intraspecific aggression, independent of prey availability. In the interior of the park, adult survival was less variable and density-independent, despite reduced prey availability. There was no effect of prey population structure in northern Yellowstone, or of winter severity in either area. Survival was similar among yearlings and adults, but lower for adults older than 6 years. Our results indicate that density-dependent intraspecific aggression is a major driver of adult wolf survival in northern Yellowstone, suggesting intrinsic density-dependent mechanisms have the potential to regulate wolf populations at high ungulate densities. When low prey availability or high removal rates maintain wolves at lower densities, limited inter-pack interactions may prevent density-dependent survival, consistent with our findings in the interior of the park. PMID:24749694

  3. Universal time dependence of nighttime F region densities at high latitudes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    De La Beaujardiere, O.; Wickwar, V. B.; Caudal, G.; Holt, J. M.; Craven, J. D.; Frank, L. A.; Brace, L. H.

    1985-01-01

    Coincident auroral-zone experiments using three incoherent-scatter radars at widely spaced longitudes are reported. The observational results demonstrate that, during the night, the F layer electron density is strongly dependent on the longitude of the observing site. Ionization patches were observed in the nighttime F region from the Chatanika and EISCAT radars, while densities observed from the Millstone radar were substantially smaller. The electron density within these maxima is larger at EISCAT than at Chatanika. When observed in the midnight sector auroral zone, these densities had a peak density at a high altitude of 360-475 km. The density was maximum when EISCAT was in the midnight sector and minimum when Millstone was in the midnight sector. A minimum in insolation in the auroral zone occurs at the UT when Millstone is in the midnight sector.

  4. Adaptive nest clustering and density-dependent nest survival in dabbling ducks

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ringelman, Kevin M.; Eadie, John M.; Ackerman, Joshua T.

    2014-01-01

    Density-dependent population regulation is observed in many taxa, and understanding the mechanisms that generate density dependence is especially important for the conservation of heavily-managed species. In one such system, North American waterfowl, density dependence is often observed at continental scales, and nest predation has long been implicated as a key factor driving this pattern. However, despite extensive research on this topic, it remains unclear if and how nest density influences predation rates. Part of this confusion may have arisen because previous studies have studied density-dependent predation at relatively large spatial and temporal scales. Because the spatial distribution of nests changes throughout the season, which potentially influences predator behavior, nest survival may vary through time at relatively small spatial scales. As such, density-dependent nest predation might be more detectable at a spatially- and temporally-refined scale and this may provide new insights into nest site selection and predator foraging behavior. Here, we used three years of data on nest survival of two species of waterfowl, mallards and gadwall, to more fully explore the relationship between local nest clustering and nest survival. Throughout the season, we found that the distribution of nests was consistently clustered at small spatial scales (˜50–400 m), especially for mallard nests, and that this pattern was robust to yearly variation in nest density and the intensity of predation. We demonstrated further that local nest clustering had positive fitness consequences – nests with closer nearest neighbors were more likely to be successful, a result that is counter to the general assumption that nest predation rates increase with nest density.

  5. Effects of hepatocyte growth factor on glutathione synthesis, growth, and apoptosis is cell density-dependent

    SciTech Connect

    Yang Heping; Magilnick, Nathaniel; Xia Meng; Lu, Shelly C.

    2008-01-15

    Hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) is a potent hepatocyte mitogen that exerts opposing effects depending on cell density. Glutathione (GSH) is the main non-protein thiol in mammalian cells that modulates growth and apoptosis. We previously showed that GSH level is inversely related to cell density of hepatocytes and is positively related to growth. Our current work examined whether HGF can modulate GSH synthesis in a cell density-dependent manner and how GSH in turn influence HGF's effects. We found HGF treatment of H4IIE cells increased cell GSH levels only under subconfluent density. The increase in cell GSH under low density was due to increased transcription of GSH synthetic enzymes. This correlated with increased protein levels and nuclear binding activities of c-Jun, c-Fos, p65, p50, Nrf1 and Nrf2 to the promoter region of these genes. HGF acts as a mitogen in H4IIE cells under low cell density and protects against tumor necrosis factor {alpha} (TNF{alpha})-induced apoptosis by limiting JNK activation. However, HGF is pro-apoptotic under high cell density and exacerbates TNF{alpha}-induced apoptosis by potentiating JNK activation. The increase in cell GSH under low cell density allows HGF to exert its full mitogenic effect but is not necessary for its anti-apoptotic effect.

  6. A physical-space approach for the probability hypothesis density and cardinalized probability hypothesis density filters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Erdinc, Ozgur; Willett, Peter; Bar-Shalom, Yaakov

    2006-05-01

    The probability hypothesis density (PHD) filter, an automatically track-managed multi-target tracker, is attracting increasing but cautious attention. Its derivation is elegant and mathematical, and thus of course many engineers fear it; perhaps that is currently limiting the number of researchers working on the subject. In this paper, we explore a physical-space approach - a bin model - which leads us to arrive the same filter equations as the PHD. Unlike the original derivation of the PHD filter, the concepts used are the familiar ones of conditional probability. The original PHD suffers from a "target-death" problem in which even a single missed detection can lead to the apparent disappearance of a target. To obviate this, PHD originator Mahler has recently developed a new "cardinalized" version of PHD (CPHD). We are able to extend our physical-space derivation to the CPHD case as well. We stress that the original derivations are mathematically correct, and need no embellishment from us; our contribution here is to offer an alternative derivation, one that we find appealing.

  7. On the density dependent hadron field theory at finite temperature and its thermodynamical consistency

    E-print Network

    S. S. Avancini; M. E. Bracco; M. Chiapparini; D. P. Menezes

    2003-11-06

    In this work we study in a formal way the density dependent hadron field theory at finite temperature for nuclear matter. The thermodynamical potential and related quantities, as energy density and pressure are derived in two different ways. We first obtain the thermodynamical potential from the grand partition function, where the Hamiltonian depends on the density operator and is truncated at first order. We then reobtain the thermodynamical potential by calculating explicitly the energy density in a Thomas-Fermi approximation and considering the entropy of a fermi gas. The distribution functions for particles and antiparticles are the output of the minimization of the thermodynamical potential. It is shown that in the mean field theory the thermodynamical consistency is achieved. The connection with effective chiral lagrangians with Brown-Rho scaling is discussed.

  8. Exposing extinction risk analysis to pathogens: Is disease just another form of density dependence?

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gerber, L.R.; McCallum, H.; Lafferty, K.D.; Sabo, J.L.; Dobson, A.

    2005-01-01

    In the United States and several other countries, the development of population viability analyses (PVA) is a legal requirement of any species survival plan developed for threatened and endangered species. Despite the importance of pathogens in natural populations, little attention has been given to host-pathogen dynamics in PVA. To study the effect of infectious pathogens on extinction risk estimates generated from PVA, we review and synthesize the relevance of host-pathogen dynamics in analyses of extinction risk. We then develop a stochastic, density-dependent host-parasite model to investigate the effects of disease on the persistence of endangered populations. We show that this model converges on a Ricker model of density dependence under a suite of limiting assumptions, including a high probability that epidemics will arrive and occur. Using this modeling framework, we then quantify: (1) dynamic differences between time series generated by disease and Ricker processes with the same parameters; (2) observed probabilities of quasi-extinction for populations exposed to disease or self-limitation; and (3) bias in probabilities of quasi-extinction estimated by density-independent PVAs when populations experience either form of density dependence. Our results suggest two generalities about the relationships among disease, PVA, and the management of endangered species. First, disease more strongly increases variability in host abundance and, thus, the probability of quasi-extinction, than does self-limitation. This result stems from the fact that the effects and the probability of occurrence of disease are both density dependent. Second, estimates of quasi-extinction are more often overly optimistic for populations experiencing disease than for those subject to self-limitation. Thus, although the results of density-independent PVAs may be relatively robust to some particular assumptions about density dependence, they are less robust when endangered populations are known to be susceptible to disease. If potential management actions involve manipulating pathogens, then it may be useful to model disease explicitly. ?? 2005 by the Ecological Society of America.

  9. Investigations of turbulent scalar fields using probability density function approach

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gao, Feng

    1991-01-01

    Scalar fields undergoing random advection have attracted much attention from researchers in both the theoretical and practical sectors. Research interest spans from the study of the small scale structures of turbulent scalar fields to the modeling and simulations of turbulent reacting flows. The probability density function (PDF) method is an effective tool in the study of turbulent scalar fields, especially for those which involve chemical reactions. It has been argued that a one-point, joint PDF approach is the one to choose from among many simulation and closure methods for turbulent combustion and chemically reacting flows based on its practical feasibility in the foreseeable future for multiple reactants. Instead of the multi-point PDF, the joint PDF of a scalar and its gradient which represents the roles of both scalar and scalar diffusion is introduced. A proper closure model for the molecular diffusion term in the PDF equation is investigated. Another direction in this research is to study the mapping closure method that has been recently proposed to deal with the PDF's in turbulent fields. This method seems to have captured the physics correctly when applied to diffusion problems. However, if the turbulent stretching is included, the amplitude mapping has to be supplemented by either adjusting the parameters representing turbulent stretching at each time step or by introducing the coordinate mapping. This technique is still under development and seems to be quite promising. The final objective of this project is to understand some fundamental properties of the turbulent scalar fields and to develop practical numerical schemes that are capable of handling turbulent reacting flows.

  10. Explaining the dark energy, baryon and dark matter coincidence via domain-dependent random densities

    SciTech Connect

    McDonald, John

    2013-05-01

    The dark energy, dark matter and baryon densities in the Universe are observed to be similar, with a factor of no more than 20 between the largest and smallest densities. We show that this coincidence can be understood via superhorizon domains of randomly varying densities when the baryon density at initial collapse of galaxy-forming perturbations is determined by anthropic selection. The baryon and dark matter densities are assumed to be dependent on random variables ?{sub d} and ?{sub b} according to ?{sub dm}??{sub d}{sup ?} and ?{sub b}??{sub b}{sup ?}, while the effectively constant dark energy density is dependent upon a random variable ?{sub Q} according to ?{sub Q}??{sub Q}{sup n}. The ratio of the baryon density to the dark energy density at initial collapse, r{sub Q}, and the baryon-to-dark matter ratio, r, are then determined purely statistically, with no dependence on the anthropically-preferred baryon density. We compute the probability distribution for r{sub Q} and r and show that the observed values of r{sub Q} and r can be naturally understood within this framework. In particular, for the case ? = 2, ? = 1 and n = 4, which can be physically realized via a combination of axion dark matter, Affleck-Dine baryogenesis and frozen quintessence with a ?{sub Q}{sup 4} potential, the range of r{sub Q} and r which corresponds to the observed Universe is a quite natural, with a probability which is broadly similar to other ranges of r{sub Q} and r.

  11. Lonely hearts or sex in the city? Density-dependent effects in mating systems

    PubMed Central

    Kokko, Hanna; Rankin, Daniel J

    2006-01-01

    Two very basic ideas in sexual selection are heavily influenced by numbers of potential mates: the evolution of anisogamy, leading to sex role differentiation, and the frequency dependence of reproductive success that tends to equalize primary sex ratios. However, being explicit about the numbers of potential mates is not typical to most evolutionary theory of sexual selection. Here, we argue that this may prevent us from finding the appropriate ecological equilibria that determine the evolutionary endpoints of selection. We review both theoretical and empirical advances on how population density may influence aspects of mating systems such as intrasexual competition, female choice or resistance, and parental care. Density can have strong effects on selective pressures, whether or not there is phenotypic plasticity in individual strategies with respect to density. Mating skew may either increase or decrease with density, which may be aided or counteracted by changes in female behaviour. Switchpoints between alternative mating strategies can be density dependent, and mate encounter rates may influence mate choice (including mutual mate choice), multiple mating, female resistance to male mating attempts, mate searching, mate guarding, parental care, and the probability of divorce. Considering density-dependent selection may be essential for understanding how populations can persist at all despite sexual conflict, but simple models seem to fail to predict the diversity of observed responses in nature. This highlights the importance of considering the interaction between mating systems and population dynamics, and we strongly encourage further work in this area. PMID:16612890

  12. Bayesian Inference on the Effect of Density Dependence and Weather on a Guanaco Population from Chile

    PubMed Central

    Zubillaga, María; Skewes, Oscar; Soto, Nicolás; Rabinovich, Jorge E.; Colchero, Fernando

    2014-01-01

    Understanding the mechanisms that drive population dynamics is fundamental for management of wild populations. The guanaco (Lama guanicoe) is one of two wild camelid species in South America. We evaluated the effects of density dependence and weather variables on population regulation based on a time series of 36 years of population sampling of guanacos in Tierra del Fuego, Chile. The population density varied between 2.7 and 30.7 guanaco/km2, with an apparent monotonic growth during the first 25 years; however, in the last 10 years the population has shown large fluctuations, suggesting that it might have reached its carrying capacity. We used a Bayesian state-space framework and model selection to determine the effect of density and environmental variables on guanaco population dynamics. Our results show that the population is under density dependent regulation and that it is currently fluctuating around an average carrying capacity of 45,000 guanacos. We also found a significant positive effect of previous winter temperature while sheep density has a strong negative effect on the guanaco population growth. We conclude that there are significant density dependent processes and that climate as well as competition with domestic species have important effects determining the population size of guanacos, with important implications for management and conservation. PMID:25514510

  13. A New Approach of Designing Superalloys for Low Density

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    MacKay, Rebecca A.; Gabb, Timothy P.; Smialek, James L.; Nathal, Michael V.

    2010-01-01

    New low-density single-crystal (LDS) alloy, have bee. developed for turbine blade applications, which have the potential for significant improvements in the thrust-to-weight ratio over current production superalloys. An innovative alloying strategy was wed to achieve alloy density reductions, high-temperature creep resistance, microstructural stability, and cyclic oxidation resistance. The alloy design relies on molybdenum as a potent. lower-density solid-solution strengthener in the nickel-based superalloy. Low alloy density was also achieved with modest rhenium levels tmd the absence of tungsten. Microstructural, physical mechanical, and environmental testing demonstrated the feasibility of this new LDS superalloy design.

  14. Gluon density and $F_{2}$ functions from BK equation with impact parameter dependence

    E-print Network

    Sergey Bondarenko

    2008-02-19

    In this note we fix the preliminary results obtained in the study of gluon density function of the paper \\cite{bom3}. The LO BK equation for unintegrated gluon density with impact parameter dependence is considered in order to fix the parameters of the proposed model. In particular the form of initial condition for the equations of proton-proton scattering from \\cite{bom3} is determined, which is similar to the form of fenomenological GBW ansatz. The gluon density function and $F_{2}$ function are also calculated and compared with the results for the gluon density and $F_{2}$ functions from the GRV parameterization for different values of $Q^2$. It is shown, that the results for $F_2$ structure function of the considered model are in the good accordance with the results obtained from the GRV parameterization of parton densities.

  15. Density dependence in group dynamics of a highly social mongoose, Suricata suricatta.

    PubMed

    Bateman, Andrew W; Ozgul, Arpat; Coulson, Tim; Clutton-Brock, Tim H

    2012-05-01

    1.?For social species, the link between individual behaviour and population dynamics is mediated by group-level demography. 2.?Populations of obligate cooperative breeders are structured into social groups, which may be subject to inverse density dependence (Allee effects) that result from a dependence on conspecific helpers, but evidence for population-wide Allee effects is rare. 3.?We use field data from a long-term study of cooperative meerkats (Suricata suricatta; Schreber, 1776) - a species for which local Allee effects are not reflected in population-level dynamics - to empirically model interannual group dynamics. 4.?Using phenomenological population models, modified to incorporate environmental conditions and potential Allee effects, we first investigate overall patterns of group dynamics and find support only for conventional density dependence that increases after years of low rainfall. 5.?To explain the observed patterns, we examine specific demographic rates and assess their contributions to overall group dynamics. Although per-capita meerkat mortality is subject to a component Allee effect, it contributes relatively little to observed variation in group dynamics, and other (conventionally density dependent) demographic rates - especially emigration - govern group dynamics. 6.?Our findings highlight the need to consider demographic processes and density dependence in subpopulations before drawing conclusions about how behaviour affects population processes in socially complex systems. PMID:22117843

  16. Estimating density dependence in time-series of age-structured populations.

    PubMed Central

    Lande, R; Engen, S; Saether, B-E

    2002-01-01

    For a life history with age at maturity alpha, and stochasticity and density dependence in adult recruitment and mortality, we derive a linearized autoregressive equation with time-lags of from 1 to alpha years. Contrary to current interpretations, the coefficients for different time-lags in the autoregressive dynamics do not simply measure delayed density dependence, but also depend on life-history parameters. We define a new measure of total density dependence in a life history, D, as the negative elasticity of population growth rate per generation with respect to change in population size, D = - partial differential lnlambda(T)/partial differential lnN, where lambda is the asymptotic multiplicative growth rate per year, T is the generation time and N is adult population size. We show that D can be estimated from the sum of the autoregression coefficients. We estimated D in populations of six avian species for which life-history data and unusually long time-series of complete population censuses were available. Estimates of D were in the order of 1 or higher, indicating strong, statistically significant density dependence in four of the six species. PMID:12396510

  17. Predicting Fish Densities in Lotic Systems: a Simple Modeling Approach

    EPA Science Inventory

    Fish density models are essential tools for fish ecologists and fisheries managers. However, applying these models can be difficult because of high levels of model complexity and the large number of parameters that must be estimated. We designed a simple fish density model and te...

  18. Nonadiabatic dynamics and simulation of time resolved photoelectron spectra within time-dependent density functional theory: Ultrafast photoswitching in benzylideneaniline

    SciTech Connect

    Mitric, Roland; Werner, Ute; Bonacic-Koutecky, Vlasta

    2008-10-28

    We present a theoretical approach for the nonadiabatic dynamics 'on the fly' based on the combination of the time-dependent density functional theory (TDDFT) with Tully's stochastic surface hopping method. Our formulation is based on localized Gaussian basis sets and is suitable for the simulation of ultrafast processes in complex molecular systems including all degrees of freedom. Our approach is used for the simulation of time resolved photoelectron spectra in the framework of the Wigner distribution approach. In order to illustrate the scope of the method, we study the ultrafast photoswitching dynamics of the prototype Schiff base benzylideneaniline (BAN). The nonradiative lifetime of the S{sub 1} state of BAN is determined to be {approx}200 fs. The mechanism of the photoisomerization has been investigated and a connection between the time resolved photoelectron signal and the underlying nonadiabatic processes has been established.

  19. Density-dependent natal dispersal patterns in a leopard population recovering from over-harvest.

    PubMed

    Fattebert, Julien; Balme, Guy; Dickerson, Tristan; Slotow, Rob; Hunter, Luke

    2015-01-01

    Natal dispersal enables population connectivity, gene flow and metapopulation dynamics. In polygynous mammals, dispersal is typically male-biased. Classically, the 'mate competition', 'resource competition' and 'resident fitness' hypotheses predict density-dependent dispersal patterns, while the 'inbreeding avoidance' hypothesis posits density-independent dispersal. In a leopard (Panthera pardus) population recovering from over-harvest, we investigated the effect of sex, population density and prey biomass, on age of natal dispersal, distance dispersed, probability of emigration and dispersal success. Over an 11-year period, we tracked 35 subadult leopards using VHF and GPS telemetry. Subadult leopards initiated dispersal at 13.6 ± 0.4 months. Age at commencement of dispersal was positively density-dependent. Although males (11.0 ± 2.5 km) generally dispersed further than females (2.7 ± 0.4 km), some males exhibited opportunistic philopatry when the population was below capacity. All 13 females were philopatric, while 12 of 22 males emigrated. Male dispersal distance and emigration probability followed a quadratic relationship with population density, whereas female dispersal distance was inversely density-dependent. Eight of 12 known-fate females and 5 of 12 known-fate male leopards were successful in settling. Dispersal success did not vary with population density, prey biomass, and for males, neither between dispersal strategies (philopatry vs. emigration). Females formed matrilineal kin clusters, supporting the resident fitness hypothesis. Conversely, mate competition appeared the main driver for male leopard dispersal. We demonstrate that dispersal patterns changed over time, i.e. as the leopard population density increased. We conclude that conservation interventions that facilitated local demographic recovery in the study area also restored dispersal patterns disrupted by unsustainable harvesting, and that this indirectly improved connectivity among leopard populations over a larger landscape. PMID:25875293

  20. Density-Dependent Natal Dispersal Patterns in a Leopard Population Recovering from Over-Harvest

    PubMed Central

    Fattebert, Julien; Balme, Guy; Dickerson, Tristan; Slotow, Rob; Hunter, Luke

    2015-01-01

    Natal dispersal enables population connectivity, gene flow and metapopulation dynamics. In polygynous mammals, dispersal is typically male-biased. Classically, the ‘mate competition’, ‘resource competition’ and ‘resident fitness’ hypotheses predict density-dependent dispersal patterns, while the ‘inbreeding avoidance’ hypothesis posits density-independent dispersal. In a leopard (Panthera pardus) population recovering from over-harvest, we investigated the effect of sex, population density and prey biomass, on age of natal dispersal, distance dispersed, probability of emigration and dispersal success. Over an 11-year period, we tracked 35 subadult leopards using VHF and GPS telemetry. Subadult leopards initiated dispersal at 13.6 ± 0.4 months. Age at commencement of dispersal was positively density-dependent. Although males (11.0 ± 2.5 km) generally dispersed further than females (2.7 ± 0.4 km), some males exhibited opportunistic philopatry when the population was below capacity. All 13 females were philopatric, while 12 of 22 males emigrated. Male dispersal distance and emigration probability followed a quadratic relationship with population density, whereas female dispersal distance was inversely density-dependent. Eight of 12 known-fate females and 5 of 12 known-fate male leopards were successful in settling. Dispersal success did not vary with population density, prey biomass, and for males, neither between dispersal strategies (philopatry vs. emigration). Females formed matrilineal kin clusters, supporting the resident fitness hypothesis. Conversely, mate competition appeared the main driver for male leopard dispersal. We demonstrate that dispersal patterns changed over time, i.e. as the leopard population density increased. We conclude that conservation interventions that facilitated local demographic recovery in the study area also restored dispersal patterns disrupted by unsustainable harvesting, and that this indirectly improved connectivity among leopard populations over a larger landscape. PMID:25875293

  1. Compositional or charge density modification of the endothelial glycocalyx accelerates flow-dependent concentration polarization of low-density lipoproteins.

    PubMed

    Kang, Hongyan; Fan, Yubo; Sun, Anqiang; Deng, Xiaoyan

    2011-07-01

    We hypothesized that diminished endothelial glycocalyx (GCX) at atherosclerotic lesion-prone sites accelerates flow-dependent concentration polarization of low-density lipoproteins (LDLs) at the luminal surface, and in turn contributes to vulnerability of these sites to atherosclerosis. A parallel plate flow chamber was applied to expose cultured endothelial monolayers to three different levels of shear stress (3, 12, 20 dyn/cm(2)). Heparinase III (Hep.III) was employed to degrade heparan sulfate proteoglycans selectively and 3-(N-morpholino) propanesulfonic acid-buffered physiological salt solutions (MOPS-PSS) were used at either normal ionic strength (Normal-MOPS), low ionic strength (LO-MOPS) or high ionic strength (HI-MOPS) to modify the effective charge density of the endothelial GCX. Water filtration velocity (V(w)) across the endothelial monolayer, the luminal concentration of LDLs (C(w)) and the uptake of LDLs by endothelial cells were measured and compared among the following five groups of cells: (1) Control; (2) Hep.III treatment; (3) LO-MOPS; (4) Normal-MOPS; and (5) HI-MOPS. The results obtained substantiated the aforementioned hypothesis and demonstrated that compositional or charge density modification of the endothelial GCX facilitated water filtration across the endothelium, enhanced the accumulation of LDLs on the luminal surface and increased the uptake of LDLs by endothelial cells, therefore contributing to atherogenesis. PMID:21659384

  2. Parental care masks a density-dependent shift from cooperation to competition among burying beetle larvae

    PubMed Central

    Schrader, Matthew; Jarrett, Benjamin J M; Kilner, Rebecca M

    2015-01-01

    Studies of siblings have focused mainly on their competitive interactions and to a lesser extent on their cooperation. However, competition and cooperation are at opposite ends on a continuum of possible interactions and the nature of these interactions may be flexible with ecological factors tipping the balance toward competition in some environments and cooperation in others. Here we show that the presence of parental care and the density of larvae on the breeding carcass change the outcome of sibling interactions in burying beetle broods. With full parental care there was a strong negative relationship between larval density and larval mass, consistent with sibling competition for resources. In the absence of care, initial increases in larval density had beneficial effects on larval mass but further increases in larval density reduced larval mass. This likely reflects a density-dependent shift between cooperation and competition. In a second experiment, we manipulated larval density and removed parental care. We found that the ability of larvae to penetrate the breeding carcass increased with larval density and that feeding within the carcass resulted in heavier larvae than feeding outside the carcass. However, larval density did not influence carcass decay. PMID:25648525

  3. Parental care masks a density-dependent shift from cooperation to competition among burying beetle larvae.

    PubMed

    Schrader, Matthew; Jarrett, Benjamin J M; Kilner, Rebecca M

    2015-04-01

    Studies of siblings have focused mainly on their competitive interactions and to a lesser extent on their cooperation. However, competition and cooperation are at opposite ends on a continuum of possible interactions and the nature of these interactions may be flexible with ecological factors tipping the balance toward competition in some environments and cooperation in others. Here we show that the presence of parental care and the density of larvae on the breeding carcass change the outcome of sibling interactions in burying beetle broods. With full parental care there was a strong negative relationship between larval density and larval mass, consistent with sibling competition for resources. In the absence of care, initial increases in larval density had beneficial effects on larval mass but further increases in larval density reduced larval mass. This likely reflects a density-dependent shift between cooperation and competition. In a second experiment, we manipulated larval density and removed parental care. We found that the ability of larvae to penetrate the breeding carcass increased with larval density and that feeding within the carcass resulted in heavier larvae than feeding outside the carcass. However, larval density did not influence carcass decay. PMID:25648525

  4. Disentangling the effects of climate, density dependence, and harvest on an iconic large herbivore's population dynamics.

    PubMed

    Koons, David N; Colchero, Fernando; Hersey, Kent; Gimenez, Olivier

    2015-06-01

    Understanding the relative effects of climate, harvest, and density dependence on population dynamics is critical for guiding sound population management, especially for ungulates in arid and semiarid environments experiencing climate change. To address these issues for bison in southern Utah, USA, we applied a Bayesian state-space model to a 72-yr time series of abundance counts. While accounting for known harvest (as well as live removal) from the population, we found that the bison population in southern Utah exhibited a strong potential to grow from low density (?0 = 0.26; Bayesian credible interval based on 95% of the highest posterior density [BCI] = 0.19-0.33), and weak but statistically significant density dependence (?1 = -0.02, BCI = -0.04 to -0.004). Early spring temperatures also had strong positive effects on population growth (Pfat1 = 0.09, BCI = 0.04-0.14), much more so than precipitation and other temperature-related variables (model weight > three times more than that for other climate variables). Although we hypothesized that harvest is the primary driving force of bison population dynamics in southern Utah, our elasticity analysis indicated that changes in early spring temperature could have a greater relative effect on equilibrium abundance than either harvest or. the strength of density dependence. Our findings highlight the utility of incorporating elasticity analyses into state-space population models, and the need to include climatic processes in wildlife management policies and planning. PMID:26465036

  5. Inversely density-dependent natal dispersal in brown bears Ursus arctos.

    PubMed

    Støen, Ole-Gunnar; Zedrosser, Andreas; Saebø, Solve; Swenson, Jon E

    2006-06-01

    There is considerable controversy in the literature about the presence of density dependence in dispersal. In this study, we exploit a data series from a long-term study (>18 years) on radio-marked brown bears (Ursus arctos L.) in two study areas in Scandinavia to investigate how individual-based densities influence the probability of natal dispersal and natal dispersal distances. Cumulatively, 32% and 46% of the females and 81% and 92% of the males dispersed before reaching 5 years of age in the northern and southern study area, respectively. Density had a negative effect on both the probability of dispersal and dispersal distances for the dispersing animals, when controlling for study area, sex and age, making this the first study to show that natal dispersal probability and distances are inversely density dependent in a large carnivore. We suggest that female-female competition for space caused females in higher density areas to settle closer to their natal area. For males, however, merging of demes, resulting in decreased relatedness and increased heterozygosity in an expanding population, might be the reason for shorter dispersal distances in males living at higher densities. This has been hypothesised for small mammals. The high proportion of dispersing female brown bears in Scandinavian compared with North American studies might be due to lower densities in Scandinavia and recent population expansion, with unoccupied areas available at the edges of the population. The longer dispersal distances in female Scandinavian brown bears suggest less social constraints on movements than for North American females. The longer dispersal distances by Scandinavian males may be due to increased searching for potential mates in peripheral areas with lower densities of females. These results, in addition to results of other brown bear studies, suggest that brown bears might be more territorial than previously thought, and that density is regulated by social interactions. PMID:16489458

  6. DENSITY-DEPENDENT RESPONSES OF GRAY-TAILED VOLES TO MOWING

    EPA Science Inventory

    Voles (Microtus spp.) commonly inhabit forage crops and may cause excessive damage to these crops. owever, cover removal by mowing or haying may cause vole populations to decline. o determine if gray-tailed voles responded to mowing of alfalfa in a density-dependent manner, the a...

  7. Host-parasite population dynamics under combined frequency-and density-dependent transmission

    E-print Network

    Knell, Rob

    to `frequency-dependent' transmission for sexually transmitted diseases (STDs) (Getz and Pickering 1983 alternative (usually applied to sexually transmitted parasites) assumes instead that the rate at which hosts), the other density-independent (e.g. sexual contacts). Drawing on a range of biological examples, we propose

  8. Red flour beetles balance thermoregulation and food acquisition via density-dependent habitat selection

    E-print Network

    Blouin-Demers, Gabriel

    Red flour beetles balance thermoregulation and food acquisition via density-dependent habitat; revised 12 July 2014; accepted 22 July 2014 doi:10.1111/jzo.12168 Abstract Theories of habitat selection assume that habitat selection patterns are based on the fitness consequences of selecting a particular

  9. Demonstrating the Temperature Dependence of Density via Construction of a Galilean Thermometer

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Priest, Marie A.; Padgett, Lea W.; Padgett, Clifford W.

    2011-01-01

    A method for the construction of a Galilean thermometer out of common chemistry glassware is described. Students in a first-semester physical chemistry (thermodynamics) class can construct the Galilean thermometer as an investigation of the thermal expansivity of liquids and the temperature dependence of density. This is an excellent first…

  10. Density dependence of the symmetry energy from neutron skin thickness in finite nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Vinas, X.; Centelles, M.; Roca-Maza, X.; Warda, M.

    2012-10-20

    The density dependence of the symmetry energy, characterized by the parameter L, is studied using information provided by the neutron skin thickness in finite nuclei. An estimate of L is obtained from experimental data of antiprotonic atoms. We also discuss the ability of parity violating electron scatering to obtain information about the neutron skin thickness in {sup 208}Pb.

  11. Tests of density dependence using indices of relative abundance in a deer population

    E-print Network

    Laval, Université

    and delayed DD in a white-tailed deer Odocoileus virginianus population on Anticosti Island, Québec, Canada1351 Tests of density dependence using indices of relative abundance in a deer population M. Anouk are rarely validated. Here, we used three different time series of relative abundance (number of deer seen

  12. Artificial reefs, the attraction-production issue, and density dependence in marine ornamental fishes

    E-print Network

    Osenberg, Craig W.

    ornamental fishes sold in the aquarium trade are collected from their natural habitats. Concerns have beenArtificial reefs, the attraction-production issue, and density dependence in marine ornamental, marine ornamentals ABSTRACT Artificial reefs may provide a useful tool to enhance production of marine

  13. DENSITY-DEPENDENT FLOW IN ONE-DIMENSIONAL VARIABLY-SATURATED MEDIA

    EPA Science Inventory

    A one-dimensional finite element is developed to simulate density-dependent flow of saltwater in variably saturated media. The flow and solute equations were solved in a coupled mode (iterative), in a partially coupled mode (non-iterative), and in a completely decoupled mode. P...

  14. Toxicology Letters 161 (2006) 135142 Functionalization density dependence of single-walled

    E-print Network

    Natelson, Douglas

    2006-01-01

    Toxicology Letters 161 (2006) 135­142 Functionalization density dependence of single-walled carbon.toxlet.2005.08.011 #12;136 C.M. Sayes et al. / Toxicology Letters 161 (2006) 135­142 are of considerable interest for biological applications, and a full toxicological evaluation can only be performed

  15. Journal of Mammalogy, 95(1):000000, 2014 Density dependence or climatic variation? Factors influencing survival,

    E-print Network

    Oli, Madan K.

    influencing survival, recruitment, and population growth rate of Virginia opossums ELIZABETH M. TROYER, SUSAN survival, recruitment, and realized population growth rate of the Virginia opossum (Didelphis virginiana of variation of precipitation. There was no evidence of density-dependent influences on opossum population

  16. Self-Consistent Separable RPA For Density- and Current-Dependent Forces

    E-print Network

    J. Kvasil; V. O. Nesterenko; P. -G. Reinhard

    2001-09-18

    Self-consistent factorization of two-body residual interaction is proposed for arbitrary density- and current-dependent energy functionals. Following this procedure, a separable RPA (SRPA) method is constructed. SRPA dramatically simplifies the calculations and demonstrates quick convergence to exact results. The method is tested for SkM* forces.

  17. Density-dependent state-space model for population-abundance data with unequal time intervals.

    PubMed

    Dennis, Brian; Ponciano, José Miguel

    2014-08-01

    The Gompertz state-space (GSS) model is a stochastic model for analyzing time-series observations of population abundances. The GSS model combines density dependence, environmental process noise, and observation error toward estimating quantities of interest in biological monitoring and population viability analysis. However, existing methods for estimating the model parameters apply only to population data with equal time intervals between observations. In the present paper, we extend the GSS model to data with unequal time intervals, by embedding it within a state-space version of the Ornstein-Uhlenbeck process, a continuous-time model of an equilibrating stochastic system. Maximum likelihood and restricted maximum likelihood calculations for the Ornstein-Uhlenbeck state-space model involve only numerical maximization of an explicit multivariate normal likelihood, and so the extension allows for easy bootstrapping, yielding confidence intervals for model parameters, statistical hypothesis testing of density dependence, and selection among sub-models using information criteria. Ecologists and managers previously drawn to models lacking density dependence or observation error because such models accommodated unequal time intervals (for example, due to missing data) now have an alternative analysis framework incorporating density dependence, process noise, and observation error. PMID:25230459

  18. A Geometric Approach to Dislocation Densities in Semiconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bakke, Knut; Moraes, Fernando

    2015-10-01

    Dislocation densities threading semiconductor crystals are a problem for device developers. Among the issues presented by the defect density is the appearance of the so called shallow levels. In this work we introduce a geometric model to explain the origin of the observed shallow levels. We show that a uniform distribution of screw dislocations acts as an effective uniform magnetic field which yields electronic bound states even in the presence of a repulsive Coulomb-like potential. This introduces energy levels within the band gap, increasing the carrier concentration in the region threaded by the dislocation density and adding additional recombination paths other than the near band-edge recombination. Our results suggest that one might use a magnetic field to destroy the dislocation density bound states and therefore minimize its effects on the charge carriers.

  19. Changes in seasonal climate outpace compensatory density-dependence in eastern brook trout

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bassar, Ronald D.; Letcher, Benjamin H.; Nislow, Keith H.; Whiteley, Andrew R.

    2015-01-01

    Understanding how multiple extrinsic (density-independent) factors and intrinsic (density-dependent) mechanisms influence population dynamics has become increasingly urgent in the face of rapidly changing climates. It is particularly unclear how multiple extrinsic factors with contrasting effects among seasons are related to declines in population numbers and changes in mean body size and whether there is a strong role for density-dependence. The primary goal of this study was to identify the roles of seasonal variation in climate driven environmental direct effects (mean stream flow and temperature) versus density-dependence on population size and mean body size in eastern brook trout (Salvelinus fontinalis). We use data from a 10-year capture-mark-recapture study of eastern brook trout in four streams in Western Massachusetts, USA to parameterize a discrete-time population projection model. The model integrates matrix modeling techniques used to characterize discrete population structures (age, habitat type and season) with integral projection models (IPMs) that characterize demographic rates as continuous functions of organismal traits (in this case body size). Using both stochastic and deterministic analyses we show that decreases in population size are due to changes in stream flow and temperature and that these changes are larger than what can be compensated for through density-dependent responses. We also show that the declines are due mostly to increasing mean stream temperatures decreasing the survival of the youngest age class. In contrast, increases in mean body size over the same period are the result of indirect changes in density with a lesser direct role of climate-driven environmental change.

  20. Density dependence of trace tritium transport in H-mode Joint European Torus plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Voitsekhovitch, I.; Garbet, X.; McDonald, D. C.; Zastrow, K.-D.; Adams, M.; Baranov, Yu.; Belo, P.; Bertalot, L.; Budny, R.; Conroy, S.; Cordey, J. G.; Garzotti, L.; Mantica, P.; McCune, D.; Ongena, J.; Parail, V.; Popovichev, S.; Stork, D.; Whiteford, A. D.

    2005-05-01

    Tritium transport in edge localized mode (ELM) high confinement (H-mode) plasmas is analyzed here as a function of density for discharges from the recent trace tritium experimental campaign performed on Joint European Torus. In this campaign small amounts of tritium have been puffed or injected (with neutral beam injectors) into deuterium plasmas [K.-D. Zastrow, J. M. Adams, Yu. Baranov et al., Plasma Phys. Controlled Fusion 46, B255 (2004)]. Information about the tritium has been obtained from the evolution of the profiles of neutron emission simulated via the TRANSP [R. J. Goldston, D. C. McCune, H. H. Towner, S. L. Davis, R. J. Hawryluk, and G. L. Schmidt, J. Comput. Phys. 43, 61 (1981)] and SANCO (L. Lauro-Taroni, B. Alper, R. Giannella, K. Lawson, F. Marcus, M. Mattioli, P. Smeulders, and M. Von Hellermann, Proceedings of the 21st European Conference on Controlled Fusion and Plasma Physics, Montpelier, France, 1994) codes. A strong inverse correlation of tritium transport with plasma density is found in this analysis. The low tritium transport at high density is close to neoclassical values while the transport becomes strongly anomalous in low density plasmas. The thermal transport does not exhibit such a strong density dependence, leading to a varying ratio of thermal to tritium transport in these discharges. An interpretation of the density effects on the trace tritium transport, partially based on the test particle simulations in plasmas with stochastic magnetic field, is proposed. A simple model for the tritium diffusion coefficient and convective velocity, which includes the modification of the neoclassical particle diffusion in presence of electromagnetic turbulence [A. I. Smolyakov and P. N. Yushmanov, Nucl. Fusion 35, 383 (1993)] completed with an empirical density dependence, is developed. This model has positive ? dependence in agreement with the results of the similarity experiments performed for trace tritium transport.

  1. Momentum and Density Dependence of Isovector Part of Nuclear Mean Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Behera, Basudeb; Routray, Tushar Ranjan; Pradhan, Aliva

    Momentum and density dependence of the isovector part of nuclear mean field u?(k, ?) is studied by using effective interactions having general form. It is found that only the difference between finite range parts of the exchange interactions between like and unlike nucleons accounts for the momentum dependence of u?(k, ?). Depending on the choice of the parameters of these exchange interactions, two conflicting trends of momentum dependence of u?(k, ?) are noted which lead to two opposite types of splitting of neutron and proton effective masses. The behavior of u?(k, ?) at the Fermi momentum k=kF is related to the density dependence of nuclear symmetry energy J?(?) and effective nucleon mass M*(k=kF, ?)/M in symmetric nuclear matter. The need for possible theoretical and experimental efforts to constrain the high density behavior of J?(?) as well as to resolve the puzzle regarding the two opposite types of splitting of neutron and proton effective masses are also stressed.

  2. LES/probability density function approach for the simulation of an ethanol spray flame

    E-print Network

    Raman, Venkat

    LES/probability density function approach for the simulation of an ethanol spray flame Colin Heye a an experimental pilot-stabilized ethanol spray flame. In this particular flame, droplet evaporation occurs away: Large-eddy simulation; Probability density function; Flamelet/progress variable approach; Ethanol

  3. Modified linear response for time-dependent density-functional theory: Application to Rydberg and charge-transfer excitations

    SciTech Connect

    Hu, Chunping; Sugino, Osamu; Miyamoto, Yoshiyuki

    2006-09-15

    We present an improved ab initio time-dependent density-functional theory (TDDFT) approach to electronic excitations. A conventional TDDFT scheme within the local-density approximation (LDA) inaccurately predicts Rydberg and charge-transfer excitation energies, mainly because the electron-hole (e-h) interaction is inappropriately described in these excitations, as can be found by analyzing the linear response formula [M. Petersilka, U. J. Gossmann, and E. K. U. Gross, Phys. Rev. Lett. 76, 1212 (1996)]. When the formula is averaged over the electron occupation, the inappropriate e-h interaction within LDA is corrected to become explicitly similar to that of the exact exchange system. As anticipated from the similarity, our proposed scheme of modified linear response greatly improves the prediction of the problematic excitations, which are exemplified for typical molecules.

  4. Theoretical analysis of the worthiness of Henry and Elder problems as benchmarks of density-dependent groundwater

    E-print Network

    Clement, Prabhakar

    -dependent groundwater flow models M.J. Simpson a , T.P. Clement a,b,* a Centre for Water Research, Department the availability of benchmark problems for testing density-dependent groundwater models is limited, one should: Groundwater-modeling; Density-dependent flow; Unsaturated flow; Contaminant transport 1. Introduction

  5. The density and temperature dependence of the cooling timescale for fragmentation of self-gravitating disks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faghei, Kazem

    2014-06-01

    The purpose of this paper is to explore the influences of cooling timescale on fragmentation of self-gravitating protoplanetary disks. We assume the cooling timescale, expressed in terms of the dynamical timescale ? tcool, has a power-law dependence on temperature and density, ? tcool ? ?-aT-b, where a and b are constants. We use this cooling timescale in a simple prescription for the cooling rate, du/dt = -u/tcool, where u is the internal energy. We perform our simulations using the smoothed particle hydrodynamics method. The simulations demonstrate that the disk is very sensitive to the cooling timescale, which depends on density and temperature. Under such a cooling timescale, the disk becomes gravitationally unstable and clumps form in the disk. This property even occurs for cooling timescales which are much longer than the critical cooling timescale, ? tcool ? 7. We show that by adding the dependence of a cooling timescale on temperature and density, the number of clumps increases and the clumps can also form at smaller radii. The simulations imply that the sensitivity of a cooling timescale to density is more than to temperature, because even for a small dependence of the cooling timescale on density, clumps can still form in the disk. However, when the cooling timescale has a large dependence on temperature, clumps form in the disk. We also consider the effects of artificial viscosity parameters on fragmentation conditions. This consideration is performed in two cases, where ? tcool is a constant and ? tcool is a function of density and temperature. The simulations consider both cases, and results show the artificial viscosity parameters have rather similar effects. For example, using too small of values for linear and quadratic terms in artificial viscosity can suppress the gravitational instability and consequently the efficiency of the clump formation process decreases. This property is consistent with recent simulations of self-gravitating disks. We perform simulations with and without the Balsara form of artificial viscosity. We find that in the cooling and self-gravitating disks without the Balsara switch, the clumps can form more easily than those with the Balsara switch. Moreover, in both cases where the Balsara switch is present or absent, the simulations show that the cooling timescale strongly depends on density and temperature.

  6. Vertebrate herbivory impacts seedling recruitment more than niche partitioning or density-dependent mortality.

    PubMed

    Clark, C J; Poulsen, J R; Levey, D J

    2012-03-01

    In tropical forests, resource-based niches and density-dependent mortality are mutually compatible mechanisms that can act simultaneously to limit seedling populations. Differences in the strengths of these mechanisms will determine their roles in maintaining species coexistence. In the first assessment of these mechanisms in a Congo Basin forest, we quantified their relative strengths and tested the extent to which density-dependent mortality is driven by the distance-dependent behavior of seed and seedling predators predicted by the Janzen-Connell hypothesis. We conducted a large-scale seed addition experiment for five randomly selected tropical tree species, caging a subset of seed addition quadrats against vertebrate predators. We then developed models to assess the mechanisms that determine seedling emergence (three months after seed addition) and survival (two years after seed addition). As predicted, both niche differentiation and density-dependent mortality limited seedling recruitment, but predation had the strongest effects on seedling emergence and survival. Seedling species responded differently to naturally occurring environmental variation among sites, including variation in light levels and soil characteristics, supporting predictions of niche-based theories of tropical tree species coexistence. The addition of higher densities of seeds into quadrats initially led to greater seedling emergence, but survival to two years decreased with seed density. Seed and seedling predation reduced recruitment below levels maintained by density-dependent mortality, an indication that predators largely determine the population size of tree seedlings. Seedling recruitment was unrelated to the distance to or density of conspecific adult trees, suggesting that recruitment patterns are generated by generalist vertebrate herbivores rather than the specialized predators predicted by the Janzen-Connell hypothesis. If the role of seed and seedling predation in limiting seedling recruitment is a general phenomenon, then the relative abundances of tree species might largely depend on species-specific adaptations to avoid, survive, and recover from damage induced by vertebrate herbivores. Likewise, population declines of herbivorous vertebrate species (many of which are large and hunted) may trigger shifts in species composition of tropical forests. PMID:22624210

  7. Density-dependent patterns of thiamine and pigment production in the diatom Nitzschia microcephala.

    PubMed

    Pinto, Ernani; Van Nieuwerburgh, Lies; Paes de Barros, Marcelo; Pedersén, Marianne; Colepicolo, Pio; Snoeijs, Pauli

    2003-05-01

    In the present study we investigate how intraspecific (density-dependent) competition for nutrients by the diatom Nitzschia microcephala affects the level of oxidative stress in the algal cells as well as their production of pigments and thiamine. N. microcephala was grown in three different densities until the stationary growth phase was reached. Throughout the experiment, growth rate was negatively related to cell density. Superoxide dismutase activity, protein thiol, and diatoxanthin concentrations indicated increasing oxidative stress with increasing cell density, which was most probably caused by nutrient depletion of the medium. Pigment contents per cell (except for diatoxanthin) decreased with increasing cell density. N. microcephala was able to synthesize thiamine and its thiamine content per cell increased in concert with cell density. In comparison, the dinoflagellate Amphidinium carterae was unable to synthesize thiamine. These results suggest that cells of N. microcephala subjected to higher competition and lower growth rates have a lower carotenoid content and a higher thiamine content. If such responses would occur in nature as well, eutrophication (higher cell densities) may alter the quality of microalgae as food items for higher trophic levels not only by species shifts in the phytoplankton, but also by changes in the cellular nutritional value within species. PMID:12711136

  8. Density- and Size-Dependent Winter Mortality and Growth of Late Chaoborus flavicans Larvae

    PubMed Central

    Schröder, Arne

    2013-01-01

    Winter processes such as overwinter survival and growth of individuals can have wide-ranging consequences for population dynamics and communities within and across seasons. In freshwater organisms winter processes have been mainly studied in fish despite that invertebrates also have substantial impacts on lake and pond food webs. One of the major invertebrate consumers in lake and ponds is the planktonic larvae of the dipteran insect Chaoborus spec. However, while much is known about Chaoborus feeding ecology, behaviour and structuring role in food webs, its winter ecology and how it affects its populations are poorly understood. Here size- and density-dependent winter mortality and body growth of late Chaoborus flavicans larvae were quantified over naturally occurring size and density ranges in autumn and under natural winter conditions using two field enclosure experiments. Winter mortality increased with autumn density but decreased with autumn body size while winter growth rates decreased with autumn density and body sizes. There was also a density- and size-independent background mortality component. The proportion of pupae found in spring decreased strongly and exponentially with autumn density. These results may explain the commonly observed univoltine life cycle and multi-annual density fluctuations in northern Chaoborus populations. They further demonstrate the relevance of winter processes and conditions for freshwater invertebrates and ecosystems. PMID:24124517

  9. Single-electron approach for time-dependent electron transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gurvitz, Shmuel

    2015-10-01

    We developed a new approach to electron transport in mesoscopic systems by using a particular single-particle basis. Although this basis generates redundant many-particle amplitudes, it greatly simplifies the treatment. By using our method for transport of non-interacting electrons, we generalize the Landauer formula for transient currents and time-dependent potentials. The result has a very simple form and clear physical interpretation. As an example, we apply it to resonant tunneling through a quantum dot where the tunneling barriers are oscillating in time. We obtain an analytical expression for the time-dependent (ac) resonant current. However, in the adiabatic limit this expression displays the dc current for zero bias (electron pumping).

  10. Single-electron approach for time-dependent electron transport

    E-print Network

    Shmuel Gurvitz

    2015-10-12

    We develop a new approach to electron transport in mesoscopic systems by using a particular single-particle basis. Although this basis generates redundant many-particle amplitudes, it greatly simplifies the treatment. By using our method for transport of non-interacting electrons, we generalize the Landauer formula for transient currents and for time-dependent potentials. The result has a very simple form and clear physical interpretation. As an example, we apply it to resonant tunneling through a quantum dot where the tunneling barriers are oscillating in time. We obtain analytical expression for the time-dependent (ac) resonant current. However, in the adiabatic limit this expression displays the dc current for zero bias (electron pumping).

  11. Time-dependent Kohn-Sham approach to quantum electrodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruggenthaler, M.; Mackenroth, F.; Bauer, D.

    2011-10-01

    We prove a generalization of the van Leeuwen theorem toward quantum electrodynamics, providing the formal foundations of a time-dependent Kohn-Sham construction for coupled quantized matter and electromagnetic fields. We circumvent the symmetry-causality problems associated with the action-functional approach to Kohn-Sham systems. We show that the effective external four-potential and four-current of the Kohn-Sham system are uniquely defined and that the effective four-current takes a very simple form. Further we rederive the Runge-Gross theorem for quantum electrodynamics.

  12. Time-dependent, lattice approach to atomic collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Schultz, D.R.

    1995-12-31

    Recent progress in developing and applying methods of direct numerical solution of atomic collision problems is described. Various forms of the three-body problem are used to illustrate these techniques. Specifically, the process of ionization in proton-, antiproton-, and electron-impact of atomic hydrogen is considered in applications ranging in computational intensity from collisions simulated in two spatial dimensions to treatment of the three-dimensional, fully correlated two-electron Schroedinger equation. These examples demonstrate the utility and feasibility of treating strongly interacting atomic systems through time-dependent, lattice approaches.

  13. An information theory approach to the density of the earth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Graber, M. A.

    1977-01-01

    Information theory can develop a technique which takes experimentally determined numbers and produces a uniquely specified best density model satisfying those numbers. A model was generated using five numerical parameters: the mass of the earth, its moment of inertia, three zero-node torsional normal modes (L = 2, 8, 26). In order to determine the stability of the solution, six additional densities were generated, in each of which the period of one of the three normal modes was increased or decreased by one standard deviation. The superposition of the seven models is shown. It indicates that current knowledge of the torsional modes is sufficient to specify the density in the upper mantle but that the lower mantle and core will require smaller standard deviations before they can be accurately specified.

  14. Threading dislocation densities in semiconductor crystals: a geometric approach

    E-print Network

    K. Bakke; F. Moraes

    2012-08-14

    In this letter, we introduce a geometric model to explain the origin of the observed shallow levels in semiconductors threaded by a dislocation density. We show that a uniform distribution of screw dislocations acts as an effective uniform magnetic field which yields bound states for a spin-half quantum particle, even in the presence of a repulsive Coulomb-like potential. This introduces energy levels within the band gap, increasing the carrier concentration in the region threaded by the dislocation density and adding additional recombination paths other than the near band-edge recombination.

  15. Density-dependent electron transport and precise modeling of GaN high electron mobility transistors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bajaj, Sanyam; Shoron, Omor F.; Park, Pil Sung; Krishnamoorthy, Sriram; Akyol, Fatih; Hung, Ting-Hsiang; Reza, Shahed; Chumbes, Eduardo M.; Khurgin, Jacob; Rajan, Siddharth

    2015-10-01

    We report on the direct measurement of two-dimensional sheet charge density dependence of electron transport in AlGaN/GaN high electron mobility transistors (HEMTs). Pulsed IV measurements established increasing electron velocities with decreasing sheet charge densities, resulting in saturation velocity of 1.9 × 107 cm/s at a low sheet charge density of 7.8 × 1011 cm-2. An optical phonon emission-based electron velocity model for GaN is also presented. It accommodates stimulated longitudinal optical (LO) phonon emission which clamps the electron velocity with strong electron-phonon interaction and long LO phonon lifetime in GaN. A comparison with the measured density-dependent saturation velocity shows that it captures the dependence rather well. Finally, the experimental result is applied in TCAD-based device simulator to predict DC and small signal characteristics of a reported GaN HEMT. Good agreement between the simulated and reported experimental results validated the measurement presented in this report and established accurate modeling of GaN HEMTs.

  16. Density matrix expansion for the isospin- and momentum-dependent MDI interaction

    SciTech Connect

    Xu Jun; Ko Che Ming

    2010-10-15

    By assuming that the isospin- and momentum-dependent MDI interaction has a form similar to the Gogny-like effective two-body interaction with a Yukawa finite-range term and the momentum dependence originates only from the finite-range exchange interaction, we determine its parameters by comparing the predicted potential energy density functional in uniform nuclear matter with what has been usually given and used extensively in transport models for studying isospin effects in intermediate-energy heavy-ion collisions as well as in investigating the properties of hot asymmetric nuclear matter and neutron star matter. We then use the density matrix expansion to derive from the resulting finite-range exchange interaction an effective Skyrme-like zero-range interaction with density-dependent parameters. As an application, we study the transition density and pressure at the inner edge of neutron star crusts using the stability conditions derived from the linearized Vlasov equation for the neutron star matter.

  17. Dispersal, density dependence, and population dynamics of a fungal microbe on leaf surfaces.

    PubMed

    Woody, Scott T; Ives, Anthony R; Nordheim, Erik V; Andrews, John H

    2007-06-01

    Despite the ubiquity and importance of microbes in nature, little is known about their natural population dynamics, especially for those that occupy terrestrial habitats. Here we investigate the dynamics of the yeast-like fungus Aureobasidium pullulans (Ap) on apple leaves in an orchard. We asked three questions. (1) Is variation in fungal population density among leaves caused by variation in leaf carrying capacities and strong density-dependent population growth that maintains densities near carrying capacity? (2) Do resident populations have competitive advantages over immigrant cells? (3) Do Ap dynamics differ at different times during the growing season? To address these questions, we performed two experiments at different times in the growing season. Both experiments used a 2 x 2 factorial design: treatment 1 removed fungal cells from leaves to reveal density-dependent population growth, and treatment 2 inoculated leaves with an Ap strain engineered to express green fluorescent protein (GFP), which made it possible to track the fate of immigrant cells. The experiments showed that natural populations of Ap vary greatly in density due to sustained differences in carrying capacities among leaves. The maintenance of populations close to carrying capacities indicates strong density-dependent processes. Furthermore, resident populations are strongly competitive against immigrants, while immigrants have little impact on residents. Finally, statistical models showed high population growth rates of resident cells in one experiment but not in the other, suggesting that Ap experiences relatively "good" and "bad" periods for population growth. This picture of Ap dynamics conforms to commonly held, but rarely demonstrated, expectations of microbe dynamics in nature. It also highlights the importance of local processes, as opposed to immigration, in determining the abundance and dynamics of microbes on surfaces in terrestrial systems. PMID:17601143

  18. EVALUATING SYSTEMATIC DEPENDENCIES OF TYPE Ia SUPERNOVAE: THE INFLUENCE OF DEFLAGRATION TO DETONATION DENSITY

    SciTech Connect

    Jackson, Aaron P.; Calder, Alan C.; Townsley, Dean M.; Chamulak, David A.; Brown, Edward F.; Timmes, F. X.

    2010-09-01

    We explore the effects of the deflagration to detonation transition (DDT) density on the production of {sup 56}Ni in thermonuclear supernova (SN) explosions (Type Ia supernovae). Within the DDT paradigm, the transition density sets the amount of expansion during the deflagration phase of the explosion and therefore the amount of nuclear statistical equilibrium (NSE) material produced. We employ a theoretical framework for a well-controlled statistical study of two-dimensional simulations of thermonuclear SNe with randomized initial conditions that can, with a particular choice of transition density, produce a similar average and range of {sup 56}Ni masses to those inferred from observations. Within this framework, we utilize a more realistic 'simmered' white dwarf progenitor model with a flame model and energetics scheme to calculate the amount of {sup 56}Ni and NSE material synthesized for a suite of simulated explosions in which the transition density is varied in the range (1-3) x10{sup 7} g cm{sup -3}. We find a quadratic dependence of the NSE yield on the log of the transition density, which is determined by the competition between plume rise and stellar expansion. By considering the effect of metallicity on the transition density, we find the NSE yield decreases by 0.055 {+-} 0.004 M {sub sun} for a 1 Z{sub sun} increase in metallicity evaluated about solar metallicity. For the same change in metallicity, this result translates to a 0.067 {+-} 0.004 M{sub sun} decrease in the {sup 56}Ni yield, slightly stronger than that due to the variation in electron fraction from the initial composition. Observations testing the dependence of the yield on metallicity remain somewhat ambiguous, but the dependence we find is comparable to that inferred from some studies.

  19. Evaluating systematic dependencies of type Ia supernovae : the influence of deflagration to detonation density.

    SciTech Connect

    Jackson, A. P.; Calder, A. C.; Townsley, D. M.; Chamulak, D. A.; Brown, E. F.; Timmes, F. X.

    2010-09-01

    We explore the effects of the deflagration to detonation transition (DDT) density on the production of {sup 56}Ni in thermonuclear supernova (SN) explosions (Type Ia supernovae). Within the DDT paradigm, the transition density sets the amount of expansion during the deflagration phase of the explosion and therefore the amount of nuclear statistical equilibrium (NSE) material produced. We employ a theoretical framework for a well-controlled statistical study of two-dimensional simulations of thermonuclear SNe with randomized initial conditions that can, with a particular choice of transition density, produce a similar average and range of {sup 56}Ni masses to those inferred from observations. Within this framework, we utilize a more realistic 'simmered' white dwarf progenitor model with a flame model and energetics scheme to calculate the amount of {sup 56}Ni and NSE material synthesized for a suite of simulated explosions in which the transition density is varied in the range (1-3) x 10{sup 7} g cm{sup -3}. We find a quadratic dependence of the NSE yield on the log of the transition density, which is determined by the competition between plume rise and stellar expansion. By considering the effect of metallicity on the transition density, we find the NSE yield decreases by 0.055 {+-} 0.004 M {circle_dot} for a 1 Z {circle_dot} increase in metallicity evaluated about solar metallicity. For the same change in metallicity, this result translates to a 0.067 {+-} 0.004 M {circle_dot} decrease in the {sup 56}Ni yield, slightly stronger than that due to the variation in electron fraction from the initial composition. Observations testing the dependence of the yield on metallicity remain somewhat ambiguous, but the dependence we find is comparable to that inferred from some studies.

  20. The nutrient density approach to healthy eating: challenges and opportunities

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The term 'nutrient density' for foods/beverages has been used loosely to promote the Dietary Guidelines for Americans. The 2010 Dietary Guidelines for Americans defined 'all vegetables, fruits, whole grains, fat-free or low-fat milk and milk products, seafood, lean meats and poultry, eggs, beans and...

  1. Alternative approaches to the calculation of nutrient density

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Over thirty years ago researchers developed a variety of different methods for rating or measuring the nutritional quality of foods. Nutrient density as the initial concept emerged was most commonly defined as the ratio of the amount of nutrients in a food to the energy provided. The nutrient dens...

  2. Photon energy and carrier density dependent dynamics of the coherent A1g phonon in bismuth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bray, Crystal; Murray, Eamonn; Fahy, Stephen; Reis, David

    2014-03-01

    We investigate the dynamics of the coherent A1g phonon as a function of photon energy and carrier density for photo-excited single-crystal thin-film bismuth. Previous experimental and theoretical studies on group V semimetals such as bismuth show strong softening of the mode with photo-excitation associated with electronic softening and a reduction in the Peierls distortion; however, theoretical models differ on the detailed dependence for how the carriers populate the conduction band states immediately following excitation [Murray et al., Phys. Rev. B 72,060301 (2005); Zijlstra et al., Phys. Rev. B 74,220301 (2006); Sheu et al., Phys. Rev. B 87,075429 (2013)]. By carefully controlling the total energy deposition and the incident photon number as a function of different pump wavelengths, we are able to test two different models for the filling near the Fermi surface: a one-chemical potential model whereby the carrier density depends on electronic temperature and a two-chemical potential model whereby the carrier density depends on the number of photons absorbed. We find evidence that neither model suffices, likely due to different relaxation mechanisms depending on which bands are involved in the initial excitation.

  3. Dependencies of Ultrasonic Properties on Apparent Bone Density in Trabecular Bone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Kang Il

    2008-07-01

    The present study aims to provide insight into the dependencies of ultrasonic properties, such as speed of sound (SOS), broadband ultrasonic attenuation (BUA), and integrated reflection coefficient (IRC), on apparent bone density in trabecular bone. SOS, BUA, and IRC were measured in 19 bovine trabecular bone specimens with apparent densities from 0.411 to 0.928 g/cm3, using a matched pair of transducers with a diameter of 12.7 mm and a center frequency of 1.0 MHz. They were also compared with the predictions obtained from the modified Biot-Attenborough (MBA) model for propagation in fluid-saturated porous media.

  4. Quantum Well Width Dependence of Threshold Current Density in InGaN Lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Amano, H.; Chow, W.W.; Han, J.; Takeuchi, T.

    1999-03-16

    The quantum confined Stark effect was found to result in a strong quantum well width dependence of threshold current density in strained group-III nitride quantum well lasers. For an In{sub 0.2}Ga{sub 0.8}N/GaN structure with quantum well width in the neighborhood of 3.5nm, our analysis shows that the reduction in spontaneous emission loss by the electron-hole spatial separation outweighs the corresponding reduction in gain to produce a threshold current density minimum.

  5. The density of states approach for the simulation of finite density quantum field theories

    E-print Network

    K. Langfeld; B. Lucini; A. Rago; R. Pellegrini; L. Bongiovanni

    2015-03-02

    Finite density quantum field theories have evaded first principle Monte-Carlo simulations due to the notorious sign-problem. The partition function of such theories appears as the Fourier transform of the generalised density-of-states, which is the probability distribution of the imaginary part of the action. With the advent of Wang-Landau type simulation techniques and recent advances, the density-of-states can be calculated over many hundreds of orders of magnitude. Current research addresses the question whether the achieved precision is high enough to reliably extract the finite density partition function, which is exponentially suppressed with the volume. In my talk, I review the state-of-play for the high precision calculations of the density-of-states as well as the recent progress for obtaining reliable results from highly oscillating integrals. I will review recent progress for the $Z_3$ quantum field theory for which results can be obtained from the simulation of the dual theory, which appears to free of a sign problem.

  6. Modeling solvation effects in real-space and real-time within Density Functional Approaches

    E-print Network

    Delgado, Alain; Pittalis, Stefano; Rozzi, Carlo Andrea

    2015-01-01

    The Polarizable Continuum Model (PCM) can be used in conjunction with Density Functional Theory (DFT) and its time-dependent extension (TDDFT) to simulate the electronic and optical properties of molecules and nanoparticles immersed in a dielectric environment, typically liquid solvents. In this contribution, we develop a methodology to account for solvation effects in real-space (and real-time) (TD)DFT calculations. The boundary elements method is used to calculate the solvent reaction potential in terms of the apparent charges that spread over the Van der Waals solute surface. In a real-space representation this potential may exhibit a Coulomb singularity at grid points that are close to the cavity surface. We propose a simple approach to regularize such singularity by using a set of spherical Gaussian functions to distribute the apparent charges. We have implemented the proposed method in the Octopus code and present results for the electrostatic contribution to the solvation free energies and solvatochrom...

  7. Behavioral signature of intraspecific competition and density dependence in colony-breeding marine predators

    PubMed Central

    Breed, Greg A; Don Bowen, W; Leonard, Marty L

    2013-01-01

    In populations of colony-breeding marine animals, foraging around colonies can lead to intraspecific competition. This competition affects individual foraging behavior and can cause density-dependent population growth. Where behavioral data are available, it may be possible to infer the mechanism of intraspecific competition. If these mechanics are understood, they can be used to predict the population-level functional response resulting from the competition. Using satellite relocation and dive data, we studied the use of space and foraging behavior of juvenile and adult gray seals (Halichoerus grypus) from a large (over 200,000) and growing population breeding at Sable Island, Nova Scotia (44.0 oN 60.0 oW). These data were first analyzed using a behaviorally switching state-space model to infer foraging areas followed by randomization analysis of foraging region overlap of competing age classes. Patterns of habitat use and behavioral time budgets indicate that young-of-year juveniles (YOY) were likely displaced from foraging areas near (<10 km) the breeding colony by adult females. This displacement was most pronounced in the summer. Additionally, our data suggest that YOY are less capable divers than adults and this limits the habitat available to them. However, other segregating mechanisms cannot be ruled out, and we discuss several alternate hypotheses. Mark–resight data indicate juveniles born between 1998 and 2002 have much reduced survivorship compared with cohorts born in the late 1980s, while adult survivorship has remained steady. Combined with behavioral observations, our data suggest YOY are losing an intraspecific competition between adults and juveniles, resulting in the currently observed decelerating logistic population growth. Competition theory predicts that intraspecific competition resulting in a clear losing competitor should cause compensatory population regulation. This functional response produces a smooth logistic growth curve as carrying capacity is approached, and is consistent with census data collected from this population over the past 50 years. The competitive mechanism causing compensatory regulation likely stems from the capital-breeding life-history strategy employed by gray seals. This strategy decouples reproductive success from resources available around breeding colonies and prevents females from competing with each other while young are dependent. PMID:24198943

  8. Optical response of C60 fullerene from a Time Dependent Thomas Fermi approach

    E-print Network

    Palade, D I

    2014-01-01

    We study the collective electron dynamics in C60 clusters within the Time Dependent Thomas Fermi method in the frame of jellium model. The results regarding the optical spectrum are in good agreement with the experimental data, our simulations being able to reproduce both resonances from 20eV and 40eV . We compare also, the results with those from other theoretical approaches and investigate the implications of quantum effects including exchange-correlation corrections, or gradient corrections from a Weizsacker term. The nature of the second resonance is studied using transition densities and phase analysis and interpreted as being a collective surface plasmon

  9. Optical response of C60 fullerene from a time dependent Thomas Fermi approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palade, D. I.; Baran, V.

    2015-09-01

    We study the collective electron dynamics in C60 clusters within the time dependent Thomas Fermi method in the frame of jellium model. The results regarding the optical spectrum are in good agreement with the experimental data, our simulations being able to reproduce both resonances from 20 {eV} and 40 {eV}. We compare also, the results with those from other theoretical approaches and investigate the implications of quantum effects including exchange-correlation corrections, or gradient corrections from a Weizsacker term. The nature of the second resonance is studied using transition densities.

  10. Pharmacological approaches to methamphetamine dependence: a focused review

    PubMed Central

    Karila, Laurent; Weinstein, Aviv; Aubin, Henri-Jean; Benyamina, Amine; Reynaud, Michel; Batki, Steven L

    2010-01-01

    Methamphetamine dependence is a serious worldwide public health problem with major medical, psychiatric, socioeconomic and legal consequences. Various neuronal mechanisms implicated in methamphetamine dependence have suggested several pharmacological approaches. A literature search from a range of electronic databases (PubMed, EMBASE, PsycInfo, the NIDA research monograph index and the reference list of clinicaltrials.gov) was conducted for the period from January 1985 to October 2009. There were no restrictions on the identification or inclusion of studies in terms of publication status, language and design type. A variety of medications have failed to show efficacy in clinical trials, including a dopamine partial agonist (aripiprazole), GABAergic agents (gabapentin) and serotonergic agents (SSRI, ondansetron, mirtazapine). Three double-blind placebo-controlled trials using modafinil, bupropion and naltrexone have shown positive results in reducing amphetamine or methamphetamine use. Two studies employing agonist replacement medications, one with d-amphetamine and the other with methylphenidate, have also shown promise. Despite the lack of success in most studies to date, increasing efforts are being made to develop medications for the treatment of methamphetamine dependence and several promising agents are targets of further research. PMID:20565449

  11. Ground state of heavy closed shell nuclei: An effective interaction and local density approximation approach

    SciTech Connect

    Modarres, M.; Rasekhinejad, N.

    2005-12-15

    We study the ground-state properties of heavy closed-shell nuclei such as {sup 48}Ca, {sup 90}Zr, {sup 120}Sn, and {sup 208}Pb as well as {sup 4}He, {sup 16}O, and {sup 40}Ca. Similar to our recent work, the local density approximation in the harmonic oscillator basis and different channel-dependent effective two-body interactions that are generated through the lowest-order constrained variational calculation for asymmetric nuclear matter with the Reid68Day, Reid68, and {delta}-Reid68 potentials are used. Unlike nuclear matter, it is shown that Reid68 potential gives ground-state binding energies closer to the experimental data with respect to the {delta}-Reid68 potential and there is not much difference between Reid68 and Reid68Day potentials, which have been define up to J=5. The different channel-dependent effective interactions (J>2) and one- and two-body density distribution functions are discussed and they are compared with the results of other approaches such as the Brueckner local density approximation, correlated basis function, variational fermion hypernetted chain, variational cluster Monte Carlo, Brueckner-Hartree-Fock, fermionic molecular dynamics, and coupled cluster. Finally it is concluded that the three-body force (isobar degrees of freedom) is very important for light (heavy) nuclei because in the most of recent many-body calculations, it is observed that the available two-body nuclear forces usually underbind light nuclei and overbind heavy nuclei and nuclear matter.

  12. Unified approach to nuclear densities from exotic atoms

    E-print Network

    E. Friedman

    2009-01-28

    Parameters of nuclear density distributions are derived from least-squares fits to strong interaction observables in exotic atoms. Global analyses of antiprotonic and pionic atoms show reasonably good agreement between the two types of probes regarding the average behaviour of root-mean-square radii of the neutron distributions. Apparent conflict regarding the shape of the neutron distribution is attributed to different radial sensitivities of these two probes.

  13. Time-dependent Density Functional Results for the Dynamic Hyperpolarizability of C{sub 60}

    SciTech Connect

    van Gisbergen, S.; Snijders, J.; Baerends, E.

    1997-04-01

    The experimental, as well as theoretical, values for the frequency-dependent hyperpolarizability of C{sub 60} differ by orders of magnitude. We present the first density functional calculation of a molecular frequency-dependent hyperpolarizability. Our implementation is very economical, enabling the treatment of molecules of this size, in a potentially much more accurate way than can be obtained with alternative methods. Our results strongly support the recent results by Geng and Wright, who report much lower experimental values than previous authors. {copyright} {ital 1997} {ital The American Physical Society}

  14. Density-Dependent Spacing Behaviour and Activity Budget in Pregnant, Domestic Goats (Capra hircus)

    PubMed Central

    Vas, Judit; Andersen, Inger Lise

    2015-01-01

    Very little is known about the spacing behaviour in social groups of domestic goats (Capra hircus) in the farm environment. In this experiment, we studied interindividual distances, movement patterns and activity budgets in pregnant goats housed at three different densities. Norwegian dairy goats were kept in stable social groups of six animals throughout pregnancy at 1, 2 or 3 m2 per individual and their spacing behaviours (i.e. distance travelled, nearest and furthest neighbour distance) and activity budgets (e.g. resting, feeding, social activities) were monitored. Observations were made in the first, second and last thirds of pregnancy in the mornings, at noon and in the afternoons of each of these phases (4.5 hours per observation period). The findings show that goats held at animal densities of 2 and 3 m2 moved longer distances when they had more space per animal and kept larger nearest and furthest neighbour distances when compared to the 1 m2 per animal density. Less feeding activity was observed at the high animal density compared to the medium and low density treatments. The phase of gestation also had an impact on almost all behavioural variables. Closer to parturition, animals moved further distances and the increase in nearest and furthest neighbour distance was more pronounced at the lower animal densities. During the last period of gestation, goats spent less time feeding and more on resting, social behaviours and engaging in other various activities. Our data suggest that more space per goat is needed for goats closer to parturition than in the early gestation phase. We concluded that in goats spacing behaviour is density-dependent and changes with stages of pregnancy and activities. Finally, the lower density allowed animals to express individual preferences regarding spacing behaviour which is important in ensuring good welfare in a farming situation. PMID:26657240

  15. Subspace formulation of time-dependent density functional theory for large-scale calculations.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xu; Lu, Gang

    2015-08-14

    A subspace formulation of time-dependent density functional theory (TDDFT) is proposed for large-scale calculations based on density functional perturbation theory. The formulation is implemented in conjunction with projector augmented-wave method and plane-wave basis set. A key bottleneck of conventional TDDFT method is circumvented by projecting the time-dependent Kohn-Sham eigenvalue equations from a full Hilbert space to a substantially reduced sub-Hilbert space. As a result, both excitation energies and ionic forces can be calculated accurately within the reduced subspace. The method is validated for several model systems and exhibits the similar accuracy as the conventional TDDFT method but at a computational cost of the ground state calculation. The Born-Oppenheimer molecular dynamics can be successfully performed for excited states in C60 and T12 molecules, opening doors for many applications involving excited state dynamics. PMID:26277130

  16. Two-component hybrid time-dependent density functional theory within the Tamm-Dancoff approximation

    SciTech Connect

    Kühn, Michael; Weigend, Florian

    2015-01-21

    We report the implementation of a two-component variant of time-dependent density functional theory (TDDFT) for hybrid functionals that accounts for spin-orbit effects within the Tamm-Dancoff approximation (TDA) for closed-shell systems. The influence of the admixture of Hartree-Fock exchange on excitation energies is investigated for several atoms and diatomic molecules by comparison to numbers for pure density functionals obtained previously [M. Kühn and F. Weigend, J. Chem. Theory Comput. 9, 5341 (2013)]. It is further related to changes upon switching to the local density approximation or using the full TDDFT formalism instead of TDA. Efficiency is demonstrated for a comparably large system, Ir(ppy){sub 3} (61 atoms, 1501 basis functions, lowest 10 excited states), which is a prototype molecule for organic light-emitting diodes, due to its “spin-forbidden” triplet-singlet transition.

  17. Negative frequency-dependent selection is intensified at higher population densities in protist populations

    PubMed Central

    Minter, Ewan J. A.; Watts, Phillip C.; Lowe, Chris D.; Brockhurst, Michael A.

    2015-01-01

    Natural populations of free-living protists often exhibit high-levels of intraspecific diversity, yet this is puzzling as classic evolutionary theory predicts dominance by genotypes with high fitness, particularly in large populations where selection is efficient. Here, we test whether negative frequency-dependent selection (NFDS) plays a role in the maintenance of diversity in the marine flagellate Oxyrrhis marina using competition experiments between multiple pairs of strains. We observed strain-specific responses to frequency and density, but an overall signature of NFDS that was intensified at higher population densities. Because our strains were not selected a priori on the basis of particular traits expected to exhibit NFDS, these data represent a relatively unbiased estimate of the role for NFDS in maintaining diversity in protist populations. These findings could help to explain how bloom-forming plankton, which periodically achieve exceptionally high population densities, maintain substantial intraspecific diversity. PMID:26063750

  18. Effective density dependent pairing forces in the T=1 and T=0 channels

    E-print Network

    E. Garrido; P. Sarriguren; E. Moya de Guerra; P. Schuck

    1999-09-13

    Effective density dependent pairing forces of zero range are adjusted on gap values in T=0,1 channels calculated with the Paris force in symmetric nuclear matter. General discussions on the pairing force are presented. In conjunction with the effective k-mass the nuclear pairing force seems to need very little renormalization in the T=1 channel. The situation in the T=0 channel is also discussed.

  19. On Traveling Wave Fronts in a Bacterial Growth Model with Density-Dependent Diffusion and Chemotaxis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mansour, M. B. A.

    2011-04-01

    Bacterial colonies often generate patterns that are characterized by fingerlike projections growing out of the propagating front. In this paper, we analyze the traveling wave fronts in bacterial growth model that accounts for chemotactic movement as well as random motion in density-dependent diffusion. Specifically, the existence of traveling wave solutions to model equations is examined by means of methods of local linear and nonlinear analysis, and numerical simulations. The occurrence is shown of both sharp and smooth traveling wave fronts.

  20. Representations in Density Dependent Hadronic Field Theory and compatibility with QCD sum-rules

    E-print Network

    R. Aguirre

    2005-08-25

    Different representations of an effective, covariant theory of the hadronic interaction are examined. For this purpose we have introduced nucleon-meson vertices parametrized in terms of scalar combinations of hadronic fields, extending the conceptual frame of the Density Dependent Hadronic Field Theory. Nuclear matter properties at zero temperature are examined in the Mean Field Approximation, including the equation of state, the Landau parameters, and collective modes. The treatment of isospin channels in terms of QCD sum rules inputs is outlined.

  1. Effects of density dependence, zooplankton and temperature on blue whiting Micromesistius poutassou growth.

    PubMed

    Trenkel, V M; Lorance, P; Fässler, S M M; Høines, Å S

    2015-10-01

    Blue whiting Micromesistius poutassou mean total length at age in the north-east Atlantic Ocean was found to vary by around ±6% during the period 2004-2011 and mean mass at age by ±22% during the years 1981-2013. Linear modelling provided strong evidence that these phenotypic growth variations can be explained by trophic conditions, mainly negative density dependence and also food availability, and a negative long-term temperature effect on asymptotic size. PMID:26376856

  2. Multi-configuration time-dependent density-functional theory based on range separation.

    PubMed

    Fromager, Emmanuel; Knecht, Stefan; Jensen, Hans Jørgen Aa

    2013-02-28

    Multi-configuration range-separated density-functional theory is extended to the time-dependent regime. An exact variational formulation is derived. The approximation, which consists in combining a long-range Multi-Configuration-Self-Consistent Field (MCSCF) treatment with an adiabatic short-range density-functional (DFT) description, is then considered. The resulting time-dependent multi-configuration short-range DFT (TD-MC-srDFT) model is applied to the calculation of singlet excitation energies in H2, Be, and ferrocene, considering both short-range local density (srLDA) and generalized gradient (srGGA) approximations. As expected, when modeling long-range interactions with the MCSCF model instead of the adiabatic Buijse-Baerends density-matrix functional as recently proposed by Pernal [J. Chem. Phys. 136, 184105 (2012)], the description of both the 1(1)D doubly-excited state in Be and the 1(1)?u(+) state in the stretched H2 molecule are improved, although the latter is still significantly underestimated. Exploratory TD-MC-srDFT/GGA calculations for ferrocene yield in general excitation energies at least as good as TD-DFT using the Coulomb attenuated method based on the three-parameter Becke-Lee-Yang-Parr functional (TD-DFT/CAM-B3LYP), and superior to wave-function (TD-MCSCF, symmetry adapted cluster-configuration interaction) and TD-DFT results based on LDA, GGA, and hybrid functionals. PMID:23464134

  3. Ignition of the beam-plasma-discharge and its dependence on electron density. Memorandum report

    SciTech Connect

    Walker, D.N.; Szuszczewicz, E.P.; Lin, C.S.

    1981-07-23

    A cold electron beam, propagating through a weakly ionized plasma will, under proper conditions, produce a modified beam-plasma state known as the Beam-Plasma-Discharge (BDP). As the subject of a continuing series of experiments in a large facility chamber it was previously determined that the BPD had an abrupt ignition threshold as the beam current I sub B was increased at fixed beam energy. While a specific empirical relationship was established among the controlling parameters of beam current, energy and length as well as ambient pressure and magnetic field, a dependence of the BPD on plasma density of the from, omega sub p approximates omega sub c, was suggested. We have since conducted a survey of various beam-plasma conditions covering beam currents from 8 to 85 ma, beam energies from 0.8 to 2.0 keV and magnetic fields at 0.9 and 1.5 gauss. This survey includes full determinations of radial profiles of electron density for each of the selected conditions extending from a low-density pre-BDP state to a strong BPD condition. At BPD threshold N sub e max was determined and omega sub p calculated as the density dependent threshold condition for BPD. The experimental results are shown to compare favorably with a developing theoretical model that considers BPD to be triggered by electron plasma wave excitation of a beam-plasma instability.

  4. A new time dependent density functional algorithm for large systems and plasmons in metal clusters.

    PubMed

    Baseggio, Oscar; Fronzoni, Giovanna; Stener, Mauro

    2015-07-14

    A new algorithm to solve the Time Dependent Density Functional Theory (TDDFT) equations in the space of the density fitting auxiliary basis set has been developed and implemented. The method extracts the spectrum from the imaginary part of the polarizability at any given photon energy, avoiding the bottleneck of Davidson diagonalization. The original idea which made the present scheme very efficient consists in the simplification of the double sum over occupied-virtual pairs in the definition of the dielectric susceptibility, allowing an easy calculation of such matrix as a linear combination of constant matrices with photon energy dependent coefficients. The method has been applied to very different systems in nature and size (from H2 to [Au147](-)). In all cases, the maximum deviations found for the excitation energies with respect to the Amsterdam density functional code are below 0.2 eV. The new algorithm has the merit not only to calculate the spectrum at whichever photon energy but also to allow a deep analysis of the results, in terms of transition contribution maps, Jacob plasmon scaling factor, and induced density analysis, which have been all implemented. PMID:26178089

  5. Nuclear clustering in the energy density functional approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ebran, J.-P.; Khan, E.; Nikši?, T.; Vretenar, D.

    2015-10-01

    Nuclear Energy Density Functionals (EDFs) are a microscopic tool of choice extensively used over the whole chart to successfully describe the properties of atomic nuclei ensuing from their quantum liquid nature. In the last decade, they also have proved their ability to deal with the cluster phenomenon, shedding a new light on its fundamental understanding by treating on an equal footing both quantum liquid and cluster aspects of nuclei. Such a unified microscopic description based on nucleonic degrees of freedom enables to tackle the question pertaining to the origin of the cluster phenomenon and emphasizes intrinsic mechanisms leading to the emergence of clusters in nuclei.

  6. Nanowire-density-dependent field emission of n-type 3C-SiC nanoarrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Lin; Gao, Fengmei; Chen, Shanliang; Li, Chengming; Yang, Weiyou

    2015-09-01

    The density of the nanowires is one of the key issues for their field emission (FE) properties of the nanoarrays, since it plays an important role on the electron emission sites and field screening effect. Here, we reported the nanowire-density-dependent FE properties of the n-type 3C-SiC nanoarrays. The highly oriented and large-scale SiC nanoarrays were grown on the 6H-SiC wafer via pyrolysis of polyureasilazane by adjusting the thicknesses of Au films used as the catalysts. The densities of the nanoarrays were tunable to be ˜2.9 × 107, ˜4.0 × 107, and ˜5.7 × 107 nanowires/cm2 by controlling the Au film thicknesses of 50, 70, and 90 nm, respectively. The measured FE characteristics disclosed that the turn-on fields of the samples could be tailored to be of ˜1.79, 1.57, and 1.95 V/?m with the increase of the densities, suggesting that a suitable nanowire density could favor the enhanced electron emission from the SiC nanoarrays with improved emission sites and limited field screening effects.

  7. Chain Length and Grafting Density Dependent Enhancement in the Hydrolysis of Ester-Linked Polymer Brushes.

    PubMed

    Melzak, Kathryn A; Yu, Kai; Bo, Deng; Kizhakkedathu, Jayachandran N; Toca-Herrera, José L

    2015-06-16

    Poly(N,N-dimethylacrylamide) (PDMA) brushes with different grafting density and chain length were grown from an ester group-containing initiator using surface-initiated polymerization. Hydrolysis of the PDMA chains from the surface was monitored by measuring thickness of the polymer layer by ellipsometry and extension length by atomic force microscopy. It was found that the initial rate of cleavage of one end-tethered PDMA chains was dependent on the grafting density and chain length; the hydrolysis rate was faster for high grafting density brushes and brushes with higher molecular weights. Additionally, the rate of cleavage of polymer chains during a given experiment changed by up to 1 order of magnitude as the reaction progressed, with a distinct transition to a lower rate as the grafting density decreased. Also, polymer chains undergo selective cleavage, with longer chains in a polydisperse brush being preferentially cleaved at one stage of the hydrolysis reaction. We suggest that the enhanced initial hydrolysis rates seen at high grafting densities and high chain lengths are due to mechanical activation of the ester bond connecting the polymer chains to the surface in association with high lateral pressure within the brush. These results have implications for the preparation of polymers brushes, their stability under harsh conditions, and the analysis of polymer brushes from partial hydrolysates. PMID:26010390

  8. A kinetic approach to modeling the manufacture of high density strucutral foam: Foaming and polymerization

    SciTech Connect

    Rao, Rekha R.; Mondy, Lisa Ann; Noble, David R.; Brunini, Victor; Roberts, Christine Cardinal; Long, Kevin Nicholas; Soehnel, Melissa Marie; Celina, Mathias C.; Wyatt, Nicholas B.; Thompson, Kyle R.; Tinsley, James

    2015-09-01

    We are studying PMDI polyurethane with a fast catalyst, such that filling and polymerization occur simultaneously. The foam is over-packed to tw ice or more of its free rise density to reach the density of interest. Our approach is to co mbine model development closely with experiments to discover new physics, to parameterize models and to validate the models once they have been developed. The model must be able to repres ent the expansion, filling, curing, and final foam properties. PMDI is chemically blown foam, wh ere carbon dioxide is pr oduced via the reaction of water and isocyanate. The isocyanate also re acts with polyol in a competing reaction, which produces the polymer. A new kinetic model is developed and implemented, which follows a simplified mathematical formalism that decouple s these two reactions. The model predicts the polymerization reaction via condensation chemis try, where vitrification and glass transition temperature evolution must be included to correctly predict this quantity. The foam gas generation kinetics are determined by tracking the molar concentration of both water and carbon dioxide. Understanding the therma l history and loads on the foam due to exothermicity and oven heating is very important to the results, since the kinetics and ma terial properties are all very sensitive to temperature. The conservation eq uations, including the e quations of motion, an energy balance, and thr ee rate equations are solved via a stabilized finite element method. We assume generalized-Newtonian rheology that is dependent on the cure, gas fraction, and temperature. The conservation equations are comb ined with a level set method to determine the location of the free surface over time. Results from the model are compared to experimental flow visualization data and post-te st CT data for the density. Seve ral geometries are investigated including a mock encapsulation part, two configur ations of a mock stru ctural part, and a bar geometry to specifically test the density model. We have found that the model predicts both average density and filling profiles well. However, it under predicts density gradients, especially in the gravity direction. Thoughts on m odel improvements are also discussed.

  9. Adapting approximate-memory potentials for time-dependent density functional theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurzweil, Yair; Baer, Roi

    2008-02-01

    Frequency dependent exchange-correlation kernels for time-dependent density functional theory can be used to construct approximate exchange-correlation potentials. The resulting potentials are usually not translationally covariant nor do they obey the so-called zero-force condition. These two basic symmetry requirements are essential for using the potentials in actual applications (even in the linear regime). We provide two pragmatic methods for fully imposing these conditions for both linear and nonlinear regimes. As an example, we take the Gross and Kohn frequency dependent XC functional [Phys. Rev. Lett. 55, 2850 (1985)], correct it, and numerically test it on a sodium metal cluster. Violation of the basic symmetries causes instabilities or spurious low frequency modes.

  10. Resampling Method for Applying Density-Dependent Habitat Selection Theory to Wildlife Surveys

    PubMed Central

    Tardy, Olivia; Massé, Ariane; Pelletier, Fanie; Fortin, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    Isodar theory can be used to evaluate fitness consequences of density-dependent habitat selection by animals. A typical habitat isodar is a regression curve plotting competitor densities in two adjacent habitats when individual fitness is equal. Despite the increasing use of habitat isodars, their application remains largely limited to areas composed of pairs of adjacent habitats that are defined a priori. We developed a resampling method that uses data from wildlife surveys to build isodars in heterogeneous landscapes without having to predefine habitat types. The method consists in randomly placing blocks over the survey area and dividing those blocks in two adjacent sub-blocks of the same size. Animal abundance is then estimated within the two sub-blocks. This process is done 100 times. Different functional forms of isodars can be investigated by relating animal abundance and differences in habitat features between sub-blocks. We applied this method to abundance data of raccoons and striped skunks, two of the main hosts of rabies virus in North America. Habitat selection by raccoons and striped skunks depended on both conspecific abundance and the difference in landscape composition and structure between sub-blocks. When conspecific abundance was low, raccoons and striped skunks favored areas with relatively high proportions of forests and anthropogenic features, respectively. Under high conspecific abundance, however, both species preferred areas with rather large corn-forest edge densities and corn field proportions. Based on random sampling techniques, we provide a robust method that is applicable to a broad range of species, including medium- to large-sized mammals with high mobility. The method is sufficiently flexible to incorporate multiple environmental covariates that can reflect key requirements of the focal species. We thus illustrate how isodar theory can be used with wildlife surveys to assess density-dependent habitat selection over large geographic extents. PMID:26042998

  11. Resampling method for applying density-dependent habitat selection theory to wildlife surveys.

    PubMed

    Tardy, Olivia; Massé, Ariane; Pelletier, Fanie; Fortin, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    Isodar theory can be used to evaluate fitness consequences of density-dependent habitat selection by animals. A typical habitat isodar is a regression curve plotting competitor densities in two adjacent habitats when individual fitness is equal. Despite the increasing use of habitat isodars, their application remains largely limited to areas composed of pairs of adjacent habitats that are defined a priori. We developed a resampling method that uses data from wildlife surveys to build isodars in heterogeneous landscapes without having to predefine habitat types. The method consists in randomly placing blocks over the survey area and dividing those blocks in two adjacent sub-blocks of the same size. Animal abundance is then estimated within the two sub-blocks. This process is done 100 times. Different functional forms of isodars can be investigated by relating animal abundance and differences in habitat features between sub-blocks. We applied this method to abundance data of raccoons and striped skunks, two of the main hosts of rabies virus in North America. Habitat selection by raccoons and striped skunks depended on both conspecific abundance and the difference in landscape composition and structure between sub-blocks. When conspecific abundance was low, raccoons and striped skunks favored areas with relatively high proportions of forests and anthropogenic features, respectively. Under high conspecific abundance, however, both species preferred areas with rather large corn-forest edge densities and corn field proportions. Based on random sampling techniques, we provide a robust method that is applicable to a broad range of species, including medium- to large-sized mammals with high mobility. The method is sufficiently flexible to incorporate multiple environmental covariates that can reflect key requirements of the focal species. We thus illustrate how isodar theory can be used with wildlife surveys to assess density-dependent habitat selection over large geographic extents. PMID:26042998

  12. Improving the worthiness of the Henry problem as a benchmark for density-dependent groundwater flow models

    E-print Network

    Clement, Prabhakar

    Improving the worthiness of the Henry problem as a benchmark for density-dependent groundwater flow), Improving the worthiness of the Henry problem as a benchmark for density- dependent groundwater flow models January 2004. [1] This study considers the worthiness of the Henry saltwater intrusion problem as a test

  13. Microwave DENSITY—INDEPENDENT Permittivity Functions as Spring Oats Kernels' Moisture Calibrators: a New Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Das, Priyanka; Ahmad, Zeeshan; Singh, P. N.; Prasad, Ashutosh

    2011-11-01

    The present work makes use of experimental data for real part of microwave complex permittivity of spring oats (Avena sativa L.) at 2.45 GHz and 24 °C as a function of moisture content, as extracted from the literature. These permittivity data were individually converted to those for solid materials using seven independent mixture equations for effective permittivity of random media. Moisture dependent quadratic models for complex permittivity of spring oats (Avena sativa L.), as developed by the present group, were used to evaluate the dielectric loss factor of spring oats kernels. Using these data, seven density—independent permittivity functions were evaluated and plotted as a function of moisture content of the samples. Second and third order polynomial regression equations were used for curve fittings with these data and their performances are reported. Coefficients of determination (r2) approaching unity (˜ 0.95-0.9999) and very small Standard Deviation (SD) ˜0.001-8.87 show good acceptability for these models. The regularity in the nature of these variations revealed the usefulness of the density—independent permittivity functions as indicators/calibrators of moisture content of spring oats kernels. Keeping in view the fact that moisture content of grains and seeds is an important factor determining quality and affecting the storage, transportation, and milling of grains and seeds, the work has the potentiality of its practical applications.

  14. New approach for the determination of the nuclear level density parameters

    SciTech Connect

    Mughabghab, S.F.; Dunford, C.L.

    1998-08-01

    The nuclear level density parameters of the stable nuclides have been determined from the neutron resonance data on the basis of new values for the spin dispersion parameter. The latter parameter is deduced from the spin dependent average level spacings of s-wave neutron resonances of odd target nuclides. In addition, the temperature dependence of the level density parameter is studied and an analytical relation for it is presented.

  15. The Time-Dependent Approach to Inverse Scattering Ricardo Weder y

    E-print Network

    The Time-Dependent Approach to Inverse Scattering #3; Ricardo Weder y Instituto de Investigaciones-dependent approach to inverse scattering, that has been developed recently. The aim of this approach is to solve various inverse scattering problems with time-dependent methods that closely fol- low the physical (and

  16. Emergent fungal entomopathogen does not alter density dependence in a viral competitor.

    PubMed

    Liebhold, Andrew M; Plymale, Ruth; Elkinton, Joseph S; Hajek, Ann E

    2013-06-01

    Population cycles in forest Lepidoptera often result from recurring density-dependent epizootics of entomopathogens. While these systems are typically dominated by a single pathogen species, insects are often infected by multiple pathogens, yet little is known how pathogens interact to affect host dynamics. The apparent invasion of northeastern North America by the fungal entomopathogen Entomophaga maimaiga some time prior to 1989 provides a unique opportunity to evaluate such interactions. Prior to the arrival of E. maimaga, the oscillatory dynamics of host gypsy moth, Lymantria dispar, populations were apparently driven by epizootics of a nucleopolyhedrovirus. Subsequent to its emergence, E. maimaiga has caused extensive mortality in host populations, but little is known about how it has altered multigenerational dynamics of the gypsy moth and its virus. Here we compared demographic data collected in gypsy moth populations prior to vs. after E. maimaiga's invasion. We found that the recently invading fungal pathogen virtually always causes greater levels of mortality in hosts than does the virus, but fungal mortality is largely density independent. Moreover, the presence of the fungus has apparently not altered the gypsy moth-virus density-dependent interactions that were shown to drive periodic oscillations in hosts before the arrival of the fungus. PMID:23923480

  17. Synthesizing mechanisms of density dependence in reef fishes: behavior, habitat configuration, and observational scale.

    PubMed

    White, J Wilson; Samhouri, Jameal F; Stier, Adrian C; Wormald, Clare L; Hamilton, Scott L; Sandin, Stuart A

    2010-07-01

    Coral and rocky reef fish populations are widely used as model systems for the experimental exploration of density-dependent vital rates, but patterns of density-dependent mortality in these systems are not yet fully understood. In particular, the paradigm for strong, directly density-dependent (DDD) postsettlement mortality stands in contrast to recent evidence for inversely density-dependent (IDD) mortality. We review the processes responsible for DDD and IDD per capita mortality in reef fishes, noting that the pattern observed depends on predator and prey behavior, the spatial configuration of the reef habitat, and the spatial and temporal scales of observation. Specifically, predators tend to produce DDD prey mortality at their characteristic spatial scale of foraging, but prey mortality is IDD at smaller spatial scales due to attack-abatement effects (e.g., risk dilution). As a result, DDD mortality may be more common than IDD mortality on patch reefs, which tend to constrain predator foraging to the same scale as prey aggregation, eliminating attack-abatement effects. Additionally, adjacent groups of prey on continuous reefs may share a subset of refuges, increasing per capita refuge availability and relaxing DDD mortality relative to prey on patch reefs, where the patch edge could prevent such refuge sharing. These hypotheses lead to a synthetic framework to predict expected mortality patterns for a variety of scenarios. For nonsocial, nonaggregating species and species that aggregate in order to take advantage of spatially clumped refuges, IDD mortality is possible but likely superseded by DDD refuge competition, especially on patch reefs. By contrast, for species that aggregate socially, mortality should be IDD at the scale of individual aggregations but DDD at larger scales. The results of nearly all prior reef fish studies fit within this framework, although additional work is needed to test many of the predicted outcomes. This synthesis reconciles some apparent contradictions in the recent reef fish literature and suggests the importance of accounting for the scale-sensitive details of predator and prey behavior in any study system. PMID:20715614

  18. Demographic, mechanistic and density-dependent determinants of population growth rate: a case study in an avian predator.

    PubMed Central

    Hone, Jim; Sibly, Richard M

    2002-01-01

    Identifying the determinants of population growth rate is a central topic in population ecology. Three approaches (demographic, mechanistic and density-dependent) used historically to describe the determinants of population growth rate are here compared and combined for an avian predator, the barn owl (Tyto alba). The owl population remained approximately stable (r approximately 0) throughout the period from 1979 to 1991. There was no evidence of density dependence as assessed by goodness of fit to logistic population growth. The finite (lambda) and instantaneous (r) population growth rates were significantly positively related to food (field vole) availability. The demographic rates, annual adult mortality, juvenile mortality and annual fecundity were reported to be correlated with vole abundance. The best fit (R(2) = 0.82) numerical response of the owl population described a positive effect of food (field voles) and a negative additive effect of owl abundance on r. The numerical response of the barn owl population to food availability was estimated from both census and demographic data, with very similar results. Our analysis shows how the demographic and mechanistic determinants of population growth rate are linked; food availability determines demographic rates, and demographic rates determine population growth rate. The effects of food availability on population growth rate are modified by predator abundance. PMID:12396509

  19. One-Dimensional Population Density Approaches to Recurrently Coupled Networks of Neurons with Noise

    E-print Network

    Campbell, Sue Ann

    One-Dimensional Population Density Approaches to Recurrently Coupled Networks of Neurons with Noise of coupled, two-dimensional, integrate-and-fire neurons such as the Izhikevich, adapting exponential (Ad density under a first order moment closure for coupled networks of integrate-and-fire neurons with white

  20. Equilibrium Sampling Approach to the Interpretation of Electron Density Maps Andreas Vitalis,1,

    E-print Network

    Caflisch, Amedeo

    1 Equilibrium Sampling Approach to the Interpretation of Electron Density Maps Andreas Vitalis,1-mail: a.vitalis@bioc.uzh.ch #12;2 RUNNING TITLE Equilibrium Sampling with Density Restraints SUMMARY on the equilibrium sampling of energy landscapes describing restraints to experimental input data. Our procedure

  1. Vertical distribution of zooplankton: density dependence and evidence for an ideal free distribution with costs

    PubMed Central

    Lampert, Winfried

    2005-01-01

    Background In lakes with a deep-water algal maximum, herbivorous zooplankton are faced with a trade-off between high temperature but low food availability in the surface layers and low temperature but sufficient food in deep layers. It has been suggested that zooplankton (Daphnia) faced with this trade-off distribute vertically according to an "Ideal Free Distribution (IFD) with Costs". An experiment has been designed to test the density (competition) dependence of the vertical distribution as this is a basic assumption of IFD theory. Results Experiments were performed in large, indoor mesocosms (Plankton Towers) with a temperature gradient of 10°C and a deep-water algal maximum established below the thermocline. As expected, Daphnia aggregated at the interface between the two different habitats when their density was low. The distribution spread asymmetrically towards the algal maximum when the density increased until 80 % of the population dwelled in the cool, food-rich layers at high densities. Small individuals stayed higher in the water column than large ones, which conformed with the model for unequal competitors. Conclusion The Daphnia distribution mimics the predictions of an IFD with costs model. This concept is useful for the analysis of zooplankton distributions under a large suite of environmental conditions shaping habitat suitability. Fish predation causing diel vertical migrations can be incorporated as additional costs. This is important as the vertical location of grazing zooplankton in a lake affects phytoplankton production and species composition, i.e. ecosystem function. PMID:15813974

  2. Evaluating Systematic Dependencies of Type Ia Supernovae: The Influence of Deflagration to Detonation Density

    E-print Network

    Jackson, Aaron P; Townsley, Dean M; Chamulak, David A; Brown, Edward F; Timmes, F X

    2010-01-01

    We explore the effects of the deflagration to detonation transition (DDT) density on the production of Ni-56 in thermonuclear supernova explosions (type Ia supernovae). Within the DDT paradigm, the transition density sets the amount of expansion during the deflagration phase of the explosion and therefore the amount of nuclear statistical equilibrium (NSE) material produced. We employ a theoretical framework for a well-controlled statistical study of two-dimensional simulations of thermonuclear supernovae with randomized initial conditions that can, with a particular choice of transition density, produce a similar average and range of Ni-56 masses to those inferred from observations. Within this framework, we utilize a more realistic "simmered" white dwarf progenitor model with a flame model and energetics scheme to calculate the amount of Ni-56 and NSE material synthesized for a suite of simulated explosions in which the transition density is varied in the range 1-3x10^7 g/cc. We find a quadratic dependence ...

  3. Quantum electrodynamical time-dependent density functional theory for many-electron systems on a lattice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farzanehpour, Mehdi; Tokatly, Ilya; Nano-Bio Spectroscopy Group; ETSF Scientific Development Centre Team

    2015-03-01

    We present a rigorous formulation of the time-dependent density functional theory for interacting lattice electrons strongly coupled to cavity photons. We start with an example of one particle on a Hubbard dimer coupled to a single photonic mode, which is equivalent to the single mode spin-boson model or the quantum Rabi model. For this system we prove that the electron-photon wave function is a unique functional of the electronic density and the expectation value of the photonic coordinate, provided the initial state and the density satisfy a set of well defined conditions. Then we generalize the formalism to many interacting electrons on a lattice coupled to multiple photonic modes and prove the general mapping theorem. We also show that for a system evolving from the ground state of a lattice Hamiltonian any density with a continuous second time derivative is locally v-representable. Spanish Ministry of Economy and Competitiveness (Grant No. FIS2013-46159-C3-1-P), Grupos Consolidados UPV/EHU del Gobierno Vasco (Grant No. IT578-13), COST Actions CM1204 (XLIC) and MP1306 (EUSpec).

  4. Temperature-Dependent Maximum Density of 1D Excitons in Carbon Nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Searles, Thomas; Walsh, Ian; Nosaka, Takayuki; Rice, William; Kono, Junichiro

    2011-03-01

    Previous studies have shown that an upper limit exists on the density of 1D excitons in single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) due to very efficient exciton-exciton annihilation (EEA). A recent theoretical study based on a dark-bright two-band exciton model predicts that there is a temperature at which the achievable exciton density will be maximized, surpassing the room-temperature upper limit. Therefore, we performed temperature-dependent (300 K to 11 K) photoluminescence (PL) on HiPco SWNTs embedded in an i-carrageenan matrix under high resonant excitation. To achieve high densities, we used pump fluences up to ~ 1014 photons/cm2 , utilizing intense fs pulses from a wavelength-tunable optical parametric amplifier. We found that for each temperature the PL intensity saturates as a function of pump fluence and the saturation intensity increases from 300 K to a moderate temperature around 100-150 K. Below that critical temperature, the PL intensity decreases with decreasing temperature. Within the framework of diffusion-limited EEA, we successfully estimated the upper limit of the density of 1D excitons in SWNTs as a function of temperature and chirality

  5. Dendritic spine dynamics in synaptogenesis after repeated LTP inductions: Dependence on pre-existing spine density

    PubMed Central

    Oe, Yuki; Tominaga-Yoshino, Keiko; Hasegawa, Sho; Ogura, Akihiko

    2013-01-01

    Not only from our daily experience but from learning experiments in animals, we know that the establishment of long-lasting memory requires repeated practice. However, cellular backgrounds underlying this repetition-dependent consolidation of memory remain largely unclear. We reported previously using organotypic slice cultures of rodent hippocampus that the repeated inductions of LTP (long-term potentiation) lead to a slowly developing long-lasting synaptic enhancement accompanied by synaptogenesis distinct from LTP itself, and proposed this phenomenon as a model system suitable for the analysis of the repetition-dependent consolidation of memory. Here we examined the dynamics of individual dendritic spines after repeated LTP-inductions and found the existence of two phases in the spines' stochastic behavior that eventually lead to the increase in spine density. This spine dynamics occurred preferentially in the dendritic segments having low pre-existing spine density. Our results may provide clues for understanding the cellular bases underlying the repetition-dependent consolidation of memory. PMID:23739837

  6. Chirality-dependent densities of carbon nanotubes by in situ 2D fluorescence-excitation and Raman characterisation in a density gradient after ultracentrifugation.

    PubMed

    Cambré, Sofie; Muyshondt, Pieter; Federicci, Remi; Wenseleers, Wim

    2015-12-21

    Density gradient ultracentrifugation (DGU) becomes increasingly important for the sorting of nanomaterials according to the particles' density, hence structure and dimensions, which determine their unique properties, but the further development of this separation technique is hindered by the limited precision with which the densities could be characterized. In this work, we determine these densities by position-dependent 2D wavelength-dependent IR fluorescence-excitation and resonant Raman spectroscopy measured directly in the density gradient after ultracentrifugation. We apply this method to study the diameter and chirality-dependent sorting of empty and water-filled single-walled carbon nanotubes coated with two different surfactants, sodium cholate (SC) and sodium deoxycholate (DOC). The results elucidate the long standing contradiction that SC would provide better diameter sorting, while DOC is the most efficient surfactant to solubilise the nanotubes. A more predictable separation is obtained for empty DOC-coated nanotubes since their density is found to vary very smoothly with diameter. The accurate and chirality-dependent densities furthermore provide information on the surfactant coating, which is also important for other separation techniques, and allow to determine the mass percentage of water encapsulated inside the nanotubes. PMID:26565985

  7. Time-dependent density functional theory calculation of van der Waals coefficient of potassium clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banerjee, Arup; Chakrabarti, Aparna; Ghanty, Tapan K.

    We employ all-electron ab initio time-dependent density functional theory (DFT)-based method to calculate the long range dipole-dipole dispersion coefficient (van der Waals coefficient) C6 of potassium atom clusters (Kn) containing even number of atoms, n ranging from 2 to 20. The dispersion coefficients are obtained via Casimir-Polder relation. The calculations are carried out with the asymptotically correct statistical average of orbital potential and compared with the results obtained using Vosko-Wilk-Nusair representation of exchange-correlation potential within local density approximation. We report the dispersion coefficients between clusters of sodium and potassium atoms as well. The present results have been compared with the available jellium-based model and other DFT results in the literature. We also study the relationship between volume of the cluster and the C6 for K clusters. It is observed that the C6 scales as square of the volume.

  8. Thickness Dependent Carrier Density at the Surface of SrTiO3 (111) Slabs

    SciTech Connect

    Sivadas, Mr. Nikhil; Dixit, Hemant M; Cooper, Valentino R; Xiao, Di

    2014-01-01

    We investigate the surface electronic structure and thermodynamic stability of the SrTiO3 (111) slabs using density functional theory. We observe that, for Ti-terminated slabs it is indeed possible to create a two-dimensional electron gas (2DEG). However, the carrier density of the 2DEG displays a strong thickness dependence due to the competition between electronic reconstruction and polar distortions. As expected, having a surface oxygen atom at the Ti termination can stabilize the system, eliminating any electronic reconstruction, thereby making the system insulating. An analysis of the surface thermodynamic stability suggests that the Ti terminated (111) surface should be experimentally realizable. This surface may be useful for exploring the behavior of electrons in oxide (111) interfaces and may have implications for modern device applications.

  9. Density-dependent cooperation as a mechanism for persistence and coexistence.

    PubMed

    Lampert, Adam; Tlusty, Tsvi

    2011-10-01

    To overcome stress, such as resource limitation, an organism often needs to successfully mediate competition with other members of its own species. This may favor the evolution of defective traits that are harmful to the species population as a whole, and that may lead to its dilution or even to its extinction (the tragedy of the commons). Here, we show that this phenomenon can be circumvented by cooperation plasticity, in which an individual decides, based on environmental conditions, whether to cooperate or to defect. Specifically, we analyze the evolution of density-dependent cooperation. In our model, the population is spatially subdivided, periodically remixed, and comprises several species. We find that evolution pushes individuals to be more cooperative when their own species is at lower densities, and we show that not only could this cooperation prevent the tragedy of the commons, but it could also facilitate coexistence between many species that compete for the same resource. PMID:21967418

  10. Centrality dependence of mid-rapidity charged particles density in relativistic heavy ion collisions - energy scaling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petrovici, M.; Berceanu, I.; Pop, A.; Andrei, C.; Herghelegiu, A.

    2013-02-01

    As far as details on the "Relativistic Heavy Ion Collisions - Expectations, Experimental Facts and Future Plans" lecture could be found on the Summer School web site, the present contribution will summarize the results considered to be of general interest, i.e. the energy scaling of centrality dependence of mid-rapidity charged particles density in relativistic heavy ion collisions, presented in the second part of the lecture, in the section dedicated to the global observables. The comparison of charged particle multiplicity in heavy ion central collisions and e+e- as a function of ?s, including the latest results obtained at LHC in Pb+Pb collisions at 2.76 is followed by the energy scaling of the pseudo-rapidity charged particle density in central rapidity as a function of centrality.

  11. Density dependent hadronic models and the relation between neutron stars and neutron skin thickness

    SciTech Connect

    Avancini, S. S.; Marinelli, J. R.; Menezes, D. P.; Moraes, M. M. W.; Providencia, C.

    2007-05-15

    In the present work, we investigate the main differences in the lead neutron skin thickness, binding energy, surface energy, and density profiles obtained with two different density dependent hadron models. Our results are calculated within the Thomas-Fermi approximation with two different numerical prescriptions and compared with results obtained with a common parametrization of the nonlinear Walecka model. The neutron skin thickness is a reflex of the equation of state properties. Hence, a direct correlation is found between the neutron skin thickness and the slope of the symmetry energy. We show that within the present approximations, the asymmetry parameter for low momentum transfer polarized electron scattering is not sensitive to the model differences.

  12. Effective electron displacements: A tool for time-dependent density functional theory computational spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Guido, Ciro A. Cortona, Pietro; Adamo, Carlo; Institut Universitaire de France, 103 Bd Saint-Michel, F-75005 Paris

    2014-03-14

    We extend our previous definition of the metric ?r for electronic excitations in the framework of the time-dependent density functional theory [C. A. Guido, P. Cortona, B. Mennucci, and C. Adamo, J. Chem. Theory Comput. 9, 3118 (2013)], by including a measure of the difference of electronic position variances in passing from occupied to virtual orbitals. This new definition, called ?, permits applications in those situations where the ?r-index is not helpful: transitions in centrosymmetric systems and Rydberg excitations. The ?-metric is then extended by using the Natural Transition Orbitals, thus providing an intuitive picture of how locally the electron density changes during the electronic transitions. Furthermore, the ? values give insight about the functional performances in reproducing different type of transitions, and allow one to define a “confidence radius” for GGA and hybrid functionals.

  13. A modified NaSch model with density-dependent randomization for traffic flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, H. B.; Ge, H. X.; Dong, L. Y.; Dai, S. Q.

    2007-05-01

    Based on the Nagel-Schreckenberg (NaSch) model of traffic flow, a modified cellular automaton (CA) traffic model with the density-dependent randomization (abbreviated as the DDR model) is proposed to simulate traffic flow. The fundamental diagram obtained by simulation shows the ability of this modified NaSch model to capture the essential features of traffic flow, e.g., synchronized flow, metastable state, hysteresis and phase separation at higher densities. Comparisons are made between this DDR model and the NaSch model, also between this DDR model and the VDR model. And the underlying mechanism is analyzed. All these results indicate that the presented model is reasonable and more realistic.

  14. Liquids that form due to dynamics of the molecules that depend on the local density

    E-print Network

    Richard P. Sear

    2015-03-26

    RNA molecules in living cells form what look like liquid droplets formed by liquid/liquid phase separation. But unlike the molecules in conventional phase separating mixtures, RNA molecules are transported by molecular motors that consume energy and so are out of equilibrium. Motivated by this we consider what sort of simple rules for the dynamics of model mRNA molecules lead to liquid/liquid phase separation. We find that dynamics that slow as the local density of molecules increases, drive the formation of liquids. We also look at the analogous separation of the two blocks of a block copolymer, in which the monomers of one block have dynamics that depend on the local density of monomers of that block. We find that this block condenses and separates from the monomers of the other block. This is a simple model of the out-of-equilibrium domain formation found in the chromatin in the nucleus of cells.

  15. Size-dependent error of the density functional theory ionization potential in vacuum and solution.

    PubMed

    Sosa Vazquez, Xochitl A; Isborn, Christine M

    2015-12-28

    Density functional theory is often the method of choice for modeling the energetics of large molecules and including explicit solvation effects. It is preferable to use a method that treats systems of different sizes and with different amounts of explicit solvent on equal footing. However, recent work suggests that approximate density functional theory has a size-dependent error in the computation of the ionization potential. We here investigate the lack of size-intensivity of the ionization potential computed with approximate density functionals in vacuum and solution. We show that local and semi-local approximations to exchange do not yield a constant ionization potential for an increasing number of identical isolated molecules in vacuum. Instead, as the number of molecules increases, the total energy required to ionize the system decreases. Rather surprisingly, we find that this is still the case in solution, whether using a polarizable continuum model or with explicit solvent that breaks the degeneracy of each solute, and we find that explicit solvent in the calculation can exacerbate the size-dependent delocalization error. We demonstrate that increasing the amount of exact exchange changes the character of the polarization of the solvent molecules; for small amounts of exact exchange the solvent molecules contribute a fraction of their electron density to the ionized electron, but for larger amounts of exact exchange they properly polarize in response to the cationic solute. In vacuum and explicit solvent, the ionization potential can be made size-intensive by optimally tuning a long-range corrected hybrid functional. PMID:26723649

  16. Size-dependent error of the density functional theory ionization potential in vacuum and solution

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Sosa Vazquez, Xochitl A.; Isborn, Christine M.

    2015-12-22

    Density functional theory is often the method of choice for modeling the energetics of large molecules and including explicit solvation effects. It is preferable to use a method that treats systems of different sizes and with different amounts of explicit solvent on equal footing. However, recent work suggests that approximate density functional theory has a size-dependent error in the computation of the ionization potential. We here investigate the lack of size-intensivity of the ionization potential computed with approximate density functionals in vacuum and solution. We show that local and semi-local approximations to exchange do not yield a constant ionization potentialmore »for an increasing number of identical isolated molecules in vacuum. Instead, as the number of molecules increases, the total energy required to ionize the system decreases. Rather surprisingly, we find that this is still the case in solution, whether using a polarizable continuum model or with explicit solvent that breaks the degeneracy of each solute, and we find that explicit solvent in the calculation can exacerbate the size-dependent delocalization error. We demonstrate that increasing the amount of exact exchange changes the character of the polarization of the solvent molecules; for small amounts of exact exchange the solvent molecules contribute a fraction of their electron density to the ionized electron, but for larger amounts of exact exchange they properly polarize in response to the cationic solute. As a result, in vacuum and explicit solvent, the ionization potential can be made size-intensive by optimally tuning a long-range corrected hybrid functional.« less

  17. Size-dependent error of the density functional theory ionization potential in vacuum and solution

    SciTech Connect

    Sosa Vazquez, Xochitl A.; Isborn, Christine M.

    2015-12-22

    Density functional theory is often the method of choice for modeling the energetics of large molecules and including explicit solvation effects. It is preferable to use a method that treats systems of different sizes and with different amounts of explicit solvent on equal footing. However, recent work suggests that approximate density functional theory has a size-dependent error in the computation of the ionization potential. We here investigate the lack of size-intensivity of the ionization potential computed with approximate density functionals in vacuum and solution. We show that local and semi-local approximations to exchange do not yield a constant ionization potential for an increasing number of identical isolated molecules in vacuum. Instead, as the number of molecules increases, the total energy required to ionize the system decreases. Rather surprisingly, we find that this is still the case in solution, whether using a polarizable continuum model or with explicit solvent that breaks the degeneracy of each solute, and we find that explicit solvent in the calculation can exacerbate the size-dependent delocalization error. We demonstrate that increasing the amount of exact exchange changes the character of the polarization of the solvent molecules; for small amounts of exact exchange the solvent molecules contribute a fraction of their electron density to the ionized electron, but for larger amounts of exact exchange they properly polarize in response to the cationic solute. As a result, in vacuum and explicit solvent, the ionization potential can be made size-intensive by optimally tuning a long-range corrected hybrid functional.

  18. Effect of pheromone dispenser density on timing and duration of approaches by peachtree borer.

    PubMed

    Teixeira, Luís A F; Grieshop, Matthew J; Gut, Larry J

    2010-10-01

    The timing and duration of approaches by male peachtree borer Synanthedon exitiosa Say (Lepidoptera: Sesiidae) to commercial pheromone dispensers placed singly or at high density in peach orchards was determined by using field-deployed video cameras and digital video recorders. Cameras were trained on one dispenser, and one standard lure was placed in a peach orchard, and on 12 dispensers in a separate orchard where dispensers for mating disruption had been placed at 371 per hectare. Male moth approaches were video recorded at the peak of peachtree borer annual flight, from 13 to 18 August 2009. The mean approach timing (h:min:sec±SD) during the study period was 11:33:12 ± 00:46:43, 11:43:52 ± 00:45:58, and 11:41:21 ± 00:45:54 AM with the single dispenser, high-density dispensers, and lure, respectively. Day-to-day variability in approach timings suggested that there were no biologically significant differences among treatments. The frequency distribution of approach durations varied among treatments, as the high-density dispensers had mostly short approaches, while the distribution of approaches to the single dispenser and lure was wider. The median (interquartile range) approach duration was 3 (2-4), 1 (1-2), and 4 (2-6) seconds with the single dispenser, high-density dispensers, and lure, respectively. The relative rank of median approach durations was constant throughout the period, indicating differences among treatments. This study showed that the presence of pheromone dispensers for mating disruption did not cause an advancement of peachtree borer diel rhythm of response. Shorter approaches to dispensers placed at high density than singly suggest that dispenser retentiveness is not constant with peachtree borer, which may bias estimates of disruption activity as a function of dispenser density. PMID:20814811

  19. Temperature dependence of current density and admittance in metal-insulator-semiconductor junctions with molecular insulator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fadjie-Djomkam, A. B.; Ababou-Girard, S.; Hiremath, R.; Herrier, C.; Fabre, B.; Solal, F.; Godet, C.

    2011-10-01

    Electrical transport in ultrathin Metal-insulator-semiconductor (MIS) tunnel junctions is analyzed using the temperature dependence of current density and admittance characteristics, as illustrated by Hg//C12H25 - n Si junctions incorporating n-alkyl molecular layers (1.45 nm thick) covalently bonded to Si(111). The voltage partition is obtained from J(V, T) characteristics, over eight decades in current. In the low forward bias regime (0.2-0.4 V) governed by thermionic emission, the observed linear T-dependence of the effective barrier height, q?EFF(T)=q?B+(kT)?0dT, provides the tunnel barrier attenuation, exp(-?0dT), with ?0= 0.93 Å-1 and the thermionic emission barrier height, ?B=0.53 eV. In the high-forward-bias regime (0.5-2.0 V), the bias dependence of the tunnel barrier transparency, approximated by a modified Simmons model for a rectangular tunnel barrier, provides the tunnel barrier height, ?T=0.5 eV; the fitted prefactor value, G0 = 10-10 ?-1, is four decades smaller than the theoretical Simmons prefactor for MIM structures. The density distribution of defects localized at the C12H25 - n Si interface is deduced from admittance data (low-high frequency method) and from a simulation of the response time ?R(V) using Gomila's model for a non equilibrium tunnel junction. The low density of electrically active defects near mid-gap (DS < 2 × 1011 eV-1.cm-2) indicates a good passivation of dangling bonds at the dodecyl - n Si (111) interface.

  20. Density dependence and risk of extinction in a small population of sea otters

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gerber, L.R.; Buenau, K.E.; VanBlaricom, G.

    2004-01-01

    Sea otters (Enhydra lutris (L.)) were hunted to extinction off the coast of Washington State early in the 20th century. A new population was established by translocations from Alaska in 1969 and 1970. The population, currently numbering at least 550 animals, A major threat to the population is the ongoing risk of majour oil spills in sea otter habitat. We apply population models to census and demographic data in order to evaluate the status of the population. We fit several density dependent models to test for density dependence and determine plausible values for the carrying capacity (K) by comparing model goodness of fit to an exponential model. Model fits were compared using Akaike Information Criterion (AIC). A significant negative relationship was found between the population growth rate and population size (r2=0.27, F=5.57, df=16, p<0.05), suggesting density dependence in Washington state sea otters. Information criterion statistics suggest that the model is the most parsimonious, followed closely by the logistic Beverton-Holt model. Values of K ranged from 612 to 759 with best-fit parameter estimates for the Beverton-Holt model including 0.26 for r and 612 for K. The latest (2001) population index count (555) puts the population at 87-92% of the estimated carrying capacity, above the suggested range for optimum sustainable population (OSP). Elasticity analysis was conducted to examine the effects of proportional changes in vital rates on the population growth rate (??). The elasticity values indicate the population is most sensitive to changes in survival rates (particularly adult survival).

  1. Pressure Dependence of the Charge-Density-Wave Gap in Rare-Earth Tri-Tellurides

    SciTech Connect

    Sacchetti, A.; Arcangeletti, E.; Perucchi, A.; Baldassarre, L.; Postorino, P.; Lupi, S.; Ru, N.; Fisher, I.R.; Degiorgi, L.; /Zurich, ETH

    2009-12-14

    We investigate the pressure dependence of the optical properties of CeTe{sub 3}, which exhibits an incommensurate charge-density-wave (CDW) state already at 300 K. Our data are collected in the mid-infrared spectral range at room temperature and at pressures between 0 and 9 GPa. The energy for the single particle excitation across the CDW gap decreases upon increasing the applied pressure, similarly to the chemical pressure by rare-earth substitution. The broadening of the bands upon lattice compression removes the perfect nesting condition of the Fermi surface and therefore diminishes the impact of the CDW transition on the electronic properties of RTe{sub 3}.

  2. Time Dependent Density Functional Theory Studies on Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons Containing Five Membered Rings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hammonds, Mark; Buragohain, Mridusmita; Pathak, Amit; Sarre, Peter

    2015-08-01

    Since the confirmation of fullerenes in both circumstellar and interstellar environments, renewed interest has been taking into the formation and destruction processes which fullerenes may undergo, and their relation to polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and other interstellar molecular species. This study presents Time Dependent Density Functional Theory (TDDFT) studies on PAHs containing five membered rings, which may be considered to be molecular fragments of fullerenes. Calculated spectra are presented and discussed in terms of the potential for identifying active fullerene chemistry in circumstellar and/or interstellar environments.

  3. Charge transfer in time-dependent density-functional theory via spin-symmetry breaking

    SciTech Connect

    Fuks, Johanna I.; Maitra, Neepa T.

    2011-04-15

    Long-range charge-transfer excitations pose a major challenge for time-dependent density-functional approximations. We show that spin-symmetry breaking offers a simple solution for molecules composed of open-shell fragments, yielding accurate excitations at large separations when the acceptor effectively contains one active electron. Unrestricted exact-exchange and self-interaction-corrected functionals are performed on one-dimensional models and on the real LiH molecule within the pseudopotential approximation to demonstrate our results.

  4. Non-monotonic density dependence of the diffusion of DNA fragments in low-salt suspensions

    E-print Network

    M. G. McPhie; G. Naegele

    2008-11-26

    The high linear charge density of 20-base-pair oligomers of DNA is shown to lead to a striking non-monotonic dependence of the long-time self-diffusion on the concentration of the DNA in low-salt conditions. This generic non-monotonic behavior results from both the strong coupling between the electrostatic and solvent-mediated hydrodynamic interactions, and from the renormalization of these electrostatic interactions at large separations, and specifically from the dominance of the far-field hydrodynamic interactions caused by the strong repulsion between the DNA fragments.

  5. Time-Dependent Density Functional Theory Calculations of Photoabsorption of Fluorinated Cyclic Molecules in the Vacuum Ultraviolet Region

    SciTech Connect

    Dixon, David A.); Matsuzawa, Nobuyuki N.; Ishitani, Ahihiko; Uda, Tsuyoshi

    2001-05-30

    Time-dependent density functional theory (TD-DFT) calculations of the photoabsorption of molecules in the vacuum region have been performed in order to aid in the design of transparent materials for use as photoresists for F2 lithography (157 nm). The method including an empirical equation for correcting the calculated transition energy is described. We have used the TD-DFT approach to predict the photoabsorption of substituted benzenes, and cycloalkane including norbornane. The calculations show that norbornane is the best cycloalkane on which to start substitution studies. We report results on the mono-, di-, and tera-fluorinated derivatives. The results show that tetrafluoro-norbornanes have the lowest absorption in the 157 nm range for the molecules that we studied.

  6. Density determination of nano-layers depending to the thickness by non-destructive method

    SciTech Connect

    Gacem, A.; Doghmane, A.; Hadjoub, Z.

    2013-12-16

    Non-destructive tests used to characterize and observe the state of the solids near the surface or at depth, without damaging them or damaging them. Density is frequently used to follow the variations of the physical structure of the samples, as well as in the calculation of quantity of material required to fill a given volume, and it is also used to determine the homogeneity of a sample. However, the measurement of the acoustic properties (density, elastic constants,…) of a thin film whose thickness is smaller than several atomic layers is not easy to perform. For that reason, we expose in this work the effects of the thicknesses of thin films on the evolution of the density, where several samples are analyzed. The samples selected structures are thin films deposited on substrates, these coatings have thicknesses varying from a few atomic layers to ten or so micrometers and can change the properties of the substrate on which they are deposited. To do so, we considered a great number of layers (Cr, Al, SiO{sub 2}, ZnO, Cu, AlN, Si{sub 3}N{sub 4}, SiC) deposited on different substrates (Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}, Cu and Quartz). It is first shown that the density exhibits a dispersive behaviour. Such a behaviour is characterized by an initial increase (or decrease) followed by a saturated region. Further investigations of these dependences led to the determination of a semi-empirical universal relations, ?=f(h/?{sub T}), for all the investigated layer/substrate combination. Such expression could be of great importance in the density prediction of even layers thicknesses.

  7. Rotochemical heating with a density-dependent superfluid energy gap in neutron stars

    SciTech Connect

    Gonzalez-Jimenez, Nicolas; Petrovich, Cristobal; Reisenegger, Andreas

    2010-08-04

    When a rotating neutron star loses angular momentum, the reduction of the centrifugal force makes it contract. This perturbs each fluid element, raising the local pressure and originating deviations from beta equilibrium, inducing reactions that release heat (rotochemical heating). This effect has previously been studied by Fernandez and Reisenegger for neutron stars of non-superfluid matter and by Petrovich and Reisenegger for superfluid matter, finding that the system in both cases reaches a quasi-steady state, corresponding to a partial equilibration between compression, due to the loss of angular momentum, and reactions that try to restore the equilibrium. However, Petrovich and Reisenegger assumes a constant value of the superfluid energy gap, whereas theoretical models predict density-dependent gap amplitudes, and therefore gaps that depend on the location in the star. In this work, we try to discriminate between several proposed gap models, comparing predicted surface temperatures to the value measured for the nearest millisecond pulsar, J0437-4715.

  8. Hydrodynamical Formulation of Time-Dependent Density Functional Theory for Probing Multiphoton Processes in Strong Fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roy, A. K.; Chu, Xi; Chu, Shih-I.

    2001-05-01

    We extend the hydrodynamical formulation of time-dependent density functional theory (TDDFT) to the study of multiphoton processes of many-electron atomic systems in intense laser fields. The initial state of the quantum system is obtained by the imaginary time propagation method. The generalized pseudospectral time-dependent techniques (X. M. Tong and S.I. Chu, Chem. Phys. 217 (1997) 119.)^, (X. Chu and S. I. Chu, Phys. Rev. A63 (2001) 023411.) are used for accurate and efficient solution of both imaginary time propagation and strong field calculations. The procedure is applied to the study of the nonlinear optical response of rare gas atoms to intense laser fields (A. K. Roy, X. Chu, J. Carrera, and S.I. Chu, to be published).

  9. Evolution of flowering decisions in a stochastic, density-dependent environment

    PubMed Central

    Metcalf, C. J. E.; Rose, K. E.; Childs, D. Z.; Sheppard, A. W.; Grubb, P. J.; Rees, M.

    2008-01-01

    Demography is central to both ecology and evolution, and characterizing the feedback between ecology and evolution is critical for understanding organisms' life histories and how these might evolve through time. Here, we show how, by combining a range of theoretical approaches with the statistical analysis of individually structured databases, accurate prediction of life history decisions is possible in natural density-regulated populations undergoing large fluctuations in demographic rates from year to year. Our predictions are remarkably accurate and statistically well defined. In addition, we show that the predicted trait values are evolutionarily and convergence stable and that protected polymorphisms are possible. PMID:18641119

  10. Exact-exchange time-dependent density-functional theory for static and dynamic polarizabilities

    SciTech Connect

    Hirata, So; Ivanov, Stanislav; Bartlett, Rodney J.; Grabowski, Ireneusz

    2005-03-01

    Time-dependent density-functional theory (TDDFT) employing the exact-exchange functional has been formulated on the basis of the optimized-effective-potential (OEP) method of Talman and Shadwick for second-order molecular properties and implemented into a Gaussian-basis-set, trial-vector algorithm. The only approximation involved, apart from the lack of correlation effects and the use of Gaussian-type basis functions, was the consistent use of the adiabatic approximation in the exchange kernel and in the linear response function. The static and dynamic polarizabilities and their anisotropy predicted by the TDDFT with exact exchange (TDOEP) agree accurately with the corresponding values from time-dependent Hartree-Fock theory, the exact-exchange counterpart in the wave function theory. The TDOEP is free from the nonphysical asymptotic decay of the exchange potential of most conventional density functionals or from any other manifestations of the incomplete cancellation of the self-interaction energy. The systematic overestimation of the absolute values and dispersion of polarizabilities that plagues most conventional TDDFT cannot be seen in the TDOEP.

  11. Cosmological constraints from the redshift dependence of the Alcock-Paczynski test: galaxy density gradient field

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Xiao-Dong; Park, Changbom; Forero-Romero, J. E.; Kim, Juhan E-mail: cbp@kias.re.kr E-mail: kjhan@kias.re.kr

    2014-12-01

    We propose a method based on the redshift dependence of the Alcock-Paczynski (AP) test to measure the expansion history of the universe. It uses the isotropy of the galaxy density gradient field to constrain cosmological parameters. If the density parameter ? {sub m} or the dark energy equation of state w are incorrectly chosen, the gradient field appears to be anisotropic with the degree of anisotropy varying with redshift. We use this effect to constrain the cosmological parameters governing the expansion history of the universe. Although redshift-space distortions (RSD) induced by galaxy peculiar velocities also produce anisotropies in the gradient field, these effects are close to uniform in magnitude over a large range of redshift. This makes the redshift variation of the gradient field anisotropy relatively insensitive to the RSD. By testing the method on mock surveys drawn from the Horizon Run 3 cosmological N-body simulations, we demonstrate that the cosmological parameters can be estimated without bias. Our method is complementary to the baryon acoustic oscillation or topology methods as it depends on D{sub AH} , the product of the angular diameter distance and the Hubble parameter.

  12. Thermodynamics predicts density-dependent energy use in organisms and ecological communities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yen, Jian D. L.; Paganin, David M.; Thomson, James R.; Mac Nally, Ralph

    2015-04-01

    Linking our knowledge of organisms to our knowledge of ecological communities and ecosystems is a key challenge for ecology. Individual size distributions (ISDs) link the size of individual organisms to the structure of ecological communities, so that studying ISDs might provide insight into how organism functioning affects ecosystems. Similarly shaped ISDs among ecosystems, coupled with allometric links between organism size and resource use, suggest the possibility of emergent resource-use patterns in ecological communities. We drew on thermodynamics to develop a maximization principle that predicted both organism and community energy use. These predictions highlighted the importance of density-dependent metabolic rates and were able to explain nonlinear relationships between community energy use and community biomass. We analyzed data on fish community energy use and biomass and found evidence of nonlinear scaling, which was predicted by the thermodynamic principle developed here and is not explained by other theories of ISDs. Detailed measurements of organism energy use will clarify the role of density dependence in driving metabolic rates and will further test our derived thermodynamic principle. Importantly, our study highlights the potential for fundamental links between ecology and thermodynamics.

  13. Photoabsorption spectra of small cationic xenon clusters from time-dependent density functional theory

    SciTech Connect

    Oliveira, Micael J. T.; Nogueira, Fernando; Marques, Miguel A. L.; Rubio, Angel

    2009-12-07

    Upon ionization, rare-gas (like Ar and Xe) clusters shift their absorption spectrum from the ultraviolet to the visible. This happens as bonding becomes much stronger due to the removal of an electron from a strongly antibonding orbital. In this article, we study the absorption spectrum of small cationic xenon clusters (Xe{sub n}{sup +}, with n=3,...,35) by means of time-dependent density functional theory. These calculations include relativistic effects through the use of relativistic j-dependent pseudopotentials in a two-spinor formulation of the Kohn-Sham equations. The peak positions in our calculated spectra are in fairly good agreement with experiment and confirm that absorption is mainly due to a charged linear core composed of 3, 4, or 5 Xe atoms where the positive charge is localized. However, we find large deviations concerning the oscillator strengths, which can be partially explained by the unsatisfactory treatment of exchange in common density functionals. Furthermore, we find that adequate ground-state geometries are necessary for the correct prediction of the qualitative features of the spectra.

  14. Constraints on neutron skin thickness in 208Pb and density-dependent symmetry energy

    E-print Network

    Jianmin Dong; Wei Zuo; Jianzhong Gu

    2015-04-09

    Accurate knowledge about the neutron skin thickness $\\Delta R_{np}$ in $^{208}$Pb has far-reaching implications for different communities of nuclear physics and astrophysics. Yet, the novel Lead Radius Experiment (PREX) did not yield stringent constraint on the $\\Delta R_{np}$ recently. We employ a more practicable strategy currently to probe the neutron skin thickness of $^{208}$Pb based on a high linear correlation between the $\\Delta R_{np}$ and $J-a_{\\text{sym}}$, where $J$ and $a_{\\text{sym}}$ are the symmetry energy (coefficient) of nuclear matter at saturation density and of $^{208}$Pb. An accurate $J-a_{\\text{sym}}$ thus places a strong constraint on the $\\Delta R_{np}$. Compared with the parity-violating asymmetry $A_{\\text{PV}}$ in the PREX, the reliably experimental information on the $J-a_{\\text{sym}}$ is much more easily available attributed to a wealth of measured data on nuclear masses and on decay energies. The density dependence of the symmetry energy is also well constrained with the $J-a_{\\text{sym}}$. Finally, with a `tomoscan' method, we find that one just needs to measure the nucleon densities in $^{208}$Pb starting from $R_{m} = 7.61\\pm0.04$ fm to obtain the $\\Delta R_{np}$ in hadron scattering experiments, regardless of its interior profile that is hampered by the strong absorption.

  15. A DENSITY DEPENDENCE FOR PROTOSTELLAR LUMINOSITY IN CLASS I SOURCES: COLLABORATIVE ACCRETION

    SciTech Connect

    Elmegreen, Bruce G.; Hurst, Rachel; Koenig, Xavier

    2014-02-10

    Class I protostars in three high-mass star-forming regions are found to have correlations among the local projected density of other Class I protostars, the summed flux from these other protostars, and the protostellar luminosity in the WISE 22 ?m band. Brighter Class I sources form in higher-density and higher-flux regions, while low luminosity sources form anywhere. These correlations depend slightly on the number of neighbors considered (from 2 to 20) and could include a size-of-sample effect from the initial mass function (i.e., larger numbers include rarer and more massive stars). Luminosities seem to vary by neighborhood with nearby protostars having values proportional to each other and higher density regions having higher values. If Class I luminosity is partially related to the accretion rate, then this luminosity correlation is consistent with the competitive accretion model, although it is more collaborative than competitive. The correlation is also consistent with primordial mass segregation and could explain why the stellar initial mass function resembles the dense core mass function even when cores form multiple stars.

  16. Seasonality selects for more acutely virulent parasites when virulence is density dependent.

    PubMed

    Donnelly, R; Best, A; White, A; Boots, M

    2013-01-22

    Host condition is often likely to influence parasite virulence. Furthermore, condition may often be correlated with host density, and therefore, it is important to understand the role of density-dependent virulence (DDV). We examine the consequences of DDV to the evolution of parasites in both seasonal and non-seasonal environments. In particular, we consider seasonality in host birth rate that results in a fluctuating host density and therefore a variable virulence. We show that parasites are selected for lower exploitation, and therefore lower transmission and virulence as the strength of DDV increases without seasonality. This is an important insight from our models; DDV has the opposite effect on the evolution of parasites to that of higher baseline mortality. Our key result is that although seasonality does not affect the evolution of virulence in classical models, with DDV parasites in seasonal environments are predicted to evolve to be more acute. This suggests that in more seasonal environments wildlife disease is likely to be more rather than less virulent if DDV is widespread. PMID:23193133

  17. Seasonality selects for more acutely virulent parasites when virulence is density dependent

    PubMed Central

    Donnelly, R.; Best, A.; White, A.; Boots, M.

    2013-01-01

    Host condition is often likely to influence parasite virulence. Furthermore, condition may often be correlated with host density, and therefore, it is important to understand the role of density-dependent virulence (DDV). We examine the consequences of DDV to the evolution of parasites in both seasonal and non-seasonal environments. In particular, we consider seasonality in host birth rate that results in a fluctuating host density and therefore a variable virulence. We show that parasites are selected for lower exploitation, and therefore lower transmission and virulence as the strength of DDV increases without seasonality. This is an important insight from our models; DDV has the opposite effect on the evolution of parasites to that of higher baseline mortality. Our key result is that although seasonality does not affect the evolution of virulence in classical models, with DDV parasites in seasonal environments are predicted to evolve to be more acute. This suggests that in more seasonal environments wildlife disease is likely to be more rather than less virulent if DDV is widespread. PMID:23193133

  18. Spin- and Parity-Dependent Level Densities in Exotic Calcium Isotopes?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Usman, I. T.; Carter, J.; Sideras-Haddad, E.; Jingo, M.; Kureba, C. O.; Donaldson, L.; Latif, M.; Neveling, R.; Smit, F. D.; Swartz, C.; Nemulodi, F.; von Neumann-Cosel, P.; Richter, A.; Fearick, R. W.; Fujita, H.; Fulita, Y.; Tamii, A.

    2015-11-01

    Level densities of 2+ and 1- states in 40Ca have been extracted from high energy-resolution (p,p') experiments performed using the K600 magnetic spectrometer at iThemba LABS, South Africa. The success of the method depends on the accurate determination of various background components underneath the giant resonance. It was found that using the nearly model-independent method of Discrete Wavelet Transform (DWT) background determination using bi-orthogonal wavelets of high order of vanishing moments proved sufficient for the extraction of level density in the excitation energy region of the Isoscalar Giant Quadrupole Resonance (ISGQR) and Isovector Giant Dipole Resonance (IVGDR). Comparison of the experimentally extracted 2+ and 1- level densities with Back-Shifted Fermi Gas Model (BSFG), Hartree-Fock Bogoliubov (HFB) and Hartree-Fock-Bardeen-Cooper Schriffer (HF-BCS) theoretical model predictions were made. Future interests in the use of radioactive-ion beams of different intensities will provide opportunities in elucidating this important property experimentally for more exotic calcium isotopes.

  19. Path integral density matrix dynamics: A method for calculating time-dependent properties in thermal adiabatic and non-adiabatic systems

    SciTech Connect

    Habershon, Scott

    2013-09-14

    We introduce a new approach for calculating quantum time-correlation functions and time-dependent expectation values in many-body thermal systems; both electronically adiabatic and non-adiabatic cases can be treated. Our approach uses a path integral simulation to sample an initial thermal density matrix; subsequent evolution of this density matrix is equivalent to solution of the time-dependent Schrödinger equation, which we perform using a linear expansion of Gaussian wavepacket basis functions which evolve according to simple classical-like trajectories. Overall, this methodology represents a formally exact approach for calculating time-dependent quantum properties; by introducing approximations into both the imaginary-time and real-time propagations, this approach can be adapted for complex many-particle systems interacting through arbitrary potentials. We demonstrate this method for the spin Boson model, where we find good agreement with numerically exact calculations. We also discuss future directions of improvement for our approach with a view to improving accuracy and efficiency.

  20. Warming and nitrogen affect size structuring and density dependence in a host–parasitoid food web

    PubMed Central

    de Sassi, Claudio; Staniczenko, Phillip P. A.; Tylianakis, Jason M.

    2012-01-01

    Body size is a major factor constraining the trophic structure and functioning of ecological communities. Food webs are known to respond to changes in basal resource abundance, and climate change can initiate compounding bottom-up effects on food-web structure through altered resource availability and quality. However, the effects of climate and co-occurring global changes, such as nitrogen deposition, on the density and size relationships between resources and consumers are unknown, particularly in host–parasitoid food webs, where size structuring is less apparent. We use a Bayesian modelling approach to explore the role of consumer and resource density and body size on host–parasitoid food webs assembled from a field experiment with factorial warming and nitrogen treatments. We show that the treatments increased resource (host) availability and quality (size), leading to measureable changes in parasitoid feeding behaviour. Parasitoids interacted less evenly within their host range and increasingly focused on abundant and high-quality (i.e. larger) hosts. In summary, we present evidence that climate-mediated bottom-up effects can significantly alter food-web structure through both density- and trait-mediated effects. PMID:23007092

  1. Time-dependent density functional theory of magneto-optical response of periodic insulators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rubio, Angel; Tokatly, Ilya V.; Lebedeva, Irina V.

    2014-03-01

    Though the linear response theory has been successfully used for molecular systems for a long time, the extension of this theory to solids is not straightforward since the position operator is ill defined in extended periodic systems. The theoretical description of homogeneous static magnetic field in periodic systems is particularly challenging as the corresponding vector potential breaks the translational invariance of the Hamiltonian. We present a unified approach to calculation of all-order response to arbitrary electromagnetic fields both for periodic and molecular systems within the formalism of non-equilibrium Green functions. The approach is applied to derive the expression for the magneto-optical response of insulating solids in the approximation of non-interacting electrons. The formula obtained is completely identical to the expression for molecular systems if the proper position and orbital magnetization operators are chosen. The terms corresponding to changes in the optical response due to the orbital magnetization of Bloch states and due to the modified density of Bloch states in the magnetic field are identified. A computational scheme based on the density matrix-perturbation theory is developed for practical calculations of the magneto-optical response. The financial support from the Marie Curie Fellowship PIIF-GA-2012-326435 (RespSpatDisp) is gratefully acknowledged.

  2. Shape evolution and collective dynamics of quasifission in the time-dependent Hartree-Fock approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Umar, A. S.; Oberacker, V. E.; Simenel, C.

    2015-08-01

    Background: At energies near the Coulomb barrier, capture reactions in heavy-ion collisions result either in fusion or in quasifission. The former produces a compound nucleus in statistical equilibrium, while the second leads to a reseparation of the fragments after partial mass equilibration without formation of a compound nucleus. Extracting the compound nucleus formation probability is crucial to predict superheavy-element formation cross sections. It requires a good knowledge of the fragment angular distribution which itself depends on quantities such as moments of inertia and excitation energies which have so far been somewhat arbitrary for the quasifission contribution. Purpose: Our main goal is to utilize the time-dependent Hartee-Fock (TDHF) approach to extract ingredients of the formula used in the analysis of experimental angular distributions. These include the moment-of-inertia and temperature. Methods: We investigate the evolution of the nuclear density in TDHF calculations leading to quasifission. We study the dependence of the relevant quantities on various initial conditions of the reaction process. Results: The evolution of the moment of inertia is clearly nontrivial and depends strongly on the characteristics of the collision. The temperature rises quickly when the kinetic energy is transformed into internal excitation. Then, it rises slowly during mass transfer. Conclusions: Fully microscopic theories are useful to predict the complex evolution of quantities required in macroscopic models of quasifission.

  3. The Impairment of Osteogenesis in Bone Sialoprotein (BSP) Knockout Calvaria Cell Cultures Is Cell Density Dependent

    PubMed Central

    Bouet, Guenaelle; Bouleftour, Wafa; Juignet, Laura; Linossier, Marie-Thérèse; Thomas, Mireille; Vanden-Bossche, Arnaud; Aubin, Jane E.; Vico, Laurence; Marchat, David; Malaval, Luc

    2015-01-01

    Bone sialoprotein (BSP) belongs to the "small integrin-binding ligand N-linked glycoprotein" (SIBLING) family, whose members interact with bone cells and bone mineral. BSP is strongly expressed in bone and we previously showed that BSP knockout (BSP-/-) mice have a higher bone mass than wild type (BSP+/+) littermates, with lower bone remodelling. Because baseline bone formation activity is constitutively lower in BSP-/- mice, we studied the impact of the absence of BSP on in vitro osteogenesis in mouse calvaria cell (MCC) cultures. MCC BSP-/- cultures exhibit fewer fibroblast (CFU-F), preosteoblast (CFU-ALP) and osteoblast colonies (bone nodules) than wild type, indicative of a lower number of osteoprogenitors. No mineralized colonies were observed in BSP-/- cultures, along with little/no expression of either osteogenic markers or SIBLING proteins MEPE or DMP1. Osteopontin (OPN) is the only SIBLING expressed in standard density BSP-/- culture, at higher levels than in wild type in early culture times. At higher plating density, the effects of the absence of BSP were partly rescued, with resumed expression of osteoblast markers and cognate SIBLING proteins, and mineralization of the mutant cultures. OPN expression and amount are further increased in high density BSP-/- cultures, while PHEX and CatB expression are differentiatlly regulated in a manner that may favor mineralization. Altogether, we found that BSP regulates mouse calvaria osteoblast cell clonogenicity, differentiation and activity in vitro in a cell density dependent manner, consistent with the effective skeletogenesis but the low levels of bone formation observed in vivo. The BSP knockout bone microenvironment may alter the proliferation/cell fate of early osteoprogenitors. PMID:25710686

  4. Partitioning the sources of demographic variation reveals density-dependent nest predation in an island bird population

    PubMed Central

    Sofaer, Helen R; Sillett, T Scott; Langin, Kathryn M; Morrison, Scott A; Ghalambor, Cameron K

    2014-01-01

    Ecological factors often shape demography through multiple mechanisms, making it difficult to identify the sources of demographic variation. In particular, conspecific density can influence both the strength of competition and the predation rate, but density-dependent competition has received more attention, particularly among terrestrial vertebrates and in island populations. A better understanding of how both competition and predation contribute to density-dependent variation in fecundity can be gained by partitioning the effects of density on offspring number from its effects on reproductive failure, while also evaluating how biotic and abiotic factors jointly shape demography. We examined the effects of population density and precipitation on fecundity, nest survival, and adult survival in an insular population of orange-crowned warblers (Oreothlypis celata) that breeds at high densities and exhibits a suite of traits suggesting strong intraspecific competition. Breeding density had a negative influence on fecundity, but it acted by increasing the probability of reproductive failure through nest predation, rather than through competition, which was predicted to reduce the number of offspring produced by successful individuals. Our results demonstrate that density-dependent nest predation can underlie the relationship between population density and fecundity even in a high-density, insular population where intraspecific competition should be strong. PMID:25077023

  5. Analytical Blowup Solutions to the 4-dimensional Pressureless Navier-Stokes-Poisson Equations with Density-dependent Viscosity

    E-print Network

    Manwai Yuen

    2008-11-09

    We study the 4-dimensional pressureless Navier--Stokes-Poisson equations with density-dependent viscosity. The analytical solutions with arbitrary time blowup, in radial symmetry, are constructed in this paper.

  6. Integration of Density Dependence and Concentration Response Models Provides an Ecologically Relevant Assessment of Populations Exposed to Toxicants

    EPA Science Inventory

    The assessment of toxic exposure on wildlife populations involves the integration of organism level effects measured in toxicity tests (e.g., chronic life cycle) and population models. These modeling exercises typically ignore density dependence, primarily because information on ...

  7. Impact of density-dependent migration flows on epidemic outbreaks in heterogeneous metapopulations.

    PubMed

    Ripoll, J; Avinyó, A; Pellicer, M; Saldaña, J

    2015-08-01

    We investigate the role of migration patterns on the spread of epidemics in complex networks. We enhance the SIS-diffusion model on metapopulations to a nonlinear diffusion. Specifically, individuals move randomly over the network but at a rate depending on the population of the departure patch. In the absence of epidemics, the migration-driven equilibrium is described by quantifying the total number of individuals living in heavily or lightly populated areas. Our analytical approach reveals that strengthening the migration from populous areas contains the infection at the early stage of the epidemic. Moreover, depending on the exponent of the nonlinear diffusion rate, epidemic outbreaks do not always occur in the most populated areas as one might expect. PMID:26382456

  8. Impact of density-dependent migration flows on epidemic outbreaks in heterogeneous metapopulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ripoll, J.; Avinyó, A.; Pellicer, M.; Saldaña, J.

    2015-08-01

    We investigate the role of migration patterns on the spread of epidemics in complex networks. We enhance the SIS-diffusion model on metapopulations to a nonlinear diffusion. Specifically, individuals move randomly over the network but at a rate depending on the population of the departure patch. In the absence of epidemics, the migration-driven equilibrium is described by quantifying the total number of individuals living in heavily or lightly populated areas. Our analytical approach reveals that strengthening the migration from populous areas contains the infection at the early stage of the epidemic. Moreover, depending on the exponent of the nonlinear diffusion rate, epidemic outbreaks do not always occur in the most populated areas as one might expect.

  9. Efficient Calculation of Electronic Absorption Spectra by Means of Intensity-Selected Time-Dependent Density Functional Tight Binding.

    PubMed

    Rüger, Robert; van Lenthe, Erik; Lu, You; Frenzel, Johannes; Heine, Thomas; Visscher, Lucas

    2015-01-13

    During the last two decades density functional based linear response approaches have become the de facto standard for the calculation of optical properties of small- and medium-sized molecules. At the heart of these methods is the solution of an eigenvalue equation in the space of single-orbital transitions, whose quickly increasing number makes such calculations costly if not infeasible for larger molecules. This is especially true for time-dependent density functional tight binding (TD-DFTB), where the evaluation of the matrix elements is inexpensive. For the relatively large systems that can be studied the solution of the eigenvalue equation therefore determines the cost of the calculation. We propose to do an oscillator strength based truncation of the single-orbital transition space to reduce the computational effort of TD-DFTB based absorption spectra calculations. We show that even a sizable truncation does not destroy the principal features of the absorption spectrum, while naturally avoiding the unnecessary calculation of excitations with small oscillator strengths. We argue that the reduced computational cost of intensity-selected TD-DFTB together with its ease of use compared to other methods lowers the barrier of performing optical property calculations of large molecules and can serve to make such calculations possible in a wider array of applications. PMID:26574214

  10. Impact of numerical artifact of the forward model in the inverse solution of density-dependent flow problem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nassar, Mohamed K.; Ginn, Timothy R.

    2014-08-01

    We investigate the effect of computational error on the inversion of a density-dependent flow and transport model, using SEAWAT and UCODE-2005 in an inverse identification of hydraulic conductivity and dispersivity using head and concentration data from a 2-D laboratory experiment. We investigated inversions using three different solution schemes including variation of number of particles and time step length, in terms of the three aspects: the shape and smoothness of the objective function surface, the consequent impacts to the optimization, and the resulting Pareto analyses. This study demonstrates that the inversion is very sensitive to the choice of the forward model solution scheme. In particular, standard finite difference methods provide the smoothest objective function surface; however, this is obtained at the cost of numerical artifacts that can lead to erroneous warping of the objective function surface. Total variation diminishing (TVD) schemes limit these impacts at the cost of more computation time, while the hybrid method of characteristics (HMOC) approach with increased particle numbers and/or reduced time step gives both smoothed and accurate objective function surface. Use of the most accurate methods (TVD and HMOC) did lead to successful inversion of the two parameters; however, with distinct results for Pareto analyses. These results illuminate the sensitivity of the inversion to a number of aspects of the forward solution of the density-driven flow problem and reveal that parameter values may result that are erroneous but that counteract numerical errors in the solution.

  11. Dynamics of a recovering Arctic bird population: the importance of climate, density dependence, and site quality.

    PubMed

    Bruggeman, Jason E; Swem, Ted; Andersen, David E; Kennedy, Patricia L; Nigro, Debora

    2015-10-01

    Intrinsic and extrinsic factors affect vital rates and population-level processes, and understanding these factors is paramount to devising successful management plans for wildlife species. For example, birds time migration in response, in part, to local and broadscale climate fluctuations to initiate breeding upon arrival to nesting territories, and prolonged inclement weather early in the breeding season can inhibit egg-laying and reduce productivity. Also, density-dependent regulation occurs in raptor populations, as territory size is related to resource availability. Arctic Peregrine Falcons (Falco peregrinus tundrius; hereafter Arctic peregrine) have a limited and northern breeding distribution, including the Colville River Special Area (CRSA) in the National Petroleum Reserve-Alaska, USA. We quantified influences of climate, topography, nest productivity, prey habitat, density dependence, and interspecific competition affecting Arctic peregrines in the CRSA by applying the Dail-Madsen model to estimate abundance and vital rates of adults on nesting cliffs from 1981 through 2002. Arctic peregrine abundance increased throughout the 1980s, which spanned the population's recovery from DDT-induced reproductive failure, until exhibiting a stationary trend in the 1990s. Apparent survival rate (i.e., emigration; death) was negatively correlated with the number of adult Arctic peregrines on the cliff the previous year, suggesting effects of density-dependent population regulation. Apparent survival and arrival rates (i.e., immigration; recruitment) were higher during years with earlier snowmelt and milder winters, and apparent survival was positively correlated with nesting season maximum daily temperature. Arrival rate was positively correlated with average Arctic peregrine productivity along a cliff segment from the previous year and initial abundance was positively correlated with cliff height. Higher cliffs with documented higher productivity (presumably indicative of higher-quality habitat), are a priority for continued protection from potential nearby development and disturbance to minimize population-level impacts. Climate change. may affect Arctic peregrines in multiple ways, including through access to more snow-free nest sites and a lengthened breeding season that may increase likelihood of nest success. Our work provides insight into factors affecting a population during and after recovery, and demonstrates how the Dail-Madsen model can be used for any unmarked population with multiple years of abundance data collected through repeated surveys. PMID:26591458

  12. Modeling solvation effects in real-space and real-time within density functional approaches.

    PubMed

    Delgado, Alain; Corni, Stefano; Pittalis, Stefano; Rozzi, Carlo Andrea

    2015-10-14

    The Polarizable Continuum Model (PCM) can be used in conjunction with Density Functional Theory (DFT) and its time-dependent extension (TDDFT) to simulate the electronic and optical properties of molecules and nanoparticles immersed in a dielectric environment, typically liquid solvents. In this contribution, we develop a methodology to account for solvation effects in real-space (and real-time) (TD)DFT calculations. The boundary elements method is used to calculate the solvent reaction potential in terms of the apparent charges that spread over the van der Waals solute surface. In a real-space representation, this potential may exhibit a Coulomb singularity at grid points that are close to the cavity surface. We propose a simple approach to regularize such singularity by using a set of spherical Gaussian functions to distribute the apparent charges. We have implemented the proposed method in the Octopus code and present results for the solvation free energies and solvatochromic shifts for a representative set of organic molecules in water. PMID:26472367

  13. Modeling solvation effects in real-space and real-time within density functional approaches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delgado, Alain; Corni, Stefano; Pittalis, Stefano; Rozzi, Carlo Andrea

    2015-10-01

    The Polarizable Continuum Model (PCM) can be used in conjunction with Density Functional Theory (DFT) and its time-dependent extension (TDDFT) to simulate the electronic and optical properties of molecules and nanoparticles immersed in a dielectric environment, typically liquid solvents. In this contribution, we develop a methodology to account for solvation effects in real-space (and real-time) (TD)DFT calculations. The boundary elements method is used to calculate the solvent reaction potential in terms of the apparent charges that spread over the van der Waals solute surface. In a real-space representation, this potential may exhibit a Coulomb singularity at grid points that are close to the cavity surface. We propose a simple approach to regularize such singularity by using a set of spherical Gaussian functions to distribute the apparent charges. We have implemented the proposed method in the Octopus code and present results for the solvation free energies and solvatochromic shifts for a representative set of organic molecules in water.

  14. T cell receptor binding kinetics required for T cell activation depend on the density of cognate ligand

    E-print Network

    Coombs, Daniel

    T cell receptor binding kinetics required for T cell activation depend on the density of cognate on a complex interplay between inherent TCR­pMHC binding kinetics and the epitope density on the APC and dissociation kinetics (4, 17). To accomplish serial engagement of multiple TCRs by a single cognate pMHC ligand

  15. The shell model Monte Carlo approach to level densities: recent developments and perspectives

    E-print Network

    Y. Alhassid

    2016-01-01

    We review recent advances in the shell model Monte Carlo approach for the microscopic calculation of statistical and collective properties of nuclei. We discuss applications to the calculation of (i) level densities in nickel isotopes, implementing a recent method to circumvent the odd-particle sign problem; (ii) state densities in heavy nuclei; (iii) spin distributions of nuclear levels; and (iv) finite-temperature quadrupole distributions.

  16. Time-dependent density functional studies of nuclear quantum dynamics in large amplitudes

    E-print Network

    Kai Wen; Kouhei Washiyama; Ni Fang; Takashi Nakatsukasa

    2015-10-13

    The time-dependent density functional theory (TDDFT) provides a unified description of the structure and reaction. The linear approximation leads to the random-phase approximation (RPA) which is capable of describing a variety of collective motion in a harmonic regime. Beyond the linear regime, we present applications of the TDDFT to nuclear fusion and fission reaction. In particular, the extraction of the internuclear potential and the inertial mass parameter is performed using two different methods. A fusion hindrance mechanism for heavy systems is investigated from the microscopic point of view. The canonical collective variables are determined by the adiabatic self-consistent collective coordinate method. Preliminary results of the spontaneous fission path, the potential, and the collective mass parameter are shown for 8Be --> alpha+alpha.

  17. Pattern Formation in Populations with Density-Dependent Movement and Two Interaction Scales

    E-print Network

    Martínez-García, Ricardo; Hernández-García, Emilio; López, Cristóbal

    2015-01-01

    We study the spatial patterns formed by a system of interacting particles where the mobility of any individual is determined by the population crowding at two different spatial scales. In this way we model the behavior of some biological organisms (like mussels) that tend to cluster at short ranges as a defensive strategy, and strongly disperse if there is a high population pressure at large ranges for optimizing foraging. We perform stochastic simulations of a particle-level model of the system, and derive and analyze a continuous density description (a nonlinear diffusion equation). In both cases we show that this interplay of scale-dependent-behaviors gives rise to a rich formation of spatial patterns ranging from labyrinths to periodic cluster arrangements. In most cases these clusters have the very peculiar appearance of ring-like structures, i.e., organisms arranging in the perimeter of the clusters, that we discuss in detail.

  18. Time-dependent density-functional theory simulation of electron wave-packet scattering with nanoflakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsubonoya, Keisuke; Hu, Chunping; Watanabe, Kazuyuki

    2014-07-01

    Low-energy electron scattering with nanoflakes is investigated using a time-dependent density functional theory (TDDFT) simulation in real time and real space. By representing the incident electron as a finite-sized wave packet, we obtain diffraction patterns that show not only the regular features of conventional low-energy electron diffraction (LEED) for periodic structures but also special features resulting from the local atomic inhomogeneity. We have also found a signature of ? plasmon excitation upon electron impact on a graphene flake. The present study shows the remarkable potential of TDDFT for simulating the electron scattering process, which is important for clarifying the local and periodic atomic geometries as well as the electronic excitations in nanostructures.

  19. Optimized Effective Potential for Quantum Electrodynamical Time-Dependent Density Functional Theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pellegrini, Camilla; Flick, Johannes; Tokatly, Ilya V.; Appel, Heiko; Rubio, Angel

    2015-08-01

    We propose an orbital exchange-correlation functional for applying time-dependent density functional theory to many-electron systems coupled to cavity photons. The time nonlocal equation for the electron-photon optimized effective potential (OEP) is derived. In the static limit our OEP energy functional reduces to the Lamb shift of the ground state energy. We test the new approximation in the Rabi model. It is shown that the OEP (i) reproduces quantitatively the exact ground-state energy from the weak to the deep strong coupling regime and (ii) accurately captures the dynamics entering the ultrastrong coupling regime. The present formalism opens the path to a first-principles description of correlated electron-photon systems, bridging the gap between electronic structure methods and quantum optics for real material applications.

  20. Time-dependent density functional studies of nuclear quantum dynamics in large amplitudes

    E-print Network

    Wen, Kai; Fang, Ni; Nakatsukasa, Takashi

    2015-01-01

    The time-dependent density functional theory (TDDFT) provides a unified description of the structure and reaction. The linear approximation leads to the random-phase approximation (RPA) which is capable of describing a variety of collective motion in a harmonic regime. Beyond the linear regime, we present applications of the TDDFT to nuclear fusion and fission reaction. In particular, the extraction of the internuclear potential and the inertial mass parameter is performed using two different methods. A fusion hindrance mechanism for heavy systems is investigated from the microscopic point of view. The canonical collective variables are determined by the adiabatic self-consistent collective coordinate method. Preliminary results of the spontaneous fission path, the potential, and the collective mass parameter are shown for 8Be --> alpha+alpha.

  1. Optimized Effective Potential for Quantum Electrodynamical Time-Dependent Density Functional Theory.

    PubMed

    Pellegrini, Camilla; Flick, Johannes; Tokatly, Ilya V; Appel, Heiko; Rubio, Angel

    2015-08-28

    We propose an orbital exchange-correlation functional for applying time-dependent density functional theory to many-electron systems coupled to cavity photons. The time nonlocal equation for the electron-photon optimized effective potential (OEP) is derived. In the static limit our OEP energy functional reduces to the Lamb shift of the ground state energy. We test the new approximation in the Rabi model. It is shown that the OEP (i) reproduces quantitatively the exact ground-state energy from the weak to the deep strong coupling regime and (ii) accurately captures the dynamics entering the ultrastrong coupling regime. The present formalism opens the path to a first-principles description of correlated electron-photon systems, bridging the gap between electronic structure methods and quantum optics for real material applications. PMID:26371646

  2. Pattern Formation in Populations with Density-Dependent Movement and Two Interaction Scales

    PubMed Central

    Martínez-García, Ricardo; Murgui, Clara; Hernández-García, Emilio; López, Cristóbal

    2015-01-01

    We study the spatial patterns formed by a system of interacting particles where the mobility of any individual is determined by the population crowding at two different spatial scales. In this way we model the behavior of some biological organisms (like mussels) that tend to cluster at short ranges as a defensive strategy, and strongly disperse if there is a high population pressure at large ranges for optimizing foraging. We perform stochastic simulations of a particle-level model of the system, and derive and analyze a continuous density description (a nonlinear diffusion equation). In both cases we show that this interplay of scale-dependent-behaviors gives rise to a rich formation of spatial patterns ranging from labyrinths to periodic cluster arrangements. In most cases these clusters have the very peculiar appearance of ring-like structures, i.e., organisms arranging in the perimeter of the clusters, which we discuss in detail. PMID:26147351

  3. Time-Dependent Density Functional Theory with Skyrme Forces:. Description of Giant Resonances in Deformed Nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kvasil, J.; Kleinig, W.; Nesterenko, V. O.; Reinhard, P.-G.; Vesely, P.

    2008-04-01

    The isovector giant dipole resonance (GDR) in deformed nuclei 154Sm and 238U is described within the self-consistent separable RPA (random-phase-approximation) with Skyrme forces SkT6, SkM*, SLy6 and SkI3. We examine dependence of the description on the Skyrme force and gross-structure effects, as well as influence of the Coulomb interaction, multipole mixing, and time-odd densities. The results are analyzed in terms of isovector characteristics of the nuclear matter. It is shown that GDR in deformed nuclei can serve as a robust test for Skyrme forces with different effective masses. The best description of the resonance is obtained for the SLy6 force.

  4. Density dependence of the nuclear symmetry energy from measurements of neutron radii in nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Viñas, X.; Centelles, M.; Roca-Maza, X.; Warda, M.

    2014-07-23

    We study the density dependence of the nuclear symmetry energy, characterized by its slope parameter L, by means of the information provided by the neutron radius and the neutron skin thickness in finite nuclei. These quantities are extracted from the analysis of data obtained in antiprotonic atoms, from the parity-violating asymmetry at low-momentum transfer in polarized electron scattering in {sup 208}Pb, and from the electric dipole polarizability obtained via polarized proton inelastic scattering at forward angles in {sup 208}Pb. All these experiments provide different constraints on the slope L of the symmetry energy but the corresponding values have a considerable overlap in a range around 50 MeV ? L ? 70 MeV, in a reasonable agreement with other estimates that use different observables and methods to extract L.

  5. Thickness dependence of the charge-density-wave transition temperature in VSe{sub 2}

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Jiyong; Liu, Yan; Du, Haifeng; Ning, Wei; Zheng, Guolin; Jin, Chiming; Han, Yuyan; Wang, Ning; Tian, Mingliang Zhang, Yuheng; Wang, Weike; Yang, Zhaorong

    2014-08-11

    A set of three-dimensional charge-density-wave (3D CDW) VSe{sub 2} nano-flakes with different thicknesses were obtained by the scotch tape-based micro-mechanical exfoliation method. Resistivity measurements showed that the 3D CDW transition temperature T{sub p} decreases systematically from 105?K in bulk to 81.8?K in the 11.6?nm thick flake. The Hall resistivity ?{sub xy} of all the flakes showed a linear dependent behavior against the magnetic field with a residual electron concentration of the order of ?10{sup 21}?cm{sup ?3} at 5?K. The electron concentration n increases slightly as the thickness d decreases, possibly due to the CDW gap is reduced with the decrease of the thickness.

  6. Density dependence of the pairing interaction and pairing correlation in unstable nuclei

    E-print Network

    S. A. Changizi; Chong Qi

    2015-08-08

    This work aims at a global assessment of the effect of the density dependence of the zero-range pairing interaction. Systematic Skyrme-Hartree-Fock-Bogoliubov calculations with the volume, surface and mixed pairing forces are carried out to study the pairing gaps in even-even nuclei over the whole nuclear chart. Calculations are also done in coordinate representation for unstable semi-magic even-even nuclei. The calculated pairing gaps are compared with empirical values from four different odd-even staggering formulae. Calculations with the three pairing interactions are comparable for most nuclei close to $\\beta$-stability line. However, the surface interaction calculations predict neutron pairing gaps in neutron-rich nuclei that are significantly stronger than those given by the mixed and volume pairing. On the other hand, calculations with volume and mixed pairing forces show noticeable reduction of neutron pairing gaps in nuclei far from the stability.

  7. Density-dependent analysis of nonequilibrium paths improves free energy estimates

    PubMed Central

    Minh, David D. L.

    2009-01-01

    When a system is driven out of equilibrium by a time-dependent protocol that modifies the Hamiltonian, it follows a nonequilibrium path. Samples of these paths can be used in nonequilibrium work theorems to estimate equilibrium quantities such as free energy differences. Here, we consider analyzing paths generated with one protocol using another one. It is posited that analysis protocols which minimize the lag, the difference between the nonequilibrium and the instantaneous equilibrium densities, will reduce the dissipation of reprocessed trajectories and lead to better free energy estimates. Indeed, when minimal lag analysis protocols based on exactly soluble propagators or relative entropies are applied to several test cases, substantial gains in the accuracy and precision of estimated free energy differences are observed. PMID:19485432

  8. Energetics and dynamics of laser-assisted field evaporation: Time-dependent density functional theory simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silaeva, Elena P.; Uchida, Kazuki; Suzuki, Yasumitsu; Watanabe, Kazuyuki

    2015-10-01

    High positive electrostatic (dc) field can break the bonds in molecules and strip away atoms from the solid surfaces. The dynamics of this field evaporation under laser pulse is studied for a H2 molecule and a Si4 cluster using time-dependent density functional theory combined with molecular dynamics. This allows us to monitor the position and charge state of the evaporated atom in real time. Our simulations demonstrate that the critical dc field for the evaporation is lower if the molecule/cluster is illuminated by a laser pulse. The behavior of the evaporation threshold as a function of laser intensity and dc field is in qualitative agreement with experiments and provides important insights into the mechanisms of laser-assisted field evaporation. Additionally, the laser-assisted field evaporation is found to be sensitive to the laser energy according to the photoabsorption spectra that demonstrate a pronounced redshift in the lower energy region at higher dc field values.

  9. Inelastic collisions and density-dependent excitation suppression in a {sup 87}Sr optical lattice clock

    SciTech Connect

    Bishof, M.; Martin, M. J.; Swallows, M. D.; Benko, C.; Lin, Y.; Quemener, G.; Rey, A. M.; Ye, J.

    2011-11-15

    We observe two-body loss of {sup 3} P{sub 0} {sup 87}Sr atoms trapped in a one-dimensional optical lattice. We measure loss rate coefficients for atomic samples between 1 and 6 {mu}K that are prepared either in a single nuclear-spin sublevel or with equal populations in two sublevels. The measured temperature and nuclear-spin preparation dependence of rate coefficients agree well with calculations and reveal that rate coefficients for distinguishable atoms are only slightly enhanced over those of indistinguishable atoms. We further observe a suppression of excitation and losses during interrogation of the {sup 1} S{sub 0}-{sup 3} P{sub 0} transition as density increases and Rabi frequency decreases, which suggests the presence of strong interactions in our dynamically driven many-body system.

  10. Exploring Non-Equilibrium Dynamics in Time Dependent Density Functional Theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Kai

    Time-dependent density functional theory(TDDFT) is a method of choice for calculations of excitation spectra and response properties in materials science and quantum chemistry. The many-body problem is mapped into a set of one-body Schrodinger equations, called the Kohn-Sham(KS) equations. In principle, the one-body potential can be chosen such that the density of the interacting system is exactly reproduced by the KS system. However, one component of the one-body potential has to be approximated and is typically "diabatic". Though in linear response regime adiabatic approximations give quite good spectra, it is important to explore their performances in non-equilibrium dynamics. In this thesis, I will present the results of the explorations on non-equilibrium dynamics in TDDFT. For the first study, a decomposition of exact exchange-correlation potential into kinetic and interaction components is derived. We compare the components with that of "adiabatic" counterparts in non-perturbative dynamics and find that the interaction component is less poorly approximated adiabatically than the kinetic component. A salient feature is that step structures generically appear, of relevance in the second study. We prove that the step structures only appear in the non-linear response regime. We find an exact condition which is typically violated by the approximations in use today. Spuriously time-dependent spectra in TDDFT can be explained and we find that the more the condition is violated the worse the dynamics is. In last, we envision that orbital functionals are able to incorporate the memory effects and compensate the deficiencies of the "adiabatic" approximations.

  11. Time-dependent density functional theory calculation of van der Waals coefficient of sodium clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banerjee, Arup; Chakrabarti, Aparna; Ghanty, Tapan K.

    2007-10-01

    In this paper we employ all-electron ab initio time-dependent density functional theory based method to calculate the long range dipole-dipole dispersion coefficient (van der Waals coefficient) C6 of sodium atom clusters containing even number of atoms ranging from 2 to 20 atoms. The dispersion coefficients are obtained via Casimir-Polder relation [Phys. Rev. 3, 360 (1948)]. The calculations are carried out with two different exchange-correlation potentials: (i) the asymptotically correct statistical average of orbital potential (SAOP) and (ii) Vosko-Wilk-Nusair representation [Can. J. Phys. 58, 1200 (1980)] of exchange-correlation potential within local density approximation. A comparison with the other theoretical results has been performed. We also present the results for the static polarizabilities of sodium clusters and also compare them with other theoretical and experimental results. These comparisons reveal that the SAOP results for C6 and static polarizability are quite accurate and very close to the experimental results. We examine the relationship between volume of the cluster and van der Waals coefficient, and find that to a very high degree of correlation C6 scales as the square of the volume. We also present the results for van der Waals coefficient corresponding to cluster-Ar atom and cluster-N2 molecule interactions.

  12. Time-dependent density functional theory calculation of van der Waals coefficient of sodium clusters.

    PubMed

    Banerjee, Arup; Chakrabarti, Aparna; Ghanty, Tapan K

    2007-10-01

    In this paper we employ all-electron ab initio time-dependent density functional theory based method to calculate the long range dipole-dipole dispersion coefficient (van der Waals coefficient) C(6) of sodium atom clusters containing even number of atoms ranging from 2 to 20 atoms. The dispersion coefficients are obtained via Casimir-Polder relation [Phys. Rev. 3, 360 (1948)]. The calculations are carried out with two different exchange-correlation potentials: (i) the asymptotically correct statistical average of orbital potential (SAOP) and (ii) Vosko-Wilk-Nusair representation [Can. J. Phys. 58, 1200 (1980)] of exchange-correlation potential within local density approximation. A comparison with the other theoretical results has been performed. We also present the results for the static polarizabilities of sodium clusters and also compare them with other theoretical and experimental results. These comparisons reveal that the SAOP results for C(6) and static polarizability are quite accurate and very close to the experimental results. We examine the relationship between volume of the cluster and van der Waals coefficient, and find that to a very high degree of correlation C(6) scales as the square of the volume. We also present the results for van der Waals coefficient corresponding to cluster-Ar atom and cluster-N(2) molecule interactions. PMID:17919007

  13. A relativistic time-dependent density functional study of the excited states of the mercury dimer.

    PubMed

    Kullie, Ossama

    2014-01-14

    In previous works on Zn2 and Cd2 dimers we found that the long-range corrected CAMB3LYP gives better results than other density functional approximations for the excited states, especially in the asymptotic region. In this paper, we use it to present a time-dependent density functional (TDDFT) study for the ground-state as well as the excited states corresponding to the (6s(2) + 6s6p), (6s(2) + 6s7s), and (6s(2) + 6s7p) atomic asymptotes for the mercury dimer Hg2. We analyze its spectrum obtained from all-electron calculations performed with the relativistic Dirac-Coulomb and relativistic spinfree Hamiltonian as implemented in DIRAC-PACKAGE. A comparison with the literature is given as far as available. Our result is excellent for the most of the lower excited states and very encouraging for the higher excited states, it shows generally good agreements with experimental results and outperforms other theoretical results. This enables us to give a detailed analysis of the spectrum of the Hg2 including a comparative analysis with the lighter dimers of the group 12, Cd2, and Zn2, especially for the relativistic effects, the spin-orbit interaction, and the performance of CAMB3LYP and is enlightened for similar systems. The result shows, as expected, that spinfree Hamiltonian is less efficient than Dirac-Coulomb Hamiltonian for systems containing heavy elements such as Hg2. PMID:24437874

  14. Heliocentric distance and temporal dependence of the interplanetary density-magnetic field magnitude correlation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roberts, D. A.

    1990-01-01

    The Helios, IMP 8, ISEE 3, ad Voyager 2 spacecraft are used to examine the solar cycle and heliocentric distance dependence of the correlation between density n and magnetic field magnitude B in the solar wind. Previous work had suggested that this correlation becomes progressively more negative with heliocentric distance out to 9.5 AU. Here it is shown that this evolution is not a solar cycle effect, and that the correlations become even more strongly negative at heliocentric distance larger than 9.5 AU. There is considerable variability in the distributions of the correlations at a given heliocentric distance, but this is not simply related to the solar cycle. Examination of the evolution of correlations between density and speed suggest that most of the structures responsible for evolution in the anticorrelation between n and B are not slow-mode waves, but rather pressure balance structures. The latter consist of both coherent structures such as tangential discontinuities and the more generally pervasive 'pseudosound' which may include the coherent structures as a subset.

  15. The phenology of space: Spatial aspects of bison density dependence in Yellowstone National Park

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Taper, M.L.; Meagher, M.; Jerde, C.L.

    2000-01-01

    The Yellowstone bison represent the only bison population in the United States that survived in the wild the near-extermination of the late 1800's. This paper capitalizes on a unique opportunity provided by the record of the bison population of Yellowstone National Park (YNP). This population has been intensely monitored for almost four decades. The analysis of long-term spatio-temporal data from 1970-1997 supports the following conclusions. 1) Even though the Yellowstone bison herd exhibits an extended period of what appears to be linear growth, this pattern can be explained with classical density dependent dynamics if one realizes that perhaps the primary response of the herd to increased density is range expansion. 2) Several spatial aspects of social behavior in the YNP bison may be behavioral adaptations by the bison to environmental changes. These behavioral strategies may buffer, temporarily at least, bison population dynamics from the immediate repercussions of possible environmental stress and habitat deterioration. 3) Bison ecological carrying capacity for YNP is on the order of 2800 to 3200 animals. 4) There do appear to be indications of changes in the bison dynamics that are associated with increasing use of sections of the interior road system in winter. 5) The possibility of habitat degradation is indicated.

  16. Constraints on neutron skin thickness in 208Pb and density-dependent symmetry energy

    E-print Network

    Dong, Jianmin; Gu, Jianzhong

    2015-01-01

    Accurate knowledge about the neutron skin thickness $\\Delta R_{np}$ in $^{208}$Pb has far-reaching implications for different communities of nuclear physics and astrophysics. Yet, the novel Lead Radius Experiment (PREX) did not yield stringent constraint on the $\\Delta R_{np}$ recently. We employ a more practicable strategy currently to probe the neutron skin thickness of $^{208}$Pb based on a high linear correlation between the $\\Delta R_{np}$ and $J-a_{\\text{sym}}$, where $J$ and $a_{\\text{sym}}$ are the symmetry energy (coefficient) of nuclear matter at saturation density and of $^{208}$Pb. An accurate $J-a_{\\text{sym}}$ thus places a strong constraint on the $\\Delta R_{np}$. Compared with the parity-violating asymmetry $A_{\\text{PV}}$ in the PREX, the reliably experimental information on the $J-a_{\\text{sym}}$ is much more easily available attributed to a wealth of measured data on nuclear masses and on decay energies. The density dependence of the symmetry energy is also well constrained with the $J-a_{\\...

  17. A unifying probabilistic Bayesian approach to derive electron density from MRI for radiation therapy treatment planning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sudhan Reddy Gudur, Madhu; Hara, Wendy; Le, Quynh-Thu; Wang, Lei; Xing, Lei; Li, Ruijiang

    2014-11-01

    MRI significantly improves the accuracy and reliability of target delineation in radiation therapy for certain tumors due to its superior soft tissue contrast compared to CT. A treatment planning process with MRI as the sole imaging modality will eliminate systematic CT/MRI co-registration errors, reduce cost and radiation exposure, and simplify clinical workflow. However, MRI lacks the key electron density information necessary for accurate dose calculation and generating reference images for patient setup. The purpose of this work is to develop a unifying method to derive electron density from standard T1-weighted MRI. We propose to combine both intensity and geometry information into a unifying probabilistic Bayesian framework for electron density mapping. For each voxel, we compute two conditional probability density functions (PDFs) of electron density given its: (1) T1-weighted MRI intensity, and (2) geometry in a reference anatomy, obtained by deformable image registration between the MRI of the atlas and test patient. The two conditional PDFs containing intensity and geometry information are combined into a unifying posterior PDF, whose mean value corresponds to the optimal electron density value under the mean-square error criterion. We evaluated the algorithm’s accuracy of electron density mapping and its ability to detect bone in the head for eight patients, using an additional patient as the atlas or template. Mean absolute HU error between the estimated and true CT, as well as receiver operating characteristics for bone detection (HU > 200) were calculated. The performance was compared with a global intensity approach based on T1 and no density correction (set whole head to water). The proposed technique significantly reduced the errors in electron density estimation, with a mean absolute HU error of 126, compared with 139 for deformable registration (p = 2? × ?10-4), 283 for the intensity approach (p = 2? × ?10-6) and 282 without density correction (p = 5? × ?10-6). For 90% sensitivity in bone detection, the proposed method achieved a specificity of 86%, compared with 80, 11 and 10% using deformable registration, intensity and without density correction, respectively. Notably, the Bayesian approach was more robust against anatomical differences between patients, with a specificity of 62% in the worst case (patient), compared to 30% specificity in registration-based approach. In conclusion, the proposed unifying Bayesian method provides accurate electron density estimation and bone detection from MRI of the head with highly heterogeneous anatomy.

  18. Enhancing and controlling single-atom high-harmonic generation spectra: a time-dependent density-functional scheme

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castro, Alberto; Rubio, Angel; Gross, Eberhard K. U.

    2015-08-01

    High harmonic generation (HHG) provides a flexible framework for the development of coherent light sources in the extreme-ultraviolet and soft X-ray regimes. However it suffers from low conversion efficiencies as the control of the HHG spectral and temporal characteristics requires manipulating electron trajectories on attosecond time scale. The phase matching mechanism has been employed to selectively enhance specific quantum paths leading to HHG. A few important fundamental questions remain open, among those how much of the enhancement can be achieved by the single-emitter and what is the role of correlations (or the electronic structure) in the selectivity and control of HHG generation. Here we address those questions by examining computationally the possibility of optimizing the HHG spectrum of isolated hydrogen and helium atoms by shaping the slowly varying envelope of a 800 nm, 200-cycles long laser pulse. The spectra are computed with a fully quantum mechanical description, by explicitly computing the time-dependent dipole moment of the systems using a time-dependent density-functional approach (or the single-electron Schrödinger equation for the case of H), on top of a one-dimensional model. The sought optimization corresponds to the selective enhancement of single harmonics, which we find to be significant. This selectivity is entirely due to the single atom response, and not to any propagation or phase-matching effect. Moreover, we see that the electronic correlation plays a role in the determining the degree of optimization that can be obtained.

  19. Modeling fast electron dynamics with real-time time-dependent density functional theory: application to small molecules and chromophores

    SciTech Connect

    Lopata, Kenneth A.; Govind, Niranjan

    2011-05-10

    The response of matter to external fields forms the basis for a vast wealth of fundamental physical processes ranging from light harvesting to nanoscale electron transport. Accurately modeling ultrafast electron dynamics in excited systems thus o_ers unparalleled insight, but requires an inherently non-linear time-resolved approach. To this end, an e_cient and massively parallel real-time real-space time-dependent density functional theory (RT-TDDFT) implementation in NWChem is presented. The implementation is first validated against linearresponse TDDFT and experimental results for a series of molecules subjected to small electric field perturbations. Second, non-linear excitation of green fluorescent protein is studied, which shows a blue-shift in the spectrum with increasing perturbation, as well as a saturation in absorption. Next, the charge dynamics of optically excited zinc porphyrin is presented in real-time and real-space, with relevance to charge injection in photovoltaic devices. Finally, intermolecular excitation in an adenine-thymine base pair is studied using the BNL range separated functional [Baer, R.; Neuhauser, D. Phys. Rev. Lett. 2005, 94, 043002], demonstrating the utility of a real-time approach in capturing charge transfer processes.

  20. Direct microscopic calculation of nuclear level densities in the shell model Monte Carlo approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alhassid, Y.; Bonett-Matiz, M.; Liu, S.; Nakada, H.

    2015-08-01

    Nuclear level densities are required for estimating statistical nuclear reaction rates. The shell model Monte Carlo method is a powerful approach for microscopic calculation of state densities in very large model spaces. However, these state densities include the spin degeneracy of each energy level, whereas experiments often measure level densities, in which each level is counted only once. To enable the direct comparison of theory with experiments, we introduce a method to calculate directly the level density in the shell model Monte Carlo approach. The method employs a projection on the minimal absolute value of the magnetic quantum number. We apply the method to nuclei in the iron region and to the strongly deformed rare-earth nucleus 162Dy . We find very good agreement with experimental data obtained by various methods, including level counting at low energies, charged particle spectra and Oslo method data at intermediate energies, neutron and proton resonance data, and Ericson's fluctuation analysis at higher excitation energies. We also extract a thermal moment of inertia from the ratio between the state density and the level density, and observe that in even-even nuclei it exhibits a signature of a phase transition to a superconducting phase below a certain excitation energy.

  1. Evaluating the B-cell density with various activation functions using White Noise Path Integral Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aban, C. J. G.; Bacolod, R. O.; Confesor, M. N. P.

    2015-06-01

    A The White Noise Path Integral Approach is used in evaluating the B-cell density or the number of B-cell per unit volume for a basic type of immune system response based on the modeling done by Perelson and Wiegel. From the scaling principles of Perelson [1], the B- cell density is obtained where antigens and antibodies mutates and activation function f(|S-SA|) is defined describing the interaction between a specific antigen and a B-cell. If the activation function f(|S-SA|) is held constant, the major form of the B-cell density evaluated using white noise analysis is similar to the form of the B-cell density obtained by Perelson and Wiegel using a differential approach.A piecewise linear functionis also used to describe the activation f(|S-SA|). If f(|S-SA|) is zero, the density decreases exponentially. If f(|S-SA|) = S-SA-SB, the B- cell density increases exponentially until it reaches a certain maximum value. For f(|S-SA|) = 2SA-SB-S, the behavior of B-cell density is oscillating and remains to be in small values.

  2. 2007 Time_Dependent Density-Functional Therory (July 15-20, 2007 Colby College, Maine)

    SciTech Connect

    Ullrich Carsten Nancy Ryan Gray

    2008-09-19

    Time-dependent density-functional theory (TDDFT) provides an efficient, elegant, and formally exact way of describing the dynamics of interacting many-body quantum systems, circumventing the need for solving the full time-dependent Schroedinger equation. In the 20 years since it was first rigorously established in 1984, the field of TDDFT has made rapid and significant advances both formally as well as in terms of successful applications in chemistry, physics and materials science. Today, TDDFT has become the method of choice for calculating excitation energies of complex molecules, and is becoming increasingly popular for describing optical and spectroscopic properties of a variety of materials such as bulk solids, clusters and nanostructures. Other growing areas of applications of TDDFT are nonlinear dynamics of strongly excited electronic systems and molecular electronics. The purpose and scope of this Gordon Research Conference is to provide a platform for discussing the current state of the art of the rapidly progressing, highly interdisciplinary field of TDDFT, to identify and debate open questions, and to point out new promising research directions. The conference will bring together experts with a diverse background in chemistry, physics, and materials science.

  3. Using an Epidemiological Model for Phylogenetic Inference Reveals Density Dependence in HIV Transmission

    PubMed Central

    Leventhal, Gabriel E.; Günthard, Huldrych F.; Bonhoeffer, Sebastian; Stadler, Tanja

    2014-01-01

    The control, prediction, and understanding of epidemiological processes require insight into how infectious pathogens transmit in a population. The chain of transmission can in principle be reconstructed with phylogenetic methods which analyze the evolutionary history using pathogen sequence data. The quality of the reconstruction, however, crucially depends on the underlying epidemiological model used in phylogenetic inference. Until now, only simple epidemiological models have been used, which make limiting assumptions such as constant rate parameters, infinite total population size, or deterministically changing population size of infected individuals. Here, we present a novel phylogenetic method to infer parameters based on a classical stochastic epidemiological model. Specifically, we use the susceptible-infected-susceptible model, which accounts for density-dependent transmission rates and finite total population size, leading to a stochastically changing infected population size. We first validate our method by estimating epidemic parameters for simulated data and then apply it to transmission clusters from the Swiss HIV epidemic. Our estimates of the basic reproductive number R0 for the considered Swiss HIV transmission clusters are significantly higher than previous estimates, which were derived assuming infinite population size. This difference in key parameter estimates highlights the importance of careful model choice when doing phylogenetic inference. In summary, this article presents the first fully stochastic implementation of a classical epidemiological model for phylogenetic inference and thereby addresses a key aspect in ongoing efforts to merge phylogenetics and epidemiology. PMID:24085839

  4. Oxidized low-density lipoproteins upregulate proline oxidase to initiate ROS-dependent autophagy.

    PubMed

    Zabirnyk, Olga; Liu, Wei; Khalil, Shadi; Sharma, Anit; Phang, James M

    2010-03-01

    Epidemiological studies showed that high levels of oxidized low-density lipoproteins (oxLDLs) are associated with increased cancer risk. We examined the direct effect of physiologic concentrations oxLDL on cancer cells. OxLDLs were cytotoxic and activate both apoptosis and autophagy. OxLDLs have ligands for peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma and upregulated proline oxidase (POX) through this nuclear receptor. We identified 7-ketocholesterol (7KC) as a main component responsible for the latter. To elucidate the role of POX in oxLDL-mediated cytotoxicity, we knocked down POX via small interfering RNA and found that this (i) further reduced viability of cancer cells treated with oxLDL; (ii) decreased oxLDL-associated reactive oxygen species generation; (iii) decreased autophagy measured via beclin-1 protein level and light-chain 3 protein (LC3)-I into LC3-II conversion. Using POX-expressing cell model, we established that single POX overexpression was sufficient to activate autophagy. Thus, it led to autophagosomes accumulation and increased conversion of LC3-I into LC3-II. Moreover, beclin-1 gene expression was directly dependent on POX catalytic activity, namely the generation of POX-dependent superoxide. We conclude that POX is critical in the cellular response to the noxious effects of oxLDL by activating protective autophagy. PMID:19942609

  5. A minimal model for excitons within time-dependent density-functional theory.

    PubMed

    Yang, Zeng-hui; Li, Yonghui; Ullrich, Carsten A

    2012-07-01

    The accurate description of the optical spectra of insulators and semiconductors remains an important challenge for time-dependent density-functional theory (TDDFT). Evidence has been given in the literature that TDDFT can produce bound as well as continuum excitons for specific systems, but there are still many unresolved basic questions concerning the role of dynamical exchange and correlation (xc). In particular, the roles of the long spatial range and the frequency dependence of the xc kernel f(xc) for excitonic binding are still not very well explored. We present a minimal model for excitons in TDDFT, consisting of two bands from a one-dimensional (1D) Kronig-Penney model and simple approximate xc kernels, providing an easily accessible model system for studying excitonic effects in TDDFT. For the 1D model system, it is found that adiabatic xc kernels can produce at most two bound excitons, confirming that the long spatial range of f(xc) is not a necessary condition. It is shown how the Wannier model, featuring an effective electron-hole interaction, emerges from TDDFT. The collective, many-body nature of excitons is explicitly demonstrated. PMID:22779671

  6. The Effects of Text Density Levels and the Cognitive Style of Field Dependence on Learning from a CBI Tutorial

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ipek, Ismail

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of variations in text density levels and the cognitive style of field dependence on learning from a CBI tutorial, based on the dependent measures of achievement, reading comprehension, and reading rate, and of lesson completion time. Eighty college undergraduate students were randomly…

  7. Theoretical approach for optical response in electrochemical systems: Application to electrode potential dependence of surface-enhanced Raman scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Iida, Kenji; Noda, Masashi; Nobusada, Katsuyuki

    2014-09-28

    We propose a theoretical approach for optical response in electrochemical systems. The fundamental equation to be solved is based on a time-dependent density functional theory in real-time and real-space in combination with its finite temperature formula treating an electrode potential. Solvation effects are evaluated by a dielectric continuum theory. The approach allows us to treat optical response in electrochemical systems at the atomistic level of theory. We have applied the method to surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) of 4-mercaptopyridine on an Ag electrode surface. It is shown that the SERS intensity has a peak as a function of the electrode potential. Furthermore, the real-space computational approach facilitates visualization of variation of the SERS intensity depending on an electrode potential.

  8. Theoretical approach for optical response in electrochemical systems: application to electrode potential dependence of surface-enhanced Raman scattering.

    PubMed

    Iida, Kenji; Noda, Masashi; Nobusada, Katsuyuki

    2014-09-28

    We propose a theoretical approach for optical response in electrochemical systems. The fundamental equation to be solved is based on a time-dependent density functional theory in real-time and real-space in combination with its finite temperature formula treating an electrode potential. Solvation effects are evaluated by a dielectric continuum theory. The approach allows us to treat optical response in electrochemical systems at the atomistic level of theory. We have applied the method to surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) of 4-mercaptopyridine on an Ag electrode surface. It is shown that the SERS intensity has a peak as a function of the electrode potential. Furthermore, the real-space computational approach facilitates visualization of variation of the SERS intensity depending on an electrode potential. PMID:25273429

  9. Liquid-gas phase transition in hot asymmetric nuclear matter with density-dependent relativistic mean-field models

    E-print Network

    Guang-Hua Zhang; Wei-Zhou Jiang

    2013-02-14

    The liquid-gas phase transition in hot asymmetric nuclear matter is studied within density-dependent relativistic mean-field models where the density dependence is introduced according to the Brown-Rho scaling and constrained by available data at low densities and empirical properties of nuclear matter. The critical temperature of the liquid-gas phase transition is obtained to be 15.7 MeV in symmetric nuclear matter falling on the lower edge of the small experimental error bars. In hot asymmetric matter, the boundary of the phase-coexistence region is found to be sensitive to the density dependence of the symmetry energy. The critical pressure and the area of phase-coexistence region increases clearly with the softening of the symmetry energy. The critical temperature of hot asymmetric matter separating the gas phase from the LG coexistence phase is found to be higher for the softer symmetry energy.

  10. Phase-space densities and effects of resonance decays in hydrodynamic approach to heavy ion collisions

    E-print Network

    S. V. Akkelin; Yu. M. Sinyukov

    2004-10-18

    A method allowing analysis of the overpopulation of phase-space in heavy ion collisions in a model independent way is proposed within the hydrodynamic approach. It makes it possible to extract a chemical potential of thermal pions at freeze out irrespective of the form of freeze-out (isothermal) hypersurface in Minkowski space and transverse flows on it. The contributions of resonance (with masses up to 2 GeV) decays to spectra, interferometry volumes and phase-space densities are calculated and discussed in detail. The estimates of average phase-space densities and chemical potentials of thermal pions are obtained for SPS and RHIC energies. They demonstrate that multibosonic phenomena at those energies might be considered as a correction factor rather than as a significant physical effect. The analysis of the evolution of the pion average phase-space density in chemically frozen hadron systems shows that it is almost constant or slightly increases with time while the particle density and phase-space density at each space point drops down rapidly during the system's expansion. We found that, unlike the particle density, the average phase-space density has no direct link to the freeze-out criterion and final thermodynamic parameters, being connected rather to the initial phase-space density of hadronic matter formed in relativistic nucleus-nucleus collisions.

  11. An obstructive sleep apnea detection approach using kernel density classification based on single-lead electrocardiogram.

    PubMed

    Chen, Lili; Zhang, Xi; Wang, Hui

    2015-05-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is a common sleep disorder that often remains undiagnosed, leading to an increased risk of developing cardiovascular diseases. Polysomnogram (PSG) is currently used as a golden standard for screening OSA. However, because it is time consuming, expensive and causes discomfort, alternative techniques based on a reduced set of physiological signals are proposed to solve this problem. This study proposes a convenient non-parametric kernel density-based approach for detection of OSA using single-lead electrocardiogram (ECG) recordings. Selected physiologically interpretable features are extracted from segmented RR intervals, which are obtained from ECG signals. These features are fed into the kernel density classifier to detect apnea event and bandwidths for density of each class (normal or apnea) are automatically chosen through an iterative bandwidth selection algorithm. To validate the proposed approach, RR intervals are extracted from ECG signals of 35 subjects obtained from a sleep apnea database ( http://physionet.org/cgi-bin/atm/ATM ). The results indicate that the kernel density classifier, with two features for apnea event detection, achieves a mean accuracy of 82.07 %, with mean sensitivity of 83.23 % and mean specificity of 80.24 %. Compared with other existing methods, the proposed kernel density approach achieves a comparably good performance but by using fewer features without significantly losing discriminant power, which indicates that it could be widely used for home-based screening or diagnosis of OSA. PMID:25732075

  12. Pharmacologic approaches to the treatment of cocaine dependence.

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, W A; Gold, M S

    1990-01-01

    When pharmacologic agents are considered in the treatment of cocaine addiction, the objective of such treatment--sustained abstinence--must be considered. Medication and medical approaches have been disappointing in the treatment of cocaine overdose. The central neurobiologic mechanism(s) involved in cocaine toxicity are poorly understood. Without a cocaine antagonist, pharmacologic approaches have been less than promising in preventing relapse. Various psychoactive medications have been tried in early cocaine abstinence, with some success. PMID:1971975

  13. Collective enhancement of nuclear state densities by the shell model Monte Carlo approach

    E-print Network

    C. Özen; Y. Alhassid; H. Nakada

    2015-01-22

    The shell model Monte Carlo (SMMC) approach allows for the microscopic calculation of statistical and collective properties of heavy nuclei using the framework of the configuration-interaction shell model in very large model spaces. We present recent applications of the SMMC method to the calculation of state densities and their collective enhancement factors in rare-earth nuclei.

  14. Approach for control of high-density plasma reactors through optimal pulse shaping*

    E-print Network

    Raja, Laxminarayan L.

    Approach for control of high-density plasma reactors through optimal pulse shaping* Tyrone L. Vincent Division of Engineering, Colorado School of Mines, Golden, Colorado 80401 Laxminarayan L. Rajaa) Department of Aerospace Engineering and Engineering Mechanics, The University of Texas at Austin, Austin

  15. A population density approach that facilitates large-scale modeling of neural networks: extension to

    E-print Network

    Nykamp, Duane Q.

    for efficiently simulating complex networks of integrate-and- fire neurons was specialized to the case in which. In the population density approach, integrate-and-fire point-neurons are grouped into large populations of similar by the firing rates of its presynaptic populations. In our original model (Nykamp and Tranchina, 2000), we

  16. A population density approach that facilitates largescale modeling of neural networks: extension to

    E-print Network

    Nykamp, Duane Q.

    for e#ciently simulating complex networks of integrate­and­ fire neurons was specialized to the case is followed in detail. In the population density approach, integrate­and­fire point­neurons are grouped process whose rate is determined by the firing rates of its presynaptic populations. In our original model

  17. Electronic excitations: density-functional versus many-body Green's-function approaches

    E-print Network

    Wu, Zhigang

    Electronic excitations: density-functional versus many-body Green's-function approaches Giovanni, France (Published 7 June 2002) Electronic excitations lie at the origin of most of the commonly measured spectra. However, the first-principles computation of excited states requires a larger effort than ground

  18. Effect of measurement error on tests of density dependence of catchability for walleyes in northern Wisconsin angling and spearing fisheries

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hansen, M.J.; Beard, T.D., Jr.; Hewett, S.W.

    2005-01-01

    We sought to determine how much measurement errors affected tests of density dependence of spearing and angling catchability for walleye Sander vitreus by quantifying relationships between spearing and angling catch rates (catch/h) and walleye population density (number/acre) in northern Wisconsin lakes. The mean measurement error of spearing catch rates was 43.5 times greater than the mean measurement error of adult walleye population densities, whereas the mean measurement error of angling catch rates was only 5.6 times greater than the mean measurement error of adult walleye population densities. The bias-corrected estimate of the relationship between spearing catch rate and adult walleye population density was similar to the ordinary-least-squares regression estimate but differed significantly from the geometric mean (GM) functional regression estimate. In contrast, the bias-corrected estimate of the relationship between angling catch rate and total walleye population density was intermediate between ordinary-least-squares and GM functional regression estimates. Catch rates of walleyes in both spearing and angling fisheries were not linearly related to walleye population density, which indicated that catch rates in both fisheries were hyperstable in relation to walleye population density. For both fisheries, GM functional regression overestimated the degree of hyperdepletion in catch rates and ordinary-least-squares regression overestimated the degree of hyperstability in catch rates. However, ordinary-least-squares regression induced significantly less bias in tests of density dependence than GM functional regression, so it may be suitable for testing the degree of density dependence in fisheries for which fish population density is estimated with mark-recapture methods similar to those used in our study. ?? Copyright by the American Fisheries Society 2005.

  19. Factors Influencing Density-Dependent Groundwater Flow in the Michigan Basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sykes, J. F.; Normani, S. D.; Yin, Y.

    2010-12-01

    Regional-scale density-dependent groundwater flow is analyzed in an approximately 18000 sq km domain of the Michigan basin centered on a site at Tiverton Ontario near the shore of Lake Huron for a proposed deep geologic repository (DGR) for low and intermediate level nuclear waste. Flow was also analyzed in an approximately 600 km west-to-east cross-section through the center of the basin. Both domains extend from the Precambrian basement to the surface and include minimal upscaling of the complex stratigraphy in the basin. The model FRAC3DVS-OPG was used for all analyses. The hydraulic gradients across the basin are small as both Lake Huron and Lake Michigan have the same water surface elevation. As a result, groundwater flow in the basin is expected to be stagnant. Hydrogeologic parameters for the models were developed from borehole and petrophysics data from the DGR site for units from the Cambrian sandstone to the Devonian. Literature data were used for the shallower units in Michigan. Excluding the surficial drift, the hydraulic conductivity in the basin ranges from 3x10e-6 m/s in the Cambrian to less than 10e-14 m/s in the Ordovician sediments. Groundwater flow is sensitive to the distribution of total dissolved solids concentration with concentrations ranging up to 384 g/L in the Guelph formation in the Silurian. Both TDS data from porewater and groundwater at the DGR site and literature data for TDS versus depth were assigned to the sedimentary rock. The TDS distribution with depth for the Precambrian rock was assigned using both data for the Canadian Shield and a literature based model. Data at the DGR site indicates that the Cambrian is overpressured with respect to the surface while the Ordovician sediments are underpressured. It is hypothesized that the underpressures are the result of the presence of a gas phase in the units. The steps in determining a converged solution for saturated density-dependent flow were as follows: (1) solve steady state density-independent flow, (2) assign a TDS concentration distribution and allow the initial equivalent freshwater heads to equilibrate to the fixed TDS distribution, (3) allow the resulting heads to equilibrate to the TDS concentration with solute transport enabled. Convergence of a solution for the regional-scale model was not achieved without the middle step. For the Michigan Basin cross-section, the 3rd step would not yield a converged solution using FRAC3DVS-OPG. Flow in both analyses is sensitive to surface topography and the TDS distribution. The overpressure in the Cambrian could be described by density differences across the basin and surface topography differences. The underpressures can be described with a gas water analysis using TOUGH2-MP. Paleoclimate analyses that included mechanical loading could not describe the underpressures. Flow in the intracratonic Michigan Basin is complex and dynamic as a result of glaciation. Converged solutions are difficult to achieve. Flow in the low permeability units such as those of the Ordovician and Silurian is negligible with solute transport being diffusion dominant. The analyses provide a bench mark for evaluating the upscaling of stratigraphic units required in continental-scale simulations.

  20. Time-dependent Green's functions approach to nuclear reactions

    E-print Network

    Arnau Rios; Pawel Danielewicz

    2008-01-28

    Nonequilibrium Green's functions represent underutilized means of studying the time evolution of quantum many-body systems. In view of a rising computer power, an effort is underway to apply the Green's functions formalism to the dynamics of central nuclear reactions. As the first step, mean-field evolution for the density matrix for colliding slabs is studied in one dimension. The strategy to extend the dynamics to correlations is described.

  1. A relativistic time-dependent density functional study of the excited states of the mercury dimer

    SciTech Connect

    Kullie, Ossama E-mail: ossama.kullie@unistra.fr

    2014-01-14

    In previous works on Zn{sub 2} and Cd{sub 2} dimers we found that the long-range corrected CAMB3LYP gives better results than other density functional approximations for the excited states, especially in the asymptotic region. In this paper, we use it to present a time-dependent density functional (TDDFT) study for the ground-state as well as the excited states corresponding to the (6s{sup 2} + 6s6p), (6s{sup 2} + 6s7s), and (6s{sup 2} + 6s7p) atomic asymptotes for the mercury dimer Hg{sub 2}. We analyze its spectrum obtained from all-electron calculations performed with the relativistic Dirac-Coulomb and relativistic spinfree Hamiltonian as implemented in DIRAC-PACKAGE. A comparison with the literature is given as far as available. Our result is excellent for the most of the lower excited states and very encouraging for the higher excited states, it shows generally good agreements with experimental results and outperforms other theoretical results. This enables us to give a detailed analysis of the spectrum of the Hg{sub 2} including a comparative analysis with the lighter dimers of the group 12, Cd{sub 2}, and Zn{sub 2}, especially for the relativistic effects, the spin-orbit interaction, and the performance of CAMB3LYP and is enlightened for similar systems. The result shows, as expected, that spinfree Hamiltonian is less efficient than Dirac-Coulomb Hamiltonian for systems containing heavy elements such as Hg{sub 2}.

  2. Neutron star properties in density-dependent relativistic Hartree-Fock theory

    E-print Network

    Bao Yuan Sun; Wen Hui Long; Jie Meng; U. Lombardo

    2009-10-22

    With the equations of state provided by the newly developed density dependent relativistic Hartree-Fock (DDRHF) theory for hadronic matter, the properties of the static and $\\beta$-equilibrium neutron stars without hyperons are studied for the first time, and compared to the predictions of the relativistic mean field (RMF) models and recent observational data. The influences of Fock terms on properties of asymmetric nuclear matter at high densities are discussed in details. Because of the significant contributions from the $\\sigma$- and $\\omega$-exchange terms to the symmetry energy, large proton fractions in neutron stars are predicted by the DDRHF calculations, which strongly affect the cooling process of the star. The critical mass about 1.45 $M_\\odot$, close to the limit 1.5 $M_\\odot$ determined by the modern soft X-ray data analysis, is obtained by DDRHF with the effective interactions PKO2 and PKO3 for the occurrence of direct Urca process in neutron stars. The maximum masses of neutron stars given by the DDRHF calculations lie between 2.45 M$_\\odot$ and 2.49 M$_\\odot$, which are in reasonable agreement with high pulsar mass $2.08 \\pm 0.19 M_\\odot$ from PSR B1516+02B. It is also found that the mass-radius relations of neutron stars determined by DDRHF are consistent with the observational data from thermal radiation measurement in the isolated neutron star RX J1856, QPOs frequency limits in LMXBs 4U 0614+09 and 4U 1636-536, and redshift determined in LMXBs EXO 0748-676.

  3. Flowing afterglow measurements of the density dependence of gas-phase ion-ion mutual neutralization reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Shuman, Nicholas S.; Viggiano, Albert A.; Johnsen, Rainer

    2013-05-28

    We have studied the dependence of several ion-ion mutual neutralization (MN) reactions on helium density in the range from 1.6 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 16} to 1.5 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 17} cm{sup -3} at 300 K, using the Variable Electron and Neutral Density Attachment Mass Spectrometry method. The rate coefficients of the reactions Ar{sup +}+ Br{sub 2}{sup -}, Ar{sup +}+ SF{sub 6}{sup -}, and Ar{sup +}+ C{sub 7}F{sub 14}{sup -} were found to be independent of gas density over the range studied, in disagreement with earlier observations that similar MN reactions are strongly enhanced at the same gas densities. The cause of the previous enhancement with density is traced to the use of 'orbital-motion-limit' theory to infer ion densities from the currents collected by ion-attracting Langmuir probes in a region where it is not applicable.

  4. THE COLUMN DENSITY VARIANCE IN TURBULENT INTERSTELLAR MEDIA: A FRACTAL MODEL APPROACH

    SciTech Connect

    Seon, Kwang-Il

    2012-12-20

    Fractional Brownian motion structures are used to investigate the dependency of column density variance ({sigma}{sup 2}{sub lnN}) in the turbulent interstellar medium on the variance of three-dimensional density ({sigma}{sup 2}{sub ln{rho}}) and the power-law slope of the density power spectrum. We provide quantitative expressions to infer the three-dimensional density variance, which is not directly observable, from the observable column density variance and spectral slope. We also investigate the relationship between the column density variance and sonic Mach number (M{sub s}) in the hydrodynamic (HD) regime by assuming the spectral slope and density variance to be functions of sonic Mach number, as obtained from the HD turbulence simulations. They are related by the expression {sigma}{sup 2}{sub lnN} = A{sigma}{sub ln{rho}} {sup 2} = Aln (1 + b {sup 2} M{sup 2}{sub s}), suggested by Burkhart and Lazarian for the magnetohydrodynamic case. The proportional constant A varies from Almost-Equal-To 0.2 to Almost-Equal-To 0.4 in the HD regime as the turbulence forcing parameter b increases from 1/3 (purely solenoidal forcing) to 1 (purely compressive forcing). It is also discussed that the parameter A is lowered in the presence of a magnetic field.

  5. Accuracy of estimated geometric parameters of trees depending on the LIDAR data density

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hadas, Edyta; Estornell, Javier

    2015-04-01

    The estimation of dendrometric variables has become important for spatial planning and agriculture projects. Because classical field measurements are time consuming and inefficient, airborne LiDAR (Light Detection and Ranging) measurements are successfully used in this area. Point clouds acquired for relatively large areas allows to determine the structure of forestry and agriculture areas and geometrical parameters of individual trees. In this study two LiDAR datasets with different densities were used: sparse with average density of 0.5pt/m2 and the dense with density of 4pt/m2. 25 olive trees were selected and field measurements of tree height, crown bottom height, length of crown diameters and tree position were performed. To determine the tree geometric parameters from LiDAR data, two independent strategies were developed that utilize the ArcGIS, ENVI and FUSION software. Strategy a) was based on canopy surface model (CSM) slicing at 0.5m height and in strategy b) minimum bounding polygons as tree crown area were created around detected tree centroid. The individual steps were developed to be applied also in automatic processing. To assess the performance of each strategy with both point clouds, the differences between the measured and estimated geometric parameters of trees were analyzed. As expected, the tree height were underestimated for both strategies (RMSE=0.7m for dense dataset and RMSE=1.5m for sparse) and tree crown height were overestimated (RMSE=0.4m and RMSE=0.7m for dense and sparse dataset respectively). For dense dataset, strategy b) allows to determine more accurate crown diameters (RMSE=0.5m) than strategy a) (RMSE=0.8m), and for sparse dataset, only strategy a) occurs to be relevant (RMSE=1.0m). The accuracy of strategies were also examined for their dependency on tree size. For dense dataset, the larger the tree (height or crown longer diameter), the higher was the error of estimated tree height, and for sparse dataset, the larger the tree, the higher was the error of estimated crown bottom height. Finally, the spatial distribution of points inside the tree crown was analyzed, by creating a normalized tree crown. It confirms a high concentration of LiDAR points inside the central part of a tree.

  6. Folding model study of the isobaric analog excitation: isovector density dependence, Lane potential and nuclear symmetry energy

    E-print Network

    Dao T. Khoa; Hoang Sy Than; Do Cong Cuong

    2007-06-09

    A consistent folding model analysis of the ($\\Delta S=0, \\Delta T=1$) charge exchange \\pn reaction measured with $^{48}$Ca, $^{90}$Zr, $^{120}$Sn and $^{208}$Pb targets at the proton energies of 35 and 45 MeV is done within a two-channel coupling formalism. The nuclear ground state densities given by the Hartree-Fock-Bogoljubov formalism and the density dependent CDM3Y6 interaction were used as inputs for the folding calculation of the nucleon optical potential and \\pn form factor. To have an accurate isospin dependence of the interaction, a complex isovector density dependence of the CDM3Y6 interaction has been carefully calibrated against the microscopic Brueckner-Hatree-Fock calculation by Jeukenne, Lejeune and Mahaux before being used as folding input. Since the isovector coupling was used to explicitly link the isovector part of the nucleon optical potential to the cross section of \\pn reaction exciting the 0$^+$ isobaric analog states in $^{48}$Sc, $^{90}$Nb, $^{120}$Sb and $^{208}$Bi, the newly parameterized isovector density dependence could be well tested in the folding model analysis of the \\pn reaction. The isospin- and density dependent CDM3Y6 interaction was further used in the Hartree-Fock calculation of asymmetric nuclear matter, and a realistic estimation of the nuclear symmetry energy has been made.

  7. Determining isotopic life history trajectories using bone density fractionation and stable isotope measurements: a new approach.

    PubMed

    Bell, L S; Cox, G; Sealy, J

    2001-09-01

    A number of recent studies have attempted to trace diet at different stages of an individual's life by comparing isotope ratios of bone from different gross anatomical sites within the skeleton. In this study we develop this approach further by separating bone of differing mineral densities within one skeletal element, where each density fraction represents a different period of time. Isotope ratios are measured for these fractions. Each density fraction represents a period of bone formation and maturation, where younger (more recently formed) bone is less well-mineralized and therefore less dense than relatively older packets of bone. In an adult, bone is therefore able to partition approximately the last 15 years of life. Bone fractions were recovered by stepped ultracentrifugation in a series of organic solvents of increasing density, and then collagen was recovered by decalcification in dilute acid, and stable carbon isotope ratios ((13)C/(12)C) were measured. Bone density microstructure was checked for bacterial remodelling using backscattered electron imaging in a scanning electron microscope. Our results indicate that the bone density fractionation method is applicable to archaeological material, here extending to a maximum of 5,000 years BP, and that collagen can successfully be extracted from such fractions. The carbon isotope values for bone fractions of different densities patterned out as expected in one modern control bone and in specimens from five archaeological human skeletons, including three precolonial hunter-gatherers and two 18th/19th century individuals. The latter two are known (from previous assessments) to have undergone marked changes in diet during their lifetimes. Postmortem alteration was evident in some of the specimens examined. The bone density fractionation approach has allowed greater resolution of diet than has hitherto been possible and has provided access to the elusive last years and months of an individual's life. PMID:11536119

  8. Reactivation-Dependent Amnesia in Pavlovian Approach and Instrumental Transfer

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, Jonathan L. C.; Everitt, Barry J.

    2008-01-01

    The theory of memory reconsolidation relates to the hypothesized restabilisation process that occurs following the reactivation of a memory through retrieval. Thus, the demonstration of reactivation-dependent amnesia for a previously acquired memory is a prerequisite for showing that such a memory undergoes reconsolidation. Here, we show that the…

  9. Predicting invasive species impacts: a community module functional response approach reveals context dependencies

    PubMed Central

    Paterson, Rachel A; Dick, Jaimie T A; Pritchard, Daniel W; Ennis, Marilyn; Hatcher, Melanie J; Dunn, Alison M

    2015-01-01

    Summary Predatory functional responses play integral roles in predator–prey dynamics, and their assessment promises greater understanding and prediction of the predatory impacts of invasive species. Other interspecific interactions, however, such as parasitism and higher-order predation, have the potential to modify predator–prey interactions and thus the predictive capability of the comparative functional response approach. We used a four-species community module (higher-order predator; focal native or invasive predators; parasites of focal predators; native prey) to compare the predatory functional responses of native Gammarus duebeni celticus and invasive Gammarus pulex amphipods towards three invertebrate prey species (Asellus aquaticus, Simulium spp., Baetis rhodani), thus, quantifying the context dependencies of parasitism and a higher-order fish predator on these functional responses. Our functional response experiments demonstrated that the invasive amphipod had a higher predatory impact (lower handling time) on two of three prey species, which reflects patterns of impact observed in the field. The community module also revealed that parasitism had context-dependent influences, for one prey species, with the potential to further reduce the predatory impact of the invasive amphipod or increase the predatory impact of the native amphipod in the presence of a higher-order fish predator. Partial consumption of prey was similar for both predators and occurred increasingly in the order A. aquaticus, Simulium spp. and B. rhodani. This was associated with increasing prey densities, but showed no context dependencies with parasitism or higher-order fish predator. This study supports the applicability of comparative functional responses as a tool to predict and assess invasive species impacts incorporating multiple context dependencies. PMID:25265905

  10. Spike train statistics and dynamics with synaptic input from any renewal process: a population density approach.

    PubMed

    Ly, Cheng; Tranchina, Daniel

    2009-02-01

    In the probability density function (PDF) approach to neural network modeling, a common simplifying assumption is that the arrival times of elementary postsynaptic events are governed by a Poisson process. This assumption ignores temporal correlations in the input that sometimes have important physiological consequences. We extend PDF methods to models with synaptic event times governed by any modulated renewal process. We focus on the integrate-and-fire neuron with instantaneous synaptic kinetics and a random elementary excitatory postsynaptic potential (EPSP), A. Between presynaptic events, the membrane voltage, v, decays exponentially toward rest, while s, the time since the last synaptic input event, evolves with unit velocity. When a synaptic event arrives, v jumps by A, and s is reset to zero. If v crosses the threshold voltage, an action potential occurs, and v is reset to v(reset). The probability per unit time of a synaptic event at time t, given the elapsed time s since the last event, h(s, t), depends on specifics of the renewal process. We study how regularity of the train of synaptic input events affects output spike rate, PDF and coefficient of variation (CV) of the interspike interval, and the autocorrelation function of the output spike train. In the limit of a deterministic, clocklike train of input events, the PDF of the interspike interval converges to a sum of delta functions, with coefficients determined by the PDF for A. The limiting autocorrelation function of the output spike train is a sum of delta functions whose coefficients fall under a damped oscillatory envelope. When the EPSP CV, sigma A/mu A, is equal to 0.45, a CV for the intersynaptic event interval, sigma T/mu T = 0.35, is functionally equivalent to a deterministic periodic train of synaptic input events (CV = 0) with respect to spike statistics. We discuss the relevance to neural network simulations. PMID:19431264

  11. Delineating effects of tensor force on the density dependence of nuclear symmetry energy

    E-print Network

    Chang Xu; Ang Li; Bao-An Li

    2012-07-06

    In this talk, we report results of our recent studies to delineate effects of the tensor force on the density dependence of nuclear symmetry energy within phenomenological models. The tensor force active in the isosinglet neutron-proton interaction channel leads to appreciable depletion/population of nucleons below/above the Fermi surface in the single-nucleon momentum distribution in cold symmetric nuclear matter (SNM). We found that as a consequence of the high momentum tail in SNM the kinetic part of the symmetry energy $E^{kin}_{sym}(\\rho)$ is significantly below the well-known Fermi gas model prediction of approximately $12.5 (\\rho/\\rho_0)^{2/3}$. With about 15% nucleons in the high momentum tail as indicated by the recent experiments at J-Lab by the CLAS Collaboration, the $E^{kin}_{sym}(\\rho)$ is negligibly small. It even becomes negative when more nucleons are in the high momentum tail in SNM. These features have recently been confirmed by three independent studies based on the state-of-the-art microscopic nuclear many-body theories. In addition, we also estimate the second-order tensor force contribution to the potential part of the symmetry energy. Implications of these findings in extracting information about nuclear symmetry energy from nuclear reactions are discussed briefly.

  12. Density-dependent decline of host abundance resulting from a new infectious disease

    PubMed Central

    Hochachka, Wesley M.; Dhondt, André A.

    2000-01-01

    Although many new diseases have emerged within the past 2 decades [Cohen, M. L. (1998) Brit. Med. Bull. 54, 523–532], attributing low numbers of animal hosts to the existence of even a new pathogen is problematic. This is because very rarely does one have data on host abundance before and after the epizootic as well as detailed descriptions of pathogen prevalence [Dobson, A. P. & Hudson, P. J. (1985) in Ecology of Infectious Diseases in Natural Populations, eds. Grenfell, B. T. & Dobson, A. P. (Cambridge Univ. Press, Cambridge, U.K.), pp. 52–89]. Month by month we tracked the spread of the epizootic of an apparently novel strain of a widespread poultry pathogen, Mycoplasma gallisepticum, through a previously unknown host, the house finch, whose abundance has been monitored over past decades. Here we are able to demonstrate a causal relationship between high disease prevalence and declining house finch abundance throughout the eastern half of North America because the epizootic reached different parts of the house finch range at different times. Three years after the epizootic arrived, house finch abundance stabilized at similar levels, although house finch abundance had been high and stable in some areas but low and rapidly increasing in others. This result, not previously documented in wild populations, is as expected from theory if transmission of the disease was density dependent. PMID:10792031

  13. Phagocytosis of aggregated lipoprotein by macrophages: Low density lipoprotein receptor-dependent foam-cell formation

    SciTech Connect

    Suits, A.G.; Chait, A.; Aviram, M.; Heinecke, J.W. )

    1989-04-01

    Low density lipoprotein (LDL) modified by incubation with phospholipase C (PLC-LDL) aggregates in solution and is rapidly taken up and degraded by human and mouse macrophages, producing foam cells in vitro. Human, mouse, and rabbit macrophages degraded {sup 125}I-labeled PLC-LDL ({sup 125}I-PLC-LDL) more rapidly than native {sup 125}I-labeled LDL ({sup 125}I-LDL), while nonphagocytic cells such as human fibroblasts and bovine aortic endothelial cells degraded {sup 125}I-PLC-LDL more slowly than {sup 125}I-LDL. This suggested the mechanism for internalization of PLC-LDL was phagocytosis. When examined by electron microscopy, mouse peritoneal macrophages appeared to be phagocytosing PLC-LDL. The uptake and degradation of {sup 125}I-PLC-LDL by human macrophages was inhibited >80% by the monoclonal antibody C7 (IgG2b) produced by hybridoma C7, which blocks the ligand binding domain of the LDL receptor. Similarly, methylation of {sup 125}I-LDL ({sup 125}I-MeLDL) prior to treatment with phospholipase C decreased its subsequent uptake and degradation by human macrophages by >90%. The uptake and degradation of phospholipase C-modified {sup 125}I-MeLDL by macrophages could be restored by incubation of the methylated lipoprotein with apoprotein E, a ligand recognized by the LDL receptor. These results indicate that macrophages internalize PLC-LDL by LDL receptor-dependent phagocytosis.

  14. Resonance Raman Scattering of Rhodamine 6G as Calculated Using Time-Dependent Density Functional Theory

    SciTech Connect

    Jensen, Lasse; Schatz, George C.

    2006-03-27

    The research described in this product was performed in part in the Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory, a national scientific user facility sponsored by the Department of Energy's Office of Biological and Environmental Research and located at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory. In this work, we present the first calculation of the resonance Raman scattering (RRS) spectrum of rhodamine 6G (R6G) which is a prototype molecule in surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS). The calculation is done using a recently developed time-dependent density functional theory (TDDFT) method, which uses a short-time approximation to evaluate the Raman scattering cross section. The normal Raman spectrum calculated with this method is in good agreement with experimental results. The calculated RRS spectrum shows qualitative agreement with SERS results at a wavelength that corresponds to excitation of the S1 state, but there are significant differences with the measured RRS spectrum at wavelengths that correspond to excitation of the vibronic sideband of S1. Although the agreement with the experiments is not perfect, the results provide insight into the RRS spectrum of R6G at wavelengths close to the absorption maximum where experiments are hindered due to strong fluorescence. The calculated resonance enhancements are found to be on the order of 105. This indicates that a surface enhancement factor of about 1010 would be required in SERS in order to achieve single-molecule detection of R6G.

  15. Dynamics of coastal cod populations: intra- and intercohort density dependence and stochastic processes

    PubMed Central

    Stenseth, N. C.; rnstad, O. N. Bj; Falck, W.; Fromentin, J.-M.; ter, J. Gj s; Gray, J. S.

    1999-01-01

    Skagerrak populations of Atlantic cod (Gadus morhua L.) have been surveyed at several fixed stations since 1919. These coastal populations consist of local stocks with a low age of maturity and a short life span. We investigated 60 time-series of 0-group juveniles (i.e. young of the year) sampled annually from 1945 to 1994. An age-structured model was developed which incorporates asymmetrical interactions between the juvenile cohorts (0-group and 1-group; i.e. one-year-old juveniles) and stochastic reproduction. The model was expressed in delay coordinates in order to estimate model parameters directly from the time-series and thereby test the model predictions. The autocovariance structure of the time-series was consistent with the delay coordinates model superimposed upon a long-term trend. The model illustrates how both regulatory (density-dependent) and disruptive (stochastic) forces are crucial in shaping the dynamics of the coastal cod populations. The age-structured life cycle acts to resonance the stochasticity inherent in the recruitment process.

  16. Vertical Singlet Excitations on Adenine Dimer: A Time Dependent Density Functional Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crespo-Hernández, Carlos E.; Marai, Christopher N. J.

    2007-12-01

    The condense phase, excited state dynamics of the adenylyl(3'?5')adenine (ApA) dinucleotide has been previously studied using transient absorption spectroscopy with femtosecond time resolution (Crespo-Hernández et al. Chem. Rev. 104, 1977-2019 (2004)). An ultrafast and a long-lived component were observed with time constants of <1 ps and 60±16 ps, respectively. Comparison of the time constants measured for the dinucleotide with that for the adenine nucleotide suggested that the fast component observed in ApA could be assigned to monomer dynamics. The long-lived component observed in ApA was assigned to an excimer state that originates from a fraction of base stacked conformations present at the time of excitation. In this contribution, supermolecule calculations using the time dependent implementation of density functional theory is used to provide more insights on the origin of the initial Franck-Condon excitations. Monomer-like, localized excitations are observed for conformations having negligible base stacking interactions, whereas delocalized excitations are predicted for conformations with significant vertical base-base overlap.

  17. Negative Density Dependence Regulates Two Tree Species at Later Life Stage in a Temperate Forest

    PubMed Central

    Piao, Tiefeng; Chun, Jung Hwa; Yang, Hee Moon; Cheon, Kwangil

    2014-01-01

    Numerous studies have demonstrated that tree survival is influenced by negative density dependence (NDD) and differences among species in shade tolerance could enhance coexistence via resource partitioning, but it is still unclear how NDD affects tree species with different shade-tolerance guilds at later life stages. In this study, we analyzed the spatial patterns for trees with dbh (diameter at breast height) ?2 cm using the pair-correlation g(r) function to test for NDD in a temperate forest in South Korea after removing the effects of habitat heterogeneity. The analyses were implemented for the most abundant shade-tolerant (Chamaecyparis obtusa) and shade-intolerant (Quercus serrata) species. We found NDD existed for both species at later life stages. We also found Quercus serrata experienced greater NDD compared with Chamaecyparis obtusa. This study indicates that NDD regulates the two abundant tree species at later life stages and it is important to consider variation in species' shade tolerance in NDD study. PMID:25058660

  18. Modeling Changing Morphology and Density Dependent Groundwater Flow in a Dynamic Environment: case study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huizer, Sebastian; Bierkens, Marc; Oude Essink, Gualbert

    2015-04-01

    The prospect of sea level rise and increase in extreme weather conditions has led to a new focus on coastal defense in the Netherlands. As an innovative solution for coastal erosion a mega-nourishment named the Sand Motor (or Sand Engine) has been constructed at the Dutch coast. This body of sand will be distributed slowly along the coastline by wind, waves and currents; keeping the coastal defense structures in place and creating a unique, dynamic environment with changing morphology over time. The large size and position of the Sand Motor might lead to a substantial increase of fresh ground water resources. This creates an opportunity to combine coastal protection with an increase of fresh water resources in coastal regions. With a three dimensional, density dependent, groundwater model the effects of changing morphology over time and the potential increase in fresh water availability have been studied. The preliminary model calculations show that in a period of 20 years volume of fresh water gradually increases to ca. 12 Mm3. In the nearby dune area 7-8 Mm3 is abstracted yearly, therefore the first results are promising in increasing fresh groundwater resources. More model calculations will be performed to investigate the sensitivity of the change in the fresh, brackish and salt water distribution.

  19. Lower Within-Community Variance of Negative Density Dependence Increases Forest Diversity

    PubMed Central

    Miranda, António; Carvalho, Luís M.; Dionisio, Francisco

    2015-01-01

    Local abundance of adult trees impedes growth of conspecific seedlings through host-specific enemies, a mechanism first proposed by Janzen and Connell to explain plant diversity in forests. While several studies suggest the importance of this mechanism, there is still little information of how the variance of negative density dependence (NDD) affects diversity of forest communities. With computer simulations, we analyzed the impact of strength and variance of NDD within tree communities on species diversity. We show that stronger NDD leads to higher species diversity. Furthermore, lower range of strengths of NDD within a community increases species richness and decreases variance of species abundances. Our results show that, beyond the average strength of NDD, the variance of NDD is also crucially important to explain species diversity. This can explain the dissimilarity of biodiversity between tropical and temperate forest: highly diverse forests could have lower NDD variance. This report suggests that natural enemies and the variety of the magnitude of their effects can contribute to the maintenance of biodiversity. PMID:25992631

  20. Polarization corrections to single-particle energies studied within the energy-density-functional and QRPA approaches

    E-print Network

    D. Tarpanov; J. Toivanen; J. Dobaczewski; B. G. Carlsson

    2013-10-01

    Background: Models based on using perturbative polarization corrections and mean-field blocking approximation give conflicting results for masses of odd nuclei. Purpose: Systematically investigate the polarization and mean-field models, implemented within self-consistent approaches that use identical interactions and model spaces, so as to find reasons for the conflicts between them. Methods: For density-dependent interactions and with pairing correlations included, we derive and study links between the mean-field and polarization results obtained for energies of odd nuclei. We also identify and discuss differences between the polarization-correction and full particle-vibration-coupling (PVC) models. Numerical calculations are performed for the mean-field ground-state properties of deformed odd nuclei and then compared to the polarization corrections determined by using the approach that conserves spherical symmetry. Results: We have identified and numerically evaluated self-interaction (SI) energies that are at the origin of different results obtained within the mean-field and polarization-correction approaches. Conclusions: Mean-field energies of odd nuclei are polluted by the SI energies, and this makes them different from those obtained by using polarization-correction methods. A comparison of both approaches allows for the identification and determination of the SI terms, which then can be calculated and removed from the mean-field results, giving the self-interaction-free energies. The simplest deformed mean-field approach that does not break parity symmetry is unable to reproduce full PVC effects.

  1. Observations of the diurnal dependence of the high-latitude F region ion density by DMSP satellites

    SciTech Connect

    Sojka, J.J.; Raitt, W.J.; Schunk, R.W.; Rich, F.J.; Sagalyn, R.C.

    1982-03-01

    Data from the DMSP F2 and F4 satellites for the period December 5--10, 1979, have been used to study the diurnal dependence of the high-latitude ion density at 800-km altitude. A 24-hour periodicity in the minimum orbital density (MOD) during a crossing of the high-latitude region is observed in both the winter and summer hemispheres. The phase of the variation in MOD is such that is has a minimum during the 24-hour period between 0700 and 0900 UT. Both the long term variation of the high-latitude ion density on a time scale of days, and the orbit by orbit variations at the same geomagnetic location in the northern (winter) hemispheres for the magnetically quiet time period chosen show good qualitative agreement with the diurnal dependence predicted by a theoretical model of the ionospheric density at high latitudes under conditions of low convection speeds (Sojka et al., 1981a).

  2. Observations of the diurnal dependence of the high-latitude F region ion density by DMSP satellites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sojka, J. J.; Raitt, W. J.; Schunk, R. W.; Rich, F. J.; Sagalyn, R. C.

    1982-01-01

    Data from the DMSP F2 and F4 satellites for the period December 5-10, 1979, have been used to study the diurnal dependence of the high-latitude ion density at 800-km altitude. A 24-hour periodicity in the minimum orbital density (MOD) during a crossing of the high-latitude region is observed in both the winter and summer hemispheres. The phase of the variation in MOD is such that it has a minimum during the 24-hour period between 0700 and 0900 UT. Both the long-term variation of the high-latitude ion density on a time scale of days, and the orbit-by-orbit variations at the same geomagnetic location in the northern (winter) hemisphere for the magnetically quiet time period chosen, show good qualitative agreement with the diurnal dependence predicted by a theoretical model of the ionospheric density at high latitudes under conditions of low convection speeds (Sojka et al., 1981).

  3. Electron dynamics in complex environments with real-time time dependent density functional theory in a QM-MM framework

    SciTech Connect

    Morzan, Uriel N.; Ramírez, Francisco F.; Scherlis, Damián A. E-mail: mcgl@qb.ffyb.uba.ar; Lebrero, Mariano C. González E-mail: mcgl@qb.ffyb.uba.ar

    2014-04-28

    This article presents a time dependent density functional theory (TDDFT) implementation to propagate the Kohn-Sham equations in real time, including the effects of a molecular environment through a Quantum-Mechanics Molecular-Mechanics (QM-MM) hamiltonian. The code delivers an all-electron description employing Gaussian basis functions, and incorporates the Amber force-field in the QM-MM treatment. The most expensive parts of the computation, comprising the commutators between the hamiltonian and the density matrix—required to propagate the electron dynamics—, and the evaluation of the exchange-correlation energy, were migrated to the CUDA platform to run on graphics processing units, which remarkably accelerates the performance of the code. The method was validated by reproducing linear-response TDDFT results for the absorption spectra of several molecular species. Two different schemes were tested to propagate the quantum dynamics: (i) a leap-frog Verlet algorithm, and (ii) the Magnus expansion to first-order. These two approaches were confronted, to find that the Magnus scheme is more efficient by a factor of six in small molecules. Interestingly, the presence of iron was found to seriously limitate the length of the integration time step, due to the high frequencies associated with the core-electrons. This highlights the importance of pseudopotentials to alleviate the cost of the propagation of the inner states when heavy nuclei are present. Finally, the methodology was applied to investigate the shifts induced by the chemical environment on the most intense UV absorption bands of two model systems of general relevance: the formamide molecule in water solution, and the carboxy-heme group in Flavohemoglobin. In both cases, shifts of several nanometers are observed, consistently with the available experimental data.

  4. Electron dynamics in complex environments with real-time time dependent density functional theory in a QM-MM framework

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morzan, Uriel N.; Ramírez, Francisco F.; Oviedo, M. Belén; Sánchez, Cristián G.; Scherlis, Damián A.; Lebrero, Mariano C. González

    2014-04-01

    This article presents a time dependent density functional theory (TDDFT) implementation to propagate the Kohn-Sham equations in real time, including the effects of a molecular environment through a Quantum-Mechanics Molecular-Mechanics (QM-MM) hamiltonian. The code delivers an all-electron description employing Gaussian basis functions, and incorporates the Amber force-field in the QM-MM treatment. The most expensive parts of the computation, comprising the commutators between the hamiltonian and the density matrix—required to propagate the electron dynamics—, and the evaluation of the exchange-correlation energy, were migrated to the CUDA platform to run on graphics processing units, which remarkably accelerates the performance of the code. The method was validated by reproducing linear-response TDDFT results for the absorption spectra of several molecular species. Two different schemes were tested to propagate the quantum dynamics: (i) a leap-frog Verlet algorithm, and (ii) the Magnus expansion to first-order. These two approaches were confronted, to find that the Magnus scheme is more efficient by a factor of six in small molecules. Interestingly, the presence of iron was found to seriously limitate the length of the integration time step, due to the high frequencies associated with the core-electrons. This highlights the importance of pseudopotentials to alleviate the cost of the propagation of the inner states when heavy nuclei are present. Finally, the methodology was applied to investigate the shifts induced by the chemical environment on the most intense UV absorption bands of two model systems of general relevance: the formamide molecule in water solution, and the carboxy-heme group in Flavohemoglobin. In both cases, shifts of several nanometers are observed, consistently with the available experimental data.

  5. Isovector Giant Dipole Resonance from the 3D Time-Dependent Density Functional Theory for Superfluid Nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Stetcu, Ionel; Bulgac, Aurel; Magierski, Piotr; Roche, Kenneth J.

    2011-11-21

    A fully symmetry unrestricted Time-Dependent Density Functional Theory extended to include pairing correlations is used to calculate properties of the isovector giant dipole resonances of the deformed open-shell nuclei 172Yb, 188Os, and 238U, and to demonstrate good agreement with experimental data on nuclear photo-absorption cross-sections for two different Skyrme force parameterizations of the energy density functional: SkP and SLy4.

  6. Low-density expansion and isospin dependence of nuclear energy functional: Comparison between relativistic and Skyrme models

    SciTech Connect

    Brito, L.; Providencia, C.; Chomaz, Ph.; Menezes, D. P.

    2007-10-15

    In the present work, we take the nonrelativistic limit of relativistic models and compare the obtained functionals with the usual Skyrme parametrization. Relativistic models with both constant couplings and with density-dependent couplings are considered. While some models already present very good results at the lowest order in the density, models with nonlinear terms only reproduce the energy functional if higher order terms are taken into account in the expansion.

  7. An efficient and accurate approximation to time-dependent density functional theory for systems of weakly coupled monomers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Jie; Herbert, John M.

    2015-07-01

    A novel formulation of time-dependent density functional theory (TDDFT) is derived, based on non-orthogonal, absolutely-localized molecular orbitals (ALMOs). We call this approach TDDFT(MI), in reference to ALMO-based methods for describing molecular interactions (MI) that have been developed for ground-state applications. TDDFT(MI) is intended for efficient excited-state calculations in systems composed of multiple, weakly interacting chromophores. The efficiency is based upon (1) a local excitation approximation; (2) monomer-based, singly-excited basis states; (3) an efficient localization procedure; and (4) a one-step Davidson method to solve the TDDFT(MI) working equation. We apply this methodology to study molecular dimers, water clusters, solvated chromophores, and aggregates of naphthalene diimide that form the building blocks of self-assembling organic nanotubes. Absolute errors of 0.1-0.3 eV with respect to supersystem methods are achievable for these systems, especially for cases involving an excited chromophore that is weakly coupled to several explicit solvent molecules. Excited-state calculations in an aggregate of nine naphthalene diimide monomers are ˜40 times faster than traditional TDDFT calculations.

  8. Kinetic Approach to Quasi-Ballistic Field-Dependent Electron Transport

    E-print Network

    Pulfrey, David L.

    Kinetic Approach to Quasi-Ballistic Field-Dependent Electron Transport A. R. St.Denis1 and D. L transport. In this work, we present a kinetic approach based on the concept of path integrals which provides and scattered) of the forward- and backward-directed fluxes via a kinetic approach. This allows the path

  9. Modeling Time-Dependent Association in Longitudinal Data: A Lag as Moderator Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Selig, James P.; Preacher, Kristopher J.; Little, Todd D.

    2012-01-01

    We describe a straightforward, yet novel, approach to examine time-dependent association between variables. The approach relies on a measurement-lag research design in conjunction with statistical interaction models. We base arguments in favor of this approach on the potential for better understanding the associations between variables by…

  10. Supplemental material to: Relativistic Coulomb excitation within Time Dependent Superfluid Local Density

    E-print Network

    Bertulani, Carlos A. - Department of Physics and Astronomy, Texas A&M University

    and currents: · density: (r) = (r, r )|r=r · spin density: s(r) = s(r, r )|r=r · current: j(r) = 1 2i ( - )(r, r )|r=r · spin current (2nd rank tensor): J(r) = 1 2i ( - ) s(r, r )|r=r · kinetic energy density: (r) = · (r, r )|r=r · spin kinetic energy density: T(r) = · s(r, r )|r=r · anomalous density: (r

  11. Bionanotechnology approach for FAD-dependent enzymes with nanomaterials sensor

    PubMed Central

    Li, Ying; Chen, Shen-Ming; Yang, Cheng-Yu; Ajmal Ali, M.; AlHemaid, Fahad M.A.

    2012-01-01

    We have reported the modification of biomolecule with nanomaterials. In this paper, the electrochemical response of different FAD-dependent enzymes at carbon nanomaterials modified electrode. The modified electrode also exhibits a promising enhanced electrocatalytic activity toward the oxidation of substrate. Different methods were used for fabrication of modified electrode. The presence of nanomaterials enhances the enzyme loading and stability. Cyclic voltammograms (CVs) were used for the determination of substrate and the apparent coefficient values for these compounds at different electrodes. Finally, we have studied the surface morphology of the modified electrode using scanning electron microscopy (SEM), which revealed that enzyme is coated on nanomaterials. PMID:23961208

  12. Dependence of Oxide Pattern Density Variation on Motor Current Endpoint Detection during Shallow Trench Isolation Chemical Mechanical Planarization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sorooshian, Jamshid; Philipossian, Ara; Stein, David J.; Timon, Robert P.; Hetherington, Dale L.

    2005-03-01

    In this study, we evaluate the limitations associated with variable shallow trench isolation (STI) oxide pattern densities for accurate motor current endpoint detection during chemical mechanical planarization (CMP). Results indicate that repeatable motor current endpoint detection can be achieved for STI wafers with oxide pattern density variations of up to 17.4%. Furthermore, results show that a dependence exists between the STI oxide pattern density variation and motor current endpoint success during polishing. According to the findings of this study, a suitable motor current endpoint detection system could yield successful termination points for STI polishing, as well as reduce the need for polishing reworks.

  13. Entrainment Rate in Shallow Cumuli: Dependence on Entrained Dry Air Sources and Probability Density Functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, C.; Liu, Y.; Niu, S.; Vogelmann, A. M.

    2012-12-01

    In situ aircraft cumulus observations from the RACORO field campaign are used to estimate entrainment rate for individual clouds using a recently developed mixing fraction approach. The entrainment rate is computed based on the observed state of the cloud core and the state of the air that is laterally mixed into the cloud at its edge. The computed entrainment rate decreases when the air is entrained from increasing distance from the cloud core edge; this is because the air farther away from cloud edge is drier than the neighboring air that is within the humid shells around cumulus clouds. Probability density functions of entrainment rate are well fitted by lognormal distributions at different heights above cloud base for different dry air sources (i.e., different source distances from the cloud core edge). Such lognormal distribution functions are appropriate for inclusion into future entrainment rate parameterization in large scale models. To the authors' knowledge, this is the first time that probability density functions of entrainment rate have been obtained in shallow cumulus clouds based on in situ observations. The reason for the wide spread of entrainment rate is that the observed clouds are affected by entrainment mixing processes to different extents, which is verified by the relationships between the entrainment rate and cloud microphysics/dynamics. The entrainment rate is negatively correlated with liquid water content and cloud droplet number concentration due to the dilution and evaporation in entrainment mixing processes. The entrainment rate is positively correlated with relative dispersion (i.e., ratio of standard deviation to mean value) of liquid water content and droplet size distributions, consistent with the theoretical expectation that entrainment mixing processes are responsible for microphysics fluctuations and spectral broadening. The entrainment rate is negatively correlated with vertical velocity and dissipation rate because entrainment mixing processes decrease cloud buoyancy and consume turbulence kinetic energy. Figure 1 Entrainment rate (?) as a function of distance (D) in the five cumulus flights. The dry air is assumed from the distance (D) - 2D away from the cloud core edges. The bars represent the standard deviations of ?. The green dot and bar show the corresponding mean values and standard deviations when the dry air properties are assumed from aircraft vertical sounding at the beginning of the flights; the x-axis value of the green dot is arbitrary.

  14. Temperature Dependence of Quantum Efficiency of InGaN/GaN Led Structures at High Current Density

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prudaev, I. A.; Kopyev, V. V.; Romanov, I. S.; Brudnyi, V. N.

    2015-09-01

    Temperature dependence of quantum efficiency of blue LED structures based on multiple InGaN/GaN quantum wells is studied at different forward currents. At high current densities, an increase in the quantum efficiency with increasing temperature is observed. Simulation of the dependences of the quantum efficiency of LED structures on the current showed that, if account is taken of the ballistic and hopping transport of charge carriers in the active region of the structure, the calculated and experimental dependences are in good agreement. A decrease in the thickness of the active region of the structure leads to a weakening of the temperature dependence of the quantum efficiency at high current density.

  15. Towards a Renormalization Group Approach to Density Functional Theory - General Formalism and Case Studies -

    E-print Network

    Sandra Kemler; Jens Braun

    2015-03-06

    We discuss a two-point particle irreducible (2PPI) approach to many-body physics which relies on a renormalization group (RG) flow equation for the associated effective action. In particular, the general structure and properties of this RG flow equation are analyzed in detail. Moreover, we discuss how our 2PPI RG approach relates to Density Functional Theory and argue that it can in principle be used to study ground-state properties of non-relativistic many-body systems from microscopic interactions, such as (heavy) nuclei. For illustration purposes, we use our formalism to compute the ground-state properties of two toy models.

  16. A new approach for analyzing bird densities from variable circular-plot counts

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fancy, S.G.

    1997-01-01

    An approach for calculating bird densities from variable circular-plot counts is described. The approach differs from previous methods in that data from several surveys are pooled and detection distances are adjusted as if all distances were recorded by a single observer under a given set of field conditions. Adjustments for covariates that affect detection distances such as observer, weather, time of day, and vegetation type are made using coefficients calculated by multiple linear regression. The effective area surveyed under standard conditions is calculated from the pooled data set and then used to determine the effective area surveyed at each sampling station under the actual conditions when the station was sampled. The method was validated in two field studies where the density of birds could be determined by independent methods. Computer software for entering and analyzing data by this method is described.

  17. Diagnostic approach of phospholipid-dependent antibodies. State-of-the art lecture.

    PubMed

    Amiral, J

    1999-01-01

    Recent scientific developments enable to better understand the strong heterogeneity of assay methods for phospholipid (PLP)-dependent antibodies, measured as lupus anticoagulant (LA) or as anti-PLP antibodies (APA). These latter are actually targeted at complexes of beta(2)-glycoprotein I (beta2GPI) and anionic PLP and also react with insolubilized beta2GPI alone in some patients. Although APA present little species specificity for beta2GPI, some of them bind preferentially to complexes of human beta2GPI and PLP. LAs are diagnosed with screening assays (dPT, dRVVT, KCT, APTT); their sensitivity is dependent on the concentration and type of PLPs used. They are either beta2GPI or prothrombin dependent. Based on the antibody-neutralizing capacity of PLP preparations (such as hexagonal phase phosphatidylethanolamine) or their bypassing activity, confirmatory assays enable to confirm LA. LAs and APAs bind to different epitopes on beta2GPI or its complexes with PLP. Major characteristics of APA assays are: the capture antigen (PLPs, beta2GPI source); its optimization and density on micro-ELISA plates; the efficacy of postcoating saturation; the animal serum used for saturation and diluent; the second antibody which must avoid nonspecific interactions; the calibrators proposed and their reference to international standards; the cutoff between the normal and the pathological ranges; the assay sensitivity and overall specificity for APAs. New optimized assays have been developed to meet these criteria. They are designed with PLP-coated plates, saturated first with immunoglobulin-free human serum as a source of beta2GPI, then with goat serum also used in diluent. The cutoff value is determined with at least 200 normal plasma samples (mean + 3 standard deviations or 99th percentiles) and plasma samples from patients without APAs. This approach offers both optimized specificity and sensitivity for testing APAs, along with a good standardization and it helps to measure the true APAs associated with pathology. PMID:10629393

  18. Weakening density dependence from climate change and agricultural intensification triggers pest outbreaks: a 37-year observation of cotton bollworms.

    PubMed

    Ouyang, Fang; Hui, Cang; Ge, Saiying; Men, Xin-Yuan; Zhao, Zi-Hua; Shi, Pei-Jian; Zhang, Yong-Sheng; Li, Bai-Lian

    2014-09-01

    Understanding drivers of population fluctuation, especially for agricultural pests, is central to the provision of agro-ecosystem services. Here, we examine the role of endogenous density dependence and exogenous factors of climate and human activity in regulating the 37-year population dynamics of an important agricultural insect pest, the cotton bollworm (Helicoverpa armigera), in North China from 1975 to 2011. Quantitative time-series analysis provided strong evidence explaining long-term population dynamics of the cotton bollworm and its driving factors. Rising temperature and declining rainfall exacerbated the effect of agricultural intensification on continuously weakening the negative density dependence in regulating the population dynamics of cotton bollworms. Consequently, ongoing climate change and agricultural intensification unleashed the tightly regulated pest population and triggered the regional outbreak of H. armigera in 1992. Although the negative density dependence can effectively regulate the population change rate to fluctuate around zero at stable equilibrium levels before and after outbreak in the 1992, the population equilibrium jumped to a higher density level with apparently larger amplitudes after the outbreak. The results highlight the possibility for exogenous factors to induce pest outbreaks and alter the population regulating mechanism of negative density dependence and, thus, the stable equilibrium of the pest population, often to a higher level, posing considerable risks to the provision of agro-ecosystem services and regional food security. Efficient and timely measures of pest management in the era of Anthropocene should target the strengthening and revival of weakening density dependence caused by climate change and human activities. PMID:25535553

  19. Aphid-induced accumulation of trehalose in Arabidopsis thaliana is systemic and dependent upon aphid density.

    PubMed

    Hodge, Simon; Ward, Jane L; Beale, Michael H; Bennett, Mark; Mansfield, John W; Powell, Glen

    2013-04-01

    Trehalose is a disaccharide sugar that is now considered to be widely distributed among higher plants. Trehalose has been attributed a number of roles, including control of basic plant processes, such as photosynthesis, and conferring tolerance to abiotic stresses, such as desiccation and high salinity. Trehalose is also a common storage sugar used by insects. In this study, we used laboratory investigations to examine various aspects of trehalose dynamics in an aphid-host plant system (Arabidopsis and the peach potato aphid, Myzus persicae). Trehalose concentrations were measured by [1-H]-NMR. Myzus persicae reared on Arabidopsis, but not on black mustard or spring cabbage, contained considerable quantities of trehalose (5 % w/w dry matter). In Arabidopsis foliage, feeding by aphids induced a density-dependent accumulation of trehalose up to 5 mg g(-1) dry weight. Leaves that were not challenged directly by aphids also exhibited increased trehalose concentrations, indicating that this accumulation was systemic. Trehalose was measured at high concentrations in the phloem sap of plants challenged by aphids, suggesting that aphid feeding induced the plant to produce significant quantities of trehalose, which moved through the plant and into the aphids via the phloem sap. Trehalose was also excreted in the aphid honeydew. Further work is required to clarify whether this trehalose accumulation in Arabidopsis has a direct role or a signalling function in plant tolerance of, or resistance to, aphid feeding, and if a similar accumulation of this sugar occurs when other species or genotypes of aphids are reared on this host plant. PMID:23242075

  20. The optimal lateral root branching density for maize depends on nitrogen and phosphorus availability.

    PubMed

    Postma, Johannes Auke; Dathe, Annette; Lynch, Jonathan Paul

    2014-10-01

    Observed phenotypic variation in the lateral root branching density (LRBD) in maize (Zea mays) is large (1-41 cm(-1) major axis [i.e. brace, crown, seminal, and primary roots]), suggesting that LRBD has varying utility and tradeoffs in specific environments. Using the functional-structural plant model SimRoot, we simulated the three-dimensional development of maize root architectures with varying LRBD and quantified nitrate and phosphorus uptake, root competition, and whole-plant carbon balances in soils varying in the availability of these nutrients. Sparsely spaced (less than 7 branches cm(-1)), long laterals were optimal for nitrate acquisition, while densely spaced (more than 9 branches cm(-1)), short laterals were optimal for phosphorus acquisition. The nitrate results are mostly explained by the strong competition between lateral roots for nitrate, which causes increasing LRBD to decrease the uptake per unit root length, while the carbon budgets of the plant do not permit greater total root length (i.e. individual roots in the high-LRBD plants stay shorter). Competition and carbon limitations for growth play less of a role for phosphorus uptake, and consequently increasing LRBD results in greater root length and uptake. We conclude that the optimal LRBD depends on the relative availability of nitrate (a mobile soil resource) and phosphorus (an immobile soil resource) and is greater in environments with greater carbon fixation. The median LRBD reported in several field screens was 6 branches cm(-1), suggesting that most genotypes have an LRBD that balances the acquisition of both nutrients. LRBD merits additional investigation as a potential breeding target for greater nutrient acquisition. PMID:24850860

  1. A resprouter herb reduces negative density-dependent effects among neighboring seeders after fire

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raventós, José; Wiegand, Thorsten; Maestre, Fernando T.; de Luis, Martín

    2012-01-01

    Plant communities are often composed of species belonging to different functional groups, but relatively few studies to date have explicitly linked their spatial structure to the outcome of the interaction among them. We investigated if mortality of seeder species during their establishment after fire is influenced by the proximity of the resprouter herb Brachypodium retusum. The study was conducted in a Mediterranean shrubland (00°39' W; 38°43' N), 40 km northwest of Alicante (Spain) with Ulex parviflorus, Cistus albidus, Helianthemum marifolium, and Ononis fruticosa as dominant obligate seeder species and a herbaceous layer is dominated by the resprouter B. retusum. We followed the fate of mapped seedlings and the biomass of B. retusum one, two, three and nine years after an experimental fire. We used point pattern analyses to evaluate the spatial pattern of mortality of seeder species at these years in relation to the biomass of B. retusum. We hypothesize that B. retusum may initially have a positive impact on seeder survival. We implemented this hypothesis as a point process model that maintains the overall number of dead seeder plants, but seeder survival varied proportionally to the biomass of B. retusum in its neighborhood. We then contrasted this hypothesis with a previous analysis based on a random mortality hypothesis. Our data were consistent with the hypothesis that proximity of B. retusum reduced the mortality of seeder plants at their establishment phase (i.e., 2 yrs after fire). However, we found no evidence that B. retusum influenced seeder mortality when plants grow to maturity. We also found that, under the more stressful conditions (fire + erosion scenario), B. retusum had a lower impact on the performance of seeder species. Our results suggest that B. retusum may reduce negative density-dependent effects among neighboring seeder plants during the first years after fire.

  2. The role of landscape features and density dependence in growth andfledging rates of Piping Plovers in North Dakota, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Anteau, Michael J.; Wiltermuth, Mark T.; Sherfy, Mark H.; Shaffer, Terry L.; Pearse, Aaron T.

    2014-01-01

    For species with precocial young, survival from hatching to fledging is a key factor influencing recruitment. Furthermore, growth rates of precocial chicks are an indicator of forage quality and habitat suitability of brood-rearing areas. We examined how growth and fledging rates of Piping Plover (Charadrius melodus) chicks were influenced by landscape features, such as hatchling density (hatchlings per hectare of remotely sensed habitat [H ha-1]), island vs. mainland, and wind fetch (exposure to waves) at 2-km segments (n ¼ 15) of Lake Sakakawea, North Dakota, during 2007–2008. Hatchling growth was comparable with published estimates for other habitats. Models for fledging rate (fledged young per segment) assuming density dependence had more support (wi ¼ 96%) than those assuming density independence (wi ¼ 4%). Density-dependent processes appeared to influence fledging rate only at densities .5 H ha-1, which occurred in 19% of the segments we sampled. When areas with densities .5 H ha-1 were excluded, density-dependence and density-independence models were equally supported (wi ¼ 52% and 48%, respectively). Fledging rate declined as the wind fetch of a segment increased. Fledging rate on mainland shorelines was 4.3 times greater than that on islands. Previous work has indicated that plovers prefer islands for nesting, but our results suggest that this preference is not optimal and could lead to an ecological trap for chicks. While other researchers have found nesting-habitat requirements to be gravelly areas on exposed beaches without fine-grain substrates, our results suggest that chicks fledge at lower rates in these habitats. Thus, breeding plovers likely require complexes of these nesting habitats along with protected areas with fine, nutrient-rich substrate for foraging by hatchlings.

  3. Characterization of Ichthyocidal Activity of Pfiesteria piscicida: Dependence on the Dinospore Cell Density

    PubMed Central

    Drgon, Tomás; Saito, Keiko; Gillevet, Patrick M.; Sikaroodi, Masoumeh; Whitaker, Brent; Krupatkina, Danara N.; Argemi, Federico; Vasta, Gerardo R.

    2005-01-01

    The ichthyocidal activity of Pfiesteria piscicida dinospores was examined in an aquarium bioassay format by exposing fish to either Pfiesteria-containing environmental sediments or clonal P. piscicida. The presence of Pfiesteria spp. and the complexity of the microbial assemblage in the bioassay were assessed by molecular approaches. Cell-free water from bioassays that yielded significant fish mortality failed to show ichthyocidal activity. Histopathological examination of moribund and dead fish failed to reveal the skin lesions reported elsewhere. Fish larvae within “cages” of variable mesh sizes were killed in those where the pore size exceeded that of Pfiesteria dinospores. In vitro exposure of fish larvae to clonal P. piscicida indicated that fish mortality was directly proportional to the dinospore cell density. Dinospores clustered around the mouth, eyes, and operculi, suggesting that fish health may be affected by their direct interaction with skin, gill epithelia, or mucous surfaces. Molecular fingerprinting revealed the presence of a very diverse microbial community of bacteria, protists, and fungi within bioassay aquaria containing environmental sediments. Some components of the microbial community were identified as potential fish pathogens, preventing the rigorous identification of Pfiesteria spp. as the only cause of fish death. In summary, our results strongly suggest (i) that this aquarium bioassay format, which has been extensively reported in the literature, is unsuitable to accurately assess the ichthyocidal activity of Pfiesteria spp. and (ii) that the ichthyocidal activity of Pfiesteria spp. is mostly due to direct interactions of the zoospores with fish skin and gill epithelia rather than to soluble factors. PMID:15640229

  4. Momentum and density dependence of the isospin part of nuclear mean field and equation of state of asymmetric nuclear matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Behera, B.; Routray, T. R.; Pradhan, A.; Patra, S. K.; Sahu, P. K.

    2005-05-01

    Momentum and density dependence of the isospin part of nuclear mean field u(k,?) which is still, in part, the open problem of the old Lane potential is analysed using density dependent finite range effective interactions. The behaviour of u(k=k,?) around the Fermi momentum k is found to be related to the density dependence of nuclear symmetry energy J(?) and nucleon effective mass M(k=k,?)/M in symmetric nuclear matter. The momentum dependence of u(k,?) is separated out in terms of a simple functional u?ex(k,?) which vanishes at k=k and involves only the finite range parts of the exchange interactions between pairs of like and unlike nucleons. Depending on the choice of the parameters of these exchange interactions two conflicting trends of momentum dependence are noticed which lead to two opposite types of splitting of neutron and proton effective masses. The equation of state of asymmetric nuclear matter and the high density behaviour of nuclear symmetry energy J(?) are studied by constraining the additional parameters involved on the basis that pure neutron matter should not be predicted to be bound by any reasonable nuclear interaction. Emphasis is also given on the need of experimental data sensitive to the differences between neutron and proton transport properties in highly asymmetric dense nuclear matter and its analysis to constrain the high density behaviour of nuclear symmetry energy as well as to resolve the controversy on the two opposite types of splitting of neutron and proton effective masses.

  5. Density-controlled growth of aligned ZnO nanowire arrays by seedless chemical approach on smooth surfaces

    E-print Network

    Wang, Zhong L.

    was ultrasonicated consecutively in ac- etone, ethanol, IPA (isopropyl alcohol), and de-ionized water each for 10 minDensity-controlled growth of aligned ZnO nanowire arrays by seedless chemical approach on smooth 28 January 2008) A novel ZnO seedless chemical approach for density-controlled growth of ZnO nanowire

  6. Consistent formulation of the crossover from density to velocity dependent recombination in organic solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ansari-Rad, Mehdi; Garcia-Belmonte, Germà; Bisquert, Juan

    2015-08-01

    Carrier recombination is a central process in bulk heterojunction organic solar cells. Based on the competition of hopping rates that either implies escape in a broad density of states or recombination across the interface, we formulate a general theory of recombination flux that distinguishes reaction or transport limited recombination according to charge density. The Langevin picture is valid only in the low charge density limit, and a crossover to the reaction controlled regime occurs at higher densities. We present results from impedance spectroscopy of poly(3-hexylthiophene):methanofullerene solar cell that exhibit this crossover.

  7. Measurement of carbon nanotube microstructure relative density by optical attenuation and observation of size-dependent variations.

    PubMed

    Park, Sei Jin; Schmidt, Aaron J; Bedewy, Mostafa; Hart, A John

    2013-07-21

    Engineering the density of carbon nanotube (CNT) forest microstructures is vital to applications such as electrical interconnects, micro-contact probes, and thermal interface materials. For CNT forests on centimeter-scale substrates, weight and volume can be used to calculate density. However, this is not suitable for smaller samples, including individual microstructures, and moreover does not enable mapping of spatial density variations within the forest. We demonstrate that the relative mass density of individual CNT microstructures can be measured by optical attenuation, with spatial resolution equaling the size of the focused spot. For this, a custom optical setup was built to measure the transmission of a focused laser beam through CNT microstructures. The transmittance was correlated with the thickness of the CNT microstructures by Beer-Lambert-Bouguer law to calculate the attenuation coefficient. We reveal that the density of CNT microstructures grown by CVD can depend on their size, and that the overall density of arrays of microstructures is affected significantly by run-to-run process variations. Further, we use the technique to quantify the change in CNT microstructure density due to capillary densification. This is a useful and accessible metrology technique for CNTs in future microfabrication processes, and will enable direct correlation of density to important properties such as stiffness and electrical conductivity. PMID:23748864

  8. Particle-based multiscale coarse graining with density-dependent potentials: application to molecular crystals (hexahydro-1,3,5-trinitro-s-triazine).

    PubMed

    Izvekov, Sergei; Chung, Peter W; Rice, Betsy M

    2011-07-28

    We describe the development of isotropic particle-based coarse-grain models for crystalline hexahydro-1,3,5-trinitro-s-triazine (RDX). The coarse graining employs the recently proposed multiscale coarse-graining (MS-CG) method, which is a particle-based force-matching approach for deriving free-energy effective interaction potentials. Though one-site and four-site coarse-grain (CG) models were parameterized from atomistic simulations of non-ordered (molten and ambient temperature amorphous) systems, the focus of the paper is a detailed study of the one-site model with a brief recourse to the four-site model. To improve the ability of the one-site model to be applied to crystalline phases at various pressures, it was found necessary to include explicit dependence on a particle density, and a new theory of local density-dependent MS-CG potentials is subsequently presented. The density-dependency is implemented through interpolation of MS-CG force fields derived at a preselected set of reference densities. The computationally economical procedure for obtaining the reference force fields starting from the interaction at ambient density is also described. The one-site MS-CG model adequately describes the atomistic lattice structure of ?-RDX at ambient and high pressures, elastic and vibrational properties, pressure-volume curve up to P = 10 GPa, and the melting temperature. In the molten state, the model reproduces the correct pair structure at different pressures as well as higher order correlations. The potential of the MS-CG model is further evaluated in simulations of shocked crystalline RDX. PMID:21806095

  9. A Unified Approach to High Density: Pion Fluctuations in Skyrmion Matter

    E-print Network

    Hee-Jung Lee; Byung-Yoon Park; Dong-Pil Min; Mannque Rho; Vicente Vento

    2003-02-04

    As the first in a series of systematic work on dense hadronic matter, we study the properties of the pion in dense medium using Skyrme's effective Lagrangian as a unified theory of the hadronic interactions applicable in the large $N_c$ limit. Dense baryonic matter is described as the ground state of a skyrmion matter which appears in two differentiated phases as a function of matter density: i) at high densities as a stable cubic-centered (CC) half-skyrmion crystal; ii) at low densities as an unstable face-centered cubic (FCC) skyrmion crystal. We substitute the latter by a stable inhomogeneous phase of lumps of dense matter, which represents a naive Maxwell construction of the phase transition. This baryonic dense medium serves as a background for the pions whose effective {\\em in-medium} Lagrangian we construct by allowing time-dependent quantum fluctuations on the classical dense matter field. We find that the same parameter which describes the phase transition for baryonic matter, the expectation value of the $\\sigma$ field, also describes the phase transition for the dynamics of the {\\em in-medium} pion. Thus, the structure of the baryonic ground state $crucially$ determines the behavior of the pion in the medium. As matter density increases, $$ decreases, a phenomenon which we interpret to signal, in terms of the parameters of the effective pion Lagrangian $f_\\pi^*$ and $m_\\pi^*$, the restoration of chiral symmetry at high density. Our calculation shows also the important role played by the higher powers in the density as it increases and chiral symmetry is being restored. This feature is likely to be generic at high density although our ground state may not be the true ground state.

  10. A time dependent density functional treatment of superfluid dynamics: Equilibration of the electron bubble in superfluid 4

    E-print Network

    Apkarian, V. Ara

    A time dependent density functional treatment of superfluid dynamics: Equilibration of the electron by the slow breathing of the cavity. The far-field motion consists of a shock wave, followed by radiating sound waves. The solitonic shock wave propagates at speeds as high as 580 m/s, determined

  11. The impact of climate change on the bottom up regulation of density dependence in large herbivore populations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahrestani, F.; Smith, W. A.; Hebblewhite, M.; Running, S. W.; Post, E.

    2013-12-01

    Population dynamics are regulated by either density dependent or, independent (environmental) factors, and climate change may influence populations through either pathway. One key factor in the population dynamics of large herbivores is the dynamics of vegetation nutrient content, which although being an environmental factor, has the potential to impact the degree of density dependence that regulates population dynamics. To understand this bottom up regulatory mechanism and how climate interacts with vegetation, we will estimate the influence of vegetation dynamics on annual abundance estimates of multiple vertebrate populations using time-series analysis. We will test the hypothesis that the strength of density dependence is expected to vary inversely with changes in vegetation availability, i.e., in areas with higher forage abundance and quality, density dependence is expected to be stronger. Extended to climate change, this hypothesis predicts that climate impacts will be stronger in areas of low vegetation availability, such as the arctic and alpine regions. We will analyze a combined dataset of 55 globally distributed Cervus (elk/red deer) and Rangifer (caribou/reindeer) populations that inhabit areas >100km2. These population time-series we will be analyzed using Markov Chain Monte Carlo Bayesian state-space models, and to represent annual vegetation dynamics we will use Global Inventory Monitoring and Modeling System (GIMMS) normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI) data (i.e., third generation GIMMS NDVI from AVHRR sensors).

  12. Analytical Blowup Solutions to the Pressureless Navier-Stokes-Poisson Equations with Density-dependent Viscosity in R^N

    E-print Network

    Manwai Yuen

    2009-04-23

    We study the N-dimensional pressureless Navier--Stokes-Poisson equations with density-dependent viscosity. With the extension of the blowup solutions for the Euler-Poisson equations, the analytical blowup solutions,in radial symmetry, in R^N are constructed.

  13. Effects of density dependent sex allocation on the dynamics of a simultaneous hermaphroditic population: Modelling and analysis

    E-print Network

    Bravo de la Parra, Rafael

    species. This theory describes how the reproduction resources are allocated between male and female of immature individuals acquiring male and female sexual roles are density dependent through nonlinear of system solutions is shown by means of numerical simulations. Females have larger fertility rate than

  14. Gray Matter Density Negatively Correlates with Duration of Heroin Use in Young Lifetime Heroin-Dependent Individuals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yuan, Yi; Zhu, Zude; Shi, Jinfu; Zou, Zhiling; Yuan, Fei; Liu, Yijun; Lee, Tatia M. C.; Weng, Xuchu

    2009-01-01

    Numerous studies have documented cognitive impairments and hypoactivity in the prefrontal and anterior cingulate cortices in drug users. However, the relationships between opiate dependence and brain structure changes in heroin users are largely unknown. In the present study, we measured the density of gray matter (DGM) with voxel-based…

  15. Is negative density dependence in egg laying by female red flour beetles (Tribolium castaneum) based on current or future competition?

    E-print Network

    Blouin-Demers, Gabriel

    Is negative density dependence in egg laying by female red flour beetles (Tribolium castaneum between adults and therefore change female oviposition decision. Female red flour beetles, Tribolium'oviposition des femelles. Les coléoptères rouges à farine femelles, Tribolium castaneum, utilisent la farine comme

  16. Anatomy of a population cycle: the role of density dependence and demographic variability on numerical instability and periodicity.

    PubMed

    Row, Jeffrey R; Wilson, Paul J; Murray, Dennis L

    2014-07-01

    Determining the causes of cyclic fluctuations in population size is a central tenet in population ecology and provides insights into population regulatory mechanisms. We have a firm understanding of how direct and delayed density dependence affects population stability and cyclic dynamics, but there remains considerable uncertainty in the specific processes contributing to demographic variability and consequent change in cyclic propensity. Spatiotemporal variability in cyclic propensity, including recent attenuation or loss of cyclicity among several temperate populations and the implications of habitat fragmentation and climate change on this pattern, highlights the heightened need to understand processes underlying cyclic variation. Because these stressors can differentially impact survival and productivity and thereby impose variable time delays in density dependence, there is a specific need to elucidate how demographic vital rates interact with the type and action of density dependence to contribute to population stability and cyclic variation. Here, we address this knowledge gap by comparing the stability of time series derived from general and species-specific (Canada lynx: Lynx canadensis; small rodents: Microtus, Lemmus and Clethrionomys spp.) matrix population models, which vary in their demographic rates and the direct action of density dependence. Our results reveal that density dependence acting exclusively on survival as opposed to productivity is destabilizing, suggesting that a shift in the action of population regulation toward reproductive output may decrease cyclic propensity and cycle amplitude. This result was the same whether delayed density dependence was pulsatile and acted on a single time period (e.g. t-1, t-2 or t-3) vs. more constant by affecting a successive range of years (e.g. t-1,…, t-3). Consistent with our general models, reductions in reproductive potential in both the lynx and small rodent systems led to notably large drops in cyclic propensity and amplitude, suggesting that changes in this vital rate may contribute to the spatial or temporal variability observed in the cyclic dynamics of both systems. Collectively, our results reveal that the type of density dependence and its effect on different demographic parameters can profoundly influence numeric stability and cyclic propensity and therefore may shift populations across the cyclic-to-noncyclic boundary. PMID:24438480

  17. Fragment approach to constrained density functional theory calculations using Daubechies wavelets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ratcliff, Laura E.; Genovese, Luigi; Mohr, Stephan; Deutsch, Thierry

    2015-06-01

    In a recent paper, we presented a linear scaling Kohn-Sham density functional theory (DFT) code based on Daubechies wavelets, where a minimal set of localized support functions are optimized in situ and therefore adapted to the chemical properties of the molecular system. Thanks to the systematically controllable accuracy of the underlying basis set, this approach is able to provide an optimal contracted basis for a given system: accuracies for ground state energies and atomic forces are of the same quality as an uncontracted, cubic scaling approach. This basis set offers, by construction, a natural subset where the density matrix of the system can be projected. In this paper, we demonstrate the flexibility of this minimal basis formalism in providing a basis set that can be reused as-is, i.e., without reoptimization, for charge-constrained DFT calculations within a fragment approach. Support functions, represented in the underlying wavelet grid, of the template fragments are roto-translated with high numerical precision to the required positions and used as projectors for the charge weight function. We demonstrate the interest of this approach to express highly precise and efficient calculations for preparing diabatic states and for the computational setup of systems in complex environments.

  18. Fragment approach to constrained density functional theory calculations using Daubechies wavelets.

    PubMed

    Ratcliff, Laura E; Genovese, Luigi; Mohr, Stephan; Deutsch, Thierry

    2015-06-21

    In a recent paper, we presented a linear scaling Kohn-Sham density functional theory (DFT) code based on Daubechies wavelets, where a minimal set of localized support functions are optimized in situ and therefore adapted to the chemical properties of the molecular system. Thanks to the systematically controllable accuracy of the underlying basis set, this approach is able to provide an optimal contracted basis for a given system: accuracies for ground state energies and atomic forces are of the same quality as an uncontracted, cubic scaling approach. This basis set offers, by construction, a natural subset where the density matrix of the system can be projected. In this paper, we demonstrate the flexibility of this minimal basis formalism in providing a basis set that can be reused as-is, i.e., without reoptimization, for charge-constrained DFT calculations within a fragment approach. Support functions, represented in the underlying wavelet grid, of the template fragments are roto-translated with high numerical precision to the required positions and used as projectors for the charge weight function. We demonstrate the interest of this approach to express highly precise and efficient calculations for preparing diabatic states and for the computational setup of systems in complex environments. PMID:26093548

  19. Demonstartion of density dependence of x-ray flux in a laser-driven hohlraum

    SciTech Connect

    Young, P E; Rosen, M D; Hammer, J H; Hsing, W S; Glendinning, S G; Turner, R E; Kirkwood, R; Schein, J; Sorce, C; Satcher, J; Hamza, A; Reibold, R A; Hibbard, R; Landen, O; Reighard, A; McAlpin, S; Stevenson, M; Thomas, B

    2008-02-11

    Experiments have been conducted using laser-driven cylindrical hohlraums whose walls are machined from Ta{sub 2}O{sub 5} foams of 100 mg/cc and 4 g/cc densities. Measurements of the radiation temperature demonstrate that the lower density walls produce higher radiation temperatures than the high density walls. This is the first experimental demonstration of the prediction that this would occur [M. D. Rosen and J. H. Hammer, Phys. Rev. E 72, 056403 (2005)]. For high density walls, the radiation front propagates subsonically, and part of the absorbed energy is wasted by the flow kinetic energy. For the lower wall density, the front velocity is supersonic and can devote almost all of the absorbed energy to heating the wall.

  20. Molecular-orbital-free algorithm for the excited-state force in time-dependent density functional theory.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jie; Liang, Wan Zhen

    2011-01-28

    Starting from the equation of motion in the density matrix formulation, we reformulate the analytical gradient of the excited-state energy at the time-dependent density functional theory level in the nonorthogonal Gaussian atom-centered orbital (AO) basis. Analogous to the analytical first derivative in molecular-orbital (MO) basis, a Z-vector equation has been derived with respect to the reduced one-electronic density matrix in AO basis, which provides a potential possibility to exploit quantum locality of the density matrix and avoids the matrix transformation between the AO and the MO basis. Numerical tests are finished for the excited-state geometry optimization and adiabatic excitation energy calculation of a series of small molecules. The results demonstrate the computational efficiency and accuracy of the current AO-based energy gradient expression in comparison with the MO-based scheme. PMID:21280694

  1. Implementation of Hydrodynamical Formulation of Time-Dependent Density Functional Theory for Probing Multiphoton Processes in Strong Fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roy, A. K.; Chu, Xi; Carrera, Juan; Chu, Shih-I.

    2001-05-01

    We extend the hydrodynamical formulation of time-dependent density We extend the hydrodynamical formulation of time-dependent density functional theory (TDDFT) to the study of multiphoton processes of many-electron atomic systems in intense laser fields. The initial state of the quantum system is obtained by the imaginary time propagation method. The generalized pseudospectral time-dependent techniques [1,2] are used for accurate and efficient solution of both imaginary time propagation and strong field calculations. The procedure is applied to the study of the nonlinear optical response of rare gas atoms to intense laser fields [3]. [1] X. M. Tong and S.I. Chu, Chem. Phys. 217 (1997) 119. [2] X. Chu and S. I. Chu, Phys. Rev. A63 (2001) 023411. [3] A. K. Roy, X. Chu, J. Carrera, and S.I. Chu, to be published.

  2. Comparison between critical current density in thin superconducting films estimated from temperature and field dependence of ac susceptibility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jan?, Zden?k; Soukup, František

    2014-06-01

    We have measured an ac magnetic susceptibility of recent second generation high temperature superconductor wires (coated conductor tapes) both as a function of an amplitude of an applied ac magnetic field at fixed temperatures and as a function of temperature at the fixed amplitudes. We find that data acquired by both methods are well described by ac susceptibility calculated on the basis of the Clem-Sanchez model to a response of thin superconducting disks in the Bean critical state to an applied perpendicular ac magnetic field. We show how to link the empirical data dependent on the field amplitude or temperature with theoretical data dependent on the ratio between the critical current density and field amplitude. The critical depinning current densities and its temperature dependence found by both methods are in good agreement. We discuss and compare accuracy and time saving of both methods.

  3. Ionic asymmetry and solvent excluded volume effects on spherical electric double layers: A density functional approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Medasani, Bharat; Ovanesyan, Zaven; Thomas, Dennis G.; Sushko, Maria L.; Marucho, Marcelo

    2014-05-01

    In this article, we present a classical density functional theory for electrical double layers of spherical macroions that extends the capabilities of conventional approaches by accounting for electrostatic ion correlations, size asymmetry, and excluded volume effects. The approach is based on a recent approximation introduced by Hansen-Goos and Roth for the hard sphere excess free energy of inhomogeneous fluids [J. Chem. Phys. 124, 154506 (2006); Hansen-Goos and Roth, J. Phys.: Condens. Matter 18, 8413 (2006)]. It accounts for the proper and efficient description of the effects of ionic asymmetry and solvent excluded volume, especially at high ion concentrations and size asymmetry ratios including those observed in experimental studies. Additionally, we utilize a leading functional Taylor expansion approximation of the ion density profiles. In addition, we use the mean spherical approximation for multi-component charged hard sphere fluids to account for the electrostatic ion correlation effects. These approximations are implemented in our theoretical formulation into a suitable decomposition of the excess free energy which plays a key role in capturing the complex interplay between charge correlations and excluded volume effects. We perform Monte Carlo simulations in various scenarios to validate the proposed approach, obtaining a good compromise between accuracy and computational cost. We use the proposed computational approach to study the effects of ion size, ion size asymmetry, and solvent excluded volume on the ion profiles, integrated charge, mean electrostatic potential, and ionic coordination number around spherical macroions in various electrolyte mixtures. Our results show that both solvent hard sphere diameter and density play a dominant role in the distribution of ions around spherical macroions, mainly for experimental water molarity and size values where the counterion distribution is characterized by a tight binding to the macroion, similar to that predicted by the Stern model.

  4. Ionic Asymmetry and Solvent Excluded Volume Effects on Spherical Electric Double Layers: A Density Functional Approach

    SciTech Connect

    Medasani, Bharat; Ovanesyan, Zaven; Thomas, Dennis G.; Sushko, Maria L.; Marucho, Marcelo

    2014-05-29

    In this article we present a classical density functional theory for electrical double layers of spherical macroions that extends the capabilities of conventional approaches by accounting for electrostatic ion correlations, size asymmetry and excluded volume effects. The approach is based on a recent approximation introduced by Hansen-Goos and Roth for the hard sphere excess free energy of inhomogeneous fluids (J. Chem. Phys. 124, 154506). It accounts for the proper and efficient description of the effects of ionic asymmetry and solvent excluded volume, especially at high ion concentrations and size asymmetry ratios including those observed in experimental studies. Additionally, we utilize a leading functional Taylor expansion approximation of the ion density profiles. In addition, we use the Mean Spherical Approximation for multi-component charged hard sphere fluids to account for the electrostatic ion correlation effects. These approximations are implemented in our theoretical formulation into a suitable decomposition of the excess free energy which plays a key role in capturing the complex interplay between charge correlations and excluded volume effects. We perform Monte Carlo simulations in various scenarios to validate the proposed approach, obtaining a good compromise between accuracy and computational cost. We use the proposed computational approach to study the effects of ion size, ion size asymmetry and solvent excluded volume on the ion profiles, integrated charge, mean electrostatic potential, and ionic coordination number around spherical macroions in various electrolyte mixtures. Our results show that both solvent hard sphere diameter and density play a dominant role in the distribution of ions around spherical macroions, mainly for experimental water molarity and size values where the counterion distribution is characterized by a tight binding to the macroion, similar to that predicted by the Stern model.

  5. Determining the density dependence of the nuclear symmetry energy using heavy-ion reactions

    E-print Network

    Lie-Wen Chen; Che Ming Ko; Bao-An Li; Gao-Chan Yong

    2007-11-12

    We review recent progress in the determination of the subsaturation density behavior of the nuclear symmetry energy from heavy-ion collisions as well as the theoretical progress in probing the high density behavior of the symmetry energy in heavy-ion reactions induced by high energy radioactive beams. We further discuss the implications of these results for the nuclear effective interactions and the neutron skin thickness of heavy nuclei.

  6. Population density-dependent hair cortisol concentrations in rhesus monkeys (Macaca mulatta)

    PubMed Central

    Dettmer, A.M.; Novak, M.A.; Meyer, J.S.; Suomi, S.J.

    2014-01-01

    Summary Population density is known to influence acute measures of hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis activity in a variety of species, including fish, deer, birds, and humans. However, the effects of population density on levels of chronic stress are unknown. Given the fact that exposure to chronically elevated levels of circulating glucocorticoids results in a host of health disparities in animals and humans alike, it is important to understand how population density may impact chronic stress. We assessed hair cortisol concentrations (HCCs), which are reliable indicators of chronic HPA axis activity, in rhesus monkeys (Macaca mulatta) to determine the influence of population density on these values. In Experiment 1, we compared HCCs of monkeys living in high-density (HD; 1 monkey/0.87m2) and low-density (LD; 1 monkey/63.37m2) environments (N=236 hair samples) and found that HD monkeys exhibited higher hair cortisol across all age categories (infant, juvenile, young adult, adult, and aged) except infancy and aged (F(5)=4.240, p=0.001), for which differences were nearly significant. HD monkeys also received more severe fight wounds than LD monkeys (?2=26.053, p<0.001), though no effects of dominance status emerged. In Experiment 2, we examined how HCCs change with fluctuating population levels across five years in the adult LD monkeys (N=155 hair samples) and found that increased population density was significantly positively correlated with HCCs in this semi-naturalistic population (r(s)=0.975, p=0.005). These are the first findings to demonstrate that increased population density is associated with increased chronic, endogenous glucocorticoid exposure in a nonhuman primate species. We discuss the implications of these findings with respect to laboratory research, population ecology, and human epidemiology. PMID:24636502

  7. An Input-Level Dependent Approach to Color Error Vishal Monga1

    E-print Network

    Evans, Brian L.

    present a visually optimum design approach for input level tone dependent error lters for each color plane formulate the design of input-level dependent color error di usion halftoning systems. An independent design ideally be di used to frequencies and colors to which the eye is least sensitive. Our design procedure

  8. A State-Dependent Riccati Equation Approach to Atmospheric Entry Guidance

    E-print Network

    Tsiotras, Panagiotis

    with a quadratic performance index is possible resulting in an algebraic Riccati equation (ARE) in termsA State-Dependent Riccati Equation Approach to Atmospheric Entry Guidance Bradley A. Steinfeldt of state-dependent Riccati equation control for closed-loop guidance of the hypersonic phase of atmospheric

  9. Laboratory Calibration of Density-Dependent Lines in the EUV and Soft X-Ray Regions

    SciTech Connect

    Lepson, J K; Beiersdorfer, P; Gu, M F; Desai, P

    2010-12-09

    We analyzed spectral data of Fe XXII and Ar XIV from laboratory sources in which the electron density varies by several orders of magnitude to help benchmark density-sensitive emission lines useful for astrophysics and to test the atomic models underlying the diagnostic line ratios. We found excellent agreement for Fe XXII, but poorer agreement for Ar XIV. A number of astrophysically important emission lines are sensitive to electron density in the EUV and soft X-ray regions. Lines from Fe XXII, for example, have been used in recent years as diagnostics of stellar coronae, such as the active variable AB Dor, Capella, and EX Hya (Sanz-Forcada et al. 2003, Mewe et al. 2001, Mauche et al. 2003). Here we report spectral data of Fe XXII and Ar XIV from laboratory sources in which the electron density is known from either K-shell density diagnostics (for electron beam ion traps) or from non-spectroscopic means (tokamaks), ranging from 5 x 10{sup 10} cm{sup -3} to 5 x 10{sup 14} cm{sup -3}. These measurements were used to test the atomic data underlying the density diagnostic line ratios, complementing earlier work (Chen et al. 2004).

  10. Nuclear state densities of odd-mass heavy nuclei in the shell model Monte Carlo approach

    E-print Network

    Özen, C; Nakada, H

    2013-01-01

    While the shell model Monte Carlo approach has been successful in the microscopic calculation of nuclear state densities, it has been difficult to calculate accurately state densities of odd-even heavy nuclei. This is because the projection on an odd number of particles in the shell model Monte Carlo method leads to a sign problem at low temperatures, making it impractical to extract the ground-state energy in direct Monte Carlo calculations. We show that the ground-state energy can be extracted to a good precision by using level counting data at low excitation energies and the neutron resonance data at the neutron threshold energy. This allows us to extend recent applications of the shell-model Monte Carlo method in even-even rare-earth nuclei to the odd-even isotopic chains of $^{149-155}$Sm and $^{143-149}$Nd. We calculate the state densities of the odd-even samarium and neodymium isotopes and find close agreement with the state densities extracted from experimental data.

  11. Nuclear state densities of odd-mass heavy nuclei in the shell model Monte Carlo approach

    E-print Network

    C. Özen; Y. Alhassid; H. Nakada

    2013-04-27

    While the shell model Monte Carlo approach has been successful in the microscopic calculation of nuclear state densities, it has been difficult to calculate accurately state densities of odd-even heavy nuclei. This is because the projection on an odd number of particles in the shell model Monte Carlo method leads to a sign problem at low temperatures, making it impractical to extract the ground-state energy in direct Monte Carlo calculations. We show that the ground-state energy can be extracted to a good precision by using level counting data at low excitation energies and the neutron resonance data at the neutron threshold energy. This allows us to extend recent applications of the shell-model Monte Carlo method in even-even rare-earth nuclei to the odd-even isotopic chains of $^{149-155}$Sm and $^{143-149}$Nd. We calculate the state densities of the odd-even samarium and neodymium isotopes and find close agreement with the state densities extracted from experimental data.

  12. A hybrid approach to crowd density estimation using statistical leaning and texture classification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yin; Zhou, Bowen

    2013-12-01

    Crowd density estimation is a hot topic in computer vision community. Established algorithms for crowd density estimation mainly focus on moving crowds, employing background modeling to obtain crowd blobs. However, people's motion is not obvious in most occasions such as the waiting hall in the airport or the lobby in the railway station. Moreover, conventional algorithms for crowd density estimation cannot yield desirable results for all levels of crowding due to occlusion and clutter. We propose a hybrid method to address the aforementioned problems. First, statistical learning is introduced for background subtraction, which comprises a training phase and a test phase. The crowd images are grided into small blocks which denote foreground or background. Then HOG features are extracted and are fed into a binary SVM for each block. Hence, crowd blobs can be obtained by the classification results of the trained classifier. Second, the crowd images are treated as texture images. Therefore, the estimation problem can be formulated as texture classification. The density level can be derived according to the classification results. We validate the proposed algorithm on some real scenarios where the crowd motion is not so obvious. Experimental results demonstrate that our approach can obtain the foreground crowd blobs accurately and work well for different levels of crowding.

  13. Testing density-dependent groundwater models: Two-dimensional steady state unstable convection in infinite, finite and inclined porous layers

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Weatherill, D.; Simmons, C.T.; Voss, C.I.; Robinson, N.I.

    2004-01-01

    This study proposes the use of several problems of unstable steady state convection with variable fluid density in a porous layer of infinite horizontal extent as two-dimensional (2-D) test cases for density-dependent groundwater flow and solute transport simulators. Unlike existing density-dependent model benchmarks, these problems have well-defined stability criteria that are determined analytically. These analytical stability indicators can be compared with numerical model results to test the ability of a code to accurately simulate buoyancy driven flow and diffusion. The basic analytical solution is for a horizontally infinite fluid-filled porous layer in which fluid density decreases with depth. The proposed test problems include unstable convection in an infinite horizontal box, in a finite horizontal box, and in an infinite inclined box. A dimensionless Rayleigh number incorporating properties of the fluid and the porous media determines the stability of the layer in each case. Testing the ability of numerical codes to match both the critical Rayleigh number at which convection occurs and the wavelength of convection cells is an addition to the benchmark problems currently in use. The proposed test problems are modelled in 2-D using the SUTRA [SUTRA-A model for saturated-unsaturated variable-density ground-water flow with solute or energy transport. US Geological Survey Water-Resources Investigations Report, 02-4231, 2002. 250 p] density-dependent groundwater flow and solute transport code. For the case of an infinite horizontal box, SUTRA results show a distinct change from stable to unstable behaviour around the theoretical critical Rayleigh number of 4??2 and the simulated wavelength of unstable convection agrees with that predicted by the analytical solution. The effects of finite layer aspect ratio and inclination on stability indicators are also tested and numerical results are in excellent agreement with theoretical stability criteria and with numerical results previously reported in traditional fluid mechanics literature. ?? 2004 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. A new approach for numerical simulation of the time-dependent Ginzburg-Landau equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Buyang; Zhang, Zhimin

    2015-12-01

    We introduce a new approach for finite element simulations of the time-dependent Ginzburg-Landau equations (TDGL) in a general curved polygon, possibly with reentrant corners. Specifically, we reformulate the TDGL into an equivalent system of equations by decomposing the magnetic potential to the sum of its divergence-free and curl-free parts, respectively. Numerical simulations of vortex dynamics show that, in a domain with reentrant corners, the new approach is much more stable and accurate than the traditional approaches of solving the TDGL directly (under either the temporal gauge or the Lorentz gauge); in a convex domain, the new approach gives comparably accurate solutions as the traditional approaches.

  15. Bound states in ab initio approaches to quantum transport: A time-dependent formulation Gianluca Stefanucci*

    E-print Network

    Stefanucci, Gianluca

    Bound states in ab initio approaches to quantum transport: A time-dependent formulation Gianluca In this work, we study the role of bound electrons in quantum transport. The partition-free approach by Cini and their future application in nanoscale circuitry entails the ne- cessity of developing a quantum theory

  16. Communication: Exciton analysis in time-dependent density functional theory: How functionals shape excited-state characters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mewes, Stefanie A.; Plasser, Felix; Dreuw, Andreas

    2015-11-01

    Excited-state descriptors based on the one-particle transition density matrix referring to the exciton picture have been implemented for time-dependent density functional theory. State characters such as local, extended ???, Rydberg, or charge transfer can be intuitively classified by simple comparison of these descriptors. Strong effects of the choice of the exchange-correlation kernel on the physical nature of excited states can be found and decomposed in detail leading to a new perspective on functional performance and the design of new functionals.

  17. Density matrix approach to the orbital ordering in the spinel vanadates: a case study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lal, Sohan; Pandey, Sudhir K.

    2014-09-01

    In this work we apply the density matrices approach to orbital ordering (OO) in order to study the OO of the spinel vanadates AV2O4 (A ? Zn, Cd and Mg), which is normally believed to be responsible for the structural transition from cubic to tetragonal phase observed in these compounds. The density matrices of vanadium atoms are obtained by using state-of-the-art full-potential linearized augmented plane wave method based GGA + U calculations. In the absence of spin-orbit coupling, the present study shows the existence of anti-ferro OO in the global (local octahedral) coordinate system where d xz and d yz ( d xz + d yz and d xz - d yz ) orbitals are mainly occupied at the neighboring V sites for all the compounds.

  18. Non-linear density-dependent effects of an intertidal ecosystem engineer.

    PubMed

    Harley, Christopher D G; O'Riley, Jaclyn L

    2011-06-01

    Ecosystem engineering is an important process in a variety of ecosystems. However, the relationship between engineer density and engineering impact remains poorly understood. We used experiments and a mathematical model to examine the role of engineer density in a rocky intertidal community in northern California. In this system, the whelk Nucella ostrina preys on barnacles (Balanus glandula and Chthamalus dalli), leaving empty barnacle tests as a resource (favorable microhabitat) for other species. Field experiments demonstrated that N. ostrina predation increased the availability of empty tests of both barnacle species, reduced the density of the competitively dominant B. glandula, and indirectly increased the density of the competitively inferior C. dalli. Empty barnacle tests altered microhabitat humidity, but not temperature, and presumably provided a refuge from wave action. The herbivorous snail Littorina plena was positively associated with empty test availability in both observational comparisons and experimental manipulations of empty test availability, and L. plena density was elevated in areas with foraging N. ostrina. To explore the effects of variation in N. ostrina predation, we constructed a demographic matrix model for barnacles in which we varied predation intensity. The model predicted that number of available empty tests increases with predation intensity to a point, but declines when predation pressure was strong enough to severely reduce adult barnacle densities. The modeled number of available empty tests therefore peaked at an intermediate level of N. ostrina predation. Non-linear relationships between engineer density and engineer impact may be a generally important attribute of systems in which engineers influence the population dynamics of the species that they manipulate. PMID:21170751

  19. Density-dependent selection closes an eco-evolutionary feedback loop in the stick insect Timema cristinae

    PubMed Central

    Farkas, Timothy E.; Montejo-Kovacevich, Gabriela

    2014-01-01

    Empirical demonstrations of feedbacks between ecology and evolution are rare. Here, we used a field experiment to test the hypothesis that avian predators impose density-dependent selection (DDS) on Timema cristinae stick insects. We transplanted wild-caught T. cristinae to wild bushes at 50 : 50 cryptic : conspicuous morph ratio and manipulated density by transplanting either 24 or 48 individuals. The frequency of the conspicuous morph was reduced by 73% in the low-density treatment, but only by 50% in the high-density treatment, supporting a hypothesis of negative DDS. Coupled with previous studies on T. cristinae, which demonstrate that maladaptive gene flow reduces population density, we support an eco-evolutionary feedback loop in this system. Furthermore, our results support the hypothesis that predator satiation is the mechanism driving DDS. We found no effects of T. cristinae density on the abundance or species richness of other arthropods. Eco-evolutionary feedbacks, driven by processes like DDS, can have implications for adaptive divergence and speciation. PMID:25505057

  20. EVALUATING SYSTEMATIC DEPENDENCIES OF TYPE Ia SUPERNOVAE: THE INFLUENCE OF CENTRAL DENSITY

    SciTech Connect

    Krueger, Brendan K.; Jackson, Aaron P.; Calder, Alan C.; Townsley, Dean M.; Brown, Edward F.; Timmes, Francis X.

    2012-10-01

    We present a study exploring a systematic effect on the brightness of Type Ia supernovae using numerical models that assume the single-degenerate paradigm. Our investigation varied the central density of the progenitor white dwarf at flame ignition, and considered its impact on the explosion yield, particularly the production and distribution of radioactive {sup 56}Ni, which powers the light curve. We performed a suite of two-dimensional simulations with randomized initial conditions, allowing us to characterize the statistical trends that we present. The simulations indicate that the production of Fe-group material is statistically independent of progenitor central density, but the mass of stable Fe-group isotopes is tightly correlated with central density, with a decrease in the production of {sup 56}Ni at higher central densities. These results imply that progenitors with higher central densities produce dimmer events. We provide details of the post-explosion distribution of {sup 56}Ni in the models, including the lack of a consistent centrally located deficit of {sup 56}Ni, which may be compared to observed remnants. By performing a self-consistent extrapolation of our model yields and considering the main-sequence lifetime of the progenitor star and the elapsed time between the formation of the white dwarf and the onset of accretion, we develop a brightness-age relation that improves our prediction of the expected trend for single degenerates and we compare this relation with observations.

  1. Density-dependent adaptive resistance allows swimming bacteria to colonize an antibiotic gradient.

    PubMed

    Hol, Felix J H; Hubert, Bert; Dekker, Cees; Keymer, Juan E

    2016-01-01

    During antibiotic treatment, antibiotic concentration gradients develop. Little is know regarding the effects of antibiotic gradients on populations of nonresistant bacteria. Using a microfluidic device, we show that high-density motile Escherichia coli populations composed of nonresistant bacteria can, unexpectedly, colonize environments where a lethal concentration of the antibiotic kanamycin is present. Colonizing bacteria establish an adaptively resistant population, which remains viable for over 24?h while exposed to the antibiotic. Quantitative analysis of multiple colonization events shows that collectively swimming bacteria need to exceed a critical population density in order to successfully colonize the antibiotic landscape. After colonization, bacteria are not dormant but show both growth and swimming motility under antibiotic stress. Our results highlight the importance of motility and population density in facilitating adaptive resistance, and indicate that adaptive resistance may be a first step to the emergence of genetically encoded resistance in landscapes of antibiotic gradients. PMID:26140531

  2. Time dependent human hip joint lubrication for periodic motion with stochastic asymmetric density function.

    PubMed

    Wierzcholski, Krzysztof

    2014-01-01

    The present paper is concerned with the calculation of the human hip joint parameters for periodic, stochastic unsteady, motion with asymmetric probability density function for gap height. The asymmetric density function indicates that the stochastic probabilities of gap height decreasing are different in comparison with the probabilities of the gap height increasing. The models of asymmetric density functions are considered on the grounds of experimental observations. Some methods are proposed for calculation of pressure distributions and load carrying capacities for unsteady stochastic conditions in a super thin layer of biological synovial fluid inside the slide biobearing gap limited by a spherical bone acetabulum. Numerical calculations are performed in Mathcad 12 Professional Program, by using the method of finite differences. This method assures stability of numerical solutions of partial differential equations and gives proper values of pressure and load carrying capacity forces occurring in human hip joints. PMID:24707824

  3. Application of Time-Dependent Density Functional and Natural Bond Orbital Theories to the UV-vis Absorption Spectra of Some Phenolic Compounds.

    PubMed

    Markovi?, Svetlana; Tošovi?, Jelena

    2015-09-01

    The UV-vis properties of 22 natural phenolic compounds, comprising anthraquinones, neoflavonoids, and flavonoids were systematically examined. The time-dependent density functional theory (TDDFT) approach in combination with the B3LYP, B3LYP-D2, B3P86, and M06-2X functionals was used to simulate the UV-vis spectra of the investigated compounds. It was shown that all methods exhibit very good (B3LYP slightly better) performance in reproducing the examined UV-vis spectra. However, the shapes of the Kohn-Sham molecular orbitals (MOs) involved in electronic transitions were misleading in constructing the MO correlation diagrams. To provide better understanding of redistribution of electron density upon excitation, the natural bond orbital (NBO) analysis was applied. Bearing in mind the spatial and energetic separations, as well as the character of the ? bonding, lone pair, and ?* antibonding natural localized molecular orbitals (NLMOs), the "NLMO clusters" were constructed. NLMO cluster should be understood as a part of a molecule characterized with distinguished electron density. It was shown that all absorption bands including all electronic transitions need to be inspected to fully understand the UV-vis spectrum of a certain compound, and, thus, to learn more about its UV-vis light absorption. Our investigation showed that the TDDFT and NBO theories are complementary, as the results from the two approaches can be combined to interpret the UV-vis spectra. Agreement between the predictions of the TDDFT approach and those based on the NLMO clusters is excellent in the case of major electronic transitions and long wavelengths. It should be emphasized that the approach for investigation of UV-vis light absorption based on the NLMO clusters is applied for the first time. PMID:26274788

  4. Temperature and density dependence of properties of nuclear matter deduced from heavy ion collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Shlomo, Shalom

    2010-11-24

    Heavy-ion collision experiments are often employed to determine properties of nuclear matter under extreme conditions of temperature and density. This has been the subject of many investigations in recent decades, since understanding the equation of state of hot nuclear matter is very important in the study supernovae, neutron stars and nuclei. We present a short and limited review of the theoretical and experimental status of determining the temperature and density of the disassembling hot nucleus from ratios of the yields of emitted fragments.

  5. Density matrix renormalization group approach to two-fluid open many-fermion systems

    E-print Network

    J. Rotureau; N. Michel; W. Nazarewicz; M. Ploszajczak; J. Dukelsky

    2008-10-04

    We have extended the density matrix renormalization group (DMRG) approach to two-fluid open many-fermion systems governed by complex-symmetric Hamiltonians. The applications are carried out for three- and four-nucleon (proton-neutron) systems within the Gamow Shell Model (GSM) in the complex-energy plane. We study necessary and sufficient conditions for the GSM+DMRG method to yield the correct ground state eigenvalue and discuss different truncation schemes within DMRG. The proposed approach will enable configuration interaction studies of weakly-bound and unbound strongly interacting complex systems which, because of a prohibitively large size of Fock space, cannot be treated by means of the direct diagonalization.

  6. Long-term and residual melanotropin-stimulated tyrosinase activity in S91 melanoma cells is density dependent.

    PubMed

    Abdel Malek, Z A; Kreutzfeld, K L; Hadley, M E; Bregman, M D; Hruby, V J; Meyskens, F L

    1986-02-01

    Cell density is a factor that affects the capacity of Cloudman S91 melanoma cells to respond to melanotropins in monolayer culture. Continuous exposure of melanoma cells to alpha-melanotropin or its potent analog [Nle4, D-Phe7]-alpha-MSH, resulted in maximal stimulation of tyrosinase after 2 d of treatment, but the magnitude of stimulation decreased thereafter despite the continued presence of the melanotropins. However, when melanoma cells continually exposed to melanotropins were subcultured to an initial low cell density and maintained in contact with alpha-MSH or [Nle4, D-Phe7]-alpha-MSH (long-term culture), tyrosinase activity was rapidly restored and greatly enhanced. Also, when cells were seeded at initial densities ranging from 0.2 to 3.2 X 10(6) cells/flask, and exposed for 24 h to 10(-7) M alpha-MSH, only the cultures seeded at low densities (0.2 and 0.4 X 10(6) cells/flask) exhibited maximal tyrosinase activity during the 24 h exposure to the melanotropins. Therefore, tyrosinase activity was primarily affected by cell density rather than by the duration of time the cells were in culture or by continuous exposure to melanotropin. Other flasks of various cell densities were treated with 10(-7) M alpha-MSH or [Nle4, D-Phe7]-alpha-MSH for 24 h, followed by removal of the melanotropins from the culture medium. The magnitude and duration of the residual stimulation of melanoma tyrosinase activity by melanotropins were also found to be dependent on the initial cell density. These results reveal that there is a limited range of optimal cell densities at which melanoma cells can respond to melanotropins and express increased tyrosinase activity. PMID:3081484

  7. Temperature Dependence of Density, Viscosity and Electrical Conductivity for Hg-Based II-VI Semiconductor Melts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Li, C.; Ban, H.; Lin, B.; Scripa, R. N.; Su, C.-H.; Lehoczky, S. L.

    2004-01-01

    The relaxation phenomenon of semiconductor melts, or the change of melt structure with time, impacts the crystal growth process and the eventual quality of the crystal. The thermophysical properties of the melt are good indicators of such changes in melt structure. Also, thermophysical properties are essential to the accurate predication of the crystal growth process by computational modeling. Currently, the temperature dependent thermophysical property data for the Hg-based II-VI semiconductor melts are scarce. This paper reports the results on the temperature dependence of melt density, viscosity and electrical conductivity of Hg-based II-VI compounds. The melt density was measured using a pycnometric method, and the viscosity and electrical conductivity were measured by a transient torque method. Results were compared with available published data and showed good agreement. The implication of the structural changes at different temperature ranges was also studied and discussed.

  8. Improved quark mass density- dependent model with quark-sigma meson and quark-omega meson couplings

    E-print Network

    Chen Wu; Wei-Liang Qian; Ru-Keng Su

    2007-06-10

    An improved quark mass density- dependent model with the non-linear scalar sigma field and the $\\omega$-meson field is presented. We show that the present model can describe saturation properties, the equation of state, the compressibility and the effective nuclear mass of nuclear matter under mean field approximation successfully. The comparison of the present model and the quark-meson coupling model is addressed.

  9. Analytical Blowup Solutions to the 3-dimensional Pressureless Navier-Stokes-Poisson Equations with Density-dependent Viscosity

    E-print Network

    Manwai Yuen

    2008-11-03

    We study the pressureless Navier--Stokes-Poisson equations of describing the evolution of the gaseous star in astrophysics. The isothermal blowup solutions of Yuen, to the Euler-Poisson equations in R2, can be extended to the pressureless Navier-Stokes-Poisson equations with density-dependent viscosity in R3. Besides some remarks, about the meaning of the blowup solutions and the applicability of such solutions to the the drift-diffusion model in semiconductors, are discussed in the end.

  10. Time Dependent Density Functional Theory Calculations of Large Compact PAH Cations: Implications for the Diffuse Interstellar Bands

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weisman, Jennifer L.; Lee, Timothy J.; Salama, Farid; Gordon-Head, Martin; Kwak, Dochan (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    We investigate the electronic absorption spectra of several maximally pericondensed polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon radical cations with time dependent density functional theory calculations. We find interesting trends in the vertical excitation energies and oscillator strengths for this series containing pyrene through circumcoronene, the largest species containing more than 50 carbon atoms. We discuss the implications of these new results for the size and structure distribution of the diffuse interstellar band carriers.

  11. The Potential Energy Density in Transverse String Waves Depends Critically on Longitudinal Motion

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rowland, David R.

    2011-01-01

    The question of the correct formula for the potential energy density in transverse waves on a taut string continues to attract attention (e.g. Burko 2010 "Eur. J. Phys." 31 L71), and at least three different formulae can be found in the literature, with the classic text by Morse and Feshbach ("Methods of Theoretical Physics" pp 126-127) stating…

  12. Frequency, temperature, density and moisture dependence of dielectric properties of unshelled and shelled peanuts

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Dielectric properties of unshelled and shelled peanuts were measured with a free-space-transmission technique between 2 and 18 GHz over wide ranges of bulk density, moisture content, and temperature. For better accuracy a pair of horn/lens antennas providing a focused beam was used; the sample was p...

  13. Efficient computation of the coupling matrix in Time-Dependent Density Functional Theory

    E-print Network

    Lorin, Emmanuel

    forming chemical bonds, are treated explicitly. The effect of core electrons is accounted for by replacing, chemical, and electronic properties of many classes of solids, liquids, molecules, and more. In density of Chemical Engineering and Materials Science, Institute for the Theory of Advanced Materials in Information

  14. Boca-dependent maturation of b-propeller/EGF modules in low-density lipoprotein receptor

    E-print Network

    Springer, Timothy A.

    of the low-density lipoprotein receptor (LDLR) family require the chaperone called Boca in Drosophila or its, but is not required for other LDLR domains. Protein interaction data suggest that as LDLRs are translated into the ER-propeller/EGF modules are found not only throughout the LDLR family but also in the precursor to the mammalian EGF

  15. Online Supplementary Information Seasonality selects for more acutely virulent parasites when virulence is density dependent.

    E-print Network

    White, Andrew

    equation (A.1) with respect to the strength of DDV , c, combining with equilibrium total host density from Parasite virulence in the non-seasonal DDV model cannot branch For the trait to branch the singularity must. Appendix C Branching in a related DDV model We consider a related DDV model with an alternative

  16. Age- and density-dependent prophylaxis in the migratory Mormon cricket Anabrus simplex (Orthoptera: Tettigoniidae)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    As a result of the increased potential for disease transmission, insects are predicted to show an increased constitutive immunity when crowded. Nymphal Mormon crickets were collected in Montana and reared in the laboratory either solitarily or at densities similar to that experienced by Mormon cric...

  17. Average electric wave spectra in the plasma sheet: Dependence on ion density and ion beta

    SciTech Connect

    Baumjohann, W.; Treumann, R.A. ); LaBelle, J. )

    1990-04-01

    Using 4 months of tail data obtained by the ELF/MF spectrum analyzer and the plasma instrument on board the AMPTE/IRM satellite, more than 50,000 ten-second-averaged electric wave spectra were analyzed in order to establish typical spectra for periods of high and low ion density and high and low ion {beta}. The general spectral slope of the spectra in the plasma sheet follows an f{sup {minus}2} law. Ion {beta} has a stronger influence on the spectral form than the ion density. Highest average spectral densities are obtained in the low-{beta} plasma sheet boundary layer, where the spectrum is that of broadband electrostatic noise extending to frequencies near and above the upper hybrid frequency. Lowest wave intensities are encountered in the high-{beta} inner central plasma sheet. The outer central plasma sheet has generally low wave intensities and is dominated by electron cyclotron odd half-harmonics and electron regions of the plasma sheet while higher odd half-harmonics dominate the low-{beta} and low-density inner central plasma sheet.

  18. A KINETIC MODEL FOR CELL DENSITY DEPENDENT BACTERIAL TRANSPORT IN POROUS MEDIA

    EPA Science Inventory

    A kinetic transport model with the ability to account for variations in cell density of the aqueous and solid phases was developed for bacteria in porous media. Sorption kinetics in the advective-dispersive-sorptive equation was described by assuming that adsorption was proportio...

  19. Stability of magnetized strange quark matter in the MIT bag model with a density dependent bag pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Isayev, A. A.

    2015-01-01

    The stability of magnetized strange quark matter (MSQM) is studied in the MIT bag model with the density dependent bag pressure. In the consistent thermodynamic description of MSQM, the quark chemical potentials, the total thermodynamic potential, and the anisotropic pressure acquire the corresponding additional term proportional to the density derivative of the bag pressure. The model parameter space is determined for which MSQM is absolutely stable, i.e., its energy per baryon is less than that of the most stable 56Fe nucleus under zero external pressure and vanishing temperature. It is shown that there exists a magnetic field strength Hu max at which the upper bound B?u on the asymptotic bag pressure B??B (?B??0) (?0 being the nuclear saturation density) from the absolute stability window vanishes. The value of this field, Hu max˜(1 -3 ) ×1018 G, represents the upper bound on the magnetic field strength, which can be reached in a strongly magnetized strange quark star. It is clarified how the absolute stability window and upper bound on the magnetic field strength are affected by varying the parameters in the Gaussian parametrization for the density dependence of the bag pressure.

  20. Fundamental population-productivity relationships can be modified through density-dependent feedbacks of life-history evolution.

    PubMed

    Kuparinen, Anna; Stenseth, Nils Christian; Hutchings, Jeffrey A

    2014-12-01

    The evolution of life histories over contemporary time scales will almost certainly affect population demography. One important pathway for such eco-evolutionary interactions is the density-dependent regulation of population dynamics. Here, we investigate how fisheries-induced evolution (FIE) might alter density-dependent population-productivity relationships. To this end, we simulate the eco-evolutionary dynamics of an Atlantic cod (Gadus morhua) population under fishing, followed by a period of recovery in the absence of fishing. FIE is associated with increases in juvenile production, the ratio of juveniles to mature population biomass, and the ratio of the mature population biomass relative to the total population biomass. In contrast, net reproductive rate (R 0 ) and per capita population growth rate (r) decline concomitantly with evolution. Our findings suggest that FIE can substantially modify the fundamental population-productivity relationships that underlie density-dependent population regulation and that form the primary population-dynamical basis for fisheries stock-assessment projections. From a conservation and fisheries-rebuilding perspective, we find that FIE reduces R 0 and r, the two fundamental correlates of population recovery ability and inversely extinction probability. PMID:25558282