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Sample records for density matrix elements

  1. Search for Off-Diagonal Density Matrix Elements for Atoms in a Supersonic Beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rubenstein, Richard A.; Dhirani, Al-Amin; Kokorowski, David A.; Roberts, Tony D.; Smith, Edward T.; Smith, Winthrop W.; Bernstein, Herbert J.; Lehner, Jana; Gupta, Subhadeep; Pritchard, David E.

    1999-03-01

    We demonstrate the absence of off-diagonal elements for the density matrix of a supersonic Na atomic beam, thus showing that there are no coherent wave packets emerging from this source. We used a differentially detuned separated oscillatory field longitudinal interferometer to search for off-diagonal density matrix elements in the longitudinal energy/momentum basis. Our study places a stringent lower bound on their possible size over an off-diagonal energy range from 0 to 100 kHz.

  2. Differential cross sections and spin density matrix elements for the reaction gamma p -> p omega

    SciTech Connect

    M. Williams, D. Applegate, M. Bellis, C.A. Meyer

    2009-12-01

    High-statistics differential cross sections and spin density matrix elements for the reaction gamma p -> p omega have been measured using the CLAS at Jefferson Lab for center-of-mass (CM) energies from threshold up to 2.84 GeV. Results are reported in 112 10-MeV wide CM energy bins, each subdivided into cos(theta_CM) bins of width 0.1. These are the most precise and extensive omega photoproduction measurements to date. A number of prominent structures are clearly present in the data. Many of these have not previously been observed due to limited statistics in earlier measurements.

  3. Spin Density Matrix Elements from {rho}{sup 0} and {phi} Meson Electroproduction at HERMES

    SciTech Connect

    Borissov, A.

    2009-03-23

    Exclusive production of {rho}{sup 0} and {phi} mesons on hydrogen and deuterium targets is studied in the HERMES kinematic region 1density matrix elements are presented. Violation of s-Channel Helicity Conservation is observed through several non-zero values of SDMEs for {rho}{sup 0}, but not for {phi}. In exclusive {rho}{sup 0} production on the proton an indication is observed of a contribution of unnatural-parity exchange amplitudes, for which the dependence on Q{sup 2} and t' is shown.

  4. Spin Density Matrix Elements in exclusive production of ω mesons at Hermes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marianski, B.; Terkulov, A.

    2014-03-01

    Spin density matrix elements have been determined for exclusive ω meson production on hydrogen and deuterium targets, in the kinematic region of 1.0 < Q2 < 10.0 GeV2, 3.0 < W < 6.3 GeV and -t' < 0.2 GeV2. The data, from which SDMEs are determined, were accumulated with the HERMES forward spectrometer during the running period of 1996 to 2007 using the 27.6 GeV electron or positron beam of HERA. A sizable contribution of unnatural parity exchange amplitudes is found for exclusive ω meson production.

  5. Differential cross sections and spin density matrix elements for the reaction γp→pω

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, M.; Applegate, D.; Bellis, M.; Meyer, C. A.; Adhikari, K. P.; Anghinolfi, M.; Baghdasaryan, H.; Ball, J.; Battaglieri, M.; Bedlinskiy, I.; Berman, B. L.; Biselli, A. S.; Bookwalter, C.; Briscoe, W. J.; Brooks, W. K.; Burkert, V. D.; Careccia, S. L.; Carman, D. S.; Cole, P. L.; Collins, P.; Crede, V.; D'Angelo, A.; Daniel, A.; Vita, R. De; Sanctis, E. De; Deur, A.; Dey, B.; Dhamija, S.; Dickson, R.; Djalali, C.; Dodge, G. E.; Doughty, D.; Dugger, M.; Dupre, R.; Alaoui, A. El; Elouadrhiri, L.; Eugenio, P.; Fedotov, G.; Fegan, S.; Fradi, A.; Gabrielyan, M. Y.; Garçon, M.; Gevorgyan, N.; Gilfoyle, G. P.; Giovanetti, K. L.; Girod, F. X.; Gohn, W.; Golovatch, E.; Gothe, R. W.; Griffioen, K. A.; Guidal, M.; Guo, L.; Hafidi, K.; Hakobyan, H.; Hanretty, C.; Hassall, N.; Hicks, K.; Holtrop, M.; Ilieva, Y.; Ireland, D. G.; Ishkhanov, B. S.; Isupov, E. L.; Jawalkar, S. S.; Jo, H. S.; Johnstone, J. R.; Joo, K.; Keller, D.; Khandaker, M.; Khetarpal, P.; Kim, W.; Klein, A.; Klein, F. J.; Krahn, Z.; Kubarovsky, V.; Kuleshov, S. V.; Kuznetsov, V.; Livingston, K.; Lu, H. Y.; Mayer, M.; McAndrew, J.; McCracken, M. E.; McKinnon, B.; Mikhailov, K.; Mirazita, M.; Mokeev, V.; Moreno, B.; Moriya, K.; Morrison, B.; Moutarde, H.; Munevar, E.; Nadel-Turonski, P.; Nepali, C. S.; Niccolai, S.; Niculescu, G.; Niculescu, I.; Niroula, M. R.; Niyazov, R. A.; Osipenko, M.; Ostrovidov, A. I.; Paris, M.; Park, K.; Park, S.; Pasyuk, E.; Pereira, S. Anefalos; Perrin, Y.; Pisano, S.; Pogorelko, O.; Pozdniakov, S.; Price, J. W.; Procureur, S.; Protopopescu, D.; Raue, B. A.; Ricco, G.; Ripani, M.; Ritchie, B. G.; Rosner, G.; Rossi, P.; Sabatié, F.; Saini, M. S.; Salamanca, J.; Salgado, C.; Schott, D.; Schumacher, R. A.; Seraydaryan, H.; Sharabian, Y. G.; Smith, E. S.; Sober, D. I.; Sokhan, D.; Stepanyan, S. S.; Stoler, P.; Strakovsky, I. I.; Strauch, S.; Taiuti, M.; Tedeschi, D. J.; Tkachenko, S.; Ungaro, M.; Vineyard, M. F.; Voutier, E.; Watts, D. P.; Weinstein, L. B.; Weygand, D. P.; Wood, M. H.; Zhang, J.; Zhao, B.

    2009-12-01

    High-statistics differential cross sections and spin-density matrix elements for the reaction γp→pω have been measured using the CEBAF large acceptance spectrometer (CLAS) at Jefferson Lab for center-of-mass (c.m.) energies from threshold up to 2.84 GeV. Results are reported in 11210-MeV wide c.m. energy bins, each subdivided into cosθc.m.ω bins of width 0.1. These are the most precise and extensive ω photoproduction measurements to date. A number of prominent structures are clearly present in the data. Many of these have not previously been observed due to limited statistics in earlier measurements.

  6. Spin Density Matrix Elements in Exclusive Production of Omega Mesons at HERMES

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marukyan, Hrachya

    2016-02-01

    Exclusive electroproduction of ω mesons on unpolarized hydrogen and deuterium targets is studied at HERMES in the kinematic region of Q2 > 1.0GeV2, 3.0GeV < W < 6.3GeV, and ‑ t‧ < 0.2GeV2. The data were accumulated during the 1996-2007 running period using the 27.6GeV longitudinally polarized electron or positron beams at HERA. The determination of the virtual-photon longitudinal-to-transverse cross-section ratio shows that a considerable part of the cross section arises from transversely polarized photons. Spin density matrix elements are derived and presented in projections of Q2 or ‑ t‧. Violation of s-channel helicity conservation is observed for some of these elements. A sizable contribution from unnatural-parity-exchange amplitudes is found and the phase shift between those amplitudes that describe transverse ω production by longitudinal and transverse virtual photons is determined for the first time. Good agreement is found between the HERMES proton data and results of a pQCD-inspired phenomenological model that includes pion-pole contributions.

  7. Spin density matrix elements for radiative decays of the omega meson in photoproduction at 5 GeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mokaya, Fridah

    2016-03-01

    The photoproduction of ω(782) meson on the nucleon at high energies is well described by a sum of t-channel exchanges. In the high energy limit of diffractive scattering, where Pomeron exchange dominates the total cross section, the helicity of the incident photon is transferred directly to the vector meson. At intermediate energies, other Regge exchanges compete with the Pomeron, leading to a complex energy dependence in the spin density matrix for vector mesons like the omega. High statistics measurements of the spin density matrix elements for the reaction γp ωp, ω π0 γ are presented based on data taken with the Radphi experiment at Jefferson Lab in the energy range 4.4 - 5.5 GeV. The results binned in Eγ and |t | are analysed in both the Gottfried Jackson and s-channel helicity frames and compared to a model with the Pomeron and other Regge exchanges contributing to the omega meson photoproduction amplitude.

  8. Differential cross sections and spin density matrix elements for the reaction {gamma}p{yields}p{omega}

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, M.; Applegate, D.; Bellis, M.; Meyer, C. A.; Dey, B.; Dickson, R.; Krahn, Z.; McCracken, M. E.; Moriya, K.; Schumacher, R. A.; Adhikari, K. P.; Careccia, S. L.; Dodge, G. E.; Klein, A.; Mayer, M.; Nepali, C. S.; Niroula, M. R.; Seraydaryan, H.; Tkachenko, S.; Weinstein, L. B.

    2009-12-15

    High-statistics differential cross sections and spin-density matrix elements for the reaction {gamma}p{yields}p{omega} have been measured using the CEBAF large acceptance spectrometer (CLAS) at Jefferson Lab for center-of-mass (c.m.) energies from threshold up to 2.84 GeV. Results are reported in 112 10-MeV wide c.m. energy bins, each subdivided into cos{theta}{sub c.m.}{sup {omega}} bins of width 0.1. These are the most precise and extensive {omega} photoproduction measurements to date. A number of prominent structures are clearly present in the data. Many of these have not previously been observed due to limited statistics in earlier measurements.

  9. First measurements of the {rho}{sup 3} spin density matrix elements in {gamma}p --> p {omega} using CLAS at JLAB

    SciTech Connect

    Vernarsky, Brian J.

    2014-01-01

    In an effort towards a ''complete'' experiment for the ω meson, we present studies from an experiment with an unpolarized target and a circularly polarized photon beam (g1c), carried out using the CEBAF Large Acceptance Spectrometer (CLAS) at Jefferson Lab. The experiment was analyzed using an extended maximum likelihood fit with partial wave amplitudes. New likelihood functions were calculated to account for the polarization of the photon beam. Both circular and linear polarizations are explored. The results of these fits are then used to project out the spin density matrix for the {omega}. First measurements of the {rho}{sup 3} spin density matrix elements will be presented using this method.

  10. Tests on the extracted current density of negative hydrogen ions from a single element of the matrix source

    SciTech Connect

    Lishev, St.; Yordanov, D. Shivarova, A.

    2015-04-08

    Concepts for the extraction of volume-produced negative hydrogen ions from a rf matrix source (a matrix of small-radius discharges with a planar-coil inductive driving) are presented and discussed based on experimental results for the current densities of the extracted ions and the co-extracted electrons. The experiment has been carried out in a single discharge of the source: a rf discharge with a radius of 2.25 cm inductively driven by a 3.5-turn planar coil. The length of the discharge tube, the area of the reference electrode inserted in the discharge volume, the discharge modes, the magnetic filter and its position along the discharge length, the position of the permanent magnets for the separation of the co-extracted electrons from the extracted ions in the extraction device and the bias applied to its first electrode are considered as factors influencing the extracted currents of negative ions.

  11. Canonical density matrix perturbation theory.

    PubMed

    Niklasson, Anders M N; Cawkwell, M J; Rubensson, Emanuel H; Rudberg, Elias

    2015-12-01

    Density matrix perturbation theory [Niklasson and Challacombe, Phys. Rev. Lett. 92, 193001 (2004)] is generalized to canonical (NVT) free-energy ensembles in tight-binding, Hartree-Fock, or Kohn-Sham density-functional theory. The canonical density matrix perturbation theory can be used to calculate temperature-dependent response properties from the coupled perturbed self-consistent field equations as in density-functional perturbation theory. The method is well suited to take advantage of sparse matrix algebra to achieve linear scaling complexity in the computational cost as a function of system size for sufficiently large nonmetallic materials and metals at high temperatures. PMID:26764847

  12. Nonorthogonal orbital based N-body reduced density matrices and their applications to valence bond theory. I. Hamiltonian matrix elements between internally contracted excited valence bond wave functions.

    PubMed

    Chen, Zhenhua; Chen, Xun; Wu, Wei

    2013-04-28

    In this series, the n-body reduced density matrix (n-RDM) approach for nonorthogonal orbitals and their applications to ab initio valence bond (VB) methods are presented. As the first paper of this series, Hamiltonian matrix elements between internally contracted VB wave functions are explicitly provided by means of nonorthogonal orbital based RDM approach. To this end, a more generalized Wick's theorem, called enhanced Wick's theorem, is presented both in arithmetical and in graphical forms, by which the deduction of expressions for the matrix elements between internally contracted VB wave functions is dramatically simplified, and the matrix elements are finally expressed in terms of tensor contractions of electronic integrals and n-RDMs of the reference VB self-consistent field wave function. A string-based algorithm is developed for the purpose of evaluating n-RDMs in an efficient way. Using the techniques presented in this paper, one is able to develop new methods and efficient algorithms for nonorthogonal orbital based many-electron theory much easier than by use of the first quantized formulism. PMID:23635123

  13. Nonorthogonal orbital based N-body reduced density matrices and their applications to valence bond theory. I. Hamiltonian matrix elements between internally contracted excited valence bond wave functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Zhenhua; Chen, Xun; Wu, Wei

    2013-04-01

    In this series, the n-body reduced density matrix (n-RDM) approach for nonorthogonal orbitals and their applications to ab initio valence bond (VB) methods are presented. As the first paper of this series, Hamiltonian matrix elements between internally contracted VB wave functions are explicitly provided by means of nonorthogonal orbital based RDM approach. To this end, a more generalized Wick's theorem, called enhanced Wick's theorem, is presented both in arithmetical and in graphical forms, by which the deduction of expressions for the matrix elements between internally contracted VB wave functions is dramatically simplified, and the matrix elements are finally expressed in terms of tensor contractions of electronic integrals and n-RDMs of the reference VB self-consistent field wave function. A string-based algorithm is developed for the purpose of evaluating n-RDMs in an efficient way. Using the techniques presented in this paper, one is able to develop new methods and efficient algorithms for nonorthogonal orbital based many-electron theory much easier than by use of the first quantized formulism.

  14. Matrix Elements for Hylleraas CI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harris, Frank E.

    The limitation to at most a single interelectron distance in individual configurations of a Hylleraas-type multiconfiguration wave function restricts significantly the types of integrals occurring in matrix elements for energy calculations, but even then if the formulation is not handled efficiently the angular parts of these integrals escalate to create expressions of great complexity. This presentation reviews ways in which the angular-momentum calculus can be employed to systematize and simplify the matrix element formulas, particularly those for the kinetic-energy matrix elements.

  15. Relativistic Dipole Matrix Element Zeros

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lajohn, L. A.; Pratt, R. H.

    2002-05-01

    There is a special class of relativistic high energy dipole matrix element zeros (RZ), whose positions with respect to photon energy ω , only depend on the bound state l quantum number according to ω^0=mc^2/(l_b+1) (independent of primary quantum number n, nuclear charge Z, central potential V and dipole retardation). These RZ only occur in (n,l_b,j_b)arrow (ɛ , l_b+1,j_b) transitions such as ns_1/2arrow ɛ p_1/2; np_3/2arrow ɛ d_3/2: nd_5/2arrow ɛ f_5/2 etc. The nonrelativistic limit of these matrix elements can be established explicitly in the Coulomb case. Within the general matrix element formalism (such as that in [1]); when |κ | is substituted for γ in analytic expressions for matrix elements, the zeros remain, but ω^0 now becomes dependent on n and Z. When the reduction to nonrelativistic form is completed by application of the low energy approximation ω mc^2 mc^2, the zeros disappear. This nonzero behavior was noted in nonrelativistic dipole Coulomb matrix elements by Fano and Cooper [2] and later proven by Oh and Pratt[3]. (J. H. Scofield, Phys. Rev. A 40), 3054 (1989 (U. Fano and J. W. Cooper, Rev. Mod. Phys. 40), 441 (1968). (D. Oh and R. H. Pratt, Phys. Rev. A 34), 2486 (1986); 37, 1524 (1988); 45, 1583 (1992).

  16. Systematic study of nuclear matrix elements in neutrinoless double-β decay with a beyond-mean-field covariant density functional theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yao, J. M.; Song, L. S.; Hagino, K.; Ring, P.; Meng, J.

    2015-02-01

    We report a systematic study of nuclear matrix elements (NMEs) in neutrinoless double-β decays with a state-of-the-art beyond-mean-field covariant density functional theory. The dynamic effects of particle-number and angular-momentum conservations as well as quadrupole shape fluctuations are taken into account with projections and generator coordinate method for both initial and final nuclei. The full relativistic transition operator is adopted to calculate the NMEs. The present systematic studies show that in most of the cases there is a much better agreement with the previous nonrelativistic calculation based on the Gogny force than in the case of the nucleus 150Nd found by Song et al. [Phys. Rev. C 90, 054309 (2014), 10.1103/PhysRevC.90.054309]. In particular, we find that the total NMEs can be well approximated by the pure axial-vector coupling term with a considerable reduction of the computational effort.

  17. Differential cross sections, charge production asymmetry, and spin-density matrix elements for D ∗±(2010) produced in 500 GeV/ cπ--nucleon interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aitala, E. M.; Amato, S.; Anjos, J. C.; Appel, J. A.; Ashery, D.; Banerjee, S.; Bediaga, I.; Blaylock, G.; Bracker, S. B.; Burchat, P. R.; Burnstein, R. A.; Carter, T.; Carvalho, H. S.; Copty, N. K.; Cremaldi, L. M.; Darling, C.; Denisenko, K.; Devmal, S.; Fernandez, A.; Fox, G. F.; Gagnon, P.; Gobel, C.; Gounder, K.; Halling, A. M.; Herrera, G.; Hurvits, G.; James, C.; Kasper, P. A.; Kwan, S.; Langs, D. C.; Leslie, J.; Lundberg, B.; Magnin, J.; Massafferri, A.; MayTal-Beck, S.; Meadows, B.; de Mello Neto, J. R. T.; Mihalcea, D.; Milburn, R. H.; de Miranda, J. M.; Napier, A.; Nguyen, A.; d'Oliveira, A. B.; O'Shaughnessy, K.; Peng, K. C.; Perera, L. P.; Purohit, M. V.; Quinn, B.; Radeztsky, S.; Rafatian, A.; Reay, N. W.; Reidy, J. J.; dos Reis, A. C.; Rubin, H. A.; Sanders, D. A.; Santha, A. K. S.; Santoro, A. F. S.; Schwartz, A. J.; Sheaff, M.; Sidwell, R. A.; Slaughter, A. J.; Sokoloff, M. D.; Solano Salinas, C. J.; Stanton, N. R.; Stefanski, R. J.; Stenson, K.; Summers, D. J.; Takach, S.; Thorne, K.; Tripathi, A. K.; Watanabe, S.; Weiss-Babai, R.; Wiener, J.; Witchey, N.; Wolin, E.; Yang, S. M.; Yi, D.; Yoshida, S.; Zaliznyak, R.; Zhang, C.; Fermilab E791 Collaboration

    2002-07-01

    We report differential cross sections for the production of D ∗±(2010) produced in 500 GeV/ cπ--nucleon interactions from experiment E791 at Fermilab, as functions of Feynman- x ( xF) and transverse momentum squared ( pT2). We also report the D ∗± charge asymmetry and spin-density matrix elements as functions of these variables. Investigation of the spin-density matrix elements shows no evidence of polarization. The average values of the spin alignment are < η>=0.01±0.02 and -0.01±0.02 for leading and non-leading particles, respectively.

  18. Data analysis techniques, differential cross sections, and spin density matrix elements for the reaction γp → Φp

    SciTech Connect

    Dey, B.; Meyer, C. A.; Bellis, M.; Williams, M.; Adhikari, K. P.; Adikaram, D.; Aghasyan, M.; Amaryan, M. J.; Anderson, M. D.; Anefalos Pereira, S.; Ball, J.; Baltzell, N. A.; Battaglieri, M.; Bedlinskiy, I.; Biselli, A. S.; Bono, J.; Boiarinov, S.; Briscoe, W. J.; Brooks, W. K.; Burkert, V. D.; Carman, D. S.; Celentano, A.; Chandavar, S.; Colaneri, L.; Cole, P. L.; Contalbrigo, M.; Cortes, O.; Crede, V.; D'Angelo, A.; Dashyan, N.; De Vita, R.; De Sanctis, E.; Deur, A.; Djalali, C.; Doughty, D.; Dugger, M.; Dupre, R.; El Alaoui, A.; El Fassi, L.; Elouadrhiri, L.; Fedotov, G.; Fegan, S.; Fleming, J. A.; Garçon, M.; Gevorgyan, N.; Ghandilyan, Y.; Gilfoyle, G. P.; Giovanetti, K. L.; Girod, F. X.; Glazier, D. I.; Goetz, J. T.; Gothe, R. W.; Griffioen, K. A.; Guidal, M.; Hafidi, K.; Hanretty, C.; Harrison, N.; Hattawy, M.; Hicks, K.; Ho, D.; Holtrop, M.; Hyde, C. E.; Ilieva, Y.; Ireland, D. G.; Ishkhanov, B. S.; Jenkins, D.; Jo, H. S.; Joo, K.; Keller, D.; Khandaker, M.; Kim, A.; Kim, W.; Klein, A.; Klein, F. J.; Koirala, S.; Kubarovsky, V.; Kuhn, S. E.; Kuleshov, S. V.; Lenisa, P.; Livingston, K.; Lu, H.; MacGregor, I. J.D.; Markov, N.; Mayer, M.; McCracken, M. E.; McKinnon, B.; Mineeva, T.; Mirazita, M.; Mokeev, V.; Montgomery, R. A.; Moriya, K.; Moutarde, H.; Munevar, E.; Munoz Camacho, C.; Nadel-Turonski, P.; Niccolai, S.; Niculescu, G.; Niculescu, I.; Osipenko, M.; Pappalardo, L. L.; Paremuzyan, R.; Park, K.; Pasyuk, E.; Peng, P.; Phillips, J. J.; Pisano, S.; Pogorelko, O.; Pozdniakov, S.; Price, J. W.; Procureur, S.; Protopopescu, D.; Puckett, A. J. R.; Rimal, D.; Ripani, M.; Ritchie, B. G.; Rizzo, A.; Rossi, P.; Roy, P.; Sabatié, F.; Saini, M. S.; Schott, D.; Schumacher, R. A.; Seder, E.; Senderovich, I.; Sharabian, Y. G.; Simonyan, A.; Smith, E. S.; Sober, D. I.; Sokhan, D.; Stepanyan, S. S.; Stoler, P.; Strakovsky, I. I.; Strauch, S.; Sytnik, V.; Taiuti, M.; Tang, W.; Tkachenko, S.; Ungaro, M.; Vernarsky, B.; Vlassov, A. V.; Voskanyan, H.; Voutier, E.; Watts, D. P.; Zachariou, N.; Zana, L.; Zhang, J.; Zhao, Z. W.; Zonta, I.

    2014-05-27

    High-statistics measurements of differential cross sections and spin density matrix elements for the reaction γ p → Φp have been made using the CLAS detector at Jefferson Lab. We cover center-of-mass energies (√s) from 1.97 to 2.84 GeV, with an extensive coverage in the Φ production angle. The high statistics of the data sample made it necessary to carefully account for the interplay between the Φ natural lineshape and effects of the detector resolution, that are found to be comparable in magnitude. We study both the charged- (Φ → K⁺K⁻) and neutral- (Φ → K0SK0L) KK̄ decay modes of the Φ. Further, for the charged mode, we differentiate between the cases where the final K⁻ track is directly detected or its momentum reconstructed as the total missing momentum in the event. The two charged-mode topologies and the neutral-mode have different resolutions and are calibrated against each other. Extensive usage is made of kinematic fitting to improve the reconstructed Φ mass resolution. Our final results are reported in 10- and mostly 30-MeV-wide √s bins for the charged- and the neutral-mode, respectively. Possible effects from K⁺Λ* channels with pKK̄ final-states are discussed. These present results constitute the most precise and extensive Φ photoproduction measurements to date and in conjunction with the ω photoproduction results recently published by CLAS, will greatly improve our understanding of low energy vector meson photoproduction.

  19. Data analysis techniques, differential cross sections, and spin density matrix elements for the reaction γp → Φp

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Dey, B.; Meyer, C. A.; Bellis, M.; Williams, M.; Adhikari, K. P.; Adikaram, D.; Aghasyan, M.; Amaryan, M. J.; Anderson, M. D.; Anefalos Pereira, S.; et al

    2014-05-27

    High-statistics measurements of differential cross sections and spin density matrix elements for the reaction γ p → Φp have been made using the CLAS detector at Jefferson Lab. We cover center-of-mass energies (√s) from 1.97 to 2.84 GeV, with an extensive coverage in the Φ production angle. The high statistics of the data sample made it necessary to carefully account for the interplay between the Φ natural lineshape and effects of the detector resolution, that are found to be comparable in magnitude. We study both the charged- (Φ → K⁺K⁻) and neutral- (Φ → K0SK0L) KK̄ decay modes of themore » Φ. Further, for the charged mode, we differentiate between the cases where the final K⁻ track is directly detected or its momentum reconstructed as the total missing momentum in the event. The two charged-mode topologies and the neutral-mode have different resolutions and are calibrated against each other. Extensive usage is made of kinematic fitting to improve the reconstructed Φ mass resolution. Our final results are reported in 10- and mostly 30-MeV-wide √s bins for the charged- and the neutral-mode, respectively. Possible effects from K⁺Λ* channels with pKK̄ final-states are discussed. These present results constitute the most precise and extensive Φ photoproduction measurements to date and in conjunction with the ω photoproduction results recently published by CLAS, will greatly improve our understanding of low energy vector meson photoproduction.« less

  20. Weak matrix elements for CP violation.

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, W.; Gupta, R.; Christ, N.; Fleming, G. T.; Kilcup, G.; Liu, G.; Mawhinney, R.; Sharpe, S.; Wu, L.; Bhattacharya, T.

    2001-01-01

    We present preliminary results of matrix elements of four fermion operators relevant to the determination of e and E ' / E using staggered fermions. To calculate the matrix elements relevant to CP violation in Kaon decays it is important to use a lattice formulation which preserves (some) chiral symmetry.

  1. Adiabatic approximation for the density matrix

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Band, Yehuda B.

    1992-05-01

    An adiabatic approximation for the Liouville density-matrix equation which includes decay terms is developed. The adiabatic approximation employs the eigenvectors of the non-normal Liouville operator. The approximation is valid when there exists a complete set of eigenvectors of the non-normal Liouville operator (i.e., the eigenvectors span the density-matrix space), the time rate of change of the Liouville operator is small, and an auxiliary matrix is nonsingular. Numerical examples are presented involving efficient population transfer in a molecule by stimulated Raman scattering, with the intermediate level of the molecule decaying on a time scale that is fast compared with the pulse durations of the pump and Stokes fields. The adiabatic density-matrix approximation can be simply used to determine the density matrix for atomic or molecular systems interacting with cw electromagnetic fields when spontaneous emission or other decay mechanisms prevail.

  2. Graphical evaluation of relativistic matrix elements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huang, K. N.

    1978-01-01

    A graphical representation of angular momentum was used to evaluate relativistic matrix elements between antisymmetrized states of many particle configurations having any number of open shells. The antisymmetrized matrix element was expanded as a sum of semisymmetrized matrix elements. The diagram representing a semisymmetrized matrix element was composed of four diagram blocks; the bra block, the ket block, the spectator block, and the interaction block. The first three blocks indicate the couplings of the two interacting configurations while the last depends on the interaction and is the replaceable component. Interaction blocks for relativistic operators and commonly used potentials were summarized in ready to use forms. A simple step by step procedure was prescribed generally for calculating antisymmetrized matrix elements of one and two particle operators.

  3. Experimental determination of real elements of the density matrix and the dipole moment of H([ital n]=3) atoms produced from 20--100-keV H[sup +] on Ar

    SciTech Connect

    Renwick, S.P.; Martell, E.C.; Weaver, W.D.; Risley, J.S. )

    1993-10-01

    Diagonal and real off-diagonal coherence elements of the density matrix for H([ital n]=3) atoms produced in 20--100-keV electron-capture collisions of protons with Ar atoms are experimentally determined. Balmer-[alpha] light from the decay of H atoms from the ([ital n]=3) state to the ([ital n]=2) state is observed. The intensity and polarization of the light as a function of an axially symmetric electric field in the collision region are fitted to a numerical model of the H atom in an electric field in order to extract density-matrix elements. A new polarimeter, using a photoelastic modulator in conjunction with photon-counting techniques, is used in the experiment, and its efficacy is analyzed and compared to that of a rotating quarter-wave plate polarimeter previously used in similar experiments. The diagonal elements of the density matrix yield relative capture cross sections for the H(3[ital l]) angular-momentum substates, while the coherence terms are used to determine the dipole moment of the atoms produced. Results are compared to those for protons colliding with a He target and the differences are discussed.

  4. Measurement of the Density Matrix of a Longitudinally Modulated Atomic Beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rubenstein, Richard A.; Kokorowski, David A.; Dhirani, Al-Amin; Roberts, Tony D.; Gupta, Subhadeep; Lehner, Jana; Smith, Winthrop W.; Smith, Edward T.; Bernstein, Herbert J.; Pritchard, David E.

    1999-09-01

    We present the first measurement of the longitudinal density matrix of a matter-wave beam. Using a unique interferometric scheme, both the amplitude and phase of off-diagonal density matrix elements were determined directly, without the use of traditional tomographic techniques. The measured density matrix of a doubly amplitude modulated atomic sodium beam compares well with theoretical predictions.

  5. Interaction picture density matrix quantum Monte Carlo

    SciTech Connect

    Malone, Fionn D. Lee, D. K. K.; Foulkes, W. M. C.; Blunt, N. S.; Shepherd, James J.; Spencer, J. S.

    2015-07-28

    The recently developed density matrix quantum Monte Carlo (DMQMC) algorithm stochastically samples the N-body thermal density matrix and hence provides access to exact properties of many-particle quantum systems at arbitrary temperatures. We demonstrate that moving to the interaction picture provides substantial benefits when applying DMQMC to interacting fermions. In this first study, we focus on a system of much recent interest: the uniform electron gas in the warm dense regime. The basis set incompleteness error at finite temperature is investigated and extrapolated via a simple Monte Carlo sampling procedure. Finally, we provide benchmark calculations for a four-electron system, comparing our results to previous work where possible.

  6. Rolling Element Bearing Stiffness Matrix Determination (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect

    Guo, Y.; Parker, R.

    2014-01-01

    Current theoretical bearing models differ in their stiffness estimates because of different model assumptions. In this study, a finite element/contact mechanics model is developed for rolling element bearings with the focus of obtaining accurate bearing stiffness for a wide range of bearing types and parameters. A combined surface integral and finite element method is used to solve for the contact mechanics between the rolling elements and races. This model captures the time-dependent characteristics of the bearing contact due to the orbital motion of the rolling elements. A numerical method is developed to determine the full bearing stiffness matrix corresponding to two radial, one axial, and two angular coordinates; the rotation about the shaft axis is free by design. This proposed stiffness determination method is validated against experiments in the literature and compared to existing analytical models and widely used advanced computational methods. The fully-populated stiffness matrix demonstrates the coupling between bearing radial, axial, and tilting bearing deflections.

  7. On solving for the density matrix

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cummings, F. W.

    1985-11-01

    A “generating matrix” formalism is presented which is useful in the solution of a class of time-dependent quantum density matrix problems. Three examples of its use are sketched, giving a unified approach to the solution of the problem of the spontaneous emission of electromagnetic radiation from a single atom in various environments.

  8. Nonorthogonal orbital based N-body reduced density matrices and their applications to valence bond theory. II. An efficient algorithm for matrix elements and analytical energy gradients in VBSCF method.

    PubMed

    Chen, Zhenhua; Chen, Xun; Wu, Wei

    2013-04-28

    In this paper, by applying the reduced density matrix (RDM) approach for nonorthogonal orbitals developed in the first paper of this series, efficient algorithms for matrix elements between VB structures and energy gradients in valence bond self-consistent field (VBSCF) method were presented. Both algorithms scale only as nm(4) for integral transformation and d(2)n(β)(2) for VB matrix elements and 3-RDM evaluation, while the computational costs of other procedures are negligible, where n, m, d, and n(β )are the numbers of variable occupied active orbitals, basis functions, determinants, and active β electrons, respectively. Using tensor properties of the energy gradients with respect to the orbital coefficients presented in the first paper of this series, a partial orthogonal auxiliary orbital set was introduced to reduce the computational cost of VBSCF calculation in which orbitals are flexibly defined. Test calculations on the Diels-Alder reaction of butadiene and ethylene have shown that the novel algorithm is very efficient for VBSCF calculations. PMID:23635124

  9. Experimental determination of the real elements of the density matrix of H({ital n}=3) atoms produced in 20--100-keV collisions of H{sup +} on Kr

    SciTech Connect

    Seifert, N.; Gibson, N.D.; Risley, J.S.

    1995-11-01

    In continuation of our previous work, charge transfer processes occurring in protons on rare-gas-atom collisions have been investigated. Diagonal and real off-diagonal coherence elements of the density matrix for H({ital n}=3) atoms produced in 20--100-keV electron-capture collisions with Kr atoms are experimentally determined by analyzing the Balmer-{alpha} light from the decay of H atoms from the ({ital n}=3) state to the ({ital n}=2) state. The intensity and polarization of the emitted light are measured as functions of an axially symmetric electric field in the collision region. These data are fitted to a numerical model of the H atom in an electric field in order to extract density-matrix elements. The results are compared to previous studies of H{sup +} on He and Ar. The collisionally produced dipole moment of the H({ital n}=3) atom decreases for increasing atomic number of the rare-gas target atoms, which indicates that the final phase of the collision process is not essential for the formation of the dipole moment. This physical picture is further supported by our alignment data. Absolute cross sections for charge transfer to the 3{ital s}, 3{ital p}, and 3{ital d} levels are presented as well.

  10. Interaction picture density matrix quantum Monte Carlo.

    PubMed

    Malone, Fionn D; Blunt, N S; Shepherd, James J; Lee, D K K; Spencer, J S; Foulkes, W M C

    2015-07-28

    The recently developed density matrix quantum Monte Carlo (DMQMC) algorithm stochastically samples the N-body thermal density matrix and hence provides access to exact properties of many-particle quantum systems at arbitrary temperatures. We demonstrate that moving to the interaction picture provides substantial benefits when applying DMQMC to interacting fermions. In this first study, we focus on a system of much recent interest: the uniform electron gas in the warm dense regime. The basis set incompleteness error at finite temperature is investigated and extrapolated via a simple Monte Carlo sampling procedure. Finally, we provide benchmark calculations for a four-electron system, comparing our results to previous work where possible. PMID:26233116

  11. Measuring Entanglement Spectrum via Density Matrix Exponentiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Guanyu; Seif, Alireza; Pichler, Hannes; Zoller, Peter; Hafezi, Mohammad

    Entanglement spectrum (ES), the eigenvalues of the reduced density matrix of a subsystem, serves as a powerful theoretical tool to study many-body systems. For example, the gap and degeneracies of the entanglement spectrum have been used to identify various topological phases. However, the usefulness of such a concept in real experiments has been debated, since it is believed that obtaining the ES requires full state tomography, at a cost which exponentially grows with the systems size. Inspired by a recent density matrix exponentiation technique, we propose a scheme to measure ES by evolving the system with a Hamiltonian that is the subsystem's own reduced density matrix. Such a time evolution can be induced by an ancilla photon that is coupled to multiple qubits at the same time. The phase associated with the time evolution can be detected and converted into ES through either a digital or an analogue scheme. The digital scheme involves a modified quantum phase estimation algorithm based on random time evolution, while the analogue scheme is in the spirit of Ramsey interferometry. Both schemes are not limited by the size of the system, and are especially sensitive to the gap and degeneracies. We also discuss the implementation in cavity/circuit-QED and ion trap systems.

  12. Fermi matrix element with isospin breaking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guichon, P. A. M.; Thomas, A. W.; Saito, K.

    2011-02-01

    Prompted by the level of accuracy now being achieved in tests of the unitarity of the CKM matrix, we consider the possible modification of the Fermi matrix element for the β-decay of a neutron, including possible in-medium and isospin violating corrections. While the nuclear modifications lead to very small corrections once the Behrends-Sirlin-Ademollo-Gatto theorem is respected, the effect of the u-d mass difference on the conclusion concerning Vud is no longer insignificant. Indeed, we suggest that the correction to the value of |+|+| is at the level of 10.

  13. NLO matrix elements and truncated showers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Höche, Stefan; Krauss, Frank; Schönherr, Marek; Siegert, Frank

    2011-08-01

    In this publication, an algorithm is presented that combines the ME+PS approach to merge sequences of tree-level matrix elements into inclusive event samples [1] with the P owheg method, which combines exact next-to-leading order matrix element results with the parton shower [2, 3]. It was developed in parallel to the ME nloPS technique discussed in [4] and has been implemented in the event generator S herpa [5, 6]. The benefits of this approach are exemplified by some first predictions for a number of processes, namely the production of jets in e + e --annihilation, in deep-inelastic ep scattering, in association with single W, Z or Higgs bosons, and with vector boson pairs at hadron colliders.

  14. Proton decay matrix elements from lattice QCD

    SciTech Connect

    Aoki, Yasumichi; Shintani, Eigo; Collaboration: RBC Collaboration; UKQCD Collaboration

    2012-07-27

    We report on the calculation of the matrix elements of nucleon to pseudoscalar decay through a three quark operator, a part of the low-energy, four-fermion, baryon-number-violating operator originating from grand unified theories. The direct calculation of the form factors using domain-wall fermions on the lattice, incorporating the u, d and s sea-quarks effects yields the results with all the relevant systematic uncertainties controlled for the first time.

  15. Transition matrices and orbitals from reduced density matrix theory

    SciTech Connect

    Etienne, Thibaud

    2015-06-28

    In this contribution, we report two different methodologies for characterizing the electronic structure reorganization occurring when a chromophore undergoes an electronic transition. For the first method, we start by setting the theoretical background necessary to the reinterpretation through simple tensor analysis of (i) the transition density matrix and (ii) the natural transition orbitals in the scope of reduced density matrix theory. This novel interpretation is made more clear thanks to a short compendium of the one-particle reduced density matrix theory in a Fock space. The formalism is further applied to two different classes of excited states calculation methods, both requiring a single-determinant reference, that express an excited state as a hole-particle mono-excited configurations expansion, to which particle-hole correlation is coupled (time-dependent Hartree-Fock/time-dependent density functional theory) or not (configuration interaction single/Tamm-Dancoff approximation). For the second methodology presented in this paper, we introduce a novel and complementary concept related to electronic transitions with the canonical transition density matrix and the canonical transition orbitals. Their expression actually reflects the electronic cloud polarisation in the orbital space with a decomposition based on the actual contribution of one-particle excitations from occupied canonical orbitals to virtual ones. This approach validates our novel interpretation of the transition density matrix elements in terms of the Euclidean norm of elementary transition vectors in a linear tensor space. A proper use of these new concepts leads to the conclusion that despite the different principles underlying their construction, they provide two equivalent excited states topological analyses. This connexion is evidenced through simple illustrations of (in)organic dyes electronic transitions analysis.

  16. Measuring Sparticles with the Matrix Element

    SciTech Connect

    Alwall, Johan; Freitas, Ayres; Mattelaer, Olivier; /INFN, Rome3 /Rome III U. /Louvain U.

    2012-04-10

    We apply the Matrix Element Method (MEM) to mass determination of squark pair production with direct decay to quarks and LSP at the LHC, showing that simultaneous mass determination of squarks and LSP is possible. We furthermore propose methods for inclusion of QCD radiation effects in the MEM. The goal of the LHC at CERN, scheduled to start this year, is to discover new physics through deviations from the Standard Model (SM) predictions. After discovery of deviations from the SM, the next step will be classification of the new physics. An important first goal in this process will be establishing a mass spectrum of the new particles. One of the most challenging scenarios is pair-production of new particles which decay to invisible massive particles, giving missing energy signals. Many methods have been proposed for mass determination in such scenarios (for a recent list of references, see e.g. [1]). In this proceeding, we report the first steps in applying the Matrix Element Method (MEM) in the context of supersymmetric scenarios giving missing energy signals. After a quick review of the MEM, we will focus on squark pair production, a process where other mass determination techniques have difficulties to simultaneously determine the LSP and squark masses. Finally, we will introduce methods to extend the range of validity of the MEM, by taking into account initial state radiation (ISR) in the method.

  17. Effective potential in density matrix functional theory.

    PubMed

    Nagy, A; Amovilli, C

    2004-10-01

    In the previous paper it was shown that in the ground state the diagonal of the spin independent second-order density matrix n can be determined by solving a single auxiliary equation of a two-particle problem. Thus the problem of an arbitrary system with even electrons can be reduced to a two-particle problem. The effective potential of the two-particle equation contains a term v(p) of completely kinetic origin. Virial theorem and hierarchy of equations are derived for v(p) and simple approximations are proposed. A relationship between the effective potential u(p) of the shape function equation and the potential v(p) is established. PMID:15473719

  18. Polarizable Embedding Density Matrix Renormalization Group.

    PubMed

    Hedegård, Erik D; Reiher, Markus

    2016-09-13

    The polarizable embedding (PE) approach is a flexible embedding model where a preselected region out of a larger system is described quantum mechanically, while the interaction with the surrounding environment is modeled through an effective operator. This effective operator represents the environment by atom-centered multipoles and polarizabilities derived from quantum mechanical calculations on (fragments of) the environment. Thereby, the polarization of the environment is explicitly accounted for. Here, we present the coupling of the PE approach with the density matrix renormalization group (DMRG). This PE-DMRG method is particularly suitable for embedded subsystems that feature a dense manifold of frontier orbitals which requires large active spaces. Recovering such static electron-correlation effects in multiconfigurational electronic structure problems, while accounting for both electrostatics and polarization of a surrounding environment, allows us to describe strongly correlated electronic structures in complex molecular environments. We investigate various embedding potentials for the well-studied first excited state of water with active spaces that correspond to a full configuration-interaction treatment. Moreover, we study the environment effect on the first excited state of a retinylidene Schiff base within a channelrhodopsin protein. For this system, we also investigate the effect of dynamical correlation included through short-range density functional theory. PMID:27537835

  19. Diagonal multisoliton matrix elements in finite volume

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pálmai, T.; Takács, G.

    2013-02-01

    We consider diagonal matrix elements of local operators between multisoliton states in finite volume in the sine-Gordon model and formulate a conjecture regarding their finite size dependence which is valid up to corrections exponential in the volume. This conjecture extends the results of Pozsgay and Takács which were only valid for diagonal scattering. In order to test the conjecture, we implement a numerical renormalization group improved truncated conformal space approach. The numerical comparisons confirm the conjecture, which is expected to be valid for general integrable field theories. The conjectured formula can be used to evaluate finite temperature one-point and two-point functions using recently developed methods.

  20. Matrix product operators, matrix product states, and ab initio density matrix renormalization group algorithms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chan, Garnet Kin-Lic; Keselman, Anna; Nakatani, Naoki; Li, Zhendong; White, Steven R.

    2016-07-01

    Current descriptions of the ab initio density matrix renormalization group (DMRG) algorithm use two superficially different languages: an older language of the renormalization group and renormalized operators, and a more recent language of matrix product states and matrix product operators. The same algorithm can appear dramatically different when written in the two different vocabularies. In this work, we carefully describe the translation between the two languages in several contexts. First, we describe how to efficiently implement the ab initio DMRG sweep using a matrix product operator based code, and the equivalence to the original renormalized operator implementation. Next we describe how to implement the general matrix product operator/matrix product state algebra within a pure renormalized operator-based DMRG code. Finally, we discuss two improvements of the ab initio DMRG sweep algorithm motivated by matrix product operator language: Hamiltonian compression, and a sum over operators representation that allows for perfect computational parallelism. The connections and correspondences described here serve to link the future developments with the past and are important in the efficient implementation of continuing advances in ab initio DMRG and related algorithms.

  1. Matrix product operators, matrix product states, and ab initio density matrix renormalization group algorithms.

    PubMed

    Chan, Garnet Kin-Lic; Keselman, Anna; Nakatani, Naoki; Li, Zhendong; White, Steven R

    2016-07-01

    Current descriptions of the ab initio density matrix renormalization group (DMRG) algorithm use two superficially different languages: an older language of the renormalization group and renormalized operators, and a more recent language of matrix product states and matrix product operators. The same algorithm can appear dramatically different when written in the two different vocabularies. In this work, we carefully describe the translation between the two languages in several contexts. First, we describe how to efficiently implement the ab initio DMRG sweep using a matrix product operator based code, and the equivalence to the original renormalized operator implementation. Next we describe how to implement the general matrix product operator/matrix product state algebra within a pure renormalized operator-based DMRG code. Finally, we discuss two improvements of the ab initio DMRG sweep algorithm motivated by matrix product operator language: Hamiltonian compression, and a sum over operators representation that allows for perfect computational parallelism. The connections and correspondences described here serve to link the future developments with the past and are important in the efficient implementation of continuing advances in ab initio DMRG and related algorithms. PMID:27394094

  2. The origin of linear scaling Fock matrix calculation with density prescreening

    SciTech Connect

    Mitin, Alexander V.

    2015-12-31

    A theorem was proven, which reads that the number of nonzero two-electron integrals scales linearly with respect to the number of basis functions for large molecular systems. This permits to show that linear scaling property of the Fock matrix calculation with using density prescreening arises due to linear scaling properties of the number of nonzero two-electron integrals and the number of leading matrix elements of density matrix. This property is reinforced by employing the density prescreening technique. The use of the density difference prescreening further improves the linear scaling property of the Fock matrix calculation method. As a result, the linear scaling regime of the Fock matrix calculation can begin from the number of basis functions of 2000–3000 in dependence on the basis function type in molecular calculations. It was also shown that the conventional algorithm of Fock matrix calculation from stored nonzero two-electron integrals with density prescreening possesses linear scaling property.

  3. Analytical finite element matrix elements and global matrix assembly for hierarchical 3-D vector basis functions within the hybrid finite element boundary integral method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, L.; Wang, K.; Li, H.; Eibert, T. F.

    2014-11-01

    A hybrid higher-order finite element boundary integral (FE-BI) technique is discussed where the higher-order FE matrix elements are computed by a fully analytical procedure and where the gobal matrix assembly is organized by a self-identifying procedure of the local to global transformation. This assembly procedure applys to both, the FE part as well as the BI part of the algorithm. The geometry is meshed into three-dimensional tetrahedra as finite elements and nearly orthogonal hierarchical basis functions are employed. The boundary conditions are implemented in a strong sense such that the boundary values of the volume basis functions are directly utilized within the BI, either for the tangential electric and magnetic fields or for the asssociated equivalent surface current densities by applying a cross product with the unit surface normals. The self-identified method for the global matrix assembly automatically discerns the global order of the basis functions for generating the matrix elements. Higher order basis functions do need more unknowns for each single FE, however, fewer FEs are needed to achieve the same satisfiable accuracy. This improvement provides a lot more flexibility for meshing and allows the mesh size to raise up to λ/3. The performance of the implemented system is evaluated in terms of computation time, accuracy and memory occupation, where excellent results with respect to precision and computation times of large scale simulations are found.

  4. Importance of Matrix Elements in the ARPES Spectra of BISCO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bansil, A.; Lindroos, M.

    2000-03-01

    We have carried out extensive first-principles angle-resolved photointensity (ARPES) simulations in Bi2212 wherein the photoemission process is modelled realistically by taking into account the full crystal wavefunctions of the initial and final states in the presence of the surface.(A. Bansil and M. Lindroos, Phys. Rev. Letters (Dec 13, 1999)) The spectral weight of the ARPES feature associated with the CuO2 plane bands is found to undergo large and systematic variations with k_allel as well as the energy and polarization of the incident photons. These theoretical predictions are in good accord with the corresponding measurements, indicating that the remarkable observed changes in the spectral weights in Bi2212 are essentially a matrix element effect and that the importance of matrix elements should be kept in mind in analyzing the ARPES spectra in the high-Tc's. Another notable implication of this work is that the integral (over energy) of the ARPES intensity does not yield the momentum density of the electron gas. We will also discuss some of our simulations aimed at gaining insight into the connectivity of the Fermi surface in Bi2212 around the M-point, the effects of modulations, and related issues. Work supported in part by the U.S.D.O.E.

  5. Precision measurement of transition matrix elements via light shift cancellation.

    PubMed

    Herold, C D; Vaidya, V D; Li, X; Rolston, S L; Porto, J V; Safronova, M S

    2012-12-14

    We present a method for accurate determination of atomic transition matrix elements at the 10(-3) level. Measurements of the ac Stark (light) shift around "magic-zero" wavelengths, where the light shift vanishes, provide precise constraints on the matrix elements. We make the first measurement of the 5s - 6p matrix elements in rubidium by measuring the light shift around the 421 and 423 nm zeros through diffraction of a condensate off a sequence of standing wave pulses. In conjunction with existing theoretical and experimental data, we find 0.3235(9)ea(0) and 0.5230(8)ea(0) for the 5s - 6p(1/2) and 5s - 6p(3/2) elements, respectively, an order of magnitude more accurate than the best theoretical values. This technique can provide needed, accurate matrix elements for many atoms, including those used in atomic clocks, tests of fundamental symmetries, and quantum information. PMID:23368314

  6. Excited State Effects in Nucleon Matrix Element Calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Constantia Alexandrou, Martha Constantinou, Simon Dinter, Vincent Drach, Karl Jansen, Theodoros Leontiou, Dru B Renner

    2011-12-01

    We perform a high-statistics precision calculation of nucleon matrix elements using an open sink method allowing us to explore a wide range of sink-source time separations. In this way the influence of excited states of nucleon matrix elements can be studied. As particular examples we present results for the nucleon axial charge g{sub A} and for the first moment of the isovector unpolarized parton distribution x{sub u-d}. In addition, we report on preliminary results using the generalized eigenvalue method for nucleon matrix elements. All calculations are performed using N{sub f} = 2+1+1 maximally twisted mass Wilson fermions.

  7. Analytical expressions for vibrational matrix elements of Morse oscillators

    SciTech Connect

    Zuniga, J.; Hidalgo, A.; Frances, J.M.; Requena, A.; Lopez Pineiro, A.; Olivares del Valle, F.J.

    1988-10-15

    Several exact recursion relations connecting different Morse oscillator matrix elements associated with the operators q/sup ..cap alpha../e/sup -//sup ..beta..//sup aq/ and q/sup ..cap alpha../e/sup -//sup ..beta..//sup aq/(d/dr) are derived. Matrix elements of the other useful operators may then be obtained easily. In particular, analytical expressions for (y/sup k/d/dr) and (y/sup k/d/dr+(d/dr)y/sup k/), matrix elements of interest in the study of the internuclear motion in polyatomic molecules, are obtained.

  8. Information Theory Density Matrix for a Simple Quantum System.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Titus, William J.

    1979-01-01

    Derives the density matrix that best describes, according to information theory, a one-dimensional single particle quantum system when the only information available is the values for the linear and quadratic position-momentum moments. (Author/GA)

  9. Density matrix embedding theory for interacting electron-phonon systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sandhoefer, Barbara; Chan, Garnet Kin-Lic

    2016-08-01

    We describe the extension of the density matrix embedding theory framework to coupled interacting fermion-boson systems. This provides a frequency-independent, entanglement embedding formalism to treat bulk fermion-boson problems. We illustrate the concepts within the context of the one-dimensional Hubbard-Holstein model, where the phonon bath states are obtained from the Schmidt decomposition of a self-consistently adjusted coherent state. We benchmark our results against accurate density matrix renormalization group calculations.

  10. Experimental determination of the density matrix describing collisionally produced H(n = 3) atoms

    SciTech Connect

    Havener, C.C.; Rouze, N.; Westerveld, W.B.; Risley, A.J.S.

    1986-01-01

    An experimental technique and analysis procedure is described for determining the axially symmetric density matrix for collisionally produced H(n = 3) atoms by measuring the Stokes parameters which characterize the emitted Balmer- radiation as a function of axial and transverse electric fields applied in the collision cell. The electric fields induce strong characteristic variations in the Stokes parameters. The 14 independent elements of the density matrix are determined by fitting the observed Stokes parameters with signals calculated from a theoretical analysis of the experiment. The physical interpretation of the density matrix is presented in terms of graphs of the electron probability distribution and the electron current distribution. Examples of the determination of the density matrix are given for 40-, 60-, and 80-keV H +He electron-transfer collisions.

  11. Communication: Generalized canonical purification for density matrix minimization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Truflandier, Lionel A.; Dianzinga, Rivo M.; Bowler, David R.

    2016-03-01

    A Lagrangian formulation for the constrained search for the N-representable one-particle density matrix based on the McWeeny idempotency error minimization is proposed, which converges systematically to the ground state. A closed form of the canonical purification is derived for which no a posteriori adjustment on the trace of the density matrix is needed. The relationship with comparable methods is discussed, showing their possible generalization through the hole-particle duality. The appealing simplicity of this self-consistent recursion relation along with its low computational complexity could prove useful as an alternative to diagonalization in solving dense and sparse matrix eigenvalue problems.

  12. Communication: Generalized canonical purification for density matrix minimization.

    PubMed

    Truflandier, Lionel A; Dianzinga, Rivo M; Bowler, David R

    2016-03-01

    A Lagrangian formulation for the constrained search for the N-representable one-particle density matrix based on the McWeeny idempotency error minimization is proposed, which converges systematically to the ground state. A closed form of the canonical purification is derived for which no a posteriori adjustment on the trace of the density matrix is needed. The relationship with comparable methods is discussed, showing their possible generalization through the hole-particle duality. The appealing simplicity of this self-consistent recursion relation along with its low computational complexity could prove useful as an alternative to diagonalization in solving dense and sparse matrix eigenvalue problems. PMID:26957150

  13. Analytic formula for quadrupole-quadrupole matrix elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosensteel, G.

    1990-12-01

    An analytic formula is reported for general matrix elements of the microscopic quadrupole-quadrupole operator in the U(3)-boson approximation. The complete infinite-dimensional basis of A-fermion wave functions is compatible with the harmonic-oscillator shell model and consists of np-nh configurations, with spurious center-of-mass excitations removed, which are symmetry adapted to the Elliott U(3) and symplectic Sp(3,R) models. The formula expresses the general Q2.Q2 matrix element with respect to this complete orthonormal basis as a Racah SU(3) U coefficient times a closed-shell matrix element. An oscillator closed-shell matrix element of Q2.Q2 is a square root of a rational function of the integer quantum numbers of the U(3) basis.

  14. [Hematopoietic microenvironment: cellular and extracellular matrix elements].

    PubMed

    Minguell, J J; Fernández, M; Tetas, M; Martínez, J; Bruzzone, M; Rodríguez, J P

    1988-06-01

    In bone marrow, cellular stroma together with extracellular matrix (EM) provide an adequate microenvironment for the proliferation and differentiation of hemopoietic progenitor cells. In this article we describe studies on the cell characteristics of a main stromal phenotype, a fibroblast-like cell and its ability to produce in vitro EM components. Comparative studies were performed in fibroblast cultures derived from normal and acute lymphoblastic leukemic (ALL) bone marrow. The grow characteristics of fibroblasts from ALL marrow as well as its capacity to synthetize collagen, fibronectin and GAGs are impaired when compared to fibroblast from normal marrow. Thus, in ALL the impaired production of EM biomolecules by a transient damaged population of stromal cells, may contribute to the development of a defective microenvironment for hemopoiesis. PMID:3154858

  15. The ab-initio density matrix renormalization group in practice

    SciTech Connect

    Olivares-Amaya, Roberto; Hu, Weifeng; Sharma, Sandeep; Yang, Jun; Chan, Garnet Kin-Lic; Nakatani, Naoki

    2015-01-21

    The ab-initio density matrix renormalization group (DMRG) is a tool that can be applied to a wide variety of interesting problems in quantum chemistry. Here, we examine the density matrix renormalization group from the vantage point of the quantum chemistry user. What kinds of problems is the DMRG well-suited to? What are the largest systems that can be treated at practical cost? What sort of accuracies can be obtained, and how do we reason about the computational difficulty in different molecules? By examining a diverse benchmark set of molecules: π-electron systems, benchmark main-group and transition metal dimers, and the Mn-oxo-salen and Fe-porphine organometallic compounds, we provide some answers to these questions, and show how the density matrix renormalization group is used in practice.

  16. Neutrinoless double-β decay and nuclear transition matrix elements

    SciTech Connect

    Rath, P. K.

    2015-10-28

    Within mechanisms involving the light Majorana neutrinos, squark-neutrino, Majorons, sterile neutrinos and heavy Majorana neutrino, nuclear transition matrix elements for the neutrinoless (β{sup −}β{sup −}){sub 0ν} decay of {sup 96}Zr, {sup 100}Mo, {sup 128,130}Te and {sup 150}Nd nuclei are calculated by employing the PHFB approach. Effects due to finite size of nucleons, higher order currents, short range correlations, and deformations of parent as well as daughter nuclei on the calculated matrix elements are estimated. Uncertainties in nuclear transition matrix elements within long-ranged mechanisms but for double Majoron accompanied (β{sup −}β{sup −}ϕϕ){sub 0ν} decay modes are 9%–15%. In the case of short ranged heavy Majorona neutrino exchange mechanism, the maximum uncertainty is about 35%. The maximum systematic error within the mechanism involving the exchange of light Majorana neutrino is about 46%.

  17. Acceleration of matrix element computations for precision measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Brandt, Oleg; Gutierrez, Gaston; Wang, M. H.L.S.; Ye, Zhenyu

    2014-11-25

    The matrix element technique provides a superior statistical sensitivity for precision measurements of important parameters at hadron colliders, such as the mass of the top quark or the cross-section for the production of Higgs bosons. The main practical limitation of the technique is its high computational demand. Using the example of the top quark mass, we present two approaches to reduce the computation time of the technique by a factor of 90. First, we utilize low-discrepancy sequences for numerical Monte Carlo integration in conjunction with a dedicated estimator of numerical uncertainty, a novelty in the context of the matrix element technique. We then utilize a new approach that factorizes the overall jet energy scale from the matrix element computation, a novelty in the context of top quark mass measurements. The utilization of low-discrepancy sequences is of particular general interest, as it is universally applicable to Monte Carlo integration, and independent of the computing environment.

  18. Neutrinoless double-β decay and nuclear transition matrix elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rath, P. K.

    2015-10-01

    Within mechanisms involving the light Majorana neutrinos, squark-neutrino, Majorons, sterile neutrinos and heavy Majorana neutrino, nuclear transition matrix elements for the neutrinoless (β-β-)0ν decay of 96Zr, 100Mo, 128,130Te and 150Nd nuclei are calculated by employing the PHFB approach. Effects due to finite size of nucleons, higher order currents, short range correlations, and deformations of parent as well as daughter nuclei on the calculated matrix elements are estimated. Uncertainties in nuclear transition matrix elements within long-ranged mechanisms but for double Majoron accompanied (β-β-ϕϕ)0ν decay modes are 9%-15%. In the case of short ranged heavy Majorona neutrino exchange mechanism, the maximum uncertainty is about 35%. The maximum systematic error within the mechanism involving the exchange of light Majorana neutrino is about 46%.

  19. A top quark mass measurement using a matrix element method

    SciTech Connect

    Linacre, Jacob Thomas

    2009-01-01

    A measurement of the mass of the top quark is presented, using top-antitop pair (t$\\bar{t}$) candidate events for the lepton+jets decay channel. The measurement makes use of Tevatron p$\\bar{p}$ collision data at centre-of-mass energy √s = 1.96 TeV, collected at the CDF detector. The top quark mass is measured by employing an unbinned maximum likelihood method where the event probability density functions are calculated using signal (t$\\bar{t}$) and background (W+jets) matrix elements, as well as a set of parameterised jet-to-parton mapping functions. The likelihood function is maximised with respect to the top quark mass, the fraction of signal events, and a correction to the jet energy scale (JES) of the calorimeter jets. The simultaneous measurement of the JES correction (ΔJES) provides an in situ jet energy calibration based on the known mass of the hadronically decaying W boson. Using 578 lepton+jets candidate events corresponding to 3.2 fb -1 of integrated luminosity, the top quark mass is measured to be mt = 172.4± 1.4 (stat+ΔJES) ±1.3 (syst) GeV=c2, one of the most precise single measurements to date.

  20. Numerical Modeling of Combined Matrix Cracking and Delamination in Composite Laminates Using Cohesive Elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Deepak; Roy, Rene; Kweon, Jin-Hwe; Choi, Jin-ho

    2016-06-01

    Sub-laminate damage in the form of matrix cracking and delamination was simulated by using interface cohesive elements in the finite element (FE) software ABAQUS. Interface cohesive elements were inserted parallel to the fiber orientation in the transverse ply with equal spacing (matrix cracking) and between the interfaces (delamination). Matrix cracking initiation in the cohesive elements was based on stress traction separation laws and propagated under mixed-mode loading. We expanded the work of Shi et al. (Appl. Compos. Mater. 21, 57-70 2014) to include delamination and simulated additional [45/-45/0/90]s and [02/90n]s { n = 1,2,3} CFRP laminates and a [0/903]s GFRP laminate. Delamination damage was quantified numerically in terms of damage dissipative energy. We observed that transverse matrix cracks can propagate to the ply interface and initiate delamination. We also observed for [0/90n/0] laminates that as the number of 90° ply increases past n = 2, the crack density decreases. The predicted crack density evolution compared well with experimental results and the equivalent constraint model (ECM) theory. Empirical relationships were established between crack density and applied stress by linear curve fitting. The reduction of laminate elastic modulus due to cracking was also computed numerically and it is in accordance with reported experimental measurements.

  1. Numerical Modeling of Combined Matrix Cracking and Delamination in Composite Laminates Using Cohesive Elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Deepak; Roy, Rene; Kweon, Jin-Hwe; Choi, Jin-ho

    2015-10-01

    Sub-laminate damage in the form of matrix cracking and delamination was simulated by using interface cohesive elements in the finite element (FE) software ABAQUS. Interface cohesive elements were inserted parallel to the fiber orientation in the transverse ply with equal spacing (matrix cracking) and between the interfaces (delamination). Matrix cracking initiation in the cohesive elements was based on stress traction separation laws and propagated under mixed-mode loading. We expanded the work of Shi et al. (Appl. Compos. Mater. 21, 57-70 2014) to include delamination and simulated additional [45/-45/0/90]s and [02/90n]s {n = 1,2,3} CFRP laminates and a [0/903]s GFRP laminate. Delamination damage was quantified numerically in terms of damage dissipative energy. We observed that transverse matrix cracks can propagate to the ply interface and initiate delamination. We also observed for [0/90n/0] laminates that as the number of 90° ply increases past n = 2, the crack density decreases. The predicted crack density evolution compared well with experimental results and the equivalent constraint model (ECM) theory. Empirical relationships were established between crack density and applied stress by linear curve fitting. The reduction of laminate elastic modulus due to cracking was also computed numerically and it is in accordance with reported experimental measurements.

  2. Distributions of off-diagonal scattering matrix elements: Exact results

    SciTech Connect

    Nock, A. Kumar, S. Sommers, H.-J. Guhr, T.

    2014-03-15

    Scattering is a ubiquitous phenomenon which is observed in a variety of physical systems which span a wide range of length scales. The scattering matrix is the key quantity which provides a complete description of the scattering process. The universal features of scattering in chaotic systems is most generally modeled by the Heidelberg approach which introduces stochasticity to the scattering matrix at the level of the Hamiltonian describing the scattering center. The statistics of the scattering matrix is obtained by averaging over the ensemble of random Hamiltonians of appropriate symmetry. We derive exact results for the distributions of the real and imaginary parts of the off-diagonal scattering matrix elements applicable to orthogonally-invariant and unitarily-invariant Hamiltonians, thereby solving a long standing problem. -- Highlights: •Scattering problem in complex or chaotic systems. •Heidelberg approach to model the chaotic nature of the scattering center. •A novel route to the nonlinear sigma model based on the characteristic function. •Exact results for the distributions of off-diagonal scattering-matrix elements. •Universal aspects of the scattering-matrix fluctuations.

  3. Matrix Methods for Estimating the Coherence Functions from Estimates of the Cross-Spectral Density Matrix

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Smallwood, D. O.

    1996-01-01

    It is shown that the usual method for estimating the coherence functions (ordinary, partial, and multiple) for a general multiple-input! multiple-output problem can be expressed as a modified form of Cholesky decomposition of the cross-spectral density matrix of the input and output records. The results can be equivalently obtained using singular value decomposition (SVD) of the cross-spectral density matrix. Using SVD suggests a new form of fractional coherence. The formulation as a SVD problem also suggests a way to order the inputs when a natural physical order of the inputs is absent.

  4. Some measurements for determining strangeness matrix elements in the nucleon

    SciTech Connect

    Henley, E.M.; Pollock, S.J.; Ying, S. ); Frederico, T. , Sao Jose dos Campos, SP . Inst. de Estudos Avancados); Krein, . Inst. de Fisica Teorica); Williams, A.G. )

    1991-01-01

    Some experiments to measure strangeness matrix elements of the proton are proposed. Two of these suggestions are described in some detail, namely electro-production of phi mesons and the difference between neutrino and antineutrino scattering for isospin zero targets such as deuterium.

  5. Some measurements for determining strangeness matrix elements in the nucleon

    SciTech Connect

    Henley, E.M.; Pollock, S.J.; Ying, S.; Frederico, T.; Krein,; Williams, A.G.

    1991-12-31

    Some experiments to measure strangeness matrix elements of the proton are proposed. Two of these suggestions are described in some detail, namely electro-production of phi mesons and the difference between neutrino and antineutrino scattering for isospin zero targets such as deuterium.

  6. Localized density matrix minimization and linear-scaling algorithms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lai, Rongjie; Lu, Jianfeng

    2016-06-01

    We propose a convex variational approach to compute localized density matrices for both zero temperature and finite temperature cases, by adding an entry-wise ℓ1 regularization to the free energy of the quantum system. Based on the fact that the density matrix decays exponentially away from the diagonal for insulating systems or systems at finite temperature, the proposed ℓ1 regularized variational method provides an effective way to approximate the original quantum system. We provide theoretical analysis of the approximation behavior and also design convergence guaranteed numerical algorithms based on Bregman iteration. More importantly, the ℓ1 regularized system naturally leads to localized density matrices with banded structure, which enables us to develop approximating algorithms to find the localized density matrices with computation cost linearly dependent on the problem size.

  7. Physical interpretation of time-dependent Hartree-Fock density matrix for heavy ion scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klein, Abraham; Umar, A. S.

    1987-05-01

    We suggest a quantum mechanical interpretation of the density matrix of the time-dependent Hartree-Fock theory for heavy ion scattering. We show how with this interpretation the time-dependent Hartree-Fock equations can be derived provided we admit (i) a generalized factorization of a suitably defined average of two-body density matrix elements in terms of a sum of products of the corresponding one-particle elements and (ii) additional semiclassical approximations which convert a sum of products into an antisymmetric product of sums. These ideas, previously recognized within the framework of soliton models, are extended here to include inelastic processes with the excitation of collective modes as the mechanism for producing deep inelastic scattering. An essential feature of the approach is that it provides, in principle, a theoretical method of obtaining exclusive amplitudes. We describe how these might be calculated.

  8. Transfer Matrix Approach to 1d Random Band Matrices: Density of States

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shcherbina, Mariya; Shcherbina, Tatyana

    2016-08-01

    We study the special case of n× n 1D Gaussian Hermitian random band matrices, when the covariance of the elements is determined by the matrix J=(-W^2triangle +1)^{-1} . Assuming that n≥ CW log W≫ 1 , we prove that the averaged density of states coincides with the Wigner semicircle law up to the correction of order W^{-1}.

  9. Importance of Matrix Elements in the ARPES Spectra of BISCO

    SciTech Connect

    Bansil, A.; Lindroos, M.

    1999-12-13

    We have carried out extensive first-principles angle-resolved photointensity (ARPES) simulations in Bi2212 wherein the photoemission process is modeled realistically by taking into account the full crystal wave functions of the initial and final states in the presence of the surface. The spectral weight of the ARPES feature associated with the CuO{sub 2} plane bands is found to undergo large and systematic variations with k{sub (parallel} {sub sign)} as well as the energy and polarization of the incident photons. These theoretical predictions are in good accord with the corresponding measurements, indicating that the remarkable observed changes in the spectral weights in Bi2212 are essentially a matrix element effect and that the importance of matrix elements should be kept in mind in analyzing the ARPES spectra in the high T{sub c} 's. (c) 1999 The American Physical Society.

  10. Importance of Matrix Elements in the ARPES Spectra of BISCO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bansil, A.; Lindroos, M.

    1999-12-01

    We have carried out extensive first-principles angle-resolved photointensity (ARPES) simulations in Bi2212 wherein the photoemission process is modeled realistically by taking into account the full crystal wave functions of the initial and final states in the presence of the surface. The spectral weight of the ARPES feature associated with the CuO2 plane bands is found to undergo large and systematic variations with k∥ as well as the energy and polarization of the incident photons. These theoretical predictions are in good accord with the corresponding measurements, indicating that the remarkable observed changes in the spectral weights in Bi2212 are essentially a matrix element effect and that the importance of matrix elements should be kept in mind in analyzing the ARPES spectra in the high Tc's.

  11. Magic wavelengths, matrix elements, polarizabilities, and lifetimes of Cs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Safronova, M. S.; Safronova, U. I.; Clark, Charles W.

    2016-07-01

    Motivated by recent interest in their applications, we report a systematic study of Cs atomic properties calculated by a high-precision relativistic all-order method. Excitation energies, reduced matrix elements, transition rates, and lifetimes are determined for levels with principal quantum numbers n ≤12 and orbital angular momentum quantum numbers l ≤3 . Recommended values and estimates of uncertainties are provided for a number of electric-dipole transitions and the electric dipole polarizabilities of the n s , n p , and n d states. We also report a calculation of the electric quadrupole polarizability of the ground state. We display the dynamic polarizabilities of the 6 s and 7 p states for optical wavelengths between 1160 and 1800 nm and identify corresponding magic wavelengths for the 6 s -7 p1 /2 and 6 s -7 p3 /2 transitions. The values of relevant matrix elements needed for polarizability calculations at other wavelengths are provided.

  12. Glueball Spectrum and Matrix Elements on Anisotropic Lattices

    SciTech Connect

    Y. Chen; A. Alexandru; S.J. Dong; T. Draper; I. Horvath; F.X. Lee; K.F. Liu; N. Mathur; C. Morningstar; M. Peardon; S. Tamhankar; B.L. Young; J.B. Zhang

    2006-01-01

    The glueball-to-vacuum matrix elements of local gluonic operators in scalar, tensor, and pseudoscalar channels are investigated numerically on several anisotropic lattices with the spatial lattice spacing ranging from 0.1fm - 0.2fm. These matrix elements are needed to predict the glueball branching ratios in J/{psi} radiative decays which will help identify the glueball states in experiments. Two types of improved local gluonic operators are constructed for a self-consistent check and the finite volume effects are studied. We find that lattice spacing dependence of our results is very weak and the continuum limits are reliably extrapolated, as a result of improvement of the lattice gauge action and local operators. We also give updated glueball masses with various quantum numbers.

  13. A stochastic method for computing hadronic matrix elements

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Alexandrou, Constantia; Constantinou, Martha; Dinter, Simon; Drach, Vincent; Jansen, Karl; Hadjiyiannakou, Kyriakos; Renner, Dru B.

    2014-01-24

    In this study, we present a stochastic method for the calculation of baryon 3-point functions which is an alternative to the typically used sequential method offering more versatility. We analyze the scaling of the error of the stochastically evaluated 3-point function with the lattice volume and find a favorable signal to noise ratio suggesting that the stochastic method can be extended to large volumes providing an efficient approach to compute hadronic matrix elements and form factors.

  14. Algebraic evaluation of matrix elements in the Laguerre function basis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCoy, A. E.; Caprio, M. A.

    2016-02-01

    The Laguerre functions constitute one of the fundamental basis sets for calculations in atomic and molecular electron-structure theory, with applications in hadronic and nuclear theory as well. While similar in form to the Coulomb bound-state eigenfunctions (from the Schrödinger eigenproblem) or the Coulomb-Sturmian functions (from a related Sturm-Liouville problem), the Laguerre functions, unlike these former functions, constitute a complete, discrete, orthonormal set for square-integrable functions in three dimensions. We construct the SU(1, 1) × SO(3) dynamical algebra for the Laguerre functions and apply the ideas of factorization (or supersymmetric quantum mechanics) to derive shift operators for these functions. We use the resulting algebraic framework to derive analytic expressions for matrix elements of several basic radial operators (involving powers of the radial coordinate and radial derivative) in the Laguerre function basis. We illustrate how matrix elements for more general spherical tensor operators in three dimensional space, such as the gradient, may then be constructed from these radial matrix elements.

  15. Weak matrix elements on the lattice - Circa 1995

    SciTech Connect

    Soni, A.

    1995-10-03

    Status of weak matrix elements is reviewed. In particular, e{prime}/e, B {yields} K*{gamma}, B{sub B} and B{sub B}, are discussed and the overall situation with respect to the lattice effort and some of its phenomenological implications are summarised. For e{prime}/e the need for the relevant matrix elements is stressed in view of the forthcoming improved experiments. For some of the operators, (e.g. O{sub 6}), even bound on their matrix elements would be very helpful. On B {yields} K{degrees}{gamma}, a constant behavior of T{sub 2} appears disfavored although dependence of T{sub 2} could, of course, be milder than a simple pole. Improved data is badly needed to settle this important issue firmly, especially in view of its ramification for extractions of V{sub td} from B {yields} {rho}{gamma}. On B{sub {kappa}}, the preliminary result from JLQCD appears to contradict Sharpe et al. JLQCD data seems to fit very well to linear {alpha} dependence and leads to an appreciably lower value of B{sub {kappa}}. Four studies of B{sub {kappa}} in the {open_quotes}full{close_quotes} (n{sub f} = 2) theory indicate very little quenching effects on B{sub {kappa}}; the full theory value seems to be just a little less than the quenched result. Based on expectations from HQET, analysis of B-parameter (B{sub h}{ell}) for the heavy-light mesons via B{sub h}{ell}) = constant + constants{prime}/m{sub h}{ell} is suggested. A summary of an illustrative sample of hadron matrix elements is given and constraints on CKM parameters (e.g. V{sub td}/V{sub ts}, on the unitarity triangle and on x{sub s}/x{sub d}, emerging from the lattice calculations along with experimental results are briefly discussed. In quite a few cases, for the first time, some indication of quenching errors on weak matrix elements are now becoming available.

  16. Multi-jet Merging with NLO Matrix Elements

    SciTech Connect

    Siegert, Frank; Hoche, Stefan; Krauss, Frank; Schonherr, Marek; /Dresden, Tech. U.

    2011-08-18

    In the algorithm presented here, the ME+PS approach to merge samples of tree-level matrix elements into inclusive event samples is combined with the POWHEG method, which includes exact next-to-leading order matrix elements in the parton shower. The advantages of the method are discussed and the quality of its implementation in SHERPA is exemplified by results for e{sup +}e{sup -} annihilation into hadrons at LEP, for deep-inelastic lepton-nucleon scattering at HERA, for Drell-Yan lepton-pair production at the Tevatron and for W{sup +}W{sup -}-production at LHC energies. The simulation of hard QCD radiation in parton-shower Monte Carlos has seen tremendous progress over the last years. It was largely stimulated by the need for more precise predictions at LHC energies where the large available phase space allows additional hard QCD radiation alongside known Standard Model processes or even signals from new physics. Two types of algorithms have been developed, which allow to improve upon the soft-collinear approximations made in the parton shower, such that hard radiation is simulated according to exact matrix elements. In the ME+PS approach [1] higher-order tree-level matrix elements for different final-state jet multiplicity are merged with each other and with subsequent parton shower emissions to generate an inclusive sample. Such a prescription is invaluable for analyses which are sensitive to final states with a large jet multiplicity. The only remaining deficiency of such tree-level calculations is the large uncertainty stemming from scale variations. The POWHEG method [2] solves this problem for the lowest multiplicity subprocess by combining full NLO matrix elements with the parton shower. While this leads to NLO accuracy in the inclusive cross section and the exact radiation pattern for the first emission, it fails to describe higher-order emissions with improved accuracy. Thus it is not sufficient if final states with high jet multiplicities are considered

  17. Acceleration of matrix element computations for precision measurements

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Brandt, Oleg; Gutierrez, Gaston; Wang, M. H.L.S.; Ye, Zhenyu

    2014-11-25

    The matrix element technique provides a superior statistical sensitivity for precision measurements of important parameters at hadron colliders, such as the mass of the top quark or the cross-section for the production of Higgs bosons. The main practical limitation of the technique is its high computational demand. Using the example of the top quark mass, we present two approaches to reduce the computation time of the technique by a factor of 90. First, we utilize low-discrepancy sequences for numerical Monte Carlo integration in conjunction with a dedicated estimator of numerical uncertainty, a novelty in the context of the matrix elementmore » technique. We then utilize a new approach that factorizes the overall jet energy scale from the matrix element computation, a novelty in the context of top quark mass measurements. The utilization of low-discrepancy sequences is of particular general interest, as it is universally applicable to Monte Carlo integration, and independent of the computing environment.« less

  18. The problem of the universal density functional and the density matrix functional theory

    SciTech Connect

    Bobrov, V. B. Trigger, S. A.

    2013-04-15

    The analysis in this paper shows that the Hohenberg-Kohn theorem is the constellation of two statements: (i) the mathematically rigorous Hohenberg-Kohn lemma, which demonstrates that the same ground-state density cannot correspond to two different potentials of an external field, and (ii) the hypothesis of the existence of the universal density functional. Based on the obtained explicit expression for the nonrel-ativistic particle energy in a local external field, we prove that the energy of the system of more than two non-interacting electrons cannot be a functional of the inhomogeneous density. This result is generalized to the system of interacting electrons. It means that the Hohenberg-Kohn lemma cannot provide justification of the universal density functional for fermions. At the same time, statements of the density functional theory remain valid when considering any number of noninteracting ground-state bosons due to the Bose condensation effect. In the framework of the density matrix functional theory, the hypothesis of the existence of the universal density matrix functional corresponds to the cases of noninteracting particles and to interaction in the Hartree-Fock approximation.

  19. SYMBMAT: Symbolic computation of quantum transition matrix elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ciappina, M. F.; Kirchner, T.

    2012-08-01

    We have developed a set of Mathematica notebooks to compute symbolically quantum transition matrices relevant for atomic ionization processes. The utilization of a symbolic language allows us to obtain analytical expressions for the transition matrix elements required in charged-particle and laser induced ionization of atoms. Additionally, by using a few simple commands, it is possible to export these symbolic expressions to standard programming languages, such as Fortran or C, for the subsequent computation of differential cross sections or other observables. One of the main drawbacks in the calculation of transition matrices is the tedious algebraic work required when initial states other than the simple hydrogenic 1s state need to be considered. Using these notebooks the work is dramatically reduced and it is possible to generate exact expressions for a large set of bound states. We present explicit examples of atomic collisions (in First Born Approximation and Distorted Wave Theory) and laser-matter interactions (within the Dipole and Strong Field Approximations and different gauges) using both hydrogenic wavefunctions and Slater-Type Orbitals with arbitrary nlm quantum numbers as initial states. Catalogue identifier: AEMI_v1_0 Program summary URL:http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/summaries/AEMI_v1_0.html Program obtainable from: CPC Program Library, Queen's University, Belfast, N. Ireland Licensing provisions: Standard CPC license, http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/licence/licence.html No. of lines in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 71 628 No. of bytes in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 444 195 Distribution format: tar.gz Programming language: Mathematica Computer: Single machines using Linux or Windows (with cores with any clock speed, cache memory and bits in a word) Operating system: Any OS that supports Mathematica. The notebooks have been tested under Windows and Linux and with versions 6.x, 7.x and 8.x Classification: 2.6 Nature of problem

  20. Density matrix embedding in an antisymmetrized geminal power bath

    SciTech Connect

    Tsuchimochi, Takashi; Welborn, Matthew; Van Voorhis, Troy

    2015-07-14

    Density matrix embedding theory (DMET) has emerged as a powerful tool for performing wave function-in-wave function embedding for strongly correlated systems. In traditional DMET, an accurate calculation is performed on a small impurity embedded in a mean field bath. Here, we extend the original DMET equations to account for correlation in the bath via an antisymmetrized geminal power (AGP) wave function. The resulting formalism has a number of advantages. First, it allows one to properly treat the weak correlation limit of independent pairs, which DMET is unable to do with a mean-field bath. Second, it associates a size extensive correlation energy with a given density matrix (for the models tested), which AGP by itself is incapable of providing. Third, it provides a reasonable description of charge redistribution in strongly correlated but non-periodic systems. Thus, AGP-DMET appears to be a good starting point for describing electron correlation in molecules, which are aperiodic and possess both strong and weak electron correlation.

  1. Generalized Pauli constraints in reduced density matrix functional theory

    SciTech Connect

    Theophilou, Iris; Helbig, Nicole; Lathiotakis, Nektarios N.; Marques, Miguel A. L.

    2015-04-21

    Functionals of the one-body reduced density matrix (1-RDM) are routinely minimized under Coleman’s ensemble N-representability conditions. Recently, the topic of pure-state N-representability conditions, also known as generalized Pauli constraints, received increased attention following the discovery of a systematic way to derive them for any number of electrons and any finite dimensionality of the Hilbert space. The target of this work is to assess the potential impact of the enforcement of the pure-state conditions on the results of reduced density-matrix functional theory calculations. In particular, we examine whether the standard minimization of typical 1-RDM functionals under the ensemble N-representability conditions violates the pure-state conditions for prototype 3-electron systems. We also enforce the pure-state conditions, in addition to the ensemble ones, for the same systems and functionals and compare the correlation energies and optimal occupation numbers with those obtained by the enforcement of the ensemble conditions alone.

  2. Calculation of hadronic matrix elements using lattice QCD

    SciTech Connect

    Gupta, R.

    1993-08-01

    The author gives a brief introduction to the scope of lattice QCD calculations in his effort to extract the fundamental parameters of the standard model. This goal is illustrated by two examples. First the author discusses the extraction of CKM matrix elements from measurements of form factors for semileptonic decays of heavy-light pseudoscalar mesons such as D {yields} Ke{nu}. Second, he presents the status of results for the kaon B parameter relevant to CP violation. He concludes the talk with a short outline of his experiences with optimizing QCD codes on the CM5.

  3. Matrix element analyses of dark matter scattering and annihilation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Jason; Marfatia, Danny

    2013-07-01

    We provide a compendium of results at the level of matrix elements for a systematic study of dark matter scattering and annihilation. We identify interactions that yield spin-dependent and spin-independent scattering and specify whether the interactions are velocity and/or momentum suppressed. We identify the interactions that lead to s-wave or p-wave annihilation, and those that are chirality suppressed. We also list the interaction structures that can interfere in scattering and annihilation processes. Using these results, we point out situations in which deviations from the standard lore are obtained.

  4. Molarity (Aromic Density) of the Elements as Pure Crystals.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pauling, Linus; Herman, Zelek S.

    1985-01-01

    Provides background information for teachers on the atomic density of the elements as pure crystals. Atomic density is defined as the reciprocal of the atomic volume. Includes atomic-density diagrams which were prepared using the atomic-volume values given by Singman, supplemented by additional values for some allotropes. (JN)

  5. Autocorrelations from the transfer-matrix density-matrix renormalization-group method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naef, F.; Wang, X.; Zotos, X.; von der Linden, W.

    1999-07-01

    Extending the transfer-matrix density-matrix renormalization-group algorithm, we are able to calculate imaginary time spin autocorrelations with high accuracy (absolute error <10-6) over a wide temperature range (0<βJ<20). After analytic continuation using the rules of probability theory along with the entropic prior (MaxEnt), we obtain real frequency spectra for the XY model, the isotropic Heisenberg, and the gapped Heisenberg-Ising model. Available exact results in some limits allow for a critical evaluation of the quality of answers expected from this procedure. We find that high-precision data are still insufficient for resolving specific line shapes such as low-frequency divergences. However, the method is appropriate for identifying low-temperature gaps and peak positions.

  6. SYMBMAT: Symbolic computation of quantum transition matrix elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ciappina, M. F.; Kirchner, T.

    2012-08-01

    We have developed a set of Mathematica notebooks to compute symbolically quantum transition matrices relevant for atomic ionization processes. The utilization of a symbolic language allows us to obtain analytical expressions for the transition matrix elements required in charged-particle and laser induced ionization of atoms. Additionally, by using a few simple commands, it is possible to export these symbolic expressions to standard programming languages, such as Fortran or C, for the subsequent computation of differential cross sections or other observables. One of the main drawbacks in the calculation of transition matrices is the tedious algebraic work required when initial states other than the simple hydrogenic 1s state need to be considered. Using these notebooks the work is dramatically reduced and it is possible to generate exact expressions for a large set of bound states. We present explicit examples of atomic collisions (in First Born Approximation and Distorted Wave Theory) and laser-matter interactions (within the Dipole and Strong Field Approximations and different gauges) using both hydrogenic wavefunctions and Slater-Type Orbitals with arbitrary nlm quantum numbers as initial states. Catalogue identifier: AEMI_v1_0 Program summary URL:http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/summaries/AEMI_v1_0.html Program obtainable from: CPC Program Library, Queen's University, Belfast, N. Ireland Licensing provisions: Standard CPC license, http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/licence/licence.html No. of lines in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 71 628 No. of bytes in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 444 195 Distribution format: tar.gz Programming language: Mathematica Computer: Single machines using Linux or Windows (with cores with any clock speed, cache memory and bits in a word) Operating system: Any OS that supports Mathematica. The notebooks have been tested under Windows and Linux and with versions 6.x, 7.x and 8.x Classification: 2.6 Nature of problem

  7. Recent progress in ab initio density matrix renormalization group methodology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hachmann, Johannes; Dorando, Jonathan J.; Kin-Lic Chan, Garnet

    2008-03-01

    We present some recent developments in the ab initio density matrix renormalization group (DMRG) method for quantum chemical problems, in particular our local, quadratic scaling algorithm [1] for low dimensional systems. This method is particularly suited for the description of strong nondynamic correlation, and allows us to compute numerically exact (FCI) correlated energies for large active spaces, up to one order of magnitude larger then can be done by conventional CASCI techniques. Other features of this method are its inherent multireference nature, compactness, variational results, size-consistency and size-extensivity. In addition we will review the problems (predominantly organic electronic materials) on which we applied the ab initio DMRG: 1) metal-insulator transition in hydrogen chains [1] 2) all-trans polyacetylene [1] 3) acenes [2] 4) polydiacetylenes [3]. References [1] Hachmann, Cardoen, Chan, JCP 125 (2006), 144101. [2] Hachmann, Dorando, Avil'es, Chan, JCP 127 (2007), 134309. [3] unpublished.

  8. Reduced density-matrix functionals applied to the Hubbard dimer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamil, Ebad; Schade, Robert; Pruschke, Thomas; Blöchl, Peter E.

    2016-02-01

    Common density-matrix functionals, the Müller and the power functional, have been benchmarked for the half-filled Hubbard dimer, which allows us to model the bond dissociation problem and the transition from the weakly to the strongly correlated limit. Unbiased numerical calculations are combined with analytical results. Despite the well known successes of the Müller functional, the ground state is degenerate with a one-dimensional manifold of ferromagnetic solutions. The resulting infinite magnetic susceptibility indicates another qualitative flaw of the Müller functional. The derivative discontinuity with respect to particle number is not present indicating an incorrect metal-like behavior. The power functional actually favors the ferromagnetic state for weak interaction. Analogous to the Hartree-Fock approximation, the power functional undergoes a transition beyond a critical interaction strength, in this case, however, to a noncollinear antiferromagnetic state.

  9. Study of spin-density matrix in exclusive electroproduction of ω meson at HERMES

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manaenkov, S. I.

    2016-02-01

    Exclusive electroproduction of ω mesons on unpolarized hydrogen and deuterium targets is studied in the kinematic region of Q2 > 1.0 GeV2, 3.0 GeV < W < 6.3 GeV, and -t' < 0.2 GeV2. The data were accumulated with the HERMES forward spectrometer during the 1996-2007 running period using the 27.6 GeV longitudinally polarized electron or positron beam of HERA. Spin-density matrix elements are presented in projections of Q2 or -t'. Violation of s-channel helicity conservation is observed for some of these elements. A sizable contribution from unnatural-parity-exchange amplitudes is established for special combinations of spin-density matrix elements. The determination of the virtual-photon longitudinal-to- transverse cross-section ratio reveals that a dominant part of the cross section arises from transversely polarized photons. Good agreement is found between the HERMES proton data and results of a pQCD-inspired Goloskokov-Kroll model that includes pion-pole contributions.

  10. Precision Study of Excited State Effects in Nucleon Matrix Elements

    SciTech Connect

    Simon Dinter, Constantia Alexandrou, Martha Constantinou, Vincent Drach, Karl Jansen, Dru B. Renner

    2011-10-01

    We present a dedicated precision analysis of the influence of excited states on the calculation of several nucleon matrix elements. This calculation is performed at fixed values of the lattice spacing, volume and pion mass that are typical of contemporary lattice computations. We focus on the nucleon axial charge, g{sub A}, for which we use 7,500 measurements, and on the average momentum of the unpolarized isovector parton distribution, x{sub u-d}, for which we use 23,000 measurements. All computations are done employing N{sub f}=2+1+1 maximally-twisted-mass Wilson fermions and non-perturbatively calculated renormalization factors. We find that excited state effects are negligible for g{sub A} and lead to a O(10%) downward shift for x{sub u-d}.

  11. Fabrication of synthetic diffractive elements using advanced matrix laser lithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Škereň, M.; Svoboda, J.; Květoň, M.; Fiala, P.

    2013-02-01

    In this paper we present a matrix laser writing device based on a demagnified projection of a micro-structure from a computer driven spatial light modulator. The device is capable of writing completely aperiodic micro-structures with resolution higher than 200 000 DPI. An optical system is combined with ultra high precision piezoelectric stages with an elementary step ~ 4 nm. The device operates in a normal environment, which significantly decreases the costs compared to competitive technologies. Simultaneously, large areas can be exposed up to 100 cm2. The capabilities of the constructed device will be demonstrated on particular elements fabricated for real applications. The optical document security is the first interesting field, where the synthetic image holograms are often combined with sophisticated aperiodic micro-structures. The proposed technology can easily write simple micro-gratings creating the color and kinetic visual effects, but also the diffractive cryptograms, waveguide couplers, and other structures recently used in the field of optical security. A general beam shaping elements and special photonic micro-structures are another important applications which will be discussed in this paper.

  12. Thouless theorem for matrix product states and subsequent post density matrix renormalization group methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wouters, Sebastian; Nakatani, Naoki; Van Neck, Dimitri; Chan, Garnet Kin-Lic

    2013-08-01

    The similarities between Hartree-Fock (HF) theory and the density matrix renormalization group (DMRG) are explored. Both methods can be formulated as the variational optimization of a wave-function Ansatz. Linearization of the time-dependent variational principle near a variational minimum allows to derive the random phase approximation (RPA). We show that the nonredundant parameterization of the matrix product state (MPS) tangent space [J. Haegeman, J. I. Cirac, T. J. Osborne, I. Pižorn, H. Verschelde, and F. Verstraete, Phys. Rev. Lett.PRLTAO0031-900710.1103/PhysRevLett.107.070601 107, 070601 (2011)] leads to the Thouless theorem for MPS, i.e., an explicit nonredundant parameterization of the entire MPS manifold, starting from a specific MPS reference. Excitation operators are identified, which extends the analogy between HF and DMRG to the Tamm-Dancoff approximation (TDA), the configuration interaction (CI) expansion, and coupled cluster theory. For a small one-dimensional Hubbard chain, we use a CI-MPS Ansatz with single and double excitations to improve on the ground state and to calculate low-lying excitation energies. For a symmetry-broken ground state of this model, we show that RPA-MPS allows to retrieve the Goldstone mode. We also discuss calculations of the RPA-MPS correlation energy. With the long-range quantum chemical Pariser-Parr-Pople Hamiltonian, low-lying TDA-MPS and RPA-MPS excitation energies for polyenes are obtained.

  13. Density matrix reconstruction of a large angular momentum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klose, Gerd

    2001-10-01

    A complete description of the quantum state of a physical system is the fundamental knowledge necessary to statistically predict the outcome of measurements. In turning this statement around, Wolfgang Pauli raised already in 1933 the question, whether an unknown quantum state could be uniquely determined by appropriate measurements-a problem that has gained new relevance in recent years. In order to harness the prospects of quantum computing, secure communication, teleportation, and the like, the development of techniques to accurately control and measure quantum states has now become a matter of practical as well as fundamental interest. However, there is no general answer to Pauli's very basic question, and quantum state reconstruction algorithms have been developed and experimentally demonstrated only for a few systems so far. This thesis presents a novel experimental method to measure the unknown and generally mixed quantum state for an angular momentum of arbitrary magnitude. The (2F + 1) x (2F + 1) density matrix describing the quantum state is hereby completely determined from a set of Stern-Gerlach measurements with (4F + 1) different orientations of the quantization axis. This protocol is implemented for laser cooled Cesium atoms in the 6S1/2(F = 4) hyperfine ground state manifold, and is applied to a number of test states prepared by optical pumping and Larmor precession. A comparison of the input and the measured states shows successful reconstructions with fidelities of about 0.95.

  14. Placing three-dimensional isoparametric elements into NASTRAN. [alterations in matrix assembly to simplify generation of higher order elements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Newman, M. B.; Filstrup, A. W.

    1973-01-01

    Linear (8 node), parabolic (20 node), cubic (32 node) and mixed (some edges linear, some parabolic and some cubic) have been inserted into NASTRAN, level 15.1. First the dummy element feature was used to check out the stiffness matrix generation routines for the linear element in NASTRAN. Then, the necessary modules of NASTRAN were modified to include the new family of elements. The matrix assembly was changed so that the stiffness matrix of each isoparametric element is only generated once as the time to generate these higher order elements tends to be much longer than the other elements in NASTRAN. This paper presents some of the experiences and difficulties of inserting a new element or family of elements into NASTRAN.

  15. Constructing Multi-Slater-Jastrow Wavefunctions via Reduced Density Matrix Covariance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, Kiel; Wagner, Lucas

    2015-03-01

    The multi-determinant Slater-Jastrow ansatz wavefunction is a powerful tool for conducting ab initio electronic structure calculations in strongly correlated systems. We illustrate a new method of systematically constructing multi-determinant expansions by analyzing the covariance of elements of the two-body reduced density matrix (2RDM) with respect to the local energy distribution for a Slater-Jastrow wave function. By ordering the elements of the 2RDM with respect to their computed mean and associating each matrix element with a new determinant, we construct new multi-determinant expansions. We show that the energies of an H2 and stretched N2 molecule converge more rapidly with respect to the number of included determinants using this technique than in conventional configuration interaction calculations. This suggests that our analysis of the 2RDM captures qualitative differences between the single Slater determinant and the Slater-Jastrow wave function. This method provides a new way of diagnosing and correcting the deficiencies of certain trial wavefunction types in quantum Monte Carlo calculations. This work was supported by NSF DMR 12-06242.

  16. Shell model nuclear matrix elements for competing mechanisms contributing to double beta decay

    SciTech Connect

    Horoi, Mihai

    2013-12-30

    Recent progress in the shell model approach to the nuclear matrix elements for the double beta decay process are presented. This includes nuclear matrix elements for competing mechanisms to neutrionless double beta decay, a comparison between closure and non-closure approximation for {sup 48}Ca, and an updated shell model analysis of nuclear matrix elements for the double beta decay of {sup 136}Xe.

  17. Reduced density-matrix functional theory: Correlation and spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Di Sabatino, S.; Romaniello, P.; Berger, J. A.; Reining, L.

    2015-07-14

    In this work, we explore the performance of approximations to electron correlation in reduced density-matrix functional theory (RDMFT) and of approximations to the observables calculated within this theory. Our analysis focuses on the calculation of total energies, occupation numbers, removal/addition energies, and spectral functions. We use the exactly solvable Hubbard dimer at 1/4 and 1/2 fillings as test systems. This allows us to analyze the underlying physics and to elucidate the origin of the observed trends. For comparison, we also report the results of the GW approximation, where the self-energy functional is approximated, but no further hypothesis is made concerning the approximations of the observables. In particular, we focus on the atomic limit, where the two sites of the dimer are pulled apart and electrons localize on either site with equal probability, unless a small perturbation is present: this is the regime of strong electron correlation. In this limit, using the Hubbard dimer at 1/2 filling with or without a spin-symmetry-broken ground state allows us to explore how degeneracies and spin-symmetry breaking are treated in RDMFT. We find that, within the used approximations, neither in RDMFT nor in GW, the signature of strong correlation is present, when looking at the removal/addition energies and spectral function from the spin-singlet ground state, whereas both give the exact result for the spin-symmetry broken case. Moreover, we show how the spectroscopic properties change from one spin structure to the other.

  18. Controlling excited-state contamination in nucleon matrix elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoon, Boram; Gupta, Rajan; Bhattacharya, Tanmoy; Engelhardt, Michael; Green, Jeremy; Joó, Bálint; Lin, Huey-Wen; Negele, John; Orginos, Kostas; Pochinsky, Andrew; Richards, David; Syritsyn, Sergey; Winter, Frank; Nucleon Matrix Elements NME Collaboration

    2016-06-01

    We present a detailed analysis of methods to reduce statistical errors and excited-state contamination in the calculation of matrix elements of quark bilinear operators in nucleon states. All the calculations were done on a 2 +1 -flavor ensemble with lattices of size 323×64 generated using the rational hybrid Monte Carlo algorithm at a =0.081 fm and with Mπ=312 MeV . The statistical precision of the data is improved using the all-mode-averaging method. We compare two methods for reducing excited-state contamination: a variational analysis and a 2-state fit to data at multiple values of the source-sink separation tsep. We show that both methods can be tuned to significantly reduce excited-state contamination and discuss their relative advantages and cost effectiveness. A detailed analysis of the size of source smearing used in the calculation of quark propagators and the range of values of tsep needed to demonstrate convergence of the isovector charges of the nucleon to the tsep→∞ estimates is presented.

  19. Matrix element method for high performance computing platforms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grasseau, G.; Chamont, D.; Beaudette, F.; Bianchini, L.; Davignon, O.; Mastrolorenzo, L.; Ochando, C.; Paganini, P.; Strebler, T.

    2015-12-01

    Lot of efforts have been devoted by ATLAS and CMS teams to improve the quality of LHC events analysis with the Matrix Element Method (MEM). Up to now, very few implementations try to face up the huge computing resources required by this method. We propose here a highly parallel version, combining MPI and OpenCL, which makes the MEM exploitation reachable for the whole CMS datasets with a moderate cost. In the article, we describe the status of two software projects under development, one focused on physics and one focused on computing. We also showcase their preliminary performance obtained with classical multi-core processors, CUDA accelerators and MIC co-processors. This let us extrapolate that with the help of 6 high-end accelerators, we should be able to reprocess the whole LHC run 1 within 10 days, and that we have a satisfying metric for the upcoming run 2. The future work will consist in finalizing a single merged system including all the physics and all the parallelism infrastructure, thus optimizing implementation for best hardware platforms.

  20. Configuration interaction matrix elements for the quantum Hall effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wooten, Rachel; Macek, Joseph

    2015-03-01

    In the spherical model of the quantum Hall system, the two-body matrix elements and pseudopotentials can be found analytically in terms of a general scalar pair interaction potential by expressing the pair interaction as a weighted sum over Legendre polynomials. For non-infinite systems, only a finite set of terms in the potential expansion contribute to the interactions; the contributing terms define an effective spatial potential for the system. The connection between the effective spatial potential and the pseudopotential is one-to-one for finite systems, and any completely defined model pseudopotential can be analytically inverted to give a unique corresponding spatial potential. This technique of inverting the pseudopotential to derive effective spatial potentials may be of use for developing accurate model spatial potentials for quantum Monte Carlo simulations. We demonstrate the technique and the corresponding spatial potentials for a few example model pseudopotentials. Supported by Office of Basic Energy Sciences, U.S. DOE, Grant DE-FG02-02ER15283 to the University of Tennessee.

  1. Spin correlations and velocity scaling in color-octet nonrelativistic QCD matrix elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bodwin, Geoffrey T.; Lee, Jungil; Sinclair, D. K.

    2005-07-01

    We compute spin-dependent decay matrix elements for S-wave charmonium and bottomonium in lattice nonrelativistic quantum chromodynamics (NRQCD). Particular emphasis is placed upon the color-octet matrix elements, since the corresponding production matrix elements are expected to appear in the dominant contributions to the production cross sections at large transverse momenta. We use three slightly different versions of the heavy-quark lattice Green’s functions in order to minimize the contributions that scale as powers of the ultraviolet cutoff. The lattice matrix elements that we calculate obey the hierarchy that is suggested by the velocity-scaling rules of NRQCD.

  2. Analytical Derivations of Single-Particle Matrix Elements in Nuclear Shell Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fatah, Aziz H.; Radhi, R. A.; Abdullah, Nzar R.

    2016-07-01

    We present analytical method to calculate single particle matrix elements used in atomic and nuclear physics. We show seven different formulas of matrix elements of the operator f(r)dr m where f(r) = rμ, rμ jJ(qr), V(r) corresponding to the Gaussian and the Yukawa potentials used in nuclear shell models and nuclear structure. In addition, we take into account a general integral formula of the matrix element that covers all seven matrix elements obtained analytically.

  3. Explicitly Correlated Gaussian Basis Functions: Derivation and Implementation of Matrix Elements and Gradient Formulas Using Matrix Differential Calculus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kinghorn, Donald Bruce

    The matrix differential calculus is introduced to the quantum chemistry community via new matrix derivations of integral formulas and gradients for Hamiltonian matrix elements in a basis of correlated Gaussian functions. Requisite mathematical background material on Kronecker products, Hadamard products, the vec and vech operators, linear structures, and matrix differential calculus is presented. New matrix forms for the kinetic and potential energy operators are presented. Integrals for overlap, kinetic energy and potential energy matrix elements are derived in matrix form using matrix calculus. The gradient of the energy functional with respect to the correlated Gaussian exponent matrices is derived. Burdensome summation notation is entirely replaced with a compact matrix notation that is both theoretically and computationally insightful. These new formulas in the basis of explicitly correlated Gaussian basis functions, are implemented and applied to find variational upper bounds for non-relativistic ground states of ^4He, ^{infty}He, Ps_2, ^9Be, and ^ {infty}Be. Analytic gradients of the energy are included to speed optimization of the exponential variational parameters. Five different nonlinear optimization subroutines (algorithms) are compared: TN, truncated Newton; DUMING, quasi-Newton; DUMIDH, modified Newton; DUMCGG, conjugate gradient; POWELL, direction set (non-gradient). The new analytic gradient formulas are found to significantly accelerate optimizations that require gradients. The truncated Newton algorithm is found to outperform the other optimizers for the selected test cases. Computer timings and energy bounds are reported. The new TN bounds surpass previously reported bounds with the same basis size.

  4. Reduced-density-matrix description for pump-probe optical phenomena in moving atomic systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jacobs, V. L.

    2014-09-01

    Linear and nonlinear (especially coherent) electromagnetic interactions of moving many-electron atoms are investigated using a reduced-density-matrix description, which is applied to electromagnetically induced transparency and related resonant pump-probe optical phenomena. External magnetic fields are included on an equal footing with the electromagnetic fields and spin-Zeeman interactions are taken into account. Complimentary time-domain (equation-of-motion) and frequency-domain (resolvent-operator) formulations of the reduced-density-matrix description are self-consistently developed. The general nonperturbative and non-Markovian formulations provide a fundamental framework for systematic evaluations of corrections to the standard Born (lowest-order-perturbation) and Markov (short-memory-time) approximations. The macroscopic electromagnetic response is described semiclassically, employing a perturbation expansion of the reduced-density operator in powers of the classical electromagnetic field. Our primary results are compact Liouville-space operator expressions for the linear and general (nth-order) nonlinear macroscopic electromagnetic-response tensors, which can be evaluated for nonlocal and nonstationary optical media described by multilevel atomic-system representations. Interactions among atoms and with environmental photons are treated as line-broadening effects by means of a general Liouville-space self-energy operator, for which the tetradic-matrix elements are explicitly evaluated in the diagonal, lowest-order, and Markov approximations. The compact Liouville-space operator expressions that are derived for the macroscopic electromagnetic-response tensors are introduced into the dynamical description of the electromagnetic-field propagation. It is pointed out that a quantized-electromagnetic-field approach will be required for a fully self-consistent quantum-mechanical treatment of local-field effects and radiative corrections.

  5. Energy density matrix formalism for interacting quantum systems: a quantum Monte Carlo study

    SciTech Connect

    Krogel, Jaron T; Kim, Jeongnim; Reboredo, Fernando A

    2014-01-01

    We develop an energy density matrix that parallels the one-body reduced density matrix (1RDM) for many-body quantum systems. Just as the density matrix gives access to the number density and occupation numbers, the energy density matrix yields the energy density and orbital occupation energies. The eigenvectors of the matrix provide a natural orbital partitioning of the energy density while the eigenvalues comprise a single particle energy spectrum obeying a total energy sum rule. For mean-field systems the energy density matrix recovers the exact spectrum. When correlation becomes important, the occupation energies resemble quasiparticle energies in some respects. We explore the occupation energy spectrum for the finite 3D homogeneous electron gas in the metallic regime and an isolated oxygen atom with ground state quantum Monte Carlo techniques imple- mented in the QMCPACK simulation code. The occupation energy spectrum for the homogeneous electron gas can be described by an effective mass below the Fermi level. Above the Fermi level evanescent behavior in the occupation energies is observed in similar fashion to the occupation numbers of the 1RDM. A direct comparison with total energy differences demonstrates a quantita- tive connection between the occupation energies and electron addition and removal energies for the electron gas. For the oxygen atom, the association between the ground state occupation energies and particle addition and removal energies becomes only qualitative. The energy density matrix provides a new avenue for describing energetics with quantum Monte Carlo methods which have traditionally been limited to total energies.

  6. Magnitude and significance of the higher-order reduced density matrix cumulants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herbert, John M.

    Using full configuration interaction wave functions for Be and LiH, in both minimal and extended basis sets, we examine the absolute magnitude and energetic significance of various contributions to the three-electron reduced density matrix (3-RDM) and its connected (size-consistent) component, the 3-RDM cumulant (3-RDMC). Minimal basis sets are shown to suppress the magnitude of the 3-RDMC in an artificial manner, whereas in extended basis sets, 3-RDMC matrix elements are often comparable in magnitude to the corresponding 3-RDM elements, even in cases where this result is not required by spin angular momentum coupling. Formal considerations suggest that these observations should generalize to higher-order p-RDMs and p-RDMCs (p > 3). This result is discussed within the context of electronic structure methods based on the contracted Schrödinger equation (CSE), as solution of the CSE relies on 3- and 4-RDM ?reconstruction functionals? that neglect the 3-RDMC, the 4-RDMC, or both. Although the 3-RDMC is responsible for at most 0.2% of the total electronic energy in Be and LiH, it accounts for up to 70% of the correlation energy, raising questions regarding whether (and how) the CSE can offer a useful computational methodology.

  7. Application of the Finite-Element Z-Matrix Method to e-H2 Collisions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huo, Winifred M.; Brown, David; Langhoff, Stephen R. (Technical Monitor)

    1997-01-01

    The present study adapts the Z-matrix formulation using a mixed basis of finite elements and Gaussians. This is a energy-independent basis which allows flexible boundary conditions and is amenable to efficient algorithms for evaluating the necessary matrix elements with molecular targets.

  8. Destructive interference of E2 matrix elements in a triaxial rotor model

    SciTech Connect

    Allmond, James M; Wood, J. L.; Kulp, W. D.

    2010-01-01

    A triaxial rotor model with independent inertia and electric quadrupole tensors is applied to nuclei that have certain E2 matrix elements equal to zero. It is shown that such vanishing E2 matrix elements are explained by the model as a destructive interference effect. The example of 196Pt is considered.

  9. Optimum element density studies for finite-element thermal analysis of hypersonic aircraft structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ko, William L.; Olona, Timothy; Muramoto, Kyle M.

    1990-01-01

    Different finite element models previously set up for thermal analysis of the space shuttle orbiter structure are discussed and their shortcomings identified. Element density criteria are established for the finite element thermal modelings of space shuttle orbiter-type large, hypersonic aircraft structures. These criteria are based on rigorous studies on solution accuracies using different finite element models having different element densities set up for one cell of the orbiter wing. Also, a method for optimization of the transient thermal analysis computer central processing unit (CPU) time is discussed. Based on the newly established element density criteria, the orbiter wing midspan segment was modeled for the examination of thermal analysis solution accuracies and the extent of computation CPU time requirements. The results showed that the distributions of the structural temperatures and the thermal stresses obtained from this wing segment model were satisfactory and the computation CPU time was at the acceptable level. The studies offered the hope that modeling the large, hypersonic aircraft structures using high-density elements for transient thermal analysis is possible if a CPU optimization technique was used.

  10. Element orbitals for Kohn-Sham density functional theory

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, Lin; Ying, Lexing

    2012-05-08

    We present a method to discretize the Kohn-Sham Hamiltonian matrix in the pseudopotential framework by a small set of basis functions automatically contracted from a uniform basis set such as planewaves. Each basis function is localized around an element, which is a small part of the global domain containing multiple atoms. We demonstrate that the resulting basis set achieves meV accuracy for 3D densely packed systems with a small number of basis functions per atom. The procedure is applicable to insulating and metallic systems.

  11. Matrix Green's functions and their application in analyzing scattering by density and sound velocity inhomogeneities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dmitriev, K. V.

    2015-11-01

    Matrix Green's functions are introduced for a linearized system of hydrodynamic equations. The relations between the retarded and advanced Green's functions and Green's functions of the direct and conjugate operators of the system of hydrodynamic equations are determined. An expression for the reciprocity principle and a relation like the Marchenko equation are derived. The proposed mathematical apparatus is used to analyze scattering by a quasi-point refraction-density inhomogeneity of a medium. The phase and amplitude limitations are obtained for the scattering coefficients of such an inhomogeneity. The existence of the largest possible amplitude of the scattered field should be taken into account in designing metamaterials consisting of individual elements whose sizes are small compared to the wavelength, including those with resonance properties.

  12. EH3 matrix mineralogy with major and trace element composition compared to chondrules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lehner, S. W.; McDonough, W. F.; NéMeth, P.

    2014-12-01

    We investigated the matrix mineralogy in primitive EH3 chondrites Sahara 97072, ALH 84170, and LAR 06252 with transmission electron microscopy; measured the trace and major element compositions of Sahara 97072 matrix and ferromagnesian chondrules with laser-ablation, inductively coupled, plasma mass spectrometry (LA-ICPMS); and analyzed the bulk composition of Sahara 97072 with LA-ICPMS, solution ICPMS, and inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectroscopy. The fine-grained matrix of EH3 chondrites is unlike that in other chondrite groups, consisting primarily of enstatite, cristobalite, troilite, and kamacite with a notable absence of olivine. Matrix and pyroxene-rich chondrule compositions differ from one another and are distinct from the bulk meteorite. Refractory lithophile elements are enriched by a factor of 1.5-3 in chondrules relative to matrix, whereas the matrix is enriched in moderately volatile elements. The compositional relation between the chondrules and matrix is reminiscent of the difference between EH3 pyroxene-rich chondrules and EH3 Si-rich, highly sulfidized chondrules. Similar refractory element ratios between the matrix and the pyroxene-rich chondrules suggest the fine-grained material primarily consists of the shattered, sulfidized remains of the formerly pyroxene-rich chondrules with the minor addition of metal clasts. The matrix, chondrule, and metal-sulfide nodule compositions are probably complementary, suggesting all the components of the EH3 chondrites came from the same nebular reservoir.

  13. Development of edge effects around experimental ecosystem hotspots is affected by edge density and matrix type

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Ecological edge effects are sensitive to landscape context. In particular, edge effects can be altered by matrix type and by the presence of other nearby edges. We experimentally altered patch configurations in an African savanna to determine how edge density and matrix type influence edge effect de...

  14. The residual interaction of bound nucleons-two-nucleon matrix elements deduced from transfer experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daehnick, W. W.

    1983-07-01

    Matrix elements for the effective two-nucleon interaction have been deduced from the population of multiplets near closed shells as observed in direct transfer reactions. In the evaluation, the limited purity of such multiples was taken into consideration, typically by weighting the observed fractions of the two-nucleon configurations by their spectroscopic strenghts and by using the resulting energy centroids. In a few cases, off-diagonal matrix elements are available from empirical wave funcitons. The systematic errors for particle-particle matrix elements extracted directly and those obtained from Pandya transformations were found to go in opposite directions. In some cases, this feautre of the empirical mehtod could be used to suggest upper and lower “bounds” for the extracted matrix elements. Diagonal matrix elements for the empirical residual interaction show a number of features suggestive of an underlying simplicity in the interaction of bound nucleons. Within experimental uncertainties (of about 10% for T=0 matrix elements) the monopole parts of the matrix elements are fit well with a simple A-0.75 dependence, and the data available to date do not reveal any significant monopole dependence on the quantum numbers of the interacting nucleons. The usefulness of scaling is suggested. Generally, diagonal matrix elements EJ( j1, j2) normalized by the extracted A-dependent monopole strength agree within expected experimental uncertainties whether derived from particle-particle or particle-hole multiples and whether extracted from the beginning or the end of a major shell. For values J≠0, the diagonal EJ( j2) matrix elements seem to follow two universal functions which depend on the semi-classical coupling angles θ 12, but are otherwise independent on j. For j1≠ j2 several “typical” functions ƒ(θ 12) can be constructed which fit subsets of the data and differ in a predictable way. The general features of the bound-nucleon interaction appear

  15. Density and elemental ratios of secondary organic aerosol: Application of a density prediction method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakao, Shunsuke; Tang, Ping; Tang, Xiaochen; Clark, Christopher H.; Qi, Li; Seo, Eric; Asa-Awuku, Akua; Cocker, David

    2013-04-01

    Organic material density is a fundamental parameter in aerosol science, yet direct measurement is not readily available. This study investigates density and elemental ratios of secondary organic aerosol (SOA) formed by the oxidation of 22 different volatile organic compounds with a wide range of molecular size (C5˜C15) in an environmental chamber. Reactants with a larger number of carbons yielded SOA with lower density (e.g., β-caryophyllene SOA: 1.22 g cm-3) compared with smaller ones (e.g., phenol SOA: 1.43 g cm-3) consistent with different extents of oxidation of the parent molecule. A recent study proposed a semi-empirical relationship between elemental ratios (O/C and H/C) and organic material density (Kuwata et al., 2012). The prediction method therein is evaluated against the large experimental data set of this study acquired in the UC Riverside/CE-CERT environmental chamber. The predicted particle densities agree with experimental measurements within 12% as stated by Kuwata et al. (2012) except for C6 compounds (benzene, phenol, and catechol). Therefore, the range of application has been further extended to include anthropogenic (aromatic) systems. The effects of nitrogen and sulfur on the density prediction remain unclear.

  16. Measurement of the CKM Matrix Elements |Vcb| and |Vub| at the B-factories

    SciTech Connect

    Menges, Wolfgang

    2006-08-01

    Recent results on inclusive and exclusive semileptonic B decays from B-factories are presented. The impact of these measurements on the determination of the CKM matrix elements |V{sub ub}| and |V{sub cb}| is discussed.

  17. Can one measure nuclear matrix elements of neutrinoless double {beta} decay?

    SciTech Connect

    Rodin, Vadim; Faessler, Amand

    2009-10-15

    By making use of the isospin conservation by strong interaction, the Fermi 0{nu}{beta}{beta} nuclear matrix element M{sub F}{sup 0{nu}} is transformed to acquire the form of an energy-weighted double Fermi transition matrix element. This useful representation allows reconstruction of the total M{sub F}{sup 0{nu}} provided a small isospin-breaking Fermi matrix element between the isobaric analog state in the intermediate nucleus and the ground state of the daughter nucleus could be measured, e.g., by charge-exchange reactions. Such a measurement could set a scale for the 0{nu}{beta}{beta} nuclear matrix elements and help to discriminate between the different nuclear structure models in which calculated M{sub F}{sup 0{nu}} may differ by as much as a factor of 5 (that translates to about 20% difference in the total M{sup 0{nu}})

  18. Zn Isotopes in Chondrites, Chondrules, and Matrix: Origin of the Volatile Element Depletion in Chondrites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moynier, F.; Pringle, E.; Hezel, D.

    2015-07-01

    The variations of Zn isotope ratios among carbonaceous chondrites show that the volatile element depletion in solar system material occurred in the solar nebula. We will also present the Zn isotopic composition of chondrules and matrix from carbonaceous chondrites.

  19. Calculation of Radiative Corrections to E1 matrix elements in the Neutral Alkalis

    SciTech Connect

    Sapirstein, J; Cheng, K T

    2004-09-28

    Radiative corrections to E1 matrix elements for ns-np transitions in the alkali metal atoms lithium through francium are evaluated. They are found to be small for the lighter alkalis but significantly larger for the heavier alkalis, and in the case of cesium much larger than the experimental accuracy. The relation of the matrix element calculation to a recent decay rate calculation for hydrogenic ions is discussed, and application of the method to parity nonconservation in cesium is described.

  20. Construct order parameters from the reduced density matrix spectra

    SciTech Connect

    Gu, Shi-Jian; Yu, Wing Chi; Lin, Hai-Qing

    2013-09-15

    In this paper, we try to establish a connection between a quantum information concept, i.e., the mutual information, and the conventional order parameter in condensed matter physics. We show that non-vanishing mutual information between two subsystems separated by a long distance means the existence of long-range orders in the system. By analyzing the spectra of the reduced density matrices that are used to calculate the mutual information, we show how to derive the local order operators that identify various ordered phases in condensed matter physics. -- Highlights: •Discussed the relation between long-range order and the mutual information (MI). •Pointed out how to check the existence of long-range order from MI. •Proposed a scheme to derive the diagonal and off-diagonal order parameter. •Gave three examples to show the effectiveness of the scheme.

  1. Density matrix renormalization group with efficient dynamical electron correlation through range separation

    SciTech Connect

    Hedegård, Erik Donovan Knecht, Stefan; Reiher, Markus; Kielberg, Jesper Skau; Jensen, Hans Jørgen Aagaard

    2015-06-14

    We present a new hybrid multiconfigurational method based on the concept of range-separation that combines the density matrix renormalization group approach with density functional theory. This new method is designed for the simultaneous description of dynamical and static electron-correlation effects in multiconfigurational electronic structure problems.

  2. Matrix density effects on the mechanical properties of SiC fiber-reinforced silicon nitride matrix properties

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bhatt, Ramakrishna T.; Kiser, Lames D.

    1990-01-01

    The room temperature mechanical properties were measured for SiC fiber reinforced reaction-bonded silicon nitride composites (SiC/RBSN) of different densities. The composites consisted of approx. 30 vol percent uniaxially aligned 142 micron diameter SiC fibers (Textron SCS-6) in a reaction-bonded Si3N4 matrix. The composite density was varied by changing the consolidation pressure during RBSN processing and by hot isostatically pressing the SiC/RBSN composites. Results indicate that as the consolidation pressure was increased from 27 to 138 MPa, the average pore size of the nitrided composites decreased from 0.04 to 0.02 microns and the composite density increased from 2.07 to 2.45 gm/cc. Nonetheless, these improvements resulted in only small increases in the first matrix cracking stress, primary elastic modulus, and ultimate tensile strength values of the composites. In contrast, HIP consolidation of SiC/RBSN resulted in a fully dense material whose first matrix cracking stress and elastic modulus were approx. 15 and 50 percent higher, respectively, and ultimate tensile strength values were approx. 40 percent lower than those for unHIPed SiC/RBSN composites. The modulus behavior for all specimens can be explained by simple rule-of-mixture theory. Also, the loss in ultimate strength for the HIPed composites appears to be related to a degradation in fiber strength at the HIP temperature. However, the density effect on matrix fracture strength was much less than would be expected based on typical monolithic Si3N4 behavior, suggesting that composite theory is indeed operating. Possible practical implications of these observations are discussed.

  3. Matrix density effects on the mechanical properties of SiC fiber-reinforced silicon nitride matrix properties

    SciTech Connect

    Bhatt, R.T.; Kiser, L.D.

    1990-08-01

    The room temperature mechanical properties were measured for SiC fiber reinforced reaction-bonded silicon nitride composites (SiC/RBSN) of different densities. The composites consisted of approx. 30 vol percent uniaxially aligned 142 micron diameter SiC fibers (Textron SCS-6) in a reaction-bonded Si3N4 matrix. The composite density was varied by changing the consolidation pressure during RBSN processing and by hot isostatically pressing the SiC/RBSN composites. Results indicate that as the consolidation pressure was increased from 27 to 138 MPa, the average pore size of the nitrided composites decreased from 0.04 to 0.02 microns and the composite density increased from 2.07 to 2.45 gm/cc. Nonetheless, these improvements resulted in only small increases in the first matrix cracking stress, primary elastic modulus, and ultimate tensile strength values of the composites. In contrast, HIP consolidation of SiC/RBSN resulted in a fully dense material whose first matrix cracking stress and elastic modulus were approx. 15 and 50 percent higher, respectively, and ultimate tensile strength values were approx. 40 percent lower than those for unHIPed SiC/RBSN composites. The modulus behavior for all specimens can be explained by simple rule-of-mixture theory. Also, the loss in ultimate strength for the HIPed composites appears to be related to a degradation in fiber strength at the HIP temperature. However, the density effect on matrix fracture strength was much less than would be expected based on typical monolithic Si3N4 behavior, suggesting that composite theory is indeed operating. Possible practical implications of these observations are discussed. 18 refs.

  4. Bone mineral density and survival of elements and element portions in the bones of the Crow Creek massacre victims.

    PubMed

    Willey, P; Galloway, A; Snyder, L

    1997-12-01

    The interpretation of archaeologically-derived skeletal series is dependent on the elements and portions of elements preserved for examination. Bone and bone portion survival is affected by factors, both intrinsic and extrinsic to the elements themselves, that influence deterioration and preservation. Among the intrinsic variables, the density of the element and element portion are particularly important with respect to the degree of preservation. Recently reported bone mineral density values from a contemporary human sample are compared to the survival of prehistoric limb bones of the Crow Creek specimens, a fourteenth-century massacre skeletal series. The contemporary density values are positively correlated with Crow Creek element and element portion survival. Two calculations of bone mineral density, however, are more closely related to preservation than a third. Such density information has implications for assessing minimum number of elements and individuals and documenting taphonomic processes. PMID:9453699

  5. Mesh refinement in finite element analysis by minimization of the stiffness matrix trace

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kittur, Madan G.; Huston, Ronald L.

    1989-01-01

    Most finite element packages provide means to generate meshes automatically. However, the user is usually confronted with the problem of not knowing whether the mesh generated is appropriate for the problem at hand. Since the accuracy of the finite element results is mesh dependent, mesh selection forms a very important step in the analysis. Indeed, in accurate analyses, meshes need to be refined or rezoned until the solution converges to a value so that the error is below a predetermined tolerance. A-posteriori methods use error indicators, developed by using the theory of interpolation and approximation theory, for mesh refinements. Some use other criterions, such as strain energy density variation and stress contours for example, to obtain near optimal meshes. Although these methods are adaptive, they are expensive. Alternatively, a priori methods, until now available, use geometrical parameters, for example, element aspect ratio. Therefore, they are not adaptive by nature. An adaptive a-priori method is developed. The criterion is that the minimization of the trace of the stiffness matrix with respect to the nodal coordinates, leads to a minimization of the potential energy, and as a consequence provide a good starting mesh. In a few examples the method is shown to provide the optimal mesh. The method is also shown to be relatively simple and amenable to development of computer algorithms. When the procedure is used in conjunction with a-posteriori methods of grid refinement, it is shown that fewer refinement iterations and fewer degrees of freedom are required for convergence as opposed to when the procedure is not used. The mesh obtained is shown to have uniform distribution of stiffness among the nodes and elements which, as a consequence, leads to uniform error distribution. Thus the mesh obtained meets the optimality criterion of uniform error distribution.

  6. FRODO: a MuPAD program to calculate matrix elements between contracted wavefunctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Angeli, C.; Cimiraglia, R.

    2005-09-01

    A symbolic program performing the Formal Reduction of Density Operators (FRODO) has been developed in the MuPAD computer algebra system with the purpose of evaluating the matrix elements of the electronic Hamiltonian between internally contracted functions in a complete active space (CAS) scheme. The program is illustrated making use of two meaningful examples. Program summaryTitle of program:FRODO Catalogue identifier:ADVY Program summary URL:http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/summaries/ADVY Program obtainable from: CPC Program Library, Queen's University of Belfast, N. Ireland Computer:Any computer on which the MuPAD computer algebra system can be installed Operating systems under which the program has been tested:Linux Programming language used:MuPAD vs. 2.5.3 for Linux No. of lines in distributed program, including test data, etc.:3939 No. of bytes in distributed program, including test data, etc.:19 661 Distribution format:tar.gz Nature of physical problem: In order to improve on the CAS-SCF wavefunction one can resort to multireference perturbation theory or configuration interaction based on internally contracted functions (ICF) which are obtained by application of the excitation operators to the reference CAS-SCF wavefunction. The formulation of such matrix elements is quite cumbersome and a computer algebra system like MuPAD appears ideally suited to perform such a task. Method of solution: The method adopted consists in successively eliminating all occurrences of inactive orbital indices (core and virtual) from the products of excitation operators which appear in the definition of the ICF's and in the electronic Hamiltonian expressed in the second quantization formalism. Restrictions due to the complexity of the problem: The program is limited to no more than doubly excited ICF's.

  7. Elemental: a new framework for distributed memory dense matrix computations.

    SciTech Connect

    Romero, N.; Poulson, J.; Marker, B.; Hammond, J.; Van de Geijn, R.

    2012-02-14

    Parallelizing dense matrix computations to distributed memory architectures is a well-studied subject and generally considered to be among the best understood domains of parallel computing. Two packages, developed in the mid 1990s, still enjoy regular use: ScaLAPACK and PLAPACK. With the advent of many-core architectures, which may very well take the shape of distributed memory architectures within a single processor, these packages must be revisited since the traditional MPI-based approaches will likely need to be extended. Thus, this is a good time to review lessons learned since the introduction of these two packages and to propose a simple yet effective alternative. Preliminary performance results show the new solution achieves competitive, if not superior, performance on large clusters.

  8. Priority Choice Experimental Two-Qubit Tomography: Measuring One by One All Elements of Density Matrices

    PubMed Central

    Bartkiewicz, Karol; Černoch, Antonín; Lemr, Karel; Miranowicz, Adam

    2016-01-01

    In standard optical tomographic methods, the off-diagonal elements of a density matrix ρ are measured indirectly. Thus, the reconstruction of ρ, even if it is based on linear inversion, typically magnifies small errors in the experimental data. Recently, an optimal tomography solution measuring all the elements of ρ one-by-one without error magnification has been theoretically proposed. We implemented this method for two-qubit polarization states. For comparison, we also experimentally implemented other well-known tomographic protocols, either based solely on local measurements (of, e.g., the Pauli operators and James-Kwiat-Munro-White projectors) or with mutually unbiased bases requiring both local and global measurements. We reconstructed seventeen separable, partially and maximally entangled two-qubit polarization states. Our experiments show that our method has the highest stability against errors in comparison to other quantum tomographies. In particular, we demonstrate that each optimally-reconstructed state is embedded in an uncertainty circle of the smallest radius, both in terms of trace distance and disturbance. We explain how to experimentally estimate uncertainty radii for all the implemented tomographies and show that, for each reconstructed state, the relevant uncertainty circles intersect indicating the approximate location of the corresponding physical density matrix. PMID:26792194

  9. Matrix elements and duality for type 2 unitary representations of the Lie superalgebra gl(m|n)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Werry, Jason L.; Gould, Mark D.; Isaac, Phillip S.

    2015-12-01

    The characteristic identity formalism discussed in our recent articles is further utilized to derive matrix elements of type 2 unitary irreducible gl(m|n) modules. In particular, we give matrix element formulae for all gl(m|n) generators, including the non-elementary generators, together with their phases on finite dimensional type 2 unitary irreducible representations which include the contravariant tensor representations and an additional class of essentially typical representations. Remarkably, we find that the type 2 unitary matrix element equations coincide with the type 1 unitary matrix element equations for non-vanishing matrix elements up to a phase.

  10. Matrix elements and duality for type 2 unitary representations of the Lie superalgebra gl(m|n)

    SciTech Connect

    Werry, Jason L.; Gould, Mark D.; Isaac, Phillip S.

    2015-12-15

    The characteristic identity formalism discussed in our recent articles is further utilized to derive matrix elements of type 2 unitary irreducible gl(m|n) modules. In particular, we give matrix element formulae for all gl(m|n) generators, including the non-elementary generators, together with their phases on finite dimensional type 2 unitary irreducible representations which include the contravariant tensor representations and an additional class of essentially typical representations. Remarkably, we find that the type 2 unitary matrix element equations coincide with the type 1 unitary matrix element equations for non-vanishing matrix elements up to a phase.

  11. Electron scattering from large molecules: a 3d finite element R-matrix approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tonzani, Stefano; Greene, Chris H.

    2005-05-01

    To solve the Schr"odinger equation for scattering of a low energy electron from a molecule, we present a three-dimensional finite element R-matrix method [S. Tonzani and C. H. Greene, J. Chem. Phys. 122 01411, (2005)]. Using the static exchange and local density approximations, we can use directly the molecular potentials extracted from ab initio codes (GAUSSIAN 98 in the work described here). A local polarization potential based on density functional theory [F. A. Gianturco and A. Rodriguez-Ruiz, Phys. Rev. A 47, 1075 (1993)] approximately describes the long range attraction to the molecular target induced by the scattering electron without adjustable parameters. We have used this approach successfully in calculations of cross sections for small and medium sized molecules (like SF6, XeF6, C60 and Uracil). This method will be useful to treat the electron-induced dynamics of extended molecular systems, possibly of biological interest, where oth er more complex ab initio methods are difficult to apply.

  12. The effects of finite element grid density on model correlation and damage detection of a bridge

    SciTech Connect

    Simmermacher, T.; Mayes, R.L.; Reese, G.M.; James, G.H.; Zimmerman, D.C.

    1995-12-31

    Variation of model size as determined by grid density is studied for both model refinement and damage detection. In model refinement 3 it is found that a large model with a fine grid is preferable in order to achieve a reasonable correlation between the experimental response and the finite element model. A smaller model falls victim to the inaccuracies of the finite element method. As the grid become increasing finer, the FE method approaches an accurate representation. In damage detection the FE method is only a starting point. The model is refined with a matrix method which doesn`t retain the FE approximation, therefore a smaller model that captures most of the dynamics of the structure can be used and is preferable.

  13. Use of R-matrix theory in light element evaluations

    SciTech Connect

    Hale, G.M.

    1992-12-31

    R-matrix theory is a general framework for describing nuclear reactions (neutron- and charged-particle-induced) that is particularly well-suited for including resonances. We will review some unconventional properties of resonances that arise from this theory, including non-Breit-Wigner (BW) resonances and shadow poles, and discuss their physical consequences. Examples will be given from the analyses of several light systems that have been used in ENDF evaluations, including {sup 4}He, {sup 5}He, {sup 15}N, and {sup 17}O. The resonances in the helium systems tend to be significantly non-BW in character, while almost all the resonances in {sup 15}N and {sup 17}O are Breit-Wigner. An interesting exception in the case of {sup 15}N indicates that some of the sub-threshold levels that have been assumed to be bound might be virtual. We find that fitting data from all possible reactions simultaneously results in level schemes for the compound systems that differ in some cases significantly from the ``accepted`` published level information.

  14. Matrix exponentials, SU(N) group elements, and real polynomial roots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Van Kortryk, T. S.

    2016-02-01

    The exponential of an N × N matrix can always be expressed as a matrix polynomial of order N - 1. In particular, a general group element for the fundamental representation of SU(N) can be expressed as a matrix polynomial of order N - 1 in a traceless N × N hermitian generating matrix, with polynomial coefficients consisting of elementary trigonometric functions dependent on N - 2 invariants in addition to the group parameter. These invariants are just angles determined by the direction of a real N-vector whose components are the eigenvalues of the hermitian matrix. Equivalently, the eigenvalues are given by projecting the vertices of an (" separators=" N - 1 ) -simplex onto a particular axis passing through the center of the simplex. The orientation of the simplex relative to this axis determines the angular invariants and hence the real eigenvalues of the matrix.

  15. A Matrix Model for Reliability of a Cold-Standby system with Identical Repairable Elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farahpour, Peyman; Mahshid, Kamrouz; Sharifi, Mani; Palizban, Aidin

    2011-09-01

    In this paper we studied a cold standby system with n identical constant failure rate repairable elements. The system has m repairmen and each repairman only works on the one failed element. After failings one element, another element replace immediately. The failure and repair rate of each element is constant as λ, μ. At first a matrix model presented to determine the state of the system. Then we establish the differential equations between the states of the system and finally with a numerical example, we illustrate the method of solving the equations. This paper divided to five main parts, we present some studies about the redundancy allocation and the marcovian models in the introduction. In the second part introduce the system description. In the third part differential equations of the system have been presented in a matrix. A numerical example presented in the 4th part to illustrated how to work with these equations. Last parts we deal with conclusion and future studies.

  16. Matrix sublimation method for the formation of high-density amorphous ice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kouchi, A.; Hama, T.; Kimura, Y.; Hidaka, H.; Escribano, R.; Watanabe, N.

    2016-08-01

    A novel method for the formation of amorphous ice involving matrix sublimation has been developed. A CO-rich CO:H2O mixed ice was deposited at 8-10 K under ultra-high vacuum condition, which was then allowed to warm. After the sublimation of matrix CO at 35 K, amorphous ice remained. The amorphous ice formed exhibits a highly porous microscale texture; however, it also rather exhibits a density similar to that of high-density amorphous ice formed under high pressure. Furthermore, unlike conventional vapor-deposited amorphous ice, the amorphous ice is stable up to 140 K, where it transforms directly to cubic ice Ic.

  17. Efficient computation of Hamiltonian matrix elements between non-orthogonal Slater determinants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Utsuno, Yutaka; Shimizu, Noritaka; Otsuka, Takaharu; Abe, Takashi

    2013-01-01

    We present an efficient numerical method for computing Hamiltonian matrix elements between non-orthogonal Slater determinants, focusing on the most time-consuming component of the calculation that involves a sparse array. In the usual case where many matrix elements should be calculated, this computation can be transformed into a multiplication of dense matrices. It is demonstrated that the present method based on the matrix-matrix multiplication attains ˜80% of the theoretical peak performance measured on systems equipped with modern microprocessors, a factor of 5-10 better than the normal method using indirectly indexed arrays to treat a sparse array. The reason for such different performances is discussed from the viewpoint of memory access.

  18. Extracellular matrix density regulates the rate of neovessel growth and branching in sprouting angiogenesis.

    PubMed

    Edgar, Lowell T; Underwood, Clayton J; Guilkey, James E; Hoying, James B; Weiss, Jeffrey A

    2014-01-01

    Angiogenesis is regulated by the local microenvironment, including the mechanical interactions between neovessel sprouts and the extracellular matrix (ECM). However, the mechanisms controlling the relationship of mechanical and biophysical properties of the ECM to neovessel growth during sprouting angiogenesis are just beginning to be understood. In this research, we characterized the relationship between matrix density and microvascular topology in an in vitro 3D organ culture model of sprouting angiogenesis. We used these results to design and calibrate a computational growth model to demonstrate how changes in individual neovessel behavior produce the changes in vascular topology that were observed experimentally. Vascularized gels with higher collagen densities produced neovasculatures with shorter vessel lengths, less branch points, and reduced network interconnectivity. The computational model was able to predict these experimental results by scaling the rates of neovessel growth and branching according to local matrix density. As a final demonstration of utility of the modeling framework, we used our growth model to predict several scenarios of practical interest that could not be investigated experimentally using the organ culture model. Increasing the density of the ECM significantly reduced angiogenesis and network formation within a 3D organ culture model of angiogenesis. Increasing the density of the matrix increases the stiffness of the ECM, changing how neovessels are able to deform and remodel their surroundings. The computational framework outlined in this study was capable of predicting this observed experimental behavior by adjusting neovessel growth rate and branching probability according to local ECM density, demonstrating that altering the stiffness of the ECM via increasing matrix density affects neovessel behavior, thereby regulated vascular topology during angiogenesis. PMID:24465500

  19. Density matrix for an electron confined in quantum dots under uniform magnetic field and static electrical field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pang, Qian-Jun

    2007-01-01

    Using unitary transformations, this paper obtains the eigenvalues and the common eigenvector of Hamiltonian and a new-defined generalized angular momentum (Lz) for an electron confined in quantum dots under a uniform magnetic field (UMF) and a static electric field (SEF). It finds that the eigenvalue of Lz just stands for the expectation value of a usual angular momentum lz in the eigen-state. It first obtains the matrix density for this system via directly calculating a transfer matrix element of operator exp(-βH) in some representations with the technique of integral within an ordered products (IWOP) of operators, rather than via solving a Bloch equation. Because the quadratic homogeneity of potential energy is broken due to the existence of SEF, the virial theorem in statistical physics is not satisfactory for this system, which is confirmed through the calculation of thermal averages of physical quantities.

  20. Quenched domain wall QCD with DBW2 gauge action toward nucleon decay matrix element calculation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aoki, Yasumichi

    2001-10-01

    The domain wall fermion action is a promising way to control chiral symmetry in lattice gauge theory. By the good chiral symmetry of this approach even at finite lattice spacing, one is able to extract hadronic matrix elements, like kaon weak matrix elements, for which the symmetry is extremely important. Ordinary fermions with poor chiral symmetry make calculation difficult because of the large mixing of operators with different chiral structure. Even though the domain wall fermion action with the simple Wilson gauge action has a good chiral symmetry, one can further improve the symmetry by using a different gauge action. We take a non-perturbatively improved action, the DBW2 action of the QCD Taro group. Hadron masses are systematically examined for a range of parameters. Application to nucleon decay matrix element is also discussed.

  1. Uncertainties in nuclear transition matrix elements of neutrinoless ββ decay

    SciTech Connect

    Rath, P. K.

    2013-12-30

    To estimate the uncertainties associated with the nuclear transition matrix elements M{sup (K)} (K=0ν/0N) for the 0{sup +} → 0{sup +} transitions of electron and positron emitting modes of the neutrinoless ββ decay, a statistical analysis has been performed by calculating sets of eight (twelve) different nuclear transition matrix elements M{sup (K)} in the PHFB model by employing four different parameterizations of a Hamiltonian with pairing plus multipolar effective two-body interaction and two (three) different parameterizations of Jastrow short range correlations. The averages in conjunction with their standard deviations provide an estimate of the uncertainties associated the nuclear transition matrix elements M{sup (K)} calculated within the PHFB model, the maximum of which turn out to be 13% and 19% owing to the exchange of light and heavy Majorana neutrinos, respectively.

  2. B(s) 0-mixing matrix elements from lattice QCD for the Standard Model and beyond

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bazavov, A.; Bernard, C.; Bouchard, C. M.; Chang, C. C.; DeTar, C.; Du, Daping; El-Khadra, A. X.; Freeland, E. D.; Gámiz, E.; Gottlieb, Steven; Heller, U. M.; Kronfeld, A. S.; Laiho, J.; Mackenzie, P. B.; Neil, E. T.; Simone, J.; Sugar, R.; Toussaint, D.; Van de Water, R. S.; Zhou, Ran; Fermilab Lattice; MILC Collaborations

    2016-06-01

    We calculate—for the first time in three-flavor lattice QCD—the hadronic matrix elements of all five local operators that contribute to neutral B0- and Bs-meson mixing in and beyond the Standard Model. We present a complete error budget for each matrix element and also provide the full set of correlations among the matrix elements. We also present the corresponding bag parameters and their correlations, as well as specific combinations of the mixing matrix elements that enter the expression for the neutral B -meson width difference. We obtain the most precise determination to date of the SU(3)-breaking ratio ξ =1.206 (18 )(6 ), where the second error stems from the omission of charm-sea quarks, while the first encompasses all other uncertainties. The threefold reduction in total uncertainty, relative to the 2013 Flavor Lattice Averaging Group results, tightens the constraint from B mixing on the Cabibbo-Kobayashi-Maskawa (CKM) unitarity triangle. Our calculation employs gauge-field ensembles generated by the MILC Collaboration with four lattice spacings and pion masses close to the physical value. We use the asqtad-improved staggered action for the light-valence quarks and the Fermilab method for the bottom quark. We use heavy-light meson chiral perturbation theory modified to include lattice-spacing effects to extrapolate the five matrix elements to the physical point. We combine our results with experimental measurements of the neutral B -meson oscillation frequencies to determine the CKM matrix elements |Vt d|=8.00 (34 )(8 )×10-3, |Vt s|=39.0 (1.2 )(0.4 )×10-3, and |Vt d/Vt s|=0.2052 (31 )(10 ), which differ from CKM-unitarity expectations by about 2 σ . These results and others from flavor-changing-neutral currents point towards an emerging tension between weak processes that are mediated at the loop and tree levels.

  3. Kinetic equations for a density matrix describing nonlinear effects in spectral line wings

    SciTech Connect

    Parkhomenko, A. I. Shalagin, A. M.

    2011-11-15

    Kinetic quantum equations are derived for a density matrix with collision integrals describing nonlinear effects in spectra line wings. These equations take into account the earlier established inequality of the spectral densities of Einstein coefficients for absorption and stimulated radiation emission by a two-level quantum system in the far wing of a spectral line in the case of frequent collisions. The relationship of the absorption and stimulated emission probabilities with the characteristics of radiation and an elementary scattering event is found.

  4. Quantum Monte Carlo calculations of electroweak transition matrix elements in A=6,7 nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Pervin, Muslema; Pieper, Steven C.; Wiringa, R. B.

    2007-12-15

    Green's function Monte Carlo (GFMC) calculations of magnetic dipole, electric quadrupole, Fermi, and Gamow-Teller transition matrix elements are reported for A=6,7 nuclei. The matrix elements are extrapolated from mixed estimates that bracket the relevant electroweak operator between variational Monte Carlo (VMC) and GFMC propagated wave functions. Because they are off-diagonal terms, two mixed estimates are required for each transition, with a VMC initial (final) state paired with a GFMC final (initial) state. The realistic Argonne v{sub 18} two-nucleon and Illinois-2 three-nucleon interactions are used to generate the nuclear states. In most cases we find good agreement with experimental data.

  5. Analytic matrix elements for the two-electron atomic basis with logarithmic terms

    SciTech Connect

    Liverts, Evgeny Z.; Barnea, Nir

    2014-08-01

    The two-electron problem for the helium-like atoms in S-state is considered. The basis containing the integer powers of ln r, where r is a radial variable of the Fock expansion, is studied. In this basis, the analytic expressions for the matrix elements of the corresponding Hamiltonian are presented. These expressions include only elementary and special functions, what enables very fast and accurate computation of the matrix elements. The decisive contribution of the correct logarithmic terms to the behavior of the two-electron wave function in the vicinity of the triple-coalescence point is reaffirmed.

  6. Matrix elements for type 1 unitary irreducible representations of the Lie superalgebra gl(m|n)

    SciTech Connect

    Gould, Mark D.; Isaac, Phillip S.; Werry, Jason L.

    2014-01-15

    Using our recent results on eigenvalues of invariants associated to the Lie superalgebra gl(m|n), we use characteristic identities to derive explicit matrix element formulae for all gl(m|n) generators, particularly non-elementary generators, on finite dimensional type 1 unitary irreducible representations. We compare our results with existing works that deal with only subsets of the class of type 1 unitary representations, all of which only present explicit matrix elements for elementary generators. Our work therefore provides an important extension to existing methods, and thus highlights the strength of our techniques which exploit the characteristic identities.

  7. Calculation of radiative corrections to E1 matrix elements in the neutral alkali metals

    SciTech Connect

    Sapirstein, J.; Cheng, K.T.

    2005-02-01

    Radiative corrections to E1 matrix elements for ns-np transitions in the alkali-metal atoms lithium through francium are evaluated. They are found to be small for the lighter alkali metals but significantly larger for the heavier alkali metals, and in the case of cesium much larger than the experimental accuracy. The relation of the matrix element calculation to a recent decay rate calculation for hydrogenic ions is discussed, and application of the method to parity nonconservation in cesium is described.

  8. LIBS Detection of Heavy Metal Elements in Liquid Solutions by Using Wood Pellet as Sample Matrix

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wen, Guanhong; Sun, Duixiong; Su, Maogen; Dong, Chenzhong

    2014-06-01

    Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) has been applied to the analysis of heavy metals in liquid samples. A new approach was presented to lower the limit of detection (LOD) and minimize the sample matrix effects, in which dried wood pellets absorbed the given amounts of Cr standard solutions and then were baked because they have stronger and rapid absorption properties for liquid samples as well as simple elemental compositions. In this work, we have taken a typical heavy metal Cr element as an example, and investigated the spectral feasibility of Cr solutions and dried wood pellets before and after absorbing Cr solutions at the same experimental conditions. The results were demonstrated to successfully produce a superior analytical response for heavy metal elements by using wood pellet as sample matrix according to the obtained LOD of 0.07 ppm for Cr element in solutions.

  9. Density-matrix Chern insulators: Finite-temperature generalization of topological insulators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rivas, A.; Viyuela, O.; Martin-Delgado, M. A.

    2013-10-01

    Thermal noise can destroy topological insulators (TI). However, we demonstrate how TIs can be made stable in dissipative systems. To that aim, we introduce the notion of band Liouvillian as the dissipative counterpart of band Hamiltonian, and show a method to evaluate the topological order of its steady state. This is based on a generalization of the Chern number valid for general mixed states (referred to as density-matrix Chern value), which witnesses topological order in a system coupled to external noise. Additionally, we study its relation with the electrical conductivity at finite temperature, which is not a topological property. Nonetheless, the density-matrix Chern value represents the part of the conductivity which is topological due to the presence of quantum mixed edge states at finite temperature. To make our formalism concrete, we apply these concepts to the two-dimensional Haldane model in the presence of thermal dissipation, but our results hold for arbitrary dimensions and density matrices.

  10. Finite-Element Z-Matrix Calculation of Electron-N2 Collisions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huo, Winifred M.; Dateo, Christopher E.

    1999-01-01

    The finite element Z-matrix method has been applied in a multichannel study of e-N2 Collisions for electron energies from threshold to 30 eV. General agreement is obtained comparing with existing experimental and theoretical data. Some discrepancies are also found.

  11. Matrix elements of explicitly correlated Gaussian basis functions with arbitrary angular momentum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joyce, Tennesse; Varga, Kálmán

    2016-05-01

    A new algorithm for calculating the Hamiltonian matrix elements with all-electron explicitly correlated Gaussian functions for quantum-mechanical calculations of atoms with arbitrary angular momentum is presented. The calculations are checked on several excited states of three and four electron systems. The presented formalism can be used as unified framework for high accuracy calculations of properties of small atoms and molecules.

  12. Long-range density-matrix-functional theory: Application to a modified homogeneous electron gas

    SciTech Connect

    Pernal, Katarzyna

    2010-05-15

    We propose a method that employs functionals of the one-electron reduced density matrix (density matrix) to capture long-range effects of electron correlation. The complementary short-range regime is treated with density functionals. In an effort to find approximations for the long-range density-matrix functional, a modified power functional is applied to the homogeneous electron gas with Coulomb interactions replaced by their corresponding long-range counterparts. For the power {beta}=1/2 and the range-separation parameter {omega}=1/r{sub s}, the functional reproduces the correlation and the kinetic correlation energies with a remarkable accuracy for intermediate and large values of r{sub s}. Analysis of the Euler equation corresponding to this functional reveals correct r{sub s} expansion of the correlation energy in the limit of large r{sub s}. The first expansion coefficient is in very good agreement with that obtained from the modified Wigner-Seitz model.

  13. Automated evaluation of matrix elements between contracted wavefunctions: A Mathematica version of the FRODO program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Angeli, C.; Cimiraglia, R.

    2013-02-01

    A symbolic program performing the Formal Reduction of Density Operators (FRODO), formerly developed in the MuPAD computer algebra system with the purpose of evaluating the matrix elements of the electronic Hamiltonian between internally contracted functions in a complete active space (CAS) scheme, has been rewritten in Mathematica. New version : A program summaryProgram title: FRODO Catalogue identifier: ADV Y _v2_0 Program summary URL:http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/summaries/ADVY_v2_0.html Program obtainable from: CPC Program Library, Queen's University, Belfast, N. Ireland Licensing provisions: Standard CPC licence, http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/licence/licence.html No. of lines in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 3878 No. of bytes in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 170729 Distribution format: tar.gz Programming language: Mathematica Computer: Any computer on which the Mathematica computer algebra system can be installed Operating system: Linux Classification: 5 Catalogue identifier of previous version: ADV Y _v1_0 Journal reference of previous version: Comput. Phys. Comm. 171(2005)63 Does the new version supersede the previous version?: No Nature of problem. In order to improve on the CAS-SCF wavefunction one can resort to multireference perturbation theory or configuration interaction based on internally contracted functions (ICFs) which are obtained by application of the excitation operators to the reference CAS-SCF wavefunction. The previous formulation of such matrix elements in the MuPAD computer algebra system, has been rewritten using Mathematica. Solution method: The method adopted consists in successively eliminating all occurrences of inactive orbital indices (core and virtual) from the products of excitation operators which appear in the definition of the ICFs and in the electronic Hamiltonian expressed in the second quantization formalism. Reasons for new version: Some years ago we published in this journal a couple of papers [1, 2

  14. Automated evaluation of matrix elements between contracted wavefunctions: A Mathematica version of the FRODO program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Angeli, C.; Cimiraglia, R.

    2013-02-01

    A symbolic program performing the Formal Reduction of Density Operators (FRODO), formerly developed in the MuPAD computer algebra system with the purpose of evaluating the matrix elements of the electronic Hamiltonian between internally contracted functions in a complete active space (CAS) scheme, has been rewritten in Mathematica. New version : A program summaryProgram title: FRODO Catalogue identifier: ADV Y _v2_0 Program summary URL:http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/summaries/ADVY_v2_0.html Program obtainable from: CPC Program Library, Queen's University, Belfast, N. Ireland Licensing provisions: Standard CPC licence, http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/licence/licence.html No. of lines in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 3878 No. of bytes in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 170729 Distribution format: tar.gz Programming language: Mathematica Computer: Any computer on which the Mathematica computer algebra system can be installed Operating system: Linux Classification: 5 Catalogue identifier of previous version: ADV Y _v1_0 Journal reference of previous version: Comput. Phys. Comm. 171(2005)63 Does the new version supersede the previous version?: No Nature of problem. In order to improve on the CAS-SCF wavefunction one can resort to multireference perturbation theory or configuration interaction based on internally contracted functions (ICFs) which are obtained by application of the excitation operators to the reference CAS-SCF wavefunction. The previous formulation of such matrix elements in the MuPAD computer algebra system, has been rewritten using Mathematica. Solution method: The method adopted consists in successively eliminating all occurrences of inactive orbital indices (core and virtual) from the products of excitation operators which appear in the definition of the ICFs and in the electronic Hamiltonian expressed in the second quantization formalism. Reasons for new version: Some years ago we published in this journal a couple of papers [1, 2

  15. Multireference configuration interaction theory using cumulant reconstruction with internal contraction of density matrix renormalization group wave function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saitow, Masaaki; Kurashige, Yuki; Yanai, Takeshi

    2013-07-01

    We report development of the multireference configuration interaction (MRCI) method that can use active space scalable to much larger size references than has previously been possible. The recent development of the density matrix renormalization group (DMRG) method in multireference quantum chemistry offers the ability to describe static correlation in a large active space. The present MRCI method provides a critical correction to the DMRG reference by including high-level dynamic correlation through the CI treatment. When the DMRG and MRCI theories are combined (DMRG-MRCI), the full internal contraction of the reference in the MRCI ansatz, including contraction of semi-internal states, plays a central role. However, it is thought to involve formidable complexity because of the presence of the five-particle rank reduced-density matrix (RDM) in the Hamiltonian matrix elements. To address this complexity, we express the Hamiltonian matrix using commutators, which allows the five-particle rank RDM to be canceled out without any approximation. Then we introduce an approximation to the four-particle rank RDM by using a cumulant reconstruction from lower-particle rank RDMs. A computer-aided approach is employed to derive the exceedingly complex equations of the MRCI in tensor-contracted form and to implement them into an efficient parallel computer code. This approach extends to the size-consistency-corrected variants of MRCI, such as the MRCI+Q, MR-ACPF, and MR-AQCC methods. We demonstrate the capability of the DMRG-MRCI method in several benchmark applications, including the evaluation of single-triplet gap of free-base porphyrin using 24 active orbitals.

  16. Densities of states, projected densities of states, and transfer-matrix methods from a unified point of view

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lemieux, M.-A.; Tremblay, A.-M. S.

    1987-07-01

    It is shown that various numerical methods to compute densities of states, projected densities of states (relevant for light scattering spectra), electrical or elastic properties of disordered media can all be considered as special cases of a general approach to these problems. This approach is based on a recursive evaluation of a generating function which in appropriate limits reduces, for example, to the approach based on the negative-eigenvalue theorem or to Gaussian elimination optimized for symmetric sparse matrices. The approach is simple and systematic. It also leads to an alternate proof of the negative-eigenvalue theorem. The general formalism and various special cases are discussed in detail. Comparisons with other methods such as the transfer-matrix, conjugate-gradient, and Haydock-Lanczos methods are provided.

  17. Matrix-Assisted Plasma Atomization Emission Spectrometry for Surface Sampling Elemental Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Xin; Zhan, Xuefang; Li, Xuemei; Zhao, Zhongjun; Duan, Yixiang

    2016-01-01

    An innovative technology has been developed involving a simple and sensitive optical spectrometric method termed matrix-assisted plasma atomization emission spectrometry (MAPAES) for surface sampling elemental analysis using a piece of filter paper (FP) for sample introduction. MAPAES was carried out by direct interaction of the plasma tail plume with the matrix surface. The FP absorbs energy from the plasma source and releases combustion heating to the analytes originally present on its surface, thus to promote the atomization and excitation process. The matrix-assisted plasma atomization excitation phenomenon was observed for multiple elements. The FP matrix served as the partial energy producer and also the sample substrate to adsorb sample solution. Qualitative and quantitative determinations of metal ions were achieved by atomic emission measurements for elements Ba, Cu, Eu, In, Mn, Ni, Rh and Y. The detection limits were down to pg level with linear correlation coefficients better than 0.99. The proposed MAPAES provides a new way for atomic spectrometry which offers advantages of fast analysis speed, little sample consumption, less sample pretreatment, small size, and cost-effective. PMID:26762972

  18. Matrix-Assisted Plasma Atomization Emission Spectrometry for Surface Sampling Elemental Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Xin; Zhan, Xuefang; Li, Xuemei; Zhao, Zhongjun; Duan, Yixiang

    2016-01-01

    An innovative technology has been developed involving a simple and sensitive optical spectrometric method termed matrix-assisted plasma atomization emission spectrometry (MAPAES) for surface sampling elemental analysis using a piece of filter paper (FP) for sample introduction. MAPAES was carried out by direct interaction of the plasma tail plume with the matrix surface. The FP absorbs energy from the plasma source and releases combustion heating to the analytes originally present on its surface, thus to promote the atomization and excitation process. The matrix-assisted plasma atomization excitation phenomenon was observed for multiple elements. The FP matrix served as the partial energy producer and also the sample substrate to adsorb sample solution. Qualitative and quantitative determinations of metal ions were achieved by atomic emission measurements for elements Ba, Cu, Eu, In, Mn, Ni, Rh and Y. The detection limits were down to pg level with linear correlation coefficients better than 0.99. The proposed MAPAES provides a new way for atomic spectrometry which offers advantages of fast analysis speed, little sample consumption, less sample pretreatment, small size, and cost-effective.

  19. Matrix-Assisted Plasma Atomization Emission Spectrometry for Surface Sampling Elemental Analysis.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Xin; Zhan, Xuefang; Li, Xuemei; Zhao, Zhongjun; Duan, Yixiang

    2016-01-01

    An innovative technology has been developed involving a simple and sensitive optical spectrometric method termed matrix-assisted plasma atomization emission spectrometry (MAPAES) for surface sampling elemental analysis using a piece of filter paper (FP) for sample introduction. MAPAES was carried out by direct interaction of the plasma tail plume with the matrix surface. The FP absorbs energy from the plasma source and releases combustion heating to the analytes originally present on its surface, thus to promote the atomization and excitation process. The matrix-assisted plasma atomization excitation phenomenon was observed for multiple elements. The FP matrix served as the partial energy producer and also the sample substrate to adsorb sample solution. Qualitative and quantitative determinations of metal ions were achieved by atomic emission measurements for elements Ba, Cu, Eu, In, Mn, Ni, Rh and Y. The detection limits were down to pg level with linear correlation coefficients better than 0.99. The proposed MAPAES provides a new way for atomic spectrometry which offers advantages of fast analysis speed, little sample consumption, less sample pretreatment, small size, and cost-effective. PMID:26762972

  20. Effect of element density on the NASTRAN calculated mechanical and thermal stresses of a spar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jenkins, J. M.

    1979-01-01

    A NASTRAN model of a spar was examined to determine the sensitivity of calculated axial thermal stresses and bending stresses to changes in element density of the model. The thermal stresses calculated with three different element densities resulted in drastically differing values. The position of the constraint also significantly affected the value of the calculated thermal stresses. Mechanical stresses calculated from an applied loading were insensitive to element density.

  1. Spin orbit coupling for molecular ab initio density matrix renormalization group calculations: Application to g-tensors

    SciTech Connect

    Roemelt, Michael

    2015-07-28

    Spin Orbit Coupling (SOC) is introduced to molecular ab initio density matrix renormalization group (DMRG) calculations. In the presented scheme, one first approximates the electronic ground state and a number of excited states of the Born-Oppenheimer (BO) Hamiltonian with the aid of the DMRG algorithm. Owing to the spin-adaptation of the algorithm, the total spin S is a good quantum number for these states. After the non-relativistic DMRG calculation is finished, all magnetic sublevels of the calculated states are constructed explicitly, and the SOC operator is expanded in the resulting basis. To this end, spin orbit coupled energies and wavefunctions are obtained as eigenvalues and eigenfunctions of the full Hamiltonian matrix which is composed of the SOC operator matrix and the BO Hamiltonian matrix. This treatment corresponds to a quasi-degenerate perturbation theory approach and can be regarded as the molecular equivalent to atomic Russell-Saunders coupling. For the evaluation of SOC matrix elements, the full Breit-Pauli SOC Hamiltonian is approximated by the widely used spin-orbit mean field operator. This operator allows for an efficient use of the second quantized triplet replacement operators that are readily generated during the non-relativistic DMRG algorithm, together with the Wigner-Eckart theorem. With a set of spin-orbit coupled wavefunctions at hand, the molecular g-tensors are calculated following the scheme proposed by Gerloch and McMeeking. It interprets the effective molecular g-values as the slope of the energy difference between the lowest Kramers pair with respect to the strength of the applied magnetic field. Test calculations on a chemically relevant Mo complex demonstrate the capabilities of the presented method.

  2. Spin orbit coupling for molecular ab initio density matrix renormalization group calculations: Application to g-tensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roemelt, Michael

    2015-07-01

    Spin Orbit Coupling (SOC) is introduced to molecular ab initio density matrix renormalization group (DMRG) calculations. In the presented scheme, one first approximates the electronic ground state and a number of excited states of the Born-Oppenheimer (BO) Hamiltonian with the aid of the DMRG algorithm. Owing to the spin-adaptation of the algorithm, the total spin S is a good quantum number for these states. After the non-relativistic DMRG calculation is finished, all magnetic sublevels of the calculated states are constructed explicitly, and the SOC operator is expanded in the resulting basis. To this end, spin orbit coupled energies and wavefunctions are obtained as eigenvalues and eigenfunctions of the full Hamiltonian matrix which is composed of the SOC operator matrix and the BO Hamiltonian matrix. This treatment corresponds to a quasi-degenerate perturbation theory approach and can be regarded as the molecular equivalent to atomic Russell-Saunders coupling. For the evaluation of SOC matrix elements, the full Breit-Pauli SOC Hamiltonian is approximated by the widely used spin-orbit mean field operator. This operator allows for an efficient use of the second quantized triplet replacement operators that are readily generated during the non-relativistic DMRG algorithm, together with the Wigner-Eckart theorem. With a set of spin-orbit coupled wavefunctions at hand, the molecular g-tensors are calculated following the scheme proposed by Gerloch and McMeeking. It interprets the effective molecular g-values as the slope of the energy difference between the lowest Kramers pair with respect to the strength of the applied magnetic field. Test calculations on a chemically relevant Mo complex demonstrate the capabilities of the presented method.

  3. Spin orbit coupling for molecular ab initio density matrix renormalization group calculations: Application to g-tensors.

    PubMed

    Roemelt, Michael

    2015-07-28

    Spin Orbit Coupling (SOC) is introduced to molecular ab initio density matrix renormalization group (DMRG) calculations. In the presented scheme, one first approximates the electronic ground state and a number of excited states of the Born-Oppenheimer (BO) Hamiltonian with the aid of the DMRG algorithm. Owing to the spin-adaptation of the algorithm, the total spin S is a good quantum number for these states. After the non-relativistic DMRG calculation is finished, all magnetic sublevels of the calculated states are constructed explicitly, and the SOC operator is expanded in the resulting basis. To this end, spin orbit coupled energies and wavefunctions are obtained as eigenvalues and eigenfunctions of the full Hamiltonian matrix which is composed of the SOC operator matrix and the BO Hamiltonian matrix. This treatment corresponds to a quasi-degenerate perturbation theory approach and can be regarded as the molecular equivalent to atomic Russell-Saunders coupling. For the evaluation of SOC matrix elements, the full Breit-Pauli SOC Hamiltonian is approximated by the widely used spin-orbit mean field operator. This operator allows for an efficient use of the second quantized triplet replacement operators that are readily generated during the non-relativistic DMRG algorithm, together with the Wigner-Eckart theorem. With a set of spin-orbit coupled wavefunctions at hand, the molecular g-tensors are calculated following the scheme proposed by Gerloch and McMeeking. It interprets the effective molecular g-values as the slope of the energy difference between the lowest Kramers pair with respect to the strength of the applied magnetic field. Test calculations on a chemically relevant Mo complex demonstrate the capabilities of the presented method. PMID:26233112

  4. Computational difficulty of global variations in the density matrix renormalization group.

    PubMed

    Eisert, J

    2006-12-31

    The density matrix renormalization group approach is arguably the most successful method to numerically find ground states of quantum spin chains. It amounts to iteratively locally optimizing matrix-product states, aiming at better and better approximating the true ground state. To date, both a proof of convergence to the globally best approximation and an assessment of its complexity are lacking. Here we establish a result on the computational complexity of an approximation with matrix-product states: The surprising result is that when one globally optimizes over several sites of local Hamiltonians, avoiding local optima, one encounters in the worst case a computationally difficult NP-hard problem (hard even in approximation). The proof exploits a novel way of relating it to binary quadratic programming. We discuss intriguing ramifications on the difficulty of describing quantum many-body systems. PMID:17280410

  5. Conditions for Describing Triplet States in Reduced Density Matrix Functional Theory.

    PubMed

    Theophilou, Iris; Lathiotakis, Nektarios N; Helbig, Nicole

    2016-06-14

    We consider necessary conditions for the one-body reduced density matrix (1RDM) to correspond to a triplet wave function of a two-electron system. The conditions concern the occupation numbers and are different for the high spin projections, Sz = ±1, and the Sz = 0 projection. Hence, they can be used to test if an approximate 1RDM functional yields the same energies for both projections. We employ these conditions in reduced density matrix functional theory calculations for the triplet excitations of two-electron systems. In addition, we propose that these conditions can be used in the calculation of triplet states of systems with more than two electrons by restricting the active space. We assess this procedure in calculations for a few atomic and molecular systems. We show that the quality of the optimal 1RDMs improves by applying the conditions in all the cases we studied. PMID:27171683

  6. Obtaining Hartree-Fock and density functional theory doubly excited states with Car-Parrinello density matrix search

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, Wenkel; Isborn, Christine M.; Li, Xiaosong

    2009-11-01

    The calculation of doubly excited states is one of the major problems plaguing the modern day excited state workhorse methodology of linear response time dependent Hartree-Fock (TDHF) and density function theory (TDDFT). We have previously shown that the use of a resonantly tuned field within real-time TDHF and TDDFT is able to simultaneously excite both the α and β electrons to achieve the two-electron excited states of minimal basis H2 and HeH+ [C. M. Isborn and X. Li, J. Chem. Phys. 129, 204107 (2008)]. We now extend this method to many electron systems with the use of our Car-Parrinello density matrix search (CP-DMS) with a first-principles fictitious mass method for wave function optimization [X. Li, C. L. Moss, W. Liang, and Y. Feng, J. Chem. Phys. 130, 234115 (2009)]. Real-time TDHF/TDDFT is used during the application of the laser field perturbation, driving the electron density toward the doubly excited state. The CP-DMS method then converges the density to the nearest stationary state. We present these stationary state doubly excited state energies and properties at the HF and DFT levels for H2, HeH+, lithium hydride, ethylene, and butadiene.

  7. SevenOperators, a Mathematica script for harmonic oscillator nuclear matrix elements arising in semileptonic electroweak interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haxton, Wick; Lunardini, Cecilia

    2008-09-01

    Semi-leptonic electroweak interactions in nuclei—such as β decay, μ capture, charged- and neutral-current neutrino reactions, and electron scattering—are described by a set of multipole operators carrying definite parity and angular momentum, obtained by projection from the underlying nuclear charge and three-current operators. If these nuclear operators are approximated by their one-body forms and expanded in the nucleon velocity through order |p→|/M, where p→ and M are the nucleon momentum and mass, a set of seven multipole operators is obtained. Nuclear structure calculations are often performed in a basis of Slater determinants formed from harmonic oscillator orbitals, a choice that allows translational invariance to be preserved. Harmonic-oscillator single-particle matrix elements of the multipole operators can be evaluated analytically and expressed in terms of finite polynomials in q, where q is the magnitude of the three-momentum transfer. While results for such matrix elements are available in tabular form, with certain restriction on quantum numbers, the task of determining the analytic form of a response function can still be quite tedious, requiring the folding of the tabulated matrix elements with the nuclear density matrix, and subsequent algebra to evaluate products of operators. Here we provide a Mathematica script for generating these matrix elements, which will allow users to carry out all such calculations by symbolic manipulation. This will eliminate the errors that may accompany hand calculations and speed the calculation of electroweak nuclear cross sections and rates. We illustrate the use of the new script by calculating the cross sections for charged- and neutral-current neutrino scattering in 12C. Program summaryProgram title: SevenOperators Catalogue identifier: AEAY_v1_0 Program summary URL:http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/summaries/AEAY_v1_0.html Program obtainable from: CPC Program Library, Queen's University, Belfast, N. Ireland

  8. $$B^0_{(s)}$$-mixing matrix elements from lattice QCD for the Standard Model and beyond

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Bazavov, A.; Bernard, C.; Bouchard, C. M.; Chang, C. C.; DeTar, C.; Du, Daping; El-Khadra, A. X.; Freeland, E. D.; Gamiz, E.; Gottlieb, Steven; et al

    2016-06-28

    We calculate—for the first time in three-flavor lattice QCD—the hadronic matrix elements of all five local operators that contribute to neutral B0- and Bs-meson mixing in and beyond the Standard Model. We present a complete error budget for each matrix element and also provide the full set of correlations among the matrix elements. We also present the corresponding bag parameters and their correlations, as well as specific combinations of the mixing matrix elements that enter the expression for the neutral B-meson width difference. We obtain the most precise determination to date of the SU(3)-breaking ratio ξ=1.206(18)(6), where the second errormore » stems from the omission of charm-sea quarks, while the first encompasses all other uncertainties. The threefold reduction in total uncertainty, relative to the 2013 Flavor Lattice Averaging Group results, tightens the constraint from B mixing on the Cabibbo-Kobayashi-Maskawa (CKM) unitarity triangle. Our calculation employs gauge-field ensembles generated by the MILC Collaboration with four lattice spacings and pion masses close to the physical value. We use the asqtad-improved staggered action for the light-valence quarks and the Fermilab method for the bottom quark. We use heavy-light meson chiral perturbation theory modified to include lattice-spacing effects to extrapolate the five matrix elements to the physical point. We combine our results with experimental measurements of the neutral B-meson oscillation frequencies to determine the CKM matrix elements |Vtd| = 8.00(34)(8)×10-3, |Vts| = 39.0(1.2)(0.4)×10-3, and |Vtd/Vts| = 0.2052(31)(10), which differ from CKM-unitarity expectations by about 2σ. In addition, these results and others from flavor-changing-neutral currents point towards an emerging tension between weak processes that are mediated at the loop and tree levels.« less

  9. Computation of the high temperature Coulomb density matrix in periodic boundary conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Militzer, B.

    2016-07-01

    The high temperature many-body density matrix is fundamental to path integral computation. The pair approximation, where the interaction part is written as a product of pair density matrices, is commonly used and is accurate to order τ2, where τ is the step size in the imaginary time. Here we present a method for systems with Coulomb interactions in periodic boundary conditions that consistently treats the all interactions with the same level of accuracy. It is shown that this leads to a more accurate high temperature solution of the Bloch equation. The method is applied to many-body simulation and tests for the isolated hydrogen atom and molecule are presented.

  10. Derivation of the density matrix of a single photon produced in parametric down-conversion

    SciTech Connect

    Kolenderski, Piotr; Wasilewski, Wojciech

    2009-07-15

    We discuss an effective numerical method of density matrix determination of fiber coupled single photon generated in process of spontaneous parametric down conversion in type I noncollinear configuration. The presented theory has been successfully applied in case of source utilized to demonstrate the experimental characterization of spectral state of single photon, what was reported in Wasilewski, Kolenderski, and Frankowski [Phys. Rev. Lett. 99, 123601 (2007)].

  11. Matrix density effects on the mechanical properties of SiC/RBSN composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bhatt, Ramakrishna T.; Kiser, James D.

    1990-01-01

    The room temperature mechanical properties were measured for SiC fiber reinforced reaction-bonded silicon nitride composites (SiC/RBSN) of different densities. The composites consisted of approx. 30 vol percent uniaxially aligned 142 micron diameter SiC fibers (Textron SCS-6) in a reaction-bonded Si3N4 matrix. The composite density was varied by changing the consolidation pressure during RBSN processing and by hot isostatically pressing the SiC/RBSN composites. Results indicate that as the consolidation pressure was increased from 27 to 138 MPa, the average pore size of the nitrided composites decreased from 0.04 to 0.02 microns and the composite density increased from 2.07 to 2.45 gm/cc. Nonetheless, these improvements resulted in only small increases in the first matrix cracking stress, primary elastic modulus, and ultimate tensile strength values of the composites. In contrast, HIP consolidation of SiC/RBSN resulted in a fully dense material whose first matrix cracking stress and elastic modulus were approx. 15 and 50 percent higher, respectively, and ultimate tensile strength values were approx. 40 percent lower than those for unHIPed SiC/RBSN composites. The modulus behavior for all specimens can be explained by simple rule-of-mixture theory. Also, the loss in ultimate strength for the HIPed composites appears to be related to a degradation in fiber strength at the HIP temperature. However, the density effect on matrix fracture strength was much less than would be expected based on typical monolithic Si3N4 behavior, suggesting that composite theory is indeed operating. Possible practical implications of these observations are discussed.

  12. Matrix elements of N-particle explicitly correlated Gaussian basis functions with complex exponential parameters.

    PubMed

    Bubin, Sergiy; Adamowicz, Ludwik

    2006-06-14

    In this work we present analytical expressions for Hamiltonian matrix elements with spherically symmetric, explicitly correlated Gaussian basis functions with complex exponential parameters for an arbitrary number of particles. The expressions are derived using the formalism of matrix differential calculus. In addition, we present expressions for the energy gradient that includes derivatives of the Hamiltonian integrals with respect to the exponential parameters. The gradient is used in the variational optimization of the parameters. All the expressions are presented in the matrix form suitable for both numerical implementation and theoretical analysis. The energy and gradient formulas have been programmed and used to calculate ground and excited states of the He atom using an approach that does not involve the Born-Oppenheimer approximation. PMID:16784284

  13. Finite element applications to explore the effects of partial bonding on metal matrix composite properties

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Caruso, J. J.; Trowbridge, D.; Chamis, C. C.

    1989-01-01

    The mechanics of materials approach (definition of E, G, Nu, and Alpha) and the finite element method are used to explore the effects of partial bonding and fiber fracture on the behavior of high temperature metal matrix composites. Composite ply properties are calculated for various degrees of disbonding to evaluate the sensitivity of these properties to the presence of fiber/matrix disbonding and fiber fracture. The mechanics of materials approach allows for the determination of the basic ply material properties needed for design/analysis of composites. The finite element method provides the necessary structural response (forces and displacements) for the mechanics of materials equations. Results show that disbonding of fractured fibers affect only E sub (111) and alpha sub (111) significantly.

  14. Finite element applications to explore the effects of partial bonding on metal matrix composite properties

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Caruso, J. J.; Chamis, C. C.; Trowbridge, D.

    1989-01-01

    The mechanics of materials approach (definition of E, G, nu, and alpha) and the finite element method are used to explore the effects of partial bonding and fiber fracture on the behavior of high temperature metal matrix composites. Composite ply properties are calculated for various degrees of disbonding to evaluate the sensitivity of these properties to the presence of fiber/matrix disbonding and fiber fracture. The mechanics of materials approach allows for the determination of the basic ply material properties needed for design/analysis of composites. The finite element method provides the necessary structural response (forces and displacements) for the mechanics of materials equations. Results show that disbonding of fractured fibers affect only E-l(11) and alpha-l(11) significantly.

  15. Kinetic-energy matrix elements for atomic Hylleraas-CI wave functions.

    PubMed

    Harris, Frank E

    2016-05-28

    Hylleraas-CI is a superposition-of-configurations method in which each configuration is constructed from a Slater-type orbital (STO) product to which is appended (linearly) at most one interelectron distance rij. Computations of the kinetic energy for atoms by this method have been difficult due to the lack of formulas expressing these matrix elements for general angular momentum in terms of overlap and potential-energy integrals. It is shown here that a strategic application of angular-momentum theory, including the use of vector spherical harmonics, enables the reduction of all atomic kinetic-energy integrals to overlap and potential-energy matrix elements. The new formulas are validated by showing that they yield correct results for a large number of integrals published by other investigators. PMID:27250282

  16. Short-distance matrix elements for $D$-meson mixing for 2+1 lattice QCD

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, Chia Cheng

    2015-01-01

    We study the short-distance hadronic matrix elements for D-meson mixing with partially quenched Nf = 2+1 lattice QCD. We use a large set of the MIMD Lattice Computation Collaboration's gauge configurations with a2 tadpole-improved staggered sea quarks and tadpole-improved Lüscher-Weisz gluons. We use the a2 tadpole-improved action for valence light quarks and the Sheikoleslami-Wohlert action with the Fermilab interpretation for the valence charm quark. Our calculation covers the complete set of five operators needed to constrain new physics models for D-meson mixing. We match our matrix elements to the MS-NDR scheme evaluated at 3 GeV. We report values for the Beneke-Buchalla-Greub-Lenz-Nierste choice of evanescent operators.

  17. T -dual Ramond-Ramond couplings on D-branes from S -matrix elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Babaei Velni, Komeil

    2016-03-01

    Using the linear T -dual Ward identity associated with the NS-NS B-field or two Neveu-Schwarz B-fields (NSNS) gauge transformations, some Ramond-Ramond (RR) couplings on Dp -branes have been found at order O (α'2) . We examine the C(p -1 ) couplings with the S -matrix elements of one RR, one graviton and one antisymmetric B-field vertex operator. We find the consistency of T -dual S -matrix elements and explicit results of scattering string amplitude and show that the string amplitude reproduces these couplings as well as some other couplings. This illustration is found for C(p -3 ) couplings in the literature, which is extended to the C(p -1 ) couplings in this paper.

  18. Kinetic-energy matrix elements for atomic Hylleraas-CI wave functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harris, Frank E.

    2016-05-01

    Hylleraas-CI is a superposition-of-configurations method in which each configuration is constructed from a Slater-type orbital (STO) product to which is appended (linearly) at most one interelectron distance rij. Computations of the kinetic energy for atoms by this method have been difficult due to the lack of formulas expressing these matrix elements for general angular momentum in terms of overlap and potential-energy integrals. It is shown here that a strategic application of angular-momentum theory, including the use of vector spherical harmonics, enables the reduction of all atomic kinetic-energy integrals to overlap and potential-energy matrix elements. The new formulas are validated by showing that they yield correct results for a large number of integrals published by other investigators.

  19. Addressable test matrix for measuring analog transfer characteristics of test elements used for integrated process control and device evaluation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buehler, Martin G. (Inventor)

    1988-01-01

    A set of addressable test structures, each of which uses addressing schemes to access individual elements of the structure in a matrix, is used to test the quality of a wafer before integrated circuits produced thereon are diced, packaged and subjected to final testing. The electrical characteristic of each element is checked and compared to the electrical characteristic of all other like elements in the matrix. The effectiveness of the addressable test matrix is in readily analyzing the electrical characteristics of the test elements and in providing diagnostic information.

  20. An improved method for extracting matrix elements from lattice three-point functions

    SciTech Connect

    C. Aubin, K. Orginos

    2011-12-01

    The extraction of matrix elements from baryon three-point functions is complicated by the fact that the signal-to-noise drops rapidly as a function of time. Using a previously discussed method to improve the signal-to-noise for lattice two-point functions, we use this technique to do so for lattice three-point functions, using electromagnetic form factors for the nucleon and Delta as an example.

  1. Finite-element grid improvement by minimization of stiffness matrix trace

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kittur, Madan G.; Huston, Ronald L.; Oswald, Fred B.

    1987-01-01

    A new and simple method of finite-element grid improvement is presented. The objective is to improve the accuracy of the analysis. The procedure is based on a minimization of the trace of the stiffness matrix. For a broad class of problems this minimization is seen to be equivalent to minimizing the potential energy. The method is illustrated with the classical tapered bar problem examined earlier by Prager and Masur. Identical results are obtained.

  2. Finite-element grid improvement by minimization of stiffness matrix trace

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kittur, Madan G.; Huston, Ronald L.; Oswald, Fred B.

    1989-01-01

    A new and simple method of finite-element grid improvement is presented. The objective is to improve the accuracy of the analysis. The procedure is based on a minimization of the trace of the stiffness matrix. For a broad class of problems this minimization is seen to be equivalent to minimizing the potential energy. The method is illustrated with the classical tapered bar problem examined earlier by Prager and Masur. Identical results are obtained.

  3. Nuclear Matrix Elements for two-neutrino DBD in Te isotopes

    SciTech Connect

    Bes, D. R.; Civitarese, O.

    2009-11-09

    Theoretical matrix elements, for the ground-state to ground-state two-neutrino double-beta-decay mode of {sup 128,130}Te isotopes, are calculated within a formalism which describes interactions between neutrons in a superfluid phase and protons in a normal phase. The model is basically a parameter-free one, since all relevant parameters are fixed from phenomenology. A comparison with the available experimental data is presented.

  4. Useful extremum principle for the variational calculation of matrix elements. II

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gerjuoy, E.; Rosenberg, L.; Spruch, L.

    1975-01-01

    Recent work (Gerjuoy et al., 1974) on variational principles for diagonal bound state matrix elements of arbitrary Hermitian operators is extended. In particular, it is shown that the previously derived minimum principle for the trial auxiliary function appearing in such variational principles can be constructed using a modified Hamiltonian possessing not heretofore recognized positive definite properties. Thus there is at least one alternative to the particular modified Hamiltonian on which the results of Gerjuoy et al. (1974) originally were based.

  5. Closed expressions for matrix elements of the trigonometric Pöschl-Teller potential

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rey, Michaël; Michelot, Françoise

    2010-10-01

    Analytical matrix elements of the x ( n>0) and [[d/dx operators are derived using the eigenfunctions of the symmetric trigonometric Pöschl-Teller potential. The closed formulas are written in terms of Gauss hypergeometric functions and could be used in variational calculations to describe vibrational energy levels associated with bending modes. Multiprecision computational packages are considered in order to obtain an arbitrary level of precision.

  6. Quantum tomography for measuring experimentally the matrix elements of an arbitrary quantum operation.

    PubMed

    D'Ariano, G M; Lo Presti, P

    2001-05-01

    Quantum operations describe any state change allowed in quantum mechanics, including the evolution of an open system or the state change due to a measurement. We present a general method based on quantum tomography for measuring experimentally the matrix elements of an arbitrary quantum operation. As input the method needs only a single entangled state. The feasibility of the technique for the electromagnetic field is shown, and the experimental setup is illustrated based on homodyne tomography of a twin beam. PMID:11328133

  7. Two functions of the density matrix and their relation to the chemical bond

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmider, Hartmut L.; Becke, Axel D.

    2002-02-01

    We examine and compare two previously introduced functions of the one-particle density matrix that are suitable to represent its off-diagonal structure in a condensed form and that have illustrative connections to the nature of the chemical bond. One of them, the Localized-Orbital Locator (LOL) [J. Molec. Struct. (THEOCHEM) 527, 51 (2000)], is based only on the noninteracting kinetic-energy density τ and the charge density ρ at a point, and gives an intuitive measure of the relative speed of electrons in its vicinity. Alternatively, LOL focuses on regions that are dominated by single localized orbitals. The other one, the Parity Function P [J. Chem. Phys. 105, 11134 (1996)], is a section through the Wigner phase-space function at zero momentum, and contains information about the phase of the interference of atomiclike orbital contributions from bound centers. In this paper, we discuss the way in which these functions condense information in the density matrix, and illustrate on a variety of examples of unusual chemical bonds how they can help to understand the nature of "covalence."

  8. Dipole transition-matrix elements of the one-electron heterodiatomic quasimolecules

    SciTech Connect

    Devdariani, A.; Kereselidze, T.M.; Noselidze, I. L.; Dalimier, E.; Angelo, P.; Schott, R.; Sauvan, P.

    2005-02-01

    The problem of dipole transition-matrix element calculation for optical transitions in multiply charged one-electron diatomic quasimolecules with unequal nuclear charges Z{sub 1} and Z{sub 2} has been stated and solved. The quasimolecule Z{sub 1}eZ{sub 2} is a unique example of a two-center system for which the energy terms and dipole transition moments have been calculated precisely in the frame of a nonrelativistic approach. Particular examples for the optical transitions with Z{sub 1}=1.5,2,2.5,3 and Z{sub 2}=1 and with the principal quantum number of the united ion n{sub u}=1,2,3,4 have been tabulated. The scaling rules make it possible to determine the matrix elements for quasimolecules having nuclear charge ratios such as 2:1, 3:1, 3:2, and 5:2. Zeros at intermediate R and zero limiting values at large R are the highlighted features of the matrix elements. The heteronucleus case generates a large number of asymptotically forbidden transitions corresponding to transitions of an electron from one ion to another.

  9. MOON for neutrino-less ββ decays and ββ nuclear matrix elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ejiri, H.

    2009-11-01

    The MOON project aims at spectroscopic 0vββ studies with the v-mass sensitivity of 100-30 meV by measuring two beta rays from 100Mo and/or 82Se. The detector is a compact super-module of multi-layer PL scintillator plates. R&D works made by the pro to-type MOON-1 and the small PL plate show the possible energy resolution of around σ~2.2%, as required for the mass sensitivity. Nuclear matrix elements M2v for 2vββ are shown to be given by the sum ΣLMk of the 2vββ matrix elements Mk through intermediate quasi-particle states in the Fermi-surface, where Mi is obtained experimentally by using the GT(Jπ = 1+) matrix elements of Mi(k) and Mf(k) for the successive single-β transitions through the k-th intermediate state.

  10. Matrix elements and few-body calculations within the unitary correlation operator method

    SciTech Connect

    Roth, R.; Hergert, H.; Papakonstantinou, P.; Neff, T.; Feldmeier, H.

    2005-09-01

    We employ the unitary correlation operator method (UCOM) to construct correlated, low-momentum matrix elements of realistic nucleon-nucleon interactions. The dominant short-range central and tensor correlations induced by the interaction are included explicitly by an unitary transformation. Using correlated momentum-space matrix elements of the Argonne V18 potential, we show that the unitary transformation eliminates the strong off-diagonal contributions caused by the short-range repulsion and the tensor interaction and leaves a correlated interaction dominated by low-momentum contributions. We use correlated harmonic oscillator matrix elements as input for no-core shell model calculations for few-nucleon systems. Compared to the bare interaction, the convergence properties are dramatically improved. The bulk of the binding energy can already be obtained in very small model spaces or even with a single Slater determinant. Residual long-range correlations, not treated explicitly by the unitary transformation, can easily be described in model spaces of moderate size allowing for fast convergence. By varying the range of the tensor correlator we are able to map out the Tjon line and can in turn constrain the optimal correlator ranges.

  11. Density hysteresis of heavy water confined in a nanoporous silica matrix

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Yang; Faraone, Antonio; Kamitakahara, William; Liu, Kao-Hsiang; Mou, Chung-Yuan; Leao, Juscelino B; Chang, Sung C; Chen, Sow-hsin H

    2011-01-01

    A neutron scattering technique was developed to measure the density of heavy water confined in a nanoporous silica matrix in a temperature-pressure range, from 300 to 130 K and from 1 to 2,900 bars, where bulk water will crystalize. We observed a prominent hysteresis phenomenon in the measured density profiles between warming and cooling scans above 1,000 bars. We inter- pret this hysteresis phenomenon as support (although not a proof) of the hypothetical existence of a first-order liquid liquid phase transition of water that would exist in the macroscopic system if crystallization could be avoided in the relevant phase region. Moreover, the density data we obtained for the confined heavy water under these conditions are valuable to large communities in biology and earth and planetary sciences interested in phenomena in which nanometer-sized water layers are involved.

  12. Urinary stones as a novel matrix for human biomonitoring of toxic and essential elements.

    PubMed

    Kuta, J; Smetanová, S; Benová, D; Kořistková, T; Machát, J

    2016-02-01

    Monitoring of body burden of toxic elements is usually based on analysis of concentration of particular elements in blood, urine and/or hair. Analysis of these matrices, however, predominantly reflects short- or medium-term exposure to trace elements or pollutants. In this work, urinary stones were investigated as a matrix for monitoring long-term exposure to toxic and essential elements. A total of 431 samples of urinary calculi were subjected to mineralogical and elemental analysis by infrared spectroscopy and inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry. The effect of mineralogical composition of the stones and other parameters such as sex, age and geographical location on contents of trace and minor elements is presented. Our results demonstrate the applicability of such approach and confirm that the analysis of urinary calculi can be helpful in providing complementary information on human exposure to trace metals and their excretion. Analysis of whewellite stones (calcium oxalate monohydrate) with content of phosphorus <0.6 % has been proved to be a promising tool for biomonitoring of trace and minor elements. PMID:25736734

  13. Controlled-surface-wettability-based fabrication of hydrogel substrates with matrix tethering density variations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rahman, Md. Mahmudur; Lee, Donghee; Bhagirath, Divya; Zhao, Xiangshan; Band, Vimla; Ryu, Sangjin

    2014-03-01

    It is widely accepted that cells behave differently responding to the stiffness of extracellular matrix (ECM). Such observations were made by culturing cells on hydrogel substrates of tunable stiffness. However, it was recently proposed that cells actually sense how strongly they are tethered to ECM, not the local stiffness of ECM. To investigate the hypothesis, we develop constant-stiffness hydrogel substrates with varying matrix tethering density (the number of anchoring sites between the gel and the ECM protein molecules). We fabricate polyacrylamide gel of static stiffness and conjugate ECM proteins to the gel using a cross-linker. When treating the gel with the cross-linker, we control positioning of cross-linker solutions with different concentrations using superhydrophobic barriers on glass, functionalize the gel by pressing it to the aligned cross-linker solutions, and conjugate an ECM protein of constant concentration to the gel. We expect that the gel will be functionalized to different degrees depending on the concentration distribution of the cross-linker and thus the gel will have variations of matrix tethering density even with constant ECM protein concentration. We acknowledge support from Bioengineering for Human Health grant of UNL-UNMC.

  14. Extending the range of real time density matrix renormalization group simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kennes, D. M.; Karrasch, C.

    2016-03-01

    We discuss a few simple modifications to time-dependent density matrix renormalization group (DMRG) algorithms which allow to access larger time scales. We specifically aim at beginners and present practical aspects of how to implement these modifications within any standard matrix product state (MPS) based formulation of the method. Most importantly, we show how to 'combine' the Schrödinger and Heisenberg time evolutions of arbitrary pure states | ψ > and operators A in the evaluation of ψ(t) = < ψ | A(t) | ψ > . This includes quantum quenches. The generalization to (non-)thermal mixed state dynamics ρ(t) =Tr [ ρA(t) ] induced by an initial density matrix ρ is straightforward. In the context of linear response (ground state or finite temperature T > 0) correlation functions, one can extend the simulation time by a factor of two by 'exploiting time translation invariance', which is efficiently implementable within MPS DMRG. We present a simple analytic argument for why a recently-introduced disentangler succeeds in reducing the effort of time-dependent simulations at T > 0. Finally, we advocate the python programming language as an elegant option for beginners to set up a DMRG code.

  15. Efficient parallel linear scaling construction of the density matrix for Born-Oppenheimer molecular dynamics.

    PubMed

    Mniszewski, S M; Cawkwell, M J; Wall, M E; Mohd-Yusof, J; Bock, N; Germann, T C; Niklasson, A M N

    2015-10-13

    We present an algorithm for the calculation of the density matrix that for insulators scales linearly with system size and parallelizes efficiently on multicore, shared memory platforms with small and controllable numerical errors. The algorithm is based on an implementation of the second-order spectral projection (SP2) algorithm [ Niklasson, A. M. N. Phys. Rev. B 2002 , 66 , 155115 ] in sparse matrix algebra with the ELLPACK-R data format. We illustrate the performance of the algorithm within self-consistent tight binding theory by total energy calculations of gas phase poly(ethylene) molecules and periodic liquid water systems containing up to 15,000 atoms on up to 16 CPU cores. We consider algorithm-specific performance aspects, such as local vs nonlocal memory access and the degree of matrix sparsity. Comparisons to sparse matrix algebra implementations using off-the-shelf libraries on multicore CPUs, graphics processing units (GPUs), and the Intel many integrated core (MIC) architecture are also presented. The accuracy and stability of the algorithm are illustrated with long duration Born-Oppenheimer molecular dynamics simulations of 1000 water molecules and a 303 atom Trp cage protein solvated by 2682 water molecules. PMID:26574255

  16. Adiabatic approximation in time-dependent reduced-density-matrix functional theory

    SciTech Connect

    Requist, Ryan; Pankratov, Oleg

    2010-04-15

    With the aim of describing real-time electron dynamics, we introduce an adiabatic approximation for the equation of motion of the one-body reduced density matrix (one-matrix). The eigenvalues of the one-matrix, which represent the occupation numbers of single-particle orbitals, are obtained from the constrained minimization of the instantaneous ground-state energy functional rather than from their dynamical equations. The performance of the approximation vis-a-vis nonadiabatic effects is assessed in real-time simulations of a two-site Hubbard model. Due to Landau-Zener-type transitions, the system evolves into a nonstationary state with persistent oscillations in the observables. The amplitude of the oscillations displays a strongly nonmonotonic dependence on the strength of the electron-electron interaction and the rate of variation of the external potential. We interpret an associated resonance behavior in the phase of the oscillations in terms of 'scattering' with spectator energy levels. To clarify the motivation for the minimization condition, we derive a sequence of energy functionals E{sub v}{sup (n)}, for which the corresponding sequence of minimizing one-matrices is asymptotic to the exact one-matrix in the adiabatic limit.

  17. Internal one-particle density matrix for Bose-Einstein condensates with finite number of particles in a harmonic potential

    SciTech Connect

    Yamada, Taiichi; Funaki, Yasuro; Horiuchi, Hisashi; Roepke, Gerd; Schuck, Peter; Tohsaki, Akihiro

    2009-05-15

    Investigations on the internal one-particle density matrix in the case of Bose-Einstein condensates with a finite number (N) of particles in a harmonic potential are performed. We solve the eigenvalue problem of the Pethick-Pitaevskii-type internal density matrix and find a fragmented condensate. On the contrary the condensate Jacobi-type internal density matrix gives complete condensation into a single state. The internal one-particle density matrix is, therefore, shown to be different in general for different choices of the internal coordinate system. We propose two physically motivated criteria for the choice of the adequate coordinate systems that give us a unique answer for the internal one-particle density matrix. One criterion is that in the infinite particle number limit (N={infinity}) the internal one-particle density matrix should have the same eigenvalues and eigenfunctions as those of the corresponding ideal Bose-Einstein condensate in the laboratory frame. The other criterion is that the coordinate of the internal one-particle density matrix should be orthogonal to the remaining (N-2) internal coordinates, though the (N-2) coordinates, in general, do not need to be mutually orthogonal. This second criterion is shown to imply the first criterion. It is shown that the internal Jacobi coordinate system satisfies these two criteria while the internal coordinate system adopted by Pethick and Pitaevskii for the construction of the internal one-particle density matrix does not. It is demonstrated that these two criteria uniquely determine the internal one-particle density matrix that is identical to that calculated with the Jacobi coordinates. The relevance of this work concerning {alpha}-particle condensates in nuclei, as well as bosonic atoms in traps, is pointed out.

  18. Iterative solutions to the steady-state density matrix for optomechanical systems.

    PubMed

    Nation, P D; Johansson, J R; Blencowe, M P; Rimberg, A J

    2015-01-01

    We present a sparse matrix permutation from graph theory that gives stable incomplete lower-upper preconditioners necessary for iterative solutions to the steady-state density matrix for quantum optomechanical systems. This reordering is efficient, adding little overhead to the computation, and results in a marked reduction in both memory and runtime requirements compared to other solution methods, with performance gains increasing with system size. Either of these benchmarks can be tuned via the preconditioner accuracy and solution tolerance. This reordering optimizes the condition number of the approximate inverse and is the only method found to be stable at large Hilbert space dimensions. This allows for steady-state solutions to otherwise intractable quantum optomechanical systems. PMID:25679739

  19. A Data Matrix Method for Improving the Quantification of Element Percentages of SEM/EDX Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lane, John

    2009-01-01

    A simple 2D M N matrix involving sample preparation enables the microanalyst to peer below the noise floor of element percentages reported by the SEM/EDX (scanning electron microscopy/ energy dispersive x-ray) analysis, thus yielding more meaningful data. Using the example of a 2 3 sample set, there are M = 2 concentration levels of the original mix under test: 10 percent ilmenite (90 percent silica) and 20 percent ilmenite (80 percent silica). For each of these M samples, N = 3 separate SEM/EDX samples were drawn. In this test, ilmenite is the element of interest. By plotting the linear trend of the M sample s known concentration versus the average of the N samples, a much higher resolution of elemental analysis can be performed. The resulting trend also shows how the noise is affecting the data, and at what point (of smaller concentrations) is it impractical to try to extract any further useful data.

  20. Performance of the density matrix functional theory in the quantum theory of atoms in molecules.

    PubMed

    García-Revilla, Marco; Francisco, E; Costales, A; Martín Pendás, A

    2012-02-01

    The generalization to arbitrary molecular geometries of the energetic partitioning provided by the atomic virial theorem of the quantum theory of atoms in molecules (QTAIM) leads to an exact and chemically intuitive energy partitioning scheme, the interacting quantum atoms (IQA) approach, that depends on the availability of second-order reduced density matrices (2-RDMs). This work explores the performance of this approach in particular and of the QTAIM in general with approximate 2-RDMs obtained from the density matrix functional theory (DMFT), which rests on the natural expansion (natural orbitals and their corresponding occupation numbers) of the first-order reduced density matrix (1-RDM). A number of these functionals have been implemented in the promolden code and used to perform QTAIM and IQA analyses on several representative molecules and model chemical reactions. Total energies, covalent intra- and interbasin exchange-correlation interactions, as well as localization and delocalization indices have been determined with these functionals from 1-RDMs obtained at different levels of theory. Results are compared to the values computed from the exact 2-RDMs, whenever possible. PMID:21943031

  1. Evaluation of Solid Modeling Software for Finite Element Analysis of Woven Ceramic Matrix Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nemeth, Noel N.; Mital, Subodh; Lang, Jerry

    2010-01-01

    Three computer programs, used for the purpose of generating 3-D finite element models of the Repeating Unit Cell (RUC) of a textile, were examined for suitability to model woven Ceramic Matrix Composites (CMCs). The programs evaluated were the open-source available TexGen, the commercially available WiseTex, and the proprietary Composite Material Evaluator (COMATE). A five-harness-satin (5HS) weave for a melt-infiltrated (MI) silicon carbide matrix and silicon carbide fiber was selected as an example problem and the programs were tested for their ability to generate a finite element model of the RUC. The programs were also evaluated for ease-of-use and capability, particularly for the capability to introduce various defect types such as porosity, ply shifting, and nesting of a laminate. Overall, it was found that TexGen and WiseTex were useful for generating solid models of the tow geometry; however, there was a lack of consistency in generating well-conditioned finite element meshes of the tows and matrix. TexGen and WiseTex were both capable of allowing collective and individual shifting of tows within a ply and WiseTex also had a ply nesting capability. TexGen and WiseTex were sufficiently userfriendly and both included a Graphical User Interface (GUI). COMATE was satisfactory in generating a 5HS finite element mesh of an idealized weave geometry but COMATE lacked a GUI and was limited to only 5HS and 8HS weaves compared to the larger amount of weave selections available with TexGen and WiseTex.

  2. Self-consistent calculation of dephasing in quantum cascade structures within a density matrix method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freeman, Will

    2016-05-01

    Dephasing in terahertz quantum cascade structures is studied within a density matrix formalism. We self-consistently calculate the pure dephasing time from the intrasubband interactions within the upper and lower lasing states. Interface roughness and ionized impurity scattering interactions are included in the calculation. Dephasing times are shown to be consistent with measured spontaneous emission spectra, and the lattice temperature dependence of the device output power is consistent with experiment. The importance of including multiple optical transitions when a lower miniband continuum is present and the resulting multi-longitudinal modes within the waveguide resonant cavity are also shown.

  3. Communication: Active space decomposition with multiple sites: Density matrix renormalization group algorithm

    SciTech Connect

    Parker, Shane M.; Shiozaki, Toru

    2014-12-07

    We extend the active space decomposition method, recently developed by us, to more than two active sites using the density matrix renormalization group algorithm. The fragment wave functions are described by complete or restricted active-space wave functions. Numerical results are shown on a benzene pentamer and a perylene diimide trimer. It is found that the truncation errors in our method decrease almost exponentially with respect to the number of renormalization states M, allowing for numerically exact calculations (to a few μE{sub h} or less) with M = 128 in both cases. This rapid convergence is because the renormalization steps are used only for the interfragment electron correlation.

  4. A practical guide to density matrix embedding theory in quantum chemistry

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Wouters, Sebastian; Jimenez-Hoyos, Carlos A.; Sun, Qiming; Chan, Garnet K.-L.

    2016-05-09

    Density matrix embedding theory (DMET) (Knizia, G.; Chan, G. K.-L. Phys. Rev. Lett. 2012, 109, 186404) provides a theoretical framework to treat finite fragments in the presence of a surrounding molecular or bulk environment, even when there is significant correlation or entanglement between the two. In this work, we give a practically oriented and explicit description of the numerical and theoretical formulation of DMET. We also describe in detail how to perform self-consistent DMET optimizations. Furthermore, we explore different embedding strategies with and without a self-consistency condition in hydrogen rings, beryllium rings, and a sample SN2 reaction.

  5. Density-matrix operatorial solution of the non-Markovian master equation for quantum Brownian motion

    SciTech Connect

    Intravaia, F.; Maniscalco, S.; Messina, A.

    2003-04-01

    An original method to exactly solve the non-Markovian master equation describing the interaction of a single harmonic oscillator with a quantum environment in the weak-coupling limit is reported. By using a superoperatorial approach, we succeed in deriving the operatorial solution for the density matrix of the system. Our method is independent of the physical properties of the environment. We show the usefulness of our solution deriving explicit expressions for the dissipative time evolution of some observables of physical interest for the system, such as, for example, its mean energy.

  6. Separability Criterion for Arbitrary Multipartite Pure State Based on the Rank of Reduced Density Matrix

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Chao; Yang, Guo-wu; Li, Xiao-yu

    2016-09-01

    Nowadays, there are plenty of separability criteria which are used to detect entanglement. Many of them are limited to apply for some cases. In this paper, we propose a separability criterion for arbitrary multipartite pure state which is based on the rank of reduced density matrix. It is proved that the rank of reduced density matrices of a multipartite state is closely related to entanglement. In fact it can be used to characterize entanglement. Our separability criterion is a necessary and sufficient condition for detecting entanglement. Furthermore, it is able to help us find the completely separable form of a multipartite pure state according to some explicit examples. Finally it demonstrates that our method are more suitable for some specific case. Our separability criterion are simple to understand and it is operational.

  7. Separability Criterion for Arbitrary Multipartite Pure State Based on the Rank of Reduced Density Matrix

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Chao; Yang, Guo-wu; Li, Xiao-yu

    2016-04-01

    Nowadays, there are plenty of separability criteria which are used to detect entanglement. Many of them are limited to apply for some cases. In this paper, we propose a separability criterion for arbitrary multipartite pure state which is based on the rank of reduced density matrix. It is proved that the rank of reduced density matrices of a multipartite state is closely related to entanglement. In fact it can be used to characterize entanglement. Our separability criterion is a necessary and sufficient condition for detecting entanglement. Furthermore, it is able to help us find the completely separable form of a multipartite pure state according to some explicit examples. Finally it demonstrates that our method are more suitable for some specific case. Our separability criterion are simple to understand and it is operational.

  8. Experimental studies of nuclear matrix elements for neutrino-less ββ decays

    SciTech Connect

    Ejiri, H.

    2013-12-30

    Nuclear matrix elements M{sup 0ν} for neutrino less double beta decays (0νββ) are crucial for neutrino studies in 0νββ experiments. The neutrino mass to be studied is sensitive to M{sup 0ν}, while theoretical calculations for M{sup 0ν} are hard. Thus experimental studies of nuclear structures and single β matrix elements M{sub β} associated with 0νββ are useful to confirm and help the theoretical calculations. This reports briefly experimental methods and recent charge exchange reaction studies for M{sub β}. The single β elements for M{sup ±}(2{sup −}) associated with M{sup 0ν}(2{sup −}), which is the major component of M{sup 0ν}, are found to be reduced (quenched) much by the spin isospin correlation and the nuclear medium (non-nucleonic isobar) effect. The present result suggests that the spin isospin components of M{sup 0ν} is fairly reduced (quenched)

  9. Cell density modulates growth, extracellular matrix, and protein synthesis of cultured rat mesangial cells.

    PubMed

    Wolthuis, A; Boes, A; Grond, J

    1993-10-01

    Mesangial cell (MC) hyperplasia and accumulation of extracellular matrix are hallmarks of chronic glomerular disease. The present in vitro study examined the effects of cell density on growth, extracellular matrix formation, and protein synthesis of cultured rat MCs. A negative linear relationship was found between initial plating density and DNA synthesis per cell after 24 hours incubation in medium with 10% fetal calf serum (range: 1 x 10(3) to 7 x 10(5) MCs/2cm2, r = 0.996, P < 0.001). Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay of the amount of fibronectin in the conditioned medium after 72 hours showed a negative relationship with increasing cell density. In contrast, the amount of cell-associated fibronectin increased to maximal values in confluent cultures, and no further increase was seen at supraconfluency. The relative collagen synthesis in the conditioned medium and cell layer--assessed by collagenase digestion after 5 hours [3H]proline pulse labeling--showed a similar pattern. Secreted collagen decreased with increasing cell density from 3.4% to 0.2% of total protein synthesis. In contrast, cell-associated collagen increased from 1.1% to 11.8% of newly synthesized protein until confluency followed by a decrease to 4.2% at supraconfluency. Specific immunoprecipitation of collagen types I, III, and IV revealed a significant (twofold) increase in collagen I synthesis per cell at confluency. Collagen III and IV synthesis was not affected by cell density. Specific protein expression in both the medium and cell layer were analyzed by two-dimensional polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (150 to 20 kd, pI 5.0 to 7.0) after 20 hours steady-state metabolic labeling with [35S]methionine. Supraconfluent MCs displayed overexpression of 10, underexpression of four, new expression of five, and changed mobility of three different intracellular proteins. Of interest was the overexpression of two proteins (89 kd, pI 5.31 and 72 kd, pI 5.32) that were identified by immunoblotting as

  10. A complete active space SCF method (CASSCF) using a density matrix formulated super-CI approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roos, Björn O.; Taylor, Peter R.; Si≐gbahn, Per E. M.

    1980-05-01

    A density matrix formulation of the super-CI MCSCF method is presented. The MC expansion is assumed to be complete in an active subset of the orbital space, and the corresponding CI secular problem is solved by a direct scheme using the unitary group approach. With a density matrix formulation the orbital optimization step becomes independent of the size of the CI expansion. It is possible to formulate the super-CI in terms of density matrices defined only in the small active subspace; the doubly occupied orbitals (the inactive subspace) do not enter. Further, in the unitary group formalism it is straightforward and simple to obtain the necessary density matrices from the symbolic formula list. It then becomes possible to treat very long MC expansions, the largest so far comprising 726 configurations. The method is demonstrated in a calculation of the potential curves for the three lowest states ( 1Σ +g, 3Σ +u and 3Π g) of the N 2 molecule, using a medium-sized gaussian basis set. Seven active orbitals were used yielding the following results: De: 8.76 (9.90), 2.43 (3.68) and 3.39 (4.90) eV; re: 1.108 (1.098), 1.309 (1.287) and 1.230 (1.213) Å; ω e: 2333 (2359), 1385 (1461) and 1680 (1733) cm -1, for the three states (experimental values within parentheses). The results of these calculations indicate that it is important to consider not only the dissociation limit but also the united atom limit in partitioning the occupied orbital space into an active and an inactive part.

  11. Critical current densities estimated from AC susceptibilities in proximity-induced superconducting matrix of multifilamentary wire

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akune, Tadahiro; Sakamoto, Nobuyoshi

    2009-03-01

    In a multifilamentary wire proximity-currents between filaments show a close resemblance with the inter-grain current in a high-Tc superconductor. The critical current densities of the proximity-induced superconducting matrix Jcm can be estimated from measured twist-pitch dependence of magnetization and have been shown to follow the well-known scaling law of the pinning strength. The grained Bean model is applied on the multifilamentary wire to obtain Jcm, where the filaments are immersed in the proximity-induced superconducting matrix. Difference of the superconducting characteristics of the filament, the matrix and the filament content factor give a variety of deformation on the AC susceptibility curves. The computed AC susceptibility curves of multifilamentary wires using the grained Bean model are favorably compared with the experimental results. The values of Jcm estimated from the susceptibilities using the grained Bean model are comparable to those estimated from measured twist-pitch dependence of magnetization. The applicability of the grained Bean model on the multifilamentary wire is discussed in detail.

  12. A state interaction spin-orbit coupling density matrix renormalization group method.

    PubMed

    Sayfutyarova, Elvira R; Chan, Garnet Kin-Lic

    2016-06-21

    We describe a state interaction spin-orbit (SISO) coupling method using density matrix renormalization group (DMRG) wavefunctions and the spin-orbit mean-field (SOMF) operator. We implement our DMRG-SISO scheme using a spin-adapted algorithm that computes transition density matrices between arbitrary matrix product states. To demonstrate the potential of the DMRG-SISO scheme we present accurate benchmark calculations for the zero-field splitting of the copper and gold atoms, comparing to earlier complete active space self-consistent-field and second-order complete active space perturbation theory results in the same basis. We also compute the effects of spin-orbit coupling on the spin-ladder of the iron-sulfur dimer complex [Fe2S2(SCH3)4](3-), determining the splitting of the lowest quartet and sextet states. We find that the magnitude of the zero-field splitting for the higher quartet and sextet states approaches a significant fraction of the Heisenberg exchange parameter. PMID:27334156

  13. A state interaction spin-orbit coupling density matrix renormalization group method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sayfutyarova, Elvira R.; Chan, Garnet Kin-Lic

    2016-06-01

    We describe a state interaction spin-orbit (SISO) coupling method using density matrix renormalization group (DMRG) wavefunctions and the spin-orbit mean-field (SOMF) operator. We implement our DMRG-SISO scheme using a spin-adapted algorithm that computes transition density matrices between arbitrary matrix product states. To demonstrate the potential of the DMRG-SISO scheme we present accurate benchmark calculations for the zero-field splitting of the copper and gold atoms, comparing to earlier complete active space self-consistent-field and second-order complete active space perturbation theory results in the same basis. We also compute the effects of spin-orbit coupling on the spin-ladder of the iron-sulfur dimer complex [Fe2S2(SCH3)4]3-, determining the splitting of the lowest quartet and sextet states. We find that the magnitude of the zero-field splitting for the higher quartet and sextet states approaches a significant fraction of the Heisenberg exchange parameter.

  14. Sodium hydrosulfide prevents myocardial dysfunction through modulation of extracellular matrix accumulation and vascular density.

    PubMed

    Pan, Li-Long; Wang, Xian-Li; Wang, Xi-Ling; Zhu, Yi-Zhun

    2014-01-01

    The aim was to examine the role of exogenous hydrogen sulfide (H2S) on cardiac remodeling in post-myocardial infarction (MI) rats. MI was induced in rats by ligation of coronary artery. After treatment with sodium hydrosulfide (NaHS, an exogenous H2S donor, 56 μM/kg·day) for 42 days, the effects of NaHS on left ventricular morphometric features, echocardiographic parameters, heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1), matrix metalloproteinases-9 (MMP-9), type I and type III collagen, vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), CD34, and α-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA) in the border zone of infarct area were analyzed to elucidate the protective mechanisms of exogenous H2S on cardiac function and fibrosis. Forty-two days post MI, NaHS-treatment resulted in a decrease in myocardial fibrotic area in association with decreased levels of type I, type III collagen and MMP-9 and improved cardiac function. Meanwhile, NaHS administration significantly increased cystathionine γ-lyase (CSE), HO-1, α-SMA, and VEGF expression. This effect was accompanied by an increase in vascular density in the border zone of infarcted myocardium. Our results provided the strong evidences that exogenous H2S prevented cardiac remodeling, at least in part, through inhibition of extracellular matrix accumulation and increase in vascular density. PMID:25514418

  15. Leptogenesis with heavy neutrino flavours: from density matrix to Boltzmann equations

    SciTech Connect

    Blanchet, Steve; Bari, Pasquale Di; Jones, David A.; Marzola, Luca E-mail: pdb1d08@soton.ac.uk E-mail: daj1g08@soton.ac.uk

    2013-01-01

    Leptogenesis with heavy neutrino flavours is discussed within a density matrix formalism. We write the density matrix equation, describing the generation of the matter-antimatter asymmetry, for an arbitrary choice of the right-handed (RH) neutrino masses. For hierarchical RH neutrino masses lying in the fully flavoured regimes, this reduces to multiple-stage Boltzmann equations. In this case we recover and extend results previously derived within a quantum state collapse description. We confirm the generic existence of phantom terms. However, taking into account the effect of gauge interactions, we show that they are washed out at the production with a wash-out rate that is halved compared to that one acting on the total asymmetry. In the N{sub 1}-dominated scenario they cancel without contributing to the final baryon asymmetry. In other scenarios they do not in general and they have to be taken into account. We also confirm that there is a (orthogonal) component in the asymmetry produced by the heavier RH neutrinos which completely escapes the washout from the lighter RH neutrinos and show that phantom terms additionally contribute to it. The other (parallel) component is washed out with the usual exponential factor, even for weak washout. Finally, as an illustration, we study the two RH neutrino model in the light of the above findings, showing that phantom terms can contribute to the final asymmetry also in this case.

  16. Density of states features in some anomalous melting elements.

    PubMed

    Schulze, R K; Wallace, D C; Lashley, J C

    2013-11-20

    Valence band photoemission measurements have been made on crystalline and supercooled liquid gallium, and across the liquid and solid phases of bismuth and indium. Measurements are angle integrated and made using photon excitations of 21.21 and 40.81 eV. In all cases the Bloch states are destroyed upon melting and the free electron gas is constrained by a charge-neutral liquid. The spectra of indium show little change upon solidification, indicating a common electronic structure for crystalline and liquid phases. In contrast, the energy distribution curves for supercooled gallium and bismuth show large changes in the electronic structure from solid to liquid phases, giving rise to the formation of pseudogaps in the density of states at the Fermi energy, EF. Observations of this kind enable us to distinguish normal or anomalous melting from photoemission measurements. PMID:24153325

  17. Stochastic method with low mode substitution for nucleon isovector matrix elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Yi-Bo; Alexandru, Andrei; Draper, Terrence; Gong, Ming; Liu, Keh-Fei; χ QCD Collaboration

    2016-02-01

    We introduce a stochastic method with low-mode substitution to evaluate the connected three-point functions. The isovector matrix elements of the nucleon for the axial-vector coupling gA3, scalar couplings gS3 and the quark momentum fraction ⟨x ⟩u -d are calculated with overlap fermion on 2 +1 flavor domain-wall configurations on a 243×64 lattice at mπ=330 MeV with lattice spacing a =0.114 fm .

  18. Many-body correlations of QRPA in nuclear matrix elements of double-beta decay

    SciTech Connect

    Terasaki, J.

    2015-10-28

    We present two new ideas on the quasiparticle random-phase approximation (QRPA) approach for calculating nuclear matrix elements of double-beta decay. First, it is necessary to calculate overlaps of the QRPA states obtained on the basis of the ground states of different nuclei. We calculate this overlap using quasiboson vacua as the QRPA ground states. Second, we show that two-particle transfer paths are possible to use for the calculation under the closure approximation. A calculation is shown for {sup 150}Nd→{sup 150}Sm using these two new ideas, and their implication is discussed.

  19. The multivariate Meixner polynomials as matrix elements of SO(d, 1) representations on oscillator states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Genest, Vincent X.; Miki, Hiroshi; Vinet, Luc; Zhedanov, Alexei

    2014-01-01

    The multivariate Meixner polynomials are shown to arise as matrix elements of unitary representations of the SO(d, 1) group on oscillator states. These polynomials depend on d discrete variables and are orthogonal with respect to the negative multinomial distribution. The emphasis is put on the bivariate case for which the SO(2, 1) connection is used to derive the main properties of the polynomials: orthogonality relation, raising/lowering relations, generating function, recurrence relations and difference equations as well as explicit expressions in terms of standard (univariate) Krawtchouk and Meixner polynomials. It is explained how these results generalize directly to d variables.

  20. Electron-H2 Collisions Studied Using the Finite Element Z-Matrix Method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huo, Winifred M.; Brown, David; Langhoff, Stephen R. (Technical Monitor)

    1997-01-01

    We have applied the Z-matrix method, using a mixed basis of finite elements and Gaussians, to study e-H2 elastic and inelastic collisions. Special attention is paid to the quality of the basis set and the treatment of electron correlation. The calculated cross sections are invariant, to machine accuracy, with respect to the choice of parameters a, b, d, e as long as they satisfy Equation (3). However, the log derivative approach, i.e., the choice a = -e = 1, b = d = 0 appears to converge slightly faster than other choices. The cross sections agree well with previous theoretical results. Comparison will be made with available experimental data.

  1. Reduced matrix elements of spin–spin interactions for the atomic f-electron configurations

    SciTech Connect

    Yeung, Y.Y.

    2014-03-15

    A re-examination of some major references on the intra-atomic magnetic interactions over the last six decades reveals that there exist some gaps or puzzles concerning the previous studies of the spin–spin interactions for the atomic f-shell electrons. Hence, tables are provided for the relevant reduced matrix elements of the four double-tensor operators z{sub r} (r=1,2,3, and 4) of rank 2 in both the orbital and spin spaces. The range of the tables covers all states of the configurations from f{sup 4} to f{sup 7}.

  2. Nucleon matrix elements with Nf=2+1+1 maximally twisted fermions

    SciTech Connect

    Simon Dinter, Constantia Alexandrou, Martha Constantinou, Vincent Drach, Karl Jansen, Dru Renner

    2010-06-01

    We present the first lattice calculation of nucleon matrix elements using four dynamical flavors. We use the Nf=2+1+1 maximally twisted mass formulation. The renormalization is performed non-perturbatively in the RI'-MOM scheme and results are given for the vector and axial vector operators with up to one-derivative. Our calculation of the average momentum of the unpolarized non-singlet parton distribution is presented and compared to our previous results obtained from the Nf=2 case.

  3. Matrix elements of scalar three-electron operators for the atomic f shell

    SciTech Connect

    Hansen, J.E.; Judd, B.R.; Crosswhite H.

    1996-01-01

    Tables are provided for the matrix elements of an orthogonal set of Hermitian three-electron operators t{sub i} for the states of the f shell. The t{sub i} are scalar with respect to the total spin S and total orbital angular momentum L, and they are among the effective operators needed to be included in an f-electron Hamiltonian in order to represent the coupling of the ground configuration f{sup N} to excited configurations via the interelectronic Coulomb interaction. 15 refs., 2 tabs.

  4. Neutrinoless double {beta}-decay nuclear matrix elements within the SRQRPA with self-consistent short range correlations

    SciTech Connect

    Benes, Petr; Simkovic, Fedor

    2009-11-09

    The nuclear matrix elements M{sup 0v} of the neutrinoless double beta decay (0v{beta}{beta}-decay) are systematically evaluated using the self-consistent renormalized quasiparticle random phase approximation (SRQRPA). The residual interaction and the two-nucleon short-range correlations are derived from the charge-dependent Bonn (CD-Bonn) potential. The importance of further progress in the calculation of the 0v{beta}{beta}-decay nuclear matrix elements is stressed.

  5. Measurement of the top quark mass in the lepton+jets final state with the matrix element method

    SciTech Connect

    Abazov, V.M.; Abbott, B.; Abolins, M.; Acharya, B.S.; Adams, M.; Adams, T.; Agelou, M.; Aguilo, E.; Ahn, S.H.; Ahsan, M.; Alexeev, G.D.; /Buenos Aires U. /Rio de Janeiro, CBPF /Sao Paulo, IFT /Alberta U. /Simon Fraser U. /York U., Canada /McGill U. /Hefei, CUST /Andes U., Bogota /Charles U. /Prague, Tech. U.

    2006-09-01

    We present a measurement of the top quark mass with the Matrix Element method in the lepton+jets final state. As the energy scale for calorimeter jets represents the dominant source of systematic uncertainty, the Matrix Element likelihood is extended by an additional parameter, which is defined as a global multiplicative factor applied to the standard energy scale. The top quark mass is obtained from a fit that yields the combined statistical and systematic jet energy scale uncertainty.

  6. Determination of element affinities by density fractionation of bulk coal samples

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Querol, X.; Klika, Z.; Weiss, Z.; Finkelman, R.B.; Alastuey, A.; Juan, R.; Lopez-Soler, A.; Plana, F.; Kolker, A.; Chenery, S.R.N.

    2001-01-01

    A review has been made of the various methods of determining major and trace element affinities for different phases, both mineral and organic in coals, citing their various strengths and weaknesses. These include mathematical deconvolution of chemical analyses, direct microanalysis, sequential extraction procedures and density fractionation. A new methodology combining density fractionation with mathematical deconvolution of chemical analyses of whole coals and their density fractions has been evaluated. These coals formed part of the IEA-Coal Research project on the Modes of Occurrence of Trace Elements in Coal. Results were compared to a previously reported sequential extraction methodology and showed good agreement for most elements. For particular elements (Be, Mo, Cu, Se and REEs) in specific coals where disagreement was found, it was concluded that the occurrence of rare trace element bearing phases may account for the discrepancy, and modifications to the general procedure must be made to account for these.

  7. Experimental Identification of the Transmittance Matrix for any Element of the Pulsating Gas Manifold

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    CYKLIS, P.

    2001-07-01

    In positive-displacement compressor manifolds there are pressure pulsations due to their cyclic operation. The analysis of pressure pulsations in the compressor manifolds is important for various reasons: they directly affect the quantity of energy required for medium compression due to dynamic pressure charging, or inversely, dynamic suppression of suction and discharge processes; they cause mechanical vibrations of compressed gas piping network, they cause aerodynamic and mechanical noise; they affect the dynamics of working valves in valve compressors, they intensify the process of heat convection in heat exchangers in the gas network. The Helmholtz model used so far, which is the basis for users, who deal with pressure pulsation damping, contains many simplifying assumptions. This is because; a straight pipe segment substitutes each element of the piping system. In many cases this model is insufficient. An attempt of the analysis of other shapes was presented in references [1-3] but only simple geometry elements were considered. In other papers [4-8] the influence of the mean flow velocity caused problems. In the presented method, on the basis of pressure pulsation measurement results, firstly a division into the forward and backward going wave is determined, then the elements of the scattering (transmittance) matrix are calculated defining the installation element. This allows introducing the correction for gas mean velocity. The results of the method using correction for the gas mean velocity have been compared with the results without correction and Helmholtz model showing better accuracy.

  8. Fluctuations of Matrix Elements of Regular Functions of Gaussian Random Matrices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lytova, A.; Pastur, L.

    2009-01-01

    We find the limit of the variance and prove the Central Limit Theorem (CLT) for the matrix elements φ jk ( M), j, k=1,…, n of a regular function φ of the Gaussian matrix M (GOE and GUE) as its size n tends to infinity. We show that unlike the linear eigenvalue statistics Tr φ( M), a traditional object of random matrix theory, whose variance is bounded as n→∞ and the CLT is valid for Tr φ( M)- E{Tr φ( M)}, the variance of φ jk ( M) is O(1/ n), and the CLT is valid for sqrt{n}(\\varphi _{jk}(M)-E\\{\\varphi _{jk}(M)\\}) . This shows the role of eigenvectors in the forming of the asymptotic regime of various functions (statistics) of random matrices. Our proof is based on the use of the Fourier transform as a basic characteristic function, unlike the Stieltjes transform and moments, used in majority of works of the field. We also comment on the validity of analogous results for other random matrices.

  9. Symbolic algorithms for the computation of Moshinsky brackets and nuclear matrix elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ursescu, D.; Tomaselli, M.; Kuehl, T.; Fritzsche, S.

    2005-12-01

    To facilitate the use of the extended nuclear shell model (NSM), a FERMI module for calculating some of its basic quantities in the framework of MAPLE is provided. The Moshinsky brackets, the matrix elements for several central and non-central interactions between nuclear two-particle states as well as their expansion in terms of Talmi integrals are easily given within a symbolic formulation. All of these quantities are available for interactive work. Program summaryTitle of program:Fermi Catalogue identifier:ADVO Program summary URL:http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/summaries/ADVO Program obtainable from: CPC Program Library, Queen's University of Belfast, N. Ireland Licensing provisions:None Computer for which the program is designed and others on which is has been tested:All computers with a licence for the computer algebra package MAPLE [Maple is a registered trademark of Waterloo Maple Inc., produced by MapleSoft division of Waterloo Maple Inc.] Instalations:GSI-Darmstadt; University of Kassel (Germany) Operating systems or monitors under which the program has beentested: WindowsXP, Linux 2.4 Programming language used:MAPLE 8 and 9.5 from MapleSoft division of Waterloo Maple Inc. Memory required to execute with typical data:30 MB No. of lines in distributed program including test data etc.:5742 No. of bytes in distributed program including test data etc.:288 939 Distribution program:tar.gz Nature of the physical problem:In order to perform calculations within the nuclear shell model (NSM), a quick and reliable access to the nuclear matrix elements is required. These matrix elements, which arise from various types of forces among the nucleons, can be calculated using Moshinsky's transformation brackets between relative and center-of-mass coordinates [T.A. Brody, M. Moshinsky, Tables of Transformation Brackets, Monografias del Instituto de Fisica, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, 1960] and by the proper use of the nuclear states in different coupling notations

  10. Top quark mass measurement from dilepton events at CDF II with the matrix-element method

    SciTech Connect

    Abulencia, A.; Acosta, D.; Adelman, Jahred A.; Affolder, T.; Akimoto, T.; Albrow, M.G.; Ambrose, D.; Amerio, S.; Amidei, D.; Anastassov, A.; Anikeev, K.; /Taiwan, Inst. Phys. /Argonne /Barcelona, IFAE /Baylor U. /INFN, Bologna /Bologna U. /Brandeis U. /UC, Davis /UCLA /UC, San Diego /UC, Santa Barbara

    2006-05-01

    We describe a measurement of the top quark mass using events with two charged leptons collected by the CDF II detector from p{bar p} collisions with {radical}s = 1.96 TeV at the Fermilab Tevatron. The likelihood in top mass is calculated for each event by convoluting the leading order matrix element describing q{bar q} {yields} t{bar t} {yields} b{ell}{nu}{sub {ell}}{bar b}{ell}{prime} {nu}{sub {ell}}, with detector resolution functions. The presence of background events in the data sample is modeled using similar calculations involving the matrix elements for major background processes. In a data sample with integrated luminosity of 340 pb{sup -1}, we observe 33 candidate events and measure M{sub top} = 165.2 {+-} 6.1(stat.) {+-} 3.4(syst.) GeV/c{sup 2}. This measurement represents the first application of this method to events with two charged leptons and is the most precise single measurement of the top quark mass in this channel.

  11. Precision Measurement of the Neutron Twist-3 Matrix Element dn2: Probing Color Forces

    SciTech Connect

    Posik, Matthew; Flay, David; Parno, Diana; Allada, Kalyan; Armstrong, Whitney; Averett, Todd; Benmokhtar, Fatiha; Bertozzi, William; Camsonne, Alexandre; Canan, Mustafa; Cates, Gordon; Chen, Chunhua; Chen, Jian-Ping; Choi, Seonho; Chudakov, Eugene; Cusanno, Francesco; Dalton, Mark; Deconinck, Wouter; De Jager, Cornelis; Deng, Xiaoyan; Deur, Alexandre; Dutta, Chiranjib; El Fassi, Lamiaa; Franklin, Gregg; Friend, Megan; Gao, Haiyan; Garibaldi, Franco; Gilad, Shalev; Gilman, Ronald; Glamazdin, Oleksandr; Golge, Serkan; Gomez, Javier; Guo, Lei; Hansen, Jens-Ole; Higinbotham, Douglas; Holmstrom, Timothy; Huang, J; Hyde, Charles; Ibrahim Abdalla, Hassan; Jiang, Xiaodong; Jin, Ge; Katich, Joseph; Kelleher, Aidan; Kolarkar, Ameya; Korsch, Wolfgang; Kumbartzki, Gerfried; LeRose, John; Lindgren, Richard; Liyanage, Nilanga; Long, Elena; Lukhanin, Oleksandr; Mamyan, Vahe; McNulty, Dustin; Meziani, Zein-Eddine; Michaels, Robert; Mihovilovic, Miha; Moffit, Bryan; Muangma, Navaphon; Nanda, Sirish; Narayan, Amrendra; Nelyubin, Vladimir; Norum, Blaine; Nuruzzaman, nfn; Oh, Yongseok; Peng, Jen-chieh; Qian, Xin; Qiang, Yi; Rakhman, Abdurahim; Riordan, Seamus; Saha, Arunava; Sawatzky, Bradley; Hashemi Shabestari, Mitra; Shahinyan, Albert; Sirca, Simon; Solvignon-Slifer, Patricia; Subedi, Ramesh; Sulkosky, Vincent; Tobias, William; Troth, Wolfgang; Wang, Diancheng; Wang, Y; Wojtsekhowski, Bogdan; Yan, X; Yao, Huan; Ye, Yunxiu; Ye, Zhihong; Yuan, Lulin; Zhan, X; Zhang, Y; Zhang, Y -W; Zhao, Bo; Zheng, Xiaochao

    2014-07-01

    Double-spin asymmetries and absolute cross sections were measured at large Bjorken x (0.25 lte x lte 0.90), in both the deep-inelastic and resonance regions, by scattering longitudinally polarized electrons at beam energies of 4.7 and 5.9 GeV from a transversely and longitudinally polarized 3He target. In this dedicated experiment, the spin structure function g2 on 3He was determined with precision at large x, and the neutron twist-three matrix element dn2 was measured at ?Q2? of 3.21 and 4.32 GeV2/c2, with an absolute precision of about 10?5. Our results are found to be in agreement with lattice QCD calculations and resolve the disagreement found with previous data at ?Q2?= 5 GeV2/c2. Combining dn2 and a newly extracted twist-four matrix element, fn2, the average neutron color electric and magnetic forces were extracted and found to be of opposite sign and about 60 MeV/fm in magnitude.

  12. Many-body-localization transition: strong multifractality spectrum for matrix elements of local operators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monthus, Cécile

    2016-07-01

    For short-ranged disordered quantum models in one dimension, the many-body-localization is analyzed via the adaptation to the many-body context (Serbyn et al 2015 Phys. Rev. X 5 041047) of the Thouless point of view on the Anderson transition: the question is whether a local interaction between two long chains is able to reshuffle completely the eigenstates (delocalized phase with a volume-law entanglement) or whether the hybridization between tensor states remains limited (many-body-localized phase with an area-law entanglement). The central object is thus the level of hybridization induced by the matrix elements of local operators, as compared with the difference of diagonal energies. The multifractal analysis of these matrix elements of local operators is used to analyze the corresponding statistics of resonances. Our main conclusion is that the critical point is characterized by the strong-multifractality spectrum f(0≤slant α ≤slant 2)=\\fracα{2} , well known in the context of Anderson localization in spaces of effective infinite dimensionality, where the size of the Hilbert space grows exponentially with the volume. Finally, the possibility of a delocalized non-ergodic phase near criticality is discussed.

  13. Precision measurement of the neutron twist-3 matrix element d(2)(n): probing color forces.

    PubMed

    Posik, M; Flay, D; Parno, D S; Allada, K; Armstrong, W; Averett, T; Benmokhtar, F; Bertozzi, W; Camsonne, A; Canan, M; Cates, G D; Chen, C; Chen, J-P; Choi, S; Chudakov, E; Cusanno, F; Dalton, M M; Deconinck, W; de Jager, C W; Deng, X; Deur, A; Dutta, C; El Fassi, L; Franklin, G B; Friend, M; Gao, H; Garibaldi, F; Gilad, S; Gilman, R; Glamazdin, O; Golge, S; Gomez, J; Guo, L; Hansen, O; Higinbotham, D W; Holmstrom, T; Huang, J; Hyde, C; Ibrahim, H F; Jiang, X; Jin, G; Katich, J; Kelleher, A; Kolarkar, A; Korsch, W; Kumbartzki, G; LeRose, J J; Lindgren, R; Liyanage, N; Long, E; Lukhanin, A; Mamyan, V; McNulty, D; Meziani, Z-E; Michaels, R; Mihovilovič, M; Moffit, B; Muangma, N; Nanda, S; Narayan, A; Nelyubin, V; Norum, B; Nuruzzaman; Oh, Y; Peng, J C; Qian, X; Qiang, Y; Rakhman, A; Riordan, S; Saha, A; Sawatzky, B; Shabestari, M H; Shahinyan, A; Širca, S; Solvignon, P; Subedi, R; Sulkosky, V; Tobias, W A; Troth, W; Wang, D; Wang, Y; Wojtsekhowski, B; Yan, X; Yao, H; Ye, Y; Ye, Z; Yuan, L; Zhan, X; Zhang, Y; Zhang, Y-W; Zhao, B; Zheng, X

    2014-07-11

    Double-spin asymmetries and absolute cross sections were measured at large Bjorken x  (0.25≤x≤0.90), in both the deep-inelastic and resonance regions, by scattering longitudinally polarized electrons at beam energies of 4.7 and 5.9 GeV from a transversely and longitudinally polarized (3)He target. In this dedicated experiment, the spin structure function g(2)((3)He) was determined with precision at large x, and the neutron twist-3 matrix element d(2)(n) was measured at ⟨Q(2)⟩ of 3.21 and 4.32  GeV(2)/c(2), with an absolute precision of about 10(-5). Our results are found to be in agreement with lattice QCD calculations and resolve the disagreement found with previous data at ⟨Q(2)⟩=5  GeV(2)/c(2). Combining d(2)(n) and a newly extracted twist-4 matrix element f(2)(n), the average neutron color electric and magnetic forces were extracted and found to be of opposite sign and about 30  MeV/fm in magnitude. PMID:25062166

  14. Measurement of single top quark production at D0 using a matrix element method

    SciTech Connect

    Mitrevski, Jovan Pavle; /Columbia U.

    2007-07-01

    Until now, the top quark has only been observed produced in pairs, by the strong force. According to the standard model, it can also be produced singly, via an electroweak interaction. Top quarks produced this way provide powerful ways to test the charged-current electroweak interactions of the top quark, to measure |V{sub tb}|, and to search for physics beyond the standard model. This thesis describes the application of the matrix element analysis technique to the search for single top quark production with the D0 detector using 0.9 fb{sup -1} of Run II data. From a comparison of the matrix element discriminants between data and the background model, assuming a Standard Model s-channel to t-channel cross section ratio of {sigma}{sub s}/{sigma}{sub t} = 0.44, we measure the single top quark production cross section: {sigma}(p{bar p} {yields} tb + X, tqb + X) = 4.8{sub -1.4}{sup +1.6} pb. This result has a p-value of 0.08%, corresponding to a 3.2 standard deviation Gaussian equivalent significance.

  15. Top Quark Mass Measurement in the Lepton plus Jets Channel Using a Modified Matrix Element Method

    SciTech Connect

    Aaltonen, T.; Adelman, J.; Akimoto, T.; Alvarez Gonzalez, B.; Amerio, S.; Amidei, D.; Anastassov, A.; Annovi, A.; Antos, J.; Apollinari, G.; Apresyan, A.; /Purdue U. /Waseda U.

    2008-12-01

    The authors report a measurement of the top quark mass, m{sub t}, obtained from p{bar p} collisions at {radical}s = 1.96 TeV at the Fermilab Tevatron using the CDF II detector. They analyze a sample corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 1.9 rfb{sup -1}. They select events with an electron or muon, large missing transverse energy, and exactly four high-energy jets in the central region of the detector, at least one of which is tagged as coming from a b quark. They calculate a signal likelihood using a matrix element integration method, where the matrix element is modified by using effective propagators to take into account assumptions on event kinematics. The event likelihood is a function of m{sub t} and a parameter JES that determines in situ the calibration of the jet energies. They use a neural network discriminant to distinguish signal from background events. They also apply a cut on the peak value of each event likelihood curve to reduce the contribution of background and badly reconstructed events. Using the 318 events that pass all selection criteria, they find m{sub t} = 172.7 {+-} 1.8 (stat. + JES) {+-} 1.2(syst.) GeV/c{sup 2}.

  16. Precision Measurement of the Neutron Twist-3 Matrix Element d2n: Probing Color Forces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Posik, M.; Flay, D.; Parno, D. S.; Allada, K.; Armstrong, W.; Averett, T.; Benmokhtar, F.; Bertozzi, W.; Camsonne, A.; Canan, M.; Cates, G. D.; Chen, C.; Chen, J.-P.; Choi, S.; Chudakov, E.; Cusanno, F.; Dalton, M. M.; Deconinck, W.; de Jager, C. W.; Deng, X.; Deur, A.; Dutta, C.; El Fassi, L.; Franklin, G. B.; Friend, M.; Gao, H.; Garibaldi, F.; Gilad, S.; Gilman, R.; Glamazdin, O.; Golge, S.; Gomez, J.; Guo, L.; Hansen, O.; Higinbotham, D. W.; Holmstrom, T.; Huang, J.; Hyde, C.; Ibrahim, H. F.; Jiang, X.; Jin, G.; Katich, J.; Kelleher, A.; Kolarkar, A.; Korsch, W.; Kumbartzki, G.; LeRose, J. J.; Lindgren, R.; Liyanage, N.; Long, E.; Lukhanin, A.; Mamyan, V.; McNulty, D.; Meziani, Z.-E.; Michaels, R.; Mihovilovič, M.; Moffit, B.; Muangma, N.; Nanda, S.; Narayan, A.; Nelyubin, V.; Norum, B.; Nuruzzaman; Oh, Y.; Peng, J. C.; Qian, X.; Qiang, Y.; Rakhman, A.; Riordan, S.; Saha, A.; Sawatzky, B.; Shabestari, M. H.; Shahinyan, A.; Širca, S.; Solvignon, P.; Subedi, R.; Sulkosky, V.; Tobias, W. A.; Troth, W.; Wang, D.; Wang, Y.; Wojtsekhowski, B.; Yan, X.; Yao, H.; Ye, Y.; Ye, Z.; Yuan, L.; Zhan, X.; Zhang, Y.; Zhang, Y.-W.; Zhao, B.; Zheng, X.; Jefferson Lab Hall A Collaboration

    2014-07-01

    Double-spin asymmetries and absolute cross sections were measured at large Bjorken x (0.25≤x ≤0.90), in both the deep-inelastic and resonance regions, by scattering longitudinally polarized electrons at beam energies of 4.7 and 5.9 GeV from a transversely and longitudinally polarized He3 target. In this dedicated experiment, the spin structure function g2He3 was determined with precision at large x, and the neutron twist-3 matrix element d2n was measured at ⟨Q2⟩ of 3.21 and 4.32 GeV2/c2, with an absolute precision of about 10-5. Our results are found to be in agreement with lattice QCD calculations and resolve the disagreement found with previous data at ⟨Q2⟩=5 GeV2/c2. Combining d2n and a newly extracted twist-4 matrix element f2n, the average neutron color electric and magnetic forces were extracted and found to be of opposite sign and about 30 MeV /fm in magnitude.

  17. Analytical techniques for the evaluation of asymptotic matrix elements in electromagnetic problems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Seong-Ook

    1997-07-01

    Analytical solutions of the asymptotic part of impedance matrix elements, whose integrand contains either a singularity or exhibits a strongly oscillatory behavior, are developed for the analysis of various geometries. These developed formulas are applied using the Method of Moments (MoM), to the analysis of wire antennas, planar transmission lines, and printed circuits including microstrip dipoles, asymmetric gap discontinuities, and arbitrary shapes of planar circuits, where computational speed and accuracy are important. The first example considered is the singularity treatment in integrands of wire-type antenna problems. To overcome the problem, first the singularity is subtracted out, and then this part is integrated analytically in the transform domain. Asymptotic matrix elements of the multilayer planar transmission lines are solved analytically by using Chebyshev polynomial basis functions in the spectral domain. These results are applied to open and coupled microstrip lines. The analysis of printed circuits involves Sommerfeld-type integrals which are extremely difficult to evaluate. To enhance the speed and accuracy of Sommerfeld-type integrals, this dissertation, for the first time, presents an analytical transformation technique. This formulation allows the infinite double integral of the asymptotic part of the impedance matrix to be transformed into a finite one-dimensional integral. Using this approach, the asymptotic part of self and mutual interactions between the triangular edge mode basis functions, along an electrically narrow strip, is solved analytically. These results are applied to microstrip dipoles and asymmetric gap discontinuities. This formula provides highly accurate results with minimal computational effort. This work is also extended to roof- top subdomain basis functions, and the obtained results can be used to solve arbitrarily shaped planar geometries. As an example, computed results of the Radar Cross Section (RCS) of a microstrip

  18. Measurement of the top quark mass in the dilepton final state using the matrix element method

    SciTech Connect

    Grohsjean, Alexander; /Munich U.

    2008-12-01

    The top quark, discovered in 1995 by the CDF and D0 experiments at the Fermilab Tevatron Collider, is the heaviest known fundamental particle. The precise knowledge of its mass yields important constraints on the mass of the yet-unobserved Higgs boson and allows to probe for physics beyond the Standard Model. The first measurement of the top quark mass in the dilepton channel with the Matrix Element method at the D0 experiment is presented. After a short description of the experimental environment and the reconstruction chain from hits in the detector to physical objects, a detailed review of the Matrix Element method is given. The Matrix Element method is based on the likelihood to observe a given event under the assumption of the quantity to be measured, e.g. the mass of the top quark. The method has undergone significant modifications and improvements compared to previous measurements in the lepton+jets channel: the two undetected neutrinos require a new reconstruction scheme for the four-momenta of the final state particles, the small event sample demands the modeling of additional jets in the signal likelihood, and a new likelihood is designed to account for the main source of background containing tauonic Z decay. The Matrix Element method is validated on Monte Carlo simulated events at the generator level. For the measurement, calibration curves are derived from events that are run through the full D0 detector simulation. The analysis makes use of the Run II data set recorded between April 2002 and May 2008 corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 2.8 fb{sup -1}. A total of 107 t{bar t} candidate events with one electron and one muon in the final state are selected. Applying the Matrix Element method to this data set, the top quark mass is measured to be m{sub top}{sup Run IIa} = 170.6 {+-} 6.1(stat.){sub -1.5}{sup +2.1}(syst.)GeV; m{sub top}{sup Run IIb} = 174.1 {+-} 4.4(stat.){sub -1.8}{sup +2.5}(syst.)GeV; m{sub top}{sup comb} = 172.9 {+-} 3.6(stat

  19. Cell response to RGD density in cross-linked artificial extracellular matrix protein films.

    PubMed

    Liu, Julie C; Tirrell, David A

    2008-11-01

    This study examines the adhesion, spreading, and migration of human umbilical vein endothelial cells on cross-linked films of artificial extracellular matrix (aECM) proteins. The aECM proteins described here were designed for application in small-diameter grafts and are composed of elastin-like structural repeats and fibronectin cell-binding domains. aECM-RGD contains the RGD sequence derived from fibronectin; the negative control protein aECM-RDG contains a scrambled cell-binding domain. The covalent attachment of poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) to aECM substrates reduced nonspecific cell adhesion to aECM-RDG-PEG but did not preclude sequence-specific adhesion of endothelial cells to aECM-RGD-PEG. Variation in ligand density was accomplished by the mixing of aECM-RGD-PEG and aECM-RDG-PEG prior to cross-linking. Increasing the density of RGD domains in cross-linked films resulted in more robust cell adhesion and spreading but did not affect cell migration speed. Control of cell-binding domain density in aECM proteins can thus be used to modulate cell adhesion and spreading and will serve as an important design tool as these materials are further developed for use in surgery, tissue engineering, and regenerative medicine. PMID:18826275

  20. Novel low density granular adsorbents - properties of a composite matrix from zeolitisation of vermiculite.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Christopher D; Worrall, Fred

    2007-06-01

    This paper reports the preparation and properties of a new low density granular absorbent material based on a zeolite/vermiculite composite. The composite prepared addresses a number of important issues relating to the use of zeolites in environmental and waste management applications. The material prepared has large particle size due to binderless adhesion of zeolite crystals within the protective lamellar matrix provided by the vermiculite granule. Additionally, the porous nature of new material ensures that it outperforms natural zeolite grains in ion-exchange tests. The material was shown to have a low bulk density (0.75 g cm(-3)) adding the benefit that the majority of grains float on water for over 15 h. The conclusion of the study is that the use of composite matrices enable the preparation of materials which show the physical properties of the host, (e.g., granular and low density), whilst maintaining the powder-like properties (e.g., high ion-exchange and small crystal size) of the active component. The resulting material can be easily handled and separated from aqueous waste streams using either flotation or exploiting its granular nature. PMID:17368511

  1. Validity of power functionals for a homogeneous electron gas in reduced-density-matrix-functional theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Putaja, A.; Eich, F. G.; Baldsiefen, T.; Räsänen, E.

    2016-03-01

    Physically valid and numerically efficient approximations for the exchange and correlation energy are critical for reduced-density-matrix-functional theory to become a widely used method in electronic structure calculations. Here we examine the physical limits of power functionals of the form f (n ,n') =(nn')α for the scaling function in the exchange-correlation energy. To this end we obtain numerically the minimizing momentum distributions for the three- and two-dimensional homogeneous electron gas, respectively. In particular, we examine the limiting values for the power α to yield physically sound solutions that satisfy the Lieb-Oxford lower bound for the exchange-correlation energy and exclude pinned states with the condition n (k )<1 for all wave vectors k . The results refine the constraints previously obtained from trial momentum distributions. We also compute the values for α that yield the exact correlation energy and its kinetic part for both the three- and two-dimensional electron gas. In both systems, narrow regimes of validity and accuracy are found at α ≳0.6 and at rs≳10 for the density parameter, corresponding to relatively low densities.

  2. Quantum phase transition by employing trace distance along with the density matrix renormalization group

    SciTech Connect

    Luo, Da-Wei; Xu, Jing-Bo

    2015-03-15

    We use an alternative method to investigate the quantum criticality at zero and finite temperature using trace distance along with the density matrix renormalization group. It is shown that the average correlation measured by the trace distance between the system block and environment block in a DMRG sweep is able to detect the critical points of quantum phase transitions at finite temperature. As illustrative examples, we study spin-1 XXZ chains with uniaxial single-ion-type anisotropy and the Heisenberg spin chain with staggered coupling and external magnetic field. It is found that the trace distance shows discontinuity at the critical points of quantum phase transition and can be used as an indicator of QPTs.

  3. Quasi-particle energy spectra in local reduced density matrix functional theory.

    PubMed

    Lathiotakis, Nektarios N; Helbig, Nicole; Rubio, Angel; Gidopoulos, Nikitas I

    2014-10-28

    Recently, we introduced [N. N. Lathiotakis, N. Helbig, A. Rubio, and N. I. Gidopoulos, Phys. Rev. A 90, 032511 (2014)] local reduced density matrix functional theory (local RDMFT), a theoretical scheme capable of incorporating static correlation effects in Kohn-Sham equations. Here, we apply local RDMFT to molecular systems of relatively large size, as a demonstration of its computational efficiency and its accuracy in predicting single-electron properties from the eigenvalue spectrum of the single-particle Hamiltonian with a local effective potential. We present encouraging results on the photoelectron spectrum of molecular systems and the relative stability of C20 isotopes. In addition, we propose a modelling of the fractional occupancies as functions of the orbital energies that further improves the efficiency of the method useful in applications to large systems and solids. PMID:25362285

  4. Electrically tunable spin polarization in silicene: A multi-terminal spin density matrix approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Son-Hsien

    2016-05-01

    Recent realized silicene field-effect transistor yields promising electronic applications. Using a multi-terminal spin density matrix approach, this paper presents an analysis of the spin polarizations in a silicene structure of the spin field-effect transistor by considering the intertwined intrinsic and Rashba spin-orbit couplings, gate voltage, Zeeman splitting, as well as disorder. Coexistence of the stagger potential and intrinsic spin-orbit coupling results in spin precession, making any in-plane polarization directions reachable by the gate voltage; specifically, the intrinsic coupling allows one to electrically adjust the in-plane components of the polarizations, while the Rashba coupling to adjust the out-of-plan polarizations. Larger electrically tunable ranges of in-plan polarizations are found in oppositely gated silicene than in the uniformly gated silicene. Polarizations in different phases behave distinguishably in weak disorder regime, while independent of the phases, stronger disorder leads to a saturation value.

  5. Density matrix renormalization group study of triangular Kitaev-Heisenberg model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sota, Shigetoshi; Sjinjo, Kazuya; Shirakawa, Tomonori; Tohyama, Takami; Yunoki, Seiji

    2015-03-01

    Topological insulator has been one of the most active subjects in the current condensed matter physics. For most of topological insulators electron correlations are considered to be not essential. However, in the case where electron correlations are strong, novel phases such as a spin liquid phase can emerge in competition with a spin-orbit coupling. Here, using the density matrix renormalization group method, we investigate magnetic phase of a triangular Kitaev-Heisenberg (quantum compass) model that contains a spin-orbital interaction and spin frustration in the antiferromagnetic region. The triangular Kitaev-Heisenberg model is regarded as a dual model of the honeycomb Kitaev-Heisenberg model that is usually employed to discuss A2CuO3 (A=Na, K). Systematically calculating ground state energy, entanglement entropy, entanglement spectrum, and spin-spin correlation functions, we discuss the duality between the triangular and the honeycomb Kitaev-Heisenberg model as well as the ground state magnetic phases.

  6. Excited-State Geometry Optimization with the Density Matrix Renormalization Group, as Applied to Polyenes.

    PubMed

    Hu, Weifeng; Chan, Garnet Kin-Lic

    2015-07-14

    We describe and extend the formalism of state-specific analytic density matrix renormalization group (DMRG) energy gradients, first used by Liu et al. [J. Chem. Theor. Comput. 2013, 9, 4462]. We introduce a DMRG wave function maximum overlap following technique to facilitate state-specific DMRG excited-state optimization. Using DMRG configuration interaction (DMRG-CI) gradients, we relax the low-lying singlet states of a series of trans-polyenes up to C20H22. Using the relaxed excited-state geometries, as well as correlation functions, we elucidate the exciton, soliton, and bimagnon ("single-fission") character of the excited states, and find evidence for a planar conical intersection. PMID:26575737

  7. The cumulant two-particle reduced density matrix as a measure of electron correlation and entanglement.

    PubMed

    Juhász, Tamás; Mazziotti, David A

    2006-11-01

    Several measures of electron correlation are compared based on two criteria: (i) the presence of a unique mapping between the reduced variables in the measure and the many-electron wave function and (ii) the linear scaling of the measure and its variables with system size. We propose the squared Frobenius norm of the cumulant part of the two-particle reduced density matrix (2-RDM) as a measure of electron correlation that satisfies these criteria. An advantage of this cumulant-based norm is its ability to measure the correlation from spin entanglement, which is not contained in the correlation energy. Alternative measures based on the 2-RDM, such as the von Neumann entropy, do not scale linearly with system size. Properties of the measures are demonstrated with Be, F(2), HF, N(2), and a hydrogen chain. PMID:17100427

  8. Quasi-particle energy spectra in local reduced density matrix functional theory

    SciTech Connect

    Lathiotakis, Nektarios N.; Helbig, Nicole; Rubio, Angel

    2014-10-28

    Recently, we introduced [N. N. Lathiotakis, N. Helbig, A. Rubio, and N. I. Gidopoulos, Phys. Rev. A 90, 032511 (2014)] local reduced density matrix functional theory (local RDMFT), a theoretical scheme capable of incorporating static correlation effects in Kohn-Sham equations. Here, we apply local RDMFT to molecular systems of relatively large size, as a demonstration of its computational efficiency and its accuracy in predicting single-electron properties from the eigenvalue spectrum of the single-particle Hamiltonian with a local effective potential. We present encouraging results on the photoelectron spectrum of molecular systems and the relative stability of C{sub 20} isotopes. In addition, we propose a modelling of the fractional occupancies as functions of the orbital energies that further improves the efficiency of the method useful in applications to large systems and solids.

  9. Multireference electron correlation methods with density matrix renormalisation group reference functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurashige, Yuki

    2014-06-01

    Recent advances in quantum chemical density matrix renormalisation group (DMRG) theory are presented. The DMRG, originally devised as an alternative to the exact diagonalisation in condensed matter physics, has become a powerful quantum chemical method for molecular systems that exhibit a multireference character, e.g., excited states, π-conjugated systems, transition metal complexes, and in particular for large systems by combining it with conventional multireference electron correlation methods. The capability of the current quantum chemical DMRG is demonstrated for an application involving the potential energy curve of the chromium dimer, which is one of the most demanding multireference systems and thus requires the best electronic structure treatment for non-dynamical and dynamical correlation as well as large basis sets.

  10. Low-density, high-strength intermetallic matrix composites by XD (trademark) synthesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kumar, K. S.; Dipietro, M. S.; Brown, S. A.; Whittenberger, J. D.

    1991-01-01

    A feasibility study was conducted to evaluate the potential of particulate composites based on low-density, L1(sub 2) trialuminide matrices for high-temperature applications. The compounds evaluated included Al22Fe3Ti8 (as a multiphase matrix), Al67Ti25Cr8, and Al66Ti25Mn9. The reinforcement consisted of TiB2 particulates. The TiB2 composites were processed by ingot and powder metallurgy techniques. Microstructural characterization and mechanical testing were performed in the hot-pressed and hot-isostatic-pressed condition. The casting were sectioned and isothermally forged into pancakes. All the materials were tested in compression as a function of temperature, and at high temperatures as a function of strain rate. The test results are discussed.

  11. A Practical Guide to Density Matrix Embedding Theory in Quantum Chemistry.

    PubMed

    Wouters, Sebastian; Jiménez-Hoyos, Carlos A; Sun, Qiming; Chan, Garnet K-L

    2016-06-14

    Density matrix embedding theory (DMET) (Knizia, G.; Chan, G. K.-L. Phys. Rev. Lett. 2012, 109, 186404) provides a theoretical framework to treat finite fragments in the presence of a surrounding molecular or bulk environment, even when there is significant correlation or entanglement between the two. In this work, we give a practically oriented and explicit description of the numerical and theoretical formulation of DMET. We also describe in detail how to perform self-consistent DMET optimizations. We explore different embedding strategies with and without a self-consistency condition in hydrogen rings, beryllium rings, and a sample SN2 reaction. The source code for the calculations in this work can be obtained from https://github.com/sebwouters/qc-dmet . PMID:27159268

  12. Generalized information (entanglement) entropies depending on the probability (density matrix), (modified gravity)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Obregón, Octavio; Cabo Bizet, Nana Geraldine

    2016-03-01

    Generalized information (entanglement) entropy(ies) that depend only on the probability (the density matrix) will be exhibited. It will be shown that these generalized information entropy(ies) are obtained by means of the superstatistics proposal and they correspond to generalized entanglement entropy(ies) that are at the same time a consequence of generalizing the Replica trick. Following the entropic force formulation, these generalized entropy(ies) provide a modified Newtońs law of gravitation. We discuss the difficulties to get an associated theory of gravity. Moreover, our results show corrections to the von Neumann entropy S0 that are larger than the usual UV ones and also than the corrections to the length dependent AdS3 entropy which result comparable to the UV ones. The correction terms due to the new entropy would modify the Ryu-Takayanagi identification between the CFT and the gravitational AdS3 entropies.

  13. Density-matrix renormalization-group study of current and activity fluctuations near nonequilibrium phase transitions.

    PubMed

    Gorissen, Mieke; Hooyberghs, Jef; Vanderzande, Carlo

    2009-02-01

    Cumulants of a fluctuating current can be obtained from a free-energy-like generating function, which for Markov processes equals the largest eigenvalue of a generalized generator. We determine this eigenvalue with the density-matrix renormalization group for stochastic systems. We calculate the variance of the current in the different phases, and at the phase transitions, of the totally asymmetric exclusion process. Our results can be described in the terms of a scaling ansatz that involves the dynamical exponent z . We also calculate the generating function of the dynamical activity (total number of configuration changes) near the absorbing-state transition of the contact process. Its scaling properties can be expressed in terms of known critical exponents. PMID:19391693

  14. Symmetry-conserving purification of quantum states within the density matrix renormalization group

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Nocera, Alberto; Alvarez, Gonzalo

    2016-01-28

    The density matrix renormalization group (DMRG) algorithm was originally designed to efficiently compute the zero-temperature or ground-state properties of one-dimensional strongly correlated quantum systems. The development of the algorithm at finite temperature has been a topic of much interest, because of the usefulness of thermodynamics quantities in understanding the physics of condensed matter systems, and because of the increased complexity associated with efficiently computing temperature-dependent properties. The ancilla method is a DMRG technique that enables the computation of these thermodynamic quantities. In this paper, we review the ancilla method, and improve its performance by working on reduced Hilbert spaces andmore » using canonical approaches. Furthermore we explore its applicability beyond spins systems to t-J and Hubbard models.« less

  15. Hybrid-Space Density Matrix Renormalization Group Study of the Two-Dimensional Hubbard Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ehlers, Georg; Noack, Reinhard M.

    We investigate the ground state of the two-dimensional Hubbard model on a cylinder geometry at intermediate coupling and weak doping. We study properties such as the behavior of the ground-state energy, pair-field correlations, and the appearance of stripes. We find striped ground states generically, with the width of the stripes depending on the filling, the boundary conditions, and the circumference of the cylinder. Furthermore, we analyse the interplay between the different stripe configurations and the decay of the pairing correlations. Our analysis is based on a hybrid-space density matrix renormalization group (DMRG) approach, which uses a momentum-space representation in the transverse and a real-space representation in the longitudinal direction. Exploiting the transverse momentum quantum number makes significant speedup and memory savings compared to the real-space DMRG possible. In particular, we obtain computational costs that are independent of the cylinder width for fixed size of the truncated Hilbert space.

  16. Layered Low-Density Generator Matrix Codes for Super High Definition Scalable Video Coding System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tonomura, Yoshihide; Shirai, Daisuke; Nakachi, Takayuki; Fujii, Tatsuya; Kiya, Hitoshi

    In this paper, we introduce layered low-density generator matrix (Layered-LDGM) codes for super high definition (SHD) scalable video systems. The layered-LDGM codes maintain the correspondence relationship of each layer from the encoder side to the decoder side. This resulting structure supports partial decoding. Furthermore, the proposed layered-LDGM codes create highly efficient forward error correcting (FEC) data by considering the relationship between each scalable component. Therefore, the proposed layered-LDGM codes raise the probability of restoring the important components. Simulations show that the proposed layered-LDGM codes offer better error resiliency than the existing method which creates FEC data for each scalable component independently. The proposed layered-LDGM codes support partial decoding and raise the probability of restoring the base component. These characteristics are very suitable for scalable video coding systems.

  17. Overcoming Matrix Effects in a Complex Sample: Analysis of Multiple Elements in Multivitamins by Atomic Absorption Spectroscopy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arnold, Randy J.; Arndt, Brett; Blaser, Emilia; Blosser, Chris; Caulton, Dana; Chung, Won Sog; Fiorenza, Garrett; Heath, Wyatt; Jacobs, Alex; Kahng, Eunice; Koh, Eun; Le, Thao; Mandla, Kyle; McCory, Chelsey; Newman, Laura; Pithadia, Amit; Reckelhoff, Anna; Rheinhardt, Joseph; Skljarevski, Sonja; Stuart, Jordyn; Taylor, Cassie; Thomas, Scott; Tse, Kyle; Wall, Rachel; Warkentien, Chad

    2011-01-01

    A multivitamin tablet and liquid are analyzed for the elements calcium, magnesium, iron, zinc, copper, and manganese using atomic absorption spectrometry. Linear calibration and standard addition are used for all elements except calcium, allowing for an estimate of the matrix effects encountered for this complex sample. Sample preparation using…

  18. TIEG1-NULL OSTEOCYTES DISPLAY DEFECTS IN THEIR MORPHOLOGY, DENSITY AND SURROUNDING BONE MATRIX

    PubMed Central

    Haddad, Oualid; Hawse, John R.; Subramaniam, Malayannan; Spelsberg, Thomas C.; Bensamoun, Sabine F.

    2011-01-01

    Through the development of TGFβ-inducible early gene-1 (TIEG1) knockout (KO) mice, we have demonstrated that TIEG1 plays an important role in osteoblast-mediated bone mineralization, and in bone resistance to mechanical strain. To further investigate the influence of TIEG1 in skeletal maintenance, osteocytes were analyzed by transmission electron microscopy using TIEG1 KO and wild-type mouse femurs at one, three and eight months of age. The results revealed an age-dependent change in osteocyte surface and density, suggesting a role for TIEG1 in osteocyte development. Moreover, there was a decrease in the amount of hypomineralized bone matrix surrounding the osteocytes in TIEG1 KO mice relative to wild-type controls. While little is known about the function or importance of this hypomineralized bone matrix immediately adjacent to osteocytes, this study reveals significant differences in this bone microenvironment and suggests that osteocyte function may be compromised in the absence of TIEG1 expression. PMID:22121306

  19. Construction of environment states in quantum-chemical density-matrix renormalization group calculations.

    PubMed

    Moritz, Gerrit; Reiher, Markus

    2006-01-21

    The application of the quantum-chemical density-matrix renormalization group (DMRG) algorithm is cumbersome for complex electronic structures with many active orbitals. The high computational cost is mainly due to the poor convergence of standard DMRG calculations. A factor which affects the convergence behavior of the calculations is the choice of the start-up procedure. In this start-up step matrix representations of operators have to be calculated in a guessed many-electron basis of the DMRG environment block. Different possibilities for the construction of these basis states exist, and we first compare four procedures to approximate the environment states using Slater determinants explicitly. These start-up procedures are applied to DMRG calculations on a sophisticated test system: the chromium dimer. It is found that the converged energies and the rate of convergence depend significantly on the choice of the start-up procedure. However, since already the most simple start-up procedure, which uses only the Hartree-Fock determinant, is comparatively good, Slater determinants, in general, appear not to be a good choice as approximate environment basis states for convergence acceleration. Based on extensive test calculations it is demonstrated that the computational cost can be significantly reduced if the number of total states m is successively increased. This is done in such a way that the environment states are built up stepwise from system states of previous truncated DMRG sweeps for slowly increasing m values. PMID:16438563

  20. Construction of environment states in quantum-chemical density-matrix renormalization group calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moritz, Gerrit; Reiher, Markus

    2006-01-01

    The application of the quantum-chemical density-matrix renormalization group (DMRG) algorithm is cumbersome for complex electronic structures with many active orbitals. The high computational cost is mainly due to the poor convergence of standard DMRG calculations. A factor which affects the convergence behavior of the calculations is the choice of the start-up procedure. In this start-up step matrix representations of operators have to be calculated in a guessed many-electron basis of the DMRG environment block. Different possibilities for the construction of these basis states exist, and we first compare four procedures to approximate the environment states using Slater determinants explicitly. These start-up procedures are applied to DMRG calculations on a sophisticated test system: the chromium dimer. It is found that the converged energies and the rate of convergence depend significantly on the choice of the start-up procedure. However, since already the most simple start-up procedure, which uses only the Hartree-Fock determinant, is comparatively good, Slater determinants, in general, appear not to be a good choice as approximate environment basis states for convergence acceleration. Based on extensive test calculations it is demonstrated that the computational cost can be significantly reduced if the number of total states m is successively increased. This is done in such a way that the environment states are built up stepwise from system states of previous truncated DMRG sweeps for slowly increasing m values.

  1. Linear response theory for the density matrix renormalization group: Efficient algorithms for strongly correlated excited states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakatani, Naoki; Wouters, Sebastian; Van Neck, Dimitri; Chan, Garnet Kin-Lic

    2014-01-01

    Linear response theory for the density matrix renormalization group (DMRG-LRT) was first presented in terms of the DMRG renormalization projectors [J. J. Dorando, J. Hachmann, and G. K.-L. Chan, J. Chem. Phys. 130, 184111 (2009)]. Later, with an understanding of the manifold structure of the matrix product state (MPS) ansatz, which lies at the basis of the DMRG algorithm, a way was found to construct the linear response space for general choices of the MPS gauge in terms of the tangent space vectors [J. Haegeman, J. I. Cirac, T. J. Osborne, I. Pižorn, H. Verschelde, and F. Verstraete, Phys. Rev. Lett. 107, 070601 (2011)]. These two developments led to the formulation of the Tamm-Dancoff and random phase approximations (TDA and RPA) for MPS. This work describes how these LRTs may be efficiently implemented through minor modifications of the DMRG sweep algorithm, at a computational cost which scales the same as the ground-state DMRG algorithm. In fact, the mixed canonical MPS form implicit to the DMRG sweep is essential for efficient implementation of the RPA, due to the structure of the second-order tangent space. We present ab initio DMRG-TDA results for excited states of polyenes, the water molecule, and a [2Fe-2S] iron-sulfur cluster.

  2. The variational two-electron reduced-density-matrix method for extended systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rubin, Nicholas C.

    In this thesis we develop the variational two-electron reduced-density-matrix method for extended systems. Extended systems are represented in two ways: i) lattice models describing the dominant valence electronic structure with periodic boundaries to account for their extended nature and ii) a crystalline-orbital basis built from atomic orbitals using the generalization of molecular orbital theory to polymers. The first part of this thesis (Ch. 3--4) examines the performance of the variational 2-RDM method on lattice systems with tunable electron correlation. The first of these systems is the classic Hubbard model with linear and ladder lattice topologies. Because electron correlation functions, such as charge- and spin-ordering, are linear functions of the 2-RDM, the difference in electronic structure between one- and quasi-one-dimensional systems is accurately characterized. The second model contains only two-body interactions and is unique among typical spin models in that it does not have a mean-field reference wave function. The ground state wave functions from all Hamiltonians in the model have the same 1-electron reduced density matrix; consequently, one-electron theories are largely inapplicable. The superconducting eta-pairing ground states make the model a unique tool for demonstrating the necessary N-representability in highly correlated environments. The second part of this thesis (Ch. 5--6) develops a formalism for modeling materials by solving the full Schrodinger equation. Crystalline-orbital Hartree-Fock provides a set of orbitals and integral tensors for the variational 2-RDM method. We demonstrate that time-reversal symmetry, which is implicitly included in position space electronic structure calculations, must be explicitly included as an N-representability constraint on the 2-RDM when using a momentum space basis. The necessity of these equality constraints is demonstrated by the accurate recovery of the binding energy of two polymers and the

  3. One plus two-body random matrix ensembles with parity: Density of states and parity ratios

    SciTech Connect

    Vyas, Manan; Srivastava, P. C.; Kota, V. K. B.

    2011-06-15

    One plus two-body embedded Gaussian orthogonal ensemble of random matrices with parity [EGOE(1+2)-{pi}] generated by a random two-body interaction (modeled by GOE in two-particle spaces) in the presence of a mean field for spinless identical fermion systems is defined, generalizing the two-body ensemble with parity analyzed by Papenbrock and Weidenmueller [Phys. Rev. C 78, 054305 (2008)], in terms of two mixing parameters and a gap between the positive ({pi}=+) and negative ({pi}=-) parity single-particle (sp) states. Numerical calculations are used to demonstrate, using realistic values of the mixing parameters appropriate for some nuclei, that the EGOE(1+2)-{pi} ensemble generates Gaussian form (with corrections) for fixed parity eigenvalue densities (i.e., state densities). The random matrix model also generates many features in parity ratios of state densities that are similar to those predicted by a method based on the Fermi-gas model for nuclei. We have also obtained, by applying the formulation due to Chang et al. [Ann. Phys. (NY) 66, 137 (1971)], a simple formula for the spectral variances defined over fixed-(m{sub 1},m{sub 2}) spaces, where m{sub 1} is the number of fermions in the positive parity sp states and m{sub 2} is the number of fermions in the negative parity sp states. Similarly, using the binary correlation approximation, in the dilute limit, we have derived expressions for the lowest two-shape parameters. The smoothed densities generated by the sum of fixed-(m{sub 1},m{sub 2}) Gaussians with lowest two-shape corrections describe the numerical results in many situations. The model also generates preponderance of positive parity ground states for small values of the mixing parameters, and this is a feature seen in nuclear shell-model results.

  4. Theoretical formulation of Doppler redistribution in scattering polarization within the framework of the velocity-space density matrix formalism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belluzzi, L.; Landi Degl'Innocenti, E.; Trujillo Bueno, J.

    2013-04-01

    Within the framework of the density matrix theory for the generation and transfer of polarized radiation, velocity density matrix correlations represent an important physical aspect that, however, is often neglected in practical applications when adopting the simplifying approximation of complete redistribution on velocity. In this paper, we present an application of the non-LTE problem for polarized radiation taking such correlations into account through the velocity-space density matrix formalism. We consider a two-level atom with infinitely sharp upper and lower levels, and we derive the corresponding statistical equilibrium equations, neglecting the contribution of velocity-changing collisions. Coupling such equations with the radiative transfer equations for polarized radiation, we derive a set of coupled equations for the velocity-dependent source function. This set of equations is then particularized to the case of a plane-parallel atmosphere. The equations presented in this paper provide a complete and solid description of the physics of pure Doppler redistribution, a phenomenon generally described within the framework of the redistribution matrix formalism. The redistribution matrix corresponding to this problem (generally referred to as RI) is derived starting from the statistical equilibrium equations for the velocity-space density matrix and from the radiative transfer equations for polarized radiation, thus showing the equivalence of the two approaches.

  5. Measurement of the RMS Parity Violating Matrix Element in URANIUM-239

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Xianzhou (Joe).

    We report the first determination of the Root -Mean-Square (RMS) parity violating matrix element in a compound nucleus (CN) system, ^{239 }U. The experiment was performed using the intense pulsed epithermal neutron beam available at the Los Alamos Neutron Scattering Center (LANSCE). The helicity dependence of neutron transmission through a spin zero target (^{238}U) is measured for neutron energies from 6 eV to 300 eV. Parity violation is analyzed on 17 p-wave resonances among which five show 2sigma or larger effects. The largest is a 7sigma effect at the 63.5 eV resonance which shows a parity violating asymmetry of p = 2.6%. A likelihood analysis is performed on these 17 parity violating asymmetries, and the RMS parity violating matrix element is determined for the first time to be M = 0.59_sp{-0.25}{+0.50} meV which corresponds to a parity violating spreading width ofGamma^{PV} = (1.0 {+1.7atop -0.8} ) times 10^{-7} {rm eV}.Using statistical nuclear spectroscopy, we are able to relate M to the effective nucleon-nucleon (NN) interaction. The result is | alpha_{p}| ~ (4 {+4atop -2} ) times 10^{-7} where alpha_{p} is the ratio of the parity violating strength to the parity conserving strength in the effective NN interaction. This agrees qualitatively with the estimate of free NN interaction. The consistency of the experimental measurement with expectation suggests that the manifestation of parity violating NN interaction in CN is understood. It is a challenging problem for the theorists to relate the RMS matrix element in the CN to the underlying NN interaction, therefore providing alternative ways to determine the Desplanques -Donoghue-Holstein (DDH) parameters of the NN interaction. The success of the parity violation study also validates the proposed experiment of studying the time reversal symmetry violation utilizing the large enhancement in the CN.

  6. LETTER TO THE EDITOR: Transfer-matrix density-matrix renormalization group for stochastic models: the Domany-Kinzel cellular automaton

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kemper, A.; Schadschneider, A.; Zittartz, J.

    2001-05-01

    We apply the transfer-matrix density-matrix renormalization group (TMRG) to a stochastic model, the Domany-Kinzel cellular automaton, which exhibits a non-equilibrium phase transition in the directed percolation universality class. Estimates for the stochastic time evolution, phase boundaries and critical exponents can be obtained with high precision. This is possible using only modest numerical effort since the thermodynamic limit can be taken analytically in our approach. We also point out further advantages of the TMRG over other numerical approaches, such as classical DMRG or Monte Carlo simulations.

  7. Density-matrix based determination of low-energy model Hamiltonians from ab initio wavefunctions

    SciTech Connect

    Changlani, Hitesh J.; Zheng, Huihuo; Wagner, Lucas K.

    2015-09-14

    We propose a way of obtaining effective low energy Hubbard-like model Hamiltonians from ab initio quantum Monte Carlo calculations for molecular and extended systems. The Hamiltonian parameters are fit to best match the ab initio two-body density matrices and energies of the ground and excited states, and thus we refer to the method as ab initio density matrix based downfolding. For benzene (a finite system), we find good agreement with experimentally available energy gaps without using any experimental inputs. For graphene, a two dimensional solid (extended system) with periodic boundary conditions, we find the effective on-site Hubbard U{sup ∗}/t to be 1.3 ± 0.2, comparable to a recent estimate based on the constrained random phase approximation. For molecules, such parameterizations enable calculation of excited states that are usually not accessible within ground state approaches. For solids, the effective Hamiltonian enables large-scale calculations using techniques designed for lattice models.

  8. Density matrix renormalization group study of the Anyon-Hubbard model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arcila-Forero, J.; Franco, R.; Silva-Valencia, J.

    2016-02-01

    Recently optical lattices allow us to observe phase transition without the uncertainty posed by complex materials, and the simulations of these systems are an excellent bridge between materials-based condensed matter physics and cold atoms. In this way, the computational physics related to many-body problems have increased in importance. Using the density matrix renormalization group method, we studied a Hubbard model for anyons, which is an equivalent to a variant of the Bose-Hubbard model in which the bosonic hopping depends on the local density. This is an exact mapping between anyons and bosons in one dimension. The anyons interlope between bosons and fermions. For two anyons under particle exchange, the wave function acquires a fractional phase eiθ . We conclude that this system exhibits two phases: Mott-insulator and superfluid. We present the phase diagram for some angles. The Mott lobe increases with an increase of the statistical. We observed a reentrance phase transition for all lobes. We showed that the model studied is in the same universality class as the Bose-Hubbard model with two-body interactions.

  9. Density matrix reconstruction of three-level atoms via Rydberg electromagnetically induced transparency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gavryusev, V.; Signoles, A.; Ferreira-Cao, M.; Zürn, G.; Hofmann, C. S.; Günter, G.; Schempp, H.; Robert-de-Saint-Vincent, M.; Whitlock, S.; Weidemüller, M.

    2016-08-01

    We present combined measurements of the spatially resolved optical spectrum and the total excited-atom number in an ultracold gas of three-level atoms under electromagnetically induced transparency conditions involving high-lying Rydberg states. The observed optical transmission of a weak probe laser at the center of the coupling region exhibits a double peaked spectrum as a function of detuning, while the Rydberg atom number shows a comparatively narrow single resonance. By imaging the transmitted light onto a charge-coupled-device camera, we record hundreds of spectra in parallel, which are used to map out the spatial profile of Rabi frequencies of the coupling laser. Using all the information available we can reconstruct the full one-body density matrix of the three-level system, which provides the optical susceptibility and the Rydberg density as a function of spatial position. These results help elucidate the connection between three-level interference phenomena, including the interplay of matter and light degrees of freedom and will facilitate new studies of many-body effects in optically driven Rydberg gases.

  10. Reconstructive approaches to one- and two-electron density matrix theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herbert, John Michael

    Novel computational methods for electronic structure theory are explored, in which the fundamental variable is either the one- or the two-electron reduced density matrix (1- or 2-RDM), rather than the electronic wavefunction. A unifying theme among these methods is density matrix reconstruction, that is, decoupling approximations that express higher-order density matrices as functionals of lower-order ones. On the 2-RDM side, a connected (extensive) version of the Contracted Schrodinger Equation (CSE) is developed, in which the basic unknowns are the RDM cumulants through order four. Reconstruction functionals that neglect the 3- and 4-RDM cumulants are examined and revealed to be significantly less accurate than suggested by previous minimal-basis results. Exact 3-RDM cumulants for some four-electron systems are calculated and found to be comparable in importance to unconnected products of lower-order cumulants. Decoupling approximations for the 3- and 4-RDM cumulants are developed based upon a renormalized, diagrammatic perturbation theory for the three- and four-particle Green's functions, in which the effective, pairwise interaction is extracted from the two-particle cumulant. Diagram rules suitable for both the time-dependent and time-independent versions of this perturbation theory are derived. Reconstructive approaches to natural orbital (1-RDM) functional theory are also examined, wherein the 2-RDM is parametrized in terms of the natural orbitals and their (generally fractional) occupancies. It is demonstrated, at the theorem level, that proposed "corrected Hartree" and "corrected Hartree-Fock" natural orbital functionals necessarily violate positivity of the 2-RDM, which is closely related to their failure to respect antisymmetry. Calculations demonstrate that negative eigenvalues of the 2-RDM are associated with a large, stabilizing (but ultimately spurious) contribution to the energy. Nevertheless, a partially self-interaction-corrected version of the

  11. Measurement of spin correlation in tt production using a matrix element approach.

    PubMed

    Abazov, V M; Abbott, B; Acharya, B S; Adams, M; Adams, T; Alexeev, G D; Alkhazov, G; Alton, A; Alverson, G; Alves, G A; Ancu, L S; Aoki, M; Arov, M; Askew, A; Åsman, B; Atramentov, O; Avila, C; BackusMayes, J; Badaud, F; Bagby, L; Baldin, B; Bandurin, D V; Banerjee, S; Barberis, E; Baringer, P; Barreto, J; Bartlett, J F; Bassler, U; Bazterra, V; Beale, S; Bean, A; Begalli, M; Begel, M; Belanger-Champagne, C; Bellantoni, L; Beri, S B; Bernardi, G; Bernhard, R; Bertram, I; Besançon, M; Beuselinck, R; Bezzubov, V A; Bhat, P C; Bhatnagar, V; Blazey, G; Blessing, S; Bloom, K; Boehnlein, A; Boline, D; Boos, E E; Borissov, G; Bose, T; Brandt, A; Brandt, O; Brock, R; Brooijmans, G; Bross, A; Brown, D; Brown, J; Bu, X B; Buehler, M; Buescher, V; Bunichev, V; Burdin, S; Burnett, T H; Buszello, C P; Calpas, B; Camacho-Pérez, E; Carrasco-Lizarraga, M A; Casey, B C K; Castilla-Valdez, H; Chakrabarti, S; Chakraborty, D; Chan, K M; Chandra, A; Chen, G; Chevalier-Théry, S; Cho, D K; Cho, S W; Choi, S; Choudhary, B; Cihangir, S; Claes, D; Clutter, J; Cooke, M; Cooper, W E; Corcoran, M; Couderc, F; Cousinou, M-C; Croc, A; Cutts, D; Das, A; Davies, G; De, K; de Jong, S J; De la Cruz-Burelo, E; Déliot, F; Demarteau, M; Demina, R; Denisov, D; Denisov, S P; Desai, S; Deterre, C; DeVaughan, K; Diehl, H T; Diesburg, M; Dominguez, A; Dorland, T; Dubey, A; Dudko, L V; Duggan, D; Duperrin, A; Dutt, S; Dyshkant, A; Eads, M; Edmunds, D; Ellison, J; Elvira, V D; Enari, Y; Evans, H; Evdokimov, A; Evdokimov, V N; Facini, G; Ferbel, T; Fiedler, F; Filthaut, F; Fisher, W; Fisk, H E; Fortner, M; Fox, H; Fuess, S; Garcia-Bellido, A; Gavrilov, V; Gay, P; Geng, W; Gerbaudo, D; Gerber, C E; Gershtein, Y; Ginther, G; Golovanov, G; Goussiou, A; Grannis, P D; Greder, S; Greenlee, H; Greenwood, Z D; Gregores, E M; Grenier, G; Gris, Ph; Grivaz, J-F; Grohsjean, A; Grünendahl, S; Grünewald, M W; Guillemin, T; Guo, F; Gutierrez, G; Gutierrez, P; Haas, A; Hagopian, S; Haley, J; Han, L; Harder, K; Harel, A; Hauptman, J M; Hays, J; Head, T; Hebbeker, T; Hedin, D; Hegab, H; Heinson, A P; Heintz, U; Hensel, C; Heredia-De la Cruz, I; Herner, K; Hesketh, G; Hildreth, M D; Hirosky, R; Hoang, T; Hobbs, J D; Hoeneisen, B; Hohlfeld, M; Hubacek, Z; Huske, N; Hynek, V; Iashvili, I; Illingworth, R; Ito, A S; Jabeen, S; Jaffré, M; Jamin, D; Jayasinghe, A; Jesik, R; Johns, K; Johnson, M; Johnston, D; Jonckheere, A; Jonsson, P; Joshi, J; Jung, A W; Juste, A; Kaadze, K; Kajfasz, E; Karmanov, D; Kasper, P A; Katsanos, I; Kehoe, R; Kermiche, S; Khalatyan, N; Khanov, A; Kharchilava, A; Kharzheev, Y N; Khatidze, D; Kirby, M H; Kohli, J M; Kozelov, A V; Kraus, J; Kulikov, S; Kumar, A; Kupco, A; Kurča, T; Kuzmin, V A; Kvita, J; Lammers, S; Landsberg, G; Lebrun, P; Lee, H S; Lee, S W; Lee, W M; Lellouch, J; Li, L; Li, Q Z; Lietti, S M; Lim, J K; Lincoln, D; Linnemann, J; Lipaev, V V; Lipton, R; Liu, Y; Liu, Z; Lobodenko, A; Lokajicek, M; Lopes de Sa, R; Lubatti, H J; Luna-Garcia, R; Lyon, A L; Maciel, A K A; Mackin, D; Madar, R; Magaña-Villalba, R; Malik, S; Malyshev, V L; Maravin, Y; Martínez-Ortega, J; McCarthy, R; McGivern, C L; Meijer, M M; Melnitchouk, A; Menezes, D; Mercadante, P G; Merkin, M; Meyer, A; Meyer, J; Miconi, F; Mondal, N K; Muanza, G S; Mulhearn, M; Nagy, E; Naimuddin, M; Narain, M; Nayyar, R; Neal, H A; Negret, J P; Neustroev, P; Novaes, S F; Nunnemann, T; Obrant, G; Orduna, J; Osman, N; Osta, J; Otero y Garzón, G J; Padilla, M; Pal, A; Parashar, N; Parihar, V; Park, S K; Parsons, J; Partridge, R; Parua, N; Patwa, A; Penning, B; Perfilov, M; Peters, K; Peters, Y; Petridis, K; Petrillo, G; Pétroff, P; Piegaia, R; Piper, J; Pleier, M-A; Podesta-Lerma, P L M; Podstavkov, V M; Polozov, P; Popov, A V; Prewitt, M; Price, D; Prokopenko, N; Protopopescu, S; Qian, J; Quadt, A; Quinn, B; Rangel, M S; Ranjan, K; Ratoff, P N; Razumov, I; Renkel, P; Rijssenbeek, M; Ripp-Baudot, I; Rizatdinova, F; Rominsky, M; Ross, A; Royon, C; Rubinov, P; Ruchti, R; Safronov, G; Sajot, G; Salcido, P; Sánchez-Hernández, A; Sanders, M P; Sanghi, B; Santos, A S; Savage, G; Sawyer, L; Scanlon, T; Schamberger, R D; Scheglov, Y; Schellman, H; Schliephake, T; Schlobohm, S; Schwanenberger, C; Schwienhorst, R; Sekaric, J; Severini, H; Shabalina, E; Shary, V; Shchukin, A A; Shivpuri, R K; Simak, V; Sirotenko, V; Skubic, P; Slattery, P; Smirnov, D; Smith, K J; Snow, G R; Snow, J; Snyder, S; Söldner-Rembold, S; Sonnenschein, L; Soustruznik, K; Stark, J; Stolin, V; Stoyanova, D A; Strauss, M; Strom, D; Stutte, L; Suter, L; Svoisky, P; Takahashi, M; Tanasijczuk, A; Taylor, W; Titov, M; Tokmenin, V V; Tsai, Y-T; Tsybychev, D; Tuchming, B; Tully, C; Uvarov, L; Uvarov, S; Uzunyan, S; Van Kooten, R; van Leeuwen, W M; Varelas, N; Varnes, E W; Vasilyev, I A; Verdier, P; Vertogradov, L S; Verzocchi, M; Vesterinen, M; Vilanova, D; Vokac, P; Wahl, H D; Wang, M H L S; Warchol, J; Watts, G; Wayne, M; Weber, M; Welty-Rieger, L; White, A; Wicke, D; Williams, M R J; Wilson, G W; Wobisch, M; Wood, D R; Wyatt, T R; Xie, Y; Xu, C; Yacoob, S; Yamada, R; Yang, W-C; Yasuda, T; Yatsunenko, Y A; Ye, Z; Yin, H; Yip, K; Youn, S W; Yu, J; Zelitch, S; Zhao, T; Zhou, B; Zhu, J; Zielinski, M; Zieminska, D; Zivkovic, L

    2011-07-15

    We determine the fraction of tt events with spin correlation, assuming that the spin of the top quark is either correlated with the spin of the top antiquark as predicted by the standard model or is uncorrelated. For the first time we use a matrix-element-based approach to study tt spin correlation. We use tt → W+ b W- b → ℓ+ νbℓ- ν b final states produced in pp collisions at a center-of-mass energy sqrt(s)=1.96  TeV, where ℓ denotes an electron or a muon. The data correspond to an integrated luminosity of 5.4  fb(-1) and were collected with the D0 detector at the Fermilab Tevatron collider. The result agrees with the standard model prediction. We exclude the hypothesis that the spins of the tt are uncorrelated at the 97.7% C.L. PMID:21838349

  12. Influence of Pairing on the Nuclear Matrix Elements of the Neutrinoless {beta}{beta} Decays

    SciTech Connect

    Caurier, E.; Nowacki, F.

    2008-02-08

    We study in this Letter the neutrinoless double beta decay nuclear matrix elements (NME's) in the framework of the interacting shell model. We analyze them in terms of the total angular momentum of the decaying neutron pair and as a function of the seniority truncations in the nuclear wave functions. This point of view turns out to be very adequate to gauge the accuracy of the NME's predicted by different nuclear models. In addition, it gives back the protagonist role in this process to the pairing interaction, the one which is responsible for the very existence of double beta decay emitters. We show that low seniority approximations, comparable to those implicit in the quasiparticle RPA in a spherical basis, tend to overestimate the NME's in several decays.

  13. OMC studies for the matrix elements in ββ decay

    SciTech Connect

    Zinatulina, D.; Brudanin, V.; Egorov, V.; Shirchenko, M.; Vasiliev, R.; Yyutlandov, I.; Briançon, Ch.; Petitjean, C.

    2013-12-30

    Energy and time spectra of gamma-rays following μ-capture in natural Kr, Se, Cd and Sm, as well as isotopic enriched {sup 82}Kr, {sup 76}Se, {sup 106}Cd and {sup 150}Sm, have been measured. Total life-times of muons in different isotopes, as well as partial μ-capture rates to the excited states of {sup 48}Sc, {sup 76}As and {sup 106}Ag, were extracted. These results are discussed in the context of the double-beta decay matrix elements. The data are also compared with data from theoretical calculations and with data from charge-exchange reactions on {sup 48}Ti. It is the first time that μ-capture and charge-exchange reaction data are being compared in the context of ββ decay.

  14. Nucleon distribution amplitudes and proton decay matrix elements on the lattice

    SciTech Connect

    Braun, Vladimir M.; Goeckeler, Meinulf; Kaltenbrunner, Thomas; Warkentin, Nikolaus; Horsley, Roger; Zanotti, James M.; Nakamura, Yoshifumi; Pleiter, Dirk; Rakow, Paul E. L.; Schaefer, Andreas; Schierholz, Gerrit; Stueben, Hinnerk

    2009-02-01

    Baryon distribution amplitudes (DAs) are crucial for the theory of hard exclusive reactions. We present a calculation of the first few moments of the leading-twist nucleon DA within lattice QCD. In addition we deal with the normalization of the next-to-leading (twist-four) DAs. The matrix elements determining the latter quantities are also responsible for proton decay in grand unified theories. Our lattice evaluation makes use of gauge field configurations generated with two flavors of clover fermions. The relevant operators are renormalized nonperturbatively with the final results given in the MS scheme. We find that the deviation of the leading-twist nucleon DA from its asymptotic form is less pronounced than sometimes claimed in the literature.

  15. Thermoplastic matrix composites - Finite-element analysis of mode I and mode II failure specimens

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bankert, Ray J.; Lambropoulos, Nicholas D.; Shephard, Mark S.; Sternstein, Sanford S.

    1989-01-01

    A finite-element analysis was conducted to evaluate the stress distributions within mode I and mode II failure specimens, assuming both isotropic and orthotropic elastic material properties. The effects of anisotropy on both the magnitude and the location of the highest stress concentration at the vicinity of the crack tip are significant. The results from modeling realistic blunt crack tip geometry and resin-rich zones imply that local variations in the microstructure strongly influence the stress state near the crack tip and therefore the measured fracture properties. In addition, the features of a viscoelastic model for thermoplastic matrices are described. This model will be used in future investigations of matrix-dominated failure phenomena.

  16. Influence of Pairing on the Nuclear Matrix Elements of the Neutrinoless ββ Decays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caurier, E.; Menéndez, J.; Nowacki, F.; Poves, A.

    2008-02-01

    We study in this Letter the neutrinoless double beta decay nuclear matrix elements (NME’s) in the framework of the interacting shell model. We analyze them in terms of the total angular momentum of the decaying neutron pair and as a function of the seniority truncations in the nuclear wave functions. This point of view turns out to be very adequate to gauge the accuracy of the NME’s predicted by different nuclear models. In addition, it gives back the protagonist role in this process to the pairing interaction, the one which is responsible for the very existence of double beta decay emitters. We show that low seniority approximations, comparable to those implicit in the quasiparticle RPA in a spherical basis, tend to overestimate the NME’s in several decays.

  17. Three-dimensional display utilizing a diffractive optical element and an active matrix liquid crystal display

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nordin, Gregory P.; Jones, Michael W.; Kulick, Jeffrey H.; Lindquist, Robert G.; Kowel, Stephen T.

    1996-12-01

    We describe the design, construction, and performance of the first real-time autostereoscopic 3D display based on the partial pixel 3D display architecture. The primary optical components of the 3D display are an active-matrix liquid crystal display and a diffractive optical element (DOE). The display operates at video frame rates and is driven with a conventional VGA signal. 3D animations with horizontal motion parallax are readily viewable as sets of stereo images. Formation of the virtual viewing slits by diffraction from the partial pixel apertures is experimentally verified. The measured contrast and perceived brightness of the display are excellent, but there are minor flaws in image quality due to secondary images. The source of these images and how they may be eliminated is discussed. The effects of manufacturing-related systematic errors in the DOE are also analyzed.

  18. HELAC-Onia: An automatic matrix element generator for heavy quarkonium physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shao, Hua-Sheng

    2013-11-01

    By the virtues of the Dyson-Schwinger equations, we upgrade the published code HELAC to be capable to calculate the heavy quarkonium helicity amplitudes in the framework of NRQCD factorization, which we dub HELAC-Onia. We rewrote the original HELAC to make the new program be able to calculate helicity amplitudes of multi P-wave quarkonium states production at hadron colliders and electron-positron colliders by including new P-wave off-shell currents. Therefore, besides the high efficiencies in computation of multi-leg processes within the Standard Model, HELAC-Onia is also sufficiently numerical stable in dealing with P-wave quarkonia (e.g. h,χ) and P-wave color-octet intermediate states. To the best of our knowledge, it is a first general-purpose automatic quarkonium matrix elements generator based on recursion relations on the market.

  19. Measurement of the top quark mass using the matrix element technique in dilepton final states

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Abazov, V. M.; Abbott, B.; Acharya, B. S.; Adams, M.; Adams, T.; Agnew, J. P.; Alexeev, G. D.; Alkhazov, G.; Alton, A.; Askew, A.; et al

    2016-08-18

    Here, we present a measurement of the top quark mass in pp collisions at a center-of-mass energy of 1.96 TeV at the Fermilab Tevatron collider. The data were collected by the D0 experiment corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 9.7 fb-1. The matrix element technique is applied to tt events in the final state containing leptons (electrons or muons) with high transverse momenta and at least two jets. The calibration of the jet energy scale determined in the lepton+jets final state of tt decays is applied to jet energies. This correction provides a substantial reduction in systematic uncertainties. We obtain amore » top quark mass of mt = 173.93±1.84 GeV.« less

  20. A modified Finite Element-Transfer Matrix for control design of space structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tan, T.-M.; Yousuff, A.; Bahar, L. Y.; Konstandinidis, M.

    1990-01-01

    The Finite Element-Transfer Matrix (FETM) method was developed for reducing the computational efforts involved in structural analysis. While being widely used by structural analysts, this method does, however, have certain limitations, particularly when used for the control design of large flexible structures. In this paper, a new formulation based on the FETM method is presented. The new method effectively overcomes the limitations in the original FETM method, and also allows an easy construction of reduced models that are tailored for the control design. Other advantages of this new method include the ability to extract open loop frequencies and mode shapes with less computation, and simplification of the design procedures for output feedback, constrained compensation, and decentralized control. The development of this new method and the procedures for generating reduced models using this method are described in detail and the role of the reduced models in control design is discussed through an illustrative example.

  1. An iterative parallel sparse matrix equation solver with application to finite element modeling of electromagnetic scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Cwik, T.; Jamnejad, V.; Zuffada, C.

    1994-12-31

    The usefulness of finite element modeling follows from the ability to accurately simulate the geometry and three-dimensional fields on the scale of a fraction of a wavelength. To make this modeling practical for engineering design, it is necessary to integrate the stages of geometry modeling and mesh generation, numerical solution of the fields-a stage heavily dependent on the efficient use of a sparse matrix equation solver, and display of field information. The stages of geometry modeling, mesh generation, and field display are commonly completed using commercially available software packages. Algorithms for the numerical solution of the fields need to be written for the specific class of problems considered. Interior problems, i.e. simulating fields in waveguides and cavities, have been successfully solved using finite element methods. Exterior problems, i.e. simulating fields scattered or radiated from structures, are more difficult to model because of the need to numerically truncate the finite element mesh. To practically compute a solution to exterior problems, the domain must be truncated at some finite surface where the Sommerfeld radiation condition is enforced, either approximately or exactly. Approximate methods attempt to truncate the mesh using only local field information at each grid point, whereas exact methods are global, needing information from the entire mesh boundary. In this work, a method that couples three-dimensional finite element (FE) solutions interior to the bounding surface, with an efficient integral equation (IE) solution that exactly enforces the Sommerfeld radiation condition is developed. The bounding surface is taken to be a surface of revolution (SOR) to greatly reduce computational expense in the IE portion of the modeling.

  2. On-shell Delta I= 3/2 kaon weak matrix elements with nonzero total momentum

    SciTech Connect

    Yamazaki, T.

    2009-05-20

    We present our results for the on-shell {Delta}I = 3/2 kaon decay matrix elements using domain wall fermions and the DBW2 gauge action at one coarse lattice spacing corresponding to a{sup -1} = 1.31 GeV in the quenched approximation. The on-shell matrix elements are evaluated in two different frames: the center-of-mass frame and nonzero total-momentum frame. We employ the formula proposed by Lellouch and Luescher in the center-of-mass frame, and its extension for a nonzero total-momentum frame to extract the infinite volume, on-shell, center-of-mass frame decay amplitudes. We determine the decay amplitude at the physical pion mass and momentum from the chiral extrapolation and an interpolation of the relative momentum using the results calculated in the two frames. We have obtained ReA{sub 2} = 1.66(23)(+48/-03)(+53/-0) x 10{sup -8} GeV and ImA{sub 2} = -1.181(26)(+141/-014)(+44/-0) x 10{sup -12} GeV at the physical point, using the data at the relatively large pion mass, m{sub {pi}} > 0.35 GeV. The first error is statistic, and the second and third are systematic. The second error is estimated with several fits of the chiral extrapolation including the (quenched) chiral perturbation formula at next to leading order using only lighter pion masses. The third one is estimated with an analysis using the lattice dispersion relation. The result of ReA{sub 2} is reasonably consistent with experiment.

  3. Nuclear-Structure Data Relevant to Neutinoless-Double-Beta-Decay Matrix Elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kay, Benjamin

    2015-10-01

    An observation of neutrinoless double beta decay is one of the most exciting prospects in contemporary physics. It follows that calculations of the nuclear matrix elements for this process are of high priority. The change in the wave functions between the initial and final states of the neutrinoless-double-beta-decay candidates 76Ge-->76Se, 100Mo-->100Ru, 130Te-->130Xe, and 136Xe-->136Ba have been studied with transfer reactions. The data are focused on the change in the occupancies of the valence orbitals in the ground states as two neutrons decay into two protons. The results set a strict constraint on any theoretical calculations describing this rearrangement and thus on the magnitude of the nuclear matrix elements for this process, which currently exhibit uncertainties at the factor of 2-4 level. Prior to these measurements there were limited experimental data were available A = 76 and 100 systems, and very limited data for the A = 130 and 136 systems, in a large part due to the gaseous Xe isotopes involved. The uncertainties on most of these data are estimated to range from 0.1-0.3 nucleons. The program started with the A = 76 system, with subsequent calculations, modified to reproduce the experimental occupancies, exhibiting a significant reduction in the discrepancy between various models. New data are available for the A = 100 , 130, and 136 systems. I review the program, making detailed comparisons between the latest theoretical calculations and the experimental data where available. This material is based upon work supported by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Science, Office of Nuclear Physics, under Contract Number DE-AC02-06CH11357.

  4. Influence of landscape elements on population densities and habitat use of three small-mammal species.

    SciTech Connect

    Mabry, Karen, E.; Dreelin, Erin, A.; Barrett, Gary, W.

    2003-01-01

    Mabry, K.E., E.A. Dreelin, and G.W. Barrett. 2003. Influence of landscape elements on population densities and habitat use of three small-mammal species. J. Mammology. 84(1):20-25. Corridor effects on population densities and habitat use of 3 small mammal species were assessed in an experimentally fragmented landscape. Corridor presence did not have a statistically significant effect on population densities of cotton rats or cotton mice; however, a significant effect was observed for old-field mice. The results suggest that landscape fragmentation and habitat structure may have varying effects on population densities of different species.

  5. Time-dependent occupation numbers in reduced-density-matrix-functional theory: Application to an interacting Landau-Zener model

    SciTech Connect

    Requist, Ryan; Pankratov, Oleg

    2011-05-15

    We prove that if the two-body terms in the equation of motion for the one-body reduced density matrix are approximated by ground-state functionals, the eigenvalues of the one-body reduced density matrix (occupation numbers) remain constant in time. This deficiency is related to the inability of such an approximation to account for relative phases in the two-body reduced density matrix. We derive an exact differential equation giving the functional dependence of these phases in an interacting Landau-Zener model and study their behavior in short- and long-time regimes. The phases undergo resonances whenever the occupation numbers approach the boundaries of the interval [0,1]. In the long-time regime, the occupation numbers display correlation-induced oscillations and the memory dependence of the functionals assumes a simple form.

  6. A reduced-scaling density matrix-based method for the computation of the vibrational Hessian matrix at the self-consistent field level

    SciTech Connect

    Kussmann, Jörg; Luenser, Arne; Beer, Matthias; Ochsenfeld, Christian

    2015-03-07

    An analytical method to calculate the molecular vibrational Hessian matrix at the self-consistent field level is presented. By analysis of the multipole expansions of the relevant derivatives of Coulomb-type two-electron integral contractions, we show that the effect of the perturbation on the electronic structure due to the displacement of nuclei decays at least as r{sup −2} instead of r{sup −1}. The perturbation is asymptotically local, and the computation of the Hessian matrix can, in principle, be performed with O(N) complexity. Our implementation exhibits linear scaling in all time-determining steps, with some rapid but quadratic-complexity steps remaining. Sample calculations illustrate linear or near-linear scaling in the construction of the complete nuclear Hessian matrix for sparse systems. For more demanding systems, scaling is still considerably sub-quadratic to quadratic, depending on the density of the underlying electronic structure.

  7. Structural Anomalies Detected in Ceramic Matrix Composites Using Combined Nondestructive Evaluation and Finite Element Analysis (NDE and FEA)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abdul-Aziz, Ali; Baaklini, George Y.; Bhatt, Ramakrishna T.

    2003-01-01

    Most reverse engineering approaches involve imaging or digitizing an object and then creating a computerized reconstruction that can be integrated, in three dimensions, into a particular design environment. The rapid prototyping technique builds high-quality physical prototypes directly from computer-aided design files. This fundamental technique for interpreting and interacting with large data sets is being used here via Velocity2 (an integrated image-processing software, ref. 1) using computed tomography (CT) data to produce a prototype three-dimensional test specimen model for analyses. A study at the NASA Glenn Research Center proposes to use these capabilities to conduct a combined nondestructive evaluation (NDE) and finite element analysis (FEA) to screen pretest and posttest structural anomalies in structural components. A tensile specimen made of silicon nitrite (Si3N4) ceramic matrix composite was considered to evaluate structural durability and deformity. Ceramic matrix composites are being sought as candidate materials to replace nickel-base superalloys for turbine engine applications. They have the unique characteristics of being able to withstand higher operating temperatures and harsh combustion environments. In addition, their low densities relative to metals help reduce component mass (ref. 2). Detailed three-dimensional volume rendering of the tensile test specimen was successfully carried out with Velocity2 (ref. 1) using two-dimensional images that were generated via computed tomography. Subsequent, three-dimensional finite element analyses were performed, and the results obtained were compared with those predicted by NDE-based calculations and experimental tests. It was shown that Velocity2 software can be used to render a three-dimensional object from a series of CT scan images with a minimum level of complexity. The analytical results (ref. 3) show that the high-stress regions correlated well with the damage sites identified by the CT scans

  8. Heavy-ion double charge exchange reactions: A tool toward 0 νββ nuclear matrix elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cappuzzello, F.; Cavallaro, M.; Agodi, C.; Bondì, M.; Carbone, D.; Cunsolo, A.; Foti, A.

    2015-11-01

    The knowledge of the nuclear matrix elements for the neutrinoless double beta decay is fundamental for neutrino physics. In this paper, an innovative technique to extract information on the nuclear matrix elements by measuring the cross section of a double charge exchange nuclear reaction is proposed. The basic point is that the initial- and final-state wave functions in the two processes are the same and the transition operators are similar. The double charge exchange cross sections can be factorized in a nuclear structure term containing the matrix elements and a nuclear reaction factor. First pioneering experimental results for the 40Ca(18O,18Ne)40Ar reaction at 270 MeV incident energy show that such cross section factorization reasonably holds for the crucial 0+ → 0+ transition to 40Args, at least at very forward angles.

  9. Determination of rare-earth elements in geological and environmental samples using an automated batch preconcentration/matrix elimination system

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, F.G.; Wiederin, D.R.; Mortlock, R.

    1994-12-31

    Determination of the rare earth elements is important in the study of sedimentary processes. Geological and environmental samples often contain very low levels of these elements, and detection by plasma spectroscopy (ICP-AES, ICP-MS) is difficult unless a preconcentration and/or matrix elimination procedure is performed prior to analysis.; An automated batch preconcentration/matrix elimination system offers rapid, off-line sample preparation for a variety of sample types. A chelating form of a solid suspended reagent is added to a pH-adjusted sample. The suspended reagent with any bound elements are trapped in a hollow fiber membrane filter while unbound matrix components are washed to waste. The reagent with bound analytes are then released in a small volume. The system works in concert with an autosampler for unattended operation. Application to a variety of geological and environmental samples will be described.

  10. Determination of an Initial Mesh Density for Finite Element Computations via Data Mining

    SciTech Connect

    Kanapady, R; Bathina, S K; Tamma, K K; Kamath, C; Kumar, V

    2001-07-23

    Numerical analysis software packages which employ a coarse first mesh or an inadequate initial mesh need to undergo a cumbersome and time consuming mesh refinement studies to obtain solutions with acceptable accuracy. Hence, it is critical for numerical methods such as finite element analysis to be able to determine a good initial mesh density for the subsequent finite element computations or as an input to a subsequent adaptive mesh generator. This paper explores the use of data mining techniques for obtaining an initial approximate finite element density that avoids significant trial and error to start finite element computations. As an illustration of proof of concept, a square plate which is simply supported at its edges and is subjected to a concentrated load is employed for the test case. Although simplistic, the present study provides insight into addressing the above considerations.

  11. Non-Periodic Finite-Element Formulation of Orbital-Free Density Functional Theory

    SciTech Connect

    Gavini, V; Knap, J; Bhattacharya, K; Ortiz, M

    2006-10-06

    We propose an approach to perform orbital-free density functional theory calculations in a non-periodic setting using the finite-element method. We consider this a step towards constructing a seamless multi-scale approach for studying defects like vacancies, dislocations and cracks that require quantum mechanical resolution at the core and are sensitive to long range continuum stresses. In this paper, we describe a local real space variational formulation for orbital-free density functional theory, including the electrostatic terms and prove existence results. We prove the convergence of the finite-element approximation including numerical quadratures for our variational formulation. Finally, we demonstrate our method using examples.

  12. Many-body localization and transition by density matrix renormalization group and exact diagonalization studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lim, S. P.; Sheng, D. N.

    2016-07-01

    A many-body localized (MBL) state is a new state of matter emerging in a disordered interacting system at high-energy densities through a disorder-driven dynamic phase transition. The nature of the phase transition and the evolution of the MBL phase near the transition are the focus of intense theoretical studies with open issues in the field. We develop an entanglement density matrix renormalization group (En-DMRG) algorithm to accurately target highly excited states for MBL systems. By studying the one-dimensional Heisenberg spin chain in a random field, we demonstrate the accuracy of the method in obtaining energy eigenstates and the corresponding statistical results of quantum states in the MBL phase. Based on large system simulations by En-DMRG for excited states, we demonstrate some interesting features in the entanglement entropy distribution function, which is characterized by two peaks: one at zero and another one at the quantized entropy S =ln2 with an exponential decay tail on the S >ln2 side. Combining En-DMRG with exact diagonalization simulations, we demonstrate that the transition from the MBL phase to the delocalized ergodic phase is driven by rare events where the locally entangled spin pairs develop power-law correlations. The corresponding phase diagram contains an intermediate or crossover regime, which has power-law spin-z correlations resulting from contributions of the rare events. We discuss the physical picture for the numerical observations in this regime, where various distribution functions are distinctly different from results deep in the ergodic and MBL phases for finite-size systems. Our results may provide new insights for understanding the phase transition in such systems.

  13. 0 ν β β and 2 ν β β nuclear matrix elements in the interacting boson model with isospin restoration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barea, J.; Kotila, J.; Iachello, F.

    2015-03-01

    We introduce a method for isospin restoration in the calculation of nuclear matrix elements (NMEs) for 0 ν β β and 2 ν β β decay within the framework of the microscopic interacting boson model (IBM-2). With this method, we calculate the NMEs for all processes of interest in 0 ν β-β- and 2 ν β-β- and in 0 ν β+β+ , 0 ν EC β+ , R 0 ν ECEC , 2 ν β+β+ , 2 ν EC β+ , and 2 ν ECEC . With this method, the Fermi matrix elements for 2 ν β β vanish, and those for 0 ν β β are considerably reduced.

  14. Matrix elements in the coupled-cluster approach - With application to low-lying states in Li

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martensson-Pendrill, Ann-Marie; Ynnerman, Anders

    1990-01-01

    A procedure is suggested for evaluating matrix elements of an operator between wavefunctions in the coupled-cluster form. The use of the exponential ansatz leads to compact exponential expressions also for matrix elements. Algorithms are developed for summing all effects of one-particle clusters and certain chains of two-particle clusters (containing the well-known random-phase approximation as a subset). The treatment of one-particle perturbations in single valence states is investigated in detail. As examples the oscillator strength for the 2s-2p transition in Li as well as the hyperfine structure for the two states are studied and compared to earlier work.

  15. Elastic-plastic finite element analyses of an unidirectional, 9 vol percent tungsten fiber reinforced copper matrix composite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sanfeliz, Jose G.

    1993-01-01

    Micromechanical modeling via elastic-plastic finite element analyses were performed to investigate the effects that the residual stresses and the degree of matrix work hardening (i.e., cold-worked, annealed) have upon the behavior of a 9 vol percent, unidirectional W/Cu composite, undergoing tensile loading. The inclusion of the residual stress-containing state as well as the simulated matrix material conditions proved to be significant since the Cu matrix material exhibited plastic deformation, which affected the subsequent tensile response of the composite system. The stresses generated during cooldown to room temperature from the manufacturing temperature were more of a factor on the annealed-matrix composite, since they induced the softened matrix to plastically flow. This event limited the total load-carrying capacity of this matrix-dominated, ductile-ductile type material system. Plastic deformation of the hardened-matrix composite during the thermal cooldown stage was not considerable, therefore, the composite was able to sustain a higher stress before showing any appreciable matrix plasticity. The predicted room temperature, stress-strain response, and deformation stages under both material conditions represented upper and lower bounds characteristic of the composite's tensile behavior. The initial deformation stage for the hardened material condition showed negligible matrix plastic deformation while for the annealed state, its initial deformation stage showed extensive matrix plasticity. Both material conditions exhibited a final deformation stage where the fiber and matrix were straining plastically. The predicted stress-strain results were compared to the experimental, room temperature, tensile stress-strain curve generated from this particular composite system. The analyses indicated that the actual thermal-mechanical state of the composite's Cu matrix, represented by the experimental data, followed the annealed material condition.

  16. Density matrix renormalization group study of Y-junction spin systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Haihui

    Junction systems are important to understand both from the fundamental and the practical point of view, as they are essential components in existing and future electronic and spintronic devices. With the continuous advance of technology, device size will eventual reach the atomic scale. Some of the most interesting and useful junction systems will be strongly correlated. We chose the Density Matrix Renormalization Group method to study two types of Y-junction systems, the Y and YDelta junctions, on strongly correlated spin chains. With new ideas coming from the quantum information field, we have made a very efficient. Y-junction DMRG algorithm, which improves the overall CUB cost from O(m6) to O(m4), where m is the number of states kept per block. We studied the ground state properties, the correlation length, and investigated the degeneracy problem on the Y and YDelta junctions. For the excited states, we researched the existence of magnon bound states for various conditions, and have shown that the bound state exists when the central coupling constant is small.

  17. Implementing the density matrix embedding theory with the hierarchical mean-field approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qin, Jingbo; Jie, Quanlin; Fan, Zhuo

    2016-07-01

    We show an implementation of density matrix embedding theory (DMET) for the spin lattice of infinite size. It is indeed a special form of hierarchical mean-field (HMF) theory. In the method, we divide the lattice into a small part and a large part. View the small part as an impurity, embedding in the large part, which is viewed as the environment. We deal the impurity with a high accuracy method. But treat the environment with a low-level method: the states of the environment nearby the impurity are expressed by a set of multiple block product states, while the distant parts are treated by mean-field consideration. Our method allows for the computation of the ground state of the infinite two-dimensional quantum spin systems. In the text, we take the frustrated Heisenberg model as an example to test our method. The ground state energy we calculated can reach a high accuracy. We also calculate the magnetization, and the fidelity to study the quantum phase transitions.

  18. Reduced-density-matrix spectrum and block entropy of permutationally invariant many-body systems.

    PubMed

    Salerno, Mario; Popkov, Vladislav

    2010-07-01

    Spectral properties of the reduced density matrix (RDM) of permutational invariant quantum many-body systems are investigated. The RDM block diagonalization which accounts for all symmetries of the Hamiltonian is achieved. The analytical expression of the RDM spectrum is provided for arbitrary parameters and rigorously proved in the thermodynamical limit. The existence of several sum rules and recurrence relations among RDM eigenvalues is also demonstrated and the distribution function of RDM eigenvalues (including degeneracies) characterized. In particular, we prove that the distribution function approaches a two-dimensional Gaussian in the limit of large subsystem sizes n>1. As a physical application we discuss the von Neumann entropy (VNE) of a block of size n for a system of hard-core bosons on a complete graph, as a function of n and of the temperature T. The occurrence of a crossover of VNE from purely logarithmic behavior at T=0 to a purely linear behavior in n for T≥Tc, is demonstrated. PMID:20866600

  19. Quantum confined stark effect in wide parabolic quantum wells: real density matrix approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zielińska-Raczyńska, Sylwia; Czajkowski, Gerard; Ziemkiewicz, David

    2015-12-01

    We show how to compute the optical functions of wide parabolic quantum wells (WPQWs) exposed to uniform electric F applied in the growth direction, in the excitonic energy region. The effect of the coherence between the electron-hole pair and the electromagnetic field of the propagating wave including the electron-hole screened Coulomb potential is adopted, and the valence band structure is taken into account in the cylindrical approximation. The role of the interaction potential and of the applied electric field, which mix the energy states according to different quantum numbers and create symmetry forbidden transitions, is stressed. We use the real density matrix approach (RDMA) and an effective e-h potential, which enable to derive analytical expressions for the WPQWs electrooptical functions. Choosing the susceptibility, we performed numerical calculations appropriate to a GaAs/GaAlAs WPQWs. We have obtained a red shift of the absorption maxima (quantum confined Stark effect), asymmetric upon the change of the direction of the applied field ( F → - F), parabolic for the ground state and strongly dependent on the confinement parameters (the QWs sizes), changes in the oscillator strengths, and new peaks related to the states with different parity for electron and hole.

  20. Decomposition of density matrix renormalization group states into a Slater determinant basis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moritz, Gerrit; Reiher, Markus

    2007-06-01

    The quantum chemical density matrix renormalization group (DMRG) algorithm is difficult to analyze because of the many numerical transformation steps involved. In particular, a decomposition of the intermediate and the converged DMRG states in terms of Slater determinants has not been accomplished yet. This, however, would allow one to better understand the convergence of the algorithm in terms of a configuration interaction expansion of the states. In this work, the authors fill this gap and provide a determinantal analysis of DMRG states upon convergence to the final states. The authors show that upon convergence, DMRG provides the same complete-active-space expansion for a given set of active orbitals as obtained from a corresponding configuration interaction calculation. Additional insight into DMRG convergence is provided, which cannot be obtained from the inspection of the total electronic energy alone. Indeed, we will show that the total energy can be misleading as a decrease of this observable during DMRG microiteration steps may not necessarily be taken as an indication for the pickup of essential configurations in the configuration interaction expansion. One result of this work is that a fine balance can be shown to exist between the chosen orbital ordering, the guess for the environment operators, and the choice of the number of renormalized states. This balance can be well understood in terms of the decomposition of total and system states in terms of Slater determinants.

  1. Decomposition of density matrix renormalization group states into a Slater determinant basis.

    PubMed

    Moritz, Gerrit; Reiher, Markus

    2007-06-28

    The quantum chemical density matrix renormalization group (DMRG) algorithm is difficult to analyze because of the many numerical transformation steps involved. In particular, a decomposition of the intermediate and the converged DMRG states in terms of Slater determinants has not been accomplished yet. This, however, would allow one to better understand the convergence of the algorithm in terms of a configuration interaction expansion of the states. In this work, the authors fill this gap and provide a determinantal analysis of DMRG states upon convergence to the final states. The authors show that upon convergence, DMRG provides the same complete-active-space expansion for a given set of active orbitals as obtained from a corresponding configuration interaction calculation. Additional insight into DMRG convergence is provided, which cannot be obtained from the inspection of the total electronic energy alone. Indeed, we will show that the total energy can be misleading as a decrease of this observable during DMRG microiteration steps may not necessarily be taken as an indication for the pickup of essential configurations in the configuration interaction expansion. One result of this work is that a fine balance can be shown to exist between the chosen orbital ordering, the guess for the environment operators, and the choice of the number of renormalized states. This balance can be well understood in terms of the decomposition of total and system states in terms of Slater determinants. PMID:17614539

  2. Coupled-Channels Density-Matrix Approach to Low-Energy Nuclear Reaction Dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Diaz-Torres, Alexis

    2011-10-28

    Atomic nuclei are complex, quantum many-body systems whose structure manifests itself through intrinsic quantum states associated with different excitation modes or degrees of freedom. Collective modes (vibration and/or rotation) dominate at low energy (near the ground-state). The associated states are usually employed, within a truncated model space, as a basis in (coherent) coupled channels approaches to low-energy reaction dynamics. However, excluded states can be essential, and their effects on the open (nuclear) system dynamics are usually treated through complex potentials. Is this a complete description of open system dynamics? Does it include effects of quantum decoherence? Can decoherence be manifested in reaction observables? In this contribution, I discuss these issues and the main ideas of a coupled-channels density-matrix approach that makes it possible to quantify the role and importance of quantum decoherence in low-energy nuclear reaction dynamics. Topical applications, which refer to understanding the astrophysically important collision {sup 12}C+{sup 12}C and achieving a unified quantum dynamical description of relevant reaction processes of weakly-bound nuclei, are highlighted.

  3. Density-matrix renormalization group study of the extended Kitaev-Heisenberg model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shinjo, Kazuya; Sota, Shigetoshi; Tohyama, Takami

    2015-02-01

    We study an extended Kitaev-Heisenberg model including additional anisotropic couplings by using the two-dimensional density-matrix renormalization group method. Calculating the ground-state energy, entanglement entropy, and spin-spin correlation functions, we make a phase diagram of the extended Kitaev-Heisenberg model around the spin-liquid phase. We find a zigzag antiferromagnetic phase, a ferromagnetic phase, a 120∘ antiferromagnetic phase, and two kinds of incommensurate phases around the Kitaev spin-liquid phase. Furthermore, we study the entanglement spectrum of the model, and we find that entanglement levels in the Kitaev spin-liquid phase are degenerate forming pairs, but those in the magnetically ordered phases are nondegenerate. The Schmidt gap defined as the energy difference between the lowest two levels changes at the phase boundary adjacent to the Kitaev spin-liquid phase. However, we find that phase boundaries between magnetically ordered phases do not necessarily agree with the change of the Schmidt gap.

  4. LATTICE MATRIX ELEMENTS AND CP VIOLATION IN B AND KA PHYSICS: STATUS AND OUTLOOK.

    SciTech Connect

    SONI,A.

    2003-01-03

    Status of lattice calculations of hadron matrix elements along with CP violation in B and in K systems is reviewed. Lattice has provided useful input which, in conjunction with experimental data, leads to the conclusion that CP-odd phase in the CKM matrix plays the dominant role in the observed asymmetry in B {yields} {psi}K{sub s}. It is now quite likely that any beyond the SM, CP-odd, phase will cause only small deviations in B-physics. Search for the effects of the new phase(s) will consequently require very large data samples as well as very precise theoretical predictions. Clean determination of all the angles of the unitarity triangle therefore becomes essential. In this regard B {yields} KD{sup 0} processes play a unique role. Regarding K-decays, remarkable progress made by theory with regard to maintenance of chiral symmetry on the lattice is briefly discussed. First application already provide quantitative information on B{sub K} and the {Delta}I = 1/2 rule. The enhancement in ReA{sub 0} appears to arise solely from tree operators, esp. Q{sub 2}; penguin contribution to ReA{sub 0} appears to be very small. However, improved calculations are necessary for {epsilon}{prime}/{epsilon} as there the contributions of QCD penguins and electroweak penguins largely seem to cancel. There are good reasons, though, to believe that these cancellations will not survive improvements that are now underway. Importance of determining the unitarity triangle purely from K-decays is also emphasized.

  5. An Investigation of Reliability Models for Ceramic Matrix Composites and their Implementation into Finite Element Codes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Duffy, Stephen F.

    1998-01-01

    The development of modeling approaches for the failure analysis of ceramic-based material systems used in high temperature environments was the primary objective of this research effort. These materials have the potential to support many key engineering technologies related to the design of aeropropulsion systems. Monolithic ceramics exhibit a number of useful properties such as retention of strength at high temperatures, chemical inertness, and low density. However, the use of monolithic ceramics has been limited by their inherent brittleness and a large variation in strength. This behavior has motivated material scientists to reinforce the monolithic material with a ceramic fiber. The addition of a second ceramic phase with an optimized interface increases toughness and marginally increases strength. The primary purpose of the fiber is to arrest crack growth, not to increase strength. The material systems of interest in this research effort were laminated ceramic matrix composites, as well as two- and three- dimensional fabric reinforced ceramic composites. These emerging composite systems can compete with metals in many demanding applications. However, the ongoing metamorphosis of ceramic composite material systems, and the lack of standardized design data has in the past tended to minimize research efforts related to structural analysis. Many structural components fabricated from ceramic matrix composites (CMC) have been designed by "trial and error." The justification for this approach lies in the fact that during the initial developmental phases for a material system fabrication issues are paramount. Emphasis is placed on demonstrating feasibility rather than fully understanding the processes controlling mechanical behavior. This is understandable during periods of rapid improvements in material properties for any composite system. But to avoid the ad hoc approach, the analytical methods developed under this effort can be used to develop rational structural

  6. Abundance, major element composition and size of components and matrix in CV, CO and Acfer 094 chondrites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ebel, Denton S.; Brunner, Chelsea; Konrad, Kevin; Leftwich, Kristin; Erb, Isabelle; Lu, Muzhou; Rodriguez, Hugo; Crapster-Pregont, Ellen J.; Friedrich, Jon M.; Weisberg, Michael K.

    2016-01-01

    The relative abundances and chemical compositions of the macroscopic components or "inclusions" (chondrules and refractory inclusions) and fine-grained mineral matrix in chondritic meteorites provide constraints on astrophysical theories of inclusion formation and chondrite accretion. We present new techniques for analysis of low count/pixel Si, Mg, Ca, Al, Ti and Fe X-ray intensity maps of rock sections, and apply them to large areas of CO and CV chondrites, and the ungrouped Acfer 094 chondrite. For many thousands of manually segmented and type-identified inclusions, we are able to assess, pixel-by-pixel, the major element content of each inclusion. We quantify the total fraction of refractory elements accounted for by various types of inclusion and matrix. Among CO chondrites, both matrix and inclusion Mg/Si ratios approach the solar (and bulk CO) ratio with increasing petrologic grade, but Si remains enriched in inclusions relative to matrix. The oxidized CV chondrites with higher matrix/inclusion ratios exhibit more severe aqueous alteration (oxidation), and their excess matrix accounts for their higher porosity relative to reduced CV chondrites. Porosity could accommodate an original ice component of matrix as the direct cause of local alteration of oxidized CV chondrites. We confirm that major element abundances among inclusions differ greatly, across a wide range of CO and CV chondrites. These abundances in all cases add up to near-chondritic (solar) bulk abundance ratios in these chondrites, despite wide variations in matrix/inclusion ratios and inclusion sizes: chondrite components are complementary. This complementarity provides a robust meteoritic constraint for astrophysical disk models.

  7. Quantitative bone matrix density measurement by water- and fat-suppressed proton projection MRI (WASPI) with polymer calibration phantoms.

    PubMed

    Cao, Haihui; Ackerman, Jerome L; Hrovat, Mirko I; Graham, Lila; Glimcher, Melvin J; Wu, Yaotang

    2008-12-01

    The density of the organic matrix of bone substance is a critical parameter necessary to clinically evaluate and distinguish structural and metabolic pathological conditions such as osteomalacia in adults and rickets in growing children. Water- and fat-suppressed proton projection MRI (WASPI) was developed as a noninvasive means to obtain this information. In this study, a density calibration phantom was developed to convert WASPI intensity to true bone matrix density. The phantom contained a specifically designed poly(ethylene oxide)/poly(methyl methacrylate) (PEO/PMMA) blend, whose MRI properties (T(1), T(2), and resonance linewidth) were similar to those of solid bone matrix (collagen, tightly bound water, and other immobile molecules), minimizing the need to correct for differences in T(1) and/or T(2) relaxation between the phantom and the subject. Cortical and trabecular porcine bone specimens were imaged using WASPI with the calibration phantom in the field of view (FOV) as a stable intensity reference. Gravimetric and amino acid analyses were carried out on the same specimens after WASPI, and the chemical results were found to be highly correlated (r(2) = 0.98 and 0.95, respectively) to the WASPI intensity. By this procedure the WASPI intensity can be used to obtain the true bone matrix mass density in g cm(-3). PMID:19025909

  8. On the definition of the spin-free cumulant of the second-order reduced density matrix

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lain, Luis; Torre, Alicia; Bochicchio, Roberto

    2002-09-01

    This note deals with the appropriate definition for the spin-free cumulant of the second-order reduced density matrix. Our approach leads to a direct derivation of one of the proposals reported by Kutzelnigg and Mukherjee [J. Chem. Phys. 116, 4787 (2002)] and it points out its suitability.

  9. Modelling the response of a vibrating-element density meter in a two-phase mixture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Billingham, John

    1997-06-01

    A vibrating-element density meter is a mechanical oscillator with known properties, for example a tuning fork or a simple rod, driven to vibrate at a known frequency. The oscillator is immersed in a fluid and the resonant frequency measured. The density of the fluid can then be inferred. We consider an idealized meter immersed in two-phase flows of various types, and investigate whether a simple single-phase interpretation allows us to deduce the density of the mixture. We find that, when the density contrast between the two fluids is not great, the simple interpretation gives good results, for example in oil/water flows. However, when the density contrast is significant, for example in gas/liquid flows, the simple interpretation is highly inaccurate.

  10. Energy and energy gradient matrix elements with N-particle explicitly correlated complex Gaussian basis functions with L=1.

    PubMed

    Bubin, Sergiy; Adamowicz, Ludwik

    2008-03-21

    In this work we consider explicitly correlated complex Gaussian basis functions for expanding the wave function of an N-particle system with the L=1 total orbital angular momentum. We derive analytical expressions for various matrix elements with these basis functions including the overlap, kinetic energy, and potential energy (Coulomb interaction) matrix elements, as well as matrix elements of other quantities. The derivatives of the overlap, kinetic, and potential energy integrals with respect to the Gaussian exponential parameters are also derived and used to calculate the energy gradient. All the derivations are performed using the formalism of the matrix differential calculus that facilitates a way of expressing the integrals in an elegant matrix form, which is convenient for the theoretical analysis and the computer implementation. The new method is tested in calculations of two systems: the lowest P state of the beryllium atom and the bound P state of the positronium molecule (with the negative parity). Both calculations yielded new, lowest-to-date, variational upper bounds, while the number of basis functions used was significantly smaller than in previous studies. It was possible to accomplish this due to the use of the analytic energy gradient in the minimization of the variational energy. PMID:18361554

  11. Symmetry of Isoscalar Matrix Elements and Systematics in the sd and beginning of fp shells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orce, J. N.; Petkov, P.; Velázquez, V.; McKay, C. J.; Lesher, S. R.; Choudry, S.; Mynk, M.; Linnemann, A.; Jolie, J.; von Brentano, P.; Werner, V.; Yates, S. W.; McEllistrem, M. T.

    2006-03-01

    A careful determination of the lifetime and measurement of the branching ratio for decay of the first 2T=1+ state in 42Sc has allowed an accurate experimental test of charge independence in the A = 42 isobaric triplet. A lifetime of 69(17) fs was measured at the University of Kentucky, while relative intensities for the 975 keV and 1586 keV transitions depopulating the first 2T=1+ state have been determined at the University of Cologne as 100(1) and 8(1), respectively. Both measurements give an isoscalar matrix element, M0, of 6.4(9) (W.u.)1/2. This result confirms charge independence for the A=42 isobaric triplet. Shell model calculations have been carried out for understanding the global trend of M0 values for A = 4n + 2 isobaric triplets ranging from A = 18 to A = 42. The 21 (T=1)+ → 01 (T=1)+ transition energies, reduced transition probabilities and M0 values are reproduced to a high degree of accuracy. The trend of M0 strength along the sd shell is interpreted in terms of the shell structure. Certain discrepancies arise at the extremes of the sd shell, for the A = 18 and A = 38 isobaric triplets, which might be explained in terms of the low valence space at the extremes of the sd shell.

  12. A measurement of the top quark mass with a matrix element method

    SciTech Connect

    Gibson, Adam Paul; /UC, Berkeley

    2006-12-01

    The authors present a measurement of the mass of the top quark. The event sample is selected from proton-antiproton collisions, at 1.96 TeV center-of-mass energy, observed with the CDF detector at Fermilab's Tevatron. They consider a 318 pb{sup -1} dataset collected between March 2002 and August 2004. They select events that contain one energetic lepton, large missing transverse energy, exactly four energetic jets, and at least one displaced vertex b tag. The analysis uses leading-order t{bar t} and background matrix elements along with parameterized parton showering to construct event-by-event likelihoods as a function of top quark mass. From the 63 events observed with the 318 pb{sup -1} dataset they extract a top quark mass of 172.0 {+-} 2.6(stat) {+-} 3.3(syst) GeV/c{sup 2} from the joint likelihood. The mean expected statistical uncertainty is 3.2 GeV/c{sup 2} for m{sub t} = 178 GTeV/c{sup 2} and 3.1 GeV/c{sup 2} for m{sub t} = 172.5 GeV/c{sup 2}. The systematic error is dominated by the uncertainty of the jet energy scale.

  13. Characterization of metal matrix composites by linear ultrasonics and finite element modeling.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xuesheng; Sharples, Steve D; Clark, Matt; Wright, David

    2013-02-01

    Titanium metal matrix composites (TiMMCs) offer advantages over traditional materials for aerospace applications due to the increased mechanical strength of the materials. But the non-destructive inspection of these materials, especially with ultrasound, is in an infancy stage. If the manufacturing process of TiMMC is not correctly controlled, then disbonds and voids between the fibers can result. The effective microstructure of the composite makes difficulty to interpret results from traditional ultrasound techniques because of the scattering caused by fibers; the scattering prevents the ultrasound from penetrating far into the composite region and produces a background signal masking any reflections from voids. In this paper, relatively low frequency ultrasound is used to probe the composite region, and the state of the composite (porosity) is inferred from the velocity of the ultrasound traversing the composite. The relationship between the velocity and porosity is complex in this regime, so finite element (FE) analysis is used to model the composite regions and relate the velocity to the porosity. The FE simulated results are validated by ultrasound velocity measurements. PMID:23363095

  14. Symmetry of Isoscalar Matrix Elements and Systematics in the sd and beginning of fp shells

    SciTech Connect

    Orce, J. N.; McKay, C. J.; Lesher, S. R.; Choudry, S.; Mynk, M.; McEllistrem, M. T.; Petkov, P.; Velazquez, V.; Linnemann, A.; Jolie, J.; Brentano, P. von; Werner, V.; Yates, S. W.

    2006-03-13

    A careful determination of the lifetime and measurement of the branching ratio for decay of the first 2{sub T=1}{sup +} state in 42Sc has allowed an accurate experimental test of charge independence in the A = 42 isobaric triplet. A lifetime of 69(17) fs was measured at the University of Kentucky, while relative intensities for the 975 keV and 1586 keV transitions depopulating the first 2{sub T=1}{sup +} state have been determined at the University of Cologne as 100(1) and 8(1), respectively. Both measurements give an isoscalar matrix element, M0, of 6.4(9) (W.u.)1/2. This result confirms charge independence for the A=42 isobaric triplet. Shell model calculations have been carried out for understanding the global trend of M0 values for A = 4n + 2 isobaric triplets ranging from A = 18 to A = 42. The 2{sub 1(T=1)}{sup +} {yields} 0{sub 1(T=1)}{sup +} transition energies, reduced transition probabilities and M0 values are reproduced to a high degree of accuracy. The trend of M0 strength along the sd shell is interpreted in terms of the shell structure. Certain discrepancies arise at the extremes of the sd shell, for the A = 18 and A 38 isobaric triplets, which might be explained in terms of the low valence space at the extremes of the sd shell.

  15. Investigation of Product Performance of Al-Metal Matrix Composites Brake Disc using Finite Element Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fatchurrohman, N.; Marini, C. D.; Suraya, S.; Iqbal, AKM Asif

    2016-02-01

    The increasing demand of fuel efficiency and light weight components in automobile sectors have led to the development of advanced material parts with improved performance. A specific class of MMCs which has gained a lot of attention due to its potential is aluminium metal matrix composites (Al-MMCs). Product performance investigation of Al- MMCs is presented in this article, where an Al-MMCs brake disc is analyzed using finite element analysis. The objective is to identify the potentiality of replacing the conventional iron brake disc with Al-MMCs brake disc. The simulation results suggested that the MMCs brake disc provided better thermal and mechanical performance as compared to the conventional cast iron brake disc. Although, the Al-MMCs brake disc dissipated higher maximum temperature compared to cast iron brake disc's maximum temperature. The Al-MMCs brake disc showed a well distributed temperature than the cast iron brake disc. The high temperature developed at the ring of the disc and heat was dissipated in circumferential direction. Moreover, better thermal dissipation and conduction at brake disc rotor surface played a major influence on the stress. As a comparison, the maximum stress and strain of Al-MMCs brake disc was lower than that induced on the cast iron brake disc.

  16. Calculating three loop ladder and V-topologies for massive operator matrix elements by computer algebra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ablinger, J.; Behring, A.; Blümlein, J.; De Freitas, A.; von Manteuffel, A.; Schneider, C.

    2016-05-01

    Three loop ladder and V-topology diagrams contributing to the massive operator matrix element AQg are calculated. The corresponding objects can all be expressed in terms of nested sums and recurrences depending on the Mellin variable N and the dimensional parameter ε. Given these representations, the desired Laurent series expansions in ε can be obtained with the help of our computer algebra toolbox. Here we rely on generalized hypergeometric functions and Mellin-Barnes representations, on difference ring algorithms for symbolic summation, on an optimized version of the multivariate Almkvist-Zeilberger algorithm for symbolic integration, and on new methods to calculate Laurent series solutions of coupled systems of differential equations. The solutions can be computed for general coefficient matrices directly for any basis also performing the expansion in the dimensional parameter in case it is expressible in terms of indefinite nested product-sum expressions. This structural result is based on new results of our difference ring theory. In the cases discussed we deal with iterative sum- and integral-solutions over general alphabets. The final results are expressed in terms of special sums, forming quasi-shuffle algebras, such as nested harmonic sums, generalized harmonic sums, and nested binomially weighted (cyclotomic) sums. Analytic continuations to complex values of N are possible through the recursion relations obeyed by these quantities and their analytic asymptotic expansions. The latter lead to a host of new constants beyond the multiple zeta values, the infinite generalized harmonic and cyclotomic sums in the case of V-topologies.

  17. Theoretical uncertainties in the nuclear matrix elements of neutrinoless double beta decay: The transition operator

    SciTech Connect

    Menéndez, Javier

    2013-12-30

    We explore the theoretical uncertainties related to the transition operator of neutrinoless double-beta (0νββ) decay. The transition operator used in standard calculations is a product of one-body currents, that can be obtained phenomenologically as in Tomoda [1] or Šimkovic et al. [2]. However, corrections to the operator are hard to obtain in the phenomenological approach. Instead, we calculate the 0νββ decay operator in the framework of chiral effective theory (EFT), which gives a systematic order-by-order expansion of the transition currents. At leading orders in chiral EFT we reproduce the standard one-body currents of Refs. [1] and [2]. Corrections appear as two-body (2b) currents predicted by chiral EFT. We compute the effects of the leading 2b currents to the nuclear matrix elements of 0νββ decay for several transition candidates. The 2b current contributions are related to the quenching of Gamow-Teller transitions found in nuclear structure calculations.

  18. Distribution of trace elements in selected pulverized coals as a function of particle size and density

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Senior, C.L.; Zeng, T.; Che, J.; Ames, M.R.; Sarofim, A.F.; Olmez, I.; Huggins, Frank E.; Shah, N.; Huffman, G.P.; Kolker, A.; Mroczkowski, S.; Palmer, C.; Finkelman, R.

    2000-01-01

    Trace elements in coal have diverse modes of occurrence that will greatly influence their behavior in many coal utilization processes. Mode of occurrence is important in determining the partitioning during coal cleaning by conventional processes, the susceptibility to oxidation upon exposure to air, as well as the changes in physical properties upon heating. In this study, three complementary methods were used to determine the concentrations and chemical states of trace elements in pulverized samples of four US coals: Pittsburgh, Illinois No. 6, Elkhorn and Hazard, and Wyodak coals. Neutron Activation Analysis (NAA) was used to measure the absolute concentration of elements in the parent coals and in the size- and density-fractionated samples. Chemical leaching and X-ray absorption fine structure (XAFS) spectroscopy were used to provide information on the form of occurrence of an element in the parent coals. The composition differences between size-segregated coal samples of different density mainly reflect the large density difference between minerals, especially pyrite, and the organic portion of the coal. The heavy density fractions are therefore enriched in pyrite and the elements associated with pyrite, as also shown by the leaching and XAFS methods. Nearly all the As is associated with pyrite in the three bituminous coals studied. The sub-bituminous coal has a very low content of pyrite and arsenic; in this coal arsenic appears to be primarily organically associated. Selenium is mainly associated with pyrite in the bituminous coal samples. In two bituminous coal samples, zinc is mostly in the form of ZnS or associated with pyrite, whereas it appears to be associated with other minerals in the other two coals. Zinc is also the only trace element studied that is significantly more concentrated in the smaller (45 to 63 ??m) coal particles.

  19. Properties of the intrinsic matrix elements of the interacting-boson approximation E2 operator in the rotational limit

    SciTech Connect

    Bijker, R.; Dieperink, A.E.L.

    1982-12-01

    It is shown that the dominance of ..beta --> gamma.. and ..gamma -->..g over ..beta -->..gE2 transitions in the SU(3) limit of the interacting-boson-approximation model, reported by Warner and Casten can be explained simply in terms of properties of the intrinsic E2 matrix elements.

  20. Comment on ``Valence-bond theory and the evaluation of electronic energy matrix elements between nonorthogonal Slater determinants''

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gallup, G. A.

    1986-07-01

    In a recent article [Phys. Rev. A 31, 2107 (1985)] Leasure and Balint-Kurti claim to give a more efficient algorithm than any previously available for determining matrix elements of the Hamiltonian in valence-bond calculations. Actually, an algorithm of no significant difference and the same efficiency has been available since 1972 and has been applied to valence-bond calculations.

  1. Fast calculation of the sensitivity matrix in magnetic induction tomography by tetrahedral edge finite elements and the reciprocity theorem.

    PubMed

    Hollaus, K; Magele, C; Merwa, R; Scharfetter, H

    2004-02-01

    Magnetic induction tomography of biological tissue is used to reconstruct the changes in the complex conductivity distribution by measuring the perturbation of an alternating primary magnetic field. To facilitate the sensitivity analysis and the solution of the inverse problem a fast calculation of the sensitivity matrix, i.e. the Jacobian matrix, which maps the changes of the conductivity distribution onto the changes of the voltage induced in a receiver coil, is needed. The use of finite differences to determine the entries of the sensitivity matrix does not represent a feasible solution because of the high computational costs of the basic eddy current problem. Therefore, the reciprocity theorem was exploited. The basic eddy current problem was simulated by the finite element method using symmetric tetrahedral edge elements of second order. To test the method various simulations were carried out and discussed. PMID:15005313

  2. A comparison of measured and calculated thermal stresses in a hybrid metal matrix composite spar cap element

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jenkins, J. M.; Taylor, A. H.; Sakata, I. F.

    1985-01-01

    A hybrid spar of titanium with an integrally brazed composite, consisting of an aluminum matrix reinforced with boron-carbide-coated fibers, was heated in an oven and the resulting thermal stresses were measured. Uniform heating of the spar in an oven resulted in thermal stresses arising from the effects of dissimilar materials and anisotropy of the metal matrix composite. Thermal stresses were calculated from a finite element structural model using anisotropic material properties deduced from constituent properties and rules of mixtures. Comparisons of calculated thermal stresses with measured thermal stresses on the spar are presented. It was shown that failure to account for anisotropy in the metal matrix composite elements would result in large errors in correlating measured and calculated thermal stresses. It was concluded that very strong material characterization efforts are required to predict accurate thermal stresses in anisotropic composite structures.

  3. Density matrix embedding theory studies of the two-dimensional Hubbard model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Bo-Xiao

    Density matrix embedding theory (DMET) provides a quantum embedding framework to compute the electronic structure in strongly correlated lattice systems. It has been applied to various model Hamiltonians and ab initio systems. In this talk, I will review the results obtained in the two-dimensional one-band Hubbard model using DMET. Over the last years, we mapped a calibrated ground-state phase diagram of the two-dimensional Hubbard model, concerning magnetic, superconducting and various inhomogeneous phases. Based on the results from this work, as well as the consistent data from other numerical methods, we are able to conclude that many parts of the Hubbard phase diagram is already settled up to an accurate energy scale of 0.001t. Recently, by using large-scale auxiliary-field quantum Monte Carlo (AFQMC) in the impurity problem, we are able to treat much larger embedded clusters at half-filling (and with the constrained path approximation at non-half-filling), which provides a deeper understanding on the finite-size effects of energy and observables in both quantum embedding and finite cluster numerical methods. Finally, we systematically investigated the putative inhomogeneous phases in the underdoped, strong coupling Hubbard model, proposing new inhomogeneous patterns as strong candidates for the ground state. Reference: [1] Bo-Xiao Zheng, Garnet K.-L. Chan, arXiv:1504.01784 [2] J.P.F. Leblanc, Andrey E. Antipov, et al., arXiv:1505.02290 We acknowledge funding from the US Department of Energy, Office of Science, through DE-SC0008624 and DE-SC0010530. This work was also performed as part of the Simons Collaboration on the Many Electron Problem, sponsored by the Simons Foundation.

  4. Ab initio density matrix renormalization group study of magnetic coupling in dinuclear iron and chromium complexes

    SciTech Connect

    Harris, Travis V.; Morokuma, Keiji; Kurashige, Yuki; Yanai, Takeshi

    2014-02-07

    The applicability of ab initio multireference wavefunction-based methods to the study of magnetic complexes has been restricted by the quickly rising active-space requirements of oligonuclear systems and dinuclear complexes with S > 1 spin centers. Ab initio density matrix renormalization group (DMRG) methods built upon an efficient parameterization of the correlation network enable the use of much larger active spaces, and therefore may offer a way forward. Here, we apply DMRG-CASSCF to the dinuclear complexes [Fe{sub 2}OCl{sub 6}]{sup 2−} and [Cr{sub 2}O(NH{sub 3}){sub 10}]{sup 4+}. After developing the methodology through systematic basis set and DMRG M testing, we explore the effects of extended active spaces that are beyond the limit of conventional methods. We find that DMRG-CASSCF with active spaces including the metal d orbitals, occupied bridging-ligand orbitals, and their virtual double shells already capture a major portion of the dynamic correlation effects, accurately reproducing the experimental magnetic coupling constant (J) of [Fe{sub 2}OCl{sub 6}]{sup 2−} with (16e,26o), and considerably improving the smaller active space results for [Cr{sub 2}O(NH{sub 3}){sub 10}]{sup 4+} with (12e,32o). For comparison, we perform conventional MRCI+Q calculations and find the J values to be consistent with those from DMRG-CASSCF. In contrast to previous studies, the higher spin states of the two systems show similar deviations from the Heisenberg spectrum, regardless of the computational method.

  5. A new Eulerian-Lagrangian finite element simulator for solute transport in discrete fracture-matrix systems

    SciTech Connect

    Birkholzer, J.; Karasaki, K.

    1996-07-01

    Fracture network simulators have extensively been used in the past for obtaining a better understanding of flow and transport processes in fractured rock. However, most of these models do not account for fluid or solute exchange between the fractures and the porous matrix, although diffusion into the matrix pores can have a major impact on the spreading of contaminants. In the present paper a new finite element code TRIPOLY is introduced which combines a powerful fracture network simulator with an efficient method to account for the diffusive interaction between the fractures and the adjacent matrix blocks. The fracture network simulator used in TRIPOLY features a mixed Lagrangian-Eulerian solution scheme for the transport in fractures, combined with an adaptive gridding technique to account for sharp concentration fronts. The fracture-matrix interaction is calculated with an efficient method which has been successfully used in the past for dual-porosity models. Discrete fractures and matrix blocks are treated as two different systems, and the interaction is modeled by introducing sink/source terms in both systems. It is assumed that diffusive transport in the matrix can be approximated as a one-dimensional process, perpendicular to the adjacent fracture surfaces. A direct solution scheme is employed to solve the coupled fracture and matrix equations. The newly developed combination of the fracture network simulator and the fracture-matrix interaction module allows for detailed studies of spreading processes in fractured porous rock. The authors present a sample application which demonstrate the codes ability of handling large-scale fracture-matrix systems comprising individual fractures and matrix blocks of arbitrary size and shape.

  6. Floating matrix tablets based on low density foam powder: effects of formulation and processing parameters on drug release.

    PubMed

    Streubel, A; Siepmann, J; Bodmeier, R

    2003-01-01

    The aim of this study was to develop and physicochemically characterize single unit, floating controlled drug delivery systems consisting of (i). polypropylene foam powder, (ii). matrix-forming polymer(s), (iii). drug, and (iv). filler (optional). The highly porous foam powder provided low density and, thus, excellent in vitro floating behavior of the tablets. All foam powder-containing tablets remained floating for at least 8 h in 0.1 N HCl at 37 degrees C. Different types of matrix-forming polymers were studied: hydroxypropyl methylcellulose (HPMC), polyacrylates, sodium alginate, corn starch, carrageenan, gum guar and gum arabic. The tablets eroded upon contact with the release medium, and the relative importance of drug diffusion, polymer swelling and tablet erosion for the resulting release patterns varied significantly with the type of matrix former. The release rate could effectively be modified by varying the "matrix-forming polymer/foam powder" ratio, the initial drug loading, the tablet geometry (radius and height), the type of matrix-forming polymer, the use of polymer blends and the addition of water-soluble or water-insoluble fillers (such as lactose or microcrystalline cellulose). The floating behavior of the low density drug delivery systems could successfully be combined with accurate control of the drug release patterns. PMID:12554071

  7. Efficient tree tensor network states (TTNS) for quantum chemistry: Generalizations of the density matrix renormalization group algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakatani, Naoki; Chan, Garnet Kin-Lic

    2013-04-01

    We investigate tree tensor network states for quantum chemistry. Tree tensor network states represent one of the simplest generalizations of matrix product states and the density matrix renormalization group. While matrix product states encode a one-dimensional entanglement structure, tree tensor network states encode a tree entanglement structure, allowing for a more flexible description of general molecules. We describe an optimal tree tensor network state algorithm for quantum chemistry. We introduce the concept of half-renormalization which greatly improves the efficiency of the calculations. Using our efficient formulation we demonstrate the strengths and weaknesses of tree tensor network states versus matrix product states. We carry out benchmark calculations both on tree systems (hydrogen trees and π-conjugated dendrimers) as well as non-tree molecules (hydrogen chains, nitrogen dimer, and chromium dimer). In general, tree tensor network states require much fewer renormalized states to achieve the same accuracy as matrix product states. In non-tree molecules, whether this translates into a computational savings is system dependent, due to the higher prefactor and computational scaling associated with tree algorithms. In tree like molecules, tree network states are easily superior to matrix product states. As an illustration, our largest dendrimer calculation with tree tensor network states correlates 110 electrons in 110 active orbitals.

  8. Higher-order adaptive finite-element methods for Kohn–Sham density functional theory

    SciTech Connect

    Motamarri, P.; Nowak, M.R.; Leiter, K.; Knap, J.; Gavini, V.

    2013-11-15

    We present an efficient computational approach to perform real-space electronic structure calculations using an adaptive higher-order finite-element discretization of Kohn–Sham density-functional theory (DFT). To this end, we develop an a priori mesh-adaption technique to construct a close to optimal finite-element discretization of the problem. We further propose an efficient solution strategy for solving the discrete eigenvalue problem by using spectral finite-elements in conjunction with Gauss–Lobatto quadrature, and a Chebyshev acceleration technique for computing the occupied eigenspace. The proposed approach has been observed to provide a staggering 100–200-fold computational advantage over the solution of a generalized eigenvalue problem. Using the proposed solution procedure, we investigate the computational efficiency afforded by higher-order finite-element discretizations of the Kohn–Sham DFT problem. Our studies suggest that staggering computational savings—of the order of 1000-fold—relative to linear finite-elements can be realized, for both all-electron and local pseudopotential calculations, by using higher-order finite-element discretizations. On all the benchmark systems studied, we observe diminishing returns in computational savings beyond the sixth-order for accuracies commensurate with chemical accuracy, suggesting that the hexic spectral-element may be an optimal choice for the finite-element discretization of the Kohn–Sham DFT problem. A comparative study of the computational efficiency of the proposed higher-order finite-element discretizations suggests that the performance of finite-element basis is competing with the plane-wave discretization for non-periodic local pseudopotential calculations, and compares to the Gaussian basis for all-electron calculations to within an order of magnitude. Further, we demonstrate the capability of the proposed approach to compute the electronic structure of a metallic system containing 1688

  9. Higher-order adaptive finite-element methods for Kohn-Sham density functional theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Motamarri, P.; Nowak, M. R.; Leiter, K.; Knap, J.; Gavini, V.

    2013-11-01

    We present an efficient computational approach to perform real-space electronic structure calculations using an adaptive higher-order finite-element discretization of Kohn-Sham density-functional theory (DFT). To this end, we develop an a priori mesh-adaption technique to construct a close to optimal finite-element discretization of the problem. We further propose an efficient solution strategy for solving the discrete eigenvalue problem by using spectral finite-elements in conjunction with Gauss-Lobatto quadrature, and a Chebyshev acceleration technique for computing the occupied eigenspace. The proposed approach has been observed to provide a staggering 100-200-fold computational advantage over the solution of a generalized eigenvalue problem. Using the proposed solution procedure, we investigate the computational efficiency afforded by higher-order finite-element discretizations of the Kohn-Sham DFT problem. Our studies suggest that staggering computational savings-of the order of 1000-fold-relative to linear finite-elements can be realized, for both all-electron and local pseudopotential calculations, by using higher-order finite-element discretizations. On all the benchmark systems studied, we observe diminishing returns in computational savings beyond the sixth-order for accuracies commensurate with chemical accuracy, suggesting that the hexic spectral-element may be an optimal choice for the finite-element discretization of the Kohn-Sham DFT problem. A comparative study of the computational efficiency of the proposed higher-order finite-element discretizations suggests that the performance of finite-element basis is competing with the plane-wave discretization for non-periodic local pseudopotential calculations, and compares to the Gaussian basis for all-electron calculations to within an order of magnitude. Further, we demonstrate the capability of the proposed approach to compute the electronic structure of a metallic system containing 1688 atoms using

  10. Correlation between bone mineral density and serum trace elements in response to supervised aerobic training in older adults

    PubMed Central

    Alghadir, Ahmad H; Gabr, Sami A; Al-Eisa, Einas S; Alghadir, Muaz H

    2016-01-01

    . Conclusion The observed changes in the levels of Ca, Mn, Cu, and Zn were shown to be positively correlated with improved bone mass density among control and osteoporosis subjects of both sexes. These results demonstrate that aerobic exercise of moderate intensity might protect bone and cartilage by regulation of body trace elements which are involved in the biosynthesis of bone matrix structures and inhibition of bone resorption process via a proposed anti-free radical mechanism. PMID:27013870

  11. Variational Optimization of the Second-Order Density Matrix Corresponding to a Seniority-Zero Configuration Interaction Wave Function.

    PubMed

    Poelmans, Ward; Van Raemdonck, Mario; Verstichel, Brecht; De Baerdemacker, Stijn; Torre, Alicia; Lain, Luis; Massaccesi, Gustavo E; Alcoba, Diego R; Bultinck, Patrick; Van Neck, Dimitri

    2015-09-01

    We perform a direct variational determination of the second-order (two-particle) density matrix corresponding to a many-electron system, under a restricted set of the two-index N-representability P-, Q-, and G-conditions. In addition, we impose a set of necessary constraints that the two-particle density matrix must be derivable from a doubly occupied many-electron wave function, i.e., a singlet wave function for which the Slater determinant decomposition only contains determinants in which spatial orbitals are doubly occupied. We rederive the two-index N-representability conditions first found by Weinhold and Wilson and apply them to various benchmark systems (linear hydrogen chains, He, N2, and CN(-)). This work is motivated by the fact that a doubly occupied many-electron wave function captures in many cases the bulk of the static correlation. Compared to the general case, the structure of doubly occupied two-particle density matrices causes the associate semidefinite program to have a very favorable scaling as L(3), where L is the number of spatial orbitals. Since the doubly occupied Hilbert space depends on the choice of the orbitals, variational calculation steps of the two-particle density matrix are interspersed with orbital-optimization steps (based on Jacobi rotations in the space of the spatial orbitals). We also point to the importance of symmetry breaking of the orbitals when performing calculations in a doubly occupied framework. PMID:26575902

  12. Constrained positive matrix factorization: Elemental ratios, spatial distinction, and chemical transport model source contributions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sturtz, Timothy M.

    Source apportionment models attempt to untangle the relationship between pollution sources and the impacts at downwind receptors. Two frameworks of source apportionment models exist: source-oriented and receptor-oriented. Source based apportionment models use presumed emissions and atmospheric processes to estimate the downwind source contributions. Conversely, receptor based models leverage speciated concentration data from downwind receptors and apply statistical methods to predict source contributions. Integration of both source-oriented and receptor-oriented models could lead to a better understanding of the implications sources have on the environment and society. The research presented here investigated three different types of constraints applied to the Positive Matrix Factorization (PMF) receptor model within the framework of the Multilinear Engine (ME-2): element ratio constraints, spatial separation constraints, and chemical transport model (CTM) source attribution constraints. PM10-2.5 mass and trace element concentrations were measured in Winston-Salem, Chicago, and St. Paul at up to 60 sites per city during two different seasons in 2010. PMF was used to explore the underlying sources of variability. Information on previously reported PM10-2.5 tire and brake wear profiles were used to constrain these features in PMF by prior specification of selected species ratios. We also modified PMF to allow for combining the measurements from all three cities into a single model while preserving city-specific soil features. Relatively minor differences were observed between model predictions with and without the prior ratio constraints, increasing confidence in our ability to identify separate brake wear and tire wear features. Using separate data, source contributions to total fine particle carbon predicted by a CTM were incorporated into the PMF receptor model to form a receptor-oriented hybrid model. The level of influence of the CTM versus traditional PMF was

  13. Matrix elements of the electromagnetic operator between kaon and pion states

    SciTech Connect

    Baum, I.; Lubicz, V.; Martinelli, G.; Orifici, L.; Simula, S.

    2011-10-01

    We compute the matrix elements of the electromagnetic operator sF{sub {mu}{nu}}{sigma}{sup {mu}{nu}}d between kaon and pion states, using lattice QCD with maximally twisted-mass fermions and two flavors of dynamical quarks (N{sub f}=2). The operator is renormalized nonperturbatively in the RI'/MOM scheme and our simulations cover pion masses as light as 270 MeV and three values of the lattice spacing from {approx_equal}0.07 up to {approx_equal}0.1 fm. At the physical point our result for the corresponding tensor form factor at zero-momentum transfer is f{sub T}{sup K{pi}}(0)=0.417(14{sub stat})(5{sub syst}), where the systematic error does not include the effect of quenching the strange and charm quarks. Our result differs significantly from the old quenched result f{sub T}{sup K{pi}}(0)=0.78(6) obtained by the SPQ{sub cd}R Collaboration with pion masses above 500 MeV. We investigate the source of this difference and conclude that it is mainly related to the chiral extrapolation. We also study the tensor charge of the pion and obtain the value f{sub T}{sup {pi}{pi}}(0)=0.195(8{sub stat})(6{sub syst}) in good agreement with, but more accurate than the result f{sub T}{sup {pi}{pi}}(0)=0.216(34) obtained by the QCDSF Collaboration using higher pion masses.

  14. FERM3D: A finite element R-matrix electron molecule scattering code

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tonzani, Stefano

    2007-01-01

    FERM3D is a three-dimensional finite element program, for the elastic scattering of a low energy electron from a general polyatomic molecule, which is converted to a potential scattering problem. The code is based on tricubic polynomials in spherical coordinates. The electron-molecule interaction is treated as a sum of three terms: electrostatic, exchange, and polarization. The electrostatic term can be extracted directly from ab initio codes ( GAUSSIAN 98 in the work described here), while the exchange term is approximated using a local density functional. A local polarization potential based on density functional theory [C. Lee, W. Yang, R.G. Parr, Phys. Rev. B 37 (1988) 785] describes the long range attraction to the molecular target induced by the scattering electron. Photoionization calculations are also possible and illustrated in the present work. The generality and simplicity of the approach is important in extending electron-scattering calculations to more complex targets than it is possible with other methods. Program summaryTitle of program:FERM3D Catalogue identifier:ADYL_v1_0 Program summary URL:http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/summaries/ADYL_v1_0 Program obtainable from: CPC Program Library, Queen's University of Belfast, N. Ireland Computer for which the program is designed and others on which it has been tested:Intel Xeon, AMD Opteron 64 bit, Compaq Alpha Operating systems or monitors under which the program has been tested:HP Tru64 Unix v5.1, Red Hat Linux Enterprise 3 Programming language used:Fortran 90 Memory required to execute with typical data:900 MB (neutral CO 2), 2.3 GB (ionic CO 2), 1.4 GB (benzene) No. of bits in a word:32 No. of processors used:1 Has the code been vectorized?:No No. of lines in distributed program, including test data, etc.:58 383 No. of bytes in distributed program, including test data, etc.:561 653 Distribution format:tar.gzip file CPC Program library subprograms used:ADDA, ACDP Nature of physical problem:Scattering of an

  15. Fabricating high-density magnetic storage elements by low-dose ion beam irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Neb, R.; Sebastian, T.; Pirro, P.; Hillebrands, B.; Pofahl, S.; Schaefer, R.; Reuscher, B.

    2012-09-10

    We fabricate magnetic storage elements by irradiating an antiferromagnetically coupled ferromagnetic/nonmagnetic/ferromagnetic trilayer by a low-dose ion beam. The irradiated areas become ferromagnetically coupled and are capable of storing information if their size is small enough. We employ Fe/Cr/Fe trilayers and a 30 keV focused Ga{sup +}-ion beam to demonstrate the working principle for a storage array with a bit density of 7 Gbit/in.{sup 2}. Micromagnetic simulations suggest that bit densities of at least two magnitudes of order larger should be possible.

  16. Ground-state properties of third-row elements with nonlocal density functionals

    SciTech Connect

    Bagno, P.; Jepsen, O.; Gunnarsson, O.

    1989-07-15

    The cohesive energy, the lattice parameter, and the bulk modulus of third-row elements are calculated using the Langreth-Mehl-Hu (LMH), the Perdew-Wang (PW), and the gradient expansion functionals. The PW functional is found to give somewhat better results than the LMH functional and both are found to typically remove half the errors in the local-spin-density (LSD) approximation, while the gradient expansion gives worse results than the local-density approximation. For Fe both the LMH and PW functionals correctly predict a ferromagnetic bcc ground state, while the LSD approximation and the gradient expansion predict a nonmagnetic fcc ground state.

  17. DERIVING PLASMA DENSITIES AND ELEMENTAL ABUNDANCES FROM SERTS DIFFERENTIAL EMISSION MEASURE ANALYSIS

    SciTech Connect

    Schmelz, J. T.; Kimble, J. A.; Saba, J. L. R.

    2012-09-20

    We use high-resolution spectral emission line data obtained by the SERTS instrument during three rocket flights to demonstrate a new approach for constraining electron densities of solar active region plasma. We apply differential emission measure (DEM) forward-fitting techniques to characterize the multithermal solar plasma producing the observed EUV spectra, with constraints on the high-temperature plasma from the Yohkoh Soft X-ray Telescope. In this iterative process, we compare line intensities predicted by an input source distribution to observed line intensities for multiple iron ion species, and search a broad range of densities to optimize {chi}{sup 2} simultaneously for the many available density-sensitive lines. This produces a density weighted by the DEM, which appears to be useful for characterizing the bulk of the emitting plasma over a significant range of temperature. This 'DEM-weighted density' technique is complementary to the use of density-sensitive line ratios and less affected by uncertainties in atomic data and ionization fraction for any specific line. Once the DEM shape and the DEM-weighted density have been established from the iron lines, the relative elemental abundances can be determined for other lines in the spectrum. We have also identified spectral lines in the SERTS wavelength range that may be problematic.

  18. Deriving Plasma Densities and Elemental Abundances from SERTS Differential Emission Measure Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schmelz, J. T.; Kimble, J. A.; Saba, J. L. R.

    2012-01-01

    We use high-resolution spectral emission line data obtained by the SERTS instrument during three rocket flights to demonstrate a new approach for constraining electron densities of solar active region plasma.We apply differential emission measure (DEM) forward-fitting techniques to characterize the multithermal solar plasma producing the observed EUV spectra, with constraints on the high-temperature plasma from the Yohkoh Soft X-ray Telescope. In this iterative process, we compare line intensities predicted by an input source distribution to observed line intensities for multiple iron ion species, and search a broad range of densities to optimize chi-square simultaneously for the many available density-sensitive lines. This produces a density weighted by the DEM, which appears to be useful for characterizing the bulk of the emitting plasma over a significant range of temperature. This "DEM-weighted density" technique is complementary to the use of density-sensitive line ratios and less affected by uncertainties in atomic data and ionization fraction for any specific line. Once the DEM shape and the DEM-weighted density have been established from the iron lines, the relative elemental abundances can be determined for other lines in the spectrum. We have also identified spectral lines in the SERTS wavelength range that may be problematic

  19. Discrete element modeling of powder consolidation and the formation of titanium-matrix composites from powder-fiber monotapes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Newell, Kenneth James

    A three year research effort is completed with the development of the Discrete Element Consolidation Analyzer (DECA) for process modeling the formation of titanium composites from powder-fiber monotapes. The primary goal of the DECA process model is to provide a statistically realistic analysis of the various physical processes necessary to achieve higher quality composites from the powder-fiber technique. Over the course of this effort, research and code development was conducted in three distinct stages. The first stage focused on the simulation of initial geometry of the powder and fibers as well as the evolution of tape configuration during the pre-consolidation processing steps. The second stage developed the mechanics of the discrete element powder consolidation and the material characterization methods necessary to model the viscoplastic response of the powder to transient thermal and mechanical boundary conditions. The final stage incorporated the presence of fibers to evaluate the interaction mechanics and possible fibers damage resulting from discrete powder-fiber contacts. As a conclusion to the research, DECA model predictions of density versus time for various consolidation profiles are directly compared to actual consolidation test results and a DECA prescribed process profile is used to fabricate a 6sp{''} × 6sp{''} composite panel of Ti-6242/SCS-6. In completing this research, the discrete element modeling technique has proven to be a powerful tool for the analysis and simulation of metal powder consolidation as well as the consolidation of metal matrix composites. The DECA code orchestrates the use of particle kinetics, some simple aspects of gas dynamics, elasticity, plasticity, creep and various innovative material characterization methods to produce a seamless analysis for powder metallurgy processing of composites. Through the application of the DECA capability, many aspects of the processing stages have been elucidated for further

  20. A finite element model of the effects of primary creep in an Al-SiC metal matrix composite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Atkins, Steven L.; Gibeling, Jeffery C.

    1995-12-01

    A two dimensional axisymmetric finite element model has been developed to study the creep behavior of a high-temperature aluminum alloy matrix (alloy 8009) reinforced with 11 vol pct silicon carbide paniculate. Because primary creep represents a significant portion of the total creep strain for this matrix alloy, the emphasis of the present investigation is on the influence of primary creep on the high-temperature behavior of the composite. The base alloy and composite are prepared by rapid solidification processing, resulting in a very fine grain size and the absence of precipitates that may complicate modeling of the composite. Because the matrix microstructure is unaffected by the presence of the SiC paniculate, this material is particularly well suited to continuum finite element modeling. Stress contours, strain contours, and creep curves are presented for the model. While the final distribution of stresses and strains is unaffected by the inclusion of primary creep, the overall creep response of the model reveals a significant primary strain transient. The effects of true primary creep are more significant than the primary-like transient introduced by the redistribution of stresses after loading. Examination of the stress contours indicates that the matrix axial and shear components become less uniform while the effective stress becomes more homogeneous as creep progresses and that the distribution of stresses do not change significantly with time after the strain rate reaches a steady state. These results also confirm that load transfer from the matrix to reinforcement occurs primarily through the shear stress. It is concluded that inclusion of matrix primary creep is essential to obtaining accurate representations of the creep response of metal matrix composites.

  1. All-electron time-dependent density functional theory with finite elements: time-propagation approach.

    PubMed

    Lehtovaara, Lauri; Havu, Ville; Puska, Martti

    2011-10-21

    We present an all-electron method for time-dependent density functional theory which employs hierarchical nonuniform finite-element bases and the time-propagation approach. The method is capable of treating linear and nonlinear response of valence and core electrons to an external field. We also introduce (i) a preconditioner for the propagation equation, (ii) a stable way to implement absorbing boundary conditions, and (iii) a new kind of absorbing boundary condition inspired by perfectly matched layers. PMID:22029294

  2. Design and expected performance of a fast neutron attenuation probe for light element density measurements

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Sweany, M.; Marleau, P.

    2016-07-08

    In this paper, we present the design and expected performance of a proof-of-concept 32 channel material identification system. Our system is based on the energy-dependent attenuation of fast neutrons for four elements: hydrogen, carbon, nitrogen and oxygen. We describe a new approach to obtaining a broad range of neutron energies to probe a sample, as well as our technique for reconstructing the molar densities within a sample. The system's performance as a function of time-of-flight energy resolution is explored using a Geant4-based Monte Carlo. Our results indicate that, with the expected detector response of our system, we will be ablemore » to determine the molar density of all four elements to within a 20–30% accuracy in a two hour scan time. In many cases this error is systematically low, thus the ratio between elements is more accurate. This degree of accuracy is enough to distinguish, for example, a sample of water from a sample of pure hydrogen peroxide: the ratio of oxygen to hydrogen is reconstructed to within 8±0.5% of the true value. Lastly, with future algorithm development that accounts for backgrounds caused by scattering within the sample itself, the accuracy of molar densities, not ratios, may improve to the 5–10% level for a two hour scan time.« less

  3. Experimental determination of the H( n =3) density matrix for 80-keV H sup + on He

    SciTech Connect

    Ashburn, J.R.; Cline, R.A.; Stone, C.D.; van der Burgt, P.J.M.; Westerveld, W.B.; Risley, J.S. )

    1989-11-01

    The density matrix is determined for H({ital n}=3) atoms produced in axially symmetric electron-transfer collisions of 80-keV protons on helium. In the experiment axial or transverse electric fields with respect to the proton beam are applied to the collision region. The intensity and polarization of Balmer-{alpha} radiation emitted by the H({ital n}=3) atoms are measured as a function of the strength of the external electric field. Detailed analysis of the measured optical signals, taking into account the time evolution of the H({ital n}=3) atoms in the applied electric field, makes it possible to extract the complete density matrix of the H({ital n}=3) atoms at the moment of their formation, averaged over all impact parameters. Significant improvements in the experimental technique and in the data analysis associated with the fit of the density matrix to the optical signals have eliminated systematic effects that were present in our previous work (Phys. Rev. A 33, 276 (1986)).

  4. Measurements of continuum lowering in solid-density plasmas created from elements and compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ciricosta, O.; Vinko, S. M.; Barbrel, B.; Rackstraw, D. S.; Preston, T. R.; Burian, T.; Chalupský, J.; Cho, B. I.; Chung, H.-K.; Dakovski, G. L.; Engelhorn, K.; Hájková, V.; Heimann, P.; Holmes, M.; Juha, L.; Krzywinski, J.; Lee, R. W.; Toleikis, S.; Turner, J. J.; Zastrau, U.; Wark, J. S.

    2016-05-01

    The effect of a dense plasma environment on the energy levels of an embedded ion is usually described in terms of the lowering of its continuum level. For strongly coupled plasmas, the phenomenon is intimately related to the equation of state; hence, an accurate treatment is crucial for most astrophysical and inertial-fusion applications, where the case of plasma mixtures is of particular interest. Here we present an experiment showing that the standard density-dependent analytical models are inadequate to describe solid-density plasmas at the temperatures studied, where the reduction of the binding energies for a given species is unaffected by the different plasma environment (ion density) in either the element or compounds of that species, and can be accurately estimated by calculations only involving the energy levels of an isolated neutral atom. The results have implications for the standard approaches to the equation of state calculations.

  5. Measurements of continuum lowering in solid-density plasmas created from elements and compounds.

    PubMed

    Ciricosta, O; Vinko, S M; Barbrel, B; Rackstraw, D S; Preston, T R; Burian, T; Chalupský, J; Cho, B I; Chung, H-K; Dakovski, G L; Engelhorn, K; Hájková, V; Heimann, P; Holmes, M; Juha, L; Krzywinski, J; Lee, R W; Toleikis, S; Turner, J J; Zastrau, U; Wark, J S

    2016-01-01

    The effect of a dense plasma environment on the energy levels of an embedded ion is usually described in terms of the lowering of its continuum level. For strongly coupled plasmas, the phenomenon is intimately related to the equation of state; hence, an accurate treatment is crucial for most astrophysical and inertial-fusion applications, where the case of plasma mixtures is of particular interest. Here we present an experiment showing that the standard density-dependent analytical models are inadequate to describe solid-density plasmas at the temperatures studied, where the reduction of the binding energies for a given species is unaffected by the different plasma environment (ion density) in either the element or compounds of that species, and can be accurately estimated by calculations only involving the energy levels of an isolated neutral atom. The results have implications for the standard approaches to the equation of state calculations. PMID:27210741

  6. Measurements of continuum lowering in solid-density plasmas created from elements and compounds

    PubMed Central

    Ciricosta, O.; Vinko, S. M.; Barbrel, B.; Rackstraw, D. S.; Preston, T. R.; Burian, T.; Chalupský, J.; Cho, B. I.; Chung, H. -K.; Dakovski, G. L.; Engelhorn, K.; Hájková, V.; Heimann, P.; Holmes, M.; Juha, L.; Krzywinski, J.; Lee, R. W.; Toleikis, S.; Turner, J. J.; Zastrau, U.; Wark, J. S.

    2016-01-01

    The effect of a dense plasma environment on the energy levels of an embedded ion is usually described in terms of the lowering of its continuum level. For strongly coupled plasmas, the phenomenon is intimately related to the equation of state; hence, an accurate treatment is crucial for most astrophysical and inertial-fusion applications, where the case of plasma mixtures is of particular interest. Here we present an experiment showing that the standard density-dependent analytical models are inadequate to describe solid-density plasmas at the temperatures studied, where the reduction of the binding energies for a given species is unaffected by the different plasma environment (ion density) in either the element or compounds of that species, and can be accurately estimated by calculations only involving the energy levels of an isolated neutral atom. The results have implications for the standard approaches to the equation of state calculations. PMID:27210741

  7. Measurements of continuum lowering in solid-density plasmas created from elements and compounds

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Ciricosta, O.; Vinko, S. M.; Barbrel, B.; Rackstraw, D. S.; Preston, T. R.; Burian, T.; Chalupský, J.; Cho, B. I.; Chung, H. -K.; Dakovski, G. L.; et al

    2016-05-23

    The effect of a dense plasma environment on the energy levels of an embedded ion is usually described in terms of the lowering of its continuum level. For strongly coupled plasmas, the phenomenon is intimately related to the equation of state; hence, an accurate treatment is crucial for most astrophysical and inertial-fusion applications, where the case of plasma mixtures is of particular interest. In this study, we present an experiment showing that the standard density-dependent analytical models are inadequate to describe solid-density plasmas at the temperatures studied, where the reduction of the binding energies for a given species is unaffectedmore » by the different plasma environment (ion density) in either the element or compounds of that species, and can be accurately estimated by calculations only involving the energy levels of an isolated neutral atom. Lastly, the results have implications for the standard approaches to the equation of state calculations.« less

  8. Prediction of the fiber-matrix interface failure due to longitudinal tensile loading using finite element methods

    SciTech Connect

    Mahfuz, H.; Ahsan Mian, A.K.M.; Vaidya, U.K.; Brown, T.; Jeelani, S.

    1995-10-01

    A 3D-unit cell for 0.90 laminated composites has been developed to predict the composite behavior under longitudinal tensile loading condition. 3D contact element has been used to model the fiber matrix interface. Two interface conditions, namely, infinitely strong and weakly bonded, are considered in the analysis. Both large displacement and plastic strain behavior for the matrix are considered to account for the geometric and material non-linearities. Investigations were carried out at three temperatures to compare the composite response obtained from mechanical tests at those temperatures. Stress-strain behavior and the local stress distributions at the fiber as well as at the matrix are presented, and their effects on the failure of the interface are discussed in the paper. The material under investigation was SiC{sub f}/Si{sub 3}N{sub 4}.

  9. Direct measurement of excited-state dipole matrix elements using electromagnetically induced transparency in the hyperfine Paschen-Back regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whiting, Daniel J.; Keaveney, James; Adams, Charles S.; Hughes, Ifan G.

    2016-04-01

    Applying large magnetic fields to gain access to the hyperfine Paschen-Back regime can isolate three-level systems in a hot alkali metal vapors, thereby simplifying usually complex atom-light interactions. We use this method to make the first direct measurement of the |<5 P ||e r ||5 D >| matrix element in 87Rb. An analytic model with only three levels accurately models the experimental electromagnetically induced transparency spectra and extracted Rabi frequencies are used to determine the dipole matrix element. We measure |<5 P3 /2||e r ||5 D5 /2>| =(2.290 ±0 .002stat±0 .04syst) e a0 , which is in excellent agreement with the theoretical calculations of Safronova, Williams, and Clark [Phys. Rev. A 69, 022509 (2004), 10.1103/PhysRevA.69.022509].

  10. Analysis of the influence of external magnetic field on transition matrix elements in quantum well and quantum cascade laser structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Demić, Aleksandar; Radovanović, Jelena; Milanović, Vitomir

    2016-08-01

    We present a method for modeling nonparabolicity effects (NPE) in quantum nanostructures in presence of external electric and magnetic field by using second order perturbation theory. The method is applied to analysis of quantum well structure and active region of a quantum cascade laser (QCL). This model will allow us to examine the influence of magnetic field on dipole matrix element in QCL structures, which will provide a better insight to how NPE can affect the gain of QCL structures.

  11. 0{nu}{beta}{beta}-decay nuclear matrix elements with self-consistent short-range correlations

    SciTech Connect

    Simkovic, Fedor; Faessler, Amand; Muether, Herbert; Rodin, Vadim; Stauf, Markus

    2009-05-15

    A self-consistent calculation of nuclear matrix elements of the neutrinoless double-beta decays (0{nu}{beta}{beta}) of {sup 76}Ge, {sup 82}Se, {sup 96}Zr, {sup 100}Mo, {sup 116}Cd, {sup 128}Te, {sup 130}Te, and {sup 136}Xe is presented in the framework of the renormalized quasiparticle random phase approximation (RQRPA) and the standard QRPA. The pairing and residual interactions as well as the two-nucleon short-range correlations are for the first time derived from the same modern realistic nucleon-nucleon potentials, namely, from the charge-dependent Bonn potential (CD-Bonn) and the Argonne V18 potential. In a comparison with the traditional approach of using the Miller-Spencer Jastrow correlations, matrix elements for the 0{nu}{beta}{beta} decay are obtained that are larger in magnitude. We analyze the differences among various two-nucleon correlations including those of the unitary correlation operator method (UCOM) and quantify the uncertainties in the calculated 0{nu}{beta}{beta}-decay matrix elements.

  12. Energy levels and transition probability matrix elements of ruby for maser applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berwin, R. W.

    1971-01-01

    Program computes fine structure energy levels of ruby as a function of magnetic field. Included in program is matrix formulation, each row of which contains a magnetic field and four corresponding energy levels.

  13. Manifestly Hermitian semiclassical expansion for the one-particle density matrix of a two-dimensional Fermi gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bencheikh, K.; van Zyl, B. P.; Berkane, K.

    2016-08-01

    The semiclassical ℏ expansion of the one-particle density matrix for a two-dimensional Fermi gas is calculated within the Wigner transform method of B. Grammaticos and A. Voros [Ann. Phys. (N.Y.) 123, 359 (1979), 10.1016/0003-4916(79)90343-9], originally developed in the context of nuclear physics. The method of Grammaticos and Voros has the virtue of preserving both the Hermiticity and idempotency of the density matrix to all orders in the ℏ expansion. As a topical application, we use our semiclassical expansion to go beyond the local-density approximation for the construction of the total dipole-dipole interaction energy functional of a two-dimensional, spin-polarized dipolar Fermi gas. We find a finite, second-order gradient correction to the Hartree-Fock energy, which takes the form ɛ (∇ρ ) 2/√{ρ } , with ɛ being small (|ɛ |≪1 ) and negative. We test the quality of the corrected energy by comparing it with the exact results available for harmonic confinement. Even for small particle numbers, the gradient correction to the dipole-dipole energy provides a significant improvement over the local-density approximation.

  14. Matrix elements of left-right four fermion operators and the electropenguin contribution to epsilon'/epsilon in lattice QCD with Wilson fermions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Franco, E.; Maiani, L.; Martinelli, G.; Morelli, A.

    1988-10-01

    The K-pi and K-pi-pi elements of left-right four fermion operators in quenched lattice QCD at beta=6 are computed. The soft-pion relations derived from the chiral structure of the operators are checked. A large enhancement of matrix elements is observed and interpreted as the effect of a scalar octet pole in the pi-K channel. This observation has implications for the related calculation of weak matrix elements.

  15. Experimental measurement of energy density in a vibrating plate and comparison with energy finite element analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Navazi, H. M.; Nokhbatolfoghahaei, A.; Ghobad, Y.; Haddadpour, H.

    2016-08-01

    In this paper, a new method and formulation is presented for experimental measurement of energy density of high frequency vibrations of a plate. By use of the new proposed method and eight accelerometers, both kinetic and potential energy densities are measured. Also, a computer program is developed based on energy finite element method to evaluate the proposed method. For several points, the results of the developed experimental formulation are compared with those of the energy finite element analysis results. It is observed that, there is a good agreement between experimental results and analyses. Finally, another test setup with reduced accelerometer spacing was prepared and based on the comparison between kinetic and potential results, it is concluded that, the kinetic and potential counterparts of the energy density are equal in high frequency bands. Based on this conclusion, the measurement procedure was upgraded to an efficient and very simple one for high frequency ranges. According to the new test procedure, another experimental measurement was performed and the results had a good agreement with the EFEA results.

  16. Very high cell density perfusion of CHO cells anchored in a non-woven matrix-based bioreactor.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ye; Stobbe, Per; Silvander, Christian Orrego; Chotteau, Véronique

    2015-11-10

    Recombinant Chinese Hamster Ovary (CHO) cells producing IgG monoclonal antibody were cultivated in a novel perfusion culture system CellTank, integrating the bioreactor and the cell retention function. In this system, the cells were harbored in a non-woven polyester matrix perfused by the culture medium and immersed in a reservoir. Although adapted to suspension, the CHO cells stayed entrapped in the matrix. The cell-free medium was efficiently circulated from the reservoir into- and through the matrix by a centrifugal pump placed at the bottom of the bioreactor resulting in highly homogenous concentrations of the nutrients and metabolites in the whole system as confirmed by measurements from different sampling locations. A real-time biomass sensor using the dielectric properties of living cells was used to measure the cell density. The performances of the CellTank were studied in three perfusion runs. A very high cell density measured as 200 pF/cm (where 1 pF/cm is equivalent to 1 × 10(6)viable cells/mL) was achieved at a perfusion rate of 10 reactor volumes per day (RV/day) in the first run. In the second run, the effect of cell growth arrest by hypothermia at temperatures lowered gradually from 37 °C to 29 °C was studied during 13 days at cell densities above 100 pF/cm. Finally a production run was performed at high cell densities, where a temperature shift to 31 °C was applied at cell density 100 pF/cm during a production period of 14 days in minimized feeding conditions. The IgG concentrations were comparable in the matrix and in the harvest line in all the runs, indicating no retention of the product of interest. The cell specific productivity was comparable or higher than in Erlenmeyer flask batch culture. During the production run, the final harvested IgG production was 35 times higher in the CellTank compared to a repeated batch culture in the same vessel volume during the same time period. PMID:26211737

  17. Effects of aluminum exposure on bone mineral density, mineral, and trace elements in rats.

    PubMed

    Li, Xinwei; Hu, Chongwei; Zhu, Yanzhu; Sun, Hao; Li, Yanfei; Zhang, Zhigang

    2011-10-01

    The purpose of the study was to investigate the effects of aluminum (Al) exposure on bone mineral elements, trace elements, and bone mineral density (BMD) in rats. One hundred Wistar rats were divided randomly into two groups. Experimental rats were given drinking water containing aluminum chloride (AlCl(3), 430 mg Al(3+)/L), whereas control rats were given distilled water for up to 150 days. Ten rats were sacrificed in each group every 30 days. The levels of Al, calcium (Ca), phosphorus (P), magnesium (Mg), zinc (Zn), iron (Fe), copper (Cu), manganese (Mn), selenium (Se), boron (B), and strontium (Sr) in bone and the BMD of femur were measured. Al-treated rats showed lower deposition of Ca, P, and Mg compared with control rats. Levels of trace elements (Zn, Fe, Cu, Mn, Se, B, and Sr) were significantly lower in the Al-treated group than in the control group from day 60, and the BMD of the femur metaphysis in the Al-treated group was significantly lower than in the control group on days 120 and 150. These findings indicate that long-term Al exposure reduces the levels of mineral and trace elements in bone. As a result, bone loss was induced (particularly in cancellous bone). PMID:20886309

  18. Finite element analysis of cylinder shell resonator and design of intelligent density meter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    W, Sui X.; M, Fan Y.; X, Zhang G.; R, Qiu Z.

    2005-01-01

    On the basis of the mathematical model and finite element analysis of the cylinder shell resonator, a novel resonant liquid density meter is designed. The meter consists of a cylinder shell resonator fixed on both ends, a measurement circuit with automatic gain control and automatic phase control, and a signal processing system with microcomputer unit C8051F021. The density meter is insensitive to the liquid pressure, and it can intelligently compensate for the temperature. The experiment results show the meter characteristic coefficients of K0, K1, and K2 at 25 centigrade are -129.5668 kg m-3, -0.2535 × 106 kg m-3 s-1 and 0.6239 × 1010 kg m-3 s-2, respectively. The accuracy of the sensor is ±0.1% in range of 700-900 kg m-3

  19. Global matrix of thermospheric density values for selected solar/geomagnetic conditions and spacecraft orbital attitudes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, D. L.

    1984-01-01

    Presented are selected thermospheric/exospheric global mean and extreme density values computed between 130 and 1100 km altitude. These values were generated from the MSFC/J70 reference orbital atmospheric model using different input conditions of solar flux and geomagnetic index, ranging from low to peak. Typical magnitudes of day-night density changes are presented, as an example, for use in space vehicle orbital analyses.

  20. First-order nonadiabatic coupling matrix elements between excited states: A Lagrangian formulation at the CIS, RPA, TD-HF, and TD-DFT levels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Zhendong; Liu, Wenjian

    2014-07-01

    Analytic expressions for the first-order nonadiabatic coupling matrix elements between electronically excited states are first formulated exactly via both time-independent equation of motion and time-dependent response theory, and are then approximated at the configuration interaction singles, particle-hole/particle-particle random phase approximation, and time-dependent density functional theory/Hartree-Fock levels of theory. Note that, to get the Pulay terms arising from the derivatives of basis functions, the standard response theory designed for electronic perturbations has to be extended to nuclear derivatives. The results are further recast into a Lagrangian form that is similar to that for excited-state energy gradients and allows to use atomic orbital based direct algorithms for large molecules.

  1. First order nonadiabatic coupling matrix elements between excited states: implementation and application at the TD-DFT and pp-TDA levels.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhendong; Suo, Bingbing; Liu, Wenjian

    2014-12-28

    The recently proposed rigorous yet abstract theory of first order nonadiabatic coupling matrix elements (fo-NACME) between electronically excited states [Z. Li and W. Liu, J. Chem. Phys. 141, 014110 (2014)] is specified in detail for two widely used models: The time-dependent density functional theory and the particle-particle Tamm-Dancoff approximation. The actual implementation employs a Lagrangian formalism with atomic-orbital based direct algorithms, which makes the computation of fo-NACME very similar to that of excited-state gradients. Although the methods have great potential in investigating internal conversions and nonadiabatic dynamics between excited states of large molecules, only prototypical systems as a first pilot application are considered here to illustrate some conceptual aspects. PMID:25554131

  2. First order nonadiabatic coupling matrix elements between excited states: Implementation and application at the TD-DFT and pp-TDA levels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Zhendong; Suo, Bingbing; Liu, Wenjian

    2014-12-01

    The recently proposed rigorous yet abstract theory of first order nonadiabatic coupling matrix elements (fo-NACME) between electronically excited states [Z. Li and W. Liu, J. Chem. Phys. 141, 014110 (2014)] is specified in detail for two widely used models: The time-dependent density functional theory and the particle-particle Tamm-Dancoff approximation. The actual implementation employs a Lagrangian formalism with atomic-orbital based direct algorithms, which makes the computation of fo-NACME very similar to that of excited-state gradients. Although the methods have great potential in investigating internal conversions and nonadiabatic dynamics between excited states of large molecules, only prototypical systems as a first pilot application are considered here to illustrate some conceptual aspects.

  3. First order nonadiabatic coupling matrix elements between excited states: Implementation and application at the TD-DFT and pp-TDA levels

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Zhendong; Suo, Bingbing; Liu, Wenjian

    2014-12-28

    The recently proposed rigorous yet abstract theory of first order nonadiabatic coupling matrix elements (fo-NACME) between electronically excited states [Z. Li and W. Liu, J. Chem. Phys. 141, 014110 (2014)] is specified in detail for two widely used models: The time-dependent density functional theory and the particle-particle Tamm-Dancoff approximation. The actual implementation employs a Lagrangian formalism with atomic-orbital based direct algorithms, which makes the computation of fo-NACME very similar to that of excited-state gradients. Although the methods have great potential in investigating internal conversions and nonadiabatic dynamics between excited states of large molecules, only prototypical systems as a first pilot application are considered here to illustrate some conceptual aspects.

  4. Equilibrium-reduced density matrix formulation: Influence of noise, disorder, and temperature on localization in excitonic systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moix, Jeremy M.; Zhao, Yang; Cao, Jianshu

    2012-03-01

    An exact method to compute the entire equilibrium-reduced density matrix for systems characterized by a system-bath Hamiltonian is presented. The approach is based upon a stochastic unraveling of the influence functional that appears in the imaginary time path integral formalism of quantum statistical mechanics. This method is then applied to study the effects of thermal noise, static disorder, and temperature on the coherence length in excitonic systems. As representative examples of biased and unbiased systems, attention is focused on the well-characterized complexes of the Fenna-Matthews-Olson (FMO) protein and the light harvesting complex of purple bacteria, LH2, respectively. Due to the bias, FMO is completely localized in the site basis at low temperatures, whereas LH2 is completely delocalized. In the latter, the presence of static disorder leads to a plateau in the coherence length at low temperature that becomes increasingly pronounced with increasing strength of the disorder. The introduction of noise, however, precludes this effect. In biased systems, it is shown that the environment may increase the coherence length, but only decrease that of unbiased systems. Finally it is emphasized that for typical values of the environmental parameters in light harvesting systems, the system and bath are entangled at equilibrium in the single excitation manifold. That is, the density matrix cannot be described as a product state as is often assumed, even at room temperature. The reduced density matrix of LH2 is shown to be in precise agreement with the steady state limit of previous exact quantum dynamics calculations.

  5. Density matrix renormalization group studies of the effect of constraint release on the viscosity of polymer melts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paeßens, Matthias; Schütz, Gunter M.

    2002-08-01

    The scaling of the viscosity of polymer melts is investigated with regard to the molecular weight. We present a generalization of the Rubinstein-Duke model, which takes constraint releases into account and calculates the effects on the viscosity by the use of the density matrix renormalization group algorithm. Using input from Rouse theory, the rates for the constraint releases are determined in a self-consistent way. We conclude that shape fluctuations of the tube caused by constraint release are not a likely candidate for improving Doi's crossover theory for the scaling of the polymer viscosity.

  6. Collision frequencies in density-matrix kinetic equations describing nonlinear effects in the wings of spectral lines

    SciTech Connect

    Parkhomenko, A I; Shalagin, Anatolii M

    2011-11-30

    Using the eikonal approximation, we have calculated effective collision frequencies in density-matrix kinetic equations describing nonlinear effects in the wings of spectral lines. We have established the relation between the probabilities of absorption and stimulated emission and the characteristics of the radiation and elementary scattering event. The example of the power interaction potential shows that quantum mechanical calculation of the collision frequencies in the eikonal approximation and previously known spectral line wing theory give similar results for the probability of radiation absorption.

  7. Spectral function of the two-dimensional Hubbard model: A density matrix renormalization group plus cluster perturbation theory study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Chun; Feiguin, Adrian E.

    2016-02-01

    We study the spectral function of the two-dimensional Hubbard model using cluster perturbation theory, and a density matrix renormalization group as a cluster solver. We reconstruct the two-dimensional dispersion at and away from half-filling using 2 ×L ladders, with L up to 80 sites, yielding results with unprecedented resolution in excellent agreement with quantum Monte Carlo. The main features of the spectrum can be described with a mean-field dispersion, with kinks and pseudogap traced back to scattering between spin and charge degrees of freedom.

  8. Obtaining Highly Excited Eigenstates of Many-Body Localized Hamiltonians by the Density Matrix Renormalization Group Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khemani, Vedika; Pollmann, Frank; Sondhi, S. L.

    2016-06-01

    The eigenstates of many-body localized (MBL) Hamiltonians exhibit low entanglement. We adapt the highly successful density-matrix renormalization group method, which is usually used to find modestly entangled ground states of local Hamiltonians, to find individual highly excited eigenstates of MBL Hamiltonians. The adaptation builds on the distinctive spatial structure of such eigenstates. We benchmark our method against the well-studied random field Heisenberg model in one dimension. At moderate to large disorder, the method successfully obtains excited eigenstates with high accuracy, thereby enabling a study of MBL systems at much larger system sizes than those accessible to exact-diagonalization methods.

  9. Influence of Hemp Fibers Pre-processing on Low Density Polyethylene Matrix Composites Properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kukle, S.; Vidzickis, R.; Zelca, Z.; Belakova, D.; Kajaks, J.

    2016-04-01

    In present research with short hemp fibres reinforced LLDPE matrix composites with fibres content in a range from 30 to 50 wt% subjected to four different pre-processing technologies were produced and such their properties as tensile strength and elongation at break, tensile modulus, melt flow index, micro hardness and water absorption dynamics were investigated. Capillary viscosimetry was used for fluidity evaluation and melt flow index (MFI) evaluated for all variants. MFI of fibres of two pre-processing variants were high enough to increase hemp fibres content from 30 to 50 wt% with moderate increase of water sorption capability.

  10. Exact finite reduced density matrix and von Neumann entropy for the Calogero model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Osenda, Omar; Pont, Federico M.; Okopińska, Anna; Serra, Pablo

    2015-12-01

    The information content of continuous quantum variables systems is usually studied using a number of well known approximation methods. The approximations are made to obtain the spectrum, eigenfunctions or the reduced density matrices that are essential to calculate the entropy-like quantities that quantify the information. Even in the sparse cases where the spectrum and eigenfunctions are exactly known, the entanglement spectrum- the spectrum of the reduced density matrices that characterize the problem- must be obtained in an approximate fashion. In this work, we obtain analytically a finite representation of the reduced density matrices of the fundamental state of the N-particle Calogero model for a discrete set of values of the interaction parameter. As a consequence, the exact entanglement spectrum and von Neumann entropy is worked out.

  11. Density-based load estimation using two-dimensional finite element models: a parametric study.

    PubMed

    Bona, Max A; Martin, Larry D; Fischer, Kenneth J

    2006-08-01

    A parametric investigation was conducted to determine the effects on the load estimation method of varying: (1) the thickness of back-plates used in the two-dimensional finite element models of long bones, (2) the number of columns of nodes in the outer medial and lateral sections of the diaphysis to which the back-plate multipoint constraints are applied and (3) the region of bone used in the optimization procedure of the density-based load estimation technique. The study is performed using two-dimensional finite element models of the proximal femora of a chimpanzee, gorilla, lion and grizzly bear. It is shown that the density-based load estimation can be made more efficient and accurate by restricting the stimulus optimization region to the metaphysis/epiphysis. In addition, a simple method, based on the variation of diaphyseal cortical thickness, is developed for assigning the thickness to the back-plate. It is also shown that the number of columns of nodes used as multipoint constraints does not have a significant effect on the method. PMID:17132530

  12. Inhibition of transferrin receptor 1 transcription by a cell density response element

    PubMed Central

    2005-01-01

    TfR1 (transferrin receptor 1) mediates the uptake of transferrin-bound iron and thereby plays a critical role in cellular iron metabolism. Its expression is coupled to cell proliferation/differentiation and controlled in response to iron levels and other signals by transcriptional and post-transcriptional mechanisms. It is well established that TfR1 levels decline when cultured cells reach a high density and in the present study we have investigated the underlying mechanisms. Consistent with previous findings, we demonstrate that TfR1 expression is attenuated in a cell-density-dependent manner in human lung cancer H1299 cells and in murine B6 fibroblasts as the result of a marked decrease in mRNA content. This response is not associated with alterations in the RNA-binding activity of iron regulatory proteins that are indicative of a transcriptional mechanism. Reporter assays reveal that the human TfR1 promoters contains sequences mediating cell-density-dependent transcriptional inhibition. Mapping of the human and mouse TfR1 promoters identified a conserved hexa-nucleotide 5′-GAGGGC-3′ motif with notable sequence similarity to a previously described element within the IGF-2 (insulin-like growth factor-2) promoter. We show that this motif is necessary for the formation of specific complexes with nuclear extracts and for cell-density-dependent regulation in reporter gene assays. Thus the TfR1 promoter contains a functional ‘cell density response element’ (CDRE). PMID:16092918

  13. Expansions of the pair distribution function and the second-order density matrix in terms of homogeneous functionals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Shubin

    1996-12-01

    It has been shown previously that under certain circumstances the correlation energy density functional Ec[ρ] and its kinetic Tc[ρ] and potential Vc[ρ] components can be expanded in terms of homogeneous functionals An[ρ], with n=1,2,3,..., and where An[ρ] is homogeneous of degree (1-n) with respect to coordinate scaling. In this paper, we extend the analysis to expand similarly the pair distribution function gxc([ρ]r1,r2) and the second-order density matrix ρ2(r1,r2). It is found that both of them can be expanded under certain circumstances in terms of functionals an([ρ]r1,r2), with n=1,2,3,..., that are homogeneous of degree -n in coordinate scaling. The An[ρ] are explicitly obtained in terms of the an([ρ]r1,r2).

  14. Combinational effect of matrix elasticity and alendronate density on differentiation of rat mesenchymal stem cells.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Pengfei; Mao, Zhengwei; Gao, Changyou

    2015-06-01

    Differentiation of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) is regulated by multivariate physical and chemical signals in a complicated microenvironment. In this study, polymerizable double bonds (GelMA) and osteo-inductive alendronate (Aln) (Aln-GelMA) were sequentially grafted onto gelatin molecules. The biocompatible hydrogels with defined stiffness in the range of 4-40 kPa were prepared by using polyethylene glycol diacrylate (PEGDA) as additional crosslinker. The Aln density was adjusted from 0 to 4 μM by controlling the ratio between the GelMA and Aln-GelMA. The combinational effects of stiffness and Aln density on osteogenic differentiation of MSCs were then studied in terms of ALP activity, collagen type I and osteocalcin expression, and calcium deposition. The results indicated that the stiffness and Aln density could synergistically improve the expression of all these osteogenesis markers. Their osteo-inductive effects are comparable to some extent, and high Aln density could be more effective than the stiffness. PMID:25805109

  15. Superheavy Element Chemistry by Relativistic Density Functional Theory Electronic Structure Modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zaitsevskii, A. V.; Polyaev, A. V.; Demidov, Yu. A.; Mosyagin, N. S.; Lomachuk, Yu. V.; Titov, A. V.

    2015-06-01

    Two-component density functional theory in its non-collinear formulation combined with the accurate relativistic electronic structure model defined by shape-consistent small-core pseudopotentials (PP/RDFT) provides a robust basis of efficient computational schemes for predicting energetic and structural properties of complex polyatomic systems including superheavy elements (SHEs). Because of the exceptional role of thermochromatography in the experiments on the "chemical" identification of SHEs with atomic numbers Z ≥ 112, we focus on the description of the adsorption of single SHE atoms on the surfaces of solids through cluster modeling of adsorption complexes. In some cases our results differ significantly from those of previous theoretical studies. The results of systematic comparative studies on chemical bonding in simple molecules of binary compounds of SHEs and their nearest homologs with most common light elements, obtained at the PP/RDFT level and visualized through the "chemical graphs", provide the understanding of the general chemistry of SHEs which at present cannot be derived from the experimental data. These results are used to discuss the main trends in changing chemical properties of the elements in the given group of the periodic table and demonstrate the specificity of SHEs.

  16. Integrating Epigenomic Elements and GWASs Identifies BDNF Gene Affecting Bone Mineral Density and Osteoporotic Fracture Risk

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Yan; Dong, Shan-Shan; Chen, Xiao-Feng; Jing, Ying-Aisha; Yang, Man; Yan, Han; Shen, Hui; Chen, Xiang-Ding; Tan, Li-Jun; Tian, Qing; Deng, Hong-Wen; Yang, Tie-Lin

    2016-01-01

    To identify susceptibility genes for osteoporosis, we conducted an integrative analysis that combined epigenomic elements and previous genome-wide association studies (GWASs) data, followed by validation at population and functional levels, which could identify common regulatory elements and predict new susceptibility genes that are biologically meaningful to osteoporosis. By this approach, we found a set of distinct epigenomic elements significantly enriched or depleted in the promoters of osteoporosis-associated genes, including 4 transcription factor binding sites, 27 histone marks, and 21 chromatin states segmentation types. Using these epigenomic marks, we performed reverse prediction analysis to prioritize the discovery of new candidate genes. Functional enrichment analysis of all the prioritized genes revealed several key osteoporosis related pathways, including Wnt signaling. Genes with high priority were further subjected to validation using available GWASs datasets. Three genes were significantly associated with spine bone mineral density, including BDNF, PDE4D, and SATB2, which all closely related to bone metabolism. The most significant gene BDNF was also associated with osteoporotic fractures. RNA interference revealed that BDNF knockdown can suppress osteoblast differentiation. Our results demonstrated that epigenomic data could be used to indicate common epigenomic marks to discover additional loci with biological functions for osteoporosis. PMID:27465306

  17. Integrating Epigenomic Elements and GWASs Identifies BDNF Gene Affecting Bone Mineral Density and Osteoporotic Fracture Risk.

    PubMed

    Guo, Yan; Dong, Shan-Shan; Chen, Xiao-Feng; Jing, Ying-Aisha; Yang, Man; Yan, Han; Shen, Hui; Chen, Xiang-Ding; Tan, Li-Jun; Tian, Qing; Deng, Hong-Wen; Yang, Tie-Lin

    2016-01-01

    To identify susceptibility genes for osteoporosis, we conducted an integrative analysis that combined epigenomic elements and previous genome-wide association studies (GWASs) data, followed by validation at population and functional levels, which could identify common regulatory elements and predict new susceptibility genes that are biologically meaningful to osteoporosis. By this approach, we found a set of distinct epigenomic elements significantly enriched or depleted in the promoters of osteoporosis-associated genes, including 4 transcription factor binding sites, 27 histone marks, and 21 chromatin states segmentation types. Using these epigenomic marks, we performed reverse prediction analysis to prioritize the discovery of new candidate genes. Functional enrichment analysis of all the prioritized genes revealed several key osteoporosis related pathways, including Wnt signaling. Genes with high priority were further subjected to validation using available GWASs datasets. Three genes were significantly associated with spine bone mineral density, including BDNF, PDE4D, and SATB2, which all closely related to bone metabolism. The most significant gene BDNF was also associated with osteoporotic fractures. RNA interference revealed that BDNF knockdown can suppress osteoblast differentiation. Our results demonstrated that epigenomic data could be used to indicate common epigenomic marks to discover additional loci with biological functions for osteoporosis. PMID:27465306

  18. Qualitative Analysis of Teeth and Evaluation of Amalgam Elements Penetration into Dental Matrix Using Laser Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Gazmeh, Meisam; Bahreini, Maryam; Tavassoli, Seyed Hassan; Asnaashari, Mohammad

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: In this study, laser induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) is used for qualitative analysis of healthy and carious teeth. The technique of laser ablation is receiving increasing attention for applications in dentistry, specifically for the treatment of teeth such as drilling of micro-holes and plaque removal. Methods: A quality-switched (Q-switched) Neodymium-Doped Yttrium Aluminium Garnet (Nd:YAG) laser operating at wavelength of 1064 nm, pulse energy of 90 mJ/pulse, repetition rate of 2Hz and pulse duration of 6 ns was used in this analysis. In the process of ablation a luminous micro-plasma is normally generated which may be exploited for on-line elemental analysis via laser induced breakdown spectroscopy technique. We propose laser induced breakdown spectroscopy as a rapid, in situ and easy method for monitoring drilling process. Results: The results of elemental analysis show the presence of some trace elements in teeth including P, Ca, Mg, Zn, K, Sr, C, Na, H, O and the permeability of some amalgam (teeth filling materials) elements including Hg, Ag, Cu and Sn into dental matrix. Conclusion: This study addresses the ability of LIBS in elemental analysis of teeth and its feasibility in acute identification of healthy and carious teeth during drilling process for future clinical applications. PMID:25987971

  19. Computation of scattering matrix elements of large and complex shaped absorbing particles with multilevel fast multipole algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Yueqian; Yang, Minglin; Sheng, Xinqing; Ren, Kuan Fang

    2015-05-01

    Light scattering properties of absorbing particles, such as the mineral dusts, attract a wide attention due to its importance in geophysical and environment researches. Due to the absorbing effect, light scattering properties of particles with absorption differ from those without absorption. Simple shaped absorbing particles such as spheres and spheroids have been well studied with different methods but little work on large complex shaped particles has been reported. In this paper, the surface Integral Equation (SIE) with Multilevel Fast Multipole Algorithm (MLFMA) is applied to study scattering properties of large non-spherical absorbing particles. SIEs are carefully discretized with piecewise linear basis functions on triangle patches to model whole surface of the particle, hence computation resource needs increase much more slowly with the particle size parameter than the volume discretized methods. To improve further its capability, MLFMA is well parallelized with Message Passing Interface (MPI) on distributed memory computer platform. Without loss of generality, we choose the computation of scattering matrix elements of absorbing dust particles as an example. The comparison of the scattering matrix elements computed by our method and the discrete dipole approximation method (DDA) for an ellipsoid dust particle shows that the precision of our method is very good. The scattering matrix elements of large ellipsoid dusts with different aspect ratios and size parameters are computed. To show the capability of the presented algorithm for complex shaped particles, scattering by asymmetry Chebyshev particle with size parameter larger than 600 of complex refractive index m = 1.555 + 0.004 i and different orientations are studied.

  20. NUMEN Project @ LNS : Heavy ions double charge exchange reactions towards the 0νββ nuclear matrix element determination

    SciTech Connect

    Agodi, C. Calabretta, L.; Calanna, A.; Carbone, D.; Cavallaro, M.; Colonna, M.; Cuttone, G.; Finocchiaro, P.; Pandola, L.; Rifuggiato, D.; Tudisco, S.; Cappuzzello, F.; Greco, V.; Bonanno, D. L.; Bongiovanni, D. G.; Longhitano, F.; Branchina, V.; Foti, A.; Lo Presti, D.; Lanzalone, G.; and others

    2015-10-28

    In the NUMEN Project it is proposed an innovative technique to access the nuclear matrix elements entering in the expression of the life-time of the neutrinoless double beta decay, using relevant cross sections of double charge exchange reactions. A key aspect is the use of MAGNEX large acceptance magnetic spectrometer, for the detection of the ejectiles, and of the INFN Laboratori Nazionali del Sud (LNS) K800 Superconducting Cyclotron (CS), for the acceleration of the required high resolution and low emittance heavy-ion beams.

  1. The nuclear matrix elements of 0νββ decay and the NUMEN project at INFN-LNS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cappuzzello, F.; Agodi, C.; Balestra, F.; Bijker, R.; Bonanno, D.; Bongiovanni, D.; Branchina, V.; Calabrese, S.; Calabretta, L.; Calanna, A.; Calvo, D.; Carbone, D.; Cavallaro, M.; Colonna, M.; Ferrero, S.; Foti, A.; Finocchiaro, P.; Giraudo, G.; Greco, V.; Iazzi, F.; Introzzi, R.; Lanzalone, G.; Lavagno, A.; Lo Presti, D.; Longhitano, F.; Muoio, A.; Pandola, L.; Rifuggiato, D.; Ruslan, M. V.; Santopinto, E.; Scaltrito, L.; Tudisco, S.; Zagatto, V.

    2016-05-01

    An innovative technique to access the nuclear matrix elements entering the expression of the life time of the double beta decay by relevant cross sections measurements of double charge exchange reactions is proposed. A key aspect of the project is the use of the MAGNEX large acceptance magnetic spectrometer, for the detection of the ejectiles, and of the LNS K800 Superconducting Cyclotron (CS), for the acceleration of the required high resolution and low emittance heavyion beams, already in operation at INFN Laboratory Nazionali del Sud in Catania (Italy).

  2. Investigation of the E2 and E3 matrix elements in 200Hg using direct nuclear reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rand, Evan; Bildstein, Vinzenz; Diaz Varela, Alejandra; Garrett, Paul; Hadinia, Baharak; Jamieson, Drew; Jigmeddorj, Badamsambuu; Laffoley, Alex; Leach, Kyle; Maclean, Andrew; Svensson, Carl; Ball, Gordon; Faestermann, Thomas; Hertenberger, Ralf; Wirth, Hans-Friedrich

    2014-09-01

    To date, 199Hg provides the most stringent limit on an atomic electric dipole moment (EDM). The existence of a permanent EDM would be a clear signal of CP violation from new physics beyond the Standard Model. Theoretical nuclear-structure calculations for 199Hg are challenging, and give varied predictions for the excited-state spectrum. Understanding the E2 and E3 strengths in 198 , 199 , 200Hg will make it possible to develop a nuclear structure model for the Schiff strength based on these matrix elements, and thereby constrain present models that predict the contribution of octupole collectivity to the Schiff moment of the nucleus. This work comprises two experiments using the Q3D magnetic spectrograph at the Maier-Leibnitz Laboratory. These experiments utilized a 22 MeV deuteron beam incident on a target of 200Hg32S. The first experiment accesses the E 2 and E 3 matrix elements in 200Hg via inelastic deuteron scattering. The second experiment, 200Hg(d , t) 199Hg, yields important information on the single-particle nature of 199Hg. Preliminary results will be presented. To date, 199Hg provides the most stringent limit on an atomic electric dipole moment (EDM). The existence of a permanent EDM would be a clear signal of CP violation from new physics beyond the Standard Model. Theoretical nuclear-structure calculations for 199Hg are challenging, and give varied predictions for the excited-state spectrum. Understanding the E2 and E3 strengths in 198 , 199 , 200Hg will make it possible to develop a nuclear structure model for the Schiff strength based on these matrix elements, and thereby constrain present models that predict the contribution of octupole collectivity to the Schiff moment of the nucleus. This work comprises two experiments using the Q3D magnetic spectrograph at the Maier-Leibnitz Laboratory. These experiments utilized a 22 MeV deuteron beam incident on a target of 200Hg32S. The first experiment accesses the E 2 and E 3 matrix elements in 200Hg via

  3. NUMEN Project @ LNS : Heavy ions double charge exchange reactions towards the 0νββ nuclear matrix element determination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agodi, C.; Cappuzzello, F.; Bonanno, D. L.; Bongiovanni, D. G.; Branchina, V.; Calabretta, L.; Calanna, A.; Carbone, D.; Cavallaro, M.; Colonna, M.; Cuttone, G.; Foti, A.; Finocchiaro, P.; Greco, V.; Lanzalone, G.; Lo Presti, D.; Longhitano, F.; Muoio, A.; Pandola, L.; Rifuggiato, D.; Tudisco, S.

    2015-10-01

    In the NUMEN Project it is proposed an innovative technique to access the nuclear matrix elements entering in the expression of the life-time of the neutrinoless double beta decay, using relevant cross sections of double charge exchange reactions. A key aspect is the use of MAGNEX large acceptance magnetic spectrometer, for the detection of the ejectiles, and of the INFN Laboratori Nazionali del Sud (LNS) K800 Superconducting Cyclotron (CS), for the acceleration of the required high resolution and low emittance heavy-ion beams.

  4. Increasing the power density when using inert matrix fuels to reduce production of transuranics

    SciTech Connect

    Recktenwald, G.D.; Deinert, M.R.

    2013-07-01

    Reducing the production of transuranics is a goal of most advanced nuclear fuel cycles. One way to do this is to recycle the transuranics into the same reactors that are currently producing them using an inert matrix fuel. In previous work we have modeled such a reactor where 72%, of the core is comprised of standard enriched uranium fuel pins, with the remaining 28% fuel made from Yttria stabilized zirconium, in which transuranics are loaded. A key feature of this core is that all of the transuranics produced by the uranium fuel assemblies are later burned in inert matrix fuel assemblies. It has been shown that this system can achieve reductions in transuranic waste of more than 86%. The disadvantage of such a system is that the core power rating must be significantly lower than a standard pressurized water reactor. One reason for the lower power is that high burnup of the uranium fuel precludes a critical level of reactivity at the end of the campaign. Increasing the uranium enrichment and changing the pin pitch are two ways to increase burnup while maintaining criticality. In this paper we use MCNPX and a linear reactivity model to quantify the effect of these two parameters on the end of campaign reactivity. Importantly, we show that in the region of our proposed reactor, enrichment increases core reactivity by 0.02 per percent uranium 235 and pin pitch increases reactivity by 0.02 per mm. Reactivity is lost at a rate of 0.005 per MWd/kgIHM uranium burnup. (authors)

  5. The rigorous stochastic matrix multiplication scheme for the calculations of reduced equilibrium density matrices of open multilevel quantum systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Xin

    2014-04-01

    Understanding the roles of the temporary and spatial structures of quantum functional noise in open multilevel quantum molecular systems attracts a lot of theoretical interests. I want to establish a rigorous and general framework for functional quantum noises from the constructive and computational perspectives, i.e., how to generate the random trajectories to reproduce the kernel and path ordering of the influence functional with effective Monte Carlo methods for arbitrary spectral densities. This construction approach aims to unify the existing stochastic models to rigorously describe the temporary and spatial structure of Gaussian quantum noises. In this paper, I review the Euclidean imaginary time influence functional and propose the stochastic matrix multiplication scheme to calculate reduced equilibrium density matrices (REDM). In addition, I review and discuss the Feynman-Vernon influence functional according to the Gaussian quadratic integral, particularly its imaginary part which is critical to the rigorous description of the quantum detailed balance. As a result, I establish the conditions under which the influence functional can be interpreted as the average of exponential functional operator over real-valued Gaussian processes for open multilevel quantum systems. I also show the difference between the local and nonlocal phonons within this framework. With the stochastic matrix multiplication scheme, I compare the normalized REDM with the Boltzmann equilibrium distribution for open multilevel quantum systems.

  6. The rigorous stochastic matrix multiplication scheme for the calculations of reduced equilibrium density matrices of open multilevel quantum systems

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Xin

    2014-04-21

    Understanding the roles of the temporary and spatial structures of quantum functional noise in open multilevel quantum molecular systems attracts a lot of theoretical interests. I want to establish a rigorous and general framework for functional quantum noises from the constructive and computational perspectives, i.e., how to generate the random trajectories to reproduce the kernel and path ordering of the influence functional with effective Monte Carlo methods for arbitrary spectral densities. This construction approach aims to unify the existing stochastic models to rigorously describe the temporary and spatial structure of Gaussian quantum noises. In this paper, I review the Euclidean imaginary time influence functional and propose the stochastic matrix multiplication scheme to calculate reduced equilibrium density matrices (REDM). In addition, I review and discuss the Feynman-Vernon influence functional according to the Gaussian quadratic integral, particularly its imaginary part which is critical to the rigorous description of the quantum detailed balance. As a result, I establish the conditions under which the influence functional can be interpreted as the average of exponential functional operator over real-valued Gaussian processes for open multilevel quantum systems. I also show the difference between the local and nonlocal phonons within this framework. With the stochastic matrix multiplication scheme, I compare the normalized REDM with the Boltzmann equilibrium distribution for open multilevel quantum systems.

  7. The reduced density matrix method for electronic structure calculations and the role of three-index representability conditions.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Zhengji; Braams, Bastiaan J; Fukuda, Mituhiro; Overton, Michael L; Percus, Jerome K

    2004-02-01

    The variational approach for electronic structure based on the two-body reduced density matrix is studied, incorporating two representability conditions beyond the previously used P, Q, and G conditions. The additional conditions (called T1 and T2 here) are implicit in the work of Erdahl [Int. J. Quantum Chem. 13, 697 (1978)] and extend the well-known three-index diagonal conditions also known as the Weinhold-Wilson inequalities. The resulting optimization problem is a semidefinite program, a convex optimization problem for which computational methods have greatly advanced during the past decade. Formulating the reduced density matrix computation using the standard dual formulation of semidefinite programming, as opposed to the primal one, results in substantial computational savings and makes it possible to study larger systems than was done previously. Calculations of the ground state energy and the dipole moment are reported for 47 different systems, in each case using an STO-6G basis set and comparing with Hartree-Fock, singly and doubly substituted configuration interaction, Brueckner doubles (with triples), coupled cluster singles and doubles with perturbational treatment of triples, and full configuration interaction calculations. It is found that the use of the T1 and T2 conditions gives a significant improvement over just the P, Q, and G conditions, and provides in all cases that we have studied more accurate results than the other mentioned approximations. PMID:15268347

  8. Response calculations based on an independent particle system with the exact one-particle density matrix: Polarizabilities

    SciTech Connect

    Giesbertz, K. J. H.; Gritsenko, O. V.; Baerends, E. J.

    2014-05-14

    Recently, we have demonstrated that the problems finding a suitable adiabatic approximation in time-dependent one-body reduced density matrix functional theory can be remedied by introducing an additional degree of freedom to describe the system: the phase of the natural orbitals [K. J. H. Giesbertz, O. V. Gritsenko, and E. J. Baerends, Phys. Rev. Lett. 105, 013002 (2010); K. J. H. Giesbertz, O. V. Gritsenko, and E. J. Baerends, J. Chem. Phys. 133, 174119 (2010)]. In this article we will show in detail how the frequency-dependent response equations give the proper static limit (ω → 0), including the perturbation in the chemical potential, which is required in static response theory to ensure the correct number of particles. Additionally we show results for the polarizability for H{sub 2} and compare the performance of two different two-electron functionals: the phase-including Löwdin–Shull functional and the density matrix form of the Löwdin–Shull functional.

  9. Spin alignment and density matrix measurement in sup 28 Si + sup 12 C orbiting reaction

    SciTech Connect

    Ray, A.; Shapira, D.; Halbert, M.L.; Gomez del Campo, J.; Kim, H.J. ); Sullivan, J.P. . Cyclotron Inst.); Shivakumar, B.; Mitchell, J. . Wright Nuclear Structure Lab.)

    1990-01-01

    Gamma-ray angular correlations have been measured for the strongly damped reactions {sup 12}C({sup 28}Si,{sup 12}C){sup 28}Si between {theta}{sub cm} = (120{degree} {minus} 160{degree}) for E{sub cm} = 43.5 and 48 MeV. We find that the density matrices for the {sup 12}C(2{sub 1}{sup +}) and {sup 28}Si states are almost diagonal with respect to the direction of motion of the outgoing particle. The measured density matrices and spin alignments are consistent with the picture of formation of a long-lived dinuclear complex undergoing orbiting, bending and wriggling motions, but not with those obtained from statistical compound nucleus or sticking model calculations. 17 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  10. Enhancement in field emission current density of Ni nanoparticles embedded in thin silica matrix by swift heavy ion irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Sarker, Debalaya; Patra, Rajkumar; Srivastava, P.; Ghosh, S.; Kumar, H.; Kabiraj, D.; Avasthi, D. K.; Vayalil, Sarathlal K.; Roth, S. V.

    2014-05-07

    The field emission (FE) properties of nickel nanoparticles embedded in thin silica matrix irradiated with 100 MeV Au{sup +7} ions at various fluences are studied here. A large increase in FE current density is observed in the irradiated films as compared to their as deposited counterpart. The dependence of FE properties on irradiation fluence is correlated with surface roughness, density of states of valence band and size distribution of nanoparticles as examined with atomic force microscope, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and grazing incidence small angle x-ray scattering. A current density as high as 0.48 mA/cm{sup 2} at an applied field 15 V/μm has been found for the first time for planar field emitters in the film irradiated with fluence of 5.0 × 10{sup 13} ions/cm{sup 2}. This significant enhancement in the current density is attributed to an optimized size distribution along with highest surface roughness of the same. This new member of field emission family meets most of the requirements of cold cathodes for vacuum micro/nanoelectronic devices.

  11. A time convolution less density matrix approach to the nonlinear optical response of a coupled system-bath complex

    SciTech Connect

    Richter, Marten Knorr, Andreas

    2010-04-15

    Time convolution less density matrix theory (TCL) is a powerful and well established tool to investigate strong system-bath coupling for linear optical spectra. We show that TCL equations can be generalised to the nonlinear optical response up to a chosen order in the optical field. This goal is achieved via an time convolution less perturbation scheme for the reduced density matrices of the electronic system. In our approach, the most important results are the inclusion of a electron-phonon coupling non-diagonal in the electronic states and memory effects of the bath: First, the considered model system is introduced. Second, the time evolution of the statistical operator is expanded with respect to the external optical field. This expansion is the starting point to explain how a TCL theory can treat the response up to in a certain order in the external field. Third, new TCL equations, including bath memory effects, are derived and the problem of information loss in the reduced density matrix is analysed. For this purpose, new dimensions are added to the reduced statistical operator to compensate lack of information in comparison with the full statistical operator. The theory is benchmarked with a two level system and applied to a three level system including non-diagonal phonon coupling. In our analysis of pump-probe experiments, the bath memory is influenced by the system state occupied between pump and probe pulse. In particular, the memory of the bath influences the dephasing process of electronic coherences developing during the time interval between pump and probe pulses.

  12. Positron accumulation effect in particles embedded in a low-density matrix

    SciTech Connect

    Dryzek, Jerzy; Siemek, Krzysztof

    2015-02-07

    Systematic studies of the so-called positron accumulation effect for samples with particles embedded in a matrix are reported. This effect is related to energetic positrons which penetrate inhomogeneous medium. Due to differences in the linear absorption coefficient, different amounts of positrons are accumulated and annihilate in the identical volume of both materials. Positron lifetime spectroscopy and Doppler broadening of the annihilation line using Na-22 positrons were applied to the studies of the epoxy resin samples with embedded micro-sized particles of transition metals, i.e., Ni, Sn, Mo, W, and nonmetal particles, i.e., Si and NaF. The significant difference between the determined fraction of positrons annihilating in the particles and the particle volume fraction indicates the positron accumulation effect. The simple phenomenological model and Monte Carlo simulations are able to describe the main features of the obtained dependencies. The aluminum alloy with embedded Sn nanoparticles is also considered for demonstration differences between the accumulation and another related effect, i.e., the positron affinity.

  13. Characteristic element of matrix attachment region mediates vector attachment and enhances nerve growth factor expression in Chinese hamster ovary cells.

    PubMed

    Wang, X Y; Zhang, J H; Sun, Q L; Yao, Z Y; Deng, B G; Guo, W Y; Wang, L; Dong, W H; Wang, F; Zhao, C P; Wang, T Y

    2015-01-01

    Preliminary studies have suggested that a characteristic element of the matrix attachment region (MAR) in human interferon-β mediates the adhesion of vectors to Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells. In this study, we investigated if vector adhesion increased nerve growth factor (NGF) expression in CHO cells. The MAR characteristic element sequence of human interferon-β was inserted into the multiple-cloning site of the pEGFP-C1 vector. The target NGF gene was inserted upstream of the MAR characteristic element sequence to construct the MAR/NGF expression vector. The recombinant plasmid was transfected into CHO cells and stable monoclonal cells were selected using G418. NGF mRNA and protein expression was detected by reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, respectively. Plasmid reduction experiments were used to determine the state of transfected plasmid in mammalian cells. The insertion of MAR into the vector increased NGF expression levels in CHO cells (1.93- fold) compared to the control. The recombinant plasmid expressing the MAR sequence was digested into a linear space vector. The inserted MAR and NGF sequences were consistent with those inserted into the plasmid before recombination. Therefore, we concluded that the MAR characteristic element mediates vector adhesion to CHO cells and enhances the stability and efficiency of the target gene expression. PMID:26345852

  14. Variable tunneling barriers in FEBID based PtC metal-matrix nanocomposites as a transducing element for humidity sensing.

    PubMed

    Kolb, Florian; Schmoltner, Kerstin; Huth, Michael; Hohenau, Andreas; Krenn, Joachim; Klug, Andreas; List, Emil J W; Plank, Harald

    2013-08-01

    The development of simple gas sensing concepts is still of great interest for science and technology. The demands on an ideal device would be a single-step fabrication method providing a device which is sensitive, analyte-selective, quantitative, and reversible without special operating/reformation conditions such as high temperatures or special environments. In this study we demonstrate a new gas sensing concept based on a nanosized PtC metal-matrix system fabricated in a single step via focused electron beam induced deposition (FEBID). The sensors react selectively on polar H2O molecules quantitatively and reversibly without any special reformation conditions after detection events, whereas non-polar species (O2, CO2, N2) produce no response. The key elements are isolated Pt nanograins (2-3 nm) which are embedded in a dielectric carbon matrix. The electrical transport in such materials is based on tunneling effects in the correlated variable range hopping regime, where the dielectric carbon matrix screens the electric field between the particles, which governs the final conductivity. The specific change of these dielectric properties by the physisorption of polar gas molecules (H2O) can change the tunneling probability and thus the overall conductivity, allowing their application as a simple and straightforward sensing concept. PMID:23818049

  15. A density-dependant finite element model for analysis of saltwater intrusion in coastal aquifers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abd-Elhamid, H. F.; Javadi, A. A.

    2011-05-01

    SummarySaltwater intrusion is a serious problem in coastal regions all over the world. It is one of the processes that degrade water-quality by raising salinity to levels exceeding acceptable drinking water standards. It may occur due to human activities and/or by natural events. Over-abstraction is considered the main cause of saltwater intrusion. Moreover, climate change and sea level rise speed up saltwater intrusion. This paper presents the development and validation of a coupled transient finite element model for simulation of fluid flow and solute transport in saturate and unsaturated soils with application to study saltwater intrusion in coastal aquifers. The model includes coupling of water flow, air flow, heat flow and solute transport. Furthermore, transient density-dependent flow is included in the model and the dependency of dispersion on velocity is considered. Different mechanisms that govern solute transport in porous media including, advection, diffusion, dispersion, adsorption, chemical reactions and biological degradation are included in the model. The governing equation of the solute transport is solved together with three balance equations for water flow, air flow and heat transfer. The nonlinear system of governing differential equations is solved using the finite element method in the space domain and a finite difference scheme in the time domain. The model is validated by application to a standard case study from the literature (Henry's problem) and then applied to predict saltwater intrusion in a coastal aquifer. The results of the model predictions are presented and discussed.

  16. The density distribution of refractory elements away from the Galactic plane

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Edgar, Richard J.; Savage, Blair D.

    1989-01-01

    The density distributions of the three refractory elements Ti II, Ca II, and Fe II away from the Galactic plane are compared with the distribution of hydrogen and dust by examining plots of N s in b versus z. It is found that Ti II and Ca II are considerably more extended in z than the H I and dust and that Fe II has an intermediate extension. Although the results are strongly influenced by sample bias, the indicated exponential scale heights for the data sample are h(Ti II) not less than 2 kpc, h(Ca II) = 1 kpc, h(Fe II) = 0.5 kpc, H(H I) = 0.3 kpc, and h(E/B-V) = 0.1 kpc. Furthermore, it is demonstrated that Ti II and Ca II are much more smoothly distributed in space than the hydrogen or dust. The large scale heights for Ti II and Ca II and their smooth distributions are most easily understood as the effect of a mixture along the line of sight of two H I phases namely, a diffuse cloud phase, in which nearly all of the Ti and Ca are tied up in dust, and an intercloud medium, where refractory elements are less depleted. It is found that Ti II and Ca II mostly trace the smoothly distributed intercloud medium. The smoothness of the distributions of Ti II and Ca II makes them candidates for use as distance indicators.

  17. Study on Hankel matrix-based SVD and its application in rolling element bearing fault diagnosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Huiming; Chen, Jin; Dong, Guangming; Liu, Tao; Chen, Gang

    2015-02-01

    Based on the traditional theory of singular value decomposition (SVD), singular values (SVs) and ratios of neighboring singular values (NSVRs) are introduced to the feature extraction of vibration signals. The proposed feature extraction method is called SV-NSVR. Combined with selected SV-NSVR features, continuous hidden Markov model (CHMM) is used to realize the automatic classification. Then the SV-NSVR and CHMM based method is applied in fault diagnosis and performance assessment of rolling element bearings. The simulation and experimental results show that this method has a higher accuracy for the bearing fault diagnosis compared with those using other SVD features, and it is effective for the performance assessment of rolling element bearings.

  18. Matrix equation decomposition and parallel solution of systems resulting from unstructured finite element problems in electromagnetics

    SciTech Connect

    Cwik, T.; Katz, D.S.

    1996-12-31

    Finite element modeling has proven useful for accurately simulating scattered or radiated electromagnetic fields from complex three-dimensional objects whose geometry varies on the scale of a fraction of an electrical wavelength. An unstructured finite element model of realistic objects leads to a large, sparse, system of equations that needs to be solved efficiently with regard to machine memory and execution time. Both factorization and iterative solvers can be used to produce solutions to these systems of equations. Factorization leads to high memory requirements that limit the electrical problem size of three-dimensional objects that can be modeled. An iterative solver can be used to efficiently solve the system without excessive memory use and in a minimal amount of time if the convergence rate is controlled.

  19. Medium Osmolarity and Pericellular Matrix Development Improves Chondrocyte Survival When Photoencapsulated in Poly(Ethylene Glycol) Hydrogels at Low Densities

    PubMed Central

    Villanueva, Idalis; Bishop, Nikki L.

    2009-01-01

    The ability to encapsulate cells over a range of cell densities is important toward mimicking cell densities of native tissues and rationally designing strategies where cell source and/or cell numbers are clinically limited. Our preliminary findings demonstrate that survival of freshly isolated adult bovine chondrocytes dramatically decreases when photoencapsulated in poly(ethylene glycol) hydrogels at low densities (4 million cells/mL). During enzymatic digestion of cartilage, chondrocytes undergo a harsh change in their microenvironment. We hypothesize that the absence of exogenous antioxidants, the hyposmotic environment, and the loss of a protective pericellular matrix (PCM) increase chondrocytes' susceptibility to free radical damage during photoencapsulation. Incorporation of antioxidants and serum into the encapsulation medium improved cell survival twofold compared to phosphate-buffered saline. Increasing medium osmolarity from 330 to 400 mOsm (physiological) improved cell survival by 40% and resulted in ∼2-fold increase in adenosine triphosphate (ATP) production 24 h postencapsulation. However, cell survival was only temporary. Allowing cells to reproduce some PCM before photoencapsulation in 400 mOsm medium resulted in superior cell survival during and postencapsulation for up to 15 days. In summary, the combination of antioxidants, physiological osmolarity, and the development of some PCM result in an improved robustness against free radical damage during photoencapsulation. PMID:19331581

  20. Direct finite element solution on an optical laboratory matrix-vector processor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Casasent, David; Riedl, Steven

    1988-01-01

    The first optical laboratory system results employing a direct LU decomposition solution of a system of linear algebraic equations are presented for a finite element problem solution. This also represents the first laboratory demonstration of the use of sign-magnitude negative number representation as well as new bit partitioning techniques to increase the accuracy of an optical encoded processor beyond the number of bit channels available.

  1. Notch Sensitivity of Woven Ceramic Matrix Composites Under Tensile Loading: An Experimental, Analytical, and Finite Element Study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haque, A.; Ahmed, L.; Ware, T.; Jeelani, S.; Verrilli, Michael J. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The stress concentrations associated with circular notches and subjected to uniform tensile loading in woven ceramic matrix composites (CMCs) have been investigated for high-efficient turbine engine applications. The CMC's were composed of Nicalon silicon carbide woven fabric in SiNC matrix manufactured through polymer impregnation process (PIP). Several combinations of hole diameter/plate width ratios and ply orientations were considered in this study. In the first part, the stress concentrations were calculated measuring strain distributions surrounding the hole using strain gages at different locations of the specimens during the initial portion of the stress-strain curve before any microdamage developed. The stress concentration was also calculated analytically using Lekhnitskii's solution for orthotropic plates. A finite-width correction factor for anisotropic and orthotropic composite plate was considered. The stress distributions surrounding the circular hole of a CMC's plate were further studied using finite element analysis. Both solid and shell elements were considered. The experimental results were compared with both the analytical and finite element solutions. Extensive optical and scanning electron microscopic examinations were carried out for identifying the fracture behavior and failure mechanisms of both the notched and notched specimens. The stress concentration factors (SCF) determined by analytical method overpredicted the experimental results. But the numerical solution underpredicted the experimental SCF. Stress concentration factors are shown to increase with enlarged hole size and the effects of ply orientations on stress concentration factors are observed to be negligible. In all the cases, the crack initiated at the notch edge and propagated along the width towards the edge of the specimens.

  2. Dynamic impact response of high-density square honeycombs made of TRIP steel and TRIP matrix composite material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ehinger, D.; Krüger, L.; Krause, S.; Martin, U.; Weigelt, C.; Aneziris, C. G.

    2012-08-01

    Two designs of square-celled metallic honeycomb structures fabricated by a modified extrusion technology based on a powder feedstock were investigated. The strength and ductility of these cellular materials are achieved by an austenitic CrNi (AISI 304) steel matrix particle reinforced by an MgO partially-stabilized zirconia building up their cell wall microstructure. Similar to the mechanical behaviour of the bulk materials, the strengthening mechanism and the martensitic phase transformations in the cell walls are affected by the deformation temperature and the nominal strain rate. The microstructure evolution during quasi-static and dynamic impact compression up to high strain rates of 103 1/s influences the buckling and failure behaviour of the honeycomb structures. In contrast to bending-dominated quasi-isotropic networks like open-celled metal foams, axial compressive loading to the honeycomb's channels causes membrane stretching as well as crushing of the vertical cell node elements and cell walls. The presented honeycomb materials differ geometrically in their cell wall thickness-to-cell size-ratio. Therefore, the failure behaviour is predominantly controlled by global buckling and torsional-flexural buckling, respectively, accompanied by plastic matrix flow and strengthening of the cell wall microstructure.

  3. Pressure-Induced Amorphization and a New High Density Amorphous Metallic Phase in Matrix-Free Ge Nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Corsini, Niccolo R C; Zhang, Yuanpeng; Little, William R; Karatutlu, Ali; Ersoy, Osman; Haynes, Peter D; Molteni, Carla; Hine, Nicholas D M; Hernandez, Ignacio; Gonzalez, Jesus; Rodriguez, Fernando; Brazhkin, Vadim V; Sapelkin, Andrei

    2015-11-11

    Over the last two decades, it has been demonstrated that size effects have significant consequences for the atomic arrangements and phase behavior of matter under extreme pressure. Furthermore, it has been shown that an understanding of how size affects critical pressure-temperature conditions provides vital guidance in the search for materials with novel properties. Here, we report on the remarkable behavior of small (under ~5 nm) matrix-free Ge nanoparticles under hydrostatic compression that is drastically different from both larger nanoparticles and bulk Ge. We discover that the application of pressure drives surface-induced amorphization leading to Ge-Ge bond overcompression and eventually to a polyamorphic semiconductor-to-metal transformation. A combination of spectroscopic techniques together with ab initio simulations were employed to reveal the details of the transformation mechanism into a new high density phase-amorphous metallic Ge. PMID:26457875

  4. Unraveling multi-spin effects in rotational resonance nuclear magnetic resonance using effective reduced density matrix theory

    SciTech Connect

    SivaRanjan, Uppala; Ramachandran, Ramesh

    2014-02-07

    A quantum-mechanical model integrating the concepts of reduced density matrix and effective Hamiltonians is proposed to explain the multi-spin effects observed in rotational resonance (R{sup 2}) nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) experiments. Employing this approach, the spin system of interest is described in a reduced subspace inclusive of its coupling to the surroundings. Through suitable model systems, the utility of our theory is demonstrated and verified with simulations emerging from both analytic and numerical methods. The analytic results presented in this article provide an accurate description/interpretation of R{sup 2} experimental results and could serve as a test-bed for distinguishing coherent/incoherent effects in solid-state NMR.

  5. Avoiding the 4-index transformation in one-body reduced density matrix functional calculations for separable functionals.

    PubMed

    Giesbertz, Klaas J H

    2016-08-01

    One of the major computational bottlenecks in one-body reduced density matrix (1RDM) functional theory is the evaluation of approximate 1RDM functionals and their derivatives. The reason is that more advanced approximate functionals are almost exclusively defined in the natural orbital basis, so a 4-index transformation of the two-electron integrals appears to be unavoidable. I will show that this is not the case and that so-called separable functionals can be evaluated much more efficiently, i.e. only at cubic cost in the basis size. Since most approximate functionals are actually separable, this new algorithm is an important development to make 1RDM functional theory calculations feasible for large electronic systems. PMID:26908059

  6. Polarization observables in the longitudinal basis for pseudo-scalar meson photoproduction using a density matrix approach

    SciTech Connect

    Biplab Dey, Michael E. McCracken, David G. Ireland, Curtis A. Meyer

    2011-05-01

    The complete expression for the intensity in pseudo-scalar meson photoproduction with a polarized beam, target, and recoil baryon is derived using a density matrix approach that offers great economy of notation. A Cartesian basis with spins for all particles quantized along a single direction, the longitudinal beam direction, is used for consistency and clarity in interpretation. A single spin-quantization axis for all particles enables the amplitudes to be written in a manifestly covariant fashion with simple relations to those of the well-known CGLN formalism. Possible sign discrepancies between theoretical amplitude-level expressions and experimentally measurable intensity profiles are dealt with carefully. Our motivation is to provide a coherent framework for coupled-channel partial-wave analysis of several meson photoproduction reactions, incorporating recently published and forthcoming polarization data from Jefferson Lab.

  7. The tensor hypercontracted parametric reduced density matrix algorithm: coupled-cluster accuracy with O(r(4)) scaling.

    PubMed

    Shenvi, Neil; van Aggelen, Helen; Yang, Yang; Yang, Weitao; Schwerdtfeger, Christine; Mazziotti, David

    2013-08-01

    Tensor hypercontraction is a method that allows the representation of a high-rank tensor as a product of lower-rank tensors. In this paper, we show how tensor hypercontraction can be applied to both the electron repulsion integral tensor and the two-particle excitation amplitudes used in the parametric 2-electron reduced density matrix (p2RDM) algorithm. Because only O(r) auxiliary functions are needed in both of these approximations, our overall algorithm can be shown to scale as O(r(4)), where r is the number of single-particle basis functions. We apply our algorithm to several small molecules, hydrogen chains, and alkanes to demonstrate its low formal scaling and practical utility. Provided we use enough auxiliary functions, we obtain accuracy similar to that of the standard p2RDM algorithm, somewhere between that of CCSD and CCSD(T). PMID:23927246

  8. Low-lying excited states in armchair polyacene within Pariser-Parr-Pople model: a density matrix renormalization group study.

    PubMed

    Das, Mousumi

    2014-03-28

    We studied the nature of the ground state and low-lying excited states of armchair polyacene oligomers (Polyphenanthrene) within long-range Pariser-Parr-Pople model Hamiltonian with up to 14 monomers using symmetrized density matrix renormalization group technique. The ground state of all armchair polyacenes studied is found to be singlet. The results show that lowest singlet dipole allowed excited state has higher energy for armchair polyacenes as compared to linear fused polyacenes. Moreover, unlike linear fused polyacenes, the lowest singlet excited state of these oligomers is always found to lie below the lowest dipole forbidden two-photon state indicating that these armchair polyacene oligomers strongly fluoresce. The calculations of low-lying excitations on singly and triply electron doped armchair polyacene oligomers show a low energy band with strong transition dipole moment that coupled to charge conductivity. This implies armchair polyacene posses novel field-effect transistor properties. PMID:24697451

  9. Low-lying excited states in armchair polyacene within Pariser-Parr-Pople model: A density matrix renormalization group study

    SciTech Connect

    Das, Mousumi

    2014-03-28

    We studied the nature of the ground state and low-lying excited states of armchair polyacene oligomers (Polyphenanthrene) within long-range Pariser-Parr-Pople model Hamiltonian with up to 14 monomers using symmetrized density matrix renormalization group technique. The ground state of all armchair polyacenes studied is found to be singlet. The results show that lowest singlet dipole allowed excited state has higher energy for armchair polyacenes as compared to linear fused polyacenes. Moreover, unlike linear fused polyacenes, the lowest singlet excited state of these oligomers is always found to lie below the lowest dipole forbidden two-photon state indicating that these armchair polyacene oligomers strongly fluoresce. The calculations of low-lying excitations on singly and triply electron doped armchair polyacene oligomers show a low energy band with strong transition dipole moment that coupled to charge conductivity. This implies armchair polyacene posses novel field-effect transistor properties.

  10. Analysis of cartilage matrix fixed charge density and three-dimensional morphology via contrast-enhanced microcomputed tomography

    PubMed Central

    Palmer, Ashley W.; Guldberg, Robert E.; Levenston, Marc E.

    2006-01-01

    Small animal models of osteoarthritis are often used for evaluating the efficacy of pharmacologic treatments and cartilage repair strategies, but noninvasive techniques capable of monitoring matrix-level changes are limited by the joint size and the low radiopacity of soft tissues. Here we present a technique for the noninvasive imaging of cartilage at micrometer-level resolution based on detecting the equilibrium partitioning of an ionic contrast agent via microcomputed tomography. The approach exploits electrochemical interactions between the molecular charges present in the cartilage matrix and an ionic contrast agent, resulting in a nonuniform equilibrium partitioning of the ionic contrast agent reflecting the proteoglycan distribution. In an in vitro model of cartilage degeneration we observed changes in x-ray attenuation magnitude and distribution consistent with biochemical and histological analyses of sulfated glycosaminoglycans, and x-ray attenuation was found to be a strong predictor of sulfated glycosaminoglycan density. Equilibration with the contrast agent also permits direct in situ visualization and quantification of cartilage surface morphology. Equilibrium partitioning of an ionic contrast agent via microcomputed tomography thus provides a powerful approach to quantitatively assess 3D cartilage composition and morphology for studies of cartilage degradation and repair. PMID:17158799

  11. Adiponectin inhibits oxidized low density lipoprotein-induced increase in matrix metalloproteinase 9 expression in vascular smooth muscle cells

    PubMed Central

    Saneipour, Maryam; Ghatreh-Samani, Keihan; Heydarian, Esfandiar; Farrokhi, Effat; Abdian, Narges

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND High expression of matrix metalloproteinase 9 (MMP9) during vascular injury and inflammation plays an important role in atherosclerotic plaque formation and rupture. In the process of atherosclerosis, oxidized low-density lipoprotein (oxLDL) upregulates MMP9 in human aortic vascular smooth muscle cells (HA/VSMCs). Adiponectin is an adipose tissue-derived hormone that has been shown to exert anti-atherogenic and anti-inflammatory effects. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of adiponectin on MMP9 expression under pathogenic condition created by oxLDL in HA/VSMCs. METHODS In this experimental study, HA/VSMC were stimulated with oxLDL alone and in the presence of adiponectin for 24 and 48 h. The expression of MMP9 gene was determined by real-time polymerase chain reaction method. The protein level of this gene was investigated by western blotting technique. RESULTS An oxLDL increased MMP9 expression 2.16 ± 0.24- and 3.32 ± 0.25-fold after 24 and 48 h, respectively and adiponectin decreased oxLDL-induced MMP9 expression in a time-dependent manner. CONCLUSION These results show that adiponectin changes extracellular matrix by reducing MMP9 mRNA and protein, therefore, may stabilize lesions and reduce atheroma rupture. PMID:26405452

  12. Dislocation density-based finite element method modeling of ultrasonic consolidation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pal, Deepankar

    A dislocation density-based constitutive model has been developed and implemented into a crystal plasticity quasi-static finite element framework. This approach captures the statistical evolution of dislocation structures and grain fragmentation at the bonding interface when sufficient boundary conditions pertaining to the Ultrasonic Consolidation (UC) process are prescribed. The hardening is incorporated using statistically stored and geometrically necessary dislocation densities (SSDs and GNDs), which are dislocation analogs of isotropic and kinematic hardening, respectively. Since the macroscopic global boundary conditions during UC involves cyclic sinosuidal simple shear loading along with constant normal pressure, the cross slip mechanism has been included in the evolution equation for SSDs. The inclusion of cross slip promotes slip irreversibility, dislocation storage, and hence, cyclic hardening during the UC. The GND considers strain-gradient and thus renders the model size-dependent. The model is calibrated using experimental data from published refereed literature for simple shear deformation of single crystalline pure aluminum alloy and uniaxial tension of polycrystalline Aluminum 3003-H18 alloy. The model also incorporates various local and global effects such as (1) friction, (2) thermal softening, (3) acoustic softening, (4) surface texture of the sonotrode and initial mating surfaces, and (6) presence of oxide-scale at the mating surfaces, which further contribute significantly specifically to the grain substructure evolution at the interface and to the anisotropic bulk deformation away from the interface during UC in general. The model results have been predicted for Al-3003 alloy undergoing UC. A good agreement between the experimental and simulated results has been observed for the evolution of linear weld density and anisotropic global strengths macroscopically. Similarly, microscopic observations such as embrittlement due to grain substructure

  13. Efficient density matrix renormalization group algorithm to study Y junctions with integer and half-integer spin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Manoranjan; Parvej, Aslam; Thomas, Simil; Ramasesha, S.; Soos, Z. G.

    2016-02-01

    An efficient density matrix renormalization group (DMRG) algorithm is presented and applied to Y junctions, systems with three arms of n sites that meet at a central site. The accuracy is comparable to DMRG of chains. As in chains, new sites are always bonded to the most recently added sites and the superblock Hamiltonian contains only new or once renormalized operators. Junctions of up to N =3 n +1 ≈500 sites are studied with antiferromagnetic (AF) Heisenberg exchange J between nearest-neighbor spins S or electron transfer t between nearest neighbors in half-filled Hubbard models. Exchange or electron transfer is exclusively between sites in two sublattices with NA≠NB . The ground state (GS) and spin densities ρr= at site r are quite different for junctions with S =1 /2 , 1, 3/2, and 2. The GS has finite total spin SG=2 S (S ) for even (odd) N and for MG=SG in the SG spin manifold, ρr>0 (<0 ) at sites of the larger (smaller) sublattice. S =1 /2 junctions have delocalized states and decreasing spin densities with increasing N . S =1 junctions have four localized Sz=1 /2 states at the end of each arm and centered on the junction, consistent with localized states in S =1 chains with finite Haldane gap. The GS of S =3 /2 or 2 junctions of up to 500 spins is a spin density wave with increased amplitude at the ends of arms or near the junction. Quantum fluctuations completely suppress AF order in S =1 /2 or 1 junctions, as well as in half-filled Hubbard junctions, but reduce rather than suppress AF order in S =3 /2 or 2 junctions.

  14. Correlation between bone mineral density and serum trace element contents of elderly males in Beijing urban area

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Liang; Yu, Haotian; Yang, Guohua; Zhang, Yan; Wang, Wenjiao; Su, Tianjiao; Ma, Weifeng; Yang, Fan; Chen, Liying; He, Li; Ma, Yuanzheng; Zhang, Yan

    2015-01-01

    Trace element levels are associated with the incidence of osteoporotic fractures, but related mechanisms remain unknown. Trace elements may interfere with growth, development and maintenance of bones. Therefore, we investigated whether plasma trace element levels are associated with bone mineral density in elderly males in Beijing. After epidemiologically investigating 91 elderly males with age ranging from 50 years to 80 years, we obtained a total of 30 healthy (group 1), 31 osteopoenic (group 2) and 30 osteoporotic (group 3) subjects. Blood was collected, and serum concentrations of trace elements were detected. Elderly males in the three groups were carefully matched in terms of body mass index. Iron, manganese, zinc, copper, selenium, cadmium and lead were analysed by inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry. Bone mineral density (BMD) was measured by QDR-2000 dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry. Correlation between BMD and serum element contents was analysed using SPSS16.0. The plasma levels of manganese, zinc, copper, selenium and lead were similar in all of the groups (P>0.05). Cadmium was significantly and negatively correlated with BMD of the lumbar vertebrae (P<0.05). Moreover, cadmium and iron contents significantly differed in osteoporotic and healthy groups. These elements may directly and correlatively affect BMD in elderly males. Many trace elements may directly and correlatively influence BMD. Future studies should be conducted to evaluate serum and bone levels of these trace elements to determine the relationship of these trace elements with osteoporosis. PMID:26770561

  15. Discrete Element Framework for Modelling Extracellular Matrix, Deformable Cells and Subcellular Components

    PubMed Central

    Gardiner, Bruce S.; Wong, Kelvin K. L.; Joldes, Grand R.; Rich, Addison J.; Tan, Chin Wee; Burgess, Antony W.; Smith, David W.

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents a framework for modelling biological tissues based on discrete particles. Cell components (e.g. cell membranes, cell cytoskeleton, cell nucleus) and extracellular matrix (e.g. collagen) are represented using collections of particles. Simple particle to particle interaction laws are used to simulate and control complex physical interaction types (e.g. cell-cell adhesion via cadherins, integrin basement membrane attachment, cytoskeletal mechanical properties). Particles may be given the capacity to change their properties and behaviours in response to changes in the cellular microenvironment (e.g., in response to cell-cell signalling or mechanical loadings). Each particle is in effect an ‘agent’, meaning that the agent can sense local environmental information and respond according to pre-determined or stochastic events. The behaviour of the proposed framework is exemplified through several biological problems of ongoing interest. These examples illustrate how the modelling framework allows enormous flexibility for representing the mechanical behaviour of different tissues, and we argue this is a more intuitive approach than perhaps offered by traditional continuum methods. Because of this flexibility, we believe the discrete modelling framework provides an avenue for biologists and bioengineers to explore the behaviour of tissue systems in a computational laboratory. PMID:26452000

  16. The effect of alloy elements on the density variation of steel melt at the interdendritic region during solidification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Y. F.; Chen, Y.; Ma, X. P.; Fu, P. X.; Kang, X. H.; Liu, H. W.; Li, D. Z.

    2016-03-01

    Alloying elements in steels have essential effects on the formation of macrosegregation by inducing a density difference between the mushy zone and the bulk melt, and even by the alteration of the solidified microstructure. Hence, in terms of the thermodynamic laws for solidification of an idealized dilute solution, a systematic theoretical analysis on the effect of elements on the density variation of the interdendritic melt is presented for common Fe-based binary alloys. It shows that density variation closely associates with three crucial parameters: the microsegregation parameter λ, the temp-comp-expansion parameter β and the initial composition CL o . With these derived parameters, a simple analytical model is proposed to assess the influence of alloy elements on density change. The theoretical analysis indicates that compared to silicon, the effect of carbon on the density variation cannot be ignored, which is remarkably different from the previous recognition of these two elements. The macrosegregation induced by carbon only is experimentally validated by two dissected 500 kg ingots with different carbon contents. Furthermore, to directly validate the results of theoretical analysis a macrosegregation model with two different microsegregation laws (lever rule and Scheil equation) is established. Then simulations of the convection during solidification in the experimental 500 kg reference ingot are performed for Fe-C and Fe-Si alloys, respectively. It demonstrates that numerically simulated effects of carbon and silicon on the interdendritic convection induced by density inversion are fairly consistent with the analytical predictions.

  17. Assessment of a three-dimensional line-of-response probability density function system matrix for PET.

    PubMed

    Yao, Rutao; Ramachandra, Ranjith M; Mahajan, Neeraj; Rathod, Vinay; Gunasekar, Noel; Panse, Ashish; Ma, Tianyu; Jian, Yiqiang; Yan, Jianhua; Carson, Richard E

    2012-11-01

    To achieve optimal PET image reconstruction through better system modeling, we developed a system matrix that is based on the probability density function for each line of response (LOR-PDF). The LOR-PDFs are grouped by LOR-to-detector incident angles to form a highly compact system matrix. The system matrix was implemented in the MOLAR list mode reconstruction algorithm for a small animal PET scanner. The impact of LOR-PDF on reconstructed image quality was assessed qualitatively as well as quantitatively in terms of contrast recovery coefficient (CRC) and coefficient of variance (COV), and its performance was compared with a fixed Gaussian (iso-Gaussian) line spread function. The LOR-PDFs of three coincidence signal emitting sources, (1) ideal positron emitter that emits perfect back-to-back γ rays (γγ) in air; (2) fluorine-18 (¹⁸F) nuclide in water; and (3) oxygen-15 (¹⁵O) nuclide in water, were derived, and assessed with simulated and experimental phantom data. The derived LOR-PDFs showed anisotropic and asymmetric characteristics dependent on LOR-detector angle, coincidence emitting source, and the medium, consistent with common PET physical principles. The comparison of the iso-Gaussian function and LOR-PDF showed that: (1) without positron range and acollinearity effects, the LOR-PDF achieved better or similar trade-offs of contrast recovery and noise for objects of 4 mm radius or larger, and this advantage extended to smaller objects (e.g. 2 mm radius sphere, 0.6 mm radius hot-rods) at higher iteration numbers; and (2) with positron range and acollinearity effects, the iso-Gaussian achieved similar or better resolution recovery depending on the significance of positron range effect. We conclude that the 3D LOR-PDF approach is an effective method to generate an accurate and compact system matrix. However, when used directly in expectation-maximization based list-mode iterative reconstruction algorithms such as MOLAR, its superiority is not clear

  18. Assessment of a Three-Dimensional Line-of-Response Probability Density Function System Matrix for PET

    PubMed Central

    Yao, Rutao; Ramachandra, Ranjith M.; Mahajan, Neeraj; Rathod, Vinay; Gunasekar, Noel; Panse, Ashish; Ma, Tianyu; Jian, Yiqiang; Yan, Jianhua; Carson, Richard E.

    2012-01-01

    To achieve optimal PET image reconstruction through better system modeling, we developed a system matrix that is based on the probability density function for each line of response (LOR-PDF). The LOR-PDFs are grouped by LOR-to-detector incident angles to form a highly compact system matrix. The system matrix was implemented in the MOLAR list mode reconstruction algorithm for a small animal PET scanner. The impact of LOR-PDF on reconstructed image quality was assessed qualitatively as well as quantitatively in terms of contrast recovery coefficient (CRC) and coefficient of variance (COV), and its performance was compared with a fixed Gaussian (iso-Gaussian) line spread function. The LOR-PDFs of 3 coincidence signal emitting sources, 1) ideal positron emitter that emits perfect back-to-back γ rays (γγ) in air; 2) fluorine-18 (18F) nuclide in water; and 3) oxygen-15 (15O) nuclide in water, were derived, and assessed with simulated and experimental phantom data. The derived LOR-PDFs showed anisotropic and asymmetric characteristics dependent on LOR-detector angle, coincidence emitting source, and the medium, consistent with common PET physical principles. The comparison of the iso-Gaussian function and LOR-PDF showed that: 1) without positron range and acolinearity effects, the LOR-PDF achieved better or similar trade-offs of contrast recovery and noise for objects of 4-mm radius or larger, and this advantage extended to smaller objects (e.g. 2-mm radius sphere, 0.6-mm radius hot-rods) at higher iteration numbers; and 2) with positron range and acolinearity effects, the iso-Gaussian achieved similar or better resolution recovery depending on the significance of positron range effect. We conclude that the 3-D LOR-PDF approach is an effective method to generate an accurate and compact system matrix. However, when used directly in expectation-maximization based list-mode iterative reconstruction algorithms such as MOLAR, its superiority is not clear. For this

  19. Assessment of a three-dimensional line-of-response probability density function system matrix for PET

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yao, Rutao; Ramachandra, Ranjith M.; Mahajan, Neeraj; Rathod, Vinay; Gunasekar, Noel; Panse, Ashish; Ma, Tianyu; Jian, Yiqiang; Yan, Jianhua; Carson, Richard E.

    2012-11-01

    To achieve optimal PET image reconstruction through better system modeling, we developed a system matrix that is based on the probability density function for each line of response (LOR-PDF). The LOR-PDFs are grouped by LOR-to-detector incident angles to form a highly compact system matrix. The system matrix was implemented in the MOLAR list mode reconstruction algorithm for a small animal PET scanner. The impact of LOR-PDF on reconstructed image quality was assessed qualitatively as well as quantitatively in terms of contrast recovery coefficient (CRC) and coefficient of variance (COV), and its performance was compared with a fixed Gaussian (iso-Gaussian) line spread function. The LOR-PDFs of three coincidence signal emitting sources, (1) ideal positron emitter that emits perfect back-to-back γ rays (γγ) in air; (2) fluorine-18 (18F) nuclide in water; and (3) oxygen-15 (15O) nuclide in water, were derived, and assessed with simulated and experimental phantom data. The derived LOR-PDFs showed anisotropic and asymmetric characteristics dependent on LOR-detector angle, coincidence emitting source, and the medium, consistent with common PET physical principles. The comparison of the iso-Gaussian function and LOR-PDF showed that: (1) without positron range and acollinearity effects, the LOR-PDF achieved better or similar trade-offs of contrast recovery and noise for objects of 4 mm radius or larger, and this advantage extended to smaller objects (e.g. 2 mm radius sphere, 0.6 mm radius hot-rods) at higher iteration numbers; and (2) with positron range and acollinearity effects, the iso-Gaussian achieved similar or better resolution recovery depending on the significance of positron range effect. We conclude that the 3D LOR-PDF approach is an effective method to generate an accurate and compact system matrix. However, when used directly in expectation-maximization based list-mode iterative reconstruction algorithms such as MOLAR, its superiority is not clear. For this

  20. Direct numerical simulations of particle-laden density currents with adaptive, discontinuous finite elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parkinson, S. D.; Hill, J.; Piggott, M. D.; Allison, P. A.

    2014-05-01

    High resolution direct numerical simulations (DNS) are an important tool for the detailed analysis of turbidity current dynamics. Models that resolve the vertical structure and turbulence of the flow are typically based upon the Navier-Stokes equations. Two-dimensional simulations are known to produce unrealistic cohesive vortices that are not representative of the real three-dimensional physics. The effect of this phenomena is particularly apparent in the later stages of flow propagation. The ideal solution to this problem is to run the simulation in three dimensions but this is computationally expensive. This paper presents a novel finite-element (FE) DNS turbidity current model that has been built within Fluidity, an open source, general purpose, computational fluid dynamics code. The model is validated through re-creation of a lock release density current at a Grashof number of 5 × 106 in two, and three-dimensions. Validation of the model considers the flow energy budget, sedimentation rate, head speed, wall normal velocity profiles and the final deposit. Conservation of energy in particular is found to be a good metric for measuring mesh performance in capturing the range of dynamics. FE models scale well over many thousands of processors and do not impose restrictions on domain shape, but they are computationally expensive. Use of discontinuous discretisations and adaptive unstructured meshing technologies, which reduce the required element count by approximately two orders of magnitude, results in high resolution DNS models of turbidity currents at a fraction of the cost of traditional FE models. The benefits of this technique will enable simulation of turbidity currents in complex and large domains where DNS modelling was previously unachievable.

  1. The density matrix functional approach to electron correlation: dynamic and nondynamic correlation along the full dissociation coordinate.

    PubMed

    Mentel, Ł M; van Meer, R; Gritsenko, O V; Baerends, E J

    2014-06-01

    For chemistry an accurate description of bond weakening and breaking is vital. The great advantage of density matrix functionals, as opposed to density functionals, is their ability to describe such processes since they naturally cover both nondynamical and dynamical correlation. This is obvious in the Löwdin-Shull functional, the exact natural orbital functional for two-electron systems. We present in this paper extensions of this functional for the breaking of a single electron pair bond in N-electron molecules, using LiH, BeH(+), and Li2 molecules as prototypes. Attention is given to the proper formulation of the functional in terms of not just J and K integrals but also the two-electron L integrals (K integrals with a different distribution of the complex conjugation of the orbitals), which is crucial for the calculation of response functions. Accurate energy curves are obtained with extended Löwdin-Shull functionals along the complete dissociation coordinate using full CI calculations as benchmark. PMID:24907988

  2. The density matrix functional approach to electron correlation: Dynamic and nondynamic correlation along the full dissociation coordinate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mentel, Ł. M.; van Meer, R.; Gritsenko, O. V.; Baerends, E. J.

    2014-06-01

    For chemistry an accurate description of bond weakening and breaking is vital. The great advantage of density matrix functionals, as opposed to density functionals, is their ability to describe such processes since they naturally cover both nondynamical and dynamical correlation. This is obvious in the Löwdin-Shull functional, the exact natural orbital functional for two-electron systems. We present in this paper extensions of this functional for the breaking of a single electron pair bond in N-electron molecules, using LiH, BeH+, and Li2 molecules as prototypes. Attention is given to the proper formulation of the functional in terms of not just J and K integrals but also the two-electron L integrals (K integrals with a different distribution of the complex conjugation of the orbitals), which is crucial for the calculation of response functions. Accurate energy curves are obtained with extended Löwdin-Shull functionals along the complete dissociation coordinate using full CI calculations as benchmark.

  3. The density matrix functional approach to electron correlation: Dynamic and nondynamic correlation along the full dissociation coordinate

    SciTech Connect

    Mentel, Ł. M.; Meer, R. van; Gritsenko, O. V.; Baerends, E. J.

    2014-06-07

    For chemistry an accurate description of bond weakening and breaking is vital. The great advantage of density matrix functionals, as opposed to density functionals, is their ability to describe such processes since they naturally cover both nondynamical and dynamical correlation. This is obvious in the Löwdin-Shull functional, the exact natural orbital functional for two-electron systems. We present in this paper extensions of this functional for the breaking of a single electron pair bond in N-electron molecules, using LiH, BeH{sup +}, and Li{sub 2} molecules as prototypes. Attention is given to the proper formulation of the functional in terms of not just J and K integrals but also the two-electron L integrals (K integrals with a different distribution of the complex conjugation of the orbitals), which is crucial for the calculation of response functions. Accurate energy curves are obtained with extended Löwdin-Shull functionals along the complete dissociation coordinate using full CI calculations as benchmark.

  4. Large-Scale Variational Two-Electron Reduced-Density-Matrix-Driven Complete Active Space Self-Consistent Field Methods.

    PubMed

    Fosso-Tande, Jacob; Nguyen, Truong-Son; Gidofalvi, Gergely; DePrince, A Eugene

    2016-05-10

    A large-scale implementation of the complete active space self-consistent field (CASSCF) method is presented. The active space is described using the variational two-electron reduced-density-matrix (v2RDM) approach, and the algorithm is applicable to much larger active spaces than can be treated using configuration-interaction-driven methods. Density fitting or Cholesky decomposition approximations to the electron repulsion integral tensor allow for the simultaneous optimization of large numbers of external orbitals. We have tested the implementation by evaluating singlet-triplet energy gaps in the linear polyacene series and two dinitrene biradical compounds. For the acene series, we report computations that involve active spaces consisting of as many as 50 electrons in 50 orbitals and the simultaneous optimization of 1892 orbitals. For the dinitrene compounds, we find that the singlet-triplet gaps obtained from v2RDM-driven CASSCF with partial three-electron N-representability conditions agree with those obtained from configuration-interaction-driven approaches to within one-third of 1 kcal mol(-1). When enforcing only the two-electron N-representability conditions, v2RDM-driven CASSCF yields less accurate singlet-triplet energy gaps in these systems, but the quality of the results is still far superior to those obtained from standard single-reference approaches. PMID:27065086

  5. Reduced-Density-Matrix Description of Single-Photon and Multi-Photon Processes in Quantized Many-Electron Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jacobs, Verne; Kutana, Alex

    The frequency-dependent transition rates for single-photon and multi-photon processes in quantized many-electron systems are evaluated using a reduced-density-matrix approach. We provide a fundamental quantum-mechanical foundation for systematic spectral simulations. A perturbation expansion of the frequency-domain Liouville-space self-energy operator is introduced for detailed evaluations of the spectral-line shapes. In the diagonal-resolvent (isolated-line) and short-memory-time (Markov) approximations, the lowest-order contributions to the spectral-line widths and shifts associated with environmental electron-photon and electron-phonon interactions are systematically evaluated. Our description is directly applicable to electromagnetic processes in a wide variety of many-electron systems, without premature approximations. In particular, our approach can be applied to investigate quantum optical phenomena involving electrons in both bulk and nanoscale semiconductor materials entirely from first principles, using a single-electron basis set obtained from density functional theory as a starting point for a many-electron description. Work supported by the Office of Naval Research through the Basic Research Program at The Naval Research Laboratory. A portion of this work was performed under the ASEE post doc program at NRL.

  6. Theory of open quantum systems with bath of electrons and phonons and spins: Many-dissipaton density matrixes approach

    SciTech Connect

    Yan, YiJing

    2014-02-07

    This work establishes a strongly correlated system-and-bath dynamics theory, the many-dissipaton density operators formalism. It puts forward a quasi-particle picture for environmental influences. This picture unifies the physical descriptions and algebraic treatments on three distinct classes of quantum environments, electron bath, phonon bath, and two-level spin or exciton bath, as their participating in quantum dissipation processes. Dynamical variables for theoretical description are no longer just the reduced density matrix for system, but remarkably also those for quasi-particles of bath. The present theoretical formalism offers efficient and accurate means for the study of steady-state (nonequilibrium and equilibrium) and real-time dynamical properties of both systems and hybridizing environments. It further provides universal evaluations, exact in principle, on various correlation functions, including even those of environmental degrees of freedom in coupling with systems. Induced environmental dynamics could be reflected directly in experimentally measurable quantities, such as Fano resonances and quantum transport current shot noise statistics.

  7. Occupancies of individual orbits, and the nuclear matrix element of the {sup 76}Ge neutrinoless {beta}{beta} decay

    SciTech Connect

    Menendez, J.; Poves, A.

    2009-10-15

    We discuss the variation of the nuclear matrix element (NME) for the neutrinoless double beta (0{nu}{beta}{beta}) decay of {sup 76}Ge when the wave functions are constrained to reproduce the experimental occupancies of the two nuclei involved in the transition. In the interacting shell model description the value of the NME is enhanced about 15% compared to previous calculations, whereas in the QRPA the NME's are reduced by 20%-30%. This diminishes the discrepancies between both approaches. In addition, we discuss the effect of the short-range correlations on the NME in light of the recently proposed parametrizations based on a consistent renormalization of the 0{nu}{beta}{beta} transition operator.

  8. Potential and matrix elements of the hamiltonian of internal rotation in molecules in the basis set of Mathieu functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turovtsev, V. V.; Orlov, Yu. D.; Tsirulev, A. N.

    2015-08-01

    The advantages of the orthonormal basis set of 2π-periodic Mathieu functions compared to the trigonometric basis set in calculations of torsional states of molecules are substantiated. Explicit expressions are derived for calculating the Hamiltonian matrix elements of a one-dimensional torsional Schrödinger equation with a periodic potential of the general form in the basis set of Mathieu functions. It is shown that variation of a parameter of Mathieu functions allows the rotation potential and the structural function to be approximated with a good accuracy by a small number of series terms. The conditions for the best choice of this parameter are specified, and approximations are obtained for torsional potentials of n-butane upon rotation about the central C-C bond and of its univalent radical n-butyl C2H5C·H2 upon rotation of the C·H2 group. All algorithms are implemented in the Maple package.

  9. The (d,2He) reaction on Se76 and the double-β-decay matrix elements for A=76

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grewe, E.-W.; Bäumer, C.; Dohmann, H.; Frekers, D.; Harakeh, M. N.; Hollstein, S.; Johansson, H.; Popescu, L.; Rakers, S.; Savran, D.; Simon, H.; Thies, J. H.; van den Berg, A. M.; Wörtche, H. J.; Zilges, A.

    2008-10-01

    The (d,2He) charge-exchange reaction on Se76 was studied at an incident energy of 183 MeV. The outgoing two protons in the 1S0 state, referred to as He2, were both momentum analyzed and detected by the same spectrometer and detector. The experiment was performed at KVI, Groningen, using the magnetic spectrometer BBS at three angular positions: 0°,2.5°, and 5°. Excitation-energy spectra of the residual nucleus As76 were obtained with an energy resolution of about 120 keV (FWHM). Gamow-Teller (GT+) transition strengths were extracted up to 5 MeV and compared with those from an (n,p) experiment at low resolution. Together with the GT- transition strengths from the 76Ge(p,n) experiment leading to the same intermediate nucleus, the nuclear matrix element of the two-neutrino double-β decay of Ge76 was evaluated.

  10. Two-loop massive operator matrix elements and unpolarized heavy flavor production at asymptotic values Q≫m

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bierenbaum, Isabella; Blümlein, Johannes; Klein, Sebastian

    2007-09-01

    We calculate the O(αs2) massive operator matrix elements for the twist-2 operators, which contribute to the heavy flavor Wilson coefficients in unpolarized deeply inelastic scattering in the region Q≫m. The calculation has been performed using light-cone expansion techniques. We confirm an earlier result obtained in [M. Buza, Y. Matiounine, J. Smith, R. Migneron, W.L. van Neerven, Nucl. Phys. B 472 (1996) 611, arxiv:/hep-ph/9601302]. The calculation is carried out without using the integration-by-parts method and in Mellin space using harmonic sums, which lead to a significant compactification of the analytic results derived previously. The results allow to determine the heavy flavor Wilson coefficients for F(x,Q) to O(αs2) and for F(x,Q) to O(αs3) for all but the power suppressed terms ∝(/Q)k,k⩾1.

  11. The (d,2He) reaction on Mo96 and the double-β decay matrix elements for Zr96

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dohmann, H.; Bäumer, C.; Frekers, D.; Grewe, E.-W.; Harakeh, M. N.; Hollstein, S.; Johansson, H.; Popescu, L.; Rakers, S.; Savran, D.; Simon, H.; Thies, J. H.; van den Berg, A. M.; Wörtche, H. J.; Zilges, A.

    2008-10-01

    The 96Mo(d,2He)96Nb charge-exchange reaction was investigated at an incident energy of Ed=183.5 MeV. An excitation-energy resolution of 110 keV was achieved. The experiment was performed at KVI, Groningen, using the magnetic spectrometer BBS at three angular positions: 0°,2.5°, and 6°. We found that below 6 MeV almost the entire Gamow-Teller (GT+) strength is concentrated in a single state at 0.69 MeV excitation energy. As Mo96 is the daughter of the ββ decay nucleus Zr96, the present result provides information about the nuclear matrix elements active in the 2νββ decay of Zr96.

  12. The nuclear matrix elements of 0vββ decay and the NUMEN project at INFN-LNS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cappuzzello, F.; Agodi, C.; Aciksoz, E.; Acosta, L.; Aslanouglou, X.; Auerbach, N.; Bijker, R.; Bonanno, D.; Bongiovanni, D.; Borello, T.; Boudhaim, S.; Bouhssa, M. L.; Boztosun, I.; Calabretta, L.; Calanna, A.; Carbone, D.; Cavallaro, M.; Calvo, D.; Chávez Lomelí, E. R.; Colonna, M.; D'Agostino, G.; Deshmukh, N.; de Faria, P. N.; Ferrero, A.; Foti, A.; Finocchiaro, P.; Gomes, P. R. S.; Greco, V.; Hacisalihoglu, A.; Housni, Z.; Khouaja, A.; Inchaou, J.; Lanzalone, G.; La Via, F.; Lay, J. A.; Lenske, H.; Linares, R.; Lubian, J.; Iazzi, F.; Introzzi, R.; Lavagno, A.; Lo Presti, D.; Medina, N.; Mendes, D. R.; Muoio, A.; Oliveira, J. R. B.; Pakou, A.; Pandola, L.; Rifuggiato, D.; Rodrigues, M. R. D.; Santagati, G.; Santopinto, E.; Scaltrito, L.; Sgouros, O.; Solakcı, S. O.; Soukeras, V.; Tudisco, S.; Vsevolodovna, R. I. M.; Zagatto, V.

    2016-07-01

    An innovative technique to access the nuclear matrix elements entering the expression of the life time of the double beta decay by relevant cross section measurements of double charge exchange reactions is proposed. A key aspect of the project is the use of the MAGNEX large acceptance magnetic spectrometer, for the detection of the ejectiles, and of the LNS K800 Superconducting Cyclotron (CS), for the acceleration of the required high resolution and low emittance heavy-ion beams, already in operation at INFN Laboratory Nazionali del Sud in Catania (Italy). However, a major upgrade is foreseen for the INFN-LNS research infrastructure to cope with beam currents as high as several ppA required by the project.

  13. Am phases in the matrix of a U–Pu–Zr alloy with Np, Am, and rare-earth elements

    SciTech Connect

    Janney, Dawn E.; Kennedy, J. Rory; Madden, James W.; O’Holleran, Thomas P.

    2015-01-01

    Phases and microstructures in the matrix of an as-cast U-Pu-Zr alloy with 3 wt% Am, 2% Np, and 8% rare-earth elements were characterized by scanning and transmission electron microscopy. The matrix consists primarily of two phases, both of which contain Am: ζ-(U, Np, Pu, Am) (~70 at% U, 5% Np, 14% Pu, 1% Am, and 10% Zr) and δ-(U, Np, Pu, Am)Zr2 (~25% U, 2% Np, 10-15% Pu, 1-2% Am, and 55-60 at% Zr). These phases are similar to those in U-Pu-Zr alloys, although the Zr content in ζ-(U, Np, Pu, Am) is higher than that in ζ-(U, Pu) and the Zr content in δ-(U, Np, Pu, Am)Zr2 is lower than that in δ-UZr2. Nanocrystalline actinide oxides with structures similar to UO2 occurred in some areas, but may have formed by reactions with the atmosphere during sample handling. Planar features consisting of a central zone of ζ-(U, Np, Pu, Am) bracketed by zones of δ-(U, Np, Pu, Am)Zr2 bound irregular polygons ranging in size from a few micrometers to a few tens of micrometers across. The rest of the matrix consists of elongated domains of ζ-(U, Np, Pu, Am) and δ-(U, Np, Pu, Am)Zr2. Each of these domains is a few tens of nanometers across and a few hundred nanometers long. The domains display strong preferred orientations involving areas a few hundred nanometers to a few micrometers across.

  14. On-shell {delta}I=3/2 kaon weak matrix elements with nonzero total momentum

    SciTech Connect

    Yamazaki, Takeshi

    2009-05-01

    We present our results for the on-shell {delta}I=3/2 kaon decay matrix elements using domain wall fermions and the DBW2 gauge action at one coarse lattice spacing corresponding to a{sup -1}=1.31 GeV in the quenched approximation. The on-shell matrix elements are evaluated in two different frames: the center-of-mass frame and nonzero total-momentum frame. We employ the formula proposed by Lellouch and Luescher in the center-of-mass frame, and its extension for a nonzero total-momentum frame to extract the infinite volume, on-shell, center-of-mass frame decay amplitudes. We determine the decay amplitude at the physical pion mass and momentum from the chiral extrapolation and an interpolation of the relative momentum using the results calculated in the two frames. We have obtained ReA{sub 2}=1.66(23)((+48/-03))((+53/-0))x10{sup -8} GeV and ImA{sub 2}=-1.181(26)((+141/-014))((+44/-0))x10{sup -12} GeV at the physical point, using the data at the relatively large pion mass, m{sub {pi}}>0.35 GeV. The first error is statistic, and the second and third are systematic. The second error is estimated with several fits of the chiral extrapolation including the (quenched) chiral perturbation formula at next to leading order using only lighter pion masses. The third one is estimated with an analysis using the lattice dispersion relation. The result of ReA{sub 2} is reasonably consistent with experiment.

  15. The screened hydrogenic model: Analytic formulae for matrix elements of radiative and collisional rates in complex ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Upcraft, L. M.

    2010-09-01

    There is an ongoing need for numerically efficient algorithms that are capable of calculating the radiative and collisional rates of arbitrarily complex ions that are present in hot plasmas to a level of accuracy that surpasses that available in many existing approximations. Hydrogen-like solutions for determining these rates in more general ions by use of an effective (and generally non-integer) atomic number frequently give poor results and are of limited validity. This paper illustrates that results accurate to of order 20% can be obtained for matrix elements of both rates for arbitrarily complex ions by use of hydrogenic wavefunctions that use different effective atomic numbers for the initial and final sub-shells. Not only does this allow for the realistic modelling of inner shell transitions, it naturally allows for the physical effect of orbital relaxation. It is shown that the integral of the generalised oscillator strength used by the Plane-wave Born approximation has an analytic solution that can be reduced to a form suitable for efficient numerical integration over an arbitrary electron distribution. Extensive use of the computer algebra package Mathematica ® has generated a unique formula for each transition and the results have been transformed to efficient fortran 90 code for all transitions between non-relativistic sub-shells with principal quantum numbers n ≤ 10. In the case of the collisional matrix elements these are typically two to three orders of magnitude faster to calculate than by direct numerical evaluation. The fortran code is available upon request from the author.

  16. Determination of trace elements in dolomite and gypsum by atomic absorption spectrometry: overcoming the matrix interference by flotation separation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stafilov, Trajče; Zendelovska, Dragica; Pavlovska, Gorica; Čundeva, Katarina

    2002-05-01

    The interferences of Ca and Mg as matrix elements in dolomite and gypsum on Ag, Cd, Cr, Mn, Tl and Zn absorbances during their electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometric (ETAAS) determination are investigated. The results reveal that Ca and Mg do not interfere on Zn and Mn, tend to decrease absorbances of Ag, Cd and Cr, while Tl suffers the most significant influence. A flotation separation method is proposed to eliminate matrix interferences. Hydrated iron(III) oxide, Fe 2O 3· xH 2O, and iron(III) hexamethylenedithiocarbamate, Fe(HMDTC) 3, are applied as flotation collectors. The influence of hydrophobic dithiocarbamate anion, HMDTC, on flotation recoveries of each analyte is studied. The most suitable concentrations of dolomite and gypsum solutions for flotation are determined. To avoid flotation suppression due to the reaction of Ca 2+ and Mg 2+ with surfactant ions, a fit foaming agent was selected. The elements present in dolomite and gypsum as traces have been analyzed by ETAAS. Their ETAAS limits of detection following flotation are found to be 0.021 μg·g -1 for Ag, 0.019 μg·g -1 for Cd, 0.014 μg·g -1 for Cr and 0.11 μg·g -1 for Tl. The determination of Mn and Zn can be performed by flame AAS (FAAS). The limit of detection for Mn is 1.5 μg·g -1, while for Zn 0.8 μg·g -1.

  17. Finite element analysis of grain-matrix micro-cracking in shale within the context of a multiscale modeling approach for fracture (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Regueiro, R. A.; Yu, S.

    2010-12-01

    The paper models grain-scale micro-cracking in shale at grain-matrix interfaces, assuming constituents are composed of quart silt grains and compacted clay matrix for a typical shale. The influence of grain-matrix-grain interaction on micro-crack patterns is investigated. Elasto-plastic pressure-sensitive cohesive-surface models are inserted at grain-matrix interfaces and intra-clay-matrix finite element facets, while a bulk elasto-plasticity model with bifurcation is employed for the clay matrix to compare to the intra-clay-matrix cohesive-surface model. Numerical examples are presented under two-dimensional plane strain condition at small strains. A procedure is proposed to upscale grain-scale micro-cracking to predict macro-fracture nucleation and propagation in shale and other bound particulate materials. It is shown that using cohesive surface elements (CSEs) at all finite element facets in the clay matrix mesh to simulate micro-cracking in the clay matrix leads to mesh-dependent results. Using CSEs at grain-clay-matrix interfaces is physical and not mesh dependent. We also considered using bulk pressure-sensitive elasto-plasticity with bifurcation condition within the clay matrix to attempt to predict onset of localization around grains in the simulations. It was encouraging to see that for both the single grain and multiple grain simulations, the finite element region in the clay matrix meshes where bifurcation was first detected around the grains was nearly the same. This gives us confidence that once a proper post-bifurcation constitutive model is implemented within an embedded discontinuity formulation, micro-cracking nucleation and propagation at the grain-scale in shale can be properly simulated, which will provide the basis for up-scaling to macro-cracks within a multiscale method for fracture in shale. Other items to address in future research are: (i) include transverse isotropy (elastic and plastic) for the bulk clay matrix elasto-plasticity model

  18. Multi-scale damage modelling in a ceramic matrix composite using a finite-element microstructure meshfree methodology.

    PubMed

    Saucedo-Mora, L; Marrow, T J

    2016-07-13

    The problem of multi-scale modelling of damage development in a SiC ceramic fibre-reinforced SiC matrix ceramic composite tube is addressed, with the objective of demonstrating the ability of the finite-element microstructure meshfree (FEMME) model to introduce important aspects of the microstructure into a larger scale model of the component. These are particularly the location, orientation and geometry of significant porosity and the load-carrying capability and quasi-brittle failure behaviour of the fibre tows. The FEMME model uses finite-element and cellular automata layers, connected by a meshfree layer, to efficiently couple the damage in the microstructure with the strain field at the component level. Comparison is made with experimental observations of damage development in an axially loaded composite tube, studied by X-ray computed tomography and digital volume correlation. Recommendations are made for further development of the model to achieve greater fidelity to the microstructure. This article is part of the themed issue 'Multiscale modelling of the structural integrity of composite materials'. PMID:27242308

  19. Factorization of the matrix elements of three-electron operators used in configuration-interactions studies of the atomic f shell

    SciTech Connect

    Judd, B.R.; Lo, E.

    1996-01-01

    Single-electron excitations of the atomic f shell are usually taken into account in analyses of lanthanide and actinide spectra by including six three-electron scalar operators t{sub i} in the Hamiltonian. Their matrix elements have been factorized for all f{sup N} by using the Wigner-Eckart theorem applied to Racah`s groups SO(7) and G{sub 2}. The two component parts, namely a reduced matrix element in G{sub 2} and an isoscalar factor, are tabulated. This provides a compact representation of the values of the matrix elements and also enables unusual selection rules and proportionalities to be exposed. 16 refs., 2 tabs.

  20. Three-dimensional turbulent bottom density currents from a high-order nonhydrostatic spectral element model.

    SciTech Connect

    Ozgokmen, T.; Fischer, P.; Duan, J.; Iliescu, T.; Mathematics and Computer Science; Univ. of Miami; IIT; Virginia Polytechnic Inst. and State Univ.

    2004-09-01

    Overflows are bottom gravity currents that supply dense water masses generated in high-latitude and marginal seas into the general circulation. Oceanic observations have revealed that mixing of overflows with ambient water masses takes place over small spatial and time scales. Studies with ocean general circulation models indicate that the strength of the thermohaline circulation is strongly sensitive to representation of overflows in these models. In light of these results, overflow-induced mixing emerges as one of the prominent oceanic processes. In this study, as a continuation of an effort to develop appropriate process models for overflows, nonhydrostatic 3D simulations of bottom gravity are carried out that would complement analysis of dedicated observations and large-scale ocean modeling. A parallel high-order spectral-element Navier-Stokes solver is used as the basis of the simulations. Numerical experiments are conducted in an idealized setting focusing on the startup phase of a dense water mass released at the top of a sloping wedge. Results from 3D experiments are compared with results from 2D experiments and laboratory experiments, based on propagation speed of the density front, growth rate of the characteristic head at the leading edge, turbulent overturning length scales, and entrainment parameters. Results from 3D experiments are found to be in general agreement with those from laboratory tank experiments. In 2D simulations, the propagation speed is approximately 20% slower than that of the 3D experiments and the head growth rate is 3 times as large, Thorpe scales are 1.3-1.5 times as large, and the entrainment parameter is up to 2 times as large as those in the 3D experiments. The differences between 2D and 3D simulations are entirely due to internal factors associated with the truncation of the Navier-Stokes equations for 2D approximation.

  1. Exact tensor hypercontraction: a universal technique for the resolution of matrix elements of local finite-range N-body potentials in many-body quantum problems.

    PubMed

    Parrish, Robert M; Hohenstein, Edward G; Schunck, Nicolas F; Sherrill, C David; Martínez, Todd J

    2013-09-27

    Configuration-space matrix elements of N-body potentials arise naturally and ubiquitously in the Ritz-Galerkin solution of many-body quantum problems. For the common specialization of local, finite-range potentials, we develop the exact tensor hypercontraction method, which provides a quantized renormalization of the coordinate-space form of the N-body potential, allowing for a highly separable tensor factorization of the configuration-space matrix elements. This representation allows for substantial computational savings in chemical, atomic, and nuclear physics simulations, particularly with respect to difficult "exchangelike" contractions. PMID:24116775

  2. Calculation of electric multipole transition radial matrix elements, oscillator strengths and Einstein coefficients over nonrelativistic radial wave function using Slater type orbitals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guseinov, I. I.; Mamedov, B. A.

    2011-04-01

    In this study, a new method is proposed for evaluating electric multipole transition (radial) matrix elements of the generalized type Hnl,n'l'k in hydrogenic atom and ions using the Slater type orbitals (STOs). The formula obtained allows the determination of all multipole transition matrix elements between two different nonrelativistic radial wave functions Rnl and R. A comparative study carried out between the results of analytical computations and other numerical simulations shows that the methods agree well and emphasizing thus the effectiveness and accuracy of the proposed analytical expressions. The simple equation thus obtained has been found to be remarkable accurate and has shown a wide range of applicability.

  3. Nuclear transition matrix elements for Majoron-accompanied neutrinoless double-β decay within a projected-Hartree-Fock-Bogoliubov model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rath, P. K.; Chandra, R.; Chaturvedi, K.; Lohani, P.; Raina, P. K.

    2016-02-01

    The model-dependent uncertainties in the nuclear transition matrix elements for the Majoron-accompanied neutrinoless double-β decay (0+→0+transition) of Zr,9694, 100Mo, Te,130128, and 150Nd isotopes are calculated by employing the projected-Hartree-Fock-Bogoliubov formalism with four different parametrizations of the pairing plus multipolar two-body interactions and three different parametrizations of the Jastrow short-range correlations. Uncertainties in the nuclear transition matrix elements turn out to be less than 15% and 21% for decays involving the emission of single and double Majorons, respectively.

  4. Determination of ultratrace impurity elements in high purity niobium materials by on-line matrix separation and direct injection/inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Kozono, Shuji; Haraguchi, Hiroki

    2007-07-31

    The determination of 52 impurity elements in niobium materials (niobium metal, niobium oxide (V), and niobium pentaethoxide) was performed by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) with on-line anion exchange matrix separation as well as direct nebulization. Niobium material samples were decomposed with a mixture of hydrofluoric acid and nitric acid to prepare 10% niobium solutions. In the on-line anion exchange matrix separation/ICP-MS, the niobium and hydrofluoric acid concentrations in sample solution were adjusted to 5% and ca. 8M, respectively. The solution was then injected into the carrier stream from the sample loop of injection valve to pass through an anion exchange resin column. In the anion exchange separation, niobium in the fluoro-complex form was adsorbed on the resin, while impurity elements were eluted. The eluted elements were introduced into ICP-MS for the determination of 25 impurity elements. On the other hand, 27 impurity elements could not be separated well from niobium matrix under the above anion exchange conditions, and then the sample solution with the niobium concentration of max. 0.2% containing internal standard elements was injected from the sample loop of injection valve directly to introduce into ICP-MS. As a result, 52 impurity elements in three kinds of niobium materials could be determined at the ng g(-1) level. PMID:19071834

  5. Search for a standard model Higgs boson produced in association with a top-quark pair and decaying to bottom quarks using a matrix element method

    SciTech Connect

    Khachatryan, Vardan

    2015-06-09

    A search for a standard model Higgs boson produced in association with a top-quark pair and decaying to bottom quarks is presented. Events with hadronic jets and one or two oppositely charged leptons are selected from a data sample corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 19.5fb-1 collected by the CMS experiment at the LHC in pp collisions at a centre-of-mass energy of 8TeV. In order to separate the signal from the larger tt¯ + jets background, this analysis uses a matrix element method that assigns a probability density value to each reconstructed event under signal or background hypotheses. The ratio between the two values is used in a maximum likelihood fit to extract the signal yield. The results are presented in terms of the measured signal strength modifier, μ, relative to the standard model prediction for a Higgs boson mass of 125GeV. The observed (expected) exclusion limit at a 95 % confidence level is μ < 4.2 (3.3), corresponding to a best fit value μ^ = 1.2+1.6-1.5.

  6. Search for a standard model Higgs boson produced in association with a top-quark pair and decaying to bottom quarks using a matrix element method

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Khachatryan, Vardan

    2015-06-09

    A search for a standard model Higgs boson produced in association with a top-quark pair and decaying to bottom quarks is presented. Events with hadronic jets and one or two oppositely charged leptons are selected from a data sample corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 19.5fb-1 collected by the CMS experiment at the LHC in pp collisions at a centre-of-mass energy of 8TeV. In order to separate the signal from the larger tt¯ + jets background, this analysis uses a matrix element method that assigns a probability density value to each reconstructed event under signal or background hypotheses. The ratiomore » between the two values is used in a maximum likelihood fit to extract the signal yield. The results are presented in terms of the measured signal strength modifier, μ, relative to the standard model prediction for a Higgs boson mass of 125GeV. The observed (expected) exclusion limit at a 95 % confidence level is μ < 4.2 (3.3), corresponding to a best fit value μ^ = 1.2+1.6-1.5.« less

  7. Novel approaches for correction against the soft matrix effects in the quantitative elemental imaging of human substantia nigra tissue using synchrotron X-ray fluorescence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Surowka, A. D.; Wrobel, P.; Marzec, M. M.; Adamek, D.; Szczerbowska-Boruchowska, M.

    2016-09-01

    The inherent structural heterogeneity of biological specimens poses a number of problems for analytical techniques to assess for the elemental composition of a sample, and this is the case with quantitative X-ray fluorescence (XRF). Differences in density along with any possible variation in thickness upon frequently used freeze drying of thin samples could influence the results of the quantification and therefore underlie one of the most critical matrix effects in XRF, often referred to as the mass thickness effect. In our study, we analyzed substantia nigra tissue samples of various thicknesses mounted onto silicon nitride membranes. The aim was to show up the variation in the mass thickness of the different substantia nigra tissue compartments: the neuromelanine pigmented neurons and neuropil could influence the final quantitative results. In that respect, the main goal was to derive several semi- and fully-quantitative methods to correct for the mass thickness effects using either a membrane Si transmission signal or the intensity of incoherently scattered primary X-ray radiation. Also, the pioneer topographic studies on dried substantia nigra tissue specimens demonstrated the drying procedure is accompanied by an around 80% reduction in the samples' thickness. The correction scheme is presented together with the semi-theoretical procedure developed to compute for the mass thickness for substantia nigra tissue structures, and the correction scheme's robustness is also presented.

  8. Spectral diagnostics based on Doppler-broadened H{sub α} line shape in a single element of a matrix source

    SciTech Connect

    Iordanova, S.; Pashov, A.

    2015-04-08

    The study is on optical emission spectroscopy diagnostics of a single element of a matrix source of negative hydrogen ions. The method developed for description of the hydrogen atoms behaviour is based on analysis of the Balmer H{sub α} line profile, and it can be readily applied to various low pressure hydrogen discharges. The present observations reveal the existence of thermal as well as of non-thermal fast hydrogen atoms in the discharge. For processing of the experimental data a line shape model, which accounts for details of the plasma kinetics and the fine structure of the Balmer lines is developed. The fit of this model to the recorded at different experimental conditions line shapes results in the temperature of the thermal atoms, the mean energy of the fast atoms, the ratio between the densities of these two group of atoms and the relative populations of the fine structure components of the n = 3 hydrogen state. The present study indicates that the reactions leading to production of fast atoms and the process of energy exchange between thermal and fast atoms may be important for the correct modeling of the plasma kinetics.

  9. Measurement of the top-quark mass in the lepton+jets channel using a matrix element technique with the CDF II detector

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Aaltonen, T.

    2011-10-14

    A measurement of the top-quark mass is presented using Tevatron data from proton-antiproton collisions at center-of-mass energy √s = 1.96 TeV collected with the CDF II detector. Events are selected from a sample of candidates for production of tt̄ pairs that decay into the lepton+jets channel. The top-quark mass is measured with an unbinned maximum likelihood method where the event probability density functions are calculated using signal and background matrix elements, as well as a set of parameterized jet-to-parton transfer functions. The likelihood function is maximized with respect to the top-quark mass, the signal fraction in the sample, and amore » correction to the jet energy scale (JES) calibration of the calorimeter jets. The simultaneous measurement of the JES correction ({Delta}{sub JES}) amounts to an additional in situ jet energy calibration based on the known mass of the hadronically decaying W boson. Using the data sample of 578 lepton+jets candidate events, corresponding to 3.2 fb-1 of integrated luminosity, the top-quark mass is measured to be mt = 172.4± 1.4 (stat + ΔJES) ± 1.3 (syst) GeV/c2.« less

  10. Measurement of the top-quark mass in the lepton+jets channel using a matrix element technique with the CDF II detector

    SciTech Connect

    Aaltonen, T.

    2011-10-14

    A measurement of the top-quark mass is presented using Tevatron data from proton-antiproton collisions at center-of-mass energy √s = 1.96 TeV collected with the CDF II detector. Events are selected from a sample of candidates for production of tt̄ pairs that decay into the lepton+jets channel. The top-quark mass is measured with an unbinned maximum likelihood method where the event probability density functions are calculated using signal and background matrix elements, as well as a set of parameterized jet-to-parton transfer functions. The likelihood function is maximized with respect to the top-quark mass, the signal fraction in the sample, and a correction to the jet energy scale (JES) calibration of the calorimeter jets. The simultaneous measurement of the JES correction ({Delta}{sub JES}) amounts to an additional in situ jet energy calibration based on the known mass of the hadronically decaying W boson. Using the data sample of 578 lepton+jets candidate events, corresponding to 3.2 fb-1 of integrated luminosity, the top-quark mass is measured to be mt = 172.4± 1.4 (stat + ΔJES) ± 1.3 (syst) GeV/c2.

  11. Search for a standard model Higgs boson produced in association with a top-quark pair and decaying to bottom quarks using a matrix element method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khachatryan, V.; Sirunyan, A. M.; Tumasyan, A.; Adam, W.; Bergauer, T.; Dragicevic, M.; Erö, J.; Friedl, M.; Frühwirth, R.; Ghete, V. M.; Hartl, C.; Hörmann, N.; Hrubec, J.; Jeitler, M.; Kiesenhofer, W.; Knünz, V.; Krammer, M.; Krätschmer, I.; Liko, D.; Mikulec, I.; Rabady, D.; Rahbaran, B.; Rohringer, H.; Schöfbeck, R.; Strauss, J.; Treberer-Treberspurg, W.; Waltenberger, W.; Wulz, C.-E.; Mossolov, V.; Shumeiko, N.; Suarez Gonzalez, J.; Alderweireldt, S.; Bansal, S.; Cornelis, T.; De Wolf, E. A.; Janssen, X.; Knutsson, A.; Lauwers, J.; Luyckx, S.; Ochesanu, S.; Rougny, R.; Van De Klundert, M.; Van Haevermaet, H.; Van Mechelen, P.; Van Remortel, N.; Van Spilbeeck, A.; Blekman, F.; Blyweert, S.; D'Hondt, J.; Daci, N.; Heracleous, N.; Keaveney, J.; Lowette, S.; Maes, M.; Olbrechts, A.; Python, Q.; Strom, D.; Tavernier, S.; Van Doninck, W.; Van Mulders, P.; Van Onsem, G. P.; Villella, I.; Caillol, C.; Clerbaux, B.; De Lentdecker, G.; Dobur, D.; Favart, L.; Gay, A. P. R.; Grebenyuk, A.; Léonard, A.; Mohammadi, A.; Perniè, L.; Randle-conde, A.; Reis, T.; Seva, T.; Thomas, L.; Vander Velde, C.; Vanlaer, P.; Wang, J.; Zenoni, F.; Adler, V.; Beernaert, K.; Benucci, L.; Cimmino, A.; Costantini, S.; Crucy, S.; Fagot, A.; Garcia, G.; Mccartin, J.; Ocampo Rios, A. A.; Poyraz, D.; Ryckbosch, D.; Salva Diblen, S.; Sigamani, M.; Strobbe, N.; Thyssen, F.; Tytgat, M.; Yazgan, E.; Zaganidis, N.; Basegmez, S.; Beluffi, C.; Bruno, G.; Castello, R.; Caudron, A.; Ceard, L.; Da Silveira, G. G.; Delaere, C.; du Pree, T.; Favart, D.; Forthomme, L.; Giammanco, A.; Hollar, J.; Jafari, A.; Jez, P.; Komm, M.; Lemaitre, V.; Nuttens, C.; Pagano, D.; Perrini, L.; Pin, A.; Piotrzkowski, K.; Popov, A.; Quertenmont, L.; Selvaggi, M.; Vidal Marono, M.; Vizan Garcia, J. M.; Beliy, N.; Caebergs, T.; Daubie, E.; Hammad, G. H.; Júnior, W. L. Aldá; Alves, G. A.; Brito, L.; Correa Martins Junior, M.; Martins, T. Dos Reis; Molina, J.; Mora Herrera, C.; Pol, M. E.; Rebello Teles, P.; Carvalho, W.; Chinellato, J.; Custódio, A.; Da Costa, E. M.; De Jesus Damiao, D.; De Oliveira Martins, C.; Fonseca De Souza, S.; Malbouisson, H.; Matos Figueiredo, D.; Mundim, L.; Nogima, H.; Prado Da Silva, W. L.; Santaolalla, J.; Santoro, A.; Sznajder, A.; Tonelli Manganote, E. J.; Vilela Pereira, A.; Bernardes, C. A.; Dogra, S.; Fernandez Perez Tomei, T. R.; Gregores, E. M.; Mercadante, P. G.; Novaes, S. F.; Padula, Sandra S.; Aleksandrov, A.; Genchev, V.; Hadjiiska, R.; Iaydjiev, P.; Marinov, A.; Piperov, S.; Rodozov, M.; Stoykova, S.; Sultanov, G.; Vutova, M.; Dimitrov, A.; Glushkov, I.; Litov, L.; Pavlov, B.; Petkov, P.; Bian, J. G.; Chen, G. M.; Chen, H. S.; Chen, M.; Cheng, T.; Du, R.; Jiang, C. H.; Plestina, R.; Romeo, F.; Tao, J.; Wang, Z.; Asawatangtrakuldee, C.; Ban, Y.; Liu, S.; Mao, Y.; Qian, S. J.; Wang, D.; Xu, Z.; Zhang, F.; Zhang, L.; Zou, W.; Avila, C.; Cabrera, A.; Chaparro Sierra, L. F.; Florez, C.; Gomez, J. P.; Gomez Moreno, B.; Sanabria, J. C.; Godinovic, N.; Lelas, D.; Polic, D.; Puljak, I.; Antunovic, Z.; Kovac, M.; Brigljevic, V.; Kadija, K.; Luetic, J.; Mekterovic, D.; Sudic, L.; Attikis, A.; Mavromanolakis, G.; Mousa, J.; Nicolaou, C.; Ptochos, F.; Razis, P. A.; Rykaczewski, H.; Bodlak, M.; Finger, M.; Finger, M.; Assran, Y.; Ellithi Kamel, A.; Mahmoud, M. A.; Radi, A.; Kadastik, M.; Murumaa, M.; Raidal, M.; Tiko, A.; Eerola, P.; Voutilainen, M.; Härkönen, J.; Karimäki, V.; Kinnunen, R.; Lampén, T.; Lassila-Perini, K.; Lehti, S.; Lindén, T.; Luukka, P.; Mäenpää, T.; Peltola, T.; Tuominen, E.; Tuominiemi, J.; Tuovinen, E.; Wendland, L.; Talvitie, J.; Tuuva, T.; Besancon, M.; Couderc, F.; Dejardin, M.; Denegri, D.; Fabbro, B.; Faure, J. L.; Favaro, C.; Ferri, F.; Ganjour, S.; Givernaud, A.; Gras, P.; Hamel de Monchenault, G.; Jarry, P.; Locci, E.; Malcles, J.; Rander, J.; Rosowsky, A.; Titov, M.; Baffioni, S.; Beaudette, F.; Busson, P.; Chapon, E.; Charlot, C.; Dahms, T.; Dobrzynski, L.; Filipovic, N.; Florent, A.; Granier de Cassagnac, R.; Mastrolorenzo, L.; Miné, P.; Naranjo, I. N.; Nguyen, M.; Ochando, C.; Ortona, G.; Paganini, P.; Regnard, S.; Salerno, R.; Sauvan, J. B.; Sirois, Y.; Veelken, C.; Yilmaz, Y.; Zabi, A.; Agram, J.-L.; Andrea, J.; Aubin, A.; Bloch, D.; Brom, J.-M.; Chabert, E. C.; Chanon, N.; Collard, C.; Conte, E.; Fontaine, J.-C.; Gelé, D.; Goerlach, U.; Goetzmann, C.; Le Bihan, A.-C.; Skovpen, K.; Van Hove, P.; Gadrat, S.; Beauceron, S.; Beaupere, N.; Bernet, C.; Boudoul, G.; Bouvier, E.; Brochet, S.; Carrillo Montoya, C. A.; Chasserat, J.; Chierici, R.; Contardo, D.; Courbon, B.; Depasse, P.; El Mamouni, H.; Fan, J.; Fay, J.; Gascon, S.; Gouzevitch, M.; Ille, B.; Kurca, T.; Lethuillier, M.; Mirabito, L.; Pequegnot, A. L.; Perries, S.; Ruiz Alvarez, J. D.; Sabes, D.; Sgandurra, L.; Sordini, V.; Vander Donckt, M.; Verdier, P.; Viret, S.; Xiao, H.; Tsamalaidze, Z.; Autermann, C.; Beranek, S.; Bontenackels, M.; Edelhoff, M.; Feld, L.; Heister, A.; Klein, K.; Lipinski, M.; Ostapchuk, A.; Preuten, M.; Raupach, F.; Sammet, J.; Schael, S.; Schulte, J. F.; Weber, H.; Wittmer, B.; Zhukov, V.; Ata, M.; Brodski, M.; Dietz-Laursonn, E.; Duchardt, D.; Erdmann, M.; Fischer, R.; Güth, A.; Hebbeker, T.; Heidemann, C.; Hoepfner, K.; Klingebiel, D.; Knutzen, S.; Kreuzer, P.; Merschmeyer, M.; Meyer, A.; Mittag, G.; Millet, P.; Olschewski, M.; Padeken, K.; Papacz, P.; Reithler, H.; Schmitz, S. A.; Sonnenschein, L.; Teyssier, D.; Thüer, S.; Cherepanov, V.; Erdogan, Y.; Flügge, G.; Geenen, H.; Geisler, M.; Haj Ahmad, W.; Hoehle, F.; Kargoll, B.; Kress, T.; Kuessel, Y.; Künsken, A.; Lingemann, J.; Nowack, A.; Nugent, I. M.; Pistone, C.; Pooth, O.; Stahl, A.; Aldaya Martin, M.; Asin, I.; Bartosik, N.; Behr, J.; Behrens, U.; Bell, A. J.; Bethani, A.; Borras, K.; Burgmeier, A.; Cakir, A.; Calligaris, L.; Campbell, A.; Choudhury, S.; Costanza, F.; Diez Pardos, C.; Dolinska, G.; Dooling, S.; Dorland, T.; Eckerlin, G.; Eckstein, D.; Eichhorn, T.; Flucke, G.; Garcia, J. Garay; Geiser, A.; Gizhko, A.; Gunnellini, P.; Hauk, J.; Hempel, M.; Jung, H.; Kalogeropoulos, A.; Karacheban, O.; Kasemann, M.; Katsas, P.; Kieseler, J.; Kleinwort, C.; Korol, I.; Krücker, D.; Lange, W.; Leonard, J.; Lipka, K.; Lobanov, A.; Lohmann, W.; Lutz, B.; Mankel, R.; Marfin, I.; Melzer-Pellmann, I.-A.; Meyer, A. B.; Mnich, J.; Mussgiller, A.; Naumann-Emme, S.; Nayak, A.; Ntomari, E.; Perrey, H.; Pitzl, D.; Placakyte, R.; Raspereza, A.; Ribeiro Cipriano, P. M.; Roland, B.; Ron, E.; Sahin, M. Ö.; Salfeld-Nebgen, J.; Saxena, P.; Schoerner-Sadenius, T.; Schröder, M.; Seitz, C.; Spannagel, S.; Vargas Trevino, A. D. R.; Walsh, R.; Wissing, C.; Blobel, V.; Centis Vignali, M.; Draeger, A. R.; Erfle, J.; Garutti, E.; Goebel, K.; Görner, M.; Haller, J.; Hoffmann, M.; Höing, R. S.; Junkes, A.; Kirschenmann, H.; Klanner, R.; Kogler, R.; Lapsien, T.; Lenz, T.; Marchesini, I.; Marconi, D.; Nowatschin, D.; Ott, J.; Peiffer, T.; Perieanu, A.; Pietsch, N.; Poehlsen, J.; Poehlsen, T.; Rathjens, D.; Sander, C.; Schettler, H.; Schleper, P.; Schlieckau, E.; Schmidt, A.; Seidel, M.; Sola, V.; Stadie, H.; Steinbrück, G.; Troendle, D.; Usai, E.; Vanelderen, L.; Vanhoefer, A.; Akbiyik, M.; Barth, C.; Baus, C.; Berger, J.; Böser, C.; Butz, E.; Chwalek, T.; De Boer, W.; Descroix, A.; Dierlamm, A.; Feindt, M.; Frensch, F.; Giffels, M.; Gilbert, A.; Hartmann, F.; Hauth, T.; Husemann, U.; Katkov, I.; Kornmayer, A.; Lobelle Pardo, P.; Mozer, M. U.; Müller, T.; Müller, Th.; Nürnberg, A.; Quast, G.; Rabbertz, K.; Röcker, S.; Simonis, H. J.; Stober, F. M.; Ulrich, R.; Wagner-Kuhr, J.; Wayand, S.; Weiler, T.; Wöhrmann, C.; Wolf, R.; Anagnostou, G.; Daskalakis, G.; Geralis, T.; Giakoumopoulou, V. A.; Kyriakis, A.; Loukas, D.; Markou, A.; Markou, C.; Psallidas, A.; Topsis-Giotis, I.; Agapitos, A.; Kesisoglou, S.; Panagiotou, A.; Saoulidou, N.; Stiliaris, E.; Tziaferi, E.; Aslanoglou, X.; Evangelou, I.; Flouris, G.; Foudas, C.; Kokkas, P.; Manthos, N.; Papadopoulos, I.; Strologas, J.; Paradas, E.; Bencze, G.; Hajdu, C.; Hidas, P.; Horvath, D.; Sikler, F.; Veszpremi, V.; Vesztergombi, G.; Zsigmond, A. J.; Beni, N.; Czellar, S.; Karancsi, J.; Molnar, J.; Palinkas, J.; Szillasi, Z.; Makovec, A.; Raics, P.; Trocsanyi, Z. L.; Ujvari, B.; Swain, S. K.; Beri, S. B.; Bhatnagar, V.; Gupta, R.; Bhawandeep, U.; Kalsi, A. K.; Kaur, M.; Kumar, R.; Mittal, M.; Nishu, N.; Singh, J. B.; Kumar, Ashok; Kumar, Arun; Ahuja, S.; Bhardwaj, A.; Choudhary, B. 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S.; Colaleo, A.; Creanza, D.; Cristella, L.; De Filippis, N.; De Palma, M.; Fiore, L.; Iaselli, G.; Maggi, G.; Maggi, M.; My, S.; Nuzzo, S.; Pompili, A.; Pugliese, G.; Radogna, R.; Selvaggi, G.; Sharma, A.; Silvestris, L.; Venditti, R.; Verwilligen, P.; Abbiendi, G.; Benvenuti, A. C.; Bonacorsi, D.; Braibant-Giacomelli, S.; Brigliadori, L.; Campanini, R.; Capiluppi, P.; Castro, A.; Cavallo, F. R.; Codispoti, G.; Cuffiani, M.; Dallavalle, G. M.; Fabbri, F.; Fanfani, A.; Fasanella, D.; Giacomelli, P.; Grandi, C.; Guiducci, L.; Marcellini, S.; Masetti, G.; Montanari, A.; Navarria, F. L.; Perrotta, A.; Rossi, A. M.; Rovelli, T.; Siroli, G. P.; Tosi, N.; Travaglini, R.; Albergo, S.; Cappello, G.; Chiorboli, M.; Costa, S.; Giordano, F.; Potenza, R.; Tricomi, A.; Tuve, C.; Barbagli, G.; Ciulli, V.; Civinini, C.; D'Alessandro, R.; Focardi, E.; Gallo, E.; Gonzi, S.; Gori, V.; Lenzi, P.; Meschini, M.; Paoletti, S.; Sguazzoni, G.; Tropiano, A.; Benussi, L.; Bianco, S.; Fabbri, F.; Piccolo, D.; Ferretti, R.; Ferro, F.; Lo Vetere, M.; Robutti, E.; Tosi, S.; Dinardo, M. E.; Fiorendi, S.; Gennai, S.; Gerosa, R.; Ghezzi, A.; Govoni, P.; Lucchini, M. T.; Malvezzi, S.; Manzoni, R. A.; Martelli, A.; Marzocchi, B.; Menasce, D.; Moroni, L.; Paganoni, M.; Pedrini, D.; Ragazzi, S.; Redaelli, N.; Tabarelli de Fatis, T.; Buontempo, S.; Cavallo, N.; Di Guida, S.; Fabozzi, F.; Iorio, A. O. M.; Lista, L.; Meola, S.; Merola, M.; Paolucci, P.; Azzi, P.; Bacchetta, N.; Bisello, D.; Carlin, R.; Checchia, P.; Dall'Osso, M.; Dorigo, T.; Dosselli, U.; Fanzago, F.; Gasparini, F.; Gasparini, U.; Gonella, F.; Gozzelino, A.; Lacaprara, S.; Margoni, M.; Meneguzzo, A. T.; Pazzini, J.; Pozzobon, N.; Ronchese, P.; Simonetto, F.; Torassa, E.; Tosi, M.; Zotto, P.; Zucchetta, A.; Zumerle, G.; Gabusi, M.; Ratti, S. P.; Re, V.; Riccardi, C.; Salvini, P.; Vitulo, P.; Biasini, M.; Bilei, G. M.; Ciangottini, D.; Fanò, L.; Lariccia, P.; Mantovani, G.; Menichelli, M.; Saha, A.; Santocchia, A.; Spiezia, A.; Androsov, K.; Azzurri, P.; Bagliesi, G.; Bernardini, J.; Boccali, T.; Broccolo, G.; Castaldi, R.; Ciocci, M. A.; Dell'Orso, R.; Donato, S.; Fedi, G.; Fiori, F.; Foà, L.; Giassi, A.; Grippo, M. T.; Ligabue, F.; Lomtadze, T.; Martini, L.; Messineo, A.; Moon, C. S.; Palla, F.; Rizzi, A.; Savoy-Navarro, A.; Serban, A. T.; Spagnolo, P.; Squillacioti, P.; Tenchini, R.; Tonelli, G.; Venturi, A.; Verdini, P. G.; Vernieri, C.; Barone, L.; Cavallari, F.; D'imperio, G.; Del Re, D.; Diemoz, M.; Jorda, C.; Longo, E.; Margaroli, F.; Meridiani, P.; Micheli, F.; Organtini, G.; Paramatti, R.; Rahatlou, S.; Rovelli, C.; Santanastasio, F.; Soffi, L.; Traczyk, P.; Amapane, N.; Arcidiacono, R.; Argiro, S.; Arneodo, M.; Bellan, R.; Biino, C.; Cartiglia, N.; Casasso, S.; Costa, M.; Covarelli, R.; Degano, A.; Demaria, N.; Finco, L.; Mariotti, C.; Maselli, S.; Migliore, E.; Monaco, V.; Musich, M.; Obertino, M. M.; Pacher, L.; Pastrone, N.; Pelliccioni, M.; Pinna Angioni, G. L.; Potenza, A.; Romero, A.; Ruspa, M.; Sacchi, R.; Solano, A.; Staiano, A.; Tamponi, U.; Belforte, S.; Candelise, V.; Casarsa, M.; Cossutti, F.; Della Ricca, G.; Gobbo, B.; La Licata, C.; Marone, M.; Schizzi, A.; Umer, T.; Zanetti, A.; Chang, S.; Kropivnitskaya, A.; Nam, S. K.; Kim, D. H.; Kim, G. N.; Kim, M. S.; Kim, M. S.; Kong, D. J.; Lee, S.; Oh, Y. D.; Park, H.; Sakharov, A.; Son, D. C.; Kim, T. J.; Ryu, M. S.; Kim, J. Y.; Moon, D. H.; Song, S.; Choi, S.; Gyun, D.; Hong, B.; Jo, M.; Kim, H.; Kim, Y.; Lee, B.; Lee, K. S.; Park, S. K.; Roh, Y.; Yoo, H. D.; Choi, M.; Kim, J. H.; Park, I. C.; Ryu, G.; Choi, Y.; Choi, Y. K.; Goh, J.; Kim, D.; Kwon, E.; Lee, J.; Yu, I.; Juodagalvis, A.; Komaragiri, J. R.; Md Ali, M. A. B.; Wan Abdullah, W. A. T.; Casimiro Linares, E.; Castilla-Valdez, H.; De La Cruz-Burelo, E.; Heredia-de La Cruz, I.; Hernandez-Almada, A.; Lopez-Fernandez, R.; Sanchez-Hernandez, A.; Carrillo Moreno, S.; Vazquez Valencia, F.; Pedraza, I.; Salazar Ibarguen, H. A.; Morelos Pineda, A.; Krofcheck, D.; Butler, P. H.; Reucroft, S.; Ahmad, A.; Ahmad, M.; Hassan, Q.; Hoorani, H. R.; Khan, W. A.; Khurshid, T.; Shoaib, M.; Bialkowska, H.; Bluj, M.; Boimska, B.; Frueboes, T.; Górski, M.; Kazana, M.; Nawrocki, K.; Romanowska-Rybinska, K.; Szleper, M.; Zalewski, P.; Brona, G.; Bunkowski, K.; Cwiok, M.; Dominik, W.; Doroba, K.; Kalinowski, A.; Konecki, M.; Krolikowski, J.; Misiura, M.; Olszewski, M.; Bargassa, P.; Beirão Da Cruz E Silva, C.; Di Francesco, A.; Faccioli, P.; Ferreira Parracho, P. G.; Gallinaro, M.; Lloret Iglesias, L.; Nguyen, F.; Rodrigues Antunes, J.; Seixas, J.; Toldaiev, O.; Vadruccio, D.; Varela, J.; Vischia, P.; Bunin, P.; Gavrilenko, M.; Golutvin, I.; Kamenev, A.; Karjavin, V.; Konoplyanikov, V.; Kozlov, G.; Lanev, A.; Malakhov, A.; Matveev, V.; Moisenz, P.; Palichik, V.; Perelygin, V.; Savina, M.; Shmatov, S.; Shulha, S.; Smirnov, V.; Zarubin, A.; Golovtsov, V.; Ivanov, Y.; Kim, V.; Kuznetsova, E.; Levchenko, P.; Murzin, V.; Oreshkin, V.; Smirnov, I.; Sulimov, V.; Uvarov, L.; Vavilov, S.; Vorobyev, A.; Vorobyev, An.; Andreev, Yu.; Dermenev, A.; Gninenko, S.; Golubev, N.; Kirsanov, M.; Krasnikov, N.; Pashenkov, A.; Tlisov, D.; Toropin, A.; Epshteyn, V.; Gavrilov, V.; Lychkovskaya, N.; Popov, V.; Pozdnyakov, I.; Safronov, G.; Semenov, S.; Spiridonov, A.; Stolin, V.; Vlasov, E.; Zhokin, A.; Andreev, V.; Azarkin, M.; Dremin, I.; Kirakosyan, M.; Leonidov, A.; Mesyats, G.; Rusakov, S. V.; Vinogradov, A.; Belyaev, A.; Boos, E.; Bunichev, V.; Dubinin, M.; Dudko, L.; Ershov, A.; Gribushin, A.; Klyukhin, V.; Kodolova, O.; Lokhtin, I.; Obraztsov, S.; Petrushanko, S.; Savrin, V.; Azhgirey, I.; Bayshev, I.; Bitioukov, S.; Kachanov, V.; Kalinin, A.; Konstantinov, D.; Krychkine, V.; Petrov, V.; Ryutin, R.; Sobol, A.; Tourtchanovitch, L.; Troshin, S.; Tyurin, N.; Uzunian, A.; Volkov, A.; Adzic, P.; Ekmedzic, M.; Milosevic, J.; Rekovic, V.; Alcaraz Maestre, J.; Battilana, C.; Calvo, E.; Cerrada, M.; Chamizo Llatas, M.; Colino, N.; De La Cruz, B.; Delgado Peris, A.; Domínguez Vázquez, D.; Escalante Del Valle, A.; Fernandez Bedoya, C.; Fernández Ramos, J. P.; Flix, J.; Fouz, M. C.; Garcia-Abia, P.; Gonzalez Lopez, O.; Goy Lopez, S.; Hernandez, J. M.; Josa, M. I.; Navarro De Martino, E.; Pérez-Calero Yzquierdo, A.; Puerta Pelayo, J.; Quintario Olmeda, A.; Redondo, I.; Romero, L.; Soares, M. S.; Albajar, C.; de Trocóniz, J. F.; Missiroli, M.; Moran, D.; Brun, H.; Cuevas, J.; Fernandez Menendez, J.; Folgueras, S.; Gonzalez Caballero, I.; Brochero Cifuentes, J. A.; Cabrillo, I. J.; Calderon, A.; Duarte Campderros, J.; Fernandez, M.; Gomez, G.; Graziano, A.; Lopez Virto, A.; Marco, J.; Marco, R.; Martinez Rivero, C.; Matorras, F.; Munoz Sanchez, F. J.; Piedra Gomez, J.; Rodrigo, T.; Rodríguez-Marrero, A. Y.; Ruiz-Jimeno, A.; Scodellaro, L.; Vila, I.; Vilar Cortabitarte, R.; Abbaneo, D.; Auffray, E.; Auzinger, G.; Bachtis, M.; Baillon, P.; Ball, A. H.; Barney, D.; Benaglia, A.; Bendavid, J.; Benhabib, L.; Benitez, J. F.; Bloch, P.; Bocci, A.; Bonato, A.; Bondu, O.; Botta, C.; Breuker, H.; Camporesi, T.; Cerminara, G.; Colafranceschi, S.; D'Alfonso, M.; d'Enterria, D.; Dabrowski, A.; David, A.; De Guio, F.; De Roeck, A.; De Visscher, S.; Di Marco, E.; Dobson, M.; Dordevic, M.; Dorney, B.; Dupont-Sagorin, N.; Elliott-Peisert, A.; Franzoni, G.; Funk, W.; Gigi, D.; Gill, K.; Giordano, D.; Girone, M.; Glege, F.; Guida, R.; Gundacker, S.; Guthoff, M.; Guida, R.; Hammer, J.; Hansen, M.; Harris, P.; Hegeman, J.; Innocente, V.; Janot, P.; Kortelainen, M. J.; Kousouris, K.; Krajczar, K.; Lecoq, P.; Lourenço, C.; Magini, N.; Malgeri, L.; Mannelli, M.; Marrouche, J.; Masetti, L.; Meijers, F.; Mersi, S.; Meschi, E.; Moortgat, F.; Morovic, S.; Mulders, M.; Orfanelli, S.; Orsini, L.; Pape, L.; Perez, E.; Petrilli, A.; Petrucciani, G.; Pfeiffer, A.; Pimiä, M.; Piparo, D.; Plagge, M.; Racz, A.; Rolandi, G.; Rovere, M.; Sakulin, H.; Schäfer, C.; Schwick, C.; Sharma, A.; Siegrist, P.; Silva, P.; Simon, M.; Sphicas, P.; Spiga, D.; Steggemann, J.; Stieger, B.; Stoye, M.; Takahashi, Y.; Treille, D.; Tsirou, A.; Veres, G. I.; Wardle, N.; Wöhri, H. K.; Wollny, H.; Zeuner, W. D.; Bertl, W.; Deiters, K.; Erdmann, W.; Horisberger, R.; Ingram, Q.; Kaestli, H. C.; Kotlinski, D.; Langenegger, U.; Renker, D.; Rohe, T.; Bachmair, F.; Bäni, L.; Bianchini, L.; Buchmann, M. A.; Casal, B.; Dissertori, G.; Dittmar, M.; Donegà, M.; Dünser, M.; Eller, P.; Grab, C.; Hits, D.; Hoss, J.; Kasieczka, G.; Lustermann, W.; Mangano, B.; Marini, A. C.; Marionneau, M.; Martinez Ruiz del Arbol, P.; Masciovecchio, M.; Meister, D.; Mohr, N.; Musella, P.; Nägeli, C.; Nessi-Tedaldi, F.; Pandolfi, F.; Pauss, F.; Perrozzi, L.; Peruzzi, M.; Quittnat, M.; Rebane, L.; Rossini, M.; Starodumov, A.; Takahashi, M.; Theofilatos, K.; Wallny, R.; Weber, H. A.; Amsler, C.; Canelli, M. F.; Chiochia, V.; De Cosa, A.; Hinzmann, A.; Hreus, T.; Kilminster, B.; Lange, C.; Ngadiuba, J.; Pinna, D.; Robmann, P.; Ronga, F. J.; Salerno, D.; Taroni, S.; Yang, Y.; Cardaci, M.; Chen, K. H.; Ferro, C.; Kuo, C. M.; Lin, W.; Lu, Y. J.; Volpe, R.; Yu, S. S.; Chang, P.; Chang, Y. H.; Chao, Y.; Chen, K. F.; Chen, P. H.; Dietz, C.; Grundler, U.; Hou, W.-S.; Liu, Y. F.; Lu, R.-S.; Miñano Moya, M.; Petrakou, E.; Tsai, J. f.; Tzeng, Y. M.; Wilken, R.; Asavapibhop, B.; Singh, G.; Srimanobhas, N.; Suwonjandee, N.; Adiguzel, A.; Bakirci, M. N.; Cerci, S.; Dozen, C.; Dumanoglu, I.; Eskut, E.; Girgis, S.; Gokbulut, G.; Guler, Y.; Gurpinar, E.; Hos, I.; Kangal, E. E.; Kayis Topaksu, A.; Onengut, G.; Ozdemir, K.; Ozturk, S.; Polatoz, A.; Sunar Cerci, D.; Tali, B.; Topakli, H.; Vergili, M.; Zorbilmez, C.; Akin, I. V.; Bilin, B.; Bilmis, S.; Gamsizkan, H.; Isildak, B.; Karapinar, G.; Ocalan, K.; Sekmen, S.; Surat, U. E.; Yalvac, M.; Zeyrek, M.; Albayrak, E. A.; Gülmez, E.; Kaya, M.; Kaya, O.; Yetkin, T.; Cankocak, K.; Vardarlı, F. I.; Levchuk, L.; Sorokin, P.; Brooke, J. J.; Clement, E.; Cussans, D.; Flacher, H.; Goldstein, J.; Grimes, M.; Heath, G. P.; Heath, H. F.; Jacob, J.; Kreczko, L.; Lucas, C.; Meng, Z.; Newbold, D. M.; Paramesvaran, S.; Poll, A.; Sakuma, T.; Seif El Nasr-storey, S.; Senkin, S.; Smith, V. J.; Williams, T.; Bell, K. W.; Belyaev, A.; Brew, C.; Brown, R. M.; Cockerill, D. J. A.; Coughlan, J. A.; Harder, K.; Harper, S.; Olaiya, E.; Petyt, D.; Shepherd-Themistocleous, C. H.; Thea, A.; Tomalin, I. R.; Williams, T.; Womersley, W. J.; Worm, S. D.; Baber, M.; Bainbridge, R.; Buchmuller, O.; Burton, D.; Colling, D.; Cripps, N.; Dauncey, P.; Davies, G.; De Wit, A.; Della Negra, M.; Dunne, P.; Elwood, A.; Ferguson, W.; Fulcher, J.; Futyan, D.; Hall, G.; Iles, G.; Jarvis, M.; Karapostoli, G.; Kenzie, M.; Lane, R.; Lucas, R.; Lyons, L.; Magnan, A.-M.; Malik, S.; Mathias, B.; Nash, J.; Nikitenko, A.; Pela, J.; Pesaresi, M.; Petridis, K.; Raymond, D. M.; Rogerson, S.; Rose, A.; Seez, C.; Sharp, P.; Tapper, A.; Vazquez Acosta, M.; Virdee, T.; Zenz, S. C.; Cole, J. E.; Hobson, P. R.; Khan, A.; Kyberd, P.; Leggat, D.; Leslie, D.; Reid, I. D.; Symonds, P.; Teodorescu, L.; Turner, M.; Dittmann, J.; Hatakeyama, K.; Kasmi, A.; Liu, H.; Pastika, N.; Scarborough, T.; Wu, Z.; Charaf, O.; Cooper, S. I.; Henderson, C.; Rumerio, P.; Avetisyan, A.; Bose, T.; Fantasia, C.; Lawson, P.; Richardson, C.; Rohlf, J.; St. John, J.; Sulak, L.; Zou, D.; Alimena, J.; Berry, E.; Bhattacharya, S.; Christopher, G.; Cutts, D.; Demiragli, Z.; Dhingra, N.; Ferapontov, A.; Garabedian, A.; Heintz, U.; Laird, E.; Landsberg, G.; Mao, Z.; Narain, M.; Sagir, S.; Sinthuprasith, T.; Speer, T.; Swanson, J.; Breedon, R.; Breto, G.; Calderon De La Barca Sanchez, M.; Chauhan, S.; Chertok, M.; Conway, J.; Conway, R.; Cox, P. T.; Erbacher, R.; Gardner, M.; Ko, W.; Lander, R.; Mulhearn, M.; Pellett, D.; Pilot, J.; Ricci-Tam, F.; Shalhout, S.; Smith, J.; Squires, M.; Stolp, D.; Tripathi, M.; Wilbur, S.; Yohay, R.; Cousins, R.; Everaerts, P.; Farrell, C.; Hauser, J.; Ignatenko, M.; Rakness, G.; Takasugi, E.; Valuev, V.; Weber, M.; Burt, K.; Clare, R.; Ellison, J.; Gary, J. W.; Hanson, G.; Heilman, J.; Ivova Rikova, M.; Jandir, P.; Kennedy, E.; Lacroix, F.; Long, O. R.; Luthra, A.; Malberti, M.; Negrete, M. Olmedo; Shrinivas, A.; Sumowidagdo, S.; Wimpenny, S.; Branson, J. G.; Cerati, G. B.; Cittolin, S.; D'Agnolo, R. T.; Holzner, A.; Kelley, R.; Klein, D.; Letts, J.; Macneill, I.; Olivito, D.; Padhi, S.; Palmer, C.; Pieri, M.; Sani, M.; Sharma, V.; Simon, S.; Tadel, M.; Tu, Y.; Vartak, A.; Welke, C.; Würthwein, F.; Yagil, A.; Zevi Della Porta, G.; Barge, D.; Bradmiller-Feld, J.; Campagnari, C.; Danielson, T.; Dishaw, A.; Dutta, V.; Flowers, K.; Franco Sevilla, M.; Geffert, P.; George, C.; Golf, F.; Gouskos, L.; Incandela, J.; Justus, C.; Mccoll, N.; Mullin, S. D.; Richman, J.; Stuart, D.; To, W.; West, C.; Yoo, J.; Apresyan, A.; Bornheim, A.; Bunn, J.; Chen, Y.; Duarte, J.; Mott, A.; Newman, H. B.; Pena, C.; Pierini, M.; Spiropulu, M.; Vlimant, J. R.; Wilkinson, R.; Xie, S.; Zhu, R. Y.; Azzolini, V.; Calamba, A.; Carlson, B.; Ferguson, T.; Iiyama, Y.; Paulini, M.; Russ, J.; Vogel, H.; Vorobiev, I.; Cumalat, J. P.; Ford, W. T.; Gaz, A.; Krohn, M.; Luiggi Lopez, E.; Nauenberg, U.; Smith, J. G.; Stenson, K.; Wagner, S. R.; Alexander, J.; Chatterjee, A.; Chaves, J.; Chu, J.; Dittmer, S.; Eggert, N.; Mirman, N.; Nicolas Kaufman, G.; Patterson, J. R.; Ryd, A.; Salvati, E.; Skinnari, L.; Sun, W.; Teo, W. D.; Thom, J.; Thompson, J.; Tucker, J.; Weng, Y.; Winstrom, L.; Wittich, P.; Winn, D.; Abdullin, S.; Albrow, M.; Anderson, J.; Apollinari, G.; Bauerdick, L. A. T.; Beretvas, A.; Berryhill, J.; Bhat, P. C.; Bolla, G.; Burkett, K.; Butler, J. N.; Cheung, H. W. K.; Chlebana, F.; Cihangir, S.; Elvira, V. D.; Fisk, I.; Freeman, J.; Gottschalk, E.; Gray, L.; Green, D.; Grünendahl, S.; Gutsche, O.; Hanlon, J.; Hare, D.; Harris, R. M.; Hirschauer, J.; Hooberman, B.; Jindariani, S.; Johnson, M.; Joshi, U.; Klima, B.; Kreis, B.; Kwan, S.; Linacre, J.; Lincoln, D.; Lipton, R.; Liu, T.; Lopes De Sá, R.; Lykken, J.; Maeshima, K.; Marraffino, J. M.; Martinez Outschoorn, V. I.; Maruyama, S.; Mason, D.; McBride, P.; Merkel, P.; Mishra, K.; Mrenna, S.; Nahn, S.; Newman-Holmes, C.; O'Dell, V.; Prokofyev, O.; Sexton-Kennedy, E.; Soha, A.; Spalding, W. J.; Spiegel, L.; Taylor, L.; Tkaczyk, S.; Tran, N. V.; Uplegger, L.; Vaandering, E. W.; Vidal, R.; Whitbeck, A.; Whitmore, J.; Yang, F.; Acosta, D.; Avery, P.; Bortignon, P.; Bourilkov, D.; Carver, M.; Curry, D.; Das, S.; De Gruttola, M.; Di Giovanni, G. P.; Field, R. D.; Fisher, M.; Furic, I. K.; Hugon, J.; Konigsberg, J.; Korytov, A.; Kypreos, T.; Low, J. F.; Matchev, K.; Mei, H.; Milenovic, P.; Mitselmakher, G.; Muniz, L.; Rinkevicius, A.; Shchutska, L.; Snowball, M.; Sperka, D.; Yelton, J.; Zakaria, M.; Hewamanage, S.; Linn, S.; Markowitz, P.; Martinez, G.; Rodriguez, J. L.; Adams, J. R.; Adams, T.; Askew, A.; Bochenek, J.; Diamond, B.; Haas, J.; Hagopian, S.; Hagopian, V.; Johnson, K. F.; Prosper, H.; Veeraraghavan, V.; Weinberg, M.; Baarmand, M. M.; Hohlmann, M.; Kalakhety, H.; Yumiceva, F.; Adams, M. R.; Apanasevich, L.; Berry, D.; Betts, R. R.; Bucinskaite, I.; Cavanaugh, R.; Evdokimov, O.; Gauthier, L.; Gerber, C. E.; Hofman, D. J.; Kurt, P.; O'Brien, C.; Sandoval Gonzalez, I. D.; Silkworth, C.; Turner, P.; Varelas, N.; Bilki, B.; Clarida, W.; Dilsiz, K.; Haytmyradov, M.; Khristenko, V.; Merlo, J.-P.; Mermerkaya, H.; Mestvirishvili, A.; Moeller, A.; Nachtman, J.; Ogul, H.; Onel, Y.; Ozok, F.; Penzo, A.; Rahmat, R.; Sen, S.; Tan, P.; Tiras, E.; Wetzel, J.; Yi, K.; Anderson, I.; Barnett, B. A.; Blumenfeld, B.; Bolognesi, S.; Fehling, D.; Gritsan, A. V.; Maksimovic, P.; Martin, C.; Swartz, M.; Xiao, M.; Baringer, P.; Bean, A.; Benelli, G.; Bruner, C.; Gray, J.; Kenny, R. P.; Majumder, D.; Malek, M.; Murray, M.; Noonan, D.; Sanders, S.; Sekaric, J.; Stringer, R.; Wang, Q.; Wood, J. S.; Chakaberia, I.; Ivanov, A.; Kaadze, K.; Khalil, S.; Makouski, M.; Maravin, Y.; Saini, L. K.; Skhirtladze, N.; Svintradze, I.; Gronberg, J.; Lange, D.; Rebassoo, F.; Wright, D.; Anelli, C.; Baden, A.; Belloni, A.; Calvert, B.; Eno, S. C.; Gomez, J. A.; Hadley, N. J.; Jabeen, S.; Kellogg, R. G.; Kolberg, T.; Lu, Y.; Mignerey, A. C.; Pedro, K.; Shin, Y. H.; Skuja, A.; Tonjes, M. B.; Tonwar, S. C.; Apyan, A.; Barbieri, R.; Baty, A.; Bierwagen, K.; Brandt, S.; Busza, W.; Cali, I. A.; Di Matteo, L.; Gomez Ceballos, G.; Goncharov, M.; Gulhan, D.; Klute, M.; Lai, Y. S.; Lee, Y.-J.; Levin, A.; Luckey, P. D.; Paus, C.; Ralph, D.; Roland, C.; Roland, G.; Stephans, G. S. F.; Sumorok, K.; Velicanu, D.; Veverka, J.; Wyslouch, B.; Yang, M.; Yoon, A. S.; Zanetti, M.; Zhukova, V.; Dahmes, B.; De Benedetti, A.; Gude, A.; Kao, S. C.; Klapoetke, K.; Kubota, Y.; Mans, J.; Nourbakhsh, S.; Rusack, R.; Singovsky, A.; Tambe, N.; Turkewitz, J.; Acosta, J. G.; Cremaldi, L. M.; Kroeger, R.; Oliveros, S.; Perera, L.; Sanders, D. A.; Summers, D.; Avdeeva, E.; Bloom, K.; Bose, S.; Claes, D. R.; Dominguez, A.; Gonzalez Suarez, R.; Keller, J.; Knowlton, D.; Kravchenko, I.; Lazo-Flores, J.; Meier, F.; Ratnikov, F.; Snow, G. R.; Zvada, M.; Dolen, J.; Godshalk, A.; Iashvili, I.; Jain, S.; Kharchilava, A.; Kumar, A.; Rappoccio, S.; Alverson, G.; Barberis, E.; Baumgartel, D.; Chasco, M.; Massironi, A.; Nash, D.; Orimoto, T.; Trocino, D.; Wood, D.; Zhang, J.; Anastassov, A.; Hahn, K. A.; Kubik, A.; Lusito, L.; Mucia, N.; Odell, N.; Pollack, B.; Pozdnyakov, A.; Schmitt, M.; Stoynev, S.; Sung, K.; Trovato, M.; Velasco, M.; Won, S.; Brinkerhoff, A.; Chan, K. M.; Drozdetskiy, A.; Hildreth, M.; Jessop, C.; Karmgard, D. J.; Kellams, N.; Lannon, K.; Lynch, S.; Marinelli, N.; Musienko, Y.; Pearson, T.; Planer, M.; Ruchti, R.; Valls, N.; Smith, G.; Wayne, M.; Wolf, M.; Woodard, A.; Antonelli, L.; Brinson, J.; Bylsma, B.; Durkin, L. S.; Flowers, S.; Hart, A.; Hill, C.; Hughes, R.; Kotov, K.; Ling, T. Y.; Luo, W.; Puigh, D.; Rodenburg, M.; Winer, B. L.; Wolfe, H.; Wulsin, H. W.; Driga, O.; Elmer, P.; Hardenbrook, J.; Hebda, P.; Koay, S. A.; Lujan, P.; Marlow, D.; Medvedeva, T.; Mooney, M.; Olsen, J.; Piroué, P.; Quan, X.; Saka, H.; Stickland, D.; Tully, C.; Werner, J. S.; Zuranski, A.; Brownson, E.; Malik, S.; Mendez, H.; Ramirez Vargas, J. E.; Barnes, V. E.; Benedetti, D.; Bortoletto, D.; Gutay, L.; Hu, Z.; Jha, M. K.; Jones, M.; Jung, K.; Kress, M.; Leonardo, N.; Miller, D. H.; Neumeister, N.; Primavera, F.; Radburn-Smith, B. C.; Shi, X.; Shipsey, I.; Silvers, D.; Svyatkovskiy, A.; Wang, F.; Xie, W.; Xu, L.; Zablocki, J.; Parashar, N.; Stupak, J.; Adair, A.; Akgun, B.; Ecklund, K. M.; Geurts, F. J. M.; Li, W.; Michlin, B.; Padley, B. P.; Redjimi, R.; Roberts, J.; Zabel, J.; Betchart, B.; Bodek, A.; de Barbaro, P.; Demina, R.; Eshaq, Y.; Ferbel, T.; Galanti, M.; Garcia-Bellido, A.; Goldenzweig, P.; Han, J.; Harel, A.; Hindrichs, O.; Khukhunaishvili, A.; Korjenevski, S.; Petrillo, G.; Verzetti, M.; Vishnevskiy, D.; Ciesielski, R.; Demortier, L.; Goulianos, K.; Mesropian, C.; Arora, S.; Barker, A.; Chou, J. P.; Contreras-Campana, C.; Contreras-Campana, E.; Duggan, D.; Ferencek, D.; Gershtein, Y.; Gray, R.; Halkiadakis, E.; Hidas, D.; Hughes, E.; Kaplan, S.; Kunnawalkam Elayavalli, R.; Lath, A.; Panwalkar, S.; Park, M.; Salur, S.; Schnetzer, S.; Sheffield, D.; Somalwar, S.; Stone, R.; Thomas, S.; Thomassen, P.; Walker, M.; Rose, K.; Spanier, S.; York, A.; Bouhali, O.; Castaneda Hernandez, A.; Dalchenko, M.; De Mattia, M.; Dildick, S.; Eusebi, R.; Flanagan, W.; Gilmore, J.; Kamon, T.; Khotilovich, V.; Krutelyov, V.; Montalvo, R.; Osipenkov, I.; Pakhotin, Y.; Patel, R.; Perloff, A.; Roe, J.; Rose, A.; Safonov, A.; Suarez, I.; Tatarinov, A.; Ulmer, K. A.; Akchurin, N.; Cowden, C.; Damgov, J.; Dragoiu, C.; Dudero, P. R.; Faulkner, J.; Kovitanggoon, K.; Kunori, S.; Lee, S. W.; Libeiro, T.; Volobouev, I.; Appelt, E.; Delannoy, A. G.; Greene, S.; Gurrola, A.; Johns, W.; Maguire, C.; Mao, Y.; Melo, A.; Sharma, M.; Sheldon, P.; Snook, B.; Tuo, S.; Velkovska, J.; Arenton, M. W.; Boutle, S.; Cox, B.; Francis, B.; Goodell, J.; Hirosky, R.; Ledovskoy, A.; Li, H.; Lin, C.; Neu, C.; Wolfe, E.; Wood, J.; Clarke, C.; Harr, R.; Karchin, P. E.; Kottachchi Kankanamge Don, C.; Lamichhane, P.; Sturdy, J.; Belknap, D. A.; Carlsmith, D.; Cepeda, M.; Dasu, S.; Dodd, L.; Duric, S.; Friis, E.; Hall-Wilton, R.; Herndon, M.; Hervé, A.; Klabbers, P.; Lanaro, A.; Lazaridis, C.; Levine, A.; Loveless, R.; Mohapatra, A.; Ojalvo, I.; Perry, T.; Pierro, G. A.; Polese, G.; Ross, I.; Sarangi, T.; Savin, A.; Smith, W. H.; Taylor, D.; Vuosalo, C.; Woods, N.; Collaboration, [Authorinst]The CMS

    2015-06-01

    A search for a standard model Higgs boson produced in association with a top-quark pair and decaying to bottom quarks is presented. Events with hadronic jets and one or two oppositely charged leptons are selected from a data sample corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 19.5 collected by the CMS experiment at the LHC in collisions at a centre-of-mass energy of 8. In order to separate the signal from the larger + jets background, this analysis uses a matrix element method that assigns a probability density value to each reconstructed event under signal or background hypotheses. The ratio between the two values is used in a maximum likelihood fit to extract the signal yield. The results are presented in terms of the measured signal strength modifier, , relative to the standard model prediction for a Higgs boson mass of 125. The observed (expected) exclusion limit at a 95 % confidence level is (3.3), corresponding to a best fit value.

  12. Topological characterization of the non-Abelian Moore-Read state using density-matrix renormalization group

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, W.; Gong, S. S.; Haldane, F. D. M.; Sheng, D. N.

    2015-10-01

    The non-Abelian topological order has attracted a lot of attention for its fundamental importance and exciting prospect of topological quantum computation. However, explicit demonstration or identification of the non-Abelian states and the associated statistics in a microscopic model is very challenging. Here, based on a density-matrix renormalization-group calculation, we provide a complete characterization of the universal properties of the bosonic Moore-Read state on a Haldane honeycomb lattice model at filling number ν =1 for larger systems, including both the edge spectrum and the bulk anyonic quasiparticle (QP) statistics. We first demonstrate that there are three degenerating ground states for each of which there is a definite anyonic flux threading through the cylinder. We identify the nontrivial countings for the entanglement spectrum in accordance with the corresponding conformal field theory. Through simulating a flux-inserting experiment, it is found that two of the Abelian ground states can be adiabatically connected, whereas the ground state in the Ising anyon sector evolves back to itself, which reveals the fusion rules between different QPs in real space. Furthermore, we calculate the modular matrices S and U , which contain all the information for the anyonic QPs, such as quantum dimensions, fusion rule, and topological spins.

  13. Effects of ultrasound on estradiol level, bone mineral density, bone biomechanics and matrix metalloproteinase-13 expression in ovariectomized rabbits

    PubMed Central

    XIA, LU; HE, HONGCHEN; GUO, HUA; QING, YUXI; HE, CHENG-QI

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to observe the effect of ultrasound (US) on estradiol level, bone mineral density (BMD), bone biomechanics and matrix metalloproteinase-13 (MMP-13) expression in ovariectomized (OVX) rabbits. A total of 28 virgin New Zealand white rabbits were randomly assigned into the following groups: Control (control group), ovariectomy (OVX group), ovariectomy with ultrasound therapy (US group) and ovariectomy with estrogen replacement therapy group (ERT group). At 8 weeks after ovariectomy, the US group received ultrasound treatment while the ERT group were orally treated with conjugated estrogens, and the control and OVX groups remained untreated. The estradiol level, BMD and bone biomechanics, cartilage histology and the MMP-13 expression were analyzed after the intervention. The results indicate that the US treatment increased estradiol level, BMD and bone biomechanical function. Furthermore, the US treatment appeared to improve the recovery of cartilage morphology and decreased the expression of MMP-13 in OVX models. Furthermore, the results suggest that 10 days of US therapy was sufficient to prevent the reduction of estradiol, BMD and bone biomechanical function, to protect osteoarthritis cartilage structure, and to reduce MMP-13 transcription and expression in OVX rabbits. Therefore, US treatment may be a potential treatment for postmenopausal osteoarthritis and osteoporosis. PMID:26622502

  14. Variational reduced-density-matrix calculations on radicals: An alternative approach to open-shell ab initio quantum chemistry

    SciTech Connect

    Hammond, Jeff R.; Mazziotti, David A.

    2006-01-15

    An alternative approach to open-shell molecular calculations using the variational two-electron reduced-density-matrix (2-RDM) theory [Mazziotti, Phys. Rev. Lett. 93, 213001 (2004)] is presented. The energy and 2-RDM of the open-shell molecule (or radical) are computed from the limit of dissociating one or more hydrogen atoms from a molecule in a singlet state. Because the ground-state energy of an 'infinitely' separated hydrogen atom in a given finite basis is known, we can determine the energy of the radical by subtracting the energy of one or more hydrogen atoms from the energy of the total dissociated system. The 2-RDM is constrained to have singlet symmetry in all calculations. Two sets of N-representability conditions are employed: (i) two-positivity conditions, and (ii) two-positivity conditions plus the T{sub 2} condition, which is a subset of the three-positivity conditions. Optimization of the energy with respect to the 2-RDM is performed with a first-order algorithm for solving the semidefinite program within the variational 2-RDM method. We present calculations of several radicals near equilibrium as well as the dissociation curves of the diatomic radicals CH and OH.

  15. Exploiting the spatial locality of electron correlation within the parametric two-electron reduced-density-matrix method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    DePrince, A. Eugene; Mazziotti, David A.

    2010-01-01

    The parametric variational two-electron reduced-density-matrix (2-RDM) method is applied to computing electronic correlation energies of medium-to-large molecular systems by exploiting the spatial locality of electron correlation within the framework of the cluster-in-molecule (CIM) approximation [S. Li et al., J. Comput. Chem. 23, 238 (2002); J. Chem. Phys. 125, 074109 (2006)]. The 2-RDMs of individual molecular fragments within a molecule are determined, and selected portions of these 2-RDMs are recombined to yield an accurate approximation to the correlation energy of the entire molecule. In addition to extending CIM to the parametric 2-RDM method, we (i) suggest a more systematic selection of atomic-orbital domains than that presented in previous CIM studies and (ii) generalize the CIM method for open-shell quantum systems. The resulting method is tested with a series of polyacetylene molecules, water clusters, and diazobenzene derivatives in minimal and nonminimal basis sets. Calculations show that the computational cost of the method scales linearly with system size. We also compute hydrogen-abstraction energies for a series of hydroxyurea derivatives. Abstraction of hydrogen from hydroxyurea is thought to be a key step in its treatment of sickle cell anemia; the design of hydroxyurea derivatives that oxidize more rapidly is one approach to devising more effective treatments.

  16. Quantifying entanglement of a two-qubit system via measurable and invariant moments of its partially transposed density matrix

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bartkiewicz, Karol; Beran, Jiří; Lemr, Karel; Norek, Michał; Miranowicz, Adam

    2015-02-01

    We describe a direct method to determine the negativity of an arbitrary two-qubit state in experiments. The method is derived by analyzing the relation between the purity, negativity, and a universal entanglement witness for two-qubit entanglement. We show how the negativity of a two-qubit state can be calculated from just three experimentally accessible moments of the partially transposed density matrix of a two-photon state. Moreover, we show that the negativity can be given as a function of only six invariants, which are linear combinations of nine invariants from the complete set of 21 fundamental and independent two-qubit invariants. We analyze the relation between these moments and the concurrence for some classes of two-qubit states (including the X states, as well as pure states affected by the amplitude-damping and phase-damping channels). We also discuss the possibility of using the universal entanglement witness as an entanglement measure for various classes of two-qubit states. Moreover, we analyze how noise affects the estimation of entanglement via this witness.

  17. Coherent nonlinear optical studies of elementary processes in biological complexes: diagrammatic techniques based on the wave function versus the density matrix

    PubMed Central

    Biggs, Jason D.; Voll, Judith A.; Mukamel, Shaul

    2012-01-01

    Two types of diagrammatic approaches for the design and simulation of nonlinear optical experiments (closed-time path loops based on the wave function and double-sided Feynman diagrams for the density matrix) are presented and compared. We give guidelines for the assignment of relevant pathways and provide rules for the interpretation of existing nonlinear experiments in carotenoids. PMID:22753822

  18. Study of a Coincidence Detector Using a Suspension of Superheated Superconducting Grains in a High Density Dielectric Matrix for Positron Emission Tomography and γ-γ Tagging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bruère Dawson, R.; Maillard, J.; Maurel, G.; Parisi, J.; Silva, J.; Waysand, G.

    2006-01-01

    We demonstrate the feasibility of coincidence detectors based on superheated superconducting grains (SSG) in a high density dielectric matrix (HDDM) for two applications: 1) positron cameras for small animal imaging, where two diametrically opposite cells are simultaneously hit by 511 keV gammas; 2) tagging of γ-γ events in electron positron colliders.

  19. Neutronic fuel element fabrication

    DOEpatents

    Korton, George

    2004-02-24

    This disclosure describes a method for metallurgically bonding a complete leak-tight enclosure to a matrix-type fuel element penetrated longitudinally by a multiplicity of coolant channels. Coolant tubes containing solid filler pins are disposed in the coolant channels. A leak-tight metal enclosure is then formed about the entire assembly of fuel matrix, coolant tubes and pins. The completely enclosed and sealed assembly is exposed to a high temperature and pressure gas environment to effect a metallurgical bond between all contacting surfaces therein. The ends of the assembly are then machined away to expose the pin ends which are chemically leached from the coolant tubes to leave the coolant tubes with internal coolant passageways. The invention described herein was made in the course of, or under, a contract with the U.S. Atomic Energy Commission. It relates generally to fuel elements for neutronic reactors and more particularly to a method for providing a leak-tight metal enclosure for a high-performance matrix-type fuel element penetrated longitudinally by a multiplicity of coolant tubes. The planned utilization of nuclear energy in high-performance, compact-propulsion and mobile power-generation systems has necessitated the development of fuel elements capable of operating at high power densities. High power densities in turn require fuel elements having high thermal conductivities and good fuel retention capabilities at high temperatures. A metal clad fuel element containing a ceramic phase of fuel intimately mixed with and bonded to a continuous refractory metal matrix has been found to satisfy the above requirements. Metal coolant tubes penetrate the matrix to afford internal cooling to the fuel element while providing positive fuel retention and containment of fission products generated within the fuel matrix. Metal header plates are bonded to the coolant tubes at each end of the fuel element and a metal cladding or can completes the fuel-matrix enclosure

  20. Kaon matrix elements and CP violation from lattice QCD with 2+1 flavors of domain wall fermions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Shu

    Low energy constants describing the weak, two-pion decays of K mesons in chiral perturbation theory are computed using 2+1 flavors of domain wall fermions in a finite volume with spatial extent 2.74 fm and for a single inverse lattice spacing 1/a = 1.73 GeV. Partially quenched perturbation theory is used in both leading and next-to-leading order. The non-perturbative regularization independent RI/MOM renormalization scheme is employed to determine these low energy constants in the continuum, RI normalization scheme with 20% statistical errors but systematic errors which are estimated to lie between 50 and 100% depending on the operator. These low energy constants are then used to estimate the DeltaI = 1/2 and DeltaI = 3/2 K → pipi decay matrix elements and epsilon'/epsilon. The poor convergence of chiral perturbation theory for quark masses as large as that of the strange quark severely limits the accuracy of these results.

  1. Magnetic dipole hyperfine interactions in {sup 137}Ba{sup +} and the accuracies of the neutral weak interaction matrix elements

    SciTech Connect

    Sahoo, Bijaya K.; Gopakumar, Geetha; Chaudhuri, Rajat K.; Das, B.P.; Merlitz, Holger; Mahapatra, Uttam Sinha; Mukherjee, Debashis

    2003-10-01

    The relativistic coupled-cluster method is applied to calculate the magnetic dipole hyperfine constant 'A' of the 6s{sub 1/2}, 6p{sub 1/2}, 6p{sub 3/2}, and 5d{sub 3/2} states of singly ionized barium. After the inclusion of two-body correlation effects into the computation of the hyperfine matrix elements, the accuracy of the obtained values was significantly increased compared to earlier computations. Based on these numbers and earlier calculations of the electric dipole transitions and excitation energies, an estimate for the accuracy of the vertical bar [5p{sup 6}]6s{sub 1/2}>{yields} vertical bar [5p{sup 6}]5d{sub 3/2}> parity-nonconserving electric dipole transition amplitude is carried out. The results suggest that for the first time, to our knowledge, a precision of better than 1% is feasible for this transition amplitude.

  2. CALCULATION OF DELTA I = 3/2 KAON WEAK MATRIX ELEMENTS INCLUDING TWO-PION INTERACTION EFFECTS IN FINITE VOLUME.

    SciTech Connect

    YAMAZAKI, T.

    2006-07-23

    We calculate {Delta}I = 3/2 kaon decay matrix elements using domain wall fermions and the DBW2 gauge action at one coarse lattice spacing corresponding to a{sup -1} = 1.3 GeV. We employ the Lellouch and Luescher formula and its extension for non-zero total momentum to extract the infinite volume, center-of-mass frame decay amplitudes. The decay amplitudes obtained from the methods correspond to those from the indirect method with full order chiral perturbation theory. We confirm that the result is consistent with the previous result calculated with H-parity (anti-periodic) boundary condition by investigating the relative momentum dependence. We evaluate the decay amplitude ReA{sub 2} at the physical point by a chiral extrapolation with a polynomial function of m{sub {pi}}{sup 2} and the relative momentum as well as the {Delta}I = 3/2 electroweak penguin contributions to {var_epsilon}{prime}/{var_epsilon}. We found that the result of ReA{sub 2} reasonably agrees with the experiment.

  3. A Measurement of the Top Quark Mass in 1.96 TeV Proton-Antiproton Collisions Using a Novel Matrix Element Method

    SciTech Connect

    Freeman, John

    2007-01-01

    A measurement of the top quark mass in t$\\bar{t}$ → l + jets candidate events, obtained from p$\\bar{p}$ collisions at √s = 1.96 TeV at the Fermilab Tevatron using the CDF II detector, is presented. The measurement approach is that of a matrix element method. For each candidate event, a two dimensional likelihood is calculated in the top pole mass and a constant scale factor, 'JES', where JES multiplies the input particle jet momenta and is designed to account for the systematic uncertainty of the jet momentum reconstruction. As with all matrix element techniques, the method involves an integration using the Standard Model matrix element for t$\\bar{t}$ production and decay. However, the technique presented is unique in that the matrix element is modified to compensate for kinematic assumptions which are made to reduce computation time. Background events are dealt with through use of an event observable which distinguishes signal from background, as well as through a cut on the value of an event's maximum likelihood. Results are based on a 955 pb-1 data sample, using events with a high-pT lepton and exactly four high-energy jets, at least one of which is tagged as coming from a b quark; 149 events pass all the selection requirements. They find Mmeas = 169.8 ± 2.3(stat.) ± 1.4(syst.) GeV/c2.

  4. A measurement of the top quark mass in 1.96 TeV proton-antiproton collisions using a novel matrix element method

    SciTech Connect

    Freeman, John C

    2007-01-01

    A measurement of the top quark mass in t$\\bar{t}$ → l + jets candidate events, obtained from p$\\bar{p}$ collisions at √s = 1.96 TeV at the Fermilab Tevatron using the CDF II detector, is presented. The measurement approach is that of a matrix element method. For each candidate event, a two dimensional likelihood is calculated in the top pole mass and a constant scale factor, 'JES', where JES multiplies the input particle jet momenta and is designed to account for the systematic uncertainty of the jet momentum reconstruction. As with all matrix elements techniques, the method involves an integration using the Standard Model matrix element for tt production and decay. however, the technique presented is unique in that the matrix element is modified to compensate for kinematic assumptions which are made to reduce computation time. Background events are dealt with through use of an event observable which distinguishes signal from background, as well as through a cut on the value of an event's maximum likelihood. Results are based on a 955 pb-1 data sample, using events with a high-pT lepton and exactly four high-energy jets, at least one of which is tagged as coming from a b quark; 149 events pass all the selection requirements. They find Mmeas = 169.8 ± 2.3(stat.) ± 1.4(syst.) GeV/c2.

  5. [Determination of 235U/238U isotope ratios in camphor tree bark samples by MC-ICP-MS after separation of uranium from matrix elements].

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiao-Ping; Zhang, Ji-Long

    2007-07-01

    Twelve camphor (cinnamomum camphora) tree bark samples were collected from Hiroshima and Kyoto, and the matrix element composition and morphology of the outer surface of these camphor tree bark samples were studied by EDXS and SEM respectively. After a dry decomposition, DOWEX 1-X8 anion exchange resin was used to separate uranium from matrix elements in these camphor tree bark samples. Finally, 235U/238 U isotope ratios in purified uranium solutions were determined by MC-ICP-MS. It was demonstrated that the outer surface of these camphor tree bark samples is porous and rough, with Al, Ca, Fe, K, Mg, Si, C, O and S as its matrix element composition. Uranium in these camphor tree bark samples can be efficiently separated and quantitatively recovered from the matrix element composition. Compared with those collected from Kyoto, the camphor tree bark samples collected from Hiroshima have significantly higher uranium contents, which may be due to the increased aerosol mass concentration during the city reconstruction. Moreover, the 235 U/23.U isotope ratios in a few camphor tree bark samples collected from Hiroshima are slightly higher than 0.007 25. PMID:17944430

  6. Achieving Finite Element Mesh Quality via Optimization of the Jacobian Matrix Norm and Associated Quantities, Part 1 - A Framework for Surface Mesh Optimization

    SciTech Connect

    Knupp, P.M.

    1999-01-18

    Structured mesh quality optimization methods are extended to optimization of unstructured triangular, quadrilateral, and mixed finite element meshes. N"ew interpretations of well-known nodally-bssed objective functions are made possible using matrices and matrix norms. The matrix perspective also suggests several new objective functions. Particularly significant is the interpretation of the Oddy metric and the Smoothness objective functions in terms of the condition number of the metric tensor and Jacobian matrix, respectively. Objective functions are grouped according to dimensionality to form weighted combinations. A simple unconstrained local optimum is computed using a modiiied N-ewton iteration. The optimization approach was implemented in the CUBIT mesh generation code and tested on several problems. Results were compared against several standard element-based quaIity measures to demonstrate that good mesh quality can be achieved with nodally-based objective functions.

  7. Communication: Wigner functions in action-angle variables, Bohr-Sommerfeld quantization, the Heisenberg correspondence principle, and a symmetrical quasi-classical approach to the full electronic density matrix.

    PubMed

    Miller, William H; Cotton, Stephen J

    2016-08-28

    It is pointed out that the classical phase space distribution in action-angle (a-a) variables obtained from a Wigner function depends on how the calculation is carried out: if one computes the standard Wigner function in Cartesian variables (p, x), and then replaces p and x by their expressions in terms of a-a variables, one obtains a different result than if the Wigner function is computed directly in terms of the a-a variables. Furthermore, the latter procedure gives a result more consistent with classical and semiclassical theory-e.g., by incorporating the Bohr-Sommerfeld quantization condition (quantum states defined by integer values of the action variable) as well as the Heisenberg correspondence principle for matrix elements of an operator between such states-and has also been shown to be more accurate when applied to electronically non-adiabatic applications as implemented within the recently developed symmetrical quasi-classical (SQC) Meyer-Miller (MM) approach. Moreover, use of the Wigner function (obtained directly) in a-a variables shows how our standard SQC/MM approach can be used to obtain off-diagonal elements of the electronic density matrix by processing in a different way the same set of trajectories already used (in the SQC/MM methodology) to obtain the diagonal elements. PMID:27586896

  8. Generalization of rectangular element stiffness matrix and thermal load vector associated with a(0) + a(1)x + a(2)y + a(3)xy type interpolation rule

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ray, Sujit K.; Utku, Senol; Wada, Ben K.

    1986-01-01

    The stiffness-matrix formulation for the rectangular finite element described by Melosh (1963) and Weaver and Johnston (1984) is generalized to orthotropic materials with material axes not necessarily coincident with the x and y axes; i.e., the condition d(13) = d(23) = 0 is removed. Also included are explicit expressions for the element load vector associated with nonuniform temperature increase in the element. Applications to the analysis of thermal stresses in thin Si-crystal ribbons subjected to temperature changes with highly nonuniform lengthwise and transverse gradients (Utku et al., 1986) and to the simulation of the thermoviscoelastic behavior of growing Si ribbons (Utku and Ray, 1986) are indicated.

  9. An ultra-high element density pMUT array with low crosstalk for 3-D medical imaging.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yi; Tian, He; Wang, Yu-Feng; Shu, Yi; Zhou, Chang-Jian; Sun, Hui; Zhang, Cang-Hai; Chen, Hao; Ren, Tian-Ling

    2013-01-01

    A ~1 MHz piezoelectric micromachined ultrasonic transducer (pMUT) array with ultra-high element density and low crosstalk is proposed for the first time. This novel pMUT array is based on a nano-layer spin-coating lead zirconium titanium film technique and can be fabricated with high element density using a relatively simple process. Accordingly, key fabrication processes such as thick piezoelectric film deposition, low-stress Si-SOI bonding and bulk silicon removal have been successfully developed. The novel fine-pitch 6 × 6 pMUT arrays can all work at the desired frequency (~1 MHz) with good uniformity, high performance and potential IC integration compatibility. The minimum interspace is ~20 μm, the smallest that has ever been achieved to the best of our knowledge. These arrays can be potentially used to steer ultrasound beams and implement high quality 3-D medical imaging applications. PMID:23896705

  10. A novel gastro-floating multiparticulate system for dipyridamole (DIP) based on a porous and low-density matrix core: in vitro and in vivo evaluation.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhao; Xu, Heming; Li, Shujuan; Li, Qijun; Zhang, Wenji; Ye, Tiantian; Yang, Xinggang; Pan, Weisan

    2014-01-30

    The study was aimed to develop a novel gastro-floating multiparticulate system based on a porous and low-density matrix core with excellent floatability. The gastro-floating pellets (GFP) were composed of a porous matrix core, a drug loaded layer (DIP and HPMC), a sub-coating layer (HPMC) and a retarding layer (Eudragit(®) NE 30D). The porous matrix cores were evaluated in specific. EC was chosen as the matrix membrane for its rigidity and minimal expansion to large extent. The porous matrix core was achieved by the complete release of the bulk water soluble excipient from the EC coated beads, and mannitol was selected as the optimal water soluble excipient. SEM photomicrographs confirmed the structure of porous matrix cores. The compositions of GFP were investigated and optimized by orthogonal array design. The optimized formulation could sustain the drug release for 12h and float on the dissolution medium for at least 12h without lag time to float. The pharmacokinetic study was conducted in beagle dogs, and the relative bioavailability of the test preparation was 193.11±3.43%. In conclusion, the novel gastro-floating pellets can be developed as a promising approach for the gastro-retentive drug delivery systems. PMID:24368104

  11. Achieving Finite Element Mesh Quality via Optimization of the Jacobian Matrix Norm and Associated Quantities, Part II - A Framework for Volume Mesh Optimization and the Condition Number of the Jacobian Matrix

    SciTech Connect

    Knupp, P.M.

    1999-03-26

    Three-dimensional unstructured tetrahedral and hexahedral finite element mesh optimization is studied from a theoretical perspective and by computer experiments to determine what objective functions are most effective in attaining valid, high quality meshes. The approach uses matrices and matrix norms to extend the work in Part I to build suitable 3D objective functions. Because certain matrix norm identities which hold for 2 x 2 matrices do not hold for 3 x 3 matrices. significant differences arise between surface and volume mesh optimization objective functions. It is shown, for example, that the equivalence in two-dimensions of the Smoothness and Condition Number of the Jacobian matrix objective functions does not extend to three dimensions and further. that the equivalence of the Oddy and Condition Number of the Metric Tensor objective functions in two-dimensions also fails to extend to three-dimensions. Matrix norm identities are used to systematically construct dimensionally homogeneous groups of objective functions. The concept of an ideal minimizing matrix is introduced for both hexahedral and tetrahedral elements. Non-dimensional objective functions having barriers are emphasized as the most logical choice for mesh optimization. The performance of a number of objective functions in improving mesh quality was assessed on a suite of realistic test problems, focusing particularly on all-hexahedral ''whisker-weaved'' meshes. Performance is investigated on both structured and unstructured meshes and on both hexahedral and tetrahedral meshes. Although several objective functions are competitive, the condition number objective function is particularly attractive. The objective functions are closely related to mesh quality measures. To illustrate, it is shown that the condition number metric can be viewed as a new tetrahedral element quality measure.

  12. A Galerkin-based formulation of the probability density evolution method for general stochastic finite element systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Papadopoulos, Vissarion; Kalogeris, Ioannis

    2016-05-01

    The present paper proposes a Galerkin finite element projection scheme for the solution of the partial differential equations (pde's) involved in the probability density evolution method, for the linear and nonlinear static analysis of stochastic systems. According to the principle of preservation of probability, the probability density evolution of a stochastic system is expressed by its corresponding Fokker-Planck (FP) stochastic partial differential equation. Direct integration of the FP equation is feasible only for simple systems with a small number of degrees of freedom, due to analytical and/or numerical intractability. However, rewriting the FP equation conditioned to the random event description, a generalized density evolution equation (GDEE) can be obtained, which can be reduced to a one dimensional pde. Two Galerkin finite element method schemes are proposed for the numerical solution of the resulting pde's, namely a time-marching discontinuous Galerkin scheme and the StreamlineUpwind/Petrov Galerkin (SUPG) scheme. In addition, a reformulation of the classical GDEE is proposed, which implements the principle of probability preservation in space instead of time, making this approach suitable for the stochastic analysis of finite element systems. The advantages of the FE Galerkin methods and in particular the SUPG over finite difference schemes, like the modified Lax-Wendroff, which is the most frequently used method for the solution of the GDEE, are illustrated with numerical examples and explored further.

  13. Positive Matrix Factorization of hourly size-segregated PM elemental concentration at a street canyon: effect of street cleaning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amato, Fulvio; Nava, Silvia; Lucarelli, Franco; Querol, Xavier; Alastuey, Andrés.

    2010-05-01

    Despite the high environmental and health burden of road dust emissions in urban environments, there is still a dearth of knowledge on the effectiveness of some possible remediation measures such as street cleaning activities. As a consequence of the recent notification from the EU commission for the exceedances of PM limit values (1999/30/EC), several EU countries (Austria, Germany and UK among others) have introduced street cleaning as one of the main measures to be taken in order to meet these limits in the next future. Nevertheless, the effectiveness of street cleaning is still far from being definitively determined since only few tests have been carried out so far and with very different local conditions. An intensive campaign was carried out during spring 2009 in the city centre of Barcelona (NE of Spain) by means of the application of innovative techniques: i) the hourly elemental composition of size segregated PM was used to investigate short term variability of specific tracers of road dust resuspension; ii) a Positive Matrix Factorization was applied in order to identify the daily pattern of each PM source. Hourly elemental concentrations were obtained by a two-stage streaker sampler, where particles are separated on different stages: an impactor deposits the aerosol coarse fraction (aerodynamic diameter between 2.5-10 µm) on a Kapton foil while the fine fraction (<2.5 µm) is collected on a Nuclepore filter having 0.4 µm pores. The two collecting plates (Kapton and Nuclepore) are paired on a cartridge which rotates at constant speed for a week: this produces a circular continuous deposition of particulate matter (streak) on both stages. Totally 349 samples were collected onto three pairs of stages and analyzed by Proton Induced X-Ray Emission (PIXE) external beam facility in Florence, based on a Van de Graaff accelerator. This facility has been used several times in the past for aerosol studies. A Positive Matrix Factorization (PMF) model was applied

  14. Accurate ab Initio Spin Densities

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    We present an approach for the calculation of spin density distributions for molecules that require very large active spaces for a qualitatively correct description of their electronic structure. Our approach is based on the density-matrix renormalization group (DMRG) algorithm to calculate the spin density matrix elements as a basic quantity for the spatially resolved spin density distribution. The spin density matrix elements are directly determined from the second-quantized elementary operators optimized by the DMRG algorithm. As an analytic convergence criterion for the spin density distribution, we employ our recently developed sampling-reconstruction scheme [J. Chem. Phys.2011, 134, 224101] to build an accurate complete-active-space configuration-interaction (CASCI) wave function from the optimized matrix product states. The spin density matrix elements can then also be determined as an expectation value employing the reconstructed wave function expansion. Furthermore, the explicit reconstruction of a CASCI-type wave function provides insight into chemically interesting features of the molecule under study such as the distribution of α and β electrons in terms of Slater determinants, CI coefficients, and natural orbitals. The methodology is applied to an iron nitrosyl complex which we have identified as a challenging system for standard approaches [J. Chem. Theory Comput.2011, 7, 2740]. PMID:22707921

  15. A general non-Abelian density matrix renormalization group algorithm with application to the C{sub 2} dimer

    SciTech Connect

    Sharma, Sandeep

    2015-01-14

    We extend our previous work [S. Sharma and G. K.-L. Chan, J. Chem. Phys. 136, 124121 (2012)], which described a spin-adapted (SU(2) symmetry) density matrix renormalization group algorithm, to additionally utilize general non-Abelian point group symmetries. A key strength of the present formulation is that the requisite tensor operators are not hard-coded for each symmetry group, but are instead generated on the fly using the appropriate Clebsch-Gordan coefficients. This allows our single implementation to easily enable (or disable) any non-Abelian point group symmetry (including SU(2) spin symmetry). We use our implementation to compute the ground state potential energy curve of the C{sub 2} dimer in the cc-pVQZ basis set (with a frozen-core), corresponding to a Hilbert space dimension of 10{sup 12} many-body states. While our calculated energy lies within the 0.3 mE{sub h} error bound of previous initiator full configuration interaction quantum Monte Carlo and correlation energy extrapolation by intrinsic scaling calculations, our estimated residual error is only 0.01 mE{sub h}, much more accurate than these previous estimates. Due to the additional efficiency afforded by the algorithm, the excitation energies (T{sub e}) of eight lowest lying excited states: a{sup 3}Π{sub u}, b{sup 3}Σ{sub g}{sup −}, A{sup 1}Π{sub u}, c{sup 3}Σ{sub u}{sup +}, B{sup 1}Δ{sub g}, B{sup ′1}Σ{sub g}{sup +}, d{sup 3}Π{sub g}, and C{sup 1}Π{sub g} are calculated, which agree with experimentally derived values to better than 0.06 eV. In addition, we also compute the potential energy curves of twelve states: the three lowest levels for each of the irreducible representations {sup 1}Σ{sub g}{sup +}, {sup 1}Σ{sub u}{sup +}, {sup 1}Σ{sub g}{sup −}, and {sup 1}Σ{sub u}{sup −}, to an estimated accuracy of 0.1 mE{sub h} of the exact result in this basis.

  16. Finite Elements approach for Density Functional Theory calculations on locally refined meshes

    SciTech Connect

    Fattebert, J; Hornung, R D; Wissink, A M

    2006-03-27

    We present a quadratic Finite Elements approach to discretize the Kohn-Sham equations on structured non-uniform meshes. A multigrid FAC preconditioner is proposed to iteratively solve the equations by an accelerated steepest descent scheme. The method was implemented using SAMRAI, a parallel software infrastructure for general AMR applications. Examples of applications to small nanoclusters calculations are presented.

  17. Finite Element approach for Density Functional Theory calculations on locally refined meshes

    SciTech Connect

    Fattebert, J; Hornung, R D; Wissink, A M

    2007-02-23

    We present a quadratic Finite Element approach to discretize the Kohn-Sham equations on structured non-uniform meshes. A multigrid FAC preconditioner is proposed to iteratively solve the equations by an accelerated steepest descent scheme. The method was implemented using SAMRAI, a parallel software infrastructure for general AMR applications. Examples of applications to small nanoclusters calculations are presented.

  18. The response of cranial biomechanical finite element models to variations in mesh density.

    PubMed

    Bright, Jen A; Rayfield, Emily J

    2011-04-01

    Finite element (FE) models provide discrete solutions to continuous problems. Therefore, to arrive at the correct solution, it is vital to ensure that FE models contain a sufficient number of elements to fully resolve all the detail encountered in a continuum structure. Mesh convergence testing is the process of comparing successively finer meshes to identify the point of diminishing returns; where increasing resolution has marginal effects on results and further detail would become costly and unnecessary. Historically, convergence has not been considered in most CT-based biomechanical reconstructions involving complex geometries like the skull, as generating such models has been prohibitively time-consuming. To assess how mesh convergence influences results, 18 increasingly refined CT-based models of a domestic pig skull were compared to identify the point of convergence for strain and displacement, using both linear and quadratic tetrahedral elements. Not all regions of the skull converged at the same rate, and unexpectedly, areas of high strain converged faster than low-strain regions. Linear models were slightly stiffer than their quadratic counterparts, but did not converge less rapidly. As expected, insufficiently dense models underestimated strain and displacement, and failed to resolve strain "hot-spots" notable in contour plots. In addition to quantitative differences, visual assessments of such plots often inform conclusions drawn in many comparative studies, highlighting that mesh convergence should be performed on all finite element models before further analysis takes place. PMID:21370496

  19. Bone Mineral 31P and Matrix-Bound Water Densities Measured by Solid-State 1H and 31P MRI

    PubMed Central

    Seifert, Alan C.; Li, Cheng; Rajapakse, Chamith S.; Bashoor- Zadeh, Mahdieh; Bhagat, Yusuf A.; Wright, Alexander C.; Zemel, Babette S.; Zavaliangos, Antonios; Wehrli, Felix W.

    2014-01-01

    Bone is a composite material consisting of mineral and hydrated collagen fractions. MRI of bone is challenging due to extremely short transverse relaxation times, but solid-state imaging sequences exist that can acquire the short-lived signal from bone tissue. Previous work to quantify bone density via MRI used powerful experimental scanners. This work seeks to establish the feasibility of MRI-based measurement on clinical scanners of bone mineral and collagen-bound water densities, the latter as a surrogate of matrix density, and to examine the associations of these parameters with porosity and donors’ age. Mineral and matrix-bound water images of reference phantoms and cortical bone from 16 human donors, ages 27-97 years, were acquired by zero-echo-time 31P and 1H MRI on whole body 7T and 3T scanners, respectively. Images were corrected for relaxation and RF inhomogeneity to obtain density maps. Cortical porosity was measured by micro-CT, and apparent mineral density by pQCT. MRI-derived densities were compared to x-ray-based measurements by least-squares regression. Mean bone mineral 31P density was 6.74±1.22 mol/L (corresponding to 1129±204 mg/cc mineral), and mean bound water 1H density was 31.3±4.2 mol/L (corresponding to 28.3±3.7 %v/v). Both 31P and bound water (BW) densities were correlated negatively with porosity (31P: R2 = 0.32, p < 0.005; BW: R2 = 0.63, p < 0.0005) and age (31P: R2 = 0.39, p < 0.05; BW: R2 = 0.70, p < 0.0001), and positively with pQCT density (31P: R2 = 0.46, p < 0.05; BW: R2 = 0.50, p < 0.005). In contrast, the bone mineralization ratio (expressed here as the ratio of 31P density to bound water density), which is proportional to true bone mineralization, was found to be uncorrelated with porosity, age, or pQCT density. This work establishes the feasibility of image-based quantification of bone mineral and bound water densities using clinical hardware. PMID:24846186

  20. Stripes in a three-chain Hubbard ladder: A comparison of density-matrix renormalization group and constrained-path Monte Carlo results

    SciTech Connect

    Bonca, J.; Gubernatis, J. E.; Guerrero, M.; Jeckelmann, Eric; White, Steven R.

    2000-02-01

    Using both the density-matrix renormalization group method and the constrained-path quantum Monte Carlo method, we studied the ground-state energies and the spin and hole densities of a 12x3 Hubbard model with open boundary conditions and six holes doped away from half-filling. Results obtained with these two methods agree well in the small and intermediate U regimes. For U/t{>=}6 we find a ground-state with charge inhomogeneities consistent with stripes. (c) 2000 The American Physical Society.

  1. Structural Health Monitoring Using High-Density Fiber Optic Strain Sensor and Inverse Finite Element Methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vazquez, Sixto L.; Tessler, Alexander; Quach, Cuong C.; Cooper, Eric G.; Parks, Jeffrey; Spangler, Jan L.

    2005-01-01

    In an effort to mitigate accidents due to system and component failure, NASA s Aviation Safety has partnered with industry, academia, and other governmental organizations to develop real-time, on-board monitoring capabilities and system performance models for early detection of airframe structure degradation. NASA Langley is investigating a structural health monitoring capability that uses a distributed fiber optic strain system and an inverse finite element method for measuring and modeling structural deformations. This report describes the constituent systems that enable this structural monitoring function and discusses results from laboratory tests using the fiber strain sensor system and the inverse finite element method to demonstrate structural deformation estimation on an instrumented test article

  2. Nuclear-structure dependence of O (. alpha. ) corrections to Fermi decays and the value of the Kobayashi-Maskawa matrix element V sub ud

    SciTech Connect

    Jaus, W.; Rasche, G. )

    1990-01-01

    We calculate nuclear-structure corrections to the {ital ft} values of the eight accurately measured superallowed {beta}{sup +} decays. The statistical fit for the average {ital ft} value is very good. The resulting new value for the matrix element of the Kobayashi-Maskawa (KM) matrix is {vert bar}{ital V}{sub {ital ud}}{vert bar}=0.9735(5). The error in {vert bar}{ital V}{sub {ital ud}}{vert bar} has thus been reduced by 50%. Combining this value for {vert bar}{ital V}{sub {ital ud}}{vert bar} with the presently accepted results from kaon-, hyperon-, and {ital B}-decay constraints, the unitarity of the KM matrix for three generations of quarks seems to be violated.

  3. Element analysis and calculation of the attenuation coefficients for gold, bronze and water matrixes using MCNP, WinXCom and experimental data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Esfandiari, M.; Shirmardi, S. P.; Medhat, M. E.

    2014-06-01

    In this study, element analysis and the mass attenuation coefficient for matrixes of gold, bronze and water with various impurities and the concentrations of heavy metals (Cu, Mn, Pb and Zn) are evaluated and calculated by the MCNP simulation code for photons emitted from Barium-133, Americium-241 and sources with energies between 1 and 100 keV. The MCNP data are compared with the experimental data and WinXCom code simulated results by Medhat. The results showed that the obtained results of bronze and gold matrix are in good agreement with the other methods for energies above 40 and 60 keV, respectively. However for water matrixes with various impurities, there is a good agreement between the three methods MCNP, WinXCom and the experimental one in low and high energies.

  4. Running sums for 2{nu}{beta}{beta}-decay matrix elements within the quasiparticle random-phase approximation with account for deformation

    SciTech Connect

    Fang Dongliang; Faessler, Amand; Rodin, Vadim; Simkovic, Fedor; Yousef, Mohamed Saleh

    2010-03-15

    The 2{nu}{beta}{beta}-decay running sums for {sup 76}Ge and {sup 150}Nd nuclei are calculated within a QRPA approach with account for deformation. A realistic nucleon-nucleon residual interaction based on the Brueckner G matrix (for the Bonn CD force) is used. The influence of different model parameters on the functional behavior of the running sums is studied. It is found that the parameter g{sub pp} renormalizing the G matrix in the QRPA particle-particle channel is responsible for a qualitative change in behavior of the running sums at higher excitation energies. For realistic values of g{sub pp} a significant negative contribution to the total 2{nu}{beta}{beta}-decay matrix element is found to come from the energy region of the giant Gamow-Teller resonance. This behavior agrees with results of other authors.

  5. Effect of carbide size, area, density on rolling-element fatigue

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chevalier, J. L.; Zaretsky, E. V.

    1972-01-01

    A carbide parameter that can be used to predict rolling element fatigue life was developed.The parameter is based on a statistical life analysis and incorporates the total number of particles per unit area, particle size, and percent carbide area. These were determined from quantimet image analyzing computer examinations of random samples selected from eight lots of material previously tested in rolling fatigue. The carbide parameter is independent of chemical composition, heat treatment, and hardening mechanism of the materials investigated.

  6. All-electron Kohn–Sham density functional theory on hierarchic finite element spaces

    SciTech Connect

    Schauer, Volker; Linder, Christian

    2013-10-01

    In this work, a real space formulation of the Kohn–Sham equations is developed, making use of the hierarchy of finite element spaces from different polynomial order. The focus is laid on all-electron calculations, having the highest requirement onto the basis set, which must be able to represent the orthogonal eigenfunctions as well as the electrostatic potential. A careful numerical analysis is performed, which points out the numerical intricacies originating from the singularity of the nuclei and the necessity for approximations in the numerical setting, with the ambition to enable solutions within a predefined accuracy. In this context the influence of counter-charges in the Poisson equation, the requirement of a finite domain size, numerical quadratures and the mesh refinement are examined as well as the representation of the electrostatic potential in a high order finite element space. The performance and accuracy of the method is demonstrated in computations on noble gases. In addition the finite element basis proves its flexibility in the calculation of the bond-length as well as the dipole moment of the carbon monoxide molecule.

  7. Combined W H ---> l nu b b search at CDF with neural network and matrix element techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Aaltonen, Timo; /Helsinki U.

    2009-01-01

    We present a Standard Model (SM) Higgs search at CDF for WH {yields} l{nu}b{bar b} produced by p{bar p} collisions at a center-of-mass energy of {radical}s = 1.96 TeV using an integrated luminosity of 4.3 fb{sup -1}. This new analysis uses several improvements to increase sensitivity for Higgs searches including a Neural Network (NN) b-tagger, a b-jet energy correction which improves Higgs dijet mass resolution, isolated track selection to increase lepton acceptance, a NN-flavor separator to reduce mistags, and a three-jet category to complement the standard two-jet procedure. We perform two independent analyses with distinct multivariate discriminant techniques, NN-analysis and Matrix Element Technique (ME). The NN analysis sets limits across a range of Higgs masses from 100 GeV/c{sup 2} to 150 GeV/c{sup 2}, with observed limits ranging from {sigma}(p{bar p} {yields} W{sup {+-}}H) x BR(H {yields} b{bar b}) < < 4.0 to 37.6 times the SM prediction and 5.3 x SM observed (4.0 expected) at M(H) = 115 GeV/c{sup 2}. The ME analysis sets limits with observed limits ranging from {sigma}(p{bar p} {yields} W{sup {+-}} H) x BR(H {yields} b{bar b}) < 4.5 to 48.8 times the SM prediction and 6.6 x SM observed (4.1 expected) at M(H) = 115 GeV/c{sup 2}. For the CDF combination we use two-jet events from NN analysis and three-jet events from ME analysis together with other CDF searches. We observe no excess in data and we calculate combined upper limits on the ratio of the Higgs boson cross section times the branching ratio to its SM prediction for Higgs boson masses between 100 and 200 GeV/c{sup 2}. The results are in good agreement with the expectations obtained from background-only pseudo-experiments. The observed (expected) 95% CL upper limit is 3.1 (2.4) higher than the SM production cross section for Higgs boson mass of 115 GeV/c{sup 2}.

  8. Fabrication and evaluation of low-cost agarose-zinc nanoporous composite matrix: influence of adsorbent density and size distribution on the performance of expanded beds.

    PubMed

    Asghari, Fateme; Jahanshahi, Mohsen

    2012-09-28

    Expanded bed adsorption (EBA), a promising and practical separation technique for adsorption of nanobioproduct/bioproduct, has been widely studied in the past two decades. The development of adsorbent with the special design for expanded bed process is a challenging course. To reduce the costs of adsorbent preparation, fine zinc powder was used as the inexpensive densifier. A series of matrices named Ag-Zn were prepared by water-in-oil emulsification method. The structure and morphology of the prepared matrix were studied by the optical microscope (OM) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The physical properties as a function of zinc powder ratio to agarose slurry were measured. The prepared matrices had regular spherical shape, and followed logarithmic normal size distribution with the range of 75-330 μm, mean diameter of 140.54-191.11 μm, wet density of 1.33-2.01 g/ml, water content of 0.45-0.75, porosity of 0.86-0.97 and pore size of about 40-90 nm. The bed expansion factor at the range of 2-3 was examined. The obtained results indicated that the expansion factor was decreased with increasing of matrix density. In addition, it was found that matrices with large particle size were suitable for high operation flow rate. The hydrodynamic properties were determined in expanded bed by the residence time distribution method (RTD). The effects of flow velocity, expansion factor and density of matrix on the hydrodynamic properties were also investigated. Moreover, the influence of particle size distribution on the performance of expanded bed has been studied. Therefore, three different particle size fractions (65-140, 215-280 and 65-280 μm) were assessed. The results indicated that dispersion in liquid-solid expanded beds increased with increasing flow rate and expansion factor; and matrix with a wide particle size distribution leaded to a reduced axial dispersion compared to matrices with a narrow size distribution. The axial dispersion coefficient also enhanced

  9. On the Use of Finite Difference Matrix-Vector Products in Newton-Krylov Solvers for Implicit Climate Dynamics with Spectral Elements

    SciTech Connect

    Gardner, David; Woodward, Carol S.; Evans, Katherine J

    2015-01-01

    Efficient solution of global climate models requires effectively handling disparate length and time scales. Implicit solution approaches allow time integration of the physical system with a time step dictated by accuracy of the processes of interest rather than by stability governed by the fastest of the time scales present. Implicit approaches, however, require the solution of nonlinear systems within each time step. Usually, a Newton s method is applied for these systems. Each iteration of the Newton s method, in turn, requires the solution of a linear model of the nonlinear system. This model employs the Jacobian of the problem-defining nonlinear residual, but this Jacobian can be costly to form. If a Krylov linear solver is used for the solution of the linear system, the action of the Jacobian matrix on a given vector is required. In the case of spectral element methods, the Jacobian is not calculated but only implemented through matrix-vector products. The matrix-vector multiply can also be approximated by a finite-difference which may show a loss of accuracy in the overall nonlinear solver. In this paper, we review the advantages and disadvantages of finite-difference approximations of these matrix-vector products for climate dynamics within the spectral-element based shallow-water dynamical-core of the Community Atmosphere Model (CAM).

  10. On the use of finite difference matrix-vector products in Newton-Krylov solvers for implicit climate dynamics with spectral elements

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Woodward, Carol S.; Gardner, David J.; Evans, Katherine J.

    2015-01-01

    Efficient solutions of global climate models require effectively handling disparate length and time scales. Implicit solution approaches allow time integration of the physical system with a step size governed by accuracy of the processes of interest rather than by stability of the fastest time scales present. Implicit approaches, however, require the solution of nonlinear systems within each time step. Usually, a Newton's method is applied to solve these systems. Each iteration of the Newton's method, in turn, requires the solution of a linear model of the nonlinear system. This model employs the Jacobian of the problem-defining nonlinear residual, but thismore » Jacobian can be costly to form. If a Krylov linear solver is used for the solution of the linear system, the action of the Jacobian matrix on a given vector is required. In the case of spectral element methods, the Jacobian is not calculated but only implemented through matrix-vector products. The matrix-vector multiply can also be approximated by a finite difference approximation which may introduce inaccuracy in the overall nonlinear solver. In this paper, we review the advantages and disadvantages of finite difference approximations of these matrix-vector products for climate dynamics within the spectral element shallow water dynamical core of the Community Atmosphere Model.« less

  11. On the use of finite difference matrix-vector products in Newton-Krylov solvers for implicit climate dynamics with spectral elements

    SciTech Connect

    Woodward, Carol S.; Gardner, David J.; Evans, Katherine J.

    2015-01-01

    Efficient solutions of global climate models require effectively handling disparate length and time scales. Implicit solution approaches allow time integration of the physical system with a step size governed by accuracy of the processes of interest rather than by stability of the fastest time scales present. Implicit approaches, however, require the solution of nonlinear systems within each time step. Usually, a Newton's method is applied to solve these systems. Each iteration of the Newton's method, in turn, requires the solution of a linear model of the nonlinear system. This model employs the Jacobian of the problem-defining nonlinear residual, but this Jacobian can be costly to form. If a Krylov linear solver is used for the solution of the linear system, the action of the Jacobian matrix on a given vector is required. In the case of spectral element methods, the Jacobian is not calculated but only implemented through matrix-vector products. The matrix-vector multiply can also be approximated by a finite difference approximation which may introduce inaccuracy in the overall nonlinear solver. In this paper, we review the advantages and disadvantages of finite difference approximations of these matrix-vector products for climate dynamics within the spectral element shallow water dynamical core of the Community Atmosphere Model.

  12. High energy density rechargeable magnesium battery using earth-abundant and non-toxic elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orikasa, Yuki; Masese, Titus; Koyama, Yukinori; Mori, Takuya; Hattori, Masashi; Yamamoto, Kentaro; Okado, Tetsuya; Huang, Zhen-Dong; Minato, Taketoshi; Tassel, Cédric; Kim, Jungeun; Kobayashi, Yoji; Abe, Takeshi; Kageyama, Hiroshi; Uchimoto, Yoshiharu

    2014-07-01

    Rechargeable magnesium batteries are poised to be viable candidates for large-scale energy storage devices in smart grid communities and electric vehicles. However, the energy density of previously proposed rechargeable magnesium batteries is low, limited mainly by the cathode materials. Here, we present new design approaches for the cathode in order to realize a high-energy-density rechargeable magnesium battery system. Ion-exchanged MgFeSiO4 demonstrates a high reversible capacity exceeding 300 mAh.g-1 at a voltage of approximately 2.4 V vs. Mg. Further, the electronic and crystal structure of ion-exchanged MgFeSiO4 changes during the charging and discharging processes, which demonstrates the (de)insertion of magnesium in the host structure. The combination of ion-exchanged MgFeSiO4 with a magnesium bis(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)imide-triglyme electrolyte system proposed in this work provides a low-cost and practical rechargeable magnesium battery with high energy density, free from corrosion and safety problems.

  13. High energy density rechargeable magnesium battery using earth-abundant and non-toxic elements

    PubMed Central

    Orikasa, Yuki; Masese, Titus; Koyama, Yukinori; Mori, Takuya; Hattori, Masashi; Yamamoto, Kentaro; Okado, Tetsuya; Huang, Zhen-Dong; Minato, Taketoshi; Tassel, Cédric; Kim, Jungeun; Kobayashi, Yoji; Abe, Takeshi; Kageyama, Hiroshi; Uchimoto, Yoshiharu

    2014-01-01

    Rechargeable magnesium batteries are poised to be viable candidates for large-scale energy storage devices in smart grid communities and electric vehicles. However, the energy density of previously proposed rechargeable magnesium batteries is low, limited mainly by the cathode materials. Here, we present new design approaches for the cathode in order to realize a high-energy-density rechargeable magnesium battery system. Ion-exchanged MgFeSiO4 demonstrates a high reversible capacity exceeding 300 mAh·g−1 at a voltage of approximately 2.4 V vs. Mg. Further, the electronic and crystal structure of ion-exchanged MgFeSiO4 changes during the charging and discharging processes, which demonstrates the (de)insertion of magnesium in the host structure. The combination of ion-exchanged MgFeSiO4 with a magnesium bis(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)imide–triglyme electrolyte system proposed in this work provides a low-cost and practical rechargeable magnesium battery with high energy density, free from corrosion and safety problems. PMID:25011939

  14. High energy density rechargeable magnesium battery using earth-abundant and non-toxic elements.

    PubMed

    Orikasa, Yuki; Masese, Titus; Koyama, Yukinori; Mori, Takuya; Hattori, Masashi; Yamamoto, Kentaro; Okado, Tetsuya; Huang, Zhen-Dong; Minato, Taketoshi; Tassel, Cédric; Kim, Jungeun; Kobayashi, Yoji; Abe, Takeshi; Kageyama, Hiroshi; Uchimoto, Yoshiharu

    2014-01-01

    Rechargeable magnesium batteries are poised to be viable candidates for large-scale energy storage devices in smart grid communities and electric vehicles. However, the energy density of previously proposed rechargeable magnesium batteries is low, limited mainly by the cathode materials. Here, we present new design approaches for the cathode in order to realize a high-energy-density rechargeable magnesium battery system. Ion-exchanged MgFeSiO4 demonstrates a high reversible capacity exceeding 300 Ah · g(-1) at a voltage of approximately 2.4 V vs. Mg. Further, the electronic and crystal structure of ion-exchanged MgFeSiO4 changes during the charging and discharging processes, which demonstrates the (de)insertion of magnesium in the host structure. The combination of ion-exchanged MgFeSiO4 with a magnesium bis(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)imide-triglyme electrolyte system proposed in this work provides a low-cost and practical rechargeable magnesium battery with high energy density, free from corrosion and safety problems. PMID:25011939

  15. Determination of the microstructure of gas bubbles in highly purified water by measuring the elements of the laser radiation scattering matrix

    SciTech Connect

    Bunkin, Nikolai F; Suyazov, N V; Shkirin, A V; Ignat'ev, P S; Indukaev, K V

    2009-04-30

    Modulation interference microscopy and measurements of the elements of the light scattering matrix showed that doubly distilled water purified from solid impurities contains macroscopic scatterers in the form of micron clusters formed by polydisperse air bubbles with the effective radius 70-90 nm. The fractal dimension of clusters lies within 2.4-2.8 and their concentration is {approx}10{sup 6} cm{sup -3}. (radiation scattering)

  16. A Measurement of the Top Quark Mass with the D0 Detector at s**(1/2) = 1.96-TeV using the Matrix Element Method

    SciTech Connect

    Kroeninger, Kevin Alexander; /Bonn U.

    2004-04-01

    Using a data set of 158 and 169 pb{sup -1} of D0 Run-II data in the electron and muon plus jets channel, respectively, the top quark mass has been measured using the Matrix Element Method. The method and its implementation are described. Its performance is studied in Monte Carlo using ensemble tests and the method is applied to the Moriond 2004 data set.

  17. High-Energy Anomaly in the Angle-Resolved Photoemission Spectra of Nd2-xCexCuO4: Evidence for a Matrix Element Effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rienks, E. D. L.; ńrrälä, M.; Lindroos, M.; Roth, F.; Tabis, W.; Yu, G.; Greven, M.; Fink, J.

    2014-09-01

    We use polarization-dependent angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES) to study the high-energy anomaly (HEA) in the dispersion of Nd2-xCexCuO4, x =0.123. We find that at particular photon energies the anomalous, waterfall-like dispersion gives way to a broad, continuous band. This suggests that the HEA is a matrix element effect: it arises due to a suppression of the intensity of the broadened quasiparticle band in a narrow momentum range. We confirm this interpretation experimentally, by showing that the HEA appears when the matrix element is suppressed deliberately by changing the light polarization. Calculations of the matrix element using atomic wave functions and simulation of the ARPES intensity with one-step model calculations provide further evidence for this scenario. The possibility to detect the full quasiparticle dispersion further allows us to extract the high-energy self-energy function near the center and at the edge of the Brillouin zone.

  18. High-energy anomaly in the angle-resolved photoemission spectra of Nd(2-x)Ce(x)CuO₄: evidence for a matrix element effect.

    PubMed

    Rienks, E D L; Ärrälä, M; Lindroos, M; Roth, F; Tabis, W; Yu, G; Greven, M; Fink, J

    2014-09-26

    We use polarization-dependent angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES) to study the high-energy anomaly (HEA) in the dispersion of Nd(2-x)Ce(x)CuO₄, x=0.123. We find that at particular photon energies the anomalous, waterfall-like dispersion gives way to a broad, continuous band. This suggests that the HEA is a matrix element effect: it arises due to a suppression of the intensity of the broadened quasiparticle band in a narrow momentum range. We confirm this interpretation experimentally, by showing that the HEA appears when the matrix element is suppressed deliberately by changing the light polarization. Calculations of the matrix element using atomic wave functions and simulation of the ARPES intensity with one-step model calculations provide further evidence for this scenario. The possibility to detect the full quasiparticle dispersion further allows us to extract the high-energy self-energy function near the center and at the edge of the Brillouin zone. PMID:25302914

  19. Communications: Adsorption of element 112 on the gold surface: Many-body wave function versus density functional theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zaitsevskii, Andréi; van Wüllen, Christoph; Titov, Anatoly V.

    2010-02-01

    The applicability of the relativistic density functional theory (RDFT) with conventional generalized gradient and hybrid exchange-correlation functionals to the description of the interactions of element 112 (Cn) and its lighter homolog Hg with a gold surface is assessed. The comparison of Cn-Au (Hg-Au) bond properties for two simple models of adsorption complexes on Au(111) surface obtained by RDFT and accurate many-body calculations indicates a strong underestimation of binding energies by conventional RDFT schemes. This effect provides a possible explanation of the discrepancies between the RDFT-based theoretical and experimental data concerning the thermochromatographic registration of the α-decay chain element 114→Cn.

  20. Measurement of the electroweak top quark production cross section and the CKM matrix element Vtb with the D0 experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Kirsch, Matthias

    2009-06-29

    At particle accelerators the Standard Model has been tested and will be tested further to a great precision. The data analyzed in this thesis have been collected at the world's highest energetic-collider, the Tevatron, located at the Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory (FNAL) in the vicinity of Chicago, IL, USA. There, protons and antiprotons are collided at a center-of-mass energy of {radical}s = 1.96 TeV. The discovery of the top quark was one of the remarkable results not only for the CDF and D0 experiments at the Tevatron collider, but also for the Standard Model, which had predicted the existence of the top quark because of symmetry arguments long before already. Still, the Tevatron is the only facility able to produce top quarks. The predominant production mechanism of top quarks is the production of a top-antitop quark pair via the strong force. However, the Standard Model also allows the production of single top quarks via the electroweak interaction. This process features the unique opportunity to measure the |Vtb| matrix element of the Cabbibo-Kobayashi-Maskawa (CKM) matrix directly, without assuming unitarity of the matrix or assuming that the number of quark generations is three. Hence, the measurement of the cross section of electroweak top quark production is more than the technical challenge to extract a physics process that only occurs one out of ten billion collisions. It is also an important test of the V-A structure of the electroweak interaction and a potential window to physics beyond the Standard Model in the case where the measurement of |V{sub tb}| would result in a value significantly different from 1, the value predicted by the Standard Model. At the Tevatron two production processes contribute significantly to the production of single top quarks: the production via the t-channel, also called W-gluon fusion, and the production via the s-channel, known as well as W* process. This analysis searches for the combined s+t channel