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Sample records for density-stratified thin keplerian

  1. General Relativistic Magnetohydrodynamic Simulations of Jet Formation with a Thin Keplerian Disk

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mizuno, Yosuke; Nishikawa, Ken-Ichi; Koide, Shinji; Hardee, Philip; Gerald, J. Fishman

    2006-01-01

    We have performed several simulations of black hole systems (non-rotating, black hole spin parameter a = 0.0 and rapidly rotating, a = 0.95) with a geometrically thin Keplerian disk using the newly developed RAISHIN code. The simulation results show the formation of jets driven by the Lorentz force and the gas pressure gradient. The jets have mildly relativistic speed (greater than or equal to 0.4 c). The matter is continuously supplied from the accretion disk and the jet propagates outward until each applicable terminal simulation time (non-rotating: t/tau S = 275 and rotating: t/tau S = 200, tau s equivalent to r(sub s/c). It appears that a rotating black hole creates an additional, faster, and more collimated inner outflow (greater than or equal to 0.5 c) formed and accelerated by the twisted magnetic field resulting from frame-dragging in the black hole ergosphere. This new result indicates that jet kinematic structure depends on black hole rotation.

  2. THE HANLE EFFECT AS A DIAGNOSTIC OF MAGNETIC FIELDS IN STELLAR ENVELOPES. V. THIN LINES FROM KEPLERIAN DISKS

    SciTech Connect

    Ignace, R.

    2010-12-10

    This paper focuses on the polarized profiles of resonance scattering lines that form in magnetized disks. Optically thin lines from Keplerian planar disks are considered. Model line profiles are calculated for simple field topologies of axial fields (i.e., vertical to the disk plane) and toroidal fields (i.e., purely azimuthal). A scheme for discerning field strengths and geometries in disks is developed based on Stokes Q - U diagrams for the run of polarization across line profiles that are Doppler-broadened by the disk rotation. A discussion of the Hanle effect for magnetized disks in which the magnetorotational instability (MRI) is operating is also presented. Given that the MRI has a tendency to mix the vector field orientation, it may be difficult to detect the disk fields with the longitudinal Zeeman effect, since the amplitude of the circularly polarized signal scales with the net magnetic flux in the direction of the observer. The Hanle effect does not suffer from this impediment, and so a multi-line analysis could be used to constrain field strengths in disks dominated by the MRI.

  3. Longitudinal Oscillations in Density Stratified and Expanding Solar Waveguides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luna-Cardozo, M.; Verth, G.; Erdélyi, R.

    2012-04-01

    Waves and oscillations can provide vital information about the internal structure of waveguides in which they propagate. Here, we analytically investigate the effects of density and magnetic stratification on linear longitudinal magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) waves. The focus of this paper is to study the eigenmodes of these oscillations. It is our specific aim to understand what happens to these MHD waves generated in flux tubes with non-constant (e.g., expanding or magnetic bottle) cross-sectional area and density variations. The governing equation of the longitudinal mode is derived and solved analytically and numerically. In particular, the limit of the thin flux tube approximation is examined. The general solution describing the slow longitudinal MHD waves in an expanding magnetic flux tube with constant density is found. Longitudinal MHD waves in density stratified loops with constant magnetic field are also analyzed. From analytical solutions, the frequency ratio of the first overtone and fundamental mode is investigated in stratified waveguides. For small expansion, a linear dependence between the frequency ratio and the expansion factor is found. From numerical calculations it was found that the frequency ratio strongly depends on the density profile chosen and, in general, the numerical results are in agreement with the analytical results. The relevance of these results for solar magneto-seismology is discussed.

  4. LONGITUDINAL OSCILLATIONS IN DENSITY STRATIFIED AND EXPANDING SOLAR WAVEGUIDES

    SciTech Connect

    Luna-Cardozo, M.; Verth, G.; Erdelyi, R. E-mail: robertus@sheffield.ac.uk

    2012-04-01

    Waves and oscillations can provide vital information about the internal structure of waveguides in which they propagate. Here, we analytically investigate the effects of density and magnetic stratification on linear longitudinal magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) waves. The focus of this paper is to study the eigenmodes of these oscillations. It is our specific aim to understand what happens to these MHD waves generated in flux tubes with non-constant (e.g., expanding or magnetic bottle) cross-sectional area and density variations. The governing equation of the longitudinal mode is derived and solved analytically and numerically. In particular, the limit of the thin flux tube approximation is examined. The general solution describing the slow longitudinal MHD waves in an expanding magnetic flux tube with constant density is found. Longitudinal MHD waves in density stratified loops with constant magnetic field are also analyzed. From analytical solutions, the frequency ratio of the first overtone and fundamental mode is investigated in stratified waveguides. For small expansion, a linear dependence between the frequency ratio and the expansion factor is found. From numerical calculations it was found that the frequency ratio strongly depends on the density profile chosen and, in general, the numerical results are in agreement with the analytical results. The relevance of these results for solar magneto-seismology is discussed.

  5. Avoidance-preference testing in density stratified solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, E.H.; Logan, D.T.; Hansen, S.

    1994-12-31

    Toxicity testing is sometimes required where density stratifies test and reference solutions. Examples include freshwater effluents that float in estuarine and marine waters and desalinating plant effluents that sink. Standard avoidance-preference testing methods and apparatus are designed to test horizontal rather than vertical gradients and so are inappropriate for density stratified solutions. To overcome associated deficiencies, the authors modified testing chambers to take advantage of density stratification. Exposure levels for tests were selected based on NOELs from standard toxicity testing. Behavior of 10 striped bass was simultaneously observed using electronic surveillance. Measure of behavior include position in two axes and swimming speed. Avoidance-preference between several types of high density byproducts of salt water evaporation and lower density receiving water were tested. Results indicate that the modified test protocols allowed the authors to determine behavior responses to test materials.

  6. Quantum image pseudocolor coding based on the density-stratified method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Nan; Wu, Wenya; Wang, Luo; Zhao, Na

    2015-05-01

    Pseudocolor processing is a branch of image enhancement. It dyes grayscale images to color images to make the images more beautiful or to highlight some parts on the images. This paper proposes a quantum image pseudocolor coding scheme based on the density-stratified method which defines a colormap and changes the density value from gray to color parallel according to the colormap. Firstly, two data structures: quantum image GQIR and quantum colormap QCR are reviewed or proposed. Then, the quantum density-stratified algorithm is presented. Based on them, the quantum realization in the form of circuits is given. The main advantages of the quantum version for pseudocolor processing over the classical approach are that it needs less memory and can speed up the computation. Two kinds of examples help us to describe the scheme further. Finally, the future work are analyzed.

  7. Universal Keplerian state transition matrix

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shepperd, S. W.

    1985-01-01

    A completely general method for computing the Keplerian state transition matrix in terms of Goodyear's universal variables is presented. This includes a new scheme for solving Kepler's problem which is a necessary first step to computing the transition matrix. The Kepler problem is solved in terms of a new independent variable requiring the evaluation of only one transcendental function. Furthermore, this transcendental function may be conveniently evaluated by means of a Gaussian continued fraction.

  8. Magnetorotational decay instability in Keplerian disks.

    PubMed

    Shtemler, Yuri; Liverts, Edward; Mond, Michael

    2013-12-01

    The saturation of the magnetorotational instability (MRI) in thin Keplerian disks through three-wave resonant interactions is introduced and discussed. That mechanism is a natural generalization of the fundamental decay instability discovered five decades ago for infinite, homogeneous, and immovable plasmas. The decay instability relies on the energy transfer from the MRI to stable slow Alfvén-Coriolis as well as magnetosonic waves. A second-order forced Duffing amplitude equation for the initially unstable MRI as well as two first-order equations for the other two waves are derived. The solutions of those equations exhibit bounded bursty nonlinear oscillations for the MRI as well as unbounded growth for the linearly stable slow Alfvén-Coriolis and magnetosonic perturbations, thus giving rise to the magnetorotational decay instability. PMID:24476249

  9. On the Global Warping of a Thin Self-gravitating Near-Keplerian Gaseous Disk with Application to the Disk in NGC 4258

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Papaloizou, John C. B.; Terquem, Caroline; Lin, Doug N. C.

    1998-04-01

    We derive the tilt equation governing the inclination of a thin self-gravitating gaseous disk subject to low-frequency global m = 1 bending perturbations. The disk orbits under the influence of a dominant central mass. However, self-gravity can be important enough that the disk approaches marginal stability to local axisymmetric perturbations (Q ~ 1). The vertical restoring forces due to self-gravity and pressure are evaluated correct to the first order in the aspect ratio H/r. Thus the effects of bending waves are included correct to lowest order in the wave-crossing rate (H/r)Ω, Ω being a characteristic disk rotation frequency. Both free and forced disturbances are considered. The disk response and precession frequency induced by the presence of a binary companion in an orbit with general inclination to the unperturbed disk plane are derived. When the degree of warping and the inclination are small, it is shown that identical results are obtained if, alternatively, perturbation of the disk out of an equilibrium plane coinciding with that of the companion is considered, the time-averaged potential due to the latter being incorporated into the equilibrium potential. The condition for the disk to precess approximately like a rigid body with a small degree of warping is found to be that the density-wave crossing time is significantly shorter than the precession period. We consider the effects of the presence of a viscosity that can be characterized with the standard α parameterization and find that, to the order we work, the precession frequency is unaffected, with any change to the inclination of the slightly warped disk occurring at a slower rate. For α << H/r, effects due to both pressure and self-gravity are important in the response, while for α >> H/r, the response becomes dominated by self-gravity with pressure effects becoming negligible. As an application of these results, we explore the possibility that the recently observed warped disk in the active

  10. COMPARISON OF NUMERICAL AND LABORATORY EXPERIMENTS ON DENSITY-STRATIFIED FLOWS AROUND A THREE-DIMENSIONAL HILL

    EPA Science Inventory

    Direct comparisons between the results of a numerical model and laboratory experiments are presented for density-stratified flows around an isolated three-dimensional hill. The numerical model integrates the Navier-Stokes equations for incompressible stratified flow using a finit...

  11. Circumnuclear Keplerian Disks in Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bertola, Francesco; Cappellari, Michele; Funes, S. J., José G.; Corsini, Enrico M.; Pizzella, Alessandro; Beltrán, Juan C. Vega

    1998-12-01

    In this Letter, we demonstrate the possibility of inferring the presence of Keplerian gaseous disks using properly equipped optical ground-based telescopes. We have modeled the peculiar bidimensional shape of the emission lines in a sample of five early-type disk galaxies as due to the motion of a gaseous disk rotating in the combined potential of a central pointlike mass and of an extended stellar disk. The value of the central mass concentration estimated for four galaxies of the sample (NGC 2179, NGC 4343, NGC 4435, and NGC 4459) is ~109 Msolar. This value, according to the assumptions made in our model, is overestimated. However, we have calculated that the effect is well within the errors. For the remaining galaxy, NGC 5064, an upper limit of 5×107 Msolar is estimated. Based on observations carried out at ESO, La Silla, (Chile) (ESO N. 58, A-0564) and at the Mount Graham International Observatory (AZ) with the VATT: the Alice P. Lennon Telescope and the Thomas J. Bannan Astrophysics Facility.

  12. Hydrographic patterns in microbial communities in the density stratified Alaska Beaufort Shelf

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamdan, L. J.; Gillevet, P. M.; Sikaroodi, M.; Greinert, J.; Treude, T.; Coffin, R. B.

    2011-12-01

    Although similar microbial communities have been observed globally in methane charged sediments, the mechanism of their dispersal is unknown. The ocean may be a physical barrier for dispersal of anaerobic microorganisms typically found in methane seeps. However, it is possible that bottom layers act as distribution conduits for dormant cells to locations where geochemical conditions would allow them to flourish. The Alaska Beaufort Shelf (ABS) was used to stage a preliminary study of dispersal patterns of microbial communities from methane influenced waters and sediments. During September 2009 three density stratified water masses were present on the ABS, including a low salinity Arctic surface layer, an intermediate Pacific layer, and a deep, cold and saline Atlantic layer. Microbial community composition was studied in each water mass and in underlying sediments to determine the influence of water mass on sediment community structure. Sediment cores were obtained using a piston corer. Water samples were retrieved using a CTD rosette, and hydrodynamic data (e.g., salinity, temperature, density, dissolved oxygen) were acquired simultaneously. Methane concentrations were measured using a GC-FID. Community composition was surveyed using Multitag Pyrosequencing (MTPS) and Length Heterogeneity-PCR (LH-PCR) by amplification of hypervariable regions of the archaeal and bacterial SSUrRNA. MTPS data were processed using the QIIME pipeline, and taxonomy was assigned using the RDP classifier. The Unifrac metric and multidimensional scaling analysis was used to determine similarity patterns. Distinct bacterial communities were evident in the three water masses. Sequences related to the SAR11 clade were highly abundant in the Arctic layer. Gammaproteobacteria related to the Thiotrichales were abundant in Pacific and Atlantic layers. Archaeal water column communities were relatively homogeneous, and unidentified Euryarchaeota dominated all three water masses. Microbial

  13. Appearance of Keplerian discs orbiting Kerr superspinars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stuchlík, Zdeněk; Schee, Jan

    2010-11-01

    We study optical phenomena related to the appearance of Keplerian accretion discs orbiting Kerr superspinars predicted by string theory. The superspinar exterior is described by standard Kerr naked singularity geometry breaking the black hole limit on the internal angular momentum (spin). We construct local photon escape cones for a variety of orbiting sources that enable us to determine the superspinars silhouette in the case of distant observers. We show that the superspinar silhouette depends strongly on the assumed edge where the external Kerr spacetime is joined to the internal spacetime governed by string theory and significantly differs from the black hole silhouette. The appearance of the accretion disc is strongly dependent on the value of the superspinar spin in both their shape and frequency shift profile. Apparent extension of the disc grows significantly with the growing spin, while the frequency shift grows with the descending spin. This behaviour differs substantially from the appearance of discs orbiting black holes enabling thus, at least in principle, to distinguish clearly the Kerr superspinars and black holes. In vicinity of a Kerr superspinar the non-escaped photons have to be separated to those captured by the superspinar and those being trapped in its strong gravitational field leading to self-illumination of the disc that could even influence its structure and cause self-reflection effect of radiation of the disc. The amount of trapped photons grows with descending superspinar spin. We thus can expect significant self-illumination effects in the field of Kerr superspinars with near-extreme spin a ~ 1.

  14. Transition from the infalling envelope to the Keplerian disk around L1551 IRS 5

    SciTech Connect

    Chou, Ti-Lin; Takakuwa, Shigehisa; Yen, Hsi-Wei; Ohashi, Nagayoshi; Ho, Paul T. P.

    2014-11-20

    We present combined Submillimeter Array (SMA) +Atacama Submillimeter Telescope Experiment (ASTE) images of the Class I protobinary L1551 IRS 5 in the CS (J = 7-6) line, the submillimeter images of L1551 IRS 5 with the most complete spatial sampling ever achieved (0.''9-36''). The SMA image of L1551 IRS 5 in the 343 GHz dust-continuum emission is also presented, which shows an elongated feature along the northwest to southeast direction (∼160 AU × 80 AU), perpendicular to the associated radio jets. The combined SMA+ASTE images show that the high-velocity (≳1.5 km s{sup –1}) CS emission traces the structure of the dust component and shows a velocity gradient along the major axis, which is reproduced by a geometrically thin Keplerian-disk model with a central stellar mass of ∼0.5 M {sub ☉}. The low-velocity (≲1.3 km s{sup –1}) CS emission shows an extended (∼1000 AU) feature that exhibits slight south (blueshifted) to north (redshifted) emission offsets, which is modeled with a rotating and infalling envelope with a conserved angular momentum. The rotational motion of the envelope connects smoothly to the inner Keplerian rotation at a radius of ∼64 AU. The infalling velocity of the envelope is ∼three times lower than the free-fall velocity toward the central stellar mass of 0.5 M {sub ☉}. These results demonstrate transition from the infalling envelope to the Keplerian disk, consistent with the latest theoretical studies of disk formation. We suggest that sizable (r ∼ 50-200 AU) Keplerian disks are already formed when the protostars are still deeply embedded in the envelopes.

  15. Forbidden tangential orbit transfers between intersecting Keplerian orbits

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burns, Rowland E.

    1990-01-01

    The classical problem of tangential impulse transfer between coplanar Keplerian orbits is addressed. A completely analytic solution which does not rely on sequential calculation is obtained and this solution is used to demonstrate that certain initially chosen angles can produce singularities in the parameters of the transfer orbit. A necessary and sufficient condition for such singularities is that the initial and final orbits intersect.

  16. Hydrodynamic turbulence in quasi-Keplerian rotating flows?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Liang; Avila, Marc; Hof, Bjoern; Liang Shi Team; Marc Avila Team; Bjoern Hof Team

    2013-11-01

    The origin of turbulence in astrophysical accretion discs has been under scrutiny for decades and remains still unclear. The velocity profiles of discs (Keplerien profiles) are centrifugally stable and therefore a different instability mechanism is required for turbulence to arise. While in hot discs turbulence can be triggered through magnetorotational instability, cooler discs lack sufficient ionization and it is unclear how turbulence sets in. In analogy to other linearly stable flows like pipe and Couette flow, subcritical transition to turbulence may be the mechanism. Recently, experimental studies of Taylor-Couette flow in quasi-Keplerian regime have given conflicting results and numerical simulations of above experimental flows showed that the top and bottom end-wall leads to strong deviations from the Keplerian velocity profile and drives turbulence. In order to clarify this, we perform direct numerical simulations of incompressible Taylor-Couette flow without end walls in the quasi Keplerian regime for Re up to 200000. Strong transient growth is observed and gives rise to strongly disorted motion, suggesting that for large enough Re this mechanism may lead to turbulence even for Keplerian flows. This work is supported by Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft (DFG) under project SFB 963 and Max Planck Society.

  17. On the dynamical and geometrical symmetries of Keplerian motion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wulfman, Carl E.

    2009-05-01

    The dynamical symmetries of classical, relativistic and quantum-mechanical Kepler systems are considered to arise from geometric symmetries in PQET phase space. To establish their interconnection, the symmetries are related with the aid of a Lie-algebraic extension of Dirac's correspondence principle, a canonical transformation containing a Cunningham-Bateman inversion, and a classical limit involving a preliminary canonical transformation in ET space. The Lie-algebraic extension establishes the conditions under which the uncertainty principle allows the local dynamical symmetry of a quantum-mechanical system to be the same as the geometrical phase-space symmetry of its classical counterpart. The canonical transformation converts Poincaré-invariant free-particle systems into ISO(3,1) invariant relativistic systems whose classical limit produces Keplerian systems. Locally Cartesian relativistic PQET coordinates are converted into a set of eight conjugate position and momentum coordinates whose classical limit contains Fock projective momentum coordinates and the components of Runge-Lenz vectors. The coordinate systems developed via the transformations are those in which the evolution and degeneracy groups of the classical system are generated by Poisson-bracket operators that produce ordinary rotation, translation and hyperbolic motions in phase space. The way in which these define classical Keplerian symmetries and symmetry coordinates is detailed. It is shown that for each value of the energy of a Keplerian system, the Poisson-bracket operators determine two invariant functions of positions and momenta, which together with its regularized Hamiltonian, define the manifold in six-dimensional phase space upon which motions evolve.

  18. On the magnetic viscosity in Keplerian accretion disks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Coroniti, F. V.

    1981-01-01

    The paper develops a model for the anomalous viscosity in accretion disks based on the hypothesis that the hydrodynamic turbulence within the disk takes the form of spatially localized magnetic flux cells. The local shear flow due to Keplerian differential rotation distorts the flux cell topology, converting shear flow energy into magnetic energy. In the radial diffusion approximation, the kinematic viscosity is estimated from the radial displacement and is shown to maximize at flux cell scale lengths for which the shear flow stopping and reconnection times are equal.

  19. Angular Momentum Transport in Quasi-Keplerian Accretion Disks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Subramanian, Prasad; Pujari, B. S.; Becker, Peter A.

    2004-03-01

    We reexamine arguments advanced by Hayashi & Matsuda (2001), who claim that several simple, physically motivated derivations based on mean free path theory for calculating the viscous torque in a quasi-Keplerian accretion disk yield results that are inconsistent with the generally accepted model. If correct, the ideas proposed by Hayashi & Matsudawould radically alter our understanding of the nature of the angular momentum transport in the disk, which is a central feature of accretion disk theory. However, in this paper we point out several fallacies in their arguments and show that there indeed exists a simple derivation based on mean free path theory that yields an expression for the viscous torque that is proportional to the radial derivative of the angular velocity in the accretion disk, as expected. The derivation is based on the analysis of the epicyclic motion of gas parcels in adjacent eddies in the disk.

  20. Lunar gravity - A long-term Keplerian rate method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ferrari, A. J.; Ananda, M. P.

    1977-01-01

    Nearside tracking data from Apollo subsatellites and Lunar Orbiter 5 are used to construct a model of the farside lunar gravity field. An indirect method of calculating the average effect of all the gravity anomalies which affect spacecraft orbits is reduced to a linear estimation problem by eliminating the integration of spacecraft dynamics. Doppler frequency shifts between the lunar satellite and earth-based tracking station are used to measure the line of sight velocity component between the orbiter and the tracker; gravity determination is then performed in a weighted least squares estimator which employs the orbital rates as data and formulates the normal equations using the associated Keplerian state. Simulations performed demonstrate that farside gravity features can be economically determined by use of gravity estimates obtained from long-period models of nearside orbiting tracks.

  1. Invited Talk: Instabilities in near-keplerian systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Madigan, Ann-Marie

    2015-05-01

    Closed orbits drive secular gravitational instabilities, and Kepler potentials are one of only two potentials in which bound orbits are closed. Though the Kepler potential is common in astrophysics -- relevant for stars orbiting massive black holes in the centers of galaxies, for planets orbiting stars, and for moons orbiting planets — few instabilities have been explored beyond the linear regime in this potential. I will present two new instabilities which grow exponentially from small initial perturbations and act to reorient eccentric orbits in near-Keplerian disks. The first results from forces in the plane of the disk and acts to spread orbits in eccentricity. The second instability results from forces out of the disk plane and drives orbits to high inclination. I will explain the dynamical mechanism behind each and make observational predictions for both planetary systems and galactic nuclei.

  2. Methane and Dissolved Organic Carbon Sustain an Ecosystem within a Density Stratified Coastal Aquifer of the Yucatan Peninsula, Mexico. Evidence for a Subterranean Microbial Loop?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brankovits, David; Pohlman, John W.; Niemann, Helge; Leigh, Mary Beth; Casso, Michael; Alvarez Noguera, Fernando; Lehmann, Moritz F.; Iliffe, Thomas M.

    2016-04-01

    In coastal karst terrains, anchialine caves that meander in density stratified aquifers provide an exceptional opportunity for scientists to study in situ biogeochemical processes within the groundwater. The Caribbean coast of Mexico's Yucatan Peninsula contains over 1000 km of mapped cave passages, the densest known accumulation of anchialine caves in the world. A decades-old study based on the simple observation of 13C-depleted biomass in the cave-adapted fauna suggested biogeochemical processes related to methane-linked carbon cycling and/or other chemoautotrophic pathways as a source of energy and carbon. In this study, we utilized cave diving and a novel sampling device (the Octopipi) to obtain cm-scale water column profiles of methane, DOC and DIC concentrations and stable carbon isotope ratios to identify the energy sources and microbial processes that sustain life in these subterranean estuaries. High concentrations (up to 9522 nM) low-δ13C (as low as -67.5 permil) methane near the ceiling of the cave (in the fresh water section of the stratified water column) and evidence for methane oxidation in the brackish water portion of the water column suggest methane availability and consumption. Profiles obtained by the Octopipi demonstrate that virtually all of the methane (˜99%) is oxidized at the interface of anoxic freshwater and hypoxic brackish water masses. The high-methane water mass near the ceiling also contained elevated concentrations of DOC (851 μM) that displayed comparatively high δ13C (-27.8 to -28.2 permil), suggesting terrestrial organic matter input from the overlying soils. Low-methane brackish and saline water was characterized by lower DOC concentration (15 to 97 μM), yet with similar δ13C (-25.9 to -27.2 permil), suggesting significant terrestrial organic matter consumption or removal with increasing depth, from fresh to saline water, within the water column. The presence of 13C-depleted fatty acids (e.g., C16:1ω7c with δ13C

  3. Optimal BLS: Optimizing transit-signal detection for Keplerian dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ofir, Aviv

    2015-08-01

    Transit surveys, both ground- and space-based, have already accumulated a large number of light curves that span several years. We optimize the search for transit signals for both detection and computational efficiencies by assuming that the searched systems can be described by Keplerian, and propagating the effects of different system parameters to the detection parameters. Importnantly, we mainly consider the information content of the transit signal and not any specific algorithm - and use BLS (Kovács, Zucker, & Mazeh 2002) just as a specific example.We show that the frequency information content of the light curve is primarily determined by the duty cycle of the transit signal, and thus the optimal frequency sampling is found to be cubic and not linear. Further optimization is achieved by considering duty-cycle dependent binning of the phased light curve. By using the (standard) BLS, one is either fairly insensitive to long-period planets or less sensitive to short-period planets and computationally slower by a significant factor of ~330 (for a 3 yr long dataset). We also show how the physical system parameters, such as the host star's size and mass, directly affect transit detection. This understanding can then be used to optimize the search for every star individually.By considering Keplerian dynamics explicitly rather than implicitly one can optimally search the transit signal parameter space. The presented Optimal BLS enhances the detectability of both very short and very long period planets, while allowing such searches to be done with much reduced resources and time. The Matlab/Octave source code for Optimal BLS is made available.

  4. Planetary Defense From Space: Part 1-Keplerian Theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maccone, Claudio

    A system of two space bases housing missiles is proposed to achieve the Planetary Defense of the Earth against dangerous asteroids and comets. We show that the layout of the Earth-Moon system with the five relevant Lagrangian (or libration) points in space leads naturally to only one, unmistakable location of these two space bases within the sphere of influence of the Earth. These locations are at the two Lagrangian points L1 (in between the Earth and the Moon) and L3 (in the direction opposite to the Moon from the Earth). We show that placing bases of missiles at L1 and L3 would cause those missiles to deflect the trajectory of asteroids by hitting them orthogonally to their impact trajectory toward the Earth, so as to maximize their deflection. We show that the confocal conics are the best class of trajectories fulfilling this orthogonal deflection requirement. An additional remark is that the theory developed in this paper is just a beginning of a larger set of future research work. In fact, while in this paper we only develop the Keplerian analytical theory of the Optimal Planetary Defense achievable from the Earth-Moon Lagrangian points L1 and L3, much more sophisticated analytical refinements would be needed to: Take into account many perturbation forces of all kinds acting on both the asteroids and missiles shot from L1 and L3; add more (non-optimal) trajectories of missiles shot from either the Lagrangian points L4 and L5 of the Earth-Moon system or from the surface of the Moon itself; encompass the full range of missiles currently available to the US (and possibly other countries) so as to really see "which asteroids could be diverted by which missiles", even in the very simplified scheme outlined here. Outlined for the first time in February 2002, our Confocal Planetary Defense concept is a Keplerian Theory that proved simple enough to catch the attention of scholars, representatives of the US Military and popular writers. These developments could

  5. Keplerian periodogram for Doppler exoplanet detection: optimized computation and analytic significance thresholds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baluev, Roman V.

    2015-01-01

    We consider the so-called Keplerian periodogram, in which the putative detectable signal is modelled by a highly non-linear Keplerian radial velocity function, appearing in Doppler exoplanetary surveys. We demonstrate that for planets on high-eccentricity orbits the Keplerian periodogram is far more efficient than the classic Lomb-Scargle periodogram and even the multiharmonic periodograms, in which the periodic signal is approximated by a truncated Fourier series. We provide a new numerical algorithm for computation of the Keplerian periodogram. This algorithm adaptively increases the parametric resolution where necessary, in order to uniformly cover all local optima of the Keplerian fit. Thanks to this improvement, the algorithm provides more smooth and reliable results with minimized computing demands. We also derive a fast analytic approximation to the false alarm probability levels of the Keplerian periodogram. This approximation has the form (Pz3/2 + Qz)Wexp ( - z), where z is the observed periodogram maximum, W is proportional to the settled frequency range, and the coefficients P and Q depend on the maximum eccentricity to scan.

  6. Floquet analysis of two-dimensional perturbed Keplerian flows in cataclysmic variables

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tamburini, F.; Bianchini, A.; Franceschini, A.

    2010-09-01

    Aims: We apply Floquet analysis to study the dynamical stability of two-dimensional axisymmetric Keplerian flows distorted by an m = 2 epicyclic periodic forcing term, representing a tidal perturbation in a thin accretion disk (AD) of a cataclysmic variable (CV). This tidal mode is responsible for the disk truncation mechanism. Methods: Floquet analysis reveals, with a positive Floquet exponent, exponentially growing modes of the local instabilities that can cause the disruption of the AD. The equations of the inviscid fluid used to model the AD describe an oversimplified two-dimensional tidally-distorted accretion disk. Viscosity and the other properties expected in a CV AD are taken from the Shakura-Sunyaev α-disk solution and introduced in the model through the thermodynamical quantities present in the equations. In particular, we address this investigation in search of parametric resonances of the radial Fourier components of the velocity field in the multi-dimensional parameter space of the solutions describing a fluid stream in a CV AD: the mass of the primary M1, the orbital period p of the system, the orbital fiducial radius r of the fluid stream and the normalized Fourier mode of the radial motion, k. Results: We find that, in region of the r3:2 orbital resonance radius, where superhumps (SH) form, the m = 2 tidal epicyclic modes alone would not introduce any perturbation in this region of the AD, and therefore the Floquet exponent of the m = 2 tidal force is found to be either negative or zero. However, only by introducing the 3:1 tidal perturbation, will the dynamics of the fluid streams at the SH radius become unstable indicating the onset of SH. Finally, Floquet analysis of the Fourier decomposition of the derivative along the radial x-direction shows the important role of the low Fourier modes of the radial velocity perturbations in the disk truncation mechanism.

  7. Stability of quasi-Keplerian Shear Flow in a Laboratory Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Schartman, Ethan; Ji, Hantao; Burin, Michael J.; Goodman, Jeremy

    2012-06-19

    Subcritical transition to turbulence has been proposed as a source of turbulent viscosity required for the associated angular momentum transport for fast accretion in Keplerian disks. Previously cited laboratory experiments in supporting this hypothesis were performed either in a di erent type of flow than Keplerian or without quantitative measurements of angular momentum transport and mean flow profile, and all of them appear to su er from Ekman e ects, secondary flows induced by nonoptimal axial boundary conditions. Such Ekman e ects are expected to be absent from astronomical disks, which probably have stress-free vertical boundaries unless strongly magnetized. Aims. To quantify angular momentum transport due to subcritical hydrodynamic turbulence, if exists, in a quasi-Keplerian flow with minimized Ekman e ects. Methods.We perform a local measurement of the azimuthal-radial component of the Reynolds stress tensor in a novel laboratory apparatus where Ekman e ects are minimized by flexible control of axial boundary conditions. Results.We find significant Ekman e ects on angular momentum transport due to nonoptimal axial boundary conditions in quasi-Keplerian flows. With the optimal control of Ekman e ects, no statistically meaningful angular momentum transport is detected in such flows at Reynolds number up to two millions. Conclusions. Either a subcritical transition does not occur, or, if a subcritical transition does occur, the associated radial transport of angular momentum in optimized quasi-Keplerian laboratory flows is too small to directly support the hypothesis that subcritical hydrodynamic turbulence is responsible for accretion in astrophysical disks. Possible limitations in applying laboratory results to astrophysical disks due to experimental geometry are discussed.

  8. A study of non-Keplerian velocities in observations of spectroscopic binary stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hearnshaw, J. B.; Komonjinda, Siramas; Skuljan, J.; Kilmartin, P. M.

    2012-11-01

    This paper presents an orbital analysis of six southern single-lined spectroscopic binary systems. The systems selected were shown to have circular or nearly circular orbits (e < 0.1) from earlier published solutions of only moderate precision. The purpose was to obtain high-precision orbital solutions in order to investigate the presence of small non-Keplerian velocity effects in the data and hence the reality of the small eccentricities found for most of the stars. The Hercules spectrograph and 1-m McLellan telescope at Mt John Observatory, New Zealand, were used to obtain over 450 CCD spectra between 2004 October and 2007 August. Radial velocities were obtained by cross-correlation. These data were used to achieve high-precision orbital solutions for all the systems studied, sometimes with solutions up to about 50 times more precise than those from the earlier literature. However, the precision of the solutions is limited in some cases by the rotational velocity or chromospheric activity of the stars. The data for the six binaries analysed here are combined with those for six stars analysed earlier by Komonjinda, Hearnshaw and Ramm. We have performed tests using the prescription of Lucy on all 12 binaries, and conclude that, with one exception, none of the small eccentricities found by fitting Keplerian orbits to the radial-velocity data can be supported. Instead we conclude that small non-Keplerian effects, which are clearly detectable for six of our stars, make impossible the precise determination of spectroscopic binary orbital eccentricities for many late-type stars to better than about 0.03 in eccentricity, unless the systematic perturbations are also carefully modelled. The magnitudes of the non-Keplerian velocity variations are given quantitatively.

  9. A Gauge-generalized Solution for Non-Keplerian Motion in the Frenet-Serret Frame

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garber, Darren D.

    2009-05-01

    The customary modeling of perturbed planetary and spacecraft motion as a continuous sequence of unperturbed two-body orbits (instantaneous ellipses) is conveniently assigned a physical interpretation through the Keplerian and Delaunay elements and complemented mathematically by the Lagrange-type equations which describe the evolution of these variables. If however the actual motion is very non-Keplerian (i.e. the perturbed orbit varies greatly from a two-body orbit), then its modeling by a sequence of conics is not necessarily optimal in terms of its mathematical description and its resulting physical interpretation. Since, in principle a curve of any type can be represented as a sequence of points from a family of curves of any other type (Efroimsky 2005), alternate non-conic curves can be utilized to better describe the perturbed non-Keplerian motion of the body both mathematically and with a physically relevant interpretation. Non-Keplerian motion exists in both celestial mechanics and astrodynamics as evident by the complex interactions within star clusters and also as the result of a spacecraft accelerating via ion propulsion, solar sails and electro-dynamic tethers. For these cases, the sequence of simple orbits to describe the motion is not based on conics, but instead a family of spirals. The selection of spirals as the underlying simple motion is supported by the fact that it is unnecessary to describe the motion in terms of instantaneous orbits tangent to the actual trajectory (Efroimsky 2002, Newman & Efroimsky 2003) and at times there is an advantage to deviate from osculation, in order to greatly simplify the resulting mathematics via gauge freedom (Efroimsky & Goldreich 2003, Slabinski 2003, Gurfil 2004). From these two principles, (1) spirals as instantaneous orbits, and (2) controlled deviation from osculation, new planetary equations are derived for new non-osculating elements in the Frenet-Serret frame with the gauge function as a measure of non-osculation.

  10. Evidence for Infalling Gas of Low Angular Momentum toward the L1551 NE Keplerian Circumbinary Disk

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takakuwa, Shigehisa; Saito, Masao; Lim, Jeremy; Saigo, Kazuya

    2013-10-01

    We report follow-up C18O(3-2) line observations of the Class I binary protostellar system L1551 NE with the Submillimeter Array in its compact and subcompact configurations. Our previous observations at a higher angular resolution in the extended configuration revealed a circumbinary disk exhibiting Keplerian motion. The combined data, with more extensive spatial coverage (~140-2000 AU), verify the presence of a Keplerian circumbinary disk and reveal for the first time a distinct low-velocity (lsim ± 0.5 km s-1 from the systemic velocity) component that displays a velocity gradient along the minor axis of the circumbinary disk. Our simple model that reproduces the main features seen in the position-velocity diagrams comprises a circumbinary disk exhibiting Keplerian motion out to a radius of ~300 AU, beyond which the gas exhibits pure infall at a constant velocity of ~0.6 km s-1. This velocity is significantly smaller than the expected free-fall velocity of ~2.2 km s-1 onto the L1551 NE protostellar mass of ~0.8 M ⊙ at ~300 AU, suggesting that the infalling gas is decelerated as it moves into regions of high gas pressure in the circumbinary disk. The discontinuity in angular momenta between the outer infalling gas and the inner Keplerian circumbinary disk implies an abrupt transition in the effectiveness at which magnetic braking is able to transfer angular momentum outward, a result perhaps of the different plasma β values and the ionization fractions between the outer and inner regions of the circumbinary disk.

  11. Optical effects related to Keplerian discs orbiting Kehagias-Sfetsos naked singularities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stuchlík, Zdeněk; Schee, Jan

    2014-10-01

    We demonstrate possible optical signatures of the Kehagias-Sfetsos (KS) naked singularity spacetimes representing a spherically symmetric vacuum solution of the modified Hořava gravity. In such spacetimes, accretion structures significantly different from those present in standard black hole spacetimes occur due to the ‘antigravity’ effect, which causes an internal static sphere surrounded by Keplerian discs. We focus our attention on the optical effects related to the Keplerian accretion discs, constructing the optical appearance of the Keplerian discs, the spectral continuum due to their thermal radiation, and the spectral profiled lines generated in the innermost parts of such discs. The KS naked singularity signature is strongly encoded in the characteristics of predicted optical effects, especially in cases where the spectral continuum and spectral lines are profiled by the strong gravity of the spacetimes due to the vanishing region of the angular velocity gradient influencing the effectiveness of the viscosity mechanism. We can conclude that optical signatures of KS naked singularities can be well distinguished from the signatures of standard black holes.

  12. Post-Keplerian corrections to the orbital periods of a two-body system and their measurability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iorio, L.

    2016-08-01

    The orbital motion of a binary system is characterized by various characteristic temporal intervals which, by definition, are different from each other: the draconitic, anomalistic and sidereal periods. They all coincide in the Keplerian case. Such a degeneracy is removed, in general, when a post-Keplerian acceleration is present. We analytically work out the corrections to such otherwise Keplerian periods which are induced by general relativity (Schwarzschild and Lense-Thirring) and, at the Newtonian level, by the quadrupole of the primary. In many astronomical and astrophysical systems, like exoplanets, one of the most accurately determined quantities is just the time span characterizing the orbital revolution, which is often measured independently with different techniques like the transit photometry and the radial velocities. Thus, our results could be useful, in principle, to either constrain the physical properties of the central body and/or perform new tests of general relativity, especially when no other standard observables like, e.g., the orbital precessions are accessible to observations. The difference of two independently measured periods would cancel out the common Keplerian term leaving just a post-Keplerian correction. Furthermore, by comparing the theoretically predicted post-Keplerian expressions $T^{(\\textrm{pK})}$ with the experimental accuracy $\\sigma_{T_\\textrm{exp}}$ in measuring the orbital period(s) it is possible to identify those systems whose observations should be re-processed with genuine post-Keplerian models if $T^{(\\textrm{pK})}>\\sigma_{T_\\textrm{exp}}$. It seems just the case for WASP-33 b since $\\sigma_{T_\\textrm{exp}}=0.04$ s, while $3$ s$\\leq T_\\textrm{dra}^{(J_2)}\\leq 9.5$ s, $T_\\textrm{dra}^{(\\textrm{GE)}}=0.36$ s.

  13. Post-Keplerian corrections to the orbital periods of a two-body system and their measurability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iorio, L.

    2016-08-01

    The orbital motion of a binary system is characterized by various characteristic temporal intervals which, by definition, are different from each other: the draconitic, anomalistic and sidereal periods Tdra, Tano, Tsid. They all coincide in the Keplerian case. Such a degeneracy is removed, in general, when a post-Keplerian acceleration is present. We analytically work out the corrections T(pK) to such otherwise Keplerian periods which are induced by general relativity (Schwarzschild and Lense-Thirring) and, at the Newtonian level, by the quadrupole J2 of the primary. In many astronomical and astrophysical systems, like exoplanets, one of the most accurately determined quantities is just the time span Texp characterizing the orbital revolution, which is often measured independently with different techniques like the transit photometry and the radial velocities. Thus, our results could be useful, in principle, to either constrain the physical properties of the central body and/or perform new tests of general relativity, especially when no other standard observables like, e.g. the orbital precessions are accessible to observations. The difference ΔT of two independently measured periods would cancel out the common Keplerian term TK leaving just a post-Keplerian correction. Furthermore, by comparing the theoretically predicted post-Keplerian expressions T(pK) with the experimental accuracy σ _{T_exp} in measuring the orbital period(s) it is possible to identify those systems whose observations should be re-processed with genuine post-Keplerian models if T^{(pK)}>σ _{T_exp}. It seems just the case for WASP-33 b since σ _{T_exp}=0.04 s, while 3 s≤ T_dra^{(J_2)}≤ 9.5 s, T_dra^{(GR)}=0.36 s.

  14. Gravitational Rutherford scattering and Keplerian orbits for electrically charged bodies in heterotic string theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Villanueva, J. R.; Olivares, Marco

    2015-11-01

    Properties of the motion of electrically charged particles in the background of the Gibbons-Maeda-Garfinkle-Horowitz-Strominger black hole is presented in this paper. Radial and angular motions are studied analytically for different values of the fundamental parameter. Therefore, gravitational Rutherford scattering and Keplerian orbits are analyzed in detail. Finally, this paper complements previous work by Fernando for null geodesics (Phys Rev D 85:024033, 2012), Olivares and Villanueva (Eur Phys J C 73:2659, 2013) and Blaga (Automat Comp Appl Math 22:41-48, 2013; Serb Astron 190:41, 2015) for time-like geodesics.

  15. PHYSICAL CHARACTERISTICS AND NON-KEPLERIAN ORBITAL MOTION OF 'PROPELLER' MOONS EMBEDDED IN SATURN'S RINGS

    SciTech Connect

    Tiscareno, Matthew S.; Burns, Joseph A.; Hedman, Matthew M.; Milano, Anthony J.; Evans, Michael W.; Sremcevic, Miodrag; Beurle, Kevin; Cooper, Nicholas J.; Porco, Carolyn C.; Spitale, Joseph N.; Weiss, John W.

    2010-08-01

    We report the discovery of several large 'propeller' moons in the outer part of Saturn's A ring, objects large enough to be followed over the 5 year duration of the Cassini mission. These are the first objects ever discovered that can be tracked as individual moons, but do not orbit in empty space. We infer sizes up to 1-2 km for the unseen moonlets at the center of the propeller-shaped structures, though many structural and photometric properties of propeller structures remain unclear. Finally, we demonstrate that some propellers undergo sustained non-Keplerian orbit motion.

  16. Keplerian Circumbinary Disk and Accretion Streams around the Protostellar Binary System L1551 NE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takakuwa, S.; Saito, M.; Lim, J.; Saigo, K.; Hanawa, T.; Matsumoto, T.

    2013-10-01

    We show our recent observational results of L1551 NE, an archetypal binary protostellar system, in the 0.9-mm dust continuum emission and the C18O (J=3-2) emission with the SubMillimeter Array (SMA). The SMA results show firm evidence for a Keplerian circumbinary disk, circumstellar disks, and an inner clearing in the circumbinary disk, in L1551 NE. We demonstrate that future observations of L1551 NE with Atacama Large Millimeter and submillimeter Array (ALMA) have the potential to unveil the theoretically-predicted “accretion streams” that channel material from the circumbinary disk to the individual circumstellar disks.

  17. Numerical integration of nearly-Hamiltonian systems. [Van der Pol oscillator and perturbed Keplerian motion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bond, V. R.

    1978-01-01

    The reported investigation is concerned with the solution of systems of differential equations which are derived from a Hamiltonian function in the extended phase space. The problem selected involves a one-dimensional perturbed harmonic oscillator. The van der Pol equation considered has an exact asymptotic value for its amplitude. Comparisons are made between a numerical solution and a known analytical solution. In addition to the van der Pol problem, known solutions regarding the restricted problem of three bodies are used as examples for perturbed Keplerian motion. The extended phase space Hamiltonian discussed by Stiefel and Scheifele (1971) is considered. A description is presented of two canonical formulations of the perturbed harmonic oscillator.

  18. On the Bound of Tschauner-Hempel Equations' Error with Respect to Keplerian Motion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Yong; Xie, Yongchun; Jiang, Tiantian

    2015-07-01

    This paper addresses theoretical analysis of the error of TH equations with respect to relative motion equations based on Keplerian orbits. By solving a second-order integral inequality, we derive a bound function of the error. The bound function depends on initial true anomaly, initial state error, eccentricity of target orbit, and current true anomaly. Using this result, we can easily calculate the moment of impulse for correction in a multi-impulsive elliptical rendezvous based on TH equations so as to guarantee the terminal relative position and velocity errors in certain ranges. The proposed result is also illustrated by simulations of elliptical rendezvous.

  19. No Keplerian Disk >10 AU Around the Protostar B335: Magnetic Braking or Young Age?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yen, Hsi-Wei; Takakuwa, Shigehisa; Koch, Patrick M.; Aso, Yusuke; Koyamatsu, Shin; Krasnopolsky, Ruben; Ohashi, Nagayoshi

    2015-10-01

    We have conducted Atacama Large Millimeter/Submillimeter Array (ALMA) cycle 2 observations in the 1.3 mm continuum and in the C18O (2-1) and SO (56-45) lines at a resolution of ˜0.″3 toward the Class 0 protostar B335. The 1.3 mm continuum, C18O, and SO emission all show central compact components with sizes of ˜40-180 AU within more extended components. The C18O component shows signs of infalling and rotational motion. By fitting simple kinematic models to the C18O data, the protostellar mass is estimated to be 0.05 {M}⊙ . The specific angular momentum, on a 100 AU scale, is (4.3 ± 0.5) × 10-5 km s-1 pc. A similar specific angular momentum, (3-5) × 10-5 km s-1 pc, is measured on a 10 AU scale from the velocity gradient observed in the central SO component, and there is no clear sign of an infalling motion in the SO emission. By comparing the infalling and rotational motion, our ALMA results suggest that the observed rotational motion has not yet reached Keplerian velocity neither on a 100 AU nor even on a 10 AU scale. Consequently, the radius of the Keplerian disk in B335 (if present) is expected to be 1-3 AU. The expected disk radius in B335 is one to two orders of magnitude smaller than those of observed Keplerian disks around other Class 0 protostars. Based on the observed infalling and rotational motion from 0.1 pc to inner 100 AU scales, there are two possible scenarios to explain the presence of such a small Keplerian disk in B335: magnetic braking and young age. If our finding is the consequence of magnetic braking, ˜50% of the angular momentum of the infalling material within a 1000 AU scale might have been removed, and the magnetic field strength on a 1000 AU scale is estimated to be ˜200 μG. If it is young age, the infalling radius in B335 is estimated to be ˜2700 AU, corresponding to a collapsing timescale of ˜5 × 104 years.

  20. Canonical elements and Keplerian-like solutions for intermediary orbits of satellites of an oblate planet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Floria, Luis

    1993-10-01

    Within the framework of the Canonical Formalism in the extended phase space, a general Hamiltonian is investigated that covers a wide class of radial intermediaries accounting for the major secular effects due to a planet's oblateness perturbations. An analytical, closed-form solution for this generic Hamiltonian is developed in terms of elementary functions via the corresponding Hamilton-Jacobi equation. The analytical solution so obtained can be contemplated according to a simple geometrical and dynamical interpretation in Keplerian language by means of the usual relations characterizing elliptic elements along a hypothetic Keplerian motion. Appropriate choices for the terms appearing in the proposed Hamiltonian lead to recovering the analogs of some well-known, classical radial intermediaries (those introduced by Deprit and the one built by Alfriend and Coffey), but also certain new ones derived by Ferrandiz for the Main Problem in the Theory of Artificial Satellites of the Earth. In any case, the results are also applicable to problems dealing with orbital motion of other planetary satellites. The generality of this pattern leads to a systematic obtaining of solutions to the considered intermediaries: special choices of the Hamiltonian yield the corresponding analytical solution to the respective intermediary problem.

  1. The APOGEE-1 Catalog of Keplerian Orbit Fits to RV Variable Sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Troup, Nicholas W.; Nidever, David L.; Fleming, Scott W.; Deshpande, Rohit; Mahadevan, Suvrath; Wisniewski, John P.; Shetrone, Matthew D.; Roy, Arpita; De Lee, Nathan M.; Stassun, Keivan; Pepper, Joshua; Nguyen, Duy Cuong; Hearty, Fred; Sobeck, Jennifer; Majewski, Steven R.

    2015-01-01

    In its three years of operation, the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS-III) Apache Point Observatory Galactic Evolution Experiment (APOGEE-1) observed over 9000 stars which have a enough (≥7) unique, quality radial velocity measurements over a sufficient baseline to fit Keplerian orbits. In this catalog we present the best fit orbital parameters of these systems from our automated Keplerian orbit fitting pipeline. While many multiplicity and exoplanet surveys have focused on FGK dwarf stars and the solar neighborhood, our sample contains >3000 evolved stars (log g <3.5), as well as stars across the disk and into the halo. With a radial velocity precision of ~100 m/s, APOGEE can probe systems with close-in companions down to a few Jupiter-masses (10-3 M⊙). In particular, our sample is well suited to comb the elusive brown-dwarf desert. Additionally, stellar parameters and chemical abundances will be available for many of the primary stars in our sample, allowing us to further probe the connection between a host star's abundance and the presence of companions. Finally, we present some of our most interesting systems with detected companions, as well as initial follow-up observations for a subset of these systems.

  2. ALMA observations of infalling flows toward the Keplerian disk around the class I protostar L1489 IRS

    SciTech Connect

    Yen, Hsi-Wei; Takakuwa, Shigehisa; Ohashi, Nagayoshi; Aikawa, Yuri; Aso, Yusuke; Koyamatsu, Shin; Machida, Masahiro N.; Saigo, Kazuya; Saito, Masao; Tomida, Kengo; Tomisaka, Kohji

    2014-09-20

    We have conducted ALMA observations in the 1.3 mm continuum and {sup 12}CO (2-1), C{sup 18}O (2-1), and SO (5{sub 6}-4{sub 5}) lines toward L1489 IRS, a Class I protostar surrounded by a Keplerian disk and an infalling envelope. The Keplerian disk is clearly identified in the {sup 12}CO and C{sup 18}O emission, and its outer radius (∼700 AU) and mass (∼0.005 M {sub ☉}) are comparable to those of disks around T Tauri stars. The protostellar mass is estimated to be 1.6 M {sub ☉} with the inclination angle of 66°. In addition to the Keplerian disk, there are blueshifted and redshifted off-axis protrusions seen in the C{sup 18}O emission pointing toward the north and the south, respectively, adjunct to the middle part of the Keplerian disk. The shape and kinematics of these protrusions can be interpreted as streams of infalling flows with a conserved angular momentum following parabolic trajectories toward the Keplerian disk, and the mass infalling rate is estimated to be ∼5 × 10{sup –7} M {sub ☉} yr{sup –1}. The specific angular momentum of the infalling flows (∼2.5 × 10{sup –3} km s{sup –1} pc) is comparable to that at the outer radius of the Keplerian disk (∼4.8 × 10{sup –3} km s{sup –1} pc). The SO emission is elongated along the disk major axis and exhibits a linear velocity gradient along the axis, which is interpreted to mean that the SO emission primarily traces a ring region in the flared Keplerian disk at radii of ∼250-390 AU. The local enhancement of the SO abundance in the ring region can be due to the accretion shocks at the centrifugal radius where the infalling flows fall onto the disk. Our ALMA observations unveiled both the Keplerian disk and the infalling gas onto the disk, and the disk can further grow by accreting material and angular momenta from the infalling gas.

  3. Linear and non-linear theory of a parametric instability of hydrodynamic warps in Keplerian discs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gammie, Charles F.; Goodman, Jeremy; Ogilvie, Gordon I.

    2000-11-01

    We consider the stability of warping modes in Keplerian discs. We find them to be parametrically unstable using two lines of attack, one based on three-mode couplings and the other on Floquet theory. We confirm the existence of the instability and investigate its non-linear development in three dimensions, via numerical experiment. The most rapidly growing non-axisymmetric disturbances are the most nearly axisymmetric (low-m) ones. Finally, we offer a simple, somewhat speculative model for the interaction of the parametric instability with the warp. We apply this model to the masing disc in NGC 4258 and show that, provided the warp is not forced too strongly, parametric instability can fix the amplitude of the warp.

  4. Compensation of spatial dispersion of an acousto-optic deflector with a special Keplerian telescope.

    PubMed

    Hu, Qinglei; Zhou, Zhenqiao; Lv, Xiaohua; Zeng, Shaoqun

    2016-01-15

    Compensation of spatial dispersion caused by the acousto-optic deflector (AOD) when using a femtosecond laser is difficult across the whole scanning range of the system, and this is a significant impediment to its use. In conventional methods, the dispersion of the AOD was compensated only when it was at a particular position, while at other positions, the quality of the light beam was reduced. We developed a novel method for compensating the spatial dispersion within the entire scanning range using a special Keplerian telescope. Our experimental results show that the residual dispersion of the AOD is compensated sufficiently, and the focal spots of the laser reach the diffraction limit within a 40-MHz ultrasound bandwidth. PMID:26766675

  5. Classical Be stars. Rapidly rotating B stars with viscous Keplerian decretion disks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rivinius, Thomas; Carciofi, Alex C.; Martayan, Christophe

    2013-10-01

    In the past decade, a consensus has emerged regarding the nature of classical Be stars: They are very rapidly rotating main sequence B stars, which, through a still unknown, but increasingly constrained process, form an outwardly diffusing gaseous, dust-free Keplerian disk. In this work, first the definition of Be stars is contrasted to similar classes, and common observables obtained for Be stars are introduced and the respective formation mechanisms explained. We then review the current state of knowledge concerning the central stars as non-radially pulsating objects and non-magnetic stars, as far as it concerns large-scale, i.e., mostly dipolar, global fields. Localized, weak magnetic fields remain possible, but are as of yet unproven. The Be-phenomenon, linked with one or more mass-ejection processes, acts on top of a rotation rate of about 75 % of critical or above. The properties of the process can be well constrained, leaving only few options, most importantly, but not exclusively, non-radial pulsation and small-scale magnetic fields. Of these, it is well possible that all are realized: In different stars, different processes may be acting. Once the material has been lifted into Keplerian orbit, memory of the details of the ejection process is lost, and the material is governed by viscosity. The disks are fairly well understood in the theoretical framework of the viscous decretion disk model. This is not only true for the disk structure, but as well for its variability, both cyclic and secular. Be binaries are reviewed under the aspect of the various types of interactions a companion can have with the circumstellar disk. Finally, extragalactic Be stars, at lower metallicities, seem more common and more rapidly rotating.

  6. Dark matter or new physics?. [deviation of galactic rotation curves from their expected Keplerian fall-off

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kazanas, Demosthenes; Mannheim, Philip D.

    1991-01-01

    Several proposals for a new physics to explain the deviation of galactic rotation curves from their expected Keplerian falloff with distance are discussed. Emphasis is given to a locally scale-invariant theory of gravity posed by the authors. The observational consequences of this theory are pointed out.

  7. Simplified solution for osculating Keplerian parameter corrections of GEO satellites for intersatellite optical link

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yılmaz, Umit C.; Cavdar, Ismail H.

    2015-04-01

    In intersatellite optical communication, the Pointing, Acquisition and Tracking (PAT) phase is one of the important phases that needs to be completed successfully before initiating communication. In this paper, we focused on correcting the possible errors on the Geostationary Earth Orbit (GEO) by using azimuth and elevation errors between Low Earth Orbit (LEO) to GEO optical link during the PAT phase. To minimise the PAT duration, a simplified correction of longitude and inclination errors of the GEO satellite's osculating Keplerian parameters has been suggested. A simulation has been done considering the beaconless tracking and spiral-scanning technique. As a result, starting from the second day, we are able to reduce the uncertainty cone of the GEO satellite by about 200 μrad, if the values are larger than that quantity. The first day of the LEO-GEO links have been used to determine the parameters. Thanks to the corrections, the locking time onto the GEO satellite has been reduced, and more data are able to transmit to the GEO satellite.

  8. PROPERTIES AND KEPLERIAN ROTATION OF THE HOT CORE IRAS 20126+4104

    SciTech Connect

    Xu Jinlong; Wang Junjie; Ning Changchun

    2012-01-10

    We present Submillimeter Array (SMA) observations of the massive star-forming region IRAS 20126+4104 in the millimeter continuum and in several molecular line transitions. With the SMA data, we have detected nine molecular transitions, including deuterated hydrogen cyanide, CH{sub 3}OH, H{sub 2}CO, and HC{sub 3}N molecules, and imaged each molecular line. From the 1.3 mm continuum emission a compact millimeter source is revealed, which is also associated with H{sub 2}O, OH, and CH{sub 3}OH masers. Using a rotation temperature diagram, we derive that the rotational temperature and the column density of CH{sub 3}OH are 200 K and 3.7 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 17} cm{sup -2}, respectively. The calculated results and analysis further indicate that a hot core coincides with IRAS 20126+4104. The position-velocity diagrams of H{sub 2}CO (3{sub 0,3}-2{sub 0,2}) and HC{sub 3}N (25-24) clearly present Keplerian rotation. Moreover, H{sub 2}CO (3{sub 0,3}-2{sub 0,2}) is found to trace the disk rotation for the first time.

  9. Nonconservative extension of Keplerian integrals and a new class of integrable system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roa, Javier

    2016-09-01

    The invariance of the Lagrangian under time translations and rotations in Kepler's problem yields the conservation laws related to the energy and angular momentum. Noether's theorem reveals that these same symmetries furnish generalized forms of the first integrals in a special nonconservative case, which approximates various physical models. The system is perturbed by a biparametric acceleration with components along the tangential and normal directions. A similarity transformation reduces the biparametric disturbance to a simpler uniparametric forcing along the velocity vector. The solvability conditions of this new problem are discussed, and closed-form solutions for the integrable cases are provided. Thanks to the conservation of a generalized energy, the orbits are classified as elliptic, parabolic, and hyperbolic. Keplerian orbits appear naturally as particular solutions to the problem. After characterizing the orbits independently, a unified form of the solution is built based on the Weierstrass elliptic functions. The new trajectories involve fundamental curves such as cardioids and logarithmic, sinusoidal, and Cotes' spirals. These orbits can represent the motion of particles perturbed by solar radiation pressure, of spacecraft with continuous thrust propulsion, and some instances of Schwarzschild geodesics. Finally, the problem is connected with other known integrable systems in celestial mechanics.

  10. Small Scale Chemical Segregation Within Keplerian Disk Candidate G35.20-0.74N

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allen, Veronica; van der Tak, Floris; Sánchez-Monge, Álvaro; Cesaroni, Riccardo; Beltrán, Maria T.

    2016-06-01

    In the study of high-mass star formation, hot cores are empirically defined stages where chemically rich emission is detected toward a massive protostar. It is unknown whether the physical origin of this emission is a disk, inner envelope, or outflow cavity wall and whether the hot core stage is common to all massive stars. With the advent of the highly sensitive sub-millimeter interferometer, ALMA, the ability to chemically characterize high mass star forming regions other than Orion has become possible. In the up-and-coming field of observational astrochemistry, these sensitive high resolution observations have opened up opportunities to find small scale variations in young protostellar sources.We have done an in depth analysis of high spatial resolution (~1000 AU) Cycle 0 ALMA observations of the high mass star forming region G35.20-0.74N, where Sánchez-Monge et al (2013) found evidence for Keplerian rotation. After further chemical analysis, numerous complex organic species have been identified in this region and we notice an interesting asymmetry in the distribution of the Nitrogen-bearing species within this source. In my talk, I will briefly outline the case for the disk and the consequences for this hypothesis following the chemical segregation we have seen.

  11. Extended analytical formulas for the perturbed Keplerian motion under a constant control acceleration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zuiani, Federico; Vasile, Massimiliano

    2015-03-01

    This paper presents a set of analytical formulae for the perturbed Keplerian motion of a spacecraft under the effect of a constant control acceleration. The proposed set of formulae can treat control accelerations that are fixed in either a rotating or inertial reference frame. Moreover, the contribution of the zonal harmonic is included in the analytical formulae. It will be shown that the proposed analytical theory allows for the fast computation of long, multi-revolution spirals while maintaining good accuracy. The combined effect of different perturbations and of the shadow regions due to solar eclipse is also included. Furthermore, a simplified control parameterisation is introduced to optimise thrusting patterns with two thrust arcs and two cost arcs per revolution. This simple parameterisation is shown to ensure enough flexibility to describe complex low thrust spirals. The accuracy and speed of the proposed analytical formulae are compared against a full numerical integration with different integration schemes. An averaging technique is then proposed as an application of the analytical formulae. Finally, the paper presents an example of design of an optimal low-thrust spiral to transfer a spacecraft from an elliptical to a circular orbit around the Earth.

  12. Nonlinear hydrodynamical evolution of eccentric Keplerian discs in two dimensions: validation of secular theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barker, A. J.; Ogilvie, G. I.

    2016-06-01

    We perform global two-dimensional hydrodynamical simulations of Keplerian discs with free eccentricity over thousands of orbital periods. Our aim is to determine the validity of secular theory in describing the evolution of eccentric discs, and to explore their nonlinear evolution for moderate eccentricities. Linear secular theory is found to correctly predict the structure and precession rates of discs with small eccentricities. However, discs with larger eccentricities (and eccentricity gradients) are observed to precess faster (retrograde relative to the orbital motion), at a rate that depends on their eccentricities (and eccentricity gradients). We derive analytically a nonlinear secular theory for eccentric gas discs, which explains this result as a modification of the pressure forces whenever eccentric orbits in a disc nearly intersect. This effect could be particularly important for highly eccentric discs produced in tidal disruption events, or for narrow gaseous rings; it might also play a role in causing some of the variability in superhump binary systems. In two dimensions, the eccentricity of a moderately eccentric disc is long-lived and persists throughout the duration of our simulations. Eccentric modes are however weakly damped by their interaction with non-axisymmetric spiral density waves (driven by the Papaloizou-Pringle instability, which occurs in our idealized setup with solid walls), as well as numerical diffusion.

  13. ALMA Observations of the Transition from Infall Motion to Keplerian Rotation around the Late-phase Protostar TMC-1A

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aso, Yusuke; Ohashi, Nagayoshi; Saigo, Kazuya; Koyamatsu, Shin; Aikawa, Yuri; Hayashi, Masahiko; Machida, Masahiro N.; Saito, Masao; Takakuwa, Shigehisa; Tomida, Kengo; Tomisaka, Kohji; Yen, Hsi-Wei

    2015-10-01

    We have observed the Class I protostar TMC-1A with the Atacama Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA) in the emissions of 12CO and C18O (J = 2–1) and 1.3 mm dust continuum. Continuum emission with a deconvolved size of 0.″50 × 0.″37, perpendicular to the 12CO outflow, is detected. It most likely traces a circumstellar disk around TMC-1A, as previously reported. In contrast, a more extended structure is detected in C18O, although it is still elongated with a deconvolved size of 3.″3 × 2.″2, indicating that C18O traces mainly a flattened envelope surrounding the disk and the central protostar. C18O shows a clear velocity gradient perpendicular to the outflow at higher velocities, indicative of rotation, while an additional velocity gradient along the outflow is found at lower velocities. The radial profile of the rotational velocity is analyzed in detail, finding that it is given as a power law ∝r‑a with an index of ∼0.5 at higher velocities. This indicates that the rotation at higher velocities can be explained as Keplerian rotation orbiting a protostar with a dynamical mass of 0.68 {M}ȯ (inclination corrected). The additional velocity gradient of C18O along the outflow is considered to be mainly infall motions in the envelope. Position–velocity diagrams made from models consisting of an infalling envelope and a Keplerian disk are compared with the observations, revealing that the observed infall velocity is ∼0.3 times smaller than the free-fall velocity yielded by the dynamical mass of the protostar. Magnetic fields could be responsible for the slow infall velocity. A possible scenario of Keplerian disk formation is discussed.

  14. Unique Non-Keplerian Orbit Vantage Locations for Sun-Earth Connection and Earth Science Vision Roadmaps

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Folta, David; Young, Corissa; Ross, Adam

    2001-01-01

    The purpose of this investigation is to determine the feasibility of attaining and maintaining unique non-Keplerian orbit vantage locations in the Earth/Moon environment in order to obtain continuous scientific measurements. The principal difficulty associated with obtaining continuous measurements is the temporal nature of astrodynamics, i.e., classical orbits. This investigation demonstrates advanced trajectory designs to meet demanding science requirements which cannot be met following traditional orbital mechanic logic. Examples of continuous observer missions addressed include Earth pole-sitters and unique vertical libration orbits that address Sun-Earth Connection and Earth Science Vision roadmaps.

  15. Reynolds number scaling of the influence of boundary layers on the global behavior of laboratory quasi-Keplerian flows

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Edlund, E. M.; Ji, H.

    2015-10-06

    Here, we present fluid velocity measurements in a modified Taylor-Couette device operated in the quasi-Keplerian regime, where it is observed that nearly ideal flows exhibit self-similarity under scaling of the Reynolds number. In contrast, nonideal flows show progressive departure from ideal Couette as the Reynolds number is increased. We present a model that describes the observed departures from ideal Couette rotation as a function of the fluxes of angular momentum across the boundaries, capturing the dependence on Reynolds number and boundary conditions.

  16. Reynolds number scaling of the influence of boundary layers on the global behavior of laboratory quasi-Keplerian flows

    SciTech Connect

    Edlund, E. M.; Ji, H.

    2015-10-01

    We present fluid velocity measurements in a modified Taylor-Couette device operated in the quasi-Keplerian regime, where it is observed that nearly ideal flows exhibit self-similarity under scaling of the Reynolds number. In contrast, nonideal flows show progressive departure from ideal Couette as the Reynolds number is increased. We present a model that describes the observed departures from ideal Couette rotation as a function of the fluxes of angular momentum across the boundaries, capturing the dependence on Reynolds number and boundary conditions.

  17. Background oriented schlieren in a density stratified fluid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verso, Lilly; Liberzon, Alex

    2015-10-01

    Non-intrusive quantitative fluid density measurement methods are essential in the stratified flow experiments. Digital imaging leads to synthetic schlieren methods in which the variations of the index of refraction are reconstructed computationally. In this study, an extension to one of these methods, called background oriented schlieren, is proposed. The extension enables an accurate reconstruction of the density field in stratified liquid experiments. Typically, the experiments are performed by the light source, background pattern, and the camera positioned on the opposite sides of a transparent vessel. The multimedia imaging through air-glass-water-glass-air leads to an additional aberration that destroys the reconstruction. A two-step calibration and image remapping transform are the key components that correct the images through the stratified media and provide a non-intrusive full-field density measurements of transparent liquids.

  18. Background oriented schlieren in a density stratified fluid.

    PubMed

    Verso, Lilly; Liberzon, Alex

    2015-10-01

    Non-intrusive quantitative fluid density measurement methods are essential in the stratified flow experiments. Digital imaging leads to synthetic schlieren methods in which the variations of the index of refraction are reconstructed computationally. In this study, an extension to one of these methods, called background oriented schlieren, is proposed. The extension enables an accurate reconstruction of the density field in stratified liquid experiments. Typically, the experiments are performed by the light source, background pattern, and the camera positioned on the opposite sides of a transparent vessel. The multimedia imaging through air-glass-water-glass-air leads to an additional aberration that destroys the reconstruction. A two-step calibration and image remapping transform are the key components that correct the images through the stratified media and provide a non-intrusive full-field density measurements of transparent liquids. PMID:26520964

  19. Formation of a Keplerian Disk in the Infalling Envelope around L1527 IRS: Transformation from Infalling Motions to Kepler Motions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohashi, Nagayoshi; Saigo, Kazuya; Aso, Yusuke; Aikawa, Yuri; Koyamatsu, Shin; Machida, Masahiro N.; Saito, Masao; Takahashi, Sanemichi Z.; Takakuwa, Shigehisa; Tomida, Kengo; Tomisaka, Kohji; Yen, Hsi-Wei

    2014-12-01

    We report Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA) cycle 0 observations of the C18O (J = 2-1), SO (JN = 65-54), and the 1.3 mm dust continuum toward L1527 IRS, a class 0 solar-type protostar surrounded by an infalling and rotating envelope. C18O emission shows strong redshifted absorption against the bright continuum emission associated with L1527 IRS, strongly suggesting infall motions in the C18O envelope. The C18O envelope also rotates with a velocity mostly proportional to r -1, where r is the radius, whereas the rotation profile at the innermost radius (~54 AU) may be shallower than r -1, suggestive of formation of a Keplerian disk around the central protostar of ~0.3 M ⊙ in dynamical mass. SO emission arising from the inner part of the C18O envelope also shows rotation in the same direction as the C18O envelope. The rotation is, however, rigid-body-like, which is very different from the differential rotation shown by C18O. In order to explain the line profiles and the position-velocity (PV) diagrams of C18O and SO observed, simple models composed of an infalling envelope surrounding a Keplerian disk of 54 AU in radius orbiting a star of 0.3 M ⊙ are examined. It is found that in order to reproduce characteristic features of the observed line profiles and PV diagrams, the infall velocity in the model has to be smaller than the free-fall velocity yielded by a star of 0.3 M ⊙. Possible reasons for the reduced infall velocities are discussed.

  20. Formation of a Keplerian disk in the infalling envelope around L1527 IRS: transformation from infalling motions to Kepler motions

    SciTech Connect

    Ohashi, Nagayoshi; Saigo, Kazuya; Aso, Yusuke; Koyamatsu, Shin; Aikawa, Yuri; Machida, Masahiro N.; Saito, Masao; Takahashi, Sanemichi Z.; Takakuwa, Shigehisa; Yen, Hsi-Wei; Tomida, Kengo; Tomisaka, Kohji

    2014-12-01

    We report Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA) cycle 0 observations of the C{sup 18}O (J = 2-1), SO (J{sub N} = 6{sub 5}-5{sub 4}), and the 1.3 mm dust continuum toward L1527 IRS, a class 0 solar-type protostar surrounded by an infalling and rotating envelope. C{sup 18}O emission shows strong redshifted absorption against the bright continuum emission associated with L1527 IRS, strongly suggesting infall motions in the C{sup 18}O envelope. The C{sup 18}O envelope also rotates with a velocity mostly proportional to r {sup –1}, where r is the radius, whereas the rotation profile at the innermost radius (∼54 AU) may be shallower than r {sup –1}, suggestive of formation of a Keplerian disk around the central protostar of ∼0.3 M {sub ☉} in dynamical mass. SO emission arising from the inner part of the C{sup 18}O envelope also shows rotation in the same direction as the C{sup 18}O envelope. The rotation is, however, rigid-body-like, which is very different from the differential rotation shown by C{sup 18}O. In order to explain the line profiles and the position-velocity (PV) diagrams of C{sup 18}O and SO observed, simple models composed of an infalling envelope surrounding a Keplerian disk of 54 AU in radius orbiting a star of 0.3 M {sub ☉} are examined. It is found that in order to reproduce characteristic features of the observed line profiles and PV diagrams, the infall velocity in the model has to be smaller than the free-fall velocity yielded by a star of 0.3 M {sub ☉}. Possible reasons for the reduced infall velocities are discussed.

  1. Non-Keplerian effects in precision radial velocity measurements of double-line spectroscopic binary stars: numerical simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sybilski, P.; Konacki, M.; Kozłowski, S. K.; Hełminiak, K. G.

    2013-05-01

    Current precision in radial velocity (RV) measurements of binary stars reaches ˜2 m s-1. This level of precision means that RV models have to take into account additional non-Keplerian effects such as tidal and rotational distortion of the components of a binary star, relativistic effects and orbital precession. Such an approach is necessary when one wants to search for planets or precisely measure fundamental parameters of stars with a very high accuracy using precision RVs of binary stars. We generate synthetic binaries using Yonsei-Yale stellar models. For typical representatives, we investigate the impact of various orbital orientations and different non-Keplerian effects on the RV curves. To this end, we simulate RV observations with an added white noise of different scale. Subsequently, we try to reconstruct the input orbital parameters and their errors by fitting a model using a standard least-squares method. In particular, we investigate the connection between the tidal distortion of the shape of the stars and the best-fitting orbital eccentricity; the possibility of deriving orbital inclination of a non-eclipsing binary star by exploiting relativistic effects and the circumstances in which the orbital precession can be detected. We confirm that the method proposed by Zucker & Alexander to obtain orbital inclination with use of the relativistic effect does work in favourable cases and that it can be used even for orbital configurations far from an edge-on orientation. We show that the RV variations imposed by tidally distorted stars can mimic non-zero eccentricity in some binaries. The scale of such an effect depends on the RV accuracy. Finally, we demonstrate that the apsidal precession can be easily detected with precision RVs. In particular, we can detect orbital precession of 10-4, 10-3 rad yr-1 for precision of RVs of 1 and 10 m s-1, respectively.

  2. A new inclination instability reshapes Keplerian discs into cones: application to the outer Solar system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Madigan, Ann-Marie; McCourt, Michael

    2016-03-01

    Discs of bodies orbiting a much more massive central object are extremely common in astrophysics. When the orbits comprising such discs are eccentric, we show they are susceptible to a new dynamical instability. Gravitational forces between bodies in the disc drive exponential growth of their orbital inclinations and clustering in their angles of pericentre, expanding an initially thin disc into a conical shape by giving each orbit an identical `tilt' with respect to the disc plane. This new instability dynamically produces the unusual distribution of orbits observed for minor planets beyond Neptune, suggesting that the instability has shaped the outer Solar system. It also implies a large disc mass (˜ 1-10 Earth masses) of scattered bodies at hundreds of AU; we predict increasing numbers of detections of minor planets clustered in their angles of pericentre with high inclinations.

  3. A Comparison of SPH Artificial Viscosities and Their Impact on the Keplerian Disk

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hosono, Natsuki; Saitoh, Takayuki R.; Makino, Junichiro

    2016-06-01

    Hydrodynamical simulations of rotating disks play important roles in the field of astrophysical and planetary science. Smoothed particle hydrodynamics (SPH) has been widely used for such simulations. However, it has been known that when using SPH, a cold and thin Kepler disk breaks up due to the unwanted angular momentum transfer. Two possible reasons have been suggested for this breaking up of the disk; the artificial viscosity (AV) and the numerical error in the evaluation of pressure gradient in SPH. Which one is dominant is still unclear. In this paper, we investigate the reason for this rapid breaking up of the disk. We implemented most of the popular formulations of AV and switches, and measured the angular momentum transfer due to both AV and the error of SPH’s estimate of the pressure gradient. We found that the angular momentum transfer due to AV at the inner edge triggers the breaking up of the disk. We also found that the classical von Neumann–Richtmyer–Landshoff type AV with a high-order estimate for {{\

  4. PLANETESIMAL FORMATION AT THE BOUNDARY BETWEEN STEADY SUPER/SUB-KEPLERIAN FLOW CREATED BY INHOMOGENEOUS GROWTH OF MAGNETOROTATIONAL INSTABILITY

    SciTech Connect

    Kato, M. T.; Ida, S.; Fujimoto, M.

    2012-03-01

    We have studied formation of planetesimals at a radial pressure bump in a protoplanetary disk created by radially inhomogeneous magnetorotational instability (MRI), through three-dimensional resistive MHD simulations including dust particles. In our previous papers, we showed that the inhomogeneous MRI developing in non-uniform structure of magnetic field or magnetic resistivity can transform the local gas flow in the disk to a quasi-steady state with local rigid rotation that is no longer unstable against the MRI. Since the outer part of the rigid rotation is super-Keplerian flow, a quasi-static pressure bump is created and dust concentration is expected there. In this paper, we perform simulations of the same systems, adding dust particles that suffer gas drag and modulate gas flow via the back-reaction of the gas drag (dust drag). We use {approx}O(10{sup 7}) super-particles, each of which represents {approx}O(10{sup 6})-O(10{sup 7}) dust particles with sizes of centimeter to meter. We have found that the dust drag suppresses turbulent motion to decrease the velocity dispersion of the dust particles while it broadens the dust concentrated regions to limit peaky dust concentration, compared with the simulation without the dust drag. We found that the positive effect for the gravitational instability (GI), reduction in the velocity dispersion, dominates over the negative one, suppression in particle concentration. For meter-size particles with the friction time {tau}{sub f} {approx_equal} 1/{Omega}, where {Omega} is Keplerian frequency, the GI of the dust particles that may lead to planetesimal formation is expected. For such a situation, we further introduced the self-gravity of dust particles to the simulation to demonstrate that several gravitationally bound clumps are actually formed. Through analytical arguments, we found that planetesimal formation from meter-sized dust particles is possible at {approx}5 AU, if dust spatial density is a few times larger than

  5. Stability of an accretion disk: nonlinear small-scale analysis of a quasi-Keplerian shear flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miquel, Benjamin; Knobloch, Edgar; Julien, Keith

    2015-11-01

    We model the background flow in the equatorial plane of an accretion disk with a radially stratified, non-magnetic zonal flow in a quasi-Keplerian balance (i.e. small pressure corrections are taken into account in the radial balance). The dynamics of the perturbations around this background flow obey a set of equations which main ingredients are: (i) a radial shear, (ii) a radial stratification, and (iii) a coupling between the flow and the background entropy gradient. The inviscid linear stability of this set of equation is first discussed: perturbations are decomposed into Kelvin modes (also known as the shearing sheet approximation) which amplitudes are determined analytically as a function of the radial stratification. Then, using as well a Kelvin modes decomposition, the viscous linear problem exhibits potentially transient growth, yet features unconditional stability as t --> ∞ . Finally, we demonstrate with 2D simulations of the viscous nonlinear problem that nonlinearities provide an energy transfer mechanism through modes that compensates the transfer induced by the linear shear. This mechanism allows for a sustained instability scenario despite the stability of the linear viscous problem.

  6. DUST CONCENTRATION AT THE BOUNDARY BETWEEN STEADY SUPER/SUB-KEPLERIAN FLOW CREATED BY INHOMOGENEOUS GROWTH OF MAGNETO-ROTATIONAL INSTABILITY

    SciTech Connect

    Kato, M. T.; Ida, S.; Fujimoto, M.

    2010-05-10

    How planetesimals are created from tiny dust particles in a proto-planetary disk before the dust particles spiral to the central star is one of the most challenging problems in the theory of planetary system formation. In our previous paper, we have shown that a steady angular velocity profile that consists of both super- and sub-Keplerian regions is created in the disk through non-uniform excitation of magneto-rotational instability (MRI). Such non-uniform MRI excitation is reasonably expected in a part of disks with relatively low ionization degree. In this paper, we show through three-dimensional resistive MHD simulations with test particles that this radial structure of the angular velocity indeed leads to the prevention of spiral-in of dust particles and furthermore to their accumulation at the boundary of super-Keplerian and sub-Keplerian regions. Treating dust particles as test particles, their motions under the influence of the non-uniform MRI through gas drag are simulated. In the most favorable cases (meter-size dust particles in the disk region with a relatively large fraction of MRI-stable region), we found that the dust concentration is peaked around the super/sub-Keplerian flow boundary and the peak dust density is 10,000 times as high as the initial value. The peak density is high enough for the subsequent gravitational instability to set in, suggesting a possible route to planetesimal formation via non-uniformly excited MRI in weakly ionized regions of a disk.

  7. Planetary Companions to HD 12661, HD 92788, and HD 38529 and Variations in Keplerian Residuals of Extrasolar Planets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fischer, Debra A.; Marcy, Geoffrey W.; Butler, R. Paul; Vogt, Steven S.; Frink, Sabine; Apps, Kevin

    2001-04-01

    Precision Doppler observations at the Lick and Keck observatories have revealed Keplerian velocity variations in the stars HD 12661, HD 92788, and HD 38529. HD 12661 (G6 V) has an orbital period of 252.7+/-2.7 days, velocity semiamplitude K=88.4+/-2.0 m s-1, and orbital eccentricity e=0.23+/-0.024. Adopting a stellar mass of 1.07 Msolar, we infer a companion mass of Msini=2.79 MJ and a semimajor axis of a=0.79 AU. HD 92788 (G5 V) has an orbital period of 326.7+/-3.2 days, velocity semiamplitude K=99.9+/-2.4, and orbital eccentricity e=0.30+/-0.06. The adopted stellar mass of 1.06 Msolar yields a companion mass of Msini=3.34 MJ and a semimajor axis of a=0.95 AU. HD 38529 (G4 IV) has an orbital period of 14.3+/-0.8 days, velocity semiamplitude K=53.8+/-2.0 m s-1, and eccentricity e=0.27+/-0.03. The stellar mass of 1.4 Msolar sets Msini=0.77 MJ, with a semimajor axis of a=0.13 AU for this companion. In addition to the 14.3 day periodicity, the velocity residuals for HD 38529 show curvature over the three years of observations. Based on a measurement of Ca II H and K emission, all three stars are chromospherically inactive. Based on both spectral synthesis modeling and narrowband photometry, HD 12661, HD 92788, and HD 38529 all appear to be metal-rich stars, reinforcing the correlation of high metallicity in the host stars of gas giant extrasolar planets. We examine the velocity residuals to the Keplerian fits for a subsample of 12 planet-bearing stars that have been observed longer than two years at the Lick Observatory. Five of the 12 (Ups Andromedae, τ Boo, 55 Cnc, HD 217107, and HD 38529) exhibit coherent variations in the residual velocities that are consistent with additional companions. Except for Upsilon Andromedae, the source of the velocity variation remains speculative pending completion of one full orbit. GJ 876 exhibits residual velocities with high rms scatter (24 m s-1), lacking identifiable coherence. The residual velocities for six of the 12 stars (51

  8. Tsien's method for generating non-Keplerian trajectories. Part 2: The question of thrust to orbit a sphere and the restricted three-body problem

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murad, P. A.

    1993-01-01

    Tsien's method is extended to treat the orbital motion of a body undergoing accelerations and decelerations. A generalized solution is discussed for the generalized case where a body undergoes azimuthal and radial thrust and the problem is further simplified for azimuthal thrust alone. Judicious selection of thrust could generate either an elliptic or hyperbolic trajectory. This is unexpected especially when the body has only enough energy for a lower state trajectory. The methodology is extended treating the problem of vehicle thrust for orbiting a sphere and vehicle thrust within the classical restricted three-body problem. Results for the latter situation can produce hyperbolic trajectories through eigen value decomposition. Since eigen values for no-thrust can be imaginary, thrust can generate real eigen values to describe hyperbolic trajectories. Keplerian dynamics appears to represent but a small subset of a much larger non-Keplerian domain especially when thrust effects are considered. The need for high thrust long duration space-based propulsion systems for changing a trajectory's canonical form is clearly demonstrated.

  9. Profiled spectral lines generated by Keplerian discs orbiting in the Bardeen and Ayòn-Beato-Garcìa spacetimes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schee, Jan; Stuchlík, Zdeněk

    2016-04-01

    Shape and frequency-shift maps of direct and indirect images of Keplerian discs orbiting in Bardeen and Ayòn-Beato-Garcìa (ABG) black hole and no-horizon spacetimes are determined. Then profiles of spectral lines generated in the innermost parts of the Keplerian discs in the Bardeen and ABG spacetimes are constructed. The frequency-shift maps and profiled spectral lines are compared to those generated in the field of Schwarzschild black holes and possible observationally relevant signatures of the regular black hole and no-horizon spacetimes are discussed. We demonstrate that differences relative to the Schwarzschild spacetimes are for the no-horizon spacetimes much more profound in comparison to the regular black hole spacetimes and increase with increasing charge parameter of the spacetime. The differences are greater for small and large inclination angles than for intermediate ones. For the no-horizon spacetimes, the differences enable us to distinguish the Bardeen and ABG spacetime, if inclination angle to the distant observer is known. We also show that contribution of the so-called ghost images to the profiled lines increases with increasing charge parameter of the spacetimes.

  10. Closed-Form and Numerically-Stable Solutions to Problems Related to the Optimal Two-Impulse Transfer Between Specified Terminal States of Keplerian Orbits

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Senent, Juan

    2011-01-01

    The first part of the paper presents some closed-form solutions to the optimal two-impulse transfer between fixed position and velocity vectors on Keplerian orbits when some constraints are imposed on the magnitude of the initial and final impulses. Additionally, a numerically-stable gradient-free algorithm with guaranteed convergence is presented for the minimum delta-v two-impulse transfer. In the second part of the paper, cooperative bargaining theory is used to solve some two-impulse transfer problems when the initial and final impulses are carried by different vehicles or when the goal is to minimize the delta-v and the time-of-flight at the same time.

  11. Nondissipative saturation of the magnetorotational instability in thin disks.

    PubMed

    Liverts, Edward; Shtemler, Yuri; Mond, Michael; Umurhan, Orkan M; Bisikalo, Dmitry V

    2012-11-30

    A new nondissipative mechanism is proposed for the saturation of the axisymmetric magnetorotational (MRI) instability in thin Keplerian disks that are subject to an axial magnetic field. That mechanism relies on the energy transfer from the MRI to stable magnetosonic waves. Such mode interaction is enabled due to the vertical stratification of the disk that results in the discretization of its MRI spectrum, as well as by applying the appropriate boundary conditions. A second order Duffing-like amplitude equation for the initially unstable MRI modes is derived. The solutions of that equation exhibit bursty nonlinear oscillations with a constant amplitude that signifies the saturation level of the MRI. Those results are verified by a direct numerical solution of the full nonlinear reduced set of thin disk magnetohydrodynamics equations. PMID:23368127

  12. Filamentary structure and Keplerian rotation in the high-mass star-forming region G35.03+0.35 imaged with ALMA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beltrán, M. T.; Sánchez-Monge, Á.; Cesaroni, R.; Kumar, M. S. N.; Galli, D.; Walmsley, C. M.; Etoka, S.; Furuya, R. S.; Moscadelli, L.; Stanke, T.; van der Tak, F. F. S.; Vig, S.; Wang, K.-S.; Zinnecker, H.; Elia, D.; Schisano, E.

    2014-11-01

    Context. Theoretical scenarios propose that high-mass stars are formed by disk-mediated accretion. Aims: To test the theoretical predictions on the formation of massive stars, we wish to make a thorough study at high-angular resolution of the structure and kinematics of the dust and gas emission toward the high-mass star-forming region G35.03+0.35, which harbors a disk candidate around a B-type (proto)star. Methods: We carried out ALMA Cycle 0 observations at 870 μm of dust of typical high-density, molecular outflow, and cloud tracers with resolutions of < 0''&dotbelow;5. Complementary Subaru COMICS 25 μm observations were carried out to trace the mid-infrared emission toward this star-forming region. Results: The submillimeter continuum emission has revealed a filamentary structure fragmented into six cores, called A-F. The filament could be in quasi-equilibrium taking into account that the mass per unit length of the filament, 200-375 M⊙/pc, is similar to the critical mass of a thermally and turbulently supported infinite cylinder, ~335 M⊙/pc. The cores, which are on average separated by ~0.02 pc, have deconvolved sizes of 1300-3400 AU, temperatures of 35-240 K, H2 densities >107 cm -3, and masses in the range 1-5 M⊙, and they are subcritical. Core A, which is associated with a hypercompact Hii region and could be the driving source of the molecular outflow observed in the region, is the most chemically rich source in G35.03+0.35 with strong emission of typical hot core tracers such as CH3CN. Tracers of high density and excitation show a clear velocity gradient along the major axis of the core, which is consistent with a disk rotating about the axis of the associated outflow. The PV plots along the SE-NW direction of the velocity gradient show clear signatures of Keplerian rotation, although infall could also be present, and they are consistent with the pattern of an edge-on Keplerian disk rotating about a star with a mass in the range 5-13 M⊙. The high

  13. Magnetically Torqued Thin Accretion Disks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kluźniak, W.; Rappaport, S.

    2007-12-01

    We compute the properties of a geometrically thin, steady accretion disk surrounding a central rotating, magnetized star. The magnetosphere is assumed to entrain the disk over a wide range of radii. The model is simplified in that we adopt two (alternate) ad hoc, but plausible, expressions for the azimuthal component of the magnetic field as a function of radial distance. We find a solution for the angular velocity profile tending to corotation close to the central star and smoothly matching a Keplerian curve at a radius where the viscous stress vanishes. The value of this ``transition'' radius is nearly the same for both of our adopted B-field models. We then solve analytically for the torques on the central star and for the disk luminosity due to gravity and magnetic torques. When expressed in a dimensionless form, the resulting quantities depend on one parameter alone, the ratio of the transition radius to the corotation radius. For rapid rotators, the accretion disk may be powered mostly by spin-down of the central star. These results are independent of the viscosity prescription in the disk. We also solve for the disk structure for the special case of an optically thick alpha disk. Our results are applicable to a range of astrophysical systems including accreting neutron stars, intermediate polar cataclysmic variables, and T Tauri systems.

  14. EXTREMELY LARGE AND HOT MULTILAYER KEPLERIAN DISK AROUND THE O-TYPE PROTOSTAR W51N: THE PRECURSORS OF THE HCH II REGIONS?

    SciTech Connect

    Zapata, Luis A.; Tang, Ya-Wen; Leurini, Silvia

    2010-12-10

    We present sensitive high angular resolution (0.''57-0.''78) SO, SO{sub 2}, CO, C{sub 2}H{sub 5}OH, HC{sub 3}N, and HCOCH{sub 2}OH line observations at millimeter and submillimeter wavelengths of the young O-type protostar W51 North made with the Submillimeter Array. We report the presence of a large (about 8000 AU) and hot molecular circumstellar disk around this object, which connects the inner dusty disk with the molecular ring or toroid reported recently and confirms the existence of a single bipolar outflow emanating from this object. The molecular emission from the large disk is observed in layers with the transitions characterized by high excitation temperatures in their lower energy states (up to 1512 K) being concentrated closer to the central massive protostar. The molecular emission from those transitions with low or moderate excitation temperatures is found in the outermost parts of the disk and exhibits an inner cavity with an angular size of around 0.''7. We modeled all lines with a local thermodynamic equilibrium (LTE) synthetic spectrum. A detailed study of the kinematics of the molecular gas together with an LTE model of a circumstellar disk shows that the innermost parts of the disk are also Keplerian plus a contracting velocity. The emission of the HCOCH{sub 2}OH reveals the possible presence of a warm 'companion' located to the northeast of the disk, however its nature is unclear. The emission of the SO and SO{sub 2} is observed in the circumstellar disk as well as in the outflow. We suggest that the massive protostar W51 North appears to be in a phase before the presence of a hypercompact or an ultracompact H II (HC/UCH II) region and propose a possible sequence on the formation of the massive stars.

  15. The Comparison of the Classical Keplerian Orbit Elements, Non-Singular Orbital Elements (Equinoctial Elements), and the Cartesian State Variables in Lagrange Planetary Equations with J2 Perturbation: Part I

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jo, Jung Hyun; Park, In Kwan; Choe, Nammi; Choi, Mansoo

    2011-03-01

    Two semi-analytic solutions for a perturbed two-body problem known as Lagrange planetary equations (LPE) were compared to a numerical integration of the equation of motion with same perturbation force. To avoid the critical conditions inherited from the configuration of LPE, non-singular orbital elements (EOE) had been introduced. In this study, two types of orbital elements, classical Keplerian orbital elements (COE) and EOE were used for the solution of the LPE. The effectiveness of EOE and the discrepancy between EOE and COE were investigated by using several near critical conditions. The near one revolution, one day, and seven days evolutions of each orbital element described in LPE with COE and EOE were analyzed by comparing it with the directly converted orbital elements from the numerically integrated state vector in Cartesian coordinate. As a result, LPE with EOE has an advantage in long term calculation over LPE with COE in case of relatively small eccentricity.

  16. Thin Clouds

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2013-04-18

    ... of this montage is a natural-color view of the Caribbean Sea east of the Yucatan Peninsula as seen by MISR's most steeply ... - Thin, feathery clouds of ice crystals over the Caribbean Sea. project:  MISR category:  gallery ...

  17. Thin Film?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kariper, İ. Afşin

    2014-09-01

    This study focuses on the critical surface tension of lead sulfite (PbSO3) crystalline thin film produced with chemical bath deposition on substrates (commercial glass).The PbSO3 thin films were deposited at room temperature at different deposition times. The structural properties of the films were defined and examined according to X-ray diffraction (XRD) and the XRD results such as dislocation density, average grain size, and no. of crystallites per unit area. Atomic force microscopy was used to measure the film thickness and the surface properties. The critical surface tension of the PbSO3 thin films was measured with an optical tensiometer instrument and calculated using the Zisman method. The results indicated that the critical surface tension of films changed in accordance with the average grain size and film thickness. The film thickness increased with deposition time and was inversely correlated with surface tension. The average grain size increased according to deposition time and was inversely correlated with surface tension.

  18. Thin Films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naffouti, Wafa; Nasr, Tarek Ben; Mehdi, Ahmed; Kamoun-Turki, Najoua

    2014-11-01

    Titanium dioxide (TiO2) thin films were synthesized on glass substrates by spray pyrolysis. The effect of solution flow rate on the physical properties of the films was investigated by use of x-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy, atomic force microscopy (AFM), and spectrophotometry techniques. XRD analysis revealed the tetragonal anatase phase of TiO2 with highly preferred (101) orientation. AFM images showed that grain size on top of TiO2 thin films depended on solution flow rate. An indirect band gap energy of 3.46 eV was determined by means of transmission and reflection measurements. The envelope method, based on the optical transmission spectrum, was used to determine film thickness and optical constants, for example real and imaginary parts of the dielectric constant, refractive index, and extinction coefficient. Ultraviolet and visible photoluminescence emission peaks were observed at room temperature. These peaks were attributed to the intrinsic emission and to the surface defect states, respectively.

  19. Thin Films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khorshidi, Zahra; Bahari, Ali; Gholipur, Reza

    2014-11-01

    Effect of annealing temperature on the characteristics of sol-gel-driven Ta ax La(1- a) x O y thin film spin-coated on Si substrate as a high- k gate dielectric was studied. Ta ax La(1- a) x O y thin films with different amounts of a were prepared (as-prepared samples). X-ray diffraction measurements of the as-prepared samples indicated that Ta0.3 x La0.7 x Oy film had an amorphous structure. Therefore, Ta0.3 x La0.7 x O y film was chosen to continue the present studies. The morphology of Ta0.3 x La0.7 x O y films was studied using scanning electron microscopy and atomic force microscopy techniques. The obtained results showed that the size of grain boundaries on Ta0.3 x La0.7 x O y film surfaces was increased with increasing annealing temperature. Electrical and optical characterizations of the as-prepared and annealed films were investigated as a function of annealing temperature using capacitance-voltage ( C- V) and current density-voltage ( J- V) measurements and the Tauc method. The obtained results demonstrated that Ta0.3 x La0.7 x O y films had high dielectric constant (≈27), wide band gap (≈4.5 eV), and low leakage current density (≈10-6 A/cm2 at 1 V).

  20. Density-stratified flow events in Great Salt Lake, Utah, USA: implications for mercury and salinity cycling

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Naftz, David L.; Carling, Gregory T.; Angeroth, Cory; Freeman, Michael; Rowland, Ryan; Pazmiño, Eddy

    2014-01-01

    Density stratification in saline and hypersaline water bodies from throughout the world can have large impacts on the internal cycling and loading of salinity, nutrients, and trace elements. High temporal resolution hydroacoustic and physical/chemical data were collected at two sites in Great Salt Lake (GSL), a saline lake in the western USA, to understand how density stratification may influence salinity and mercury (Hg) distributions. The first study site was in a causeway breach where saline water from GSL exchanges with less saline water from a flow restricted bay. Near-surface-specific conductance values measured in water at the breach displayed a good relationship with both flow and wind direction. No diurnal variations in the concentration of dissolved (total and MeHg loadings was observed during periods of elevated salinity. The second study site was located on the bottom of GSL where movement of a high-salinity water layer, referred to as the deep brine layer (DBL), is restricted to a naturally occurring 1.5-km-wide “spillway” structure. During selected time periods in April/May, 2012, wind-induced flow reversals in a railroad causeway breach, separating Gunnison and Gilbert Bays, were coupled with high-velocity flow pulses (up to 55 cm/s) in the DBL at the spillway site. These flow pulses were likely driven by a pressure response of highly saline water from Gunnison Bay flowing into the north basin of Gilbert Bay. Short-term flow reversal events measured at the railroad causeway breach have the ability to move measurable amounts of salt and Hg from Gunnison Bay into the DBL. Future disturbance to the steady state conditions currently imposed by the railroad causeway infrastructure could result in changes to the existing chemical balance between Gunnison and Gilbert Bays. Monitoring instruments were installed at six additional sites in the DBL during October 2012 to assess impacts from any future modifications to the railroad causeway.

  1. A semi-implicit spectral method for compressible convection of rotating and density-stratified flows in Cartesian geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cai, Tao

    2016-04-01

    In this paper, we have described a 'stratified' semi-implicit spectral method to study compressible convection in Cartesian geometry. The full set of compressible hydrodynamic equations are solved in conservative forms. The numerical scheme is accurate and efficient, based on fast Fourier/sin/cos spectral transforms in the horizontal directions, Chebyshev spectral transform or second-order finite difference scheme in the vertical direction, and second order semi-implicit scheme in time marching of linear terms. We have checked the validity of both the fully pseudo-spectral scheme and the mixed finite-difference pseudo-spectral scheme by studying the onset of compressible convection. The difference of the critical Rayleigh number between our numerical result and the linear stability analysis is within two percent. Besides, we have computed the Mach numbers with different Rayleigh numbers in compressible convection. It shows good agreement with the numerical results of finite difference methods and finite volume method. This model has wide application in studying laminar and turbulent flow. Illustrative examples of application on horizontal convection, gravity waves, and long-lived vortex are given in this paper.

  2. Explosive magnetorotational instability in Keplerian disks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shtemler, Yu.; Liverts, E.; Mond, M.

    2016-06-01

    Differentially rotating disks under the effect of axial magnetic field are prone to a nonlinear explosive magnetorotational instability (EMRI). The dynamic equations that govern the temporal evolution of the amplitudes of three weakly detuned resonantly interacting modes are derived. As distinct from exponential growth in the strict resonance triads, EMRI occurs due to the resonant interactions of an MRI mode with stable Alfvén-Coriolis and magnetosonic modes. Numerical solutions of the dynamic equations for amplitudes of a triad indicate that two types of perturbations behavior can be excited for resonance conditions: (i) EMRI which leads to infinite values of the three amplitudes within a finite time, and (ii) bounded irregular oscillations of all three amplitudes. Asymptotic explicit solutions of the dynamic equations are obtained for EMRI regimes and are shown to match the numerical solutions near the explosion time.

  3. Exact time-dependent solutions for the thin accretion disc equation: boundary conditions at finite radius

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanaka, Takamitsu

    2011-01-01

    We discuss Green's function solutions of the equation for a geometrically thin, axisymmetric Keplerian accretion disc with a viscosity prescription ν∝Rn. The mathematical problem was solved by Lynden-Bell & Pringle for the special cases with boundary conditions of zero-viscous torque and zero mass flow at the disc centre. While it has been widely established that the observational appearance of astrophysical discs depends on the physical size of the central object(s), exact time-dependent solutions with boundary conditions imposed at finite radius have not been published for a general value of the power-law index n. We derive exact Green's function solutions that satisfy either a zero-torque or a zero-flux condition at a non-zero inner boundary Rin > 0, for an arbitrary initial surface density profile. Whereas the viscously dissipated power diverges at the disc centre for the previously known solutions with Rin= 0, the new solutions with Rin > 0 have finite expressions for the disc luminosity that agree, in the limit t→∞, with standard expressions for steady-state disc luminosities. The new solutions are applicable to the evolution of the innermost regions of thin accretion discs.

  4. Pyrolyzed thin film carbon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tai, Yu-Chong (Inventor); Liger, Matthieu (Inventor); Harder, Theodore (Inventor); Konishi, Satoshi (Inventor); Miserendino, Scott (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    A method of making carbon thin films comprises depositing a catalyst on a substrate, depositing a hydrocarbon in contact with the catalyst and pyrolyzing the hydrocarbon. A method of controlling a carbon thin film density comprises etching a cavity into a substrate, depositing a hydrocarbon into the cavity, and pyrolyzing the hydrocarbon while in the cavity to form a carbon thin film. Controlling a carbon thin film density is achieved by changing the volume of the cavity. Methods of making carbon containing patterned structures are also provided. Carbon thin films and carbon containing patterned structures can be used in NEMS, MEMS, liquid chromatography, and sensor devices.

  5. Biomimetic thin film synthesis

    SciTech Connect

    Graff, G.L.; Campbell, A.A.; Gordon, N.R.

    1995-05-01

    The purpose of this program is to develop a new process for forming thin film coatings and to demonstrate that the biomimetic thin film technology developed at PNL is useful for industrial applications. In the biomimetic process, mineral deposition from aqueous solution is controlled by organic functional groups attached to the underlying substrate surface. The coatings process is simple, benign, inexpensive, energy efficient, and particularly suited for temperature sensitive substrate materials (such as polymers). In addition, biomimetic thin films can be deposited uniformly on complex shaped and porous substrates providing a unique capability over more traditional line-of-sight methods.

  6. Thin film hydrogen sensor

    DOEpatents

    Cheng, Y.T.; Poli, A.A.; Meltser, M.A.

    1999-03-23

    A thin film hydrogen sensor includes a substantially flat ceramic substrate with first and second planar sides and a first substrate end opposite a second substrate end; a thin film temperature responsive resistor on the first planar side of the substrate proximate to the first substrate end; a thin film hydrogen responsive metal resistor on the first planar side of the substrate proximate to the fist substrate end and proximate to the temperature responsive resistor; and a heater on the second planar side of the substrate proximate to the first end. 5 figs.

  7. Electrochemical thinning of silicon

    DOEpatents

    Medernach, John W.

    1994-01-01

    Porous semiconducting material, e.g. silicon, is formed by electrochemical treatment of a specimen in hydrofluoric acid, using the specimen as anode. Before the treatment, the specimen can be masked. The porous material is then etched with a caustic solution or is oxidized, depending of the kind of structure desired, e.g. a thinned specimen, a specimen, a patterned thinned specimen, a specimen with insulated electrical conduits, and so on. Thinned silicon specimen can be subjected to tests, such as measurement of interstitial oxygen by Fourier transform infra-red spectroscopy (FTIR).

  8. Electrochemical thinning of silicon

    SciTech Connect

    Medernach, J.W.

    1994-01-11

    Porous semiconducting material, e.g. silicon, is formed by electrochemical treatment of a specimen in hydrofluoric acid, using the specimen as anode. Before the treatment, the specimen can be masked. The porous material is then etched with a caustic solution or is oxidized, depending of the kind of structure desired, e.g. a thinned specimen, a specimen, a patterned thinned specimen, a specimen with insulated electrical conduits, and so on. Thinned silicon specimen can be subjected to tests, such as measurement of interstitial oxygen by Fourier transform infra-red spectroscopy (FTIR). 14 figures.

  9. Thin film hydrogen sensor

    DOEpatents

    Cheng, Yang-Tse; Poli, Andrea A.; Meltser, Mark Alexander

    1999-01-01

    A thin film hydrogen sensor, includes: a substantially flat ceramic substrate with first and second planar sides and a first substrate end opposite a second substrate end; a thin film temperature responsive resistor on the first planar side of the substrate proximate to the first substrate end; a thin film hydrogen responsive metal resistor on the first planar side of the substrate proximate to the fist substrate end and proximate to the temperature responsive resistor; and a heater on the second planar side of the substrate proximate to the first end.

  10. Thin-disk models in an integrable Weyl-Dirac theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vieira, Ronaldo S. S.; Letelier, Patricio S.

    2014-01-01

    We construct a class of static, axially symmetric solutions representing razor-thin disks of matter in the Integrable Weyl-Dirac theory proposed in Israelit (Found Phys 29:1303, 1999). The main differences between these solutions and the corresponding general relativistic one are analyzed, focusing on the behavior of physical observables (rotation curves of test particles, density and pressure profiles). We consider the case in which test particles move along Weyl geodesics. The same rotation curve can be obtained from many different solutions of the Weyl-Dirac theory, although some of these solutions present strong qualitative differences with respect to the usual general relativistic model (such as the appearance of a ring-like density profile). In particular, for typical galactic parameters all rotation curves of the Weyl-Dirac model present Keplerian fall-off. As a consequence, we conclude that a more thorough analysis of the problem requires the determination of the gauge function on galactic scales, as well as restrictions on the test-particle behavior under the action of the additional geometrical fields introduced by this theory.

  11. Ceramic Composite Thin Films

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ruoff, Rodney S. (Inventor); Stankovich, Sasha (Inventor); Dikin, Dmitriy A. (Inventor); Nguyen, SonBinh T. (Inventor)

    2013-01-01

    A ceramic composite thin film or layer includes individual graphene oxide and/or electrically conductive graphene sheets dispersed in a ceramic (e.g. silica) matrix. The thin film or layer can be electrically conductive film or layer depending the amount of graphene sheets present. The composite films or layers are transparent, chemically inert and compatible with both glass and hydrophilic SiOx/silicon substrates. The composite film or layer can be produced by making a suspension of graphene oxide sheet fragments, introducing a silica-precursor or silica to the suspension to form a sol, depositing the sol on a substrate as thin film or layer, at least partially reducing the graphene oxide sheets to conductive graphene sheets, and thermally consolidating the thin film or layer to form a silica matrix in which the graphene oxide and/or graphene sheets are dispersed.

  12. Thin film metrology.

    PubMed

    Nitsch, Gerald; Flinn, Gregory

    2007-10-01

    Thin film metrology is suitable for characterising and performing quality control of a variety of coatings and films used in medical applications. The capabilities of today's systems are described. PMID:18078184

  13. Super Thin Ceramic Coatings

    NASA Video Gallery

    New technology being developed at NASA's Glenn Research Center creates super thin ceramic coatings on engine components. The Plasma Spray – Physical Vapor Deposition (PS-PVD) rig uses a powerful ...

  14. Line Thinning Algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feigin, G.; Ben-Yosef, N.

    1983-10-01

    A thinning algorithm, of the banana-peel type, is presented. In each iteration pixels are attacked from all directions (there are no sub-iterations), and the deletion criteria depend on the 24 nearest neighbours.

  15. Multifunctional thin film surface

    SciTech Connect

    Brozik, Susan M.; Harper, Jason C.; Polsky, Ronen; Wheeler, David R.; Arango, Dulce C.; Dirk, Shawn M.

    2015-10-13

    A thin film with multiple binding functionality can be prepared on an electrode surface via consecutive electroreduction of two or more aryl-onium salts with different functional groups. This versatile and simple method for forming multifunctional surfaces provides an effective means for immobilization of diverse molecules at close proximities. The multifunctional thin film has applications in bioelectronics, molecular electronics, clinical diagnostics, and chemical and biological sensing.

  16. Thin silicon solar cells

    SciTech Connect

    Hall, R.B.; Bacon, C.; DiReda, V.; Ford, D.H.; Ingram, A.E.; Cotter, J.; Hughes-Lampros, T.; Rand, J.A.; Ruffins, T.R.; Barnett, A.M.

    1992-12-01

    The silicon-film design achieves high performance by using a dun silicon layer and incorporating light trapping. Optimally designed thin crystalline solar cells (<50 microns thick) have performance advantages over conventional thick devices. The high-performance silicon-film design employs a metallurgical barrier between the low-cost substrate and the thin silicon layer. Light trapping properties of silicon-film on ceramic solar cells are presented and analyzed. Recent advances in process development are described here.

  17. Thin film tritium dosimetry

    DOEpatents

    Moran, Paul R.

    1976-01-01

    The present invention provides a method for tritium dosimetry. A dosimeter comprising a thin film of a material having relatively sensitive RITAC-RITAP dosimetry properties is exposed to radiation from tritium, and after the dosimeter has been removed from the source of the radiation, the low energy electron dose deposited in the thin film is determined by radiation-induced, thermally-activated polarization dosimetry techniques.

  18. Lithospheric and crustal thinning

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moretti, I.

    1985-01-01

    In rift zones, both the crust and the lithosphere get thinner. The amplitude and the mechanism of these two thinning situations are different. The lithospheric thinning is a thermal phenomenon produced by an asthenospherical uprising under the rift zone. In some regions its amplitude can exceed 200%. This is observed under the Baikal rift where the crust is directly underlaid by the mantellic asthenosphere. The presence of hot material under rift zones induces a large negative gravity anomaly. A low seismic velocity zone linked to this thermal anomaly is also observed. During the rifting, the magmatic chambers get progressively closer from the ground surface. Simultaneously, the Moho reflector is found at shallow depth under rift zones. This crustal thinning does not exceed 50%. Tectonic stresses and vertical movements result from the two competing effects of the lithospheric and crustal thinning. On the one hand, the deep thermal anomaly induces a large doming and is associated with extensive deviatoric stresses. On the other hand, the crustal thinning involves the formation of a central valley. This subsidence is increased by the sediment loading. The purpose here is to quantify these two phenomena in order to explain the morphological and thermal evolution of rift zones.

  19. Thin film photovoltaics

    SciTech Connect

    Zweibel, K; Ullal, H S

    1989-05-01

    Thin films are considered a potentially attractive technological approach to making cost-effective electricity by photovoltaics. Over the last twenty years, many have been investigated and some (cadmium telluride, copper indium diselenide, amorphous silicon) have become leading candidates for future large-scale commercialization. This paper surveys the past development of these key thin films and gives their status and future prospects. In all cases, significant progress toward cost-effective PV electricity has been made. If this progress continues, it appears that thin film PV could provide electricity that is competitive for summer daytime peaking power requirements by the middle of the 1990s; and electricity in a range that is competitive with fossil fuel costs (i.e., 6 cents/kilowatt-hour) should be available from PV around the turn of the century. 22 refs., 9 figs.

  20. Thin film temperature sensor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grant, H. P.; Przybyszewski, J. S.

    1980-01-01

    Thin film surface temperature sensors were developed. The sensors were made of platinum-platinum/10 percent rhodium thermocouples with associated thin film-to-lead wire connections and sputtered on aluminum oxide coated simulated turbine blades for testing. Tests included exposure to vibration, low velocity hydrocarbon hot gas flow to 1250 K, and furnace calibrations. Thermal electromotive force was typically two percent below standard type S thermocouples. Mean time to failure was 42 hours at a hot gas flow temperature of 1250 K and an average of 15 cycles to room temperature. Failures were mainly due to separation of the platinum thin film from the aluminum oxide surface. Several techniques to improve the adhesion of the platinum are discussed.

  1. Thin-film optical initiator

    DOEpatents

    Erickson, Kenneth L.

    2001-01-01

    A thin-film optical initiator having an inert, transparent substrate, a reactive thin film, which can be either an explosive or a pyrotechnic, and a reflective thin film. The resultant thin-film optical initiator system also comprises a fiber-optic cable connected to a low-energy laser source, an output charge, and an initiator housing. The reactive thin film, which may contain very thin embedded layers or be a co-deposit of a light-absorbing material such as carbon, absorbs the incident laser light, is volumetrically heated, and explodes against the output charge, imparting about 5 to 20 times more energy than in the incident laser pulse.

  2. Thin film photovoltaic device

    DOEpatents

    Catalano, A.W.; Bhushan, M.

    1982-08-03

    A thin film photovoltaic solar cell which utilizes a zinc phosphide semiconductor is of the homojunction type comprising an n-type conductivity region forming an electrical junction with a p-type region, both regions consisting essentially of the same semiconductor material. The n-type region is formed by treating zinc phosphide with an extrinsic dopant such as magnesium. The semiconductor is formed on a multilayer substrate which acts as an opaque contact. Various transparent contacts may be used, including a thin metal film of the same chemical composition as the n-type dopant or conductive oxides or metal grids. 5 figs.

  3. Thin film ceramic thermocouples

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gregory, Otto (Inventor); Fralick, Gustave (Inventor); Wrbanek, John (Inventor); You, Tao (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    A thin film ceramic thermocouple (10) having two ceramic thermocouple (12, 14) that are in contact with each other in at least on point to form a junction, and wherein each element was prepared in a different oxygen/nitrogen/argon plasma. Since each element is prepared under different plasma conditions, they have different electrical conductivity and different charge carrier concentration. The thin film thermocouple (10) can be transparent. A versatile ceramic sensor system having an RTD heat flux sensor can be combined with a thermocouple and a strain sensor to yield a multifunctional ceramic sensor array. The transparent ceramic temperature sensor that could ultimately be used for calibration of optical sensors.

  4. Thin film photovoltaic device

    DOEpatents

    Catalano, Anthony W.; Bhushan, Manjul

    1982-01-01

    A thin film photovoltaic solar cell which utilizes a zinc phosphide semiconductor is of the homojunction type comprising an n-type conductivity region forming an electrical junction with a p-type region, both regions consisting essentially of the same semiconductor material. The n-type region is formed by treating zinc phosphide with an extrinsic dopant such as magnesium. The semiconductor is formed on a multilayer substrate which acts as an opaque contact. Various transparent contacts may be used, including a thin metal film of the same chemical composition as the n-type dopant or conductive oxides or metal grids.

  5. Shear Thinning in Xenon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bergm Robert F.; Moldover, Michael R.; Yao, Minwu; Zimmerli, Gregory A.

    2009-01-01

    We measured shear thinning, a viscosity decrease ordinarily associated with complex liquids such as molten plastics or ketchup, near the critical point of xenon. The data span a wide range of dimensionless shear rate: the product of the shear rate and the relaxation time of critical fluctuations was greater than 0.001 and was less than 700. As predicted by theory, shear thinning occurred when this product was greater than 1. The measurements were conducted aboard the Space Shuttle Columbia to avoid the density stratification caused by Earth's gravity.

  6. Treading on Thin Water.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haley, Richard D.

    1985-01-01

    Provides a simple introduction to animals whose habitat is the thin surface film of water. Describes adaptive mechanisms of water striders, whirlygigs and riffle bugs and suggests ways to observe them in the wild or as aquarium animals. Includes basic demonstrations of the nature of surface tension. (JHZ)

  7. Thin Lens Ray Tracing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gatland, Ian R.

    2002-01-01

    Proposes a ray tracing approach to thin lens analysis based on a vector form of Snell's law for paraxial rays as an alternative to the usual approach in introductory physics courses. The ray tracing approach accommodates skew rays and thus provides a complete analysis. (Author/KHR)

  8. Thin Wall Iron Castings

    SciTech Connect

    J.F. Cuttino; D.M. Stefanescu; T.S. Piwonka

    2001-10-31

    Results of an investigation made to develop methods of making iron castings having wall thicknesses as small as 2.5 mm in green sand molds are presented. It was found that thin wall ductile and compacted graphite iron castings can be made and have properties consistent with heavier castings. Green sand molding variables that affect casting dimensions were also identified.

  9. Epitaxial thin films

    DOEpatents

    Hunt, Andrew Tye; Deshpande, Girish; Lin, Wen-Yi; Jan, Tzyy-Jiuan

    2006-04-25

    Epitatial thin films for use as buffer layers for high temperature superconductors, electrolytes in solid oxide fuel cells (SOFC), gas separation membranes or dielectric material in electronic devices, are disclosed. By using CCVD, CACVD or any other suitable deposition process, epitaxial films having pore-free, ideal grain boundaries, and dense structure can be formed. Several different types of materials are disclosed for use as buffer layers in high temperature superconductors. In addition, the use of epitaxial thin films for electrolytes and electrode formation in SOFCs results in densification for pore-free and ideal gain boundary/interface microstructure. Gas separation membranes for the production of oxygen and hydrogen are also disclosed. These semipermeable membranes are formed by high-quality, dense, gas-tight, pinhole free sub-micro scale layers of mixed-conducting oxides on porous ceramic substrates. Epitaxial thin films as dielectric material in capacitors are also taught herein. Capacitors are utilized according to their capacitance values which are dependent on their physical structure and dielectric permittivity. The epitaxial thin films of the current invention form low-loss dielectric layers with extremely high permittivity. This high permittivity allows for the formation of capacitors that can have their capacitance adjusted by applying a DC bias between their electrodes.

  10. Thin film photovoltaic cell

    DOEpatents

    Meakin, John D.; Bragagnolo, Julio

    1982-01-01

    A thin film photovoltaic cell having a transparent electrical contact and an opaque electrical contact with a pair of semiconductors therebetween includes utilizing one of the electrical contacts as a substrate and wherein the inner surface thereof is modified by microroughening while being macro-planar.

  11. Thin film solar cell workshop

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Armstrong, Joe; Jeffrey, Frank

    1993-01-01

    A summation of responses to questions posed to the thin-film solar cell workshop and the ensuing discussion is provided. Participants in the workshop included photovoltaic manufacturers (both thin film and crystalline), cell performance investigators, and consumers.

  12. Thin films for material engineering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wasa, Kiyotaka

    2016-07-01

    Thin films are defined as two-dimensional materials formed by condensing one by one atomic/molecular/ionic species of matter in contrast to bulk three-dimensional sintered ceramics. They are grown through atomic collisional chemical reaction on a substrate surface. Thin film growth processes are fascinating for developing innovative exotic materials. On the basis of my long research on sputtering deposition, this paper firstly describes the kinetic energy effect of sputtered adatoms on thin film growth and discusses on a possibility of room-temperature growth of cubic diamond crystallites and the perovskite thin films of binary compound PbTiO3. Secondly, high-performance sputtered ferroelectric thin films with extraordinary excellent crystallinity compatible with MBE deposited thin films are described in relation to a possible application for thin-film MEMS. Finally, the present thin-film technologies are discussed in terms of a future material science and engineering.

  13. NMR characterization of thin films

    DOEpatents

    Gerald II, Rex E.; Klingler, Robert J.; Rathke, Jerome W.; Diaz, Rocio; Vukovic, Lela

    2010-06-15

    A method, apparatus, and system for characterizing thin film materials. The method, apparatus, and system includes a container for receiving a starting material, applying a gravitational force, a magnetic force, and an electric force or combinations thereof to at least the starting material, forming a thin film material, sensing an NMR signal from the thin film material and analyzing the NMR signal to characterize the thin film of material.

  14. NMR characterization of thin films

    DOEpatents

    Gerald, II, Rex E.; Klingler, Robert J.; Rathke, Jerome W.; Diaz, Rocio; Vukovic, Lela

    2008-11-25

    A method, apparatus, and system for characterizing thin film materials. The method, apparatus, and system includes a container for receiving a starting material, applying a gravitational force, a magnetic force, and an electric force or combinations thereof to at least the starting material, forming a thin film material, sensing an NMR signal from the thin film material and analyzing the NMR signal to characterize the thin film of material.

  15. Biomimetic thin film deposition

    SciTech Connect

    Rieke, P.R.; Graff, G.E.; Campbell, A.A.; Bunker, B.C.; Baskaran, S.; Song, L.; Tarasevich, B.J.; Fryxell, G.E.

    1995-09-01

    Biological mineral deposition for the formation of bone, mollusk shell and other hard tissues provides materials scientists with illustrative materials processing strategies. This presentation will review the key features of biomineralization and how these features can be of technical importance. We have adapted existing knowledge of biomineralization to develop a unique method of depositing inorganic thin films and coating. Our approach to thin film deposition is to modify substrate surfaces to imitate the proteins found in nature that are responsible for controlling mineral deposition. These biomimetic surfaces control the nucleation and growth of the mineral from a supersaturated aqueous solution. This has many processing advantages including simple processing equipment, environmentally benign reagents, uniform coating of highly complex shapes, and enhanced adherence of coating. Many different types of metal oxide, hydroxide, sulfide and phosphate materials with useful mechanical, optical, electronic and biomedical properties can be deposited.

  16. Shear-thinning Fluid

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2001-01-01

    Whipped cream and the filling for pumpkin pie are two familiar materials that exhibit the shear-thinning effect seen in a range of industrial applications. It is thick enough to stand on its own atop a piece of pie, yet flows readily when pushed through a tube. This demonstrates the shear-thinning effect that was studied with the Critical Viscosity of Xenon Experiment (CVX-2) on the STS-107 Research 1 mission in 2002. CVX observed the behavior of xenon, a heavy inert gas used in flash lamps and ion rocket engines, at its critical point. The principal investigator was Dr. Robert Berg of the National Institutes of Standards and Technology in Gaithersburg, MD.

  17. Advanced thin film thermocouples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kreider, K. G.; Semancik, S.; Olson, C.

    1984-10-01

    The fabrication, materials characterization, and performance of thin film platinum rhodium thermocouples on gas turbine alloys was investigated. The materials chosen for the study were the turbine blade alloy systems MAR M200+Hf with NiCoCrAlY and FeCrAlY coatings, and vane alloy systems MAR M509 with FeCrAlY. Research was focussed on making improvements in the problem areas of coating substrate stability, adhesion, and insulation reliability and durability. Diffusion profiles between the substrate and coating with and without barrier coatings of Al2O3 are reported. The relationships between fabrication parameters of thermal oxidation and sputtering of the insulator and its characterization and performance are described. The best thin film thermocouples were fabricated with the NiCoCrAlY coatings which were thermally oxidized and sputter coated with Al2O3.

  18. Advanced thin film thermocouples

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kreider, K. G.; Semancik, S.; Olson, C.

    1984-01-01

    The fabrication, materials characterization, and performance of thin film platinum rhodium thermocouples on gas turbine alloys was investigated. The materials chosen for the study were the turbine blade alloy systems MAR M200+Hf with NiCoCrAlY and FeCrAlY coatings, and vane alloy systems MAR M509 with FeCrAlY. Research was focussed on making improvements in the problem areas of coating substrate stability, adhesion, and insulation reliability and durability. Diffusion profiles between the substrate and coating with and without barrier coatings of Al2O3 are reported. The relationships between fabrication parameters of thermal oxidation and sputtering of the insulator and its characterization and performance are described. The best thin film thermocouples were fabricated with the NiCoCrAlY coatings which were thermally oxidized and sputter coated with Al2O3.

  19. Ultra-Thin, Flexible Electronics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holland, Brian; McPherson, Ryan; Zhang, Tan; Hou, Zhenwei; Dean, Robert; Johnson, R. Wayne; DelCastillo, Linda; Moussessian, Alina

    2008-01-01

    Thinned die can be used to realize ultra-thin flexible electronics for applications such as conformal and wearable electronics. Three techniques have been developed to achieve this goal using thinned die: die flip chip bonded onto flexible substrates, die laminated onto LCP films, and die embedded in polyimide. A key to achieving each of these techniques is the thinning of die to a thickness of 50 microns or thinner. Conventional CMP processing can be used to thin to 50 microns. At 50 microns, the active die become flexible and must be handled by temporarily bonding them to a holder die, for further processing. Once bonded face down to the holder die, the active die can be further thinned by DRIE etching the exposed backside. The thinned die can then been packaged in or on the flexible substrate.

  20. Thin film superconductor magnetic bearings

    SciTech Connect

    Weinberger, B.R.

    1995-12-26

    A superconductor magnetic bearing includes a shaft that is subject to a load (L) and rotatable around an axis of rotation, a magnet mounted to the shaft, and a stator in proximity to the shaft. The stator has a superconductor thin film assembly positioned to interact with the magnet to produce a levitation force on the shaft that supports the load (L). The thin film assembly includes at least two superconductor thin films and at least one substrate. Each thin film is positioned on a substrate and all the thin films are positioned such that an applied magnetic field from the magnet passes through all the thin films. A similar bearing in which the thin film assembly is mounted on the shaft and the magnet is part of the stator also can be constructed. 8 figs.

  1. Thin film superconductor magnetic bearings

    DOEpatents

    Weinberger, Bernard R.

    1995-12-26

    A superconductor magnetic bearing includes a shaft (10) that is subject to a load (L) and rotatable around an axis of rotation, a magnet (12) mounted to the shaft, and a stator (14) in proximity to the shaft. The stator (14) has a superconductor thin film assembly (16) positioned to interact with the magnet (12) to produce a levitation force on the shaft (10) that supports the load (L). The thin film assembly (16) includes at least two superconductor thin films (18) and at least one substrate (20). Each thin film (18) is positioned on a substrate (20) and all the thin films are positioned such that an applied magnetic field from the magnet (12) passes through all the thin films. A similar bearing in which the thin film assembly (16) is mounted on the shaft (10) and the magnet (12) is part of the stator (14) also can be constructed.

  2. Evaporated VOx Thin Films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stapinski, Tomasz; Leja, E.

    1989-03-01

    VOx thin films on glass were obtained by thermal evaporation of V205, powder. The structural investigations were carried out with the use of X-ray diffractometer. The electrical properties of the film were examined by means of temperature measurements of resistivity for the samples heat-treated in various conditions. Optical transmission and reflection spectra of VOX films of various composition showed the influence of the heat treatment.

  3. Thin, Lightweight Solar Cell

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brandhorst, Henry W., Jr.; Weinberg, Irving

    1991-01-01

    Improved design for thin, lightweight solar photovoltaic cells with front contacts reduces degradation of electrical output under exposure to energetic charged particles (protons and electrons). Increases ability of cells to maintain structural integrity under exposure to ultraviolet radiation by eliminating ultraviolet-degradable adhesives used to retain cover glasses. Interdigitated front contacts and front junctions formed on semiconductor substrate. Mating contacts formed on back surface of cover glass. Cover glass and substrate electrostatically bonded together.

  4. Thin film scintillators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McDonald, Warren; McKinney, George; Tzolov, Marian

    2015-03-01

    Scintillating materials convert energy flux (particles or electromagnetic waves) into light with spectral characteristic matching a subsequent light detector. Commercial scintillators such as yttrium aluminum garnet (YAG) and yttrium aluminum perovskite (YAP) are commonly used. These are inefficient at lower energies due to the conductive coating present on their top surface, which is needed to avoid charging. We hypothesize that nano-structured thin film scintillators will outperform the commercial scintillators at low electron energies. We have developed alternative thin film scintillators, zinc tungstate and zinc oxide, which show promise for higher sensitivity to lower energy electrons since they are inherently conductive. Zinc tungstate films exhibit photoluminescence quantum efficiency of 74%. Cathodoluminescence spectroscopy was applied in transmission and reflection geometries. The comparison between the thin films and the YAG and YAP commercial scintillators shows much higher light output from the zinc tungstate and zinc oxide at electron energies less than 5 keV. Our films were integrated in a backscattered electron detector. This detector delivers better images than an identical detector with commercial YAG scintillator at low electron energies. Dr. Nicholas Barbi from PulseTor LLC, Dr. Anura Goonewardene, NSF Grants: #0806660, #1058829, #0923047.

  5. Polycrystalline thin film photovoltaics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zweibel, K.; Ullal, H. S.; Mitchell, R. L.

    Significant progress has recently been made towards improving the efficiencies of polycrystalline thin-film solar cells and modules using CuInSe2 and CdTe. The history of using CuInSe2 and CdTe for solar cells is reviewed. Initial outdoor stability tests of modules are encouraging. Progress in semiconductor deposition techniques has also been substantial. Both CuInSe2 and CdTe are positioned for commercialization during the 1990s. The major participants in developing these materials are described. The US DOE/SERI (Solar Energy Research Institute) program recognizes the rapid progress and important potential of polycrystalline thin films to meet ambitious cost and performance goals. US DOE/SERI is in the process of funding an initiative in this area with the goal of ensuring US leadership in the development of these technologies. The polycrystalline thin-film module development initiative, the modeling and stability of the devices, and health and safety issues are discussed.

  6. thin films as absorber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    González, J. O.; Shaji, S.; Avellaneda, D.; Castillo, G. A.; Das Roy, T. K.; Krishnan, B.

    2014-09-01

    Photovoltaic structures were prepared using AgSb(S x Se1- x )2 as absorber and CdS as window layer at various conditions via a hybrid technique of chemical bath deposition and thermal evaporation followed by heat treatments. Silver antimony sulfo selenide thin films [AgSb(S x Se1- x )2] were prepared by heating multilayers of sequentially deposited Sb2S3/Ag dipped in Na2SeSO3 solution, glass/Sb2S3/Ag/Se. For this, Sb2S3 thin films were deposited from a chemical bath containing SbCl3 and Na2S2O3. Then, Ag thin films were thermally evaporated on glass/Sb2S3, followed by selenization by dipping in an acidic solution of Na2SeSO3. The duration of dipping was varied as 3, 4 and 5 h. Two different heat treatments, one at 350 °C for 20 min in vacuum followed by a post-heat treatment at 325 °C for 2 h in Ar, and the other at 350 °C for 1 h in Ar, were applied to the multilayers of different configurations. X-ray diffraction results showed the formation of AgSb(S x Se1- x )2 thin films as the primary phase and AgSb(S,Se)2 and Sb2S3 as secondary phases. Morphology and elemental detection were done by scanning electron microscopy and energy dispersive X-ray analysis. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopic studies showed the depthwise composition of the films. Optical properties were determined by UV-vis-IR transmittance and reflection spectral analysis. AgSb(S x Se1- x )2 formed at different conditions was incorporated in PV structures glass/FTO/CdS/AgSb(S x Se1- x )2/C/Ag. Chemically deposited post-annealed CdS thin films of various thicknesses were used as window layer. J- V characteristics of the cells were measured under dark and AM1.5 illumination. Analysis of the J- V characteristics resulted in the best solar cell parameters of V oc = 520 mV, J sc = 9.70 mA cm-2, FF = 0.50 and η = 2.7 %.

  7. On the theory of thin and thin-walled rods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dzhanelidze, G Y

    1951-01-01

    Through the work of V. Z. Vlasov a theory of thin-walled rods has been established that is widely applicable in practice. This theory was extended by A. A. Umanski to thin-walled rods of closed profile section. The authors based their work on the concepts of the modern theory of shells. An attempt is made herein to construct a theory of thin-walled rods including the classical theory of deformation of thin rods by making use of a kinematic assumption.

  8. Ureilite Thin Section Preparation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harrington, R.; Righter, K.

    2014-01-01

    Preparing thin and thick sections of ureilite type meteorites is a challenge that can confound even the most experienced section preparer. A common characteristic of these samples is the presence of carbon phases, particularly nanodiamonds, in the matrix along silicate grain boundaries, fractures, and cleavage plains [1]. The extreme hardness of the nanodiamonds presents a challenge to the section preparer in the form of high surface relief on the section. This hard material also causes considerable wear and tear on equipment and materials that are used for making the sections. These issues will be discussed and potentially helpful measures will be presented.

  9. Carbon thin film thermometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Collier, R. S.; Sparks, L. L.; Strobridge, T. R.

    1973-01-01

    The work concerning carbon thin film thermometry is reported. Optimum film deposition parameters were sought on an empirical basis for maximum stability of the films. One hundred films were fabricated for use at the Marshall Space Flight Center; 10 of these films were given a precise quasi-continuous calibration of temperature vs. resistance with 22 intervals between 5 and 80 K using primary platinum and germanium thermometers. Sensitivity curves were established and the remaining 90 films were given a three point calibration and fitted to the established sensitivity curves. Hydrogen gas-liquid discrimination set points are given for each film.

  10. Method for thinning specimen

    DOEpatents

    Follstaedt, David M.; Moran, Michael P.

    2005-03-15

    A method for thinning (such as in grinding and polishing) a material surface using an instrument means for moving an article with a discontinuous surface with an abrasive material dispersed between the material surface and the discontinuous surface where the discontinuous surface of the moving article provides an efficient means for maintaining contact of the abrasive with the material surface. When used to dimple specimens for microscopy analysis, a wheel with a surface that has been modified to produce a uniform or random discontinuous surface significantly improves the speed of the dimpling process without loss of quality of finish.

  11. Thin film hydrogen sensor

    DOEpatents

    Lauf, Robert J.; Hoffheins, Barbara S.; Fleming, Pamela H.

    1994-01-01

    A hydrogen sensor element comprises an essentially inert, electrically-insulating substrate having a thin-film metallization deposited thereon which forms at least two resistors on the substrate. The metallization comprises a layer of Pd or a Pd alloy for sensing hydrogen and an underlying intermediate metal layer for providing enhanced adhesion of the metallization to the substrate. An essentially inert, electrically insulating, hydrogen impermeable passivation layer covers at least one of the resistors, and at least one of the resistors is left uncovered. The difference in electrical resistances of the covered resistor and the uncovered resistor is related to hydrogen concentration in a gas to which the sensor element is exposed.

  12. Polycrystalline thin-films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zweibel, K.; Mitchell, R.

    1986-02-01

    This annual report summarizes the status, accomplishments, and projected future research directions of the Polycrystalline Thin Film Task in the Photovoltaic Program Branch of the Solar Energy Research Institute's Solar Electric Research Division. Major subcontracted work in this area has concentrated on development of CuInSe2 and CdTe technologies. During FY 1985, major progress was achieved by subcontractors in: (1) developing a new, low-cost method of fabricating CuInSe2, and (2) improving the efficiency of CuInSe2 devices by about 10% (relative). The report also lists research planned to meet the Department of Energy's goals in these technologies.

  13. Thin-Film Power Transformers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Katti, Romney R.

    1995-01-01

    Transformer core made of thin layers of insulating material interspersed with thin layers of ferromagnetic material. Flux-linking conductors made of thinner nonferromagnetic-conductor/insulator multilayers wrapped around core. Transformers have geometric features finer than those of transformers made in customary way by machining and mechanical pressing. In addition, some thin-film materials exhibit magnetic-flux-carrying capabilities superior to those of customary bulk transformer materials. Suitable for low-cost, high-yield mass production.

  14. Polycrystalline thin film photovoltaic technology

    SciTech Connect

    Ullal, H.S.; Zweibel, K.; Mitchell, R.L.; Noufi, R.

    1991-03-01

    Low-cost, high-efficiency thin-film modules are an exciting photovoltaic technology option for generating cost-effective electricity in 1995 and beyond. In this paper we review the significant technical progress made in the following thin films: copper indium diselenide, cadmium telluride, and polycrystalline thin silicon films. Also, the recent US DOE/SERI initiative to commercialize these emerging technologies is discussed. 6 refs., 9 figs.

  15. Center for thin film studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shannon, Robert P.; Gibson, Ursula J.

    1987-11-01

    This report covers the first year of operation of the URI Thin Film Center (TFC), and describes a diverse array of studies on thin-film materials, substrates, and their processing and analysis. Individual efforts are highlighted in sections on nucleation studies, ion-assisted deposition, Rutherford backscattering spectrometry, Brillouin scattering, a continuum theory of the evolution of structure in thin films, a study of polishing parameters relevant to the preparation of substrates, and the setup of a characterization facility for the Center.

  16. The thin eggshell problem

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stickel, L.F.; Rhodes, L.I.

    1970-01-01

    It has long been known that DDT and related chemicals can impair the reproduction of birds. In early years of organochlorine pesticide use, widespread mortality occurred immediately following heavy applications of these chemicals, and survivors contained substantial amounts of toxicant in their tissues. Repopulation from untreated areas tended to conceal the extent of the effects. DDT and dieldrin have become ubiquitous and the original source of the chemicals producing bird deaths often cannot be traced. The extent of sublethal effects cannot be fully appraised, although laboratory experiments continually reveal new and potentially deleterious physiological reactions. Thin eggshells have become prevalent among certain declining species of predatory birds. Shell thinning and associated reproductive effects have been produced experimentally in mallard ducks and in sparrow hawks. Coturnix quail fed dietary dosages of p,p'-DDT produced fewer eggs than did untreated birds and the eggs had thinner shells. Hatchability was not significantly altered. Comparisons between these results and those obtained in other studies indicate significant species differences.

  17. Cortical thinning in psychopathy

    PubMed Central

    Ly, Martina; Motzkin, Julian C.; Philippi, Carissa L.; Kirk, Gregory R.; Newman, Joseph P.; Kiehl, Kent A.; Koenigs, Michael

    2013-01-01

    Objective Psychopathy is a personality disorder associated with severely antisocial behavior and a host of cognitive and affective deficits. The neuropathological basis of the disorder has not been clearly established. Cortical thickness is a sensitive measure of brain structure that has been used to identify neurobiological abnormalities in a number of psychiatric disorders. The purpose of this study is to evaluate cortical thickness and corresponding functional connectivity in criminal psychopaths. Method Using T1 MRI data, we computed cortical thickness maps in a sample of adult male prison inmates selected based on psychopathy diagnosis (n=21 psychopathic inmates, n=31 non-psychopathic inmates). Using rest-fMRI data from a subset of these inmates (n=20 psychopathic inmates, n=20 non-psychopathic inmates), we then computed functional connectivity within networks exhibiting significant thinning among psychopaths. Results Relative to non-psychopaths, psychopaths exhibited significantly thinner cortex in a number of regions, including left insula and dorsal anterior cingulate cortex, bilateral precentral gyrus, bilateral anterior temporal cortex, and right inferior frontal gyrus. These neurostructural differences were not due to differences in age, IQ, or substance abuse. Psychopaths also exhibited a corresponding reduction in functional connectivity between left insula and left dorsal anterior cingulate cortex. Conclusions Psychopathy is associated with a distinct pattern of cortical thinning and reduced functional connectivity. PMID:22581200

  18. Thin-film microextraction.

    PubMed

    Bruheim, Inge; Liu, Xiaochuan; Pawliszyn, Janusz

    2003-02-15

    The properties of a thin sheet of poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS) membrane as an extraction phase were examined and compared to solid-phase microextraction (SPME) PDMS-coated fiber for application to semivolatile analytes in direct and headspace modes. This new PDMS extraction approach showed much higher extraction rates because of the larger surface area to extraction-phase volume ratio of the thin film. Unlike the coated rod formats of SPME using thick coatings, the high extraction rate of the membrane SPME technique allows larger amounts of analytes to be extracted within a short period of time. Therefore, higher extraction efficiency and sensitivity can be achieved without sacrificing analysis time. In direct membrane SPME extraction, a linear relationship was found between the initial rate of extraction and the surface area of the extraction phase. However, for headspace extraction, the rates were somewhat lower because of the resistance to analyte transport at the sample matrix/headspace barrier. It was found that the effect of this barrier could be reduced by increasing either agitation, temperature, or surface area of the sample matrix/headspace interface. A method for the determination of PAHs in spiked lake water samples was developed based on the membrane PDMS extraction coupled with GC/MS. A linearity of 0.9960 and detection limits in the low-ppt level were found. The reproducibility was found to vary from 2.8% to 10.7%. PMID:12622398

  19. Thin film mechanics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cooper, Ryan C.

    This doctoral thesis details the methods of determining mechanical properties of two classes of novel thin films suspended two-dimensional crystals and electron beam irradiated microfilms of polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS). Thin films are used in a variety of surface coatings to alter the opto-electronic properties or increase the wear or corrosion resistance and are ideal for micro- and nanoelectromechanical system fabrication. One of the challenges in fabricating thin films is the introduction of strains which can arise due to application techniques, geometrical conformation, or other spurious conditions. Chapters 2-4 focus on two dimensional materials. This is the intrinsic limit of thin films-being constrained to one atomic or molecular unit of thickness. These materials have mechanical, electrical, and optical properties ideal for micro- and nanoelectromechanical systems with truly novel device functionality. As such, the breadth of applications that can benefit from a treatise on two dimensional film mechanics is reason enough for exploration. This study explores the anomylously high strength of two dimensional materials. Furthermore, this work also aims to bridge four main gaps in the understanding of material science: bridging the gap between ab initio calculations and finite element analysis, bridging the gap between ab initio calculations and experimental results, nanoscale to microscale, and microscale to mesoscale. A nonlinear elasticity model is used to determine the necessary elastic constants to define the strain-energy density function for finite strain. Then, ab initio calculations-density functional theory-is used to calculate the nonlinear elastic response. Chapter 2 focuses on validating this methodology with atomic force microscope nanoindentation on molybdenum disulfide. Chapter 3 explores the convergence criteria of three density functional theory solvers to further verify the numerical calculations. Chapter 4 then uses this model to investigate

  20. Stability of a velocity field tangential discontinuity in a three-layer density-stratified liquid with a moving middle layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shiryaeva, S. O.; Grigor'ev, A. I.

    2016-04-01

    A dispersion relation is analytically derived for gravitational waves in an ideal incompressible threelayer liquid with a free surface in the presence of a velocity field tangential discontinuity between the layers. The discontinuity results from the motion of the middle layer. The instability of the tangential discontinuity is shown to depend on the relative velocity of contacting layers, which, in turn, depends on the ratio of their densities. The closer the density ratio to unity, the lower the moving layer velocity causing instability. In the given case, instability involves internal waves arising at the second and third interfaces in accordance with the Kelvin-Helmholtz concept of instability development. Internal waves with wavelengths far exceeding the thickness of the middle layer are found to interact with each other. Surface waves only change their frequencies.

  1. Thin film atomic hydrogen detectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gruber, C. L.

    1977-01-01

    Thin film and bead thermistor atomic surface recombination hydrogen detectors were investigated both experimentally and theoretically. Devices were constructed on a thin Mylar film substrate. Using suitable Wheatstone bridge techniques sensitivities of 80 microvolts/2x10 to the 13th power atoms/sec are attainable with response time constants on the order of 5 seconds.

  2. Polysilicon thin films and interfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Kamins, T. ); Raicu, B. ); Thompson, C.V. )

    1990-01-01

    This volume contains the proceedings of a symposium on polysilicon thin films and interfaces, held as part of the 1990 Materials Research Society Spring Meeting. Topics covered include: crystal grown fo silicon and germanium wafers for photovoltaic devices, microanalysis of tungsten silicide interface, thermal processing of polysilicon thin films, and electrical and optical properties of polysilicon sheets for photovoltaic devices.

  3. Thin film ion conducting coating

    DOEpatents

    Goldner, Ronald B.; Haas, Terry; Wong, Kwok-Keung; Seward, George

    1989-01-01

    Durable thin film ion conducting coatings are formed on a transparent glass substrate by the controlled deposition of the mixed oxides of lithium:tantalum or lithium:niobium. The coatings provide durable ion transport sources for thin film solid state storage batteries and electrochromic energy conservation devices.

  4. Selective inorganic thin films

    SciTech Connect

    Phillips, M.L.F.; Weisenbach, L.A.; Anderson, M.T.

    1995-05-01

    This project is developing inorganic thin films as membranes for gas separation applications, and as discriminating coatings for liquid-phase chemical sensors. Our goal is to synthesize these coatings with tailored porosity and surface chemistry on porous substrates and on acoustic and optical sensors. Molecular sieve films offer the possibility of performing separations involving hydrogen, air, and natural gas constituents at elevated temperatures with very high separation factors. We are focusing on improving permeability and molecular sieve properties of crystalline zeolitic membranes made by hydrothermally reacting layered multicomponent sol-gel films deposited on mesoporous substrates. We also used acoustic plate mode (APM) oscillator and surface plasmon resonance (SPR) sensor elements as substrates for sol-gel films, and have both used these modified sensors to determine physical properties of the films and have determined the sensitivity and selectivity of these sensors to aqueous chemical species.

  5. Thin wire pointing method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Green, G.; Mattauch, R. J. (Inventor)

    1983-01-01

    A method is described for forming sharp tips on thin wires, in particular phosphor bronze wires of diameters such as one-thousandth inch used to contact micron size Schottky barrier diodes, which enables close control of tip shape and which avoids the use of highly toxic solutions. The method includes dipping an end of a phosphor bronze wire into a dilute solution of sulfamic acid and applying a current through the wire to electrochemically etch it. The humidity in the room is controlled to a level of less than 50%, and the voltage applied between the wire and another electrode in the solutions is a half wave rectified voltage. The current through the wire is monitored, and the process is stopped when the current falls to a predetermined low level.

  6. Ferromagnetic thin films

    DOEpatents

    Krishnan, Kannan M.

    1994-01-01

    A ferromagnetic .delta.-Mn.sub.1-x Ga.sub.x thin film having perpendicular anisotropy is described which comprises: (a) a GaAs substrate, (b) a layer of undoped GaAs overlying said substrate and bonded thereto having a thickness ranging from about 50 to about 100 nanometers, (c) a layer of .delta.-Mn.sub.1-x Ga.sub.x overlying said layer of undoped GaAs and bonded thereto having a thickness ranging from about 20 to about 30 nanometers, and (d) a layer of GaAs overlying said layer of .delta.-Mn.sub.1-x Ga.sub.x and bonded thereto having a thickness ranging from about 2 to about 5 nanometers, wherein x is 0.4 .+-.0.05.

  7. Ferromagnetic thin films

    DOEpatents

    Krishnan, K.M.

    1994-12-20

    A ferromagnetic [delta]-Mn[sub 1[minus]x]Ga[sub x] thin film having perpendicular anisotropy is described which comprises: (a) a GaAs substrate, (b) a layer of undoped GaAs overlying said substrate and bonded thereto having a thickness ranging from about 50 to about 100 nanometers, (c) a layer of [delta]-Mn[sub 1[minus]x]Ga[sub x] overlying said layer of undoped GaAs and bonded thereto having a thickness ranging from about 20 to about 30 nanometers, and (d) a layer of GaAs overlying said layer of [delta]-Mn[sub 1[minus]x]Ga[sub x] and bonded thereto having a thickness ranging from about 2 to about 5 nanometers, wherein x is 0.4[+-]0.05. 7 figures.

  8. Polyimide Aerogel Thin Films

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meador, Mary Ann; Guo, Haiquan

    2012-01-01

    Polyimide aerogels have been crosslinked through multifunctional amines. This invention builds on "Polyimide Aerogels With Three-Dimensional Cross-Linked Structure," and may be considered as a continuation of that invention, which results in a polyimide aerogel with a flexible, formable form. Gels formed from polyamic acid solutions, end-capped with anhydrides, and cross-linked with the multifunctional amines, are chemically imidized and dried using supercritical CO2 extraction to give aerogels having density around 0.1 to 0.3 g/cubic cm. The aerogels are 80 to 95% porous, and have high surface areas (200 to 600 sq m/g) and low thermal conductivity (as low as 14 mW/m-K at room temperature). Notably, the cross-linked polyimide aerogels have higher modulus than polymer-reinforced silica aerogels of similar density, and can be fabricated as both monoliths and thin films.

  9. Polycrystalline thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zweibel, K.; Mitchell, R.; Ullal, H.

    1987-02-01

    This annual report for fiscal year 1986 summarizes the status, accomplishments, and projected future research directions of the Polycrystalline Thin Film Task in the Photovoltaic Program Branch of the Solar Energy Research Institute's Solar Electric Research Division. Subcontracted work in this area has concentrated on the development of CuInSe2 and CdTe technologies. During FY 1986, major progress was achieved by subcontractors in (1) achieving 10.5% (SERI-verified) efficiency with CdTe, (2) improving the efficiency of selenized CuInSe2 solar cells to nearly 8%, and (3) developing a transparent contact to CdTe cells for potential use in the top cells of tandem structures.

  10. Nonlinear optical thin films

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leslie, Thomas M.

    1993-01-01

    A focused approach to development and evaluation of organic polymer films for use in optoelectronics is presented. The issues and challenges that are addressed include: (1) material synthesis, purification, and the tailoring of the material properties; (2) deposition of uniform thin films by a variety of methods; (3) characterization of material physical properties (thermal, electrical, optical, and electro-optical); and (4) device fabrication and testing. Photonic materials, devices, and systems were identified as critical technology areas by the Department of Commerce and the Department of Defense. This approach offers strong integration of basic material issues through engineering applications by the development of materials that can be exploited as the active unit in a variety of polymeric thin film devices. Improved materials were developed with unprecedented purity and stability. The absorptive properties can be tailored and controlled to provide significant improvement in propagation losses and nonlinear performance. Furthermore, the materials were incorporated into polymers that are highly compatible with fabrication and patterning processes for integrated optical devices and circuits. By simultaneously addressing the issues of materials development and characterization, keeping device design and fabrication in mind, many obstacles were overcome for implementation of these polymeric materials and devices into systems. We intend to considerably improve the upper use temperature, poling stability, and compatibility with silicon based devices. The principal device application that was targeted is a linear electro-optic modulation etalon. Organic polymers need to be properly designed and coupled with existing integrated circuit technology to create new photonic devices for optical communication, image processing, other laser applications such as harmonic generation, and eventually optical computing. The progression from microscopic sample to a suitable film

  11. Host thin films incorporating nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qureshi, Uzma

    The focus of this research project was the investigation of the functional properties of thin films that incorporate a secondary nanoparticulate phase. In particular to assess if the secondary nanoparticulate material enhanced a functional property of the coating on glass. In order to achieve this, new thin film deposition methods were developed, namely use of nanopowder precursors, an aerosol assisted transport technique and an aerosol into atmospheric pressure chemical vapour deposition system. Aerosol assisted chemical vapour deposition (AACVD) was used to deposit 8 series of thin films on glass. Five different nanoparticles silver, gold, ceria, tungsten oxide and zinc oxide were tested and shown to successfully deposit thin films incorporating nanoparticles within a host matrix. Silver nanoparticles were synthesised and doped within a titania film by AACVD. This improved solar control properties. A unique aerosol assisted chemical vapour deposition (AACVD) into atmospheric pressure chemical vapour deposition (APCVD) system was used to deposit films of Au nanoparticles and thin films of gold nanoparticles incorporated within a host titania matrix. Incorporation of high refractive index contrast metal oxide particles within a host film altered the film colour. The key goal was to test the potential of nanopowder forms and transfer the suspended nanopowder via an aerosol to a substrate in order to deposit a thin film. Discrete tungsten oxide nanoparticles or ceria nanoparticles within a titanium dioxide thin film enhanced the self-cleaning and photo-induced super-hydrophilicity. The nanopowder precursor study was extended by deposition of zinc oxide thin films incorporating Au nanoparticles and also ZnO films deposited from a ZnO nanopowder precursor. Incorporation of Au nanoparticles within a VO: host matrix improved the thermochromic response, optical and colour properties. Composite VC/TiC and Au nanoparticle/V02/Ti02 thin films displayed three useful

  12. Learning unit: Thin lenses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nita, L.-S.

    2012-04-01

    Learning unit: Thin lenses "Why objects seen through lenses are sometimes upright and sometimes reversed" Nita Laura Simona National College of Arts and Crafts "Constantin Brancusi", Craiova, Romania 1. GEOMETRIC OPTICS. 13 hours Introduction (models, axioms, principles, conventions) 1. Thin lenses (Types of lenses. Defining elements. Path of light rays through lenses. Image formation. Required physical quantities. Lens formulas). 2. Lens systems (Non-collated lenses. Focalless systems). 3. Human eye (Functioning as an optical system. Sight defects and their corrections). 4. Optical instruments (Characteristics exemplified by a magnifying glass. Paths of light rays through a simplified photo camera. Path of light rays through a classical microscope) (Physics curriculum for the IXth grade/ 2011). This scenario exposes a learning unit based on experimental sequences (defining specific competencies), as a succession of lessons started by noticing a problem whose solution assumes the setup of an experiment under laboratory conditions. Progressive learning of theme objectives are realised with sequential experimental steps. The central cognitive process is the induction or the generalization (development of new knowledge based on observation of examples or counterexamples of the concept to be learnt). Pupil interest in theme objectives is triggered by problem-situations, for example: "In order to better see small objects I need a magnifying glass. But when using a magnifier, small object images are sometimes seen upright and sometimes seen reversed!" Along the way, pupils' reasoning will converge to the idea: "The image of an object through a lens depends on the relative distances among object, lens, and observer". Associated learning model: EXPERIMENT Specific competencies: derived from the experiment model, in agreement with the following learning unit steps I. Evoking - Anticipation: Size of the problem, formulation of hypotheses and planning of experiment. II

  13. Chiral atomically thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Cheol-Joo; Sánchez-Castillo, A.; Ziegler, Zack; Ogawa, Yui; Noguez, Cecilia; Park, Jiwoong

    2016-06-01

    Chiral materials possess left- and right-handed counterparts linked by mirror symmetry. These materials are useful for advanced applications in polarization optics, stereochemistry and spintronics. In particular, the realization of spatially uniform chiral films with atomic-scale control of their handedness could provide a powerful means for developing nanodevices with novel chiral properties. However, previous approaches based on natural or grown films, or arrays of fabricated building blocks, could not offer a direct means to program intrinsic chiral properties of the film on the atomic scale. Here, we report a chiral stacking approach, where two-dimensional materials are positioned layer-by-layer with precise control of the interlayer rotation (θ) and polarity, resulting in tunable chiral properties of the final stack. Using this method, we produce left- and right-handed bilayer graphene, that is, a two-atom-thick chiral film. The film displays one of the highest intrinsic ellipticity values (6.5 deg μm–1) ever reported, and a remarkably strong circular dichroism (CD) with the peak energy and sign tuned by θ and polarity. We show that these chiral properties originate from the large in-plane magnetic moment associated with the interlayer optical transition. Furthermore, we show that we can program the chiral properties of atomically thin films layer-by-layer by producing three-layer graphene films with structurally controlled CD spectra.

  14. Chiral atomically thin films.

    PubMed

    Kim, Cheol-Joo; Sánchez-Castillo, A; Ziegler, Zack; Ogawa, Yui; Noguez, Cecilia; Park, Jiwoong

    2016-06-01

    Chiral materials possess left- and right-handed counterparts linked by mirror symmetry. These materials are useful for advanced applications in polarization optics, stereochemistry and spintronics. In particular, the realization of spatially uniform chiral films with atomic-scale control of their handedness could provide a powerful means for developing nanodevices with novel chiral properties. However, previous approaches based on natural or grown films, or arrays of fabricated building blocks, could not offer a direct means to program intrinsic chiral properties of the film on the atomic scale. Here, we report a chiral stacking approach, where two-dimensional materials are positioned layer-by-layer with precise control of the interlayer rotation (θ) and polarity, resulting in tunable chiral properties of the final stack. Using this method, we produce left- and right-handed bilayer graphene, that is, a two-atom-thick chiral film. The film displays one of the highest intrinsic ellipticity values (6.5 deg μm(-1)) ever reported, and a remarkably strong circular dichroism (CD) with the peak energy and sign tuned by θ and polarity. We show that these chiral properties originate from the large in-plane magnetic moment associated with the interlayer optical transition. Furthermore, we show that we can program the chiral properties of atomically thin films layer-by-layer by producing three-layer graphene films with structurally controlled CD spectra. PMID:26900756

  15. Interference Colors in Thin Films.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Armstrong, H. L.

    1979-01-01

    Explains interference colors in thin films as being due to the removal, or considerable reduction, of a certain color by destructive inteference that results in the complementary color being seen. (GA)

  16. Thin, Flexible IMM Solar Array

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walmsley, Nicholas

    2015-01-01

    NASA needs solar arrays that are thin, flexible, and highly efficient; package compactly for launch; and deploy into large, structurally stable high-power generators. Inverted metamorphic multijunction (IMM) solar cells can enable these arrays, but integration of this thin crystalline cell technology presents certain challenges. The Thin Hybrid Interconnected Solar Array (THINS) technology allows robust and reliable integration of IMM cells into a flexible blanket comprising standardized modules engineered for easy production. The modules support the IMM cell by using multifunctional materials for structural stability, shielding, coefficient of thermal expansion (CTE) stress relief, and integrated thermal and electrical functions. The design approach includes total encapsulation, which benefits high voltage as well as electrostatic performance.

  17. Simplified Propagation of Uncertainty in the Non-Keplerian Problem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, I.; Scheeres, D.

    2014-09-01

    A major topic in the field of space situational awareness is the accurate mapping of the uncertainty of an observed object; this has led to high precision modeling of orbital motion and their associated uncertainty propagation. A main purpose of our research is to explore how much precision is needed in describing the dynamical motion of a spacecraft to accurately map uncertainty. To do this, we define an analytical simplified dynamical system (SDS) and probe the relation between accuracy and precision in uncertainty propagation. The use of an analytical theory that is precise enough can have significant savings in computation time. In this research, our SDS is developed based on analytic solutions found by applying the Deprit-Hori Lie transformation theory. An analytic approach has an advantage in that it can give more insight into how the short-period variations influence the uncertainty propagation as well as provide more efficient computation. The SDS includes multiple perturbations caused by the oblate Earth, gravitational attraction of a third-body, and solar radiation pressure (SRP). An artificial satellite in a Medium-Earth-Orbit (MEO) is chosen to magnify perturbing effects due to the third-body and SRP relative to the Earth oblateness. A reference uncertainty is generated through Monte-Carlo simulations based on the full dynamical system. The accuracy of the SDS is verified through two statistical methods: 1) comparison of the central moments of the probability density function, 2) statistical energy test. Improvements in computational efficiency are investigated by comparing two factors: 1) number of function calls, 2) computation time. In summary, we derive approximate analytic solutions including multiple perturbations, and then define the SDS from them for a satellite in the MEO region. We verify the accuracy of the uncertainty propagation with the SDS by applying two statistical methods as well as show improvements in the computational efficiency of this approach.

  18. Thin EFG octagons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalejs, J. P.

    1994-01-01

    Mobil Solar Energy Corporation currently practices a unique crystal growth technology for producing crystalline silicon sheet, which is then cut with lasers into wafers. The wafers are processed into solar cells and incorporated into modules for photovoltaic applications. The silicon sheet is produced using a method known as Edge-defined Film-fed growth (EFG), in the form of hollow eight-sided polygons (octagons) with 10 cm faces. These are grown to lengths of 5 meters and thickness of 300 microns, with continuous melt replenishment, in compact furnaces designed to operate at a high sheet area production area of 135 sq cm/min. The present Photovoltaic Manufacturing Technology (PVMaT) three-year program seeks to advance the manufacturing line capabilities of the Mobil Solar crystal growth and cutting technologies. If successful, these advancements will provide significant reductions in already low silicon raw material usage, improve process productivity, laser cutting throughput and yield, and so lower both individual wafer cost and the cost of module production. This report summarizes the significant technical improvements in EFG technology achieved in Phase 1 of this program. Technical results are reported for each of the three main program areas: (1) thin octagon growth (crystal growth) -- to reduce the thickness of the octagon to an interim goal of 250 microns during Phase 1, with an ultimate goal of achieving 200 micron thicknesses; (2) laser cutting -- to improve the laser cutting process, so as to produce wafers with decreased laser cutting damage at increased wafer throughput rates; and (3) process control and product specification -- to implement advanced strategies in crystal growth process control and productivity designed to increase wafer yields.

  19. Thin film cell development workshop report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woodyard, James R.

    1991-01-01

    The Thin Film Development Workshop provided an opportunity for those interested in space applications of thin film cells to debate several topics. The unique characteristics of thin film cells as well as a number of other issues were covered during the discussions. The potential of thin film cells, key research and development issues, manufacturing issues, radiation damage, substrates, and space qualification of thin film cells were discussed.

  20. The endometrium in assisted reproductive technology: How thin is thin?

    PubMed Central

    Mahajan, Nalini; Sharma, S.

    2016-01-01

    A thin endometrium is encountered infrequently (2.4%) in assisted reproductive technology cycles. When it does occur it is a cause of concern as it is associated with lower implantation rate and pregnancy rate. Though pregnancies have been reported at 4 and 5 mm it is apparent that an endometrial thickness <6 mm is associated with a trend toward lower probability of pregnancy. Hormone replacement therapy – frozen embryo transfer (FET) cycles appear to give better results due to an improvement in endometrial receptivity (ER). The etiology of thin endometrium plays a significant part in its receptivity. A number of treatments have been tried to improve endometrial growth, but none has been validated so far. Confirming ER of a thin endometrium by an ER array test before FET offers reassurance. PMID:27110071

  1. Line-driven ablation of circumstellar discs – I. Optically thin decretion discs of classical Oe/Be stars

    PubMed Central

    Kee, Nathaniel Dylan; Owocki, Stanley; Sundqvist, J. O.

    2016-01-01

    The extreme luminosities of massive, hot OB stars drive strong stellar winds through line-scattering of the star's UV continuum radiation. For OB stars with an orbiting circumstellar disc, we explore here the effect of such line-scattering in driving an ablation of material from the disc's surface layers, with initial focus on the marginally optically thin decretion discs of classical Oe and Be stars. For this we apply a multidimensional radiation-hydrodynamics code that assumes simple optically thin ray tracing for the stellar continuum, but uses a multiray Sobolev treatment of the line transfer; this fully accounts for the efficient driving by non-radial rays, due to desaturation of line-absorption by velocity gradients associated with the Keplerian shear in the disc. Results show a dense, intermediate-speed surface ablation, consistent with the strong, blueshifted absorption of UV wind lines seen in Be shell stars that are observed from near the disc plane. A key overall result is that, after an initial adjustment to the introduction of the disc, the asymptotic disc destruction rate is typically just an order-unity factor times the stellar wind mass-loss rate. For optically thin Be discs, this leads to a disc destruction time of order months to years, consistent with observationally inferred disc decay times. The much stronger radiative forces of O stars reduce this time to order days, making it more difficult for decretion processes to sustain a disc in earlier spectral types, and so providing a natural explanation for the relative rarity of Oe stars in the Galaxy. Moreover, the decrease in line-driving at lower metallicity implies both a reduction in the winds that help spin-down stars from near-critical rotation, and a reduction in the ablation of any decretion disc; together these provide a natural explanation for the higher fraction of classical Be stars, as well as the presence of Oe stars, in the lower metallicity Magellanic Clouds. We conclude with a

  2. Line-driven ablation of circumstellar discs - I. Optically thin decretion discs of classical Oe/Be stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kee, Nathaniel Dylan; Owocki, Stanley; Sundqvist, J. O.

    2016-05-01

    The extreme luminosities of massive, hot OB stars drive strong stellar winds through line-scattering of the star's UV continuum radiation. For OB stars with an orbiting circumstellar disc, we explore here the effect of such line-scattering in driving an ablation of material from the disc's surface layers, with initial focus on the marginally optically thin decretion discs of classical Oe and Be stars. For this we apply a multidimensional radiation-hydrodynamics code that assumes simple optically thin ray tracing for the stellar continuum, but uses a multiray Sobolev treatment of the line transfer; this fully accounts for the efficient driving by non-radial rays, due to desaturation of line-absorption by velocity gradients associated with the Keplerian shear in the disc. Results show a dense, intermediate-speed surface ablation, consistent with the strong, blueshifted absorption of UV wind lines seen in Be shell stars that are observed from near the disc plane. A key overall result is that, after an initial adjustment to the introduction of the disc, the asymptotic disc destruction rate is typically just an order-unity factor times the stellar wind mass-loss rate. For optically thin Be discs, this leads to a disc destruction time of order months to years, consistent with observationally inferred disc decay times. The much stronger radiative forces of O stars reduce this time to order days, making it more difficult for decretion processes to sustain a disc in earlier spectral types, and so providing a natural explanation for the relative rarity of Oe stars in the Galaxy. Moreover, the decrease in line-driving at lower metallicity implies both a reduction in the winds that help spin-down stars from near-critical rotation, and a reduction in the ablation of any decretion disc; together these provide a natural explanation for the higher fraction of classical Be stars, as well as the presence of Oe stars, in the lower metallicity Magellanic Clouds. We conclude with a

  3. Thin-film metal hydrides.

    PubMed

    Remhof, Arndt; Borgschulte, Andreas

    2008-12-01

    The goal of the medieval alchemist, the chemical transformation of common metals into nobel metals, will forever be a dream. However, key characteristics of metals, such as their electronic band structure and, consequently, their electric, magnetic and optical properties, can be tailored by controlled hydrogen doping. Due to their morphology and well-defined geometry with flat, coplanar surfaces/interfaces, novel phenomena may be observed in thin films. Prominent examples are the eye-catching hydrogen switchable mirror effect, the visualization of solid-state diffusion and the formation of complex surface morphologies. Thin films do not suffer as much from embrittlement and/or decrepitation as bulk materials, allowing the study of cyclic absorption and desorption. Therefore, thin-metal hydride films are used as model systems to study metal-insulator transitions, for high throughput combinatorial research or they may be used as indicator layers to study hydrogen diffusion. They can be found in technological applications as hydrogen sensors, in electrochromic and thermochromic devices. In this review, we discuss the effect of hydrogen loading of thin niobium and yttrium films as archetypical examples of a transition metal and a rare earth metal, respectively. Our focus thereby lies on the hydrogen induced changes of the electronic structure and the morphology of the thin films, their optical properties, the visualization and the control of hydrogen diffusion and on the study of surface phenomena and catalysis. PMID:18980236

  4. Obese people's perceptions of the thin ideal.

    PubMed

    Couch, Danielle; Thomas, Samantha L; Lewis, Sophie; Blood, R Warwick; Holland, Kate; Komesaroff, Paul

    2016-01-01

    The media play a key role in promoting the thin ideal. A qualitative study, in which we used in depth interviews and thematic analysis, was undertaken to explore the attitudes of 142 obese individuals toward media portrayals of the thin ideal. Participants discussed the thin ideal as a social norm that is also supported through the exclusion of positive media portrayals of obese people. They perceived the thin ideal as an 'unhealthy' mode of social control, reflecting on their personal experiences and their concerns for others. Participants' perceptions highlighted the intersections between the thin ideal and gender, grooming and consumerism. Participants' personal responses to the thin ideal were nuanced--some were in support of the thin ideal and some were able to critically reflect and reject the thin ideal. We consider how the thin ideal may act as a form of synoptical social control, working in tandem with wider public health panoptical surveillance of body weight. PMID:26685706

  5. [Obesity and thinness in painting].

    PubMed

    Schüller Pérez, Amador

    2004-01-01

    The obesity, serious frequenty sanitary problem, cause of complications that effects to the expectation of life, with aesthetic repercussion and with an increase in the last decades. Admitted the obesity android, gynoide, central or abdominal, wide aesthetic repercussion and physiopathologic like hyperdislipemias, metabolic alterations (diabetes mellitus, etc...), arterial hypertension, column arthrosis and outlying. Ethiopathologics co-factors, sedentariness, genotypic predisposition, endocrine alterations and of the leptina secretion. Illustrative cases of obesity in the painting of those that characteristic models are exposed, from slight grades to intense affecting to both genders. The thinness counterpoint of the obesity, multicausal process, less frequent than the obesity with aesthetic and psychological repercussion. It is the formed aesthetic thinness to the diverse types physiopathologic, without forgetting the constitutional and family form and the anorexy, the serial ones to disasters, wars, famines, etc..., the mystic thinness of saints and ascetics, and the serial one to consuming processes. PMID:15997591

  6. Thin metal electrode for AMTEC

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, Roger M. (Inventor); Wheeler, Bob L. (Inventor); Jefferies-Nakamura, Barbara (Inventor); Lamb, James L. (Inventor); Bankston, C. Perry (Inventor); Cole, Terry (Inventor)

    1989-01-01

    An electrode having higher power output is formed of a thin, porous film (less than 1 micrometer) applied to a beta-alumina solid electrolyte (BASE). The electrode includes an open grid, current collector such as a series of thin, parallel, grid lines applied to the thin film and a plurality of cross-members such as loop of metal wire surrounding the BASE tube. The loops are electrically connected by a bus wire. The overall impedance of the electrode considering both the contributions from the bulk BASE and the porous electrode BASE interface is low, about 0.5 OHM/cm.sup.2 and power densities of over 0.3 watt/cm.sup.2 for extended periods.

  7. Squirming through shear thinning fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Datt, Charu; Zhu, Lailai; Elfring, Gwynn J.; Pak, On Shun

    2015-11-01

    Many microorganisms find themselves surrounded by fluids which are non-Newtonian in nature; human spermatozoa in female reproductive tract and motile bacteria in mucosa of animals are common examples. These biological fluids can display shear-thinning rheology whose effects on the locomotion of microorganisms remain largely unexplored. Here we study the self-propulsion of a squirmer in shear-thinning fluids described by the Carreau-Yasuda model. The squirmer undergoes surface distortions and utilizes apparent slip-velocities around its surface to swim through a fluid medium. In this talk, we will discuss how the nonlinear rheological properties of a shear-thinning fluid affect the propulsion of a swimmer compared with swimming in Newtonian fluids.

  8. Vapor deposition of thin films

    DOEpatents

    Smith, David C.; Pattillo, Stevan G.; Laia, Jr., Joseph R.; Sattelberger, Alfred P.

    1992-01-01

    A highly pure thin metal film having a nanocrystalline structure and a process of preparing such highly pure thin metal films of, e.g., rhodium, iridium, molybdenum, tungsten, rhenium, platinum, or palladium by plasma assisted chemical vapor deposition of, e.g., rhodium(allyl).sub.3, iridium(allyl).sub.3, molybdenum(allyl).sub.4, tungsten(allyl).sub.4, rhenium(allyl).sub.4, platinum(allyl).sub.2, or palladium(allyl).sub.2 are disclosed. Additionally, a general process of reducing the carbon content of a metallic film prepared from one or more organometallic precursor compounds by plasma assisted chemical vapor deposition is disclosed.

  9. About Thinning Invariant Partition Structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Starr, Shannon; Vermesi, Brigitta; Wei, Ang

    2012-08-01

    Bernoulli- p thinning has been well-studied for point processes. Here we consider three other cases: (1) sequences ( X 1, X 2,…); (2) gaps of such sequences ( X n+1- X 1) n∈ℕ; (3) partition structures. For the first case we characterize the distributions which are simultaneously invariant under Bernoulli- p thinning for all p∈(0,1]. Based on this, we make conjectures for the latter two cases, and provide a potential approach for proof. We explain the relation to spin glasses, which is complementary to important previous work of Aizenman and Ruzmaikina, Arguin, and Shkolnikov.

  10. Thin Film Solid Lubricant Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Benoy, Patricia A.

    1997-01-01

    Tribological coatings for high temperature sliding applications are addressed. A sputter-deposited bilayer coating of gold and chromium is investigated as a potential solid lubricant for protection of alumina substrates during sliding at high temperature. Evaluation of the tribological properties of alumina pins sliding against thin sputtered gold films on alumina substrates is presented.

  11. High Performance Thin Layer Chromatography.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Costanzo, Samuel J.

    1984-01-01

    Clarifies where in the scheme of modern chromatography high performance thin layer chromatography (TLC) fits and why in some situations it is a viable alternative to gas and high performance liquid chromatography. New TLC plates, sample applications, plate development, and instrumental techniques are considered. (JN)

  12. New strategies for thinning peaches

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    An evaluation of two mechanical thinners was conducted in four commercial peach orchard blocks in 2007. A mechanical blossom thinner designed by a German grower for thinning apple trees that employed nylon cords (strings) to remove blossoms was tested on peach trees trained to either a perpendicula...

  13. Thin film polymeric gel electrolytes

    DOEpatents

    Derzon, D.K.; Arnold, C. Jr.; Delnick, F.M.

    1996-12-31

    Novel hybrid thin film electrolytes, based on an organonitrile solvent system, which are compositionally stable, environmentally safe, can be produced efficiently in large quantity and which, because of their high conductivities {approx_equal}10{sup {minus}3}{Omega}{sup {minus}1} cm{sup {minus}1} are useful as electrolytes for rechargeable lithium batteries. 1 fig.

  14. Calorimetry of epitaxial thin films.

    PubMed

    Cooke, David W; Hellman, F; Groves, J R; Clemens, B M; Moyerman, S; Fullerton, E E

    2011-02-01

    Thin film growth allows for the manipulation of material on the nanoscale, making possible the creation of metastable phases not seen in the bulk. Heat capacity provides a direct way of measuring thermodynamic properties of these new materials, but traditional bulk calorimetric techniques are inappropriate for such a small amount of material. Microcalorimetry and nanocalorimetry techniques exist for the measurements of thin films but rely on an amorphous membrane platform, limiting the types of films which can be measured. In the current work, ion-beam-assisted deposition is used to provide a biaxially oriented MgO template on a suspended membrane microcalorimeter in order to measure the specific heat of epitaxial thin films. Synchrotron x-ray diffraction showed the biaxial order of the MgO template. X-ray diffraction was also used to prove the high quality of epitaxy of a film grown onto this MgO template. The contribution of the MgO layer to the total heat capacity was measured to be just 6.5% of the total addenda contribution. The heat capacity of a Fe(.49)Rh(.51) film grown epitaxially onto the device was measured, comparing favorably to literature data on bulk crystals. This shows the viability of the MgO∕SiN(x)-membrane-based microcalorimeter as a way of measuring the thermodynamic properties of epitaxial thin films. PMID:21361612

  15. Some Experiments with Thin Prisms.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fernando, P. C. B.

    1980-01-01

    Described are several experiments, for a course in geometrical optics or for a college physics laboratory, which have a bearing on ophthalmic optics. Experiments include the single thin prism, crossed prisms, and the prismatic power of a lens. (Author/DS)

  16. Hybrid thin-film amplifier

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cleveland, G.

    1977-01-01

    Miniature amplifier for bioelectronic instrumentation consumes only about 100 mW and has frequency response flat to within 0.5 dB from 0.14 to 450 Hz. Device consists of five thin film substrates, which contain eight operational amplifiers and seven field-effect transistor dice.

  17. Thin film polymeric gel electrolytes

    DOEpatents

    Derzon, Dora K.; Arnold, Jr., Charles; Delnick, Frank M.

    1996-01-01

    Novel hybrid thin film electrolyte, based on an organonitrile solvent system, which are compositionally stable, environmentally safe, can be produced efficiently in large quantity and which, because of their high conductivities .apprxeq.10.sup.-3 .OMEGA..sup.-1 cm.sup.-1 are useful as electrolytes for rechargeable lithium batteries.

  18. Thin film-coated polymer webs

    DOEpatents

    Wenz, Robert P.; Weber, Michael F.; Arudi, Ravindra L.

    1992-02-04

    The present invention relates to thin film-coated polymer webs, and more particularly to thin film electronic devices supported upon a polymer web, wherein the polymer web is treated with a purifying amount of electron beam radiation.

  19. Semiconductor-nanocrystal/conjugated polymer thin films

    DOEpatents

    Alivisatos, A. Paul; Dittmer, Janke J.; Huynh, Wendy U.; Milliron, Delia

    2014-06-17

    The invention described herein provides for thin films and methods of making comprising inorganic semiconductor-nanocrystals dispersed in semiconducting-polymers in high loading amounts. The invention also describes photovoltaic devices incorporating the thin films.

  20. On thinning of chains in MCMC

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Link, William A.; Eaton, Mitchell J.

    2012-01-01

    4. We discuss the background and prevalence of thinning, illustrate its consequences, discuss circumstances when it might be regarded as a reasonable option and recommend against routine thinning of chains unless necessitated by computer memory limitations.

  1. Semiconductor-nanocrystal/conjugated polymer thin films

    DOEpatents

    Alivisatos, A. Paul; Dittmer, Janke J.; Huynh, Wendy U.; Milliron, Delia

    2010-08-17

    The invention described herein provides for thin films and methods of making comprising inorganic semiconductor-nanocrystals dispersed in semiconducting-polymers in high loading amounts. The invention also describes photovoltaic devices incorporating the thin films.

  2. Low work function, stable thin films

    DOEpatents

    Dinh, Long N.; McLean, II, William; Balooch, Mehdi; Fehring, Jr., Edward J.; Schildbach, Marcus A.

    2000-01-01

    Generation of low work function, stable compound thin films by laser ablation. Compound thin films with low work function can be synthesized by simultaneously laser ablating silicon, for example, and thermal evaporating an alkali metal into an oxygen environment. For example, the compound thin film may be composed of Si/Cs/O. The work functions of the thin films can be varied by changing the silicon/alkali metal/oxygen ratio. Low work functions of the compound thin films deposited on silicon substrates were confirmed by ultraviolet photoelectron spectroscopy (UPS). The compound thin films are stable up to 500.degree. C. as measured by x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). Tests have established that for certain chemical compositions and annealing temperatures of the compound thin films, negative electron affinity (NEA) was detected. The low work function, stable compound thin films can be utilized in solar cells, field emission flat panel displays, electron guns, and cold cathode electron guns.

  3. Thin films under chemical stress

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-01-01

    The goal of work on this project has been develop a set of experimental tools to allow investigators interested in transport, binding, and segregation phenomena in composite thin film structures to study these phenomena in situ. Work to-date has focuses on combining novel spatially-directed optical excitation phenomena, e.g. waveguide eigenmodes in thin dielectric slabs, surface plasmon excitations at metal-dielectric interfaces, with standard spectroscopies to understand dynamic processes in thin films and at interfaces. There have been two main scientific thrusts in the work and an additional technical project. In one thrust we have sought to develop experimental tools which will allow us to understand the chemical and physical changes which take place when thin polymer films are placed under chemical stress. In principle this stress may occur because the film is being swelled by a penetrant entrained in solvent, because interfacial reactions are occurring at one or more boundaries within the film structure, or because some component of the film is responding to an external stimulus (e.g. pH, temperature, electric field, or radiation). However all work to-date has focused on obtaining a clearer understanding penetrant transport phenomena. The other thrust has addressed the kinetics of adsorption of model n-alkanoic acids from organic solvents. Both of these thrusts are important within the context of our long-term goal of understanding the behavior of composite structures, composed of thin organic polymer films interspersed with Langmuir-Blodgett (LB) and self-assembled monolayers. In addition there has been a good deal of work to develop the local technical capability to fabricate grating couplers for optical waveguide excitation. This work, which is subsidiary to the main scientific goals of the project, has been successfully completed and will be detailed as well. 41 refs., 10 figs.

  4. Polyimide thin-film dielectrics on ferroelectrics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Galiardi, R. V.

    1977-01-01

    Conducting layers of multi-layered thin-film ferroelectric device, such as is used in liquid crystal/ferroelectric display, can be electrically isolated using thin-film layer of polyimide. Ease of application and high electrical-breakdown strength allow dependable and economical means of providing dielectric for other thin-film microelectronic devices.

  5. Cut Costs with Thin Client Computing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hartley, Patrick H.

    2001-01-01

    Discusses how school districts can considerably increase the number of administrative computers in their districts without a corresponding increase in costs by using the "Thin Client" component of the Total Cost of Ownership (TCC) model. TCC and Thin Client are described, including its software and hardware components. An example of a Thin Client…

  6. 7 CFR 29.3648 - Thin Leaf (C Group).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... specifications, and tolerances C1L Choice Quality Light-brown Thin Leaf. Ripe, thin, open leaf structure, smooth... injury tolerance. C2L Fine Quality Light-brown Thin Leaf. Ripe, thin, open leaf structure, smooth, oily... tolerance. C4L Fair Quality Light-brown Thin Leaf. Mature, thin, close leaf structure, rough, lean in...

  7. 7 CFR 29.3648 - Thin Leaf (C Group).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... specifications, and tolerances C1L Choice Quality Light-brown Thin Leaf. Ripe, thin, open leaf structure, smooth... injury tolerance. C2L Fine Quality Light-brown Thin Leaf. Ripe, thin, open leaf structure, smooth, oily... tolerance. C4L Fair Quality Light-brown Thin Leaf. Mature, thin, close leaf structure, rough, lean in...

  8. 7 CFR 29.3648 - Thin Leaf (C Group).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... specifications, and tolerances C1L Choice Quality Light-brown Thin Leaf. Ripe, thin, open leaf structure, smooth... injury tolerance. C2L Fine Quality Light-brown Thin Leaf. Ripe, thin, open leaf structure, smooth, oily... tolerance. C4L Fair Quality Light-brown Thin Leaf. Mature, thin, close leaf structure, rough, lean in...

  9. 7 CFR 29.3648 - Thin Leaf (C Group).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... specifications, and tolerances C1L Choice Quality Light-brown Thin Leaf. Ripe, thin, open leaf structure, smooth... injury tolerance. C2L Fine Quality Light-brown Thin Leaf. Ripe, thin, open leaf structure, smooth, oily... tolerance. C4L Fair Quality Light-brown Thin Leaf. Mature, thin, close leaf structure, rough, lean in...

  10. 7 CFR 29.2438 - Thin Leaf (C Group).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... Fair Light-brown Thin Leaf. Thin to medium body, mature to ripe, close, lean in oil, inelastic, weak... Light-brown Thin Leaf. Thin to medium body, mature to ripe, close, lean in oil, inelastic, weak, dull... Medium-brown Thin Leaf. Thin to medium body, mature to ripe, close, lean in oil, inelastic, weak,...

  11. 7 CFR 29.3648 - Thin Leaf (C Group).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... tolerance. C4L Fair Quality Light-brown Thin Leaf. Mature, thin, close leaf structure, rough, lean in oil... tolerance. C5L Low Quality Light-brown Thin Leaf Underripe, thin, close leaf structure, rough, lean in oil... tolerance. C4F Fair Quality Medium-brown Thin Leaf. Mature, thin, close leaf structure, rough, lean in...

  12. 7 CFR 29.2663 - Thin Leaf (C Group).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... tolerance. C4L Fair Light-brown Thin Leaf. Thin, mature, close, lean in oil, inelastic, weak, dull finish... Thin Leaf. Thin, mature, close, lean in oil, inelastic, weak, dull finish, pale color intensity, narrow... tolerance. C4F Fair Medium-brown Thin Leaf. Thin, mature, close, lean in oil, inelastic, weak, dull...

  13. Thin film concentrator panel development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zimmerman, D. K.

    1982-07-01

    The development and testing of a rigid panel concept that utilizes a thin film reflective surface for application to a low-cost point-focusing solar concentrator is discussed. It is shown that a thin film reflective surface is acceptable for use on solar concentrators, including 1500 F applications. Additionally, it is shown that a formed steel sheet substrate is a good choice for concentrator panels. The panel has good optical properties, acceptable forming tolerances, environmentally resistant substrate and stiffeners, and adaptability to low to mass production rates. Computer simulations of the concentrator optics were run using the selected reflector panel design. Experimentally determined values for reflector surface specularity and reflectivity along with dimensional data were used in the analysis. The simulations provided intercept factor and net energy into the aperture as a function of aperture size for different surface errors and pointing errors. Point source and Sun source optical tests were also performed.

  14. Phase Coarsening in Thin Films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, K. G.; Glicksman, M. E.

    2015-08-01

    Phase coarsening (Ostwald ripening) phenomena are ubiquitous in materials growth processes such as thin film formation. The classical theory explaining late-stage phase coarsening phenomena was developed by Lifshitz and Slyozov, and by Wagner in the 1960s. Their theory is valid only for a vanishing volume fraction of the second phase in three dimensions. However, phase coarsening in two-dimensional systems is qualitatively different from that in three dimensions. In this paper, the many-body concept of screening length is reviewed, from which we derive the growth law for a `screened' phase island, and develop diffusion screening theory for phase coarsening in thin films. The coarsening rate constant, maximum size of phase islands in films, and their size distribution function will be derived from diffusion screening theory. A critical comparison will be provided of prior coarsening concepts and improvements derived from screening approaches.

  15. [Ultra-thin transnasal esophagogastroduodenoscopy].

    PubMed

    Kawai, Takashi; Yamamoto, Kei; Fukuzawa, Mari; Sakai, Yoshihiro; Moriyasu, Fuminori

    2010-07-01

    It is reported that ultra-thin transnasal esophagogastroduodenoscopy (TN-EGD) reduces pharyngeal discomfort and is more tolerable for the patients. Ultra-thin transnasal endoscopy has been reported as inferior to transoral conventional EGD (TO-EGD) in terms of image quality, suction, air insufflation and lens washing, due to the smaller endoscope caliber. TN-EGD should be conducted slowly, with short distance observation, and also with image-enhanced endoscopy. With reference to image-enhanced endoscopy, chromoendoscopy method (indigocarmine) is suitable for gastric neoplasm, on the other hand optical digital method (NBI) and digital method (i-scan, FICE) is suitable for esophageal neoplasm. TN-EGD is applied in various gastrointestinal (GI) procedures such as percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy, nasoenteric feeding tube placement, endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreaticography with nasobiliary drainage, long intestinal tube placement in small bowel obstruction, esophageal manometry. PMID:20662204

  16. Fundamentals of thin solar cells

    SciTech Connect

    Yablonovitch, E.

    1995-08-01

    It is now widely recognized that thin solar cells can present certain advantages for performance and cost. This is particularly the case when light trapping in the semiconductor film is incorporated, as compensation for the diminished single path thickness of the solar cell. In a solar cell thinner than a minority carrier diffusion length, the current collection is of course very easy. More importantly the concentration of an equivalent number of carriers in a thinner volume results in a higher Free Energy, or open circuit voltage. This extra Free Energy may be regarded as due to the concentration factor, just as it would be for photons, electrons, or for any chemical species. The final advantage of a thin solar cell is in the diminished material usage, a factor of considerable importance when we consider the material cost of the high quality semiconductors which we hope to employ.

  17. Punching Holes in Thin Metals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garcia, Richard; Foster, Derrell; Miranda, Valentino

    1987-01-01

    Simple punching tool used to make holes in thin metal sheets, without burrs and edge deformations. Tool used on such materials as stainless steel, nickel alloys, beryllium, copper, and aluminum, in thicknesses of 0.002 to 0.010 in. With new punch, hole size held to tolerance of 0.025 mm. Includes rubber punch extruding into hole in top plate, pushing out exposed portion of clamped metal sheet.

  18. Fastener for thin fragile materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sokol, S.

    1979-01-01

    Two-piece fastener is ideal for securing thin delicate parts that might be damaged by conventional fasteners, such as rivets or upset collars. Strength of new fastener approaches that of riveted connection. Easily fabricated, fastener consists of plastic button and spring-steel collar. Parts have large contact area to distribute loads on delicate assemblies and low profile so that they fit into narrow spaces. Fastener is suitable for materials ranging in density from sheet metal to fabric sandwiches.

  19. (Thin films under chemical stress)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-01-01

    As stated above the purpose of this research is to enable workers in a variety of fields to understand the chemical and physical changes which take place when thin films (primarily organic films) are placed under chemical stress. This stress may occur because the film is being swelled by penetrant entrained in solvent, because interfacial reactions are occurring at one or more boundaries within the film structure, or because some component of the film is responding to an external stimulus (e.g. pH, temperature, electric field, or radiation). These questions are important within the context of our long-term goal of understanding the behavior of composite structures, composed of thin organic polymer films interspersed with Langmuir-Blodgett (LB) and self-assembled monolayers, which might have unique functional properties. In the past year we have concentrated on the following objectives: (1) understanding how the two possible diffusion mechanisms contribute to the swelling of thin films of organic polymers place in solution, (2) identifying systems which are appropriate polymer media for the construction of composite membranes for use in aqueous environments, and (3) understanding the self-assembly process for long chain fatty acids at model surfaces. Progress in meeting each of these objectives will be described in this report. 4 figs.

  20. The Thin Oil Film Equation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, James L.; Naughton, Jonathan W.

    1999-01-01

    A thin film of oil on a surface responds primarily to the wall shear stress generated on that surface by a three-dimensional flow. The oil film is also subject to wall pressure gradients, surface tension effects and gravity. The partial differential equation governing the oil film flow is shown to be related to Burgers' equation. Analytical and numerical methods for solving the thin oil film equation are presented. A direct numerical solver is developed where the wall shear stress variation on the surface is known and which solves for the oil film thickness spatial and time variation on the surface. An inverse numerical solver is also developed where the oil film thickness spatial variation over the surface at two discrete times is known and which solves for the wall shear stress variation over the test surface. A One-Time-Level inverse solver is also demonstrated. The inverse numerical solver provides a mathematically rigorous basis for an improved form of a wall shear stress instrument suitable for application to complex three-dimensional flows. To demonstrate the complexity of flows for which these oil film methods are now suitable, extensive examination is accomplished for these analytical and numerical methods as applied to a thin oil film in the vicinity of a three-dimensional saddle of separation.

  1. Scattering from Thin Dielectric Disks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Levine, D. M.; Schneider, A.; Lang, R. H.; Carter, H. G.

    1984-01-01

    A solution was obtained for scattering from thin dielectric disks by approximating the currents induced inside the disk with the currents which would exist inside a dielectric slab of the same thickness, orientation and dielectric properties. This approximation reduces to an electrostatic approximation when the disk thickness, T, is small compared to the wavelength of the incident radiation and the approximation yields a conventional physical optics solution when the dimension, A, characteristic of the geometrical cross section of the disk (e.g., the diameter of a circular disk) is large compared to wavelength. When the ratio A/T is sufficiently large the disk will always be in one or the other of these regimes (T lambda or kA1. Consequently, when A/T is large this solution provides a conventional approximation for the scattered fields which can be applied at all frequencies. As a check on this conclusion, a comparison was made between the theoretical and measured radar cross section of thin dielectric disks. Agreement was found for thin disks with both large and small values of kA.

  2. Thin Watts-Strogatz networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Moura, Alessandro P. S.

    2006-01-01

    A modified version of the Watts-Strogatz (WS) network model is proposed, in which the number of shortcuts scales with the network size N as Nα , with α<1 . In these networks, the ratio of the number of shortcuts to the network size approaches zero as N→∞ , whereas in the original WS model, this ratio is constant. We call such networks “thin Watts-Strogatz networks.” We show that even though the fraction of shortcuts becomes vanishingly small for large networks, they still cause a kind of small-world effect, in the sense that the length L of the network increases sublinearly with the size. We develop a mean-field theory for these networks, which predicts that the length scales as N1-αlnN for large N . We also study how a search using only local information works in thin WS networks. We find that the search performance is enhanced compared to the regular network, and we predict that the search time τ scales as N1-α/2 . These theoretical results are tested using numerical simulations. We comment on the possible relevance of thin WS networks for the design of high-performance low-cost communication networks.

  3. Thinning increases climatic resilience of red pine

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Magruder, Matthew; Chhin, Sophan; Palik, Brian; Bradford, John B.

    2013-01-01

    Forest management techniques such as intermediate stand-tending practices (e.g., thinning) can promote climatic resiliency in forest stands by moderating tree competition. Residual trees gain increased access to environmental resources (i.e., soil moisture, light), which in turn has the potential to buffer trees from stressful climatic conditions. The influences of climate (temperature and precipitation) and forest management (thinning method and intensity) on the productivity of red pine (Pinus resinosa Ait.) in Michigan were examined to assess whether repeated thinning treatments were able to increase climatic resiliency (i.e., maintaining productivity and reduced sensitivity to climatic stress). The cumulative productivity of each thinning treatment was determined, and it was found that thinning from below to a residual basal area of 14 m2·ha−1 produced the largest average tree size but also the second lowest overall biomass per acre. On the other hand, the uncut control and the thinning from above to a residual basal area of 28 m2·ha−1 produced the smallest average tree size but also the greatest overall biomass per acre. Dendrochronological methods were used to quantify sensitivity of annual radial growth to monthly and seasonal climatic factors for each thinning treatment type. Climatic sensitivity was influenced by thinning method (i.e., thinning from below decreased sensitivity to climatic stress more than thinning from above) and by thinning intensity (i.e., more intense thinning led to a lower climatic sensitivity). Overall, thinning from below to a residual basal area of 21 m2·ha−1 represented a potentially beneficial compromise to maximize tree size, biomass per acre, and reduced sensitivity to climatic stress, and, thus, the highest level of climatic resilience.

  4. Computational modeling of thin ceramic tiles backed by thin substrates

    SciTech Connect

    Walker, J.D.; Anderson, C.E. Jr.; Cox, P.A.

    1995-12-31

    Building on the work of Wilkins, Eulerian hydrocode calculations were performed with ceramic models to examine the behavior of thin ceramic tiles backed by a thin substrate. In order to match ballistic limit data it was necessary to include a pressure dependent flow stress for failed ceramic. Reasonable agreement is found between the modified model and ballistic limit data for a simulated armor piercing round impacting an AD-85 alumina/6061T6 aluminum laminate. Based upon this success, the modified model was used to examine the performance of a SiC/6061T6 aluminum laminate when impacted by an M80 ball round (7.62 mm) at muzzle velocity. The projectile undergoes large deformation, as does the aluminum backing sheet. The computational results indicate, for the M80 projectile impacting at muzzle velocity, that the ballistic limit thickness for the SiC/aluminum laminate should weigh 10% less than the ballistic limit thickness for steel. The talk will include a video tape of calculations.

  5. New thin materials for electronics.

    SciTech Connect

    Schwartzberg, Adam

    2012-02-01

    The work described in this report is from an Early Career LDRD to develop and investigate novel thin film organic conductors with drastically improved electronic properties over the current state of the art. In collaboration with the Molecular Foundry at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory a Langmuir-Blodgett trough (LB) was built from scavenged parts and added to a scanning Raman microscope at LBNL. First order thin peptoid film samples were fabricated for testing Raman and photoluminescence imagining techniques. Tests showed that a single peptoid sheet can be successfully imaged using confocal Raman spectroscopy and a peptoid sheet can be successfully imaged using near-field photoluminescence at a resolution less than 70 nm. These results have helped position Sandia for advances in this area of MOF film creation. In collaboration with the Molecular Foundry at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, a Langmuir-Blodgett trough (LB) was built and added to a scanning Raman microscope at LBNL. Thin peptoid film samples were fabricated for testing Raman and photoluminescence imagining techniques. Tests showed that a single peptoid sheet can be successfully imaged using confocal Raman spectroscopy, and a peptoid sheet can be successfully imaged using near-field photoluminescence at a resolution less than 70 nm. These results have positioned Sandia for advance in this area of MOF film creation. The interactions with LBNL also led to award of two user projects at the Molecular Foundry at LBNL led by current Sandia staff and the appointment of a current Sandia staff to the Molecular Foundry User Executive Committee.

  6. Thin film based plasmon nanorulers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taylor, Alexander D.; Lu, Chang; Geyer, Scott; Carroll, D. L.

    2016-07-01

    In this work, isolated metal nanoparticles are supported on a dielectric thin film that is placed on a conducting plane. The optical scattering characteristics of these metal nanoparticles are directly correlated with the localized surface plasmon states of the nanoparticle—image particle dimer, formed in the conducting plane below. Quantification of plasmon resonance shifts can be directly correlated with the application of the plasmon nanoruler equation. This simple geometry shows that direct optical techniques can be used to resolve thickness variations in dielectrics of only a few nanometers.

  7. Advanced Thin Ionization Calorimeter (ATIC)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wefel, John P.

    1998-01-01

    This is the final report for NASA grant NAGW-4577, "Advanced Thin Ionization Calorimeter (ATIC)". This grant covered a joint project between LSU and the University of Maryland for a Concept Study of a new type of fully active calorimeter to be used to measure the energy spectra of very high energy cosmic rays, particularly Hydrogen and Helium, to beyond 1014 eV. This very high energy region has been studied with emulsion chamber techniques, but never investigated with electronic calorimeters. Technology had advanced to the point that a fully active calorimeter based upon Bismuth Germanate (BGO) scintillating crystals appeared feasible for balloon flight (and eventually space) experiments.

  8. Improved Thin, Flexible Heat Pipes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rosenfeld, John H.; Gernert, Nelson J.; Sarraf, David B.; Wollen, Peter J.; Surina, Frank C.; Fale, John E.

    2004-01-01

    Flexible heat pipes of an improved type are fabricated as layers of different materials laminated together into vacuum- tight sheets or tapes. In comparison with prior flexible heat pipes, these flexible heat pipes are less susceptible to leakage. Other advantages of these flexible heat pipes, relative to prior flexible heat pipes, include high reliability and greater ease and lower cost of fabrication. Because these heat pipes are very thin, they are highly flexible. When coated on outside surfaces with adhesives, these flexible heat pipes can be applied, like common adhesive tapes, to the surfaces of heat sinks and objects to be cooled, even if those surfaces are curved.

  9. Thin film buried anode battery

    DOEpatents

    Lee, Se-Hee; Tracy, C. Edwin; Liu, Ping

    2009-12-15

    A reverse configuration, lithium thin film battery (300) having a buried lithium anode layer (305) and process for making the same. The present invention is formed from a precursor composite structure (200) made by depositing electrolyte layer (204) onto substrate (201), followed by sequential depositions of cathode layer (203) and current collector (202) on the electrolyte layer. The precursor is subjected to an activation step, wherein a buried lithium anode layer (305) is formed via electroplating a lithium anode layer at the interface of substrate (201) and electrolyte film (204). The electroplating is accomplished by applying a current between anode current collector (201) and cathode current collector (202).

  10. Thin film solar energy collector

    DOEpatents

    Aykan, Kamran; Farrauto, Robert J.; Jefferson, Clinton F.; Lanam, Richard D.

    1983-11-22

    A multi-layer solar energy collector of improved stability comprising: (1) a substrate of quartz, silicate glass, stainless steel or aluminum-containing ferritic alloy; (2) a solar absorptive layer comprising silver, copper oxide, rhodium/rhodium oxide and 0-15% by weight of platinum; (3) an interlayer comprising silver or silver/platinum; and (4) an optional external anti-reflective coating, plus a method for preparing a thermally stable multi-layered solar collector, in which the absorptive layer is undercoated with a thin film of silver or silver/platinum to obtain an improved conductor-dielectric tandem.

  11. Characteristics Of Vacuum Deposited Sucrose Thin Films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ungureanu, F.; Predoi, D.; Ghita, R. V.; Vatasescu-Balcan, R. A.; Costache, M.

    Thin films of sucrose (C12H22O11) were deposited on thin cut glass substrates by thermal evaporation technique (p ~ 10-5 torr). The surface morphology was putted into evidence by FT-IR and SEM analysis. The experimental results confirm a uniform deposition of an adherent sucrose layer. The biological tests (e.g., cell morphology and cell viability evaluated by measuring mitochondrial dehydrogenise activity with MTT assay) confirm the properties of sucrose thin films as bioactive material. The human fetal osteoblast system grown on thin sucrose film was used for the determination of cell proliferation, cell viability and cell morphology studies.

  12. Analysis of Hard Thin Film Coating

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shen, Dashen

    1998-01-01

    MSFC is interested in developing hard thin film coating for bearings. The wearing of the bearing is an important problem for space flight engine. Hard thin film coating can drastically improve the surface of the bearing and improve the wear-endurance of the bearing. However, many fundamental problems in surface physics, plasma deposition, etc, need further research. The approach is using electron cyclotron resonance chemical vapor deposition (ECRCVD) to deposit hard thin film an stainless steel bearing. The thin films in consideration include SiC, SiN and other materials. An ECRCVD deposition system is being assembled at MSFC.

  13. Analysis of Hard Thin Film Coating

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shen, Dashen

    1998-01-01

    Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) is interested in developing hard thin film coating for bearings. The wearing of the bearing is an important problem for space flight engine. Hard thin film coating can drastically improve the surface of the bearing and improve the wear-endurance of the bearing. However, many fundamental problems in surface physics, plasma deposition, etc, need further research. The approach is using Electron Cyclotron Resonance Chemical Vapor Deposition (ECRCVD) to deposit hard thin film on stainless steel bearing. The thin films in consideration include SiC, SiN and other materials. An ECRCVD deposition system is being assembled at MSFC.

  14. Capillary Thinning of Particle-laden Drops

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wagoner, Brayden; Thete, Sumeet; Jahns, Matt; Doshi, Pankaj; Basaran, Osman

    2015-11-01

    Drop formation is central in many applications such as ink-jet printing, microfluidic devices, and atomization. During drop formation, a thinning filament is created between the about-to-form drop and the fluid hanging from the nozzle. Therefore, the physics of capillary thinning of filaments is key to understanding drop formation and has been thoroughly studied for pure Newtonian fluids. The thinning dynamics is, however, altered completely when the fluid contains particles, the physics of which is not well understood. In this work, we explore the impact of solid particles on filament thinning and drop formation by using a combination of experiments and numerical simulations.

  15. Beryllium thin films for resistor applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fiet, O.

    1972-01-01

    Beryllium thin films have a protective oxidation resistant property at high temperature and high recrystallization temperature. However, the experimental film has very low temperature coefficient of resistance.

  16. Plasmonics in atomically thin materials.

    PubMed

    García de Abajo, F Javier; Manjavacas, Alejandro

    2015-01-01

    The observation and electrical manipulation of infrared surface plasmons in graphene have triggered a search for similar photonic capabilities in other atomically thin materials that enable electrical modulation of light at visible and near-infrared frequencies, as well as strong interaction with optical quantum emitters. Here, we present a simple analytical description of the optical response of such kinds of structures, which we exploit to investigate their application to light modulation and quantum optics. Specifically, we show that plasmons in one-atom-thick noble-metal layers can be used both to produce complete tunable optical absorption and to reach the strong-coupling regime in the interaction with neighboring quantum emitters. Our methods are applicable to any plasmon-supporting thin materials, and in particular, we provide parameters that allow us to readily calculate the response of silver, gold, and graphene islands. Besides their interest for nanoscale electro-optics, the present study emphasizes the great potential of these structures for the design of quantum nanophotonics devices. PMID:25774774

  17. Thin film solar cell module

    SciTech Connect

    Gay, R.R.

    1987-01-20

    A thin film solar cell module is described comprising a first solar cell panel containing an array of solar cells consisting of a TFS semiconductor sandwiched between a transparent conductive zinc oxide layer and a transparent conductive layer selected from the group consisting of tin oxide, indium tin oxide, and zinc oxide deposited upon a transparent superstrate, and a second solar cell panel containing an array of solar cells consisting of a CIS semiconductor layer sandwiched between a zinc oxide semiconductor layer and a conductive metal layer deposited upon an insulating substrate. The zinc oxide semiconductor layer contains a first relatively thin layer of high resistivity zinc oxide adjacent the CIS semiconductor and a second relatively thick layer of low resistivity zinc oxide overlying the high resistivity zinc oxide layer. The transparent conductive zinc oxide layer of the first panel faces the low resistivity zinc oxide layer of the second panel, the first and second panels being positioned optically in series and separated by a transparent insulating layer.

  18. Superconducting UBe 13 thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quateman, J. H.; Tedrow, P. M.

    1985-12-01

    Of the known heavy fermion superconductors only UBe 13 can have a low resistivity ratio and still go superconducting. In addition, it is a line compound with a melting temperature of nearly twice that of the constituents. These facts make UBe 13 a promising choice for fabrication in thin film form. We have successfully made 2000 Å UBe 13 films by coevaporation of uranium and beryllium on 700°C substrates which were then heated in situ to 1100°C. These films were polycrystalline as shown by X-ray diffraction and have Tc's of 0.85 K, that of the bulk. The resistivity rise at approximately 2 K and the strong negative magnetoresistance were also of the same magnitude as that of the bulk, as were both the perpendicular and parallel critical fields. Thin films of UBe 13 will make more accessible tunneling and proximity effect experiments which can help elucidate the nature of the superconductivity of this compound.

  19. Thin film of biocompatible polysaccharides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richert, Ludovic; Lavalle, Philippe; Schaaf, Pierre; Voegel, Jean-Claude; Picart, Catherine

    2003-03-01

    The layer-by-layer deposition method proposed by Decher et al. (1991) is a very simple and versatile method used to build thin films. These films are of interest for bioengineering because of their unique properties and of the possible insertion of bioactive molecules. We present here the peculiar properties of a new kind of film formed with natural biopolymers, namely hyaluronan (HA)and chitosan (CHI). The films may be used as biomimetic substrates to control bacterial and cell adhesion. These polysaccharides are of particular interest because they are biodegradable, non toxic, and can be found in various tissues. Hyaluronan is also a natural ligand for a numerous type of cells through the CD44 receptor. Chitosan has already largely been used for its biological and anti-microbial properties. (CHI/HA) films were built in acidic pH at different ionic strength. The buildup was followed in situ by optical waveguide lightmode spectroscopy (OWLS), quartz crystal microbalance, streaming potential measurements and atomic force microscopy. The kinetics of adsorption and desorption of the polyelectrolytes depended on the ionic strength. Small islands were initially present on the surface which grew by mutual coalescence until becoming a flat film. The films were around 200 nm in thickness. These results suggest that different types of thin films constituted of polysaccharides can be built on any type of surface. These films are currently investigated toward their cell adhesion and bacterial adhesion properties.

  20. Thin CVD Coating Protects Titanium Aluminide Alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clark, Ronald; Wallace, Terryl; Cunnington, George; Robinson, John

    1994-01-01

    Feasibility of using very thin CVD coatings to provide both protection against oxidation and surfaces of low catalytic activity for thin metallic heat-shield materials demonstrated. Use of aluminum in compositions increases emittances of coatings and reduces transport of oxygen through coatings to substrates. Coatings light in weight and applied to foil-gauge materials with minimum weight penalties.

  1. Thin Silicon MEMS Contact-Stress Sensor

    SciTech Connect

    Kotovksy, J; Tooker, A; Horsley, D

    2010-05-28

    This thin, MEMS contact-stress sensor continuously and accurately measures time-varying, solid interface loads over tens of thousands of load cycles. The contact-stress sensor is extremely thin (150 {mu}m) and has a linear output with an accuracy of {+-} 1.5% FSO.

  2. Thin films of mixed metal compounds

    DOEpatents

    Mickelsen, Reid A.; Chen, Wen S.

    1985-01-01

    A compositionally uniform thin film of a mixed metal compound is formed by simultaneously evaporating a first metal compound and a second metal compound from independent sources. The mean free path between the vapor particles is reduced by a gas and the mixed vapors are deposited uniformly. The invention finds particular utility in forming thin film heterojunction solar cells.

  3. Recent advances in thin-layer chromatography

    SciTech Connect

    Dallas, F.A.A.; Read, H.; Ruane, R.J.; Wilson, I.D.

    1988-01-01

    This book is a collection of proceedings from the 1987 Chromatographic Society International Symposium on Thin-Layer Chromatography in Brighton. The book is divided into four sections: Instrumentation, Radio-Thin-Layer Chromatography, Sorbents and Modifiers, and Applications. References date from the 1970s to the mid-1980s. Compounds and subject indexes are included.

  4. Thin-Film Nanocapacitor and Its Characterization

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hunter, David N.; Pickering, Shawn L.; Jia, Dongdong

    2007-01-01

    An undergraduate thin-film nanotechnology laboratory was designed. Nanocapacitors were fabricated on silicon substrates by sputter deposition. A mask was designed to form the shape of the capacitor and its electrodes. Thin metal layers of Au with a 80 nm thickness were deposited and used as two infinitely large parallel plates for a capacitor.…

  5. Thin film bioreactors in space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hughes-Fulford, M.; Scheld, H. W.

    1989-01-01

    Studies from the Skylab, SL-3 and D-1 missions have demonstrated that biological organisms grown in microgravity have changes in basic cellular functions such as DNA, mRNA and protein synthesis, cytoskeleton synthesis, glucose utilization, and cellular differentiation. Since microgravity could affect prokaryotic and eukaryotic cells at a subcellular and molecular level, space offers an opportunity to learn more about basic biological systems with one inmportant variable removed. The thin film bioreactor will facilitate the handling of fluids in microgravity, under constant temperature and will allow multiple samples of cells to be grown with variable conditions. Studies on cell cultures grown in microgravity would make it possible to identify and quantify changes in basic biological function in microgravity which are needed to develop new applications of orbital research and future biotechnology.

  6. Collapsing thin shells with rotation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delsate, Térence; Rocha, Jorge V.; Santarelli, Raphael

    2014-06-01

    We construct exact solutions describing the motion of rotating thin shells in a fully backreacted five-dimensional rotating black hole spacetime. The radial equation of motion follows from the Darmois-Israel junction conditions, where both interior and exterior geometries are taken to be equal angular momenta Myers-Perry solutions. We show that rotation generates anisotropic pressures and momentum along the shell. Gravitational collapse scenarios including rotation are analyzed and a new class of stationary solutions is introduced. Energy conditions for the anisotropic matter shell are briefly discussed. We find that the weak energy condition is not violated for the collapse scenario where the shell starts at rest from infinity, nor for the new class of stationary solutions in anti-de Sitter. We further prove that the cosmic censorship conjecture is always satisfied in our setup.

  7. Thin-film optical shutter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matlow, S. L.

    1981-02-01

    The ideal solution to the excessive solar gain problem is an optical shutter, a device which switches from being highly transmissive to solar radiation to being highly reflective to solar radiation when a critical temperature is reached in the enclosure. The switching occurs because one or more materials in the device undergo a phase transition at the critical temperature. A specific embodiment of macroconjugated macromolecules, the poly (p-phenylene)'s, was chosen as the one most likely to meet all of the requirements of the thin film optical shutter project (TFOS). The reason for this choice is explored. In order to be able to make meaningful calculations of the thermodynamic and optical properties of the poly (p-phenylene)'s a quantum mechanical method, the equilibrium bond length (EBL) theory, was developed. Some results of EBL theory are included.

  8. BDS thin film damage competition

    SciTech Connect

    Stolz, C J; Thomas, M D; Griffin, A J

    2008-10-24

    A laser damage competition was held at the 2008 Boulder Damage Symposium in order to determine the current status of thin film laser resistance within the private, academic, and government sectors. This damage competition allows a direct comparison of the current state-of-the-art of high laser resistance coatings since they are all tested using the same damage test setup and the same protocol. A normal incidence high reflector multilayer coating was selected at a wavelength of 1064 nm. The substrates were provided by the submitters. A double blind test assured sample and submitter anonymity so only a summary of the results are presented here. In addition to the laser resistance results, details of deposition processes, coating materials, and layer count will also be shared.

  9. Wrinkle motifs in thin films

    PubMed Central

    Budrikis, Zoe; Sellerio, Alessandro L.; Bertalan, Zsolt; Zapperi, Stefano

    2015-01-01

    On length scales from nanometres to metres, partial adhesion of thin films with substrates generates a fascinating variety of patterns, such as ‘telephone cord’ buckles, wrinkles, and labyrinth domains. Although these patterns are part of everyday experience and are important in industry, they are not completely understood. Here, we report simulation studies of a previously-overlooked phenomenon in which pairs of wrinkles form avoiding pairs, focusing on the case of graphene over patterned substrates. By nucleating and growing wrinkles in a controlled way, we characterize how their morphology is determined by stress fields in the sheet and friction with the substrate. Our simulations uncover the generic behaviour of avoiding wrinkle pairs that should be valid at all scales. PMID:25758174

  10. New devices using ferroelectric thin films

    SciTech Connect

    Land, C.E.; Butler, M.A.; Martin, S.J.

    1989-01-01

    Recent developments in the fabrication technologies of ferroelectric thin films in general and of PZT (lead zirconate titanate) and PLZT (lead lanthanum zirconate titanate) thin films in particular have suggested the feasibility of several new devices. Integrated optical devices for information processing and high-speed switching, high-density optical information processing and storage devices and spatial light modulators are some of the applications currently being investigated for these films. Ongoing studies of the longitudinal electrooptic effects and the photosensitivities of PZT and PLZT thin films have established the feasibility of erasable/rewritable optical memories with fast switching and potentially long lifetimes compared to current magneto-optic thin film devices. Some properties of PZT thin films and of new devices based on those properties are described in this paper. 15 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab.

  11. A monolithic thin film electrochromic window

    SciTech Connect

    Goldner, R.B.; Arntz, F.O.; Berera, G.; Haas, T.E.; Wong, K.K. . Electro-Optics Technology Center); Wei, G. ); Yu, P.C. )

    1991-01-01

    Three closely related thin film solid state ionic devices that are potentially important for applications are: electrochromic smart windows, high energy density thin film rechargeable batteries, and thin film electrochemical sensors. Each usually has at least on mixed ion/electron conductor, an electron-blocking ion conductor, and an ion-blocking electron conductor, and many of the technical issues associated with thin film solid state ionics are common to all three devices. Since the electrochromic window has the added technical requirement of electrically-controlled optical modulation, (over the solar spectrum), and since research at the authors' institution has focused primarily on the window structure, this paper will address the electrochromic window, and particularly a monolithic variable reflectivity electrochromic window, as an illustrative example of some of the challenges and opportunities that are confronting the thin film solid state ionics community. 33 refs.

  12. A monolithic thin film electrochromic window

    SciTech Connect

    Goldner, R.B.; Arntz, F.O.; Berera, G.; Haas, T.E.; Wong, K.K.; Wei, G.; Yu, P.C.

    1991-12-31

    Three closely related thin film solid state ionic devices that are potentially important for applications are: electrochromic smart windows, high energy density thin film rechargeable batteries, and thin film electrochemical sensors. Each usually has at least on mixed ion/electron conductor, an electron-blocking ion conductor, and an ion-blocking electron conductor, and many of the technical issues associated with thin film solid state ionics are common to all three devices. Since the electrochromic window has the added technical requirement of electrically-controlled optical modulation, (over the solar spectrum), and since research at the authors` institution has focused primarily on the window structure, this paper will address the electrochromic window, and particularly a monolithic variable reflectivity electrochromic window, as an illustrative example of some of the challenges and opportunities that are confronting the thin film solid state ionics community. 33 refs.

  13. Zinc oxide thin film acoustic sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohammed, Ali Jasim; Salih, Wafaa Mahdi; Hassan, Marwa Abdul Muhsien; Mansour, Hazim Louis; Nusseif, Asmaa Deiaa; Kadhum, Haider Abdullah

    2013-12-01

    This paper reports the implementation of (750 nm) thickness of Zinc Oxide (ZnO) thin film for the piezoelectric pressure sensors. The film was prepared and deposited employing the spray pyrolysis technique. XRD results show that the growth preferred orientation is the (002) plane. A polycrystalline thin film (close to mono crystallite like) was obtained. Depending on the Scanning Electron Microscopy photogram, the film homogeneity and thickness were shown. The resonance frequency measured (about 19 kHz) and the damping coefficient was calculated and its value was found to be about (2.5538), the thin film be haves as homogeneous for under and over damped. The thin film pressure sensing was approximately exponentially related with frequency, the thin film was observed to has a good response for mechanical stresses also it is a good material for the piezoelectric properties.

  14. Preparation and Characterization of PZT Thin Films

    SciTech Connect

    Bose, A.; Sreemany, M.; Bhattacharyya, D. K.; Sen, Suchitra; Halder, S. K.

    2008-07-29

    In analogy with Piezoelectric Wafer Active Sensors (PWAS), Lead Zirconate Titanate (PZT) thin films also seem to be promising for Structural Health Monitoring (SHM) due to a number of reasons. Firstly, PZT thin films with well oriented domains show enhanced piezoelectric response. Secondly, PWAS requires comparatively large voltage leading to a demand for thin PZT films (<< {mu}m in thickness) for low voltage operation at {<=}10 V. This work focuses on two different aspects: (a) growing oriented PZT thin films in ferroelectric perovskite phase in the range of (80-150) nm thickness on epitaxial Si/Pt without a seed layer and (b) synthesizing perovskite phase in PZT thin films on Corning glass 1737 using a seed layer of TiO{sub x} (TiO{sub x} thickness ranging between 30 nm to 500 nm)

  15. Zinc oxide thin film acoustic sensor

    SciTech Connect

    Mohammed, Ali Jasim; Salih, Wafaa Mahdi; Hassan, Marwa Abdul Muhsien; Nusseif, Asmaa Deiaa; Kadhum, Haider Abdullah; Mansour, Hazim Louis

    2013-12-16

    This paper reports the implementation of (750 nm) thickness of Zinc Oxide (ZnO) thin film for the piezoelectric pressure sensors. The film was prepared and deposited employing the spray pyrolysis technique. XRD results show that the growth preferred orientation is the (002) plane. A polycrystalline thin film (close to mono crystallite like) was obtained. Depending on the Scanning Electron Microscopy photogram, the film homogeneity and thickness were shown. The resonance frequency measured (about 19 kHz) and the damping coefficient was calculated and its value was found to be about (2.5538), the thin film be haves as homogeneous for under and over damped. The thin film pressure sensing was approximately exponentially related with frequency, the thin film was observed to has a good response for mechanical stresses also it is a good material for the piezoelectric properties.

  16. Surface defects on thin cryosections.

    PubMed

    Frederik, P M; Busing, W M; Persson, A

    1984-01-01

    The electron microscopic observation of thin cryosections is frequently impaired by the occurrence of surface defects. To investigate the possible causes of these surface defects the structure of cryosections ( CTEM ) from frozen biological material was correlated with the structure of the block-face (SEM) from which the sections were obtained. Both sections and block-face showed steps with a periodicity larger than 0.5 micron. Upon dry sectioning of hard plastic comparable features were observed in the section ( CTEM /SEM) and block-face (SEM). Thin cryosections cut below 143 K were found to be smooth apart from defects introduced by imperfections of the knife. In addition to "long" wave length distortions, a periodical distortion smaller than 120 nm can be observed in cryosections from biological material. At a given temperature the frequency is related to the sectioning speed. At all sectioning temperatures studied, distortions of this high frequency/short wave length type have been observed although they were less conspicuous in thinner sections. The surface defects observed in cryosections from biological material resemble the defects found after metal cutting and chip-formation. Shear forces seem to be the main causes for the observed periodic deformations on both cryosections as well as on sections from metals and plastics. This may imply that material is collected and periodically shedded from a dead zone around the knife edge. In metal cutting such a dead zone can have the form of a built-up-edge on top of the knife or as a small overhang in front of the knife edge. PMID:6377477

  17. Longwall mining of thin seams

    SciTech Connect

    Curth, E A

    1981-01-01

    Thin seam operations pose a challenge to the ingenuity of mining engineers to overcome the factor of human inconvenience in the restricted environment and associated high cost production. Surprisingly, low seam longwalls in the Federal Republic of Germany in an average thickness of 35 in. and dipping less than 18/sup 0/ come close to achieving the average production rate of all German longwall operations. They are all plow faces, and a consistent production of 3300 tons per day and a productivity of 40 tons per man shift are reported from one of the thin seam longwalls. These results were attained by reliable high-capacity equipment and roof support by shields that can be collapsed to as low as 22 inches. Maximum mining height for plow operated faces lies at 31.5 inches. Technology for mechanized mining of flat lying coalbeds less than 31.5 inches in thickness without rock cutting is not available, and firmness of coal, undulation of the strata, coalbed thickness variation, and the necessity of cutting rock, particularly through faults, set limits to plow application. The in-web shearer can be used in firm coal to a minimum mining height of 40 inches, and a daily production of 1650 to 2200 tons is reported from a longwall in the Saar district of Germany equipped with such a shearer and shields. Numerous in-web shearers are employed in the United Kingdom; reports as to their success are contradictory. Also, experience in the United States, though limited, has been negative. The steady increase in output from single drum shearer faces in Pennsylvania is a remarkable achievement, and occasional record breaking peaks in production indicate the potential of such mining. Technology development for the future is discussed.

  18. Mutation-Specific Effects on Thin Filament Length in Thin Filament Myopathy

    PubMed Central

    de Winter, Josine M.; Joureau, Barbara; Lee, Eun-Jeong; Kiss, Balázs; Yuen, Michaela; Gupta, Vandana A.; Pappas, Christopher T.; Gregorio, Carol C.; Stienen, Ger J. M.; Edvardson, Simon; Wallgren-Pettersson, Carina; Lehtokari, Vilma-Lotta; Pelin, Katarina; Malfatti, Edoardo; Romero, Norma B.; van Engelen, Baziel G.; Voermans, Nicol C.; Donkervoort, Sandra; Bönnemann, C. G.; Clarke, Nigel F.; Beggs, Alan H.; Granzier, Henk; Ottenheijm, Coen A. C.

    2016-01-01

    Objective Thin filament myopathies are among the most common nondystrophic congenital muscular disorders, and are caused by mutations in genes encoding proteins that are associated with the skeletal muscle thin filament. Mechanisms underlying muscle weakness are poorly understood, but might involve the length of the thin filament, an important determinant of force generation. Methods We investigated the sarcomere length-dependence of force, a functional assay that provides insights into the contractile strength of muscle fibers as well as the length of the thin filaments, in muscle fibers from 51 patients with thin filament myopathy caused by mutations in NEB, ACTA1, TPM2, TPM3, TNNT1, KBTBD13, KLHL40, and KLHL41. Results Lower force generation was observed in muscle fibers from patients of all genotypes. In a subset of patients who harbor mutations in NEB and ACTA1, the lower force was associated with downward shifted force–sarcomere length relations, indicative of shorter thin filaments. Confocal microscopy confirmed shorter thin filaments in muscle fibers of these patients. A conditional Neb knockout mouse model, which recapitulates thin filament myopathy, revealed a compensatory mechanism; the lower force generation that was associated with shorter thin filaments was compensated for by increasing the number of sarcomeres in series. This allowed muscle fibers to operate at a shorter sarcomere length and maintain optimal thin–thick filament overlap. Interpretation These findings might provide a novel direction for the development of therapeutic strategies for thin filament myopathy patients with shortened thin filament lengths. PMID:27074222

  19. Accelerated longitudinal cortical thinning in adolescence.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Dongming; Lebel, Catherine; Treit, Sarah; Evans, Alan; Beaulieu, Christian

    2015-01-01

    It remains unclear if changes of the cerebral cortex occur gradually from childhood to adulthood, or if adolescence marks a differential period of cortical development. In the current study of 90 healthy volunteers aged 5-32years (48 females, 85 right handed) with 180 scans (2 scans for each participant with ~4year gaps), thinning of overall mean thickness and across the four major cortical lobes bilaterally was observed across this full age span. However, the thinning rate, calculated as Δcortical thickness/Δage (mm/year) between scans of each participant, revealed an accelerated cortical thinning during adolescence, which was preceded by less thinning in childhood and followed by decelerated thinning in young adulthood. Males and females showed similarly faster thinning rates during adolescence relative to young adults. The underlying basis and role of accelerated cortical thinning during adolescence for cognition, behaviour and disorders that appear at such a stage of development remains to be determined in future work. PMID:25312772

  20. Fillability of Thin-Wall Steel Castings

    SciTech Connect

    Robert C. Voigt; Joseph Bertoletti; Andrew Kaley; Sandi Ricotta; Travis Sunday

    2002-07-30

    The use of steel components is being challenged by lighter nonferrous or cast iron components. The development of techniques for enhancing and ensuring the filability of thin-wall mold cavities is most critical for thinner wall cast steel production. The purpose of this research was to develop thin-wall casting techniques that can be used to reliably produce thin-wall castings from traditional gravity poured sand casting processes. The focus of the research was to enhance the filling behavior to prevent misrunds. Experiments were conducted to investigate the influence of various foundry variables on the filling of thin section steel castings. These variables include casting design, heat transfer, gating design, and metal fluidity. Wall thickness and pouring temperature have the greatest effect on casting fill. As wall thickness increases the volume to surface area of the casting increases, which increases the solidification time, allowing the metal to flow further in thicker sect ions. Pouring time is another significant variable affecting casting fill. Increases or decreases of 20% in the pouring time were found to have a significant effect on the filling of thin-wall production castings. Gating variables, including venting, pouring head height, and mold tilting also significantly affected thin-wall casting fill. Filters offer less turbulent, steadier flow, which is appropriate for thicker castings, but they do not enhance thin-wall casting fill.

  1. Macro stress mapping on thin film buckling

    SciTech Connect

    Goudeau, P.; Villain, P.; Renault, P.-O.; Tamura, N.; Celestre, R.S.; Padmore, H.A.

    2002-11-06

    Thin films deposited by Physical Vapour Deposition techniques on substrates generally exhibit large residual stresses which may be responsible of thin film buckling in the case of compressive stresses. Since the 80's, a lot of theoretical work has been done to develop mechanical models but only a few experimental work has been done on this subject to support these theoretical approaches and nothing concerning local stress measurement mainly because of the small dimension of the buckling (few 10th mm). This paper deals with the application of micro beam X-ray diffraction available on synchrotron radiation sources for stress mapping analysis of gold thin film buckling.

  2. Progressive bilateral thinning of the parietal bones

    SciTech Connect

    Cederlund, C.G.; Andren, L.; Olivecrona, H.

    1982-03-01

    Observation of a case of progressive bilateral parietal thinning within a period of 14 years induced us to study skull films of 3 636 consecutive patients. Parietal thinning was found in 86 patients (2.37%). It was more common in women, with a sex ratio of 1:1.9. The mean age of the females was 72 years, and that of the males 63 years. Previous skull films of 25 of these patients were available and showed progression in 10. It is concluded that parietal thinning is a slowly progressive disease of middle-aged and old patients and is not an anatomical variant or congenital dysplasia of the dipole.

  3. Weld Repair of Thin Aluminum Sheet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beuyukian, C. S.; Mitchell, M. J.

    1986-01-01

    Weld repairing of thin aluminum sheets now possible, using niobium shield and copper heat sinks. Refractory niobium shield protects aluminum adjacent to hole, while copper heat sinks help conduct heat away from repair site. Technique limits tungsten/inert-gas (TIG) welding bombardment zone to melt area, leaving surrounding areas around weld unaffected. Used successfully to repair aluminum cold plates on Space Shuttle, Commercial applications, especially in sealing fractures, dents, and holes in thin aluminum face sheets or clad brazing sheet in cold plates, heat exchangers, coolers, and Solar panels. While particularly suited to thin aluminum sheet, this process also used in thicker aluminum material to prevent surface damage near weld area.

  4. Surface roughness evolution of nanocomposite thin films

    SciTech Connect

    Turkin, A. A.; Pei, Y. T.; Shaha, K. P.; Chen, C. Q.; Vainshtein, D. I.; Hosson, J. Th. M. de

    2009-01-01

    An analysis of dynamic roughening and smoothening mechanisms of thin films grown with pulsed-dc magnetron sputtering is presented. The roughness evolution has been described by a linear stochastic equation, which contains the second- and fourth-order gradient terms. Dynamic smoothening of the growing interface is explained by ballistic effects resulting from impingements of ions to the growing thin film. These ballistic effects are sensitive to the flux and energy of impinging ions. The predictions of the model are compared with experimental data, and it is concluded that the thin film roughness can be further controlled by adjusting waveform, frequency, and width of dc pulses.

  5. De Sitter thin brane model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishi, Masato

    2016-07-01

    We discuss the large mass hierarchy problem in a braneworld model which represents our acceleratively expanding universe. The Randall-Sundrum (RS) model with one extra warped dimension added to a flat four-dimensional space-time cannot describe our expanding universe. Here, we study instead the de Sitter thin brane model. This is described by the same action as that for the RS model, but the four-dimensional space-time on the branes is dS_4. We study the model for both the cases of positive five-dimensional cosmological constant Λ_5 and a negative one. In the positive Λ_5 case, the four-dimensional large hierarchy necessitates a five-dimensional large hierarchy, and we cannot get a natural explanation. On the other hand, in the negative Λ_5 case, the large hierarchy is naturally realized in the five-dimensional theory in the same manner as in the RS model. Moreover, another large hierarchy between the Hubble parameter and the Planck scale is realized by the O(10^2) hierarchy of the five-dimensional quantities. Finally, we find that the lightest mass of the massive Kaluza-Klein modes and the intervals of the mass spectrum are of order 10^2 GeV, which are the same as in the RS case and do not depend on the value of the Hubble parameter.

  6. Reconnection in thin current sheets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tenerani, Anna; Velli, Marco; Pucci, Fulvia; Rappazzo, A. F.

    2016-05-01

    It has been widely believed that reconnection is the underlying mechanism of many explosive processes observed both in nature and laboratory, but the question of reconnection speed and initial trigger have remained mysterious. How is fast magnetic energy release triggered in high Lundquist (S) and Reynolds (R) number plasmas?It has been shown that a tearing mode instability can grow on an ideal timescale, i.e., independent from the the Lundquist number, once the current sheet thickness becomes thin enough, or rather the inverse aspect ratio a/L reaches a scale a/L~S-1/3. As such, the latter provides a natural, critical threshold for current sheets that can be formed in nature before they disrupt in a few Alfvén time units. Here we discuss the transition to fast reconnection extended to simple viscous and kinetic models and we propose a possible scenario for the transition to explosive reconnection in high-Lundquist number plasmas, that we support with fully nonlinear numerical MHD simulations of a collapsing current sheet.

  7. Ultra-thin multilayer capacitors.

    SciTech Connect

    Renk, Timothy Jerome; Monson, Todd C.

    2009-06-01

    The fabrication of ultra-thin lanthanum-doped lead zirconium titanate (PLZT) multilayer ceramic capacitors (MLCCs) using a high-power pulsed ion beam was studied. The deposition experiments were conducted on the RHEPP-1 facility at Sandia National Laboratories. The goal of this work was to increase the energy density of ceramic capacitors through the formation of a multilayer device with excellent materials properties, dielectric constant, and standoff voltage. For successful device construction, there are a number of challenging requirements including achieving correct stoichiometric and crystallographic composition of the deposited PLZT, as well as the creation of a defect free homogenous film. This report details some success in satisfying these requirements, although 900 C temperatures were necessary for PLZT perovskite phase formation. These temperatures were applied to a previously deposited multi-layer film which was then post-annealed to this temperature. The film exhibited mechanical distress attributable to differences in the coefficient of thermal expansion (CTE) of the various layers. This caused significant defects in the deposited films that led to shorts across devices. A follow-on single layer deposition without post-anneal produced smooth layers with good interface behavior, but without the perovskite phase formation. These issues will need to be addressed in order for ion beam deposited MLCCs to become a viable technology. It is possible that future in-situ heating during deposition may address both the CTE issue, and result in lowered processing temperatures, which in turn could raise the probability of successful MLCC formation.

  8. Thin wetting film lensless imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allier, C. P.; Poher, V.; Coutard, J. G.; Hiernard, G.; Dinten, J. M.

    2011-03-01

    Lensless imaging has recently attracted a lot of attention as a compact, easy-to-use method to image or detect biological objects like cells, but failed at detecting micron size objects like bacteria that often do not scatter enough light. In order to detect single bacterium, we have developed a method based on a thin wetting film that produces a micro-lens effect. Compared with previously reported results, a large improvement in signal to noise ratio is obtained due to the presence of a micro-lens on top of each bacterium. In these conditions, standard CMOS sensors are able to detect single bacterium, e.g. E.coli, Bacillus subtilis and Bacillus thuringiensis, with a large signal to noise ratio. This paper presents our sensor optimization to enhance the SNR; improve the detection of sub-micron objects; and increase the imaging FOV, from 4.3 mm2 to 12 mm2 to 24 mm2, which allows the detection of bacteria contained in 0.5μl to 4μl to 10μl, respectively.

  9. VUV thin films, chapter 7

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zukic, Muamer; Torr, Douglas G.

    1993-01-01

    The application of thin film technology to the vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) wavelength region from 120 nm to 230 nm has not been fully exploited in the past because of absorption effects which complicate the accurate determination of the optical functions of dielectric materials. The problem therefore reduces to that of determining the real and imaginary parts of a complex optical function, namely the frequency dependent refractive index n and extinction coefficient k. We discuss techniques for the inverse retrieval of n and k for dielectric materials at VUV wavelengths from measurements of their reflectance and transmittance. Suitable substrate and film materials are identified for application in the VUV. Such applications include coatings for the fabrication of narrow and broadband filters and beamsplitters. The availability of such devices open the VUV regime to high resolution photometry, interferometry and polarimetry both for space based and laboratory applications. This chapter deals with the optics of absorbing multilayers, the determination of the optical functions for several useful materials, and the design of VUV multilayer stacks as applied to the design of narrow and broadband reflection and transmission filters and beamsplitters. Experimental techniques are discussed briefly, and several examples of the optical functions derived for selected materials are presented.

  10. Thin film production method and apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Loutfy, Raouf O.; Moravsky, Alexander P.; Hassen, Charles N.

    2010-08-10

    A method for forming a thin film material which comprises depositing solid particles from a flowing suspension or aerosol onto a filter and next adhering the solid particles to a second substrate using an adhesive.