Science.gov

Sample records for dental amalgam fillings

  1. Dental Amalgam

    MedlinePlus

    ... Products and Medical Procedures Dental Devices Dental Amalgam Dental Amalgam Share Tweet Linkedin Pin it More sharing options Linkedin Pin it Email Print Dental amalgam is a dental filling material which is ...

  2. Mercury Exposure Levels in Children with Dental Amalgam Fillings

    PubMed Central

    Miriam Varkey, Indu; Shetty, Rajmohan; Hegde, Amitha

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT% Objectives: Mercury combined with other metals to form solid amalgams has long been used in reconstructive dentistry but its use has been controversial since at least the middle of the 19th century. The exposure and body burden of mercury reviews have consistently stated that there is a deficiency of adequate epidemiological studies addressing this issue. Fish and dental amalgam are two major sources of human exposure to organic (MeHg) and inorganic Hg respectively. Materials and methods: A total of 150 subjects aged between 9 and 14 years were divided into two groups of 75 subjects each depending on their diet, i.e. seafood or nonseafood consuming. Each category was subdivided into three groups based on number of restorations. Scalp hair and urine samples were collected at baseline and 3 months later to assess the organic and inorganic levels of mercury respectively by atomic absorption spectrophotometer (AAS). Results: The mean values of urinary mercury (inorganic mercury) in the group of children with restorations were 1.5915 μg/l as compared to 0.0130 μg/l in the groups with no amalgam restorations (p < 0.001) (Wilcoxon sign rank test and paired t-test). The hair mercury levels (organic mercury) varied signi-ficantly between the fsh-eating group and nonfsh-eating group, the average values being 1.03 μg/l and 0.84 μg/l respectively (p < 0.001) (Mann-Whitney U-test and paired t-test). Conclusion and significance: The notion about the mercury being released from the amalgam restorations as a sole exposure source needs to be put to a rest, as environmental factors collectively overpower the exposure levels from restorations alone. How to cite this article: Varkey IM, Shetty R, Hegde A. Mercury Exposure Levels in Children with Dental Amalgam Fillings. Int J Clin Pediatr Dent 2014;7(3):180-185. PMID:25709298

  3. Maternal-fetal distribution of mercury ( sup 203 Hg) released from dental amalgam fillings

    SciTech Connect

    Vimy, M.J.; Takahashi, Y.; Lorscheider, F.L. )

    1990-04-01

    In humans, the continuous release of Hg vapor from dental amalgam tooth restorations is markedly increased for prolonged periods after chewing. The present study establishes a time-course distribution for amalgam Hg in body tissues of adult and fetal sheep. Under general anesthesia, five pregnant ewes had twelve occlusal amalgam fillings containing radioactive 203Hg placed in teeth at 112 days gestation. Blood, amniotic fluid, feces, and urine specimens were collected at 1- to 3-day intervals for 16 days. From days 16-140 after amalgam placement (16-41 days for fetal lambs), tissue specimens were analyzed for radioactivity, and total Hg concentrations were calculated. Results demonstrate that Hg from dental amalgam will appear in maternal and fetal blood and amniotic fluid within 2 days after placement of amalgam tooth restorations. Excretion of some of this Hg will also commence within 2 days. All tissues examined displayed Hg accumulation. Highest concentrations of Hg from amalgam in the adult occurred in kidney and liver, whereas in the fetus the highest amalgam Hg concentrations appeared in liver and pituitary gland. The placenta progressively concentrated Hg as gestation advanced to term, and milk concentration of amalgam Hg postpartum provides a potential source of Hg exposure to the newborn. It is concluded that accumulation of amalgam Hg progresses in maternal and fetal tissues to a steady state with advancing gestation and is maintained. Dental amalgam usage as a tooth restorative material in pregnant women and children should be reconsidered.

  4. [Biocompatibility of dental amalgam].

    PubMed

    Missias, P

    1990-10-01

    The purpose of the present review was to present a detailed description of those current scientific results and opinions relative to the biocompatibility of dental amalgam. The first section of the percent review to the pulpar reactions caused by amalgam fillings, especially when no protective base has been used, while the second part concerns itself with the biocompatibility of the dental amalgam per se. Specifically, reference is made to: a) the adverse reactions due to amalgam fillings both on the patient's physiological system and on the dentist's employing the material under consideration. b) those investigation results bearing a relation on the amount of mercury liberated during the amalgam filling procedures, i.e., mixing, condensation, finishing and polishing and/or removal of old amalgam fillings. c) Liberation of mercury, as well as metallic ions in the patients mouth cavity during chewing and/or during the process of intrabuccal galvanization and corrosion, and d) on the amount of mercury traced in the blood and urine of the patient following amalgam fillings. No conclusive evidence on any adverse reactions on the patient's health, attributable to the liberation of mercury from amalgam fillings, could be presented by the scientific investigations under consideration. Moreover, the number of cases reported on toxic reactions due to dental amalgam is negligible compared to the immense number of amalgam fillings performed in practice. It merits mentioning in this connection, however, the fact that the total amount of mercury attained by the patient from any other source, in conjunction with that liberated from amalgam fillings, could by all means contribute to a number of toxic reactions on the patient's health in general. Conclusively, one could state without reservations, that dental amalgam fillings per se are by and large free of toxic reactions on the patient, based on current scientific observations. Mentioning is finally made on several simple but

  5. Dental amalgam--environmental aspects

    SciTech Connect

    Arenholt-Bindslev, D. )

    1992-09-01

    Increasing knowledge about the risk of toxic effects caused by anthropogenic mercury accumulation in ecosystems has resulted in a growing pressure for reduction of the discharge of mercury waste. Consequently, the mercury waste problems of dental clinics have been given increased attention, and restrictions on handling and discharge of contaminated waste have been established in several countries. Major amalgam particles from trituration surplus of those produced during the carving and burnishing of new amalgam restorations are generally collected in coarse filters and sold for refinement. Minor amalgam particles released by production of new fillings or by removal of old restorations partly sediment in tubes and drains. The remaining particles are carried with the waste water stream to the local purifying plant. In Scandinavia, the industrial discharge of mercury-contaminated waste water has been reduced to a minimum. According to recent investigations, dental clinics appear to be responsible for the major amount of mercury collected in the sludge generated in purifying plants. If threshold values for heavy metal content, including mercury, are exceeded, the sludge is not allowed to be recycled as fertilizer. Installation of an approved amalgam-separating apparatus in dental clinics is now mandatory in several countries--for example, Switzerland, Germany, Sweden, and Denmark. Approval of amalgam separators is based on national testing programs, including clinical or laboratory tests demanding 95-99% separating efficiency. 18 refs.

  6. 21 CFR 872.3100 - Dental amalgamator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Dental amalgamator. 872.3100 Section 872.3100 Food... DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 872.3100 Dental amalgamator. (a) Identification. A dental... and dental alloy particles, such as silver, tin, zinc, and copper. The mixed dental amalgam...

  7. 21 CFR 872.3100 - Dental amalgamator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Dental amalgamator. 872.3100 Section 872.3100 Food... DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 872.3100 Dental amalgamator. (a) Identification. A dental... and dental alloy particles, such as silver, tin, zinc, and copper. The mixed dental amalgam...

  8. 21 CFR 872.3100 - Dental amalgamator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Dental amalgamator. 872.3100 Section 872.3100 Food... DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 872.3100 Dental amalgamator. (a) Identification. A dental... and dental alloy particles, such as silver, tin, zinc, and copper. The mixed dental amalgam...

  9. 21 CFR 872.3100 - Dental amalgamator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Dental amalgamator. 872.3100 Section 872.3100 Food... DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 872.3100 Dental amalgamator. (a) Identification. A dental... and dental alloy particles, such as silver, tin, zinc, and copper. The mixed dental amalgam...

  10. 21 CFR 872.3100 - Dental amalgamator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Dental amalgamator. 872.3100 Section 872.3100 Food... DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 872.3100 Dental amalgamator. (a) Identification. A dental... and dental alloy particles, such as silver, tin, zinc, and copper. The mixed dental amalgam...

  11. About Dental Amalgam Fillings

    MedlinePlus

    ... same as the mercury in some types of fish? No. There are several different chemical forms of ... mercury vapor. The form of mercury found in fish is methylmercury, a type of organic mercury. Mercury ...

  12. Increased Zn/Glutathione Levels and Higher Superoxide Dismutase-1 Activity as Biomarkers of Oxidative Stress in Women with Long-Term Dental Amalgam Fillings: Correlation between Mercury/Aluminium Levels (in Hair) and Antioxidant Systems in Plasma

    PubMed Central

    Cabaña-Muñoz, María Eugenia; Parmigiani-Izquierdo, José María; Bravo-González, Luis Alberto; Kyung, Hee-Moon; Merino, José Joaquín

    2015-01-01

    Background The induction of oxidative stress by Hg can affect antioxidant enzymes. However, epidemiological studies have failed to establish clear association between dental fillings presence and health problems. Objectives To determine whether heavy metals (in hair), antioxidant enzymes (SOD-1) and glutathione levels could be affected by the chronic presence of heavy metals in women who had dental amalgam fillings. Materials and Methods 55 hair samples (42 females with amalgam fillings and 13 female control subjects) were obtained. All subjects (mean age 44 years) who had dental amalgam filling for more than 10 years (average 15 years). Certain metals were quantified by ICP-MS (Mass Spectrophotometry) in hair (μg/g: Al, Hg, Ba, Ag, Sb, As, Be, Bi, Cd, Pb, Pt, Tl, Th, U, Ni, Sn, Ti) and SOD-1 and Glutathione (reduced form) levels in plasma. Data were compared with controls without amalgams, and analyzed to identify any significant relation between metals and the total number of amalgam fillings, comparing those with four or less (n = 27) with those with more than four (n = 15). As no significant differences were detected, the two groups were pooled (Amlgam; n = 42). Findings Hg, Ag, Al and Ba were higher in the amalgam group but without significant differences for most of the heavy metals analyzed. Increased SOD-1 activity and glutathione levels (reduced form) were observed in the amalgam group. Aluminum (Al) correlated with glutathione levels while Hg levels correlated with SOD-1. The observed Al/glutathione and Hg/SOD-1 correlation could be adaptive responses against the chronic presence of mercury. Conclusions Hg, Ag, Al and Ba levels increased in women who had dental amalgam fillings for long periods. Al correlated with glutathione, and Hg with SOD-1. SOD-1 may be a possible biomarker for assessing chronic Hg toxicity. PMID:26076368

  13. Critical appraisal: dental amalgam update--part II: biological effects.

    PubMed

    Wahl, Michael J; Swift, Edward J

    2013-12-01

    Dental amalgam restorations have been controversial for over 150 years. In Part I of this Critical Appraisal, the clinical efficacy of dental amalgam was updated. Here in Part II, the biological effects of dental amalgam are addressed. PMID:24320063

  14. The dental amalgam controversy: a review

    PubMed Central

    Feuer, George; Injeyan, H Stephen

    1996-01-01

    In spite of the long history of mercury amalgam as a dental restorative material, its use continues to be controversial. Mercury vapour is continuously released from dental amalgam and is ultimately absorbed into a variety of tissues. Experimental data have demonstrated that the uptake, tissue retention and excretion of mercury from dental amalgam is significant. Evidence has accumulated indicating a relationship between tissue mercury levels and a multitude of clinical manifestations. However, the clinical significance of mercury toxicity from dental amalgams is a matter for debate. The literature is devoid of randomized clinical trials that are rigorously designed to address this issue. Thus, although research data renders the notion of amalgam safety questionable, the dental community appears determined to continue its use as long as unequivocal evidence correlating amalgam mercury toxicity to specific clinical conditions is lacking.

  15. 21 CFR 872.3070 - Dental amalgam, mercury, and amalgam alloy.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Dental amalgam, mercury, and amalgam alloy. 872... SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 872.3070 Dental amalgam, mercury... elemental mercury, supplied as a liquid in bulk, sachet, or predosed capsule form, and amalgam...

  16. 21 CFR 872.3070 - Dental amalgam, mercury, and amalgam alloy.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Dental amalgam, mercury, and amalgam alloy. 872... SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 872.3070 Dental amalgam, mercury... elemental mercury, supplied as a liquid in bulk, sachet, or predosed capsule form, and amalgam...

  17. 21 CFR 872.3070 - Dental amalgam, mercury, and amalgam alloy.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Dental amalgam, mercury, and amalgam alloy. 872... SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 872.3070 Dental amalgam, mercury... elemental mercury, supplied as a liquid in bulk, sachet, or predosed capsule form, and amalgam...

  18. 21 CFR 872.3070 - Dental amalgam, mercury, and amalgam alloy.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Dental amalgam, mercury, and amalgam alloy. 872... SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 872.3070 Dental amalgam, mercury... elemental mercury, supplied as a liquid in bulk, sachet, or predosed capsule form, and amalgam...

  19. 21 CFR 872.3070 - Dental amalgam, mercury, and amalgam alloy.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Dental amalgam, mercury, and amalgam alloy. 872... SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 872.3070 Dental amalgam, mercury... elemental mercury, supplied as a liquid in bulk, sachet, or predosed capsule form, and amalgam...

  20. Mercury recovery in situ of four different dental amalgam separators.

    PubMed

    Hylander, Lars D; Lindvall, Anders; Uhrberg, Roland; Gahnberg, Lars; Lindh, Ulf

    2006-07-31

    Amalgam separators are used to physically remove dental amalgam from waste water in dental clinics. They are thereby supposed to reduce mercury (Hg) emissions to the municipal waste water system to acceptable levels. We here present results from a comparative study in situ of three amalgam separators available on the market, all with a claimed efficiency of 99% according to Danish and ISO protocols, and using sedimentation as the principle of separation. We also present corresponding data for an investigational prototype of an improved separator. The obtained efficiency of the three commercial separators is far below what is stated by the manufacturer and by authorities assumed to be the efficiency in clinical conditions. They reduced Hg emissions by 79 - 91%, leaving an average Hg content in outgoing waste water of 1.5 mg L(-1). However, the prototype separator participating in this study retained 99.9% of the waste water Hg emissions, leaving an average Hg content in outgoing waste water of 0.004 mg L(-1). Physical restrictions prohibit sedimentary type separators to recover the Hg fractions causing the largest damages in wastewater treatment plants. This fraction is not considered in the ISO protocol for testing amalgam separators, which therefore needs to be revised. Abolishing the use of dental amalgam and cleaning the tubing systems is the most efficient long-term solution to reduce Hg emissions from dental clinics. Until then, Hg emissions originating from placing, polishing or removing existing amalgam fillings, should be counteracted by the use of low-emission amalgam separators, already on the market or presently being developed for use alone or together with sedimentary type amalgam separators. PMID:16182343

  1. 21 CFR 872.3110 - Dental amalgam capsule.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Dental amalgam capsule. 872.3110 Section 872.3110...) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 872.3110 Dental amalgam capsule. (a) Identification. A dental amalgam capsule is a container device in which silver alloy is intended to be mixed with...

  2. 21 CFR 872.3110 - Dental amalgam capsule.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Dental amalgam capsule. 872.3110 Section 872.3110...) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 872.3110 Dental amalgam capsule. (a) Identification. A dental amalgam capsule is a container device in which silver alloy is intended to be mixed with...

  3. 21 CFR 872.3110 - Dental amalgam capsule.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Dental amalgam capsule. 872.3110 Section 872.3110...) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 872.3110 Dental amalgam capsule. (a) Identification. A dental amalgam capsule is a container device in which silver alloy is intended to be mixed with...

  4. 21 CFR 872.3110 - Dental amalgam capsule.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Dental amalgam capsule. 872.3110 Section 872.3110...) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 872.3110 Dental amalgam capsule. (a) Identification. A dental amalgam capsule is a container device in which silver alloy is intended to be mixed with...

  5. 21 CFR 872.3110 - Dental amalgam capsule.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Dental amalgam capsule. 872.3110 Section 872.3110...) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 872.3110 Dental amalgam capsule. (a) Identification. A dental amalgam capsule is a container device in which silver alloy is intended to be mixed with...

  6. Increased Release of Mercury from Dental Amalgam Fillings due to Maternal Exposure to Electromagnetic Fields as a Possible Mechanism for the High Rates of Autism in the Offspring: Introducing a Hypothesis.

    PubMed

    Mortazavi, Gh; Haghani, M; Rastegarian, N; Zarei, S; Mortazavi, S M J

    2016-03-01

    According to the World Health Organization (WHO), factors such as growing electricity demand, ever-advancing technologies and changes in social behaviour have led to steadily increasing exposure to man-made electromagnetic fields.  Dental amalgam fillings are among the major sources of exposure to elemental mercury vapour in the general population. Although it was previously believed that low levels are mercury (i.g. release of mercury from dental amalgam) is not hazardous, now numerous data indicate that even very low doses of mercury cause toxicity. There are some evidence indicating that perinatal exposure to mercury is significantly associated with an increased risk of developmental disorders such as autism spectrum disorders (ASD) and attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). Furthermore, mercury can decrease the levels of neurotransmitters dopamine, serotonin, noreprenephrine, and acetylcholine in the brain and cause neurological problems. On the other hand, a strong positive correlation between maternal and cord blood mercury levels is found in some studies. We have previously shown that exposure to MRI or microwave radiation emitted by common mobile phones can lead to increased release of mercury from dental amalgam fillings. Moreover, when we investigated the effects of MRI machines with stronger magnetic fields, our previous findings were confirmed. As a strong association between exposure to electromagnetic fields and mercury level has been found in our previous studies, our findings can lead us to this conclusion that maternal exposure to electromagnetic fields in mothers with dental amalgam fillings may cause elevated levels of mercury and trigger the increase in autism rates. Further studies are needed to have a better understanding of the possible role of the increased mercury level after exposure to electromagnetic fields and the rate of autism spectrum disorders in the offspring. PMID:27026954

  7. Increased Release of Mercury from Dental Amalgam Fillings due to Maternal Exposure to Electromagnetic Fields as a Possible Mechanism for the High Rates of Autism in the Offspring: Introducing a Hypothesis

    PubMed Central

    Mortazavi, Gh.; Haghani, M.; Rastegarian, N.; Zarei, S.; Mortazavi, S.M.J.

    2016-01-01

    According to the World Health Organization (WHO), factors such as growing electricity demand, ever-advancing technologies and changes in social behaviour have led to steadily increasing exposure to man-made electromagnetic fields.  Dental amalgam fillings are among the major sources of exposure to elemental mercury vapour in the general population. Although it was previously believed that low levels are mercury (i.g. release of mercury from dental amalgam) is not hazardous, now numerous data indicate that even very low doses of mercury cause toxicity. There are some evidence indicating that perinatal exposure to mercury is significantly associated with an increased risk of developmental disorders such as autism spectrum disorders (ASD) and attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). Furthermore, mercury can decrease the levels of neurotransmitters dopamine, serotonin, noreprenephrine, and acetylcholine in the brain and cause neurological problems. On the other hand, a strong positive correlation between maternal and cord blood mercury levels is found in some studies. We have previously shown that exposure to MRI or microwave radiation emitted by common mobile phones can lead to increased release of mercury from dental amalgam fillings. Moreover, when we investigated the effects of MRI machines with stronger magnetic fields, our previous findings were confirmed. As a strong association between exposure to electromagnetic fields and mercury level has been found in our previous studies, our findings can lead us to this conclusion that maternal exposure to electromagnetic fields in mothers with dental amalgam fillings may cause elevated levels of mercury and trigger the increase in autism rates. Further studies are needed to have a better understanding of the possible role of the increased mercury level after exposure to electromagnetic fields and the rate of autism spectrum disorders in the offspring. PMID:27026954

  8. Mercury vapour exposure during dental student training in amalgam removal

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Amalgam that is used for dental fillings contains approximately 50% elemental mercury. During dental student training, amalgam is often removed by drilling without the use of water spray and suction, which are protective measures in preventing mercury aerosol. In this study we measured mercury vapor levels in ambient air during amalgam removal as is typically performed in dental training. Methods Mercury vapor levels in ambient air were measured in a dental school laboratory during removal of amalgam fillings from artificial teeth set into a dental jaw simulator. Mercury vapor was measured under three conditions (25 measurements each): with the simultaneous use of water spray and suction, with the use of suction only, and with the use of neither suction nor water spray. These three conditions are all used during dental student training. Results were compared to Alberta occupational exposure limits for mercury vapor in order to assess potential occupational risk to students. Analysis of variance testing was used to compare data obtained under the three conditions. Results When water spray and suction were used, mercury vapor levels ranged from 4.0 to 19.0 μg/m3 (arithmetic mean = 8.0 μg/m3); when suction only was used, mercury vapor levels ranged from 14.0 to 999.0 (999.0 μg/m3 represents the high limit detection of the Jerome analyzer) (arithmetic mean = 141.0 μg/m3); when neither suction nor water was used, the vapor levels ranged from 34.0 to 796.0 μg/m3 (arithmetic mean = 214.0 μg/m3). Conclusions The Alberta Occupational Health and Safety threshold limit value for mercury vapor over an eight-hour time-weighted period is 25.0 μg/m3. The absolute ceiling for mercury vapor, not to be exceeded at any time, is 125.0 μg/m3. When both water spray and suction were used, mercury vapor levels were consistently below this threshold. When suction without water spray was used, mercury vapor levels exceeded the safety threshold 8% of

  9. Patients’ experiences of changes in health complaints before, during, and after removal of dental amalgam

    PubMed Central

    Sjursen, Therese T.; Binder, Per-Einar; Lygre, Gunvor B.; Helland, Vigdis; Dalen, Knut; Björkman, Lars

    2015-01-01

    In this article, we explore how patients with health complaints attributed to dental amalgam experienced and gave meaning to changes in health complaints before, during, and after removal of all amalgam fillings. We conducted semistructured qualitative interviews with 12 participants from the treatment group in a Norwegian amalgam removal trial. Interviews took place within a couple months of the final follow-up 5 years after amalgam removal. Using the NVivo9 software, we conducted an explorative and reflective thematic analysis and identified the following themes: Something is not working: betrayed by the body, You are out there on your own, Not being sure of the importance of amalgam removal, The relief experienced after amalgam removal, and To accept, to give up, or to continue the search. We discuss the findings in the context of patients’ assigning meaning to illness experiences. PMID:26112454

  10. Electrical activity in dental amalgam of submerged divers during welding.

    PubMed

    Ortendahl, T W; Holland, R I

    1987-10-01

    Divers performing underwater manual metal arc welding/cutting (UMMA) have complained about a metallic taste phenomenon. In several dives with voluntary leakage in their diving suits, potential alterations in dental amalgam were registered when they performed UMMA. Polarization resistance values were obtained for the test amalgam cylinders used and the diver's dental restorations. These values, along with the recorded potential values of the amalgam test cylinders and of the diver's dental restorations, enabled us to calculate the depolarizing current, using the law of Ohm. The current depolarizing the amalgam test cylinder did not differ significantly from the mean intermetallic currents between the dental restorations. The clinical effect of intraoral currents when performing UMMA welding should be regarded as small, whereas considerably higher currents should not be ruled out in an intense cutting situation. PMID:3478937

  11. Microstructural studies of dental amalgams using analytical transmission electron microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hooghan, Tejpal Kaur

    Dental amalgams have been used for centuries as major restorative materials for decaying teeth. Amalgams are prepared by mixing alloy particles which contain Ag, Sn, and Cu as the major constituent elements with liquid Hg. The study of microstructure is essential in understanding the setting reactions and improving the properties of amalgams. Until the work reported in this dissertation, optical microscopy (OM), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and x-ray diffractometry (XRD) were used commonly to analyze amalgam microstructures. No previous systematic transmission electron microscopy (TEM) study has been performed due to sample preparation difficulties and composite structure of dental amalgams. The goal of this research was to carry out detailed microstructural and compositional studies of dental amalgams. This was accomplished using the enhanced spatial resolution of the TEM and its associated microanalytical techniques, namely, scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM), x-ray energy dispersive spectroscopy (XEDS) and micro-microdiffraction (mumuD). A new method was developed for thinning amalgam samples to electron transparency using the "wedge technique." Velvalloy, a low-Cu amalgam, and Tytin, a high-Cu amalgam, were the two amalgams characterized. Velvalloy is composed of a Agsb2Hgsb3\\ (gammasb1)/HgSnsb{7-9}\\ (gammasb2) matrix surrounding unreacted Agsb3Sn (gamma) particles. In addition, hitherto uncharacterized reaction layers between Agsb3Sn(gamma)/Agsb2Hgsb3\\ (gammasb2)\\ and\\ Agsb2Hgsb3\\ (gammasb1)/HgSnsb{7-9}\\ (gammasb2) were observed and analyzed. An Ag-Hg-Sn (betasb1) phase was clearly identified for the first time. In Tytin, the matrix consists of Agsb2Hgsb3\\ (gammasb1) grains. Fine precipitates of Cusb6Snsb5\\ (etasp') are embedded inside the gammasb1 and at the grain boundaries. These precipitates are responsible for the improved creep resistance of Tytin compared to Velvalloy. The additional Cu has completely eliminated the gammasb

  12. Microstructure of dental amalgams containing high and low copper contents.

    PubMed

    Malhotra, M L; Asgar, K

    1977-12-01

    Microstructure of commercial dental alloys and their amalgams were studied primarily by x-ray diffraction, optical metallography, scanning electron microscopy, and x-ray energy dispersive spectroscopy. X-ray diffraction revealed more phases than normally reported in these materials. Presence of new phase was discussed and their formation mechanism understood. Some phases having interacting 2 theta degrees values with others were properly identified. Both new and conventional dental alloys and their amalgams, namely Tytin, Sybraloy, Dispersalloy, Kerr Spheraloy, Caulk Spherical, Shofu Spherical, and Caulk 20th Century Microcut were used to complete the investigation. PMID:277466

  13. Is dental amalgam safe for humans? The opinion of the scientific committee of the European Commission

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    It was claimed by the Scientific Committee on Emerging and Newly Identified Health Risks (SCENIHR)) in a report to the EU-Commission that "....no risks of adverse systemic effects exist and the current use of dental amalgam does not pose a risk of systemic disease..." [1, available from: http://ec.europa.eu/health/ph_risk/committees/04_scenihr/docs/scenihr_o_016.pdf]. SCENIHR disregarded the toxicology of mercury and did not include most important scientific studies in their review. But the real scientific data show that: (a) Dental amalgam is by far the main source of human total mercury body burden. This is proven by autopsy studies which found 2-12 times more mercury in body tissues of individuals with dental amalgam. Autopsy studies are the most valuable and most important studies for examining the amalgam-caused mercury body burden. (b) These autopsy studies have shown consistently that many individuals with amalgam have toxic levels of mercury in their brains or kidneys. (c) There is no correlation between mercury levels in blood or urine, and the levels in body tissues or the severity of clinical symptoms. SCENIHR only relied on levels in urine or blood. (d) The half-life of mercury in the brain can last from several years to decades, thus mercury accumulates over time of amalgam exposure in body tissues to toxic levels. However, SCENIHR state that the half-life of mercury in the body is only "20-90 days". (e) Mercury vapor is about ten times more toxic than lead on human neurons and with synergistic toxicity to other metals. (f) Most studies cited by SCENIHR which conclude that amalgam fillings are safe have severe methodical flaws. PMID:21232090

  14. Reaction of mercury with silver-tin dental amalgam alloy.

    PubMed

    Abbott, J R; Miller, D R; Netherway, D J

    1982-09-01

    Electron diffraction evidence confirming the ordered orthorhombic crystal structure of the gamma phase of the silver-tin system has been obtained, and it has been established by optical metallography that an alloy with a composition corresponding to the dental amalgam alloy formula Ag3Sn (i.e., 26.85 wt % Sn) lies outside the single gamma phase field and in the duplex (gamma + Sn) phase field adjacent to it. Studies of the mechanism of the hardening reaction of single crystals of homogeneous gamma phase alloys with mercury were carried out using both scanning and transmission electron microscopy. Mercury attack occurred preferentially along well-defined planes in the single crystals. Using electron channeling and trace analysis techniques these planes of preferential attack were found to be [010] and [011], and from transmission electron microscopy of thin foils these were shown to be slip bands and deformation twins, respectively. In bicrystals of gamma phase material, preferential attack also occurred along grain boundaries. Similar preferential mercury attack, leading to the development of deep planar intrusions into the gamma phase material, was observed in an experimental dental amalgam prepared from a lathe-cut homogeneous gamma phase amalgam alloy. It is believed that the presence of such features would have important implications for the clinical performance of dental amalgam. PMID:7130210

  15. The Chemical Forms of Mercury in Aged and Fresh Dental Amalgam Surfaces

    PubMed Central

    George, Graham N.; Singh, Satya P.; Hoover, Jay; Pickering, Ingrid J.

    2009-01-01

    Mercury-containing dental amalgam is known to be a source of human exposure to mercury. We have explored the use of electron-yield Hg LIII X-ray absorption spectroscopy to characterize the chemical nature of dental amalgam surfaces. We find that the method is practical, and that it shows extensive mercury depletion in the surface of the aged amalgam with significant differences between old and fresh amalgam surfaces. Whereas the fresh amalgam gives spectra that are typical of metallic mercury, the aged amalgam is predominantly β-mercuric sulfide. The toxicological implications of these results are discussed. PMID:19842619

  16. Whole-body imaging of the distribution of mercury released from dental fillings into monkey tissues

    SciTech Connect

    Hahn, L.J.; Kloiber, R.; Leininger, R.W.; Vimy, M.J.; Lorscheider, F.L. )

    1990-11-01

    The fate of mercury (Hg) released from dental silver amalgam tooth fillings into human mouth air is uncertain. A previous report about sheep revealed uptake routes and distribution of amalgam Hg among body tissues. The present investigation demonstrates the bodily distribution of amalgam Hg in a monkey whose dentition, diet, feeding regimen, and chewing pattern closely resemble those of humans. When amalgam fillings, which normally contain 50% Hg, are made with a tracer of radioactive {sup 203}Hg and then placed into monkey teeth, the isotope appears in high concentration in various organs and tissues within 4 wk. Whole-body images of the monkey revealed that the highest levels of Hg were located in the kidney, gastrointestinal tract, and jaw. The dental profession's advocacy of silver amalgam as a stable tooth restorative material is not supported by these findings.

  17. Dental composites and amalgam and physical development in children.

    PubMed

    Maserejian, N N; Hauser, R; Tavares, M; Trachtenberg, F L; Shrader, P; McKinlay, S

    2012-11-01

    Resin-based composite dental restoration materials may release bisphenol-A, an endocrine-disrupting chemical. Using secondary analysis of a randomized clinical safety trial of amalgam vs. composites, we tested the hypothesis that dental restoration materials affect children's growth. Children (N = 218 boys, N = 256 girls) aged 6 to 10 yrs at baseline with ≥ 2 decayed posterior teeth were randomized to amalgam or composites (bisphenol-A-diglycidyl-dimethacrylate composite for permanent teeth, urethane-dimethacrylate compomer for primary teeth) for treatment of posterior caries throughout follow-up. Primary outcomes for this analysis were 5-year changes in BMI-for-age z-scores, body fat percentage (BF%), and height velocity; exploratory analyses (n = 113) examined age at menarche. Results showed no significant differences between treatment assignment and changes in physical development in boys [(composites vs. amalgam) BF%, 4.9 vs. 5.7, p = 0.49; (BMI-z-score) 0.13 vs. 0.25, p = 0.36] or girls (8.8 vs. 7.7, p = 0.95; 0.36 vs. 0.21, p = 0.49). Children with more treatment on primary teeth had greater increases in BF% regardless of material type. Girls assigned to composites had lower risk of menarche during follow-up (hazard ratio = 0.57, 95% CI 0.35-0.95). Overall, there were no significant differences in physical development over 5 years in children treated with composites or amalgam. Additional studies examining these restoration materials in relation to age at menarche are warranted (clinicaltrials.gov number NCT00065988). PMID:22972857

  18. Dental amalgam and urinary mercury concentrations: a descriptive study

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Dental amalgam is a source of elemental and inorganic mercury. The safety of dental amalgam in individuals remains a controversial issue. Urinary mercury concentrations are used to assess chronic exposure to elemental mercury. At present, there are no indications of mercury-associated adverse effects at levels below 5 μg Hg/g creatinine (Cr) or 7 μg Hg/L (urine). The purpose of the present study is to determine the overall urinary mercury level in the Canadian general population in relation to the number of dental amalgam surfaces. Methods Data come from the 2007/09 Canadian Health Measures Survey, which measured urinary mercury concentrations in a nationally representative sample of 5,418 Canadians aged 6–79 years. Urinary mercury concentrations were stratified by sex, age, and number of dental amalgam surfaces. Results The overall mean urinary mercury concentration varied between 0.12 μg Hg/L and 0.31 μg Hg/L or 0.13 μg Hg/g Cr and 0.40 μg Hg/g Cr. In general, females showed slightly higher mean urinary mercury levels than men. The overall 95th percentile was 2.95 μg Hg/L, the 99th percentile was 7.34E μg Hg/L, and the 99.9th percentile was 17.45 μg Hg/L. Expressed as μg Hg/g Cr, the overall 95th percentile was 2.57 μg Hg/g Cr, the 99th percentile was 5.65 μg Hg/g Cr, and the 99.9th percentiles was 12.14 μg Hg/g Cr. Overall, 98.2% of participants had urinary mercury levels below 7 μg Hg/L and 97.7% had urinary mercury levels below 5 μg Hg/g Cr. All data are estimates for the Canadian population. The estimates followed by the letter “E” should be interpreted with caution due to high sampling variability (coefficient of variation 16.6%-33.3%). Conclusions The mean urinary mercury concentrations in the general Canadian population are significantly lower than the values considered to pose any risks for health. PMID:24015978

  19. Dental fillings in Civil War skulls: what do they tell us?

    PubMed

    Glenner, R A; Willey, P; Sledzik, P S; Junger, E P

    1996-11-01

    This article discusses the dental techniques, methods and materials used in the South during the Civil War based on the dental restorations found in the skulls of four confederate soldiers. The skulls display a variety of dental filling materials, including thorium, lead, tin and tin amalgam. These materials were used at a time when more valuable materials, such as gold and silver, were not readily available in the South. PMID:8952248

  20. [Abrasion measurements in vivo in occlusal composite and amalgam fillings].

    PubMed

    Meier, C; Lutz, F

    1978-09-01

    A new method for quantitative measurement of occlusal wear on restorations is described. In a clinical evaluation with four different composites and an amalgam the method proved to be simple in execution and very exact. Statistical analysis after 7 months has shown significant differences in wear resistance of the different materials. The nature of the resulting wear was electron optically examined. Typical structural surface characteristics were observed for each of the different materials. More recently developed composities utilizing extremly small filler particles (Aerosil) seem to be comparable to amalgam in wear resistance. PMID:279445

  1. Effects of magnetic fields from underwater electrical cutting on in vitro corrosion of dental amalgam.

    PubMed

    Ortendahl, T W; Högstedt, P; Odelius, H; Norén, J G

    1988-11-01

    Metallic taste has been reported from divers working with underwater electric welding and cutting. An in vitro model was designed to simulate the intraoral situation of the divers with respect to the magnetic field. Potentiostatic analyses were performed on amalgam samples exposed to AC and DC magnetic fields. Morphologic changes were analyzed using differential interference light microscopy and scanning electron microscopy. Chemical changes on the surface of the amalgam samples were analyzed with secondary ion mass spectrometry. Results demonstrated that dental amalgams exposed to a specific AC magnetic field underwent morphologic and chemical changes in the superficial amalgam layers. PMID:3227577

  2. Amalgam

    SciTech Connect

    Fox, Kevin

    2012-09-05

    Amalgam is a system that allows you to generate collections of files that work with conventional tools but take up minimal extra space on storage. If you already are archiving files in a file system and don't want to make multiple copies of whole files in order to ship the data somewhere then this system is for you. Amalgam consists of tools that allow you to create and get information about '.amalgam' files which contain just the metadata associated with a set of files. It also contains a fuse file system that, using amalgam files, will dynamically create traditional tar files. With this setup, you can see multiple orders of magnitude reduction in storage requirements for temporary data collections.

  3. Amalgam

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    2012-09-05

    Amalgam is a system that allows you to generate collections of files that work with conventional tools but take up minimal extra space on storage. If you already are archiving files in a file system and don't want to make multiple copies of whole files in order to ship the data somewhere then this system is for you. Amalgam consists of tools that allow you to create and get information about '.amalgam' files which containmore » just the metadata associated with a set of files. It also contains a fuse file system that, using amalgam files, will dynamically create traditional tar files. With this setup, you can see multiple orders of magnitude reduction in storage requirements for temporary data collections.« less

  4. Comparison of the abrasive wear resistance between amalgams, hybrid composite material and different dental cements.

    PubMed

    Gil, F J; Espias, A; Sánchez, L A; Planell, J A

    1999-12-01

    This paper reports on the abrasion wear of various restorative dental materials (three amalgams and two dental cements and a hybrid composite material) commonly used in dentistry. The mechanical properties, surface roughness and the volume loss by abrasion were determined for the different materials studied. The results showed a better profile for the amalgams versus the composite materials due to the failure of the polymeric matrix of the latter materials. However, the amalgams exhibited corrosion observed by means of Scanning Electron Microscopy. PMID:10907431

  5. Creep as a mechanism for sealing amalgams.

    PubMed

    Osborne, John W

    2006-01-01

    Dental amalgam seals itself over time. The reduction of microleakage in amalgam restorations has been explained by corrosion products filling in the interface gap between amalgam and tooth structure in order to seal the restoration interface. This concept has been widely accepted; yet, curiously, there is little research supporting this theory. The creep mechanism may be a plausible alternative to explaining why microleakage is reduced over time in amalgam restorations. Amalgam restorations are confined to the fixed space of the cavity preparation; expansion of the amalgam through internal phase changes in this confined area must be relieved. The resultant creep-expansion of the amalgam restoration fills in the tooth/amalgam interface gap. Once the interfacial gap is filled and amalgam has made intimate contact with the cavity wall, the dental amalgam slides along the tooth preparation plane as predicted by classic metallurgical studies. The results of the creep of amalgam have been observed clinically as the extrusion of amalgam from the cavity preparation. This explanation for amalgam sealing the tooth/amalgam gap fits many clinical observations and certain research data. PMID:16827016

  6. The Chemistry of Modern Dental Filling Materials.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nicholson, John W.; Anstice, H. Mary

    1999-01-01

    Discusses materials used by dentists to restore teeth after decay has been removed. Shows how dental-material science is an interdisciplinary field in which chemistry plays a major part. Reviews the many developments polymer chemistry has contributed to the field of dental fillings. (CCM)

  7. A scanning transmission electron microscopy study of two dental amalgams.

    PubMed

    Williams, K R

    1983-10-01

    Two fully aged amalgam alloys were examined using a scanning transmission electron microscope both in the transmission and scanning mode. The dispersed type amalgam containing a distribution of silver-copper spheres in addition to the Ag3Sn powder showed a markedly reduced gamma 1 grain size compared to a conventional Ag3Sn type amalgam. It is suggested that the increased compressive creep strength of the dispersed type material is a direct result of the reduced gamma 1 grain size and not due to a dispersion hardening effect from the cores of the remaining Ag-Cu spheres. Similarly, the formation of complex Cu-Sn intermediate phases at the Ag-Cu sphere surfaces are unlikely to lead to a dispersion strengthening effect. It is postulated that the reduced grain size in high copper amalgams is a consequence of the enhanced nucleating effect of a copper based phase on gamma 1. PMID:6640049

  8. Monte Carlo dose calculation in dental amalgam phantom.

    PubMed

    Aziz, Mohd Zahri Abdul; Yusoff, A L; Osman, N D; Abdullah, R; Rabaie, N A; Salikin, M S

    2015-01-01

    It has become a great challenge in the modern radiation treatment to ensure the accuracy of treatment delivery in electron beam therapy. Tissue inhomogeneity has become one of the factors for accurate dose calculation, and this requires complex algorithm calculation like Monte Carlo (MC). On the other hand, computed tomography (CT) images used in treatment planning system need to be trustful as they are the input in radiotherapy treatment. However, with the presence of metal amalgam in treatment volume, the CT images input showed prominent streak artefact, thus, contributed sources of error. Hence, metal amalgam phantom often creates streak artifacts, which cause an error in the dose calculation. Thus, a streak artifact reduction technique was applied to correct the images, and as a result, better images were observed in terms of structure delineation and density assigning. Furthermore, the amalgam density data were corrected to provide amalgam voxel with accurate density value. As for the errors of dose uncertainties due to metal amalgam, they were reduced from 46% to as low as 2% at d80 (depth of the 80% dose beyond Zmax) using the presented strategies. Considering the number of vital and radiosensitive organs in the head and the neck regions, this correction strategy is suggested in reducing calculation uncertainties through MC calculation. PMID:26500401

  9. Monte Carlo dose calculation in dental amalgam phantom

    PubMed Central

    Aziz, Mohd. Zahri Abdul; Yusoff, A. L.; Osman, N. D.; Abdullah, R.; Rabaie, N. A.; Salikin, M. S.

    2015-01-01

    It has become a great challenge in the modern radiation treatment to ensure the accuracy of treatment delivery in electron beam therapy. Tissue inhomogeneity has become one of the factors for accurate dose calculation, and this requires complex algorithm calculation like Monte Carlo (MC). On the other hand, computed tomography (CT) images used in treatment planning system need to be trustful as they are the input in radiotherapy treatment. However, with the presence of metal amalgam in treatment volume, the CT images input showed prominent streak artefact, thus, contributed sources of error. Hence, metal amalgam phantom often creates streak artifacts, which cause an error in the dose calculation. Thus, a streak artifact reduction technique was applied to correct the images, and as a result, better images were observed in terms of structure delineation and density assigning. Furthermore, the amalgam density data were corrected to provide amalgam voxel with accurate density value. As for the errors of dose uncertainties due to metal amalgam, they were reduced from 46% to as low as 2% at d80 (depth of the 80% dose beyond Zmax) using the presented strategies. Considering the number of vital and radiosensitive organs in the head and the neck regions, this correction strategy is suggested in reducing calculation uncertainties through MC calculation. PMID:26500401

  10. Long-term clinical evaluation of fracture and pulp injury following glass-ionomer cement or composite resin applied as a base filling in teeth restored with amalgam.

    PubMed

    De C Luz, M A; Ciaramicoli-Rodrigues, M T; Garone Netto, N; De Lima, A C

    2001-07-01

    The aim of this research was to analyse the long-term clinical behaviour of two dental materials applied as filling under silver amalgam restorations: glass-ionomer cement (GIC) and composite resin with adhesive system (CR). In this study, 117 posterior teeth (29 premolars and 88 molars) were selected with carious lesions which resulted in great loss of dentin and cusps with unsupported enamel. After caries removal, cavities were prepared and totally filled with GIC or with CR. In a following visit, new cavities were prepared, leaving the employed filling material as a base and support for the enamel, which were then restored with silver amalgam. Restorations were evaluated periodically after 6 months and up to 5 years. Both fracture and pulpal involvement rates were low. Although differences could be observed in the behaviour of the materials, statistical survival estimation showed that the performances of GIC and CR as filling material were similar. There was a significant association both between kind of tooth (molar or premolar) and long-term survival of the restorations; and between degree of unsupported enamel and the same long-term survival. Our results confirmed that the technique in which GIC or CR are used as filling under silver amalgam restorations is clinically acceptable. PMID:11422695

  11. Biomarkers of kidney integrity in children and adolescents with dental amalgam mercury exposure: Findings from the Casa Pia children's amalgam trial

    SciTech Connect

    Woods, James S. Martin, Michael D.; Leroux, Brian G.; DeRouen, Timothy A.; Bernardo, Mario F.; Luis, Henrique S.; Leitao, Jorge G.; Kushleika, John V.; Rue, Tessa C.; Korpak, Anna M.

    2008-11-15

    Mercury is toxic to the kidney, and dental amalgam is a source of mercury exposure. Few studies have evaluated the effects of dental amalgam on kidney function in a longitudinal context in children. Here, we evaluated urinary concentrations of glutathione S-transferases (GSTs) {alpha} and {pi} as biomarkers of renal proximal and distal tubular integrity, respectively, and albumin as a biomarker of glomerular integrity in children and adolescents 8-18 years of age over a 7-year course of dental amalgam treatment. Five hundred seven children, 8-12 years of age at baseline, participated in a clinical trial to evaluate the neurobehavioral and renal effects of dental amalgam in children. Subjects were randomized to either dental amalgam or resin composite treatments. Urinary GSTs {alpha} and {pi}, albumin, and creatinine concentrations were measured at baseline and annually in all subjects. Results were evaluated using linear regression analysis. GST-{alpha} concentrations were similar between treatment groups and in each sex and race (white vs. non-white) group in each follow-up year. GST-{pi} levels tended upward over the course of follow-up by four- to six-fold. This increase was seen in all groups irrespective of the treatment, race, or gender. Females had GST-{pi} levels approximately twice those of males at all ages. Albumin concentrations were constant throughout the follow-up period and did not differ by treatment, although females had 39% higher albumin levels than males. Additionally, we found no significant effects of amalgam treatment on the proportion of children with microalbuminuria (>30 mg/g creatinine). These findings are relevant within the context of children's health risk assessment as relates to the safety of mercury exposure from dental amalgam on kidney function. These data also provide normative values for sensitive indices of renal functional integrity that may serve in the evaluation of children and adolescents with renal disorders.

  12. Status of scrap (recyclable) dental amalgams as environmental health hazards or toxic substances.

    PubMed

    Rogers, K D

    1989-07-01

    This article presents information garnered after an investigation by the Environmental Protection Agency in 1987 of dentists and others who had sold scrap dental amalgam to refiners who had "arranged for the disposal or treatment ... of hazardous substances," and were responsible for adverse consequences associated with their subsequent management and refining. Information about the health hazard status of scrap dental amalgams was obtained by: interviews with toxicologists, review of published lists of toxic and hazardous materials, and survey of biomedical publications (1977 through 1987) concerning toxicity or health hazards associated with dental amalgams. The conclusions were that scrap dental amalgam is not: a waste substance to be disposed of, but is a product of commercial value; identified or regulated by the Environmental Protection Agency, the Occupational Safety and Health Administration, the Department of Transportation, the Food and Drug Administration, the National Institute of Occupational Safety and Health, the US Public Health Service, or the Centers for Disease Control as an environmental health hazard or toxic substance; identified by toxicologists and persons responsible for solid waste regulation as a toxic substance or environmental health hazard; nor proved by scientific study to be toxic or hazardous in the manner and form in which it is collected and stored by dentists and subsequently sold to metal refiners. PMID:2668374

  13. 75 FR 33169 - Dental Devices: Classification of Dental Amalgam, Reclassification of Dental Mercury, Designation...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-06-11

    ... Administration (FDA) published a final rule in the Federal Register of August 4, 2009 (74 FR 38686) which... (powder), which is composed primarily of silver, tin, and copper (74 FR 38686). The final rule classified... previous classification of amalgam alloy in the codified section of the final rule (74 FR 38686 at...

  14. Mercury exposure in the work place and human health: dental amalgam use in dentistry at dental teaching institutions and private dental clinics in selected cities of Pakistan.

    PubMed

    Khwaja, Mahmood A; Nawaz, Sadaf; Ali, Saeed Waqar

    2016-03-01

    During the past two decades, mercury has come under increasing scrutiny with regard to its safety both in the general population and in occupationally exposed groups. It's a growing issue of global concern because of its adverse environmental and health impacts. Very few investigations on mercury amalgam use in the dentistry sector have been carried out in South Asia and there is little data reported on mercury contamination of indoor/outdoor air at dental sites. According to an earlier SDPI study, reported in 2013, alarmingly high mercury levels were observed in air (indoor as well as outdoor) at 11 of the 34 visited dental sites (17 dental teaching institutions, 7 general hospitals & 10 dental clinics) in five main cities of Pakistan. 88% of the sites indicated indoor mercury levels in air above the USA EPA reference level of 300 ng/m3. According to our study, carried out at 38 dental teaching institutions in 12 main cities (in Khyber Pakhtunkhwa, Punjab and Sindh provinces) of Pakistan, respondents were of the opinion that the currently offered BDS curriculum does not effectively guide outgoing dental professionals and does not provide them adequate knowledge and training about mercury/mercury amalgam and other mercury related human health and mercury waste issues. 90% of respondents supported the review and revision of the present dental curriculum offered at dental teaching institutions in the country, at the earliest. A study has also been conducted to assess the status of mercury amalgam use in private dental clinics in Gilgit, Hunza, Peshawar, Rawalpindi and Islamabad. More than 90 private dental clinics were visited and dental professionals/private clinics in-charge were interviewed during June-July, 2015. The focus areas of the study were Hg amalgam toxicity, its waste management practices and safety measures practiced among the dental practitioners. In the light of the findings described and discussed in this brief report, to safeguard public health and

  15. The use of CDA best management practices and amalgam separators to improve the management of dental wastewater.

    PubMed

    Condrin, Amy Knepshield

    2004-07-01

    Concerns over the persistence and effects of mercury in the environment, particularly in wastewater, have increased significantly over the past decade. Because mercury is a component of dental amalgam, comprising about 50 percent of amalgam among other metals, in recent years the concern has affected dental practices and even educational curricula in the dental schools. While numbers vary widely from area to area, on average, it is estimated dentistry contributes less than 1 percent of the mercury generated from human activity to the environment. Despite dentistry's low contribution to the environmental mercury load, organized dentistry's position is that dentistry's role as a public health profession includes environmental stewardship, as well as patient safety, and that dental professionals must act responsibly by taking steps to prevent amalgam waste or any potentially harmful materials from entering the environment, no matter how small the amount. In support of this belief, both the California Dental Association and the American Dental Association have developed recommendations for best practice that dental offices should follow when handling dental amalgam waste. Many dental schools and auxiliary programs have shown their commitment to minimizing detrimental effects to the environment, evidenced by the fact that most, if not all, have incorporated safe work practices including mercury hygiene procedures as part of clinical coursework. Some local jurisdictions hardest hit by the effects of mercury in wastewater have gone even further to recommend, or even require, the installation of amalgam separators in dental offices. This article will describe the history of BMPs and amalgam separators usage in California, and examine the practical aspects of their usage in reducing the discharge of dental amalgam into waste streams. PMID:15468540

  16. Effect of Surface Polishing on Mercury Release from Dental Amalgam After Treatment 16% Carbamide Peroxide Gel

    PubMed Central

    Azarsina, M.; Kasraei, Sh.; Masoum, T.; Khamverdi, Z.

    2011-01-01

    Objectives: This study evaluated the effect of surface polishing on mercury release from dental amalgam after treatment with 16% carbamide peroxide gel. Materials and Methods: Ninety-six samples from two different amalgam brands were prepared in truncated cone-shaped PVC polymer molds with an external surface area of 195 mm2. Half of the specimens were polished with green and red rubber, a brush and tin oxide paste at low speed. Samples were treated with 16% carbamide peroxide gel in tubes containing 3 mL of carbamide peroxide gel and 0.1 mL of distilled water for 14 and 28 hours. Subsequently, carbamide peroxide gel on the sample surfaces was rinsed away with 7.0 mL of distilled water until the volume of each tube increased to 10 mL. The mercury level of each solution was measured using the VAV–440 mercury analyzer system. Considering the surface area of each amalgam disc, mercury amounts were calculated in μg/mm2. Data were analyzed using two-way ANOVA. Results: There were significant differences between the mean levels of mercury release from polished vs. unpolished amalgam surfaces after treatment with 16% carbamide peroxide. Increasing the storage time from 14 to 28 hours did not result in significant changes in the amount of mercury release. There was no significant interaction effect between amalgam surface polish and storage time statistically. Conclusion: Polished amalgam restorations release less mercury after treatment with carbamide peroxide bleaching gel in comparison with unpolished amalgam restorations. PMID:21998805

  17. Removal of dental filling materials by Er:YAG laser radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hibst, Raimund; Keller, Ulrich

    1991-05-01

    In previous reports it could be shown that pulsed Er:YAG laser radiation is effective for the removal of dental enamel, dentin, and caries. Damage to the adjacent hard substances is minimal. Temperature measurements and animal studies revealed that thermal pulp damage can be avoided. The experimental results make the Er:YAG laser promising for the preparation of dental cavities. In many cases patients already have fillings which have to be removed. In the present work, investigation is made of the effect of Er:YAG laser radiation on various restorative filling materials. The experiments demonstrate that removal is possible for all tested cements, composites and amalgam. Ablation efficiency is comparable to that of enamel and dentin, and thus sufficient for practical applications. Morphology of crater walls indicates greater thermal side effects than for natural dental hard substances.

  18. Costs and prices of single dental fillings in Europe: a micro-costing study.

    PubMed

    Tan, Siok Swan; Ken Redekop, W; Rutten, Frans F H

    2008-01-01

    Dental fillings represent an established procedure to treat tooth decay. The present paper provides a cost comparison of dental filling procedures across nine European countries. More specifically, the paper aims to estimate the costs and prices (i.e. reimbursement fees) of a single dental filling procedure in an approximately 12-year-old child with a toothache in a lower molar who presents at a dental practice, as described in a case vignette. Both amalgam and composite fillings were examined. Total costs were determined by identifying resource use and unit costs for the following cost components: diagnostic procedures, labour, materials, drugs, and overheads. Altogether, 49 practices provided data for the cost calculations. Mean total costs per country varied considerably, ranging from 8 euros to 156 euros. Labour costs were the most important cost driver in all practices, comprising 58% of total costs. Overhead costs were the second-most important cost component in the majority of countries. Actual cost differences across practices within countries were relatively small. Cost variations between countries were primarily due to differences in unit costs, especially for labour and overheads, and only to a lesser extent to differences in resource use. Finally, cost estimates for a single dental filling procedure based on reimbursement fees led to an underestimation of the total costs by approximately 50%. PMID:18186032

  19. [Studies on the effects of dental amalgam upon the fertilization and early development of sea urchin eggs (Hemicentrotus pulcherrimus) (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Kukizaki, S

    1975-05-01

    Silver-tin amalgam that has been used as a filling material in routine dental clinic contains a large amount of mercury and the cytotoxity of metal mercury may hazard to patients. There have been a number of papers reporting that the dental amalgam has not any toxic action to living cells in animal experiments in vivo. However, the mechanism of cytotoxic action and effects of these metals for tissues and cells were not reported so far. In the present experiments, the analysis of the cytotoxic action of silver-tin alloys and their amalgam in vitro cytological experiments with fertilized eggs and developing embryos of sea urchin, Hemicentrotus pulcherrimus, were examined. When the silver-tin alloy powder was incubated in normal sea water medium there are non or weak cytotoxic reaction upon fertilized eggs and early embryos of sea urchin. Metal mercury in the medium effects remarkable cytotoxic action upon the development of early embryos; the cleavage and early development were delayed and all of the embryos show deformity. Immediately after the alloy powder was triturated with mercury, it shows strong cytotoxic action as the metal mercury was incubated, however, the cytotoxic action decreased and almost disappeared in 5 hours after trituration. The mechanism of cytotoxic action and the adequacy of clinical application of the amalgam were discussed. PMID:1058261

  20. Sealing ability of MTA, Super EBA, Vitremer and amalgam as root-end filling materials.

    PubMed

    Pereira, Cecília Luiz; Cenci, Maximiliano Sérgio; Demarco, Flávio Fernando

    2004-01-01

    This study evaluated the root-end sealing ability of mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA Angelus), reinforced zinc oxide-eugenol cement (Super EBA), resin-modified glass ionomer (Vitremer) and zinc-free amalgam (GS-80) (control). The root canals of eighty human lower molars were accessed, cleansed, shaped and obturated. Apexes were resected and cavities were prepared. Teeth were divided into 4 groups of 40 cavities, root-end filled with the materials, and immersed in methylene blue for 72 h at 37 degrees C. Roots were then sectioned transversally at each millimeter and evaluated under magnification, observing the dye penetration in each section. Data were evaluated using Kruskal-Wallis test at a 5% level of significance, showing the differences among all materials (p < 0.001). The crescent order of microleakage was MTA < Vitremer < Super EBA < amalgam. Higher leakage levels were observed in the first millimeter sections of amalgam, Vitremer and MTA, when compared with the third millimeter section (p < 0.05). PMID:16089263

  1. Element sensitive X-ray micro tomography for determination of the metal diffusion in teeth with amalgam fillings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masschaele, B.; Baechler, S.; Cauwels, P.; Cloetens, P.; Dierick, M.; Jolie, J.; Mondelaers, W.

    2001-06-01

    Element sensitive X-ray tomography has been applied to detect the metal diffusion from the amalgam tooth filling into the tooth. By performing tomographies with energies above and below the K-edges of the various metals of the amalgam, it is possible to determine their distribution. Here presented are the results of measurements at ID15 and ID19 of the ESRF. To improve the sensitivity of our measurements a method for contrast enhancement for projections was developed.

  2. Comparison of chlorine and chloramine in the release of mercury from dental amalgam.

    PubMed

    Stone, Mark E; Scott, John W; Schultz, Stephen T; Berry, Denise L; Wilcoxon, Monte; Piwoni, Marv; Panno, Brent; Bordson, Gary

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this project was to compare the ability of chlorine (HOCl/OCl(-)) and monochloramine (NH(2)Cl) to mobilize mercury from dental amalgam. Two types of amalgam were used in this investigation: laboratory-prepared amalgam and samples obtained from dental-unit wastewater. For disinfectant exposure simulations, 0.5 g of either the laboratory-generated or clinically obtained amalgam waste was added to 250 mL amber bottles. The amalgam samples were agitated by end-over-end rotation at 30 rpm in the presence of 1 mg/L chlorine, 10 mg/L chlorine, 1 mg/L monochloramine, 10 mg/L monochloramine, or deionized water for intervals of 0 h, 2 h, 4 h, 8 h, and 24 h for the clinically obtained amalgam waste samples and 4 h and 24 h for the laboratory-prepared samples. Chlorine and monochloramine concentrations were measured with a spectrophotometer. Samples were filtered through a 0.45 microm membrane filter and analyzed for mercury with USEPA standard method 245.7. When the two sample types were combined, the mean mercury level in the 1 mg/L chlorine group was 0.020 mg/L (n=25, SD=0.008). The 10 mg/L chlorine group had a mean mercury concentration of 0.59 mg/L (n=25, SD=1.06). The 1 mg/L chloramine group had a mean mercury level of 0.023 mg/L (n=25, SD=0.010). The 10 mg/L chloramine group had a mean mercury level of 0.024 mg/L (n=25, SD=0.011). Independent samples t-tests showed that there was a significant difference between the natural log mercury measurements of 10 mg/L chlorine compared to those of 1 mg/L and 10 mg/L chloramine. Changing from chlorine to chloramine disinfection at water treatment plants would not be expected to produce substantial increases in dissolved mercury levels in dental-unit wastewater. PMID:18973926

  3. Bonding of a light-curing glass-ionomer cement to dental amalgam.

    PubMed

    Aboush, Y E; Elderton, R J

    1991-04-01

    In the clinical situation, the need may arise for placement of a glass-ionomer cement over an existing amalgam restoration. This study assessed the tensile bond strength of a recently developed light-curing glass ionomer (Vitrabond) to dental amalgam (Dispersalloy), with and without the use of Scotchbond dual cure as an intermediary. Amalgam adherend specimens were prepared, then aged in water at 37 degrees C for seven days. Immediately before being bonded, the amalgam surfaces were finished flat on 600-grit paper. Forty specimens were used for bonding in this condition, and another 40 were covered with a thin layer of Scotchbond, which was light-cured for 10 s. The glass-ionomer was applied to the adherend surface in two increments, each light-cured for 30 s. After being bonded, half the specimens were stored in water at 37 degrees C, while half were stored in an environment of 95 +/- 5% RH at 37 degrees C. The 24-hour tensile bond strengths, in MPa, were: for specimens stored in water, without Scotchbond 8.4 +/- 1.2, with Scotchbond 4.7 +/- 1.3%; and for specimens stored in 95 +/- 5% RH, without Scotchbond 9.2 +/- 2.1, with Scotchbond 4.6 +/- 1.5. The data were further analyzed by the Weibull distribution function. It was concluded that a strong reliable bond can be achieved between Vitrabond and set Dispersalloy, and that the use of Scotchbond as an intermediary is contra-indicated. PMID:1936641

  4. Theoretical models of mercury dissolution from dental amalgams in neutral and acidic flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keanini, Russell G.; Ferracane, Jack L.; Okabe, Toru

    2001-06-01

    This article reports an experimental and theoretical investigation of mercury dissolution from dental amalgams immersed in neutral (noncorrosive) and acidic (corrosive) flows. Atomic absorption spectrophotometric measurements of Hg loss indicate that in neutral flow, surface oxide films formed in air prior to immersion persist and effectively suppress significant mercury release. In acidic (pH 1) flows, by contrast, oxide films are unstable and dissolve; depending on the amalgam’s material composition, particularly its copper content, two distinct mercury release mechanisms are initiated. In low copper amalgam, high initial mercury release rates are observed and appear to reflect preferential mercury dissolution from unstable Sn8Hg ( γ 2) grains within the amalgam matrix. In high copper amalgam, mercury release rates are initially low, but increase with time. Microscopic examination suggests that this feature reflects corrosion of copper from grains of Cu6Sn5 ( η') and consequent exposure of Ag2Hg3 ( γ 1) grains; the latter serve as internal mercury release sites and become more numerous as corrosion proceeds. Three theoretical models are proposed in order to explain observed dissolution characteristics. Model I, applicable to high and low copper amalgams in neutral flow, assumes that mercury dissolution is mediated by solid diffusion within the amalgam, and that a thin oxide film persists on the amalgam’s surface and lumps diffusive in-film transport into an effective convective boundary condition. Model II, applicable to low copper amalgam in acidic flow, assumes that the amalgam’s external oxide film dissolves on a short time scale relative to the experimental observation period; it neglects corrosive suppression of mercury transport. Model III, applicable to high copper amalgam in acidic flow, assumes that internal mercury release sites are created by corrosion of copper in η' grains and that corrosion proceeds via an oxidation-reduction reaction

  5. In vitro lymphoproliferative assays with HgCl2 cannot identify patients with systemic symptoms attributed to dental amalgam.

    PubMed

    Cederbrant, K; Gunnarsson, L G; Hultman, P; Norda, R; Tibbling-Grahn, L

    1999-08-01

    Dental amalgam is suspected, by some exposed individuals, to cause various systemic psychological, sensory, and neurological symptoms. Since not all amalgam-bearers experience such reactions, an individual characteristic--for example, a susceptible immune system--might explain these conditions. In vitro lymphocyte proliferation is a valuable tool in the diagnosis of allergy. With HgCl2 as the antigen, however, the test is hampered, because Hg2+ can cause unspecific lymphocyte proliferation, optimal at 1.4 to 9.5 micrograms HgCl2/mL. Recently, the use of suboptimal HgCl2 concentrations (< or = 0.5 microgram/mL) has been suggested to circumvent these problems. The main aim of this study was to investigate whether patients with systemic symptoms alleged to result from the presence of dental amalgam differ from healthy controls, with reference to in vitro lymphoproliferative responses to HgCl2 < or = 0.5 microgram/mL. Three different test protocols--lymphocyte transformation test (LTT) in micro- and macro-cultures, and the memory lymphocyte immunostimulation assay (MELISA)--were used. Other immune parameters--such as a standard patch test for dental materials, the number of T- and B-lymphocytes, monocytes, granulocytes, and NK cells in peripheral blood, allergic symptoms, and predisposition--were also investigated. Twenty-three amalgam patients, 30 healthy blood donors with amalgam, ten healthy subjects without amalgam, and nine patients with oral lichen planus (OLP) adjacent to dental amalgam and a positive patch test to Hg0 were tested. None of the investigated immune parameters revealed any significant differences between amalgam patients and controls. The sensitivity of in vitro lymphocyte proliferation ranged from 33 to 67%, with the OLP patients as a positive control group, and the specificity from 0 to 70% for healthy controls with a negative patch test to Hg0. Thus, despite the use of HgCl2 < or = 0.5 microgram/mL, a high frequency of positive results was

  6. The Chemistry of Modern Dental Filling Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nicholson, John W.; Anstice, H. Mary

    1999-11-01

    The chemistry underpinning modern tooth-colored dental fillings is described. Two broad groups of material are covered, the so-called composite resins and the glass-ionomer cements. Composite resins consist of bulky difunctional monomers together with high loadings of powdered inorganic fillers, and they set by addition polymerization. Glass-ionomers consist of aqueous polymeric acids, such as polyacrylic acid, plus basic glass powders. They set by a neutralization reaction, but leave a substantial amount of the glass unreacted, to act as reinforcing filler. Various attempts have been made to combine the attractive properties of these materials, and the different types of hybrids of them are described. The importance of chemistry to this important branch of health care is emphasized.

  7. Dental metal-induced innate reactivity in keratinocytes.

    PubMed

    Mortazavi, S M J; Mortazavi, Ghazal; Paknahad, Maryam

    2016-06-01

    In their paper that is published in Toxicology in Vitro, Rachmawati et al. have recently claimed that in spite of the growing concern about the safety of amalgam, negative reports about the health effects of dental amalgam are still scarce or controversial. Substantial evidence indicates that mercury release from dental amalgam fillings may adversely affect human health. Over the past years, we have shown that exposure to electromagnetic fields (EMFs) can increase the release of mercury from dental amalgam fillings. It is worth mentioning that the results of investigations on the microleakage of amalgam fillings following MRI have confirmed our results. Furthermore, exposure to X-rays as a part of the electromagnetic spectrum has also been linked to increased mercury release from dental amalgam fillings. Considering the explosive rise in human exposure to electromagnetic fields, the role of human exposure to EMF as a key factor in increasing the release of mercury from dental amalgam restorations cannot be simply ignored. PMID:26928047

  8. Clinical Evaluation of Reasons for Replacement of Amalgam Restorations in Patients Referring to a Dental School in Iran

    PubMed Central

    Pouralibaba, Firoz; Joulaei, Mohammad; Kashefimehr, Atabak; Pakdel, Farzaneh; Jamali, Zahra; Esmaeili, Ali

    2010-01-01

    Background and aims The present study evaluated the most common reasons for replacing amalgam restorations in a university clinic. Materials and methods A total of 217 restorations which needed to be replaced were clinically and radiographically evaluated in a period of 4 months. The frequencies of reasons for replacing amalgam restorations were calculated: The assessed items included recurrent caries, tooth structure fracture (functional or non-functional cusps), amalgam bulk fracture, amalgam marginal fracture, proximal overhangs, and esthetics. Data were analyzed using Fischer’s exact test. Results Both in vital teeth and teeth which had undergone root canal therapy, the most common reason for amalgam replacement was cusp fracture, with the fracture of non-functional cusps being statistically significant. Recurrent caries was the second most common reason for amalgam replacement. In Class I restorations, the most common reasons were recurrent caries and esthetics, with no statistical significance. The most frequent problem in Class II restorations was fracture of non-functional cusps, with a statistical significance in three-surface restorations. Conclusion According to the results, failing to reduce undermined cusps and neglectful caries removal are the reasons for majority of amalgam restoration replacements. These issues should be emphasized in the curriculum for dental students and continuing education courses. PMID:22991598

  9. Effects of mercury release from amalgam dental restorations during cremation on soil mercury levels of three New Zealand crematoria

    SciTech Connect

    Nieschmidt, A.K.; Kim, N.D.

    1997-05-01

    A vast amount of research has been undertaken in the last 15-20 years on the corrosion reactions occurring in dental amalgam, release of mercury from amalgam restorations, and the toxic effects of this released mercury on the human body. However, one environmental aspect of amalgam dental restorations that has not received a great deal of attention is the release of mercury during cremation. Mercury is liberated during cremation both because dental amalgams are unstable at cremation temperatures (650-700{degrees}C) and because the free mercury metal is highly volatile. In New Zealand, 58% of deaths are followed by cremation and this figure is likely to rise in the future. This increasing use of cremation as the method of corpse disposal, coupled with the fact that each amalgam restoration is approximately 50% mercury, implies that a significant amount of mercury may be emitted into the environment every year. This study examines mercury released from crematoria in New Zealand. 20 refs., 2 figs., 5 tabs.

  10. In vitro fabrication of dental filling nanopowder by green route and its antibacterial activity against dental pathogens.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jeong-Ho; Velmurugan, Palanivel; Park, Jung-Hee; Lee, Kui-Jae; Jin, Jong-Sik; Park, Yool-Jin; Bang, Keuk-Soo; Oh, Byung-Taek

    2016-06-01

    The aim of this study was to introduce novel Sn, Cu, Hg, and Ag nanopowders (NPs) and a composite nanopowder (NP) synthesized using Salvia miltiorrhiza Bunge (SM) root extract as a reducing and capping agent to improve the antibacterial property of dental filling materials. All of the NPs obtained were characterized using a scanning transmission electron microscope (STEM), and energy dispersive X-ray (EDX) spectrum imaging was performed to map the elemental distributions of the NP composite. Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy was performed to identify the role of various functional groups in all of the obtained NPs and the phyto-compound responsible for the reduction of various metal ions. The X-ray diffraction (XRD) patterns clearly illustrated the crystalline phase of the synthesized NP. The antibacterial properties of the synthesized Sn, Cu, Hg, Ag, composite NP, SM root extract, and commercial amalgam powder were evaluated. The Cu, composite NP, SM root extract and Ag NP displayed excellent antibacterial activity against dental bacteria Streptococcus mutans and Lactobacillus acidophilus. The results of this study require further evaluation for signs of metal toxicity in appropriate animal models. However, the results are encouraging for the application of metal NPs as suitable alternatives for antibiotics and disinfectants, especially in dental filling materials. PMID:27085055

  11. Cytogenetic genotoxic investigation in peripheral blood lymphocytes of subjects with dental composite restorative filling materials.

    PubMed

    Pettini, F; Savino, M; Corsalini, M; Cantore, S; Ballini, A

    2015-01-01

    Dental composite resins are biomaterials commonly used to aesthetically restore the structure and function of teeth impaired by caries, erosion, or fracture. Residual monomers released from resin restorations as a result of incomplete polymerization processes interact with living oral tissues. The objective of this study was to evaluate the genotoxicity of a common dental composite material (Enamel Plus-HFO), in subjects with average 13 filled teeth with the same material, compared to a control group (subjects having neither amalgam nor composite resin fillings). Genotoxicity assessment of composite materials was carried out in vitro in human peripheral blood leukocytes using sister-chromatid exchange (SCE) and chromosomal aberrations (CA) cytogenetic tests. The results of correlation and multiple regression analyses confirmed the absence of a relationship between SCE/cell, high frequency of SCE(HFC) or CA frequencies and exposure to dental composite materials. These results indicate that composite resins used for dental restorations differ extensively in vivo in their cytotoxic and genotoxic potential and in their ability to affect chromosomal integrity, cell-cycle progression, DNA replication and repair. PMID:25864763

  12. Effects of the Nd:YAG laser on amalgam dental restorative material: a preliminary study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cernavin, Igor; Hogan, Sean P.

    1996-09-01

    The Nd:YAG laser has been marketed as an instrument for use on both hard and soft dental tissues. Its potential for use on hard tissues is limited but it may be the instrument of choice for use in certain soft tissue procedures. The aim of this study was to examine the effects of the Nd:YAG laser on amalgam restorations which frequently occur on tooth surfaces adjacent to areas of soft tissue which may be subjected to the laser. The amalgam used was Tytin. The laser firing was controlled by a computer and a constant repetition rate of 40 Hz was used. Energy per pulse was altered as follows, 30 mJ, 40 mJ, 60 mJ, 80 mJ, 120 mJ and 140 mJ. Exposure times of 0.05 sec, 0.125 sec, 0.25 sec, 0.5 sec, 1 sec, 2 sec, 3 sec, 4 sec, and 5 sec were used. The width of defect was measured using a Nikon measurescope with 10x magnification and it was established that the damage threshold lies between 0.125 sec and 0.25 sec for 30 mJ per pulse. The data was analyzed using a one way ANOVA statistical test. There was a significant correlation between the width of the defect and energy per pulse setting as well as exposure time. The findings indicate that amalgam restorations are prone to damage from inadvertent laser exposure and clinicians must take measures to protect such restorations during lasing of soft tissues.

  13. Qualitative Analysis of Teeth and Evaluation of Amalgam Elements Penetration into Dental Matrix Using Laser Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Gazmeh, Meisam; Bahreini, Maryam; Tavassoli, Seyed Hassan; Asnaashari, Mohammad

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: In this study, laser induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) is used for qualitative analysis of healthy and carious teeth. The technique of laser ablation is receiving increasing attention for applications in dentistry, specifically for the treatment of teeth such as drilling of micro-holes and plaque removal. Methods: A quality-switched (Q-switched) Neodymium-Doped Yttrium Aluminium Garnet (Nd:YAG) laser operating at wavelength of 1064 nm, pulse energy of 90 mJ/pulse, repetition rate of 2Hz and pulse duration of 6 ns was used in this analysis. In the process of ablation a luminous micro-plasma is normally generated which may be exploited for on-line elemental analysis via laser induced breakdown spectroscopy technique. We propose laser induced breakdown spectroscopy as a rapid, in situ and easy method for monitoring drilling process. Results: The results of elemental analysis show the presence of some trace elements in teeth including P, Ca, Mg, Zn, K, Sr, C, Na, H, O and the permeability of some amalgam (teeth filling materials) elements including Hg, Ag, Cu and Sn into dental matrix. Conclusion: This study addresses the ability of LIBS in elemental analysis of teeth and its feasibility in acute identification of healthy and carious teeth during drilling process for future clinical applications. PMID:25987971

  14. The influence of amalgam fillings on the detection of approximal caries by cone beam CT: in vitro study

    PubMed Central

    Dyszkiewicz Konwińska, M; Owecka, M; Krzyżostaniak, J; Surdacka, A

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: The aim of this CBCT investigation on the detection of caries was to assess the influence of artefacts produced by the presence of amalgam fillings located in the vicinity. Methods: 102 non-cavitated pre-molar and molar teeth were placed in blocks of silicone with approximal contacts consisting of 3 sound or carious teeth and 1 mesial–occlusal–distal amalgam-filled tooth in-between. Radiographs of all the teeth were recorded using the CBCT system (NewTom™ 3G; QR Srl, Verona, Italy; field of view, 9 inches). Data from the CBCT unit were reconstructed and sectioned in the mesiodistal tooth plane. Images were evaluated twice by two observers, using a five-step confidence scale. After the CBCT examination, the teeth were individually sectioned in the mesiodistal direction with a diamond saw. Using a light microscope at ×40 magnification, the true morphological status of all approximal surfaces was established. Results: Sensitivity of the CBCT for the detection of caries on surfaces located proximally and distally to an amalgam filing ranged from 0.27 to 0.30 for enamel and from 0.47 to 0.56 for dentin. Specificity values for enamel proximal and distal lesions were 0.48 and 0.53, respectively, for enamel and 0.33 to 0.38, respectively, for proximal and distal dentin cases. Intra-observer reliability was 0.84, and interobserver reliability was 0.49. Conclusions: Owing to its low specificity, scans from a CBCT examination should not be used to determine the presence of demineralization of the tooth surface when amalgam fillings are present in the region of interest. PMID:24986630

  15. Hg, Bi, Cu and Zn distribution in human teeth treated by dental amalgam measured by synchrotron microprobe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carvalho, M. L.; Marques, J. P.; Brito, J.; Casaca, C.; Cunha, A. S.

    2002-11-01

    Human teeth restored with dental amalgam were analysed by a synchrotron microprobe to evaluate the diffusion of its major constituents, Cu, Zn and Hg, throughout the tooth structures. We measured the elemental distribution inside the tooth from the root to the enamel, specially the region around the amalgam, after its total removal. Hg is present only in restored teeth and concentration profiles show strongly increased levels of this element close to the amalgam region, reaching 500 μg g -1 in one or two cases, decreasing strongly to the inner part of the tooth. Pb concentration profiles do not seem to be affected by metallic amalgam. Very high concentrations of Bi were found in one of the restored teeth, reaching more than 2000 μg g -1, decreasing sharply to the outer regions. The distribution of Mn, Fe, Cu and Zn was also determined in order to evaluate elemental influences by amalgam components. No significant changes in elemental concentrations were detected for Mn and Fe between healthy and restored teeth. However, the levels of Zn and Cu are increased in restored teeth. An X-ray fluorescence set-up with microprobe capabilities, 100 μm of spatial resolution and an energy of 18 keV, installed at LURE synchrotron (France) was used.

  16. Magnetic field effects on dental amalgam in divers welding and cutting electrically underwater.

    PubMed

    Ortendahl, T W; Högstedt, P

    1988-11-01

    Divers have for some years been complaining about a metallic taste in the mouth while electrically welding and cutting underwater. This paper reports on results from an assessment of this problem. It was hypothesized that the magnetic fields arising from the welding or cutting current could correlate with the reported symptoms. The intraoral magnetic flux density was calculated to 1.15 mT, at 650 ADC, in a normal cutting situation. This was verified in vivo. This magnetic field was shown to contain an AC component that is a candidate for inducing secondary currents in the oral tissues and restorative materials. Five submerged divers exposed to a magnetic field of 0.35 mT did not report any metallic taste. Magnetophosphenes were reported by 1 diver. (Magnetophosphenes are luminous impressions due to excitement of the retina by a magnetic field in addition to or in place of impingement of light rays.) Only a slight shielding effect to magnetic fields was observed due to a copper-brass helmet. An in vitro model for exposure of dental amalgams to magnetic fields was designed. Recommendations for decreasing the magnetic field surrounding the diver in practical work is given. PMID:3227576

  17. The spontaneous regression of palmoplantar pustulosis following removal of dental amalgams: A report of two cases.

    PubMed

    Liu, Fang; Zhang, Min; Lou, Yanfeng; Liu, Haibo; Sang, Hong

    2016-08-01

    Metal allergens are occasionally reported to be associated with palmoplantar pustulosis. We describe two severe, therapy-resistant, chronic cases of palmoplantar pustulosis induced by metal dental fillings. Both patients' clinical findings and symptoms regressed following the removal of their metal teeth. A patch test examination revealed positive reactions to metal allergens in both cases (in Case 1 the positive reactions were to cobalt chloride hexahydrate and nickel sulfate and in Case 2 the positive reaction was to nickel sulphate). Our studies suggest that metal allergens may play an important role in the pathogenesis of palmoplantar pustulosis. PMID:26081174

  18. The effect of the cooling rate of dental alloys on their amalgamation properties.

    PubMed

    Johnson, L B; Carwile, A C

    1978-05-01

    Silver-tin alloys of various compositions (60-80 atomic % Ag) have been prepared from the melt using cooling rates from about 50 degrees C/hr to about 10(6) degrees C/sec. Structural differences due to the different cooling rates were shown by metallographic and x-ray diffraction techniques. From each composition and cooling rate, powders were then prepared and amalgamated. The amalgams were tested for Hg content, dimensional change during setting, and tensile strength. Changes in cooling rates had some effect on the relative amounts of phases present but primarily affected the grain sizes. In general, the faster the cooling rate, the smaller the grain size; the smaller the grain size, the faster and more uniform the amalgamation; the more uniform the amalgamation, the stronger the amalgam. Storage of the alloy powders at room temperatures slowed their amalgamation rates, destroyed their uniformity,and resulted in weaker amalgams. However, no phase changes were observed by x-ray diffraction in the freshly comminuted alloys after aging at room temperature for two months. PMID:670259

  19. British Society of Prosthodontics Debate on the Implications of the Minamata Convention on Mercury to Dental Amalgam--Should our Patients be Worried?.

    PubMed

    Austin, Rupert; Eliyas, Shiyana; Burke, F J Trevor; Taylor, Phil; Toner, James; Briggs, Peter

    2016-01-01

    In 2013, the Minamata Convention on Mercury called for a global phase-down of amalgam use, with a view to reduce environmental mercury pollution. This will significantly impact UK dentistry, given the still extensive use of amalgam in U.K. general dental practice. However, until now there has been little national discussion or debate. In Spring 2015, The British Society of Prosthodontics dedicated a significant part of its Annual Conference to debating the implications of this issue. Clinical case examples were discussed with audience interaction and voting facilitated using innovative Audience Response System Technology. A remarkable range of concerns and opinions were given. The debate elicited specific concerns amongst clinicians regarding the suitability of mercury-free alternatives to amalgam; particularly where cavities are large and extend beneath the gingival anatomy. There are also anecdotal reports of Dental Foundation (DF) dentists not being adequately taught the use of dental amalgam in undergraduate dental schools. CPD/CLINICAL RELEVANCE: Many clinicians, especially those treating patients for whom moisture control is challenging, feel that amalgam should remain available for clinicians to choose in certain clinical circumstances for the restoration of posterior teeth, even in the event of a complete phase-down. PMID:27024898

  20. Bonding dental amalgam to a light-curing glass-ionomer liner/base.

    PubMed

    Aboush, Y E; Elderton, R J

    1991-03-23

    At a time when amalgam is used widely, yet when the criteria for its use are still evolving, the incorporation of an element of adhesive bonding between the amalgam and the base material may come into greater prominence and aid the general move towards more conservative new or replacement cavity preparations. This study assessed the 24-hour tensile bond strength of amalgam (Dispersalloy) to a light-curing glass-ionomer liner/base (Vitrabond), using Scotchbond dual cure, uncured Vitrabond or Vitrabond liquid as intermediaries. Using the Weibull distribution function, it was found that uncured Vitrabond was a better intermediary than Scotchbond or Vitrabond liquid. The bond strengths obtained with uncured Vitrabond intermediary were of the same order as those which can be expected between a glass-ionomer cement and dentine. This suggests scope for developing techniques for bonding amalgam to parts of cavity preparations. PMID:2021495

  1. Making High-Tensile-Strength Amalgam Components

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grugel, Richard

    2008-01-01

    Structural components made of amalgams can be made to have tensile strengths much greater than previously known to be possible. Amalgams, perhaps best known for their use in dental fillings, have several useful attributes, including room-temperature fabrication, corrosion resistance, dimensional stability, and high compressive strength. However, the range of applications of amalgams has been limited by their very small tensile strengths. Now, it has been discovered that the tensile strength of an amalgam depends critically on the sizes and shapes of the particles from which it is made and, consequently, the tensile strength can be greatly increased through suitable choice of the particles. Heretofore, the powder particles used to make amalgams have been, variously, in the form of micron-sized spheroids or flakes. The tensile reinforcement contributed by the spheroids and flakes is minimal because fracture paths simply go around these particles. However, if spheroids or flakes are replaced by strands having greater lengths, then tensile reinforcement can be increased significantly. The feasibility of this concept was shown in an experiment in which electrical copper wires, serving as demonstration substitutes for copper powder particles, were triturated with gallium by use of a mortar and pestle and the resulting amalgam was compressed into a mold. The tensile strength of the amalgam specimen was then measured and found to be greater than 10(exp 4) psi (greater than about 69 MPa). Much remains to be done to optimize the properties of amalgams for various applications through suitable choice of starting constituents and modification of the trituration and molding processes. The choice of wire size and composition are expected to be especially important. Perusal of phase diagrams of metal mixtures could give insight that would enable choices of solid and liquid metal constituents. Finally, whereas heretofore, only binary alloys have been considered for amalgams

  2. Endodontic re-treatment associated with the elimination of amalgam root-end filling through sinus tracts: a report of two cases.

    PubMed

    Soares, Janir Alves; Nunes, Eduardo; Silveira, Frank Ferreira; Santos, Suelleng Maria Cunha; Oliveira, Maiolino Thomaz Fonseca

    2009-08-01

    Two patients presented with complaints of recurrent drainage of purulent exudate from sinus tracts, inflammation and pain after endodontic re-treatment of the maxillary left (Case 1) and right (Case 2) lateral incisors. The periapical lesions persisted after apical curettage, apicectomy and root-end filling with silver amalgam. Radiographic examination exposed the poor quality of the endodontic treatments and the silver amalgam root-end fillings, which were associated with periapical radiolucent areas in both teeth. The sinus tract persisted after root canal cleaning and shaping, followed by a calcium hydroxide root canal dressing. The root-end fillings were periapically dislodged with endodontic K-files, and showed progressive displacement by sinus tracts up to elimination in the oral cavity. Follow ups of 42 and 65 months post procedure revealed clinical disappearance of the symptoms, sinus tracts and exudates, and radiographs revealed that the repair process of the periapical radiolucent areas was quite advanced. PMID:19703076

  3. Beeswax as Dental Filling on a Neolithic Human Tooth

    PubMed Central

    Bernardini, Federico; Tuniz, Claudio; Coppa, Alfredo; Mancini, Lucia; Dreossi, Diego; Eichert, Diane; Turco, Gianluca; Biasotto, Matteo; Terrasi, Filippo; De Cesare, Nicola; Hua, Quan; Levchenko, Vladimir

    2012-01-01

    Evidence of prehistoric dentistry has been limited to a few cases, the most ancient dating back to the Neolithic. Here we report a 6500-year-old human mandible from Slovenia whose left canine crown bears the traces of a filling with beeswax. The use of different analytical techniques, including synchrotron radiation computed micro-tomography (micro-CT), Accelerator Mass Spectrometry (AMS) radiocarbon dating, Infrared (IR) Spectroscopy and Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM), has shown that the exposed area of dentine resulting from occlusal wear and the upper part of a vertical crack affecting enamel and dentin tissues were filled with beeswax shortly before or after the individual’s death. If the filling was done when the person was still alive, the intervention was likely aimed to relieve tooth sensitivity derived from either exposed dentine and/or the pain resulting from chewing on a cracked tooth: this would provide the earliest known direct evidence of therapeutic-palliative dental filling. PMID:23028670

  4. The development of mercury- and selenium-containing deposits in the kidneys following implantation of dental amalgams in guinea pigs.

    PubMed Central

    Eley, B. M.; Cox, S. W.

    1986-01-01

    Examination of light microscopical sections of the kidneys of guinea pigs with chronic exposure to mercury as the result of the breakdown of subcutaneous implants of powdered dental amalgam demonstrated the development of black, refractile deposits in the cytoplasm and nuclei of cells in both the straight and convoluted portions of the proximal tubule. The more numerous cytoplasmic deposits were of a particulate nature with dimensions of approximately 1 microgram. The nuclear deposits, which appeared later but which were relatively more common in longer-term animals, took the form of prominent inclusions, 1 to 3 micrograms in diameter. The ratio of nuclear to cytoplasmic deposits was higher in animals receiving high copper as compared with conventional amalgam. At electron microscopical level, the cytoplasmic deposits were seen to consist of collections of fine particles within lysosomes. Similar deposits were also found in far smaller numbers in lysosomes in collecting duct cells. The nuclear inclusions in proximal tubular cells were made up of closely packed electron dense granules. X-ray microanalysis showed both lysosomal and nuclear deposits to contain mercury and selenium. The association of mercury with selenium, which was present in the animals' diet at low levels, probably aided the microscopical visualisation of the deposits. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 Fig. 6 Fig. 7 PMID:3026428

  5. Lichenoid reaction associated to amalgam restoration.

    PubMed

    Segura-Egea, Juan José; Bullón-Fernández, Pedro

    2004-01-01

    Hypersensitivity to mercury associated with amalgam restorations may occur and present in one of two different ways. Most commonly it presents as an oral lichenoid reaction affecting oral mucosa in direct contact with an amalgam restoration and represents a delayed, type IV, cell mediated immune response to mercury or one of the other constituents of the dental amalgam. We report a case of oral lichenoid reaction associated to amalgam restoration. A 38 year-old woman presented a caries lesion of tooth #37. A Blacks class I preparation was performed and filled with amalgam. After 19 months, intra-oral examination revealed atrophic lesion, lightly erythematous, affecting the left buccal mucous. The lesion contacted directly with the amalgam restoration in the lower first molar. The right buccal mucosa was normal. His medical history was unremarkable, he was taking no medication and had no known allergies. However, the patient had felt certain rare sensation in that zone when eating sharp meals. Biopsy showed histological changes compatible with oral lichen planus. The patient decided not to change again the restoration, because she did not have important annoyances and she did not wish to be treated again. Other restorations were performed with composite resins, and no reaction was evidenced in the mucosa. PMID:15580119

  6. Comparison of the sealing capabilities of Ketac-silver and extra high copper alloy amalgam when used as retrograde root canal filling.

    PubMed

    al-Ajam, A D; McGregor, A J

    1993-07-01

    Apical microleakage following reverse retrograde root filling with extra high copper amalgam alloy was compared with that following a silver-glass ionomer retrofilling. The root canals of 56 extracted, single-rooted anterior human teeth were instrumented and obturated with laterally condensed gutta-percha and zinc oxide-eugenol sealer. Each tooth was apically resected at 45 degrees to its long axis and the root surface isolated with nail varnish. Teeth were divided into three groups. The first group received extra high copper amalgam retrograde fillings, the second group was retrofilled with a silver-glass ionomer, and the control group had no retrograde root filling placed. Following immersion in 1% methylene blue dye at 37 degrees C, the roots were sectioned and dye penetration was measured using an image analyzer. The sealing effectiveness of these materials was determined by their ability to inhibit dye penetration at 24 and 48 h. The results of this study show that a silver glass-ionomer is just as effective as extra high copper amalgam in terms of sealing capability. There was no statistically significant difference between the two materials. PMID:8245758

  7. Use of Mercury in Dental Silver Amalgam: An Occupational and Environmental Assessment

    PubMed Central

    Jamil, Nadia; Ilyas, Samar; Qadir, Abdul; Arslan, Muhammad; Salman, Muhammad; Ahsan, Naveed; Zahid, Hina

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this study was to assess the occupational exposure to mercury in dentistry and associated environmental emission in wastewater of Lahore, Pakistan. A total of ninety-eight blood samples were collected comprising 37 dentists, 31 dental assistants, and 30 controls. Results demonstrate that the dentistry personnel contained significantly higher mean concentration of mercury in their blood samples (dentists: 29.835 µg/L and dental assistants: 22.798 µg/L) compared to that of the controls (3.2769 µg/L). The mean concentration of mercury was found maximum in the blood samples of older age group (62.8 µg/L) in dentists and (44.3 µg/L) in dental assistants. The comparison of mercury concentration among dentists, dental assistants, and controls (pairing based on their ages) revealed that the concentration increased with the age and experience among the dentists and dental assistants. Moreover, the mercury concentration in all the studied dental wastewater samples, collected from twenty-two dental clinics, was found to be exceeding the recommended discharge limit of 0.01 mg/L. Therefore, we recommend that immediate steps must be taken to ensure appropriate preventive measures to avoid mercury vapors in order to prevent potential health hazards to dentistry personnel. Strong regulatory and administrative measures are needed to deal with mercury pollution on emergency basis. PMID:27446955

  8. Use of Mercury in Dental Silver Amalgam: An Occupational and Environmental Assessment.

    PubMed

    Jamil, Nadia; Baqar, Mujtaba; Ilyas, Samar; Qadir, Abdul; Arslan, Muhammad; Salman, Muhammad; Ahsan, Naveed; Zahid, Hina

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this study was to assess the occupational exposure to mercury in dentistry and associated environmental emission in wastewater of Lahore, Pakistan. A total of ninety-eight blood samples were collected comprising 37 dentists, 31 dental assistants, and 30 controls. Results demonstrate that the dentistry personnel contained significantly higher mean concentration of mercury in their blood samples (dentists: 29.835 µg/L and dental assistants: 22.798 µg/L) compared to that of the controls (3.2769 µg/L). The mean concentration of mercury was found maximum in the blood samples of older age group (62.8 µg/L) in dentists and (44.3 µg/L) in dental assistants. The comparison of mercury concentration among dentists, dental assistants, and controls (pairing based on their ages) revealed that the concentration increased with the age and experience among the dentists and dental assistants. Moreover, the mercury concentration in all the studied dental wastewater samples, collected from twenty-two dental clinics, was found to be exceeding the recommended discharge limit of 0.01 mg/L. Therefore, we recommend that immediate steps must be taken to ensure appropriate preventive measures to avoid mercury vapors in order to prevent potential health hazards to dentistry personnel. Strong regulatory and administrative measures are needed to deal with mercury pollution on emergency basis. PMID:27446955

  9. Influence of alloy composition on the hardening of silver-tin dental amalgam.

    PubMed

    Abbott, J R; Miller, D R; Netherway, D J

    1986-01-01

    The objective of the investigation was to examine the reactions of mercury with silver-tin alloys with compositions spanning the phase fields beta, (beta + gamma), gamma, and (gamma + Sn). The experimental methods employed include the application of light microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, and electron probe microanalysis. These techniques were used to investigate the mechanisms of reaction and to identify the nature and morphology of the reaction products formed on bulk specimens of the alloys. The progress and characteristics of the reactions that occur during hardening of amalgams prepared from powders of these alloys were monitored using a high-sensitivity dilatometer. These results were correlated with direct observations on the development of the microstructures. The reaction of mercury with the beta-phase alloy occurred rapidly and resulted in a very marked and rapid expansion during the initial stages of hardening. gamma-Phase alloys, on the other hand, reacted more slowly and contracted markedly during hardening. The behavior of amalgams made from alloys with compositions lying between these two extremes appeared to be explicable in terms of the characteristics of the separate phases from which they were constituted. PMID:3782188

  10. Bacterial leakage of mineral trioxide aggregate as compared with zinc-free amalgam, intermediate restorative material, and Super-EBA as a root-end filling material.

    PubMed

    Fischer, E J; Arens, D E; Miller, C H

    1998-03-01

    Several dye leakage studies have demonstrated the fact that mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA) leaks significantly less than other root-end filling materials. The purpose of this study was to determine the time needed for Serratia marcescens to penetrate a 3 mm thickness of zinc-free amalgam, Intermediate Restorative Material (IRM), Super-EBA, and MTA when these materials were used as root-end filling materials. Fifty-six, single-rooted extracted human teeth were cleaned and shaped with a series of .04 Taper rotary instruments (Pro-series 29 files). Once the canals were prepared in a crown down approach, the ends were resected and 48 root-end cavities were ultrasonically prepared to a 3 mm depth. The teeth were then steam sterilized. Using an aseptic technique, under a laminar air flow hood, the root-end cavities were filled with amalgam, IRM, Super-EBA, and MTA. Four root-end cavities were filled with thermoplasticized gutta-percha without a root canal sealer and served as positive controls. Another four root-end cavities were filled with sticky wax covered with two layers of nail polish and served as negative controls. The teeth were attached to presterilized (ethylene oxide gas) plastic caps, and the root ends were placed into 12-ml vials of phenol red broth. Using a micropipette, a tenth of a milliliter of S. marcescens was placed into the root canal of each tooth. To test the sterility of the apparatus set-up, the root canals of two teeth with test root-end filling materials and one tooth from the positive and negative control groups were filled with sterile saline. The number of days required for S. marcescens to penetrate the four root-end filling materials and grow in the phenol red broth was recorded and analyzed. Most of the samples filled with zinc-free amalgam leaked bacteria in 10 to 63 days. IRM began leaking 28 to 91 days. Super-EBA began leaking 42 to 101 days. MTA did not begin leaking until day 49. At the end of the study, four of the MTA samples

  11. An interview study of persons who attribute health problems to dental filling materials--part two in a triangulation study on 65 and 75 years old Swedes.

    PubMed

    Ståhlnacke, Katri; Söderfeldt, Björn

    2013-01-01

    Dental materials are perceived as a health problem by some people, although scientists do not agree about possible causes of such problems. The aim of this paper was to gain a deeper knowledge and understanding of experiences from living with health problems attributed to dental materials. Addressed topics were the type of problem, both as to general and oral health, perceived causes of the problems,their experienced effect on life, and reception by health professionals. Persons, who in a previous large questionnaire study had answered that they had experienced troubles from dental materials and also agreed to answer follow-up questions, were contacted with a request to take part in an interview study. Eleven individual interviews were held.The interviews were transcribed verbatim and the material was analysed according to the Qualitative Content Analysis method. Meaning units were extracted and condensed into a number of codes, which were combined into subcategories, categories, and themes. Four themes were identified: 1) Long-term oral, mental, and somatic difficulties of varying character, caused by dental amalgam. 2) Problems treated mainly by replacement of dental material in fillings. 3) Powerful effects on life, mostly negative. 4) The reception by health professionals was generally good, but with elements of encounters where they felt treated with nonchalance and lack of respect. In conclusion, people who attributed their health difficulties to dental materials had a complex range of problems and the perception was that amalgam/mercury was the cause of the troubles. The reception from health professionals was perceived as generally good, although with occasional negative experiences. PMID:24341165

  12. [Is amalgam a health hazard?].

    PubMed

    Göhring, Till N; Schicht, Olivier O; Imfeld, Thomas

    2008-02-01

    Since more than 100 years amalgam is successfully used for the functional restoration of decayed teeth. During the early 1990s the use of amalgam has been discredited by a not very objective discussion about small amounts of quicksilver that can evaporate from the material. Recent studies and reviews, however, found little to no correlation between systemic or local diseases and amalgam restorations in man. Allergic reactions are extremely rare. Most quicksilver evaporates during placement and removal of amalgam restorations. Hence it is not recommended to make extensive rehabilitations with amalgam in pregnant or nursing women. To date, there is no dental material, which can fully substitute amalgam as a restorative material. According to present scientific evidence the use of amalgam is not a health hazard. PMID:18517065

  13. Performance of a gaseous detector based energy dispersive X-ray fluorescence imaging system: Analysis of human teeth treated with dental amalgam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silva, A. L. M.; Figueroa, R.; Jaramillo, A.; Carvalho, M. L.; Veloso, J. F. C. A.

    2013-08-01

    Energy dispersive X-ray fluorescence (EDXRF) imaging systems are of great interest in many applications of different areas, once they allow us to get images of the spatial elemental distribution in the samples. The detector system used in this study is based on a micro patterned gas detector, named Micro-Hole and Strip Plate. The full field of view system, with an active area of 28 × 28 mm2 presents some important features for EDXRF imaging applications, such as a position resolution below 125 μm, an intrinsic energy resolution of about 14% full width at half maximum for 5.9 keV X-rays, and a counting rate capability of 0.5 MHz. In this work, analysis of human teeth treated by dental amalgam was performed by using the EDXRF imaging system mentioned above. The goal of the analysis is to evaluate the system capabilities in the biomedical field by measuring the drift of the major constituents of a dental amalgam, Zn and Hg, throughout the tooth structures. The elemental distribution pattern of these elements obtained during the analysis suggests diffusion of these elements from the amalgam to teeth tissues.

  14. High Tensile Strength Amalgams for In-Space Fabrication and Repair

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grugel, Richard N.

    2006-01-01

    Amalgams are well known for their use in dental practice as a tooth filling material. They have a number of useful attributes that include room temperature fabrication, corrosion resistance, dimensional stability, and very good compressive strength. These properties well serve dental needs but, unfortunately, amalgams have extremely poor tensile strength, a feature that severely limits other potential applications. Improved material properties (strength and temperature) of amalgams may have application to the freeform fabrication of repairs or parts that might be necessary during an extended space mission. Advantages would include, but are not limited to: the ability to produce complex parts, a minimum number of processing steps, minimum crew interaction, high yield - minimum wasted material, reduced gravity compatibility, minimum final finishing, safety, and minimum power consumption. The work presented here shows how the properties of amalgams can be improved by changing particle geometries in conjunction with novel engineering metals.

  15. High Tensile Strength Amalgams for In-Space Repair and Fabrication

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grugel, R. N.

    2005-01-01

    Amalgams are defined as an alloy of mercury with one or more other metals. These, along with those based on gallium (also liquid at near room temperature), are widely used in dental practice as a tooth filling material. Amalgams have a number of useful attributes that indude room temperature compounding. corrosion resistance, dimensional stability, and good compressive strength. These properties well serve dental needs but, unfortunately, amalgams have extremely poor tensile strength, a feature that severely limits their applications. The work presented here demonstrates how, by modifying particle geometry, the tensile strength of amalgams can be increased and thus extending the range of potential applications. This is relevant to, for example, the freeform fabrication of replacement parts that might be necessary during an extended space mission. Advantages, i.e. Figures-of-Merit. include the ability to produce complex parts, minimum crew interaction, high yield - minimum wasted material, reduced gravity compatibility, minimum final finishing, safety, and minimum power consumption.

  16. Preparation of dental amalgam and spectral diagnosis of mercury in plasmas-laser in the region of 250 nm - 850 nm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De la Ossa, A.; Pacheco, P.; Sarmiento, R.

    2013-11-01

    In this paper we presents results of the spectral study of plasmas-laser of dental amalgam by technique Laser-induced Breakdown Spectroscopy (LIBS). Plasmas were generated focusing the beam of a Nd: YAG laser on the matrix of the mixture Ag-Sn-Cu and on amalgams with different proportions of mercury (3:2, 5:2, 6:2). Based on the spectral results and reported atomic parameters, became estimation of electron temperature plasmas- laser and their behavior with the concentration of Hg. The estimated values of the electron temperature for the respective proportions were 20 846 K, 19 139 K and 16 872 K, using the distribution of population of Boltzmann energy levels associated with spectral lines, considering conditions Local Thermodinamic Equilibrium (LTE) of plasmas.

  17. DEVELOPMENT AND VERIFICATION OF NEW SOLID DENTAL FILLING TEMPORARY MATERIALS CONTAINING ZINC. FORMULA DEVELOPMENT STAGE.

    PubMed

    Pytko-Polończyk, Jolanta; Antosik, Agata; Zajac, Magdalena; Szlósarczyk, Marek; Krywult, Agnieszka; Jachowicz, Renata; Opoka, Włodzimierz

    2016-01-01

    Caries is the most popular problem affecting teeth and this is the reason why so many temporary dental filling materials are being developed. An example of such filling is zinc oxide paste mixed with eugenol, Thymodentin and Coltosol F®. Zinc-oxide eugenol is used in dentistry because of its multiplied values: it improves heeling of the pulp by dentine bridge formation; has antiseptic properties; is hygroscopic. Because of these advantages compouds of zinc oxide are used as temporary fillings, especially in deep caries lesions when treatment is oriented on support of vital pulp. Temporary dental fillings based on zinc oxide are prepared ex tempone by simple mixing powder (Thymodentin) and eugenol liqiud together or a ready to use paste Coltosol F®. Quantitative composition depends mainly on experience of person who is preparing it, therefore, exact qualitative composition of dental fillings is not replicable. The main goal of the study was to develop appropriate dental fillings in solid form containing set amount of zinc oxide. Within the study, the influence of preparation method on solid dental fillings properties like mechanical properties and zinc ions release were examined. PMID:27476293

  18. Dosimetric consideration for patients with dental filling materials undergoing irradiation of oral cavity using RapidArc: challenges and solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mail, Noor; Albarakati, Y.; Khan, M. Ahmad; Saeedi, F.; Safadi, N.; Al-Ghamdi, S.; Saoudi, A.

    2012-03-01

    In this study, we investigate the effect of dental filling materials (DFM) on RapidArcTM treatment plans and delivery in a patient undergoing radiotherapy treatment. The presence of DFM creates uncertainties in CT number and causes long streaking artifacts in the reconstructed images which greatly affect the dose distribution inside the oral cavity. The influence of extensive dental filling artifacts on dose distribution was performed using a geometrically well defined head and neck IMRT verification phantom (PTW, Freiburg, Germany) together with inserts from DFM (Amalgam, 11.3 g/cm3). The phantom was scanned using Siemens SOMATOM Sensation CT simulator (Siemens AG, Germany) under standard head and neck imaging protocol (120 kV, 120 mAs, voxel size 1×1×2 mm3). Three RapidArcTM plans were created in the Varian Eclipse treatment planning System (TPS) to treat oral cavity using the same CT dataset including; 1) raw CT image, 2) streaking artifacts replaced with a mask of 10 HU and 3) 2 cm thick 6000 HU virtual filter (a volume around the teeth in TPS to mimic extra attenuation). The virtual filter thickness optimization was purely based on measured PDD data acquired with DFM and the calculation in Eclipse Planning System using direct beam. The dose delivery and distribution for the three plans was verified using Gafchromic EBT2 (International Specialty Product, Wayne, NJ, USA) film measurements. The artifact mask and virtual filter around the teeth in the planning was found very useful to reduce the discrepancies between the dose plan and delivery. From clinical point of view, these results can be helpful to understand the increase of mucositis in patient having DFM, and further investigation is underway for clinical solution.

  19. The Changes in Dentists’ Perception and Patient’s Acceptance on Amalgam Restoration in Kurdistan-Iraq: A Questionnaire-based Cross-Sectional Study

    PubMed Central

    Mohammad, Hawzhen Masoud; Mohammad, Kale Masoud

    2015-01-01

    Background There has been considerable controversy concerning the health risks and benefits of utilizing mercury-containing amalgam. Across the developing countries, a reduction in the use of dental amalgam in oral health care provision is expected. Purpose Assessment of dentists’ and patient’s attitude of dental amalgam regarding attractiveness, perceived health, and treatment preferences in Kurdistan, Iraq. Materials and Methods A 4-page questionnaire comprised two parts, specific for dentist and patient were structured and delivered to each dentist oneself. Both open-ended and close-ended questions about the treatment needs of patients, uses of amalgam and its alternative, the properties and usefulness of different materials. Patient’s acceptance was assessed by means of structured questionnaire prepared based on commonly asked questions from routinely daily practice. Questions on the type of filling material in their mouth, previous knowledge of mercury in dental amalgam and disappointment due to mercury hazard and toxicity. They were to indicate their acceptance with filling their cavities by dental amalgam with or without prior information about its mercury content. This part was also accomplished by the dentists participated in this survey. Results Out of 185 dentists shared, only 39 (21.1%) indicated that amalgam presents no harm for the dentists and patients. While majority of dentists 85 (45.9%) were uncertain about this issue. Amalgam was selected most often 107 (57.8%) as the material of choice for restoring posterior teeth. About 94(50.8%) and 85(45.9%) of the practitioners primarily used glass ionomer/resin-reinforced glass ionomer and composite, respectively. Among 1850 patients received treatment, only 450 (24.32%) claimed to have heard about adverse reactions to dental amalgams. Those who believed it to be safe were 200 (10.82%).Acceptance towards amalgam was 62%. Conclusion While amalgam was the most common material used for posterior

  20. Surface roughness characterization of dental fillings: a diffractive analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    April, Gilbert V.; Bouchard, Michel; Doucet, Michel

    1993-02-01

    The large number of new materials such as amalgams and the variety of techniques for finishing and polishing in operative dentistry has stimulated interest in simple, nondestructive methods of surface roughness evaluation. We studied an optical method based on the scattering of reflected coherent light on prepared samples of composite resins submitted to different surface treatments. The method should be able to measure the degree of flatness of the samples, thus enabling a classification procedure according to a figure of merit to be defined. The diffraction properties of such moderately rough surfaces has been correlated with mechanical profilometer measurements of the residual granular structure after polishing. Different surface treatments of composite resins result in distinctive levels of surface flatness, and it is shown that a relation between the intensity of the normalized specular reflection of a beam of coherent light and the rms surface roughness can be established for characterization purposes.

  1. Oral Lichenoid Contact Lesions to Mercury and Dental Amalgam—A Review

    PubMed Central

    McParland, Helen; Warnakulasuriya, Saman

    2012-01-01

    Human oral mucosa is subjected to many noxious stimuli. One of these substances, in those who have restorations, is dental amalgam which contains mercury. This paper focuses on the local toxic effects of amalgam and mercury from dental restorations. Components of amalgam may, in rare instances, cause local side effects or allergic reactions referred to as oral lichenoid lesions (OLLs). OLLs to amalgams are recognised as hypersensitivity reactions to low-level mercury exposure. The use of patch testing to identify those susceptible from OLL is explored, and recommendations for removing amalgam fillings, when indicated are outlined. We conclude that evidence does not show that exposure to mercury from amalgam restorations poses a serious health risk in humans, except for an exceedingly small number of hypersensitivity reactions that are discussed. PMID:22888200

  2. Mechanical Properties Comparing Composite Fiber Length to Amalgam

    PubMed Central

    Petersen, Richard C.; Liu, Perng-Ru

    2016-01-01

    Photocure fiber-reinforced composites (FRCs) with varying chopped quartz-fiber lengths were incorporated into a dental photocure zirconia-silicate particulate-filled composite (PFC) for mechanical test comparisons with a popular commercial spherical-particle amalgam. FRC lengths included 0.5-mm, 1.0 mm, 2.0 mm, and 3.0 mm all at a constant 28.2 volume percent. Four-point fully articulated fixtures were used according to American Standards Test Methods with sample dimensions of 2×2×50 mm3 across a 40 mm span to provide sufficient Euler flexural bending and prevent top-load compressive shear error. Mechanical properties for flexural strength, modulus, yield strength, resilience, work of fracture, critical strain energy release, critical stress intensity factor, and strain were obtained for comparison. Fiber length subsequently correlated with increasing all mechanical properties, p < 1.1×10−5. Although the modulus was significantly statistically higher for amalgam than all composites, all FRCs and even the PFC had higher values than amalgam for all other mechanical properties. Because amalgams provide increased longevity during clinical use compared to the standard PFCs, modulus would appear to be a mechanical property that might sufficiently reduce margin interlaminar shear stress and strain-related microcracking that could reduce failure rates. Also, since FRCs were tested with all mechanical properties that statistically significantly increased over the PFC, new avenues for future development could be provided toward surpassing amalgam in clinical longevity.

  3. SU-E-T-365: Dosimetric Impact of Dental Amalgam CT Image Artifacts On IMRT and VMAT Head and Neck Plans

    SciTech Connect

    Cao, N; Young, L; Parvathaneni, U; Liao, J; Richard, P; Ford, E; Sandison, G

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: The presence of high density dental amalgam in patient CT image data sets causes dose calculation errors for head and neck (HN) treatment planning. This study assesses and compares dosimetric variations in IMRT and VMAT treatment plans due to dental artifacts. Methods: Sixteen HN patients with similar treatment sites (oropharynx), tumor volume and extensive dental artifacts were divided into two groups: IMRT (n=8, 6 to 9 beams) and VMAT (n=8, 2 arcs with 352° rotation). All cases were planned with the Pinnacle 9.2 treatment planning software using the collapsed cone convolution superposition algorithm and a range of prescription dose from 60 to 72Gy. Two different treatment plans were produced, each based on one of two image sets: (a)uncorrected; (b)dental artifacts density overridden (set to 1.0g/cm{sup 3}). Differences between the two treatment plans for each of the IMRT and VMAT techniques were quantified by the following dosimetric parameters: maximum point dose, maximum spinal cord and brainstem dose, mean left and right parotid dose, and PTV coverage (V95%Rx). Average differences generated for these dosimetric parameters were compared between IMRT and VMAT plans. Results: The average absolute dose differences (plan a minus plan b) for the VMAT and IMRT techniques, respectively, caused by dental artifacts were: 2.2±3.3cGy vs. 37.6±57.5cGy (maximum point dose, P=0.15); 1.2±0.9cGy vs. 7.9±6.7cGy (maximum spinal cord dose, P=0.026); 2.2±2.4cGy vs. 12.1±13.0cGy (maximum brainstem dose, P=0.077); 0.9±1.1cGy vs. 4.1±3.5cGy (mean left parotid dose, P=0.038); 0.9±0.8cGy vs. 7.8±11.9cGy (mean right parotid dose, P=0.136); 0.021%±0.014% vs. 0.803%±1.44% (PTV coverage, P=0.17). Conclusion: For the HN plans studied, dental artifacts demonstrated a greater dose calculation error for IMRT plans compared to VMAT plans. Rotational arcs appear on the average to compensate dose calculation errors induced by dental artifacts. Thus, compared to VMAT, density

  4. From the art of filling teeth to the science of dental caries prevention: a personal review.

    PubMed

    Krasse, B

    1996-01-01

    The journey from the art of filling teeth to the science of prevention is reviewed. First, a private winding road is described that produced some new methods of value in risk assessment, treatment of the causes of dental caries, and prevention of the disease. The description illustrates the importance of monitoring the effects of different measures. Next, the new knowledge and methods that form the primary basis of prevention on a large scale are reviewed. They represent a golden era in caries research and form a solid ground for the prevention of dental caries and for the treatment of the causes of disease. The prevalence and incidence of dental caries has fallen not only among schoolchildren, but also among adults in developed countries. Improvement in dental health is due to the successful application of new knowledge-it has not happened by chance. New or improved opportunities for prevention could lead to a further reduction in dental caries. The problem is to find ways to stimulate both dentists and patients to use them. Finally, the next part of the journey is discussed. In some countries the journey probably will be an uphill struggle; in others, it could be fairly undulating, eventually leading to further declines in dental caries. PMID:9034973

  5. Extensive amalgam tattoo on the alveolar-gingival mucosa.

    PubMed

    Galletta, Vivian C; Artico, Gabriela; Dal Vechio, Aluana M C; Lemos Jr, Celso A; Migliari, Dante A

    2011-01-01

    Amalgam tattoos are common exogenous pigmented lesions of the oral mucosa occurring mainly by inadvertent placement of amalgam particles into soft tissues. The diagnosis of amalgam tattoo is simple, usually based on clinical findings associated with presence or history of amalgam fillings removal. Intraoral X-rays may be helpful in detecting amalgam-related radiopacity. In cases where amalgam tattoo cannot be differentiated from other causes of oral pigmentation, a biopsy should be performed. This article deals with an extensive amalgam tattoo lesion which required a biopsy for a definitive diagnosis. PMID:22147048

  6. Amalgam--Resurrection and redemption. Part 1: the clinical and legal mythology of anti-amalgam.

    PubMed

    Wahl, M J

    2001-01-01

    Dental amalgam has come under attack for its allegedly poor physical properties and clinical performance in addition to its poor appearance. It has been claimed that the American Dental Association has a hidden agenda to protect amalgam and that other countries have banned its use. A literature search revealed that the vast majority of amalgam restorations do not cause fractured cusps or have recurrent caries. Most amalgam restorations have been shown to last longer than resin composite restorations. In addition, the materials and techniques involved in amalgam restorations have vastly improved in recent years. Like resin composite restorations, amalgam restorations can often be repaired. The American Dental Association has no vested interest in protecting amalgam. The use of amalgam has not been banned in any country in the European Union. According to the latest scientific information available, dental amalgam is a remarkably durable and long-lasting restorative material. Although its appearance is unesthetic, its clinical performance and effectiveness are unsurpassed by those of resin composite. PMID:11495565

  7. The impacts of dental filling materials on RapidArc treatment planning and dose delivery: Challenges and solution

    SciTech Connect

    Mail, Noor; Al-Ghamdi, S.; Saoudi, A.; Albarakati, Y.; Ahmad Khan, M.; Saeedi, F.; Safadi, N.

    2013-08-15

    Purpose: The presence of high-density material in the oral cavity creates dose perturbation in both downstream and upstream directions at the surfaces of dental filling materials (DFM). In this study, the authors have investigated the effect of DFM on head and neck RapidArc treatment plans and delivery. Solutions are proposed to address (1) the issue of downstream dose perturbation, which might cause target under dosage, and (2) to reduce the upstream dose from DFM which may be the primary source of mucositis. In addition, an investigation of the clinical role of a custom-made plastic dental mold/gutter (PDM) in sparing the oral mucosa and tongue reaction is outlined.Methods: The influence of the dental filling artifacts on dose distribution was investigated using a geometrically well-defined head and neck intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) verification phantom (PTW, Freiberg, Germany) with DFM inserts called amalgam, which contained 50% mercury, 25% silver, 14% tin, 8% copper, and 3% other trace metals. Three RapidArc plans were generated in the Varian Eclipse System to treat the oral cavity using the same computer tomography (CT) dataset, including (1) a raw CT image, (2) a streaking artifacts region, which was replaced with a mask of 10 HU, and (3) a 2 cm-thick 6000 HU virtual filter [a volume created in treatment planning system to compensate for beam attenuation, where the thickness of this virtual filter is based on the measured percent depth dose (PDD) data and Eclipse calculation]. The dose delivery for the three plans was verified using Gafchromic-EBT2 film measurements. The custom-made PDM technique to reduce backscatter dose was clinically tested on four head and neck cancer patients (T3, N1, M0) with DFM, two patients with PDM and the other two patients without PDM. The thickness calculation of the PDM toward the mucosa and tongue was purely based on the measured upstream dose. Patients’ with oral mucosal reaction was clinically examined

  8. Low-intensity lasers, modern filling materials, and bonding systems influence on mineral metabolism of hard dental tissues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kunin, Anatoly A.; Yesaulenko, I. E.; Zoibelmann, M.; Pankova, Svetlana N.; Ippolitov, Yu. A.; Oleinik, Olga I.; Popova, T. A.; Koretskaya, I. V.; Shumilovitch, Bogdan R.; Podolskaya, Elana E.

    2001-10-01

    One of the main reasons of low quality filling is breaking Ca-P balance in hard tissues. Our research was done with the purpose of studying the influence of low intensity lasers, diodic radiation, the newest filling and bonding systems on the processes of mineral metabolism in hard dental tissues while filling a tooth. 250 patients having caries and its compli-cations were examined and treated. Our complex research included: visual and instrumental examination, finding out the level of oral cavity hygiene, acid enamel biopsy, scanning electronic microscopy and X-ray spectrum microanalysis. Filling processes may produce a negative effect on mineral metabolism of hard dental tissues the latter is less pronounced when applying fluoride-containing filling materials with bonding systems. It has also been found that bonding dentin and enamel systems are designed for both a better filling adhesion (i.e. mechanical adhesion) and migration of useful microelements present in them by their sinking into hard dental tissues (i.e. chemical adhesion). Our research showed a positive influence of low intensity laser and diodic beams accompanying the use of modern filling and bonding systems on mineral metabolism of hard dental tissues.

  9. Backscattering from dental restorations and splint materials during therapeutic radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Farman, A.G.; Sharma, S.; George, D.I.; Wilson, D.; Dodd, D.; Figa, R.; Haskell, B.

    1985-08-01

    Models were constructed to simulate as closely as possible the human oral cavity. Radiation absorbed doses were determined for controls and various test situations involving the presence of dental restorative and splint materials during cobalt-60 irradiation of the models. Adjacent gold full crowns and adjacent solid dental silver amalgam cores both increased the dose to the interproximal gingivae by 20%. Use of orthodontic full bands for splinting the jaws increased the dose to the buccal tissues by an average of 10%. Augmentation of dose through backscatter radiation was determined to be only slight for intracoronal amalgam fillings and stainless steel or plastic bracket splints.

  10. The FiCTION dental trial protocol – filling children’s teeth: indicated or not?

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background There is a lack of evidence for effective management of dental caries (decay) in children’s primary (baby) teeth and an apparent failure of conventional dental restorations (fillings) to prevent dental pain and infection for UK children in Primary Care. UK dental schools’ teaching has been based on British Society of Paediatric Dentistry guidance which recommends that caries in primary teeth should be removed and a restoration placed. However, the evidence base for this is limited in volume and quality, and comes from studies conducted in either secondary care or specialist practices. Restorations provided in specialist environments can be effective but the generalisability of this evidence to Primary Care has been questioned. The FiCTION trial addresses the Health Technology Assessment (HTA) Programme’s commissioning brief and research question “What is the clinical and cost effectiveness of restoration caries in primary teeth, compared to no treatment?” It compares conventional restorations with an intermediate treatment strategy based on the biological (sealing-in) management of caries and with no restorations. Methods/Design This is a Primary Care-based multi-centre, three-arm, parallel group, patient-randomised controlled trial. Practitioners are recruiting 1461 children, (3–7 years) with at least one primary molar tooth where caries extends into dentine. Children are randomized and treated according to one of three treatment approaches; conventional caries management with best practice prevention, biological management of caries with best practice prevention or best practice prevention alone. Baseline measures and outcome data (at review/treatment during three year follow-up) are assessed through direct reporting, clinical examination including blinded radiograph assessment, and child/parent questionnaires. The primary outcome measure is the incidence of either pain or infection related to dental caries. Secondary outcomes are

  11. Observation of an amalgam-bonded tooth through a scanning electron microscope.

    PubMed

    Orosa, Jose Luis B

    2003-01-01

    Bonding dental amalgam to tooth reduces the occurrence of marginal leakage, fracture and sensitivity. However, most studies of amalgam bonding have made use of resin cements and the conventional three-bottle bonding agents. In this study, a newer, single-bottle bonding agent was used to bond amalgam both to dentin and enamel. Interfaces of bonded amalgam and unbonded amalgam were observed under the scanning electron microscope. PMID:13677864

  12. Distribution of toxic elements in teeth treated with amalgam using μ-energy dispersive X-ray fluorescence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guerra, M.; Ferreira, C.; Carvalho, M. L.; Santos, J. P.; Pessanha, S.

    2016-08-01

    Over the years, the presence of mercury in amalgam fillings has raised some safety concerns. Amalgam is one of the most commonly used tooth fillings and contains approximately 50% of elemental mercury and 50% of other metals, mostly silver, tin and copper. Amalgam can release small amounts of mercury vapor over time, and patients can absorb these vapors by inhaling or ingesting them. In this study, 10 human teeth treated with dental amalgam were analyzed using energy dispersive X-ray fluorescence (EDXRF) to study the diffusion of its constituents, Ag, Cu, Sn and Hg. The used EDXRF setup, makes use of a polycapillary lens to focus radiation up to 25 μm allowing the mapping of the elemental distribution in the samples. Quantification was performed using the inbuilt software based on the Fundamental Parameters method for bulk samples, considering a hydroxyapatite matrix. The teeth were longitudinally cut and each slice was scanned from the surface enamel to the inner region (dentin and pulp cavity). Mercury concentration profiles show strong levels of this element close to the amalgam region, decreasing significantly in the dentin, and increasing again up to 40,000 μg·g- 1 in the cavity were the pulp used to exist when the tooth was vital.

  13. A study of the apical microleakage of a gallium alloy as a retrograde filling material.

    PubMed

    Hosoya, N; Lautenschlager, E P; Greener, E H

    1995-09-01

    The feasibility of utilizing mercury-free Gallium alloy GF for retrograde filling was investigated by comparing apical microleakage in 184 extracted human teeth. The teeth were divided into four experimental and two control groups. Three experimental groups were apical cavity retrofillings with the Gallium alloy GF, a mercury-containing amalgam, and a glass ionomer. The fourth experimental group was filled with gutta-percha and heat-burnished after apicoectomy. After 24 h, 1 wk, 4 wk, and 12 wk immersion in dye solution, the roots were vertically sectioned, and the deepest point of dye penetration was recorded. The glass ionomer showed the least leakage, followed by the amalgam group and the gallium group (no significant difference). The gutta-percha heat-burnished group displayed the greatest leakage. Gallium alloy GF was shown to have an equivalent sealing potential to dental amalgam for a retrograde filling material. PMID:8537788

  14. Amalgam use and waste management by Pakistani dentists: an environmental perspective.

    PubMed

    Mumtaz, R; Ali Khan, A; Noor, N; Humayun, S

    2010-03-01

    To assess amalgam use and waste management protocols practised by Pakistani dentists, a cross-sectional study was made of 239 dentists in Islamabad and Rawalpindi, recruited by convenience and cluster sampling. Amalgam was the most frequently used restorative material, with the choice dictated by patients' financial constraints. While 90.4% of dentists perceived amalgam as a health risk, only 46.4% considered it an environmental hazard. The majority disposed of amalgam waste in the trash, down the sink or as hospital waste. Very few (5.9%) had an amalgam separator installed in their dental office. Amalgam waste management protocols and mercury recycling should be introduced in Pakistan. PMID:20795451

  15. Dental Stem Cell Migration on Pulp Ceiling Cavities Filled with MTA, Dentin Chips, or Bio-Oss

    PubMed Central

    Lymperi, Stefania; Taraslia, Vasiliki; Tsatsoulis, Ioannis N.; Samara, Athina; Velentzas, Athanasios D.; Agrafioti, Anastasia; Anastasiadou, Ema; Kontakiotis, Evangelos

    2015-01-01

    MTA, Bio-Oss, and dentin chips have been successfully used in endodontics. The aim of this study was to assess the adhesion and migration of dental stem cells on human pulp ceiling cavities filled with these endodontic materials in an experimental model, which mimics the clinical conditions of regenerative endodontics. Cavities were formed, by a homemade mold, on untouched third molars, filled with endodontic materials, and observed with electron microscopy. Cells were seeded on cavities' surface and their morphology and number were analysed. The phenomenon of tropism was assessed in a migration assay. All three materials demonstrated appropriate microstructures for cell attachment. Cells grew on all reagents, but they showed a differential morphology. Moreover, variations were observed when comparing cells numbers on cavity's filling versus the surrounding dentine disc. The highest number of cells was recorded on dentin chips whereas the opposite was true for Bio-Oss. This was confirmed in the migration assay where a statistically significant lower number of cells migrated towards Bio-Oss as compared to MTA and dentin chips. This study highlights that MTA and dentin chips have a greater potential compared to Bio-Oss regarding the attraction of dental stem cells and are good candidates for bioengineered pulp regeneration. PMID:26146613

  16. Evaluation of Marginal Integrity of Four Bulk-Fill Dental Composite Materials: In Vitro Study

    PubMed Central

    Orłowski, Mirosław; Tarczydło, Bożena; Chałas, Renata

    2015-01-01

    Objective. The aim of the study was to compare under in vitro conditions marginal sealing of 4 different bulk-fill materials composite restorations of class II. Methods. Comparative evaluation concerned 4 composites of a bulk-fill type: SonicFill, Tetric EvoCeram Bulk Fill, Filtek Bulk Fill, and SDR. The study used 30 third molars without caries. In each tooth 4 cavities of class II were prepared. The prepared tooth samples were placed in a 1% methylene blue solution for 24 h, and after that in each restoration the depth of dye penetration along the side walls was evaluated. Results. The highest rating (score 0, no dye penetration) was achieved by 93.33% of the restorations made of the SDR material, 90% of restorations of SonicFill system, 86.66% of restorations of the composite Filtek Bulk Fill, and 73.33% of restorations of the Tetric EvoCeram Bulk Fill. Conclusion. The performed study showed that bulk-fill flowable or sonic-activated flowable composite restorations have better marginal sealing (lack of discoloration) in comparison with bulk-fill paste-like composite. PMID:25874254

  17. Amalgam ablation with the Er:YAG laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wigdor, Harvey A.; Visuri, Steven R.; Walsh, Joseph T., Jr.

    1995-04-01

    Any laser that will be used by dentist to replace the dental drill (handpiece) must remove dental hard tissues safely. These lasers must also have the ability to ablate the restorative dental materials which are present in the teeth being treated. Prior to any laser being used to treat humans a thorough knowledge of the effects of the laser treatment on dental materials must be understood. Cores of dental amalgam were created and sliced into thin wafers for this experiment. Ablation efficiency and thermal changes were evaluated with and without water. It appears as if the Er:YAG laser can effectively ablate amalgam dental material with and without water. The water prevents the temperature from increasing much above baseline and does not reduce efficiency of ablation.

  18. [Amalgam gingival tatoo].

    PubMed

    Iacobelli, L; Ferraro, M; Vairo, F; Ianniciello, L; Venneri, A

    1988-01-01

    The Authors present (5) cases of gingival tattooing resulted by rapport between argentum amalgam and prosthetic reconstruction with aurum or combination. Theu concluded is opportune to substitute the stumps reconstructions in amalgam with other materials not cause of electrogalvanism. So we avaid principally the antiaesthetic aspect of pigmentation. PMID:3274159

  19. Evaluation of simulation learning materials use to fill the gap in Japanese dental English education.

    PubMed

    Seki, Naoko; Moross, Janelle; Sunaga, Masayo; Hobo, Koki; Miyoshi, Tomoe; Nitta, Hiroshi; Kinoshita, Atsuhiro; Morio, Ikuko

    2016-01-01

    Even though English is most frequently the common language when the patient's native language differs from that of a dentist, the opportunities for Japanese undergraduate dental students to learn dental English are now quite limited. The purposes of our study were to investigate: the effectiveness and feasibility of the computer-assisted simulation materials as one solution strategy for dental English education in Japan, and the needs and demands for dental English from the learners' side. Interactive simulation materials for medical interviews in English and clinical cases which were translated to English, were delivered via Learning Management System (LMS) to nineteen trainee residents of dentistry (residents). Evaluation for the materials, learners' knowledge and interests in the contents, and ease of operation were obtained by post-questionnaire (response rates were 100% and 95%, respectively). Both questionnaire-surveys received positive feedback toward the materials, yet 47% answered that they lacked the level of knowledge about contents of the medical interview in English. Results were sufficient to suggest that the residents would like to have the opportunity to study or practice medical interview in English, or English related to dentistry, and that the simulation materials could be one of the solution strategies for opportunity provision. PMID:27181485

  20. Reliance on social security benefits by Swedish patients with ill-health attributed to dental fillings: a register-based cohort study

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Some people attribute their ill health to dental filling materials, experiencing a variety of symptoms. Yet, it is not known if they continue to financially support themselves by work or become reliant on different types of social security benefits. The aim of this study was to analyse reliance on different forms of social security benefits by patients who attribute their poor health to dental filling materials. Methods A longitudinal cohort study with a 13-year follow up. The subjects included were 505 patients attributing their ill health to dental restorative materials, who applied for subsidised filling replacement. They were compared to a cohort of matched controls representing the general population (three controls per patient). Annual individual data on disability pension, sick leave, unemployment benefits, and socio-demographic factors was obtained from Statistics Sweden. Generalized estimating equations were used to test for differences between cohorts in number of days on different types of social security benefits. Results The cohort of dental filling patients had a significantly higher number of days on sick leave and disability pension than the general population. The test of an overall interaction effect between time and cohort showed a significant difference between the two cohorts regarding both sick leave and disability pension. In the replacement cohort, the highest number of sick-leave days was recorded in the year they applied for subsidised replacement of fillings. While sick leave decreased following the year of application, the number of days on disability pension increased and peaked at the end of follow-up. Conclusions Ill health related to dental materials is likely to be associated with dependence on social security benefits. Dental filling replacement does not seem to improve workforce participation. PMID:22935213

  1. Does Magnetic Resonance Imaging Affect the Microleakage of Amalgam Restorations?

    PubMed Central

    Akgun, Ozlem Marti; Polat, Gunseli Guven; Turan Illca, Ahmet; Yildirim, Ceren; Demir, Pervin; Basak, Feridun

    2014-01-01

    Background: The effect of MRI on microleakage of amalgam restorations is an important health issue that should be considered. If MRI application causes increase of microleakage, amalgam fillings should be reassessed after MRI and replaced if necessary. Objectives: The aim of this study is to compare the effect of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) on microleakage of class II bonded amalgam versus classical amalgam restorations. Materials and Methods: Class II cavities (3 mm width × 1.5 mm depth) with gingival margins ending 1 mm below the cementoenamel junction (CEJ) were prepared in 40 permanent molar teeth. The teeth were randomly divided into four groups. Cavities in the first and second groups were restored with dentin adhesive and amalgam (bonded amalgam), and those in the third and fourth groups with amalgam only. MRI was performed with the teeth specimens from the first and third groups. All specimens were then thermocycled at 5° to 55° C with a 30-second dwell time for 1000 cycles. The samples were then immersed in 0.5% methylene blue dye for 24 hours and sectioned longitudinally. Dye penetration at the occlusal and gingival margins was quantified by 15× stereomicroscopy. IBM SPSS Statistics ver. 21.0 (IBM Corp., Released 2012., IBM SPSS Statistics for Windows, Armonk, NY: IBM Corp.) and MS-Excel 2007 programs were used for statistical analyses and calculations. “nparLD” module was used for F2_LD_F1 design analysis at R program. P<0.05 was considered statistically significant. Results: In teeth with amalgam filling, there were no significant differences of occlusal and gingival surface microleakage after MRI exposure. Occlusal and gingival surface microleakages were also similar with and without MRI in teeth with bonded amalgam filling. Conclusions: The results of this study suggest that MRI does not increase microleakage of amalgam restorations. PMID:25763074

  2. Tissue response of apatite-filled resin cement and titanium-reinforced apatite dental implants in dogs.

    PubMed

    Ogiso, M; Tabata, T; Nakabayashi, N; Yamashita, Y; Borgese, D

    1993-01-01

    Abutment and root portion divided two-piece dental implants were designed to modify the one-piece dense hydroxyapatite (D-HAP) implant. The initial placement of the root portion endosseously ensured an aseptic environment and physical stability for the implant during the bone healing period. The outer D-HAP shell of the root portion was fortified by an inner titanium cylinder and cemented with an adhesive resin cement containing 4-methacryloyoxyethyl trimellitate anhydride (4-META) and reinforced by fine apatite filler. Upon attaining integration of the bone and implant, the abutment was screwed and fixed into the screw hole of the root portion. The tissue response of both the apatite-filled resin cement and root portion of the two-piece implant was studied by animal canine experiments. Light and electron microscopic examination of specimens taken from experimental animal tissue showed bone contacted directly not only the exposed apatite filler at the surface of the apatite-filled resin cement, but also the resin portion. These findings of direct bone contact suggested that the tissue response of apatite-filled resin cement was approximately similar to the usual D-HAP. Because most of the surface of the outer D-HAP shell of the root portion came in contact with bone, it prevented the deposition of contamination on the D-HAP surface during the manufacturing procedures of the root portion. PMID:10148567

  3. The food and drug administration agrees to classify mercury fillings.

    PubMed

    Edlich, Richard F; Cross, Catherine L; Wack, Courtney A; Long, William B; Newkirk, Anthony T

    2008-01-01

    In the United States Court of Appeals of the District of Columbia Circuit, the Appellants Mom's Against Mercury, Connecticut Coalition for Environmental Justice, Oregonians for Life, California Citizens for Health Freedom, Kevin J. Biggers, Karen Johnson, Linda Brocato, R. Andrew Landerman, and Antia Vazquez Tibaul filed a petition for review of Regulatory Inaction by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA). On Monday June 2, 2008, the lawsuit was settled with the FDA after it agreed to classify mercury fillings. During its negotiation session with the Appellants, the FDA indicated that it would change its website on mercury fillings. The FDA no longer claims that no science exists about the safety of mercury amalgam or that other countries have acted for environmental reasons only. On its website, the FDA now states the following: "Dental amalgams contain mercury, which may have neurotoxic effects on the nervous systems of developing children and fetus." The FDA also states that "Pregnant women and persons who may have a health condition that makes them more sensitive to mercury exposure, including individuals with existing high levels of mercury bioburden, should not avoid seeking dental care, but should discuss options with their health practitioner." The FDA decision to classify mercury fillings is a reflection of the legislations enacted in Europe and Canada that highlight the neurotoxic effects of mercury fillings. PMID:19105536

  4. Evaluation of the apical seal of amalgam retrofillings with the use of a root canal sealer interface.

    PubMed

    Cathers, S J; Roahen, J O

    1993-09-01

    The apical seal of amalgam retrograde fillings was evaluated in 86 extracted teeth. The experimental groups included retrofillings of amalgam alone, amalgam with a cavity varnish interface, and amalgam with a root canal sealer interface. After a 3-month immersion of the teeth in Higgins ink and subsequent clearing process, statistical analysis of ink penetration measurements showed significantly less leakage (p < 0.001) around amalgam retrofillings when using a root canal sealer as an interface between the retrograde cavity preparation and the condensed amalgam. PMID:8378048

  5. Managing the phase-down of amalgam: Part I. Educational and training issues.

    PubMed

    Lynch, C D; Wilson, N H F

    2013-08-01

    Following the recently agreed Minamata Convention, a phase-down in the use of dental amalgam will become a priority for the profession. With a lead-in period of a number of years, important changes in the mind-set of the profession are required to ensure that patient safety is not compromised. Posterior composites have been a viable, and in many cases preferable, alternative to amalgam for many years. However, notwithstanding considerable developments in dental school teaching on the application and placement of posterior composites, growing evidence to support the use of composites in the restoration of posterior teeth and advances in composite systems, many practitioners remain reluctant to place composite rather than amalgam. This paper considers the present and future use of posterior composites and highlights ways in which dental school teaching and continuing professional development (CPD) may contribute to the successful phase-down, and now inevitable discontinuation, in the use of dental amalgam. PMID:23928599

  6. Release and toxicity of dental resin composite

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Saurabh K.; Saxena, Payal; Pant, Vandana A.; Pant, Aditya B.

    2012-01-01

    Dental resin composite that are tooth-colored materials have been considered as possible substitutes to mercury-containing silver amalgam filling. Despite the fact that dental resin composites have improved their physico-chemical properties, the concern for its intrinsic toxicity remains high. Some components of restorative composite resins are released in the oral environment initially during polymerization reaction and later due to degradation of the material. In vitro and in vivo studies have clearly identified that these components of restorative composite resins are toxic. But there is a large gap between the results published by research laboratories and clinical reports. The objective of this manuscript was to review the literature on release phenomenon as well as in vitro and in vivo toxicity of dental resin composite. Interpretation made from the recent data was also outlined. PMID:23293458

  7. The Post-Amalgam Era: Norwegian Dentists’ Experiences with Composite Resins and Repair of Defective Amalgam Restorations

    PubMed Central

    Kopperud, Simen E.; Staxrud, Frode; Espelid, Ivar; Tveit, Anne Bjørg

    2016-01-01

    Amalgam was banned as a dental restorative material in Norway in 2008 due to environmental considerations. An electronic questionnaire was sent to all dentists in the member register of the Norwegian Dental Association (NTF) one year later, to evaluate dentists’ satisfaction with alternative restorative materials and to explore dentists’ treatment choices of fractured amalgam restorations. Replies were obtained from 61.3%. Composite was the preferred restorative material among 99.1% of the dentists. Secondary caries was the most commonly reported cause of failure (72.7%), followed by restoration fractures (25.1%). Longevity of Class II restorations was estimated to be ≥10 years by 45.8% of the dentists, but 71.2% expected even better longevity if the restoration was made with amalgam. Repair using composite was suggested by 24.9% of the dentists in an amalgam restoration with a fractured cusp. Repair was more often proposed among young dentists (p < 0.01), employees in the Public Dental Service (PDS) (p < 0.01) and dentists working in counties with low dentist density (p = 0.03). There was a tendency towards choosing minimally invasive treatment among dentists who also avoided operative treatment of early approximal lesions (p < 0.01). Norwegian dentists showed positive attitudes towards composite as a restorative material. Most dentists chose minimally- or medium invasive approaches when restoring fractured amalgam restorations. PMID:27110804

  8. The Post-Amalgam Era: Norwegian Dentists' Experiences with Composite Resins and Repair of Defective Amalgam Restorations.

    PubMed

    Kopperud, Simen E; Staxrud, Frode; Espelid, Ivar; Tveit, Anne Bjørg

    2016-01-01

    Amalgam was banned as a dental restorative material in Norway in 2008 due to environmental considerations. An electronic questionnaire was sent to all dentists in the member register of the Norwegian Dental Association (NTF) one year later, to evaluate dentists' satisfaction with alternative restorative materials and to explore dentists' treatment choices of fractured amalgam restorations. Replies were obtained from 61.3%. Composite was the preferred restorative material among 99.1% of the dentists. Secondary caries was the most commonly reported cause of failure (72.7%), followed by restoration fractures (25.1%). Longevity of Class II restorations was estimated to be ≥10 years by 45.8% of the dentists, but 71.2% expected even better longevity if the restoration was made with amalgam. Repair using composite was suggested by 24.9% of the dentists in an amalgam restoration with a fractured cusp. Repair was more often proposed among young dentists (p < 0.01), employees in the Public Dental Service (PDS) (p < 0.01) and dentists working in counties with low dentist density (p = 0.03). There was a tendency towards choosing minimally invasive treatment among dentists who also avoided operative treatment of early approximal lesions (p < 0.01). Norwegian dentists showed positive attitudes towards composite as a restorative material. Most dentists chose minimally- or medium invasive approaches when restoring fractured amalgam restorations. PMID:27110804

  9. The effects of cavity smear layer removal on experimental marginal leakage around amalgam restorations.

    PubMed

    Jodaikin, A; Austin, J C

    1981-11-01

    Unvarnished freshly-packed dental amalgam restorations leak initially. However, with time, a marginal seal is usually effected. It is not known whether the smear layer which forms during cavity preparation is associated with this leakage pattern. This study was undertaken to evaluate experimental marginal leakage around amalgam restorations (left in situ for one and 12 wk) which had been placed in cavities prepared with and without removal of the smear layer in vital and devitalized teeth. The cavities were obturated with two types of dental amalgams, a conventional and a dispersed-phase amalgam. The excised teeth restorations were subjected to a fluorescent dye marginal leakage experiment. All of the short-term specimens leaked severely, but some of the long-term specimens displayed significant sealing properties. No significant differences were found between the two types of amalgams. However, the non-vital tooth specimens and cavities without smear layers displayed significantly improved sealing properties. PMID:7026631

  10. Effect of composite/amalgam thickness on fracture resistance of maxillary premolar teeth, restored with combined amalgam-composite restorations

    PubMed Central

    Firouzmandi, Maryam; Doozandeh, Maryam; Abbasi, Sanaz

    2016-01-01

    Background Combined amalgam-composite restorations have been used through many years to benefit from the advantages of both dental amalgam and composite resin. Two variations have been mentioned for this technique, this study investigated the fracture resistance of maxillary premolar teeth with extended mesio-occluso-distal (MOD) cavities, restored with the two variations of combined amalgam-composite restorations. Material and Methods Sixty intact extracted premolar teeth were randomly divided into 6 groups (G1-G6) of 10 teeth. G1; consisted of intact teeth and G2; consisted of teeth with MOD preparations were assigned as the positive and negative control groups respectively. Other experimental groups after MOD preparations were as follows: G3, amalgam restoration; G4, composite restoration; G5 combined amalgam-composite restoration with amalgam placement only on 1mm of the gingival floor of the proximal boxes; G6, combined amalgam-composite restoration with amalgam placement to the height of contact area of the proximal surface of the tooth. Fracture strength of the specimens was measured and the data were analyzed using one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA). The level of significance was P<0.05. Fracture mode of the specimens was also recorded. Results G1 had the highest value of fracture resistance (1736.90 N). G2 and G3 had the lowest fracture resistance (775.70 N and 874.70 N, respectively). The difference between G 4, 5 and 6 was not statistically significant. However, G4, G5 and G6 showed significantly higher resistance to fracture compared to G2 and G3. Fracture modes were favorable in all of the study groups except in G6. Conclusions Fracture resistance of the premolars restored with the two variations of combined amalgam-composite restoration was similar to that achieved with composite restoration alone and more than that of amalgam restoration alone. It can be concluded that the thickness of amalgam in combined amalgam-composite restorations did not

  11. Long-term deterioration of composite resin and amalgam restorations.

    PubMed

    Smales, R J

    1991-01-01

    Previous long-term longitudinal studies of two different methods of placing an auto-cured conventional anterior composite resin, and of a low- and a high-copper amalgam alloy, had shown similar restoration survivals despite the different resin treatment methods used or the types of amalgam alloy placed. Therefore, the aim of the present study was to assess several clinical factors or characteristics of these restorations that were believed to affect the survival of the restorative materials. The 950 composite resin and the 1042 amalgam restorations examined were placed by many operators in numerous patients attending a dental hospital. The composite resin restorations were placed using unetched- and etched-enamel-bonding treatment methods, and the amalgam restorations were polished after insertion. Clinical ratings supplemented by color transparencies were used for the assessment of four factors for the resin, and four factors for the amalgam restoration. Significant deterioration differences were found for several of the clinical factors assessed for both the two different composite resin treatment methods, and for the two different amalgam alloys, which were not directly related to the restoration survivals. PMID:1840079

  12. 21 CFR 872.3700 - Dental mercury.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Dental mercury. 872.3700 Section 872.3700 Food and... DENTAL DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 872.3700 Dental mercury. (a) Identification. Dental mercury is a device composed of mercury intended for use as a component of amalgam alloy in the restoration of...

  13. Mercury release of amalgams with various silver contents after exposure to bleaching agent

    PubMed Central

    Bahari, Mahmoud; Alizadeh Oskoee, Parnian; Savadi Oskoee, Siavash; Pouralibaba, Firoz; Morsali Ahari, Ali

    2016-01-01

    Background. Since it is possible for carbamide peroxide (CP) bleaching agent to contact old amalgam restorations, the present in vitro study evaluated the amount of dissolved mercury released from amalgam restorations with various percent-ages of silver content subsequent to the use of 15% CP. Methods. Thirty ANA 2000 amalgam disks with 43.1% silver content and thirty ANA 70 amalgam disks with 69.3% silver content were prepared. In each group, 15 samples were randomly placed in glass tubes containing 15% CP (as experimental groups) and the remaining 15 samples were placed in buffered phosphate solution (as control groups) with the same 3-mL volume for 48 hours. Subsequently, the amount of mercury dissolved in each test tube was measured using Mercury Analyzing System (Cold Vapor Atomic Absorption, MASLO, Shimadzu, Japan). Data was analyzed with two-way ANOVA and a post hoc Tukey test. (α = 0.05). Results. The amount of mercury released after exposure to CP was significantly higher than that released after exposure to buffered phosphate (P < 0.001). In addition, the amount of mercury released from dental amalgam with a silver content of 43% was significantly higher than that released from dental amalgam with a silver content of 69% (P < 0.001). Conclusion. The amount of mercury release is inversely proportional to the silver content of dental amalgam. PMID:27429729

  14. Mercury release of amalgams with various silver contents after exposure to bleaching agent.

    PubMed

    Bahari, Mahmoud; Alizadeh Oskoee, Parnian; Savadi Oskoee, Siavash; Pouralibaba, Firoz; Morsali Ahari, Ali

    2016-01-01

    Background. Since it is possible for carbamide peroxide (CP) bleaching agent to contact old amalgam restorations, the present in vitro study evaluated the amount of dissolved mercury released from amalgam restorations with various percent-ages of silver content subsequent to the use of 15% CP. Methods. Thirty ANA 2000 amalgam disks with 43.1% silver content and thirty ANA 70 amalgam disks with 69.3% silver content were prepared. In each group, 15 samples were randomly placed in glass tubes containing 15% CP (as experimental groups) and the remaining 15 samples were placed in buffered phosphate solution (as control groups) with the same 3-mL volume for 48 hours. Subsequently, the amount of mercury dissolved in each test tube was measured using Mercury Analyzing System (Cold Vapor Atomic Absorption, MASLO, Shimadzu, Japan). Data was analyzed with two-way ANOVA and a post hoc Tukey test. (α = 0.05). Results. The amount of mercury released after exposure to CP was significantly higher than that released after exposure to buffered phosphate (P < 0.001). In addition, the amount of mercury released from dental amalgam with a silver content of 43% was significantly higher than that released from dental amalgam with a silver content of 69% (P < 0.001). Conclusion. The amount of mercury release is inversely proportional to the silver content of dental amalgam. PMID:27429729

  15. Class II glass ionomer cermet tunnel, resin sandwich and amalgam restorations over 2 years.

    PubMed

    Wilkie, R; Lidums, A; Smales, R

    1993-08-01

    This study compared the clinical behavior of a glass ionomer (polyalkenoate) silver cermet, a posterior resin composite used with the "tunnel" technique, a posterior resin composite used with the "closed sandwich" technique, and a high-copper amalgam for restoring small, proximal surface carious lesions. Two dentists placed 86 restorations in the posterior permanent teeth of 26 adults treated at a dental hospital. Restorations were assessed at 6-month intervals over 2 years for gingivitis adjacent to them, the tightness of proximal contacts, occlusal wear, surface voids, roughness and cracking, surface and marginal staining, and marginal fracture. Small filling defects, surface voids and occlusal wear were obvious with the cermet material, with surface crazing and cracking present in 48% of the tunnel restorations. Two of the posterior resin composites, but none of the amalgam restorations, also failed. The cermet cannot be recommended as a long-term permanent restorative material in situations where it is likely to be subjected to heavy occlusal stresses and abrasive wear. PMID:7803004

  16. Forensic or archaeological issue: is chemical analysis of dental restorations helpful in assessing time since death and identification of skeletonized human remains?

    PubMed

    Zelic, Ksenija; Djonic, Danijela; Neskovic, Olivera; Stoiljkovic, Milovan; Nikolic, Slobodan; Zivkovic, Vladimir; Djuric, Marija

    2013-09-01

    In 2011, small mass grave with completely skeletonized remains was discovered in Belgrade suburb. An eyewitness claimed that skeletons belonged to German soldiers killed in WWII. Anthropologists were engaged to investigate whether the skeletal remains correspond to the indicated German group or represent more recent case requiring court trial. Numerous dental restorations were noticed. Owing to the fact that different dental materials were used in dental practice at certain times, the aim of this study was to explore whether analysis of dental restorations could help in identification and estimation of time since death. Inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry revealed that dental fillings corresponded to copper amalgam, conventional silver amalgam, silicophosphate cement, and zinc phosphate cement. Chemical results combined with anthropological and historical facts suggest that the individuals lived before the 1960s in country with well-developed dental service at that time. Therefore, chemical analysis of dental fillings was useful to distinguish between skeletal remains that are too old to be of forensic interest and the remains relevant to legal investigations. PMID:23866008

  17. VIEW, LOOKING SOUTHWEST OF GOLD AMALGAMATION ROOM, SHOWING AMALGAMATION BARREL ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    VIEW, LOOKING SOUTHWEST OF GOLD AMALGAMATION ROOM, SHOWING AMALGAMATION BARREL AT CENTER FOREGROUND, BULLION FURNACE IN LARGE HOOD BEHIND IT, AND GOLD RETORT IN BACKGROUND HOOD. NOTE OVERHEAD MONORAIL FOR MATERIALS HANDLING. - Shenandoah-Dives Mill, 135 County Road 2, Silverton, San Juan County, CO

  18. A Safe Protocol for Amalgam Removal

    PubMed Central

    Colson, Dana G.

    2012-01-01

    Today's environment has different impacts on our body than previous generations. Heavy metals are a growing concern in medicine. Doctors and individuals request the removal of their amalgam (silver mercury) restorations due to the high mercury content. A safe protocol to replace the silver mercury filling will ensure that there is minimal if any absorption of materials while being removed. Strong alternative white composite and lab-processed materials are available today to create a healthy and functioning mouth. Preparation of the patient prior to the procedure and after treatment is vital to establish the excretion of the mercury from the body. PMID:22315627

  19. Microstructure in gold-containing Ag3Sn-amalgam.

    PubMed

    Malhotra, M L

    1976-01-01

    The present study was conducted in order to understand the microstructural characteristics in dental amalgam which consists of both spherical and irregular Ag3Sn alloy particles with gold substituted in varying amounts for silver (0, 9, and 15%). Spherical alloy particles were used as obtained from Western Gold and Platinum and irregular alloy particles were prepared in the laboratory and then employed in the present study. The amalgam was prepared from the alloy particles by the trituration and condensation method. The polished and etched samples were studied using the techniques of X-ray diffraction, optical metallography, scanning electron microscopy, and X-ray energy dispersive spectroscopy. The microstructure in both types amalgam studied after two weeks of preparation contains gamma (unreacted Ag3Sn particles), gamma1 (Ag2Hg3), and gamma2 (Sn7-8Hg) phases in pure Ag3Sn-amalgam and gamma, gamma1, and (Au-Sn) phases in gold-containing amalgam. The The (Au-Sn) phase existed in the form of rings surrounding the gamma grains and acted as a barrier for mercury diffusion in Ag3Sn particles. PMID:1249092

  20. [Restoration of hemi-arcades with amalgam].

    PubMed

    Vermeersch, A G

    1975-01-01

    As a rule should the half-mouth restorations in the frame of oral rehabilitation be done with gold inlays, overlays or full crowns. It is nevertheless possible to consider such restorations with amalgam and, providing that certain principles and technics and respected, such quadrant restorations could be valuable as well on the periodontal point of view as on the occlusal one. Regarding the periodontal point of view, it is now generally accepted that de restorations of the proximal aspects of the teeth have not to extend under the gingival margin. If this creates a risk for caries recurrences, still questionable, it eliminates the unavoidable periodontal lesions. Regarding the occlusal point of view, it is on the one hand difficult to build up a perfect occlusal restoration with a material which, on the moment the filling is completed acquires only a insufficient fraction of its final resistance. On the other hand it seems impossible to raise the occlusion in one or more teeth for the very same reason. The solution to this problem comprises a dubbel aspect. One has first of all to rebuild to the desired occlusal level the cavities of the whole quadrant with a temporary but resistant material wich allows at once a carefulness mastication. Polycarboxylate cement is suitable for this purpose. This temporary material is then replaced tooth after tooth in one or more sittings with amalgam. The second aspect of the solution consists in the use of amalgam wich acquires faster a sufficent resistance, allowing an ajustment of a perfect occlusion without the danger of fracturing it. Following the first estimates it seems that amalgam made of spherical particules and dispersed phase type alloys could meet with this requirements and bring an acceptable solution to our problem. PMID:1065913

  1. [Dental care, dental diseases and dentistry in antiquity].

    PubMed

    Józsa, László

    2009-01-01

    Numerous written relicts, belletristic works (poems of Martial, Juvenal, Ovid etc.) indicate that oral hygiene and its tools (toothbrush, toothpick, use of tooth pastes and tooth-powder) were used long before our times. Already ancient people started to remove, file, dye and inlay teeth. The teeth were dyed red, green or black in Egypt, red or brown (with henna or betel) in India, white by Romans. The teeth decoration has a long but forgotten history. The most skillful and artistic work was done by the Maya's between 900 BC and 1500 AD. The modification of contours (more than fifty forms) of the incisors were practiced also in Mesoamerica. Dentistry was surely practiced in ancient Egypt, India, China, Greece and Rome, while odontology and especially suitable dental appliances arose only by Etruscan. Dental prosthesis, including bridges and simple retention bands were invented by the Etruscans 2500 years ago. These Etruscan bridges were worn mostly by females, suggesting that cosmetics was the principal dental concern. Some,--if not all--of the Roman and other prostheses have been purely ornamental. Orthodontic appliances are also Etruscan invention. The holes caused by caries were filled with garlic, incense, caraway seed in Egypt, with wood or lead in Rome, and with "silver-paste" (amalgam) in ancient China. The toothache was cured with poppy-tee, or hashish and nightshade plants (Solanaceae) in Egypt, Greece, Roman Empire while with coca (Erythroxylon coca) in South-America. PMID:20481107

  2. Biocompatibility of dental materials used in contemporary endodontic therapy: a review. Part 2. Root-canal-filling materials.

    PubMed

    Hauman, C H J; Love, R M

    2003-03-01

    Root-canal-filling materials are either placed directly onto vital periapical tissues or may leach through dentine. The tissue response to these materials therefore becomes important and may influence the outcome of endodontic treatment. This paper is a review of the biocompatibility of contemporary orthograde and retrograde root-canal-filling materials. PMID:12657140

  3. In vitro bond strengths of amalgam added to existing amalgams.

    PubMed

    Roggenkamp, Clyde L; Berry, Frederick A; Lu, Huan

    2010-01-01

    This study determined if a standardized condensation force and dwell time per condensation pressure point could reliably bond new amalgam to older amalgam without applying extrinsic Hg. A stabilization jig was created to hold 15 friction-fit 1-inch diameter (25 mm) cylindrical resin specimen blocks face up with cavities drilled to contain the condensed primary amalgam (Valiant PhD-XT). Freshly mixed secondary amalgam (Valiant PhD-XT) was condensed against the primary amalgam surfaces through the 3.5-mm-diameter central holes of specially fabricated split-ring molds. The 15 disks fit snugly within the holes of the stabilization jig tray. Condensation was with a consistent, calibrated force of 22.5 MPa (4 lbs/0.79 mm2) applied with a spring-loaded amalgam carrier custom adapted with a 1-mm-diameter stainless steel condenser tip. Secondary amalgam additions were built up in three 1-mm thick increments with a pattern of eight 22.5 MPa two-second condenser strokes per incremental layer. Shear-bond testing with a 1-mm/minute crosshead speed occurred 24-hours post-condensation. One-way analysis of variance statistical analysis was conducted to analyze the results. The mean shear-bond forces (MPa, N = 15) found were: Control 28.1 +/- 5, 15 minutes 31 +/-5, one hour 10.7 +/-4 (N = 30), one day 25.5 +/- 4, one week 25.2 +/- 4, two months 25.1 +/- 5 and seven years 24.7 +/- 4. Under the condensation pressures used in the current study, the addition of new amalgam to smooth previously set amalgam surfaces, not including the one-hour group, up to seven years old, resulted in shear-bond forces not statistically different (p = 0.05) from the intact control. Virtually all (94%) of the bonds tested, except for the one-hour sample, resulted in cohesive rather than adhesive failures except those of the one-hour sample. Forty percent bond strengths of the controls were achieved when only 5.6 MPa (1 lb/0.79 mm2) and 14 MPa (2.5 lb/0.79 mm2) condensation pressures were used. PMID

  4. Lichenoid reaction associated with silver amalgam restoration in a Bombay blood group patient: A case report

    PubMed Central

    Pawar, Rohini Rangarao; Mattigatti, Sudha S.; Mahaparale, Rushikesh R.; Kamble, Amit P.

    2016-01-01

    The pathogenic relationship between the oral lichenoid reaction (OLR) and dental restorative materials has been confirmed many times. An OLR affecting oral mucosa in direct contact with an amalgam restoration represents a delayed, type IV, cell mediated immune response to mercury or one of the other constituents of the dental amalgam. Bombay blood group patients are more prone to this. A case of bilateral OLR is presented, which is present in relation to amalgam restoration. The lesion healed up after the replacement of restorations with an intermediate restorative material. The clinician should be aware of all the possible pathological etiologies of white lesions. If there is any doubt about the nature or management of a usual oral lesion, a referral to an appropriate specialist is mandatory. PMID:27217647

  5. Lichenoid reaction associated with silver amalgam restoration in a Bombay blood group patient: A case report.

    PubMed

    Pawar, Rohini Rangarao; Mattigatti, Sudha S; Mahaparale, Rushikesh R; Kamble, Amit P

    2016-01-01

    The pathogenic relationship between the oral lichenoid reaction (OLR) and dental restorative materials has been confirmed many times. An OLR affecting oral mucosa in direct contact with an amalgam restoration represents a delayed, type IV, cell mediated immune response to mercury or one of the other constituents of the dental amalgam. Bombay blood group patients are more prone to this. A case of bilateral OLR is presented, which is present in relation to amalgam restoration. The lesion healed up after the replacement of restorations with an intermediate restorative material. The clinician should be aware of all the possible pathological etiologies of white lesions. If there is any doubt about the nature or management of a usual oral lesion, a referral to an appropriate specialist is mandatory. PMID:27217647

  6. Bond strength comparison of amalgam repair protocols using resin composite in situations with and without dentin exposure.

    PubMed

    Ozcan, Mutlu; Schoonbeek, Geert; Gökçe, Bülent; Cömlekoglu, Erhan; Dündar, Mine

    2010-01-01

    The replacement of defective amalgam restorations leads to loss of tooth material and weakens the tooth, creating an increased risk of cusp fracture. The repair of such defects is a minimal intervention technique. The current study compared the repair bond strengths of a resin composite to amalgam and an amalgam-dentin complex after various surface conditioning methods. The specimens (N = 50) consisted of sound human canines with cylindrical preparations (diameter: 2.3 mm, depth: 3 mm) with amalgam-dentin complex (N = 30, n = 10/per group) and two groups with amalgam only (N = 20, n = 10/per group). The teeth were embedded in auto-polymerized polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA). The preparations were filled with non-Gamma 2 amalgam. The enamel was removed to expose dentin. The specimens with the amalgam-dentin complex were randomly assigned to one of the following conditioning methods: Group 1: Silicacoating amalgam, etching dentin, silane application on amalgam, primer/bonding on dentin, opaquer on amalgam, resin composite on both; Group 2: Etching dentin, silicacoating amalgam, silane application on amalgam, primer/bonding on dentin, opaquer on amalgam, resin composite on both and Group 3: Etching dentin, primer/bonding on dentin, opaquer, resin composite. The specimens with only amalgam were assigned to one of the following conditioning methods: Group 4: Silicacoating, silane application, opaquer, resin composite and Group 5: Opaquer, resin composite. For the two control groups, where no dentin was involved (Groups 4 and 5), bonding was achieved only on amalgam and Group 5 had no conditioning. The specimens were kept in water at 37 degrees C for five weeks before bond strength (MPa +/- SD) testing (Universal Testing Machine). After debonding, the failure types were analyzed. The results were significantly affected by the surface conditioning method (ANOVA). Only dentin conditioning (Group 3) showed the highest bond strength (39.9 +/- 14). The unconditioned control

  7. Comparison of wear and clinical performance between amalgam, composite and open sandwich restorations: 2-year results.

    PubMed

    Sachdeo, A; Gray, Gordon B; Sulieman, M A; Jagger, Daryll C

    2004-03-01

    There has been some disquiet over the use of mercury containing restorative materials. The most commonly used alternative is composite resin but this has the potential disadvantage associated with wear and marginal leakage, which in turn, has proven to result in secondary caries and sensitivity. To overcome the shortcomings of a directly placed composite restoration, the glass-ionomer/composite open sandwich technique was introduced followed by the subsequent introduction of compomer systems. The aims of this study were to evaluate the wear and clinical performance of a control group of amalgam restorations compared with that of a group of posterior composite resin restorations fillings and a group of compomer/composite open sandwich restorations placed by a single general dental practitioner. The duration of the study was 2 years. One hundred and thirty three (71.4%) patients were successfully recalled and the wear and clinical performance of each restoration after 6, 12 and 24 months was measured, indirectly. There was no statistically significant difference recorded between the groups at 6 months or 1 year (p > 0.05). However, at the end of the 2-year study, there was a significantly lower rate of wear recorded for the control amalgam restorations compared with other two groups (p = 0.033). There was no statistically significant difference in wear recorded between the two groups of tooth-coloured restorations (p > 0.05). With regards to clinical performance of the restorations, occlusal and proximal contacts in each group of restoration remained satisfactory throughout the study. PMID:15058177

  8. Effect of restoration size on fracture resistance of bonded amalgam restorations.

    PubMed

    Lindemuth, J S; Hagge, M S; Broome, J S

    2000-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the effect of restoration size on the fracture strength of amalgam restorations bonded with Amalgambond Plus (with HPA). Research has shown that this adhesive is dispersed throughout the unset amalgam during condensation and that a decrease in diametral tensile strength, proportional to the amount of adhesive incorporated into the unset amalgam, has resulted. Smaller cavity preparations have a higher ratio of surface area to volume than do larger preparations, and it was anticipated that a proportionately greater amount of adhesive would be incorporated into smaller amalgam restorations. Sixty extracted human molars were divided into four groups of 15 teeth and mounted in tray acrylic-filled PVC cylinders. Shallow approximo-occlusal channels were prepared in two groups. One group was restored with Amalgambond Plus and Tytin amalgam, the other with just Tytin amalgam. Larger proximo-occlusal preparations were made in the remaining two groups, then restored in the same fashion. Samples were stored in 37 degrees C for at least 24 hours, then thermocycled from 5-55 degrees C 1000 times with a one-minute dwell time. Specimens were mounted in a Universal Testing Machine, and a chisel was applied to the restorations in compression mode at a crosshead speed of 5.0 mm/minute until bulk fracture of the amalgam occurred. The results indicated no difference in bulk fracture strengths between large amalgam restorations restored with and without Amalgambond Plus. However, small amalgam restorations restored with Amalgambond Plus exhibited significantly greater (p < 0.025) bulk fracture strengths than small amalgam restorations restored without use of the adhesive. PMID:11203813

  9. Biologic assessment of copper-containing amalgams.

    PubMed

    Mjor, I A; Eriksen, H M; Haugen, E; Skogedal, O

    1977-12-01

    In order to reduce creep and avoid marginal fractures in amalgam restorations, new alloys containing higher proportions of copper have been introduced. Fillings of these materials were placed in cavities prepared in the deciduous teeth of monkeys or placed in polyethylene tubes and implanted subcutaneously in rats. Conventional silver/tin alloys and zinc oxide eugenol cement were used as reference materials. Despite limitations due to the varying depths of cavities and the small number of animals involved it was concluded that the high copper alloys caused more severe pulp damage than the other materials studied. In the implantation studies many of the high copper specimens were exfoliated before the end of the experimental period. It is concluded that in deep cavities these materials require the use of a non-toxic base or lining material although as they are commonly used in young children's teeth the placement of linings and the isolation of the cavity pose problems. PMID:412793

  10. Microleakage of bonded amalgam restorations: effect of thermal cycling.

    PubMed

    Helvatjoglou-Antoniades, M; Theodoridou-Pahini, S; Papadogiannis, Y; Karezis, A

    2000-01-01

    This study examined the effect of thermal cycling on the microleakage of bonded amalgam restorations. Three dental amalgam alloys and a gallium alloy were tested with two adhesive resin systems and copal varnish as a control. Class V cavity preparations were prepared on 168 freshly extracted premolars or molars. The preparations were placed parallel to and 1.0 mm occlusal to the cementoenamel junction (CEJ). Four groups of 42 teeth each were treated with one of the following adhesive dentin systems: Bond-It, All-Bond 2/Resinomer or a copal varnish (Copalite). The four groups of 42 teeth each were then restored with one of three dental amalgams: Orosphere Plus, Indiloy, Oralloy or a Gallium alloy (Galloy), resulting in 12 test groups of 14 teeth each. The specimens were stored in double distilled water at 37 degrees C for 24 hours. Final contouring and polishing of the restorations were performed under water spray. Half of the restorations in each group were thermocycled for 3000 cycles (5 degrees C-37 degrees C-55 degrees C-37 degrees C) with a dwell time of 15 sec at each temperature. The other half were stored in double distilled water at 37 degrees C for 24 hours. Then all 168 restorations were stained with dye, sectioned and scored for microleakage. Results showed that the adhesive dentin systems reduced microleakage in amalgam restorations compared to copal varnish only in non-thermocycled specimens. Statistical analysis of the results showed that there was an extremely significant difference (p < 0.001) in microleakage between the non-thermocycled and the thermocycled specimens in all test groups, whereas, there was no significant difference (p > 0.05) among thermocycled specimens. The reduction of microleakage was not significantly different between Bond-It and All-Bond 2/Resinomer in non-thermocycled specimens. Oralloy showed the most microleakage in the non-thermocycled groups when compared to the other alloys using the same adhesive liner. PMID:11203837

  11. Current Teaching of Proximal Retention Grooves for Class II Amalgam Preparations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moore, David L.

    1992-01-01

    A survey gathered information on methods of class II amalgam preparation taught in 59 dental schools. Focus was on the teaching and testing of proximal retention groove use, stated rationale for placing retention grooves, and the relationship of the instruction to board criteria for cavity preparation. (MSE)

  12. 75 FR 33315 - Dental Products Panel of the Medical Devices Advisory Committee; Notice of Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-06-11

    ... received by FDA concerning the final rule on the classification of dental amalgam, which published in the Federal Register on August 4, 2009 (74 FR 38686). These petitions (docket numbers FDA-2008-N-0163 and FDA... adequacy of the risk assessment performed by FDA in classifying dental amalgam in light of a new report...

  13. Preservation-based approaches to restore posterior teeth with amalgam, resin or a combination of materials.

    PubMed

    Baghdadi, Ziad D

    2002-02-01

    This review is a systematic assessment, from the literature, of the status quo of dental amalgam, resin-based composite and glass-ionomer restorations for carious lesions as it applies to new concepts, coupled with clinical research. Scientifically based and practical new materials and techniques are recommended to include in contemporary practice throughout the world. Clinical and laboratory studies which have been carried out in light of modern conservative principles, and in light of the current emphasis of treating dental caries as a disease process were reviewed and discussed. An approach to managing carious lesions based upon selected advantages of dental amalgam, resin-based composite and glass-ionomer technology applied to what is termed "preservation-based" approaches to restoring teeth has been synthesized. Researched evidence contradicts the notion of "extension for prevention" in favor of maintaining sound tooth structure which would translate into more patients with healthy dentitions for entire lifetimes. PMID:12074231

  14. Dental Calculus Arrest of Dental Caries

    PubMed Central

    Keyes, Paul H.; Rams, Thomas E.

    2016-01-01

    Background An inverse relationship between dental calculus mineralization and dental caries demineralization on teeth has been noted in some studies. Dental calculus may even form superficial layers over existing dental caries and arrest their progression, but this phenomenon has been only rarely documented and infrequently considered in the field of Cariology. To further assess the occurrence of dental calculus arrest of dental caries, this study evaluated a large number of extracted human teeth for the presence and location of dental caries, dental calculus, and dental plaque biofilms. Materials and methods A total of 1,200 teeth were preserved in 10% buffered formal saline, and viewed while moist by a single experienced examiner using a research stereomicroscope at 15-25× magnification. Representative teeth were sectioned and photographed, and their dental plaque biofilms subjected to gram-stain examination with light microscopy at 100× magnification. Results Dental calculus was observed on 1,140 (95%) of the extracted human teeth, and no dental carious lesions were found underlying dental calculus-covered surfaces on 1,139 of these teeth. However, dental calculus arrest of dental caries was found on one (0.54%) of 187 evaluated teeth that presented with unrestored proximal enamel caries. On the distal surface of a maxillary premolar tooth, dental calculus mineralization filled the outer surface cavitation of an incipient dental caries lesion. The dental calculus-covered carious lesion extended only slightly into enamel, and exhibited a brown pigmentation characteristic of inactive or arrested dental caries. In contrast, the tooth's mesial surface, without a superficial layer of dental calculus, had a large carious lesion going through enamel and deep into dentin. Conclusions These observations further document the potential protective effects of dental calculus mineralization against dental caries.

  15. Clinical evaluation of marginal fracture of amalgam restorations: one-year report.

    PubMed

    Osborne, J W; Friedman, S J

    1986-03-01

    Fourteen dental amalgam alloys were used in this study. After 1 year, amalgam restorations were evaluated for fracture at the margins. The clinical results indicated that Dispersalloy, Indiloy, a high-copper blend by Syntex, Cluster, and Unison had the least marginal failure. This was followed by Premalloy, Cupralloy, Tytin, Cupralloy ESP, and Contour. Velvalloy and Sybraloy and Orosphere II were the third major grouping with Summalloy having the most fracture at the margins. Different batches of the same alloy performed similarly. The correlation between creep and ridit means (fracture at the margins) was not found to be statistically significant. PMID:3457164

  16. Sealing ability of five different retrograde filling materials.

    PubMed

    Gerhards, F; Wagner, W

    1996-09-01

    The sealing ability of Amalgam, Harvard-Cement, Diaket, gold-leaf, and Ketac-Endo as retrofilling materials was investigated. Paper cones were fixed with Harvard-Cement in the instrumented roots of 100 extracted human incisors. Apicectomy was performed and a 2-mm-deep retrograde cavity was prepared. Teeth were assigned to five groups (n = 20); each group received a different filling material. Surfaces of the roots were isolated with nail polish. Teeth, were stored in 1% methylene blue dye for 72 h. Roots were sectioned, and the depth of dye penetration was evaluated through a stereomicroscope. Retrofills with Ketac-Endo showed significantly less leakage compared with amalgam. There was no significant difference between the amalgam and Diaket groups. The sealing ability of Harvard-Cement and gold foil was lower than amalgam. It was concluded that retrograde fillings with Ketac-Endo or Diaket can be considered as alternatives for amalgam. PMID:9198426

  17. Bond strength of repaired amalgam restorations.

    PubMed

    Rey, Rosalia; Mondragon, Eduardo; Shen, Chiayi

    2015-01-01

    This in vitro study investigated the interfacial flexural strength (FS) of amalgam repairs and the optimal combination of repair materials and mechanical retention required for a consistent and durable repair bond. Amalgam bricks were created, each with 1 end roughened to expose a fresh surface before repair. Four groups followed separate repair protocols: group 1, bonding agent with amalgam; group 2, bonding agent with composite resin; group 3, mechanical retention (slot) with amalgam; and group 4, slot with bonding agent and amalgam. Repaired specimens were stored in artificial saliva for 1, 10, 30, 120, or 360 days before being loaded to failure in a 3-point bending test. Statistical analysis showed significant changes in median FS over time in groups 2 and 4. The effect of the repair method on the FS values after each storage period was significant for most groups except the 30-day storage groups. Amalgam-amalgam repair with adequate condensation yielded the most consistent and durable bond. An amalgam bonding agent could be beneficial when firm condensation on the repair surface cannot be achieved or when tooth structure is involved. Composite resin can be a viable option for amalgam repair in an esthetically demanding region, but proper mechanical modification of the amalgam surface and selection of the proper bonding system are essential. PMID:26325656

  18. A radiographic study of the effect of various retrograde fillings on periapical healing after replantation.

    PubMed

    Andreasen, J O; Pitt Ford, T R

    1994-12-01

    An effective retrograde sealing procedure places great demands upon both technique and materials. Prevention of micro-leakage, biocompatibility and stability of the material in the apical tissues are very important. To evaluate potential retrograde filling materials, a replantation model has been developed in which extracted permanent molars were replanted in monkeys after apicectomy of each root, preparation of a 2-mm deep retrograde cavity and its sealing with various dental materials. Prior to retro-filling the remaining pulp was exposed to saliva. Apicected molars which were infected and did not receive retrograde fillings served as positive controls. Periapical healing was evaluated radiographically after 8 weeks based on planimetric measurements of the size of the periapical radiolucency. The following dental materials were tested: amalgam, glass ionomer cement, calcium-hydroxide lining cement, AH 26 root canal sealer, various zinc oxide-eugenol cements, Cavit, and gutta-percha with various sealers. The materials which were associated with better apical healing than the infected controls were glass ionomer cement, Cavit, and the zinc oxide-eugenol cements. When plain zinc oxide-eugenol or IRM were combined with a gutta-percha core, healing was best and not statistically different from normal apices. It was concluded that radiographic assessment at 8 weeks of molar teeth retrograde filled prior to replantation could be a valuable method for discrimination of potentially useful materials in vivo. PMID:7867616

  19. Tensile bond strength of repaired amalgam.

    PubMed

    Hadavi, F; Hey, J H; Czech, D; Ambrose, E R

    1992-03-01

    This study evaluated the tensile strength of repaired high-copper amalgams and analyzed the different treatments of the amalgam interface prior to repair. One hundred specimens were divided into 10 groups: group 1 was left intact and was considered as the control group. In groups 2 through 8, the specimens were sectioned into halves after 10 days and were reconstructed with new amalgam. Groups 9 and 10 were condensed with time intervals of 15 minutes and all specimens were subjected to tensile loads in a Universal Testing Machine. The tensile strengths at the junction between old and new amalgam ranged between 50% to 79% of those of the control group and verified that the same type of amalgam and uncontaminated interfaces had higher strengths. The results also suggested that if an amalgam repair is anticipated, additional retention is critical to the longevity of the restoration. PMID:1507091

  20. Clinical evaluation of occlusal glass ionomer, resin, and amalgam restorations.

    PubMed

    Smales, R J; Gerke, D C; White, I L

    1990-10-01

    The purpose of the study was to evaluate four materials (a glass ionomer (polyalkenoate) silver cermet, two composite resin restoratives and a high copper content dental amalgam) placed in either conventional Class I cavities or in modified odontotomy-enameloplasty-sealant (OES) fissure preparations. One experienced operator inserted 438 occlusal. Class I restorations in the posterior permanent teeth of 124 patients in a private dental practice. Restorations were assessed for bulk loss of material, surface voids and cracking, restoration margin fractures and staining, and surface staining and roughness, by using colour transparencies taken at baseline and at recalls for up to 3 years. The glass ionomer cermet was the most difficult material to handle and also gave the least satisfactory clinical result. Loss of material and surface voids were common in the cermet restorations with surface cracking or crazing being seen in 11.4 per cent of the restorations, especially in the larger, conventional Class I preparations. One posterior resin was more viscous and difficult to handle than the other resin and exhibited more surface voids. The amalgam alloy was used in Class I preparations only and showed more restoration margin fractures and surface staining than did the other three materials. However, there were no unsatisfactory clinical assessments given for either restoration margin fracture and staining, or surface staining and roughness for any of the materials. Patient acceptance of the modified OES fissure preparation was extremely good. PMID:2127419

  1. Maternal dental history and child’s birth outcome and early cognitive development

    PubMed Central

    Daniels, JL; Rowland, AS; Longnecker, MP; Crawford, P; Golding, J

    2013-01-01

    Summary Prenatal exposure to high levels of mercury, radiation, and inflammation have been associated with adverse reproductive outcomes such as increases in preterm delivery, low birthweight, and delayed neurodevelopment. Few data are available to evaluate the potential effects of prenatal low-level exposure to these factors as might occur during dental care. We evaluated maternal dental history prior to and during pregnancy in relation to birth outcomes and early communicative development among offspring in a large cohort (n=7375) of British children born in 1991–1992. Dental history was assessed by questionnaire. The child’s communicative development was assessed using the MacArthur Communicative Development Inventory at 15 months of age. Total mercury was measured in umbilical cord tissue for a subset of the children. Overall, dental care, including amalgam fillings, was not associated with birth outcomes or language development. Having x-rays taken during pregnancy was not associated with birthweight measured continuously (β=14.7, p=0.4), but was associated with slightly increased odds of having a term, low birthweight baby (OR 1.9, 95%CI 1.0–3.4). More detailed evaluation of the potential adverse effects of elective dental treatment during pregnancy, particularly dental x-rays, may be warranted. PMID:17697075

  2. Comparison of the push-out shear bond strength of four types of glass ionomers when used to bond amalgam: An in vitro study

    PubMed Central

    Mathew, Vinod Babu; Ramachandran, S; Indira, R; Shankar, P

    2011-01-01

    Background: Dental amalgam is the primary direct posterior restorative material used worldwide, but it have certain shortcomings due to the lack of adhesiveness to the cavity. The introduction of the concept of bonded amalgam helped improve the use of amalgam as a restorative material. Aim: Evaluation of the comparative push-out shear bond strength of four types of conventional glass ionomers used to bond amalgam to tooth in simulated class I situations. Materials and Methods: Four chemical cure glass ionomers are used: GC Fuji I, GC Fuji II, GC Fuji III and GC Fuji VII, and are compared with unbonded amalgam. The push-out bond strength was tested using the Instron Universal Testing Machine at a crosshead speed of 0.5 mm/min. Statistical Analysis: One-way ANOVA and post hoc Bonferroni tests were used to analyze the data. Results: The results showed that the use of glass ionomer to bond amalgam resulted in an increase in the bond strength of amalgam. The Type VII glass ionomer showed the highest bond strength in comparison with the other glass ionomers. Conclusions: Conventional glass ionomer bonds to amalgam and shows a beneficial increase in the bond strength of the restoration in comparison with unbonded amalgam. PMID:22144798

  3. Environmental hazard evaluation of amalgam scrap.

    PubMed

    Fan, P L; Chang, S B; Siew, C

    1992-11-01

    Amalgam scrap was subjected to two different Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) extraction procedures to determine if it presents an environmental hazard. The results indicate that concentrations of mercury and silver in the extracts do not exceed the EPA's maximum allowable concentrations. It was concluded that amalgam scrap is not a hazardous solid waste. Proper handling of amalgam scrap disposal by recycling is, however, highly recommended. PMID:1303382

  4. [Amalgam--a question of belief? A review and assessment of the current literature].

    PubMed

    Metzler, H; Metzler, C

    1998-01-01

    Several hundred written sources have been researched regarding old and new findings. Forgotten and new facts are covered in four chapters. One of the authors is a retired industrial chemist, and the other a dental surgeon. In the first section the natural and synthetic sources of mercury are explained. In every scientific study the ubiquity of mercury for billions of years must be taken into consideration. The second chapter looks at the toxicology of mercury and its compounds. Well known catastrophies in Japan and Iraq are depicted. Individual intoxications are hardly mentioned in literature. The third chapter is devoted to the dental amalgam, a silver alloy with both physical-chemical properties, and corrosive and thermal behaviour. An attempt is made to define the mercury balance. The forth paragraph deals with the disposal and recycling of mercury. Many dental associations are currently discussing the possibility of recycling amalgam, which is rather a stable silver alloy than a volatile mercury compound. A controlled landfill disposal of dental amalgam will absorb a certain quantity of mercury during its life cycle, and is positive. Recycling is expensive, energy consuming and causes additional exposure. Unless silver and mercury become rare metals, recycling should not be considered. As yet no worldwide regulatory procedures exist. PMID:9741247

  5. Dynamic cure measurement of dental polymer composites using optical coherence tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tomlins, Peter H.; Palin, Will M.; Shortall, Adrian C.

    2008-02-01

    Dental amalgam is being increasingly replaced by Light-activated resin-based dental composites. However, these materials are limited by inefficient setting reactions as a function of depth, constraining the maximum extent of cure and reducing biocompatibility. In this paper we demonstrate a novel metrological tool for dynamic monitoring of refractive index and thickness change through curing resins using spectral-domain optical coherence tomography. We present real-time measurements from pre- to post-cure of a series of un-filled bisphenol-A diglycidyl ether dimethacrylate (bisGMA) and triethylene glycol dimethacrylate (TEGDMA) resins with different inhibitor concentrations. Our results demonstrate that refractive index measurements are sensitive to the extent of cure of such resins and that the inhibitor concentration strongly affects the cure dynamics and final extent of cure.

  6. 21 CFR 872.3275 - Dental cement.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Dental cement. 872.3275 Section 872.3275 Food and... DENTAL DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 872.3275 Dental cement. (a) Zinc oxide-eugenol—(1) Identification... filling or as a base cement to affix a temporary tooth filling, to affix dental devices such as crowns...

  7. 21 CFR 872.3275 - Dental cement.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Dental cement. 872.3275 Section 872.3275 Food and... DENTAL DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 872.3275 Dental cement. (a) Zinc oxide-eugenol—(1) Identification... filling or as a base cement to affix a temporary tooth filling, to affix dental devices such as crowns...

  8. Morphology and electrochemical behavior of Ag-Cu nanoparticle-doped amalgams.

    PubMed

    Chung, Kwok-Hung; Hsiao, Li-Yin; Lin, Yu-Sheng; Duh, Jenq-Gong

    2008-05-01

    The aim of this study was to introduce Ag-Cu phase nanopowder as an additive to improve the corrosion behavior of dental amalgams. A novel Ag-Cu nanopowder was synthesized by the precipitation method. An amalgam alloy powder (World-Cap) was added and mixed with 5 wt.% and 10 wt.% of Ag-Cu nanopowders, respectively, to form experimental amalgam alloy powders. The original alloy powder was used as a control. Alloy powders were examined using X-ray diffraction, transmission electron microscopy (TEM), scanning electron microscopy and electron probe microanalysis. Amalgam disk specimens of metallurgically prepared were tested in 0.9% NaCl solution using electrochemical methods. The changes in the corrosion potential and anodic polarization characteristics were determined. Corrosion potential data were analyzed statistically (n=3, analysis of variance, Tukey's test, p<0.05). The diameters of lamellar structure Ag-Cu nanoparticles were measured to be approximately 30 nm. The composition of the Ag-Cu nanoparticles determined by TEM-energy-dispersive spectroscopy was 56.28 at.% Ag-43.72 at.% Cu. A light-shaded phase was found mixing with dark Cu-Sn reaction particles in the reaction zones of Ag-Cu nanoparticle-doped amalgams. The Ag-Cu nanoparticle-doped amalgams exhibited zero current potentials more positive than the control (p<0.05) and no current peak was observed at -325mV that related to Ag-Hg phase and Cu6Sn5 phase in anodic polarization curves. The results indicated that the corrosion resistance of high-copper single-composition amalgam could be improved by Ag-Cu nanoparticle-doping. PMID:18321799

  9. Amalgam Restorations: To Bond or Not.

    PubMed

    Larson, Thomas D

    2015-01-01

    This article will review the use of various liners used to eliminate microleakage in amalgam restorations. It will review the literature about whether amalgam restorations are improved by using a bonding process and if so specifically how it improves the patient outcome. PMID:26596104

  10. An in vitro Evaluation of Microleakage of Posterior Teeth Restored with Amalgam, Composite and Zirconomer – A Stereomicroscopic Study

    PubMed Central

    Punia, Sandhya Kapoor; Bhat, Surekha; Singh, Gautam; Goyal, Pravesh; Oza, Swapnil; Raiyani, Chirag M.

    2015-01-01

    Background Numerous restorative materials are being used in dentistry to achieve adequate strength and restore aesthetics. However, a perfect ideal restorative material has still eluded dentist. Dental amalgam is versatile material with self-sealing property, but is unaesthetic. Other restorative materials like, composites require conservative preparation, but exhibits polymerisation shrinkage resulting in microleakage. To overcome these drawbacks a high strength restorative material reinforced with ceramic and zirconia fillers known as zirconomer has been introduced. The aim of this study was to evaluate the micro-leakage of these three different restorative materials. Materials and Methods Thirty non-carious human permanent first and second molars were utilized in this study. Class I cavities were prepared on the occlusal surface; cavities were then restored with amalgam, composite and zirconomer as per manufacture’s instruction. All samples were stored for 24 hours in distilled water followed by thermocycling. The entire tooth surface was painted with two coats of varnish to within 1mm of the restoration margins. The teeth were immersed in dye. Teeth were sectioned and observed under stereomicroscope. Results In this study the zirconomer exhibited the highest micro leakage as compared to composite and amalgam but composite having higher micro leakage as compared to amalgam and lower micro leakage as compared to zirconomer. Conclusion Even though composite and amalgam are being marketed aggressively and new material like zirconomer are on origin, amalgam still proves to be one of the best materials. PMID:26393208

  11. The cognitive-emotional amalgam.

    PubMed

    Pessoa, Luiz

    2015-01-01

    In the précis to The Cognitive-Emotional Brain, I summarize a framework for understanding the organization of cognition and emotion in the brain. Here, I address six major themes that emerged in the commentaries: (1) emotional perception and automaticity; (2) the status of cognition and emotion: together or separate? (3) evolutionary implications for the understanding of emotion and cognition; (4) the diverse forms of cognitive-emotional integration; (5) dual process theories; and (6) functional diversity of brain regions/networks and cognitive ontologies. The central argument is, again, that cognition and emotion are so highly interactive, and indeed integrated, that these two elements blend into a new amalgam. PMID:26815655

  12. The pin-amalgam restoration. Part 1. A review.

    PubMed

    Evans, J R; Wetz, J H

    1977-01-01

    A review of the literature indicates that the use of pins to support amalgam or cast gold restorations in advanced caries in posterior teeth is a quick and relatively inexpensive method of restoring teeth otherwise doomed to extraction. However, the use of pins demands a careful and skillful dentist who understands the morphology of these teeth and the proper use of the materials if injury to the pulp, accidental perforations, crazing of the dentin, and splitting of teeth are to be prevented. Until more objective and controlled studies are completed, the use of cemented pins vs. self-threading pins remains a matter of empirical and personal preference. It is clear that success in the use of any pin or pins depends more on the dentist's skill and judgment than on the particular type of pin technique used. In order to more objectively evaluate the use of pin-amalgam restorations, Part 11 of this study will analyze the results obtained in the Clinic at Tufts University School of Dental Medicine. PMID:318695

  13. Factors affecting the placement or replacement of direct restorations in a dental school

    PubMed Central

    Silvani, Samara; Trivelato, Roberta Ferreira; Nogueira, Ruchele Dias; Gonçalves, Luciano de Souza; Geraldo-Martins, Vinícius Rangel

    2014-01-01

    Context: The knowledge of the reasons for the placement of direct restorations makes possible to trace an epidemiological profile of a specific population and to direct the teaching of dentistry to techniques that are commonly used today and will be continued performed in the future. Purpose: The aim of this study was to verify the reasons for placement and replacement of direct restorations in patients treated in the Dental Clinic of the Uberaba University – Brazil. Materials and Methods: This study evaluated 306 restorative procedures carried out on 60 patients. During the treatment planning, a form that contained information about the patient's gender, tooth number, the classification of restorations, the reasons for placement and replacement of amalgam and tooth-colored restorations, the material that had to be removed and the new material used to fill the cavities was filled for each patient. Statistical analysis was carried out using Chi-square test (α = 0.05). Results: The data showed that most of the patients were female (66.7%). Of all the restorations placed, 60.45% were 1st-time placements, while 39.55% were replacements. For 1st-time restorations, the main reason for placement was primary caries (76.76%), followed by non-carious cervical lesions (15.14%). The amalgam restorations were replaced more frequently (67.77%). The primary reason for replacements was the presence of secondary caries (for both previous amalgam (42.68%) and composite (66.67%) restorations (P < 0.05). The resin composite was the most indicated material for the new restorations (98.04%) (P < 0.05). Conclusions: The main reason for placement of direct restorations was primary caries, while secondary caries was the main reason for replacements. In almost all cases, the material used to fill the cavities was the resin composite. PMID:24808696

  14. The effect of 3 T MRI on microleakage of amalgam restorations

    PubMed Central

    Yilmaz, S; Misirlioğlu, M

    2013-01-01

    Objectives: To evaluate the effects of 3 T magnetic field on microleakage of amalgam restorations containing three different types of silver (Ag). Methods: 60 extracted teeth were restored with three different types of amalgam filling materials. Restored teeth were sectioned mesiodistally and divided into experimental and control groups. Experimental groups were exposed to a magnetic field of 3 T for 20 min. All samples were plunged into 2% basic fuchsin solution and examined under a digital microscope by three different observers with regard to microleakage. Results: Statistical analysis showed significant differences in microleakage between the groups exposed to MRI and controls, whereas differences in microleakage between amalgam types were insignificant. Conclusions: The primary risk of MRI systems arises from the effects of its strong magnetic field on objects containing ferromagnetic materials. An MRI of 1.5 T is known to be safe for amalgam restorations. However, our research indicates that MRI is not completely devoid of any effects on amalgam restorations. PMID:23674614

  15. Effect of different adhesive systems on microleakage at the amalgam/composite resin interface.

    PubMed

    Hadavi, F; Hey, J H; Ambrose, E R; Elbadrawy, H E

    1993-01-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the effect of different bonding systems on teh microleakage at the amalgam/composite interface. The microleakage at the amalgam/composite resin interface was evaluated with a quantitative dye penetration method. Amalgam cylinders were made and a 2 mm composite base was added after the application of five different bonding systems to the roughened interface of the amalgam cylinders. The cylinders were filled with an exact volume of 0.05% fuchsin solution, and the total weight of the sample was measured. The cylinders were placed on a filter paper with the composite base down and evaluated for leakage after 1, 3, 6, and 24 hours. Weight loss and coloring of the filter paper represented microleakage. The results indicated that the application of Prisma Universal Bond 2 adhesive, Cover Up II, or Amalgambond (groups E, F, and G) reduced the amount of microleakage significantly as compared to the groups in which no adhesive system, 3M Porcelain Repair Kit (with and without acid etching of the amalgam surface), or Prisma Universal Bond 2 primer and adhesive (groups A, B, C or D) was applied. PMID:8332537

  16. Sealing ability of MTA and amalgam in different root-end preparations and resection bevel angles: an in vitro evaluation using marginal dye leakage.

    PubMed

    Post, Letícia Kirst; Lima, Fábio Garcia; Xavier, Cristina Braga; Demarco, Flávio Fernando; Gerhardt-Oliveira, Marília

    2010-01-01

    This in vitro study evaluated the effect of different apicoectomy angles, instruments used in root-end preparation, and dental materials used in retrofilling on apical sealing. Root ends were resected at 45 or 90 degrees in 80 single-rooted teeth. For each type of apicoectomy, root-end cavities were prepared with either a round carbide #2 bur or an S12/90D ultrasonic tip. The root-end cavities in each subgroup (apicoectomy + root-end preparation) were filled with silver amalgam without zinc (Am) or with gray mineral trioxide aggregate -Angelus (MTA), and the specimens were immediately immersed in 0.2% rhodamine B for 24 h. Sealing was evaluated based on the dyed cross-sectional dentin area. Data were analyzed statistically by the Kruskal-Wallis test at 5% significance level. No group showed complete sealing of root-end areas. The only significant factor affecting microleakage was dental material, with MTA exhibiting less leakage. PMID:21180797

  17. Radiochemical separation of gold by amalgam exchange

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ruch, R.R.

    1970-01-01

    A rapid and simple method for the radiochemical separation of gold after neutron activation. The technique is based on treatment with a dilute indium-gold amalgam, both chemical reduction and isotopic exchange being involved. The counting efficiency for 198Au in small volumes of the amalgam is good. Few interferences occur and the method is applicable to clays, rocks, salts and metals. The possibility of determining silver, platinum and palladium by a similar method is mentioned. ?? 1970.

  18. On modeling and nanoanalysis of caries-affected dentin surfaces restored with Zn-containing amalgam and in vitro oral function.

    PubMed

    Toledano, Manuel; Aguilera, Fátima S; Osorio, Estrella; López-López, Modesto T; Cabello, Inmaculada; Toledano-Osorio, Manuel; Osorio, Raquel

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this research was to assess the influence of mechanical loading on the ability of Zn-free versus Zn-containing amalgams to promote remineralization at the dentin interface. Sound and caries-affected dentin surfaces (CAD) were restored using Zn-free or Zn-containing dental amalgams. Midcoronal dentin surfaces were studied by (1) atomic force microscopy analysis (including plot and phase imaging, nanoindentation test [modulus of Young (Ei), nanoroughness measurements, and fibril diameter assessment], (2) Raman spectroscopy/cluster analysis, (3) x-ray diffraction, (4) field emission electron microscope and energy-dispersive analysis, for morphological, mechanical, and physicochemical characterization. Analyses were performed before amalgam placement and after amalgam removal, at 24 h and 3 weeks of load cycling. Zn-free and Zn-containing amalgams restorations promoted an increase in the modulus of Young of CAD surfaces, after 3 weeks of load cycling; at this time, Zn-containing amalgams attained higher Ei than Zn-free restorations. Zn-containing amalgams induced tubular occlusion after load cycling, in both sound and CAD. Zn free-amalgams promoted remineralization of both intertubular and peritubular dentin in CAD substrata. These minerals were identified as calcium-phosphate deposits and crystals as hydroxyl-apatite with augmented crystallographic maturity but with some components of lattice distortion. Crosslinking of collagen diminished and secondary structure of collagen increased in CAD substrate restored with Zn-containing amalgam after 3 weeks of load cycling, indicating an advanced preservation, molecular organization, and orientation of collagen fibrils after load cycling. Plot and phase images permitted to observe the topographical changes which were promoted by the mineral deposits; in general, the indexes related to higher remineralization gave rise to a decrease of nanoroughness and an augmentation of the bandwidth of the collagen fibrils. Zn

  19. Dental care - child

    MedlinePlus

    ... dental exams, and getting necessary treatments such as fluoride, extractions, fillings, or braces and other orthodontics. ... provider if your infant needs to take oral fluoride . THE FIRST TRIP TO THE DENTIST Your child's ...

  20. Shear bond strength, failure modes, and confocal microscopy of bonded amalgam restorations.

    PubMed

    Cianconi, Luigi; Conte, Gabriele; Mancini, Manuele

    2011-01-01

    This study evaluated the shear bond strength, failure modes, and confocal microscopy of two different amalgam alloy restorations lined with five adhesive systems. Two regular-set high-copper dental amalgam alloys, Amalcap Plus and Valiant Ph.D, and five commercially available adhesive systems were selected. One hundred and twenty freshly-extracted human third molars were used for the study. The results were statistically evaluated using two-factor analysis of variance (ANOVA). The shear bond strength (SBS) of amalgam to dentin was significantly affected by both the adhesive (p<0.0001) and amalgam alloy (p<0.0002). Regarding mode of failure (MF), among samples restored with Valiant Ph.D, 31 of 50 exhibited adhesive failure, and 19 displayed mixed failure. Laser optical microscopy (OM) of the bonded interface revealed the presence of a good hybrid layer was evident in all experimental groups. Higher bond strengths were measured for four of the five adhesives when used in combination with the spherical alloy. PMID:21383518

  1. Utility of Megavoltage Fan-Beam CT for Treatment Planning in a Head-And-Neck Cancer Patient with Extensive Dental Fillings Undergoing Helical Tomotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Claus; Liu Tianxiao; Jennelle, Richard L.; Ryu, Janice K.; Vijayakumar, Srinivasan; Purdy, James A.; Chen, Allen M.

    2010-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to demonstrate the potential utility of megavoltage fan-beam computed tomography (MV-FBCT) for treatment planning in a patient undergoing helical tomotherapy for nasopharyngeal carcinoma in the presence of extensive dental artifact. A 28-year-old female with locally advanced nasopharyngeal carcinoma presented for radiation therapy. Due to the extensiveness of the dental artifact present in the oral cavity kV-CT scan acquired at simulation, which made treatment planning impossible on tomotherapy planning system, MV-FBCT imaging was obtained using the HI-ART tomotherapy treatment machine, with the patient in the treatment position, and this information was registered with her original kV-CT scan for the purposes of structure delineation, dose calculation, and treatment planning. To validate the feasibility of the MV-FBCT-generated treatment plan, an electron density CT phantom (model 465, Gammex Inc., Middleton, WI) was scanned using MV-FBCT to obtain CT number to density table. Additionally, both a 'cheese' phantom (which came with the tomotherapy treatment machine) with 2 inserted ion chambers and a generic phantom called Quasar phantom (Modus Medical Devices Inc., London, ON, Canada) with one inserted chamber were used to confirm dosimetric accuracy. The MV-FBCT could be used to clearly visualize anatomy in the region of the dental artifact and provide sufficient soft-tissue contrast to assist in the delineation of normal tissue structures and fat planes. With the elimination of the dental artifact, the MV-FBCT images allowed more accurate dose calculation by the tomotherapy system. It was confirmed that the phantom material density was determined correctly by the tomotherapy MV-FBCT number to density table. The ion chamber measurements agreed with the calculations from the MV-FBCT generated phantom plan within 2%. MV-FBCT may be useful in radiation treatment planning for nasopharyngeal cancer patients in the setting of extensive

  2. Utility of megavoltage fan-beam CT for treatment planning in a head-and-neck cancer patient with extensive dental fillings undergoing helical tomotherapy.

    PubMed

    Yang, Claus; Liu, Tianxiao; Jennelle, Richard L; Ryu, Janice K; Vijayakumar, Srinivasan; Purdy, James A; Chen, Allen M

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to demonstrate the potential utility of megavoltage fan-beam computed tomography (MV-FBCT) for treatment planning in a patient undergoing helical tomotherapy for nasopharyngeal carcinoma in the presence of extensive dental artifact. A 28-year-old female with locally advanced nasopharyngeal carcinoma presented for radiation therapy. Due to the extensiveness of the dental artifact present in the oral cavity kV-CT scan acquired at simulation, which made treatment planning impossible on tomotherapy planning system, MV-FBCT imaging was obtained using the HI-ART tomotherapy treatment machine, with the patient in the treatment position, and this information was registered with her original kV-CT scan for the purposes of structure delineation, dose calculation, and treatment planning. To validate the feasibility of the MV-FBCT-generated treatment plan, an electron density CT phantom (model 465, Gammex Inc., Middleton, WI) was scanned using MV-FBCT to obtain CT number to density table. Additionally, both a "cheese" phantom (which came with the tomotherapy treatment machine) with 2 inserted ion chambers and a generic phantom called Quasar phantom (Modus Medical Devices Inc., London, ON, Canada) with one inserted chamber were used to confirm dosimetric accuracy. The MV-FBCT could be used to clearly visualize anatomy in the region of the dental artifact and provide sufficient soft-tissue contrast to assist in the delineation of normal tissue structures and fat planes. With the elimination of the dental artifact, the MV-FBCT images allowed more accurate dose calculation by the tomotherapy system. It was confirmed that the phantom material density was determined correctly by the tomotherapy MV-FBCT number to density table. The ion chamber measurements agreed with the calculations from the MV-FBCT generated phantom plan within 2%. MV-FBCT may be useful in radiation treatment planning for nasopharyngeal cancer patients in the setting of extensive

  3. Barodontalgias, dental and orofacial barotraumas: a survey in Swiss divers and caisson workers.

    PubMed

    Zanotta, Cristina; Dagassan-Berndt, Dorothea; Nussberger, Peter; Waltimo, Tuomas; Filippi, Andreas

    2014-01-01

    Changing ambient pressure can lead to medical conditions in body cavities filled with air. Intraoral pain elicited by changes in pressure is referred to as barodontalgia. Dental barotraumas are defined as pressure-induced damages of teeth and restorations. The pathophysiologic background so far is not completely clear. The present study deals with dental and orofacial symptoms which can occur as a result of pressure variations. With the aid of cantonal administrations, diving associations, and tunnel construction firms, 520 pressure-exposed individuals (499 scuba/ professional divers, 21 caisson workers operating at excess pressure) were questioned regarding dental problems. A personal interview was conducted with affected individuals. Problems in the dental area were experienced by 15% of all respondents. Toothaches were suffered by 10.2% of the participants. Tooth injuries occurred in 6.3% of all interviewees (26 fractured amalgam restorations, 4 crown fractures, 3 losses of tooth fragments). A proportion of 11.3% among the respondents complained about temporomandibular joint problems or mucosal irritations (for example aphthae) related to the mouthpieces. Barotraumas outside the dental area were incurred by 31.9% of the divers. Of these, 69.9% concerned the ears and 65.6% occurred during the descent. Based on the results obtained from the survey and taking into account the current literature, recommendations for the prevention of barotraumas in divers and caisson workers were prepared. Diagnostic exclusion of dental pathologies and avoidance of retentive reconstruction materials are important factors for the prevention of barodontalgias and dental barotraumas. PMID:24853026

  4. Bonding amalgam to dentin by different methods.

    PubMed

    Hadavi, F; Hey, J H; Strasdin, R B; McMeekin, G P

    1994-09-01

    The shear bond strengths of amalgam to dentin by use of (1) All-Bond-2 adhesive, (2) Amalgambond Plus adhesive and (3) TMS Minim pins were compared in this study. Forty-five sound human molars were mounted in acrylic resin and randomly assigned to one of the three groups. The occlusal surfaces were ground to expose the dentin, which was then wet-polished with 600-grit sand paper. All materials were applied according to manufacturer's instructions. A split die with a 5 mm opening was placed and amalgam was condensed, which created an amalgam cylinder bonded/retained to the dentin surface. A shear bond force was applied to the base of the amalgam cylinder. The data were analyzed with analysis of variance and Scheffé's test at the 95% level. All systems were found to promote adhesion/retention of amalgam to dentin. The All-Bond 2 group showed significantly higher bond strength (11.106 +/- 3.585 MPa) than Amalgambond Plus (6.343 +/- 3.564 MPa) and TMS pin (6.868 +/- 0.794 MPa) (p < 0.05). PMID:7965897

  5. Radiochemical separation of gallium by amalgam exchange

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ruch, R.R.

    1969-01-01

    An amalgam-exchange separation of radioactive gallium from a number of interfering radioisotopes has been developed. A dilute (ca. 0.3%) gallium amalgam is agitated with a slightly acidic solution of 72Ga3+ containing concentrations of sodium thiocyanate and either perchlorate or chloride. The amalgam is then removed and the radioactive gallium stripped by agitation with dilute nitric acid. The combined exchange yield of the perchlorate-thiocyanate system is 90??4% and that of the chloride-thiocyanate system is 75??4%. Decontamination yields of most of the 11 interfering isotopes studied were less than 0.02%. The technique is applicable for use with activation analysis for the determination of trace amounts of gallium. ?? 1969.

  6. Bonded amalgam sealants: two-year clinical results.

    PubMed

    Staninec, M; Eakle, W S; Silverstein, S; Marshall, G W; Artiga, N

    1998-03-01

    The authors used bonded amalgams as pit and fissure sealants without mechanical preparation. They compared the two-year retention of the bonded amalgams with that of resin-based pit and fissure sealants. Clinical examinations at six months, one year and two years revealed no difference between the retention of the two sealants. This technique opens up the possibility of using bonded amalgam in pits and fissures surrounding very conservative preparations in a preventive amalgam restoration. PMID:9529807

  7. Filling cavities or restoring teeth?

    PubMed

    Versluis, Antheunis; Versluis-Tantbirojn, Daranee

    2011-01-01

    Teeth seldom fracture under normal functional loading. This indicates that the natural tooth design is optimized for the distribution of regular masticatory forces by means of its properties and structure. When a tooth is restored with an intracoronal restoration, however, the incidence of tooth fracture increases. Since remaining tissues do not change, the restorative actions apparently alter the original stress distributions. In this study, the effect of different restoration types (unbonded amalgam and bonded composite restorations) were compared with the original stress conditions of the intact tooth, using finite element analysis. It was shown that an unbonded amalgam restoration did not restore the original stress conditions but led to much higher stresses in the buccal and lingual enamel and to higher tensile stresses in the cavity floor. The unbonded amalgam thus filled the cavity but did not restore the tooth. In contrast, a bonded composite restoration restored the original stress pattern in the tooth if there was no polymerization shrinkage. Polymerization shrinkage causes residual tensile stresses in the dentin around the cavity and in the buccal and lingual enamel. Residual tensile stresses in the buccal and lingual enamel are momentary compensated by compressive stress components during occlusal loading. It was concluded that bonding and elimination of residual stresses are prerequisites for restoring the original tooth integrity. PMID:21748978

  8. Novel Amalgams for In-Space Parts Fabrication

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cochran, Calvin; VanHoose, James R.; Grugel, Richard N.

    2012-01-01

    Sound amalgams can be fabricated by substituting Ga-In liquid for mercury; Cu-coated steel fibers bond well with the amalgam components. Inclusion of steel fibers significantly improved mechanical properties. An application scenario utilizing amalgams for in-space parts fabrication and repair was suggested. Procedure and materials need to be optimized

  9. Wear of dental resin composites: insights into underlying processes and assessment methods--a review.

    PubMed

    Turssi, Cecilia Pedroso; De Moraes Purquerio, Benedito; Serra, Mônica Campos

    2003-05-15

    Given the increased aesthetic demands of patients, along with improvements in the formulation of resin composites, the ability of these materials to bond to tooth structures, and concerns about dental amalgam fillings, the applicability of resin composites in dentistry has become increasingly widespread. As resistance to wear represents an important factor in determining the clinical success of resin composite restoratives, the aim of this article was to define what constitutes wear; the major underlying phenomena involved in this process-adhesion, abrasion, fatigue, and corrosion-being described. Discussions were also focused on factors that contribute both to the magnitude and minimization of resin composite wear. Finally, insights were included on both in vivo and laboratory studies used to determine wear resistance. PMID:12687721

  10. Effects of high temperature on different restorations in forensic identification: Dental samples and mandible

    PubMed Central

    Patidar, Kalpana A; Parwani, Rajkumar; Wanjari, Sangeeta

    2010-01-01

    Introduction: The forensic odontologist strives to utilize the charred human dentition throughout each stage of dental evaluation, and restorations are as unique as fingerprints and their radiographic morphology as well as the types of filling materials are often the main feature for identification. The knowledge of detecting residual restorative material and composition of unrecovered adjacent restoration is a valuable tool-mark in the presumptive identification of the dentition of a burned victim. Gold, silver amalgam, silicate restoration, and so on, have a different resistance to prolonged high temperature, therefore, the identification of burned bodies can be correlated with adequate qualities and quantities of the traces. Most of the dental examination relies heavily on the presence of the restoration as well as the relationship of one dental structure to another. This greatly narrows the research for the final identification that is based on postmortem data. Aim: The purpose of this study is to examine the resistance of teeth and different restorative materials, and the mandible, to variable temperature and duration, for the purpose of identification. Materials and Methods: The study was conducted on 72 extracted teeth which were divided into six goups of 12 teeth each based on the type of restorative material. (Group 1 - unrestored teeth, group 2 - teeth restored with Zn3(PO4)2, group 3 - with silver amalgam, group 4 with glass ionomer cement, group 5 - Ni-Cr-metal crown, group 6 - metal ceramic crown) and two specimens of the mandible. The effect of incineration at 400°C (5 mins, 15 mins, 30 mins) and 1100°C (15 mins) was studied. Results: Damage to the teeth subjected to variable temperatures and time can be categorized as intact (no damage), scorched (superficially parched and discolored), charred (reduced to carbon by incomplete combustion) and incinerated (burned to ashes). PMID:21189989

  11. Amalgam containing nickel or tungsten dispersions. I.

    PubMed

    Reisbick, M H; Bunshah, R F; Agarwal, N

    1977-12-01

    Wetting tests were conducted to determine compatability between select dispersion powders and Ag3Sn. Subsequently, a method was perfected for incorporating nickel or tungsten powder into the Ag3 Sn ingot. Initial studies reveal good distributions of the dispersed phase in the ingots and the comminuted alloys, after amalgamation, appear to retain their normal working characteristics. PMID:277462

  12. The release, tissue distribution and excretion of mercury from experimental amalgam tattoos.

    PubMed Central

    Cox, S. W.; Eley, B. M.

    1986-01-01

    Following the subcutaneous implantation of powdered dental amalgam in guinea pigs, there was an initial extrusion of material from the healing implantation wounds. Longer-term release of mercury from the lesions was demonstrated by linear regression analysis of the mercury contents of implant sites removed after time periods of up to 2 years. Raised mercury levels were detected in the blood, bile, kidneys, liver, spleen and lungs of implanted animals; by far the highest concentrations were found in the renal cortex. Mercury was excreted with the urine and, to a lesser extent, the faeces. The pattern of mercury redistribution resembled that seen following chronic exposure to mercuric compounds. PMID:3801303

  13. Oral health status, dental anxiety, and behavior-management problems in children with oppositional defiant disorder.

    PubMed

    Aminabadi, Naser A; Najafpour, Ebrahim; Erfanparast, Leila; Jamali, Zahra; Pournaghi-Azar, Fatemeh; Tamjid-Shabestari, Shabnam; Shirazi, Sajjad

    2016-02-01

    Mental disorders have been shown to affect children's oral health. This study was carried out to investigate the oral health status, dental anxiety (DA), and behavior-management problems (BMPs) during dental treatment in 6- to 9-yr-old children with oppositional defiant disorder (ODD)/attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). The study and control groups included 40 children with ODD/ADHD and 80 normal children, respectively. All participants received an amalgam restoration. During the procedure, the children's behavior was assessed using the Frankl Rating Scale and the Verbal Skill Scale. Parents rated their children's DA using the parental version of the Children's Fear Survey Schedule-Dental subscale (CFSS-DS). Comorbid anxiety disorders were assessed using the Kiddie-Sads-Present and Lifetime Version questionnaire. Oral health status was assessed using the gingival index and the decayed, missing, and filled teeth score for permanent (DMFT) and primary (dmft) teeth. The findings showed that DA and BMPs were significantly higher in children with ODD/ADHD than in the controls. Furthermore, the frequency of DA and BMPs was higher in children with both ODD/ADHD and a comorbid anxiety disorder than in those without comorbid anxiety disorder. Children with ODD/ADHD had significantly higher DMFT/dmft scores than those in the control group, whereas the difference in gingival index was not statistically significant. In conclusion, children with ODD/ADHD had higher levels of DA, BMP and poorer oral health status. PMID:26707341

  14. Ablation by-products of dental materials from the Er:YAG laser and the dental handpiece

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wigdor, Harvey A.; Visuri, Steven R.; Walsh, Joseph T., Jr.

    1995-05-01

    Recently there has been much interest in lasers and their potential use to replace the dental drill. The research has been directed towards vital dental tissues. It must be understood that any laser to be used in dentistry which will replace the dental drill must also ablate and remove existing dental materials. Some concern exists about the ablation products when the Er:YAG laser is used to ablate dental materials. It is incumbent on the professionals using these lasers to understand the materials being produced by these lasers and protect themselves and their patients from possible toxic products. It is the intent of this paper to evaluate the products produced by the ablation of both dental amalgam and composite dental restorative materials and compare them with those produced by the traditional dental handpiece (drill).

  15. Improving orthodontic bonding to silver amalgam.

    PubMed

    Zachrisson, B U; Büyükyilmaz, T; Zachrisson, Y O

    1995-01-01

    Flat rectangular tabs (n = 84) prepared from lathe-cut amalgam (ANA 2000) were subjected to aluminum oxide sandblasting or roughening with a diamond bur. Mandibular incisor edgewise brackets were bonded to these tabs using: Concise (Bis-GMA resin); one of three metal-bonding adhesives, viz., Superbond C&B (4-META resin), Panavia Ex (10-MDP Bis-GMA resin) or Geristore (composite base); and Concise after application of the intermediate resins All-Bond 2 Primers A+B, or the Scotch-Bond Multi-Purpose (SBMP) system. All specimens were stored in water at 37 degrees C for 24 hours before tensile bond strength testing. Alignment and uniform loading during testing were secured by engaging a hook in a circular ring soldered onto the bracket slot before bonding. Similar control brackets (n = 12) were bonded with Concise to extracted caries-free mandibular incisors. Bond failure sites were classified by a modified ARI system. Mean tensile bond strengths in the experimental group ranged from 3.4 to 6.4 MPa--significantly weaker than the control sample (13.2 MPa). Bond failure generally occurred at the amalgam/adhesive interface. Superbond C&B created the strongest bonds to amalgam; according to ANOVA and Duncan's Multiple-Range test, they were significantly stronger than the bonds with Panavia Ex and Concise, with Geristore in between. However, the bond strength of Concise to sandblasted amalgam was comparable to the Superbond C&B bonds when coupled with an intermediate application of All-Bond 2 Primers A+B. The SBMP, on the other hand, was less effective.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:7726460

  16. Mercury burden and health impairment in dental auxilaries. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Shapiro, I.M.; Bloch, P.; Ship, I.I.; Spitz, L.; Summer, A.

    1988-01-01

    An effort was made to develop a safe and effective x-ray fluorescence system for monitoring mercury and other elements in human tissues in-situ, to determine mercury levels in 207 dental auxiliaries exposed to dental amalgam on the job, to evaluate mercury in matching nonexposed populations and in 298 dentists using mercury amalgam, and to evaluate deficiencies in central and peripheral nervous systems resulting from the mercury exposure. Mercury levels were below 20 micrograms/gram in 60% of the dentists and 90% of the dental auxiliaries. Dentists with the higher mercury concentrations in their heads or wrists had considerably longer median motor distal latencies and median F-wave latency. Five of them demonstrated abnormalities consistent with carpal tunnel syndrome; seven had polyneuropathies defined as reduced motor or sensory conduction velocities of response amplitudes in two or more nerves. Neuropsychological tests indicated both groups of dental workers were adversely affected by mercury exposure.

  17. METHOD AND APPARATUS FOR DETERMINING AMALGAM DECOMPOSITION RATE

    DOEpatents

    Johnson, R.W.; Wright, C.C.

    1962-04-24

    A method and apparatus for measuring the rate at which an amalgam decomposes in contact with aqueous solutions are described. The amalgam and an aqueous hydroxide solution are disposed in an electrolytic cell. The amalgam is used as the cathode of the cell, and an electrode and anode are disposed in the aqueous solution. A variable source of plating potential is connected across the cell. The difference in voltage between the amalgam cathode and a calibrated source of reference potential is used to control the variable source to null the difference in voltage and at the same time to maintain the concentration of the amalgam at some predetermined constant value. The value of the current required to maintain this concentration constant is indicative of the decomposition rate of the amalgam. (AEC)

  18. 48. INTERIOR VIEW FROM THE WEST END OF THE AMALGAMATION ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    48. INTERIOR VIEW FROM THE WEST END OF THE AMALGAMATION TABLES LOOKING NORTH TOWARDS THE STAMP BATTERIES WITH AMALGAM TRAPS SHOWN IN THE BOTTOM FOREGROUND. NOTE THE EXTANT EQUIPMENT IN THE FOREGROUND THAT THE PARK USES TO INTERPRET THE MILL. FROM LEFT TO RIGHT, A SCREEN FROM THE MORTAR BOX, A STAMP STOP. A (HUMAN'S) SHOE, A DIE FROM THE BOTTOM OF A MORTAR BOX, AN AMALGAM SCRAPPER AND AN AMALGAM BUCKET. - Standard Gold Mill, East of Bodie Creek, Northeast of Bodie, Bodie, Mono County, CA

  19. Influence of dental materials on dental MRI

    PubMed Central

    Tymofiyeva, O; Vaegler, S; Rottner, K; Boldt, J; Hopfgartner, AJ; Proff, PC; Richter, E-J; Jakob, PM

    2013-01-01

    Objectives: To investigate the potential influence of standard dental materials on dental MRI (dMRI) by estimating the magnetic susceptibility with the help of the MRI-based geometric distortion method and to classify the materials from the standpoint of dMRI. Methods: A series of standard dental materials was studied on a 1.5 T MRI system using spin echo and gradient echo pulse sequences and their magnetic susceptibility was estimated using the geometric method. Measurements on samples of dental materials were supported by in vivo examples obtained in dedicated dMRI procedures. Results: The tested materials showed a range of distortion degrees. The following materials were classified as fully compatible materials that can be present even in the tooth of interest: the resin-based sealer AH Plus® (Dentsply, Maillefer, Germany), glass ionomer cement, gutta-percha, zirconium dioxide and composites from one of the tested manufacturers. Interestingly, composites provided by the other manufacturer caused relatively strong distortions and were therefore classified as compatible I, along with amalgam, gold alloy, gold–ceramic crowns, titanium alloy and NiTi orthodontic wires. Materials, the magnetic susceptibility of which differed from that of water by more than 200 ppm, were classified as non-compatible materials that should not be present in the patient’s mouth for any dMRI applications. They included stainless steel orthodontic appliances and CoCr. Conclusions: A classification of the materials that complies with the standard grouping of materials according to their magnetic susceptibility was proposed and adopted for the purposes of dMRI. The proposed classification can serve as a guideline in future dMRI research. PMID:23610088

  20. Review of Spaceflight Dental Emergencies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Menon, Anil

    2012-01-01

    All exploration class missions--extending beyond earth's orbit--differ from existing orbital missions by being of longer duration and often not having a means of evacuation. If an exploration mission extends beyond a year, then there will be a greater lapse since the crewmembers last terrestrial dental exams, which routinely occur each year. This increased time since professional dental care could increase the chance of a dental emergency such as intractable pain, dental decay requiring a temporary filling, crown replacement, exposed pulp, abscess, tooth avulsion, or toothache. Additionally, any dental emergency will have to be treated in-flight with available resources and personnel who may not have extensive training in dental care. Thus, dental emergencies are an important risk to assess in preparation for exploration missions.

  1. An in vitro and in vivo study of the release of mercury vapor from different types of amalgam alloys.

    PubMed

    Berglund, A

    1993-05-01

    The aim of the in vitro part of the study was to measure the rate of release of mercury vapor from different types of dental amalgam in air, and in air during cyclic dipping into isotonic saline solution or Fusayama solution. The measurements were carried out by means of the Mercollector/Mercometer system, based on atomic absorption spectrophotometry. Both new (age approximately 2 months) and old (age approximately 1.5 years) amalgam specimens were studied. The variations in the rate of release of mercury vapor in air during cyclic dipping into aqueous media were most pronounced during the first day of the 10-day period studied. In air during cyclic dipping into the aqueous media, the conventional amalgam specimens released mercury vapor at lower rates over the whole period than did the dispersed and single-composition types studied. The aim of the in vivo part of the study was to determine the daily release of mercury vapor from amalgam restorations made of alloys of the same types and batches as those used in the in vitro part of the study. A series of measurements was carried out on each of eight subjects before and after amalgam therapy. None of the subjects was occupationally exposed to mercury. The subjects had to follow a standardized schedule for 24 h, where they ate, drank, and brushed their teeth at predetermined times (Berglund, 1990). The amount of mercury vapor released per time unit was measured at intervals of 30-45 min. Samples of urine and saliva were analyzed formercury.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:8501292

  2. Dental cavities

    MedlinePlus

    ... it with a material such as silver alloy, gold, porcelain, or composite resin. Porcelain and composite resin ... teeth. Many dentists consider silver amalgam (alloy) and gold to be stronger, and these materials are often ...

  3. Measurement of resistance of amalgam mixes to condensation.

    PubMed

    Ogura, H; Hadavi, F; Asgar, K

    1983-08-01

    A method was designed to evaluate the resistance of amalgam mixes to condensation forces. For the purpose of classification with respect to the plasticity of amalgam, the optimum test condition was to apply 40 or 50 lb of static load at 30 sec after trituration. PMID:6575043

  4. Usefulness of an energy-binned photon-counting x-ray detector for dental panoramic radiographs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fukui, Tatsumasa; Katsumata, Akitoshi; Ogawa, Koichi; Fujiwara, Shuu

    2015-03-01

    A newly developed dental panoramic radiography system is equipped with a photon-counting semiconductor detector. This photon-counting detector acquires transparent X-ray beams by dividing them into several energy bands. We developed a method to identify dental materials in the patient's teeth by means of the X-ray energy analysis of panoramic radiographs. We tested various dental materials including gold alloy, dental amalgam, dental cement, and titanium. The results of this study suggest that X-ray energy scattergram analysis could be used to identify a range of dental materials in a patient's panoramic radiograph.

  5. Dental hyponatraemia.

    PubMed

    Simpson, R M

    2011-08-01

    A 14-year-old girl developed dental pain and was treated for acute infected pulpitis of her right upper lateral incisor with drilling and filling. The pain continued and was helped by analgesia, sucking ice cubes and drinking cold water. Forty-eight hours later, she became confused and disoriented. She started to vomit and complained of headache. Investigations revealed hyponatraemia with normal serum potassium levels and initially normal urinary sodium excretion. Over the next 24 hours, she passed 5.45 L of urine and her serum sodium rose from 125 to 143 mmol/L. Self-induced water intoxication has been described during drinking games and initiation ceremonies, but this would appear to an unusual cause. Conservative management proved successful in allowing this girl to recover without sequelae. PMID:21873727

  6. Dental Sealants

    MedlinePlus

    ... Data & Statistics > Find Data by Topic > Dental Sealants Dental Sealants Main Content Dental sealants are thin plastic coatings that protect the chewing surfaces of children’s back teeth from tooth decay. Overall, the prevalence of sealants ...

  7. Dental Procedures.

    PubMed

    Ramponi, Denise R

    2016-01-01

    Dental problems are a common complaint in emergency departments in the United States. There are a wide variety of dental issues addressed in emergency department visits such as dental caries, loose teeth, dental trauma, gingival infections, and dry socket syndrome. Review of the most common dental blocks and dental procedures will allow the practitioner the opportunity to make the patient more comfortable and reduce the amount of analgesia the patient will need upon discharge. Familiarity with the dental equipment, tooth, and mouth anatomy will help prepare the practitioner for to perform these dental procedures. PMID:27482994

  8. In vivo assessment of secondary caries and dentin characteristics after traditional amalgam restorations

    PubMed Central

    de Assunção Pinheiro, Isauremi Vieira; Borges, Boniek Castillo Dutra; de Lima, Kenio Costa

    2012-01-01

    Objective This study aimed to evaluate in vivo the occurrence of secondary caries and dentin characteristics in permanent molars after traditional amalgam restorations, by means of clinical visual examination, radiographs and laser-induced fluorescence (LF) (DIAGNOdent). Methods: Thirty first permanent molars of 30 schoolchildren in the 7 to14 year-old age group were included. Caries was removed by hand. Thus, indirect pulp capping was performed with glass-ionomer cement (GIC), the cavity was varnished and amalgam filled. LF was measured before and after cavity preparation and after a 12-month observation period. Dentin color after cavity preparation and after the 12-month observation period was recorded. Recurrent caries was also investigated by visual clinical and radiographic examinations, in addition to dentin thickness between pulp and indirect GIC pulp capping. Data was analyzed by ANOVA for repeated measurements, paired “t” test and descriptive statistic. Results: There were statistically significant differences (P<.05) among LF scores for dentin in all periods evaluated, with the lowest scores shown after 12 month of observation. There was no statistical difference between dentin color after cavity preparation and following 12 months of observation. Moreover, there was no recurrent caries attack at 12-month follow-up; dentin thickness between pulp and indirect GIC pulp capping was similar between baseline and final observation periods. It was concluded that the clinical restorative procedure using hand caries removal, indirect pulp capping with GIC, varnishing and amalgam filling the cavity did not provide secondary caries and increased dentin mineral content after 12 months. PMID:22904654

  9. Coronal microleakage of two root-end filling materials using a polymicrobial marker.

    PubMed

    Ferk Luketić, Suzana; Malcić, Ana; Jukić, Silvana; Anić, Ivica; Segović, Sanja; Kalenić, Smilja

    2008-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate polymicrobial coronal leakage of mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA) and amalgam. There were 108 single-rooted teeth randomly divided into 3 groups of 32 teeth each and positive and negative control groups of 6 teeth and obturated with gutta percha and either Diaket (3M/ESPE, Seefeld, Germany), AH Plus (Dentsply, De Trey, Konstanz, Germany), or Ketac Endo (3M/ESPE). These groups were further divided into 2 subgroups of 16 teeth in which root ends were resected and obturated with either MTA or zinc-free amalgam. The samples have been incorporated in a dual-chamber leakage model with a polymicrobial marker of five facultative anaerobes on the coronal part. Leakage was observing during a period of 90 days. The least leakage was found in a combination of Diaket and MTA (76.9 +/-14.8 days) followed by AH Plus and MTA (66.1 +/- 18.7), Diaket and amalgam (60.0 +/- 23.1), AH Plus and amalgam (56.9 +/- 22.1), and Ketac Endo and MTA (42.1 +/- 17.8), whereas the greatest leakage was observed in the Ketac Endo and amalgam group (40.0 +/- 17.24). Samples filled with MTA showed significantly better sealing than samples filled with amalgam (p < 0.05). PMID:18215682

  10. [Electromagnetic interference of electrical dental equipment with cardiac pacemakers].

    PubMed

    Brand, H S; van der Hoeff, E V; Schrama, T A M; Entjes, M L; van Nieuw, Amerongen A

    2007-09-01

    Eight different electrical dental appliances were tested at different intervals for their ability to interfere with the function of a contemporary cardiac pacemaker. The normal atrial and ventricular pacing was inhibited by an ultrasonic bath cleaner at a distance of less than 15 cm. In contrast, a dental chair, an electrosurgical unit, an ultrasonic tooth scaler, 2 handpieces, and 2 amalgamators failed to produce electromagnetic interference at the minimum distance of 2.5 cm. In conclusion, the results suggest that normal clinical use of dental electrical equipment does not have any significant effect on the cardiac pacemaker tested. PMID:17937372

  11. Behavior of three high-Cu amalgams.

    PubMed

    Mahler, D B

    1979-09-01

    Amalgams made from three single-composition high-Cu alloys of the same nominal composition were investigated for differences in creep behavior. The curves of creep vs. final Hg content for all three alloys showed a sudden creep increase (jump) at approximately 46% final Hg content. Previous studies have shown this creep jump to be associated with the initiation of the Sn--Hg phase (gamma 2). The anticipated final Hg content in clinical restorations for two of these alloys is below the creep jump and gamma 2 would not be expected. On the other hand, the clinical Hg content for the third alloy was above its creep jump and gamma 2 would be expected. The effect on clinical behavior of this finding require further investigation. PMID:479216

  12. Evaluation of interproximal finishing techniques for silver amalgam restorations.

    PubMed

    Bower, C F; Reinhardt, R A; DuBois, L M

    1986-09-01

    In spite of the incidence of recurrent caries and gingival inflammation surrounding the gingival margins of interproximal silver amalgam restorations, little information exists on the efficacy of finishing procedures in this location. This study was intended to evaluate surface smoothness of interproximal silver amalgams using four finishing techniques. Results indicated that surfaces finished using the carve, floss, and finishing strip polish consistently produced a measurably smoother surface (p less than 0.01) than did the other techniques. The use of finishing strips on the gingival margin of Class II silver amalgam restorations shows promise of improving interproximal surface smoothness. PMID:3462385

  13. Determination of ablation threshold for composite resins and amalgam irradiated with femtosecond laser pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freitas, A. Z.; Freschi, L. R.; Samad, R. E.; Zezell, D. M.; Gouw-Soares, S. C.; Vieira, N. D., Jr.

    2010-03-01

    The use of laser for caries removal and cavity preparation is already a reality in the dental clinic. The objective of the present study was to consider the viability of ultrashort laser pulses for restorative material selective removal, by determining the ablation threshold fluence for composite resins and amalgam irradiated with femtosecond laser pulses. Lasers pulses centered at 830 nm with 50 fs of duration and 1 kHz of repetition rate, with energies in the range of 300 to 770 μJ were used to irradiate the samples. The samples were irradiated using two different geometrical methods for ablation threshold fluence determinations and the volume ablation was measured by optical coherence tomography. The shape of the ablated surfaces were analyzed by optical microscopy and scanning electron microscopy. The determined ablation threshold fluence is 0.35 J/cm2 for the composite resins Z-100 and Z-350, and 0.25 J/cm2 for the amalgam. These values are half of the value for enamel in this temporal regime. Thermal damages were not observed in the samples. Using the OCT technique (optical coherence tomography) was possible to determine the ablated volume and the total mass removed.

  14. 21 CFR 872.3820 - Root canal filling resin.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Root canal filling resin. 872.3820 Section 872...) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 872.3820 Root canal filling resin. (a) Identification. A root canal filling resin is a device composed of material, such as methylmethacrylate,...

  15. 21 CFR 872.3820 - Root canal filling resin.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Root canal filling resin. 872.3820 Section 872...) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 872.3820 Root canal filling resin. (a) Identification. A root canal filling resin is a device composed of material, such as methylmethacrylate,...

  16. 21 CFR 872.3820 - Root canal filling resin.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Root canal filling resin. 872.3820 Section 872...) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 872.3820 Root canal filling resin. (a) Identification. A root canal filling resin is a device composed of material, such as methylmethacrylate,...

  17. 21 CFR 872.3310 - Coating material for resin fillings.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Coating material for resin fillings. 872.3310... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 872.3310 Coating material for resin fillings. (a) Identification. A coating material for resin fillings is a device intended to be applied to...

  18. 21 CFR 872.3310 - Coating material for resin fillings.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Coating material for resin fillings. 872.3310... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 872.3310 Coating material for resin fillings. (a) Identification. A coating material for resin fillings is a device intended to be applied to...

  19. 21 CFR 872.3310 - Coating material for resin fillings.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Coating material for resin fillings. 872.3310... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 872.3310 Coating material for resin fillings. (a) Identification. A coating material for resin fillings is a device intended to be applied to...

  20. 21 CFR 872.3310 - Coating material for resin fillings.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Coating material for resin fillings. 872.3310... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 872.3310 Coating material for resin fillings. (a) Identification. A coating material for resin fillings is a device intended to be applied to...

  1. 21 CFR 872.3310 - Coating material for resin fillings.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Coating material for resin fillings. 872.3310... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 872.3310 Coating material for resin fillings. (a) Identification. A coating material for resin fillings is a device intended to be applied to...

  2. Reasons for Retreatment of Amalgam and Composite Restorations among the Patients Referring to Tabriz Faculty of Dentistry

    PubMed Central

    Kimyai, Soodabeh; Mehdipour, Masomeh; Savadi Oskoee, Siavash; Alizadeh Oskoee, Parnian; Abbaszadeh, Armin

    2007-01-01

    Background and aims Retreatment of existing restorations not only requires a lot of money and time but also there is a danger of weakening tooth structure and irritating the pulp. Since awareness of the reasons for the retreatment of teeth will save the teeth from possible future failure, the aim of this study was to assess the reasons for retreatment of amalgam and composite restorations in patients referring to Tabriz Faculty of Dentistry. Materials and methods In this descriptive study, the subjects had previously received an amalgam or a composite restoration in the Operative Department by dental students and were judged to need retreatment in their second visit. A total of 300 defective teeth were selected by simple random sampling method. The data was collected through examination and questionnaires and analyzed using chi-square test. Results There was a statistically significant association between the type of the restorative material and the reason for retreatment (p=0.001). Conclusion Although the reasons for the retreatment of amalgam and composite restorations were different, recurrent caries was the main reason for the retreatment for both restorative materials. PMID:23277830

  3. Biomechanical Stress Analysis of Mandibular First Permanent Molar; Restored with Amalgam and Composite Resin: A Computerized Finite Element Study

    PubMed Central

    Prabhakar, AR

    2010-01-01

    Normal mastication with its varying magnitude and direction generates considerable reactionary stresses in teeth and their supporting tissues. The structure of the human tooth and its supporting tissues is a complex assemblage of materials of varied mechanical properties. The finite element method (FEM), a modern technique of numerical stress analysis, has the great advantage of being applicable to solids of irregular geometry and heterogeneous material properties and therefore ideally suited to the examination of structural behavior of teeth. The mandibular first permanent molar is one of the earliest permanent teeth to erupt in the oral cavity and hence most prone to caries. The purpose of the present study was to construct a two-dimensional FE model of the mandibular first permanent molar and its supporting structures, using a FE software called NISA II-Display III, EMRC, USA to study the following: • To compare stress distributions patterns when a modeled Class I Cavity was restored with dental amalgam and composite resin. • To compare the stress distributions pattern when the load was applied to different to locations, i.e.: At the mesial cusp tip, and at the center of the occlusal surface. Both amalgam and composite resin showed similar stress distribution pattern, however, the magnitudes of stresses generated in the tooth restored with composite resin were higher. Thus, amalgam is a better restorative material in distributing stresses.

  4. Occlusal glass ionomer cermet, resin sandwich and amalgam restorations: a 2-year clinical study.

    PubMed

    Lidums, A; Wilkie, R; Smales, R

    1993-08-01

    This study compared the clinical behavior of a glass ionomer silver cermet (Ketac-Silver), a posterior resin composite (Visio-Molar) used with the "sandwich" technique, and a high-copper amalgam (Dispersalloy) for restoring conventional Class I occlusal cavity preparations. Two dentists placed 116 restorations in the posterior permanent teeth of 35 adults treated at a dental hospital. Restorations were assessed at 6-month intervals over 2 years for bulk loss of material and occlusal wear, surface voids, roughness and cracking, surface and marginal staining, and marginal fracture. Losses of material and surface voids were obvious with the cermet material, with surface crazing or cracking being present in 33% of the restorations. The cermet cannot be recommended as a long-term permanent restorative material if the restorations are likely to be subjected to heavy occlusal stresses and abrasive wear. PMID:7803005

  5. A 4 year follow-up study of alveolar bone height influenced by two dissimilar Class II amalgam restorations.

    PubMed

    Fisher, D; Markitziu, A; Fishel, D; Brayer, L

    1984-07-01

    Fifty-four paired, approximal amalgam fillings, extended (E) versus unextended (NE) were placed in forty-three patients and followed up to 4 years. Yearly measurements between the alveolar crest and (a) the apical margin of the fillings (E, NE), and (b) the cemento-enamel junction of the control group, were performed using bite-wing radiographs joined to a translucent grid magnified ten-fold. The rate of alveolar crest resorption was similar for the control (C) and the unextended filling (NE) and reached 0.45 mm after 4 years of follow-up. The resorption of the alveolar crest under the extended (E) filling was significantly higher and reached 0.80 mm after 4 years (P less than 0.001). PMID:6589386

  6. Health maintenance facility: Dental equipment requirements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Young, John; Gosbee, John; Billica, Roger

    1991-01-01

    The objectives were to test the effectiveness of the Health Maintenance Facility (HMF) dental suction/particle containment system, which controls fluids and debris generated during simulated dental treatment, in microgravity; to test the effectiveness of fiber optic intraoral lighting systems in microgravity, while simulating dental treatment; and to evaluate the operation and function of off-the-shelf dental handheld instruments, namely a portable dental hand drill and temporary filling material, in microgravity. A description of test procedures, including test set-up, flight equipment, and the data acquisition system, is given.

  7. Effect of bonded amalgam on the fracture resistance of teeth.

    PubMed

    Eakle, W S; Staninec, M; Lacy, A M

    1992-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine whether amalgam bonded to tooth structure with an adhesive resin cement can increase the fracture resistance of restored teeth. Extracted paired upper premolars were prepared for G.V. Black type mesioocclusodistal amalgam restorations. In one tooth of each pair (the experimental group), the enamel walls were etched with phosphoric acid and were painted with an adhesive resin (Panavia), and amalgam was condensed and carved. For the other tooth in each pair (the control group), amalgam was placed in the same manner but was not etched and lined with resin. The teeth were thermocycled and mounted for testing and then were loaded until fracture. A significant difference (p less than 0.05, the paired Student's t-test) was found in the force needed to fracture the bonded amalgam group (70.5 +/- 21.6 kg) compared with that needed to fracture the conventional amalgam group (60.3 +/- 16.8 kg). SEM examination of fractures at the interface occurred predominantly within the resin. PMID:1501170

  8. Scanning probe microscopy on new dental alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reusch, B.; Geis-Gerstorfer, J.; Ziegler, C.

    Surface analytical methods such as scanning force microscopy (SFM), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) were used to determine the surface properties of amalgam substitutes as tooth filling materials. In particular the corrosion and the passivation behavior of new gallium restorative materials were studied. To give relevant practical data, the measurements were performed with and without the alloys being stored in artificial saliva to simulate physiological oral conditions.

  9. Comparative study of mechanical properties of dental restorative materials and dental hard tissues in compressive loads.

    PubMed

    Chun, Keyoung Jin; Lee, Jong Yeop

    2014-01-01

    There are two objectives. One is to show the differences in the mechanical properties of various dental restorative materials compared to those of enamel and dentin. The other is to ascertain which dental restorative materials are more suitable for clinical treatments. Amalgam, dental ceramic, gold alloy, dental resin, zirconia, and titanium alloy were processed as dental restorative material specimens. The specimens (width, height, and length of 1.2, 1.2, and 3.0 mm, respectively) were compressed at a constant loading speed of 0.1 mm/min. The maximum stress (115.0 ± 40.6, 55.0 ± 24.8, 291.2 ± 45.3, 274.6 ± 52.2, 2206.0 ± 522.9, and 953.4 ± 132.1 MPa), maximum strain (7.8% ± 0.5%, 4.0% ± 0.1%, 12.7% ± 0.8%, 32.8% ± 0.5%, 63.5% ± 14.0%, and 45.3% ± 7.4%), and elastic modulus (1437.5 ± 507.2, 1548.4 ± 583.5, 2323.4 ± 322.4, 833.1 ± 92.4, 3895.2 ± 202.9, and 2222.7 ± 277.6 MPa) were evident for amalgam, dental ceramic, gold alloy, dental resin, zirconia, and titanium alloy, respectively. The reference hardness value of amalgam, dental ceramic, gold alloy, dental resin, zirconia, and titanium alloy was 90, 420, 130-135, 86.6-124.2, 1250, and 349, respectively. Since enamel grinds food, its abrasion resistance is important. Therefore, hardness value should be prioritized for enamel. Since dentin absorbs bite forces, mechanical properties should be prioritized for dentin. The results suggest that gold alloy simultaneously has a hardness value lower than enamel (74.8 ± 18.1), which is important in the wear of the opposing natural teeth, and higher maximum stress, maximum strain, and elastic modulus than dentin (193.7 ± 30.6 MPa, 11.9% ± 0.1%, 1653.7 ± 277.9 MPa, respectively), which are important considering the rigidity to absorb bite forces. PMID:25352921

  10. Comparative study of mechanical properties of dental restorative materials and dental hard tissues in compressive loads

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jong Yeop

    2014-01-01

    There are two objectives. One is to show the differences in the mechanical properties of various dental restorative materials compared to those of enamel and dentin. The other is to ascertain which dental restorative materials are more suitable for clinical treatments. Amalgam, dental ceramic, gold alloy, dental resin, zirconia, and titanium alloy were processed as dental restorative material specimens. The specimens (width, height, and length of 1.2, 1.2, and 3.0 mm, respectively) were compressed at a constant loading speed of 0.1 mm/min. The maximum stress (115.0 ± 40.6, 55.0 ± 24.8, 291.2 ± 45.3, 274.6 ± 52.2, 2206.0 ± 522.9, and 953.4 ± 132.1 MPa), maximum strain (7.8% ± 0.5%, 4.0% ± 0.1%, 12.7% ± 0.8%, 32.8% ± 0.5%, 63.5% ± 14.0%, and 45.3% ± 7.4%), and elastic modulus (1437.5 ± 507.2, 1548.4 ± 583.5, 2323.4 ± 322.4, 833.1 ± 92.4, 3895.2 ± 202.9, and 2222.7 ± 277.6 MPa) were evident for amalgam, dental ceramic, gold alloy, dental resin, zirconia, and titanium alloy, respectively. The reference hardness value of amalgam, dental ceramic, gold alloy, dental resin, zirconia, and titanium alloy was 90, 420, 130–135, 86.6–124.2, 1250, and 349, respectively. Since enamel grinds food, its abrasion resistance is important. Therefore, hardness value should be prioritized for enamel. Since dentin absorbs bite forces, mechanical properties should be prioritized for dentin. The results suggest that gold alloy simultaneously has a hardness value lower than enamel (74.8 ± 18.1), which is important in the wear of the opposing natural teeth, and higher maximum stress, maximum strain, and elastic modulus than dentin (193.7 ± 30.6 MPa, 11.9% ± 0.1%, 1653.7 ± 277.9 MPa, respectively), which are important considering the rigidity to absorb bite forces. PMID:25352921

  11. Crater Fill

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Context image for PIA03082 Crater Fill

    This VIS image shows part of the floor of an unnamed crater located between the Hellas and Argyre Basins. At some point in time the entire floor of the crater was filled by material. That material is now being eroded away to form the depressions seen in the center and bottom of the image.

    Image information: VIS instrument. Latitude 46.6S, Longitude 5.0E. 17 meter/pixel resolution.

    Note: this THEMIS visual image has not been radiometrically nor geometrically calibrated for this preliminary release. An empirical correction has been performed to remove instrumental effects. A linear shift has been applied in the cross-track and down-track direction to approximate spacecraft and planetary motion. Fully calibrated and geometrically projected images will be released through the Planetary Data System in accordance with Project policies at a later time.

    NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory manages the 2001 Mars Odyssey mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. The Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS) was developed by Arizona State University, Tempe, in collaboration with Raytheon Santa Barbara Remote Sensing. The THEMIS investigation is led by Dr. Philip Christensen at Arizona State University. Lockheed Martin Astronautics, Denver, is the prime contractor for the Odyssey project, and developed and built the orbiter. Mission operations are conducted jointly from Lockheed Martin and from JPL, a division of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena.

  12. Dental Hygienists

    MedlinePlus

    ... anatomy, patient management, and periodontics, which is the study of gum disease. High school students interested in becoming dental hygienists should take courses in biology, chemistry, and math. Most dental hygiene programs also require applicants to have completed at ...

  13. Dental sealants

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000779.htm Dental sealants To use the sharing features on this ... case a sealant needs to be replaced. How Dental Sealants Are Applied Your dentist applies sealants on ...

  14. Blood lead level and dental caries in school-age children.

    PubMed Central

    Gemmel, Allison; Tavares, Mary; Alperin, Susan; Soncini, Jennifer; Daniel, David; Dunn, Julie; Crawford, Sybil; Braveman, Norman; Clarkson, Thomas W; McKinlay, Sonja; Bellinger, David C

    2002-01-01

    The association between blood lead level and dental caries was evaluated in cross-sectional analyses of baseline data for 543 children 6-10 years old screened for enrollment in the Children's Amalgam Trial, a study designed to assess potential health effects of mercury in silver fillings. Approximately half of the children were recruited from an urban setting (Boston/Cambridge, MA, USA) and approximately half from a rural setting (Farmington, ME, USA). Mean blood lead level was significantly greater among the urban subgroup, as was the mean number of carious tooth surfaces. Blood lead level was positively associated with number of caries among urban children, even with adjustment for demographic and maternal factors and child dental practices. This association was stronger in primary than in permanent dentition and stronger for occlusal, lingual, and buccal tooth surfaces than for mesial or distal surfaces. In general, blood lead was not associated with caries in the rural subgroup. The difference between the strength of the associations in the urban and rural settings might reflect the presence of residual confounding in the former setting, the presence of greater variability in the latter setting in terms of important caries risk factors (e.g., fluoride exposure), or greater exposure misclassification in the rural setting. These findings add to the evidence supporting a weak association between children's lead exposure and caries prevalence. A biologic mechanism for lead cariogenicity has not been identified, however. Our data are also consistent with residual confounding by factors associated with both elevated lead exposure and dental caries. PMID:12361944

  15. ENVIRONMENTAL TECHNOLOGY VERIFICATION REPORT REMOVAL OF MERCURY FROM DENTAL OFFICE WASTEWATER

    EPA Science Inventory

    Verification testing of the DRNA Mercury Recovery Unit (MRU) was conducted during a seven-week period, at a dental office in Michigan that had three operatory rooms and two hygiene rooms. The office operated four days per week and averaged approximately eight (8) mercury amalgam ...

  16. DENTAL PULP TISSUE ENGINEERING

    PubMed Central

    Demarco, FF; Conde, MCM; Cavalcanti, B; Casagrande, L; Sakai, V; Nör, JE

    2013-01-01

    Dental pulp is a highly specialized mesenchymal tissue, which have a restrict regeneration capacity due to anatomical arrangement and post-mitotic nature of odontoblastic cells. Entire pulp amputation followed by pulp-space disinfection and filling with an artificial material cause loss of a significant amount of dentin leaving as life-lasting sequelae a non-vital and weakened tooth. However, regenerative endodontics is an emerging field of modern tissue engineering that demonstrated promising results using stem cells associated with scaffolds and responsive molecules. Thereby, this article will review the most recent endeavors to regenerate pulp tissue based on tissue engineering principles and providing insightful information to readers about the different aspects enrolled in tissue engineering. Here, we speculate that the search for the ideal combination of cells, scaffolds, and morphogenic factors for dental pulp tissue engineering may be extended over future years and result in significant advances in other areas of dental and craniofacial research. The finds collected in our review showed that we are now at a stage in which engineering a complex tissue, such as the dental pulp, is no longer an unachievable and the next decade will certainly be an exciting time for dental and craniofacial research. PMID:21519641

  17. Silver-tin alloys and amalgams: electrochemical considerations.

    PubMed

    Mueller, H J

    1980-01-01

    The corrosion potential and anodic polarization profiles of a representative number of silver-tin alloys and their corresponding amalgams in a physiological solution were determined and compared to their microstructures. For the alloys with tin-content greater than 27%(wt) and for all amalgams, the corrosion process is related to the attack of free tin for the alloys and to the gamma-2 tin for the amalgams. The gamma-2 concentration in the amalgams increases with an increase in tin-content. For alloys with tin-content less than 27%, the corrosion process is even more restricted than for the process observed with pure silver. From a developed theory based upon the potential-time and polarization results, association of the O2 reduction process on a SnO cathodic film to an intermediate specie of H2O2 is made. The rate of H2O2 decomposition on a SnO surface in a four electron process is thought to control the O2 reduction overvoltage. The O2 reduction overvoltage decreases with increases in the silver-content of the amalgam, particularily seen with the 8 and 12% tin compositions. Due to the polarization induced corrosion process, a phase with high silver and high mercury concentrations was observed over the unreacted particles. PMID:7362862

  18. Dental OCT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colston, Bill W.; Sathyam, Ujwal S.; Dasilva, Luiz B.; Everett, Matthew J.; Stroeve, Pieter; Otis, L. L.

    1998-09-01

    We present here the first in vivo optical coherence tomography (OCT) images of human dental tissue. A novel dental optical coherence tomography system has been developed. This system incorporates the interferometer sample arm and transverse scanning optics into a handpiece that can be used intraorally to image human dental tissues. The average imaging depth of this system varied from 3 mm in hard tissues to 1.5 mm in soft tissues. We discuss the application of this imaging system for dentistry and illustrate the potential of our dental OCT system for diagnosis of periodontal disease, detection of caries, and evaluation of dental restorations.

  19. Surface characterization of amalgam made with Hg-In liquid alloy.

    PubMed

    Nakajima, H; Akaiwa, Y; Hashimoto, H; Ferracane, J L; Okabe, T

    1997-01-01

    When amalgam was triturated with Hg-In liquid alloys instead of pure mercury, the resultant amalgams released a significantly smaller amount of mercury vapor during setting. To understand the mechanisms responsible for the drastic decrease in mercury evaporation from the In-containing amalgam, we used Auger Electron Spectroscopy to examine surface oxide films on amalgams made with Hg-10 wt% In or pure mercury. The surface of the In-containing amalgam was rapidly covered with both indium and tin oxide films. Greater amounts of oxygen were found on the gamma 1 Ag-Hg matrix in the In-containing amalgam than in the amalgam without indium. The rapid formation of the oxide film contributes to a reduction in the mercury release from the In-containing amalgam by forming an effective barrier to evaporation. PMID:9042085

  20. Integrated starting and running amalgam assembly for an electrodeless fluorescent lamp

    DOEpatents

    Borowiec, Joseph Christopher; Cocoma, John Paul; Roberts, Victor David

    1998-01-01

    An integrated starting and running amalgam assembly for an electrodeless SEF fluorescent lamp includes a wire mesh amalgam support constructed to jointly optimize positions of a starting amalgam and a running amalgam in the lamp, thereby optimizing mercury vapor pressure in the lamp during both starting and steady-state operation in order to rapidly achieve and maintain high light output. The wire mesh amalgam support is constructed to support the starting amalgam toward one end thereof and the running amalgam toward the other end thereof, and the wire mesh is rolled for friction-fitting within the exhaust tube of the lamp. The positions of the starting and running amalgams on the wire mesh are jointly optimized such that high light output is achieved quickly and maintained, while avoiding any significant reduction in light output between starting and running operation.

  1. Exposures of dental professionals to elemental mercury and methylmercury.

    PubMed

    Goodrich, Jaclyn M; Chou, Hwai-Nan; Gruninger, Stephen E; Franzblau, Alfred; Basu, Niladri

    2016-01-01

    Mercury (Hg) exposure, a worldwide public health concern, predominantly takes two forms--methylmercury from fish consumption and elemental Hg from dental amalgam restorations. We recruited 630 dental professionals from an American Dental Association meeting to assess Hg body burden and primary sources of exposure in a dually exposed population. Participants described occupational practices and fish consumption patterns via questionnaire. Hg levels in biomarkers of elemental Hg (urine) and methylmercury (hair and blood) were measured with a Direct Mercury Analyzer-80 and were higher than the general US population. Geometric means (95% CI) were 1.28 (1.19-1.37) μg/l in urine, 0.60 (0.54-0.67) μg/g in hair and 3.67 (3.38-3.98) μg/l in blood. In multivariable linear regression, personal amalgams predicted urine Hg levels along with total years in dentistry, amalgams handled, working hours and sex. Fish consumption patterns predicted hair and blood Hg levels, which were higher among Asians compared with Caucasians. Five species contributed the majority of the estimated Hg intake from fish--swordfish, fresh tuna, white canned tuna, whitefish and king mackerel. When studying populations with occupational exposure to Hg, it is important to assess environmental exposures to both elemental Hg and methylmercury as these constitute a large proportion of total exposure. PMID:26329138

  2. Novel Amalgams for In-Space Fabrication of Replacement Parts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cochran, Calvin T.; Van Hoose, James R.; Grugel, R. N.

    2012-01-01

    Being able to fabricate replacement parts during extended space flight missions precludes the weight, storage volume, and speculation necessary to accommodate spares. Amalgams, widely used in dentistry, are potential candidates for fabricating parts in microgravity environments as they are moldable, do not require energy for melting, and do not pose fluid handling problems. Unfortunately, amalgams have poor tensile strength and the room temperature liquid component is mercury. To possibly resolve these issues a gallium-indium alloy was substituted for mercury and small steel fibers were mixed in with the commercial alloy powder. Subsequent microscopic examination of the novel amalgam revealed complete bonding of the components, and mechanical testing of comparable samples showed those containing steel fibers to have a significant improvement in strength. Experimental procedures, microstructures, and test results are presented and discussed in view of further improving properties.

  3. 21 CFR 872.3275 - Dental cement.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    .... Zinc oxide-eugenol is a device composed of zinc oxide-eugenol intended to serve as a temporary tooth filling or as a base cement to affix a temporary tooth filling, to affix dental devices such as crowns or bridges, or to be applied to a tooth to protect the tooth pulp. (2) Classification. Class I...

  4. 21 CFR 872.3275 - Dental cement.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    .... Zinc oxide-eugenol is a device composed of zinc oxide-eugenol intended to serve as a temporary tooth filling or as a base cement to affix a temporary tooth filling, to affix dental devices such as crowns or bridges, or to be applied to a tooth to protect the tooth pulp. (2) Classification. Class I...

  5. 21 CFR 872.3275 - Dental cement.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    .... Zinc oxide-eugenol is a device composed of zinc oxide-eugenol intended to serve as a temporary tooth filling or as a base cement to affix a temporary tooth filling, to affix dental devices such as crowns or bridges, or to be applied to a tooth to protect the tooth pulp. (2) Classification. Class I...

  6. [Prosthetic dental alloys. 1].

    PubMed

    Quintero Engelmbright, M A

    1990-11-01

    A wide variety of restoration materials for prosthetic odontology is now available to the dental surgeon, either of the covalent type (acrylic resins), metallic (alloys), ionic (porcelains), or a combination of them, as in the so-called composites, such as the composite resins, or as ceramics-metals mixtures. An example of the latter is a product called Miracle-Mix, a glass ionomere cement reinforced with an amalgam alloy. In those cases where the blend is done by a synterization process, the material is called Cermet. The above-listed alternatives clearly evidence day-to-day advances in odontology, with researchers and manufacturers engaged the world over in improving existing products or developing new ones to enrich the dentist's armamentarium. As a side effect of this constant renewal, those dentists who have failed to update their knowledge fall behind in their practice as they persist in using products they have known for years, and may be deceived by advertisements of too-often unreliable products. It is, therefore, important to be aware of available products and their latest improvements. PMID:2132464

  7. [Prosthetic dental alloys (2)].

    PubMed

    Quintero Englembright, M A

    1990-12-01

    A wide variety of restoration materials for prosthetic odontology is now available to the dental surgeon, either of the covalent type (acrylic resins), metallic (alloys), ionic (porcelains), or a combination of them, as in the so-called composites, such as the composite resins, or as ceramics-metals mixtures. An example of the latter is a product called Miracle-Mix, a glass ionomere cement reinforced with an amalgam alloy. In those cases where the blend is done by a synterization process, the material is called Cermet. The above-listed alternatives clearly evidence day-to-day advances in odontology, with researchers and manufacturers engaged the world over in improving existing products or developing new ones to enrich the dentist's armamentarium. As a side effect of this constant renewal, those dentists who have failed to update their knowledge fall behind in their practice as they persist in using products they have known for years, and may be deceived by advertisements of too-often unreliable products. It is, therefore, important to be aware of available products and their latest improvements. PMID:2132470

  8. Tooth-Colored Fillings

    MedlinePlus

    ... Dental Implants Dentures Direct Bonding Implants versus Bridges Orthodontics and Aligners Periodontal Plastic Surgery Porcelain Crowns Porcelain ... Dental Implants Dentures Direct Bonding Implants versus Bridges Orthodontics and Aligners Periodontal Plastic Surgery Porcelain Crowns Porcelain ...

  9. The problem of motivating teaching staff in a complex amalgamation.

    PubMed

    Kenrick, M A

    1993-09-01

    This paper addresses some of the problems brought about by the merger of a number of schools of nursing into a new complex amalgamation. A very real concern in the new colleges of nursing and midwifery in the United Kingdom is the effect of amalgamation on management systems and staff morale. The main focus of this paper is the motivation of staff during this time of change. There is currently a lack of security amongst staff and in many instances the personal job satisfaction of nurse teachers and managers of nurse education has been reduced, which has made the task of motivating staff difficult. Hence, two major theories of motivation and the implications of these theories for managers of nurse education are discussed. The criteria used for the selection of managers within the new colleges, leadership styles and organizational structures are reviewed. The amalgamations have brought about affiliation with higher-education institutions. Some problems associated with these mergers and the effects on the motivation of staff both within the higher-education institutions and the nursing colleges are outlined. Strategies for overcoming some of the problems are proposed including job enlargement, job enrichment, potential achievement rewards and the use of individual performance reviews which may be useful for assessing the ability of all staff, including managers, in the new amalgamations. PMID:8258610

  10. Test of Picture-Text Amalgams in Procedural Texts.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stone, David Edey

    Designed to assess how people read and comprehend information presented in picture-text amalgams in procedural texts, this instrument presents various combinations of text information and illustrative information on slides. Subjects are assigned to one of four conditions and directed to follow the instructions presented on the slides. Videotapes…