Science.gov

Sample records for dental ct images

  1. Three-dimensional dental imaging by spiral CT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vannier, Michael W.; Hildebolt, Charles F.; Conover, Gary; Knapp, Robert H.; Yokoyama-Crothers, Naoko; Wang, Ge

    1995-05-01

    Three-dimensional image acquisition, display, and analysis of dental structures was performed and validated using spiral computed tomography (SCT) with metal artifact suppression. Isolated extracted teeth, a dry mandible, cadaver mandible, and cadaver head were scanned and reconstructed using a spiral CT scanner (Siemens Somatom PLUS-S) with 1 mm detector collimation, 1-mm table feed, and 0.1 - 1 mm reconstruction interval using specially developed software. Algorithms for metal artifact reduction including extended attenuation range and interpolation of missing projections were applied. Volumetric rendering of voxel sum images was performed to synthesize images comparable to conventional intraoral dental radiographs. Direct comparison of voxel-based synthetic and digitized film images was made. Several isolated, extracted teeth were sectioned with a diamond saw and submitted for histomorphometric analysis to aid in direct comparison with CT slice images obtained by multiplanar reconstruction. Metal artifact reduction was successful in markedly reducing the streaks and star patterns that usually accompany metallic restorations and intraoral appliances. Individual teeth were comparable to CT slice images. Voxel sum images were comparable to dental radiographs; however, for the SCT images, the spatial resolution was higher within the plane of section than it was orthogonal to the plane of section. Serial examinations were obtained by SCT, registered by surface matching, and interval change measured by 3D subtraction. Simulated lesions and restorations were introduced and quantitatively evaluated pre- and post-interventionally to assess imaging method performance.

  2. Dental imaging using laminar optical tomography and micro CT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Long, Feixiao; Ozturk, Mehmet S.; Intes, Xavier; Kotha, Shiva

    2014-02-01

    Dental lesions located in the pulp are quite difficult to identify based on anatomical contrast, and, hence, to diagnose using traditional imaging methods such as dental CT. However, such lesions could lead to functional and/or molecular optical contrast. Herein, we report on the preliminary investigation of using Laminar Optical Tomography (LOT) to image the pulp and root canals in teeth. LOT is a non-contact, high resolution, molecular and functional mesoscopic optical imaging modality. To investigate the potential of LOT for dental imaging, we injected an optical dye into ex vivo teeth samples and imaged them using LOT and micro-CT simultaneously. A rigid image registration between the LOT and micro-CT reconstruction was obtained, validating the potential of LOT to image molecular optical contrast deep in the teeth with accuracy, non-invasively. We demonstrate that LOT can retrieve the 3D bio-distribution of molecular probes at depths up to 2mm with a resolution of several hundred microns in teeth.

  3. Fast and Accurate Semiautomatic Segmentation of Individual Teeth from Dental CT Images

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Ho Chul; Choi, Chankyu; Shin, Juneseuk; Lee, Jeongjin; Shin, Yeong-Gil

    2015-01-01

    DIn this paper, we propose a fast and accurate semiautomatic method to effectively distinguish individual teeth from the sockets of teeth in dental CT images. Parameter values of thresholding and shapes of the teeth are propagated to the neighboring slice, based on the separated teeth from reference images. After the propagation of threshold values and shapes of the teeth, the histogram of the current slice was analyzed. The individual teeth are automatically separated and segmented by using seeded region growing. Then, the newly generated separation information is iteratively propagated to the neighboring slice. Our method was validated by ten sets of dental CT scans, and the results were compared with the manually segmented result and conventional methods. The average error of absolute value of volume measurement was 2.29 ± 0.56%, which was more accurate than conventional methods. Boosting up the speed with the multicore processors was shown to be 2.4 times faster than a single core processor. The proposed method identified the individual teeth accurately, demonstrating that it can give dentists substantial assistance during dental surgery. PMID:26413143

  4. Fast and Accurate Semiautomatic Segmentation of Individual Teeth from Dental CT Images.

    PubMed

    Kang, Ho Chul; Choi, Chankyu; Shin, Juneseuk; Lee, Jeongjin; Shin, Yeong-Gil

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, we propose a fast and accurate semiautomatic method to effectively distinguish individual teeth from the sockets of teeth in dental CT images. Parameter values of thresholding and shapes of the teeth are propagated to the neighboring slice, based on the separated teeth from reference images. After the propagation of threshold values and shapes of the teeth, the histogram of the current slice was analyzed. The individual teeth are automatically separated and segmented by using seeded region growing. Then, the newly generated separation information is iteratively propagated to the neighboring slice. Our method was validated by ten sets of dental CT scans, and the results were compared with the manually segmented result and conventional methods. The average error of absolute value of volume measurement was 2.29 ± 0.56%, which was more accurate than conventional methods. Boosting up the speed with the multicore processors was shown to be 2.4 times faster than a single core processor. The proposed method identified the individual teeth accurately, demonstrating that it can give dentists substantial assistance during dental surgery. PMID:26413143

  5. Dose measurements for dental cone-beam CT: a comparison with MSCT and panoramic imaging.

    PubMed

    Deman, P; Atwal, P; Duzenli, C; Thakur, Y; Ford, N L

    2014-06-21

    To date there is a lack of published information on appropriate methods to determine patient doses from dental cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) equipment. The goal of this study is to apply and extend the methods recommended in the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) Report 111 for CBCT equipment to characterize dose and effective dose for a range of dental imaging equipment. A protocol derived from the one proposed by Dixon et al (2010 Technical Report 111, American Association of Physicist in Medicine, MD, USA), was applied to dose measurements of multi-slice CT, dental CBCT (small and large fields of view (FOV)) and a dental panoramic system. The computed tomography dose index protocol was also performed on the MSCT to compare both methods. The dose distributions in a cylindrical polymethyl methacrylate phantom were characterized using a thimble ionization chamber and Gafchromic™ film (beam profiles). Gafchromic™ films were used to measure the dose distribution in an anthropomorphic phantom. A method was proposed to extend dose estimates to planes superior and inferior to the central plane. The dose normalized to 100 mAs measured in the center of the phantom for the large FOV dental CBCT (11.4 mGy/100 mAs) is two times lower than that of MSCT (20.7 mGy/100 mAs) for the same FOV, but approximately 15 times higher than for a panoramic system (0.6 mGy/100 mAs). The effective dose per scan (in clinical conditions) found for the dental CBCT are 167.60 ± 3.62, 61.30 ± 3.88 and 92.86 ± 7.76 mSv for the Kodak 9000 (fixed scan length of 3.7 cm), and the iCAT Next Generation for 6 cm and 13 cm scan lengths respectively. The method to extend the dose estimates from the central slice to superior and inferior slices indicates a good agreement between theory and measurement. The Gafchromic™ films provided useful beam profile data and 2D distributions of dose in phantom. PMID:24862349

  6. Dose measurements for dental cone-beam CT: a comparison with MSCT and panoramic imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deman, P.; Atwal, P.; Duzenli, C.; Thakur, Y.; Ford, N. L.

    2014-06-01

    To date there is a lack of published information on appropriate methods to determine patient doses from dental cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) equipment. The goal of this study is to apply and extend the methods recommended in the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) Report 111 for CBCT equipment to characterize dose and effective dose for a range of dental imaging equipment. A protocol derived from the one proposed by Dixon et al (2010 Technical Report 111, American Association of Physicist in Medicine, MD, USA), was applied to dose measurements of multi-slice CT, dental CBCT (small and large fields of view (FOV)) and a dental panoramic system. The computed tomography dose index protocol was also performed on the MSCT to compare both methods. The dose distributions in a cylindrical polymethyl methacrylate phantom were characterized using a thimble ionization chamber and Gafchromic™ film (beam profiles). Gafchromic™ films were used to measure the dose distribution in an anthropomorphic phantom. A method was proposed to extend dose estimates to planes superior and inferior to the central plane. The dose normalized to 100 mAs measured in the center of the phantom for the large FOV dental CBCT (11.4 mGy/100 mAs) is two times lower than that of MSCT (20.7 mGy/100 mAs) for the same FOV, but approximately 15 times higher than for a panoramic system (0.6 mGy/100 mAs). The effective dose per scan (in clinical conditions) found for the dental CBCT are 167.60 ± 3.62, 61.30 ± 3.88 and 92.86 ± 7.76 mSv for the Kodak 9000 (fixed scan length of 3.7 cm), and the iCAT Next Generation for 6 cm and 13 cm scan lengths respectively. The method to extend the dose estimates from the central slice to superior and inferior slices indicates a good agreement between theory and measurement. The Gafchromic™ films provided useful beam profile data and 2D distributions of dose in phantom.

  7. Three-dimensional analysis of alveolar bone resorption by image processing of 3-D dental CT images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagao, Jiro; Kitasaka, Takayuki; Mori, Kensaku; Suenaga, Yasuhito; Yamada, Shohzoh; Naitoh, Munetaka

    2006-03-01

    We have developed a novel system that provides total support for assessment of alveolar bone resorption, caused by periodontitis, based on three-dimensional (3-D) dental CT images. In spite of the difficulty in perceiving the complex 3-D shape of resorption, dentists assessing resorption location and severity have been relying on two-dimensional radiography and probing, which merely provides one-dimensional information (depth) about resorption shape. However, there has been little work on assisting assessment of the disease by 3-D image processing and visualization techniques. This work provides quantitative evaluation results and figures for our system that measures the three-dimensional shape and spread of resorption. It has the following functions: (1) measures the depth of resorption by virtually simulating probing in the 3-D CT images, taking advantage of image processing of not suffering obstruction by teeth on the inter-proximal sides and much smaller measurement intervals than the conventional examination; (2) visualizes the disposition of the depth by movies and graphs; (3) produces a quantitative index and intuitive visual representation of the spread of resorption in the inter-radicular region in terms of area; and (4) calculates the volume of resorption as another severity index in the inter-radicular region and the region outside it. Experimental results in two cases of 3-D dental CT images and a comparison of the results with the clinical examination results and experts' measurements of the corresponding patients confirmed that the proposed system gives satisfying results, including 0.1 to 0.6mm of resorption measurement (probing) error and fairly intuitive presentation of measurement and calculation results.

  8. Quantification of dental prostheses on cone-beam CT images by the Taguchi method.

    PubMed

    Kuo, Rong-Fu; Fang, Kwang-Ming; Ty, Wong; Hu, Chia Yu

    2016-01-01

    The gray values accuracy of dental cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) is affected by dental metal prostheses. The distortion of dental CBCT gray values could lead to inaccuracies of orthodontic and implant treatment. The aim of this study was to quantify the effect of scanning parameters and dental metal prostheses on the accuracy of dental cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) gray values using the Taguchi method. Eight dental model casts of an upper jaw including prostheses, and a ninth prosthesis-free dental model cast, were scanned by two dental CBCT devices. The mean gray value of the selected circular regions of interest (ROIs) were measured using dental CBCT images of eight dental model casts and were compared with those measured from CBCT images of the prosthesis-free dental model cast. For each image set, four consecutive slices of gingiva were selected. The seven factors (CBCTs, occlusal plane canting, implant connection, prosthesis position, coping material, coping thickness, and types of dental restoration) were used to evaluate scanning parameter and dental prostheses effects. Statistical methods of signal to noise ratio (S/N) and analysis of variance (ANOVA) with 95% confidence were applied to quantify the effects of scanning parameters and dental prostheses on dental CBCT gray values accuracy. For ROIs surrounding dental prostheses, the accuracy of CBCT gray values were affected primarily by implant connection (42%), followed by type of restoration (29%), prostheses position (19%), coping material (4%), and coping thickness (4%). For a single crown prosthesis (without support of implants) placed in dental model casts, gray value differences for ROIs 1-9 were below 12% and gray value differences for ROIs 13-18 away from pros-theses were below 10%. We found the gray value differences set to be between 7% and 8% for regions next to a single implant-supported titanium prosthesis, and between 46% and 59% for regions between double implant

  9. The Use of Micro-CT with Image Segmentation to Quantify Leakage in Dental Restorations

    PubMed Central

    Carrera, Carola A.; Lan, Caixia; Escobar-Sanabria, David; Li, Yuping; Rudney, Joel; Aparicio, Conrado; Fok, Alex

    2015-01-01

    Objective To develop a method for quantifying leakage in composite resin restorations after curing, using non-destructive X-ray micro-computed tomography (micro-CT) and image segmentation. Methods Class-I cavity preparations were made in 20 human third molars, which were divided into 2 groups. Group I was restored with Z100 and Group II with Filtek LS. Micro-CT scans were taken for both groups before and after they were submerged in silver nitrate solution (AgNO3 50%) to reveal any interfacial gap and leakage at the tooth restoration interface. Image segmentation was carried out by first performing image correlation to align the before- and after-treatment images and then by image subtraction to isolate the silver nitrate penetrant for precise volume calculation. Two-tailed Student’s t-test was used to analyze the results, with the level of significance set at p<0.05. Results All samples from Group I showed silver nitrate penetration with a mean volume of 1.3 ± 0.7 mm3. In Group II, only 2 out of the 10 restorations displayed infiltration along the interface, giving a mean volume of 0.3 ± 0.3 mm3. The difference between the two groups was statistically significant (p < 0.05). The infiltration showed non-uniform patterns within the interface. Significance We have developed a method to quantify the volume of leakage using non-destructive micro-CT, silver nitrate infiltration and image segmentation. Our results confirmed that substantial leakage could occur in composite restorations that have imperfections in the adhesive layer or interfacial debonding through polymerization shrinkage. For the restorative systems investigated in this study, this occurred mostly at the interface between the adhesive system and the tooth structure. PMID:25649496

  10. CT segmentation of dental shapes by anatomy-driven reformation imaging and B-spline modelling.

    PubMed

    Barone, S; Paoli, A; Razionale, A V

    2016-06-01

    Dedicated imaging methods are among the most important tools of modern computer-aided medical applications. In the last few years, cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) has gained popularity in digital dentistry for 3D imaging of jawbones and teeth. However, the anatomy of a maxillofacial region complicates the assessment of tooth geometry and anatomical location when using standard orthogonal views of the CT data set. In particular, a tooth is defined by a sub-region, which cannot be easily separated from surrounding tissues by only considering pixel grey-intensity values. For this reason, an image enhancement is usually necessary in order to properly segment tooth geometries. In this paper, an anatomy-driven methodology to reconstruct individual 3D tooth anatomies by processing CBCT data is presented. The main concept is to generate a small set of multi-planar reformation images along significant views for each target tooth, driven by the individual anatomical geometry of a specific patient. The reformation images greatly enhance the clearness of the target tooth contours. A set of meaningful 2D tooth contours is extracted and used to automatically model the overall 3D tooth shape through a B-spline representation. The effectiveness of the methodology has been verified by comparing some anatomy-driven reconstructions of anterior and premolar teeth with those obtained by using standard tooth segmentation tools. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:26418417

  11. Sparse-view image reconstruction in inverse-geometry CT (IGCT) for fast, low-dose, volumetric dental X-ray imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hong, D. K.; Cho, H. S.; Oh, J. E.; Je, U. K.; Lee, M. S.; Kim, H. J.; Lee, S. H.; Park, Y. O.; Choi, S. I.; Koo, Y. S.; Cho, H. M.

    2012-12-01

    As a new direction for computed tomography (CT) imaging, inverse-geometry CT (IGCT) has been recently introduced and is intended to overcome limitations in conventional cone-beam CT (CBCT) such as the cone-beam artifacts, imaging dose, temporal resolution, scatter, cost, and so on. While the CBCT geometry consists of X-rays emanating from a small focal spot and collimated toward a larger detector, the IGCT geometry employs a large-area scanned source array with the Xray beams collimated toward a smaller-area detector. In this research, we explored an effective IGCT reconstruction algorithm based on the total-variation (TV) minimization method and studied the feasibility of the IGCT geometry for potential applications to fast, low-dose volumetric dental X-ray imaging. We implemented the algorithm, performed systematic simulation works, and evaluated the imaging characteristics quantitatively. Although much engineering and validation works are required to achieve clinical implementation, our preliminary results have demonstrated a potential for improved volumetric imaging with reduced dose.

  12. Experimental study on the application of a compressed-sensing (CS) algorithm to dental cone-beam CT (CBCT) for accurate, low-dose image reconstruction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oh, Jieun; Cho, Hyosung; Je, Uikyu; Lee, Minsik; Kim, Hyojeong; Hong, Daeki; Park, Yeonok; Lee, Seonhwa; Cho, Heemoon; Choi, Sungil; Koo, Yangseo

    2013-03-01

    In practical applications of three-dimensional (3D) tomographic imaging, there are often challenges for image reconstruction from insufficient data. In computed tomography (CT); for example, image reconstruction from few views would enable fast scanning with reduced doses to the patient. In this study, we investigated and implemented an efficient reconstruction method based on a compressed-sensing (CS) algorithm, which exploits the sparseness of the gradient image with substantially high accuracy, for accurate, low-dose dental cone-beam CT (CBCT) reconstruction. We applied the algorithm to a commercially-available dental CBCT system (Expert7™, Vatech Co., Korea) and performed experimental works to demonstrate the algorithm for image reconstruction in insufficient sampling problems. We successfully reconstructed CBCT images from several undersampled data and evaluated the reconstruction quality in terms of the universal-quality index (UQI). Experimental demonstrations of the CS-based reconstruction algorithm appear to show that it can be applied to current dental CBCT systems for reducing imaging doses and improving the image quality.

  13. SU-E-T-365: Dosimetric Impact of Dental Amalgam CT Image Artifacts On IMRT and VMAT Head and Neck Plans

    SciTech Connect

    Cao, N; Young, L; Parvathaneni, U; Liao, J; Richard, P; Ford, E; Sandison, G

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: The presence of high density dental amalgam in patient CT image data sets causes dose calculation errors for head and neck (HN) treatment planning. This study assesses and compares dosimetric variations in IMRT and VMAT treatment plans due to dental artifacts. Methods: Sixteen HN patients with similar treatment sites (oropharynx), tumor volume and extensive dental artifacts were divided into two groups: IMRT (n=8, 6 to 9 beams) and VMAT (n=8, 2 arcs with 352° rotation). All cases were planned with the Pinnacle 9.2 treatment planning software using the collapsed cone convolution superposition algorithm and a range of prescription dose from 60 to 72Gy. Two different treatment plans were produced, each based on one of two image sets: (a)uncorrected; (b)dental artifacts density overridden (set to 1.0g/cm{sup 3}). Differences between the two treatment plans for each of the IMRT and VMAT techniques were quantified by the following dosimetric parameters: maximum point dose, maximum spinal cord and brainstem dose, mean left and right parotid dose, and PTV coverage (V95%Rx). Average differences generated for these dosimetric parameters were compared between IMRT and VMAT plans. Results: The average absolute dose differences (plan a minus plan b) for the VMAT and IMRT techniques, respectively, caused by dental artifacts were: 2.2±3.3cGy vs. 37.6±57.5cGy (maximum point dose, P=0.15); 1.2±0.9cGy vs. 7.9±6.7cGy (maximum spinal cord dose, P=0.026); 2.2±2.4cGy vs. 12.1±13.0cGy (maximum brainstem dose, P=0.077); 0.9±1.1cGy vs. 4.1±3.5cGy (mean left parotid dose, P=0.038); 0.9±0.8cGy vs. 7.8±11.9cGy (mean right parotid dose, P=0.136); 0.021%±0.014% vs. 0.803%±1.44% (PTV coverage, P=0.17). Conclusion: For the HN plans studied, dental artifacts demonstrated a greater dose calculation error for IMRT plans compared to VMAT plans. Rotational arcs appear on the average to compensate dose calculation errors induced by dental artifacts. Thus, compared to VMAT, density

  14. Head CT (image)

    MedlinePlus

    CT stands for computerized tomography. In this procedure, a thin X-ray beam is rotated around the ... D image of a section through the body. CT scans are very detailed and provide excellent information ...

  15. CT scan (image)

    MedlinePlus

    CT stands for computerized tomography. In this procedure, a thin X-ray beam is rotated around the ... D image of a section through the body. CT scans are very detailed and provide excellent information ...

  16. CT Image Presentations For Oral Surgery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rhodes, Michael L.; Rothman, Stephen L. G.; Schwarz, Melvyn S.; Tivattanasuk, Eva S.

    1988-06-01

    Reformatted CT images of the mandible and maxilla are described as a planning aid to the surgical implantation of dental fixtures. Precisely scaled and cross referenced axial, oblique, CT generated panorex, and 3-D images are generated to help indicate where and how critical anatomic structures are positioned. This information guides the oral surgeon to those sites where dental implants have optimal osteotic support and least risk to sensitive neural tissue. Oblique images are generated at 1-2 mm increments along the arch of the mandible (or maxilla). Each oblique is oriented perpendicular to the local arch curvature. The adjoining five CT generated panorex views match the patient's mandibular (or maxilla) arch, with each of the views separated by twice the distance between axial CT slices. All views are mutually cross-referenced to show fine detail of the underlying mandibular (or maxilla) structure. Several exams are illustrated and benefit to subsequent surgery is assessed.

  17. Simulation and experimental studies of three-dimensional (3D) image reconstruction from insufficient sampling data based on compressed-sensing theory for potential applications to dental cone-beam CT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Je, U. K.; Lee, M. S.; Cho, H. S.; Hong, D. K.; Park, Y. O.; Park, C. K.; Cho, H. M.; Choi, S. I.; Woo, T. H.

    2015-06-01

    In practical applications of three-dimensional (3D) tomographic imaging, there are often challenges for image reconstruction from insufficient sampling data. In computed tomography (CT), for example, image reconstruction from sparse views and/or limited-angle (<360°) views would enable fast scanning with reduced imaging doses to the patient. In this study, we investigated and implemented a reconstruction algorithm based on the compressed-sensing (CS) theory, which exploits the sparseness of the gradient image with substantially high accuracy, for potential applications to low-dose, high-accurate dental cone-beam CT (CBCT). We performed systematic simulation works to investigate the image characteristics and also performed experimental works by applying the algorithm to a commercially-available dental CBCT system to demonstrate its effectiveness for image reconstruction in insufficient sampling problems. We successfully reconstructed CBCT images of superior accuracy from insufficient sampling data and evaluated the reconstruction quality quantitatively. Both simulation and experimental demonstrations of the CS-based reconstruction from insufficient data indicate that the CS-based algorithm can be applied directly to current dental CBCT systems for reducing the imaging doses and further improving the image quality.

  18. Compressed-sensing (CS)-based 3D image reconstruction in cone-beam CT (CBCT) for low-dose, high-quality dental X-ray imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, M. S.; Kim, H. J.; Cho, H. S.; Hong, D. K.; Je, U. K.; Oh, J. E.; Park, Y. O.; Lee, S. H.; Cho, H. M.; Choi, S. I.; Koo, Y. S.

    2013-09-01

    The most popular reconstruction algorithm for cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) is based on the computationally-inexpensive filtered-backprojection (FBP) method. However, that method usually requires dense projections over the Nyquist samplings, which imposes severe restrictions on the imaging doses. Moreover, the algorithm tends to produce cone-beam artifacts as the cone angle is increased. Several variants of the FBP-based algorithm have been developed to overcome these difficulties, but problems with the cone-beam reconstruction still remain. In this study, we considered a compressed-sensing (CS)-based reconstruction algorithm for low-dose, high-quality dental CBCT images that exploited the sparsity of images with substantially high accuracy. We implemented the algorithm and performed systematic simulation works to investigate the imaging characteristics. CBCT images of high quality were successfully reconstructed by using the built-in CS-based algorithm, and the image qualities were evaluated quantitatively in terms of the universal-quality index (UQI) and the slice-profile quality index (SPQI).We expect the reconstruction algorithm developed in the work to be applicable to current dental CBCT systems, to reduce imaging doses, and to improve the image quality further.

  19. Region-of-interest reconstruction for a cone-beam dental CT with a circular trajectory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Zhanli; Zou, Jing; Gui, Jianbao; Zheng, Hairong; Xia, Dan

    2013-04-01

    Dental CT is the most appropriate and accurate device for preoperative evaluation of dental implantation. It can demonstrate the quantity of bone in three dimensions (3D), the location of important adjacent anatomic structures and the quality of available bone with minimal geometric distortion. Nevertheless, with the rapid increase of dental CT examinations, we are facing the problem of dose reduction without loss of image quality. In this work, backprojection-filtration (BPF) and Feldkamp-Davis-Kress (FDK) algorithm was applied to reconstruct the 3D full image and region-of-interest (ROI) image from complete and truncated circular cone-beam data respectively by computer-simulation. In addition, the BPF algorithm was evaluated based on the 3D ROI-image reconstruction from real data, which was acquired from our developed circular cone-beam prototype dental CT system. The results demonstrated that the ROI-image quality reconstructed from truncated data using the BPF algorithm was comparable to that reconstructed from complete data. The FDK algorithm, however, created artifacts while reconstructing ROI-image. Thus it can be seen, for circular cone-beam dental CT, reducing scanning angular range of the BPF algorithm used for ROI-image reconstruction are helpful for reducing the radiation dose and scanning time. Finally, an analytical method was developed for estimation of the ROI projection area on the detector before CT scanning, which would help doctors to roughly estimate the total radiation dose before the CT examination.

  20. Infant dental care (image)

    MedlinePlus

    ... child to bed with a bottle of milk, juice, or sugar water. As the child grows, establishing proper dental hygiene will promote healthy teeth and gums which are essential to overall good health. Poor dental development, dental disease, and dental trauma ...

  1. Infant dental care (image)

    MedlinePlus

    Even though newborns and infants do not have teeth, care of the mouth and gums is important. ... sugar water. As the child grows, establishing proper dental hygiene will promote healthy teeth and gums which ...

  2. PET/CT imaging artifacts.

    PubMed

    Sureshbabu, Waheeda; Mawlawi, Osama

    2005-09-01

    The purpose of this paper is to introduce the principles of PET/CT imaging and describe the artifacts associated with it. PET/CT is a new imaging modality that integrates functional (PET) and structural (CT) information into a single scanning session, allowing excellent fusion of the PET and CT images and thus improving lesion localization and interpretation accuracy. Moreover, the CT data can also be used for attenuation correction, ultimately leading to high patient throughput. These combined advantages have rendered PET/CT a preferred imaging modality over dedicated PET. Although PET/CT imaging offers many advantages, this dual-modality imaging also poses some challenges. CT-based attenuation correction can induce artifacts and quantitative errors that can affect the PET emission images. For instance, the use of contrast medium and the presence of metallic implants can be associated with focal radiotracer uptake. Furthermore, the patient's breathing can introduce mismatches between the CT attenuation map and the PET emission data, and the discrepancy between the CT and PET fields of view can lead to truncation artifacts. After reading this article, the technologist should be able to describe the principles of PET/CT imaging, identify at least 3 types of image artifacts, and describe the differences between PET/CT artifacts of different causes: metallic implants, respiratory motion, contrast medium, and truncation. PMID:16145223

  3. Dental cone-beam CT reconstruction from limited-angle view data based on compressed-sensing (CS) theory for fast, low-dose X-ray imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Je, Uikyu; Cho, Hyosung; Lee, Minsik; Oh, Jieun; Park, Yeonok; Hong, Daeki; Park, Cheulkyu; Cho, Heemoon; Choi, Sungil; Koo, Yangseo

    2014-06-01

    Recently, reducing radiation doses has become an issue of critical importance in the broader radiological community. As a possible technical approach, especially, in dental cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT), reconstruction from limited-angle view data (< 360°) would enable fast scanning with reduced doses to the patient. In this study, we investigated and implemented an efficient reconstruction algorithm based on compressed-sensing (CS) theory for the scan geometry and performed systematic simulation works to investigate the image characteristics. We also performed experimental works by applying the algorithm to a commercially-available dental CBCT system to demonstrate its effectiveness for image reconstruction in incomplete data problems. We successfully reconstructed CBCT images with incomplete projections acquired at selected scan angles of 120, 150, 180, and 200° with a fixed angle step of 1.2° and evaluated the reconstruction quality quantitatively. Both simulation and experimental demonstrations of the CS-based reconstruction from limited-angle view data show that the algorithm can be applied directly to current dental CBCT systems for reducing the imaging doses and further improving the image quality.

  4. NETL CT Imaging Facility

    ScienceCinema

    None

    2014-05-21

    NETL's CT Scanner laboratory is equipped with three CT scanners and a mobile core logging unit that work together to provide characteristic geologic and geophysical information at different scales, non-destructively.

  5. NETL CT Imaging Facility

    SciTech Connect

    2013-09-04

    NETL's CT Scanner laboratory is equipped with three CT scanners and a mobile core logging unit that work together to provide characteristic geologic and geophysical information at different scales, non-destructively.

  6. Radiochromic films for dental CT dosimetry: a feasibility study.

    PubMed

    Rampado, O; Bianchi, S D; Peruzzo Cornetto, A; Rossetti, V; Ropolo, R

    2014-02-01

    Dental CT dose evaluations are commonly performed using thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLD) inside anthropomorphic phantoms. Radiochromic films with good sensitivity in the X-ray diagnostic field have recently been developed and are commercially available as GAFCHROMIC XR-QA. There are potential advantages in the use of radiochromic films such as a more comprehensive dosimetry thanks to the adjustable size of the film samples. The purpose of this study was to investigate the feasibility of using radiochromic films for dental CT dose evaluations. Film samples were cut with a width of 5mm and a length of 25 mm (strips), the same size as the Alderson Rando anthropomorphic phantom holes used in this study. Dental CT dose measurements were performed using simultaneously both TLD and radiochromic strips in the same phantom sites. Two equipment types were considered for dental CT examinations: a 16 slice CT and a cone beam CT. Organ equivalent doses were then obtained averaging the measurements from the sites of the same organ and effective doses were calculated using ICRP 103 weighting factors. The entire procedure was repeated four times for each CT in order to compare also the repeatability of the two dosimeter types. A linear correlation was found between the absorbed dose evaluated with radiochromic films and with TLD, with slopes of 0.930 and 0.944 (correlation r>0.99). The maximum difference between the two dosimeter's measurements was 25%, whereas the average difference was 7%. The measurement repeatability was comparable for the two dosimeters at cumulative doses above 15 mGy (estimated uncertainty at 1 sigma level of about 5%), whereas below this threshold radiochromic films show a greater dispersion of data, of about 10% at 1 sigma level. We obtained, using respectively Gafchromic and TLD measurements, effective dose values of 107 μSv and 117 μSv (i.e. difference of 8.6%) for the cone beam CT and of 523 μSv and 562 μSv (i.e. difference of 7%) for the

  7. Diagnostic Imaging of Dental Disease in Pet Rabbits and Rodents.

    PubMed

    Capello, Vittorio

    2016-09-01

    Diagnostic imaging techniques are of paramount importance for dentistry and oral disorders of rabbits, rodents, and other exotic companion mammals. Aside from standard radiography, stomatoscopy is a complementary tool allowing a thorough and detailed inspection of the oral cavity. Computed tomography (CT) generates multiple 2-dimensional views and 3-dimensional reconstructions providing superior diagnostic accuracy also useful for prognosis and treatment of advanced dental disease and its related complications. MRI is a diagnostic imaging technique additional to CT used primarily to enhance soft tissues, including complex odontogenic abscesses. PMID:27497205

  8. CT number variations in micro CT imaging systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tu, Shu-Ju; Hsieh, Hui-Ling; Chao, Tsi-Chian

    2008-03-01

    CT numbers can be directly computed from the linear attenuation coefficients in the reconstructed CT images and are correlated to the electron densities of the chemical elements with specific atomic numbers. However, the computed CT numbers can be varied when different imaging parameters are used. Phantoms composed of clinically relevant and tissue-equivalent materials (lung, bone, muscle, and adipose) were scanned with a commercial circular-scanning micro CT imager. This imaging system is composed with a micro-focused x-ray tube and charged-coupled device (CCD) camera as the detector. The mean CT numbers and the corresponding standard deviations in terms of Hounsfield units were then computed from a pre-defined region of interest located within the reconstructed volumetric images. The variations of CT number were then identified from a series of imaging parameters. Those parameters include imaging acquisition modes (e.g., the metal filter used in the x-ray tube), reconstruction methods (e.g., Feldkamp and iterative algorithm), and post-image processing techniques (e.g., ring artifact, beam-hardening artifact, and smoothing processing). These variations of CT numbers are useful and important in tissue characterization, quantitative bone structure analysis, bone marrow density evaluation, and Monte Carlo dose calculations for the pilot small animal study when micro CT imaging systems are employed. Also these variations can be used as the quantification for the performance of the micro CT imaging systems.

  9. CT Imaging: Basics and New Trends

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peyrin, Françoise; Engelke, Klaus

    This chapter presents the principle of X-ray CT and its evolution during the last 40 years. The first section describes the physical basis of X-ray CT, tomographic image reconstruction algorithms, and the source of artifacts in X-ray CT images. The second section is devoted to the evolution of CT technology from the first translation-rotation systems to multi-slice spiral CTs currently used today. The next section addresses specific developments of CT technology and applications, like perfusion CT, quantitative CT, and spectral CT. The fourth section introduces the problem of radiation exposure delivered to the patient and its evaluation. Finally the last section addresses the development in micro- and even nano-CT which is a rapidly evolving area in preclinical imaging and biology.

  10. Multimodal imaging system for dental caries detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, Rongguang; Wong, Victor; Marcus, Michael; Burns, Peter; McLaughlin, Paul

    2007-02-01

    Dental caries is a disease in which minerals of the tooth are dissolved by surrounding bacterial plaques. A caries process present for some time may result in a caries lesion. However, if it is detected early enough, the dentist and dental professionals can implement measures to reverse and control caries. Several optical, nonionized methods have been investigated and used to detect dental caries in early stages. However, there is not a method that can singly detect the caries process with both high sensitivity and high specificity. In this paper, we present a multimodal imaging system that combines visible reflectance, fluorescence, and Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT) imaging. This imaging system is designed to obtain one or more two-dimensional images of the tooth (reflectance and fluorescence images) and a three-dimensional OCT image providing depth and size information of the caries. The combination of two- and three-dimensional images of the tooth has the potential for highly sensitive and specific detection of dental caries.

  11. Diagnostic Imaging for Dental Implant Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Nagarajan, Aishwarya; Perumalsamy, Rajapriya; Thyagarajan, Ramakrishnan; Namasivayam, Ambalavanan

    2014-01-01

    Dental implant is a device made of alloplastic (foreign) material implanted into the jaw bone beneath the mucosal layer to support a fixed or removable dental prosthesis. Dental implants are gaining immense popularity and wide acceptance because they not only replace lost teeth but also provide permanent restorations that do not interfere with oral function or speech or compromise the self-esteem of a patient. Appropriate treatment planning for replacement of lost teeth is required and imaging plays a pivotal role to ensure a satisfactory outcome. The development of pre-surgical imaging techniques and surgical templates helps the dentist place the implants with relative ease. This article focuses on various types of imaging modalities that have a pivotal role in implant therapy. PMID:25379354

  12. Diagnostic imaging for dental implant therapy.

    PubMed

    Nagarajan, Aishwarya; Perumalsamy, Rajapriya; Thyagarajan, Ramakrishnan; Namasivayam, Ambalavanan

    2014-01-01

    Dental implant is a device made of alloplastic (foreign) material implanted into the jaw bone beneath the mucosal layer to support a fixed or removable dental prosthesis. Dental implants are gaining immense popularity and wide acceptance because they not only replace lost teeth but also provide permanent restorations that do not interfere with oral function or speech or compromise the self-esteem of a patient. Appropriate treatment planning for replacement of lost teeth is required and imaging plays a pivotal role to ensure a satisfactory outcome. The development of pre-surgical imaging techniques and surgical templates helps the dentist place the implants with relative ease. This article focuses on various types of imaging modalities that have a pivotal role in implant therapy. PMID:25379354

  13. MicroCT and optical coherence tomography imagistic assessment of the dental roots adhesive

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sinescu, Cosmin; Negrutiu, Meda Lavinia; Nica, Luminita; Manescu, Adrian; Duma, Virgil-Florin; Podoleanu, Adrian G.

    2015-03-01

    Several obturation methods are available today to study the 3D filling of the root canal. There are also several methods capable to evaluate the ability to seal apically the root canals. However, the common methods of investigation are invasive; they also lead to the destruction of the samples. If the sectioning differs slightly from the desired area, the investigation is non-conclusive regarding the micro-leakages. Also, although the use of Cone-Beam Micro Computer Tomography (CBCT) appears to be most promising for endodontic purposes, its effective radiation doses are higher than with conventional intra-oral and panoramic imaging. In contrast, enface (ef) Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT) proves to be efficient for the investigation of material defects of dental restorations, dental materials, and micro-leakage at the interfaces, where the penetration depth depends on the material. Therefore, ef OCT has been proposed in our studies as a potential tool for in vivo endodontic imaging. Twenty five recently extracted human maxillary molars were selected for the study for caries or periodontal reasons. The pulp chambers were completely opened, the dental pulp was removed, and the root canals were shaped. Silver nanoparticles were used in half of the samples in order to increase the scattering of the adhesive material in comparison with the dental roots walls. The sample teeth were then probed using Time Domain (TD) OCT working at 1300 nm. A synchrotron radiation X-Ray microCT experiment was also performed. The imagistic results pointed out the efficiency of the silver nanoparticle layer used in order to increase the scattering of the root canal adhesive scattering for the OCT non-invasive investigation. MicroCT allowed for obtaining qualitative data related to the depth penetration of the root canal adhesive into the dentin walls.

  14. Intracranial vascular malformations: MR and CT imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Kucharczyk, W.; Lemme-Pleghos, L.; Uske, A.; Brant-Zawadzki, M.; Dooms, G.; Norman, D.

    1985-08-01

    Twenty-four patients with 29 cerebrovascular malformations were evaluated with a combination of computed tomography (CT), angiography, and magnetic resonance (MR) imaging. Characteristics of the malformations on MR images were reviewed retrospectively, and a comparative evaluation of MR and CT images was made. Of 14 angiographically evident malformations, 13 intra-axial lesions were detected on both CT and MR images, and one dural malformation gave false-negative results on both modalities. The appearance of parenchymal lesions on MR images closely mirrored characteristic CT findings. Angiographically evident malformations have a highly characteristic appearance on MR images. MR may be more sensitive than CT in the detection of small hemorrhagic foci associated with cryptic arteriovenous malformations and may add specificity in the diagnosis of occult malformations in some cases, but MR is less sensitive than CT for the detection of small calcified malformations.

  15. Alteration of computer dental radiography images.

    PubMed

    Bruder, G A; Casale, J; Goren, A; Friedman, S

    1999-04-01

    This study was designed to determine if digital images stored on the hard drive of a Schick computer dental radiography system could be exported, altered, and then restored to the drive without any visible signs of alteration. Digital images were downloaded from the computer dental radiography system using an I-Omega Zip Drive, 100-MB capacity, and then opened in Corel Photo Paint where images were altered and manufacturer export symbols were edited. The resulting images were printed to a default printer (Fargo Foto Fun). The ease of manipulation of the exported digital images reflects the need for the manufacturer to implement safeguards so that the integrity of digital imaging cannot be compromised. Computer dental radiography has many advantages: conservation of time (instant radiographs), less radiation (50 to 60%), no chemical waste, and many viewing options. However, questions that might be raised regarding the ability of persons with minimal computer expertise, using a commercially available program to alter images should be addressed. PMID:10425956

  16. Three-dimensional metal artifact reduction method for dental conebeam CT scanners

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kobayashi, Koji; Katsumata, Atsushi; Ito, Koichi; Aoki, Takafumi

    2009-02-01

    In dental treatments where metal is indispensable material and dental implants require precise structural measurements of teeth and bones, the ability of CT scanners to perform Metal Artifact Reduction (MAR) is a very important yet unsolved problem. The increasing need for dental implants is raising the demand for a conebeam CT. In this paper, an MAR method of the Metal Erasing Method (MEM) is extended to three dimensions. Assuming that metals are completely opaque to X-ray, MEM reconstructs metals and other materials separately, then combines them afterward. 3D-MEM is not only more efficient but performs better than the repetition of MEM, because it identifies metals more precisely by utilizing the continuity of metals in the third dimension. Another important contribution of the research is the application of advanced binarization techniques for identifying metal-corrupted areas on projection images. Differential histogram techniques are applied to find an adequate threshold value. Whereas MEM needs to identify metals on a sinogram that covers the all rotation angles with a single threshold value, identifying metals on each projection image with an individual value is an important benefit of 3D-MEM. The threshold value varies per projection angle, especially by the influence of the spine and scull, that are objects outside of the field of view. The performance of 3D-MEM is examined using a subject who has as many as 12 pieces of complex metals in his teeth. It is shown that the metals are successfully identified and the grade of metal artifact has been considerably reduced.

  17. Computer aided detection of oral lesions on CT images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galib, S.; Islam, F.; Abir, M.; Lee, H. K.

    2015-12-01

    Oral lesions are important findings on computed tomography (CT) images. In this study, a fully automatic method to detect oral lesions in mandibular region from dental CT images is proposed. Two methods were developed to recognize two types of lesions namely (1) Close border (CB) lesions and (2) Open border (OB) lesions, which cover most of the lesion types that can be found on CT images. For the detection of CB lesions, fifteen features were extracted from each initial lesion candidates and multi layer perceptron (MLP) neural network was used to classify suspicious regions. Moreover, OB lesions were detected using a rule based image processing method, where no feature extraction or classification algorithm were used. The results were validated using a CT dataset of 52 patients, where 22 patients had abnormalities and 30 patients were normal. Using non-training dataset, CB detection algorithm yielded 71% sensitivity with 0.31 false positives per patient. Furthermore, OB detection algorithm achieved 100% sensitivity with 0.13 false positives per patient. Results suggest that, the proposed framework, which consists of two methods, has the potential to be used in clinical context, and assist radiologists for better diagnosis.

  18. A contrast and registration template for magnetic resonance image data guided dental implant placement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eggers, Georg; Cosgarea, Raluca; Rieker, Marcus; Kress, Bodo; Dickhaus, Hartmut; Mühling, Joachim

    2009-02-01

    An oral imaging template was developed to address the shortcomings of MR image data for image guided dental implant planning and placement. The template was conctructed as a gadolinium filled plastic shell to give contrast to the dentition and also to be accurately re-attachable for use in image guided dental implant placement. The result of segmentation and modelling of the dentition from MR Image data with the template was compared to plaster casts of the dentition. In a phantom study dental implant placement was performed based on MR image data. MR imaging with the contrast template allowed complete representation of the existing dentition. In the phantom study, a commercially available system for image guided dental implant placement was used. Transformation of the imaging contrast template into a surgical drill guide based on the MR image data resulted in pilot burr hole placement with an accuracy of 2 mm. MRI based imaging of the existing dentition for proper image guided planning is possible with the proposed template. Using the image data and the template resulted in less accurate pilot burr hole placement in comparison to CT-based image guided implant placement.

  19. Dental x-ray image segmentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Said, Eyad; Fahmy, Gamal F.; Nassar, Diaa; Ammar, Hany

    2004-08-01

    Law enforcement agencies have been exploiting biometric identifiers for decades as key tools in forensic identification. With the evolution in information technology and the huge volume of cases that need to be investigated by forensic specialists, it has become important to automate forensic identification systems. While, ante mortem (AM) identification, that is identification prior to death, is usually possible through comparison of many biometric identifiers, postmortem (PM) identification, that is identification after death, is impossible using behavioral biometrics (e.g. speech, gait). Moreover, under severe circumstances, such as those encountered in mass disasters (e.g. airplane crashers) or if identification is being attempted more than a couple of weeks postmortem, under such circumstances, most physiological biometrics may not be employed for identification, because of the decay of soft tissues of the body to unidentifiable states. Therefore, a postmortem biometric identifier has to resist the early decay that affects body tissues. Because of their survivability and diversity, the best candidates for postmortem biometric identification are the dental features. In this paper we present an over view about an automated dental identification system for Missing and Unidentified Persons. This dental identification system can be used by both law enforcement and security agencies in both forensic and biometric identification. We will also present techniques for dental segmentation of X-ray images. These techniques address the problem of identifying each individual tooth and how the contours of each tooth are extracted.

  20. Terahertz pulsed imaging study of dental caries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karagoz, Burcu; Altan, Hakan; Kamburoglu, Kıvanç

    2015-07-01

    Current diagnostic techniques in dentistry rely predominantly on X-rays to monitor dental caries. Terahertz Pulsed Imaging (TPI) has great potential for medical applications since it is a nondestructive imaging method. It does not cause any ionization hazard on biological samples due to low energy of THz radiation. Even though it is strongly absorbed by water which exhibits very unique chemical and physical properties that contribute to strong interaction with THz radiation, teeth can still be investigated in three dimensions. Recent investigations suggest that this method can be used in the early identification of dental diseases and imperfections in the tooth structure without the hazards of using techniques which rely on x-rays. We constructed a continuous wave (CW) and time-domain reflection mode raster scan THz imaging system that enables us to investigate various teeth samples in two or three dimensions. The samples comprised of either slices of individual tooth samples or rows of teeth embedded in wax, and the imaging was done by scanning the sample across the focus of the THz beam. 2D images were generated by acquiring the intensity of the THz radiation at each pixel, while 3D images were generated by collecting the amplitude of the reflected signal at each pixel. After analyzing the measurements in both the spatial and frequency domains, the results suggest that the THz pulse is sensitive to variations in the structure of the samples that suggest that this method can be useful in detecting the presence of caries.

  1. CT & CBCT imaging: assessment of the orbits.

    PubMed

    Hatcher, David C

    2012-11-01

    The orbits can be visualized easily on routine or customized protocols for computed tomography (CT) or cone beam CT (CBCT) scans. Detailed orbital investigations are best performed with 3-dimensional imaging methods. CT scans are preferred for visualizing the osseous orbital anatomy and fissures while magnetic resonance imaging is preferred for evaluating tumors and inflammation. CBCT provides high-resolution anatomic data of the sinonasal spaces, airway, soft tissue surfaces, and bones but does not provide much detail within the soft tissues. This article discusses CBCT imaging of the orbits, osseous anatomy of the orbits, and CBCT investigation of selected orbital pathosis. PMID:22981080

  2. Application of digital tomosynthesis (DTS) of optimal deblurring filters for dental X-ray imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oh, J. E.; Cho, H. S.; Kim, D. S.; Choi, S. I.; Je, U. K.

    2012-04-01

    Digital tomosynthesis (DTS) is a limited-angle tomographic technique that provides some of the tomographic benefits of computed tomography (CT) but at reduced dose and cost. Thus, the potential for application of DTS to dental X-ray imaging seems promising. As a continuation of our dental radiography R&D, we developed an effective DTS reconstruction algorithm and implemented it in conjunction with a commercial dental CT system for potential use in dental implant placement. The reconstruction algorithm employed a backprojection filtering (BPF) method based upon optimal deblurring filters to suppress effectively both the blur artifacts originating from the out-focus planes and the high-frequency noise. To verify the usefulness of the reconstruction algorithm, we performed systematic simulation works and evaluated the image characteristics. We also performed experimental works in which DTS images of enhanced anatomical resolution were successfully obtained by using the algorithm and were promising to our ongoing applications to dental X-ray imaging. In this paper, our approach to the development of the DTS reconstruction algorithm and the results are described in detail.

  3. Image optimization in digital dental radiography.

    PubMed

    Silverstrim, Kelli J; Schneider, Erich; van der Hoeven, Christopher

    2015-06-01

    Presented is a method for establishing the appropriate balance of image quality and radiation dose for dental imaging. Using the Monte Carlo N-Particle Extended (MCNPX) radiation transport code, the DC Planmeca radiographic unit and a dental bitewing phantom were modeled. The Carestream 6100 RVG sensor signal response, noise response, dose rate dependence, and reproducibility were determined experimentally, including uncertainties and inter/intraunit variabilities. The computationally varied parameters were peak kilovoltage and tube filtration. The entrance air kerma for the current clinical technique was used to establish reference image quality. Four figures of merit (FOM) were chosen to encompass parameter variation. With equal weighting of FOMs and no equipment limitations, the optimal parameters were 90 kVp with 0.1 mm added copper filtration. The optimal technique in the radiographic units' operating range was 70 kVp and 0.1 mm added copper filtration, resulting in a ∼50% (±17%) entrance dose and ∼40% effective dose savings. PMID:25905519

  4. Bariatric CT Imaging: Challenges and Solutions.

    PubMed

    Fursevich, Dzmitry M; LiMarzi, Gary M; O'Dell, Matthew C; Hernandez, Manuel A; Sensakovic, William F

    2016-01-01

    The obesity epidemic in the adult and pediatric populations affects all aspects of health care, including diagnostic imaging. With the increasing prevalence of obese and morbidly obese patients, bariatric computed tomographic (CT) imaging is becoming common in day-to-day radiology practice, and a basic understanding of the unique problems that bariatric patients pose to the imaging community is crucial in any setting. Because larger patients may not fit into conventional scanners, having a CT scanner with an adequate table load limit, a large gantry aperture, a large scan field of view, and a high-power generator is a prerequisite for bariatric imaging. Iterative reconstruction methods, high tube current, and high tube voltage can reduce the image noise that is frequently seen in bariatric CT images. Truncation artifacts, cropping artifacts, and ring artifacts frequently complicate the interpretation of CT images of larger patients. If recognized, these artifacts can be easily reduced by using the proper CT equipment, scan acquisition parameters, and postprocessing options. Lastly, because of complex contrast material dynamics, contrast material-enhanced studies of bariatric patients require special attention. Understanding how the rate of injection, the scan timing, and the total mass of iodine affect vascular and parenchymal enhancement will help to optimize contrast-enhanced studies in the bariatric population. This article familiarizes the reader with the challenges that are frequently encountered at CT imaging of bariatric patients, beginning with equipment selection and ending with a review of the most commonly encountered obesity-related artifacts and the technical considerations in the acquisition of contrast-enhanced images. (©)RSNA, 2016. PMID:27232505

  5. A Study of Radiographic Imaging Systems Used for Dental Hygiene.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Karst, Nancy S.

    Thirty-three two-year dental hygiene programs throughout the United States were surveyed to identify the radiographic imaging system most often used and the accompanying rationale for that decision. A literature review identified the three radiographic imaging systems most frequently used and indicated that all dental hygiene programs had the…

  6. Comparison of CT-Number and Gray Scale Value of Different Dental Materials and Hard Tissues in CT and CBCT

    PubMed Central

    Emadi, Naghmeh; Safi, Yaser; Akbarzadeh Bagheban, Alireza; Asgary, Saeed

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: Computed tomography (CT) and cone-beam CT (CBCT) are valuable diagnostic aids for many clinical applications. This study was designed to compare the gray scale value (GSV) and Hounsfield unit (HU) of selected dental materials and various hard tissues using CT or CBCT. Methods and Materials: Three samples of all test materials including amalgam (AM), composite resin (CR), glass ionomer (GI), zinc-oxide eugenol (ZOE), calcium-enriched mixture (CEM) cement, AH-26 root canal sealer (AH-26), gutta-percha (GP), Coltosol (Col), Dycal (DL), mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA), zinc phosphate (ZP), and polycarbonate cement (PC) were prepared and scanned together with samples of bone, dentin and enamel using two CBCT devices, Scanora 3D (S3D) and NewTom VGi (NTV) and a spiral CT (SCT) scanner (Somatom Emotion 16 multislice spiral CT);. Subsequently, the HU and GSV values were determined and evaluated. The data were analyzed by the Kruskal-Wallis and Mann-Whitney U tests. The level of significance was determined at 0.05. Results: There were significant differences among the three different scanners (P<0.05). The differences between HU/GSV values of 12 selected dental materials using NTV was significant (P<0.05) and for S3D and SCT was insignificant (P>0.05). All tested materials showed maximum values in S3D and SCT (3094 and 3071, respectively); however, bone and dentin showed low/medium values (P<0.05). In contrast, the tested materials and tissues showed a range of values in NTV (366 to15383; P<0.05). Conclusion: Scanner system can influence the obtained HU/GSV of dental materials. NTV can discriminate various dental materials, in contrast to S3D/SCT scanners. NTV may be a more useful diagnostic aid for clinical practice. PMID:25386210

  7. Advances in CT imaging for urolithiasis.

    PubMed

    Andrabi, Yasir; Patino, Manuel; Das, Chandan J; Eisner, Brian; Sahani, Dushyant V; Kambadakone, Avinash

    2015-01-01

    Urolithiasis is a common disease with increasing prevalence worldwide and a lifetime-estimated recurrence risk of over 50%. Imaging plays a critical role in the initial diagnosis, follow-up and urological management of urinary tract stone disease. Unenhanced helical computed tomography (CT) is highly sensitive (>95%) and specific (>96%) in the diagnosis of urolithiasis and is the imaging investigation of choice for the initial assessment of patients with suspected urolithiasis. The emergence of multi-detector CT (MDCT) and technological innovations in CT such as dual-energy CT (DECT) has widened the scope of MDCT in the stone disease management from initial diagnosis to encompass treatment planning and monitoring of treatment success. DECT has been shown to enhance pre-treatment characterization of stone composition in comparison with conventional MDCT and is being increasingly used. Although CT-related radiation dose exposure remains a valid concern, the use of low-dose MDCT protocols and integration of newer iterative reconstruction algorithms into routine CT practice has resulted in a substantial decrease in ionizing radiation exposure. In this review article, our intent is to discuss the role of MDCT in the diagnosis and post-treatment evaluation of urolithiasis and review the impact of emerging CT technologies such as dual energy in clinical practice. PMID:26166961

  8. Advances in CT imaging for urolithiasis

    PubMed Central

    Andrabi, Yasir; Patino, Manuel; Das, Chandan J.; Eisner, Brian; Sahani, Dushyant V.; Kambadakone, Avinash

    2015-01-01

    Urolithiasis is a common disease with increasing prevalence worldwide and a lifetime-estimated recurrence risk of over 50%. Imaging plays a critical role in the initial diagnosis, follow-up and urological management of urinary tract stone disease. Unenhanced helical computed tomography (CT) is highly sensitive (>95%) and specific (>96%) in the diagnosis of urolithiasis and is the imaging investigation of choice for the initial assessment of patients with suspected urolithiasis. The emergence of multi-detector CT (MDCT) and technological innovations in CT such as dual-energy CT (DECT) has widened the scope of MDCT in the stone disease management from initial diagnosis to encompass treatment planning and monitoring of treatment success. DECT has been shown to enhance pre-treatment characterization of stone composition in comparison with conventional MDCT and is being increasingly used. Although CT-related radiation dose exposure remains a valid concern, the use of low-dose MDCT protocols and integration of newer iterative reconstruction algorithms into routine CT practice has resulted in a substantial decrease in ionizing radiation exposure. In this review article, our intent is to discuss the role of MDCT in the diagnosis and post-treatment evaluation of urolithiasis and review the impact of emerging CT technologies such as dual energy in clinical practice. PMID:26166961

  9. Registration of the Cone Beam CT and Blue-Ray Scanned Dental Model Based on the Improved ICP Algorithm.

    PubMed

    Mei, Xue; Li, Zhenhua; Xu, Songsong; Guo, Xiaoyan

    2014-01-01

    Multimodality image registration and fusion has complementary significance for guiding dental implant surgery. As the needs of the different resolution image registration, we develop an improved Iterative Closest Point (ICP) algorithm that focuses on the registration of Cone Beam Computed Tomography (CT) image and high-resolution Blue-light scanner image. The proposed algorithm includes two major phases, coarse and precise registration. Firstly, for reducing the matching interference of human subjective factors, we extract feature points based on curvature characteristics and use the improved three point's translational transformation method to realize coarse registration. Then, the feature point set and reference point set, obtained by the initial registered transformation, are processed in the precise registration step. Even with the unsatisfactory initial values, this two steps registration method can guarantee the global convergence and the convergence precision. Experimental results demonstrate that the method has successfully realized the registration of the Cone Beam CT dental model and the blue-ray scanner model with higher accuracy. So the method could provide researching foundation for the relevant software development in terms of the registration of multi-modality medical data. PMID:24511309

  10. Image analysis for dental bone quality assessment using CBCT imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suprijanto; Epsilawati, L.; Hajarini, M. S.; Juliastuti, E.; Susanti, H.

    2016-03-01

    Cone beam computerized tomography (CBCT) is one of X-ray imaging modalities that are applied in dentistry. Its modality can visualize the oral region in 3D and in a high resolution. CBCT jaw image has potential information for the assessment of bone quality that often used for pre-operative implant planning. We propose comparison method based on normalized histogram (NH) on the region of inter-dental septum and premolar teeth. Furthermore, the NH characteristic from normal and abnormal bone condition are compared and analyzed. Four test parameters are proposed, i.e. the difference between teeth and bone average intensity (s), the ratio between bone and teeth average intensity (n) of NH, the difference between teeth and bone peak value (Δp) of NH, and the ratio between teeth and bone of NH range (r). The results showed that n, s, and Δp have potential to be the classification parameters of dental calcium density.

  11. CT image registration in sinogram space

    SciTech Connect

    Mao Weihua; Li Tianfang; Wink, Nicole; Xing Lei

    2007-09-15

    Object displacement in a CT scan is generally reflected in CT projection data or sinogram. In this work, the direct relationship between object motion and the change of CT projection data (sinogram) is investigated and this knowledge is applied to create a novel algorithm for sinogram registration. Calculated and experimental results demonstrate that the registration technique works well for registering rigid 2D or 3D motion in parallel and fan beam samplings. Problem and solution for 3D sinogram-based registration of metallic fiducials are also addressed. Since the motion is registered before image reconstruction, the presented algorithm is particularly useful when registering images with metal or truncation artifacts. In addition, this algorithm is valuable for dealing with situations where only limited projection data are available, making it appealing for various applications in image guided radiation therapy.

  12. Hybrid SPECT/CT imaging in neurology.

    PubMed

    Ciarmiello, Andrea; Giovannini, Elisabetta; Meniconi, Martina; Cuccurullo, Vincenzo; Gaeta, Maria Chiara

    2014-01-01

    In recent years, the SPECT/CT hybrid modality has led to a rapid development of imaging techniques in nuclear medicine, opening new perspectives for imaging staff and patients as well. However, while, the clinical role of positron emission tomography-computed tomography (PET-CT) is well consolidated, the diffusion and the consequent value of single-photon emission tomography-computed tomography (SPECT-CT) has yet to be weighed, Hence, there is a need for a careful analysis, comparing the "potential" benefits of the hybrid modality with the "established" ones of the standalone machine. The aim of this article is to analyze the impact of this hybrid tool on the diagnosis of diseases of the central nervous system, comparing strengths and weaknesses of both modalities through the use of SWOT analysis. PMID:25143053

  13. Spiral CT image deblurring for cochlear implantation.

    PubMed

    Wang, G; Vannier, M W; Skinner, M W; Cavalcanti, M G; Harding, G W

    1998-04-01

    Cochlear implantation is the standard treatment for profound hearing loss. Preimplantation and postimplantation spiral computed tomography (CT) is essential in several key clinical and research aspects. The maximum image resolution with commercial spiral CT scanners is insufficient to define clearly anatomical features and implant electrode positions in the inner ear. In this paper, we develop an expectation-maximization (EM)-like iterative deblurring algorithm to achieve spiral CT image super-resolution for cochlear implantation, assuming a spatially invariant linear spiral CT system with a three-dimensional (3-D) separable Gaussian point spread function (PSF). We experimentally validate the 3-D Gaussian blurring model via phantom measurement and profile fitting. The imaging process is further expressed as convolution of an isotropic 3-D Gaussian PSF and a blurred underlying volumetric image. Under practical conditions, an oblique reconstructed section is approximated as convolution of an isotropic two-dimensional (2-D) Gaussian PSF and the corresponding actual cross section. The spiral CT image deblurring algorithm is formulated with sieve and resolution kernels for suppressing noise and edge artifacts. A typical cochlear cross section is used for evaluation, demonstrating a resolution gain up to 30%40% according to the correlation criterion. Physical phantoms, preimplantation and postimplantation patients are reconstructed into volumes of 0.1-mm cubic voxels. The patient images are digitally unwrapped along the central axis of the cochlea and the implanted electrode array respectively, then oblique sections orthogonal to the central axis formed. After deblurring, representation of structural features is substantially improved in all the cases. PMID:9688157

  14. CT Image Processing Using Public Digital Networks

    PubMed Central

    Rhodes, Michael L.; Azzawi, Yu-Ming; Quinn, John F.; Glenn, William V.; Rothman, Stephen L.G.

    1984-01-01

    Nationwide commercial computer communication is now commonplace for those applications where digital dialogues are generally short and widely distributed, and where bandwidth does not exceed that of dial-up telephone lines. Image processing using such networks is prohibitive because of the large volume of data inherent to digital pictures. With a blend of increasing bandwidth and distributed processing, network image processing becomes possible. This paper examines characteristics of a digital image processing service for a nationwide network of CT scanner installations. Issues of image transmission, data compression, distributed processing, software maintenance, and interfacility communication are also discussed. Included are results that show the volume and type of processing experienced by a network of over 50 CT scanners for the last 32 months.

  15. CT imaging of enhanced oil recovery experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Gall, B.L.

    1992-12-01

    X-ray computerized tomography (Cr) has been used to study fluid distributions during chemical enhanced oil recovery experiments. Four CT-monitored corefloods were conducted, and oil saturation distributions were calculated at various stages of the experiments. Results suggested that this technique could add significant information toward interpretation and evaluation of surfactant/polymer EOR recovery methods. CT-monitored tracer tests provided information about flow properties in the core samples. Nonuniform fluid advance could be observed, even in core that appeared uniform by visual inspection. Porosity distribution maps based on CT density calculations also showed the presence of different porosity layers that affected fluid movement through the cores. Several types of CT-monitored corefloods were conducted. Comparisons were made for CT-monitored corefloods using chemical systems that were highly successful in reducing residual oil saturations in laboratory experiments and less successful systems. Changes were made in surfactant formulation and in concentration of the mobility control polymer. Use of a poor mobility control agent failed to move oil that was not initially displaced by the injected surfactant solution; even when a good'' surfactant system was used. Use of a less favorable surfactant system with adequate mobility control could produce as much oil as the use of a good surfactant system with inadequate mobility control. The role of mobility control, therefore, becomes a critical parameter for successful application of chemical EOR. Continuation of efforts to use CT imaging in connection with chemical EOR evaluations is recommended.

  16. CT imaging of enhanced oil recovery experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Gall, B.L.

    1992-12-01

    X-ray computerized tomography (Cr) has been used to study fluid distributions during chemical enhanced oil recovery experiments. Four CT-monitored corefloods were conducted, and oil saturation distributions were calculated at various stages of the experiments. Results suggested that this technique could add significant information toward interpretation and evaluation of surfactant/polymer EOR recovery methods. CT-monitored tracer tests provided information about flow properties in the core samples. Nonuniform fluid advance could be observed, even in core that appeared uniform by visual inspection. Porosity distribution maps based on CT density calculations also showed the presence of different porosity layers that affected fluid movement through the cores. Several types of CT-monitored corefloods were conducted. Comparisons were made for CT-monitored corefloods using chemical systems that were highly successful in reducing residual oil saturations in laboratory experiments and less successful systems. Changes were made in surfactant formulation and in concentration of the mobility control polymer. Use of a poor mobility control agent failed to move oil that was not initially displaced by the injected surfactant solution; even when a ``good`` surfactant system was used. Use of a less favorable surfactant system with adequate mobility control could produce as much oil as the use of a good surfactant system with inadequate mobility control. The role of mobility control, therefore, becomes a critical parameter for successful application of chemical EOR. Continuation of efforts to use CT imaging in connection with chemical EOR evaluations is recommended.

  17. A novel root analogue dental implant using CT scan and CAD/CAM: selective laser melting technology.

    PubMed

    Figliuzzi, M; Mangano, F; Mangano, C

    2012-07-01

    Direct laser metal forming (DLMF) is a new technique which allows solids with complex geometry to be produced by annealing metal powder microparticles in a focused laser beam, according to a computer-generated three-dimensional (3D) model. For dental implants, the fabrication process involves the laser-induced fusion of titanium microparticles, in order to build, layer by layer, the desired object. Modern computed tomography (CT) acquisition and 3D image conversion, combined with the DLMF process, allows the fabrication of custom-made, root-analogue implants (RAI), perfect copies of the radicular units that need replacing. This report demonstrates the successful clinical use of a custom-made, root-analogue DLMF implant. CT images of the residual non-restorable root of a right maxillary premolar were acquired and modified with specific software into a 3D model. From this model, a custom-made, root-analogue, DLMF implant was fabricated. Immediately after tooth extraction, the root-analogue implant was placed in the extraction socket and restored with a single crown. At the 1-year follow-up examination, the custom-made implant showed almost perfect functional and aesthetic integration. The possibility of fabricating custom-made, root-analogue DLMF implants opens new interesting perspectives for immediate placement of dental implants. PMID:22377004

  18. Imaging features of rhinosporidiosis on contrast CT

    PubMed Central

    Prabhu, Shailesh M; Irodi, Aparna; Khiangte, Hannah L; Rupa, V; Naina, P

    2013-01-01

    Context: Rhinosporidiosis is a chronic granulomatous disease endemic in certain regions of India. Computed tomography (CT) imaging appearances of rhinosporidiosis have not been previously described in the literature. Aims: To study imaging features in rhinosporidiosis with contrast-enhanced CT and elucidate its role in the evaluation of this disease. Materials and Methods: Sixteen patients with pathologically proven rhinosporidiosis were included in the study. Contrast-enhanced CT images were analyzed retrospectively and imaging findings were correlated with surgical and histopathologic findings. Results: A total of 29 lesions were found and evaluated. On contrast-enhanced CT, rhinosporidiosis was seen as moderately enhancing lobulated or irregular soft tissue mass lesions in the nasal cavity (n = 13), lesions arising in nasal cavity and extending through choana into nasopharynx (n = 5), pedunculated polypoidal lesions arising from the nasopharyngeal wall (n = 5), oropharyngeal wall (n = 2), larynx (n = 1), bronchus (n = 1), skin and subcutaneous tissue (n = 2). The inferior nasal cavity comprising nasal floor, inferior turbinate, and inferior meatus was the most common site of involvement (n = 13). Surrounding bone involvement was seen in the form of rarefaction (n = 6), partial (n = 3) or complete erosion (n = 3) of inferior turbinate, thinning of medial maxillary wall (n = 2), and septal erosion (n = 2). Nasolacrimal duct involvement was seen in four cases. Conclusions: Contrast-enhanced CT has an important role in delineating the site and extent of the disease, as well as the involvement of surrounding bone, nasolacrimal duct and tracheobronchial tree. This provides a useful roadmap prior to surgery. PMID:24347850

  19. Cardiac CT Imaging of Plaque Vulnerability: Hype or Hope?

    PubMed

    Willemink, Martin J; Leiner, Tim; Maurovich-Horvat, Pál

    2016-03-01

    Advances in cardiovascular computed tomography (CT) have resulted in an excellent ability to exclude coronary heart disease (CHD). Anatomical information, functional information, and spectral information can already be obtained with current CT technologies. Moreover, novel developments such as targeted nanoparticle contrast agents, photon-counting CT, and phase contrast CT will further enhance the diagnostic value of cardiovascular CT. This review provides an overview of current state of the art and future cardiovascular CT imaging. PMID:26922591

  20. Volume-of-interest reconstruction from severely truncated data in dental cone-beam CT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Zheng; Kusnoto, Budi; Han, Xiao; Sidky, E. Y.; Pan, Xiaochuan

    2015-03-01

    As cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) has gained popularity rapidly in dental imaging applications in the past two decades, radiation dose in CBCT imaging remains a potential, health concern to the patients. It is a common practice in dental CBCT imaging that only a small volume of interest (VOI) containing the teeth of interest is illuminated, thus substantially lowering imaging radiation dose. However, this would yield data with severe truncations along both transverse and longitudinal directions. Although images within the VOI reconstructed from truncated data can be of some practical utility, they often are compromised significantly by truncation artifacts. In this work, we investigate optimization-based reconstruction algorithms for VOI image reconstruction from CBCT data of dental patients containing severe truncations. In an attempt to further reduce imaging dose, we also investigate optimization-based image reconstruction from severely truncated data collected at projection views substantially fewer than those used in clinical dental applications. Results of our study show that appropriately designed optimization-based reconstruction can yield VOI images with reduced truncation artifacts, and that, when reconstructing from only one half, or even one quarter, of clinical data, it can also produce VOI images comparable to that of clinical images.

  1. Utility of Megavoltage Fan-Beam CT for Treatment Planning in a Head-And-Neck Cancer Patient with Extensive Dental Fillings Undergoing Helical Tomotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Claus; Liu Tianxiao; Jennelle, Richard L.; Ryu, Janice K.; Vijayakumar, Srinivasan; Purdy, James A.; Chen, Allen M.

    2010-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to demonstrate the potential utility of megavoltage fan-beam computed tomography (MV-FBCT) for treatment planning in a patient undergoing helical tomotherapy for nasopharyngeal carcinoma in the presence of extensive dental artifact. A 28-year-old female with locally advanced nasopharyngeal carcinoma presented for radiation therapy. Due to the extensiveness of the dental artifact present in the oral cavity kV-CT scan acquired at simulation, which made treatment planning impossible on tomotherapy planning system, MV-FBCT imaging was obtained using the HI-ART tomotherapy treatment machine, with the patient in the treatment position, and this information was registered with her original kV-CT scan for the purposes of structure delineation, dose calculation, and treatment planning. To validate the feasibility of the MV-FBCT-generated treatment plan, an electron density CT phantom (model 465, Gammex Inc., Middleton, WI) was scanned using MV-FBCT to obtain CT number to density table. Additionally, both a 'cheese' phantom (which came with the tomotherapy treatment machine) with 2 inserted ion chambers and a generic phantom called Quasar phantom (Modus Medical Devices Inc., London, ON, Canada) with one inserted chamber were used to confirm dosimetric accuracy. The MV-FBCT could be used to clearly visualize anatomy in the region of the dental artifact and provide sufficient soft-tissue contrast to assist in the delineation of normal tissue structures and fat planes. With the elimination of the dental artifact, the MV-FBCT images allowed more accurate dose calculation by the tomotherapy system. It was confirmed that the phantom material density was determined correctly by the tomotherapy MV-FBCT number to density table. The ion chamber measurements agreed with the calculations from the MV-FBCT generated phantom plan within 2%. MV-FBCT may be useful in radiation treatment planning for nasopharyngeal cancer patients in the setting of extensive

  2. Utility of megavoltage fan-beam CT for treatment planning in a head-and-neck cancer patient with extensive dental fillings undergoing helical tomotherapy.

    PubMed

    Yang, Claus; Liu, Tianxiao; Jennelle, Richard L; Ryu, Janice K; Vijayakumar, Srinivasan; Purdy, James A; Chen, Allen M

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to demonstrate the potential utility of megavoltage fan-beam computed tomography (MV-FBCT) for treatment planning in a patient undergoing helical tomotherapy for nasopharyngeal carcinoma in the presence of extensive dental artifact. A 28-year-old female with locally advanced nasopharyngeal carcinoma presented for radiation therapy. Due to the extensiveness of the dental artifact present in the oral cavity kV-CT scan acquired at simulation, which made treatment planning impossible on tomotherapy planning system, MV-FBCT imaging was obtained using the HI-ART tomotherapy treatment machine, with the patient in the treatment position, and this information was registered with her original kV-CT scan for the purposes of structure delineation, dose calculation, and treatment planning. To validate the feasibility of the MV-FBCT-generated treatment plan, an electron density CT phantom (model 465, Gammex Inc., Middleton, WI) was scanned using MV-FBCT to obtain CT number to density table. Additionally, both a "cheese" phantom (which came with the tomotherapy treatment machine) with 2 inserted ion chambers and a generic phantom called Quasar phantom (Modus Medical Devices Inc., London, ON, Canada) with one inserted chamber were used to confirm dosimetric accuracy. The MV-FBCT could be used to clearly visualize anatomy in the region of the dental artifact and provide sufficient soft-tissue contrast to assist in the delineation of normal tissue structures and fat planes. With the elimination of the dental artifact, the MV-FBCT images allowed more accurate dose calculation by the tomotherapy system. It was confirmed that the phantom material density was determined correctly by the tomotherapy MV-FBCT number to density table. The ion chamber measurements agreed with the calculations from the MV-FBCT generated phantom plan within 2%. MV-FBCT may be useful in radiation treatment planning for nasopharyngeal cancer patients in the setting of extensive

  3. An evaluation of three commercially available metal artifact reduction methods for CT imaging.

    PubMed

    Huang, Jessie Y; Kerns, James R; Nute, Jessica L; Liu, Xinming; Balter, Peter A; Stingo, Francesco C; Followill, David S; Mirkovic, Dragan; Howell, Rebecca M; Kry, Stephen F

    2015-02-01

    Three commercial metal artifact reduction methods were evaluated for use in computed tomography (CT) imaging in the presence of clinically realistic metal implants: Philips O-MAR, GE's monochromatic gemstone spectral imaging (GSI) using dual-energy CT, and GSI monochromatic imaging with metal artifact reduction software applied (MARs). Each method was evaluated according to CT number accuracy, metal size accuracy, and streak artifact severity reduction by using several phantoms, including three anthropomorphic phantoms containing metal implants (hip prosthesis, dental fillings and spinal fixation rods). All three methods showed varying degrees of success for the hip prosthesis and spinal fixation rod cases, while none were particularly beneficial for dental artifacts. Limitations of the methods were also observed. MARs underestimated the size of metal implants and introduced new artifacts in imaging planes beyond the metal implant when applied to dental artifacts, and both the O-MAR and MARs algorithms induced artifacts for spinal fixation rods in a thoracic phantom. Our findings suggest that all three artifact mitigation methods may benefit patients with metal implants, though they should be used with caution in certain scenarios. PMID:25585685

  4. An evaluation of three commercially available metal artifact reduction methods for CT imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Jessie Y.; Kerns, James R.; Nute, Jessica L.; Liu, Xinming; Balter, Peter A.; Stingo, Francesco C.; Followill, David S.; Mirkovic, Dragan; Howell, Rebecca M.; Kry, Stephen F.

    2015-02-01

    Three commercial metal artifact reduction methods were evaluated for use in computed tomography (CT) imaging in the presence of clinically realistic metal implants: Philips O-MAR, GE’s monochromatic gemstone spectral imaging (GSI) using dual-energy CT, and GSI monochromatic imaging with metal artifact reduction software applied (MARs). Each method was evaluated according to CT number accuracy, metal size accuracy, and streak artifact severity reduction by using several phantoms, including three anthropomorphic phantoms containing metal implants (hip prosthesis, dental fillings and spinal fixation rods). All three methods showed varying degrees of success for the hip prosthesis and spinal fixation rod cases, while none were particularly beneficial for dental artifacts. Limitations of the methods were also observed. MARs underestimated the size of metal implants and introduced new artifacts in imaging planes beyond the metal implant when applied to dental artifacts, and both the O-MAR and MARs algorithms induced artifacts for spinal fixation rods in a thoracic phantom. Our findings suggest that all three artifact mitigation methods may benefit patients with metal implants, though they should be used with caution in certain scenarios.

  5. An evaluation of three commercially available metal artifact reduction methods for CT imaging

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Jessie Y; Kerns, James R; Nute, Jessica L; Liu, Xinming; Balter, Peter A; Stingo, Francesco C; Followill, David S; Mirkovic, Dragan; Howell, Rebecca M; Kry, Stephen F

    2015-01-01

    Three commercial metal artifact reduction methods were evaluated for use in computed tomography (CT) imaging in the presence of clinically realistic metal implants: Philips O-MAR, GE's monochromatic Gemstone Spectral Imaging (GSI) using dual-energy CT, and GSI monochromatic imaging with metal artifact reduction software applied (MARs). Each method was evaluated according to CT number accuracy, metal size accuracy, and streak artifact severity reduction by using several phantoms, including three anthropomorphic phantoms containing metal implants (hip prosthesis, dental fillings, and spinal fixation rods). All three methods showed varying degrees of success for the hip prosthesis and spinal fixation rod cases, while none were particularly beneficial for dental artifacts. Limitations of the methods were also observed. MARs underestimated the size of metal implants and introduced new artifacts in imaging planes beyond the metal implant when applied to dental artifacts, and both the O-MAR and MARs algorithms induced artifacts for spinal fixation rods in a thoracic phantom. Our findings suggest that all three artifact mitigation methods may benefit patients with metal implants, though they should be used with caution in certain scenarios. PMID:25585685

  6. Validation of a technique for integration of a digital dental model into stereophotogrammetric images of the face using cone-beam computed tomographic data.

    PubMed

    Codari, Marina; Pucciarelli, Valentina; Tommasi, Davide G; Sforza, Chiarella

    2016-06-01

    We wanted to find and validate a new way to visualise patients' faces and their dental arches non-invasively. The stereophotogrammetric images of the faces and the digitised dental casts of seven healthy subjects were analysed. Point-based and surface-based recording techniques matched the facial image with those of the mandibular and maxillary dental arches in their relative positions. The cone-beam computed tomographic (CT) images of the same subjects were analysed retrospectively. Twenty-eight dentofacial distances were obtained on cone-beam CT images and on the recorded facial and dental surfaces. The median (IQR) distances of more than 96% of the measurements did not differ significantly. PMID:26852270

  7. RONI Based Secured and Authenticated Indexing of Lung CT Images

    PubMed Central

    Jasmine Selvakumari Jeya, I.; Suganthi, J.

    2015-01-01

    Medical images need to be transmitted with the patient's information without altering the image data. The present paper discusses secured indexing of lung CT image (SILI) which is a secured way of indexing the lung CT images with the patient information. Authentication is provided using the sender's logo information and the secret key is used for embedding the watermark into the host image. Watermark is embedded into the region of Noninterest (RONI) of the lung CT image. RONI is identified by segmenting the lung tissue from the CT scan image. The experimental results show that the proposed approach is robust against unauthorized access, noise, blurring, and intensity based attacks. PMID:26078782

  8. RONI Based Secured and Authenticated Indexing of Lung CT Images.

    PubMed

    Jasmine Selvakumari Jeya, I; Suganthi, J

    2015-01-01

    Medical images need to be transmitted with the patient's information without altering the image data. The present paper discusses secured indexing of lung CT image (SILI) which is a secured way of indexing the lung CT images with the patient information. Authentication is provided using the sender's logo information and the secret key is used for embedding the watermark into the host image. Watermark is embedded into the region of Noninterest (RONI) of the lung CT image. RONI is identified by segmenting the lung tissue from the CT scan image. The experimental results show that the proposed approach is robust against unauthorized access, noise, blurring, and intensity based attacks. PMID:26078782

  9. Body-wide anatomy recognition in PET/CT images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Huiqian; Udupa, Jayaram K.; Odhner, Dewey; Tong, Yubing; Zhao, Liming; Torigian, Drew A.

    2015-03-01

    With the rapid growth of positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT)-based medical applications, body-wide anatomy recognition on whole-body PET/CT images becomes crucial for quantifying body-wide disease burden. This, however, is a challenging problem and seldom studied due to unclear anatomy reference frame and low spatial resolution of PET images as well as low contrast and spatial resolution of the associated low-dose CT images. We previously developed an automatic anatomy recognition (AAR) system [15] whose applicability was demonstrated on diagnostic computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance (MR) images in different body regions on 35 objects. The aim of the present work is to investigate strategies for adapting the previous AAR system to low-dose CT and PET images toward automated body-wide disease quantification. Our adaptation of the previous AAR methodology to PET/CT images in this paper focuses on 16 objects in three body regions - thorax, abdomen, and pelvis - and consists of the following steps: collecting whole-body PET/CT images from existing patient image databases, delineating all objects in these images, modifying the previous hierarchical models built from diagnostic CT images to account for differences in appearance in low-dose CT and PET images, automatically locating objects in these images following object hierarchy, and evaluating performance. Our preliminary evaluations indicate that the performance of the AAR approach on low-dose CT images achieves object localization accuracy within about 2 voxels, which is comparable to the accuracies achieved on diagnostic contrast-enhanced CT images. Object recognition on low-dose CT images from PET/CT examinations without requiring diagnostic contrast-enhanced CT seems feasible.

  10. Attenuation correction of emission PET images with average CT: Interpolation from breath-hold CT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Tzung-Chi; Zhang, Geoffrey; Chen, Chih-Hao; Yang, Bang-Hung; Wu, Nien-Yun; Wang, Shyh-Jen; Wu, Tung-Hsin

    2011-05-01

    Misregistration resulting from the difference of temporal resolution in PET and CT scans occur frequently in PET/CT imaging, which causes distortion in tumor quantification in PET. Respiration cine average CT (CACT) for PET attenuation correction has been reported to improve the misalignment effectively by several papers. However, the radiation dose to the patient from a four-dimensional CT scan is relatively high. In this study, we propose a method to interpolate respiratory CT images over a respiratory cycle from inhalation and exhalation breath-hold CT images, and use the average CT from the generated CT set for PET attenuation correction. The radiation dose to the patient is reduced using this method. Six cancer patients of various lesion sites underwent routine free-breath helical CT (HCT), respiration CACT, interpolated average CT (IACT), and 18F-FDG PET. Deformable image registration was used to interpolate the middle phases of a respiratory cycle based on the end-inspiration and end-expiration breath-hold CT scans. The average CT image was calculated from the eight interpolated CT image sets of middle respiratory phases and the two original inspiration and expiration CT images. Then the PET images were reconstructed by these three methods for attenuation correction using HCT, CACT, and IACT. Misalignment of PET image using either CACT or IACT for attenuation correction in PET/CT was improved. The difference in standard uptake value (SUV) from tumor in PET images was most significant between the use of HCT and CACT, while the least significant between the use of CACT and IACT. Besides the similar improvement in tumor quantification compared to the use of CACT, using IACT for PET attenuation correction reduces the radiation dose to the patient.

  11. Imaging of dental implant osseointegration using optical coherent tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ionita, I.; Reisen, P.

    2009-02-01

    Investigation of initial implant stability with different dental implant designs is an important task to obtain good quality dental implants. Failure of a dental implant is often related to failure to osseointegrate correctly. Optical Coherent Tomography is a competitive non-invasive method of osseointegration investigation. FD-OCT with Swept Source was used to obtain 3-D image of the peri-implant tissue (soft and hard) in the case of mandible fixed screw. 1350 nm centered laser source give better images than 850 nm laser source for hard tissue imaging. Present work suggests that Optical Coherent Tomography is a proper technique to obtain the image of the contact tissue-metal screw. OCT images are useful to evaluate optical properties of bone tissues.

  12. Image segmentation for automated dental identification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haj Said, Eyad; Nassar, Diaa Eldin M.; Ammar, Hany H.

    2006-02-01

    Dental features are one of few biometric identifiers that qualify for postmortem identification; therefore, creation of an Automated Dental Identification System (ADIS) with goals and objectives similar to the Automated Fingerprint Identification System (AFIS) has received increased attention. As a part of ADIS, teeth segmentation from dental radiographs films is an essential step in the identification process. In this paper, we introduce a fully automated approach for teeth segmentation with goal to extract at least one tooth from the dental radiograph film. We evaluate our approach based on theoretical and empirical basis, and we compare its performance with the performance of other approaches introduced in the literature. The results show that our approach exhibits the lowest failure rate and the highest optimality among all full automated approaches introduced in the literature.

  13. Pitfalls in PET/CT imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rondogianni, Ph; Papathanasiou, N.; Giannopoulou, Ch

    2011-09-01

    PET with 2-[fluorine 18] fluoro-2-deoxy-d-glucose (FDG), has been a clinical tool for the evaluation of various cancers providing valuable metabolic information clinically helpful in the diagnosis, initial staging, therapy monitoring and restaging. However, FDG is not specific for neoplastic processes. Unless anatomic correlation is available to delineate normal structures, pathologic sites of FDG accumulation can easily be confused with normal physiological uptake, leading to false-positive or false-negative findings. Coregistration of PET scans (functional and morphologic information) with computed tomographic (CT) scans (anatomic information) using a combined PET-CT scanner improves the overall sensitivity and specificity of information provided by PET or CT alone. In this paper, we discuss the probable causes of false negative images and pitfalls due to technical reasons, inflammatory processes or benign lesions as well as the utility of PET-CT in differentiating malignant from inflammatory and benign processes, since in some cases such differentiation cannot be made, with certainty, using FDG PET alone.

  14. MR to CT registration of brains using image synthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roy, Snehashis; Carass, Aaron; Jog, Amod; Prince, Jerry L.; Lee, Junghoon

    2014-03-01

    Computed tomography (CT) is the preferred imaging modality for patient dose calculation for radiation therapy. Magnetic resonance (MR) imaging (MRI) is used along with CT to identify brain structures due to its superior soft tissue contrast. Registration of MR and CT is necessary for accurate delineation of the tumor and other structures, and is critical in radiotherapy planning. Mutual information (MI) or its variants are typically used as a similarity metric to register MRI to CT. However, unlike CT, MRI intensity does not have an accepted calibrated intensity scale. Therefore, MI-based MR-CT registration may vary from scan to scan as MI depends on the joint histogram of the images. In this paper, we propose a fully automatic framework for MR-CT registration by synthesizing a synthetic CT image from MRI using a co-registered pair of MR and CT images as an atlas. Patches of the subject MRI are matched to the atlas and the synthetic CT patches are estimated in a probabilistic framework. The synthetic CT is registered to the original CT using a deformable registration and the computed deformation is applied to the MRI. In contrast to most existing methods, we do not need any manual intervention such as picking landmarks or regions of interests. The proposed method was validated on ten brain cancer patient cases, showing 25% improvement in MI and correlation between MR and CT images after registration compared to state-of-the-art registration methods.

  15. Method for transforming CT images for attenuation correction in PET/CT imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Carney, Jonathan P.J.; Townsend, David W.; Rappoport, Vitaliy; Bendriem, Bernard

    2006-04-15

    A tube-voltage-dependent scheme is presented for transforming Hounsfield units (HU) measured by different computed tomography (CT) scanners at different x-ray tube voltages (kVp) to 511 keV linear attenuation values for attenuation correction in positron emission tomography (PET) data reconstruction. A Gammex 467 electron density CT phantom was imaged using a Siemens Sensation 16-slice CT, a Siemens Emotion 6-slice CT, a GE Lightspeed 16-slice CT, a Hitachi CXR 4-slice CT, and a Toshiba Aquilion 16-slice CT at kVp ranging from 80 to 140 kVp. All of these CT scanners are also available in combination with a PET scanner as a PET/CT tomograph. HU obtained for various reference tissue substitutes in the phantom were compared with the known linear attenuation values at 511 keV. The transformation, appropriate for lung, soft tissue, and bone, yields the function 9.6x10{sup -5}{center_dot}(HU+1000) below a threshold of {approx}50 HU and a{center_dot}(HU+1000)+b above the threshold, where a and b are fixed parameters that depend on the kVp setting. The use of the kVp-dependent scaling procedure leads to a significant improvement in reconstructed PET activity levels in phantom measurements, resolving errors of almost 40% otherwise seen for the case of dense bone phantoms at 80 kVp. Results are also presented for patient studies involving multiple CT scans at different kVp settings, which should all lead to the same 511 keV linear attenuation values. A linear fit to values obtained from 140 kVp CT images using the kVp-dependent scaling plotted as a function of the corresponding values obtained from 80 kVp CT images yielded y=1.003x-0.001 with an R{sup 2} value of 0.999, indicating that the same values are obtained to a high degree of accuracy.

  16. Variability of dental cone beam CT grey values for density estimations

    PubMed Central

    Pauwels, R; Nackaerts, O; Bellaiche, N; Stamatakis, H; Tsiklakis, K; Walker, A; Bosmans, H; Bogaerts, R; Jacobs, R; Horner, K

    2013-01-01

    Objective The aim of this study was to investigate the use of dental cone beam CT (CBCT) grey values for density estimations by calculating the correlation with multislice CT (MSCT) values and the grey value error after recalibration. Methods A polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA) phantom was developed containing inserts of different density: air, PMMA, hydroxyapatite (HA) 50 mg cm−3, HA 100, HA 200 and aluminium. The phantom was scanned on 13 CBCT devices and 1 MSCT device. Correlation between CBCT grey values and CT numbers was calculated, and the average error of the CBCT values was estimated in the medium-density range after recalibration. Results Pearson correlation coefficients ranged between 0.7014 and 0.9996 in the full-density range and between 0.5620 and 0.9991 in the medium-density range. The average error of CBCT voxel values in the medium-density range was between 35 and 1562. Conclusion Even though most CBCT devices showed a good overall correlation with CT numbers, large errors can be seen when using the grey values in a quantitative way. Although it could be possible to obtain pseudo-Hounsfield units from certain CBCTs, alternative methods of assessing bone tissue should be further investigated. Advances in knowledge The suitability of dental CBCT for density estimations was assessed, involving a large number of devices and protocols. The possibility for grey value calibration was thoroughly investigated. PMID:23255537

  17. Oral and dental imaging equipment and techniques for small animals.

    PubMed

    Coffman, Curt R; Brigden, Glenn M

    2013-05-01

    In the diagnosis and treatment of oral and dental diseases in dogs and cats, digital intraoral radiography offers many advantages over the use of standard dental radiographic film, including rapid image generation, easier exposure correction, enhancement, and paperless storage. Digital image receptors can be divided into 2 main types, direct digital systems using charged coupled devices and complementary metal oxide semiconductor sensors, and indirect digital systems using phosphor plates with a computerized scanner. Each system is paired with a computer software system to allow handling, visualization, enhancement, sharing, and archiving of the images. PMID:23643018

  18. Dental calculus image based on optical coherence tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsieh, Yao-Sheng; Ho, Yi-Ching; Lee, Shyh-Yuan; Chuang, Ching-Cheng; Wang, Chun-Yang; Sun, Chia-Wei

    2011-03-01

    In this study, the dental calculus was characterized and imaged by means of swept-source optical coherence tomography (SSOCT). The refractive indices of enamel, dentin, cementum and calculus were measured as 1.625+/-0.024, 1.534+/-0.029, 1.570+/-0.021 and 1.896+/-0.085, respectively. The dental calculus lead strong scattering property and thus the region can be identified under enamel with SSOCT imaging. An extracted human tooth with calculus was covered by gingiva tissue as in vitro sample for SSOCT imaging.

  19. Dental caries imaging using hyperspectral stimulated Raman scattering microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Zi; Zheng, Wei; Jian, Lin; Huang, Zhiwei

    2016-03-01

    We report the development of a polarization-resolved hyperspectral stimulated Raman scattering (SRS) imaging technique based on a picosecond (ps) laser-pumped optical parametric oscillator system for label-free imaging of dental caries. In our imaging system, hyperspectral SRS images (512×512 pixels) in both fingerprint region (800-1800 cm-1) and high-wavenumber region (2800-3600 cm-1) are acquired in minutes by scanning the wavelength of OPO output, which is a thousand times faster than conventional confocal micro Raman imaging. SRS spectra variations from normal enamel to caries obtained from the hyperspectral SRS images show the loss of phosphate and carbonate in the carious region. While polarization-resolved SRS images at 959 cm-1 demonstrate that the caries has higher depolarization ratio. Our results demonstrate that the polarization resolved-hyperspectral SRS imaging technique developed allows for rapid identification of the biochemical and structural changes of dental caries.

  20. [Imaging of rheumatoid arthritis: role of MR imaging and CT].

    PubMed

    Sugimoto, Hideharu

    2013-07-01

    An increasing aggressive therapeutic strategy has attracted growing attention to the potentials of MR imaging in the diagnosis, prognostication, and outcome measure of rheumatoid arthritis (RA). In the diagnosis of RA, skeletal destructions are the key to the diagnosis and assessment of long-term prognosis in RA. Marginal bone erosion is still recognized as an important finding in the 2010 RA criteria, and erosions typical of RA are deemed to have prima facie evidence of RA. MR imaging can detect erosions better than radiolography. In this regard, erosions detected by CT are considered to be reference standard to evaluate diagnostic accuracy of erosion in MR imaging and other imaging modalities. Further, to assess therapeutic effect of therapeutic agents involving the control of bone remodeling, CT may be used to evaluate bone formation and improvement of osteoporosis. PMID:23961666

  1. Segmentation-based CT image compression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thammineni, Arunoday; Mukhopadhyay, Sudipta; Kamath, Vidya

    2004-04-01

    The existing image compression standards like JPEG and JPEG 2000, compress the whole image as a single frame. This makes the system simple but inefficient. The problem is acute for applications where lossless compression is mandatory viz. medical image compression. If the spatial characteristics of the image are considered, it can give rise to a more efficient coding scheme. For example, CT reconstructed images have uniform background outside the field of view (FOV). Even the portion within the FOV can be divided as anatomically relevant and irrelevant parts. They have distinctly different statistics. Hence coding them separately will result in more efficient compression. Segmentation is done based on thresholding and shape information is stored using 8-connected differential chain code. Simple 1-D DPCM is used as the prediction scheme. The experiments show that the 1st order entropies of images fall by more than 11% when each segment is coded separately. For simplicity and speed of decoding Huffman code is chosen for entropy coding. Segment based coding will have an overhead of one table per segment but the overhead is minimal. Lossless compression of image based on segmentation resulted in reduction of bit rate by 7%-9% compared to lossless compression of whole image as a single frame by the same prediction coder. Segmentation based scheme also has the advantage of natural ROI based progressive decoding. If it is allowed to delete the diagnostically irrelevant portions, the bit budget can go down as much as 40%. This concept can be extended to other modalities.

  2. System Design For A Dental Image Processing System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cady, Fredrick M.; Stover, John C.; Senecal, William J.

    1988-12-01

    An image processing system for a large clinic dental practice has been designed and tested. An analysis of spatial resolution requirements and field tests by dentists show that a system built with presently available, PC-based, image processing equipment can provide diagnostic quality images without special digital image processing. By giving the dentist a tool to digitally enhance x-ray images, increased diagnostic capabilities can be achieved. Very simple image processing procedures such as linear and non-linear contrast expansion, edge enhancement, and image zooming can be shown to be very effective. In addition to providing enhanced imagery in the dentist's treatment room, the system is designed to be a fully automated, dental records management system. It is envisioned that a patient's record, including x-rays and tooth charts, may be retrieved from optical disk storage as the patient enters the office. Dental procedures undertaken during the visit may be entered into the record via the imaging workstation by the dentist or the dental assistant. Patient billing and records keeping may be generated automatically.

  3. Analyzing radiation absorption difference of dental substance by using Dual CT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, H.; Lee, H. K.; Cho, J. H.; Yang, H. J.; Ju, Y. S.

    2015-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the changes of noise and computer tomography (CT) number in each dental substance, by using the metal artefact reduction algorithm; we used dual CT for this study. For the study, we produced resin, titanium, gypsum, and wax that are widely used by dentists. In addition, we made nickel to increase the artefact. While making the study materials, we made sure that there is no difficulty when inserting the substances inside phantom. In order to study, we scanned before and after using the metal artefact reduction algorithm. We conducted an average analysis of CT number and noise, before and after using the metal artefact reduction algorithm. As a result, there was no difference in CT number and noise before and after using the metal artefact reduction algorithm. However, when it comes to the noise value in each substance, wax's noise value was the lowest whereas titanium's noise value was the highest, after applying the metal artefact reduction algorithm. In nickel, CT number and noise value from artefact area showed a decreased noise value when applying the metal artefact reduction algorithm. In conclusion, we assumed that we could increase the effectiveness of CT examination by applying dual energy's metal artefact reduction algorithm.

  4. Digital tomosynthesis-experiences with a new imaging device for the dental field.

    PubMed

    Ziegler, Christoph M; Franetzki, Manfred; Denig, Tina; Mühling, Joachim; Hassfeld, Stefan

    2003-03-01

    Based on the principles of classic film tomography, a new digital X-ray device for dental sites was developed and clinically evaluated. The tomosynthesis process produces several slices from a finite number of radiographs taken from different projection angles, obtaining a three-dimensional image of the jaws and teeth. During evaluation of an industrial prototype, a total of 52 tomosynthesis data sets were made covering different anatomic areas. Of those, 32 sets were assessed by ten radiologically experienced dentists. Anatomic regions not shown on conventional intraoral dental films were displayed due to the extraoral sensor. Diagnostic images of high value were mainly achieved within the scope of lateral views and transverse views in the frontal region. Even small structures such as the periodontal ligament could be shown in several planes, resulting in superposition-free representation. The elimination of metal artefacts caused by dental restorations was facilitated. However, improvements can be made in definition and resolution. Views in the sagittal plane and incomplete blurring of the contralateral jaw are difficulties that remain. The tomosynthesis process combined with a planned 3D representation is likely to be well suited for dental radiology. The use of such a device could be much less expensive than computed tomography (CT). Furthermore, it offers higher spatial resolution, exposes patients to less radiation, and could be easily used in daily practice, even chairside. PMID:12673437

  5. Rodent brain imaging with SPECT/CT

    SciTech Connect

    Seo, Youngho; Gao, D.-W.; Hasegawa, Bruce H.; Dae, Michael W.; Franc, Benjamin L.

    2007-04-15

    We evaluated methods of imaging rat models of stroke in vivo using a single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) system dedicated to small animal imaging (X-SPECT{sup TM}, Gamma Medica-Ideas, Northridge, CA). An animal model of ischemic stroke was developed for in vivo SPECT/CT imaging using the middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO) technique. The presence of cerebral ischemia was verified in ex vivo studies using triphenyltetrazolium chloride (TTC) staining. In vivo radionuclide imaging of cerebral blood flow was performed in rats following MCAO using dynamic planar imaging of {sup 99m}Tc-exametazime with parallel hole collimation. This was followed immediately by in vivo radionuclide imaging of cerebral blood flow with {sup 99m}Tc-exametazime in the same animals using 1-mm pinhole SPECT. Correlated computed tomography imaging was performed to localize radiopharmaceutical uptake. The animals were allowed to recover and ex vivo autoradiography was performed with separate administration of {sup 99m}Tc-exametazime. Time activity curve of {sup 99m}Tc-exametazime showed that the radiopharmaceutical uptake could be maintained for over 9 min. The activity would be expected to be relatively stable for a much longer period, although the data were only obtained for 9 min. TTC staining revealed sizable infarcts by visual observation of inexistence of TTC stain in infracted tissues of MCAO rat brains. In vivo SPECT imaging showed cerebral blood flow deficit in the MCAO model, and the in vivo imaging result was confirmed with ex vivo autoradiography. We have demonstrated a capability of imaging regions of cerebral blood flow deficit in MCAO rat brains in vivo using a pinhole SPECT dedicated to small animal imaging.

  6. Metal Artifact Reduction and Segmentation of Dental Computerized Tomography Images Using Least Square Support Vector Machine and Mean Shift Algorithm

    PubMed Central

    Mortaheb, Parinaz; Rezaeian, Mehdi

    2016-01-01

    Segmentation and three-dimensional (3D) visualization of teeth in dental computerized tomography (CT) images are of dentists’ requirements for both abnormalities diagnosis and the treatments such as dental implant and orthodontic planning. On the other hand, dental CT image segmentation is a difficult process because of the specific characteristics of the tooth's structure. This paper presents a method for automatic segmentation of dental CT images. We present a multi-step method, which starts with a preprocessing phase to reduce the metal artifact using the least square support vector machine. Integral intensity profile is then applied to detect each tooth's region candidates. Finally, the mean shift algorithm is used to partition the region of each tooth, and all these segmented slices are then applied for 3D visualization of teeth. Examining the performance of our proposed approach, a set of reliable assessment metrics is utilized. We applied the segmentation method on 14 cone-beam CT datasets. Functionality analysis of the proposed method demonstrated precise segmentation results on different sample slices. Accuracy analysis of the proposed method indicates that we can increase the sensitivity, specificity, precision, and accuracy of the segmentation results by 83.24%, 98.35%, 72.77%, and 97.62% and decrease the error rate by 2.34%. The experimental results show that the proposed approach performs well on different types of CT images and has better performance than all existing approaches. Moreover, segmentation results can be more accurate by using the proposed algorithm of metal artifact reduction in the preprocessing phase. PMID:27014607

  7. Fluorescence lifetime imaging of oxygen in dental biofilm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gerritsen, Hans C.; de Grauw, Cees J.

    2000-12-01

    Dental biofilm consists of micro-colonies of bacteria embedded in a matrix of polysaccharides and salivary proteins. pH and oxygen concentration are of great importance in dental biofilm. Both can be measured using fluorescence techniques. The imaging of dental biofilm is complicated by the thickness of the biofilms that can be up to several hundred micrometers thick. Here, we employed a combination of two-photon excitation microscopy with fluorescence lifetime imaging to quantify the oxygen concentration in dental biofilm. Collisional quenching of fluorescent probes by molecular oxygen leads to a reduction of the fluorescence lifetime of the probe. We employed this mechanism to measure the oxygen concentration distribution in dental biofilm by means of fluorescence lifetime imaging. Here, TRIS Ruthenium chloride hydrate was used as an oxygen probe. A calibration procedure on buffers was use to measure the lifetime response of this Ruthenium probe. The results are in agreement with the Stern-Volmer equation. A linear relation was found between the ratio of the unquenched and the quenched lifetime and the oxygen concentration. The biofilm fluorescence lifetime imaging results show a strong oxygen gradient at the buffer - biofilm interface and the average oxygen concentration in the biofilm amounted to 50 μM.

  8. A feasibility study of digital tomosynthesis for volumetric dental imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cho, M. K.; Kim, H. K.; Youn, H.; Kim, S. S.

    2012-03-01

    We present a volumetric dental tomography method that compensates for insufficient projection views obtained from limited-angle scans. The reconstruction algorithm is based on the backprojection filtering method which employs apodizing filters that reduce out-of-plane blur artifacts and suppress high-frequency noise. In order to accompolish this volumetric imaging two volume-reconstructed datasets are synthesized. These individual datasets provide two different limited-angle scans performed at orthogonal angles. The obtained reconstructed images, using less than 15% of the number of projection views needed for a full skull phantom scan, demonstrate the potential use of the proposed method in dental imaging applications. This method enables a much smaller radiation dose for the patient compared to conventional dental tomography.

  9. Subjective image quality comparison between two digital dental radiographic systems and conventional dental film

    PubMed Central

    Ajmal, Muhammed; Elshinawy, Mohamed I.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives Digital radiography has become an integral part of dentistry. Digital radiography does not require film or dark rooms, reduces X-ray doses, and instantly generates images. The aim of our study was to compare the subjective image quality of two digital dental radiographic systems with conventional dental film. Materials & methods A direct digital (DD) ‘Digital’ system by Sirona, a semi-direct (SD) digital system by Vista-scan, and Kodak ‘E’ speed dental X-ray films were selected for the study. Endodontically-treated extracted teeth (n = 25) were used in the study. Details of enamel, dentin, dentino-enamel junction, root canal filling (gutta percha), and simulated apical pathology were investigated with the three radiographic systems. The data were subjected to statistical analyzes to reveal differences in subjective image quality. Results Conventional dental X-ray film was superior to the digital systems. For digital systems, DD imaging was superior to SD imaging. Conclusion Conventional film yielded superior image quality that was statistically significant in almost all aspects of comparison. Conventional film was followed in image quality by DD, and SD provided the lowest quality images. Conventional film is still considered the gold standard to diagnose diseases affecting the jawbone. Recommendations Improved software and hardware for digital imaging systems are now available and these improvements may now yield images that are comparable in quality to conventional film. However, we recommend that studies still use more observers and other statistical methods to produce ideal results. PMID:25382946

  10. Fusion of PET and CT images using wavelet transform.

    PubMed

    Shalchian, Bahareh; Rajabi, Hossein; Soltanian-zadeh, Hamid

    2009-01-01

    While information about anatomy is available in CT images, information about physiology and metabolism is available in PET images. To integrate both information, the two images are fused. Image fusion methods include simple methods like pixel averaging and sophisticated methods like wavelet transformation. An advantage of using wavelet transformation is that it preserves significant parts of each image. After creating lesions of 10, 8, 6 mm in a NURBS (non-uniform rational B-splines) based cardiac torso (NCAT) phantom, PET images were simulated using SimSET simulator. Attenuation maps of the activity phantom were used as CT images. Each of the PET and CT images was divided into an approximation image and three detailed images by the wavelet transform. The corresponding transformed images generated from the PET and CT images were fused in nine different ways to generate composite images, which were compared to the original images. The basis of comparison is the lesion-to-tissue contrast in the fused image in comparison to the lesion-to-tissue contrast in the original PET and CT images. Our results showed that except for one method, the lesion-to-tissue contrast in the fused image was higher than that of the CT images. In the first six methods, the lesion-to-tissue contrast in the fused image was less than the contrast, in the PET image. In the other three methods, the contrast in the fused image was higher than in the PET image. This was true in cases of 10, 8, 6 mm lesions. In conclusion, we have show that the approximation image produced a better ultimate image and that the lesion-to-tissue contrast in the fused image was also better than that of the original PET and CT images. This is because the approximation image is comprised of fundamental information of the signal (low frequency) that directly affects the image contrast. PMID:19936335

  11. Near-IR imaging of occlusal dental decay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buehler, Christopher M.; Fried, Daniel

    2005-03-01

    Dental enamel manifests high transparency in the near-IR. Previous work demonstrated that near-IR light at 1310-nm is ideally suited for the transillumination of interproximal dental caries (dental decay in between teeth) [1]. However, most new dental decay occurs in the pits and fissures of the occlusal (biting) surfaces of posterior teeth. These caries lesions cannot be detected by x-rays during the early stages of decay due to the overlapping topography of the crown of the tooth. In this study, a near-IR imaging system operating at 1310-nm was used to acquire occlusal images by launching the near-IR light into the buccal surface of the tooth just above the gingival margin (gum-line). The near-IR light diffuses through the highly scattering dentin providing uniform back illumination of the enamel of the crowns allowing imaging of the occlusal surfaces. The near-IR images show high contrast between sound and demineralized areas. Demineralization (decay) can be easily differentiated from stains and pigmentation. Moreover, the high transparency of the enamel enables imaging at greater depth for the detection of subsurface decay hidden under the enamel. These early images suggest that the near-IR offers significant advantages over conventional visual, tactile and radiographic caries detection methods.

  12. Validation of a Monte Carlo simulation for dose assessment in dental cone beam CT examinations.

    PubMed

    Morant, J J; Salvadó, M; Casanovas, R; Hernández-Girón, I; Velasco, E; Calzado, A

    2012-07-01

    A Monte Carlo (MC) simulation for calculating absorbed dose has been developed and applied for dental applications with an i-CAT cone beam CT (CBCT) system. To validate the method a comparison was made between calculated and measured dose values for two different clinical protocols. Measurements with a pencil CT chamber were performed free-in-air and in a CT dose head phantom; measurements were also performed with a transmission ionization chamber. In addition for each protocol a total number of 58 thermoluminescence dosemeters (TLD) were packed in groups and placed at 16 representative anatomical locations of an anthropomorphic phantom (Remab system) to assess absorbed doses. To simulate X-ray exposure, a software application based on the EGS4 package was applied. Dose quantities were calculated for different voxelized models representing the CT ionization and transmission chambers, the TLDs, and the phantoms as well. The dose quantities evaluated in the comparison were the accumulated dose averaged along the rotation axis (D(i)), the volume average dose,D(vol) for the dosimetric phantom, the dose area product (DAP) and the absorbed dose for the TLDs. Absolute differences between measured and simulated outcomes were ≤ 2.1% for free-in-air doses; ≤ 6.2% in the 5 cavities of the CT dose head phantom; ≤ 13% for TLDs inside the primary beam. Such differences were considered acceptable in all cases and confirmed the validity of the MC program for different geometries. In conclusion, the devised MC simulation program can be a robust tool to optimize protocols and estimate patient doses for CBCT units in dental, oral and maxillofacial radiology. PMID:21807542

  13. Evaluation of the resolving potency of a novel reconstruction filter on periodontal ligament space with dental cone-beam CT: a quantitative phantom study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Houno, Yuuki; Hishikawa, Toshimitsu; Gotoh, Ken-ichi; Naitoh, Munetaka; Ariji, Eiichiro; Kodera, Yoshie

    2014-03-01

    Diagnosis of the alveolar bone condition is important for the treatment planning of periodontal disease. Especially the determination of periodontal ligament space is the most important remark because it represents the periodontal tissue support for tooth retention. However, owing to the image blur of the current cone-beam CT (CBCT) imaging technique, the periodontal ligament space is difficult to visualize. In this study, we developed an original periodontal ligament phantom (PLP) and evaluated the image quality of simulated periodontal ligament space using a novel reconstruction filter for CBCT that emphasized high frequency component. PLP was composed from two resin blocks of different materials, the bone equivalent block and the dentine equivalent block. They were assembled to make continuously changing space from 0.0 to 1.0 millimeter that mimics periodontal ligament space. PLP was placed in water and the image was obtained by using Alphard-3030 dental cone-beam CT (Asahi Roentgen Industry Co., Ltd.). Then we reconstructed the projection data with a novel reconstruction filter. The axial images were compared with conventional reconstructed images. In novel filter reconstruction images, 0.4 millimeter of the space width was steadily detected by calculation of pixel value, on the other hand 0.6 millimeter was in conventional images. With our method, the resolving potency of conebeam CT images was improved.

  14. Neural network and its application to CT imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Nikravesh, M.; Kovscek, A.R.; Patzek, T.W.

    1997-02-01

    We present an integrated approach to imaging the progress of air displacement by spontaneous imbibition of oil into sandstone. We combine Computerized Tomography (CT) scanning and neural network image processing. The main aspects of our approach are (I) visualization of the distribution of oil and air saturation by CT, (II) interpretation of CT scans using neural networks, and (III) reconstruction of 3-D images of oil saturation from the CT scans with a neural network model. Excellent agreement between the actual images and the neural network predictions is found.

  15. PET/CT imaging in neuroblastoma.

    PubMed

    Piccardo, A; Lopci, E; Conte, M; Foppiani, L; Garaventa, A; Cabria, M; Villavecchia, G; Fanti, S; Cistaro, A

    2013-03-01

    123Iodine-metaiodobenzylguanidine (123I-MIBG) scintigraphy is currently the tracer of choice for neuroblastoma (NB). It has high diagnostic accuracy and prognostic value for the assessment of patients after chemotherapy. A positive 123I-MIBG scan is also used for the basis of targeted radionuclide therapy with 131I-MIBG. I-123 MIBG scan however has some limitations which should be taken into account. Moreover the reasons for false negative MIBG results have not been entirely elucidated. Meticulous correlation with radiological examinations and recognition of the normal distribution pattern of 123I-MIBG in children is vital to obtain optimal results. With its technical superiorities, positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) can be successfully introduced into the diagnostic workup of NB. Different PET tracers have been offered for imaging in patients with NB, and the efficacy of this modality has been compared with that of 123I-MIBG scan. Our review aims to analyze the present role of PET/CT imaging and radiopharmaceuticals in NB. PMID:23474633

  16. Upright cone beam CT imaging using the onboard imager

    SciTech Connect

    Fave, Xenia Martin, Rachael; Yang, Jinzhong; Balter, Peter; Court, Laurence; Carvalho, Luis; Pan, Tinsu

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: Many patients could benefit from being treated in an upright position. The objectives of this study were to determine whether cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) could be used to acquire upright images for treatment planning and to demonstrate whether reconstruction of upright images maintained accurate geometry and Hounsfield units (HUs). Methods: A TrueBeam linac was programmed in developer mode to take upright CBCT images. The gantry head was positioned at 0°, and the couch was rotated to 270°. The x-ray source and detector arms were extended to their lateral positions. The x-ray source and gantry remained stationary as fluoroscopic projections were taken and the couch was rotated from 270° to 90°. The x-ray tube current was normalized to deposit the same dose (measured using a calibrated Farmer ion chamber) as that received during a clinical helical CT scan to the center of a cylindrical, polyethylene phantom. To extend the field of view, two couch rotation scans were taken with the detector offset 15 cm superiorly and then 15 cm inferiorly. The images from these two scans were stitched together before reconstruction. Upright reconstructions were compared to reconstructions from simulation CT scans of the same phantoms. Two methods were investigated for correcting the HUs, including direct calibration and mapping the values from a simulation CT. Results: Overall geometry, spatial linearity, and high contrast resolution were maintained in upright reconstructions. Some artifacts were created and HU accuracy was compromised; however, these limitations could be removed by mapping the HUs from a simulation CT to the upright reconstruction for treatment planning. Conclusions: The feasibility of using the TrueBeam linac to take upright CBCT images was demonstrated. This technique is straightforward to implement and could be of enormous benefit to patients with thoracic tumors or those who find a supine position difficult to endure.

  17. An approach for quantitative image quality analysis for CT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rahimi, Amir; Cochran, Joe; Mooney, Doug; Regensburger, Joe

    2016-03-01

    An objective and standardized approach to assess image quality of Compute Tomography (CT) systems is required in a wide variety of imaging processes to identify CT systems appropriate for a given application. We present an overview of the framework we have developed to help standardize and to objectively assess CT image quality for different models of CT scanners used for security applications. Within this framework, we have developed methods to quantitatively measure metrics that should correlate with feature identification, detection accuracy and precision, and image registration capabilities of CT machines and to identify strengths and weaknesses in different CT imaging technologies in transportation security. To that end we have designed, developed and constructed phantoms that allow for systematic and repeatable measurements of roughly 88 image quality metrics, representing modulation transfer function, noise equivalent quanta, noise power spectra, slice sensitivity profiles, streak artifacts, CT number uniformity, CT number consistency, object length accuracy, CT number path length consistency, and object registration. Furthermore, we have developed a sophisticated MATLAB based image analysis tool kit to analyze CT generated images of phantoms and report these metrics in a format that is standardized across the considered models of CT scanners, allowing for comparative image quality analysis within a CT model or between different CT models. In addition, we have developed a modified sparse principal component analysis (SPCA) method to generate a modified set of PCA components as compared to the standard principal component analysis (PCA) with sparse loadings in conjunction with Hotelling T2 statistical analysis method to compare, qualify, and detect faults in the tested systems.

  18. Soft tissue imaging with photon counting spectroscopic CT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shikhaliev, Polad M.

    2015-03-01

    The purpose of this work was experimental investigation of photon counting spectroscopic CT (PCS-CT) imaging of anatomical soft tissue with clinically relevant size. The imaging experiments were performed using a spectroscopic CT system based on CdZnTe photon counting detector with two rows of pixels, 256 pixels in each row, 1  ×  1 mm2 pixel size, and 25.6 cm detector length. The detector could split the x-ray energy spectrum to 5 regions (energy bins), and acquire 5 multi-energy (spectroscopic) CT images in a single CT scan. A sample of round shaped anatomical soft tissue of 14 cm diameter including lean and fat was used for imaging. To avoid the negative effect of anatomical noise on quantitative analysis, a spectroscopic CT phantom with tissue equivalent solid materials was used. The images were acquired at 60, 90, and 120 kVp tube voltages, and spectroscopic image series were acquired with 3 and 5 energy bins. Spectroscopic CT numbers were introduced and used to evaluate an energy selective image series. The anatomical soft tissue with 14 cm diameter was visualized with good quality and without substantial artifacts by the photon counting spectroscopic CT system. The effects of the energy bin crosstalk on spectroscopic CT numbers were quantified and analyzed. The single and double slice PCS-CT images were acquired and compared. Several new findings were observed, including the effect of soft tissue non-uniformity on image artifacts, unique status of highest energy bin, and material dependent visualization in spectroscopic image series. Fat-lean decomposition was performed using dual energy subtraction and threshold segmentation methods, and compared. Using K-edge filtered x-rays improved fat-lean decomposition as compared to conventional x-rays. Several new and important aspects of the PCS-CT were investigated. These include imaging soft tissue with clinically relevant size, single- and double-slice PCS-CT imaging, using spectroscopic CT

  19. Soft tissue imaging with photon counting spectroscopic CT.

    PubMed

    Shikhaliev, Polad M

    2015-03-21

    The purpose of this work was experimental investigation of photon counting spectroscopic CT (PCS-CT) imaging of anatomical soft tissue with clinically relevant size. The imaging experiments were performed using a spectroscopic CT system based on CdZnTe photon counting detector with two rows of pixels, 256 pixels in each row, 1  ×  1 mm(2) pixel size, and 25.6 cm detector length. The detector could split the x-ray energy spectrum to 5 regions (energy bins), and acquire 5 multi-energy (spectroscopic) CT images in a single CT scan. A sample of round shaped anatomical soft tissue of 14 cm diameter including lean and fat was used for imaging. To avoid the negative effect of anatomical noise on quantitative analysis, a spectroscopic CT phantom with tissue equivalent solid materials was used. The images were acquired at 60, 90, and 120 kVp tube voltages, and spectroscopic image series were acquired with 3 and 5 energy bins. Spectroscopic CT numbers were introduced and used to evaluate an energy selective image series. The anatomical soft tissue with 14 cm diameter was visualized with good quality and without substantial artifacts by the photon counting spectroscopic CT system. The effects of the energy bin crosstalk on spectroscopic CT numbers were quantified and analyzed. The single and double slice PCS-CT images were acquired and compared. Several new findings were observed, including the effect of soft tissue non-uniformity on image artifacts, unique status of highest energy bin, and material dependent visualization in spectroscopic image series. Fat-lean decomposition was performed using dual energy subtraction and threshold segmentation methods, and compared. Using K-edge filtered x-rays improved fat-lean decomposition as compared to conventional x-rays. Several new and important aspects of the PCS-CT were investigated. These include imaging soft tissue with clinically relevant size, single- and double-slice PCS-CT imaging, using spectroscopic CT

  20. Automated vertebra identification in CT images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ehm, Matthias; Klinder, Tobias; Kneser, Reinhard; Lorenz, Cristian

    2009-02-01

    In this paper, we describe and compare methods for automatically identifying individual vertebrae in arbitrary CT images. The identification is an essential precondition for a subsequent model-based segmentation, which is used in a wide field of orthopedic, neurological, and oncological applications, e.g., spinal biopsies or the insertion of pedicle screws. Since adjacent vertebrae show similar characteristics, an automated labeling of the spine column is a very challenging task, especially if no surrounding reference structures can be taken into account. Furthermore, vertebra identification is complicated due to the fact that many images are bounded to a very limited field of view and may contain only few vertebrae. We propose and evaluate two methods for automatically labeling the spine column by evaluating similarities between given models and vertebral objects. In one method, object boundary information is taken into account by applying a Generalized Hough Transform (GHT) for each vertebral object. In the other method, appearance models containing mean gray value information are registered to each vertebral object using cross and local correlation as similarity measures for the optimization function. The GHT is advantageous in terms of computational performance but cuts back concerning the identification rate. A correct labeling of the vertebral column has been successfully performed on 93% of the test set consisting of 63 disparate input images using rigid image registration with local correlation as similarity measure.

  1. Comparison of physical quality assurance between Scanora 3D and 3D Accuitomo 80 dental CT scanners

    PubMed Central

    Ali, Ahmed S.; Fteita, Dareen; Kulmala, Jarmo

    2015-01-01

    Background The use of cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) in dentistry has proven to be useful in the diagnosis and treatment planning of several oral and maxillofacial diseases. The quality of the resulting image is dictated by many factors related to the patient, unit, and operator. Materials and methods In this work, two dental CBCT units, namely Scanora 3D and 3D Accuitomo 80, were assessed and compared in terms of quantitative effective dose delivered to specific locations in a dosimetry phantom. Resolution and contrast were evaluated in only 3D Accuitomo 80 using special quality assurance phantoms. Results Scanora 3D, with less radiation time, showed less dosing values compared to 3D Accuitomo 80 (mean 0.33 mSv, SD±0.16 vs. 0.18 mSv, SD±0.1). Using paired t-test, no significant difference was found in Accuitomo two scan sessions (p>0.05), while it was highly significant in Scanora (p>0.05). The modulation transfer function value (at 2 lp/mm), in both measurements, was found to be 4.4%. The contrast assessment of 3D Accuitomo 80 in the two measurements showed few differences, for example, the grayscale values were the same (SD=0) while the noise level was slightly different (SD=0 and 0.67, respectively). Conclusions The radiation dose values in these two CBCT units are significantly less than those encountered in systemic CT scans. However, the dose seems to be affected more by changing the field of view rather than the voltage or amperage. The low doses were at the expense of the image quality produced, which was still acceptable. Although the spatial resolution and contrast were inferior to the medical images produced in systemic CT units, the present results recommend adopting CBCTs in maxillofacial imaging because of low radiation dose and adequate image quality. PMID:26091832

  2. Evaluation of trabecular bone patterns on dental radiographic images: influence of cortical bone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amouriq, Yves; Evenou, Pierre; Arlicot, Aurore; Normand, Nicolas; Layrolle, Pierre; Weiss, Pierre; Guédon, Jean-Pierre

    2010-03-01

    For some authors trabecular bone is highly visible in intraoral radiographs. For other authors, the observed intrabony trabecular pattern is a representation of only the endosteal surface of cortical bone, not of intermedullary striae. The purpose of this preliminary study was to investigate the true anatomical structures that are visible in routine dental radiographs and classically denoted trabecular bone. This is a major point for bone texture analysis on radiographs. Computed radiography (CR) images of dog mandible section in molar region were compared with simulations calculated from high-resolution micro-CT volumes. Calculated simulations were obtained using the Mojette Transform. By digitally editing the CT volume, the simulations were separated into trabecular and cortical components into a region of interest. Different images were compared and correlated, some bone micro-architecture parameters calculated. A high correlation was found between computed radiographs and calculated simulations from micro-CT. The Mojette transform was successful to obtain high quality images. Cortical bone did not contribute to change in a major way simulated images. These first results imply that intrabony trabecular pattern observed on radiographs can not only be a representation of the cortical bone endosteal surface and that trabecular bone is highly visible in intraoral radiographs.

  3. CT image retrieval using dual tree complex wavelet packet transform

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kokare, Manesh

    2010-02-01

    In this paper, novel method based on Dual Tree Complex Wavelet Packet Transform (DT-CWPT) to analyze texture of Computer Tomography (CT) images and extract the corresponding feature vectors for content based medical image retrieval is proposed. This is mainly because of DT-CWPT characterizes textural property of CT images in better way. The feature vectors of CT images are extracted by measuring energy and standard deviation of DT-CWPT subband. These features are used to facilitate content based medical image retrieval (CBMIR).The proposed method outperforms than existing available methods.

  4. Viability of imaging structures inside human dentin using dental transillumination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grandisoli, C. L.; Alves-de-Souza, F. D.; Costa, M. M.; Castro, L.; Ana, P. A.; Zezell, D. M.; Lins, E. C.

    2014-02-01

    Dental Transillumination (DT) is a technique for imaging internal structures of teeth by detecting infrared radiation transmitted throughout the specimens. It was successfully used to detect caries even considering dental enamel and dentin scatter infrared radiation strongly. Literature reports enamel's scattering coefficient is 10 to 30 times lower than dentin; this explain why DT is useful for imaging pathologies in dental enamel, but does not disable its using for imaging dental structures or pathologies inside the dentin. There was no conclusive data in the literature about the limitations of using DT to access biomedical information of dentin. The goal in this study was to present an application of DT to imaging internal structures of dentin. Slices of tooth were confectioned varying the thickness of groups from 0.5 mm up to 2,5 mm. For imaging a FPA InGaAs camera Xeva 1.7- 320 (900-1700 nm; Xenics, Inc., Belgium) and a 3W lamp-based broadband light source (Ocean Optics, Inc., USA) was used; bandpass optical filters at 1000+/-10 nm, 1100+/-10 nm, 1200+/-10 nm and 1300+/-50 nm spectral region were also applied to spectral selection. Images were captured for different camera exposure times and finally a computational processing was applied. The best results revealed the viability to imaging dent in tissue with thickness up to 2,5 mm without a filter (900-1700nm spectral range). After these results a pilot experiment of using DT to detect the pulp chamber of an incisive human tooth was made. New data showed the viability to imaging the pulp chamber of specimen.

  5. Automatic Lumbar Spondylolisthesis Measurement in CT Images.

    PubMed

    Liao, Shu; Zhan, Yiqiang; Dong, Zhongxing; Yan, Ruyi; Gong, Liyan; Zhou, Xiang Sean; Salganicoff, Marcos; Fei, Jun

    2016-07-01

    Lumbar spondylolisthesis is one of the most common spinal diseases. It is caused by the anterior shift of a lumbar vertebrae relative to subjacent vertebrae. In current clinical practices, staging of spondylolisthesis is often conducted in a qualitative way. Although meyerding grading opens the door to stage spondylolisthesis in a more quantitative way, it relies on the manual measurement, which is time consuming and irreproducible. Thus, an automatic measurement algorithm becomes desirable for spondylolisthesis diagnosis and staging. However, there are two challenges. 1) Accurate detection of the most anterior and posterior points on the superior and inferior surfaces of each lumbar vertebrae. Due to the small size of the vertebrae, slight errors of detection may lead to significant measurement errors, hence, wrong disease stages. 2) Automatic localize and label each lumbar vertebrae is required to provide the semantic meaning of the measurement. It is difficult since different lumbar vertebraes have high similarity of both shape and image appearance. To resolve these challenges, a new auto measurement framework is proposed with two major contributions: First, a learning based spine labeling method that integrates both the image appearance and spine geometry information is designed to detect lumbar vertebrae. Second, a hierarchical method using both the population information from atlases and domain-specific information in the target image is proposed for most anterior and posterior points positioning. Validated on 258 CT spondylolisthesis patients, our method shows very similar results to manual measurements by radiologists and significantly increases the measurement efficiency. PMID:26849859

  6. Hyperspectral laser-induced autofluorescence imaging of dental caries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bürmen, Miran; Fidler, Aleš; Pernuš, Franjo; Likar, Boštjan

    2012-01-01

    Dental caries is a disease characterized by demineralization of enamel crystals leading to the penetration of bacteria into the dentine and pulp. Early detection of enamel demineralization resulting in increased enamel porosity, commonly known as white spots, is a difficult diagnostic task. Laser induced autofluorescence was shown to be a useful method for early detection of demineralization. The existing studies involved either a single point spectroscopic measurements or imaging at a single spectral band. In the case of spectroscopic measurements, very little or no spatial information is acquired and the measured autofluorescence signal strongly depends on the position and orientation of the probe. On the other hand, single-band spectral imaging can be substantially affected by local spectral artefacts. Such effects can significantly interfere with automated methods for detection of early caries lesions. In contrast, hyperspectral imaging effectively combines the spatial information of imaging methods with the spectral information of spectroscopic methods providing excellent basis for development of robust and reliable algorithms for automated classification and analysis of hard dental tissues. In this paper, we employ 405 nm laser excitation of natural caries lesions. The fluorescence signal is acquired by a state-of-the-art hyperspectral imaging system consisting of a high-resolution acousto-optic tunable filter (AOTF) and a highly sensitive Scientific CMOS camera in the spectral range from 550 nm to 800 nm. The results are compared to the contrast obtained by near-infrared hyperspectral imaging technique employed in the existing studies on early detection of dental caries.

  7. Hybrid µCT-FMT imaging and image analysis

    PubMed Central

    Zafarnia, Sara; Babler, Anne; Jahnen-Dechent, Willi; Lammers, Twan; Lederle, Wiltrud; Kiessling, Fabian

    2015-01-01

    Fluorescence-mediated tomography (FMT) enables longitudinal and quantitative determination of the fluorescence distribution in vivo and can be used to assess the biodistribution of novel probes and to assess disease progression using established molecular probes or reporter genes. The combination with an anatomical modality, e.g., micro computed tomography (µCT), is beneficial for image analysis and for fluorescence reconstruction. We describe a protocol for multimodal µCT-FMT imaging including the image processing steps necessary to extract quantitative measurements. After preparing the mice and performing the imaging, the multimodal data sets are registered. Subsequently, an improved fluorescence reconstruction is performed, which takes into account the shape of the mouse. For quantitative analysis, organ segmentations are generated based on the anatomical data using our interactive segmentation tool. Finally, the biodistribution curves are generated using a batch-processing feature. We show the applicability of the method by assessing the biodistribution of a well-known probe that binds to bones and joints. PMID:26066033

  8. Reduced dental calcium expression and dental mass in chronic sleep deprived rats: Combined EDS, TOF-SIMS, and micro-CT analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuo, Yi-Jie; Huang, Yung-Kai; Chou, Hsiu-Chu; Pai, Man-Hui; Lee, Ai-Wei; Mai, Fu-Der; Chang, Hung-Ming

    2015-08-01

    Teeth are the hardest tissue in the body. The growth of teeth is closely regulated by circadian rhythmicity. Considering that sleep deprivation (SD) is a severe condition that disrupts normal circadian rhythmicity, this study was conducted to determine whether calcium expression (the major element participating in teeth constitution), and dental mass would be significantly impaired following SD. Adolescent rats subjected to 3 weeks of SD were processed for energy dispersive spectrum (EDS), time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry (TOF-SIMS), and micro-computed tomography (micro-CT) analyses. The EDS and TOF-SIMS results indicated that high calcium intensity was detected in both the upper and lower incisors of untreated rats. Micro-CT analysis corresponded closely with spectral data in which an enhanced dental mass was calculated in intact animals. However, following SD, both calcium expression and the dental mass were remarkably decreased to nearly half those of the untreated values. Because SD plays a detrimental role in impairing dental structure, establishing satisfactory sleep behavior would therefore serve as a crucial strategy for preventing or improving prevalent dental dysfunctions.

  9. Calibration free beam hardening correction for cardiac CT perfusion imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levi, Jacob; Fahmi, Rachid; Eck, Brendan L.; Fares, Anas; Wu, Hao; Vembar, Mani; Dhanantwari, Amar; Bezerra, Hiram G.; Wilson, David L.

    2016-03-01

    Myocardial perfusion imaging using CT (MPI-CT) and coronary CTA have the potential to make CT an ideal noninvasive gate-keeper for invasive coronary angiography. However, beam hardening artifacts (BHA) prevent accurate blood flow calculation in MPI-CT. BH Correction (BHC) methods require either energy-sensitive CT, not widely available, or typically a calibration-based method. We developed a calibration-free, automatic BHC (ABHC) method suitable for MPI-CT. The algorithm works with any BHC method and iteratively determines model parameters using proposed BHA-specific cost function. In this work, we use the polynomial BHC extended to three materials. The image is segmented into soft tissue, bone, and iodine images, based on mean HU and temporal enhancement. Forward projections of bone and iodine images are obtained, and in each iteration polynomial correction is applied. Corrections are then back projected and combined to obtain the current iteration's BHC image. This process is iterated until cost is minimized. We evaluate the algorithm on simulated and physical phantom images and on preclinical MPI-CT data. The scans were obtained on a prototype spectral detector CT (SDCT) scanner (Philips Healthcare). Mono-energetic reconstructed images were used as the reference. In the simulated phantom, BH streak artifacts were reduced from 12+/-2HU to 1+/-1HU and cupping was reduced by 81%. Similarly, in physical phantom, BH streak artifacts were reduced from 48+/-6HU to 1+/-5HU and cupping was reduced by 86%. In preclinical MPI-CT images, BHA was reduced from 28+/-6 HU to less than 4+/-4HU at peak enhancement. Results suggest that the algorithm can be used to reduce BHA in conventional CT and improve MPI-CT accuracy.

  10. Deformable image registration of CT and truncated cone-beam CT for adaptive radiation therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhen, Xin; Yan, Hao; Zhou, Linghong; Jia, Xun; Jiang, Steve B.

    2013-11-01

    Truncation of a cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) image, mainly caused by the limited field of view (FOV) of CBCT imaging, poses challenges to the problem of deformable image registration (DIR) between computed tomography (CT) and CBCT images in adaptive radiation therapy (ART). The missing information outside the CBCT FOV usually causes incorrect deformations when a conventional DIR algorithm is utilized, which may introduce significant errors in subsequent operations such as dose calculation. In this paper, based on the observation that the missing information in the CBCT image domain does exist in the projection image domain, we propose to solve this problem by developing a hybrid deformation/reconstruction algorithm. As opposed to deforming the CT image to match the truncated CBCT image, the CT image is deformed such that its projections match all the corresponding projection images for the CBCT image. An iterative forward-backward projection algorithm is developed. Six head-and-neck cancer patient cases are used to evaluate our algorithm, five with simulated truncation and one with real truncation. It is found that our method can accurately register the CT image to the truncated CBCT image and is robust against image truncation when the portion of the truncated image is less than 40% of the total image. Part of this work was presented at the 54th AAPM Annual Meeting (Charlotte, NC, USA, 29 July-2 August 2012).

  11. Quantitative image quality evaluation for cardiac CT reconstructions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tseng, Hsin-Wu; Fan, Jiahua; Kupinski, Matthew A.; Balhorn, William; Okerlund, Darin R.

    2016-03-01

    Maintaining image quality in the presence of motion is always desirable and challenging in clinical Cardiac CT imaging. Different image-reconstruction algorithms are available on current commercial CT systems that attempt to achieve this goal. It is widely accepted that image-quality assessment should be task-based and involve specific tasks, observers, and associated figures of merits. In this work, we developed an observer model that performed the task of estimating the percentage of plaque in a vessel from CT images. We compared task performance of Cardiac CT image data reconstructed using a conventional FBP reconstruction algorithm and the SnapShot Freeze (SSF) algorithm, each at default and optimal reconstruction cardiac phases. The purpose of this work is to design an approach for quantitative image-quality evaluation of temporal resolution for Cardiac CT systems. To simulate heart motion, a moving coronary type phantom synchronized with an ECG signal was used. Three different percentage plaques embedded in a 3 mm vessel phantom were imaged multiple times under motion free, 60 bpm, and 80 bpm heart rates. Static (motion free) images of this phantom were taken as reference images for image template generation. Independent ROIs from the 60 bpm and 80 bpm images were generated by vessel tracking. The observer performed estimation tasks using these ROIs. Ensemble mean square error (EMSE) was used as the figure of merit. Results suggest that the quality of SSF images is superior to the quality of FBP images in higher heart-rate scans.

  12. Dual-energy CT imaging of thoracic malignancies

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Long Jiang; Yang, Gui Fen; Wu, Sheng Yong; Lu, Guang Ming; Schoepf, U. Joseph

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Computed tomography (CT) plays a pivotal role in the detection, characterization, and staging of lung cancer and other thoracic malignancies. Since the introduction of clinically viable dual-energy CT techniques, substantial evidence has accumulated on the use of this modality for imaging chest malignancies. This article describes the principles of dual-energy CT along with suitable image acquisition, reconstruction, and postprocessing strategies for oncologic applications in the chest. The potential of dual-energy CT techniques for the detection, characterization, staging, and surveillance of chest malignancy, as well as the limitations of this modality are discussed. PMID:23470989

  13. Accelerated Compressed Sensing Based CT Image Reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Hashemi, SayedMasoud; Beheshti, Soosan; Gill, Patrick R.; Paul, Narinder S.; Cobbold, Richard S. C.

    2015-01-01

    In X-ray computed tomography (CT) an important objective is to reduce the radiation dose without significantly degrading the image quality. Compressed sensing (CS) enables the radiation dose to be reduced by producing diagnostic images from a limited number of projections. However, conventional CS-based algorithms are computationally intensive and time-consuming. We propose a new algorithm that accelerates the CS-based reconstruction by using a fast pseudopolar Fourier based Radon transform and rebinning the diverging fan beams to parallel beams. The reconstruction process is analyzed using a maximum-a-posterior approach, which is transformed into a weighted CS problem. The weights involved in the proposed model are calculated based on the statistical characteristics of the reconstruction process, which is formulated in terms of the measurement noise and rebinning interpolation error. Therefore, the proposed method not only accelerates the reconstruction, but also removes the rebinning and interpolation errors. Simulation results are shown for phantoms and a patient. For example, a 512 × 512 Shepp-Logan phantom when reconstructed from 128 rebinned projections using a conventional CS method had 10% error, whereas with the proposed method the reconstruction error was less than 1%. Moreover, computation times of less than 30 sec were obtained using a standard desktop computer without numerical optimization. PMID:26167200

  14. Ring artifacts removal from synchrotron CT image slices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Zhouping; Wiebe, Sheldon; Chapman, Dean

    2013-06-01

    Ring artifacts can occur in reconstructed images from x-ray Computerized Tomography (CT) as full or partial concentric rings superimposed on the scanned structures. Due to the data corruption by those ring artifacts in CT images, qualitative and quantitative analysis of these images are compromised. In this paper, we propose to correct the ring artifacts on the reconstructed synchrotron radiation (SR) CT image slices. The proposed correction procedure includes the following steps: (1). transform the reconstructed CT images into polar coordinates; (2) apply discrete two-dimensional (2D) wavelet transform to the polar image to decompose it into four image components: low pass band image component, as well as the components from horizontal, vertical and diagonal details bands; (3). apply 2D Fourier transform to the vertical details band image component only, since the ring artifacts become vertical lines in the polar coordinates; (4). apply Gaussian filtering in Fourier domain along the abscissa direction to suppress the vertical lines, since the information of the vertical lines in Fourier domain is completely condensed to that direction; (5). perform inverse Fourier transform to get the corrected vertical details band image component; (6). perform inverse wavelet transform to get the corrected polar image; (7). transform the corrected polar image back to Cartesian coordinates to get the CT image slice with reduced ring artifacts. This approach has been successfully used on CT data acquired from the Biomedical Imaging and Therapy (BMIT) beamline in Canadian Light Source (CLS), and the results show that the ring artifacts in original SR CT images have been effectively suppressed with all the structure information in the image preserved.

  15. A portable dental image viewer using a mobile network to provide a tele-dental service.

    PubMed

    Park, Wonse; Kim, Dong-Keun; Kim, Jung-Chae; Kim, Kee-Deog; Yoo, Sun K

    2009-01-01

    We tested three imaging devices for suitability in emergency dental situations for telemedicine. The three devices were a special-purpose oral camera, a digital single lens reflex (DSLR) camera, and the built-in camera of a mobile phone. A total of 20 subjects volunteered to take part in the study. We simulated five different conditions which could affect the quality of the image and measured image transmission times across two widely available mobile networks (a CDMA-based 3G network and a Wireless Broadband Network, WiBRO). The DSLR produced the best quality images, although it was a relatively large device and not easy to use. The oral camera failed to give satisfactory images under certain conditions (i.e. without extra lighting, out of focus and head motion). In contrast, the mobile phone based camera was very easy to use and to handle, and it gave good information for initial diagnosis, even at high compression ratios. If the image acquisition conditions are carefully set up, this device might be the best for emergency dental trauma situations. PMID:19364900

  16. Photon counting spectral CT versus conventional CT: comparative evaluation for breast imaging application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shikhaliev, Polad M.; Fritz, Shannon G.

    2011-04-01

    Spectral CT systems with photon counting detectors have more advantages compared to conventional CT systems. However, clinical applications have been hampered for a long time due to the high demands of clinical systems and limitations of spectroscopic x-ray detectors. Photon counting detector technology has gained considerable improvements in the past decade, and spectral CT has become a hot topic. Several experimental spectral CT systems are under investigation. The purpose of this work was to perform the first direct, side-by-side comparison of existing spectral CT technology with a mature clinical CT system based on a conventional energy integrating detector. We have built an experimental spectral CT system whose main parameters are similar to the parameters of a clinical CT system. The system uses a spectroscopic cadmium zinc telluride (CZT) detector. The detector includes two rows of CZT pixels with 256 pixels in each row. The pixel size is 1 × 1 mm2, and the maximum count rate is 2 Mcounts/pixel/s. The spectral CT system has a magnification factor of 1.62 and the source to detector and source to image distances of 85 and 53 cm, respectively. The above parameters are similar to those of the clinical CT system, Siemens Sensation 16, used for comparison. The two systems were compared by imaging spatial resolution and contrast resolution phantoms made from acrylic cylinders with 14 cm diameters. The resolution phantom included Al wires with 0.3, 0.6, and 1 mm diameters, and 0.25 g cc-1 CaCO3 contrast. The contrast phantom included contrast elements with 1.7, 5, and 15 mg cc-1 iodine, and 1.1, 3.3, and 10 mg cc-1 gadolinium. The phantoms were imaged with the two systems using 120 kVp tube voltage and 470 mR total skin exposure. The spectral CT showed CT numbers, image noise, and spatial and contrast resolutions to be similar within 10% compared to the Siemens 16 system, and provided an average of 10% higher CNR. However, the spectral CT system had a major

  17. Application of high resolution synchrotron micro-CT radiation in dental implant osseointegration.

    PubMed

    Neldam, Camilla Albeck; Lauridsen, Torsten; Rack, Alexander; Lefolii, Tore Tranberg; Jørgensen, Niklas Rye; Feidenhans'l, Robert; Pinholt, Else Marie

    2015-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to describe a refined method using high-resolution synchrotron radiation microtomography (SRmicro-CT) to evaluate osseointegration and peri-implant bone volume fraction after titanium dental implant insertion. SRmicro-CT is considered gold standard evaluating bone microarchitecture. Its high resolution, high contrast, and excellent high signal-to-noise-ratio all contribute to the highest spatial resolutions achievable today. Using SRmicro-CT at a voxel size of 5 μm in an experimental goat mandible model, the peri-implant bone volume fraction was found to quickly increase to 50% as the radial distance from the implant surface increased, and levelled out to approximately 80% at a distance of 400 μm. This method has been successful in depicting the bone and cavities in three dimensions thereby enabling us to give a more precise answer to the fraction of the bone-to-implant contact compared to previous methods. PMID:25957106

  18. Anesthetic and Dental Management of a Child With IMAGe Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Lindemeyer, Rochelle G.; Rashewsky, Stephanie E.; Louie, Phillip J.; Schleelein, Laura

    2014-01-01

    IMAGe syndrome (OMIM 300290) is a rare multisystem disorder that has a broad phenotypic presentation. Though variable, this disorder mainly consists of Intrauterine growth retardation, Metaphyseal dysplasia, Adrenal hypoplasia congenita, and Genital abnormalities. Patients with IMAGe syndrome present as an uncommon yet important challenge for dentists and anesthesiologists due to their wide range of dysmorphic facial features, adrenal insufficiency, electrolyte imbalances, and need for steroid replacement. The purpose of this case report is to describe the successful anesthetic management of a pediatric patient diagnosed with IMAGe syndrome who presented for full mouth dental rehabilitation. PMID:25517553

  19. Interactions between magnetic resonance imaging and dental material

    PubMed Central

    Mathew, Chalakuzhiyl Abraham; Maller, Sudhakara; Maheshwaran

    2013-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has become a common and important life-saving diagnostic tool in recent times, for diseases of the head and neck region. Dentists should be aware of the interactions of various restorative dental materials and different technical factors put to use by an MRI scanning machine. Specific knowledge about these impacts, at the dentist level and at the level of the personnel at the MRI centers can save valuable time for the patient and prevent errors in MRI images. Artifacts from metal restorations are a major hindrance at such times, as they result in disappearance or distortion of the image and loss of important information. PMID:23946562

  20. Anesthetic and dental management of a child with IMAGe syndrome.

    PubMed

    Lindemeyer, Rochelle G; Rashewsky, Stephanie E; Louie, Phillip J; Schleelein, Laura

    2014-01-01

    IMAGe syndrome (OMIM 300290) is a rare multisystem disorder that has a broad phenotypic presentation. Though variable, this disorder mainly consists of Intrauterine growth retardation, Metaphyseal dysplasia, Adrenal hypoplasia congenita, and Genital abnormalities. Patients with IMAGe syndrome present as an uncommon yet important challenge for dentists and anesthesiologists due to their wide range of dysmorphic facial features, adrenal insufficiency, electrolyte imbalances, and need for steroid replacement. The purpose of this case report is to describe the successful anesthetic management of a pediatric patient diagnosed with IMAGe syndrome who presented for full mouth dental rehabilitation. PMID:25517553

  1. A generalized method of converting CT image to PET linear attenuation coefficient distribution in PET/CT imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Lu; Wu, Li-Wei; Wei, Le; Gao, Juan; Sun, Cui-Li; Chai, Pei; Li, Dao-Wu

    2014-02-01

    The accuracy of attenuation correction in positron emission tomography scanners depends mainly on deriving the reliable 511-keV linear attenuation coefficient distribution in the scanned objects. In the PET/CT system, the linear attenuation distribution is usually obtained from the intensities of the CT image. However, the intensities of the CT image relate to the attenuation of photons in an energy range of 40 keV-140 keV. Before implementing PET attenuation correction, the intensities of CT images must be transformed into the PET 511-keV linear attenuation coefficients. However, the CT scan parameters can affect the effective energy of CT X-ray photons and thus affect the intensities of the CT image. Therefore, for PET/CT attenuation correction, it is crucial to determine the conversion curve with a given set of CT scan parameters and convert the CT image into a PET linear attenuation coefficient distribution. A generalized method is proposed for converting a CT image into a PET linear attenuation coefficient distribution. Instead of some parameter-dependent phantom calibration experiments, the conversion curve is calculated directly by employing the consistency conditions to yield the most consistent attenuation map with the measured PET data. The method is evaluated with phantom experiments and small animal experiments. In phantom studies, the estimated conversion curve fits the true attenuation coefficients accurately, and accurate PET attenuation maps are obtained by the estimated conversion curves and provide nearly the same correction results as the true attenuation map. In small animal studies, a more complicated attenuation distribution of the mouse is obtained successfully to remove the attenuation artifact and improve the PET image contrast efficiently.

  2. Optimization of SPECT-CT Hybrid Imaging Using Iterative Image Reconstruction for Low-Dose CT: A Phantom Study

    PubMed Central

    Grosser, Oliver S.; Kupitz, Dennis; Ruf, Juri; Czuczwara, Damian; Steffen, Ingo G.; Furth, Christian; Thormann, Markus; Loewenthal, David; Ricke, Jens; Amthauer, Holger

    2015-01-01

    Background Hybrid imaging combines nuclear medicine imaging such as single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) or positron emission tomography (PET) with computed tomography (CT). Through this hybrid design, scanned patients accumulate radiation exposure from both applications. Imaging modalities have been the subject of long-term optimization efforts, focusing on diagnostic applications. It was the aim of this study to investigate the influence of an iterative CT image reconstruction algorithm (ASIR) on the image quality of the low-dose CT images. Methodology/Principal Findings Examinations were performed with a SPECT-CT scanner with standardized CT and SPECT-phantom geometries and CT protocols with systematically reduced X-ray tube currents. Analyses included image quality with respect to photon flux. Results were compared to the standard FBP reconstructed images. The general impact of the CT-based attenuation maps used during SPECT reconstruction was examined for two SPECT phantoms. Using ASIR for image reconstructions, image noise was reduced compared to FBP reconstructions for the same X-ray tube current. The Hounsfield unit (HU) values reconstructed by ASIR were correlated to the FBP HU values(R2 ≥ 0.88) and the contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) was improved by ASIR. However, for a phantom with increased attenuation, the HU values shifted for low X-ray tube currents I ≤ 60 mA (p ≤ 0.04). In addition, the shift of the HU values was observed within the attenuation corrected SPECT images for very low X-ray tube currents (I ≤ 20 mA, p ≤ 0.001). Conclusion/Significance In general, the decrease in X-ray tube current up to 30 mA in combination with ASIR led to a reduction of CT-related radiation exposure without a significant decrease in image quality. PMID:26390216

  3. Medipix2 based CdTe microprobe for dental imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vykydal, Z.; Fauler, A.; Fiederle, M.; Jakubek, J.; Svestkova, M.; Zwerger, A.

    2011-12-01

    Medical imaging devices and techniques are demanded to provide high resolution and low dose images of samples or patients. Hybrid semiconductor single photon counting devices together with suitable sensor materials and advanced techniques of image reconstruction fulfil these requirements. In particular cases such as the direct observation of dental implants also the size of the imaging device itself plays a critical role. This work presents the comparison of 2D radiographs of tooth provided by a standard commercial dental imaging system (Gendex 765DC X-ray tube with VisualiX scintillation detector) and two Medipix2 USB Lite detectors one equipped with a Si sensor (300 μm thick) and one with a CdTe sensor (1 mm thick). Single photon counting capability of the Medipix2 device allows virtually unlimited dynamic range of the images and thus increases the contrast significantly. The dimensions of the whole USB Lite device are only 15 mm × 60 mm of which 25% consists of the sensitive area. Detector of this compact size can be used directly inside the patients' mouth.

  4. Wide-Field Raman Imaging of Dental Lesions

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Shan; Li, Bolan; Akkus, Anna; Akkus, Ozan; Lang, Lisa

    2014-01-01

    Detection of dental caries at the onset remains as a great challenge in dentistry. Raman spectroscopy could be successfully applied towards detecting caries since it is sensitive to the amount of the Raman active mineral crystals, the most abundant component of enamel. Effective diagnosis requires full examination of a tooth surface via a Raman mapping. Point-scan Raman mapping is not clinically relevant (feasible) due to lengthy data acquisition time. In this work, a wide-field Raman imaging system was assembled based on a high-sensitivity 2D CCD camera for imaging the mineralization status of teeth with lesions. Wide-field images indicated some lesions to be hypomineralized and others to be hypermineralized. The observations of wide-field Raman imaging were in agreement with point-scan Raman mapping. Therefore, sound enamel and lesions can be discriminated by Raman imaging of the mineral content. In conclusion, wide-field Raman imaging is a potentially useful tool for visualization of dental lesions in the clinic. PMID:24781363

  5. Patient-specific CT dose determination from CT images using Monte Carlo simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, Qing

    Radiation dose from computed tomography (CT) has become a public concern with the increasing application of CT as a diagnostic modality, which has generated a demand for patient-specific CT dose determinations. This thesis work aims to provide a clinically applicable Monte-Carlo-based CT dose calculation tool based on patient CT images. The source spectrum was simulated based on half-value layer measurements. Analytical calculations along with the measured flux distribution were used to estimate the bowtie-filter geometry. Relative source output at different points in a cylindrical phantom was measured and compared with Monte Carlo simulations to verify the determined spectrum and bowtie-filter geometry. Sensitivity tests were designed with four spectra with the same kVp and different half-value layers, and showed that the relative output at different locations in a phantom is sensitive to different beam qualities. An mAs-to-dose conversion factor was determined with in-air measurements using an Exradin A1SL ionization chamber. Longitudinal dose profiles were measured with thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLDs) and compared with the Monte-Carlo-simulated dose profiles to verify the mAs-to-dose conversion factor. Using only the CT images to perform Monte Carlo simulations would cause dose underestimation due to the lack of a scatter region. This scenario was demonstrated with a cylindrical phantom study. Four different image extrapolation methods from the existing CT images and the Scout images were proposed. The results show that performing image extrapolation beyond the scan region improves the dose calculation accuracy under both step-shoot scan mode and helical scan mode. Two clinical studies were designed and comparisons were performed between the current CT dose metrics and the Monte-Carlo-based organ dose determination techniques proposed in this work. The results showed that the current CT dosimetry failed to show dose differences between patients with the same

  6. New sensors for dental X-ray imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fröjdh, C.; Andersson, J.; Bates, R.; Heuken, M.; Irsigler, R.; Petersson, C. S.; O'Shea, V.; Smith, K.; Stamatakis, H.; Welander, U.

    1999-09-01

    Digital systems for dental X-ray imaging are rapidly replacing conventional film techniques. The major advantages of digital systems are reduced X-ray doses due to increased sensitivity, time savings since no development is needed and reduced use of chemicals for film development. Most of the currently available digital systems are based on a silicon CCD coated with a scintillating material. In this paper we present some of the research going on in order to develop new X-ray imaging sensors with improved sensitivity.

  7. Image quality assessment for CT used on small animals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cisneros, Isabela Paredes; Agulles-Pedrós, Luis

    2016-07-01

    Image acquisition on a CT scanner is nowadays necessary in almost any kind of medical study. Its purpose, to produce anatomical images with the best achievable quality, implies the highest diagnostic radiation exposure to patients. Image quality can be measured quantitatively based on parameters such as noise, uniformity and resolution. This measure allows the determination of optimal parameters of operation for the scanner in order to get the best diagnostic image. A human Phillips CT scanner is the first one minded for veterinary-use exclusively in Colombia. The aim of this study was to measure the CT image quality parameters using an acrylic phantom and then, using the computational tool MatLab, determine these parameters as a function of current value and window of visualization, in order to reduce dose delivery by keeping the appropriate image quality.

  8. Acoustic 3D imaging of dental structures

    SciTech Connect

    Lewis, D.K.; Hume, W.R.; Douglass, G.D.

    1997-02-01

    Our goals for the first year of this three dimensional electodynamic imaging project was to determine how to combine flexible, individual addressable; preprocessing of array source signals; spectral extrapolation or received signals; acoustic tomography codes; and acoustic propagation modeling code. We investigated flexible, individually addressable acoustic array material to find the best match in power, sensitivity and cost and settled on PVDF sheet arrays and 3-1 composite material.

  9. Value of Computed Tomography (CT) in Imaging the Morbidity of Submerged Molars: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Kırzıoḡlu, Zuhal; Karayılmaz, Hüseyin; Baykal, Bahattin

    2007-01-01

    Submerged primary molars can be difficult to manage due to the developing dentition. Rarely in some severe cases, may the surgical interventions be required while ensuring the vital structures are protected. Therefore these cases require sophisticated imaging techniques in order to locate the vital structures. In this case report, a 17 year old girl who had a retained and submerged deciduous molar which caused impaction of the second premolar and tipping of the first molar was presented. In addition, value of computed tomography (CT) for locating the vital anatomic structures was discussed. In our case, CT has been supplied effective information about localization of the vital structures and amount of bone volume during the diagnosis and treatment planning period in addition to the routine dental radiographies. PMID:19212475

  10. Panoramic dental radiography image intensification employing minification techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Cushman, R.H.

    1981-09-01

    Panoramic dental x-ray machine wherein an x-ray source-camera assembly orbits a seated patient is described. A slot in the camera assembly collimates the x-rays which are continuously generated by the x-ray source, which x-rays are converted to light images of the patient's dental arch structure by only a single intensifying screen which remains stationary. This screen comprises about 1/40 the area of conventional intensifying screens and is made thicker for providing improved detection efficiency. A fiber optic minifying lens reduces the size of the image from the screen while proportionately increasing the light intensity of the image, thus making it possible to provide useable film images at reduced x-ray exposures due to non-linear film exposure versus optical density characteristics. The resultant minified, light-intensified image may now be recorded on 35 mm roll film, for example, as opposed to standard radiographic film of 5'' X 12'' size, or 12.70 cm X 30.48 cm.

  11. Deformable planning CT to cone-beam CT image registration in head-and-neck cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Hou Jidong; Guerrero, Mariana; Chen, Wenjuan; D'Souza, Warren D.

    2011-04-15

    Purpose: The purpose of this work was to implement and validate a deformable CT to cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) image registration method in head-and-neck cancer to eventually facilitate automatic target delineation on CBCT. Methods: Twelve head-and-neck cancer patients underwent a planning CT and weekly CBCT during the 5-7 week treatment period. The 12 planning CT images (moving images) of these patients were registered to their weekly CBCT images (fixed images) via the symmetric force Demons algorithm and using a multiresolution scheme. Histogram matching was used to compensate for the intensity difference between the two types of images. Using nine known anatomic points as registration targets, the accuracy of the registration was evaluated using the target registration error (TRE). In addition, region-of-interest (ROI) contours drawn on the planning CT were morphed to the CBCT images and the volume overlap index (VOI) between registered contours and manually delineated contours was evaluated. Results: The mean TRE value of the nine target points was less than 3.0 mm, the slice thickness of the planning CT. Of the 369 target points evaluated for registration accuracy, the average TRE value was 2.6{+-}0.6 mm. The mean TRE for bony tissue targets was 2.4{+-}0.2 mm, while the mean TRE for soft tissue targets was 2.8{+-}0.2 mm. The average VOI between the registered and manually delineated ROI contours was 76.2{+-}4.6%, which is consistent with that reported in previous studies. Conclusions: The authors have implemented and validated a deformable image registration method to register planning CT images to weekly CBCT images in head-and-neck cancer cases. The accuracy of the TRE values suggests that they can be used as a promising tool for automatic target delineation on CBCT.

  12. PET/CT Imaging in Mouse Models of Myocardial Ischemia

    PubMed Central

    Gargiulo, Sara; Greco, Adelaide; Gramanzini, Matteo; Petretta, Maria Piera; Ferro, Adele; Larobina, Michele; Panico, Mariarosaria; Brunetti, Arturo; Cuocolo, Alberto

    2012-01-01

    Different species have been used to reproduce myocardial infarction models but in the last years mice became the animals of choice for the analysis of several diseases, due to their short life cycle and the possibility of genetic manipulation. Many techniques are currently used for cardiovascular imaging in mice, including X-ray computed tomography (CT), high-resolution ultrasound, magnetic resonance imaging, and nuclear medicine procedures. Cardiac positron emission tomography (PET) allows to examine noninvasively, on a molecular level and with high sensitivity, regional changes in myocardial perfusion, metabolism, apoptosis, inflammation, and gene expression or to measure changes in anatomical and functional parameters in heart diseases. Currently hybrid PET/CT scanners for small laboratory animals are available, where CT adds high-resolution anatomical information. This paper reviews mouse models of myocardial infarction and discusses the applications of dedicated PET/CT systems technology, including animal preparation, anesthesia, radiotracers, and images postprocessing. PMID:22505813

  13. PET/CT imaging in mouse models of myocardial ischemia.

    PubMed

    Gargiulo, Sara; Greco, Adelaide; Gramanzini, Matteo; Petretta, Maria Piera; Ferro, Adele; Larobina, Michele; Panico, Mariarosaria; Brunetti, Arturo; Cuocolo, Alberto

    2012-01-01

    Different species have been used to reproduce myocardial infarction models but in the last years mice became the animals of choice for the analysis of several diseases, due to their short life cycle and the possibility of genetic manipulation. Many techniques are currently used for cardiovascular imaging in mice, including X-ray computed tomography (CT), high-resolution ultrasound, magnetic resonance imaging, and nuclear medicine procedures. Cardiac positron emission tomography (PET) allows to examine noninvasively, on a molecular level and with high sensitivity, regional changes in myocardial perfusion, metabolism, apoptosis, inflammation, and gene expression or to measure changes in anatomical and functional parameters in heart diseases. Currently hybrid PET/CT scanners for small laboratory animals are available, where CT adds high-resolution anatomical information. This paper reviews mouse models of myocardial infarction and discusses the applications of dedicated PET/CT systems technology, including animal preparation, anesthesia, radiotracers, and images postprocessing. PMID:22505813

  14. Thoracic cancer imaging with PET/CT in radiation oncology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chi, Pai-Chun Melinda

    Significance. Respiratory motion has been shown to cause artifacts in PET/CT imaging. This breathing artifact can have a significant impact on PET quantification and it can lead to large uncertainties when using PET for radiation therapy planning. We have demonstrated a promising solution to resolve the breathing artifact by acquiring respiration-averaged CT (ACT) for PET/CT. The purpose of this work was to optimize the ACT acquisition for clinical implementation and to evaluate the impact of ACT on PET/CT quantification. The hypothesis was that ACT is an effective method in removing the breathing artifact when compared to our current clinical protocol. Methods. Phase and cine approaches for acquiring ACT were investigated and the results of these two approaches were compared to the ACT generated from clinical 4DCT data sets (abbreviated as ACT10phs ). In the phase approach, ACT was generated based on combinations of selected respiratory phases; in the cine approach, ACT was generated based on cine images acquired over a fixed cine duration. The phase combination and cine duration that best approximated the ACT10phs were determined to be the optimized scanning parameters. 216 thoracic PET/CT patients were scanned with both current clinical and the ACT protocols. The effects of ACT on PET/CT quantification were assessed by comparing clinical PET/CT and ACT PET/CT using 3 metrics: PET/CT image alignment, maximum standardized uptake value (SUVmax), and threshold segmented gross tumor volume (GTV). Results. ACT10phs can be best approximated to within 2% of SUV variation by phase averaging based on 4 representative phases, and to within 3% by cine image averaging based on >3s of cine duration. We implemented the cine approach on the PET/CT scanners and acquired 216 patient data sets. 68% of patients had breathing artifacts in their clinical PET/CT and the artifacts were removed/reduced in all corresponding ACT PET/CT. PET/CT quantification for lesions <50 cm3 and

  15. TLD assessment of mouse dosimetry during microCT imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Figueroa, Said Daibes; Winkelmann, Christopher T.; Miller, William H.; Volkert, Wynn A.; Hoffman, Timothy J.

    2008-09-15

    Advances in laboratory animal imaging have provided new resources for noninvasive biomedical research. Among these technologies is microcomputed tomography (microCT) which is widely used to obtain high resolution anatomic images of small animals. Because microCT utilizes ionizing radiation for image formation, radiation exposure during imaging is a concern. The objective of this study was to quantify the radiation dose delivered during a standard microCT scan. Radiation dose was measured using thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLDs), which were irradiated employing an 80 kVp x-ray source, with 0.5 mm Al filtration and a total of 54 mA s for a full 360 deg rotation of the unit. The TLD data were validated using a 3.2 cm{sup 3} CT ion chamber probe. TLD results showed a single microCT scan air kerma of 78.0{+-}5.0 mGy when using a poly(methylmethacrylate) (PMMA) anesthesia support module and an air kerma of 92.0{+-}6.0 mGy without the use of the anesthesia module. The validation CT ion chamber study provided a measured radiation air kerma of 81.0{+-}4.0 mGy and 97.0{+-}5.0 mGy with and without the PMMA anesthesia module, respectively. Internal TLD analysis demonstrated an average mouse organ radiation absorbed dose of 76.0{+-}5.0 mGy. The author's results have defined x-ray exposure for a routine microCT study which must be taken into consideration when performing serial molecular imaging studies involving the microCT imaging modality.

  16. TLD assessment of mouse dosimetry during microCT imaging

    PubMed Central

    Figueroa, Said Daibes; Winkelmann, Christopher T.; Miller, William H.; Volkert, Wynn A.; Hoffman, Timothy J.

    2008-01-01

    Advances in laboratory animal imaging have provided new resources for noninvasive biomedical research. Among these technologies is microcomputed tomography (microCT) which is widely used to obtain high resolution anatomic images of small animals. Because microCT utilizes ionizing radiation for image formation, radiation exposure during imaging is a concern. The objective of this study was to quantify the radiation dose delivered during a standard microCT scan. Radiation dose was measured using thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLDs), which were irradiated employing an 80 kVp x-ray source, with 0.5 mm Al filtration and a total of 54 mA s for a full 360 deg rotation of the unit. The TLD data were validated using a 3.2 cm3 CT ion chamber probe. TLD results showed a single microCT scan air kerma of 78.0±5.0 mGy when using a poly(methylmethacrylate) (PMMA) anesthesia support module and an air kerma of 92.0±6.0 mGy without the use of the anesthesia module. The validation CT ion chamber study provided a measured radiation air kerma of 81.0±4.0 mGy and 97.0±5.0 mGy with and without the PMMA anesthesia module, respectively. Internal TLD analysis demonstrated an average mouse organ radiation absorbed dose of 76.0±5.0 mGy. The author’s results have defined x-ray exposure for a routine microCT study which must be taken into consideration when performing serial molecular imaging studies involving the microCT imaging modality. PMID:18841837

  17. Non-Rigid Registration of Liver CT Images for CT-Guided Ablation of Liver Tumors.

    PubMed

    Luu, Ha Manh; Klink, Camiel; Niessen, Wiro; Moelker, Adriaan; Walsum, Theo van

    2016-01-01

    CT-guided percutaneous ablation for liver cancer treatment is a relevant technique for patients not eligible for surgery and with tumors that are inconspicuous on US imaging. The lack of real-time imaging and the use of a limited amount of CT contrast agent make targeting the tumor with the needle challenging. In this study, we evaluate a registration framework that allows the integration of diagnostic pre-operative contrast enhanced CT images and intra-operative non-contrast enhanced CT images to improve image guidance in the intervention. The liver and tumor are segmented in the pre-operative contrast enhanced CT images. Next, the contrast enhanced image is registered to the intra-operative CT images in a two-stage approach. First, the contrast-enhanced diagnostic image is non-rigidly registered to a non-contrast enhanced image that is conventionally acquired at the start of the intervention. In case the initial registration is not sufficiently accurate, a refinement step is applied using non-rigid registration method with a local rigidity term. In the second stage, the intra-operative CT-images that are used to check the needle position, which often consist of only a few slices, are registered rigidly to the intra-operative image that was acquired at the start of the intervention. Subsequently, the diagnostic image is registered to the current intra-operative image, using both transformations, this allows the visualization of the tumor region extracted from pre-operative data in the intra-operative CT images containing needle. The method is evaluated on imaging data of 19 patients at the Erasmus MC. Quantitative evaluation is performed using the Dice metric, mean surface distance of the liver border and corresponding landmarks in the diagnostic and the intra-operative images. The registration of the diagnostic CT image to the initial intra-operative CT image did not require a refinement step in 13 cases. For those cases, the resulting registration had a Dice

  18. Current and Novel Imaging Techniques in Coronary CT.

    PubMed

    Machida, Haruhiko; Tanaka, Isao; Fukui, Rika; Shen, Yun; Ishikawa, Takuya; Tate, Etsuko; Ueno, Eiko

    2015-01-01

    Multidetector coronary computed tomography (CT), which is widely performed to assess coronary artery disease noninvasively and accurately, provides excellent image quality. Use of electrocardiography (ECG)-controlled tube current modulation and low tube voltage can reduce patient exposure to nephrotoxic contrast media and carcinogenic radiation when using standard coronary CT with a retrospective ECG-gated helical scan. Various imaging techniques are expected to overcome the limitations of standard coronary CT, which also include insufficient spatial and temporal resolution, beam-hardening artifacts, limited coronary plaque characterization, and an inability to allow functional assessment of coronary stenosis. Use of a step-and-shoot scan, iterative reconstruction, and a high-pitch dual-source helical scan can further reduce radiation dose. Dual-energy CT can improve contrast medium enhancement and reasonably reduce the contrast dose when combined with noise reduction with the use of iterative reconstruction. High-definition CT can improve spatial resolution and diagnostic evaluation of small or peripheral coronary vessels and coronary stents. Dual-source CT and a motion correction algorithm can improve temporal resolution and reduce coronary motion artifacts. Whole-heart coverage with 320-detector CT and an intelligent boundary registration algorithm can eliminate stair-step artifacts. By decreasing beam hardening and enabling material decomposition, dual-energy CT is expected to remove or reduce the depiction of coronary calcification to improve intraluminal evaluation of calcified vessels and to provide detailed analysis of coronary plaque components and accurate qualitative and quantitative assessment of myocardial perfusion. Fractional flow reserve derived from coronary CT is a state-of-the-art noninvasive technique for accurately identifying myocardial ischemia beyond coronary CT. Understanding these techniques is important to enhance the value of coronary CT

  19. Flash imaging in dual source CT (DSCT)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bruder, H.; Petersilka, M.; Mehldau, H.; Heidinger, W.; Allmendinger, T.; Schmidt, B.,; Raupach, R.; Thierfelder, C.,; Stierstorfer, K.; Flohr, T.

    2009-02-01

    We present new acquisition modes of a recently introduced dual-source computed tomography (DSCT) system equipped with two X-ray tubes and two corresponding detectors, mounted onto the rotating gantry with an angular offset of typically 90°. Due to the simultaneous acquisition of complementary data, the minimum exposure time is reduced by a factor of two compared to a single-source CT system (SSCT). The correspondingly improved temporal resolution is beneficial for cardiac CT. Also, maximum table feed per rotation in a spiral mode can be increased by a factor of 2 compared to SSCT, which provides benefits both for cardiac CT and non-cardiac CT. In an ECG-triggered mode the entire cardiac volume can be scanned within a fraction of one cardiac RR-cycle. At a rotation time of 0.28s using a detector with 64×0.6 mm beam collimation, the scan time of the entire heart is less than 0.3s at a temporal resolution of 75 ms. It will be shown, that the extremely fast cardiac scan reduces the patient dose to a theoretical lowest limit: for a 120 kV scan the dose level for a typical cardiac CT scan is well below 2 mSv. Using further protocol optimization (scan range adaptation, 100kV), the radiation dose can be reduced below 1mSv.

  20. X-ray CT and NMR imaging of rocks

    SciTech Connect

    Vinegar, H.J.

    1986-03-01

    In little more than a decade, X-ray computerized tomography (CT) and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) imaging have become the premier modalities of medical radiology. Both of these imaging techniques also promise to be useful tools in petrophysics and reservoir engineering, because CT and NMR can nondestructively image a host of physical and chemical properties of porous rocks and multiple fluid phases contained within their pores. The images are taken within seconds to minutes, at reservoir temperatures and pressures, with spatial resolution on the millimeter and submillimeter level. The physical properties imaged by the two techniques are complementary. CT images bulk density and effective atomic number. NMR images the nuclide concentration, M/sub 0/, of a variety of nuclei (/sup 1/H, /sup 19/F, /sup 23/Na, /sup 31/P, etc.), their longitudinal and transverse relaxation-time curves (t/sub 1/ and t/sub 2/), and their chemical shift spectra. In rocks, CT images both rock matrix and pore fluids, while NMR images only mobile fluids and the interactions of these mobile fluids with the confining surfaces of the pores.

  1. MR and CT image fusion of the cervical spine: a noninvasive alternative to CT-myelography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Yangqiu; Mirza, Sohail K.; Jarvik, Jeffrey G.; Heagerty, Patrick J.; Haynor, David R.

    2005-04-01

    CT-Myelography (CTM) is routinely used for planning surgery for degenerative disease of the spine, but its invasive nature, significant potential morbidity, and high costs make a noninvasive substitute desirable. We report our work on evaluating CT and MR image fusion as an alternative to CTM. Because the spine is only piecewise rigid, a multi-rigid approach to the registration of spinal CT and MR images was developed (SPIE 2004), in which the spine on CT images is first segmented into separate vertebrae, each of which is then rigidly registered with the corresponding vertebra on MR images. The results are then blended to obtain fusion images. Since they contain information from both modalities, we hypothesized that fusion images would be equivalent to CTM. To test this we selected 34 patients who had undergone MRI and CTM for degenerative disease of the cervical spine, and used the multi-rigid approach to produce fused images. A clinical vignette for each patient was created and presented along with either CT/MR fusion images or CTM images. A group of spine surgeons are asked to formulate detailed surgical plans based on each set of images, and the surgical plans are compared. A similar study assessing diagnostic agreement is being performed with neuroradiologists, who also assess the accuracy of registration. Our work to date has demonstrated the feasibility of segmentation and multi-rigid fusion in clinical cases and the acceptability of the questionnaire to physicians. Preliminary analysis of one surgeon's and one neuroradiologist"s evaluation has been performed.

  2. Constrained TV-minimization image reconstruction for industrial CT system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Buxin; Yang, Min; Zhang, Zheng; Bian, Junguo; Han, Xiao; Sidky, Emil; Pan, Xiaochuan

    2014-02-01

    In this work, we investigate the applicability of the constrained total-variation (TV)-minimization reconstruction method to industrial CT system. In general, industrial CT systems have the same principles of imaging process with clinical CT systems, but different imaging objectives and evaluation metrics. Optimization-based image reconstruction methods have been actively developed to meet practical challenges and extensively tested for clinical CT systems. However, the utility of optimization-based reconstruction methods is task-specific and not necessarily transferrable among different tasks. In this work, we adopt constrained TV-minimization programs together with adaptive-steepest-descent-projection-ontoconvex-sets (ASD-POCS) algorithm for reconstructing images from data of a concrete sample collected using a laboratory industrial CT system developed for non-destructive evaluation. Our results, compared to those reconstructed from FBPbased algorithm, suggest that the constrained TV-minimization program combined with ASD-POCS algorithm can yield images with comparable or improved visual quality and achieve equivalent or better imaging objectives over the currently used FBP-based algorithm under dense sampling data condition.

  3. Development of contrast-enhanced rodent imaging using functional CT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, Yun; Stantz, Keith M.; Krishnamurthi, Ganapathy; Steinmetz, Rosemary; Hutchins, Gary D.

    2003-05-01

    Micro-computed tomography (microCT) is capable of obtaining high-resolution images of skeletal tissues. However its image contrast among soft tissues remains inadequate for tumor detection. High speed functional computed tomography will be needed to image tumors by employing x-ray contrast medium. The functional microCT development will not only facilitate the image contrast enhancement among different tissues but also provide information of tumor physiology. To demonstrate the feasibility of functional CT in mouse imaging, sequential computed tomography is performed in mice after contrast material administration using a high-speed clinical CT scanner. Although the resolution of the clinical scanner is not sufficient to dissolve the anatomic details of rodents, bulky physiological parameters in major organs such as liver, kidney, pancreas, and ovaries (testicular) can be examined. For data analysis, a two-compartmental model is employed and implemented to characterize the tissue physiological parameters (regional blood flow, capillary permeability, and relative compartment volumes.) The measured contrast dynamics in kidneys are fitted with the compartmental model to derive the kidney tissue physiology. The study result suggests that it is feasible to extract mouse tissue physiology using functional CT imaging technology.

  4. Implications of CT noise and artifacts for quantitative {sup 99m}Tc SPECT/CT imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Hulme, K. W.; Kappadath, S. C.

    2014-04-15

    Purpose: This paper evaluates the effects of computed tomography (CT) image noise and artifacts on quantitative single-photon emission computed-tomography (SPECT) imaging, with the aim of establishing an appropriate range of CT acquisition parameters for low-dose protocols with respect to accurate SPECT attenuation correction (AC). Methods: SPECT images of two geometric and one anthropomorphic phantom were reconstructed iteratively using CT scans acquired at a range of dose levels (CTDI{sub vol} = 0.4 to 46 mGy). Resultant SPECT image quality was evaluated by comparing mean signal, background noise, and artifacts to SPECT images reconstructed using the highest dose CT for AC. Noise injection was performed on linear-attenuation (μ) maps to determine the CT noise threshold for accurate AC. Results: High levels of CT noise (σ ∼ 200–400 HU) resulted in low μ-maps noise (σ ∼ 1%–3%). Noise levels greater than ∼10% in 140 keV μ-maps were required to produce visibly perceptible increases of ∼15% in {sup 99m}Tc SPECT images. These noise levels would be achieved at low CT dose levels (CTDI{sub vol} = 4 μGy) that are over 2 orders of magnitude lower than the minimum dose for diagnostic CT scanners. CT noise could also lower (bias) the expected μ values. The relative error in reconstructed SPECT signal trended linearly with the relative shift in μ. SPECT signal was, on average, underestimated in regions corresponding with beam-hardening artifacts in CT images. Any process that has the potential to change the CT number of a region by ∼100 HU (e.g., misregistration between CT images and SPECT images due to motion, the presence of contrast in CT images) could introduce errors in μ{sub 140} {sub keV} on the order of 10%, that in turn, could introduce errors on the order of ∼10% into the reconstructed {sup 99m}Tc SPECT image. Conclusions: The impact of CT noise on SPECT noise was demonstrated to be negligible for clinically achievable CT parameters. Because

  5. Borne identity: CT imaging of vascular infections.

    PubMed

    Huang, Jessica S; Ho, Alexander S; Ahmed, Absar; Bhalla, Sanjeev; Menias, Christine O

    2011-08-01

    Vascular infections present in a multitude of ways with computed tomography (CT) aiding in the diagnosis of many of the uncommon vascular infections, which are equally dangerous and carry severe life-threatening consequences if untreated from a delay in diagnosis. This pictorial review aims to discuss and illustrate the CT findings of the following vascular infections including aortitis, mycotic aneurysms, infective endocarditis, septic thrombophlebitis in the chest and abdomen, and Kawasaki disease. Recognition and prompt diagnosis of these uncommon vascular infections are critical to the initiation of the appropriate management and therapy. PMID:21424803

  6. CT and MR imaging after middle ear surgery.

    PubMed

    Kösling, S; Bootz, F

    2001-11-01

    This article describes the current value of imaging in patients after stapes surgery and surgery after chronic otitis media including cholesteatoma. Possibilities and limits of computed tomography (CT) and MRI are described and most important investigation parameters are mentioned. After otosclerosis surgery, CT is the method of first choice in detection of reasons for vertigo and/or recurrent hearing loss in the later postoperative phase. CT may show the position and condition of prosthesis, scarring around the prosthesis and otospongiotic foci. Sometimes, it gives indirect hints for perilymphatic fistulas and incus necrosis. MRI is able to document inner ear complications. CT has a high negative predictive value in cases with a free cavity after mastoidectomy. Localized opacities or total occlusion are difficult to distinguish by CT alone. MRI provides important additional information in the differentiation of cholesterol granuloma, cholesteatoma, effusion, granulation and scar tissue. PMID:11704358

  7. Radiation absorbed from dental implant radiography: a comparison of linear tomography, CT scan, and panoramic and intra-oral techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Clark, D.E.; Danforth, R.A.; Barnes, R.W.; Burtch, M.L. )

    1990-01-01

    Absorbed radiation dose in bone marrow, thyroid, salivary gland, eye, and skin entrance was determined by placement of lithium fluoride thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLD's) at selected anatomical sites within and on a human-like x-ray phantom. The phantom was exposed to radiation from linear tomographic and computer-assisted tomographic (CT) simulated dental implant radiographic examinations. The mean dose was determined for each anatomical site. Resulting dose measurements from linear tomography and computer-assisted tomography are compared with reported panoramic and intra-oral doses. CT examination delivered the greatest dose, while linear tomography was generally lowest. Panoramic and intra-oral doses were similar to those of linear tomography.

  8. High Speed Imaging of Cavitation around Dental Ultrasonic Scaler Tips

    PubMed Central

    Vyas, Nina; Pecheva, Emilia; Dehghani, Hamid; Sammons, Rachel L.; Wang, Qianxi X.; Leppinen, David M.; Walmsley, A. Damien

    2016-01-01

    Cavitation occurs around dental ultrasonic scalers, which are used clinically for removing dental biofilm and calculus. However it is not known if this contributes to the cleaning process. Characterisation of the cavitation around ultrasonic scalers will assist in assessing its contribution and in developing new clinical devices for removing biofilm with cavitation. The aim is to use high speed camera imaging to quantify cavitation patterns around an ultrasonic scaler. A Satelec ultrasonic scaler operating at 29 kHz with three different shaped tips has been studied at medium and high operating power using high speed imaging at 15,000, 90,000 and 250,000 frames per second. The tip displacement has been recorded using scanning laser vibrometry. Cavitation occurs at the free end of the tip and increases with power while the area and width of the cavitation cloud varies for different shaped tips. The cavitation starts at the antinodes, with little or no cavitation at the node. High speed image sequences combined with scanning laser vibrometry show individual microbubbles imploding and bubble clouds lifting and moving away from the ultrasonic scaler tip, with larger tip displacement causing more cavitation. PMID:26934340

  9. High Speed Imaging of Cavitation around Dental Ultrasonic Scaler Tips.

    PubMed

    Vyas, Nina; Pecheva, Emilia; Dehghani, Hamid; Sammons, Rachel L; Wang, Qianxi X; Leppinen, David M; Walmsley, A Damien

    2016-01-01

    Cavitation occurs around dental ultrasonic scalers, which are used clinically for removing dental biofilm and calculus. However it is not known if this contributes to the cleaning process. Characterisation of the cavitation around ultrasonic scalers will assist in assessing its contribution and in developing new clinical devices for removing biofilm with cavitation. The aim is to use high speed camera imaging to quantify cavitation patterns around an ultrasonic scaler. A Satelec ultrasonic scaler operating at 29 kHz with three different shaped tips has been studied at medium and high operating power using high speed imaging at 15,000, 90,000 and 250,000 frames per second. The tip displacement has been recorded using scanning laser vibrometry. Cavitation occurs at the free end of the tip and increases with power while the area and width of the cavitation cloud varies for different shaped tips. The cavitation starts at the antinodes, with little or no cavitation at the node. High speed image sequences combined with scanning laser vibrometry show individual microbubbles imploding and bubble clouds lifting and moving away from the ultrasonic scaler tip, with larger tip displacement causing more cavitation. PMID:26934340

  10. Image manipulation: Fraudulence in digital dental records: Study and review

    PubMed Central

    Chowdhry, Aman; Sircar, Keya; Popli, Deepika Bablani; Tandon, Ankita

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: In present-day times, freely available software allows dentists to tweak their digital records as never before. But, there is a fine line between acceptable enhancements and scientific delinquency. Aims and Objective: To manipulate digital images (used in forensic dentistry) of casts, lip prints, and bite marks in order to highlight tampering techniques and methods of detecting and preventing manipulation of digital images. Materials and Methods: Digital image records of forensic data (casts, lip prints, and bite marks photographed using Samsung Techwin L77 digital camera) were manipulated using freely available software. Results: Fake digital images can be created either by merging two or more digital images, or by altering an existing image. Discussion and Conclusion: Retouched digital images can be used for fraudulent purposes in forensic investigations. However, tools are available to detect such digital frauds, which are extremely difficult to assess visually. Thus, all digital content should mandatorily have attached metadata and preferably watermarking in order to avert their malicious re-use. Also, computer alertness, especially about imaging software's, should be promoted among forensic odontologists/dental professionals. PMID:24696587

  11. An extraction algorithm of pulmonary fissures from multislice CT image

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tachibana, Hiroyuki; Saita, Shinsuke; Yasutomo, Motokatsu; Kubo, Mitsuru; Kawata, Yoshiki; Niki, Noboru; Nakano, Yasutaka; Sasagawa, Michizo; Eguchi, Kenji; Moriyama, Noriyuki

    2005-04-01

    Aging and smoking history increases number of pulmonary emphysema. Alveoli restoration destroyed by pulmonary emphysema is difficult and early direction is important. Multi-slice CT technology has been improving 3-D image analysis with higher body axis resolution and shorter scan time. And low-dose high accuracy scanning becomes available. Multi-slice CT image helps physicians with accurate measuring but huge volume of the image data takes time and cost. This paper is intended for computer added emphysema region analysis and proves effectiveness of proposed algorithm.

  12. Research on THz CT system and image reconstruction algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Ming-liang; Wang, Cong; Cheng, Hong

    2009-07-01

    Terahertz Computed Tomography takes the advantages of not only high resolution in space and density without image overlap but also the capability of being directly used in digital processing and spectral analysis, which determine it to be a good choice in parameter detection for process control. But Diffraction and scattering of THz wave will obfuscate or distort the reconstructed image. In order to find the most effective reconstruction method to build THz CT model. Because of the expensive cost, a fan-shaped THz CT industrial detection system scanning model, which consists of 8 emitters and 32 receivers, is established based on studying infrared CT technology. The model contains control and interface, data collecting and image reconstruction sub-system. It analyzes all the sub-function modules then reconstructs images with algebraic reconstruction algorithm. The experimental result proves it to be an effective, efficient algorithm with high resolution and even better than back-projection method.

  13. CT guided diffuse optical tomography for breast cancer imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baikejiang, Reheman; Zhang, Wei; Zhu, Dianwen; Li, Changqing

    2016-03-01

    Diffuse optical tomography (DOT) has attracted attentions in the last two decades due to its intrinsic sensitivity in imaging chromophores of tissues such as blood, water, and lipid. However, DOT has not been clinically accepted yet due to its low spatial resolution caused by strong optical scattering in tissues. Structural guidance provided by an anatomical imaging modality enhances the DOT imaging substantially. Here, we propose a computed tomography (CT) guided multispectral DOT imaging system for breast cancer detection. To validate its feasibility, we have built a prototype DOT imaging system which consists of a laser at wavelengths of 650 and an electron multiplying charge coupled device (EMCCD) camera. We have validated the CT guided DOT reconstruction algorithms with numerical simulations and phantom experiments, in which different imaging setup parameters, such as projection number of measurements, the width of measurement patch, have been investigated. Our results indicate that an EMCCD camera with air cooling is good enough for the transmission mode DOT imaging. We have also found that measurements at six projections are sufficient for DOT to reconstruct the optical targets with 4 times absorption contrast when the CT guidance is applied. Finally, we report our effort and progress on the integration of the multispectral DOT imaging system into a breast CT scanner.

  14. CT imaging findings of a calcifying epithelial odontogenic tumour

    PubMed Central

    Venkateswarlu, M; Geetha, P; Lakshmi Kavitha, N

    2012-01-01

    We report a case of calcifying epithelial odontogenic tumour (CEOT), also known as a Pindborg tumour, with local aggressive behaviour. CT imaging showed a large expansile bone-forming lesion in the mandible, which showed the exact extent and nature of the lesion. We briefly discuss the imaging features of CEOT and the relevant literature. PMID:22190756

  15. CT imaging with a mobile C-arm prototype

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheryauka, Arvi; Tubbs, David; Langille, Vinton; Kalya, Prabhanjana; Smith, Brady; Cherone, Rocco

    2008-03-01

    Mobile X-ray imagery is an omnipresent tool in conventional musculoskeletal and soft tissue applications. The next generation of mobile C-arm systems can provide clinicians of minimally-invasive surgery and pain management procedures with both real-time high-resolution fluoroscopy and intra-operative CT imaging modalities. In this study, we research two C-arm CT experimental system configurations and evaluate their imaging capabilities. In a non-destructive evaluation configuration, the X-ray Tube - Detector assembly is stationary while an imaging object is placed on a rotating table. In a medical imaging configuration, the C-arm gantry moves around the patient and the table. In our research setting, we connect the participating devices through a Mobile X-Ray Imaging Environment known as MOXIE. MOXIE is a set of software applications for internal research at GE Healthcare - Surgery and used to examine imaging performance of experimental systems. Anthropomorphic phantom volume renderings and orthogonal slices of reconstructed images are obtained and displayed. The experimental C-arm CT results show CT-like image quality that may be suitable for interventional procedures, real-time data management, and, therefore, have great potential for effective use on the clinical floor.

  16. Statistical iterative reconstruction for streak artefact reduction when using multidetector CT to image the dento-alveolar structures

    PubMed Central

    Hayakawa, Y; Kober, C

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: When metallic prosthetic appliances and dental fillings exist in the oral cavity, the appearance of metal-induced streak artefacts is not avoidable in CT images. The aim of this study was to develop a method for artefact reduction using the statistical reconstruction on multidetector row CT images. Methods: Adjacent CT images often depict similar anatomical structures. Therefore, reconstructed images with weak artefacts were attempted using projection data of an artefact-free image in a neighbouring thin slice. Images with moderate and strong artefacts were continuously processed in sequence by successive iterative restoration where the projection data was generated from the adjacent reconstructed slice. First, the basic maximum likelihood–expectation maximization algorithm was applied. Next, the ordered subset–expectation maximization algorithm was examined. Alternatively, a small region of interest setting was designated. Finally, the general purpose graphic processing unit machine was applied in both situations. Results: The algorithms reduced the metal-induced streak artefacts on multidetector row CT images when the sequential processing method was applied. The ordered subset–expectation maximization and small region of interest reduced the processing duration without apparent detriments. A general-purpose graphic processing unit realized the high performance. Conclusions: A statistical reconstruction method was applied for the streak artefact reduction. The alternative algorithms applied were effective. Both software and hardware tools, such as ordered subset–expectation maximization, small region of interest and general-purpose graphic processing unit achieved fast artefact correction. PMID:24754471

  17. A simple method for labeling CT images with respiratory states

    SciTech Connect

    Berlinger, Kajetan; Sauer, Otto; Vences, Lucia; Roth, Michael

    2006-09-15

    A method is described for labeling CT images with their respiratory state by a needle, connected to the patient's chest/abdomen. By means of a leverage the needle follows the abdominal respiratory motion. The needle is visible as a blurred spot in every CT slice. The method was tested with nine patients. A series of volume scans during free breathing was performed. The detected positions of the moving needle in every single slice were compared to each other thus enabling respiratory state assignment. The tool is an inexpensive alternative to complex respiratory measuring tools for four dimensional (4D) CT and was greatly accepted in the clinic due to its simplicity.

  18. Adaptively Tuned Iterative Low Dose CT Image Denoising

    PubMed Central

    Hashemi, SayedMasoud; Paul, Narinder S.; Beheshti, Soosan; Cobbold, Richard S. C.

    2015-01-01

    Improving image quality is a critical objective in low dose computed tomography (CT) imaging and is the primary focus of CT image denoising. State-of-the-art CT denoising algorithms are mainly based on iterative minimization of an objective function, in which the performance is controlled by regularization parameters. To achieve the best results, these should be chosen carefully. However, the parameter selection is typically performed in an ad hoc manner, which can cause the algorithms to converge slowly or become trapped in a local minimum. To overcome these issues a noise confidence region evaluation (NCRE) method is used, which evaluates the denoising residuals iteratively and compares their statistics with those produced by additive noise. It then updates the parameters at the end of each iteration to achieve a better match to the noise statistics. By combining NCRE with the fundamentals of block matching and 3D filtering (BM3D) approach, a new iterative CT image denoising method is proposed. It is shown that this new denoising method improves the BM3D performance in terms of both the mean square error and a structural similarity index. Moreover, simulations and patient results show that this method preserves the clinically important details of low dose CT images together with a substantial noise reduction. PMID:26089972

  19. A modified VMAT adaptive radiotherapy for nasopharyngeal cancer patients based on CT-CT image fusion

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background To investigate the feasibility and benefits of a modified adaptive radiotherapy (ART) by replanning in the initial CT (iCT) with new contours from a repeat CT (rCT) based on CT-CT image fusion for nasopharyngeal cancer (NPC) patients underwent volumetric modulated arc radiotherapy (VMAT). Materials and methods Nine NPC patients underwent VMAT treatment with a rCT at 23rd fraction were enrolled in this study. Dosimetric differences for replanning VMAT plans in the iCT and in the rCT were compared. Volumetric and dosimetric changes of gross tumor volume (GTV) and organs at risk (OARs) of this modified ART were also investigated. Results No dosimetric differences between replanning in the iCT and in the rCT were observed. The average volume of GTV decreased from 78.83 ± 38.42 cm3 in the iCT to 71.44 ± 37.46 cm3 in the rCT, but with no significant difference (p = 0.42).The average volume of the left and right parotid decreased from 19.91 ± 4.89 cm3 and 21.58 ± 6.16 cm3 in the iCT to 11.80 ± 2.79 cm3 and 13.29 ± 4.17 cm3 in the rCT (both p < 0.01), respectively. The volume of other OARs did not shrink very much. No significant differences on PTVGTV and PTVCTV coverage were observed for replanning with this modified ART. Compared to the initial plans, the average mean dose of the left and right parotid after re-optimization were decreased by 62.5 cGy (p = 0.05) and 67.3 cGy (p = 0.02), respectively, and the V5 (the volume receiving 5 Gy) of the left and right parotids were decreased by 7.8% (p = 0.01) and 11.2% (p = 0.001), respectively. There was no significant difference on the dose delivered to other OARs. Conclusion Patients with NPC undergoing VMAT have significant anatomic and dosimetric changes to parotids. Repeat CT as an anatomic changes reference and re-optimization in the iCT based on CT-CT image fusion was accurate enough to identify the volume changes and to ensure safe dose to

  20. Performance benchmarking of liver CT image segmentation and volume estimation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiong, Wei; Zhou, Jiayin; Tian, Qi; Liu, Jimmy J.; Qi, Yingyi; Leow, Wee Kheng; Han, Thazin; Wang, Shih-chang

    2008-03-01

    In recent years more and more computer aided diagnosis (CAD) systems are being used routinely in hospitals. Image-based knowledge discovery plays important roles in many CAD applications, which have great potential to be integrated into the next-generation picture archiving and communication systems (PACS). Robust medical image segmentation tools are essentials for such discovery in many CAD applications. In this paper we present a platform with necessary tools for performance benchmarking for algorithms of liver segmentation and volume estimation used for liver transplantation planning. It includes an abdominal computer tomography (CT) image database (DB), annotation tools, a ground truth DB, and performance measure protocols. The proposed architecture is generic and can be used for other organs and imaging modalities. In the current study, approximately 70 sets of abdominal CT images with normal livers have been collected and a user-friendly annotation tool is developed to generate ground truth data for a variety of organs, including 2D contours of liver, two kidneys, spleen, aorta and spinal canal. Abdominal organ segmentation algorithms using 2D atlases and 3D probabilistic atlases can be evaluated on the platform. Preliminary benchmark results from the liver segmentation algorithms which make use of statistical knowledge extracted from the abdominal CT image DB are also reported. We target to increase the CT scans to about 300 sets in the near future and plan to make the DBs built available to medical imaging research community for performance benchmarking of liver segmentation algorithms.

  1. Efficient iterative image reconstruction algorithm for dedicated breast CT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antropova, Natalia; Sanchez, Adrian; Reiser, Ingrid S.; Sidky, Emil Y.; Boone, John; Pan, Xiaochuan

    2016-03-01

    Dedicated breast computed tomography (bCT) is currently being studied as a potential screening method for breast cancer. The X-ray exposure is set low to achieve an average glandular dose comparable to that of mammography, yielding projection data that contains high levels of noise. Iterative image reconstruction (IIR) algorithms may be well-suited for the system since they potentially reduce the effects of noise in the reconstructed images. However, IIR outcomes can be difficult to control since the algorithm parameters do not directly correspond to the image properties. Also, IIR algorithms are computationally demanding and have optimal parameter settings that depend on the size and shape of the breast and positioning of the patient. In this work, we design an efficient IIR algorithm with meaningful parameter specifications and that can be used on a large, diverse sample of bCT cases. The flexibility and efficiency of this method comes from having the final image produced by a linear combination of two separately reconstructed images - one containing gray level information and the other with enhanced high frequency components. Both of the images result from few iterations of separate IIR algorithms. The proposed algorithm depends on two parameters both of which have a well-defined impact on image quality. The algorithm is applied to numerous bCT cases from a dedicated bCT prototype system developed at University of California, Davis.

  2. Multiscale registration of planning CT and daily cone beam CT images for adaptive radiation therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Paquin, Dana; Levy, Doron; Xing Lei

    2009-01-15

    Adaptive radiation therapy (ART) is the incorporation of daily images in the radiotherapy treatment process so that the treatment plan can be evaluated and modified to maximize the amount of radiation dose to the tumor while minimizing the amount of radiation delivered to healthy tissue. Registration of planning images with daily images is thus an important component of ART. In this article, the authors report their research on multiscale registration of planning computed tomography (CT) images with daily cone beam CT (CBCT) images. The multiscale algorithm is based on the hierarchical multiscale image decomposition of E. Tadmor, S. Nezzar, and L. Vese [Multiscale Model. Simul. 2(4), pp. 554-579 (2004)]. Registration is achieved by decomposing the images to be registered into a series of scales using the (BV, L{sup 2}) decomposition and initially registering the coarsest scales of the image using a landmark-based registration algorithm. The resulting transformation is then used as a starting point to deformably register the next coarse scales with one another. This procedure is iterated at each stage using the transformation computed by the previous scale registration as the starting point for the current registration. The authors present the results of studies of rectum, head-neck, and prostate CT-CBCT registration, and validate their registration method quantitatively using synthetic results in which the exact transformations our known, and qualitatively using clinical deformations in which the exact results are not known.

  3. Feature detection on 3D images of dental imprints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mokhtari, Marielle; Laurendeau, Denis

    1994-09-01

    A computer vision approach for the extraction of feature points on 3D images of dental imprints is presented. The position of feature points are needed for the measurement of a set of parameters for automatic diagnosis of malocclusion problems in orthodontics. The system for the acquisition of the 3D profile of the imprint, the procedure for the detection of the interstices between teeth, and the approach for the identification of the type of tooth are described, as well as the algorithm for the reconstruction of the surface of each type of tooth. A new approach for the detection of feature points, called the watershed algorithm, is described in detail. The algorithm is a two-stage procedure which tracks the position of local minima at four different scales and produces a final map of the position of the minima. Experimental results of the application of the watershed algorithm on actual 3D images of dental imprints are presented for molars, premolars and canines. The segmentation approach for the analysis of the shape of incisors is also described in detail.

  4. PET/CT (and CT) instrumentation, image reconstruction and data transfer for radiotherapy planning.

    PubMed

    Sattler, Bernhard; Lee, John A; Lonsdale, Markus; Coche, Emmanuel

    2010-09-01

    The positron emission tomography in combination with CT in hybrid, cross-modality imaging systems (PET/CT) gains more and more importance as a part of the treatment-planning procedure in radiotherapy. Positron emission tomography (PET), as a integral part of nuclear medicine imaging and non-invasive imaging technique, offers the visualization and quantification of pre-selected tracer metabolism. In combination with the structural information from CT, this molecular imaging technique has great potential to support and improve the outcome of the treatment-planning procedure prior to radiotherapy. By the choice of the PET-Tracer, a variety of different metabolic processes can be visualized. First and foremost, this is the glucose metabolism of a tissue as well as for instance hypoxia or cell proliferation. This paper comprises the system characteristics of hybrid PET/CT systems. Acquisition and processing protocols are described in general and modifications to cope with the special needs in radiooncology. This starts with the different position of the patient on a special table top, continues with the use of the same fixation material as used for positioning of the patient in radiooncology while simulation and irradiation and leads to special processing protocols that include the delineation of the volumes that are subject to treatment planning and irradiation (PTV, GTV, CTV, etc.). General CT acquisition and processing parameters as well as the use of contrast enhancement of the CT are described. The possible risks and pitfalls the investigator could face during the hybrid-imaging procedure are explained and listed. The interdisciplinary use of different imaging modalities implies a increase of the volume of data created. These data need to be stored and communicated fast, safe and correct. Therefore, the DICOM-Standard provides objects and classes for this purpose (DICOM RT). Furthermore, the standard DICOM objects and classes for nuclear medicine (NM, PT) and

  5. Liver recognition based on statistical shape model in CT images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiang, Dehui; Jiang, Xueqing; Shi, Fei; Zhu, Weifang; Chen, Xinjian

    2016-03-01

    In this paper, an automatic method is proposed to recognize the liver on clinical 3D CT images. The proposed method effectively use statistical shape model of the liver. Our approach consist of three main parts: (1) model training, in which shape variability is detected using principal component analysis from the manual annotation; (2) model localization, in which a fast Euclidean distance transformation based method is able to localize the liver in CT images; (3) liver recognition, the initial mesh is locally and iteratively adapted to the liver boundary, which is constrained with the trained shape model. We validate our algorithm on a dataset which consists of 20 3D CT images obtained from different patients. The average ARVD was 8.99%, the average ASSD was 2.69mm, the average RMSD was 4.92mm, the average MSD was 28.841mm, and the average MSD was 13.31%.

  6. Automated delineation of stroke lesions using brain CT images

    PubMed Central

    Gillebert, Céline R.; Humphreys, Glyn W.; Mantini, Dante

    2014-01-01

    Computed tomographic (CT) images are widely used for the identification of abnormal brain tissue following infarct and hemorrhage in stroke. Manual lesion delineation is currently the standard approach, but is both time-consuming and operator-dependent. To address these issues, we present a method that can automatically delineate infarct and hemorrhage in stroke CT images. The key elements of this method are the accurate normalization of CT images from stroke patients into template space and the subsequent voxelwise comparison with a group of control CT images for defining areas with hypo- or hyper-intense signals. Our validation, using simulated and actual lesions, shows that our approach is effective in reconstructing lesions resulting from both infarct and hemorrhage and yields lesion maps spatially consistent with those produced manually by expert operators. A limitation is that, relative to manual delineation, there is reduced sensitivity of the automated method in regions close to the ventricles and the brain contours. However, the automated method presents a number of benefits in terms of offering significant time savings and the elimination of the inter-operator differences inherent to manual tracing approaches. These factors are relevant for the creation of large-scale lesion databases for neuropsychological research. The automated delineation of stroke lesions from CT scans may also enable longitudinal studies to quantify changes in damaged tissue in an objective and reproducible manner. PMID:24818079

  7. Prior CT imaging history for patients who undergo PAN CT for acute traumatic injury

    PubMed Central

    Kenter, Jeremy; Blow, Osbert; Krall, Scott P.; Gest, Albert; Smith, Cynthia

    2015-01-01

    Objective. A single PAN scan may provide more radiation to a patient than is felt to be safe within a one-year period. Our objective was to determine how many patients admitted to the trauma service following a PAN scan had prior CT imaging within our six-hospital system. Methods. We performed a secondary analysis of a prospectively collected trauma registry. The study was based at a level-two trauma center and five affiliated hospitals, which comprise 70.6% of all Emergency Department visits within a twelve county region of southern Texas. Electronic medical records were reviewed dating from the point of trauma evaluation back to December 5, 2005 to determine evidence of prior CT imaging. Results. There were 867 patients were admitted to the trauma service between January 1, 2012 and December 31, 2012. 460 (53%) received a PAN scan and were included in the study group. The mean age of the study group was 37.7 ± 1.54 years old, 24.8% were female, and the mean ISS score was 13.4 ± 1.07. The most common mechanism of injury was motor vehicle collision (47%). 65 (14%; 95% CI [11–18]%) of the patients had at least one prior CT. The most common prior studies performed were: CT head (29%; 19–42%), CT Face (29%; 19–42%) and CT Abdomen and Pelvis (18%; 11–30%). Conclusion. Within our trauma registry, 14% of patients had prior CT imaging within our hospital system before their traumatic event and PAN scan. PMID:26056616

  8. Calculating Contrast Stretching Variables in Order to Improve Dental Radiology Image Quality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Widodo, Haris B.; Soelaiman, Arief; Ramadhani, Yogi; Supriyanti, Retno

    2016-01-01

    Teeth are one of the body's digestive tract that serves as a softener food that can be digested easily. One branch of science that was instrumental in the treatment and diagnosis of teeth is Dental Radiology. However, in reality many dental radiology images has low resolution, thus inhibiting in making diagnosis of dental disease perfectly. This research aims to improve low resolution dental radiology image using image processing techniques. This paper discussed the use of contrast stretching method to improve the dental radiology image quality, especially relating to the calculation of the variable contrast stretching method. The results showed that contrast stretching method is promising for use in improving the image quality in a simple but efficient.

  9. A biological phantom for evaluation of CT image reconstruction algorithms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cammin, J.; Fung, G. S. K.; Fishman, E. K.; Siewerdsen, J. H.; Stayman, J. W.; Taguchi, K.

    2014-03-01

    In recent years, iterative algorithms have become popular in diagnostic CT imaging to reduce noise or radiation dose to the patient. The non-linear nature of these algorithms leads to non-linearities in the imaging chain. However, the methods to assess the performance of CT imaging systems were developed assuming the linear process of filtered backprojection (FBP). Those methods may not be suitable any longer when applied to non-linear systems. In order to evaluate the imaging performance, a phantom is typically scanned and the image quality is measured using various indices. For reasons of practicality, cost, and durability, those phantoms often consist of simple water containers with uniform cylinder inserts. However, these phantoms do not represent the rich structure and patterns of real tissue accurately. As a result, the measured image quality or detectability performance for lesions may not reflect the performance on clinical images. The discrepancy between estimated and real performance may be even larger for iterative methods which sometimes produce "plastic-like", patchy images with homogeneous patterns. Consequently, more realistic phantoms should be used to assess the performance of iterative algorithms. We designed and constructed a biological phantom consisting of porcine organs and tissue that models a human abdomen, including liver lesions. We scanned the phantom on a clinical CT scanner and compared basic image quality indices between filtered backprojection and an iterative reconstruction algorithm.

  10. Dedicated Cone-Beam CT System for Extremity Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Al Muhit, Abdullah; Zbijewski, Wojciech; Thawait, Gaurav K.; Stayman, J. Webster; Packard, Nathan; Senn, Robert; Yang, Dong; Foos, David H.; Yorkston, John; Siewerdsen, Jeffrey H.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To provide initial assessment of image quality and dose for a cone-beam computed tomographic (CT) scanner dedicated to extremity imaging. Materials and Methods A prototype cone-beam CT scanner has been developed for imaging the extremities, including the weight-bearing lower extremities. Initial technical assessment included evaluation of radiation dose measured as a function of kilovolt peak and tube output (in milliampere seconds), contrast resolution assessed in terms of the signal difference–to-noise ratio (SDNR), spatial resolution semiquantitatively assessed by using a line-pair module from a phantom, and qualitative evaluation of cadaver images for potential diagnostic value and image artifacts by an expert CT observer (musculoskeletal radiologist). Results The dose for a nominal scan protocol (80 kVp, 108 mAs) was 9 mGy (absolute dose measured at the center of a CT dose index phantom). SDNR was maximized with the 80-kVp scan technique, and contrast resolution was sufficient for visualization of muscle, fat, ligaments and/or tendons, cartilage joint space, and bone. Spatial resolution in the axial plane exceeded 15 line pairs per centimeter. Streaks associated with x-ray scatter (in thicker regions of the patient—eg, the knee), beam hardening (about cortical bone—eg, the femoral shaft), and cone-beam artifacts (at joint space surfaces oriented along the scanning plane—eg, the interphalangeal joints) presented a slight impediment to visualization. Cadaver images (elbow, hand, knee, and foot) demonstrated excellent visibility of bone detail and good soft-tissue visibility suitable to a broad spectrum of musculoskeletal indications. Conclusion A dedicated extremity cone-beam CT scanner capable of imaging upper and lower extremities (including weight-bearing examinations) provides sufficient image quality and favorable dose characteristics to warrant further evaluation for clinical use. © RSNA, 2013 Online supplemental material is available for

  11. A segmentation algorithm of intracranial hemorrhage CT image

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Haibo; Chen, Zhiguo; Wang, Jianzhi

    2011-10-01

    To develop a computer aided detection (CAD) system that improves diagnostic accuracy of intracranial hemorrhage on cerebral CT. A method for CT image segmentation of brain is proposed, with which, several regions that are suspicious of hemorrhage can be segmented rapidly and effectively. Extracting intracranial area algorithm is introduced firstly to extract intracranial area. Secondly, FCM is employed twice, we named it with TFCM. FCM is first employed to identify areas of intracranial hemorrhage. Finally, FCM is employed to segment the lesions. Experimental results on real medical images demonstrate the efficiency and effectiveness.

  12. Utilization of CT images for the quantification of FDG uptake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karidioula, I.; De Freitas, D.; Cachin, F.; Geissler, B.; Jullien, Ph.; Maublant, J.

    2006-12-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate an automatic method based on a computed tomography (CT) derived region of interest (ROI) to quantify the mean standardized uptake value (SUVm) of 18F-fluoro-deoxy-glucose (FDG) in pulmonary lesions detected by positron emission tomography (PET). A total of 164 pairs of slices were selected in a series of PET/CT studies performed in 26 patients presenting lung tumours of various forms and complexities. On each matched CT slice, a ROI was obtained by growth-region segmentation starting from a pixel contained in the tumour. The obtained ROI was then applied to the PET image to calculate SUVm. Results were compared with the conventional manual method using a geometric ROI positioned directly on the PET lesion. The automatic delineation of the tumour from the CT image was successful in 136 sections (83%). The SUVm calculated by the manual and automatic method were respectively (mean±standard deviation) 5.05±2.39 and 6.70±3.18 ( p<0.05). The ROI size (in number of pixels) was respectively 28±23 and 21±17 ( p<0.05). The variability of the automatic method was 0% versus 20% for the manual method. SUV of FDG in PET/CT can be calculated with an excellent reproducibility by using the CT-derived limits of the lesion.

  13. PET/CT imaging in lung cancer: indications and findings*

    PubMed Central

    Hochhegger, Bruno; Alves, Giordano Rafael Tronco; Irion, Klaus Loureiro; Fritscher, Carlos Cezar; Fritscher, Leandro Genehr; Concatto, Natália Henz; Marchiori, Edson

    2015-01-01

    The use of PET/CT imaging in the work-up and management of patients with lung cancer has greatly increased in recent decades. The ability to combine functional and anatomical information has equipped PET/CT to look into various aspects of lung cancer, allowing more precise disease staging and providing useful data during the characterization of indeterminate pulmonary nodules. In addition, the accuracy of PET/CT has been shown to be greater than is that of conventional modalities in some scenarios, making PET/CT a valuable noninvasive method for the investigation of lung cancer. However, the interpretation of PET/CT findings presents numerous pitfalls and potential confounders. Therefore, it is imperative for pulmonologists and radiologists to familiarize themselves with the most relevant indications for and limitations of PET/CT, seeking to protect their patients from unnecessary radiation exposure and inappropriate treatment. This review article aimed to summarize the basic principles, indications, cancer staging considerations, and future applications related to the use of PET/CT in lung cancer. PMID:26176525

  14. Gastric Cancer Staging with Dual Energy Spectral CT Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Pan, Zilai; Pang, Lifang; Ding, Bei; Yan, Chao; Zhang, Huan; Du, Lianjun; Wang, Baisong; Song, Qi; Chen, Kemin; Yan, Fuhua

    2013-01-01

    Purpose To evaluate the clinical utility of dual energy spectral CT (DEsCT) in staging and characterizing gastric cancers. Materials and Methods 96 patients suspected of gastric cancers underwent dual-phasic scans (arterial phase (AP) and portal venous phase (PP)) with DEsCT mode. Three types of images were reconstructed for analysis: conventional polychromatic images, material-decomposition images, and monochromatic image sets with photon energies from 40 to 140 keV. The polychromatic and monochromatic images were compared in TNM staging. The iodine concentrations in the lesions and lymph nodes were measured on the iodine-based material-decomposition images. These values were further normalized against that in aorta and the normalized iodine concentration (nIC) values were statistically compared. Results were correlated with pathological findings. Results The overall accuracies for T, N and M staging were (81.2%, 80.0%, and 98.9%) and (73.9%, 75.0%, and 98.9%) determined with the monochromatic images and the conventional kVp images, respectively. The improvement of the accuracy in N-staging using the keV images was statistically significant (p<0.05). The nIC values between the differentiated and undifferentiated carcinoma and between metastatic and non-metastatic lymph nodes were significantly different both in AP (p = 0.02, respectively) and PP (p = 0.01, respectively). Among metastatic lymph nodes, nIC of the signet-ring cell carcinoma were significantly different from the adenocarcinoma (p = 0.02) and mucinous adenocarcinoma (p = 0.01) in PP. Conclusion The monochromatic images obtained with DEsCT may be used to improve the N-staging accuracy. Quantitative iodine concentration measurements may be helpful for differentiating between differentiated and undifferentiated gastric carcinoma, and between metastatic and non-metastatic lymph nodes. PMID:23424614

  15. Automated planning of breast radiotherapy using cone beam CT imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Amit, Guy; Purdie, Thomas G.

    2015-02-15

    Purpose: Develop and clinically validate a methodology for using cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) imaging in an automated treatment planning framework for breast IMRT. Methods: A technique for intensity correction of CBCT images was developed and evaluated. The technique is based on histogram matching of CBCT image sets, using information from “similar” planning CT image sets from a database of paired CBCT and CT image sets (n = 38). Automated treatment plans were generated for a testing subset (n = 15) on the planning CT and the corrected CBCT. The plans generated on the corrected CBCT were compared to the CT-based plans in terms of beam parameters, dosimetric indices, and dose distributions. Results: The corrected CBCT images showed considerable similarity to their corresponding planning CTs (average mutual information 1.0±0.1, average sum of absolute differences 185 ± 38). The automated CBCT-based plans were clinically acceptable, as well as equivalent to the CT-based plans with average gantry angle difference of 0.99°±1.1°, target volume overlap index (Dice) of 0.89±0.04 although with slightly higher maximum target doses (4482±90 vs 4560±84, P < 0.05). Gamma index analysis (3%, 3 mm) showed that the CBCT-based plans had the same dose distribution as plans calculated with the same beams on the registered planning CTs (average gamma index 0.12±0.04, gamma <1 in 99.4%±0.3%). Conclusions: The proposed method demonstrates the potential for a clinically feasible and efficient online adaptive breast IMRT planning method based on CBCT imaging, integrating automation.

  16. Optical crosstalk in CT detectors and its effects on CT images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Youn, Hanbean; Kam, Soohwa; Han, Jong Chul; Kim, Ho Kyung

    2014-03-01

    Detectors for computed tomography (CT) typically consist of scintillator and photodiode arrays which are coupled using optical glue. Therefore, the leakage of optical photons generated in a scintillator block to neighboring pixel photodiodes through the optical glue layer is inevitable. Passivation layers to protect the silicon photodiode as well as the silicon layer itself, which is inactive to the optical photons, are another causes for the leakage. This optical crosstalk reduces image sharpness, and eventually will blur CT images. We have quantitatively investigated the optical crosstalk in CT detectors using the Monte Carlo technique. We performed the optical Monte Carlo simulations for various thicknesses of optical components in a 129 × 129 CT detector array. We obtained the coordinates of optical photons hitting the user-defined detection plane. From the coordinate information, we calculated the collection efficiency at the detection plane and the collection efficiency at the single pixel located just below the scintillator in which the optical photons were generated. Difference between the two quantities provided the optical crosstalk. In addition, using the coordinate information, we calculated point-spread functions as well as modulation-transfer functions from which we estimated the effective aperture due to the optical photon spreading. The optical crosstalk was most severely affected by the thickness of photodiode passivation layer. The effective aperture due to the optical crosstalk was about 110% of the detector pixel aperture for a 0.1 mm-thick passivation layer, and this signal blur was appeared as a relative error of about 3-4% in mismatches between CT images with and without the optical crosstalk. The detailed simulation results are shown and will be very useful for the design of CT detectors.

  17. New Applications of Cardiac Computed Tomography: Dual-Energy, Spectral, and Molecular CT Imaging.

    PubMed

    Danad, Ibrahim; Fayad, Zahi A; Willemink, Martin J; Min, James K

    2015-06-01

    Computed tomography (CT) has evolved into a powerful diagnostic tool, and it is impossible to imagine current clinical practice without CT imaging. Because of its widespread availability, ease of clinical application, superb sensitivity for the detection of coronary artery disease, and noninvasive nature, CT has become a valuable tool within the armamentarium of cardiologists. In the past few years, numerous technological advances in CT have occurred, including dual-energy CT, spectral CT, and CT-based molecular imaging. By harnessing the advances in technology, cardiac CT has advanced beyond the mere evaluation of coronary stenosis to an imaging tool that permits accurate plaque characterization, assessment of myocardial perfusion, and even probing of molecular processes that are involved in coronary atherosclerosis. Novel innovations in CT contrast agents and pre-clinical spectral CT devices have paved the way for CT-based molecular imaging. PMID:26068288

  18. Recent Advances in Cardiac Computed Tomography: Dual Energy, Spectral and Molecular CT Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Danad, Ibrahim; Fayad, Zahi A.; Willemink, Martin J.; Min, James K.

    2015-01-01

    Computed tomography (CT) evolved into a powerful diagnostic tool and it is impossible to imagine current clinical practice without CT imaging. Due to its widespread availability, ease of clinical application, superb sensitivity for detection of CAD, and non-invasive nature, CT has become a valuable tool within the armamentarium of the cardiologist. In the last few years, numerous technological advances in CT have occurred—including dual energy CT (DECT), spectral CT and CT-based molecular imaging. By harnessing the advances in technology, cardiac CT has advanced beyond the mere evaluation of coronary stenosis to an imaging modality tool that permits accurate plaque characterization, assessment of myocardial perfusion and even probing of molecular processes that are involved in coronary atherosclerosis. Novel innovations in CT contrast agents and pre-clinical spectral CT devices have paved the way for CT-based molecular imaging. PMID:26068288

  19. Osmotic blood-brain barrier disruption: CT and radionuclide imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Roman-Goldstein, S.; Clunie, D.A.; Stevens, J.; Hogan, R.; Monard, J.; Ramsey, F.; Neuwelt, E.A.

    1994-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare CT and radionuclide imaging of osmotic blood-brain barrier disruption, and to develop a quantitative method for imaging osmotic blood-brain barrier disruption and to see if iopamidol could be safety given intravenously in conjunction with blood-brain barrier disruption. Forty-five blood-brain barrier disruption procedures were imaged with CT and radionuclide scans. The scans were evaluated with visual and quantitative scales. Patients were observed for adverse effects after blood-brain barrier disruption. There was a 4% rate of seizures in this study. There was good agreement between visual CT and radionuclide grading systems. Quantitative disruption did not add useful information to visual interpretations. Nonionic iodine-based contrast medium has a lower incidence of seizures when injected intravenously in conjunction with osmotic blood-brain barrier disruption than ionic contrast material. Contrast-enhanced CT is the preferred method to image disruption because it has better spatial resolution than radionuclide techniques. 34 refs., 4 figs., 6 tabs.

  20. Interhospital CT image communication: T-1 line versus courier service

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lou, Shyhliang A.; Huang, H. K.; Bazzill, Todd M.; Gould, Robert G.; Dillon, William P.; Schomer, Barbara G.

    1995-05-01

    The Mount Zion Hospital (MZH) in San Francisco, Calif. is associated with the University of California at San Francisco (UCSF) medical center. These hospitals are approximately two miles apart. The UCSF radiology department supports specialty image reading for MZH daily. The major issue involved with this service is the access of patient images. Currently, the patient image access is through two ways: (1) inter-hospital travel, and (2) image delivery. Both methods are neither efficient nor economic. If patient images can be transferred from MZH to UCSF to be viewed in digital form in a reasonable time period, the issue of patient image accession can be resolved. This study attempts to use an available digital communication technology, a T-1 line, to verify this hypothesis. The study is centered on the comparison between the T-1 line and courier service with respect to cost and image delivery performance. This comparison study focuses on CT images with an emphasis on neuroradiology application.

  1. Accuracy of CT-based attenuation correction in PET/CT bone imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abella, Monica; Alessio, Adam M.; Mankoff, David A.; MacDonald, Lawrence R.; Vaquero, Juan Jose; Desco, Manuel; Kinahan, Paul E.

    2012-05-01

    We evaluate the accuracy of scaling CT images for attenuation correction of PET data measured for bone. While the standard tri-linear approach has been well tested for soft tissues, the impact of CT-based attenuation correction on the accuracy of tracer uptake in bone has not been reported in detail. We measured the accuracy of attenuation coefficients of bovine femur segments and patient data using a tri-linear method applied to CT images obtained at different kVp settings. Attenuation values at 511 keV obtained with a 68Ga/68Ge transmission scan were used as a reference standard. The impact of inaccurate attenuation images on PET standardized uptake values (SUVs) was then evaluated using simulated emission images and emission images from five patients with elevated levels of FDG uptake in bone at disease sites. The CT-based linear attenuation images of the bovine femur segments underestimated the true values by 2.9 ± 0.3% for cancellous bone regardless of kVp. For compact bone the underestimation ranged from 1.3% at 140 kVp to 14.1% at 80 kVp. In the patient scans at 140 kVp the underestimation was approximately 2% averaged over all bony regions. The sensitivity analysis indicated that errors in PET SUVs in bone are approximately proportional to errors in the estimated attenuation coefficients for the same regions. The variability in SUV bias also increased approximately linearly with the error in linear attenuation coefficients. These results suggest that bias in bone uptake SUVs of PET tracers ranges from 2.4% to 5.9% when using CT scans at 140 and 120 kVp for attenuation correction. Lower kVp scans have the potential for considerably more error in dense bone. This bias is present in any PET tracer with bone uptake but may be clinically insignificant for many imaging tasks. However, errors from CT-based attenuation correction methods should be carefully evaluated if quantitation of tracer uptake in bone is important.

  2. Phase and amplitude binning for 4D-CT imaging.

    PubMed

    Abdelnour, A F; Nehmeh, S A; Pan, T; Humm, J L; Vernon, P; Schöder, H; Rosenzweig, K E; Mageras, G S; Yorke, E; Larson, S M; Erdi, Y E

    2007-06-21

    We compare the consistency and accuracy of two image binning approaches used in 4D-CT imaging. One approach, phase binning (PB), assigns each breathing cycle 2pi rad, within which the images are grouped. In amplitude binning (AB), the images are assigned bins according to the breathing signal's full amplitude. To quantitate both approaches we used a NEMA NU2-2001 IEC phantom oscillating in the axial direction and at random frequencies and amplitudes, approximately simulating a patient's breathing. 4D-CT images were obtained using a four-slice GE Lightspeed CT scanner operating in cine mode. We define consistency error as a measure of ability to correctly bin over repeated cycles in the same field of view. Average consistency error mue+/-sigmae in PB ranged from 18%+/-20% to 30%+/-35%, while in AB the error ranged from 11%+/-14% to 20%+/-24%. In PB nearly all bins contained sphere slices. AB was more accurate, revealing empty bins where no sphere slices existed. As a proof of principle, we present examples of two non-small cell lung carcinoma patients' 4D-CT lung images binned by both approaches. While AB can lead to gaps in the coronal images, depending on the patient's breathing pattern, PB exhibits no gaps but suffers visible artifacts due to misbinning, yielding images that cover a relatively large amplitude range. AB was more consistent, though often resulted in gaps when no data existed due to patients' breathing pattern. We conclude AB is more accurate than PB. This has important consequences to treatment planning and diagnosis. PMID:17664557

  3. CT scan of the brain (image)

    MedlinePlus

    ... allowing high definition not only of the bony structures, but of the soft tissues. Clear images of organs such as the brain, muscles, joint structures, veins and arteries, as well as anomalies like ...

  4. A contrast correction method for dental images based on histogram registration

    PubMed Central

    Economopoulos, TL; Asvestas, PA; Matsopoulos, GK; Gröndahl, K; Gröndahl, H-G

    2010-01-01

    Contrast correction is often required in digital subtraction radiography when comparing medical data acquired over different time periods owing to dissimilarities in the acquisition process. This paper focuses on dental radiographs and introduces a novel approach for correcting the contrast in dental image pairs. The proposed method modifies the subject images by applying typical registration techniques on their histograms. The proposed histogram registration method reshapes the histograms of the two subject images in such a way that these images are matched in terms of their contrast deviation. The method was extensively tested over 4 sets of dental images, consisting of 72 registered dental image pairs with unknown contrast differences as well as 20 dental pairs with known contrast differences. The proposed method was directly compared against the well-known histogram-based contrast correction method. The two methods were qualitatively and quantitatively evaluated for all 92 available dental image pairs. The two methods were compared in terms of the contrast root mean square difference between the reference image and the corrected image in each case. The obtained results were also verified statistically using appropriate t-tests in each set. The proposed method exhibited superior performance compared with the well-established method, in terms of the contrast root mean square difference between the reference and the corrected images. After suitable statistical analysis, it was deduced that the performance advantage of the proposed approach was statistically significant. PMID:20587655

  5. Imaging lobular breast carcinoma: comparison of synchrotron radiation DEI-CT technique with clinical CT, mammography and histology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fiedler, S.; Bravin, A.; Keyriläinen, J.; Fernández, M.; Suortti, P.; Thomlinson, W.; Tenhunen, M.; Virkkunen, P.; Karjalainen-Lindsberg, M.-L.

    2004-01-01

    Different modalities for imaging cancer-bearing breast tissue samples are described and compared. The images include clinical mammograms and computed tomography (CT) images, CT images with partly coherent synchrotron radiation (SR), and CT and radiography images taken with SR using the diffraction enhanced imaging (DEI) method. The images are evaluated by a radiologist and compared with histopathological examination of the samples. Two cases of lobular carcinoma are studied in detail. The indications of cancer are very weak or invisible in the conventional images, but the morphological changes due to invasion of cancer become pronounced in the images taken by the DEI method. The strands penetrating adipose tissue are seen clearly in the DEI-CT images, and the histopathology confirms that some strands contain the so-called 'Indian file' formations of cancer cells. The radiation dose is carefully measured for each of the imaging modalities. The mean glandular dose (MGD) for 50% glandular breast tissue is about 1 mGy in conventional mammography and less than 0.25 mGy in projection DEI, while in the clinical CT imaging the MGD is very high, about 45 mGy. The entrance dose of 95 mGy in DEI-CT imaging gives rise to an MGD of 40 mGy, but the dose may be reduced by an order of magnitude, because the contrast is very large in most images.

  6. Computer-aided kidney segmentation on abdominal CT images.

    PubMed

    Lin, Daw-Tung; Lei, Chung-Chih; Hung, Siu-Wan

    2006-01-01

    In this paper, an effective model-based approach for computer-aided kidney segmentation of abdominal CT images with anatomic structure consideration is presented. This automatic segmentation system is expected to assist physicians in both clinical diagnosis and educational training. The proposed method is a coarse to fine segmentation approach divided into two stages. First, the candidate kidney region is extracted according to the statistical geometric location of kidney within the abdomen. This approach is applicable to images of different sizes by using the relative distance of the kidney region to the spine. The second stage identifies the kidney by a series of image processing operations. The main elements of the proposed system are: 1) the location of the spine is used as the landmark for coordinate references; 2) elliptic candidate kidney region extraction with progressive positioning on the consecutive CT images; 3) novel directional model for a more reliable kidney region seed point identification; and 4) adaptive region growing controlled by the properties of image homogeneity. In addition, in order to provide different views for the physicians, we have implemented a visualization tool that will automatically show the renal contour through the method of second-order neighborhood edge detection. We considered segmentation of kidney regions from CT scans that contain pathologies in clinical practice. The results of a series of tests on 358 images from 30 patients indicate an average correlation coefficient of up to 88% between automatic and manual segmentation. PMID:16445250

  7. Cardiovascular PET-CT imaging: a new frontier?

    PubMed

    Adamson, P D; Williams, M C; Newby, D E

    2016-07-01

    Cardiovascular positron-emission tomography combined with computed tomography (PET-CT) has recently emerged as an imaging technology with the potential to simultaneously describe both anatomical structures and physiological processes in vivo. The scope for clinical application of this technique is vast, but to date this promise has not been realised. Nonetheless, significant research activity is underway to explore these possibilities and it is likely that the knowledge gained will have important diagnostic and therapeutic implications in due course. This review provides a brief overview of the current state of cardiovascular PET-CT and the likely direction of future developments. PMID:26951964

  8. Perfusion CT imaging of the liver: review of clinical applications

    PubMed Central

    Oğul, Hayri; Kantarcı, Mecit; Genç, Berhan; Pirimoğlu, Berhan; Çullu, Neşat; Kızrak, Yeşim; Yılmaz, Ömer; Karabulut, Nevzat

    2014-01-01

    Perfusion computed tomography (CT) has a great potential for determining hepatic and portal blood flow; it offers the advantages of quantitative determination of lesion hemodynamics, distinguishing malignant and benign processes, as well as providing morphological data. Many studies have reported the use of this method in the assessment of hepatic tumors, hepatic fibrosis associated with chronic liver disease, treatment response following radiotherapy and chemotherapy, and hepatic perfusion changes after radiological or surgical interventions. The main goal of liver perfusion imaging is to improve the accuracy in the characterization of liver disorders. In this study, we reviewed the clinical application of perfusion CT in various hepatic diseases. PMID:24834487

  9. Perfusion CT imaging of treatment response in oncology.

    PubMed

    Prezzi, Davide; Khan, Aisha; Goh, Vicky

    2015-12-01

    Perfusion CT was first described in the 1970s but has become accepted as a clinical technique in recent years. In oncological practice Perfusion CT allows the downstream effects of therapies on the tumour vasculature to be monitored. From the dynamic changes in tumour and vascular enhancement following intravenous iodinated contrast agent administration, qualitative and quantitative parameters may be derived that reflect tumour perfusion, blood volume, and microcirculatory changes with treatment. This review outlines the mechanisms of action of available therapies and state-of-the-art imaging practice. PMID:25864440

  10. ROI extraction of chest CT images using adaptive opening filter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamada, Nobuhiro; Kubo, Mitsuru; Kawata, Yoshiki; Niki, Noboru; Eguchi, Kenji; Omatsu, Hironobu; Kakinuma, Ryutaro; Kaneko, Masahiro; Kusumoto, Masahiko; Nishiyama, Hiroyuki; Moriyama, Noriyuki

    2003-05-01

    We have already developed a prototype of computer-aided diagnosis (CAD) system that can automatically detect suspicious shadows from Chest CT images. But the CAD system cannot detect Ground-Grass-Attenuation perfectly. In many cases, this reason depends on the inaccurate extraction of the region of interests (ROI) that CAD system analyzes, so we need to improve it. In this paper, we propose a method of an accurate extraction of the ROI, and compare proposed method to ordinary method that have used in CAD system. Proposed Method is performed by application of the three steps. Firstly we extract lung area using threshold. Secondly we remove the slowly varying bias field using flexible Opening Filter. This Opening Filter is calculated by the combination of the ordinary opening value and the distribution which CT value and contrast follow. Finally we extract Region of Interest using fuzzy clustering. When we applied proposal method to Chest CT images, we got a good result in which ordinary method cannot achieve. In this study we used the Helical CT images that are obtained under the following measurement: 10mm beam width; 20mm/sec table speed; 120kV tube voltage; 50mA tube current; 10mm reconstruction interval.

  11. Near-infrared transillumination at 1310-nm for the imaging of early dental decay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, Robert S.; Huynh, Gigi D.; Jones, Graham C.; Fried, Daniel

    2003-09-01

    New imaging technologies are needed for the early detection of dental caries (decay) in the interproximal contact sites between teeth. Previous measurements have demonstrated that dental enamel is highly transparent in the near-IR at 1300-nm. In this study, a near-IR imaging system operating at 1300-nm was used to acquire images through tooth sections of varying thickness and whole teeth in order to demonstrate the utility of a near-IR dental transillumination system for the imaging of early dental caries (decay). Simulated lesions, which model the optical scattering of natural dental caries, were placed in plano-parallel dental enamel sections. The contrast ratio between the simulated lesions and surrounding sound enamel was calculated from analysis of acquired projection images. The results show significant contrast between the lesion and the enamel (>0.35) and a spatial line profile that clearly resolves the lesion in samples as thick as 6.75-mm. This study clearly demonstrates that a near-IR transillumination system has considerable potential for the imaging of early dental decay.

  12. Pros and cons of organ shielding for CT imaging.

    PubMed

    Samei, Ehsan

    2014-10-01

    With the increased importance of CT radiation dose to health care providers, patients and the general public, there is an increased responsibility to minimize patient dose effectively. Bismuth shields offer a simple strategy to reduce dose to certain anterior radiosensitive organs such as breasts and eyes. However, in order to reduce organ dose they must be used properly; improper use can lead to an actual increase in the patient dose. They also create a proportional increase in image noise in the section of the body adjacent to the shield and further reduce the quantitative precision of CT numbers. In addition, shielding can degrade the overall efficiency (by an order of approximately 10%) of the imaging process, reducing the theoretical image quality that can be expected from a certain level of patient dose. However, in spite of their significant disadvantages, there are certain clinical situations and practice considerations that provide qualified justification for their continued use. PMID:25304710

  13. Fast and Automatic Ultrasound Simulation from CT Images

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Jian; Liu, Yue; Wang, Yongtian

    2013-01-01

    Ultrasound is currently widely used in clinical diagnosis because of its fast and safe imaging principles. As the anatomical structures present in an ultrasound image are not as clear as CT or MRI. Physicians usually need advance clinical knowledge and experience to distinguish diseased tissues. Fast simulation of ultrasound provides a cost-effective way for the training and correlation of ultrasound and the anatomic structures. In this paper, a novel method is proposed for fast simulation of ultrasound from a CT image. A multiscale method is developed to enhance tubular structures so as to simulate the blood flow. The acoustic response of common tissues is generated by weighted integration of adjacent regions on the ultrasound propagation path in the CT image, from which parameters, including attenuation, reflection, scattering, and noise, are estimated simultaneously. The thin-plate spline interpolation method is employed to transform the simulation image between polar and rectangular coordinate systems. The Kaiser window function is utilized to produce integration and radial blurring effects of multiple transducer elements. Experimental results show that the developed method is very fast and effective, allowing realistic ultrasound to be fast generated. Given that the developed method is fully automatic, it can be utilized for ultrasound guided navigation in clinical practice and for training purpose. PMID:24348736

  14. Automatic labeling and segmentation of vertebrae in CT images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rasoulian, Abtin; Rohling, Robert N.; Abolmaesumi, Purang

    2014-03-01

    Labeling and segmentation of the spinal column from CT images is a pre-processing step for a range of image- guided interventions. State-of-the art techniques have focused either on image feature extraction or template matching for labeling of the vertebrae followed by segmentation of each vertebra. Recently, statistical multi- object models have been introduced to extract common statistical characteristics among several anatomies. In particular, we have created models for segmentation of the lumbar spine which are robust, accurate, and computationally tractable. In this paper, we reconstruct a statistical multi-vertebrae pose+shape model and utilize it in a novel framework for labeling and segmentation of the vertebra in a CT image. We validate our technique in terms of accuracy of the labeling and segmentation of CT images acquired from 56 subjects. The method correctly labels all vertebrae in 70% of patients and is only one level off for the remaining 30%. The mean distance error achieved for the segmentation is 2.1 +/- 0.7 mm.

  15. A new method to acquire 3-D images of a dental cast

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Zhongke; Yi, Yaxing; Zhu, Zhen; Li, Hua; Qin, Yongyuan

    2006-01-01

    This paper introduced our newly developed method to acquire three-dimensional images of a dental cast. A rotatable table, a laser-knife, a mirror, a CCD camera and a personal computer made up of a three-dimensional data acquiring system. A dental cast is placed on the table; the mirror is installed beside the table; a linear laser is projected to the dental cast; the CCD camera is put up above the dental cast, it can take picture of the dental cast and the shadow in the mirror; while the table rotating, the camera records the shape of the laser streak projected on the dental cast, and transmit the data to the computer. After the table rotated one circuit, the computer processes the data, calculates the three-dimensional coordinates of the dental cast's surface. In data processing procedure, artificial neural networks are enrolled to calibrate the lens distortion, map coordinates form screen coordinate system to world coordinate system. According to the three-dimensional coordinates, the computer reconstructs the stereo image of the dental cast. It is essential for computer-aided diagnosis and treatment planning in orthodontics. In comparison with other systems in service, for example, laser beam three-dimensional scanning system, the characteristic of this three-dimensional data acquiring system: a. celerity, it casts only 1 minute to scan a dental cast; b. compact, the machinery is simple and compact; c. no blind zone, a mirror is introduced ably to reduce blind zone.

  16. Human airway measurement from CT images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Jaesung; Reeves, Anthony P.; Fotin, Sergei; Apanasovich, Tatiyana; Yankelevitz, David

    2008-03-01

    A wide range of pulmonary diseases, including common ones such as COPD, affect the airways. If the dimensions of airway can be measured with high confidence, the clinicians will be able to better diagnose diseases as well as monitor progression and response to treatment. In this paper, we introduce a method to assess the airway dimensions from CT scans, including the airway segments that are not oriented axially. First, the airway lumen is segmented and skeletonized, and subsequently each airway segment is identified. We then represent each airway segment using a segment-centric generalized cylinder model and assess airway lumen diameter (LD) and wall thickness (WT) for each segment by determining inner and outer wall boundaries. The method was evaluated on 14 healthy patients from a Weill Cornell database who had two scans within a 2 month interval. The corresponding airway segments were located in two scans and measured using the automated method. The total number of segments identified in both scans was 131. When 131 segments were considered altogether, the average absolute change over two scans was 0.31 mm for LD and 0.12 mm for WT, with 95% limits of agreement of [-0.85, 0.83] for LD and [-0.32, 0.26] for WT. The results were also analyzed on per-patient basis, and the average absolute change was 0.19 mm for LD and 0.05 mm for WT. 95% limits of agreement for per-patient changes were [-0.57, 0.47] for LD and [-0.16, 0.10] for WT.

  17. Seamless Insertion of Pulmonary Nodules in Chest CT Images.

    PubMed

    Pezeshk, Aria; Sahiner, Berkman; Zeng, Rongping; Wunderlich, Adam; Chen, Weijie; Petrick, Nicholas

    2015-12-01

    The availability of large medical image datasets is critical in many applications, such as training and testing of computer-aided diagnosis systems, evaluation of segmentation algorithms, and conducting perceptual studies. However, collection of data and establishment of ground truth for medical images are both costly and difficult. To address this problem, we are developing an image blending tool that allows users to modify or supplement existing datasets by seamlessly inserting a lesion extracted from a source image into a target image. In this study, we focus on the application of this tool to pulmonary nodules in chest CT exams. We minimize the impact of user skill on the perceived quality of the composite image by limiting user involvement to two simple steps: the user first draws a casual boundary around a nodule in the source, and, then, selects the center of desired insertion area in the target. We demonstrate the performance of our system on clinical samples, and report the results of a reader study evaluating the realism of inserted nodules compared to clinical nodules. We further evaluate our image blending techniques using phantoms simulated under different noise levels and reconstruction filters. Specifically, we compute the area under the ROC curve of the Hotelling observer (HO) and noise power spectrum of regions of interest enclosing native and inserted nodules, and compare the detectability, noise texture, and noise magnitude of inserted and native nodules. Our results indicate the viability of our approach for insertion of pulmonary nodules in clinical CT images. PMID:26080378

  18. CT Scanning Imaging Method Based on a Spherical Trajectory.

    PubMed

    Chen, Ping; Han, Yan; Gui, Zhiguo

    2016-01-01

    In industrial computed tomography (CT), the mismatch between the X-ray energy and the effective thickness makes it difficult to ensure the integrity of projection data using the traditional scanning model, because of the limitations of the object's complex structure. So, we have developed a CT imaging method that is based on a spherical trajectory. Considering an unrestrained trajectory for iterative reconstruction, an iterative algorithm can be used to realise the CT reconstruction of a spherical trajectory for complete projection data only. Also, an inclined circle trajectory is used as an example of a spherical trajectory to illustrate the accuracy and feasibility of this new scanning method. The simulation results indicate that the new method produces superior results for a larger cone-beam angle, a limited angle and tabular objects compared with traditional circle trajectory scanning. PMID:26934744

  19. CT Scanning Imaging Method Based on a Spherical Trajectory

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    In industrial computed tomography (CT), the mismatch between the X-ray energy and the effective thickness makes it difficult to ensure the integrity of projection data using the traditional scanning model, because of the limitations of the object’s complex structure. So, we have developed a CT imaging method that is based on a spherical trajectory. Considering an unrestrained trajectory for iterative reconstruction, an iterative algorithm can be used to realise the CT reconstruction of a spherical trajectory for complete projection data only. Also, an inclined circle trajectory is used as an example of a spherical trajectory to illustrate the accuracy and feasibility of this new scanning method. The simulation results indicate that the new method produces superior results for a larger cone-beam angle, a limited angle and tabular objects compared with traditional circle trajectory scanning. PMID:26934744

  20. Three modality image registration of brain SPECT/CT and MR images for quantitative analysis of dopamine transporter imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamaguchi, Yuzuho; Takeda, Yuta; Hara, Takeshi; Zhou, Xiangrong; Matsusako, Masaki; Tanaka, Yuki; Hosoya, Kazuhiko; Nihei, Tsutomu; Katafuchi, Tetsuro; Fujita, Hiroshi

    2016-03-01

    Important features in Parkinson's disease (PD) are degenerations and losses of dopamine neurons in corpus striatum. 123I-FP-CIT can visualize activities of the dopamine neurons. The activity radio of background to corpus striatum is used for diagnosis of PD and Dementia with Lewy Bodies (DLB). The specific activity can be observed in the corpus striatum on SPECT images, but the location and the shape of the corpus striatum on SPECT images only are often lost because of the low uptake. In contrast, MR images can visualize the locations of the corpus striatum. The purpose of this study was to realize a quantitative image analysis for the SPECT images by using image registration technique with brain MR images that can determine the region of corpus striatum. In this study, the image fusion technique was used to fuse SPECT and MR images by intervening CT image taken by SPECT/CT. The mutual information (MI) for image registration between CT and MR images was used for the registration. Six SPECT/CT and four MR scans of phantom materials are taken by changing the direction. As the results of the image registrations, 16 of 24 combinations were registered within 1.3mm. By applying the approach to 32 clinical SPECT/CT and MR cases, all of the cases were registered within 0.86mm. In conclusions, our registration method has a potential in superimposing MR images on SPECT images.

  1. CT Imaging of Coronary Stents: Past, Present, and Future

    PubMed Central

    Mahnken, Andreas H.

    2012-01-01

    Coronary stenting became a mainstay in coronary revascularization therapy. Despite tremendous advances in therapy, in-stent restenosis (ISR) remains a key problem after coronary stenting. Coronary CT angiography evolved as a valuable tool in the diagnostic workup of patients after coronary revascularization therapy. It has a negative predictive value in the range of 98% for ruling out significant ISR. As CT imaging of coronary stents depends on patient and stent characteristics, patient selection is crucial for success. Ideal candidates have stents with a diameter of 3 mm and more. Nevertheless, even with most recent CT scanners, about 8% of stents are not accessible mostly due to blooming or motion artifacts. While the diagnosis of ISR is currently based on the visual assessment of the stent lumen, functional information on the hemodynamic significance of in-stent stenosis became available with the most recent generation of dual source CT scanners. This paper provides a comprehensive overview on previous developments, current techniques, and clinical evidence for cardiac CT in patients with coronary artery stents. PMID:22997590

  2. Gallium-68 EDTA PET/CT for Renal Imaging.

    PubMed

    Hofman, Michael S; Hicks, Rodney J

    2016-09-01

    Nuclear medicine renal imaging provides important functional data to assist in the diagnosis and management of patients with a variety of renal disorders. Physiologically stable metal chelates like ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA) and diethylenetriamine penta-acetate (DTPA) are excreted by glomerular filtration and have been radiolabelled with a variety of isotopes for imaging glomerular filtration and quantitative assessment of glomerular filtration rate. Gallium-68 ((68)Ga) EDTA PET usage predates Technetium-99m ((99m)Tc) renal imaging, but virtually disappeared with the widespread adoption of gamma camera technology that was not optimal for imaging positron decay. There is now a reemergence of interest in (68)Ga owing to the greater availability of PET technology and use of (68)Ga to label other radiotracers. (68)Ga EDTA can be used a substitute for (99m)Tc DTPA for wide variety of clinical indications. A key advantage of PET for renal imaging over conventional scintigraphy is 3-dimensional dynamic imaging, which is particularly helpful in patients with complex anatomy in whom planar imaging may be nondiagnostic or difficult to interpret owing to overlying structures containing radioactive urine that cannot be differentiated. Other advantages include accurate and absolute (rather than relative) camera-based quantification, superior spatial and temporal resolution and integrated multislice CT providing anatomical correlation. Furthermore, the (68)Ga generator enables on-demand production at low cost, with no additional patient radiation exposure compared with conventional scintigraphy. Over the past decade, we have employed (68)Ga EDTA PET/CT primarily to answer difficult clinical questions in patients in whom other modalities have failed, particularly when it was envisaged that dynamic 3D imaging would be of assistance. We have also used it as a substitute for (99m)Tc DTPA if unavailable owing to supply issues, and have additionally examined the role of

  3. Incorporating detection tasks into the assessment of CT image quality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scalzetti, E. M.; Huda, W.; Ogden, K. M.; Khan, M.; Roskopf, M. L.; Ogden, D.

    2006-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare traditional and task dependent assessments of CT image quality. Chest CT examinations were obtained with a standard protocol for subjects participating in a lung cancer-screening project. Images were selected for patients whose weight ranged from 45 kg to 159 kg. Six ABR certified radiologists subjectively ranked these images using a traditional six-point ranking scheme that ranged from 1 (inadequate) to 6 (excellent). Three subtle diagnostic tasks were identified: (1) a lung section containing a sub-centimeter nodule of ground-glass opacity in an upper lung (2) a mediastinal section with a lymph node of soft tissue density in the mediastinum; (3) a liver section with a rounded low attenuation lesion in the liver periphery. Each observer was asked to estimate the probability of detecting each type of lesion in the appropriate CT section using a six-point scale ranging from 1 (< 10%) to 6 (> 90%). Traditional and task dependent measures of image quality were plotted as a function of patient weight. For the lung section, task dependent evaluations were very similar to those obtained using the traditional scoring scheme, but with larger inter-observer differences. Task dependent evaluations for the mediastinal section showed no obvious trend with subject weight, whereas there the traditional score decreased from ~4.9 for smaller subjects to ~3.3 for the larger subjects. Task dependent evaluations for the liver section showed a decreasing trend from ~4.1 for the smaller subjects to ~1.9 for the larger subjects, whereas the traditional evaluation had a markedly narrower range of scores. A task-dependent method of assessing CT image quality can be implemented with relative ease, and is likely to be more meaningful in the clinical setting.

  4. Validating automatic semantic annotation of anatomy in DICOM CT images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pathak, Sayan D.; Criminisi, Antonio; Shotton, Jamie; White, Steve; Robertson, Duncan; Sparks, Bobbi; Munasinghe, Indeera; Siddiqui, Khan

    2011-03-01

    In the current health-care environment, the time available for physicians to browse patients' scans is shrinking due to the rapid increase in the sheer number of images. This is further aggravated by mounting pressure to become more productive in the face of decreasing reimbursement. Hence, there is an urgent need to deliver technology which enables faster and effortless navigation through sub-volume image visualizations. Annotating image regions with semantic labels such as those derived from the RADLEX ontology can vastly enhance image navigation and sub-volume visualization. This paper uses random regression forests for efficient, automatic detection and localization of anatomical structures within DICOM 3D CT scans. A regression forest is a collection of decision trees which are trained to achieve direct mapping from voxels to organ location and size in a single pass. This paper focuses on comparing automated labeling with expert-annotated ground-truth results on a database of 50 highly variable CT scans. Initial investigations show that regression forest derived localization errors are smaller and more robust than those achieved by state-of-the-art global registration approaches. The simplicity of the algorithm's context-rich visual features yield typical runtimes of less than 10 seconds for a 5123 voxel DICOM CT series on a single-threaded, single-core machine running multiple trees; each tree taking less than a second. Furthermore, qualitative evaluation demonstrates that using the detected organs' locations as index into the image volume improves the efficiency of the navigational workflow in all the CT studies.

  5. The appearance and effects of metallic implants in CT images.

    PubMed

    Kairn, T; Crowe, S B; Fogg, P; Trapp, J V

    2013-06-01

    The computed tomography (CT) imaging artefacts that metallic medical implants produce in surrounding tissues are usually contoured and over-ridden during radiotherapy treatment planning. In cases where radiotherapy treatment beams unavoidably pass though implants, it is especially important to understand the imaging artefacts that may occur within the implants themselves. This study examines CT images of a set of simple metallic objects, immersed in water, in order to evaluate reliability and variability of CT numbers (Hounsfield units, HUs) within medical implants. Model implants with a range of sizes (heights from 2.2 to 49.6 mm), electron densities (from 2.3 to 7.7 times the electron density of water) and effective atomic numbers (from 3.9 to 9.0 times the effective atomic number of water in a CT X-ray beam) were created by stacking metal coins from several currencies. These 'implants' were CT scanned within a large (31.0 cm across) and a small (12.8 cm across) water phantom. Resulting HU values are as much as 50 % lower than the result of extrapolating standard electron density calibration data (obtained for tissue and bone densities) up to the metal densities and there is a 6 % difference between the results obtained by scanning with 120 and 140 kVp tube potentials. Profiles through the implants show localised cupping artefacts, within the implants, as well as a gradual decline in HU outside the implants that can cause the implants' sizes to be over estimated by 1.3-9.0 mm. These effects are exacerbated when the implants are scanned in the small phantom or at the side of the large phantom, due to reduced pre-hardening of the X-ray beam in these configurations. These results demonstrate the necessity of over-riding the densities of metallic implants, as well as their artefacts in tissue, in order to obtain accurate radiotherapy dose calculations. PMID:23760920

  6. Segmentation of the ovine lung in 3D CT Images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Lijun; Hoffman, Eric A.; Reinhardt, Joseph M.

    2004-04-01

    Pulmonary CT images can provide detailed information about the regional structure and function of the respiratory system. Prior to any of these analyses, however, the lungs must be identified in the CT data sets. A popular animal model for understanding lung physiology and pathophysiology is the sheep. In this paper we describe a lung segmentation algorithm for CT images of sheep. The algorithm has two main steps. The first step is lung extraction, which identifies the lung region using a technique based on optimal thresholding and connected components analysis. The second step is lung separation, which separates the left lung from the right lung by identifying the central fissure using an anatomy-based method incorporating dynamic programming and a line filter algorithm. The lung segmentation algorithm has been validated by comparing our automatic method to manual analysis for five pulmonary CT datasets. The RMS error between the computer-defined and manually-traced boundary is 0.96 mm. The segmentation requires approximately 10 minutes for a 512x512x400 dataset on a PC workstation (2.40 GHZ CPU, 2.0 GB RAM), while it takes human observer approximately two hours to accomplish the same task.

  7. Cochlear anatomy using micro computed tomography (μCT) imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Namkeun; Yoon, Yongjin; Steele, Charles; Puria, Sunil

    2008-02-01

    A novel micro computed tomography (μCT) image processing method was implemented to measure anatomical features of the gerbil and chinchilla cochleas, taking into account the bent modailosis axis. Measurements were made of the scala vestibule (SV) area, the scala tympani (SV) area, and the basilar membrane (BM) width using prepared cadaveric temporal bones. 3-D cochlear structures were obtained from the scanned images using a process described in this study. It was necessary to consider the sharp curvature of mododailosis axis near the basal region. The SV and ST areas were calculated from the μCT reconstructions and compared with existing data obtained by Magnetic Resonance Microscopy (MRM), showing both qualitative and quantitative agreement. In addition to this, the width of the BM, which is the distance between the primary and secondary osseous spiral laminae, is calculated for the two animals and compared with previous data from the MRM method. For the gerbil cochlea, which does not have much cartilage in the osseous spiral lamina, the μCT-based BM width measurements show good agreement with previous data. The chinchilla BM, which contains more cartilage in the osseous spiral lamina than the gerbil, shows a large difference in the BM widths between the μCT and MRM methods. The SV area, ST area, and BM width measurements from this study can be used in building an anatomically based mathematical cochlear model.

  8. The influence of respiratory motion on CT image volume definition

    SciTech Connect

    Rodríguez-Romero, Ruth Castro-Tejero, Pablo

    2014-04-15

    Purpose: Radiotherapy treatments are based on geometric and density information acquired from patient CT scans. It is well established that breathing motion during scan acquisition induces motion artifacts in CT images, which can alter the size, shape, and density of a patient's anatomy. The aim of this work is to examine and evaluate the impact of breathing motion on multislice CT imaging with respiratory synchronization (4DCT) and without it (3DCT). Methods: A specific phantom with a movable insert was used. Static and dynamic phantom acquisitions were obtained with a multislice CT. Four sinusoidal breath patterns were simulated to move known geometric structures longitudinally. Respiratory synchronized acquisitions (4DCT) were performed to generate images during inhale, intermediate, and exhale phases using prospective and retrospective techniques. Static phantom data were acquired in helical and sequential mode to define a baseline for each type of respiratory 4DCT technique. Taking into account the fact that respiratory 4DCT is not always available, 3DCT helical image studies were also acquired for several CT rotation periods. To study breath and acquisition coupling when respiratory 4DCT was not performed, the beginning of the CT image acquisition was matched with inhale, intermediate, or exhale respiratory phases, for each breath pattern. Other coupling scenarios were evaluated by simulating different phantom and CT acquisition parameters. Motion induced variations in shape and density were quantified by automatic threshold volume generation and Dice similarity coefficient calculation. The structure mass center positions were also determined to make a comparison with their theoretical expected position. Results: 4DCT acquisitions provided volume and position accuracies within ±3% and ±2 mm for structure dimensions >2 cm, breath amplitude ≤15 mm, and breath period ≥3 s. The smallest object (1 cm diameter) exceeded 5% volume variation for the breath

  9. Assessment of metal artefact reduction around dental titanium implants in cone beam CT

    PubMed Central

    Ibrahim, N; Hassan, B; Syriopoulos, K; van der Stelt, P

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: The aim of this study was to investigate if the metal artefact reduction (MAR) tool used in the software of the ORTHOPANTOMOGRAPH® OP300 (Instrumentarium Dental, Tuusula, Finland) can improve the gray value levels in post-operative implant scans. Methods: 20 potential implant sites were selected from 5 edentulous human dry mandibles. Each mandible was scanned by a CBCT scanner, and images were produced under three different conditions: implant sites drilled but no implants inserted, implants inserted without application of MAR and implants inserted with application of MAR. Using Geomagic® Studio 2012 (Geomagic, Morrisville, NC) and 3Diagnosys® v. 5.3.1 (3Diemme® SRL, Cantù, Italy) software, three scans of each mandible were superimposed. The mean gray value of identical regions of bone around the implants was derived for each condition. The differences between gray value measurements at implant sites derived from different conditions were assessed. Results: A significant difference was found between mean gray values from the scans with no implants inserted and with implants inserted (with and without MAR) (p = 0.012). No significant difference was revealed for gray values measured from scans with and without MAR (p = 0.975). Conclusions: The MAR tool in the software of the ORTHOPANTOMOGRAPH OP300 CBCT scanner does not significantly correct the voxel gray values affected by the metal artefact in the vicinity of an implant in human dry mandibles. PMID:25135316

  10. Dental image replacement on cone beam computed tomography with three-dimensional optical scanning of a dental cast, occlusal bite, or bite tray impression.

    PubMed

    Kang, S-H; Lee, J-W; Lim, S-H; Kim, Y-H; Kim, M-K

    2014-10-01

    The goal of the present study was to compare the accuracy of dental image replacement on a cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) image using digital image data from three-dimensional (3D) optical scanning of a dental cast, occlusal bite, and bite tray impression. A Bracket Typodont dental model was used. CBCT of the dental model was performed and the data were converted to stereolithography (STL) format. Three experimental materials, a dental cast, occlusal bite, and bite tray impression, were optically scanned in 3D. STL files converted from the CBCT of the Typodont model and the 3D optical-scanned STL files of the study materials were image-registered. The error range of each methodology was measured and compared with a 3D optical scan of the Typodont. For the three materials, the smallest error observed was 0.099±0.114mm (mean error±standard deviation) for registering the 3D optical scan image of the dental cast onto the CBCT dental image. Although producing a dental cast can be laborious, the study results indicate that it is the preferred method. In addition, an occlusal bite is recommended when bite impression materials are used. PMID:25015906

  11. Reducing metal artifacts in cone-beam CT images by preprocessing projection data

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang Yongbin; Zhang Lifei; Zhu, X. Ronald; Lee, Andrew K.; Chambers, Mark; Dong Lei . E-mail: ldong@mdanderson.org

    2007-03-01

    Purpose: Computed tomography (CT) streak artifacts caused by metallic implants remain a challenge for the automatic processing of image data. The impact of metal artifacts in the soft-tissue region is magnified in cone-beam CT (CBCT), because the soft-tissue contrast is usually lower in CBCT images. The goal of this study was to develop an effective offline processing technique to minimize the effect. Methods and Materials: The geometry calibration cue of the CBCT system was used to track the position of the metal object in projection views. The three-dimensional (3D) representation of the object can be established from only two user-selected viewing angles. The position of the shadowed region in other views can be tracked by projecting the 3D coordinates of the object. Automatic image segmentation was used followed by a Laplacian diffusion method to replace the pixels inside the metal object with the boundary pixels. The modified projection data were then used to reconstruct a new CBCT image. The procedure was tested in phantoms, prostate cancer patients with implanted gold markers and metal prosthesis, and a head-and-neck patient with dental amalgam in the teeth. Results: Both phantom and patient studies demonstrated that the procedure was able to minimize the metal artifacts. Soft-tissue visibility was improved near or away from the metal object. The processing time was 1-2 s per projection. Conclusion: We have implemented an effective metal artifact-suppressing algorithm to improve the quality of CBCT images.

  12. Active contour based segmentation of resected livers in CT images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oelmann, Simon; Oyarzun Laura, Cristina; Drechsler, Klaus; Wesarg, Stefan

    2015-03-01

    The majority of state of the art segmentation algorithms are able to give proper results in healthy organs but not in pathological ones. However, many clinical applications require an accurate segmentation of pathological organs. The determination of the target boundaries for radiotherapy or liver volumetry calculations are examples of this. Volumetry measurements are of special interest after tumor resection for follow up of liver regrow. The segmentation of resected livers presents additional challenges that were not addressed by state of the art algorithms. This paper presents a snakes based algorithm specially developed for the segmentation of resected livers. The algorithm is enhanced with a novel dynamic smoothing technique that allows the active contour to propagate with different speeds depending on the intensities visible in its neighborhood. The algorithm is evaluated in 6 clinical CT images as well as 18 artificial datasets generated from additional clinical CT images.

  13. PET and PET/CT imaging of skeletal metastases

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Bone scintigraphy augmented with radiographs or cross-sectional imaging, such as computed tomography (CT) or magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), has remained the commonest method to diagnose and follow up skeletal metastases. However, bone scintigraphy is associated with relatively poor spatial resolution, limited diagnostic specificity and reduced sensitivity for bone marrow disease. It also shows limited diagnostic accuracy in assessing response to therapy in a clinically useful time period. With the advent of hybrid positron emission tomography (PET)/CT scanners there has been an increasing interest in using various PET tracers to evaluate skeletal disease including [18F]fluoride (NaF) as a bone-specific tracer and [18F]fluorodeoxyglucose and [18F]choline as tumour-specific tracers. There is also early work exploring the receptor status of skeletal metastases with somatostatin receptor analogues. This review describes the potential utility of these tracers in the assessment of skeletal metastases. PMID:20663736

  14. Real-time in vivo imaging of dental tissue by means of optical coherence tomography (OCT)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brandenburg, Roland; Haller, Bernd; Hauger, Christoph

    2003-11-01

    We have carried out real-time in vivo and in vitro imaging of human dental tissue in a clinical setting by means of optical coherence tomography (OCT). We have used a compact, commercial prototype OCT system applying for the first time a surgical microscope as a beam delivery system for investigations of dental tissue. We have imaged demineralised tissue, caries lesions, restored teeth and oral mucosa and demonstrate the detection of changes in tissue microstructure. We discuss the details of this system and its potential and limitations with respect to dental applications.

  15. Biomechanics of the press-fit phenomenon in dental implantology: an image-based finite element analysis

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background A fundamental pre-requisite for the clinical success in dental implant surgery is the fast and stable implant osseointegration. The press-fit phenomenon occurring at implant insertion induces biomechanical effects in the bone tissues, which ensure implant primary stability. In the field of dental surgery, the understanding of the key factors governing the osseointegration process still remains of utmost importance. A thorough analysis of the biomechanics of dental implantology requires a detailed knowledge of bone mechanical properties as well as an accurate definition of the jaw bone geometry. Methods In this work, a CT image-based approach, combined with the Finite Element Method (FEM), has been used to investigate the effect of the drill size on the biomechanics of the dental implant technique. A very accurate model of the human mandible bone segment has been created by processing high resolution micro-CT image data. The press-fit phenomenon has been simulated by FE analyses for different common drill diameters (DA = 2.8 mm, DB = 3.3 mm, and DC = 3.8 mm) with depth L = 12 mm. A virtual implant model has been assumed with a cylindrical geometry having height L = 11 mm and diameter D = 4 mm. Results The maximum stresses calculated for drill diameters DA, DB and DC have been 12.31 GPa, 7.74 GPa and 4.52 GPa, respectively. High strain values have been measured in the cortical area for the models of diameters DA and DB, while a uniform distribution has been observed for the model of diameter DC . The maximum logarithmic strains, calculated in nonlinear analyses, have been ϵ = 2.46, 0.51 and 0.49 for the three models, respectively. Conclusions This study introduces a very powerful, accurate and non-destructive methodology for investigating the effect of the drill size on the biomechanics of the dental implant technique. Further studies could aim at understanding how different drill shapes can determine the

  16. Brain CT and MRI: differential diagnosis of imaging findings.

    PubMed

    Masdeu, Joseph C; Gadhia, Rajan; Faridar, Alireza

    2016-01-01

    Following a traditional approach, in Chapters 5 and 14-29 in the previous volume, diverse brain diseases are listed and their imaging findings described in detail. In this chapter the approach is from the imaging finding to the disease: for instance, what list of diseases can give rise to a contrast-enhancing mass in the cerebellopontine angle? Imaging findings that are reviewed in succession include the location of the lesion, its multiplicity and symmetry, its volume, ranging from atrophy to mass effect, its homogeneity, its density, measurable by computed tomography (CT), its appearance on T1, T2, and diffusion magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), and, finally, its characteristics after the infusion of intravenous contrast. A differential diagnosis for each finding is provided. While the approach adopted in this chapter is unconventional, we hope that it will be most helpful to anyone reading images. Furthermore, it could serve as the basis to create or complete image databases to guide in the interpretation of brain CT and MRI. PMID:27430457

  17. A stationary wavelet transform based approach to registration of planning CT and setup cone beam-CT images in radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Deng, Jun-Min; Yue, Hai-Zhen; Zhuo, Zhi-Zheng; Yan, Hua-Gang; Liu, Di; Li, Hai-Yun

    2014-05-01

    Image registration between planning CT images and cone beam-CT (CBCT) images is one of the key technologies of image guided radiotherapy (IGRT). Current image registration methods fall roughly into two categories: geometric features-based and image grayscale-based. Mutual information (MI) based registration, which belongs to the latter category, has been widely applied to multi-modal and mono-modal image registration. However, the standard mutual information method only focuses on the image intensity information and overlooks spatial information, leading to the instability of intensity interpolation. Due to its use of positional information, wavelet transform has been applied to image registration recently. In this study, we proposed an approach to setup CT and cone beam-CT (CBCT) image registration in radiotherapy based on the combination of mutual information (MI) and stationary wavelet transform (SWT). Firstly, SWT was applied to generate gradient images and low frequency components produced in various levels of image decomposition were eliminated. Then inverse SWT was performed on the remaining frequency components. Lastly, the rigid registration of gradient images and original images was implemented using a weighting function with the normalized mutual information (NMI) being the similarity measure, which compensates for the lack of spatial information in mutual information based image registration. Our experiment results showed that the proposed method was highly accurate and robust, and indicated a significant clinical potential in improving the accuracy of target localization in image guided radiotherapy (IGRT). PMID:24729043

  18. Brain Imaging Using Mobile CT: Current Status and Future Prospects.

    PubMed

    John, Seby; Stock, Sarah; Cerejo, Russell; Uchino, Ken; Winners, Stacey; Russman, Andrew; Masaryk, Thomas; Rasmussen, Peter; Hussain, Muhammad S

    2016-01-01

    Computed tomography (CT) is an invaluable tool in the diagnosis of many clinical conditions. Several advancements in biomedical engineering have achieved increase in speed, improvements in low-contrast detectability and image quality, and lower radiation. Portable or mobile CT constituted one such important advancement. It is especially useful in evaluating critically ill, intensive care unit patients by scanning them at bedside. A paradigm shift in utilization of mobile CT was its installation in ambulances for the management of acute stroke. Given the time sensitive nature of acute ischemic stroke, Mobile stroke units (MSU) were developed in Germany consisting of an ambulance equipped with a CT scanner, point of care laboratory system, along with teleradiological support. In a radical reconfiguration of stroke care, the MSU would bring the CT scanner to the stroke patient, without waiting for the patient at the emergency room. Two separate MSU projects in Saarland and Berlin demonstrated the safety and feasibility of this concept for prehospital stroke care, showing increased rate of intravenous thrombolysis and significant reduction in time to treatment compared to conventional care. MSU also improved the triage of patients to appropriate and specialized hospitals. Although multiple issues remain yet unanswered with the MSU concept including clinical outcome and cost-effectiveness, the MSU venture is visionary and enables delivery of life-saving and enhancing treatment for ischemic and hemorrhagic stroke. In this review, we discuss the development of mobile CT and its applications, with specific focus on its use in MSUs along with our institution's MSU experience. PMID:26593629

  19. Rodent Brain Imaging with X-ray CT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seo, Youngho; Hashimoto, Tomoki; Nuki, Yoshitsugu; Hasegawa, Bruce; Franc, Benjamin

    2007-03-01

    High resolution compact computed tomography (CT) systems have become increasingly important for examining morphology in small animal models of human biology and disease. However, functional measurements of blood flow and tissue perfusion are more challenging due to limited temporal resolution and need for x-ray absorptive contrast media. We therefore have developed methodologies which use x-ray CT for imaging hemorrhagic stroke in the brain of the intact rat. The head of the anesthetized rat was secured in an immobilization device, followed by in vivo imaging with a dedicated small animal CT scanner (X-O, Gamma Medica-Ideas, Northridge, CA). Imaging was performed without iodine contrast to visualize a very small volume (less than 0.1 ml) of arterial blood in a rat model of intracranial hemorrhage, and with iodine contrast (iopromide, 300 mgI/ml) to visualize carotid and cerebral arteries in order to study aneurysms and other vascular formations that may precede or indicate intracranial hemorrhage.

  20. [Intraoperative CT imaging system using a mobile CT scanner gantry mounted on floor-embedded rails for neurosurgery].

    PubMed

    Kabuto, M; Kubota, T; Kobayashi, H; Handa, Y; Sato, K; Ishii, H; Takeuchi, H; Uno, H; Arishima, H; Ido, K; Ueda, Y; Adachi, M; Ishida, M; Hasegawa, Y; Yanagimoto, M; Goto, Y

    1998-11-01

    Many neurosurgeons prefer to use intraoperative computed tomographic (CT) scanning, when possible, to check whether there is residual lesion or unexpected bleeding. We report a practical intraoperative CT imaging system using a high-speed CT scanner installed in the operating room along with a digitally controlled neurosurgical operating table. We designed a rail-track system to mobilize the CT gantry. The gantry is fixed onto a motorized carrier that can be moved smoothly on a rail-track embedded in the floor and with a maximum reach of 2.85 m from the room's wall to the operating table. The longitudinal motion of the operating table is easily adjusted by a foot switch from manual control to automatic control directly from the CT scanner's computer like an ordinary CT scanner bed in increments of 2, 5 or 10 mm during CT scanning. Either a carbon-made radiolucent head frame or carbon-made head plate is used as a headrest. Using this CT scanner system, pre- and intraoperative CT scannings were performed on 46 patients with brain tumors, cervical lesions or other intracranial lesions. We could operate on the patient with enough working space between the mobile CT gantry and the operating table for microneurosurgery. We could obtain intraoperative CT imaging of a patient on the operating table while the surgical wound remained open, the surgical drapes kept in place, and the surgical position unchanged, saving time in intraoperative CT scanning and preparation for further surgery when needed. This intraoperative CT imaging system installed in the operating room should be useful for neurosurgery. PMID:9866126

  1. Semiautomatic segmentation of liver metastases on volumetric CT images

    SciTech Connect

    Yan, Jiayong; Schwartz, Lawrence H.; Zhao, Binsheng

    2015-11-15

    Purpose: Accurate segmentation and quantification of liver metastases on CT images are critical to surgery/radiation treatment planning and therapy response assessment. To date, there are no reliable methods to perform such segmentation automatically. In this work, the authors present a method for semiautomatic delineation of liver metastases on contrast-enhanced volumetric CT images. Methods: The first step is to manually place a seed region-of-interest (ROI) in the lesion on an image. This ROI will (1) serve as an internal marker and (2) assist in automatically identifying an external marker. With these two markers, lesion contour on the image can be accurately delineated using traditional watershed transformation. Density information will then be extracted from the segmented 2D lesion and help determine the 3D connected object that is a candidate of the lesion volume. The authors have developed a robust strategy to automatically determine internal and external markers for marker-controlled watershed segmentation. By manually placing a seed region-of-interest in the lesion to be delineated on a reference image, the method can automatically determine dual threshold values to approximately separate the lesion from its surrounding structures and refine the thresholds from the segmented lesion for the accurate segmentation of the lesion volume. This method was applied to 69 liver metastases (1.1–10.3 cm in diameter) from a total of 15 patients. An independent radiologist manually delineated all lesions and the resultant lesion volumes served as the “gold standard” for validation of the method’s accuracy. Results: The algorithm received a median overlap, overestimation ratio, and underestimation ratio of 82.3%, 6.0%, and 11.5%, respectively, and a median average boundary distance of 1.2 mm. Conclusions: Preliminary results have shown that volumes of liver metastases on contrast-enhanced CT images can be accurately estimated by a semiautomatic segmentation

  2. The use of megavoltage CT (MVCT) images for dose recomputations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Langen, K. M.; Meeks, S. L.; Poole, D. O.; Wagner, T. H.; Willoughby, T. R.; Kupelian, P. A.; Ruchala, K. J.; Haimerl, J.; Olivera, G. H.

    2005-09-01

    Megavoltage CT (MVCT) images of patients are acquired daily on a helical tomotherapy unit (TomoTherapy, Inc., Madison, WI). While these images are used primarily for patient alignment, they can also be used to recalculate the treatment plan for the patient anatomy of the day. The use of MVCT images for dose computations requires a reliable CT number to electron density calibration curve. In this work, we tested the stability of the MVCT numbers by determining the variation of this calibration with spatial arrangement of the phantom, time and MVCT acquisition parameters. The two calibration curves that represent the largest variations were applied to six clinical MVCT images for recalculations to test for dosimetric uncertainties. Among the six cases tested, the largest difference in any of the dosimetric endpoints was 3.1% but more typically the dosimetric endpoints varied by less than 2%. Using an average CT to electron density calibration and a thorax phantom, a series of end-to-end tests were run. Using a rigid phantom, recalculated dose volume histograms (DVHs) were compared with plan DVHs. Using a deformed phantom, recalculated point dose variations were compared with measurements. The MVCT field of view is limited and the image space outside this field of view can be filled in with information from the planning kVCT. This merging technique was tested for a rigid phantom. Finally, the influence of the MVCT slice thickness on the dose recalculation was investigated. The dosimetric differences observed in all phantom tests were within the range of dosimetric uncertainties observed due to variations in the calibration curve. The use of MVCT images allows the assessment of daily dose distributions with an accuracy that is similar to that of the initial kVCT dose calculation.

  3. SU-E-I-59: Image Quality and Dose Measurement for Partial Cone-Beam CT

    SciTech Connect

    Abouei, E; Ford, N

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To characterize performance of cone beam CT (CBCT) used in dentistry investigating quantitatively the image quality and radiation dose during dental CBCT over different settings for partial rotation of the x-ray tube. Methods: Image quality and dose measurements were done on a variable field of view (FOV) dental CBCT (Carestream 9300). X-ray parameters for clinical settings were adjustable for 2–10 mA, 60–90 kVp, and two optional voxel size values, but time was fixed for each FOV. Image quality was assessed by scanning cylindrical poly-methyl methacrylate (PMMA) image quality phantom (SEDENTEXCT IQ), and then the images were analyzed using ImageJ to calculate image quality parameters such as noise, uniformity, and contrast to noise ratio (CNR). A protocol proposed by SEDENTEXCT, dose index 1 (DI1), was applied to dose measurements obtained using a thimble ionization chamber and cylindrical PMMA dose index phantom (SEDENTEXCT DI). Dose distributions were obtained using Gafchromic film. The phantoms were positioned in the FOV to imitate a clinical positioning. Results: The image noise was 6–12.5% which, when normalized to the difference of mean voxel value of PMMA and air, was comparable between different FOVs. Uniformity was 93.5ß 99.7% across the images. CNR was 1.7–4.2 and 6.3–14.3 for LDPE and Aluminum, respectively. Dose distributions were symmetric about the rotation angle's bisector. For large and medium FOVs at 4 mA and 80–90 kVp, DI1 values were in the range of 1.26–3.23 mGy. DI1 values were between 1.01–1.93 mGy for small FOV (5×5 cm{sup 2}) at 4–5 mA and 75–84 kVp. Conclusion: Noise decreased by increasing kVp, and the CNR increased for each FOV. When FOV size increased, image noise increased and CNR decreased. DI1 values were increased by increasing tube current (mA), tube voltage (kVp), and/or FOV. Funding for this project from NSERC Discovery grant, UBC Faculty of Dentistry Research Equipment Grant and UBC Faculty of

  4. High contrast optical imaging methods for image guided laser ablation of dental caries lesions

    PubMed Central

    LaMantia, Nicole R.; Tom, Henry; Chan, Kenneth H.; Simon, Jacob C.; Darling, Cynthia L.; Fried, Daniel

    2014-01-01

    Laser based methods are well suited for automation and can be used to selectively remove dental caries to minimize the loss of healthy tissues and render the underlying enamel more resistant to acid dissolution. The purpose of this study was to determine which imaging methods are best suited for image-guided ablation of natural non-cavitated carious lesions on occlusal surfaces. Multiple caries imaging methods were compared including near-IR and visible reflectance and quantitative light fluorescence (QLF). In order for image-guided laser ablation to be feasible, chemical and physical modification of tooth surfaces due to laser irradiation cannot greatly reduce the contrast between sound and demineralized dental hard tissues. Sound and demineralized surfaces of 48 extracted human molar teeth with non-cavitated lesions were examined. Images were acquired before and after laser irradiation using visible and near-IR reflectance and QLF at several wavelengths. Polarization sensitive-optical coherence tomography was used to confirm that lesions were present. The highest contrast was attained at 1460-nm and 1500–1700-nm, wavelengths coincident with higher water absorption. The reflectance did not decrease significantly after laser irradiation for those wavelengths. PMID:24791129

  5. High contrast optical imaging methods for image guided laser ablation of dental caries lesions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    LaMantia, Nicole R.; Tom, Henry; Chan, Kenneth H.; Simon, Jacob C.; Darling, Cynthia L.; Fried, Daniel

    2014-02-01

    Laser based methods are well suited for automation and can be used to selectively remove dental caries to minimize the loss of healthy tissues and render the underlying enamel more resistant to acid dissolution. The purpose of this study was to determine which imaging methods are best suited for image-guided ablation of natural non-cavitated carious lesions on occlusal surfaces. Multiple caries imaging methods were compared including near-IR and visible reflectance and quantitative light fluorescence (QLF). In order for image-guided laser ablation to be feasible, chemical and physical modification of tooth surfaces due to laser irradiation cannot greatly reduce the contrast between sound and demineralized dental hard tissues. Sound and demineralized surfaces of 48 extracted human molar teeth with non-cavitated lesions were examined. Images were acquired before and after laser irradiation using visible and near-IR reflectance and QLF at several wavelengths. Polarization sensitive-optical coherence tomography was used to confirm that lesions were present. The highest contrast was attained at 1460-nm and 1500-1700-nm, wavelengths coincident with higher water absorption. The reflectance did not decrease significantly after laser irradiation for those wavelengths.

  6. Pancreas tumor model in rabbit imaged by perfusion CT scans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gunn, Jason; Tichauer, Kenneth; Moodie, Karen; Kane, Susan; Hoopes, Jack; Stewart, Errol E.; Hadway, Jennifer; Lee, Ting-Yim; Pereira, Stephen P.; Pogue, Brian W.

    2013-03-01

    The goal of this work was to develop and validate a pancreas tumor animal model to investigate the relationship between photodynamic therapy (PDT) effectiveness and photosensitizer drug delivery. More specifically, this work lays the foundation for investigating the utility of dynamic contrast enhanced blood perfusion imaging to be used to inform subsequent PDT. A VX2 carcinoma rabbit cell line was grown in the tail of the pancreas of three New Zealand White rabbits and approximately 3-4 weeks after implantation the rabbits were imaged on a CT scanner using a contrast enhanced perfusion protocol, providing parametric maps of blood flow, blood volume, mean transit time, and vascular permeability surface area product.

  7. Imaging of Scrub Typhus by PET/CT.

    PubMed

    Lv, Jing; Liu, Shuai; Pan, Yu; Ju, Huijun; Zhang, Yifan

    2015-10-01

    A 19-year-old man had an unexplained fever, dizziness, headache, fatigue, and pain in the scrotum. An FDG PET/CT imaging was acquired to assess fever of unknown origin. The images showed multiple foci of increased FDG activity in the enlarged lymph nodes in the body. In addition, mildly increased activity in the enlarged spleen and lung bases was also noted. The patient was eventually diagnosed with scrub typhus based on positive results of the Weil-Felix agglutination test, eschar in the scrotum, and effective therapy. PMID:26252322

  8. CT and MR imaging of odontoid abnormalities: A pictorial review

    PubMed Central

    Jain, Nishchint; Verma, Ritu; Garga, Umesh C; Baruah, Barinder P; Jain, Sachin K; Bhaskar, Surya N

    2016-01-01

    Odontoid process is the central pillar of the craniovertebral junction. Imaging of this small structure continues to be a challenge for the radiologists due to complex bony and ligamentous anatomy. A wide range of developmental and acquired abnormalities of odontoid have been identified. Their accurate radiologic evaluation is important as different lesions have markedly different clinical course, patient management, and prognosis. This article seeks to provide knowledge for interpreting appearances of odontoid on computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) with respect to various disease processes, along with providing a quick review of the embryology and relevant anatomy. PMID:27081234

  9. CT and MR imaging of odontoid abnormalities: A pictorial review.

    PubMed

    Jain, Nishchint; Verma, Ritu; Garga, Umesh C; Baruah, Barinder P; Jain, Sachin K; Bhaskar, Surya N

    2016-01-01

    Odontoid process is the central pillar of the craniovertebral junction. Imaging of this small structure continues to be a challenge for the radiologists due to complex bony and ligamentous anatomy. A wide range of developmental and acquired abnormalities of odontoid have been identified. Their accurate radiologic evaluation is important as different lesions have markedly different clinical course, patient management, and prognosis. This article seeks to provide knowledge for interpreting appearances of odontoid on computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) with respect to various disease processes, along with providing a quick review of the embryology and relevant anatomy. PMID:27081234

  10. Image quality assessment of three cone beam CT machines using the SEDENTEXCT CT phantom

    PubMed Central

    Bamba, J; Araki, K; Endo, A; Okano, T

    2013-01-01

    Objectives: The SEDENTEXCT Project proposed quality assurance (QA) methods and introduced a QA image quality phantom. A new prototype was recently introduced that may be improved according to previous reports. The purpose of this study is to evaluate image quality in various protocols of three cone beam CT (CBCT) machines using the proposed QA phantom. Methods: Using three CBCT machines, nine image quality parameters, including image homogeneity (noise), uniformity, geometrical distortion, pixel intensity value, contrast resolution, spatial resolution [line pair (LP) chart, point spread function (PSF) and modulation transfer function (MTF)] and metal artefacts, were evaluated using a QA phantom proposed by SEDENTEXCT. Exposure parameters, slice thickness and field of view position changed variously, and the number of total protocols was 22. Results: Many protocols showed a uniform gray value distribution except in the minimum slice thickness image acquired using 3D Accuitomo 80 (Morita, Kyoto, Japan) and Veraviewepocs 3Df (Morita). Noise levels differed among the protocols. There was no geometric distortion, and the pixel intensity values were correlated with the CT value. Low contrast resolution differed among the protocols, but high contrast resolution performed well in all. Many protocols showed that the maximum line pair was larger than 1 LP mm−1 but smaller than 3 LP mm−1. PSF and MTF did not correlate well with the pixel size. The measured metal artefact areas varied for each device. Conclusions: We studied the image quality of three CBCT machines using the SEDENTEXCT phantom. Image quality varied with exposure protocols and machines. PMID:23956235

  11. Compact CT/SPECT Small-Animal Imaging System

    PubMed Central

    Kastis, George A.; Furenlid, Lars R.; Wilson, Donald W.; Peterson, Todd E.; Barber, H. Bradford; Barrett, Harrison H.

    2015-01-01

    We have developed a dual-modality CT/SPECT imaging system for small-animal imaging applications. The X-ray system comprises a commercially available micro-focus X-ray tube and a CCD-based X-ray camera. X-ray transmission measurements are performed based on cone-beam geometry. Individual projections are acquired by rotating the animal about a vertical axis in front of the CCD detector. A high-resolution CT image is obtained after reconstruction using an ordered subsets-expectation maximization (OS-EM) reconstruction algorithm. The SPECT system utilizes a compact semiconductor camera module previously developed in our group. The module is mounted perpendicular to the X-ray tube/CCD combination. It consists of a 64×64 pixellated CdZnTe detector and a parallel-hole tungsten collimator. The field of view is 1 square inch. Planar projections for SPECT reconstruction are obtained by rotating the animal in front of the detector. Gamma-ray and X-ray images are presented of phantoms and mice. Procedures for merging the anatomical and functional images are discussed. PMID:26538684

  12. Image quality in CT: From physical measurements to model observers.

    PubMed

    Verdun, F R; Racine, D; Ott, J G; Tapiovaara, M J; Toroi, P; Bochud, F O; Veldkamp, W J H; Schegerer, A; Bouwman, R W; Giron, I Hernandez; Marshall, N W; Edyvean, S

    2015-12-01

    Evaluation of image quality (IQ) in Computed Tomography (CT) is important to ensure that diagnostic questions are correctly answered, whilst keeping radiation dose to the patient as low as is reasonably possible. The assessment of individual aspects of IQ is already a key component of routine quality control of medical x-ray devices. These values together with standard dose indicators can be used to give rise to 'figures of merit' (FOM) to characterise the dose efficiency of the CT scanners operating in certain modes. The demand for clinically relevant IQ characterisation has naturally increased with the development of CT technology (detectors efficiency, image reconstruction and processing), resulting in the adaptation and evolution of assessment methods. The purpose of this review is to present the spectrum of various methods that have been used to characterise image quality in CT: from objective measurements of physical parameters to clinically task-based approaches (i.e. model observer (MO) approach) including pure human observer approach. When combined together with a dose indicator, a generalised dose efficiency index can be explored in a framework of system and patient dose optimisation. We will focus on the IQ methodologies that are required for dealing with standard reconstruction, but also for iterative reconstruction algorithms. With this concept the previously used FOM will be presented with a proposal to update them in order to make them relevant and up to date with technological progress. The MO that objectively assesses IQ for clinically relevant tasks represents the most promising method in terms of radiologist sensitivity performance and therefore of most relevance in the clinical environment. PMID:26459319

  13. Feasibility and Initial Performance of Simultaneous SPECT-CT Imaging Using a Commercial Multi-Modality Preclinical Imaging System

    PubMed Central

    Osborne, Dustin R.; Austin, Derek W.

    2015-01-01

    Multi-modality imaging provides coregistered PET-CT and SPECT-CT images; however such multi-modality workflows usually consist of sequential scans from the individual imaging components for each modality. This typical workflow may result in long scan times limiting throughput of the imaging system. Conversely, acquiring multi-modality data simultaneously may improve correlation and registration of images, improve temporal alignment of the acquired data, increase imaging throughput, and benefit the scanned subject by minimizing time under anesthetic. In this work, we demonstrate the feasibility and procedure for modifying a commercially available preclinical SPECT-CT platform to enable simultaneous SPECT-CT acquisition. We also evaluate the performance of simultaneous SPECT-CT tomographic imaging with this modified system. Performance was accessed using a 57Co source and image quality was evaluated with 99mTc phantoms in a series of simultaneous SPECT-CT scans. PMID:26146568

  14. Improving image accuracy of region-of-interest in cone-beam CT using prior image.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jiseoc; Kim, Jin Sung; Cho, Seungryong

    2014-01-01

    In diagnostic follow-ups of diseases, such as calcium scoring in kidney or fat content assessment in liver using repeated CT scans, quantitatively accurate and consistent CT values are desirable at a low cost of radiation dose to the patient. Region of-interest (ROI) imaging technique is considered a reasonable dose reduction method in CT scans for its shielding geometry outside the ROI. However, image artifacts in the reconstructed images caused by missing data outside the ROI may degrade overall image quality and, more importantly, can decrease image accuracy of the ROI substantially. In this study, we propose a method to increase image accuracy of the ROI and to reduce imaging radiation dose via utilizing the outside ROI data from prior scans in the repeated CT applications. We performed both numerical and experimental studies to validate our proposed method. In a numerical study, we used an XCAT phantom with its liver and stomach changing their sizes from one scan to another. Image accuracy of the liver has been improved as the error decreased from 44.4 HU to -0.1 HU by the proposed method, compared to an existing method of data extrapolation to compensate for the missing data outside the ROI. Repeated cone-beam CT (CBCT) images of a patient who went through daily CBCT scans for radiation therapy were also used to demonstrate the performance of the proposed method experimentally. The results showed improved image accuracy inside the ROI. The magnitude of error decreased from -73.2 HU to 18 HU, and effectively reduced image artifacts throughout the entire image. PMID:24710451

  15. Imaging performance in differential phase contrast CT compared with the conventional CT-noise equivalent quanta NEQ(k)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Xiangyang; Yang, Yi; Tang, Shaojie

    2012-03-01

    The grating-based x-ray differential phase contrast (DPC) CT is emerging as a new technology with the potential for extensive preclinical and clinical applications. In general, the performance of an imaging system is jointly determined by its signal property (modulation transfer function-MTF(k)) and noise property (noise power spectrum-NPS(k)), which is characterized by its spectrum of noise equivalent quanta. As reported by us previously, owing to an adoption of the Hilbert filtering for image reconstruction in the fashion of filtered backprojection (FBP), the noise property of DPC-CT characterized by its NPS(k) differs drastically from that of the conventional attenuation-based CT (1/|k| trait vs. |k| trait). In this work, via system analysis, modeling and simulated phantom study, we initially investigate the signal property of DPC-CT characterized by its MTF(k) and compare it with that of the conventional CT. In addition, we investigate the DPC-CT's spectrum of noise equivalent quanta NEQ(k) - the most important figure of merit (FOM) in the assessment of an imaging system's performance - by taking the MTF(k) and NPS(k) jointly into account. Through such a thorough investigation into both the signal and noise properties, the imaging performance of DPC-CT and its potential over the conventional attenuation-based CT can be fully understood and appreciated.

  16. 3D motion artifact compenstation in CT image with depth camera

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ko, Youngjun; Baek, Jongduk; Shim, Hyunjung

    2015-02-01

    Computed tomography (CT) is a medical imaging technology that projects computer-processed X-rays to acquire tomographic images or the slices of specific organ of body. A motion artifact caused by patient motion is a common problem in CT system and may introduce undesirable artifacts in CT images. This paper analyzes the critical problems in motion artifacts and proposes a new CT system for motion artifact compensation. We employ depth cameras to capture the patient motion and account it for the CT image reconstruction. In this way, we achieve the significant improvement in motion artifact compensation, which is not possible by previous techniques.

  17. Infective endocarditis detection through SPECT/CT images digital processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moreno, Albino; Valdés, Raquel; Jiménez, Luis; Vallejo, Enrique; Hernández, Salvador; Soto, Gabriel

    2014-03-01

    Infective endocarditis (IE) is a difficult-to-diagnose pathology, since its manifestation in patients is highly variable. In this work, it was proposed a semiautomatic algorithm based on SPECT images digital processing for the detection of IE using a CT images volume as a spatial reference. The heart/lung rate was calculated using the SPECT images information. There were no statistically significant differences between the heart/lung rates values of a group of patients diagnosed with IE (2.62+/-0.47) and a group of healthy or control subjects (2.84+/-0.68). However, it is necessary to increase the study sample of both the individuals diagnosed with IE and the control group subjects, as well as to improve the images quality.

  18. Ultrasmall dopamine-coated nanogolds: preparation, characteristics, and CT imaging

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Yao; Wu, Youshen; Liu, JiaJun; Zhan, Yonghua; Wu, Daocheng

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Water-dispersible ultrasmall nanogolds (WDU AuNPs) and their dopamine-coated nanogolds (WDU AuNPs@DPAs) were prepared by a reduction method with sodium borohydride as a reducing agent and a stabilised agent of 2-mercaptosuccinic acid in aqueous solution. The effects of these nanoparticles on computed tomography (CT) imaging were evaluated. The size distributions and Zeta potential of the nanoparticles were measured with a Malvern size analyser, and nanoparticle morphology was observed by transmission electron microscopy. These characteristics were confirmed by Fourier transform spectroscopy and ultraviolet/visible spectra. It was found that WDU AuNPs@DPAs were 5.4 nm in size with clear core–shell structure. The 3-(4, 5-Dimethyl-2-thiazolyl)-2, 5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide assay results showed that the WDU AuNPs and WDU AuNPs@DPAs were hypotoxic to different cells. The WDU AuNPs@DPAs showed a much longer circulation time and a larger CT attenuation coefficient than iohexol and could be excreted by the kidney and bladder. These nanoparticles showed considerable potential for future application in CT imaging. PMID:27366201

  19. Iterative image-domain decomposition for dual-energy CT

    SciTech Connect

    Niu, Tianye; Dong, Xue; Petrongolo, Michael; Zhu, Lei

    2014-04-15

    Purpose: Dual energy CT (DECT) imaging plays an important role in advanced imaging applications due to its capability of material decomposition. Direct decomposition via matrix inversion suffers from significant degradation of image signal-to-noise ratios, which reduces clinical values of DECT. Existing denoising algorithms achieve suboptimal performance since they suppress image noise either before or after the decomposition and do not fully explore the noise statistical properties of the decomposition process. In this work, the authors propose an iterative image-domain decomposition method for noise suppression in DECT, using the full variance-covariance matrix of the decomposed images. Methods: The proposed algorithm is formulated in the form of least-square estimation with smoothness regularization. Based on the design principles of a best linear unbiased estimator, the authors include the inverse of the estimated variance-covariance matrix of the decomposed images as the penalty weight in the least-square term. The regularization term enforces the image smoothness by calculating the square sum of neighboring pixel value differences. To retain the boundary sharpness of the decomposed images, the authors detect the edges in the CT images before decomposition. These edge pixels have small weights in the calculation of the regularization term. Distinct from the existing denoising algorithms applied on the images before or after decomposition, the method has an iterative process for noise suppression, with decomposition performed in each iteration. The authors implement the proposed algorithm using a standard conjugate gradient algorithm. The method performance is evaluated using an evaluation phantom (Catphan©600) and an anthropomorphic head phantom. The results are compared with those generated using direct matrix inversion with no noise suppression, a denoising method applied on the decomposed images, and an existing algorithm with similar formulation as the

  20. Segmentation of large periapical lesions toward dental computer-aided diagnosis in cone-beam CT scans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rysavy, Steven; Flores, Arturo; Enciso, Reyes; Okada, Kazunori

    2008-03-01

    This paper presents an experimental study for assessing the applicability of general-purpose 3D segmentation algorithms for analyzing dental periapical lesions in cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) scans. In the field of Endodontics, clinical studies have been unable to determine if a periapical granuloma can heal with non-surgical methods. Addressing this issue, Simon et al. recently proposed a diagnostic technique which non-invasively classifies target lesions using CBCT. Manual segmentation exploited in their study, however, is too time consuming and unreliable for real world adoption. On the other hand, many technically advanced algorithms have been proposed to address segmentation problems in various biomedical and non-biomedical contexts, but they have not yet been applied to the field of dentistry. Presented in this paper is a novel application of such segmentation algorithms to the clinically-significant dental problem. This study evaluates three state-of-the-art graph-based algorithms: a normalized cut algorithm based on a generalized eigen-value problem, a graph cut algorithm implementing energy minimization techniques, and a random walks algorithm derived from discrete electrical potential theory. In this paper, we extend the original 2D formulation of the above algorithms to segment 3D images directly and apply the resulting algorithms to the dental CBCT images. We experimentally evaluate quality of the segmentation results for 3D CBCT images, as well as their 2D cross sections. The benefits and pitfalls of each algorithm are highlighted.

  1. Liver segmentation for CT images using GVF snake

    SciTech Connect

    Liu Fan; Zhao Binsheng; Kijewski, Peter K.; Wang Liang; Schwartz, Lawrence H.

    2005-12-15

    Accurate liver segmentation on computed tomography (CT) images is a challenging task especially at sites where surrounding tissues (e.g., stomach, kidney) have densities similar to that of the liver and lesions reside at the liver edges. We have developed a method for semiautomatic delineation of the liver contours on contrast-enhanced CT images. The method utilizes a snake algorithm with a gradient vector flow (GVF) field as its external force. To improve the performance of the GVF snake in the segmentation of the liver contour, an edge map was obtained with a Canny edge detector, followed by modifications using a liver template and a concavity removal algorithm. With the modified edge map, for which unwanted edges inside the liver were eliminated, the GVF field was computed and an initial liver contour was formed. The snake algorithm was then applied to obtain the actual liver contour. This algorithm was extended to segment the liver volume in a slice-by-slice fashion, where the result of the preceding slice constrained the segmentation of the adjacent slice. 551 two-dimensional liver images from 20 volumetric images with colorectal metastases spreading throughout the livers were delineated using this method, and also manually by a radiologist for evaluation. The difference ratio, which is defined as the percentage ratio of mismatching volume between the computer and the radiologist's results, ranged from 2.9% to 7.6% with a median value of 5.3%.

  2. Molecular Body Imaging: MR Imaging, CT, and US. Part I. Principles

    PubMed Central

    Kircher, Moritz F.

    2012-01-01

    Molecular imaging, generally defined as noninvasive imaging of cellular and subcellular events, has gained tremendous depth and breadth as a research and clinical discipline in recent years. The coalescence of major advances in engineering, molecular biology, chemistry, immunology, and genetics has fueled multi- and interdisciplinary innovations with the goal of driving clinical noninvasive imaging strategies that will ultimately allow disease identification, risk stratification, and monitoring of therapy effects with unparalleled sensitivity and specificity. Techniques that allow imaging of molecular and cellular events facilitate and go hand in hand with the development of molecular therapies, offering promise for successfully combining imaging with therapy. While traditionally nuclear medicine imaging techniques, in particular positron emission tomography (PET), PET combined with computed tomography (CT), and single photon emission computed tomography, have been the molecular imaging methods most familiar to clinicians, great advances have recently been made in developing imaging techniques that utilize magnetic resonance (MR), optical, CT, and ultrasonographic (US) imaging. In the first part of this review series, we present an overview of the principles of MR imaging-, CT-, and US-based molecular imaging strategies. © RSNA, 2012 PMID:22623690

  3. Accuracy of quantitative reconstructions in SPECT/CT imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shcherbinin, S.; Celler, A.; Belhocine, T.; van der Werf, R.; Driedger, A.

    2008-09-01

    The goal of this study was to determine the quantitative accuracy of our OSEM-APDI reconstruction method based on SPECT/CT imaging for Tc-99m, In-111, I-123, and I-131 isotopes. Phantom studies were performed on a SPECT/low-dose multislice CT system (Infinia-Hawkeye-4 slice, GE Healthcare) using clinical acquisition protocols. Two radioactive sources were centrally and peripherally placed inside an anthropometric Thorax phantom filled with non-radioactive water. Corrections for attenuation, scatter, collimator blurring and collimator septal penetration were applied and their contribution to the overall accuracy of the reconstruction was evaluated. Reconstruction with the most comprehensive set of corrections resulted in activity estimation with error levels of 3-5% for all the isotopes.

  4. Improved image quality for x-ray CT imaging of gel dosimeters

    SciTech Connect

    Kakakhel, M. B.; Kairn, T.; Kenny, J.; Trapp, J. V.

    2011-09-15

    Purpose: This study provides a simple method for improving precision of x-ray computed tomography (CT) scans of irradiated polymer gel dosimetry. The noise affecting CT scans of irradiated gels has been an impediment to the use of clinical CT scanners for gel dosimetry studies. Methods: In this study, it is shown that multiple scans of a single PAGAT gel dosimeter can be used to extrapolate a ''zero-scan'' image which displays a similar level of precision to an image obtained by averaging multiple CT images, without the compromised dose measurement resulting from the exposure of the gel to radiation from the CT scanner. Results: When extrapolating the zero-scan image, it is shown that exponential and simple linear fits to the relationship between Hounsfield unit and scan number, for each pixel in the image, provide an accurate indication of gel density. Conclusions: It is expected that this work will be utilized in the analysis of three-dimensional gel volumes irradiated using complex radiotherapy treatments.

  5. Optimal ''image-based'' weighting for energy-resolved CT

    SciTech Connect

    Schmidt, Taly Gilat

    2009-07-15

    This paper investigates a method of reconstructing images from energy-resolved CT data with negligible beam-hardening artifacts and improved contrast-to-nosie ratio (CNR) compared to conventional energy-weighting methods. Conceptually, the investigated method first reconstructs separate images from each energy bin. The final image is a linear combination of the energy-bin images, with the weights chosen to maximize the CNR in the final image. The optimal weight of a particular energy-bin image is derived to be proportional to the contrast-to-noise-variance ratio in that image. The investigated weighting method is referred to as ''image-based'' weighting, although, as will be described, the weights can be calculated and the energy-bin data combined prior to reconstruction. The performance of optimal image-based energy weighting with respect to CNR and beam-hardening artifacts was investigated through simulations and compared to that of energy integrating, photon counting, and previously studied optimal ''projection-based'' energy weighting. Two acquisitions were simulated: dedicated breast CT and a conventional thorax scan. The energy-resolving detector was simulated with five energy bins. Four methods of estimating the optimal weights were investigated, including task-specific and task-independent methods and methods that require a single reconstruction versus multiple reconstructions. Results demonstrated that optimal image-based weighting improved the CNR compared to energy-integrating weighting by factors of 1.15-1.6 depending on the task. Compared to photon-counting weighting, the CNR improvement ranged from 1.0 to 1.3. The CNR improvement factors were comparable to those of projection-based optimal energy weighting. The beam-hardening cupping artifact increased from 5.2% for energy-integrating weighting to 12.8% for optimal projection-based weighting, while optimal image-based weighting reduced the cupping to 0.6%. Overall, optimal image-based energy weighting

  6. Lung imaging in rodents using dual energy micro-CT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Badea, C. T.; Guo, X.; Clark, D.; Johnston, S. M.; Marshall, C.; Piantadosi, C.

    2012-03-01

    Dual energy CT imaging is expected to play a major role in the diagnostic arena as it provides material decomposition on an elemental basis. The purpose of this work is to investigate the use of dual energy micro-CT for the estimation of vascular, tissue, and air fractions in rodent lungs using a post-reconstruction three-material decomposition method. We have tested our method using both simulations and experimental work. Using simulations, we have estimated the accuracy limits of the decomposition for realistic micro-CT noise levels. Next, we performed experiments involving ex vivo lung imaging in which intact lungs were carefully removed from the thorax, were injected with an iodine-based contrast agent and inflated with air at different volume levels. Finally, we performed in vivo imaging studies in (n=5) C57BL/6 mice using fast prospective respiratory gating in endinspiration and end-expiration for three different levels of positive end-expiratory pressure (PEEP). Prior to imaging, mice were injected with a liposomal blood pool contrast agent. The mean accuracy values were for Air (95.5%), Blood (96%), and Tissue (92.4%). The absolute accuracy in determining all fraction materials was 94.6%. The minimum difference that we could detect in material fractions was 15%. As expected, an increase in PEEP levels for the living mouse resulted in statistically significant increases in air fractions at end-expiration, but no significant changes in end-inspiration. Our method has applicability in preclinical pulmonary studies where various physiological changes can occur as a result of genetic changes, lung disease, or drug effects.

  7. CT discrimination and image process on damage process of unsaturated compacted loess during triaxial creep

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xiaojun; Jiang, Lihua; Tang, Yichuan

    2010-08-01

    The triaxial creep compression tests of compacted loess samples are conducted with a new set of modified triaxial compression apparatus. With the new apparatus, the loess sample can be scanned with CT machine at the same time during compression process. The different damage process of compacted loess sample is directly observed for the first time with CT images and CT numbers. The initiation mechanisms of loess micro-crack during different creep compression processes are analyzed with CT images.

  8. Dental OCT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colston, Bill W.; Sathyam, Ujwal S.; Dasilva, Luiz B.; Everett, Matthew J.; Stroeve, Pieter; Otis, L. L.

    1998-09-01

    We present here the first in vivo optical coherence tomography (OCT) images of human dental tissue. A novel dental optical coherence tomography system has been developed. This system incorporates the interferometer sample arm and transverse scanning optics into a handpiece that can be used intraorally to image human dental tissues. The average imaging depth of this system varied from 3 mm in hard tissues to 1.5 mm in soft tissues. We discuss the application of this imaging system for dentistry and illustrate the potential of our dental OCT system for diagnosis of periodontal disease, detection of caries, and evaluation of dental restorations.

  9. Evaluation of cross-polarized near infrared hyperspectral imaging for early detection of dental caries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Usenik, Peter; Bürmen, Miran; Fidler, Aleš; Pernuš, Franjo; Likar, Boštjan

    2012-01-01

    Despite major improvements in dental healthcare and oral hygiene, dental caries remains one of the most prevalent oral diseases and represents the primary cause of oral pain and tooth loss. The initial stages of dental caries are characterized by demineralization of enamel crystals and are difficult to diagnose. Near infrared (NIR) hyperspectral imaging is a new promising technique for detection of early changes in the surfaces of carious teeth. This noninvasive imaging technique can characterize and differentiate between the sound tooth surface and initial or advanced tooth caries. The absorbing and scattering properties of dental tissues reflect in distinct spectral features, which can be measured, quantified and used to accurately classify and map different dental tissues. Specular reflections from the tooth surface, which appear as bright spots, mostly located around the edges and the crests of the teeth, act as a noise factor which can significantly interfere with the spectral measurements and analysis of the acquired images, degrading the accuracy of the classification and diagnosis. Employing cross-polarized imaging setup can solve this problem, however has yet to be systematically evaluated, especially in broadband hyperspectral imaging setups. In this paper, we employ cross-polarized illumination setup utilizing state-of-the-art high-contrast broadband wire-grid polarizers in the spectral range from 900 nm to 1700 nm for hyperspectral imaging of natural and artificial carious lesions of various degrees.

  10. Near-IR polarization imaging of sound and carious dental enamel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Darling, Cynthia L.; Jiao, Jane J.; Lee, Chulsung; Kang, Hobin; Fried, Daniel

    2010-02-01

    A thorough understanding of how polarized near-IR light propagates through sound and carious dental hard tissues is important for the development of dental optical imaging systems. New optical imaging tools for the detection and assessment of dental caries (dental decay) such as near-IR imaging and optical coherence tomography can exploit the enhanced contrast provided by polarization sensitivity. In this investigation, an automated system was developed to collect images for the full 16-element Mueller Matrix. The polarized light was controlled by linear polarizers and liquid crystal retarders and the 36 images were acquired as the polarized near-IR light propagates through the enamel of extracted human thin tooth sections. In previous work, we reported that polarized light is rapidly depolarized by demineralized enamel, and sound and demineralized dentin.1 The rapid depolarization of polarized light by dental caries in the near-IR provides high contrast for caries imaging and detection. In this initial study, major differences in the Mueller matrix elements were observed in both sound and demineralized enamel which supports this approach and warrants further investigation.