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  1. Dentist and practice characteristics associated with restorative treatment of enamel caries in permanent teeth: multiple-regression modeling of observational clinical data from The National Dental PBRN

    PubMed Central

    Fellows, Jeffrey L; Gordan, Valeria V.; Gilbert, Gregg H.; Rindal, D. Brad; Qvist, Vibeke; Litaker, Mark S.; Benjamin, Paul; Flink, Håkan; Pihlstrom, Daniel J.; Johnson, Neil

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Current evidence in dentistry recommends non-surgical treatment to manage enamel caries lesions. However, surveyed practitioners report they would restore enamel lesions that are confined to the enamel. We used actual clinical data to evaluate patient, dentist, and practice characteristics associated with restoration of enamel caries, while accounting for other factors. Methods We combined data from a National Dental Practice-Based Research Network observational study of consecutive restorations placed in previously unrestored permanent tooth surfaces and practice/demographic data from 229 participating network dentists. Analysis of variance and logistic regression, using generalized estimating equations (GEE) and variable selection within blocks, were used to test the hypothesis that patient, dentist, and practice characteristics were associated with variations in enamel restorations of occlusal and proximal caries compared to dentin lesions, accounting for dentist and patient clustering. Results Network dentists from 5 regions placed 6,891 restorations involving occlusal and/or proximal caries lesions. Enamel restorations accounted for 16% of enrolled occlusal caries lesions and 6% of enrolled proximal caries lesions. Enamel occlusal restorations varied significantly (p<0.05) by patient age and race/ethnicity, dentist use of caries risk assessment, network region, and practice type. Enamel proximal restorations varied significantly (p<0.05) by dentist race/ethnicity, network region, and practice type. CLINICAL SIGNIFICANCE Identifying patient, dentist, and practice characteristics associated with enamel caries restorations can guide strategies to improve provider adherence to evidence-based clinical recommendations. PMID:25000667

  2. Before and After (Dental Restorations)

    MedlinePlus

    FAQs | Common Questions Why see a prosthodontist? Dentures Dental Implants Board Certification Improving Your Smile Conditions & Symptoms | ... of Care in the Restoration and Replacement of Teeth This site brought to you by: American College ...

  3. Health Instruction Packages: Permanent Teeth, Dental Deposits, and Dental Instruments. Dientes Permanentes, Depositos Dentales y Instrumentos Dentales.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lind, Patricia; Germano, Catherine

    These five learning modules use text interspersed with illustrations and reinforcement exercises to instruct dental aide and dental hygiene students about jaw bones and gums, dental deposits, and dental instruments. The first four modules were prepared by Patricia Lind in both Spanish and English. "The Gum and Bone of Permanent Teeth" ("La Encia y…

  4. Reasons for Placement of Restorations on Previously Unrestored Tooth Surfaces by Dental PBRN Dentists

    PubMed Central

    Nascimento, Marcelle M.; Gordan, Valeria V.; Qvist, Vibeke; Litaker, Mark S.; Rindal, D. Brad; Williams, O.D.; Fellows, Jeffrey L.; Ritchie, Lloyd K.; Mjör, Ivar A.; McClelland, Jocelyn; Gilbert, Gregg H.

    2010-01-01

    Objective To identify and quantify the reasons for placing restorations on unrestored permanent tooth surfaces and the dental materials used by Dental Practice-Based Research Network (DPBRN; www.DentalPBRN.org) dentists. Methods A total of 229 DPBRN practitioner-investigators collected data on 9,890 consecutive restorations from 5,810 patients. Information included: (1) reasons for restoring; (2) tooth and surfaces restored; and (3) restorative materials employed. Results Primary caries (85%) and non-carious defects (15%), which included abrasion/ abfraction/ erosion lesions and tooth fracture, were the main reasons for placement of restorations. Restorations due to caries were frequently placed on occlusal surfaces (49%), followed by distal, mesial, buccal/facial, lingual/palatal, and incisal surfaces. Amalgam was used for 46% of the molar and 45% of the premolar restorations. Directly placed resin-based composite (RBC) was used for 48% of the molar, 49% of the premolar, and 92% of the anterior restorations. Conclusion Dental caries on occlusal and proximal surfaces of molar teeth are the main reasons for placing restorations on previously unrestored tooth surfaces by DPBRN practitioner-investigators. RBC is the material most commonly used for occlusal and anterior restorations. Amalgam remains the material of choice to restore proximal caries in posterior teeth, although there are significant differences by DPBRN region. PMID:20354094

  5. A modified technique on the reattachment of permanent tooth fragments following dental trauma. Case report.

    PubMed

    Arapostathis, Konstantinos; Arhakis, Aristidis; Kalfas, Sotiris

    2005-01-01

    Fractured anterior teeth can be restored by adhesive bonding of the fractured fragment to the remaining tooth structure. One of the major challenges for the practitioner treating traumatized anterior teeth with immediate fragment reattachment is disguising the fracture line, through the correct use of masking and restorative resins to make the restorations imperceptible to the eye as well as improve the retention of the restoration. This paper discusses a modified technique for reattaching a permanent tooth fragment following dental trauma. The initial procedure involved simple reattachment using light cured composite resin between the fragment and the remnant part of the tooth, without additional preparation. The surplus resin was spread across it in an attempt to optimize marginal seal and improve the aesthetics of the restoration. Finally, after taking into account the occlusion, the lingual surfaces of the teeth were veneered with microfilled composite to improve the retention of the reattached fragments. PMID:16302596

  6. Radiographic diagnosis of dental restoration misfit: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Liedke, G S; Spin-Neto, R; da Silveira, H E D; Wenzel, A

    2014-12-01

    The objective of this study was to perform a systematic review on the use of radiographic methods for the diagnosis of misfit in dental prostheses and restorations. The MEDLINE bibliographic database was searched from 1950 to February 2014 for reports on the radiographic diagnosis of misfits. The search strategy was limited to English-language publications using the following combined MeSH terms in the search strategy: (Dental Restoration OR Dental Prosthesis OR Crown OR Inlays OR Dental Abutments) and (Dental Leakage OR Prosthesis Fitting OR Dental Marginal Adaptation OR Surface Properties) and (Radiography, Dental OR Radiography, Dental, Digital OR Cone-Beam Computed Tomography). Twenty-eight publications were identified and read in full text, and 14 studies fulfilled criteria for inclusion. Information regarding the use of radiographic methods for the diagnosis of misfits in dental prosthesis and restorations, and in which the methodology/results comprised information regarding how the sample was collected/prepared, the method, imaging protocol, presence of a reference test and the outcomes were evaluated. QUADAS criteria was used to rate the studies in high, moderate or low quality. The evidence supporting the use of radiographic methods for the diagnosis of misfits in dental prosthesis and restorations is limited to low-/moderate-quality studies. The well-established intra-oral orthogonal projection is still under investigation and considered the most appropriate method, both when evaluating the relation between dental restoration to tooth and abutment to implant. Studies using digital radiographs have not evaluated the effect of image post-processing, and tomography has not been evaluated. PMID:25142004

  7. Loss of Alloy in Cast Restorations Fabricated by Dental Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Soh, George

    1991-01-01

    A study investigated the quantity of alloy lost in the fabrication of three types of cast restoration by dental students, and identified the proportion of loss at each of the four principal stages of the fabrication process. Suggestions for reducing metal loss and related costs in dental schools are offered. (MSE)

  8. Nonthermal Atmospheric Plasmas in Dental Restoration.

    PubMed

    Liu, Y; Liu, Q; Yu, Q S; Wang, Y

    2016-05-01

    It is well known that the service life of contemporary composite restoration is unsatisfactory, and longevity of dentin bonding is one of the major culprits. Bonding is essentially a hybridization process in which dental substrate and adhesive resin interact with each other through an exchange process. Thus, the longevity of dentin bonding can only be improved with enhanced qualities in substrate, adhesive resin, and their interaction within the hybridization zone. This review aims to collect and summarize recent advances in utilizing nonthermal atmospheric plasmas (NTAPs)-a novel technology that delivers highly reactive species in a gaseous medium at or below physiologic temperature-to improve the durability of dentin bonding by addressing these 3 issues simultaneously. Overall, NTAP has demonstrated efficacies in improving a number of critical properties for dentin bonding, including deactivation of oral pathogens, modification of surface chemistry/properties, resin polymerization, improvement in adhesive-dentin interactions, and establishment of auxiliary bonding mechanism. While a few preliminary studies have indicated the benefit of NTAP to bond strength and stability, additional researches are warranted to employ knowledge acquired so far and to evaluate these properties in a systematic way. PMID:26848068

  9. The demand for preventive and restorative dental services.

    PubMed

    Meyerhoefer, Chad D; Zuvekas, Samuel H; Manski, Richard

    2014-01-01

    Chronic tooth decay is the most common chronic condition in the United States among children ages 5-17 and also affects a large percentage of adults. Oral health conditions are preventable, but less than half of the US population uses dental services annually. We seek to examine the extent to which limited dental coverage and high out-of-pocket costs reduce dental service use by the nonelderly privately insured and uninsured. Using data from the 2001-2006 Medical Expenditure Panel Survey and an American Dental Association survey of dental procedure prices, we jointly estimate the probability of using preventive and both basic and major restorative services through a correlated random effects specification that controls for endogeneity. We found that dental coverage increased the probability of preventive care use by 19% and the use of restorative services 11% to 16%. Both conditional and unconditional on dental coverage, the use of dental services was not sensitive to out-of-pocket costs. We conclude that dental coverage is an important determinant of preventive dental service use, but other nonprice factors related to consumer preferences, especially education, are equal if not stronger determinants. PMID:23349123

  10. Nanotechnology-based restorative materials for dental caries management

    PubMed Central

    Melo, Mary A.S.; Guedes, Sarah F.F.; Xu, Hockin H.K.; Rodrigues, Lidiany K.A.

    2013-01-01

    Nanotechnology has been applied to dental materials as an innovative concept for the development of materials with better properties and anticaries potential. In this review we discuss the current progress and future applications of functional nanoparticles incorporated in dental restorative materials as useful strategies to dental caries management. We also overview proposed antimicrobial and remineralizing mechanisms. Nanomaterials have great potential to decrease biofilm accumulation, inhibit the demineralization process, to be used for remineralizing tooth structure, and to combat caries-related bacteria. These results are encouraging and open the doors to future clinical studies that will allow the therapeutic value of nanotechnology-based restorative materials to be established. PMID:23810638

  11. Finite element calculation of residual stress in dental restorative material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grassia, Luigi; D'Amore, Alberto

    2012-07-01

    A finite element methodology for residual stresses calculation in dental restorative materials is proposed. The material under concern is a multifunctional methacrylate-based composite for dental restorations, activated by visible light. Reaction kinetics, curing shrinkage, and viscoelastic relaxation functions were required as input data on a structural finite element solver. Post cure effects were considered in order to quantify the residual stresses coming out from natural contraction with respect to those debited to the chemical shrinkage. The analysis showed for a given test case that residual stresses frozen in the dental restoration at uniform temperature of 37°C are of the same order of magnitude of the strength of the dental composite material per se.

  12. A Novel Approach for the Reimbursement of Permanent Partial Dental Disability Following Dental Injury.

    PubMed

    Ayoub, Fouad; Nehme, Edgar; Jad, Sami; Salameh, Ziad

    2015-06-01

    Reimbursement of long-term permanent disability following a dental injury can lead to claims and legal involvement by the injured person. This will delay the treatment the patient's quality of life and the court system. A new formula has been hypothesized to address the problem. This might help the stakeholders including patients, insurance companies. The details of calculating the index and its significance are discussed. Implication studies are mandatory to refine the proposed hypothesis. PMID:26323454

  13. Understanding dental CAD/CAM for restorations - dental milling machines from a mechanical engineering viewpoint.

    PubMed

    Lebon, Nicolas; Tapie, Laurent; Duret, Francois; Attal, Jean-Pierre

    2016-01-01

    Nowadays, dental numerical controlled (NC) milling machines are available for dental laboratories (labside solution) and dental production centers. This article provides a mechanical engineering approach to NC milling machines to help dental technicians understand the involvement of technology in digital dentistry practice. The technical and economic criteria are described for four labside and two production center dental NC milling machines available on the market. The technical criteria are focused on the capacities of the embedded technologies of milling machines to mill prosthetic materials and various restoration shapes. The economic criteria are focused on investment cost and interoperability with third-party software. The clinical relevance of the technology is discussed through the accuracy and integrity of the restoration. It can be asserted that dental production center milling machines offer a wider range of materials and types of restoration shapes than labside solutions, while labside solutions offer a wider range than chairside solutions. The accuracy and integrity of restorations may be improved as a function of the embedded technologies provided. However, the more complex the technical solutions available, the more skilled the user must be. Investment cost and interoperability with third-party software increase according to the quality of the embedded technologies implemented. Each private dental practice may decide which fabrication option to use depending on the scope of the practice. PMID:27274561

  14. Various Effects of Sandblasting of Dental Restorative Materials

    PubMed Central

    Nishigawa, Goro; Maruo, Yukinori; Irie, Masao; Maeda, Naoto; Yoshihara, Kumiko; Nagaoka, Noriyuki; Matsumoto, Takuya; Minagi, Shogo

    2016-01-01

    Background Sandblasting particles which remain on the surfaces of dental restorations are removed prior to cementation. It is probable that adhesive strength between luting material and sandblasting particle remnants might exceed that with restorative material. If that being the case, blasting particles adhere to sandblasted material surface could be instrumental to increasing adhesive strength like underlying bonding mechanism between luting material and silanized particles of tribochemical silica coating-treated surface. We hypothesize that ultrasonic cleaning of bonding surfaces, which were pretreated with sandblasting, may affect adhesive strength of a resin luting material to dental restorative materials. Methods We therefore observed adhesive strength of resin luting material to aluminum oxide was greater than those to zirconia ceramic and cobalt-chromium alloy beforehand. To measure the shear bond strengths of resin luting material to zirconia ceramic and cobalt-chromium alloy, forty specimens of each restorative material were prepared. Bonding surfaces were polished with silicon abrasive paper and then treated with sandblasting. For each restorative material, 40 sandblasted specimens were equally divided into two groups: ultrasonic cleaning (USC) group and non-ultrasonic cleaning (NUSC) group. After resin luting material was polymerized on bonding surface, shear test was performed to evaluate effect of ultrasonic cleaning of bonding surfaces pretreated with sandblasting on bond strength. Results For both zirconia ceramic and cobalt-chromium alloy, NUSC group showed significantly higher shear bond strength than USC group. Conclusions Ultrasonic cleaning of dental restorations after sandblasting should be avoided to retain improved bonding between these materials. PMID:26764913

  15. Effect of Industry Sponsorship on Dental Restorative Trials.

    PubMed

    Schwendicke, F; Tu, Y-K; Blunck, U; Paris, S; Göstemeyer, G

    2016-01-01

    Industry sponsorship was found to potentially introduce bias into clinical trials. We assessed the effects of industry sponsorship on the design, comparator choice, and findings of randomized controlled trials on dental restorative materials. A systematic review was performed via MEDLINE, CENTRAL, and EMBASE. Randomized trials on dental restorative and adhesive materials published 2005 to 2015 were included. The design of sponsored and nonsponsored trials was compared statistically (risk of bias, treatment indication, setting, transferability, sample size). Comparator choice and network geometry of sponsored and nonsponsored trials were assessed via network analysis. Material performance rankings in different trial types were estimated via Bayesian network meta-analysis. Overall, 114 studies were included (15,321 restorations in 5,232 patients). We found 21 and 41 (18% and 36%) trials being clearly or possibly industry sponsored, respectively. Trial design of sponsored and nonsponsored trials did not significantly differ for most assessed items. Sponsored trials evaluated restorations of load-bearing cavities significantly more often than nonsponsored trials, had longer follow-up periods, and showed significantly increased risk of detection bias. Regardless of sponsorship status, comparisons were mainly performed within material classes. The proportion of trials comparing against gold standard restorative or adhesive materials did not differ between trial types. If ranked for performance according to the need to re-treat (best: least re-treatments), most material combinations were ranked similarly in sponsored and nonsponsored trials. The effect of industry sponsorship on dental restorative trials seems limited. PMID:26442947

  16. Confined compression of dental composites for Class I restorations

    PubMed Central

    Patki, Amol S.; Vural, Murat; Gosz, Mike

    2011-01-01

    This study focuses on the mechanical response of a particle-reinforced restorative dental composite (Renew™) under proportional transverse confinement to understand the effects of stress multiaxiality on its mechanical and failure behaviors. We describe the confining ring technique as an experimental tool to introduce multiaxial compressive stress states in dental composites that realistically mimic three-dimensional stress states commonly experienced by dental restorations in the oral cavity. Effect of initial radial misfit between confining ring and specimen is analyzed through computational finite element simulations, and an analytical treatment of problem is also provided to compute the confining stress during elasto-plastic expansion of confining ring. Experimental results suggest that inelastic response of Renew composite is significantly influenced by hydrostatic stress component, and pressure-dependent yield functions are required to analyze plastic deformations and internal damage accumulation process. PMID:21857744

  17. Backscattering from dental restorations and splint materials during therapeutic radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Farman, A.G.; Sharma, S.; George, D.I.; Wilson, D.; Dodd, D.; Figa, R.; Haskell, B.

    1985-08-01

    Models were constructed to simulate as closely as possible the human oral cavity. Radiation absorbed doses were determined for controls and various test situations involving the presence of dental restorative and splint materials during cobalt-60 irradiation of the models. Adjacent gold full crowns and adjacent solid dental silver amalgam cores both increased the dose to the interproximal gingivae by 20%. Use of orthodontic full bands for splinting the jaws increased the dose to the buccal tissues by an average of 10%. Augmentation of dose through backscatter radiation was determined to be only slight for intracoronal amalgam fillings and stainless steel or plastic bracket splints.

  18. Approaching biomimetics in dental restorations via photonics.

    PubMed

    Kishen, A; Asundi, A

    2002-01-01

    It is established that a natural system balances functional requirements with the anatomical optimizations it has achieved. Though such process of functional adaptation is recognized in bone tissue, any mode of functional adaptation in dental tissue is yet to be understood. In this study a three-dimensional digital photoelasticity is conducted to evaluate the nature of stress distribution in the sagittal aspect and the cross-sections of the dentine structure. Later, a fluoroscopic X-ray microscopic analysis and a microindentation experiments, are performed on different sections obtained from the sagittal and cross-sections of the dentine. These experiments aided in correlating the multi-plane pattern of mineralization and the spatial gradients in elastic modulus in the original dentine structure with the three-dimensional stress distribution in photoelastic models. This study highlights dentine structure as a biologically graded structure to functional loads. PMID:22388045

  19. Longevity of posterior dental restorations and reasons for failure.

    PubMed

    Kopperud, Simen E; Tveit, Anne Bjørg; Gaarden, Torunn; Sandvik, Leiv; Espelid, Ivar

    2012-12-01

    Tooth-coloured restorative materials are being used increasingly more often in Class II preparations in permanent teeth. Using a practice-based study design, we aimed to assess the survival time of Class II restorations and to identify factors relevant to their longevity. Class II restorations (n = 4,030), consisting of resin composites (81.5%), compomers (12.7%), amalgams (4.6%), and glass-ionomer cement restorations (1.2%), were placed in 1,873 patients with a median age of 15 yr. In total, 92.7% of restorations were placed due to primary caries and 5.8% were replacements. After an average follow-up period of 4.6 yr, 61.6% of the restorations were successful, 11.2% had failed, and 27.2% were not available for evaluation (owing to patient drop-out). The mean annual failure rate was 2.9% for resin-composite restorations and 1.6% for amalgams. For resin-composite restorations, secondary caries was the most common reason for replacement (73.9%), followed by loss (8.0%), fracture (5.3%), and marginal defects (2.4%). Multilevel Cox-regression analyses identified young age of the patient, high previous caries experience, deep cavities, and saucer-shaped preparation technique as predisposing to shorter longevity of resin-composite restorations. One brand of resin composite had a shorter survival time than the others. PMID:23167471

  20. Monitoring Wear On Dental Restoration Surfaces Using Microscope Photogrammetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitchell, Harvey L.; Chadwick, R. G.; McCabe, John F.

    1989-04-01

    35mm photography of denture teeth and resin replicas through a convergent-axes microscope was used in an assessment of wear in dental restoration materials. The difficulty was to isolate and evaluate the significant photogrammetric parameters, but thereafter, the required depths could be calculated to accuracies of 0.01 mm r.m.s. using stereocomparator observations and quite simple formulae. The technique is applicable to biomedical laboratories which have access to an appropriate microscope if photogrammetric observations can be undertaken.

  1. Biomechanical Stress Analysis of Mandibular First Permanent Molar; Restored with Amalgam and Composite Resin: A Computerized Finite Element Study

    PubMed Central

    Prabhakar, AR

    2010-01-01

    Normal mastication with its varying magnitude and direction generates considerable reactionary stresses in teeth and their supporting tissues. The structure of the human tooth and its supporting tissues is a complex assemblage of materials of varied mechanical properties. The finite element method (FEM), a modern technique of numerical stress analysis, has the great advantage of being applicable to solids of irregular geometry and heterogeneous material properties and therefore ideally suited to the examination of structural behavior of teeth. The mandibular first permanent molar is one of the earliest permanent teeth to erupt in the oral cavity and hence most prone to caries. The purpose of the present study was to construct a two-dimensional FE model of the mandibular first permanent molar and its supporting structures, using a FE software called NISA II-Display III, EMRC, USA to study the following: • To compare stress distributions patterns when a modeled Class I Cavity was restored with dental amalgam and composite resin. • To compare the stress distributions pattern when the load was applied to different to locations, i.e.: At the mesial cusp tip, and at the center of the occlusal surface. Both amalgam and composite resin showed similar stress distribution pattern, however, the magnitudes of stresses generated in the tooth restored with composite resin were higher. Thus, amalgam is a better restorative material in distributing stresses.

  2. Restorative material and other tooth-specific variables associated with the decision to repair or replace defective restorations: findings from The Dental PBRN

    PubMed Central

    Gordan, Valeria V.; Riley, Joseph L.; Worley, Donald C.; Gilbert, Gregg H.

    2012-01-01

    Objectives Using data from dentists participating in The Dental Practice-Based Research Network (DPBRN), the study had 2 main objectives: (1) to identify and quantify the types of restorative materials in the existing failed restorations; and (2) to identify and quantify the materials used to repair or replace those failed restorations. Methods This cross-sectional study used a consecutive patient/restoration recruitment design. Practitioner-investigators recorded data on consecutive restorations in permanent teeth that needed repair or replacement. Data included the primary reason for repair or replacement, tooth surface(s) involved, restorative materials used, and patient demographics. Results Data for 9,875 restorations were collected from 7,502 patients in 197 practices for which 75% of restorations were replaced and 25% repaired. Most of the restorations that were either repaired or replaced were amalgam (56%) for which most (56%) of the material used was direct tooth-colored. The restorative material was 5 times more likely to be changed when the original restoration was amalgam (OR=5.2, p<.001). The likelihood of changing an amalgam restoration differed as a function of the tooth type (OR=3.0, p<.001), arch (OR=6.6, p<.001); and number of surfaces in the original restoration (OR=12.2, p<.001). Conclusion The probability of changing from amalgam to another restorative material differed with several characteristics of the original restoration. The change was most likely to take place when (1) the treatment was a replacement; (2) the tooth was not a molar; (3) the tooth was in the maxillary arch; and (4) the original restoration involved a single surface. PMID:22342563

  3. The decision to repair or replace a defective restoration is affected by who placed the original restoration: findings from the National Dental PBRN

    PubMed Central

    Gordan, Valeria V; Riley, Joseph; Geraldeli, Saulo; Williams, O. Dale; Spoto, Joseph C; Gilbert, Gregg H

    2014-01-01

    Objectives To evaluate how restoration characteristics are associated with the decision to repair or replace an existing restoration. The following hypotheses were studied: Dentists who placed the original restoration are more likely to repair instead of replace restorations (H1) that are in molar teeth; (H2) that are in the upper arch; (H3) that have amalgam restorative material; (H4) if a fracture is not the primary reason for the defect; and (H5) when the restoration comprises more than one surface. Methods This cross-sectional study used a consecutive patient/restoration recruitment design. 194 dentists members of a dental practice-based research network recorded data on restorations in permanent teeth that needed repair or replacement. Results For 6,623 of the 8,770 defective restorations in 6,643 patients, the treatment was provided by the dentist who had not placed the original restoration (75%). The 2-way interaction revealed that dentists who had placed the original restoration often chose to repair when the defective restoration was in a molar, relative to premolar or anterior teeth (OR = 2.2, p < .001); and chose to replace when the restoration had amalgam (OR = 0.5, p < .001), and when it was a fracture compared to another reason (OR = 0.8, p = 001). Conclusion Most dentists are not conservative when they revisit a restoration that they originally placed regardless of type of failure, number of surfaces or material used. However, dentists who had placed the original restoration were significantly more likely to repair it when the defective restoration was in a molar tooth. PMID:25223822

  4. Recent Advances and Developments in Composite Dental Restorative Materials

    PubMed Central

    Cramer, N.B.; Stansbury, J.W.; Bowman, C.N.

    2011-01-01

    Composite dental restorations represent a unique class of biomaterials with severe restrictions on biocompatibility, curing behavior, esthetics, and ultimate material properties. These materials are presently limited by shrinkage and polymerization-induced shrinkage stress, limited toughness, the presence of unreacted monomer that remains following the polymerization, and several other factors. Fortunately, these materials have been the focus of a great deal of research in recent years with the goal of improving restoration performance by changing the initiation system, monomers, and fillers and their coupling agents, and by developing novel polymerization strategies. Here, we review the general characteristics of the polymerization reaction and recent approaches that have been taken to improve composite restorative performance. PMID:20924063

  5. A Review of Developments in Computer-Based Systems to Image Teeth and Produce Dental Restorations

    PubMed Central

    Rekow, E. Dianne; Erdman, Arthur G.; Speidel, T. Michael

    1987-01-01

    Computer-aided design and manufacturing (CAD/CAM) make it possible to automate the creation of dental restorations. Currently practiced techniques are described. Three automated systems currently under development are described and compared. Advances in computer-aided design and computer-aided manufacturing (CAD/CAM) provide a new option for dentistry, creating an alternative technique for producing dental restorations. It is possible to create dental restorations that are automatically produced and meet or exceed current requirements for fit and occlusion.

  6. Comparative study of mechanical properties of dental restorative materials and dental hard tissues in compressive loads.

    PubMed

    Chun, Keyoung Jin; Lee, Jong Yeop

    2014-01-01

    There are two objectives. One is to show the differences in the mechanical properties of various dental restorative materials compared to those of enamel and dentin. The other is to ascertain which dental restorative materials are more suitable for clinical treatments. Amalgam, dental ceramic, gold alloy, dental resin, zirconia, and titanium alloy were processed as dental restorative material specimens. The specimens (width, height, and length of 1.2, 1.2, and 3.0 mm, respectively) were compressed at a constant loading speed of 0.1 mm/min. The maximum stress (115.0 ± 40.6, 55.0 ± 24.8, 291.2 ± 45.3, 274.6 ± 52.2, 2206.0 ± 522.9, and 953.4 ± 132.1 MPa), maximum strain (7.8% ± 0.5%, 4.0% ± 0.1%, 12.7% ± 0.8%, 32.8% ± 0.5%, 63.5% ± 14.0%, and 45.3% ± 7.4%), and elastic modulus (1437.5 ± 507.2, 1548.4 ± 583.5, 2323.4 ± 322.4, 833.1 ± 92.4, 3895.2 ± 202.9, and 2222.7 ± 277.6 MPa) were evident for amalgam, dental ceramic, gold alloy, dental resin, zirconia, and titanium alloy, respectively. The reference hardness value of amalgam, dental ceramic, gold alloy, dental resin, zirconia, and titanium alloy was 90, 420, 130-135, 86.6-124.2, 1250, and 349, respectively. Since enamel grinds food, its abrasion resistance is important. Therefore, hardness value should be prioritized for enamel. Since dentin absorbs bite forces, mechanical properties should be prioritized for dentin. The results suggest that gold alloy simultaneously has a hardness value lower than enamel (74.8 ± 18.1), which is important in the wear of the opposing natural teeth, and higher maximum stress, maximum strain, and elastic modulus than dentin (193.7 ± 30.6 MPa, 11.9% ± 0.1%, 1653.7 ± 277.9 MPa, respectively), which are important considering the rigidity to absorb bite forces. PMID:25352921

  7. Comparative study of mechanical properties of dental restorative materials and dental hard tissues in compressive loads

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jong Yeop

    2014-01-01

    There are two objectives. One is to show the differences in the mechanical properties of various dental restorative materials compared to those of enamel and dentin. The other is to ascertain which dental restorative materials are more suitable for clinical treatments. Amalgam, dental ceramic, gold alloy, dental resin, zirconia, and titanium alloy were processed as dental restorative material specimens. The specimens (width, height, and length of 1.2, 1.2, and 3.0 mm, respectively) were compressed at a constant loading speed of 0.1 mm/min. The maximum stress (115.0 ± 40.6, 55.0 ± 24.8, 291.2 ± 45.3, 274.6 ± 52.2, 2206.0 ± 522.9, and 953.4 ± 132.1 MPa), maximum strain (7.8% ± 0.5%, 4.0% ± 0.1%, 12.7% ± 0.8%, 32.8% ± 0.5%, 63.5% ± 14.0%, and 45.3% ± 7.4%), and elastic modulus (1437.5 ± 507.2, 1548.4 ± 583.5, 2323.4 ± 322.4, 833.1 ± 92.4, 3895.2 ± 202.9, and 2222.7 ± 277.6 MPa) were evident for amalgam, dental ceramic, gold alloy, dental resin, zirconia, and titanium alloy, respectively. The reference hardness value of amalgam, dental ceramic, gold alloy, dental resin, zirconia, and titanium alloy was 90, 420, 130–135, 86.6–124.2, 1250, and 349, respectively. Since enamel grinds food, its abrasion resistance is important. Therefore, hardness value should be prioritized for enamel. Since dentin absorbs bite forces, mechanical properties should be prioritized for dentin. The results suggest that gold alloy simultaneously has a hardness value lower than enamel (74.8 ± 18.1), which is important in the wear of the opposing natural teeth, and higher maximum stress, maximum strain, and elastic modulus than dentin (193.7 ± 30.6 MPa, 11.9% ± 0.1%, 1653.7 ± 277.9 MPa, respectively), which are important considering the rigidity to absorb bite forces. PMID:25352921

  8. Mechanical benefits of conservative restoration for dental fissure caries.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhongpu; Zheng, Keke; Li, Eric; Li, Wei; Li, Qing; Swain, Michael V

    2016-01-01

    The principle of minimal intervention dentistry (MID) is to limit removal of carious tooth tissue while maximizing its repair and survival potential. The objective of this study is to explore the fracture resistance of a permanent molar tooth with a fissure carious lesion along with three clinical restoration procedures, namely one traditional and two conservative approaches, based upon MID. The traditional restoration employs extensive surgical removal of enamel and dentine about the cavity to eliminate potential risk of further caries development, while conservative method #1 removes significantly less enamel and infected dentine, and conservative method #2 only restores the overhanging enamel above the cavity and leaves the infected and affected dentine as it was. An extended finite element method (XFEM) is adopted here to analyze the fracture behaviors of both two-dimensional (2D) and three-dimensional (3D) modeling of these four different scenarios. It was found that the two conservative methods exhibited better fracture resistance than the traditional restorative method. Although conservative method #2 has less fracture resistance than method #1, it had significantly superior fracture resistance compared to other restorations. More important, after cavity sealing it may potentially enhance the opportunity for remineralization and improved loading bearing capacity and fracture resistance. PMID:26298801

  9. Scattering and Absorption Properties of Biomaterials for Dental Restorative Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernandez-Oliveras, A.; Rubiño, M.; Pérez, M. M.

    2013-08-01

    The physical understanding of the optical properties of dental biomaterials is mandatory for their final success in restorative applications.Light propagation in biological media is characterized by the absorption coefficient, the scattering coefficient, the scattering phase function,the refractive index, and the surface conditions (roughness). We have employed the inverse adding-doubling (IAD) method to combine transmittance and reflectance measurements performed using an integrating-sphere setup with the results of the previous scattering-anisotropygoniometric measurements. This has led to the determination of the absorption and the scattering coefficients. The aim was to optically characterize two different dental-resin composites (nanocomposite and hybrid) and one type of zirconia ceramic, and comparatively study them. The experimental procedure was conducted under repeatability conditions of measurement in order to determine the uncertainty associated to the optical properties of the biomaterials. Spectral variations of the refraction index and the scattering anisotropy factor were also considered. The whole experimental procedure fulfilled all the necessary requirements to provide optical-property values with lower associated uncertainties. The effective transport coefficient presented a similar spectral behavior for the two composites but completely different for the zirconia ceramic. The results demonstrated that the scattering anisotropy exerted a clearly distinct impact on the optical properties of the zirconia ceramic compared with those of the dental-resin composites.

  10. Dental Therapy Assistant: Quality of Restorations Placed and Finished.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heid, Theodore H.; Bair, Jeffrey H.

    The U.S. Army Dental Corps has implemented a new concept of dental care delivery, formally identified as the Improved Dental Care Delivery System. The concept is based on the conservation of professional manpower resources through the use of dental treatment teams employing expanded duty dental assistants. Dental Therapy Assistant (DTA) is the…

  11. Evaluation of Craniofacial Morphology of Children with Dental Fluorosis in Early Permanent Dentition Period

    PubMed Central

    Dogan, Alev Aksoy; Bolpaca, Pinar

    2009-01-01

    Objectives High intake of fluoride (>1.5 mg/L) for a prolonged period may lead to skeletal fluorosis as well as dental fluorosis. The aim of this study was to compare the craniofacial characteristics of children with dental fluorosis in early permanent dentition period to those without fluorosis. Methods Two hundred and sixteen children in early permanent dentition (girls:121, boys:95) were included in the study. Study group was composed of 124 children with dental fluorosis who was born and grew up in Isparta (girls:75, boys:49) whereas control group of children (n=92: 46 girls and 46 boys) had no dental fluorosis. Dental fluorosis was classified using Thylstrup Fejerskov Fluorosis Index. Radiological evaluation was performed by cephalometric tracing using Björk analysis. Statistical evaluation in between study and control groups was done by Independent Samples T test and comparison with Björk’s standards was done by One Sample T test analysis. The association between two quantitative variables was evaluated with Pearson’s correlation coefficient (rho). Results The mean dental fluorosis level was 4.6±1.8 for children with fluorosis. Systemic fluorosis affect girls no different than boys in the early permanent dentition period because none of the angular measurements show significant difference between boys and girls in the fluoridated group. Comparison of craniofacial angular values of boys with fluorosis show greater diversity compared to boys without fluorosis against Björk’s mean values for boys. Conclusions Craniofacial morphology of children with fluorosis did not show great diversity than the ones without fluorosis in the early permanent dentition period. None of the angular measurements were significantly different between boys and girls in the fluoridated group which might imply that systemic fluorosis did not show gender difference in the early permanent dentition. (Eur J Dent 2009;3:304–313) PMID:19826603

  12. Antibacterial dental restorative materials: a state-of-the-art review.

    PubMed

    Chen, Liang; Shen, Hong; Suh, Byoung In

    2012-12-01

    This review presents an updated knowledge on the antibacterial dental restorative materials and their performance clinically and in the laboratory. A search of English peer-reviewed dental literature over the last 30 years from PubMed and MEDLINE databases was conducted, and the key words included antibacterial, antimicrobial, dental, primer, adhesive, bonding agent, cement, and composite. Titles and abstracts of the articles listed from search results were reviewed and evaluated for relevancy. In summary, the incorporation of an appropriate amount of antibacterial agent provided dental restorative materials (dental bonding agents, resin composites, resin cements, glass-ionomer cements) antibacterial activity without significantly influencing mechanical properties. PMID:23409624

  13. Laser equipment for investigation of light distribution in dental tissues and restorative materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grisimov, Vladimir N.; Smirmov, Alexander V.; Stafeev, Sergey C.

    1997-04-01

    The description of experimental set-up for investigation of light scattering in dental tissue and dental restorative material is presented. The set-up includes the light source (He-Ne laser), beam shaping light polarization control unit and registration device. The latter represents the computer interfaced CCD-camera. The experimental results of side light scattering in enamel/dentin and in double-layer porcelain are represented. The results of this research may be useful for aesthetic dental restorations.

  14. Hardness and modulus of elasticity of primary and permanent teeth after wear against different dental materials

    PubMed Central

    Galo, Rodrigo; Contente, Marta Maria Martins Giamatei; Galafassi, Daniel; Borsatto, Maria Cristina

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: The purpose of this study was to determine the Young's modulus and the hardness of deciduous and permanent teeth following wear challenges using different dental materials. Materials and Methods: Wear challenges were performed against four dental materials: A resin-based fissure sealant (Fluoroshield®), a glass ionomer based fissure sealant (Vitremer®), and two microhybrid composite resins (Filtek Z250 and P90®). Using the pin-on-plate design, a deciduous or a permanent tooth was made into a pin (4 mm × 4 mm × 2 mm) working at a 3 N vertical load, 1 Hz frequency, and 900 cycles (15 min) with Fusayama artificial saliva as a lubricant. Before and after the tribological tests, the hardness and elasticity modulus of the tooth samples were measured by creating a nanoindentation at load forces up to 50 mN and 150 mN. All of the results were statistically analyzed using ANOVA and post-hoc Duncan's tests (P < 0.05). Results: No difference in hardness was encountered between deciduous and permanent teeth (P < 0.05) or modulus of elasticity (P < 0.05) before or after the wear challenges for all of the dental materials tested. Conclusions: Wear challenges against the studied dental materials did not alter the properties of permanent or deciduous teeth after the application of a 3 N load. PMID:26929700

  15. Recommendations for conducting controlled clinical studies of dental restorative materials.

    PubMed

    Hickel, R; Roulet, J-F; Bayne, S; Heintze, S D; Mjör, I A; Peters, M; Rousson, V; Randall, R; Schmalz, G; Tyas, M; Vanherle, G

    2007-03-01

    designs, guidelines for design, randomization, number of subjects, characteristics of participants, clinical assessment, standards and calibration, categories for assessment, criteria for evaluation, and supplemental documentation. Part 2 of the review considers categories of assessment for esthetic evaluation, functional assessment, biological responses to restorative materials, and statistical analysis of results. The overall review represents a considerable effort to include a range of clinical research interests over the past years. As part of the recognition of the importance of these suggestions, the review is being published simultaneously in identical form in both the "Journal of Adhesive Dentistry" and the "Clinical Oral Investigations." Additionally an extended abstract will be published in the "International Dental Journal" giving a link to the web full version. This should help to introduce these considerations more quickly to the scientific community. PMID:17262225

  16. A novel antibacterial resin composite for improved dental restoratives.

    PubMed

    Weng, Yiming; Howard, Leah; Guo, Xia; Chong, Voon Joe; Gregory, Richard L; Xie, Dong

    2012-06-01

    A novel furanone-containing antibacterial resin composite has been prepared and evaluated. compressive strength (CS) and Streptococcus mutans viability were used to evaluate the mechanical strength and antibacterial activity of the composites. The modified resin composites showed a significant antibacterial activity without substantially decreasing the mechanical strengths. With 5-30 % addition of the furanone derivative, the composite kept its original CS unchanged but showed a significant antibacterial activity with a 16-68 % reduction in the S. mutans viability. Further, the antibacterial function of the new composite was not affected by human saliva. The aging study indicates that the composite may have a long-lasting antibacterial function. Within the limitations of this study, it appears that the experimental antibacterial resin composite may potentially be developed into a clinically attractive dental restorative due to its high mechanical strength and antibacterial function. PMID:22466818

  17. Mechanical performance of novel bioactive glass containing dental restorative composites

    PubMed Central

    Khvostenko, D.; Mitchell, J. C.; Hilton, T. J.; Ferracane, J. L.; Kruzic, J. J.

    2013-01-01

    Objectives Bioactive glass (BAG) is known to possess antimicrobial properties and release ions needed for remineralization of tooth tissue, and therefore may be a strategic additive for dental restorative materials. The objective of this study was to develop BAG containing dental restorative composites with adequate mechanical properties comparable to successful commercially available composites, and to confirm the stability of these materials when exposed to a biologically challenging environment. Methods Composites with 72 wt.% total filler content were prepared while substituting 0–15% of the filler with ground BAG. Flexural strength, fracture toughness, and fatigue crack growth tests were performed after several different soaking treatments: 24 hours in DI water (all experiments), two months in brain-heart infusion (BHI) media+S. mutans bacteria (all experiments) and two months in BHI media (only for flexural strength). Mechanical properties of new BAG composites were compared along with the commercial composite Heliomolar by two-way ANOVA and Tukey’s multiple comparison test (p≤0.05). Results Flexural strength, fracture toughness, and fatigue crack growth resistance for the BAG containing composites were unaffected by increasing BAG content up to 15% and were superior to Heliomolar after all post cure treatments. The flexural strength of the BAG composites was unaffected by two months exposure to aqueous media and a bacterial challenge, while some decreases in fracture toughness and fatigue resistance were observed. The favorable mechanical properties compared to Heliomolar were attributed to higher filler content and a microstructure morphology that better promoted the toughening mechanisms of crack deflection and bridging. Significance Overall, the BAG containing composites developed in this study demonstrated adequate and stable mechanical properties relative to successful commercial composites. PMID:24050766

  18. Relations between anterior permanent teeth, dental arches and hard palate.

    PubMed

    Petricević, Nikola; Stipetić, Jasmina; Antonić, Robert; Borcić, Josipa; Strujić, Mihovil; Kovacić, Ivan; Celebić, Asja

    2008-12-01

    The width and length of the anterior teeth, the dimensions of the frontal dental arches and the dimensions of the hard palate were measured (24 men and 56 women, age range of 18-30 years). The results showed gender-related dimorphism only for the cervical width of the maxillary canine, which were wider in men, p < 0.05. The width-to-length ratios of the maxillary frontal teeth varied from 0.82 to 0.91. The tooth-to-tooth width ratios among different maxillary frontal teeth varied from 0.78 to 0.91. The sum of all anterior maxillary teeth widths was equal to the hamular width and to the distal maxillary arch width (p > 0.05), meaning that the sum of the frontal artificial teeth width may be selected upon the measurement of the hamular width on the hard palate. The ratios between the maxillary and the mandibular frontal dental arch dimensions are representative values for the skeletal class I. PMID:19149214

  19. [Atraumatic restorative treatment in relation to pain, discomfort and dental treatment anxiety].

    PubMed

    Frencken, J E F M; Flohil, K A; de Baat, C

    2014-01-01

    Dental treatment anxiety usually develops during childhood due to a bad experience and the dental drill as well as the injection needle are the most common causes. The Atraumatic Restorative Treatment provides the opportunity to provoke little or no dental treatment anxiety because only hand instruments are used and local anaesthesia is seldom required. Several scientific studies have indicated that the Atraumatic Restorative Treatment causes less pain, discomfort and anxiety by comparison with conventional treatments. Therefore, the Atraumatic Restorative Treatment is considered to be promising for the treatment of carious lesions in anxious children and adults, and potentially also for patients suffering from dental treatment phobia. Furthermore, the Atraumatic Restorative Treatment may be indicated as the primary treatment method in children to prevent dental treatment anxiety and treatment under general anaesthesia. These conclusions must still be confirmed with responsible scientific research. PMID:25174188

  20. Understanding dental CAD/CAM for restorations - dental milling machines from a mechanical engineering viewpoint. Part A: chairside milling machines.

    PubMed

    Lebon, Nicolas; Tapie, Laurent; Duret, Francois; Attal, Jean-Pierre

    2016-01-01

    The dental milling machine is an important device in the dental CAD/CAM chain. Nowadays, dental numerical controlled (NC) milling machines are available for dental surgeries (chairside solution). This article provides a mechanical engineering approach to NC milling machines to help dentists understand the involvement of technology in digital dentistry practice. First, some technical concepts and definitions associated with NC milling machines are described from a mechanical engineering viewpoint. The technical and economic criteria of four chairside dental NC milling machines that are available on the market are then described. The technical criteria are focused on the capacities of the embedded technologies of these milling machines to mill both prosthetic materials and types of shape restorations. The economic criteria are focused on investment costs and interoperability with third-party software. The clinical relevance of the technology is assessed in terms of the accuracy and integrity of the restoration. PMID:27027102

  1. Cluster Effects in a National Dental PBRN restorative study.

    PubMed

    Litaker, M S; Gordan, V V; Rindal, D B; Fellows, J L; Gilbert, G H

    2013-09-01

    Items in clusters, such as patients of the same clinician or teeth within the same patient, tend to be more similar than items from different groups. This within-group similarity, represented by the intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC), reduces precision, yielding less statistical power and wider confidence intervals, compared with non-clustered samples of the same size. This must be considered in the design of studies including clusters. We present ICC estimates from a study of 7,826 restorations placed in previously unrestored tooth surfaces of 4,672 patients by 222 clinicians in the National Dental Practice-Based Research Network, as a resource for sample size planning in restorative studies. Our findings suggest that magnitudes of ICCs in practice-based research can be substantial. These can have large effects on precision and the power to detect treatment effects. Generally, we found relatively large ICCs for characteristics that are influenced by clinician choice (e.g., 0.36 for rubber dam use). ICCs for outcomes within individual patients, such as tooth surfaces affected by a caries lesion, tended to be smaller (from 0.03 to 0.15), but were still sufficiently large to substantially affect statistical power. Clustering should be taken into account in the design of oral health studies and derivation of statistical power estimates for these studies (ClinicalTrials.gov, NCT00847470). PMID:23857643

  2. Cluster Effects in a National Dental PBRN Restorative Study

    PubMed Central

    Litaker, M.S.; Gordan, V.V.; Rindal, D.B.; Fellows, J.L.; Gilbert, G.H.

    2013-01-01

    Items in clusters, such as patients of the same clinician or teeth within the same patient, tend to be more similar than items from different groups. This within-group similarity, represented by the intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC), reduces precision, yielding less statistical power and wider confidence intervals, compared with non-clustered samples of the same size. This must be considered in the design of studies including clusters. We present ICC estimates from a study of 7,826 restorations placed in previously unrestored tooth surfaces of 4,672 patients by 222 clinicians in the National Dental Practice-Based Research Network, as a resource for sample size planning in restorative studies. Our findings suggest that magnitudes of ICCs in practice-based research can be substantial. These can have large effects on precision and the power to detect treatment effects. Generally, we found relatively large ICCs for characteristics that are influenced by clinician choice (e.g., 0.36 for rubber dam use). ICCs for outcomes within individual patients, such as tooth surfaces affected by a caries lesion, tended to be smaller (from 0.03 to 0.15), but were still sufficiently large to substantially affect statistical power. Clustering should be taken into account in the design of oral health studies and derivation of statistical power estimates for these studies (ClinicalTrials.gov, NCT00847470). PMID:23857643

  3. A useful and non-invasive microanalysis method for dental restoration materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hosoki, M.; Satsuma, T.; Nishigawa, K.; Takeuchi, H.; Asaoka, K.

    2012-12-01

    The elemental analysis of intraoral dental restorations provides considerable information for the treatment of dental metal allergy. Elemental analyses require specific instruments and complicated procedures, so this examination is not commonly carried out in private dental clinics. We describe a novel, simple and useful micro-analytical method for dental metal restorations. Micro metal dust was obtained by polishing the surface of restorative metal material with an unused silicone point (SUPER-SNAP). The metal dust on the silicone point was then rubbed onto adhesive tape, and this tape was covered with polyethylene film. The amount of metal dust material was <20 μg. An energy dispersive X-ray fluorescence spectrometer was used to carry out the elementary analysis of the metal dust on the polyethylene film. Three types of dental metal alloy materials of known components were examined. The results of elementary analyses were compared with the specifications provided by the manufacturer. The same procedure was carried out for three dental metal restorations of an adult female volunteer in vivo. The results of elemental analyses for five alloy materials exactly matched the product specification. Three metal samples obtained from intraoral restoration were also available for elemental analyses. The distinct advantage of this method is that it enables sample extraction without an invasive effect for the restoration. The metal sample is in a polyethylene film, so it is easy to mail it for inspection at specialist institutes yet it can be also be used in general dental clinics.

  4. Teaching atraumatic restorative treatment in U.S. dental schools: a survey of predoctoral pediatric dentistry program directors.

    PubMed

    Kateeb, Elham T; Warren, John J; Damiano, Peter; Momany, Elizabeth; Kanellis, Michael; Weber-Gasparoni, Karin; Ansley, Tim

    2013-10-01

    The International Dental Federation and World Health Organization have promoted the use of Atraumatic Restorative Treatment (ART) in modern clinical settings worldwide. In the United States, the practice of ART is not believed to be widely used, which may be a result of little attention given to ART training in predoctoral pediatric dentistry curricula in U.S. dental schools. This study investigated the extent of clinical and didactic instruction on ART provided in U.S. dental schools by surveying the predoctoral pediatric dentistry programs in 2010. Of the fifty-seven directors asked to complete the survey, forty-four responded for a response rate of 77 percent. Of these forty-four programs, 66 percent reported providing clinical training on ART, though only 14 percent provide this training often or very often. The types of ART training provided often or very often included interim treatment (18 percent) and single-surface cavities (14 percent) in primary teeth. However, ART was said to be rarely taught as a definitive treatment in permanent teeth (2 percent). Attitude was a major predictor, for clinical training provided and using professional guidelines in treatment decisions were associated with a positive attitude towards ART. These predoctoral pediatric dentistry programs used ART mainly in primary, anterior, and single-surface cavities and as interim treatment. As ART increases access of children to dental care, the incorporation of the ART approach into the curricula of U.S. dental schools should be facilitated by professional organizations. PMID:24098034

  5. Multi-material laser densification (MMLD) of dental restorations: Process optimization and properties evaluation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xiaoxuan

    This Ph.D. thesis proposes to investigate the feasibility of laser-assisted dental restoration and to develop a fundamental understanding of the interaction between laser beam and dental materials. Traditional dental restorations are produced by the porcelain-fused-to-metal (PFM) process, in which a dental restoration is cast from a metallic alloy and then coated with dental porcelains by multiple furnace-firing processes. PFM method is labor-intensive and hence very expensive. In order to fabricate dental restoration units faster and more cost-effectively, the Solid Freeform Fabrication (SFF) technique has been employed in this study. In particular, a Multi-Material Laser Densification (MMLD) process has been investigated for its potential to fabricate artificial teeth automatically from 3-D computer dental tooth files. Based on the principle of SFF, the MMLD process utilizes a micro-extruder system to deliver commercial dental alloy and porcelain slurry in a computer-controlled pattern line by line and layer by layer. Instead of firing the artificial tooth/teeth in a furnace, the extruded dental materials are laser scanned to convert the loose powder to a fully dense body. Different laser densification parameters including the densification temperature, laser output power, laser beam size, line dimension, ratio of the beam size to line width, beam scanning rate, processing atmosphere and pressure, dental powder state (powder bed or slurry), powder particle size, etc. have been used to evaluate their effects on the microstructures and properties of the laser densified dental body, and hence to optimize MMLD conditions. Furthermore, laser-scanning induced phase transformations in dental porcelains have been studied because the transformations have great impact on coefficient of thermal expansion (CTE) of dental porcelains, which should match that of dental alloy substrate. Since a single dental material line delivered by the MMLD system functions as a "construction

  6. Dental Composite Restorations and Neuropsychological Development in Children: Treatment Level Analysis from a Randomized Clinical Trial

    PubMed Central

    Maserejian, Nancy N.; Trachtenberg, Felicia L.; Hauser, Russ; McKinlay, Sonja; Shrader, Peter; Bellinger, David C.

    2012-01-01

    Background Resin-based dental restorations may intra-orally release their components and bisphenol A. Gestational bisphenol A exposure has been associated with poorer executive functioning in children. Objectives To examine whether exposure to resin-based composite restorations is associated with neuropsychological development in children. Methods Secondary analysis of treatment level data from the New England Children’s Amalgam Trial, a 2-group randomized safety trial conducted from 1997–2006. Children (N=534) aged 6–10 y with >2 posterior tooth caries were randomized to treatment with amalgam or resin-based composites (bisphenol-A-diglycidyl-dimethacrylate-composite for permanent teeth; urethane dimethacrylate-based polyacid-modified compomer for primary teeth). Neuropsychological function at 4- and 5-year follow-up (N=444) was measured by a battery of tests of executive function, intelligence, memory, visual-spatial skills, verbal fluency, and problem-solving. Multivariable generalized linear regression models were used to examine the association between composite exposure levels and changes in neuropsychological test scores from baseline to follow-up. For comparison, data on children randomized to amalgam treatment were similarly analyzed. Results With greater exposure to either dental composite material, results were generally consistent in the direction of slightly poorer changes in tests of intelligence, achievement or memory, but there were no statistically significant associations. For the four primary measures of executive function, scores were slightly worse with greater total composite exposure, but statistically significant only for the test of Letter Fluency (10-surface-years β= −0.8, SE=0.4, P=0.035), and the subtest of color naming (β= −1.5, SE=0.5, P=0.004) in the Stroop Color-Word Interference Test. Multivariate analysis of variance confirmed that the negative associations between composite level and executive function were not

  7. Influence of gag reflex on dental attendance, dental anxiety, self-reported temporomandibular disorders and prosthetic restorations.

    PubMed

    Akarslan, Z Z; Yıldırım Biçer, A Z

    2013-12-01

    To assess the influence of gag reflex severity, assessed according to the short form of the patient part of Gagging Problem Assessment Questionnaire (GPA-pa SF), on the dental attendance, dental anxiety, self-reported temporomandibular disorder (TMD) symptoms and presence of prosthetic restorations among patients requiring prosthodontic treatment in Turkey. A total of 505 patients (305 women; mean age: 46·35 years, SD: 28·2 years) undergoing dental examination were administered a questionnaire containing questions regarding their age, gender, education level, dental attendance, TMD symptoms (limitation in jaw opening, muscle pain, pain/sounds in the temporomandibular jaw), the Turkish version of the Modified Dental Anxiety Scale (MDAS) and the GPA-pa SF. Subsequently, any prosthetic restoration was recorded by a dentist. Descriptive statistics, one-way analysis of variance (anova) and the chi-square test were used for statistical analysis. Differences were found between GPA-pa SF scores 0, 1 and 2 for education level (P = 0·001), MDAS scores (P = 0·003), self-reported TMD (P = 0·000) and prosthesis wear (P = 0·000), but not for attendance patterns (P = 0·826). Patients with gag reflex had lower education levels, higher levels of dental anxiety, more self-reported TMD symptoms and fewer fixed or removable prosthetic restorations than patients without gag reflex. Gag reflex has impacts on dental anxiety, self-reported TMD and prosthetic restorations, but not on dental attendance patterns, according to the results of the GPA-pa SF. PMID:24118087

  8. Machinable glass-ceramics forming as a restorative dental material.

    PubMed

    Chaysuwan, Duangrudee; Sirinukunwattana, Krongkarn; Kanchanatawewat, Kanchana; Heness, Greg; Yamashita, Kimihiro

    2011-01-01

    MgO, SiO(2), Al(2)O(3), MgF(2), CaF(2), CaCO(3), SrCO(3), and P(2)O(5) were used to prepare glass-ceramics for restorative dental materials. Thermal properties, phases, microstructures and hardness were characterized by DTA, XRD, SEM and Vickers microhardness. Three-point bending strength and fracture toughness were applied by UTM according to ISO 6872: 1997(E). XRD showed that the glass crystallized at 892°C (second crystallization temperature+20°C) for 3 hrs consisted mainly of calcium-mica and fluorapatite crystalline phases. Average hardness (3.70 GPa) closely matched human enamel (3.20 GPa). The higher fracture toughness (2.04 MPa√m) combined with the hardness to give a lower brittleness index (1.81 µm(-1/2)) which indicates that they have exceptional machinability. Bending strength results (176.61 MPa) were analyzed by Weibull analysis to determine modulus value (m=17.80). Machinability of the calcium mica-fluorapatite glass-ceramic was demonstrated by fabricating with CAD/CAM. PMID:21597218

  9. In situ reaction kinetic analysis of dental restorative materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Younas, Basma; Samad Khan, Abdul; Muzaffar, Danish; Hussain, Ijaz; Chaudhry, Aqif Anwar; Rehman, Ihtesham Ur

    2013-12-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate in situ structural and thermal changes of dental restorative materials at periodical time intervals. The commercial materials included zinc oxide eugenol (ZOE), zinc phosphate type I (ZnPO4), glass ionomer cement type II (GIC) and resin-based nano-omposite (Filtek Z350 XT). These materials were processed according to manufacturer's instructions. For the structural analysis Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) was used at high resolution. TGA was used to evaluate thermal weight-loss. The FTIR spectra were collected at periodic time intervals. FTIR spectra showed that with time passing all materials exhibited an increase in peak intensities and a new appearance of shoulders and shifting of peaks for example, ZnPO4 (P-O), ZOE (C═O, C═N, C-O-C), GIC (COO-, C-H, Si-OH), composites (C═O, C═C, C═N, C-N-H). The peaks were replaced by bands and these bands became broader with time interval. Composites showed a degree of conversion and new peaks corresponded to the cross-linking of polymer composites. TGA analysis showed that significant changes in weight loss of set materials were observed after 24 h, where ZOE showed continuous changes in thermal degradation. The spectral changes and thermal degradation with time interval elucidated in situ setting behaviour and understanding of their bonding compatibility with tooth structure and change in relation to time.

  10. Characteristics Identified for Success by Restorative Dental Science Department Chairpersons.

    PubMed

    Wee, Alvin G; Weiss, Robert O; Wichman, Christopher S; Sukotjo, Cortino; Brundo, Gerald C

    2016-03-01

    The primary aim of this study was to determine the characteristics that current chairpersons in restorative dentistry, general dentistry, prosthodontics, and operative dentistry departments in U.S. dental schools feel are most relevant in contributing to their success. The secondary aim was to determine these individuals' rankings of the importance of a listed set of characteristics for them to be successful in their position. All 82 current chairs of the specified departments were invited to respond to an electronic survey. The survey first asked respondents to list the five most essential characteristics to serve as chair of a department and to rank those characteristics based on importance. Participants were next given a list of ten characteristics in the categories of management and leadership and, without being aware of the category of each individual item, asked to rank them in terms of importance for their success. A total of 39 chairpersons completed the survey (47.6% response rate; 83.3% male and 16.2% female). In section one, the respondents reported that leadership, vision, work ethic, integrity, communication, and organization were the most essential characteristics for their success. In section two, the respondents ranked the leadership characteristics as statistically more important than the management characteristics (p<0.0001) for being successful in their positions. PMID:26933102

  11. [Post-academic dental specialties. 11. Discomfort during atraumatic restorative treatment (ART) versus conventional restorative treatment].

    PubMed

    van Gemert-Schriks, M C M

    2007-05-01

    Although Atraumatic Restorative Treatment (ART) claims to be a patient-friendly method of treatment, little scientific proof of this is available. The aim of this study, therefore, was to acquire a reliable measurement of the degree of discomfort which children experience during dental treatment performed according to the ART approach and during the conventional method. A number of 403 Indonesian schoolchildren were randomly divided into 2 groups. In each child, one class II restoration was carried out on a deciduous molar either by means of ART or the use of rotary instruments (750 rpm). Discomfort scores were determined both by physiological measurements (heart rate) and behavioral observations (Venham scale). Venham scores showed a marked difference between the 2 groups, whereas heart rate scores only differed significantly during deep excavation. A correlation was found between Venham scores and heart rate measurements. Sex, initial anxiety and performing dentist were shown to be confounding variables. In conclusion it can be said that children treated according to the ART approach experience less discomfort than those treated with rotary instruments. PMID:17552299

  12. Contribution of prosthetic treatment considerations for dental extractions of permanent teeth.

    PubMed

    Fernández-Barrera, Miguel Ángel; Medina-Solís, Carlo Eduardo; Casanova-Rosado, Juan Fernando; Mendoza-Rodríguez, Martha; Escoffié-Ramírez, Mauricio; Casanova-Rosado, Alejandro José; Navarrete-Hernández, José de Jesús; Maupomé, Gerardo

    2016-01-01

    Background. Tooth loss is an easily identifiable outcome that summarizes a complex suite of factors in an individual's history of dental disease and its treatment by dental services over a lifetime. Assessment of overall tooth loss data is essential for epidemiologically evaluating the adequacy of dental care provided at a systems level, as well as for placing in context tooth loss for non-disease causes. For example, when derived from prosthetic treatment planning, the latter may unfortunately lead to some teeth being extracted (pulled) for the sake of better comprehensive clinical results. The objective of the present manuscript was to identify the contribution to overall tooth loss, by extraction of permanent teeth because of prosthetic treatment reasons. Material and Methods. A cross-sectional study included sex, age, total number of extractions performed by subject, sextant (anterior vs. posterior), group of teeth (incisors, canines, premolars and molars), upper or lower arch, and the main reason underlying extraction (extraction for any reason vs. prosthetic treatment), in patients 18 years of age and older seeking care at a dental school clinic in Mexico. A multivariate logistic regression model was generated. Results. A total of 749 teeth were extracted in 331 patients; 161 teeth (21.5% of total) were extracted for explicit prosthetic treatment indications. As age increased, the likelihood of having an extraction for prosthetic reasons increased 3% (OR = 1.03, p < 0.001). Women (OR = 1.57, p < 0.05) were more likely to be in this situation, and molars (OR = 2.70, p < 0.001) were most at risk. As the total number of extractions increased, the risk of having an extraction for prosthetic reasons decreased (OR = 0.94, p < 0.05). Conclusions. A significant amount (21.5%) of the extractions of permanent teeth were performed for prosthetic reasons in this dental school clinical environment; age, sex, type of tooth, and the total number of extractions moderated

  13. Contribution of prosthetic treatment considerations for dental extractions of permanent teeth

    PubMed Central

    Fernández-Barrera, Miguel Ángel; Casanova-Rosado, Juan Fernando; Mendoza-Rodríguez, Martha; Escoffié-Ramírez, Mauricio; Casanova-Rosado, Alejandro José; Navarrete-Hernández, José de Jesús; Maupomé, Gerardo

    2016-01-01

    Background. Tooth loss is an easily identifiable outcome that summarizes a complex suite of factors in an individual’s history of dental disease and its treatment by dental services over a lifetime. Assessment of overall tooth loss data is essential for epidemiologically evaluating the adequacy of dental care provided at a systems level, as well as for placing in context tooth loss for non-disease causes. For example, when derived from prosthetic treatment planning, the latter may unfortunately lead to some teeth being extracted (pulled) for the sake of better comprehensive clinical results. The objective of the present manuscript was to identify the contribution to overall tooth loss, by extraction of permanent teeth because of prosthetic treatment reasons. Material and Methods. A cross-sectional study included sex, age, total number of extractions performed by subject, sextant (anterior vs. posterior), group of teeth (incisors, canines, premolars and molars), upper or lower arch, and the main reason underlying extraction (extraction for any reason vs. prosthetic treatment), in patients 18 years of age and older seeking care at a dental school clinic in Mexico. A multivariate logistic regression model was generated. Results. A total of 749 teeth were extracted in 331 patients; 161 teeth (21.5% of total) were extracted for explicit prosthetic treatment indications. As age increased, the likelihood of having an extraction for prosthetic reasons increased 3% (OR = 1.03, p < 0.001). Women (OR = 1.57, p < 0.05) were more likely to be in this situation, and molars (OR = 2.70, p < 0.001) were most at risk. As the total number of extractions increased, the risk of having an extraction for prosthetic reasons decreased (OR = 0.94, p < 0.05). Conclusions. A significant amount (21.5%) of the extractions of permanent teeth were performed for prosthetic reasons in this dental school clinical environment; age, sex, type of tooth, and the total number of extractions moderated

  14. Failure Rate of Direct High-Viscosity Glass-Ionomer Versus Hybrid Resin Composite Restorations in Posterior Permanent Teeth - a Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Mickenautsch, Steffen; Yengopal, Veerasamy

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Traditionally, resin composite restorations are claimed by reviews of the dental literature as being superior to glass-ionomer fillings in terms of restoration failures in posterior permanent teeth. The aim of this systematic review is to answer the clinical question, whether conventional high-viscosity glass-ionomer restorations, in patients with single and/or multi-surface cavities in posterior permanent teeth, have indeed a higher failure rate than direct hybrid resin composite restorations. Methods Eight databases were searched until December 02, 2013. Trials were assessed for bias risks, in-between datasets heterogeneity and statistical sample size power. Effects sizes were computed and statistically compared. A total of 55 citations were identified through systematic literature search. From these, 46 were excluded. No trials related to high-viscosity glass-ionomers versus resin composite restorations for direct head-to-head comparison were found. Three trials related to high-viscosity glass-ionomers versus amalgam and three trials related to resin composite versus amalgam restorations could be included for adjusted indirect comparison, only. Results The available evidence suggests no difference in the failure rates between both types of restoration beyond the play of chance, is limited by lack of head-to-head comparisons and an insufficient number of trials, as well as by high bias and in-between-dataset heterogeneity risk. The current clinical evidence needs to be regarded as too poor in order to justify superiority claims regarding the failure rates of both restoration types. Sufficiently large-sized, parallel-group, randomised control trials with high internal validity are needed, in order to justify any clinically meaningful judgment to this topic. PMID:26962372

  15. Understanding dental CAD/CAM for restorations--the digital workflow from a mechanical engineering viewpoint.

    PubMed

    Tapie, L; Lebon, N; Mawussi, B; Fron Chabouis, H; Duret, F; Attal, J-P

    2015-01-01

    As digital technology infiltrates every area of daily life, including the field of medicine, so it is increasingly being introduced into dental practice. Apart from chairside practice, computer-aided design/computer-aided manufacturing (CAD/CAM) solutions are available for creating inlays, crowns, fixed partial dentures (FPDs), implant abutments, and other dental prostheses. CAD/CAM dental solutions can be considered a chain of digital devices and software for the almost automatic design and creation of dental restorations. However, dentists who want to use the technology often do not have the time or knowledge to understand it. A basic knowledge of the CAD/CAM digital workflow for dental restorations can help dentists to grasp the technology and purchase a CAM/CAM system that meets the needs of their office. This article provides a computer-science and mechanical-engineering approach to the CAD/CAM digital workflow to help dentists understand the technology. PMID:25911827

  16. Complex layered dental restorations: Are they recognizable and do they survive extreme conditions?

    PubMed

    Soon, Alistair S; Bush, Mary A; Bush, Peter J

    2015-09-01

    Recent research has shown that restorative dental materials can be recognized by microscopy and elemental analysis (scanning electron microscopy/energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy and X-ray fluorescence; SEM/EDS and XRF) and that this is possible even in extreme conditions, such as cremation. These analytical methods and databases of dental materials properties have proven useful in DVI (disaster victim identification) of a commercial plane crash in 2009, and in a number of other victim identification cases. Dental materials appear on the market with ever expanding frequency. With their advent, newer methods of restoration have been proposed and adopted in the dental office. Methods might include placing multiple layers of dental materials, where they have different properties including adhesion, viscosity, or working time. These different dental materials include filled adhesives, flowable resins, glass ionomer cements, composite resins, liners and sealants. With possible combinations of different materials in these restorations, the forensic odontologist is now confronted with a new difficulty; how to recognize each individual material. The question might be posed if it is even possible to perform this task. Furthermore, an odontologist might be called upon to identify a victim under difficult circumstances, such as when presented with fragmented or incinerated remains. In these circumstances the ability to identify specific dental materials could assist in the identification of the deceased. Key to use of this information is whether these new materials and methods are detailed in the dental chart. Visual or radiographic inspection may not reveal the presence of a restoration, let alone the possible complex nature of that restoration. This study demonstrates another scientific method in forensic dental identification. PMID:26151675

  17. Compressive fatigue limit of four types of dental restorative materials.

    PubMed

    Chen, Song; Öhman, Caroline; Jefferies, Steven R; Gray, Holly; Xia, Wei; Engqvist, Håkan

    2016-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the quasi-static compressive strength and the compressive fatigue limit of four different dental restorative materials, before and after aging in distilled water for 30 days. A conventional glass ionomer cement (Fuji IX GP; IG), a zinc-reinforced glass ionomer cement (Chemfil rock; CF), a light curable resin-reinforced glass ionomer cement (Fuji II LC; LC) and a resin-based composite (Quixfil; QF) were investigated. Cylindrical specimens (4mm in diameter and 6mm in height) were prepared according to the manufacturer׳s instructions. The compressive fatigue limit was obtained using the staircase method. Samples were tested in distilled water at 37°C, at a frequency of 10Hz with 10(5) cycles set as run-out. 17 fatigue samples were tested for each group. Two-way ANOVA and one-way ANOVA followed by Tukey׳s post-hoc test were used to analyze the results. Among the four types of materials, the resin-based composite exhibited the highest compressive strength (244±13.0MPa) and compressive fatigue limit (134±7.8MPa), followed by the light-cured resin reinforced glass ionomer cement (168±8.5MPa and 92±6.6MPa, respectively) after one day of storage in distilled water. After being stored for 30 days, all specimens showed an increase in compressive strength. Aging showed no effect on the compressive fatigue limit of the resin-based composite and the light-cured resin reinforced glass ionomer cement, however, the conventional glass ionomer cements showed a drastic decrease (37% for IG, 31% for CF) in compressive fatigue limit. In conclusion, in the present study, resin modified GIC and resin-based composite were found to have superior mechanical properties to conventional GIC. PMID:27085845

  18. Teaching the placement of posterior resin-based composite restorations in Spanish dental schools

    PubMed Central

    Lynch, Christopher; McConnell, Robert; Wilson, Nairn

    2012-01-01

    Objectives: In an area of esthetic dentistry such as posterior composites, in which new materials and techniques are being devolved continuously, it is important to confirm that dental students have a clear understanding of the basic principles of clinical application of this knowledge. Considering that the preparation of dental graduates in Spain may be of interest to competent dental authorities and employers with whom they can work worldwide, this study investigated the teaching of posterior composite restorations in Spanish dental schools. Study design: In late 2009⁄ early 2010, a questionnaire seeking information on the teaching of posterior composites was emailed to the professor responsible for teaching operative dentistry in each of the fifteen dental schools having complete undergraduate dental degree programs in Spain. Results: The response rate was 100%. Most investigated topics did not show noteworthy differences depending on whether the schools were public or private. Variations were found among Spanish dental schools in both the amount and content of the teaching programs concerning posterior composite restorations. Differences were recorded in the teaching of cavity design, contraindications to composite placement, indications for liners and bases, matrix and wedging techniques, composite and bonding systems, light curing and finishing procedures for composite restorations. More consistency was observed in teaching methods of moisture-control, indirect composites and amalgam bonding. Conclusions: As recommended in previously surveyed countries, efforts must be made to promote harmonization of dental curricula to make it easier for graduates to work elsewhere, and to ensure they meet the needs of their patients on entering independent practice. Key words:Aesthetic dentistry, composite restoration, dental education, teaching program, undergraduate dental student. PMID:22322491

  19. Caries prevalence and restorative dental services in some Pacific Islands.

    PubMed

    Speake, J D

    1980-08-01

    Caries prevalence rates at eight and eleven years of age were estimated according to WHO criteria in six Pacific Island countries and territories during the period 1975 to 1977. The components of the dental caries index (DIMF(T)) on a country or territory basis were examined and the dental care index calculated. Factors influencing the delivery of dental services in the region are discussed. PMID:6934741

  20. Genome-wide association Scan of dental caries in the permanent dentition

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Over 90% of adults aged 20 years or older with permanent teeth have suffered from dental caries leading to pain, infection, or even tooth loss. Although caries prevalence has decreased over the past decade, there are still about 23% of dentate adults who have untreated carious lesions in the US. Dental caries is a complex disorder affected by both individual susceptibility and environmental factors. Approximately 35-55% of caries phenotypic variation in the permanent dentition is attributable to genes, though few specific caries genes have been identified. Therefore, we conducted the first genome-wide association study (GWAS) to identify genes affecting susceptibility to caries in adults. Methods Five independent cohorts were included in this study, totaling more than 7000 participants. For each participant, dental caries was assessed and genetic markers (single nucleotide polymorphisms, SNPs) were genotyped or imputed across the entire genome. Due to the heterogeneity among the five cohorts regarding age, genotyping platform, quality of dental caries assessment, and study design, we first conducted genome-wide association (GWA) analyses on each of the five independent cohorts separately. We then performed three meta-analyses to combine results for: (i) the comparatively younger, Appalachian cohorts (N = 1483) with well-assessed caries phenotype, (ii) the comparatively older, non-Appalachian cohorts (N = 5960) with inferior caries phenotypes, and (iii) all five cohorts (N = 7443). Top ranking genetic loci within and across meta-analyses were scrutinized for biologically plausible roles on caries. Results Different sets of genes were nominated across the three meta-analyses, especially between the younger and older age cohorts. In general, we identified several suggestive loci (P-value ≤ 10E-05) within or near genes with plausible biological roles for dental caries, including RPS6KA2 and PTK2B, involved in p38-depenedent MAPK signaling

  1. Knowledge and practice of implant-retained restorations among dental students in Saudi Arabia

    PubMed Central

    Vohra, Fahim; Shah, Altaf Hussain; Zafar, Mohammad Sohail; Kola, Zaheer

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: The aim of the study was to assess the knowledge and practice of implant retained restorations (IRR) among senior dental students in Saudi Arabia. Methods: Four hundred questionnaires were distributed among senior dental students of five dental schools in Saudi Arabia. Student’s knowledge was assessed regarding which implant restoration [cement retained restoration (CRR) or screw retained restoration (SRR)] better provides the desired clinical properties. Students’ practice of IRR, perception of their knowledge and need for further education related to IRR were also assessed. Descriptive statistics and chi-square test were employed to assess collected data. Results: Three hundred and fifty four senior dental students responded at a response rate of 88.5%. Thirty three percent respondents did not have any practical experience of IRR. Students showed a clear preference for CRR with regards to aesthetics (71.4%), passive fit (55.3%), fabrication ease (57.3%) and fracture resistance (40%). SRR were considered to provide better retention (59.6%), soft tissue health (51.1%) and ease of retrievability (72%). Nearly 40% of students agreed that they did not get sufficient information related to IRR in undergraduate courses. Conclusions: Clinical training of IRR is compromised in the undergraduate curriculum in dental schools of Saudi Arabia. The knowledge of dental students regarding IRR was broadly in line with current evidence. PMID:26430416

  2. Synchrotron-radiation-based X-ray micro-computed tomography reveals dental bur debris under dental composite restorations.

    PubMed

    Hedayat, Assem; Nagy, Nicole; Packota, Garnet; Monteith, Judy; Allen, Darcy; Wysokinski, Tomasz; Zhu, Ning

    2016-05-01

    Dental burs are used extensively in dentistry to mechanically prepare tooth structures for restorations (fillings), yet little has been reported on the bur debris left behind in the teeth, and whether it poses potential health risks to patients. Here it is aimed to image dental bur debris under dental fillings, and allude to the potential health hazards that can be caused by this debris when left in direct contact with the biological surroundings, specifically when the debris is made of a non-biocompatible material. Non-destructive micro-computed tomography using the BioMedical Imaging & Therapy facility 05ID-2 beamline at the Canadian Light Source was pursued at 50 keV and at a pixel size of 4 µm to image dental bur fragments under a composite resin dental filling. The bur's cutting edges that produced the fragment were also chemically analyzed. The technique revealed dental bur fragments of different sizes in different locations on the floor of the prepared surface of the teeth and under the filling, which places them in direct contact with the dentinal tubules and the dentinal fluid circulating within them. Dispersive X-ray spectroscopy elemental analysis of the dental bur edges revealed that the fragments are made of tungsten carbide-cobalt, which is bio-incompatible. PMID:27140158

  3. Does atraumatic restorative treatment reduce dental anxiety in children? A systematic review and meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Simon, Arun K.; Bhumika, T. V.; Nair, N. Sreekumaran

    2015-01-01

    Dental anxiety is one of the major problems affecting children, which impairs the rendering of dental care, leading to impaired quality of life. It often leads to occupational stress in dental personnel and conflict between parents/caregivers. The objective of this study was to conduct a systematic review and meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials done in children, to synthesize evidence of the effectiveness of atraumatic restorative treatment (ART) in reducing dental anxiety in children compared to conventional restorative treatments. The databases searched included PubMed, Google Scholar and The Cochrane Oral Health Group's Trials Register. Eligible studies reporting dental anxiety by a variety of psychometric scales were tabulated. The review was conducted and reported in accordance with the guidelines provided by the Cochrane Collaboration. Among 416 studies retrieved through literature search, six studies matched the inclusion criteria. Due to lack of data, only three studies were included for meta-analysis using RevMan software (Review Manager, Version 5.3;The Cochrane Collaboration, Copenhagen, 2014). The pooled meta-analysis data, (standardized mean difference − 2.12 [95% confidence interval: −4.52, 0.27]) failed to show any difference between ART group and the conventional treatment group. In conclusion, ART was not more beneficial in reducing dental anxiety among pediatric dental patients. The findings are relevant in the field of clinical practice in dentistry in the management of the anxious pediatric dental patient. PMID:26038668

  4. Understanding dental CAD/CAM for restorations--accuracy from a mechanical engineering viewpoint.

    PubMed

    Tapie, Laurent; Lebon, Nicolas; Mawussi, Bernardin; Fron-Chabouis, Hélène; Duret, Francois; Attal, Jean-Pierre

    2015-01-01

    As is the case in the field of medicine, as well as in most areas of daily life, digital technology is increasingly being introduced into dental practice. Computer-aided design/ computer-aided manufacturing (CAD/CAM) solutions are available not only for chairside practice but also for creating inlays, crowns, fixed partial dentures (FPDs), implant abutments, and other dental prostheses. CAD/CAM dental practice can be considered as the handling of devices and software processing for the almost automatic design and creation of dental restorations. However, dentists who want to use dental CAD/CAM systems often do not have enough information to understand the variations offered by such technology practice. Knowledge of the random and systematic errors in accuracy with CAD/CAM systems can help to achieve successful restorations with this technology, and help with the purchasing of a CAD/CAM system that meets the clinical needs of restoration. This article provides a mechanical engineering viewpoint of the accuracy of CAD/ CAM systems, to help dentists understand the impact of this technology on restoration accuracy. PMID:26734668

  5. Practitioner, patient, and caries lesion characteristics associated with type of material used to restore carious teeth: findings from The Dental PBRN

    PubMed Central

    Makhija, Sonia K; Gordan, Valeria V.; Gilbert, Gregg H.; Litaker, Mark S.; Rindal, D. Brad; Pihlstrom, Daniel J.; Qvist, Vibeke

    2011-01-01

    Background The authors conducted a study to identify factors associated with material use by dentists in The Dental Practice-Based Research Network (DPBRN) when placing the first restoration on permanent tooth surfaces. Methods A total of 182 DPBRN practitioner-investigators provided data on 5,599 posterior teeth with caries. Practitioner-investigators completed an enrollment questionnaire that included the dentist’s age, gender, practice workload, practice type, and years since graduation. When a consented patient presented with a previously un-restored carious surface, practitioner-investigators recorded patient and tooth characteristics. Results Amalgam was used more often than direct resin-based composite (RBC) for posterior carious lesions. Practitioner/practice characteristics (years since graduation and type of practice); patient characteristics (gender, race, age, and dental insurance); and lesion characteristics (tooth location and surface, pre-and post-operative depth) were associated with the type of restorative material used. Conclusions There are several practitioner/practice, patient, and lesion characteristics significantly associated with use of amalgam and RBC: region, years since graduation, dental insurance, tooth location and surface, and pre-and post-operative depth. Clinical implications Amalgam remains a material commonly used by United States dentists to restore posterior caries lesions. PMID:21628683

  6. Genotoxicity evaluation of dental restoration nanocomposite using comet assay and chromosome aberration test

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Musa, Marahaini; Thirumulu Ponnuraj, Kannan; Mohamad, Dasmawati; Rahman, Ismail Ab

    2013-01-01

    Nanocomposite is used as a dental filling to restore the affected tooth, especially in dental caries. The dental nanocomposite (KelFil) for tooth restoration used in this study was produced by the School of Dental Sciences, Universiti Sains Malaysia, Malaysia and is incorporated with monodispersed, spherical nanosilica fillers. The aim of the study was to determine the genotoxic effect of KelFil using in vitro genotoxicity tests. The cytotoxicity and genotoxicity of KelFil was evaluated using MTT assay, comet assay and chromosome aberration tests with or without the addition of a metabolic activation system (S9 mix), using the human lung fibroblast cell line (MRC-5). Concurrent negative and positive controls were included. In the comet assay, no comet formation was found in the KelFil groups. There was a significant difference in tail moment between KelFil groups and positive control (p < 0.05). Similarly, no significant aberrations in chromosomes were noticed in KelFil groups. The mitotic indices of treatment groups and negative control were significantly different from positive controls. Hence, it can be concluded that the locally produced dental restoration nanocomposite (KelFil) is non-genotoxic under the present test conditions.

  7. Inequalities in preventive and restorative dental services in England, Wales and Northern Ireland.

    PubMed

    Cheema, J; Sabbah, W

    2016-09-01

    Aims The objective of this study is to assess socioeconomic inequalities in the use of selected dental procedures.Methods Data is from the Adult Dental Health Survey 2009, a nationally representative cross-sectional survey of England, Northern Ireland and Wales. Overall, 6,279 participants were included in the analysis. Occupational classification and education were used to assess variations in the use of preventive, restorative services and tooth extraction using a series of logistic regression models, adjusting for age, sex, ethnicity, DMFT, self-reported oral health, dental visits and country.Results There were clear socioeconomic variations in the utilisation of preventive and restorative services. In the fully adjusted model those with no educational qualification were less likely to report ever having preventive services than those with a degree (OR 0.48, 95%CI: 0.36,0.65). Similarly, individuals in routine/manual occupation were significantly less likely to report ever having preventive services than those in managerial/professional occupation (OR 0.58, 95%CI: 0.46,0.74) in the fully adjusted model.Conclusion The findings imply that despite relatively equitable access and higher use of dental services in UK, the least educated and those at the bottom of social hierarchy are less likely to have preventive and restorative dental services. PMID:27608576

  8. [The atraumatic restorative treatment approach in pediatric dental care: a comparative clinical study].

    PubMed

    Dmitrova, A G; Kulakov, A A

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to assess and compare the discomfort levels during Atraumatic Restorative Treatment and Minimal Cavity Preparation using rotary instruments and Air abrasion method. The results of the study suggest that ART induces less discomfort, therefore this method can be recommended for children who have a fear of dental procedures as well as for children with intellectual disabilities. PMID:26145474

  9. Quantification of Staphylococcus aureus adhesion forces on various dental restorative materials using atomic force microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Merghni, Abderrahmen; Kammoun, Dorra; Hentati, Hajer; Janel, Sébastien; Popoff, Michka; Lafont, Frank; Aouni, Mahjoub; Mastouri, Maha

    2016-08-01

    In the oral cavity dental restorative biomaterials can act as a reservoir for infection with opportunistic Staphylococcus aureus pathogen, which can lead to the occurrence of secondary caries and treatment failures. Our aim was to evaluate the adhesion forces by S. aureus on four dental restorative biomaterials and to correlate this finding to differences in specific surface characteristics. Additionally, the influence of salivary conditioning films in exerted adhesion forces was investigated. The substrate hydrophobicity was measured by goniometer and the surface free energy was calculated using the equilibrium advancing contact angle values of water, formamide, and diiodomethane on the tested surfaces. The surface roughness was determined using atomic force microscope (AFM). Additionally, cell force spectroscopy was achieved to quantify the forces that drive cell-substrate interactions. S. aureus bacterium exerted a considerable adhesion forces on various dental restorative materials, which decreased in the presence of saliva conditioning film. The influence of the surface roughness and free energy in initial adhesion appears to be more important than the effect of hydrophobicity, either in presence or absence of saliva coating. Hence, control of surface properties of dental restorative biomaterials is of crucial importance in preventing the attachment and subsequent the biofilm formation.

  10. Perception of dental esthetics: influence of restoration type, symmetry, and color in four different countries.

    PubMed

    Mehl, Christian; Harder, Sönke; Lin, Jun; Vollrath, Oliver; Kern, Matthias

    2015-01-01

    In this study, the influence of restoration type, symmetry, and color on the perception of dental appearance was evaluated. An esthetic questionnaire was completed by 29 patients before and after esthetic rehabilitation. In addition, 94 dentists from four countries (Germany, the United Kingdom [UK], China, and Switzerland) evaluated the influence of the above factors using before-and-after rehabilitation pictures. The most invasive treatment was recommended by Chinese dentists, while German, Swiss, and UK dentists recommended comparable treatment options. As for restorative symmetry, restoration type, and color, significant differences could be found among and within the dentists of the four countries (P ± .05). PMID:25588175

  11. Effects of temperature change and beverage on mechanical and tribological properties of dental restorative composites.

    PubMed

    Ayatollahi, M R; Yahya, Mohd Yazid; Karimzadeh, A; Nikkhooyifar, M; Ayob, Amran

    2015-09-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of temperature change and immersion in two common beverages on the mechanical and tribological properties for three different types of dental restorative materials. Thermocycling procedure was performed for simulating temperature changes in oral conditions. Black tea and soft drink were considered for beverages. Universal composite, universal nanohybrid composite and universal nanofilled composite, were used as dental materials. The nanoindentation and nanoscratch experiments were utilized to determine the elastic modulus, hardness, plasticity index and wear resistance of the test specimens. The results showed that thermocycling and immersion in each beverage had different effects on the tested dental materials. The mechanical and tribological properties of nanohybrid composite and nanocomposite were less sensitive to temperature change and to immersion in beverages in comparison with those of the conventional dental composite. PMID:26046269

  12. Effects of high temperature on different restorations in forensic identification: Dental samples and mandible

    PubMed Central

    Patidar, Kalpana A; Parwani, Rajkumar; Wanjari, Sangeeta

    2010-01-01

    Introduction: The forensic odontologist strives to utilize the charred human dentition throughout each stage of dental evaluation, and restorations are as unique as fingerprints and their radiographic morphology as well as the types of filling materials are often the main feature for identification. The knowledge of detecting residual restorative material and composition of unrecovered adjacent restoration is a valuable tool-mark in the presumptive identification of the dentition of a burned victim. Gold, silver amalgam, silicate restoration, and so on, have a different resistance to prolonged high temperature, therefore, the identification of burned bodies can be correlated with adequate qualities and quantities of the traces. Most of the dental examination relies heavily on the presence of the restoration as well as the relationship of one dental structure to another. This greatly narrows the research for the final identification that is based on postmortem data. Aim: The purpose of this study is to examine the resistance of teeth and different restorative materials, and the mandible, to variable temperature and duration, for the purpose of identification. Materials and Methods: The study was conducted on 72 extracted teeth which were divided into six goups of 12 teeth each based on the type of restorative material. (Group 1 - unrestored teeth, group 2 - teeth restored with Zn3(PO4)2, group 3 - with silver amalgam, group 4 with glass ionomer cement, group 5 - Ni-Cr-metal crown, group 6 - metal ceramic crown) and two specimens of the mandible. The effect of incineration at 400°C (5 mins, 15 mins, 30 mins) and 1100°C (15 mins) was studied. Results: Damage to the teeth subjected to variable temperatures and time can be categorized as intact (no damage), scorched (superficially parched and discolored), charred (reduced to carbon by incomplete combustion) and incinerated (burned to ashes). PMID:21189989

  13. Utilizing optical coherence tomography for CAD/CAM of indirect dental restorations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chityala, Ravishankar; Vidal, Carola; Jones, Robert

    Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT) has seen broad application in dentistry including early carious lesion detection and imaging defects in resin composite restorations. This study investigates expanding the clinical usefulness by investigating methods to use OCT for obtaining three-dimensional (3D) digital impressions, which can be integrated to CAD/CAM manufacturing of indirect restorations. 3D surface topography `before' and `after' a cavity preparation was acquired by an intraoral cross polarization swept source OCT (CP-OCT) system with a Micro-Electro-Mechanical System (MEMS) scanning mirror. Image registration and segmentation methods were used to digitally construct a replacement restoration that modeled the original surface morphology of a hydroxyapatite sample. After high resolution additive manufacturing (e.g. polymer 3D printing) of the replacement restoration, micro-CT imaging was performed to examine the marginal adaptation. This study establishes the protocol for further investigation of integrating OCT with CAD/CAM of indirect dental restorations.

  14. An update on glass fiber dental restorative composites: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Khan, Abdul Samad; Azam, Maria Tahir; Khan, Maria; Mian, Salman Aziz; Ur Rehman, Ihtesham

    2015-02-01

    Dentistry is a much developed field in the last few decades. New techniques have changed the conventional treatment methods as applications of new dental materials give better outcomes. The current century has suddenly forced on dentistry, a new paradigm regarding expected standards for state-of-the-art patient care. Within the field of restorative dentistry, the incredible advances in dental materials research have led to the current availability of esthetic adhesive restorations. The chemistry and structure of the resins and the nature of the glass fiber reinforced systems in dental composites are reviewed in relation to their influence and properties including mechanical, physical, thermal, biocompatibility, technique sensitivity, mode and rate of failure of restorations on clinical application. It is clear that a deeper understanding of the structure of the polymeric matrix and resin-based dental composite is required. As a result of ongoing research in the area of glass fiber reinforced composites and with the development and advancement of these composites, the future prospects of resin-based composite are encouraging. PMID:25492169

  15. Cytogenetic genotoxic investigation in peripheral blood lymphocytes of subjects with dental composite restorative filling materials.

    PubMed

    Pettini, F; Savino, M; Corsalini, M; Cantore, S; Ballini, A

    2015-01-01

    Dental composite resins are biomaterials commonly used to aesthetically restore the structure and function of teeth impaired by caries, erosion, or fracture. Residual monomers released from resin restorations as a result of incomplete polymerization processes interact with living oral tissues. The objective of this study was to evaluate the genotoxicity of a common dental composite material (Enamel Plus-HFO), in subjects with average 13 filled teeth with the same material, compared to a control group (subjects having neither amalgam nor composite resin fillings). Genotoxicity assessment of composite materials was carried out in vitro in human peripheral blood leukocytes using sister-chromatid exchange (SCE) and chromosomal aberrations (CA) cytogenetic tests. The results of correlation and multiple regression analyses confirmed the absence of a relationship between SCE/cell, high frequency of SCE(HFC) or CA frequencies and exposure to dental composite materials. These results indicate that composite resins used for dental restorations differ extensively in vivo in their cytotoxic and genotoxic potential and in their ability to affect chromosomal integrity, cell-cycle progression, DNA replication and repair. PMID:25864763

  16. Determination of optical properties in dental restorative biomaterials using the inverse-adding-doubling method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernández-Oliveras, Alicia; Rubiño, Manuel; Pérez, María. M.

    2013-11-01

    Light propagation in biological media is characterized by the absorption coefficient, the scattering coefficient, the scattering phase function, the refractive index, and the surface conditions (roughness). By means of the inverse-adding-doubling (IAD) method, transmittance and reflectance measurements lead to the determination of the absorption coefficient and the reduced scattering coefficient. The additional measurement of the phase function performed by goniometry allows the separation of the reduced scattering coefficient into the scattering coefficient and the scattering anisotropy factor. The majority of techniques, such as the one utilized in this work, involve the use of integrating spheres to measure total transmission and reflection. We have employed an integrating sphere setup to measure the total transmittance and reflectance of dental biomaterials used in restorative dentistry. Dental biomaterials are meant to replace dental tissues, such as enamel and dentine, in irreversibly diseased teeth. In previous works we performed goniometric measurements in order to evaluate the scattering anisotropy factor for these kinds of materials. In the present work we have used the IAD method to combine the measurements performed using the integrating sphere setup with the results of the previous goniometric measurements. The aim was to optically characterize the dental biomaterials analyzed, since whole studies to assess the appropriate material properties are required in medical applications. In this context, complete optical characterizations play an important role in achieving the fulfillment of optimal quality and the final success of dental biomaterials used in restorative dentistry.

  17. Dental practitioners' attitudes, subjective norms and intentions to practice atraumatic restorative treatment (ART) in Tanzania.

    PubMed

    Kikwilu, Emil N; Frencken, Jo E; Mulder, Jan; Masalu, Joyce R

    2009-01-01

    The aim of this study was to describe the attitude and subjective norm of dental practitioners towards practicing the atraumatic restorative treatment (ART) in Tanzania. A pre-tested questionnaire on attitudes and subjective norms to practice ART was mailed to all 147 dental practitioners working in the regional and district government clinics. The independent variables were: gender, working experience, qualification and ever heard of ART. The dependent variables were: attitude, subjective norm and intention to practice ART. Chi-square tests and multiple regression analysis were used to test for effects between independent and dependent variables. Significance level was set at 5%. A total of 138 practitioners returned completed questionnaires. More experienced dental practitioners encountered moderate social pressure than less experienced dental practitioners, who met strong social pressure (p=0.045). A total of 73.2% of dental practitioners felt that ART was worth introducing in Tanzania, 92.8% recommended ART training for all dental practitioners and 97.8% recommended inclusion of ART in dental curricula. Positive attitude, strong subjective norm and high intention to practice ART were recorded in 76.3%, 28.1% and 90.6% of the practitioners, respectively. Only subjective norm had a statistically significant influence on the intention to practice ART (p<0.0001). The results indicated that dental practitioners were willing to have ART introduced in Tanzania and had positive attitudes towards practicing this technique. Nevertheless, their intention to perform ART was strongly influenced by social pressures. Therefore, in order to have a successful introduction of ART in Tanzania, people who matter in the daily practice of dental practitioners need to accept and appraise the ART approach positively. PMID:19274393

  18. Testing adhesion of direct restoratives to dental hard tissue - a review.

    PubMed

    Salz, Ulrich; Bock, Thorsten

    2010-10-01

    This articles concerns itself with the testing of adhesion between direct restoratives and dental hard tissue, ie, enamel and dentin. The aim is to survey available methods for adhesion testing and influential parameters affecting experimental outcome. The testing of adhesion to indirect restorative materials, eg, ceramics and metals, is beyond the scope of this article and shall be discussed elsewhere. The longevity and success of modern dental restorations very often relies on potent dental adhesives to provide durable bonds between the dental hard substance and the restorative composite. To predict the clinical outcome of such restorative treatment, a large variety of in vitro laboratory tests and clinical in vivo experiments have been devised, analyzed, and published. The purpose of this review is to provide a current overview of bond strength testing methods and their applicability to the characterization of dental adhesives. Regardless of the method employed, subtle variations in sample preparation may already severely impact test results, usually necessitating at least co-testing of a well-known internal reference to allow conclusive interpretation. This article attempts to list and discuss the most influential parameters, such as substrate nature, age, health status, storage, clinically relevant pre-treatment, and sample preparation. Special attention is devoted to the last aspect, as numerous publications have stressed the tremendous influence of preparatory parameters on the validity and scope of obtained data. Added to the large variety of such factors, an equally large diversity of load-applying procedures exists to actually quantify adhesion between composites and dental hard substance. This article summarizes the basics of macro and micro approaches to shear and tensile bond strength testing, as well as push- and pull-out tests. The strengths and weaknesses inherent to each method and influential test parameters are reviewed and methods for

  19. Molecular Toxicology of Substances Released from Resin–Based Dental Restorative Materials

    PubMed Central

    Bakopoulou, Athina; Papadopoulos, Triantafillos; Garefis, Pavlos

    2009-01-01

    Resin-based dental restorative materials are extensively used today in dentistry. However, significant concerns still remain regarding their biocompatibility. For this reason, significant scientific effort has been focused on the determination of the molecular toxicology of substances released by these biomaterials, using several tools for risk assessment, including exposure assessment, hazard identification and dose-response analysis. These studies have shown that substances released by these materials can cause significant cytotoxic and genotoxic effects, leading to irreversible disturbance of basic cellular functions. The aim of this article is to review current knowledge related to dental composites’ molecular toxicology and to give implications for possible improvements concerning their biocompatibility. PMID:19865523

  20. Modelling the Longevity of Dental Restorations by means of a CBR System

    PubMed Central

    Aliaga, Ignacio J.; Vera, Vicente; García, Alvaro E.

    2015-01-01

    The lifespan of dental restorations is limited. Longevity depends on the material used and the different characteristics of the dental piece. However, it is not always the case that the best and longest lasting material is used since patients may prefer different treatments according to how noticeable the material is. Over the last 100 years, the most commonly used material has been silver amalgam, which, while very durable, is somewhat aesthetically displeasing. Our study is based on the collection of data from the charts, notes, and radiographic information of restorative treatments performed by Dr. Vera in 1993, the analysis of the information by computer artificial intelligence to determine the most appropriate restoration, and the monitoring of the evolution of the dental restoration. The data will be treated confidentially according to the Organic Law 15/1999 on 13 December on the Protection of Personal Data. This paper also presents a clustering technique capable of identifying the most significant cases with which to instantiate the case-base. In order to classify the cases, a mixture of experts is used which incorporates a Bayesian network and a multilayer perceptron; the combination of both classifiers is performed with a neural network. PMID:25866792

  1. New layer-based imaging and rapid prototyping techniques for computer-aided design and manufacture of custom dental restoration.

    PubMed

    Lee, M-Y; Chang, C-C; Ku, Y C

    2008-01-01

    Fixed dental restoration by conventional methods greatly relies on the skill and experience of the dental technician. The quality and accuracy of the final product depends mostly on the technician's subjective judgment. In addition, the traditional manual operation involves many complex procedures, and is a time-consuming and labour-intensive job. Most importantly, no quantitative design and manufacturing information is preserved for future retrieval. In this paper, a new device for scanning the dental profile and reconstructing 3D digital information of a dental model based on a layer-based imaging technique, called abrasive computer tomography (ACT) was designed in-house and proposed for the design of custom dental restoration. The fixed partial dental restoration was then produced by rapid prototyping (RP) and computer numerical control (CNC) machining methods based on the ACT scanned digital information. A force feedback sculptor (FreeForm system, Sensible Technologies, Inc., Cambridge MA, USA), which comprises 3D Touch technology, was applied to modify the morphology and design of the fixed dental restoration. In addition, a comparison of conventional manual operation and digital manufacture using both RP and CNC machining technologies for fixed dental restoration production is presented. Finally, a digital custom fixed restoration manufacturing protocol integrating proposed layer-based dental profile scanning, computer-aided design, 3D force feedback feature modification and advanced fixed restoration manufacturing techniques is illustrated. The proposed method provides solid evidence that computer-aided design and manufacturing technologies may become a new avenue for custom-made fixed restoration design, analysis, and production in the 21st century. PMID:18183523

  2. When Restoration Fails: One State's Answer to the Dilemma of Permanent Incompetence.

    PubMed

    Simpson, Joseph R

    2016-06-01

    The landmark 1972 U.S. Supreme Court decision in Jackson v. Indiana prohibited the indefinite commitment of criminal defendants on grounds of incompetence to stand trial if there was no substantial probability of restoration to competency in the foreseeable future. Such defendants are still subject to ordinary civil commitment; however, not all will meet civil commitment criteria, given that the criteria for a finding of incompetency to stand trial do not map directly onto the general criteria for involuntary psychiatric hospitalization. If a person charged with a serious crime, such as murder, has no substantial probability of being restored to competency, but does not meet standard civil commitment criteria, compliance with Jackson would seem to require release into the community. This article describes a legislative response to this possibility that became law in California four decades ago, as well as the outcome of its main legal challenge a few years later. Although the law has received harsh criticism from some quarters, it has survived, and provides a legally straightforward, if ethically controversial, means of answering the question of what to do with a permanently incompetent defendant who is charged with a serious violent offense and does not meet traditional civil commitment criteria. PMID:27236171

  3. Perfluorotriethylene glycol dimethacrylate modified composite resins for improved dental restoratives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Guigui

    The studies described in this dissertation focus on improvement of water resistance and durability of current dental composite resins. The physical, thermal and mechanical properties of the diluent fluorinated monomer, perfluorotriethylene glycol methacrylate (FTEGDMA), FTEGDMA-containing neat resin and its formulated composite resins were evaluated and compared with the conventional visible light-cured (VLC) dental composite resins. Further, the biocompatibility of this monomer and its cured resins were investigated and compared with their conventional counterparts. The results showed that the FTEGDMA-containing neat resin and its composite systems showed more water resistance and longer durability, compared to the conventional Bisphenol A glycol dimethacrylate/triethylene glycol dimethacrylate (BisGMA/TEGDMA) system. The preliminary in vitro biocompatibility test showed that FTEGDMA favored cell growth, compared to the conventional dental resins. The first study investigated basic physical properties of the diluent FTEGDMA monomer. The results showed that the FTEGDMA exhibited lower viscosity, lower refractive index, and a smaller contact angle, which were all beneficial to lowering the water sorption and increasing hydrophobicity. The second study evaluated some physical, thermal, and mechanical properties of the FTEGDMA based neat resins, including polymerization shrinkage, contact angle, water sorption, glass-transitions, dynamic modulus, thermal expansion, compressive strength, and diametral tensile strength. The results showed that the FTEGDMA diluent exhibited significant less water sorption and lower polymerization shrinkage and the BisEMA also contributed towards reducing water sorption. The third study investigated the effects of the FTEGDMA on the mechanical properties of the composite resins including flexural strength (FS), diametral tensile strength (DTS) and wear resistance (WR). In addition, the fracture surface topography of the tested materials

  4. [Atraumatic restorative treatment to control dental caries: history, characteristics, and contributions of the technique].

    PubMed

    Tascón, Jorge

    2005-02-01

    This paper presents relevant scientific information on the history, characteristics, and contributions of atraumatic restorative treatment (ART) for use in preventing and controlling dental caries. Within the area of oral public health, ART has been for years an economical, effective method for preventing and controlling caries in vulnerable populations. Among other things, ART reduces the stress and anxiety in patients that conventional restoration methods produce. This technique promises major benefits for Latin America. However, given its limitations with dental cavities on two or more surfaces, it is recommended that more research on this approach be encouraged, with the aim of improving the technique's effectiveness based on its characteristics, indications, and technical merits. PMID:15826387

  5. Priorities for future innovation, research, and advocacy in dental restorative materials.

    PubMed

    Watson, T; Fox, C H; Rekow, E D

    2013-11-01

    Innovations in materials science, both within and outside of dentistry, open opportunities for the development of exciting direct restorative materials. From rich dialog among experts from dental and non-dental academic institutions and industry, as well as those from policy, research funding, and professional organizations, we learned that capitalizing on these opportunities is multifactorial and far from straightforward. Beginning from the point when a restoration is needed, what materials, delivery systems, and skills are needed to best serve the most people throughout the world's widely varied economic and infrastructure systems? New research is a critical element in progress. Effective advocacy can influence funding and drives change in practice and policy. Here we articulate both research and advocacy priorities, with the intention of focusing the energy and expertise of our best scientists on making a difference, bringing new innovations to improve oral health. PMID:24129817

  6. Factors affecting the placement or replacement of direct restorations in a dental school

    PubMed Central

    Silvani, Samara; Trivelato, Roberta Ferreira; Nogueira, Ruchele Dias; Gonçalves, Luciano de Souza; Geraldo-Martins, Vinícius Rangel

    2014-01-01

    Context: The knowledge of the reasons for the placement of direct restorations makes possible to trace an epidemiological profile of a specific population and to direct the teaching of dentistry to techniques that are commonly used today and will be continued performed in the future. Purpose: The aim of this study was to verify the reasons for placement and replacement of direct restorations in patients treated in the Dental Clinic of the Uberaba University – Brazil. Materials and Methods: This study evaluated 306 restorative procedures carried out on 60 patients. During the treatment planning, a form that contained information about the patient's gender, tooth number, the classification of restorations, the reasons for placement and replacement of amalgam and tooth-colored restorations, the material that had to be removed and the new material used to fill the cavities was filled for each patient. Statistical analysis was carried out using Chi-square test (α = 0.05). Results: The data showed that most of the patients were female (66.7%). Of all the restorations placed, 60.45% were 1st-time placements, while 39.55% were replacements. For 1st-time restorations, the main reason for placement was primary caries (76.76%), followed by non-carious cervical lesions (15.14%). The amalgam restorations were replaced more frequently (67.77%). The primary reason for replacements was the presence of secondary caries (for both previous amalgam (42.68%) and composite (66.67%) restorations (P < 0.05). The resin composite was the most indicated material for the new restorations (98.04%) (P < 0.05). Conclusions: The main reason for placement of direct restorations was primary caries, while secondary caries was the main reason for replacements. In almost all cases, the material used to fill the cavities was the resin composite. PMID:24808696

  7. Low-shrinkage dental restorative composite: modeling viscoelastic behavior during setting.

    PubMed

    Dauvillier, Bibi S; Feilzer, Albert J

    2005-04-01

    Much attention has been directed toward developing dental direct restorative composites that generate less shrinkage stress during setting. The aim of this study was to explore the viscoelastic behavior of a new class of low-shrinkage dental restorative composite during setting. The setting behavior of an experimental oxirane composite has been investigated by analyzing stress-strain data with two-parametric mechanical models. Experimental data were obtained from a dynamic test method, in which the setting light-activated composite was continuously subjected to sinusoidal strain cycles. The material parameters and the model's predictive capacity were analyzed with validated modeling procedures. The light-activated oxirane composite exhibited shrinkage delay and low polymerization shrinkage strain and stresses when compared with conventional light-activated composite. Noise in the stress data restricted the predictive ability of the Maxwell model to the elastic modulus development of the composite only. Evaluation tests of their potential as restorative material are required, to examine if the biocompatibility and mechanical properties after setting of oxirane composites are acceptable for dental use. PMID:15685614

  8. Reliability and strength of all-ceramic dental restorations fabricated by direct ceramic machining (DCM).

    PubMed

    Filser, F; Kocher, P; Weibel, F; Lüthy, H; Schärer, P; Gauckler, L J

    2001-04-01

    All-ceramic dental bridges for the molar region are not yet available at reasonable costs. The novel direct ceramic machining (DCM) process allows an easy, reliable and rapid fabrication for all-ceramic dental restorations with high mechanical strength and good biocompatibility. In DCM, an enlarged framework is easily milled out of a pre-fabricated porous ceramic blank made of zirconia. After sintering to full density, no further time-consuming hard machining with diamond tools is needed. For individual esthetical requirements, the framework is coated with a veneer porcelain. Compared to the commercially available In-Ceram Alumina and IPS Empress2 restorations, the mechanical strength of zirconia frameworks is twice as high, allowing the restorations to bear the high mastication forces in the molar region. In terms of reliability, zirconia bridges fabricated by the DCM process are also superior to In-Ceram Alumina and IPS Empress2. A clinical study of three-unit dental bridges in the molar region found no problems after the first year of observation. PMID:11697309

  9. An evaluation of microleakage of various glass ionomer based restorative materials in deciduous and permanent teeth: An in vitro study

    PubMed Central

    Singla, Teena; Pandit, I.K.; Srivastava, Nikhil; Gugnani, Neeraj; Gupta, Monika

    2011-01-01

    Aim To evaluate the microleakage of recently available glass ionomer based restorative materials (GC Fuji IX GP, GC Fuji VII, and Dyract) and compare their microleakage with the previously existing glass ionomer restorative materials (GC Fuji II LC) in primary and permanent teeth. Method One hundred and fifty (75 + 75) non-carious deciduous and permanent teeth were restored with glass ionomer based restorative materials after making class I cavities. Samples were subjected to thermocycling after storing in distilled water for 24 h. Two coats of nail polish were applied 1 mm short of restorative margins and samples sectioned buccolingually after storing in methylene blue dye for 24 h. Microleakage was assessed using stereomicroscope. Result Significant differences (P < 0.05) were found when inter group comparisons were done. Except when GC Fuji VII (Group III) was compared with GC Fuji II LC (Group II) and Dyract (Group IV), non-significant differences (P > 0.05) were observed. It was found that there was no statistically significant difference when the means of microleakage of primary teeth were compared with those of permanent teeth. Conclusions GC Fuji IX GP showed maximum microleakage and GC Fuji VII showed least microleakage. PMID:23960526

  10. Refractory chronic spontaneous urticaria and permanent atrial fibrillation associated with dental infection: Mere coincidence or something more to it?

    PubMed

    Kasperska-Zajac, Alicja; Grzanka, Alicja; Kowalczyk, Jacek; Wyszyńska-Chłap, Magdalena; Lisowska, Grażyna; Kasperski, Jacek; Jarząb, Jerzy; Misiołek, Maciej; Kalarus, Zbigniew

    2016-03-01

    Controversy surrounds the role of dental infection/inflammation in the oral cavity in chronic spontaneous urticaria (CSU) and atrial fibrillation (AF), which is mainly due to scarce literature in this area. Therefore, this case report and review of literature illustrate a possible association between the acute-phase response (APR) and clinical conditions, such as CSU and dental infection/inflammation of oral cavity and AF.We describe a 36-year-old man with an 8-year history of difficult-to-treat, uncontrolled CSU, co-existent with dental infection/inflammatory processes of oral cavity and permanent atrial fibrillation (AF). In the presented case, the most likely triggering or aggravating/maintaining factor of the symptoms was the inflammation/dental infection of the oral cavity because of rapid reduction of the urticarial symptoms, drug doses, and serum CRP levels after the dental therapy. Dental treatment may have a beneficial effect on the systemic inflammatory response, reducing/normalizing the circulating levels of APR markers. APR activation appears to worsen CSU course, early identification and treatment of infectious/inflammatory foci in the oral cavity would form the mainstay of supportive therapy for CU probably through reduction of the systemic inflammatory burden. APR associated with infectious/inflammatory foci in the oral cavity could be taken into account as a predisposing agents to AF. PMID:26634403

  11. Immediately restored dental implants for partial-arch applications. A literature update.

    PubMed

    Carrillo García, Celia; Boronat López, Araceli; Peñarrocha Diago, Miguel

    2008-07-01

    This article carries out a literature update on immediately restored dental implants in partially edentulous patients. A search was made in Medline of all articles published between the year 2000 and February 2007, including all articles published in both English and Spanish, in which immediate restoration of implants was made of partially edentulous areas with a minimum of 12 implants and six months follow-up. Certain decisive factors exist for the success of this technique in partially edentulous patients, such as primary stability, a roughened implant surface, and the absence of parafunctional habits in patients acceptable for this type of treatment. Following the analysis of these studies of immediate restoration of teeth in partially edentulous areas, a weighted mean survival of 95.39% was observed. In spite of the high success rate, major controversy still exists on this subject resulting in few studies and short follow-up periods, making the routine use of this technique questionable. PMID:18587310

  12. Seventeen Years of Using Flowable Resin Restoratives--A Dental Practitioner's Personal Clinical Review.

    PubMed

    Firla, Markus Th

    2015-04-01

    Seen through the author's eyes on the basis of his practising dentistry for almost three decades, light-activated flowable resin restoratives (FRCs) or, in common clinical dental terminology, flowable composites have gradually gained major importance in restorative dentistry. Inputs to this ongoing trend are coming from continuous improvements in material properties and the favourable handling characteristics experienced with this particular group of restoratives. Intended to be used in direct adhesive filling procedures, the number and variety of recent generations of flowable composites for lining, restoration of all cavity classes (I-V), core build-ups and, more recently, 'bulk-fill-restorations', however, necessitates a profound clinical understanding of the selective use of flowable composites to ensure clinical success and guarantee long-term high quality results. Clinical relevance: Today's flowable composites allow for reliable restoration of all kinds of defects. However, both the handling characteristics and the material properties of FRCs must be fully understood before taking advantage of their potentially excellent clinical performance. PMID:26076545

  13. Dental implants with the periodontium: a new approach for the restoration of missing teeth.

    PubMed

    Lin, Cheng; Dong, Qing-Shan; Wang, Lei; Zhang, Jun-Rui; Wu, Li-An; Liu, Bao-Lin

    2009-01-01

    Tooth loss is a common occurrence in mankind and damages human health. Osseointegrated dental implants have been successfully used as a popular prosthetic restoration for the missing teeth for many years. However, osseointegration, representing a direct connection between the implant and bone tissue without the periodontium, causes some inevitable problems, such as masticatory force concentration and immobility of the dental implant. Thus, an ideal dental implant should have its own peri-implant periodontium, as do the natural teeth. A number of attempts have been made to reconstruct the periodontium around the implants. Unfortunately, it has been established that a predictable periodontal reconstruction, especially the acellular cementum reconstruction on the surface of the implant, is a very difficult task. In this paper, we propose the hypothesis that the cementum may be a special phenotype of the bone tissue, on the basis of its strong similarity in development, structure, and function. In a certain condition, the bone tissue may change to cementum for special functional needs. In accordance with this hypothesis, we consider a novel approach to reconstruct the peri-implant tissues. Unlike previous studies, this approach imitates the tooth re-plantation process. The key point is to convert the implant-surrounding bone tissues to cementum as a result of adaptive changes to the implant-support demands. This hypothesis, if proven to be valid, will not only represent a breakthrough in cementum research, but also will open a new door to the restoration of missing teeth. PMID:18829177

  14. Swept source optical coherence tomography for quantitative and qualitative assessment of dental composite restorations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sadr, Alireza; Shimada, Yasushi; Mayoral, Juan Ricardo; Hariri, Ilnaz; Bakhsh, Turki A.; Sumi, Yasunori; Tagami, Junji

    2011-03-01

    The aim of this work was to explore the utility of swept-source optical coherence tomography (SS-OCT) for quantitative evaluation of dental composite restorations. The system (Santec, Japan) with a center wavelength of around 1300 nm and axial resolution of 12 μm was used to record data during and after placement of light-cured composites. The Fresnel phenomenon at the interfacial defects resulted in brighter areas indicating gaps as small as a few micrometers. The gap extension at the interface was quantified and compared to the observation by confocal laser scanning microscope after trimming the specimen to the same cross-section. Also, video imaging of the composite during polymerization could provide information about real-time kinetics of contraction stress and resulting gaps, distinguishing them from those gaps resulting from poor adaptation of composite to the cavity prior to polymerization. Some samples were also subjected to a high resolution microfocus X-ray computed tomography (μCT) assessment; it was found that differentiation of smaller gaps from the radiolucent bonding layer was difficult with 3D μCT. Finally, a clinical imaging example using a newly developed dental SS-OCT system with an intra-oral scanning probe (Panasonic Healthcare, Japan) is presented. SS-OCT is a unique tool for clinical assessment and laboratory research on resin-based dental restorations. Supported by GCOE at TMDU and NCGG.

  15. Eighteenth and nineteenth century dental restoration, treatment and consequences in a British nobleman.

    PubMed

    Cox, M; Chandler, J; Boyle, A; Kneller, P; Haslam, R

    2000-12-01

    This paper examines unusual eighteenth and nineteenth century dental treatment and its consequences, in a nobleman excavated from beneath St. Nicholas' Church, Sevenoaks, Kent, UK in the early 1990s. This rare archaeological case exhibits erosion of dental enamel on the labial surface of all the anterior dentition. A programme of historical research suggests that this might be attributed to the application of an acid-based dental tincture or the use of an abrasive substance to whiten the teeth. Palliative treatment for the consequence of this application was prescribed by Dr Robert Blake of Dublin. Further, it bears witness to three dental restorations, two of gold and one tin. The two gold (foil) fillings are an occlusal in the upper-right second molar and a cervical on the labial surface of the upper left canine. The tin filling is an occlusal in the upper left second molar. Excavation of the carious tissue appears to have been undertaken using a spoon shaped implement. PMID:11132689

  16. New Design for Rapid Prototyping of Digital Master Casts for Multiple Dental Implant Restorations

    PubMed Central

    Romero, Luis; Jiménez, Mariano; Espinosa, María del Mar; Domínguez, Manuel

    2015-01-01

    Aim This study proposes the replacement of all the physical devices used in the manufacturing of conventional prostheses through the use of digital tools, such as 3D scanners, CAD design software, 3D implants files, rapid prototyping machines or reverse engineering software, in order to develop laboratory work models from which to finish coatings for dental prostheses. Different types of dental prosthetic structures are used, which were adjusted by a non-rotatory threaded fixing system. Method From a digital process, the relative positions of dental implants, soft tissue and adjacent teeth of edentulous or partially edentulous patients has been captured, and a maser working model which accurately replicates data relating to the patients oral cavity has been through treatment of three-dimensional digital data. Results Compared with the conventional master cast, the results show a significant cost savings in attachments, as well as an increase in the quality of reproduction and accuracy of the master cast, with the consequent reduction in the number of patient consultation visits. The combination of software and hardware three-dimensional tools allows the optimization of the planning of dental implant-supported rehabilitations protocol, improving the predictability of clinical treatments and the production cost savings of master casts for restorations upon implants. PMID:26696528

  17. Multilevel modelling of clustered grouped survival data using Cox regression model: an application to ART dental restorations.

    PubMed

    Wong, May C M; Lam, K F; Lo, Edward C M

    2006-02-15

    In some controlled clinical trials in dental research, multiple failure time data from the same patient are frequently observed that result in clustered multiple failure time. Moreover, the treatments are often delivered by more than one operator and thus the multiple failure times are clustered according to a multilevel structure when the operator effects are assumed to be random. In practice, it is often too expensive or even impossible to monitor the study subjects continuously, but they are examined periodically at some regular pre-scheduled visits. Hence, discrete or grouped clustered failure time data are collected. The aim of this paper is to illustrate the use of the Monte Carlo Markov chain (MCMC) approach and non-informative prior in a Bayesian framework to mimic the maximum likelihood (ML) estimation in a frequentist approach in multilevel modelling of clustered grouped survival data. A three-level model with additive variance components model for the random effects is considered in this paper. Both the grouped proportional hazards model and the dynamic logistic regression model are used. The approximate intra-cluster correlation of the log failure times can be estimated when the grouped proportional hazards model is used. The statistical package WinBUGS is adopted to estimate the parameter of interest based on the MCMC method. The models and method are applied to a data set obtained from a prospective clinical study on a cohort of Chinese school children that atraumatic restorative treatment (ART) restorations were placed on permanent teeth with carious lesions. Altogether 284 ART restorations were placed by five dentists and clinical status of the ART restorations was evaluated annually for 6 years after placement, thus clustered grouped failure times of the restorations were recorded. Results based on the grouped proportional hazards model revealed that clustering effect among the log failure times of the different restorations from the same child was

  18. Translucency of human teeth and dental restorative materials and its clinical relevance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Yong-Keun

    2015-04-01

    The purpose was to review the translucency of human teeth and related dental materials that should be considered for the development of esthetic restorative materials. Translucency is the relative amount of light transmission or diffuse reflection from a substrate surface through a turbid medium. Translucency influences the masking ability, color blending effect, and the degree of light curing through these materials. Regarding the translucency indices, transmission coefficient, translucency parameter, and contrast ratio have been used, and correlations among these indices were confirmed. Translucency of human enamel and dentine increases in direct proportion to the wavelength of incident light in the visible light range. As for the translucency changes by aging, limited differences were reported in human dentine, while those for enamel proved to increase. There have been studies for the adjustment of translucency in dental esthetic restorative materials; the size and amount of filler and the kind of resin matrix were modified in resin composites, and the kind of ingredient and the degree of crystallization were modified in ceramics. Based on the translucency properties of human enamel and dentine, those of replacing restorative materials should be optimized for successful esthetic rehabilitation. Biomimetic simulation of the natural tooth microstructure might be a promising method.

  19. Investigation of thiol-ene and thiol-ene-methacrylate based resins as dental restorative materials

    PubMed Central

    Cramer, Neil B.; Couch, Charles L.; Schreck, Kathleen M.; Carioscia, Jacquelyn A.; Boulden, Jordan E.; Stansbury, Jeffrey W.; Bowman, Christopher N.

    2009-01-01

    Objectives The objective of this work was to evaluate thiol-norbornene and thiol-ene-methacrylate systems as the resin phase of dental restorative materials and demonstrate their superior performance as compared to dimethacrylate materials. Methods Polymerization kinetics and overall functional group conversions were determined by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR). Flexural strength and modulus were determined with a 3-point flexural test. Polymerization-induced shrinkage stress was measured with a tensometer. Results Thiol-ene polymer systems were demonstrated to exhibit advantageous properties for dental restorative materials in regards to rapid curing kinetics, high conversion, and low shrinkage and stress. However, both the thiol-norbornene and thiol-allyl ether systems studied here exhibit significant reductions in flexural strength and modulus relative to BisGMA/TEGDMA. By utilizing the thiol-ene component as the reactive diluent in dimethacrylate systems, high flexural modulus and strength are achieved while dramatically reducing the polymerization shrinkage stress. The methacrylate-thiol-allyl ether and methacrylate-thiol-norbornene systems both exhibited equivalent flexural modulus (2.1 ± 0.1 GPa) and slightly reduced flexural strength (95 ± 1 and 101 ± 3 MPa, respectively) relative to BisGMA/TEGDMA (flexural modulus; 2.2 + 0.1 GPa and flexural strength; 112 ± 3 MPa). Both the methacrylate-thiol-allyl ether and methacrylate-thiol-norbornene systems exhibited dramatic reductions in shrinkage stress (1.1 ± 0.1 and 1.1 ± 0.2 MPa, respectively) relative to BisGMA/TEGDMA (2.6 ± 0.2 MPa). Significance The improved polymerization kinetics and overall functional group conversion, coupled with reductions in shrinkage stress while maintaining equivalent flexural modulus, result in a superior overall dental restorative material as compared to traditional bulk dimethacrylate resins. PMID:19781757

  20. Investigation of the electrical properties of some dental composite restorative materials before and after laser exposure.

    PubMed

    ElKestawy, M A; Saafan, S A; Shehata, M M; Saafan, A M

    2006-10-01

    Some electrical properties, such as piezoelectricity, ac conductivity, dielectric constant and loss tangent of nine commercial types of dental composite restorative materials, have been investigated before and after laser exposure for 3s to study the effect of a probable laser exposure during some surgeries on the electrical properties of these materials. No piezoelectric effect has been found in these materials before and after laser exposure. The materials were found to be good insulators (very poorly conducting materials). The temperature and frequency dependence of ac conductivity, dielectric constant and loss tangent have not shown significant changes in values after laser exposure. PMID:16387356

  1. Sociodemographic, Socio-economic, Clinical and Behavioural Factors Modifying Experience and Prevalence of Dental Caries in the Permanent Dentition

    PubMed Central

    Herrera, MS; Medina-Solis, CE; Islas-Granillo, H; Lara-Carrillo, E; Scougall-Vilchis, RJ; Escoffié-Ramírez, M; la Rosa-Santillana, R De; Avila-Burgos, L

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objective: To identify the sociodemographic, socio-economic, clinical and behavioural factors that modify the experience of decayed, missing and filled teeth (DMFT) and caries prevalence in Nicaraguan children 9-12 years old. Subjects and Methods: We conducted a cross-sectional study in 800 school children 9-12 years old in the city of León, Nicaragua. The clinical oral examinations to identify caries experience were undertaken by two trained and certified examiners. Sociodemographic, socio-economic and behavioural data were collected using questionnaires. Negative binomial regression (NBR) and binary logistic regression (BLR) models were used to model caries experience and caries prevalence, respectively. Results: Mean DMFT index was 0.98 ± 1.74 and caries prevalence (DMFT > 0) was 37.9%. In the NBR model, the categories that increase the expected DMFT mean were: older age, female gender, presence of plaque, and if the school children received curative and curative/preventive dental care in the last year. In the BLR model, the odds of presenting with caries in the permanent dentition were increased in older children, those from large families, mothers with a positive dental attitude, and those school children who received curative and curative/preventive dental care in the last year. Conclusions: Using different models, we identified several sociodemographic, socio-economic, clinical and behavioural factors that modify the experience (NBR) and prevalence (BLR) of dental caries. PMID:25867561

  2. A study of dentists’ preferences for the restoration of shortened dental arches with partial dentures

    PubMed Central

    Nassani, Mohammad Zakaria; Ibraheem, Shukran; Al-Hallak, Khaled Rateb; Ali El Khalifa, Mohammed Othman; Baroudi, Kusai

    2015-01-01

    Objective: This study aimed to use a utility method in order to assess dentists’ preferences for the restoration of shortened dental arches (SDAs) with partial dentures. Also, the impact of patient age and length of the SDA on dentists’ preferences for the partial dentures was investigated. Materials and Methods: Totally, 104 subjects holding a basic degree in dentistry and working as staff members in a private dental college in Saudi Arabia were interviewed and presented with 12 scenarios for patients of different ages and mandibular SDAs of varying length. Participants were asked to indicate on a standardized visual analog scale how they would value the health of the patient's mouth if the mandibular SDAs were restored with cobalt-chromium removable partial dentures (RPDs). Results: With a utility value of 0.0 representing the worst possible health state for a mouth and 1.0 representing the best, dentists’ average utility value of the RPD for the SDAs was 0.49 (sd= 0.15). Mean utility scores of the RPDs across the 12 SDA scenarios ranged between 0.35 and 0.61. RPDs that restored the extremely SDAs attracted the highest utility values and dentists’ utility of the RPD significantly increased with the increase in the number of missing posterior teeth. No significant differences in dentists’ mean utility values for the RPD were identified among SDA scenarios for patients of different ages. Conclusion: Restoration of the mandibular SDAs by RPDs is not a highly preferred treatment option among the surveyed group of dentists. Length of the SDA affects dentists’ preferences for the RPD, but patient age does not. PMID:26038647

  3. The effect of a mouthrinse containing essential oils on dental restorative materials.

    PubMed

    von Fraunhofer, J A; Kelley, J I; DePaola, L G; Meiller, T F

    2006-01-01

    Mouthrinses that contain essential oils are effective for controlling plaque and periodontal disease. Recent studies have shown that such mouthrinses are effective at preventing the formation of biofilm in dental unit waterlines. However, there is no information in the literature regarding the effect of such mouthrinses on restorative materials used within the oral cavity. Specimens of three common restorative materials (a glass ionomer, a composite resin, and amalgam) were subjected to continuous exposure to Listerine and distilled water for 10 days; at that time, the strength, fluid sorption, and surface appearance of the specimens were compared. Specimens of the test materials also were placed in intraoral devices; volunteer patients wore these devices for 12 hours per day for a period of 10 days. During that time, the patients were instructed to rinse twice daily for 30 seconds with Listerine Cool Mint or a non-active mouthrinse. After 10 days, the specimens were salvaged from the devices and inspected by visible and SEM examination. This study indicates that routine use of mouthrinses containing essential oils (or even prolonged exposure to such mouthrinses) has no adverse effects on restorative materials that might be expected to react to such mixtures because of their chemical compositions. It was concluded that active mouthrinses do not appear to have any adverse effects on a variety of restorative biomaterials. PMID:17134077

  4. Finite element analysis of the residual thermal stresses on functionally gradated dental restorations.

    PubMed

    Henriques, B; Miranda, G; Gasik, M; Souza, J C M; Nascimento, R M; Silva, F S

    2015-10-01

    The aim of this work was to study, using the finite element method (FEM), the distribution of thermal residual stresses arising in metal-ceramic dental restorations after cooling from the processing temperature. Three different interface configurations were studied: with conventional sharp transition; one with a 50% metal-50% ceramic interlayer; and one with a compositionally functionally gradated material (FGM) interlayer. The FE analysis was performed based on experimental data obtained from Dynamic Mechanical Analysis (DMA) and Dilatometry (DIL) studies of the monolithic materials and metal/ceramic composites. Results have shown significant benefits of using the 50% metal-50% ceramic interlayer and the FGM interlayer over the conventional sharp transition interface configuration in reduction of the thermal residual stress and improvement of stress profiles. Maximum stresses magnitudes were reduced by 10% for the crowns with 50% metal-50% ceramic interlayer and by 20% with FGM interlayer. The reduction in stress magnitude and smoothness of the stress distribution profile due to the gradated architectures might explain the improved behavior of these novel dental restorative systems relative to the conventional one, demonstrated by in-vitro studies already reported in literature. PMID:26122789

  5. Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus and infection control for restorative dental treatment in nursing homes.

    PubMed

    Hall, David L

    2003-01-01

    The prevalence of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) in nursing home residents now averages 20-35%. This includes both numerous asymptomatic mostly unidentified carriers, and the occasional patient with an active infection. Among the most common sites for positive MRSA colonization are the nares and mouth (saliva). Ohio State University (OSU) dental students perform routine restorative dental care onsite in local nursing homes using portable equipment including handpieces that can generate aerosols. Using a series of cultured test swabs and plates, this pilot study suggests that protection for both dental health care personnel and patients are provided by the following: 1. universal barrier precautions (for example, gloves, gowns, masks, hats, facial shields, glasses), 2. surface disinfectants, 3. pre-op 0.12% chlorhexidene mouth rinses, 4. high volume evacuation, 5. perioral skin scrubs. Additional infection control methods, techniques and equipment were evaluated and compared including rubber dam isolation, hand excavation and bond technique, high-speed air turbine and electric "high" speed handpiece. There was no indication of a special tendency or heightened ability of MRSA to aerosolize. PMID:14650558

  6. Accuracy of intraoral and extraoral digital data acquisition for dental restorations

    PubMed Central

    Rudolph, Heike; Salmen, Harald; Moldan, Matthias; Kuhn, Katharina; Sichwardt, Viktor; Wöstmann, Bernd; Luthardt, Ralph Gunnar

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The computer-aided design (CAD) and computer-aided manufacturing (CAM) process chain for dental restorations starts with taking an impression of the clinical situation. For this purpose, either extraoral digitization of gypsum models or intraoral digitization can be used. Despite the increasing use of dental digitizing systems, there are only few studies on their accuracy. Objective This study compared the accuracy of various intraoral and extraoral digitizing systems for dental CAD/CAM technology. Material and Methods An experimental setup for three-dimensional analysis based on 2 prepared ceramic master dies and their corresponding virtual CAD-models was used to assess the accuracy of 10 extraoral and 4 intraoral optical non-contact dental digitizing systems. Depending on the clinical procedure, 10 optical measurements of either 10 duplicate gypsum dies (extraoral digitizing) or directly of the ceramic master dies (intraoral digitizing) were made and compared with the corresponding CAD-models. Results The digitizing systems showed differences in accuracy. However, all topical systems were well within the benchmark of ±20 µm. These results apply to single tooth measurements. Conclusions Study results are limited, since only single teeth were used for comparison. The different preparations represent various angles and steep and parallel opposing tooth surfaces (incisors). For most digitizing systems, the latter are generally the most difficult to capture. Using CAD/CAM technologies, the preparation angles should not be too steep to reduce digitizing errors. Older systems might be limited to a certain height or taper of the prepared tooth, whereas newer systems (extraoral as well as intraoral digitization) do not have these limitations. PMID:27008261

  7. Accuracy of intraoral and extraoral digital data acquisition for dental restorations.

    PubMed

    Rudolph, Heike; Salmen, Harald; Moldan, Matthias; Kuhn, Katharina; Sichwardt, Viktor; Wöstmann, Bernd; Luthardt, Ralph Gunnar

    2016-02-01

    The computer-aided design (CAD) and computer-aided manufacturing (CAM) process chain for dental restorations starts with taking an impression of the clinical situation. For this purpose, either extraoral digitization of gypsum models or intraoral digitization can be used. Despite the increasing use of dental digitizing systems, there are only few studies on their accuracy. Objective This study compared the accuracy of various intraoral and extraoral digitizing systems for dental CAD/CAM technology. Material and Methods An experimental setup for three-dimensional analysis based on 2 prepared ceramic master dies and their corresponding virtual CAD-models was used to assess the accuracy of 10 extraoral and 4 intraoral optical non-contact dental digitizing systems. Depending on the clinical procedure, 10 optical measurements of either 10 duplicate gypsum dies (extraoral digitizing) or directly of the ceramic master dies (intraoral digitizing) were made and compared with the corresponding CAD-models. Results The digitizing systems showed differences in accuracy. However, all topical systems were well within the benchmark of ±20 µm. These results apply to single tooth measurements. Conclusions Study results are limited, since only single teeth were used for comparison. The different preparations represent various angles and steep and parallel opposing tooth surfaces (incisors). For most digitizing systems, the latter are generally the most difficult to capture. Using CAD/CAM technologies, the preparation angles should not be too steep to reduce digitizing errors. Older systems might be limited to a certain height or taper of the prepared tooth, whereas newer systems (extraoral as well as intraoral digitization) do not have these limitations. PMID:27008261

  8. Permanent teeth development in a Spanish sample. Application to dental age estimation.

    PubMed

    Feijóo, Gonzalo; Barbería, Elena; De Nova, Joaquín; Prieto, Jose Luis

    2012-01-10

    The purpose of this study is to clarify the chronology of different stages of dental development, according to Demirjian, in a sample of Spanish children, which will enable us to build a database that will be used as a reference in regard to the dental development of individuals of our socio-geographic environment. In the same studied sample, a calculation of the dental age according to Demirjian was carried out. This study was conducted in a final sample consisting of 1010 orthopantograms, corresponding to Spanish children (485 boys and 525 girls) ages 2-16. Comparing the age of onset of the different stages among the children, evidence was found that girls had an earlier general development than boys. These differences were only statistically significant in teeth and concrete stages. The canine teeth revealed greater gender dimorphism, with significant differences in all stages compared with the upper canines. The method proposed by Demirjian for dental age calculation resulted in a significant overestimation of dental age in relation to the chronological age in boys (average of 0.87 years) and girls (average of 0.55 years). Data from this study may be used as reference for dental maturity, as well as a standard for estimating age in Spanish children. PMID:21940122

  9. Association between nutritional status and dental caries in permanent dentition among primary schoolchildren aged 12-14 years, Thailand.

    PubMed

    Narksawat, Kulaya; Tonmukayakul, Utsana; Boonthum, Angsana

    2009-03-01

    This cross-sectional study assessed associations between nutrition and dental caries in permanent dentition and identified oral hygiene indicators among older children aged 12-14 years in primary schools in Thailand. The study was comprised of 862 schoolchildren from five provinces representing five regions of Thailand, from both rural and urban areas, including Bangkok. The dental hygeine status was assessed by evaluating for decayed teeth, missing teeth due to decay, and filled teeth index (DMFT index). Weight and height were measured to evaluate the nutritional status; hygiene practices assessed by interview. The results show a negative relationship between nutritional status and the DMFT index, which increased when the nutritional status decreased (Spearman's rho correlation = -0.140, p < 0.001). The results from multiple logistic regression analysis showed normal weight and thin schoolchildren were more likely to have a DMFT of at least 1 by 1.94 times (OR = 1.94; 95%CI = 1.25-3.00, p = 0.004) and 2.22 times (OR = 2.22; 95%CI = 1.20-4.09, p = 0.001), respectively, compared to overweight and obese children. Normal and thin schoolchildren had a higher risk for dental caries than overweight and obese children aged 12-14 years in Thailand. School health promotion activities should emphasize eating habit improvement in order to reduce the incidence of caries. PMID:19323020

  10. Matching the optical properties of direct esthetic dental restorative materials to those of human enamel and dentin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ragain, James Carlton, Jr.

    One of the goals of the restorative dentist is to restore the appearance of the natural dentition. Clinical matching of teeth and restorative materials are seldom accurate and shade selection techniques are subjective. The first specific aim of this research was to characterize the optical absorption and scattering that occurs within enamel, dentin, and composite resin and compomer restorative materials and to relate those phenomena to translucency and color. The second aim was to evaluate small color differences among composite restorative materials which would be detectable by humans. The last aim was to lay the foundation for developing an improved model of specifying layers of dental restorative materials in order to match the translucency and color to those of human enamel. The Kubelka-Munk theory was validated for enamel, dentin, and the restorative materials. These tissues and materials were then characterized in terms of their color parameters. Tooth cores were also characterized in terms of color space parameters. Human subjects were evaluated for their abilities to discriminate small color differences in the dental composite resin materials. The following conclusions were derived from this study: (1) Kubelka-Munk theory accurately predicts the diffuse reflectance spectra of enamel, dentin, and the direct esthetic dental restorative materials studied. (2) Scattering and absorption coefficients of the dental tissues and esthetic restorative materials can be directly calculated from diffuse reflectance measurements of a uniformly thick slab of tissue/material using black and white backings and the appropriate refractive index. (3) For tooth cores, there is a positive correlation between L* and b* and a negative correlation between L* and a*. (4) The range of translucency parameters for the restorative materials studied does not match those of enamel and dentin. (5) None of the shades of the dental composite resin restorative materials studied fit into the

  11. Dental students' ability to assess their performance in a preclinical restorative course: comparison of students' and faculty members' assessments.

    PubMed

    Tuncer, Duygu; Arhun, Neslihan; Yamanel, Kıvanç; Çelik, Çiğdem; Dayangaç, Berrin

    2015-06-01

    Dental education consists of both theoretical and practical learning for students to develop competence in treating patients clinically. When dental students encounter practical courses in their first year as a new educational experience, they must also learn to evaluate themselves. Self-evaluation is an essential skill to learn for dental professionals to keep increasing their competence over the course of their careers. The aim of this study was to compare the assessment scores of second- and third-year dental students and the faculty in two consecutive preclinical practical exams in restorative dentistry courses in a dental school in Turkey. Faculty- and student-assigned scores were calculated from two consecutive preclinical examinations on tooth restorations performed on both artificial casts and phantom patients. The students were formally instructed on grading procedures for tooth preparations, base and restoration placement, and polishing criteria. After each step, each item was assessed by faculty members, the student, and another student. The results indicated that the initial differences between second-year students' assessments of their own preclinical practical ability and that of the faculty decreased among the third-year students. Self-evaluation scores did not indicate whether the third-year students tended to over- or underestimate the quality of their own work. However, the second-year students not only overestimated themselves but thought they were above average. The results point to the need to develop students' self-insight with more exercises and practical training. PMID:26034030

  12. Yellow Nail Syndrome and Nail Lichen Planus may be Induced by a Common Culprit. Focus on Dental Restorative Substances

    PubMed Central

    Baran, Léon-Robert

    2014-01-01

    Different clinical appearances such as Yellow nail syndrome and Lichen planus or lichenoid reactions can originate from close or identical etiologies. They may result from dental restorative materials or metal allergy. Interestingly, the nail sometimes returns to its normal condition, months after the withdrawal of the offending agents. PMID:25593919

  13. Contraction behaviors of dental composite restorations--finite element investigation with DIC validation.

    PubMed

    Chuang, Shu-Fen; Chang, Chih-Han; Chen, Terry Yuan-Fang

    2011-11-01

    The objective of this study was to examine the effects of cavity configuration on the polymerization shrinkage and stress of light-cured composite restorations by combining local strain measurement and a finite element analysis (FEA). Dental mesio-occluso-distal cavities of various widths and depths (each for 2 vs. 4 mm), representing different configuration factors, were prepared on extracted molars. The displacements of the bonded tooth cusps and cavity floors, caused by polymerization shrinkage of composite restorations, were assessed utilizing a digital-image-correlation (DIC) technique. The cervical marginal microleakage was investigated by examining the resin replicas of these restorations under SEM. The local material properties of the polymerized composite along the curing depth were defined by the nanoindentation test and applied in the subsequent FEA. In the FEA, four models were generated to correspond with the experimental restorations. In the DIC measurement results, the 4(w)×4(D) mm cavity presented the greatest values of inward displacements at the cusp and floor. The cavity depth, rather than the cavity width, was found to significantly correlate to the floor deformation, the location of shrinkage centers, and also the cervical microleakage ratio. The FEA simulation results showed that the 2(w)×4(D) mm cavity presented the maximal von Mises and principal stress located respectively on the cervical margins and cavity floor. Additional safety factor analysis showed a high risk of bond failure over the cavity floor in the 4-mm deep cavity. With the experimental validation, the simulation revealed that the cavity depth was significant to the formation of contraction stress and the incidence of interfacial debonding. PMID:22098914

  14. Heat generation caused by ablation of dental restorative materials with an ultra short pulse laser (USPL) system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Braun, Andreas; Wehry, Richard; Brede, Olivier; Frentzen, Matthias; Schelle, Florian

    2011-03-01

    The aim of this study was to assess heat generation in dental restoration materials following laser ablation using an Ultra Short Pulse Laser (USPL) system. Specimens of phosphate cement (PC), ceramic (CE) and composite (C) were used. Ablation was performed with an Nd:YVO4 laser at 1064 nm and a pulse length of 8 ps. Heat generation during laser ablation depended on the thickness of the restoration material. A time delay for temperature increase was observed in the PC and C group. Employing the USPL system for removal of restorative materials, heat generation has to be considered.

  15. Effectiveness of benzocaine in reducing deep cavity restoration and post-extraction stress in dental patients

    PubMed Central

    Al-Samadani, Khalid H.; Gazal, Giath

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: To investigate the effectiveness of topical anesthetic, 20% benzocaine in relieving pain and stress in patients following deep cavity restoration and extraction of teeth under local anesthesia (LA). Methods: A prospective clinical trial was conducted from October 2014 until April 2015 at Taibah University, Al Madinah Al Munawarah, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia. Forty-five patients were included in the 20% benzocaine group, and 46 in the normal saline group. Evaluation of the dental stress was made pre-operatively and immediately post-operative treatment using the visual analogue scale (VAS). Furthermore, discomfort of the injections were recorded by the patients after each treatment on standard 100 mm VAS, tagged at the endpoints with “no pain” (0 mm) and “unbearable pain” (100 mm). Results: There were statistically significant differences between the mean stress scores for patients in the benzocaine and normal saline groups post-operatively (p=0.002). There were significant differences between the mean pain scores for patients in the post buccal injection (p=0.001), post palatal injection (p=0.01), and the post inferior alveolar nerve block groups (p=0.02). Buccal, palatal, and inferior alveolar nerve block injections were more painful for patients in the normal saline group than the benzocaine group. Conclusion: This investigation has demonstrated that post-operative stress associated with deep cavity restoration and dental extractions under LA can be reduced by the application of topical anesthetic (20% benzocaine) at the operative site for intra-oral injections. PMID:26593169

  16. Non-thermal atmospheric plasmas in dental restoration: improved resin adhesive penetration

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Ying; Yu, Qingsong; Wang, Yong

    2014-01-01

    Objective To investigate the influence of non-thermal plasma treatment on the penetration of a model dental adhesive into the demineralized dentin. Methods Prepared dentin surfaces were conditioned with Scotchbond Universal etchant for 15 s and sectioned equally perpendicular to the etched surfaces. The separated halves were randomly selected for treatment with an argon plasma brush (input current 6 mA, treatment time 30 s) or gentle argon air blowing (treatment time 30 s, as control). The plasma-treated specimens and control specimens were applied with a model adhesive containing 2,2-bis[4-(2-hydroxy-3-methacryloxypropoxy) phenyl]-propane (BisGMA) and 2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate (HEMA) (mass ratio of 30/70), gently air-dried for 5 s, and light-cured for 20 s. Cross-sectional specimens were characterized using micro-Raman spectral mapping across the dentin, adhesive/dentin interface, and adhesive layer at 1∼micron spatial resolution. SEM was also employed to examine the adhesive/dentin interfacial morphology. Results The micro-Raman result disclosed that plasma treatment significantly improved the penetration of the adhesive, evidenced by the apparently higher content of the adhesive at the adhesive/dentin interface as compared to the control. Specifically, the improvement of the adhesive penetration using plasma technique was achieved by dramatically enhancing the penetration of hydrophilic monomer (HEMA), while maintaining the penetration of hydrophobic monomer (BisGMA). Morphological observation at the adhesive/dentin interface using SEM also confirmed the improved adhesive penetration. The results further suggested that plasma treatment could benefit polymerization of the adhesive, especially in the interface region. Conclusion The significant role of the non-thermal plasma brush in improving the adhesive penetration into demineralized dentin has been demonstrated. The results obtained may offer a better prospect of using plasma in dental restoration to

  17. Effect of prosthetic restoration on masticatory function in patients with shortened dental arches: a multicentre study.

    PubMed

    Fueki, K; Igarashi, Y; Maeda, Y; Baba, K; Koyano, K; Sasaki, K; Akagawa, Y; Kuboki, T; Kasugai, S; Garrett, N R

    2016-07-01

    The aim of this multicentre study was to investigate the effect of prosthetic restoration for missing posterior teeth on mastication in patients with shortened dental arches (SDAs). Partially dentate patients who had an intact teeth in anterior region and missed distal molar(s) (2-12 missing occlusal units) classified as Kennedy Class I or Class II were recruited from seven university-based dental hospitals in Japan. Of the 125 subjects who underwent baseline (pre-treatment) and follow-up/post-treatment evaluation, 53 chose no replacement of missing teeth and 72 chose treatment with removable partial dentures (n = 53) or implant-supported fixed partial dentures (n = 19). Objective masticatory performance (MP) was evaluated using a gummy jelly test. Perception of chewing ability (CA) was rated using a food intake questionnaire. In the no-treatment group, mean MP and CA scores at baseline were similar to those at follow-up evaluation (P > 0·05). In the treatment group, mean MP after treatment was significantly greater than the pre-treatment mean MP (P < 0·05). However, the mean perceived CA in the treatment groups was similar at pre- and post-treatment (P > 0·05). In a subgroup analysis of subjects in the treatment group, subjects with lower pre-treatment CA showed a significant CA increase after treatment (P = 0·004), but those with higher pre-treatment CA showed a significant decrease in CA (P = 0·001). These results suggest that prosthetic restoration for SDAs may benefit objective masticatory performance in patients needing replacement of missing posterior teeth, but the benefit in subjective chewing ability seems to be limited in subjects with perceived impairment in chewing ability before treatment. PMID:26854877

  18. Ultrashort pulse laser processing of hard tissue, dental restoration materials, and biocompatibles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yousif, A.; Strassl, M.; Beer, F.; Verhagen, L.; Wittschier, M.; Wintner, E.

    2007-07-01

    During the last few years, ultra-short laser pulses have proven their potential for application in medical tissue treatment in many ways. In hard tissue ablation, their aptitude for material ablation with negligible collateral damage provides many advantages. Especially teeth representing an anatomically and physiologically very special region with less blood circulation and lower healing rates than other tissues require most careful treatment. Hence, overheating of the pulp and induction of microcracks are some of the most problematic issues in dental preparation. Up till now it was shown by many authors that the application of picosecond or femtosecond pulses allows to perform ablation with very low damaging potential also fitting to the physiological requirements indicated. Beside the short interaction time with the irradiated matter, scanning of the ultra-short pulse trains turned out to be crucial for ablating cavities of the required quality. One main reason for this can be seen in the fact that during scanning the time period between two subsequent pulses incident on the same spot is so much extended that no heat accumulation effects occur and each pulse can be treated as a first one with respect to its local impact. Extension of this advantageous technique to biocompatible materials, i.e. in this case dental restoration materials and titanium plasma-sprayed implants, is just a matter of consequence. Recently published results on composites fit well with earlier data on dental hard tissue. In case of plaque which has to be removed from implants, it turns out that removal of at least the calcified version is harder than tissue removal. Therefore, besides ultra-short lasers, also Diode and Neodymium lasers, in cw and pulsed modes, have been studied with respect to plaque removal and sterilization. The temperature increase during laser exposure has been experimentally evaluated in parallel.

  19. Clinical practice guidelines for recall and maintenance of patients with tooth-borne and implant-borne dental restorations.

    PubMed

    Bidra, Avinash S; Daubert, Diane M; Garcia, Lily T; Kosinski, Timothy F; Nenn, Conrad A; Olsen, John A; Platt, Jeffrey A; Wingrove, Susan S; Chandler, Nancy Deal; Curtis, Donald A

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to provide guidelines for patient recall regimen, professional maintenance regimen, and at-home maintenance regimen for patients with tooth-borne and implant-borne removable and fixed restorations. The American College of Prosthodontists (ACP) convened a scientific panel of experts appointed by the ACP, American Dental Association, Academy of General Dentistry, and American Dental Hygienists Association, who critically evaluated and debated recently published findings from 2 systematic reviews on this topic. The major outcomes and consequences considered during formulation of the clinical practice guidelines (CPGs) were risk for failure of tooth- and implant-borne restorations. The panel conducted a roundtable discussion of the proposed guidelines, which were debated in detail. Feedback was used to supplement and refine the proposed guidelines, and consensus was attained. A set of CPGs was developed for tooth-borne restorations and implant-borne restorations. Each CPG comprised (1) patient recall, (2) professional maintenance, and (3) at-home maintenance. For tooth-borne restorations, the professional maintenance and at-home maintenance CPGs were subdivided for removable and fixed restorations. For implant-borne restorations, the professional maintenance CPGs were subdivided for removable and fixed restorations and further divided into biological maintenance and mechanical maintenance for each type of restoration. The at-home maintenance CPGs were subdivided for removable and fixed restorations. The clinical practice guidelines presented in this document were initially developed using the 2 systematic reviews. Additional guidelines were developed using expert opinion and consensus, which included discussion of the best clinical practices, clinical feasibility, and risk-benefit ratio to the patient. To the authors' knowledge, these are the first CPGs addressing patient recall regimen, professional maintenance regimen, and at

  20. Time-dependent strength and fatigue resistance of dental direct restorative materials.

    PubMed

    Lohbauer, Ulrich; Frankenberger, Roland; Krämer, Norbert; Petschelt, Anselm

    2003-12-01

    Elastic modulus (EM), initial fracture strength (FS) and flexural fatigue limit (FFL) of dental restorative materials were measured in a simulated oral environment to correlate mechanical response under the influence of water with the chemical nature of the test materials under investigation. One resin composite (RC; Tetric Ceram, Ivoclar-Vivadent Corp., Liechtenstein), an ion-leaching resin composite (ILRC; Ariston pHc, Ivoclar-Vivadent Corp., Liechtenstein) a compomer (CO; Dyract AP, Dentsply Corp., USA) and a glass-ionomer cement (GIC; Ketac Molar, 3MEspe Corp., Germany) were tested. Static EM, FS and dynamic FFL experiments were performed. The FFL was determined under cyclic loading for 10(5) cycles in terms of a staircase approach. The materials were stored for 1, 8, 30, 90 and 180 days in 37 degrees C distilled water, respectively. The RC degraded over time due to water adsorption followed by failure within the resin matrix. The ILRC suffered from a pronounced decrease in FS as well as in FFL due to a constant ion-leaching and macroscopic crack growth. CO failed over time due to resin-filler interface cracking. The GIC exhibited improved mechanical performance over time due to a post-hardening mechanism. The results reveal the necessity for substantial preclinical evaluation of direct restorative materials. The material parameters under investigation are capable of predicting clinical performance over time. PMID:15348497

  1. Effects of the Nd:YAG laser on amalgam dental restorative material: a preliminary study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cernavin, Igor; Hogan, Sean P.

    1996-09-01

    The Nd:YAG laser has been marketed as an instrument for use on both hard and soft dental tissues. Its potential for use on hard tissues is limited but it may be the instrument of choice for use in certain soft tissue procedures. The aim of this study was to examine the effects of the Nd:YAG laser on amalgam restorations which frequently occur on tooth surfaces adjacent to areas of soft tissue which may be subjected to the laser. The amalgam used was Tytin. The laser firing was controlled by a computer and a constant repetition rate of 40 Hz was used. Energy per pulse was altered as follows, 30 mJ, 40 mJ, 60 mJ, 80 mJ, 120 mJ and 140 mJ. Exposure times of 0.05 sec, 0.125 sec, 0.25 sec, 0.5 sec, 1 sec, 2 sec, 3 sec, 4 sec, and 5 sec were used. The width of defect was measured using a Nikon measurescope with 10x magnification and it was established that the damage threshold lies between 0.125 sec and 0.25 sec for 30 mJ per pulse. The data was analyzed using a one way ANOVA statistical test. There was a significant correlation between the width of the defect and energy per pulse setting as well as exposure time. The findings indicate that amalgam restorations are prone to damage from inadvertent laser exposure and clinicians must take measures to protect such restorations during lasing of soft tissues.

  2. Timing of mineralization of homologues permanent teeth--an evaluation of the dental maturation in panoramic radiographs.

    PubMed

    Sahlstrand, Pia; Lith, Agneta; Hakeberg, Magnus; Norén, Jörgen G

    2013-01-01

    Clinically the condition Molar Incisor Hypomineralization (MIH),varies considerably between individuals, where any number of molars, from one to all four permanent first molars, may be affected with different degrees of hypomineralized enamel within the same dentition. An explanation to these variations could be that the start of the enamel mineralization differs between homologues teeth. The aim of this study was to compare the dental development between homologues teeth in digital panoramic radiographs (PRs),from children aged 7 to 11 years, using the Gleiser & Hunt method on second and third molars and to calculate the crown/root ratio for the mandibular premolars.77 PRs, from individuals between 7.3 and 11.0 years of age, were studied. Differences in developmental stages between homologues teeth (second and third molars) were studied. In 72 of these PRs, the crown/root ratio of mandibular premolars was also compared. In 31 of the PRs, a difference in development was found between the right and left maxillary second molar. In 22 PRs, a difference in development between the right and left mandibular second molar was found. In 17 of the PRs, a difference in development was found between the right and left maxillary third molars. In 26 PRs,a difference in-between the right and left mandibular third molar was found. In 72 PRs, the crown/root ratio of mandibular premolars was measured and differences were found. All these differences were significant. A possible explanation to the variations in expressivity of MIH may be a result of differences in the start of mineralization between homologues teeth. Timing of mineralization of homologues permanent teeth--An evaluation of the dental maturation in panoramic radiographs. PMID:24341164

  3. [Gingivo-dental sparing strategy of orthodontic treatment (fitting with permanent dentures)].

    PubMed

    Bragin, E A

    2003-01-01

    Development of inflammatory process in the marginal part of the mucosa is caused not only by epithelial injury during tooth preparation and dental plaque accumulation, but by irregular contour and position of the artificial crown edge as well. Clinical, x-ray, and cytoenzymological studies showed that orthodontic treatment with cermet and polyceramic dentures with fixation of the supporting elements at the level of the gingival edge in tissues adjacent to the tooth causes the slightest pathological changes. The compensatory adaptive processes in this area of the buccal mucosa are the most pronounced if preparation of hard dental tissues is combined with closed currettage of periodontal pouches, which was confirmed by remote clinical results and laboratory findings in patients with slight and medium-severe periodontitis. PMID:12931421

  4. Biometric analysis of the dental casts of Maasai following traditional extraction of mandibular permanent central incisors and of Kikuyu children.

    PubMed

    Hassanali, J; Amwayi, P

    1993-12-01

    Dental plaster casts of 93 Maasai and 79 Kikuyu children age 12-15 years were analysed. Four biometric measurements were taken of the maxillary and mandibular casts: intercanine distance (C-C), inter-molar distance (M-M), canine arch circumference (C-C ACirc.), and molar arch circumference (M-M ACirc.). Incisor space (IS) was also measured in the mandibular casts. The mean values of all measurements except (M-M) in the mandibular casts were significantly reduced in the Maasai who had permanent central incisors extracted compared to the non-extracted Maasai and the Kikuyu. The mean incisor space in the Maasai with extractions was 6.3 mm compared to 11.7 mm in the non-extracted Maasai group. The extent of reduction of IS, C-C, C-C ACirc. and M-M ACirc. following extractions of the incisors may depend on the mesial drift of lateral incisors, jaw growth and soft tissue influence. The position of the tongue and occlusal relationship of the molars may prevent bucco-lingual movements maintaining a constant M-M. There was no significant difference in the mandibular cast dimensions of the non-extracted Maasai and the Kikuyu. Analysis of the maxillary cast dimensions of the Maasai with extraction, non-extracted Maasai and Kikuyu showed no significant differences suggesting that the extraction of mandibular incisors has no effect on maxillary arch dimensions. The variability in growth of the dento-alveolar complex itself may explain why the dental arch dimensions are similar in the Maasai and Kikuyu despite ethnic differences. There was no significant difference between the male and female dental arch dimensions. PMID:8112417

  5. Combined effect of staining substances on the discoloration of esthetic Class V dental restorative materials.

    PubMed

    Lee, Yong-Keun; Powers, John M

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the combined effect of an organic substance (mucin as a substitute for salivary organic substances), chlorhexidine, and an iron compound/tea solution on the changes in the color of esthetic Class V dental restorative materials. Color of a glass ionomer, resin-modified glass ionomer, compomer and flowable resin composite of A2 shade, respectively, was determined according to the CIELAB color scale relative to the standard illuminant D65. Color was measured at baseline, and after sequential immersion in the following substances: Step-1, mucin in PBS (MCP) for 48 h; Step-2, chlorhexidine (CHX) for 24 h; Step-3, iron compound (IRN) or tea solution (TEA) up to 7 days; and Step-4, ultrasonic cleaning for 1 h. Color change (DeltaE(ab )*) was calculated by the equation: DeltaE(ab)* = [(DeltaL*)(2) + (Deltaa*)(2) + (Deltab*)(2)](1/2), of which DeltaL(*) indicates changes in value, Deltaa(*) indicates changes in red-green parameter and Deltab(*) indicates changes in yellow-blue parameter. DeltaE(ab)* values after immersion in MCP and CHX were compared, and DeltaE(ab)* values after immersion in IRN or TEA, and subsequent ultrasonic cleaning were compared with respect to the restorative material and immersion substance. DeltaE(ab)* and changes in the color parameters (DeltaL(*), DeltaC(ab)* and DeltaH(ab)*) were analyzed by repeated measures, analysis of variance and a post-hoc test at the 0.05 level of significance. Color changes after immersion in MCP were acceptable (DeltaE(ab)* < 3.3), and those after immersion in CHX were generally acceptable. The range of DeltaE(ab)* values after immersion in IRN was 3.1-19.6, and that after ultrasonic cleaning was 2.4-9.6. The range of DeltaE(ab)* values after immersion in TEA was 10.7-21.1, and that after ultrasonic cleaning was 11.9-14.5. Color changes of four Class V restorative materials after combined treatment with mucin, chlorhexidine and an iron compound/tea solution were not acceptable

  6. Microleakage of Four Dental Cements in Metal Ceramic Restorations With Open Margins

    PubMed Central

    Eftekhar Ashtiani, Reza; Farzaneh, Babak; Azarsina, Mohadese; Aghdashi, Farzad; Dehghani, Nima; Afshari, Aisooda; Mahshid, Minu

    2015-01-01

    Background: Fixed prosthodontics is a routine dental treatment and microleakage is a major cause of its failure. Objectives: The aim of this study was to assess the marginal microleakage of four cements in metal ceramic restorations with adapted and open margins. Materials and Methods: Sixty sound human premolars were selected for this experimental study performed in Tehran, Iran and prepared for full-crown restorations. Wax patterns were formed leaving a 300 µm gap on one of the proximal margins. The crowns were cast and the samples were randomly divided into four groups based on the cement used. Copings were cemented using zinc phosphate cement (Fleck), Fuji Plus resin-modified glass ionomer, Panavia F2.0 resin cement, or G-Cem resin cement, according to the manufacturers’ instructions. Samples were immersed in 2% methylene blue solution. After 24 hours, dye penetration was assessed under a stereomicroscope and analyzed using the respective software. Data were analyzed using ANOVA, paired t-tests, and Kruskal-Wallis, Wilcoxon, and Mann-Whitney tests. Results: The least microleakage occurred in the Panavia F2.0 group (closed margin, 0.18 mm; open margin, 0.64 mm) and the maximum was observed in the Fleck group (closed margin, 1.92 mm; open margin, 3.32 mm). The Fleck group displayed significantly more microleakage compared to the Fuji Plus and Panavia F2.0 groups (P < 0.001) in both closed and open margins. In open margins, differences in microleakage between the Fuji Plus and G-Cem as well as between the G-Cem and Panavia F2.0 groups were significant (P < 0.001). In closed margins, only the G-Cem group displayed significantly more microleakage as compared to the Panavia F2.0 group (P < 0.05). Paired t-test results showed significantly more microleakage in open margins compared to closed margins, except in the Fuji Plus group (P = 0.539). Conclusions: Fuji Plus cement exhibited better sealing ability in closed and open margins compared to G-Cem and Fleck

  7. Measurement for natural dental neck data of normal adults and its clinical significance on guiding implant restoration

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Mingxu; Gu, Fang; Wang, Junjun; Zhou, Chengyuan; Xia, Junnan; Qin, Hongwei; Yang, Jianjun

    2015-01-01

    Objective: Provide reference basis for the clinical implant restoration to select implant diameter through measuring each data of 7 teeth in the dental neck of bilateral upper and lower jaws of the young volunteers with normal dentition. Methods: Select 30 healthy young volunteers with complete dentition but no malocclusion, take cone beam CT (CBCT), measure the mesiodistal and buccolingual distance of the tooth root at 1.5 mm from 14 teeth (bilateral upper and lower jaws) to alveolar crest, trace out the outline of each tooth neck in this layer, calculate the cross sectional area and roundness of each tooth neck according to pixel value calibration, and then carry out statistical processing. Results: Complete the data collection and processing of mesiodistal length, buccolingual width, cross sectional area, and cross sectional roundness of the dental neck at 1.5 mm from these seven teeth of the bilateral upper and lower jaws to the alveolar crest of 30 volunteers, and calculate the mean value, variance, and reference value range of medical science of each index. Conclusion: CBCT can effectively obtain the image information of the dental neck. Through mimics 10.0 and Photoshop CS3, it is possible to accurately calculate the dental neck length and width, and cross sectional area of each tooth according to CBCT image information. This result can provide reference basis for the implant restoration of the clinical teeth. PMID:26628955

  8. Effects of mercury release from amalgam dental restorations during cremation on soil mercury levels of three New Zealand crematoria

    SciTech Connect

    Nieschmidt, A.K.; Kim, N.D.

    1997-05-01

    A vast amount of research has been undertaken in the last 15-20 years on the corrosion reactions occurring in dental amalgam, release of mercury from amalgam restorations, and the toxic effects of this released mercury on the human body. However, one environmental aspect of amalgam dental restorations that has not received a great deal of attention is the release of mercury during cremation. Mercury is liberated during cremation both because dental amalgams are unstable at cremation temperatures (650-700{degrees}C) and because the free mercury metal is highly volatile. In New Zealand, 58% of deaths are followed by cremation and this figure is likely to rise in the future. This increasing use of cremation as the method of corpse disposal, coupled with the fact that each amalgam restoration is approximately 50% mercury, implies that a significant amount of mercury may be emitted into the environment every year. This study examines mercury released from crematoria in New Zealand. 20 refs., 2 figs., 5 tabs.

  9. CCL3 and CXCL12 production in vitro by dental pulp fibroblasts from permanent and deciduous teeth stimulated by Porphyromonas gingivalis LPS

    PubMed Central

    SIPERT, Carla Renata; MORANDINI, Ana Carolina de Faria; MODENA, Karin Cristina da Silva; DIONÍSIO, Thiago José; MACHADO, Maria Aparecida Andrade Moreira; de OLIVEIRA, Sandra Helena Penha; CAMPANELLI, Ana Paula; SANTOS, Carlos Ferreira

    2013-01-01

    Objective: The aim of this study was to compare the production of the chemokines CCL3 and CXCL12 by cultured dental pulp fibroblasts from permanent (PDPF) and deciduous (DDPF) teeth under stimulation by Porphyromonas gingivalis LPS (PgLPS). Material and Methods: Primary culture of fibroblasts from permanent (n=3) and deciduous (n=2) teeth were established using an explant technique. After the fourth passage, fibroblasts were stimulated by increasing concentrations of PgLPS (0 - 10 µg/mL) at 1, 6 and 24 h. The cells were tested for viability through MTT assay, and production of the chemokines CCL3 and CXCL12 was determined through ELISA. Comparisons among samples were performed using One-way ANOVA for MTT assay and Two-way ANOVA for ELISA results. Results: Cell viability was not affected by the antigen after 24 h of stimulation. PgLPS induced the production of CCL3 by dental pulp fibroblasts at similar levels for both permanent and deciduous pulp fibroblasts. Production of CXCL12, however, was significantly higher for PDPF than DDPF at 1 and 6 h. PgLPS, in turn, downregulated the production of CXCL12 by PDPF but not by DDPF. Conclusion: These data suggest that dental pulp fibroblasts from permanent and deciduous teeth may present a differential behavior under PgLPS stimulation. PMID:23739851

  10. Assessment of exposures and potential risks to the US adult population from wear (attrition and abrasion) of gold and ceramic dental restorations.

    PubMed

    Richardson, G Mark; Clemow, Scott R; Peters, Rachel E; James, Kyle J; Siciliano, Steven D

    2016-01-01

    Little has been published on the chemical exposures and risks of dental restorative materials other than from dental amalgam and composite resins. Here we provide the first exposure and risk assessment for gold (Au) alloy and ceramic restorative materials. Based on the 2001-2004 US National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES), we assessed the exposure of US adults to the components of Au alloy and ceramic dental restorations owing to dental material wear. Silver (Ag) is the most problematic component of Au alloy restorations, owing to a combination of toxicity and proportional composition. It was estimated that adults could possess an average of four tooth surfaces restored with Au alloy before exceeding, on average, the reference exposure level (REL) for Ag. Lithium (Li) is the most problematic component of dental ceramics. It was estimated that adults could possess an average of 15 tooth surfaces restored with ceramics before exceeding the REL for Li. Relative risks of chemical exposures from dental materials decrease in the following order: Amalgam>Au alloys>ceramics>composite resins. PMID:25805253

  11. Clinical Evaluation of Reasons for Replacement of Amalgam Restorations in Patients Referring to a Dental School in Iran

    PubMed Central

    Pouralibaba, Firoz; Joulaei, Mohammad; Kashefimehr, Atabak; Pakdel, Farzaneh; Jamali, Zahra; Esmaeili, Ali

    2010-01-01

    Background and aims The present study evaluated the most common reasons for replacing amalgam restorations in a university clinic. Materials and methods A total of 217 restorations which needed to be replaced were clinically and radiographically evaluated in a period of 4 months. The frequencies of reasons for replacing amalgam restorations were calculated: The assessed items included recurrent caries, tooth structure fracture (functional or non-functional cusps), amalgam bulk fracture, amalgam marginal fracture, proximal overhangs, and esthetics. Data were analyzed using Fischer’s exact test. Results Both in vital teeth and teeth which had undergone root canal therapy, the most common reason for amalgam replacement was cusp fracture, with the fracture of non-functional cusps being statistically significant. Recurrent caries was the second most common reason for amalgam replacement. In Class I restorations, the most common reasons were recurrent caries and esthetics, with no statistical significance. The most frequent problem in Class II restorations was fracture of non-functional cusps, with a statistical significance in three-surface restorations. Conclusion According to the results, failing to reduce undermined cusps and neglectful caries removal are the reasons for majority of amalgam restoration replacements. These issues should be emphasized in the curriculum for dental students and continuing education courses. PMID:22991598

  12. Catechol-Functionalized Synthetic Polymer as a Dental Adhesive to Contaminated Dentin Surface for a Composite Restoration

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    This study reports a synthetic polymer functionalized with catechol groups as dental adhesives. We hypothesize that a catechol-functionalized polymer functions as a dental adhesive for wet dentin surfaces, potentially eliminating the complications associated with saliva contamination. We prepared a random copolymer containing catechol and methoxyethyl groups in the side chains. The mechanical and adhesive properties of the polymer to dentin surface in the presence of water and salivary components were determined. It was found that the new polymer combined with an Fe3+ additive improved bond strength of a commercial dental adhesive to artificial saliva contaminated dentin surface as compared to a control sample without the polymer. Histological analysis of the bonding structures showed no leakage pattern, probably due to the formation of Fe–catechol complexes, which reinforce the bonding structures. Cytotoxicity test showed that the polymers did not inhibit human gingival fibroblast cells proliferation. Results from this study suggest a potential to reduce failure of dental restorations due to saliva contamination using catechol-functionalized polymers as dental adhesives. PMID:26176305

  13. Finite element modeling of dental restoration through multi-material laser densification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dai, Kun

    To provide guidance for intelligent selection of various parameters in the Multi-Material Laser Densification (MMLD) process for dental restorations, finite element modeling (FEM) has been carried out to investigate the MMLD process. These modeling investigations include the thermal analysis of the nominal surface temperature that should be adopted during experiments in order to achieve the desired microstructure; the effects of the volume shrinkage due to transformation from a powder compact to dense liquid on the temperature distribution and the size of the transformation zone; the evolution of transient temperature, transient stresses, residual stresses and distortions; and the effects of laser processing conditions, such as fabrication sequences, laser scanning patterns, component sizes, preheating temperatures, laser scanning rates, initial porosities, and thicknesses of each powder layer, on the final quality of the component fabricated via the MMLD process. The simulation results are compared with the experiments. It is found that the predicted temperature distribution matches the experiments very well. The nominal surface temperature applied on the dental porcelain body should be below 1273 K to prevent the forming of the un-desired microstructure (i.e., a leucite-free glassy phase). The simplified models that do not include the volume shrinkage effect provide good estimations of the temperature field and the size of the laser-densified body, although the shape of the laser-densified body predicted is different from that obtained in the experiment. It is also fount that warping and residual thermal stresses of the laser-densified component are more sensitive to the chamber preheating temperature and the thickness of each powder layer than to the laser scanning rate and the initial porosity of the powder layer. The major mechanism responsible for these phenomena is identified to be related to the change of the temperature gradient induced by these laser

  14. Assessing ex vivo dental biofilms and in vivo composite restorations using cross-polarization optical coherence tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, R.; Aparicio, C.; Chityala, R.; Chen, R.; Fok, A.; Rudney, J.

    2012-01-01

    A cross-polarization 1310-nm optical coherence tomography system (CP-OCT), using a beam splitter based design, was used to assess ex vivo growth of complex multi-species dental biofilms. These biofilm microcosms were derived from plaque samples along the interface of composite or amalgam restoration in children with a history of early childhood caries. This paper presents a method of measuring the mean biofilm height of mature biofilms using CP-OCT. For our in vivo application, the novel swept source based CP-OCT intraoral probe (Santec Co. Komaki, Japan) dimensions and system image acquisition speed (20 image frames/second) allowed imaging pediatric subjects as young as 4 years old. The subsurface enamel under the interface of composite resin restorations of pediatric subjects were imaged using CP-OCT. Cavitated secondary caries is clearly evident from sound resin composite restorations.

  15. Optical coherence tomography based imaging of dental demineralisation and cavity restoration in 840 nm and 1310 nm wavelength regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Damodaran, Vani; Rao, Suresh Ranga; Vasa, Nilesh J.

    2016-08-01

    In this paper, a study of in-house built optical coherence tomography (OCT) system with a wavelength of 840 nm for imaging of dental caries, progress in demineralisation and cavity restoration is presented. The caries when imaged with the 840 nm OCT system showed minute demineralisation in the order of 5 μm. The OCT system was also proposed to study the growth of lesion and this was demonstrated by artificially inducing caries with a demineralisation solution of pH 4.8. The progress of carious lesion to a depth of about 50-60 μm after 60 hours of demineralisation was clearly observed with the 840 nm OCT system. The tooth samples were subjected to accelerated demineralisation condition at pH of approximately 2.3 to study the adverse effects and the onset of cavity formation was clearly observed. The restoration of cavity was also studied by employing different restorative materials (filled and unfilled). In the case of restoration without filler material (unfilled), the restoration boundaries were clearly observed. Overall, results were comparable with that of the widely used 1310 nm OCT system. In the case of restoration with filler material, the 1310 nm OCT imaging displayed better imaging capacity due to lower scattering than 840 nm imaging.

  16. CHIPPING FRACTURE RESISTANCE OF DENTAL CAD/CAM RESTORATIVE MATERIALS: PART I, PROCEDURES AND RESULTS

    PubMed Central

    Quinn, G. D.; Giuseppetti, A. A.; Hoffman, K. H.

    2014-01-01

    Objective The edge chipping test was used to measure the fracture resistance of CAD/CAM dental restoration ceramics and resin composites. Methods An edge chipping machine was used to evaluate six materials including one feldspathic porcelain, two glass ceramics, a filled resin-composite, a yttria-stabilized zirconia, and a new ceramic-resin composite material. Force versus edge distance data were collected over a broad range of forces and distances. Data were analyzed by several approaches and several chipping resistance parameters were evaluated. The effects of using different indenter types were explored. Results The force versus distance trends were usually nonlinear with good fits to a power law equation with exponents usually ranging from 1.2 to 1.9. The order of chipping resistance (from least to greatest) was: feldspathic porcelain and a leucite glass ceramic (which were similar), followed by the lithium disilicate glass ceramic and the two resin composites (which were similar), and finally the zirconia which had the greatest resistance to chipping. Chipping with a Vickers indenter required 28% to 45% more force than with the sharp conical 120° indenter. The two indenters rank materials approximately the same way. The power law exponents were very similar for the two indenters for a particular material, but the exponents varied with material. The Rockwell C indenter gives different power law trends and rankings. Significance Despite the variations in the trends and indenters, simple comparisons between materials can be made by chipping with sharp conical 120° or Vickers indenters at 0.50 mm. Broad distance ranges are recommended for trend evaluation. PMID:24685178

  17. Frequency and variability of dental morphology in deciduous and permanent dentition of a Nasa indigenous group in the municipality of Morales, Cauca, Colombia

    PubMed Central

    Díaz, Eider; García, Lorena; Hernández, Michelle; Palacio, Lesly; Ruiz, Diana; Velandia, Nataly; Villavicencio, Judy

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: To determine the frequency, variability, sexual dimorphism and bilateral symmetry of fourteen dental crown traits in the deciduous and permanent dentition of 60 dental models (35 women and 25 men) obtained from a native, indigenous group of Nasa school children of the Musse Ukue group in the municipality of Morales, Department of Cauca, Colombia. Methods: This is a quantitative, descriptive, cross-sectional study that characterizes dental morphology by means of the systems for temporary dentition from Dahlberg (winging), and ASUDAS (crowding, reduction of hypocone, metaconule and cusp 6), Hanihara (central and lateral incisors in shovel-shape and cusp 7), Sciulli (double bit, layered fold protostylid, cusp pattern and cusp number) and Grine (Carabelli trait); and in permanent dentition from ASUDAS (Winging, crowding, central and lateral incisors in shovel-shape and double shovel-shape, Carabelli trait, hypocone reduction, metaconule, cusp pattern, cusp number, layered fold protostylid, cusp 6 and cusp 7). Results: The most frequent dental crown features were the shovel-shaped form, grooved and fossa forms of the Carabelli trait, metaconule, cusp pattern Y6, layered fold, protostylid (point P) and cusp 6. Sexual dimorphism was not observed and there was bilateral symmetry in the expression of these features. Conclusions: The sample studied presented a great affinity with ethnic groups belonging to the Mongoloid Dental Complex due to the frequency (expression) and variability (gradation) of the tooth crown traits, upper incisors, the Carabelli trait, the protostylid, cusp 6 and cusp 7. The influence of the Caucasoide Dental Complex associated with ethno-historical processes cannot be ruled out. PMID:24970955

  18. Optical properties of dental restorative materials in the wavelength range 400 to 700 nm for the simulation of color perception

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Friebel, Moritz; Povel, Kirsten; Cappius, Hans-Joachim; Helfmann, Jürgen; Meinke, Martina

    2009-09-01

    Aesthetic restorations require dental restorative materials to have optical properties very similar to those of the teeth. A method is developed to this end to determine the optical parameters absorption coefficient μa, scattering coefficient μs, anisotropy factor g, and effective scattering coefficient μs' of dental restorative materials. The method includes sample preparation and measurements of transmittance and reflectance in an integrating sphere spectrometer followed by inverse Monte Carlo simulations. Using this method the intrinsic optical parameters are determined for shade B2 of the light-activated composites TPH® Spectrum®, Esthet-X®, and the Ormocer® Definite® in the wavelength range 400 to 700 nm. By using the determined parameters μa, μs, and g together with an appropriate phase function, the reflectance of samples with 1-mm layer thickness and shade B2 could be predicted with a very high degree of accuracy using a forward Monte Carlo simulation. The color perception was calculated from the simulated reflectance according to the CIELAB system. We initiate the compilation of a data pool of optical parameters that in the future will enable calculation models to be used as a basis for optimization of the optical approximation of the natural tooth, and the composition of new materials and their production process.

  19. The Efficacy of Noncontingent Escape for Decreasing Children's Disruptive Behavior during Restorative Dental Treatment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Callaghan, Patrick M.; Allen, Keith D.; Powell, Shawn; Salama, Fouad

    2006-01-01

    We evaluated the effectiveness of a dentist-implemented behavioral intervention in which brief escape from dental treatment was provided on a regular basis, independent of the child's behavior. Within a multiple baseline design across subjects, 5 children, ages 4 to 7 years, were provided with temporary escape from dental treatment on a fixed-time…

  20. Clinical Investigation of a New Bulk Fill Composite Resin in the Restoration of Posterior Teeth

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-09-07

    Dental Restoration Failure of Marginal Integrity; Dental Caries; Unrepairable Overhanging of Dental Restorative Materials; Poor Aesthetics of Existing Restoration; Secondary Dental Caries Associated With Failed or Defective Dental Restorations; Fractured Dental Restorative Materials Without Loss of Materials; Fracture of Dental Restorative Materials With Loss of Material

  1. Fluoride Release and Uptake of Five Dental Restoratives from Mouthwashes and Dentifrices

    PubMed Central

    Rao, B Saketh Rama; Moosani, Gopi Krishna Reddy; Shanmugaraj, Muthu; Kannapan, Balamurugan; Shankar, B. Shiva; Ismail, Prabu Mahin Syed

    2015-01-01

    Background: This study evaluated the fluoride release and uptake of five common dental restoratives mainly glass ionomer formulations, including a conventional glass ionomer, a relatively new caries stabilization glass ionomer and resin-modified glass ionomer (Fuji II, Fuji VII and Fuji II LC); one compomer (F2000); and one fluoride releasing composite resin (tetric ceram). Materials and Methods: A total of 12 cylindrical specimens for each of the five materials were prepared following manufacturer’s instructions for manipulation and immersed independently in 25 ml of artificial saliva and stored as five groups Group I-V. Each group was further divided into three sub Groups A, B, C. The saliva was changed every day in all the specimens. No treatment was carried out for the specimens in subgroup A. The specimens were immersed in 2% sodium fluoride for 1 min before changing saliva in sub group B and the specimens were treated by brushing with a fluoridated dentifrice for 2 min before changing saliva in sub Group C. The fluoride release was evaluated on the 1st, 7th and 28th day using a fluoride ion specific electrode. Results: The results demonstrated that the conventional glass ionomer and the recently introduced caries stabilizing glass ionomer showed similar patterns and quantity of fluoride release, which was significantly higher than the resin-modified glass ionomer, the compomer and the composite resin. The resin-modified glass ionomer showed higher fluoride release than the compomer and the composite resin. All the formulations of glass ionomers showed fluoride uptake from the neutral sodium fluoride and the fluoridated dentifrice, by releasing increased amounts of fluoride after treatment, in comparison with the untreated group. However, the compomer and the composite resin showed no fluoride uptake. Conclusion: The fluoride released by the glass ionomer cements (GICs) was found to be highest during the first 24 h and decreased significantly over the 1st

  2. Non-thermal Atmospheric Plasma Treatment for Deactivation of Oral Bacteria and Improvement of Dental Composite Restoration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Qing Song; Li, H.; Ritts, A. C.; Yang, B.; Chen, M.; Hong, L.; Xu, C.; Yao, X.; Wang, Y.

    This paper reviews our recent research results of using non-thermal ­atmospheric plasmas for oral bacterial deactivation and for composite restoration improvement. Oral bacteria of Streptococcus mutans (S. mutans) and Lactobacillus acidophilus (L. acidophilus) with an initial bacterial population density between 1.0 × 108 and 5.0 × 108 cfu/ml were seeded on various media and their survivability with plasma exposure was examined. The plasma exposure time for a 99.9999% cell reduction was less than 15 s for S. mutans and within 5 min for L. acidophilus. To evaluate the dentin/composite interfacial bonding, extracted unerupted human third molars were used by removing the crowns and etching the exposed dentin surfaces with 35% phosphoric acid gel. After dental composite application and light curing, the teeth were then sectioned into micro-bars as the specimens for microtensile test. Student Newman Keuls (SNK) tests showed that the bonding strength of the composite restoration to peripheral dentin was significantly increased (by 64%) after 30 s plasma treatment of the dentin surfaces. These findings indicated that non-thermal atmospheric plasma technology is very promising for dental clinical applications.

  3. Quantification of organic eluates from polymerized resin-based dental restorative materials by use of GC/MS.

    PubMed

    Michelsen, Vibeke Barman; Moe, Grete; Skålevik, Rita; Jensen, Einar; Lygre, Henning

    2007-05-01

    Residual monomers, additives and degradation products from resin-based dental restorative materials eluted into the oral cavity may influence the biocompatibility of these materials. Emphasis has been placed on studies addressing cytotoxic, genotoxic and estrogenic potential of these substances. A prerequisite for analyzing the potential of exposure to eluted compounds from dental materials is reliable quantification methods, both real time and accelerated measurements. The purpose of the present study was to quantify nine eluates; 2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate (HEMA), hydroquinone monomethyl ether (MEHQ), camphorquinone (CQ), butylated hydroxytoluene (BHT), ethyl 4-(dimethylamino)benzoate (DMABEE), triethylene glycoldimethacrylate (TEGDMA), trimethylolpropane trimethacrylate (TMPTMA), oxybenzone (HMBP) and drometrizole (TIN P) leaching from specimens of four commonly used resin-based dental materials in ethanol and an aqueous solution. All analyses were performed by use of GC/MS, each component was quantified separately and the results presented in microg mm(-2). This study has shown that elution from various materials differs significantly, not only in the types of eluates, but also regarding amounts of total and of single components. A high amount of HMBP, a UV stabilizer with potential estrogenic activity, was detected from one material in both solutions. PMID:17127109

  4. Multiple Unerupted Permanent Teeth Associated with Noonan Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Uloopi, KS; Madhuri, V; Gopal, AS; Vinay, C; Chandrasekhar, R

    2015-01-01

    The present report describes a case of Noonan's syndrome from a dental viewpoint. Noonan syndrome is an autosomal dominant multisystem disorder. Congenital heart deformities, short stature, thoracic deformities, short neck with webbing, hypertelorism, and malocclusions are some of the frequently observed clinical features. Atypical dental anomalies such as multiple unerupted permanent teeth, multiple submerged and retained deciduous teeth, and supernumerary teeth were found in the present case. Oral prophylaxis and preventive resin restorations were done following which the supernumerary teeth were extracted. 54, 55, 64, 65, 74, 75 and 84 were extracted after orthodontic consultation to facilitate the eruption of permanent teeth. The patient is undergoing fixed orthodontic therapy for forced eruption of unerupted permanent teeth. General dentists should correlate dental anomalies with other systemic features in the diagnosis of such syndromes because of the variability in presentation and the need for multidisciplinary care. PMID:26229724

  5. Novel Dental Restorative Materials having Low Polymerization Shrinkage Stress via Stress Relaxation by Addition-Fragmentation Chain Transfer

    PubMed Central

    Park, Hee Young; Kloxin, Christopher J.; Abuelyaman, Ahmed S.; Oxman, Joe D.; Bowman, Christopher N.

    2012-01-01

    Objectives To produce a reduced stress dental restorative material while simultaneously maintaining excellent mechanical properties, we have incorporated an allyl sulfide functional group into norbornene-methacrylate comonomer resins. We hypothesize that the addition-fragmentation chain transfer (AFCT) enabled by the presence of the allyl sulfide relieves stress in these methacrylate-based systems while retaining excellent mechanical properties owing to the high glass transition temperature of norbornene-containing resins. Methods An allyl sulfide-containing dinorbornene was stoichiometrically formulated with a ring-containing allyl sulfide-possessing methacrylate. To evaluate the stress relaxation effect as a function of the allyl sulfide concentration, a propyl sulfide-based dinorbornene, not capable of addition-fragmentation, was also formulated with the methacrylate monomer. Shrinkage stress, the glass transition temperature and the elastic modulus were all measured. The composite flexural strength and modulus were also measured. ANOVA (CI 95%) was conducted to determine differences between the means. Results Increasing the allyl sulfide content in the resin dramatically reduces the final stress in the norbornene-methacrylate systems. Both norbornene-methacrylate resins demonstrated almost zero stress (more than 96% stress reduction) compared with the conventional BisGMA/TEGDMA 70/30 wt% control. Mechanical properties of the allyl sulfide-based dental composites were improved to the point of being statistically indistinguishable from the control BisGMA-TEGDMA by changing the molar ratio between the methacrylate and norbornene functionalities. Significance The allyl sulfide-containing norbornene-methacrylate networks possessed super-ambient Tg, and demonstrated significantly lower shrinkage stress when compared with the control (BisGMA/TEGDMA 70 to 30 wt%). Although additional development remains, these low stress materials exhibit excellent mechanical

  6. Forensic or archaeological issue: is chemical analysis of dental restorations helpful in assessing time since death and identification of skeletonized human remains?

    PubMed

    Zelic, Ksenija; Djonic, Danijela; Neskovic, Olivera; Stoiljkovic, Milovan; Nikolic, Slobodan; Zivkovic, Vladimir; Djuric, Marija

    2013-09-01

    In 2011, small mass grave with completely skeletonized remains was discovered in Belgrade suburb. An eyewitness claimed that skeletons belonged to German soldiers killed in WWII. Anthropologists were engaged to investigate whether the skeletal remains correspond to the indicated German group or represent more recent case requiring court trial. Numerous dental restorations were noticed. Owing to the fact that different dental materials were used in dental practice at certain times, the aim of this study was to explore whether analysis of dental restorations could help in identification and estimation of time since death. Inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry revealed that dental fillings corresponded to copper amalgam, conventional silver amalgam, silicophosphate cement, and zinc phosphate cement. Chemical results combined with anthropological and historical facts suggest that the individuals lived before the 1960s in country with well-developed dental service at that time. Therefore, chemical analysis of dental fillings was useful to distinguish between skeletal remains that are too old to be of forensic interest and the remains relevant to legal investigations. PMID:23866008

  7. Dental caries and first permanent molar pit and fissure morphology in 7- to 8-year-old children in Wuhan, China.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jin-Dong; Chen, Xi; Frencken, Jo; Du, Min-Quan; Chen, Zhi

    2012-09-01

    To obtain the caries experience and, plaque accumulation severity and pit and fissure morphology in first permanent molars in 7-8 children in Wuhan, as a reasonable prediction of caries risk and preventive attention in the future, a convenient sample of five primary schools in the vicinity of the Wuhan University School and Hospital of Stomatology was drawn. Two calibrated examiners orally examined all present grade 2 children in the classroom, using standard caries plaque and tooth morphology criteria. Dental caries was scored at enamel (D(2)) and dentine (D(3)) for tooth and surface level. Independent variables were age, gender and school. Data analysis used analysis of variance and t-test. The sample comprised 1 043 7- and 8-year-olds. The prevalence of dental caries in permanent dentition was 8.7% and in primary dentition, 68.7%. Mean Decayed, Missing, Filled Teeth/S (DMFT/S) scores were 0.11 and 0.14, respectively. Mean dmft/s scores were 2.8 and 5.0. The d-component constituted 75% of the d(3)mft index, while enamel carious lesions constituted 36% of the total number of carious lesions (d(2,3)-component). Prevalence of medium and deep pits and fissures was 84.6%. Prevalence of medium and severe plaque accumulation was 67.4%. Prevalence of dental caries in the deciduous and permanent dentitions of 7- to 8-year-old children was high. Deep pits and fissures in high caries risk children should be sealed. PMID:22699265

  8. Recommendations for conducting controlled clinical studies of dental restorative materials. Science Committee Project 2/98--FDI World Dental Federation study design (Part I) and criteria for evaluation (Part II) of direct and indirect restorations including onlays and partial crowns.

    PubMed

    Hickel, Reinhard; Roulet, Jean-François; Bayne, Stephen; Heintze, Siegward D; Mjör, Ivar A; Peters, Mathilde; Rousson, Valentin; Randall, Ros; Schmalz, Gottfried; Tyas, Martin; Vanherle, Guido

    2007-01-01

    clinical trial designs, guidelines for design, randomization, number of subjects, characteristics of participants, clinical assessment, standards and calibration, categories for assessment, criteria for evaluation, and supplemental documentation. Part 2 of the review considers categories of assessment for esthetic evaluation, functional assessment, biological responses to restorative materials, and statistical analysis of results. The overall review represents a considerable effort to include a range of clinical research interests over the past years. As part of the recognition of the importance of these suggestions, the review is being published simultaneously in identical form in both the Journal of Adhesive Dentistry and Clinical Oral Investigations. Additionally, an extended abstract will be published in the International Dental Journal, giving a link to the web full version. This should help to introduce these considerations more quickly to the scientific community. PMID:18341239

  9. The efficacy of noncontingent escape for decreasing children's disruptive behavior during restorative dental treatment.

    PubMed

    O'Callaghan, Patrick M; Allen, Keith D; Powell, Shawn; Salama, Fouad

    2006-01-01

    We evaluated the effectiveness of a dentist-implemented behavioral intervention in which brief escape from dental treatment was provided on a regular basis, independent of the child's behavior. Within a multiple baseline design across subjects, 5 children, ages 4 to 7 years, were provided with temporary escape from dental treatment on a fixed-time schedule. The intervals were signaled by an electronic timer worn by the dentist. Clinically significant reductions were observed in physically disruptive behavior across all 5 children with the introduction of noncontingent escape, and verbally disruptive behavior was markedly reduced in 4 of the 5 children. In addition, the dental staff s use of physical restraint was reduced to near zero across all 5 children. The research extends the literature in both clinical dentistry and in applied behavior analysis by demonstrating that a dentist can easily and effectively implement noncontingent reinforcement to produce clinically significant and socially important changes in children's health behavior. PMID:16813038

  10. Adjunctive role of dental restorations in personal identification of burnt victims

    PubMed Central

    Vandrangi, Sameer Kumar; Radhika, MB; Paremala, K; Reshma, V; Sudhakara, M; Hosthor, Sreelatha S

    2016-01-01

    Background: Fire remains one of the major causes of morbidity and mortality throughout the world and identification of a body from the fatal fire remains a daunting task. Several forensic cases involve interpretation of burnt human bodies from airline and automobile accidents, bombings and unlawful cremation. Fire is also involved in homicides, suicides, accidental death, arson and in attempts to destroy forensic evidence in criminal cases. Soft tissue destruction from fire can be so extensive that conventional methods of identification may be impossible. However, teeth survive even high temperatures due to their resistant composition and so, obviously, the restorative material housed in the teeth are even more secure and can yield valuable information in personal identification. Aim: To assess the usefulness of most common restorations in personal identification in burnt cases. Materials and Methods: The study was conducted on 40 extracted teeth which were divided into four groups (Group 1 - Unrestored teeth, Group 2 - Amalgam restored, Group 3 - Glass ionomer restored and Group 4 - Composite resin restored teeth. The effect of incineration at 200°C, 400°C, 600°C, 800°C, 1000°C for 15 min at each target temperature followed by subsequent cooling was studied. Results: Amalgam restoration was resistant and intact even at 1000°C, whereas GIC and composite restoration are identifiable till 600°C, the residual cavity preparation leaves a clue for narrowing down the spectrum of identification. PMID:27194881

  11. Measurement of the fluorescence of restorative dental materials using a 655-nm diode laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zanin, Fatima A. A.; Souza-Campos, Dilma H.; Zanin, Sissi; Brugnera, Aldo, Jr.; Pecora, Jesus D.; Pinheiro, Antonio L. B.; Harari, Sonia

    2001-04-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the level of fluorescence of seven restorative materials using 655 nm diode laser. The laser fluorescence system has ben used as an auxiliary method for the detection of carious lesions. This new diagnostic method increases information which are important for the choice of treatment by the Dentist. The characteristic of restorative materials and sealers interferes in the values obtained by the apparatus during the detection of secondary carious lesions. The optical properties of each biological tissue or material are related to the interaction with the laser beam. Aware of that, the fluorescence of healthy dentin and enamel is 0-15, the authors determined the fluorescence of seven restorative materials with 10 teeth in each group. The laser reading scale differed according to the materia, ranging from 1 to 22 with several materials, for example the sealer without inorganic filler and the glass ionomer, showing fluorescence values similar to carious enamel which interferes with the readings around the restorations resulting in a false positive. Knowledge of restoration material fluorescence can aid in the detection of secondary carious lesions around the restorations.

  12. A correlative study of the levels of salivary Streptococcus mutans, lactobacilli and Actinomyces with dental caries experience in subjects with mixed and permanent dentition

    PubMed Central

    Chokshi, Achala; Mahesh, Pushpalatha; Sharada, P; Chokshi, Krunal; Anupriya, S; Ashwini, BK

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: The aim of the study was to estimate the salivary levels of Streptococcus mutans, Lactobacilli and Actinomyces and to correlate it with dental caries experience in mixed and permanent dentition. Materials and Methods: The sample size comprised 110 subjects. The decayed, missing and filled teeth (DMFT) index of all the individuals participating in the study was calculated. Saliva samples were collected from patients and samples were inoculated on specific culture media and incubated for a period of 48 h. Based on colony characteristics, S. mutans, Lactobacilli and Actinomyces were identified. Results: A positive correlation exists between DMFT and S. mutans, Lactobacilli and Actinomyces in mixed dentition and permanent dentition group samples (P < 0.001). Conclusion: The conclusion from the results obtained was that S. Mutans, lactobacilli and Actinomyces which are the components of the normal microbial flora of the oral cavity play an important role in the pathogenesis of dental caries and increased number of microorganisms is associated with an increased caries frequency. PMID:27194858

  13. Knowledge and Awareness among Parents and General Dental Practitioners regarding Rehabilitation with Full Coverage Restoration in Children: A Multi-centric Trial

    PubMed Central

    Saroj, Gyanendra; Sharma, Swati; Gupta, Basant

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Aims: The aim of this study was to evaluate the knowledge and awareness among parents and general dental practitioners regarding rehabilitation with full coverage restoration in children following pulp therapy. Materials and methods: A multiple choice questionnaire was given to 1,000 parents and 400 general practitioners in this multicentric trial. The questionnaire assessed their beliefs, knowledge regarding care of primary teeth, assessment of treating children, and knowledge regarding importance of primary teeth. All the questionnaires were then compiled and statistically analyzed using Statistical Package for Social Sciences (SPSS) software. Results and discussion: 53% parents did not know the importance of primary teeth and 73% parents also thought that no treatment is possible for pulpally involved primary teeth. 20% parents believed that root canal treatment can be possible for children and only 10% knew about full coverage restorations. 40% of the general dentists felt that the best treatment in the case of primary necrotic teeth is extraction and only 13% knew about stainless steel crowns. 62% of general dental practitioners pointed out patients’ noninterest in providing crowns whereas 68% parents reported non-information by dentists. Conclusion: Both parents and general dental practitioners have incomplete and inadequate knowledge regarding full coverage restorations, and we need to improve the knowledge and dental awareness of the parents and the general dental practitioners. How to cite this article: Moda A, Saroj G, Sharma S, Gupta B. Knowledge and Awareness among Parents and General Dental Practitioners regarding Rehabilitation with Full Coverage Restoration in Children: A Multi-centric Trial. Int J Clin Pediatr Dent 2016;9(2):177-180. PMID:27365944

  14. Effect of diamond burs on process and damage involving in vitro dental resurfacing of a restorative porcelain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yin, Ling; Han, Yi-Gang; Song, Xiao-Fei; Wang, Hui

    2007-09-01

    This work reports on the effect of diamond burs with coarse, medium and fine grit sizes and nickel or chromium coatings on in vitro dental resurfacing of a restorative porcelain. Process parameters such as tangential and normal forces, surface roughness, surface damage and morphology were studied as a function of removal rate using the different burs. At the lower removal rate, the differences for both the tangential and the normal forces were not significant among the coarse, medium and fine burs. However, when the porcelain was removed at the higher removal rate, both the tangential and the normal forces were markedly higher using the fine bur than those using the medium and coarse burs. Surface roughness values in terms of arithmetic mean and maximum roughness decreased significantly with a decrease in diamond grit size. The scale of surface damage in the form of brittle fracture decreased, and more transitions from brittle removal to ductile flow were observed when using finer grit diamond burs. In a comparison of the diamond bur topographies before and after dental finishing, it was found that minimal wear occurred on the nickel-coated coarse diamond bur, while minor abrasive wear occurred on the nickel-coated medium and chromium-coated fine burs.

  15. Recent advances in dental optics - Part I: 3D intraoral scanners for restorative dentistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Logozzo, Silvia; Zanetti, Elisabetta M.; Franceschini, Giordano; Kilpelä, Ari; Mäkynen, Anssi

    2014-03-01

    Intra-oral scanning technology is a very fast-growing field in dentistry since it responds to the need of an accurate three-dimensional mapping of the mouth, as required in a large number of procedures such as restorative dentistry and orthodontics. Nowadays, more than 10 intra-oral scanning devices for restorative dentistry have been developed all over the world even if only some of those devices are currently available on the market. All the existing intraoral scanners try to face with problems and disadvantages of traditional impression fabrication process and are based on different non-contact optical technologies and principles. The aim of this publication is to provide an extensive review of existing intraoral scanners for restorative dentistry evaluating their working principles, features and performances.

  16. The Use of Micro-CT with Image Segmentation to Quantify Leakage in Dental Restorations

    PubMed Central

    Carrera, Carola A.; Lan, Caixia; Escobar-Sanabria, David; Li, Yuping; Rudney, Joel; Aparicio, Conrado; Fok, Alex

    2015-01-01

    Objective To develop a method for quantifying leakage in composite resin restorations after curing, using non-destructive X-ray micro-computed tomography (micro-CT) and image segmentation. Methods Class-I cavity preparations were made in 20 human third molars, which were divided into 2 groups. Group I was restored with Z100 and Group II with Filtek LS. Micro-CT scans were taken for both groups before and after they were submerged in silver nitrate solution (AgNO3 50%) to reveal any interfacial gap and leakage at the tooth restoration interface. Image segmentation was carried out by first performing image correlation to align the before- and after-treatment images and then by image subtraction to isolate the silver nitrate penetrant for precise volume calculation. Two-tailed Student’s t-test was used to analyze the results, with the level of significance set at p<0.05. Results All samples from Group I showed silver nitrate penetration with a mean volume of 1.3 ± 0.7 mm3. In Group II, only 2 out of the 10 restorations displayed infiltration along the interface, giving a mean volume of 0.3 ± 0.3 mm3. The difference between the two groups was statistically significant (p < 0.05). The infiltration showed non-uniform patterns within the interface. Significance We have developed a method to quantify the volume of leakage using non-destructive micro-CT, silver nitrate infiltration and image segmentation. Our results confirmed that substantial leakage could occur in composite restorations that have imperfections in the adhesive layer or interfacial debonding through polymerization shrinkage. For the restorative systems investigated in this study, this occurred mostly at the interface between the adhesive system and the tooth structure. PMID:25649496

  17. Clinical cross-polarization optical coherence tomography assessment of subsurface enamel below dental resin composite restorations

    PubMed Central

    Lenton, Patricia; Rudney, Joel; Fok, Alex; Jones, Robert S.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract. A newly designed intraoral swept source cross-polarization optical coherence tomography (CP-OCT) imaging system was used to examine the integrity of the subsurface enamel below resin composite restorations placed in primary teeth. CP-OCT analysis was performed using images obtained from resin composite restoration in 62 (n=62) pediatric subjects. Clinical examination was performed by a single examiner prior to CP-OCT imaging and analysis. CP-OCT images are presented using a unique combined intensity image, where a false color scale is overlaid on the grayscale intensity image. There was a clear difference in the distribution of the mean-backscattered intensity (mR) between restorations recently placed and those possessing frank cavitation (Student’s t-test, P<0.0001). For mR above 15.49 dB, the sensitivity was 80% and specificity 86%. The Youden index J was 0.8 above 12.3 dB where sensitivity was 100% and specificity was 80%. CP-OCT imaging may be used to confirm the subsurface marginal integrity below resin composite restorations but with careful consideration of limitations of the imaging modality. CP-OCT imaging may be a useful adjunct to clinical visual investigation to confirm that a composite margin has a sound and well-adapted interface. PMID:26158031

  18. Clinical cross-polarization optical coherence tomography assessment of subsurface enamel below dental resin composite restorations.

    PubMed

    Lenton, Patricia; Rudney, Joel; Fok, Alex; Jones, Robert S

    2014-04-01

    A newly designed intraoral swept source cross-polarization optical coherence tomography (CP-OCT) imaging system was used to examine the integrity of the subsurface enamel below resin composite restorations placed in primary teeth. CP-OCT analysis was performed using images obtained from resin composite restoration in 62 ([Formula: see text]) pediatric subjects. Clinical examination was performed by a single examiner prior to CP-OCT imaging and analysis. CP-OCT images are presented using a unique combined intensity image, where a false color scale is overlaid on the grayscale intensity image. There was a clear difference in the distribution of the mean-backscattered intensity (mR) between restorations recently placed and those possessing frank cavitation (Student's t-test, [Formula: see text]). For mR above 15.49 dB, the sensitivity was 80% and specificity 86%. The Youden index J was 0.8 above 12.3 dB where sensitivity was 100% and specificity was 80%. CP-OCT imaging may be used to confirm the subsurface marginal integrity below resin composite restorations but with careful consideration of limitations of the imaging modality. CP-OCT imaging may be a useful adjunct to clinical visual investigation to confirm that a composite margin has a sound and well-adapted interface. PMID:26158031

  19. Rapid and non-destructive analysis of metallic dental restorations using X-ray fluorescence spectra and light-element sampling tools

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Furuhashi, K.; Uo, M.; Kitagawa, Y.; Watari, F.

    2012-12-01

    IntroductionRecently, allergic diseases caused by dental metals have been increasing. Therefore, rapid and accurate analytical methods for the metal restorations in the oral cavities of patients are required. The purpose of this study was to develop a non-destructive extraction method for dental alloys, along with a subsequent, rapid and accurate elemental analysis. Materials and methodSamples were obtained by polishing the surfaces of metal restorations using a dental rotating tool with disposable buffs and polishing pastes. As materials for the analysis, three dental alloys were used. To compare the sampling and analysis efficiencies, two buffs and seven pastes were used. After polishing the surface of a metal restoration, the buff was analyzed using X-ray scanning analytical microscopy (XSAM). ResultsThe efficiency of the analysis was judged based on the sampling rate achieved and the absence of disturbing elements in the background in fluorescence X-ray spectra. The best results were obtained for the combination of TexMet as a buff with diamond as a paste. This combination produced a good collection efficiency and a plain background in the fluorescence X-ray spectra, resulting in a high precision of the analysis.

  20. Effects of restoration and substrate on polymerization contraction stress of dental composites.

    PubMed

    Feng, L; Nunez, R; Carvalho, R; Suh, B I

    2009-02-01

    The aim of this study was to treat both restoration and substrate as a combined factor (RS-factor) to complement the popular C-factor in prediction of polymerization contraction stress (PCS). A simple model consists of a uniaxial restoration with a curing composite sandwiched between two solid mountings (substrates). By using the equal stress principle and taking into account substrate deformation, a set of equations were developed and solved, resulting in a mathematical relationship between PCS and the size and stiffness of the substrate and the restoration. The strain gage method was used to experimentally assess the PCS of a light-cured composite encircled in an aluminum ring. Differently sized inserts made of cured composites and glass were placed in the center of the ring to control the thickness of the composite to be cured and created different RS factors as well as C-factors. According to the model, a restoration with a small RS-factor will produce a high PCS. The model also predicts that a restoration with a small C-factor will have a high PCS because of the compliance of substrates. These predictions were tentatively confirmed by the strain gage measurements. A higher PCS was detected when a smaller insert was used, which created a smaller RS-factor or C-factor, or when a glass insert was used instead of a less stiff composite insert, in which the former created a smaller RS-factor. The RS-factor may be a dominant factor in determining the PCS outcome in some special cases. PMID:18561293

  1. Impact of Technique-Specific Operative Videos on First-Year Dental Students' Performance of Restorative Procedures.

    PubMed

    Patel, Shalizeh A; Barros, Juliana A; Clark, Christina M; Frey, Gary N; Streckfus, Charles F; Quock, Ryan L

    2015-09-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the impact of psychomotor operative video demonstrations on first-year dental students who are performing specific procedures for the first time in a preclinical setting. The class was randomly divided into two groups, and three restorative procedures were selected. On the date on which each procedure was to be performed in the preclinical laboratory for the first time, one group (experimental, n=50) was shown a technique video for that specific procedure immediately before commencing the exercise; the control cohort (n=50) did not view the video. Technical performance on procedures was evaluated by students and two calibrated and blinded examiners. The students' perceptions of the experience were also collected in a survey. All first-year students participated in the study, for a 100% response rate. A Mann-Whitney U test did not show any group differences in technical performance (mean values on preparation: 77.1 vs. 77.8; amalgam: 82.7 vs. 82.8; composite: 79.7 vs. 78.0). A Spearman rho test revealed a significantly higher correlation in 13 out of 25 evaluation categories between student self-assessment and blinded examiner assessment for the experimental group. A chi-square test of questionnaire responses revealed a positive student perception of administering these videos for the preparation (X(2)=4.8, p<0.03), the amalgam restoration (X(2)=12.4, p<0.001), and the composite restoration (X(2)=11.3, p<0.001). The psychomotor video demonstrations did not immediately improve student performance on preclinical operative procedures, but they were well received by students and augmented self-assessment ability. These findings suggest that videos can be a useful teaching aid in a preclinical environment, especially regarding comprehension of concepts. PMID:26329035

  2. Comparison of acceptance, preference and efficacy between pressure anesthesia and classical needle infiltration anesthesia for dental restorative procedures in adult patients

    PubMed Central

    Makade, Chetana Sachin; Shenoi, Pratima R; Gunwal, Mohit K

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: Intraoral local anesthesia is essential for delivering dental care. Needless devices have been developed to provide anesthesia without injections. Little controlled research is available on its use in dental restorative procedures in adult patients. The aims of this study were to compare adult patients acceptability and preference for needleless jet injection with classical local infiltration as well as to evaluate the efficacy of the needleless anesthesia. Materials and Methods: Twenty non fearful adults with no previous experience of dental anesthesia were studied using split-mouth design. The first procedure was performed with classical needle infiltration anesthesia. The same amount of anesthetic solution was administered using MADA jet needleless device in a second session one week later, during which a second dental restorative procedure was performed. Patients acceptance was assessed using Universal pain assessment tool while effectiveness was recorded using soft tissue anesthesia and pulpal anesthesia. Patients reported their preference for the anesthetic method at the third visit. The data was evaluated using chi square test and student's t-test. Results: Pressure anesthesia was more accepted and preferred by 70% of the patients than traditional needle anesthesia (20%). Both needle and pressure anesthesia was equally effective for carrying out the dental procedures. Conclusion: Patients experienced significantly less pain and fear (p<0.01) during anesthetic procedure with pressure anesthesia. However, for more invasive procedures needle anesthesia will be more effective. PMID:24778516

  3. Dental Caries and its Relationship to Malocclusion in Permanent Dentition Among 12-15 Year Old School Going Children

    PubMed Central

    Gaikwad, Shashank S; Gheware, Anjali; Kamatagi, Laxmikant; Pasumarthy, Sandeep; Pawar, Vivek; Fatangare, Madhura

    2014-01-01

    Background: This study aimed to know the prevalence of dental caries among children having malocclusion. Materials and Methods: This cross-sectional study included 880 students aged 1215 years, among whom 488 were boys and 392 were girls. A proforma was prepared to record dental caries status and dental esthetic index (DAI) using the WHO Oral Health Assessment Form (1997). Data were analyzed using Student’s t-test and ANOVA. The P value of 0.05 or less was considered as statistically significant. Results: It was found that 644 (73.2%) had no abnormality or minor malocclusion, whereas 115 (13.0%), 100 (11.4%) and 21 (2.4%) had definite, severe and very severe or handicapping malocclusion, respectively. Overall mean of decayed teeth (DT) component was found to be 0.95 ± 1.006, missing teeth 0.23 ± 0.670 and filled teeth 0.23 ± 0.559 and decayed, missing, filled tooth (DMFT) was 1.41 ± 1.483. DT and overall DMFT component significantly increased with increasing DAI of malocclusion (P ≤ 0.05). Conclusion: The severity of dental caries showed positive relation with DAI and age. PMID:25395789

  4. Evaluation of the Load-bearing Capacity of Fractured Incisal Edge of Maxillary Permanent Central Incisors restored with a Glass Fiber-reinforced Nanocomposite: An in vitro Study

    PubMed Central

    Srilatha, KT; Nandlal, B; Dhull, Kanika Singh

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objectives: The aim of this study was to evaluate and compare the load-bearing capacity of fractured incisal edge of maxillary permanent central incisors restored with a nanocomposite and a glass fiber-reinforced nanocomposite. Materials and methods: Thirty-six extracted sound maxillary central incisors randomly divided in three groups were used for the present study. Group I (control) contained untreated teeth. Samples in experimental groups II and III were prepared by cutting the incisal (one-third) part of the crown horizontally and subjected to enamel preparations and restored with a nanocomposite and a glass fiber-reinforced nanocomposite respectively. All restored teeth were stored in distilled water at room temperature for 24 hours. Fracture resistance was evaluated as peak load at failure (Newton) for samples tested in a cantilever-bending test using Hounsfield universal testing machine. Failure modes were microscopically examined. Results: Highest mean peak failure load (Newton) among experimental groups was observed in glass fiber-reinforced nano composite group (863.50 ± 76.12 N) followed by nanocomposite group (633.67 ± 40.14 N). One-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) revealed that the restoration technique significantly affected the load-bearing capacity (p < 0.001). Scheffe’s post-hoc comparison test (subset for α = 0.05) revealed that there was significant difference in the mean peak failure load values of nanocomposite and glass fiber-reinforced nanocomposite groups when considered together (p < 0.001). Experimental groups showed similar types of failure modes with majority occurring ascohesive and mixed type. Fifty-eight percent of the teeth in glass fiber-reinforced nanocomposite group fractured below the cementoenamel junction. Conclusion: By using fiber-reinforced composite substructure under conventional composites in the repair of fractured incisors, the load-bearing capacity of the restored incisal edge could be substantially

  5. Fracture Toughness of Veneering Ceramics for Fused to Metal (PFM) and Zirconia Dental Restorative Materials

    PubMed Central

    Quinn, Janet B.; Quinn, George D.; Sundar, Veeraraghaven

    2010-01-01

    Veneering ceramics designed to be used with modern zirconia framework restorations have been reported to fracture occasionally in vivo. The fracture toughness of such veneering ceramics was measured and compared to that of conventional feldspathic porcelain veneering ceramics for metal framework restorations. The fracture toughness of the leucite free veneer was measured to be 0.73 MPa m ± 0.02 MPa m, which is less than that for the porcelain fused to metal (PFM) veneering ceramic: 1.10 MPa ± 0.2 MPa. (Uncertainties are one standard deviation unless otherwise noted.) The surface crack in flexure (SCF) method was suitable for both materials, but precrack identification was difficult for the leucite containing feldspathic porcelain PFM veneer. PMID:21833158

  6. Restoration of divergent implants with a 2-piece screw-retained fixed, complete dental implant prostheses.

    PubMed

    Pelekanos, Stavros; Pozidi, Georgia; Kourtis, Stefanos

    2016-04-01

    Restoring a severely resorbed maxilla is challenging because of poor bone quality and the resorptive pattern that follows tooth loss. When bone augmentation is not possible, implants are placed in suboptimal positions, making the prosthetic rehabilitation more complex. This report presents the steps used to rehabilitate a severely resorbed maxilla with divergent implants, using an implant-supported 2-piece screw-retained prosthesis. PMID:26597464

  7. Open photoacoustic cell for thermal diffusivity measurements of a fast hardening cement used in dental restoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Astrath, F. B. G.; Astrath, N. G. C.; Baesso, M. L.; Bento, A. C.; Moraes, J. C. S.; Santos, A. D.

    2012-01-01

    Thermal diffusivity and conductivity of dental cements have been studied using open photoacoustic cell (OPC). The samples consisted of fast hardening cement named CER, developed to be a root-end filling material. Thermal characterization was performed in samples with different gel/powder ratio and particle sizes and the results were compared to the ones from commercial cements. Complementary measurements of specific heat and mass density were also performed. The results showed that the thermal diffusivity of CER tends to increase smoothly with gel volume and rapidly against particle size. This behavior was linked to the pores size and their distribution in the samples. The OPC method was shown to be a valuable way in deriving thermal properties of porous material.

  8. Effect of Nutritional Habits on Dental Caries in Permanent Dentition among Schoolchildren Aged 10–12 Years: A Zero-Inflated Generalized Poisson Regression Model Approach

    PubMed Central

    ALMASI, Afshin; RAHIMIFOROUSHANI, Abbas; ESHRAGHIAN, Mohammad Reza; MOHAMMAD, Kazem; PASDAR, Yahya; TARRAHI, Mohammad Javad; MOGHIMBEIGI, Abbas; AHMADI JOUYBARI, Touraj

    2016-01-01

    Background: The aim of this study was to assess the associations between nutrition and dental caries in permanent dentition among schoolchildren. Methods: A cross-sectional survey was undertaken on 698 schoolchildren aged 10 to 12 yr from a random sample of primary schools in Kermanshah, western Iran, in 2014. The study was based on the data obtained from the questionnaire containing information on nutritional habits and the outcome of decayed/missing/filled teeth (DMFT) index. The association between predictors and dental caries was modeled using the Zero Inflated Generalized Poisson (ZIGP) regression model. Results: Fourteen percent of the children were caries free. The model was shown that in female children, the odds of being in a caries susceptible sub-group was 1.23 (95% CI: 1.08–1.51) times more likely than boys (P=0.041). Additionally, mean caries count in children who consumed the fizzy soft beverages and sweet biscuits more than once daily was 1.41 (95% CI: 1.19–1.63) and 1.27 (95% CI: 1.18–1.37) times more than children that were in category of less than 3 times a week or never, respectively. Conclusions: Girls were at a higher risk of caries than boys were. Since our study showed that nutritional status may have significant effect on caries in permanent teeth, we recommend that health promotion activities in school should be emphasized on healthful eating practices; especially limiting beverages containing sugar to only occasionally between meals. PMID:27141498

  9. Dental OCT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colston, Bill W.; Sathyam, Ujwal S.; Dasilva, Luiz B.; Everett, Matthew J.; Stroeve, Pieter; Otis, L. L.

    1998-09-01

    We present here the first in vivo optical coherence tomography (OCT) images of human dental tissue. A novel dental optical coherence tomography system has been developed. This system incorporates the interferometer sample arm and transverse scanning optics into a handpiece that can be used intraorally to image human dental tissues. The average imaging depth of this system varied from 3 mm in hard tissues to 1.5 mm in soft tissues. We discuss the application of this imaging system for dentistry and illustrate the potential of our dental OCT system for diagnosis of periodontal disease, detection of caries, and evaluation of dental restorations.

  10. The assessment of surface roughness and microleakage of eroded tooth-colored dental restorative materials

    PubMed Central

    Hussein, Thulfiqar Ali; Bakar, Wan Zaripah Wan; Ghani, Zuryati Ab; Mohamad, Dasmawati

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: To investigate the effect of acidic solution on surface roughness and microleakage of tooth-colored restorative materials. Materials and Methods: A 160 box-shaped cavities were prepared on the buccal surfaces of 160 human molars, and assigned to four groups: Group A restored with Ketac™ Molar Easymix, Group B with Fuji II™ LC, Group C with Ketac™ N100, and Group D with Filtek™ Z250, and subdivided into study and control groups (n = 20). Study groups were immersed in lemon juice (pH = 2.79) for 24 h, whilst controlgroups in deionized distilled water. All samples were immersed in 2% methylene blue dye, sectioned into two equal halves for surface roughness, and microleakage tests. Data were analyzed using Mann–Whitney and Kruskal–Wallis tests at P < 0.05. Results: There was a significant difference in surface roughness of Ketac™ Molar, Fuji II™ LC, and Ketac™ N100. No significant difference was found in microleakage of Ketac™ Molar and Fuji II™ LC; however, there were significant differences in the gingival margin of Ketac™ N100, and the occlusal margin of Filtek™ Z250. Conclusions: All glass ionomer cements were eroded after exposure to the acidic drink. Filtek™ Z250 and Ketac™ Molar Easymix showed more microleakage. All materials showed more microleakage at the gingival margins. PMID:25506139

  11. Biomechanical behavior of restored and unrestored mandible with shortened dental arch under vertical loading condition.

    PubMed

    Tanasić, Ivan; Tihaček-Šojić, Ljiljana; Milić-Lemić, Aleksandra

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this in vitro study was to investigate the strain distribution of the compressed mandible bone under the applied restoration- removable partial denture and to compare with the same but unrestored mandible under vertical (occlusal) load and to find out whether removable partial denture-restored or unrestored mandible causes greater strain effect on supporting tissue. Four mandible models were tested during loading for the purpose of strain measuring. Digital image correlation system (GOM - German Optical Measuring, Braunschweig, Germany), used for measuring strain consists of two digital cameras and software ARAMIS (6.2.0, Braunschweig, Germany). Remaining teeth suffer from greater strain in the mandible model without removable partial denture (7.5-10%). On the contrary, mandible with removable partial denture shows the maximum strain below the denture saddle (3.5%). However, it can be noticed that the marginal bone of the second lower praemolar in both experimental models is deformed whether the mandible model has (2.8%) or has not (10%) replacement. Within the limitations of this study the higher strain is observed in mandible model without replacement and the strain is limited locally, in the bone region that surrounds remaining teeth and mental foramen. PMID:23394230

  12. Improving flexural strength of dental restorative ceramics using laser interference direct structuring

    SciTech Connect

    Daniel, Claus; Drummond, James; Giordano, Russell A.

    2008-01-01

    Zirconia and alumina ceramics restorative materials were treated with laser interference direct structuring using the third harmonic of a short pulse Nd:YAG and tested in a three-point bending test to measure the flexural strength. The surface was restructured in a periodic line like pattern with controlled surface porosity and a surface composite pattern. The composite consist of two different defect states rather than different phase compositions. The resulting mechanical properties are a function of the number of laser pulses, laser energy, and angle in between the laser beams defining the periodic feature distance. This composite effect is comparable with a laminate showing increasing stiffness with decreasing layer thickness. The material s fracture strength could be controlled through the three mentioned laser parameters and in an initial study significantly improved by up to 50% from initial 422 MPa to 630 MPa for alumina and 833 MPa to 1250 MPa for zirconia.

  13. Highly-translucent, strong and aging-resistant 3Y-TZP ceramics for dental restoration by grain boundary segregation.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Fei; Vanmeensel, Kim; Batuk, Maria; Hadermann, Joke; Inokoshi, Masanao; Van Meerbeek, Bart; Naert, Ignace; Vleugels, Jef

    2015-04-01

    Latest trends in dental restorative ceramics involve the development of full-contour 3Y-TZP ceramics which can avoid chipping of veneering porcelains. Among the challenges are the low translucency and the hydrothermal stability of 3Y-TZP ceramics. In this work, different trivalent oxides (Al2O3, Sc2O3, Nd2O3 and La2O3) were selected to dope 3Y-TZP ceramics. Results show that dopant segregation was a key factor to design hydrothermally stable and high-translucent 3Y-TZP ceramics and the cation dopant radius could be used as a controlling parameter. A large trivalent dopant, oversized as compared to Zr(4+), exhibiting strong segregation at the ZrO2 grain boundary was preferred. The introduction of 0.2 mol% La2O3 in conventional 0.1-0.25 wt.% Al2O3-doped 3Y-TZP resulted in an excellent combination of high translucency and superior hydrothermal stability, while retaining excellent mechanical properties. PMID:25662163

  14. Chipping fracture resistance of dental CAD/CAM restorative materials: Part 2. Phenomenological model and the effect of indenter type

    PubMed Central

    Quinn, G.D.; Giuseppetti, A.A.; Hoffman, K.H.

    2014-01-01

    The edge chipping resistances of six CAD/CAM dental restoration materials are analyzed and correlated to other mechanical properties. A new quadratic relationship that is based on a phenomenological model is presented. Objective The purpose of this study was to further analyze the edge chipping resistance of the brittle materials evaluated in Part 1. One objective was to determine why some force-distance trends were linear and others were nonlinear. A second objective was to account for differences in chipping resistance with indenter type. Methods Edge chipping experiments were conducted with different indenters, including some custom-made sharp conical indenters. A new force – distance quadratic expression was correlated to the data and compared to the linear and power law trends. Results The new quadratic function was an excellent fit in every instance. It can account for why some materials can be fit by a linear trend, while others can be fit by the power law trend. The effects of indenter type are accounted for variations in crack initiation and by the wedging stresses once an indentation hole is created. Significance The new quadratic force – edge distance function can be used with edge chipping data for all brittle materials, not just those evaluated in this study. The data trends vary from linear to nonlinear depending upon the material’s hardness, fracture toughness, and elastic modulus. PMID:24685179

  15. Study of the surface wear resistance and biological properties of the Ti-Zr-Nb-Sn alloy for dental restoration.

    PubMed

    Hu, Xin; Wei, Qiang; Li, Chang-Yi; Deng, Jia-Yin; Liu, Shuang; Zhang, Lian-Yun

    2010-10-01

    A new titanium alloy (Ti-12.5Zr-3Nb-2.5Sn) was developed to meet the needs of clinical requirements for medical titanium alloys and improve the properties of existing titanium alloys. The as-prepared alloy was solution treated at 500 °C for 3 h in vacuum followed by water quenching. Tensile, wear and hardness tests were carried out to examine the mechanical properties of the Ti-Zr-Nb-Sn alloy. Oral mucous membrane irritation test was performed to evaluate the surface biological properties of the Ti-Zr-Nb-Sn alloy. The results suggested that the surface hardness and wear-resistant properties of the Ti-12.5Zr-3Nb-2.5Sn alloy were superior to commercially pure Ti. The oral mucous irritation test showed that all samples had no mucous membrane irritation. It indicates that Ti-12.5Zr-3Nb-2.5Sn has large potential to be used as dental restoration material. PMID:20876964

  16. Flexural strength of dental composite restoratives: comparison of biaxial and three-point bending test.

    PubMed

    Chung, S M; Yap, A U J; Chandra, S P; Lim, C T

    2004-11-15

    This study compared two test methods used to evaluate the flexural strength of resin-based dental composites. The two test methods evaluated were the three-point bending test4 and the biaxial flexural test. Materials used in this investigation were from the same manufacturer (3M ESPE) and included microfill (A110), minifill (Z100 and Filtek Z250), polyacid modified (F2000), and flowable [Filtek Flowable (FF)] composites. Flexural strength was determined with the use of both test methods after 1 week of conditioning in water at 37 degrees C. Data were analyzed with the use of an ANOVA/Scheffe test and an independent-samples t test at significance level 0.05. Mean flexural strength (n = 7) ranged from 66.61 to 147.21 and 67.27 to 182.81 MPa for three-point bending and ball-on-three-ball biaxial test methods, respectively. In both test methods, Z100 was significantly stronger than all other composites evaluated. In the three-point bending test, flexural strength of Z250 was significantly higher than A110, F2000 and FF, and FF was significantly stronger than A110 and F2000. The biaxial test method arrived at the same conclusions except that there was no significant difference between Z250 and FF. Pearson's correlation revealed a significantly (p < 0.01) positive and good correlation (R2 = 0.72) in flexural strength between the two test methods. Although the biaxial test has the advantage of utilizing small specimens, the low reproducibility of this test method does not support the proposition that it is a more reliable test method when compared to the ISO three-point bending test. PMID:15386492

  17. Installation-Restoration Program; preliminary assessment for the 165th Tactical Airlift Group and Savannah Permanent Field Training Site, Georgia Air National Guard, Savannah International Airport, Savannah, Georgia

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1987-12-01

    The Hazardous Materials Technical Center (HMTC) was retained in May 1987 to conduct the Installation-Restoration Program (IRP) Preliminary Assessment of the 165th Tactical Airlift Group (TAG) and the Savannah Permanent Field Training Site (PTFS) of the Georgia Air National Guard (ANG), Savannah International Airport, Savannah, Georgia (hereinafter referred to as the Base). The Preliminary Assessment included: an onsite Base visit, including interviews with 26 past and present base employees and conducted by HMTC personnel during 18-21 May 1987; the acquisition and analysis of pertinent information and records on the use of hazardous material and generation and disposal of hazardous waste at the Base; the acquisition and analysis of available geologic, hydrologic, meteorologic, and environmental data from pertinent Federal and State agencies; and the identification of sites on the Base which may be potentially contaminated with hazardous material/hazardous waste (HM/HW).

  18. The incorporation of nanoparticles into conventional glass-ionomer dental restorative cements.

    PubMed

    Gjorgievska, Elizabeta; Van Tendeloo, Gustaaf; Nicholson, John W; Coleman, Nichola J; Slipper, Ian J; Booth, Samantha

    2015-04-01

    Conventional glass-ionomer cements (GICs) are popular restorative materials, but their use is limited by their relatively low mechanical strength. This paper reports an attempt to improve these materials by incorporation of 10 wt% of three different types of nanoparticles, aluminum oxide, zirconium oxide, and titanium dioxide, into two commercial GICs (ChemFil® Rock and EQUIA™ Fil). The results indicate that the nanoparticles readily dispersed into the cement matrix by hand mixing and reduced the porosity of set cements by filling the empty spaces between the glass particles. Both cements showed no significant difference in compressive strength with added alumina, and ChemFil® Rock also showed no significant difference with zirconia. By contrast, ChemFil® Rock showed significantly higher compressive strength with added titania, and EQUIA™ Fil showed significantly higher compressive strength with both zirconia and titania. Fewer air voids were observed in all nanoparticle-containing cements and this, in turn, reduced the development of cracks within the matrix of the cements. These changes in microstructure provide a likely reason for the observed increases in compressive strength, and overall the addition of nanoparticles appears to be a promising strategy for improving the physical properties of GICs. PMID:25691120

  19. Substance P incorporation in calcium phosphate cement for dental alveolar bone defect restoration.

    PubMed

    Wang, Tianjue; Wu, Di; Li, Yuan; Li, Wantao; Zhang, Shuyin; Hu, Kaijin; Zhou, Hongzhi

    2016-12-01

    A combination of osteoinductive neuropeptide substance P (SP) and osteoconductive bone cement of calcium phosphate (CPC) might provide an effective and lower-cost solution for complex alveolar bone defects restoration. The present study aims to investigate the key design considerations of SP delivery in CPC. In this study, CPC-based modular scaffolds were developed, where collagen type I was used as accessory organic ingredient to modulate the physical and biological characters. SP was directly mixed in the cement as free peptides, or was covalently immobilized with collagen component. The structural and mechanical properties of the scaffolds were assessed in vitro, and their osteogenic ability was observed in a rabbit model with alveolar bone defect. The results showed that SP could enhance the osteo-conductivity/inductivity of CPC. Collagen solution optimized biocompatibility of CPC, and meanwhile exhibited additive effects on the functions of SP. Nevertheless, immobilization of SP with collagen blocked their bioactivity in CPC. Collagen sponges created macro-porosity in CPC and achieved maximum bone ingrowth with the aid of SP. In conclusion, the present study primarily demonstrated that CPC scaffold can be functionalized by synthetic SP, and the biocompatibility and porosity of the scaffold are adaptable key factors determining their final osteogenic activities. PMID:27612746

  20. [Tooth color matching systems and communication with dental laboratory in indirect restorations: 2011 update].

    PubMed

    Ginzburg, M; Gilboa, I

    2012-01-01

    There has been many technological developments in the last decade. Today's shade-matching technologies have been developed in an effort to increase the success of color matching, communication, reproduction and verification in clinical dentistry and, ultimately, to increase the efficiency of esthetic restorative work within any practice. In general, the output of the color measurements can be classified and specified in several ways. The most common systems for describing color are Munsell's System and the international Commission on Illumination (CIE) L a b color system. Albert Munsell described color as a three-dimensional phenomenon. He described the three dimensions as hue, value (brightness), and chroma (saturation). Visual colour determination by comparison of teeth and shade guides is the most frequently applied method in dentistry. Vitapan Classical (Vita Zahnfabrik, Germany) and its derivations(evidence-based Vitapan 3D-Master shade guide and Linearguide) are the most commonly used shade guides. However, several factors can influence consistency of visual colour selection and specification: individual colour matching ability may vary, the colour perception of any individual may show temporal variation, the range of shades available is inadequate and does not cover the complete colour space of natural teeth, the shade guide tabs are not systematically distributed in their colour space, and changes in lighting conditions can cause alterations in perceived colour. instruments for clinical shade-matching encompass spectrophotometers, colorimeters and digital imaging systems. It can be concluded that different devices have different accuracy and precision. Colorimeters are significantly less reliable than spectrophotometers and digital cameras. Benefits and limitations exist, and the clinician must consider how the technology relates to expectations and needs. Combination of visual colour determination (Vitapan 3D-Master shade guide and Linearguide) with

  1. Dental sealants and restorations and urinary bisphenol A concentrations in children in the 2003-2004 National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey

    PubMed Central

    McKinney, Christy; Rue, Tessa; Sathyanarayana, Sheela; Martin, Michael; Seminario, Ana Lucia; DeRouen, Timothy

    2015-01-01

    Background Resin-based dental sealants and composites contain bisphenol A-glycidyl methacrylate, a bisphenol A (BPA) derivative. The authors hypothesized that a greater number of sealants or restorations would be associated with higher urinary BPA concentrations. Methods The authors examined urinary BPA measurements (in nanograms per milliliter) and oral examination data for 1,001 children aged 6 to 19 years from the dataset of the 2003-2004 National Health Examination and Nutrition Survey (NHANES). They categorized children into four groups according to number of occlusal sealants and number of restorations, separately. They estimated associations by using unadjusted and adjusted tobit regression models. Results The lowest quartile of BPA concentrations ranged from 0.3 ng/mL to 1.9 ng/mL, whereas the highest quartile ranged from 7.3 ng/mL to 149 ng/mL. In adjusted analysis, children with seven to 16 sealants had geometric mean BPA concentrations 25 percent higher than those of children with no sealants (95 percent confidence interval [CI], −14 percent to 82 percent; P = .23). In adjusted analyses, children with seven to 42 restorations had geometric mean BPA concentrations 20 percent higher than those of children with no restorations (95 percent CI, −6 percent to 53 percent; P = .13). Neither of these adjusted estimates was statistically significant. Conclusions Though the findings were in the direction hypothesized, the authors did not observe a statistically significant association between a greater number of sealants or restorations and higher urinary BPA concentrations. Additional studies are needed to determine the extent of oral and systemic exposure to BPA from resin-based dental restorative materials over time. Practical Implications Dentists should follow this issue carefully as it develops and as the body of evidence grows. There is insufficient evidence to change practice at this time. PMID:24982281

  2. Use of SIG device to accurately place permanent miniature dental implants to retain mandibular overdenture. A case report.

    PubMed

    Sussman, Harold I; Goodridge, Opal F

    2006-01-01

    A case of mini-dental implant insertion for retention of a mandibular overdenture in a hospitalized patient has been documented. The additional use of the SIG (drill guide) directional device in the implant placement protocol gave the practitioner more confidence and resulted in the proper alignment of the three ball-top, one-piece fixtures. The three implants were inserted exactly 1 cm apart and parallel to each other. The distal fixtures were approximately 1 cm away from the mental foramina, thereby eliminating the risk of lip paresthesia. Keeper caps were placed in the denture's intaglio after one month. The keeper caps allowed for proper retention of the overdenture. The caps also enabled the patient to easily insert and withdraw his denture, even though he displayed limited manual dexterity. The tissue response was excellent, and oral hygiene was made easier with adequate spacing of the exposed ball-tops. The overall experience for both the operator and the patient was very positive. General dentists should be able to readily master this technique and add it to their armamentarium for the benefit of all their patients. PMID:17036584

  3. Immune Depletion in Combination with Allogeneic Islets Permanently Restores Tolerance to Self-Antigens in Diabetic NOD Mice

    PubMed Central

    Gagliani, Nicola; Jofra, Tatiana; Posgai, Amanda L.; Atkinson, Mark A.; Battaglia, Manuela

    2015-01-01

    The destruction of beta cells in type 1 diabetes (T1D) results in loss of insulin production and glucose homeostasis. Treatment of non-obese diabetic (NOD) mice with immune-depleting/modulating agents (e.g., anti-CD3, murine anti-thymocyte-globulin (mATG)) can lead to diabetes reversal. However, for preclinical studies with these and other agents seeking to reverse disease at onset, the necessity for exogenous insulin administration is debated. Spontaneously diabetic NOD mice were treated with a short-course of mATG and insulin provided as drug therapy or by way of allogeneic islet implants. Herein we demonstrate that exogenous insulin administration is required to achieve disease reversal with mATG in NOD mice. Unexpectedly, we also observed that provision of insulin by way of allogeneic islet implantation in combination with mATG leads to a pronounced reversal of diabetes as well as restoration of tolerance to self-islets. Expansion/induction of regulatory cells was observed in NOD mice stably cured with mATG and allogeneic islets. These data suggest that transient provision of allogeneic insulin-producing islets might provide a temporary window for immune depletion to be more effective and instilling stable tolerance to endogenous beta cells. These findings support the use of a never before explored approach for preserving beta cell function in patients with recent onset T1D. PMID:26580221

  4. Occlusal glass ionomer cermet, resin sandwich and amalgam restorations: a 2-year clinical study.

    PubMed

    Lidums, A; Wilkie, R; Smales, R

    1993-08-01

    This study compared the clinical behavior of a glass ionomer silver cermet (Ketac-Silver), a posterior resin composite (Visio-Molar) used with the "sandwich" technique, and a high-copper amalgam (Dispersalloy) for restoring conventional Class I occlusal cavity preparations. Two dentists placed 116 restorations in the posterior permanent teeth of 35 adults treated at a dental hospital. Restorations were assessed at 6-month intervals over 2 years for bulk loss of material and occlusal wear, surface voids, roughness and cracking, surface and marginal staining, and marginal fracture. Losses of material and surface voids were obvious with the cermet material, with surface crazing or cracking being present in 33% of the restorations. The cermet cannot be recommended as a long-term permanent restorative material if the restorations are likely to be subjected to heavy occlusal stresses and abrasive wear. PMID:7803005

  5. Evaluation of the effect of tooth and dental restoration material on electron dose distribution and production of photon contamination in electron beam radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Bahreyni Toossi, Mohammad Taghi; Ghorbani, Mahdi; Akbari, Fatemeh; Mehrpouyan, Mohammad; Sobhkhiz Sabet, Leila

    2016-03-01

    The aim of this study is to evaluate the effect of tooth and dental restoration materials on electron dose distribution and photon contamination production in electron beams of a medical linac. This evaluation was performed on 8, 12 and 14 MeV electron beams of a Siemens Primus linac. MCNPX Monte Carlo code was utilized and a 10 × 10 cm(2) applicator was simulated in the cases of tooth and combinations of tooth and Ceramco C3 ceramic veneer, tooth and Eclipse alloy and tooth and amalgam restoration materials in a soft tissue phantom. The relative electron and photon contamination doses were calculated for these materials. The presence of tooth and dental restoration material changed the electron dose distribution and photon contamination in phantom, depending on the type of the restoration material and electron beam's energy. The maximum relative electron dose was 1.07 in the presence of tooth including amalgam for 14 MeV electron beam. When 100.00 cGy was prescribed for the reference point, the maximum absolute electron dose was 105.10 cGy in the presence of amalgam for 12 MeV electron beam and the maximum absolute photon contamination dose was 376.67 μGy for tooth in 14 MeV electron beam. The change in electron dose distribution should be considered in treatment planning, when teeth are irradiated in electron beam radiotherapy. If treatment planning can be performed in such a way that the teeth are excluded from primary irradiation, the potential errors in dose delivery to the tumour and normal tissues can be avoided. PMID:26581762

  6. Annual review of selected dental literature: report of the Committee on Scientific Investigation of the American Academy of Restorative Dentistry.

    PubMed

    Jendresen, M D; Allen, E P; Bayne, S C; Donovan, T E; Hansson, T L; Klooster, J; Preston, J D

    1993-07-01

    The annual review of selected dental literature this year cites 384 published papers and reports. This year's review contains more editorial comment than reviews of years passed. New data on the biological responses to materials is emphasized in several sections. Observations on new compounds able to prevent plaque formation are presented. Clinically relevant advances in knowledge concerning the etching of different tooth structures are reported along with the effect of etching procedures on the dental pulp. Evaluation of periodontal diseases in all age groups is a topic. Limitations of current diagnostic techniques in periodontal disease, temporomandibular disorders, and implant therapy are included. There are new views on the use of dental amalgam. The future use of dental mercury is predicted. Interest in new ceramic systems is indicated as the demand for esthetics continues. Clinical information is emphasized over scientific information throughout this year's review. PMID:8366458

  7. Dental Fear Among University Employees: Implications for Dental Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kaakko, Tarja; Milgrom, Peter; Coldwell, Susan E.; Getz, Tracy; Weinstein, Philip; Ramsay, Douglas S.

    1998-01-01

    A survey of 270 University of Washington permanent employees who were potential candidates for teaching clinics, found dental anxiety prevalent, correlating with poorer perceived dental health, longer intervals between dental appointments, higher frequency of past fear behaviors, more physical symptoms during last dental injection, and more…

  8. Diagnostic Imaging for Dental Implant Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Nagarajan, Aishwarya; Perumalsamy, Rajapriya; Thyagarajan, Ramakrishnan; Namasivayam, Ambalavanan

    2014-01-01

    Dental implant is a device made of alloplastic (foreign) material implanted into the jaw bone beneath the mucosal layer to support a fixed or removable dental prosthesis. Dental implants are gaining immense popularity and wide acceptance because they not only replace lost teeth but also provide permanent restorations that do not interfere with oral function or speech or compromise the self-esteem of a patient. Appropriate treatment planning for replacement of lost teeth is required and imaging plays a pivotal role to ensure a satisfactory outcome. The development of pre-surgical imaging techniques and surgical templates helps the dentist place the implants with relative ease. This article focuses on various types of imaging modalities that have a pivotal role in implant therapy. PMID:25379354

  9. Diagnostic imaging for dental implant therapy.

    PubMed

    Nagarajan, Aishwarya; Perumalsamy, Rajapriya; Thyagarajan, Ramakrishnan; Namasivayam, Ambalavanan

    2014-01-01

    Dental implant is a device made of alloplastic (foreign) material implanted into the jaw bone beneath the mucosal layer to support a fixed or removable dental prosthesis. Dental implants are gaining immense popularity and wide acceptance because they not only replace lost teeth but also provide permanent restorations that do not interfere with oral function or speech or compromise the self-esteem of a patient. Appropriate treatment planning for replacement of lost teeth is required and imaging plays a pivotal role to ensure a satisfactory outcome. The development of pre-surgical imaging techniques and surgical templates helps the dentist place the implants with relative ease. This article focuses on various types of imaging modalities that have a pivotal role in implant therapy. PMID:25379354

  10. Effect of prosthetic restoration on oral health-related quality of life in patients with shortened dental arches: a multicentre study.

    PubMed

    Fueki, K; Igarashi, Y; Maeda, Y; Baba, K; Koyano, K; Sasaki, K; Akagawa, Y; Kuboki, T; Kasugai, S; Garrett, N R

    2015-09-01

    The aim of this multicentre prospective study was to investigate the effect of prosthetic restoration for missing posterior teeth in patients with shortened dental arches (SDAs). SDA patients with 2-12 missing occlusal units (a pair of occluding premolars corresponds to one unit, and a pair of occluding molars corresponds to two units) were consecutively recruited from seven university-based dental hospitals in Japan. Patients chose no replacement of missing teeth or prosthetic treatment with removable partial dentures (RPDs) or implant-supported fixed partial dentures (IFPDs). Oral health-related quality of life (OHRQoL) was measured using the oral health impact profile (Japanese version - OHIP-J) at baseline and follow-up/post-treatment evaluation. Of the 169 subjects who completed baseline evaluation, 125 subjects (mean age; 63.0 years) received follow-up/post-treatment evaluation. No-treatment was chosen by 42% (53/125) of the subjects, and 58% (72/125) chose treatment with a RPD (n = 53) or an IFPD (n = 19). In the no-treatment (NT) group, the mean OHIP summary score at baseline was similar to that at follow-up evaluation (P = 0.69). In the treatment (TRT) group, the mean OHIP summary score decreased significantly after the RPD treatment (P = 0.002), and it tended to decrease, though not statistically significant (P = 0.18), after the IFPD treatment. The restoration of one occlusal unit was associated with a 1.2-point decrease in OHIP summary score (P = 0.034). These results suggest that the replacement of missing posterior teeth with RPDs or IFPDs improved OHRQoL. Prosthetic restoration for SDAs may benefit OHRQoL in patients needing replacement of missing posterior teeth. PMID:25818656

  11. Dental OCT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilder-Smith, Petra; Otis, Linda; Zhang, Jun; Chen, Zhongping

    This chapter describes the applications of OCT for imaging in vivo dental and oral tissue. The oral cavity is a diverse environment that includes oral mucosa, gingival tissues, teeth and their supporting structures. Because OCT can image both hard and soft tissues of the oral cavity at high resolution, it offers the unique capacity to identity dental disease before destructive changes have progressed. OCT images depict clinically important anatomical features such as the location of soft tissue attachments, morphological changes in gingival tissue, tooth decay, enamel thickness and decay, as well as the structural integrity of dental restorations. OCT imaging allows for earlier intervention than is possible with current diagnostic modalities.

  12. Treatment of traumatic injuries in the front teeth: restorative aspects in crown fractures.

    PubMed

    Dietschi, D; Jacoby, T; Dietschi, J M; Schatz, J P

    2000-10-01

    Crown fractures are the most common form of traumatic dental injuries encountered in permanent dentition. Restorative treatment modalities incorporate adhesive materials to effectively maintain function and aesthetics. While uncomplicated injuries of the enamel and/or dentin can be treated solely with adhesive procedures, complicated trauma that involves pulp exposure requires the incorporation of a multidisciplinary treatment approach. Fragment reattachment is facilitated by the utilization of bonding agents that enhance retention and aesthetics. This article discusses the application of provisional and permanent restorative options for the treatment of complications following traumatic injuries. PMID:11404871

  13. Assessment of exposures and potential risks to the US adult population from the leaching of elements from gold and ceramic dental restorations.

    PubMed

    Richardson, G Mark; James, Kyle Jordan; Peters, Rachel Elizabeth; Clemow, Scott Richard; Siciliano, Steven Douglas

    2016-05-01

    Using data from the 2001 to 2004 US National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) on the number and placement of tooth restorations in adults, we quantified daily doses due to leaching of elements from gold (Au) alloy and ceramic restorative materials. The elements with the greatest leaching rates from these materials are often the elements of lowest proportional composition. As a result, exposure due to wear will predominate for those elements of relatively high proportional composition, while exposure due leaching may predominate for elements of relatively low proportional composition. The exposure due to leaching of silver (Ag) and palladium (Pd) from Au alloys exceeded published reference exposure levels (RELs) for these elements when multiple full surface crowns were present. Six or more molar crowns would result in exceeding the REL for Ag, whereas three or more crowns would be necessary to exceed the REL for Pd. For platinum (Pt), the majority of tooth surfaces, beyond just molar crowns, would be necessary to exceed the REL for Pd. Exposures due to leaching of elements from ceramic dental materials were less than published RELs for all components examined here, including having all restorations composed of ceramic. PMID:26374655

  14. Dental Pulp Defence and Repair Mechanisms in Dental Caries

    PubMed Central

    Farges, Jean-Christophe; Alliot-Licht, Brigitte; Renard, Emmanuelle; Ducret, Maxime; Gaudin, Alexis; Smith, Anthony J.; Cooper, Paul R.

    2015-01-01

    Dental caries is a chronic infectious disease resulting from the penetration of oral bacteria into the enamel and dentin. Microorganisms subsequently trigger inflammatory responses in the dental pulp. These events can lead to pulp healing if the infection is not too severe following the removal of diseased enamel and dentin tissues and clinical restoration of the tooth. However, chronic inflammation often persists in the pulp despite treatment, inducing permanent loss of normal tissue and reducing innate repair capacities. For complete tooth healing the formation of a reactionary/reparative dentin barrier to distance and protect the pulp from infectious agents and restorative materials is required. Clinical and in vitro experimental data clearly indicate that dentin barrier formation only occurs when pulp inflammation and infection are minimised, thus enabling reestablishment of tissue homeostasis and health. Therefore, promoting the resolution of pulp inflammation may provide a valuable therapeutic opportunity to ensure the sustainability of dental treatments. This paper focusses on key cellular and molecular mechanisms involved in pulp responses to bacteria and in the pulpal transition between caries-induced inflammation and dentinogenic-based repair. We report, using selected examples, different strategies potentially used by odontoblasts and specialized immune cells to combat dentin-invading bacteria in vivo. PMID:26538821

  15. Development of the Permanent Dentition and Validity of Demirjian and Goldstein Method for Dental Age Estimation in Sample of Saudi Arabian Children (Qassim Region)

    PubMed Central

    Nour El Deen, Ragia E. H.; Alduaiji, Hifaa M.; Alajlan, Ghadir M.; Aljabr, Abdalla A.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives To determine dental maturity (dental age) in cross-sectional sample of Saudi Arabian children by applying the standards established by Demirjian and Golstein and to examine the applicability of these standards in determination of dental maturity among Saudi Arabian children (Qassim region). Materials & Methods Dental maturity was assessed from panoramic radiographs of 400 Saudi Arabian children, 222 boys, and 198 girls ranging in age from 4 to 14 years by using these standards. The difference between the dental and chronological age in different age groups in both sexes was statistically compared using ANOVA testat 0.05 level of significance. Results The Saudi Arabian children were generally somewhat advanced in dental maturity compared with the French Canadian reference sample with an overall mean difference between the dental and chronological age of 0.279 years in boys and 0.385 years in girls. Conclusion The applied standards appear to be adequate for studying dental age in groups of children among Saudi Arabian population. PMID:27004054

  16. The significance of cone beam computed tomography for the visualization of anatomical variations and lesions in the maxillary sinus for patients hoping to have dental implant-supported maxillary restorations in a private dental office in Japan

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Objectives The purpose of the present study was to elucidate the significance of cone bean computed tomography (CBCT) for patients hoping to undergo implant-supported restorations of the maxilla. Therefore, two studies were planned. One was to compare the prevalence of anatomic variations and lesions in the maxillary sinus on CBCT of patients hoping to undergo implant-supported restorations of the maxilla with that in patients with other chief complaints in a private dental office in Japan. The other study was to elucidate the limitations of panoramic radiographs in the detection of anatomic variations and lesions in the maxillary sinus. Study design Sixty-one pairs of panoramic radiographs and CBCT were retrospectively analyzed in two groups of patients, those who hoped to undergo implant-supported restorations in the maxilla (Implant group) and those who did not (Non-implant group). The presence of anatomic variations and lesions in the maxillary sinus were analyzed. Results The detection rate of mucosal thickening was significantly higher in the Implant group than in the Non-implant group. The detection rates for the features analyzed were significantly lower on panoramic radiographs. In particular, the detection rates of internal and anterior locations of some features were noticeably lower on panoramic radiographs. A significant relationship was found between the change in the detection rate on panoramic radiographs and the widths of mucosal thickening or the lengths of the major axis of SOLs in the maxillary sinus. If the width of mucosal thickening or the length of the major axis of SOLs was <3 mm or <4 mm, respectively, the detection rate on panoramic radiographs was significantly decreased. Conclusion CBCT is important for patients hoping to undergo implant-supported restorations of the maxilla because of the mucosal thickening in the maxillary sinus in such patients and their lower detection rates on panoramic radiographs. PMID:24884983

  17. Clinical evaluation of occlusal glass ionomer, resin, and amalgam restorations.

    PubMed

    Smales, R J; Gerke, D C; White, I L

    1990-10-01

    The purpose of the study was to evaluate four materials (a glass ionomer (polyalkenoate) silver cermet, two composite resin restoratives and a high copper content dental amalgam) placed in either conventional Class I cavities or in modified odontotomy-enameloplasty-sealant (OES) fissure preparations. One experienced operator inserted 438 occlusal. Class I restorations in the posterior permanent teeth of 124 patients in a private dental practice. Restorations were assessed for bulk loss of material, surface voids and cracking, restoration margin fractures and staining, and surface staining and roughness, by using colour transparencies taken at baseline and at recalls for up to 3 years. The glass ionomer cermet was the most difficult material to handle and also gave the least satisfactory clinical result. Loss of material and surface voids were common in the cermet restorations with surface cracking or crazing being seen in 11.4 per cent of the restorations, especially in the larger, conventional Class I preparations. One posterior resin was more viscous and difficult to handle than the other resin and exhibited more surface voids. The amalgam alloy was used in Class I preparations only and showed more restoration margin fractures and surface staining than did the other three materials. However, there were no unsatisfactory clinical assessments given for either restoration margin fracture and staining, or surface staining and roughness for any of the materials. Patient acceptance of the modified OES fissure preparation was extremely good. PMID:2127419

  18. Principles of restorative dentistry.

    PubMed

    Banker, T

    1993-08-01

    A great deal of information regarding materials, instrumentation, and techniques used for restorative dentistry can be borrowed from the human dental field. Veterinary restorative dentistry is in its infancy. A thorough knowledge of the commonly used materials and how they can be effectively applied is important. Treatment planning is probably one of the most critical phases of restorative dentistry as is painstaking attention to detail. If the guidelines for restorative dental techniques are followed, failures will be minimal. However, one of the most important points to remember is that the success of a restoration is not determined at the completion of the procedure. A restoration, if properly planned and performed, should last the lifetime of the animal patient. It is very important that veterinary dentists continue to evaluate and assess their restorative work at regular intervals so that restorative failures can be detected early, and so that restorative techniques and materials can be critically evaluated in veterinary patients. PMID:8210800

  19. Application of color image processing and low-coherent optical computer tomography in evaluation of adhesive interfaces of dental restorations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bessudnova, Nadezda O.; Shlyapnikova, Olga A.; Venig, Sergey B.; Genina, Elina A.; Sadovnikov, Alexandr V.

    2015-03-01

    Durability of bonded interfaces between dentin and a polymer material in resin-based composite restorations remains a clinical dentistry challenge. In the present study the evolution of bonded interfaces in biological active environment is estimated in vivo. A novel in vivo method of visual diagnostics that involves digital processing of color images of composite restorations and allows the evaluation of adhesive interface quality over time, has been developed and tested on a group of volunteers. However, the application of the method is limited to the analysis of superficial adhesive interfaces. Low-coherent optical computer tomography (OCT) has been tested as a powerful non-invasive tool for in vivo, in situ clinical diagnostics of adhesive interfaces over time. In the long-term perspective adhesive interface monitoring using standard methods of clinical diagnostics along with colour image analysis and OCT could make it possible to objectivise and prognosticate the clinical longevity of composite resin-based restorations with adhesive interfaces.

  20. Management of a malpositioned implant using custom abutment and screw-retained fixed dental prosthesis.

    PubMed

    Turkyilmaz, Ilser

    2014-01-01

    A 32-year-old woman with missing permanent mandibular right molars and left first molar presented for treatment. One of the implants were misaligned during the placement due to sudden mouth closure of the patient. All implants success fully osseointegrated. However, the misaligned implant resulted in substantial mechanical and esthetic restorative challenges. The prosthodontic treatment included a custom abutment and a screw-retained fixed dental prosthesis on the right side. The patient did not report any problems with the implants and restorations during the first year of service. The treatment presented in this clinical report may be an alternative option to restore malpositioned implants. PMID:25307826

  1. Restorative Treatment Thresholds for Occlusal Primary Caries by Dentists in “The Dental Practice-Based Research Network”

    PubMed Central

    Gordan, Valeria V; Bader, James D; Garvan, Cynthia W; Richman, Joshua S; Qvist, Vibeke; Fellows, Jeffrey L; Rindal, D. Brad; Gilbert, Gregg H

    2010-01-01

    Objectives (1) Quantify at which carious lesion depths dentists intervene surgically for cases of varying caries penetration and caries risk; (2) Identify characteristics that are associated with surgical intervention. Methods Dentists in a practice-based research network who reported doing at least some restorative dentistry were surveyed. Dentists were asked to indicate whether they would surgically intervene in a series of cases depicting occlusal caries. Each case included a photograph of an occlusal surface displaying typical characteristics of caries penetration, and a written description of a patient at a specific level of caries risk. Using logistic regression, we analyzed associations of surgical treatment with dentist and practice characteristics, and patient caries risk levels. Results 519 DPBRN practitioner-investigators responded, of whom 63% indicated that they would surgically restore lesions located on inner enamel surfaces, and 90% of lesions located in outer dentin surfaces in a low caries risk individual. Regarding individuals at high caries risk, 77% reported that they would surgically restore inner enamel lesions and 94% reported restoring lesions located on the outer dentin surface. Dentists who did not assess caries risk were more likely to intervene on dentin lesions (p=.004). Practitioner-investigators who were in private practice were significantly more likely to intervene surgically on enamel lesions, compared to dentists from large group practices (p<.001). Conclusion Most dentists chose to provide some treatment to lesions that were within the enamel surface. Decisions to intervene surgically in the caries process differ by caries lesion depth, patient caries risk, assessment of caries risk, type of practice model, and percent of patients who self-pay. PMID:20123876

  2. Outcomes of root canal treatment in Dental PBRN practices

    PubMed Central

    Gilbert, Gregg H.; Tilashalski, Ken R.; Litaker, Mark S.; McNeal, Sandre F.; Boykin, Michael J.; Kessler, Allen W.

    2010-01-01

    Our purpose was to quantify the incidence of root canal treatment (RCT) failure and identify its predictors in root canals done in or referred from general dentistry practices in a practice-based research network (PBRN). A retrospective cohort study of 174 endodontically-treated teeth was conducted. Mean duration of follow-up was 8.6 years. Permanent restorations were ultimately placed in 89% of teeth; mean (S.D.) number of days to permanent restoration was 215.4 (609.1). Although RCT had been completed, 18% of teeth were ultimately extracted anyway. Receipt of a permanent restoration was a significant predictor of treatment failure, whether it was determined clinically or radiographically. This study of PBRN practices suggests a higher failure rate than reported from studies in highly-controlled environments or populations with high levels of dental insurance. Also, the probability of receipt of a permanent restoration is not optimal -- and strongly predicts RCT failure. Appropriately, no RCT was done on teeth with severe periodontal bone loss. PMID:20129890

  3. Infrared Spectroscopic Identification of Chosen Dental Materials and Natural Teeth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hędzelek, W.; Marcinkowska, A.; Domka, L.; Wachowiak, R.

    2008-08-01

    Studies using solid phase infrared spectroscopy in the range of 400 to 4000 wave numbers were conducted in order to quickly identify solid tooth fragments and differentiate them from dental materials used in the dental practice. The frequently employed dental materials were evaluated. Natural chemical structure of permanent teeth obtained from donors of various ages provided the reference material. The infrared vibrations detected in infrared transmission spectra depended on the chemical structure of examined compound. Comparable distinctive peaks in infrared spectra of natural teeth and inorganic dental materials (porcelain) were exhibited. Analogous infrared spectra of dental materials consisting of organic matrix with inorganic fillers were found. In the case of acrylic materials specific organic groups were enhanced. The prepared database of infrared transmission spectra included 23 dental materials, facilitating their appropriate identification. Application of infrared spectroscopy allowed for a quick differential identification of typical dental materials produced from organic compounds for inorganic restorations (porcelain) and of tooth structure-resembling hydroxyapatite and its contaminate forms with fluoride and carbonate ions.

  4. Cleidocranial Dysplasia Case Report: Remodeling of Teeth as Aesthetic Restorative Treatment

    PubMed Central

    da Cunha, Leonardo Fernandes; Caetano, Isabela Maria; Dalitz, Fernando; Gonzaga, Carla Castiglia; Mondelli, José

    2014-01-01

    Cleidocranial dysplasia (CCD), is an autosomal dominant disorder with a prevalence of 1 in 1,000,000 individuals. It is generally characterized by orofacial manifestations, including enamel hypoplasia, retained primary teeth, and impacted permanent and supernumerary teeth. The successful treatment involving a timing intervention (orthodontic-maxillofacial surgeons-restorative) is already described. However, the restorative treatment might improve the aesthetic final result in dentistry management for patients with cleidocranial dysplasia. Objective. Therefore, this clinical report presents a conservative restorative management (enamel microabrasion, dental bleaching, and direct composite resin) for aesthetic solution for a patient with CCD. Clinical Considerations. The cosmetic remodeling is a conservative, secure, and low cost therapy that can be associated with other procedures such as enamel microabrasion and dental bleaching to achieve optimal outcome. Additionally, the Golden Proportion can be used to guide dental remodeling to improve the harmony of the smile and the facial composition. Conclusions. Thus, dentists must know and be able to treat dental aesthetic problems in cleidocranial dysplasia patients. The intention of this paper is to describe a restorative approach with the cosmetic remodeling teeth (by grinding or addicting material) associated with enamel microabrasion and dental bleaching to reestablish the form, shape, and color of smile for patients with cleidocranial dysplasia. PMID:25045546

  5. Erosive potential of commonly used beverages, medicated syrup, and their effects on dental enamel with and without restoration: An in vitro study

    PubMed Central

    Trivedi, Krishna; Bhaskar, Vijay; Ganesh, Mahadevan; Venkataraghavan, Karthik; Choudhary, Prashant; Shah, Shalin; Krishnan, Ramesh

    2015-01-01

    Aim: This study evaluates erosive potential of commonly used beverages, medicated syrup, and their effects on dental enamel with and without restoration in vitro. Materials and Methods: Test medias used in this study included carbonated beverage, noncarbonated beverage, high-energy sports drink medicated cough syrup, distilled water as the control. A total of 110 previously extracted human premolar teeth were selected for the study. Teeth were randomly divided into two groups. Test specimens were randomly distributed to five beverages groups and comprised 12 specimens per group. Surface roughness (profilometer) readings were performed at baseline and again, following immersion for 14 days (24 h/day). Microleakage was evaluated. The results obtained were analyzed for statistical significance using SPSS-PC package using the multiple factor ANOVA at a significance level of P < 0.05. Paired t-test, Friedman test ranks, and Wilcoxon signed ranks test. Results: For surface roughness high-energy sports drink and noncarbonated beverage showed the highly significant difference with P values of 0.000 and 0.000, respectively compared to other test media. For microleakage high-energy sports drink had significant difference in comparison to noncarbonated beverage (P = 0.002), medicated syrup (P = 0.000), and distilled water (P = 0.000). Conclusion: High-energy sports drink showed highest surface roughness value and microleakage score among all test media and thus greater erosive potential to enamel while medicated syrup showed least surface roughness value and microleakage among all test media. PMID:26538901

  6. Enamel hypoplasia: challenges of esthetic restorative treatment.

    PubMed

    Ruschel, Vanessa Carla; Araújo, Élito; Bernardon, Jussara Karina; Lopes, Guilherme Carpena

    2016-01-01

    Enamel defects, such as white or yellow-brown spots, usually cause problems that are more esthetic than functional. Enamel hypoplasia may be the result of hereditary, systemic, or local factors. Dental trauma is a local etiologic factor. It is relatively common in the primary dentition and can cause defects on the surface of permanent successors. Treatment for such defects can differ, depending on the depth of the spots. For deeper white-spot lesions, a composite resin restoration may be necessary. This is an excellent mode of treatment, due to both its low cost and its conservation of healthy tooth structure. The objective of this case report is to describe composite resin restoration of a maxillary central incisor affected by enamel hypoplasia. PMID:27599287

  7. Critical appraisal: dental amalgam update--part II: biological effects.

    PubMed

    Wahl, Michael J; Swift, Edward J

    2013-12-01

    Dental amalgam restorations have been controversial for over 150 years. In Part I of this Critical Appraisal, the clinical efficacy of dental amalgam was updated. Here in Part II, the biological effects of dental amalgam are addressed. PMID:24320063

  8. Influence of powder/liquid mixing ratio on the performance of a restorative glass-ionomer dental cement.

    PubMed

    Fleming, Garry J P; Farooq, Ahmed A; Barralet, Jake E

    2003-10-01

    The influence of powder/liquid mixing regime on the performance of a hand-mixed restorative glass-ionomer cement (GIC) was evaluated in terms of compressive strength, working characteristics and the porosity distribution. Mean compressive fracture strengths, standard deviations and associated Weibull moduli (m) were determined from series of 20 cylindrical specimens (6mm height, 4mm diameter) prepared by hand-mixing the relative proportions of the powder and liquid constituents. Working characteristics were assessed using an oscillating rheometer whilst scanning electron microscopy and image analysis were used to investigate the influence of the mixing regime on pore distribution. For a constant volume of liquid (1ml) the mean compressive strength decreased from 102.1+/-23.1MPa for 7.4g of powder, to 93.8+/-22.9, 82.6+/-18.5 and 55.7+/-17.2MPa for 6.66, 5.94 and 3.7g of powder, respectively. A concomitant increase in both the working and setting times was also observed.GICs manipulated to a powder/liquid mixing consistency below the manufacturers' recommend ratio, for a constant volume of liquid, resulted in reduced porosity levels in the cement mass and extended working and setting times. Unfortunately, a reduction in the concentration of reinforcing glass particles in the set material below that specified by the manufacturers decreases the cements' load bearing capacity so that they fail at lower compressive stress levels in the posterior region of the mouth. PMID:12853247

  9. A comparative study of sliding wear of nonmetallic dental restorative materials with emphasis on micromechanical wear mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Dupriez, Nataliya Deyneka; von Koeckritz, Ann-Kristin; Kunzelmann, Karl-Heinz

    2015-05-01

    The purpose of this study is to investigate the in vitro tribological behavior of modern nonmetallic restorative materials. Specimen prepared of IPS e.max Press lithium disilicate glass ceramic, IPS Empress Esthetic leucite-reinforced glass ceramic, Everest ZS Blanks yttria-stabilized zirconia and Lava Ultimate composite were subjected to wear using a wear machine designed to simulate occlusal loads. The wear of the investigated materials and antagonists were evaluated by a three-dimensional surface scanner. The quantitative wear test results were used to compare and rank the materials. Specimens were divided into two groups with steatite and alumina antagonists. For each antagonist material an analysis of variance was applied. As a post hoc test of the significant differences, Tukey's honest significant difference test was used. With steatite antagonist: wear of zirconia < wear of leucite-reinforced ceramic < wear of lithium disilicate ceramic < wear of Lava Ultimate composite. No significant wear difference was found for steatite antagonist. The wear of IPS e.max Press and Lava Ultimate against hard alumina was found to be twice lower as compared to their wear when opposing to steatite. The differences were associated with materials mechanical properties (hardness and fracture toughness) and with materials microstructure. Wear mechanisms are discussed. PMID:25303041

  10. RADIOPACITY OF RESTORATIVE MATERIALS USING DIGITAL IMAGES

    PubMed Central

    Salzedas, Leda Maria Pescinini; Louzada, Mário Jefferson Quirino; de Oliveira, Antonio Braz

    2006-01-01

    The radiopacity of esthetic restorative materials has been established as an important requirement, improving the radiographic diagnosis. The aim of this study was to evaluate the radiopacity of six restorative materials using a direct digital image system, comparing them to the dental tissues (enamel-dentin), expressed as equivalent thickness of aluminum (millimeters of aluminum). Five specimens of each material were made. Three 2-mm thick longitudinal sections were cut from an intact extracted permanent molar tooth (including enamel and dentin). An aluminum step wedge with 9 steps was used. The samples of different materials were placed on a phosphor plate together with a tooth section, aluminum step wedge and metal code letter, and were exposed using a dental x-ray unit. Five measurements of radiographic density were obtained from each image of each item assessed (restorative material, enamel, dentin, each step of the aluminum step wedge) and the mean of these values was calculated. Radiopacity values were subsequently calculated as equivalents of aluminum thickness. Analysis of variance (ANOVA) indicated significant differences in radiopacity values among the materials (P<0.0001). The radiopacity values of the restorative materials evaluated were, in decreasing order: TPH, F2000, Synergy, Prisma Flow, Degufill, Luxat. Only Luxat had significantly lower radiopacity values than dentin. One material (Degufill) had similar radiopacity values to enamel and four (TPH, F2000, Synergy and Prisma Flow) had significantly higher radiopacity values than enamel. In conclusion, to assess the adequacy of posterior composite restorations it is important that the restorative material to be used has enough radiopacity, in order to be easily distinguished from the tooth structure in the radiographic image. Knowledge on the radiopacity of different materials helps professionals to select the most suitable material, along with other properties such as biocompatibility, adhesion and

  11. 21 CFR 872.3700 - Dental mercury.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Dental mercury. 872.3700 Section 872.3700 Food and... DENTAL DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 872.3700 Dental mercury. (a) Identification. Dental mercury is a device composed of mercury intended for use as a component of amalgam alloy in the restoration of...

  12. Dental caries in primary and permanent molars in 7-8-year-old schoolchildren evaluated with Caries Assessment Spectrum and Treatment (CAST) index

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background No reports on a caries pattern covering the full spectrum of the disease could be found in the literature. The aim of this study was to evaluate caries in primary and first permanent molars of 7-8-year-old Polish children by the Caries Assessment Spectrum and Treatment (CAST) index and to find whether there was any correlation between the caries stages in such teeth. Methods The study covered 284 7-8-year-old children from randomly selected schools in the Bialystok District, Poland. The prevalence of CAST categories was evaluated with regard to the first and second primary, and first permanent, molars. The Spearman’s rank correlation coefficient was used to explore the correlation of the distribution of CAST codes among the evaluated teeth. The level of statistical significance was established at p < 0.05. The intra-examiner reliability was determined by the unweighted kappa coefficient. Results With regard to the permanent molars, caries was observed in 14.8% to 17.3% of the molar and most lesions were scored at the non-cavitation level. Caries in primary molars was most often recorded at the stage of cavitated dentine lesion. Teeth with pulpal involvement, sepsis and extracted due to caries were found to be more prevalent in first, and then in second primary molars. A strong correlation was found between the status of teeth from the right and left sides of the oral cavity. The correlation of the status of first and second primary teeth was stronger for the left than for the right side of the mouth, r was 0.627 and 0.472 in maxilla and 0.513 and 0.483 in mandible (p < 0.001), respectively. For the neighbouring primary and permanent molars the correlation was assessed to be weak. With regard to the teeth situated in opposite jaws the study revealed that the correlations were moderate - r between 0.33 and 0.49. The intra-examiner reliability was established at 0.96 for the primary dentition and at 0.878 for permanent molars. Conclusion The

  13. Advances in dental materials.

    PubMed

    Vaderhobli, Ram M

    2011-07-01

    The use of materials to rehabilitate tooth structures is constantly changing. Over the past decade, newer material processing techniques and technologies have significantly improved the dependability and predictability of dental material for clinicians. The greatest obstacle, however, is in choosing the right combination for continued success. Finding predictable approaches for successful restorative procedures has been the goal of clinical and material scientists. This article provides a broad perspective on the advances made in various classes of dental restorative materials in terms of their functionality with respect to pit and fissure sealants, glass ionomers, and dental composites. PMID:21726695

  14. Use of a compact fiber optic spectrometer for spectral feedback during the laser ablation of dental hard tissues and restorative materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Joyce Y.; Fan, Kenneth; Fried, Daniel

    2006-02-01

    One perceived disadvantage of caries removal using lasers is the loss of the tactile feedback associated with the handpiece. However, alternative methods of acoustic and optical feedback become available with the laser that can be exploited to provide information about the chemical composition of the material ablated, the ablation efficiency and rate, the depth of the incision, and the surface and plume temperature during ablation. Such information can be used to increase the selectivity of ablation, avoid peripheral thermal damage and excessive heat deposition in the tooth, and provide a mechanism of robotic automation. The objective of this study was to test the hypothesis that a compact fiberoptic spectrometer could be used to differentiate between the ablation of sound and carious enamel and dentin and between dental hard tissues and composite. Sound and carious tooth surfaces along with composite restorative materials were scanned with λ=0.355, 2.79 and 9.3 μm laser pulses at irradiation intensities ranging from 0.5-100 J/cm2 and spectra were acquired from λ=250-900-nm using a compact fiber-optic spectrometer. Emission spectra varied markedly with the laser wavelength and pulse duration. Optical feedback was not successful in differentiating between sound and carious enamel and dentin even with the addition of various chromophores to carious lesion areas. However, the spectral feedback was successfully used to differentiate between composites and sound enamel and dentin enabling the selective removal of composite from tooth surfaces using a computer controlled λ=9.3-μm pulsed CO II laser and scanning system.

  15. 12 CFR 1229.11 - Capital restoration plans.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... capital restoration plan submitted by a Bank shall set forth a plan to restore its permanent and total... restoration plan, including setting forth a schedule for it to restore its permanent and total capital to... submission. A Bank must submit a proposed capital restoration plan no later than 15 business-days after...

  16. 12 CFR 1229.11 - Capital restoration plans.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... capital restoration plan submitted by a Bank shall set forth a plan to restore its permanent and total... restoration plan, including setting forth a schedule for it to restore its permanent and total capital to... submission. A Bank must submit a proposed capital restoration plan no later than 15 business-days after...

  17. 12 CFR 1229.11 - Capital restoration plans.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... capital restoration plan submitted by a Bank shall set forth a plan to restore its permanent and total... restoration plan, including setting forth a schedule for it to restore its permanent and total capital to... submission. A Bank must submit a proposed capital restoration plan no later than 15 business-days after...

  18. Dental Amalgam

    MedlinePlus

    ... Products and Medical Procedures Dental Devices Dental Amalgam Dental Amalgam Share Tweet Linkedin Pin it More sharing options Linkedin Pin it Email Print Dental amalgam is a dental filling material which is ...

  19. Restoration of ankle movements with the ActiGait implantable drop foot stimulator: a safe and reliable treatment option for permanent central leg palsy.

    PubMed

    Martin, Klaus Daniel; Polanski, Witold Henryk; Schulz, Anne-Kathrin; Jöbges, Michael; Hoff, Hansjoerg; Schackert, Gabriele; Pinzer, Thomas; Sobottka, Stephan B

    2016-01-01

    OBJECT The ActiGait drop foot stimulator is a promising technique for restoration of lost ankle function by an implantable hybrid stimulation system. It allows ankle dorsiflexion by active peroneal nerve stimulation during the swing phase of gait. In this paper the authors report the outcome of the first prospective study on a large number of patients with stroke-related drop foot. METHODS Twenty-seven patients who experienced a stroke and with persisting spastic leg paresis received an implantable ActiGait drop foot stimulator for restoration of ankle movement after successful surface test stimulation. After 3 to 5 weeks, the stimulator was activated, and gait speed, gait endurance, and activation time of the system were evaluated and compared with preoperative gait tests. In addition, patient satisfaction was assessed using a questionnaire. RESULTS Postoperative gait speed significantly improved from 33.9 seconds per 20 meters to 17.9 seconds per 20 meters (p < 0.0001), gait endurance from 196 meters in 6 minutes to 401 meters in 6 minutes (p < 0.0001), and activation time from 20.5 seconds to 10.6 seconds on average (p < 0.0001). In 2 patients with nerve injury, surgical repositioning of the electrode cuff became necessary. One patient showed a delayed wound healing, and in another patient the system had to be removed because of a wound infection. Marked improvement in mobility, social participation, and quality of life was confirmed by 89% to 96% of patients. CONCLUSIONS The ActiGait implantable drop foot stimulator improves gait speed, endurance, and quality of life in patients with stroke-related drop foot. Regarding gait speed, the ActiGait system appears to be advantageous compared with foot orthosis or surface stimulation devices. Randomized trials with more patients and longer observation periods are needed to prove the long-term benefit of this device. PMID:26207599

  20. Directly Placed Restorative Materials: Review and Network Meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Schwendicke, F; Göstemeyer, G; Blunck, U; Paris, S; Hsu, L-Y; Tu, Y-K

    2016-06-01

    For restoring cavitated dental lesions, whether carious or not, a large number of material combinations are available. We aimed to systematically review and synthesize data of comparative dental restorative trials. A systematic review was performed. Randomized controlled trials published between 2005 and 2015 were included that compared the survival of ≥2 restorative and/or adhesive materials (i.e., no need for restorative reintervention). Pairwise and Bayesian network meta-analyses were performed, with separate evaluations for cervical cavitated lesions and load-bearing posterior cavitated lesions in permanent and primary teeth. A total of 11,070 restorations (5,330 cervical, 5,740 load bearing) had been placed in 3,633 patients in the included trials. Thirty-six trials investigated restoration of cervical lesions (all in permanent teeth) and 36 of load-bearing lesions (8 in primary and 28 in permanent teeth). Resin-modified glass ionomer cements had the highest chance of survival in cervical cavitated lesions; composites or compomers placed via 2-step self-etch and 3-step etch-and-rinse adhesives were ranked next. Restorations placed with 2-step etch-and-rinse or 1-step self-etch adhesives performed worst. For load-bearing restorations, conventional composites had the highest probability of survival, while siloranes were found least suitable. Ambiguity remains regarding which adhesive strategy to use in load-bearing cavitated lesions. Most studies showed high risk of bias, and several comparisons were prone for publication bias. If prioritized for survival, resin-modified glass ionomer cements might be recommended to restore cervical lesions. For load-bearing ones, conventional or bulk fill composites seem most suitable. The available evidence is quantitatively and qualitatively insufficient for further recommendations, especially with regard to adhesive strategies in posterior load-bearing situations. Moreover, different material classifications might yield

  1. Oral Health-Related Quality of Life and Traumatic Dental Injuries in Young Permanent Incisors in Brazilian Schoolchildren: A Multilevel Approach

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Background Traumatic dental injury (TDI) during childhood may negatively impact the quality of life of children. Objective To describe the association of oral health-related quality of life (OHRQoL) and domains (oral symptons, functional limitation, emotional- and social-well-being) of children with individual and contextual variables. Methods A cross-sectional study was performed using a representative sample of 1,201 schoolchildren, 8–10 years-old, from public and private schools of Belo Horizonte, Brazil. The CPQ8–10 was used to assess OHRQoL, dichotomized in low and high impact. Sociodemographic information was collected through questionnaires to parents. Children were examined at schools, using the Andreasen criteria. Individual variables were gender, age, number of residents in home, parents/caregivers’ level of education, family income, and TDI (dichotomized into without trauma/mild trauma and severe trauma). Dental caries and malocclusion were considered co-variables. Contextual variables were the Social Vulnerability Index and type of school. Ethical approval and consent forms were obtained. Data were analyzed using SPSS for Windows 19.0 and HLM 6.06, including frequency distribution, chi-squared test and multilevel approach (p < 0.05). Results The prevalence of a negative impact on OHRQoL in children with severe trauma was 55.9%. The TDI negatively impacted emotional and social domains of OHRQoL. A multilevel analysis revealed a significant difference in OHRQoL according to the type of school and showed that 16% of the total variance was due to contextual characteristics (p < 0.001; ICC = 0.16). The negative impact on OHRQoL was higher in girls (p = 0.009), younger children (p = 0.023), with severe TDI (p = 0.014), those from public schools (p = 0.017) and whose parents had a lower education level (p = 0.001). Conclusion Severe trauma impacts OHRQoL on emotional and social domains. Contextual dimensions add information to individual variability to

  2. Reparative dentistry or restorative dentistry?

    PubMed

    Small, Bruce W

    2008-01-01

    The real definition of restorative dentistry is found in the heart and hands of each individual restorative dentist. His or her training, continuing dental education, mentors, needs (financial and emotional), and style of practice all help to develop a philosophy of dental practice that affects daily restorative decisions. Depending on the factors described above, the decision to repair a tooth or change the environment and restore the tooth to a different shape, size, or color also may change. In recent years, patients' esthetic desires have become more of a factor than they were in previous decades. There are no exact written-tn-stone definitions of restorative dentistry, since the answers are operator-dependent and can vary. This column is meant to be food for thought and perhaps inspire discussion when dentists assemble for meetings or study clubs with the goal of delivering longer-lasting dentistry through a restorative dental practice. PMID:18348367

  3. Prevalence of First Permanent Molar Caries in and Its Relationship to the Dental Knowledge of 9–12-Year Olds from Jeddah, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia

    PubMed Central

    Al-Samadani, Khalid H. M.; Ahmad, Mohammad Sami

    2012-01-01

    The carious status of the first permanent molar (FPM) was studied in 432 school children (aged 9–12 years) from a randomly selected primary schools from Sharfia area of Jeddah, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia. The sample consisted of 108 children from each age group of 9, 10, 11, and 12 years old. In total, 24.5% had all of their FPMs sound and 6% had all FPMs carious. The prevalence of four sound FPMs varied according to age with the highest (33%) amongst the nine-year olds and the lowest (16.5%) in the oldest children (12 years). Almost one-third (32.5%) of the children, who knew the age of eruption of the FPMs, had all of their molars sound. The children who had received advice regarding oral hygiene from a dentist or parent had more sound FPMs compared to the children who did not receive any advice. The number of carious FPMs increased with age. The prevalence of caries of the FPM was high and increased with increasing age. The level of knowledge had a positive correlation with the caries levels amongst this cohort of scholars. PMID:22461990

  4. New nano-sized Al2O3-BN coating 3Y-TZP ceramic composites for CAD/CAM-produced all-ceramic dental restorations. Part I. Fabrication of powders.

    PubMed

    Yang, Se Fei; Yang, Li Qiang; Jin, Zhi Hao; Guo, Tian Wen; Wang, Lei; Liu, Hong Chen

    2009-06-01

    Partially sintered 3 mol % yttria-stabilized tetragonal zirconium dioxide (ZrO(2), zirconia) polycrystal (3Y-TZP) ceramics are used in dental posterior restorations with computer-aided design-computer-aided manufacturing (CAD/CAM) techniques. High strength is acquired after sintering, but shape distortion of preshaped compacts during their sintering is inevitable. The aim of this study is to fabricate new machinable ceramic composites with strong mechanical properties that are fit for all-ceramic dental restorations. Aluminum oxide (Al(2)O(3))-coated 3Y-TZP powders were first prepared by the heterogeneous precipitation method starting with 3Y-TZP, Al(NO(3))(3) . 9H(2)O, and ammonia, then amorphous boron nitride (BN) was produced and the as-received composite powders were coated via in situ reaction with boric acid and urea. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and X-ray diffraction (XRD) were used to analyze the status of Al(2)O(3)-BN on the surface of the 3Y-TZP particles. TEM micrographs show an abundance of Al(2)O(3) particles and amorphous BN appearing uniformly on the surface of the 3Y-TZP particles after the coating process. The size of the Al(2)O(3) particles is about 20 nm. The XRD pattern shows clearly the peak of amorphous BN among the peaks of ZrO(2). PMID:19223246

  5. The restorative management of microdontia.

    PubMed

    Laverty, D P; Thomas, M B M

    2016-08-26

    Microdontia is a dental abnormality that will often present to the dental practitioner due to the aesthetic concerns of the patient. Treatment is therefore aimed at addressing the aesthetics issue of the patient and this can present a number of challenges which may require a multidisciplinary approach in its management. This article presents the restorative management of localised and generalised microdontia. PMID:27561572

  6. Facial Gel Complication after Dental Injection: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Pourdanesh, Fereydoun; Shams, Shahin; Sadeghi, Hasan Mir Mohammad

    2013-01-01

    Injectable gel is becoming increasingly popular for cosmetic reasons. The polyacrylamide gel (PAAG) is a permanent filler material used worldwide. In spite of the fact that the filler materials used today are considered quite safe, various complications have been reported in the literature. Hence PAAG use in the United States is not popular. As the area is very close to the dental field, a large complication potential is relatively considered following buccal dental injections. The aim of this article is to highlight a rare complication observed following a local anesthetic administration of a simple molar restoration in a healthy 33-year-old woman who had history of a filler augmentation in her cheek approximately 6 years ago. PMID:24436772

  7. Facial gel complication after dental injection: a case report.

    PubMed

    Pourdanesh, Fereydoun; Shams, Shahin; Sadeghi, Hasan Mir Mohammad

    2013-12-01

    Injectable gel is becoming increasingly popular for cosmetic reasons. The polyacrylamide gel (PAAG) is a permanent filler material used worldwide. In spite of the fact that the filler materials used today are considered quite safe, various complications have been reported in the literature. Hence PAAG use in the United States is not popular. As the area is very close to the dental field, a large complication potential is relatively considered following buccal dental injections. The aim of this article is to highlight a rare complication observed following a local anesthetic administration of a simple molar restoration in a healthy 33-year-old woman who had history of a filler augmentation in her cheek approximately 6 years ago. PMID:24436772

  8. 78 FR 24761 - National Institute of Dental & Craniofacial Research; Notice of Closed Meetings

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-04-26

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Institute of Dental & Craniofacial Research... personal privacy. Name of Committee: National Institute of Dental and Craniofacial Research Special Emphasis Panel; Design and Development of Novel Dental Composite Restorative Systems Review Panel....

  9. Class II glass ionomer cermet tunnel, resin sandwich and amalgam restorations over 2 years.

    PubMed

    Wilkie, R; Lidums, A; Smales, R

    1993-08-01

    This study compared the clinical behavior of a glass ionomer (polyalkenoate) silver cermet, a posterior resin composite used with the "tunnel" technique, a posterior resin composite used with the "closed sandwich" technique, and a high-copper amalgam for restoring small, proximal surface carious lesions. Two dentists placed 86 restorations in the posterior permanent teeth of 26 adults treated at a dental hospital. Restorations were assessed at 6-month intervals over 2 years for gingivitis adjacent to them, the tightness of proximal contacts, occlusal wear, surface voids, roughness and cracking, surface and marginal staining, and marginal fracture. Small filling defects, surface voids and occlusal wear were obvious with the cermet material, with surface crazing and cracking present in 48% of the tunnel restorations. Two of the posterior resin composites, but none of the amalgam restorations, also failed. The cermet cannot be recommended as a long-term permanent restorative material in situations where it is likely to be subjected to heavy occlusal stresses and abrasive wear. PMID:7803004

  10. Multidisciplinary approach on rehabilitation of primary teeth traumatism repercussion on the permanent successor: 6-year follow-up case report.

    PubMed

    Mello-Moura, A C V; Bonini, G A V C; Suga, S S; Navarro, R S; Wanderley, M T

    2009-01-01

    Traumatic lesions in primary teeth are frequent in pediatric patients and can cause problems both to the deciduous tooth and permanent successor. The impact strength on deciduous tooth can reach the growing permanent tooth, affecting its morphology, structure and position, or even hampering its proper development. This report describes an aesthetic-functional rehabilitation process in an 8 year 10 month old boy during a multidisciplinary treatment held at the Clinical Center of Dental Trauma in Primary Teeth of the Pediatric Dentistry of Dental College of University of São Paulo, Brazil. The patient presented bilateral posterior cross bite and the permanent left upper central incisor with ectopic eruption and enamel hypoplasy, preceded by avulsion of element 61, occurred when the patient was 1.6 years old. After diagnosis and treatment planning, a quick expansion of jaws was recommended with Hass-type rapid expander and orthodontic leveling with fixed braces. Due to the ectopic eruption, the gingival contour had been altered and hypertrophia was found, compromising aesthetics and avoiding local hygienic procedures. Gingivoplasty was carried out with high-intensity Diode Laser, followed by aesthetic restoration with compound resin. It was concluded that after deciduous teeth traumatism it is important that the patient undergoes clinic and radiographic assistance until the permanent teeth erupt so that an adequate multidisciplinary treatment can be offered to the patient. PMID:19736508

  11. Class II Resin Composites: Restorative Options.

    PubMed

    Patel, Minesh; Mehta, Shamir B; Banerji, Subir

    2015-10-01

    Tooth-coloured, resin composite restorations are amongst the most frequently prescribed forms of dental restoration to manage defects in posterior teeth. The attainment of a desirable outcome when placing posterior resin composite restorations requires the clinician to have a good understanding of the benefits (as well as the limitations) posed by this material, together with a sound knowledge of placement technique. Numerous protocols and materials have evolved to assist the dental operator with this type of demanding posterior restoration. With the use of case examples, four techniques available are reported here. CPD/Clinical Relevance: This article explores varying techniques for the restoration of Class II cavities using resin composite. PMID:26685471

  12. CAD/CAM ceramic restorations in the operatory and laboratory.

    PubMed

    Fasbinder, Dennis J

    2003-08-01

    Computer assisted design/computer assisted machining (CAD/CAM) technology has received considerable clinical and research interest from modern dental practices as a means of delivering all-ceramic restorations. The CEREC, System offers CAD/CAM dental technology designed for clinical use by dentists, as well as a separate system designed for dental laboratory technicians. The CEREC 3 system is indicated for dental operatory applications, and the CEREC inLab, system is indicated for dental laboratory applications. Although both systems rely on similar CAD/CAM technology, several significant differences exist in the processing techniques involved, restorative materials used, and types of restoration provided. PMID:14692164

  13. Quantitative determination of TEGDMA, BHT, and DMABEE in eluates from polymerized resin-based dental restorative materials by use of GC/MS.

    PubMed

    Seiss, Mario; Langer, Christopher; Hickel, Reinhard; Reichl, Franz-Xaver

    2009-12-01

    This study investigated the leaching of ingredients from several commercial dental composite resins cured with LED, and immersed in methanol or water for 24 h, respectively. The composites used were: Admira Dentin (VOCO), Artemis Schmelz (Enamel) (Ivoclar Vivadent), Els extra low shrinkage (Saremco Dental), Filtek Supreme XT Dentin (3 M ESPE), Gradia Direct (GC), Venus & Venus flow (Heraeus Kulzer), and XRV Herculite Prodigy Enamel (Kerr). From each dental composite four specimens with defined structure and 100-mg net weight were made. After the polymerization process, according to manufacturer's instructions, the specimens were immersed in either 1 ml water or 1 ml methanol and incubated at 37 degrees C for 24 h. Eluted ingredients triethyleneglycoldimethacrylate (TEGDMA), 2,6-di-tert-butyl-4-methylphenol (BHT), and 4-N,N-dimethylaminobenzoicacidethylester (DMABEE) were detected and quantified using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). The amounts of the detected analytes from 100 mg polymerized composites ranged between the following values: TEGDMA: 0-0.5 mg (water), 0-1.6 mg (methanol); BHT: 0-0.03 μg (water), 0-0.11 mg (methanol); and DMABEE: 0-0.11 mg (water), 0-1.4 mg (methanol). We conclude from the results that the elution rates into methanol and water differ significantly. Furthermore, it is concluded that all the determined amounts eluting from the composites are far below toxic-relevant concentrations. PMID:19771414

  14. [The application of universal adhesives in dental bonding].

    PubMed

    Guo, Jingmei; Lei, Wenlong; Yang, Hongye; Huang, Cui

    2016-03-01

    The bonding restoration has become an important clinical technique for the development of dental bonding technology. Because of its easy operation and the maximum preservation of tooth tissues, bonding repair is widely used in dental restoration. The recent multi-mode universal adhesives have brought new progress in dental bonding restoration. In this article the universal adhesives were reviewed according to its definition, development, improvement, application features and possible problems. PMID:26980660

  15. Dental Sealants

    MedlinePlus

    ... Data & Statistics > Find Data by Topic > Dental Sealants Dental Sealants Main Content Dental sealants are thin plastic coatings that protect the chewing surfaces of children’s back teeth from tooth decay. Overall, the prevalence of sealants ...

  16. Surface texture measurement for dental wear applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Austin, R. S.; Mullen, F.; Bartlett, D. W.

    2015-06-01

    The application of surface topography measurement and characterization within dental materials science is highly active and rapidly developing, in line with many modern industries. Surface measurement and structuring is used extensively within oral and dental science to optimize the optical, tribological and biological performance of natural and biomimetic dental materials. Although there has historically been little standardization in the use and reporting of surface metrology instrumentation and software, the dental industry is beginning to adopt modern areal measurement and characterization techniques, especially as the dental industry is increasingly adopting digital impressioning techniques in order to leverage CAD/CAM technologies for the design and construction of dental restorations. As dental treatment becomes increasingly digitized and reliant on advanced technologies such as dental implants, wider adoption of standardized surface topography and characterization techniques will become evermore essential. The dental research community welcomes the advances that are being made in surface topography measurement science towards realizing this ultimate goal.

  17. Improved single- and multi-contact life-time testing of dental restorative materials using key characteristics of the human masticatory system and a force/position-controlled robotic dental wear simulator.

    PubMed

    Raabe, D; Harrison, A; Ireland, A; Alemzadeh, K; Sandy, J; Dogramadzi, S; Melhuish, C; Burgess, S

    2012-03-01

    This paper presents a new in vitro wear simulator based on spatial parallel kinematics and a biologically inspired implicit force/position hybrid controller to replicate chewing movements and dental wear formations on dental components, such as crowns, bridges or a full set of teeth. The human mandible, guided by passive structures such as posterior teeth and the two temporomandibular joints, moves with up to 6 degrees of freedom (DOF) in Cartesian space. The currently available wear simulators lack the ability to perform these chewing movements. In many cases, their lack of sufficient DOF enables them only to replicate the sliding motion of a single occlusal contact point by neglecting rotational movements and the motion along one Cartesian axis. The motion and forces of more than one occlusal contact points cannot accurately be replicated by these instruments. Furthermore, the majority of wear simulators are unable to control simultaneously the main wear-affecting parameters, considering abrasive mechanical wear, which are the occlusal sliding motion and bite forces in the constraint contact phase of the human chewing cycle. It has been shown that such discrepancies between the true in vivo and the simulated in vitro condition influence the outcome and the quality of wear studies. This can be improved by implementing biological features of the human masticatory system such as tooth compliance realized through the passive action of the periodontal ligament and active bite force control realized though the central nervous system using feedback from periodontal preceptors. The simulator described in this paper can be used for single- and multi-occlusal contact testing due to its kinematics and ability to exactly replicate human translational and rotational mandibular movements with up to 6 DOF without neglecting movements along or around the three Cartesian axes. Recorded human mandibular motion and occlusal force data are the reference inputs of the simulator

  18. Dental Procedures.

    PubMed

    Ramponi, Denise R

    2016-01-01

    Dental problems are a common complaint in emergency departments in the United States. There are a wide variety of dental issues addressed in emergency department visits such as dental caries, loose teeth, dental trauma, gingival infections, and dry socket syndrome. Review of the most common dental blocks and dental procedures will allow the practitioner the opportunity to make the patient more comfortable and reduce the amount of analgesia the patient will need upon discharge. Familiarity with the dental equipment, tooth, and mouth anatomy will help prepare the practitioner for to perform these dental procedures. PMID:27482994

  19. Dental therapists in general dental practices: an economic evaluation.

    PubMed

    Beazoglou, Tryfon J; Lazar, Vickie F; Guay, Albert H; Heffley, Dennis R; Bailit, Howard L

    2012-08-01

    Dental access disparities are well documented and have been recognized as a national problem. Their major cause is the lack of reasonable Medicaid reimbursement rates for the underserved. Specifically, Medicaid reimbursement rates for children average 40 percent below market rates. In addition, most state Medicaid programs do not cover adults. To address these issues, advocates of better oral health for the underserved are considering support for a new allied provider--a dental therapist--capable of providing services at a lower cost per service and in low-income and rural areas. Using a standard economic analysis, this study estimated the potential cost, price, utilization, and dentist's income effects of dental therapists employed in general dental practices. The analysis is based on national general dental practice data and the broadest scope of responsibility for dental therapists that their advocates have advanced, including the ability to provide restorations and extractions to adults and children, training for three years, and minimum supervision. Assuming dental therapists provide restorative, extraction, and pulpal services to patients of all ages and dental hygienists continue to deliver all hygiene services, the mean reduction in a general practice costs ranges between 1.57 and 2.36 percent. For dental therapists treating children only, the range is 0.31 to 0.47 percent. The effects on price and utilization are even smaller. In addition, the effects on most dentists' gross income, hours of work, and net income are negative. The estimated economic impact of dental therapists in the United States on private dental practice is very limited; therefore, the demand for dental therapists by private practices also would probably be very limited. PMID:22855595

  20. Restoring proximal caries lesions conservatively with tunnel restorations

    PubMed Central

    Chu, Chun-Hung; Mei, May L; Cheung, Chloe; Nalliah, Romesh P

    2013-01-01

    The tunnel restoration has been suggested as a conservative alternative to the conventional box preparation for treating proximal caries. The main advantage of tunnel restoration over the conventional box or slot preparation includes being more conservative and increasing tooth integrity and strength by preserving the marginal ridge. However, tunnel restoration is technique-sensitive and can be particularly challenging for inexperienced restorative dentists. Recent advances in technology, such as the contemporary design of dental handpieces with advanced light-emitting diode (LED) and handheld comfort, offer operative dentists better vision, illumination, and maneuverability. The use of magnifying loupes also enhances the visibility of the preparation. The advent of digital radiographic imaging has improved dental imaging and reduced radiation. The new generation of restorative materials has improved mechanical properties. Tunnel restoration can be an option to restore proximal caries if the dentist performs proper case selection and pays attention to the details of the restorative procedures. This paper describes the clinical technique of tunnel restoration and reviews the studies of tunnel restorations. PMID:24019754

  1. Novel Osteogenic Ti-6Al-4V Device For Restoration Of Dental Function In Patients With Large Bone Deficiencies: Design, Development And Implementation

    PubMed Central

    Cohen, D. J.; Cheng, A.; Kahn, A.; Aviram, M.; Whitehead, A. J.; Hyzy, S. L.; Clohessy, R. M.; Boyan, B. D.; Schwartz, Z.

    2016-01-01

    Custom devices supporting bone regeneration and implant placement are needed for edentulous patients with large mandibular deficiencies where endosteal implantation is not possible. We developed a novel subperiosteal titanium-aluminum-vanadium bone onlay device produced by additive manufacturing (AM) and post-fabrication osteogenic micro-/nano-scale surface texture modification. Human osteoblasts produced osteogenic and angiogenic factors when grown on laser-sintered nano-/micro-textured surfaces compared to smooth surfaces. Surface-processed constructs caused higher bone-to-implant contact, vertical bone growth into disk pores (microCT and histomorphometry), and mechanical pull-out force at 5 and 10 w on rat calvaria compared to non surface-modified constructs, even when pre-treating the bone to stimulate osteogenesis. Surface-modified wrap-implants placed around rabbit tibias osseointegrated by 6 w. Finally, patient-specific constructs designed to support dental implants produced via AM and surface-processing were implanted on edentulous mandibular bone. 3 and 8 month post-operative images showed new bone formation and osseointegration of the device and indicated stability of the dental implants. PMID:26854193

  2. Novel Osteogenic Ti-6Al-4V Device For Restoration Of Dental Function In Patients With Large Bone Deficiencies: Design, Development And Implementation.

    PubMed

    Cohen, D J; Cheng, A; Kahn, A; Aviram, M; Whitehead, A J; Hyzy, S L; Clohessy, R M; Boyan, B D; Schwartz, Z

    2016-01-01

    Custom devices supporting bone regeneration and implant placement are needed for edentulous patients with large mandibular deficiencies where endosteal implantation is not possible. We developed a novel subperiosteal titanium-aluminum-vanadium bone onlay device produced by additive manufacturing (AM) and post-fabrication osteogenic micro-/nano-scale surface texture modification. Human osteoblasts produced osteogenic and angiogenic factors when grown on laser-sintered nano-/micro-textured surfaces compared to smooth surfaces. Surface-processed constructs caused higher bone-to-implant contact, vertical bone growth into disk pores (microCT and histomorphometry), and mechanical pull-out force at 5 and 10 w on rat calvaria compared to non surface-modified constructs, even when pre-treating the bone to stimulate osteogenesis. Surface-modified wrap-implants placed around rabbit tibias osseointegrated by 6 w. Finally, patient-specific constructs designed to support dental implants produced via AM and surface-processing were implanted on edentulous mandibular bone. 3 and 8 month post-operative images showed new bone formation and osseointegration of the device and indicated stability of the dental implants. PMID:26854193

  3. The FiCTION dental trial protocol – filling children’s teeth: indicated or not?

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background There is a lack of evidence for effective management of dental caries (decay) in children’s primary (baby) teeth and an apparent failure of conventional dental restorations (fillings) to prevent dental pain and infection for UK children in Primary Care. UK dental schools’ teaching has been based on British Society of Paediatric Dentistry guidance which recommends that caries in primary teeth should be removed and a restoration placed. However, the evidence base for this is limited in volume and quality, and comes from studies conducted in either secondary care or specialist practices. Restorations provided in specialist environments can be effective but the generalisability of this evidence to Primary Care has been questioned. The FiCTION trial addresses the Health Technology Assessment (HTA) Programme’s commissioning brief and research question “What is the clinical and cost effectiveness of restoration caries in primary teeth, compared to no treatment?” It compares conventional restorations with an intermediate treatment strategy based on the biological (sealing-in) management of caries and with no restorations. Methods/Design This is a Primary Care-based multi-centre, three-arm, parallel group, patient-randomised controlled trial. Practitioners are recruiting 1461 children, (3–7 years) with at least one primary molar tooth where caries extends into dentine. Children are randomized and treated according to one of three treatment approaches; conventional caries management with best practice prevention, biological management of caries with best practice prevention or best practice prevention alone. Baseline measures and outcome data (at review/treatment during three year follow-up) are assessed through direct reporting, clinical examination including blinded radiograph assessment, and child/parent questionnaires. The primary outcome measure is the incidence of either pain or infection related to dental caries. Secondary outcomes are

  4. Dental treatment abuse.

    PubMed

    Chalakkal, Paul; Ataide, Ida De Noronha De; Krishnan, Ramesh; Pavaskar, Rajdeep

    2014-07-01

    These case reports highlight dental treatment abuse performed by a quack on children. The anterior teeth of these children were metal capped using cement, which were otherwise healthy. The treatment was done on children without parental consent by a quack from Denmark who gave the reason as for resolving proclination of upper permanent incisors. The unanatomic, unaesthetic metal caps were removed after the child reported to the Department of Pedodontics and Preventive Dentistry. PMID:25177645

  5. Dental Treatment Abuse

    PubMed Central

    Ataide, Ida De Noronha De; Krishnan, Ramesh; Pavaskar, Rajdeep

    2014-01-01

    These case reports highlight dental treatment abuse performed by a quack on children. The anterior teeth of these children were metal capped using cement, which were otherwise healthy. The treatment was done on children without parental consent by a quack from Denmark who gave the reason as for resolving proclination of upper permanent incisors. The unanatomic, unaesthetic metal caps were removed after the child reported to the Department of Pedodontics and Preventive Dentistry. PMID:25177645

  6. Oral findings and dental treatment in a child with Williams-Beuren syndrome.

    PubMed

    Torres, Carolina Paes; Valadares, Gleice; Martins, Mariana Izabella; Borsatto, Maria Cristina; Díaz-Serrano, Kranya Victoria; de Queiroz, Alexandra Mussolino

    2015-01-01

    Williams-Beuren syndrome (WBS), also known as Williams syndrome, is a rare congenital disorder involving cardiovascular problems, mental retardation, distinctive facial features and tooth anomalies. It is caused by the submicroscopic deletion of 1.5 to 1.8 Mb on chromosome 7q11.23. This paper reports the dental care to a 7-year-old child with WBS syndrome. The interview also revealed visual impairment, sensorineural hearing loss, hyperacusis, photophobia and hoarse voice. The intraoral clinical examination showed anterior open bite, tongue thrusting, excessive interdental spacing, enamel hypomineralization of the incisors, hypoplasia and caries lesions. The dental treatment included: modulating sessions to control aversion to noises, the photophobia, and the dental fear and anxiety because of his reduced visual acuity; oral hygiene instructions, dietary and daily use of a 0.05% sodium fluoride mouthwash; the permanent mandibular left first molar was treated endodontically, and maxillary and mandibular first molars were restored with amalgam. Due to the patient's heart defect, a prophylactic antibiotic regimen was prescribed prior to the dental procedures. This patient has been followed up for 4 years and this case report underscores the importance of early dental evaluation and counseling for parents of WBS patients. PMID:26200160

  7. An in vitro Evaluation of Microleakage of Posterior Teeth Restored with Amalgam, Composite and Zirconomer – A Stereomicroscopic Study

    PubMed Central

    Punia, Sandhya Kapoor; Bhat, Surekha; Singh, Gautam; Goyal, Pravesh; Oza, Swapnil; Raiyani, Chirag M.

    2015-01-01

    Background Numerous restorative materials are being used in dentistry to achieve adequate strength and restore aesthetics. However, a perfect ideal restorative material has still eluded dentist. Dental amalgam is versatile material with self-sealing property, but is unaesthetic. Other restorative materials like, composites require conservative preparation, but exhibits polymerisation shrinkage resulting in microleakage. To overcome these drawbacks a high strength restorative material reinforced with ceramic and zirconia fillers known as zirconomer has been introduced. The aim of this study was to evaluate the micro-leakage of these three different restorative materials. Materials and Methods Thirty non-carious human permanent first and second molars were utilized in this study. Class I cavities were prepared on the occlusal surface; cavities were then restored with amalgam, composite and zirconomer as per manufacture’s instruction. All samples were stored for 24 hours in distilled water followed by thermocycling. The entire tooth surface was painted with two coats of varnish to within 1mm of the restoration margins. The teeth were immersed in dye. Teeth were sectioned and observed under stereomicroscope. Results In this study the zirconomer exhibited the highest micro leakage as compared to composite and amalgam but composite having higher micro leakage as compared to amalgam and lower micro leakage as compared to zirconomer. Conclusion Even though composite and amalgam are being marketed aggressively and new material like zirconomer are on origin, amalgam still proves to be one of the best materials. PMID:26393208

  8. Use of an Electronic Patient Record system to evaluate restorative treatment following root canal therapy.

    PubMed

    Shelley, Peter Q; Johnson, Bradford R; BeGole, Ellen A

    2007-10-01

    Electronic Patient Record (EPR) systems are rapidly gaining acceptance as an important tool for managing patient information. The purpose of this project was to evaluate the use of an EPR system for assessment of quality of care in an academic dental institution. The primary outcome of interest was the timeliness and completeness of restorative care following completion of nonsurgical root canal therapy. An initial query of the EPR database was performed using the following inclusion criteria: root canal treatment performed in the postgraduate endodontics clinic between September 2002 and June 2004, patient age > or =18 years old, and posterior tooth (premolars and molars). A total of 925 patients with 1,014 endodontically treated teeth met the inclusion criteria. A random sample of 30 percent of the treated teeth (302 teeth on 281 patients) was selected for detailed review. This sample of 302 teeth was then screened to determine if any restorative treatment had been performed between September 2002 and November 2005. Forty-eight percent (n=146) of the 302 teeth did not receive any form of permanent restoration over the time period studied. Twenty-five percent (n=75) of the teeth received a buildup only, and 27 percent (n=82) received the recommended treatment, a full occlusal coverage restoration. This study documents the use of an EPR system to objectively and efficiently assess one aspect of quality of care in a dental school environment. PMID:17923711

  9. Fatigue of restorative materials.

    PubMed

    Baran, G; Boberick, K; McCool, J

    2001-01-01

    Failure due to fatigue manifests itself in dental prostheses and restorations as wear, fractured margins, delaminated coatings, and bulk fracture. Mechanisms responsible for fatigue-induced failure depend on material ductility: Brittle materials are susceptible to catastrophic failure, while ductile materials utilize their plasticity to reduce stress concentrations at the crack tip. Because of the expense associated with the replacement of failed restorations, there is a strong desire on the part of basic scientists and clinicians to evaluate the resistance of materials to fatigue in laboratory tests. Test variables include fatigue-loading mode and test environment, such as soaking in water. The outcome variable is typically fracture strength, and these data typically fit the Weibull distribution. Analysis of fatigue data permits predictive inferences to be made concerning the survival of structures fabricated from restorative materials under specified loading conditions. Although many dental-restorative materials are routinely evaluated, only limited use has been made of fatigue data collected in vitro: Wear of materials and the survival of porcelain restorations has been modeled by both fracture mechanics and probabilistic approaches. A need still exists for a clinical failure database and for the development of valid test methods for the evaluation of composite materials. PMID:11603506

  10. Treatment planning for restorative implantology.

    PubMed

    Boyce, Ricardo A; Klemons, Gary

    2015-04-01

    In this article, current literature on fixed and removable prosthodontics is reviewed along with evidence-based systematic reviews, including advice from those in the dental profession with years of experience, which help restorative dentists manage and treat their cases successfully. Treatment planning for restorative implantology should be looked at in 4 sections: (1) review of past medical history, (2) oral examination and occlusion, (3) dental imaging (ie, cone-beam computed tomography), and (4) fixed versus removable prosthodontics. These 4 concepts of treatment planning, along with proper surgical placements of the implant(s), result in successful cases. PMID:25835794