Science.gov

Sample records for dependent myocardial angiotensin

  1. Apoptosis after reperfused myocardial infarction: Role of angiotensin II

    PubMed Central

    Jugdutt, Bodh I

    2004-01-01

    Angiotensin II (Ang II) plays a significant role in apoptosis after myocardial infarction (MI) and reperfused MI. Cumulative evidence suggests that Ang II is a major contributor to cardiomyocyte (CM) apoptosis and left ventricular (LV) dysfunction after acute reperfused MI and that apoptosis mediates a major portion of early LV dysfunction. Importantly, blockade of the Ang II type 1 receptor (AT1R) limits CM apoptosis and LV dysfunction after acute reperfused MI. Ang II type 2 receptor activation during AT1R blockade contributes to these beneficial effects. The role of Ang II and apoptosis in chronic LV remodelling, healing and post-MI heart failure is more complex and involves effects on the CMs, fibroblasts and vascular cells. The long-term effects of agents targeting apoptosis after reperfused MI, including AT1R blockade, on apoptosis in different cell types, windows of enhanced apoptosis and the appropriate timing of therapy need to be considered. PMID:19641712

  2. Noninvasive Imaging of Angiotensin Receptors After Myocardial Infarction

    PubMed Central

    Verjans, Johan W. H.; Lovhaug, Dagfinn; Narula, Navneet; Petrov, Artiom D.; Indrevoll, Bård; Bjurgert, Emma; Krasieva, Tatiana B.; Petersen, Lizette B.; Kindberg, Grete M.; Solbakken, Magne; Cuthbertson, Alan; Vannan, Mani A.; Reutelingsperger, Chris P. M.; Tromberg, Bruce J.; Hofstra, Leonard; Narula, Jagat

    2010-01-01

    OBJECTIVES The purpose of this study was to evaluate the feasibility of noninvasive imaging of angiotensin II (AT) receptor upregulation in a mouse model of post-myocardial infarction (MI) heart failure (HF). BACKGROUND Circulating AT levels do not reflect the status of upregulation of renin-angiotensin axis in the myocardium, which plays a central role in ventricular remodeling and evolution of HF after MI. Appropriately labeled AT or AT receptor blocking agents should be able to specifically target AT receptors by molecular imaging techniques. METHODS AT receptor imaging was performed in 29 mice at various time points after permanent coronary artery ligation or in controls using a fluoresceinated angiotensin peptide analog (APA) and radiolabeled losartan. The APA was used in 19 animals for intravital fluorescence microscopy on a beating mouse heart. Tc-99m losartan was used for in vivo radionuclide imaging and quantitative assessment of AT receptor expression in 10 mice. After imaging, hearts were harvested for pathological characterization using confocal and 2-photon microscopy. RESULTS No or little APA uptake was observed in control animals or within infarct regions on days 0 and 1. Distinct uptake occurred in the infarct area at 1 to 12 weeks after MI; the uptake was at maximum at 3 weeks and reduced markedly at 12 weeks after MI. Ultrasonographic examination demonstrated left ventricular remodeling, and pathologic characterization revealed localization of the APA tracer with collagen-producing myofibroblasts. Tc-99m losartan uptake in the infarct region (0.524 ± 0.212% injected dose/g) increased 2.4-fold as compared to uptake in the control animals (0.215 ± 0.129%; p < 0.05). CONCLUSIONS The present study demonstrates the feasibility of in vivo molecular imaging of AT receptors in the remodeling myocardium. Noninvasive imaging studies aimed at AT receptor expression could play a role in identification of subjects likely to develop heart failure. In addition

  3. Prevention of stroke and myocardial infarction by amlodipine and Angiotensin receptor blockers: a quantitative overview.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ji-Guang; Li, Yan; Franklin, Stanley S; Safar, Michel

    2007-07-01

    In the present quantitative overview of outcome trials, we investigated the efficacy of amlodipine or angiotensin receptor blockers in the prevention of stroke and myocardial infarction in patients with hypertension, coronary artery disease, or diabetic nephropathy. The analysis included 12 trials of 94 338 patients. The analysis of trials involving an amlodipine group showed that amlodipine provided more protection against stroke and myocardial infarction than other antihypertensive drugs, including angiotensin receptor blockers (-19%, P<0.0001 and -7%, P=0.03) and placebo (-37%, P=0.06 and -29%, P=0.04). The analysis of trials involving an angiotensin receptor blocker group showed contrasting results between trials versus amlodipine and trials versus other antihypertensive drugs for stroke (+19% versus -25%; P<0.0001) and myocardial infarction (+21% versus +1%; P=0.03). The results of 3 trials comparing an angiotensin receptor blocker with placebo were neutral (P> or =0.14). The within-trial between-group difference in achieved systolic pressure ranged from -1.1 to +4.7 mm Hg for trials involving an amlodipine group and from -2.8 to +4.0 mm Hg for trials involving an angiotensin receptor blocker group. The metaregression analysis correlating odds ratios with blood pressure differences showed a negative relationship (regression coefficients: -3% to -8%), which reached statistical significance (regression coefficient: -6%; P=0.01) for stroke in trials involving an amlodipine group. In conclusion, blood pressure differences largely accounted for cardiovascular outcome. PMID:17502490

  4. The variable effects of angiotensin converting enzyme inhibition on myocardial ischaemia in chronic stable angina.

    PubMed

    Simon, J; Gibbs, R; Crean, P A; Mockus, L; Wright, C; Sutton, G C; Fox, K M

    1989-08-01

    The effect of angiotensin converting enzyme inhibition on myocardial ischaemia was studied in 12 normotensive patients with chronic stable angina and exercise induced ST segment depression. The study was randomised, double blind, placebo controlled, and crossover with treatment periods of two weeks. Enalapril was used to inhibit angiotensin converting enzyme. Assessment was by angina diaries and maximum symptom limited treadmill exercise tests. The results for the whole group showed a significant reduction in systolic blood pressure at rest and at peak exercise. Mean total exercise duration was 466 s (95% confidence interval 406 to 525) when the patients were taking placebo and 509 s (436 to 583) when they were taking enalapril. Four patients prolonged their total exercise time (mean 450 to mean 591 s) by more than 20%. Two patients, however, developed ischaemia earlier on exercise and reduced their total exercise duration (mean 490 to mean 390 s). Although angiotensin converting enzyme inhibition tended to reduce myocardial ischaemia in the group as a whole, some patients improved while others deteriorated. Thus the effects of enalapril are variable and this may have important implications when enalapril is used to treat heart failure in patients with underlying severe ischaemic heart disease. PMID:2548548

  5. The variable effects of angiotensin converting enzyme inhibition on myocardial ischaemia in chronic stable angina.

    PubMed Central

    Simon, J; Gibbs, R; Crean, P A; Mockus, L; Wright, C; Sutton, G C; Fox, K M

    1989-01-01

    The effect of angiotensin converting enzyme inhibition on myocardial ischaemia was studied in 12 normotensive patients with chronic stable angina and exercise induced ST segment depression. The study was randomised, double blind, placebo controlled, and crossover with treatment periods of two weeks. Enalapril was used to inhibit angiotensin converting enzyme. Assessment was by angina diaries and maximum symptom limited treadmill exercise tests. The results for the whole group showed a significant reduction in systolic blood pressure at rest and at peak exercise. Mean total exercise duration was 466 s (95% confidence interval 406 to 525) when the patients were taking placebo and 509 s (436 to 583) when they were taking enalapril. Four patients prolonged their total exercise time (mean 450 to mean 591 s) by more than 20%. Two patients, however, developed ischaemia earlier on exercise and reduced their total exercise duration (mean 490 to mean 390 s). Although angiotensin converting enzyme inhibition tended to reduce myocardial ischaemia in the group as a whole, some patients improved while others deteriorated. Thus the effects of enalapril are variable and this may have important implications when enalapril is used to treat heart failure in patients with underlying severe ischaemic heart disease. PMID:2548548

  6. Effect of angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors on myocardial ischemia/reperfusion injury: an overview.

    PubMed

    Zughaib, M E; Sun, J Z; Bolli, R

    1993-01-01

    There are multiple mechanisms whereby ACE inhibitors could be beneficial during myocardial ischemia and reperfusion, including: i) reduced formation of angiotensin II, ii) decreased metabolism of bradykinin, iii) antioxidant activity, and iv) possibly other unknown mechanisms. Reduced formation of angiotensin II should be beneficial because this peptide exerts several actions that are potentially detrimental to the ischemic/reperfused myocardium, including vasoconstriction, increased release of norepinephrine, stimulation of phospholipase C and/or A2, and increased afterload with an attendant increase in oxygen demands. Reduced metabolism of bradykinin could be beneficial by increasing myocardial glucose uptake, by causing vasodilation, and by stimulating production of endothelium-derived relaxing factor and prostacyclin. Although earlier studies suggested that sulfhydryl-containing ACE inhibitors scavenge superoxide anions, recent data have shown that these drugs scavenge hydroxyl radical and hypochlorous acid with no effect on superoxide anion. Studies in isolated hearts have demonstrated that ACE inhibitors attenuate the metabolic, arrhythmic, and contractile dearrangements associated with ischemia and reperfusion, and have suggested that such beneficial effects are mediated by potentiation of bradykinin and/or increased synthesis of prostacyclin. Studies in models of myocardial stunning after brief (15-min) ischemia in vivo (anesthetized dogs) suggest that ACE inhibitors enhance the recovery of contractile function after a single brief ischemic episode. No data are available regarding the effect of these drugs on myocardial stunning after a prolonged, partly reversible episode, after multiple consecutive brief ischemic episodes, and after global ischemia. The mechanism for the salutary effects of ACE inhibitors on stunning remains a mystery. It may involve an antioxidant action (in the case of thiol-containing molecules) or potentiation of prostaglandins (in

  7. Recent Updates on the Proximal Tubule Renin-Angiotensin System in Angiotensin II-Dependent Hypertension.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiao C; Zhuo, Jia L

    2016-08-01

    It is well recognized that the renin-angiotensin system (RAS) exists not only as circulating, paracrine (cell to cell), but also intracrine (intracellular) system. In the kidney, however, it is difficult to dissect the respective contributions of circulating RAS versus intrarenal RAS to the physiological regulation of proximal tubular Na(+) reabsorption and hypertension. Here, we review recent studies to provide an update in this research field with a focus on the proximal tubular RAS in angiotensin II (ANG II)-induced hypertension. Careful analysis of available evidence supports the hypothesis that both local synthesis or formation and AT1 (AT1a) receptor- and/or megalin-mediated uptake of angiotensinogen (AGT), ANG I and ANG II contribute to high levels of ANG II in the proximal tubules of the kidney. Under physiological conditions, nearly all major components of the RAS including AGT, prorenin, renin, ANG I, and ANG II would be filtered by the glomerulus and taken up by the proximal tubules. In ANG II-dependent hypertension, the expression of AGT, prorenin, and (pro)renin receptors, and angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) is upregulated rather than downregulated in the kidney. Furthermore, hypertension damages the glomerular filtration barrier, which augments the filtration of circulating AGT, prorenin, renin, ANG I, and ANG II and their uptake in the proximal tubules. Together, increased local ANG II formation and augmented uptake of circulating ANG II in the proximal tubules, via activation of AT1 (AT1a) receptors and Na(+)/H(+) exchanger 3, may provide a powerful feedforward mechanism for promoting Na(+) retention and the development of ANG II-induced hypertension. PMID:27372447

  8. Angiotensin II type 1 receptor blockers as a first choice in patients with acute myocardial infarction

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jang Hoon; Bae, Myung Hwan; Yang, Dong Heon; Park, Hun Sik; Cho, Yongkeun; Lee, Won Kee; Jeong, Myung Ho; Kim, Young Jo; Cho, Myeong Chan; Kim, Chong Jin; Chae, Shung Chull

    2016-01-01

    Background/Aims: Angiotensin II type 1 receptor blockers (ARBs) have not been adequately evaluated in patients without left ventricular (LV) dysfunction or heart failure after acute myocardial infarction (AMI). Methods: Between November 2005 and January 2008, 6,781 patients who were not receiving angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors (ACEIs) or ARBs were selected from the Korean AMI Registry. The primary endpoints were 12-month major adverse cardiac events (MACEs) including death and recurrent AMI. Results: Seventy percent of the patients were Killip class 1 and had a LV ejection fraction ≥ 40%. The prescription rate of ARBs was 12.2%. For each patient, a propensity score, indicating the likelihood of using ARBs during hospitalization or at discharge, was calculated using a non-parsimonious multivariable logistic regression model, and was used to match the patients 1:4, yielding 715 ARB users versus 2,860 ACEI users. The effect of ARBs on in-hospital mortality and 12-month MACE occurrence was assessed using matched logistic and Cox regression models. Compared with ACEIs, ARBs significantly reduced in-hospital mortality(1.3% vs. 3.3%; hazard ratio [HR], 0.379; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.190 to0.756; p = 0.006) and 12-month MACE occurrence (4.6% vs. 6.9%; HR, 0.661; 95% CI, 0.457 to 0.956; p = 0.028). However, the benefit of ARBs on 12-month mortality compared with ACEIs was marginal (4.3% vs. 6.2%; HR, 0.684; 95% CI, 0.467 to 1.002; p = 0.051). Conclusions: Our results suggest that ARBs are not inferior to, and may actually be better than ACEIs in Korean patients with AMI. PMID:26701233

  9. Angiotensin converting enzyme inhibition in chronic stable angina: effects on myocardial ischaemia and comparison with nifedipine.

    PubMed Central

    Ikram, H.; Low, C. J.; Shirlaw, T. M.; Foy, S. G.; Crozier, I. G.; Richards, A. M.; Khurmi, N. S.; Horsburgh, R. J.

    1994-01-01

    OBJECTIVES--To determine the anti-ischaemic effects of a new angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitor, benazepril, compared with nifedipine, alone and in combination, in chronic stable angina caused by coronary artery disease. DESIGN--Placebo controlled, double blind, latin square design. SETTING--Regional cardiology service for a mixed urban and rural population. SUBJECTS--40 patients with stable exertional angina producing at least 1 mm ST segment depression on exercise test with the Bruce protocol. 34 patients completed all four phases of the trial. INTERVENTIONS--Each patient was treated with placebo, benazepril (10 mg twice daily), nifedipine retard (20 mg twice daily), and a combination of benazepril and nifedipine in the same doses, in random order for periods of two weeks. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES AND RESULTS--Total duration of exercise was not increased by any treatment. Exercise time to the development of 1 mm ST segment depression was not significantly changed with benazepril alone or in combination with nifedipine but was increased with nifedipine from 4.18 (1.8) min to 4.99 (1.6) min (95% confidence interval (95% CI) 0.28 to 1.34; p < 0.05). There was a significant relation between increase in duration of exercise and resting renin concentration (r = 0.498; p < 0.01). Myocardial ischaemia during daily activity, as assessed by ambulatory electrocardiographic monitoring, was reduced by benazepril and by the benazepril and nifedipine combination. This was significant for total ischaemic burden (451(628) min v 231(408) min; 95% CI -398 to -41 min; p < 0.05) and maximal depth of ST segment depression (-2.47(1.2) mm v -2.16 mm; 95% CI 0.04 to 0.57; p < 0.05) for the combination and for maximal ST segment depth for benazepril monotherapy (-2.47 (1.2) mm v -1.96(1.2) mm; 95% CI 0.18 to 0.91; p < 0.05). Benazepril significantly altered the circadian rhythm of cardiac ischaemia, abolishing the peak ischaemic periods at 0700 to 1200 and 1700 to 2300 (p < 0

  10. Effect of post-myocardial infarction exercise training on the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system and cardiac function.

    PubMed

    Wan, Wenhan; Powers, Anthony S; Li, Ji; Ji, Lisa; Erikson, John M; Zhang, John Q

    2007-10-01

    After a myocardial infarction (MI), the injured heart undergoes intensive remodeling characterized by activation of the circulating renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system (RAAS), left ventricular (LV) dilation, and contractile dysfunction. Exercise training may attenuate activation of the RAAS and improve myocardial remodeling. In this study, we investigated whether starting exercise training early or late after MI would have different effect on circulating RAAS and LV dilation and function. Male Sprague-Dawley rats (7 weeks old) underwent surgically induced MI. After surgery, rats were matched for similar infarct sizes and assigned into two major groups, based on the designated starting time of exercise training. Exercise groups started exercise at either 1 or 6 weeks after MI and exercised on a treadmill for 8 weeks. Groups starting exercise 1 week after MI included sham-operated control (1Wk-Sham), MI-ksedentary (1Wk-MI-Sed), and MI-exercise (1Wk-MI-Ex). Groups starting exercise 6 weeks after MI included sham-operated control (6Wk-Sham), MI-sedentary (6Wk-MI-Sed), and MI-exercise (6Wk-MI-Ex). An echocardiogram was performed before and after exercise training. Blood samples were obtained at the end of experiments. The results showed that compared with sedentary rats with MI, exercise training significantly attenuated circulating renin, angiotensin converting enzyme, angiotensin II, and aldosterone. Rats in exercise groups had similar LV end-diastolic diameters compared with their sedentary counterparts and tended to have smaller LV end-systolic diameters, and percent fractional shortening in exercise rats was significantly higher than in sedentary rats. These findings suggest that exercise training does not cause LV dilation and preserves LV function. Post-MI exercise training also normalizes the circulating RAAS, and this effect is independent of timing of post-MI exercise. Exercise starting early or late after MI affects myocardial remodeling and function

  11. Contractile effects of angiotensin peptides in rat aorta are differentially dependent on tyrosine kinase activity.

    PubMed

    Petrescu, G; Costuleanu, M; Slatineanu, S M; Costuleanu, N; Foia, L; Costuleanu, A

    2001-09-01

    It has been suggested that tyrosine kinase activity participates in the regulation of signal transduction associated with angiotensin II (Ang II)-induced pharmaco-mechanical coupling in rat aortic smooth muscle. We further tested the effects of genistein, a tyrosine-kinase inhibitor, and its inactive analogue, daidzein, on angiotensin I (Ang I), angiotensin III (Ang III) and angiotensin IV (Ang IV) contractions, as compared with those on Ang II. Genistein partially inhibited Ang II- and Ang I-induced contractions. The genistein-induced inhibition was more evident on Ang III and especially important on Ang IV contractile effects. Thus, Ang IV- and Ang III-induced contractions seem to be more dependent on tyrosine kinase activity than those evoked by Ang II or Ang I. Daidzein did not significantly affect the contractile effects of any of angiotensin peptides tested. These results clearly suggest that the inhibition of the action of angiotensin peptides actions by genistein is mediated by inhibition of endogenous tyrosine kinase activity. Furthermore, our data show that the type and/or intensity of tyrosine kinase activity is differentially associated with the contractile effects of different angiotensin peptides in rat aorta. Nifedipine, a blocker of membrane L-type Ca2+ channels, strongly inhibited Ang IV-induced contractions. At the same time, it significantly inhibited Ang III contractile effects as compared with Ang II and Ang I contractions. Meanwhile, we observed a close relationship between calcium influx and tyrosine kinase phosphorylation activity under the stimulatory effects of angiotensin peptides. Furthermore, genistein did not significantly influence the phasic contractions induced by angiotensin peptides in Ca2+-free Krebs-Henseleit solution. Thus, it appears that Ca2+ influx, rather than the release of Ca2+ from IP3-sensitive stores, may play a major role in the contractile effects of angiotensin peptides in rat aorta via tyrosine kinase activation

  12. Hypercholesterolaemia exacerbates ventricular remodelling after myocardial infarction in the rat: role of angiotensin II type 1 receptors

    PubMed Central

    Mączewski, M; Mączewska, J; Duda, M

    2008-01-01

    Background and purpose: Diet-induced hypercholesterolaemia exacerbates post-myocardial infarction (MI) ventricular remodelling and heart failure, but the mechanism of this phenomenon remains unknown. This study examined whether worsening of post-MI ventricular remodelling induced by dietary hypercholesterolaemia was related to upregulation of angiotensin II type 1 (AT1) receptor in the rat heart. Experimental approach: MI was induced surgically in rats fed normal or high cholesterol diet. Both groups of rats were then assigned to control, atorvastatin, losartan or atorvastatin+losartan-treated subgroups and followed for 8 weeks. Left ventricular (LV) function was assessed with echocardiography. In isolated hearts, LV pressures were measured with a latex balloon and a tip catheter. AT1-receptor density was assessed in LV membranes with radioligand-binding assays. Key results: High cholesterol diet exacerbated LV dilation and dysfunction in post-MI hearts. Atorvastatin or losartan prevented these hypercholesterolaemia-induced effects, whereas their combination was not more effective than each drug alone. AT1 receptors were upregulated 8 weeks after MI, this was further increased by hypercholesterolaemia and restored to baseline levels by atorvastatin. Conclusions and implications: Hypercholesterolaemia exacerbated LV remodelling and dysfunction in post-MI rat hearts and upregulated cardiac AT1 receptors. All these effects were effectively prevented by atorvastatin. Thus, the pleiotropic statin effects may include interference with the renin-angiotensin system through downregulation of AT1 receptors. PMID:18536757

  13. Lack of weight gain after angiotensin AT1 receptor blockade in diet-induced obesity is partly mediated by an angiotensin-(1–7)/ Mas-dependent pathway

    PubMed Central

    Schuchard, Johanna; Winkler, Martina; Stölting, Ines; Schuster, Franziska; Vogt, Florian M; Barkhausen, Jörg; Thorns, Christoph; Santos, Robson A; Bader, Michael; Raasch, Walter

    2015-01-01

    Background and Purpose Angiotensin AT1 receptor antagonists induce weight loss; however, the mechanism underlying this phenomenon is unknown. The Mas receptor agonist angiotensin-(1-7) is a metabolite of angiotensin I and of angiotensin II. As an agonist of Mas receptors, angiotensin-(1-7) has beneficial cardiovascular and metabolic effects. Experimental Approach We investigated the anti-obesity effects of transgenically overexpressed angiotensin-(1-7) in rats. We secondly examined whether weight loss due to telmisartan (8 mg·kg−1·d−1) in diet-induced obese Sprague Dawley (SD) rats can be blocked when the animals were co-treated with the Mas receptor antagonist A779 (24 or 72 μg·kg−1·d−1). Key Results In contrast to wild-type controls, transgenic rats overexpressing angiotensin-(1-7) had 1.) diminished body weight when they were regularly fed with chow; 2.) were protected from developing obesity although they were fed with cafeteria diet (CD); 3.) showed a reduced energy intake that was mainly related to a lower CD intake; 5.) remained responsive to leptin despite chronic CD feeding; 6.) had a higher, strain-dependent energy expenditure, and 7.) were protected from developing insulin resistance despite CD feeding. Telmisartan-induced weight loss in SD rats was partially antagonized after a high, but not a low dose of A779. Conclusions and Implications Angiotensin-(1-7) regulated food intake and body weight and contributed to the weight loss after AT1 receptor blockade. Angiotensin-(1-7)-like agonists may be drug candidates for treating obesity. PMID:25906670

  14. CYP4A2-Induced Hypertension is 20-HETE and Angiotensin II-Dependent

    PubMed Central

    Sodhi, Komal; Wu, Cheng-Chia; Cheng, Jennifer; Gotlinger, Katherine; Inoue, Kazuyoshi; Goli, Mohan; Falck, John R.; Abraham, Nader G.; Schwartzman, Michal L.

    2010-01-01

    We have previously shown that increased vascular endothelial expression of CYP4A2 leads to 20-HETE-dependent hypertension. The renin-angiotensin system (RAS) is a key regulator of blood pressure. In this study, we examined possible interactions between 20-HETE and RAS. In normotensive (110±3 mmHg) Sprague Dawley rats transduced with a lentivirus expressing the CYP4A2 cDNA under the control of an endothelial-specific promoter (VECAD-4A2), systolic blood pressure increased rapidly, reaching 139±1, 145±3 and 150±2 mmHg at 3, 5 and 10 days after transduction; blood pressure remained elevated, thereafter, with maximum levels of 163±3 mmHg. Treatment with lisinopril, losartan or the 20-HETE antagonist 20-hydroxyeicosa-6(Z), 15(Z)-dienoic acid (20-HEDE) decreased blood pressure to control values, but blood pressure returned to its high levels after cessation of treatment. Endothelial-specific overexpression of CYP4A2 resulted in increased expression of vascular angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) and angiotensin II type 1 receptor (AT1R) and increased levels of plasma and tissue Angiotensin II; all were attenuated by treatment with HET0016, an inhibitor of 20-HETE synthesis, or with 20-HEDE. In cultured endothelial cells, 20-HETE specifically and potently induced ACE expression without altering the expression of ACE2, angiotensinogen or angiotensin II receptors. This is the first study to demonstrate that 20-HETE, a key constrictor eicosanoid in the microcirculation, induces ACE and AT1R expression and increases Angiotensin II levels, suggesting that the mechanisms by which 20-HETE promotes hypertension include activation of RAS that is likely initiated at the level of ACE induction. PMID:20837888

  15. Angiotensin converting enzyme as a genetic risk factor for coronary artery spasm. Implication in the pathogenesis of myocardial infarction.

    PubMed Central

    Oike, Y; Hata, A; Ogata, Y; Numata, Y; Shido, K; Kondo, K

    1995-01-01

    It has been reported that individuals with the D allele of an insertion/deletion (I/D) polymorphism of the angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) gene are at greater risk for myocardial infarction (MI), especially among subjects normally considered to be at low risk. However, little is known about the mechanism by which the ACE polymorphism affects the risk of MI. Coronary artery spasm (CAS) is considered to be one possible mechanism for developing MI. We therefore examined the ACE polymorphism relation to CAS to determine if this was the mechanism by which the DD genotype influences MI. We studied 150 angiographically assessed Japanese males, all more than 60 yr old. CASs were detected using intracoronary injection of ergonovine maleate. Subjects were divided into three groups: those with CAS (group 1), those without CAS, but with fixed organic stenosis (group 2); and those without CAS and no organic stenosis (group 3). DD subjects were significantly represented in group 1 when compared with groups 2 (P = 0.002) and 3 (P = 0.026). These results suggest that the DD genotype relates to the greater risk for MI in the patients with CAS. PMID:8675669

  16. p38 MAPK Inhibition Improves Synaptic Plasticity and Memory in Angiotensin II-dependent Hypertensive Mice.

    PubMed

    Dai, Hai-Long; Hu, Wei-Yuan; Jiang, Li-Hong; Li, Le; Gaung, Xue-Feng; Xiao, Zhi-Cheng

    2016-01-01

    The pathogenesis of hypertension-related cognitive impairment has not been sufficiently clarified, new molecular targets are needed. p38 MAPK pathway plays an important role in hypertensive target organ damage. Activated p38 MAPK was seen in AD brain tissue. In this study, we found that long-term potentiation (LTP) of hippocampal CA1 was decreased, the density of the dendritic spines on the CA1 pyramidal cells was reduced, the p-p38 protein expression in hippocampus was elevated, and cognitive function was impaired in angiotensin II-dependent hypertensive C57BL/6 mice. In vivo, using a p38 heterozygous knockdown mice (p38(KI/+)) model, we showed that knockdown of p38 MAPK in hippocampus leads to the improvement of cognitive function and hippocampal synaptic plasticity in angiotensin II-dependent p38(KI/+) hypertensive mice. In vitro, LTP was improved in hippocampal slices from C57BL/6 hypertensive mice by treatment with p38MAPK inhibitor SKF86002. Our data demonstrated that p38 MAPK may be a potential therapeutic target for hypertension-related cognitive dysfunction. PMID:27283322

  17. p38 MAPK Inhibition Improves Synaptic Plasticity and Memory in Angiotensin II-dependent Hypertensive Mice

    PubMed Central

    Dai, Hai-long; Hu, Wei-yuan; Jiang, Li-hong; Li, Le; Gaung, Xue-feng; Xiao, Zhi-cheng

    2016-01-01

    The pathogenesis of hypertension-related cognitive impairment has not been sufficiently clarified, new molecular targets are needed. p38 MAPK pathway plays an important role in hypertensive target organ damage. Activated p38 MAPK was seen in AD brain tissue. In this study, we found that long-term potentiation (LTP) of hippocampal CA1 was decreased, the density of the dendritic spines on the CA1 pyramidal cells was reduced, the p-p38 protein expression in hippocampus was elevated, and cognitive function was impaired in angiotensin II-dependent hypertensive C57BL/6 mice. In vivo, using a p38 heterozygous knockdown mice (p38KI/+) model, we showed that knockdown of p38 MAPK in hippocampus leads to the improvement of cognitive function and hippocampal synaptic plasticity in angiotensin II-dependent p38KI/+ hypertensive mice. In vitro, LTP was improved in hippocampal slices from C57BL/6 hypertensive mice by treatment with p38MAPK inhibitor SKF86002. Our data demonstrated that p38 MAPK may be a potential therapeutic target for hypertension-related cognitive dysfunction. PMID:27283322

  18. Dose-Dependent Bidirectional Effect of Angiotensin IV on Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm via Variable Angiotensin Receptor Stimulation.

    PubMed

    Kong, Jing; Zhang, Kai; Meng, Xiao; Zhang, Yun; Zhang, Cheng

    2015-09-01

    Angiotensin IV (Ang IV), as an effector peptide of the rennin-angiotensin system, possesses many biological properties yet not completely known. In this study, we aimed to investigate the role of Ang IV in the development of Ang II-induced abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) in apolipoprotein E-knockout mice. We used Ang II infusion to induce AAA, and animals were treated with Ang II (1.44 mg/kg per day) plus no treatment, Ang II (1.44 mg/kg per day) plus low-, medium-, and high-dose Ang IV (0.72, 1.44, and 2.88 mg/kg per day, respectively). The incidence of AAA was 87.5%, 66.7%, 37.5%, and 83.3% in the no treatment, the low-, medium-, or high-dose Ang IV group, respectively. Compared with the no treatment group, medium-dose Ang IV treatment markedly reduced macrophage infiltration; levels of proinflammatory cytokines, including monocyte chemoattractant protein 1, interleukin 6, and intercellular adhesion molecule 1; the expression and activity of metalloproteinases 2 and 9; but increased smooth muscle cells, and collagen content in AAA. However, high-dose Ang IV treatment did not have obvious protective effect. The beneficial effect of medium-dose Ang IV may be contributed to the stimulation of type 4 angiotensin receptor (AT4R) and AT2R with suppression of AT1R, activation of Akt, and inhibition of nuclear factor-κB, as these beneficial effects were largely reversed by cotreatment with the AT4R antagonist divalinal-Ang IV in Ang II-infused mice or with the Akt inhibitor A6730 in Ang II-stimulated human smooth muscle cells. Therefore, medium dose of Ang IV may provide a novel and promising approach to the treatment of AAA. PMID:26238445

  19. Effect of the angiotensin II receptor blocker valsartan on cardiac hypertrophy and myocardial histone deacetylase expression in rats with aortic constriction

    PubMed Central

    XU, WEI-PING; YAO, TONG-QING; JIANG, YI-BO; ZHANG, MAO-ZHEN; WANG, YUE-PENG; YU, YING; LI, JING-XIANG; LI, YI-GANG

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to observe the myocardial expression of members of the histone deacetylase (HDAC) family (HDAC2, HDAC5 and HDAC9) in rats with or without myocardial hypertrophy (MH) in the presence and absence of the angiotensin II receptor blocker valsartan. Adult male Wistar rats were randomly divided into three groups (n=6/group): Sham-operated control rats, treated with distilled water (1 ml/day) through gavage; rats with MH (established through aortic constriction), treated with distilled water (1 ml/day) through gavage; and MH + valsartan rats, treated with 20 mg/kg/day valsartan through gavage. Treatments commenced one day after surgery and continued for eight weeks. Body weight (BW), heart weight (HW) and plasma atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) and brain natriuretic peptide (BNP) levels were determined, and the myocardial expression of HDAC2, HDAC5 and HDAC9 was analyzed through a reverse transcription semi-quantitative polymerase chain reaction. The BWs of the rats in the three groups were similar at baseline; however, after eight weeks the BW of the rats in the MH + valsartan group was significantly reduced compared with that of the MH rats. Furthermore, the HW/BW ratio and plasma ANP and BNP levels were increased, the myocardial HDAC2 expression was significantly upregulated and the HDAC5 and HDAC9 expression was significantly downregulated in the MH rats compared with those in the control rats; however, these changes were significantly attenuated by valsartan. Modulation of myocardial HDAC5, HDAC9 and HDAC2 expression may therefore be one of the anti-hypertrophic mechanisms of valsartan in this rat MH model. PMID:26136964

  20. Angiotensin II Signaling in Human Preadipose Cells: Participation of ERK1,2-Dependent Modulation of Akt

    PubMed Central

    Dünner, Natalia; Quezada, Carolina; Berndt, F. Andrés; Cánovas, José; Rojas, Cecilia V.

    2013-01-01

    The renin-angiotensin system expressed in adipose tissue has been implicated in the modulation of adipocyte formation, glucose metabolism, triglyceride accumulation, lipolysis, and the onset of the adverse metabolic consequences of obesity. As we investigated angiotensin II signal transduction mechanisms in human preadipose cells, an interplay of extracellular-signal-regulated kinases 1 and 2 (ERK1,2) and Akt/PKB became evident. Angiotensin II caused attenuation of phosphorylated Akt (p-Akt), at serine 473; the p-Akt/Akt ratio decreased to 0.5±0.2-fold the control value without angiotensin II (p<0.001). Here we report that the reduction of phosphorylated Akt associates with ERK1,2 activities. In the absence of angiotensin II, inhibition of ERK1,2 activation with U0126 or PD98059 resulted in a 2.1±0.5 (p<0.001) and 1.4±0.2-fold (p<0.05) increase in the p-Akt/Akt ratio, respectively. In addition, partial knockdown of ERK1 protein expression by the short hairpin RNA technique also raised phosphorylated Akt in these cells (the p-Akt/Akt ratio was 1.5±0.1-fold the corresponding control; p<0.05). Furthermore, inhibition of ERK1,2 activation with U0126 prevented the reduction of p-Akt/Akt by angiotensin II. An analogous effect was found on the phosphorylation status of Akt downstream effectors, the forkhead box (Fox) proteins O1 and O4. Altogether, these results indicate that angiotensin II signaling in human preadipose cells involves an ERK1,2-dependent attenuation of Akt activity, whose impact on the biological functions under its regulation is not fully understood. PMID:24098385

  1. Effect of Beta Blockers and Renin-Angiotensin System Inhibitors on Survival in Patients With Acute Myocardial Infarction Undergoing Percutaneous Coronary Intervention.

    PubMed

    Lee, Pil Hyung; Park, Gyung-Min; Kim, Young-Hak; Yun, Sung-Cheol; Chang, Mineok; Roh, Jae-Hyung; Yoon, Sung-Han; Ahn, Jung-Min; Park, Duk-Woo; Kang, Soo-Jin; Lee, Seung-Whan; Lee, Cheol Whan; Park, Seong-Wook; Park, Seung-Jung

    2016-03-01

    Because it remains uncertain whether β-blockers (BBs) and/or renin-angiotensin system inhibitors benefit a broad population of acute myocardial infarction (AMI) patients, we sought to evaluate the effectiveness of these drugs in improving survival for post-AMI patients who underwent a percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI).From the nationwide data of the South Korea National Health Insurance, 33,390 patients with a diagnosis of AMI who underwent a PCI between 2009 and 2013 and survived at least 30 days were included in this study. We evaluated the risk of all-cause death for patients treated with both BB and angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor (ACEI)/angiotensin II receptor antagonist (ARB) (n = 16,280), only BB (n = 3683), and only ACEI/ARB (n = 9849), with the drug-untreated patients (n = 3578) as the reference.Over a median follow-up of 2.4 years, although treated patients displayed a trend toward improved survival, there were no significant differences in the adjusted risk of all-cause death when patients were treated with both drugs (hazard ratio [HR] 0.86, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.70-1.06, P = 0.154), BB (HR 0.88, 95% CI 0.68-1.14, P = 0.325), or ACEI/ARB (HR 0.84, 95% CI 0.68-1.04, P = 0.111). No additional benefit was found for the combination therapy compared with either isolated BB (HR 0.98, 95% CI 0.80-1.21, P = 0.856) or ACEI/ARB (HR 1.03, 95% CI 0.89-1.19, P = 0.727) therapy.Treatment with BB and/or ACEI/ARB has limited effect on survival in unselected nonfatal AMI patients who undergo PCI. PMID:26962802

  2. Attenuation of myocardial fibrosis with curcumin is mediated by modulating expression of angiotensin II AT1/AT2 receptors and ACE2 in rats

    PubMed Central

    Pang, Xue-Fen; Zhang, Li-Hui; Bai, Feng; Wang, Ning-Ping; Garner, Ron E; McKallip, Robert J; Zhao, Zhi-Qing

    2015-01-01

    Curcumin is known to improve cardiac function by balancing degradation and synthesis of collagens after myocardial infarction. This study tested the hypothesis that inhibition of myocardial fibrosis by curcumin is associated with modulating expression of angiotensin II (Ang II) receptors and angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 (ACE2). Male Sprague Dawley rats were subjected to Ang II infusion (500 ng/kg/min) using osmotic minipumps for 2 and 4 weeks, respectively, and curcumin (150 mg/kg/day) was fed by gastric gavage during Ang II infusion. Compared to the animals with Ang II infusion, curcumin significantly decreased the mean arterial blood pressure during the course of the observation. The protein level of the Ang II type 1 (AT1) receptor was reduced, and the Ang II type 2 (AT2) receptor was up-regulated, evidenced by an increased ratio of the AT2 receptor over the AT1 receptor in the curcumin group (1.2±0.02%) vs in the Ang II group (0.7±0.03%, P<0.05). These changes were coincident with less locally expressed AT1 receptor and enhanced AT2 receptor in the intracardiac vessels and intermyocardium. Along with these modulations, curcumin significantly decreased the populations of macrophages and alpha smooth muscle actin-expressing myofibroblasts, which were accompanied by reduced expression of transforming growth factor beta 1 and phosphorylated-Smad2/3. Collagen I synthesis was inhibited, and tissue fibrosis was attenuated, as demonstrated by less extensive collagen-rich fibrosis. Furthermore, curcumin increased protein level of ACE2 and enhanced its expression in the intermyocardium relative to the Ang II group. These results suggest that curcumin could be considered as an add-on therapeutic agent in the treatment of fibrosis-derived heart failure patient who is intolerant of ACE inhibitor therapy. PMID:26648693

  3. Maternal Treatment with Agonistic Autoantibodies against Type-1 Angiotensin II Receptor in Late Pregnancy Increases Apoptosis of Myocardial Cells and Myocardial Susceptibility to Ischemia-Reperfusion Injury in Offspring Rats

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xiaofang; Zheng, Yanqian; Zhang, Qiaoyan; Zhi, Jianming

    2013-01-01

    Epidemiological studies have demonstrated that offspring born to mothers preeclampsia (PE) are at increased risk for developing cardiovascular diseases after birth, but the underlying mechanism is unknown. Angiotensin II receptor type 1 autoantibody (AT1-AA), an agonist acting via activation of the AT1 receptor, is believed to be involved in the pathogenesis of both PE and fetal growth restriction. The aim of the present study was to confirm the hypothesis that prenatal AT1-AA exposure increases the heart susceptibility to ischemia/reperfusion injury (IRI) in the offspring in an AT1-AA-induced animal model of PE, and determine whether or not the increase of maternal AT1-AA level is a factor contributing to sustained abnormalities of the heart structure during infancy. The hearts of 45-day-old offspring rats were studied using Langendorff preparation to determine the susceptibility of the heart to IRI. The results showed that the body weight of the maternal rats was not significantly different between the study and control groups, but the body weight of their offspring in AT1-AA group was decreased slightly at day 21 of gestational age, and at day 3 after birth. Although the heart weight index was not significantly affected at all ages examined, AT1-AA significantly increased the size of myocardial cells of the left ventricle (LV) at the age of 45 days. AT1-AA gained access to fetal circulation via the placenta and induced apoptosis of fetal myocardial cells. AT1-AA also significantly delayed recovery from IRI and affected the LV function of 45-day-old offspring. This was associated with a significant increase in IRI-induced LV myocardial infarct size. These results suggest that AT1-AA induced abnormal apoptosis of fetal myocardial cells during the fetal period and increased the cardiac susceptibility to IRI in adult offspring. PMID:24278308

  4. Myocardial pathology induced by aldosterone is dependent on non-canonical activities of G protein-coupled receptor kinases

    PubMed Central

    Cannavo, Alessandro; Liccardo, Daniela; Eguchi, Akito; Elliott, Katherine J.; Traynham, Christopher J.; Ibetti, Jessica; Eguchi, Satoru; Leosco, Dario; Ferrara, Nicola; Rengo, Giuseppe; Koch, Walter J.

    2016-01-01

    Hyper-aldosteronism is associated with myocardial dysfunction including induction of cardiac fibrosis and maladaptive hypertrophy. Mechanisms of these cardiotoxicities are not fully understood. Here we show that mineralocorticoid receptor (MR) activation by aldosterone leads to pathological myocardial signalling mediated by mitochondrial G protein-coupled receptor kinase 2 (GRK2) pro-death activity and GRK5 pro-hypertrophic action. Moreover, these MR-dependent GRK2 and GRK5 non-canonical activities appear to involve cross-talk with the angiotensin II type-1 receptor (AT1R). Most importantly, we show that ventricular dysfunction caused by chronic hyper-aldosteronism in vivo is completely prevented in cardiac Grk2 knockout mice (KO) and to a lesser extent in Grk5 KO mice. However, aldosterone-induced cardiac hypertrophy is totally prevented in Grk5 KO mice. We also show human data consistent with MR activation status in heart failure influencing GRK2 levels. Therefore, our study uncovers GRKs as targets for ameliorating pathological cardiac effects associated with high-aldosterone levels. PMID:26932512

  5. DNA Damage and Augmented Oxidative Stress in Bone Marrow Mononuclear Cells from Angiotensin-Dependent Hypertensive Mice

    PubMed Central

    Campagnaro, Bianca P.; Tonini, Clarissa L.; Nogueira, Breno V.; Casarini, Dulce E.; Vasquez, Elisardo C.; Meyrelles, Silvana S.

    2013-01-01

    It has been proposed that the nonhemodynamic effects of angiotensin II are important for the damage observed in the two-kidney, one-clip (2K1C) renovascular hypertension model. Much evidence confirms that angiotensin II is directly involved in NAD(P)H oxidase activation and consequent superoxide anion production, which can damage DNA. The current study was performed to examine the effects of angiotensin-II-dependent hypertension in bone marrow mononuclear cells (BM-MNC); dihydroethidium staining was used to assess reactive oxygen species (ROS) production, and the comet assay was used to assess DNA fragmentation in 2K1C hypertensive mice 14 days after renal artery clipping. In this study we demonstrated that 2K1C hypertensive mice have an elevated lymphocyte count, while undifferentiated BM-MNC counts were diminished. 2K1C mice also showed an augmented ROS production and marked BM-MNC DNA fragmentation. In conclusion, endogenous renin angiotensin system activation-induced arterial hypertension is characterized by excessive ROS production in BM-MNC, which might cause marked DNA damage. PMID:23476745

  6. Oxidative activation of CaMKIIδ in acute myocardial ischemia/reperfusion injury: A role of angiotensin AT1 receptor-NOX2 signaling axis.

    PubMed

    Rajtik, Tomas; Carnicka, Slavka; Szobi, Adrian; Giricz, Zoltan; O-Uchi, Jin; Hassova, Veronika; Svec, Pavel; Ferdinandy, Peter; Ravingerova, Tanya; Adameova, Adriana

    2016-01-15

    During ischemia/reperfusion (IR), increased activation of angiotensin AT1 receptors recruits NADPH oxidase 2 (NOX2) which contributes to oxidative stress. It is unknown whether this stimulus can induce oxidative activation of Ca(2+)/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase IIδ (CaMKIIδ) leading into the aggravation of cardiac function and whether these effects can be prevented by angiotensin AT1 receptors blockade. Losartan, a selective AT1 blocker, was used. Its effects were compared with effects of KN-93, an inhibitor of CaMKIIδ. Global IR was induced in Langendorff-perfused rat hearts. Protein expression was evaluated by immunoblotting and lipoperoxidation was measured by TBARS assay. Losartan improved LVDP recovery by 25%; however, it did not reduce reperfusion arrhythmias. Oxidized CaMKIIδ (oxCaMKIIδ) was downregulated at the end of reperfusion compared to before ischemia and losartan did not change these levels. Phosphorylation of CaMKIIδ mirrored the pattern of changes in oxCaMKIIδ levels. Losartan did not prevent the higher lipoperoxidation due to IR and did not influence NOX2 expression. Inhibition of CaMKII ameliorated cardiac IR injury; however, this was not accompanied with changes in the levels of either active form of CaMKIIδ in comparison to the angiotensin AT1 receptor blockade. In spite of no changes of oxCaMKIIδ, increased cardiac recovery of either therapy was abolished when combined together. This study showed that oxidative activation of CaMKIIδ is not elevated at the end of R phase. NOX2-oxCAMKIIδ signaling is unlikely to be involved in cardioprotective action of angiotensin AT1 receptor blockade which is partially abolished by concomitant CaMKII inhibition. PMID:26694801

  7. Effect of Beta Blockers and Renin–Angiotensin System Inhibitors on Survival in Patients With Acute Myocardial Infarction Undergoing Percutaneous Coronary Intervention

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Pil Hyung; Park, Gyung-Min; Kim, Young-Hak; Yun, Sung-Cheol; Chang, Mineok; Roh, Jae-Hyung; Yoon, Sung-Han; Ahn, Jung-Min; Park, Duk-Woo; Kang, Soo-Jin; Lee, Seung-Whan; Lee, Cheol Whan; Park, Seong-Wook; Park, Seung-Jung

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Because it remains uncertain whether β-blockers (BBs) and/or renin–angiotensin system inhibitors benefit a broad population of acute myocardial infarction (AMI) patients, we sought to evaluate the effectiveness of these drugs in improving survival for post-AMI patients who underwent a percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI). From the nationwide data of the South Korea National Health Insurance, 33,390 patients with a diagnosis of AMI who underwent a PCI between 2009 and 2013 and survived at least 30 days were included in this study. We evaluated the risk of all-cause death for patients treated with both BB and angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor (ACEI)/angiotensin II receptor antagonist (ARB) (n = 16,280), only BB (n = 3683), and only ACEI/ARB (n = 9849), with the drug-untreated patients (n = 3578) as the reference. Over a median follow-up of 2.4 years, although treated patients displayed a trend toward improved survival, there were no significant differences in the adjusted risk of all-cause death when patients were treated with both drugs (hazard ratio [HR] 0.86, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.70–1.06, P = 0.154), BB (HR 0.88, 95% CI 0.68–1.14, P = 0.325), or ACEI/ARB (HR 0.84, 95% CI 0.68–1.04, P = 0.111). No additional benefit was found for the combination therapy compared with either isolated BB (HR 0.98, 95% CI 0.80–1.21, P = 0.856) or ACEI/ARB (HR 1.03, 95% CI 0.89–1.19, P = 0.727) therapy. Treatment with BB and/or ACEI/ARB has limited effect on survival in unselected nonfatal AMI patients who undergo PCI. PMID:26962802

  8. Uremic Conditions Drive Human Monocytes to Pro-Atherogenic Differentiation via an Angiotensin-Dependent Mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Trojanowicz, Bogusz; Ulrich, Christof; Seibert, Eric; Fiedler, Roman; Girndt, Matthias

    2014-01-01

    Aims Elevated expression levels of monocytic-ACE have been found in haemodialysis patients. They are not only epidemiologically linked with increased mortality and cardiovascular disease, but may also directly participate in the initial steps of atherosclerosis. To further address this question we tested the role of monocytic-ACE in promotion of atherosclerotic events in vitro under conditions mimicking those of chronic renal failure. Methods and Results Treatment of human primary monocytes or THP-1 cells with uremic serum as well as PMA-induced differentiation led to significantly up-regulated expression of ACE, further increased by additional treatment with LPS. Functionally, these monocytes revealed significantly increased adhesion and transmigration through endothelial monolayers. Overexpression of ACE in transfected monocytes or THP-1 cells led to development of more differentiated, macrophage-like phenotype with up-regulated expression of Arg1, MCSF, MCP-1 and CCR2. Expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines TNFa and IL-6 were also noticeably up-regulated. ACE overexpression resulted in significantly increased adhesion and transmigration properties. Transcriptional screening of ACE-overexpressing monocytes revealed noticeably increased expression of Angiotensin II receptors and adhesion- as well as atherosclerosis-related ICAM-1 and VCAM1. Inhibition of monocyte ACE or AngII-receptor signalling led to decreased adhesion potential of ACE-overexpressing cells. Conclusions Taken together, these data demonstrate that uremia induced expression of monocytic-ACE mediates the development of highly pro-atherogenic cells via an AngII-dependent mechanism. PMID:25003524

  9. Molecular basis and functional significance of Angiotensin II-induced increase in Discoidin Domain Receptor 2 gene expression in cardiac fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    George, Mereena; Vijayakumar, Anupama; Dhanesh, Sivadasan Bindu; James, Jackson; Shivakumar, K

    2016-01-01

    Delineation of mechanisms underlying the regulation of fibrosis-related genes in the heart is an important clinical goal as cardiac fibrosis is a major cause of myocardial dysfunction. This study probed the regulation of Discoidin Domain Receptor 2 (DDR2) gene expression and the regulatory links between Angiotensin II, DDR2 and collagen in Angiotensin II-stimulated cardiac fibroblasts. Real-time PCR and western blot analyses showed that Angiotensin II enhances DDR2 mRNA and protein expression in rat cardiac fibroblasts via NADPH oxidase-dependent reactive oxygen species induction. NF-κB activation, demonstrated by gel shift assay, abolition of DDR2 expression upon NF-κB inhibition, and luciferase and chromatin immunoprecipitation assays confirmed transcriptional control of DDR2 by NF-κB in Angiotensin II-treated cells. Inhibitors of Phospholipase C and Protein kinase C prevented Angiotensin II-dependent p38 MAPK phosphorylation that in turn blocked NF-κB activation. Angiotensin II also enhanced collagen gene expression. Importantly, the stimulatory effects of Angiotensin II on DDR2 and collagen were inter-dependent as siRNA-mediated silencing of one abolished the other. Angiotensin II promoted ERK1/2 phosphorylation whose inhibition attenuated Angiotensin II-stimulation of collagen but not DDR2. Furthermore, DDR2 knockdown prevented Angiotensin II-induced ERK1/2 phosphorylation, indicating that DDR2-dependent ERK1/2 activation enhances collagen expression in cells exposed to Angiotensin II. DDR2 knockdown was also associated with compromised wound healing response to Angiotensin II. To conclude, Angiotensin II promotes NF-κB activation that up-regulates DDR2 transcription. A reciprocal regulatory relationship between DDR2 and collagen, involving cross-talk between the GPCR and RTK pathways, is central to Angiotensin II-induced increase in collagen expression in cardiac fibroblasts. PMID:26674152

  10. Long-term protective effects of the angiotensin receptor blocker telmisartan on epirubicin-induced inflammation, oxidative stress and myocardial dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    DESSÌ, MARIELE; PIRAS, ALESSANDRA; MADEDDU, CLELIA; CADEDDU, CHRISTIAN; DEIDDA, MARTINO; MASSA, ELENA; ANTONI, GIORGIA; MANTOVANI, GIOVANNI; MERCURO, GIUSEPPE

    2011-01-01

    Chronic inflammation, oxidative stress and the renin-angiotensin system (RAS) play a significant role in chemotherapy-induced cardiotoxicity (CTX). Telmisartan (TEL), an antagonist of the angiotensin II type-1 receptor, was found to reduce anthracycline (ANT)-induced CTX. We carried out a phase II placebo (PLA)-controlled randomized trial to assess the possible role of TEL in the prevention of cardiac subclinical damage induced by epirubicin (EPI). Forty-nine patients (mean age ± SD, 53.0±8 years), cardiovascular disease-free with cancer at different sites and eligible for EPI-based treatment, were randomized to one of two arms: TEL n=25; PLA n=24. A conventional echocardiography equipped with Tissue Doppler imaging, strain and strain rate (SR) was performed, and serum levels of proinflammatory cytokines, IL-6 and TNF-α, and oxidative stress parameters, reactive oxygen species (ROS) and glutathione peroxidase were determined. All assessments were carried out at baseline, after every 100 mg/m2 of EPI dose and at the 12-month follow-up (FU). A significant reduction in the SR peak both in the TEL and PLA arms was observed at t2 (cumulative dose of 200 mg/m2 of EPI) in comparison to t0. Conversely, at t3 (300 mg/m2 EPI), t4 (400 mg/m2 EPI) and the 12-month FU, the SR increased reaching the normal range only in the TEL arm, while in the PLA arm the SR remained significantly lower as compared to t0 (baseline). The differences between SR changes in the PLA and TEL arms were significant from 300 mg/m2 EPI (t3) up to the 12-month FU. Serum levels of IL-6 increased significantly in the PLA arm at 200 mg/m2 EPI (t2) in comparison to baseline, but remained unchanged in the TEL arm. The same trend was demonstrated for ROS levels which significantly increased at t2 vs. baseline in the PLA arm, while remained unchanged in the TEL arm. The mean change in ROS and IL-6 at t2 was significantly different between the two arms. In the present study, we confirmed at the 3-month FU a

  11. AT1 Receptor Mediated Augmentation of Intrarenal Angiotensinogen in Angiotensin II-Dependent Hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Kobori, Hiroyuki; Prieto-Carrasquero, Minolfa C.; Ozawa, Yuri; Navar, L. Gabriel

    2009-01-01

    Angiotensin (Ang) II-infused hypertensive rats exhibit increases in renal angiotensinogen mRNA and protein, as well as urinary angiotensinogen excretion in association with increased intrarenal Ang II content. The present study was performed to determine if the augmentation of intrarenal angiotensinogen requires activation of Ang II type 1 (AT1) receptors. Male Sprague-Dawley rats (200 to 220 g) were divided into 3 groups: sham surgery (n=10), subcutaneous infusion of Ang II (80 ng/min, n=11), and Ang II infusion plus AT1 blocker (ARB), olmesartan (5 mg/d, n=12). Ang II infusion progressively increased systolic blood pressure (SBP) compared with sham (178±8 mm Hg versus119±4 at day 11). ARB treatment prevented hypertension (113±6 at day 11). Twenty-four-hour urine collections were taken at day 12, and plasma and tissue samples were harvested at day 13. The Ang II+ARB group had a significant increase in plasma Ang II compared with Ang II and sham groups (365±46 fmol/mL versus 76±9 and 45±14, respectively). Nevertheless, ARB treatment markedly limited the enhancement of kidney Ang II by Ang II infusion (65±17 fmol/g in sham, 606±147 in Ang II group, and 288±28 in Ang II+ARB group). Ang II infusion significantly increased kidney angiotensinogen compared with sham (1.69±0.21 densitometric units versus 1.00±0.17). This change was reflected by increased angiotensinogen immunostaining in proximal tubules. ARB treatment prevented this increase (1.14±0.12). Urinary angiotensinogen excretion rates were enhanced 4.7× in Ang II group (4.67±0.41 densitometric units versus 1.00±0.21) but ARB treatment prevented the augmentation of urinary angiotensinogen (0.96±0.23). These data demonstrate that augmentation of intrarenal angiotensinogen in Ang II-infused rats is AT1-dependent and provide further evidence that urinary angiotensinogen is closely linked to intrarenal Ang II in Ang II-dependent hypertension. PMID:15037565

  12. Angiotensin-converting enzyme polymorphism and development of diabetic nephropathy in non-insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Mizuiri, S; Hemmi, H; Inoue, A; Yoshikawa, H; Tanegashima, M; Fushimi, T; Ishigami, M; Amagasaki, Y; Ohara, T; Shimatake, H

    1995-01-01

    We determined the distribution frequency of angiotensin-converting enzyme insertion/deletion (I/D) polymorphism in 111 Japanese patients with non-insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (NIDDM) of at least 10 years duration (80 patients with diabetic nephropathy and 31 patients without nephropathy) and 76 healthy Japanese controls. Patients with diabetic nephropathy showed an excess of the ID genotype compared with patients without nephropathy (p < 0.02) and less of the II genotype compared with healthy controls (p < 0.01) and patients without nephropathy (p < 0.01). NIDDM patients with the II genotype have a decreased risk for the development of diabetic nephropathy. PMID:7477652

  13. Abnormal Adrenal Responsiveness and Angiotensin II Dependency in High Renin Essential Hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Dluhy, Robert G.; Bavli, Sam Z.; Leung, Frank K.; Solomon, Harold S.; Moore, Thomas J.; Hollenberg, Norman K.; Williams, Gordon H.

    1979-01-01

    Adrenal responsiveness to angiotensin II (AII) and the diastolic blood pressure responses to saralasin were studied in 19 patients with high renin essential hypertension (HREH) on a 10-meq Na+/100 meq K+ diet. The increment in plasma renin activity (PRA) between supine and upright positions was used as an estimate of the acute stimulation of the adrenal gland by endogenous AII; the normal increment in plasma aldosterone divided by the increment in PRA was >3.8. 7 of 19 had abnormal upright posture responses with significantly greater mean PRA increments (24±6 ng/ml per h) and significantly smaller plasma aldosterone increments 47 ± 16 ng/dl) (P < 0.036) compared to the increments observed in HREH patients with normal adrenal responsiveness (PRA = 15 ± 1 ng/ml per h; plasma aldosterone = 87 ± 17 ng/dl). When AII was infused at doses of 0.1-3 ng/kg per min, only patients with normal posture responses had normal plasma aldosterone increments; plasma aldosterone levels failed to significantly increase even at the highest infusion rate in the patients with the abnormal upright posture responses. The AII competitive inhibitor, saralasin (0.3-30 μg/kg per min) was then infused to study the occurrence of angiotensinogenic hypertension in both HREH subgroups. The mean decline in diastolic blood pressure to saralasin in the subnormal adrenal responsive patients (−15 ± 3 mm Hg) was significantly greater than in the normal adrenal responsive group (−3 ± 2 mm Hg) (P < 0.02). It is concluded that patients with HREH are not a homogeneous population; approximately one-third have AII-dependent hypertension. In these patients, the mechanism responsible for the elevated renin and blood pressure could be a compensatory increase secondary to decreased adrenal responsiveness to AII. In the remainder, the high PRA levels have little, if any, causal role in the pathogenesis of the hypertension but could reflect a marker of other pathophysiologic processes. PMID:500810

  14. Regulation of the Cardiac Sodium/Bicarbonate Cotransporter by Angiotensin II: Potential Contribution to Structural, Ionic and Electrophysiological Myocardial Remodelling

    PubMed Central

    Aiello, Ernesto Alejandro; Giusti, Verónica Celeste De

    2013-01-01

    The sodium/ bicarbonate cotransporter (NBC) is, with the Na+/H+ exchanger (NHE), an important alkalinizing mechanism that maintains cellular intracellular pH (pHi). In the heart exists at least three isoforms of NBC, one that promotes the co-influx of 1 molecule of Na+ per 1molecule of HCO3-(electroneutral isoform; nNBC) and two others that generates the co-influx of 1 molecule of Na+ per 2 molecules of HCO3- (electrogenic isoforms; eNBC). In addition, the eNBC generates an anionic repolarizing current that modulate the cardiac action potential (CAP), adding to such isoforms the relevance to modulate the electrophysiological function of the heart. Angiotensin II (Ang II) is one of the main hormones that regulate cardiac physiology. The alkalinizing mechanisms (NHE and NBC) are stimulated by Ang II, increasing pHi and intracellular Na+ concentration, which indirectly, due to the stimulation of the Na+/Ca2+ exchanger (NCX) operating in the reverse form, leads to an increase in the intracellular Ca2+ concentration. Interestingly, it has been shown that Ang II exhibits an opposite effect on NBC isoforms: it activates the nNBC and inhibits the eNBC. This inhibition generates a CAP prolongation, which could directly increase the intracellular Ca2+ concentration. The regulation of the intracellular Na+ and Ca2+ concentrations is crucial for the cardiac cellular physiology, but these ions are also involved in the development of cardiac hypertrophy and the damage produced by ischemia-reperfusion, suggesting a potential role of NBC in cardiac diseases. PMID:23116057

  15. Angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibition prevents myocardial infarction-induced increase in renal cortical cGMP and cAMP phosphodiesterase activities.

    PubMed

    Clauss, François; Charloux, Anne; Piquard, François; Doutreleau, Stéphane; Talha, Samy; Zoll, Joffrey; Lugnier, Claire; Geny, Bernard

    2015-08-01

    We investigated whether myocardial infarction (MI) enhances renal phosphodiesterases (PDE) activities, investigating particularly the relative contribution of PDE1-5 isozymes in total PDE activity involved in both cGMP and cAMP pathways, and whether angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibition (ACEi) decreases such renal PDE hyperactivities. We also investigated whether ACEi might thereby improve atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) efficiency. We studied renal cortical PDE1-5 isozyme activities in sham (SH)-operated, MI rats and in MI rats treated with perindopril (ACEi) 1 month after coronary artery ligation. Circulating atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP), its second intracellular messenger cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP) and cGMP/ANP ratio were also determined. Cortical cGMP-PDE2 (80.3 vs. 65.1 pmol/min/mg) and cGMP-PDE1 (50.7 vs. 30.1 pmol/min/mg), and cAMP-PDE2 (161 vs. 104.1 pmol/min/mg) and cAMP-PDE4 (307.5 vs. 197.2 pmol/min/mg) activities were higher in MI than in SH rats. Despite increased ANP plasma level, ANP efficiency tended to be decreased in MI compared to SH rats. Perindopril restored PDE activities and tended to improve ANP efficiency in MI rats. One month after coronary ligation, perindopril treatment of MI rats prevents the increase in renal cortical PDE activities. This may contribute to increase renal ANP efficiency in MI rats. PMID:25939307

  16. ADAMTS13 deficiency exacerbates VWF-dependent acute myocardial ischemia/reperfusion injury in mice

    PubMed Central

    Gandhi, Chintan; Motto, David G.; Jensen, Melissa; Lentz, Steven R.

    2012-01-01

    Epidemiologic studies suggest that elevated VWF levels and reduced ADAMTS13 activity in the plasma are risk factors for myocardial infarction. However, it remains unknown whether the ADAMTS13-VWF axis plays a causal role in the pathophysiology of myocardial infarction. In the present study, we tested the hypothesis that ADAMTS13 reduces VWF-mediated acute myocardial ischemia/reperfusion (I/R) injury in mice. Infarct size, neutrophil infiltration, and myocyte apoptosis in the left ventricular area were quantified after 30 minutes of ischemia and 23.5 hours of reperfusion injury. Adamts13−/− mice exhibited significantly larger infarcts concordant with increased neutrophil infiltration and myocyte apoptosis compared with wild-type (WT) mice. In contrast, Vwf−/− mice exhibited significantly reduced infarct size, neutrophil infiltration, and myocyte apoptosis compared with WT mice, suggesting a detrimental role for VWF in myocardial I/R injury. Treating WT or Adamts13−/− mice with neutralizing Abs to VWF significantly reduced infarct size compared with control Ig–treated mice. Finally, myocardial I/R injury in Adamts13−/−/Vwf−/− mice was similar to that in Vwf−/− mice, suggesting that the exacerbated myocardial I/R injury observed in the setting of ADAMTS13 deficiency is VWF dependent. These findings reveal that ADAMTS13 and VWF are causally involved in myocardial I/R injury. PMID:22983446

  17. CIKS (Act1 or TRAF3IP2) mediates Angiotensin-II-induced Interleukin-18 expression, and Nox2-dependent cardiomyocyte hypertrophy.

    PubMed

    Valente, Anthony J; Clark, Robert A; Siddesha, Jalahalli M; Siebenlist, Ulrich; Chandrasekar, Bysani

    2012-07-01

    Chronic elevation of angiotensin (Ang)-II can lead to myocardial inflammation, hypertrophy and cardiac failure. The adaptor molecule CIKS (connection to IKK and SAPK/JNK) activates the IκB kinase/nuclear factor (NF)-κB and JNK/activator protein (AP)-1 pathways in autoimmune and inflammatory diseases. Since Ang-II is a potent activator of NF-κB and AP-1, we investigated whether CIKS is critical in Ang-II-mediated cardiac hypertrophy. Here we report that Ang-II induced CIKS mRNA and protein expression, CIKS binding to IKK and JNK perhaps functioning as a scaffold protein, CIKS-dependent IKK/NF-κB and JNK/AP-1 activation, p65 and c-Jun phosphorylation and nuclear translocation, NF-κB- and AP-1-dependent IL-18 and MMP-9 induction, and hypertrophy of adult cardiomyocytes isolated from WT, but not CIKS-null mice. These results were recapitulated in WT-cardiomyocytes following CIKS knockdown. Infusion of Ang-II for 7days induced cardiac hypertrophy, increased collagen content, and upregulated CIKS mRNA and protein expression in WT mice, whereas cardiac hypertrophy and collagen deposition were markedly attenuated in the CIKS-null mice, despite a similar increase in systolic blood pressure and DPI-inhibitable superoxide generation in both types of animals. Further, Ang-II-induced IKK/p65 and JNK/c-Jun phosphorylation, NF-κB and AP-1 activation, and IL-18 and MMP-9 expression were also markedly attenuated in CIKS-null mice. These results demonstrate that CIKS is critical in Ang-II-induced cardiomyocyte hypertrophy and fibrosis, and that CIKS is an important intermediate in Ang-II-induced redox signaling. CIKS is a potential therapeutic target in cardiac hypertrophy, fibrosis, and congestive heart failure. PMID:22575763

  18. Troglitazone stimulates {beta}-arrestin-dependent cardiomyocyte contractility via the angiotensin II type 1{sub A} receptor

    SciTech Connect

    Tilley, Douglas G.; Nguyen, Anny D.; Rockman, Howard A.; Department of Cell Biology, Duke University Medical Center; Department of Molecular Genetics and Microbiology, Duke University Medical Center

    2010-06-11

    Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor {gamma} (PPAR{gamma}) agonists are commonly used to treat cardiovascular diseases, and are reported to have several effects on cardiovascular function that may be due to PPAR{gamma}-independent signaling events. Select angiotensin receptor blockers (ARBs) interact with and modulate PPAR{gamma} activity, thus we hypothesized that a PPAR{gamma} agonist may exert physiologic effects via the angiotensin II type 1{sub A} receptor (AT1{sub A}R). In AT1{sub A}R-overexpressing HEK 293 cells, both angiotensin II (Ang II) and the PPAR{gamma} agonist troglitazone (Trog) enhanced AT1{sub A}R internalization and recruitment of endogenous {beta}-arrestin1/2 ({beta}arr1/2) to the AT1{sub A}R. A fluorescence assay to measure diacylglycerol (DAG) accumulation showed that although Ang II induced AT1{sub A}R-G{sub q} protein-mediated DAG accumulation, Trog had no impact on DAG generation. Trog-mediated recruitment of {beta}arr1/2 was selective to AT1{sub A}R as the response was prevented by an ARB- and Trog-mediated {beta}arr1/2 recruitment to {beta}1-adrenergic receptor ({beta}1AR) was not observed. In isolated mouse cardiomyocytes, Trog increased both % and rate of cell shortening to a similar extent as Ang II, effects which were blocked with an ARB. Additionally, these effects were found to be {beta}arr2-dependent, as cardiomyocytes isolated from {beta}arr2-KO mice showed blunted contractile responses to Trog. These findings show for the first time that the PPAR{gamma} agonist Trog acts at the AT1{sub A}R to simultaneously block G{sub q} protein activation and induce the recruitment of {beta}arr1/2, which leads to an increase in cardiomyocyte contractility.

  19. Enhanced Mesenteric Arterial Responsiveness to Angiotensin II Is Androgen Receptor-Dependent in Prenatally Protein-Restricted Adult Female Rat Offspring1

    PubMed Central

    Sathishkumar, Kunju; Balakrishnan, Meena P.; Yallampalli, Chandrasekhar

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Gestational protein restriction results in intrauterine growth restriction and hypertension in adult female growth-restricted rats. Enhanced vascular responsiveness to angiotensin II is observed, and blockade of the renin-angiotensin system abolishes hypertension in adult growth-restricted rats, suggesting that the renin-angiotensin system contributes to intrauterine growth restriction-induced hypertension. Moreover, growth-restricted adult rats have higher plasma testosterone levels, and antiandrogen treatment abolishes hypertension, indicating an important role for testosterone. We hypothesized that androgens may play a pivotal role in the enhanced responsiveness to Ang II and hypertension. Female offspring of pregnant rats fed 20% protein (control) or 6% protein diet (protein restricted), at 6 mo of age, were studied. Plasma testosterone and mean arterial pressure in protein-restricted offspring were significantly higher compared to controls. Flutamide treatment (10 mg/kg/day subcutaneously for 10 days) reduced mean arterial pressure in protein-restricted offspring but was without significant effect in controls. Vascular Agtr1/Agtr2 ratio was significantly higher in protein-restricted offspring, an effect that was reversed by flutamide. Flutamide treatment did not have any effect on Agtr1/Agtr2 ratio in controls. Enhanced contractile response to angiotensin II in mesenteric arteries was observed in protein-restricted offspring compared with control. Flutamide treatment reversed the enhanced contractile response to angiotensin II in protein-restricted offspring without significant effect in controls. Vascular reactivity to phenylephrine was similar between the control and protein-restricted offspring with and without flutamide treatment, suggesting that enhanced contractile response and flutamide's reversal effect is specific to angiotensin II. These results suggest that prenatally protein-restricted rats exhibit an enhanced responsiveness to angiotensin

  20. Tannic acid down-regulates the angiotensin type 1 receptor through a MAPK-dependent mechanism.

    PubMed

    Yesudas, Rekha; Gumaste, Upendra; Snyder, Russell; Thekkumkara, Thomas

    2012-03-01

    In the present study, we investigated the effects of tannic acid (TA), a hydrolysable polyphenol, on angiotensin type 1 receptor (AT1R) expression in continuously passaged rat liver epithelial cells. Under normal conditions, exposure of cells to TA resulted in the down-regulation of AT1R-specific binding in concentrations ranging from 12.5-100 μg/ml (7.34-58.78 μm) over a time period of 2-24 h with no change in receptor affinity to angiotensin II (AngII). The inhibitory effect of TA on AT1R was specific and reversible. In TA-treated cells, we observed a significant reduction in AngII-mediated intracellular calcium signaling, a finding consistent with receptor down-regulation. Under similar conditions, TA down-regulated AT1R mRNA expression without changing the rate of mRNA degradation, suggesting that TA's effect is mediated through transcriptional inhibition. Cells expressing recombinant AT1R without the native promoter show no change in receptor expression, whereas a pCAT reporter construct possessing the rat AT1R promoter was significantly reduced in activity. Furthermore, TA induced the phosphorylation of MAPK p42/p44. Pretreatment of the cells with a MAPK kinase (MEK)-specific inhibitor PD98059 prevented TA-induced MAPK phosphorylation and down-regulation of the AT1R. Moreover, there was no reduction in AngII-mediated intracellular calcium release upon MEK inhibition, suggesting that TA's observed inhibitory effect is mediated through MEK/MAPK signaling. Our findings demonstrate, for the first time, that TA inhibits AT1R gene expression and cellular response, suggesting the observed protective effects of dietary polyphenols on cardiovascular conditions may be, in part, through inhibition of AT1R expression. PMID:22322600

  1. Angiotensin II-dependent chronic hypertension and cardiac hypertrophy are unaffected by gp91phox-containing NADPH oxidase.

    PubMed

    Touyz, Rhian M; Mercure, Chantel; He, Ying; Javeshghani, Danesh; Yao, Guoying; Callera, Glaucia E; Yogi, Alvaro; Lochard, Nadheige; Reudelhuber, Timothy L

    2005-04-01

    The gp91phox-containing NADPH oxidase is the major source of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in the cardiovascular system and inactivation of gp91phox has been reported to blunt hypertension and cardiac hypertrophy seen in angiotensin (Ang) II-infused animals. In the current study, we sought to determine the role of gp91phox-derived ROS on cardiovascular outcomes of chronic exposure to Ang II. The gp91phox-deficient mice were crossed with transgenic mice expressing active human renin in the liver (TTRhRen). TTRhRen mice exhibit chronic Ang II-dependent hypertension and frank cardiac hypertrophy by age 10 to 12 weeks. Four genotypes of mice were generated: control, TTRhRen trangenics (TTRhRen), gp91phox-deficient (gp91-), and TTRhRen transgenic gp91phox-deficient (TTRhRen/gp91-). Eight to 10 mice/group were studied. ROS levels were significantly reduced (P<0.05) in the heart and aorta of TTRhRen/gp91- and gp91-mice compared with control counterparts, and this was associated with reduced cardiac, aortic, and renal NADPH oxidase activity (P<0.05). Systolic blood pressure (SBP), cardiac mass, and cardiac fibrosis were increased in TTRhRen versus controls. In contrast to its action on ROS generation, gp91phox inactivation had no effect on development of hypertension or cardiac hypertrophy in TTRhRen mice, although interstitial fibrosis was reduced. Cardiac and renal expression of gp91phox homologues, Nox1 and Nox4, was not different between groups. Thus, although eliminating gp91phox-associated ROS production may be important in cardiovascular consequences in acute insult models, it does not prevent the development of hypertension and cardiac hypertrophy in a model in which the endogenous renin-angiotensin system is chronically upregulated. PMID:15753233

  2. Contribution of Chymase-Dependent Angiotensin II Formation to the Progression of Tubulointerstitial Fibrosis in Obstructed Kidneys in Hamsters

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Yu-Yan; Nishiyama, Akira; Fujisawa, Yoshihide; Kobori, Hiroyuki; Nakano, Daisuke; Matsuura, Junji; Hase, Naoki; Hitomi, Hirofumi; Kiyomoto, Hideyasu; Urata, Hidenori; Kohno, Masakazu

    2009-01-01

    Recent studies indicate a role of chymase in the regulation of angiotensin II (AngII) formation in cardiovascular and renal tissues. We investigated a possible contribution of chymase to AngII formation and to renal fibrosis in unilateral ureteral obstruction (UUO). Eight-week-old Syrian hamsters were subjected to UUO and treated with vehicle, the specific chymase inhibitor (CI) 4-[1-(4-methyl-benzo[b]thiophen-3-ylmethyl)-1H-benzimidazol-2-ylsulfanyl]-butyric acid (50 mg/kg, twice a day, p.o.), or the selective AT1-receptor blocker olmesartan (10 mg/kg per day, p.o,) for 14 days. UUO-induced renal interstitial fibrosis was associated with increases in renal mRNA levels of α-smooth muscle actin (SMA), type I collagen, and transforming growth factor (TGF)-β. The UUO hamsters showed markedly higher AngII contents and increased AT1-receptor mRNA level in the obstructed kidney than sham-operated ones. In contrast, angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) protein expression was significantly lower in UUO hamsters. In UUO hamsters, treatment with CI or olmesartan significantly decreased AngII levels in renal tissue and mRNA levels of α-SMA, type I collagen, and TGF-β and ameliorated tubulointerstitial injury. On the other hand, neither CI nor olmesartan changed systolic blood pressure, renal ACE, and AT1-receptor protein levels. These data suggest that chymase-dependent intrarenal AngII formation contributes to the pathogenesis of interstitial fibrosis in obstructed kidneys of hamsters. PMID:19721329

  3. Obligatory Role for B Cells in the Development of Angiotensin II-Dependent Hypertension.

    PubMed

    Chan, Christopher T; Sobey, Christopher G; Lieu, Maggie; Ferens, Dorota; Kett, Michelle M; Diep, Henry; Kim, Hyun Ah; Krishnan, Shalini M; Lewis, Caitlin V; Salimova, Ekaterina; Tipping, Peter; Vinh, Antony; Samuel, Chrishan S; Peter, Karlheinz; Guzik, Tomasz J; Kyaw, Tin S; Toh, Ban-Hock; Bobik, Alexander; Drummond, Grant R

    2015-11-01

    Clinical hypertension is associated with raised serum IgG antibodies. However, whether antibodies are causative agents in hypertension remains unknown. We investigated whether hypertension in mice is associated with B-cell activation and IgG production and moreover whether B-cell/IgG deficiency affords protection against hypertension and vascular remodeling. Angiotensin II (Ang II) infusion (0.7 mg/kg per day; 28 days) was associated with (1) a 25% increase in the proportion of splenic B cells expressing the activation marker CD86, (2) an 80% increase in splenic plasma cell numbers, (3) a 500% increase in circulating IgG, and (4) marked IgG accumulation in the aortic adventitia. In B-cell-activating factor receptor-deficient (BAFF-R(-/-)) mice, which lack mature B cells, there was no evidence of Ang II-induced increases in serum IgG. Furthermore, the hypertensive response to Ang II was attenuated in BAFF-R(-/-) (Δ30±4 mm Hg) relative to wild-type (Δ41±5 mm Hg) mice, and this response was rescued by B-cell transfer. BAFF-R(-/-) mice displayed reduced IgG accumulation in the aorta, which was associated with 80% fewer aortic macrophages and a 70% reduction in transforming growth factor-β expression. BAFF-R(-/-) mice were also protected from Ang II-induced collagen deposition and aortic stiffening (assessed by pulse wave velocity analysis). Finally, like BAFF-R deficiency, pharmacological depletion of B cells with an anti-CD20 antibody attenuated Ang II-induced hypertension by ≈35%. Hence, these studies demonstrate that B cells/IgGs are crucial for the development of Ang II-induced hypertension and vessel remodeling in mice. Thus, B-cell-targeted therapies-currently used for autoimmune diseases-may hold promise as future treatments for hypertension. PMID:26351030

  4. Contractile effects of intracellularly administered angiotensin II are partially dependent on membrane receptors internalization in isolated rat aorta.

    PubMed

    Petrescu, G; Costuleanu, M; Slătineanu, S M; Foia, L; Costuleanu, N; Costuleanu, A

    2001-01-01

    In the present study we used the isolated rat aorta as a model to characterize the modulation of contractile effects of extra- and intracellularly administered angiotensin II by dithiothreitol (DTT) and hyperosmotic sucrose. DTT inactivation of AT1 receptor as well as disruption of the clathrin-coated pits by hyperosmotic sucrose significantly inhibited the contraction induced by intracellularly administered AII. We suggest that these intracellular effects of angiotensin peptides are associated with AT1 receptor activation/internalization and may thus be part of the mechanism of angiotensin peptides direct contractile effects in the vascular smooth muscle. PMID:12092224

  5. Expression of Heme Oxygenase-1 in Thick Ascending Loop of Henle Attenuates Angiotensin II-Dependent Hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Drummond, Heather A.; Gousette, Monette U.; Storm, Megan V.; Abraham, Nader G.; Csongradi, Eva

    2012-01-01

    Kidney-specific induction of heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) attenuates the development of angiotensin II (Ang II) -dependent hypertension, but the relative contribution of vascular versus tubular induction of HO-1 is unknown. To determine the specific contribution of thick ascending loop of Henle (TALH) -derived HO-1, we generated a transgenic mouse in which the uromodulin promoter controlled expression of human HO-1. Quantitative RT-PCR and confocal microscopy confirmed successful localization of the HO-1 transgene to TALH tubule segments. Medullary HO activity, but not cortical HO activity, was significantly higher in transgenic mice than control mice. Enhanced TALH HO-1 attenuated the hypertension induced by Ang II delivered by an osmotic minipump for 10 days (139±3 versus 153±2 mmHg in the transgenic and control mice, respectively; P<0.05). The lower blood pressure in transgenic mice associated with a 60% decrease in medullary NKCC2 transporter expression determined by Western blot. Transgenic mice also exhibited a 36% decrease in ouabain-sensitive sodium reabsorption and a significantly attenuated response to furosemide in isolated TALH segments,. In summary, these results show that increased levels of HO-1 in the TALH can lower blood pressure by a mechanism that may include alterations in NKCC2-dependent sodium reabsorption. PMID:22323644

  6. Dietary peptides from the non-digestible fraction of Phaseolus vulgaris L. decrease angiotensin II-dependent proliferation in HCT116 human colorectal cancer cells through the blockade of the renin-angiotensin system.

    PubMed

    Luna-Vital, Diego A; Liang, Katie; González de Mejía, Elvira; Loarca-Piña, Guadalupe

    2016-05-18

    This study aimed to determine the ability of peptides present in the non-digestible fraction (NDF) of common beans to decrease angiotensin II (AngII) through the blockade of RAS and its effect on the proliferation of HCT116 human colorectal cancer cells. Pure synthesized peptides GLTSK and GEGSGA and the peptide fractions (PF) of cultivars Azufrado Higuera and Bayo Madero were used. The cells were pretreated with pure peptides, PF or AGT at their IC50 or IC25 values, in comparison with the simultaneous treatment of peptides and AGT. For western blot and microscopy analysis, 100 μM and 0.5 mg mL(-1) were used for pure peptides and PF treatments, respectively. According to the ELISA tests, GLTSK and GEGSGA decreased (p < 0.05) the conversion rate of AGT to angiotensin I (AngI) by 38 and 28%, respectively. All the peptides tested reduced (p < 0.05) the conversion rate of AngI to AngII from 38 to 50%. When the cells were pretreated with both pure peptides and PF before exposure to AGT, the effectiveness inhibiting cell proliferation was higher than the simultaneous treatment suggesting their preventive effects. GLTSK and GEGSGA interacted with the catalytic site of renin, the angiotensin-I converting enzyme, and the AngII receptor, mainly through hydrogen bonds, polar, hydrophobic and cation-π interactions according to molecular docking. Through confocal microscopy, it was determined that GLTSK and GEGSGA caused the decrease (p < 0.05) of AngII-dependent STAT3 nuclear activation in HCT116 cells by 66 and 23%, respectively. The results suggest that peptides present in the common bean NDF could potentially ameliorate the effects of RAS overexpression in colorectal cancer. PMID:27156533

  7. Angiotensin-(1-7) inhibits epidermal growth factor receptor transactivation via a Mas receptor-dependent pathway

    PubMed Central

    Akhtar, Saghir; Yousif, Mariam HM; Dhaunsi, Gursev S; Chandrasekhar, Bindu; Al-Farsi, Omama; Benter, Ibrahim F

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE The transactivation of the epidermal growth factor (EGF) receptor appears to be an important central transduction mechanism in mediating diabetes-induced vascular dysfunction. Angiotensin-(1-7) [Ang-(1-7)] via its Mas receptor can prevent the development of hyperglycaemia-induced cardiovascular complications. Here, we investigated whether Ang-(1-7) can inhibit hyperglycaemia-induced EGF receptor transactivation and its classical signalling via ERK1/2 and p38 MAPK in vivo and in vitro. EXPERIMENTAL APPROACH Streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats were chronically treated with Ang-(1-7) or AG1478, a selective EGF receptor inhibitor, for 4 weeks and mechanistic studies performed in the isolated mesenteric vasculature bed as well as in primary cultures of vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs). KEY RESULTS Diabetes significantly enhanced phosphorylation of EGF receptor at tyrosine residues Y992, Y1068, Y1086, Y1148, as well as ERK1/2 and p38 MAPK in the mesenteric vasculature bed whereas these changes were significantly attenuated upon Ang-(1–7) or AG1478 treatment. In VSMCs grown in conditions of high glucose (25 mM), an Src-dependent elevation in EGF receptor phosphorylation was observed. Ang-(1-7) inhibited both Ang II- and glucose-induced transactivation of EGF receptor. The inhibition of high glucose-mediated Src-dependant transactivation of EGF receptor by Ang-(1-7) could be prevented by a selective Mas receptor antagonist, D-Pro7-Ang-(1-7). CONCLUSIONS AND IMPLICATIONS These results show for the first time that Ang-(1-7) inhibits EGF receptor transactivation via a Mas receptor/Src-dependent pathway and might represent a novel general mechanism by which Ang-(1-7) exerts its beneficial effects in many disease states including diabetes-induced vascular dysfunction. PMID:21806601

  8. Myocardial perfusion as assessed by thallium-201 scintigraphy during the discontinuation of mechanical ventilation in ventilator-dependent patients

    SciTech Connect

    Hurford, W.E.; Lynch, K.E.; Strauss, H.W.; Lowenstein, E.; Zapol, W.M. )

    1991-06-01

    Patients who cannot be separated from mechanical ventilation (MV) after an episode of acute respiratory failure often have coexisting coronary artery disease. The authors hypothesized that increased left ventricular (LV) wall stress during periods of spontaneous ventilation (SV) could alter myocardial perfusion in these patients. Using thallium-201 (201TI) myocardial scintigraphy, the authors studied the occurrence of myocardial perfusion abnormalities during periods of SV in 15 MV-dependent patients (nine women, six men; aged 71 {plus minus} 7 yr, mean {plus minus} SD). Fourteen of these patients were studied once with 201TI myocardial scintigraphy during intermittent mechanical ventilation (IMV) and again on another day, after at least 10 min of SV through a T-piece. One patient was studied during SV only. Thirteen of 14 of the patients (93%) studied during MV had abnormal patterns of initial myocardial 201TI uptake, but only 1 patient demonstrated redistribution of 201TI on delayed images. The remainder of the abnormalities observed during MV were fixed defects. SV produced significant alterations of myocardial 201TI distribution or transient LV dilation, or both, in 7 of the 15 patients (47%). Four patients demonstrated new regional decreases of LV myocardial thallium concentration with redistribution of the isotope on delayed images. The patient studied only during SV also had myocardial 201TI defects with redistribution. Five patients (3 also having areas of 201TI redistribution) had transient LV dilation during SV.

  9. Low-Salt Diet and Circadian Dysfunction Synergize to Induce Angiotensin II-Dependent Hypertension in Mice.

    PubMed

    Pati, Paramita; Fulton, David J R; Bagi, Zsolt; Chen, Feng; Wang, Yusi; Kitchens, Julia; Cassis, Lisa A; Stepp, David W; Rudic, R Daniel

    2016-03-01

    Blood pressure exhibits a robust circadian rhythm in health. In hypertension, sleep apnea, and even shift work, this balanced rhythm is perturbed via elevations in night-time blood pressure, inflicting silent damage to the vasculature and body organs. Herein, we examined the influence of circadian dysfunction during experimental hypertension in mice. Using radiotelemetry to measure ambulatory blood pressure and activity, the effects of angiotensin II administration were studied in wild-type (WT) and period isoform knockout (KO) mice (Per2-KO, Per2, 3-KO, and Per1, 2, 3-KO/Per triple KO [TKO] mice). On a normal diet, administration of angiotensin II caused nondipping blood pressure and exacerbated vascular hypertrophy in the Period isoform KO mice relative to WT mice. To study the endogenous effects of angiotensin II stimulation, we then administered a low-salt diet to the mice, which does stimulate endogenous angiotensin II in addition to lowering blood pressure. A low-salt diet decreased blood pressure in wild-type mice. In contrast, Period isoform KO mice lost their circadian rhythm in blood pressure on a low-salt diet, because of an increase in resting blood pressure, which was restorable to rhythmicity by the angiotensin receptor blocker losartan. Chronic administration of low salt caused vascular hypertrophy in Period isoform KO mice, which also exhibited increased renin levels and altered angiotensin 1 receptor expression. These data suggest that circadian clock genes may act to inhibit or control renin/angiotensin signaling. Moreover, circadian disorders such as sleep apnea and shift work may alter the homeostatic responses to sodium restriction to potentially influence nocturnal hypertension. PMID:26781276

  10. p21(CIP1/WAF1)-dependent inhibition of cardiac hypertrophy in response to Angiotensin II involves Akt/Myc and pRb signaling.

    PubMed

    Hauck, Ludger; Grothe, Daniela; Billia, Filio

    2016-09-01

    The cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor p21(CIP1/WAF1) (p21) is highly expressed in the adult heart. However, in response to stress, its expression is downregulated. Therefore, we investigated the role of p21 in the regulation of cardiac hypertrophic growth. At 2 months of age, p21 knockout mice (p21KO) lack an overt cardiac phenotype. In contrast, by 10 months of age, p21KO developed age-dependent cardiac hypertrophy and heart failure. After 3 weeks of trans-aortic banding (TAB), the heart/body weight ratio in 11 week old p21KO mice increased by 57%, as compared to 42% in wild type mice indicating that p21KO have a higher susceptibility to pressure overload-induced cardiac hypertrophy. We then chronically infused 8 week old wild type mice with Angiotensin II (2.0mg/kg/min) or saline subcutaneously by osmotic pumps for 14 days. Recombinant TAT conjugated p21 protein variants (10mg/kg body weight) or saline were intraperitoneally injected once daily for 14 days into Angiotensin II and saline-infused animals. Angiotensin II treated mice developed pathological cardiac hypertrophy with an average increase of 38% in heart/body weight ratios, as compared to saline-treated controls. Reconstitution of p21 function by TAT.p21 protein transduction prevented Angiotensin II-dependent development of cardiac hypertrophy and failure. Taken together, our genetic and biochemical data show an important function of p21 in the regulation of growth-related processes in the heart. PMID:27486069

  11. Structure-activity relationship study of angiotensin II analogs in terms of β-arrestin-dependent signaling to aldosterone production.

    PubMed

    Valero, Thairy Reyes; Sturchler, Emmanuel; Jafferjee, Malika; Rengo, Giuseppe; Magafa, Vassiliki; Cordopatis, Paul; McDonald, Patricia; Koch, Walter J; Lymperopoulos, Anastasios

    2016-04-01

    The known angiotensin II (AngII) physiological effect of aldosterone synthesis and secretion induction, a steroid hormone that contributes to the pathology of postmyocardial infarction (MI) heart failure (HF), is mediated by both Gq/11 proteins and β-arrestins, both of which couple to the AngII type 1 receptors (AT1Rs) of adrenocortical zona glomerulosa (AZG) cells. Over the past several years, AngII analogs with increased selectivity ("bias") toward β-arrestin-dependent signaling at the AT1R have been designed and described, starting with SII, the gold-standard β-arrestin-"biased" AngII analog. In this study, we examined the relative potencies of an extensive series of AngII peptide analogs at relative activation of G proteins versus β-arrestins by the AT1R. The major structural difference of these peptides from SII was their varied substitutions at position 5, rather than position 4 of native AngII. Three of them were found biased for β-arrestin activation and extremely potent at stimulating aldosterone secretion in AZG cells in vitro, much more potent than SII in that regard. Finally, the most potent of these three ([Sar(1), Cys(Et)(5), Leu(8)]-AngII, CORET) was further examined in post-MI rats progressing to HF and overexpressing adrenal β-arrestin1 in vivo. Consistent with the in vitro studies, CORET was found to exacerbate the post-MI hyperaldosteronism, and, consequently, cardiac function of the post-MI animals in vivo. Finally, our data suggest that increasing the size of position 5 of the AngII peptide sequence results in directly proportional increases in AT1R-dependent β-arrestin activation. These findings provide important insights for AT1R pharmacology and future AngII-targeted drug development. PMID:27069636

  12. Sex-dependent effects of sleep deprivation on myocardial sensitivity to ischemic injury.

    PubMed

    Zoladz, Phillip R; Krivenko, Anna; Eisenmann, Eric D; Bui, Albert D; Seeley, Sarah L; Fry, Megan E; Johnson, Brandon L; Rorabaugh, Boyd R

    2016-01-01

    Sleep deprivation is associated with increased risk of myocardial infarction. However, it is unknown whether the effects of sleep deprivation are limited to increasing the likelihood of experiencing a myocardial infarction or if sleep deprivation also increases the extent of myocardial injury. In this study, rats were deprived of paradoxical sleep for 96 h using the platform-over-water method. Control rats were subjected to the same condition except the control platform was large enough for the rats to sleep. Hearts from sleep deprived and control rats were subjected to 20 min ischemia on a Langendorff isolated heart system. Infarct size and post ischemic recovery of contractile function were unaffected by sleep deprivation in male hearts. In contrast, hearts from sleep-deprived females exhibited significantly larger infarcts than hearts from control females. Post ischemic recovery of rate pressure product and + dP/dT were significantly attenuated by sleep deprivation in female hearts, and post ischemic recovery of end diastolic pressure was significantly elevated in hearts from sleep deprived females compared to control females, indicating that post ischemic recovery of both systolic and diastolic function were worsened by sleep deprivation. These data provide evidence that sleep deprivation increases the extent of ischemia-induced injury in a sex-dependent manner. PMID:26953626

  13. Targeting Cardiac Mast Cells: Pharmacological Modulation of the Local Renin-Angiotensin System

    PubMed Central

    Reid, Alicia C.; Brazin, Jacqueline A.; Morrey, Christopher; Silver, Randi B.; Levi, Roberto

    2012-01-01

    Enhanced production of angiotensin II and excessive release of norepinephrine in the ischemic heart are major causes of arrhythmias and sudden cardiac death. Mast cell-dependent mechanisms are pivotal in the local formation of angiotensin II and modulation of norepinephrine release in cardiac pathophysiology. Cardiac mast cells increase in number in myocardial ischemia and are located in close proximity to sympathetic neurons expressing angiotensin AT1- and histamine H3-receptors. Once activated, cardiac mast cells release a host of potent pro-inflammatory and pro-fibrotic cytokines, chemokines, preformed mediators (e.g., histamine) and proteases (e.g., renin). In myocardial ischemia, angiotensin II (formed locally from mast cell-derived renin) and histamine (also released from local mast cells) respectively activate AT1- and H3-receptors on sympathetic nerve endings. Stimulation of angiotensin AT1-receptors is arrhythmogenic whereas H3-receptor activation is cardioprotective. It is likely that in ischemia/reperfusion the balance may be tipped toward the deleterious effects of mast cell renin, as demonstrated in mast cell-deficient mice, lacking mast cell renin and histamine in the heart. In these mice, no ventricular fibrillation occurs at reperfusion following ischemia, as opposed to wild-type hearts which all fibrillate. Preventing mast cell degranulation in the heart and inhibiting the activation of a local reninangiotensin system, hence abolishing its detrimental effects on cardiac rhythmicity, appears to be more significant than the loss of histamine-induced cardioprotection. This suggests that therapeutic targets in the treatment of myocardial ischemia, and potentially congestive heart failure and hypertension, should include prevention of mast cell degranulation, mast cell renin inhibition, local ACE inhibition, ANG II antagonism and H3-receptor activation. PMID:22103845

  14. Actin cytoskeleton-dependent Rab GTPase-regulated angiotensin type I receptor lysosomal degradation studied by fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Hewang; Yu, Peiying; Sun, Yuansheng; Felder, Robin A.; Periasamy, Ammasi; Jose, Pedro A.

    2010-09-01

    The dynamic regulation of the cellular trafficking of human angiotensin (Ang) type 1 receptor (AT1R) is not well understood. Therefore, we investigated the cellular trafficking of AT1R-enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) (AT1R-EGFP) heterologously expressed in HEK293 cells by determining the change in donor lifetime (AT1R-EGFP) in the presence or absence of acceptor(s) using fluorescence lifetime imaging-fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) microscopy. The average lifetime of AT1R-EGFP in our donor-alone samples was ~2.33 ns. The basal state lifetime was shortened slightly in the presence of Rab5 (2.01+/-0.10 ns) or Rab7 (2.11+/-0.11 ns) labeled with Alexa 555, as the acceptor fluorophore. A 5-min Ang II treatment markedly shortened the lifetime of AT1R-EGFP in the presence of Rab5-Alexa 555 (1.78+/-0.31 ns) but was affected minimally in the presence of Rab7-Alexa 555 (2.09+/-0.37 ns). A 30-min Ang II treatment further decreased the AT1R-EGFP lifetime in the presence of both Rab5- and Rab7-Alexa 555. Latrunculin A but not nocodazole pretreatment blocked the ability of Ang II to shorten the AT1R-EGFP lifetime. The occurrence of FRET between AT1R-EGFP (donor) and LAMP1-Alexa 555 (acceptor) with Ang II stimulation was impaired by photobleaching the acceptor. These studies demonstrate that Ang II-induced AT1R lysosomal degradation through its association with LAMP1 is regulated by Rab5/7 via mechanisms that are dependent on intact actin cytoskeletons.

  15. Renal Inhibition of Heme Oxygenase-1 Increases Blood Pressure in Angiotensin II-Dependent Hypertension.

    PubMed

    Csongradi, Eva; Storm, Megan V; Stec, David E

    2012-01-01

    The goal of this study was to test the hypothesis that renal medullary heme oxygenase (HO) acts as a buffer against Ang-II dependent hypertension. To test this hypothesis, renal medullary HO activity was blocked using QC-13, an imidazole-dioxolane HO-1 inhibitor, or SnMP, a classical porphyrin based HO inhibitor. HO inhibitors were infused via IRMI catheters throughout the study starting 3 days prior to implantation of an osmotic minipump which delivered Ang II or saline vehicle. MAP was increased by Ang II infusion and further increased by IRMI infusion of QC-13 or SnMP. MAP averaged 113 ± 3, 120 ± 7, 141 ± 2, 153 ± 2, and 154 ± 3 mmHg in vehicle, vehicle + IRMI QC-13, Ang II, Ang II + IRMI QC-13, and Ang II + IRMI SnMP treated mice, respectively (n = 6). Inhibition of renal medullary HO activity with QC-13 in Ang II infused mice was also associated with a significant increase in superoxide production as well as significant decreases in antioxidant enzymes catalase and MnSOD. These results demonstrate that renal inhibition of HO exacerbates Ang II dependent hypertension through a mechanism which is associated with increases in superoxide production and decreases in antioxidant enzymes. PMID:22164328

  16. P450-dependent arachidonic acid metabolism and angiotensin II-induced renal damage.

    PubMed

    Kaergel, Eva; Muller, Dominik N; Honeck, Horst; Theuer, Juergen; Shagdarsuren, Erdenechimeg; Mullally, Alexander; Luft, Friedrich C; Schunck, Wolf-Hagen

    2002-09-01

    Transgenic rats overexpressing both human renin and angiotensinogen genes (dTGR) develop hypertension, inflammation, and renal failure. We tested the hypothesis that these pathological features are associated with changes in renal P450-dependent arachidonic acid (AA) metabolism. Samples were prepared from 5- and 7-week-old dTGR and from normotensive Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats, ie, before and after the dTGR developed severe hypertension and albuminuria. At both stages, dTGR showed significantly lower renal microsomal AA epoxygenase and hydroxylase activities that reached 63% and 76% of the control values at week 7. Furthermore, the protein levels of several potential AA epoxygenases (CYP2C11, CYP2C23, and CYP2J) were significantly reduced. Immunoinhibition studies identified CYP2C23 as the major AA epoxygenase, both in dTGR and SD rats. Immunohistochemistry showed that CYP2C23 was localized in cortical and outer medullary tubules that progressively lost this enzyme from week 5 to week 7 in dTGR. CYP2C11 expression occurred only in the outer medullary tubules and was markedly reduced in dTGR compared with age-matched SD rats. These findings indicate site-specific decreases in the availability of AA epoxygenase products in the kidney of dTGR. In contrast to renal microsomes, liver microsomes of dTGR and SD rats showed no change in the expression and activity of AA epoxygenases and hydroxylases. We conclude that hypertension and end-organ damage in dTGR is associated with kidney-specific downregulation of P450-dependent AA metabolism. Because the products of AA epoxygenation have anti-inflammatory properties, this alteration may contribute to uncontrolled renal inflammation, which is a major cause of renal damage in dTGR. PMID:12215466

  17. Hydroxytyrosol Protects against Myocardial Ischemia/Reperfusion Injury through a PI3K/Akt-Dependent Mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Pei, Ying-hao; Chen, Jiao; Xie, Liang; Cai, Xiao-min; Yang, Run-Hua; Wang, Xing; Gong, Jian-bin

    2016-01-01

    Objective. To investigate the effects and mechanisms of hydroxytyrosol (HT) during the pathogenesis of myocardial ischemia reperfusion (I/R) in rat hearts. Methods. The rats were randomized into five groups: sham group, I/R group, HT+I/R group, HT+LY294002+I/R group, and LY+I/R group. Myocardial infarct size, markers of oxidative stress, extent of myocardial apoptosis, echocardiographically assessed cardiac function, and expression of Akt and GSK 3β were measured in each group. Results. Prereperfusion administration of HT was associated with a significantly smaller area of myocardial infarction and remarkably decreased level of myocardial apoptosis and necrosis, as evidenced by a lower apoptotic index, reduced cleaved caspase-3, and the serum activities of lactate dehydrogenase and creatinine kinase MB. Moreover, HT also attenuated the impairment of cardiac systolic function. However, cotreatment with LY294002 and HT completely abolished the above cardioprotective effects of HT. A subsequent mechanistic study revealed that the cardioprotective effects of HT during the process of I/R of the myocardium were dependent on the activation of the Akt/GSK3β pathway. Conclusion. Pretreatment with HT may have antiapoptotic and cardioprotective effects against myocardial I/R injury, and these effects seem to be related to the activation of the Akt/GSK3β pathway in the myocardium. PMID:26966340

  18. Adaptation of myocardial blood flow to increased metabolic demand is not dependent on endothelial vasodilators in the rat heart.

    PubMed Central

    Tiefenbacher, C. P.; Tillmanns, H.; Niroomand, F.; Zimmermann, R.; Kübler, W.

    1997-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To investigate the role of endothelial vasodilating factors in adaptation of myocardial blood flow to increased metabolic demands. DESIGN: Alterations in the effects of endothelium dependent (acetylcholine) and independent (sodium nitroprusside) vasodilators and the beta 1 receptor agonist dobutamine were studied after inhibition of endothelium derived relaxing factor (EDRF) with L-NG-nitro-arginine methyl ester (L-NAME), prostanoid synthesis with indomethacin, and ATP sensitive potassium channels with glibenclamide. EXPERIMENTAL ANIMALS: Female Wistar rats, in situ perfused heart. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Myocardial blood flow (H2 clearance); systolic fractional thickening (pulsed Doppler); mean arterial blood pressure. RESULTS: L-NAME reduced myocardial blood flow by 58 (12)% (mean (SD), P < 0.001) and systolic thickening fraction (FT) by 36 (9)% (P < 0.05). These effects were significantly reversed by administration of L-arginine but not D-arginine. Pretreatment with L-NAME inhibited the increase in myocardial blood flow caused by acetylcholine (control: +42 (9)%; L-NAME: -29 (7)%, P < 0.001) but did not affect the increase in myocardial blood flow caused by sodium nitroprusside (control: +44 (5)%; L-NAME: +34 (10)%, NS). Pretreatment with L-NAME did not change the effect of dobutamine on myocardial blood flow (+61 (3)%) and FT (+32 (8)%) compared with baseline values (P < 0.001). Neither pretreatment with indomethacin nor with glibenclamide reduced the dobutamine induced increase in myocardial blood flow. CONCLUSIONS: Inhibition of EDRF, prostanoid synthesis, and ATP sensitive potassium channels did not reduce the vasodilator reserve during increased metabolic demands induced by beta 1 adrenergic stimulation. Therefore, adaptation of myocardial blood flow to increased metabolic demands is independent of endothelial relaxing factors in the rat heart. PMID:9068398

  19. Prolonged Subcutaneous Administration of Oxytocin Accelerates Angiotensin II-Induced Hypertension and Renal Damage in Male Rats

    PubMed Central

    Phie, James; Haleagrahara, Nagaraja; Newton, Patricia; Constantinoiu, Constantin; Sarnyai, Zoltan; Chilton, Lisa; Kinobe, Robert

    2015-01-01

    Oxytocin and its receptor are synthesised in the heart and blood vessels but effects of chronic activation of this peripheral oxytocinergic system on cardiovascular function are not known. In acute studies, systemic administration of low dose oxytocin exerted a protective, preconditioning effect in experimental models of myocardial ischemia and infarction. In this study, we investigated the effects of chronic administration of low dose oxytocin following angiotensin II-induced hypertension, cardiac hypertrophy and renal damage. Angiotensin II (40 μg/Kg/h) only, oxytocin only (20 or 100 ng/Kg/h), or angiotensin II combined with oxytocin (20 or 100 ng/Kg/h) were infused subcutaneously in adult male Sprague-Dawley rats for 28 days. At day 7, oxytocin or angiotensin-II only did not change hemodynamic parameters, but animals that received a combination of oxytocin and angiotensin-II had significantly elevated systolic, diastolic and mean arterial pressure compared to controls (P < 0.01). Hemodynamic changes were accompanied by significant left ventricular cardiac hypertrophy and renal damage at day 28 in animals treated with angiotensin II (P < 0.05) or both oxytocin and angiotensin II, compared to controls (P < 0.01). Prolonged oxytocin administration did not affect plasma concentrations of renin and atrial natriuretic peptide, but was associated with the activation of calcium-dependent protein phosphatase calcineurin, a canonical signalling mechanism in pressure overload-induced cardiovascular disease. These data demonstrate that oxytocin accelerated angiotensin-II induced hypertension and end-organ renal damage, suggesting caution should be exercised in the chronic use of oxytocin in individuals with hypertension. PMID:26393919

  20. miR-34a modulates angiotensin II-induced myocardial hypertrophy by direct inhibition of ATG9A expression and autophagic activity.

    PubMed

    Huang, Jionghua; Sun, Wen; Huang, He; Ye, Jing; Pan, Wei; Zhong, Yun; Cheng, Chuanfang; You, Xiangyu; Liu, Benrong; Xiong, Longgen; Liu, Shiming

    2014-01-01

    Cardiac hypertrophy is characterized by thickening myocardium and decreasing in heart chamber volume in response to mechanical or pathological stress, but the underlying molecular mechanisms remain to be defined. This study investigated altered miRNA expression and autophagic activity in pathogenesis of cardiac hypertrophy. A rat model of myocardial hypertrophy was used and confirmed by heart morphology, induction of cardiomyocyte autophagy, altered expression of autophagy-related ATG9A, LC3 II/I and p62 proteins, and decrease in miR-34a expression. The in vitro data showed that in hypertrophic cardiomyocytes induced by Ang II, miR-34a expression was downregulated, whereas ATG9A expression was up-regulated. Moreover, miR-34a was able to bind to ATG9A 3'-UTR, but not to the mutated 3'-UTR and inhibited ATG9A protein expression and autophagic activity. The latter was evaluated by autophagy-related LC3 II/I and p62 levels, TEM, and flow cytometry in rat cardiomyocytes. In addition, ATG9A expression induced either by treatment of rat cardiomyocytes with Ang II or ATG9A cDNA transfection upregulated autophagic activity and cardiomyocyte hypertrophy in both morphology and expression of hypertrophy-related genes (i.e., ANP and β-MHC), whereas knockdown of ATG9A expression downregulated autophagic activity and cardiomyocyte hypertrophy. However, miR-34a antagonized Ang II-stimulated myocardial hypertrophy, whereas inhibition of miR-34a expression aggravated Ang II-stimulated myocardial hypertrophy (such as cardiomyocyte hypertrophy-related ANP and β-MHC expression and cardiomyocyte morphology). This study indicates that miR-34a plays a role in regulation of Ang II-induced cardiomyocyte hypertrophy by inhibition of ATG9A expression and autophagic activity. PMID:24728149

  1. Naked Polyamidoamine Polymers Intrinsically Inhibit Angiotensin II-Mediated EGFR and ErbB2 Transactivation in a Dendrimer Generation- and Surface Chemistry-Dependent Manner.

    PubMed

    Akhtar, Saghir; El-Hashim, Ahmed Z; Chandrasekhar, Bindu; Attur, Sreeja; Benter, Ibrahim F

    2016-05-01

    The effects of naked polyamidoamine (PAMAM) dendrimers on renin-angiotensin system (RAS) signaling via Angiotensin (Ang) II-mediated transactivation of the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) and the closely related family member ErbB2 (HER2) were investigated. In primary aortic vascular smooth muscle cells, a cationic fifth-generation (G5) PAMAM dendrimer dose- and time-dependently inhibited Ang II/AT1 receptor-mediated transactivation of EGFR and ErbB2 as well as their downstream signaling via extracellular-regulated kinase 1/2 (ERK1/2). Inhibition even occurred at noncytotoxic concentrations at short (1 h) exposure times and was dependent on dendrimer generation (G7 > G6 > G5 > G4) and surface group chemistry (amino > carboxyl > hydroxyl). Mechanistically, the cationic G5 PAMAM dendrimer inhibited Ang II-mediated transactivation of EGFR and ErbB2 via inhibition of the nonreceptor tyrosine kinase Src. This novel, early onset, intrinsic biological action of PAMAM dendrimers as inhibitors of the Ang II/AT1/Src/EGFR-ErbB2/ERK1/2 signaling pathway could have important toxicological and pharmacological implications. PMID:26985693

  2. ROCK/NF-κB axis-dependent augmentation of angiotensinogen by angiotensin II in primary-cultured preglomerular vascular smooth muscle cells

    PubMed Central

    Satou, Ryousuke; Shao, Weijian; Prieto, Minolfa C.; Urushihara, Maki; Kobori, Hiroyuki; Navar, L. Gabriel

    2014-01-01

    In angiotensin II (ANG II)-dependent hypertension, the augmented intrarenal ANG II constricts the renal microvasculature and stimulates Rho kinase (ROCK), which modulates vascular contractile responses. Rho may also stimulate angiotensinogen (AGT) expression in preglomerular vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs), but this has not been established. Therefore, the aims of this study were to determine the direct interactions between Rho and ANG II in regulating AGT and other renin-angiotensin system (RAS) components and to elucidate the roles of the ROCK/NF-κB axis in the ANG II-induced AGT augmentation in primary cultures of preglomerular VSMCs. We first demonstrated that these preglomerular VSMCs express renin, AGT, angiotensin-converting enzyme, and ANG II type 1 (AT1) receptors. Furthermore, incubation with ANG II (100 pmol/l for 24 h) increased AGT mRNA (1.42 ± 0.03, ratio to control) and protein (1.68 ± 0.05, ratio to control) expression levels, intracellular ANG II levels, and NF-κB activity. In contrast, the ANG II treatment did not alter AT1a and AT1b mRNA levels in the cells. Treatment with H-1152 (ROCK inhibitor, 10 nmol/l) and ROCK1 small interfering (si) RNA suppressed the ANG II-induced AGT augmentation and the upregulation and translocalization of p65 into nuclei. Functional studies showed that ROCK exerted a greater influence on afferent arteriole responses to ANG II in rats subjected to chronic ANG II infusions. These results indicate that ROCK is involved in NF-κB activation and the ROCK/NF-κB axis contributes to ANG II-induced AGT upregulation, leading to intracellular ANG II augmentation. PMID:24431199

  3. Sex-dependent effects of chronic psychosocial stress on myocardial sensitivity to ischemic injury.

    PubMed

    Rorabaugh, Boyd R; Krivenko, Anna; Eisenmann, Eric D; Bui, Albert D; Seeley, Sarah; Fry, Megan E; Lawson, Joseph D; Stoner, Lauren E; Johnson, Brandon L; Zoladz, Phillip R

    2015-01-01

    Individuals with post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) experience many debilitating symptoms, including intrusive memories, persistent anxiety and avoidance of trauma-related cues. PTSD also results in numerous physiological complications, including increased risk for cardiovascular disease (CVD). However, characterization of PTSD-induced cardiovascular alterations is lacking, especially in preclinical models of the disorder. Thus, we examined the impact of a psychosocial predator-based animal model of PTSD on myocardial sensitivity to ischemic injury. Male and female Sprague-Dawley rats were exposed to psychosocial stress or control conditions for 31 days. Stressed rats were given two cat exposures, separated by a period of 10 days, and were subjected to daily social instability throughout the paradigm. Control rats were handled daily for the duration of the experiment. Rats were tested on the elevated plus maze (EPM) on day 32, and hearts were isolated on day 33 and subjected to 20 min ischemia and 2 h reperfusion on a Langendorff isolated heart system. Stressed male and female rats gained less body weight relative to controls, but only stressed males exhibited increased anxiety on the EPM. Male, but not female, rats exposed to psychosocial stress exhibited significantly larger infarcts and attenuated post-ischemic recovery of contractile function compared to controls. Our data demonstrate that predator stress combined with daily social instability sex-dependently increases myocardial sensitivity to ischemic injury. Thus, this manipulation may be useful for studying potential mechanisms underlying cardiovascular alterations in PTSD, as well as sex differences in the cardiovascular stress response. PMID:26458179

  4. Myocardial Feature Tracking Reduces Observer-Dependence in Low-Dose Dobutamine Stress Cardiovascular Magnetic Resonance

    PubMed Central

    Schuster, Andreas; Paul, Matthias; Bettencourt, Nuno; Hussain, Shazia T.; Morton, Geraint; Kutty, Shelby; Bigalke, Boris; Chiribiri, Amedeo; Perera, Divaka

    2015-01-01

    Objectives To determine whether quantitative wall motion assessment by CMR myocardial feature tracking (CMR-FT) would reduce the impact of observer experience as compared to visual analysis in patients with ischemic cardiomyopathy (ICM). Methods 15 consecutive patients with ICM referred for assessment of hibernating myocardium were studied at 3 Tesla using SSFP cine images at rest and during low dose dobutamine stress (5 and 10 μg/kg/min of dobutamine). Conventional visual, qualitative analysis was performed independently and blinded by an experienced and an inexperienced reader, followed by post-processing of the same images by CMR-FT to quantify subendocardial and subepicardial circumferential (Eccendo and Eccepi) and radial (Err) strain. Receiver operator characteristics (ROC) were assessed for each strain parameter and operator to detect the presence of inotropic reserve as visually defined by the experienced observer. Results 141 segments with wall motion abnormalities at rest were eligible for the analysis. Visual scoring of wall motion at rest and during dobutamine was significantly different between the experienced and the inexperienced observer (p<0.001). All strain values (Eccendo, Eccepi and Err) derived during dobutamine stress (5 and 10 μg/kg/min) showed similar diagnostic accuracy for the detection of contractile reserve for both operators with no differences in ROC (p>0.05). Eccendo was the most accurate (AUC of 0.76, 10 μg/kg/min of dobutamine) parameter. Diagnostic accuracy was worse for resting strain with differences between operators for Eccendo and Eccepi (p<0.05) but not Err (p>0.05). Conclusion Whilst visual analysis remains highly dependent on operator experience, quantitative CMR-FT analysis of myocardial wall mechanics during DS-CMR provides diagnostic accuracy for the detection of inotropic reserve regardless of operator experience and hence may improve diagnostic robustness of low-dose DS-CMR in clinical practice. PMID:25848764

  5. Frequency Dependence of Petechial Hemorrhage and Cardiomyocyte Injury Induced during Myocardial Contrast Echocardiography.

    PubMed

    Miller, Douglas L; Lu, Xiaofang; Fabiilli, Mario; Fields, Kristina; Dou, Chunyan

    2016-08-01

    Myocardial contrast echocardiography (MCE) for perfusion imaging can induce microscale bio-effects during intermittent high-Mechanical Index scans. The dependence of MCE-induced bio-effects on the ultrasonic frequency was examined in rats at 1.6, 2.5 and 3.5 MHz. Premature complexes were counted in the electrocardiogram, petechial hemorrhages with microvascular leakage on the heart surface were observed at the time of exposure, plasma troponin elevation was measured after 4 h and cardiomyocyte injury was detected at 24 h. Increasing response to exposure above an apparent threshold was observed for all endpoints at each frequency. The effects decreased with increasing ultrasonic frequency, and the thresholds increased. Linear regressions for frequency-dependent thresholds indicated coefficients and exponents of 0.6 and 1.07 for petechial hemorrhages, respectively, and 1.02 and 0.8 for cardiomyocyte death, compared with 1.9 and 0.5 (square root) for the guideline limit of the mechanical index. The results clarify the dependence of cardiac bio-effects on frequency, and should allow development of theoretical descriptions of the phenomena and improved safety guidance for MCE. PMID:27126240

  6. Valsartan after myocardial infarction.

    PubMed

    Güleç, Sadi

    2014-12-01

    One of the important problems of the patients undergoing acute myocardial infarction (MI) is early development of heart failure. It has been revealed in various studies that renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system (RAAS) has a significant role in this process. The studies conducted with angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors have resulted in decreased mortality rate. Another RAAS blocker which was discovered about ten years later than other ACE inhibitors in historical process is angiotensin receptor blockers (ARB) inhibiting the efficiency of angiotensin 2 by binding to angiotensin 1 receptor. Valsartan is one of the molecules of this group, which has higher number of large-scale randomized clinical studies. In this review, following presentation of a general overview on heart failure after acute MI, the efficiency of ARBs in this patient group will be discussed. This discussion will mostly emphasize the construction, outcomes and clinical importance of VALIANT (VALsartan In Acute myocardial iNfarcTion), which is the study on valsartan after acute MI heart failure. PMID:25604205

  7. [A comprehensive analysis of incidence of myocardial infarction in Vladikavkaz depending on solar and geomagnetic activity].

    PubMed

    Botoeva, N K; Khetarugova, l G; Rapoport, S I

    2013-01-01

    The data on myocardial infarction morbidity in Vladikavkaz for 2007-2010 were analysed with reference to solar and geomagnetic activity. Time series of morbidity in men and women were constructed and their seasonal constituent was distinguished. It was found that the number of myocardial infarctions increases on day with enhanced geomagnetic activity especially among subjects aged 50-69 years. Regression analysis of the relationship between the number of sunspots and myocardial infarctions yielded the equation of piecewise linear regression showing that 42% of the cases were due to the changes in the number of sunspots. Medium strength negative correlation was found between the number of myocardial infarctions and the recurrence index of Bz-component of the interplanetary magnetic field. It suggests an important role of chaotic dynamics of external factors in the development of myocardial infarction. PMID:25696947

  8. Adiponectin protects against myocardial ischemia-reperfusion injury through AMPK- and COX-2—dependent mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Shibata, Rei; Sato, Kaori; Pimentel, David R; Takemura, Yukihiro; Kihara, Shinji; Ohashi, Koji; Funahashi, Tohru; Ouchi, Noriyuki; Walsh, Kenneth

    2010-01-01

    Obesity-related disorders are associated with the development of ischemic heart disease. Adiponectin is a circulating adipose-derived cytokine that is downregulated in obese individuals and after myocardial infarction. Here, we examine the role of adiponectin in myocardial remodeling in response to acute injury. Ischemia-reperfusion in adiponectin-deficient (APN-KO) mice resulted in increased myocardial infarct size, myocardial apoptosis and tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α expression compared with wild-type mice. Administration of adiponectin diminished infarct size, apoptosis and TNF-α production in both APN-KO and wild-type mice. In cultured cardiac cells, adiponectin inhibited apoptosis and TNF-α production. Dominant negative AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) reversed the inhibitory effects of adiponectin on apoptosis but had no effect on the suppressive effect of adiponectin on TNF-α production. Adiponectin induced cyclooxygenase (COX)-2–dependent synthesis of prostaglandin E2 in cardiac cells, and COX-2 inhibition reversed the inhibitory effects of adiponectin on TNF-α production and infarct size. These data suggest that adiponectin protects the heart from ischemia-reperfusion injury through both AMPK- and COX-2–dependent mechanisms. PMID:16155579

  9. PKC-α-dependent augmentation of cAMP and CREB phosphorylation mediates the angiotensin II stimulation of renin in the collecting duct.

    PubMed

    Gonzalez, Alexis A; Liu, Liu; Lara, Lucienne S; Bourgeois, Camille R T; Ibaceta-Gonzalez, Cristobal; Salinas-Parra, Nicolas; Gogulamudi, Venkateswara R; Seth, Dale M; Prieto, Minolfa C

    2015-11-15

    In contrast to the negative feedback of angiotensin II (ANG II) on juxtaglomerular renin, ANG II stimulates renin in the principal cells of the collecting duct (CD) in rats and mice via ANG II type 1 (AT1R) receptor, independently of blood pressure. In vitro data indicate that CD renin is augmented by AT1R activation through protein kinase C (PKC), but the exact mechanisms are unknown. We hypothesize that ANG II stimulates CD renin synthesis through AT1R via PKC and the subsequent activation of cAMP/PKA/CREB pathway. In M-1 cells, ANG II increased cAMP, renin mRNA (3.5-fold), prorenin, and renin proteins, as well as renin activity in culture media (2-fold). These effects were prevented by PKC inhibition with calphostin C, PKC-α dominant negative, and by PKA inhibition. Forskolin-induced increases in cAMP and renin expression were prevented by calphostin C. PKC inhibition and Ca2+ depletion impaired ANG II-mediated CREB phosphorylation and upregulation of renin. Adenylate cyclase 6 (AC) siRNA remarkably attenuated the ANG II-dependent upregulation of renin mRNA. Physiological activation of AC with vasopressin increased renin expression in M-1 cells. The results suggest that the ANG II-dependent upregulation of renin in the CD depends on PKC-α, which allows the augmentation of cAMP production and activation of PKA/CREB pathway via AC6. This study defines the intracellular signaling pathway involved in the ANG II-mediated stimulation of renin in the CD. This is a novel mechanism responsible for the regulation of local renin-angiotensin system in the distal nephron. PMID:26268270

  10. Dependence of light fluence on treated depth with photosensitization reaction shortly after photosensitizer injection in rabbit myocardial tissue in vivo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suenari, T.; Matsuo, H.; Ito, A.; Miyoshi, S.; Arai, T.

    2010-02-01

    We investigated experimentally dependence of light fluence on treated depth with photosensitization reaction shortly after photosensitizer injection in rabbit myocardial tissue in vivo. In this particular photosensitization reaction scheme, the photosensitizer accumulation characteristics for target region are not available. Meanwhile, the photosensitizer dose and hospitalization period under restricted light circumstance might be reduced. Since both photosensitizer and oxygen supply are governed by blood flow, this photosensitization reaction is influenced significantly by blood flow variation in particular blood vessel occlusion. We employed the myocardial tissue to keep tissue blood flow during the photosensitization reaction because vessel blood flow speed in myocardial tissue is fast to resist vascular occlusion. Surgically exposed rabbits myocardial tissues were irradiated with the light fluence ranging 25-100 J/cm2 by a 663 nm diode laser 30 min after the injection of 2 mg/kg water soluble chlorin photosensitizer, Talaporfin sodium. Two weeks after the irradiation, the rabbits were sacrificed and the histological specimens of the irradiated area were made to measure scar layer thickness. The scar layer tissue thickness of 0.2-3.0 mm was observed microscopically by the light fluence ranging 25-100 J/cm2. The scarring threshold in the deposit light fluence was estimated to 15-25 J/cm3 based on the above mentioned relation assuming constant and uniform myocardial effective attenuation coefficient of 0.72 mm-1. The estimated scarring threshold in the deposit light fluence was lower than the threshold of conventional PDT. Large variation of the estimated threshold value might be attributed to unconsidered PDT parameter such as flow rate inhomogeneity in the myocardial tissue. These results suggested that the photosensitization reaction investigated in this study would be available to apply arrhythmia therapy such as atrial fibrillation.

  11. Exercise training attenuates age-dependent elevation of angiotensin II type 1 receptor and Nox2 signaling in the rat heart.

    PubMed

    Lee, Yang; Kwak, Hyo-Bum; Hord, Jeff; Kim, Jong-Hee; Lawler, John M

    2015-10-01

    Fibrosis of the aging heart impedes cardiac function and increases the risk of arrhythmias and heart disease. Previously, we demonstrated that exercise-induced reduction of collagen I in the aging heart was linked to a suppression of oxidative stress and transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-ß). The renin-angiotensin II system (RAS) increases oxidative stress via NADPH oxidase-2 (Nox2) and thus elevates TGF-ß and collagen accumulation. Therefore, we tested the hypothesis that exercise training would alleviate age-related upregulation of the angiotensin II receptor I (AT1R) and NADPH oxidase-2 (Nox2), concomitant with suppression of TGF-β and fibrosis. Young (3 months, n=20) and old (31 months, n=20) Fischer 344 ×B rown Norway F1 (FBNF1) hybrid rats were assigned into sedentary and exercise groups, with exercise training rats training on a treadmill 45 min/day, 5 days/week for the next 12 weeks. Exercise training mitigated age-related upregulation of AT1R, Nox2 activity, and Nox2 subunits gp91phox and p47phox. Exercise training also attenuated TGF-ß positive staining and downstream effectors of fibrosis in the aging heart: connective tissue growth factor, phosphorylation of Smad2 at Ser423, myofibroblast proliferation, and collagen I-positive staining. Our results are consistent with the hypothesis that exercise training protects against age-dependent cardiac fibrosis by suppressing AT1R and Nox2 as part of a RAS-Nox2-TGF-β pathway. PMID:26239262

  12. The Hepatocyte Growth Factor/c-Met Antagonist, Divalinal-Angiotensin IV, Blocks the Acquisition of Methamphetamine Dependent Conditioned Place Preference in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Wright, John W.; Wilson, Wendy L.; Wakeling, Vanessa; Boydstun, Alan S.; Jensen, Audrey; Kawas, Leen; Harding, Joseph W.

    2012-01-01

    The use of methamphetamine (MA) is increasing in the U.S. and elsewhere around the world. MA’s capacity to cause addiction significantly exceeds other psychostimulant drugs, and its use negatively impacts learning and memory. Recently, attempts have been made to interfere with the presumed mechanism(s) underlying the establishment of drug-induced memory consolidation. The majority of these studies have employed matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) inhibitors to disrupt MMP-induced extracellular matrix molecule dependent synaptic reconfiguration, or GABA receptor agonists. The present investigation utilized an angiotensin IV (AngIV) analogue, Divalinal-AngIV (divalinal), to disrupt acquisition of MA-induced dependence in rats as measured using the conditioned place preference paradigm. Results indicate that both acute and chronic intracerebroventricular infusion of divalinal prior to each daily subcutaneous injection of MA prevented acquisition. However, divalinal was unable to prevent MA-induced reinstatement after prior acquisition followed by extinction trials. These results indicate that prevention of MA dependence can be accomplished by blockade of the brain AT4 receptor subtype. On the other hand, once MA-induced memory consolidation is in place divalinal appears to be ineffective. Mechanistic studies indicated that divalinal is a potent inhibitor of the hepatocyte growth factor (HGF)/c-Met receptor system, and thus it appears that a functional HGF/c-Met system is required for the acquisition of MA-mediated conditioned place preference. PMID:24961196

  13. Myocardial iron overload assessment by T2* magnetic resonance imaging in adult transfusion dependent patients with acquired anemias.

    PubMed

    Di Tucci, Anna Angela; Matta, Gildo; Deplano, Simona; Gabbas, Attilio; Depau, Cristina; Derudas, Daniele; Caocci, Giovanni; Agus, Annalisa; Angelucci, Emanuele

    2008-09-01

    Only limited data are available regarding myocardial iron overload in adult patients with transfusion dependent acquired anemias. To address this topic using MRI T2* we studied 27 consecutive chronic transfusion dependent patients with acquired anemias: (22 myelodysplastic syndrome, 5 primary myelofibrosis). Cardiac MRI T2* values obtained ranged from 5.6 to 58.7 (median value 39.8) milliseconds. Of the 24 analyzable patients, cardiac T2* correlated with transfusion burden (p=0.0002). No patient who had received less than 290 mL/kg of packed red blood cells (101 units=20 grams of iron) had a pathological cardiac T2* value (< 20 ms). All patients who had received at least 24 PRBC units showed MRI T2* detectable hepatic iron (liver T2* value myocardial iron deposition. Serum ferritin was not significantly correlated with cardiac T2* (p=0.24). Gradient echo T2* magnetic resonance imaging provides a rapid and reproducible method for detecting myocardial iron overload which developed after a heavy transfusion burden equal to or greater than 290 mL/kg of packed red blood cell units. PMID:18603557

  14. Circadian Dependence of Infarct Size and Acute Heart Failure in ST Elevation Myocardial Infarction

    PubMed Central

    Devi, Anju; Carvalho, Leonardo P.; Chua, Terrance; Koh, Tian-Hai; Tan, Huay-Cheem; Foo, David; Tong, Khim-Leng; Ong, Hean-Yee; Richards, A. Mark; Yew, Chow Khuan; Chan, Mark Y.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives There are conflicting data on the relationship between the time of symptom onset during the 24-hour cycle (circadian dependence) and infarct size in ST-elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI). Moreover, the impact of this circadian pattern of infarct size on clinical outcomes is unknown. We sought to study the circadian dependence of infarct size and its impact on clinical outcomes in STEMI. Methods We studied 6,710 consecutive patients hospitalized for STEMI from 2006 to 2009 in a tropical climate with non-varying day-night cycles. We categorized the time of symptom onset into four 6-hour intervals: midnight–6:00 A.M., 6:00 A.M.–noon, noon–6:00 P.M. and 6:00 P.M.–midnight. We used peak creatine kinase as a surrogate marker of infarct size. Results Midnight–6:00 A.M patients had the highest prevalence of diabetes mellitus (P = 0.03), more commonly presented with anterior MI (P = 0.03) and received percutaneous coronary intervention less frequently, as compared with other time intervals (P = 0.03). Adjusted mean peak creatine kinase was highest among midnight–6:00 A.M. patients and lowest among 6:00 A.M.–noon patients (2,590.8±2,839.1 IU/L and 2,336.3±2,386.6 IU/L, respectively, P = 0.04). Midnight–6:00 A.M patients were at greatest risk of acute heart failure (P<0.001), 30-day mortality (P = 0.03) and 1-year mortality (P = 0.03), while the converse was observed in 6:00 A.M.–noon patients. After adjusting for diabetes, infarct location and performance of percutaneous coronary intervention, circadian variations in acute heart failure incidence remained strongly significant (P = 0.001). Conclusion We observed a circadian peak and nadir in infarct size during STEMI onset from midnight–6:00A.M and 6:00A.M.–noon respectively. The peak and nadir incidence of acute heart failure paralleled this circadian pattern. Differences in diabetes prevalence, infarct location and mechanical reperfusion may account partly for the observed circadian

  15. Angiotensin-converting enzyme gene insertion/deletion, not bradykinin B2 receptor -58T/C gene polymorphism, associated with angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor-related cough in Chinese female patients with non-insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Lee, Y J; Tsai, J C

    2001-11-01

    To investigate the genetic susceptibility associated with cough related to angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor (ACEI) therapy in patients with type 2 diabetes, 189 non-insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (NIDDM) patients with proteinuria or hypertension treated with perindopril were studied. Cough was considered to be present if the patients had been bothered by a cough during treatment and if they had had related symptoms for at least 2 weeks without an identifiable cause. Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) coupled with single-strand conformation polymorphism (SSCP) was used to detect polymorphisms of ACE and bradykinin B2-receptor genes. After 8 weeks of treatment, 49.2% (93 of 189) of our NIDDM patients were found to be suffering from ACEI-related cough. ACEI-related cough was mainly associated with female patients, with 71.7% (76 of 106) of female and only 20.5% (17 of 83) of male patients experiencing cough after ACEI treatment. There was a significant association of ACE II genotype with ACEI-related cough. The genotype frequencies were 58.2% for II, 47.8% for ID, and 16.7% for DD in patients with ACEI-associated cough and 41.8% for II, 52.2% for ID, and 83.3% for DD in subjects without ACEI-associated cough (chi(2) = 10.268; df = 2, P =.006). As female patients made up the majority of the subjects suffering from ACEI-related cough, we further analyzed the association of ACE I/D genotype with ACEI-related cough separately by sex. Male patients with ACEI-related cough were not associated with ACE I/D genotype distribution, while female patients were strongly associated with ACE I/D genotype polymorphism (chi(2) = 16.12; df = 2; P <.001). There was no association between the bradykinin B2 receptor gene -58T/C polymorphism with ACEI-related cough. In conclusion, our results indicate that Chinese diabetic female subjects are susceptible to ACEI-related cough, and this susceptibility may be genetically predetermined. PMID:11699055

  16. Heparin inhibits Angiotensin II-induced vasoconstriction on isolated mouse mesenteric resistance arteries through Rho-A- and PKA-dependent pathways

    PubMed Central

    Xie-Zukauskas, Hui; Das, Jharna; Short, Billie Lou; Gutkind, J. Silvio; Ray, Patricio E.

    2013-01-01

    Heparin is commonly used to treat intravascular thrombosis in children undergoing extracorporeal membrane oxygenation or cardiopulmonary bypass. These clinical circumstances are associated with elevated plasma levels of angiotensin II (Ang II). However, the mechanisms by which heparin modulates vascular reactivity of Ang II remain unclear. We hypothesized that heparin may offset Ang II-induced vasoconstriction on mesenteric resistances arteries through modulating the Rho-A/Rho kinase pathway. Vascular contractility was studied using pressurized, resistance-sized mesenteric arteries from mice. Rho-A activation was measured by pull-down assay, and myosin light chain or PKA phosphorylation by immunoblotting. We found that heparin significantly attenuated vasoconstriction induced by Ang II but not that by KCl. The combined effect of Ang II with heparin was almost abolished by a specific Rho kinase inhibitor Y27632. Ang II stimulated Rho-A activation and myosin light chain phosphorylation, both responses were antagonized by heparin. Moreover, the inhibitory effect of heparin on Ang II-induced vasoconstriction was reversed by Rp-cAMPS (cAMP-dependent PKA inhibitor), blunted by ODQ (soluble guanylate cyclase inhibitor), and mimicked by a cell-permeable cGMP analogue, 8-Br-cGMP, but not by a cAMP analogue. PKC and Src kinase were not involved. We conclude that heparin inhibits Ang II-induced vasoconstriction through Rho-A/Rho kinase- and cGMP/PKA-dependent pathways. PMID:23268358

  17. Measuring Age-Dependent Myocardial Stiffness across the Cardiac Cycle using MR Elastography: A Reproducibility Study

    PubMed Central

    Wassenaar, Peter A; Eleswarpu, Chethanya N; Schroeder, Samuel A; Mo, Xiaokui; Raterman, Brian D; White, Richard D; Kolipaka, Arunark

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To assess reproducibility in measuring left ventricular (LV) myocardial stiffness in volunteers throughout the cardiac cycle using magnetic resonance elastography (MRE) and to determine its correlation with age. Methods Cardiac MRE (CMRE) was performed on 29 normal volunteers, with ages ranging from 21 to 73 years. For assessing reproducibility of CMRE-derived stiffness measurements, scans were repeated per volunteer. Wave images were acquired throughout the LV myocardium, and were analyzed to obtain mean stiffness during the cardiac cycle. CMRE-derived stiffness values were correlated to age. Results Concordance correlation coefficient revealed good inter-scan agreement with rc of 0.77, with p-value<0.0001. Significantly higher myocardial stiffness was observed during end-systole (ES) compared to end-diastole (ED) across all subjects. Additionally, increased deviation between ES and ED stiffness was observed with increased age. Conclusion CMRE-derived stiffness is reproducible, with myocardial stiffness changing cyclically across the cardiac cycle. Stiffness is significantly higher during ES compared to ED. With age, ES myocardial stiffness increases more than ED, giving rise to an increased deviation between the two. PMID:26010456

  18. Time dependent alterations of serum matrix metalloproteinase-1 and metalloproteinase-1 tissue inhibitor after successful reperfusion of acute myocardial infarction.

    PubMed Central

    Hirohata, S.; Kusachi, S.; Murakami, M.; Murakami, T.; Sano, I.; Watanabe, T.; Komatsubara, I.; Kondo, J.; Tsuji, T.

    1997-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To test the hypothesis that changes in serum matrix metalloproteinase-1 (MMP-1) and tissue inhibitors of metalloproteinase-1 (TIMP-1) after acute myocardial infarction reflect extracellular matrix remodelling and the infarct healing process. PATIENTS: 13 consecutive patients with their first acute myocardial infarction who underwent successful reperfusion. METHODS: Blood was sampled on the day of admission, and on days 2, 3, 4, 5, 7, 14, and 28. Serum MMP-1 and TIMP-1 were measured by one step sandwich enzyme immunoassay. Left ventricular volume indices were determined by left ventriculography performed four weeks after the infarct. RESULTS: Serum concentrations of both MMP-1 and TIMP-1 changed over time. The average serum MMP-1 was more than 1 SD below the mean control values during the initial four days, increased thereafter, reaching a peak concentration around day 14, and then returned to the middle control range. Negative correlations with left ventricular end systolic volume index and positive correlations with left ventricular ejection fraction were obtained for serum MMP-1 on day 5, when it began to rise, and for the magnitude of rise in MMP-1 on day 5 compared to admission. Serum TIMP-1 at admission was more than 1 SD below the mean control value, and increased gradually thereafter, reaching a peak on around day 14. Negative correlations with left ventricular end systolic volume index and positive correlations with left ventricular ejection fraction were obtained for serum TIMP-1 on days 5 and 7, and for the magnitude of rise in TIMP-1 on days 5 and 7 compared to admission. CONCLUSIONS: Both MMP-1 and TIMP-1 showed significant time dependent alteration after acute myocardial infarction. Thus MMP-1 and TIMP-1 may provide useful information in evaluating the healing process as it affects left ventricular remodelling after acute myocardial infarction. PMID:9391291

  19. Synthetic Generation of Myocardial Blood-Oxygen-Level-Dependent MRI Time Series via Structural Sparse Decomposition Modeling

    PubMed Central

    Rusu, Cristian; Morisi, Rita; Boschetto, Davide; Dharmakumar, Rohan; Tsaftaris, Sotirios A.

    2014-01-01

    This paper aims to identify approaches that generate appropriate synthetic data (computer generated) for Cardiac Phase-resolved Blood-Oxygen-Level-Dependent (CP–BOLD) MRI. CP–BOLD MRI is a new contrast agent- and stress-free approach for examining changes in myocardial oxygenation in response to coronary artery disease. However, since signal intensity changes are subtle, rapid visualization is not possible with the naked eye. Quantifying and visualizing the extent of disease relies on myocardial segmentation and registration to isolate the myocardium and establish temporal correspondences and ischemia detection algorithms to identify temporal differences in BOLD signal intensity patterns. If transmurality of the defect is of interest pixel-level analysis is necessary and thus a higher precision in registration is required. Such precision is currently not available affecting the design and performance of the ischemia detection algorithms. In this work, to enable algorithmic developments of ischemia detection irrespective to registration accuracy, we propose an approach that generates synthetic pixel-level myocardial time series. We do this by (a) modeling the temporal changes in BOLD signal intensity based on sparse multi-component dictionary learning, whereby segmentally derived myocardial time series are extracted from canine experimental data to learn the model; and (b) demonstrating the resemblance between real and synthetic time series for validation purposes. We envision that the proposed approach has the capacity to accelerate development of tools for ischemia detection while markedly reducing experimental costs so that cardiac BOLD MRI can be rapidly translated into the clinical arena for the noninvasive assessment of ischemic heart disease. PMID:24691119

  20. Valsartan preconditioning protects against myocardial ischemia-reperfusion injury through TLR4/NF-kappaB signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Yang, Jian; Jiang, Hong; Yang, Jun; Ding, Jia-Wang; Chen, Li-Hua; Li, Song; Zhang, Xiao-Dong

    2009-10-01

    Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) activation has been implicated in the pathogenesis of myocardial ischemia/reperfusion (I/R) injury. The activated TLR4 is capable of activating a variety of proinflammatory mediators, such as tumor necrosis factor-a (TNF-a) and interleukin-6 (IL-6). Valsartan as a kind of Angiotensin II type 1 receptor blockers is gradually used for the treatment of ischemic heart disease depending on its anti-inflammation function. Therefore, we hypothesized that valsartan protects against myocardial I/R injury by suppressing TLR4 activation. We constructed the rat model of myocardial I/R injury. The rats were pretreated with valsartan for 2 weeks, and then subjected to 30 min ischemia and 2 h reperfusion. TLR4 and Nuclear factor kappa-B (NF-kappaB) levels were detected by quantitative real-time PCR and western blot. In order to evaluate myocardial damage, the myocardial infarct size, histopathologic changes, and the release of myocardial enzymes, proinflammation cytokines and Angiotensin II were analyzed by triphenyl tetrazolium chloride (TTC) staining, light microscopy, and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), respectively. Valsartan preconditioning inhibited TLR4 and NF-kappaB expressions concomitant with an improvement in myocardial injury, such as smaller infarct size, fewer release of myocardial enzymes, and proinflammation mediators. These findings suggest that valsartan plays a pivotal role in the protective effects on myocardial I/R injury. This protection mechanism is possibly due to its anti-inflammation function via TLR4/NF-kappaB signaling pathway. PMID:19370315

  1. Time course of ouabain uptake in isolated myocardial cells: dependence on extracellular potassium and calcium concentration.

    PubMed Central

    Meldgaard, L.; Steiness, E.; Waldorff, S.

    1981-01-01

    1 Spontaneously beating myocardial cells isolated from newborn rats have been used to evaluate the time course of cellular ouabain uptake. 2 The rate of cellular uptake and the amount of ouabain bound at equilibrium were computed by fitting the experimental data to the conventional exponential equation for receptor binding of drugs. 3 At normal extracellular potassium and calcium concentrations a biexponential equation was the best fit to the experimental data, indicating two receptor sites of ouabain with different rates of uptake. 4 Increasing extracellular potassium or calcium concentrations decreased the amounts of ouabain bound at equilibrium. 5 High and low extracellular concentrations of potassium or calcium decreased the rate of ouabain uptake. 6 It is well known that ouabain changes ionic fluxes. Changes in the extracellular potassium and calcium concentrations also influence the amount of ouabain taken up by myocardial cells, as demonstrated in the present study. PMID:7236989

  2. Cardioprotective actions of Notch1 against myocardial infarction via LKB1-dependent AMPK signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Yang, Hui; Sun, Wanqing; Quan, Nanhu; Wang, Lin; Chu, Dongyang; Cates, Courtney; Liu, Quan; Zheng, Yang; Li, Ji

    2016-05-15

    AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) signaling pathway plays a pivotal role in intracellular adaptation to energy stress during myocardial ischemia. Notch1 signaling in the adult myocardium is also activated in response to ischemic stress. However, the relationship between Notch1 and AMPK signaling pathways during ischemia remains unclear. We hypothesize that Notch1 as an adaptive signaling pathway protects the heart from ischemic injury via modulating the cardioprotective AMPK signaling pathway. C57BL/6J mice were subjected to an in vivo ligation of left anterior descending coronary artery and the hearts from C57BL/6J mice were subjected to an ex vivo globe ischemia and reperfusion in the Langendorff perfusion system. The Notch1 signaling was activated during myocardial ischemia. A Notch1 γ-secretase inhibitor, dibenzazepine (DBZ), was intraperitoneally injected into mice to inhibit Notch1 signaling pathway by ischemia. The inhibition of Notch1 signaling by DBZ significantly augmented cardiac dysfunctions caused by myocardial infarction. Intriguingly, DBZ treatment also significantly blunted the activation of AMPK signaling pathway. The immunoprecipitation experiments demonstrated that an interaction between Notch1 and liver kinase beta1 (LKB1) modulated AMPK activation during myocardial ischemia. Furthermore, a ligand of Notch1 Jagged1 can significantly reduce cardiac damage caused by ischemia via activation of AMPK signaling pathway and modulation of glucose oxidation and fatty acid oxidation during ischemia and reperfusion. But Jagged1 did not have any cardioprotections on AMPK kinase dead transgenic hearts. Taken together, the results indicate that the cardioprotective effect of Notch1 against ischemic damage is mediated by AMPK signaling via an interaction with upstream LKB1. PMID:27015742

  3. Endotoxin-induced skeletal muscle wasting is prevented by angiotensin-(1-7) through a p38 MAPK-dependent mechanism.

    PubMed

    Morales, María Gabriela; Olguín, Hugo; Di Capua, Gabriella; Brandan, Enrique; Simon, Felipe; Cabello-Verrugio, Claudio

    2015-09-01

    Skeletal muscle atrophy induced during sepsis syndrome produced by endotoxin in the form of LPS (lipopolysaccharide), is a pathological condition characterized by the loss of strength and muscle mass, an increase in MHC (myosin heavy chain) degradation, and an increase in the expression of atrogin-1 and MuRF-1 (muscle-specific RING-finger protein 1), two ubiquitin E3 ligases belonging to the ubiquitin-proteasome system. Ang-(1-7) [Angiotensin-(1-7)], through its Mas receptor, has beneficial effects in skeletal muscle. We evaluated in vivo the role of Ang-(1-7) and Mas receptor on the muscle wasting induced by LPS injection into C57BL/10J mice. In vitro studies were performed in murine C2C12 myotubes and isolated myofibres from EDL (extensor digitorum longus) muscle. In addition, the participation of p38 MAPK (mitogen-activated protein kinase) in the Ang-(1-7) effect on the LPS-induced muscle atrophy was evaluated. Our results show that Ang-(1-7) prevents the decrease in the diameter of myofibres and myotubes, the decrease in muscle strength, the diminution in MHC levels and the induction of atrogin-1 and MuRF-1 expression, all of which are induced by LPS. These effects were reversed by using A779, a Mas antagonist. Ang-(1-7) exerts these anti-atrophic effects at least in part by inhibiting the LPS-dependent activation of p38 MAPK both in vitro and in vivo. We have demonstrated for the first time that Ang-(1-7) counteracts the skeletal muscle atrophy induced by endotoxin through a mechanism dependent on the Mas receptor that involves a decrease in p38 MAPK phosphorylation. The present study indicates that Ang-(1-7) is a novel molecule with a potential therapeutic use to improve muscle wasting during endotoxin-induced sepsis syndrome. PMID:25989282

  4. Early Endosomal Antigen 1 (EEA1) Is an Obligate Scaffold for Angiotensin II-induced, PKC-α-dependent Akt Activation in Endosomes*

    PubMed Central

    Nazarewicz, Rafal Robert; Salazar, Gloria; Patrushev, Nikolay; Martin, Alejandra San; Hilenski, Lula; Xiong, Shiqin; Alexander, R. Wayne

    2011-01-01

    Akt/protein kinase B (PKB) activation/phosphorylation by angiotensin II (Ang II) is a critical signaling event in hypertrophy of vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs). Conventional wisdom asserts that Akt activation occurs mainly in plasma membrane domains. Recent evidence that Akt activation may take place within intracellular compartments challenges this dogma. The spatial identity and mechanistic features of these putative signaling domains have not been defined. Using cell fractionation and fluorescence methods, we demonstrate that the early endosomal antigen-1 (EEA1)-positive endosomes are a major site of Ang II-induced Akt activation. Akt moves to and is activated in EEA1 endosomes. The expression of EEA1 is required for phosphorylation of Akt at both Thr-308 and Ser-473 as well as for phosphorylation of its downstream targets mTOR and S6 kinase, but not for Erk1/2 activation. Both Akt and phosphorylated Akt (p-Akt) interact with EEA1. We also found that PKC-α is required for organizing Ang II-induced, EEA1-dependent Akt phosphorylation in VSMC early endosomes. EEA1 expression enables PKC-α phosphorylation, which in turn regulates Akt upstream signaling kinases, PDK1 and p38 MAPK. Our results indicate that PKC-α is a necessary regulator of EEA1-dependent Akt signaling in early endosomes. Finally, EEA1 down-regulation or expression of a dominant negative mutant of PKC-α blunts Ang II-induced leucine incorporation in VSMCs. Thus, EEA1 serves a novel function as an obligate scaffold for Ang II-induced Akt activation in early endosomes. PMID:21097843

  5. [Transition of myocardial ischemia to heart failure].

    PubMed

    Ertl, G; Fraccarollo, D; Gaudron, P; Hu, K; Laser, A; Neubauer, S; Schorb, W

    1998-09-01

    Myocardial ischemia results in myocardial dysfunction. Recovery may be delayed ("stunning"), or persistent if perfusion remains reduced ("hibernation") and ischemia may go on to necrosis, thus, contributing to chronic heart failure. In addition, myocardium not directly affected by ischemia may undergo adaptive processes like hypertrophy and dilatation, which may result in chronic left heart failure. This process is characterized by hemodynamic, neurohumoral, and progressive morphologic changes of the heart which are closely interrelated. Hemodynamic changes basically consist of an increase in left ventricular filling pressure and a decrease in global ejection fraction, and, in most cases years after myocardial infarction, in an increase in systemic vascular resistance and right atrial pressure. Neurohumoral changes consist of an increase in plasma catecholamines, atrial natriuretic factor and vasopressin, and in an activation of the renin-angiotensin-system. Plasma endothelin-1 was recently reported to be increased in patients with heart failure, and prognosis was related to endothelin levels. Diminished response of vessels to endothelium (EDRF/NO) dependent vasodilatation suggests impairment of vascular endothelium in heart failure. Local changes of cardiac neurohumoral systems could contribute to structural changes of the heart, e.g., systemic activation to hemodynamic changes. Structural changes of the heart are characterized by an increase in volume and thickness of surviving myocardium and an expansion of ischemic and necrotic myocardium. Molecular control of these processes which include various cell types, such as cardiomyocytes and cardiofibroblasts, are currently an issue of intense research and could result in specific therapeutic importance. PMID:9816648

  6. Effects of angiotensin II on intracellular Ca2+ and pH in isolated beating rabbit hearts and myocytes loaded with the indicator indo-1.

    PubMed Central

    Ikenouchi, H; Barry, W H; Bridge, J H; Weinberg, E O; Apstein, C S; Lorell, B H

    1994-01-01

    1. Angiotensin II increases myocardial contractility in several species, including the rabbit and man. However, it is controversial whether the predominant mechanism is an increase in free cytosolic [Ca2+]i or a change in myofilament Ca2+ sensitivity. To address this question, we infused angiotensin II in isolated perfused rabbit hearts loaded with the Ca2+ indicator indo-1 AM and measured changes in beat-to-beat surface transients of the Ca2+i-sensitive 400:500 nm ratio and left ventricular contractility. The effects of angiotensin II were compared with the response to a Ca(2+)-dependent increase in the inotropic state produced by a change in the perfusate [Ca2+] from 0.9 to 3.6 nM. 2. In the isolated beating heart, an increase in perfusate [Ca2+] caused an increase in left ventricular pressure +dP/dt in association with an increase in peak systolic [Ca2+]i. Angiotensin II perfusion caused a similar increase in left ventricular +dP/dt in the absence of any increase in peak systolic [Ca2+]i. 3. To exclude any contribution of non-myocyte sources of Ca(2+)-sensitive fluorescence which may be present in the intact heart, we also compared the effects of angiotensin II and a change in superfusate [Ca2+] in collagenase-dissociated paced adult rabbit ventricular myocytes loaded with indo-1 AM. In the isolated rabbit myocytes a change in perfusate [Ca2+] from 0.9 to 3.6 mM caused an increase in peak systolic cell shortening coincident with an increase in peak systolic [Ca2+]i. In contrast, angiotensin II caused a similar increase in peak systolic cell shortening whereas there was no increase in peak systolic [Ca2+]i. There was also no change in inward Ca2+ current (ICa) in response to angiotensin II. 4. To investigate further the mechanism of the positive inotropic action of angiotensin II, its effects on intracellular pH were studied in isolated rabbit myocytes loaded with the fluorescent H+ probe SNARF 1. These experiments demonstrated that angiotensin II induced a 0.2 p

  7. Renal Intramedullary Infusion of Tempol Normalizes the Blood Pressure Response to Intrarenal Blockade of Heme Oxygenase-1 in Angiotensin II-Dependent Hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Stec, David E.; Juncos, Luis A.; Granger, Joey P.

    2016-01-01

    Background Previous studies have demonstrated that intramedullary inhibition of heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) increases the blood pressure and superoxide production response to angiotensin II (Ang II) infusion. The current study was designed to test the hypothesis that increased renal medullary superoxide production contributes to the increase in blood pressure in response to blockade of renal medullary HO-1 in Ang II-induced hypertension. Methods Male C57BL/6J mice (16–24 weeks of age) were implanted with chronic intrarenal medullary interstitial (IRMI) and infused with: saline, Tempol (6mM), the HO-1 inhibitor QC-13 (25 μM), or a combination of tempol + QC-13. Tempol treatment was started 2 days before infusion of QC-13. After 2 days, Ang II was infused subcutaneously at at a rate of 1 μg/kg/min for 10 days. Results Blood pressures on days 7–10 of Ang II infusion alone averaged 150 ± 3 mmHg in mice receiving IRMI infusion of saline. IRMI infusion of QC-13 increased blood pressure in Ang II treated mice to 164 ± 2 (p<0.05). Renal medullary superoxide production in Ang II treated mice was significantly increased by infusion of QC-13 alone. Ang II treated mice receiving IRMI infusion of tempol had a blood pressure of 136 ± 3 mmHg. Ang II treated mice receiving IRMI infusion of tempol and QC-13 had a significantly lower blood pressure (142 ± 2 mmHg, p<0.05) than mice receiving QC-13 alone. The increase in renal medullary superoxide production was normalized by infusion of tempol alone or in combination with QC-13. Conclusion These results demonstrate that renal medullary interstitial blockade of HO-1 exacerbates Ang II-induced hypertension via a mechanism that is dependent on enhanced superoxide generation and highlight the important anti-oxidant function of HO-1 in the renal medulla. PMID:26922123

  8. A small difference in the molecular structure of angiotensin II receptor blockers induces AT1 receptor-dependent and -independent beneficial effects

    PubMed Central

    Fujino, Masahiro; Miura, Shin-ichiro; Kiya, Yoshihiro; Tominaga, Yukio; Matsuo, Yoshino; Karnik, Sadashiva S; Saku, Keijiro

    2013-01-01

    Angiotensin II (Ang II) type 1 (AT1) receptor blockers (ARBs) induce multiple pharmacological beneficial effects, but not all ARBs have the same effects and the molecular mechanisms underlying their actions are not certain. In this study, irbesartan and losartan were examined because of their different molecular structures (irbesartan has a cyclopentyl group whereas losartan has a chloride group). We analyzed the binding affinity and production of inositol phosphate (IP), monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1) and adiponectin. Compared with losartan, irbesartan showed a significantly higher binding affinity and slower dissociation rate from the AT1 receptor and a significantly higher degree of inverse agonism and insurmountability toward IP production. These effects of irbesartan were not seen with the AT1-Y113A mutant receptor. On the basis of the molecular modeling of the ARBs–AT1 receptor complex and a mutagenesis study, the phenyl group at Tyr113 in the AT1 receptor and the cyclopentyl group of irbesartan may form a hydrophobic interaction that is stronger than the losartan–AT1 receptor interaction. Interestingly, irbesartan inhibited MCP-1 production more strongly than losartan. This effect was mediated by the inhibition of nuclear factor-kappa B activation that was independent of the AT1 receptor in the human coronary endothelial cells. In addition, irbesartan, but not losartan, induced significant adiponectin production that was mediated by peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ activation in 3T3-L1 adipocytes, and this effect was not mediated by the AT1 receptor. In conclusion, irbesartan induced greater beneficial effects than losartan due to small differences between their molecular structures, and these differential effects were both dependent on and independent of the AT1 receptor. PMID:20668453

  9. p66Shc mediates high-glucose and angiotensin II-induced oxidative stress renal tubular injury via mitochondrial-dependent apoptotic pathway

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, Li; Nie, Jing; Liu, Fu-you; Ling, Guang-hui; Zhu, Xue-jing; Tang, Wen-bin; Chen, Wen-cui; Xia, Yun-cheng; Zhan, Ming; Ma, Ming-ming; Peng, You-ming; Liu, Hong; Liu, Ying-hong; Kanwar, Yashpal S.

    2010-01-01

    p66Shc, a promoter of apoptosis, modulates oxidative stress response and cellular survival, but its role in the progression of diabetic nephropathy is relatively unknown. In this study, mechanisms by which p66Shc modulates high-glucose (HG)- or angiotensin (ANG) II-induced mitochondrial dysfunction were investigated in renal proximal tubular cells (HK-2 cells). Expression of p66Shc and its phosphorylated form (p-p66Shc, serine residue 36) and apoptosis were notably increased in renal tubules of diabetic mice, suggesting an increased reactive oxygen species production. In vitro, HG and ANG II led to an increased expression of total and p-p66Shc in HK-2 cells. These changes were accompanied with increased production of mitochondrial H2O2, reduced mitochondrial membrane potential, increased translocation of mitochondrial cytochrome c from mitochondria into cytosol, upregulation of the expression of caspase-9, and ultimately reduced cell survival. Overexpression of a dominant-negative Ser36 mutant p66Shc (p66ShcS36A) or treatment of p66Shc- or PKC-β-short interfering RNAs partially reversed these changes. Treatment of HK-2 cells with HG and ANG II also increased the protein-protein association between p-p66Shc and Pin1, an isomerase, in the cytosol, and with cytochrome c in the mitochondria. These interactions were partially disrupted with the treatment of PKC-β inhibitor or Pin1-short interfering RNA. These data suggest that p66Shc mediates HG- and ANG II-induced mitochondrial dysfunctions via PKC-β and Pin1-dependent pathways in renal tubular cells. PMID:20739391

  10. T-lymphocyte induction of human monocyte angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) is not dependent upon T-lymphocyte proliferation

    SciTech Connect

    Vuk-Pavlovic, Z.; Rohrbach, M.S.

    1986-03-05

    Human peripheral blood monocytes cultured in serum free media for seven days show a basal activity of the ectoenzyme ACE which is augmented 2-3 times by the presence of autologous peripheral blood T-lymphocytes. Since these two cell types are also involved in autologous mixed lymphocyte reaction if serum is present, the authors compared the ability of T-cells to stimulate ACE activity in the presence or absence of proliferation (measured by /sup 3/H-thymidine incorporation). By the seventh day, cultures with 5% AB/sup +/ serum showed significant increase in proliferation but no increase in ACE activity compared to the serum free cultures. Even higher proliferation rate achieved by co-culturing T-lymphocytes with allogeneic monocytes did not increase ACE production; on the contrary, ACE activity remained at the basal level. Monocyte-T-cell co-cultures stimulated with increasing concentrations of ConA or PHA showed dose dependent increases in proliferation but parallel decreases in ACE activity. Addition of soluble antigen (Candida albicans) also enhanced proliferation but not ACE synthesis. They conclude that T-lymphocyte induction of monocyte ACE is a result of cooperation between autologous cells which is not dependent upon T-cell proliferation.

  11. Neuronal Uptake of Nanoformulated Superoxide Dismutase and Attenuation of Angiotensin II-Dependent Hypertension Following Central Administration

    PubMed Central

    Savalia, Krupa; Manickam, Devika S.; Rosenbaugh, Erin G.; Tian, Jun; Ahmad, Iman M.; Kabanov, Alexander V.; Zimmerman, Matthew C.

    2014-01-01

    Excessive production of superoxide (O2•−) in the central nervous system has been widely implicated in the pathogenesis of cardiovascular diseases, including chronic heart failure and hypertension. In an attempt to overcome the failed therapeutic impact of currently available antioxidants in cardiovascular disease, we developed a nanomedicine-based delivery system for the O2•− scavenging enzyme, copper/zinc superoxide dismutase (CuZnSOD), in which CuZnSOD protein is electrostatically bound to poly-L-lysine (PLL50)-polyethylene glycol (PEG) block co-polymer to form CuZnSOD nanozyme. Different formulations of CuZnSOD nanozyme are covalently stabilized by either reducible or non-reducible crosslinked bonds between the PLL50-PEG polymers. Herein, we tested the hypothesis that PLL50-PEG CuZnSOD nanozyme delivers active CuZnSOD protein to neurons and decreases blood pressure in a mouse model of AngII-dependent hypertension. As determined by electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy, nanozymes retain full SOD enzymatic activity as compared to native CuZnSOD protein. Non-reducible CuZnSOD nanozyme delivers active CuZnSOD protein to central neurons in culture (CATH.a neurons) without inducing significant neuronal toxicity. In vivo studies conducted in adult male C57BL/6 mice demonstrate that hypertension established by chronic subcutaneous infusion of AngII is significantly attenuated for up to 7 days following a single intracerebroventricular (ICV) injection of non-reducible nanozyme. These data indicate the efficacy of non-reducible PLL50-PEG CuZnSOD nanozyme in counteracting excessive O2•− and decreasing blood pressure in AngII-dependent hypertensive mice following central administration. Additionally, this study supports the further development of PLL50-PEG CuZnSOD nanozyme as an antioxidant-based therapeutic option for hypertension. PMID:24924945

  12. Oxidative inhibition of the vascular Na+-K+ pump via NADPH oxidase-dependent β1-subunit glutathionylation: implications for angiotensin II-induced vascular dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Liu, Chia-Chi; Karimi Galougahi, Keyvan; Weisbrod, Robert M; Hansen, Thomas; Ravaie, Ramtin; Nunez, Andrea; Liu, Yi B; Fry, Natasha; Garcia, Alvaro; Hamilton, Elisha J; Sweadner, Kathleen J; Cohen, Richard A; Figtree, Gemma A

    2013-12-01

    Glutathionylation of the Na(+)-K(+) pump's β1-subunit is a key molecular mechanism of physiological and pathophysiological pump inhibition in cardiac myocytes. Its contribution to Na(+)-K(+) pump regulation in other tissues is unknown, and cannot be assumed given the dependence on specific β-subunit isoform expression and receptor-coupled pathways. As Na(+)-K(+) pump activity is an important determinant of vascular tone through effects on [Ca(2+)]i, we have examined the role of oxidative regulation of the Na(+)-K(+) pump in mediating angiotensin II (Ang II)-induced increases in vascular reactivity. β1-subunit glutathione adducts were present at baseline and increased by exposure to Ang II in rabbit aortic rings, primary rabbit aortic vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs), and human arterial segments. In VSMCs, Ang II-induced glutathionylation was associated with marked reduction in Na(+)-K(+)ATPase activity, an effect that was abolished by the NADPH oxidase inhibitory peptide, tat-gp91ds. In aortic segments, Ang II-induced glutathionylation was associated with decreased K(+)-induced vasorelaxation, a validated index of pump activity. Ang II-induced oxidative inhibition of Na(+)-K(+) ATPase and decrease in K(+)-induced relaxation were reversed by preincubation of VSMCs and rings with recombinant FXYD3 protein that is known to facilitate deglutathionylation of β1-subunit. Knock-out of FXYD1 dramatically decreased K(+)-induced relaxation in a mouse model. Attenuation of Ang II signaling in vivo by captopril (8 mg/kg/day for 7 days) decreased superoxide-sensitive DHE levels in the media of rabbit aorta, decreased β1-subunit glutathionylation, and enhanced K(+)-induced vasorelaxation. Ang II inhibits the Na(+)-K(+) pump in VSMCs via NADPH oxidase-dependent glutathionylation of the pump's β1-subunit, and this newly identified signaling pathway may contribute to altered vascular tone. FXYD proteins reduce oxidative inhibition of the Na(+)-K(+) pump and may have an

  13. Angiotensin II formation in the intact human heart. Predominance of the angiotensin-converting enzyme pathway.

    PubMed Central

    Zisman, L S; Abraham, W T; Meixell, G E; Vamvakias, B N; Quaife, R A; Lowes, B D; Roden, R L; Peacock, S J; Groves, B M; Raynolds, M V

    1995-01-01

    It has been proposed that the contribution of myocardial tissue angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) to angiotensin II (Ang II) formation in the human heart is low compared with non-ACE pathways. However, little is known about the actual in vivo contribution of these pathways to Ang II formation in the human heart. To examine angiotensin II formation in the intact human heart, we administered intracoronary 123I-labeled angiotensin I (Ang I) with and without intracoronary enalaprilat to orthotopic heart transplant recipients. The fractional conversion of Ang I to Ang II, calculated after separation of angiotensin peptides by HPLC, was 0.415 +/- 0.104 (n = 5, mean +/- SD). Enalaprilat reduced fractional conversion by 89%, to a value of 0.044 +/- 0.053 (n = 4, P = 0.002). In a separate study of explanted hearts, a newly developed in vitro Ang II-forming assay was used to examine cardiac tissue ACE activity independent of circulating components. ACE activity in solubilized left ventricular membrane preparations from failing hearts was 49.6 +/- 5.3 fmol 125I-Ang II formed per minute per milligram of protein (n = 8, +/- SE), and 35.9 +/- 4.8 fmol/min/mg from nonfailing human hearts (n = 7, P = 0.08). In the presence of 1 microM enalaprilat, ACE activity was reduced by 85%, to 7.3 +/- 1.4 fmol/min/mg in the failing group and to 4.6 +/- 1.3 fmol/min/mg in the nonfailing group (P < 0.001). We conclude that the predominant pathway for angiotensin II formation in the human heart is through ACE. Images PMID:7657820

  14. Renal intramedullary infusion of tempol normalizes the blood pressure response to intrarenal blockade of heme oxygenase-1 in angiotensin II-dependent hypertension.

    PubMed

    Stec, David E; Juncos, Luis A; Granger, Joey P

    2016-04-01

    Previous studies have demonstrated that intramedullary inhibition of heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) increases the blood pressure and superoxide production response to angiotensin II (Ang II) infusion. The present study was designed to test the hypothesis that increased renal medullary superoxide production contributes to the increase in blood pressure in response to blockade of renal medullary HO-1 in Ang II-induced hypertension. Male C57BL/6J mice (16-24 weeks of age) were implanted with chronic intrarenal medullary interstitial (IRMI) and infused with: saline, tempol (6 mM), the HO-1 inhibitor QC-13 (25 μM), or a combination of tempol + QC-13. Tempol treatment was started 2 days before infusion of QC-13. After 2 days, Ang II was infused subcutaneously at a rate of 1 μg/kg/min for 10 days. Blood pressures on days 7-10 of Ang II infusion alone averaged 150 ± 3 mm Hg in mice receiving IRMI infusion of saline. IRMI infusion of QC-13 increased blood pressure in Ang II-treated mice to 164 ± 2 (P < .05). Renal medullary superoxide production in Ang II-treated mice was significantly increased by infusion of QC-13 alone. Ang II-treated mice receiving IRMI infusion of tempol had a blood pressure of 136 ± 3 mm Hg. Ang II-treated mice receiving IRMI infusion of tempol and QC-13 had a significantly lower blood pressure (142 ± 2 mm Hg,P < .05) than mice receiving QC-13 alone. The increase in renal medullary superoxide production was normalized by infusion of tempol alone or in combination with QC-13. These results demonstrate that renal medullary interstitial blockade of HO-1 exacerbates Ang II-induced hypertension via a mechanism that is dependent on enhanced superoxide generation and highlight the important antioxidant function of HO-1 in the renal medulla. PMID:26922123

  15. Combination of angiotensin-(1–7) with perindopril is better than single therapy in ameliorating diabetic cardiomyopathy

    PubMed Central

    Hao, Panpan; Yang, Jianmin; Liu, Yanping; Zhang, Mingxiang; Zhang, Kai; Gao, Fei; Chen, Yuguo; Zhang, Cheng; Zhang, Yun

    2015-01-01

    We recently found that overexpression of angiotensin (Ang)-converting enzyme 2, which metabolizes Ang-II to Ang-(1–7) and Ang-I to Ang-(1–9), may improve left ventricular remodeling in diabetic cardiomyopathy. Here we aimed to test whether chronic infusion of Ang-(1–7) can dose-dependently ameliorate left ventricular remodeling and function in a rat model of diabetic cardiomyopathy and whether the combination of Ang-(1–7) and Ang-converting enzyme inhibition may be superior to single therapy. Our results showed that Ang-(1–7) treatment dose-dependently ameliorated left ventricular remodeling and dysfunction in diabetic rats by attenuating myocardial fibrosis, myocardial hypertrophy and myocyte apoptosis via both the Mas receptor and angiotensin II type 2 receptor. Furthermore, combining Ang-(1–7) with perindopril provided additional cardioprotection relative to single therapy. Ang-(1–7) administration provides a novel and promising approach for treatment of diabetic cardiomyopathy. PMID:25740572

  16. ANGIOTENSIN II-INDUCED VASCULAR SMOOTH MUSCLE CELL MIGRATION AND GROWTH ARE MEDIATED BY CYTOCHROME P450 1B1-DEPENDENT SUPEROXIDE GENERATION

    PubMed Central

    Yaghini, Fariborz A.; Song, Chi Young; Lavrentyev, Eduard N.; Ghafoor, Hafiz U. B.; Fang, Xiao R.; Estes, Anne M.; Campbell, William B.; Malik, Kafait U.

    2010-01-01

    Cytochrome P450 1B1, expressed in vascular smooth muscle cells, can metabolize arachidonic acid in vitro into several products including 12- and 20-hydroxyeicosatetraenoic acids that stimulate vascular smooth muscle cell growth. This study was conducted to determine if cytochrome P450 1B1 contributes to angiotensin II-induced rat aortic smooth muscle cell migration, proliferation and protein synthesis. Ang II stimulated migration of these cells, measured by the wound healing approach, by 1.78 fold and DNA synthesis, measured by [3H]thymidine incorporation, by 1.44 fold after 24 hours, and protein synthesis, measured by [3H]leucine incorporation, by 1.40 fold after 48 hours. Treatment of vascular smooth muscle cells with the cytochrome P450 1B1 inhibitor, 2, 4, 3′, 5′-tetramethoxystilbene, or transduction of these cells with adenovirus cytochrome P450 1B1 shRNA, but not its scrambled control, reduced the activity of this enzyme and abolished angiotensin II- and arachidonic acid-induced cell migration, [3H]thymidine and [3H]leucine incorporation. Metabolism of arachidonic acid to 5-, 12-, 15- and 20-hydoxyeicosatetraenoic acids in these cells was not altered, but angiotensin II- and arachidonic acid-induced reactive oxygen species production and extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2, and p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase, activity were inhibited by 2, 4, 3′, 5′-tetramethoxystilbene and cytochrome P450 1B1 shRNA, and by tempol that inactivates reactive oxygen species. Tempol did not alter cytochrome P450 1B1 activity. These data suggest that angiotensin II-induced vascular smooth muscle cell migration and growth are mediated by reactive oxygen species generated from arachidonic acid by cytochrome P450 1B1 and activation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2, and p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase. PMID:20439821

  17. [Myocardial responses to ischemia].

    PubMed

    Borisenko, V G; Gubareva, E A; Kade, A Kh

    2010-01-01

    The paper details the types of a myocardial response to impaired blood flow, such as myocardial stunning, hibernation, ischemic preconditioning, warm-up phenomenon, ischemic postconditioning, remodeling, and infarction. According to the pathogenesis, the authors identify several types of myocardial dysfunction in transient ischemic attack--uptake, delivery; and a mixed one. It is concluded the myocardial response to damage depends on a combination of influencing factors, a number of pathophysiological processes starting in the acute phase of ischemia achieve its peak in the late period. PMID:20564927

  18. Angiotensin III: a physiological relevant peptide of the renin angiotensin system.

    PubMed

    Yugandhar, Vudhya G; Clark, Michelle A

    2013-08-01

    The renin angiotensin system (RAS) is a peptide hormone system that plays an important role in the pathophysiology of various diseases, including congestive heart failure, hypertension, myocardial infarction, and diabetic nephropathy. This has led researchers to focus extensively on this system, leading to the discovery of various peptides, peptidases, receptors and signal transduction mechanisms intrinsic to the RAS. Angiotensinogen (AGT), angiotensin (Ang) II, Ang III, Ang IV, and Ang-(1-7) are the main biologically active peptides of RAS. However, most of the available studies have focused on Ang II as the likely key peptide from the RAS that directly and indirectly regulates physiological functions leading to pathological conditions. However, data from recent studies suggest that Ang III may produce physiologically relevant effects that are similar to those produced by Ang II. Hence, this review focuses on Ang III and the myriad of physiological effects that it produces in the body. PMID:23692861

  19. [Angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors as neutralizers of hydroxyl radical].

    PubMed

    Mira, M L; Silva, M M; Queirós, M J; Manso, C

    1992-05-01

    Angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors are utilized in the treatment of essential hypertension and of chronic cardiac failure. They are also employed in the treatment of the myocardial lesion of ischemia-reperfusion, which involves oxygen free radicals. In the present study we investigated the possibility of three angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors (captopril, enalapril, lisinopril) to act as hydroxyl radical scavengers. The rate constants for reactions of those compounds with .OH were determined using the deoxyribose method. All there compounds proved to be good scavengers of .OH with rate constants of about 10(10)M-1s-1 and are iron chelators specially enalapril. The fact that captopril possesses a thiol group does not confer an higher antioxidative capacity. These results suggest that scavenging of oxygen free radicals may be a possible mechanism contributing to the therapeutic effect of angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors. PMID:1325814

  20. Concentration-dependent wrestling between detrimental and protective effects of H2O2 during myocardial ischemia/reperfusion

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Z-H; Liu, J-L; Wu, L; Yu, Z; Yang, H-T

    2014-01-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) and endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress are paradoxically implicated in myocardial ischemia/reperfusion (I/R) injury and cardioprotection. However, the precise interpretation for the dual roles of ROS and its relationship with the ER stress during I/R remain elusive. Here we investigated the concentration-dependent effects of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) preconditioning (PC) and postconditioning (PoC) on the ER stress and prosurvival reperfusion injury salvage kinase (RISK) activation using an ex vivo rat myocardial I/R model. The effects of H2O2 PC and PoC showed three phases. At a low level (1 μM), H2O2 exacerbated I/R-induced left ventricular (LV) contractile dysfunction and ER stress, as indicated by enhanced phosphorylation of protein kinase-like ER kinase and expressions of glucose-regulated protein 78, X-box-binding protein 1 splicing variant, TNF receptor-associated factor 2, activating transcription factor-6 cleaved 50 kDa fragment, and caspase-12 cleavage, but the I/R-induced RISK activation including protein kinase B (PKB/Akt) and protein kinase Cɛ (PKCɛ) remained unchanged. Consistently, the postischemic LV performance in 1 μM H2O2 PC and PoC groups was improved by inhibiting ER stress with 4-phenyl butyric acid but not affected by the ER stress inducer, tunicamycin. At a moderate level (10–100 μM), H2O2 significantly improved postischemic LV performance and enhanced RISK activation, but it did no further alter the ER stress. The cardioprotection but not ER stress was abrogated with Akt or PKCɛ inhibitor wortmannin or ɛV1–2. At a high level (1 mM), H2O2 markedly aggravated the reperfusion injury and the oxidative stress but did not further enhance the RISK activation. In addition, 1 or 20 μM of H2O2 PC did not alter cardioprotective effects of ischemic PC in postischemic contractile performance and protein oxidation. Our data suggest that the differential effects of H2O2 are derived from a concentration-dependent

  1. Incidence and prognostic significance of atrial fibrillation in acute myocardial infarction: the GISSI-3 data

    PubMed Central

    Pizzetti, F; Turazza, F; Franzosi, M; Barlera, S; Ledda, A; Maggioni, A; Santoro, L; Tognoni, G

    2001-01-01

    BACKGROUND—Atrial fibrillation is the most common supraventricular arrhythmia in patients with acute myocardial infarction. Recent advances in pharmacological treatment of myocardial infarction may have changed the impact of this arrhythmia.
OBJECTIVE—To assess the incidence and prognosis of atrial fibrillation complicating myocardial infarction in a large population of patients receiving optimal treatment, including angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors.
METHODS—Data were derived from the GISSI-3 trial, which included 17 944 patients within the first 24 hours after acute myocardial infarction. Atrial fibrillation was recorded during the hospital stay, and follow up visits were planned at six weeks and six months. Survival of the patients at four years was assessed through census offices.
RESULTS—The incidence of in-hospital atrial fibrillation or flutter was 7.8%. Atrial fibrillation was associated with indicators of a worse prognosis (age > 70 years, female sex, higher Killip class, previous myocardial infarction, treated hypertension, high systolic blood pressure at entry, insulin dependent diabetes, signs or symptoms of heart failure) and with some adverse clinical events (reinfarction, sustained ventricular tachycardia, ventricular fibrillation). After adjustment for other prognostic factors, atrial fibrillation remained an independent predictor of increased in-hospital mortality: 12.6% v 5%, adjusted relative risk (RR) 1.98, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.67 to 2.34. Data on long term mortality (four years after acute myocardial infarction) confirmed the persistent negative influence of atrial fibrillation (RR 1.78, 95% CI 1.60 to 1.99).
CONCLUSIONS—Atrial fibrillation is an indicator of worse prognosis after acute myocardial infarction, both in the short term and in the long term, even in an unselected population.


Keywords: atrial fibrillation; acute myocardial infarction; prognosis PMID:11602545

  2. Quantitative reconstruction for myocardial perfusion SPECT: an efficient approach by depth-dependent deconvolution and matrix rotation.

    PubMed

    Ye, J; Liang, Z; Harrington, D P

    1994-08-01

    An efficient reconstruction method for myocardial perfusion single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) has been developed which compensates simultaneously for attenuation, scatter, and resolution variation. The scattered photons in the primary-energy-window measurements are approximately removed by subtracting the weighted scatter-energy-window samples. The resolution variation is corrected by deconvolving the subtracted data with the detector-response kernel in frequency space using the depth-dependent frequency relation. The attenuated photons are compensated by recursively tracing the attenuation factors through the object-specific attenuation map. An experimental chest phantom with defects inside myocardium was used to test the method. The attenuation map of the phantom was reconstructed from transmission scans using a flat external source and a high-resolution parallel-hole collimator of a single-detector system. The detector-response kernel was approximated from measurements of a point source in air at several depths from the collimator surface. The emission data were acquired by the same detector setting. A computer simulation using similar protocols as in the experiment was performed. Both the simulation and experiment showed significant improvement in quantification with the proposed method, as compared to the conventional filtered-backprojection technique. The quantitative gain by the additional deconvolution was demonstrated. The computation time was less than 20 min on a HP/730 desktop computer for reconstruction of a 1282 x 64 array from 128 projections of 128 x 64 samples. PMID:15551566

  3. High-Dose Estradiol-Replacement Therapy Enhances the Renal Vascular Response to Angiotensin II via an AT2-Receptor Dependent Mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Safari, Tahereh; Nematbakhsh, Mehdi; Evans, Roger G.; Denton, Kate M.

    2015-01-01

    Physiological levels of estrogen appear to enhance angiotensin type 2 receptor- (AT2R-) mediated vasodilatation. However, the effects of supraphysiological levels of estrogen, analogous to those achieved with high-dose estrogen replacement therapy in postmenopausal women, remain unknown. Therefore, we pretreated ovariectomized rats with a relatively high dose of estrogen (0.5 mg/kg/week) for two weeks. Subsequently, renal hemodynamic responses to intravenous angiotensin II (Ang II, 30–300 ng/kg/min) were tested under anesthesia, while renal perfusion pressure was held constant. The role of AT2R was examined by pretreating groups of rats with PD123319 or its vehicle. Renal blood flow (RBF) decreased in a dose-related manner in response to Ang II. Responses to Ang II were enhanced by pretreatment with estradiol. For example, at 300 ng kg−1 min−1, Ang II reduced RBF by 45.7 ± 1.9% in estradiol-treated rats but only by 27.3 ± 5.1% in vehicle-treated rats. Pretreatment with PD123319 blunted the response of RBF to Ang II in estradiol-treated rats, so that reductions in RBF were similar to those in rats not treated with estradiol. We conclude that supraphysiological levels of estrogen promote AT2R-mediated renal vasoconstriction. This mechanism could potentially contribute to the increased risk of cardiovascular disease associated with hormone replacement therapy using high-dose estrogen. PMID:26681937

  4. Role of the Collecting Duct Renin Angiotensin System in Regulation of Blood Pressure and Renal Function.

    PubMed

    Ramkumar, Nirupama; Kohan, Donald E

    2016-04-01

    Recent evidence suggests that the renal tubular renin angiotensin system regulates urinary Na(+) and water excretion and blood pressure. Three key components of the tubular renin angiotensin system, namely renin, prorenin receptor, and angiotensin-II type 1 receptor, are localized to the collecting duct. This system may modulate collecting duct Na(+) and water reabsorption via angiotensin-II-dependent and angiotensin-II-independent pathways. Further, the system may be of greatest relevance in hypertensive states and particularly those characterized by high circulating angiotensin-II. In this review, we summarize the current knowledge on the synthesis, regulation, and function of collecting duct-derived renin angiotensin system components and examine recent developments with regard to regulation of blood pressure and renal fluid and Na(+) excretion. PMID:26951246

  5. Characterization of the sex-dependent myocardial S-nitrosothiol proteome.

    PubMed

    Shao, Qin; Fallica, Jonathan; Casin, Kevin M; Murphy, Elizabeth; Steenbergen, Charles; Kohr, Mark J

    2016-02-15

    Premenopausal women exhibit endogenous cardioprotective signaling mechanisms that are thought to result from the beneficial effects of estrogen, which we have shown to increase protein S-nitrosylation in the heart. S-nitrosylation is a labile protein modification that increases with a number of different forms of cardioprotection, including ischemic preconditioning. Herein, we sought to identify a potential role for protein S-nitrosylation in sex-dependent cardioprotection. We utilized a Langendorff-perfused mouse heart model of ischemia-reperfusion injury with male and female hearts, and S-nitrosylation-resin-assisted capture with liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry to identify S-nitrosylated proteins and modification sites. Consistent with previous studies, female hearts exhibited resilience to injury with a significant increase in functional recovery compared with male hearts. In a separate set of hearts, we identified a total of 177 S-nitrosylated proteins in female hearts at baseline compared with 109 S-nitrosylated proteins in male hearts. Unique S-nitrosylated proteins in the female group included the F1FO-ATPase and cyclophilin D. We also utilized label-free peptide analysis to quantify levels of common S-nitrosylated identifications and noted that the S-nitrosylation of sarcoplasmic/endoplasmic reticulum Ca(2+)-ATPase 2a was nearly 70% lower in male hearts compared with female, with no difference in expression. Furthermore, we found a significant increase in endothelial nitric oxide synthase expression, phosphorylation, and total nitric oxide production in female hearts compared with males, likely accounting for the enhanced S-nitrosylation protein levels in female hearts. In conclusion, we identified a number of novel S-nitrosylated proteins in female hearts that are likely to contribute to sex-dependent cardioprotection. PMID:26702143

  6. Short-term add-on therapy with angiotensin receptor blocker for end-stage inotrope-dependent heart failure patients: B-type natriuretic peptide reduction in a randomized clinical trial

    PubMed Central

    Ochiai, Marcelo E; Brancalhão, Euler C O; Puig, Raphael S. N.; Vieira, Kelly R N; Cardoso, Juliano N; de Oliveira-Jr, Múcio Tavares; Barretto, Antonio C P

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: We aimed to evaluate angiotensin receptor blocker add-on therapy in patients with low cardiac output during decompensated heart failure. METHODS: We selected patients with decompensated heart failure, low cardiac output, dobutamine dependence, and an ejection fraction <0.45 who were receiving an angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor. The patients were randomized to losartan or placebo and underwent invasive hemodynamic and B-type natriuretic peptide measurements at baseline and on the seventh day after intervention. ClinicalTrials.gov: NCT01857999. RESULTS: We studied 10 patients in the losartan group and 11 patients in the placebo group. The patient characteristics were as follows: age 52.7 years, ejection fraction 21.3%, dobutamine infusion 8.5 mcg/kg.min, indexed systemic vascular resistance 1918.0 dynes.sec/cm5.m2, cardiac index 2.8 L/min.m2, and B-type natriuretic peptide 1,403 pg/mL. After 7 days of intervention, there was a 37.4% reduction in the B-type natriuretic peptide levels in the losartan group compared with an 11.9% increase in the placebo group (mean difference, -49.1%; 95% confidence interval: -88.1 to -9.8%, p = 0.018). No significant difference was observed in the hemodynamic measurements. CONCLUSION: Short-term add-on therapy with losartan reduced B-type natriuretic peptide levels in patients hospitalized for decompensated severe heart failure and low cardiac output with inotrope dependence. PMID:24838894

  7. E2F1-dependent miR-421 regulates mitochondrial fragmentation and myocardial infarction by targeting Pink1.

    PubMed

    Wang, Kun; Zhou, Lu-Yu; Wang, Jian-Xun; Wang, Yin; Sun, Teng; Zhao, Bing; Yang, Yong-Jie; An, Tao; Long, Bo; Li, Na; Liu, Cui-Yun; Gong, Ying; Gao, Jin-Ning; Dong, Yan-Han; Zhang, Jian; Li, Pei-Feng

    2015-01-01

    Mitochondrial fragmentation plays an important role in the progression of cardiac diseases, such as myocardial infarction and heart failure. Mitochondrial network is controlled by many factors in different cell types. Here we show that the interplay between E2F1, miR-421 and Pink1 regulates mitochondrial morphology and cardiomyocyte cell death. Pink1 reduces mitochondrial fragmentation and protects cardiomyocyte from apoptosis. On the other hand, miR-421 promotes cardiomyocyte mitochondrial fragmentation, apoptosis and myocardial infarction by suppressing Pink1 translation. Finally, we show that transcription factor E2F1 activates miR-421 expression. Knocking down E2F1 suppresses mitochondrial fragmentation, apoptosis and myocardial infarction by affecting miR-421 levels. Collectively, these data identify the E2F1/miR-421/Pink axis as a regulator of mitochondrial fragmentation and cardiomyocyte apoptosis, and suggest potential therapeutic targets in treatment of cardiac diseases. PMID:26184432

  8. Angiotensin converting enzyme of Thalassophryne nattereri venom.

    PubMed

    da Costa Marques, Maria Elizabeth; de Araújo Tenório, Humberto; Dos Santos, Claudio Wilian Victor; Dos Santos, Daniel Moreira; de Lima, Maria Elena; Pereira, Hugo Juarez Vieira

    2016-10-01

    Animal venoms are complex mixtures, including peptides, proteins (i.e., enzymes), and other compounds produced by animals in predation, digestion, and defense. These molecules have been investigated regarding their molecular mechanisms associated with physiological action and possible pharmacological applications. Recently, we have described the presence of a type of angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) activity in the venom of Thalassophryne nattereri. It is a zinc-dependent peptidase with a wide range of effects. By removing dipeptide His-Leu from terminal C, the ACE converts angiotensinI (AngI) into angiotensin II (AngII) and inactivates bradykinin, there by regulating blood pressure and electrolyte homeostasis. The fractionation of T. nattereri venom in CM-Sepharose indicated a peak (CM2) with angiotensin-converting activity, converting AngI into Ang II. Electrophoresis on polyacrylamide gel (12%) revealed one band with 30kDa for CM2 similar in size to natterins, which are toxins with proteolytic activity found in T. nattereri venom. Mass spectrometry indicated that the protein sequence of the ACE purified from T. nattereri venom corresponds to natterin 1. The isolated protein has also demonstrated inhibition through captopril and EDTA and is characterized as a classic ACE. Thus, the isolated enzyme purified from T. nattereri venom is the first ACE isolated from fish venom. PMID:27327905

  9. Comparative effects of contraction and angiotensin II on growth of adult feline cardiocytes in primary culture

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wada, H.; Zile, M. R.; Ivester, C. T.; Cooper, G. 4th; McDermott, P. J.

    1996-01-01

    The purposes of this study were 1) to determine whether angiotensin II causes growth of adult feline cardiocytes in long-term culture, 2) to compare the growth effects of angiotensin II with those resulting from electrically stimulated contraction, and 3) to determine whether the anabolic effects of contraction are exerted via the angiotensin type 1 receptor. Adult feline cardiocytes were cultured on laminin-coated trays in a serum-free medium. Cardiocytes were either electrically stimulated to contract (1 Hz, 5-ms pulse duration, alternating polarity) or were nonstimulated and quiescent. Quiescent cells were studied as controls and after treatment with angiotensin II (10(-8) M), losartan (10(-6) M; an angiotensin type 1-receptor antagonist), or angiotensin II plus losartan. Contracting cells were studied in the presence and absence of angiotensin II or losartan. In quiescent cardiocytes, angiotensin II treatment on day 7 significantly increased protein synthesis rates by 22% and protein content per cell by 17%. The effects of angiotensin II were completely blocked by losartan. Electrically stimulated contraction on days 4 and 7 in culture significantly increased protein synthesis rate by 18 and 38% and protein content per cell by 19 and 46%, respectively. Angiotensin II treatment did not further increase protein synthesis rate or protein content in contracting cardiocytes. Furthermore, losartan did not block the anabolic effects of contraction on protein synthesis rates or protein content. In conclusion, angiotensin II can exert a modest anabolic effect on adult feline cardiocytes in culture. In contracting feline cardiocytes, angiotensin II has no effect on growth. Growth caused by electrically stimulated contraction occurs more rapidly and is greater in magnitude than that caused by angiotensin II. Growth of contracting adult feline cardiocytes is not dependent on activation of the angiotensin receptor.

  10. 20-Hydroxyeicosatetraenoic Acid (HETE)-dependent Hypertension in Human Cytochrome P450 (CYP) 4A11 Transgenic Mice: NORMALIZATION OF BLOOD PRESSURE BY SODIUM RESTRICTION, HYDROCHLOROTHIAZIDE, OR BLOCKADE OF THE TYPE 1 ANGIOTENSIN II RECEPTOR.

    PubMed

    Savas, Üzen; Wei, Shouzou; Hsu, Mei-Hui; Falck, John R; Guengerich, F Peter; Capdevila, Jorge H; Johnson, Eric F

    2016-08-01

    Male and female homozygous 129/Sv mice carrying four copies of the human cytochrome P450 4A11 gene (CYP4A11) under control of its native promoter (B-129/Sv-4A11(+/+)) develop hypertension (142 ± 8 versus 113 ± 7 mm Hg systolic blood pressure (BP)), and exhibit increased 20-hydroxyeicosatetraenoic acid (20-HETE) in kidney and urine. The hypertension is reversible by a low-sodium diet and by the CYP4A inhibitor HET0016. B-129/Sv-4A11(+/+) mice display an 18% increase of plasma potassium (p < 0.02), but plasma aldosterone, angiotensin II (ANGII), and renin activities are unchanged. This phenotype resembles human genetic disorders with elevated activity of the sodium chloride co-transporter (NCC) and, accordingly, NCC abundance is increased by 50% in transgenic mice, and NCC levels are normalized by HET0016. ANGII is known to increase NCC abundance, and renal mRNA levels of its precursor angiotensinogen are increased 2-fold in B-129/Sv-4A11(+/+), and blockade of the ANGII receptor type 1 with losartan normalizes BP. A pro-hypertensive role for 20-HETE was implicated by normalization of BP and reversal of renal angiotensin mRNA increases by administration of the 20-HETE antagonists 2-((6Z,15Z)-20-hydroxyicosa-6,15-dienamido)acetate or (S)-2-((6Z,15Z)-20-hydroxyicosa-6,15-dienamido)succinate. SGK1 expression is also increased in B-129/Sv-4A11(+/+) mice and paralleled increases seen for NCC. Losartan, HET0016, and 20-HETE antagonists each normalized SGK1 mRNA expression. These results point to a potential 20-HETE dependence of intrarenal angiotensinogen production and ANGII receptor type 1 activation that are associated with increases in NCC and SGK1 and identify elevated P450 4A11 activity and 20-HETE as potential risk factors for salt-sensitive human hypertension by perturbation of the renal renin-angiotensin axis. PMID:27298316

  11. Contractile Function During Angiotensin-II Activation

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Min; Prosser, Benjamin L.; Bamboye, Moradeke A.; Gondim, Antonio N.S.; Santos, Celio X.; Martin, Daniel; Ghigo, Alessandra; Perino, Alessia; Brewer, Alison C.; Ward, Christopher W.; Hirsch, Emilio; Lederer, W. Jonathan; Shah, Ajay M.

    2015-01-01

    Background Renin-angiotensin system activation is a feature of many cardiovascular conditions. Activity of myocardial reduced nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate oxidase 2 (NADPH oxidase 2 or Nox2) is enhanced by angiotensin II (Ang II) and contributes to increased hypertrophy, fibrosis, and adverse remodeling. Recent studies found that Nox2-mediated reactive oxygen species production modulates physiological cardiomyocyte function. Objectives This study sought to investigate the effects of cardiomyocyte Nox2 on contractile function during increased Ang II activation. Methods We generated a cardiomyocyte-targeted Nox2-transgenic mouse model and studied the effects of in vivo and ex vivo Ang II stimulation, as well as chronic aortic banding. Results Chronic subpressor Ang II infusion induced greater cardiac hypertrophy in transgenic than wild-type mice but unexpectedly enhanced contractile function. Acute Ang II treatment also enhanced contractile function in transgenic hearts in vivo and transgenic cardiomyocytes ex vivo. Ang II–stimulated Nox2 activity increased sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) Ca2+ uptake in transgenic mice, increased the Ca2+ transient and contractile amplitude, and accelerated cardiomyocyte contraction and relaxation. Elevated Nox2 activity increased phospholamban phosphorylation in both hearts and cardiomyocytes, related to inhibition of protein phosphatase 1 activity. In a model of aortic banding–induced chronic pressure overload, heart function was similarly depressed in transgenic and wild-type mice. Conclusions We identified a novel mechanism in which Nox2 modulates cardiomyocyte SR Ca2+ uptake and contractile function through redox-regulated changes in phospholamban phosphorylation. This mechanism can drive increased contractility in the short term in disease states characterized by enhanced renin-angiotensin system activation. PMID:26184620

  12. The association between obesity and acute myocardial infarction is age- and gender-dependent in a Japanese population.

    PubMed

    Oda, Eiji; Goto, Masayuki; Matsushita, Hirooki; Takarada, Ken; Tomita, Makoto; Saito, Atsushi; Fuse, Koichi; Fujita, Satoru; Ikeda, Yoshio; Kitazawa, Hitoshi; Takahashi, Minoru; Sato, Masahito; Okabe, Masaaki; Aizawa, Yoshifusa

    2013-09-01

    Controversies concerning the association between obesity and acute myocardial infarction (AMI) are still ongoing in Japan. We investigated the association between obesity defined by body mass index of 25 kg/m(2) or higher and AMI by a case-control study using data from 1199 AMI cases and 4056 apparently healthy controls. The analysis was performed in age- and sex-matched samples of 621 case-control pairs younger than 80 years and in crude samples aged 40-79 years divided into 10-year age groups. Prevalence of obesity, diabetes, current smoking, hypertension, and hypercholesterolemia were compared between cases and controls, and a multivariable odds ratio (OR) of AMI was calculated for each risk factor in various age groups. The OR (95 % confidence interval (CI)) of AMI for obesity was 1.63 (1.23-2.17), P = 0.0008 in men younger than 80 years; 2.65 (1.41-5.00), P = 0.0025 in women younger than 80 years; 2.23 (1.46-3.41), P = 0.0002 in men aged 59 years or younger; 1.34 (0.90-2.01), P = 0.1510 in men aged 60-79 years; and 2.98 (1.56-5.71), P = 0.0010 in women aged 60-79 years using paired samples. The OR (95 % CI) of AMI for obesity was 4.92 (2.53-9.58), P < 0.0001 in men aged 40-49 years; 1.54 (1.07-2.21), P = 0.0197 in men aged 50-59 years; 1.07 (0.69-1.66), P = 0.7717 in men aged 60-69 years; 2.24 (1.20-4.20), P = 0.0118 in men aged 70-79 years; 2.48 (1.12-5.48), P = 0.0245 in women aged 60-69 years; and 3.05 (1.46-6.37), P = 0.0029 in women aged 70-79 years using crude samples. The association between obesity and AMI was age- and gender-dependent in a Japanese population. PMID:22975714

  13. Effects of Angiotensin II Receptor Blockers on Metabolism of Arachidonic Acid via CYP2C8.

    PubMed

    Senda, Asuna; Mukai, Yuji; Toda, Takaki; Hayakawa, Toru; Yamashita, Miki; Eliasson, Erik; Rane, Anders; Inotsume, Nobuo

    2015-01-01

    Arachidonic acid (AA) is metabolized to epoxyeicosatrienoic acids (EETs) via cytochrome enzymes such as CYP 2C9, 2C8 and 2J2. EETs play a role in cardioprotection and regulation of blood pressure. Recently, adverse reactions such as sudden heart attack and fatal myocardial infarction were reported among patients taking angiotensin II receptor blockers (ARBs). As some ARBs have affinity for these CYP enzymes, metabolic inhibition of AA by ARBs is a possible cause for the increase in cardiovascular events. In this study, we quantitatively investigated the inhibitory effects of ARBs on the formation of EETs and further metabolites, dihydroxyeicosatrienoic acids (DHETs), from AA via CYP2C8. In incubations with recombinant CYP2C8 in vitro, the inhibitory effects were compared by measuring EETs and DHETs by HPLC-MS/MS. Inhibition of AA metabolism by ARBs was detected in a concentration-dependent manner with IC50 values of losartan (42.7 µM), telmisartan (49.5 µM), irbesartan (55.6 µM), olmesartan (66.2 µM), candesartan (108 µM), and valsartan (279 µM). Losartan, telmisartan and irbesartan, which reportedly accumulate in the liver and kidneys, have stronger inhibitory effects than other ARBs. The lower concentration of EETs leads to less protective action on the cardiovascular system and a higher incidence of adverse effects such as sudden heart attack and myocardial infarction in patients taking ARBs. PMID:26632190

  14. The Attenuation of Central Angiotensin II-dependent Pressor Response and Intra-neuronal Signaling by Intracarotid Injection of Nanoformulated Copper/Zinc Superoxide Dismutase

    PubMed Central

    Rosenbaugh, Erin G.; Roat, James; Gao, Lie; Yang, Rui-Fang; Manickam, Devika S.; Yin, Jing-Xiang; Schultz, Harold D.; Bronich, Tatiana K.; Batrakova, Elena V.; Kabanov, Alexander V.; Zucker, Irving H.; Zimmerman, Matthew C.

    2010-01-01

    Adenoviral-mediated overexpression of the intracellular superoxide (O2•−) scavenging enzyme copper/zinc superoxide dismutase (CuZnSOD) in the brain attenuates central angiotensin II (AngII)-induced cardiovascular responses. However, the therapeutic potential for adenoviral vectors is weakened by toxicity and the inability of adenoviral vectors to target the brain following peripheral administration. Therefore, we developed a non-viral delivery system in which CuZnSOD protein is electrostatically bound to a synthetic poly(ethyleneimine)-poly(ethyleneglycol) (PEI-PEG) polymer to form a polyion complex (CuZnSOD nanozyme). We hypothesized that PEI-PEG polymer increases transport of functional CuZnSOD to neurons, which inhibits AngII intra-neuronal signaling. The AngII-induced increase in O2•−, as measured by dihydroethidium fluorescence and electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy, was significantly inhibited in CuZnSOD nanozyme-treated neurons compared to free CuZnSOD- and non-treated neurons. CuZnSOD nanozyme also attenuated the AngII-induced inhibition of K+ current in neurons. Intracarotid injection of CuZnSOD nanozyme into rabbits significantly inhibited the pressor response of intracerebroventricular-delivered AngII; however, intracarotid injection of free CuZnSOD or PEI-PEG polymer alone failed to inhibit this response. Importantly, neither the PEI-PEG polymer alone nor the CuZnSOD nanozyme induced neuronal toxicity. These findings indicate that CuZnSOD nanozyme inhibits AngII intra-neuronal signaling in vitro and in vivo. PMID:20378166

  15. Phosphorylation of rat kidney Na-K pump at Ser938 is required for rapid angiotensin II-dependent stimulation of activity and trafficking in proximal tubule cells.

    PubMed

    Massey, Katherine J; Li, Quanwen; Rossi, Noreen F; Keezer, Susan M; Mattingly, Raymond R; Yingst, Douglas R

    2016-02-01

    How angiotensin (ANG) II acutely stimulates the Na-K pump in proximal tubules is only partially understood, limiting insight into how ANG II increases blood pressure. First, we tested whether ANG II increases the number of pumps in plasma membranes of native rat proximal tubules under conditions of rapid activation. We found that exposure to 100 pM ANG II for 2 min, which was previously shown to increase affinity of the Na-K pump for Na and stimulate activity threefold, increased the amount of the Na-K pump in plasma membranes of native tubules by 33%. Second, we tested whether previously observed increases in phosphorylation of the Na-K pump at Ser(938) were part of the stimulatory mechanism. These experiments were carried out in opossum kidney cells, cultured proximal tubules stably coexpressing the ANG type 1 (AT1) receptor, and either wild-type or a S938A mutant of rat kidney Na-K pump under conditions found by others to stimulate activity. We found that 10 min of incubation in 10 pM ANG II stimulated activity of wild-type pumps from 2.3 to 3.5 nmol K · mg protein(-1) · min(-1) and increased the amount of the pump in the plasma membrane by 80% but had no effect on cells expressing the S938A mutant. We conclude that acute stimulation of Na-K pump activity in native rat proximal tubules includes increased trafficking to the plasma membrane and that phosphorylation at Ser(938) is part of the mechanism by which ANG II directly stimulates activity and trafficking of the rat kidney Na-K pump in opossum kidney cells. PMID:26582472

  16. Nox4 NADPH Oxidase Mediates Peroxynitrite-dependent Uncoupling of Endothelial Nitric-oxide Synthase and Fibronectin Expression in Response to Angiotensin II

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Doug-Yoon; Wauquier, Fabien; Eid, Assaad A.; Roman, Linda J.; Ghosh-Choudhury, Goutam; Khazim, Khaled; Block, Karen; Gorin, Yves

    2013-01-01

    Activation of glomerular mesangial cells (MCs) by angiotensin II (Ang II) leads to extracellular matrix accumulation. Here, we demonstrate that, in MCs, Ang II induces endothelial nitric-oxide synthase (eNOS) uncoupling with enhanced generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and decreased production of NO. Ang II promotes a rapid increase in 3-nitrotyrosine formation, and uric acid attenuates Ang II-induced decrease in NO bioavailability, demonstrating that peroxynitrite mediates the effects of Ang II on eNOS dysfunction. Ang II rapidly up-regulates Nox4 protein. Inhibition of Nox4 abolishes the increase in ROS and peroxynitrite generation as well as eNOS uncoupling triggered by Ang II, indicating that Nox4 is upstream of eNOS. This pathway contributes to Ang II-mediated fibronectin accumulation in MCs. Ang II also elicits an increase in mitochondrial abundance of Nox4 protein, and the oxidase contributes to ROS production in mitochondria. Overexpression of mitochondrial manganese superoxide dismutase prevents the stimulatory effects of Ang II on mitochondrial ROS production, loss of NO availability, and MC fibronectin accumulation, whereas manganese superoxide dismutase depletion increases mitochondrial ROS, NO deficiency, and fibronectin synthesis basally and in cells exposed to Ang II. This work provides the first evidence that uncoupled eNOS is responsible for Ang II-induced MC fibronectin accumulation and identifies Nox4 and mitochondrial ROS as mediators of eNOS dysfunction. These data shed light on molecular processes underlying the oxidative signaling cascade engaged by Ang II and identify potential targets for intervention to prevent renal fibrosis. PMID:23940049

  17. Angiotensin II receptors in testes

    SciTech Connect

    Millan, M.A.; Aguilera, G.

    1988-05-01

    Receptors for angiotensin II (AII) were identified and characterized in testes of rats and several primate species. Autoradiographic analysis of the binding of 125I-labeled (Sar1,Ile8)AII to rat, rhesus monkey, cebus monkey, and human testicular slide-mounted frozen sections indicated specific binding to Leydig cells in the interstitium. In rat collagenase-dispersed interstitial cells fractionated by Percoll gradient, AII receptor content was parallel to that of hCG receptors, confirming that the AII receptors are in the Leydig cells. In rat dispersed Leydig cells, binding was specific for AII and its analogs and of high affinity (Kd, 4.8 nM), with a receptor concentration of 15 fmol/10(6) cells. Studies of AII receptors in rat testes during development reveals the presence of high receptor density in newborn rats which decreases toward the adult age (4934 +/- 309, 1460 +/- 228, 772 +/- 169, and 82 +/- 12 fmol/mg protein at 5, 15, 20, and 30 days of age, respectively) with no change in affinity. At all ages receptors were located in the interstitium, and the decrease in binding was parallel to the decrease in the interstitial to tubular ratio observed with age. AII receptor properties in membrane-rich fractions from prepuberal testes were similar in the rat and rhesus monkey. Binding was time and temperature dependent, reaching a plateau at 60 min at 37 C, and was increased by divalent cations, EGTA, and dithiothreitol up to 0.5 mM. In membranes from prepuberal monkey testes, AII receptors were specific for AII analogs and of high affinity (Kd, 4.2 nM) with a receptor concentration of 7599 +/- 1342 fmol/mg protein. The presence of AII receptors in Leydig cells in rat and primate testes in conjunction with reports of the presence of other components of the renin-angiotensin system in the testes suggests that the peptide has a physiological role in testicular function.

  18. PKC-dependent extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 pathway is involved in the inhibition of Ib on AngiotensinII-induced proliferation of vascular smooth muscle cells

    SciTech Connect

    Wang Yu; Yan Tianhua; Wang Qiujuan Wang Wei; Xu Jinyi; Wu Xiaoming; Ji Hui

    2008-10-10

    AngiotensinII (AngII) induces vascular smooth muscle cell (VSMC) proliferation, which plays an important role in the development and progression of hypertension. AngII-induced cellular events have been implicated, in part, in the activation of protein kinase C (PKC) and extracellular signal-regulated kinases 1/2 (ERK1/2). In the present study, we investigated the effect of Ib, a novel nonpeptide AngII receptor type 1 (AT{sub 1}) antagonist, on the activation of PKC and ERK1/2 in VSMC proliferation induced by AngII. MTT, and [{sup 3}H]thymidine incorporation assay showed that AngII-induced VSMC proliferation was inhibited significantly by Ib. The specific binding of [{sup 125}I]AngII to AT{sub 1} receptors was blocked by Ib in a concentration-dependent manner with IC{sub 50} value of 0.96 nM. PKC activity assay and Western blot analysis demonstrated that Ib significantly inhibited the activation of PKC and phosphorylation of ERK1/2 induced by AngII, respectively. Furthermore, AngII-induced ERK1/2 activation was obviously blocked by GF109203X, a PKC inhibitor. These findings suggest that the suppression of Ib on AngII-induced VSMC proliferation may be attributed to its inhibitory effect on PKC-dependent ERK1/2 pathway.

  19. Diurnal variations in myocardial metabolism

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The heart is challenged by a plethora of extracellular stimuli over the course of a normal day, each of which distinctly influences myocardial contractile function. It is therefore not surprising that myocardial metabolism also oscillates in a time-of-day dependent manner. What is becoming increasin...

  20. [Mortality of myocardial infarction].

    PubMed

    Bonnefoy, E; Kirkorian, G

    2011-12-01

    Coronary disease is a major cause of death and disability. From 1975 to 2000, coronary mortality was reduced by half. Better treatments and reduction of risk factors are the main causes. This phenomenon is observed in most developed countries, but mortality from coronary heart disease continues to increase in developing countries. In-hospital mortality of ST elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI) is in the range of 7 to 10% in registries. In infarction without ST segment elevation (NSTEMI), in-hospital mortality is around 5%. More recent studies found a similar in-hospital mortality for STEMI and NSTEMI. Because of patient selection and monitoring, mortality in clinical trials is much lower. After adjustment for the extent of coronary disease, age, risk factors, history of myocardial infarction, the excess mortality observed in women is fading. Many clinical, biological and laboratory parameters are associated with mortality in myocardial infarction. They refer to the immediate risk of death (ventricular rhythm disturbances, shock…), the extent of infarction (number of leads with ST elevation on the ECG, release of biomarkers, ejection fraction…), the presence of heart failure, the failure of reperfusion and the patient's baseline risk (age, renal function…). Risk scores, and more specifically the GRACE risk score, synthesize these different markers to predict the risk of death in a given patient. However, their use for the treatment of myocardial only concerns NSTEMI. Only a limited number of mechanical or pharmacological interventions reduces mortality of heart attack. The main benefits are observed with reperfusion by thrombolysis or primary angioplasty in STEMI, aspirin, heparin, beta-blockers, angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors. Some medications such as bivalirudin and fondaparinux reduce mortality by decreasing the incidence of hemorrhagic complications. The guidelines classify interventions according to their benefit and especially their ability

  1. Apelin-13 protects against myocardial infarction-induced myocardial fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xuemin; Hu, Wenyu; Feng, Feng; Xu, Jian; Wu, Fang

    2016-06-01

    Myocardial infarction is a serious health threat. Apelin is an endogenous ligand of angiotensin II receptor-like 1 (APJ) and the apelin/APJ system is associated with various types of heart disease. However, whether apelin protects against myocardial infarction‑induced myocardial fibrosis remains unclear. The present study aimed to investigate the function of apelin‑13 during myocardial infarction‑induced myocardial fibrosis, and to determine the mechanism underlying the effects of apelin‑13. Apelin‑13 was demonstrated to improve left ventricular function and results of hematoxylin and eosin staining, Masson's trichrome staining and western blotting showed that apelin‑13 attenuated myocardial fibrosis. Further mechanistic investigation was performed by enzyme‑linked immunosorbent assay, western blotting and electrophoretic mobility shift assay. The results demonstrated that apelin‑13 inhibited the activation of nuclear factor (NF)‑κB signaling in vitro and in vivo. To the best of our knowledge, the present study was the first to demonstrate that apelin‑13 may attenuate myocardial infarction‑induced myocardial fibrosis, and that this protective function may be mediated by inhibition of NF‑κB signaling. The present study suggests a theoretical basis for the effects of apelin‑13 and provides insight into the potential clinical application of apelin-13. PMID:27109054

  2. Angiotensin II receptor heterogeneity

    SciTech Connect

    Herblin, W.F.; Chiu, A.T.; McCall, D.E.; Ardecky, R.J.; Carini, D.J.; Duncia, J.V.; Pease, L.J.; Wong, P.C.; Wexler, R.R.; Johnson, A.L. )

    1991-04-01

    The possibility of receptor heterogeneity in the angiotensin II (AII) system has been suggested previously, based on differences in Kd values or sensitivity to thiol reagents. One of the authors earliest indications was the frequent observation of incomplete inhibition of the binding of AII to adrenal cortical membranes. Autoradiographic studies demonstrated that all of the labeling of the rat adrenal was blocked by unlabeled AII or saralasin, but not by DuP 753. The predominant receptor in the rat adrenal cortex (80%) is sensitive to dithiothreitol (DTT) and DuP 753, and is designated AII-1. The residual sites in the adrenal cortex and almost all of the sites in the rat adrenal medulla are insensitive to both DTT and DuP 753, but were blocked by EXP655. These sites have been confirmed by ligand binding studies and are designated AII-2. The rabbit adrenal cortex is unique in yielding a nonuniform distribution of AII-2 sites around the outer layer of glomerulosa cells. In the rabbit kidney, the sites on the glomeruli are AII-1, but the sites on the kidney capsule are AII-2. Angiotensin III appears to have a higher affinity for AII-2 sites since it inhibits the binding to the rabbit kidney capsule but not the glomeruli. Elucidation of the distribution and function of these diverse sites should permit the development of more selective and specific therapeutic strategies.

  3. Attenuation of Myocardial Injury by HMGB1 Blockade during Ischemia/Reperfusion Is Toll-Like Receptor 2-Dependent

    PubMed Central

    Iskandar, Franziska; Habeck, Katharina; Zimmermann, René; Schumann, Ralf R.; Koch, Alexander

    2013-01-01

    Genetic or pharmacological ablation of toll-like receptor 2 (TLR2) protects against myocardial ischemia/reperfusion injury (MI/R). However, the endogenous ligand responsible for TLR2 activation has not yet been detected. The objective of this study was to identify HMGB1 as an activator of TLR2 signalling during MI/R. C57BL/6 wild-type (WT) or TLR2−/−-mice were injected with vehicle, HMGB1, or HMGB1 BoxA one hour before myocardial ischemia (30 min) and reperfusion (24 hrs). Infarct size, cardiac troponin T, leukocyte infiltration, HMGB1 release, TLR4-, TLR9-, and RAGE-expression were quantified. HMGB1 plasma levels were measured in patients undergoing coronary artery bypass graft (CABG) surgery. HMGB1 antagonist BoxA reduced cardiomyocyte necrosis during MI/R in WT mice, accompanied by reduced leukocyte infiltration. Injection of HMGB1 did, however, not increase infarct size in WT animals. In TLR2−/−-hearts, neither BoxA nor HMGB1 affected infarct size. No differences in RAGE and TLR9 expression could be detected, while TLR2−/−-mice display increased TLR4 and HMGB1 expression. Plasma levels of HMGB1 were increased MI/R in TLR2−/−-mice after CABG surgery in patients carrying a TLR2 polymorphism (Arg753Gln). We here provide evidence that absence of TLR2 signalling abrogates infarct-sparing effects of HMGB1 blockade. PMID:24371373

  4. Different regulation of miR-29a-3p in glomeruli and tubules in an experimental model of angiotensin II-dependent hypertension: potential role in renal fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Castoldi, Giovanna; di Gioia, Cira; Giollo, Fabrizio; Carletti, Raffaella; Bombardi, Camila; Antoniotti, Marco; Roma, Francesca; Zerbini, Gianpaolo; Stella, Andrea

    2016-03-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the role of the angiotensin II (Ang II) induced-differential miRNA expression in renal glomerular and tubulo-interstitial fibrosis in an experimental model of Ang II-dependent hypertension. To clarify this issue, Sprague Dawley rats were treated with Ang II (200 ng/kg per minute, n = 15) or physiological saline (n = 14) for 4 weeks. Systolic blood pressure and albuminuria were measured every 2 weeks. At the end of the experimental period, renal glomerular and tubulo-interstitial fibrosis was evaluated by histomorphometric analysis, after Sirius-Red and Masson's trichrome staining. Ang II increased systolic blood pressure (P < 0.0001), albuminuria (P < 0.01) and both glomerular and tubulo-interstitial fibrosis (P < 0.01). Using laser capture microdissection and miRNA microarray analysis this study showed that miR-29a-3p was down-regulated in renal tubules and up-regulated in glomeruli. Real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) experiments confirmed in Ang II-treated rats a down-regulation of miR-29a-3p in tubules (P < 0.01), while no significant changes were observed in glomeruli. Matrix metalloproteinase-2 (MMP-2) was identified as putative miR-29a-3p target (by TargetScan, miRanda, Tarbase software) and functionally confirmed by luciferase activity assay. These data demonstrate that the effects of Ang II on miR-29a-3p expression in renal tubules is different from the one exerted in the glomeruli and that miR-29a-3p targets MMP-2. These results suggest that the development of renal fibrosis at glomerular and tubulo-interstitial level depends on different molecular mechanisms. PMID:26700017

  5. Effect of Angiotensin(1-7) on Heart Function in an Experimental Rat Model of Obesity

    PubMed Central

    Blanke, Katja; Schlegel, Franziska; Raasch, Walter; Bader, Michael; Dähnert, Ingo; Dhein, Stefan; Salameh, Aida

    2015-01-01

    Aim: Obesity is a risk factor for the development of cardiovascular diseases. Recently it was shown that overexpression of the Mas-receptor antagonist angiotensin(1-7) could prevent from diet-induced obesity. However, it remained unclear whether diet-induced obesity and angiotensin(1-7) overexpression might also have effects on the cardiovascular system in these rats. Methods:Twenty three male Sprague Dawley rats were fed with standard chow (SD+chow, n = 5) or a cafeteria diet (SD+CD, n = 6) for 5 months. To investigate the effect of angiotensin(1-7) transgenic rats, expressing an angiotensin(1-7)-producing fusion protein in testis were used. These transgenic rats also received a 5 month's feeding period with either chow (TGR+chow, n = 6) or cafeteria diet (TGR+CD, n = 6), respectively. Hemodynamic measurements (pressure-volume loops) were carried out to assess cardiac function and blood pressure. Subsequently, hearts were explanted and investigated according to the Langendorff technique. Furthermore, cardiac remodeling in these animals was investigated histologically. Results:After 5 months cafeteria diet feeding rats showed a significantly increased body weight, which could be prevented in transgenic rats. However, there was no effect on cardiac performance after cafeteria diet in non-transgenic and transgenic rats. Moreover, overexpression of angiotensin(1-7) deteriorated cardiac contractility as indicated by impaired dp/dt. Furthermore, histological analysis revealed that cafeteria diet led to myocardial fibrosis in both, control and transgenic rats and this was not inhibited by an overproduction of angiotensin(1-7). Conclusion:These results indicate that an overexpression of circulating angiotensin(1-7) prevents a cafeteria diet-induced increase in body weight, but does not affect cardiac performance in this experimental rat model of obesity. Furthermore, overexpression of angiotensin(1-7) alone resulted in an impairment of cardiac function. PMID:26733884

  6. Rosiglitazone-induced myocardial protection against ischaemia-reperfusion injury is mediated via a phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase/Akt-dependent pathway.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xue-Jiao; Xiong, Zi-Bo; Tang, An-Li; Ma, Hong; Ma, Yue-Dong; Wu, Jing-Guo; Dong, Yu-Gang

    2010-02-01

    1. Rosiglitazone is widely used in the treatment of Type 2 diabetes. However, in recent years it has become evident that the therapeutic effects of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma ligands reach far beyond their use as insulin sensitizers. Recently, the ability of rosiglitazone pretreatment to induce cardioprotection following ischaemia-reperfusion (I/R) has been well documented; however, the protective mechanisms have not been elucidated. In the present study, examined the role of the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3-K)/Akt signalling pathway in rosiglitazone cardioprotection following I/R injury. 2. Mice were pretreated with 3 mg/kg per day rosiglitazone for 14 days before hearts were subjected to ischaemia (30 min) and reperfusion (2 h). Wortmannin (1.4 mg/kg, i.p.), an inhibitor of PI3-K, was administered 10 min prior to myocardial I/R. Then, activation of the PI3-K/Akt/glycogen synthase kinase (GSK)-3alpha signalling pathway was examined. The effects of PI3-K inhibition on rosiglitazone-induced cardioprotection were also evaluated. 3. Compared with control rats, the ratio of infarct size to ischaemic area (area at risk) and the occurrence of sustained ventricular fibrillation in rosiglitazone-pretreated rats was significantly reduced (P < 0.05). Rosiglitazone pretreatment attenuated cardiac apoptosis, as assessed by ELISA to determine cardiomyocyte DNA fragmentation. Rosiglitazone pretreatment significantly increased levels of phosphorylated (p-) Akt and p-GSK-3alpha in the rat myocardium. Pharmacological inhibition of PI3-K by wortmannin markedly abolished the cardioprotection induced by rosiglitazone. 4. These results indicate that rosiglitazone-induced cardioprotection in I/R injury is mediated via a PI3-K/Akt/GSK-3alpha-dependent pathway. The data also suggest that modulation of PI3-K/Akt/GSK-3alpha-dependent signalling pathways may be a viable strategy to reduce myocardial I/R injury. PMID:19566839

  7. Myocardial Bridge

    MedlinePlus

    ... artery. See also on this site: Ask a Texas Heart Institute Doctor: Search "myocardial bridge" Updated August ... comments. Terms of Use and Privacy Policy © Copyright Texas Heart Institute All rights reserved.

  8. Renin, angiotensins, and angiotensin-converting enzyme in neuroblastoma cells: evidence for intracellular formation of angiotensins.

    PubMed Central

    Okamura, T; Clemens, D L; Inagami, T

    1981-01-01

    The mechanism of formation of various peptide hormones in neuronal cells in the brain is not clear. The question of whether brain angiotensin II is formed by an extracellular mechanism as in the peripheral system or by an intracellular mechanism can be answered by using cloned cells in culture. We have screened several neuroblastoma cell lines of rat and mouse origin and found at least three cell lines that contain renin (EC 3.4.99.19), angiotensin-converting enzyme (dipeptidyl carboxypeptidase; peptidyldipeptide hydrolase, EC 3.4.15.1), and angiotensins I and II. This finding was interpreted to indicate that in these cells angiotensin formation takes place by an intracellular mechanism, in contrast to the extracellular mechanism well known to occur in plasma. This study also demonstrates the existence of viable and cloned cell lines that produce renin. PMID:6273896

  9. The past, present and future of renin–angiotensin aldosterone system inhibition☆

    PubMed Central

    Mentz, Robert J.; Bakris, George L.; Waeber, Bernard; McMurray, John J.V.; Gheorghiade, Mihai; Ruilope, Luis M.; Maggioni, Aldo P.; Swedberg, Karl; Piña, Ileana L.; Fiuzat, Mona; O’Connor, Christopher M.; Zannad, Faiez; Pitt, Bertram

    2014-01-01

    The renin–angiotensin aldosterone system (RAAS) is central to the pathogenesis of cardiovascular disease. RAAS inhibition can reduce blood pressure, prevent target organ damage in hypertension and diabetes, and improve outcomes in patients with heart failure and/or myocardial infarction. This review presents the history of RAAS inhibition including a summary of key heart failure, myocardial infarction, hypertension and atrial fibrillation trials. Recent developments in RAAS inhibition are discussed including implementation and optimization of current drug therapies. Finally, ongoing clinical trials, opportunities for future trials and issues related to the barriers and approvability of novel RAAS inhibitors are highlighted. PMID:23121914

  10. Angiotensin II Stimulation of Cardiac Hypertrophy and Functional Decompensation in Osteoprotegerin-Deficient Mice.

    PubMed

    Tsuruda, Toshihiro; Sekita-Hatakeyama, Yoko; Hao, Yilin; Sakamoto, Sumiharu; Kurogi, Syuji; Nakamura, Midori; Udagawa, Nobuyuki; Funamoto, Taro; Sekimoto, Tomohisa; Hatakeyama, Kinta; Chosa, Etsuo; Kato, Johji; Asada, Yujiro; Kitamura, Kazuo

    2016-05-01

    Circulating and myocardial expressions of receptor activator of nuclear factor-κb ligand and osteoprotegerin are activated in heart failure; however, it remains to be determined their pathophysiological roles on left ventricular structure and function in interaction with renin-angiotensin system. We conducted experiments using 8-week-old osteoprotegerin(-/-)mice and receptor activator of nuclear factor-κb ligand-transgenic mice to assess whether they affect the angiotensin II-induced left ventricular remodeling. Subcutaneous infusion of angiotensin II to osteoprotegerin(-/-)mice progressed the eccentric hypertrophy, resulting in left ventricular systolic dysfunction for 28 days, and this was comparable with wild-type mice, showing concentric hypertrophy, irrespective of equivalent elevation of systolic blood pressure. The structural alteration was associated with reduced interstitial fibrosis, decreased procollagen α1 and syndecan-1 expressions, and the increased number of apoptotic cells in the left ventricle, compared with wild-type mice. In contrast, angiotensin II infusion to the receptor activator of nuclear factor-κb ligand-transgenic mice revealed the concentric hypertrophy with preserved systolic contractile function. Intraperitoneal administration of human recombinant osteoprotegerin, but not subcutaneous injection of anti-receptor activator of nuclear factor-κb ligand antibody, to the angiotensin II-infused osteoprotegerin(-/-)mice for 28 days ameliorated the progression of heart failure without affecting systolic blood pressure. These results underscore the biological activity of osteoprotegerin in preserving myocardial structure and function during the angiotensin II-induced cardiac hypertrophy, independent of receptor activator of nuclear factor-κb ligand activity. In addition, the antiapoptotic and profibrotic actions of osteoprotegerin that emerged from our data might be involved in the mechanisms. PMID:27001297

  11. Cytoplasmic translocation of HuR contributes to angiotensin II induced cardiac fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Bai, Danna; Ge, Lan; Gao, Yan; Lu, Xiaozhao; Wang, Haichang; Yang, Guodong

    2015-08-01

    Cardiac fibrosis is one of the key structural changes of the hypertrophied left ventricle in hypertensive heart disease. Increased angiotensin II was found to be important in the hypertension related fibrosis, while the underlying mechanism is unknown. In this study, we found that angiotensin II dose-dependently increased the expression of Col1a1, Col3a1 and α-smooth muscle actin, which were blocked by ROS (reactive oxygen species) scavenger N-acetyl cysteine (NAC). Mechanistically, angiotensin II induced robust ROS generation, which in turn induced cytoplasmic translocation of RNA binding protein HuR. Cytoplasmic translocated HuR increased TGFβ pathway activity and subsequent collagen synthesis. In contrast, knockdown of HuR nearly blocked angiotensin II induced TGFβ activation and collagen synthesis. Taken together, we here identified that angiotensin II promotes collagen synthesis in cardiac fibroblast through ROS-HuR-TGFβ pathway. PMID:26093296

  12. Effect of renin-angiotensin system on sodium intake.

    PubMed Central

    Chiaraviglio, E

    1976-01-01

    1. Water and saline intake was measured in rats depleted of Na by I.P. dialysis. Na intake was prevented 180 min but not 60-90 min after bilateral nephrectomy. Unilateral nephrectomy as well as ureteral ligature had no effect on Na intake. 2. Renin (3u.) injected I.P. re-established the Na appetite abolished by nephrectomy. 3. Angiotensin I (5 ng) or II (5-40 ng) injected into the 3rd ventricle, also restored the Na intake and this effect was dose-dependent. 4. The angiotensin converting-enzyme inhibitor Sq 20,881 (1 mg/kg) inhibited the effect of AI but not that of AII in restoring Na intake. 5. It is concluded that the kidneys might play a role in the regulation of Na intake through the renin-angiotensin system. PMID:1255521

  13. Ginsenoside Rd Attenuates Myocardial Ischemia/Reperfusion Injury via Akt/GSK-3β Signaling and Inhibition of the Mitochondria-Dependent Apoptotic Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xiaoliang; Lau, Waynebond; Wang, Yajing; Xing, Yuan; Zhang, Xing; Ma, Xinliang; Gao, Feng

    2013-01-01

    Evidence suggests Ginsenoside Rd (GSRd), a biologically active extract from the medical plant Panax Ginseng, exerts antioxidant effect, decreasing reactive oxygen species (ROS) formation. Current study determined the effect of GSRd on myocardial ischemia/reperfusion (MI/R) injury (a pathological condition where ROS production is significantly increased) and investigated the underlying mechanisms. The current study utilized an in vivo rat model of MI/R injury and an in vitro neonatal rat cardiomyocyte (NRC) model of simulated ischemia/reperfusion (SI/R) injury. Infarct size was measured by Evans blue/TTC double staining. NRC injury was determined by MTT and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) leakage assay. ROS accumulation and apoptosis were assessed by flow cytometry. Mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP) was determined by 5, 5′, 6, 6′-tetrachloro-1, 1′, 3, 3′-tetrathylbenzimidazol carbocyanine iodide (JC-1). Cytosolic translocation of mitochondrial cytochrome c and expression of caspase-9, caspase-3, Bcl-2 family proteins, and phosphorylated Akt and GSK-3β were determined by western blot. Pretreatment with GSRd (50 mg/kg) significantly augmented rat cardiac function, as evidenced by increased left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) and ±dP/dt. GSRd reduced myocardial infarct size, apoptotic cell death, and blood creatine kinase/lactate dehydrogenase levels after MI/R. In NRCs, GSRd (10 µM) inhibited SI/R-induced ROS generation (P<0.01), decreased cellular apoptosis, stabilized the mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP), and attenuated cytosolic translocation of mitochondrial cytochrome c. GSRd inhibited activation of caspase-9 and caspase-3, increased the phosphorylated Akt and GSK-3β, and increased the Bcl-2/Bax ratio. Together, these data demonstrate GSRd mediated cardioprotective effect against MI/R–induced apoptosis via a mitochondrial-dependent apoptotic pathway. PMID:23976968

  14. Characterization of angiotensin-binding sites in the bovine adrenal and the rat brain

    SciTech Connect

    Rogulja, I.

    1989-01-01

    The first study was designed to determine whether systemically administered MSG affects neurons in the CVOs that are potentially important in mediating angiotensin-dependent responses. Rats were pretreated with MSG and the receptors for angiotensin II were assayed by radioligand binding in brain homogenates from the septum anteroventral third ventricular region (AV3V) and the thalamus/hypothalamus region using {sup 125}I-angiotensin II as the radioligand. The results of this experiment indicate that systematically administered MSG in the rat significantly reduced the number (Bmax) of Ang II receptors in a tissue sample which contained both extra blood-brain barrier organs as well as tissue within the blood-brain barrier with no change in the affinity (Kd) of the binding sites. The second chapter reports the successful solubilization of bovine adrenal {sup 125}I Ang II and {sup 125}I Sar{sup 1},Ile{sup 8}-Ang II binding sites with the detergent CHAPS. The results of our studies indicate the presence of two angiotensin binding sites. The one site is specific for naturally occurring angiotensins as well as sarcosine-1 substituted angiotensin analogues. The other site which can be optimally stabilized be re-addition of 0.3% CHAPS into the incubation assay binds sarcosine-1 substituted angiotensins exclusively. Hydrophobic interaction chromatography experiments suggest that these sites, possibly, represent distinct proteins. The third chapter discusses the successful solubilization and partial characterization of the rat brain angiotensin receptor.

  15. Fimasartan: A New Angiotensin Receptor Blocker.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hae-Young; Oh, Byung-Hee

    2016-07-01

    Fimasartan is the ninth, and most recent, angiotensin II receptor antagonist approved as an antihypertensive agent. Fimasartan, a pyrimidin-4(3H)-one derivative of losartan with the imidazole ring replaced, which enables higher potency and longer duration than losartan. Fecal elimination and biliary excretion are the predominant elimination pathways of fimasartan and the urinary excretion was found to be less than 3 % 24 h after administration. Fimasartan is primarily catabolized by cytochrome P450 isoform 3A and no significant drug interaction was observed when used in combination with hydrochlorothiazide, amlodipine, warfarin, or digoxin. Fimasartan at a dosage range of 60-120 mg once daily showed an antihypertensive effect over 24 h. In a large, population-based observational study, fimasartan showed an excellent safety profile. Anti-inflammatory and organ-protecting effects of fimasartan have been shown in various preclinical studies, including aortic balloon injury, myocardial infarct ischemia/reperfusion, doxorubicin cardiotoxicity, and ischemic stroke models. PMID:27272555

  16. Acute Myocardial Response to Stretch: What We (don't) Know

    PubMed Central

    Neves, João S.; Leite-Moreira, André M.; Neiva-Sousa, Manuel; Almeida-Coelho, João; Castro-Ferreira, Ricardo; Leite-Moreira, Adelino F.

    2016-01-01

    Myocardial stretch, as result of acute hemodynamic overload, is one of the most frequent challenges to the heart and the ability of the heart to intrinsically adapt to it is essential to prevent circulatory congestion. In this review, we highlight the historical background, the currently known mechanisms, as well as the gaps in the understanding of this physiological response. The systolic adaptation to stretch is well-known for over 100 years, being dependent on an immediate increase in contractility—known as the Frank-Starling mechanism—and a further progressive increase—the slow force response. On the other hand, its diastolic counterpart remains largely unstudied. Mechanosensors are structures capable of perceiving mechanical signals and activating pathways that allow their transduction into biochemical responses. Although the connection between these structures and stretch activated pathways remains elusive, we emphasize those most likely responsible for the initiation of the acute response. Calcium-dependent pathways, including angiotensin- and endothelin-related pathways; and cGMP-dependent pathways, comprising the effects of nitric oxide and cardiac natriuretic hormones, embody downstream signaling. The ischemic setting, a paradigmatic situation of acute hemodynamic overload, is also touched upon. Despite the relevant knowledge accumulated, there is much that we still do not know. The quest for further understanding the myocardial response to acute stretch may provide new insights, not only in its physiological importance, but also in the prevention and treatment of cardiovascular diseases. PMID:26779036

  17. Effects of dexmedetomidine postconditioning on myocardial ischemia and the role of the PI3K/Akt-dependent signaling pathway in reperfusion injury

    PubMed Central

    CHENG, XIANG YANG; GU, XIAO YU; GAO, QIN; ZONG, QIAO FENG; LI, XIAO HONG; ZHANG, YE

    2016-01-01

    The present study aimed to determine whether post-ischemic treatment with dexmedetomidine (DEX) protected the heart against acute myocardial ischemia/reperfusion (I/R)-induced injury in rats. The phosphatidylinositol-3 kinase/protein kinase B(PI3K/Akt)-dependent signaling pathway was also investigated. Male Sprague Dawley rats (n=64) were subjected to ligation of the left anterior descending artery (LAD), which produced ischemia for 25 min, followed by reperfusion. Following LAD ligation, rats were treated with DEX (5, 10 and 20 µg/kg) or underwent post-ischemic conditioning, which included three cycles of ischemic insult. In order to determine the role of the PI3K/Akt signaling pathway, wortmannin (Wort), a PI3K inhibitor, was used to treat a group of rats that had also been treated with DEX (20 µg/kg). Post-reperfusion, lactate dehydrogenase (LDH), cardiac troponin I (cTnI), creatine kinase isoenzymes (CK-MB), superoxide dismutase (SOD) and malondialdehyde (MDA) serum levels were measured using an ultraviolet spectrophotometer. The protein expression levels of phosphorylated (p)-Akt, Ser9-p-glycogen synthase kinase-3β (p-GSK-3β) and cleaved caspase-3 were detected in heart tissue by western blotting. The mRNA expression levels of B-cell lymphoma 2 (Bcl-2) and Bcl-2-associated X protein (Bax) were detected using reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction. At the end of the experiment, the hearts were removed and perfused in an isolated perfusion heart apparatus with Evans blue (1%) in order to determine the non-ischemic areas. The risk and infarct areas of the heart were not dyed. As expected, I/R induced myocardial infarction, as determined by the increased serum levels of cTnI, CK-MB and MDA, and the decreased levels of SOD. Post-ischemic treatment with DEX increased the expression levels of p-Akt and p-GSK-3β, whereas caspase-3 expression was reduced following DEX treatment compared with in the I/R group. Compared with the I/R group, the ratio of Bcl

  18. Localized accumulation of angiotensin II and production of angiotensin-(1-7) in rat luteal cells and effects on steroidogenesis.

    PubMed

    Pepperell, John R; Nemeth, Gabor; Yamada, Yuji; Naftolin, Frederick; Merino, Maricruz

    2006-08-01

    These studies aim to investigate subcellular distribution of angiotensin II (ANG II) in rat luteal cells, identify other bioactive angiotensin peptides, and investigate a role for angiotensin peptides in luteal steroidogenesis. Confocal microscopy showed ANG II distributed within the cytoplasm and nuclei of luteal cells. HPLC analysis showed peaks that eluted with the same retention times as ANG-(1-7), ANG II, and ANG III. Their relative concentrations were ANG II >or= ANG-(1-7) > ANG III, and accumulation was modulated by quinapril, an inhibitor of angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE), Z-proprolinal (ZPP), an inhibitor of prolyl endopeptidase (PEP), and parachloromercurylsulfonic acid (PCMS), an inhibitor of sulfhydryl protease. Phenylmethylsulfonyl fluoride (PMSF), a serine protease inhibitor, did not affect peptide accumulation. Quinapril, ZPP, PCMS, and PMSF, as well as losartan and PD-123319, the angiotensin receptor type 1 (AT1) and type 2 (AT2) receptor antagonists, were used in progesterone production studies. ZPP significantly reduced luteinizing hormone (LH)-dependent progesterone production (P < 0.05). Quinapril plus ZPP had a greater inhibitory effect on LH-stimulated progesterone than either inhibitor alone, but this was not reversed by exogenous ANG II or ANG-(1-7). Both PCMS and PMSF acutely blocked LH-stimulated progesterone, and PCMS blocked LH-sensitive cAMP accumulation. Losartan inhibited progesterone production in permeabilized but not intact luteal cells and was reversed by ANG II. PD-123319 had no significant effect on luteal progesterone production in either intact or permeabilized cells. These data suggest that steroidogenesis may be modulated by angiotensin peptides that act in part through intracellular AT1 receptors. PMID:16478781

  19. L-type calcium channel β subunit modulates angiotensin II responses in cardiomyocytes.

    PubMed

    Hermosilla, Tamara; Moreno, Cristian; Itfinca, Mircea; Altier, Christophe; Armisén, Ricardo; Stutzin, Andres; Zamponi, Gerald W; Varela, Diego

    2011-01-01

    Angiotensin II regulation of L-type calcium currents in cardiac muscle is controversial and the underlying signaling events are not completely understood. Moreover, the possible role of auxiliary subunit composition of the channels in Angiotensin II modulation of L-type calcium channels has not yet been explored. In this work we study the role of Ca(v)β subunits and the intracellular signaling responsible for L-type calcium current modulation by Angiotensin II. In cardiomyocytes, Angiotensin II exposure induces rapid inhibition of L-type current with a magnitude that is correlated with the rate of current inactivation. Semi-quantitative PCR of cardiomyocytes at different days of culture reveals changes in the Ca(v)β subunits expression pattern that are correlated with the rate of current inactivation and with Angiotensin II effect. Over-expression of individual b subunits in heterologous systems reveals that the magnitude of Angiotensin II inhibition is dependent on the Ca(v)β subunit isoform, with Ca(v)β(1b) containing channels being more strongly regulated. Ca(v)β(2a) containing channels were insensitive to modulation and this effect was partially due to the N-terminal palmitoylation sites of this subunit. Moreover, PLC or diacylglycerol lipase inhibition prevents the Angiotensin II effect on L-type calcium channels, while PKC inhibition with chelerythrine does not, suggesting a role of arachidonic acid in this process. Finally, we show that in intact cardiomyocytes the magnitude of calcium transients on spontaneous beating cells is modulated by Angiotensin II in a Ca(v)β subunit-dependent manner. These data demonstrate that Ca(v)β subunits alter the magnitude of inhibition of L-type current by Angiotensin II. PMID:21525790

  20. Angiotensin II promotes endometrial cancer cell survival.

    PubMed

    Nowakowska, Magdalena; Matysiak-Burzyńska, Zuzanna; Kowalska, Karolina; Płuciennik, Elżbieta; Domińska, Kamila; Piastowska-Ciesielska, Agnieszka W

    2016-08-01

    Endometrial cancer (EC) is one of the most common female cancers. One of the key processes involved in EC development is uncontrolled proliferation stimulated by local factors such as angiotensin. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the influence of angiotensin II (Ang II) on human EC cells. Biological assays and gene expression analysis were performed on three cell lines: ISH, MFE-296 and MFE-280. Our results indicated that at the beginning of cancerogenesis Ang II induced abnormal proliferation at lower doses. We also showed that dose-dependent induction of proliferation was connected with changes in the expression of MKI67, CCND1 and CCNE1 genes in well- and poorly differentiated cancer cells. After Ang II treatment, poorly differentiated endometrial cancer cell line acquired a mesenchymal phenotype, which was characterized by induced expression of EMT-related genes (VIM, CD44, SNAI1, ZEB1 and ZEB2). Our study revealed that Ang II influences EC cells in terms of cancer-related processes, and is responsible for increased proliferation, reduction in apoptosis, increased mobility and modulation of adhesion potential. Its effect and effectiveness appear to be highly connected with the differentiation status of the cancerous cells, as Ang II appears to play a crucial role in the early and late stages of malignant transformation. PMID:27349856

  1. Angiotensin II regulation of angiotensin-converting enzymes in spontaneously hypertensive rat primary astrocyte cultures.

    PubMed

    Gowrisankar, Yugandhar V; Clark, Michelle A

    2016-07-01

    Angiotensin (Ang) II plays a critical role in cardiovascular and blood pressure regulation. Ang II is produced by angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) and it interacts with the Ang AT1 receptor to cause much of its well-known cardiovascular effects. Ang-(1-7) is another active peptide produced by the rennin-angiotensin system. This peptide is produced from Ang I or Ang II by the catalytic activity of ACE2. Ang-(1-7) interacts with the Mas receptor to counteract many of the effects of Ang II. Thus, the ACE2/Ang-(1-7)/Mas axis acts opposite of the ACE/Ang II/AT1 axis. In this study we investigated how Ang II regulates the key enzymes of these axes, ACE and its homolog ACE2, and determined whether they are dysregulated in the hypertensive condition. Brainstem and cerebellum astrocytes isolated from the spontaneously hypertensive rat (SHR) were used in these studies. Ang II effect on the enzymes' mRNA and protein levels was measured using quantitative PCR and western blotting techniques, respectively. Results from this study showed that Ang II up-regulated ACE protein levels, but down-regulated ACE mRNA levels in brainstem and cerebellum astrocytes in both models. Ang II also reduced ACE2 mRNA expression in SHR and Wistar astrocytes isolated from both brain regions. Ang II effects on ACE2 protein were biphasic. In SHR astrocytes, Ang II-mediated ACE2 protein initially increased then decreased at later time points. In contrast, in Wistar astrocytes, Ang II initially decreased ACE2 protein expression, but up-regulated the protein at later time points. The findings of these studies suggest that Ang II has a differential effect on ACE and ACE2 expression. Furthermore, in the SHR model there may be alteration in the ACE/ACE2 balance in a manner that favors increased Ang II generation and decreased Ang-(1-7) production contributing to the hypertensive phenotype observed in this model. The levels of angiotensin (Ang) II depend on the actions of angiotensin-converting enzyme

  2. Nanoparticle-Mediated Delivery of Irbesartan Induces Cardioprotection from Myocardial Ischemia-Reperfusion Injury by Antagonizing Monocyte-Mediated Inflammation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakano, Yasuhiro; Matoba, Tetsuya; Tokutome, Masaki; Funamoto, Daiki; Katsuki, Shunsuke; Ikeda, Gentaro; Nagaoka, Kazuhiro; Ishikita, Ayako; Nakano, Kaku; Koga, Jun-Ichiro; Sunagawa, Kenji; Egashira, Kensuke

    2016-07-01

    Myocardial ischemia-reperfusion (IR) injury limits the therapeutic effect of early reperfusion therapy for acute myocardial infarction (AMI), in which the recruitment of inflammatory monocytes plays a causative role. Here we develop bioabsorbable poly-lactic/glycolic acid (PLGA) nanoparticles incorporating irbesartan, an angiotensin II type 1 receptor blocker with a peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR)γ agonistic effect (irbesartan-NP). In a mouse model of IR injury, intravenous PLGA nanoparticles distribute to the IR myocardium and monocytes in the blood and in the IR heart. Single intravenous treatment at the time of reperfusion with irbesartan-NP (3.0 mg kg‑1 irbesartan), but not with control nanoparticles or irbesartan solution (3.0 mg kg‑1), inhibits the recruitment of inflammatory monocytes to the IR heart, and reduces the infarct size via PPARγ-dependent anti-inflammatory mechanisms, and ameliorates left ventricular remodeling 21 days after IR. Irbesartan-NP is a novel approach to treat myocardial IR injury in patients with AMI.

  3. Nanoparticle-Mediated Delivery of Irbesartan Induces Cardioprotection from Myocardial Ischemia-Reperfusion Injury by Antagonizing Monocyte-Mediated Inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Nakano, Yasuhiro; Matoba, Tetsuya; Tokutome, Masaki; Funamoto, Daiki; Katsuki, Shunsuke; Ikeda, Gentaro; Nagaoka, Kazuhiro; Ishikita, Ayako; Nakano, Kaku; Koga, Jun-ichiro; Sunagawa, Kenji; Egashira, Kensuke

    2016-01-01

    Myocardial ischemia-reperfusion (IR) injury limits the therapeutic effect of early reperfusion therapy for acute myocardial infarction (AMI), in which the recruitment of inflammatory monocytes plays a causative role. Here we develop bioabsorbable poly-lactic/glycolic acid (PLGA) nanoparticles incorporating irbesartan, an angiotensin II type 1 receptor blocker with a peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR)γ agonistic effect (irbesartan-NP). In a mouse model of IR injury, intravenous PLGA nanoparticles distribute to the IR myocardium and monocytes in the blood and in the IR heart. Single intravenous treatment at the time of reperfusion with irbesartan-NP (3.0 mg kg−1 irbesartan), but not with control nanoparticles or irbesartan solution (3.0 mg kg−1), inhibits the recruitment of inflammatory monocytes to the IR heart, and reduces the infarct size via PPARγ-dependent anti-inflammatory mechanisms, and ameliorates left ventricular remodeling 21 days after IR. Irbesartan-NP is a novel approach to treat myocardial IR injury in patients with AMI. PMID:27403534

  4. Urinary kallikrein in the rat: stimulation with angiotensin infusion but depression with increasing sodium concentration.

    PubMed Central

    Mills, I H; Lee, G; Brownlee, A A

    1994-01-01

    1. The kallikrein response to angiotensin II infusion in the conscious rat was studied to compare it with the response in the dog. 2. Active kallikrein was measured by the aprotinin-suppressible esterase technique in 20 min periods. Angiotensin (5 x 10(-9) to 5 x 10(-2) micrograms min-1) was infused in 10 mM saline in period 10 (group A), or in 90 mM saline in periods 10-12 (group B). 3. In group A, no dose of angiotensin was antinatriuretic. Natriuresis and urinary sodium concentration were dose dependent. 4. Kallikrein excretion was dose dependent with angiotensin (P < 0.0001) and inversely correlated with urinary sodium concentration (P = 0.011). In natriuretic and non-natriuretic rats, kallikrein excretion after angiotensin was inversely correlated with urinary sodium concentration in the preceding period. 5. In group B, natriuresis and urinary sodium concentration were dose dependent. Kallikrein excretion in periods 10-13 was inversely correlated with urinary sodium concentration in the preceding period (P = 0.0001) and inversely correlated with urinary osmolality in periods 9-13. 6. Infusion of angiotensin II at 5 x 10(-6) micrograms min-1 led to antinatriuresis. 7. Formulae were derived which enabled the opposing effects of angiotensin and urinary sodium concentration on kallikrein excretion to be separated. In group A both these effects were statistically significant only in the natriuretic rats (natriuresis > 20 mumols per period). In group B the formulae showed a dose-dependent rise in kallikrein excretion, which was counteracted by the decrease in kallikrein excretion associated with the increasing urinary sodium concentration. 8. With infusions of 0.9% saline, kallikrein excretion in periods 10-13 was inversely correlated with urinary sodium concentration in the preceding period (P = 0.001). 9. The overall effect in the rat differs from that in the dog, where kallikrein increases with angiotensin natriuresis and dilution of the urine occurs. PMID

  5. Activation of Central PPAR-γ Attenuates Angiotensin II-Induced Hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Yang; Xue, Bao-Jian; Wei, Shun-Guang; Zhang, Zhi-Hua; Beltz, Terry G; Guo, Fang; Johnson, Alan Kim; Felder, Robert B

    2015-01-01

    Inflammation and renin-angiotensin system activity in the brain contribute to hypertension through effects on fluid intake, vasopressin release, and sympathetic nerve activity. We recently reported that activation of brain peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR)-γ in heart failure rats reduced inflammation and renin-angiotensin system activity in the hypothalamic paraventricular nucleus and ameliorated the peripheral manifestations of heart failure. We hypothesized that activation of brain PPAR-γ might have beneficial effects in angiotensin II-induced hypertension. Sprague-Dawley rats received a 2-week subcutaneous infusion of angiotensin II (120 ng/kg/min) combined with a continuous intracerebroventricular infusion of vehicle, the PPAR-γ agonist pioglitazone (3 nmol/h) or the PPAR-γ antagonist GW9662 (7 nmol/h). Angiotensin II+vehicle rats had increased mean blood pressure, increased sympathetic drive as indicated by the mean blood pressure response to ganglionic blockade, and increased water consumption. PPAR-γ mRNA in subfornical organ and hypothalamic paraventricular nucleus was unchanged, but PPAR-γ DNA binding activity was reduced. mRNA for interleukin-1β, tumor necrosis factor-α, cyclooxygenase-2 and angiotensin II type-1 receptor was augmented in both nuclei, and hypothalamic paraventricular nucleus neuronal activity was increased. The plasma vasopressin response to a 6-hour water restriction also increased. These responses to angiotensin II were exacerbated by GW9662 and ameliorated by pioglitazone, which increased PPAR-γ mRNA and PPAR-γ DNA binding activity in subfornical organ and hypothalamic paraventricular nucleus. Pioglitazone and GW9662 had no effects on control rats. The results suggest that activating brain PPAR-γ to reduce central inflammation and brain renin-angiotensin system activity may be a useful adjunct in the treatment of angiotensin II-dependent hypertension. PMID:26101342

  6. Activation of central PPAR-γ attenuates angiotensin II-induced hypertension.

    PubMed

    Yu, Yang; Xue, Bao-Jian; Wei, Shun-Guang; Zhang, Zhi-Hua; Beltz, Terry G; Guo, Fang; Johnson, Alan Kim; Felder, Robert B

    2015-08-01

    Inflammation and renin-angiotensin system activity in the brain contribute to hypertension through effects on fluid intake, vasopressin release, and sympathetic nerve activity. We recently reported that activation of brain peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR)-γ in heart failure rats reduced inflammation and renin-angiotensin system activity in the hypothalamic paraventricular nucleus and ameliorated the peripheral manifestations of heart failure. We hypothesized that the activation of brain PPAR-γ might have beneficial effects in angiotensin II-induced hypertension. Sprague-Dawley rats received a 2-week subcutaneous infusion of angiotensin II (120 ng/kg per minute) combined with a continuous intracerebroventricular infusion of vehicle, the PPAR-γ agonist pioglitazone (3 nmol/h) or the PPAR-γ antagonist GW9662 (7 nmol/h). Angiotensin II+vehicle rats had increased mean blood pressure, increased sympathetic drive as indicated by the mean blood pressure response to ganglionic blockade, and increased water consumption. PPAR-γ mRNA in subfornical organ and hypothalamic paraventricular nucleus was unchanged, but PPAR-γ DNA-binding activity was reduced. mRNA for interleukin-1β, tumor necrosis factor-α, cyclooxygenase-2, and angiotensin II type 1 receptor was augmented in both nuclei, and hypothalamic paraventricular nucleus neuronal activity was increased. The plasma vasopressin response to a 6-hour water restriction also increased. These responses to angiotensin II were exacerbated by GW9662 and ameliorated by pioglitazone, which increased PPAR-γ mRNA and PPAR-γ DNA-binding activity in subfornical organ and hypothalamic paraventricular nucleus. Pioglitazone and GW9662 had no effects on control rats. The results suggest that activating brain PPAR-γ to reduce central inflammation and brain renin-angiotensin system activity may be a useful adjunct in the treatment of angiotensin II-dependent hypertension. PMID:26101342

  7. Aldosterone response to angiotensin II during hypoxemia

    SciTech Connect

    Colice, G.L.; Ramirez, G.

    1986-07-01

    Exercise stimulates the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system (RAAS). However, increases in plasma aldosterone concentrations (PAC) are suppressed when exercise is performed at high altitude or under hypoxemic conditions. As the angiotensin-II response to high-altitude exercise is normal, it is speculated that an inhibitor, discharged during hypoxemia, acted to suppress angiotensin-II-mediated aldosterone release. A study was conducted to test this hypothesis, taking into account the measurement of the aldosterone response to exogenous angiotensin II during normoxemia and hypoxemia. It was found that the dose-response curve of PAC to angiotensin II was not significantly inhibited by the considered model of hypoxemia. The hypoxemia-mediated release of an angiotensin II inhibitor does, therefore, not explain the previous observations of PAC suppression during hypoxemic exercise. 28 references.

  8. Inflammation, oxidative stress and renin angiotensin system in atherosclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Husain, Kazim; Hernandez, Wilfredo; Ansari, Rais A; Ferder, Leon

    2015-01-01

    Atherosclerosis is a chronic inflammatory disease associated with cardiovascular dysfunction including myocardial infarction, unstable angina, sudden cardiac death, stroke and peripheral thromboses. It has been predicted that atherosclerosis will be the primary cause of death in the world by 2020. Atherogenesis is initiated by endothelial injury due to oxidative stress associated with cardiovascular risk factors including diabetes mellitus, hypertension, cigarette smoking, dyslipidemia, obesity, and metabolic syndrome. The impairment of the endothelium associated with cardiovascular risk factors creates an imbalance between vasodilating and vasoconstricting factors, in particular, an increase in angiotensin II (Ang II) and a decrease in nitric oxide. The renin-angiotensin system (RAS), and its primary mediator Ang II, also have a direct influence on the progression of the atherosclerotic process via effects on endothelial function, inflammation, fibrinolytic balance, and plaque stability. Anti-inflammatory agents [statins, secretory phospholipase A2 inhibitor, lipoprotein-associated phospholipase A2 inhibitor, 5-lipoxygenase activating protein, chemokine motif ligand-2, C-C chemokine motif receptor 2 pathway inhibitors, methotrexate, IL-1 pathway inhibitor and RAS inhibitors (angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors)], Ang II receptor blockers and ranin inhibitors may slow inflammatory processes and disease progression. Several studies in human using anti-inflammatory agents and RAS inhibitors revealed vascular benefits and reduced progression of coronary atherosclerosis in patients with stable angina pectoris; decreased vascular inflammatory markers, improved common carotid intima-media thickness and plaque volume in patients with diagnosed atherosclerosis. Recent preclinical studies have demonstrated therapeutic efficacy of vitamin D analogs paricalcitol in ApoE-deficient atherosclerotic mice. PMID:26322175

  9. Effect of Wenxin Granule on Ventricular Remodeling and Myocardial Apoptosis in Rats with Myocardial Infarction

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Aiming; Zhai, Jianying; Zhang, Dongmei; Lou, Lixia; Zhu, Haiyan; Gao, Yonghong; Chai, Limin; Xing, Yanwei; Lv, Xiying; Zhu, Lingqun; Zhao, Mingjing; Wang, Shuoren

    2013-01-01

    Aim. To determine the effect of a Chinese herbal compound named Wenxin Granule on ventricular remodeling and myocardial apoptosis in rats with myocardial infarction (MI). Methods. Male Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats were randomly divided into four groups: the control group, the model group, the metoprolol group, and the Wenxin Granule group (WXKL group) with sample size (n) of 7 rats in each group. An MI model was established in all rats by occlusion of the left anterior descending coronary artery (the control group was without occlusion). Wenxin Granule (1.35 g/kg/day), metoprolol (12 mg/kg/day), and distilled water (5 mL/kg/day for the control and model groups) were administered orally for 4 weeks. Ultrasonic echocardiography was used to examine cardiac structural and functional parameters. Myocardial histopathological changes were observed using haematoxylin and eosin (H&E) dyeing. Myocardial apoptosis was detected by terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase mediated dUTP nick end labeling (TUNEL) staining. Serum angiotensin II (Ang II) concentration was measured using the enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Results. It was found that Wenxin Granule could partially reverse ventricular remodeling, improve heart function, alleviate the histopathological damage, inhibit myocardial apoptosis, and reduce Ang II concentration in rats with MI. Conclusions. The results of the current study suggest that Wenxin Granule may be a potential alternative and complementary medicine for the treatment of MI. PMID:23997803

  10. Aprotinin Exerts Differential and Dose Dependent Effects on Myocardial Contractility, Oxidative Stress and Cytokine Release Following Ischemia-Reperfusion

    PubMed Central

    McEvoy, Matthew D.; Taylor, Anna-Greta; Zavadzkas, Juozas A.; Mains, Ira M.; Ford, Rachael A.; Stroud, Robert E.; Jeffords, Laura B.; Beck, Christy U.; Reeves, Scott T.; Spinale, Francis G.

    2009-01-01

    Background Cardiac surgery can result in LV ischemia and reperfusion (I/R), the release of cytokines such as tumor necrosis factor, and oxidative-stress with release of myeloperoxidase. While aprotinin has been used in cardiac surgery, the likely multiple effects of this serine protease inhibitor limits clinical utility. This study tested the hypothesis that different APRO doses cause divergent effects on LV contractility, cytokine release and oxidative stress in the context of I/R. Methods/Results LV I/R (30 min I/60 min R) was induced in mice and LV contractility (maximal end-systolic elastance; Emax) determined. Mice were randomized to 2×104 KIU/kg aprotinin (n=11), 4 × 104 KIU/kg aprotinin (n=10), and Vehicle (saline, n=10). Based upon a fluorogenic assay, aprotinin doses of 2 and 4×104 KIU/kg resulted in plasma concentrations similar to those of the half and full Hammersmith doses, respectively. Following I/R, Emax fell by over 40% from baseline (p<0.05), and this effect was attenuated with 2 ×104 KIU/kg but not 4 ×104 KIU/kg aprotinin. Tumor necrosis factor increased by over 60% from control (p<0.05) with I/R, bit was reduced with 4 ×104 KIU/kg aprotinin. Myeloperoxidase increased with I/R, and was reduced to the greatest degree by 2 ×104 KIU/kg aprotinin. Conclusions Aprotinin influences LV contractility, cytokine release and oxidative stress which are dose dependent. These results provide mechanistic evidence that multiple pathways are differentially affected by aprotinin in a context relevant to cardiac surgery. PMID:18640335

  11. Effects of dexmedetomidine postconditioning on myocardial ischemia and the role of the PI3K/Akt-dependent signaling pathway in reperfusion injury.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Xiang Yang; Gu, Xiao Yu; Gao, Qin; Zong, Qiao Feng; Li, Xiao Hong; Zhang, Ye

    2016-07-01

    The present study aimed to determine whether post-ischemic treatment with dexmedetomidine (DEX) protected the heart against acute myocardial ischemia/reperfusion (I/R)‑induced injury in rats. The phosphatidylinositol‑3 kinase/protein kinase B(PI3K/Akt)‑dependent signaling pathway was also investigated. Male Sprague Dawley rats (n=64) were subjected to ligation of the left anterior descending artery (LAD), which produced ischemia for 25 min, followed by reperfusion. Following LAD ligation, rats were treated with DEX (5, 10 and 20 µg/kg) or underwent post‑ischemic conditioning, which included three cycles of ischemic insult. In order to determine the role of the PI3K/Akt signaling pathway, wortmannin (Wort), a PI3K inhibitor, was used to treat a group of rats that had also been treated with DEX (20 µg/kg). Post‑reperfusion, lactate dehydrogenase (LDH), cardiac troponin I (cTnI), creatine kinase isoenzymes (CK‑MB), superoxide dismutase (SOD) and malondialdehyde (MDA) serum levels were measured using an ultraviolet spectrophotometer. The protein expression levels of phosphorylated (p)‑Akt, Ser9‑p‑glycogen synthase kinase‑3β (p‑GSK‑3β) and cleaved caspase‑3 were detected in heart tissue by western blotting. The mRNA expression levels of B‑cell lymphoma 2 (Bcl‑2) and Bcl‑2‑associated X protein (Bax) were detected using reverse transcription‑polymerase chain reaction. At the end of the experiment, the hearts were removed and perfused in an isolated perfusion heart apparatus with Evans blue (1%) in order to determine the non‑ischemic areas. The risk and infarct areas of the heart were not dyed. As expected, I/R induced myocardial infarction, as determined by the increased serum levels of cTnI, CK‑MB and MDA, and the decreased levels of SOD. Post‑ischemic treatment with DEX increased the expression levels of p‑Akt and p‑GSK‑3β, whereas caspase‑3 expression was reduced following DEX treatment compared with in the

  12. Hypertension and acute myocardial infarction: an overview.

    PubMed

    Pedrinelli, Roberto; Ballo, Piercarlo; Fiorentini, Cesare; Denti, Silvia; Galderisi, Maurizio; Ganau, Antonello; Germanò, Giuseppe; Innelli, Pasquale; Paini, Anna; Perlini, Stefano; Salvetti, Massimo; Zacà, Valerio

    2012-03-01

    History of hypertension is a frequent finding in patients with acute myocardial infarction (AMI) and its recurring association with female sex, diabetes, older age, less frequent smoking and more frequent vascular comorbidities composes a risk profile quite distinctive from the normotensive ischemic counterpart.Antecedent hypertension associates with higher rates of death and morbid events both during the early and long-term course of AMI, particularly if complicated by left ventricular dysfunction and/or congestive heart failure. Renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system blockade, through either angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibition, angiotensin II receptor blockade or aldosterone antagonism, exerts particular benefits in that high-risk hypertensive subgroup.In contrast to the negative implications carried by antecedent hypertension, higher systolic pressure at the onset of chest pain associates with lower mortality within 1 year from coronary occlusion, whereas increased blood pressure recorded after hemodynamic stabilization from the acute ischemic event bears inconsistent relationships with recurring coronary events in the long-term follow-up.Whether antihypertensive treatment in post-AMI hypertensive patients prevents ischemic relapses is uncertain. As a matter of fact, excessive diastolic pressure drops may jeopardize coronary perfusion and predispose to new acute coronary events, although the precise cause-effect mechanisms underlying this phenomenon need further evaluation. PMID:22317927

  13. C1q/Tumor Necrosis Factor-Related Protein 9 Protects against Acute Myocardial Injury through an Adiponectin Receptor I-AMPK-Dependent Mechanism.

    PubMed

    Kambara, Takahiro; Shibata, Rei; Ohashi, Koji; Matsuo, Kazuhiro; Hiramatsu-Ito, Mizuho; Enomoto, Takashi; Yuasa, Daisuke; Ito, Masanori; Hayakawa, Satoko; Ogawa, Hayato; Aprahamian, Tamar; Walsh, Kenneth; Murohara, Toyoaki; Ouchi, Noriyuki

    2015-06-01

    Obesity is a risk factor for cardiovascular disease. C1q/tumor necrosis factor-related protein 9 (CTRP9) is an adipokine that is downregulated by obesity. We investigated the role of CTRP9 in cardiac injury with loss-of-function genetic manipulations and defined the receptor-mediated signaling pathway downstream of this adipokine. CTRP9-knockout (CTRP9-KO) mice at the age of 12 weeks were indistinguishable from wild-type (WT) mice under basal conditions. CTRP9-KO mice had exacerbated contractile left ventricle dysfunction following intraperitoneal injection of lipopolysaccharide (LPS) compared to WT mice. Administration of LPS to CTRP9-KO mice also resulted in increased expression of proinflammatory cytokines and oxidative stress markers in the heart compared to WT mice. Likewise, CTRP9-KO mice showed increased myocardial infarct size and elevated expression of inflammatory mediators in ischemic heart following ischemia and reperfusion compared to WT mice. Treatment of cardiac myocytes with CTRP9 protein led to suppression of LPS-induced expression of proinflammatory genes, which was reversed by blockade of AMPK or ablation of adiponectin receptor I (AdipoR1). Systemic delivery of CTRP9 attenuated LPS-induced cardiac dysfunction in WT mice but not in muscle-specific transgenic mice expressing dominant-negative mutant form of AMPK or in AdipoR1-knockout mice. CTRP9 protects against acute cardiac damage in response to pathological stimuli by suppressing inflammatory reactions through AdipoR1/AMPK-dependent mechanisms. PMID:25870106

  14. Spliced stromal cell-derived factor-1α analog stimulates endothelial progenitor cell migration and improves cardiac function in a dose-dependent manner after myocardial infarction

    PubMed Central

    Hiesinger, William; Frederick, John R.; Atluri, Pavan; McCormick, Ryan C.; Marotta, Nicole; Muenzer, Jeffrey R.; Woo, Y. Joseph

    2011-01-01

    Objectives Stromal cell-derived factor (SDF)-1α is a potent endogenous endothelial progenitor cell (EPC) chemokine and key angiogenic precursor. Recombinant SDF-1α has been demonstrated to improve neovasculogenesis and cardiac function after myocardial infarction (MI) but SDF-1α is a bulky protein with a short half-life. Small peptide analogs might provide translational advantages, including ease of synthesis, low manufacturing costs, and the potential to control delivery within tissues using engineered biomaterials. We hypothesized that a minimized peptide analog of SDF-1α, designed by splicing the N-terminus (activation and binding) and C-terminus (extracellular stabilization) with a truncated amino acid linker, would induce EPC migration and preserve ventricular function after MI. Methods EPC migration was first determined in vitro using a Boyden chamber assay. For in vivo analysis, male rats (n=48) underwent left anterior descending coronary artery ligation. At infarction, the rats were randomized into 4 groups and received peri-infarct intramyocardial injections of saline, 3 μg/kg of SDF-1α, 3 μg/kg of spliced SDF analog, or 6 μg/kg spliced SDF analog. After 4 weeks, the rats underwent closed chest pressure volume conductance catheter analysis. Results EPCs showed significantly increased migration when placed in both a recombinant SDF-1α and spliced SDF analog gradient. The rats treated with spliced SDF analog at MI demonstrated a significant dose-dependent improvement in end-diastolic pressure, stroke volume, ejection fraction, cardiac output, and stroke work compared with the control rats. Conclusions A spliced peptide analog of SDF-1α containing both the N- and C- termini of the native protein induced EPC migration, improved ventricular function after acute MI, and provided translational advantages compared with recombinant human SDF-1α. PMID:20951261

  15. Angiotensin II diminishes the effect of SGK1 on the WNK4-mediated inhibition of ROMK1 channels.

    PubMed

    Yue, Peng; Sun, Peng; Lin, Dao-Hong; Pan, Chunyang; Xing, Wenming; Wang, WenHui

    2011-02-01

    ROMK1 channels are located in the apical membrane of the connecting tubule and cortical collecting duct and mediate the potassium secretion during normal dietary intake. We used a perforated whole-cell patch clamp to explore the effect of angiotensin II on these channels in HEK293 cells transfected with green fluorescent protein (GFP)-ROMK1. Angiotensin II inhibited ROMK1 channels in a dose-dependent manner, an effect abolished by losartan or by inhibition of protein kinase C. Furthermore, angiotensin II stimulated a protein kinase C-sensitive phosphorylation of tyrosine 416 within c-Src. Inhibition of protein tyrosine kinase attenuated the effect of angiotensin II. Western blot studies suggested that angiotensin II inhibited ROMK1 channels by enhancing its tyrosine phosphorylation, a notion supported by angiotensin II's failure to inhibit potassium channels in cells transfected with the ROMK1 tyrosine mutant (R1Y337A). However, angiotensin II restored the with-no-lysine kinase-4 (WNK4)-induced inhibition of R1Y337A in the presence of serum-glucocorticoids-induced kinase 1 (SGK1), which reversed the inhibitory effect of WNK4 on ROMK1. Moreover, protein tyrosine kinase inhibition abolished the angiotensin II-induced restoration of WNK4-mediated inhibition of ROMK1. Angiotensin II inhibited ROMK channels in the cortical collecting duct of rats on a low sodium diet, an effect blocked by protein tyrosine kinase inhibition. Thus, angiotensin II inhibits ROMK channels by two mechanisms: increasing tyrosine phosphorylation of the channel and synergizing the WNK4-induced inhibition. Hence, angiotensin II may have an important role in suppressing potassium secretion during volume depletion. PMID:20927043

  16. Cognitive-enhancing effects of angiotensin IV

    PubMed Central

    Gard, Paul R

    2008-01-01

    Angiotensin IV is a derivative of the potent vasoconstrictor angiotensin II and it has been shown to enhance acquisition, consolidation and recall in animal models of learning and memory when administered centrally or peripherally. Whether changes in angiotensin IV activity underlie the cognitive effects of those cardiovascular drugs designed to disrupt the peripheral renin-angiotensin system in humans remains undetermined, but angiotensin IV appears to be a worthy candidate for consideration in drug development programmes. The mechanism of action of angiotensin IV is still debated, although its AT4 receptor has been convincingly identified as being insulin-regulated amino peptidase, which is also known as oxytocinase and placental leucine aminopeptidase. It is speculated that angiotensin IV may interact with insulin-regulated amino peptidase to enhance neuronal glucose uptake, prevent metabolism of other neuroactive peptides, induce changes in extracellular matrix molecules, or induce release of acetylcholine and/or dopamine. All of these things may be responsible for the beneficial effects on cognition, but none of them are yet proven. Importantly, strain differences in murine responses to angiotensin IV suggest that some individuals may benefit from drugs targeted to the AT4 receptor whilst others may be refractory. At present it thus appears that those individuals with the poorest baseline cognition may receive greatest benefit, but possible genetic differences in responses to angiotensin IV cannot be ruled-out. PMID:19090988

  17. Direct positive chronotropic action by angiotensin II in the isolated mouse atrium.

    PubMed

    Mori, Toyoki; Hashimoto, Ayako

    2006-07-10

    We observed the direct positive chronotropic effect of angiotensin II in mouse atria and characterized its pharmacological property. C57BL/6J mice were anesthetized with pentobarbital and hearts were quickly excised. Atrial preparations including right and left atrium were isolated and suspended in the organ bath filled with Krebs-Henseleit solution gassed with 95% O2 and 5% CO2. Angiotensin II at concentrations of 10(-10) to 10(-6) M caused concentration-dependent increase in heart rate, and the maximal response was about 13% of that by isoproterenol. The effect was blocked by the selective AT1-receptor antagonist, losartan at concentrations of 10(-6) M, but not by the selective beta-blocker, nadolol at concentration of 10(-5) M. Furthermore, angiotensin I also caused concentration-dependent increase in heart rate, and the effect was blocked by angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitor, captopril at concentrations of 10(-6) M. These results suggested that angiotensin I is converted to angiotensin II via ACE system in mice atria, and regulate heart rate through AT1-receptor stimulation, not by beta-adrenergic receptor. PMID:16564555

  18. Cardiac protective effects of irbesartan via the PPAR-gamma signaling pathway in angiotensin-converting enzyme 2-deficient mice

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 (ACE2), a monocarboxypeptidase which metabolizes angiotensin II (Ang II) to generate Ang-(1–7), has been shown to prevent cardiac hypertrophy and injury but the mechanism remains elusive. Irbesartan has the dual actions of angiotensin receptor blockade and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ (PPARγ) activation. We hypothesized that irbesartan would exert its protective effects on ACE2 deficiency-mediated myocardial fibrosis and cardiac injury via the PPARγ signaling. Methods 10-week-old ACE2 knockout (ACE2KO; Ace2-/y) mice received daily with irbesartan (50 mg/kg) or saline for 2 weeks. The wild-type mice (Ace2+/y) were used to the normal controls. We examined changes in myocardial ultrastructure, fibrosis-related genes and pathological signaling by real-time PCR gene array, Western blotting, Masson trichrome staining and transmission electron microscope analyses, respectively. Results Compared with the Ace2+/y mice, cardiac expression of PPARα and PPARγ were reduced in Ace2-/y mice and the myocardial collagen volume fraction (CVF) and expression of fibrosis-related genes were increased, including transforming growth factor-β1 (TGFβ1), connective tissue growth factor (CTGF), collagen I and collagen III. Moreover, ACE2 deficiency triggered cardiac hypertrophy, increased myocardial fibrosis and adverse ultrastructure injury in ACE2KO hearts with higher levels of atrial natriuretic factor (ANF) and phosphorylated extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 (ERK1/2), without affecting cardiac systolic function. Intriguingly, treatment with irbesartan significantly reversed ACE2 deficiency-mediated pathological hypertrophy and myocardial fibrosis in Ace2-/y mice linked with enhancement of plasma Ang-(1–7) level and downregulation of AT1 receptor in heart. Consistent with attenuation of myocardial fibrosis and ultrastructure injury, the myocardial CVF and levels of ANF, TGFβ1, CTGF, collagen I, collagen III

  19. Des-aspartate angiotensin I (DAA-I) reduces endothelial dysfunction in the aorta of the spontaneously hypertensive rat through inhibition of angiotensin II-induced oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    Loh, Wei Mee; Ling, Wei Chih; Murugan, Dharmani D; Lau, Yeh Siang; Achike, Francis I; Vanhoutte, Paul M; Mustafa, Mohd Rais

    2015-08-01

    Des-aspartate angiotensin I (DAA-I), an endogenous nonapeptide, counteracts several effects of angiotensin II on vascular tone. The aim of this study was to investigate the acute protective effect of DAA-I on endothelial function in the spontaneously hypertensive rat (SHR) as well as its effect on angiotensin II-induced contractions and oxidative stress. Aortic rings were incubated with DAA-I (0.1μM) for 30min prior to the assessment of angiotensin II-induced contractions (0.1nM-10μM) in WKY and SHR aortas. Total nitrate and nitrite levels were assessed using a colorimetric method and reactive oxygen species (ROS) were measured by dihydroethidium (DHE) fluorescence and lucigenin-enhanced chemiluminescence. The effect of DAA-I was also assessed against endothelium-dependent and -independent relaxations to acetylcholine and sodium nitroprusside, respectively. Angiotensin II-induced contractions were significantly reduced by DAA-I, losartan and tempol. Incubation with ODQ (soluble guanylyl cyclase inhibitor) and removal of the endothelium prevented the reduction of angiotensin II-induced contractions by DAA-I. Total nitrate and nitrite levels were increased in DAA-I, losartan and tempol treated-SHR tissues while ROS level was reduced by DAA-I and the latter inhibitors. In addition, DAA-I significantly improved the impaired acetylcholine-induced relaxation in SHR aortas whilst sodium nitroprusside-induced endothelium-independent relaxation remained unaffected. The present findings indicate that improvement of endothelial function by DAA-I in the SHR aorta is mediated through endothelium-dependent release of nitric oxide and inhibition of angiotensin II-induced oxidative stress. PMID:25869508

  20. Increased Titin Compliance Reduced Length-Dependent Contraction and Slowed Cross-Bridge Kinetics in Skinned Myocardial Strips from Rbm (20ΔRRM) Mice.

    PubMed

    Pulcastro, Hannah C; Awinda, Peter O; Methawasin, Mei; Granzier, Henk; Dong, Wenji; Tanner, Bertrand C W

    2016-01-01

    Titin is a giant protein spanning from the Z-disk to the M-band of the cardiac sarcomere. In the I-band titin acts as a molecular spring, contributing to passive mechanical characteristics of the myocardium throughout a heartbeat. RNA Binding Motif Protein 20 (RBM20) is required for normal titin splicing, and its absence or altered function leads to greater expression of a very large, more compliant N2BA titin isoform in Rbm20 homozygous mice (Rbm20 (ΔRRM) ) compared to wild-type mice (WT) that almost exclusively express the stiffer N2B titin isoform. Prior studies using Rbm20 (ΔRRM) animals have shown that increased titin compliance compromises muscle ultrastructure and attenuates the Frank-Starling relationship. Although previous computational simulations of muscle contraction suggested that increasing compliance of the sarcomere slows the rate of tension development and prolongs cross-bridge attachment, none of the reported effects of Rbm20 (ΔRRM) on myocardial function have been attributed to changes in cross-bridge cycling kinetics. To test the relationship between increased sarcomere compliance and cross-bridge kinetics, we used stochastic length-perturbation analysis in Ca(2+)-activated, skinned papillary muscle strips from Rbm20 (ΔRRM) and WT mice. We found increasing titin compliance depressed maximal tension, decreased Ca(2+)-sensitivity of the tension-pCa relationship, and slowed myosin detachment rate in myocardium from Rbm20 (ΔRRM) vs. WT mice. As sarcomere length increased from 1.9 to 2.2 μm, length-dependent activation of contraction was eliminated in the Rbm20 (ΔRRM) myocardium, even though myosin MgADP release rate decreased ~20% to prolong strong cross-bridge binding at longer sarcomere length. These data suggest that increasing N2BA expression may alter cardiac performance in a length-dependent manner, showing greater deficits in tension production and slower cross-bridge kinetics at longer sarcomere length. This study also supports the

  1. Increased Titin Compliance Reduced Length-Dependent Contraction and Slowed Cross-Bridge Kinetics in Skinned Myocardial Strips from Rbm20ΔRRM Mice

    PubMed Central

    Pulcastro, Hannah C.; Awinda, Peter O.; Methawasin, Mei; Granzier, Henk; Dong, Wenji; Tanner, Bertrand C. W.

    2016-01-01

    Titin is a giant protein spanning from the Z-disk to the M-band of the cardiac sarcomere. In the I-band titin acts as a molecular spring, contributing to passive mechanical characteristics of the myocardium throughout a heartbeat. RNA Binding Motif Protein 20 (RBM20) is required for normal titin splicing, and its absence or altered function leads to greater expression of a very large, more compliant N2BA titin isoform in Rbm20 homozygous mice (Rbm20ΔRRM) compared to wild-type mice (WT) that almost exclusively express the stiffer N2B titin isoform. Prior studies using Rbm20ΔRRM animals have shown that increased titin compliance compromises muscle ultrastructure and attenuates the Frank-Starling relationship. Although previous computational simulations of muscle contraction suggested that increasing compliance of the sarcomere slows the rate of tension development and prolongs cross-bridge attachment, none of the reported effects of Rbm20ΔRRM on myocardial function have been attributed to changes in cross-bridge cycling kinetics. To test the relationship between increased sarcomere compliance and cross-bridge kinetics, we used stochastic length-perturbation analysis in Ca2+-activated, skinned papillary muscle strips from Rbm20ΔRRM and WT mice. We found increasing titin compliance depressed maximal tension, decreased Ca2+-sensitivity of the tension-pCa relationship, and slowed myosin detachment rate in myocardium from Rbm20ΔRRM vs. WT mice. As sarcomere length increased from 1.9 to 2.2 μm, length-dependent activation of contraction was eliminated in the Rbm20ΔRRM myocardium, even though myosin MgADP release rate decreased ~20% to prolong strong cross-bridge binding at longer sarcomere length. These data suggest that increasing N2BA expression may alter cardiac performance in a length-dependent manner, showing greater deficits in tension production and slower cross-bridge kinetics at longer sarcomere length. This study also supports the idea that passive

  2. DIOL Triterpenes Block Profibrotic Effects of Angiotensin II and Protect from Cardiac Hypertrophy

    PubMed Central

    Jurado-López, Raquel; Martínez-Martínez, Ernesto; Gómez-Hurtado, Nieves; Delgado, Carmen; Visitación Bartolomé, Maria; San Román, José Alberto; Cordova, Claudia; Lahera, Vicente; Nieto, Maria Luisa; Cachofeiro, Victoria

    2012-01-01

    myofibroblasts. They inhibit the angiotensin II-induced proliferation in a PPAR-γ-dependent manner, while at high doses they activate pathways of programmed cell death that are dependent on JNK and PPAR-γ. PMID:22844495

  3. The Renal Renin-Angiotensin System

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harrison-Bernard, Lisa M.

    2009-01-01

    The renin-angiotensin system (RAS) is a critical regulator of sodium balance, extracellular fluid volume, vascular resistance, and, ultimately, arterial blood pressure. In the kidney, angiotensin II exerts its effects to conserve salt and water through a combination of the hemodynamic control of renal blood flow and glomerular filtration rate and…

  4. Angiotensin II receptors in the gonads

    SciTech Connect

    Aguilera, G.; Millan, M.A.; Harwood, J.P.

    1989-05-01

    The presence of components of the renin-angiotensin system in ovaries and testes suggests that angiotensin II (AII) is involved in gonadal function, and thus we sought to characterize receptors for AII in rat and primate gonads. In the testes, autoradiographic studies showed receptors in the interstitium in all species. In rat interstitial cells fractionated by Percoll gradient, AII receptors coincided with hCG receptors indicating that AII receptors are located on the Leydig cells. In Leydig cells and membranes from rat and rhesus monkey prepuberal testes, AII receptors were specific for AII analogues and of high affinity (Kd=nM). During development, AII receptor content in rat testes decreases with age parallel to a fall in the ratio of interstitial to tubular tissue. In the ovary, the distribution of AII receptors was dependent on the stage of development, being high in the germinal epithelium and stromal tissue between five and 15 days, and becoming localized in secondary follicles in 20-and 40-day-old rats. No binding was found in primordial or primary follicles. In rhesus monkey ovary, AII receptors were higher in stromal tissue and lower in granulosa and luteal cells of the follicles. Characterization of the binding in rat and monkey ovarian membranes showed a single class of sites with a Kd in the nmol/L range and specificity similar to that of the adrenal glomerulosa and testicular AII receptors. Receptors for AII were also present in membrane fractions from PMSG/hCG primed rat ovaries. Infusion of AII (25 ng/min) or captopril (1.4 micrograms/min) during the PMSG/hCG induction period had no effect on ovarian weight or AII receptor concentration in the ovaries.

  5. Left ventricular volumes, ejection fraction, and plasma proatrial natriuretic factor (1-98) after withdrawal of enalapril treatment initiated early after myocardial infarction. CONSENSUS II Multi-Echo Study Group.

    PubMed Central

    Bonarjee, V. V.; Omland, T.; Nilsen, D. W.; Carstensen, S.; Berning, J.; Edner, M.; Caidahl, K.

    1995-01-01

    OBJECTIVES--To assess whether the reduction in left ventricular dilatation after acute myocardial infarction obtained by early administration of angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors depends on continuous treatment. DESIGN--Prospective observational and cross sectional study of withdrawal of randomised treatment with enalapril or placebo. PATIENTS--106 patients on 6 months trial treatment after an acute myocardial infarction. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES--Left ventricular volumes and ejection fraction as assessed by echocardiography and circulating proatrial natriuretic factor (1-98) before and 4-6 weeks after withdrawal of treatment. RESULTS--There were no significant changes (mean (SD)) in left ventricular systolic (0.7 (4.7) ml/m2) and diastolic (0.4 (6.6) ml/m2) volume indices, ejection fraction (-0.9 (6)%), and proatrial natriuretic factor (172 (992) pmol/l) after withdrawal of enalapril. The significantly lower left ventricular volumes observed with 6 months of enalapril therapy after acute myocardial infarction, as compared with placebo, were maintained 6 weeks after drug withdrawal. CONCLUSION--The results show that the benefit of 6 months of enalapril treatment initiated early after myocardial infarction is maintained for at least 6 weeks after drug withdrawal, suggesting that the treatment effect on left ventricular structure is not reversed by changes in loading conditions caused by subsequent drug withdrawal. PMID:7626347

  6. Angiotensin AT1 receptor-mediated excitation of rat carotid body chemoreceptor afferent activity.

    PubMed

    Allen, A M

    1998-08-01

    1. A high density of angiotensin II receptors was observed in the rat carotid body by in vitro autoradiography employing 125I-[Sar1, Ile8]-angiotensin II as radioligand. Displacement studies demonstrated that the receptors were of the AT1 subtype. 2. The binding pattern indicated that the AT1 receptors occurred over clumps of glomus cells, the principal chemoreceptor cell of the carotid body. Selective lesions of the sympathetic or afferent innervation of the carotid body had little effect on the density of receptor binding, demonstrating that the majority of AT1 receptors were intrinsic to the glomus cells. 3. To determine the direct effect of angiotensin II on chemoreceptor function, without the confounding effects of the vasoconstrictor action of angiotensin II, carotid sinus nerve activity was recorded from the isolated carotid body in vitro. The carotid body was superfused with Tyrode solution saturated with carbogen (95 % O2, 5 % CO2), maintained at 36 C, and multi-unit nerve activity recorded with a suction electrode. 4. Angiotensin II elicited a dose-dependent excitation of carotid sinus nerve activity (maximum increase of 36 +/- 11 % with 10 nM angiotensin II) with a threshold concentration of 1 nM. The response was blocked by the addition of an AT1 receptor antagonist, losartan (1 microM), but not by the addition of an AT2 receptor antagonist, PD123319 (1 microM). 5. In approximately 50 % of experiments the excitation was preceded by an inhibition of activity (maximum decrease of 24 +/- 8 % with 10 nM angiotensin II). This inhibitory response was markedly attenuated by losartan but not affected by PD123319. 6. These observations demonstrate that angiotensin II, acting through AT1 receptors located on glomus cells in the carotid body, can directly alter carotid chemoreceptor afferent activity. This provides a means whereby humoral information about fluid and electrolyte homeostasis might influence control of cardiorespiratory function. PMID:9660892

  7. Angiotensin AT1 receptor-mediated excitation of rat carotid body chemoreceptor afferent activity

    PubMed Central

    Allen, A M

    1998-01-01

    A high density of angiotensin II receptors was observed in the rat carotid body by in vitro autoradiography employing 125I-[Sar1,Ile8]-angiotensin II as radioligand. Displacement studies demonstrated that the receptors were of the AT1 subtype.The binding pattern indicated that the AT1 receptors occurred over clumps of glomus cells, the principal chemoreceptor cell of the carotid body. Selective lesions of the sympathetic or afferent innervation of the carotid body had little effect on the density of receptor binding, demonstrating that the majority of AT1 receptors were intrinsic to the glomus cells.To determine the direct effect of angiotensin II on chemoreceptor function, without the confounding effects of the vasoconstrictor action of angiotensin II, carotid sinus nerve activity was recorded from the isolated carotid body in vitro. The carotid body was superfused with Tyrode solution saturated with carbogen (95% O2, 5% CO2), maintained at 36 °C, and multi-unit nerve activity recorded with a suction electrode.Angiotensin II elicited a dose-dependent excitation of carotid sinus nerve activity (maximum increase of 36 ± 11% with 10 nm angiotensin II) with a threshold concentration of 1 nm. The response was blocked by the addition of an AT1 receptor antagonist, losartan (1 μm), but not by the addition of an AT2 receptor antagonist, PD123319 (1 μm).In approximately 50% of experiments the excitation was preceded by an inhibition of activity (maximum decrease of 24 ± 8% with 10 nm angiotensin II). This inhibitory response was markedly attenuated by losartan but not affected by PD123319.These observations demonstrate that angiotensin II, acting through AT1 receptors located on glomus cells in the carotid body, can directly alter carotid chemoreceptor afferent activity. This provides a means whereby humoral information about fluid and electrolyte homeostasis might influence control of cardiorespiratory function. PMID:9660892

  8. Reproduction and the renin-angiotensin system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ganong, W. F.

    1995-01-01

    A unique aspect of the circulating renin-angiotensin system and the many independent tissue renin-angiotensin systems is their interactions at multiple levels with reproduction. These interactions, which have received relatively little attention, include effects of estrogens and possibly androgens on hepatic and renal angiotensinogen mRNA; effects of androgens on the Ren-2 gene and salivary renin in mice; the prorenin surge that occurs with but outlasts the LH surge during the menstrual cycle; the inhibitory effects of estrogens on thirst and water intake; the tissue renin-angiotensin systems in the brain, the anterior pituitary, and the ovaries and testes, that is, in all the components of the hypothalamo-pituitary-gonadal axis; the presence of some components of the renin-angiotensin system in the uterus and the fetoplacental unit; and the possible relation of renin and angiotensin to ovulation and fetal well-being. These interactions are described and their significance considered in this short review.

  9. Key fibrogenic mediators: old players. Renin–angiotensin system

    PubMed Central

    Macconi, Daniela; Remuzzi, Giuseppe; Benigni, Ariela

    2014-01-01

    Interstitial fibrosis represents the final common pathway of any form of progressive renal disease. The severity of tubular interstitial damage is highly correlated to the degree of decline of renal function, even better than the glomerular lesions do. Angiotensin II (Ang II), the main effector of the renin–angiotensin system, is a critical promoter of fibrogenesis. It represents a nexus among glomerular capillary hypertension, barrier dysfunction, and renal tubular injury caused by abnormally filtered proteins. Transforming growth factor (TGF)-β1 and reactive oxygen species (ROS) are the key mediators of the pro-fibrotic effect of Ang II causing apoptosis and epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition of the renal tubular epithelium. Recent studies link fibrosis to changes of microRNA (miRNA) modulated by Ang II through TGF-β1, unraveling that antifibrotic action of Ang II antagonism is attributable to epigenetic control of fibrosis-associated genes. Other mechanisms of Ang II-induced fibrosis include ROS-dependent activation of hypoxia-inducible factor-1. Finally, Ang II via angiotensin type 1 receptor regulates the activation and transdifferentiation of pericytes and fibrocytes into scar-forming myofibroblasts. Detachment and phenotypic changes of the former can lead to the loss of peritubular capillaries and also contribute to hypoxia-dependent fibrosis. PMID:26312151

  10. Angiotensin-Converting-Enzyme Inhibition in Stable Coronary Artery Disease

    PubMed Central

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND Angiotensin-converting-enzyme (ACE) inhibitors are effective in reducing the risk of heart failure, myocardial infarction, and death from cardiovascular causes in patients with left ventricular systolic dysfunction or heart failure. ACE inhibitors have also been shown to reduce atherosclerotic complications in patients who have vascular disease without heart failure. METHODS In the Prevention of Events with Angiotensin Converting Enzyme Inhibition (PEACE) Trial, we tested the hypothesis that patients with stable coronary artery disease and normal or slightly reduced left ventricular function derive therapeutic benefit from the addition of ACE inhibitors to modern conventional therapy. The trial was a double-blind, placebo-controlled study in which 8290 patients were randomly assigned to receive either trandolapril at a target dose of 4 mg per day (4158 patients) or matching placebo (4132 patients). RESULTS The mean (±SD) age of the patients was 64±8 years, the mean blood pressure 133±17/78±10 mm Hg, and the mean left ventricular ejection fraction 58±9 percent. The patients received intensive treatment, with 72 percent having previously undergone coronary revascularization and 70 percent receiving lipid-lowering drugs. The incidence of the primary end point — death from cardiovascular causes, myocardial infarction, or coronary revascularization — was 21.9 percent in the trandolapril group, as compared with 22.5 percent in the placebo group (hazard ratio in the trandolapril group, 0.96; 95 percent confidence interval, 0.88 to 1.06; P=0.43) over a median follow-up period of 4.8 years. CONCLUSIONS In patients with stable coronary heart disease and preserved left ventricular function who are receiving “current standard” therapy and in whom the rate of cardiovascular events is lower than in previous trials of ACE inhibitors in patients with vascular disease, there is no evidence that the addition of an ACE inhibitor provides further benefit in

  11. Proteolytic Processing of Angiotensin-I in Human Blood Plasma

    PubMed Central

    Hildebrand, Diana; Merkel, Philipp; Eggers, Lars Florian; Schlüter, Hartmut

    2013-01-01

    In mammalian species, except humans, N-terminal processing of the precursor peptide angiotensin I (ANG-1-10) into ANG-2-10 or ANG-3-10 was reported. Here we hypothesize that aminopeptidase-generated angiotensins bearing the same C-terminus as ANG-1-10 are also present in humans. We demonstrate the time dependent generation of ANG-2-10, ANG-3-10, ANG-4-10, ANG-5-10 and ANG-6-10 from the precursor ANG-1-10 by human plasma proteins. The endogenous presence of ANG-4-10, ANG-5-10 and ANG-6-10 in human plasma was confirmed by an immuno-fluorescence assay. Generation of ANG-2-10, ANG-3-10 and ANG-4-10 from ANG-1-10 by immobilized human plasma proteins was sensitive to the cysteine/serine protease inhibitor antipain. The metal ion chelator EDTA inhibited Ang-6-10-generation. Incubation of the substrates ANG-3-10, ANG-4-10 and ANG-5-10 with recombinant aminopeptidase N (APN) resulted in a successive N-terminal processing, finally releasing ANG-6-10 as a stable end product, demonstrating a high similarity concerning the processing pattern of the angiotensin peptides compared to the angiotensin generating activity in plasma. Recombinant ACE-1 hydrolyzed the peptides ANG-2-10, ANG-3-10, ANG-4-10 and ANG-5-10 into ANG-2-8, ANG-3-8, ANG-4-8 and ANG-5-8. Since ANG-2-10 was processed into ANG-2-8, ANG-4-8 and ANG-5-8 by plasma proteases the angiotensin peptides bearing the same C-terminus as ANG-1-10 likely have a precursor function in human plasma. Our results confirm the hypothesis of aminopeptidase mediated processing of ANG-1-10 in humans. We show the existence of an aminopeptidase mediated pathway in humans that bypasses the known ANG-1-8-carboxypeptidase pathway. This expands the knowledge about the known human renin angiotensin system, showing how efficiently the precursor ANG-1-10 is used by nature. PMID:23724017

  12. Primary Systemic Amyloidosis and High Levels of Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme: Two Case Reports

    PubMed Central

    Praena-Segovia, J.; Sanchez-Gastaldo, A.; Bernabeu-Wittel, M.; Ocete-Pérez, R.; Ávila-Polo, R.; Martino, M. L.

    2013-01-01

    Infiltrative heart diseases are caused by a heterogeneous group of disorders; amyloidosis and sarcoidosis are two frequent causes of myocardial infiltration, which differ in clinical and biological outcome and treatment issues. The presence of high levels of angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) in a patient with infiltrative heart disease may increase suspicion of sarcoidosis. Nevertheless, no mention about increased ACE levels in extracerebral primary systemic amyloidosis is available. We present two cases of primary systemic amyloidosis, which are cardiac involvement and elevated ACE levels. PMID:24826302

  13. Exacerbation of myocardial dysfunction and autonomic imbalance contribute to the estrogen-dependent chronic hypotensive effect of ethanol in female rats

    PubMed Central

    El-Mas, Mahmoud M.; Abdel-Rahman, Abdel A.

    2012-01-01

    Our previous studies showed that the hypotensive effect of chronic ethanol in female rats is reduced by ovariectomy (OVX) rats and was restored after estrogen replacement (OVXE2). Further, in randomly cycling rats, chronic ethanol increased cardiac parasympathetic dominance and subsequently reduced myocardial contractility and blood pressure (BP). In this study, we tested the hypothesis that alterations in myocardial contractility and sympathovagal control account for the E2 exacerbation of the hemodynamic effects of ethanol. BP, myocardial contractility (+dP/dtmax), and spectral cardiovascular autonomic profiles were evaluated in radiotelemetered OVX, and OVXE2 rats receiving liquid diet with or without ethanol (5%, w/v) for 13 weeks. In OVX rats, ethanol caused modest hypotension along with significant increases in +dP/dtmax during weeks 2–5. The high-frequency (IBIHF, 0.75–3 Hz) and low-frequency (IBILF, 0.25–0.75 Hz) bands of interbeat intervals were briefly increased and decreased, respectively, by ethanol. Compared with its effects in OVX rats, chronic treatment of OVXE2 rats with ethanol elicited significantly greater and more sustained reductions in systolic (SBP) and diastolic (DBP) blood pressures and +dP/dtmax. Altered sympathovagal balance and parasympathetic overactivity were more evident in ethanol-treated OVXE2 rats as suggested by the sustained: (i) increases in high-frequency bands of interbeat intervals (IBIHF, 0.75–3 Hz), and (ii) decreases in low-frequency IBI bands (IBILF, 0.25–0.75 Hz), IBILF/HF ratio and +dP/dtmax. The plasma ethanol concentration was not affected by changes in the hormonal milieu. These findings suggest that estrogen exacerbates the ethanol-evoked reductions in myocardial contractility and BP and the associated parasympathetic overactivity in female rats. PMID:22305881

  14. Myocardial infarction: management of the subacute period.

    PubMed

    Mercado, Michael G; Smith, Dustin K; McConnon, Michael L

    2013-11-01

    Optimal management of myocardial infarction in the subacute period focuses on improving the discharge planning process, implementing therapies early to prevent recurrent myocardial infarction, and avoiding hospital readmission. Evidence-based guidelines for the care of patients with acute coronary syndrome are not followed up to 25% of the time. Antiplatelet therapy, renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system inhibitors, beta blockers, and statins constitute the foundation of medical therapy. Early noninvasive stress testing is an important risk assessment tool, especially in patients who do not undergo revascularization. Discharge preparation should include a review of medications, referral for exercise-based cardiac rehabilitation, activity recommendations, education about lifestyle modification and recognition of cardiac symptoms, and a clear follow-up plan. Because nonadherence to medications is common in patients after a myocardial infarction and is associated with increased mortality risk, modifiable factors associated with medication self-discontinuation should be addressed before discharge. Structured discharge processes should be used to enhance communication and facilitate the transition from the hospital to the family physician's care. PMID:24364634

  15. Angiotensin II receptors and peritoneal dialysis-induced peritoneal fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Morinelli, Thomas A; Luttrell, Louis M; Strungs, Erik G; Ullian, Michael E

    2016-08-01

    The vasoactive hormone angiotensin II initiates its major hemodynamic effects through interaction with AT1 receptors, a member of the class of G protein-coupled receptors. Acting through its AT1R, angiotensin II regulates blood pressure and renal salt and water balance. Recent evidence points to additional pathological influences of activation of AT1R, in particular inflammation, fibrosis and atherosclerosis. The transcription factor nuclear factor κB, a key mediator in inflammation and atherosclerosis, can be activated by angiotensin II through a mechanism that may involve arrestin-dependent AT1 receptor internalization. Peritoneal dialysis is a therapeutic modality for treating patients with end-stage kidney disease. The effectiveness of peritoneal dialysis at removing waste from the circulation is compromised over time as a consequence of peritoneal dialysis-induced peritoneal fibrosis. The non-physiological dialysis solution used in peritoneal dialysis, i.e. highly concentrated, hyperosmotic glucose, acidic pH as well as large volumes infused into the peritoneal cavity, contributes to the development of fibrosis. Numerous trials have been conducted altering certain components of the peritoneal dialysis fluid in hopes of preventing or delaying the fibrotic response with limited success. We hypothesize that structural activation of AT1R by hyperosmotic peritoneal dialysis fluid activates the internalization process and subsequent signaling through the transcription factor nuclear factor κB, resulting in the generation of pro-fibrotic/pro-inflammatory mediators producing peritoneal fibrosis. PMID:27167177

  16. Baicalin attenuates angiotensin II-induced endothelial dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Wei, Xiling; Zhu, Xingyu; Hu, Nan; Zhang, Xiuqin; Sun, Tianjiao; Xu, Jiyang; Bian, Xiaohong

    2015-09-11

    Angiotensin II (Ang II) has been shown to activate multiple downstream pathways resulting in endothelial dysfunction and oxidative stress. Baicalin, a natural flavone, exerts anti-oxidant and anti-apoptotic effects in cardiovascular diseases. In the present study, we hypothesized that baicalin has beneficial effects in Ang II-induced endothelial cells injury. Here, we shown that baicalin improved endothelial fuction impaired by Ang II through promoting endothelial-dependent vasodilation and suppressing the apoptosis of HUVECs in which baicalin decreased the expression of bax and cleaved caspase-3, and increased bcl-2 expression. Additionally, baicalin significantly conversed Ang II to angiotensin-1-7 [Ang-(1-7)] by activating angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 (ACE2) and Mas receptor mRNA expression and protein expression. Moreover, treatment with baicalin significantly reduced cell oxidative damage induced by Ang II through MDA/ROS decrease and NO/T-AOC increase. This antioxidant capacity was related to the increases of PI3K, phosphor-AKT (Ser-473) and phosphor-eNOS (Ser-1177). In conclusion, our results implicate that baicalin could protect endothelial cells from Ang II-induced endothelial dysfunction and oxidative stress via modulating the expression of bax, bcl-2 and cleaved caspase-3, activating ACE2/Ang-(1-7)/Mas axis and up-regulating PI3K/AKT/eNOS pathway. PMID:26239661

  17. Mechanism of pulmonary conversion of angiotensin I to angiotensin II in the dog.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oparil, S.; Tregear, G. W.; Koerner, T.; Barnes, B. A.; Haber, E.

    1971-01-01

    The conversion mechanism was studied in vivo in the pulmonary circulation of the intact anesthetized dog and in vitro in plasma by using L-Leu-angiotensin I, D-Leu-angiotensin I, and des-Leu-angiotensin I which had been synthesized by the solid-phase technique. The results obtained indicate that pulmonary conversion in vivo and plasma conversion in vitro occur via a dipeptidylcarboxypeptidase and that a D-amino acid at the C-terminus prevents conversion.

  18. Angiotensin and insulin resistance: conspiracy theory.

    PubMed

    Townsend, Raymond R

    2003-04-01

    Resistance to the metabolic effects of insulin is a contender for the short list of major cardiovascular risk factors. Since the elements of the syndrome of insulin resistance were first articulated together in 1988, numerous epidemiologic investigations and treatment endeavors have established a relationship between the metabolic disarray of impaired insulin action and cardiovascular disease. Angiotensin II, the primary effector of the renin-angiotensin system, has also achieved a place in the chronicles of cardiovascular risk factors. Conspiracy mechanisms by which angiotensin II and insulin resistance interact in the pathogenesis of cardiovascular disease are reviewed, with particular attention to recent developments in this engaging area of human research. PMID:12642009

  19. Acute myocardial infarction

    PubMed Central

    Domes, Trustin; Szafran, Olga; Bilous, Cheryl; Olson, Odell; Spooner, G. Richard

    2006-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To assess the quality of care of acute myocardial infarction (AMI) in a rural health region. DESIGN Clinical audit employing multiple explicit criteria of care elements for emergency department and in-hospital AMI management. The audit was conducted using retrospective chart review. SETTING Twelve acute care health centres and hospitals in the East Central Health Region, a rural health region in Alberta, where medical and surgical services are provided almost entirely by family physicians. PARTICIPANTS Hospital inpatients with a confirmed discharge diagnosis of AMI (ICD-9-CM codes 410.xx) during the period April 1, 2001, to March 31, 2002, were included (177 confirmed cases). MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES Quality of AMI care was assessed using guidelines from the American College of Cardiology and the American Heart Association and the Canadian Cardiovascular Outcomes Research Team and Canadian Cardiovascular Society. Quality of care indicators at three stages of patient care were assessed: at initial recognition and AMI management in the emergency department, during in-hospital AMI management, and at preparation for discharge from hospital. RESULTS In the emergency department, the quality of care was high for most procedural and therapeutic audit elements, with the exception of rapid electrocardiography, urinalysis, and provision of nitroglycerin and morphine. Average door-to-needle time for thrombolysis was 102.5 minutes. The quality of in-hospital care was high for most elements, but low for nitroglycerin and angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors, daily electrocardiography, and counseling regarding smoking cessation and diet. Few patients received counseling for lifestyle changes at hospital discharge. Male and younger patients were treated more aggressively than female and older patients. Sites that used care protocols achieved better results in initial AMI management than sites that did not. Stress testing was not readily available in the rural

  20. Regulation of hypothalamic renin-angiotensin system and oxidative stress by aldosterone

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Bing S; Zheng, Hong; Tan, Junhui; Patel, Kaushik P; Leenen, Frans HH

    2011-01-01

    In rats with salt-induced hypertension or post myocardial infarction (MI), AT1 receptor (AT1R) densities and oxidative stress increase and neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS) levels decrease in the paraventricular nucleus (PVN). The present study was designed to determine whether these changes may depend on activation of the aldosterone – “ouabain” neuromodulatory pathway. After intracerebroventricular (icv) infusion of aldosterone (20ng/h) for 14 days, blood pressure (BP) and heart rate (HR) were recorded in conscious Wistar rats, and mRNA and protein for nNOS, endothelial NOS (eNOS), AT1R and NADPH oxidase subunits were assessed in brain tissue. BP and HR were significantly increased by aldosterone. Aldosterone significantly increased mRNA and protein of AT1R, P22phox, P47phox, P67phox and Nox2, and decreased nNOS but not eNOS mRNA and protein in the PVN, and increased angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) and AT1R binding densities in the PVN and SON. The increases in BP and HR as well as changes in mRNA, proteins and ACE and AT1R binding densities were all largely prevented by concomitant icv infusion of Digibind (to bind “ouabain”) or benzamil (to block presumably epithelial sodium channels). These data indicate that aldosterone via “ouabain” increases in the PVN ACE, AT1R and oxidative stress but decreases nNOS, and suggest that endogenous aldosterone may cause this similar pattern of changes observed in salt sensitive hypertension and heart failure post MI. PMID:21824999

  1. Angiotensin and mineralocorticoid receptor antagonism attenuates cardiac oxidative stress in angiotensin II-infused rats.

    PubMed

    Minas, Jacqueline N; Thorwald, Max A; Conte, Debra; Vázquez-Medina, Jose-Pablo; Nishiyama, Akira; Ortiz, Rudy M

    2015-11-01

    Angiotensin II (Ang II) and aldosterone contribute to hypertension, oxidative stress and cardiovascular damage, but the contributions of aldosterone during Ang II-dependent hypertension are not well defined because of the difficulty to assess each independently. To test the hypothesis that during Ang II infusion, oxidative and nitrosative damage is mediated through both the mineralocorticoid receptor (MR) and angiotensin type 1 receptor (AT1), five groups of Sprague-Dawley rats were studied: (i) control; (ii) Ang II infused (80 ng/min × 28 days); (iii) Ang II + AT1 receptor blocker (ARB; 10 mg losartan/kg per day × 21 days); (iv) Ang II + mineralocorticoid receptor (MR) antagonist (Epl; 100 mg eplerenone/day × 21 days); and (v) Ang II + ARB + Epl (Combo; × 21 days). Both ARB and combination treatments completely alleviated the Ang II-induced hypertension, whereas eplerenone treatment only prolonged the onset of the hypertension. Eplerenone treatment exacerbated the Ang II-mediated increase in plasma and heart aldosterone 2.3- and 1.8-fold, respectively, while ARB treatment reduced both. Chronic MR blockade was sufficient to ameliorate the AT1-mediated increase in oxidative damage. All treatments normalized protein oxidation (nitrotyrosine) levels; however, only ARB and Combo treatments completely reduced lipid peroxidation (4-hydroxynonenal) to control levels. Collectively, these data suggest that receptor signalling, and not the elevated arterial blood pressure, is the principal culprit in the oxidative stress-associated cardiovascular damage in Ang II-dependent hypertension. PMID:26234762

  2. Angiopoietin-1 attenuates angiotensin II-induced ER stress in glomerular endothelial cells via a Tie2 receptor/ERK1/2-p38 MAPK-dependent mechanism.

    PubMed

    Bi, Xiao; Niu, Jianying; Ding, Wei; Zhang, Minmin; Yang, Min; Gu, Yong

    2016-06-15

    Research has indicated that endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress in endothelial cells affects vascular pathologies and induces cellular dysfunction and apoptosis. Angiopoietin1 (Angpt1) has been shown to have therapeutic potential in some vascular diseases, including chronic kidney disease. This study showed that Angpt1 is a powerful factor that attenuated ER stress-induced cellular dysfunction and apoptosis in glomerular endothelial cells (GEnCs). Furthermore, Angpt1 significantly decreased the angiotensin II (Ang II)-induced expression of the ER stress response proteins GRP78, GRP94, p-PERK and CHOP. These results suggest that the Angpt1-mediated cellular protection may occur downstream of the ER stress response. In addition, both specific inhibitors and siRNAs for Tie2 reversed these changes, implying the importance of Tie2 receptor activation in the signalling pathways that prevent ER stress. The protective effects of Angpt1 are related to the activation of two downstream signalling pathways, ERK1/2 and p38 MAPK. The inhibition of these pathways with specific inhibitors, PD98059 and SB203580, respectively, partially increased the expression of chaperones that assist in folding proteins in the ER and reduce the protective effects of Angpt1. In conclusion, Angpt1 attenuated ER stress-induced cellular dysfunction and apoptosis via the Tie2 receptor/ERK1/2-p38 MAPK pathways in GEnCs. This study may provide insights into a novel underlying mechanism and a strategy for alleviating ER stress-induced injury. PMID:27033326

  3. Angiotensin II Vascular Receptors: Their Avidity in Relationship to Sodium Balance, the Autonomic Nervous System, and Hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Brunner, Hans R.; Chang, Paul; Wallach, Ronald; Sealey, Jean E.; Laragh, John H.

    1972-01-01

    During intravenous administration of varying doses of angiotensin II antibody to anesthetized rats, apparently specific vascular receptors were characterized. These receptors compete with administered antibody to bind circulating angiotensin. This competitive phenomenon was used to evaluate the affinity of these receptors for angiotensin. Apparent vascular receptor affinity was defined by the amount of antibody required to block the blood pressure response to exogenous angiotensin. It was found that this receptor affinity varies directly with sodium intake so that the amount of antibody required to block was eightfold greater in normal animals on a high sodium intake, as compared with those on a low sodium intake. Sodium dependence of receptors was also demonstrated in nephrectomized animals, in desoxycorticosterone (DOC)-treated rats, and in chronic renal hypertension. Thus the observed changes in receptor affinity were usually inversely related to measured endogenous angiotensin II levels. Ganglionic blockade increased antibody requirement eightfold. All of these changes were consistent, with no overlap observed in response of individual animals from different groups. These results may explain the variation in pressor activity of angiotensin associated with changes in salt balance and ganglionic blockade. In general, when sufficient antibody was injected to block the effect of exogenous angiotensin a blood pressure lowering effect was also observed. Two exceptions were the nephrectomized and the one-kidney renal hypertensive animals, in both of which antibody administration had no effect on blood pressure. Additional results suggest that changes in receptor affinity are involved in the pathogenesis of various types of experimental hypertensions because the amount of antibody required to block angiotensin was enhanced in renal (twofold), DOC (fourfold), and genetic (fourfold) hypertension. Accordingly, changes in the affinity of these receptors could be critically

  4. Activation of the Cardiac Renin-Angiotensin System in High Oxygen-Exposed Newborn Rats: Angiotensin Receptor Blockade Prevents the Developmental Programming of Cardiac Dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Bertagnolli, Mariane; Dios, Anne; Béland-Bonenfant, Sarah; Gascon, Gabrielle; Sutherland, Megan; Lukaszewski, Marie-Amélie; Cloutier, Anik; Paradis, Pierre; Schiffrin, Ernesto L; Nuyt, Anne Monique

    2016-04-01

    Newborn rats exposed to high oxygen (O2), mimicking preterm birth-related neonatal stress, develop later in life cardiac hypertrophy, dysfunction, fibrosis, and activation of the renin-angiotensin system. Cardiac renin-angiotensin system activation in O2-exposed adult rats is characterized by an imbalance in angiotensin (Ang) receptors type 1/2 (AT1/2), with prevailing AT1 expression. To study the role of renin-angiotensin system in the developmental programming of cardiac dysfunction, we assessed Ang receptor expression during neonatal high O2 exposure and whether AT1 receptor blockade prevents cardiac alterations in early adulthood. Sprague-Dawley newborn rats were kept with their mother in 80% O2 or room air (control) from days 3 to 10 (P3-P10) of life. Losartan or water was administered by gavage from P8 to P10 (n=9/group). Rats were studied at P3 (before O2 exposure), P5, P10 (end of O2), and P28. Losartan treatment had no impact on growth or kidney development. AT1 and Ang type 2 receptors were upregulated in the left ventricle by high O2 exposure (P5 and P10), which was prevented by Losartan treatment at P10. Losartan prevented the cardiac AT1/2 imbalance at P28. Losartan decreased cardiac hypertrophy and fibrosis and improved left ventricle fraction of shortening in P28 O2-exposed rats, which was associated with decreased oxidation of calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II, inhibition of the transforming growth factor-β/SMAD3 pathway, and upregulation of cardiac angiotensin-converting enzyme 2. In conclusion, short-term Ang II blockade during neonatal high O2 prevents the development of cardiac alterations later in life in rats. These findings highlight the key role of neonatal renin-angiotensin system activation in the developmental programming of cardiac dysfunction induced by deleterious neonatal conditions. PMID:26857347

  5. Myocardial imaging. Coxsackie myocarditis

    SciTech Connect

    Wells, R.G.; Ruskin, J.A.; Sty, J.R.

    1986-09-01

    A 3-week-old male neonate with heart failure associated with Coxsackie virus infection was imaged with Tc-99m PYP and TI-201. The abnormal imaging pattern suggested myocardial infarction. Autopsy findings indicated that the cause was myocardial necrosis secondary to an acute inflammatory process. Causes of abnormal myocardial uptake of Tc-99m PYP in pediatrics include infarction, myocarditis, cardiomyopathy, bacterial endocarditis, and trauma. Myocardial imaging cannot provide a specific cause diagnosis. Causes of myocardial infarction in pediatrics are listed in Table 1.

  6. Angiotensin receptor-neprilysin inhibitors: clinical potential in heart failure and beyond

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Jagdeep SS; Lang, Chim C

    2015-01-01

    Heart failure remains a major concern across the globe as life expectancies and delivery of health care continue to improve. There has been a dearth of new developments in heart failure therapies in the last decade until last year, with the release of the results from the PARADIGM-HF Trial heralding the arrival of a promising new class of drug, ie, the angiotensin receptor-neprilysin inhibitor. In this review, we discuss the evolution of our incremental understanding of the neurohormonal mechanisms involved in the pathophysiology of heart failure, which has led to our success in modulating its various pathways. We start by examining the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system, followed by the challenges of modulating the natriuretic peptide system. We then delve deeper into the pharmacology and mechanisms by which angiotensin receptor-neprilysin inhibitors achieve their significant cardiovascular benefits. Finally, we also consider the potential application of this new class of drug in other areas, such as heart failure with preserved ejection fraction, hypertension, patients with renal impairment, and following myocardial infarction. PMID:26082640

  7. Angiotensin receptor-neprilysin inhibitors: clinical potential in heart failure and beyond.

    PubMed

    Singh, Jagdeep S S; Lang, Chim C

    2015-01-01

    Heart failure remains a major concern across the globe as life expectancies and delivery of health care continue to improve. There has been a dearth of new developments in heart failure therapies in the last decade until last year, with the release of the results from the PARADIGM-HF Trial heralding the arrival of a promising new class of drug, ie, the angiotensin receptor-neprilysin inhibitor. In this review, we discuss the evolution of our incremental understanding of the neurohormonal mechanisms involved in the pathophysiology of heart failure, which has led to our success in modulating its various pathways. We start by examining the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system, followed by the challenges of modulating the natriuretic peptide system. We then delve deeper into the pharmacology and mechanisms by which angiotensin receptor-neprilysin inhibitors achieve their significant cardiovascular benefits. Finally, we also consider the potential application of this new class of drug in other areas, such as heart failure with preserved ejection fraction, hypertension, patients with renal impairment, and following myocardial infarction. PMID:26082640

  8. Spontaneous late improvement of myocardial viability in the chronic infarct zone is possible, depending on persistent TIMI 3 flow and a low grade stenosis of the infarct artery

    PubMed Central

    Faraggi, M; Montalescot, G; Sarda, L; Heintz, J; Doumit, D; Drobinski, G; Sotirov, I; Le Guludec, D; Thomas, D

    1999-01-01

    OBJECTIVE—In the chronic phase of myocardial infarction, the relation between myocardial recovery and infarct related artery status remains unclear. The spontaneous changes in rest-redistribution thallium defect size were prospectively studied over six months in 52 patients with chronic Q wave myocardial infarction.
DESIGN—Changes in rest thallium defect size, thallium uptake in the infarct area, and radionuclide left ventricular ejection fraction were compared to the quantitative coronary angiogram data. Two groups of patients were considered: patients with a percentage of stenosis below 100% (group 1, n = 31); and patients with an occluded artery (group 2, n = 21). 
RESULTS—In the overall population, the mean (SD) defect size decreased from 28.2 (17.2)% to 24.9 (19.3)% of the whole myocardium (p = 0.01), while, in this area, the thallium uptake increased from 62.9 (13.7)% to 66.9 (15.6)% (p < 0.001). At the time of inclusion, the defect size, thallium uptake, and ejection fraction were similar in both groups. In group 1 patients only, the reduction in defect size correlated with the improvement in ejection fraction (r = 0.41, p = 0.02) and was related to the percentage of coronary artery stenosis. TIMI 3 patients reduced the defect size while other patients increased this defect (−5.1 (7.0)% v +11.0 (14.4)%, p < 0.001). In contrast, no significant relations were found in group 2 patients.
CONCLUSION—Late spontaneous recovery in thallium defect can occur in patients with a patent infarct related artery, depending on the TIMI flow grade and a low grade stenosis of the infarct related artery, and is associated with functional improvement.

 Keywords: myocardial infarction; thallium; infarct related artery; TIMI 3 flow grade PMID:10092571

  9. Overexpression of angiotensin II type I receptor in cardiomyocytes induces cardiac hypertrophy and remodeling

    PubMed Central

    Paradis, Pierre; Dali-Youcef, Nassim; Paradis, François W.; Thibault, Gaétan; Nemer, Mona

    2000-01-01

    Angiotensin II (AII) is a major determinant of arterial pressure and volume homeostasis, mainly because of its vascular action via the AII type 1 receptor (AT1R). AII has also been implicated in the development of cardiac hypertrophy because angiotensin I-converting enzyme inhibitors and AT1R antagonists prevent or regress ventricular hypertrophy in animal models and in human. However, because these treatments impede the action of AII at cardiac as well as vascular levels, and reduce blood pressure, it has been difficult to determine whether AII action on the heart is direct or a consequence of pressure-overload. To determine whether AII can induce cardiac hypertrophy directly via myocardial AT1R in the absence of vascular changes, transgenic mice overexpressing the human AT1R under the control of the mouse α-myosin heavy chain promoter were generated. Cardiomyocyte-specific overexpression of AT1R induced, in basal conditions, morphologic changes of myocytes and nonmyocytes that mimic those observed during the development of cardiac hypertrophy in human and in other mammals. These mice displayed significant cardiac hypertrophy and remodeling with increased expression of ventricular atrial natriuretic factor and interstitial collagen deposition and died prematurely of heart failure. Neither the systolic blood pressure nor the heart rate were changed. The data demonstrate a direct myocardial role for AII in the development of cardiac hypertrophy and failure and provide a useful model to elucidate the mechanisms of action of AII in the pathogenesis of cardiac diseases. PMID:10639182

  10. Overexpression of angiotensin II type I receptor in cardiomyocytes induces cardiac hypertrophy and remodeling.

    PubMed

    Paradis, P; Dali-Youcef, N; Paradis, F W; Thibault, G; Nemer, M

    2000-01-18

    Angiotensin II (AII) is a major determinant of arterial pressure and volume homeostasis, mainly because of its vascular action via the AII type 1 receptor (AT1R). AII has also been implicated in the development of cardiac hypertrophy because angiotensin I-converting enzyme inhibitors and AT1R antagonists prevent or regress ventricular hypertrophy in animal models and in human. However, because these treatments impede the action of AII at cardiac as well as vascular levels, and reduce blood pressure, it has been difficult to determine whether AII action on the heart is direct or a consequence of pressure-overload. To determine whether AII can induce cardiac hypertrophy directly via myocardial AT1R in the absence of vascular changes, transgenic mice overexpressing the human AT1R under the control of the mouse alpha-myosin heavy chain promoter were generated. Cardiomyocyte-specific overexpression of AT1R induced, in basal conditions, morphologic changes of myocytes and nonmyocytes that mimic those observed during the development of cardiac hypertrophy in human and in other mammals. These mice displayed significant cardiac hypertrophy and remodeling with increased expression of ventricular atrial natriuretic factor and interstitial collagen deposition and died prematurely of heart failure. Neither the systolic blood pressure nor the heart rate were changed. The data demonstrate a direct myocardial role for AII in the development of cardiac hypertrophy and failure and provide a useful model to elucidate the mechanisms of action of AII in the pathogenesis of cardiac diseases. PMID:10639182

  11. ACE2: Angiotensin II/Angiotensin-(1-7) balance in cardiorenal injury

    PubMed Central

    Varagic, Jasmina; Ahmad, Sarfaraz; Nagata, Sayaka; Ferrario, Carlos M.

    2014-01-01

    Our current recognition of the renin-angiotensin system is more convoluted than originally thought due to the discovery of multiple novel enzymes, peptides, and receptors inherent to this interactive biochemical cascade. Over the last decade angiotensin converting enzyme 2 (ACE2) has emerged as a key player in the pathophysiology of hypertension and cardiovascular and renal disease due to its pivotal role in metabolizing vasoconstrictive/hypertrophic/proliferative angiotensin II into favorable angiotensin-(1-7). This review addresses a considerable advancement in research on the role of tissue ACE2 in development and progression of hypertension and cardiorenal injury. We also summarize the results from recent clinical and experimental studies suggesting that serum or urine soluble ACE2 may serve as a novel biomarker or independent risk factor relevant for diagnosis and prognosis of cardiorenal disease. Recent proceedings on novel therapeutic approaches to enhance ACE2/angiotensin-(1-7) axis are also reviewed. PMID:24510672

  12. Angiotensin II Reduces Lipoprotein Lipase Expression in Visceral Adipose Tissue via Phospholipase C β4 Depending on Feeding but Increases Lipoprotein Lipase Expression in Subcutaneous Adipose Tissue via c-Src.

    PubMed

    Uchiyama, Tsuyoshi; Tomono, Shoichi; Sato, Koichi; Nakamura, Tetsuya; Kurabayashi, Masahiko; Okajima, Fumikazu

    2015-01-01

    Metabolic syndrome is characterized by visceral adiposity, insulin resistance, high triglyceride (TG)- and low high-density lipoprotein cholesterol-levels, hypertension, and diabetes-all of which often cause cardiovascular and cerebrovascular diseases. It remains unclear, however, why visceral adiposity but not subcutaneous adiposity causes insulin resistance and other pathological situations. Lipoprotein lipase (LPL) catalyzes hydrolysis of TG in plasma lipoproteins. In the present study, we investigated whether the effects of angiotensin II (AngII) on TG metabolism are mediated through an effect on LPL expression. Adipose tissues were divided into visceral adipose tissue (VAT) and subcutaneous adipose tissue (SAT) for comparison. AngII accelerated LPL expression in SAT but, on the contrary, suppressed its expression in VAT. In both SAT and VAT, AngII signaled through the same type 1 receptor. In SAT, AngII increased LPL expression via c-Src and p38 MAPK signaling. In VAT, however, AngII reduced LPL expression via the Gq class of G proteins and the subsequent phospholipase C β4 (PLCβ4), protein kinase C β1, nuclear factor κB, and inducible nitric oxide synthase signaling pathways. PLCβ4 small interfering RNA experiments showed that PLCβ4 expression is important for the AngII-induced LPL reduction in VAT, in which PLCβ4 expression increases in the evening and falls at night. Interestingly, PLCβ4 expression in VAT decreased with fasting, while AngII did not decrease LPL expression in VAT in a fasting state. In conclusion, AngII reduces LPL expression through PLCβ4, the expression of which is regulated by feeding in VAT, whereas AngII increases LPL expression in SAT. The different effects of AngII on LPL expression and, hence, TG metabolism in VAT and SAT may partly explain their different contributions to the development of metabolic syndrome. PMID:26447765

  13. Angiotensin II Reduces Lipoprotein Lipase Expression in Visceral Adipose Tissue via Phospholipase C β4 Depending on Feeding but Increases Lipoprotein Lipase Expression in Subcutaneous Adipose Tissue via c-Src

    PubMed Central

    Uchiyama, Tsuyoshi; Tomono, Shoichi; Sato, Koichi; Nakamura, Tetsuya; Kurabayashi, Masahiko; Okajima, Fumikazu

    2015-01-01

    Metabolic syndrome is characterized by visceral adiposity, insulin resistance, high triglyceride (TG)- and low high-density lipoprotein cholesterol-levels, hypertension, and diabetes—all of which often cause cardiovascular and cerebrovascular diseases. It remains unclear, however, why visceral adiposity but not subcutaneous adiposity causes insulin resistance and other pathological situations. Lipoprotein lipase (LPL) catalyzes hydrolysis of TG in plasma lipoproteins. In the present study, we investigated whether the effects of angiotensin II (AngII) on TG metabolism are mediated through an effect on LPL expression. Adipose tissues were divided into visceral adipose tissue (VAT) and subcutaneous adipose tissue (SAT) for comparison. AngII accelerated LPL expression in SAT but, on the contrary, suppressed its expression in VAT. In both SAT and VAT, AngII signaled through the same type 1 receptor. In SAT, AngII increased LPL expression via c-Src and p38 MAPK signaling. In VAT, however, AngII reduced LPL expression via the Gq class of G proteins and the subsequent phospholipase C β4 (PLCβ4), protein kinase C β1, nuclear factor κB, and inducible nitric oxide synthase signaling pathways. PLCβ4 small interfering RNA experiments showed that PLCβ4 expression is important for the AngII-induced LPL reduction in VAT, in which PLCβ4 expression increases in the evening and falls at night. Interestingly, PLCβ4 expression in VAT decreased with fasting, while AngII did not decrease LPL expression in VAT in a fasting state. In conclusion, AngII reduces LPL expression through PLCβ4, the expression of which is regulated by feeding in VAT, whereas AngII increases LPL expression in SAT. The different effects of AngII on LPL expression and, hence, TG metabolism in VAT and SAT may partly explain their different contributions to the development of metabolic syndrome. PMID:26447765

  14. Slow-pressor angiotensin II hypertension and concomitant dendritic NMDA receptor trafficking in estrogen receptor β-containing neurons of the mouse hypothalamic paraventricular nucleus are sex and age dependent.

    PubMed

    Marques-Lopes, Jose; Van Kempen, Tracey; Waters, Elizabeth M; Pickel, Virginia M; Iadecola, Costantino; Milner, Teresa A

    2014-09-01

    The incidence of hypertension increases after menopause. Similar to humans, "slow-pressor" doses of angiotensin II (AngII) increase blood pressure in young males, but not in young female mice. However, AngII increases blood pressure in aged female mice, paralleling reproductive hormonal changes. These changes could influence receptor trafficking in central cardiovascular circuits and contribute to hypertension. Increased postsynaptic N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor activity in the hypothalamic paraventricular nucleus (PVN) is crucial for the sympathoexcitation driving AngII hypertension. Estrogen receptors β (ERβs) are present in PVN neurons. We tested the hypothesis that changes in ovarian hormones with age promote susceptibility to AngII hypertension, and influence NMDA receptor NR1 subunit trafficking in ERβ-containing PVN neurons. Transgenic mice expressing enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) in ERβ-containing cells were implanted with osmotic minipumps delivering AngII (600 ng/kg/min) or saline for 2 weeks. AngII increased blood pressure in 2-month-old males and 18-month-old females, but not in 2-month-old females. By electron microscopy, NR1-silver-intensified immunogold (SIG) was mainly in ERβ-EGFP dendrites. At baseline, NR1-SIG density was greater in 2-month-old females than in 2-month-old males or 18-month-old females. After AngII infusion, NR1-SIG density was decreased in 2-month-old females, but increased in 2-month-old males and 18-month-old females. These findings suggest that, in young female mice, NR1 density is decreased in ERβ-PVN dendrites thus reducing NMDA receptor activity and preventing hypertension. Conversely, in young males and aged females, NR1 density is upregulated in ERβ-PVN dendrites and ultimately leads to the neurohumoral dysfunction driving hypertension. PMID:24639345

  15. Effect of angiotensin-induced hypertension on rat coronary arteries and myocardium.

    PubMed Central

    Giacomelli, F.; Anversa, P.; Wiener, J.

    1976-01-01

    Acute hypertension has been produced in rats by the intravenous infusion of angiotensin amide for 4 hours. Both control and hypertensive animals were injected intravenously prior to sacrifice with either horseradish peroxidase (HRP) or colloidal carbon. Epicardial arteries and blocks of ventricular myocardium containing intramyocardial arteries and arterioles have been processed for electron microscopy. HRP appears to penetrate the endoethelium of epicardial arteries from control animals within vesicles that bypass endothelial junctions and empty into interendoethelial clefts. Peroxidase does not traverse the endothelium of intramural arteries and arterioles of controls over the 10-minute period of observation. There is acceleration of lateral vesicular transport in the endothelium of epicardial arteries after angiotensin infusion and direct permeation of interendothelial clefts of intramural arterial vessels. Medial fragmentation and more extensive necrosis are observed in intramyocardial but not in epicardial arterial vessels. Foci of myocardial damage resembling irreversible ischemic or anoxic injury followed by reflow are described. It is suggested that the increased permeability of epicardial arteries may be due to elevated pressure, while the altered permeability and vascular lesions of intramural arteries and arterioles are more readily attributable to the vasoconstriction produced by angiotension. The vascular and myocardial lesions are also discussed in relation to the regional actions of angiotensin on the coronary circulation and known effects of this vasoactive peptide on myocardium. Images Figure 19 Figure 26 Figure 27 Figure 28 Figure 1 Figure 2 Figures 20 and 21 Figure 29 Figure 30 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figures 5-8 Figure 9 Figure 22 Figure 10 Figure 11 Figure 12 Figure 13 Figure 14 Figure 15 Figure 23 Figure 24 Figure 25 Figure 16 Figure 17 Figure 18 PMID:937512

  16. Applying the results of large clinical trials in the management of acute myocardial infarction.

    PubMed Central

    Sweeney, J P; Schwartz, G G

    1996-01-01

    Mortality from acute myocardial infarction has declined in recent years, largely due to the widespread application of new pharmacologic and mechanical interventions that have been tested in large, prospective, randomized clinical trials. For practicing generalists, we review the key data from such trials that have shaped the current management of patients with acute myocardial infarction. We discuss the roles of thrombolytic therapy, coronary angioplasty, nitrates, beta- and calcium channel blockers, angiotensin-converting-enzyme inhibitors, magnesium, and antiarrhythmic and antithrombotic agents. In addition, we highlight critical unanswered questions in the management of this disorder. PMID:8775936

  17. Relationship between myocardial flow reserve by oxygen-15 water positron emission tomography in the subacute phase of myocardial infarction and left ventricular remodeling in the chronic phase.

    PubMed

    Ohara, Minako; Yukiiri, Kazushi; Masugata, Hisashi; Iwado, Yasuyoshi; Takinami, Hiroyuki; Nishiyama, Yoshihiro; Ohkawa, Motoomi; Senda, Shoichi; Ohmori, Koji; Kohno, Masakazu

    2008-07-01

    The purposes of this study were to examine the effects of angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors (ACEI) or angiotensin receptor blockers (ARB) on myocardial flow reserve in patients with acute myocardial infarction (AMI) in the subacute phase using oxygen-15 positron emission tomography (PET) and to elucidate the relationship between the myocardial flow reserve and remodeling in the chronic phase. Sixty patients who had been treated with coronary angioplasty within 12 h after the onset of AMI were enrolled. Patients were divided into an enalapril (ACEI) group and a candesartan (ARB) group. The myocardial flow reserve was measured by oxygen-15 water PET in the subacute phase from the 20th to the 30th day after the onset of AMI. Left ventriculography was performed to measure the left ventricular ejection fraction in the chronic phase about 6 months after the onset. Ten patients (33%) in the enalapril group and 4 patients (13%) in the candesartan group stopped taking their respective medications within a few days of starting, because of side effects such as cough or hypotension. Thus, the prevalence of medication intolerance was higher in the enalapril group. The myocardial flow reserve in the subacute phase and the left ventricular ejection fraction in the chronic phase were lower in the enalapril group (2.08 +/- 0.30 and 42 +/- 6%) than in the candesartan group (2.25 +/- 0.20 and 49 +/- 5%) (p < 0.05). The myocardial flow reserve significantly correlated with the left ventricular ejection fraction in all patients (r = 0.45, p < 0.01). The myocardial flow reserve assessed by PET in the subacute phase after AMI was found to be related to left ventricular remodeling in the chronic phase. PMID:18957800

  18. [The role of angiotensin-converting enzyme gene I/D polymorphism in development of metabolic disorders in patients with cardiovascular pathology].

    PubMed

    Vynohradova, S V

    2005-01-01

    The role of angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) gene I/D polymorphism in development of cardiovascular pathology (CVP), metabolic syndrom and insulin-independent diabet associated with such metabolic disorders as glucose intolerance and hyperglicemia, intolerance to insulin and hyperinsulinemia, dyslipiproteinemia (DLP) and obesity is discussed. Most of authors consider D-allel and DD genotype to be assosiated with development of DLP and such CVP as ishemic heart disease and myocardial infarction. PMID:16018179

  19. The Prognostic Value of the Left Ventricular Ejection Fraction Is Dependent upon the Severity of Mitral Regurgitation in Patients with Acute Myocardial Infarction

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Jung Sun; Youn, Ho-Joong; Her, Sung-Ho; Park, Maen Won; Kim, Chan Joon; Park, Gyung-Min; Cho, Jae Yeong; Ahn, Youngkeun; Kim, Kye Hun; Park, Jong Chun; Seung, Ki Bae; Cho, Myeong Chan; Kim, Chong Jin; Kim, Young Jo; Han, Kyoo Rok; Kim, Hyo Soo

    2015-01-01

    The prognostic value of the left ventricle ejection fraction (LVEF) after acute myocardial infarction (AMI) has been questioned even though it is an accurate marker of left ventricle (LV) systolic dysfunction. This study aimed to examine the prognostic impact of LVEF in patients with AMI with or without high-grade mitral regurgitation (MR). A total of 15,097 patients with AMI who received echocardiography were registered in the Korean Acute Myocardial Infarction Registry (KAMIR) between January 2005 and July 2011. Patients with low-grade MR (grades 0-2) and high-grade MR (grades 3-4) were divided into the following two sub-groups according to LVEF: LVEF ≤ 40% (n = 2,422 and 197, respectively) and LVEF > 40% (n = 12,252 and 226, respectively). The primary endpoints were major adverse cardiac events (MACE), cardiac death, and all-cause death during the first year after registration. Independent predictors of mortality in the multivariate analysis in AMI patients with low-grade MR were age ≥ 75 yr, Killip class ≥ III, N-terminal pro-B-type natriuretic peptide > 4,000 pg/mL, high-sensitivity C-reactive protein ≥ 2.59 mg/L, LVEF ≤ 40%, estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR), and percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI). However, PCI was an independent predictor in AMI patients with high-grade MR. No differences in primary endpoints between AMI patients with high-grade MR (grades 3-4) and EF ≤ 40% or EF > 40% were noted. MR is a predictor of a poor outcome regardless of ejection fraction. LVEF is an inadequate method to evaluate contractile function of the ischemic heart in the face of significant MR. PMID:26130953

  20. Unexpected binding of an octapeptide to the angiotensin II receptor

    SciTech Connect

    Soffer, R.L.; Bandyopadhyay, S.; Rosenberg, E.; Hoeprich, P.; Teitelbaum, A.; Brunck, T.; Colby, C.B.; Gloff, C.

    1987-12-01

    An octapeptide, TBI-22 (Lys-Gly-Val-Tyr-Ile, His-Ala-Leu), inhibited binding of angiotensin II by a solubilized angiotensin receptor partially purified from rabbit liver. This inhibition appears to result from competition for binding to the same receptor. Radioiodinated TBI-22, like angiotensin II, bound to the solubilized receptor with an affinity such that the binding was inhibited 50% by unlabeled TBI-22 or angiotensin II at nanomolar concentrations. The binding reaction, like that for angiotensin II, required p-chloromercuriphenylsulfonic acid and was reversed in the presence of dithiothreitol. TBI-22 and angiotensin II share the sequence Val-Tyr-Ile-His; this tetrapeptide alone, however, did not inhibit binding of angiotensin II. Replacement of the tyrosine residue by aspartic acid in TBI-22 greatly reduced the ability of the peptide to compete with angiotensin II for binding, suggesting an important contribution of this residue to the configuration required for recognition by the receptor.

  1. N- and C-terminal structure-activity study of angiotensin II on the angiotensin AT2 receptor.

    PubMed

    Bouley, R; Pérodin, J; Plante, H; Rihakova, L; Bernier, S G; Maletínská, L; Guillemette, G; Escher, E

    1998-02-19

    The predominant angiotensin II receptor expressed in the human myometrium is the angiotensin AT2 receptor. This preparation was used for a structure-activity relationship study on angiotensin II analogues modified in positions 1 and 8. The angiotensin AT2 receptor present on human myometrium membranes displayed a high affinity (pKd = 9.18) and was relatively abundant (53-253 fmol/mg of protein). The pharmacological profile was typical of an angiotensin AT2 receptor with the following order of affinities: (angiotensin III > or = angiotensin II > angiotensin I > PD123319 > angiotensin-(1-7) > angiotensin-(1-6) approximately angiotensin IV > Losartan). Modifications of the N-terminal side chain and of the primary amine of angiotensin II were evaluated. Neutralisation of the methylcarboxylate (Asp) to a methylcarboxamide (Asn) or to a hydroxymethyl (Ser) or substitution for a methylsulfonate group (cysteic acid) improved the affinity. Extension from methylcarboxylate (Asp) to ethylcarboxylate (Glu) did not affect the affinity. Introduction of larger side chains such as the bulky p-benzoylphenylalanine (p-Bpa) or the positively charged Lys did not substantially affect the affinity. Complete removal of the side chain (angiotensin III), however, resulted in a significant affinity increase. Removal or acetylation of the primary amine of angiotensin II did not noticeably influence the affinity. Progressive alkylation of the primary amine significantly increased the affinity, betain structures being the most potent. It appears that quite important differences exist between the angiotensin AT1 and AT2 receptors concerning their pharmacological profile towards analogues of angiotensin II modified in position 1. On position 8 of angiotensin II, a structure-activity relationship on the angiotensin AT2 receptor was quite similar to that observed with angiotensin AT1 receptor. Bulky, hydrophobic aromatic residues displayed affinities similar to or even better than [Sarcosine1

  2. Myocardial repair/remodelling following infarction: roles of local factors

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Yao

    2009-01-01

    Heart failure is a global health problem, appearing most commonly in patients with previous myocardial infarction (MI). Cardiac remodelling, particularly fibrosis, seen in both the infarcted and non-infarcted myocardium is recognized to be a major determinant of the development of impaired ventricular function, leading to a poor prognosis. Elucidating cellular and molecular mechanisms responsible for the accumulation of extracellular matrix is essential for designing cardioprotective and reparative strategies that could regress fibrosis after infarction. Multiple factors contribute to left ventricular remodelling at different stages post-MI. This review will discuss the role of oxidative stress and locally produced angiotensin II in the pathogenesis of myocardial repair/remodelling after MI. PMID:19050008

  3. In silico analysis and molecular docking studies of potential angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor using quercetin glycosides

    PubMed Central

    Muhammad, Syed Aun; Fatima, Nighat

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to analyze the inhibitory action of quercetin glycosides by computational docking studies. For this, natural metabolite quercetin glycosides isolated from buckwheat and onions were used as ligand for molecular interaction. The crystallographic structure of molecular target angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) (peptidyl-dipeptidase A) was obtained from PDB database (PDB ID: 1O86). Enalapril, a well-known brand of ACE inhibitor was taken as the standard for comparative analysis. Computational docking analysis was performed using PyRx, AutoDock Vina option based on scoring functions. The quercetin showed optimum binding affinity with a molecular target (angiotensin-converting-enzyme) with the binding energy of −8.5 kcal/mol as compared to the standard (−7.0 kcal/mol). These results indicated that quercetin glycosides could be one of the potential ligands to treat hypertension, myocardial infarction, and congestive heart failure. PMID:26109757

  4. Angiotensin II and angiotensin II receptor blocker modulate the arrhythmogenic activity of pulmonary veins

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yi-Jen; Chen, Yao-Chang; Tai, Ching-Tai; Yeh, Hung-I; Lin, Cheng-I; Chen, Shih-Ann

    2005-01-01

    Angiotensin II receptor blockers (AIIRBs) have been shown to prevent atrial fibrillation. The pulmonary veins (PVs) are the most important focus for the generation of atrial fibrillation. The aim of this study was to evaluate whether angiotensin II or AIIRB may change the arrhythmogenic activity of the PVs. Conventional microelectrodes and whole-cell patch clamps were used to investigate the action potentials (APs) and ionic currents in isolated rabbit PV tissue and single cardiomyocytes before and after administering angiotensin II or losartan (AIIRB). In the tissue preparations, angiotensin II induced delayed after-depolarizations (1, 10, and 100 nM) and accelerated the automatic rhythm (10 and 100 nM). Angiotensin II (100 nM) prolonged the AP duration and increased the contractile force (10 and 100 nM). Losartan (1 and 10 μM) inhibited the automatic rhythm. Losartan (10 μM) prolonged the AP duration and reduced the contractile force (1 and 10 μM). Angiotensin II reduced the transient outward potassium current (Ito) but increased the L-type calcium, delayed rectifier potassium (IK), transient inward (Iti), pacemaker, and Na+–Ca2+ exchanger (NCX) currents in the PV cardiomyocytes. Losartan decreased the Ito, IK, Iti, and NCX currents. In conclusion, angiotensin II and AIIRB modulate the PV electrical activity, which may play a role in the pathophysiology of atrial fibrillation. PMID:16273119

  5. Identification of the angiotensin II receptor in rat mesenteric artery.

    PubMed Central

    McQueen, J; Murray, G D; Semple, P F

    1984-01-01

    Specific binding sites of high affinity and low capacity for 125I-angiotensin II have been identified in a membrane fraction derived from arterial arcades of the rat mesentery. Heterogeneity of binding sites and extensive tracer degradation necessitated the use of nonlinear regression methods for the analysis of radioligand binding data. Forward and reverse rate constants for the high affinity sites obtained by three experimental approaches were in good agreement and gave a dissociation equilibrium constant (Kd) of 19-74 pM (95% confidence interval). Affinities for a number of angiotensin-related peptides calculated from competitive binding curves were in the order 125I-angiotensin II = angiotensin II greater than angiotensin III greater than [Sar1,Ile8]angiotensin II greater than [Sar1,Gly8]angiotensin II. Angiotensin I and biochemically unrelated peptides had virtually no effect on binding of tracer angiotensin II. The divalent cations Mn2+, Mg2+ and Ca2+ stimulated 125I-angiotensin II binding at concentrations of 2-10 mM, as did Na+ at 50-100 mM. In the presence of Na+ or Li+, K+ had a biphasic effect. The chelating agents EDTA and EGTA were inhibitory, as were the thiol reagents dithiothreitol and cysteine. This study defined angiotensin II binding sites in a vascular target tissue of sufficiently high affinity to interact rapidly with plasma angiotensin II at physiological concentrations. PMID:6095806

  6. Idiopathic calcified myocardial mass

    PubMed Central

    Patterson, David; Gibson, Derek; Gomes, Ricardo; McDonald, Lawson; Olsen, Eckhardt; Parker, John; Ross, Donald

    1974-01-01

    Patterson, D., Gibson, D., Gomes, R., McDonald, L., Olsen, E., Parker, J., and Ross, D. (1974).Thorax,29, 589-594. Idiopathic calcified myocardial mass. Myocardial calcification can be subdivided into three groups—metastatic, dystrophic or an extension inwards from the pericardium. This case in which the calcified myocardial mass was initially delineated by radiography and by echocardiography and subsequently removed does not fit into any subdivision and has been termed idiopathic. Images PMID:4279467

  7. p38 MAPK-dependent small HSP27 and αB-crystallin phosphorylation in regulation of myocardial function following cardioplegic arrest.

    PubMed

    Clements, Richard T; Feng, Jun; Cordeiro, Brenda; Bianchi, Cesario; Sellke, Frank W

    2011-05-01

    We previously demonstrated that myocardial p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) and heat shock protein 27 (HSP27) are phosphorylated following cardioplegic arrest in patients undergoing cardiac surgery and correlate with reduced cardiac function. The following studies were performed to determine whether inhibition of p38 MAPK and/or overexpression of nonphosphorylatable HSP27 improves cardiac function following cardioplegic arrest. Langendorff-perfused isolated rat hearts were subjected to 2 h of intermittent cold cardioplegia followed by 30 min of reperfusion. Hearts were treated with (CP+SB) or without (CP) the p38 MAPK inhibitor SB-203580 (5 μM) supplied in the cardioplegia. Sham-treated hearts served as controls. In separate experiments, isolated rat ventricular myocytes infected with either green fluorescent protein (GFP) or a nonphosphorylatable HSP27 mutant (3A-HSP27) were subjected to 3 h of cold hypoxic cardioplegia and simulated reperfusion (CP) followed by video microscopy and length change measurements. Baseline parameters of cardiac function were similar between groups [left ventricular developed pressure (LVDP), 119 ± 4.9 mmHg; positive and negative first derivatives of LV pressure (± dP/dt), 3,139 ± 245 and 2, 314 ± 110 mmHg/s]. CP resulted in reduced cardiac function (LVDP, 72.2 ± 5.8 mmHg; ± dP/dt, 2,076 ± 231 and -1,317 ± 156 mmHg/s) compared with baseline. Treatment with 5 μM SB-203580 significantly improved CP-induced cardiac function (LVDP, 101.9 ± 0 mmHg; ± dP/dt, 2,836 ± 163 and -2,108 ± 120 mmHg/s; P = 0.03, 0.01, and 0.04, CP+SB vs. CP). Inhibition of p38 MAPK significantly lowered CP-induced p38 MAPK, HSP27, and αB-crystallin (cryAB) phosphorylation. In vitro CP decreased myocyte length changes from 10.3 ± 1.5% (GFP) to 5.7 ± 0.8% (GFP+CP). Infection with 3A-HSP27 completely rescued CP-induced decreased myocyte contraction (11.1 ± 1.0%). However, infection with 3A-HSP27 did not block the endogenous HSP27 response

  8. Angiotensin converting enzyme inhibition and the kidney

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hollenberg, N. K.

    1988-01-01

    Angiotensin II (Ang II) induces a marked reduction in renal blood flow at doses well below those required to induce a pressor response, and as blood flow falls there is a decline in glomerular filtration rate and sodium excretion. This striking sensitivity of the renal blood supply led many workers to consider the possibility that angiotensin functions as a local renal hormone. As angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) was found in particular abundance in the lung, it seemed reasonable to suspect that most of the conversion occurred there, and that the function of Ang II would be primarily systemic, rather than intrarenal. In this review, I will explore the evidence that has accumulated on these two possibilities, since they have important implications for our current understanding of normal kidney function and derangements of kidney function in disease.

  9. Angiotensins as therapeutic targets beyond heart disease.

    PubMed

    Passos-Silva, Danielle Gomes; Brandan, Enrique; Santos, Robson Augusto Souza

    2015-05-01

    The renin-angiotensin system (RAS) plays a pivotal role in cardiovascular and hydro-electrolyte homeostasis. Blockade of the RAS as a therapeutic strategy for treating hypertension and related cardiovascular diseases is well established. However, actions of the RAS go far beyond the targets initially described. In this regard, the recent identification of novel components of the RAS, including angiotensin-(1-7) [Ang-(1-7)], Ang-(1-9), and alamandine, have opened new possibilities for interfering with the development and manifestations of cardiovascular and non-cardiovascular diseases. In this article, we briefly review novel targets for angiotensins and its therapeutic implications in diverse areas, including cancer, inflammation, and glaucoma. PMID:25847571

  10. Differences in cell-type-specific responses to angiotensin II explain cardiac remodeling differences in C57BL/6 mouse substrains.

    PubMed

    Cardin, Sophie; Scott-Boyer, Marie-Pier; Praktiknjo, Samantha; Jeidane, Saloua; Picard, Sylvie; Reudelhuber, Timothy L; Deschepper, Christian F

    2014-11-01

    Despite indications that hearts from the C57BL/6N and C57BL/6J mouse substrains differ in terms of their contractility and their responses to stress-induced overload, no information is available about the underlying molecular and cellular mechanisms. We tested whether subacute (48 hours) and chronic (14 days) administration of angiotensin II (500 ng/kg per day) had different effects on the left ventricles of male C57BL/6J and C57BL/6N mice. Despite higher blood pressure in C57BL/6J mice, chronic angiotensin II induced fibrosis and increased the left ventricular weight/body weight ratio and cardiac expression of markers of left ventricular hypertrophy to a greater extent in C57BL/6N mice. Subacute angiotensin II affected a greater number of cardiac genes in C57BL/6N than in C57BL/6J mice. Some of the most prominent differences were observed for markers of (1) macrophage activation and M2 polarization, including 2 genes (osteopontin and galectin-3) whose inactivation was reported as sufficient to prevent angiotensin II-induced myocardial fibrosis; and (2) fibroblast activation. These differences were confirmed in macrophage- and fibroblast-enriched populations of cells isolated from the hearts of experimental mice. When testing F2 animals, the amount of connective tissue present after chronic angiotensin II administration did not cosegregate with the inactivation mutation of the nicotinamide nucleotide transhydrogenase gene from C57BL/6J mice, thus discounting its possible contribution to differences in cardiac remodeling. However, expression levels of osteopontin and galectin-3 were cosegregated in hearts from angiotensin II-treated F2 animals and may represent endophenotypes that could facilitate the identification of genetic regulators of the cardiac fibrogenic response to angiotensin II. PMID:25069667

  11. Angiotensin II during Experimentally Simulated Central Hypovolemia

    PubMed Central

    Jensen, Theo Walther; Olsen, Niels Vidiendal

    2016-01-01

    Central hypovolemia, defined as diminished blood volume in the heart and pulmonary vascular bed, is still an unresolved problem from a therapeutic point of view. The development of pharmaceutical agents targeted at specific angiotensin II receptors, such as the non-peptidergic AT2-receptor agonist compound 21, is yielding many opportunities to uncover more knowledge about angiotensin II receptor profiles and possible therapeutic use. Cardiovascular, anti-inflammatory, and neuroprotective therapeutic use of compound 21 have been suggested. However, there has not yet been a focus on the use of these agents in a hypovolemic setting. We argue that the latest debates on the effect of angiotensin II during hypovolemia might guide for future studies, investigating the effect of such agents during experimentally simulated central hypovolemia. The purpose of this review is to examine the role of angiotensin II during episodes of central hypovolemia. To examine this, we reviewed results from studies with three experimental models of simulated hypovolemia: head up tilt table test, lower body negative pressure, and hemorrhage of animals. A systemic literature search was made with the use of PubMed/MEDLINE for studies that measured variables of the renin–angiotensin system or its effect during simulated hypovolemia. Twelve articles, using one of the three models, were included and showed a possible organ-protective effect and an effect on the sympathetic system of angiotensin II during hypovolemia. The results support the possible organ-protective vasodilatory role for the AT2-receptor during hypovolemia on both the kidney and the splanchnic tissue. PMID:26973842

  12. NADPH Oxidases and Angiotensin II Receptor Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Garrido, Abel Martin; Griendling, Kathy K.

    2010-01-01

    Over the last decade many studies have demonstrated the importance of reactive oxygen species (ROS) production by NADPH oxidases in angiotensin II (Ang II) signaling, as well as a role for ROS in the development of different diseases in which Ang II is a central component. In this review, we summarize the mechanism of activation of NADPH oxidases by Ang II and describe the molecular targets of ROS in Ang II signaling in the vasculature, kidney and brain. We also discuss the effects of genetic manipulation of NADPH oxidase function on the physiology and pathophysiology of the renin angiotensin system. PMID:19059306

  13. Intrarenal alterations of the angiotensin-converting enzyme type 2/angiotensin 1-7 complex of the renin-angiotensin system do not alter the course of malignant hypertension in Cyp1a1-Ren-2 transgenic rats.

    PubMed

    Husková, Zuzana; Kopkan, Libor; Červenková, Lenka; Doleželová, Šárka; Vaňourková, Zdeňka; Škaroupková, Petra; Nishiyama, Akira; Kompanowska-Jezierska, Elzbieta; Sadowski, Janusz; Kramer, Herbert J; Červenka, Luděk

    2016-04-01

    The role of the intrarenal renin-angiotensin system (RAS) in the pathophysiology of malignant hypertension is not fully understood. Accumulating evidence indicates that the recently discovered vasodilator axis of the RAS, angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) type 2 (ACE2)/angiotensin 1-7 (ANG 1-7), constitutes an endogenous system counterbalancing the hypertensiogenic axis, ACE/angiotensin II (ANG II)/AT1 receptor. This study aimed to evaluate the role of the intrarenal vasodilator RAS axis in the pathophysiology of ANG II-dependent malignant hypertension in Cyp1a1-Ren-2 transgenic rats. ANG II-dependent malignant hypertension was induced by 13 days' dietary administration of indole-3-carbinol (I3C), a natural xenobiotic that activates the mouse renin gene in Cyp1a1-Ren-2 transgenic rats. It was hypothesized that pharmacologically-induced inhibition of the ACE2/ANG 1-7 complex should aggravate, and activation of this axis should attenuate, the course of ANG II-dependent malignant hypertension. Blood pressure (BP) was monitored by radiotelemetry. ACE2 inhibitor (DX 600, 0.2 μg/day) and ACE2 activator (DIZE, 1 mg/day) were administrated via osmotic minipumps. Even though ACE2 inhibitor significantly decreased and ACE2 activator increased intrarenal ANG 1-7 concentrations, the course of BP, as well as of albuminuria, cardiac hypertrophy and renal glomerular damage, were not altered. It was shown that intrarenal alterations in the ACE2/ANG 1-7 complex did not significantly modify the course of malignant hypertension in I3C-induced Cyp1a1-Ren-2 transgenic rats. Thus, in our experimental setting alterations of this intrarenal vasodilator complex of the RAS do not significantly modify the form of malignant hypertension that clearly depends on the inappropriately increased activity of the ACE/ANG II/AT1 receptor axis. PMID:26833491

  14. Comparative effectiveness of angiotensin-receptor blockers for preventing macrovascular disease in patients with diabetes: a population-based cohort study

    PubMed Central

    Antoniou, Tony; Camacho, Ximena; Yao, Zhan; Gomes, Tara; Juurlink, David N.; Mamdani, Muhammad M.

    2013-01-01

    Background: Telmisartan, unlike other angiotensin-receptor blockers, is a partial agonist of peroxisome proliferator–activated receptor-γ, a property that has been associated with improvements in surrogate markers of cardiovascular health in small trials involving patients with diabetes. However, whether this property translates into a reduced risk of cardiovascular events and death in these patients is unknown. We sought to explore the risk of myocardial infarction, stroke and heart failure in patients with diabetes who were taking telmisartan relative to the risk of these events occurring in patients taking other angiotensin-receptor blockers. Methods: We conducted a population-based, retrospective cohort study of Ontario residents with diabetes aged 66 years and older who started treatment with candesartan, irbesartan, losartan, telmisartan or valsartan between Apr. 1, 2001, and Mar. 31, 2011. Our primary outcome was a composite of admission to hospital for acute myocardial infarction, stroke or heart failure. We examined each outcome individually in secondary analyses, in addition to all-cause mortality. Results: We identified 54 186 patients with diabetes who started taking an angiotensin-receptor blocker during the study period. After multivariable adjustment, patients who took either telmisartan (adjusted hazard ratio [HR] 0.85, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.74–0.97) or valsartan (adjusted HR 0.86, 95% CI 0.77–0.95) had a lower risk of the composite outcome compared with patients who took irbesartan. In contrast, no significant difference in risk was seen between other angiotensin-receptor blockers and irbesartan. In secondary analyses, we found a reduced risk of admission to hospital for heart failure with telmisartan compared with irbesartan (adjusted HR 0.79, 95% CI 0.66–0.96), but no significant differences in risk were seen between angiotensin-receptor blockers in our other secondary analyses. Interpretation: Compared with other angiotensin

  15. Angiotensin II reduces calcium uptake into bone.

    PubMed

    Schurman, Scott J; Bergstrom, William H; Shoemaker, Lawrence R; Welch, Thomas R

    2004-01-01

    Children with neonatal Bartter syndrome (NBS) have hypercalciuria, nephrocalcinosis, and osteopenia. A complex of basic-fibroblast growth factor (b-FGF) and a naturally occurring glycosaminoglycan has been identified in the serum and urine of NBS patients. This complex increases bone resorption in a bone disc bioassay system. Angiotensin II (AT II), which is increased in Bartter syndrome, increases the synthesis of b-FGF by cultured endothelial cells. Addition of 10(-8) M AT II to the bioassay, a concentration reported in Bartter syndrome patients, significantly decreased calcium uptake into bone discs [E/C 0.60 (0.04), P < 0.001 compared with buffer, normal E/C >0.90]. Adding b-FGF monoclonal antibody at 10 microg/ml [E/C 0.90 (0.06), P=NS] or indomethacin [E/C 1.00 (0.03), P=NS] to 10(-8 )M AT II neutralized this effect. In separate experiments, newborn rats were given intraperitoneal injections of AT II. Bone discs from these animals were used in the bioassay system and calcium uptake was markedly reduced compared with discs from rats injected with phosphate-buffered saline [AT II 6.6 x 10(-9), E/C 0.10 (0.04), P<0.001, AT II 3.3 x 10(-8), E/C 0.10 (0.05), P<0.001]. AT II decreases calcium uptake in the bone disc bioassay system. This effect can be abrogated by antibody to b-FGF or prostaglandin synthetase inhibition. These results support the hypothesis that in children with NBS, elevated levels of AT II stimulate local skeletal b-FGF synthesis, with a resultant increase in bone resorption via a prostaglandin-dependent pathway. PMID:14648327

  16. Vascular Smooth Muscle Mineralocorticoid Receptor Contributes to Coronary and Left Ventricular Dysfunction After Myocardial Infarction.

    PubMed

    Gueret, Alexandre; Harouki, Najah; Favre, Julie; Galmiche, Guillaume; Nicol, Lionel; Henry, Jean-Paul; Besnier, Marie; Thuillez, Christian; Richard, Vincent; Kolkhof, Peter; Mulder, Paul; Jaisser, Frédéric; Ouvrard-Pascaud, Antoine

    2016-04-01

    Mineralocorticoid receptor (MR) antagonists slow down the progression of heart failure after myocardial infarction (MI), but the cell-specific role of MR in these benefits is unclear. In this study, the role of MR expressed in vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) was investigated. Two months after coronary artery ligation causing MI, mice with VSMC-specific MR deletion (MI-MR(SMKO)) and mice treated with the MR antagonist finerenone (MI-fine) had improved left ventricular compliance and elastance when compared with infarcted control mice (MI-CTL), as well as reduced interstitial fibrosis. Importantly, the coronary reserve assessed by magnetic resonance imaging was preserved (difference in myocardial perfusion before and after induction of vasodilatation, mL mg (-1) min(-1): MI-CTL: 1.1±0.5, nonsignificant; MI-MR(SMKO): 4.6±1.6 [P<0.05]; MI-fine: 3.6±0.7 [P<0.01]). The endothelial function, tested on isolated septal coronary arteries by analyzing the acetylcholine-induced nitric oxide-dependent relaxation, was also improved by MR deletion in VSMCs or by finerenone treatment (relaxation %: MI-CTL: 36±5, MI-MR(SMKO): 54±3, and MI-fine: 76±4; P<0.05). Such impairment of the coronary endothelial function on MI involved an oxidative stress that was reduced when MR was deleted in VSMCs or by finerenone treatment. Moreover, short-term incubation of coronary arteries isolated from noninfarcted animals with low-dose angiotensin-II (10(-9) mol/L) induced oxidative stress and impaired acetylcholine-induced relaxation in CTL but neither in MR(SMKO) nor in mice pretreated with finerenone. In conclusion, deletion of MR in VSMCs improved left ventricular dysfunction after MI, likely through maintenance of the coronary reserve and improvement of coronary endothelial function. MR blockage by finerenone had similar effects. PMID:26902493

  17. Hydrogen Sulfide Donor GYY4137 Protects against Myocardial Fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Meng, Guoliang; Zhu, Jinbiao; Xiao, Yujiao; Huang, Zhengrong; Zhang, Yuqing; Tang, Xin; Xie, Liping; Chen, Yu; Shao, Yongfeng; Ferro, Albert; Wang, Rui; Moore, Philip K.; Ji, Yong

    2015-01-01

    Hydrogen sulfide (H2S) is a gasotransmitter which regulates multiple cardiovascular functions. However, the precise roles of H2S in modulating myocardial fibrosis in vivo and cardiac fibroblast proliferation in vitro remain unclear. We investigated the effect of GYY4137, a slow-releasing H2S donor, on myocardial fibrosis. Spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR) were administrated with GYY4137 by intraperitoneal injection daily for 4 weeks. GYY4137 decreased systolic blood pressure and inhibited myocardial fibrosis in SHR as evidenced by improved cardiac collagen volume fraction (CVF) in the left ventricle (LV), ratio of perivascular collagen area (PVCA) to lumen area (LA) in perivascular regions, reduced hydroxyproline concentration, collagen I and III mRNA expression, and cross-linked collagen. GYY4137 also inhibited angiotensin II- (Ang II-) induced neonatal rat cardiac fibroblast proliferation, reduced the number of fibroblasts in S phase, decreased collagen I and III mRNA expression and protein synthesis, attenuated oxidative stress, and suppressed α-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA), transforming growth factor-β1 (TGF-β1) expression as well as Smad2 phosphorylation. These results indicate that GYY4137 improves myocardial fibrosis perhaps by a mechanism involving inhibition of oxidative stress, blockade of the TGF-β1/Smad2 signaling pathway, and decrease in α-SMA expression in cardiac fibroblasts. PMID:26078813

  18. Angiotensin 1-7 Protects against Angiotensin II-Induced Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress and Endothelial Dysfunction via Mas Receptor

    PubMed Central

    Murugan, Dharmani; Lau, Yeh Siang; Lau, Wai Chi; Mustafa, Mohd Rais; Huang, Yu

    2015-01-01

    Angiotensin 1–7 (Ang 1–7) counter-regulates the cardiovascular actions of angiotensin II (Ang II). The present study investigated the protective effect of Ang 1–7 against Ang II-induced endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress and endothelial dysfunction. Ex vivo treatment with Ang II (0.5 μM, 24 hours) impaired endothelium-dependent relaxation in mouse aortas; this harmful effect of Ang II was reversed by co-treatment with ER stress inhibitors, l4-phenylbutyric acid (PBA) and tauroursodeoxycholic acid (TUDCA) as well as Ang 1–7. The Mas receptor antagonist, A779, antagonized the effect of Ang 1–7. The elevated mRNA expression of CHOP, Grp78 and ATF4 or protein expression of p-eIF2α and ATF6 (ER stress markers) in Ang II-treated human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) and mouse aortas were blunted by co-treatment with Ang 1–7 and the latter effect was reversed by A779. Furthermore, Ang II-induced reduction in both eNOS phosphorylation and NO production was inhibited by Ang 1–7. In addition, Ang 1–7 decreased the levels of ER stress markers and augmented NO production in HUVECs treated with ER stress inducer, tunicamycin. The present study provides new evidence for functional antagonism between the two arms of the renin-angiotensin system in endothelial cells by demonstrating that Ang 1–7 ameliorates Ang II-stimulated ER stress to raise NO bioavailability, and subsequently preserves endothelial function. PMID:26709511

  19. Histone-deacetylase Inhibition Reverses Atrial Arrhythmia Inducibility and Fibrosis in Cardiac Hypertrophy Independent of Angiotensin

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Fang; Levin, Mark D.; Petrenko, Nataliya B.; Lu, Min Min; Wang, Tao; Yuan, Li Jun; Stout, Andrea L.; Epstein, Jonathan A.; Patel, Vickas V.

    2008-01-01

    Atrial fibrosis influences the development of atrial fibrillation (AF), particularly in the setting of structural heart disease where angiotensin-inhibition is partially effective for reducing atrial fibrosis and AF. Histone-deacetylase inhibition reduces cardiac hypertrophy and fibrosis, so we sought to determine if the HDAC inhibitor trichostatin A (TSA) could reduce atrial fibrosis and arrhythmias. Mice over-expressing homeodomain-only protein (HopXTg), which recruits HDAC activity to induce cardiac hypertrophy were investigated in 4 groups (aged 14-18 weeks): wild-type (WT), HopXTg, HopXTg mice treated with TSA for 2 weeks (HopX-TSA) and wild-type mice treated with TSA for 2 weeks (WT-TSA). These groups were characterized using invasive electrophysiology, atrial fibrosis measurements, atrial connexin immunocytochemistry and myocardial angiotensin II measurements. Invasive electrophysiologic stimulation, using the same attempts in each group, induced more atrial arrhythmias in HopXTg mice (48 episodes in 13 of 15 HopXTg mice versus 5 episodes in 2 of 15 HopX-TSA mice, P<0.001; versus 9 episodes in 2 of 15 WT mice, P<0.001; versus no episodes in any WT-TSA mice, P<0.001). TSA reduced atrial arrhythmia duration in HopXTg mice (1307±289 milliseconds versus 148±110 milliseconds, P<0.01) and atrial fibrosis (8.1±1.5% versus 3.9±0.4%, P<0.001). Atrial connexin40 was lower in HopXTg compared to WT mice, and TSA normalized the expression and size distribution of connexin40 gap junctions. Myocardial angiotensin II levels were similar between WT and HopXTg mice (76.3±26.0 versus 69.7±16.6 pg/mg protein, P=NS). Therefore, it appears HDAC inhibition reverses atrial fibrosis, connexin40 remodeling and atrial arrhythmia vulnerability independent of angiotensin II in cardiac hypertrophy. PMID:18926829

  20. Functional proteomic analysis reveals sex-dependent differences in structural and energy-producing myocardial proteins in rat model of alcoholic cardiomyopathy

    PubMed Central

    Fogle, Rachel L.; Hollenbeak, Christopher S.; Stanley, Bruce A.; Vary, Thomas C.; Kimball, Scot R.

    2011-01-01

    Long-term ethanol exposure leads to a sexually dimorphic response in both the susceptibility to cardiac pathology (protective effect of the female heart) and the expression of selected myocardial proteins. The purpose of the present study was to use proteomics to examine the effect of chronic alcohol consumption on a broader array of cardiac proteins and how these were affected between the sexes. Male and female rats were maintained for 18 wk on a 40% ethanol-containing diet in which alcohol was provided in drinking water and agar blocks. Differences in the content of specific cardiac proteins in isopycnic centrifugal fractions were determined using mass spectrometry on iTRAQ-labeled tryptic fragments. A random effects model of meta-analysis was developed to combine the results from multiple iTRAQ experiments. Analysis of a network of proteins involved in cardiovascular system development and function showed that troponins were oppositely regulated by alcohol exposure in females (upregulated) vs. males (downregulated), and this effect was validated by Western blot analysis. Pathway analysis also revealed that alcohol-consuming males showed increased expression of proteins involved in various steps of oxidative phosphorylation including complexes I, III, IV, and V, whereas females showed no change or decreased content. One implication from these findings is that females may be protected from the toxic effects of alcohol due to their ability to maintain contractile function, maintain efficiency of force generation, and minimize oxidative stress. However, the alcohol-induced insult may lead to increased production of reactive oxygen species and structural abnormalities in male myocardium. PMID:21245415

  1. Early post-myocardial infarction survival in MRL mice is mediated by attenuated apoptosis and inflammation but depends on genetic background

    PubMed Central

    Hunt, Darlene L.; Campbell, Patrick H.; Zambon, Alexander C.; Vranizan, Karen; Evans, Sylvia M.; Kuo, Hai-Chien; Yamaguchi, Ken D.; Omens, Jeffrey H.; McCulloch, Andrew D.

    2011-01-01

    The Murphy Roths Large (MRL) mouse, a strain capable of regenerating right ventricular myocardium, has a high post-myocardial infarction (MI) survival rate compared with C57BL/6J (C57) mice. The biological processes responsible for this survival advantage are unknown. To assess the effect of genetic background, the LG/J strain, which harbors 75% of the MRL composite genome, was included in the study. The MRL survival advantage versus C57 mice (92% vs. 68%, P < 0.05) occurred primarily in the first 5 days; LG/J survival was intermediate (P = NS). Microarray data analysis revealed an attenuation of apoptotic (P < 0.05) and stress response transcripts in MRL hearts compared with C57 hearts after MI. Supporting the microarray results, there were fewer TUNEL-positive cells 1 day post-MI in MRL infarcts compared with C57 infarcts (P = 0.001) and fewer CD45-positive cells in the MRL infarct border zone 2 days post-MI (P < 0.01). LG/J results were intermediate (P = NS). MRL hearts had smaller infarct scars and attenuated ventricular dilation 30 days post-MI compared with C57 hearts (P < 0.05). We conclude that the early post-MI survival advantage of MRL mice over the C57 strain is mediated at least in part by reductions in apoptosis and inflammatory infiltration, and that these reductions may influence chronic remodeling. The intermediate survival, apoptosis and inflammation profile of LG/J mice suggests this high tolerance for MI in the MRL could be derived from its shared genetic background with the LG/J. PMID:21967898

  2. Calpain inhibition preserves myocardial structure and function following myocardial infarction.

    PubMed

    Mani, Santhosh K; Balasubramanian, Sundaravadivel; Zavadzkas, Juozas A; Jeffords, Laura B; Rivers, William T; Zile, Michael R; Mukherjee, Rupak; Spinale, Francis G; Kuppuswamy, Dhandapani

    2009-11-01

    Cardiac pathology, such as myocardial infarction (MI), activates intracellular proteases that often trigger programmed cell death and contribute to maladaptive changes in myocardial structure and function. To test whether inhibition of calpain, a Ca(2+)-dependent cysteine protease, would prevent these changes, we used a mouse MI model. Calpeptin, an aldehydic inhibitor of calpain, was intravenously administered at 0.5 mg/kg body wt before MI induction and then at the same dose subcutaneously once per day. Both calpeptin-treated (n = 6) and untreated (n = 6) MI mice were used to study changes in myocardial structure and function after 4 days of MI, where end-diastolic volume (EDV) and left ventricular ejection fraction (EF) were measured by echocardiography. Calpain activation and programmed cell death were measured by immunohistochemistry, Western blotting, and TdT-mediated dUTP nick-end labeling (TUNEL). In MI mice, calpeptin treatment resulted in a significant improvement in EF [EF decreased from 67 + or - 2% pre-MI to 30 + or - 4% with MI only vs. 41 + or - 2% with MI + calpeptin] and attenuated the increase in EDV [EDV increased from 42 + or - 2 microl pre-MI to 73 + or - 4 microl with MI only vs. 55 + or - 4 microl with MI + calpeptin]. Furthermore, calpeptin treatment resulted in marked reduction in calpain- and caspase-3-associated changes and TUNEL staining. These studies indicate that calpain contributes to MI-induced alterations in myocardial structure and function and that it could be a potential therapeutic target in treating MI patients. PMID:19734364

  3. Current trend of acute myocardial infarction in Korea (from the Korea Acute Myocardial Infarction Registry from 2006 to 2013).

    PubMed

    Kook, Hyun Yi; Jeong, Myung Ho; Oh, Sangeun; Yoo, Sung-Hee; Kim, Eun Jung; Ahn, Youngkeun; Kim, Ju Han; Chai, Leem Soon; Kim, Young Jo; Kim, Chong Jin; Chan Cho, Myeong

    2014-12-15

    Although the incidence of acute myocardial infarction (AMI) in Korea has been rapidly changed because of westernization of diet, lifestyle, and aging of the population, the recent trend of the myocardial infarction have not been reported by classification. We investigated recent trends in the incidence and mortality associated with the 2 major types of AMI. We reviewed 39,978 patients registered in the Korea Acute Myocardial Infarction Registry for either ST-segment elevation acute myocardial infarction (STEMI) or non-ST-segment elevation acute myocardial infarction (NSTEMI) from 2006 to 2013. When the rate for AMI were investigated according to each year, the incidence rates of STEMI decreased markedly from 60.5% in 2006 to 48.1% in 2013 (p <0.001). In contrast, a gradual increase in the incidence rates of NSTEMI was observed from 39.5% in 2006 to 51.9% in 2013 (p <0.001). As risk factors, hypertension, diabetes mellitus, and dyslipidemia were much more common in patients with NSTEMI than STEMI. Among medical treatments, the use of β blockers, angiotensin receptor blocker, and statin were increased from 2006 to 2013 in patients with STEMI and NSTEMI. Patients with STEMI and NSTEMI were more inclined to be increasingly treated by invasive treatments with percutaneous coronary intervention. In conclusion, this study demonstrated that the trend of myocardial infarction has been changed rapidly in the aspect of risk factors, ratio of STEMI versus NSTEMI, and therapeutic strategies during the recent 8 years in Korea. PMID:25438907

  4. Angiotensin II-related hypertension and eye diseases

    PubMed Central

    Marin Garcia, Pablo Jesus; Marin-Castaño, Maria Encarna

    2014-01-01

    Systemic vascular disease, especially hypertension, has been suspected as a risk factor for some eye diseases including, diabetic retinopathy and age-related macular degeneration. Hypertension can contribute to chronic diseases by hemodynamic injury and/or cellular actions induced by hypertension-related hormones or growth factors. Among the most important is Angiotensin II (Ang II), which controls blood pressure and induces different cellular functions that may be dependent or independent of its effect on blood pressure. Importantly, as is true for heart, kidney and other organs, the renin-angiotensin system (RAS) is present in the eye. So, even in the absence of hypertension, local production of Ang II could be involved in eye diseases. The goal of this manuscript is to review the most relevant scientific evidence supporting the role of the RAS activation, in the development of age-related macular degeneration and diabetic retinopathy, and highlight the importance of Ang II in the etiology of these diseases. PMID:25276298

  5. Combined Angiotensin Receptor Antagonism and Neprilysin Inhibition.

    PubMed

    Hubers, Scott A; Brown, Nancy J

    2016-03-15

    Heart failure affects ≈5.7 million people in the United States alone. Angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors, angiotensin receptor blockers, β-blockers, and aldosterone antagonists have improved mortality in patients with heart failure and reduced ejection fraction, but mortality remains high. In July 2015, the US Food and Drug Administration approved the first of a new class of drugs for the treatment of heart failure: Valsartan/sacubitril (formerly known as LCZ696 and currently marketed by Novartis as Entresto) combines the angiotensin receptor blocker valsartan and the neprilysin inhibitor prodrug sacubitril in a 1:1 ratio in a sodium supramolecular complex. Sacubitril is converted by esterases to LBQ657, which inhibits neprilysin, the enzyme responsible for the degradation of the natriuretic peptides and many other vasoactive peptides. Thus, this combined angiotensin receptor antagonist and neprilysin inhibitor addresses 2 of the pathophysiological mechanisms of heart failure: activation of the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system and decreased sensitivity to natriuretic peptides. In the Prospective Comparison of ARNI With ACEI to Determine Impact on Global Mortality and Morbidity in Heart Failure (PARADIGM-HF) trial, valsartan/sacubitril significantly reduced mortality and hospitalization for heart failure, as well as blood pressure, compared with enalapril in patients with heart failure, reduced ejection fraction, and an elevated circulating level of brain natriuretic peptide or N-terminal pro-brain natriuretic peptide. Ongoing clinical trials are evaluating the role of valsartan/sacubitril in the treatment of heart failure with preserved ejection fraction and hypertension. We review here the mechanisms of action of valsartan/sacubitril, the pharmacological properties of the drug, and its efficacy and safety in the treatment of heart failure and hypertension. PMID:26976916

  6. Hypertrophic response to hemodynamic overload: role of load vs. renin-angiotensin system activation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koide, M.; Carabello, B. A.; Conrad, C. C.; Buckley, J. M.; DeFreyte, G.; Barnes, M.; Tomanek, R. J.; Wei, C. C.; Dell'Italia, L. J.; Cooper, G. 4th; Zile, M. R.

    1999-01-01

    Myocardial hypertrophy is one of the basic mechanisms by which the heart compensates for hemodynamic overload. The mechanisms by which hemodynamic overload is transduced by the cardiac muscle cell and translated into cardiac hypertrophy are not completely understood. Candidates include activation of the renin-angiotensin system (RAS) and angiotensin II receptor (AT1) stimulation. In this study, we tested the hypothesis that load, independent of the RAS, is sufficient to stimulate cardiac growth. Four groups of cats were studied: 14 normal controls, 20 pulmonary artery-banded (PAB) cats, 7 PAB cats in whom the AT1 was concomitantly and continuously blocked with losartan, and 8 PAB cats in whom the angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) was concomitantly and continuously blocked with captopril. Losartan cats had at least a one-log order increase in the ED50 of the blood pressure response to angiotensin II infusion. Right ventricular (RV) hypertrophy was assessed using the RV mass-to-body weight ratio and ventricular cardiocyte size. RV hemodynamic overload was assessed by measuring RV systolic and diastolic pressures. Neither the extent of RV pressure overload nor RV hypertrophy that resulted from PAB was affected by AT1 blockade with losartan or ACE inhibition with captopril. RV systolic pressure was increased from 21 +/- 3 mmHg in normals to 68 +/- 4 mmHg in PAB, 65 +/- 5 mmHg in PAB plus losartan and 62 +/- 3 mmHg in PAB plus captopril. RV-to-body weight ratio increased from 0.52 +/- 0.04 g/kg in normals to 1.11 +/- 0.06 g/kg in PAB, 1.06 +/- 0.06 g/kg in PAB plus losartan and 1.06 +/- 0.06 g/kg in PAB plus captopril. Thus 1) pharmacological modulation of the RAS with losartan and captopril did not change the extent of the hemodynamic overload or the hypertrophic response induced by PAB; 2) neither RAS activation nor angiotensin II receptor stimulation is an obligatory and necessary component of the signaling pathway that acts as an intermediary coupling load to the

  7. Renal Sympathetic Denervation in Rats Ameliorates Cardiac Dysfunction and Fibrosis Post-Myocardial Infarction Involving MicroRNAs

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Xiaoxin; Li, Xiaoyan; Lyu, Yongnan; He, Yiyu; Wan, Weiguo; Jiang, Xuejun

    2016-01-01

    Background The role of renal sympathetic denervation (RSD) in ameliorating post-myocardial infarction (MI) left ventricular (LV) fibrosis via microRNA-dependent regulation of connective tissue growth factor (CTGF) remains unknown. Material/Methods MI and RSD were induced in Sprague–Dawley rats by ligating the left coronary artery and denervating the bilateral renal nerves, respectively. Norepinephrine, renin, angiotensin II and aldosterone in plasma, collagen, microRNA21, microRNA 101a, microRNA 133a and CTGF in heart tissue, as well as cardiac function were evaluated six weeks post-MI. Results In the RSD group, parameters of cardiac function were significantly improved as evidenced by increased LV ejection fraction (p<0.01), LV end-systolic diameter (p<0.01), end-diastolic diameter (p<0.05), LV systolic pressure (p<0.05), maximal rate of pressure rise and decline (dP/dtmax and dP/dtmin, p<0.05), and decreased LV end-diastolic pressure (p<0.05) when compared with MI rats. Further, reduced collagen deposition in peri-infarct myocardium was observed in RSD-treated rats along with higher microRNA101a and microRNA133a (p<0.05) and lower microRNA21 expression (p<0.01) than in MI rats. CTGF mRNA and protein levels were decreased in LV following RSD (p<0.01), accompanied by decreased expression of norepinephrine, renin, angiotensin II and aldosterone in plasma (p<0.05) compared with untreated MI rats. Conclusions The potential therapeutic effects of RSD on post-MI LV fibrosis may be partly mediated by inhibition of CTGF expression via upregulation of microRNA 101a and microRNA 133a and downregulation of microRNA21. PMID:27490896

  8. Renal Sympathetic Denervation in Rats Ameliorates Cardiac Dysfunction and Fibrosis Post-Myocardial Infarction Involving MicroRNAs.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Xiaoxin; Li, Xiaoyan; Lyu, Yongnan; He, Yiyu; Wan, Weiguo; Jiang, Xuejun

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND The role of renal sympathetic denervation (RSD) in ameliorating post-myocardial infarction (MI) left ventricular (LV) fibrosis via microRNA-dependent regulation of connective tissue growth factor (CTGF) remains unknown. MATERIAL AND METHODS MI and RSD were induced in Sprague-Dawley rats by ligating the left coronary artery and denervating the bilateral renal nerves, respectively. Norepinephrine, renin, angiotensin II and aldosterone in plasma, collagen, microRNA21, microRNA 101a, microRNA 133a and CTGF in heart tissue, as well as cardiac function were evaluated six weeks post-MI. RESULTS In the RSD group, parameters of cardiac function were significantly improved as evidenced by increased LV ejection fraction (p<0.01), LV end-systolic diameter (p<0.01), end-diastolic diameter (p<0.05), LV systolic pressure (p<0.05), maximal rate of pressure rise and decline (dP/dtmax and dP/dtmin, p<0.05), and decreased LV end-diastolic pressure (p<0.05) when compared with MI rats. Further, reduced collagen deposition in peri-infarct myocardium was observed in RSD-treated rats along with higher microRNA101a and microRNA133a (p<0.05) and lower microRNA21 expression (p<0.01) than in MI rats. CTGF mRNA and protein levels were decreased in LV following RSD (p<0.01), accompanied by decreased expression of norepinephrine, renin, angiotensin II and aldosterone in plasma (p<0.05) compared with untreated MI rats. CONCLUSIONS The potential therapeutic effects of RSD on post-MI LV fibrosis may be partly mediated by inhibition of CTGF expression via upregulation of microRNA 101a and microRNA 133a and downregulation of microRNA21. PMID:27490896

  9. Classical Renin-Angiotensin System in Kidney Physiology

    PubMed Central

    Sparks, Matthew A.; Crowley, Steven D.; Gurley, Susan B.; Mirotsou, Maria; Coffman, Thomas M.

    2014-01-01

    The renin-angiotensin system has powerful effects in control of the blood pressure and sodium homeostasis. These actions are coordinated through integrated actions in the kidney, cardio-vascular system and the central nervous system. Along with its impact on blood pressure, the renin-angiotensin system also influences a range of processes from inflammation and immune responses to longevity. Here, we review the actions of the “classical” renin-angiotensin system, whereby the substrate protein angiotensinogen is processed in a two-step reaction by renin and angiotensin converting enzyme, resulting in the sequential generation of angiotensin I and angiotensin II, the major biologically active renin-angiotensin system peptide, which exerts its actions via type 1 and type 2 angiotensin receptors. In recent years, several new enzymes, peptides, and receptors related to the renin-angiotensin system have been identified, manifesting a complexity that was previously unappreciated. While the functions of these alternative pathways will be reviewed elsewhere in this journal, our focus here is on the physiological role of components of the “classical” renin-angiotensin system, with an emphasis on new developments and modern concepts. PMID:24944035

  10. 25-Hydroxyvitamin D status, arterial stiffness and the renin-angiotensin system in healthy humans.

    PubMed

    Abdi-Ali, Ahmed; Nicholl, David D M; Hemmelgarn, Brenda R; MacRae, Jennifer M; Sola, Darlene Y; Ahmed, Sofia B

    2014-01-01

    Vitamin D deficiency is associated with increased arterial stiffness. We sought to clarify the influence of vitamin D in modulating angiotensin II-dependent arterial stiffness. Thirty-six healthy subjects (33 ± 2 years, 67% female, mean 25-hydroxyvitamin D 69 ± 4 nmol/L) were studied in high salt balance. Arterial stiffness, expressed as brachial pulse wave velocity (bPWV) and aortic augmentation index (AIx), was measured by tonometry at baseline and in response to angiotensin II infusion (3 ng/kg/min × 30 min then 6 ng/kg/min × 30 min). The primary outcome was change in bPWV after an angiotensin II challenge. Results were analyzed according to plasma 25-hydroxyvitamin D status: deficient (<50 nmol/L) and sufficient (≥ 50 nmol/L). There were no differences in baseline arterial stiffness between vitamin D deficient (25-hydroxyvitamin D 40 ± 2 nmol/L) and sufficient (25-hydroxyvitamin D 80 ± 4 nmol/L) groups. Compared with sufficient vitamin D status, vitamin D deficiency was associated with a decreased arterial response to angiotensin II challenge (Δbrachial pulse wave velocity: 0.48 ± 0.44 m/s versus 1.95 ± 0.22 m/s, p=0.004; Δaortic augmentation index: 9.4 ± 3.4% versus 14.2 ± 2.7%, p=0.3), which persisted for brachial pulse wave velocity response after adjustment for covariates (p=0.03). Vitamin D deficiency is associated with increased arterial stiffness in healthy humans, possibly through an angiotensin II-dependent mechanism. PMID:24164282

  11. RGS4 inhibits angiotensin II signaling and macrophage localization during renal reperfusion injury independent of vasospasm

    PubMed Central

    Pang, Paul; Jin, Xiaohua; Proctor, Brandon M.; Farley, Michelle; Roy, Nilay; Chin, Matthew S.; von Andrian, Ulrich H.; Vollmann, Elisabeth; Perro, Mario; Hoffman, Ryan J.; Chung, Joseph; Chauhan, Nikita; Mistri, Murti; Muslin, Anthony J.; Bonventre, Joseph V.; Siedlecki, Andrew M.

    2014-01-01

    Vascular inflammation is a major contributor to the severity of acute kidney injury. In the context of vasospasm-independent reperfusion injury we studied the potential anti-inflammatory role of the Gα-related RGS protein, RGS4. Transgenic RGS4 mice were resistant to 25 minute injury, although post-ischemic renal arteriolar diameter was equal to the wild type early after injury. A 10 minute unilateral injury was performed to study reperfusion without vasospasm. Eighteen hours after injury blood flow was decreased in the inner cortex of wild type mice with preservation of tubular architecture. Angiotensin II levels in the kidneys of wild type and transgenic mice were elevated in a sub-vasoconstrictive range 12 and 18 hours after injury. Angiotensin II stimulated pre-glomerular vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMC) to secrete the macrophage chemoattractant, RANTES; a process decreased by angiotensin II R2 (AT2) inhibition. However, RANTES increased when RGS4 expression was suppressed implicating Gα protein activation in an AT2-RGS4-dependent pathway. RGS4 function, specific to VSMC, was tested in a conditional VSMC-specific RGS4 knockout showing high macrophage density by T2 MRI compared to transgenic and non-transgenic mice after the 10 minute injury. Arteriolar diameter of this knockout was unchanged at successive time points after injury. Thus, RGS4 expression, specific to renal VSMC, inhibits angiotensin II-mediated cytokine signaling and macrophage recruitment during reperfusion, distinct from vasomotor regulation. PMID:25469849

  12. Gynura procumbens causes vasodilation by inhibiting angiotensin II and enhancing bradykinin actions.

    PubMed

    Poh, Ting-Fung; Ng, Hien-Kun; Hoe, See-Ziau; Lam, Sau-Kuen

    2013-05-01

    Previous studies showed that Gynura procumbens reduced blood pressure by blocking calcium channels and inhibiting the angiotensin-converting enzyme activity. The present experiments were to further explore the effects and mechanisms of a purer aqueous fraction (FA-I) of G. procumbens on angiotensin I (Ang I)-induced and angiotensin II (Ang II)-induced contraction of aortic rings and also on the bradykinin (BK) effect on cardiovascular system. Rat aortic rings suspended in organ chambers were used to investigate the vascular reactivity of FA-I. Effect of FA-I on BK was studied by in vitro and in vivo methods. Results show that FA-I significantly (P < 0.05) decreased the contraction evoked by Ang I and Ang II. In the presence of indomethacin (10 µM) or N-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester (0.1 µM), the inhibitory effect of FA-I on Ang II-induced contraction of aortic rings was reduced. Besides, FA-I potentiated the vasorelaxant effect and enhanced the blood pressure-lowering effect of BK. In conclusion, FA-I reduced the contraction evoked by Ang II probably via the endothelium-dependent pathways, which involve activation of the release of nitric oxide and prostaglandins. The inhibition of angiotensin-converting enzyme activity by FA-I may contribute to the potentiation of the effects of BK on cardiovascular system. PMID:23328388

  13. Evidence that the angiotensin IV (AT(4)) receptor is the enzyme insulin-regulated aminopeptidase.

    PubMed

    Albiston, A L; McDowall, S G; Matsacos, D; Sim, P; Clune, E; Mustafa, T; Lee, J; Mendelsohn, F A; Simpson, R J; Connolly, L M; Chai, S Y

    2001-12-28

    Central infusion of angiotensin IV or its more stable analogues facilitates memory retention and retrieval in normal animals and reverses amnesia induced by scopolamine or by bilateral perforant pathway lesions. These peptides bind with high affinity and specificity to a novel binding site designated the angiotensin AT(4) receptor. Until now, the AT(4) receptor has eluded molecular characterization. Here we identify the AT(4) receptor, by protein purification and peptide sequencing, to be insulin-regulated aminopeptidase (IRAP). HEK 293T cells transfected with IRAP exhibit typical AT(4) receptor binding characteristics; the AT(4) receptor ligands, angiotensin IV and LVV-hemorphin 7, compete for the binding of [(125)I]Nle(1)-angiotensin IV with IC(50) values of 32 and 140 nm, respectively. The distribution of IRAP and its mRNA in the brain, determined by immunohistochemistry and hybridization histochemistry, parallels that of the AT(4) receptor determined by radioligand binding. We also show that AT(4) receptor ligands dose-dependently inhibit the catalytic activity of IRAP. We have therefore demonstrated that the AT(4) receptor is IRAP and propose that AT(4) receptor ligands may exert their effects by inhibiting the catalytic activity of IRAP thereby extending the half-life of its neuropeptide substrates. PMID:11707427

  14. Transient myocardial ischaemia after acute myocardial infarction.

    PubMed Central

    Currie, P; Saltissi, S

    1990-01-01

    The prevalence and characteristics of transient myocardial ischaemia were studied in 203 patients with recent acute myocardial infarction by both early (6.4 days) and late (38 days) ambulatory monitoring of the ST segment. Transient ST segment depression was much commoner during late (32% patients) than early (14%) monitoring. Most transient ischaemia (greater than 85% episodes) was silent and 80% of patients had only silent episodes. During late monitoring painful ST depression was accompanied by greater ST depression and tended to occur at a higher heart rate. Late transient ischaemia showed a diurnal distribution, occurred at a higher initial heart rate, and was more often accompanied by a further increase in heart rate than early ischaemia. Thus in the first 2 months after myocardial infarction transient ischaemia became increasingly common and more closely associated with increased myocardial oxygen demand. Because transient ischaemic episodes during early and late ambulatory monitoring have dissimilar characteristics they may also have different pathophysiologies and prognostic implications. PMID:2245108

  15. Metabolic Actions of Angiotensin II and Insulin: A Microvascular Endothelial Balancing Act

    PubMed Central

    Muniyappa, Ranganath; Yavuz, Shazene

    2012-01-01

    Metabolic actions of insulin to promote glucose disposal are augmented by nitric oxide (NO)-dependent increases in microvascular blood flow to skeletal muscle. The balance between NO-dependent vasodilator actions and endothelin-1-dependent vasoconstrictor actions of insulin is regulated by phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase-dependent (PI3K) - and mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK)-dependent signaling in vascular endothelium, respectively. Angiotensin II acting on AT2 receptor increases capillary blood flow to increase insulin-mediated glucose disposal. In contrast, AT1 receptor activation leads to reduced NO bioavailability, impaired insulin signaling, vasoconstriction, and insulin resistance. Insulin-resistant states are characterized by dysregulated local renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system (RAAS). Under insulin-resistant conditions, pathway-specific impairment in PI3K-dependent signaling may cause imbalance between production of NO and secretion of endothelin-1, leading to decreased blood flow, which worsens insulin resistance. Similarly, excess AT1 receptor activity in the microvasculature may selectively impair vasodilation while simultaneously potentiating the vasoconstrictor actions of insulin. Therapeutic interventions that target pathway-selective impairment in insulin signaling and the imbalance in AT1 and AT2 receptor signaling in microvascular endothelium may simultaneously ameliorate endothelial dysfunction and insulin resistance. In the present review, we discuss molecular mechanisms in the endothelium underlying microvascular and metabolic actions of insulin and Angiotensin II, the mechanistic basis for microvascular endothelial dysfunction and insulin resistance in RAAS dysregulated clinical states, and the rationale for therapeutic strategies that restore the balance in vasodilator and constrictor actions of insulin and Angiotensin II in the microvasculature. PMID:22684034

  16. Role of AMP-activated protein kinase α1 in angiotensin-II-induced renal Tgfß-activated kinase 1 activation.

    PubMed

    Mia, Sobuj; Castor, Tatsiana; Musculus, Katharina; Voelkl, Jakob; Alesutan, Ioana; Lang, Florian

    2016-08-01

    Angiotensin-II is a key factor in renal fibrosis. Obstructive nephropathy induces an isoform shift from catalytic Ampkα2 towards Ampkα1 which contributes to signaling involved in renal tissue injury. The present study explored whether the Ampkα1 isoform contributes to the renal effects of angiotensin-II. To this end, angiotensin-II was infused by subcutaneous implantation of osmotic minipumps in gene-targeted mice lacking functional Ampkα1 (Ampkα1(-/-)) and corresponding wild-type mice (Ampkα1(+/+)). Western blotting and qRT-PCR were employed to determine protein abundance and mRNA levels, respectively, in renal tissue. In Ampkα1(+/+) mice, angiotensin-II increased renal Ampkα1 protein expression without significantly modifying renal Ampkα2 protein expression. The renal phosphorylated Ampkα (Thr(172)) protein abundance was not affected by angiotensin-II in neither genotypes, but was significantly lower in Ampkα1(-/-) mice than Ampkα1(+/+) mice. Angiotensin-II increased the phosphorylation of Tak1 (Ser(412)) in renal tissue of Ampkα1(+/+) mice, an effect virtually absent in the Ampkα1(-/-) mice. Furthermore, angiotensin-II treatment significantly increased renal protein and mRNA expression of α-smooth muscle actin (αSma) as well as Tak1-target gene expression: Cox2, Il6 and Pai1 in Ampkα1(+/+) mice, all effects significantly less pronounced in Ampkα1(-/-) mice. In conclusion, angiotensin-II up-regulates the Ampkα1 isoform in renal tissue. Ampkα1 participates in renal Tak1 activation and Tak1-dependent signaling induced by angiotensin-II. PMID:27230958

  17. Design of a MCoTI-based Cyclotide with Angiotensin 1–7-like Activity

    PubMed Central

    Aboye, Teshome; Meeks, Christopher J.; Majumder, Subhabrata; Shekhtman, Alexander; Rodgers, Kathleen; Camarero, Julio A.

    2016-01-01

    We report for the first time the design and synthesis of a novel cyclotide able to activate the unique receptor of angiotensin-(1–7) (AT1–7), the MAS1 receptor. This was accomplished by grafting an AT 1–7 peptide analog onto loop 6 of cyclotide MCoTI-I using isopeptide bonds to preserve the α-amino and C-terminal carboxylate groups of AT1–7, which are required for activity. The resulting cyclotide construct was able to adopt a cyclotide-like conformation and showed similar activity to that of AT1–7. This cyclotide also showed high stability in human serum thereby providing a promising lead compound for the design of a novel type of peptide-based in the treatment of cancer and myocardial infarction. PMID:26821010

  18. Myocardial infarction and marijuana.

    PubMed

    Charles, R; Holt, S; Kirkham, N

    1979-04-01

    Myocardial infarction in the virtual absence of risk factors occurred in a 25-year old man shortly after smoking a cigarette containing marijuana. Subsequent coronary arteriography was normal. PMID:466984

  19. Dual renin-angiotensin system inhibition for prevention of renal and cardiovascular events: do the latest trials challenge existing evidence?

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Circulatory and tissue renin-angiotensin systems (RAS) play a central role in cardiovascular (CV) and renal pathophysiology, making RAS inhibition a logical therapeutic approach in the prevention of CV and renal disease in patients with hypertension. The cardio- and renoprotective effects observed with angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors or angiotensin II receptor blockers (ARBs) monotherapy, together with the availability of a direct renin inhibitor (DRI), led to the investigation of the potential benefits of dual RAS inhibition. In small studies, ARB and ACE inhibitor combinations were shown to be beneficial in patients with CV or renal disease, with improvement in surrogate markers. However, in larger outcome trials, involving combinations of ACE inhibitors, ARBs or DRIs, dual RAS inhibition did not show reduction in mortality in patients with diabetes, heart failure, coronary heart disease or after myocardial infarction, and was in fact, associated with increased harm. A recent meta-analysis of all major trials conducted over the past 22 years involving dual RAS inhibition has clearly shown that the risk-benefit ratio argues against the use of dual RAS inhibition. Hence, the recent evidence clearly advocates against the use of dual RAS inhibition, and single RAS inhibition appears to be the most suitable approach to controlling blood pressure and improving patient outcomes. PMID:23866091

  20. Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme Inhibitors and Active Tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Jiunn-Yih; Lee, Meng-Tse Gabriel; Lee, Si-Huei; Lee, Shih-Hao; Tsai, Yi-Wen; Hsu, Shou-Chien; Chang, Shy-Shin; Lee, Chien-Chang

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Numerous epidemiological data suggest that the use of angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors (ACEis) can improve the clinical outcomes of pneumonia. Tuberculosis (TB) is an airborne bacteria like pneumonia, and we aimed to find out whether the use of ACEis can decrease the risk of active TB. We conducted a nested case–control analysis by using a 1 million longitudinally followed cohort, from Taiwan national health insurance research database. The rate ratios (RRs) for TB were estimated by conditional logistic regression, and adjusted using a TB-specific disease risk score (DRS) with 71 TB-related covariates. From January, 1997 to December, 2011, a total of 75,536 users of ACEis, and 7720 cases of new active TB were identified. Current use (DRS adjusted RR, 0.87 [95% CI, 0.78–0.97]), but not recent and past use of ACEis, was associated with a decrease in risk of active TB. Interestingly, it was found that chronic use (>90 days) of ACEis was associated with a further decrease in the risk of TB (aRR, 0.74, [95% CI, 0.66–0.83]). There was also a duration response effect, correlating decrease in TB risk with longer duration of ACEis use. The decrease in TB risk was also consistent across all patient subgroups (age, sex, heart failure, cerebrovascular diseases, myocardial infraction, renal diseases, and diabetes) and patients receiving other cardiovascular medicine. In this large population-based study, we found that subjects with recent and chronic use of ACEis were associated with decrease in TB risk. PMID:27175655

  1. A sensitive method for the assay of angiotensin

    PubMed Central

    Regoli, D.; Vane, J. R.

    1964-01-01

    A method is described for the assay of angiotensin on the rat colon. Under the conditions of the assay, the preparation is sensitive to angiotensin and relatively insensitive to 5-hydroxytryptamine, to histamine and to other substances which might be present in blood. Bradykinin and catechol amines do not interfere with the assay. Evidence is given for the specificity of the angiotensin receptors. PMID:14228135

  2. Documentation of angiotensin II receptors in glomerular epithelial cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sharma, M.; Sharma, R.; Greene, A. S.; McCarthy, E. T.; Savin, V. J.; Cowley, A. W. (Principal Investigator)

    1998-01-01

    Angiotensin II decreases glomerular filtration rate, renal plasma flow, and glomerular capillary hydraulic conductivity. Although angiotensin II receptors have been demonstrated in mesangial cells and proximal tubule cells, the presence of angiotensin II receptors in glomerular epithelial cells has not previously been shown. Previously, we have reported that angiotensin II caused an accumulation of cAMP and a reorganization of the actin cytoskeleton in cultured glomerular epithelial cells. Current studies were conducted to verify the presence of angiotensin II receptors by immunological and non-peptide receptor ligand binding techniques and to ascertain the activation of intracellular signal transduction in glomerular epithelial cells in response to angiotensin II. Confluent monolayer cultures of glomerular epithelial cells were incubated with angiotensin II, with or without losartan and/or PD-123,319 in the medium. Membrane vesicle preparations were obtained by homogenization of washed cells followed by centrifugation. Sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis of membrane proteins followed by multiscreen immunoblotting was used to determine the presence of angiotensin II receptor type 1 (AT1) or type 2 (AT2). Angiotensin II-mediated signal transduction in glomerular epithelial cells was studied by measuring the levels of cAMP, using radioimmunoassay. Results obtained in these experiments showed the presence of both AT1 and AT2 receptor types in glomerular epithelial cells. Angiotensin II was found to cause an accumulation of cAMP in glomerular epithelial cells, which could be prevented only by simultaneous use of losartan and PD-123,319, antagonists for AT1 and AT2, respectively. The presence of both AT1 and AT2 receptors and an increase in cAMP indicate that glomerular epithelial cells respond to angiotensin II in a manner distinct from that of mesangial cells or proximal tubular epithelial cells. Our results suggest that glomerular epithelial

  3. Experimental myocardial infarction

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Raj; Joison, Julio; Gilmour, David P.; Molokhia, Farouk A.; Pegg, C. A. S.; Hood, William B.

    1971-01-01

    The hemodynamic effects of tachycardia induced by atrial pacing were investigated in left ventricular failure of acute and healing experimental myocardial infarction in 20 intact, conscious dogs. Myocardial infarction was produced by gradual inflation of a balloon cuff device implanted around the left anterior descending coronary artery 10-15 days prior to the study. 1 hr after acute myocardial infarction, atrial pacing at a rate of 180 beats/min decreased left ventricular end-diastolic pressure from 19 to 8 mm Hg and left atrial pressure from 17 to 12 mm Hg, without change in cardiac output. In the healing phase of myocardial infarction 1 wk later, atrial pacing decreased left ventricular end-diastolic pressure from 17 to 9 mm Hg and increased the cardiac output by 37%. This was accompanied by evidence of peripheral vasodilation. In two dogs with healing anterior wall myocardial infarction, left ventricular failure was enhanced by partial occlusion of the circumflex coronary artery. Both the dogs developed pulmonary edema. Pacing improved left ventricular performance and relieved pulmonary edema in both animals. In six animals propranolol was given after acute infarction, and left ventricular function deteriorated further. However the pacing-induced augmentation of cardiac function was unaltered and, hence, is not mediated by sympathetics. The results show that the spontaneous heart rate in left ventricular failure of experimental canine myocardial infarction may be less than optimal and that maximal cardiac function may be achieved at higher heart rates. Images PMID:4395910

  4. Plasma cathepsin D isoforms and their active metabolites increase after myocardial infarction and contribute to plasma renin activity.

    PubMed

    Naseem, R Haris; Hedegard, Wade; Henry, Timothy D; Lessard, Jennifer; Sutter, Kathryn; Katz, Stephen A

    2005-03-01

    Plasma renin activity (PRA) is often found to increase after myocardial infarction (MI). Elevated PRA may contribute to increased myocardial angiotensin II that is responsible for maladaptive remodeling of the myocardium after MI. We hypothesized that MI would also result in cardiac release of cathepsin D, a ubiquitous lysosomal enzyme with high renin sequence homology. Cathepsin D release from damaged myocardial tissue could contribute to angiotensin formation by acting as an enzymatic alternate to renin. We assessed circulating renin and cathepsin D from both control and MI patient plasma (7-20 hours after MI) using shallow gradient focusing that allowed for independent measurement of both enzymes. Cathepsin D was increased significantly in the plasma after MI (P < 0.001). Furthermore, circulating active cathepsin D metabolites were also significantly elevated after MI (P < 0.04), and contained the majority of cathepsin D activity in plasma. Spiking control plasma with cathepsin D resulted in a variable but significant (P = 0.005) increase in PRA using a clinical assay. We conclude that 7-20 hours after MI, plasma cathepsin D is significantly elevated and most of the active enzymatic activity is circulating as plasma metabolites. Circulating cathepsin D can falsely increase clinical PRA determinations, and may also provide an alternative angiotensin formation pathway after MI. PMID:15739123

  5. [Polyamines antagonizing angiotensin II contractile effects in isolated rat aorta].

    PubMed

    Costuleanu, Natalia; Foia, Liliana; Slătineanu, Simona Mihaela; Indrei, L L; Costuleanu, M; Petrescu, Gh

    2003-01-01

    Our study showed that the administration in pre-treatment of some polyamines (especially spermine and spermidine and almost null agmatine, putrescine and cadaverine) reduced the contractile effects of angiotensin II (Ang II) in isolated rat aorta. These effects might not be associated to the interference of clathrin coated vesicles (coated pits) formation or caveolae interaction (and thus to Ang II internalization through AT1 receptors). In contrast, these effects seem to be due to the interaction with voltage-gated membrane Ca2+ channels. Therefore, the alteration of transmembrane Ca2+ fluxes does not exclude the involvement of internalization process through coated pits or caveolae, since the endocytosis mediated by these phenomena essentially needs Ca2+. In addition, the inhibitory effects are dependent on the number of positive charges of the polyamine molecules. PMID:14755941

  6. Angiotensin II and gene expression in the kidney.

    PubMed

    Klahr, S; Morrissey, J

    1998-01-01

    Angiotensin II, a potent vasoconstrictor, has a key role in renal injury and in the progression of chronic renal disease of diverse causes. In vascular smooth muscle cells, angiotensin II modulates growth, which may lead to hypertrophy and also may inhibit mitogen-stimulated DNA synthesis. The effects of angiotensin II on responsive cells are mediated by two classes of receptors, AT-1 and AT-2. Information obtained in the last decade indicates that angiotensin II increases the production of several autocrine factors, including transforming growth factor beta1 (TGF-beta1), tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha), and platelet-derived growth factor A chain (PDGF). Angiotensin also increases the release of other growth factors such as endothelin, platelet-activating factor (PAF), and interleukin 6. In addition, it increases the "activity" of nuclear factor-kappaB (NF-kappaB) and the synthesis of angiotensinogen. The emerging picture indicates that the actions of angiotensin II may be related to factors that are released or upregulated by angiotensin II, possibly through NF-kappaB activation. It appears likely that many of the effects of angiotensin II on renal disease may be mediated by TGF-beta1, TNF-alpha, and changes in the activity of NF-kappaB. The use of ACE inhibitors or antagonists of AT-1 or AT-2 receptors in experimental animals decreases the levels of angiotensin II or limits its action, thereby interfering with the production and effects of the factors described. PMID:9428470

  7. A Low-Protein Diet Enhances Angiotensin II Production in the Lung of Pregnant Rats but Not Nonpregnant Rats

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Haijun; Tanchico, Daren Tubianosa; Yallampalli, Uma; Yallampalli, Chandrasekhar

    2016-01-01

    Pulmonary angiotensin II production is enhanced in pregnant rats fed a low-protein (LP) diet. Here we assessed if LP diet induces elevations in angiotensin II production in nonpregnant rats and whether Ace expression and ACE activity in lungs are increased. Nonpregnant rats were fed a normal (CT) or LP diet for 8, 12, or 17 days and timed pregnant rats fed for 17 days from Day 3 of pregnancy. Plasma angiotensin II, expressions of Ace and Ace2, and activities of these proteins in lungs, kidneys, and plasma were measured. These parameters were compared among nonpregnant rats or between nonpregnant and pregnant rats fed different diets. Major findings are as follows: (1) plasma angiotensin II levels were slightly higher in the LP than CT group on Days 8 and 12 in nonpregnant rats; (2) expression of Ace and Ace2 and abundance and activities of ACE and ACE2 in lungs, kidneys, and plasma of nonpregnant rats were unchanged by LP diet except for minor changes; (3) the abundance and activities of ACE in lungs of pregnant rats fed LP diet were greater than nonpregnant rats, while those of ACE2 were decreased. These results indicate that LP diet-induced increase in pulmonary angiotensin II production depends on pregnancy. PMID:27195150

  8. Ethanol alters angiotensin II stimulated mitogen activated protein kinase in hepatocytes: agonist selectivity and ethanol metabolic independence.

    PubMed

    Weng, Y; Shukla, S D

    2000-06-23

    Angiotensin II activated mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) (p42 and p44) in rat hepatocytes exposed to ethanol and the relevance of ethanol metabolism on this activation was investigated. Hepatocytes, isolated from rat liver, were treated with or without ethanol for 24 h. Angiotensin II, vasopressin, insulin, serum and epinephrine significantly increased hepatocyte MAPK activity. Platelet activating factor (PAF), tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha), and insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1) had little effect on MAPK activation. Interestingly, among the above agonists, which activated hepatocyte MAPK, ethanol exposure potentiated only angiotensin II and epinephrine-stimulated MAPK. Thus, potentiation of MAPK by ethanol exhibited agonist selectivity. In contrast to several other cells, there was prevalence of p42 over p44 MAPK band in hepatocytes. Angiotensin II treatment caused a rapid activation (peak 5 min) of MAPK followed by a decrease to basal levels in 30 min. Exposure with 100 mM ethanol potentiated the angiotensin II stimulated MAPK activity. This potentiation was partially blocked by pertussis toxin suggesting it to be a G-protein-dependent event. Treatment of the hepatocytes with pyrazole (an inhibitor of ethanol metabolism) or acetaldehyde (an ethanol metabolite) had no effect on potentiation. Thus, ethanol potentiation of hepatocyte MAPK is agonist-selective and independent of ethanol metabolism. PMID:10862821

  9. Renin-angiotensin system in ventilator-induced diaphragmatic dysfunction: Potential protective role of Angiotensin (1-7).

    PubMed

    Sigurta', Anna; Zambelli, Vanessa; Bellani, Giacomo

    2016-09-01

    Ventilator-induced diaphragmatic dysfunction is a feared complication of mechanical ventilation that adversely affects the outcome of intensive care patients. Human and animal studies demonstrate atrophy and ultrastructural alteration of diaphragmatic muscular fibers attributable to increased oxidative stress, depression of the anabolic pathway regulated by Insulin-like growing factor 1 and increased proteolysis. The renin-angiotensin system, through its main peptide Angiotensin II, plays a major role in skeletal muscle diseases, mainly increasing oxidative stress and inducing insulin resistance, atrophy and fibrosis. Conversely, its counter-regulatory peptide Angiotensin (1-7) has a protective role in these processes. Recent data on rodent models show that renin-angiotensin system is activated after mechanical ventilation and that infusion of Angiotensin II induces diaphragmatic skeletal muscle atrophy. Given: (A) common pathways shared by ventilator-induced diaphragmatic dysfunction and skeletal muscle pathology induced by renin-angiotensin system, (B) evidences of an involvement of renin-angiotensin system in diaphragm atrophy and dysfunction, we hypothesize that renin-angiotensin system plays an important role in ventilator-induced diaphragmatic dysfunction, while Angiotensin (1-7) can have a protective effect on this pathological process. The activation of renin-angiotensin system in ventilator-induced diaphragmatic dysfunction can be demonstrated by quantification of its main components in the diaphragm of ventilated humans or animals. The infusion of Angiotensin (1-7) in an established rodent model of ventilator-induced diaphragmatic dysfunction can be used to test its potential protective role, that can be further confirmed with the infusion of Angiotensin (1-7) antagonists like A-779. Verifying this hypothesis can help in understanding the processes involved in ventilator-induced diaphragmatic dysfunction pathophysiology and open new possibilities for its

  10. Myocardial Noncompaction Presenting With Myocardial Bridge

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Yuechun; Li, Xinchun; Lu, Dongfeng; Xiao, Aiyi; Li, Jun

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Myocardial noncompaction, namly isolated noncompaction of the left ventricular myocardium (NVM), is a rare congenital disease. It can be either seen in the absence of other cardiac anomalies, or associated with other congenital cardiac defects, mostly stenotic lesions of the left ventricular outflow tract. A myocardial bridge (MB) is thought being associated with coronary heart disease, such as coronary spasm, arrhythmia, and so on. The significance of MB in association with other congenital cardiac conditions is unknown. We report a novel case who was presented NVM and MB. A 34-year-old man complained of chest prickling-like pain and dizzy for 1 year. His blood pressure was 110/70 mm Hg. Echocardiograph revealed increased trabeculations below the level of papillary muscle of left ventricle (LV); deep intertrabecular recesses in the endocardial wall of LV particularly in apex free wall; and LV ejection fraction of 57%. A coronary computerized tomography scan showed that part, 38.9 cm, of left descending artery tunnel was surrounding by cardiac muscles rather than resting on top of the myocardium. The therapeutics interventions included lifestyle cares, agents of anti-ischemia and improvement myocardial cell metabolism. The patient was followed up for 2.6 years, and his general condition was stable. This case indicates that NVM can be developed with MB, and the complete diagnosis of NVM and MB should be made by different image studies. PMID:26356695

  11. Synthesis of angiotensins by cultured granuloma macrophages in murine schistosomiasis mansoni

    SciTech Connect

    Weinstock, J.V.; Blum, A.M.

    1986-03-01

    Components of the angiotensin system are present in granulomas of murine schistosomiasis mansoni. Angiotensins may have immunoregulatory function. Granuloma macrophages cultured for up to 3 days generated substantial angiotensin I (AI) and angiotensin II (AII) which appeared in the culture supernatants. Macrophage monolayers were incubated with (/sup 3/H) amino acids, and culture supernatants were extracted with acetone and analyzed by HPLC. Radiolabeled products eluded at times corresponding to those of authentic angiotensins. Immunoadsorption of angiotensins with angiotensin antisera removed reputed radiolabeled angiotensins from the supernatants. Treatment of the elution fraction corresponding to that of authentic AI with angiotensin converting enzyme resulted in the generation of radiolabeled polypeptides which co-eluted with authentic AII and His-Leu. Similar experiments conducted with nonadherent granuloma cells devoid of macrophages failed to demonstrate angiotensin production. These results suggest that granuloma macrophages can synthesize angiotensin.

  12. [Fibrinolysis in acute myocardial infarct].

    PubMed

    Bleifeld, W

    1987-10-24

    Fibrinolysis has opened up a new avenue in the treatment of acute myocardial infarction (AMI). In principle, the rate of reperfusion depends on the type of compound used, the mode of administration and the time between onset of symptoms and the beginning of treatment. With intracoronary streptokinase the reperfusion rate is of the order of 85%. Intravenous urokinase administered as a bolus results in a reopening rate of 50-60%; a similar rate of reperfusion is achieved with rt-PA as infusion, while i.v. streptokinase produces about 50% reopened coronary vessels. The final infarct size is decreased in 70% of patients if fibrinolysis is initiated within 2.5 hours after the onset of symptoms and followed by reopening of the occluded vessel. This results in a lowering of in-hospital mortality, which in various studies is of the order of 45-60%.- Bearing in mind the contraindications, fibrinolysis should be initiated within 3 hours. Hemodynamic improvement by a decrease of infarct size may also be achieved beyond 3 hours in large anterior myocardial infarctions and in posterior infarctions with cardiogenic shock. Early initiation of thrombolysis is of major importance in improving left ventricular function and lowering mortality following acute myocardial infarction. Therefore, prehospital thrombolytic therapy should be considered. - In the postinfarction phase coronary angiography is indicated in patients with angina at rest, stable angina of ECG signs of ischemia. In this situation transfer to a specialized cardiology division for possible percutaneous transluminal angioplasty is indicated. - Reocclusion after successful thrombolysis occurs in 20-30%, and it is therefore important to avoid reinfarction to improve the long term prognosis after AMI.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:3321420

  13. Myocardial protection: what the anesthesiologist does.

    PubMed

    Merin, R G

    1990-09-01

    The role of the anesthesiologist in myocardial protection is to optimize myocardial oxygen balance during the perioperative period. Nonpharmacological steps that can be taken to achieve this revolve around maintaining a satisfactory hemoglobin concentration and oxyhemoglobin saturation through maximizing ventilation. In addition, alkalosis and hypothermia should be prevented since they cause a left shift of the oxyhemoglobin dissociation curve, thus interfering with tissue oxygen delivery. Hypocarbia increases coronary vascular resistance. Blood volume must be adequate with an optimal hemoglobin concentration. Pharmacological measures should also be used, and it is important to continue through the perioperative period any previously administered cardioactive drugs. Furthermore, in the prebypass period, tachycardia may not be controlled by anesthetics; unless the tachycardia is paroxysmal, beta blockers are the drugs of choice. Depending on the cause, diastolic hypotension also needs to be treated either with volume, vasoconstrictors, or inotropes. Likewise, major hypertension can produce increased demand and, again depending on the cause, either anesthetics, vasodilators, beta blockers, or calcium blockers may be useful. Finally, myocardial ischemia without obvious cause probably should be treated with nitroglycerin or calcium blockers. During surgery, the effect of the anesthetic drugs on myocardial oxygen balance is important. PMID:2133851

  14. Calpain system and its involvement in myocardial ischemia and reperfusion injury

    PubMed Central

    Neuhof, Christiane; Neuhof, Heinz

    2014-01-01

    Calpains are ubiquitous non-lysosomal Ca2+-dependent cysteine proteases also present in myocardial cytosol and mitochondria. Numerous experimental studies reveal an essential role of the calpain system in myocardial injury during ischemia, reperfusion and postischemic structural remodelling. The increasing Ca2+-content and Ca2+-overload in myocardial cytosol and mitochondria during ischemia and reperfusion causes an activation of calpains. Upon activation they are able to injure the contractile apparatus and impair the energy production by cleaving structural and functional proteins of myocytes and mitochondria. Besides their causal involvement in acute myocardial dysfunction they are also involved in structural remodelling after myocardial infarction by the generation and release of proapoptotic factors from mitochondria. Calpain inhibition can prevent or attenuate myocardial injury during ischemia, reperfusion, and in later stages of myocardial infarction. PMID:25068024

  15. Big angiotensin-25: a novel glycosylated angiotensin-related peptide isolated from human urine.

    PubMed

    Nagata, Sayaka; Hatakeyama, Kinta; Asami, Maki; Tokashiki, Mariko; Hibino, Hajime; Nishiuchi, Yuji; Kuwasako, Kenji; Kato, Johji; Asada, Yujiro; Kitamura, Kazuo

    2013-11-29

    The renin-angiotensin system (RAS), including angiotensin II (Ang II), plays an important role in the regulation of blood pressure and body fluid balance. Consequently, the RAS has emerged as a key target for treatment of kidney and cardiovascular disease. In a search for bioactive peptides using an antibody against the N-terminal portion of Ang II, we identified and characterized a novel angiotensin-related peptide from human urine as a major molecular form. We named the peptide Big angiotensin-25 (Bang-25) because it consists of 25 amino acids with a glycosyl chain and added cysteine. Bang-25 is rapidly cleaved by chymase to Ang II, but is resistant to cleavage by renin. The peptide is abundant in human urine and is present in a wide range of organs and tissues. In particular, immunostaining of Bang-25 in the kidney is specifically localized to podocytes. Although the physiological function of Bang-25 remains uncertain, our findings suggest it is processed from angiotensinogen and may represent an alternative, renin-independent path for Ang II synthesis in tissue. PMID:24211583

  16. [Protective effect and mechanism of β-CM7 on renin angiotensin system & diabetic cardiomyopathy].

    PubMed

    Wang, Kun; Han, Dongning; Zhang, Yujuan; Rong, Chao; Zhang, Yuanshu

    2016-02-01

    This article aimed at exploring the effects and protective mechanism of β-CM7 on renin angiotensin system (RAS) in diabetic rats myocardial tissue. We divided 32 male SD rats into 4 groups: control group, diabetic model control group, insulin (3.7x10(-8) mol/d) treatment group and β-CM7 (7.5x10(-8) mol/d) treatment group. After 30 days, all rats were decapitated and myocardical tissues were collected immediately. After injection, β-CM7 could decrease the content of Ang II, increase the content of Angl-7. And β-CM7 could improve the mRNA of AT1 receptor and Mas receptor. β-CM7 also could improve the mRNA of ACE and ACE2, enhance the activity of ACE and ACE2. These data confirmed tli β-CM7 could activate ACE2-Angl-7-Mas axis, negative passage in RAS, to inhibit the expression ACE mnRiJA and protein in rat myocardium, alleviate the myocardial tissue damage induced by Ang II. The effect of β-CM7 on inhibiting myocardium damage might be related to ACE/ACE2 passageway. PMID:27382769

  17. Association of angiotensin converting enzyme and angiotensin II type 1 receptor genotypes with left ventricular function and mass in patients with angiographically normal coronary arteries.

    PubMed Central

    Hamon, M.; Amant, C.; Bauters, C.; Richard, F.; Helbecque, N.; McFadden, E.; Lablanche, J. M.; Bertrand, M.; Amouyel, P.

    1997-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To analyse the potential association of the angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) and angiotensin II type 1 receptor (AT1R) gene polymorphisms on left ventricular function and mass in patients with normal coronary arteries. DESIGN: Consecutive sample. SETTING: University hospital. SUBJECTS: 141 consecutive white patients referred for coronary angiography and with angiographically normal coronary arteries. Patients with valvar diseases, cardiomyopathies, or a history of myocardial infarction were excluded. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Left ventricular variables were measured for all patients. The ACE and AT1R genotypes were determined with a polymerase chain reaction based protocol using DNA prepared from white blood cells. A general linear model was used to compare data according to the ACE and to the AT1R genotypes. RESULTS: A strong association was observed between left ventricular mass and systemic hypertension (mean (SD) hypertension: 114 (31) g/m2; no hypertension 98 (23) g/m2; P < 0.003). However, no influence of ACE and AT1R polymorphisms on left ventricular mass was found, regardless of systemic hypertension. The subjects homozygous for the AT1R CC mutation had a significantly lower ejection fraction than those with allele A (AC+AA) (mean (SD) 62(12)% and 68(10)%, respectively, P < 0.05). No synergistic interaction of ACE and AT1R gene polymorphisms on left ventricular function and mass was found. CONCLUSIONS: These data do not support an association of the ACE and AT1R genotypes on left ventricular hypertrophy in white patients with normal coronary arteries. PMID:9227291

  18. Comparative Effectiveness of Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme Inhibitors and Angiotensin II Receptor Blockers in Terms of Major Cardiovascular Disease Outcomes in Elderly Patients

    PubMed Central

    Chien, Shu-Chen; Ou, Shuo-Ming; Shih, Chia-Jen; Chao, Pei-Wen; Li, Szu-Yuan; Lee, Yi-Jung; Kuo, Shu-Chen; Wang, Shuu-Jiun; Chen, Tzeng-Ji; Tarng, Der-Cherng; Chu, Hsi; Chen, Yung-Tai

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Renin and aldosterone activity levels are low in elderly patients, raising concerns about the benefits and risks of angiotensin-converting-enzyme inhibitors (ACEIs) and angiotensin II receptor blockers (ARB) use. However, data from direct comparisons of the effects of ACEIs on ARBs in the elderly population remain inconclusive. In this nationwide study, all patients aged ≥ 70 years were retrieved from the Taiwan National Health Insurance database for the period 2000 to 2009 and were followed up until the end of 2010. The ARB cohort (12,347 patients who continuously used ARBs for ≥ 90 days) was matched to ACEI cohort using high-dimensional propensity score (hdPS). Intention-to-treat (ITT) and as-treated (AT) analyses were conducted. In the ITT analysis, after considering death as a competing risk, the ACEI cohort had similar risks of myocardial infarction (hazard ratio [HR] 0.92, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.79–1.06), ischemic stroke (HR 0.98, 95% CI 0.90–1.07), and heart failure (HR 0.93, 95% CI 0.83–1.04) compared with the ARB cohort. No difference in adverse effects, such as acute kidney injury (HR 0.99, 95% CI 0.89–1.09) and hyperkalemia (HR 1.02, 95% CI 0.87–1.20), was observed between cohorts. AT analysis produced similar results to those of ITT analysis. We were unable to demonstrate a survival difference between cohorts (HR 1.03, 95% CI 0.88–1.21) after considering drug discontinuation as a competing risk in AT analysis. Our study supports the notion that ACEI and ARB users have similar risks of major adverse cardiovascular events (MACE), even in elderly populations. PMID:26512568

  19. Angiotensin processing activities in the venom of Thalassophryne nattereri.

    PubMed

    Tenório, Humberto de Araújo; Marques, Maria Elizabeth da Costa; Machado, Sonia Salgueiro; Pereira, Hugo Juarez Vieira

    2015-05-01

    The venom of marine animals is a rich source of compounds with remarkable functional specificity and diversity. Thalassophryne nattereri is a small venomous fish inhabiting the northern and northeastern coast of Brazil, and represents a relatively frequent cause of injuries. Its venom causes severe inflammatory response followed frequently by the necrosis of the affected area. This venom presents characterized components such as proteases (Natterins 1-4) and a lectin (Nattectin) with complex effects on the human organism. A specific inhibitor of tissue kallikrein (TKI) reduces the nociception and the edema caused by the venom in mice. Our study sought to investigate the proteolytic activities against vasopeptides Angiotensin I, Angiotensin II, Angiotensin 1-9 and Bradykinin. The venom indicated angiotensin conversion against angiotensin I, as well as kininase against bradykinin. Captopril conducted the total inhibition of the converting activity, featuring the first report of ACE activity in fish venoms. PMID:25702959

  20. Oxidative stress-mediated effects of angiotensin II in the cardiovascular system

    PubMed Central

    Wen, Hairuo; Gwathmey, Judith K; Xie, Lai-Hua

    2014-01-01

    Angiotensin II (Ang II), an endogenous peptide hormone, plays critical roles in the pathophysiological modulation of cardiovascular functions. Ang II is the principle effector of the renin-angiotensin system for maintaining homeostasis in the cardiovascular system, as well as a potent stimulator of NAD(P)H oxidase, which is the major source and primary trigger for reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation in various tissues. Recent accumulating evidence has demonstrated the importance of oxidative stress in Ang II-induced heart diseases. Here, we review the recent progress in the study on oxidative stress-mediated effects of Ang II in the cardiovascular system. In particular, the involvement of Ang II-induced ROS generation in arrhythmias, cell death/heart failure, ischemia/reperfusion injury, cardiac hypertrophy and hypertension are discussed. Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II is an important molecule linking Ang II, ROS and cardiovascular pathological conditions. PMID:24587981

  1. Glycyl-histidyl-lysine interacts with the angiotensin II AT1 receptor.

    PubMed

    García-Sáinz, J A; Olivares-Reyes, J A

    1995-01-01

    Gly-His-Lys, a tripeptide isolated from human plasma that increases the growth rate of many cells, stimulated in dose-dependent fashion the activity of phosphorylase a in isolated rat hepatocytes. Such effect was associated to increases in both IP3 production and [Ca++]i. Interestingly, these effects of Gly-His-Lys were antagonized by losartan, a nonpeptide angiotensin II receptor antagonist (AT1 selective), which suggested that these receptors were involved in its effect. Binding competition experiments using the radioligand [125I][Sar1-Ile8]angiotensin II clearly indicated that Gly-His-Lys interacts with AT1 receptors. It was also observed that other histidine-containing tripeptides were also capable of interacting with these receptors. PMID:8545239

  2. Angiotensin converting enzyme inhibition does not affect the response to exogenous angiotensin II in the human forearm.

    PubMed Central

    Lyons, D; Stewart, D; Webster, J; Benjamin, N

    1994-01-01

    Suppression of endogenous levels of angiotensin II by angiotensin converting enzyme inhibition, may result in up-regulation of vascular AT1 receptors. We have evaluated the effects of orally administered enalapril on angiotensin II induced vasoconstriction in the human forearm. Subjects received in random order, enalapril (20 mg) or matched placebo daily for 2 weeks. Forearm blood flow response to increasing doses of angiotensin II was measured using venous occlusion plethysmography at the beginning of the study and at the end of each 2 week treatment period. Treatment with enalapril significantly reduced plasma angiotensin II levels and supine blood pressure compared with placebo. The percentage reductions in forearm blood flow in the infused arm, in response to the maximum dose of angiotensin II (50,000 fmol min-1) were 48.1 +/- 3.6% at baseline, 57.5 +/- 3.6% on placebo and 54.5 +/- 4.2% on enalapril. The differences were not significantly different. This demonstrates that suppression of plasma angiotensin II for a 14 day period does not enhance the response to exogenous intra-arterial angiotensin II in the human forearm of healthy salt replete subjects. PMID:7893582

  3. Knocking out Angiotensin II in the Heart

    PubMed Central

    Zablocki, Daniela; Sadoshima, Junichi

    2011-01-01

    Despite ongoing medical advances, cardiovascular disease continues to be a leading health concern. The renin-angiotensin system (RAS) plays an important role in regulating cardiovascular function, and is, therefore, the subject of extensive study. Several of the drugs currently used to treat hypertension and heart failure are designed to target Ang II synthesis and function, but none have been able to completely block the effects of RAS signaling thus far. This review discusses current and emerging approaches towards inhibiting cardiac RAS function in order to further improve cardiovascular disease outcomes. PMID:21234717

  4. Myocardial diseases of animals.

    PubMed Central

    Van Vleet, J. F.; Ferrans, V. J.

    1986-01-01

    In this review we have attempted a comprehensive compilation of the cardiac morphologic changes that occur in spontaneous and experimental myocardial diseases of animals. Our coverage addresses diseases of mammals and birds and includes these diseases found in both domesticated and wild animals. A similar review of the myocardial diseases in this broad range of animal species has not been attempted previously. We have summarized and illustrated the gross, microscopic, and ultrastructural alterations for these myocardial diseases; and, whenever possible, we have reviewed their biochemical pathogenesis. We have arranged the myocardial diseases for presentation and discussion according to an etiologic classification with seven categories. These include a group of idiopathic or primary cardiomyopathies recognized in man (hypertrophic, dilated, and restrictive types) and a large group of secondary cardiomyopathies with known causes, such as inherited tendency; nutritional deficiency; toxicity; physical injury and shock; endocrine disorders, and myocarditides of viral, bacterial, and protozoal causation. Considerable overlap exists between each of the etiologic groups in the spectrum of pathologic alterations seen in the myocardium. These include various degenerative changes, myocyte necrosis, and inflammatory lesions. However, some diseases show rather characteristic myocardial alterations such as vacuolar degeneration in anthracycline cardiotoxicity, myofibrillar lysis in furazolidone cardiotoxicity, calcification in calcinosis of mice, glycogen accumulation in the glycogenoses, lipofuscinosis in cattle, fatty degeneration in erucic acid cardiotoxicity, myofiber disarray in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, and lymphocytic inflammation with inclusion bodies in canine parvoviral myocarditis. The myocardial diseases represent the largest group in the spectrum of spontaneous cardiac diseases of animals. Pericardial and endocardial diseases and congential cardiac diseases are

  5. Tumor necrosis factor-induced contraction of cultured rat mesangial cells: interaction with angiotensin II.

    PubMed

    Medina, J; Baud, L; Garcia Escribano, C; Gila, J A; Rodriguez Puyol, D; Rodriguez Puyol, M

    1993-08-01

    The role of tumor necrosis factor alpha in the regulation of renal function, particularly glomerular filtration rate, has not been completely defined. This study was designed to assess the intrinsic role of this cytokine on glomerular filtration rate by analyzing its short-term effect on the degree of contraction in cultured rat mesangial cells, not only directly but also in the presence of angiotensin II. Contraction was evaluated both morphologically--by measuring planar cell surface area of cultured rat mesangial cells and glomerular cross-sectional area of isolated rat glomeruli--and biochemically--by analyzing myosin light-chain phosphorylation in cells. Tumor necrosis factor alpha significantly decreased planar cell surface area in a dose-dependent and time-dependent manner, an effect completely abolished by preincubation of the cells with platelet-activating factor receptor antagonists BN 52021 and alprazolam. This effect was also observed in the presence of angiotensin II, whether tumor necrosis factor alpha was added before or after angiotensin II, increasing the reduction in planar cell surface area induced by angiotensin II in both cases. Changes in planar cell surface area were evident not only when the absolute values of this parameter were considered but also when the percentage of contracted cells (cells with a planar cell surface area reduction > 10%) was analyzed. Tumor necrosis factor alpha also induced a significant reduction of glomerular cross-sectional area in isolated rat glomeruli. The results of the morphologic studies were supported by myosin light-chain phosphorylation experiments.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:8340701

  6. Comparative effectiveness of angiotensin-converting-enzyme inhibitors and angiotensin II receptor blockers in patients with type 2 diabetes and retinopathy

    PubMed Central

    Shih, Chia-Jen; Chen, Hung-Ta; Kuo, Shu-Chen; Li, Szu-Yuan; Lai, Pi-Hsiang; Chen, Shu-Chen; Ou, Shuo-Ming; Chen, Yung-Tai

    2016-01-01

    Background: Angiotensin-converting-enzyme (ACE) inhibitors and angiotensin II receptor blockers (ARBs) are effective treatments for diabetic retinopathy, but randomized trials and meta-analyses comparing their effects on macrovascular complications have yielded conflicting results. We compared the effectiveness of these drugs in patients with pre-existing diabetic retinopathy in a large population-based cohort. Methods: We conducted a propensity score–matched cohort study using Taiwan’s National Health Insurance Research Database. We included adult patients prescribed an ACE inhibitor or ARB within 90 days after diagnosis of diabetic retinopathy between 2000 and 2010. Primary outcomes were all-cause death and major adverse cardiovascular events (myocardial infarction, ischemic stroke or cardiovascular death). Secondary outcomes were hospital admissions with acute kidney injury or hyperkalemia. Results: We identified 11 246 patients receiving ACE inhibitors and 15 173 receiving ARBs, of whom 9769 patients in each group were matched successfully by propensity scores. In the intention-to-treat analyses, ARBs were similar to ACE inhibitors in risk of all-cause death (hazard ratio [HR] 0.94, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.87–1.01) and major adverse cardiovascular events (HR 0.95, 95% CI 0.87–1.04), including myocardial infarction (HR 1.03, 95% CI 0.88–1.20), ischemic stroke (HR 0.94, 95% CI 0.85–1.04) and cardiovascular death (HR 1.01, 95% CI 0.88–1.16). They also did not differ from ACE inhibitors in risk of hospital admission with acute kidney injury (HR 1.01, 95% CI 0.91–1.13) and hospital admission with hyperkalemia (HR 1.01, 95% CI 0.86–1.18). Results were similar in as-treated analyses. Interpretation: Our study showed that ACE inhibitors were similar to ARBs in risk of all-cause death, major adverse cardiovascular events and adverse effects among patients with pre-existing diabetic retinopathy. PMID:27001739

  7. Myocardial Tissue Doppler Velocity in Child Growth

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Sun-Ha; Kim, Nam Kyun; Jung, Jo Won; Choi, Jae Young

    2016-01-01

    Background In adults, tissue Doppler imaging (TDI) is a recommended component of routine echocardiography. However, TDI velocities are less accepted in pediatrics, due to their strong variability and age dependence in children. This study examines the distribution of myocardial tissue Doppler velocities in healthy children to assess the effect of age with cardiac growth on the various echocardiographic measurements. Methods Total 144 healthy children were enrolled in this study. They were recruited from the pediatric outpatient clinic for routine well-child visits. The statistical relationships between age and TDI values were analyzed. Also, the statistical relationships between body surface area (BSA) and TDI values, left ventricle end-diastolic dimension (LVEDD) and TDI values were analyzed. Also, we conducted multivariate analysis of cardiac growth parameters such as, age, BSA, LVEDD and TDI velocity data. Results All of the age, BSA, and LVEDD had positive correlations with deceleration time (DT), pressure half-time (PHT), peak early diastolic myocardial velocity, peak systolic myocardial velocity, and had negative correlations with peak late diastolic velocity (A) and the ratio of trans-mitral inflow velocity to early diastolic velocity of mitral annulus (E/E'). In the multivariate analysis, all of the age, BSA, and LVEDD had positive correlations with DT, PHT, and negative correlations with A and E/E'. Conclusion The cardiac growth parameters related alterations of E/E' may suggest that diastolic myocardial velocities are cardiac growth dependent, and diastolic function has positive correlation with cardiac growth in pediatric group. This cardiac growth related myocardial functional variation would be important for assessment of cardiac involvement either in healthy and sick child. PMID:27081443

  8. Intravenous high mobility group box 1 upregulates the expression of HIF-1α in the myocardium via a protein kinase B-dependent pathway in rats following acute myocardial ischemia

    PubMed Central

    YAO, HENG-CHEN; ZHOU, MIN; ZHOU, YAN-HONG; WANG, LAN-HUA; ZHANG, DE-YONG; HAN, QIAN-FENG; LIU, TAO; WU, LEI; TIAN, KE-LI; ZHANG, MEI

    2016-01-01

    The effects of intravenous high mobility group box 1 (HMGB1) on myocardial ischemia/reperfusion (I/R) injury remains to be elucidated. The purpose of the present study was to investigate the effects of intravenous HMGB1 on the expression of hypoxia inducible factor-1α (HIF-1α) in the myocardium of rats following acute myocardial ischemia, and to examine the effects of intravenous HMGB1 on myocardial I/R injury. Male Wistar rats were divided into the following groups: Sham operation group (n=10), a group exposed to ischemia for 30 min and reperfusion for 4 h (I/R group) as a control (n=10), an HMGB group, in which 100 ng/kg HMGB was administered intravenously 30 min prior to ischemia (n=10), an LY group, in whic LY294002, an inhibitor of phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K), was administered intravenously (0.3 mg/kg) 40 min prior to ischemia (n=10), and the HMGB1+LY group, in which HMGB1 (100 ng/kg) and LY294002 (0.3 mg/kg) were administered intravenously 30 min and 40 min prior to ischemia, respectively (n=10). The serum levels of cardiac troponin I (cTnI) and tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), and myocardial infarct size were measured. The expression levels of phosphorylated Akt and HIF-1α were investigated using western blot analyses. The results showed that pre-treatment with HMGB1 significantly decreased serum levels of cTnI, and TNF-α, and reduced myocardial infarct size following 4 h reperfusion (all P<0.05). HMGB1 also increased the expression levels of HIF-1α and p-Akt induced by I/R (P<0.05). LY294002 was found to eliminate the effects of intravenous HMGB1 on myocardial I/R injury (P<0.05). These results suggest that intravenous pre-treatment with HMGB1 may exert its cardioprotective effects via the upregulation of the myocardial expression of HIF-1α, which may be regulated by the PI3K/Akt signaling pathway, in rats following acute myocardial I/R. PMID:26648172

  9. [Enalapril reduces the degree of left ventricular remodeling after acute myocardial infarction and reduces the incidence of arrhythmia in ischemic disease].

    PubMed

    Altieri, P I; González, R; de Mello, W; Escobales, N

    1994-12-01

    The present study shows that enalapril prevents the excessive remodeling of the left ventricle after acute myocardial infarction. This randomized and double blind clinical study analysed 50 patients with an inferior myocardial infarction. The effect of enalapril was evaluated through cardiac volumes, ejection fraction, neurohormonal levels and incidence of the left ventricle disfunction after acute myocardial infarction. The patients treated with enalapril showed a significant reduction on the values of nor-epinefrine, angiotensine II, natriuretic hormone and vasopressine, four weeks after initiation of treatment. The ejection fraction and the level of the wall movement was more favourable, four weeks after infarction, in the group treated with enalapril. The incidence of congestive heart failure and arrhythmias was lower in the group treated with enalapril. So, we conclude that enalapril is a drug that prevents the excessive remodelling of the left ventricle after an acute myocardial infarction. PMID:7873221

  10. Myocardial ischemia--association with perioperative cardiac morbidity.

    PubMed Central

    Cunningham, A. J.

    1993-01-01

    The development of ambulatory electrocardiographic recorders and analysers and the application of transesophageal echocardiography in the mid-1980's enabled investigators to quantify and describe the occurrence of silent as well as symptomatic ischemia in the perioperative period. Several technical advances which have recently occurred in ECG monitoring include the use of miniaturized digital computing equipment to store and analyze data. In addition, real time ST-segment analysis has become widely available on multicomponent monitors in both the operating room and intensive care units. The incidence of perioperative myocardial ischemia depends on the patient population, the surgical procedure, and the monitoring technique used. Several studies in the early 1990's have shown that cardiac morbidity in patients undergoing major, noncardiac surgery is best predicted by postoperative myocardial ischemia, rather than tradition preoperative clinical predictors. Long duration postoperative ischemia may be the factor most significantly associated with adverse cardiac outcome. Postoperative pain, physiological and emotional stress may all combine to cause tachycardia, hypertension, increase in cardiac output, and fluid shifts which, in high risk patients, might result in subendocardial ischemia and eventual myocardial infarction. If postoperative myocardial ischemia is the cause of late postoperative myocardial infarction in patients undergoing non-cardiac surgery, then treatment of postoperative myocardial ischemia should reduce morbidity. In addition, reducing pain and stress and avoiding postoperative hypoxemia might prevent postoperative myocardial ischemia and minimize the need for extensive preoperative cardiac evaluation. PMID:7825338

  11. Angiotensin Converting Enzyme Activity in Alopecia Areata

    PubMed Central

    Namazi, Mohammad Reza; Handjani, Farhad; Eftekhar, Ebrahim; Kalafi, Amir

    2014-01-01

    Background. Alopecia areata (AA) is a chronic inflammatory disease of the hair follicle. The exact pathogenesis of AA remains unknown, although recent studies support a T-cell mediated autoimmune process. On the other hand, some studies have proposed that the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system (RAAS) may play a role in autoimmunity. Therefore, we assessed serum activity of angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE), a component of this system, in AA. Methods. ACE activity was measured in the sera of 19 patients with AA and 16 healthy control subjects. In addition, the relationship between severity and duration of the disease and ACE activity was evaluated. Results. Serum ACE activity was higher in the patient group (55.81 U/L) compared to the control group (46.41 U/L), but the difference was not statistically significant (P = 0.085). Also, there was no correlation between ACE activity and severity (P = 0.13) and duration of disease (P = 0.25) in the patient group. Conclusion. The increased serum ACE activity found in this study may demonstrate local involvement of the RAAS in the pathogenesis of AA. Assessment of ACE in a study with a larger sample size as well as in tissue samples is recommended in order to further evaluate the possible role of RAAS in AA. PMID:25349723

  12. Bovine myocardial epithelial inclusions.

    PubMed

    Baker, D C; Schmidt, S P; Langheinrich, K A; Cannon, L; Smart, R A

    1993-01-01

    Light microscopic, histochemical, immunohistochemical, and ultrastructural methods were used to examine myocardial epithelial masses in the hearts of ten cattle. The tissues consisted of paraffin-embedded or formalin-fixed samples from eight hearts that were being inspected in slaughter houses and from two hearts from calves that died of septicemia. The ages of the cattle ranged from 4 days to 12 years; the breeds were unspecified for all but one Hereford female and the two Holstein calves; and there were three males, four females, and three steers. The masses in these cases were compared with similar appearing lesions found in other animal species. The lesions in the bovine hearts were single to multiple, well circumscribed, found in the left ventricle wall, and composed of squamous to cuboidal epithelial cells that formed tubular, ductular, and acinar structures with lumens that were void or filled with amorphous protein globules. Electron microscopic examination revealed epithelial cells that had sparse apical microvilli, tight apical intercellular junctions, perinuclear bundles of filaments, and rare cilia. Almost half of the bovine epithelial masses (4/9) had occasional diastase-resistant periodic acid-Schiff-positive granules in their cytoplasm, and few had hyaluronidase-resistant alcian blue-positive granules (2/9) or colloidal iron-positive granules (1/9). All myocardial masses had abundant collagen surrounding the tubular and acinar structures, and 2/9 had elastin fibers as well. None of the myocardial masses had Churukian-Schenk or Fontana Masson's silver staining granules in epithelial cells. Immunohistochemically, all bovine myocardial tumors stained positively for cytokeratin (8/8), and occasional masses stained positively for vimentin (3/8) or carcinoembryonic antigen (3/8). None of the masses stained positively for desmin. The myocardial epithelial tumors most likely represent endodermal rests of tissue misplaced during organogenesis. PMID:7680178

  13. Glial high-affinity binding site with specificity for angiotensin II not angiotensin III: a possible N-terminal-specific converting enzyme

    SciTech Connect

    Printz, M.P.; Jennings, C.; Healy, D.P.; Kalter, V.

    1986-01-01

    Anomalous binding properties of angiotensin II to fetal rat brain primary cultures suggested a possible contribution from contaminating glia. To investigate this possibility, cultures of C6 glioma, a clonal rat cell line, were examined for the presence of angiotensin II receptors. A specific high-affinity site for (/sup 125/I)angiotensin II was measured both by traditional methodology using whole cells and by autoradiography. This site shared properties similar to that found with the brain cells, namely low ligand internalization and markedly decreased affinity for N-terminal sarcosine or arginine-angiotensin analogs. The competition rank order was angiotensin II much greater than (Sar1,Ile8)angiotensin II greater than or equal to des(Asp1,Arg2)angiotensin II. Angiotensin III did not compete for binding to the site. High-pressure liquid chromatography analysis indicated that the ligand either in the incubation or bound to the site was stable at 15 degrees C, but there was very rapid and extensive degradation by the C6 glioma cells at 37 degrees C. It is concluded that the site exhibits unusual N-terminal specificity for angiotensin with nanomolar affinity for angiotensin II. If angiotensin III is an active ligand in the brain, the site may have a converting enzyme function. Alternatively, it may form the des-Asp derivatives of angiotensin for subsequent degradation by other enzymatic pathways. Either way, it is proposed that the site may modulate the brain-angiotensin system.

  14. Quantitative autoradiography of angiotensin II receptors in the SHR brain

    SciTech Connect

    Gehlert, D.R.; Speth, R.C.; Wamsley, J.K.

    1986-11-01

    Several lines of evidence indicate brain angiotensin II is associated with the elevation of blood pressure seen in the spontaneously hypertensive rat (SHR). These include an increased pressor response to intracerebroventricularly administered angiotensin II and a reduction of blood pressure in response to centrally administered angiotensin II receptor antagonists. Using quantitative receptor autoradiography, we have detected greater angiotensin II receptor binding in a number of discrete brain nuclei of the 6-week-old SHR when compared to age-matched Wistar-Kyoto controls. Tissue sections from various brain regions were labeled with (/sup 125/I)-angiotensin II according to a previously described method. Autoradiograms were generated by apposing the labeled tissue sections to LKB Ultrofilm along with brain paste standards which contained known amounts of (/sup 125/I). Quantitation of the binding, utilizing computer-assisted microdensitometry, indicated greater (/sup 125/I)-angiotensin II binding in several brain areas implicated in cardiovascular control including the subfornical organ, nucleus of the solitary tract, dorsal motor nucleus of the vagus, locus coeruleus, supraoptic nucleus and the organum vasculosum of the lamina terminalis. Scatchard analysis of the binding in the nucleus of the solitary tract indicated an increased receptor number (Bmax) was responsible for the change while binding in two forebrain structures, the subfornical organ and supraoptic nucleus, showed alterations in receptor number and affinity (Kd). Several other brain regions, unrelated to cardiovascular control, exhibited no change in (/sup 125/I)-angiotensin II binding.

  15. The Angiotensin Infusion Test and Peripheral Venous Renin Activity

    PubMed Central

    Silah, J. G.; Strong, C. G.; Nowaczynski, W.; Genest, J.

    1967-01-01

    Forty hypertensive patients were studied to examine the assumption that the angiotensin pressor dose reflects endogenous renin activity. Peripheral renin activity was assayed by the method of Boucher et al.4 Sensitivity to the infusion of synthetic angiotensin II was determined as suggested by Kaplan and Silah.1 Sixteen patients with essential hypertension with normal renal angiography required 3.8 ng. angiotensin/kg./min. to raise the diastolic pressure 20 mm. Hg. All but one were sensitive to angiotensin infusion of less than 5 ng./kg./min. Renin activity was normal in all except in one sensitive subject. Angiotensin infusion response and mean renin activity in 13 patients with essential hypertension with abnormal renal angiography were similar to that of the first group. The pressor dose in 11 renovascular hypertensives was 9.8 ng./kg./min. All but three had elevated plasma renin activity. Our results suggest that: (1) the angiotensin infusion test is suitable for differentiating patients with true renovascular hypertension from those with essential hypertension with or without associated renal artery disease; (2) the angiotensin pressor dose correlates with the level of peripheral venous renin activity (p < 0.01). PMID:4290836

  16. The angiotensin infusion test and peripheral venous renin activity.

    PubMed

    Silah, J G; Strong, C G; Nowaczynski, W; Genest, J

    1967-05-27

    Forty hypertensive patients were studied to examine the assumption that the angiotensin pressor dose reflects endogenous renin activity. Peripheral renin activity was assayed by the method of Boucher et al.(4) Sensitivity to the infusion of synthetic angiotensin II was determined as suggested by Kaplan and Silah.(1)Sixteen patients with essential hypertension with normal renal angiography required 3.8 ng. angiotensin/kg./min. to raise the diastolic pressure 20 mm. Hg. All but one were sensitive to angiotensin infusion of less than 5 ng./kg./min. Renin activity was normal in all except in one sensitive subject. Angiotensin infusion response and mean renin activity in 13 patients with essential hypertension with abnormal renal angiography were similar to that of the first group. The pressor dose in 11 renovascular hypertensives was 9.8 ng./kg./min. All but three had elevated plasma renin activity.OUR RESULTS SUGGEST THAT: (1) the angiotensin infusion test is suitable for differentiating patients with true renovascular hypertension from those with essential hypertension with or without associated renal artery disease; (2) the angiotensin pressor dose correlates with the level of peripheral venous renin activity (p < 0.01). PMID:4290836

  17. Perioperative Assessment of Myocardial Deformation

    PubMed Central

    Duncan, Andra E.; Alfirevic, Andrej; Sessler, Daniel I.; Popovic, Zoran B.; Thomas, James D.

    2014-01-01

    Evaluation of left ventricular performance improves risk assessment and guides anesthetic decisions. However, the most common echocardiographic measure of myocardial function, the left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF), has important limitations. LVEF is limited by subjective interpretation which reduces accuracy and reproducibility, and LVEF assesses global function without characterizing regional myocardial abnormalities. An alternative objective echocardiographic measure of myocardial function is thus needed. Myocardial deformation analysis, which performs quantitative assessment of global and regional myocardial function, may be useful for perioperative care of surgical patients. Myocardial deformation analysis evaluates left ventricular mechanics by quantifying strain and strain rate. Strain describes percent change in myocardial length in the longitudinal (from base to apex) and circumferential (encircling the short-axis of the ventricle) direction and change in thickness in the radial direction. Segmental strain describes regional myocardial function. Strain is a negative number when the ventricle shortens longitudinally or circumferentially and is positive with radial thickening. Reference values for normal longitudinal strain from a recent meta-analysis using transthoracic echocardiography are (mean ± SD) −19.7 ± 0.4%, while radial and circumferential strain are 47.3 ± 1.9 and −23.3 ± 0.7%, respectively. The speed of myocardial deformation is also important and is characterized by strain rate. Longitudinal systolic strain rate in healthy subjects averages −1.10 ± 0.16 sec−1. Assessment of myocardial deformation requires consideration of both strain (change in deformation), which correlates with LVEF, and strain rate (speed of deformation), which correlates with rate of rise of left ventricular pressure (dP/dt). Myocardial deformation analysis also evaluates ventricular relaxation, twist, and untwist, providing new and noninvasive methods to

  18. Olmesartan Potentiates the Anti-Angiogenic Effect of Sorafenib in Mice Bearing Ehrlich's Ascites Carcinoma: Role of Angiotensin (1–7)

    PubMed Central

    Abd-Alhaseeb, Mohammad M.; Zaitone, Sawsan A.; Abou-El-Ela, Soad H.; Moustafa, Yasser M.

    2014-01-01

    Local renin-angiotensin systems exist in various malignant tumor tissues; this suggests that the main effector peptide, angiotensin II, could act as a key factor in tumor growth. The underlying mechanisms for the anti-angiogenic effect of angiotensin II type 1 receptor blockers need to be further evaluated. The present study was carried out to investigate the anti-angiogenic effect of olmesartan alone or in combination with sorafenib, an angiotensin (1–7) agonist or an angiotensin (1–7) antagonist in Ehrlich's ascites carcinoma-bearing mice. The tumor was induced by intradermal injection of Ehrlich's ascites carcinoma cells into mice. Tumor discs were used to evaluate the microvessel density; the serum levels of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and serum insulin-like growth factor I (IGF-I); and their intratumoral receptors, VEGF receptor-2 and IGF-I receptor, respectively. All parameters were determined following the treatment course, which lasted for 21 days post-inoculation. Monotherapy with olmesartan and its combination with sorafenib resulted in a significant reduction in microvessel density and serum levels of VEGF and IGF-I, as well as their intratumoral receptors. In addition, the combination of olmesartan (30 mg/kg) with an angiotensin (1–7) agonist reduced the microvessel density, IGF-I serum levels and the levels of its intratumoral receptor. In conclusion, olmesartan reduced the levels of the angiogenesis markers IGF-I and VEGF and down-regulated the intratumoral expression of their receptors in a dose-dependent manner, and these effects were dependent on the angiotensin (1–7) receptor. These results suggest that olmesartan is a promising adjuvant to sorafenib in the treatment of cancer. PMID:24465768

  19. Characterization of the renin-angiotensin system in the turtle Pseudemys scripta.

    PubMed

    Cipolle, M D; Zehr, J E

    1984-07-01

    Studies were conducted in freshwater turtles Pseudemys scripta to define some characteristics of the renin-angiotensin system in this reptile. Dialyzed acid-treated kidney extract (1 g tissue per ml water) produced a prolonged pressor response in unanesthetized turtles, which was eliminated by boiling the extract or by pretreating the turtle with [Sar1, Ile8]angiotensin II. A rat pressor assay was employed because turtle angiotensin (ANG) was bound poorly by the anti-[Asp1, Ile5, His9]ANG I used in our radioimmunoassay. Kidney extract incubated with homologous plasma (pH 5.5 and 25 degrees C) produced a time-dependent pressor response in rats. The pressor activity of the product was eliminated by dialysis or by pretreating the rats with [Sar1, Ile8]ANG II. The pressor response in anesthetized turtles to ANG I was significantly reduced by captopril, whereas the ANG II response remained unchanged, thus demonstrating the presence of ANG-converting enzyme activity in these animals. We determined the velocity of turtle ANG formation at various dilutions of enzyme (kidney extract) or substrate (plasma). Turtle kidney extract incubated with homologous plasma displayed typical Michaelis-Menten kinetics. Finally we conducted experiments to determine whether a portion of turtle plasma renin exists in an inactive form. Trypsinization caused a slight increase in plasma renin activity (PRA), whereas acidification to pH 3.3 yielded a fourfold increase in PRA. PMID:6377928

  20. Effect of angiotensin II, ATP, and ionophore A23187 on potassium efflux in adrenal glomerulosa cells

    SciTech Connect

    Lobo, M.V.; Marusic, E.T.

    1986-02-01

    Angiotensin II stimulus on perifused bovine adrenal glomerulosa cells elicited an increase in 86Rb efflux from cells previously equilibrated with the radioisotope. When 45Ca fluxes were measured under similar conditions, it was observed that Ca and Rb effluxes occurred within the first 30 s of the addition of the hormone and were independent of the presence of external Ca. The 86Rb efflux due to angiotensin II was inhibited by quinine and apamin. The hypothesis that the angiotensin II response is a consequence of an increase in the K permeability of the glomerulosa cell membrane triggered by an increase in cytosolic Ca is supported by the finding that the divalent cation ionophore A23187 also initiated 86Rb or K loss (as measured by an external K electrode). This increased K conductance was also seen with 10(-4) M ATP. Quinine and apamin greatly reduced the effect of ATP or A23187 on 86Rb or K release in adrenal glomerulosa cells. The results suggest that Ca-dependent K channels or carriers are present in the membranes of bovine adrenal glomerulosa cells and are sensitive to hormonal stimulus.

  1. Angiotensins processing activities in the venom and epidermic mucus of Scorpaena plumieri.

    PubMed

    Tenório, Humberto de Araújo; Costa, Ricardo Bezerra; Costa Marques, Maria Elizabeth; Victor Dos Santos, Claudio Wilian; Gomes, Francis Soares; Vieira Pereira, Hugo Juarez

    2016-09-01

    The venom of marine animals is a rich source of compounds with remarkable selectivity and functional diversity. Scorpaena plumieri is the most venomous fish in the Brazilian fauna and is responsible for relatively frequent accidents involving anglers and bathers. In humans, its venom causes edema, erythema, ecchymoses, anxiety, nausea, vomiting, and syncope. The venom is chemically characterized by Sp-CTx, a enzyme able to generate an initial endothelium-dependent relaxation response, followed by a contraction response. This study sought to investigate the proteolytic activities regarding vasopeptides angiotensin I and II. Both the venom and the epidermal mucus presented angiotensin conversion activity for angiotensin I, as well as a capacity to form Ang 1-7 directly via Ang I and II. Captopril (10 μM) and EDTA (1 mM) were able to abolish the converting activity of the venom and the epidermal mucus, representing the first description of a converting activity in S. plumieri venom and epidermal mucus. PMID:27215174

  2. Angiotensin receptor antagonists delay nitric oxide-deficient stroke in stroke-prone rats.

    PubMed

    Ahmad, S

    1997-08-20

    We investigated whether chronic deficiency of nitric oxide (NO) in stroke-prone spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHRSP) precipitates stroke and whether exogenous nitrates and other pharmacological agents can prevent stroke. Groups of five-week-old male SHRSP rats chronically received saline, L-nitro-arginine methyl ester (L-NAME) in saline, L-NAME along with pharmacological agents (L-arginine, isosorbide dinitrate, enalapril maleate and L-158,809; angiotensin receptor antagonist; 5,7-dimethyl-2-ethyl-3(-)[[2'-(1H-tetrazol-5-yl)biphenyl-4-yl]meth yl]-imidazo[4,5-b]pyridine) in saline to drink. The development of visible neurological deficits following various treatments was considered as an occurrence of stroke. Within hours following onset of stroke, the rats were anesthetized, catheterized and attached to a Cardiomax blood pressure recorder. SHRSP treated with L-NAME (10+/-2 mg/day) developed stroke in 11+/-2 days while no neurological deficit was seen in animals receiving saline till the end of the study period (35 days). Blockade of the renin-angiotensin system with enalapril or L-158,809 significantly delayed the onset of stroke (19+/-2 and 20+/-2 days, respectively), but caused only slight reductions in mean arterial blood pressure. These results suggest that chronic inhibition of NO synthase in SHRSP is associated with the development of stroke and such stroke appears to be renin-angiotensin system-dependent. PMID:9311659

  3. A Modern Understanding of the Traditional and Nontraditional Biological Functions of Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme

    PubMed Central

    Ong, Frank S.; Blackwell, Wendell-Lamar B.; Shah, Kandarp H.; Giani, Jorge F.; Gonzalez-Villalobos, Romer A.; Shen, Xiao Z.; Fuchs, Sebastien

    2013-01-01

    Angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) is a zinc-dependent peptidase responsible for converting angiotensin I into the vasoconstrictor angiotensin II. However, ACE is a relatively nonspecific peptidase that is capable of cleaving a wide range of substrates. Because of this, ACE and its peptide substrates and products affect many physiologic processes, including blood pressure control, hematopoiesis, reproduction, renal development, renal function, and the immune response. The defining feature of ACE is that it is composed of two homologous and independently catalytic domains, the result of an ancient gene duplication, and ACE-like genes are widely distributed in nature. The two ACE catalytic domains contribute to the wide substrate diversity of ACE and, by extension, the physiologic impact of the enzyme. Several studies suggest that the two catalytic domains have different biologic functions. Recently, the X-ray crystal structure of ACE has elucidated some of the structural differences between the two ACE domains. This is important now that ACE domain-specific inhibitors have been synthesized and characterized. Once widely available, these reagents will undoubtedly be powerful tools for probing the physiologic actions of each ACE domain. In turn, this knowledge should allow clinicians to envision new therapies for diseases not currently treated with ACE inhibitors. PMID:23257181

  4. Knockout of Angiotensin AT2 receptors accelerates healing but impairs quality

    PubMed Central

    Faghih, Mahya; Hosseini, Sayed M.; Smith, Barbara; Ansari, Amir Mehdi.; Lay, Frank; Ahmed, Ali Karim; Inagami, Tedashi; Marti, Guy P.; Harmon, John W.; Walston, Jeremy D.; Abadir, Peter M.

    2015-01-01

    Wounds are among the most common, painful, debilitating and costly conditions in older adults. Disruption of the angiotensin type 1 receptors (AT1R), has been associated with impaired wound healing, suggesting a critical role for AT1R in this repair process. Biological functions of angiotensin type 2 receptors (AT2R) are less studied. We investigated effects of genetically disrupting AT2R on rate and quality of wound healing. Our results suggest that AT2R effects on rate of wound closure depends on the phase of wound healing. We observed delayed healing during early phase of wound healing (inflammation). An accelerated healing rate was seen during later stages (proliferation and remodeling). By day 12, fifty percent of AT2R−/− mice had complete wound closure as compared to none in either C57/BL6 or AT1R−/− mice. There was a significant increase in AT1R, TGFβ1 and TGFβ2 expression during the proliferative and remodeling phases in AT2R−/− mice. Despite the accelerated closure rate, AT2R−/− mice had more fragile healed skin. Our results suggest that in the absence of AT2R, wound healing rate is accelerated, but yielded worse skin quality. Elucidating the contribution of both of the angiotensin receptors may help fine tune future intervention aimed at wound repair in older individuals. PMID:26727887

  5. Aliskiren inhibits the renin-angiotensin system in retinal pigment epithelium cells.

    PubMed

    Simão, Sónia; Santos, Daniela F; Silva, Gabriela A

    2016-09-20

    Observations of increased angiotensin II levels and activation of the (pro)renin receptor in retinopathies support the role of ocular renin-angiotensin system (RAS) in the development of retinal diseases. While targeting RAS presents significant therapeutic potential, current RAS-based therapies are ineffective halting the progression of these diseases. A new class of drugs, the direct renin inhibitors such as aliskiren, is a potential therapeutic alternative. However, it is unclear how aliskiren acts in the retina, in particular in the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE), the structure responsible for the maintenance of retinal homeostasis whose role is deeply compromised in retinal diseases. We firstly analyzed the expression and activity of the main RAS components in RPE cells. Time- and concentration-dependent treatments with aliskiren were performed to modulate different pathways of the RAS in RPE cells. Our data demonstrate that RPE cells express the main RAS constituents. Exposure of RPE cells to aliskiren inhibited the activity of renin and consequently decreased the levels of angiotensin II. Additionally, aliskiren reduced the translocation of the (pro)renin receptor to the cellular membrane of RPE cells preventing the activation of ERK1/2. Our findings of the RPE well-defined RAS, together with the demonstration that aliskiren effectively blocks this system at different steps of the cascade, suggest that aliskiren might be an alternative and successful drug in preventing the deleterious effects derived from the overactivation of the RAS, known to contribute to the pathogenesis of different retinal diseases. PMID:27343695

  6. Cellular mechanisms for the treatment of chronic heart failure: the nitric oxide- and adenosine-dependent pathways.

    PubMed

    Minamino, Tetsuo; Kitakaze, Masafumi

    2002-05-01

    Accumulated evidence suggests that several drugs proven to improve survival in patients with chronic heart failure (CHF) enhance endogenous nitric oxide (NO)- and/or adenosine-dependent pathways. Indeed, we and others have demonstrated that: i) antagonists of either renin-angiotensin-aldosterone or beta-adrenergic systems enhance NO-dependent pathways; ii) although carvedilol and amlodipine belong to different drug classes, both of them can increase cardiac adenosine levels; iii) increased adenosine levels by dipyridamole are associated with the improvement of CHF. Interestingly, both NO and adenosine have multifactorial beneficial actions in cardiovascular systems. First of all, both of them induce vasodilation and decrease myocardial hypercontractility, which may contribute to a reduction in the severity of myocardial ischaemia. Both adenosine and NO are also involved in cardioprotection attributable to acute and late phases of ischaemic preconditioning, respectively. Secondly, they can modulate the neurohormonal systems that contribute to the progression of CHF. Thus, we propose that enhancement of endogenous NO and/or adenosine as potential therapeutic targets in a new strategy for the treatment for CHF. PMID:15989539

  7. Telmisartan protects against microvascular dysfunction during myocardial ischemia/reperfusion injury by activation of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background We investigated the potential of telmisartan to improve microvascular dysfunction induced by myocardial ischemia/reperfusion (I/R) injury by activating the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPARG) pathway. Methods Forty-eight male rabbits were randomly allocated into sham-operated, I/R, GW9662, telmisartan, telmisartan–GW9662, or candesartan groups. Rabbits were anesthetized, and the left anterior descending coronary artery (LAD) was ligated for 60 minutes. Following reperfusion for 6 hours, angiotensin II content of the heart was determined using radioimmunoassay. Myocardial neutrophil accumulation and microvessel cross-sectional area were examined histologically. Myocardial capillaries were examined with transmission electron microscopy. Intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) and vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 (VCAM-1) in the myocardium were measured using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Western blot was utilized for investigating the expression of nuclear factor kappa-light-chain-enhancer of activated B cells (NF-κB) and PPARG. Results Angiotensin II concentration was significantly increased in all treatment groups compared with the sham-operated group (P < 0.05, all). Accumulation of polymorphonuclear neutrophils was significantly lower, while microvessel cross-sectional area was significantly higher in the telmisartan, telmisartan-GW9662, and candesartan groups compared with the I/R group (P < 0.05). ICAM-1 and VCAM-1 levels were also significantly lower, and correlated with lower NF-κB expression in these groups. The effects were the most significant in the telmisartan group compared with the telmisartan–GW9662 and candesartan groups. Telmisartan significantly increased PPARG protein expression compared with all other groups (P < 0.05, all). Conclusions Except for the typical effects of angiotensin II-receptor blocker, telmisartan improved microvascular dysfunction during myocardial I/R injury via the

  8. Loss of Apelin Exacerbates Myocardial Infarction Adverse Remodeling and Ischemia‐reperfusion Injury: Therapeutic Potential of Synthetic Apelin Analogues

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Wang; McKinnie, Shaun M.K.; Patel, Vaibhav B.; Haddad, George; Wang, Zuocheng; Zhabyeyev, Pavel; Das, Subhash K.; Basu, Ratnadeep; McLean, Brent; Kandalam, Vijay; Penninger, Josef M.; Kassiri, Zamaneh; Vederas, John C.; Murray, Allan G.; Oudit, Gavin Y.

    2013-01-01

    Background Coronary artery disease leading to myocardial ischemia is the most common cause of heart failure. Apelin (APLN), the endogenous peptide ligand of the APJ receptor, has emerged as a novel regulator of the cardiovascular system. Methods and Results Here we show a critical role of APLN in myocardial infarction (MI) and ischemia‐reperfusion (IR) injury in patients and animal models. Myocardial APLN levels were reduced in patients with ischemic heart failure. Loss of APLN increased MI‐related mortality, infarct size, and inflammation with drastic reductions in prosurvival pathways resulting in greater systolic dysfunction and heart failure. APLN deficiency decreased vascular sprouting, impaired sprouting of human endothelial progenitor cells, and compromised in vivo myocardial angiogenesis. Lack of APLN enhanced susceptibility to ischemic injury and compromised functional recovery following ex vivo and in vivo IR injury. We designed and synthesized two novel APLN analogues resistant to angiotensin converting enzyme 2 cleavage and identified one analogue, which mimicked the function of APLN, to be markedly protective against ex vivo and in vivo myocardial IR injury linked to greater activation of survival pathways and promotion of angiogenesis. Conclusions APLN is a critical regulator of the myocardial response to infarction and ischemia and pharmacologically targeting this pathway is feasible and represents a new class of potential therapeutic agents. PMID:23817469

  9. Captopril Pretreatment Produces an Additive Cardioprotection to Isoflurane Preconditioning in Attenuating Myocardial Ischemia Reperfusion Injury in Rabbits and in Humans

    PubMed Central

    Tian, Yi; Li, Haobo; Liu, Peiyu; Xu, Jun-mei; Irwin, Michael G.; Xia, Zhengyuan; Tian, Guogang

    2015-01-01

    Background. Pretreatment with the angiotensin-converting inhibitor captopril or volatile anesthetic isoflurane has, respectively, been shown to attenuate myocardial ischemia reperfusion (MI/R) injury in rodents and in patients. It is unknown whether or not captopril pretreatment and isoflurane preconditioning (Iso) may additively or synergistically attenuate MI/R injury. Methods and Results. Patients selected for heart valve replacement surgery were randomly assigned to five groups: untreated control (Control), captopril pretreatment for 3 days (Cap3d), or single dose captopril (Cap1hr, 1 hour) before surgery with or without Iso (Cap3d+Iso and Cap1hr+Iso). Rabbit MI/R model was induced by occluding coronary artery for 30 min followed by 2-hour reperfusion. Rabbits were randomized to receive sham operation (Sham), MI/R (I/R), captopril (Cap, 24 hours before MI/R), Iso, or the combination of captopril and Iso (Iso+Cap). In patients, Cap3d+Iso but not Cap1hr+Iso additively reduced postischemic myocardial injury and attenuated postischemic myocardial inflammation. In rabbits, Cap or Iso significantly reduced postischemic myocardial infarction. Iso+Cap additively reduced cellular injury that was associated with improved postischemic myocardial functional recovery and reduced myocardial apoptosis and attenuated oxidative stress. Conclusion. A joint use of 3-day captopril treatment and isoflurane preconditioning additively attenuated MI/R by reducing oxidative stress and inflammation. PMID:26273143

  10. RGS4 inhibits angiotensin II signaling and macrophage localization during renal reperfusion injury independent of vasospasm.

    PubMed

    Pang, Paul; Jin, Xiaohua; Proctor, Brandon M; Farley, Michelle; Roy, Nilay; Chin, Matthew S; von Andrian, Ulrich H; Vollmann, Elisabeth; Perro, Mario; Hoffman, Ryan J; Chung, Joseph; Chauhan, Nikita; Mistri, Murti; Muslin, Anthony J; Bonventre, Joseph V; Siedlecki, Andrew M

    2015-04-01

    Vascular inflammation is a major contributor to the severity of acute kidney injury. In the context of vasospasm-independent reperfusion injury we studied the potential anti-inflammatory role of the Gα-related RGS protein, RGS4. Transgenic RGS4 mice were resistant to 25 min injury, although post-ischemic renal arteriolar diameter was equal to the wild type early after injury. A 10 min unilateral injury was performed to study reperfusion without vasospasm. Eighteen hours after injury, blood flow was decreased in the inner cortex of wild-type mice with preservation of tubular architecture. Angiotensin II levels in the kidneys of wild-type and transgenic mice were elevated in a sub-vasoconstrictive range 12 and 18 h after injury. Angiotensin II stimulated pre-glomerular vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) to secrete the macrophage chemoattractant RANTES, a process decreased by angiotensin II R2 (AT2) inhibition. However, RANTES increased when RGS4 expression was suppressed implicating Gα protein activation in an AT2-RGS4-dependent pathway. RGS4 function, specific to VSMC, was tested in a conditional VSMC-specific RGS4 knockout showing high macrophage density by T2 MRI compared with transgenic and non-transgenic mice after the 10 min injury. Arteriolar diameter of this knockout was unchanged at successive time points after injury. Thus, RGS4 expression, specific to renal VSMC, inhibits angiotensin II-mediated cytokine signaling and macrophage recruitment during reperfusion, distinct from vasomotor regulation. PMID:25469849

  11. Angiotensin II stimulates melanogenesis via the protein kinase C pathway

    PubMed Central

    LIU, LI-HONG; FAN, XIN; XIA, ZHI-KUAN; AN, XU-XI; YANG, RONG-YA

    2015-01-01

    Melanogenesis is a physiological process that results in the synthesis of melanin pigments, which serve a crucial function in hyperpigmentation. The aim of the present study was to determine the effects of angiotensin II (Ang II) on melanogenesis and to elucidate the molecular events of Ang II-induced melanogenesis. Experiments were performed on human melanocytes to elucidate the pigmenting effect of Ang II and the underlying mechanisms. The elements involved in melanogenesis, including melanin content, tyrosinase (TYR) activity, and microphthalmia-associated transcription factor (MITF) and TYR expression at the mRNA and protein levels were evaluated. Melanin content and TYR activity increased in response to Ang II treatment in a concentration-dependent manner. MITF and TYR mRNA and protein expression levels were increased significantly in response to Ang II in a concentration-dependent manner. The Ang II-induced increase in melanin synthesis was reduced significantly in response to co-treatment with Ro-32-0432, a protein kinase C (PKC) inhibitor, whereas co-treatment with H-89, a PKA inhibitor, did not attenuate the Ang II-induced increase in melanin levels. These results suggest that PKC is required for Ang II-induced pigmentation in human melanocytes and that the mechanism involves the PKC pathway and MITF upregulation. PMID:26622519

  12. [Prehospital thrombolytic therapy in acute myocardial infarction].

    PubMed

    Carlsson, J; Schuster, H P; Tebbe, U

    1997-10-01

    The extent of myocardial damage occurring during acute myocardial infarction is time dependent, and there is abundant evidence from most clinical trials that mortality reduction is greatest in patients treated early with thrombolytic agents, although beneficial effects have been shown with treatment initiated up to 12 h after onset of symptoms. All studies on prehospital thrombolysis have conclusively shown the practicability and safety of patient selection and administration of the thrombolytic agent. The accuracy of diagnosis in the prehospital setting was comparable to trials of in-hospital thrombolysis, e.g., in the Myocardial Infarction Triage and Intervention Project (MITI) 98% of the patients enrolled had subsequent evidence of acute myocardial infarction. With regard to time savings, all randomized studies showed positive results. The smallest time gain was observed in the MITI trial: prehospital-treated patients received thrombolytic therapy an average of 33 min earlier than those treated in hospital. In the European Myocardial Infarction Project (EMIP) the difference in time between prehospital and hospital treatment was a median of 55 min. However, none of these trials was able to show a significant short-term mortality difference between the two groups. Only a meta analysis of five randomized studies with a combined median time gain of about 60 min showed a significant 17% reduction in short-term mortality for patients who received thrombolytic therapy in the prehospital phase. In the Grampian Region Early Anistreplase Trial (GREAT), a study performed in a more rural area than other studies, the time gain by prehospital initiation of thrombolysis was a median of 130 min. GREAT was the only study to date reporting a significant mortality benefit for prehospital-treated patients after 3 months and 1 year. In conclusion, prehospital thrombolysis is feasible and safe. Patients with acute myocardial infarction can be correctly identified and treated with

  13. [Modelling of myocardial hypertrophy in vitro for solving problems of medicinal correction].

    PubMed

    Moiseeva, O M; Semenova, E G; Polevaia, E V; Selivanova, G V; Vlasova, T D; Khirmanov, V N; Pinaev, G P

    1998-01-01

    The work has been done on primary heart culture from neonatal rat ventricle. Cardiomyocyte hypertrophy was modelled using noradrenaline (NA), angiotensin II (AII) and fetal serum, respectively. Cell hypertrophy of primary heart cultures was assessed by measuring the surface area, the scope of protein synthesis estimated by 3H-leucine autoradiography and the contents of nucleic acids in gallocyanin-chromalum stained cardiomyocytes. The structure of myofibrillar apparatus was studied by rhodamine-conjugated phalloidin and indirect immunofluorescence of muscle alpha-actinin. Treatment with 10(-6) M NA increased 3H-leucine incorporation in 9-day old heart culture by 42% without changing cell size. AII in a dose 1 microM stimulated protein synthesis activity by 1.3 fold and the surface area by 1.7 fold, both in 2- and 9-day old primary heart cultures. The maximum stimulation of cell hypertrophy was provided by the medium supplemented with fetal serum. RNA contents in the cytoplasm of cardiomyocytes increased by 7.8 fold and the myocardial cell size by 2.9 fold in serum-supplemented culture by 9 days of cultivation. In the medium with fetal serum, amounts of cardiomyocytes with tetraploid nuclei reached 33%, against 14% in control. Coculturing of myocardiocytes and fibroblasts rendered effects of fetal serum on the growth of myocardiocytes. Cultivation in the presence of 1 microM enalapril, an ACE inhibitor, suppressed the development of cardiac muscle cells hypertrophy. The effect of enalapril depended on the degree of cellular hypertrophy. Addition of 10 microM amiloride to the medium lowered the protein synthesis by 29% independently on the initial cellular hypertrophy. PMID:10188217

  14. Acute myocardial infarction.

    PubMed

    Rischpler, Christoph

    2016-09-01

    Inflammatory processes after myocardial infarction have gained major interest in recent cardiovascular research. It is believed that not only the degree of cell recruitment to the heart plays a pivotal role in the quality of wound healing after myocardial infarction, but also the balance between different types or even subtypes of cells. It is also this balance which is thought to control key processes in tissue repair, such as apoptosis and neoangiogenesis. In this paper, we aim to review imaging strategies (with a special focus on nuclear molecular imaging strategies) that target cells and processes involved in postischemic inflammation and that have a high potential to be translated into clinic or that are already being used and evaluated in humans. PMID:27225319

  15. Nitric oxide mediates the inhibitory action of platelet-activating factor on angiotensin II-induced renal vasoconstriction, in vivo.

    PubMed

    Handa, R K; Strandhoy, J W

    1996-06-01

    The objective of our study was to determine the mechanism(s) involved in the inhibitory effect of platelet-activating factor on renal vascular reactivity, in vivo. Bolus injections of vasoconstrictor agonists were administered into the renal circulation of pentobarbital anesthetized male Wistar rats at a dose to cause a transient 45 to 50% decrease in renal blood flow. Intrarenal infusion of platelet-activating factor (PAF) at 2.5 ng/min/kg attenuated the vasoconstrictor response to angiotensin II by 66%, a significantly smaller reduction of 35% for norepinephrine-mediated vasoconstriction, 22% for vasopressin-mediated vasoconstriction and no alteration of KCl-mediated vasoconstriction. The preferential inhibitory effect of platelet-activating factor on angiotensin II-mediated renal vasoconstriction was mimicked by the intrarenal infusion of either 0.2 to 5 micrograms/min/kg methacholine (endothelium-dependent vasodilator) or 2 micrograms/min/kg sodium nitroprusside (nitric oxide donor). After inhibition of nitric oxide synthesis with NG-monomethyl-L-arginine, intrarenal infusion of PAF or methacholine reduced angiotensin II-mediated renal vasoconstriction significantly less than that observed in the absence of NG-monomethyl-L-arginine. Therefore, this study provides evidence that the shared ability of platelet-activating factor and methacholine to selectively reduce angiotensin II-mediated renal vasoconstriction involves endothelium-derived nitric oxide. PMID:8667214

  16. Transdermal delivery of Angiotensin Converting Enzyme inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Helal, Fouad; Lane, Majella E

    2014-09-01

    The Angiotensin Converting Enzyme (ACE) inhibitor class of drugs has been in clinical use since the 1970s for the management of all grades of heart failure, hypertension, diabetic nephropathy and prophylaxis of cardiovascular events. Because of the advantages associated with transdermal delivery compared with oral delivery many researchers have investigated the skin as a portal for administration of ACE inhibitors. This review summarises the various studies reported in the literature describing the development and evaluation of transdermal formulations of ACE inhibitors. Captopril, enalapril maleate, lisinopril dihydrate, perindopril erbumine and trandolapril are the most studied in connection with transdermal preparations. The methodologies reported are considered critically and the limitations of the various skin models used are also highlighted. Finally, opportunities for novel transdermal preparations of ACE inhibitor drugs are discussed with an emphasis on rational formulation design. PMID:24657822

  17. Identification of angiotensin II receptor subtypes

    SciTech Connect

    Chiu, A.T.; Herblin, W.F.; McCall, D.E.; Ardecky, R.J.; Carini, D.J.; Duncia, J.V.; Pease, L.J.; Wong, P.C.; Wexler, R.R.; Johnson, A.L.; )

    1989-11-30

    We have demonstrated the existence of two distinct subtypes of the angiotensin II receptor in the rat adrenal gland using radioligand binding and tissue section autoradiography. The identification of the subtypes was made possible by the discovery of two structurally dissimilar, nonpeptide compounds, DuP 753 and EXP655, that show reciprocal selectivity for the two subtypes. In the rat adrenal cortex, DuP 753 inhibited 80% of the total AII binding with an IC50 value on the sensitive sites of 2 x 10(-8) M, while EXP655 displaced only 20%. In the rat adrenal medulla, EXP655 gave 90% inhibition of AII binding with an IC50 value of 3.0 x 10(-8) M, while DuP 753 was essentially inactive. The combination of the two compounds completely inhibited AII binding in both tissues.

  18. Angiotensin II Receptor Blocker Neprilysin Inhibitor (ARNI): New Avenues in Cardiovascular Therapy.

    PubMed

    Volpe, M; Tocci, G; Battistoni, A; Rubattu, S

    2015-09-01

    The burden of cardiovascular disease (CVD) is continuously and progressively raising worldwide. Essential hypertension is a major driver of cardiovascular events, including coronary artery disease, myocardial infarction, ischemic stroke and congestive heart failure. This latter may represent the final common pathway of different cardiovascular diseases, and it is often mediated by progressive uncontrolled hypertension. Despite solid advantages derived from effective and sustained blood pressure control, and the widespread availability of effective antihypertensive medications, the vast majority of the more than 1 billion hypertensive patients worldwide continue to have uncontrolled hypertension. Among various factors that may be involved, the abnormal activation of neurohormonal systems is one consistent feature throughout the continuum of cardiovascular diseases. These systems may initiate biologically meaningful "injury responses". However, their sustained chronic overactivity often may induce and maintain the progression from hypertension towards congestive heart failure. The renin-angiotensin-aldosteron system, the sympathetic nervous system and the endothelin system are major neurohormonal stressor systems that are not only able to elevate blood pressure levels by retaining water and sodium, but also to play a role in the pathophysiology of cardiovascular diseases. More recently, the angiotensin receptor neprilysin inhibitor (ARNI) represents a favourable approach to inhibit neutral endopeptidase (NEP) and suppress the RAAS via blockade of the AT1 receptors, without the increased risk of angioedema. LCZ696, the first-in-class ARNI, has already demonstrated BP lowering efficacy in patients with hypertension, in particular with respect to systolic blood pressure levels, improved cardiac biomarkers, cardiac remodelling and prognosis in patients with heart failure. This manuscript will briefly overview the main pathophysiological and therapeutic aspects of ARNI in

  19. [Duality of angiotensin II receptors and risk for stroke and cancer: what is the connection?].

    PubMed

    Fournier, A; Ghitu, A; Darabont, R; Mazouz, H; Makdassi, R; Canaple, S; Rosa, A; Fernandez, L A

    Angiotensin II (AII) acts by 2 types of receptors: the ATI receptor which mediates its actions on vasoconstriction, renin (inhibition) and aldosterone (stimulation) secretions, cellular proliferation and angiogenesis and the non-AT1 (often called AT2) receptors. Mainly expressed in the embryon these latter may favor cellular differentiation and recruitment of collateral circulation. Angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors (ACEI) decrease the synthesis of All and therefore the stimulation of both receptor types whereas AT1-receptor antagonists (AT1RA) block only the stimulation of these latter and increase the stimulation of AT2 receptor since they increase the production of All secondarily to the inhibition of the feedback of renin secretion by All. Experimentally ACEI and AT1RA decrease angiogenesis and cellular proliferation and favor cellular differentiation which could explain the protective effect of ACEI against cancer suggested recently in a Scotish study. Despite of their common suppressive effect on angiogenesis AT1RA may better than ACEI protect against ischemic events specially the cerebral ones because they favor the rapid recruitment of collateral circulation. This has been demonstrated for losartan in case of abrupt ligation of the carotid in the gerbil since its previous administration protects against fatal cerebral ischemia whereas its previous administration with enalapril abolishes this protection. These data may explain why, in the CAPP trial, captopril which has prevented more effectively diabetes occurrence could not be proved superior to diuretics and/or betablocker in the prevention of myocardial infarction and specially of strokes for which exist on the contrary a suspicion of a lower protection. Therefore a comparative trial between AT1RA and ACEI in the prevention of stroke recurrence should appear as a priority for Public Health and Pharmaceutical Industry Authorities. PMID:10360191

  20. PKC δ and βII regulate angiotensin II-mediated fibrosis through p38: a mechanism of RV fibrosis in pulmonary hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Chichger, Havovi; Vang, Alexander; O'Connell, Kelly A.; Zhang, Peng; Mende, Ulrike; Harrington, Elizabeth O.

    2015-01-01

    Pulmonary hypertension (PH) eventually leads to right ventricular (RV) fibrosis and dysfunction that is associated with increased morbidity and mortality. Although angiotensin II plays an important role in RV remodeling associated with hypoxic PH, the molecular mechanisms underlying RV fibrosis in PH largely remain unresolved. We hypothesized that PKC-p38 signaling is involved in RV collagen accumulation in PH and in response to angiotensin II stimulation. Adult male Sprague-Dawley rats were exposed to 3 wk of normoxia or hypoxia (10% FiO2) as a model of PH. Hypoxic rats developed RV hypertrophy and fibrosis associated with an increase in PKC βII and δ protein expression and p38 dephosphorylation in freshly isolated RV cardiac fibroblasts. Further mechanistic studies were performed in cultured primary cardiac fibroblasts stimulated with angiotensin II, a key activator of ventricular fibrosis in PH. Angiotensin II induced a reduction in p38 phosphorylation that was attenuated following chemical inhibition of PKC βII and δ. Molecular and chemical inhibition of PKC βII and δ abrogated angiotensin II-induced cardiac fibroblast proliferation and collagen deposition in vitro. The effects of PKC inhibition on proliferation and fibrosis were reversed by chemical inhibition of p38. Conversely, constitutive activation of p38 attenuated angiotensin II-induced increase of cardiac fibroblast proliferation and collagen accumulation. PKC βII- and δ-dependent inactivation of p38 regulates cardiac fibroblast proliferation and collagen deposition in response to angiotensin II, which suggests that the PKC-p38 signaling in cardiac fibroblasts may be involved and important in the pathophysiology of RV fibrosis in PH. PMID:25659900

  1. Angiotensin Receptors: Structure, Function, Signaling and Clinical Applications

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Khuraijam Dhanachandra; Karnik, Sadashiva S

    2016-01-01

    Angiotensinogen – a serpin family protein predominantly produced by the liver is systematically processed by proteases of the Renin Angiotensin system (RAS) generating hormone peptides. Specific cell surface receptors for at least three distinct angiotensin peptides produce distinct cellular signals that regulate system-wide physiological response to RAS. Two well characterized receptors are angiotensin type 1 receptor (AT1 receptor) and type 2 receptor (AT2 receptor). They respond to the octapeptide hormone angiotensin II. The oncogene product MAS is a putative receptor for Ang (1–7). While these are G-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs), the in vivo angiotensin IV binding sites may be type 2 transmembrane proteins. These four receptors together regulate cardiovascular, hemodynamic, neurological, renal, and endothelial functions; as well as cell proliferation, survival, matrix-cell interactions and inflammation. Angiotensin receptors are important therapeutic targets for several diseases. Thus, researchers and pharmaceutical companies are focusing on drugs targeting AT1 receptor than AT2 receptor, MAS and AngIV binding sites. AT1 receptor blockers are the cornerstone of current treatment for hypertension, heart failure, renal failure and many types of vascular diseases including atherosclerosis, aortic aneurism and Marfan syndrome. PMID:27512731

  2. Regional suppression by lesions in the anterior third ventricle of c-fos expression induced by either angiotensin II or hypertonic saline.

    PubMed

    Xu, Z; Herbert, J

    1995-07-01

    supraoptic nucleus and paraventricular nucleus following i.v. angiotensin II is also dependent on an intact median preoptic nucleus, suggesting that supraoptic nucleus and paraventricular nucleus activation may be dependent on the median preoptic nucleus, and that suppression following i.c.v. infusions is not due to mechanical obstruction to infused peptide. However, there is a clear separation of the effects of i.c.v. and i.v. angiotensin II on brainstem structures. The median preoptic nucleus (but not the subfornical organ) seems essential for activation following the former but not the latter, suggesting alternative mechanisms for the effect of i.v. angiotension II on the brainstem.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 400 WORDS) PMID:7477894

  3. Preparation and Biological Activity of the Monoclonal Antibody against the Second Extracellular Loop of the Angiotensin II Type 1 Receptor

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Mingming; Zhao, Chengrui; Zhang, Suli; Wang, Li; Liu, Huirong; Ma, Xinliang

    2016-01-01

    The current study was to prepare a mouse-derived antibody against the angiotensin II type 1 receptor (AT1-mAb) based on monoclonal antibody technology, to provide a foundation for research on AT1-AA-positive diseases. Balb/C mice were actively immunized with the second extracellular loop of the angiotensin II type 1 receptor (AT1R-ECII). Then, mouse spleen lymphocytes were fused with myeloma cells and monoclonal hybridomas that secreted AT1-mAb were generated and cultured, after which those in logarithmic-phase were injected into the abdominal cavity of mice to retrieve the ascites. Highly purified AT1-mAb was isolated from mouse ascites after injection with 1 × 107 hybridomas. A greater amount of AT1-mAb was purified from mouse ascites compared to the cell supernatant of hybridomas. AT1-mAb purified from mouse ascites constricted the thoracic aorta of mice and increased the beat frequency of neonatal rat myocardial cells via the AT1R, identical to the effects of AT1-AA extracted from patients' sera. Murine blood pressure increased after intravenous injection of AT1-mAb via the tail vein. High purity and good biological activity of AT1-mAb can be obtained from mouse ascites after intraperitoneal injection of monoclonal hybridomas that secrete AT1-mAb. These data provide a simple tool for studying AT1-AA-positive diseases. PMID:27057554

  4. Cardioprotection against experimental myocardial ischemic injury using cornin.

    PubMed

    Xu, Y; Xu, Y; Luan, H; Jiang, Y; Tian, X; Zhang, S

    2016-02-01

    Phosphorylated-cyclic adenosine monophosphate response element-binding protein (Phospho-CREB) has an important role in the pathogenesis of myocardial ischemia. We isolated the iridoid glycoside cornin from the fruit of Verbena officinalis L, investigated its effects against myocardial ischemia and reperfusion (I/R) injury in vivo, and elucidated its potential mechanism in vitro. Effects of cornin on cell viability, as well as expression of phospho-CREB and phospho-Akt in hypoxic H9c2 cells in vitro, and myocardial I/R injury in vivo, were investigated. Cornin attenuated hypoxia-induced cytotoxicity significantly in H9c2 cells in a concentration-dependent manner. Treatment of H9c2 cells with cornin (10 µM) blocked the reduction of expression of phospho-CREB and phospho-Akt in a hypoxic condition. Treatment of rats with cornin (30 mg/kg, iv) protected them from myocardial I/R injury as indicated by a decrease in infarct volume, improvement in hemodynamics, and reduction of severity of myocardial damage. Cornin treatment also attenuated the reduction of expression of phospho-CREB and phospho-Akt in ischemic myocardial tissue. These data suggest that cornin exerts protective effects due to an increase in expression of phospho-CREB and phospho-Akt. PMID:26871971

  5. Amelioration of adriamycin and daunorubicin myocardial toxicity by adenosine.

    PubMed

    Newman, R A; Hacker, M P; Krakoff, I H

    1981-09-01

    Primary cultures of rat myocardial cells were used to investigate the dose and time-dependent cellular enzyme release induced by either Adriamycin or daunorubicin, Concentrations of either anthracycline (1.8 or 18 microM) produced significant release of creatine phosphokinase and lactic dehydrogenase from myocardial cells within 24 hr of exposure without a detectable decrease in cell viability. Preincubation of the myocardial cells with varying concentrations of adenosine (10 microM to 1 mM) for 24 hr prior to the addition of anthracycline decreased or prevented drug-induced enzyme release. Other putative myocardial protectants, i.e., N-acetyl-L-cysteine, alpha-tocopherol, or carnitine, were ineffective in preventing anthracycline-induced enzyme release. Although adenosine was an effective myocardial protectant, it had no significant effect on cellular uptake of daunorubicin, nor did adenosine adversely affect the oncolytic activity of daunorubicin against L1210 leukemia cells in vitro. Anthramycin, another oncolytic agent having reported cardiotoxic effects, was also tested in the in vitro system. With this drug, however, no enzyme release was detected at less than lethal doses nor did adenosine have any protective potential against the toxicity of anthramycin. Finally, Adriamycin caused no significant lactic dehydrogenase release when incubated at 1.8 or 18 microM with H9c2 cells, a cell line having primarily skeletal muscle characteristics. This result suggests a specific toxicity of anthracyclines for myocardial but not skeletal muscle cells. PMID:7260911

  6. Cardioprotection against experimental myocardial ischemic injury using cornin

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Y.; Xu, Y.; Luan, H.; Jiang, Y.; Tian, X.; Zhang, S.

    2016-01-01

    Phosphorylated-cyclic adenosine monophosphate response element-binding protein (Phospho-CREB) has an important role in the pathogenesis of myocardial ischemia. We isolated the iridoid glycoside cornin from the fruit of Verbena officinalis L, investigated its effects against myocardial ischemia and reperfusion (I/R) injury in vivo, and elucidated its potential mechanism in vitro. Effects of cornin on cell viability, as well as expression of phospho-CREB and phospho-Akt in hypoxic H9c2 cells in vitro, and myocardial I/R injury in vivo, were investigated. Cornin attenuated hypoxia-induced cytotoxicity significantly in H9c2 cells in a concentration-dependent manner. Treatment of H9c2 cells with cornin (10 µM) blocked the reduction of expression of phospho-CREB and phospho-Akt in a hypoxic condition. Treatment of rats with cornin (30 mg/kg, iv) protected them from myocardial I/R injury as indicated by a decrease in infarct volume, improvement in hemodynamics, and reduction of severity of myocardial damage. Cornin treatment also attenuated the reduction of expression of phospho-CREB and phospho-Akt in ischemic myocardial tissue. These data suggest that cornin exerts protective effects due to an increase in expression of phospho-CREB and phospho-Akt. PMID:26871971

  7. Effects of Angiotensin-II Receptor Blocker on Inhibition of Thrombogenicity in a Canine Atrial Fibrillation Model

    PubMed Central

    Jung, Jae Seung; Kim, Min Kyung; Sim, Jaemin; Kim, Jin Seok; Lim, Hong Euy; Park, Sang Weon; Kim, Young-Hoon

    2016-01-01

    Background and Objectives Angiotensin-II receptor blockers (ARBs) are known to reduce the development of atrial fibrillation (AF) through reverse-remodeling. However, the effect of ARBs on thrombogenicity in AF remains unknown. Materials and Methods Twelve dogs were assigned to control (n=4), ARB (candesartan cilexitil 10 mg/kg/day p.o., 12 weeks; n=4), or sham (n=4) groups. Sustained AF was induced by rapid atrial pacing. Both arterial and venous serum levels of tissue inhibitor of matrix metalloproteinase-1, von Willebrand factor, P-selectin, and vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 (VCAM-1) were measured at baseline and during AF (0, 4, and 12 weeks) with enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Biopsies from both atria including the appendages were performed to semi-quantitatively assess endocardial and myocardial fibrosis after 12 weeks. Results The serum levels of bio-markers were not significantly different at baseline or during AF between the control and the candesartan groups. The levels were not significantly different over time, but there was a trend toward a decrease in arterial VCAM-1 from 4 to 12 weeks in the candesartan group compared to the control group. The grades of endocardial fibrosis after 12 weeks but not those of myocardial fibrosis were slightly reduced in the candesartan group compared to the control group. Conclusion This study did not show that the ARB candesartan significantly reverses thrombogenicity or fibrosis during AF. Future studies using a larger number of subjects are warranted to determine the therapeutic effect of renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system blockade on prothrombogenic processes in AF. PMID:27275170

  8. Suboptimal medical care of patients with ST-Elevation Myocardial Infarction and Renal Insufficiency: results from the Korea acute Myocardial Infarction Registry

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The clinical outcomes of ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI) are poor in patients with renal insufficiency. This study investigated changes in the likelihood that patients received optimal medical care throughout the entire process of myocardial infarction management, on the basis of their glomerular filtration rate (GFR). Methods This study analyzed 7,679 patients (age, 63 ± 13 years; men 73.6%) who had STEMI and were enrolled in the Korea Acute Myocardial Infarction Registry (KAMIR) from November 2005 to August 2008. The study subjects were divided into 5 groups corresponding to strata used to define chronic kidney disease stages. Results Patients with lower GFR were less likely to present with typical chest pain. The average symptom-to-door time, door-to-balloon time, and symptom-to-balloon time were longer with lower GFR than higher GFR. Primary reperfusion therapy was performed less frequently and the results of reperfusion therapy were poorer in patients with renal insufficiency; these patients were less likely to receive adjunctive medical treatment, such as treatment with aspirin, clopidogrel, β-blocker, angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitor/angiotensin-receptor blocker (ARB), or statin, during hospitalization and at discharge. Patients who received less intense medical therapy had worse clinical outcomes than those who received more intense medical therapy. Conclusions Patients with STEMI and renal insufficiency had less chance of receiving optimal medical care throughout the entire process of MI management, which may contribute to worse outcomes in these patients. PMID:22966970

  9. Csk regulates angiotensin II-induced podocyte apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Lu; Ren, Zhilong; Yang, Qian; Ding, Guohua

    2016-07-01

    Increasing data have shown that angiotensin II (Ang II) perpetuates podocyte injury and promotes progression to end-stage kidney disease. The mechanism underlying Ang II-induced podocyte apoptosis has not been established. C-terminal Src kinase (Csk) is a cytoplasmic kinase that interacts with scaffolding proteins involved in cell growth, adhesion, and polarization, and the role of Csk in regulating cellular apoptosis has gradually attracted attention. This study evaluates the role of Csk in Ang II-induced podocyte apoptosis. In vivo, Wistar rats were randomly subjected to a normal saline or Ang II infusion. In vitro, we exposed differentiated mouse podocytes to Ang II. Ang II increased Csk expression and induced podocyte apoptosis, stimulated Csk translocation and binding to Caveolin-1, and stimulated decreased Fyn pY416, increased Fyn pY529, and nephrin dephosphorylation. Csk knockdown prevented Ang II-induced podocyte apoptosis, reduced Fyn kinase inactivation, and increased the interaction between nephrin and the activated form of Fyn, accompanied by a reduced interaction between Csk and Caveolin-1. These findings indicate that Ang II induces podocyte injury via a Csk-dependent pathway. PMID:27225249

  10. An orally active formulation of angiotensin-(1-7) produces an antithrombotic effect

    PubMed Central

    Fraga-Silva, Rodrigo Araujo; Costa-Fraga, Fabiana P; De Sousa, Frederico B; Alenina, Natalia; Bader, Michael; Sinisterra, Ruben D; Santos, Robson A S

    2011-01-01

    INTRODUCTION AND OBJECTIVE: The heptapeptide angiotensin-(1-7) is a component of the renin-angiotensin system, which promotes many beneficial cardiovascular effects, including antithrombotic activity. We have recently shown that the antithrombotic effect of angiotensin-(1-7) involves receptor Mas-mediated NO-release from platelets. Here, we describe an orally active formulation based on angiotensin-(1-7) inclusion in cyclodextrin [Ang-(1-7)- CyD] as an antithrombotic agent. Cyclodextrins are pharmaceutical tools that are used to enhance drug stability, absorption across biological barriers and gastric protection. METHOD: To test the antithrombotic effect of Ang-(1-7)-CyD, thrombus formation was induced in the abdominal vena cava of spontaneously hypertensive rats that were pretreated either acutely or chronically with Ang-(1-7)-CyD. Male Mas-knockout and wild-type mice were used to verify the role of the Mas receptor on the effect of Ang-(1-7)-CyD. RESULTS: Acute or chronic oral treatment with Ang-(1-7)-CyD promoted an antithrombotic effect (measured by thrombus weight; all values are, respectively, untreated vs. treated animals) in spontaneously hypertensive rats (acute: 2.86 ± 0.43 mg vs. 1.14 ± 0.40 mg; chronic: 4.27 ± 1.03 mg vs. 1.39 ± 0.68 mg). This effect was abolished in Mas-knockout mice (thrombus weight in Mas wild-type: 0.76 ± 0.10 mg vs. 0.37 ± 0.02 mg; thrombus weight in Mas-knockout: 0.96 ± 0.11 mg vs. 0.87 ± 0.14 mg). Furthermore, the antithrombotic effect of Ang-(1-7)-CyD was associated with an increase in the plasma level of Angiotensin-(1-7). CONCLUSION: These results show for the first time that the oral formulation Ang-(1-7)-CyD has biological activity and produces a Mas-dependent antithrombotic effect. PMID:21789389

  11. Effect of alpha 1-adrenergic blockade on myocardial blood flow during exercise after myocardial infarction.

    PubMed

    Herzog, C A; Dai, X Z; Bache, R J

    1991-08-01

    The effect of alpha 1-adrenergic blockade with prazosin on myocardial blood flow at rest and during two levels of treadmill exercise was assessed in 16 chronically instrumented dogs 9-14 days after myocardial infarction had been produced by occlusion of the left circumflex coronary artery. During resting conditions prazosin did not alter mean myocardial blood flow or the subendocardial-to-subepicardial flow ratio in either normally perfused or collateral-dependent myocardium. However, during exercise at comparable external work loads and comparable rate-pressure products, prazosin significantly increased blood flow to normally perfused (27% increase at the second level of exercise, P less than 0.001) and collateral-dependent myocardium (35% increase at the second level of exercise, P less than 0.001) compared with control. In addition, prazosin caused a small but significant decrease in the subendocardial-to-subepicardial flow ratio in both normal (1.27 +/- 0.04 to 1.19 +/- 0.04; P less than 0.01) and collateral-dependent myocardium (0.57 +/- 0.11 to 0.52 +/- 0.11; P less than 0.01) compared with control, reflecting a disproportionally greater increase in subepicardial flow in response to alpha 1-adrenergic blockade. These data demonstrate that alpha 1-adrenergic vasoconstriction inhibits coronary vasodilation during exercise, even in areas of collateral-dependent myocardium relatively early after coronary artery occlusion. PMID:1678929

  12. Dipyridamole thallium-201 myocardial scintigraphy

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1988-09-01

    Thallium-201 (/sup 201/Tl) myocardial scintigraphy is a sensitive technique for detecting coronary artery disease. Standardized exercise testing is the most common method for inducing myocardial stress for /sup 201/Tl imaging. Unfortunately, a significant number of patients are unable to undergo adequate treadmill or bicycle exercise. In these patients, pharmacologic stress with dipyridamole provides a safe, efficacious, and reliable alternative.

  13. [Coronary artery disease, myocardial perfusion and ventricular function in Q-wave and non-Q-wave myocardial infarcts].

    PubMed

    Macieira-Coelho, E; Garcia-Alves, M; da Costa, B; Cantinho, G; Pedro, P; Dionisio, I; Gouveia, A; de Padua, F

    1997-04-01

    Controversy remains in considering non-Q wave myocardial infarction (NQMI) a distinct pathophysiological entity of Q wave myocardial infarction (QMI). In order to analyze the severity of coronary artery disease, extension of myocardial scar or myocardial ischemia and ventricular function, 78 consecutive patients with QMI and 32 with NQMI, mean age 55.4 +/- 8.5, not submitted to thrombolytic therapy, were studied. Coronary angiography, exercise thallium scintigraphy and radionuclide ventriculography were performed in all at least within 3 months of a prior myocardial infarction. In the present study the occurrence of QMI was significantly more frequent in older patients than NQMI. There was no prevalence of occlusion either in the right, left circumflex or left anterior descending coronary arteries in both groups. Ejection fraction, degree of occlusion and presence of collateral circulation showed an equal prevalence in QMI and NQMI patients. A higher incidence of multivessel disease was found in NQMI that had less necrosis than QMI patients. The prevalence of exercise induced thallium-201 redistribution defects within the infarct zone was substantially higher and involved more scar segments in NQMI patients. Physiological and clinical consequences of coronary thrombosis depends on the size and the number of diseased arteries, the approach the pathophysiologic consequences of coronary disease in terms of fractal structure has been suggested. A pronounced heterogeneity in regional myocardial blood flow in a fractal branching arterial network may be responsible for the pathophysiologic differences of coronary thrombosis between Q-wave and non Q-wave infarction. PMID:9341032

  14. Spiral MR myocardial tagging.

    PubMed

    Ryf, Salome; Kissinger, Kraig V; Spiegel, Marcus A; Börnert, Peter; Manning, Warren J; Boesiger, Peter; Stuber, Matthias

    2004-02-01

    In the present study, complementary spatial modulation of magnetization (CSPAMM) myocardial tagging was extended with an interleaved spiral imaging sequence. The use of a spiral sequence enables the acquisition of grid-tagged images with a tagline distance as low as 4 mm in a single breath-hold. Alternatively, a high temporal resolution of 77 frames per second was obtained with 8-mm grid spacing. Ten healthy adult subjects were studied. With this new approach, high-quality images can be obtained and the tags persist throughout the entire cardiac cycle. PMID:14755646

  15. Assessment of myocardial viability.

    PubMed

    Travin, Mark I; Bergmann, Steven R

    2005-01-01

    The prevalence of left ventricular (LV) dysfunction and resultant congestive heart failure is increasing. Patients with this condition are at high risk for cardiac death and usually have significant limitations in their lifestyles. Although there have been advances in medical therapy resulting in improved survival and well being, the best and most definitive therapy, when appropriate, is revascularization. In the setting of coronary artery disease, accounting for approximately two thirds of cases of congestive heart failure, LV dysfunction often is not the result of irreversible scar but rather caused by impairment in function and energy use of still viable-myocytes, with the opportunity for improved function if coronary blood flow is restored. Patients with LV dysfunction who have viable myocardium are the patients at highest risk because of the potential for ischemia but at the same time benefit most from revascularization. It is important to identify viable myocardium in these patients, and radionuclide myocardial scintigraphy is an excellent tool for this. Single-photon emission computed tomography perfusion scintigraphy, whether using thallium-201, Tc-99m sestamibi, or Tc-99m tetrofosmin, in stress and/or rest protocols, has consistently been shown to be an effective modality for identifying myocardial viability and guiding appropriate management. Metabolic imaging with positron emission tomography radiotracers frequently adds additional information and is a powerful tool for predicting which patients will have an improved outcome from revascularization, including some patients referred instead for cardiac transplantation. Other noninvasive modalities, such as stress echocardiography, also facilitate the assessment of myocardial viability, but there are advantages and disadvantages compared with the nuclear techniques. Nuclear imaging appears to require fewer viable cells for detection, resulting in a higher sensitivity but a lower specificity than stress

  16. In vitro inhibition of [3H]-angiotensin II binding on the human AT1 receptor by proanthocyanidins from Guazuma ulmifolia bark.

    PubMed

    Caballero-George, Catherina; Vanderheyden, Patrick M L; De Bruyne, Tess; Shahat, Abdel-Atty; Van den Heuvel, Hilde; Solis, Pablo N; Gupta, Mahabir P; Claeys, Magda; Pieters, Luc; Vauquelin, Georges; Vlietinck, Arnold J

    2002-12-01

    A bioassay-guided fractionation of the 70% acetone extract of the bark of Guazuma ulmifolia Lam. on the inhibition of angiotensin II binding to the AT 1 receptor led to the isolation and identification of bioactive oligomeric and polymeric proanthocyanidins consisting mainly of (-)-epicatechin units. The displacement of [3H]-angiotensin II binding was dose-dependent and correlated with the degree of polymerization of the different fractions containing proanthocyanidins. A strong displacement was seen for the residual fraction suggesting that the most active substances corresponding to the highly polymerized proanthocyanidins. Angiotensin II AT 1 receptor binding might be considered as a potentially interesting biological activity of proanthocyanidins contributing to the very broad spectrum of biological activities of the condensed tannins. PMID:12494331

  17. Angiotensin II directly impairs adipogenic differentiation of human preadipose cells.

    PubMed

    Palominos, Marisol M; Dünner, Natalia H; Wabitsch, Martin; Rojas, Cecilia V

    2015-10-01

    Angiotensin II reduces adipogenic differentiation of preadipose cells present in the stroma-vascular fraction of human adipose tissue, which also includes several cell types. Because of the ability of non-adipose lineage cells in the stroma-vascular fraction to respond to angiotensin II, it is not possible to unequivocally ascribe the anti-adipogenic response to a direct effect of this hormone on preadipose cells. Therefore, we used the human Simpson-Golabi-Behmel syndrome (SGBS) preadipocyte cell strain to investigate the consequences of angiotensin II treatment on adipogenic differentiation under serum-free conditions, by assessing expression of typical adipocyte markers perilipin and fatty acid-binding protein 4 (FABP4), at the transcript and protein level. Reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction showed that perilipin and FABP4 transcripts were, respectively, reduced to 0.33 ± 0.07 (P < 0.05) and 0.41 ± 0.19-fold (P < 0.05) in SGBS cells induced to adipogenic differentiation in the presence of angiotensin II. Western Blot analysis corroborated reduction of the corresponding proteins to 0.23 ± 0.21 (P < 0.01) and 0.46 ± 0.30-fold (P < 0.01) the respective controls without angiotensin II. Angiotensin II also impaired morphological changes associated with early adipogenesis. Hence, we demonstrated that angiotensin II is able to directly reduce adipogenic differentiation of SGBS preadipose cells. PMID:26112903

  18. Angiotensin II Receptor Blockers and Cancer Risk

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Yun-Tao; Li, Peng-Yang; Zhang, Jian-Qiang; Wang, Lei; Yi, Zhong

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Angiotensin II receptor blockers (ARB) are widely used drugs that are proven to reduce cardiovascular disease events; however, several recent meta-analyses yielded conflicting conclusions regarding the relationship between ARB and cancer incidence, especially when ARB are combined with angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors (ACEI). We investigated the risk of cancer associated with ARB at different background ACEI levels. Search of PubMed and EMBASE (1966 to December 17, 2015) without language restriction. Randomized, controlled trials (RCTs) had at least 12 months of follow-up data and reported cancer incidence was included. Study characteristics, quality, and risk of bias were assessed by 2 reviewers independently. Nineteen RCTs including 148,334 patients were included in this study. Random-effects model meta-analyses were used to estimate the risk ratio (RR) of cancer risk. No excessive cancer risk was observed in our analyses of ARB alone versus placebo alone without background ACEI use (risk ratio [RR] 1.08, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.00–1.18, P = 0.05); ARB alone versus ACEI alone (RR 1.03, 95%CI 0.94–1.14, P = 0.50); ARB plus partial use of ACEI versus placebo plus partial use of ACEI (RR 0.97, 95%CI 0.90–1.04, P = 0.33); and ARB plus ACEI versus ACEI (RR 0.99, 95%CI 0.79–1.24, P = 0.95). Lack of long-term data, inadequate reporting of safety data, significant heterogeneity in underlying study populations, and treatment regimens. ARB have a neutral effect on cancer incidence in randomized trials. We observed no significant differences in cancer incidence when we compared ARB alone with placebo alone, ARB alone with ACEI alone, ARB plus partial use of ACEI with placebo plus partial use of ACEI, or ARB plus ACEI combination with ACEI. PMID:27149494

  19. Angiotensin-converting enzyme insertion/deletion polymorphism in heterozygous familial hypercholesterolemia patients

    SciTech Connect

    Maslen, C.L.; O`Malley, J.P.; Illingworth, D.R.

    1994-09-01

    The insertion/deletion polymorphism in angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE/ID) has been shown to be an independent risk factor for myocardial infarction (MI). Patients with heterozygous familial hypercholesterolemia (FH) are known to be at greatly increased risk for heart disease because of their high levels of low density lipoprotein cholesterol. We obtained DNA samples from 105 unrelated FH patients and typed them for ACE/ID by PCR analysis. The frequencies of the DD, DI, and II genotypes were 0.381, 0.390, and 0.229, respectively. The allele frequencies were 0.576 for D and 0.423 for I. This is similar to the allele frequencies observed by Cambien et al. in a control population in Toulouse, France. The relative risk for MI or coronary artery disease (CAD) was assessed in patients who were aged 50 years or older. The criteria for CAD was history of coronary arterial bypass surgery. While the relative risk of having had a myocardial infarction was slightly increased from 0.14 (4/28) in the DI + II group to 0.16 (3/19) in the DD genotype, the differences were not statistically significant. The individual`s risk of CAD increased in the DD genotype, (0.579 of the DD population (n=19) compared to 0.321 of the DI + II population (n=28)). Therefore the ACE/ID polymorphism does appear to interact with FH in increasing a DD individual`s risk of heart disease by a factor of 1.8 relative to the DI and II genotypes.

  20. Aldosterone and myocardial extracellular matrix expansion in type 2 diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Rao, Ajay D; Shah, Ravi V; Garg, Rajesh; Abbasi, Siddique A; Neilan, Tomas G; Perlstein, Todd S; Di Carli, Marcelo F; Jerosch-Herold, Michael; Kwong, Raymond Y; Adler, Gail K

    2013-07-01

    Myocardial extracellular matrix expansion and reduced coronary flow reserve (CFR) occur in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus without heart failure or coronary artery disease. Because aldosterone is implicated in the pathophysiology of cardiac fibrosis and vascular injury, the aim of this study was to test the hypothesis that aldosterone is associated with extracellular matrix expansion and reduced CFR in type 2 diabetes mellitus. Patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus without evidence of coronary artery disease were recruited. Blood pressure, lipid management, and glycemic control were optimized over 3 months. Cardiac magnetic resonance imaging with T1 mapping was used to measure myocardial extracellular volume (ECV). Cardiac positron emission tomography was used to assess CFR. On a liberal, 250 mEq/day sodium diet, 24-hour urinary aldosterone and change in serum aldosterone with angiotensin II stimulation were measured. Fifty-three participants with type 2 diabetes (68% men, mean age 53 ± 7 years, mean body mass index 32.2 ± 4.3 kg/m², mean glycosylated hemoglobin 6.8 ± 0.7%, mean systolic blood pressure 126 ± 14 mm Hg) without infarction or ischemia by cardiac magnetic resonance and positron emission tomography were studied. Subjects had impaired CFR (2.51 ± 0.83) and elevated ECV (0.36 ± 0.05), despite normal echocardiographic diastolic function and normal left ventricular function. Myocardial ECV, but not CFR, was positively associated with 24-hour urinary aldosterone excretion (r = 0.37, p = 0.01) and angiotensin II-stimulated aldosterone increase (r = 0.35, p = 0.02). In a best-overall multivariate model (including age, gender, body mass index, glycosylated hemoglobin, and blood pressure), 24-hour urinary aldosterone was the strongest predictor of myocardial ECV (p = 0.004). In conclusion, in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus without coronary artery disease, aldosterone is associated with myocardial extracellular matrix expansion. These

  1. Intrarenal distributions and changes of Angiotensin-converting enzyme and Angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 in feline and canine chronic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Mitani, Sawane; Yabuki, Akira; Sawa, Mariko; Chang, Hye-Sook; Yamato, Osamu

    2014-01-01

    Angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) is a key enzyme in the renin-angiotensin system (RAS). ACE2 is a newly identified member of the RAS. The present immunohistochemical study focused on changes in intrarenal ACE and ACE2 immunoreactivity in feline and canine chronic kidney disease (CKD). ACE immunoreactivity was predominantly observed in the brush border of the proximal tubules in dogs and cats. ACE immunoreactivity was lower in CKD kidneys than in normal kidneys, and quantitative analysis demonstrated negative correlations between ACE and renal tissue damage in dogs. ACE2 immunoreactivity was also detected in the proximal tubules; it increased or decreased with CKD in dogs, depending on the renal region assessed. The changes in ACE and ACE2 in CKD were associated with the plasma creatinine concentration in dogs. Findings from dogs with glomerulonephritis were similar to those from dogs with non-glomerulonephritis. The present study suggests that changes in the intrarenal expression of ACE and ACE2 contribute to the pathological mechanisms of canine CKD, but not to the mechanisms of feline CKD. PMID:24004970

  2. Effect of the Angiotensin I Converting Enzyme Inhibitor, MK-421, on Experimentally Induced Drinking

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fregley, Melvin J.; Fater, Dennis C.; Greenleaf, John E.

    1982-01-01

    MK-421, the ethyl ester maleate salt of N-(S)-1-(ethoxycarbonyl)-3-phenyl-propyl- Ala-L-Pro, is an angiotensin I converting enzyme inhibitor. An initial objective was to determine whether MK-421, administered at 0, 2.5, 5.0, 10.0, 20.0 and 40.0 mg/kg, ip to 96 female rats 15 min prior to administration of the beta-adrenergic agonist, isoproterenol (25 microgram/kg, ip), would inhibit the drinking induced by isoproterenol during 2 h after its administration. The water intake induced by isoproterenol was inhibited significantly by 2.5 mg MK-421/kg. When a similar experiment was performed using Angiotensin I (AI) (200 microgram/kg, ip) as the dipsogenic agent, MK-421 (5 mg/kg, ip), administered 15 min prior to AI, inhibited significantly both the dipsogenic and the diuretic effect of AI. However, administration of angiotensin II (AII, 200 microgram/kg, ip) 15 min after MK-421 (5mg/kg) was accompanied by a water intake that did not differ from AII alone. The drink induced by ip administration of 1.0 m NaCl solution (1% of body wt, ip) was not inhibited by administration of MK-421 (5 mg/kg) 15 min prior to allowing access to water while the drink induced by a 24 h dehydration was partially inhibited. Thus, the drinks induced by administraition of either isoproterenol or AI are dependent on formation of AII. That induced by dehydration is partially dependent, while that induced by hypertonic siilinc is independent of the formation of AII.

  3. PICSO: from myocardial salvage to tissue regeneration.

    PubMed

    Mohl, Werner; Gangl, Clemens; Jusić, Alem; Aschacher, Thomas; De Jonge, Martin; Rattay, Frank

    2015-01-01

    Despite advances in primary percutaneous interventions (PPCI), management of microvascular obstructions in reperfused myocardial tissue remains challenging and is a high-risk procedure. This has led to renewed interest in the coronary venous system as an alternative route of access to the myocardium. This article reviews historical data describing therapeutic options via cardiac veins as well as discussing the clinical potential and limitations of a catheter intervention: pressure controlled intermittent coronary sinus occlusion (PICSO). Collected experimental and clinical information suggest that PICSO also offers the potential for tissue regeneration beyond myocardial salvage. A meta-analysis of observer controlled pICSO application in animal studies showed a dose dependent reduction in infarct size of 29.3% (p < 0.001). Additionally, a 4-fold increase of hemeoxygenase-1 gene expression (p < 0.001) in the center of infarction and a 2.5 fold increase of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) (p < 0.002) in border zones suggest that molecular pathways are initiating structural maintenance. Early clinical evidence confirmed significant salvage and event free survival in patients with acute myocardial infarction and risk reduction for event free survival 5 years after the acute event (p < 0.0001). This experimental and clinical evidence was recently corroborated using modern PICSO technology in PPCI showing a significant reduction of infarct size, when compared to matched controls (p < 0.04). PICSO enhances redistribution of flow towards deprived zones, clearing microvascular obstruction and leading to myocardial protection. Beyond salvage, augmentation of molecular regenerative networks suggests a second mechanism of PICSO involving the activation of vascular cells in cardiac veins, thus enhancing structural integrity and recovery. PMID:25616738

  4. Trauma Induced Myocardial Infarction

    PubMed Central

    Lolay, Georges A.; Abdel-Latef, Ahmed K.

    2016-01-01

    Chest Trauma in athletes is a common health problem. However, myocardial infarction secondary to coronary dissection in the setting of blunt chest trauma is extremely rare. We report a case of acute inferior wall myocardial infarction following blunt chest trauma. A 32-year-old male with no relevant medical problems was transferred to our medical center for retrosternal chest pain after being elbowed in the chest during a soccer game. Few seconds later, he started experiencing sharp retrosternal chest pain that was severe to that point where he called the emergency medical service. Upon arrival to the Trauma department patient was still complaining of chest pain. ECG demonstrated ST segment elevation in the inferior leads with reciprocal changes in the lateral leads all consistent with active ischemia. After rolling out Aortic dissection, patient was loaded with ASA, ticagerlor, heparin and was emergently taken to the cardiac catheterization lab. Coronary angiography demonstrated 100% thrombotic occlusion in the distal right coronary artery with TIMI 0 flow distally. After thrombus aspiration, a focal dissection was noted on the angiogram that was successfully stented. Two days after admission patient was discharged home. Echocardiography prior to discharge showed inferior wall akinesis, normal right ventricular systolic function and normal overall ejection fraction. PMID:26490501

  5. Norepinephrine uptake by rat jejunum: Modulation by angiotensin II

    SciTech Connect

    Suvannapura, A.; Levens, N.R. )

    1988-02-01

    Angiotensin II (ANG II) is believed to stimulate sodium and water absorption from the small intestine by enhancing sympathetic nerve transmission. This study is designed to determine whether ANG II can enhance sympathetic neurotransmission within the small intestine by inhibition norepinephrine (NE) uptake. Intracellular NE accumulation by rat jejunum was concentration dependent and resolved into high- and low-affinity components. The high-affinity component (uptake 1) exhibited a Michaelis constant (K{sub m}) of 1.72 {mu}M and a maximum velocity (V{sub max}) of 1.19 nmol {center dot} g{sup {minus}1} {center dot} 10 min{sup {minus}1}. The low-affinity component (uptake 2) exhibited a K{sub m} of 111.1 {mu}M and a V{sub max} of 37.1 nmol {center dot} g{sup {minus}1} {center dot} 10 min{sup {minus}1}. Cocaine, an inhibitor of neuronal uptake, inhibited the intracellular accumulation of label by 80%. Treatment of animals with 6-hydroxydopamine, which depletes norepinephrine from sympathetic terminals, also attenuated NE uptake by 60%. Thus accumulation within sympathetic nerves constitutes the major form of ({sup 3}H)NE uptake into rat jejunum. ANG II inhibited intracellular ({sup 3}H)NE uptake in a concentration-dependent manner. At a dose of 1 mM, ANG II inhibited intracellular ({sup 3}H)NE accumulation by 60%. Cocaine failed to potentiate the inhibition of ({sup 3}H)NE uptake produced by ANG II. Thus ANG II appears to prevent ({sup 3}H)NE accumulation within rat jejunum by inhibiting neuronal uptake.

  6. Angiotensin II binding to cultured bovine adrenal chromaffin cells: identification of angiotensin II receptors

    SciTech Connect

    Boyd, V.L.; Printz, M.P.

    1986-03-05

    Physiological experiments have provided evidence that angiotensin II stimulates catecholamine secretion from the adrenal gland. Their laboratory and others have now shown by receptor autoradiography the presence of angiotensin II receptors (AIIR) in bovine and rat adrenal medulla. In order to extend these studies they have undertaken to define AIIR on cultured bovine adrenal chromaffin cells. Cells were isolated using the method of Levitt including cell enrichment with Percoll gradient centrifugation. Primary cultures of bovine adrenal medullary cells were maintained in DME/F12 medium containing 10% FCS. Cells were characterized by immunocytochemistry for Met- and Leu-enkephalin, PNMT, DBH and Chromagranin A. Cultured cells bind with high affinity and specificity (/sup 125/I)-ANG II yielding a K/sub D/ of 0.74 nM and B/sub max/ of 24,350 sites/cell. After Percoll treatment values of .77 nm and 34,500 sites/cell are obtained. K/sub D/ values are in close agreement with that obtained in adrenal slices by Healy. Competition studies identify a rank order of binding by this receptor similar to that of other tissues. They conclude that cultured chromaffin cells provide a suitable model system for the investigation and characterization of the ANG II receptor and for cellular studies of its functional significance.

  7. Stimulation of the renin-angiotensin system in cats with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Taugner, F M

    2001-01-01

    Feline hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) is a disease of the ventricular myocardium, which may cause sudden death in cats, but neither the aetiology nor the effect on the circulation are well understood. Fourteen cats of either sex with naturally occurring HCM were studied post mortem. Their ages ranged from 9 months to 10 years with an average age of 4.9 years. Heart weights and heart weight expressed as a percentage of body weight were elevated (27.9 g and 0.65%, respectively) as compared with normal values obtained in previous studies. Myocardial disarray was evident in nine of the 14 cats and moderate to severe fibrosis was present in six animals. To evaluate the renal renin-angiotensin system, semiquantitative morphometric data were obtained by means of renin immunohistochemistry and compared with results from an earlier study of 10 healthy cats by the author. The juxtaglomerular index was 36.8% in the cats with HCM as compared with 30.6% in healthy cats. The renin-positive portion of the afferent arteriole was increased in cats affected by HCM to 86.0 microm as compared with 49.9 microm in normal cats. The increase in kidney renin values in cats with HCM may have been due to decreased blood pressure and reduced renal perfusion resulting from impaired cardiac output. PMID:11578127

  8. Platelet activation during angiotensin II infusion in healthy volunteers.

    PubMed

    Larsson, P T; Schwieler, J H; Wallén, N H

    2000-01-01

    The present study was undertaken to evaluate the effects of an intravenous infusion of angiotensin II (10 ng/kg per min) on platelet function and coagulation in vivo in 18 healthy males. The infusion increased mean arterial pressure by 23+/-2 mm Hg. Plasma beta-thromboglobulin levels, reflecting platelet secretion, increased by 66+/-24% during the infusion, as did also platelet surface expression of P-selectin as measured by flow cytometry. Platelet fibrinogen binding increased, whereas platelet aggregability, assessed by ex vivo filtragometry, was unaltered. Angiotensin II caused mild activation of the coagulation cascade with increases in plasma levels of thrombin-antithrombin complex and prothrombin fragment F1 + 2. In conclusion, angiotensin II has mild platelet-activating effects in vivo and also enhances coagulation. Markers of platelet secretion are significantly increased, whereas markers of platelet aggregability are less affected. The clinical relevance of these findings remains to be clarified. PMID:10691100

  9. The Nox1/4 Dual Inhibitor GKT137831 or Nox4 Knockdown Inhibits Angiotensin-II-Induced Adult Mouse Cardiac Fibroblast Proliferation and Migration. AT1 Physically Associates With Nox4.

    PubMed

    Somanna, Naveen K; Valente, Anthony J; Krenz, Maike; Fay, William P; Delafontaine, Patrice; Chandrasekar, Bysani

    2016-05-01

    Both oxidative stress and inflammation contribute to chronic hypertension-induced myocardial fibrosis and adverse cardiac remodeling. Here we investigated whether angiotensin (Ang)-II-induced fibroblast proliferation and migration are NADPH oxidase (Nox) 4/ROS and IL-18 dependent. Our results show that the potent induction of mouse cardiac fibroblast (CF) proliferation and migration by Ang-II is markedly attenuated by Nox4 knockdown and the Nox inhibitor DPI. Further, Nox4 knockdown and DPI pre-treatment attenuated Ang-II-induced IL-18, IL-18Rα and collagen expression, and MMP9 and LOX activation. While neutralization of IL-18 blunted Ang-II-induced CF proliferation and migration, knockdown of MMP9 attenuated CF migration. The antioxidant NAC and the cell-permeable SOD mimetics Tempol, MnTBAP, and MnTMPyP attenuated oxidative stress and inhibited CF proliferation and migration. The Nox1/Nox4 dual inhibitor GKT137831 also blunted Ang-II-induced H2 O2 production and CF proliferation and migration. Further, AT1 bound Nox4, and Ang-II enhanced their physical association. Notably, GKT137831 attenuated the AT1/Nox4 interaction. These results indicate that Ang-II induces CF proliferation and migration in part via Nox4/ROS-dependent IL-18 induction and MMP9 activation, and may involve AT1/Nox4 physical association. Thus, either (i) neutralizing IL-18, (ii) blocking AT1/Nox4 interaction or (iii) use of the Nox1/Nox4 inhibitor GKT137831 may have therapeutic potential in chronic hypertension-induced adverse cardiac remodeling. PMID:26445208

  10. Acute hemodynamic effects of angiotensin- converting enzyme inhibition after prolonged cardiac arrest with Bretschneider's solution.

    PubMed

    Hoyer, Alexandro; Kempfert, Jörg; Pritzwald-Stegmann, Patrick; Mohr, Friedrich-Wilhelm; Dhein, Stefan

    2014-12-01

    Evidence as to how ACE inhibitors attenuate ischemia-reperfusion injury (IR) after cardioplegic arrest remains scarce. Twenty-four rabbit hearts were perfused on a Langendorff apparatus. Control hearts (n = 6) were arrested with pure histidine-tryptophan-ketoglutarate (HTK)-Bretschneider. Treatment groups received added to the cardioplegic solution (n = 6) captopril (100 μmol/l) and losartan (100 μmol/l) for selective AT1-receptor antagonism or BQ123 (100 nmol/l) for selective ETA-receptor antagonism. Pre-ischemic equilibration of 45 min was followed by 90 min of cardioplegic arrest and 30 min of reperfusion. Indices of myocardial contractility (LVP, dp/dt max, dp/dt min), coronary flow, heart rate, and O2 consumption were recorded before and after ischemic arrest. Tissue adenosine triphosphate (ATP) and malondialdehyde (MDA) contents were measured to evaluate energy content and oxidative stress, respectively. After selective cardiac arrest with Bretschneider, captopril-treated hearts showed improved hemodynamics compared to control and the other treatment groups. Oxygen consumption was significantly decreased during early reperfusion in captopril-treated hearts (34 ± 3 μmol/min/g/mmHg) compared to controls and losartan- and BQ123-treated hearts (controls: 77 ± 9 μmol/min/g/mmHg, p = 0.003; losartan: 54 ± 9 μmol/min/g/mmHg, p = 0.015; BQ123: 64 ± 13 μmol/min/g/mmHg, p = 0.046). The ATP content of the reperfused tissue was significantly elevated after captopril treatment compared to control group (24 ± 2 vs. 16 ± 2 μmol/g, p = 0.033), whereas the level of MDA was substantially decreased (0.58 ± 0.163 vs. 1.5 ± 0.28 μmol/g, p = 0.009). ACE inhibition leads to a significantly greater and faster recovery of myocardial contractility after prolonged cardiac arrest with Bretschneider solution. Due to decreased oxygen consumption, myocardial protection is enhanced. The association between ACE and ischemia cannot be clarified by selective blockade of

  11. An unusual myocardial infarction

    PubMed Central

    Di Michele, Sara; Mirabelli, Francesca; Mankad, Sunil

    2014-01-01

    Summary We present a 74-year-old male with a chondrosarcoma, who presented with chest pain. The history, electrocardiogram (ECG), and biomarkers established the diagnosis of myocardial infarction (MI); angiography did not show coronary atherosclerosis and, both initial transthoracic echocardiogram and chest computed tomography (CT), did not demonstrate any cardiac abnormalities. A second echocardiogram following a routine ECG showed presence of a mass involving the right ventricle and the cardiac apex that was confirmed by chest CT scan. We underline the importance of considering cardiac tumors in the clinical arena of MI management. Learning points Cardiac tumors cause ECG changes similar to ischemic heart diseases.Keep in mind cardiac tumors when performing transthoracic echocardiogram (TTE) in the setting of suspected MI.TTE is the technique of choice in detecting cardiac tumors. PMID:26693309

  12. Masquerades of myocardial infarction.

    PubMed Central

    Bean, W. B.

    1976-01-01

    I summarize these observations in Figure 1. It represents every person in a hypothetical population who has myocardial infarction. A large but unknown number, some believe almost half, never get help. Mobile coronary care units are reducing this group, but so far only a little. When the diagnosis is not understood the disease is not recognized. Then come discovery and popularization. Hereafter masquerades hide some cases and the diagnosis is missed. Somewhere fairly early the diagnostic fad leads to false positive diagnosis. As new techniques are discovered, perfected and mastered, false positive errors and masquerades leading to oversights diminish but still exist. All the skill and technical virtuosity in the world will not be applied if we do not think of the disease. When we think of it, even obscure cases may be resolved easily. PMID:960416

  13. Angiotensin II (de)sensitization: Fluid intake studies with implications for cardiovascular control.

    PubMed

    Daniels, Derek

    2016-08-01

    Cardiovascular disease is the leading cause of death worldwide and hypertension is the most common risk factor for death. Although many anti-hypertensive pharmacotherapies are approved for use in the United States, rates of hypertension have increased over the past decade. This review article summarizes a presentation given at the 2015 meeting of the Society for the Study of Ingestive Behavior. The presentation described work performed in our laboratory that uses angiotensin II-induced drinking as a model system to study behavioral and cardiovascular effects of the renin-angiotensin system, a key component of blood pressure regulation, and a common target of anti-hypertensives. Angiotensin II (AngII) is a potent dipsogen, but the drinking response shows a rapid desensitization after repeated injections of AngII. This desensitization appears to be dependent upon the timing of the injections, requires activation of the AngII type 1 (AT1) receptor, requires activation of mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinase family members, and involves the anteroventral third ventricle (AV3V) region as a critical site of action. Moreover, the response does not appear to be the result of a more general suppression of behavior, a sensitized pressor response to AngII, or an aversive state generated by the treatment. More recent studies suggest that the treatment regimen used to produce desensitization in our laboratory also prevents the sensitization that occurs after daily bolus injections of AngII. Our hope is that these findings can be used to support future basic research on the topic that could lead to new developments in treatments for hypertension. PMID:26801390

  14. QM/MM investigation of the catalytic mechanism of angiotensin-converting enzyme.

    PubMed

    Mu, Xia; Zhang, Chunchun; Xu, Dingguo

    2016-06-01

    Angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) converts angiotensin I to angiotensin II and degrades bradykinin and other vasoactive peptides. ACE inhibitors are used to treat diseases such as hypertension and heart failure. It is thus highly desirable to understand the catalytic mechanism of ACE, as this should facilitate the design of more powerful and selective ACE inhibitors. ACE exhibits two different active domains, the C-domain and the N-domain. In this work, we systematically investigated the inhibitor- and substrate-binding patterns in the N-domain of human ACE using a combined quantum mechanical and molecular mechanical approach. The hydrolysis of hippuryl-histidyl-leucine (HHL) as catalyzed by the N-domain of human somatic ACE was explored, and the effects of chloride ion on the overall reaction were also investigated. Two models, one with and one without a chloride ion at the first binding position, were then designed to examine the chloride dependence of inhibitor-substrate binding and the catalytic mechanism. Our calculations indicate that the hydrolysis reaction follows a stepwise general base/general acid catalysis path. The estimated mean free energy barrier height in the two models is about 15.6 kcal/mol, which agrees very well with the experimentally estimated value of 15.8 kcal/mol. Our simulations thus suggest that the N-domain is in a mixed form during ACE-catalyzed hydrolysis, with the single-chloride-ion and the double-chloride-ion forms existing simultaneously. Graphical Abstract Superposition of ACE C- and N- domains. PMID:27184002

  15. Investigation of the Fate of Type I Angiotensin Receptor after Biased Activation

    PubMed Central

    Szakadáti, Gyöngyi; Tóth, András D.; Oláh, Ilona; Erdélyi, László Sándor; Balla, Tamas; Várnai, Péter; Balla, András

    2015-01-01

    Biased agonism on the type I angiotensin receptor (AT1-R) can achieve different outcomes via activation of G protein–dependent and –independent cellular responses. In this study, we investigated whether the biased activation of AT1-R can lead to different regulation and intracellular processing of the receptor. We analyzed β-arrestin binding, endocytosis, and subsequent trafficking steps, such as early and late phases of recycling of AT1-R in human embryonic kidney 293 cells expressing wild-type or biased mutant receptors in response to different ligands. We used Renilla luciferase–tagged receptors and yellow fluorescent protein–tagged β-arrestin2, Rab5, Rab7, and Rab11 proteins in bioluminescence resonance energy transfer measurements to follow the fate of the receptor after stimulation. We found that not only is the signaling of the receptor different upon using selective ligands, but the fate within the cells is also determined by the type of the stimulation. β-arrestin binding and the internalization kinetics of the angiotensin II–stimulated AT1-R differed from those stimulated by the biased agonists. Similarly, angiotensin II–stimulated wild-type AT1-R showed differences compared with a biased mutant AT1-R (DRY/AAY AT1-R) with regards to β-arrestin binding and endocytosis. We found that the differences in the internalization kinetics of the receptor in response to biased agonist stimulation are due to the differences in plasma membrane phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate depletion. Moreover, the stability of the β-arrestin binding is a major determinant of the later fate of the internalized AT1-R receptor. PMID:25804845

  16. Nitric oxide up-regulates endothelial expression of angiotensin II type 2 receptors.

    PubMed

    Dao, Vu Thao-Vi; Medini, Sawsan; Bisha, Marion; Balz, Vera; Suvorava, Tatsiana; Bas, Murat; Kojda, Georg

    2016-07-15

    Increasing vascular NO levels following up-regulation of endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) is considered beneficial in cardiovascular disease. Whether such beneficial effects exerted by increased NO-levels include the vascular renin-angiotensin system remains elucidated. Exposure of endothelial cells originated from porcine aorta, mouse brain and human umbilical veins to different NO-donors showed that expression of the angiotensin-II-type-2-receptor (AT2) mRNA and protein is up-regulated by activation of soluble guanylyl cyclase, protein kinase G and p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase without changing AT2 mRNA stability. In mice, endothelial-specific overexpression of eNOS stimulated, while chronic treatment with the NOS-blocker l-nitroarginine inhibited AT2 expression. The NO-induced AT2 up-regulation was associated with a profound inhibition of angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE)-activity. In endothelial cells this reduction of ACE-activity was reversed by either the AT2 antagonist PD 123119 or by inhibition of transcription with actinomycin D. Furthermore, in C57Bl/6 mice an acute i.v. bolus of l-nitroarginine did not change AT2-expression and ACE-activity suggesting that inhibition of ACE-activity by endogenous NO is crucially dependent on AT2 protein level. Likewise, three weeks of either voluntary or forced exercise training increased AT2 expression and reduced ACE-activity in C57Bl/6 but not in mice lacking eNOS suggesting significance of this signaling interaction for vascular physiology. Finally, aortic AT2 expression is about 5 times greater in female as compared to male C57Bl/6 and at the same time aortic ACE activity is reduced in females by more than 50%. Together these findings imply that endothelial NO regulates AT2 expression and that AT2 may regulate ACE-activity. PMID:27235748

  17. Angiotensin-(1-7) regulates Angiotensin II-induced VCAM-1 expression on vascular endothelial cells

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Feng; Ren, Jingyi; Chan, Kenneth; Chen, Hong

    2013-01-11

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We for the first time found that Ang-(1-7) inhibits Ang II-induced VCAM-1 expression. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The inhibitory effect of Ang-(1-7) on VCAM-1 is mediated by MAS receptor. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The effect of Ang-(1-7) is due to the suppression of NF-kappaB translocation. -- Abstract: Angiotensin II (Ang II) and Angiotensin-(1-7) (Ang-(1-7)) are key effector peptides in the renin-angiotensin system. Increased circulatory Ang II level is associated with the development of hypertension and atherosclerosis, whereas Ang-(1-7) is a counter-regulatory mediator of Ang II which appears to be protective against cardiovascular disease. However, whether Ang-(1-7) regulates the action of Ang II on vascular endothelial cells (EC) remains unclear. We investigated the effects of Ang II and Ang-(1-7) in the context of atherogenesis, specifically endothelial cell VCAM-1 expression that is implicated in early plaque formation. The results show that Ang II increased VCAM-1 mRNA expression and protein displayed on EC surface, while Ang-(1-7) alone exerted no effects. However, Ang-(1-7) significantly suppressed Ang II-induced VCAM-1 expression. Ang-(1-7) also inhibited the Ang II-induced VCAM-1 promoter activity driven by transcription factor NF-KappaB. Furthermore, immunofluorescence assay and ELISA showed that Ang II facilitated the nuclear translocation of NF-kappaB in ECs, and this was attenuated by the presence of Ang-(1-7). The inhibitory effects of Ang-(1-7) on Ang II-induced VCAM-1 promoter activity and NF-kappaB nuclear translocation were all reversed by the competitive antagonist of Ang-(1-7) at the Mas receptor. Our results suggest that Ang-(1-7) mediates its affects on ECs through the Mas receptor, and negatively regulates Ang II-induced VCAM-1 expression by attenuating nuclear translocation of NF-kappaB.

  18. Angiotensin II inhibitor facilitates epidermal wound regeneration in diabetic mice

    PubMed Central

    Kamber, Maria; Papalazarou, Vasileios; Rouni, Georgia; Papageorgopoulou, Evagelia; Papalois, Apostolos; Kostourou, Vassiliki

    2015-01-01

    Tissue regeneration and wound healing are severely impaired in diabetes and are associated with poor circulation and dysfunctional blood vessels. Angiotensin II inhibitors are anti-hypertensive drugs used in clinical practice to regulate blood pressure and could affect tissue remodeling. We hypothesize that blocking angiotensin II, using Losartan, could facilitate tissue regeneration in diabetic mice. To this end, we established an experimental model of wound healing in streptozotocin-induced diabetic mice. Our data demonstrated that Losartan accelerates wound repair and normalizes wound stromal responses, having a beneficial role in wounds of diabetic individuals. Our findings highlight a potential therapeutic use of Losartan in improving wound repair in diabetic conditions. PMID:26106332

  19. Pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of LCZ696, a novel dual-acting angiotensin receptor-neprilysin inhibitor (ARNi).

    PubMed

    Gu, Jessie; Noe, Adele; Chandra, Priya; Al-Fayoumi, Suliman; Ligueros-Saylan, Monica; Sarangapani, Ramesh; Maahs, Suzanne; Ksander, Gary; Rigel, Dean F; Jeng, Arco Y; Lin, Tsu-Han; Zheng, Weiyi; Dole, William P

    2010-04-01

    Angiotensin receptor blockade and neprilysin (NEP) inhibition together offer potential benefits for the treatment of hypertension and heart failure. LCZ696 is a novel single molecule comprising molecular moieties of valsartan and NEP inhibitor prodrug AHU377 (1:1 ratio). Oral administration of LCZ696 caused dose-dependent increases in atrial natriuretic peptide immunoreactivity (due to NEP inhibition) in Sprague-Dawley rats and provided sustained, dose-dependent blood pressure reductions in hypertensive double-transgenic rats. In healthy participants, a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled study (n = 80) of single-dose (200-1200 mg) and multiple-dose (50-900 mg once daily for 14 days) oral administration of LCZ696 showed that peak plasma concentrations were reached rapidly for valsartan (1.6-4.9 hours), AHU377 (0.5-1.1 hours), and its active moiety, LBQ657 (1.8-3.5 hours). LCZ696 treatment was associated with increases in plasma cGMP, renin concentration and activity, and angiotensin II, providing evidence for NEP inhibition and angiotensin receptor blockade. In a randomized, open-label crossover study in healthy participants (n = 56), oral LCZ696 400 mg and valsartan 320 mg were shown to provide similar exposure to valsartan (geometric mean ratio [90% confidence interval]: AUC(0-infinity) 0.90 [0.82-0.99]). LCZ696 was safe and well tolerated. These data support further clinical development of LCZ696, a novel, orally bioavailable, dual-acting angiotensin receptor-NEP inhibitor (ARNi) for hypertension and heart failure. PMID:19934029

  20. Mechanisms underlying angiotensin II-induced calcium oscillations

    PubMed Central

    Edwards, Aurélie; Pallone, Thomas L.

    2008-01-01

    To gain insight into the mechanisms that underlie angiotensin II (ANG II)-induced cytoplasmic Ca2+ concentration ([Ca]cyt) oscillations in medullary pericytes, we expanded a prior model of ion fluxes. ANG II stimulation was simulated by doubling maximal inositol trisphosphate (IP3) production and imposing a 90% blockade of K+ channels. We investigated two configurations, one in which ryanodine receptors (RyR) and IP3 receptors (IP3R) occupy a common store and a second in which they reside on separate stores. Our results suggest that Ca2+ release from stores and import from the extracellular space are key determinants of oscillations because both raise [Ca] in subplasmalemmal spaces near RyR. When the Ca2+-induced Ca2+ release (CICR) threshold of RyR is exceeded, the ensuing Ca2+ release is limited by Ca2+ reuptake into stores and export across the plasmalemma. If sarco(endo)plasmic reticulum Ca2+-ATPase (SERCA) pumps do not remain saturated and sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca2+ stores are replenished, that phase is followed by a resumption of leak from internal stores that leads either to [Ca]cyt elevation below the CICR threshold (no oscillations) or to elevation above it (oscillations). Our model predicts that oscillations are more prone to occur when IP3R and RyR stores are separate because, in that case, Ca2+ released by RyR during CICR can enhance filling of adjacent IP3 stores to favor a high subsequent leak that generates further CICR events. Moreover, the existence or absence of oscillations depends on the set points of several parameters, so that biological variation might well explain the presence or absence of oscillations in individual pericytes. PMID:18562632

  1. Angiotensin II induced release of prostaglandins from rat uterus.

    PubMed

    Campos, G A; Guerra, F A; Israel, E J

    1983-08-01

    The effect of Angiotensin II (A-II) on 6-keto-prostaglandin F1 (6-keto-PGF1 alpha) and prostaglandin F (PGF) production by the rat uterus was studied using a novel superfusion technique. The method of superfusion used allows prostaglandin synthesis in the myometrium and endometrium to be measured independently while their anatomical relationship is undisturbed. Prostaglandins were measured by radioimmunoassay. In uterine horns from castrated, estrogen treated rats, A-II (10(-6)M) stimulated the production rate of 6-keto-PGF1 alpha in the myometrium nd PGF in the endometrium. Sterile horns and pregnant horns coexisting in the same animals showed different responses when superfused with culture medium containing A-II (10(-6)M). In the sterile horns A-II failed to stimulate prostaglandin synthesis whereas in the pregnant horns there was a significant increase in the production rate of both 6-keto-PGF1 alpha and PGF in the decidua (endometrium) and of 6-keto-PGF1 alpha in the myometrium. Our results suggests that the effect of A-II on prostaglandin synthesis by the rat uterus appears to be dependent of the hormonal milieu of the experimental animal. Estrogen stimulated A-II induced PG synthesis. Progesterone inhibited the synthesis of PGs caused by A-II in non-decidualized uterus but stimulated the release of PG in the decidualized uterus. The apparent differential effect of A-II in stimulating prostaglandin synthesis in the whole uterus indicates that there are different pathways for prostaglandin production in both the endometrium and myometrium. PMID:6689628

  2. Myocardial Defect Detection Using PET-CT: Phantom Studies

    PubMed Central

    Mananga, Eugene S.; El Fakhri, Georges; Schaefferkoetter, Joshua; Bonab, Ali A.; Ouyang, Jinsong

    2014-01-01

    It is expected that both noise and activity distribution can have impact on the detectability of a myocardial defect in a cardiac PET study. In this work, we performed phantom studies to investigate the detectability of a defect in the myocardium for different noise levels and activity distributions. We evaluated the performance of three reconstruction schemes: Filtered Back-Projection (FBP), Ordinary Poisson Ordered Subset Expectation Maximization (OP–OSEM), and Point Spread Function corrected OSEM (PSF–OSEM). We used the Channelized Hotelling Observer (CHO) for the task of myocardial defect detection. We found that the detectability of a myocardial defect is almost entirely dependent on the noise level and the contrast between the defect and its surroundings. PMID:24505429

  3. Prorenin contributes to angiotensin peptide formation in transgenic rats with rat prorenin expression targeted to the liver.

    PubMed

    Campbell, Duncan J; Karam, Habib; Ménard, Joël; Bruneval, Patrick; Mullins, John J

    2009-12-01

    We reported previously that targeted expression of rat prorenin to the liver under the control of the human alpha1-antitrypsin promoter increased plasma prorenin levels by several-hundred-fold in male transgenic rats and caused cardiac hypertrophy, severe renal lesions, and myocardial fibrosis by 20 weeks of age, despite normal blood pressure. We examined the evolution of the phenotype of male transgenic rats over 12 months and the effects of binephrectomy on the renin-angiotensin (Ang) system. Plasma prorenin levels were >1000-fold higher than in wild type littermates, whereas plasma and renal Ang II levels were no different from wild-type (WT) levels, and kidney renin levels were suppressed in transgenic rats. In contrast to our earlier report, transgenic rats had increased systolic blood pressure at 3 to 12 months of age, and only modest renal lesions and myocardial fibrosis were evident after 6 months of age. Binephrectomy reduced plasma renin activity and concentration and prorenin levels by 50% to 80% and Ang II levels by 90% in WT rats. By contrast, binephrectomy increased plasma renin activity and concentration and prorenin levels by 52.0-, 13.0-, and 5.8-fold, respectively, without change in Ang II levels in transgenic rats. We conclude that, in the animals studied in this report, elevated prorenin levels did not cause renal lesions or myocardial fibrosis during the first 6 months of age. Ang peptide formation consequent to the increased prorenin levels prevented reduction of Ang II levels after binephrectomy and was likely to have contributed to hypertension, cardiac hypertrophy, and suppression of kidney renin levels in these transgenic rats. PMID:19841286

  4. Angiotensin-converting enzyme and matrix metalloproteinase inhibition with developing heart failure: comparative effects on left ventricular function and geometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McElmurray, J. H. 3rd; Mukherjee, R.; New, R. B.; Sampson, A. C.; King, M. K.; Hendrick, J. W.; Goldberg, A.; Peterson, T. J.; Hallak, H.; Zile, M. R.; Spinale, F. G.

    1999-01-01

    The progression of congestive heart failure (CHF) is left ventricular (LV) myocardial remodeling. The matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) contribute to tissue remodeling and therefore MMP inhibition may serve as a useful therapeutic target in CHF. Angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) inhibition favorably affects LV myocardial remodeling in CHF. This study examined the effects of specific MMP inhibition, ACE inhibition, and combined treatment on LV systolic and diastolic function in a model of CHF. Pigs were randomly assigned to five groups: 1) rapid atrial pacing (240 beats/min) for 3 weeks (n = 8); 2) ACE inhibition (fosinopril, 2.5 mg/kg b.i.d. orally) and rapid pacing (n = 8); 3) MMP inhibition (PD166793 2 mg/kg/day p.o.) and rapid pacing (n = 8); 4) combined ACE and MMP inhibition (2.5 mg/kg b.i.d. and 2 mg/kg/day, respectively) and rapid pacing (n = 8); and 5) controls (n = 9). LV peak wall stress increased by 2-fold with rapid pacing and was reduced in all treatment groups. LV fractional shortening fell by nearly 2-fold with rapid pacing and increased in all treatment groups. The circumferential fiber shortening-systolic stress relation was reduced with rapid pacing and increased in the ACE inhibition and combination groups. LV myocardial stiffness constant was unchanged in the rapid pacing group, increased nearly 2-fold in the MMP inhibition group, and was normalized in the ACE inhibition and combination treatment groups. Increased MMP activation contributes to the LV dilation and increased wall stress with pacing CHF and a contributory downstream mechanism of ACE inhibition is an effect on MMP activity.

  5. Primacy of cardiac chymase over angiotensin converting enzyme as an angiotensin-(1-12) metabolizing enzyme.

    PubMed

    Ahmad, Sarfaraz; Varagic, Jasmina; VonCannon, Jessica L; Groban, Leanne; Collawn, James F; Dell'Italia, Louis J; Ferrario, Carlos M

    2016-09-16

    We showed previously that rat angiotensin-(1-12) [Ang-(1-12)] is metabolized by chymase and angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) to generate Angiotensin II (Ang II). Here, we investigated the affinity of cardiac chymase and ACE enzymes for Ang-(1-12) and Angiotensin I (Ang I) substrates. Native plasma membranes (PMs) isolated from heart and lung tissues of adult spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR) were incubated with radiolabeled (125)I-Ang-(1-12) or (125)I-Ang I, in the absence or presence of a chymase or ACE inhibitor (chymostatin and lisinopril, respectively). Products were quantitated by HPLC connected to an in-line flow-through gamma detector. The rate of (125)I-Ang II formation from (125)I-Ang-(1-12) by chymase was significantly higher (heart: 7.0 ± 0.6 fmol/min/mg; lung: 33 ± 1.2 fmol/min/mg, P < 0.001) when compared to (125)I-Ang I substrate (heart: 0.8 ± 0.1 fmol/min/mg; lung: 2.1 ± 0.1 fmol/min/mg). Substrate affinity of (125)I-Ang-(1-12) for rat cardiac chymase was also confirmed using excess unlabeled Ang-(1-12) or Ang I (0-250 μM). The rate of (125)I-Ang II formation was significantly lower using unlabeled Ang-(1-12) compared to unlabeled Ang I substrate. Kinetic data showed that rat chymase has a lower Km (64 ± 6.3 μM vs 142 ± 17 μM), higher Vmax (13.2 ± 1.3 μM/min/mg vs 1.9 ± 0.2 μM/min/mg) and more than 15-fold higher catalytic efficiency (ratio of Vmax/Km) for Ang-(1-12) compared to Ang I substrate, respectively. We also investigated ACE mediated hydrolysis of (125)I-Ang-(1-12) and (125)I-Ang I in solubilized membrane fractions of the SHR heart and lung. Interestingly, no significant difference in (125)I-Ang II formation by ACE was detected using either substrate, (125)I-Ang-(1-12) or (125)I-Ang I, both in the heart (1.8 ± 0.2 fmol/min/mg and 1.8 ± 0.3 fmol/min/mg, respectively) and in the lungs (239 ± 25 fmol/min/mg and 248 ± 34 fmol/min/mg, respectively). Compared to chymase, ACE

  6. Angiotensin-II blockage, muscle strength, and exercise capacity in physically independent older adults

    PubMed Central

    Coelho, Vinícius A.; Probst, Vanessa S.; Nogari, Bruna M.; Teixeira, Denilson C.; Felcar, Josiane M.; Santos, Denis C.; Gomes, Marcus Vinícius M.; Andraus, Rodrigo A. C.; Fernandes, Karen B. P.

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] This study aimed to assess the exercise capacity and muscle strength in elderly people using drugs for angiotensin-II blockage. [Subjects and Methods] Four hundred and seven older adults were recruited for this study. Data about comorbidities and medication use were recorded and the individuals were divided into three groups: control group- elderly people with normal exercise capacity (n=235); angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor group − individuals using angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors (n=140); and angiotensin-II receptor blocker group- patients using angiotensin-II receptor blockers (n= 32). Exercise capacity was evaluated by a 6-minute walking test and muscle strength was measured using a handgrip dynamometer. [Results] Patients from the angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor group (mean: 99 ± 12%) and the angiotensin-II receptor blocker group (mean: 101 ± 14%) showed higher predicted values in the 6-minute walking test than the control group patients (mean: 96 ± 10%). Patients from the angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor group (mean: 105 ± 19%) and the angiotensin-II receptor blocker group (mean: 105.1 ± 18.73%) showed higher predicted values of muscle strength than control group patients (mean: 98.15 ± 18.77%). [Conclusion] Older adults using angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors or angiotensin-II receptor blockers have better functional exercise capacity and muscle strength. PMID:27065543

  7. Pancreatic angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 improves glycemia in angiotensin II-infused mice

    PubMed Central

    Chhabra, Kavaljit H.; Xia, Huijing; Pedersen, Kim Brint; Speth, Robert C.

    2013-01-01

    An overactive renin-angiotensin system (RAS) is known to contribute to type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). Although ACE2 overexpression has been shown to be protective against the overactive RAS, a role for pancreatic ACE2, particularly in the islets of Langerhans, in regulating glycemia in response to elevated angiotensin II (Ang II) levels remains to be elucidated. This study examined the role of endogenous pancreatic ACE2 and the impact of elevated Ang II levels on the enzyme's ability to alleviate hyperglycemia in an Ang II infusion mouse model. Male C57bl/6J mice were infused with Ang II or saline for a period of 14 days. On the 7th day of infusion, either an adenovirus encoding human ACE2 (Ad-hACE2) or a control adenovirus (Ad-eGFP) was injected into the mouse pancreas. After an additional 7–8 days, glycemia and plasma insulin levels as well as RAS components expression and oxidative stress were assessed. Ang II-infused mice exhibited hyperglycemia, hyperinsulinemia, and impaired glucose-stimulated insulin secretion from pancreatic islets compared with control mice. This phenotype was associated with decreased ACE2 expression and activity, increased Ang II type 1 receptor (AT1R) expression, and increased oxidative stress in the mouse pancreas. Ad-hACE2 treatment restored pancreatic ACE2 expression and compensatory activity against Ang II-mediated impaired glycemia, thus improving β-cell function. Our data suggest that decreased pancreatic ACE2 is a link between overactive RAS and impaired glycemia in T2DM. Moreover, maintenance of a normal endogenous ACE2 compensatory activity in the pancreas appears critical to avoid β-cell dysfunction, supporting a therapeutic potential for ACE2 in controlling diabetes resulting from an overactive RAS. PMID:23462816

  8. Angiotensin-Receptor Blocker, Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme Inhibitor, and Risks of Atrial Fibrillation

    PubMed Central

    Hsieh, Yu-Cheng; Hung, Chen-Ying; Li, Cheng-Hung; Liao, Ying-Chieh; Huang, Jin-Long; Lin, Ching-Heng; Wu, Tsu-Juey

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Both angiotensin-receptor blockers (ARB) and angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors (ACEI) have protective effects against atrial fibrillation (AF). The differences between ARB and ACEI in their effects on the primary prevention of AF remain unclear. This study compared ARB and ACEI in combined antihypertensive medications for reducing the risk of AF in patients with hypertension, and determined which was better for AF prevention in a nationwide cohort study. Patients aged ≥55 years and with a history of hypertension were identified from Taiwan National Health Insurance Research Database. Medical records of 25,075 patients were obtained, and included 6205 who used ARB, 8034 who used ACEI, and 10,836 nonusers (no ARB or ACEI) in their antihypertensive regimen. Cox regression models were applied to estimate the hazard ratio (HR) for new-onset AF. During an average of 7.7 years’ follow-up, 1619 patients developed new-onset AF. Both ARB (adjusted HR: 0.51, 95% CI 0.44–0.58, P < 0.001) and ACEI (adjusted HR: 0.53, 95% CI 0.47–0.59, P < 0.001) reduced the risk of AF compared to nonusers. Subgroup analysis showed that ARB and ACEI were equally effective in preventing new-onset AF regardless of age, gender, the presence of heart failure, diabetes, and vascular disease, except for those with prior stroke or transient ischemic attack (TIA). ARB prevents new-onset AF better than ACEI in patients with a history of stroke or TIA (log-rank P = 0.012). Both ARB and ACEI reduce new-onset AF in patients with hypertension. ARB prevents AF better than ACEI in patients with a history of prior stroke or TIA. PMID:27196491

  9. Wave Propagation of Myocardial Stretch: Correlation with Myocardial Stiffness

    PubMed Central

    Pislaru, Cristina; Pellikka, Patricia A.; Pislaru, Sorin V.

    2015-01-01

    The mechanism of flow propagation during diastole in the left ventricle (LV) has been well described. Little is known about the associated waves propagating along the heart wall s. These waves may have a mechanism similar to pulse wave propagation in arteries. The major goal of the study was to evaluate the effect of myocardial stiffness and preload on this wave transmission. Methods Longitudinal late diastolic deformation and wave speed (Vp) of myocardial stretch in the anterior LV wall were measured using sonomicrometry in sixteen pigs. Animals with normal and altered myocardial stiffness (acute myocardial infarction) were studied with and without preload alterations. Elastic modulus estimated from Vp (EVP; Moens-Korteweg equation) was compared to incremental elastic modulus obtained from exponential end -diastolic stress-strain relation (ESS). Myocardial distensibility and α-and β-coefficients of stress-strain relations were calculated. Results Vp was higher at reperfusion compared to baseline (2.6±1.3 m/s vs. 1.3±0.4 m/s; p=0.005) and best correlated with ESS (r 2=0.80, p<0.0001), β-coefficient (r2=0.78, p<0.0001), distensibility (r2=0.47, p=0.005), and wall thickness/diameter ratio (r2=0.42, p=0.009). Elastic moduli (EVP and ESS) were strongly correlated (r2=0.83, p<0.0001). Increasing preload increased Vp and EVP and decreased distensibility. At multivariate analysis, ESS, wall thickness, and end-diastolic and systolic LV pressures were independent predictors of Vp (r2model=0.83, p<0.0001). Conclusions The main determinants of wave propagation of longitudinal myocardial stretch were myocardial stiffness and LV geometry and pressure. This local wave speed could potentially be measured noninvasively by echocardiography. PMID:25193091

  10. Resistance to outflow of cerebrospinal fluid after central infusions of angiotensin

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morrow, B. A.; Keil, L. C.; Severs, W. B.

    1992-01-01

    Infusions of artificial cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) into the cerebroventricles of conscious rats can raise CSF pressure (CSFp). This response can be modified by some neuropeptides. One of these, angiotensin, facilitates the rise in CSFp. We measured CSFp in conscious rats with a computerized system and evaluated resistance to CSF outflow during infusion of artificial CSF, with or without angiotensin, from the decay kinetics of superimposed bolus injections. Angiotensin (10 ng/min) raised CSFp (P less than 0.05) compared with solvent, but the resistance to CSF outflow of the two groups was similar (P greater than 0.05). Because CSFp was increased by angiotensin without an increase in the outflow resistance, a change in some volume compartment is likely. Angiotensin may raise CSFp by increasing CSF synthesis; this possibility is supported, since the choroid plexuses contain an intrinsic isorenin-angiotensin system. Alternatively, angiotensin may dilate pial arteries, leading to an increased intracranial blood volume.

  11. Evaluation of the effect of myocardial segmentation errors on myocardial blood flow estimates from DCE-MRI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biglands, J.; Magee, D.; Boyle, R.; Larghat, A.; Plein, S.; Radjenović, A.

    2011-04-01

    Quantitative analysis of cardiac dynamic contrast enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI) perfusion datasets is dependent on the drawing (manually or automatically) of myocardial contours. The required accuracy of these contours for myocardial blood flow (MBF) estimation is not well understood. This study investigates the relationship between myocardial contour errors and MBF errors. Myocardial contours were manually drawn on DCE-MRI perfusion datasets of healthy volunteers imaged in systole. Systematic and random contour errors were simulated using spline curves and the resulting errors in MBF were calculated. The degree of contour error was also evaluated by two recognized segmentation metrics. We derived contour error tolerances in terms of the maximum deviation (MD) a contour could deviate radially from the 'true' contour expressed as a fraction of each volunteer's mean myocardial width (MW). Significant MBF errors were avoided by setting tolerances of MD <= 0.4 MW, when considering the whole myocardium, MD <= 0.3 MW, when considering six radial segments, and MD <= 0.2 MW for further subdivision into endo- and epicardial regions, with the exception of the anteroseptal region, which required greater accuracy. None of the considered segmentation metrics correlated with MBF error; thus, both segmentation metrics and MBF errors should be used to evaluate contouring algorithms.

  12. [The content of selen in blood plasma in patients with acute Q-wave myocardial infarction].

    PubMed

    Radchenko, E N; Nizov, A A; Ivanova, A Yu; Sidorova, Yu S

    2015-01-01

    The level of blood plasma selenium was analyzed by microfluorimetric method in in-patients and out-patients with acute coronary syndrome with ST-elevation resulting in acute Q-wave myocardial infarction. 72 patients, 40-75 years old, with acute Q-wave myocardial infarction were followed during a month. The initial decreased concentration of blood plasma selenium was recorded in most patients in the acute period of the myocardial infarction: deficiency of the microelement (< 90 mcg/l) was found in 30 subjects, the critical ranges (< 70 mcg/l) were stated in 33 patients. Just 2 patients had optimal concentration and 7 patients had a suboptimal one (90-114 mcg/l). Blood plasma level of the microelement increased in 2 weeks after myocardial infarction (in subacute stage) but it was still within deficient or critical levels. No difference was detected in selen concentration depending on gender, age, location on myocardial infarction, accompanying diseases, presence of some risk factors (smoking, alcohol abuse, hereditary predisposition to coronary artery disease). At the same time we revealed a significant Spearman rank correlation in patients with Q-wave myocardial infarction between basal level of blood serum selenium on the one hand, and electrocardiography indices (reflecting the rate of myocardial lesion and necrosis), echocardiography. data (which characterize myocardium reparation processes and remodeling), CPK (a prognostic marker of the myocardial necrosis), HDL-cholesterol (lipid profile index), blood potassium level and BMI on the other. PMID:26863808

  13. Cardiac MRI: a Translational Imaging Tool for Characterizing Anthracycline-Induced Myocardial Remodeling.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Kim-Lien; Hu, Peng; Ennis, Daniel B; Shao, Jiaxin; Pham, Kimberly A; Chen, Joseph J

    2016-08-01

    Cardiovascular side effects of cancer therapeutics are the leading causes of morbidity and mortality in cancer survivors. Anthracyclines (AC) serve as the backbone of many anti-cancer treatment strategies, but dose-dependent myocardial injury limits their use. Cumulative AC exposure can disrupt the dynamic equilibrium of the myocardial microarchitecture while repeated injury and repair leads to myocyte loss, interstitial myocardial fibrosis, and impaired contractility. Although children are assumed to have greater myocardial plasticity, AC exposure at a younger age portends worse prognosis. In older patients, there is lower overall survival once they develop cardiovascular disease. Because aberrations in the myocardial architecture predispose the heart to a decline in function, early detection with sensitive imaging tools is crucial and the implications for resource utilization are substantial. As a comprehensive imaging modality, cardiac magnetic resonance (CMR) imaging is able to go beyond quantification of ejection fraction and myocardial deformation to characterize adaptive microstructural and microvascular changes that are important to myocardial tissue health. Herein, we describe CMR as an established translational imaging tool that can be used clinically to characterize AC-associated myocardial remodeling. PMID:27292153

  14. Effect of drugs used in different type of myocardial infarction (STEMI or (NTEMI) on mortality.

    PubMed

    Vincze, Z; Brugos, B; Lorincz, I; Paragh, G

    2014-06-01

    We examined 416 patients with acute myocardial infarction. 249 patients had STEMI and 167 NSTEMI. 227 were men and 189 women. 142 men had STEMI and 85 men had NSTEMI. 107 women were diagnosed with STEMI and 82 with NSTEMI. 22.5% of patient with STEMI and 20.2% of patients with NSTEMI died (p = 0.58). We compared the effect of anticoagulant treatment, clopidogrel, salicylate, nitrate, beta-blocker, angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor, statin and trimetazidine therapy on mortality in function of the type of myocardial infarction. There were no differences between mortality of patients with STEMI and NSTEMI with respect of use of heparine, salicylate, nitrate, beta-blocker, ACE inhibitor, statin and trimetazidine. While examining the effect of clopidogrel, we observed a significantly lower mortality rate in patients with NSTEMI compared to the STEMI group (p = 0.005). These differences are due to the known variability in clopidogrel absorption and metabolism, which could be influenced by the type of myocardial infarction. PMID:24974579

  15. Some Comparative Aspects of the Renin-Angiotensin System.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Malvin, Richard L.

    1984-01-01

    The renin-angiotensin system (RAS) maintains salt and water balance. Discusses functions of the RAS as defined in mammalian species, considering how the system arose and what its original function was. Also discusses where some of the changes occurred in the system (and why) as well as other topics. (JN)

  16. Expression of Angiotensin II Receptor-1 in Human Articular Chondrocytes

    PubMed Central

    Kawakami, Yuki; Matsuo, Kosuke; Murata, Minako; Yudoh, Kazuo; Nakamura, Hiroshi; Shimizu, Hiroyuki; Beppu, Moroe; Inaba, Yutaka; Saito, Tomoyuki; Kato, Tomohiro; Masuko, Kayo

    2012-01-01

    Background. Besides its involvement in the cardiovascular system, the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone (RAS) system has also been suggested to play an important role in inflammation. To explore the role of this system in cartilage damage in arthritis, we investigated the expression of angiotensin II receptors in chondrocytes. Methods. Articular cartilage was obtained from patients with osteoarthritis, rheumatoid arthritis, and traumatic fractures who were undergoing arthroplasty. Chondrocytes were isolated and cultured in vitro with or without interleukin (IL-1). The expression of angiotensin II receptor types 1 (AT1R) and 2 (AT2R) mRNA by the chondrocytes was analyzed using reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). AT1R expression in cartilage tissue was analyzed using immunohistochemistry. The effect of IL-1 on AT1R/AT2R expression in the chondrocytes was analyzed by quantitative PCR and flow cytometry. Results. Chondrocytes from all patient types expressed AT1R/AT2R mRNA, though considerable variation was found between samples. Immunohistochemical analysis confirmed AT1R expression at the protein level. Stimulation with IL-1 enhanced the expression of AT1R/AT2R mRNA in OA and RA chondrocytes. Conclusions. Human articular chondrocytes, at least partially, express angiotensin II receptors, and IL-1 stimulation induced AT1R/AT2R mRNA expression significantly. PMID:23346400

  17. Activation of the Renin-Angiotensin System Promotes Colitis Development

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Yongyan; Liu, Tianjing; He, Lei; Dougherty, Urszula; Chen, Li; Adhikari, Sarbani; Alpert, Lindsay; Zhou, Guolin; Liu, Weicheng; Wang, Jiaolong; Deb, Dilip K.; Hart, John; Liu, Shu Q.; Kwon, John; Pekow, Joel; Rubin, David T.; Zhao, Qun; Bissonnette, Marc; Li, Yan Chun

    2016-01-01

    The renin-angiotensin system (RAS) plays pathogenic roles in renal and cardiovascular disorders, but whether it is involved in colitis is unclear. Here we show that RenTgMK mice that overexpress active renin from the liver developed more severe colitis than wild-type controls. More than 50% RenTgMK mice died whereas all wild-type mice recovered. RenTgMK mice exhibited more robust mucosal TH17 and TH1/TH17 responses and more profound colonic epithelial cell apoptosis compared to wild-type controls. Treatment with aliskiren (a renin inhibitor), but not hydralazine (a smooth muscle relaxant), ameliorated colitis in RenTgMK mice, although both drugs normalized blood pressure. Chronic infusion of angiotensin II into wild-type mice mimicked the severe colitic phenotype of RenTgMK mice, and treatment with losartan [an angiotensin type 1 receptor blocker (ARB)] ameliorated colitis in wild-type mice, confirming a colitogenic role for the endogenous RAS. In human biopsies, pro-inflammatory cytokines were suppressed in patients with inflammatory bowel disease who were on ARB therapy compared to patients not receiving ARB therapy. These observations demonstrate that activation of the RAS promotes colitis in a blood pressure independent manner. Angiotensin II appears to drive colonic mucosal inflammation by promoting intestinal epithelial cell apoptosis and mucosal TH17 responses in colitis development. PMID:27271344

  18. Klotho Ameliorates Kidney Injury and Fibrosis and Normalizes Blood Pressure by Targeting the Renin-Angiotensin System.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Lili; Mo, Hongyan; Miao, Jinhua; Zhou, Dong; Tan, Roderick J; Hou, Fan Fan; Liu, Youhua

    2015-12-01

    Loss of Klotho and activation of the renin-angiotensin system (RAS) are common pathological findings in chronic kidney diseases. However, whether these two events are intricately connected is poorly understood. We hypothesized that Klotho might protect kidneys by targeted inhibition of RAS activation in diseased kidneys. To test this hypothesis, mouse models of remnant kidney, as well as adriamycin nephropathy and unilateral ureteral obstruction, were utilized. At 6 weeks after 5/6 nephrectomy, kidney injury was evident, characterized by elevated albuminuria and serum creatinine levels, and excessive deposition of interstitial matrix proteins. These lesions were accompanied by loss of renal Klotho expression, up-regulation of RAS components, and development of hypertension. In vivo expression of exogenous Klotho through hydrodynamic-based gene delivery abolished the induction of multiple RAS proteins, including angiotensinogen, renin, angiotensin-converting enzyme, and angiotensin II type 1 receptor, and normalized blood pressure. Klotho also inhibited β-catenin activation and ameliorated renal fibrotic lesions. Similar results were obtained in mouse models of adriamycin and obstructive nephropathy. In cultured kidney tubular epithelial cells, Klotho dose-dependently blocked Wnt1-triggered RAS activation. Taken together, these results demonstrate that Klotho exerts its renal protection by targeted inhibition of RAS, a pathogenic pathway known to play a key role in the evolution and progression of hypertension and chronic kidney disorders. PMID:26475416

  19. Angiotensin antagonists with increased specificity for the renal vasculature.

    PubMed Central

    Taub, K J; Caldicott, W J; Hollenberg, N K

    1977-01-01

    This study was designed to ascertain whether renal vascular angiotensin receptors differ from other systemic angiotensin receptors and whether, on that basis, antagonists with greater specificity for the renal vasculature can be defined. Femoral and renal blood flow and their responses to angiotensin II (AII) and its heptapeptide analogue, 1-des Asp AII (AIII), were measured with an electromagnetic flowmeter in 26 dogs. For the kidney, the threshold doses of AII and AIII were identical (2.5+/-0.27 vs. 2.3+/-0.35 pmol/100 ml renal blood flow, with similar dose-response curves. In contrast, AII had a greater pressor effect (P less than 0.001) and produced more femoral vasoconstriction (P less than 0.001) than AIII. All four antagonists studied (1-Sar, 8-Ala AII [P113]; 8-Ala AII; 1-des Asp, 8-Ala AII; 1-des Asp, 8-Ile AII) induced parallel shifts in the renal blood flow response to AII and AIII. P113 induced greater blockade than 8-Ala AII (P less than 0.001) which, in turn, was more effective than 1-des Asp, 8-Ala AII (P less than 0.001). 1-des Asp, 8-Ile AII was as effective as P113. Each analogue induced an identical inhibition of the renal vascular response to AII and AIII. In addition, AII and AIII induced cross-tachyphylaxis. All lines of evidence suggested that AII and AIII act on a single receptor in the kidney, which differs at least functionally from other systemic vascular receptors. The possibility that heptapeptide analogues represent angiotensin antagonists with greater specificity for the renal vasculature was pursued in a model in which the renin-angiotensin system is activated. Acute, partial thoracic inferior vena caval occlusion was induced in an additional 16 dogs. P113 induced progressive, dose-related hypotension and a limited increase in renal blood flow in this model. The 1-des Asp, 8-Ile AII analogue, conversely, induced a consistent, larger, dose-related renal blood flow increase, with significantly less hypotension over a wide dose range

  20. Myocardial Function and Lipid Metabolism in the Chronic Alcoholic Animal

    PubMed Central

    Regan, Timothy J.; Khan, Mohammad I.; Ettinger, Philip O.; Haider, Bunyad; Lyons, Michael M.; Oldewurtel, Henry A.; Weber, Marilyn

    1974-01-01

    In view of the variables that obscure the pathogenesis of cardiomyopathy, a study was undertaken in mongrel dogs fed ethanol as 36% of calories for up to 22 mo. Both the experimental and control groups maintained body weight, hematocrit, plasma vitamin, and protein levels. Left ventricular function was evaluated in the intact anesthetized dog using indicator dilution for end-diastolic and stroke volume determinations. During increased afterload with angiotensin, the ethanol group exhibited a larger rise of end-diastolic pressure (P<0.01), whereas end-diastolic and stroke volume responses were significantly less than in controls. Preload increments with saline elicited a significantly higher end-diastolic pressure rise in the ethanol group (P<0.01). No hypertrophy, inflammation, or fibrosis was present and it was postulated that the enhanced diastolic stiffness was related to accumulation of Alcian Blue-positive material in the ventricular interstitium. To evaluate myocardial lipid metabolism, [1-14C]oleic acid was infused systemically. Plasma specific activity and myocardial lipid uptake were similar in both groups. There was a significantly increased incorporation of label into triglyceride, associated with a reduced 14CO2 production, considered the basis for a twofold increment of triglyceride content. In addition, diminished incorporation of [14C]oleic acid into phospholipid was observed accompanied by morphologic abnormalities of cardiac cell membranes. Potassium loss and sodium gain, like the lipid alteration, was more prominent in the subendocardium. Thus, chronic ethanol ingestion in this animal model is associated with abnormalities of ventricular function without evident malnutrition, analogous to the preclinical malfunction described in the human alcoholic. Images PMID:4368946

  1. Activation of calpain by renin-angiotensin system in pleural mesothelial cells mediates tuberculous pleural fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Jie; Xiang, Fei; Cai, Peng-Cheng; Lu, Yu-Zhi; Xu, Xiao-Xiao; Yu, Fan; Li, Feng-Zhi; Greer, Peter A.; Shi, Huan-Zhong; Zhou, Qiong; Xin, Jian-Bao; Ye, Hong; Su, Yunchao

    2016-01-01

    Pleural fibrosis is defined as an excessive deposition of extracellular matrix (ECM) components that results in destruction of the normal pleural tissue architecture. It can result from diverse inflammatory conditions, especially tuberculous pleurisy. Pleural mesothelial cells (PMCs) play a pivotal role in pleural fibrosis. Calpain is a family of calcium-dependent endopeptidases, which plays an important role in ECM remodeling. However, the role of calpain in pleural fibrosis remains unknown. In the present study, we found that tuberculous pleural effusion (TPE) induced calpain activation in PMCs and that inhibition of calpain prevented TPE-induced collagen-I synthesis and cell proliferation of PMCs. Moreover, our data revealed that the levels of angiotensin (ANG)-converting enzyme (ACE) were significantly higher in pleural fluid of patients with TPE than those with malignant pleural effusion, and ACE-ANG II in TPE resulted in activation of calpain and subsequent triggering of the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K)/Akt/NF-κB signaling pathway in PMCs. Finally, calpain activation in PMCs and collagen depositions were confirmed in pleural biopsy specimens from patients with tuberculous pleurisy. Together, these studies demonstrated that calpain is activated by renin-angiotensin system in pleural fibrosis and mediates TPE-induced collagen-I synthesis and proliferation of PMCs via the PI3K/Akt/NF-κB signaling pathway. Calpain in PMCs might be a novel target for intervention in tuberculous pleural fibrosis. PMID:27261452

  2. Synthesis and evaluation of novel angiotensin II receptor 1 antagonists as anti-hypertension drugs.

    PubMed

    Bao, Xiaolu; Zhu, Weibo; Zhang, Ruijing; Wen, Caihong; Wang, Li; Yan, Yijia; Tang, Hesheng; Chen, Zhilong

    2016-05-01

    Three new angiotensin II receptor 1 antagonists, 1, 2 and 3 were designed, synthesized and evaluated. The AT1 receptor-binding assays in vitro showed that all the synthesized compounds had nanomolar affinity for the AT1 receptor. From which compound 3 was found to be the most potent ligands with an IC50 value of 2.67±0.23 nM. Biological evaluation in vivo revealed that all the compounds could cause significant decrease on MBP in a dose dependent manner in spontaneously hypertensive rats, and compound 3 especially showed an efficient and long-lasting effect in reducing blood pressure, whose maximal response lowered 41 mmHg of MBP at 10mg/kg and 62 mmHg at 15 mg/kg after oral administration, the significant anti-hypertensive effect lasted beyond 12 h, which is better than the reference compound losartan. The pharmacokinetic experiments showed that compound 3 could be absorbed efficiently and metabolized smoothly both in blood and in tissues in Wistar rats. The acute toxicity assay suggested that it has low toxicity with the LD50 value of 2974.35 mg/kg. These results demonstrate that compound 3 is a potent angiotensin AT1 receptor antagonist which could be considered as a novel anti-hypertension candidate and deserved for further investigation. PMID:27004954

  3. Synthesis and biological evaluation of a new angiotensin II receptor antagonist.

    PubMed

    Zheng, H-l; Zhu, W-b; Wu, D; Da, Y-j; Yan, Y-J; Bian, J; Chen, Z-l

    2014-12-01

    The design, synthesis, in vitro and in vivo evaluation of (2 R,6 S)-4-({1-[2-(1 H-tetrazol-5-yl)phenyl]-1 H-indol-4-yl}methyl)-2,6-dimethylmorpholine, compound 1, as a novel angiotensin II receptor antagonist is outlined. Radioligand binding assays showed that 1 displayed a high affinity for the angiotensin II type 1receptor with IC50 value of 0.82 nM. It acted as a potent anti-hypertensive derivative (maximal reduction of mean arterial pressure of 47 mm Hg at 10 mg/kg po in spontaneously hypertensive rat producing a dose-dependent fall in blood pressure following oral administration lasting beyond 10 h. Acute toxicity tests measured the LD50 of 1 value as 2431.7 mg/kg, which is higher than Losartan (LD50=2248 mg/kg). In addition further testing showed that 1 also demonstrated efficient anti-proliferative activity in vitro and anti-prostate cancer activity in vivo were also found. Taken together this compound could be considered as an effective and durable anti-hypertension drug candidate with additional anti-prostate cancer activity. These encouraging results are deserved of further investigation towards its use for therapeutic benefit. PMID:24573978

  4. Activation of calpain by renin-angiotensin system in pleural mesothelial cells mediates tuberculous pleural fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Yang, Jie; Xiang, Fei; Cai, Peng-Cheng; Lu, Yu-Zhi; Xu, Xiao-Xiao; Yu, Fan; Li, Feng-Zhi; Greer, Peter A; Shi, Huan-Zhong; Zhou, Qiong; Xin, Jian-Bao; Ye, Hong; Su, Yunchao; Ma, Wan-Li

    2016-07-01

    Pleural fibrosis is defined as an excessive deposition of extracellular matrix (ECM) components that results in destruction of the normal pleural tissue architecture. It can result from diverse inflammatory conditions, especially tuberculous pleurisy. Pleural mesothelial cells (PMCs) play a pivotal role in pleural fibrosis. Calpain is a family of calcium-dependent endopeptidases, which plays an important role in ECM remodeling. However, the role of calpain in pleural fibrosis remains unknown. In the present study, we found that tuberculous pleural effusion (TPE) induced calpain activation in PMCs and that inhibition of calpain prevented TPE-induced collagen-I synthesis and cell proliferation of PMCs. Moreover, our data revealed that the levels of angiotensin (ANG)-converting enzyme (ACE) were significantly higher in pleural fluid of patients with TPE than those with malignant pleural effusion, and ACE-ANG II in TPE resulted in activation of calpain and subsequent triggering of the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K)/Akt/NF-κB signaling pathway in PMCs. Finally, calpain activation in PMCs and collagen depositions were confirmed in pleural biopsy specimens from patients with tuberculous pleurisy. Together, these studies demonstrated that calpain is activated by renin-angiotensin system in pleural fibrosis and mediates TPE-induced collagen-I synthesis and proliferation of PMCs via the PI3K/Akt/NF-κB signaling pathway. Calpain in PMCs might be a novel target for intervention in tuberculous pleural fibrosis. PMID:27261452

  5. Contributions of Leukocytic Angiotensin-converting Enzyme to Development of Atherosclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Xiaofeng; Lu, Hong; Zhao, Mingming; Tashiro, Katsuya; Cassis, Lisa A.; Daugherty, Alan

    2013-01-01

    Objective This study determined the role of angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) on the development of angiotensin I (AngI)-induced atherosclerosis and the contribution of leukocyte-specific expression of this enzyme. Approach and Results To define the contribution of ACE-dependent activity to AngII synthesis in atherosclerotic development, male LDL receptor -/- mice were fed a fat-enriched diet and infused with either AngI or AngII. The same infusion rate of these peptides had equivalent effects on atherosclerotic development. Co-infusion of an ACE inhibitor, enalapril, ablated AngI augmented atherosclerosis, but had no effect on AngII-induced lesion development. ACE protein was detected in several cell types in atherosclerotic lesions, with a predominance in macrophages. This cell type secreted AngII, which was ablated by ACE inhibition. To study whether leukocyte ACE contributed to atherosclerosis, irradiated male LDL receptor -/- mice were repopulated with bone marrow-derived cells from either ACE +/+ or -/- mice and fed the fat-enriched diet for 12 weeks. Chimeric mice with ACE deficiency in bone marrow-derived cells had modestly reduced atherosclerotic lesions in aortic arches, but had no effects in aortic roots. Conclusions ACE mediates AngI-induced atherosclerosis, and ACE expression in leukocytes modestly contributes to atherosclerotic development in hypercholesterolemic mice. PMID:23846498

  6. Angiotensin Converting Enzyme Inhibitor-related Angioedema: A Case of an Unexpected Death.

    PubMed

    Atalay, Eray; Özdemir, Mehmet Tamer; Çiğsar, Gülşen; Omurca, Ferhat; Aslan, Nurullah; Yildiz, Mehmet; Gey, Zehra Bahar

    2015-11-01

    Angioedema is an asymmetric non-pitting oedema on face, lips, tongue and mucous membranes; any delay in diagnosis and treatment can be fatal. Treatment with lisinopril as an angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitor, can be a reason of angioedema. Here we report a case who developed oral-facial edema four years after using lisinopril/hydrochlorothiazide. Laryngeal oedema is a main cause of death in angioedema. The treatment of choice in angioedema including fresh frozen plasma, C1 inhibitor concentrations and BRK-2 antagonists (bradykinin B2 receptor antagonists) were used. In this case; a 77 years old female patient suffering from hypertension was considered. This patient was suffering two days from swelling on her face and neck. Non- allergic angioedema was distinguished in five major forms; acquired (AAO), hereditary (HAE), renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system (RAAS) blocker-dependent, pseudoallergic angioedema (PAS) and an idiopathic angioedema (IAO). She was admitted to our clinic with the diagnosis of hereditary angioedema. Patient had skin edema and life threatening laryngeal edema. In emergency department treatment was started using intravenous methylprednisolone, diphenydramine as well as inhaled and subcutaneous epinephrine simultaneously. Despite the initial treatment, the patient died due to the insufficient respiration and cardiac arrest. The patient has no history of kidney disease. PMID:26725563

  7. The inhibitory effect of angiotensin II on BKCa channels in podocytes via oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    Gao, Na; Wang, Hui; Zhang, Xiaochen; Yang, Zhuo

    2015-01-01

    Angiotensin II (Ang II) is an important active substance of the renin-angiotensin system (RAS). The present study has confirmed that abnormalities of Ang II may be related with cerebrovascular diseases, endocrine diseases, cardiovascular diseases, liver diseases, such as: cerebral hypoxia, diabetes, obesity, atrial fibrillation, and liver cirrhosis. However, understanding effects of Ang II on podocytes is not enough. This study was to investigate the effects of oxidative stress on the large conductance, Ca(2+)-activated K(+) channels (BKCa). Results from the 3-(4, 5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2, 5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay showed that Ang II induced podocyte death in a concentration-dependent manner. The measurement of superoxide dismutase (SOD) generation demonstrated that Ang II decreased the total SOD of cellular levels. Meaningfully, pretreatment of a type of ROS scavenger formulations named N-(mercaptopropionyl)-glycine (N-MPG) could inhibit podocyte apoptosis induced by Ang II. Meanwhile, patch-clamp technique was used in this study to detect the effects of Ang II on currents of BKCa channel in podocytes. The results indicated that Ang II inhibited the current amplitude of BKCa channel and decreased the slope of I-V curve. Ang II also made the activation curves of BKCa channel shift to the left. These results may provide a theoretical basis for potential treatment of chronic glomerular disease in the future. PMID:25234195

  8. Anti-hypertensive Effects of Diminazene Aceturate: An Angiotensin- Converting Enzyme 2 Activator in Rats.

    PubMed

    De Maria, Marilda L A; Araújo, Liliane D; Fraga-Silva, Rodrigo A; Pereira, Letícia A S; Ribeiro, Heder J; Menezes, Gustavo B; Shenoy, Vinayak; Raizada, Mohan K; Ferreira, Anderson J

    2016-01-01

    Previous studies have shown that activation of endogenous angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 (ACE2) results in various beneficial effects in the cardiovascular system. Recently, a new ACE2 activator, named diminazene aceturate (DIZE), was described. Here, we evaluated the actions of this compound in blood pressure (BP) and heart rate (HR) of conscious normotensive and hypertensive rats, as well as explored its mechanism of actions using isolated vessels. The renovascular model of hypertension was utilized. The participation of the Angiotensin-(1-7) receptor Mas and nitric oxide (NO) in the effects of DIZE was evaluated using A-779 and L-NAME, respectively. It was observed that DIZE caused a marked decrease in BP with a compensatory increase in HR in nornotensive rats. Accordingly, a significant reduction in the blood flow of the mesenteric bed was evidenced using intravital microscopy. Moreover, in rats with renovascular hypertension, DIZE caused a decrease in BP similar to the hypotensive effect induced by captopril. Importantly, this compound also prevented the development of cardiac hypertrophy induced by hypertension. The isolated vessels technique revealed that the vasodilator effects of DIZE were dependent on Mas activation and NO release. Thus, our findings demonstrated that DIZE reduces the BP of normotensinve and hypertensive rats possibly by a mechanism involving Mas and NO. PMID:26458404

  9. Regulation of coronary vascular tone via redox modulation in the alpha1-adrenergic-angiotensin-endothelin axis of the myocardium.

    PubMed

    Yamaguchi, Osamu; Kaneshiro, Takashi; Saitoh, Shu-ichi; Ishibashi, Toshiyuki; Maruyama, Yukio; Takeishi, Yasuchika

    2009-01-01

    We hypothesized that alpha(1)-adrenoceptor stimulation of cardiac myocytes results in the production of an endothelin (ET)-releasing factor that stimulates the coronary vasculature to release ET and, by manipulating the redox state of cardiac and vascular cells, may influence the extent of alpha(1)-adrenergic-ET-1 vasoconstriction. Dihydroethidium (DHE) and dichlorodihydrofluorescein (DCF) intensities were increased by phenylephrine stimulation in isolated rat cardiac myocytes, which were enhanced by the mitochondrial electron transport chain complex I inhibitor rotenone (DHE: 20.4 +/- 1.2-fold and DCF: 25.2 +/- 0.9-fold, n = 8, P < 0.01, respectively) but not by the NADPH oxidase inhibitor apocynin. Olmesartan, an angiotensin II type 1 receptor antagonist, and enalaprilate did not change DHE and DCF intensities by phenylephrine. Next, we measured the vasoconstriction of isolated, pressurized rat coronary arterioles (diameter: 74 +/- 8 microm) in response to supernatant collected from isolated cardiac myocytes. The addition of supernatant from phenylephrine-stimulated myocytes to a 2-ml vessel bath (n = 8 each) caused volume-dependent vasoconstriction (500 microl: -14.8 +/- 2.2%). Olmesartan and TA0201, an ET type A receptor antagonist, converted vasoconstriction into vasodilation (8.5 +/- 1.2% and 10.5 +/- 0.5%, P < 0.01, respectively) in response to supernatant from phenylephrine-stimulated myocytes, which was eliminated with catalase. Vasoconstriction was weakened using supernatant from phenylephrine with rotenone-treated myocytes. Treatment of arterioles with apocynin to myocyte supernatant converted vasoconstriction into vasodilation (7.8 +/- 0.8%, P < 0.01). These results suggest that alpha(1)-adrenergic stimulation in cardiac myocytes produces angiotensin I and H(2)O(2) and that angiotensin releases ET-1 through NADPH oxidase in coronary arterioles. Thus, coronary vasoconstriction via the alpha-adrenergic-angiotensin-ET axis appears to require redox

  10. CAD of myocardial perfusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Storm, Corstiaan J.; Slump, Cornelis H.

    2007-03-01

    Our purpose is in the automated evaluation of the physiological relevance of lesions in coronary angiograms. We aim to extract as much as possible quantitative information about the physiological condition of the heart from standard angiographic image sequences. Coronary angiography is still the gold standard for evaluating and diagnosing coronary abnormalities as it is able to locate precisely the coronary artery lesions. The dimensions of the stenosis can be assessed nowadays successfully with image processing based Quantitative Coronary Angiography (QCA) techniques. Our purpose is to assess the clinical relevance of the pertinent stenosis. We therefore analyze the myocardial perfusion as revealed in standard angiographic image sequences. In a Region-of-Interest (ROI) on the angiogram (without an overlaying major blood vessel) the contrast is measured as a function of time (the so-called time-density curve). The required hyperemic state of exercise is induced artificially by the injection of a vasodilator drug e.g. papaverine. In order to minimize motion artifacts we select based on the recorded ECG signal end-diastolic images in both a basal and a hyperemic run in the same projection to position the ROI. We present the development of the algorithms together with results of a small study of 20 patients which have been catheterized following the standard protocol.

  11. Experimental myocardial infarction

    PubMed Central

    Hood, William B.; Bianco, Jesus A.; Kumar, Raj; Whiting, Richard B.

    1970-01-01

    Compliance of the infarcted left ventricle was studied in dogs 3-5 days after occlusion of the left anterior descending coronary artery. Compliance was assessed from postmortem pressure-volume curves and from pressure-length measurements (mercury-in-silastic segment length gauges) made both in vivo and postmortem. Postmortem pressure-volume curves showed reduced compliance compared to sham-operated animals. Postmortem pressure-length curves of infarcted and adjacent normal myocardium indicated that the diminished total compliance could be attributed to an increase in stiffness of the infarcted area. This was confirmed by in vivo end-diastolic pressure-length changes produced by transient aortic occlusion. The infarcted area was akinetic, showing neither contraction nor aneurysmal bulging. In addition, anesthetized dogs with infarcts, when compared with sham-operated animals, had similar left ventricular end-diastolic volumes (indicator dilution method), but higher left ventricular end-diastolic pressures. Taken with previous observations, which show that systolic aneurysmal bulging is uniformly present at the onset of ischemia, these results indicate that stiffening of the ischemic myocardium occurs during the first 5 days after infarction, and show that elevation of left ventricular filling pressure does not necessarily signify ventricular dilatation. The results also suggest a mechanism whereby ventricular performance may improve during recovery from acute myocardial infarction. Images PMID:4914678

  12. Renin-angiotensin system in thyroidectomized rats at different periods of development.

    PubMed

    Jiménez, E; Ruiz, M; Montiel, M; Narvaez, J A; Dieguez, J L; Morell, M

    1991-12-01

    The relationship between the renal function and some components of the renin-angiotensin system has been studied in hypothyroid rats thyroidectomized surgically at different periods of their life. Changes in plasma renin concentration (PRC) depending on the period hypothyroidism were induced. Results showed that the renin release control could result from an equilibrium between the reduced beta-adrenergic activity and the marked natriuresis observed in hypothyroidism. A reduction in plasma angiotensinogen concentration (PAC), due to a decrease in its hepatic production, was observed in thyroidectomized animals. PAC reduction was independent of the hypothyroidism induction period. Alterations in plasma renin activity (PRA) were a consequence of PRC and PAC changes in thyroidectomized animals, as an increase in fractional sodium excretion (FENa) time course dependent, was found in these rats. PMID:1725739

  13. Brain renin-angiotensin system and dopaminergic cell vulnerability

    PubMed Central

    Labandeira-García, Jose L.; Garrido-Gil, Pablo; Rodriguez-Pallares, Jannette; Valenzuela, Rita; Borrajo, Ana; Rodríguez-Perez, Ana I.

    2014-01-01

    Although the renin-angiotensin system (RAS) was classically considered as a circulating system that regulates blood pressure, many tissues are now known to have a local RAS. Angiotensin, via type 1 receptors, is a major activator of the NADPH-oxidase complex, which mediates several key events in oxidative stress (OS) and inflammatory processes involved in the pathogenesis of major aging-related diseases. Several studies have demonstrated the presence of RAS components in the basal ganglia, and particularly in the nigrostriatal system. In the nigrostriatal system, RAS hyperactivation, via NADPH-oxidase complex activation, exacerbates OS and the microglial inflammatory response and contributes to progression of dopaminergic degeneration, which is inhibited by angiotensin receptor blockers and angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors. Several factors may induce an increase in RAS activity in the dopaminergic system. A decrease in dopaminergic activity induces compensatory upregulation of local RAS function in both dopaminergic neurons and glia. In addition to its role as an essential neurotransmitter, dopamine may also modulate microglial inflammatory responses and neuronal OS via RAS. Important counterregulatory interactions between angiotensin and dopamine have also been observed in several peripheral tissues. Neurotoxins and proinflammatory factors may also act on astrocytes to induce an increase in RAS activity, either independently of or before the loss of dopamine. Consistent with a major role of RAS in dopaminergic vulnerability, increased RAS activity has been observed in the nigra of animal models of aging, menopause and chronic cerebral hypoperfusion, which also showed higher dopaminergic vulnerability. Manipulation of the brain RAS may constitute an effective neuroprotective strategy against dopaminergic vulnerability and progression of Parkinson’s disease. PMID:25071471

  14. Mas-Mediated Antioxidant Effects Restore the Functionality of Angiotensin Converting Enzyme 2-Angiotensin-(1–7)-Mas Axis in Diabetic Rat Carotid

    PubMed Central

    Gomes, Mayara Santos; Restini, Carolina Baraldi Araujo

    2014-01-01

    We hypothesized that endothelial AT1-activated NAD(P)H oxidase-driven generation of reactive oxygen species during type I-diabetes impairs carotid ACE2-angiotensin-(1–7)-Mas axis functionality, which accounts for the impaired carotid flow in diabetic rats. We also hypothesized that angiotensin-(1–7) chronic treatment of diabetic rats restores carotid ACE2-angiotensin-(1–7)-Mas axis functionality and carotid flow. Relaxant curves for angiotensin II or angiotensin-(1–7) were obtained in carotid from streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats. Superoxide or hydrogen peroxide levels were measured by flow cytometry in carotid endothelial cells. Carotid flow was also determined. We found that endothelial AT1-activated NAD(P)H oxidase-driven generation of superoxide and hydrogen peroxide in diabetic rat carotid impairs ACE2-angiotensin-(1–7)-Mas axis functionality, which reduces carotid flow. In this mechanism, hydrogen peroxide derived from superoxide dismutation inhibits ACE2 activity in generating angiotensin-(1–7) seemingly by activating ICl,SWELL, while superoxide inhibits the nitrergic Mas-mediated vasorelaxation evoked by angiotensin-(1–7). Angiotensin-(1–7) treatment of diabetic rats restored carotid ACE2-angiotensin-(1–7)-Mas axis functionality by triggering a positive feedback played by endothelial Mas receptors, that blunts endothelial AT1-activated NAD(P)H oxidase-driven generation of reactive oxygen species. Mas-mediated antioxidant effects also restored diabetic rat carotid flow, pointing to the contribution of ACE2-angiotensin-(1–7)-Mas axis in maintaining carotid flow. PMID:24877125

  15. Effect of angiotensin II on uterine and systemic vasculature in pregnant sheep.

    PubMed Central

    Naden, R P; Rosenfeld, C R

    1981-01-01

    The response of uteroplacental blood flow (UBF) to angiotensin II is controversial. Moreover, the relationship of the uterine and systemic responses to infused angiotensin II is not well understood. Thus, in eight chronically instrumented, near-term pregnant sheep, we have determined the relationships between the dose and duration of constant systemic infusions of angiotensin II ([Val5] ANG II) and changes in UBF, uterine vascular resistance (UVR), mean arterial pressure (MAP), and systemic vascular resistance (SVR). [Val5] ANG II caused dose-dependent increases in UVR and MAP at all doses studied (P less than 0.05). The response in UBF was bidirectional, with increases at doses less than or equal to 1.15 microgram/min and decreases at greater than or equal to 2.29 micrograms/min (P less than 0.05). Increases in UBP occurred when the relative rise (delta) in MAP greater than delta UVR, whereas UBF was unchanged when delta MAP = delta UVR and decreased when delta MAP less than delta UVR. SVR also rose in a dose-dependent fashion (P less than 0.05); delta SVR was greater than delta UVR at doses less than or equal to 2.29 micrograms [Val5] ANG II/min (P less than 0.01). In studies of the effect of duration of [Val5] ANG II infusions, UBF increased at all doses during the 1st min, followed by stabilization at 4--5 min, with eventual decreases at doses greater than or equal to 2.29 micrograms/min and increases at doses less than 2.29 micrograms/min. The relationship between the changes in MAP and UVR to the response of UBF was as noted above. It is evident that (a) [Val5] NAG II is uterine vasoconstrictor, (b) changes in UBF are dependent upon relative changes in perfusion pressure and UVR, which in turn are dependent upon both the dose and duration of a [Val5] ANG II infusion, and (c) the uteroplacental vasculature is relatively refractory to the vasoconstricting effects of low doses of [Val5] ANG II. PMID:7263862

  16. Myocardial perfusion imaging for detection of silent myocardial ischemia

    SciTech Connect

    Beller, G.A.

    1988-04-21

    Despite the widespread use of the exercise stress test in diagnosing asymptomatic myocardial ischemia, exercise radionuclide imaging remains useful for detecting silent ischemia in numerous patient populations, including those who are totally asymptomatic, those who have chronic stable angina, those who have recovered from an episode of unstable angina or an uncomplicated myocardial infarction, and those who have undergone angioplasty or received thrombolytic therapy. Studies show that thallium scintigraphy is more sensitive than exercise electrocardiography in detecting ischemia, i.e., in part, because perfusion defects occur more frequently than ST depression and before angina in the ischemic cascade. Thallium-201 scintigraphy can be performed to differentiate a true- from a false-positive exercise electrocardiographic test in patients with exercise-induced ST depression and no angina. The development of technetium-labeled isonitriles may improve the accuracy of myocardial perfusion imaging. 11 references.

  17. MYOCARDIAL AKT: THE OMNIPRESENT NEXUS

    PubMed Central

    Sussman, Mark A.; Völkers, Mirko; Fischer, Kimberlee; Bailey, Brandi; Cottage, Christopher T.; Din, Shabana; Gude, Natalie; Avitabile, Daniele; Alvarez, Roberto; Sundararaman, Balaji; Quijada, Pearl; Mason, Matt; Konstandin, Mathias H.; Malhowski, Amy; Cheng, Zhaokang; Khan, Mohsin; McGregor, Michael

    2013-01-01

    One of the greatest examples of integrated signal transduction is revealed by examination of effects mediated by AKT kinase in myocardial biology. Positioned at the intersection of multiple afferent and efferent signals, AKT exemplifies a molecular sensing node that coordinates dynamic responses of the cell in literally every aspect of biological responses. The balanced and nuanced nature of homeostatic signaling is particularly essential within the myocardial context, where regulation of survival, energy production, contractility, and response to pathological stress all flow through the nexus of AKT activation or repression. Equally important, the loss of regulated AKT activity is primarily the cause or consequence of pathological conditions leading to remodeling of the heart and eventual decompensation. This review presents an overview compendium of the complex world of myocardial AKT biology gleaned from more than a decade of research. Summarization of the widespread influence that AKT exerts upon myocardial responses leaves no doubt that the participation of AKT in molecular signaling will need to be reckoned with as a seemingly omnipresent regulator of myocardial molecular biological responses. PMID:21742795

  18. How reliable is myocardial imaging in the diagnosis of acute myocardial infarction

    SciTech Connect

    Willerson, J.T.

    1983-01-01

    Myocardial scintigraphic techniques available presently allow a sensitive and relatively specific diagnosis of acute myocardial infarction when they are used correctly, although every technique has definite limitations. Small myocardial infarcts (less than 3 gm.) may be missed, and there are temporal limitations in the usefulness of the scintigraphic techniques. The development of tomographic methodology that may be used with single-photon radionuclide emitters (including technetium and /sup 201/Tl will allow the detection of relatively small abnormalities in myocardial perfusion and regions of myocardial infarction and will help to provide a more objective interpretation of the myocardial scintigrams. The use of overlay techniques allowing simultaneous assessment of myocardial perfusion, infarct-avid imaging, and radionuclide ventriculograms will provide insight into the relevant aspects of the extent of myocardial damage, the relationship of damage to myocardial perfusion, and the functional impact of myocardial infarction on ventricular performance.

  19. Mineralocorticoid and angiotensin II type 1 receptors in the subfornical organ mediate angiotensin II - induced hypothalamic reactive oxygen species and hypertension.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hong-Wei; Huang, Bing S; White, Roselyn A; Chen, Aidong; Ahmad, Monir; Leenen, Frans H H

    2016-08-01

    Activation of angiotensinergic pathways by central aldosterone (Aldo)-mineralocorticoid receptor (MR) pathway plays a critical role in angiotensin II (Ang II)-induced hypertension. The subfornical organ (SFO) contains both MR and angiotensin II type 1 receptors (AT1R) and can relay the signals of circulating Ang II to downstream nuclei such as the paraventricular nucleus (PVN), supraoptic nucleus (SON) and rostral ventrolateral medulla (RVLM). In Wistar rats, subcutaneous (sc) infusion of Ang II at 500ng/min/kg for 1 or 2weeks increased reactive oxygen species (ROS) as measured by dihydroethidium (DHE) staining in a nucleus - specific pattern. Intra-SFO infusion of AAV-MR- or AT1aR-siRNA prevented the Ang II-induced increase in AT1R mRNA expression in the SFO and decreased MR mRNA. Both MR- and AT1aR-siRNA prevented increases in ROS in the PVN and RVLM. MR- but not AT1aR-siRNA in the SFO prevented the Ang II-induced ROS in the SON. Both MR- and AT1aR-siRNA in the SFO prevented most of the Ang II-induced hypertension as assessed by telemetry. These results indicate that Aldo-MR signaling in the SFO is needed for the activation of Ang II-AT1R-ROS signaling from the SFO to the PVN and RVLM. Activation of Aldo-MR signaling from the SFO to the SON may enhance AT1R dependent activation of pre-sympathetic neurons in the PVN. PMID:27163380

  20. The effect of altered sodium balance upon renal vascular reactivity to angiotensin II and norepinephrine in the dog. Mechanism of variation in angiotensin responses.

    PubMed Central

    Oliver, J A; Cannon, P J

    1978-01-01

    The mechanism whereby the vasoconstrictor response to angiotensin II (AII) is influenced by sodium balance or disease is unclear. To explore this question, the renal vascular responses (RVR) to intrarenal injections of subpressor doses of AII and norepinephrine were studied in dogs with an electromagnetic flowmeter. Acute and chronic sodium depletion increased plasma renin activity (PRA) and blunted the RVR to AII, while acute sodium repletion and chronic sodium excess plus desoxycorticosterone acetate decreased PRA and enhanced the RVR to AII. The magnitude of the RVR to AII was inversely related to PRA. The RVR to norepinephrine was unaffected by sodium balance and was not related to PRA. Inhibition of the conversion of angiotensin I to AII by SQ 20,881 during sodium depletion lowered mean arterial blood pressure (MABP), increased renal blood flow (RBF), and enhanced the RVR to AII but not to norepinephrine. Administration of bradykinin to chronically sodium-depleted dogs also lowered the MABP and increased RBF but had no effect on the RVR to AII. SQ 20,881 had no effect on MABP, RBF, or the RVR to AII in the dogs with chronic sodium excess and desoxycorticosterone acetate. Administration of indomethacin to chronically sodium-depleted dogs lowered RBF but did not influence the RVR to AII. The results indicate that the RVR to AII is selectively influenced by sodium balance and that the magnitude of the response is inversely related to the availability of endogenous AII. The data did not suggest that the variations in the RVR to AII were because of direct effects of sodium on vascular contraction, changes in the number of vascular AII receptors, or the renal prostaglandins. The results are consistent with the hypothesis that the vasoconstrictor effect of AII in the renal vasculature is primarily dependent upon the degree to which the AII vascular receptors are occupied by endogenous hormone. PMID:641142

  1. [Does a genetic predisposition for infarction expansion exist? Evaluation of genetic polymorphisms of the renin-angiotensin system].

    PubMed

    Zedda, N; Onnis, E; Angius, A; Balata, F; Cherchi, P A; Sole, G; Olla, N; Poddie, D; Cao, A; Cherchi, A; Pirastu, M

    1997-03-01

    Aim of this study is to carry out a genetic analysis of polymorphisms of the renin-angiotensin system in a genetically homogeneous population, in patients with and without myocardial infarction (AMI) expansion and to evaluate the influence of non genetic, mechanical factors. The study was conducted on 299 patients with first AMI. Ecocardiography studies were performed on all patients on day 1 and 3 from the onset of AMI and before discharge. Eighty-four patients were excluded because of inadequate quality of echocardiograms and 215 (163 males, 52 females) were admitted. Of these, 157 had no evidence of AMI expansion (EXP-) while 58 had expansion (EXP+). DNA was extracted by standard methods from blood samples. Age and gender had no influence on AMI expansion. Anterior infarction (p < 0.000001) and Q-wave infarction (p < 0.00002) were found more frequently in EXP+. Peak of creatine phosphokinase was higher in EXP+ than in EXP- (p < 0.00001). The percent of patients treated with thrombolysis or with hypertension and/or left ventricular hypertrophy was not significantly different in the two groups. AGT MT235 polymorphism of angiotensinogen gene, I/D polymorphism of ACE gene and AT1 A1166C of AT1 receptor of angiotensin II were not significantly different in two groups. Stratified analysis showed that in patients with anterior AMI (n = 87), with a higher risk of AMI expansion, there is a significant difference (p < 0.02) in ACE genotype between EXP- and EXP+. Odds ratio assuming the dominant effect of I allele (II+ ID < DD) was 3.35 (confidence interval 1.41-7.56) with increased risk of expansion. More extension studies are need to verify if these results can contribute to early identification of patients at higher risk and to optimize therapeutic approach. PMID:9172934

  2. Myocardial infarction following bee sting.

    PubMed

    Puvanalingam, A; Karpagam, P; Sundar, C; Venkatesan, S; Ragunanthanan

    2014-08-01

    Bee stings are commonly encountered worldwide. Various manifestations after bee sting have been described. Local reactions are common. Unusually, manifestations like vomiting, diarrhoea, dyspnoea, generalised oedema, acute renal failure, hypotension and collapse may occur. Rarely vasculitis, serum sickness, neuritis and encephalitis have been described which generally develop days to weeks after a sting. Acute coronary syndromes after hymenoptera stings and other environmental exposures are referred to as the Kounis syndrome or allergic myocardial ischaemia and infarction. We report a 60 year old male who developed myocardial infarction after multiple bee stings over his body. PMID:25856951

  3. Ventricular myocardial architecture in marine fishes.

    PubMed

    Sanchez-Quintana, D; Hurle, J M

    1987-03-01

    The fiber architecture of the ventricular myocardium has been studied in elasmobranch (Isurus oxyrhinchus, Galeorhinus galeus, Prionace glauca) and teleost (Xiphias gladius, Thunnus thynnus, Thunnus alalunga) fish species with hearts displaying mixed types of ventricular musculature (compact and trabecular). In all cases, the compact myocardium is organized in layers of fiber bundles with an orderly arrangement within the ventricular walls. The number of these layers appears to be dependent on the relative thickness of the compact myocardium. Differences in the pattern of myocardial fiber arrangement were observed among the different fish species. In elasmobranchs the compact myocardium at the level of the atrioventricular orifice is continuous with the trabeculated myocardium. Furthermore, in elasmobranchs the trabeculated myocardium displays a precise arrangement in arcuate trabeculae running from the auriculoventricular to the conoventricular orifices. In teleosts, the compact myocardium is independent of the trabeculated myocardium and a large number of fibers insert into the bulboventricular fibrous ring. The trabeculated myocardium in these species displays an anarchic arrangement except at the level of the bulboventricular orifice, where the fibers tend to be aligned longitudinally, also being inserted into the fibrous ring. Minor differences, consisting mainly of the presence of extra bundles of fibers, were also observed among different individuals of the same species. The possible relationship between myocardial fiber architecture and ventricular shape is discussed. PMID:3578842

  4. Current perspectives on direct myocardial revascularization.

    PubMed

    Kornowski, R; Hong, M K; Leon, M B

    1998-04-01

    Direct myocardial revascularization (DMR), either surgical or catheter-based, uses lasers to create channels between ischemic myocardium and the left ventricular cavity to improve perfusion and decrease angina. This technique can also be used to deliver drugs to the damaged tissue. Candidates include patients with chronic, severe, refractory angina and those unable to undergo conventional surgical revascularization or angioplasty because remaining conduits or acceptable target vessels are lacking. Although the mechanism of action of DMR is still not known, several theories have been proposed, including stimulated angiogenesis. Late sequelae also remain to be determined. Channel characteristics differ depending on whether they were created by carbon dioxide or holmium/yttrium-aluminum-garnet (Ho: YAG) lasers. Catheter-based DMR obviates thoracotomy and anesthesia and, in systems that can create electromechanical maps, fluoroscopy. Phase I clinical trials are now under way to evaluate catheter-based DMR, with endpoints that include improvement in symptoms of angina, exercise capacity, and radionuclide myocardial perfusion. PMID:9551594

  5. Optimal antagonism of the Renin-Angiotensin-aldosterone system: do we need dual or triple therapy?

    PubMed

    Werner, Christian; Pöss, Janine; Böhm, Michael

    2010-07-01

    The cardiovascular and cardiorenal disease continuum comprises the transition from cardiovascular risk factors to endothelial dysfunction and atherosclerosis, to clinical complications such as myocardial infarction (MI) and stroke, to the development of persistent target-organ damage and, ultimately, to chronic congestive heart failure (CHF), end-stage renal disease or premature death. The renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system (RAAS) is involved in all steps along this pathway, and RAAS blockade with ACE inhibitors or angiotensin AT(1)-receptor antagonists (angiotensin receptor blockers; ARBs) has turned out to be beneficial for patient outcomes throughout the disease continuum. Both ACE inhibitors and ARBs can prevent or reverse endothelial dysfunction and atherosclerosis, thereby reducing the risk of cardiovascular events. These drugs have further been shown to reduce end-organ damage in the heart, kidneys and brain. Aldosterone antagonists such as spironolactone and eplerenone are increasingly recognized as a third class of RAAS inhibitor with potent risk-reducing properties, especially but not solely with respect to the inhibition of cardiac remodelling and the possible prevention of heart failure. In secondary prevention, head-to-head comparisons of ACE inhibitors and ARBs, such as the recent ONTARGET study, provided evidence that, in addition to better tolerability, ARBs are non-inferior to ACE inhibitors in the prevention of clinical endpoints such as MI and stroke in cardiovascular high-risk patients. However, the combination of both ramipril and telmisartan at the maximally tolerated dosage achieved no further benefits and was associated with more adverse events such as symptomatic hypotension and renal dysfunction. In acute MI complicated by heart failure, the VALIANT trial has shown similar effects of ACE inhibition with captopril and ARB treatment with valsartan, but dual RAAS blockade did not further reduce events. In CHF, meta-analyses of RESOLVD, Val

  6. Side effects of using nitrates to treat heart failure and the acute coronary syndromes, unstable angina and acute myocardial infarction.

    PubMed

    Thadani, Udho; Ripley, Toni L

    2007-07-01

    Nitrates are potent venous dilators and anti-ischemic agents. They are widely used for the relief of chest pain and pulmonary congestion in patients with acute coronary syndromes and heart failure. Nitrates, however, do not reduce mortality in patients with acute coronary syndromes. Combination of nitrates and hydralazine when given in addition to beta-blockers and angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors reduce mortality and heart failure hospitalizations in patients with heart failure due to left ventricular systolic dysfunction who are of African-American origin. Side effects during nitrate therapy are common but are less well described in the literature compared with the reported side effects in patients with stable angina pectoris. The reported incidence of side effects varies highly among different studies and among various disease states. Headache is the most commonly reported side effect with an incidence of 12% in acute heart failure, 41-73% in chronic heart failure, 3-19% in unstable angina and 2-26% in acute myocardial infarction. The reported incidence of hypotension also differs: 5-10% in acute heart failure, 20% in chronic heart failure, 9% in unstable angina and < 1-48% in acute myocardial infarction, with the incidence being much higher with concomitant nitrate therapy plus angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors. Reported incidence of dizziness is as low as 1% in patients with acute myocardial infarction to as high as 29% in patients with heart failure. Severe headaches and/or symptomatic hypotension may necessitate discontinuation of nitrate therapy. Severe life threatening hypotension or even death may occur when nitrates are used in patients with acute inferior myocardial infarction associated with right ventricular dysfunction or infarction, or with concomitant use of phosphodiesterase-5 inhibitors or N-acetylcysteine. Despite the disturbing observational reports in the literature that continuous and prolonged use of nitrates may lead to

  7. Angiotensin receptors and angiotensin I-converting enzyme in rat intestine

    SciTech Connect

    Duggan, K.A.; Mendelsohn, F.A.; Levens, N.R. )

    1989-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to map the distribution of angiotensin II (ANG II) receptors and ANG I-converting enzyme (ACE) in rat intestine. ANG II binding sites were visualized by in vitro autoradiography using iodinated (Sar1, Ile8)ANG II. The distribution of ACE was mapped using an iodinated derivative of lisinopril. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were killed and the interior of the whole intestine washed with ice-cold saline. Segments of duodenum, jejunum, ileum, and colon were quickly frozen in a mixture of isopentane and dry ice. Twenty-micron frozen sections were thaw-mounted onto gelatin-coated slides, incubated with either ligand, and exposed to X-ray film. After exposure and subsequent development, the films were quantitated by computerized densitometry. ANG II receptors were most dense in the colon, followed by the ileum, duodenum, and jejunum. Within each segment of intestine, specific ANG II binding sites were localized exclusively to the muscularis. In contrast, ACE was present in both the mucosa and the muscularis. The colocalization of ANG II receptors and ACE may suggest a role for locally generated ANG II in the control of intestinal function. The luminal orientation of ACE in the mucosa of the small intestine may suggest that at this site ACE serves primarily to hydrolyze dietary peptides.

  8. Is angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors/angiotensin receptor blockers therapy protective against prostate cancer?

    PubMed Central

    Mao, Yeqing; Xu, Xin; Wang, Xiao; Zheng, Xiangyi; Xie, Liping

    2016-01-01

    Emerging evidence suggests that renin-angiotensin system (RAS) may act as a molecular and therapeutic target for treating site-specific cancers, including prostate cancer. However, previous observational studies regarding the association between RAS inhibitors and prostate cancer risk have reported inconsistent results. We examined this association by performing a systematic review and meta-analysis. A total of 20,267 patients from nine cohort studies were enrolled. Compared with non-users of RAS inhibitors, individuals using RAS inhibitors had a reduced risk of prostate cancer (RR 0.92, 95 % CI 0.87-0.98), without statistically significant heterogeneity among studies (P = 0.118 for heterogeneity, I2 = 37.6 %). In addition, when subgroup analyses by study quality and number of cases, more statistically significant associations were observed in studies of high quality (RR 0.93, 95 % CI 0.88-0.97) and large sample size (RR 0.94, 95 % CI 0.91-0.98). There was no evidence of significant publication bias with Begg's test (P = 0.602) or with Egger's test (P = 0.350). Overall, this study indicates that use of RAS inhibitors may be associated with a decreased risk of prostate cancer. Large-scale well designed studies are needed to further explore this association. PMID:26760503

  9. Thallium-201 myocardial scintigraphy in acute myocardial infarction and ischemia

    SciTech Connect

    Wackers, F.J.

    1982-04-01

    Thallium-201 scintigraphy provides a sensitive and reliable method of detecting acute myocardial infarction and ischemia when imaging is performed with understanding of the temporal characteristics and accuracy of the technique. The results of scintigraphy are related to the time interval between onset of symptoms and time of imaging. During the first 6 hr after chest pain almost all patients with acute myocardial infarction and approximately 50% of the patients with unstable angina will demonstrate /sup 201/TI pefusion defects. Delayed imaging at 2-4 hr will permit distinction between ischemia and infarction. In patients with acute myocardial infarction, the size of the perfusion defect accurately reflects the extent of the infarcted and/or jeopardized myocardium, which may be used for prognostic stratification. In view of the characteristics of /sup 201/TI scintigraphy, the most practical application of this technique is in patients in whom myocardial infarction has to be ruled out, and for early recognition of patients at high risk for complications.

  10. Inhibition of the renin-angiotensin system for lowering coronary artery disease risk.

    PubMed

    Sheppard, Richard J; Schiffrin, Ernesto L

    2013-04-01

    The renin-angiotensin system when activated exerts proliferative and pro-inflammatory actions and thereby contributes to progression of atherosclerosis, including that occurring in the coronary arteries. It thus contributes as well to coronary artery disease (CAD). Several clinical trials have examined effects of renin-angiotensin system inhibition for primary and secondary prevention of coronary heart disease. These include important trials such as HOPE, EUROPA and PEACE using angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors, VALIANT, OPTIMAAL and TRANSCEND using angiotensin receptor blockers, and the ongoing TOPCAT study in patients with preserved ejection fraction heart failure, many of who also have coronary artery disease. Data are unavailable as yet of effects of either direct renin inhibitors or the new angiotensin receptor/neprilysin inhibitor agents. Today, inhibition of the renin-angiotensin system is standard-of-care therapy for lowering cardiovascular risk in secondary prevention in high cardiovascular risk subjects. PMID:23523606

  11. Angiotensin II stimulated expression of transforming growth factor-beta1 in cardiac fibroblasts and myofibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Campbell, S E; Katwa, L C

    1997-07-01

    Angiotensin II (Ang II) stimulates pathologic myocardial fibrosis. Cardiac fibroblasts (CFb) and myofibroblasts mediate this response, perhaps in part by indirect production of specific cytokines. We sought to determine if Ang II could stimulate transforming growth factor-beta1 (TGF-beta1) gene expression and protein production in adult rat CFb and two cardiac myofibroblast cell types, scar myofibroblasts (MyoFb) and valvular interstitial cells (VIC). Confluent CFb, MyoFb, and VIC in serum-deprived (0.4% FCS) media were treated with Ang II (10(-7) m for CFb; 10(-9) m for MyoFb, VIC) for 24 h. Untreated cells served as controls. Culture media was collected and TGF-beta1 levels determined in triplicate using a sandwich ELISA. Reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) analysis was performed to determine TGF-beta1 mRNA expression. Ang II increased CFb (P<0.02) and VIC (P<0.04) TGF-beta1 mRNA expression, while the increase in MyoFb was not statistically significant. MyoFb produced the highest TGF-beta1 levels under control conditions compared to VIC and CFb. Ang II stimulated further TGF-beta1 secretion in VIC and CFb, but not MyoFb. The AT1 receptor antagonist Losartan (10(-7) m) greatly attenuated Ang II-stimulated TGF-B1 secretion and decreased TGF-beta1 immunostaining in VIC. The AT2 receptor antagonist PD123177 (10(-7) m) also decreased secretion and immunostaining of TGF-beta1 in VIC, but to a lesser extent than Losartan. TGF-beta1 secretion by MyoFb was unaffected by Losartan and PD123177, although TGF-B1 immunostaining was absent or greatly decreased, respectively, compared to Ang II-treated MyoFb. Ang II stimulates TGF-beta1 gene expression and/or protein production in cardiac fibroblast-like cells which may act as an autocrine/paracrine stimulus to collagen formation. Furthermore, TGF-beta1 production and secretion in these cells can be modulated by specific Ang II receptor antagonists, suggesting a potential benefit in preventing

  12. Multiple Risk Factors of Alcoholic and Non-Alcoholic Myocardial Infarction Patients

    PubMed Central

    Harisharan; Singh, Awnish Kumar; Dangal, Nidhu Ram; Surapaneni, Krishna Mohan; Joshi, Ashish

    2016-01-01

    Background: Myocardial infarction (MI) is one of the most critical medical emergency and contributor to morbidity and mortality worldwide. Myocardial infarction is the most common form of coronary heart disease and leading cause of premature death. Past century has seen substantial advancement in the field of medical sciences but still mortality trends due to myocardial infarction is increasing in developing countries including India. We have conducted this study to compare the Sociodemographic characteristics of alcoholic and non alcoholic MI patients admitted in coronary care unit of Saveetha Medical College, Chennai, India. Methods: An exploratory cross sectional study was performed by enrolling a convenient sample of 100 Myocardial Infarction patients. Information about Sociodemographic characteristics, past medical history, alcohol and tobacco intake, physical activity, psychological stress and biochemical measurements was gathered. Results: The mean age of the respondents was 46 (SD=6) years and majority of them were male i.e. 82%. 100% married and 89% literate, there were 24% past and 22% present alcoholics. Consumption of alcohol on a monthly, weekly and daily basis was 8%, 11% and 5% respectively. Preference to brandy was 67%, rum was 21% and that the beer was 12%. Current smoker were 20% and former were 11%. 93% and 52% respondents were under medication of beta blocker and angiotensin-converting-enzyme (ACE) inhibitors respectively. Conclusion: Worldwide, MI is the most common cause of mortality and morbidity and hence early diagnosis and management is most essential. Results from our study revealed that, participants had sedentary lifestyles where risk factors of MI such as alcohol consumption, and smoking does existed. PMID:26234988

  13. Apelin-13 increases myocardial progenitor cells and improves repair postmyocardial infarction.

    PubMed

    Li, Lanfang; Zeng, Heng; Chen, Jian-Xiong

    2012-09-01

    Apelin is an endogenous ligand for the angiotensin-like 1 receptor (APJ) and has beneficial effects against myocardial ischemia-reperfusion injury. Little is known about the role of apelin in the homing of vascular progenitor cells (PCs) and cardiac functional recovery postmyocardial infarction (post-MI). The present study investigated whether apelin affects PC homing to the infarcted myocardium, thereby mediating repair and functional recovery post-MI. Mice were infarcted by coronary artery ligation, and apelin-13 (1 mg·kg(-1)·day(-1)) was injected for 3 days before MI and for 14 days post-MI. Homing of vascular PCs [CD133(+)/c-Kit(+)/Sca1(+), CD133(+)/stromal cell-derived factor (SDF)-1α(+), and CD133(+)/CXC chemokine receptor (CXCR)-4(+)] into the ischemic area was examined. Myocardial Akt, endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS), VEGF, jagged1, notch3, SDF-1α, and CXCR-4 expression were assessed at 24 h and 14 days post-MI. Functional analyses were performed on day 14 post-MI. Mice that received apelin-13 treatment demonstrated upregulation of SDF-1α/CXCR-4 expression and dramatically increased the number of CD133(+)/c-Kit(+)/Sca1(+), CD133(+)/SDF-1α(+), and c-Kit(+)/CXCR-4(+) cells in infarcted hearts. Apelin-13 also significantly increased Akt and eNOS phosphorylation and upregulated VEGF, jagged1, and notch3 expression in ischemic hearts. This was accompanied by a significant reduction of myocardial apoptosis. Furthermore, treatment with apelin-13 promoted myocardial angiogenesis and attenuated cardiac fibrosis and hypertrophy together with a significant improvement of cardiac function at 14 days post-MI. Apelin-13 increases angiogenesis and improves cardiac repair post-MI by a mechanism involving the upregulation of SDF-1α/CXCR-4 and homing of vascular PCs. PMID:22752632

  14. DNA Methylation Analysis of the Angiotensin Converting Enzyme (ACE) Gene in Major Depression

    PubMed Central

    Zill, Peter; Baghai, Thomas C.; Schüle, Cornelius; Born, Christoph; Früstück, Clemens; Büttner, Andreas; Eisenmenger, Wolfgang; Varallo-Bedarida, Gabriella; Rupprecht, Rainer; Möller, Hans-Jürgen; Bondy, Brigitta

    2012-01-01

    Background The angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) has been repeatedly discussed as susceptibility factor for major depression (MD) and the bi-directional relation between MD and cardiovascular disorders (CVD). In this context, functional polymorphisms of the ACE gene have been linked to depression, to antidepressant treatment response, to ACE serum concentrations, as well as to hypertension, myocardial infarction and CVD risk markers. The mostly investigated ACE Ins/Del polymorphism accounts for ∼40%–50% of the ACE serum concentration variance, the remaining half is probably determined by other genetic, environmental or epigenetic factors, but these are poorly understood. Materials and Methods The main aim of the present study was the analysis of the DNA methylation pattern in the regulatory region of the ACE gene in peripheral leukocytes of 81 MD patients and 81 healthy controls. Results We detected intensive DNA methylation within a recently described, functional important region of the ACE gene promoter including hypermethylation in depressed patients (p = 0.008) and a significant inverse correlation between the ACE serum concentration and ACE promoter methylation frequency in the total sample (p = 0.02). Furthermore, a significant inverse correlation between the concentrations of the inflammatory CVD risk markers ICAM-1, E-selectin and P-selectin and the degree of ACE promoter methylation in MD patients could be demonstrated (p = 0.01 - 0.04). Conclusion The results of the present study suggest that aberrations in ACE promoter DNA methylation may be an underlying cause of MD and probably a common pathogenic factor for the bi-directional relationship between MD and cardiovascular disorders. PMID:22808171

  15. Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme Inhibitors and Active Tuberculosis: A Population-Based Study.

    PubMed

    Wu, Jiunn-Yih; Lee, Meng-Tse Gabriel; Lee, Si-Huei; Lee, Shih-Hao; Tsai, Yi-Wen; Hsu, Shou-Chien; Chang, Shy-Shin; Lee, Chien-Chang

    2016-05-01

    Numerous epidemiological data suggest that the use of angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors (ACEis) can improve the clinical outcomes of pneumonia. Tuberculosis (TB) is an airborne bacteria like pneumonia, and we aimed to find out whether the use of ACEis can decrease the risk of active TB.We conducted a nested case-control analysis by using a 1 million longitudinally followed cohort, from Taiwan national health insurance research database. The rate ratios (RRs) for TB were estimated by conditional logistic regression, and adjusted using a TB-specific disease risk score (DRS) with 71 TB-related covariates.From January, 1997 to December, 2011, a total of 75,536 users of ACEis, and 7720 cases of new active TB were identified. Current use (DRS adjusted RR, 0.87 [95% CI, 0.78-0.97]), but not recent and past use of ACEis, was associated with a decrease in risk of active TB. Interestingly, it was found that chronic use (>90 days) of ACEis was associated with a further decrease in the risk of TB (aRR, 0.74, [95% CI, 0.66-0.83]). There was also a duration response effect, correlating decrease in TB risk with longer duration of ACEis use. The decrease in TB risk was also consistent across all patient subgroups (age, sex, heart failure, cerebrovascular diseases, myocardial infraction, renal diseases, and diabetes) and patients receiving other cardiovascular medicine.In this large population-based study, we found that subjects with recent and chronic use of ACEis were associated with decrease in TB risk. PMID:27175655

  16. Myocardial contusion following nonfatal blunt chest trauma

    SciTech Connect

    Kumar, S.A.; Puri, V.K.; Mittal, V.K.; Cortez, J.

    1983-04-01

    Currently available diagnostic techniques for myocardial contusion following blunt chest trauma were evaluated. We investigated 30 patients prospectively over a period of 1 year for the presence of myocardial contusion. Among the 30 patients, eight were found to have myocardial contusion on the basis of abnormal electrocardiograms, elevated creatine phosphokinase MB fraction (CPK-MB), and positive myocardial scan. Myocardial scan was positive in seven of eight patients (87.5%). CPK-MB fraction was elevated in four of eight patients (50%). Definitive electrocardiographic changes were seen in only two of eight patients (25%). It appears that myocardial scan using technetium pyrophosphate and CPK-MB fraction determinations are the most reliable aids in diagnosis of myocardial contusion following blunt chest trauma.

  17. The importance of the renin-angiotensin system in normal cardiovascular homeostasis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haber, E.

    1975-01-01

    Studies were carried out on adult mongrel dogs (20 to 30 kilograms) to investigate the importance of the renin-angiotensin system. Results indicate that the renin-angiotensin system plays a major role in the maintenance of circulatory homeostasis when extracellular fluid volume is depleted. It was also found that angiotensin II concentration, in addition to renal perfusion pressure, is a factor in the regulation of renin release.

  18. Chronobiology and Pharmacologic Modulation of the Renin-Angiotensin-Aldosterone System in Dogs: What Have We Learned?

    PubMed

    Mochel, Jonathan P; Danhof, Meindert

    2015-01-01

    Congestive heart failure (CHF) is a primary cause of morbidity and mortality with an increasing prevalence in human and canine populations. Recognition of the role of renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system (RAAS) overactivation in the pathophysiology of CHF has led to significant medical advances. By decreasing systemic vascular resistance and angiotensin II (AII) production, angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors such as benazepril improve cardiac hemodynamics and reduce mortality in human and dog CHF patients. Although several experiments have pointed out that efficacy of ACE inhibitors depends on the time of administration, little attention is paid to the optimum time of dosing of these medications. A thorough characterization of the chronobiology of the renin cascade has the potential to streamline the therapeutic management of RAAS-related diseases and to help determining the optimal time of drug administration that maximizes efficacy of ACE inhibitors, while minimizing the occurrence of adverse effects. We have developed an integrated pharmacokinetic-pharmacodynamic model that adequately captures the disposition kinetics of the paradigm drug benazeprilat, as well as the time-varying changes of systemic renin-angiotensin-aldosterone biomarkers, without and with ACE inhibition therapy. Based on these chronobiological investigations, the optimal efficacy of ACE inhibitors is expected with bedtime dosing. The data further show that benazepril influences the dynamics of the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone cascade, resulting in a profound decrease in AII and aldosterone (ALD), while increasing renin activity for about 24 h. From the results of recent investigations in human, it is hypothesized that reduction of AII and ALD is one of the drivers of increased survival and improved quality of life in dogs receiving ACE inhibitors. To support and consolidate this hypothesis, additional efforts should be directed toward the collection of circulating RAAS peptides

  19. Angiotensin-(1-7): new perspectives in atherosclerosis treatment

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Feng; Liu, Jun; Li, Su-Fang; Song, Jun-Xian; Ren, Jing-Yi; Chen, Hong

    2015-01-01

    Angiotensin (Ang)-(1-7) is recognized as a new bioactive peptide in renin-angiotensin system (RAS). Ang-(1-7) is a counter-regulatory mediator of Ang-II which appears to be protective against cardiovascular disease. Recent studies have found that Ang-(1-7) played an important role in reducing smooth muscle cell proliferation and migration, improving endothelial function and regulating lipid metabolism, leading to inhibition of atherosclerotic lesions and increase of plaque stability. Although clinical application of Ang-(1-7) is restricted due to its pharmacokinetic properties, identification of stabilized compounds, including more stable analogues and specific delivery compounds, has enabled clinical application of Ang-(1-7). In this review, we discussed recent findings concerning the biological role of Ang-(1-7) and related mechanism during atherosclerosis development. In addition, we highlighted the perspective to develop therapeutic strategies using Ang-(1-7) to treat atherosclerosis. PMID:26788046

  20. Data of the natural and pharmaceutical angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor isoleucine-tryptophan as a potent blocker of matrix metalloproteinase-2 expression in rat aorta.

    PubMed

    Kopaliani, Irakli; Martin, Melanie; Zatschler, Birgit; Müller, Bianca; Deussen, Andreas

    2016-09-01

    The present data are related to the research article entitled "Whey peptide isoleucine-tryptophan inhibits expression and activity of matrix metalloproteinase-2 in rat aorta" [1]. Here we present data on removal of endothelium from aorta, endothelium dependent aortic relaxation and inhibition of expression of pro-MMP2 by di-peptide isoleucine-tryptophan (IW). Experiments were performed in rat aortic endothelial cells (EC) and smooth muscle cells (SMC) in vitro, along with isolated rat aorta ex vivo. The cells and isolated aorta were stimulated with angiotensin II (ANGII) or angiotensin I (ANGI). ACE activity was inhibited by treatment with either IW or captopril (CA). Losartan was used as a blocker of angiotensin type-1 receptor. IW inhibited MMP2 protein expression induced with ANGI in a dose-dependent manner. IW was effective both in ECs and SMCs, as well as in isolated aorta. Similarly, captopril (CA) inhibited ANGI-induced MMP2 protein expression in both in vitro and ex vivo. Neither IW nor CA inhibited ANGII-induced MMP2 protein expression in contrast to losartan. The data also displays that removal of endothelium in isolated rat aorta abolished the endothelium-dependent relaxation induced with acetylcholine. However, SMC-dependent relaxation induced with sodium nitroprusside remained intact. Finally, the data provides histological evidence of selective removal of endothelial cells from aorta. PMID:27508250

  1. Local actions of angiotensin II: quantitative in vitro autoradiographic localization of angiotensin II receptor binding and angiotensin converting enzyme in target tissues

    SciTech Connect

    Chai, S.Y.; Allen, A.M.; Adam, W.R.; Mendelsohn, F.A.

    1986-01-01

    In order to gain insight into the local actions of angiotensin II (ANG II) we have determined the distribution of a component of the effector system for the peptide, the ANG II receptor, and that of an enzyme-catalysing ANG II formation, angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE), by in vitro autoradiography in several target tissues. The superagonist ANG II analog, /sup 125/I(Sar1)ANG II, or the antagonist analog, /sup 125/I(Sar1,Ile8)ANG II, were used as specific radioligands for ANG II receptors. A derivative of the specific ACE inhibitor, lysinopril, called /sup 125/I-351A, was used to label ACE in tissues. In the adrenal, a high density of ANG II receptors occurs in the glomerulosa zone of the cortex and in the medulla. ACE is also localized in these two zones, indicating that local production of ANG II may occur close to its sites of action in the zona glomerulosa and adrenal medulla. In the kidney, a high density of ANG II receptors is associated with glomeruli in the cortex and also with vasa recta bundles in the inner stripe of the outer medulla. ACE is found in very high concentration in deep proximal convoluted tubules of the cortex, while much lower concentrations of the enzyme occur in the vascular endothelium throughout the kidney. In the central nervous system three classes of relationships between ANG II receptors and ACE are observed: In the circumventricular organs, including the subfornical organ and organum vasculosum of the lamina terminalis, a high concentration of both components occurs. Since these structures have a deficient blood-brain barrier, local conversion of circulating angiotensin I (ANG I) to ANG II may contribute to the action of ANG II at these sites.

  2. Adenosine as an Adjunct Therapy in ST Elevation Myocardial Infarction Patients: Myth or Truth?

    PubMed

    Kassimis, George; Davlouros, Periklis; Patel, Niket; De Maria, Gianluigi; Kallistratos, Manolis S; Kharbanda, Rajesh K; Manolis, Athanasios J; Alexopoulos, Dimitrios; Banning, Adrian P

    2015-10-01

    Early reperfusion represents the key strategy in ST elevation myocardial infarction. However, reperfusion may induce myocardial damage due to the reperfusion myocardial injury, compromising the full potential of reperfusion therapy and accounting for unfavourable results in high risk patients. Adenosine seems to attenuate ischemia reperfusion injury, and thus represents a promising therapeutic option for treating such patients. However, previous randomized clinical trials have collectively failed to demonstrate whether adenosine can effectively reduce measures of myocardial injury and improve clinical outcome, despite its good basic evidence. The failure of such trials to show a real beneficial action may be in part related to specific factors other than adenosine's clinical efficacy. The purpose of this review is to explain the rationale for the use of adenosine as an adjunctive pharmacological cardio-protective agent following reperfusion of the ischemic myocardium, to address the weakness of previous trials and to summarize the current state of knowledge regarding the effect of adenosine administration on reperfusion myocardial injury in patients with myocardial infarction. Although some preclinical and clinical studies point towards the beneficial role of adenosine in the prevention and treatment of no-reflow phenomenon in myocardial infarction, many unanswered questions still remain, including the optimal clinical indication, mode, dosage, duration and timing of application, and the exact mechanisms leading to potential benefits. Clarifying these issues will depend on further properly designed, adequately powered and well conducted clinical trials, which will probably provide us with the definite answers. PMID:26150100

  3. Aqueous extract of Saussurea lappa root ameliorate oxidative myocardial injury induced by isoproterenol in rats

    PubMed Central

    Saleem, T. S. Mohamed; Lokanath, N.; Prasanthi, A.; Madhavi, M.; Mallika, G.; Vishnu, M. N.

    2013-01-01

    Saussurea lappa Clarke (Compositae), is commonly known as Kushta. In Ayurvedha, it is mentioned that the aqueous extract of the root S. lappa was used for treatment of angina pectoris. The present study was designed to investigate the cardioprotective effect of aqueous extract of root of S. lappa against isoproterenol induced myocardial injury. Myocardial injury in rat was induced by the administration of isoproterenol at a dose of 85 mg/kg, i.p., The rats were pretreated with the aqueous extract of S. lappa (AESL) in three different doses (100, 200 and 300 mg/kg, p.o.) through the oral route. Isoproterenol alone-treated rats showed increased serum concentration of lactate dehydrogenase (LDH), creatinine kinase (CK), and aspartate transaminase (AST), increased myocardial thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS) level, and decreased myocardial glutathione (GSH) level due to myocardial damage produced by isoproterenol. This is further conformed by histopathological changes. Chronic oral administration of AESL in three different doses significantly restored the level of myocardial LDH, CK, AST, TBARS, and GSH. The extract effect was compared with the reference standard α-tocopherol which also offered similar protection in biochemical and histopathological changes. The overall beneficial effect which was observed with the dose of 200 mg/kg indicated that AESL produced significant dose-dependent activity against isoproterenol induced myocardial injury. PMID:23833749

  4. Spousal Adjustment to Myocardial Infarction.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ziglar, Elisa J.

    This paper reviews the literature on the stresses and coping strategies of spouses of patients with myocardial infarction (MI). It attempts to identify specific problem areas of adjustment for the spouse and to explore the effects of spousal adjustment on patient recovery. Chapter one provides an overview of the importance in examining the…

  5. [Sewer gas induced myocardial toxicity].

    PubMed

    Antonelli, Dante; Sabanchiev, Avi; Rosner, Ehud; Turgeman, Yoav

    2014-07-01

    We report the case of a 19 year-old worker who collapsed after acute exposure to sewer gas. He rapidly developed cardiorespiratory failure with electrocardiographic, echocardiographic and laboratory findings of myocardial involvement. The mainstay of the therapy was mainly supportive treatment with a successful outcome. PMID:25189024

  6. Thrombolysis for Acute Myocardial Infarction

    PubMed Central

    Webb, John; Thompson, Christopher

    1992-01-01

    Thrombolysis has an important role in the management of acute myocardial infarction. Early treatment can markedly reduce mortality and morbidity. This new standard of care requires knowledge of accepted indications and contraindications for thrombolysis as well as familiarity with available agents and regimens. ImagesFigure 3 PMID:21221398

  7. Angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibition by Brazilian plants.

    PubMed

    Braga, Fernão C; Serra, Carla P; Viana, Nilton S; Oliveira, Alaíde B; Côrtes, Steyner F; Lombardi, Júlio A

    2007-07-01

    The potential antihypertensive activity of Brazilian plants was evaluated in vitro by its ability to inhibit the angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE). Forty-four plants belonging to 30 families were investigated. Plants were selected based on their popular use as antihypertensive and/or diuretics. The following plants presented significant ACE inhibition rates: Calophyllum brasiliense, Combretum fruticosum, Leea rubra, Phoenix roebelinii and Terminalia catappa. PMID:17513067

  8. Nonclassical renin-angiotensin system and renal function.

    PubMed

    Chappell, Mark C

    2012-10-01

    The renin-angiotensin system (RAS) constitutes one of the most important hormonal systems in the physiological regulation of blood pressure through renal and nonrenal mechanisms. Indeed, dysregulation of the RAS is considered a major factor in the development of cardiovascular pathologies, including kidney injury, and blockade of this system by the inhibition of angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) or blockade of the angiotensin type 1 receptor (AT1R) by selective antagonists constitutes an effective therapeutic regimen. It is now apparent with the identification of multiple components of the RAS within the kidney and other tissues that the system is actually composed of different angiotensin peptides with diverse biological actions mediated by distinct receptor subtypes. The classic RAS can be defined as the ACE-Ang II-AT1R axis that promotes vasoconstriction, water intake, sodium retention, and other mechanisms to maintain blood pressure, as well as increase oxidative stress, fibrosis, cellular growth, and inflammation in pathological conditions. In contrast, the nonclassical RAS composed primarily of the AngII/Ang III-AT2R pathway and the ACE2-Ang-(1-7)-AT7R axis generally opposes the actions of a stimulated Ang II-AT1R axis through an increase in nitric oxide and prostaglandins and mediates vasodilation, natriuresis, diuresis, and reduced oxidative stress. Moreover, increasing evidence suggests that these non-classical RAS components contribute to the therapeutic blockade of the classical system to reduce blood pressure and attenuate various indices of renal injury, as well as contribute to normal renal function. PMID:23720263

  9. The effect of oestrogen and progesterone on the pressor action of angiotensin in the rat

    PubMed Central

    Hettiaratchi, E. S. G.; Pickford, Mary

    1968-01-01

    1. A comparison was made between the pressor responses to angiotensin in rats during different stages of the oestrous cycle, pregnancy, pseudopregnancy and also following oestrogen and progesterone treatment. 2. No evidence for an effect of oestrogen on the response to angiotensin was found. 3. Pregnancy and pseudopregnancy were found to diminish the pressor response to angiotensin. 4. Progesterone treatment also diminished the response to angiotensin. 5. It is suggested that the decrease in pressor response in pregnancy and pseudopregnancy is attributable to progesterone. 6. The possible mode of action of progesterone is discussed. PMID:4297416

  10. Angiotensin II prevents hypoxic pulmonary hypertension and vascular changes in rat

    SciTech Connect

    Rabinovitch, M.; Mullen, M.; Rosenberg, H.C.; Maruyama, K.; O'Brodovich, H.; Olley, P.M. )

    1988-03-01

    Angiotensin II, a vasoconstrictor, has been previously demonstrated to produce a secondary vasodilatation due to release of prostaglandins. Because of this effect, the authors investigated whether infusion of exogenous angiotensin II via miniosmopumps in rats during a 1-wk exposure to chronic hypobaric hypoxia might prevent pulmonary hypertension, right ventricular hypertrophy, and vascular changes. They instrumented the rats with indwelling cardiovascular catheters and compared the hemodynamic and structural response in animals given angiotensin II, indomethacin in addition to angiotensin II (to block prostaglandin production), or saline with or without indomethacin. They then determine whether angiotensin II infusion also prevents acute hypoxic pulmonary vasoconstriction. They observed that exogenous angiotensin II infusion abolished the rise in pulmonary artery pressure, the right ventricular hypertrophy, and the vascular changes induced during chronic hypoxia in control saline-infused rats with or without indomethacin. The protective effects of angiotensin II was lost when indomethacin was given to block prostaglandin synthesis. During acute hypoxia, both antiotensin II and prostacyclin infusion similarly prevented the rise in pulmonary artery pressure observed in saline-infused rats and in rats given indomethacin or saralasin in addition to angiotensin II. Thus exogenous angiotensin II infusion prevents chronic hypoxic pulmonary hypertension, associated right ventricular hypertrophy, and vascular changes and blocks acute hypoxic pulmonary hypertension, and this is likely related to its ability to release vasodilator prostaglandins.

  11. Renin Angiotensin Signaling in Normal Pregnancy and Preeclampsia

    PubMed Central

    Irani, Roxanna A.; Xia, Yang

    2011-01-01

    Summary Many reports indicate that there is an increase in almost all of the components of the renin-angiotensin system (RAS) during an uncomplicated pregnancy, but renin activity, angiotensin II, and aldosterone decrease in preeclampsia (PE) for reasons that are unclear. PE is a life-threatening disorder of late pregnancy characterized by hypertension, proteinuria, increased soluble fms-like tyrosine kinase-1, as well as renal and placental morphologic abnormalities. Although a leading cause of maternal and perinatal morbidity and mortality, the pathogenic mechanisms of PE remain largely undefined. Immunologic mechanisms and aberrations of the RAS have been long considered contributors to the disorder. Bridging these two concepts, numerous studies report the presence of the angiotensin II type I receptor agonistic autoantibody (AT1-AA) found circulating in preeclamptic women. This autoantibody induces many key features of the disorder through AT1 receptor signaling, and has been implicated in the pathogenesis of PE. Here we review the functions of the RAS during normal pregnancy and PE, and highlight the role of AT1-AA in both animal models and in the human disorder. PMID:21266264

  12. Renin angiotensin system: A novel target for migraine prophylaxis.

    PubMed

    Nandha, Ruchika; Singh, Harpal

    2012-03-01

    Migraine constitutes 16% of primary headaches affecting 10-20% of general population according to International Headache Society. Till now nonsteroidalanti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDS), opioids and triptans are the drugs being used for acute attack of migraine. Substances with proven efficacy for prevention include β-blockers, calcium channel blockers, antiepileptic drugs and antidepressants. All the already available drugs have certain limitations. Either they are unable to produce complete relief or 30-40% patients are no responders or drugs produce adverse effects. This necessitates the search for more efficacious and well-tolerated drugs. A new class of drugs like angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors (ACE inhibitors) and angiotensin II receptor antagonists have recently been studied for their off label use in prophylaxis of migraine. Studies, done so far, have shown results in favour of their clinical use because of the ability to reduce number of days with headache, number of days with migraine, hours with migraine, headache severity index, level of disability, improved Quality of life and decrease in consumption of specific or nonspecific analgesics. This article reviews the available evidence on the efficacy and safety of these drugs in prophylaxis of migraine and can give physician a direction to use these drugs for chronic migraineurs. Searches of pubmed, Cochrane database, Medscape, Google and clinicaltrial.org were made using terms like ACE inhibitors, angiotensin II receptor antagonists and migraine. Relevant journal articles were chosen to provide necessary information. PMID:22529467

  13. Interleukin-17A Regulates Renal Sodium Transporters and Renal Injury in Angiotensin II-Induced Hypertension.

    PubMed

    Norlander, Allison E; Saleh, Mohamed A; Kamat, Nikhil V; Ko, Benjamin; Gnecco, Juan; Zhu, Linjue; Dale, Bethany L; Iwakura, Yoichiro; Hoover, Robert S; McDonough, Alicia A; Madhur, Meena S

    2016-07-01

    Angiotensin II-induced hypertension is associated with an increase in T-cell production of interleukin-17A (IL-17A). Recently, we reported that IL-17A(-/-) mice exhibit blunted hypertension, preserved natriuresis in response to a saline challenge, and decreased renal sodium hydrogen exchanger 3 expression after 2 weeks of angiotensin II infusion compared with wild-type mice. In the current study, we performed renal transporter profiling in mice deficient in IL-17A or the related isoform, IL-17F, after 4 weeks of Ang II infusion, the time when the blood pressure reduction in IL-17A(-/-) mice is most prominent. Deficiency of IL-17A abolished the activation of distal tubule transporters, specifically the sodium-chloride cotransporter and the epithelial sodium channel and protected mice from glomerular and tubular injury. In human proximal tubule (HK-2) cells, IL-17A increased sodium hydrogen exchanger 3 expression through a serum and glucocorticoid-regulated kinase 1-dependent pathway. In mouse distal convoluted tubule cells, IL-17A increased sodium-chloride cotransporter activity in a serum and glucocorticoid-regulated kinase 1/Nedd4-2-dependent pathway. In both cell types, acute treatment with IL-17A induced phosphorylation of serum and glucocorticoid-regulated kinase 1 at serine 78, and treatment with a serum and glucocorticoid-regulated kinase 1 inhibitor blocked the effects of IL-17A on sodium hydrogen exchanger 3 and sodium-chloride cotransporter. Interestingly, both HK-2 and mouse distal convoluted tubule 15 cells produce endogenous IL-17A. IL17F had little or no effect on blood pressure or renal sodium transporter abundance. These studies provide a mechanistic link by which IL-17A modulates renal sodium transport and suggest that IL-17A inhibition may improve renal function in hypertension and other autoimmune disorders. PMID:27141060

  14. Cardiac angiotensin-(1-12) expression and systemic hypertension in rats expressing the human angiotensinogen gene.

    PubMed

    Ferrario, Carlos M; VonCannon, Jessica; Jiao, Yan; Ahmad, Sarfaraz; Bader, Michael; Dell'Italia, Louis J; Groban, Leanne; Varagic, Jasmina

    2016-04-15

    Angiotensin-(1-12) [ANG-(1-12)] is processed into ANG II by chymase in rodent and human heart tissue. Differences in the amino acid sequence of rat and human ANG-(1-12) render the human angiotensinogen (hAGT) protein refractory to cleavage by renin. We used transgenic rats harboring the hAGT gene [TGR(hAGT)L1623] to assess the non-renin-dependent effects of increased hAGT expression on heart function and arterial pressure. Compared with Sprague-Dawley (SD) control rats (n= 11), male homozygous TGR(hAGT)L1623 (n= 9) demonstrated sustained daytime and nighttime hypertension associated with no changes in heart rate but increased heart rate lability. Increased heart weight/tibial length ratio and echocardiographic indexes of cardiac hypertrophy were associated with modest reduction of systolic function in hAGT rats. Robust human ANG-(1-12) immunofluorescence within myocytes of TGR(hAGT)L1623 rats was associated with a fourfold increase in cardiac ANG II content. Chymase enzymatic activity, using the rat or human ANG-(1-12) as a substrate, was not different in the cardiac tissue of SD and hAGT rats. Since both cardiac angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) and ACE2 activities were not different among the two strains, the changes in cardiac structure and function, blood pressure, and left ventricular ANG II content might be a product of an increased cardiac expression of ANG II generated through a non-renin-dependent mechanism. The data also underscore the existence in the rat of alternate enzymes capable of acting on hAGT protein. Homozygous transgenic rats expressing the hAGT gene represent a novel tool to investigate the contribution of human relevant renin-independent cardiac ANG II formation and function. PMID:26873967

  15. Angiotensin peptides attenuate platelet-activating factor-induced inflammatory activity in rats.

    PubMed

    Sato, Akira; Yokoyama, Izumi; Ebina, Keiichi

    2015-11-01

    Angiotensin (Ang)--a peptide that is part of the renin-angiotensin system-induces vasoconstriction and a subsequent increase in blood pressure; Ang peptides, especially AngII, can also act as potent pro-inflammatory mediators. Platelet-activating factor (PAF) is a potent phospholipid mediator that is implicated in many inflammatory diseases. In this study, we investigated the effects of Ang peptides (AngII, AngIII, and AngIV) on PAF-induced inflammatory activity. In experiments using a rat hind-paw oedema model, AngII markedly and dose-dependently attenuated the paw oedema induced by PAF. The inhibitory effects of AngIII and AngIV on PAF-induced paw oedema were lower than that of AngII. Two Ang receptors, the AT1 and AT2 receptors, did not affect the AngII-mediated attenuation of PAF-induced paw oedema. Moreover, intrinsic tyrosine fluorescence studies demonstrated that AngII, AngIII, and AngIV interact with PAF, and that their affinities were closely correlated with their inhibitory effects on PAF-induced rat paw oedema. Also, AngII interacted with metabolite/precursor of PAF (lyso-PAF), and an oxidized phospholipid, 1-palmitoyl-2-(5'-oxo-valeroyl)-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (POVPC), which bears a marked structural resemblance to PAF. Furthermore, POVPC dose-dependently inhibited AngII-mediated attenuation of PAF-induced paw oedema. These results suggest that Ang peptides can attenuate PAF-induced inflammatory activity through binding to PAF and lyso-PAF in rats. Therefore, Ang peptides may be closely involved in the regulation of many inflammatory diseases caused by PAF. PMID:26348270

  16. Aliskiren – an alternative to angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors or angiotensin receptor blockers in the therapy of arterial hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Hoffmann, Karolina; Bryl, Wiesław; Minczykowski, Andrzej

    2013-01-01

    There has been enormous progress in antihypertensive therapy over the last few decades. However, the management of arterial hypertension is still insufficient and more efforts are needed to improve both non-pharmacological and pharmacological treatment of this widely prevalent disease. Renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system (RAAS) inhibition is crucial both for blood pressure (BP) control and for prevention of organ damage or its development in patients with hypertension. Angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors and/or sartans block RAAS incompletely. Aliskiren is one of the novel drugs that has been introduced to antihypertensive therapy recently. Up to now no trial has confirmed that aliskiren is efficacious in reducing cardiovascular events. Double RAAS blockade with aliskiren was not always safe. This review article presents the current view on the place of aliskiren in the therapy of arterial hypertension. PMID:25276171

  17. Angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors and angiotensin receptor blockers in women of childbearing age: risks versus benefits.

    PubMed

    Pucci, Mark; Sarween, Nadia; Knox, Ellen; Lipkin, Graham; Martin, Una

    2015-03-01

    Angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors (ACEIs) and angiotensin receptor blockers (ARBs) are effective and widely used antihypertensive drugs. Exposure to these agents is known to be harmful to the fetus in the second and third trimesters of pregnancy. Concerns have also been raised about the risk of congenital malformations if ACEIs or ARBs are taken during the first trimester of pregnancy. The evidence to date, however, is conflicting and observed malformations may be due to confounders such as undiagnosed diabetes or maternal obesity, other antihypertensive medications or the hypertension itself. Nonetheless, in women who become pregnant while taking an ACEI or ARB, the drug should be stopped as soon as possible. In women with chronic kidney disease and proteinuria, it may be appropriate to continue taking an ACEI or ARB until the pregnancy is confirmed because of the significant benefit to their kidney function and the lower fertility rate in these patients. PMID:25612630

  18. Aliskiren - an alternative to angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors or angiotensin receptor blockers in the therapy of arterial hypertension.

    PubMed

    Zaporowska-Stachowiak, Iwona; Hoffmann, Karolina; Bryl, Wiesław; Minczykowski, Andrzej

    2014-08-29

    There has been enormous progress in antihypertensive therapy over the last few decades. However, the management of arterial hypertension is still insufficient and more efforts are needed to improve both non-pharmacological and pharmacological treatment of this widely prevalent disease. Renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system (RAAS) inhibition is crucial both for blood pressure (BP) control and for prevention of organ damage or its development in patients with hypertension. Angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors and/or sartans block RAAS incompletely. Aliskiren is one of the novel drugs that has been introduced to antihypertensive therapy recently. Up to now no trial has confirmed that aliskiren is efficacious in reducing cardiovascular events. Double RAAS blockade with aliskiren was not always safe. This review article presents the current view on the place of aliskiren in the therapy of arterial hypertension. PMID:25276171

  19. Deletion of the angiotensin II type 1 receptor–associated protein enhances renal sodium reabsorption and exacerbates angiotensin II–mediated hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Ohsawa, Masato; Tamura, Kouichi; Wakui, Hiromichi; Maeda, Akinobu; Dejima, Toru; Kanaoka, Tomohiko; Azushima, Kengo; Uneda, Kazushi; Tsurumi-Ikeya, Yuko; Kobayashi, Ryu; Matsuda, Miyuki; Uchida, Shinichi; Toya, Yoshiyuki; Kobori, Hiroyuki; Nishiyama, Akira; Yamashita, Akio; Ishikawa, Yoshihiro; Umemura, Satoshi

    2014-01-01

    Angiotensin II type 1 receptor (AT1R)–associated protein (ATRAP) promotes AT1R internalization along with suppression of pathological activation of tissue AT1R signaling. However, the functional significance of ATRAP in renal sodium handling and blood pressure regulation under pathological stimuli is not fully resolved. Here we show the blood pressure of mice with a gene-targeted disruption of ATRAP was comparable to that of wild-type mice at baseline. However, in ATRAP-knockout mice, angiotensin II–induced hypertension was exacerbated and the extent of positive sodium balance was increased by angiotensin II. Renal expression of the sodium-proton antiporter 3, a major sodium transporter in the proximal tubules, urinary pH, renal angiotensinogen production, and angiotensin II content was unaffected. Stimulation of the renal expression and activity of the epithelial sodium channel (ENaC), a major sodium transporter in the distal tubules, was significantly enhanced by chronic angiotensin II infusion. The circulating and urinary aldosterone levels were comparable. The blood pressure response and renal ENaC expression by aldosterone were not affected. Thus, ATRAP deficiency exacerbated angiotensin II–mediated hypertension by pathological activation of renal tubular AT1R by angiotensin II. This directly stimulates ENaC in the distal tubules and enhances sodium retention in an aldosterone-independent manner. PMID:24694992

  20. Coronary microvascular obstruction in acute myocardial infarction.

    PubMed

    Niccoli, Giampaolo; Scalone, Giancarla; Lerman, Amir; Crea, Filippo

    2016-04-01

    The success of a primary percutaneous intervention (PCI) in the setting of ST elevation myocardial infarction depends on the functional and structural integrity of coronary microcirculation. Coronary microvascular dysfunction and obstruction (CMVO) occurs in up to half of patients submitted to apparently successful primary PCI and is associated to a much worse outcome. The current review summarizes the complex mechanisms responsible for CMVO, including pre-existing coronary microvascular dysfunction, and highlights the current limitations in the assessment of microvascular function. More importantly, at the light of the substantial failure of trials hitherto published on the treatment of CMVO, this review proposes a novel integrated therapeutic approach, which should overcome the limitations of previous studies. PMID:26364289

  1. Relationship between angiotensin-(1-7) and angiotensin II correlates with hemodynamic changes in human liver cirrhosis

    PubMed Central

    Vilas-Boas, Walkíria Wingester; Ribeiro-Oliveira Jr, Antônio; Pereira, Regina Maria; da Cunha Ribeiro, Renata; Almeida, Jerusa; Nadu, Ana Paula; Simões e Silva, Ana Cristina; dos Santos, Robson Augusto Souza

    2009-01-01

    AIM: To measure circulating angiotensins at different stages of human cirrhosis and to further evaluate a possible relationship between renin angiotensin system (RAS) components and hemodynamic changes. METHODS: Patients were allocated into 4 groups: mild-to-moderate liver disease (MLD), advanced liver disease (ALD), patients undergoing liver transplantation, and healthy controls. Blood was collected to determine plasma renin activity (PRA), angiotensin (Ang) I, Ang II, and Ang-(1-7) levels using radioimmunoassays. During liver transplantation, hemodynamic parameters were determined and blood was simultaneously obtained from the portal vein and radial artery in order to measure RAS components. RESULTS: PRA and angiotensins were elevated in ALD when compared to MLD and controls (P < 0.05). In contrast, Ang II was significantly reduced in MLD. Ang-(1-7)/Ang II ratios were increased in MLD when compared to controls and ALD. During transplantation, Ang II levels were lower and Ang-(1-7)/Ang II ratios were higher in the splanchnic circulation than in the peripheral circulation (0.52 ± 0.08 vs 0.38 ± 0.04, P < 0.02), whereas the peripheral circulating Ang II/Ang I ratio was elevated in comparison to splanchnic levels (0.18 ± 0.02 vs 0.13 ± 0.02, P < 0.04). Ang-(1-7)/Ang II ratios positively correlated with cardiac output (r = 0.66) and negatively correlated with systemic vascular resistance (r = -0.70). CONCLUSION: Our findings suggest that the relationship between Ang-(1-7) and Ang II may play a role in the hemodynamic changes of human cirrhosis. PMID:19469002

  2. Perioperative management of patients treated with angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors and angiotensin II receptor blockers: a quality improvement audit.

    PubMed

    Vijay, A; Grover, A; Coulson, T G; Myles, P S

    2016-05-01

    Previous studies have shown that patients continuing angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors or angiotensin II receptor blockers on the day of surgery are more likely to have significant intraoperative hypotension, higher rates of postoperative acute kidney injury, and lower incidences of postoperative atrial fibrillation. However, many of these studies were prone to bias and confounding, and questions remain over the validity of these outcomes. This observational, before-and-after quality improvement audit aimed to assess the effect of withholding these medications on the morning of surgery. We recruited 323 participants, with 83 (26%) having their preoperative angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor (ACEi) or angiotensin II receptor blocker (ARB) withheld on the day of surgery. There were only very small Spearman rank-order correlations between time since last dose of these medications (rho -0.12, P=0.057) and intraoperative and recovery room intravenous fluid administration (rho -0.11, P=0.042). There was no statistically significant difference between the continued or withheld groups in vasopressor (metaraminol use 3.5 [1.5-8.3] mg versus 3.5 [1.5-8.5] mg, P=0.67) or intravenous fluid administration (1000 ml [800-1500] ml versus 1000 [800-1500] ml, P=0.096), nor rates of postoperative acute kidney injury (13% vs 18%, P=0.25) or atrial fibrillation (15% versus 18%, P=0.71). This audit found no significant differences in measured outcomes between the continued or withheld ACEi/ARB groups. This finding should be interpreted with caution due to the possibility of confounding and an insufficient sample size. However, as the finding is in contrast to many previous studies, future prospective randomised clinical trials are required to answer this important question. PMID:27246933

  3. An angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) polymorphism may mitigate the effects of angiotensin-pathway medications on posttraumatic stress symptoms.

    PubMed

    Nylocks, K M; Michopoulos, V; Rothbaum, A O; Almli, L; Gillespie, C F; Wingo, A; Schwartz, A C; Habib, L; Gamwell, K L; Marvar, P J; Bradley, B; Ressler, K J

    2015-06-01

    Angiotensin, which regulates blood pressure may also act within the brain to mediate stress and fear responses. Common antihypertensive medication classes of angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors (ACE-Is) and angiotensin receptor blockers (ARBs) have been associated with lower PTSD symptoms. Here we examine the rs4311 SNP in the ACE gene, previously implicated in panic attacks, in the relationship between ACE-I/ARB medications and PTSD symptoms. Participants were recruited from outpatient wait rooms between 2006 and March 2014 (n=  803). We examined the interaction between rs4311 genotype and the presence of blood pressure medication on PTSD symptoms and diagnosis. PTSD symptoms were lower in individuals taking ACE-Is or ARBs (N = 776). The rs4311 was associated with PTSD symptoms and diagnosis (N = 3803), as the T-carriers at the rs4311 SNP had significantly greater likelihood of a PTSD diagnosis. Lastly, the rs4311 genotype modified the effect of ACE-Is or ARBs on PTSD symptoms (N = 443; F1,443 = 4.41, P < 0.05). Individuals with the CC rs4311 genotype showed lower PTSD symptoms in the presence of ACE-Is or ARBs. In contrast, T- carriers showed the opposite, such that the presence of ACE-Is or ARBs was associated with higher PTSD symptoms. These data suggest that the renin-angiotensin system may be important in PTSD, as ACE-I/ARB usage associates with lower symptoms. Furthermore, we provide genetic evidence that some individuals are comparatively more benefitted by ACE-Is/ARBs in PTSD treatment. Future research should examine the mechanisms by which ACE-Is/ARBs affect PTSD symptoms such that pharmaco-genetically informed interventions may be used to treat PTSD. PMID:25921615

  4. Angiotensin IV protects cardiac reperfusion injury by inhibiting apoptosis and inflammation via AT4R in rats.

    PubMed

    Park, Byung Mun; Cha, Seung Ah; Lee, Sun Hwa; Kim, Suhn Hee

    2016-05-01

    Angiotensin IV (Ang IV) is formed by aminopeptidase N from Ang III by removing the first N-terminal amino acid. Previously, we reported that Ang III has some cardioprotective effects against global ischemia in Langendorff heart. However, it is not clear whether Ang IV has cardioprotective effects. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the effect of Ang IV on myocardial ischemia-reperfusion (I/R) injury in rats. Before ischemia, male Sprague-Dawley rats received Ang IV (1mg/kg/day) for 3 days. Anesthetized rats were subjected to 45min of ischemia by ligation of left anterior descending coronary artery followed by reperfusion and then, sacrificed 1 day or 1 week after reperfusion. Plasma creatine kinase (CK) and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) concentrations, and infarct size were measured. Quantitative analysis of apoptotic and inflammatory proteins in ventricles were performed using Western blotting. Pretreatment with Ang IV attenuated I/R-induced increases in plasma CK and LDH levels, and infarct size, which were blunted by Ang IV receptor (AT4R) antagonist and but not by antagonist for AT1R, AT2R, or Mas receptor. I/R increased Bax, caspase-3 and caspase-9 protein levels, and decreased Bcl-2 protein level in ventricles, which were blunted by Ang IV. I/R-induced increases in TNF-α, MMP-9, and VCAM-1 protein levels in ventricles were also blunted by Ang IV. Ang IV increased the phosphorylation of Akt and mTOR. These effects were attenuated by co-treatment with AT4R antagonist or inhibitors of downstream signaling pathway. Myocardial dysfunction after reperfusion was improved by Ang IV. These results suggest that Ang IV has cardioprotective effect against I/R injury by inhibiting apoptosis via AT4R and PI3K-Akt-mTOR pathway. PMID:27038740

  5. Cognitive enhancing effect of angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors and angiotensin receptor blockers on learning and memory

    PubMed Central

    Nade, V. S.; Kawale, L. A.; Valte, K. D.; Shendye, N. V.

    2015-01-01

    Objective: The present study was designed to investigate cognitive enhancing property of angiotensin-converting enzymes inhibitors (ACEI) and angiotensin receptor blockers (ARBs) in rats. Materials and Methods: The elevated plus maze (EPM), passive avoidance test (PAT), and water maze test (WMT) were used to assess cognitive enhancing activity in young and aged rats. Ramipril (10 mg/kg, p.o.), perindopril (10 mg/kg, i.p), losartan (20 mg/kg, i.p), and valsartan (20 mg/kg, p.o) were administered to assess their effect on learning and memory. Scopolamine (1 mg/kg, i.p) was used to impair cognitive function. Piracetam (200 mg/kg, i.p) was used as reference drug. Results: All the treatments significantly attenuated amnesia induced by aging and scopolamine. In EPM, aged and scopolamine-treated rats showed an increase in transfer latency (TL) whereas, ACEI and ARBs showed a significant decrease in TL. Treatment with ACEI and ARBs significantly increased step down latencies and decreased latency to reach the platform in target quadrant in young, aged and scopolamine-treated animals in PAT and WMT, respectively. The treatments inhibited acetylcholinesterase (AChE) enzyme in the brain. Similarly, all the treatments attenuated scopolamine-induced lipid peroxidation and normalize antioxidant enzymes. Conclusion: The results suggest that the cognitive enhancing effect of ACEI and ARBs may be due to inhibition of AChE or by regulation of antioxidant system or increase in formation of angiotensin IV. PMID:26069362

  6. The Renin-Angiotensin System Modulates Inflammatory Processes in Atherosclerosis: Evidence from Basic Research and Clinical Studies

    PubMed Central

    Montecucco, Fabrizio; Pende, Aldo; Mach, François

    2009-01-01

    Recent evidence shows that the renin-angiotensin system is a crucial player in atherosclerotic processes. The regulation of arterial blood pressure was considered from its first description of the main mechanism involved. Vasoconstriction (mediated by angiotensin II) and salt and water retention (mainly due to aldosterone) were classically considered as pivotal proatherosclerotic activities. However, basic research and animal studies strongly support angiotensin II as a proinflammatory mediator, which directly induces atherosclerotic plaque development and heart remodeling. Furthermore, angiotensin II induces proatherosclerotic cytokine and chemokine secretion and increases endothelial dysfunction. Accordingly, the pharmacological inhibition of the renin-angiotensin system improves prognosis of patients with cardiovascular disease even in settings of normal baseline blood pressure. In the present review, we focused on angiotensin-convertingenzyme (ACE) inhibitors, angiotensin II receptor blockers (ARBs), and renin inhibitors to update the direct activities of the renin-angiotensin system in inflammatory processes governing atherosclerosis. PMID:19390623

  7. Angiotensin II type 2 receptor- and acetylcholine-mediated relaxation: essential contribution of female sex hormones and chromosomes.

    PubMed

    Pessôa, Bruno Sevá; Slump, Denise E; Ibrahimi, Khatera; Grefhorst, Aldo; van Veghel, Richard; Garrelds, Ingrid M; Roks, Anton J M; Kushner, Steven A; Danser, A H Jan; van Esch, Joep H M

    2015-08-01

    Angiotensin-induced vasodilation, involving type 2 receptor (AT2R)-induced generation of nitric oxide (NO; by endothelial NO synthase) and endothelium-derived hyperpolarizing factors, may be limited to women. To distinguish the contribution of female sex hormones and chromosomes to AT2R function and endothelium-derived hyperpolarizing factor-mediated vasodilation, we made use of the four-core genotype model, where the testis-determining Sry gene has been deleted (Y(-)) from the Y chromosome, allowing XY(-) mice to develop a female gonadal phenotype. Simultaneously, by incorporating the Sry gene onto an autosome, XY(-)Sry and XXSry transgenic mice develop into gonadal male mice. Four-core genotype mice underwent a sham or gonadectomy (GDX) operation, and after 8 weeks, iliac arteries were collected to assess vascular function. XY(-)Sry male mice responded more strongly to angiotensin than XX female mice, and the AT2R antagonist PD123319 revealed that this was because of a dilator AT2R-mediated effect occurring exclusively in XX female mice. The latter could not be demonstrated in XXSry male and XY(-) female mice nor in XX female mice after GDX, suggesting that it depends on both sex hormones and chromosomes. Indeed, treating C57bl/6 GDX male mice with estrogen could not restore angiotensin-mediated, AT2R-dependent relaxation. To block acetylcholine-induced relaxation of iliac arteries obtained from four-core genotype XX mice, both endothelial NO synthase and endothelium-derived hyperpolarizing factor inhibition were required, whereas in four-core genotype XY animals, endothelial NO synthase inhibition alone was sufficient. These findings were independent of gonadal sex and unaltered after GDX. In conclusion, AT2R-induced relaxation requires both estrogen and the XX chromosome sex complement, whereas only the latter is required for endothelium-derived hyperpolarizing factors. PMID:26056343

  8. Parametric methods for characterizing myocardial tissue by magnetic resonance imaging (part 2): T2 mapping.

    PubMed

    Perea Palazón, R J; Solé Arqués, M; Prat González, S; de Caralt Robira, T M; Cibeira López, M T; Ortiz Pérez, J T

    2015-01-01

    Cardiac magnetic resonance imaging is considered the reference technique for characterizing myocardial tissue; for example, T2-weighted sequences make it possible to evaluate areas of edema or myocardial inflammation. However, traditional sequences have many limitations and provide only qualitative information. Moreover, traditional sequences depend on the reference to remote myocardium or skeletal muscle, which limits their ability to detect and quantify diffuse myocardial damage. Recently developed magnetic resonance myocardial mapping techniques enable quantitative assessment of parameters indicative of edema. These techniques have proven better than traditional sequences both in acute cardiomyopathy and in acute ischemic heart disease. This article synthesizes current developments in T2 mapping as well as their clinical applications and limitations. PMID:26315259

  9. Vascular Type 1A Angiotensin II Receptors Control BP by Regulating Renal Blood Flow and Urinary Sodium Excretion.

    PubMed

    Sparks, Matthew A; Stegbauer, Johannes; Chen, Daian; Gomez, Jose A; Griffiths, Robert C; Azad, Hooman A; Herrera, Marcela; Gurley, Susan B; Coffman, Thomas M

    2015-12-01

    Inappropriate activation of the type 1A angiotensin (AT1A) receptor contributes to the pathogenesis of hypertension and its associated complications. To define the role for actions of vascular AT1A receptors in BP regulation and hypertension pathogenesis, we generated mice with cell-specific deletion of AT1A receptors in smooth muscle cells (SMKO mice) using Loxp technology and Cre transgenes with robust expression in both conductance and resistance arteries. We found that elimination of AT1A receptors from vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) caused a modest (approximately 7 mmHg) yet significant reduction in baseline BP and exaggerated sodium sensitivity in mice. Additionally, the severity of angiotensin II (Ang II)-dependent hypertension was dramatically attenuated in SMKO mice, and this protection against hypertension was associated with enhanced urinary excretion of sodium. Despite the lower BP, acute vasoconstrictor responses to Ang II in the systemic vasculature were largely preserved (approximately 80% of control levels) in SMKO mice because of exaggerated activity of the sympathetic nervous system rather than residual actions of AT1B receptors. In contrast, Ang II-dependent responses in the renal circulation were almost completely eliminated in SMKO mice (approximately 5%-10% of control levels). These findings suggest that direct actions of AT1A receptors in VSMCs are essential for regulation of renal blood flow by Ang II and highlight the capacity of Ang II-dependent vascular responses in the kidney to effect natriuresis and BP control. PMID:25855778

  10. Myocardial steatosis and necrosis in atria and ventricles of rats given pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Jones, Huw Bowen; Reens, Jaimini; Johnson, Elizabeth; Brocklehurst, Simon; Slater, Ian

    2014-12-01

    Pharmaceutical therapies for non-insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (NIDDM) include plasma glucose lowering by enhancing glucose utilization. The mitochondrial pyruvate dehydrogenase (PDH) complex is important in controlling the balance between glucose and fatty acid substrate oxidation. Administration of pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase inhibitors (PDHKIs) to rats effectively lowers plasma glucose but results in myocardial steatosis that in some instances is associated primarily with atrial and to a lesser degree with ventricular pathology. Induction of myocardial steatosis is not dose-dependent, varies from minimal to moderate severity, and is either of multifocal or diffuse distribution. Ventricular histopathology was restricted to few myocardial degenerative fibers, while that in the atrium/atria was of either acute or chronic appearance with the former showing myocardial degeneration/necrosis, acute myocarditis, edema, endothelial activation (rounding up), endocarditis, and thrombosis associated with moderate myocardial steatosis and the latter with myocardial loss, replacement fibrosis, and no apparent or minimal association with steatosis. The evidence from these evaluations indicate that excessive intramyocardial accumulation of lipid may be either primarily adverse or represents an indicator of other adversely affected cellular processes. PMID:24742628

  11. Myocardial Oxidative Stress in Infants Undergoing Cardiac Surgery.

    PubMed

    Sznycer-Taub, Nathaniel; Mackie, Stewart; Peng, Yun-Wen; Donohue, Janet; Yu, Sunkyung; Aiyagari, Ranjit; Charpie, John

    2016-04-01

    Cardiac surgery for congenital heart disease often necessitates a period of myocardial ischemia during cardiopulmonary bypass and cardioplegic arrest, followed by reperfusion after aortic cross-clamp removal. In experimental models, myocardial ischemia-reperfusion is associated with significant oxidative stress and ventricular dysfunction. A prospective observational study was conducted in infants (<1 year) who underwent elective surgical repair of a ventricular septal defect (VSD) or tetralogy of Fallot (TOF). Blood samples were drawn following anesthetic induction (baseline) and directly from the coronary sinus at 1, 3, 5, and 10 min following aortic cross-clamp removal. Samples were analyzed for oxidant stress using assays for thiobarbituric acid-reactive substances, protein carbonyl, 8-isoprostane, and total antioxidant capacity. For each subject, raw assay data were normalized to individual baseline samples and expressed as fold-change from baseline. Results were compared using a one-sample t test with Bonferroni correction for multiple comparisons. Sixteen patients (ten with TOF and six with VSD) were enrolled in the study, and there were no major postoperative complications observed. For the entire cohort, there was an immediate, rapid increase in myocardial oxidative stress that was sustained for 10 min following aortic cross-clamp removal in all biomarker assays (all P < 0.01), except total antioxidant capacity. Infant cardiac surgery is associated with a rapid, robust, and time-dependent increase in myocardial oxidant stress as measured from the coronary sinus in vivo. Future studies with larger enrollment are necessary to assess any association between myocardial oxidative stress and early postoperative outcomes. PMID:26843460

  12. Structural determinants for binding to angiotensin converting enzyme 2 (ACE2) and angiotensin receptors 1 and 2

    PubMed Central

    Clayton, Daniel; Hanchapola, Iresha; Thomas, Walter G.; Widdop, Robert E.; Smith, Alexander I.; Perlmutter, Patrick; Aguilar, Marie-Isabel

    2015-01-01

    Angiotensin converting enzyme 2 (ACE2) is a zinc carboxypeptidase involved in the renin–angiotensin system (RAS) and inactivates the potent vasopressive peptide angiotensin II (Ang II) by removing the C-terminal phenylalanine residue to yield Ang1–7. This conversion inactivates the vasoconstrictive action of Ang II and yields a peptide that acts as a vasodilatory molecule at the Mas receptor and potentially other receptors. Given the growing complexity of RAS and level of cross-talk between ligands and their corresponding enzymes and receptors, the design of molecules with selectivity for the major RAS binding partners to control cardiovascular tone is an on-going challenge. In previous studies we used single β-amino acid substitutions to modulate the structure of Ang II and its selectivity for ACE2, AT1R, and angiotensin type 2 (AT2R) receptor. We showed that modification at the C-terminus of Ang II generally resulted in more pronounced changes to secondary structure and ligand binding, and here, we further explore this region for the potential to modulate ligand specificity. In this study, (1) a library of 47 peptides derived from the C-terminal tetrapeptide sequence (-IHPF) of Ang II was synthesized and assessed for ACE2 binding, (2) the terminal group requirements for high affinity ACE2 binding were explored by and N- and C-terminal modification, (3) high affinity ACE2 binding chimeric AngII analogs were then synthesized and assessed, (4) the structure of the full-length Ang II analogs were assessed by circular dichroism, and (5) the Ang II analogs were assessed for AT1R/AT2R selectivity by cell-based assays. Studies on the C-terminus of Ang II demonstrated varied specificity at different residue positions for ACE2 binding and four Ang II chimeric peptides were identified as selective ligands for the AT2 receptor. Overall, these results provide insight into the residue and structural requirements for ACE2 binding and angiotensin receptor selectivity. PMID

  13. Imaging and Modeling of Myocardial Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Jamshidi, Neema; Karimi, Afshin; Birgersdotter-Green, Ulrika; Hoh, Carl

    2010-01-01

    Current imaging methods have focused on evaluation of myocardial anatomy and function. However, since myocardial metabolism and function are interrelated, metabolic myocardial imaging techniques, such as positron emission tomography, single photon emission tomography, and magnetic resonance spectroscopy present novel opportunities for probing myocardial pathology and developing new therapeutic approaches. Potential clinical applications of metabolic imaging include hypertensive and ischemic heart disease, heart failure, cardiac transplantation, as well as cardiomyopathies. Furthermore, response to therapeutic intervention can be monitored using metabolic imaging. Analysis of metabolic data in the past has been limited, focusing primarily on isolated metabolites. Models of myocardial metabolism, however, such as the oxygen transport and cellular energetics model and constraint-based metabolic network modeling, offer opportunities for evaluation interactions between greater numbers of metabolites in the heart. In this review, the roles of metabolic myocardial imaging and analysis of metabolic data using modeling methods for expanding our understanding of cardiac pathology are discussed. PMID:20559785

  14. Rapamycin Treatment of Healthy Pigs Subjected to Acute Myocardial Ischemia-Reperfusion Injury Attenuates Cardiac Functions and Increases Myocardial Necrosis

    PubMed Central

    Lassaletta, Antonio D; Elmadhun, Nassrene Y; Zanetti, Arthus V D; Feng, Jun; Anduaga, Javier; Gohh, Reginald Y.; Sellke, Frank W; Bianchi, Cesario

    2013-01-01

    Background The Mechanistic Target of Rapamycin (mTOR) pathway is a major regulator of cell immunity and metabolism. mTOR is a well-known suppressor of tissue rejection in organ transplants, however, it has other non-immune functions including in the cardiovascular system, where it is a regulator of heart hypertrophy and locally, in coated vascular stents, inhibits vascular wall cell growth and hence neointimal formation/restenosis. Because the mTOR pathway plays major roles in normal cell growth, metabolism and survival, we hypothesized that inhibiting it with rapamycin, prior to an acute myocardial ischemia-reperfusion injury (IRI), would confer cardioprotection by virtue of slowing down cardiac function and metabolism. Methods Yorkshire pigs received orally either placebo or 4 mg/day rapamycin for 7 days before the IRI. All animals underwent median sternotomy and the mid-left anterior descending coronary artery was occluded for 60 min followed by 120 min of reperfusion. Left ventricular pressure-volume data was collected throughout the operation. The ischemic and infarcted areas were determined by monastral blue and triphenyltetrazolium chloride staining, respectively and plasma cardiac troponin I concentration. mTOR kinase activities were monitored in remote cardiac tissue by western blotting with specific antibodies against specific substrates phosphorylating sites. Results Rapamycin pre-treatement impaired endothelial-dependent vasorelaxation, attenuated cardiac function during IRI, and increased myocardial necrosis. Western blotting confirmed effective inhibition of myocardial mTOR kinase activities. Conclusions Pre-treatment of healthy pigs with rapamycin prior to acute myocardial IRI is associated with decreased cardiac function and higher myocardial necrosis. PMID:24266948

  15. Perioperative myocardial ischemia reperfusion injury.

    PubMed

    Shernan, Stanton K

    2003-09-01

    Myocardial I-R injury contributes to adverse cardiovascular outcomes after cardiac surgery. The pathogenesis of I-R injury is complex and involves the activation, coordination, and amplification of several systemic and local proinflammatory pathways (Fig. 4). Treatment and prevention of perioperative morbidity associated with myocardial I-R will ultimately require a multifocal approach. Combining preoperative risk stratification (co-morbidity and surgical complexity), minimizing initiating factors predisposing to SIRS, limiting ischemia duration, and administering appropriate immunotherapy directed toward systemic and local proinflammatory mediators of I-R injury, should all be considered. In addition, the role of the genetic-environmental interactions in the pathogenesis of cardiovascular disease is also being examined. Thus, in the near future, preoperative screening for polymorphisms of certain inflammatory and coagulation genes should inevitably help reduce morbidity by permitting the identification of high-risk cardiac surgical patients and introducing the opportunity for gene therapy or pharmacogenetic intervention [42,64]. PMID:14562561

  16. Myocardialization of the cardiac outflow tract

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    van den Hoff, M. J.; Moorman, A. F.; Ruijter, J. M.; Lamers, W. H.; Bennington, R. W.; Markwald, R. R.; Wessels, A.

    1999-01-01

    During development, the single-circuited cardiac tube transforms into a double-circuited four-chambered heart by a complex process of remodeling, differential growth, and septation. In this process the endocardial cushion tissues of the atrioventricular junction and outflow tract (OFT) play a crucial role as they contribute to the mesenchymal components of the developing septa and valves in the developing heart. After fusion, the endocardial ridges in the proximal portion of the OFT initially form a mesenchymal outlet septum. In the adult heart, however, this outlet septum is basically a muscular structure. Hence, the mesenchyme of the proximal outlet septum has to be replaced by cardiomyocytes. We have dubbed this process "myocardialization." Our immunohistochemical analysis of staged chicken hearts demonstrates that myocardialization takes place by ingrowth of existing myocardium into the mesenchymal outlet septum. Compared to other events in cardiac septation, it is a relatively late process, being initialized around stage H/H28 and being basically completed around stage H/H38. To unravel the molecular mechanisms that are responsible for the induction and regulation of myocardialization, an in vitro culture system in which myocardialization could be mimicked and manipulated was developed. Using this in vitro myocardialization assay it was observed that under the standard culture conditions (i) whole OFT explants from stage H/H20 and younger did not spontaneously myocardialize the collagen matrix, (ii) explants from stage H/H21 and older spontaneously formed extensive myocardial networks, (iii) the myocardium of the OFT could be induced to myocardialize and was therefore "myocardialization-competent" at all stages tested (H/H16-30), (iv) myocardialization was induced by factors produced by, most likely, the nonmyocardial component of the outflow tract, (v) at none of the embryonic stages analyzed was ventricular myocardium myocardialization-competent, and finally

  17. The path to an angiotensin receptor antagonist-neprilysin inhibitor in the treatment of heart failure.

    PubMed

    Braunwald, Eugene

    2015-03-17

    The PARADIGM-HF (Prospective comparison of ARNi with ACEi to Determine Impact on Global Mortality and Morbidity in Heart Failure) trial demonstrated that a new angiotensin receptor antagonist-neprilysin inhibitor was superior to an angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor in reducing mortality in patients with heart failure and reduced ejection fraction. This paper traces the research path that culminated in the development of this drug. The first phase, elucidation of the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system, began with Tigerstedt's discovery of renin, followed by isolation of angiotensin, isolation of angiotensin-converting enzyme, and synthesis of its inhibitors and of angiotensin receptor blockers. Phase 2 began with de Bold's discovery of atrial natriuretic peptide, followed by isolation of the enzyme that degrades it (neprilysin) and its inhibitors. Phase 3 consists of blocking both the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone and atrial natriuretic peptide-degrading systems simultaneously. A molecular complex, LCZ696, developed by scientists at Novartis, combines an angiotensin receptor blocker with a neprilysin inhibitor, is well tolerated, and represents an important step in the management of heart failure and reduced ejection fraction. PMID:25766951

  18. The role of the renin–angiotensin system blocking in the management of atrial fibrillation

    PubMed Central

    Cliff, Brett; Younis, Naveed; Hama, Salam; Soran, Handrean

    2012-01-01

    Objective To review current available evidence for the role of renin–angiotensin system blockade in the management of atrial fibrillation. Method We conducted a PubMed and Medline literature search (January 1980 through July 2011) to identify all clinical trials published in English concerning the use of angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors or angiotensin II receptor blockers for primary and secondary prevention of atrial fibrillation. We also discussed renin–angiotensin system and its effects on cellular electrophysiology. Conclusion The evidence from the current studies discussed does not provide a firm definitive indication for the use of angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors or angiotensin II receptor blockers in the primary or secondary prevention of atrial fibrillation. Nevertheless, modest benefits were observed in patients with left ventricular dysfunction. In view of the possible benefits and the low incidence of side-effects with angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors and angiotensin II receptor blockers, they can be given to patients with recurrent AF, specifically those with hypertension, heart failure and diabetes mellitus.

  19. ACE Inhibitor and Angiotensin Receptor Blocker Use and Mortality in Patients with Chronic Kidney Disease

    PubMed Central

    Molnar, Miklos Z; Kalantar-Zadeh, Kamyar; Lott, Evan H; Lu, Jun Ling; Malakauskas, Sandra M; Ma, Jennie Z; Quarles, Darryl L; Kovesdy, Csaba P

    2014-01-01

    Objective To assess the association between ACEI/ARB use and mortality in CKD patients. Background There is insufficient evidence about the association of angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors (ACEI) or angiotensin receptor blockers (ARBs) with mortality in chronic kidney disease (CKD) patients. Methods A logistic regression analysis was used to calculate the propensity of ACEI/ARB initiation in 141,413 US veterans with non-dialysis CKD previously unexposed to ACEI/ARB treatment. We examined the association of ACEI/ARB administration with all-cause mortality in patients matched by propensity scores, using the Kaplan-Meier method and Cox models in “intention-to-treat” analyses, and in generalized linear models with binary outcomes and inverse probability treatment weighing (IPTW) in “as-treated” analyses. Results The mean±SD age of the patients at baseline was 75±10 years, 8% of patients were black, and 22% were diabetic. ACEI/ARB administration was associated with significantly lower risk of mortality both in the intention-to-treat analysis (HR=0.81; 95%CI: 0.78-0.84, p<0.001) and in the as-treated analysis with IPTW (OR=0.37; 95%CI: 0.34-0.41, p<0.001). The association of ACEI/ARB treatment with lower risk of mortality was present in all examined subgroups. Conclusions In this large contemporary cohort of non-dialysis dependent CKD patients, ACEI/ARB administration was associated with greater survival. PMID:24269363

  20. Telmisartan Induced Inhibition of Vascular Cell Proliferation beyond Angiotensin Receptor Blockade and PPARγ Activation

    PubMed Central

    Yamamoto, Koichi; Ohishi, Mitsuru; Ho, Christopher; Kurtz, Theodore W; Rakugi, Hiromi

    2010-01-01

    We investigated the ability of ARBs with PPARγ agonist activity (telmisartan and irbesartan), and ARBs devoid of PPARγ agonist activity (eprosartan and valsartan), to inhibit vascular cell proliferation studied in the absence of angiotensin II stimulation. Telmisartan and to a lesser extent irbesartan, inhibited proliferation of human aortic vascular smooth muscle cells in a dose dependent fashion whereas eprosartan and valsartan did not. To investigate the role of PPARγ in the antiproliferative effects of telmisartan, we studied genetically engineered NIH3T3 cells that express PPARγ. Pioglitazone inhibited proliferation of NIH3T3 cells expressing PPARγ, but had little effect on control NIH3T3 cells that lack PPARγ. In contrast, telmisartan inhibited proliferation equally in NIH3T3 with and without PPARγ. Valsartan failed to inhibit proliferation of either cell line. In addition, telmisartan inhibited proliferation equally in aortic smooth muscle cells derived from mice with targeted knockout of PPARγ in smooth muscle and from control mice whereas valsartan had no effect on cell proliferation. Telmisartan but not valsartan, reduced phosphorylation of AKT but not ERK otherwise induced by exposure to serum of either quiescent human smooth muscle cells, quiescent mice smooth muscle cells lacking PPARγ or quiescent CHO-K1 cells lacking AT1 receptor. In summary, the antiproliferative effect of telmisartan in the absence of exogenously supplemented angiotensin II involve more than just AT1 receptor blockade and do not require activation of PPARγ. It might be postulated that inhibition of AKT activation is a mechanism mediating the antiproliferative effects of telmisartan including in cells lacking AT1 receptors or PPARγ. PMID:19822796

  1. Involvement of Spinal Angiotensin II System in Streptozotocin-Induced Diabetic Neuropathic Pain in Mice.

    PubMed

    Ogata, Yoshiki; Nemoto, Wataru; Nakagawasai, Osamu; Yamagata, Ryota; Tadano, Takeshi; Tan-No, Koichi

    2016-09-01

    Renin-angiotensin system (RAS) activity increases under hyperglycemic states, and is thought to be involved in diabetic complications. We previously demonstrated that angiotensin (Ang) II, a main bioactive component of the RAS, might act as a neurotransmitter and/or neuromodulator in the transmission of nociceptive information in the spinal cord. Here, we examined whether the spinal Ang II system is responsible for diabetic neuropathic pain induced by streptozotocin (STZ). Tactile allodynia was observed concurrently with an increase in blood glucose levels the day after mice received STZ (200 mg/kg, i.v.) injections. Tactile allodynia on day 14 was dose-dependently inhibited by intrathecal administration of losartan, an Ang II type 1 (AT1) receptor antagonist, but not by PD123319, an AT2 receptor antagonist. In the lumbar dorsal spinal cord, the expression of Ang II, Ang converting enzyme (ACE), and phospho-p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) were all significantly increased on day 14 after STZ injection compared with vehicle-treated controls, whereas no differences were observed among AT1 receptors or angiotensinogen levels. Moreover, the increase in phospho-p38 MAPK was significantly inhibited by intrathecal administration of losartan. These results indicate that the expression of spinal ACE increased in STZ-induced diabetic mice, which in turn led to an increase in Ang II levels and tactile allodynia. This increase in spinal Ang II was accompanied by the phosphorylation of p38 MAPK, which was shown to be mediated by AT1 receptors. PMID:27401876

  2. Inhibitors of angiotensin-converting enzyme modulate mitosis and gene expression in pancreatic cancer cells

    SciTech Connect

    Reddy, M.K.; Baskaran, K.; Molteni, A.

    1995-12-01

    The angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitor captopril inhibits mitosis in several cell types that contain ACE and renin activity. In the present study, we evaluated the effect of the ACE inhibitors captopril and CGS 13945 (10{sup {minus}8} to 10{sup {minus}2}M) on proliferation and gene expression in hamster pancreatic duct carcinoma cells in culture. These cells lack renin and ACE activity. Both ACE inhibitors produced a dose-dependent reduction in tumor cell proliferation within 24 hr. Captopril at a concentration of 0.36 mM and CGS 13945 at 150 {mu}M decreased cellular growth rate to approximately half that of the control. Neither drug influenced the viability or the cell cycle distribution of the tumor cells. Slot blot analysis of mRNA for four genes, proliferation associated cell nuclear antigen (PCNA), K-ras, protein kinase C-{Beta} (PKC-{Beta}) and carbonic anhydrase II (CA II) was performed. Both ACE inhibitors increased K-ras expression by a factor of 2, and had no effect on CA II mRNA levels. Captopril also lowered PCNA by 40% and CGS 13945 lowered PKC-{Beta} gene expression to 30% of the control level. The data demonstrate that ACE inhibitors exhibit antimitotic activity and differential gene modulation in hamster pancreatic duct carcinoma cells. The absence of renin and ACE activity in these cells suggests that the antimitotic action of captopril and CGS 13945 is independent of renin-angiotensin regulation. The growth inhibition may occur through downregulation of growth-related gene expression. 27 refs., 5 figs.

  3. Acute care of myocardial infarction.

    PubMed Central

    Gutman, M. B.; Lee, T. F.; Gin, K.; Ho, K.

    1996-01-01

    Patients with acute myocardial infarct (AMI) need rapid diagnosis and prompt initiation of thrombolytic therapy. Patients with suspected cardiac ischemia must receive a coordinated team response by the emergency room staff including rapid electrocardiographic analysis and a quick but thorough history and physical examination to diagnose AMI. Thrombolysis and adjunct therapies should be administered promptly when indicated. The choice of thrombolytics is predicated by the location of the infarct. PMID:8754702

  4. Myocardial Infarction in the Elderly

    PubMed Central

    Carro, Amelia; Kaski, Juan Carlos

    2011-01-01

    Advances in pharmacological treatment and effective early myocardial revascularization have –in recent years- led to improved clinical outcomes in patients with acute myocardial infarction (AMI). However, it has been suggested that compared to younger subjects, elderly AMI patients are less likely to receive evidence-based treatment, including myocardial revascularization therapy. Several reasons have been postulated to explain this trend, including uncertainty regarding the true benefits of the interventions commonly used in this setting as well as increased risk mainly associated with comorbidities. The diagnosis, management, and post-hospitalization care of elderly patients presenting with an acute coronary syndrome pose many difficulties at present. A complex interplay of variables such as comorbidities, functional and socioeconomic status, side effects associated with multiple drug administration, and individual biologic variability, all contribute to creating a complex clinical scenario. In this complex setting, clinicians are often required to extrapolate evidence-based results obtained in cardiovascular trials from which older patients are often, implicitly or explicitly, excluded. This article reviews current recommendations regarding management of AMI in the elderly. PMID:22396870

  5. Coronary arterial BK channel dysfunction exacerbates ischemia/reperfusion-induced myocardial injury in diabetic mice.

    PubMed

    Lu, Tong; Jiang, Bin; Wang, Xiao-Li; Lee, Hon-Chi

    2016-09-01

    The large conductance Ca(2+)-activated K(+) (BK) channels, abundantly expressed in coronary artery smooth muscle cells (SMCs), play a pivotal role in regulating coronary circulation. A large body of evidence indicates that coronary arterial BK channel function is diminished in both type 1 and type 2 diabetes. However, the consequence of coronary BK channel dysfunction in diabetes is not clear. We hypothesized that impaired coronary BK channel function exacerbates myocardial ischemia/reperfusion (I/R) injury in streptozotocin-induced diabetic mice. Combining patch-clamp techniques and cellular biological approaches, we found that diabetes facilitated the colocalization of angiotensin II (Ang II) type 1 receptors and BK channel α-subunits (BK-α), but not BK channel β1-subunits (BK-β1), in the caveolae of coronary SMCs. This caveolar compartmentation in vascular SMCs not only enhanced Ang II-mediated inhibition of BK-α but also produced a physical disassociation between BK-α and BK-β1, leading to increased infarct size in diabetic hearts. Most importantly, genetic ablation of caveolae integrity or pharmacological activation of coronary BK channels protected the cardiac function of diabetic mice from experimen