Sample records for deposit bathurst mining

  1. Brine-pool deposition for the Zn–Pb–Cu massive sulphide deposits of the Bathurst mining camp, New Brunswick, Canada. II. Ocean anoxia during mineralisation

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Mike Solomon

    2008-01-01

    Current models of massive sulphide ore genesis in the Bathurst mining camp, New Brunswick, involve settling of sulphide particles from a stagnating, low-salinity hydrothermal plume spreading laterally in an anoxic ocean layer with minimal sulphate content. There is fragmentary evidence of ocean anoxia in the form of local fine lamination in the shales that host some of the deposits but

  2. MINERALOGY AND GEOCHEMISTRY OF SUSPENDED SEDIMENTS FROM GROUNDWATERS ASSOCIATED WITH UNDISTURBED Zn Pb MASSIVE SULFIDE DEPOSITS, BATHURST MINING CAMP, NEW BRUNSWICK, CANADA

    Microsoft Academic Search

    MATTHEW I. LEYBOURNE

    2001-01-01

    Suspended sediments from groundwaters were recovered from two undisturbed massive sulfide deposits (Halfmile Lake and Restigouche) in the Bathurst Mining Camp, New Brunswick, Canada. Suspended sediments in most groundwaters are dominated by quartz and aluminum silicate minerals. Fe oxyhydroxides are probably present as surface coatings in addition to amorphous phases. Suspended sediments from groundwaters recovered from boreholes that intersect the

  3. Brine pool deposition for the Zn–Pb–Cu massive sulphide deposits of the Bathurst mining camp, New Brunswick, Canada. I. Comparisons with the Iberian pyrite belt

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Mike Solomon

    2008-01-01

    The Ordovician Zn–Pb–Cu massive sulphide ore deposits of the Bathurst mining camp share many features with those of the Devonian\\/Carboniferous Iberian pyrite belt, particularly the tendency to large size (tonnage and metal content); shape, as far as can be determined after allowing for deformation; metal content, particularly Fe\\/Cu, Pb\\/Zn and Sn; mineral assemblages (pyrite+arsenopyrite±pyrrhotite and lack or rarity of sulphates);

  4. Crustal-scale reflection seismic investigations in the Bathurst Mining Camp, New Brunswick, Canada

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheraghi, Saeid; Malehmir, Alireza; Bellefleur, Gilles

    2011-06-01

    The Bathurst Mining Camp, northern New Brunswick, Canada contains the super giant Brunswick No. 12 massive sulphide deposit and the smaller, now abandoned, Brunswick No. 6 deposit. Discoveries of additional base metal deposits in the camp require a better understanding of geological structures at depth. To this end, reflection seismic data in the Brunswick No. 6 area were acquired along three 2D profiles in 1999, with a total length of about 30 km. We have recovered, processed and interpreted these seismic data in conjunction with petrophysical and geological data from the study area. The seismic data and the borehole geophysical data allow a better understanding of both the shallow and deep structures (to 9 km depth) in the area. The seismic data show steeply dipping structures of the Brunswick No. 6 area, many of which reach the surface and allow for correlation with the surface and borehole geological information. Finite-difference modeling of major geological formations constrained with borehole petrophysical measurements indicates good correlation between the observed seismic and the synthetic data. A sequence of seismically reflective and transparent zones indicates a thrust stack in the Brunswick No. 6 area. The contact between the reflective and transparent zones is a series of faults bringing the two units over each other. A reflective package is observed in all three profiles and correlates well with the Brunswick horizon, the key mineralized zone in the study area. The Brunswick horizon extends down to depth greater than 3 km, increasing the hope for discovery of deeper base metal deposits. Two other sets of reflections are also observed in all three profiles in the depth range of about 5-8 km. We interpret them as two sets of thrusted sheets, which could be an indication that the Brunswick belt extends down to a maximum depth of 8 km.

  5. Reflection seismic studies in the Bathurst Mining Camp, Canada: Implications for crustal scale architecture and mineral potentials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malehmir, Alireza; Cheraghi, Saeid; Bellefleur, Gilles

    2010-05-01

    The Bathurst Mining Camp of northern New Brunswick, Canada is a major base-metal producing region that includes the super-giant Brunswick No. 12 and smaller size Brunswick No. 6 mines. Sustaining mining activity in the camp requires better understanding of crustal scale structures and mineral potential at depth. In such circumstances, reflection seismic data is instrumental for providing a framework allowing integration of other geophysical and geological data and allowing determination of new strategies for deep mineral exploration. In this work, we recovered, processed, modeled and interpreted a series of reflection seismic profiles with a total length of about 30 km acquired near the Brunswick No. 6 mine area. One of the main objectives of this survey is to provide key information on the geological structures associated with mineral deposits at depth. Although the data is acquired in crystalline environment, it shows an excellent data quality with a series of steeply dipping reflections imaged down to 9 km depth. The results demonstrate that reflection seismic imaging is particularly effective for imaging structures of the Brunswick No. 6 mine, many of which intersect the surface and thus allow for correlation with surface geology. Even more encouraging, the Brunswick horizon and associated iron mineralization are identifiable within a distinctive reflective package that can be used as a guide for deep base-metal exploration in the region. Two packages of dipping reflections appear to be in direct connection with mineralization that continues to depths greater than 9 km. A relatively high-amplitude reflection at depth of about 7 km is observed in all the seismic profiles and is interpreted as either a mafic-ultramafic sill intrusion or a granitic intrusion. Due to its geometrical shape and their presence in the study area, a granitic origin is a preferred interpretation. If this is the case, the granitic intrusion could have provided heat and hydrothermal fluids for mineralization in the Brunswick No. 6 mining area. The results from the seismic reflection data in combination with other geological and geophysical data have greatly improved our understanding of the tectonostratigraphic framework and architecture of the eastern part of the Bathurst Mining Camp.

  6. Gold in the Brunswick No. 12 volcanogenic massive sulfide deposit, Bathurst Mining Camp, Canada: Evidence from bulk ore analysis and laser ablation ICP-MS data on sulfide phases

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Sean H. McClenaghan; David R. Lentz; Jillian Martin; Wilfredo G. Diegor

    2009-01-01

    The 329-Mt Brunswick No. 12 volcanogenic massive sulfide deposit (total resource of 163 Mt at 10.4% Zn, 4.2% Pb, 0.34% Cu, and 115 g\\/t Ag) is hosted within a Middle Ordovician bimodal volcanic and sedimentary sequence. Massive sulfides are for the most part syngenetic, and the bulk of the sulfide ore occurs as a Zn-Pb-rich banded sulfide facies that forms

  7. Gold in the Brunswick No. 12 volcanogenic massive sulfide deposit, Bathurst Mining Camp, Canada: Evidence from bulk ore analysis and laser ablation ICP?MS data on sulfide phases

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Sean H. McClenaghan; David R. Lentz; Jillian Martin; Wilfredo G. Diegor

    2009-01-01

    The 329-Mt Brunswick No. 12 volcanogenic massive sulfide deposit (total resource of 163 Mt at 10.4% Zn, 4.2% Pb, 0.34% Cu,\\u000a and 115 g\\/t Ag) is hosted within a Middle Ordovician bimodal volcanic and sedimentary sequence. Massive sulfides are for the\\u000a most part syngenetic, and the bulk of the sulfide ore occurs as a Zn–Pb-rich banded sulfide facies that forms an intimate

  8. Gold in the Brunswick No. 12 volcanogenic massive sulfide deposit, Bathurst Mining Camp, Canada: Evidence from bulk ore analysis and laser ablation ICP-MS data on sulfide phases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McClenaghan, Sean H.; Lentz, David R.; Martin, Jillian; Diegor, Wilfredo G.

    2009-07-01

    The 329-Mt Brunswick No. 12 volcanogenic massive sulfide deposit (total resource of 163 Mt at 10.4% Zn, 4.2% Pb, 0.34% Cu, and 115 g/t Ag) is hosted within a Middle Ordovician bimodal volcanic and sedimentary sequence. Massive sulfides are for the most part syngenetic, and the bulk of the sulfide ore occurs as a Zn-Pb-rich banded sulfide facies that forms an intimate relationship with a laterally extensive Algoma-type iron formation and defines the Brunswick Horizon. Zone refining of stratiform sulfides is considered to have resulted in the development of a large replacement-style Cu-rich basal sulfide facies, which is generally confined between the banded sulfide facies and an underlying stringer sulfide zone. Complex polyphase deformation and associated lower- to upper-greenschist facies regional metamorphism is responsible for the present geometry of the deposit. Textural modification has resulted in a general increase in grain size through the development of pyrite and arsenopyrite porphyroblasts, which tend to overprint primary mineral assemblages. Despite the heterogeneous ductile deformation, primary features have locally been preserved, such as fine-grained colloform pyrite and base and precious metal zonation within the Main Zone. Base metal and trace element abundances in massive sulfides from the Brunswick No. 12 deposit indicate two distinct geochemical associations. The basal sulfide facies, characterized by a proximal high-temperature hydrothermal signature (Cu-Co-Bi-Se), contains generally low Au contents averaging 0.39 ppm ( n = 34). Conversely, Au is enriched in the banded sulfide facies, averaging 1.1 ppm Au ( n = 21), and is associated with an exhalative suite of elements (Zn-Pb-As-Sb-Ag-Sn). Finely laminated sulfide lenses hosted by iron formation at the north end of the Main Zone are further enriched in Au, averaging 1.7 ppm ( n = 41) and ranging up to 8.2 ppm. Laser ablation inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) analyses of pyrite ( n = 97) from the north end of the Main Zone average 2.6 ppm Au and range from the detection limit (0.015 ppm) to 21 ppm. Overall, these analyses reveal a distinct Au-Sb-As-Ag-Hg-Mn association within pyrite grains. Gold is strongly enriched in large pseudo-primary masses of pyrite that exhibit relict banding and fine-grained cores; smaller euhedral pyrite porphyroblasts, and euhedral rims of metamorphic origin surrounding the pyrite masses, contain much less Au, Sb, Ag, As, and Sn. Arsenopyrite, occurring chiefly as late porphyroblasts, contains less Au, averaging 1.0 ppm and ranging from the detection limit (0.027 ppm) to 6.9 ppm. Depth profiles for single-spot laser ablation ICP-MS analyses of pyrite and arsenopyrite display uniform values of Au and an absence of discrete microscopic inclusions of Au-bearing minerals, which is consistent with chemically bonded Au in the sulfide structure. The pervasive correlation of Au with Sn in the Zn-Pb-rich banded sulfide facies suggests similar hydrothermal behavior during the waxing stages of deposition on the seafloor. Under high temperature (>350ºC) and moderate- to low-pH conditions, Au and Sn in hydrothermal fluids would be transported as chlorocomplexes. An abrupt decrease in temperature and aH2S, accompanied by an increase in fO2 and pH during mixing with seawater, would lead to the simultaneous destabilization of both Au and Sn chlorocomplexes. The enrichment of Au in fine-grained laminated sulfides on the periphery of the deposit, accompanied by sporadic occurrences of barite and Fe-poor sphalerite, supports lower hydrothermal fluid temperatures analogous to white smoker activity on the flanks of a large volcanogenic massive sulfide system. In lower temperature (<350ºC) and mildly acidic hydrothermal fluids, Au would be transported by thiocomplexes, which exhibit multifunctional (retrograde-prograde) solubility and a capacity to mobilize Au to the outer parts of the sulfide mound. The sluggish nature of this low-temperature venting together with larger variations in ambient fO2 could lead to a s

  9. Rapid development of negative Ce anomalies in surface waters and contrasting REE patterns in groundwaters associated with Zn–Pb massive sulphide deposits

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Matthew I Leybourne; Wayne D Goodfellow; Dan R Boyle; Gwendy M Hall

    2000-01-01

    Ground and surface waters collected from two undisturbed Zn–Pb massive sulphide deposits (the Halfmile Lake and Restigouche deposits) and active mines in the Bathurst Mining Camp (BMC), NB, Canada were analysed for the rare earth elements (REE). REE contents are highly variable in waters of the BMC, with higher contents typical of waters with higher Fe and lower pH. There

  10. Rare Earth Element Mines, Deposits, and Occurrences

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Orris, Greta J.; Grauch, Richard I.

    2002-01-01

    Data on rare earth (including yttrium) mines, deposits, and occurrences were compiled as part of an effort by the USGS and the University of Arizona Center for Mineral Resources to summarize current knowledge on the supply and demand outlook and related topics for this group of elements. Economic competition and environmental concerns are increasingly constraining the mining and processing of rare earths from the Mountain Pass mine in California. For many years, the deposit at Mountain Pass was the world's dominant source of rare earth elements and the United States was essentially self-sufficient. Starting approximately 10 years ago, the U.S. has become increasingly dependent (> 90 percent of separated rare earths) upon imports from China, now the dominant source of rare earths. A knowledge of the known economic and noneconomic sources of rare earths is basic to evaluating the outlook for rare earth supply and associated issues.

  11. Rare Earth Element Mines, Deposits, and Occurrences

    E-print Network

    Torgersen, Christian

    Rare Earth Element Mines, Deposits, and Occurrences by Greta J. Orris1 and Richard I. Grauch2 Open Table 1. Rare earth mineral codes and associated mineral names.......................................................................................6 Table 2. Non-rare earth mineral codes and associated mineral names

  12. Microbiological and geochemical characterization of fluvially deposited sulfidic mine tailings

    Microsoft Academic Search

    BRUCE WIELINGA; JULIETTE K. LUCY; JOHNNIE N. MOORE; OCTOBER F. SEASTONE; JAMES E. GANNON

    1999-01-01

    The fluvial deposition of mine tailings generated from historic mining operations near Butte, Montana, has resulted in substantial surface and shallow groundwater contamination along Silver Bow Creek. Biogeochemical processes in the sediment and underlying hyporheic zone were studied in an attempt to characterize interactions consequential to heavy-metal contamination of shallow groundwater. Sediment cores were extracted and fractionated based on sediment

  13. Electromagnetic induction for mapping textural contrasts of mine tailing deposits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nearing, Grey S.; Tuller, Markus; Jones, Scott B.; Heinse, Robert; Meding, Mercer S.

    2013-02-01

    Mine tailings present an important legacy of past and present ore-extraction activities in the Desert Southwest. Inactive mine tailings have no immediate economic role in current mining operations, yet from an environmental point of view it is important that such deposits are stabilized to prevent mass movement, wind or water erosion, leaching of chemicals such as acid mine drainage, and to reduce visual blight. In the presented study, we assess the potential for inferring textural properties of mine tailing deposits with electromagnetic induction (EMI) mapping as a means of informing efforts to establish vegetation at mine waste sites. EMI measurements of apparent electrical conductivity (ECa) and tailing samples were collected at a mine waste site in Southern Arizona, USA and used to test empirical and theoretical relationships between ECa and physical and mineralogical properties using linear and Gaussian process regression. Sensitivity analyses of a semi-theoretical and a regression model of ECa as a function of tailing properties indicated that volumetric clay fraction in the top 60 cm was a primary influence on bulk electrical conductivity along with water content, conductivity of the soil water and the presence of conductive minerals hematite and pyrite. At this site, latitude and longitude were better predictors of clay content than ECa, and while it was possible to obtain information about the spatial distribution of tailing texture using EMI, simple Kriging of texture data was a more powerful textural mapping technique. We conclude that EMI is a useful tool for mapping tailing texture at waste deposit sites, but due to physical and chemical heterogeneity of tailing deposits, it is necessary to collect more in situ samples than are needed for agricultural applications.

  14. Root penetration through sealing layers at mine deposit sites.

    PubMed

    Stoltz, Eva; Greger, Maria

    2006-12-01

    To prevent acid mine drainage arising from oxygen and water penetration of sulphide-rich mine tailings, the tailings are covered with layers of dry sealing material. Plant roots have a great ability to penetrate dense materials, and if the roots are able to penetrate the sealing layer of a tailings deposit, its oxygen-shielding properties could be reduced. The objective of this study was to evaluate whether plant roots are able to penetrate sealing layers covering mine tailings deposits. Root penetration into layers of various sealing materials, such as clayey moraine (clay, 8-10%; silt, 22-37%; sand, 37-55%; gravel, 15-18%), moraine (unspecified), 6-mm bentonite (kaolin clay) fabric, lime and clay, Cefyll (mixture of pulverized coal fly ash, cement and water) and a mixture containing biosludge (30-35%) and bioashes (65-70%), was investigated. In the field, roots were studied by digging trenches alongside vegetation growing in 3- and 10-year-old mine sites. In the greenhouse root growth of Betula pendula, Pinus sylvestris, Poa pratensis and Salix viminalis were studied in compartments where the plants had been growing for 22 months. The results from the field experiment indicated that roots are able to penetrate both deep down in the cover layer (1.7 m) and also into the sealing layers of various materials, and even to penetrate hard Cefyll. The addition of nutrients in the top cover reduced deep root growth and thereby also penetration through the sealing layer. Low hydraulic conductivity of the sealing layer or a thick cover layer had less effect on root penetration. In the greenhouse experiment roots did not penetrate the thin bentonite fabric, due to low pH (2.1-2.7) that was created from the underlying weathered mine tailings. The clayey moraine was penetrated by all species used in the greenhouse experiment; Pinus sylvestris had the greatest ability to penetrate. To prevent root penetration of the other sealing layer, a suitable condition for the plants should be created in the upper part of the cover layer, namely a sufficient amount of plant nutrients. However, to define such a condition is difficult since different plant species have different requirements. PMID:17253002

  15. Biogeometallurgical pre-mining characterization of ore deposits: an approach to increase sustainability in the mining process.

    PubMed

    Dold, Bernhard; Weibel, Leyla

    2013-11-01

    Based on the knowledge obtained from acid mine drainage formation in mine waste environments (tailings impoundments and waste rock dumps), a new methodology is applied to characterize new ore deposits before exploitation starts. This gives the opportunity to design optimized processes for metal recovery of the different mineral assemblages in an ore deposit and at the same time to minimize the environmental impact and costs downstream for mine waste management. Additionally, the whole economic potential is evaluated including strategic elements. The methodology integrates high-resolution geochemistry by sequential extractions and quantitative mineralogy in combination with kinetic bioleach tests. The produced data set allows to define biogeometallurgical units in the ore deposit and to predict the behavior of each element, economically or environmentally relevant, along the mining process. PMID:23616204

  16. Pitchblende deposits at the Wood and Calhoun mines, Central City mining district, Gilpin County, Colorado

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Moore, Frank Baker; Butler, C.R.

    1952-01-01

    Pitchblende has been mined in commercial quantities from four gold- and silver-bearing pyrite-sphalerite-galena veins that occur in an area about one-half mile square on the south side of Quartz Hill, Central City district, Gilpin County, Colo. These veins are the Kirk, the German-Belcher, the Wood, and the Calhoun. Two of these veins, the Wood and the Calhoun, were studied in an attempt to determine the geologic factors favorable for pitchblende deposition. All accessible workings at the Wood and East Calhoun mines were mapped by tape and compass, and the distribution of radioactivity was studied in the field. Channel and chip samples were taken for chemical assay to compare radioactivity with uranium content. The pitchblende-bearing veins cat both pre-Cambrian granite gneiss and quartz-biotite schist; however, the gneiss was the more favorable host rock. Two bostonite porphyry dikes of Tertiary(?) age were crosscut by the Wood and Calhoun veins. The pitchblende occurs in lenses erratically distributed along the veins and in stringers extending outward from the veins. In the lenses it forms hard'. masses, but elsewhere it is Soft and powdery. The pitchblende is contemporaneous with the pyrite bat earlier than the sphalerite and galena in the same vein. All the observed pitchblende was at depths of less than 400 ft. The veins probably cannot be mined profitably for the pitchblende alone under present conditions.

  17. Microbiological and geochemical characterization of fluvially deposited sulfidic mine tailings

    SciTech Connect

    Wielinga, B.; Lucy, J.K.; Moore, J.N.; Seastone, O.F.; Gannon, J.E. [Univ. of Montana, Missoula, MT (United States)

    1999-04-01

    The fluvial deposition of mine tailings generated from historic mining operations near Butte, Montana, has resulted in substantial surface and shallow groundwater contamination along Silver Bow Creek. Biogeochemical processes in the sediment and underlying hyporheic zone were studied in an attempt to characterize interactions consequential to heavy-metal contamination of shallow groundwater. Sediment cores were extracted and fractionated based on sediment stratification. Subsamples of each fraction were assayed for culturable heterotrophic microbiota, specific microbial guilds involved in metal redox transformations, and both aqueous- and solid-phase geochemistry. Populations of cultivable Fe(III)-reducing bacteria were most prominent in the anoxic, circumneutral pH regions associated with a ferricrete layer or in an oxic zone high in organic carbon and soluble iron. Sulfur- and iron-oxidizing bacteria were distributed in discrete zones throughout the tailings and were often recovered from sections at and below the anoxic groundwater interface. Sulfate-reducing bacteria were also widely distributed in the cores and often occurred in zones overlapping iron and sulfur oxidizers. Sulfate-reducing bacteria were consistently recovered from oxic zones that contained high concentrations of metals in the oxidizable fraction. Altogether, these results suggest a highly varied and complex microbial ecology within a very heterogeneous geochemical environment. Such physical and biological heterogeneity has often been overlooked when remediation strategies for metal contaminated environments are formulated.

  18. Applications of soft computing in Mining Undiscovered Global Porphyry Copper Deposits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Friedel, M. J.

    2011-12-01

    We demonstrate the efficacy of an unsupervised artificial neural network, called a self-organizing map (SOM), to facilitate modeling of undiscovered porphyry copper deposits at the global scale. Specifically, the SOM can provide relevant model input for quantifying the amounts of undiscovered metals, and predicting the economic feasibility of mining undiscovered deposits. In quantifying the amounts of metals, the SOM is used to estimate missing data values, estimate numbers of deposits, and evaluate grade and tonnage models. In predicting the economic feasibility of mining, the SOM is used to derive empirical equations. Examples are provided including the prediction of economic likelihood for mining a permissive tract in the Yukon Territory, Canada.

  19. Mapping of evaporite deformation in a potash mine using ground penetrating radar: Upper Kama deposit, Russia

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Oleg Kovin

    2011-01-01

    Understanding the deformation processes in potash mines is very important for safe mining, planning the methods of extracting the orebody, and the prevention of catastrophic water inflow. A variety of deformational structures are present in the Upper Kama potash deposit. Folding is a dominant and most common form of deformation of ductile evaporites (herein also referred to as salts). Brittle

  20. Geology and ore deposits of the Whitepine area, Tomichi mining district, Gunnison County, Colorado

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Robinson, Charles Sherwood

    1956-01-01

    The Tomichi mining district is on the western slope of the Continental Divide near the southern end of the Sawatch Range in southeastern Gunnison County, Colorado. The most productive part of the Tomichi district was the Whitepine area. It is estimated that since the discovery of ore in 1879 the area has produced approximately $7,000,000, principally in lead and zinc, with lesser amounts of silver, copper, and gold. Geologically, the Whitepine area is a faulted syncline of Paleozoic rocks that was intruded by Tertiary igneous rocks. The oldest rock of the area is the Silver Plume granite of pre-Cambrian age. Deposited upon this successively were the Sawatch quartzite (Late Cambrian), Manitou dolomite (Early Ordovician), Harding quartzite (Middle Ordovician), Fremont dolomite (Lade Ordovician), Chaffee formation (Late Devonian), Leadville limestone (Late Mississippian), and Beldon shale (Late Pennsylvanian); a total thickness of about 1,450 feet. During the Laramide Revolution, the sedimentary rocks were folded into a broad northward-plunging syncline, faulted, and intruded by a series of igneous rocks. The igneous rocks, in order of relative age from oldest to youngest, are: a rhyolite stock, the Princeton quartz monzonite batholith, quartz monzonite or quartz latite porphyry dikes, and rhyolite or pitchstone porphyry dikes. The ore deposits of the Whitepine area may be classified into replacement deposits, vein deposits, and contact metamorphic deposits. The replacement deposits may be further subdivided into deposits along faults and bedded deposits. Of the types of deposits, the most productive have been the replacement deposits along faults. The major replacement deposits along faults are those of the Akron, Morning Star, and Victor mines. The ore deposits of these mines are in the foot wall of the Star faults in the Akron mine in the Manitou dolomite and in the Morning Star and Victor mines in the Leadville limestone. The chief bedded replacement deposits are those of the Erie, North Star, and Tenderfoot mines. In the Erie mine the ore deposits are in the Leadville limestone at, or just below, its contact with the Belden shale. In the North Star and Tenderfoot mines the ore bodies are in the Manitou dolomite along the crest of an anticline and the trough of a syncline, respectively. The vein deposits occur in the Silver Plume granite, Princeton quartz monzonite, and Paleozoic sedimentary rocks. The only vein of commercial importance was that of the Spar Copper mine, which is in the Silver Plume granite. Contact metamorphic minerals are found chiefly in the top of the Leadville limestone in the vicinity of the Erie mine, and in the limestone of the Belden shale. Magnetite is the only ore mineral and it was produced only from the Iron King mine. The replacement deposits consist, in general, of sphalerite, galena, pyrite, and chalcopyrite in a gangue of siliclfied limestone or dolomite, quartz, and calcite. The veins, for the most part, consist of pyrite and quartz with only minor amounts of galena, sphalerite, and chalcopyrite. In both types of deposits gold is believed to be associated with the pyrite and sphalerite and silver with the galena. Oxidized ore was the chief product of the early mining. This ore consists of calamine, cerussite, smithsonite, or anglesite, or a combination of these minerals, in a gangue of siliceous limestone or silicified limestone or dolomite. Oxidation did not extend, in most cases, for more than 150 feetbelow the surface. The ore deposits are believed to be genetically related to the Princeton quartz monzonite batholith. Ore-bearing solutions derived from the cooling of magma are believed to have migrated upwards along the pre-existing faults replacing favorable zones in the sedimentary rocks, or depositing quartz and ore minerals in open fissures in the igneous rocks.

  1. A methodological toolkit for field assessments of artisanally mined alluvial diamond deposits

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Chirico, Peter G.; Malpeli, Katherine C.

    2014-01-01

    This toolkit provides a standardized checklist of critical issues relevant to artisanal mining-related field research. An integrated sociophysical geographic approach to collecting data at artisanal mine sites is outlined. The implementation and results of a multistakeholder approach to data collection, carried out in the assessment of Guinea’s artisanally mined diamond deposits, also are summarized. This toolkit, based on recent and successful field campaigns in West Africa, has been developed as a reference document to assist other government agencies or organizations in collecting the data necessary for artisanal diamond mining or similar natural resource assessments.

  2. Element flows associated with marine shore mine tailings deposits.

    PubMed

    Dold, Bernhard

    2006-02-01

    From 1938 until 1975, flotation tailings from the Potrerillos--El Salvador mining district (porphyry copper deposits) were discharged into the El Salado valley and transported in suspension to the sea at Chaliaral Bay, Atacama Desert, northern Chile. Over 220 Mt of tailings, averaging 0.8 +/- 0.25 wt % of pyrite, were deposited into the bay, resulting in over a 1 kilometer seaward displacement of the shoreline and an estimated 10-15 m thick tailings accumulation covering a approximately 4 km2 surface area. The Chaniaral case was classified by the United Nations Environmental Programme (UNEP) in 1983 as one of the most serious cases of marine contamination in the Pacific area. Since 1975, the tailings have been exposed to oxidation, resulting in a 70-188 cm thick low-pH (2.6-4) oxidation zone at the top with liberation of divalent metal cations, such as Cu2+, Ni2+, and Zn2+ (up to 2265 mg/L, 18.1 mg/L, and 20.3 mg/ L, respectively). Evaporation-induced transport capillarity led to metal enrichment atthe tailings surface (e.g. up to 2.4% Cu) in the form of secondary chlorides and/or sulfates (dominated by eriochalcite [CuCl.H2O] and halite). These, mainly water-soluble, secondary minerals were exposed to eolian transport in the direction of the Village of Chañaral by the predominant W-SW winds. Two element-flow directions (toward the tailings surface, via capillarity, and toward the sea) and two element groups with different geochemical behaviors (cations such as Cu, Zn, Ni, and oxyanions such as As and Mo) could be distinguished. It can be postulated, that the sea is mainly affected by the following: As, Mo, Cu, and Zn contamination, which were liberated from the oxidation zone from the tailings and mobilized through the tidal cycle, and by Cu and Zn from the subsurface waters flowing in the El Salado valley (up to 19 mg/L and 12 mg/L Zn, respectively), transported as chloro complexes at neutral pH. PMID:16509314

  3. Dynamic Slope Stability Analysis of Mine Tailing Deposits: the Case of Raibl Mine

    SciTech Connect

    Roberto, Meriggi; Marco, Del Fabbro; Erica, Blasone; Erica, Zilli [Department of Georesources and Territory, University of Udine Via Cotonificio, 114, 33100 Udine (Italy)

    2008-07-08

    Over the last few years, many embankments and levees have collapsed during strong earthquakes or floods. In the Friuli Venezia Giulia Region (North-Eastern Italy), the main source of this type of risk is a slag deposit of about 2x10{sup 6} m{sup 3} deriving from galena and lead mining activity until 1991 in the village of Raibl. For the final remedial action plan, several in situ tests were performed: five boreholes equipped with piezometers, four CPTE and some geophysical tests with different approaches (refraction, ReMi and HVSR). Laboratory tests were conducted on the collected samples: geotechnical classification, triaxial compression tests and constant head permeability tests in triaxial cell. Pressure plate tests were also done on unsaturated slag to evaluate the characteristic soil-water curve useful for transient seepage analysis. A seepage analysis was performed in order to obtain the maximum pore water pressures during the intense rainfall event which hit the area on 29th August 2003. The results highlight that the slag low permeability prevents the infiltration of rainwater, which instead seeps easily through the boundary levees built with coarse materials. For this reason pore water pressures inside the deposits are not particularly influenced by rainfall intensity and frequency. Seismic stability analysis was performed with both the pseudo-static method, coupled with Newmark's method, and dynamic methods, using as design earthquake the one registered in Tolmezzo (Udine) on 6{sup th} May 1976. The low reduction of safety factors and the development of very small cumulative displacements show that the stability of embankments is assured even if an earthquake of magnitude 6.4 and a daily rainfall of 141.6 mm occur at the same time.

  4. Map showing potential metal-mine drainage hazards in Colorado, based on mineral-deposit geology

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Plumlee, Geoffrey S.; Streufert, Randall K.; Smith, Kathleen S.; Smith, Steven M.; Wallace, Alan R.; Toth, Margo I.; Nash, J. Thomas; Robinson, Rob A.; Ficklin, Walter H.; Lee, Gregory K.

    1995-01-01

    This map, compiled by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) in cooperation with the Colorado Geological Survey (CGS) and the U. S. Bureau of Land Management (BLM), shows potential mine-drainage hazards that may exist in Colorado metal-mining districts, as indicated by the geologic characteristics of the mineral deposits that occur in the respective districts. It was designed to demonstrate how geologic and geochemical information can be used on a regional scale to help assess the potential for mining-related and natural drainage problems in mining districts, unmined mineralized areas, and surrounding watersheds. The map also provides information on the distribution of different mineral deposit types across Colorado. A GIS (Geographic Information System) format was used to integrate geologic, geochemical, water-quality, climate, landuse, and ecological data from diverse sources. Likely mine-drainage signatures were defined for each mining district based on: (1) a review of the geologic characteristics of the mining district, including mineralogy, trace-element content, host-rock lithology, and wallrock alteration, and; (2) results of site specific studies on the geologic controls on mine-drainage composition.

  5. Diatoms and their relationship to environmental variables from lakes and ponds on Bathurst Island, Nunavut, Canadian High Arctic

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Darlene S. S. Lim; Marianne S. V. Douglas; John P. Smol

    2001-01-01

    Baseline and historical environmental data are sparse in the High Arctic, however diatom assemblages preserved in high arctic lake and pond sediment profiles can provide proxy data of past environmental changes. Ecological data, however, are still sparse. Diatom taxa preserved in the surficial sediment of lakes and ponds on Bathurst Island (75° 42' N, 97° 21' W), Nunavut, Canadian High

  6. Geobotanical studies on zinc deposit areas of Zawar mines, Udaipur

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Y. D. Tiagi; N. C. Aery

    1982-01-01

    This study reveals disjunct distribution patterns of certain plant species on zinc-rich soils in the Zawar mines region near Udaipur. Ten plant species have high constancy and fidelity values on zinc-rich soils in comparison to normal soil. The plant community composed of these species has been named Impatiens balsamina-Triumfetta pentandra association. As Impatients balsamina is the most characteristic species on

  7. Effects of historical and modern mining on mercury deposition in southeastern Peru

    PubMed Central

    Beal, Samuel A.; Jackson, Brian P.; Kelly, Meredith A.; Stroup, Justin S.; Landis, Joshua D.

    2013-01-01

    Both modern anthropogenic emissions of mercury (Hg), primarily from artisanal and small-scale gold mining (ASGM), and preindustrial anthropogenic emissions from mining are thought to have a large impact on present-day atmospheric Hg deposition. We study the spatial distribution of Hg and its depositional history over the past ~400 years in sediment cores from lakes located regionally proximal (~90–150 km) to the largest ASGM in Peru and distal (>400 km) to major preindustrial mining centers. Total Hg concentrations in surface sediments from fourteen lakes are typical of remote regions (10–115 ng g?1). Hg fluxes in cores from four lakes demonstrate preindustrial Hg deposition in southeastern Peru was spatially variable and at least an order of magnitude lower than previously reported fluxes in lakes located closer to mining centers. Average modern (A.D. 2000–2011) Hg fluxes in these cores are 3.4–6.9 ?g m?2 a?1, compared to average preindustrial (A.D. 1800–1850) fluxes of 0.8–2.5 ?g m?2 a?1. Modern Hg fluxes determined from the four lakes are on average 3.3 (±1.5) times greater than their preindustrial fluxes, similar to those determined in other remote lakes around the world. This agreement suggests that Hg emissions from ASGM are likely not significantly deposited in nearby downwind regions. PMID:24124645

  8. Development of a dust deposition forecast model for a mine tailings impoundment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stovern, Michael

    Wind erosion, transport and deposition of particulate matter can have significant impacts on the environment. It is observed that about 40% of the global land area and 30% of the earth's population lives in semiarid environments which are especially susceptible to wind erosion and airborne transport of contaminants. With the increased desertification caused by land use changes, anthropogenic activities and projected climate change impacts windblown dust will likely become more significant. An important anthropogenic source of windblown dust in this region is associated with mining operations including tailings impoundments. Tailings are especially susceptible to erosion due to their fine grain composition, lack of vegetative coverage and high height compared to the surrounding topography. This study is focused on emissions, dispersion and deposition of windblown dust from the Iron King mine tailings in Dewey-Humboldt, Arizona, a Superfund site. The tailings impoundment is heavily contaminated with lead and arsenic and is located directly adjacent to the town of Dewey-Humboldt. The study includes in situ field measurements, computational fluid dynamic modeling and the development of a windblown dust deposition forecasting model that predicts deposition patterns of dust originating from the tailings impoundment. Two instrumented eddy flux towers were setup on the tailings impoundment to monitor the aeolian and meteorological conditions. The in situ observations were used in conjunction with a computational fluid dynamic (CFD) model to simulate the transport of windblown dust from the mine tailings to the surrounding region. The CFD model simulations include gaseous plume dispersion to simulate the transport of the fine aerosols, while individual particle transport was used to track the trajectories of larger particles and to monitor their deposition locations. The CFD simulations were used to estimate deposition of tailings dust and identify topographic mechanisms that influence deposition. Simulation results indicated that particles preferentially deposit in regions of topographic upslope. In addition, turbulent wind fields enhanced deposition in the wake region downwind of the tailings. This study also describes a deposition forecasting model (DFM) that can be used to forecast the transport and deposition of windblown dust originating from a mine tailings impoundment. The DFM uses in situ observations from the tailings and theoretical simulations of aerosol transport to parameterize the model. The model was verified through the use of inverted-disc deposition samplers. The deposition forecasting model was initialized using data from an operational Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model and the forecast deposition patterns were compared to the inverted-disc samples through gravimetric, chemical composition and lead isotopic analysis. The DFM was verified over several month-long observing periods by comparing transects of arsenic and lead tracers measured by the samplers to the DFM PM27 forecast. Results from the sampling periods indicated that the DFM was able to accurately capture the regional deposition patterns of the tailings dust up to 1 km. Lead isotopes were used for source apportionment and showed spatial patterns consistent with the DFM and the observed weather conditions. By providing reasonably accurate estimates of contaminant deposition rates, the DFM can improve the assessment of human health impacts caused by windblown dust from the Iron King tailings impoundment.

  9. Generation of Polluted Waters from Mining Wastes in a Uranium Deposit

    Microsoft Academic Search

    STOYAN N. GROUDEV; IRENA I. SPASOVA; MARINA V. NICOLOVA; PLAMEN S. GEORGIEV

    Dump consisting of 9500 tons of rich-in-pyrite mining wastes located in the uranium deposit Curilo, Western Bulgaria, was, after rainfall, an intensive source of acid drainage waters. These waters had a pH in the range of about 1.7 ñ 4.5 and contained radionuclides (uranium, radium), heavy metals (copper, zinc, cadmium, lead, nickel, cobalt, iron, and manganese), arsenic and sulphates in

  10. Depositional Influences on Porewater Arsenic in Sediments of a Mining-Contaminated Freshwater Lake

    Microsoft Academic Search

    G. Toevs; M. J. Morra; L. Winowiecki; D. Strawn; M. L. Polizzotto; S. Fendorf

    2009-01-01

    Arsenic-containing minerals mobilized during mining activities and deposited to Lake Coeur d'Alene (CDA), Idaho sediments represent a potential source of soluble As to the overlying water. Our objective was to delineate the processes controlling porewater As concentrations within Lake CDA sediments. Sediment and porewater As concentrations were determined, and solid-phase As associations were probed using X-ray absorption near-edge structure (XANES)

  11. Geophysical Modeling of a Cu-Mo Prophry Deposit, Copper Flat Mine Hillsboro, New Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gutierrez, A. E.

    2012-12-01

    The Copper Flat Mine is located is located in the Las Animas Mining District in Sierra County, New Mexico. The mine has been producing ore since 1877, but it was not until 1985 that Quintana Mineral started a full production copper mine there. The project is located on the eastern side of the Arizona-Sonora-New Mexico porphyry copper belt of Cretaceous age. Copper Flat is predominantly a Cretaceous age stratovolcano composed of Quartz monzonite. The quartz monzonite was intruded by a block of andesite after which a series of latite dikes cut the quartz monzonite and andesite creating veining along the terrain where the majority of the deposits are located. The copper flat deposit is mineralized along a breccia pipe where the breccia is the result of auto-brecciation due to the pore pressure created by hydrothermal fluids which are greater than the confining pressure of the overlying rocks. There have been a number of geophysical studies conducted at Copper Flat. The most recent survey focused on Direct current (DC), Induce Polarization (IP), and Magnotellurics (MT). The purpose of the new study is the reinterpretation of the IP survey and emphasizes the practical use of other geophysical methods in assessing the validity of the IP survey results. The primary methods that will used to identify the deposits are gravity and magnetic surveys with auxiliary methods that would complement and enhance the study such as microgravity, well logging and seismology. The research done at Copper Flat defines the boundary of the different structure that composes the ore deposit. The survey is expected to identify the boundaries of the four types on breccias that compose the Copper Flat deposit in order to identify the alteration that surround that part of the ore body. The understanding of the anomalies that appeared during previous IP surveys did not define clearly as well as different structure of the deposit needs to be reevaluated in order to have a sharper model of Copper Flat, to be aware of the interaction of the different structure that shape the ore deposit at Copper Flat.

  12. Environmental impact of early Basque mining and smelting recorded in a high ash minerogenic peat deposit.

    PubMed

    Monna, F; Galop, D; Carozza, L; Tual, M; Beyrie, A; Marembert, F; Chateau, C; Dominik, J; Grousset, F E

    2004-07-01

    More than four metres of core, covering almost 5000 years of deposition, were collected in a high ash minerogenic peat deposit located in the High Aldudes valley (Basque country), an area well known for its mineral abundance, exploited from Roman Times at least. Although minerogenic peatlands are not generally considered as the best archives to reconstruct past atmospheric metal deposition history, lead isotopic geochemistry demonstrates the integrity of the Pb record at least within the three upper meters; that is to say over the last four millennia. Zn, Cd and Cu may have been widely redistributed either by biological cycling, advective groundwater movements, or diffusional processes. Anthropogenic lead input phases are clearly pinpointed by positive shifts in Pb/Sc ratios with concomitant sharp drops in (206)Pb/(207)Pb ratios. They are often accompanied by significant declines in tree taxa, interpreted as increasing demand for wood to supply energy for local mining and/or metallurgical operations. Periods of mining and/or smelting activity are identified during Antiquity and Modern Times, and are also confirmed by textual and field evidence. Inputs from the Rio Tinto (Southern Spain), often invoked as a major lead contributor to the European atmosphere during Roman Times, were not detected here. This remote source was probably masked by local inputs. Other mining and/or smelting phases, only suspected by archaeologists, are here identified as early as the Bronze Age. Although the durations of these phases are possibly overestimated because of detrital inputs consequent to the release of lead from polluted soils over a long period of time after major pollutant inputs, the periods at which pollution peaks occur are in good agreement with archaeological knowledge and palaeo-botanical data. The combination of geochemical and palaeo-botanical techniques with field archaeology, therefore provides a powerful tool in studying the interaction of early human societies with their environment, as regards early mining and smelting. PMID:15172582

  13. The Anderson Mine (Arizona)--An early diagenetic uranium deposit in Miocene Lake Sediments

    SciTech Connect

    Mueller, A.; Halbach, P.

    1983-03-01

    The Anderson mine is located in Yavapai County, West-Central Arizona, an area forming part of the Basin and Range province. The uranium deposit occurs in the Miocene Chapin Wash Formation, a sequence of interbedded lacustrine and alluvial sediments. Uranium mineralization is confined to the lacustrine facies of Chapin Wash sediments, composed of tuffaceous mudstones, fine-grained sandstones, and silicified marlstones. South of the Anderson mine outcrop zone, the lacustrine sequence reaches an average thickness of 150 m, including two basal carbonaceous horizons of 37 and 35 m in thickness. Uranium is locally associated with high values of Mo, As, and V. In drill core samples, highgrade mineralization (up to 2.2% U) is confined to individual seams of lignitic coal, forms halos around rootlet remains, and fills burrows or irregular fractures. Spotlike concentrations are associated with framboidal pyrite spheres. Uranyl-bearing opaline silica and colloform coffinite have been identified as main ore minerals. Uranium was preconcentrated during early diagenesis by sorption onto colloidal humic substance, silica gel, and zeolites. Subsequent precipitation as coffinite was mainly controlled by bacteriogenic H/sub 2/S gas. At present, both mineralized carbonaceous horizons are in a state of radiogenic equilibrium. Uranium mineralization was displaced by late Miocene to early Pliocene tectonic movements along Basin and Range normal faults. The Anderson mine may be classified as a strata-bound, low-temperature deposit in lacustrine sediments formed by complex sorption and precipitation processes in an early diagenetic environment.

  14. Use of structural geology in exploration for and mining of sedimentary rock-hosted Au deposits

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Peters, Stephen G.

    2001-01-01

    Structural geology is an important component in regional-, district- and orebody-scale exploration and development of sedimentary rock-hosted Au deposits.Identification of timing of important structural events in an ore district allows analysis and classification of fluid conduits and construction of genetic models for ore formation.The most practical uses of structural geology deal with measurement and definition of various elements that comprise orebodies, which can then be directly applied to ore-reserve estimation,ground control,grade control, safety issues,and mine planning.District- and regional-scale structural studies are directly applicable to long-term strategic planning,economic analysis,and land ownership. Orebodies in sedimentary rock-hosted Au deposits are discrete, hypogene, epigenetic masses usually hosted in a fault zone,breccia mass, or lithologic bed or unit. These attributes allow structural geology to be directly applied to the mining and exploration of sedimentary rock-hosted Au deposits. Internal constituents in orebodies reflect unique episodes relating to ore formation.The main internal constituents in orebodies are ore minerals, gangue, and alteration minerals that usually are mixed with one another in complex patterns, the relations among which may be used to interpret the processes of orebody formation and control.Controls of orebody location and shape usually are due to structural dilatant zones caused by changes in attitude, splays, lithologic contacts,and intersections of the host conduit or unit.In addition,conceptual parameters such as district fabric,predictable distances, and stacking also are used to understand the geometry of orebodies.Controls in ore districts and location and geometry of orebodies in ore districts can be predicted to various degrees by using a number of qualitative concepts such as internal and external orebody plunges,district plunge, district stacking, conduit classification, geochemical, geobarometric and geothermal gradients, and tectonic warps. These concepts have practical and empirical application in most mining districts where they are of use in the exploration for ore, but are of such broad and general application that they may not represent known or inferred ore formation processes. Close spatial relation among some sedimentary rock- hosted Au deposits and their host structures suggests that the structures and the orebodies are genetically linked because they may have shared the same developmental history. Examples of probable syn-deformational genesis and structural control of sedimentary rock-hosted Au deposits are in the large Betze deposit in the Carlin trend, Nevada and in the Lannigou, Jinlongshan, and Maanqiao Au deposits, China.

  15. Geology and ore deposits of the Kutam Mine, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Smith, C.W.; Anderson, R. Ernest; Dehlavi, M.R.

    1977-01-01

    The ancient Kutam mine in southwestern Saudi Arabia was discovered during the course of regional geologic mapping. Malachite coatings along fractures in the ancient workings and nearby large piles of slag indicate the mine was worked for copper. Quartz porphyry of Precambrian age is the principal host rock of the deposit. The quartz porphyry is associated with volcanic rocks of mafic to intermediate composition. All rocks have been deformed and metamorphosed to various types of schist, of which quartz-sericite-chlorite schist is the most common. Mineralization is thought to be controlled by the convergence of three fault patterns that strike N 60?W., N 45?W Cross faults that extend between faults of the N 45?W. pattern have influenced deposition of sulfides locally. Southeast-plunging lineation derived from two converging directions of planar schistosity also may have exerted control on sulfide deposition. Detailed geologic mapping of surface features and geochemical and geophysical studies indicated that the deposit warranted subsurface exploration. Accordingly, eight holes were drilled that delineated possible economic-grade sulfide deposits in an area about 300 m long and which is known to continue to a depth of more than 200 m. However, drilling found copper-zinc mineralization along a strike length of 850 m. Drill findings show that copper and zinc sulfides partially replace chlorite and higher concentrations of chlorite generally define the higher-grade mineralization. The more intensely chloritized zones tend to follow the N.45?W. fracture pattern. South of drill hole KA-I, the sulfide mineralization may plunge 40? to 60? southeast. Indicated and inferred reserves outlined by drilling total 8,056,000 metric tons, the grade of which averages 0.31 g/t Au, 6.13 g/t Ag, 1.83 percent Cu, and 0.95 percent Zn.

  16. Research and implementation of mining GIS software for unstratified mineral deposit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Mei; Liu, Yajing; Mao, Shanjun

    2006-10-01

    In this paper, a professional mining GIS software called Geological and Surveying Spatial Management Information System (GSSMIS) was designed and implemented. Due to restriction of mine design and computerization level, geostatistics and 3D block model were not fully applied in metal mining. The geologists interpreted drill holes and delimit mineral boundaries on the 2D plane and section. Unlike other 3D mining software, a 2D & 3D integration technological architecture for unstratified mineral deposit was proposed considering the conventional exploration and exploitation approaches. The whole system contains 3 modules: geological and surveying database module, 2D MGIS module and 3D modeling and visualization module. Database module input, manage, store and extract all kinds of geological and surveying data. 2D MGIS module provide lots of toolbox for plotting all sorts of engineering maps and processing advance analysis such as geostatistical and uncertain analysis, reserve computation and mining economic estimation. GSSMIS has a typical COM GIS configuration with 5 different developing levels. The 5 level structure has advantage of less coding, easier maintenance and management, good ability of extension and secondary development, adding or subtracting the modules according to user's need. Also, 5 important system characters were introduced in the article, which were: 1) 2D auto-mapping; 2) interactive interpretation of geological boundaries; 3) mutual modifications of plane and section; 4) 3D solid modeling; 5) section profile cutting. Finally, the article presented the implement of GSSMIS in Laixin Iron, Shandong Province. The system changed traditional handcraft mapping mode thoroughly, relieved the heavy burden of engineers and promoted the process of computerization and informatization in China.

  17. Trace metal depositional patterns from an open pit mining activity as revealed by archived avian gizzard contents.

    PubMed

    Bendell, L I

    2011-02-15

    Archived samples of blue grouse (Dendragapus obscurus) gizzard contents, inclusive of grit, collected yearly between 1959 and 1970 were analyzed for cadmium, lead, zinc, and copper content. Approximately halfway through the 12-year sampling period, an open-pit copper mine began activities, then ceased operations 2 years later. Thus the archived samples provided a unique opportunity to determine if avian gizzard contents, inclusive of grit, could reveal patterns in the anthropogenic deposition of trace metals associated with mining activities. Gizzard concentrations of cadmium and copper strongly coincided with the onset of opening and the closing of the pit mining activity. Gizzard zinc and lead demonstrated significant among year variation; however, maximum concentrations did not correlate to mining activity. The archived gizzard contents did provide a useful tool for documenting trends in metal depositional patterns related to an anthropogenic activity. Further, blue grouse ingesting grit particles during the time of active mining activity would have been exposed to toxicologically significant levels of cadmium. Gizzard lead concentrations were also of toxicological significance but not related to mining activity. This type of "pulse" toxic metal exposure as a consequence of open-pit mining activity would not necessarily have been revealed through a "snap-shot" of soil, plant or avian tissue trace metal analysis post-mining activity. PMID:21195454

  18. Depositional Influences on Porewater Arsenic in Sediments of a Mining-Contaminated Freshwater Lake

    SciTech Connect

    Toevs, G.; Morra, M.J.; Winowiecki, L.; Strawn, D.; Polizzotto, M.L.; Fendorf, S.

    2009-05-26

    Arsenic-containing minerals mobilized during mining activities and deposited to Lake Coeur d'Alene (CDA), Idaho sediments represent a potential source of soluble As to the overlying water. Our objective was to delineate the processes controlling porewater As concentrations within Lake CDA sediments. Sediment and porewater As concentrations were determined, and solid-phase As associations were probed using X-ray absorption near-edge structure (XANES) spectroscopy. Although maximum As in the sediment porewaters varied from 8.4 to 16.2 microM, As sorption on iron oxyhydroxides at the oxic sediment-water interface prevented flux to overlying water. Floods deposit sediment containing variable amounts of arsenopyrite (FeAsS), with majorfloods depositing large amounts of sediment that bury and preserve reduced minerals. Periods of lower deposition increase sediment residence times in the oxic zone, promoting oxidation of reduced minerals, SO4(2-) efflux, and formation of oxide precipitates. Depositional events bury oxides containing sorbed As, transitioning them into anoxic environments where they undergo dissolution, releasing As to the porewater. High Fe:S ratios limit the formation of arsenic sulfides in the anoxic zone. As a result of As sequestration at the sediment-water interface and its release upon burial, decreased concentrations of porewater As will not occur unless As-bearing erosional inputs are eliminated.

  19. Undrained Strength of Deposited Mine Tailings Beds: Effect of Water Content, Effective Stress and Time of Consolidation

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Rozalina S. DimitrovaErnest; Ernest K. Yanful

    An understanding of the geotechnical behaviour of mine tailings is imperative when evaluating the stability and erosional\\u000a resistance of sedimented tailings beds; as well as for the design and long-term management of tailings disposal facilities.\\u000a Laboratory testing was conducted on mine tailings beds of various ages and thicknesses, deposited from concentrated slurries.\\u000a Measured index properties allowed classifying the tailings as

  20. Distribution of Cu, Co, As, and Fe in mine waste, sediment, soil, and water in and around mineral deposits and mines of the Idaho Cobalt Belt, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gray, John E.; Eppinger, Robert G.

    2012-01-01

    The distribution of Cu, Co, As and Fe was studied downstream from mines and deposits in the Idaho Cobalt Belt (ICB), the largest Co resource in the USA. To evaluate potential contamination in ecosystems in the ICB, mine waste, stream sediment, soil, and water were collected and analyzed for Cu, Co, As and Fe in this area. Concentrations of Cu in mine waste and stream sediment collected proximal to mines in the ICB ranged from 390 to 19,000 ?g/g, exceeding the USEPA target clean-up level and the probable effect concentration (PEC) for Cu of 149 ?g/g in sediment; PEC is the concentration above which harmful effects are likely in sediment dwelling organisms. In addition concentrations of Cu in mine runoff and stream water collected proximal to mines were highly elevated in the ICB and exceeded the USEPA chronic criterion for aquatic organisms of 6.3 ?g/L (at a water hardness of 50 mg/L) and an LC50 concentration for rainbow trout of 14 ?g/L for Cu in water. Concentrations of Co in mine waste and stream sediment collected proximal to mines varied from 14 to 7400 ?g/g and were highly elevated above regional background concentrations, and generally exceeded the USEPA target clean-up level of 80 ?g/g for Co in sediment. Concentrations of Co in water were as high as in 75,000 ?g/L in the ICB, exceeding an LC50 of 346 ?g/L for rainbow trout for Co in water by as much as two orders of magnitude, likely indicating an adverse effect on trout. Mine waste and stream sediment collected in the ICB also contained highly elevated As concentrations that varied from 26 to 17,000 ?g/g, most of which exceeded the PEC of 33 ?g/g and the USEPA target clean-up level of 35 ?g/g for As in sediment. Conversely, most water samples had As concentrations that were below the 150 ?g/L chronic criterion for protection of aquatic organisms and the USEPA target clean-up level of 14 ?g/L. There is abundant Fe oxide in streams in the ICB and several samples of mine runoff and stream water exceeded the chronic criterion for protection of aquatic organisms of 1000 ?g/L for Fe. There has been extensive remediation of mined areas in the ICB, but because some mine waste remaining in the area contains highly elevated Cu, Co, As and Fe, inhalation or ingestion of mine waste particulates may lead to human exposure to these elements.

  1. Reactive Iron deposition and ground water inflow control neutralization processes in acidic mine lakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blodau, C.

    2002-12-01

    The controls on the internal neutralization of highly acidified waters by iron sulphide accumulation are yet poorly understood. To elucidate the influence of ground water inflow on neutralization processes, inventories of solid phase iron and sulphur, pore water profiles and rates of ferrous iron and sulphate production and consumption were analyzed in different areas of an acidic mine lake. Ground water inflow had previously been determined by ground water modelling and chamber measurements (Knoll et al., 1999). The investigated sediments adjacent to mine tailings, which were subject to the inflow of groundwater (10-30 L d-1 m-2), were richer in dissolved ferrous iron iron (30 vs. 5 mmol L-1) and sulphate (30 vs. 10 mmol L-1) and showed higher pH values (6 vs. 4) than the sediments in areas of the lake not being influenced by groundwater inflow. Sediments adjacent to the mine tailings also showed higher rates of sulphate reduction and iron sulphide accumulation (Fig. 1). From these data it is suggested that neutralization processes in iron rich, acidic mine lakes neutralization processes primarily occur in areas influenced by the inflow of acid mine groundwater. These waters usually have considerably higher pH values than the surface waters in the lakes due to buffering processes in the tailings. The seepage of this water through the sediment might thus lead to higher pH values and thus to a higher thermodynamic competitiveness of sulfate reduction vs. iron reduction (Blodau and Peiffer 2002). This causes increased neutralization rates. These findings have consequences for remediation measures in highly acidic lakes. In areas influenced by the inflow of mine drainage increases in carbon availability, for example by the deposition of particulate organic matter, should enhance iron sulphide formation rates, whereas in other areas increases in carbon availability would only result in enhanced rates of iron reduction without a lasting gain in alkalinity. Blodau, C. und Peiffer, S. (2002): Thermodynamics and organic matter: Constraints on the internal neutralization of highly acidic waters. Applied Geochemistry, in print. Knoll, D. Weber, L., und Schäfer, W. (1999): Grundwasseranbindung von alten Tagebaurestseen im Niederlausitzer Braunkohletagebaugebiet.Grundwasser 2/99: 55-61

  2. Geotechnical and rheological characteristics of waste materials taken from abandoned mine deposit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeong, Sueng-Won; Ji, Sang Woo; Fukuoka, Hiroshi

    2014-05-01

    According to the Ministry of Trade, Industry & Energy in Korean (MOTIE), approximately 5,000 metal mines are spread in the Republic of Korea, but almost 80% mines are still left without any proper remediation and cleanup. The physic-chemical properties of waste materials in the mountainous area are strongly affected by heavy rainfall. Failed sediments pose the largest threat to the mountain communities and environments. In particular, a significant amount of heavy metals, such as arsenic, cadmium, copper, zinc, lead etc., is introduced to soil systems. This study examined the geotechnical and rheological characteristics of waste rock materials collected from mine deposits, located in Imgi-ri, Busan Metropolitan City, Korea. We used a ring shear apparatus for geotechnical properties and a rheometer for rheological properties. The materials collected from mines are classified as gravelly sand soils. A series of drained and undrained ring shear tests were performed to examine the stress characteristics with regard to (i) shearing time dependency, (ii) shear speed dependency, and (iii) normal stress dependency. In addition, the grain crushing in the shear zone was examined to explain a high mobile failed masses. This work is also concerned with post-failure characteristics of rainfall-induced debris flows. From the rheological tests, the materials examined exhibited the shear-thinning behavior, which is the viscosity decreases with increasing shear rates. In the relationship between shear stress and shear rate, one of simplest rheological models, i.e., the ideal Bingham fluid model, is selected to examine the debris flow potential. There are positive relationships between the volumetric concentration of sediment ranging from 50% to 65% and rheological values (i.e., yield stress and viscosities). However, the difference in rheological parameters is of significance for given shear rates. The effect of wall-slip in different geometries between ball and vane-penetrated system is emphasized.

  3. Plant macroscopic remains from recent sediments of Banks Island, Northwest Territories, and Bathurst Island, Nunavut, Canada, and the interpretation of Quaternary cold stage plant macroscopic assemblages

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Richard G. West; Mary E. Pettit

    2000-01-01

    Macroscopic plant remains were extracted from recent sediments of streams on Banks Island and Bathurst Island. Analyses of the samples are given and their general relation to the vegetation is described. Problems of interpretation of the contemporary and Quaternary cold stage macroscopic assemblages include the variation of the representation of taxa, the significance of taphonomy, especially under fluvial conditions, and

  4. Reflection seismic characterization of the Grängesberg iron deposit and its mining-induced structures, central Sweden

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Place, Joachim; Malehmir, Alireza; Högdahl, Karin; Juhlin, Christopher; Persson Nilsson, Katarina

    2014-05-01

    Reflection seismic investigation has been conducted on the Grängesberg apatite iron deposit where over 150 Mt of iron ore were produced until the mine closed in 1989. The mine infrastructure with shafts and tunnels extend down to ca. 650 m below the surface. Both natural and mine induced fracture and fault systems are today water-filled (some of them extending to the surface). The disputed ore genesis of the apatite-iron ores and its exploration potential due to large remaining quantities once again attracts both scientific and commercial interests. A good understanding of the geometry of mineral deposits and their hostrock structures at depth is essential for optimizing their exploration and exploitation. In addition, deep understanding of the fracture system is vital if mining activity is resumed as these may impact the terrain stability and seismicity, which may put at risk new populated and industrial areas. To address some of these challenging issues related to the past mining and also to obtain information about the depth continuation of the existing deposit, two E-W oriented reflection lines with a total length of 3.5 km were acquired in May 2013 by Uppsala University. A weight drop mounted on an hydraulic bobcat truck (traditionally used for concrete breaking in demolition sector) was used to generate seismic signal. In order to increase the signal-to-noise ratio, several impacts were generated at each shot point and stacked together. The seismic lines intersect at high angle the Grängesberg ore body and open pit, as well as several mining-induced faults. A combination of cabled and wireless receivers placed at every 10 m was used for the data recording. Use of wireless receivers was necessary as deploying cabled sensors was not possible due to city infrastructures, roads and houses. A careful analysis of the data suggested that several field-related issues such as (1) the crooked geometry of the lines (due to the available path and road network), (2) electric and vibration noise due to populated areas and roads, as well as a rock crusher working close to the line, (3) significant static variations (due to the variable nature of the terrain: forest, roads, open pit filled with 10s of meters of unconsolidated materials...), make this dataset similar to a city-kind dataset. Preprocessing of the data first required the cable- and wireless- recorded sub-datasets to be merged using GPS time stamps (nanoseconds accuracy) registered in the active data. Vertical shift and stack was then carried out to stack all data available at each shot point. Preliminary results from brute stacks exhibit evidences of reflections or diffractions. It is anticipated that further processing, involving especially appropriate static corrections and velocity analysis, would help interpreting such seismic events in relation to the ore body and its surrounding structures. Possible along-profile compartmentalization is also detected; further processing is however necessary before interpreting such features in terms of recent faulting. Acknowledgements: Formas, Grängesberg Iron AB, Spendrups and Geological Survey of Sweden

  5. Stratiform copper deposit, northern anatolia, Turkey: evidence for early bronze I (2800 B.C.) mining activity.

    PubMed

    Giles, D L; Kuijpers, E P

    1974-11-29

    A stratiform, massive copper sulfide deposit with possible gold, silver, and cobalt credits was discovered by a United Nations reconnaissance team in Paleozoic (?) metamorphic terrain of north central Turkey. The deposit, which is of possible volcanigenic exhalative origin, contains evidence of extensive prehistoric underground mining and smelting activity that, based on radiocarbon data, may date to 2800 B.C. (Early Bronze I Age). PMID:17838597

  6. Post-depositional redistribution of trace metals in reservoir sediments of a mining/smelting-impacted watershed (the Lot

    E-print Network

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    . It is estimated that, during a major flood event, about 870 t of Zn, 18 t of Cd, 25 t of Pb and 17 t of Cu could of sulfide phases. These amounts are equivalent to 13-fold (Cd), ~6-fold #12;(Zn), 4-fold (Pb) the meanPost-depositional redistribution of trace metals in reservoir sediments of a mining

  7. Distribution of selected trace and major elements around the massive sulfide deposit at the Penn mine, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Peterson, J.A.

    1988-01-01

    This paper discusses the distribution of 17 elements in 119 rock samples collected in a 2-km2 area around the Penn mine. Because the rock units in the area dip steeply, a cross section through the deposit can be studied using surface samples and maps. -Author

  8. CHANGES IN GRADE, VOLUME AND CONTAINED GOLD DURING THE MINING LIFE-CYCLE OF GOLD PLACER DEPOSITS.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bliss, J.D.; Orris, G.J.; Menzie, W.D.

    1987-01-01

    Analysis of gold placer data throughout the world suggests that gold grades and volumes cannot be used to distinguish between most types of gold placers. Only the alluvial plain and fan placers are significantly different among the types of gold placers considered. Gold grades and volumes change when working placers go from small-volume methods to large-volume methods. The odds that a placer will be dominantly worked using small-volume methods at the surface are about 5:3. Once small-volume mining has occurred, the odds against subsequent large-volume mining are about 4:1. If a deposit is suitable for large-volume mining and the amount of gold produced from small-volume mining was reported, an estimate of the remaining gold (log//1//0kg) can be made using an equation.

  9. Application of a Depositional Facies Model to an Acid Mine Drainage Site? †

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Juliana F.; Jones, Daniel S.; Mills, Daniel B.; Macalady, Jennifer L.; Burgos, William D.

    2011-01-01

    Lower Red Eyes is an acid mine drainage site in Pennsylvania where low-pH Fe(II) oxidation has created a large, terraced iron mound downstream of an anoxic, acidic, metal-rich spring. Aqueous chemistry, mineral precipitates, microbial communities, and laboratory-based Fe(II) oxidation rates for this site were analyzed in the context of a depositional facies model. Depositional facies were defined as pools, terraces, or microterracettes based on cm-scale sediment morphology, irrespective of the distance downstream from the spring. The sediments were composed entirely of Fe precipitates and cemented organic matter. The Fe precipitates were identified as schwertmannite at all locations, regardless of facies. Microbial composition was studied with fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) and transitioned from a microaerophilic, Euglena-dominated community at the spring, to a Betaproteobacteria (primarily Ferrovum spp.)-dominated community at the upstream end of the iron mound, to a Gammaproteobacteria (primarily Acidithiobacillus)-dominated community at the downstream end of the iron mound. Microbial community structure was more strongly correlated with pH and geochemical conditions than depositional facies. Intact pieces of terrace and pool sediments from upstream and downstream locations were used in flowthrough laboratory reactors to measure the rate and extent of low-pH Fe(II) oxidation. No change in Fe(II) concentration was observed with 60Co-irradiated sediments or with no-sediment controls, indicating that abiotic Fe(II) oxidation was negligible. Upstream sediments attained lower effluent Fe(II) concentrations compared to downstream sediments, regardless of depositional facies. PMID:21097582

  10. Preliminary Study of Formation Mechanism of the Erdenetiin Ovoo Porphyry Copper-Molybdenum Deposit and Environmental Effects of Erdenet Mine, Northern Mongolia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Munkhtsengel, B.; Ohara, M.; Gerel, O.; Dandar, S.; Tsuchiya, N.

    2006-05-01

    The Erdenetiin ovoo is a biggest porphyry copper-molybdenum deposit in Mongolia, which is situated in Northern Mongolia. The deposit has been mined since 1978 at an annual rate of approximately 20 Mt of ore. As it plays important role to country's economy and still have controversies calling researchers interest. Ore formation mechanism of the Erdenetiin Ovoo deposit and environmental impacts of the Erdenet Mine are study subjects of our team.

  11. Leading a double life in 17th-century Oxford: Ralph Bathurst (1620-1704), physician-physiologist and cleric.

    PubMed

    Guy, Jean M

    2006-02-01

    Ralph Bathurst spent most of his working life in Trinity College, Oxford. Strongly influenced by William Harvey, he was a friend and colleague of Thomas Willis, Robert Boyle and many other eminent experimentalists. His intended career as an Anglican priest and theologian was frustrated during the Commonwealth. Instead, he trained as a physician and practised in Abingdon in Berkshire and in the Navy. His examination papers for the degrees of Bachelor and Doctor of Medicine survived and were printed many years after his death. This paper, summarizing the three Latin lectures on respiration given for his doctoral degree in 1654, throws light on the physiological research carried out in Oxford at that time. The lectures included clinical observations, the results of experiments performed by himself and others, and speculations on the chemistry of air in the era before Joseph Priestley. PMID:16435028

  12. Mercury contamination of active channel sediment and floodplain deposits from historic gold mining at Gold Hill, North Carolina, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lecce, Scott; Pavlowsky, Robert; Schlomer, Gwenda

    2008-07-01

    A reconnaissance investigation of mercury contamination associated with historic gold mining in North Carolina, USA, revealed high concentrations of mercury in channel and floodplain sediments downstream from the Gold Hill mining district. The most intense period of mining activities in this region occurred in the 1840s and 1850s when mercury amalgamation was used to recover fine gold particles from milled ore. This paper evaluates mercury concentrations measured in active channel sediments and two cores recovered from historic floodplain deposits of the lower portion of Dutch Buffalo Creek. Mercury concentrations in these cores range from 0.01 to 2.2 mg/kg, with maximum concentrations more than 35 times background levels. A later peak in copper concentrations is associated with the operation of a large copper mine between 1899 and 1906. Following the most intense periods of mining, both mercury and copper concentrations decrease upcore to constant levels of about twice pre-mining background concentrations. Results suggest that vertical trends in mercury and other trace metals provide a useful tool for interpreting rates of historic floodplain sedimentation in the Piedmont of North Carolina.

  13. Environmental geochemistry of a Kuroko-type massive sulfide deposit at the abandoned Valzinco mine, Virginia, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Seal, R.R., II; Hammarstrom, J.M.; Johnson, A.N.; Piatak, N.M.; Wandless, G.A.

    2008-01-01

    The abandoned Valzinco mine, which worked a steeply dipping Kuroko-type massive sulfide deposit in the Virginia Au-pyrite belt, contributed significant metal-laden acid-mine drainage to the Knight's Branch watershed. The host rocks were dominated by metamorphosed felsic volcanic rocks, which offered limited acid-neutralizing potential. The ores were dominated by pyrite, sphalerite, galena, and chalcopyrite, which represented significant acid-generating potential. Acid-base accounting and leaching studies of flotation tailings - the dominant mine waste at the site - indicated that they were acid generating and therefore, should have liberated significant quantities of metals to solution. Field studies of mine drainage from the site confirmed that mine drainage and the impacted stream waters had pH values from 1.1 to 6.4 and exceeded aquatic ecosystem toxicity limits for Fe, Al, Cd, Cu, Pb and Zn. Stable isotope studies of water, dissolved SO42 -, and primary and secondary sulfate and sulfide minerals indicated that two distinct sulfide oxidation pathways were operative at the site: one dominated by Fe(III) as the oxidant, and another by molecular O2 as the oxidant. Reaction-path modeling suggested that geochemical interactions between tailings and waters approached a steady state within about a year. Both leaching studies and geochemical reaction-path modeling provided reasonable predictions of the mine-drainage chemistry.

  14. Post-Depositional Behavior of Cu in a Metal-Mining Polishing Pond (East Lake, Canada)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Martin, A.J.; Jambor, J.L.; Pedersen, T.F.; Crusius, J.

    2003-01-01

    The post-depositional behavior of Cu in a gold-mining polishing pond (East Lake, Canada) was assessed after mine closure by examination of porewater chemistry and mineralogy. The near-surface (upper 1.5 cm) sediments are enriched in Cu, with values ranging from 0.4 to 2 wt %. Mineralogical examination revealed that the bulk of the Cu inventory is present as authigenic copper sulfides. Optical microscopy, energy-dispersion spectra, and X-ray data indicate that the main Cu sulfide is covellite (CuS). The formation of authigenic Cu-S phases is supported by the porewater data, which demonstrate that the sediments are serving as a sink for dissolved Cu below sub-bottom depths of 1-2 cm. The zone of Cu removal is consistent with the occurrence of detectable sulfide and the consumption of sulfate. The sediments can be viewed as a passive bioreactor that permanently removes Cu as insoluble copper sulfides. This process is not unlike that which occurs in other forms of bioremediation, such as wetlands and permeable reactive barriers. Above the zone of Cu removal, dissolved Cu maxima in the interfacial porewaters range from 150 to 450 ??g L-1 and reflect the dissolution of a Cu-bearing phase in the surface sediments. The reactive phase is thought to be a component of treatment sludges delivered to the lake as part of cyanide treatment. Flux calculations indicate that the efflux of dissolved Cu from the sediments to the water column (14-51 ??g cm-2 yr-1) can account for the elevated levels of dissolved Cu in lake waters (???50 ??g L-1). Implications for lake recovery are discussed.

  15. Assessment of atmospheric heavy metal deposition in the Tarkwa gold mining area of Ghana using epiphytic lichens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boamponsem, L. K.; Adam, J. I.; Dampare, S. B.; Nyarko, B. J. B.; Essumang, D. K.

    2010-05-01

    In situ lichens ( Parmelia sulcata) have been used to assess atmospheric heavy metal deposition in the Tarkwa gold mining area of Ghana. Total heavy metal concentrations obtained by instrumental neutron activation analysis (INAA) were processed by positive matrix factorization (PMF), principal component (PCA) and cluster (CA) analyses. The pollution index factor (PIF) and pollution load index (PLI) criteria revealed elevated levels of Sb, Mn, Cu, V, Al, Co, Hg, Cd and As in excess of the background values. The PCA and CA classified the examined elements into anthropogenic and natural sources, and PMF resolved three primary sources/factors: agricultural activities and other non-point anthropogenic origins, natural soil dust, and gold mining activities. Gold mining activities, which are characterized by dominant species of Sb, Th, As, Hg, Cd and Co, and significant contributions of Cu, Al, Mn and V, are the main contributors of heavy metals in the atmosphere of the study area.

  16. Geophysical model of the Cu-Mo porphyry ore deposit at Copper Flat Mine, Hillsboro, Sierra County, New Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gutierrez, Adrian Emmanuel Gutierrez

    A 3D gravity model of the Copper Flat Mine was performed as part of the exploration of new resources in at the mine. The project is located in the Las Animas Mining District in Sierra County, New Mexico. The mine has been producing ore since 1877 and is currently owned by the New Mexico Copper Corporation, which plans o bringing the closed copper mine back into production with innovation and a sustainable approach to mining development. The Project is located on the Eastern side of the Arizona-Sonora-New Mexico porphyry copper Belt of Cretaceous age. Copper Flat is predominantly a Cretaceous age stratovolcano composed mostly of quartz monzonite. The quartz monzonite was intruded by a block of andesite alter which a series of latite dikes creating veining along the topography where the majority of the deposit. The Copper Flat deposit is mineralized along a breccia pipe where the breccia is the result of auto-brecciation due to the pore pressure. There have been a number of geophysical studies conducted at the site. The most recent survey was a gravity profile on the area. The purpose of the new study is the reinterpretation of the IP Survey and emphasizes the practical use of the gravity geophysical method in evaluating the validity of the previous survey results. The primary method used to identify the deposit is gravity in which four Talwani models were created in order to created a 3D model of the ore body. The Talwani models have numerical integration approaches that were used to divide every model into polygons. The profiles were sectioned into polygons; each polygon was assigning a specific density depending on the body being drawn. Three different gridding techniques with three different filtering methods were used producing ten maps prior to the modeling, these maps were created to establish the best map to fit the models. The calculation of the polygons used an exact formula instead of the numerical integration of the profile made with a Talwani approach. A least squared comparison between the calculated and observed gravity is used to determine the best fitting gravity vectors and the best susceptibility for the assemblage of polygonal prisms. The survey is expected to identify the geophysical anomalies found at the Copper Flat deposit in order to identify the alteration that surrounds that part of the ore body. The understanding of the anomalies needs to be reevaluated in order to have a sharper model of Copper Flat, and to understand the relations of the different structures that shaped this copper porphyry deposit.

  17. Mineralogic sources of metals in leachates from the weathering of sedex, massive sulfide, and vein deposit mining wastes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Diehl, S.F.; Hageman, P.L.; Seal, R.R., II; Piatak, N.M.; Lowers, H.

    2011-01-01

    Weathered mine waste consists of oxidized primary minerals and chemically unstable secondary phases that can be sources of readily soluble metals and acid rock drainage. Elevated concentrations of metals such as Cd, Cu, Fe, Mn, Ni, Pb, and Zn are observed in deionized water-based leachate solutions derived from complex sedex and Cu-Pb-Zn mine wastes. Leachate (USGS FLT) from the Elizabeth mine, a massive sulfide deposit, has a pH of 3.4 and high concentrations of Al (16700 ug/L), Cu (440 ug/L), and Zn (8620 ug/L). Leachate from the sedex Faro mine has a pH of 3.5 and high concentrations of Al (2040 ug/L), Cu (1930 ug/L), Pb (2080 ug/L), and Zn (52900 ug/L). In contrast, higher-pH leachates produced from tailings of polymetallic vein deposits have order of magnitude lower metal concentrations. These data indicate that highly soluble secondary mineral phases exist at the surface of waste material where the samples were collected. Sulfide minerals from all sites exhibit differential degrees of weathering, from dissolution etched grain rims, to rinds of secondary minerals, to skeletal remnants. These microscale mineral-dissolution textures enhance weathering and metal teachability of waste material. Besides the formation of secondary minerals, sulfide grains from dried tailings samples may be coated by amorphous Fe-Al-Si minerals that also adsorb metals such as Cu, Ni, and Zn.

  18. Generation of polluted waters from mining wastes in a uranium deposit.

    PubMed

    Groudev, Stoyan N; Spasova, Irena I; Nicolova, Marina V; Georgiev, Plamen S

    2005-01-01

    Dump consisting of 9500 tons of rich-in-pyrite mining wastes located in the uranium deposit Curilo, Western Bulgaria, was, after rainfall, an intensive source of acid drainage waters. These waters had a pH in the range of about 1.7-4.5 and contained radionuclides (uranium, radium), heavy metals (copper, zinc, cadmium, lead, nickel, cobalt, iron, and manganese), arsenic and sulphates in concentrations usually much higher than the relevant permissible levels for waters intended for use in the agriculture and/or industry. The generation of these polluted waters was studied under real field conditions for a period of about seven years during different climatic seasons. It was found that the dump was inhabited by a diverse microflora in which some acidophilic chemolithotrophic bacteria were the prevalent microorganisms. The solubilization of the above-mentioned pollutants from the dump material was connected mainly with the oxidation of pyrite and other sulphide minerals by these bacteria. Their activity depended on some essential environmental factors such as temperature, pH, and water, oxygen and nutrient contents in the dump. PMID:16457374

  19. Syrian bean-caper (Zygophyllum fabago L.) improves organic matter and other properties of mine wastes deposits.

    PubMed

    Kabas, S; Arocena, J M; Acosta, J A; Faz, A; Martínez-Martínez, S; Zornoza, R; Carmona, D M

    2014-01-01

    The omni-presence of Zygophyllum fabago L. (Syrian bean-caper) natural colonies in post mining areas prompted us to investigate its contributions to reclamation of mine wastes deposits in southeast Spain. Select plant-related (edaphic) characteristics and bio- and water soluble-Cd, Cu, Pb and Zn in rhizosphere of Z. fabago were compared to deposits one year since application of pig slurry and marble waste. Total N in rhizosphere increased up to a factor of 20X (339 vs 17 mg N kg(-1)) in El Gorguel and 27X (85 vs 3.1 mg N kg(-1)) in El Lirio sites. Organic matter accumulation in rhizosphere from litter and roots of Z. fabago increased organic C from 6.6 to 19.5 g kg(-1) in El Gorguel and from 2.1 to 5.7 g kg(-1) in El Lirio in one year. Dissolution of inorganic C takes place due to organic acids from root exudates of Z. fabago. Reduction in bio-available Cd, Cu, Pb, and Zn in rhizosphere of Z. fabago at El Lirio is attributed to increase in pH from 5.3 to 7.7 through marble waste addition, although increased cation exchange capacity may also have played a role. Addition of marble waste to encourage colonization by Z. fabago in acidic mine wastes deposits was recommended. PMID:24912237

  20. Avoidable errors in deposited macromolecular structures: an impediment to efficient data mining

    PubMed Central

    Dauter, Zbigniew; Wlodawer, Alexander; Minor, Wladek; Jaskolski, Mariusz; Rupp, Bernhard

    2014-01-01

    Whereas the vast majority of the more than 85?000 crystal structures of macromolecules currently deposited in the Protein Data Bank are of high quality, some suffer from a variety of imperfections. Although this fact has been pointed out in the past, it is still worth periodic updates so that the metadata obtained by global analysis of the available crystal structures, as well as the utilization of the individual structures for tasks such as drug design, should be based on only the most reliable data. Here, selected abnormal deposited structures have been analysed based on the Bayesian reasoning that the correctness of a model must be judged against both the primary evidence as well as prior knowledge. These structures, as well as information gained from the corresponding publications (if available), have emphasized some of the most prevalent types of common problems. The errors are often perfect illustrations of the nature of human cognition, which is frequently influenced by preconceptions that may lead to fanciful results in the absence of proper validation. Common errors can be traced to negligence and a lack of rigorous verification of the models against electron density, creation of non-parsimonious models, generation of improbable numbers, application of incorrect symmetry, illogical presentation of the results, or violation of the rules of chemistry and physics. Paying more attention to such problems, not only in the final validation stages but during the structure-determination process as well, is necessary not only in order to maintain the highest possible quality of the structural repositories and databases but most of all to provide a solid basis for subsequent studies, including large-scale data-mining projects. For many scientists PDB deposition is a rather infrequent event, so the need for proper training and supervision is emphasized, as well as the need for constant alertness of reason and critical judgment as absolutely necessary safeguarding measures against such problems. Ways of identifying more problematic structures are suggested so that their users may be properly alerted to their possible shortcomings. PMID:25075337

  1. Avoidable errors in deposited macromolecular structures: an impediment to efficient data mining.

    PubMed

    Dauter, Zbigniew; Wlodawer, Alexander; Minor, Wladek; Jaskolski, Mariusz; Rupp, Bernhard

    2014-05-01

    Whereas the vast majority of the more than 85?000 crystal structures of macromolecules currently deposited in the Protein Data Bank are of high quality, some suffer from a variety of imperfections. Although this fact has been pointed out in the past, it is still worth periodic updates so that the metadata obtained by global analysis of the available crystal structures, as well as the utilization of the individual structures for tasks such as drug design, should be based on only the most reliable data. Here, selected abnormal deposited structures have been analysed based on the Bayesian reasoning that the correctness of a model must be judged against both the primary evidence as well as prior knowledge. These structures, as well as information gained from the corresponding publications (if available), have emphasized some of the most prevalent types of common problems. The errors are often perfect illustrations of the nature of human cognition, which is frequently influenced by preconceptions that may lead to fanciful results in the absence of proper validation. Common errors can be traced to negligence and a lack of rigorous verification of the models against electron density, creation of non-parsimonious models, generation of improbable numbers, application of incorrect symmetry, illogical presentation of the results, or violation of the rules of chemistry and physics. Paying more attention to such problems, not only in the final validation stages but during the structure-determination process as well, is necessary not only in order to maintain the highest possible quality of the structural repositories and databases but most of all to provide a solid basis for subsequent studies, including large-scale data-mining projects. For many scientists PDB deposition is a rather infrequent event, so the need for proper training and supervision is emphasized, as well as the need for constant alertness of reason and critical judgment as absolutely necessary safeguarding measures against such problems. Ways of identifying more problematic structures are suggested so that their users may be properly alerted to their possible shortcomings. PMID:25075337

  2. Distribution of the platinum group elements in peat deposit near a historic lead and silver mining district.

    PubMed

    Strnad, Ladislav; Mihaljevic, Martin; Ettler, Vojtech; Barsová, Linda; Zuna, Milan; Sebek, Ondrej

    2008-08-01

    Concentrations of platinum group elements (PGE) and Ag were studied in a minerotrophic peat deposit near a historic Pb-Ag mining district (Príbram, Czech Republic). The PGE determinations were performed by quadrupole ICP-MS after NiS fire assay procedure. In the individual peat layers (dated by measurement of (210)Pb activity) the PGE concentrations were low and ranged from 0.015 ng g(-1) (Ir) to 11.8 ng g(-1) (Pt). The enrichment of PGE (especially Pt) compared to the Earth crust contents were observed during two periods. The peak in the second half of 19th century was explained by massive increase of ore mining and affinity of PGE to concentrate in molten lead during Pb processing. The recent PGE enrichment in peat layers might be explained by automobile (with catalytic converters) exhaust fumes or processing of computer electronic parts by the smelter. PMID:18373043

  3. Water quality of coal deposits and abandoned mines, Saginaw County, Michigan

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Handy, A.H.

    1982-01-01

    Coal was last mined in Saginaw County, Michigan in 1950. Water from abandoned mines and from undisturbed coal-bearing beds in the Saginaw Formation is highly mineralized and contains high concentrations of iron. Compared to streams in the area, the water contains higher concentrations of at least 15 constituents including boron, phenol, lithium, strontium, and manganese. Water from abandoned mines and coal-bearing beds is a poor source of water for domestic, public, or agricultural uses. Large amounts of this highly mineralized ground water reaching local streams would have a deleterious effect on surface-water quality. (USGS)

  4. Metal and fluid sources in a potential world-class gold deposit: El-Sid mine, Egypt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Helmy, Hassan; Zoheir, Basem

    2014-11-01

    Lode gold mineralization at the El-Sid mine area is associated with the ca. 600 Ma Fawakhir granite intrusion, which cuts the ~737 Ma ophiolite nappes in the Central Eastern Desert of Egypt. The mineralized quartz veins are hosted by ~E- and NE-trending fault/fracture sets cutting the western boundary of the intrusion and sheared ophiolites. The results of electron microprobe analyses of gold-associated hydrothermal sulfide and silicate minerals suggest that Au was mobilized alongside Ni, Co, Cr and As from the adjacent ophiolitic serpentinite. After granite emplacement, hydrothermal fluids interacted with the sheared serpentinite, leaching metals and re-depositing them in the faults/fractures and adjacent wall rock in a cyclic process. Low-salinity aqueous-carbonic fluids with significant quantities of volatile species (CO2, CH4, and N2 ± H2S) leached and transported Au from deep to shallow crustal levels. Carbon dioxide had a buffering effect on the Au-bearing hydrothermal solution, maintaining its pH within a narrow near-neutral range, where elevated gold concentration was transported by complexation with reduced magmatic sulfur in a reducing environment. Gold deposition along fault/fracture conduits in the Fawakhir granite and adjacent serpentinite resulted from interplay of pressure drop, fluctuations in oxygen and sulfur fugacities, and exsolution of the volatile phases. Infiltration of meteoric water may have contributed to the formation of the late stage gold-sulfide mineralization that formed at shallower levels during terrane uplift. Sulfidation of the Fe-rich magmatic minerals was, on the other hand, the overriding process in the wall rock as evidenced by abundant disseminated sulfides with gold inclusions. Considering the structural control by regional shear zones (fluid conduits) and the voluminous granitic and ophiolitic rocks (metal sources), a high tonnage gold deposit amenable to open pit mining at the El-Sid mine area is very likely.

  5. Geological controls on refractory ore in an orogenic gold deposit, Macraes mine, New Zealand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petrie, B. S.; Craw, D.; Ryan, C. G.

    2005-07-01

    The Macraes mine is hosted in an orogenic (mesothermal) gold deposit in metasedimentary rocks of the Otago Schist belt. Much gold occurs within altered schist with minimal silica-addition, and this study focuses on altered schist ore types. The unmineralized host schists are chemically and mineralogically uniform in composition, but include two end-member rock types: feldspathic schist and micaceous schist. Both rock types have undergone hydrothermal alteration along a shallow-dipping foliation-parallel shear zone, but their different rheological properties have affected the style of mineralisation. Micaceous schist has been extensively recrystallized and hydrothermally altered during ductile deformation, to form ores characterized by abundant, disseminated millimetre-scale pyrite cubes (typically 1 2 wt% S) and minor silicification. The earliest pyrite contained Ni and/or As in solid solution and no gold was imaged in these pyrites or later arsenopyrite grains. The ore type is refractory and gold recovery by cyanide leaching is less than 50%, with lowest recovery in rocks that have been less affected by later brittle deformation. In contrast, hydrothermally altered feldspathic schist is characterized by mineralised black microshears and veinlets formed during shear-zone related brittle deformation. Microsheared ore has relatively low sulphur content (<0.7 wt%) and muscovite has been illitised during hydrothermal alteration. Pyrite and arsenopyrite in microshears are fractured and deformed, and contain 1 10 ?m blebs of gold. Later pyrite veinlets also contain micron- to submicron-scale inclusions of sphalerite, chalcopyrite, galena, and gold (?10 microns). Gold in microsheared ore is more readily recoverable than in the refractory ore, although encapsulation of the fine gold grains inhibits cyanidation. Both microsheared ore and disseminated pyritic ore pass laterally into mineralised black shears, which contain hydrothermal graphite and late-stage cataclastic sulphides. This black, sheared ore releases gold readily, but the gold is then adsorbed on to gangue minerals (preg-robbed) and net cyanidation recovery can be less than 50%. Hence, low gold recovery during cyanidation results from (1) poor liberation of gold encapsulated in microcrystalline quartz and unfractured sulphide grains, and (2) preg-robbing of liberated gold during cyanidation. Introduction of pressure-oxidation of ore prior to cynidation has mitigated these issues.

  6. International Workshop on ecological aspects on underground mining of usable minerals deposits,

    E-print Network

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    the reclamation work in the opencast mines, the stabilisation of the waste dumps, control of erosion, protection the overburden materials were dumped on hillsides, at limit of equilibrium at heights of 40 to 250 metres

  7. Plant macroscopic remains from recent sediments of Banks Island, Northwest Territories, and Bathurst Island, Nunavut, Canada, and the interpretation of Quaternary cold stage plant macroscopic assemblages

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    West, Richard G.; Pettit, Mary E.

    2000-02-01

    Macroscopic plant remains were extracted from recent sediments of streams on Banks Island and Bathurst Island. Analyses of the samples are given and their general relation to the vegetation is described. Problems of interpretation of the contemporary and Quaternary cold stage macroscopic assemblages include the variation of the representation of taxa, the significance of taphonomy, especially under fluvial conditions, and the origin of the assemblages in a mosaic of vegetation. The contribution of analyses of macroscopic remains to interpretations of vegetation and environment based on pollen analysis is emphasised.

  8. The respiratory health hazard of tephra from the 2010 Centennial eruption of Merapi with implications for occupational mining of deposits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Damby, D. E.; Horwell, C. J.; Baxter, P. J.; Delmelle, P.; Donaldson, K.; Dunster, C.; Fubini, B.; Murphy, F. A.; Nattrass, C.; Sweeney, S.; Tetley, T. D.; Tomatis, M.

    2013-07-01

    Ashfall into heavily populated areas during the October-November 2010 eruption of Merapi volcano, Indonesia created anxiety regarding the growing impacts to health as the eruption escalated and the hazard zone widened. We made a preliminary assessment of the respiratory hazards to human health of the tephra deposits (ashfall, lahar, and PDC surge) from the eruption using a laboratory protocol specifically developed to study the toxic potential of volcanic ash particles. Twenty samples collected from a range of locations were analysed for health-pertinent mineralogical parameters (grain size, crystalline silica content, morphology, surface area, bulk chemistry, and leachable elements) and bio-reactivity (hydroxyl radical generation, haemolytic potential, oxidative capacity, pro-inflammatory response). The grain size pertinent to respiratory health was variable, ranging from 1.4-15.6 vol.% sub-4 ?m and 3.0-28.9 vol.% sub-10 ?m diameter material. No fibre-like particles were observed. Cristobalite was present in all samples, ranging from 1.9-9.5 wt.%, but surface reactivity and in vitro toxicity assays showed low reactivity for all samples tested. The risk of direct exposure to ash from fallout was in any case low due to seasonal rains limiting its re-suspension and the immediate and effective clean-up of communities by local people who supplied the ash to the Indonesian construction industry for use as aggregate. However, mining of the lahar and thick PDC deposits in the valleys draining the volcano is performed on a vast, industrial scale, which could result in high occupational exposure to thousands of sand miners at Merapi during the dry seasons. Further study of the health hazard of the mined Merapi deposits is warranted.

  9. Ore genesis at the Camaquã copper mine, a neoproterozoic sediment-hosted deposit in Southern Brazil

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Jorge Henrique Laux; Zara Gerhardt Lindenmayer; João Batista Guimarães Teixeira; Artur Bastos Neto

    2005-01-01

    The Camaquã copper mine includes the Uruguai and the São Luiz orebodies, hosted by sandstone and conglomerate of the Neoproterozoic to Early Paleozoic Camaquã basin. Despite a great controversy regarding the evolution of the Camaquã basin, it is generally accepted that the basin was initially marine and progressively changed into a definite continental environment. The ore consists of massive sulfides

  10. Formation of elongated displacement cracks in the mining of deep vein deposits

    Microsoft Academic Search

    A. N. Galybin; V. N. Odintsev

    1992-01-01

    Mining at a great depth is associated with dynamic fracturing of the rock bed. Rock bursts, microshocks, and rock collapses occur in stopes and development workings. Inside the bed, major rock bursts may be produced either by dynamic displacement of the bed on a tectonic fault or by the formation of new shear cracks. Although some progress has been attained

  11. New lithogeochemical and mineralogical exploration of Li-Sn greisen mineralisation in old mining adits of the Zinnwald deposit, Germany

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neßler, Jörg; Seifert, Thomas; Gutzmer, Jens; Müller, Armin; Henker, Jan; Kühn, Kersten

    2014-05-01

    The polymetallic Zinnwald-Cínovec deposit is represented by greisen-type mineralisation hosted within the apical portion of a small granite intrusion. Similar to other granitic stocks with Sn-W mineralisation in the Erzgebirge, the Zinnwald granite intruded during the post-collisional stage of the late-Variscan (Permo-Carboniferous) magmatic evolution. These intrusions are characterised by the prominent enrichment of incompatible elements (F, Li, Rb, Cs, Sn, Nb and Ta) and the depletion of P2O5. The deposit is located in the eastern part of the Erzgebirge region, Germany and straddles the border between Germany and the Czech Republic. It is characterised by flat dipping, sheet-like greisen ore bodies (up to 40 m in thickness) and veins (up to 1 m in thickness) located in the apical part and along the quaquaversal dipping edges of the granite stock. The greisen bodies predominantly consist of quartz, Li-Rb-Cs-bearing mica (named zinnwaldite), topaz, fluorite and accessory kaolinite and cassiterite. Historically mined for its cassiterite and wolframite ores since the 16th and 19th century, respectively, the deposit still provides access to a wide spread system of drifts and adits. Selected parts of the underground mine are now presented by the visitor's mine "Vereinigt Zwitterfeld zu Zinnwald". These local conditions are favourable for the re-examination of the exhibited greisen mineralisation. Within the framework of the ongoing Li and Sn exploration project of the SolarWorld Solicium GmbH in the German part of the deposit, an underground sampling campaign has been conducted, incorporating a series of 88 channel samples gained at two different levels (Tiefer Bünau adit = 750 m a.s.l.; Tiefe Hilfe Gottes adit = 720 m a.s.l.). Equally spaced channels of 2 m intervals and approximate dimensions of 180 x 5 x 2.5 cm have been created on pre-selected and detailed mapped walls of two different adits within the mine. The sample material has been gained for mineralogical and geochemical investigation using optical light microscopy and ICP-MS. The herein presented work aims to provide information about the horizontal distribution of selected elements (Li, Rb, Cs, Sn, W, Sc, Nb, Ta and Zn) and to assess historic data on mineralogy and geochemistry. Furthermore, the question of a sufficient sampling distance is tried to answer with the help of statistical exclusion principles. Investigations on the chemical composition of the greisen ore yielded homogeneous concentration of elements contained in micas (Li, Rb, Cs, Zn and Sc!) with Li concentration of about 0.3 wt. %, whereas concentrations of Sn and W (but also Nb and Ta) are more heterogenic distributed with some high-grade values connected to local mica-nests, veins and/or joint planes. Moreover, results of investigated elements from this campaign are in good agreement with the overall geochemical pattern obtained by past investigations. Compared with geochemical whole rock data from drill core samples of surrounding drill holes, the mean Li grades of channel samples are consistent for different areas within the mine. In case of Li, the application of statistical exclusion principles can provide a good estimation of the sufficient maximum sampling distance (about 5 m).

  12. Data set of world phosphate mines, deposits, and occurrences: Part A. geologic data; Part B. location and mineral economic data

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Chernoff, Carlotta B.; Orris, G.J.

    2002-01-01

    An inventory of more than 1,600 world phosphate mines, deposits, and occurrences was compiled from smaller data sets collected as part of multiple research efforts by Carlotta Chernoff, University of Arizona, and Greta Orris, U.S. Geological Survey. These data have been utilized during studies of black shale depositional environments and to construct phosphate deposit models. The compiled data have been edited for consistency and additional location information has been added where possible. The database of compiled phosphate information is being released in two sections; the geologic data in one section and the location and mineral economic data in the second. This report, U.S. Geological Survey Open-File Report 02–156–A, contains the geologic data and is best used with the complimentary data contained in Open-File Report 02–156–B. U.S. Geological Survey Open-File Report 02–156–B contains commodity data, location and analytical data, a variety of mineral economic data, reference information, and pointers to related records in the U.S. Geological Survey National mineral databases—MASMILS and MRDS.

  13. Prediction of AMD generation potential in mining waste piles, in the Sarcheshmeh porphyry copper deposit, Iran.

    PubMed

    Modabberi, Soroush; Alizadegan, Ali; Mirnejad, Hassan; Esmaeilzadeh, Esmat

    2013-11-01

    This study investigates the possibility of acid mine drainage (AMD) generation in active and derelict mine waste piles in Sarcheshmeh Copper Mine produced in several decades, using static tests including acid-base accounting (ABA) and net acid-generating pH (NAGpH). In this study, 51 composite samples were taken from 11 waste heaps, and static ABA and NAGpH tests were carried out on samples. While some piles are acid producing at present and AMD is discharging from the piles, most of them do not show any indication on their AMD potential, and they were investigated to define their acid-producing potential. The analysis of data indicates that eight waste piles are potentially acid generating with net neutralization potentials (NNPs) of -56.18 to -199.3, net acid generating of 2.19-3.31, and NPRs from 0.18 to 0.44. Other waste piles exhibited either a very low sulfur, high carbonate content or excess carbonate over sulfur; hence, they are not capable of acid production or they can be considered as weak acid producers. Consistency between results of ABA and NAGpH tests using a variety of classification criteria validates these tests as powerful means for preliminary evaluation of AMD/ARD possibilities in any mining district. It is also concluded that some of the piles with very negative NNPs are capable to produce AMD naturally, and they can be used in heap leaching process for economic recovery of trace amounts of metals without applying any biostimulation methods. PMID:23813094

  14. Sedimentological controls on gold in a late Pleistocene glacial placer deposit, Cariboo Mining District, British Columbia, Canada

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eyles, Nicholas; Kocsis, Stephen P.

    1989-11-01

    It is a widely perceived notion that glaciation results in dispersal of mineralized bedrock and that sedimentary concentrates of economic minerals (placers) rarely occur in glaciated basins. This paper describes economic gold placers within late Pleistocene glacial and related fluvial sediments of the Cariboo Mining District in central British Columbia, Canada. The area has been defined as a "giant" gold placer; total production since 1858 is over 93,000 kg. The oldest and volumetrically largest placers occur in fluvial gravels and valley-side fan deposits deposited during a long non-glacial interval from as early as 125,000 to 30,000years B.P. The richest placers are found along bedrock "gutters" in the deepest parts of valleys, indicating repeated fluvial reworking of the valley infills. Braided and "wandering gravel bed" fluvial facies can be identified. Glacial placers, that overlie the fluvial placers, occur within lodgement till complexes deposited below the late Wisconsin Cordilleran ice sheet after 30,000 years B.P. The basal portions of lodgement tills are commonly enriched in gold as a result of incorporation from older gravels. Subglacial meltwaters created a highly effective sluicing system and left lucrative pay zones along meltwater-cut channels on bedrock benches, within intraformational gravels in lodgement till and within "lee-side" deposits down-ice of bedrock highs. "Lee-side" deposits are essentially water-worked talus slopes that accumulated in subglacial cavities. Finally, postglacial "wandering gravel-bed rivers" have repeatedly reworked older placers resulting in rich pay zones at the base of extensive bar platform deposits. Similar sedimentological controls on gold distribution can be identified in other glacial placers of late Cenozoic and Paleozoic age in North America, southern Africa and Australia. A distinction is drawn between these placers, all characterized by coarse-grained, nuggety gold, and the more well-known Precambrian and Paleozoic placers where finely-comminuted gold is dispersed through large thicknesses of rock. Episodes of glaciation typically occur after long periods of tropical and subtropical weathering when supergene processes were active and glaciers were able to remove and concentrate coarse gold. In contrast, gold in non-glacial placers of Precambrian and Paleozoic age has been through many cycles of erosion and transport and coarse gold is uncommon.

  15. Geophysical methods as mapping tools in a strata-bound gold deposit: Haile mine, South Carolina slate belt.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wynn, J.C.; Luce, R.W.

    1984-01-01

    The Haile mine is the largest gold producer in the eastern USA. It is postulated to be a strata-bound gold deposit formed by a fumarolic or hot-spring system in felsic tuffs of Cambrian(?) age. Two mineralized zones occur, each composed of a sericitic part overlain by a siliceous part. Au is concentrated in especially silicified horizons and in pyrite horizons in the siliceous part of each mineralized zone. The tuffs are metamorphosed to greenschist facies and intruded by diabase and other mafic dykes. Weathering is deep and the mineralized tuffs are partly covered by coastal-plain sediments. It is suggested that certain geophysical methods may be useful in mapping and exploring Haile-type deposits in the Carolina slate belt. Very low frequency electromagnetic resistivity surveys help define alteration and silicified zones. A magnetic survey found sharp highs that correlate with unexposed mafic and ultramafic dykes. Induced polarization proved useful in giving a two-dimensional view of the structure.-G.J.N.

  16. Influence of Underground Coal Mining on the Environment in Horna Nitra Deposits in Slovakia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malgot, Jozef; Baliak, Frantisek

    Mechanical mining of brown coal takes place in the complicated engineering-geological conditions below the volcanic mountain range Vtacnik and under the Novaky tectonic basin of Neogene age. Vtacnik Mts is affected by huge gravitational slope deformations. The main mass of the mountain range is 300-800 m thick (andesites, agglomerate tuffs) it rests upon plastic clays in which lie coal seams of 9 m thick. After excavation of the coal seams without backfilling, reactivation of extensive slope deformations (blocks, landslides) takes place. These are 100-400 m thick. This process has a large negative influence on the environment of the whole undermined area. In the Novaky basin, after mining out of the coal seam, occur large depressions on the surface. There are several villages, highways, and railways in endangered area. This paper deals with the negative influence of the activated landslides and subsidence on the environment. The methods to quantify the influence are based on engineering-geological mapping and special methods of monitoring.

  17. Palynostratigraphy and depositional environment of Vastan Lignite Mine (Early Eocene), Gujarat, western India

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rao, M. R.; Sahni, Ashok; Rana, R. S.; Verma, Poonam

    2013-04-01

    Early Eocene sedimentary successions of south Asia, are marked by the development of extensive fossil-bearing, lignite-rich sediments prior to the collision of India with Asia and provide data on contemporary equatorial faunal and vegetational assemblages. One such productive locality in western India is the Vastan Lignite Mine representing approximately a 54-52 Ma sequence dated by the presence of benthic zone marker species, Nummulites burdigalensis burdigalensis. The present study on Vastan Lignite Mine succession is based on the spore-pollen and dinoflagellate cyst assemblages and documents contemporary vegetational changes. 86 genera and 105 species belonging to algal remains (including dinoflagellate cysts), fungal remains, pteridophytic spores and angiospermous pollen grains have been recorded. On the basis of first appearance, acme and decline of palynotaxa, three cenozones have been recognized and broadly reflect changing palaeodepositional environments. These are in ascending stratigraphic order (i) Proxapertites Spp. Cenozone, (ii) Operculodinium centrocarpum Cenozone and (iii) Spinizonocolpites Spp. Cenozone. The basal sequence is lagoonal, palm-dominated and overlain by more open marine conditions with dinoflagellate cysts and at the top, mangrove elements are dominant. The succession has also provided a unique record of fish, lizards, snakes, and mammals.

  18. Alteration associated with metamorphosed ophiolitic cupriferous iron sulfide deposits: Whalesback mine, Notre Dame Bay, Newfoundland

    Microsoft Academic Search

    D. J. Bachinski

    1977-01-01

    Ophiolitic metabasite host rocks of the Whalesback cupriferous iron sulfide deposit, Notre Dame Bay, Newfoundland, have undergone extensive redistribution of alkalis and lime. Such alteration (hydrothermal alteration, halmyrolysis) occurred before Acadian deformation and chlorite-zone greenschist facies metamorphism. The pyritic ores occur in chloritized rocks within such altered metabasites. Areas of intense chloritization, usually associated with silicification and minor sericitization, represent

  19. Effective resource estimates for primary diamond deposits from the EKATI Diamond Mine™, Canada

    Microsoft Academic Search

    D. R. Dyck; P. A. Oshust; J. A. Carlson; T. E. Nowicki; M. P. Mullins

    2004-01-01

    Primary economic diamond deposit modelling has rarely been documented in the public domain. This paper presents information collected from significantly diamondiferous kimberlite pipes located near Lac de Gras in the Arctic region of Canada's Northwest Territories. The resource estimation process is widely accepted as a cyclical iteration of data collection and evaluation processes. A resource database is typically assembled from

  20. [Phylogenetic diversity of culturable bacteria in the ancient salt deposits of the Yipinglang Salt Mine, P. R. China].

    PubMed

    Chen, Yi-guang; Li, Hui-ming; Li, Qin-yuan; Chen, Wei; Cui, Xiao-long

    2007-08-01

    The microbial diversity of cultivable bacteria, isolated from the ancient salt deposits from the Yipinglang Salt Mine (YPL) in the Yunnan Province, P. R. China,was investigated by using conventional culture-dependent method and phylogenetic analyses based on 16S rRNA gene sequence comparisons. 38 bacteria strains were isolated from the brine, halite and saline soil samples on MBA (marine broth agar 2216, Difco) and ISP 2 (International Streotomyces Project medium 2) media supplemented with 0.5-3.5 mol/L NaCl. The genomic DNAs of the isolates were extracted and their 16S rRNA genes were amplified by PCR using bacterial universal primers. The resulting 16S rRNA gene sequences were compared with sequences obtained from public databases to find the most closely related species. Phylogenetic analyses were performed using the software packages MEGA after multiple alignment of sequence data by CLUSTAL X. The evolutional instances (corrected by Kimura's 2-parameter model) were calculated and clustering was performed with the neighbor-joining method. The results showed that the isolates are members of twenty-four genera (Acinetobacter, Agromyces, Arthrobacter, Bacillus, Brevundimonas, Chromohalobacter, Dietzia, Erythrobacter, Exiguobacterium, Halomonas, Idiomarina, Kocuria, Marinobacter, Micrococcus, Paracoccus, Planomicrbium, Porphyrobacter, Pseudomonas, Psychrobacter, Roseivivax, Saccharospirillum, Salegentibactor, Salinicoccus, Streptomyces) of seventeen families (Alteromonadaceae, Bacillaceae, Caulobacteraceae, Flavobacteriaceae, Halomonadaceae, Idiomarinaceae, Microbacteriaceae, Micrococcaceae, Moraxellaceae, Planococcaceae, Pseudomonadaceae, Rhodobacteraceae, Dietziaceae, Saccharospirillaceae, Sphingomonadaceae, Staphylococcaceae, Streptomycetaceae) in four major phylogenetic groups (Actinobacteria, Bacteroidetes, Firmicutes, Proteobacteria). The most abundant and diverse isolates were within the phyla of Proteobacteria (47.3%; Gamma-Proteobacteria, 31.5%; Alpha-Proteobacteria, 15.8%) and Firmicutes (34.2%). The phylogenetic distance matrix results suggested that out of 38 isolates 32 are different strains of 27 known species, and that at least 3 stains represent new species within 3 characterized genera. Y3 (Accession No. EF177665) and Y25 (EF177670) represent new species of the genera Idiomarina and Saccharospirillum, respectively. Y15 (DQ837380), Y16 (EF177680) and Y22 (EF177689) represent a new species of the genus Salinicoccus. And strain Y21 (EF177692) may represent a novel species of a possible new genus of the family Staphylococcaceae. The results presented above shown that there are abundant bacterial species diversity and phylogenetic diversity in the ancient salt deposits from the Yipinglang Salt Mine. PMID:17944352

  1. Mercury contamination of active channel sediment and floodplain deposits from historic gold mining at Gold Hill, North Carolina, USA

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Scott Lecce; Robert Pavlowsky; Gwenda Schlomer

    2008-01-01

    A reconnaissance investigation of mercury contamination associated with historic gold mining in North Carolina, USA, revealed\\u000a high concentrations of mercury in channel and floodplain sediments downstream from the Gold Hill mining district. The most\\u000a intense period of mining activities in this region occurred in the 1840s and 1850s when mercury amalgamation was used to recover\\u000a fine gold particles from milled

  2. Stable isotope and fluid inclusion studies of carbonate deposits from the Tolfa Mountains mining district (Latium, central Italy)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Masi, U.; Ferrini, V.; O'Neil, J.R.; Batchelder, J.N.

    1980-01-01

    Carbon and oxygen isotope analyses were made of representative samples of calcite and quartz from the carbonate deposits in the Tolfa Mountains mining district. Measurements were also made of hydrogen isotope compositions, filling temperatures and salinities of fluid inclusions in these minerals. There are three stages of mineralization at Tolfa. In stage I, characterized by calc-silicate hornfels, the carbonates have relatively high ?? 18O values of 14.5 to 21.6 suggesting a rather low water/rock ratio. ??13C values of -0.3 to 2.1 indicate that appreciable decarbonation or introduction of deep-seated carbon did not occur. Stage II is marked by phanerocrystalline carbonates; ?? 18O values of 13.1 to 20.0 and ??13C values of 0.7 to 5.0 identify them as hydrothermal veins rather than marbles. ?? D values of -56 to -50 for inclusion fluids suggest a possible magmatic component to the hydrothermal fluid. Filling temperatures of coarse-grained samples of Calcite II are 309?? to 362?? C with a salinity range of 5.3 to 7.1 weight percent NaCl. Calculated ??18O values of 11-12 for these fluids are again indicative of low water/rock ratios. The sparry calcites of stage III have ??18O and ??13C values of 8.1 to 12.9 and -1.7 to 3.2, respectively. ?? D values of inclusion fluids are -40 to -33, clearly heavier than in earlier stages and similar to values of modern local ground waters. A salinity measurement of <0.1 weight percent NaCl in a sample of Calcite III is compatible with a relatively unaltered ground water origin for this fluid. Precipitation of the sparry calcite took place at much lower temperatures, around 160?? C. For quartz, ??18O values of 9.3 to 12.4 and ?? D values for inclusions of -53 to -28 are consistent with its late occurrence and paragenetic link with associated carbonates. ?? 1980 Springer-Verlag.

  3. 43 CFR 3814.1 - Mineral reservation in entry and patent; mining and removal of reserved deposits; bonds.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Mineral reservation in entry and patent; mining and...LAND MANAGEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR MINERALS MANAGEMENT (3000) LANDS AND MINERALS SUBJECT TO LOCATION Disposal of...

  4. 43 CFR 3814.1 - Mineral reservation in entry and patent; mining and removal of reserved deposits; bonds.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Mineral reservation in entry and patent; mining and...LAND MANAGEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR MINERALS MANAGEMENT (3000) LANDS AND MINERALS SUBJECT TO LOCATION Disposal of...

  5. 43 CFR 3814.1 - Mineral reservation in entry and patent; mining and removal of reserved deposits; bonds.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Mineral reservation in entry and patent; mining and...LAND MANAGEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR MINERALS MANAGEMENT (3000) LANDS AND MINERALS SUBJECT TO LOCATION Disposal of...

  6. 43 CFR 3814.1 - Mineral reservation in entry and patent; mining and removal of reserved deposits; bonds.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Mineral reservation in entry and patent; mining and...LAND MANAGEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR MINERALS MANAGEMENT (3000) LANDS AND MINERALS SUBJECT TO LOCATION Disposal of...

  7. Trace metal depositional patterns from an open pit mining activity as revealed by archived avian gizzard contents

    Microsoft Academic Search

    L. I. Bendell

    2011-01-01

    Archived samples of blue grouse (Dendragapus obscurus) gizzard contents, inclusive of grit, collected yearly between 1959 and 1970 were analyzed for cadmium, lead, zinc, and copper content. Approximately halfway through the 12-year sampling period, an open-pit copper mine began activities, then ceased operations 2 years later. Thus the archived samples provided a unique opportunity to determine if avian gizzard contents,

  8. The geology and mineral deposits of part of the western half of the Hailey 1 degree x 2 degrees quadrangle, Idaho; with sections on the Neal mining district and the Dixie mining district

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bennett, Earl H.

    2001-01-01

    Rocks in the western half of the Hailey 1 ?? 2 ? quadrangle of south-central Idaho include various units of the Atlanta lobe of the Idaho batholith (biotite granodiorite to two-mica granite) of Cretaceous age and plutons and dikes of Tertiary (Eocene to Miocene) age that intrude the batholith. Eocene plutonic rocks consist of a bimodal suite of anorogenic granite and tonalite-granodiorite and hypabyssal rhyolite and rhyodacite dikes. Rocks of the Eocene Challis Volcanics are scarce in the map area but are widespread to the east. Rhyolite ash flows of the Miocene Idavada Volcanics and basalt of the Snake River Plain crop out in the southern part of the area. Lacustrine rocks of probable Eocene to Holocene age are present in the vicinity of Anderson Ranch Reservoir. Quaternary basalts and gravels are widespread on the South Fork of the Boise River, and alluvial deposits are common along active drainages. Metasedimentary rocks of unknown age crop out on House Mountain, Chimney Peak, and on the ridges east of Anderson Ranch Reservoir. Older structures in the Idaho batholith include a major fault beneath House Mountain that may be a decollement for one of the large thrust sheets in eastern Idaho or part of an extensional core complex. The southern part of the Atlanta lobe of the Idaho batholith is cut by northeast-striking faults (parallel with the Trans-Challis fault system) that are related to Eocene extension and by northwest-oriented faults that formed during basin and range extension in the Miocene. The basin and range faults have prominent scarps typical of basin and range topography. The combination of northeast and northwest faults has broken the batholith into a series of rhomboid blocks. Some of these northeast and northwest faults are older structures that were reactivated in the Eocene or Miocene, as indicated by Ar 40 /Ar 39 dates on mineralized rock contained in some of the structures. The Idaho batholith and associated rocks in the map area host several hundred mines and prospects in 18 mining districts. The deposits range in age from Cretaceous to Eocene, and many were developed for precious metals. Most of the deposits are in quartz veins in shear zones in granitic rocks of the batholith. Several districts were actively being explored for low-grade, bulk-minable, precious-metal deposits in the late 1980s and early 1990s.

  9. Sampling Tsunami Deposits

    USGS Multimedia Gallery

    Dr. Starin Fernanda, Geological Survey & Mines Bureau of Sri Lanka, preparing a trench for sampling of tsunami deposit. Leaves on the surface days or weeks after the tsunami and blanket the sand deposited by the tsunami....

  10. Depth-dependent geochemical and microbiological gradients in Fe(III) deposits resulting from coal mine-derived acid mine drainage

    PubMed Central

    Brantner, Justin S.; Haake, Zachary J.; Burwick, John E.; Menge, Christopher M.; Hotchkiss, Shane T.; Senko, John M.

    2014-01-01

    We evaluated the depth-dependent geochemistry and microbiology of sediments that have developed via the microbially-mediated oxidation of Fe(II) dissolved in acid mine drainage (AMD), giving rise to a 8–10 cm deep “iron mound” that is composed primarily of Fe(III) (hydr)oxide phases. Chemical analyses of iron mound sediments indicated a zone of maximal Fe(III) reducing bacterial activity at a depth of approximately 2.5 cm despite the availability of dissolved O2 at this depth. Subsequently, Fe(II) was depleted at depths within the iron mound sediments that did not contain abundant O2. Evaluations of microbial communities at 1 cm depth intervals within the iron mound sediments using “next generation” nucleic acid sequencing approaches revealed an abundance of phylotypes attributable to acidophilic Fe(II) oxidizing Betaproteobacteria and the chloroplasts of photosynthetic microeukaryotic organisms in the upper 4 cm of the iron mound sediments. While we observed a depth-dependent transition in microbial community structure within the iron mound sediments, phylotypes attributable to Gammaproteobacterial lineages capable of both Fe(II) oxidation and Fe(III) reduction were abundant in sequence libraries (comprising ?20% of sequences) from all depths. Similarly, abundances of total cells and culturable Fe(II) oxidizing bacteria were uniform throughout the iron mound sediments. Our results indicate that O2 and Fe(III) reduction co-occur in AMD-induced iron mound sediments, but that Fe(II)-oxidizing activity may be sustained in regions of the sediments that are depleted in O2. PMID:24860562

  11. Biostratigraphy and structure of paleozoic host rocks and their relationship to Carlin-type gold deposits in the Jerritt Canyon mining district, Nevada

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Peters, S.G.; Armstrong, A.K.; Harris, A.G.; Oscarson, R.L.; Noble, P.J.

    2003-01-01

    The Jerritt Canyon mining district in the northern Independence Range, northern Nevada, contains multiple, nearly horizontal, thrust masses of platform carbonate rocks that are exposed in a series of north- to northeast-elongated, tectonic windows through rocks of the Roberts Mountains allochthon. The Roberts Mountains allochthon was emplaced during the Late Devonian to Early Mississippian Antler orogeny. These thrust masses contain structurally and stratigraphically controlled Carlin-type gold deposits. The gold deposits are hosted in tectonically truncated units of the Silurian to Devonian Hanson Creek and Roberts Mountains Formations that lie within structural slices of an Eastern assemblage of Cambrian to Devonian carbonate rocks. In addition, these multiply thrust-faulted and folded host rocks are structurally interleaved with Mississippian siliciclastic rocks and are overlain structurally by Cambrian to Devonian siliciclastic units of the Roberts Mountains allochthon. All sedimentary rocks were involved in thrusting, high-angle faulting, and folding, and some of these events indicate substantial late Paleozoic and/or Mesozoic regional shortening. Early Pennsylvanian and late Eocene dikes also intrude the sedimentary rocks. These rocks all were uplifted into a northeast-trending range by subsequent late Cenozoic Basin and Range faulting. Eocene sedimentary and volcanic rocks flank part of the range. Pathways of hydrothermal fluid flow and locations of Carlin-type gold orebodies in the Jerritt Canyon mining district were controlled by structural and host-rock geometries within specific lithologies of the stacked thrust masses of Eastern assemblage rocks. The gold deposits are most common proximal to intersections of northeast-striking faults, northwest-striking dikes, and thrust planes that lie adjacent to permeable stratigraphic horizons. The host stratigraphic units include carbonate sequences that contained primary intercrystalline permeability, which provided initial pathways for fluid flow and later served as precipitation sites for ore minerals. Alteration, during, and perhaps prior to mineralization, enhanced primary permeability by dissolution, by removal of calcite, and by formation of dolomite. Ore-stage sulfide minerals and alteration minerals commonly precipitated in pore spaces among dolomite grains. Microveinlets and microbrecciation in zones of intense alteration also provided networks of secondary permeability that further enhanced fluid flux and produced additional sites for ore deposition.

  12. 26 CFR 1.611-2 - Rules applicable to mines, oil and gas wells, and other natural deposits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ...that these data are available); (vi) The number of pay sands and average thickness of each pay sand or zone; (vii) The average depth to the top of each of the different pay sands; (viii) The annual production of the deposit or of...

  13. 26 CFR 1.611-2 - Rules applicable to mines, oil and gas wells, and other natural deposits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ...that these data are available); (vi) The number of pay sands and average thickness of each pay sand or zone; (vii) The average depth to the top of each of the different pay sands; (viii) The annual production of the deposit or of...

  14. 26 CFR 1.611-2 - Rules applicable to mines, oil and gas wells, and other natural deposits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ...that these data are available); (vi) The number of pay sands and average thickness of each pay sand or zone; (vii) The average depth to the top of each of the different pay sands; (viii) The annual production of the deposit or of...

  15. 26 CFR 1.611-2 - Rules applicable to mines, oil and gas wells, and other natural deposits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ...that these data are available); (vi) The number of pay sands and average thickness of each pay sand or zone; (vii) The average depth to the top of each of the different pay sands; (viii) The annual production of the deposit or of...

  16. Technologies for Decreasing Mining Losses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valgma, Ingo; Väizene, Vivika; Kolats, Margit; Saarnak, Martin

    2013-12-01

    In case of stratified deposits like oil shale deposit in Estonia, mining losses depend on mining technologies. Current research focuses on extraction and separation possibilities of mineral resources. Selective mining, selective crushing and separation tests have been performed, showing possibilities of decreasing mining losses. Rock crushing and screening process simulations were used for optimizing rock fractions. In addition mine backfilling, fine separation, and optimized drilling and blasting have been analyzed. All tested methods show potential and depend on mineral usage. Usage in addition depends on the utilization technology. The questions like stability of the material flow and influences of the quality fluctuations to the final yield are raised.

  17. Environmental Studies of Mineral Deposits in Alaska

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    1996-01-01

    This collection of articles summarizes environmental geochemical studies of metallic mineral deposits in Alaska, including sulfide, gold, mercury, chromium, and uranium mines and deposits. The studies report metal and acid concentrations in samples collected around such mines and deposits, and evaluate environmental effects of the deposits. An introduction explains geochemical processes, how metals enter environments downstream from mineral deposits, and background geochemical studies. Other articles are: Studies of Mineral Deposits Rich in Heavy Metals; Environmental Geochemistry of Mercury Mines in Southwestern Alaska; Environmental Geochemistry of Alaskan Gold Deposits; Geochemistry of Surface Waters Draining Alaskan Chromite Deposits; and Radioactivity Concerns of Uranium and Thorium Deposits at Bokan Mountain, Southeastern Alaska.

  18. On the origin of zebra textures in Mississippi Valley-Type Pb-Zn Deposits with a special emphasis on the San Vicente Mine, Peru

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kelka, Ulrich; Koehn, Daniel

    2014-05-01

    Alternating dark and white bands are common features of ore hosting dolostones which are generally termed zebra textures. Worldwide these structures occur in ore deposits of the Mississippi Valley-Type (MVT). This type of deposit frequently develops in hydrothermal systems located in the flanks of foreland basins. In most MVT ore deposits it is possible to distinguish between different stages which occur during the formation of the zebra textures and the precipitation of the ore-minerals (mostly Sphalerite and Galena). As the dark and white bands consist nearly completely of dolomite, despite the colour, the only clearly recognisable difference is the grain size. Today there are several theories which try to explain the formation of this kind of structure, for example by dissolution-precipitation (FONTBONTé et al., 1993) or by displacive vein growth (MERINO et al., 2006). Based on these theories and additional analytical findings, we want to develop a numerical model to study the banding and mineralisation. This model should include all processes from dolomitization, to the development of the zebra textures and finally the precipitation of Sphalerite and Galena. Using optical microscope and SEM, we found, that there are also differences in the shapes of the grain boundaries of the fine grained dark (lobate) and coarse grained white bands (polygonal). Furthermore, there is a large number of second-phase particles, namely apatite, iron oxides and organic matter, present in the dark bands. Often these particles are lined up at the grain boundaries. These insights lead to the hypothesis that the grain growth in the dark bands is influenced by obstacles that reduce the growth rate and therefore lead to a bifurcation of this rate in the system. For the modelling the microdynamic simulation software ELLE is used to perform a 2D-simulation at the scale of a thin section. This simulation uses a boundary-model coupled with a lattice-particle-code (BONS et al. 2001). The grain boundaries move according to a rate law based on dissolution-precipitation processes as a function of differences in surface energy. Layered distributions of particle densities are initially set as a background. With this simple simulation of grain growth influenced by particle distributions we show, that this process is able to develop structural patterns that are very similar to those present in the natural samples from the San Vicente Mine in Peru. References BONS P D, KOEHN D, and JESSELL W (2008) Microdynamic Simulation. Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg FONTBONTé L (1993) Self-organization fabrics in carbonate-hosted ore deposits: the example of diagenetic crystallization rhythmites (DCRs), In: Current research in geology applied to ore deposits. Proceedings of the Second Biennial SGA Meeting, Granada, Spain, p. 11 -14 MERINO E, CANALS A, and FLECHTER R C (2006) Genesis of self-organized zebra textures in burial dolomites: Displacive veins, induced stress, and dolomitization. Geologica Acta, Vol. 4 No. 3, p. 383-393

  19. Lunar vertical-shaft mining system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Introne, Steven D. (editor); Krause, Roy; Williams, Erik; Baskette, Keith; Martich, Frederick; Weaver, Brad; Meve, Jeff; Alexander, Kyle; Dailey, Ron; White, Matt

    1994-01-01

    This report proposes a method that will allow lunar vertical-shaft mining. Lunar mining allows the exploitation of mineral resources imbedded within the surface. The proposed lunar vertical-shaft mining system is comprised of five subsystems: structure, materials handling, drilling, mining, and planning. The structure provides support for the exploration and mining equipment in the lunar environment. The materials handling subsystem moves mined material outside the structure and mining and drilling equipment inside the structure. The drilling process bores into the surface for the purpose of collecting soil samples, inserting transducer probes, or locating ore deposits. Once the ore deposits are discovered and pinpointed, mining operations bring the ore to the surface. The final subsystem is planning, which involves the construction of the mining structure.

  20. MINING MITIGATION IN NORWAY AND FUTURE IMPROVEMENT POSSIBILITIES1

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Tom V. Segalstad; Ingar F. Walder; Steinar Nilssen

    Norway has a long history of mining dating back to the Akersberg silver mine in Oslo about 1000 years ago. Larger-scale mining for copper and sulfur became common in the early 1600s. There is no active mining of massive sulfide deposits in Norway today; but the operations have left behind tailings, waste rocks and adits that in many cases discharge

  1. Effect of Atmospheric Mercury Deposition on Selenium Accumulation in Rice (Oryza sativa L.) at a Mercury Mining Region in Southwestern China.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Chao; Qiu, Guangle; Anderson, Christopher W N; Zhang, Hua; Meng, Bo; Liang, Liang; Feng, Xinbin

    2015-03-17

    Selenium (Se) is an important trace element for human nutrition and has an interactive effect on mercury (Hg) uptake by plants and Hg toxicity in animals. Rice (Oryza sativa L.) is the dominant source of dietary Se in China, however the effect of soil Hg contamination on the Se concentration in rice is unknown. We collected 29 whole rice plant samples and corresponding soils from an active artisanal mercury mining area and an abandoned commercial mercury mining area. The soil Se concentration was similar across the two mining areas and greater than the background concentration for China. However, the Se concentration in rice grain was dramatically different (artisanal area 51 ± 3 ng g(-1); abandoned area 235 ± 99 ng g(-1)). The total gaseous mercury (TGM) concentration in ambient air at the artisanal mining site was significantly greater than at the abandoned area (231 and 34 ng m(-3), respectively) and we found a negative correlation between TGM and the Se concentration in grain for the artisanal area. Principal component analysis indicated that the source of Se in rice was the atmosphere for the artisanal area (no contribution from soil), and both the atmosphere and soil for the abandoned area. We propose that TGM falls to soil and reacts with Se, inhibiting the translocation of Se to rice grain. Our data suggest that Se intake by the artisanal mining community is insufficient to meet Se dietary requirements, predisposing this community to greater risk from Hg poisoning. PMID:25688871

  2. Longwall mining

    SciTech Connect

    NONE

    1995-03-14

    As part of EIA`s program to provide information on coal, this report, Longwall-Mining, describes longwall mining and compares it with other underground mining methods. Using data from EIA and private sector surveys, the report describes major changes in the geologic, technological, and operating characteristics of longwall mining over the past decade. Most important, the report shows how these changes led to dramatic improvements in longwall mining productivity. For readers interested in the history of longwall mining and greater detail on recent developments affecting longwall mining, the report includes a bibliography.

  3. Relationships between microbial communities and environmental parameters at sites impacted by mining of volcanogenic massive sulfide deposits, Prince William Sound, Alaska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Foster, A.L.; Munk, L.; Koski, R.A.; Shanks, W. C., III; Stillings, L.L.

    2008-01-01

    The relations among geochemical parameters and sediment microbial communities were examined at three shoreline sites in the Prince William Sound, Alaska, which display varying degrees of impact by acid-rock drainage (ARD) associated with historic mining of volcanogenic massive sulfide deposits. Microbial communities were examined using total fatty acid methyl esters (FAMEs), a class of compounds derived from lipids produced by eukaryotes and prokaryotes (bacteria and Archaea); standard extraction techniques detect FAMEs from both living (viable) and dead (non-viable) biomass, but do not detect Archaeal FAMEs. Biomass and diversity (as estimated by FAMEs) varied strongly as a function of position in the tidal zone, not by study site; subtidal muds, Fe oxyhydroxide undergoing biogenic reductive dissolution, and peat-rich intertidal sediment had the highest values. These estimates were lowest in acid-generating, intertidal zone sediment; if valid, the estimates suggest that only one or two bacterial species predominate in these communities, and/or that Archeal species are important members of the microbial community in this sediment. All samples were dominated by bacterial FAMEs (median value >90%). Samples with the highest absolute abundance of eukaryotic FAMEs were biogenic Fe oxyhydroxides from shallow freshwater pools (fungi) and subtidal muds (diatoms). Eukaryotic FAMEs were practically absent from low-pH, sulfide-rich intertidal zone sediments. The relative abundance of general microbial functional groups such as aerobes/anaerobes and gram(+)/gram(-) was not estimated due to severe inconsistency among the results obtained using several metrics reported in the literature. Principal component analyses (PCAs) were performed to investigate the relationship among samples as separate functions of water, sediment, and FAMEs data. PCAs based on water chemistry and FAMEs data resulted in similar relations among samples, whereas the PCA based on sediment chemistry produced a very different sample arrangement. Specifically, the sediment parameter PCA grouped samples with high bulk trace metal concentration regardless of whether the metals were incorporated into secondary precipitates or primary sulfides. The water chemistry PCA and FAMEs PCA appear to be less prone to this type of artifact. Signature lipids in sulfide-rich sediments could indicate the presence of acid-tolerant and/or acidophilic members of the genus Thiobacillus or they could indicate the presence of SO4-reducing bacteria. The microbial community documented in subtidal and offshore sediments is rich in SRB and/or facultative anaerobes of the Cytophaga-Flavobacterium group; both could reasonably be expected in PWS coastal environments. The results of this study provide evidence for substantial feedback between local (meter to centimeter-scale) geochemical variations, and sediment microbial community composition, and show that microbial community signatures in the intertidal zone are significantly altered at sites where ARD drainage is present relative to sites where it is not, even if the sediment geochemistry indicates net accumulation of ARD-generated trace metals in the intertidal zone. ?? 2007 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Text Mining.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Trybula, Walter J.

    1999-01-01

    Reviews the state of research in text mining, focusing on newer developments. The intent is to describe the disparate investigations currently included under the term text mining and provide a cohesive structure for these efforts. A summary of research identifies key organizations responsible for pushing the development of text mining. A section…

  5. Data Mining

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Data Mining, also known as Knowledge Discovery in Databases, is a process used to extract implicit, previously unknown, but potentially useful information from raw data. This first website (1) provides a basic overview of Data Mining and some applications for the process. Common applications of data mining include fraud detection and marketing, but data mining has also been applied in paleoecology, and medical genetics as described on this website from the University of Helsinki (2). This website from the University of Massachusetts, Amherst (3) describes a project involving the development of new algorithms that will be applied to the creation of two large-scale databases to be used to "enable insight into government efficiency and the flow of scientific ideas." This white paper (4) provides a nice educational resource for Data Mining. If you are inspired to try your the process, the Weka Machine Learning Project from Waikato University (5) offers open source software that can be used for data mining tasks. KD Nuggets (6) posts articles on Data Mining, Knowledge Discovery, Genomic Mining, Web Mining that range from the serious to the silly, along with other resources. For a brief history of data mining and related fields, visit this website (7). Finally, The Data Mine website (8) is an excellent place to venture into further explorations on Data Mining.

  6. Data Mining.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Benoit, Gerald

    2002-01-01

    Discusses data mining (DM) and knowledge discovery in databases (KDD), taking the view that KDD is the larger view of the entire process, with DM emphasizing the cleaning, warehousing, mining, and visualization of knowledge discovery in databases. Highlights include algorithms; users; the Internet; text mining; and information extraction.…

  7. Sustainable Development in Estonian Mining

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Šommet, Julija

    2013-12-01

    Importance and demand of high qualified mining material (carbonate rocks, oil shale) are growing nowadays. Deposits are widespread around the world. Is it possible to create the sustainability paradigm, that helps to manage quarries adequately to improve overall effectiveness of the company in total? This study focuses especially on the mining industry. This paper will introduce modern systems and a new one, that allows to make an indexation of the company by mining sustainability index and gradation of the company by its wellness; also brings several benefits for future sustainable development.

  8. Method and apparatus for slurry borehole mining

    Microsoft Academic Search

    J. E. Coakley; J. J. Nolan

    1982-01-01

    A method and apparatus is provided for recovering deep subterranean ore deposits using conventional dual conduit pipe in the tool string. The drill cuttings and ore are returned to the surface by reverse circulation. A combination drilling and mining head is disclosed which permits the outer casing to be driven by the power swivel during both the drilling and mining

  9. Microgravity method for detection of abandoned mines in New Jersey

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Ghatge

    1993-01-01

    The microgravity method has been used to detect two shallow, subsurface abandoned mines in northern New Jersey. Synthetic models simulated the expected gravity anomalies in the two areas. The first site, Lawrence Iron Mine, tested the applicability of microgravity for abandoned-mine detection. Two profile lines were laid out at right angles to the strike of the magnetite deposit in an

  10. Geology Club Field Trip New Jersey Zinc Mine and Vicinity

    E-print Network

    Merguerian, Charles

    Geology Club Field Trip New Jersey Zinc Mine and Vicinity Ogdensburg, NJ 3-4 May 2008 Bedrock map of the area surrounding the New Jersey Zinc Mine in Ogdensburg, New Jersey. The mines are found in the rolling hills of northwest New Jersey. Each is situated next to a zinc-iron-manganese ore deposit

  11. Colorado School of Mines mine rescue simulator

    E-print Network

    Colorado School of Mines mine rescue simulator Our national interests are best served by having mines. However, recent mine disasters have indicated that focused training on hazard recognition, deci training plan for all personnel involved in a mine rescue. A report on the Sago Mine di- saster indicated

  12. African mining

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1987-01-01

    This book contains papers presented at a conference addressing the development of the minerals industry in Africa. Topics covered include: A review - past, present and future - of Zimbabwe's mining industry; Geomorphological processes and related mineralization in Tanzania; and Rock mechanics investigations at Mufulira mine, Zambia.

  13. Pollution of Water and Stream Sediments Associated with the Vale De Abrutiga Uranium Mine, Central Portugal

    Microsoft Academic Search

    M. M. S. C. Pinto; M. M. V. G. Silva; A. M. R. Neiva

    2004-01-01

    The Vale de Abrutiga uranium deposit, located in Central Portugal near the Aguieira dam reservoir, was surface mined. Low-grade ore and waste rock were deposited on permeable ground, close to the mine, and were not revegetated. A lake has formed in the open pit. Surface waters draining the mine site are acidic, have high conductivity, and high concentrations of U,

  14. VALUING ACID MINE DRAINAGE REMEDIATION OF IMPAIRED WATERWAYS IN WEST VIRGINIA: A HEDONIC MODELING APPROACH

    EPA Science Inventory

    States with active and abandoned mines face large private and public costs to remediate damage to streams and rivers from acid mine drainage (AMD), the metal rich runoff flowing primarily from abandoned mines and surface deposits of mine waste. AMD can lower stream and river pH ...

  15. Molding pillars in underground mining of oil shale

    SciTech Connect

    Sweeney, W.A.

    1984-04-03

    An improvement in room-and-pillar mining of underground oil shale deposits in which: spaces between the pillars are filled with a fluid cementitious composition comprising spent oil shale and a binder to form floor-to-ceiling bodies of the composition; the bodies are allowed to harden to form support members for supporting the roof of the mine cavity; and the pillars are thereafter mined from the mine cavity.

  16. Littoral Oceanography for Mine Mine Warfare

    E-print Network

    Chu, Peter C.

    Littoral Oceanography for Mine Warfare #12;Mine Warfare Different than other weapons systems Target to be there for it to work. Can be crude and still be VERY effective Requires advanced planning #12;US vs Mines · Of the 18 of mines #12;U.S. vs. MINES What It Takes To Go"Anytime, Anywhere" by Rear Adm. Horne, Proceedings, Jan

  17. Mining engineering College of Engineering and Mines

    E-print Network

    Hartman, Chris

    Mining engineering College of Engineering and Mines Department of Mining and Geological Engineering As the nation's northernmost accredited mining engineering program, our mission is to advance and disseminate. The mining engineering program emphasizes engineering as it ap- plies to the exploration and development

  18. Air pollutant intrusion into the Wieliczka Salt Mine

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Salmon, L.G.; Cass, G.R.; Kozlowski, R.; Hejda, A.; Spiker, E. C.; Bates, A.L.

    1996-01-01

    The Wieliczka Salt Mine World Cultural Heritage Site contains many rock salt sculptures that are threatened by water vapor condensation from the mine ventilation air. Gaseous and particulate air pollutant concentrations have been measured both outdoors and within the Wieliczka Salt Mine, along with pollutant deposition fluxes to surfaces within the mine. One purpose of these measurements was to determine whether or not low deliquescence point ionic materials (e.g., NH4NO3) are accumulating on surfaces to an extent that would exacerbate the water vapor condensation problems in the mine. It was found that pollutant gases including SO2 and HNO3 present in outdoor air are removed rapidly and almost completely from the air within the mine by deposition to surfaces. Sulfur isotope analyses confirm the accumulation of air pollutant-derived sulfur in liquid dripping from surfaces within the mine. Particle deposition onto interior surfaces in the mine is apparent, with resulting soiling of some of those sculptures that have been carved from translucent rock salt. Water accumulation by salt sculpture surfaces was studied both experimentally and by approximate thermodynamic calculations. Both approaches suggest that the pollutant deposits on the sculpture surfaces lower the relative humidity (RH) at which a substantial amount of liquid water will accumulate by 1% to several percent. The extraordinarily low SO2 concentrations within the mine may explain the apparent success of a respiratory sanatorium located deep within the mine.

  19. Environment of ore deposition in the Creede mining district, San Juan Mountains, Colorado; Part IV, source of fluids, from oxygen, hydrogen, and carbon isotope studies

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bethke, P.M.; Rye, R.O.

    1979-01-01

    The hydrogen isotopic composition of fluids responsible for formation of the near-surface silver-base metal vein deposits at Creede was measured by direct analysis of inclusion fluids in sphalerite, quartz, and rhodochrosite and was estimated from analyses of illite and chlorite. The oxygen isotopic composition was determined directly on inclusion fluids in sphalerite and was estimated from analyses of quartz, illite, rhodochrosite, siderite, and adularia. The carbon isotopic composition was estimated from analyses of rhodochrosite and siderite. The ranges in isotopic composition for water and CO2 in the fluids associated with the formation of each of the minerals is given below (number of determinations given in parentheses):Mineral delta D (sub H2) O ppm delta 18 O (sub H2) O ppm delta 13 C (sub CO2) ppmSphalerite -81 to -54 (4) -10.1 to -4.5 (4)Quartz -97 to -86 (4) -5.9 to 1.8 (18)Illite -62 to -50 (8) -1.6 to 1.2(7)Chlorite -64 to -55 (10) -2.2 to 0.8 (10)Adularia 4.2 (1)Rhodochrosite -82 to -78 (2) 4.2 to 9.4 (9) -5.7 to -4.2 (9)Siderite 4.9 to 9.9 (6) -6.9 to -2.7 (6)The delta D (sub H2) O and delta 18 O (sub H2) O values of fluids associated with the formation of sphalerite, quartz, illite/chlorite, and carbonate minerals differ substantially from one another, and these differences appear to have been maintained throughout the depositional history, regardless of the positions of the minerals in the paragenetic sequence.The data suggest that waters from three coexisting reservoirs fed the vein system alternately and episodically during vein formation, and apparently there was little mixing of the fluids from the different reservoirs. The hydrogen, oxygen, and carbon isotope data suggest that the carbonate waters were deep seated, probably dominantly magmatic, in origin. The sphalerite and illite/chlorite waters must have been dominantly meteoric in origin and substantially oxygen shifted by exchange with the volcanic country rocks. The quartz waters were also oxygen shifted meteoric waters but were some 40 per mil lower in deuterium content than the sphalerite and illite/chlorite waters.We propose that the quartz fluids entered the vein system from reservoirs beneath the mountainous areas to the north in the vicinity of the present Continental Divide, but that the sphalerite and illite/chlorite fluids entered the vein system from a topographically low area to the south along the structural moat of the Creede caldera. The difference in delta D between the two meteoric waters may reflect differences in altitude of the recharge areas for the two reservoirs or may be clue to isotopic evolution of the closed-basin lake and interstitial waters in the moat surrounding the Creede caldera.

  20. Atmospheric emission and plant uptake of mercury from agricultural soils near the Almaden mercury mine

    Microsoft Academic Search

    S. E. Lindberg; D. R. Jackson; J. W. Huckabee; S. A. Janzen; M. J. Levin; J. R. Lund

    1979-01-01

    Surface soils collected near the Almaden, Spain, mercury mine reflected increasing concentrations of mercury (Hg) with proximity to the mine due to weathered mineral deposits and to atmospheric deposition of Hg from the smelter. Extractions with NaHCOâ or NHâOAc removed small amounts of Hg from both control (20 km from the mine; total Hg = 2.3 ..mu..g\\/g) and mine site

  1. MINE DEVELOPMENT SURFACE WATER

    E-print Network

    Boisvert, Jeff

    Mine Engineering Plan Surface Water Components Site Drainage Mine Site Dewatering (If covered Dewatering Open Pit Lake Drain site / Water Disposal Mine Site Runoff Dikes Seepage Underground Mine Rivers

  2. The Data Mine

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Pryke, Andy

    The Data Mine website is an excellent place to venture into detailed and complex explorations on data mining. The site is divided up in to five topic areas, or "webs," which include: "Data Mining Software," "Data Mining Events," "Data Mining General/Misc," "People Working in Data Mining," and "Data Mining Companies and Organizations." Visitors are encouraged to add information from their data mining worlds, as well.

  3. Asteroid mining

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gertsch, Richard E.

    1992-01-01

    The earliest studies of asteroid mining proposed retrieving a main belt asteroid. Because of the very long travel times to the main asteroid belt, attention has shifted to the asteroids whose orbits bring them fairly close to the Earth. In these schemes, the asteroids would be bagged and then processed during the return trip, with the asteroid itself providing the reaction mass to propel the mission homeward. A mission to one of these near-Earth asteroids would be shorter, involve less weight, and require a somewhat lower change in velocity. Since these asteroids apparently contain a wide range of potentially useful materials, our study group considered only them. The topics covered include asteroid materials and properties, asteroid mission selection, manned versus automated missions, mining in zero gravity, and a conceptual mining method.

  4. INTRODUCTION The massive sulfide deposits of southern Spain

    E-print Network

    van Geen, Alexander

    as the Iberian pyrite belt (Munha et al., 1986; Fig. 1). The deposits typically contain 50% sul- fur, 42% iron, 2 an important source of wealth for the Phoenicians (Morral, 1990).About 5 Mt of pyrite had been mined from). Spain became a Roman province, and mining of the rich deposits of the Iberian pyrite belt for copper

  5. Audio Mining

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Leske, Cavin.

    2002-01-01

    Occasionally referred to as audio indexing, audio mining is a computerized task involving the processing of an audio file, extracting the dialog and creating a textual transcript, and searching the transcript for certain words or phrases. Considering the amount of audio content on the Internet and other sources, it is clear that audio mining is a growing technology.To get an idea of what audio mining is and how it can be used, people can read this article from the Cutter Consortium (1). It lists six broad areas that can benefit from using the technology and briefly discusses each one. A more detailed introduction is offered on the Leavitt Communications Web site (2). This article delves into how audio mining works by giving a basic technical understanding of the process. A new method of searching an audio file, dubbed the "phonetic search engine," is compared to traditional methods in this white paper (3). A publication from the Compaq Cambridge Research Laboratory (4) discusses ways of collecting and analyzing information from an audio file. It also mentions SpeechBot, a Web-based tool for multimedia retrieval. Several papers can be downloaded from the home page of a research project studying the National Gallery of the Spoken Word (5). The repository is comprised of massive historical audio content, and the team at the University of Colorado is investigating phrase recognition to index the data. Have you ever had a tune stuck in your head, but not known the name of the artist or song title? The Musical Audio-Mining project (6) is working on ways to search for information about a song simply by humming part of it. Audio mining can also be used in the War on Terrorism, as is described in this article of Federal Computer Week (7). Massive amounts of recorded phone conversations are intercepted by the government each day, and audio mining would be an efficient way to sort through irrelevant material and catch suspicious activity. The World Wide Web Consortium released this draft of the Voice Extensible Markup Language (8), which could have applications for the audio mining community.

  6. Design risk assessment for burst-prone mines: Application in a Canadian mine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheung, David J.

    A proactive stance towards improving the effectiveness and consistency of risk assessments has been adopted recently by mining companies and industry. The next 10-20 years forecasts that ore deposits accessible using shallow mining techniques will diminish. The industry continues to strive for success in "deeper" mining projects in order to keep up with the continuing demand for raw materials. Although the returns are quite profitable, many projects have been sidelined due to high uncertainty and technical risk in the mining of the mineral deposit. Several hardrock mines have faced rockbursting and seismicity problems. Within those reported, mines in countries like South Africa, Australia and Canada have documented cases of severe rockburst conditions attributed to the mining depth. Severe rockburst conditions known as "burst-prone" can be effectively managed with design. Adopting a more robust design can ameliorate the exposure of workers and equipment to adverse conditions and minimize the economic consequences, which can hinder the bottom line of an operation. This thesis presents a methodology created for assessing the design risk in burst-prone mines. The methodology includes an evaluation of relative risk ratings for scenarios with options of risk reduction through several design principles. With rockbursts being a hazard of seismic events, the methodology is based on research in the area of mining seismicity factoring in rockmass failure mechanisms, which results from a combination of mining induced stress, geological structures, rockmass properties and mining influences. The methodology was applied to case studies at Craig Mine of Xstrata Nickel in Sudbury, Ontario, which is known to contain seismically active fault zones. A customized risk assessment was created and applied to rockburst case studies, evaluating the seismic vulnerability and consequence for each case. Application of the methodology to Craig Mine demonstrates that changes in the design can reduce both exposure risk (personnel and equipment), and economical risk (revenue and costs). Fatal and catastrophic consequences can be averted through robust planning and design. Two customized approaches were developed to conduct risk assessment of case studies at Craig Mine. Firstly, the Brownfield Approach utilizes the seismic database to determine the seismic hazard from a rating system that evaluates frequency-magnitude, event size, and event-blast relation. Secondly, the Greenfield Approach utilizes the seismic database, focusing on larger magnitude events, rocktype, and geological structure. The customized Greenfield Approach can also be applied in the evaluation of design risk in deep mines with the same setting and condition as Craig Mine. Other mines with different settings and conditions can apply the principles in the methodology to evaluate design alternatives and risk reduction strategies for burst-prone mines.

  7. Stillwater Mine

    USGS Multimedia Gallery

    Rocks from the Stillwater Mine are collected, ground, and blended with other rocks and materials to make the lunar regolith simulant. __________ The USGS has created man-made moon dirt, or regolith, to help NASA prepare for upcoming moon explorations. Four tons of the simulant is expected to be ma...

  8. Stillwater Mine

    USGS Multimedia Gallery

    View of the Stullwater Mine, where rocks are collected for making lunar regolith simulant. __________ The USGS has created man-made moon dirt, or regolith, to help NASA prepare for upcoming moon explorations. Four tons of the simulant is expected to be made by this summer of 2009 and turned over t...

  9. Asteroid mining

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Richard E. Gertsch

    1992-01-01

    The earliest studies of asteroid mining proposed retrieving a main belt asteroid. Because of the very long travel times to the main asteroid belt, attention has shifted to the asteroids whose orbits bring them fairly close to the Earth. In these schemes, the asteroids would be bagged and then processed during the return trip, with the asteroid itself providing the

  10. Mining asteroids

    Microsoft Academic Search

    M. Ingebretsen

    2001-01-01

    Melting trapped ice on near Earth objects (dormant comets, asteroids) could turn a profit for private companies, with metal processing not far behind. Elaborate plans have been drawn up for NEO missions. In a typical plan, a ship departs Earth for an asteroid when the two bodies' orbits are such that the lowest change in velocity, ?V, is required. Mining

  11. Statistical methods of estimating mining costs

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Long, K.R.

    2011-01-01

    Until it was defunded in 1995, the U.S. Bureau of Mines maintained a Cost Estimating System (CES) for prefeasibility-type economic evaluations of mineral deposits and estimating costs at producing and non-producing mines. This system had a significant role in mineral resource assessments to estimate costs of developing and operating known mineral deposits and predicted undiscovered deposits. For legal reasons, the U.S. Geological Survey cannot update and maintain CES. Instead, statistical tools are under development to estimate mining costs from basic properties of mineral deposits such as tonnage, grade, mineralogy, depth, strip ratio, distance from infrastructure, rock strength, and work index. The first step was to reestimate "Taylor's Rule" which relates operating rate to available ore tonnage. The second step was to estimate statistical models of capital and operating costs for open pit porphyry copper mines with flotation concentrators. For a sample of 27 proposed porphyry copper projects, capital costs can be estimated from three variables: mineral processing rate, strip ratio, and distance from nearest railroad before mine construction began. Of all the variables tested, operating costs were found to be significantly correlated only with strip ratio.

  12. Major brazilian gold deposits - 1982 to 1999

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Thorman, C.H.; Dewitt, E.; Maron, M.A.; Ladeira, E.A.

    2001-01-01

    Brazil has been a major but intermittent producer of gold since its discovery in 1500. Brazil led the world in gold production during the 18th and early 19th centuries. From the late 19th century to the late 20th century, total mining company and garimpeiro production was small and relatively constant at about 5 to 8 t/year. The discovery of alluvial deposits in the Amazon by garimpeiros in the 1970s and the opening of eight mines by mining companies from 1983 to 1990 fueled a major boom in Brazil's gold production, exceeding 100 t/year in 1988 and 1989. However, garimpeiro alluvial production decreased 'rapidly in the 1990s, to about 10 t/year by 1999. Company production increased about tenfold from about 4 t/year in 1982 to 40 t in 1992. Production from 1992 to the present remained relatively stable, even though several mines were closed or were in the process of closing and no new major mines were put into production during that period. Based on their production history from 1982-1999, 17 gold mines are ranked as major (> 20 t) and minor (3-8 t) mines. From 1982-1999, deposits hosted in Archean rocks produced 66% of the gold in Brazil, whereas deposits in Paleoproterozoic and Neoproterozoic rocks accounted for 19% and 15%, respectively. Deposits in metamorphosed sedimentary rocks, especially carbonate-rich rocks and carbonate iron-formation, yielded the great bulk of the gold. Deposits in igneous rocks were of much less importance. The Archean and Paleoproterozoic terranes of Brazil largely lack base-metal-rich volcanogenic massive sulfide deposits, porphyry deposits, and polymetallic veins and sedimentary exhalative deposits. An exception to this is in the Caraja??s Mineral Province.

  13. Mine waste management legislation. Gold mining areas in Romania

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maftei, Raluca-Mihaela; Filipciuc, Constantina; Tudor, Elena

    2014-05-01

    Problems in the post-mining regions of Eastern Europe range from degraded land and landscapes, huge insecure dumps, surface cracks, soil pollution, lowering groundwater table, deforestation, and damaged cultural potentials to socio economic problems like unemployment or population decline. There is no common prescription for tackling the development of post-mining regions after mine closure nor is there a common definition of good practices or policy in this field. Key words : waste management, legislation, EU Directive, post mining Rosia Montana is a common oh 16 villages; one of them is also called Rosia Montana, a traditional mining Community, located in the Apuseni Mountains in the North-Western Romania. Beneath part of the village area lays one of the largest gold and silver deposits in Europe. In the Rosia Montana area mining had begun ever since the height of the Roman Empire. While the modern approach to mining demands careful remediation of environmental impacts, historically disused mines in this region have been abandoned, leaving widespread environmental damage. General legislative framework Strict regulations and procedures govern modern mining activity, including mitigation of all environmental impacts. Precious metals exploitation is put under GO no. 190/2000 re-published in 2004. The institutional framework was established and organized based on specific regulations, being represented by the following bodies: • The Ministry of Economy and Commerce (MEC), a public institution which develops the Government policy in the mining area, also provides the management of the public property in the mineral resources area; • The National Agency for the development and implementation of the mining Regions Reconstruction Programs (NAD), responsible with promotion of social mitigation measures and actions; • The Office for Industry Privatization, within the Education Ministry, responsible with privatization of companies under the CEM; • The National Agency for Mineral Resources (NAMR) manages, on behalf of the state, the mineral resources. Waste management framework Nowadays, Romania, is trying to align its regulation concerning mining activity to the European legislation taking into consideration waste management and their impact on the environment. Therefore the European Waste Catalog (Commission Decision 2001/118/EC) has been updated and published in the form of HG 856/2002 Waste management inventory and approved wastes list, including dangerous wastes. The HG 349/2005 establishes the legal framework for waste storage activity as well as for the monitoring of the closing and post-closing existing deposits, taking into account the environment protection and the health of the general population. Based on Directive 2000/60/EC the Ministry of Waters Administration, Forests and Environment Protection from Romania issued the GO No 756/1997 (amended by GO 532/2002 and GO 1144/2002),"Regulations for environment pollution assessment" that contains alarm and intervention rates for soil pollution for contaminants such as metals, metalloids (Sb, Ag, As, Be, Bi, B, Cd, Co, Cr, Cu, Hg, Mo, Ni, Pb, Se, Sn, TI, V, Zn) and cyanides. Also GO No 756/1997 was amended and updated by Law No 310/2004 and 112/2006 in witch technical instructions concerning general framework for the use of water sources in the human activities including mining industry, are approved. Chemical compounds contained in industrial waters are fully regulated by H. G. 352/2005 concerning the contents of waste water discharged. Directive 2006/21/EC of the European Parliament and of the Council relating to the management of waste from extractive industries and amending Directive 2004/35/EC is transposed into the national law of the Romanian Government under Decision No 856/2008. The 856/2008 Decision on the management of waste from extractive industries establishes "the legal framework concerning the guidelines, measures and procedures to prevent or reduce as far as possible any adverse effects on the environment, in particular water, air, soi

  14. The Mechanization of Mining.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marovelli, Robert L.; Karhnak, John M.

    1982-01-01

    Mechanization of mining is explained in terms of its effect on the mining of coal, focusing on, among others, types of mining, productivity, machinery, benefits to retired miners, fatality rate in underground coal mines, and output of U.S. mining industry. (Author/JN)

  15. Data mining

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, K.; Kargupta, H.; Stafford, B.G.; Buescher, K.L.; Ravindran, B.

    1998-12-31

    This is the final report of a one-year, Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). The objective of this project was to develop and implement data mining technology suited to the analysis of large collections of unstructured data. This has taken the form of a software tool, PADMA (Parallel Data Mining Agents), which incorporates parallel data accessing, parallel scalable hierarchical clustering algorithms, and a web-based user interface for submitting Structured Query Language (SQL) queries and interactive data visualization. The authors have demonstrated the viability and scalability of PADMA by applying it to an unstructured text database of 25,000 documents running on an IBM SP2 at Argonne National Laboratory. The utility of PADMA for discovering patterns in data has also been demonstrated by applying it to laboratory test data for Hepatitis C patients and autopsy reports in collaboration with the University of New Mexico School of Medicine.

  16. Moon Mining

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    In this activity, students will investigate how to find and mine valuable resources from a simulated lunar surface. They will gather data by spectroscopically locating simulated ilmenite (an iron-titanium oxide mineral), and collect the 'ilmenite' by mining the simulated lunar surface. They will then gather data by using observations while extracting oxygen from the mineral, develop a conclusion based upon their results, and compare individual results to class results to look for patterns. The activity is designed to accompany the Kids' Science News Network (KSNN) 21st Century Explorer 30-second news break entitled 'Why Return to the Moon Before Going to Mars?' The activity includes a teacher's guide and instructions for students, and a Spanish translation is available.

  17. BENTONITE MINE SPOIL REVEGETATION AND LONG-TERM ASSESSMENT

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Abandoned bentonite mine spoils are prehaps the most difficult material to successfully rehabilitate because of the nature of the spoil and the climate of the region where bentonite is mined. The major U.S. deposits of bentonite are in the tri-state region of Montana, South Dakota, and Wyoming, an a...

  18. MERCURY CONTRIBUTIONS TO THE ENVIRONMENT FROM HISTORIC MINING PRACTICES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Significant quantities of mercury have been released to the environment as a result of historic precious metal mining. Many gold and silver deposits are enriched in mercury, which is released during mining and processing activities. Historically in the U.S., although a modern ...

  19. CEMENTED PASTE BACKFILL LEACHATE CHARACTERISTICS - SNAP LAKE DIAMOND MINE1

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Ken DeVos; Rens Verburg

    A geochemical study was completed as part of an Environmental Assessment Report for De Beers Canada Inc. Snap Lake diamond mine located in the Canadian Northwest Territories. The deposit will be mined using underground methods and consists of a diamond bearing planar kimberlite dyke dipping at about 15 degrees, hosted in metavolcanic and granite rock. Processing will include grinding of

  20. Mercury contamination from historical gold mining in California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Alpers, Charles N.; Hunerlach, Michael P.; May, Jason T.; Hothem, Roger L.

    2005-01-01

    Mercury contamination from historical gold mines represents a potential risk to human health and the environment. This fact sheet provides background information on the use of mercury in historical gold mining and processing operations in California, with emphasis on historical hydraulic mining areas. It also describes results of recent USGS projects that address the potential risks associated with mercury contamination. Miners used mercury (quicksilver) to recover gold throughout the western United States. Gold deposits were either hardrock (lode, gold-quartz veins) or placer (alluvial, unconsolidated gravels). Underground methods (adits and shafts) were used to mine hardrock gold deposits. Hydraulic, drift, or dredging methods were used to mine the placer gold deposits. Mercury was used to enhance gold recovery in all the various types of mining operations; historical records indicate that more mercury was used and lost at hydraulic mines than at other types of mines. On the basis of USGS studies and other recent work, a better understanding is emerging of mercury distribution, ongoing transport, transformation processes, and the extent of biological uptake in areas affected by historical gold mining. This information has been used extensively by federal, state, and local agencies responsible for resource management and public health in California.

  1. Ground water of coal deposits, Bay County, Michigan

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stark, J.R.; McDonald, Michael G.

    1980-01-01

    A coal deposit in Bay County, Mich., typical of Pennsylvanian-coal deposits in the State, was studied to determine the degree to which hydrologic factors might affect future coal mining. The coal deposit, which averages about 0.5 meters in thickness, lies 50 meters below land surface. It is part of a multi-layered aquifer system that contains sandstone, shale, sand and gravel, and clay units in addition to beds of coal. Hydrologic characteristics (hydraulic conductivity and storage coefficient) of each unit were evaluated by analyses of aquifer tests and a finite-difference groundwater flow model. A model simulating groundwater flow to a hypothetical mine was developed. Results of the study indicate that seepage will probably not be great enough to preclude mining coal. Also, pumping water to keep the mine dry will have little effect on heads in aquifers outside the mine during the first decade of mining. Although coal was mined in Michigan during 1860-1950, significant reserves remain. These deposits, part of the Saginaw Formation of Pennsylvanian age, are near the industrialized parts of the State. The quantity of pumped water needed to keep mines dry and the effect of pumping on aquifers surrounding the mines is a major factor in determining the feasibility of opening new mines. (USGS)

  2. Expansion of the Commercial Output of Estonian Oil Shale Mining and Processing

    Microsoft Academic Search

    JACOB FRAIMAN; IGOR KUZMIV

    1996-01-01

    Economic and ecological preconditions are considered for the transition from monoproduct oil shale mining to pofyproduct Estonian oil shale deposits. Underground water, limestone, and underground heat found in oil shale mines with smallreserves can be operated for a long time using chambers left after oil shale extraction. The adjacent fields of the closed mines can be connected to the operations

  3. HYPERSPECTRAL SENSING OF ACID MINE DRAINAGE - TWO COLORADO CASE STUDIES1

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Phoebe L. Hauff; Douglas C. Peters; David W. Coulter; Matthew A. Sares; David A. Bird; Frederick B. Henderson; Eric C. Prosh

    The upper Arkansas River basin of central Colorado contains watersheds that are affected by acid rock drainage (ARD) from both natural and mining induced sources, including the Leadville mining district. Hyperspectral, high-resolution remote sensing technology is being used to characterize and map the source mineralogy of ARD, changes in downstream water quality, and the fluvial deposition of mine tailings downstream.

  4. Mining Bench Height Evaluation for the Wallaby Resource - A Conditional Simulation Case Study

    Microsoft Academic Search

    I M Glacken; M Noppé; M Titley

    2000-01-01

    A study on the feasibility of mining the recently discovered Wallaby gold deposit is due for completion by mid-2000. Open pit mining is the favoured method. Determination of the impact of mining bench height on the recovery of ore, including the estimation of dilution and ore loss, is critical to the economics of the operation. Conditional simulation was used to

  5. Historical archaeology at the Clarkson Mine, an eastern Ohio mining complex

    SciTech Connect

    Keener, C.S. [Archaeological Service Team, Plain City, OH (United States)

    2003-07-01

    This study examines the Clarkson Mine (33BL333), an eastern Ohio coal mine complex dating to the 1910s to 1920s, situated along Wheeling Creek. The results of preliminary surveys and the subsequent mitigation of four structures at the site are presented. The historical archaeology conducted at the site demonstrates the significant research possibilities inherent at many of these early industrial mine complexes. Of particular interest is the findings of depositional patterning around residential structures that revealed the influence of architecture on where and how items were deposited on the land surface. The ceramic and faunal assemblage were analyzed and provide significant details on socioeconomic attributes associated with the workers or staff. Artifacts recovered at the site provide an excellent diagnostic framework from which other similarly aged sites can be compared and dated. The findings at the Clarkson Mine are also placed into a more regional perspective and compared with other contemporary studies.

  6. Geologic processes influence the effects of mining on aquatic ecosystems

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Schmidt, Travis S.; Clements, William H.; Wanty, Richard B.; Verplanck, Philip L.; Church, Stanley E.; San Juan, Carma A.; Fey, David L.; Rockwell, Barnaby W.; DeWitt, Ed H.; Klein, Terry L.

    2012-01-01

    Geologic processes strongly influence water and sediment quality in aquatic ecosystems but rarely are geologic principles incorporated into routine biomonitoring studies. We test if elevated concentrations of metals in water and sediment are restricted to streams downstream of mines or areas that may discharge mine wastes. We surveyed 198 catchments classified as “historically mined” or “unmined,” and based on mineral-deposit criteria, to determine whether water and sediment quality were influenced by naturally occurring mineralized rock, by historical mining, or by a combination of both. By accounting for different geologic sources of metals to the environment, we were able to distinguish aquatic ecosystems limited by metals derived from natural processes from those due to mining. Elevated concentrations of metals in water and sediment were not restricted to mined catchments; depauperate aquatic communities were found in unmined catchments. The type and intensity of hydrothermal alteration and the mineral deposit type were important determinants of water and sediment quality as well as the aquatic community in both mined and unmined catchments. This study distinguished the effects of different rock types and geologic sources of metals on ecosystems by incorporating basic geologic processes into reference and baseline site selection, resulting in a refined assessment. Our results indicate that biomonitoring studies should account for natural sources of metals in some geologic environments as contributors to the effect of mines on aquatic ecosystems, recognizing that in mining-impacted drainages there may have been high pre-mining background metal concentrations.

  7. Geologic processes influence the effects of mining on aquatic ecosystems.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, Travis S; Clements, William H; Wanty, Richard B; Verplanck, Philip L; Church, Stanley E; San Juan, Carma A; Fey, David L; Rockwell, Barnaby W; DeWitt, Ed H; Klein, Terry L

    2012-04-01

    Geologic processes strongly influence water and sediment quality in aquatic ecosystems but rarely are geologic principles incorporated into routine biomonitoring studies. We test if elevated concentrations of metals in water and sediment are restricted to streams downstream of mines or areas that may discharge mine wastes. We surveyed 198 catchments classified as "historically mined" or "unmined," and based on mineral-deposit criteria, to determine whether water and sediment quality were influenced by naturally occurring mineralized rock, by historical mining, or by a combination of both. By accounting for different geologic sources of metals to the environment, we were able to distinguish aquatic ecosystems limited by metals derived from natural processes from those due to mining. Elevated concentrations of metals in water and sediment were not restricted to mined catchments; depauperate aquatic communities were found in unmined catchments. The type and intensity of hydrothermal alteration and the mineral deposit type were important determinants of water and sediment quality as well as the aquatic community in both mined and unmined catchments. This study distinguished the effects of different rock types and geologic sources of metals on ecosystems by incorporating basic geologic processes into reference and baseline site selection, resulting in a refined assessment. Our results indicate that biomonitoring studies should account for natural sources of metals in some geologic environments as contributors to the effect of mines on aquatic ecosystems, recognizing that in mining-impacted drainages there may have been high pre-mining background metal concentrations. PMID:22645817

  8. Mine waste dumps and heavy metal pollution in abandoned mining district of Boccheggiano (Southern Tuscany, Italy)

    Microsoft Academic Search

    M. Benvenuti; I. Mascaro; F. Corsini; P. Lattanzi; P. Parrini; G. Tanelli

    1997-01-01

    Mining activity in the Boccheggiano-Fontalcinaldo area (Southern Tuscany) dates back at least to the 16th century AD and\\u000a lasted up to very recent times. Copper-rich hydrothermal veins, massive pyrite deposits, and their gossans were exploited.\\u000a Two mine waste dumps (Fontalcinaldo, Fontebona), one flotation tailings impoundment (Gabellino), and one roasting\\/smelting\\u000a waste dump (Merse-Ribudelli) in the study area were selected to ascertain

  9. Mining system

    SciTech Connect

    Gilbert, C. J.; Hassialis, M. D.; Scrymgeour, A. H.; Vera, S. I.

    1985-04-23

    This system develops an ore body in two lifts, driven from opposite ends (at different times) and utilizes the concept of lane pillars rather than square block pillars. These conditions generate a new ventilation system that is flexible and well suited for the varying air requirements in oil shale mining. The ore handling system is load-haul-dump (LHD) to portable crushers to belts to surface. The layout of this method introduces unique functions for this system by creating two directional ore flow from the workings, which optimize logistics and material handling methods.

  10. Environmental Geochemistry of Mercury Mines in Alaska

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    This U.S. Geological Survey fact sheet investigates potential environmental contamination around naturally occurring, mercury-rich mineral deposits in Alaska. Testing of mercury levels in streams and sediments is described, as well as mercury levels in fish downstream from mines and the environmental effects of mercury entering the food chain.

  11. Solar-Assisted Solution-Mining Concept

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dowler, W. L.; French, R. L.; Becker, J. C. J.; Bills, J.

    1983-01-01

    Brine heated in solar pond dissolves minerals from deposits. In proposed solution-mining process, hot brine is pumped down one well and recovered at one or more other wells. Emerging brine is rich in desired mineral. Brine is evaporated in solar ponds to recover mineral.

  12. Wikipedia Mining

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakayama, Kotaro; Ito, Masahiro; Erdmann, Maike; Shirakawa, Masumi; Michishita, Tomoyuki; Hara, Takahiro; Nishio, Shojiro

    Wikipedia, a collaborative Wiki-based encyclopedia, has become a huge phenomenon among Internet users. It covers a huge number of concepts of various fields such as arts, geography, history, science, sports and games. As a corpus for knowledge extraction, Wikipedia's impressive characteristics are not limited to the scale, but also include the dense link structure, URL based word sense disambiguation, and brief anchor texts. Because of these characteristics, Wikipedia has become a promising corpus and a new frontier for research. In the past few years, a considerable number of researches have been conducted in various areas such as semantic relatedness measurement, bilingual dictionary construction, and ontology construction. Extracting machine understandable knowledge from Wikipedia to enhance the intelligence on computational systems is the main goal of "Wikipedia Mining," a project on CREP (Challenge for Realizing Early Profits) in JSAI. In this paper, we take a comprehensive, panoramic view of Wikipedia Mining research and the current status of our challenge. After that, we will discuss about the future vision of this challenge.

  13. Emergency system for mines

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Cavrak

    1983-01-01

    An emergency communication system is provided in an underground mine having a plurality of locations capable of being mined. A cable extends from a central station to each of the mining locations. An emergency receiver ties into the cable located in each location and further connects to a load center which provides power to the mining equipment in that location.

  14. Handbook of Marine Mineral Deposits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moore, George W.

    Handbook of Marine Mineral Deposits delves into marine mineral exploration and mining, covering both the fields economics and the state of the art of its science. The 1982 Law of the Sea Convention had a chilling effect on the deep-sea mining industry Later in the 1980s, most nations adopted the 370-km exclusive economic zone, which rekindled interest in the industry. Amendments made to the law in 1994 have also improved the outlook since then. India has agreed to abide by the Law of the Sea Convention by setting aside reserves of manganese nodules in the Central Indian Basin for international use that equal those it has claimed for itself.

  15. Geophysical modeling of two willemite deposits, Vazante (Brazil) and Beltana (Australia) Richard A. Krahenbuhl* and Murray Hitzman

    E-print Network

    Geophysical modeling of two willemite deposits, Vazante (Brazil) and Beltana (Australia) Richard A. Krahenbuhl* and Murray Hitzman Department of Geophysics*, Colorado School of Mines Department of Geology & Geological Engineering , Colorado School of Mines Summary Non-sulfide zinc deposits (zinc "oxide" deposits

  16. Kettlebottoms: their relation to mine roof and support

    SciTech Connect

    Chase, F.E.; Sames, G.P.

    1983-01-01

    kettlebottoms are columnar masses of rock - the preserved casts of ancient tree stumps - embedded in coal-mine roof strata. Unsupported Kettlebottoms are a hazard to miners because they can detach from a mine roof without warning. Information obtained from interviews with mine operators and MSHA personnel and from visits to mines in Pennsylvania, West Virginia, and Kentucky, indicates that the size and frequency of kettlebottoms in a mine roof are dependent upon past geologic events during the deposition of roof sediments. To ensure the safety of mine personnel, all undermined kettlebottoms should be supported. The roof next to kettlebottoms less than 3ft in diameter should be bolted cose enough to allow a portion of a wood or steel header to be extended beneath each kettlebottom for support. Two bolts and a wooden plank or steel strap should be used to support kettlebottoms over 3 ft in diameter.

  17. 4. OVERALL VIEW OF MINE SITE, SHOWING MINE CAR TRACKS, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    4. OVERALL VIEW OF MINE SITE, SHOWING MINE CAR TRACKS, SNOWSHEDS AND TIPPLE (LEFT BACKGROUND). VIEW TO EAST. - Park Utah Mining Company: Keetley Mine Complex, 1 mile East of U.S. 40 at Keetley, Heber City, Wasatch County, UT

  18. 1. OVERALL VIEW OF MINE SITE FROM KEETLEY MINE ROAD, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. OVERALL VIEW OF MINE SITE FROM KEETLEY MINE ROAD, SHOWING TAILING DUMP. VIEW TO WEST. - Park Utah Mining Company: Keetley Mine Complex, 1 mile East of U.S. 40 at Keetley, Heber City, Wasatch County, UT

  19. Haneberg, W.C., Creighton, A.L., Medley, E.W., and Jonas, D.A., 2005, Use of LiDAR to assess slope haz-ards at the Lihir gold mine, Papua New Guinea, in O. Hungr, R. Fell, R. Couture, and E. Eberhardt, edi-

    E-print Network

    Haneberg, William C.

    DAR to assess slope haz- ards at the Lihir gold mine, Papua New Guinea, in O. Hungr, R. Fell, R. Couture, and E Guinea, the Lihir mine is one of the world's largest gold mining and processing opera- tions. The epithermal sulfide gold deposit was dis- covered in 1983 and mining commenced in 1997. Mining is scheduled

  20. Zinc and Lead Poisoning in Wild Birds in the Tri-State Mining District (Oklahoma, Kansas, and Missouri)

    Microsoft Academic Search

    W. N. Beyer; J. Dalgarn; S. Dudding; J. B. French; R. Mateo; J. Miesner; L. Sileo; J. Spann

    2004-01-01

    The Tri-State Mining District (Oklahoma, Kansas, and Missouri) is contaminated with Pb, Cd, and Zn from mining, milling and smelting. Metals have been dispersed heterogeneously throughout the District in the form of milled mine waste (“chat”), as flotation tailings and from smelters as aerial deposition or slag. This study was conducted to determine if the habitat has been contaminated to

  1. Iowa State Mining and Mineral Resources Research Institute

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-08-01

    During 1990--1991, the Iowa State Mining and Mineral Resources Research Institute (ISMMRRI) has worked diligently to further the objectives of the Mineral Institute Program. About 70% of our Allotment Grant funding goes toward research and education of graduate students within the participating departments of the university. It is our goal to encourage graduate students in diverse fields such as agronomy, engineering, geology, landscape architecture, and many others to pursue a career in mining- and mineral-related fields by preparing them to either enter the private or public sectors. During the 1990 calendar year, ISMMRRI granted research assistantships to 17 graduate students to perform research in topics relating to mineral exploration, characterization and processing, extractive metallurgy, mining engineering, fuel science, mineral waste management, and mined-land reclamation. Research areas include the following: Fluid-inclusion studies on fluorspar mineral deposits in an actively mined region; Geochemical modeling of gold and gold-telluride deposits; Characterization of coal particles for surface-based beneficiation; Impact of surface mining and reclamation of a gypsum deposit area on the surrounding community; Stress-strain response of fine coal particles during transport and storage; Recovery of metal values from mining wastes using bioleaching; Coal beneficiation utilizing triboelectric charging in a fast fluidized bed; and Mathematical modeling of breakage for optimum sizing during crushing of rock.

  2. Mines and Mineral Occurrences of Afghanistan

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    2002-01-01

    The USGS has recently released the report Mines and Mineral Occurrences of Afghanistan in Adobe Acrobat (.pdf) format. The 95-page open file report is an inventory of more than 1000 mines and mineral occurrences in the country that resources that include metals, industrial minerals, coal, and peat. The data was compiled from published literature and digital files of the members of the National Industrial Minerals project, and are presented in tables that list mineral showings, deposits, and pegmatite fields. This site is also reviewed in the May 3, 2002 Scout Report.

  3. California's Office of Mine Reclamation

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    California's Office of Mine Reclamation offers assistance "for reclamation planning and promotes cost-effective reclamation." The website features materials on abandoned mines, mine pollution, and mine monitoring. Mine operators can learn about financial assurances. Users can download the quarterly Surface Mining and Reclamation Act (SMARA) issues. While this website provides information for policies for California, everyone can learn about the dangers of mines, protocol for dealing with abandoned mines, and more.

  4. Constraining Modern and Historic Mercury Emissions From Gold Mining

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strode, S. A.; Jaeglé, L.; Selin, N. E.; Sunderland, E.

    2007-12-01

    Mercury emissions from both historic gold and silver mining and modern small-scale gold mining are highly uncertain. Historic mercury emissions can affect the modern atmosphere through reemission from land and ocean, and quantifying mercury emissions from historic gold and silver mining can help constrain modern mining sources. While estimates of mercury emissions during historic gold rushes exceed modern anthropogenic mercury emissions in North America, sediment records in many regions do not show a strong gold rush signal. We use the GEOS-Chem chemical transport model to determine the spatial footprint of mercury emissions from mining and compare model runs from gold rush periods to sediment and ice core records of historic mercury deposition. Based on records of gold and silver production, we include mercury emissions from North and South American mining of 1900 Mg/year in 1880, compared to modern global anthropogenic emissions of 3400 Mg/year. Including this large mining source in GEOS-Chem leads to an overestimate of the modeled 1880 to preindustrial enhancement ratio compared to the sediment core record. We conduct sensitivity studies to constrain the level of mercury emissions from modern and historic mining that is consistent with the deposition records for different regions.

  5. Influences of water and substrate quality for periphyton in a montane stream affected by acid mine drainage

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Dev K. Niyogi; Diane M. McKnight; William M. Lewis

    1999-01-01

    St. Kevin Gulch, a headwater stream of the Rocky Mountains of Colorado, receives acid mine drainage that maintains low pH, high concentrations of heavy metals, and high rates of metal hydroxide deposition. An acid- tolerant alga, Ulothrix sp., is present below the source of mine drainage in St. Kevin Gulch, but its biomass is limited by the deposition rates of

  6. Geochemical characterization of slags, other mines wastes, and their leachates from the Elizabeth and Ely mines (Vermont), the Ducktown mining district (Tennessee), and the Clayton smelter site (Idaho)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Piatak, Nadine M.; Seal, Robert R., II; Hammarstrom, Jane M.; Meier, Allen L.; Briggs, Paul H.

    2003-01-01

    Waste-rock material produced at historic metal mines contains elevated concentrations of potentially toxic trace elements. Two types of mine waste were examined in this study: sintered waste rock and slag. The samples were collected from the Elizabeth and Ely mines in the Vermont copper belt (Besshi-type massive sulfide deposits), from the Copper Basin mining district near Ducktown, Tennessee (Besshi-type massive sulfide deposits), and from the Clayton silver mine in the Bayhorse mining district, Idaho (polymetallic vein and replacement deposits). The data in this report are presented as a compilation with minimal interpretation or discussion. A detailed discussion and interpretation of the slag data are presented in a companion paper. Data collected from sintered waste rock and slag include: (1) bulk rock chemistry, (2) mineralogy, (3) and the distribution of trace elements among phases for the slag samples. In addition, the reactivity of the waste material under surficial conditions was assessed by examining secondary minerals formed on slag and by laboratory leaching tests using deionized water and a synthetic solution approximating precipitation in the eastern United States.

  7. Principles of Data Mining

    Microsoft Academic Search

    David J. Hand; Heikki Mannila; Padhraic Smyth

    2001-01-01

    The growing interest in data mining is motivated by a common problem across disciplines: how does one store, access, model, and ultimately describe and understand very large data sets? Historically, different aspects of data mining have been addressed independently by different disciplines. This is the first truly interdisciplinary text on data mining, blending the contributions of information science, computer science,

  8. Materialized Data Mining Views

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Tadeusz Morzy; Marek Wojciechowski; Maciej Zakrzewicz

    2000-01-01

    Data mining is a useful decision support technique, which can be used to find trends and regularities in warehouses of corporate data. A serious problem of its practical applications is long processing time required by data mining algorithms. Current systems consume minutes or hours to answer simple queries. In this paper we present the concept of materialized data mining views.

  9. Mining Made Simple

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Eric Cohen

    Students simulate operating an iron mine, from choosing property to writing an environmental impact statement to setting up the mining operation. Chocolate chip cookies (with the chocolate chips representing iron ore) are used for this experiment. Students are challenged to operate the most profitable and environmentally sound mine they can.

  10. Data Mining for CRM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thearling, Kurt

    Data Mining technology allows marketing organizations to better understand their customers and respond to their needs. This chapter describes how Data Mining can be combined with customer relationship management to help drive improved interactions with customers. An example showing how to use Data Mining to drive customer acquisition activities is presented.

  11. Pyroclastic deposits as sites for lunar bases

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hawke, B. Ray; Clark, Beth; Coombs, C. R.

    1990-01-01

    Ilmenite-rich pyroclastic deposits may prove to be excellent sites for the establishment of a permanent lunar base for mining purposes. A wide variety of potentially useful by-products could be produced (e.g., Fe, Ti, H, N, C, S, Cu, Zn, Cd, Bi, and Pb). A number of ilmenite-rich pyroclastic deposits of regional extent has been studied. The physical properties of the regional pyroclastic units have important implications for lunar construction. These extensive, deep deposits of ilmenite-rich pyroclastic material are block-free and uncontaminated; they could be easily excavated and would be ideal for lunar mining operations. These deep, loose pyroclastic deposits would also be ideal for rapidly covering base modules with an adequate thickness of shielding.

  12. Mercury Methylation and Environmental Effects of Inactive Mercury Mines in the Circum-Pacific Region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gray, J. E.

    2001-05-01

    Mercury mines worldwide contain of some the highest concentrations of mercury on earth, and as a result of local mercury contamination, these mines represent areas of environmental concern when mine-drainage enters downstream aquatic systems. The most problematic aspect of mine site mercury contamination is the conversion of inorganic mercury to highly toxic organic mercury compounds, such as methylmercury, and their subsequent uptake by aquatic organisms in surrounding ecosystems. Mercury and methylmercury concentrations were measured in sediment and water samples collected from several inactive mercury mines in Nevada, Alaska, and the Philippines, which are part of the circum-Pacific mineral belt. The mines studied represent different mercury deposit types and sizes, and climatic settings. Geochemical data collected from these mines indicate that areas surrounding hot-springs type mercury deposits generally have lower methylmercury concentrations than silica-carbonate mercury deposits. In hot-springs mercury deposits in Nevada and Alaska, ore is dominantly cinnabar with few acid-water generating minerals such as pyrite, and as a result, mine-water drainage has near neutral pH in which there is low solubility of mercury. Conversely, silica-carbonate deposits, such as Palawan, Philippines, contain abundant cinnabar and pyrite, and the resultant acidic-mine drainage generally has higher concentrations of mercury and methylmercury. Additional factors such as the proximity of mercury mines to wetlands, climatic effects, or mine wastes containing highly soluble mercury compounds potentially enhance mercury methylation. The Palawan mercury mine may be a unique example where several adverse environmental factors produced local mercury contamination, high mercury methylation, fish contamination, and mercury poisoning of humans that consumed these contaminated fish.

  13. Expansion of the commercial output of Estonian oil shale mining and processing

    SciTech Connect

    Fraiman, J.; Kuzmiv, I. [Estonian Oil Shale State Co., Jyhvi (Estonia). Scientific Research Center

    1996-09-01

    Economic and ecological preconditions are considered for the transition from monoproduct oil shale mining to polyproduct Estonian oil shale deposits. Underground water, limestone, and underground heat found in oil shale mines with small reserves can be operated for a long time using chambers left after oil shale extraction. The adjacent fields of the closed mines can be connected to the operations of the mines that are still working. Complex usage of natural resources of Estonian oil shale deposits is made possible owing to the unique features of its geology and technology. Oil shale seam development is carried out at shallow depths (40--70 m) in stable limestones and does not require expensive maintenance. Such natural resources as underground water, carbonate rocks, heat of rock mass, and underground chambers are opened by mining and are ready for utilization. Room-and-pillar mining does not disturb the surface, and worked oil shale and greenery waste heaps do not breach its ecology. Technical decisions and economic evaluation are presented for the complex utilization of natural resources in the boundaries of mine take of the ``Tammiku`` underground mine and the adjacent closed mine N2. Ten countries have already experienced industrial utilization of oil shale in small volumes for many years. Usually oil shale deposits are not notable for complex geology of the strata and are not deeply bedded. Thus complex utilization of quite extensive natural resources of Estonian oil shale deposits is of both scientific and practical interest.

  14. Design criteria for an underground lunar mine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siekmeier, John A.

    Underground excavation and construction techniques have been well developed terrestrially and provide an attractive option for lunar mining and habitat construction. The lunar mine, processing facilities and habitats could be located beneath the lunar surface in basaltic rock that would protect the crew and equipment from the hazardous surface environment. A terrestrial-like atmosphere would be created within the underground structures allowing more conventional technologies to be utilized. In addition, the basalt would likely contain higher quality mineral deposits than the regolith (lunar soil) since the minerals in the regolith have been degraded by meteorite bombardment. The conditions that would affect the design of an underground lunar mine are described and a lunar rock mass rated to assess its quality using terrestrial rock mass classification systems. Design criteria are established and a construction scenario proposed. Parameters having the greatest effect on stability are identified based on distinct element computer modeling and terrestrial experience.

  15. Metagenomic mining for microbiologists.

    PubMed

    Delmont, Tom O; Malandain, Cedric; Prestat, Emmanuel; Larose, Catherine; Monier, Jean-Michel; Simonet, Pascal; Vogel, Timothy M

    2011-12-01

    Microbial ecologists can now start digging into the accumulating mountains of metagenomic data to uncover the occurrence of functional genes and their correlations to microbial community members. Limitations and biases in DNA extraction and sequencing technologies impact sequence distributions, and therefore, have to be considered. However, when comparing metagenomes from widely differing environments, these fluctuations have a relatively minor role in microbial community discrimination. As a consequence, any functional gene or species distribution pattern can be compared among metagenomes originating from various environments and projects. In particular, global comparisons would help to define ecosystem specificities, such as involvement and response to climate change (for example, carbon and nitrogen cycle), human health risks (eg, presence of pathogen species, toxin genes and viruses) and biodegradation capacities. Although not all scientists have easy access to high-throughput sequencing technologies, they do have access to the sequences that have been deposited in databases, and therefore, can begin to intensively mine these metagenomic data to generate hypotheses that can be validated experimentally. Information about metabolic functions and microbial species compositions can already be compared among metagenomes from different ecosystems. These comparisons add to our understanding about microbial adaptation and the role of specific microbes in different ecosystems. Concurrent with the rapid growth of sequencing technologies, we have entered a new age of microbial ecology, which will enable researchers to experimentally confirm putative relationships between microbial functions and community structures. PMID:21593798

  16. Commercial Data Mining Software

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Qingyu; Segall, Richard S.

    This chapter discusses selected commercial software for data mining, supercomputing data mining, text mining, and web mining. The selected software are compared with their features and also applied to available data sets. The software for data mining are SAS Enterprise Miner, Megaputer PolyAnalyst 5.0, PASW (formerly SPSS Clementine), IBM Intelligent Miner, and BioDiscovery GeneSight. The software for supercomputing are Avizo by Visualization Science Group and JMP Genomics from SAS Institute. The software for text mining are SAS Text Miner and Megaputer PolyAnalyst 5.0. The software for web mining are Megaputer PolyAnalyst and SPSS Clementine . Background on related literature and software are presented. Screen shots of each of the selected software are presented, as are conclusions and future directions.

  17. Raman spectroscopy of efflorescent sulfate salts from Iron Mountain Mine Superfund Site, California.

    PubMed

    Sobron, Pablo; Alpers, Charles N

    2013-03-01

    The Iron Mountain Mine Superfund Site near Redding, California, is a massive sulfide ore deposit that was mined for iron, silver, gold, copper, zinc, and pyrite intermittently for nearly 100 years. As a result, both water and air reached the sulfide deposits deep within the mountain, producing acid mine drainage consisting of sulfuric acid and heavy metals from the ore. Particularly, the drainage water from the Richmond Mine at Iron Mountain is among the most acidic waters naturally found on Earth. The mineralogy at Iron Mountain can serve as a proxy for understanding sulfate formation on Mars. Selected sulfate efflorescent salts from Iron Mountain, formed from extremely acidic waters via drainage from sulfide mining, have been characterized by means of Raman spectroscopy. Gypsum, ferricopiapite, copiapite, melanterite, coquimbite, and voltaite are found within the samples. This work has implications for Mars mineralogical and geochemical investigations as well as for terrestrial environmental investigations related to acid mine drainage contamination. PMID:23464669

  18. Raman spectroscopy of efflorescent sulfate salts from Iron Mountain Mine Superfund Site, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sobron, Pablo; Alpers, Charles N.

    2013-01-01

    The Iron Mountain Mine Superfund Site near Redding, California, is a massive sulfide ore deposit that was mined for iron, silver, gold, copper, zinc, and pyrite intermittently for nearly 100 years. As a result, both water and air reached the sulfide deposits deep within the mountain, producing acid mine drainage consisting of sulfuric acid and heavy metals from the ore. Particularly, the drainage water from the Richmond Mine at Iron Mountain is among the most acidic waters naturally found on Earth. The mineralogy at Iron Mountain can serve as a proxy for understanding sulfate formation on Mars. Selected sulfate efflorescent salts from Iron Mountain, formed from extremely acidic waters via drainage from sulfide mining, have been characterized by means of Raman spectroscopy. Gypsum, ferricopiapite, copiapite, melanterite, coquimbite, and voltaite are found within the samples. This work has implications for Mars mineralogical and geochemical investigations as well as for terrestrial environmental investigations related to acid mine drainage contamination.

  19. An evaluation of problems arising from acid mine drainage in the vicinity of Shasta Lake, Shasta County, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fuller, Richard H.; Shay, J.M.; Ferreira, R.F.; Hoffman, R.J.

    1978-01-01

    Streams draining the mined areas of massive sulfide ore deposits in the Shasta Mining Districts of northern California are generally acidic and contain large concentrations of dissolved metals, including iron, copper, and zinc. The streams, including Flat, Little Backbone, Spring, West Squaw, Horse, and Zinc Creeks, discharge into Shasta Reservoir and the Sacramento River and have caused numerous fish kills. The sources of pollution are discharge from underground mines, streams that flow into open pits, and streams that flow through pyritic mine dumps where the oxidation of pyrite and other sulfide minerals results in the production of acid and the mobilization of metals. Suggested methods of treatment include the use of air and hydraulic seals in the mines, lime neutralization of mine effluent, channeling of runoff and mine effluent away from mine and tailing areas, and the grading and sealing of mine dumps. A comprehensive preabatement and postabatement program is recommended to evaluate the effects of any treatment method used. (Woodard-USGS)

  20. Environmental mobility of antimony around mesothermal stibnite deposits, New South Wales, Australia and southern New Zealand

    Microsoft Academic Search

    P. M. Ashley; D. Craw; B. P. Graham; D. A. Chappell

    2003-01-01

    Antimony (Sb) occurs principally in stibnite (Sb2S3) in mesothermal vein deposits hosted in low-grade metamorphic belts of eastern Australia and southern New Zealand. Stibnite is commonly associated with gold. Many deposits have been mined historically, with one large deposit, at Hillgrove, New South Wales, being mined recently. Natural outcrops in the relatively rugged terrains are oxidised under humid to semiarid

  1. Method and apparatus for slurry borehole mining

    SciTech Connect

    Coakley, J.E.; Nolan, J.J.

    1982-09-07

    A method and apparatus is provided for recovering deep subterranean ore deposits using conventional dual conduit pipe in the tool string. The drill cuttings and ore are returned to the surface by reverse circulation. A combination drilling and mining head is disclosed which permits the outer casing to be driven by the power swivel during both the drilling and mining operations. A hydraulic eductor pump located at the suction entrance to the inner conduit is used to raise drill cuttings to the surface; a separate slurry eductor pump within the inner conduit located only sufficiently below the slurry discharge of the tool to prevent cavitation at the jet is used to pump the ore slurry to the surface. Another embodiment of this invention employs both eductors to raise the drill cuttings and ore slurry to the surface. Valves controlling the flow of fluid to the drill bit, the mining jet and the slurry discharge eductor pump are located within the inner conduit and a novel valve actuating means is disclosed which employs the pressure within the annular space between the conduits to convert the tool from the drilling to the mining mode. Surface mounted flow control valves and flowmeters in the fluid feed line and in the slurry discharge line control the volume of fluid entering and discharging from the tool. These valves may be controlled by instrumentation to balance the flows, adjusted to control the mining cavity pressure or to compensate for the influx of ground water.

  2. Preliminary Model of Porphyry Copper Deposits

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Berger, Byron R.; Ayuso, Robert A.; Wynn, Jeffrey C.; Seal, Robert R., II

    2008-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) Mineral Resources Program develops mineral-deposit models for application in USGS mineral-resource assessments and other mineral resource-related activities within the USGS as well as for nongovernmental applications. Periodic updates of models are published in order to incorporate new concepts and findings on the occurrence, nature, and origin of specific mineral deposit types. This update is a preliminary model of porphyry copper deposits that begins an update process of porphyry copper models published in USGS Bulletin 1693 in 1986. This update includes a greater variety of deposit attributes than were included in the 1986 model as well as more information about each attribute. It also includes an expanded discussion of geophysical and remote sensing attributes and tools useful in resource evaluations, a summary of current theoretical concepts of porphyry copper deposit genesis, and a summary of the environmental attributes of unmined and mined deposits.

  3. Mine Inspection Data Analysis System

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Winthrop F. Watts Jr; Douglas R. Parker

    1995-01-01

    In 1980, the U.S. Bureau of Mines developed the Mine Inspection Data Analysis System. It is a computerized industrial hygiene database capable of statistically analyzing Mine Safety and Health Administration compliance data collected in coal and noncoal mines and mills. Data are collected by inspectors and mine operators, and are provided to the Bureau annually on magnetic tape. The Bureau

  4. GIS-technologies for integrated assessment of the productive mining areas

    SciTech Connect

    Zamaraev, R.Y.; Oparin, V.N.; Popov, S.E.; Potapov, V.P.; Pyastunovich,O.L. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Kemerovo (Russian Federation)

    2008-05-15

    The paper describes the bases of a new application of GIS-technologies for integrated assessment and comparison of the productive mining areas, involving a wide range of mining and technological factors, considering mineral properties, mineral occurrence conditions and geographical advantages of a mineral deposit location. The model capabilities are exemplified by a comparison of technological characteristics of coals, transportation and power supply infrastructure of the productive mining areas at the Kuznetsk Coal Basin.

  5. Using sulfur and oxygen isotope data for sulfide oxidation assessment in the Freiberg polymetallic sulfide mine

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Manuela Junghans; Marion Tichomirowa

    2009-01-01

    The isotopic and chemical composition and dissolved SO42- of mine water from a mined and backfilled ore vein at the polymetallic sulfide deposit in Freiberg was used to study the SO42- sources and mixing processes. The main SO42- sources in mine water are SO42- in soil seepage water and groundwater, and sulfide oxidation. Using O- and S-isotope analysis, it has

  6. From Sequence Mining to Multidimensional Sequence Mining

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Karine Zeitouni

    2009-01-01

    Sequential pattern mining has been broadly studied and many algorithms have been proposed. The first part of this chapter\\u000a proposes a new algorithm for mining frequent sequences. This algorithm processes only one scan of the database thanks to an\\u000a indexed structure associated to a bit map representation. Thus, it allows a fast data access and a compact storage in main

  7. Evaluation of airborne geophysical surveys for large-scale mapping of contaminated mine pools: draft final report

    SciTech Connect

    Geosciences Division, National Energy Technology Laboratory, US Department of Energy, Pittsburgh, PA; Hammack, R.W.

    2006-12-28

    Decades of underground coal mining has left about 5,000 square miles of abandoned mine workings that are rapidly filling with water. The water quality of mine pools is often poor; environmental regulatory agencies are concerned because water from mine pools could contaminate diminishing surface and groundwater supplies. Mine pools are also a threat to the safety of current mining operations. Conversely, mine pools are a large, untapped water resource that, with treatment, could be used for a variety of industrial purposes. Others have proposed using mine pools in conjunction with heat pumps as a source of heating and cooling for large industrial facilities. The management or use of mine pool water requires accurate maps of mine pools. West Virginia University has predicted the likely location and volume of mine pools in the Pittsburgh Coalbed using existing mine maps, structure contour maps, and measured mine pool elevations. Unfortunately, mine maps only reflect conditions at the time of mining, are not available for all mines, and do not always denote the maximum extent of mining. Since 1999, the National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) has been evaluating helicopter-borne, electromagnetic sensing technologies for the detection and mapping of mine pools. Frequency domain electromagnetic sensors are able to detect shallow mine pools (depth < 50 m) if there is sufficient contrast between the conductance of the mine pool and the conductance of the overburden. The mine pools (conductors) most confidently detected by this technology are overlain by thick, resistive sandstone layers. In 2003, a helicopter time domain electromagnetic sensor was applied to mined areas in southwestern Virginia in an attempt to increase the depth of mine pool detection. This study failed because the mine pool targets were thin and not very conductive. Also, large areas of the surveys were degraded or made unusable by excessive amounts of cultural electromagnetic noise that obscured the subtle mine pool anomalies. However, post-survey modeling suggested that thicker, more conductive mine pools might be detected at a more suitable location. The current study sought to identify the best time domain electromagnetic sensor for detecting mine pools and to test it in an area where the mine pools are thicker and more conductive that those in southwestern Virginia. After a careful comparison of all airborne time domain electromagnetic sensors (including both helicopter and fixed-wing systems), the SkyTEM system from Denmark was determined to be the best technology for this application. Whereas most airborne time domain electromagnetic systems were developed to find large, deep, highly conductive mineral deposits, the SkyTEM system is designed for groundwater exploration studies, an application similar to mine pool detection.

  8. Implementation of Paste Backfill Mining Technology in Chinese Coal Mines

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Qingliang; Zhou, Huaqiang; Bai, Jianbiao

    2014-01-01

    Implementation of clean mining technology at coal mines is crucial to protect the environment and maintain balance among energy resources, consumption, and ecology. After reviewing present coal clean mining technology, we introduce the technology principles and technological process of paste backfill mining in coal mines and discuss the components and features of backfill materials, the constitution of the backfill system, and the backfill process. Specific implementation of this technology and its application are analyzed for paste backfill mining in Daizhuang Coal Mine; a practical implementation shows that paste backfill mining can improve the safety and excavation rate of coal mining, which can effectively resolve surface subsidence problems caused by underground mining activities, by utilizing solid waste such as coal gangues as a resource. Therefore, paste backfill mining is an effective clean coal mining technology, which has widespread application. PMID:25258737

  9. Implementation of paste backfill mining technology in Chinese coal mines.

    PubMed

    Chang, Qingliang; Chen, Jianhang; Zhou, Huaqiang; Bai, Jianbiao

    2014-01-01

    Implementation of clean mining technology at coal mines is crucial to protect the environment and maintain balance among energy resources, consumption, and ecology. After reviewing present coal clean mining technology, we introduce the technology principles and technological process of paste backfill mining in coal mines and discuss the components and features of backfill materials, the constitution of the backfill system, and the backfill process. Specific implementation of this technology and its application are analyzed for paste backfill mining in Daizhuang Coal Mine; a practical implementation shows that paste backfill mining can improve the safety and excavation rate of coal mining, which can effectively resolve surface subsidence problems caused by underground mining activities, by utilizing solid waste such as coal gangues as a resource. Therefore, paste backfill mining is an effective clean coal mining technology, which has widespread application. PMID:25258737

  10. Selective mining and beneficiation at Grootegeluk coal mine Waterberg Coalfield, South Africa

    SciTech Connect

    NONE

    1999-07-01

    Grootegeluk Coal Mine, situated in the Waterberg Coalfield in the Northern Province of South Africa, ranks among the largest open pit coal mines in the world in terms of run of mine tonnage. Commissioned in 1980 to provide steel producer Iscor with coking coal, Grootegeluk currently produces 53 Mt of coking coal per annum. At present Iscor consumes 1.2 Mt of coking coal while Matimba, the world's largest direct dry cooled PowerStation consumes an additional 12.6 Mt. Fine washing and screening plants currently beneficiate the run of mine feed from this multi-seam multi-product mine. Although the Waterberg Coalfield contains approximately 50% of South Africa's coal reserves, Grootegeluk is the only operating mine in this coalfield. The coal seams of the Waterberg Coalfield occur in the Volksrust and Vryheids formations of the Karoo Sequence. Numerous coal seams ranging from a few millimeters up to 8 meters occur over a stratigraphic thickness of at least 120 meters. These coal seams are grouped into eleven coal bearing zones that can be correlated across the coalfield. The coal- and coalbearing strata in the Waterberg are of late Paleozoic to early Mesozoic age. Coal from the Volksrust formation is autochthonous while the coal from the Vryheid formation is allochthonous. To ensure that sufficient geological and analytical data are obtained from exploration boreholes an extensive sampling procedure was established with washability data ranging from 1,35 to 2,20 g/cc. The analyses indicated that certain parts of the coalbearing strata is not suitable for the production of coking coal due to the high phosphorus content or the poor coking properties. This resulted in an open pit with 11 mining benches. The upper parts of the deposit is extracted by conventional shovel and truck operations while the coal seams of the lower part of the deposit are mined selectively with hydraulic shovels. At Grootegeluk down the hole geophysics (natural gamma) are used for grade control and also to quantify the effect of over- or undermining on the various mining benches. Reconciliation between the run of mine material dispatched to the various plants and their resulted yields/qualities are done regularly.

  11. The Impacts of Coal Mining on the Economy and Environment of South Kalimantan Province, Indonesia

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Luthfi Fatah

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this research is to analyse the impact of the coal mining industry on the economy as well as the environment of South Kalimantan Province, Indonesia. The South Kalimantan Province is an area with abundant deposits of coal and contributes 16.36 per cent to the national coal stock. Coal mining is a profitable business. It creates employment, generates

  12. Riparian shrub metal concentrations and growth in amended fluvial mine tailings

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Fluvial mine tailing deposition has caused extensive riparian damage throughout the western United States. Willows are often used for fluvial mine tailing revegetation, but some species accumulate excessive metal concentrations which could be detrimental to browsers. In a greenhouse experiment, gr...

  13. Evaluation of Roof Bolting Requirements Based on In-Mine Roof Bolter Drilling

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Syd S. Peng

    2005-01-01

    Roof bolting is the most popular method for underground openings in the mining industry, especially in the bedded deposits such as coal. In fact, all U.S. underground coal mine entries are roof-bolted as required by law. However, roof falls still occur frequently in the roof bolted entries. The two possible reasons are: the lack of knowledge of and technology to

  14. The historical effects of coal mining on the hydrology of Appalachia

    Microsoft Academic Search

    C. M. Ruffing; A. J. Wreschnig; D. J. Bain; C. M. Hermans; S. M. McCormack; T. Urbanova

    2009-01-01

    The Appalachian Mountains, a region known for its rich coal deposits, is also the headwaters to most important river systems draining to the Atlantic Ocean. Coal mined from the Appalachian's was fundamental to the industrialization of the United States during the nineteenth and early twentieth centuries. Deforestation and waste disposal associated with deep mining were common throughout the region. Anecdotal

  15. Growth and Metal Accumulation of Geyer and Mountain Willow Grown in Topsoil versus Amended Mine Tailings

    Microsoft Academic Search

    M. J. Boyter; J. E. Brummer; W. C. Leininger

    2009-01-01

    Willows (Salix spp.) are an integral component in the restoration of wetland plant communities that have been impacted by the fluvial deposition\\u000a of mine tailings. A greenhouse study was conducted to compare growth and metal uptake of Geyer (S. geyeriana) and mountain (S. monticola) willow grown in topsoil versus lime and biosolids amended mine tailings. Biomass, leader length, and tissue

  16. Organic matter quality in reclaimed boreal forest soils following oil sands mining

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Isabelle Turcotte; Sylvie A. Quideau; Se-Woung Oh

    2009-01-01

    Following surface mining of the Athabasca Oil Sands deposits in northeastern Alberta, Canada, land reclamation entails the reconstruction of soil-like profiles using salvaged soil materials such as peat and mining by-products. The overall objective of this research was to assess soil organic matter (SOM) quality in different reclamation practices as compared to undisturbed soils found in the region. Soil samples

  17. Geochemical processes influencing arsenic mobility at Bullendale historic gold mine, Otago, New Zealand

    Microsoft Academic Search

    L Haffert; D Craw

    2010-01-01

    The historic Bullendale gold mine processed arsenopyrite-rich ore from mesothermal deposits in the South Island of New Zealand from 1864 to 1907. No site rehabilitation was undertaken upon mine closure and processing waste contains arsenic concentration of up to 40 wt%. Originally, all of this arsenic was present as arsenopyrite and with time it has been replaced by secondary arsenic

  18. Mine Safety & Health Administration

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Created in 1978 as a part of the United States Department of Labor, the Mine Safety & Health Administration (MSHA) is dedicated to "protecting miners' safety & health". On the MSHA homepage, visitors can make their way through sections that include "Highlights", "Online Tools", "Quick Links", and "Data Transparency at MSHA". In terms of getting an overview of their work, the "Highlights" area is a fine place to start. Here visitors can view press releases, informational studies, and links to safety regulations and mine evacuation procedures. The homepage also features a brief statistical portrait of the nation's mines in the "MSHA by the Numbers" area, along with basic information on fatalities in mines. On the right-hand side of the homepage visitors with more of a technical interest in the nation's mines will appreciate the inclusion of various reports on mine safety compliance and training modules.

  19. Mining Your Own Business

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    2007-02-08

    In this month-long project students conduct research to develop a mineral location and recovery plan. The plan must include how the minerals formed, a justification for choosing the area to be mined, and the manner in which the resource will be mined. Also important are safety, cost-effectiveness, post-mining site restoration. Each group will share with the class a written document and presentation.

  20. Mining for Natural Resources

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Vince Obremski

    In this activity, students mine the chips from chocolate chip cookies. They weigh the cookies before and after mining, weigh the chips, and calculate the percent yield. This lab is designed to give students a better understanding of the processes involved in harvesting a natural resource and the impact it has on their environment and community. Analysis and conclusion questions focus on the fact that the mining of nonrenewable natural resources has a dramatic effect on our environment.

  1. Mining the hydrosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petersen, Ulrich

    1994-05-01

    Rapid technological progress over the past two decades has significantly lowered the cost of water desalination and has spurred an impressive growth of this industry. About half of the desalination capacity uses seawater, the other half uses continental brackish water. Most of the desalted water is consumed for domestic and municipal purposes. However, some of it, especially that derived from brackish water, is also competitive for irrigation of high-value crops, and for some industrial purposes, particularly in water-deficient regions. In addition to fresh water, at present only halite, magnesium, and bromine are commercially obtained from seawater. These commodities plus sodium carbonate (trona), sodium sulfate, I, Li, B, and potash are also produced from natural brines. Prior attempts to obtain potash, U, Au, and other mineral commodities from seawater failed because the market value of the recovered products was too low to cover the capital and operating costs of processing plants exclusively dedicated to recover them separately. The economics are more favorable if these and/or other elements or compounds are obtained as byproducts of seawater desalination, especially when combined with cogeneration of electricity. Under these circumstances the major capital and operating costs for pumping seawater and for disposing of the reject brine are absorbed mostly by the proceeds from freshwater production. The byproducts need only to pay for the additional recovery processes. One advantage of this strategy is to reduce the environmental impact of reject brine disposal. Another is to reduce the environmental, safety, and health impacts of land-based mining. Furthermore, obtaining nonmetallic mineral commodities from seawater at a number of localities scattered over the Earth can significantly reduce their transportation costs, which is a major proportion of their cost to nations lacking these resources. This is particularly pertinent for common salt (halite), potash, sodium carbonate (trona), sodium sulfate, S, and gypsum. These compounds, plus B, Cl, Calcium chloride, Li, and Sr (perhaps also F and U) are the best candidates for recovery from seawater because their value per ton of seawater is greater than that of other products. Further research aimed at recovering the aforementioned elements and compounds from seawater is justified and recommended. Given the many uncertainties involved, it is beyond the scope of this paper to present specific flow sheets and estimates of capital and operating costs for byproduct recovery. Rather, the purpose of this contribution is to provide a general overview of the potential benefits and problems, so that future research can be directed more fruitfully to the recovery of certain sets of elements or compounds under specific circumstances. Once a mineral commodity can be economically obtained from seawater, there is no further need to mine it on land from lower grade, deeper or more distant ore deposits (or to mine it in ecologically sensitive areas). Current producers need not excessively fear the proposed new supplies because in the past high transportation costs often prevented their nonmetallic commodities from reaching the distant potential markets that would be served by many byproduct-producing seawater processing plants. In addition, population growth and rising standards of living may well absorb much of the feared overcapacity in their spheres of influence. For traditional metals, such as Fe, Al, Cu, Pb, Zn, Au, and Ag, byproduct recovery from seawater desalination appears to be out of reach for a long time.

  2. Distribution of heavy metals and radionuclides in sediments, water, and fish in an area of Great Bear Lake contaminated with mine wastes

    Microsoft Academic Search

    James W. Moore; David J. Sutherland

    1981-01-01

    The concentrations of heavy metals and radionuclides in the sediments and water of Great Bear Lake were determined during 1978 near an operating silver mine and an abandoned uranium mine. Additional information on the level of mercury in fish tissues were also collected. The mines, situated on the same site, deposited tailings and other waste material directly into the lake.

  3. COMPARISON OF DATA FROM SYNTHETIC LEACHATE AND DIRECT SAMPLING OF ACID DRAINAGE FROM MINE WASTES: IMPLICATIONS FOR MERCURY TRANSPORT AND WASTE MANAGEMENT

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Sulphur Bank Mercury Mine (SBMM) in Lake County, California operated from the 1860s through the 1950's. Mining for sulfur started with surface operations and progressed to shaft, then open pit techniques to obtain mercury. Mining has resulted in deposition of approximately ...

  4. New Mining Rules

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Koplow, Travis.

    2001-01-01

    The Bush administration yesterday overturned some of former President Clinton's eleventh hour legislation governing mining. The Department of the Interior's Bureau of Land Management (BLM) explains that the new rule, amending the "3809" surface mining regulations, will eliminate "several unduly burdensome provisions of the current mining regulations." Among the provisions being eliminated is one that allows the Secretary of the Interior to prohibit new mines on federal land if they could cause "substantial irreparable harm" to the environment or communities. The administration is, however, keeping provisions that regulate the use of cyanide in gold mining and the control of acid waste, as well as those that require mining companies to issue reclamation bonds to ensure they will have money for clean up. The new regulations will be published as a final rule on Tuesday and take effect 60 days later. Also, in a separate action, a top legal advisor for the Department of the Interior recommended reversal of a legal decision issued under former Secretary Bruce Babbitt to block an open-pit gold mine near sites sacred to the Quechan Tribe in California. This is perhaps the beginning of more wide-reaching changes to mining laws as Gale Norton, Secretary of the Interior, intends to ask for Congress' help in a more wide-reaching overhaul of the mining laws.

  5. A baseline lunar mine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gertsch, Richard E.

    1992-01-01

    A models lunar mining method is proposed that illustrates the problems to be expected in lunar mining and how they might be solved. While the method is quite feasible, it is, more importantly, a useful baseline system against which to test other, possible better, methods. Our study group proposed the slusher to stimulate discussion of how a lunar mining operation might be successfully accomplished. Critics of the slusher system were invited to propose better methods. The group noted that while nonterrestrial mining has been a vital part of past space manufacturing proposals, no one has proposed a lunar mining system in any real detail. The group considered it essential that the design of actual, workable, and specific lunar mining methods begin immediately. Based on an earlier proposal, the method is a three-drum slusher, also known as a cable-operated drag scraper. Its terrestrial application is quite limited, as it is relatively inefficient and inflexible. The method usually finds use in underwater mining from the shore and in moving small amounts of ore underground. When lunar mining scales up, the lunarized slusher will be replaced by more efficient, high-volume methods. Other aspects of lunar mining are discussed.

  6. Coal and coal mine drainage

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Olem

    1983-01-01

    This review of 1982 literature covers the formation and effects of acid mine drainage from coal mines, coal cleaning wastes and coal transportation and storage. Environmental regulations related to coal mining and processing industries enacted in 1982 are indicated.

  7. Tectonic setting and metallogenesis of volcanogenic massive sulfide deposits in the Bonnifield Mining District, Northern Alaska Range: Chapter B in Recent U.S. Geological Survey studies in the Tintina Gold Province, Alaska, United States, and Yukon, Canada--results of a 5-year project

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dusel-Bacon, Cynthia; Aleinikoff, John N.; Premo, Wayne R.; Paradis, Suzanne; Lohr-Schmidt, Ilana

    2007-01-01

    This paper summarizes the results of field and laboratory investigations, including whole-rock geochemistry and radiogenic isotopes, of outcrop and drill core samples from volcanogenic massive sulfide (VMS) deposits and associated metaigneous rocks in the Wood River area of the Bonnifield mining district, northern Alaska Range (see fig. 1 of Editors’ Preface and Overview). U-Pb zircon igneous crystallization ages from felsic rocks indicate a prolonged period of Late Devonian to Early Mississippian (373±3 to 357±4 million years before present, or Ma) magmatism. This magmatism occurred in a basinal setting along the ancient Pacific margin of North America. The siliceous and carbonaceous compositions of metasedimentary rocks, Precambrian model ages based on U-Pb dating of zircon and neodymium ages, and for some units, radiogenic neodymium isotopic compositions and whole-rock trace-element ratios similar to those of continental crust are evidence for this setting. Red Mountain (also known as Dry Creek) and WTF, two of the largest VMS deposits, are hosted in peralkaline metarhyolite of the Mystic Creek Member of the Totatlanika Schist. The Mystic Creek Member is distinctive in having high concentrations of high-field-strength elements (HFSE) and rare-earth elements (REE), indicative of formation in a within-plate (extensional) setting. Mystic Creek metarhyolite is associated with alkalic, within-plate basalt of the Chute Creek Member; neodymium isotopic data indicate an enriched mantle component for both members of this bimodal (rhyolite-basalt) suite. Anderson Mountain, the other significant VMS deposit, is hosted by the Wood River assemblage. Metaigneous rocks in the Wood River assemblage span a wide compositional range, including andesitic rocks, which are characteristic of arc volcanism. Our data suggest that the Mystic Creek Member likely formed in an extensional, back-arc basin that was associated with an outboard continental-margin volcanic arc that included rocks of the Wood River assemblage. We suggest that elevated HFSE and REE trace-element contents of metavolcanic rocks, whose major-element composition may have been altered, are an important prospecting tool for rocks of VMS deposit potential in east-central Alaska.

  8. Sustainable mineral resources management: from regional mineral resources exploration to spatial contamination risk assessment of mining

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jordan, Gyozo

    2009-07-01

    Wide-spread environmental contamination associated with historic mining in Europe has triggered social responses to improve related environmental legislation, the environmental assessment and management methods for the mining industry. Mining has some unique features such as natural background contamination associated with mineral deposits, industrial activities and contamination in the three-dimensional subsurface space, problem of long-term remediation after mine closure, problem of secondary contaminated areas around mine sites, land use conflicts and abandoned mines. These problems require special tools to address the complexity of the environmental problems of mining-related contamination. The objective of this paper is to show how regional mineral resources mapping has developed into the spatial contamination risk assessment of mining and how geological knowledge can be transferred to environmental assessment of mines. The paper provides a state-of-the-art review of the spatial mine inventory, hazard, impact and risk assessment and ranking methods developed by national and international efforts in Europe. It is concluded that geological knowledge on mineral resources exploration is essential and should be used for the environmental contamination assessment of mines. Also, sufficient methodological experience, knowledge and documented results are available, but harmonisation of these methods is still required for the efficient spatial environmental assessment of mine contamination.

  9. Arsenic partitioning among particle-size fractions of mine wastes and stream sediments from cinnabar mining districts.

    PubMed

    Silva, Veronica; Loredo, Jorge; Fernández-Martínez, Rodolfo; Larios, Raquel; Ordóñez, Almudena; Gómez, Belén; Rucandio, Isabel

    2014-10-01

    Tailings from abandoned mercury mines represent an important pollution source by metals and metalloids. Mercury mining in Asturias (north-western Spain) has been carried out since Roman times until the 1970s. Specific and non-specific arsenic minerals are present in the paragenesis of the Hg ore deposit. As a result of intensive mining operations, waste materials contain high concentrations of As, which can be geochemically dispersed throughout surrounding areas. Arsenic accumulation, mobility and availability in soils and sediments are strongly affected by the association of As with solid phases and granular size composition. The objective of this study was to examine phase associations of As in the fine grain size subsamples of mine wastes (La Soterraña mine site) and stream sediments heavily affected by acid mine drainage (Los Rueldos mine site). An arsenic-selective sequential procedure, which categorizes As content into seven phase associations, was applied. In spite of a higher As accumulation in the finest particle-size subsamples, As fractionation did not seem to depend on grain size since similar distribution profiles were obtained for the studied granulometric fractions. The presence of As was relatively low in the most mobile forms in both sites. As was predominantly linked to short-range ordered Fe oxyhydroxides, coprecipitated with Fe and partially with Al oxyhydroxides and associated with structural material in mine waste samples. As incorporated into short-range ordered Fe oxyhydroxides was the predominant fraction at sediment samples, representing more than 80% of total As. PMID:24729075

  10. Mojave Field Trips or Mining Districts

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    David Jessey

    This web site hosts field trips to 10 localities in the Mojave area of southeastern California and southwestern Nevada. Most of the localities are mining districts or mines. They include: Calico Mining District, Waterman Mine, Mohawk Mine and Copper World Mine, Mountain Pass Mine, Colosseum Mine, the Goodsprings District with Red Cloud Mine and Keystone Mine, Snow White Mine, Beck Iron Mine, War Eagle Mine, and several stops in the Mammoth/Owens Valley area. The commodities include gold, silver, copper, zinc, iron, lead, barite, and talc. Sketches give the geology and mining history of the areas and may include cross sections and simple geologic maps.

  11. The Lifecycle of a Mineral Deposit: A Teache's Guide for Hands-On Mineral Education Activities

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    This teacher's guide provides an introduction to the process of finding or exploring for a mineral deposit, extracting or mining the resource, recovering it, and reclaiming the mined area (sometimes called 'beneficiation' or 'life cycle'). Topics include what a mineral deposit is; how they are identified and measured, how the minerals are extracted; and how the mining site is reclaimed. There is also discussion of how minerals and mineral resources are processed and how they are used in everyday life. The guide includes ten activities that educate students on basic geologic concepts; the processes of finding, identifying, and extracting the resources from a mineral deposit; and the uses of minerals.

  12. Acid Mine Drainage Remediation

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    2010-12-10

    In this video, an environmental technologist visits an abandoned coal mine in Kentucky to talk about how a remediation system (a series of settling ponds and treatment cells) is neutralizing the acid drainage flowing from the mine and keeping it from damaging a creek downstream.

  13. Goldland Super Mine Adventure

    E-print Network

    Hacker, Randi; Tsutsui, William

    2006-08-16

    in an active mine in Shandong Province, GoldLand invites visitors to try their hand at mining and to eat "golden lotus roots", a snack named after the most sensual novel in Chinese history. If you're planning a visit, don't forget your shades: the amount...

  14. Privacy Preserving Data Mining

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Yehuda Lindell; Benny Pinkas

    2000-01-01

    In this paper we address the issue of privacy preserving data mining. Specifically, we consider a scenario in which two parties owning confidential databases wish to run a data mining algorithm on the union of their databases, without revealing any unnecessary information. Our work is motivated by the need to both protect privileged information and enable its use for research

  15. Mineral mining installation

    Microsoft Academic Search

    K. Beckmann; H. Grisebach

    1981-01-01

    A mineral mining installation comprises a mechanical mining machine (such as a plough or a shearer) and a hydraulic winning machine. The hydraulic winning machine has a plurality of high pressure nozzles and a high-pressure pump for supplying the nozzles with high-pressure water (or other hydraulic fluid). Means are provided for driving each of the two winning machines independently of

  16. Data Mining Technology

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    This website provides a basic overview of Data Mining and some applications for the process. The site lists some typical tasks addressed by data mining, such as identifying cross-sell opportunities and predicting a peak load of a network. There are also some academic resources on such topics as "Anomaly Localization," "Generating Non-Linear Functions," and "Symbolic Knowledge Discovery."

  17. Biotreatment of mine drainage

    SciTech Connect

    Bender, J.; Phillips, R. [Microbial Aquatic Treatment Systems, Atlanta, GA (United States)

    1996-12-31

    Several experiments and field tests of microbial mats are described. One study determined the removal rate of Uranium 238 and metals from groundwater by microbial mats. Free floating mats, immobilized mats, excised mats, and pond treatment were examined. Field tests of acid coal mine drainage and precious metal mine drainage are also summarized. The mechanisms of metal removal are briefly described.

  18. Mining for Computing Jobs

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Chuck Litecky; Andrew Aken; Altaf Ahmad; H. James Nelson

    2010-01-01

    A Web content mining approach identified 20 job categories and the associated skills needs prevalent in the computing professions. Using a Web content data mining application, we extracted almost a quarter million unique IT job descriptions from various job search engines and distilled each to its required skill sets. We statistically examined these, revealing 20 clusters of similar skill sets

  19. PRB mines mature

    SciTech Connect

    Buchsbaum, L.

    2007-08-15

    Already seeing the results of reclamation efforts, America's largest surface mines advance as engineers prepare for the future. 30 years after the signing of the Surface Mining Control and Reclamation Act by Jimmy Carter, western strip mines in the USA, especially in the Powder River Basin, are producing more coal than ever. The article describes the construction and installation of a $38.5 million near-pit crusher and overland belt conveyor system at Foundation Coal West's (FCW) Belle Ayr surface mine in Wyoming, one of the earliest PRB mines. It goes on to describe the development by Rio Tinto of an elk conservatory, the Rochelle Hill Conservation Easement, on reclaimed land at Jacobs Ranch, adjacent to the Rochelle Hills. 4 photos.

  20. Quantitative Microbial Community Analysis of Three Different Sulfidic Mine Tailing Dumps Generating Acid Mine Drainage

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Dagmar Kock; Axel Schippers

    2008-01-01

    The microbial communities of three different sulfidic and acidic mine waste tailing dumps located in Botswana, Germany, and Sweden were quantitatively analyzed using quantitative real-time PCR (Q-PCR), fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH), catalyzed reporter deposition-FISH (CARD-FISH), Sybr green II direct counting, and the most probable number (MPN) cultivation technique. Depth profiles of cell numbers showed that the compositions of the

  1. GROUND TRUTH WITH MINE COOPERATION Minnesota Taconite Mines

    E-print Network

    Stump, Brian W.

    GROUND TRUTH WITH MINE COOPERATION Minnesota Taconite Mines Brian W Stump Southern Methodist and identification of mining explosions using regional seismic and acoustic observations can minimize the number blasting provided by a mine operator may be useful in improving monitoring functions. A cooperative

  2. Efficient Mining of Indirect Associations Using HI-Mine

    E-print Network

    An, Aijun

    Efficient Mining of Indirect Associations Using HI-Mine Qian Wan and Aijun An Department. Discovering association rules is one of the important tasks in data mining. While most of the existing algorithms are developed for efficient mining of frequent patterns, it has been noted recently that some

  3. 1. VIEW OF SULLIVAN MINE ON RIGHT WITH PHILLIPS MINE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. VIEW OF SULLIVAN MINE ON RIGHT WITH PHILLIPS MINE LOCATED APPROXIMATELY 200 YARDS THROUGH TREES IN THE DIRECTION OF THE MOUND ON THE LEFT SIDE OF ROAD. CAMERA POINTING NORTH-NORTHEAST. - Florida Mountain Mining Sites, Sullivan Mine, East side of Florida Mountain, Silver City, Owyhee County, ID

  4. 2. EMPIRE STATE MINE. VIEW OF COLLAPSED BUILDINGS AT MINE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    2. EMPIRE STATE MINE. VIEW OF COLLAPSED BUILDINGS AT MINE WITH TAILINGS ON RIGHT. CAMERA POINTED SOUTHWEST. COLLAPSED ADIT APPROXIMATELY 25 YARDS UPHILL TO THE LEFT OF FAR BUILDING. TIP TOP AND ONTARIO ARE LOCATED OUT OF THE PICTURE TO THE RIGHT. - Florida Mountain Mining Sites, Empire State Mine, West side of Florida Mountain, Silver City, Owyhee County, ID

  5. 1. VIEW OF PHILLIPS MINE. CAMERA POINTED SOUTHEAST. SULLIVAN MINE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. VIEW OF PHILLIPS MINE. CAMERA POINTED SOUTHEAST. SULLIVAN MINE IS LOCATED ROUGHLY 75 YARDS BEYOND AND ROUGHLY IN LINE WITH THE SNOW ON THE RIGHT SIDE OF THE IMAGE. - Florida Mountain Mining Sites, Phillips Mine, East side of Florida Mountain, Silver City, Owyhee County, ID

  6. Image Mining: A New Approach for Data Mining

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Carlos Ordonez; Edward Omiecinski

    We introduce a new focus for data mining, which is concerned with knowledge discovery in image databases. We expect all aspects of data mining to be relevant to image mining but in this first work we concentrate on the problem of finding associations. To that end, we present a data mining algorithm to find association rules in 2-dimensional color images.

  7. Spontaneous revegetation of mined peatlands: An useful restoration tool?

    Microsoft Academic Search

    C. Lavoie; P. Grosvernier; M. Girard; K. Marcoux

    2003-01-01

    The recent development of peatland restoration activities indicates that modern peat mining techniques seriously hamper the natural capacity of bog ecosystems to regenerate after a disturbance. However, some plants have the ability to colonize dry peat deposits, and seem to help stabilize the soil surface and facilitate the establishment of other plant species. In this paper, we review studies regarding

  8. PURIFICATION OF WATERS DISCHARGED FROM POLISH LIGNITE MINES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The exploitation of lignite deposits is linked with the necessity of lowering the groundwater table and dewatering the mine of precipitation. A large percentage of the discharge waters requires purification prior to delivery of receiving streams. The chief pollutants of these wat...

  9. Exploration drilling for pre-mining gas drainage in coal mines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shubina, E. A.; Brylin, V. I.; Lukyanov, V. G.; Korotchenko, T. V.

    2015-02-01

    High natural gas content in coal seams and low gas drainage efficiency are the basic issues to be addressed in order to ensure coal mining safety. A great number of wells being drilled within various gas drainage techniques significantly increase the costs of coal mining and do not reduce the gas content levels within the coal beds up to the required parameters in a short period of time. The integrated approach toward exploration well spacing applied at the stage of project development could make it possible to consider coal seam data to provide more effective gas drainage not only ahead of mining but also during further gas content reduction and commercial production of methane. The comparative analysis of a closely spaced grid of exploration program compiled in accordance with the recommendations on applying mineral reserves classification and inferred resources of coal and shale coal deposits and currently effective stimulation radius proves the necessity and possibility to consider exploration well data for gas drainage. Pre-mining gas drainage could ensure the safety of mining operations.

  10. Acid mine drainage from the Panasqueira mine and its influence on Zêzere river (Central Portugal)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Candeias, Carla; Ávila, Paula Freire; Ferreira da Silva, Eduardo; Ferreira, Adelaide; Salgueiro, Ana Rita; Teixeira, João Paulo

    2014-11-01

    The Panasqueira hydrothermal mineralization, located in central Portugal, is the biggest Sn-W deposit of the Western Europe. The main evidences of the mining exploitation and ore treatment operations are testified with huge tailings, mainly, in the Rio and Barroca Grande areas. The mining and beneficiation processes, at the site, produces metal rich mine wastes. Oxidation of sulfides tailings and flow from open impoundments are responsible for the mobilization and migration of metals from the mine wastes into the environment. Acid mine drainage (AMD) discharged from Rio tailing has a pH around 3 and high metal concentrations. In Zêzere river, Fe and As are the most rapidly depleted downstream from AMD once As adsorbs, coprecipitate and form compounds with iron oxyhydroxides. The Zêzere river waters are oversaturated with respect to kaolinite and goethite and ferrihydrite can precipitate on stream with a near-neutral pH. At sites having low pH the dissolved Fe species in the water, mainly, occur as sulfate complexes due to a high SO4 concentration. Melanterite (Fe2+(SO4)·7(H2O)) and minor amounts of rozenite (Fe2+(SO4)·4(H2O)) and szomolnokite (Fe2+(SO4)·(H2O)) were observed on Rio tailing basement.

  11. Molybdenum and copper levels in white-tailed deer near uranium mines in Texas

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    King, K.A.; LeLeux, J.; Mulhern, B.M.

    1984-01-01

    Molybdenum toxicity, molybdenosis, in ruminant animals has been identified in at least 15 states and in Canada, England, Australia, and New Zealand. In most western states, molybdenosis has been associated with strip-mine spoil deposits. Molybdenum toxicity has been diagnosed in cattle pastured near uranium strip-mine spoils in several Texas counties. Recent reports from hunters and the authors' observations indicated that white-tailed deer (Odocoileus virginianus ) that fed near uranium-mine spoil deposits may also have been exposed to high levels of molybdenum. The objectives of this study were to determine if white-tailed deer from a South Texas uranium mining district were accumulating harmful levels of molybdenum and to compare molybdenum and copper levels with antler development in deer from the mined area vs. an unmined control area.

  12. Deposition Equipment

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    This is a description for a learning module from Maricopa Advanced Technology Education Center. This PDF describes the module; access may be purchased by visiting the MATEC website. Use this module to develop your learners' ability to control deposition equipment operations. The activities are adaptable to cleanroom or laboratory, and employ the Applied Materials Precision 5000 as a prototypical CVD tool. The module takes learners through a review of the deposition process, an introduction to the systems and subsystems of a CVD tool, and through an entire operations cycle from recipe interpretation through process control of inputs/outputs.

  13. The historical effects of coal mining on the hydrology of Appalachia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruffing, C. M.; Wreschnig, A. J.; Bain, D. J.; Hermans, C. M.; McCormack, S. M.; Urbanova, T.

    2009-12-01

    The Appalachian Mountains, a region known for its rich coal deposits, is also the headwaters to most important river systems draining to the Atlantic Ocean. Coal mined from the Appalachian’s was fundamental to the industrialization of the United States during the nineteenth and early twentieth centuries. Deforestation and waste disposal associated with deep mining were common throughout the region. Anecdotal evidence suggests that historic coal mining had a significant influence on the region’s hydrology. There is a growing body of literature examining the effects of contemporary mining activity on hydrologic systems, but few studies have quantified historic impacts. This study examines the extent of coal mining activity in Appalachia during the first era of increased coal production (1865 - 1929). Areas within the region most affected by mining activity were identified using dates of published mine maps and coal production data for the region. Intensively mined areas were paired with relatively unaffected stream basins to address the influence of mining on hydrology, and particularly legacy effects. This study will inform future studies exploring common mine-related environmental issues in Appalachia such as acid mine drainage and subsidence.

  14. Decision support methods for the environmental assessment of contamination at mining sites.

    PubMed

    Jordan, Gyozo; Abdaal, Ahmed

    2013-09-01

    Polluting mine accidents and widespread environmental contamination associated with historic mining in Europe and elsewhere has triggered the improvement of related environmental legislation and of the environmental assessment and management methods for the mining industry. Mining has some unique features such as natural background pollution associated with natural mineral deposits, industrial activities and contamination located in the three-dimensional sub-surface space, the problem of long-term remediation after mine closure, problem of secondary contaminated areas around mine sites and abandoned mines in historic regions like Europe. These mining-specific problems require special tools to address the complexity of the environmental problems of mining-related contamination. The objective of this paper is to review and evaluate some of the decision support methods that have been developed and applied to mining contamination. In this paper, only those methods that are both efficient decision support tools and provide a 'holistic' approach to the complex problem as well are considered. These tools are (1) landscape ecology, (2) industrial ecology, (3) landscape geochemistry, (4) geo-environmental models, (5) environmental impact assessment, (6) environmental risk assessment, (7) material flow analysis and (8) life cycle assessment. This unique inter-disciplinary study should enable both the researcher and the practitioner to obtain broad view on the state-of-the-art of decision support methods for the environmental assessment of contamination at mine sites. Documented examples and abundant references are also provided. PMID:23456223

  15. Microgravity method for detection of abandoned mines in New Jersey

    SciTech Connect

    Ghatge, S.L. (New Jersey Geological Survey, Trenton, NJ (United States))

    1993-03-01

    The microgravity method has been used to detect two shallow, subsurface abandoned mines in northern New Jersey. Synthetic models simulated the expected gravity anomalies in the two areas. The first site, Lawrence Iron Mine, tested the applicability of microgravity for abandoned-mine detection. Two profile lines were laid out at right angles to the strike of the magnetite deposit in an amphibolite host rock. The broad gravity lows (magnitude 0.04 and 0.07 mGals) on the gravity profiles were modeled to show mine workings about 10 ft square and 5 ft deep that were filled with loose soil. Trenching confirmed the location of the buried mine. At the Schuyler Copper Mine, located in an urban area, data were collected along four parallel profile lines spaced 10 ft apart. An anomalous low (magnitude 0.03 mGals) on the gravity map was modeled and interpreted to be due to an empty vertical shaft. The shaft is more than 60 ft deep, about 12 ft long and 8 to 10 ft wide. It is capped by about 10 ft of unconsolidated material overlying sandstone bedrock. Drilling confirmed the results of the gravity model. The success of the method depended on the depth and size of the mine instrument accuracy, station spacing, station location and elevation control. Minimizing errors due to the instrument drift, station location and station elevation maximized the resolution of the technique.

  16. Land reclamation beautifies coal mines

    SciTech Connect

    Coblentz, B. [MSU Ag Communications (United States)

    2009-07-15

    The article explains how the Mississippi Agricultural and Forestry Experiments station, MAFES, has helped prepare land exploited by strip mining at North American Coal Corporation's Red Hills Mine. The 5,800 acre lignite mine is over 200 ft deep and uncovers six layers of coal. About 100 acres of land a year is mined and reclaimed, mostly as pine plantations. 5 photos.

  17. School of Mines Undergraduate Bulletin

    E-print Network

    #12;Colorado School of Mines 2009­2010 Undergraduate Bulletin #12;To Mines Students: This Bulletin is for your use as a source of continuing reference. Please save it. Published by Colorado School of Mines, Golden, CO 80401 Address correspondence to: Colorado School of Mines, Golden, CO 80401 Main Telephone

  18. School of Mines Graduate Bulletin

    E-print Network

    Colorado School of Mines 2010­2011 Graduate Bulletin #12;To Mines Graduate Students: This Bulletin is for your use as a source of continuing reference. Please save it. Published by Colorado School of Mines, Golden, CO 80401 Address correspondence to: Office of Graduate Studies Colorado School of Mines 1500

  19. ORGANIZATIONAL DATA MINING IN KOREA

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Eun-Jeong Cho; Ho Han; C. Christopher Lee

    2007-01-01

    This study investigates organizational data mining in Korea. A survey instrument was developed based on a review of the organizational data mining literature and e-mailed to 600 professionals in the field of data mining or data analysis. 90 usable responses were analyzed using stepwise regression. Data quality, process documentation, understanding of data, data integration, data mining outsourcing strategy, understanding of

  20. Solar for Mining Hugh Rudnick

    E-print Network

    Catholic University of Chile (Universidad Católica de Chile)

    Solar for Mining Hugh Rudnick Professor Pontificia Universidad Católica de Chile #12;Solar Energy in Mining · Solar energy is becoming affordable · Attractive potential use for mining purposes · Must solve the storage requirement to increase its participation worldwide #12;Solar Energy in Mining · Electrical Energy

  1. Subterranean drilling and slurry mining

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Bunnelle

    1978-01-01

    A description is given of subterranean slurry mining with one or more mining nozzles which, during mining, directs a high pressure jet of liquid into a granular ore matrix to reduce the ore to a slurry which is thereafter pumped to the surface by an eductor pump including a high pressure eductor nozzle. The drilling and mining apparatus includes several

  2. Geochemical Characterization of Mine Waste, Mine Drainage, and Stream Sediments at the Pike Hill Copper Mine Superfund Site, Orange County, Vermont

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Piatak, Nadine M.; Seal, Robert R., II; Hammarstrom, Jane M.; Kiah, Richard G.; Deacon, Jeffrey R.; Adams, Monique; Anthony, Michael W.; Briggs, Paul H.; Jackson, John C.

    2006-01-01

    The Pike Hill Copper Mine Superfund Site in the Vermont copper belt consists of the abandoned Smith, Eureka, and Union mines, all of which exploited Besshi-type massive sulfide deposits. The site was listed on the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA) National Priorities List in 2004 due to aquatic ecosystem impacts. This study was intended to be a precursor to a formal remedial investigation by the USEPA, and it focused on the characterization of mine waste, mine drainage, and stream sediments. A related study investigated the effects of the mine drainage on downstream surface waters. The potential for mine waste and drainage to have an adverse impact on aquatic ecosystems, on drinking- water supplies, and to human health was assessed on the basis of mineralogy, chemical concentrations, acid generation, and potential for metals to be leached from mine waste and soils. The results were compared to those from analyses of other Vermont copper belt Superfund sites, the Elizabeth Mine and Ely Copper Mine, to evaluate if the waste material at the Pike Hill Copper Mine was sufficiently similar to that of the other mine sites that USEPA can streamline the evaluation of remediation technologies. Mine-waste samples consisted of oxidized and unoxidized sulfidic ore and waste rock, and flotation-mill tailings. These samples contained as much as 16 weight percent sulfides that included chalcopyrite, pyrite, pyrrhotite, and sphalerite. During oxidation, sulfides weather and may release potentially toxic trace elements and may produce acid. In addition, soluble efflorescent sulfate salts were identified at the mines; during rain events, the dissolution of these salts contributes acid and metals to receiving waters. Mine waste contained concentrations of cadmium, copper, and iron that exceeded USEPA Preliminary Remediation Goals. The concentrations of selenium in mine waste were higher than the average composition of eastern United States soils. Most mine waste was potentially acid generating because of paste-pH values of less than 4 and negative net-neutralization potentials (NNP). The processed flotation-mill tailings, however, had a near neutral paste pH, positive NNP, and a few weight percent calcite. Leachate tests indicated that elements and compounds such as Al, Cd, Cu, Fe, Mn, Se, SO4, and Zn were leached from mine waste in concentrations that exceeded aquatic ecosystem and drinking-water standards. Mine waste from the Pike Hill mines was chemically and mineralogically similar to that from the Elizabeth and Ely mines. In addition, metals were leached and acid was produced from mine waste from the Pike Hill mines in comparable concentrations to those from the Elizabeth and Ely mines, although the host rock of the Pike Hill deposits contains significant amounts of carbonate minerals and, thus, a greater acid-neutralizing capacity when compared to the host rocks of the Elizabeth and Ely deposits. Water samples collected from unimpacted parts of the Waits River watershed generally contained lower amounts of metals compared to water samples from mine drainage, were alkaline, and had a neutral pH, which was likely because of calcareous bedrock. Seeps and mine pools at the mine site had acidic to neutral pH, ranged from oxic to anoxic, and generally contained concentrations of metals, for example, aluminum, cadmium, copper, iron, and zinc, that exceeded aquatic toxicity standards or drinking-water standards, or both. Surface waters directly downstream of the Eureka and Union mines were acidic, as indicated by pH values from 3.1 to 4.2, and contained high concentrations of some elements including as much as 11,400 micrograms per liter (?g/L) Al, as much as 22.9 ?g/L Cd, as much as 6,790 ?g/L Cu, as much as 23,300 ?g/L Fe, as much as 1,400 ?g/L Mn, and as much as 3,570 ?g/L Zn. The concentrations of these elements exceeded water-quality guidelines. Generally, in surface waters, the pH increased and the concentrations of these elemen

  3. From Web Mining to Social Multimedia Mining

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Georgios Lappas

    2011-01-01

    Web mining is a well established field with many applications. Over the last years we experience a vast and rapidly growing amount of multimedia content that becomes available online. Web 2.0 and online social networks have dramatically influenced the growing amount of multimedia content due to the fact that users become more active producers and distributors of such multimedia context.

  4. Emergency system for mines

    SciTech Connect

    Cavrak, T.

    1983-11-15

    An emergency communication system is provided in an underground mine having a plurality of locations capable of being mined. A cable extends from a central station to each of the mining locations. An emergency receiver ties into the cable located in each location and further connects to a load center which provides power to the mining equipment in that location. The emergency receiver further includes an alarm and an emergency switch and an oral communication system. A switchboard located at the central station is tied into the cable and is in independent signal communication with each location. The switchboard includes a power on/off switch and an oral communication system for each location. Activation of the system by the dispatcher or operator in the central station, or activation by a miner within a mining location, automatically turns off the power from the load center to the mining equipment in that location. Independent oral communication is possible between each location of the mine crew and the central office.

  5. Method of Appraising Economic Prospects of Mining Exploration over Large Territories: Algerian Sahara Case Study

    Microsoft Academic Search

    M. Allais

    1957-01-01

    The present study has essentially been conceived as a part of a larger study in the field of operations research. Its purpose resides in the scientific detection of the best and economically optimal strategy to be used in prospecting for metal deposits in the Sahara. The purpose of mining exploration is to discover workable deposits, and to acquire certain information

  6. TRACE AND POTENTIALLY TOXIC ELEMENTS ASSOCIATED WITH URANIUM DEPOSITS IN SOUTH TEXAS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The environmentally sensitive trace elements molybdenum, arsenic, and selenium are concentrated with uranium in ore deposits in South Texas. Cattle grazing in some pastures in mining areas have contracted molybdenosis, a cattle disease resulting from an imbalance of molybdenum an...

  7. Support vector machines and gradient boosting for graphical estimation of a slate deposit

    Microsoft Academic Search

    J. M. Matías; A. Vaamonde; J. Taboada; W. González-Manteiga

    2004-01-01

    Critical for an efficient and effective exploitation of a slate mine is to obtain information on its technical quality, in other words, on the exploitability potential of the deposit. We applied support vector machines (SVM) and LS-Boosting to the assessment of the technical quality of a new unexploited area of a mine, and compared the results to those obtained for

  8. Minerals and mine drainage

    SciTech Connect

    Thomson, B.M. [Univ. of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM (United States); Turney, W.R. [Univ. of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM (United States)]|[Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States)

    1995-06-01

    This paper briefly lists the various literature reviews dealing with (a) Environmental regulations and impacts, and (b) Characterization, prevention, treatment and reclamation, with respect to minerals and mine drainage. 47 refs.

  9. Minerals and mine drainage

    SciTech Connect

    Thomson, B.M. [Univ. of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM (United States); Turney, W.R. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States)

    1996-11-01

    This paper provides a review of literature published in 1995 on the subject of wastewater related to minerals and mine drainage. Topics covered include: environmental regulations and impacts; and characterization, prevention, treatment and reclamation. 65 refs.

  10. Topoff Mining Company Assignment

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Enrique Gomezdelcampo

    Enrique Gomezdelcampo, Bowling Green State University Summary Laboratory exercise to demonstrate the use of TINs in GIS using an example from surface coal mining. Context Type and level of course This is one of ...

  11. Coal mine subsidence

    SciTech Connect

    Rahall, N.J.

    1991-05-01

    This paper examines the efficacy of the Department of the Interior's Office of Surface Mining Reclamation and Enforcement's (OSMRE) efforts to implement the federally assisted coal mine subsidence insurance program. Coal mine subsidence, a gradual settling of the earth's surface above an underground mine, can damage nearby land and property. To help protect property owners from subsidence-related damage, the Congress passed legislation in 1984 authorizing OSMRE to make grants of up to $3 million to each state to help the states establish self-sustaining, state-administered insurance programs. Of the 21 eligible states, six Colorado, Indiana, Kentucky, Ohio, West Virginia, and Wyoming applied for grants. This paper reviews the efforts of these six states to develop self-sustaining insurance programs and assessed OSMRE's oversight of those efforts.

  12. Algorithms for data mining

    E-print Network

    Wang, Grant J. (Grant Jenhorn), 1979-

    2006-01-01

    Data of massive size are now available in a wide variety of fields and come with great promise. In theory, these massive data sets allow data mining and exploration on a scale previously unimaginable. However, in practice, ...

  13. Mining - Least Cost lab

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Ann Linsley

    Students use a simulated land area disguised as a chocolate chip cookie to conduct a mining simulation and least cost theory evaluation. After carefully extracting as much of the available ore (chocolate chips) materials the students calculate the simulated costs of mining and reclamation to determine if there is a profit or loss. These calculations and conversions are used to determine the optimal location for manufacturing in relation to the market.

  14. EnviroMine

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    This site serves as a reference library of up-to-date information on mining and the environment by providing links to an abundance of resources related to the industry. There are links to environmental topics such as acid rock drainage, waste rock, dust control, water quality and many more. The site also features an image library, current news, events, publications, employment, and links to other mining-related environmental websites.

  15. NVESD mine lane facility

    Microsoft Academic Search

    James D. Habersat; Christopher Marshall; George Maksymonko

    2003-01-01

    The NVESD Mine Lane Facility has recently undergone an extensive renovation. It now consists of an indoor, dry lane portion, a greenhouse portion with moisture-controlled lanes, a control room, and two outdoor lanes. The indoor structure contains six mine lanes, each approximately 2.5m (width) × 1.2m (depth) × 33m(length). These lanes contain six different soil types: magnetite\\/sand, silt, crusher run

  16. Ekati Diamond Mine

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    2001-01-01

    The page on the Ekati Diamond Mine, which is located in the Northwest Territories and is North America's only operating diamond mine, presents a satellite image and informational text. A detailed map of the region is also included which will allow users to compare the satellite image to what the area looks like on a map. The CCRS was last mentioned in the May 24, 2000 Scout Report for Science and engineering.

  17. Trends in the small-scale mining of precious minerals in Ghana: a perspective on its environmental impact

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Benjamin N. A Aryee; Bernard K Ntibery; Evans Atorkui

    2003-01-01

    Small-scale mining in Ghana is defined to include both the exploitation of mineral deposits (1) using fairly rudimentary implements and\\/or (2) at low levels of production with minimal capital investment. While the large-scale mining—of particularly gold—has become predominant, small-scale mining, which predates such operations, has continued to be an important economic activity, particularly within the remote and poorer areas of

  18. 30 CFR 49.4 - Alternative mine rescue capability for special mining conditions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 2014-07-01 false Alternative mine rescue capability for special mining conditions... Section 49.4 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR EDUCATION AND TRAINING MINE RESCUE TEAMS Mine Rescue Teams for...

  19. 30 CFR 49.4 - Alternative mine rescue capability for special mining conditions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 2013-07-01 false Alternative mine rescue capability for special mining conditions... Section 49.4 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR EDUCATION AND TRAINING MINE RESCUE TEAMS Mine Rescue Teams for...

  20. 30 CFR 49.4 - Alternative mine rescue capability for special mining conditions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 2012-07-01 false Alternative mine rescue capability for special mining conditions... Section 49.4 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR EDUCATION AND TRAINING MINE RESCUE TEAMS Mine Rescue Teams for...

  1. A CASE STUDY USING INDICATOR KRIGING — THE MOUNT MORGAN GOLD-COPPER DEPOSIT, QUEENSLAND

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Ivor Jones

    In August 1882, the Morgan brothers recognised a mineral deposit, now known as the Mount Morgan Gold-Copper Deposit. The final production figures for the mine were 250 tonnes of gold and 360,000 tonnes of copper from 50 million tonnes of ore, making the average grades 4.99g\\/t gold and 0.72% copper. A three dimensional grade model was made of the pre-mined

  2. Facies architecture of the upper Calvert Bluff Formation exposed in the highwall of Big Brown Mine, Fairfield, Texas

    E-print Network

    Sturdy, Michael Dale

    2006-10-30

    of Big Brown Mine, near Fairfield, Texas. Observed bedding and facies architecture are interpreted in terms of temporal changes, depositional environments and sequence stratigraphic setting. A three dimensional grid of 89 subsurface logs is correlated...

  3. Underground at Black Diamond Mines

    SciTech Connect

    Higgins, C.T.

    1989-10-01

    Although California is noted for its mining history and annually leads the nation in total monetary value of minerals produced, there a few opportunities for the public to tour underground mines. One reason is that nearly all mining in the state today is done above ground in open pits. Another reason is that active underground mines are not commonly favorable to public tours. There is one place, Black Diamond Mines Regional Preserve, where the public can safely tour a formerly active underground mine. Black Diamond Mines Regional Preserve is a 3,600-acre parkland about 5 miles southwest of Antioch in Contra Costa County. The Preserve was established in the early 1970s and is administered by the East Bay Regional Park District. Black Diamond Mines Preserve is noteworthy for its mining history as well as its natural history, both of which are briefly described here.

  4. Mercury Benthic Flux: A Comparison Between 3 Mining-Impacted Water Bodies in the Western United States

    Microsoft Academic Search

    B. R. Topping; J. S. Kuwabara; M. C. Marvin-Dipasquale; J. L. Agee; L. H. Kieu; J. R. Flanders; F. Parchaso

    2004-01-01

    The legacy of mining in the Western United States has left an indelible environmental imprint on terrestrial and aquatic systems. On both sides of the Sierra Nevada mountain range (Sierras), mercury was used copiously in the amalgamation of gold and silver. Mercury deposits in close proximity to San Francisco Bay (e.g., the New Almaden mining district) provided much of the

  5. Ubiquitous Mining with Interactive Data Mining Agents

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Xin-Dong Wu; Xing-quan Zhu; Qi-jun Chen; Fei-yue Wang

    2009-01-01

    Due to the increasing availability and sophistication of data recording techniques, multiple information sources and distributed\\u000a computing are becoming the important trends of modern information systems. Many applications such as security informatics\\u000a and social computing require a ubiquitous data analysis platform so that decisions can be made rapidly under distributed and\\u000a dynamic system environments. Although data mining has now been

  6. Hydrochemical characteristics of mine waters from abandoned mining sites in Serbia and their impact on surface water quality.

    PubMed

    Atanackovi?, Nebojša; Dragiši?, Veselin; Stojkovi?, Jana; Papi?, Petar; Zivanovi?, Vladimir

    2013-11-01

    Upon completion of exploration and extraction of mineral resources, many mining sites have been abandoned without previously putting environmental protection measures in place. As a consequence, mine waters originating from such sites are discharged freely into surface water. Regional scale analyses were conducted to determine the hydrochemical characteristics of mine waters from abandoned sites featuring metal (Cu, Pb-Zn, Au, Fe, Sb, Mo, Bi, Hg) deposits, non-metallic minerals (coal, Mg, F, B) and uranium. The study included 80 mine water samples from 59 abandoned mining sites. Their cation composition was dominated by Ca2+, while the most common anions were found to be SO4(2-) and HCO3-. Strong correlations were established between the pH level and metal (Fe, Mn, Zn, Cu) concentrations in the mine waters. Hierarchical cluster analysis was applied to parameters generally indicative of pollution, such as pH, TDS, SO4(2-), Fe total, and As total. Following this approach, mine water samples were grouped into three main clusters and six subclusters, depending on their potential environmental impact. Principal component analysis was used to group together variables that share the same variance. The extracted principal components indicated that sulfide oxidation and weathering of silicate and carbonate rocks were the primary processes, while pH buffering, adsorption and ion exchange were secondary drivers of the chemical composition of the analyzed mine waters. Surface waters, which received the mine waters, were examined. Analysis showed increases of sulfate and metal concentrations and general degradation of surface water quality. PMID:23872888

  7. CAERs's mine mapping program and Kentucky's mine mapping initiative

    SciTech Connect

    Hiett, J. [University of Kentucky Center for Applied Energy Research, Lexington, KY (United States). Mine Map Repository and Mine Map Information Systems

    2007-07-01

    Since 1884 the Kentucky Department of Mines and Minerals (KDMM now OMSL) has had a mine mapping function as it relates to mine safety. The CAER's Mine Mapping Program has provided this service to that agency since 1972. The program has been in continuous operation under the current staff and management over that period. Functions include operating the Mine Map Repository/Mine Map Information Center of the OMSL; and receiving and processing all annual coal mine license maps, old maps, and related data. The Kentucky Mine Mapping Initiative's goal is to ensure that every underground and surface mine map in Kentucky is located, digitized and online. The Kentucky mine mapping website plays a vital role in the safety of Kentuckians. The purpose of the web service is to make available electronic maps of mined out areas and approximately 32,000 engineering drawings of operating or closed mines that are located in the state. Future phases of the project will include the archival scanning of all submitted mine maps; the recovery from outside sources of maps that were destroyed in a 1948 fire; and the development of further technology to process maps and related data. 7 photos.

  8. Iowa State Mining and Mineral Resources Research Institute. Final report, July 1, 1990--June 30, 1991

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-08-01

    During 1990--1991, the Iowa State Mining and Mineral Resources Research Institute (ISMMRRI) has worked diligently to further the objectives of the Mineral Institute Program. About 70% of our Allotment Grant funding goes toward research and education of graduate students within the participating departments of the university. It is our goal to encourage graduate students in diverse fields such as agronomy, engineering, geology, landscape architecture, and many others to pursue a career in mining- and mineral-related fields by preparing them to either enter the private or public sectors. During the 1990 calendar year, ISMMRRI granted research assistantships to 17 graduate students to perform research in topics relating to mineral exploration, characterization and processing, extractive metallurgy, mining engineering, fuel science, mineral waste management, and mined-land reclamation. Research areas include the following: Fluid-inclusion studies on fluorspar mineral deposits in an actively mined region; Geochemical modeling of gold and gold-telluride deposits; Characterization of coal particles for surface-based beneficiation; Impact of surface mining and reclamation of a gypsum deposit area on the surrounding community; Stress-strain response of fine coal particles during transport and storage; Recovery of metal values from mining wastes using bioleaching; Coal beneficiation utilizing triboelectric charging in a fast fluidized bed; and Mathematical modeling of breakage for optimum sizing during crushing of rock.

  9. Underground mine communications: a survey

    SciTech Connect

    Yarkan, S.; Guzelgoz, S.; Arslan, H.; Murphy, R.R. [University of South Florida, Tampa, FL (United States)

    2009-07-01

    After a recent series of unfortunate underground mining disasters, the vital importance of communications for underground mining is underlined one more time. Establishing reliable communication is a very difficult task for underground mining due to the extreme environmental conditions. Until now, no single communication system exists which can solve all of the problems and difficulties encountered in underground mine communications. However, combining research with previous experiences might help existing systems improve, if not completely solve all of the problems. In this survey, underground mine communication is investigated. Major issues which underground mine communication systems must take into account are discussed. Communication types, methods, and their significance are presented.

  10. A Mining Symposium The mining sector is growing as metal prices and consumption increases. Mining is often presented as

    E-print Network

    Zhao, Yuxiao

    A Mining Symposium The mining sector is growing as metal prices and consumption increases. Mining Geography, Durham University 09.55-10.15 "Contrasting Political Support to the Swedish Metal Mining. Not least in Sweden with its mining-friendly policy framework, mines causes disagreements over land use

  11. Deep-Sea Mining: Integrating Geology, Oceanography, and Engineering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meyer, F. Michael; Halbach, Peter E.; Martens, Peer N.; Hein, James R.; Scott, Steve

    2008-09-01

    Shaping the Future: Deep-Sea Minerals and Mining Congress; Aachen, Germany, 9-13 March 2008; A strong increase in the global demand for metallic raw materials, coupled with rising market prices, has heightened interest in marine seabed mineral deposits and the feasibility of their extraction for many marine scientists, engineers, and mining companies. This interest focuses not only on base and precious metals but also on strategically important elements needed for high-technology applications, such as cobalt, nickel, molybdenum, titanium, gallium, selenium, telurium, indium, and the rare earth elements.

  12. Diamonds: Exploration, mines and marketing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Read, George H.; Janse, A. J. A. (Bram)

    2009-11-01

    The beauty, value and mystique of exceptional quality diamonds such as the 603 carat Lesotho Promise, recovered from the Letseng Mine in 2006, help to drive a multi-billion dollar diamond exploration, mining and marketing industry that operates in some 45 countries across the globe. Five countries, Botswana, Russia, Canada, South Africa and Angola account for 83% by value and 65% by weight of annual diamond production, which is mainly produced by four major companies, De Beers, Alrosa, Rio Tinto and BHP Billiton (BHPB), which together account for 78% by value and 72% by weight of annual diamond production for 2007. During the last twelve years 16 new diamond mines commenced production and 4 re-opened. In addition, 11 projects are in advanced evaluation and may begin operations within the next five years. Exploration for diamondiferous kimberlites was still energetic up to the last quarter of 2008 with most work carried out in Canada, Angola, Democratic Republic of the Congo (DRC) and Botswana. Many kimberlites were discovered but no new economic deposits were outlined as a result of this work, except for the discovery and possible development of the Bunder project by Rio Tinto in India. Exploration methods have benefitted greatly from improved techniques of high resolution geophysical aerial surveying, new research into the geochemistry of indicator minerals and further insights into the formation of diamonds and the relation to tectonic/structural events in the crust and mantle. Recent trends in diamond marketing indicate that prices for rough diamonds and polished goods were still rising up to the last quarter of 2008 and subsequently abruptly sank in line with the worldwide financial crisis. Most analysts predict that prices will rise again in the long term as the gap between supply and demand will widen because no new economic diamond discoveries have been made recently. The disparity between high rough and polished prices and low share prices of publicly traded diamond companies may be due to investors losing patience with the slow pace or absence of new promising discoveries and switching into shares of base metals and fertilizers for agriculture (potash and phosphates).

  13. Reactivation of landslides by surface subsidence from longwall mining

    SciTech Connect

    Iannacchione, A.T.; Ackman, T.E.

    1984-12-01

    Subsidence research by the US Bureau of Mines has identified and documented the occurrence of landslides over a longwall mining area in the Dunkard basin. Mining by longwall methods has been observed or produce a gradual surface subsidence profile of up to 60% of the thickness of the mined coal bed. The gradual subsidence of panels averaging 600 x 5000 ft (180 x 1525 m) can cause reactivation of older landslide deposits by decreasing the support to the landslide toe area. Examination of surficial features over a longwall mining area comprised of nine panels has led to the identification of several reactivated landslides. The two largest landslides occurred above a thin sandstone member with several associated springs. The largest landslides ranged from 100 to 300 ft (30 to 90 m) in length and from 100 to 200 ft (30 to 60 m) in width. Maximum scarp-slope displacements were approximately 7 ft (2 m). Less significant mass wasting was also observed over the longwall panels. Identification of landslides was accomplished through examination of premining aerial photographs and geologic field investigation. Characterization of reactivated zones was achieved through evaluation of current aerial 2-ft (0.6-m) surface contour map and field surveys. Recognition of problem areas will make civic and mining personnel aware of the landslide potential so that damage in such areas can be minimized.

  14. Environment-Adaptive Antipersonnel Mine Detection System - Advanced Mine Sweeper

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Toshio Fukuda; Yasuhisa Hasegawa; Kazuhiro Kosuge; Kiyoshi Komoriya; Fumihisa Kitagawa; Tomohiro Ikegami

    2006-01-01

    In this paper, we propose an environment-adaptive antipersonnel mine detection system called Advanced Mine Sweeper. Advanced Mine Sweeper is developed based on sensing technologies, access-control technologies and system integration technologies for safe and effective demining procedure after the Level II survey. Advanced Mine Sweeper consists of a sensing vehicle\\/unit, an access vehicle, and an assist vehicle. The sensing vehicle\\/unit is

  15. 2008 Macmillan Publishers Limited. All rights reserved. 2008 Macmillan Publishers Limited. All rights reserved. Negative impact of nitrogen deposition on

    E-print Network

    Cleveland, Cory

    release base cations, such as calcium and magnesium, neutralizing the increase in acidity. Once these base present results from a nitrogen deposition experiment that suggests that a long legacy of acid deposition associated with acid mine drainage soils. We show that increases in nitrogen deposition in the region result

  16. Production of oil from Intermountain West tar sands deposits

    SciTech Connect

    Glassett, J.M.; Glassett, J.A.

    1976-03-01

    Six tar sand deposits in the Intermountain West, each containing more than one billion barrels of oil in place, are identified. All of these deposits are in eastern Utah and contain a total of twenty-eight billion barrels of oil. The names of the six deposits arranged in descending order of desirability for large-scale surface-mining oil recovery operations are as follows: Sunnyside, Tar Sand Triangle, Asphalt Ridge, P.R. Spring, Circle Cliffs, and Hill Creek. An overview of each deposit is presented including geology, surface-mining variables, chemical processing variables, environmental aspects, and economics. A comparison of Utah tar sands and Athabasca, Alberta, Canada tar sands is also presented.

  17. Environmental Impact of the Helen, Research, and Chicago Mercury Mines on Water, Sediment, and Biota in the Upper Dry Creek Watershed, Lake County, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rytuba, James J.; Hothem, Roger L.; May, Jason T.; Kim, Christopher S.; Lawler, David; Goldstein, Daniel; Brussee, Brianne E.

    2009-01-01

    The Helen, Research, and Chicago mercury (Hg) deposits are among the youngest Hg deposits in the Coast Range Hg mineral belt and are located in the southwestern part of the Clear Lake volcanic field in Lake County, California. The mine workings and tailings are located in the headwaters of Dry Creek. The Helen Hg mine is the largest mine in the watershed having produced about 7,600 flasks of Hg. The Chicago and Research Hg mines produced only a small amount of Hg, less than 30 flasks. Waste rock and tailings have eroded from the mines, and mine drainage from the Helen and Research mines contributes Hg-enriched mine wastes to the headwaters of Dry Creek and contaminate the creek further downstream. The mines are located on federal land managed by the U.S. Bureau of Land Management (USBLM). The USBLM requested that the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) measure and characterize Hg and geochemical constituents in tailings, sediment, water, and biota at the Helen, Research, and Chicago mines and in Dry Creek. This report is made in response to the USBLM request to conduct a Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA - Removal Site Investigation (RSI). The RSI applies to removal of Hg-contaminated mine waste from the Helen, Research, and Chicago mines as a means of reducing Hg transport to Dry Creek. This report summarizes data obtained from field sampling of mine tailings, waste rock, sediment, and water at the Helen, Research, and Chicago mines on April 19, 2001, during a storm event. Further sampling of water, sediment, and biota at the Helen mine area and the upper part of Dry Creek was completed on July 15, 2003, during low-flow conditions. Our results permit a preliminary assessment of the mining sources of Hg and associated chemical constituents that could elevate levels of monomethyl Hg (MMeHg) in the water, sediment, and biota that are impacted by historic mining.

  18. String Mining in Bioinformatics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abouelhoda, Mohamed; Ghanem, Moustafa

    Sequence analysis is a major area in bioinformatics encompassing the methods and techniques for studying the biological sequences, DNA, RNA, and proteins, on the linear structure level. The focus of this area is generally on the identification of intra- and inter-molecular similarities. Identifying intra-molecular similarities boils down to detecting repeated segments within a given sequence, while identifying inter-molecular similarities amounts to spotting common segments among two or multiple sequences. From a data mining point of view, sequence analysis is nothing but string- or pattern mining specific to biological strings. For a long time, this point of view, however, has not been explicitly embraced neither in the data mining nor in the sequence analysis text books, which may be attributed to the co-evolution of the two apparently independent fields. In other words, although the word "data-mining" is almost missing in the sequence analysis literature, its basic concepts have been implicitly applied. Interestingly, recent research in biological sequence analysis introduced efficient solutions to many problems in data mining, such as querying and analyzing time series [49,53], extracting information from web pages [20], fighting spam mails [50], detecting plagiarism [22], and spotting duplications in software systems [14].

  19. String Mining in Bioinformatics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abouelhoda, Mohamed; Ghanem, Moustafa

    Sequence analysis is a major area in bioinformatics encompassing the methods and techniques for studying the biological sequences, DNA, RNA, and proteins, on the linear structure level. The focus of this area is generally on the identification of intra- and inter-molecular similarities. Identifying intra-molecular similarities boils down to detecting repeated segments within a given sequence, while identifying inter-molecular similarities amounts to spotting common segments among two or multiple sequences. From a data mining point of view, sequence analysis is nothing but string- or pattern mining specific to biological strings. For a long time, this point of view, however, has not been explicitly embraced neither in the data mining nor in the sequence analysis text books, which may be attributed to the co-evolution of the two apparently independent fields. In other words, although the word “data-mining” is almost missing in the sequence analysis literature, its basic concepts have been implicitly applied. Interestingly, recent research in biological sequence analysis introduced efficient solutions to many problems in data mining, such as querying and analyzing time series [49,53], extracting information from web pages [20], fighting spam mails [50], detecting plagiarism [22], and spotting duplications in software systems [14].

  20. Mining the earth

    SciTech Connect

    Young, J.E.

    1992-01-01

    Substances extracted from the earth - stone, iron, bronze - have been so critical to human development that historians name the ages of our past after them. But while scholars have carefully tracked human use of minerals, they have never accounted for the vast environmental damage incurred in mineral production. Few people would guess that a copper mining operation has removed a piece of Utah seven times the weight of all the material dug for the Panama Canal. Few would dream that mines and smelters take up to a tenth of all the energy used each year, or that the waste left by mining measures in the billions of tons - dwarfing the world's total accumulation of more familiar kinds of waste, such as municipal garbage. Indeed, more material is now stripped from the earth by mining than by all the natural erosion of the earth's rivers. The effects of mining operations on the environment are discussed under the following topics: minerals in the global economy, laying waste, at what cost cleaning up, and dipping out. It is concluded that in the long run, the most effective strategy for minimizing new damage is not merely to make mineral extraction cleaner, but to reduce the rich nations needs for virgin (non-recycled) minerals.

  1. Division of Oil, Gas, and Mining Permitting

    E-print Network

    Utah, University of

    John R. Baza DirectorCoal Minerals Abandoned Mine Reclamation Oil and Gas Board of Oil, Gas and Mining. #12;Utah Mined Land Reclamation Act · Established in 1975 · Utah Code §40-8-4, Definitions · "Mining in Title 40, Chapter 6, Board and Division of Oil, Gas and Mining. #12;Coal Mining and Reclamation

  2. Mine Dewatering Studies at Jwaneng Open Pit Diamond Mine - Botswana

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Benjamin Mafa

    The geological environment at Jwaneng Mine in Botswana is characterized by a complex faulting system that preceded the emplacement of kimberlite into the Transvaal sedimentary sequence. Mine dewatering studies at Jwaneng have previously focused on identifying water bearing structures on the faulting systems that transgress the current mine pit excavations and also on the hypothesis that dolomites occurring at depths

  3. Privacy-preserving data mining

    E-print Network

    Zhang, Nan

    2009-05-15

    , design principles, and implementation techniques for privacy-preserving data mining systems. We then discuss the key components of privacy-preserving data mining systems which include three protocols: data collection, inference control, and information...

  4. Coal and coal mine drainage

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Olem

    1984-01-01

    This review of 1983 literature covers the formation and effects of acid drainage from coal mines, coal cleaning wastes and coal transportation and storage. US environmental regulations related to coal mining which were proposed or adopted in 1983 are indicated.

  5. Coal and coal mine drainage

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Olem

    1982-01-01

    This review of recent literature covers the formation of coal mine drainage and its environmental effects, treatment and control of mine drainage, coal cleaning wastes, and coal transport and storage.

  6. Gravity in a Mine Shaft.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hall, Peter M.; Hall, David J.

    1995-01-01

    Discusses the effects of gravity, local density compared to the density of the earth, the mine shaft, centrifugal force, and air buoyancy on the weight of an object at the top and at the bottom of a mine shaft. (JRH)

  7. Minerals and mine drainage

    SciTech Connect

    Liang, H.C.; Thomson, B.M. [Tetra Technical Inc, Denver, CO (United States)

    2009-09-15

    A review of literature published in 2008 and early 2009 on research related to the production of acid mine drainage and/or in the dissolution of minerals as a result of mining, with special emphasis on the effects of these phenomena on the water quality in the surrounding environment, is presented. This review is divided into six sections: 1) Site Characterization and Assessment, 2) Protection, Prevention, and Restoration, 3) Toxicity Assessment, 4) Environmental Fate and Transport, 5) Biological Characterization, and 6) Treatment Technologies. Because there is much overlap in research areas associated with minerals and mine drainage, many papers presented in this review can be classified into more than one category, and the six sections should not be regarded as being mutually-exclusive, nor should they be thought of as being all-inclusive.

  8. Mine roof support plate

    SciTech Connect

    White, C.C.

    1981-02-10

    A support plate is disclosed for a mine roof including a substantially flat body engageable with the mine roof, the body having an enlarged central opening through which are passed one end of a roof bolt on which is threaded an expansion shell which is inserted into a mine roof opening. Ribs extend longitudinally of the flat body on both sides of the central opening for additional strength. The ribs are spaced a predetermined distance apart on opposite sides of the central opening. Centering members are provided on the body portion intermediate the ribs on opposite sides of the central opening, the centering members and ribs serving to center the washer and bolt portion of the bolt assembly.

  9. Tellurium, a guide to mineral deposits

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Watterson, J.R.; Gott, G.B.; Neuerburg, G.J.; Lakin, H.W.; Cathrall, J.B.

    1977-01-01

    Te dispersion patterns are useful in exploring for different types of mineral deposits and in providing additional information about known ore deposits. The Te content of rocks is given for five mining districts in the western United States: Coeur d'Alene, Idaho; Robinson, near Ely, Nevada; Montezuma, Colorado; Crater Creek area, Colorado; Cripple Creek, Colorado. Many of the analyses were obtained by use of a new analytical method sensitive to 0.001 ppm Te. The principal ore deposits in the Coeur d'Alene district, Idaho, are Pb-Zn-Ag replacement veins in Precambrian rocks of the Belt Supergroup. Te dispersion patterns show the outlines of the original mineral belts, the effects of intrusive events, the location of ore deposits, the displacements caused by post-ore faulting, and the borders of the 780-km2 district. The disseminated porphyry Cu deposits of the Robinson mining district, Nevada, are associated with Cretaceous quartz monzonite stocks that have intruded Palaeozoic carbonate rocks. Te is present in rock samples in concentrations as high as 10,000 ppm and forms a halo around the areas containing the Cu deposits. The alteration zones in the porphyry Mo district near Montezuma, Colorado, are developed around several small Tertiary intrusions occurring along a regional shear zone. Te haloes reflect the locations of porphyry intrusives, individual deposits and their ore shoots, and the pattern and intensity of adjacent alteration. The Te content of soils over the Montezuma stock is higher than, and varies independently from, the Te content of adjacent outcrops. Soils generally contain more Te than adjacent outcropping rocks. Soil may collect gaseous Te compounds from mineral deposits. The Crater Creek area is a northwestern extension of the Summitville mining district, Colorado. Te dispersion patterns radiate out from exposed Cu-Pb-Zn veins, from an outcrop of molybdenite stockwork veins and from associated iron-stained altered rock. Te haloes intensify exponentially with proximity to known ore and suggest the presence of Summitville-type chimney deposits. Most of the gold- and silver-telluride ore in the Cripple Creek district, Colorado, is found in fracture fillings within a volcanic subsidence basin. Haloes of Au, Ag and Te all define the mineralized portions of the fissure veins. ?? 1977.

  10. Seismic modeling of a rising mine water table

    SciTech Connect

    Dirk Orlowsky; Bobo Lehmann

    2007-01-15

    In former deep coal mining areas in Germany the mine water table is regulated by a water pump system such that the drinking water at the earth's surface is not influenced. For the modelling of possible changes at the earth's surface using the so called box model, a finite element model of the hydrogeologic situation in the Ruhr Area has been developed. To observe the depth of the mine water table usually old shafts or exploration drill holes are used at selected locations. Nevertheless, there are to less observation stations for a detailed modelling of the complete Ruhr Area so that additional observation locations are needed. To avoid the construction of expensive and complicated drill holes down to more than 1000 m depth an alternative technique to monitor the rising of the mine water table could be the time-lapse seismic (TLS) which is routinely used to monitor the effects of the exploitation of oil and gas deposits. It is expected, that the mine water table will not be detected directly as an additional reflector of seismic waves, due to the fact, that the impedance contrast between saturated carbonate rock and none saturated rock is too weak. Nevertheless, the reflectivity function of the layers in the underground will change, due to the water saturation process such that it might be possible to observe the rising of the mine water table using the TLS method. To define the requirements for the acquisition instrumentation and for the seismic field geometry extensive seismic modelling was performed to investigate, if it is possible to identify the rising of the mine water table. In a first step the influence of water saturation on the reflectivity and the velocities of seismic waves in carbonate rocks have to be determined. If the mine water table can be monitored, a direct input of the seismic results into a geological model should be possible to forecast critical changes at the surface. 5 refs.

  11. The environmental impact of mine wastes — Roles of microorganisms and their significance in treatment of mine wastes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ledin, M.; Pedersen, K.

    1996-10-01

    Mine wastes have been generated for several centuries, and mining activity has accelerated significantly during the 20th century. The mine wastes constitute a potential source of contamination to the environment, as heavy metals and acid are released in large amounts. A great variety of microorganisms has been found in mine wastes and microbiological processes are usually responsible for the environmental hazard created by mine wastes. However, microorganisms can also be used to retard the adverse impact of mine wastes on the environment. Conventionally, the mine drainage as well as the waste itself can be treated with alkali to increase pH and precipitate metals. The main drawback of this method is that it has to be continuously repeated to be fully effective. There may also be negative effects on beneficial microorganisms. Several other treatment methods have been developed to stop weathering processes thereby reducing the environmental impact of mine wastes. One approach has been to influence the waste deposit itself by reducing the transfer of oxygen and water to the waste. This can be achieved by covering the waste or by placing it under water. Vegetating the cover will probably also decrease the transfer of oxygen and water, and will give the deposit area a more aesthetical appearance. The other main approach to reduce the environmental impact of mine wastes is to treat the drainage water. Various methods aim at using microorganisms for this in natural or engineered systems. Sulfate-reducing bacteria, metal-transforming bacteria and metal accumulating microorganisms are some examples. Often, some kind of reactor design is needed to effectively control these processes. Recently, much interest has been focused on the use of natural or artificial wetlands for treatment since this generally is a low-cost and low-maintenance method. Bacterial sulfate-reduction and microbial metal accumulation are processes wanted in such systems. Few studies have dealt with long-term effects of wetland systems, but there are some indications that the wetland material has to be replaced for effective treatment. Furthermore, bacterial iron reduction may take place instead of sulfate-reduction in some wetlands. In general, the activity of microorganisms is neglected in the design of mine waste treatment systems, and the treatments are created merely from a technical point of view. This can result in situations where unexpected microbial processes take over, and, in the worst scenario, the overall effect is opposite to the desired.

  12. Predictive Data Mining: Practical Examples

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Slavco Velickov; Dimitri Solomatine

    The paper addresses some theoretical and practical aspects of data mining, focusing on predictive data mining, where two central types of prediction problems are discussed: classification and regression. Further accent is made on predictive data mining, where the time-stamped data greatly increase the dimensions and complexity of problem solving. The main goal is through processing of data (records from the

  13. Mine-Mouth Geyser Problem.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    de Nevers, Noel

    1982-01-01

    An oilwell drilling rig accidentally drilled into an underground salt mine, draining a lake and filling the mine, with water jetting out of the mine 400 feet into the air. An explanation of the jetting phenomenon is offered in terms of the laws of fluid dynamics, with supporting diagrams and calculations. (Author/JN)

  14. Soil Sampling Near Uranium Mine

    USGS Multimedia Gallery

    USGS Scientists Sarah Davis, Taylor Mills, and David Naftz collect soil samples near the Pinenut uranium mine. Mine features visible in the background include the gray ore stockpile at the far left, the head frame used to access the underground mine workings at mid left, and the detention pond conta...

  15. REMOTE SENSING AND MOUNTAINTOP MINING

    EPA Science Inventory

    Coal mining is Appalachia has undergone dramatic changes in the past decade. Modem mining practices know as Mountaintop Mining (MTM) and Valley Fills (VF) are at the center of an environmental and legal controversy that has spawned lawsuits and major environmental investigations....

  16. Subterranean drilling and slurry mining

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Bunnelle

    1977-01-01

    An apparatus is described for drilling and mining one or more layers of granular ore without withdrawing the apparatus from the well cavity between the drilling and mining phases. One or more mining nozzles direct a high pressure jet of liquid into a granular ore matrix to reduce the ore to a slurry which is thereafter pumped to the surface

  17. Humanitarian Consequences of Land Mines.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rutherford, Ken

    1997-01-01

    Investigates the human and economic consequences of the continuing use and abandonment of land mines. Discusses the reasons for the worldwide proliferation (over 85 million uncleared mines in at least 62 countries) and the legal complexities in curtailing their use. Includes a brief account by a land-mine victim. (MJP)

  18. Spiral mining for lunar volatiles

    Microsoft Academic Search

    H. H. Schmitt; G. L. Kulcinski; I. N. Sviatoslavsky; W. D. Carrier III

    1992-01-01

    Lunar spiral mining, extending outward from a periodically mobile central power and processing station represents an alternative for comparison with more traditional mining schemes. In this concept, a mining machine would separate regolith fines and extract the contained volatiles. Volatiles then would be pumped along the miner's support arm to the central station for refining and for export or storage.

  19. Statistical Data Mining Tutorials

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Moore, Andrew W., Ph.D.

    These tutorial, created by Professor Andrew Moore at Carnegie-Mellon University, cover a range of topics in statistical data mining "including the foundations of probability, the foundations of statistical data analysis, and most of the classic machine learning and data mining algorithms." Decision Trees, Information Gain, and Cross-Validation are just a few of the items presented here. Each topic contains a set of tutorial slides in PDF, excellent for converting into a classroom presentation or left as they are for a classroom handout or online learning resource.

  20. Under-mining health: environmental justice and mining in India.

    PubMed

    Saha, Shubhayu; Pattanayak, Subhrendu K; Sills, Erin O; Singha, Ashok K

    2011-01-01

    Despite the potential for economic growth, extractive mineral industries can impose negative health externalities in mining communities. We estimate the size of these externalities by combining household interviews with mine location and estimating statistical functions of respiratory illness and malaria among villagers living along a gradient of proximity to iron-ore mines in rural India. Two-stage regression modeling with cluster corrections suggests that villagers living closer to mines had higher respiratory illness and malaria-related workday loss, but the evidence for mine workers is mixed. These findings contribute to the thin empirical literature on environmental justice and public health in developing countries. PMID:21130678

  1. A simplified economic filter for open-pit mining and heap-leach recovery of copper in the United States

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Long, Keith R.; Singer, Donald A.

    2001-01-01

    Determining the economic viability of mineral deposits of various sizes and grades is a critical task in all phases of mineral supply, from land-use management to mine development. This study evaluates two simple tools for estimating the economic viability of porphyry copper deposits mined by open-pit, heap-leach methods when only limited information on these deposits is available. These two methods are useful for evaluating deposits that either (1) are undiscovered deposits predicted by a mineral resource assessment, or (2) have been discovered but for which little data has been collected or released. The first tool uses ordinary least-squared regression analysis of cost and operating data from selected deposits to estimate a predictive relationship between mining rate, itself estimated from deposit size, and capital and operating costs. The second method uses cost models developed by the U.S. Bureau of Mines (Camm, 1991) updated using appropriate cost indices. We find that the cost model method works best for estimating capital costs and the empirical model works best for estimating operating costs for mines to be developed in the United States.

  2. Geology of the Copper King Mine area, Prairie Divide, Larimer County, Colorado (Part 1)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sims, Paul Kibler; Phair, George

    1952-01-01

    The Copper King mine, in Larimer County, Colo., in the northern part of the Front Range of Colorado, was operated for a short time prior to World War II for copper and zino, but since 1949, when pitchblende was discovered on the mine dump, it has been worked for uranium. The bedrock in the mine area consists predominantly of pre-Cambrian (Silver Plums) granite with minor migmatite and metasediments--biotite-quartz-plagioclase gneiss, biotite schist, quartzite, amphibolite, amphibole skarn, and biotite skols. The metasediments occur as inclusions that trend northeast in the granite. This trend is essentially parallel to the prevailing foliation in the granite. At places the metasediments are crosscut sharply by the granite to form angular, partly discordant, steep-walled bodies in the granite. Faults, confined to a narrow zone that extends through the mine, cut both the pre-Cambrian rocks and the contained sulfide deposits. The Copper King fault, a breccia zone, contains a deposit of pitchblende; the other faults are believed to be later than the ore. The two types of mineral deposits--massive sulfide and pitchblende deposits--in the mine area, are of widely different mineralogy, age, and origin. The massive sulfide deposits are small and consist of pyrite, sphalerite, chalcopyrite, pyrrhotite, and in places magnetite in amphibole skarn, mice skols, and quartzite. The deposit at the Copper King mine has yielded small quantities of high-grade sphalerite ore. The massive sulfides are pyrometasomatic deposits of pre-Cambrian age. The pitchblende at the Copper King mine is principally in the Copper King vein, a tight, hard breccia zone that cuts through both granite and the massive sulfide deposit. A small part of the pitchblende is in small fractures near the vein and in boxwork pyrite adjacent to the vein; the post-ore faults, close to their intersection with the Copper King vein, contain some radioactive material, but elsewhere, so far as is known, they are barren. The pitchblende in the deposit forms a steeply plunging ore shoot that has a horizontal length of more than 50 feet and a vertical height of about 85 feet. The thickness of the ore shoot averages about 2 feet, but it ranges from a feather edge to about 4 feet. The hard pitch-blende is intimately intergrown with siderite; other gangue minerals include pyrite, quartz, and finely comminuted fragments of the wall rocks. The vein was repeatedly reopened during mineral deposition as shown by several stages of brecciation and recommended by the vein matter. The pitchblende deposit probably formed at intermediate temperatures and depths and, according to the Pb/U ratio, is about 60 million years old--an early Tertiary age.

  3. Solid Particle Erosion Studies of Weld Hardfacing Deposits

    Microsoft Academic Search

    S. G. Sapate; A. V. Rama Rao; N. K. Garg

    2000-01-01

    Solid particle erosion studies were carried out on five commercial weld hardfacing alloys deposited by manual metal arc and flux cored arc-welding methods. These alloys were low and high chromium cast irons, which are widely used in cement plants, steel industries and mining industries for protection against wear by erosion. Erosive wear tests were conducted using industrial erodents like cement

  4. Using geology to control geostatistics in the Hellyer deposit

    Microsoft Academic Search

    G. J. McArthur

    1988-01-01

    The Hellyer orebody, a polymetallic massive sulfide deposit, was discovered in western Tasmania by Aberfoyle in 1983. Delineation diamond drilling was carried out in 1984 on a nominal 50-m square grid pattern to outline the resource. Resource estimation methods were influenced by the requirement to develop a regular block model for conceptual mine planning studies. Detailed geological interpretation indicates that

  5. A Geochemical and Geophysical Characterization of Sulfide Mine Ponds at the Iberian Pyrite Belt (Spain)

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Tomás Martín-Crespo; Silvia Martín-Velázquez; David Gómez-Ortiz; Javier Lillo-Ramos

    2011-01-01

    This work presents the results of a geochemical and geophysical characterization of the Monte Romero and La Naya mine ponds,\\u000a belonging to the Cueva de la Mora and Riotinto mine districts, respectively, based on mineralogical, geochemical and geophysical\\u000a techniques. In order to obtain a representative environmental characterization, two deposits showing different mineralogies,\\u000a physico-chemical parameters, chemical compositions of tailings and pond

  6. Mining Linguistically Interpreted Texts

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Cassiana Fagundes da Silva; Renata Vieira; Paulo Quaresma

    This paper proposes and evaluates the use of linguistic information in the pre-processing phase of text mining tasks. We present several experiments comparing our proposal for selection of terms based on linguistic knowledge with usual techniques applied in the field. The results show that part of speech information is useful for the pre-processing phase of text categorization and clustering, as

  7. Contextual Text Mining

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mei, Qiaozhu

    2009-01-01

    With the dramatic growth of text information, there is an increasing need for powerful text mining systems that can automatically discover useful knowledge from text. Text is generally associated with all kinds of contextual information. Those contexts can be explicit, such as the time and the location where a blog article is written, and the…

  8. Lunabotics Mining Competition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mueller, Rob; Murphy, Gloria

    2010-01-01

    This slide presentation describes a competition to design a lunar robot (lunabot) that can be controlled either remotely or autonomously, isolated from the operator, and is designed to mine a lunar aggregate simulant. The competition is part of a systems engineering curriculum. The 2010 competition winners in five areas of the competition were acknowledged, and the 2011 competition was announced.

  9. Crowd Mining Yael Amsterdamer

    E-print Network

    Milo, Tova

    , micro-economists, journalists, marketers, public health specialists, and politicians alike routinely alternative baseline algorithms. Categories and Subject Descriptors H.2.8 [Database Applications]: Data mining individuals about their daily life are costly to implement, and moreover, it is often hard to know which

  10. Mining Behavior Graphs for \\

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Chao Liu; Xifeng Yan; Hwanjo Yu; Jiawei Han; Philip S. Yu

    2005-01-01

    Analyzing the executions of a buggy software program is es- sentially a data mining process. Although many interesting methods have been developed to trace crashing bugs (such as memory violation and core dumps), it is still difficult to analyze noncrashing bugs (such as logical errors). In this paper, we develop a novel method to classify the structured traces of program

  11. Mining outer space

    Microsoft Academic Search

    M. J. Gaffey; T. B. McCord

    1977-01-01

    The need to develop new mineral resources as terrestrial supplies are depleted could lead to mining efforts in outer space, where other bodies can be found with materials similar to those of the earth. The high cost of direct sampling requires that earth-based observations be made first, followed by unmanned flights and landing missions. The surface composition of over 100

  12. Iowa State Mining and Mineral Resources Research Institute

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-08-01

    This final report describes the activities of the Iowa State Mining and Mineral Resources Research Institute (ISMMRRI) at Iowa State University for the period July 1, 1989, to June 30, 1990. Activities include research in mining- and mineral-related areas, education and training of scientists and engineers in these fields, administration of the Institute, and cooperative interactions with industry, government agencies, and other research centers. During this period, ISMMRRI has supported research efforts to: (1) Investigate methods of leaching zinc from sphalerite-containing ores. (2) Study the geochemistry and geology of an Archean gold deposit and of a gold-telluride deposit. (3) Enchance how-quality aggregates for use in construction. (4) Pre-clean coal by triboelectric charging in a fluidized-bed. (5) Characterize the crystal/grain alignment during processing of yttrium-barium-copper-perovskite (1-2-3) superconductors. (5) Study the fluid inclusion properties of a fluorite district. (6) Study the impacts of surface mining on community planning. (7) Assess the hydrophobicity of coal and pyrite for beneficiation. (8) Investigate the use of photoacoustic absorption spectroscopy for monitoring unburnt carbon in the exhaust gas from coal-fired boilers. The education and training program continued within the interdepartmental graduate minor in mineral resources includes courses in such areas as mining methods, mineral processing, industrial minerals, extractive metallurgy, coal science and technology, and reclamation of mined land. In addition, ISMMRRI hosted the 3rd International Conference on Processing and Utilization of High-Sulfur Coals in Ames, Iowa. The Institute continues to interact with industry in order to foster increased cooperation between academia and the mining and mineral community.

  13. A jewel in the desert: BHP Billiton's San Juan underground mine

    SciTech Connect

    Buchsbaum, L.

    2007-12-15

    The Navajo Nation is America's largest native American tribe by population and acreage, and is blessed with large tracks of good coal deposits. BHP Billiton's New Mexico Coal Co. is the largest in the Navajo regeneration area. The holdings comprise the San Juan underground mine, the La Plata surface mine, now in reclamation, and the expanding Navajo surface mine. The article recounts the recent history of the mines. It stresses the emphasis on sensitivity to and helping to sustain tribal culture, and also on safety. San Juan's longwall system is unique to the nation. It started up as an automated system from the outset. Problems caused by hydrogen sulfide are being tackled. San Juan has a bleederless ventilation system to minimise the risk of spontaneous combustion of methane and the atmospheric conditions in the mine are heavily monitored, especially within the gob areas. 3 photos.

  14. A Case-Based Data Mining Platform

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Xingwen Wang; Joshua Zhexue Huang

    2006-01-01

    \\u000a Data mining practice in industry heavily depends on experienced data mining professionals to provide solutions. Normal business\\u000a users cannot easily use data mining tools to solve their business problems, because of the complexity of data mining process\\u000a and data mining tools. In this paper, we propose a case-based data mining platform, which reuses the knowledge captured in\\u000a past data mining

  15. Multisource causal data mining

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woodley, Robert; Gosnell, Michael; Shallenberger, Kevin

    2012-06-01

    Analysts are faced with mountains of data, and finding that relevant piece of information is the proverbial needle in a haystack, only with dozens of haystacks. Analysis tools that facilitate identifying causal relationships across multiple data sets are sorely needed. 21st Century Systems, Inc. (21CSi) has initiated research called Causal-View, a causal datamining visualization tool, to address this challenge. Causal-View is built on an agent-enabled framework. Much of the processing that Causal-View will do is in the background. When a user requests information, Data Extraction Agents launch to gather information. This initial search is a raw, Monte Carlo type search designed to gather everything available that may have relevance to an individual, location, associations, and more. This data is then processed by Data- Mining Agents. The Data-Mining Agents are driven by user supplied feature parameters. If the analyst is looking to see if the individual frequents a known haven for insurgents he may request information on his last known locations. Or, if the analyst is trying to see if there is a pattern in the individual's contacts, the mining agent can be instructed with the type and relevance of the information fields to look at. The same data is extracted from the database, but the Data Mining Agents customize the feature set to determine causal relationships the user is interested in. At this point, a Hypothesis Generation and Data Reasoning Agents take over to form conditional hypotheses about the data and pare the data, respectively. The newly formed information is then published to the agent communication backbone of Causal- View to be displayed. Causal-View provides causal analysis tools to fill the gaps in the causal chain. We present here the Causal-View concept, the initial research into data mining tools that assist in forming the causal relationships, and our initial findings.

  16. Example Building Damage Caused by Mining Exploitation in Disturbed Rock Mass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Florkowska, Lucyna

    2013-06-01

    Issues concerning protection of buildings against the impact of underground coal mining pose significant scientific and engineering challenges. In Poland, where mining is a potent and prominent industry assuring domestic energy security, regions within reach of mining influences are plenty. Moreover, due to their industrial character they are also densely built-up areas. Because minerals have been extracted on an industrial scale in majority of those areas for many years, the rock mass structure has been significantly disturbed. Hence, exploitation of successive layers of multi-seam deposits might cause considerable damage - both in terms of surface and existing infrastructure networks. In the light of those facts, the means of mining and building prevention have to be improved on a regular basis. Moreover, they have to be underpinned by reliable analyses holistically capturing the comprehensive picture of the mining, geotechnical and constructional situation of structures. Scientific research conducted based on observations and measurements of mining-induced strain in buildings is deployed to do just that. Presented in this paper examples of damage sustained by buildings armed with protection against mining influences give an account of impact the mining exploitation in disturbed rock mass can have. This paper is based on analyses of mining damage to church and Nursing Home owned by Evangelical Augsburg Parish in Bytom-Miechowice. Neighbouring buildings differ in the date they were built, construction, building technology, geometry of the building body and fitted protection against mining damage. Both the buildings, however, have sustained lately significant deformation and damage caused by repeated mining exploitation. Selected damage has been discussed hereunder. The structures have been characterised, their current situation and mining history have been outlined, which have taken their toll on character and magnitude of damage. Description has been supplemented with photographic documentation.

  17. Active oil seep at Nevada gold mine holds intrigue for more exploration

    SciTech Connect

    Pinnell, M.L.; Blake, J.G. (Pioneer Oil and Gas, Midvale, UT (US)); Hulen, J.B. (Univ. of Utah Research Inst., Salt Lake City, UT (US))

    1991-07-15

    This paper reports on an active oil seep has been discovered in one of Nevada's famous Carlin-type low grade disseminated gold deposits. This unique seep, at the Yankee gold mine in White Pine County, may have important implications for both oil and gas and gold exploration in the Basin and Range province of the western U.S. The open pit Yankee mine, near the western margin of Long Valley, exploits one of numerous Carlin-type gold ore bodies in the alligator Ridge mining district; all are currently owned and operated by USMX Corp.

  18. Uranium deposits of Canada

    SciTech Connect

    Evans, E.L.

    1986-01-01

    Topics covered in this book include: the history, early Aphebian conglomerate-hosted deposits; proterozoic deposits hosted by folded, metamorphosed rocks; Hudsonion classical vein deposits, Saskatchewan unconformity-associated and sedimentary-hosted deposits of Helikian age; other Helikian unconformity-associated and sedimentary-hosted rocks; and Phanerozoic deposits.

  19. Geochemical characterization of acid mine lakes in northwest Turkey and their effect on the environment.

    PubMed

    Yucel, Deniz Sanliyuksel; Baba, Alper

    2013-04-01

    Mining activity generates a large quantity of mine waste. The potential hazard of mine waste depends on the host mineral. The tendency of mine waste to produce acid mine drainage (AMD) containing potentially toxic metals depends on the amounts of sulfide, carbonate minerals, and trace-element concentrations found in ore deposits. The acid mine process is one of the most significant environmental challenges and a major source of water pollution worldwide. AMD and its effects were studied in northwest Turkey where there are several sedimentary and hydrothermal mineral deposits that have been economically extracted. The study area is located in Can county of Canakkale province. Canakkale contains marine, lagoon, and lake sediments precipitated with volcanoclastics that occurred as a result of volcanism, which was active during various periods from the Upper Eocene to Plio-Quaternary. Can county is rich in coal with a total lignite reserve >100 million tons and contains numerous mines that were operated by private companies and later abandoned without any remediation. As a result, human intervention in the natural structure and topography has resulted in large open pits and deterioration in these areas. Abandoned open pit mines typically fill with water from runoff and groundwater discharge, producing artificial lakes. Acid drainage waters from these mines have resulted in the degradation of surface-water quality around Can County. The average pH and electrical conductivity of acid mine lakes (AMLs) in this study were found to be 3.03 and 3831.33 ?S cm(-1), respectively. Total iron (Fe) and aluminum (Al) levels were also found to be high (329.77 and 360.67 mg L(-1), respectively). The results show that the concentration of most elements, such as Fe and Al in particular, exceed national and international water-quality standards. PMID:23223936

  20. Searching for Pre-2004 Tsunami Deposits in Thailand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tuttle, M.; Alam, S.; Atwater, B.; Charoentitirat, T.; Charusiri, P.; Choowong, M.; Fernando, S.; Jankaew, K.; Jittanoon, V.; Kongko, W.; Maxcia, C.; Pailoplee, S.; Phantuwongraj, S.; Rajendran, K.; Rhodes, B.; Srichan, N.; Tejakusuma, I.; Yulianto, E.

    2007-05-01

    We found only one candidate for a pre-2004 tsunami deposit during a ten-day search in July 2006 of four coastal sites in Phangnga Province. Although our initial field effort was limited, the paucity of pre-2004 tsunami deposits suggests that either there have been few Late Holocene tsunamis like the 2004 event or that the identification of paleotsunami deposits will be challenging in this region. Our investigations at Ban Bang Neang, Ban Lang Ong, Ban Nauk Nai, and Khlong Phru Sai involved examining soils and sediments 30 to 250 cm below the surface in cutbank exposures, gouge-core samples, and excavations. We targeted swales between beach ridges in areas undisturbed by tin mining and where tsunami deposits might have accumulated and been preserved. As shown in previous studies, the deposits of the 2004 tsunami extend as much as 1.5 km inland, thin over high ground, and thicken in swales. The deposits are composed of 1 to 4 beds, ranging from coarse to very fine sand, that commonly fine upward and locally contain parallel laminations. Where estuaries are relatively unprotected by mangroves, the 2004 tsunami deposits extend farther inland. Where mangroves fringe estuaries for 100s of meters, the deposits are concentrated in areas of mangrove damage. Crabs have already destroyed much of the tsunami deposits by mixing it with underlying peaty soil. At Ban Nauk Nai, we found a candidate for a pre-2004 tsunami deposit about 1.1 km inland at the back edge of the coastal plain adjacent to a steep hillslope. The deposit, identified over a distance of 60 meters, consists of a 10-cm-thick, silty, fining-upward coarse to fine sand about 25 cm below the bottom of a shallow pond and the adjoining area. In the same area, the overlying 6 to 13- cm-thick 2004 tsunami deposit consists of a normally graded fine to very fine sand. At the other sites, we found coarse, medium, and fine sand beds typical of coastal plain beach deposits. Although tsunami deposits may occur within the beach deposits, we were not able to identify any with confidence. In future searches, it may be beneficial to target natural ponds near upland areas where accumulation of organics and fines may help to separate tsunami deposits from other sandy deposits. Our findings suggest that the apparent scarcity of pre- 2004 tsunami deposits in Phangnga Province may be due in part to extensive placer mining of the coastal plain, bioturbation of mangrove soils, and difficulty in distinguishing tsunami from beach deposits.

  1. Geochemical and mineralogical characterization of the abandoned Valzinco (lead-zinc) and Mitchell (gold) mine sites prior to reclamation, Spotsylvania County, Virginia

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hammarstrom, Jane M.; Johnson, Adam N.; Seal, Robert R., II; Meier, Allen L.; Briggs, Paul L.; Piatak, Nadine M.

    2006-01-01

    The Virginia gold-pyrite belt, part of the central Virginia volcanic-plutonic belt, hosts numerous abandoned metal mines. The belt extends from about 50 km south of Washington, D.C., for approximately 175 km to the southwest into central Virginia. The rocks that comprise the belt include metamorphosed volcanic and clastic (noncarbonate) sedimentary rocks that were originally deposited during the Ordovician). Deposits that were mined can be classified into three broad categories: 1. volcanic-associated massive sulfide deposits, 2. low-sulfide quartz-gold vein deposits, 3. gold placer deposits, which result from weathering of the vein deposits The massive sulfide deposits were historically mined for iron and pyrite (sulfur), zinc, lead, and copper but also yielded byproduct gold and silver. The most intensely mineralized and mined section of the belt is southwest of Fredericksburg, in the Mineral district of Louisa and Spotsylvania counties. The Valzinco Piatak lead-zinc mine and the Mitchell gold prospect are abandoned sites in Spotsylvania County. As a result of environmental impacts associated with historic mining, both sites were prioritized for reclamation under the Virginia Orphaned Land Program administered by the Virginia Department of Mines, Minerals, and Energy (VDMME). This report summarizes geochemical data for all solid sample media, along with mineralogical data, and results of weathering experiments on Valzinco tailings and field experiments on sediment accumulation in Knights Branch. These data provide a framework for evaluating water-rock interactionsand geoenvironmental signatures of long-abandoned mines developed in massive sulfide deposits and low-sulfide gold-quartz vein deposits in the humid temperate ecosystem domain in the eastern United States.

  2. AS A MINING ENGINEER Mining provides the raw materials and energy resources needed to sustain modern civilization. Mining Engineers

    E-print Network

    Simons, Jack

    AS A MINING ENGINEER Mining provides the raw materials and energy resources needed to sustain modern civilization. Mining Engineers are trained to determine the safest most sustainable way to remove. IMAGINE IMAGINE Careers · Mining Engineer · Manager of Mine Technical Services · Manager of Operations

  3. 30 CFR 77.1712 - Reopening mines; notification; inspection prior to mining.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Reopening mines; notification; inspection prior to mining...Section 77.1712 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR COAL MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH MANDATORY SAFETY...

  4. 30 CFR 77.1712 - Reopening mines; notification; inspection prior to mining.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Reopening mines; notification; inspection prior to mining...Section 77.1712 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR COAL MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH MANDATORY SAFETY...

  5. 30 CFR 77.1712 - Reopening mines; notification; inspection prior to mining.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Reopening mines; notification; inspection prior to mining...Section 77.1712 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR COAL MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH MANDATORY SAFETY...

  6. 30 CFR 49.4 - Alternative mine rescue capability for special mining conditions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 2011-07-01 false Alternative mine rescue capability for special mining conditions... Section 49.4 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR EDUCATION AND TRAINING MINE RESCUE TEAMS § 49.4...

  7. 30 CFR 77.1712 - Reopening mines; notification; inspection prior to mining.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Reopening mines; notification; inspection prior to mining...Section 77.1712 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR COAL MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH MANDATORY SAFETY...

  8. 30 CFR 77.1712 - Reopening mines; notification; inspection prior to mining.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Reopening mines; notification; inspection prior to mining...Section 77.1712 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR COAL MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH MANDATORY SAFETY...

  9. 76 FR 21265 - Interest on Deposits; Deposit Insurance Coverage

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-04-15

    ...FEDERAL DEPOSIT INSURANCE CORPORATION 12 CFR Parts 329 and 330 RIN 3064-AD78 Interest on Deposits; Deposit Insurance Coverage AGENCY: Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation (FDIC). ACTION: Notice...

  10. Freshwater diatomite deposits in the western United States

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wallace, Alan R.; Frank, David G.; Founie, Alan

    2006-01-01

    Freshwater diatomite deposits in the Western United States are found in lake beds that formed millions of years ago. These diatom-rich sediments are among the Nation's largest commercial diatomite deposits. Each deposit contains billions of tiny diatom skeletons, which are widely used for filtration, absorption, and abrasives. New studies by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) are revealing how ancient lakes in the Western States produced such large numbers of diatoms. These findings can be used by both land-use managers and mining companies to better evaluate diatomite resources in the region.

  11. Using imaging spectroscopy to map acidic mine waste

    SciTech Connect

    Swayze, G.A.; Smith, K.S.; Clark, R.N. [and others] [and others

    2000-01-01

    The process of pyrite oxidation at the surface of mine waste may produce acidic water that is gradually neutralized as it drains away from the waste, depositing different Fe-bearing secondary minerals in roughly concentric zones that emanate from mine-waste piles. These Fe-bearing minerals are indicators of the geochemical conditions under which they form. Airborne and orbital imaging spectrometers can be used to map these mineral zones because each of these Fe-bearing secondary minerals is spectrally unique. In this way, imaging spectroscopy can be used to rapidly screen entire mining districts for potential sources of surface acid drainage and to detect acid producing minerals in mine waste or unmined rock outcrops. Spectral data from the AVIRIS instrument were used to evaluate mine waste at the California Gulch Superfund Site near Leadville, CO. Laboratory leach tests of surface samples show that leachate pH is most acidic and metals most mobile in samples from the inner jarosite zone and that leachate pH is near-neutral and metals least mobile in samples from the outer goethite zone.

  12. Technology experience and economics of oil shale mining in Estonia

    SciTech Connect

    Fraiman, J.; Kuzmiv, I. [Estonian Oil Shale State Co., Jyhvi (Estonia). Scientific Research Center

    1995-11-01

    The exhaustion of fuel-energy resources became an evident problem of the European continent in the 1960s. Careful utilization of their own reserves of coal, oil, and gas (Germany, France, Spain) and assigned shares of imports of these resources make up the strategy of economic development of the European countries. The expansion of oil shale utilization is the most topical problem. The experience of mining oil shale deposits in Estonia and Russia, in terms of the practice and the economic results, is reviewed in this article. The room-and-pillar method of underground mining and the open-cut technology of clearing the ground ensure the fertility of a soil. The economics of underground and open pit oil shale mines is analyzed in terms of natural, organizational, and technical factors. These analyses are used in the planning and management of oil shale mining enterprises. The perspectives of the oil shale mining industry of Estonia and the economic expediency of multiproduction are examined. Recommendations and guidelines for future industrial utilization of oil shale are given in the summary.

  13. Iowa State Mining and Mineral Resources Research Institute

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-08-01

    During the past year, the Iowa State Mining and Mineral Resources Research Institute has worked diligently to further the objectives of the Mineral Institute Program (ISMMRRI). The majority of our Allotment Grant funding goes toward research and education of graduate students within the participating departments of the university. It is our goal to encourage graduate students in diverse fields such as agronomy, engineering, geology, landscape architecture, and many others to pursue a career in mining- and mineral-related fields by preparing them to either enter the private or public sectors. During the 1991--1992 academic year, ISMMRRI granted research assistantships to 12 graduate students to perform research in topics relating to mineral exploration, extractive metallurgy, characterization and processing, mining engineering, fuel science, mineral waste management, mineral handling, and mineral-energy utilization. Research areas include the following: Geochemical modeling of gold and gold-telluride deposits; Study of shale strength to predict and reduce roof falls in mines; Characterization of the combustion performance of chemically-cleaned coal; Predicting the performance of coal cleaning by selective agglomeration; Temperature sensitive surfactants for surface-based coal cleaning; Conversion of sulfur-dioxide wastes to hydrochloric acid; Evaluating the mechanical properties of coal filter cake; Recovery of metal values from mining wastesusing bioleaching; Coal beneficiation utilizing triboelectric charging in a fast fluidized bed; and Improved impact crushing of limestone.

  14. Assessment of practicality of remote sensing techniques for a study of the effects of strip mining in Alabama

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hughes, T. H.; Dillion, A. C., III; White, J. R., Jr.; Drummond, S. E., Jr.; Hooks, W. G.

    1975-01-01

    Because of the volume of coal produced by strip mining, the proximity of mining operations, and the diversity of mining methods (e.g. contour stripping, area stripping, multiple seam stripping, and augering, as well as underground mining), the Warrior Coal Basin seemed best suited for initial studies on the physical impact of strip mining in Alabama. Two test sites, (Cordova and Searles) representative of the various strip mining techniques and environmental problems, were chosen for intensive studies of the correlation between remote sensing and ground truth data. Efforts were eventually concentrated in the Searles Area, since it is more accessible and offers a better opportunity for study of erosional and depositional processes than the Cordova Area.

  15. Climax-Type Porphyry Molybdenum Deposits

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ludington, Steve; Plumlee, Geoffrey S.

    2009-01-01

    Climax-type porphyry molybdenum deposits, as defined here, are extremely rare; thirteen deposits are known, all in western North America and ranging in age from Late Cretaceous to mainly Tertiary. They are consistently found in a postsubduction, extensional tectonic setting and are invariably associated with A-type granites that formed after peak activity of a magmatic cycle. The deposits consist of ore shells of quartz-molybdenite stockwork veins that lie above and surrounding the apices of cupola-like, highly evolved, calc-alkaline granite and subvolcanic rhyolite-porphyry bodies. These plutons are invariably enriched in fluorine (commonly >1 percent), rubidium (commonly >500 parts per million), and niobium-tantalum (Nb commonly >50 parts per million). The deposits are relatively high grade (typically 0.1-0.3 percent Mo) and may be very large (typically 100-1,000 million tons). Molybdenum, as MoS2, is the primary commodity in all known deposits. The effect on surface-water quality owing to natural influx of water or sediment from a Climax-type mineralized area can extend many kilometers downstream from the mineralized area. Waste piles composed of quartz-silica-pyrite altered rocks will likely produce acidic drainage waters. The potential exists for concentrations of fluorine or rare metals in surface water and groundwater to exceed recommended limits for human consumption near both mined and unmined Climax-type deposits.

  16. Text Mining for Neuroscience

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tirupattur, Naveen; Lapish, Christopher C.; Mukhopadhyay, Snehasis

    2011-06-01

    Text mining, sometimes alternately referred to as text analytics, refers to the process of extracting high-quality knowledge from the analysis of textual data. Text mining has wide variety of applications in areas such as biomedical science, news analysis, and homeland security. In this paper, we describe an approach and some relatively small-scale experiments which apply text mining to neuroscience research literature to find novel associations among a diverse set of entities. Neuroscience is a discipline which encompasses an exceptionally wide range of experimental approaches and rapidly growing interest. This combination results in an overwhelmingly large and often diffuse literature which makes a comprehensive synthesis difficult. Understanding the relations or associations among the entities appearing in the literature not only improves the researchers current understanding of recent advances in their field, but also provides an important computational tool to formulate novel hypotheses and thereby assist in scientific discoveries. We describe a methodology to automatically mine the literature and form novel associations through direct analysis of published texts. The method first retrieves a set of documents from databases such as PubMed using a set of relevant domain terms. In the current study these terms yielded a set of documents ranging from 160,909 to 367,214 documents. Each document is then represented in a numerical vector form from which an Association Graph is computed which represents relationships between all pairs of domain terms, based on co-occurrence. Association graphs can then be subjected to various graph theoretic algorithms such as transitive closure and cycle (circuit) detection to derive additional information, and can also be visually presented to a human researcher for understanding. In this paper, we present three relatively small-scale problem-specific case studies to demonstrate that such an approach is very successful in replicating a neuroscience expert's mental model of object-object associations entirely by means of text mining. These preliminary results provide the confidence that this type of text mining based research approach provides an extremely powerful tool to better understand the literature and drive novel discovery for the neuroscience community.

  17. Metal-residence sites in mine tailings in the Magdalena District, New Mexico, USA

    SciTech Connect

    Larocque, A.C.L. [Univ. of Manitoba, Winnipeg, Manitoba (Canada). Dept. of Geological Sciences; Chapin, C.E. [New Mexico Bureau of Mines and Mineral Resources, Socorro, NM (United States); Laughlin, A.W. [ICF Kaiser Ltd., Los Alamos, NM (United States); Hickmott, D. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States)

    1996-05-01

    Mineralization in the Kelly Mining Camp is hosted by the Mississippian Kelly Limestone and comprises Zn-Pb skarn, replacement, and vein deposits related to Tertiary intrusive activity. The ore consists of primary (hypogene) sulfide mineralization which has been oxidized near surface to form secondary (supergene) mineralization. A zone of secondary sulfide-enrichment separates the sulfide and oxide ores. Mine tailings in the camp contain primary sulfide, oxide and gangue minerals, secondary (supergene) minerals formed during weathering of the primary ore, and tertiary minerals formed by alteration of hypogene and supergene assemblages after deposition in the tailings impoundment.

  18. The Rammelsberg massive sulphide Cu-Zn-Pb-Ba-Deposit, Germany: an example of sediment-hosted, massive sulphide mineralisation

    Microsoft Academic Search

    D. Large; E. Walcher

    1999-01-01

    The Rammelsberg polymetallic massive sulphide deposit was the basis of mining activity for nearly 1000?y before finally closing\\u000a in 1988. The deposit is hosted by Middle Devonian pelitic sediments in the Rhenohercynian terrane of the Variscan Orogen.\\u000a The deposit consists of two main orebodies that have been intensely deformed. Deformation obscures the original depositional\\u000a relationships, but the regional setting as

  19. Data Mining Architectures - A Comparative Study

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Thomas Thomas; Sanjeev Jayakumar; B. Muthukumaran

    2001-01-01

    Data mining is the process of deriving knowledge from data. The architecture of a data mining system plays a significant role in the efficiency with which data is mined. It is probably as important as the algorithms used for the mining process. CRITIKAL is a three-tier data mining architecture consisting of Client, Middle tier and the Data Warehouse. The architecture

  20. Data Mining and Text Mining for Science & Technology Research

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Edda Leopold; Michael May; Gerhard Paaß

    The goal of the paper is to give an overview on the state of the art of data mining and text mining approaches which are useful\\u000a for bibliometrics and patent databases. The paper explains the basics of data mining in a non-technical manner. Basic approaches\\u000a from statistics and machine learning are introduced in order to clarify the groundwork of data

  1. www.miningengineeringmagazine.com Mining engineering FEBRUARY 2014 33 Student Mine Rescue Training

    E-print Network

    www.miningengineeringmagazine.com Mining engineering FEBRUARY 2014 33 Student Mine Rescue Training Student mine rescue in today's mining engineering curriculum by Nicole R. Henderson, Helmut Mischo School of Mines, and Helmut Mischo, member SME, is professor and mine manager at TU Bergakademie Freiberg

  2. Mining with microbes

    SciTech Connect

    Rawlings., D.E. [Univ. of Cape Town, Rondebosch (South Africa)] [Univ. of Cape Town, Rondebosch (South Africa); Silver, S. [Univ. of Illinois, Chicago, IL (United States)] [Univ. of Illinois, Chicago, IL (United States)

    1995-08-01

    Microbes are playing increasingly important roles in commercial mining operations, where they are being used in the {open_quotes}bioleaching{close_quotes} of copper, uranium, and gold ores. Direct leaching is when microbial metabolism changes the redox state of the metal being harvested, rendering it more soluble. Indirect leaching includes redox chemistry of other metal cations that are then coupled in chemical oxidation or reduction of the harvested metal ion and microbial attack upon and solubilization of the mineral matrix in which the metal is physically embedded. In addition, bacterial cells are used to detoxify the waste cyanide solution from gold-mining operations and as {open_quotes}absorbants{close_quotes} of the mineral cations. Bacterial cells may replace activated carbon or alternative biomass. With an increasing understanding of microbial physiology, biochemistry and molecular genetics, rational approaches to improving these microbial activities become possible. 40 refs., 3 figs.

  3. Mineral mining installation

    SciTech Connect

    Beckmann, K.; Grisebach, H.

    1981-02-17

    A mineral mining installation comprises a mechanical mining machine (such as a plough or a shearer) and a hydraulic winning machine. The hydraulic winning machine has a plurality of high pressure nozzles and a high-pressure pump for supplying the nozzles with high-pressure water (or other hydraulic fluid). Means are provided for driving each of the two winning machines independently of the other along a mineral face. This permits the mechanical winning machine to operate at its optimum, high speed rate without interference from the slower moving hydraulic winning machine. The pump is preferably a multiple radial-piston pump powered by an electric motor. Both electric power and water may be supplied to the hydraulic winning machine via pick-up arms on the machine and supply channels extending along the face.

  4. Mining Time Series Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ratanamahatana, Chotirat Ann; Lin, Jessica; Gunopulos, Dimitrios; Keogh, Eamonn; Vlachos, Michail; Das, Gautam

    Much of the world's supply of data is in the form of time series. In the last decade, there has been an explosion of interest in mining time series data. A number of new algorithms have been introduced to classify, cluster, segment, index, discover rules, and detect anomalies/novelties in time series. While these many different techniques used to solve these problems use a multitude of different techniques, they all have one common factor; they require some high level representation of the data, rather than the original raw data. These high level representations are necessary as a feature extraction step, or simply to make the storage, transmission, and computation of massive dataset feasible. A multitude of representations have been proposed in the literature, including spectral transforms, wavelets transforms, piecewise polynomials, eigenfunctions, and symbolic mappings. This chapter gives a high-level survey of time series Data Mining tasks, with an emphasis on time series representations.

  5. Phosphate Mines, Jordan

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2008-01-01

    Jordan's leading industry and export commodities are phosphate and potash, ranked in the top three in the world. These are used to make fertilizer. The Jordan Phosphate Mines Company is the sole producer, having started operations in 1935. In addition to mining activities, the company produces phosphoric acid (for fertilizers, detergents, pharmaceuticals), diammonium phosphate (for fertilizer), sulphuric acid (many uses), and aluminum fluoride (a catalyst to make aluminum and magnesium).

    The image covers an area of 27.5 x 49.4 km, was acquired on September 17, 2005, and is located near 30.8 degrees north latitude, 36.1 degrees east longitude.

    The U.S. science team is located at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif. The Terra mission is part of NASA's Science Mission Directorate.

  6. A geochemical perspective of Red Mountain: an unmined volcanogenic massive sulfide deposit in the Alaska Range

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Giles, Stuart A.; Eppinger, Robert G.

    2014-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) has investigated the environmental geochemistry of a group of unmined volcanogenic massive sulfide (VMS) deposits in the Bonnifield mining district, Alaska Range, east-central Alaska. The spectacularly colored Red Mountain deposit is the best exposed of these and provides excellent baseline geochemical data for natural environmental impacts of acidic rock drainage, metal dissolution and transport, and acidic salt and metal precipitation from an exposed and undisturbed VMS deposit.

  7. Mining with microbes

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Douglas E. Rawlings; Simon Silver

    1995-01-01

    Microbes are playing increasingly important roles in commercial mining operations, where they are being used in the {open_quotes}bioleaching{close_quotes} of copper, uranium, and gold ores. Direct leaching is when microbial metabolism changes the redox state of the metal being harvested, rendering it more soluble. Indirect leaching includes redox chemistry of other metal cations that are then coupled in chemical oxidation or

  8. Germany knows mining

    SciTech Connect

    NONE

    2006-11-15

    Whether it is the nuance of precision or robust rock breaking strength, German suppliers have the expertise. Germany has about 120 companies in the mining equipment industry, employing some 16,000 people. The article describes some recent developments of the following companies: DBT, Liebherr, Atlas Copco, BASF, Boart Longyear, Eickhoff, IBS, Maschinenfabrik Glueckauf, Komatsu, TAKRA, Terex O & R, Thyssen Krupp Foerdertechnik and Wirtgen. 7 photos.

  9. Mining Generalized Association Rules

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Ramakrishnan Srikant; Rakesh Agrawal

    1995-01-01

    We introduce the problem of mining generalized association rules. Given a large database of transactions, where each transaction consists of a set of items, and a taxonomy (is-a hierarchy) on the items, we find associations between items at any level of the taxonomy.For example, given a taxonomy that says that jackets is-a outerwear is-e clothes, we may infer a rule

  10. Fungus speeds mine reclamation

    SciTech Connect

    Wolf, C.H.

    1982-09-01

    A bacterial fungus, Pislothus tinctorius is showing potential in coal-mine reclamation. The fungus typically appears as puffballs, and roots of pine, spruce, cedar, fir, yew and oak are found to increase in size because of the fungus and are better able to absorb moisture and nutrients and thus to survive in adverse conditions. Research is being undertaken at the US Forest Service into inoculating pine seedlings with the fungus.

  11. The persistence of lead from past gasoline emissions and mining drainage in a large riparian system: Evidence from lead isotopes in the Sacramento River, California

    Microsoft Academic Search

    C. E. Dunlap; C. N. Alpers; R. Bouse; H. E. Taylor; D. M. Unruh; A. R. Flegal

    2008-01-01

    Lead concentrations and isotope ratios measured in river water colloids and streambed sediment samples along 426km of the Sacramento River, California reveal that the influence of lead from the historical mining of massive sulfide deposits in the West Shasta Cu-mining district (at the headwaters of the Sacramento River) is confined to a 60km stretch of river immediately downstream of that

  12. Ergonomics in mining.

    PubMed

    McPhee, B

    2004-08-01

    Like other areas of occupational health and safety (OHS) ergonomics is evolving and becoming more integrated into overall work management systems. As we learn more about the complex interaction between psychosocial and physical factors in the aetiology of work-related illness and injury the more we rely on managers to 'get it right' if we are to prevent these conditions. Risks to health and safety in the mining industry posed by longer shift lengths, higher work loads, less task variation and decision latitude have not really been well researched. Heavy physical workloads and stresses are still areas of concern, but are likely to be intermittent rather than constant. Recent research confirms current thinking rather than shedding new light on the subject. The contribution of slips, trips and falls and increasing age of miners to manual handling injuries is still not clear. In some cases sedentary work and the operation of machinery has completely replaced heavy physical work. The issues of machinery design for operations and maintenance and whole-body vibration exposures when operating machines and vehicles are becoming more critical. The link between prolonged sitting, poor cab design and vibration with back and neck pain is being recognized but has yet to be addressed in any systematic way by the mining industry. On the plus side some mining companies have well-developed participative approaches to problem solving and these need to be extended to areas such as ergonomics. PMID:15289585

  13. Lunar site characterization and mining

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glass, Charles E.

    1992-01-01

    Lunar mining requirements do not appear to be excessively demanding in terms of volume of material processed. It seems clear, however, that the labor-intensive practices that characterize terrestrial mining will not suffice at the low-gravity, hard-vacuum, and inaccessible sites on the Moon. New research efforts are needed in three important areas: (1) to develop high-speed, high-resolution through-rock vision systems that will permit more detailed and efficient mine site investigation and characterization; (2) to investigate the impact of lunar conditions on our ability to convert conventional mining and exploration equipment to lunar prototypes; and (3) to develop telerobotic or fully robotic mining systems for operations on the Moon and other bodies in the inner solar system. Other aspects of lunar site characterization and mining are discussed.

  14. Lunabotics Mining Competition: Inspiration through Accomplishment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mueller, Robert P.

    2012-01-01

    Space Mining for resources such as water ice, and regolith, which contain many elements in the form of metals, minerals, volatiles and other compounds, is a necessary step in Space Resource Utilization. One of the primary goals is to extract propellants from the regolith such as oxygen and hydrogen which could then be used for in-space transportation. In addition, the space mining system can be used for various construction tasks that can benefit human and robotic exploration as well as scientific investigations based on the exposed topography. The National Aeronautics & Space Administration (NASA) Lunabotics Mining Competition is a university-level competition designed to engage and retain students in science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM). NASA will directly benefit from the competition by encouraging the development of innovative lunar excavation concepts from universities which may result in clever ideas and solutions which could be applied to an actual lunar excavation device or payload. The challenge is for students to design and build a remote controlled or autonomous excavator, called a lunabot, that can collect and deposit a minimum of 10 kilograms of lunar simulant within 15 minutes. The complexities of the challenge include the abrasive characteristics of the lunar simulant, the weight and size limitations of the lunabot, and the ability to control the lunabot from a remote control center or operate autonomously. This paper will present an update of the results and lessons learned during the first and second annual Lunabotics Mining Competitions held in May 2010 and May 2011. It will also preview the 2012 competition with a review of the revised rules. In 2010,22 United States (US) universities competed, and in May 2011 the competition was opened to international participation. In 2011, 36 teams actually competed from 26 USA states and 4 foreign countries (India, Bangladesh, Colombia and Canada). This combined total directly inspired an estimated 653 university students. In 2012 more students and the public will be engaged via internet broadcasting and social networking media. The various designs will be cataloged and categorized to provide information to future Lunabotics mining robot designers and competitors. It is also expected to be of value for actual future space missions, as knowledge is gained from testing many innovative prototypes in simulated lunar regolith.

  15. Mine and monitor impacts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2015-03-01

    Modern societies require more and more metals, not least for renewable energy generation. Scientists from a range of disciplines are needed to prospect for ore deposits and provide a basis for sustainable exploration.

  16. Comprehensive Prospecting Model for Lead-Zinc Deposit of Huanggang-Ganzhuermiao Metallogenic Belt, Inner Mongolia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    WANG, Miao; FAN, Jizhang; WANG, Zhongwen; MA, Yanying

    Taking the lead-zinc deposit of the Huanggang-Ganzhuermiao metallegenic belt as a predicted mine, this article systematically analyzes the relationships between the geological conditions, including strata, magmatic rock, lead-zinc deposit, and so on, and has discovered their control action and the manner of geological conditions on the lead-zinc deposit, and has then established the comprehensive prospecting model for the lead-zinc deposit, which consists of geological, geochemical, and mineralization information, which will provide a theoretical basis for predicting the lead-zinc deposit within the metallegenic belt.

  17. Life-cycle inventory and impact evaluation of mining municipal solid waste landfills.

    PubMed

    Jain, Pradeep; Powell, Jon T; Smith, Justin L; Townsend, Timothy G; Tolaymat, Thabet

    2014-03-01

    Recent research and policy directives have emerged with a focus on sustainable management of waste materials, and the mining of old landfills represents an opportunity to meet sustainability goals by reducing the release of liquid- and gas-phase contaminants into the environment, recovering land for more productive use, and recovering energy from the landfilled materials. The emissions associated with the landfill mining process (waste excavation, screening, and on-site transportation) were inventoried on the basis of diesel fuel consumption data from two full-scale mining projects (1.3-1.5 L/in-place m(3) of landfill space mined) and unit emissions (mass per liter of diesel consumption) from heavy equipment typically deployed for mining landfills. An analytical framework was developed and used in an assessment of the life-cycle environmental impacts of a few end-use management options for materials deposited and mined from an unlined landfill. The results showed that substantial greenhouse gas emission reductions can be realized in both the waste relocation and materials and energy recovery scenarios compared to a "do nothing" case. The recovery of metal components from landfilled waste was found to have the greatest benefit across nearly all impact categories evaluated, while emissions associated with heavy equipment to mine the waste itself were found to be negligible compared to the benefits that mining provided. PMID:24512420

  18. Economics of mining law

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Long, K.R.

    1995-01-01

    Modern mining law, by facilitating socially and environmentally acceptable exploration, development, and production of mineral materials, helps secure the benefits of mineral production while minimizing environmental harm and accounting for increasing land-use competition. Mining investments are sunk costs, irreversibly tied to a particular mineral site, and require many years to recoup. Providing security of tenure is the most critical element of a practical mining law. Governments owning mineral rights have a conflict of interest between their roles as a profit-maximizing landowner and as a guardian of public welfare. As a monopoly supplier, governments have considerable power to manipulate mineral-rights markets. To avoid monopoly rent-seeking by governments, a competitive market for government-owned mineral rights must be created by artifice. What mining firms will pay for mineral rights depends on expected exploration success and extraction costs. Landowners and mining firms will negotlate respective shares of anticipated differential rents, usually allowing for some form of risk sharing. Private landowners do not normally account for external benefits or costs of minerals use. Government ownership of mineral rights allows for direct accounting of social prices for mineral-bearing lands and external costs. An equitable and efficient method is to charge an appropriate reservation price for surface land use, net of the value of land after reclamation, and to recover all or part of differential rents through a flat income or resource-rent tax. The traditional royalty on gross value of production, essentially a regressive income tax, cannot recover as much rent as a flat income tax, causes arbitrary mineral-reserve sterilization, and creates a bias toward development on the extensive margin where marginal environmental costs are higher. Mitigating environmental costs and resolving land-use conflicts require local evaluation and planning. National oversight ensures that the relative global avaliability of minerals and other values are considered, and can also promote adaptive efficiency by publicizing creative local solutions, providing technical support, and funding useful research. ?? 1995 Oxford University Press.

  19. Data Mining for Financial Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kovalerchuk, Boris; Vityaev, Evgenii

    This chapter describes Data Mining in finance by discussing financial tasks, specifics of methodologies and techniques in this Data Mining area. It includes time dependence, data selection, forecast horizon, measures of success, quality of patterns, hypothesis evaluation, problem ID, method profile, attribute-based and relational methodologies. The second part of the chapter discusses Data Mining models and practice in finance. It covers use of neural networks in portfolio management, design of interpretable trading rules and discovering money laundering schemes using decision rules and relational Data Mining methodology.

  20. School of Mines Graduate Bulletin

    E-print Network

    School of Mines 1500 Illinois Street Golden, CO 80401-1887 Main Telephone: (303) 273-3247 Toll Free: 1 and Continuing Education (SPACE) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 19

  1. 30 CFR 57.4760 - Shaft mines.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Shaft mines. 57.4760 Section 57.4760 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR METAL AND NONMETAL MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH SAFETY AND HEALTH...

  2. 30 CFR 57.4760 - Shaft mines.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Shaft mines. 57.4760 Section 57.4760 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR METAL AND NONMETAL MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH SAFETY AND HEALTH...

  3. 30 CFR 57.4760 - Shaft mines.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Shaft mines. 57.4760 Section 57.4760 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR METAL AND NONMETAL MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH SAFETY AND HEALTH...

  4. 30 CFR 57.4760 - Shaft mines.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Shaft mines. 57.4760 Section 57.4760 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR METAL AND NONMETAL MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH SAFETY AND HEALTH...

  5. 75 FR 80374 - Mine Safety Disclosure

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-12-22

    ...disclosure under Section 1503(a). One mining company \\42\\ has suggested that we...amounts separately? f. The total number of mining-related fatalities. Section 1503...requirement to disclose the total number of mining-related fatalities, and our...

  6. 76 FR 81761 - Mine Safety Disclosure

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-12-28

    ...NSSGA'') and Wyoming Mining Association (``WMA...provision in the regulatory text of 17 CFR Parts 229, 239 and...DGS Law''), National Mining Association (``NMA...other entities operating at the mining site, who would have...

  7. 30 CFR 75.1200 - Mine map.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Mine map. 75.1200 Section 75.1200 Mineral Resources...MANDATORY SAFETY STANDARDS-UNDERGROUND COAL MINES Maps § 75.1200 Mine map. [Statutory Provisions] The operator...

  8. 30 CFR 75.1200 - Mine map.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Mine map. 75.1200 Section 75.1200 Mineral Resources...MANDATORY SAFETY STANDARDS-UNDERGROUND COAL MINES Maps § 75.1200 Mine map. [Statutory Provisions] The operator...

  9. 30 CFR 75.1200 - Mine map.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Mine map. 75.1200 Section 75.1200 Mineral Resources...MANDATORY SAFETY STANDARDS-UNDERGROUND COAL MINES Maps § 75.1200 Mine map. [Statutory Provisions] The operator...

  10. 30 CFR 75.1200 - Mine map.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Mine map. 75.1200 Section 75.1200 Mineral Resources...MANDATORY SAFETY STANDARDS-UNDERGROUND COAL MINES Maps § 75.1200 Mine map. [Statutory Provisions] The operator...

  11. 30 CFR 75.1200 - Mine map.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Mine map. 75.1200 Section 75.1200 Mineral Resources...MANDATORY SAFETY STANDARDS-UNDERGROUND COAL MINES Maps § 75.1200 Mine map. [Statutory Provisions] The operator...

  12. Mine drainage water from the Sar Cheshmeh porphyry copper mine, Kerman, IR Iran.

    PubMed

    Shahabpour, J; Doorandish, M

    2008-06-01

    This paper presents the results of a study on stream and mine waters in the area of one of the world largest porphyry copper deposit located in the southeastern Iran, the Sar Cheshmeh porphyry copper mine. Trace metals are present as adsorption on Fe and Mn oxide and hydroxide particles, as sulfate, simple metal ions, and scarcely as adsorption on clay particles and hydrous aluminium oxides. Mean pH decreases and the mean concentration of trace elements, EC and SO4(2-) increases from the maximum discharge period (MXDP) during snow melt run off (May), through the moderate discharge period (MDDP; March and July) to the minimum discharge period (MNDP; September). Water samples have sulfatic character essentially, however, from the MNDP through the MDDP towards the MXDP they show a bicarbonate tendency. This study indicates that the surface waters draining the Sar Cheshmeh open pit have a higher pH and lower concentration of trace metals compared with some other porphyry copper deposits. PMID:17879141

  13. A simplified economic filter for open-pit gold-silver mining in the United States

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Singer, Donald A.; Menzie, W. David; Long, Keith R.

    1998-01-01

    In resource assessments of undiscovered mineral deposits and in the early stages of exploration, including planning, a need for prefeasibility cost models exists. In exploration, these models to filter economic from uneconomic deposits help to focus on targets that can really benefit the exploration enterprise. In resource assessment, these models can be used to eliminate deposits that would probably be uneconomic even if discovered. The U. S. Bureau of Mines (USBM) previously developed simplified cost models for such problems (Camm, 1991). These cost models estimate operating and capital expenditures for a mineral deposit given its tonnage, grade, and depth. These cost models were also incorporated in USBM prefeasibility software (Smith, 1991). Because the cost data used to estimate operating and capital costs in these models are now over ten years old, we decided that it was necessary to test these equations with more current data. We limited this study to open-pit gold-silver mines located in the United States.

  14. Review of samples of sediment, tailings, and waters adjacent to the Cactus Queen gold mine, Kern County, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rytuba, James J.; Kim, Christopher S.; Goldstein, Daniel N.

    2011-01-01

    The Cactus Queen Mine is located in the western Mojave Desert in Kern County, California. The Cactus Queen gold-silver (Au-Ag) deposit is similar to other Au-Ag deposits hosted in Miocene volcanic rocks that consist of silicic domes and associated flows, pyroclastic rocks, and subvolcanic intrusions. The volcanic rocks were emplaced onto a basement of Mesozoic silicic intrusive rocks. A part of the Cactus Queen Mine is located on Federal land managed by the U.S. Bureau of Land Management (BLM). Staff from the BLM initially sampled the mine area and documented elevated concentrations of arsenic (As) in tailings and sediment. BLM then requested that the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), in collaboration with Chapman University, measure and characterize As and other geochemical constituents in sediment, tailings, and waters on the part of the mine on Federal lands. This report is made in response to the request by the BLM, the lead agency mandated to conduct a Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) - Removal Site Investigation (RSI). The RSI applies to the potential removal of As-contaminated mine waste from the Cactus Queen Mine as a means of reducing As release and exposure to humans and biota. This report summarizes data obtained from field sampling of sediments, mine tailings, and surface waters at the Cactus Queen Mine on January 27, 2008. Our results provide a preliminary assessment of the sources of As and associated chemical constituents that could potentially impact humans and biota.

  15. In-mine evaluation of smart mine fire sensor

    Microsoft Academic Search

    R. A. Franks; G. F. Friel; J. C. Edwards; A. C. Smith

    An evaluation of a nuisance-emissions-discriminating smart mine fire sensor system was made in an operating coal mine. These field evaluations were conducted to determine the sensor system's ability to discern nuisance emissions, such as diesel exhaust, emissions from flame cutting and welding operations, or hydrogen gas from a charging station, from real fires and to compare the number of falsely

  16. MINE WASTE TECHNOLOGY PROGRAM - UNDERGROUND MINE SOURCE CONTROL DEMONSTRATION PROJECT

    EPA Science Inventory

    This report presents results of the Mine Waste Technology Program Activity III, Project 8, Underground Mine Source Control Demonstration Project implemented and funded by the U. S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and jointly administered by EPA and the U. S. Department of E...

  17. Environmental Impact of the Contact and Sonoma Mercury Mines on Water, Sediment, and Biota in Anna Belcher and Little Sulphur Creek Watersheds, Sonoma County, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rytuba, James J.; Hothem, Roger L.; May, Jason T.; Kim, Christopher S.; Lawler, David; Goldstein, Daniel

    2009-01-01

    The Contact and Sonoma mercury (Hg) deposits are among the youngest Hg deposits in the Coast Range Hg mineral belt and are located in the western part of the Clear Lake volcanic field in Sonoma County, California. The mine workings and tailings are located in the headwaters of Anna Belcher Creek, which is a tributary to Little Sulphur Creek. The Contact Hg mine produced about 1,000 flasks of Hg, and the Sonoma mine produced considerably less. Waste rock and tailings eroded from the Contact and Sonoma mines have contributed Hg-enriched mine waste material to the headwaters of Anna Belcher Creek. The mines are located on federal land managed by the U.S. Bureau of Land Management (USBLM). The USBLM requested that the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) measure and characterize Hg and other geochemical constituents in tailings, sediment, water, and biota at the Contact and Sonoma mines and in Anna Belcher and Little Sulphur Creeks. This report is made in response to the USBLM request, the lead agency mandated to conduct a Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) - Removal Site Investigation (RSI). The RSI applies to removal of Hg-contaminated mine waste from the Contact and Sonoma mines as a means of reducing Hg transport to Anna Belcher and Little Sulphur Creeks. This report summarizes data obtained from field sampling of mine tailings, waste rock, sediment, and water at the Contact and Sonoma mines that was initiated on April 20 during a storm event, and on June 19, 2001. Further sampling of water, sediment, and biota in a pond and tributaries that drain from the mine area was completed on April 1, 2003. Our results permit a preliminary assessment of the mining sources of Hg and associated chemical constituents that could elevate levels of monomethyl Hg (MMeHg) in tributaries and biota that are impacted by historic mining.

  18. Deposition head for laser

    DOEpatents

    Lewis, Gary K. (Los Alamos, NM); Less, Richard M. (Los Alamos, NM)

    1999-01-01

    A deposition head for use as a part of apparatus for forming articles from materials in particulate form in which the materials are melted by a laser beam and deposited at points along a tool path to form an article of the desired shape and dimensions. The deposition head delivers the laser beam and powder to a deposition zone, which is formed at the tip of the deposition head. A controller comprised of a digital computer directs movement of the deposition zone along the tool path and provides control signals to adjust apparatus functions, such as the speed at which the deposition head moves along the tool path.

  19. ArcMine: A GIS extension to support mine reclamation planning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Sung-Min; Choi, Yosoon; Suh, Jangwon; Oh, Sungchan; Park, Hyeong-Dong; Yoon, Suk-Ho; Go, Wa-Ra

    2012-09-01

    This paper presents a new GIS extension, named ArcMine, developed to support reclamation planning in abandoned mining areas. ArcMine provides four tools to (a) assess mine subsidence hazards, (b) estimate the erosion of mine wastes, (c) analyze flow paths of mine water at the surface, and (d) identify suitable tree species for mine reforestation. A spatial database incorporating a topographical map, geological map, mine drift map, and borehole data was designed and utilized in ArcMine to examine distributed mine hazards that can damage the surrounding environment. Application to abandoned mining areas in Korea shows that ArcMine could provide useful information on mine hazards to support reclamation planning. This paper reports the concept, development, and implementation of ArcMine.

  20. Geology of the Eymir iron mine, Edremit, Turkey

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Jacobson, Herbert Samuel; Turet, Erdogan

    1972-01-01

    The Eymir mine near Edremit on Turkey's Aegean coast (long 27?30'E.,1at 39?36'N.) was investigated as part of the Maden Tetkik ve Arama Enstitutsu (MTA)-U. S. Geological Survey (USGS) mineral exploration and training project, for the purpose of increasing the known mineral reserves. Geologic mapping of the mine area indicates that hematite is restricted to argillized, silicified, and pyritized dacite and possibly andesite. Hematite is present as massive replacements, impregnations, disseminations, and fracture fillings. Most of the upper part of the iron deposit consists of a breccia composed mostly of silicifiled dacite fragments in a hematite matrix. The iron deposit was apparently formed in three steps: 1. Argillation, silicification, and pyritization of the andesitic lava and dacite units as a result of a regional intrusion. 2. Intrusion of the Dere Oren dacite stock, with associated faulting, fracturing, and breccia formation at the surface. 3. Deposition of hematite by oxidation of pyrite, and transfer of iron via fractures and faults by hydrothermal or meteoric fluids. The Eymir iron deposit is a blanketlike deposit on the crest of the Sivritepe-Eymir ridge. It is 1300 meters long, 80 to 450 meters wide, and has an average thickness of 18.6 meters. Drill holes in the deposit show the iron content to range from 32.0 to 57.6 percent, and to average 46.5 percent. Most of the gangue is silica, and an arsenic impurity averaging 0.39 percent is present. Most of the deposit cannot be utilized as iron ore because of low iron content, high silica content, and high arsenic content. Ore-dressing tests have shown that it is feasible to concentrate the low-grade material, producing a concentrate having increased iron content and reduced silica content. Tests have shown also that the arsenic content of the ore can be reduced substantially by sintering. Further tests and economic feasibility studies are necessary to determine whether an economic marketable iron ore can be produced. If such studies indicate the technical and economic feasibility of utilizing all the Eymir iron deposit, detailed additional studies are recommended including: 1. A detailed drilling and sampling program to include 60 drill holes averaging 40 meters in depth and detailed sampling of mine dumps. 2. Pilot-plant testing of concentration and sintering procedures. 3. A detailed pre-investment economic feasibility study.

  1. Hydraulic mining method

    DOEpatents

    Huffman, Lester H. (Kent, WA); Knoke, Gerald S. (Kent, WA)

    1985-08-20

    A method of hydraulically mining an underground pitched mineral vein comprising drilling a vertical borehole through the earth's lithosphere into the vein and drilling a slant borehole along the footwall of the vein to intersect the vertical borehole. Material is removed from the mineral vein by directing a high pressure water jet thereagainst. The resulting slurry of mineral fragments and water flows along the slant borehole into the lower end of the vertical borehole from where it is pumped upwardly through the vertical borehole to the surface.

  2. Mining the Home Environment

    PubMed Central

    Cook, Diane J.; Krishnan, Narayanan

    2014-01-01

    Individuals spend a majority of their time in their home or workplace and for many, these places are our sanctuaries. As society and technology advance there is a growing interest in improving the intelligence of the environments in which we live and work. By filling home environments with sensors and collecting data during daily routines, researchers can gain insights on human daily behavior and the impact of behavior on the residents and their environments. In this article we provide an overview of the data mining opportunities and challenges that smart environments provide for researchers and offer some suggestions for future work in this area. PMID:25506128

  3. Airflow obstruction and mining

    SciTech Connect

    Stenton, S.C.; Hendrick, D.J. (Univ. of Newcastle upon Tyne (United Kingdom))

    1993-01-01

    Bronchitis and emphysema have long been described as diseases of miners, but the precise contribution of occupational exposures to coal and other mine dusts in causing these disorders, as opposed to cofactors such as social class, environmental pollution, and cigarette smoking, has not been fully defined. Epidemiologic studies have attempted, with varying degrees of success, to determine the incidence and severity of chronic obstructive pulmonary diseases in miners as compared to the general population. The results from these studies, and those in other nonmining industries with dust exposures, are examined. 98 refs.

  4. Finding Gold in Data Mining

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Flaherty, Bill

    2013-01-01

    Data-mining systems provide a variety of opportunities for school district personnel to streamline operations and focus on student achievement. This article describes the value of data mining for school personnel, finance departments, teacher evaluations, and in the classroom. It suggests that much could be learned about district practices if one…

  5. Diamonds: Exploration, mines and marketing

    Microsoft Academic Search

    George H. Read

    2009-01-01

    The beauty, value and mystique of exceptional quality diamonds such as the 603 carat Lesotho Promise, recovered from the Letseng Mine in 2006, help to drive a multi-billion dollar diamond exploration, mining and marketing industry that operates in some 45 countries across the globe. Five countries, Botswana, Russia, Canada, South Africa and Angola account for 83% by value and 65%

  6. Speedy backfilling for old mines

    Microsoft Academic Search

    R. C. Dyni; M. Burnett

    1993-01-01

    This article describes pneumatic equipment that can help fill the underground voids left by abandoned coal mines that threaten nearly half a million acres of densely populated urban areas in the US alone. In 1910, when coal was king in northeastern Pennsylvania, engineers built a 600 ft cut-and-cover tunnel to transport coal from a mine entrance to a rail siding

  7. Database Mining: A Performance Perspective

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Rakesh Agrawal; Tomasz Imielinski; Arun N. Swami

    1993-01-01

    We present our perspective of database mining as the confluence of machine learning techniques and the performance emphasis of database technology. We describe three classes of database mining problems involving classification, associations, and sequences, and arguethat these problems can be uniformly viewed as requiring discovery of rules embedded inmassive data. We describe a model and some basic operations for the

  8. Web mining research: a survey

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Raymond Kosala; Hendrik Blockeel

    2000-01-01

    With the huge amount of information available online, the World Wide Web is a fertile area for data mining research. The Web mining research is at the cross road of research from several research communities, such as database, infor- mation retrieval, and within AI, especially the sub-areas of machine learning and natural language processing. How- ever, there is a lot

  9. Scalable Algorithms for Association Mining

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Mohammed Javeed Zaki

    2000-01-01

    Association rule discovery has emerged as an important problem in knowledge discovery and data mining. The association mining task consists of identifying the frequent itemsets and then, forming conditional implication rules among them. In this paper, we present efficient algorithms for the discovery of frequent itemsets which forms the compute intensive phase of the task. The algorithms utilize the structural

  10. Privacy-Preserving Data Mining

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Rakesh Agrawal; Ramakrishnan Srikant

    2000-01-01

    A fruitful direction for future data mining research will be the development of techniques that incorporate privacy concerns. Specifically, we address the following question. Since the primary task in data mining is the development of models about aggregated data, can we develop accurate models without access to precise information in individual data records? We consider the concrete case of building

  11. Automatic Coal-Mining System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Collins, E. R., Jr.

    1985-01-01

    Coal cutting and removal done with minimal hazard to people. Automatic coal mine cutting, transport and roof-support movement all done by automatic machinery. Exposure of people to hazardous conditions reduced to inspection tours, maintenance, repair, and possibly entry mining.

  12. Parallel Data Mining - Case Study

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Firat Tekiner; Mike Pettipher; Larry Bull; Mathew Studley; Ian Whittley; Tony Bagnall

    The continuing rapid growth of data and knowledge in scientific domain has spurred huge interest in distributed\\/parallel data and text mining. This paper reports the investigation of a large scale data mining application to supercomputing environment. The aim is to explore some of the issues that may arise in porting and working with the C++\\/MPI implementation of the ensemble knn

  13. Lunar surface mine feasibility study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blair, Brad R.

    This paper describes a lunar surface mine, and demonstrates the economic feasibility of mining oxygen from the moon. The mine will be at the Apollo 16 landing site. Mine design issues include pit size and shape, excavation equipment, muck transport, and processing requirements. The final mine design will be driven by production requirements, and constrained by the lunar environment. This mining scenario assumes the presence of an operating lunar base. Lunar base personnel will set-up a and run the mine. The goal of producing lunar oxygen is to reduce dependence on fuel shipped from Earth. Thus, the lunar base is the customer for the finished product. The perspective of this paper is that of a mining contractor who must produce a specific product at a remote location, pay local labor, and sell the product to an onsite captive market. To make a profit, it must be less costly to build and ship specialized equipment to the site, and pay high labor and operating costs, than to export the product directly to the site.

  14. Topic in Depth - Audio Mining

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Occasionally referred to as audio indexing, audio mining is a computerized task involving the processing of an audio file, extracting the dialog and creating a textual transcript, and searching the transcript for certain words or phrases. Considering the amount of audio content on the Internet and other sources, it is clear that audio mining is a growing technology of growing importance.

  15. Movie review mining and summarization

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Li Zhuang; Feng Jing; Xiao-Yan Zhu

    2006-01-01

    With the ?ourish of the Web, online review is becoming a more and more useful and important information resource for people. As a result, automatic review mining and sum- marizing has become a hot research topic recently. Difier- ent from traditional text summarization, review mining and summarizing aims at extracting the features on which the re- viewers express their opinions

  16. Sentiment Analysis and Opinion Mining

    E-print Network

    Plotkin, Joshua B.

    . A popular research topic in NLP, text mining, and Web mining in recent years (Shanahan, Qu, and Wiebe, 2006 every aspect of NLP and yet is confined. Little research in NLP/Linguistics in the past. Potentially a major technology from NLP. But it is hard. Bing Liu @ AAAI-2011, Aug. 8, 2011, San Francisco, USA 6 #12

  17. Process Mining Online Assessment Data

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pechenizkiy, Mykola; Trcka, Nikola; Vasilyeva, Ekaterina; van der Aalst, Wil; De Bra, Paul

    2009-01-01

    Traditional data mining techniques have been extensively applied to find interesting patterns, build descriptive and predictive models from large volumes of data accumulated through the use of different information systems. The results of data mining can be used for getting a better understanding of the underlying educational processes, for…

  18. Fast vertical mining using diffsets

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Mohammed Javeed Zaki; Karam Gouda

    2003-01-01

    A number of vertical mining algorithms have been proposed recently for association mining, which have shown to be very effective and usually outperform horizontal approaches. The main advantage of the vertical format is support for fast frequency counting via intersection operations on transaction ids (tids) and automatic pruning of irrelevant data. The main problem with these approaches is when intermediate

  19. Acid Mine Drainage and Precipitates

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    KET

    2011-01-11

    In this video, environmental scientists measure the pH of water to detect acid mine drainage from an abandoned coal mine and then demonstrate how metals present in acid drainage fall out of solution as precipitates when a basic substance is added to the water.

  20. Abandoned Mine Drainage in Pennsylvania

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Alec Bodzin

    2003-05-01

    Abandoned Mine Drainage in Pennsylvania is a science-technology-society (STS) role playing debate simulation. In this activity, learners investigate the abandoned mine drainage (AMD) issue from differing perspectives. In their investigation, they identify AMD problems, search for a solution, evaluate options, and decide on a course of action to treat and clean up AMD in Pennsylvania.

  1. Mine Planning for Asteroid Orebodies

    Microsoft Academic Search

    L. S. Gertsch; R. E. Gertsch

    2000-01-01

    Given that an asteroid (or comet) has been determined to contain sufficient material of value to be potentially economic to exploit, a mining method must be selected and implemented. This paper discusses the engineering necessary to bring a mine online, and the opportunities and challenges inherent in asteroid mineral prospects. The very important step of orebody characterization is discussed elsewhere.

  2. Web Mining for Hyperlinked Communities

    E-print Network

    Hu, Wen-Chen

    Web Mining for Hyperlinked Communities Gary William Flake flake@research.nj.nec.com NEC Research Institute #12;Motivation for Web Mining More than 1B web pages and 20TB of raw data. Even more content will always be disorganized (or at best self-organized). In the future, everything will be on the web

  3. Tourmaline in Appalachian - Caledonian massive sulphide deposits and its exploration significance.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Slack, J.F.

    1982-01-01

    Tourmaline is a common gangue mineral in several types of stratabound mineral deposits, including some massive base-metal sulphide ores of the Appalachian - Caledonian orogen. It is most abundant (sometimes forming massive foliated tourmalinite) in sediment-hosted deposits, such as those at the Elizabeth Cu mine and the Ore Knob Cu mine (North Carolina, USA). Trace amounts of tourmaline occur associated with volcanic-hosted deposits in the Piedmont and New England and also in the Trondheim district. Tourmaline associated with the massive sulphide deposits are Mg- rich dravites with major- and trace-element compositions significantly different from schorl. It is suggested that the necessary B was produced by submarine exhalative processes as a part of the same hydrothermal system that deposited the ores. An abundance of dravite in non-evaporitic terrains is believed to indicate proximity to former subaqueous fumarolic centres.-R.A.H.

  4. Toward safer underground coal mines

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1982-01-01

    An underground mine safety study aimed at reducing the number of accidental injuries and fatalities focused on determining what factors make some US mines safer than others and how mines can be made safer in the future. Some credit for safety improvements in this century goes to better laws and stricter enforcement, partly the result of new geological information and technological improvements, but the committee identified attitudes and motivations as the key factors in accident prevention. These factors involve a commitment by management, cooperation between management and labor, and the quality of management and employee training. There is also a link with youth and small mines to the number of accidents. The report outlines several options to mining companies and miners, and suggests ways the federal and state governments can help. 32 references, 18 figures, 29 tables. (DCK)

  5. Measuring mine roof bolt strains

    DOEpatents

    Steblay, Bernard J. (Lakewood, CO)

    1986-01-01

    A mine roof bolt and a method of measuring the strain in mine roof bolts of this type are disclosed. According to the method, a flat portion on the head of the mine roof bolt is first machined. Next, a hole is drilled radially through the bolt at a predetermined distance from the bolt head. After installation of the mine roof bolt and loading, the strain of the mine roof bolt is measured by generating an ultrasonic pulse at the flat portion. The time of travel of the ultrasonic pulse reflected from the hole is measured. This time of travel is a function of the distance from the flat portion to the hole and increases as the bolt is loaded. Consequently, the time measurement is correlated to the strain in the bolt. Compensation for various factors affecting the travel time are also provided.

  6. Eocene palynomorphs from the black diamond mines regional preserve, contra costa county, California

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Abbas Kimyai

    1993-01-01

    Palynomorphs from Eocene coaly deposits of the Black Diamond Mines Regional Preserve in California are described. Thirty?two species of spores and pollen are recognized and two of them, Graminidites scabratus and Arecipites antiochus, are regarded as new. The encountered specimens are characterized by 26% spores, 32% gymnosperm pollen, 41% angiosperm pollen, and 1% foraminifers. The climate is considered to be

  7. Active oil seep at Nevada gold mine holds intrigue for more exploration

    Microsoft Academic Search

    M. L. Pinnell; J. G. Blake; J. B. Hulen

    1991-01-01

    This paper reports on an active oil seep has been discovered in one of Nevada's famous Carlin-type low grade disseminated gold deposits. This unique seep, at the Yankee gold mine in White Pine County, may have important implications for both oil and gas and gold exploration in the Basin and Range province of the western U.S. The open pit Yankee

  8. Establishment and Growth of Two Willow Species in a Riparian Zone Impacted by Mine Tailings

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Melody M. Bourret; Joe E. Brummer; Wayne C. Leininger

    2009-01-01

    A fi eld study was initiated to determine survival, growth characteristics, and metal uptake of two montane riparian willow species, Geyer (Salix geyeriana Andersson) and mountain (S. monticola Bebb) willow, grown in amended fl uvial mine tailing deposits. Revegetation was done with staked and previously rooted cuttings to determine if planting method had an eff ect on successful establishment of

  9. Chlorine-bearing amphiboles from the Fraser mine, Sudbury, Ontario, Canada: Description and crystal chemistry

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McCormick, K.A.; McDonald, A.M.

    1999-01-01

    Three chemically distinct populations of Cl-bearing amphibole have been recognized in association with contact Ni-Cu ore deposits in Footwall Breccia at the Fraser mine, Sudbury, Ontario. The first population, defined as halogen-poor (700 ppm) and F (2500 ppm). These rocks thus may have been a significant contributor to the fluids.

  10. Development of a Tracer Test in a flooded Uranium Mine using Lycopodium clavatum

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Christian Wolkersdorfer; Nicole Feldtner

    The polymetallic Niederschlema\\/Alberoda uranium deposit in the Saxonian Erzgebirge (Ore Mountains) has been flooded since 1991. The objectives of the tests were to investigate the quality and rate of flow within a large part of the flooded mine to predict the mass flow of the pollutants. Based on the results of a first tracer test with Lycopodium clavatum in mid

  11. Optimization of the anthropogenic vadose zone monitoring at the sulfidic mining waste dumps and engineering constructions

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Irena Twardowska; Sebastian Stefaniak

    2006-01-01

    Acid Rock Drainage (ARD) that causes severe ground water deterioration and mobilization of potentially toxic elements is one of the persistent environmental problems in countries with a developed extractive industries. In brief, it results from exothermic process of sulfide minerals decomposition in mining waste deposited at the surface in the presence of atmospheric oxygen and moisture\\/infiltration water from precipitation. To

  12. Holocene floodplain sedimentation in Central Europe and the impact of historic mining

    Microsoft Academic Search

    T. Raab; K. Huerkamp; J. Voelkel

    2008-01-01

    In most parts of Europe, the Late Quaternary evolution of floodplain environments is the result of interactions between natural and human factors. Land-use changes, during the Neolithic, such as deforestation and the introduction of agriculture affected the stratigraphy of river sediments due to soil erosion on the slopes and alluvial deposition of fine-grained sediments in the floodplains. Beside agriculture mining

  13. Settlement of mine spoil fill from water infiltration: Case study in eastern Kentucky

    SciTech Connect

    Karem, W.A.; Kalinski, M.E.; Hancher, D.E. [University of Kentucky, Lexington, KY (United States). Dept. of Civil Engineering

    2007-09-15

    Mine spoil valley fills are a by-product of mountaintop removal mining in the Appalachian coal mining region of the United States. These fills often result in large expanses of relatively flat land covering thousands of acres, which can be used for commercial or industrial development. However, this material is susceptible to damaging settlement, and highly publicized failures of structures built on mine spoil fills have led to reluctance on the part of investors to develop these areas. A key settlement mechanism in mine spoil is water infiltration. Percolating water slakes the shaly, angular spoil material at interparticle stress points, leading to excessive deformation and settlement. A lumber processing facility in Hazard, Ky., is an example of a structure that sustained serious damage as a result of settlement caused by water infiltration. A forensic site investigation of the facility revealed that excavation of existing surface mine spoil beneath the building footprint removed the low-permeability crust that forms on the top of mature mine spoil fill deposits. The removal of the crust allowed the infiltration of surface water. This, coupled with the unique configuration of the storm water drainage system at the facility and surface water drainage toward the building, led to differential settlement up to 1:120 (vertical: horizontal) and angular distortion up to 1: 150 over a period of several months. Foundation underpinning was performed to remedy the situation. For future development on mine spoil sites, recommended mitigating measures include presaturation of the mine spoil, design of drainage systems to adequately convey surface water away from the building, and use of geosynthetic barrier layers to prevent infiltration of surface water into the mine spoil beneath the structure.

  14. Classification of hydraulic borehole mining technological processes during pay zone development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bondarchuk, I. B.; Shenderova, I. V.

    2015-02-01

    Relevance of the work is defined by the need of solid mineral deposits development by hydraulic borehole mining. The main advantage of the method is that the extraction of minerals could be carried out in difficult geological conditions, excluding tunneling of mine workings and quarries construction. The article presents a generalized and systematic classification of hydraulic borehole mining technological processes during pay zones development. According to the classification three groups of technological processes were defined: main, auxiliary and hydraulic borehole cutting head monitoring. The main technological processes are: rocks fracturing, suction and lifting of the slurry to the surface, delivery of the slurry to the slurry pump. Auxiliary processes include: cleaning of intake ports of slurry retrieval device, drilling of pilot hole and maintenance of mining chambers roof sustainability. To hydraulic borehole cutting head monitoring processes refer: operation modes control, tripping operation and rotation.

  15. Water quality impacts from mining in the Black Hills, South Dakota, USA

    SciTech Connect

    Rahn, P.H.; Davis, A.D.; Webb, C.J. [South Dakota School of Mines and Technology, Rapid City, SD (United States)] [South Dakota School of Mines and Technology, Rapid City, SD (United States); Nichols, A.D. [Versar, Inc., Eden Prairie, MN (United States)] [Versar, Inc., Eden Prairie, MN (United States)

    1996-02-01

    The focus of this research was to determine if abandoned mines constitute a major environmental hazard in the Black Hills. Many abandoned gold mines in the Black Hills contribute acid and heavy metals to streams. In some areas of sulfide mineralization local impacts are severe, but in most areas the impacts are small because most ore deposits consist of small quartz veins with few sulfides. Pegmatite mines appear to have negligible effects on water due to the insoluble nature of pegmatite minerals. Uranium mines in the southern Black Hills contribute some radioactivity to surface water, but he impact is limited because of the dry climate and lack of runoff in that area. 26 refs.

  16. DOI: 10.1002/cvde.200606563 Analysis of Al2O3 Atomic Layer Deposition on ZrO2

    E-print Network

    George, Steven M.

    DOI: 10.1002/cvde.200606563 Full Paper Analysis of Al2O3 Atomic Layer Deposition on ZrO2, and Steven M. George* Al2O3 atomic layer deposition (ALD) is analyzed on ZrO2 nanoparticles in a rotary reactant exposure to be deter- mined to maximize reactant usage. The ZrO2 nanoparticles are coated using

  17. 20 CFR 726.107 - Deposits of negotiable securities with Federal Reserve banks or the Treasurer of the United...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    20 Employees' Benefits 4 2014-04-01...Deposits of negotiable securities with Federal Reserve...authority to sell such securities; interest thereon... FEDERAL COAL MINE HEALTH AND SAFETY ACT OF 1969...Deposits of negotiable securities with Federal Reserve...of the Office with power in the Office,...

  18. 20 CFR 726.107 - Deposits of negotiable securities with Federal Reserve banks or the Treasurer of the United...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    20 Employees' Benefits 4 2012-04-01...Deposits of negotiable securities with Federal Reserve...authority to sell such securities; interest thereon... FEDERAL COAL MINE HEALTH AND SAFETY ACT OF 1969...Deposits of negotiable securities with Federal Reserve...of the Office with power in the Office,...

  19. 20 CFR 726.107 - Deposits of negotiable securities with Federal Reserve banks or the Treasurer of the United...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    20 Employees' Benefits 3 2010-04-01...Deposits of negotiable securities with Federal Reserve...authority to sell such securities; interest thereon... FEDERAL COAL MINE HEALTH AND SAFETY ACT OF 1969...Deposits of negotiable securities with Federal Reserve...of the Office with power in the Office,...

  20. 20 CFR 726.107 - Deposits of negotiable securities with Federal Reserve banks or the Treasurer of the United...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    20 Employees' Benefits 4 2013-04-01...Deposits of negotiable securities with Federal Reserve...authority to sell such securities; interest thereon... FEDERAL COAL MINE HEALTH AND SAFETY ACT OF 1969...Deposits of negotiable securities with Federal Reserve...of the Office with power in the Office,...

  1. 20 CFR 726.107 - Deposits of negotiable securities with Federal Reserve banks or the Treasurer of the United...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    20 Employees' Benefits 3 2011-04-01...Deposits of negotiable securities with Federal Reserve...authority to sell such securities; interest thereon... FEDERAL COAL MINE HEALTH AND SAFETY ACT OF 1969...Deposits of negotiable securities with Federal Reserve...of the Office with power in the Office,...

  2. Comparison of indicator kriging, conditional indicator simulation and multiple-point statistics used to model slate deposits

    Microsoft Academic Search

    F. G. Bastante; C. Ordóñez; J. Taboada; J. M. Matías

    2008-01-01

    The resources in an ornamental slate deposit can be estimated using geostatistical estimation techniques applied to information collected from drill cores. The result, however, is a smooth approximation that fails to take account of the natural variability in mineralization, which is fundamental to proper design and evaluation of the financial viability of a mining deposit. Geostatistical simulation techniques are more

  3. Mercury content in electrum from artisanal mining site of Mongolia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murao, Satoshi; Naito, Kazuki; Dejidmaa, Gunchin; Sie, Soey H.

    2006-08-01

    In Mongolia, artisanal gold mining, modern gold rush, in which people use mercury to extract gold, is being proliferated rapidly and the mercury contamination of mining site is becoming a serious social issue. For the risk assessment of mercury, it is necessary to understand how much mercury is introduced to the environment from what kind of materials during mining activity. It is already known that major contribution of the contamination comes from mercury that was bought at shops and brought to mining sites by miners. However, no information is available on how much mercury is removed from electrum (natural gold grain) to the environment. Since gold deposit is always accompanied by mercury anomaly, it is anticipated that electrum grains contain some amount of mercury of natural origin, and this mercury (primary mercury) contributes to some extent to the contamination. In order to clarify how much mercury is incorporated in electrum grains, micro-PIXE at CSIRO was used for grain-by-grain analysis. The result showed that electrum from study area contains mercury up to 8260 ppm. It is concluded that for the risk management of mercury contamination, release of natural mercury from electrum grains during smelting must not be ignored.

  4. Metal and Metalloid Contaminants in Atmospheric Aerosols from Mining Operations

    PubMed Central

    Csavina, Janae; Landázuri, Andrea; Wonaschütz, Anna; Rine, Kyle; Rheinheimer, Paul; Barbaris, Brian; Conant, William; Sáez, A. Eduardo; Betterton, Eric A.

    2013-01-01

    Mining operations are potential sources of airborne metal and metalloid contaminants through both direct smelter emissions and wind erosion of mine tailings. The warmer, drier conditions predicted for the Southwestern US by climate models may make contaminated atmospheric dust and aerosols increasingly important, with potential deleterious effects on human health and ecology. Fine particulates such as those resulting from smelting operations may disperse more readily into the environment than coarser tailings dust. Fine particles also penetrate more deeply into the human respiratory system, and may become more bioavailable due to their high specific surface area. In this work, we report the size-fractionated chemical characterization of atmospheric aerosols sampled over a period of a year near an active mining and smelting site in Arizona. Aerosols were characterized with a 10-stage (0.054 to 18 ?m aerodynamic diameter) multiple orifice uniform deposit impactor (MOUDI), a scanning mobility particle sizer (SMPS), and a total suspended particulate (TSP) collector. The MOUDI results show that arsenic and lead concentrations follow a bimodal distribution, with maxima centered at approximately 0.3 and 7.0 ?m diameter. We hypothesize that the sub-micron arsenic and lead are the product of condensation and coagulation of smelting vapors. In the coarse size, contaminants are thought to originate as aeolian dust from mine tailings and other sources. Observation of ultrafine particle number concentration (SMPS) show the highest readings when the wind comes from the general direction of the smelting operations site. PMID:23441050

  5. DRY DEPOSITION MODULE FOR REGIONAL ACID DEPOSITION

    EPA Science Inventory

    Methods to compute surface dry deposition velocities for sulfur dioxide, sulfate, ozone, NO plus NO2, and nitric acid vapor over much of the North American continent have been developed for use with atmospheric numerical models of long-range transport and deposition. The resultin...

  6. Heavy metal pollution and lake acidity changes caused by one thousand years of copper mining at Falun, central Sweden

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Anna S. Ek; Ingemar Renberg

    2001-01-01

    One thousand years of mining of sulfurous ores at the Falun copper mine, central Sweden, and the resulting atmospheric emissions of metals and sulfur dioxide, gives a unique opportunity to study long-term responses to acid deposition. Copper production peaked in the 17th century, when Falun supplied 2\\/3 of the world's copper production. Thereafter production and associated emissions have declined, and

  7. Study on moist-locking mining technique of cool water well coal mine

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Liu Yujie; Fan Limin; Nie Zhongquan; Liu Guodong

    2011-01-01

    Cool water Wells coal mine is a modern large mine in Shaanxi Yulin-Shenmu coal mine areas. Coal mining had caused serious destruction and pollution to local geological environment and threatened the groundwater resources. If it couldn't control properly, the great accidents would be caused easily and even influence the development of mining cities later. Therefore, the paper puts forward some

  8. Microbial methane formation from hard coal and timber in an abandoned coal mine

    SciTech Connect

    Kruger, M.; Beckmann, S.; Engelen, B.; Thielemann, T.; Cramer, B.; Schippers, A.; Cypionka, H. [Federal Institute for Geoscience and Natural Resources BGR, Hannover (Germany)

    2008-07-01

    About 7% of the global annual methane emissions originate from coal mining. Also, mine gas has come into focus of the power industry and is being used increasingly for heat and power production. In many coal deposits worldwide, stable carbon and hydrogen isotopic signatures of methane indicate a mixed thermogenic and biogenic origin. In this study, we have measured in an abandoned coal mine methane fluxes and isotopic signatures of methane and carbon dioxide, and collected samples for microbiological and phylogenetic investigations. Mine timber and hard coal showed an in-situ production of methane with isotopic signatures similar to those of the methane in the mine atmosphere. Enrichment cultures amended with mine timber or hard coal as sole carbon sources formed methane over a period of nine months. Predominantly, acetoclastic methanogenesis was stimulated in enrichments containing acetate or hydrogen/carbon dioxide. Molecular techniques revealed that the archaeal community in enrichment cultures and unamended samples was dominated by members of the Methanosarcinales. The combined geochemical and microbiological investigations identify microbial methanogenesis as a recent source of methane in abandoned coal mines.

  9. Heat accumulation and storage capacity of the water-filled mines at Ely, Minnesota

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walton, M.; McSwiggen, P.

    1982-12-01

    The iron mines at Ely occupy a doubly plunging isoclinal syncline with a nearly vertical axial plane, forming an irregular, canoe-shaped structure, striking about N.70 E., enclosed within massive Archean greenstone pillow lavas. A reasonably complete collection of mine maps and sections has been assembled from several sources to provide, at least for the present an adequate picture of the as-built configuration of the underground workings. No topographic data have been found to show the contour of the ground over the mines before subsidence, but it is clear that most of the depression occupied by Miners Lake is due to subsidence, and only a minor amount is due to open-pit mining at the western end of the deposit. Acoustic profiles of the lake, the U.S. Geological Survey 7-1/2-minute topographic map prepared before the water in the mines rose into the subsidence area, and enlarged aerial photographs taken at different dates during the filling of the mines are being studied to evaluate the subsidence of the mine and filling of the lake since 1965.

  10. A Collaborative Educational Association Rule Mining Tool

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Garcia, Enrique; Romero, Cristobal; Ventura, Sebastian; de Castro, Carlos

    2011-01-01

    This paper describes a collaborative educational data mining tool based on association rule mining for the ongoing improvement of e-learning courses and allowing teachers with similar course profiles to share and score the discovered information. The mining tool is oriented to be used by non-expert instructors in data mining so its internal…

  11. Collaborative Data Mining Tool for Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Garcia, Enrique; Romero, Cristobal; Ventura, Sebastian; Gea, Miguel; de Castro, Carlos

    2009-01-01

    This paper describes a collaborative educational data mining tool based on association rule mining for the continuous improvement of e-learning courses allowing teachers with similar course's profile sharing and scoring the discovered information. This mining tool is oriented to be used by instructors non experts in data mining such that, its…

  12. Integrating Classification and Association Rule Mining

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Bing Liu; Wynne Hsu; Yiming Ma

    1998-01-01

    Classification rule mining aims to discover a small set of rules in the database that forms an accurate classifier. Association rule mining finds all the rules existing in the database that satisfy some minimum support and minimum confidence constraints. For association rule mining, the target of discovery is not pre-determined, while for classification rule mining there is one and only

  13. Efficiently mining frequent trees in a forest

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Mohammed Javeed Zaki

    2002-01-01

    Mining frequent trees is very useful in domains like bioinformatics, web mining, mining semistructured data, and so on. We formulate the problem of mining (embedded) subtrees in a forest of rooted, labeled, and ordered trees. We present TREEMINER, a novel algorithm to discover all frequent subtrees in a forest, using a new data structure called scope-list. We contrast TREEMINER with

  14. Ensemble Mine Impact Burial Naval Postgraduate School

    E-print Network

    Chu, Peter C.

    Ensemble Mine Impact Burial Prediction Peter Chu Naval Postgraduate School Monterey, CA 93943 #12;Typical Mine Insertion Profile #12;Modeling Mine Impact Burial Depth Modeling is first step in planning mine hunting mission Determining depth of burial, and height, area and volume protruding upon impact

  15. Application of geophysics in metalliferous mines

    Microsoft Academic Search

    G. N. Fallon; P. K. Fullagar; S. N. Sheard

    1997-01-01

    The role of geophysics in mineral exploration has expanded rapidly in recent decades, but in mining its importance is only just being recognised. The barriers to greater acceptance of geophysics in mining are more ‘cultural’ than technical, insofar as mining companies have historically (albeit unconsciously) effectively quarantined geo?physicists from mine development and production personnel. The principal motivation of this paper

  16. Resource Recovery from Flooded Underground Mines

    EPA Science Inventory

    Butte, Montana has been the site of hard rock mining activities for over a century. Over 400 hundred underground mines were developed and over 10,000 miles of underground mine workings were created. During active mining, groundwater was removed from the workings by large-scale pu...

  17. Resource Recovery of Flooded Underground Mine Workings

    EPA Science Inventory

    Butte, Montana has been the site of hard rock mining activities for over a century. Over 400 hundred underground mines were developed and over 10,000 miles of underground mine workings were created. During active mining, groundwater was removed from the workings by large-scale pu...

  18. 30 CFR 77.1200 - Mine map.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Mine map. 77.1200 Section 77.1200 Mineral Resources...MINES AND SURFACE WORK AREAS OF UNDERGROUND COAL MINES Maps § 77.1200 Mine map. The operator shall maintain an accurate and...

  19. Image Information Mining Utilizing Hierarchical Segmentation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tilton, James C.; Marchisio, Giovanni; Koperski, Krzysztof; Datcu, Mihai

    2002-01-01

    The Hierarchical Segmentation (HSEG) algorithm is an approach for producing high quality, hierarchically related image segmentations. The VisiMine image information mining system utilizes clustering and segmentation algorithms for reducing visual information in multispectral images to a manageable size. The project discussed herein seeks to enhance the VisiMine system through incorporating hierarchical segmentations from HSEG into the VisiMine system.

  20. MINE WASTE TECHNOLOGY PROGRAM: A SUCCESS STORY

    EPA Science Inventory

    Mining Waste generated by active and inactive mining operations is a growing problem for the mining industry, local governments, and Native American communities because of its impact on human health and the environment. In the US, the reported volume of mine waste is immense: 2 b...

  1. 30 CFR 77.1200 - Mine map.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Mine map. 77.1200 Section 77.1200 Mineral Resources...MINES AND SURFACE WORK AREAS OF UNDERGROUND COAL MINES Maps § 77.1200 Mine map. The operator shall maintain an accurate and...

  2. 30 CFR 77.1200 - Mine map.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Mine map. 77.1200 Section 77.1200 Mineral Resources...MINES AND SURFACE WORK AREAS OF UNDERGROUND COAL MINES Maps § 77.1200 Mine map. The operator shall maintain an accurate and...

  3. 30 CFR 77.1200 - Mine map.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Mine map. 77.1200 Section 77.1200 Mineral Resources...MINES AND SURFACE WORK AREAS OF UNDERGROUND COAL MINES Maps § 77.1200 Mine map. The operator shall maintain an accurate and...

  4. 30 CFR 77.1200 - Mine map.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Mine map. 77.1200 Section 77.1200 Mineral Resources...MINES AND SURFACE WORK AREAS OF UNDERGROUND COAL MINES Maps § 77.1200 Mine map. The operator shall maintain an accurate and...

  5. Research on routing protocol for mine WSN

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Gao Jing; Wang Qianping

    2010-01-01

    WSN technology applied in the coal mine is a general trend. According to the specificity of the mine environment, this paper bring forward an improving GEAR routing protocol, we call it GEAR-R. We use the hybrid GEAR and GEAR-R wireless routing protocols to the mine situation. Simulation analysis shows that the improved protocol with the mobile node in the mine

  6. Risk Assessment of Heavy Metals in Abandoned Mine Lands as Signifcant Contamination Problem in Romania

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horvath, E.; Jordan, G.; Fugedi, U.; Bartha, A.; Kuti, L.; Heltai, G.; Kalmar, J.; Waldmann, I.; Napradean, I.; Damian, G.

    2009-04-01

    INTRODUCTION Wide-spread environmental contamination associated with historic mining in Europe has triggered social responses to improve related environmental legislation, the environmental assessment and management methods for the mining industry. Pollution by acid mine drainage (AMD) from ore and coal mining is the outstanding and most important source of mining-induced environmental pollution. Younger et al. (2002) estimates that watercourses polluted by coal mine drainage could be in the order of 2,000 to 3,000 km, and 1,000 to 1,500 km polluted by metal mine discharges for the EU 15 Member States (Younger et al. 2002). Significance of contamination risk posed by mining is also highlighted by mine accidents such as those in Baia Mare, Romania in 2002 and in Aznalcollar, Spain in 1999 (Jordan and D'Alessandro 2004). The new EU Mine Waste Directive (Directive 2006/21/EC) requires the risk-based inventory of abandoned mines in the EU. The cost-effective implementation of the inventory is especially demanding in countries with extensive historic mining and great number of abandoned mine sites, like Romania. The problem is further complicated in areas with trans-boundary effects. The objective of this investigation to carry out the risk-based contamination assessment of a mine site with possible trans-boundary effects in Romania. Assessment follows the source-pathway-receptor chain with a special attention to heavy metal leaching from waste dumps as sources and to transport modelling along surface water pathways. STUDY AREA In this paper the Baiut mine catchment located in the Gutai Mts., Romania, close to the Hungarian border is studied. The polymetallic deposites in the Tertiary Inner-Carpathian Volcanic Arc are exposed by a series of abandoned Zn and Pb mines first operated in the 14th century. Elevation in the high relief catchment ranges from 449m to 1044m. Geology is characterised by andesites hosting the ore deposits and paleogene sediments dominating at the lower topographic elevations. Several mine adits, waste rock dumps are located along the main stream and a large tailings dump is found next to village Baiut just above the receiving floodplain. Predominant land cover is coniferous and mixed forests with agricultural lands on the downstream floodplain. METHODS Six samples at vaious depths were collected from the two major waste rock dumps in the headwater area, and the large tailings dump was also sampled for heavy metal source characterisation. 11 stream sediment samples were collected along the main surface water contamination transport pathway, and a further 11 soil samples were collected in 2 boreholes in the receptor floodplain in October 2008. Besides background stream sediment samples, samples from the exposed rock formations were also collected in order to capture natural background geochemistry in the studied mineralised area. The collected waste rock, stream sediment, soil and rock samples are analysed for total chemical composition (major elements and heavy metals) by ICP-MS spectroscopy, and XRD is used for the determination of mineralogical composition. Rock sample mineralogy is further investigated in thin-sections by petrological microscopy. According to EU legislation expectations, a special emphasis is taken on the determination of metal mobility from the waste rock dumps and various leaching tests are performed and compared including US EPA, USGS and ISO methods. A simple cathcment-based distributed sediment transport model (Jordan et al, 2005; Jordan et al. 2005, 2008) is used to decribe the pathways and quantities of particle-bound contamination. RESULTS AND CONCLUSIONS Results show that (1) sediments are an efficient means for the preliminary inventory of mine contamination as a preparation for the more detailed hydrological sampling and assessment, and (2) the risk-based contamination assessment of mining sites often located in diverse geological, hydrological and landcover environment requires careful and successive sampling design and a tiered assessment approach. Leaching tests are show

  7. Small mammal-heavy metal concentrations from mined and control sites

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Smith, G.J.; Rongstad, O.J.

    1982-01-01

    Total body concentrations of zinc, copper, cadmium, lead, nickel, mercury and arsenic were determined for Peromyscus maniculatus and Microtus pennsylvanicus from an active zinc-copper mine near Timmins, Ontario, Canada, and a proposed zinc-copper mine near Crandon, Wisconsin, USA. Metal concentrations were evaluated with respect to area, species, sex and age groups. Metal concentrations in Peromyscus from the proposed mine site were not different from those collected in a third area where no mine or deposit exists. This is probably due to the 30 m of glacial material over the proposed mine site deposit. A statistical interaction between area, species, sex and age was observed for zinc and copper concentrations in small mammals we examined. Peromyscus from the mine site had consistently higher metal concentrations than Peromyscus from the control site. Greater total body cadmium and lead concentrations in adult?compared with juvenile?Peromyscus collected at the mine site suggests age-dependent accumulation of these toxic metals. Microtus did not exhibit this age-related response, and responded to other environmental metals more erratically and to a lesser degree. Differences in the response of these two species to environmental metal exposure may be due to differences in food habits. Nickel, mercury and arsenic concentrations in small mammals from the mine site were not different from controls. Heavy metal concentrations are also presented for Sorex cinereus, Blarina brevicauda and Zapus hudsonicus without respect to age and sex cohorts. Peromyscus may be a potentially important species for the monitoring of heavy metal pollution.

  8. Mercury contamination in agricultural soils from abandoned metal mines classified by geology and mineralization.

    PubMed

    Kim, Han Sik; Jung, Myung Chae

    2012-01-01

    This survey aimed to compare mercury concentrations in soils related to geology and mineralization types of mines. A total of 16,386 surface soils (0~15 cm in depth) were taken from agricultural lands near 343 abandoned mines (within 2 km from each mine) and analyzed for Hg by AAS with a hydride-generation device. To meaningfully compare mercury levels in soils with geology and mineralization types, three subclassification criteria were adapted: (1) five mineralization types, (2) four valuable ore mineral types, and (3) four parent rock types. The average concentration of Hg in all soils was 0.204 mg kg(-1) with a range of 0.002-24.07 mg kg(-1). Based on the mineralization types, average Hg concentrations (mg kg(-1)) in the soils decreased in the order of pegmatite (0.250) > hydrothermal vein (0.208) > hydrothermal replacement (0.166) > skarn (0.121) > sedimentary deposits (0.045). In terms of the valuable ore mineral types, the concentrations decreased in the order of Au-Ag-base metal mines ? base metal mines > Au-Ag mines > Sn-W-Mo-Fe-Mn mines. For parent rock types, similar concentrations were found in the soils derived from sedimentary rocks and metamorphic rocks followed by heterogeneous rocks with igneous and metamorphic processes. Furthermore, farmland soils contained relatively higher Hg levels than paddy soils. Therefore, it can be concluded that soils in Au, Ag, and base metal mines derived from a hydrothermal vein type of metamorphic rocks and pegmatite deposits contained relatively higher concentrations of mercury in the surface environment. PMID:21814815

  9. [Introduction to medical data mining].

    PubMed

    Zhu, Lingyun; Wu, Baoming; Cao, Changxiu

    2003-09-01

    Modern medicine generates a great deal of information stored in the medical database. Extracting useful knowledge and providing scientific decision-making for the diagnosis and treatment of disease from the database increasingly becomes necessary. Data mining in medicine can deal with this problem. It can also improve the management level of hospital information and promote the development of telemedicine and community medicine. Because the medical information is characteristic of redundancy, multi-attribution, incompletion and closely related with time, medical data mining differs from other one. In this paper we have discussed the key techniques of medical data mining involving pretreatment of medical data, fusion of different pattern and resource, fast and robust mining algorithms and reliability of mining results. The methods and applications of medical data mining based on computation intelligence such as artificial neural network, fuzzy system, evolutionary algorithms, rough set, and support vector machine have been introduced. The features and problems in data mining are summarized in the last section. PMID:14565039

  10. Microbial diversity at the moderate acidic stage in three different sulfidic mine tailings dumps generating acid mine drainage.

    PubMed

    Korehi, Hananeh; Blöthe, Marco; Schippers, Axel

    2014-11-01

    In freshly deposited sulfidic mine tailings the pH is alkaline or circumneutral. Due to pyrite or pyrrhotite oxidation the pH is dropping over time to pH values <3 at which acidophilic iron- and sulfur-oxidizing prokaryotes prevail and accelerate the oxidation processes, well described for several mine waste sites. The microbial communities at the moderate acidic stage in mine tailings are only scarcely studied. Here we investigated the microbial diversity via 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis in eight samples (pH range 3.2-6.5) from three different sulfidic mine tailings dumps in Botswana, Germany and Sweden. In total 701 partial 16S rRNA gene sequences revealed a divergent microbial community between the three sites and at different tailings depths. Proteobacteria and Firmicutes were overall the most abundant phyla in the clone libraries. Acidobacteria, Actinobacteria, Bacteroidetes, and Nitrospira occurred less frequently. The found microbial communities were completely different to microbial communities in tailings at

  11. [Impact of mining wastes on the physicochemical and biological characteristics of groundwater in a mining area in Marrakech (Morocco)].

    PubMed

    El Adnani, M; Boughrous, A Ait; Khebiza, M Yacoubi; El Gharmali, A; Sbai, M L; Errouane, A S; Idrissi, L Loukili; Nejmeddine, A

    2007-01-01

    Metal sulphide tailings represent a potential risk basically for the environment and particularly for water resources, because of their natural oxidisability which leads to the production of acid/neutral mine drainage. The prospected site close to Marrakech includes zinc, lead and copper sulphide deposits. This site is located in an agricultural area where ground water is used both for irrigation and drinking. Eco-toxicological investigations have been undertaken in order to asses the tailings impact on water quality in nearby wells. These investigations include physico-chemical characterization of the groundwaters as well as faunistic population determination. As compared to standard wells, waters from the wells located downstream of the mining site, have high electrical conductivities and high major ions contents, which can reach: 755 mg l(-1) in SO4(2-), 1670 mg l(-1) in Ca2+, 528 mg l(-1) in Mg2+, 2289 mg I(-1) in Na+ and 14981 mg l(-1) in Cl-. The fauna distribution analysis carried out around the studied wells shows qualitative and quantitative differences according to the flow gradient of the groundwaters. Areas located upstream of the mine tailings site are richer in stygobite species (Type and quantity) than those located downstream or close to it. It is likely that these biological differences are due to water quality alteration induced by the mining activity. PMID:17283951

  12. Cascadia Tsunami Deposit Database

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Peters, Robert; Jaffe, Bruce; Gelfenbaum, Guy; Peterson, Curt

    2003-01-01

    The Cascadia Tsunami Deposit Database contains data on the location and sedimentological properties of tsunami deposits found along the Cascadia margin. Data have been compiled from 52 studies, documenting 59 sites from northern California to Vancouver Island, British Columbia that contain known or potential tsunami deposits. Bibliographical references are provided for all sites included in the database. Cascadia tsunami deposits are usually seen as anomalous sand layers in coastal marsh or lake sediments. The studies cited in the database use numerous criteria based on sedimentary characteristics to distinguish tsunami deposits from sand layers deposited by other processes, such as river flooding and storm surges. Several studies cited in the database contain evidence for more than one tsunami at a site. Data categories include age, thickness, layering, grainsize, and other sedimentological characteristics of Cascadia tsunami deposits. The database documents the variability observed in tsunami deposits found along the Cascadia margin.

  13. Remediation and rehabilitation of abandoned mining sites in Cyprus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Helsen, S.; Rommens, T.; De Ridder, A.; Panayiotou, C.; Colpaert, J.

    2009-04-01

    Due to a particular geological setting, Cyprus is rich in ore deposits, many of them subject to extensive mining. Most of the mines have a long history, sometimes dating back to prehistorical times. These abandoned mines cause severe off-site environmental problems and health risks for the local population. Groundwater supplies are affected by the leaching of pollutants, surface water is contaminated because of water erosion, and harmful dust containing heavy metals or asbestos is spread due to wind erosion. In addition to the environmental risks associated with the abandoned mines, many of these sites are aestethically unattractive, and remain an economic burden to stakeholders and the public in general, due to the downgrading of surrounding areas, non-development and hence loss of revenue. These factors are important in Cyprus where tourism is a significant source of income for local communities. An EUREKA-project addresses the issue of abandoned mine clean-up and restoration. The main objectives of this study are : (1) To develop phytostabilization and -remediation techniques to stabilize and clean up sites characterized by high nickel and copper concentrations in the soil, using endemic plants (Alyssum spp. and mycorrhizal Pinus brutia). In some old mines, efforts were already made to stabilize slopes in an attempt to minimize soil erosion and spreading of pollutants. These restoration efforts, however, remained largely unsuccessful because vegetation that was planted could not cope with the harsh hydrogeochemical soil characteristics. Regeneration of the vegetation cover therefore failed ; (2) to demonstrate the risks associated to the environmental hazard of metal polluted mine spoils and outline a method by which to accomplish this type of risk assessment ; (3) to analyse costs and benefits of phytostabilization- and phytoremediation-based solution for the problem. Results of the first experiments are still preliminary and incomplete. However, it is expected that a better knowledge on growing conditions of the selected plant species will contribute to the development of a phytoremediation technique for a low-cost and sustainable restoration of the old mine sites. Moreover, this will have direct utility to other areas in the Mediterranean region, that are similarly threatened by the presence of heavy metals in the environment.

  14. Mining and Reclamation Technology Symposium

    SciTech Connect

    None Available

    1999-06-24

    The Mining and Reclamation Technology Symposium was commissioned by the Mountaintop Removal Mining/Valley Fill Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) Interagency Steering Committee as an educational forum for the members of the regulatory community who will participate in the development of the EIS. The Steering Committee sought a balanced audience to ensure the input to the regulatory community reflected the range of perspectives on this complicated and emotional issue. The focus of this symposium is on mining and reclamation technology alternatives, which is one of eleven topics scheduled for review to support development of the EIS. Others include hydrologic, environmental, ecological, and socio-economic issues.

  15. Automated Coal-Mining System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gangal, M. D.; Isenberg, L.; Lewis, E. V.

    1985-01-01

    Proposed system offers safety and large return on investment. System, operating by year 2000, employs machines and processes based on proven principles. According to concept, line of parallel machines, connected in groups of four to service modules, attacks face of coal seam. High-pressure water jets and central auger on each machine break face. Jaws scoop up coal chunks, and auger grinds them and forces fragments into slurry-transport system. Slurry pumped through pipeline to point of use. Concept for highly automated coal-mining system increases productivity, makes mining safer, and protects health of mine workers.

  16. Kentucky Mine Mapping Information System

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    This Geographic Information System (GIS) allows users to view and download all known mined out areas (polygons) digitized by the Kentucky Revenue Cabinet; individual reports from the Mines and Minerals database; and scanned images of engineering drawings (mine maps) submitted since January 2002, plus selected earlier maps. The maps can be viewed directly online with the use of an interactive viewer, or they can be downloaded from an FTP site. The interactive viewer shows all scanned maps and oil/gas wells (where available) for a selected area, overlain on a base map or imagery.

  17. Movie review mining and summarization

    E-print Network

    Li Zhuang; Feng Jing; Xiao-yan Zhu

    2006-01-01

    With the flourish of the Web, online review is becoming a more and more useful and important information resource for people. As a result, automatic review mining and summarization has become a hot research topic recently. Different from traditional text summarization, review mining and summarization aims at extracting the features on which the reviewers express their opinions and determining whether the opinions are positive or negative. In this paper, we focus on a specific domain – movie review. A multi-knowledge based approach is proposed, which integrates WordNet, statistical analysis and movie knowledge. The experimental results show the effectiveness of the proposed approach in movie review mining and summarization.

  18. The Rammelsberg shale-hosted Cu-Zn-Pb sulfide and barite deposit, Germany: Linking SEDEX and Kuroko-type massive sulfides

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Andreas G. Mueller

    2008-01-01

    The Rammelsberg Cu-Zn-Pb sulfide-barite deposit in the Harz mountain range, northern Germany, was mined almost continuously for more than a 1000 years (968-1988 AD). The mine, located south of the medieval town centre of Goslar, is now a UNESCO world heritage site. The Rammelsberg is a type locality for shale-hosted, sedimentary-exhalative (SEDEX) Zn-Pb-Ag deposits but is unusual because of the

  19. Ensemble Data Mining Methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oza, Nikunj C.

    2004-01-01

    Ensemble Data Mining Methods, also known as Committee Methods or Model Combiners, are machine learning methods that leverage the power of multiple models to achieve better prediction accuracy than any of the individual models could on their own. The basic goal when designing an ensemble is the same as when establishing a committee of people: each member of the committee should be as competent as possible, but the members should be complementary to one another. If the members are not complementary, Le., if they always agree, then the committee is unnecessary---any one member is sufficient. If the members are complementary, then when one or a few members make an error, the probability is high that the remaining members can correct this error. Research in ensemble methods has largely revolved around designing ensembles consisting of competent yet complementary models.

  20. Data Mining SIAM Presentation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Srivastava, Ashok; McIntosh, Dawn; Castle, Pat; Pontikakis, Manos; Diev, Vesselin; Zane-Ulman, Brett; Turkov, Eugene; Akella, Ram; Xu, Zuobing; Kumaresan, Sakthi Preethi

    2006-01-01

    This viewgraph document describes the data mining system developed at NASA Ames. Many NASA programs have large numbers (and types) of problem reports.These free text reports are written by a number of different people, thus the emphasis and wording vary considerably With so much data to sift through, analysts (subject experts) need help identifying any possible safety issues or concerns and help them confirm that they haven't missed important problems. Unsupervised clustering is the initial step to accomplish this; We think we can go much farther, specifically, identify possible recurring anomalies. Recurring anomalies may be indicators of larger systemic problems. The requirement to identify these anomalies has led to the development of Recurring Anomaly Discovery System (ReADS).

  1. Mine roof support structure

    SciTech Connect

    Boer, W.; Lachner, H.; Maschonat, G.; Richter, J.; Schulte, H.; Warnke, H.

    1981-10-06

    A mine roof support structure includes a floor skid, a supporting shield pivotally connected thereto by a pair of rocker arms forming a lemniscate guide, a roof cap pivotally connected at a roof cap joint to the shield, and hydraulic props supporting the roof cap. A hydraulic actuator is pivotally connected at opposite ends to the skid and to one of the arms, and the other of the rocker arms is disposed nearer the coal-face end of the support than the one arm. Such other arm is longitudinally adjustable and is pivotally connected at opposite ends to the skid and to the shield. This other arm is so constructed that its opposite ends may be adjusted relative to one another to enable the cap and the roof cap joint to follow a lemniscate path during settling of the roof and to follow a circular arc during a lowering of the cap toward the skid upon actuation of the hydraulic actuator.

  2. US enacts new mine safety policies

    SciTech Connect

    Fiscor, S.

    2006-06-15

    New legislation in the USA requires mine operators to be prepared, increases funding for safety equipment research, strengthens mine rescue teams, and raises the limits for penalties. The Mine Improvement and New Emergency Response (MINER) Act represents the efforts of industry and politicians in reaction to recent mining tragedies. S.2803 was signed on 15 June 2006. The article discusses the content of the Act and its implications for coal mine operators. 2 figs.

  3. Investigation on the Nanjing Gypsum Mine Flooding

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Guangya Wang; Guanlin You; Yulin Xu

    Nanjing Gypsum Mine, or NGM, is encountering some engineering challenges in deep underground mining. The major challenges\\u000a that affect the underground mine geomechanics and geoenvironment are attributed to groundwater, rock properties and geological\\u000a structures, such as faults. A catastrophic mine flooding, triggered at NGM on 11 Sept. 2006, inundated the entire underground\\u000a mine. The causes of this geological disaster are

  4. Knowledge Management, Data Mining, and Text Mining in Medical Informatics

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Hsinchun Chen; Sherrilynne S. Fuller; Carol Friedman; William Hersh

    In this chapter we provide a broad overview of selected knowledge management, data mining, and text mining techniques and\\u000a their use in various emerging biomedical applications. It aims to set the context for subsequent chapters. We first introduce\\u000a five major paradigms for machine learning and data analysis including: probabilistic and statistical models, symbolic learning\\u000a and rule induction, neural networks, evolution-based

  5. Advancing apparatus for coal-mining machine in underground mine

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Schupphaus

    1984-01-01

    A coal-mining machine is advanced along a face conveyor by providing a rack extending along the conveyor and a plurality of advancing units. Each advancing unit includes a hydraulic motor to rotate a drive wheel while meshing with the teeth of the gear rack. The advancing units arranged side-by-side along the mining machine have curved end faces to abut against

  6. Deposition Overview - Part II

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    This YouTube video, created by Southwest Center for Microsystems Education (SCME), provides an overview of the deposition processes used to fabricate micro-sized devicesâ??. The lecture runs for 10:33 seconds and covers "a brief overview of chemical vapor deposition, physical vapor deposition, and electrodeposition." More information on desposition can be found on the SCME website. 

  7. Ilmenite-rich pyroclastic deposits - An ideal lunar resource

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hawke, B. R.; Clark, B.; Coombs, C. R.

    1990-01-01

    With a view of investigating possible economic benefits that a permanent lunar settlement might provide to the near-earth space infrastructures, consideration was given to the ilmenite-rich pyroclastic deposits as sources of oxygen (for use as a propellant) and He-3 (for nuclear fusion fuel). This paper demonstrates that ilmenite-rich pyroclastic deposits would be excellent sources of a wide variety of valuable elements besides O and He-3, including Fe, Ti, H2, N, C, S, Cu, Zn, Cd, Bi, and Pb. It is shown that several ilmenite-rich pyroclastic deposits of regional extent exist on the lunar surface. The suitability of regional pyroclastic deposits for lunar mining operations, construction activities, and the establishment of permanent lunar settlements is examined.

  8. Features of ore formation in the gold-quartz Sovinoye deposit (Northern Chukotka)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kolova, E. E.; Volkov, A. V.; Prokof'ev, V. Yu.; Sidorov, A. A.

    2014-12-01

    The results of studying fluid inclusions in the quartz of ore body no. 6 from the Sovinoye deposit developed by the underground mine workings at a depth of 80 m from the surface are considered. The investigations showed that the ore in the Sovinoye deposit was formed at average temperatures during several stages from weakly concentrated hydrotherms saturated with Na, Cl, Mg, and Fe ions. Such ore-forming conditions are typical of mezothermal gold-quartz veined deposits in the terrigeneous quartz-carbonate strata. The results of FI study by modern methods do not contradict the previously offered metamorphogenic-magmatogenic model of ore formation for the Sovinoye deposit.

  9. Properties of chemical vapor infiltration diamond deposited in a diamond powder matrix

    SciTech Connect

    Panitz, J.K.G.; Tallant, D.R.; Hills, C.R.; Staley, D.J.

    1993-12-31

    Densifying non-mined diamond powder precursors with diamond produced by chemical vapor infiltration (CVI) is an attractive approach for forming thick diamond deposits that avoids many potential manufacturability problems associated with predominantly chemical vapor deposition (CVD) processes. The authors have developed two techniques: electrophoretic deposition and screen printing, to form nonmined diamond powder precursors on substrates. They then densify these precursors in a hot filament assisted reactor. Analysis indicated that a hot filament assisted chemical vapor infiltration process forms intergranular diamond deposits with properties that are to some degree different from predominantly hot-filament-assisted CVD material.

  10. 30 CFR 780.27 - Reclamation plan: Surface mining near underground mining.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Reclamation plan: Surface mining near underground...Resources OFFICE OF SURFACE MINING RECLAMATION AND ENFORCEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF...INTERIOR SURFACE COAL MINING AND RECLAMATION OPERATIONS PERMITS AND COAL...

  11. 30 CFR 780.27 - Reclamation plan: Surface mining near underground mining.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Reclamation plan: Surface mining near underground...Resources OFFICE OF SURFACE MINING RECLAMATION AND ENFORCEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF...INTERIOR SURFACE COAL MINING AND RECLAMATION OPERATIONS PERMITS AND COAL...

  12. 30 CFR 780.27 - Reclamation plan: Surface mining near underground mining.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Reclamation plan: Surface mining near underground...Resources OFFICE OF SURFACE MINING RECLAMATION AND ENFORCEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF...INTERIOR SURFACE COAL MINING AND RECLAMATION OPERATIONS PERMITS AND COAL...

  13. 30 CFR 780.27 - Reclamation plan: Surface mining near underground mining.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Reclamation plan: Surface mining near underground...Resources OFFICE OF SURFACE MINING RECLAMATION AND ENFORCEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF...INTERIOR SURFACE COAL MINING AND RECLAMATION OPERATIONS PERMITS AND COAL...

  14. 76 FR 20940 - Troy Mine, Incorporated, Troy Mine Revised Reclamation Plan, Kootenai National Forest, Lincoln...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-04-14

    ...Troy Mine, Incorporated, Troy Mine Revised Reclamation Plan, Kootenai National Forest, Lincoln County...Silver Company, submitted the Troy Mine Revised Reclamation Plan (Revised Reclamation Plan or Proposed Action) on February 27,...

  15. 30 CFR 780.27 - Reclamation plan: Surface mining near underground mining.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Reclamation plan: Surface mining near underground...Resources OFFICE OF SURFACE MINING RECLAMATION AND ENFORCEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF...INTERIOR SURFACE COAL MINING AND RECLAMATION OPERATIONS PERMITS AND COAL...

  16. 76 FR 63238 - Proximity Detection Systems for Continuous Mining Machines in Underground Coal Mines

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-10-12

    ...1219-AB65 Proximity Detection Systems for Continuous Mining Machines in Underground Coal...addressing Proximity Detection Systems for Continuous Mining Machines in Underground Coal...rule for Proximity Detection Systems on Continuous Mining Machines in Underground...

  17. 76 FR 70075 - Proximity Detection Systems for Continuous Mining Machines in Underground Coal Mines

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-11-10

    ...1219-AB65 Proximity Detection Systems for Continuous Mining Machines in Underground Coal...addressing Proximity Detection Systems for Continuous Mining Machines in Underground Coal...rule, Proximity Detection Systems for Continuous Mining Machines in Underground...

  18. 30 CFR 49.3 - Alternative mine rescue capability for small and remote mines.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...Resources 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Alternative mine rescue capability for small and remote mines. 49.3 Section 49.3 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR EDUCATION...

  19. 30 CFR 49.13 - Alternative mine rescue capability for small and remote mines.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...Resources 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Alternative mine rescue capability for small and remote mines. 49.13 Section 49.13 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR EDUCATION...

  20. 30 CFR 49.3 - Alternative mine rescue capability for small and remote mines.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...Resources 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Alternative mine rescue capability for small and remote mines. 49.3 Section 49.3 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR EDUCATION...

  1. 30 CFR 49.3 - Alternative mine rescue capability for small and remote mines.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...Resources 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Alternative mine rescue capability for small and remote mines. 49.3 Section 49.3 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR EDUCATION...

  2. 30 CFR 49.13 - Alternative mine rescue capability for small and remote mines.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...Resources 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Alternative mine rescue capability for small and remote mines. 49.13 Section 49.13 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR EDUCATION...

  3. 30 CFR 49.13 - Alternative mine rescue capability for small and remote mines.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...Resources 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Alternative mine rescue capability for small and remote mines. 49.13 Section 49.13 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR EDUCATION...

  4. 30 CFR 49.3 - Alternative mine rescue capability for small and remote mines.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...Resources 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Alternative mine rescue capability for small and remote mines. 49.3 Section 49.3 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR EDUCATION...

  5. 30 CFR 49.13 - Alternative mine rescue capability for small and remote mines.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...Resources 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Alternative mine rescue capability for small and remote mines. 49.13 Section 49.13 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR EDUCATION...

  6. Mining law and regulations of Mexico

    SciTech Connect

    Miranda, F.C.

    1992-01-01

    The mining law and regulations of Mexico have been of considerable interest to mining lawyers in the united States. Recent wide-ranging changes in Mexican mining regulations have come at a time when the mining industry hopes to broaden its scope to contend with worldwide competition. Article 27 of the Federal Constitution of Mexico governs the mining of metallic, nonmetallic, and coal materials. New regulation implementing this law became effective on December 10, 1990. These regulations, generally regarded as providing far greater flexibility in the acquisition and maintenance of mineral rights, also provide substantial additional flexibility in the ability of non-Mexican companies to own concessions. The Laws section of this book includes: General Provision, ministry of National Patrimony, mining concession, beneficiating plant concessions, execution and proof of exploitation work oppositions, national mineral reserves, special concessions on National Mineral Reserves, Public/Registry of mining, mining promotion and of the assistance to small miners, Industrial Mining Reserves and violations and penalties. The regulations section includes: general dispositions, mineral reserves, mining assignments and concessions, right of mining concession holders, obligations of the holders of mining concessions, mining companies, mining public registry, mining experts, inspections, sanctions and remedies.

  7. The mineral treasure that almost got away: Re-evaluating yesterday's mine waste

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Högdahl, K.; Jonsson, E.; Troll, V.; Majka, J.

    2012-04-01

    Rare metals and semi-metals such as In, Ga, Se, Te and rare earth elements (REE) are increasing in demand for use in "new" and "green" technology. Yet, before the end of the 20th century the applications and thus the markets for these elements were limited. In many mines, the exploration paradigms and current knowledge as well as contemporary analytical methodology likely resulted in minerals hosting these metals to end up as waste, that is, on the mine dumps. In other cases, they were identified, but considered as mineralogical "exotica". Even extremely well-known and traditionally valuable metals such as gold went undetected on the dumps in some mine fields. This is due to a combination of factors such as that the deposits were "of the wrong type", assays were expensive, and suitable laboratory capacity sparse. This implies that in many regions, this old mine waste is a potential resource for several sought-after metals and semi-metals, including the ones increasingly used in modern high-tech applications. Admittedly, many older dumps and dump fields host only minor to moderate total amounts of material, but in todaýs society - increasingly focused on sustainability and related needs for recycling - this is likely to become an asset. In Sweden, many mine dumps date back hundreds of years or more as mining has been documented to go back at least 1000 years. Before the 20th century, only a single or, at best, a couple of metals were extracted from any given mine. Due to modern development in analytical techniques, the concentrations of trace elements, including highly sought-after metals and semi-metals can be obtained at moderate costs today. The presence of variable amounts of precious and rare elements along with the main ore commodity has now been documented in several cases. A recently started project in the classic, Palaeoproterozoic Bergslagen ore province in central Sweden is aimed at resolving the potential for finding and utilising these "unknown treasures". A conservative estimate based on SGU databases is that in this province alone, there are over 6500 mineralisations/deposits. A majority of these have associated mine dumps and in the case of more recently mined deposits, different types of tailings. Initial results highlight the high average contents of REÉs and identify their mineralogical and textural distribution in apatite-iron oxide ore present in both dumps and tailings. In addition, we report the occurrence of previously undetected mineralisation of indium and tungsten in different mine dumps in the western part of the province.

  8. Mineralogy, geochemistry and radioactivity of some Egyptian phosphorite deposits

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Dabous; A. A. A

    1981-01-01

    Mineralogical, geochemical, and radiogeological studies of forty-nine phosphorite samples from three main mining areas in Egypt, Abu Tartur (Western Desert), Sibaiya (Nile Valley), and Safaga (Red Sea) have been carried out. X-ray diffraction studies of these Egyptian phosphorites show that carbonate-fluorapatite (francolite) is the major phosphorite mineral in these deposits, with partial substitution of Mg and Na for Ca, and

  9. Origins of Halophilic Microorganisms in Ancient Salt Deposits

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Terry McGenity

    This eight-page review article considers the evidence for and against long-term survival of halophilic microorganisms in ancient salt deposits. Included sections are hypersaline environments and their inhabitants, haloarchaea and halite precipitation, isolations of microorganisms from brines in salt mines, isolations of microorganisms from ancient rock salt, isolations of microorganisms directly from fluid inclusions, relationship of subsurface haloarchaea to surface isolates, dispersal of haloarchaea, and long-term survival of haloarchaea inside salt crystals.

  10. Comparison of Dolostone and Limestone Assessment Methods for Estonian Deposits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sommet, Julija; Pastarus, Juri-Rivaldo

    2012-09-01

    The goal of this study was to elaborate a methodology of sustainability assessment for developing advanced mining technologies. Last year sustainability assessment methods were conducted for Estonian deposits of dolostone and limestone. The elaborated sustainability assessment methods have shown that a three - level risk matrix monitoring scale gives a structured analysis results. The paper introduces with comparison of new Module Analysis (three - level risk matrix) and earlier used Module Analysis (simplest risk scale).

  11. Dried Acid Mine Drainage Residuals

    USGS Multimedia Gallery

    Dried acid mine drainage residuals that are formed during treatment of the drainage.  The USGS has pioneered a new use for these residuals that are currently a disposal challenge, using them to filter phosphorus from agricultural and municipal wastewaters....

  12. Topic in Depth - Data Mining

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    This Topic in Depth explores data mining, also known as knowledge discovery in databases. Data mining is used to extract implicit, previously unknown, but potentially useful information from raw data. It is a blend of three main subjects: statistics, artificial intelligence, and machine learning. Often, true data mining is characterized by a self-acting program and a unique blend of knowledge discovery and prediction that allows individuals and businesses to sort and classify very large amounts of data quickly and efficiently. Data mining programs can be tailored to meet the needs of the users, whether that need is for the forecasting of future investments, or simply the need to recognize patterns among the data being analyzed.

  13. Mining Safety and Health Research

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    This clearinghouse site provides information about health and safety in the mining industry. The site features links to fact sheets, statistics, data, research projects, training materials, publications, educational and occupational software, and national laboratories.

  14. Mining, Minerals and Sustainable Development

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    The Mining, Minerals and Sustainable Development Project (MMSD) is a completed, independent two-year project of research and consultation seeking to understand how the mining and minerals sector can contribute to the global transition to sustainable development. The final report, as well as various regional reports, timelines, and working papers, are available in English, Spanish, French, and Portuguese. Information on a wide spectrum of topics is available, including the following: armed conflict; artisanal and small-scale mining; biodiversity; current industry practice; corporate citizenship; finance dialogue; health and safety; human rights; indigenous peoples; information dialogue; large-volume waste; life-cycle assessment; managing mineral wealth; mine closure policy; minerals availability; planning for outcomes; public participation; and resettlement and displacement.

  15. School of Mines Undergraduate Bulletin

    E-print Network

    , Golden, CO 80401-1887 Correspondence Address correspondence to: Colorado School of Mines, Golden, CO. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 Section 1­Welcome. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 Mission and Goals. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7 Administration. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7 Section 2­Student Life

  16. School of Mines Undergraduate Bulletin

    E-print Network

    , Golden, CO 80401 Address correspondence to: Colorado School of Mines, Golden, CO 80401 Main Telephone Section 1­Welcome. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 Mission and Goals . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10 Section 2­Student Life . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11 Facilities

  17. School of Mines Undergraduate Bulletin

    E-print Network

    , Golden, CO 80401 Address correspondence to: Colorado School of Mines, Golden, CO 80401 Main Telephone. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 Section 1­Welcome. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 Mission and Goals . . 8 Appeal Process for Student Academic Misconduct . 9 Section 2­Student Life

  18. Using Unfolding to Obtain Improved Estimates in the Murrin Murrin Nickel-Cobalt Laterite Deposit in Western Australia

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Mark Murphy; Lyn Bloom; Ute Mueller

    Nickel and cobalt are key additives to modern alloys. The largest worldwide nickel-cobalt resources occur in surface laterite\\u000a deposits that have formed during chemical weathering of ultramafic rocks at the Earth’s surface. Geologically young deposits\\u000a have formed by rapid weathering processes in tropical environments while older deposits that have formed in drier climates.\\u000a At the Murrin Murrin mine in Western

  19. Use of mine spoils from Teruel coal mining district (NE, Spain)

    Microsoft Academic Search

    S. Meseguer; M. M. Jordán; T. Sanfeliu

    2009-01-01

    Coal mine restoration projects increase public perception of mining companies. Spain has relatively few examples of completed\\u000a opencast mine rehabilitation projects. This study seeks to obtain the use of mine spoils from coal mines in Teruel. The studied\\u000a mine spoils may be used as raw material for the Spanish ceramic industry, located in the provinces of Castellon, Valencia\\u000a and Teruel.

  20. Co-offending Network Mining

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Patricia L. Brantingham; Martin Ester; Richard Frank; Uwe Glässer; Mohammad A. Tayebi

    \\u000a We propose here a computational framework for co-offending network mining defined in terms of a process that combines formal data modeling with data mining of large crime and terrorism data sets\\u000a as gathered and maintained by law enforcement and intelligence agencies. Our crime data analysis aims at exploring relevant\\u000a properties of criminal networks in arrest-data and is based on 5?years