Sample records for depression study protocol

  1. Research Protocol. A Qualitative Study Investigating Depressive Prodrome in Adolescents

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Rebecca J. Syed; Alison R. Yung

    2006-01-01

    Background: Depression is common, disabling and often has its onset in adolescents. Adolescents with depression are at high risk for persistence and recurrence of depression into adulthood. Subthreshold forms of depression in adolescents are also common. Objective: To retrospectively reconstruct the period leading up to the first episode of major depressive disorder (MDD) in a sample of adolescents. It is

  2. Community pharmacist intervention in depressed primary care patients (PRODEFAR study): randomized controlled trial protocol

    PubMed Central

    Rubio-Valera, Maria; Serrano-Blanco, Antoni; Travé, Pere; Peñarrubia-María, M Teresa; Ruiz, Mar; Pujol, Marian March

    2009-01-01

    Background Treatment of depression, the most prevalent and costly mental disorder, needs to be improved. Non-concordance with clinical guidelines and non-adherence can limit the efficacy of pharmacological treatment of depression. Through pharmaceutical care, pharmacists can improve patients' compliance and wellbeing. The aim of this study is to evaluate the effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of a community pharmacist intervention developed to improve adherence and outcomes of primary care patients with depression. Methods/design A randomized controlled trial, with 6-month follow-up, comparing patients receiving a pharmaceutical care support programme in primary care with patients receiving usual care. The total sample comprises 194 patients (aged between 18 and 75) diagnosed with depressive disorder in a primary care health centre in the province of Barcelona (Spain). Subjects will be asked for written informed consent in order to participate in the study. Diagnosis will be confirmed using the SCID-I. The intervention consists of an educational programme focused on improving knowledge about medication, making patients aware of the importance of compliance, reducing stigma, reassuring patients about side-effects and stressing the importance of carrying out general practitioners' advice. Measurements will take place at baseline, and after 3 and 6 months. Main outcome measure is compliance with antidepressants. Secondary outcomes include; clinical severity of depression (PHQ-9), anxiety (STAI-S), health-related quality of life (EuroQol-5D), satisfaction with the treatment received, side-effects, chronic physical conditions and socio-demographics. The use of healthcare and social care services will be assessed with an adapted version of the Client Service Receipt Inventory (CSRI). Discussion This trial will provide valuable information for health professionals and policy makers on the effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of a pharmaceutical intervention programme in the context of primary care. Trial registration NCT00794196 PMID:19656386

  3. Psychoanalytic and cognitive-behavior therapy of chronic depression: study protocol for a randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Despite limited effectiveness of short-term psychotherapy for chronic depression, there is a lack of trials of long-term psychotherapy. Our study is the first to determine the effectiveness of controlled long-term psychodynamic and cognitive-behavioral (CBT) treatments and to assess the effects of preferential vs. randomized assessment. Methods/design Patients are assigned to treatment according to their preference or randomized (if they have no clear preference). Up to 80 sessions of psychodynamic or psychoanalytically oriented treatments (PAT) or up to 60 sessions of CBT are offered during the first year in the study. After the first year, PAT can be continued according to the ‘naturalistic’ usual method of treating such patients within the system of German health care (normally from 240 up to 300 sessions over two to three years). CBT therapists may extend their treatment up to 80 sessions, but focus mainly maintenance and relapse prevention. We plan to recruit a total of 240 patients (60 per arm). A total of 11 assessments are conducted throughout treatment and up to three years after initiation of treatment. The primary outcome measures are the Quick Inventory of Depressive Symptoms (QIDS, independent clinician rating) and the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI) after the first year. Discussion We combine a naturalistic approach with randomized controlled trials(RCTs)to investigate how effectively chronic depression can be treated on an outpatient basis by the two forms of treatment reimbursed in the German healthcare system and we will determine the effects of treatment preference vs. randomization. Trial registration http://www.controlled-trials.com/ISRCTN91956346 PMID:22834725

  4. Collaborative Depression Trial (CADET): multi-centre randomised controlled trial of collaborative care for depression - study protocol

    Microsoft Academic Search

    David A Richards; Adwoa Hughes-Morley; Rachel A Hayes; Ricardo Araya; Michael Barkham; John M Bland; Peter Bower; John Cape; Carolyn A Chew-Graham; Linda Gask; Simon Gilbody; Colin Green; David Kessler; Glyn Lewis; Karina Lovell; Chris Manning; Stephen Pilling

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Comprising of both organisational and patient level components, collaborative care is a potentially powerful intervention for improving depression treatment in UK primary Care. However, as previous models have been developed and evaluated in the United States, it is necessary to establish the effect of collaborative care in the UK in order to determine whether this innovative treatment model can

  5. Cognitive bias modification to prevent depression (COPE): study protocol for a randomised controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Depression is a leading cause of disability worldwide and, although efficacious treatments are available, their efficacy is suboptimal and recurrence of symptoms is common. Effective preventive strategies could reduce disability and the long term social and health complications associated with the disorder, but current options are limited. Cognitive bias modification (CBM) is a novel, simple, and safe intervention that addresses attentional and interpretive biases associated with anxiety, dysphoria, and depression. The primary aim of this trial is to determine if CBM decreases the one-year onset of a major depressive episode among adults with subsyndromal depression. Design and methods This randomised controlled trial will recruit 532 adults with subsyndromal symptoms of depression living in the Australian community (parallel design, 1:1 allocation ratio). Participants will be free of clinically significant symptoms of depression and of psychotic disorders, sensory and cognitive impairment, and risky alcohol use. The CBM intervention will target attentional and interpretive biases associated with depressive symptoms. The sessions will be delivered via the internet over a period of 52 weeks. The primary outcome of interest is the onset of a major depressive episode according the DSM-IV-TR criteria over a 12-month period. Secondary outcomes of interest include change in the severity of depressive symptoms as measured by the Patient Health Questionnaire (PHQ-9), use of antidepressants or benzodiazepines, and changes in attention and interpretive biases. The assessment of outcomes will take place 3, 6, 9, and 12 months after randomisation and will occur via the internet. Discussion We propose to test the efficacy of an innovative intervention that is well grounded in theory and for which increasing empirical evidence for an effect on mood is available. The intervention is simple, inexpensive, easy to access, and could be easily rolled out into practice if our findings confirm a role for CBM in the prevention of depression. Trial registration Australian and New Zealand Clinical Trials Registry ACTRN12613001334796. Date: 5th December 2013. PMID:25012399

  6. A study protocol to investigate the management of depression and challenging behaviors associated with dementia in aged care settings

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The high occurrence and under-treatment of clinical depression and behavioral and psychological symptoms of dementia (BPSD) within aged care settings is concerning, yet training programs aimed at improving the detection and management of these problems have generally been ineffective. This article presents a study protocol to evaluate a training intervention for facility managers/registered nurses working in aged care facilities that focuses on organisational processes and culture as well as knowledge, skills and self-efficacy. Methods A Randomised Control Trial (RCT) will be implemented across 18 aged care facilities (divided into three conditions). Participants will be senior registered nurses and personal care attendants employed in the aged care facility. The first condition will receive the training program (Staff as Change Agents – Enhancing and Sustaining Mental Health in Aged Care), the second condition will receive the training program and clinical support, and the third condition will receive no intervention. Results Pre-, post-, 6-month and 12-month follow-up measures of staff and residents will be used to demonstrate how upskilling clinical leaders using our transformational training approach, as well as the use of a structured screening, referral and monitoring protocol, can address the mental health needs of older people in residential care. Conclusions The expected outcome of this study is the validation of an evidence-based training program to improve the management of depression and BPSD among older people in residential care settings by establishing routine practices related to mental health. This relatively brief but highly focussed training package will be readily rolled out to a larger number of residential care facilities at a relatively low cost. Trial registration Australia and New Zealand Clinical Trials Register (ANZCTR): The Universal Trial Number (UTN) is U1111-1141-0109. PMID:24047236

  7. INtegration of DEPression Treatment into HIV Care in Uganda (INDEPTH-Uganda): study protocol for a randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Despite 10 to% of persons living with HIV in sub-Saharan Africa having clinical depression, and the consequences of depression for key public health outcomes (HIV treatment adherence and condom use), depression treatment is rarely integrated into HIV care programs. Task-shifting, protocolized approaches to depression care have been used to overcome severe shortages of mental health specialists in developing countries, but not in sub-Saharan Africa and not with HIV clients. The aims of this trial are to evaluate the implementation outcomes and cost-effectiveness of a task-shifting, protocolized model of antidepressant care for HIV clinics in Uganda. Methods/Design INDEPTH-Uganda is a cluster randomized controlled trial that compares two task-shifting models of depression care - a protocolized model versus a model that relies on the clinical acumen of trained providers to provide depression care in ten public health HIV clinics in Uganda. In addition to data abstracted from routine data collection mechanisms and supervision logs, survey data will be collected from patient and provider longitudinal cohorts; at each site, a random sample of 150 medically stable patients who are depressed according to the PHQ-2 screening will be followed for 12 months, and providers involved in depression care implementation will be followed over 24 months. These data will be used to assess whether the two models differ on implementation outcomes (proportion screened, diagnosed, treated; provider fidelity to model of care), provider adoption of treatment care knowledge and practices, and depression alleviation. A cost-effectiveness analysis will be conducted to compare the relative use of resources by each model. Discussion If effective and resource-efficient, the task-shifting, protocolized model will provide an approach to building the capacity for sustainable integration of depression treatment in HIV care settings across sub-Saharan Africa and improving key public health outcomes. Trial registration INDEPTH-Uganda has been registered with the National Institutes of Health sponsored clinical trials registry (3 February 2013) and has been assigned the identifier NCT02056106. PMID:24962086

  8. Homeopathy for Depression - DEP-HOM: study protocol for a randomized, partially double-blind, placebo controlled, four armed study

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Homeopathy is often sought by patients with depression. In classical homeopathy, the treatment consists of two main elements: the case history and the prescription of an individually selected homeopathic remedy. Previous data suggest that individualized homeopathic Q-potencies were not inferior to the antidepressant fluoxetine in a sample of patients with moderate to severe depression. However, the question remains whether individualized homeopathic Q-potencies and/or the type of the homeopathic case history have a specific therapeutical effect in acute depression as this has not yet been investigated. The study aims to assess the two components of individualized homeopathic treatment for acute depression, i.e., to investigate the specific effect of individualized Q-potencies versus placebo and to investigate the effect of different approaches to the homeopathic case history. Methods/Design A randomized, partially double-blind, placebo-controlled, four-armed trial using a 2 × 2 factorial design with a six-week study duration per patient will be performed. 228 patients diagnosed with major depression (moderate episode) by a psychiatrist will be included. The primary endpoint is the total score on the 17-item Hamilton Depression Rating Scale after six weeks. Secondary end points are: Hamilton Depression Rating Scale total score after two and four weeks; response and remission rates, Beck Depression inventory total score, quality of life and safety at two, four and six weeks. Statistical analyses will be by intention-to-treat. The main endpoint will be analysed by a two-factorial analysis of covariance. Within this model generalized estimation equations will be used to estimate differences between verum and placebo, and between both types of case history. Discussion For the first time this study evaluates both the specific effect of homeopathic medicines and of a homeopathic case taking in patients with depression. It is an attempt to deal with the challenges of homeopathic research and the results might be useful information in the current discussion about the evidence on homeopathy Trial registration ClinicalTrials.gov: NCT01178255 PMID:21320338

  9. Strategic use of new generation antidepressants for depression: SUN(^_^)D study protocol

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Toshi A Furukawa; Tatsuo Akechi; Shinji Shimodera; Mitsuhiko Yamada; Kazuhira Miki; Norio Watanabe; Masatoshi Inagaki; Naohiro Yonemoto

    2011-01-01

    Background  After more than half a century of modern psychopharmacology, with billions of dollars spent on antidepressants annually world-wide,\\u000a we lack good evidence to guide our everyday decisions in conducting antidepressant treatment of patients with major depression.\\u000a First we did not know which antidepressant to use as first line treatment. Second we do not know which dosage we should be\\u000a aiming

  10. Study protocol for examining job strain as a risk factor for severe unipolar depression in an individual participant meta-analysis of 14 European cohorts

    PubMed Central

    Madsen, Ida E. H.; Hannerz, Harald; Nyberg, Solja T.; Magnusson Hanson, Linda L.; Ahola, Kirsi; Alfredsson, Lars; Batty, G. David; Bjorner, Jakob B.; Borritz, Marianne; Burr, Hermann; Dragano, Nico; Ferrie, Jane E.; Hamer, Mark; Jokela, Markus; Knutsson, Anders; Koskenvuo, Markku; Koskinen, Aki; Leineweber, Constanze; Nielsen, Martin L.; Nordin, Maria; Oksanen, Tuula; Pejtersen, Jan H.; Pentti, Jaana; Salo, Paula; Singh-Manoux, Archana; Suominen, Sakari; Theorell, Töres; Toppinen-Tanner, Salla; Vahtera, Jussi; Väänänen, Ari; Westerholm, Peter J. M; Westerlund, Hugo; Fransson, Eleonor; Heikkilä, Katriina; Virtanen, Marianna

    2014-01-01

    Background: Previous studies have shown that gainfully employed individuals with high work demands and low control at work (denoted “job strain”) are at increased risk of common mental disorders, including depression. Most existing studies have, however, measured depression using self-rated symptom scales that do not necessarily correspond to clinically diagnosed depression. In addition, a meta-analysis from 2008 indicated publication bias in the field. Methods: This study protocol describes the planned design and analyses of an individual participant data meta-analysis, to examine whether job strain is associated with an increased risk of clinically diagnosed unipolar depression based on hospital treatment registers.  The study will be based on data from approximately 120,000 individuals who participated in 14 studies on work environment and health in 4 European countries. The self-reported working conditions data will be merged with national registers on psychiatric hospital treatment, primarily hospital admissions. Study-specific risk estimates for the association between job strain and depression will be calculated using Cox regressions. The study-specific risk estimates will be pooled using random effects meta-analysis. Discussion: The planned analyses will help clarify whether job strain is associated with an increased risk of clinically diagnosed unipolar depression. As the analysis is based on pre-planned study protocols and an individual participant data meta-analysis, the pooled risk estimates will not be influenced by selective reporting and publication bias. However, the results of the planned study may only pertain to severe cases of unipolar depression, because of the outcome measure applied. PMID:24627793

  11. Morning light therapy for juvenile depression and severe mood dysregulation: study protocol for a randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The prevalence of depression in young people is increasing. The predominant co-morbidities of juvenile depression include sleep disturbances and persistent problems with the sleep-wake rhythm, which have shown to influence treatment outcomes negatively. Severe mood dysregulation is another condition that includes depressive symptoms and problems with the sleep-wake rhythm. Patients with severe mood dysregulation show symptoms of depression, reduced need for sleep, and disturbances in circadian functioning which negatively affect both disorder-specific symptoms and daytime functioning. One approach to treating both depression and problems with the sleep-wake rhythm is the use of light therapy. Light therapy is now a standard therapy for ameliorating symptoms of seasonal affective disorder and depression in adults, but has not yet been investigated in children and adolescents. In this trial, the effects of 2 weeks of morning bright-light therapy on juvenile depression and severe mood dysregulation will be evaluated. Methods/design A total of 60 patients with depression, aged between 12 and 18 years, in some cases presenting additional symptoms of affective dysregulation, will be included in this trial. Morning bright-light therapy will be implemented for 2 weeks (10 sessions of 45 minutes each), either with ‘active’ light (10,000 lux) or ‘inactive’ light (100 lux). A comprehensive test battery will be conducted before and after treatment and at follow-up 3 weeks later, to assess depression severity, sleep, and attention parameters. Melatonin levels will be measured by assessing the Dim Light Melatonin Onset. Discussion In this pilot study, the use of morning bright-light therapy for juvenile depression and severe mood dysregulation shall be evaluated and discussed. Trials registration Current Controlled Trials ISRCTN89305231 PMID:23773310

  12. The study protocol of the Norwegian randomized controlled trial of electroconvulsive therapy in treatment resistant depression in bipolar disorder

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background The treatment of depressive phases of bipolar disorder is challenging. The effects of the commonly used antidepressants in bipolar depression are questionable. Electroconvulsive therapy is generally considered to be the most effective treatment even if there are no randomized controlled trials of electroconvulsive therapy in bipolar depression. The safety of electroconvulsive therapy is well documented, but there are some controversies as to the cognitive side effects. The aim of this study is to compare the effects and side effects of electroconvulsive therapy to pharmacological treatment in treatment resistant bipolar depression. Cognitive changes and quality of life during the treatment will be assessed. Methods/Design A prospective, randomised controlled, multi-centre six- week acute treatment trial with seven clinical assessments. Follow up visit at 26 weeks or until remission (max 52 weeks). A neuropsychological test battery designed to be sensitive to changes in cognitive function will be used. Setting: Nine study centres across Norway, all acute psychiatric departments. Sample: n = 132 patients, aged 18 and over, who fulfil criteria for treatment resistant depression in bipolar disorder, Montgomery Åsberg Depression Rating Scale Score of at least 25 at baseline. Intervention: Intervention group: 3 sessions per week for up to 6 weeks, total up to 18 sessions. Control group: algorithm-based pharmacological treatment as usual. Discussion This study is the first randomized controlled trial that aims to investigate whether electroconvulsive therapy is better than pharmacological treatment as usual in treatment resistant bipolar depression. Possible long lasting cognitive side effects will be evaluated. The study is investigator initiated, without support from industry. Trial registration NCT00664976 PMID:20178636

  13. Effectiveness of depression and anxiety prevention in adolescents with high familial risk: study protocol for a randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Depression and anxiety disorders during adolescence can have detrimental consequences. Both disorders are related to negative outcome in various areas during adolescence and are also predictive of depression and anxiety disorders later in life. Especially parental psychopathology and being female are risk factors that increase the probability of developing one of these disorders during adolescence. Research has shown that prevention programs have promising results, especially for adolescents who have these risk factors. Therefore, in this study, we will focus on the effectiveness of a prevention program ‘A jump forward’ that has been developed for adolescent girls with a familial risk of depression and/or anxiety. Methods/Design We designed a randomized controlled trial to test the effectiveness of an indicated and selective prevention program aimed at depression and anxiety in adolescent girls. Adolescents aged between 11 and 15 years old with depressive and/or anxiety symptoms and with parents who show indicators of parental psychopathology will be randomly assigned to the experimental (N?=?80) or control groups (N?=?80). Participants in the experimental group will follow a preventive intervention, consisting of six sessions of 90 minutes each. All participants will complete baseline, intervention phase 1 (after session 2), intervention phase 2 (after session 4), post-intervention, 6 month follow-up, and 12 month follow-up assessments. Furthermore, parents will be asked to complete assessments at baseline, post-intervention, and 12-month follow-up. Primary outcome will be depressive symptoms. Secondary outcomes will be anxiety symptoms, suicidal ideation, response style, negative cognitive errors, parental emotional support and parental control, parental psychopathology, parenting stress and adolescents’ depression and anxiety symptoms according to the parents. Discussion This paper described the study designed to evaluate a program for preventing depression and/or anxiety in high-risk adolescents over a 12-month follow-up period. If the program showed to be effective in reducing symptoms of depression and anxiety and preventing adolescents from developing clinical levels of these disorders, our results would be relevant to practice. Thus, the intervention could be used on a large scale. Moreover, this study aims to contribute to the evidence-based prevention of depression and anxiety of adolescents. Trial registration Dutch Trial Register NTR3720 PMID:24268128

  14. Introduction of Auricular Acupuncture in Elderly Patients Suffering from Major Depression: Protocol of a Mixed Methods Feasibility Study

    PubMed Central

    Geib, Janina; Rieger, Monika A.; Eschweiler, Gerhard W.; Dresler, Thomas; Metzger, Florian G.

    2015-01-01

    Background. Due to an increasing number of elderly people suffering from major depression and potential side effects of the prescribed drugs, the introduction of new therapeutic approaches is needed. Currently, in Germany, auricular acupuncture is no part of clinical care for gerontopsychiatric patients. Based on promising clinical experiences and existing evidence for treating addiction and trauma, a benefit of auricular acupuncture integrated in existing treatment programs in elderly patients may be hypothesized. Within this project auricular acupuncture according to the National Acupuncture Detoxification Association (NADA) will be integrated in the multimodal treatment regime for elderly patients with major depression in a daytime ward setting. Methods/Design. To evaluate the feasibility and acceptance a mixed method approach is used. In a day clinic, a sample of 20 psychogeriatric patients with the diagnosis of major depression will be enrolled. The patients will receive a total of nine auricular acupuncture treatments according to the standardized NADA protocol in a group setting. The therapeutic process, its organization, the experience, and the willingness of patients to participate will be evaluated by interviews with patients and the therapeutic team. Data will be analyzed qualitatively using content analysis. Additionally, quantitative outcome parameters will be measured by standardized questionnaires. PMID:25954756

  15. Cognitive-reminiscence therapy and usual care for depression in young adults: study protocol for a randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Depression is a common affliction for young adults, and is associated with a range of adverse outcomes. Cognitive-reminiscence therapy is a brief, structured intervention that has been shown to be highly effective for reducing depressive symptoms, yet to date has not been evaluated in young adult populations. Given its basis in theory-guided reminiscence-based therapy, and incorporation of effective therapeutic techniques drawn from cognitive therapy and problem-solving frameworks, it is hypothesized to be effective in treating depression in this age group. Methods and design This article presents the design of a randomized controlled trial implemented in a community-based youth mental health service to compare cognitive-reminiscence therapy with usual care for the treatment of depressive symptoms in young adults. Participants in the cognitive-reminiscence group will receive six sessions of weekly, individual psychotherapy, whilst participants in the usual-care group will receive support from the youth mental health service according to usual procedures. A between-within repeated-measures design will be used to evaluate changes in self-reported outcome measures of depressive symptoms, psychological wellbeing and anxiety across baseline, three weeks into the intervention, post-intervention, one month post-intervention and three months post-intervention. Interviews will also be conducted with participants from the cognitive-reminiscence group to collect information about their experience receiving the intervention, and the process underlying any changes that occur. Discussion This study will determine whether a therapeutic approach to depression that has been shown to be effective in older adult populations is also effective for young adults. The expected outcome of this study is the validation of a brief, evidence-based, manualized treatment for young adults with depressive symptoms. Trial registration Australian New Zealand Clinical Trials Registry ACTRN12613000084785. PMID:24143890

  16. Cost and outcome of behavioural activation versus cognitive behaviour therapy for depression (COBRA): study protocol for a randomised controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Cognitive behaviour therapy (CBT) is an effective treatment for depression. However, CBT is a complex therapy that requires highly trained and qualified practitioners, and its scalability is therefore limited by the costs of training and employing sufficient therapists to meet demand. Behavioural activation (BA) is a psychological treatment for depression that may be an effective alternative to CBT and, because it is simpler, might also be delivered by less highly trained and specialised mental health workers. Methods/Design COBRA is a two-arm, non-inferiority, patient-level randomised controlled trial, including clinical, economic, and process evaluations comparing CBT delivered by highly trained professional therapists to BA delivered by junior professional or para-professional mental health workers to establish whether the clinical effectiveness of BA is non-inferior to CBT and if BA is cost effective compared to CBT. Four hundred and forty patients with major depressive disorder will be recruited through screening in primary care. We will analyse for non-inferiority in per-protocol and intention-to-treat populations. Our primary outcome will be severity of depression symptoms (Patient Health Questionnaire-9) at 12 months follow-up. Secondary outcomes will be clinically significant change and severity of depression at 18 months, and anxiety (General Anxiety Disorder-7 questionnaire) and health-related quality of life (Short-Form Health Survey-36) at 12 and 18 months. Our economic evaluation will take the United Kingdom National Health Service/Personal Social Services perspective to include costs of the interventions, health and social care services used, plus productivity losses. Cost-effectiveness will explored in terms of quality-adjusted life years using the EuroQol-5D measure of health-related quality of life. Discussion The clinical and economic outcomes of this trial will provide the evidence to help policy makers, clinicians and guideline developers decide on the merits of including BA as a first-line treatment of depression. Trial registration Current Controlled Trials ISRCTN27473954 PMID:24447460

  17. Transcutaneous vagus nerve stimulation for the treatment of depression: a study protocol for a double blinded randomized clinical trial

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Depressive disorders are the most common form of mental disorders in community and health care settings. Unfortunately, the treatment of Major Depressive Disorder (MDD) is far from satisfactory. Vagus nerve stimulation (VNS) is a relatively new and promising physical treatment for depressive disorders. One particularly appealing element of VNS is the long-term benefit in mood regulation. However, because this intervention involves surgery, perioperative risks, and potentially significant side effects, this treatment has been limited to those patients with treatment-resistant depression who have failed medication trials and exhausted established somatic treatments for major depression, due to intolerance or lack of response. This double-blinded randomized clinical trial aims to overcome these limitations by introducing a novel method of stimulating superficial branches of the vagus nerve on the ear to treat MDD. The rationale is that direct stimulation of the afferent nerve fibers on the ear area with afferent vagus nerve distribution should produce a similar effect as classic VNS in reducing depressive symptoms without the burden of surgical intervention. Design One hundred twenty cases (60 males) of volunteer patients with mild and moderate depression will be randomly divided into transcutaneous vagus nerve stimulation group (tVNS) and sham tVNS group. The treatment period lasts 4 months and all clinical and physiological measurements are acquired at the beginning and the end of the treatment period. Discussion This study has the potential to significantly extend the application of VNS treatment for MDD and other disorders (including epilepsy, bipolar disorder, and morbid obesity), resulting in direct benefit to the patients suffering from these highly prevalent disorders. In addition, the results of this double-blinded clinical trial will shed new light on our understanding of acupuncture point specificity, and development of methodologies in clinical trials of acupuncture treatment. Trials registration Clinical Trials. ChiCTR-TRC-11001201 http://www.chictr.org/cn/ PMID:23241431

  18. Efficacy of a dilemma-focused intervention for unipolar depression: study protocol for a multicenter randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Depression is one of the more severe and serious health problems because of its morbidity, disabling effects and for its societal and economic burden. Despite the variety of existing pharmacological and psychological treatments, most of the cases evolve with only partial remission, relapse and recurrence. Cognitive models have contributed significantly to the understanding of unipolar depression and its psychological treatment. However, success is only partial and many authors affirm the need to improve those models and also the treatment programs derived from them. One of the issues that requires further elaboration is the difficulty these patients experience in responding to treatment and in maintaining therapeutic gains across time without relapse or recurrence. Our research group has been working on the notion of cognitive conflict viewed as personal dilemmas according to personal construct theory. We use a novel method for identifying those conflicts using the repertory grid technique (RGT). Preliminary results with depressive patients show that about 90% of them have one or more of those conflicts. This fact might explain the blockage and the difficult progress of these patients, especially the more severe and/or chronic. These results justify the need for specific interventions focused on the resolution of these internal conflicts. This study aims to empirically test the hypothesis that an intervention focused on the dilemma(s) specifically detected for each patient will enhance the efficacy of cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) for depression. Design A therapy manual for a dilemma-focused intervention will be tested using a randomized clinical trial by comparing the outcome of two treatment conditions: combined group CBT (eight, 2-hour weekly sessions) plus individual dilemma-focused therapy (eight, 1-hour weekly sessions) and CBT alone (eight, 2-hour group weekly sessions plus eight, 1-hour individual weekly sessions). Method Participants are patients aged over 18 years meeting diagnostic criteria for major depressive disorder or dysthymic disorder, with a score of 19 or above on the Beck depression inventory, second edition (BDI-II) and presenting at least one cognitive conflict (implicative dilemma or dilemmatic construct) as assessed using the RGT. The BDI-II is the primary outcome measure, collected at baseline, at the end of therapy, and at 3- and 12-month follow-up; other secondary measures are also used. Discussion We expect that adding a dilemma-focused intervention to CBT will increase the efficacy of one of the more prestigious therapies for depression, thus resulting in a significant contribution to the psychological treatment of depression. Trial registration ISRCTN92443999; ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT01542957. PMID:23683841

  19. Tailored interventions to implement recommendations for elderly patients with depression in primary care: a study protocol for a pragmatic cluster randomised controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The prevalence of depression is high and the elderly have an increased risk of developing chronic course. International data suggest that depression in the elderly is under-recognised, the latency before clinicians provide a treatment plan is longer and elderly patients with depression are not offered psychotherapy to the same degree as younger patients. Although recommendations for the treatment of elderly patients with depression exist, health-care professionals adhere to these recommendations to a limited degree only. We conducted a systematic review to identify recommendations for managing depression in the elderly and prioritised six recommendations. We identified and prioritised the determinants of practice related to the implementation of these recommendations in primary care, and subsequently discussed and prioritised interventions to address the identified determinants. The objective of this study is to evaluate the effectiveness of these tailored interventions for the six recommendations for the management of elderly patients with depression in primary care. Methods/design We will conduct a pragmatic cluster randomised trial comparing the implementation of the six recommendations using tailored interventions with usual care. We will randomise 80 municipalities into one of two groups: an intervention group, to which we will deliver tailored interventions to implement the six recommendations, and a control group, to which we will not deliver any intervention. We will randomise municipalities rather than patients, individual clinicians or practices, because we will deliver the intervention for the first three recommendations at the municipal level and we want to minimise the risk of contamination across GP practices for the other three recommendations. The primary outcome is the proportion of actions taken by GPs that are consistent with the recommendations. Discussion This trial will investigate whether a tailored implementation approach is an effective strategy for improving collaborative care in the municipalities and health-care professionals’ practice towards elderly patients with depression in primary care. The effectiveness evaluation described in this protocol will be accompanied with a process evaluation exploring why and how the interventions were effective or ineffective. Trial registration ClinicalTrials.gov: NCT01913236 PMID:24405891

  20. Protocol for a randomised controlled trial investigating self-help email messages for sub-threshold depression: the Mood Memos study

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Amy J Morgan; Anthony F Jorm; Andrew J Mackinnon

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Sub-threshold depression is common, impairs functioning, and increases the risk of developing major depression. Although psychological treatments have been investigated for sub-threshold depression, they are costly. A less costly alternative could be an educational health promotion campaign about effective self-help for depression symptoms. The aim of the study is to test the efficacy of a low-cost email-based mental health

  1. Predictors of remission in depression to individual and combined treatments (PReDICT): study protocol for a randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Limited controlled data exist to guide treatment choices for clinicians caring for patients with major depressive disorder (MDD). Although many putative predictors of treatment response have been reported, most were identified through retrospective analyses of existing datasets and very few have been replicated in a manner that can impact clinical practice. One major confound in previous studies examining predictors of treatment response is the patient’s treatment history, which may affect both the predictor of interest and treatment outcomes. Moreover, prior treatment history provides an important source of selection bias, thereby limiting generalizability. Consequently, we initiated a randomized clinical trial designed to identify factors that moderate response to three treatments for MDD among patients never treated previously for the condition. Methods/design Treatment-naïve adults aged 18 to 65?years with moderate-to-severe, non-psychotic MDD are randomized equally to one of three 12-week treatment arms: (1) cognitive behavior therapy (CBT, 16 sessions); (2) duloxetine (30–60?mg/d); or (3) escitalopram (10–20?mg/d). Prior to randomization, patients undergo multiple assessments, including resting state functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), immune markers, DNA and gene expression products, and dexamethasone-corticotropin-releasing hormone (Dex/CRH) testing. Prior to or shortly after randomization, patients also complete a comprehensive personality assessment. Repeat assessment of the biological measures (fMRI, immune markers, and gene expression products) occurs at an early time-point in treatment, and upon completion of 12-week treatment, when a second Dex/CRH test is also conducted. Patients remitting by the end of this acute treatment phase are then eligible to enter a 21-month follow-up phase, with quarterly visits to monitor for recurrence. Non-remitters are offered augmentation treatment for a second 12-week course of treatment, during which they receive a combination of CBT and antidepressant medication. Predictors of the primary outcome, remission, will be identified for overall and treatment-specific effects, and a statistical model incorporating multiple predictors will be developed to predict outcomes. Discussion The PReDICT study’s evaluation of biological, psychological, and clinical factors that may differentially impact treatment outcomes represents a sizeable step toward developing personalized treatments for MDD. Identified predictors should help guide the selection of initial treatments, and identify those patients most vulnerable to recurrence, who thus warrant maintenance or combination treatments to achieve and maintain wellness. Trial registration Clinicaltrials.gov Identifier: NCT00360399. Registered 02 AUG 2006. First patient randomized 09 FEB 2007. PMID:22776534

  2. International Study to Predict Optimized Treatment for Depression (iSPOT-D), a randomized clinical trial: rationale and protocol

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Leanne M Williams; A John Rush; Stephen H Koslow; Stephen R Wisniewski; Nicholas J Cooper; Charles B Nemeroff; Alan F Schatzberg; Evian Gordon

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Clinically useful treatment moderators of Major Depressive Disorder (MDD) have not yet been identified, though some baseline predictors of treatment outcome have been proposed. The aim of iSPOT-D is to identify pretreatment measures that predict or moderate MDD treatment response or remission to escitalopram, sertraline or venlafaxine; and develop a model that incorporates multiple predictors and moderators. METHODS\\/DESIGN: The

  3. A randomised, feasibility trial of a tele-health intervention for Acute Coronary Syndrome patients with depression ('MoodCare'): Study protocol

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Coronary heart disease (CHD) and depression are leading causes of disease burden globally and the two often co-exist. Depression is common after Myocardial Infarction (MI) and it has been estimated that 15-35% of patients experience depressive symptoms. Co-morbid depression can impair health related quality of life (HRQOL), decrease medication adherence and appropriate utilisation of health services, lead to increased morbidity and suicide risk, and is associated with poorer CHD risk factor profiles and reduced survival. We aim to determine the feasibility of conducting a randomised, multi-centre trial designed to compare a tele-health program (MoodCare) for depression and CHD secondary prevention, with Usual Care (UC). Methods Over 1600 patients admitted after index admission for Acute Coronary Syndrome (ACS) are being screened for depression at six metropolitan hospitals in the Australian states of Victoria and Queensland. Consenting participants are then contacted at two weeks post-discharge for baseline assessment. One hundred eligible participants are to be randomised to an intervention or a usual medical care control group (50 per group). The intervention consists of up to 10 × 30-40 minute structured telephone sessions, delivered by registered psychologists, commencing within two weeks of baseline screening. The intervention focuses on depression management, lifestyle factors (physical activity, healthy eating, smoking cessation, alcohol intake), medication adherence and managing co-morbidities. Data collection occurs at baseline (Time 1), 6 months (post-intervention) (Time 2), 12 months (Time 3) and 24 months follow-up for longer term effects (Time 4). We are comparing depression (Cardiac Depression Scale [CDS]) and HRQOL (Short Form-12 [SF-12]) scores between treatment and UC groups, assessing the feasibility of the program through patient acceptability and exploring long term maintenance effects. A cost-effectiveness analysis of the costs and outcomes for patients in the intervention and control groups is being conducted from the perspective of health care costs to the government. Discussion This manuscript presents the protocol for a randomised, multi-centre trial to evaluate the feasibility of a tele-based depression management and CHD secondary prevention program for ACS patients. The results of this trial will provide valuable new information about potential psychological and wellbeing benefits, cost-effectiveness and acceptability of an innovative tele-based depression management and secondary prevention program for CHD patients experiencing depression. Trial Registration Number Australia and New Zealand Clinical Trials Register (ANZCTR): ACTRN12609000386235 PMID:21349204

  4. The efficacy of a behavioral activation intervention among depressed US Latinos with limited English language proficiency: study protocol for a randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Major depressive disorder is highly prevalent among Latinos with limited English language proficiency in the United States. Although major depressive disorder is highly treatable, barriers to depression treatment have historically prevented Latinos with limited English language proficiency from accessing effective interventions. The project seeks to evaluate the efficacy of behavioral activation treatment for depression, an empirically supported treatment for depression, as an intervention that may address some of the disparities surrounding the receipt of efficacious mental health care for this population. Methods/design Following a pilot study of behavioral activation treatment for depression with 10 participants which yielded very promising results, the current study is a randomized control trial testing behavioral activation treatment for depression versus a supportive counseling treatment for depression. We are in the process of recruiting 60 Latinos with limited English language proficiency meeting criteria for major depressive disorder according to the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders 4th and 5th Edition for participation in a single-center efficacy trial. Participants are randomized to receive 10 sessions of behavioral activation treatment for depression (n?=?30) or 10 sessions of supportive counseling (n?=?30). Assessments occur prior to each session and at 1 month after completing treatment. Intervention targets include depressive symptomatology and the proposed mechanisms of behavioral activation treatment for depression: activity level and environmental reward. We will also examine other factors related to treatment outcome such as treatment adherence, treatment satisfaction, and therapeutic alliance. Discussion This randomized controlled trial will allow us to determine the efficacy of behavioral activation treatment for depression in a fast-growing, yet highly underserved population in US mental health services. The study is also among the first to examine the effect of the proposed mechanisms of change of behavioral activation treatment for depression (that is, activity level and environmental reward) on depression over time. To our knowledge, this is the first randomized controlled trial to compare an empirical-supported treatment to a control supportive counseling condition in a sample of depressed, Spanish-speaking Latinos in the United States. Trial registration Clinical Trials Register: NCT01958840; registered 8 October 2013. PMID:24938081

  5. Depression among patients with tuberculosis: determinants, course and impact on pathways to care and treatment outcomes in a primary care setting in southern Ethiopia—a study protocol

    PubMed Central

    Ambaw, Fentie; Mayston, Rosie; Hanlon, Charlotte; Alem, Atalay

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Depression is commonly comorbid with chronic physical illnesses and is associated with a range of adverse clinical outcomes. Currently, the literature on the role of depression in determining the course and outcome of tuberculosis (TB) is very limited. Aim Our aim is to examine the relationship between depression and TB among people newly diagnosed and accessing care for TB in a rural Ethiopian setting. Our objectives are to investigate: the prevalence and determinants of probable depression, the role of depression in influencing pathways to treatment of TB, the incidence of depression during treatment, the impact of anti-TB treatment on the prognosis of depression and the impact of depression on the outcomes of TB treatment. Methods and analysis We will use a prospective cohort design. 703 newly diagnosed cases of TB (469 without depression and 234 with depression) will be consecutively recruited from primary care health centres. Data collection will take place at baseline, 2 and 6?months after treatment initiation. The primary exposure variable is probable depression measured using the Patient Health Questionnaire-9. Outcome variables include: pathways to treatment, classical outcomes for anti-TB treatment quality of life and disability. Descriptive statistics, logistic regression and multilevel mixed-effect analysis will be used to test the study hypotheses. Ethics and dissemination Ethical approval has been obtained from the Institutional Review Board (IRB) of the College of Health Sciences, Addis Ababa University. Findings will be disseminated through scientific publications, conference presentations, community meetings and policy briefs. Anticipated impact Findings will contribute to a sparse evidence base on comorbidity of depression and TB. We hope the dissemination of findings will raise awareness of comorbidity among clinicians and service providers, and contribute to ongoing debates regarding the delivery of mental healthcare in primary care in Ethiopia. PMID:26155818

  6. Realist explanatory theory building method for social epidemiology: a protocol for a mixed method multilevel study of neighbourhood context and postnatal depression.

    PubMed

    Eastwood, John G; Jalaludin, Bin B; Kemp, Lynn A

    2014-01-01

    A recent criticism of social epidemiological studies, and multi-level studies in particular has been a paucity of theory. We will present here the protocol for a study that aims to build a theory of the social epidemiology of maternal depression. We use a critical realist approach which is trans-disciplinary, encompassing both quantitative and qualitative traditions, and that assumes both ontological and hierarchical stratification of reality. We describe a critical realist Explanatory Theory Building Method comprising of an: 1) emergent phase, 2) construction phase, and 3) confirmatory phase. A concurrent triangulated mixed method multilevel cross-sectional study design is described. The Emergent Phase uses: interviews, focus groups, exploratory data analysis, exploratory factor analysis, regression, and multilevel Bayesian spatial data analysis to detect and describe phenomena. Abductive and retroductive reasoning will be applied to: categorical principal component analysis, exploratory factor analysis, regression, coding of concepts and categories, constant comparative analysis, drawing of conceptual networks, and situational analysis to generate theoretical concepts. The Theory Construction Phase will include: 1) defining stratified levels; 2) analytic resolution; 3) abductive reasoning; 4) comparative analysis (triangulation); 5) retroduction; 6) postulate and proposition development; 7) comparison and assessment of theories; and 8) conceptual frameworks and model development. The strength of the critical realist methodology described is the extent to which this paradigm is able to support the epistemological, ontological, axiological, methodological and rhetorical positions of both quantitative and qualitative research in the field of social epidemiology. The extensive multilevel Bayesian studies, intensive qualitative studies, latent variable theory, abductive triangulation, and Inference to Best Explanation provide a strong foundation for Theory Construction. The study will contribute to defining the role that realism and mixed methods can play in explaining the social determinants and developmental origins of health and disease. PMID:24422187

  7. Mindfulness-based cognitive therapy (MBCT) versus the health-enhancement program (HEP) for adults with treatment-resistant depression: a randomized control trial study protocol

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Major depressive disorder (MDD) is the leading cause of disability in the developed world, yet broadly effective treatments remain elusive. Up to 40% of patients with depression are unresponsive to at least two trials of antidepressant medication and thus have “treatment-resistant depression” (TRD). There is an urgent need for cost-effective, non-pharmacologic, evidence-based treatments for TRD. Mindfulness-Based Cognitive Therapy (MBCT) is an effective treatment for relapse prevention and residual depression in major depression, but has not been previously studied in patients with TRD in a large randomized trial. Methods/Design The purpose of this study was to evaluate whether MBCT is an effective augmentation of antidepressants for adults with MDD who failed to respond to standard pharmacotherapy. MBCT was compared to an active control condition, the Health-Enhancement Program (HEP), which incorporates physical activity, functional movement, music therapy and nutritional advice. HEP was designed as a comparator condition for mindfulness-based interventions to control for non-specific effects. Originally investigated in a non-clinical sample to promote stress reduction, HEP was adapted for a depressed population for this study. Individuals age 18 and older with moderate to severe TRD, who failed to respond to at least two trials of antidepressants in the current episode, were recruited to participate. All participants were taking antidepressants (Treatment as usual; TAU) at the time of enrollment. After signing an informed consent, participants were randomly assigned to either MBCT or HEP condition. Participants were followed for 1 year and assessed at weeks 1–7, 8, 24, 36, and 52. Change in depression severity, rate of treatment response and remission after 8 weeks were the primary outcomes measured by the clinician-rated Hamilton Depression Severity Rating (HAM-D) 17-item scale. The participant-rated Quick Inventory of Depression Symptomology (QIDS-SR) 16-item scale was the secondary outcome measure of depression severity, response, and remission. Discussion Treatment-resistant depression entails significant morbidity and has few effective treatments. We studied the effect of augmenting antidepressant medication with MBCT, compared with a HEP control, for patients with TRD. Analyses will focus on clinician and patient assessment of depression, participants’ clinical global impression change, employment and social functioning scores and quality of life and satisfaction ratings. Trial registration ClincalTrials.gov identifier: NCT01021254 PMID:24612825

  8. Integrated care for comorbid alcohol dependence and anxiety and/or depressive disorder: study protocol for an assessor-blind, randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background A major barrier to successful treatment in alcohol dependence is psychiatric comorbidity. During treatment, the time to relapse is shorter, the drop-out rate is increased, and long-term alcohol consumption is greater for those with comorbid major depression or anxiety disorder than those with an alcohol use disorder with no comorbid mental disorder. The treatment of alcohol dependence and psychological disorders is often the responsibility of different services, and this can hinder the treatment process. Accordingly, there is a need for an effective integrated treatment for alcohol dependence and comorbid anxiety and/or depression. Methods/Design We aim to assess the effectiveness of a specialized, integrated intervention for alcohol dependence with comorbid anxiety and/or mood disorder using a randomized design in an outpatient hospital setting. Following a three-week stabilization period (abstinence or significantly reduced consumption), participants will undergo complete formal assessment for anxiety and depression. Those patients with a diagnosis of an anxiety and/or depressive disorder will be randomized to either 1) integrated intervention (cognitive behavioral therapy) for alcohol, anxiety, and/or depression; or 2) usual counseling care for alcohol problems. Patients will then be followed up at weeks 12, 16, and 24. The primary outcome measure is alcohol consumption (total abstinence, time to lapse, and time to relapse). Secondary outcome measures include changes in alcohol dependence severity, depression, or anxiety symptoms and changes in clinician-rated severity of anxiety and depression. Discussion The study findings will have potential implications for clinical practice by evaluating the implementation of specialized integrated treatment for comorbid anxiety and/or depression in an alcohol outpatient service. Trial registration ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT01941693 PMID:24245491

  9. The InterHerz project - a web-based psychological treatment for cardiac patients with depression: study protocol of a randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Patients with heart disease often suffer from difficulties in psychological adaptation during cardiac rehabilitation. Mood disorders such as depression are known to be highly prevalent in cardiac patients and to have a negative impact on the progression of coronary heart disease. However, cardiac patients have difficulties to get psychological treatments due to low availability and motivational difficulties. Web-based interventions have been proven to be effective in treating depressive symptoms. Deprexis is a promising web-based psychological treatment which was devised for depressed patients. The aim of the study InterHerz is to examine if Deprexis is an effective psychological treatment to reduce stress and depression in cardiac patients. Methods/Design The sample will consist of 80 depressed patients randomized to an intervention group or a waitlist (10 weeks). Patients are recruited via cardiologists, cardiac rehabilitation units and the website of the Swiss Heart Foundation. Patients have access to a guided self-help program in which they work themselves through several modules and receive feedback from a clinical psychologist. Pre- and post-assessments, and a six-month follow-up, are conducted using online questionnaires and diagnostic interviews. Discussion Deprexis is a new web-based treatment which has the potential to help depressed cardiac patients with limited access to psychological treatment to increase their mental health. Trial registration Current Controlled Trials ISRCTN45945396 PMID:23273042

  10. Effectiveness, relapse prevention and mechanisms of change of cognitive therapy vs. interpersonal therapy for depression: Study protocol for a randomised controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Major depression is a common mental disorder that substantially impairs quality of life and has high societal costs. Although psychotherapies have proven to be effective antidepressant treatments, initial response rates are insufficient and the risk of relapse and recurrence is high. Improvement of treatments is badly needed. Studying the mechanisms of change in treatment might be a good investment for improving everyday mental health care. However, the mechanisms underlying therapeutic change remain largely unknown. The objective of the current study is to assess both the effectiveness of two commonly used psychotherapies for depression in terms of reduction of symptoms and prevention of relapse on short and long term, as well as identifying underlying mechanisms of change. Methods In a randomised trial we will compare (a) Cognitive Therapy (CT) with (b) Interpersonal therapy (IPT), and (c) an 8-week waiting list condition followed by treatment of choice. One hundred eighty depressed patients (aged 18-65) will be recruited in a mental health care centre in Maastricht (the Netherlands). Eligible patients will be randomly allocated to one of the three intervention groups. The primary outcome measure of the clinical evaluation is depression severity measured by the Beck Depression Intenvory-II (BDI-II). Other outcomes include process variables such as dysfunctional beliefs, negative attributions, and interpersonal problems. All self-report outcome assessments will take place on the internet at baseline, three, seven, eight, nine, ten, eleven, twelve and twenty-four months. At 24 months a retrospective telephone interview will be administered. Furthermore, a rudimentary analysis of the cost-effectiveness will be embedded. The study has been ethically approved and registered. Discussion By comparing CT and IPT head-to-head and by investigating multiple potential mediators and outcomes at multiple time points during and after therapy, we hope to provide new insights in the effectiveness and mechanisms of change of CT and IPT for depression, and contribute to the improvement of mental health care for adults suffering from depression. Trial registration The study has been registered at the Netherlands Trial Register, part of the Dutch Cochrane Centre (ISRCTN67561918) PMID:21672217

  11. Effectiveness and cost effectiveness of guided online treatment for patients with major depressive disorder on a waiting list for psychotherapy: study protocol of a randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Depressive disorders are highly prevalent and result in negative consequences for both patients and society. It is therefore important that these disorders are treated adequately. However, due to increased demand for mental healthcare and subsequent increased costs, it would be desirable to reduce costs associated with major depressive disorder while maintaining or improving the quality of care within the healthcare system. Introducing evidence-based online self-help interventions in mental healthcare might be the way to maintain clinical effects while minimizing costs by reducing the number of face-to-face sessions. This study aims to evaluate the clinical and economical effects of a guided online self-help intervention when offered to patients with major depressive disorder on a waiting list for psychotherapy in specialized mental health centers (MHCs). Methods Patients at mental health centers identified with a Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, fourth edition (DSM-IV) diagnosis of major depression who are awaiting face-to-face treatment are studied in a randomized controlled trial. During this waiting list period, patients are randomized and either (1) receive an internet-based guided self-help treatment or (2) receive a self-help book. The 5-week internet-based guided self-help intervention and the self-help booklet are based on problem solving treatment. After the intervention, patients are allowed to start regular face-to-face treatment at MHCs. Costs and effects are measured at baseline, after the intervention at 6 to 8 weeks, 6 months and 12 months. The primary outcome measure is symptoms of depression. Secondary outcome measures are diagnosis of depression, number of face-to-face sessions, absence of work and healthcare uptake in general. Additional outcome measures are anxiety, insomnia, quality of life and mastery. Discussion This study evaluates the effectiveness and cost effectiveness of internet-based guided self-help in patients at specialized mental health centers. The aim is to demonstrate whether the introduction of internet-based self-help interventions in regular mental healthcare for depressive disorders can maintain clinical effects and reduce costs. Strengths and limitations of this study are discussed. Trial registration Netherlands Trial Register NTR2824 PMID:24289099

  12. Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy for Depression in an Older Gay Man: A Clinical Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Satterfield, Jason M.; Crabb, Rebecca

    2010-01-01

    Although strong evidence supports cognitive-behavioral therapy for late-life depression and depression in racial and ethnic minorities, there are no empirical studies on the treatment of depression in older sexual minorities. Three distinct literatures were tapped to create a depression treatment protocol for an older gay male. Interventions were…

  13. Efficacy of temporary work modifications on disability related to musculoskeletal pain or depressive symptoms—study protocol for a controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Haukka, Eija; Martimo, Kari-Pekka; Kivekäs, Teija; Horppu, Ritva; Lallukka, Tea; Solovieva, Svetlana; Shiri, Rahman; Pehkonen, Irmeli; Takala, Esa-Pekka; MacEachen, Ellen; Viikari-Juntura, Eira

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Previous research suggests that work with a suitable workload may promote health and work retention in people with disability. This study will examine whether temporary work modifications at the early stage of work disability are effective in enhancing return to work (RTW) or staying at work among workers with musculoskeletal or depressive symptoms. Methods and analysis A single-centre controlled trial with modified stepped wedge design will be carried out in eight enterprises and their occupational health services (OHSs) in nine cities in Finland. Patients seeking medical advice due to musculoskeletal pain (?4 on a scale from 0–10) or depressive symptoms (?1 positive response to 2 screening questions) and fulfilling other inclusion criteria are eligible. The study involves an educational intervention among occupational physicians to enhance the initiation of work modifications. Primary outcomes are sustained RTW (?4?weeks at work without a new sickness absence (SA)) and the total number of SA days during a 12-month follow-up. Secondary outcomes are intensity of musculoskeletal pain (scale 0–10), pain interference with work or sleep (scale 0–10) and severity of depressive symptoms (Patient Health Questionnaire, PHQ-9), inquired via online questionnaires at baseline and 3, 6, 9 and 12?months after recruitment. Information on SA days will be collected from the medical records of the OHSs over 12?months, before and after recruitment. The findings will give new information about the possibilities of training physicians to initiate work modifications and their effects on RTW in employees with work disability due to musculoskeletal pain or depressive symptoms. Ethics and dissemination The Coordinating Ethics Committee of Hospital District of Helsinki and Uusimaa has granted approval for this study. The results will be published in peer-reviewed journals. Trial registration number ISRCTN74743666. PMID:25986643

  14. Collaborative Interventions for Circulation and Depression (COINCIDE): study protocol for a cluster randomized controlled trial of collaborative care for depression in people with diabetes and/or coronary heart disease

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Depression is up to two to three times as common in people with long-term conditions. It negatively affects medical management of disease and self-care behaviors, and leads to poorer quality of life and high costs in primary care. Screening and treatment of depression is increasingly prioritized, but despite initiatives to improve access and quality of care, depression remains under-detected and under-treated, especially in people with long-term conditions. Collaborative care is known to positively affect the process and outcome of care for people with depression and long-term conditions, but its effectiveness outside the USA is still relatively unknown. Furthermore, collaborative care has yet to be tested in settings that resemble more naturalistic settings that include patient choice and the usual care providers. The aim of this study was to test the effectiveness of a collaborative-care intervention, for people with depression and diabetes/coronary heart disease in National Health Service (NHS) primary care, in which low-intensity psychological treatment services are delivered by the usual care provider - Increasing Access to Psychological Therapies (IAPT) services. The study also aimed to evaluate the cost-effectiveness of the intervention over 6 months, and to assess qualitatively the extent to which collaborative care was implemented in the intervention general practices. Methods This is a cluster randomized controlled trial of 30 general practices allocated to either collaborative care or usual care. Fifteen patients per practice will be recruited after a screening exercise to detect patients with recognized depression (?10 on the nine-symptom Patient Health Questionnaire; PHQ-9). Patients in the collaborative-care arm with recognized depression will be offered a choice of evidence-based low-intensity psychological treatments based on cognitive and behavioral approaches. Patients will be case managed by psychological well-being practitioners employed by IAPT in partnership with a practice nurse and/or general practitioner. The primary outcome will be change in depressive symptoms at 6 months on the 90-item Symptoms Checklist (SCL-90). Secondary outcomes include change in health status, self-care behaviors, and self-efficacy. A qualitative process evaluation will be undertaken with patients and health practitioners to gauge the extent to which the collaborative-care model is implemented, and to explore sustainability beyond the clinical trial. Discussion COINCIDE will assess whether collaborative care can improve patient-centered outcomes, and evaluate access to and quality of care of co-morbid depression of varying intensity in people with diabetes/coronary heart disease. Additionally, by working with usual care providers such as IAPT, and by identifying and evaluating interventions that are effective and appropriate for routine use in the NHS, the COINCIDE trial offers opportunities to address translational gaps between research and implementation. Trial Registration Number ISRCTN80309252 Trial Status Open PMID:22906179

  15. The effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of lay counsellor-delivered psychological treatments for harmful and dependent drinking and moderate to severe depression in primary care in India: PREMIUM study protocol for randomized controlled trials

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The leading mental health causes of the global burden of disease are depression in women and alcohol use disorders in men. A major hurdle to the implementation of evidence-based psychological treatments in primary care in developing countries is the non-availability of skilled human resources. The aim of these trials is to evaluate the effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of two psychological treatments developed for the treatment of depression and alcohol use disorders in primary care in India. Methods/design This study protocol is for parallel group, randomized controlled trials (Healthy Activity Program for moderate to severe depression, Counselling for Alcohol Problems for harmful and dependent drinking) in eight primary health centres in Goa, India. Adult primary care attendees will be screened with the Patient Health Questionnaire for depression and, in men only, the Alcohol Use Disorders Identification Test for drinking problems. Screen-positive attendees will be invited to participate; men who screen positive for both disorders will be invited to participate in the Counselling for Alcohol Problems trial. Those who consent will be allocated in a 1:1 ratio to receive either the respective psychological treatment plus enhanced usual care or enhanced usual care only using a computer generated allocation sequence, stratified by primary health centre and, for depression, by sex. The enhanced usual care comprises providing primary health centre doctors with contextualized World Health Organization guidelines and screening results. Psychological treatments will be delivered by lay counsellors, over a maximum period of three months. Primary outcomes are severity of disorder and remission rates at three months post-enrolment and, for the Counselling for Alcohol Problems trial, drinking and the impact of drinking on daily lives. Secondary outcomes include severity of disorder and remission rates at 12?months, disability scores, suicidal behaviour and economic impact, and cost-effectiveness at three and 12?months. 500 participants with depression and 400 participants with harmful drinking will be recruited. Primary analyses will be intention-to-treat. Discussion These trials may offer a new approach for the treatment of moderate-severe depression and drinking problems in primary care that is potentially scalable as it relies on delivery by a single pool of lay counsellors. Trial registration Both trials are registered with the International Society for the Registration of Clinical Trials (Healthy Activity Programme registration number ISRCTN95149997; Counselling for Alcohol Problems registration number ISRCTN76465238). PMID:24690184

  16. Implementing a knowledge application program for anxiety and depression in community-based primary mental health care: a multiple case study research protocol

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Anxiety and depressive disorders are increasingly recognized as a health care policy priority. Reducing the treatment gap for common mental disorders requires strengthening the quality of primary mental health care. We developed a knowledge application program designed to improve the organization and delivery of care for anxiety and depression in community-based primary mental health care teams in Quebec, Canada. The principal objectives of the study are: to implement and evaluate this evidence-based knowledge application program; to examine the contextual factors associated with the selection of local quality improvement strategies; to explore barriers and facilitators associated with the implementation of local quality improvement plans; and to study the implementation of local quality monitoring strategies. Methods The research design is a mixed-methods prospective multiple case study. The main analysis unit (cases) is composed of the six multidisciplinary community-based primary mental health care teams, and each of the cases has identified at least one primary care medical clinic interested in collaborating with the implementation project. The training modules of the program are based on the Chronic Care Model, and the implementation strategies were developed according to the Promoting Action on Research Implementation in Health Services conceptual framework. Discussion The implementation of an evidence-based knowledge application program for anxiety and depression in primary care aims to improve the organization and delivery of mental health services. The uptake of evidence to improve the quality of care for common mental disorders in primary care is a complex process that requires careful consideration of the context in which innovations are introduced. The project will provide a close examination of the interplay between evidence, context and facilitation, and contribute to the understanding of factors associated with the process of implementation of interventions in routine care. The implementation of the knowledge application program with a population health perspective is consistent with the priorities set forth in the current mental health care reform in Quebec. Strengthening primary mental health care will lead to a more efficient health care system. PMID:23497399

  17. Physical activity as a treatment for depression: the TREAD randomised trial protocol

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Depression is one of the most common reasons for consulting a General Practitioner (GP) within the UK. Whilst antidepressants have been shown to be clinically effective, many patients and healthcare professionals would like to access other forms of treatment as an alternative or adjunct to drug therapy for depression. A recent systematic review presented some evidence that physical activity could offer one such option, although further investigation is needed to test its effectiveness within the context of the National Health Service. The aim of this paper is to describe the protocol for a randomised, controlled trial (RCT) designed to evaluate an intervention developed to increase physical activity as a treatment for depression within primary care. Methods/design The TREAD study is a pragmatic, multi-centre, two-arm RCT which targets patients presenting with a new episode of depression. Patients were approached if they were aged 18-69, had recently consulted their GP for depression and, where appropriate, had been taking antidepressants for less than one month. Only those patients with a confirmed diagnosis of a depressive episode as assessed by the Clinical Interview Schedule-Revised (CIS-R), a Beck Depression Inventory (BDI) score of at least 14 and informed written consent were included in the study. Eligible patients were individually randomised to one of two treatment groups; usual GP care or usual GP care plus facilitated physical activity. The primary outcome of the trial is clinical symptoms of depression assessed using the BDI four months after randomisation. A number of secondary outcomes are also measured at the 4-, 8- and 12-month follow-up points including quality of life, attitude to and involvement in physical activity and antidepressant use/adherence. Outcomes will be analysed on an intention-to-treat (ITT) basis and will use linear and logistic regression models to compare treatments. Discussion The results of the trial will provide information about the effectiveness of physical activity as a treatment for depression. Given the current prevalence of depression and its associated economic burden, it is hoped that TREAD will provide a timely contribution to the evidence on treatment options for patients, clinicians and policy-makers. Trial registration: ISRCTN 16900744 PMID:21073712

  18. Case management for the treatment of patients with major depression in general practices – rationale, design and conduct of a cluster randomized controlled trial – PRoMPT (Primary care Monitoring for depressive Patient's Trial) [ISRCTN66386086] – Study protocol

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Jochen Gensichen; Marion Torge; Monika Peitz; Heike Wendt-Hermainski; Martin Beyer; Thomas Rosemann; Christian Krauth; Heiner Raspe; Josef B Aldenhoff; Ferdinand M Gerlach

    2005-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Depression is a disorder with high prevalence in primary health care and a significant burden of illness. The delivery of health care for depression, as well as other chronic illnesses, has been criticized for several reasons and new strategies to address the needs of these illnesses have been advocated. Case management is a patient-centered approach which has shown efficacy

  19. Study protocol for a randomized controlled trial comparing mindfulness-based cognitive therapy with maintenance anti-depressant treatment in the prevention of depressive relapse/recurrence: The PREVENT trial

    E-print Network

    Kuyken, Willem; Byford, Sarah; Byng, Richard; Dalgleish, Tim; Lewis, Glyn; Taylor, Rod; Watkins, Edward R; Hayes, Rachel; Lanham, Paul; Kessler, David; Morant, Nicola; Evans, Alison

    2010-10-20

    Catastrophe Living: How to Cope with Stress, Pain and Illness Using Mindfulness Meditation New York: Delacorte 1990. 36. Beck AT, Rush AJ, Shaw B F , Emery G: Cognitive therapy of depression New York: Guilford Press 1979. 37. Hollon SD, DeRubeis RJ, Shelton RC... approach to relapse/recurrence prevention. Inclusion criteria are: a diagnosis of recurrent major depressive disorder in full or partial remission according to the DSM-IV, with 3 or more previous major depressive episodes; aged 18 or older; and on a...

  20. Staying well after depression: trial design and protocol

    Microsoft Academic Search

    J Mark G Williams; Ian T Russell; Catherine Crane; Daphne Russell; Chris J Whitaker; Danielle S Duggan; Thorsten Barnhofer; Melanie JV Fennell; Rebecca Crane; Sarah Silverton

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Depression is often a chronic relapsing condition, with relapse rates of 50-80% in those who have been depressed before. This is particularly problematic for those who become suicidal when depressed since habitual recurrence of suicidal thoughts increases likelihood of further acute suicidal episodes. Therefore the question how to prevent relapse is of particular urgency in this group. METHODS\\/DESIGN: This

  1. A Depression Recognition and Treatment package for families living with Stroke (DepReT-Stroke): study protocol for a randomised controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Depression occurs in up to 50% of patients after stroke and limits rehabilitation and recovery. Mood disorders are also highly prevalent in carers; their mental health intertwined with the physical and mental wellbeing of the person they are caring for. We argue that working with families, rather than patients alone may improve the treatment of depression in both patients and their carers enhancing the mental wellbeing and quality of life of both. Methods A single blind cluster randomised controlled trial to evaluate whether families after stroke who are treated with the Depression Recognition and Treatment package (DepReT-Stroke) in addition to treatment as usual (TAU) show improved mental well being compared to those families who receive only TAU. We aim to recruit one hundred and twenty-six families (63 in each group). The DepReT-Stroke intervention will help families to consider the various treatment options for depression, make choices about which are likely to fit best with their lives and support them in the use of self-help therapies (e.g. computerised Cognitive Behavioural Therapy or exercise). An essential component of the DepReT-Stroke package will be to help people adhere to their chosen treatment(s). The primary outcome will be the Mental Component Subscale of the SF-36 assessed at baseline and again six months post intervention. Effectiveness of the intervention will be determined using analysis of co-variance; comparing the mean change in MCS scores from baseline to six months follow-up adjusting for the clustering effects of baseline scores and family. An economic evaluation of the intervention will help us determine whether the intervention represents a cost-effective use of resources. Discussion Depression both for patients and their carers is common after stroke. Our Depression Recognition and Treatment package (DepReT-stroke) may help clinicians be more effective at detecting and managing a common co-morbidity that limits rehabilitation and recovery. Trial Registration ISRCTN: ISRCTN32451749 Research Ethics Committee Reference Number: 10/H0310/23 Grant Reference Number: (NIHR) PB-PG-0808-17056 PMID:21529370

  2. Alexithymia and Depression: A Prospective Study of Patients With Major Depressive Disorder

    Microsoft Academic Search

    KIRSI HONKALAMPI; L IC; JUKKA HINTIKKA; D. EILA LAUKKANEN; JOHANNES LEHTONEN; HEIMO VIINAMAKI

    2001-01-01

    The authors conducted a 12-month follow-up study to determine the association between alexi- thymia and depression in 116 outpatients with major depressive disorder (MDD) and 540 control subjects from the general population. Alexithymia was screened using the Toronto Alexithymia Scale (TAS-20), and depression was assessed using the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI). The results show that the severity of depression was

  3. Effects of emotion recognition training on mood among individuals with high levels of depressive symptoms: study protocol for a randomised controlled trial

    E-print Network

    Adams, Sally; Penton-Voak, Ian S; Harmer, Catherine J; Holmes, Emily A; Munafò, Marcus R

    2013-06-01

    negative affect, and increased positive effect, compared with individuals randomised to receive a placebo intervention. Methods/design Designagain if they would like to sign up for the study or if they require further information. On completion... will be removed from the final analysis. Ethical considerations and informed consent Ethics approval from the Faculty of Science Ethics Com- mittee has been granted. The study will be conducted according to the revised Declaration of Helsinki and Good Clinical...

  4. Efficacy of individualized homeopathic treatment and fluoxetine for moderate to severe depression in peri- and postmenopausal women (HOMDEP-MENOP): study protocol for a randomized, double-dummy, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The perimenopausal period refers to the interval when women’s menstrual cycles become irregular and is characterized by an increased risk of depressive symptoms. Use of homeopathy to treat depression is widespread but there is a lack of clinical trials about its efficacy in depression in peri- and postmenopausal women. Previous trials suggest that individualized homeopathic treatments improve depression. In classical homeopathy, an individually selected homeopathic remedy is prescribed after a complete case history of the patient. The aim of this study is to assess the efficacy and safety of the homeopathic individualized treatment versus placebo or fluoxetine in peri- and postmenopausal women with moderate to severe depression. Methods/design A randomized, placebo-controlled, double-blind, double-dummy, three-arm trial with a six-week follow-up study was designed. The study will be conducted in a public research hospital in Mexico City (Juárez de México Hospital) in the outpatient service of homeopathy. One hundred eighty nine peri- and postmenopausal women diagnosed with major depression according to the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, 4th edition (moderate to severe intensity) will be included. The primary outcome is change in the mean total score among groups on the 17-item Hamilton Rating Scale for Depression after the fourth and sixth week of treatment. Secondary outcomes are: Beck Depression Inventory change in mean score, Greene’s Scale change in mean score, response and remission rates and safety. Efficacy data will be analyzed in the intention-to-treat population. To determine differences in the primary and secondary outcomes among groups at baseline and weeks four and six, data will be analyzed by analysis of variance for independent measures with the Bonferroni post-hoc test. Discussion This study is the first trial of classical homeopathy that will evaluate the efficacy of homeopathic individualized treatment using C-potencies versus placebo or fluoxetine in peri- and postmenopausal women with moderate to severe depression. It is an attempt to deal with the obstacles of homeopathic research due to the need for individual prescriptions in one of the most common psychiatric diseases. Trial registration ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT01635218. PMID:23782520

  5. Bipolar II versus unipolar chronic depression: A 312-case study

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Franco Benazzi

    1999-01-01

    Differences between bipolar II depression and unipolar depression have been reported, such as a lower age at onset and more atypical features in bipolar II depression. The aim of the present study was to compare chronic\\/nonchronic bipolar II depression with chronic\\/nonchronic unipolar depression to determine whether the reported differences are present when chronicity is taken into account. Three hundred twelve

  6. Spreading Depression in Focal Ischemia: A Computational Study

    E-print Network

    Ruppin, Eytan

    Spreading Depression in Focal Ischemia: A Computational Study February 27, 1997 Kenneth Revett cortical spreading depression (CSD) waves, i.e., by ischemic depolarizations. We describe here depression, computational models, stroke, ischemic penumbra and post-infarct debilitation. Running title

  7. Efficacy of transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) in depression: naturalistic study.

    PubMed

    Aliño, Juan José López-Ibor; Jiménez, J L Pastrana; Flores, S Cisneros; Alcocer, M I López-Ibor

    2010-01-01

    Transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) is a technique is which the evidence has been confirming its efficacy. Repetitive stimulation (rTMS) of the left prefrontal dorsolateral (LPFDL) area with frequencies between 10 and 20 Hz has been shown to be effective in major depression. This article presents the prospective analysis of the treatments performed using TMS on LPFDL at 20 Hz with an intensity of 70% in a protocol of 10 sessions on 107 patients (41 male and 61 female) due to drug treatment resistant depressive symptoms in different conditions. The patients had previously undergone two psychopharmacological attempts with adequate dosage and time, who had been considered candidates for electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) if they did not respond to any conventional treatment. A total of 62.7% had mood disorder, 13.1% obsessive-compulsive disorders (OCT), 7.5% cognitive disorders, 4.7% personality disorders and 3.7% were psychiatric disorders. Mean age of the group was 49.98 years (SD = 17.09). The global results showed that the TMS provided some degree of improvement in 48.6%, although only half, that is 24.3%, maintained it beyond week 12. Efficacy by diagnoses showed a significant difference in favor of affective disorders. In the case of bipolar disorders in the depressive phase, there was improvement in 88.9%, which was maintained in 66.7% of the patients treated. No differences in efficacy were found within each one of the groups diagnosed based on gender, age or presence of personality disorders. The efficacy of the ECT was similar to the TMS in the group in which it had to be applied in comparison with the general group. New studies are proposed with the inclusion of the TMS for resistant-depression treatment protocols in a step prior to the ECT and even before all the drug treatments had been attempted, combining it with them for their potentiation. PMID:20976637

  8. Magnetic resonance imaging of a randomized controlled trial investigating predictors of recovery following psychological treatment in adolescents with moderate to severe unipolar depression: study protocol for Magnetic Resonance-Improving Mood with Psychoanalytic and Cognitive Therapies (MR-IMPACT)

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Major depressive disorders (MDD) are a debilitating and pervasive group of mental illnesses afflicting many millions of people resulting in the loss of 110 million working days and more than 2,500 suicides per annum. Adolescent MDD patients attending NHS clinics show high rates of recurrence into adult life. A meta-analysis of recent research shows that psychological treatments are not as efficacious as previously thought. Modest treatment outcomes of approximately 65% of cases responding suggest that aetiological and clinical heterogeneity may hamper the better use of existing therapies and discovery of more effective treatments. Information with respect to optimal treatment choice for individuals is lacking, with no validated biomarkers to aid therapeutic decision-making. Methods/Design Magnetic resonance-Improving Mood with Psychoanalytic and Cognitive Therapies, the MR-IMPACT study, plans to identify brain regions implicated in the pathophysiology of depressions and examine whether there are specific behavioural or neural markers predicting remission and/or subsequent relapse in a subsample of depressed adolescents recruited to the IMPACT randomised controlled trial (Registration # ISRCTN83033550). Discussion MR-IMPACT is an investigative biomarker component of the IMPACT pragmatic effectiveness trial. The aim of this investigation is to identify neural markers and regional indicators of the pathophysiology of and treatment response for MDD in adolescents. We anticipate that these data may enable more targeted treatment delivery by identifying those patients who may be optimal candidates for therapeutic response. Trial registration Adjunctive study to IMPACT trial (Current Controlled Trials: ISRCTN83033550). PMID:24094274

  9. Major depressive disorder: A prospective study of residual subthreshold depressive symptoms as predictor of rapid relapse

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Lewis L. Judd; Hagop S. Akiskal; Jack D. Maser; Pamela J. Zeller; Jean Endicott; William Coryell; Martin P. Paulus; Jelena L. Kunovac; Andrew C Leon; Timothy I. Mueller; John A. Rice; Martin B. Keller

    1998-01-01

    Background: The study tested whether level of recovery from major depressive episodes (MDEs) predicts duration of recovery in unipolar major depressive disorder (MDD) patients. Methods: MDD patients seeking treatment at five academic centers were followed naturalistically for 10 years or longer. Patients were divided on the basis of intake MDE recovery into residual depressive symptoms (SSD; N=82) and asymptomatic (N=155)

  10. Depression

    MedlinePLUS

    ... and negative thinking worse. Back Continue Depression Can Go Unrecognized People with depression may not realize they ... themselves or who have eating disorders or who go through extreme mood changes may have unrecognized depression. ...

  11. Divided Visual Field Study of Depression, Cognition, and Mood

    E-print Network

    Garratt, Genevieve

    2007-11-26

    This study compared the performance of 27 previously depressed and 21 never-depressed participants on a divided visual field task designed to examine the lateralization of emotional processing. Participants were asked to ...

  12. Bullied Teens At Risk for Later Depression, Study Finds

    MedlinePLUS

    ... of study, we can never be certain that bullying causes depression," she explained. "However, our evidence suggests ... At age 13, all completed a questionnaire about bullying. At 18, they were assessed for depression. The ...

  13. Preventing the onset of major depression based on the level and profile of risk of primary care attendees: protocol of a cluster randomised trial (the predictD-CCRT study)

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The ‘predictD algorithm’ provides an estimate of the level and profile of risk of the onset of major depression in primary care attendees. This gives us the opportunity to develop interventions to prevent depression in a personalized way. We aim to evaluate the effectiveness, cost-effectiveness and cost-utility of a new intervention, personalized and implemented by family physicians (FPs), to prevent the onset of episodes of major depression. Methods/Design This is a multicenter randomized controlled trial (RCT), with cluster assignment by health center and two parallel arms. Two interventions will be applied by FPs, usual care versus the new intervention predictD-CCRT. The latter has four components: a training workshop for FPs; communicating the level and profile of risk of depression; building up a tailored bio-psycho-family-social intervention by FPs to prevent depression; offering a booklet to prevent depression; and activating and empowering patients. We will recruit a systematic random sample of 3286 non-depressed adult patients (1643 in each trial arm), nested in 140 FPs and 70 health centers from 7 Spanish cities. All patients will be evaluated at baseline, 6, 12 and 18 months. The level and profile of risk of depression will be communicated to patients by the FPs in the intervention practices at baseline, 6 and 12 months. Our primary outcome will be the cumulative incidence of major depression (measured by CIDI each 6 months) over 18 months of follow-up. Secondary outcomes will be health-related quality of life (SF-12 and EuroQol), and measurements of cost-effectiveness and cost-utility. The inferences will be made at patient level. We shall undertake an intention-to-treat effectiveness analysis and will handle missing data using multiple imputations. We will perform multi-level logistic regressions and will adjust for the probability of the onset of major depression at 12 months measured at baseline as well as for unbalanced variables if appropriate. The economic evaluation will be approached from two perspectives, societal and health system. Discussion To our knowledge, this will be the first RCT of universal primary prevention for depression in adults and the first to test a personalized intervention implemented by FPs. We discuss possible biases as well as other limitations. Trial registration ClinicalTrials.gov identifier: NCT01151982 PMID:23782553

  14. Behavioral Activation for Depressed Teens: A Pilot Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ritschel, Lorie A.; Ramirez, Cynthia L.; Jones, Meredith; Craighead, W. Edward

    2011-01-01

    Behavioral activation (BA) is a psychosocial intervention that has shown promising treatment outcome results with depressed adults. The current pilot study evaluated a version of BA adapted for depressed adolescents. Six teens (3 male, 3 female, ages 14-17) who met criteria for major depressive disorder participated in the study. Participants were…

  15. Grandparents Raising Their Grandchildren: A Comparative Study of Depression

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Strutton, Joan N.

    2010-01-01

    There has been a steady increase in the United States in recent decades of grandparents raising their grandchildren. The aim of this study was to determine if depression levels of grandparents raising their grandchildren and depression levels of traditional grandparents differ. Additionally, the extent of the relationship to depression scores by…

  16. Depressants

    MedlinePLUS

    ... GHB and Rohypnol® are also misused to facilitate sexual assault. Affect on mind Depressants used therapeutically do what ... GHB and Rohypnol® are also misused to facilitate sexual assault. Affect on mind Depressants used therapeutically do what ...

  17. Depression

    MedlinePLUS

    ... young adults to take antidepressants? Can I take St. John's wort to treat depression? How can I help myself ... their website . Return to top Can I take St. John's wort to treat depression? St. John's wort is a ...

  18. Depression

    MedlinePLUS

    ... future episodes for certain people at high risk. Psychotherapy: Psychotherapy , or “talk therapy,” is sometimes used alone for ... of mild depression; for moderate to severe depression. Psychotherapy is often used in along with antidepressant medications. ...

  19. Evaluation of the Role of Training in the Implementation of a Depression Screening and Treatment Protocol in 2 Academic Outpatient Internal Medicine Clinics Utilizing the Electronic Medical Record.

    PubMed

    Loeb, Danielle; Sieja, Amber; Corral, Janet; Zehnder, Nichole G; Guiton, Gretchen; Nease, Donald E

    2015-07-01

    Systematic approaches to depression identification and management are effective though not consistently implemented. The research team implemented a depression protocol, preceded by training, in 2 faculty-resident practices. Medical assistants used the Patient Health Questionnaire (PHQ)-2 for initial screening; providers performed the PHQ-9. These were documented in the electronic medical record. Logistic regression was performed to assess the association of provider type, clinic site, and training attendance with documentation of PHQ-9 after positive PHQ-2s, and with repeat PHQ-9s after positive PHQ-9s. In logistic regression analysis, training attendance was positively associated with documentation of PHQ-9 after a positive PHQ-2 (odds ratio [OR] = 2.4 [confidence interval (CI) = 1.3-4.3]) and repeated documentation of a PHQ-9 after a positive PHQ-9 (OR = 2.5 [CI = 1.1-5.3]). This study describes the successful implementation of a stepped-care approach to depression care. The positive association of training with compliance with protocol procedures indicates the importance of training in the implementation of practice change. PMID:24829154

  20. Depression.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Strock, Margaret

    Approximately ten percent of the population suffers from a depressive illness each year. Although the economic cost is high, the cost in human suffering is immeasurable. To help educate the population about this disorder, this paper presents a definition of depression and its common manifestations. The symptoms that people often experience are…

  1. Depression

    MedlinePLUS

    ... and depression is usually a major contributing factor. Adults 65 and older have a suicide rate that is higher than the rate for ... somewhat lower than those for young and middle-aged women, rates among men 75 ... highest suicide rate in the United States. Types of Depression ...

  2. Gender differences in postpartum depression: a longitudinal cohort study

    PubMed Central

    Artazcoz, Lucía

    2010-01-01

    Background The course of depression from pregnancy to 1?year post partum and risk factors among mothers and fathers are not known. Aims (1) To report the longitudinal patterns of depression from the third trimester of pregnancy to 1?year after childbirth; (2) to determine the gender differences between women and their partners in the effect of psychosocial and personal factors on postpartum depression. Methods A longitudinal cohort study was carried out over a consecutive sample of 769 women in their third trimester of pregnancy and their partners attending the prenatal programme in the Valencian Community (Spain) and follow-up at 3 and 12?months post partum. The outcome variable was the presence of depression at 3 or 12?months post partum measured by the Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale. Predictor variables were: psychosocial (marital dissatisfaction, confidant and affective social support) and personal (history of depression, partner's depression and negative life events, depression during the third trimester of pregnancy) variables. Logistic regression models were fitted via generalised estimating equations. Results At 3 and 12?months post partum, 9.3% and 4.4% of mothers and 3.4% and 4.0% of fathers, respectively, were newly diagnosed as having depression. Low marital satisfaction, partner's depression and depression during pregnancy increased the probability of depression during the first 12?months after birth in mothers and fathers. Negative life events increased the risk of depression only among mothers. Conclusions Psychosocial and personal factors were strong predictors of depression during the first 12?months post partum for both mothers and fathers. PMID:20515899

  3. A Genome-Wide Association Study of Depressive Symptoms

    PubMed Central

    Cornelis, Marilyn C.; Amin, Najaf; Bakshis, Erin; Baumert, Jens; Ding, Jingzhong; Liu, Yongmei; Marciante, Kristin; Meirelles, Osorio; Nalls, Michael A.; Sun, Yan V.; Vogelzangs, Nicole; Yu, Lei; Bandinelli, Stefania; Benjamin, Emelia J.; Bennett, David A.; Boomsma, Dorret; Cannas, Alessandra; Coker, Laura H.; de Geus, Eco; De Jager, Philip L.; Diez-Roux, Ana V.; Purcell, Shaun; Hu, Frank B.; Rimma, Eric B.; Hunter, David J.; Jensen, Majken K.; Curhan, Gary; Rice, Kenneth; Penman, Alan D.; Rotter, Jerome I.; Sotoodehnia, Nona; Emeny, Rebecca; Eriksson, Johan G.; Evans, Denis A.; Ferrucci, Luigi; Fornage, Myriam; Gudnason, Vilmundur; Hofman, Albert; Illig, Thomas; Kardia, Sharon; Kelly-Hayes, Margaret; Koenen, Karestan; Kraft, Peter; Kuningas, Maris; Massaro, Joseph M.; Melzer, David; Mulas, Antonella; Mulder, Cornelis L.; Murray, Anna; Oostra, Ben A.; Palotie, Aarno; Penninx, Brenda; Petersmann, Astrid; Pilling, Luke C.; Psaty, Bruce; Rawal, Rajesh; Reiman, Eric M.; Schulz, Andrea; Shulman, Joshua M.; Singleton, Andrew B.; Smith, Albert V.; Sutin, Angelina R.; Uitterlinden, André G.; Völzke, Henry; Widen, Elisabeth; Yaffe, Kristine; Zonderman, Alan B.; Cucca, Francesco; Harris, Tamara; Ladwig, Karl-Heinz; Llewellyn, David J.; Räikkönen, Katri; Tanaka, Toshiko

    2013-01-01

    Background Depression is a heritable trait that exists on a continuum of varying severity and duration. Yet, the search for genetic variants associated with depression has had few successes. We exploit the entire continuum of depression to find common variants for depressive symptoms. Methods In this genome-wide association study, we combined the results of 17 population-based studies assessing depressive symptoms with the Center for Epidemiological Studies Depression Scale. Replication of the independent top hits (p < 1 × 10?5) was performed in five studies assessing depressive symptoms with other instruments. In addition, we performed a combined meta-analysis of all 22 discovery and replication studies. Results The discovery sample comprised 34,549 individuals (mean age of 66.5) and no loci reached genome-wide significance (lowest p = 1.05 × 10?7). Seven independent single nucleotide polymorphisms were considered for replication. In the replication set (n = 16,709), we found suggestive association of one single nucleotide polymorphism with depressive symptoms (rs161645, 5q21, p = 9.19 × 10?3). This 5q21 region reached genome-wide significance (p = 4.78 × 10?8) in the overall meta-analysis combining discovery and replication studies (n = 51,258). Conclusions The results suggest that only a large sample comprising more than 50,000 subjects may be sufficiently powered to detect genes for depressive symptoms. PMID:23290196

  4. Disrupting the rhythm of depression using Mobile Cognitive Therapy for recurrent depression: randomized controlled trial design and protocol

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Claudi LH Bockting; Gemma D Kok; Lillian van der Kamp; Filip Smit; Evelien van Valen; Robert Schoevers; Harm van Marwijk; Pim Cuijpers; Heleen Riper; Jack Dekker; Aaron T Beck

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Major depressive disorder (MDD) is projected to rank second on a list of 15 major diseases in terms of burden in 2030. The major contribution of MDD to disability and health care costs is largely due to its highly recurrent nature. Accordingly, efforts to reduce the disabling effects of this chronic condition should shift to preventing recurrence, especially in

  5. Appendix E: Study Protocol Protocol for Biosampling Children with Leukemia (Acute Lymphocytic and

    E-print Network

    Appendix E: Study Protocol Protocol for Biosampling Children with Leukemia (Acute Lymphocytic and Acute Myelocytic Leukemias) plus a Comparison Population in Sierra Vista, Arizona The protocol Assessment of Case Children with Leukemia (Acute Lymphocytic and Acute Myelocytic Leukemias) and a Reference

  6. Rumination, anxiety, depressive symptoms and subsequent depression in adolescents at risk for psychopathology: a longitudinal cohort study

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background A ruminative style of responding to low mood is associated with subsequent high depressive symptoms and depressive disorder in children, adolescents and adults. Scores on self-report rumination scales correlate strongly with scores on anxiety and depression symptom scales. This may confound any associations between rumination and subsequent depression. Methods Our sample comprised 658 healthy adolescents at elevated risk for psychopathology. This study applied ordinal item (non-linear) factor analysis to pooled items from three self-report questionnaires to explore whether there were separate, but correlated, constructs of rumination, depression and anxiety. It then tested whether rumination independently predicted depressive disorder and depressive symptoms over the subsequent 12 months, after adjusting for confounding variables. Results We identified a single rumination factor, which was correlated with factors representing cognitive symptoms of depression, somatic symptoms of depression and anxiety symptoms; and one factor representing adaptive responses to low mood. Elevated rumination scores predicted onset of depressive disorders over the subsequent year (p?=?0.035), and levels of depressive symptoms 12 months later (p?depressive and anxiety symptoms. Conclusion High rumination predicts onset of depressive disorder in healthy adolescents. Therapy that reduces rumination and increases distraction/problem-solving may reduce onset and relapse rates of depression. PMID:24103296

  7. Morphologic study of posterior articular depression in Schatzker IV fractures.

    PubMed

    Zhai, Qilin; Hu, Chengfang; Xu, Yafeng; Wang, Dan; Luo, Congfeng

    2015-02-01

    The Schatzker classification of tibial plateau fractures is widely accepted. Type IV fractures are medial tibial plateau fractures that are either split off as a wedge fragment or depressed and comminuted. Posterior articular surface depression in Schatzker type IV tibial plateau fractures can be seen as a unique variant that increases the difficulty of reduction of the articular surface. Its morphologic characteristics have not been fully studied, and the incidence is sometimes underestimated. The goal of this study was to evaluate the morphologic characteristics of posterior articular depression in Schatzker type IV fractures based on computed tomography measurements. From January 2009 to December 2011, the medical records, including digital radiologic data, of all patients treated for tibial plateau fracture at the authors' institution were retrospectively analyzed. Articular surface depression deeper than 5 mm was the criterion for study inclusion. The depression depth, precise location of the articular depression center, surface area percentage, and distance of the fracture gap to the depression center were calculated. One hundred fifteen cases of Schatzker type IV fracture were retrieved, and a total of 47.83% (55 of 115) cases had posterior articular surface depression. The average depth of the depressed articular surface was 12.41 mm, the surface area percentage was 20.15% of the entire tibial plateau, and the gap distance from the medial direction was 41.40 mm, 2.8 times longer than that from the posterior direction, which was 14.91 mm. Posterior articular surface depression occurs in nearly half of Schatzker type IV fractures, and the posterior approach provides more direct access to the depression than the medial approach. PMID:25665117

  8. Folate augmentation of treatment - evaluation for depression (FolATED): protocol of a randomised controlled trial

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Seren Haf Roberts; Emma Bedson; Dyfrig Hughes; Keith Lloyd; David B Menkes; Stuart Moat; Munir Pirmohamed; Gary Slegg; Johannes Thome; Richard Tranter; Rhiannon Whitaker; Clare Wilkinson; Ian Russell

    2007-01-01

    Clinical depression is common, debilitating and treatable; one in four people experience it during their lives. The majority of sufferers are treated in primary care and only half respond well to active treatment. Evidence suggests that folate may be a useful adjunct to antidepressant treatment: 1) patients with depression often have a functional folate deficiency; 2) the severity of such

  9. Pilot study on depression among secondary school students in Selangor.

    PubMed

    Adlina, S; Suthahar, A; Ramli, M; Edariah, A B; Soe, Soe Aye; Mohd Ariff, F; Narimah, A H H; Nuraliza, A S; Karuthan, C

    2007-08-01

    A cross sectional descriptive study of 2048 subjects was conducted to determine the prevalence of depression and factors influencing depression among students in secondary school from urban and rural areas in the state of Selangor, Malaysia. The children's depression inventory (CDI) developed by Maria Kovacs was used in this study. Students who participated in this study come from two urban schools and three rural schools. It was found that in the yield for scores for five factors were 9.2% have negative mood, 5% have interpersonal problems, 8.3% have ineffectiveness, 9.8% have anhedonia and 10.6% have negative self esteem. Following the interpretive guidelines for the T-scores, it was found that 10.3% of the students were much above average in the depression scale. This study also found that: 1% of students were smoking, 1.6% of students were gum sniffling, 0.9% took drugs, 4.1% took alcohol and 9.9% took things from other people. Females were more depressed than males. The Chinese students were more depressed compared to Indian students. Students whose parents had no formal education or had only primary education were more depressed than students whose parents had secondary, college or university education. Depression increased with increasing number of siblings. Depression contributed to the habit of drug abuse, gum sniffing and stealing but not to smoking and alcohol abuse. Suicidal tendencies were more likely among the depressed students. It is imperative that not only caregivers but also teachers have to be equipped with the knowledge, attitude and skills to assist secondary school children cope with their emotions, handle conflicts and manage stress early so that a more productive society will develop in the future. PMID:18246911

  10. Attachment orientations and depression: a longitudinal study of new parents.

    PubMed

    Rholes, W Steven; Simpson, Jeffry A; Kohn, Jamie L; Wilson, Carol L; Martin, A McLeish; Tran, Sisi; Kashy, Deborah A

    2011-04-01

    In this longitudinal study, we followed a large sample of first-time parents (both partners) across the first 2 years of the transition to parenthood. Guided by attachment theory (Bowlby, 1969), we tested several predictions about how attachment anxiety and avoidance are related to the incidence, maintenance, increase, and decline of depressive symptoms in both sexes across the first 2 years of the transition. We found that (a) the association between attachment anxiety and depressive symptoms was moderated by factors related to the marital and/or romantic relationship; (b) the association between avoidance and depressive symptoms was moderated by factors related to family responsibilities; (c) styles of caregiving provided by romantic partners affected depressive symptoms differently among anxious and avoidant persons; and (d) in certain predictable situations, depressive symptoms persisted at higher levels or increased to higher levels in anxious or avoidant persons across the 2-year transition period. Important implications of these results are discussed. PMID:21443372

  11. Reliving the Depression: Integrating English and Social Studies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gillespie, Joanne S.

    1990-01-01

    Describes the interdisciplinary approach used by a language arts teacher and a social studies teacher to teach seventh graders about the Great Depression. Discusses how students prepare interviews, radio plays, and newsreels. (SR)

  12. Delusional depression, family history, and DST response: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Bond, T C; Rothschild, A J; Lerbinger, J; Schatzberg, A F

    1986-11-01

    Results of the Dexamethasone Suppression Test (DST), performed on 65 patients with major unipolar depression, were classified both by suppression versus nonsuppression and by three ranges of postdexamethasone cortisol levels. Subgroups of patients were then compared for familial prevalence for depression and alcoholism and for delusional symptomatology. A strong association emerged among high postdexamethasone cortisol levels, a significantly increased familial prevalence for depression, and the presence of delusions in probands. In this study, ranges of DST responses were superior to suppression versus nonsuppression criteria alone in defining this subgroup. PMID:3756274

  13. U-CARE: Internet-based stepped care with interactive support and cognitive behavioral therapy for reduction of anxiety and depressive symptoms in cancer - a clinical trial protocol

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Approximately 20–30% of patients with cancer experience a clinically relevant level of emotional distress in response to disease and treatment. This in itself is alarming but it is even more problematic because it is often difficult for physicians and nurses to identify cancer patients who experience clinically relevant levels of anxiety and depression symptoms. This can result in persistent distress and can cause human suffering as well as costs for individuals and to the community. Methods Applying a multi-disciplinary and design-oriented approach aimed at attaining new evidence-based knowledge in basic and applied psychosocial oncology, this protocol will evaluate an intervention to be implemented in clinical practice to reduce cancer patient anxiety and depression. A prospective randomized design will be used. The overarching goal of the intervention is to promote psychosocial health among patients suffering from cancer by means of self-help programmes delivered via an Internet platform. Another goal is to reduce costs for individuals and society, caused by emotional distress in response to cancer. Following screening to detect levels of patient distress, patients will be randomized to standard care or a stepped care intervention. For patients randomized to the intervention, step 1 will consist of self-help material, a chat forum where participants will be able to communicate with each other, and a Frequently Asked Questions (FAQ) section where they can ask questions and get answers from an expert. Patients in the intervention group who still report symptoms of anxiety or depression after access to step 1 will be offered step 2, which will consist of cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) administered by a personal therapist. The primary end point of the study is patients’ levels of anxiety and depression, evaluated longitudinally during and after the intervention. Discussion There is a lack of controlled studies of the psychological and behavioral processes involved in this type of intervention for anxiety and depressive disorders. Since anxiety and depressive symptoms are relatively common in patients with cancer and the availability of adequate support efforts is limited, there is a need to develop evidence-based stepped care for patients with cancer, to be delivered via the Internet. Trial registration ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT01630681 PMID:24024826

  14. Understanding prognostic benefits of exercise and antidepressant therapy for persons with depression and heart disease: the UPBEAT study – rationale, design, and methodological issues

    PubMed Central

    Blumenthal, James A; Sherwood, Andrew; Rogers, Sharon D; Babyak, Michael A; Doraiswamy, P Murali; Watkins, Lana; Hoffman, Benson M; O’Connell, Cara; Johnson, Julie J; Patidar, Seema M; Waugh, Robert; Hinderliter, Alan

    2013-01-01

    Background Depression is relatively common in patients with coronary heart disease (CHD) and is associated with worse prognosis. Recently there has been interest in evaluating the impact of treating depression on clinical outcomes. Anti-depressant medications have been shown to be safe and efficacious for many patients; exercise also may be effective for treating depression and may also improve cardiopulmonary functioning. However, methodological limitations of previous studies have raised questions about the value of exercise, and no study has compared the effects of exercise with standard anti-depressant medication in depressed cardiac patients. Purpose UPBEAT is a randomized clinical trial (RCT) funded by NHLBI to evaluate the effects of sertraline or exercise compared to placebo on depression and biomarkers of cardiovascular risk in patients with CHD and elevated depressive symptoms. Methods The UPBEAT study includes 200 stable CHD patients with scores on the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI) ? 9 randomized to 4 months of treatment with aerobic exercise, sertraline, or placebo. The primary outcomes include depressive symptoms determined by clinical ratings on the Hamilton Rating Scale for Depression (HAM-D) and measures of heart rate variability (HRV), baroreflex control (BRC), vascular function (i.e., flow-mediated dilation (FMD)), and measures of inflammation and platelet aggregation. Results This article reviews the rationale and design of UPBEAT and addresses several key methodologic issues that were carefully considered in the development of this protocol: the use of a placebo control condition in depressed cardiac patients, study design, and selection of intermediate endpoints or biomarkers of cardiovascular risk. Limitations This study is not powered to assess treatment group differences in CHD morbidity and mortality. Intermediate endpoints are not equivalent to ‘hard’ clinical events and further studies are needed to determine the clinical significance of these biomarkers. Conclusions The UPBEAT study is designed to assess the efficacy of exercise in treating depression in cardiac patients and evaluates the impact of treating depression on important biomarkers of cardiovascular risk. PMID:17942470

  15. Collaborative care for the treatment of comorbid depression and coronary heart disease: a systematic review and meta-analysis protocol

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Depression and coronary heart disease (CHD) are frequently comorbid and portend higher morbidity, mortality and poorer quality of life. Prior systematic reviews of depression treatment randomized controlled trials (RCTs) in the population with CHD have not assessed the efficacy of collaborative care. This systematic review aims to bring together the contemporary research on the effectiveness of collaborative care interventions for depression in comorbid CHD populations. Methods/Design Electronic databases (Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials MEDLINE, EMBASE, PsycINFO and CINAHL) will be searched using a sensitive search strategy exploding the topics CHD, depression and RCT. Full text inspection and bibliography searching will be conducted, and authors of included studies will be contacted to identify unpublished studies. Eligibility criteria are: population, depression comorbid with CHD; intervention, RCT of collaborative care defined as a coordinated model of care involving multidisciplinary health care providers, including: (a) primary physician and at least one other health professional (e.g. nurse, psychiatrist, psychologist), (b) a structured patient management plan that delivers either pharmacological or non-pharmacological intervention, (c) scheduled patient follow-up and (d) enhanced inter-professional communication between the multiprofessional team; comparison, either usual care, enhanced usual care, wait-list control group or no further treatment; and outcome, major adverse cardiac events (MACE), standardized measure of depression, anxiety, quality of life, cost-effectiveness. Screening, data extraction and risk of bias assessment will be undertaken by two reviewers with disagreements resolved through discussion. Meta-analytic methods will be used to synthesize the data collected relating to the outcomes. Discussion This review will evaluate the effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of collaborative care for depression in populations primarily with CHD. The results will facilitate integration of evidence-based practice for this precarious population. Systematic review registration PROSPERO CRD42014013653. PMID:25351999

  16. Depression

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Patient Education Institute

    This patient education program explains depression, the symptoms, causes and available treatment options. This is a MedlinePlus Interactive Health Tutorial from the National Library of Medicine, designed and developed by the Patient Education Institute. NOTE: The tutorial requires a special Flash plug-in, version 4 or above. If you do not have Flash, you will be prompted to obtain a free download of the software before you start the tutorial. You will also need an Acrobat Reader, available as a free download, in order to view the Reference Summary.

  17. Social relationship correlates of major depressive disorder and depressive symptoms in Switzerland: nationally representative cross sectional study

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The quality and quantity of social relationships are associated with depression but there is less evidence regarding which aspects of social relationships are most predictive. We evaluated the relative magnitude and independence of the association of four social relationship domains with major depressive disorder and depressive symptoms. Methods We analyzed a cross-sectional telephone interview and postal survey of a probability sample of adults living in Switzerland (N?=?12,286). Twelve-month major depressive disorder was assessed via structured interview over the telephone using the Composite International Diagnostic Interview (CIDI). The postal survey assessed depressive symptoms as well as variables representing emotional support, tangible support, social integration, and loneliness. Results Each individual social relationship domain was associated with both outcome measures, but in multivariate models being lonely and perceiving unmet emotional support had the largest and most consistent associations across depression outcomes (incidence rate ratios ranging from 1.55-9.97 for loneliness and from 1.23-1.40 for unmet support, p’s?depressive symptoms whereas only loneliness and unmet support were associated with depressive disorder. Conclusions Perceived quality and frequency of social relationships are associated with clinical depression and depressive symptoms across a wide adult age spectrum. This study extends prior work linking loneliness to depression by showing that a broad range of social relationship domains are associated with psychological well-being. PMID:24656048

  18. [Institutionalized elderly and depression: a multicenter observational study].

    PubMed

    Storti, Matteo; Braggion, Marco; Dal Santo, Pierluigi; Fanchin, Gianmaria; Zanolin, Maria Elisabetta

    2012-04-01

    Scientific literature recommends nurses to use the Geriatric Depression Scale (GDS) in the assessment of symptoms of depression among elderly with no cognitive deficits. The first purpose of this observational study was to determine the prevalence of depressive symptoms and the related antidepressant therapy in a sample of institutionalized elderly people administering the 30 questions GDS (GDS 30). The second aim was to estimate the time to complete the test. The survey is a cross-sectional multicenter study. 115 cognitively intact elderly residents in 5 retirement houses in the province of Vicenza (Italy) were administered the 30 items GDS by nursing staff: 80 females with a median age of 83 years (Inter Quartile Range RIQ: 80-85) and 35 males with a median age of 79 years (RIQ: 73-85). The prevalence of depression was 46% (95% Confidence Interval: 37-55%). The difference in depression between males and females was not significant (p=0.646). The median of the total answering time was equal to 306 seconds (RIQ: 257-315). The answering time of the GDS in people taking antidepressants is higher with respect to those who do not take them. The GDS 30 is an useful tool for nurses to identify in a fairly short amount of time institutionalised individuals with no cognitive deficit and risk of depression. PMID:22561994

  19. Cortisol awakening response and subsequent depression: prospective longitudinal study

    PubMed Central

    Carnegie, Rebecca; Araya, Ricardo; Ben-Shlomo, Yoav; Glover, Vivette; O’Connor, Thomas G.; O’Donnell, Kieran J.; Pearson, Rebecca; Lewis, Glyn

    2014-01-01

    Background Some studies have found an association between elevated cortisol and subsequent depression, but findings are inconsistent. The cortisol awakening response may be a more stable measure of hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal function and potentially of stress reactivity. Aims To investigate whether salivary cortisol, particularly the cortisol awakening response, is associated with subsequent depression in a large population cohort. Method Young people (aged 15 years, n = 841) from the Avon Longitudinal Study of Parents and Children (ALSPAC) collected salivary cortisol at four time points for 3 school days. Logistic regression was used to calculate odds ratios for developing depression meeting ICD-10 criteria at 18 years. Results We found no evidence for an association between salivary cortisol and subsequent depression. Odds ratios for the cortisol awakening response were 1.24 per standard deviation (95% CI 0.93-1.66, P = 0.14) before and 1.12 (95% CI 0.73-1.72, P = 0.61) after adjustment for confounding factors. There was no evidence that the other cortisol measures, including cortisol at each time point, diurnal drop and area under the curve, were associated with subsequent depression. Conclusions Our findings do not support the hypothesis that elevated salivary cortisol increases the short-term risk of subsequent depressive illness. The results suggest that if an association does exist, it is small and unlikely to be of clinical significance. PMID:24311550

  20. The development of a brief psychodynamic protocol for depression: Dynamic Interpersonal Therapy (DIT)

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Alessandra Lemma; Mary Target; Peter Fonagy

    2010-01-01

    This paper outlines the development of a manualized, brief (16-session) psychodynamic intervention – Dynamic Interpersonal Therapy (DIT) – for the treatment of depression. DIT is based on a distillation of the evidence-based brief psychoanalytic\\/psychodynamic treatments pooled together from manualized approaches that were reviewed as part of the competence framework for psychological therapies first commissioned by Skills for Health. DIT has

  1. PROSPECTIVE ASSOCIATIONS OF DEPRESSIVE RUMINATION AND SOCIAL PROBLEM SOLVING WITH DEPRESSION: A 6-MONTH LONGITUDINAL STUDY(.).

    PubMed

    Hasegawa, Akira; Hattori, Yosuke; Nishimura, Haruki; Tanno, Yoshihiko

    2015-06-01

    -The main purpose of this study was to examine whether depressive rumination and social problem solving are prospectively associated with depressive symptoms. Nonclinical university students (N = 161, 64 men, 97 women; M age = 19.7 yr., SD = 3.6, range = 18-61) recruited from three universities in Japan completed the Beck Depression Inventory-Second Edition (BDI-II), the Ruminative Responses Scale, Social Problem-Solving Inventory-Revised Short Version (SPSI-R:S), and the Means-Ends Problem-Solving Procedure at baseline, and the BDI-II again at 6 mo. later. A stepwise multiple regression analysis with the BDI-II and all subscales of the rumination and social problem solving measures as independent variables indicated that only the BDI-II scores and the Impulsivity/carelessness style subscale of the SPSI-R:S at Time 1 were significantly associated with BDI-II scores at Time 2 (? = 0.73, 0.12, respectively; independent variables accounted for 58.8% of the variance). These findings suggest that in Japan an impulsive and careless problem-solving style was prospectively associated with depressive symptomatology 6 mo. later, as contrasted with previous findings of a cycle of rumination and avoidance problem-solving style. PMID:25978191

  2. Effects of an internet-based cognitive behavioural therapy intervention on preventing major depressive episodes among workers: a protocol for a randomised controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Imamura, Kotaro; Kawakami, Norito; Furukawa, Toshi A; Matsuyama, Yutaka; Shimazu, Akihito; Kasai, Kiyoto

    2015-01-01

    Introduction The aim of this study is to examine the effects of an internet-based cognitive behavioural therapy (iCBT) program on decreasing the risk of major depressive episodes (MDEs) among workers employed in a private corporate group in Japan, using a randomised controlled trial design. Methods and analysis All of the workers in a corporate group (n=20?000) will be recruited through an invitation email. Participants who fulfil the inclusion criteria will be randomly allocated to intervention or control groups (planned N=4050 for each group). They will be allowed to complete the six lessons of the iCBT program within 10?weeks after the baseline survey. Those in the control group will receive the same iCBT after 12?months. The program includes several CBT skills: self-monitoring, cognitive restructuring, assertiveness, problem-solving and relaxation. The primary outcome measure is no new onset of MDE (using Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fourth Edition, Text Revision (DSM-IV-TR)/DSM-5 criteria) during the 12-month follow-up. Assessment will use the web version of the WHO Composite International Diagnostic Interview V.3.0 depression section. Ethics and dissemination The Research Ethics Review Board of Graduate School of Medicine, the University of Tokyo (No. 3083-(2)), approved the study procedures. Trial registration number The study protocol is registered at the UMIN Clinical Trials Registry (UMIN-CTR; ID=UMIN000014146). PMID:25968004

  3. Does family history of depression predict major depression in midlife women? Study of Women's Health Across the Nation Mental Health Study (SWAN MHS).

    PubMed

    Colvin, Alicia; Richardson, Gale A; Cyranowski, Jill M; Youk, Ada; Bromberger, Joyce T

    2014-08-01

    This study aims to determine whether family history of depression predicts major depression in midlife women independent of psychosocial and health profiles at midlife. Participants were 303 African American and Caucasian women (42-52 years at baseline) recruited into the Study of Women's Health Across the Nation (SWAN) and the Women's Mental Health Study (MHS) in Pittsburgh. Major depression was assessed annually with the Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-IV. Family mental health history was collected at the ninth or tenth follow-up. Multivariable logistic regression was used to determine whether family history of depression predicted major depression in midlife, adjusting for covariates. The odds of experiencing major depression during the study were three times greater for those with a family history than for those without a family history (OR?=?3.22, 95% CI?=?1.95-5.31). Family history predicted depression (OR?=?2.67, 95% CI?=?1.50-4.78) after adjusting for lifetime history of depression, age, trait anxiety, chronic medical conditions, and stressful life events. In analyses stratified by lifetime history of depression, family history significantly predicted depression only among women with a lifetime history of depression. Family history of depression predicts major depression in midlife women generally, but particularly in those with a lifetime history of depression prior to midlife. PMID:24952069

  4. Meta-analyses of genetic studies on major depressive disorder

    Microsoft Academic Search

    S López-León; A C J W Janssens; A M González-Zuloeta Ladd; J Del-Favero; S J Claes; B A Oostra; C M van Duijn; CM van Duijn

    2008-01-01

    The genetic basis of major depressive disorder (MDD) has been investigated extensively, but the identification of MDD genes has been hampered by conflicting results from underpowered studies. We review all MDD case–control genetic association studies published before June 2007 and perform meta-analyses for polymorphisms that had been investigated in at least three studies. The study selection and data extraction were

  5. Animal models as tools to study the pathophysiology of depression.

    PubMed

    Abelaira, Helena M; Réus, Gislaine Z; Quevedo, João

    2013-01-01

    The incidence of depressive illness is high worldwide, and the inadequacy of currently available drug treatments contributes to the significant health burden associated with depression. A basic understanding of the underlying disease processes in depression is lacking; therefore, recreating the disease in animal models is not possible. Popular current models of depression creatively merge ethologically valid behavioral assays with the latest technological advances in molecular biology. Within this context, this study aims to evaluate animal models of depression and determine which has the best face, construct, and predictive validity. These models differ in the degree to which they produce features that resemble a depressive-like state, and models that include stress exposure are widely used. Paradigms that employ acute or sub-chronic stress exposure include learned helplessness, the forced swimming test, the tail suspension test, maternal deprivation, chronic mild stress, and sleep deprivation, to name but a few, all of which employ relatively short-term exposure to inescapable or uncontrollable stress and can reliably detect antidepressant drug response. PMID:24271223

  6. Therapeutic horticulture in clinical depression: a prospective study.

    PubMed

    Gonzalez, Marianne Thorsen; Hartig, Terry; Patil, Grete Grindal; Martinsen, Egil W; Kirkevold, Marit

    2009-01-01

    Clinically depressed persons suffer from impaired mood and distortion of cognition. This study assessed changes in depression severity and perceived attentional capacity of clinically depressed adults (N=18) during a 12-week therapeutic horticulture program. The Beck Depression Inventory (BDI) and Attentional Function Index (AFI) were administered at baseline, twice during (4 and 8 weeks), and immediately after the intervention (12 weeks), and at a 3-month follow-up. Experiences of being away and fascination related to the intervention were measured at 4, 8, and 12 weeks. The mean BDI score declined 9.7 points from pretest (27.3) to posttest (p < .001) and were clinically relevant (deltaBDI > or =6) for 72% of the cases. The mean AFI score increased 10.2 points from pretest (68.8) to posttest (p = .06). The greatest change in BDI and AFI scores occurred in the initial weeks of the intervention. The reduction in BDI scores remained significant and clinically relevant at the 3-month follow-up (N=16). The decline in depression severity during the intervention correlated strongly with the degree to which the participants found that it captured their attention. Therapeutic horticulture may decrease depression severity and improve perceived attentional capacity by engaging effortless attention and interrupting rumination. PMID:19999748

  7. Psychosocial, Physical, and Autonomic Correlates of Depression in Korean Adults: Results from a County-Based Depression Screening Study

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Ki Won; Kim, Seok Hyeon; Shin, Jin Ho; Choi, Bo Yul; Nam, Jung Hyun

    2014-01-01

    Objective We aimed to investigate the prevalence and psychosocial and neurophysiological correlates of depression in a large county-based cohort of Korean adults. Methods We recruited 2355 adults from a rural county-based health promotion program. The following psychometric scales were used: the Center for Epidemiologic Studies Depression scale (CES-D) was used to assess depression, the General Health Questionnaire (GHQ) was used to evaluate stress, and the Medical Outcome Study Social Support Survey (MOS-SSS) was used to determine perceived social support. Heart rate variability (HRV) was used to assess neurophysiological properties. The psychosocial and neurophysiological variables of adults with depression (CES-D score ?25) and without depression (CES-D score <25) were statistically compared. A logistic regression model was constructed to identify factors independently associated with depression. Results We estimated that 17.7% of the subjects had depression, which was associated with old age, being female, being single, less religious affiliation, high education, low body mass index (BMI), low levels of aerobic exercise, low social support, and a low HRV triangular index. The explanatory factors of depression included high education, less religious affiliation, low levels of current aerobic exercise, low BMI, and low social support. Conclusion Given the relatively high prevalence of overall depression, subsyndromal depression should also be regarded as an important issue in screening. The independent factors associated with depression suggest that practical psychosocial intervention, including brief psychotherapy, aerobic exercise, and other self-help methods should be considered. In addition, the HRV results suggest that further depression screening accompanied by neurophysiological features would require fine methodological modifications with proactive efforts to prevent depressive symptoms. PMID:25395971

  8. STUDY PROTOCOL Open Access Epidemiological study of prostate cancer (EPICAP)

    E-print Network

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    STUDY PROTOCOL Open Access Epidemiological study of prostate cancer (EPICAP): a population Abstract Background: Prostate cancer is the most common cancer in male in most Western countries, including France. Despite a significant morbidity and mortality to a lesser extent, the etiology of prostate cancer

  9. A longitudinal study of differences in late- and early-onset geriatric depression: Depressive symptoms and psychosocial, cognitive, and neurological functioning

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Natalie Sachs-Ericsson; Elizabeth Corsentino; Jerad Moxley; Jennifer L. Hames; Nicole C. Rushing; Kathryn Sawyer; Thomas Joiner; Edward A. Selby; Steven Zarit; Ian H. Gotlib; David C. Steffens

    2012-01-01

    Objectives: Studies suggest early-onset depression (EOD) is associated with a more severe course of the depressive disorder, while late-onset depression (LOD) is associated with more cognitive and neuroimaging changes. This study examined if older adults with EOD, compared with those with LOD, would exhibit more severe symptoms of depression and, consistent with the glucocorticoid cascade hypothesis, have more hippocampal volume

  10. Early Predictors of Adolescent Depression: A 7-Year Longitudinal Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mazza, James J.; Abbott, Robert D.; Fleming, Charles B.; Harachi, Tracy W.; Cortes, Rebecca C.; Park, Jisuk; Haggerty, Kevin P.; Catalano, Richard F.

    2009-01-01

    This study examined the longitudinal relationship of early elementary predictors to adolescent depression 7 years later. The sample consisted of 938 students who have been part of a larger longitudinal study that started in 1993. Data collected from parents, teachers, and youth self-reports on early risk factors when students were in 1st and 2nd…

  11. Neurological signs and late-life depressive symptoms in a community population: the ESPRIT Study

    E-print Network

    Boyer, Edmond

    1 Neurological signs and late-life depressive symptoms in a community population: the ESPRIT Study: Neurological signs, Late-life Depression, Depressive symptoms, Old age, Neurodegenerative theory Key points-level depression but were more likely to be present in those with a lifetime history of neurological disorder

  12. A 35-Year Longitudinal Assessment of Cognition and Midlife Depression Symptoms: The Vietnam Era Twin Study of Aging

    PubMed Central

    Franz, Carol E.; Lyons, Michael J.; O’Brien, Robert; Panizzon, Matthew S.; Kim, Kathleen; Bhat, Reshma; Grant, Michael D.; Toomey, Rosemary; Eisen, Seth; Xian, Hong; Kremen, William S.

    2010-01-01

    Objective To determine whether early adult cognitive ability is a risk factor for depressive symptoms in midlife and how genetic and environmental influences explain the association; to examine cross-sectional relationships between depressive symptoms and specific cognitive abilities at midlife. Methods Design 35-year longitudinal and cross-sectional twin study of cognitive aging. Setting Large multicenter study in the United States. Participants 1237 male twins ages 51 to 60. Measurements At age 20 and midlife, participants completed the same version of a general cognitive ability test (Armed Forces Qualification Test [AFQT]). Midlife testing included an extensive neurocognitive protocol assessing processing speed, verbal memory, visual-spatial memory, working memory, executive function, and visual-spatial ability. Participants completed the Center for Epidemiologic Studies Depression Scale prior to cognitive testing and provided health and lifestyle information during a medical history interview. Results Lower age 20 AFQT scores predicted higher levels of depressive symptoms at age 55 (r=?.16, p<.001). In bivariate twin modeling, 77% of the correlation between early cognitive ability and midlife depressive symptoms was due to shared genetic influences. Controlling for current age, age 20 AFQT, and non-independence of observations, depressive symptoms were associated with worse midlife AFQT scores and poorer performance in all cognitive domains except verbal memory Conclusion Results suggest that low cognitive ability is a risk factor for depressive symptoms; this association is partly due to shared genetic influences. Cross-sectional analyses indicate that the association between depressive symptoms and performance is not linked to specific cognitive domains. PMID:21606899

  13. Acupuncture for depression and myalgia in patients with hepatitis: an observational study

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Zeliha Kocak Tufan; Hüseyin Arslan; Fatih Yildiz; Cemal Bulut; Hasan Irmak; Sami Kinikli; Ali Pekcan Demiroz

    2010-01-01

    BackgroundDepressive symptoms and myalgia are commonly seen in patients with chronic hepatitis B and chronic hepatitis C.ObjectiveTo investigate the efficacy of acupuncture treatment on depressive symptoms and myalgia in patients with hepatitis.MethodsOf 44 patients with hepatitis screened for depression and myalgia, 28 were enrolled and included in the study. The main outcome measure for depressive symptoms was Beck's Depression Inventory

  14. Depression and anxiety: Associations with biological and perceived stress reactivity to a psychological stress protocol in a middle-aged population

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Susanne R. de Rooij; Aart H. Schene; David I. Phillips; Tessa J. Roseboom

    2010-01-01

    Background: Depression and anxiety have been linked to higher as well as lower reactivity to stressful circumstances. Large, population-based studies investigating the association between depression and anxiety, perceived and physiological stress responses are lacking. Methods: We studied 725 men and women, aged 55-60 years, from a population-based cohort, who filled out the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS). We performed

  15. Is sertraline treatment or depression remission in depressed Alzheimer’s patients associated with improved caregiver wellbeing? The Depression in Alzheimer’s Disease Study 2 (DIADS-2)

    PubMed Central

    Longmire, Crystal V. Flynn; Drye, Lea T.; Frangakis, Constantine E.; Martin, Barbara K.; Meinert, Curtis L.; Mintzer, Jacobo E.; Munro, Cynthia A.; Porsteinsson, Anton P.; Rabins, Peter V.; Rosenberg, Paul B.; Schneider, Lon S.; Weintraub, Daniel; Lyketsos, Constantine G.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives To assess if sertraline treatment (vs. placebo) or remission of depression at 12 weeks (vs. non-remission) in Alzheimer’s patients is associated with improved caregiver wellbeing. Design A randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled clinical trial of the efficacy and safety of sertraline for the treatment of depression in individuals with Alzheimer’s disease. Setting Five clinical research sites across the United States. Participants Caregivers of patients enrolled in the Depression in Alzheimer’s Disease Study 2 (N=131). Intervention All caregivers received standardized psychosocial support throughout the study. Measurements Caregiver outcome measures included depression (Beck Depression Inventory), distress (Neuropsychiatric Inventory), burden (Zarit Burden Interview), and quality of life (Medical Outcomes Study Short Form Health Survey). Results Fifty-nine percent of caregivers were spouses, 63.4% were female, and 64.1% were white. Caregivers of patients in both treatment groups had significant reductions in distress scores over the 24 week study period, but there was not a greater benefit for caregivers of patients taking sertraline. However, caregivers of patients whose depression was in remission at week 12 had greater declines in distress scores over the 24 weeks than caregivers of patients whose depression did not remit by week 12. Conclusions Patient treatment with sertraline was not associated with significantly greater reductions in caregiver distress than placebo treatment. Distress but not level of depression or burden lessened for all caregivers regardless of remission status and even more so for those who cared for patients whose depression remitted. Results imply an interrelationship between caregiver distress and patient psychiatric outcomes. PMID:24314887

  16. Treatment of depressive disorders in primary care - protocol of a multiple treatment systematic review of randomized controlled trials

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Several systematic reviews have summarized the evidence for specific treatments of primary care patients suffering from depression. However, it is not possible to answer the question how the available treatment options compare with each other as review methods differ. We aim to systematically review and compare the available evidence for the effectiveness of pharmacological, psychological, and combined treatments for patients with depressive disorders in primary care. Methods/Design To be included, studies have to be randomized trials comparing antidepressant medication (tricyclic antidepressants, selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs), hypericum extracts, other agents) and/or psychological therapies (e.g. interpersonal psychotherapy, cognitive therapy, behavioural therapy, short dynamically-oriented psychotherapy) with another active therapy, placebo or sham intervention, routine care or no treatment in primary care patients in the acute phase of a depressive episode. Main outcome measure is response after completion of acute phase treatment. Eligible studies will be identified from available systematic reviews, from searches in electronic databases (Medline, Embase and Central), trial registers, and citation tracking. Two reviewers will independently extract study data and assess the risk of bias using the Cochrane Collaboration's corresponding tool. Meta-analyses (random effects model, inverse variance weighting) will be performed for direct comparisons of single interventions and for groups of similar interventions (e.g. SSRIs vs. tricyclics) and defined time-windows (up to 3 months and above). If possible, a global analysis of the relative effectiveness of treatments will be estimated from all available direct and indirect evidence that is present in a network of treatments and comparisons. Discussion Practitioners do not only want to know whether there is evidence that a specific treatment is more effective than placebo, but also how the treatment options compare to each other. Therefore, we believe that a multiple treatment systematic review of primary-care based randomized controlled trials on the most important therapies against depression is timely. PMID:22085705

  17. Personality disorders in heart failure patients requiring psychiatric management: comorbidity detections from a routine depression and anxiety screening protocol.

    PubMed

    Tully, Phillip J; Selkow, Terina

    2014-12-30

    Several international guidelines recommend routine depression screening in cardiac disease populations. No previous study has determined the prevalence and comorbidities of personality disorders in patients presenting for psychiatric treatment after these screening initiatives. In the first stage 404 heart failure (HF) patients were routinely screened and 73 underwent structured interview when either of the following criteria were met: (a) Patient Health Questionnaire ?10; (b) Generalized Anxiety Disorder Questionnaire ?7); (c) Response to one item panic-screener. Or (d) Suicidality. Patients with personality disorders were compared to the positive-screen patients on psychiatric comorbidities. The most common personality disorders were avoidant (8.2%), borderline (6.8%) and obsessive compulsive (4.1%), other personality disorders were prevalent in less than <3% of patients. Personality disorder patients had significantly greater risk of major depression (risk ratio (RR) 1.2; 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.2-13.3), generalized anxiety disorder (RR 3.2; 95% CI 1.0-10.0), social phobia (RR 3.8; 95% CI 1.3-11.5) and alcohol abuse/dependence (RR 3.2; 95% 1.0-9.5). The findings that HF patients with personality disorders presented with complex psychiatric comorbidity suggest that pathways facilitating the integration of psychiatric services into cardiology settings are warranted when routine depression screening is in place. PMID:25238983

  18. Group interpersonal psychotherapy for postnatal depression: a pilot study

    Microsoft Academic Search

    R. Reay; Y. Fisher; M. Robertson; E. Adams; C. Owen

    2006-01-01

    Summary  We conducted a pilot study to assess the potential effectiveness of group interpersonal psychotherapy (IPT-G) as a treatment\\u000a for postnatal depression (PND). The study was also established to test a treatment manual for IPT-G, assess the acceptability\\u000a of this format for participants and test a recruitment strategy for a randomised controlled trial. 18 mothers diagnosed with\\u000a PND participated in 2

  19. Parental Major Depression and the Risk of Depression and Other Mental Disorders in Offspring: A Prospective-Longitudinal Community Study

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Roselind Lieb; Barbara Isensee; Michael Hofler; Hildegard Pfister; Hans-Ulrich Wittchen

    2002-01-01

    Background: This article examines associations between DSM-IV depressive disorders, their natural course, other psychopathology, and parental major depression in a community sample of adolescents and young adults. Methods: Baseline and 4-year follow-up data were used from the Early Developmental Stages of Psychopa- thology Study, a prospective-longitudinal community study of adolescents and young adults. Results are based on 2427 subjects who

  20. Personality and depressive symptoms: Stress generation and cognitive vulnerabilities to depression in a prospective daily diary study

    PubMed Central

    Hankin, Benjamin L.

    2014-01-01

    Personality and psychopathology have long been associated, however the mechanisms that account for this link are less understood. Stress generation was examined as a potential mechanism to explain the association between personality traits, especially negative emotionality, and depressive symptoms. In addition, the moderating influence of cognitive vulnerabilities to potentiate the relation between stressors and depressive symptoms was investigated. These hypothesized processes were evaluated in a prospective daily diary study in which young adults (N=210) completed baseline measures of personality, dysfunctional attitudes, negative cognitive style, and depressive symptoms. The participants then recorded their levels of depressive symptoms and the occurrence of stressors daily for 35 days. Negative Emotionality-Stress Reaction (NEM-SR) predicted initial levels and trajectories of depressive symptoms and stressors over time. Daily stressors partially mediated the longitudinal association between baseline NEM-SR and trajectories of daily depressive symptoms. Both dysfunctional attitudes and negative cognitive style interacted with these additional stressors to predict prospective fluctuations of daily depressive symptoms. PMID:25435650

  1. Do you have depression? Stanford University is conducting a research study on the

    E-print Network

    Sonnenburg, Justin L.

    Do you have depression? Stanford University is conducting a research study on the interaction between depression and pre-diabetes. Study participants receive a comprehensive assessment on behavior and role in brain function in men and women with depression. Who can participate? The researchers

  2. A Prospective 12Year Study of Subsyndromal and Syndromal Depressive Symptoms in Unipolar Major Depressive Disorders

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Lewis L. Judd; Hagop S. Akiskal; Jack D. Maser; Pamela J. Zeller; Jean Endicott; William Coryell; Martin P. Paulus; Jelena L. Kunovac; Andrew C. Leon; Timothy I. Mueller; John A. Rice; Martin B. Keller

    1998-01-01

    9 of 10 patients spent weeks at 3 or 4 different levels during follow-up. The MinD (27%) and SSD (17%) symptom levels were more common than the MDD (15%) symptom level. Patients with double depression and recurrent depression had more chronic symptoms than patients with their first lifetime major depressive episode (72% and 65%, respectively, vs 46% of fol- low-up

  3. Depression, Diabetes, and Healthcare Utilization: Results from the Korean Longitudinal Study of Aging (KLoSA)

    PubMed Central

    Kyung LEE, Hyun; Hee LEE, Seung

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Background The aim of this study was to explore the relationship between diabetes and depression and investigate the effects of comorbid diabetes and depression on healthcare utilization. Methods The study sample included 10,179 Korean adults aged ? 45 years. The presence of diabetes was assessed by asking participants if the participants had ever been diagnosed with diabetes. Depression was measured using the 10-item Center for Epidemiological Studies—Depression scale. Healthcare utilization was assessed by self-report. Multiple logistic regression analyses were performed. Results Diabetes was positively associated with depression after controlling socioeconomic and health variables. Diabetic patients who had low socioeconomic status, who were obese, who were smokers, and who had higher numbers of chronic diseases had a higher depression risk. Diabetes and depression was associated with increased healthcare utilization. People with both diabetes and depression had significantly increased odds of multiple physician visits, multiple hospital admissions, and prolonged hospitalization compared with individuals with neither diabetes nor depression. Patients with both diabetes and depression had greater odds of multiple hospital admissions than patients with diabetes alone. Conclusions We found a positive association between diabetes and depression. Depression in persons with diabetes is associated with increased multiple hospital admissions. More research is warranted to clarify an association between co-occurring depression with diabetes and increased healthcare utilization.

  4. Cost-effectiveness analysis of cognitive behaviour therapy for treatment of minor or mild-major depression in elderly patients with type 2 diabetes: study protocol for the economic evaluation alongside the MIND-DIA randomized controlled trial (MIND-DIA CEA)

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Nadja Chernyak; Frank Petrak; Kristin Plack; Martin Hautzinger; Matthias J Müller; Guido Giani; Andrea Icks

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Depression and elevated depression symptoms are more prevalent in patients with type 2 diabetes than in those without diabetes and are associated with adverse health outcomes and increased total healthcare utilization. This suggests that more effective depression treatment might not only improve health outcome, but also reduce costs. However, there is a lack of evidence on (cost-) effectiveness of

  5. Reticuloendothelial-Depressing Substance: Studies on the Mechanism of Action

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Daniel J. Loegering; Dudley G. Moon; John E. Kaplan; Peter Weber; Frank A. Blumenstock

    1985-01-01

    Thisstudywas carriedouttoevaluatethemechanism ofactionofa reticulo- endothelial (RE)-depressing substance. This RE-depressing substance was obtained from the plasma of dogs subjected to 3 hr of intestinal ischemia. RE- depressing substance was partially purified by dialysis and reverse-phase column chromatography. The assay of RE-depressing activity was based on the depression of the rate of clearance of colloidal carbon from the blood of rats or

  6. Reduced reward anticipation in youth at high-risk for unipolar depression: A preliminary study

    PubMed Central

    Olino, Thomas M.; McMakin, Dana L.; Morgan, Judith K.; Silk, Jennifer S.; Birmaher, Boris; Axelson, David A.; Williamson, Douglas E.; Dahl, Ronald E.; Ryan, Neal D.; Forbes, Erika E.

    2014-01-01

    Offspring of depressed parents are at risk for depression and recent evidence suggests that reduced positive affect (PA) may be a marker of risk. We investigated whether self-reports of PA and fMRI-measured striatal response to reward, a neural correlate of PA, are reduced in adolescent youth at high familial risk for depression (HR) relative to youth at low familial risk for depression (LR). Functional magnetic resonance imaging assessments were conducted with 14 HR and 12 LR youth. All youth completed an ecological momentary assessment protocol to measure PA in natural settings and a self-report measure of depression symptomatology. Analyses found that HR youth demonstrated lower striatal response than LR youth during both reward anticipation and outcome. However, after controlling for youth self-reports of depression, HR youth demonstrated lower striatal response than LR youth only during reward anticipation. No significant differences were found between HR and LR youth on subjective ratings of PA or depressive symptoms. Results are consistent with previous findings that reduced reward response is a marker of risk for depression, particularly during reward anticipation, even in the absence of (or accounting for) disrupted subjective mood. Further examinations of prospective associations between reward response and depression onset are needed. PMID:24369885

  7. [Depression in cardiac patients undergoing rehabilitation--a study for investigating the correlations between depression and occupational groups].

    PubMed

    Kittel, J; Wamper, U; Hinz, A; Schwarz, R; Karoff, M

    2003-06-01

    The results of many studies show that physical recovery and social integration of cardiac patients are negatively influenced by a persistent depressive disorder. For this reason issues of occupational integration should be considered from this point of view, too. Correlations between various occupational groups and depression were investigated with 907 cardiac patients at the beginning and at the end of a follow-up treatment. The results were compared to those for 756 persons in corresponding age groups from the general population. We found that at the beginning of rehabilitation the depression values of the HADS did not show any significant differences between the various occupational groups, however, their values were significantly higher than those found in the general population. During rehabilitation the HADS values decreased significantly. At the end of rehabilitation, unskilled and semi-skilled workers had significantly higher depression values than skilled workers and persons in higher positions. Consequences for medical rehabilitation are discussed. PMID:12813653

  8. The impact of stress on depressive symptoms is moderated by social support in Chinese adolescents with subthreshold depression: A multi-wave longitudinal study

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Juan Yang; Shuqiao Yao; Xiongzhao Zhu; Chenchen Zhang; Yu Ling; John R. Z. Abela; Petra G. Esseling; Chad McWhinnie

    2010-01-01

    BackgroundMost studies have shown that negative life events and social support are important factors in the development and outcome of depression. It is unknown if these factors are important in adolescents with subthreshold depression. Thus, the current study examined whether high levels of social support from peers buffer adolescents exhibiting subthreshold depressive symptoms against experiencing further increases in such symptoms

  9. Importance of Studying the Contributions of Early Adverse Experience to Neurobiological Findings in Depression

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Christine Heim; Paul M Plotsky; Charles B Nemeroff

    2004-01-01

    Almost four decades of intensive research have sought to elucidate the neurobiological bases of depression. Epidemiological studies have revealed that both genetic and environmental factors contribute to the risk for depression. Adverse early-life experiences influence neurobiological systems within genetic limits, leading to the neurobiological and behavioral manifestations of depression. We summarize the burgeoning evidence concerning a pre-eminent role of early

  10. Gender, Anxiety, and Depressive Symptoms: A Longitudinal Study of Early Adolescents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chaplin, Tara M.; Gillham, Jane E.; Seligman, Martin E. P.

    2009-01-01

    Does anxiety lead to depression more for girls than for boys? This study prospectively examines gender differences in the relationship between anxiety and depressive symptoms in early adolescence. One hundred thirteen 11- to 14-year-old middle school students complete questionnaires assessing depressive symptoms and three dimensions of anxiety…

  11. J Clin Psychiatry . Author manuscript A prospective study of hormone therapy and depression in

    E-print Network

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    and depression in community-dwelling elderly women: the Three City Study Jacqueline Scali 1 , Joanne Ryan 1-laure.ancelin@inserm.fr > Abstract Background The potential benefits of hormone therapy in treating depressed postmenopausal women are controversial and data on depression (re)emergence in the context of HT discontinuation are lacking. Objective

  12. The discriminant validity of burnout and depression: A confirmatory factor analytic study

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Michael P. Leiter; Josette Durup

    1994-01-01

    Health care workers (N=307) completed measures of burnout and depression as part of a study of personal and occupational sources of distress. A confirmatory factor analysis provided support for differentiating burnout and depression. The analysis confirmed the three-factor structure of the Maslach Burnout Inventory and s multiple factor structure for depression measures. The analysis also provided support for the existence

  13. Cognitive Behavioral Therapy for Depressed Adults with Mild Intellectual Disability: A Pilot Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hartley, Sigan L.; Esbensen, Anna J.; Shalev, Rebecca; Vincent, Lori B.; Mihaila, Iulia; Bussanich, Paige

    2015-01-01

    There is a paucity of research on psychosocial treatments for depression in adults with intellectual disability (ID). In this pilot study, we explored the efficacy of a group CBT treatment that involved a caregiver component in adults with mild ID with a depressive disorder. Sixteen adults with mild ID and a depressive disorder participated in a…

  14. Metabolic syndrome and onset of depressive symptoms in elderly: Finding from the Three-City Study

    E-print Network

    Boyer, Edmond

    1 Metabolic syndrome and onset of depressive symptoms in elderly: Finding from the Three-City Study Running title: Metabolic Syndrome and depression in elderly Tasnime N. Akbaraly PhD1,2 , Marie of both metabolic syndrome (MetS) and depressive symptoms during old age, we aimed to examine

  15. Validating the Center for Epidemiological Studies Depression Scale for Children in Rwanda

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Betancourt, Theresa; Scorza, Pamela; Meyers-Ohki, Sarah; Mushashi, Christina; Kayiteshonga, Yvonne; Binagwaho, Agnes; Stulac, Sara; Beardslee, William R.

    2012-01-01

    Objective: We assessed the validity of the Center for Epidemiological Studies Depression Scale for Children (CES-DC) as a screen for depression in Rwandan children and adolescents. Although the CES-DC is widely used for depression screening in high-income countries, its validity in low-income and culturally diverse settings, including sub-Saharan…

  16. Depression-Related Stress Generation: A Longitudinal Study of Black Adolescents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wingate, LaRicka R.; Joiner, Thomas E., Jr.

    2004-01-01

    The authors examined Hammen's (1991) model of stress generation in depression in a Black adolescent population. The longitudinal sample of 1,766 participants entered the study at ages 13 to 18. Stressful events and depressive and other symptom occurrence over a 1-year period were analyzed. Results supported the stress generation model. Depressive

  17. Study protocol: the Whitehall II imaging sub-study

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The Whitehall II (WHII) study of British civil servants provides a unique source of longitudinal data to investigate key factors hypothesized to affect brain health and cognitive ageing. This paper introduces the multi-modal magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) protocol and cognitive assessment designed to investigate brain health in a random sample of 800 members of the WHII study. Methods/design A total of 6035 civil servants participated in the WHII Phase 11 clinical examination in 2012–2013. A random sample of these participants was included in a sub-study comprising an MRI brain scan, a detailed clinical and cognitive assessment, and collection of blood and buccal mucosal samples for the characterisation of immune function and associated measures. Data collection for this sub-study started in 2012 and will be completed by 2016. The participants, for whom social and health records have been collected since 1985, were between 60–85 years of age at the time the MRI study started. Here, we describe the pre-specified clinical and cognitive assessment protocols, the state-of-the-art MRI sequences and latest pipelines for analyses of this sub-study. Discussion The integration of cutting-edge MRI techniques, clinical and cognitive tests in combination with retrospective data on social, behavioural and biological variables during the preceding 25 years from a well-established longitudinal epidemiological study (WHII cohort) will provide a unique opportunity to examine brain structure and function in relation to age-related diseases and the modifiable and non-modifiable factors affecting resilience against and vulnerability to adverse brain changes. PMID:24885374

  18. Serotonergic genes and depressive disorder in acute coronary syndrome: The Korean depression in ACS (K-DEPACS) study.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jae-Min; Stewart, Robert; Kang, Hee-Ju; Bae, Kyung-Yeol; Kim, Sung-Wan; Shin, Il-Seon; Hong, Young Joon; Ahn, Youngkeun; Jeong, Myung Ho; Park, Sung-Woo; Kim, Young-Hoon; Yoon, Jin-Sang

    2015-06-01

    Genes coding for the serotonergic pathway have been associated with depressive disorders. However, these associations have rarely been tested in acute coronary syndrome (ACS) patients vulnerable to depression. This study aimed to investigate whether polymorphisms of serotonin transporter (5-HTT) and serotonin 2a receptor (5-HTR2a) genes are associated with occurrence of depressive disorder in ACS. 969 patients with recently developed ACS were recruited at baseline, and 711 were followed 1 year thereafter. Depressive disorder was diagnosed according to DSM-IV criteria, and analysed as an outcome at baseline (prevalence), and follow up (incidence and persistence). Genotypes were ascertained for 5-HTTLPR, STin2 VNTR, 5-HTR2a 102T/C, and 5-HTR2a 1438A/G. Logistic regression models were used to investigate associations. The 5-HTTLPR s/s genotype was independently associated with depressive disorder prevalence and persistence following ACS, but no significant associations were found with the other polymorphisms. ACS patients with the 5-HTTLPR s allele are thus potentially susceptible to depressive disorder in the early phase after ACS, and with its persistence over the subsequent year. PMID:25772786

  19. The Relationship between Depression and Asthma: A Meta-Analysis of Prospective Studies

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Fu-rui; Gao, Yang; Shen, Pamela; Chen, Rong-chang; Zhang, Guo-jun

    2015-01-01

    Background Previous studies have suggested that asthmatic patients often have comorbid depression; however, temporal associations remain unclear. Objectives To determine whether depression predicts asthma and, conversely, whether asthma predicts depression. Methods A literature search was conducted without language restrictions using Pubmed, Embase, Cochrane and PsycINFO for studies published before January, 2015. Papers referenced by the obtained articles were also reviewed. Only comparative prospective studies with reported risk estimates of the association between depression and asthma were included. In order to investigate whether one of these conditions was predictive of the other, studies were excluded if enrolled participants had pre-existing depression or asthma. A random-effects model was used to calculate the pooled risk estimates for two outcomes: depression predicting asthma and asthma predicting depression. Results Seven citations, derived from 8 cohort studies, met our inclusion criteria. Of these, six studies reported that depression predicted incident adult-onset asthma, including 83684 participants and 2334 incident cases followed for 8 to 20 years. Conversely, two studies reported that asthma predicted incident depression. These studies involved 25566 participants and 2655 incident cases followed for 10 and 20 years, respectively. The pooled adjusted relative risks (RRs) of acquiring asthma associated with baseline depression was 1.43 (95% CI, 1.28–1.61) (P<0.001). The adjusted RRs for acquiring depression associated with baseline asthma was 1.23 (95% CI, 0.72–2.10) (P = 0.45). Conclusions Depression was associated with a 43% increased risk of developing adult-onset asthma. However, asthma did not increase the risk of depression based on limited studies. Further prospective studies ascertaining the true association between asthma and subsequent risk of depression are warranted. PMID:26197472

  20. [Depression and stress management in medical students. A comparative study between freshman and advanced medical students].

    PubMed

    Jurkat, H B; Richter, L; Cramer, M; Vetter, A; Bedau, S; Leweke, F; Milch, W

    2011-05-01

    International studies have indicated a high prevalence of depression and a lack of coping with stress in medical students. Freshman and advanced medical students were investigated using a specific questionnaire and the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI) with a response rate of 100%. Of the subjects studied 81.1% did not have any depression, 13.1% slight and 5.8% clinically relevant symptoms of depression. The severity of symptoms was highly associated with subjective appraisal of stressors. Coping skills of first year students significantly influenced the depression symptoms calling for preventative measures even in freshman medical students. PMID:21165590

  1. Unipolar depression across cultures: A Delphi analysis of the methodological and conceptual issues confronting the cross-cultural study of depression

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Melinda Redmond; Rosanna Rooney; Brian Bishop

    2006-01-01

    The objective of the research is to investigate the epistemological and methodological discrepancies involved in the cross-cultural study of unipolar depression. These discrepancies include the methodological design and measurement of depression and culture, and the epistemological variation in researchers as to whether depression is a universal or socially constructed phenomenon. A Delphi procedure was utilised which enabled a group of

  2. Urinary metabonomics study of anti-depressive effect of Chaihu-Shu-Gan-San on an experimental model of depression induced by chronic variable stress in rats

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Zhi-Heng Su; Shu-Qi Li; Guo-An Zou; Chang-Yuan Yu; Yan-Guo Sun; Hong-Wu Zhang; Ying Gu; Zhong-Mei Zou

    2011-01-01

    Chaihu-Shu-Gan-San (CSGS), a traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) formula, has been effectively used for the treatment of depression in clinic. However, studies of its anti-depressive mechanism are challenging, accounted for the complex pathophysiology of depression, and complexity of CSGS with multiple constituents acting on different metabolic pathways. The variations of endogenous metabolites in rat model of depression after administration of CSGS

  3. Online screening and referral for postpartum depression: an exploratory study.

    PubMed

    Drake, Emily; Howard, Erica; Kinsey, Emily

    2014-04-01

    The fear and stigma associated with postpartum depression (PPD) is a major challenge in the treatment of this disease. Our goal is to develop innovative methods of screening women for the symptoms of PPD to facilitate referral and treatment. This study explores the efficacy of the Internet in reaching out to postpartum women in the convenience and privacy of their own homes, particularly those in rural and underserved areas. An exploratory study design was used to explore the feasibility and acceptability of online screening for PPD with postpartum women in the first 2-3 months after delivery (N = 18). In the first phase, a focus group was conducted with a small group of postpartum women; the second phase consisted of individual interviews of postpartum women in their homes; and in phase three, 10 women participated in the on-line screening intervention. PPD was measured using an online version of the Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale (EPDS) a well-established instrument with reported alpha reliabilities (0.81-0.88) across studies and concurrent validity demonstrated using the gold standard, Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fourth Edition criteria for depression interview. Qualitative data collected from all the participants were also analyzed. The sample included women age 18-29; 70 % White/Caucasian, 50 % low income, and the majority living in rural areas. The EPDS scores ranged from 0 to 13 (mean 8.0; SD 4.76). Participants described the online PPD screening process as easy, straightforward and personalized and provided additional suggestions for improvement. PMID:23283485

  4. Depression and low bone mineral density: a meta-analysis of epidemiologic studies

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Q. Wu; J. H. Magnus; J. Liu; A. F. Bencaz; J. G. Hentz

    2009-01-01

    Summary  The association between depression and loss of bone mineral density (BMD) has been reported inconsistently. This meta-analysis,\\u000a which pooled results from 14 qualifying individual studies, found that depression was associated with a significantly decreased\\u000a BMD, with a substantially greater BMD decrease in depressed women and in cases of clinical depression.\\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a Introduction  The reported association between depression and loss of BMD has

  5. A Longitudinal Study of the Relation Between Depressive Symptomatology and Parenting Practices

    PubMed Central

    Errázuriz, Paula A.; Harvey, Elizabeth A.; Thakar, Dhara A.

    2011-01-01

    This longitudinal study examined whether mothers’ depressive symptomatology predicted parenting practices in a sample of 199 mothers of 3-year-old children with behavior problems who were assessed yearly until age 6. Higher maternal depressive symptoms were associated with higher overreactivity and laxness and lower warmth when children were 6 years old. Higher maternal depressive symptoms were also related to increases in overreactivity across the preschool years. Moreover, depression and parenting practices (overreactivity and laxness) covaried over time within mothers. These results provide evidence of a strong link between maternal depression and parenting during the preschool years. PMID:22611298

  6. Promotoras across the border: a pilot study addressing depression in Mexican women impacted by migration.

    PubMed

    Edelblute, Heather B; Clark, Sandra; Mann, Lilli; McKenney, Kathryn M; Bischof, Jason J; Kistler, Christine

    2014-06-01

    The migration of working-aged men from Mexico to the United States fractures the family-centered support structures typical of Latin America and contributes to high levels of depression in women left behind in migratory sending communities in Mexico. Mujeres en Solidaridad Apoyandose (MESA) was developed to improve depression in women through social support in a resource poor setting. MESA is a promotora intervention that trains women in the community to lead social support groups over a five-week period. The MESA curriculum uses a combination of cognitive behavioral theory techniques, psychoeducation, and social support activities aimed at alleviating or preventing depression in women. Results from this pilot efficacy study (n = 39) show that depressed participants at baseline experienced declines in depression as measured by the Center for Epidemiologic Studies Depression Scale at follow-up. Other findings demonstrate the complexity behind addressing social support and depression for women impacted by migration in different ways. PMID:23440449

  7. The Impact of Staff Initiated Referral and Intervention Protocols on Symptoms of Depression in People with Mild Intellectual Disability

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McGillivray, Jane A.; Kershaw, Mavis M.

    2013-01-01

    It has been estimated that people with ID experience the same and possibly higher levels of depression than the general population. Referral to a General Medical Practitioner (GP) for primary care is recommended practice for people with depression and cognitive behavioural (CB) therapy is now an accepted evidence based intervention. A growing body…

  8. Depression in Dercum’s disease and in obesity: A case control study

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Dercum’s disease is characterised by pronounced pain in the adipose tissue and a number of associated symptoms. The condition is usually accompanied by generalised weight gain. Many of the associated symptoms could also be signs of depression. Depression in Dercum’s disease has been reported in case reports but has never been studied using an evidence-based methodology. The aim of this study was to examine the presence of depression in patients with Dercum’s disease compared to obese controls that do not experience any pain. Methods A total of 111 women fulfilling the clinical criteria of Dercum’s disease were included. As controls, 40 obese healthy women were recruited. To measure depression, the Montgomery Åsberg Depression Rating Scale (MADRS) was used. Results According to the total MADRS score, less than half of the patients were classified as having “no depression” (44%), the majority had “light” or “moderate depression” (55%) and one individual had “severe depression” in the Dercum group. In the control groups, the majority of the patients were classified as having “no depression” (85%) and a small number had “light depression” (15%). There was a statistically significant difference for the total MADRS score between the two groups (p?=?0.014). Conclusion The results indicate that the patients with Dercum’s disease are more likely to suffer from depression than controls. PMID:22759645

  9. Obesity as a prospective predictor of depression in adolescent females

    PubMed Central

    Boutelle, Kerri N.; Hannan, Peter; Fulkerson, Jayne A.; Crow, Scott J.; Stice, Eric

    2010-01-01

    Structured Abstract Objective Both obesity and depression are prominent during adolescence, and it is possible that obesity is a trigger for adolescent depression. The purpose of this paper is to evaluate whether overweight or obese status contributes to the development of depression in adolescent females. Design Participants were 496 adolescent girls who completed interview based measures of depression and had their height and weight measured at 4 yearly assessments. Repeated measures logistic regressions with generalized estimating equations were used to evaluate whether overweight or obese status were associated with Major depression or an increase in depressive symptoms the following year. Main Outcome Measures Major depression and depressive symptoms were evaluating using a modified version of the K-SADS interview. Overweight and obese status was determined using standardized protocols to measure height and weight. Results Results showed that obese status, not overweight status, was associated with future depressive symptoms, but not Major depression. This study demonstrated that obesity is a risk factor for depressive symptoms, but not for clinical depression. Conclusions As depressive symptoms are considered along the spectrum of depression with clinical depression at the high end, these results suggest that weight status could be considered a factor along the pathway of development of depression in some adolescent females. PMID:20496983

  10. A Prospective Study of Stress Autonomy versus Stress Sensitization in Adolescents at Varied Risk for Depression

    PubMed Central

    Morris, Matthew C.; Ciesla, Jeffrey A.; Garber, Judy

    2010-01-01

    This longitudinal study investigated the stress autonomy, stress sensitization, and depression vulnerability hypotheses in adolescents across six years (i.e., grades 6 through 12). Participants were 240 children (Time 1 mean age = 11.86, SD = 0.57) who varied in risk for depression based on their mother’s history of mood disorders. All analyses were conducted as multilevel models to account for nesting in the data. Results were consistent with the stress sensitization hypothesis. The within-subject relation of stress levels to depressive symptoms strengthened with increasing numbers of prior depressive episodes. In addition, evidence consistent with the vulnerability hypothesis was found. The relation of stress levels to depressive symptoms was stronger for adolescents who were at risk for depression based on maternal depression history and for those who had experienced more depressive episodes through grade 12. These findings suggest that onsets of depression in adolescents may be predicted by both relatively stable and dynamic transactions between stressful life events and vulnerabilities such as maternal depression and youths’ own history of depressive episodes. PMID:20455607

  11. Study on Cloud Security Based on Trust Spanning Tree Protocol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lai, Yingxu; Liu, Zenghui; Pan, Qiuyue; Liu, Jing

    2015-02-01

    Attacks executed on Spanning Tree Protocol (STP) expose the weakness of link layer protocols and put the higher layers in jeopardy. Although the problems have been studied for many years and various solutions have been proposed, many security issues remain. To enhance the security and credibility of layer-2 network, we propose a trust-based spanning tree protocol aiming at achieving a higher credibility of LAN switch with a simple and lightweight authentication mechanism. If correctly implemented in each trusted switch, the authentication of trust-based STP can guarantee the credibility of topology information that is announced to other switch in the LAN. To verify the enforcement of the trusted protocol, we present a new trust evaluation method of the STP using a specification-based state model. We implement a prototype of trust-based STP to investigate its practicality. Experiment shows that the trusted protocol can achieve security goals and effectively avoid STP attacks with a lower computation overhead and good convergence performance.

  12. Parent Involvement in CBT Treatment of Adolescent Depression: Experiences in the Treatment for Adolescents with Depression Study (TADS)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wells, Karen C.; Albano, Anne Marie

    2005-01-01

    The Treatment for Adolescents With Depression Study (TADS) evaluated the short- and long-term effectiveness of cognitive behavior therapy (CBT) alone, fluoxetine alone, and their combination, relative to pill placebo, and the 12-week treatment effects were recently published (TADS Team, 2004). Results showed that treatment that combined CBT with…

  13. Beyond normality in the study of bereavement: heterogeneity in depression outcomes following loss in older adults.

    PubMed

    Galatzer-Levy, Isaac R; Bonanno, George A

    2012-06-01

    Studies of individual differences in bereavement have revealed prototypical patterns of outcome. However, many of these studies were conducted prior to the advent of sophisticated contemporary data analytic techniques. For example, Bonanno et al. (2002) used rudimentary categorization procedures to identify unique trajectories of depression symptomatology from approximately 3 years prior to 4 years following conjugal loss in a representative sample of older American adults. In the current study, we revisited these same data using Latent Class Growth Analysis (LCGA) to derive trajectories and test predictors. LCGA is a technique well-suited for modeling empirically- and conceptually-derived heterogeneous longitudinal patterns while simultaneously modeling predictors of those longitudinal patterns. We uncovered four discrete trajectories similar in shape and proportion to the previous analyses: Resilience (characterized by little or no depression; 66.3%), Chronic Grief (characterized by depression following loss, alleviated by 4 years post-loss; 9.1%), _Pre-existing Chronic Depression (ongoing high pre- through post-loss depression; 14.5%), and Depressed-Improved (characterized by high pre-loss depression that decreases following loss; 10.1%). Using this analytic strategy, we were able to examine multiple hypotheses about bereavement simultaneously. Health, financial stress, and emotional stability emerged as strong predictors of variability in depression only for some trajectories, indicating that depression levels do not have a common etiology across all the bereaved. As such, we find that identifying distinct patterns informs both the course and etiology of depression in response to bereavement. PMID:22472274

  14. Iatrogenic depression in the elderlyResults from a community-based study in the Netherlands

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Ton D. F. Dhondt; Aartjan T. F. Beekman; Dorly J. H. Deeg; Willem van Tilburg

    2002-01-01

    Background The aim of this study was to investigate the association between the use of medication and depression in the elderly. Method A cross-sectional population-based study was conducted. Associations between the use of medication and depression are corrected\\u000a for eight other etiological correlates of depression. The sample consisted of 2646 elderly people living in 11 municipalities\\u000a in the Netherlands. Subjects

  15. A Unix network protocol security study: network information service

    Microsoft Academic Search

    David K. Hess; David R. Safford; Udo W. Pooch

    1992-01-01

    This note is a study of the security weaknesses present in a widely used Unix network protocol, Network Information Service (NIS). NIS (formerly known as Yellow Pages or YP) was developed by Sun Microsys-tems primarily to reduce the effort required to setup and maintain a network of Unix workstations. This is accomplished through the centralization on a NIS server of

  16. STUDY PROTOCOL Open Access EMPIRICUS micafungin versus placebo during

    E-print Network

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    STUDY PROTOCOL Open Access EMPIRICUS micafungin versus placebo during nosocomial sepsis in Candida micafungin 100 mg intravenously once a day or placebo for 14 days. We plan to enroll 260 patients. The main at day 28 as compared to placebo. Other outcomes include day 28 and 90 survival and organ failure

  17. An Empirical Study on Interoperability between Service Discovery Protocols

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Beihong Jin; Zhi Zang; Liang Zhang

    2008-01-01

    Service discovery protocol (SDP) is one of the fundamental infrastructures in pervasive computing. However, various SDPs differ on service description model, system architecture, deployment network and service discovery mechanism. It is highly necessary to develop a framework that can provide interoperability for multiple SDPs. In this paper, we carry out an empirical study on building a novel interoperable framework called

  18. STUDY PROTOCOL Open Access Electrons for intraoperative radiotherapy in

    E-print Network

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    STUDY PROTOCOL Open Access Electrons for intraoperative radiotherapy in selected breast-cancer for early-breast cancer in selected patients. IORT provides good late cosmetics results and should-Bernard Dubois1 and Marian Gutowski3 Abstract Background: The Montpellier cancer institute phase II trial started

  19. STUDY PROTOCOL Open Access Methadone induction in primary care

    E-print Network

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    STUDY PROTOCOL Open Access Methadone induction in primary care (ANRS-Methaville): a phase III, an opioid maintenance treatment (OMT), in primary care for drug users has led to an impressive reduction for drug and alcohol dependence (CSAPA) or a hospital setting) and are referred to primary care physicians

  20. Evening salivary alpha-amylase, major depressive disorder, and antidepressant use in the Netherlands Study of Depression and Anxiety (NESDA).

    PubMed

    Veen, Gerthe; Giltay, Erik J; Licht, Carmilla M M; Vreeburg, Sophie A; Cobbaert, Christa M; Penninx, Brenda W J H; Zitman, Frans G

    2013-06-30

    Salivary alpha-amylase (sAA) may be a suitable index for sympathetic activity and dysregulation of the autonomic nervous system. The relationship between antidepressants and depression with sAA levels was studied, since antidepressants were previously shown to have a profound impact on heart rate variability as an ANS indicator. Data are from 1692 participants of the Netherlands Study of Depression and Anxiety (NESDA) who were recruited from the community, general practice, and specialized mental health care. Differences in evening sAA levels were examined between patient groups (i.e., 752 current major depressive disorder [MDD], 611 remitted MDD, and 329 healthy controls) and between 46 tricyclic antidepressant (TCA) users, 307 selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI) users, 97 users of another antidepressant, and 1242 non-users. Each participant sampled twice at 22.00h and 23.00h. In multivariable analysis, there was a trend over the three groups with increasing sAA levels from controls to remitted MDD to current MDD that approached significance. Furthermore, in comparison to non-users of antidepressants, TCA rather than SSRI users showed higher sAA levels, that persisted after multivariable adjustment. The present study shows that higher evening sAA levels in depressed patients, indicative of an increased sympathetic activity, may be induced by TCAs. PMID:23587658

  1. The Longitudinal Relationship Between Depression and Walking Behavior in Older Latinos: The “!Caminemos!” Study

    PubMed Central

    Hernandez, Rosalba; Prohaska, Thomas R.; Wang, Pin-Chieh; Sarkisian, Catherine A.

    2013-01-01

    Objectives This study sought to evaluate the relationship between baseline depression and prospective engagement in walking and exercise behavior after enrollment in an exercise intervention. Methods The study used baseline, 1-month, 12-month, and 24-month in-person interview and pedometer data collected from Latinos aged ?60 years participating in an exercise intervention (¡Caminemos!) at 27 senior centers (n=572). Results After joining an exercise intervention, and when using continuous pedometer data and scores from the Yale Physical Activity Survey (YPAS) as the outcomes of interest, older adults with baseline depression exhibited comparable levels of physical activity across time when compared to their non-depressed counterparts. Significant difference in physical activity levels between the depressed and non-depressed subgroups no longer existed within one month of initiating the exercise intervention. Discussion Among sedentary older Latino adults, having depression may not delay exercise initiation nor does it appear to prevent achievement or maintenance of an exercise program. PMID:23264440

  2. Oxidative stress and depressive symptoms in older adults: A magnetic resonance spectroscopy study.

    PubMed

    Duffy, Shantel L; Lagopoulos, Jim; Cockayne, Nicole; Hermens, Daniel F; Hickie, Ian B; Naismith, Sharon L

    2015-07-15

    Major depression is common in older adults and associated with greater health care utilisation and increased risk of poor health outcomes. Oxidative stress may be implicated in the pathophysiology of depression and can be measured via the neurometabolite glutathione using proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy ((1)H-MRS). This study aimed to examine the relationship between glutathione concentration and depressive symptom severity in older adults 'at-risk' of depression. In total, fifty-eight older adults considered 'at-risk' of depression (DEP) and 12 controls underwent (1)H-MRS, medical and neuropsychological assessments. Glutathione was measured in the anterior cingulate cortex (ACC), and calculated as a ratio to creatine. Depressive and anxiety symptoms were assessed using the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS). Compared to controls, DEP patients had increased glutathione/creatine ratios in the ACC (t=2.7, p=0.012). In turn, these increased ratios were associated with greater depressive symptoms (r=0.28, p=0.038), and poorer performance on a verbal learning task (r=-0.28, p=0.040). In conclusion, depressive symptoms in older people are associated with increased glutathione in the ACC. Oxidative stress may be pathophysiologically linked to illness development and may represent an early compensatory response. Further research examining the utility of glutathione as a marker for depressive symptoms and cognitive decline is now required. PMID:25881278

  3. Risk of Developing Depressive Disorders following Rheumatoid Arthritis: A Nationwide Population-Based Study

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Li-Yu; Tsai, Shih-Jen; Yang, Albert C.; You, Zi-Hong

    2014-01-01

    Background & Aims To evaluate the risk of depressive disorders among rheumatoid arthritis (RA) by using the Taiwan National Health Insurance Research Database (NHIRD). Methods We conducted a retrospective study of a matched cohort of 18 285 participants (3 657 RA patients and 14 628 control patients) who were selected from the NHIRD. Patients were observed for a maximum of 10 years to determine the rates of newly diagnosed depressive disorders, and Cox regression was used to identify the risk factors associated with depressive disorders in RA patients. Results During the 10-year follow-up period, 205 (11.2 per 1000 person-years) RA patients and 384 (5.1 per 1000 person-years) control patients were diagnosed with depressive disorders. In RA patients, most depressive disorders (n?=?163, 80%) developed with five years of being diagnosed with RA. The incidence risk ratio of depressive disorders between RA patients and control patients was 2.20 (95% confidence interval [CI], 1.84–2.61, P<.001). After adjusting for age, sex, and comorbidities, RA patients were 2.06 times more likely to develop depressive disorders (95% CI, 1.73–2.44, P<.001) compared with the control patients. Hyperthyroidism (HR?=?1.67) was an independent risk factor for depressive disorders in patients with RA. Conclusions The likelihood of developing depressive disorders is greater among RA patients than among patients without RA. Symptoms of depression should be sought in patients with RA. PMID:25226167

  4. Protocols for studying antizyme expression and function.

    PubMed

    Murai, Noriyuki; Murakami, Yasuko; Matsufuji, Senya

    2011-01-01

    Antizyme (AZ) is a key molecule in feedback regulation of cellular polyamines. It is induced by polyamines through stimulation of ribosomal frameshifting during its translation. In mammals, AZ is diverged into three paralogs, AZ1-3. Tissue and subcellular distribution are different among the paralogs, as determined by immunochemical methods or expression of fluorescent-tagged proteins. Only AZ2 is known to be phosphorylated. AZ regulates cellular polyamine levels through multiple mechanisms. It binds to ornithine decarboxylase (ODC) to form an inactive complex and to trigger degradation of ODC by 26S proteasomes. The AZ activity to promote ODC degradation can be measured both in vitro and in cells. AZ also inhibits cellular uptake of polyamines. This chapter comprises seven subchapters describing methods for studying expression and function of AZ. PMID:21318878

  5. Thyroid function in clinical subtypes of major depression: an exploratory study

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Konstantinos N Fountoulakis; Apostolos Iacovides; Philippos Grammaticos; George St Kaprinis; Per Bech

    2004-01-01

    : BACKGROUND: Unipolar depression might be characterized by a 'low-thyroid function syndrome'. To our knowledge, this is the first study which explores the possible relationship of DSM-IV depressive subtypes and the medium term outcome, with thyroid function. METHODS: Material: Thirty major depressive patients (DSM-IV) aged 21–60 years and 60 control subjects were included. Clinical Diagnosis: The SCAN v 2.0 and

  6. Insomnia and depressive symptoms in late pregnancy - a population based study

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Malin Eberhard-Gran

    2012-01-01

    A population based questionnaire study of 2816 women was conducted in week 32 of pregnancy to estimate the prevalence of and risk factors for insomnia and depressive symptoms. The Bergen Insomnia Scale (BIS) measured insomnia. The Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale (EPDS) measured depressive symptoms. The prevalence of insomnia (DSM-IV-TR criteria) was 61.9%, and mean BIS score 17.5 (SD 10.5), significantly

  7. Insomnia and Depressive Symptoms in Late Pregnancy: A Population-Based Study

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Malin Eberhard-Gran

    2012-01-01

    A population-based questionnaire study of 2,816 women was conducted in week 32 of pregnancy to estimate the prevalence of and risk factors for insomnia and depressive symptoms. The Bergen Insomnia Scale (BIS) measured insomnia. The Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale (EPDS) measured depressive symptoms. The prevalence of insomnia (DSM-IV-TR criteria) was 61.9%, and mean BIS score 17.5 (SD = 10.5), significantly

  8. Sleep and depression — results from psychobiological studies: an overview

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Dieter Riemann; Mathias Berger; Ulrich Voderholzer

    2001-01-01

    Disturbances of sleep are typical for most depressed patients and belong to the core symptoms of the disorder. Polysomnographic sleep research has demonstrated that besides disturbances of sleep continuity, in depression sleep is characterized by a reduction of slow wave sleep and a disinhibition of REM sleep, with a shortening of REM latency, a prolongation of the first REM period

  9. Incidence of Depression in Early Adolescence: A Preliminary Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Albert, Nina; Beck, Aaron T.

    1975-01-01

    An instrument used to measure depression indicated that 35 percent of grade 7 and 8 students had significant levels of depression. The author suggests that programs regarding student mental health be instituted toward preventive guidance through the school system. (Author/DEP)

  10. Intimate Partner Violence and Incident Depressive Symptoms and Suicide Attempts: A Systematic Review of Longitudinal Studies

    PubMed Central

    Devries, Karen M.; Mak, Joelle Y.; Bacchus, Loraine J.; Child, Jennifer C.; Falder, Gail; Petzold, Max; Astbury, Jill; Watts, Charlotte H.

    2013-01-01

    Background Depression and suicide are responsible for a substantial burden of disease globally. Evidence suggests that intimate partner violence (IPV) experience is associated with increased risk of depression, but also that people with mental disorders are at increased risk of violence. We aimed to investigate the extent to which IPV experience is associated with incident depression and suicide attempts, and vice versa, in both women and men. Methods and Findings We conducted a systematic review and meta-analysis of longitudinal studies published before February 1, 2013. More than 22,000 records from 20 databases were searched for studies examining physical and/or sexual intimate partner or dating violence and symptoms of depression, diagnosed major depressive disorder, dysthymia, mild depression, or suicide attempts. Random effects meta-analyses were used to generate pooled odds ratios (ORs). Sixteen studies with 36,163 participants met our inclusion criteria. All studies included female participants; four studies also included male participants. Few controlled for key potential confounders other than demographics. All but one depression study measured only depressive symptoms. For women, there was clear evidence of an association between IPV and incident depressive symptoms, with 12 of 13 studies showing a positive direction of association and 11 reaching statistical significance; pooled OR from six studies?=?1.97 (95% CI 1.56–2.48, I2?=?50.4%, pheterogeneity?=?0.073). There was also evidence of an association in the reverse direction between depressive symptoms and incident IPV (pooled OR from four studies?=?1.93, 95% CI 1.51–2.48, I2?=?0%, p?=?0.481). IPV was also associated with incident suicide attempts. For men, evidence suggested that IPV was associated with incident depressive symptoms, but there was no clear evidence of an association between IPV and suicide attempts or depression and incident IPV. Conclusions In women, IPV was associated with incident depressive symptoms, and depressive symptoms with incident IPV. IPV was associated with incident suicide attempts. In men, few studies were conducted, but evidence suggested IPV was associated with incident depressive symptoms. There was no clear evidence of association with suicide attempts. Please see later in the article for the Editors' Summary PMID:23671407

  11. Depression and Incident Dementia. An 8-Year Population-Based Prospective Study

    PubMed Central

    Luppa, Melanie; Luck, Tobias; Ritschel, Franziska; Angermeyer, Matthias C.; Villringer, Arno; Riedel-Heller, Steffi G.

    2013-01-01

    Aims The aim of the study was to investigate the impact of depression (categorical diagnosis; major depression, MD) and depressive symptoms (dimensional diagnosis and symptom patterns) on incident dementia in the German general population. Methods Within the Leipzig Longitudinal Study of the Aged (LEILA 75+), a representative sample of 1,265 individuals aged 75 years and older were interviewed every 1.5 years over 8 years (mean observation time 4.3 years; mean number of visits 4.2). Cox proportional hazards and binary logistic regressions were used to estimate the effect of baseline depression and depressive symptoms on incident dementia. Results The incidence of dementia was 48 per 1,000 person-years (95% confidence interval (CI) 45–51). Depressive symptoms (Hazard ratio HR 1.03, 95% CI 1.01–1.05), and in particular mood-related symptoms (HR 1.08, 95% CI 1.03–1.14), showed a significant impact on the incidence of dementia only in univariate analysis, but not after adjustment for cognitive and functional impairment. MD showed only a significant impact on incidence of dementia in Cox proportional hazards regression, but not in binary logistic regression models. Discussion The present study using different diagnostic measures of depression on future dementia found no clear significant associations of depression and incident dementia. Further in-depth investigation would help to understand the nature of depression in the context of incident dementia. PMID:23527147

  12. Treatment of Depression and Anxiety in Parkinson's Disease: A Pilot Study Using Group Cognitive Behavioural Therapy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Feeney, Farah; Egan, Sarah; Gasson, Natalie

    2005-01-01

    Depression and anxiety affect up to 50% of people with Parkinson's Disease (PD) (Marsh, 2000; Murray, 1996), however, few studies have examined the effectiveness of psychological treatment. This study examined the effectiveness of group cognitive behaviour therapy (CBT) in treating depression and anxiety in PD. Four participants, aged between 56…

  13. Number of risk genotypes is a risk factor for major depressive disorder: a case control study

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Holly A Garriock; Pedro Delgado; Mitchel A Kling; Linda L Carpenter; Michael Burke; William J Burke; Thomas Schwartz; Lauren B Marangell; Mustafa Husain; Robert P Erickson; Francisco A Moreno

    2006-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The objective of the study was to determine the genetic basis of Major Depressive Disorder, and the capacity to respond to antidepressant treatment. An association study of 21 candidate polymorphisms relevant to monoamine function and the mechanism of antidepressant response was conducted in 3 phenotypically distinct samples: a group with chronic or recurrent depression unable to respond to antidepressants

  14. Prevalence of depressive symptoms in a Japanese occupational setting: a preliminary study.

    PubMed Central

    Iwata, N; Okuyama, Y; Kawakami, Y; Saito, K

    1989-01-01

    We measured the prevalence of depressive symptoms in 2,190 Japanese tax office workers using the Japanese version of the Center for Epidemiologic Studies Depression Scale (CES-D). Score distribution by sex was more symmetrical and the mean score of each sex was higher than in the United States population. A high level of depressive symptoms was found in 15.2 percent of males and 10.6 percent of females by controlling for age and marital status. Males aged 50 years and over had more depressive symptoms than other male age groups. Perceived stress, related both to family life and the workplace, was associated with a high level of depressive symptoms. "Long-distance marriage" ("business bachelorhood"), peculiar to Japanese occupations, had little influence on depressive symptomatology. PMID:2817157

  15. Developing the Autism Model of Implementation for Autism spectrum disorder community providers: study protocol

    E-print Network

    Drahota, Amy; Aarons, Gregory A; Stahmer, Aubyn C

    2012-01-01

    disorder community providers: study protocol. Implementation ScienceScience STUDY PROTOCOL Open Access Developing the Autism Model of Implementation for Autism spectrum disorderdisorders. Moreover, the proposed study will posi- tively impact the field of implementation science

  16. A cross-sectional study of antenatal depression and associated factors in Malawi.

    PubMed

    Stewart, Robert C; Umar, Eric; Tomenson, Barbara; Creed, Francis

    2014-04-01

    Depression, and disabling levels of mixed depressive, anxious and somatic symptoms, termed common mental disorder, occurring in the perinatal period are an important health problem in low- and middle-income countries. In this cross-sectional study, pregnant women were recruited from a district hospital antenatal clinic in Malawi. Symptoms of depression and anxiety, and non-specific somatic symptoms commonly associated with distress, were measured using validated local versions of the Self Reporting Questionnaire (SRQ). In a sub-sample, Diagnostic Statistical Manual (DSM)-IV diagnoses of major and minor depressive disorders were made using the Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-IV. Maternal socio-demographic and health variables were measured, and associations with SRQ score and depression diagnosis were determined. Of 599 eligible women, 583 were included in the analysis. The adjusted weighted prevalence of current major depressive episode and current major or minor depressive episode were 10.7 % (95 % CI 6.9-14.5 %) and 21.1 % (95 % CI 15.5-26.6 %), respectively. On multivariate analysis, SRQ score was significantly associated with lower perceived social support, experience of intimate partner violence, having had a complication in a previous delivery, higher maternal mid-upper arm circumference and more years of schooling. Major depressive episode was associated with lower perceived social support and experience of intimate partner violence. This study demonstrates that antenatal depression/CMD is common in Malawi and is associated with factors that may be amenable to psychosocial interventions. PMID:24240635

  17. Prophylactic onabotulinumtoxinA in patients with chronic migraine and comorbid depression: An open-label, multicenter, pilot study of efficacy, safety and effect on headache-related disability, depression, and anxiety

    PubMed Central

    Boudreau, Guy P; Grosberg, Brian M; McAllister, Peter J; Lipton, Richard B; Buse, Dawn C

    2015-01-01

    Background Chronic migraine is associated with significant headache-related disability and psychiatric comorbidity. OnabotulinumtoxinA (BOTOX®) is effective and well tolerated in the prophylactic treatment of chronic migraine. This study aimed to provide preliminary data on the efficacy and safety of prophylactic onabotulinumtoxinA in patients with chronic migraine and comorbid depressive symptoms. Methods This was a prospective, open-label, multicenter pilot study. Eligible patients met International Classification of Headache Disorders 2nd edition Revision criteria for chronic migraine and had associated depressive symptoms, including Patient Health Questionnaire depression module scores of 5–19. Eligible participants received 155 units of onabotulinumtoxinA, according to the PREEMPT protocol, at baseline and week 12. Assessments included headache frequency, the Headache Impact Test™, the Migraine Disability Assessment, the Beck Depression Inventory®-II, the nine-item Patient Health Questionnaire depression module, and the seven-item Generalized Anxiety Disorder questionnaire. Adverse events were also monitored. Results Overall, 32 participants received treatment. At week 24, there were statistically significant mean (standard deviation [SD]) improvements relative to baseline in the number of headache/migraine-free days (+8.2 [5.8]) (P<0.0001) and in the number of headache/migraine days (?8.2 [5.8]) (P<0.0001) per 30-day period. In addition, there were significant improvements in Headache Impact Test scores (?6.3 [6.9]) (P=0.0001) and Migraine Disability Assessment scores (?44.2 [67.5]) (P=0.0058). From baseline to week 24, statistically significant improvements were also seen in Beck Depression Inventory-II (?7.9 [6.0]) (P<0.0001), Patient Health Questionnaire depression module (?4.3 [4.7]) (P<0.0001), and Generalized Anxiety Disorder questionnaire (?3.5 [5.0]) (P=0.0002) scores. No serious adverse events were reported. Adverse events considered related to treatment occurred in 30% of patients and were mild or moderate. Conclusion Prophylactic onabotulinumtoxinA was well tolerated in patients with chronic migraine and comorbid depression, and was effective in reducing headache frequency, impact, and related disability, which led to statistically significant improvements in depression and anxiety symptoms. PMID:25733924

  18. Prospective study on the reciprocal relationship between intimate partner violence and depression among women in Korea.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jinseok; Lee, Joohee

    2013-12-01

    This study aimed to examine the bi-directional relationship between intimate partner violence (IPV) and depression using prospective data. Data from the Korean Welfare Panel Study (KOWEPS) were used to test whether IPV was associated with an increased overall level of depression and with the rate of change over time in depressive symptoms and whether this model of change in depressive symptoms was associated with subsequent incidences of IPV. This study utilized data from 3153 married women who participated in the KOWEPS from 2006 through 2009. The KOWEPS is a panel study of a nationally representative sample of Korean households. The women's responses to multiple questions adopted from the Conflict Tactics Scale (CTS) were used to create a dichotomous IPV variable at Wave1 and Wave4. The CESD-11 was used to measure the women's level of depression. We utilized a latent growth model (LGM) of depression using IPV at Wave1 as a predictor and IPV at Wave4 as an outcome predicted by the model parameters of the LGM of depression. We found that after controlling for the effects of age, education, social support and income, IPV at Wave1 was positively associated with overall depression levels and negatively associated with the growth rate of depression. Further, IPV at Wave4 was associated with the intercept and the slope of the depression LGM and with IPV at Wave1. The overall model fit the data well. This study indicated that experiencing IPV influences a woman's level of depression in terms of its overall level and rate of change, which, in turn, influences the victim's likelihood of experiencing subsequent IPV. PMID:24355469

  19. NHEXAS PHASE I REGION 5 STUDY--LIST OF STUDY DOCUMENTS: PROTOCOLS AND SOPS

    EPA Science Inventory

    This document lists available protocols and SOPs for the NHEXAS Phase I Region 5 study. It identifies protocols and SOPs for the following study components: (1) Sample collection and field operations, (2) Sample analysis, (3) RTI's trace metals facility, (4) General laboratory pr...

  20. Right frontal lobe slow frequency repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (SF r-TMS) is an effective treatment for depression: a case-control pilot study of safety and efficacy

    PubMed Central

    Menkes, D.; Bodnar, P.; Ballesteros, R.; Swenson, M.

    1999-01-01

    Major depression may result from decreased left frontal lobe function with respect to the right. Fast frequency repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (FF r-TMS) excites the underlying cortex whereas slow frequency repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (SF r-TMS) causes cortical inhibition. Left frontal FF r-TMS attenuates major depression whereas the inhibitory effects of right frontal SF r-TMS are unknown. This study tested the hypothesis that right frontal SF r-TMS would treat depressed patients with minimal effect on controls.? A psychiatrist administered the Beck depression inventory and Hamilton D depression rating scales to eight depressed patients and six controls before and after the treatment protocol. Eight sessions of 100 right frontal lobe SF r-TMS were given at motor threshold and 0.5 Hz over a 6 week period. No adverse outcomes were noted in either group. A significant antidepressant effect was noted in depressed patients on the Beck and Hamilton D depression rating scales (p<0.05). No change on either scale was noted in the controls. In conclusion right frontal lobe SF r-TMS is a safe, non-invasive treatment for major depression that deserves further investigation.?? PMID:10369835

  1. Altered White Matter Microstructure in Adolescents with Major Depression: A Preliminary Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cullen, Kathryn R.; Klimes-Dougan, Bonnie; Muetzel, Ryan; Mueller, Bryon A.; Camchong, Jazmin; Houri, Alaa; Kurma, Sanjiv; Lim, Kelvin O.

    2010-01-01

    Objective: Major depressive disorder (MDD) occurs frequently in adolescents, but the neurobiology of depression in youth is poorly understood. Structural neuroimaging studies in both adult and pediatric populations have implicated frontolimbic neural networks in the pathophysiology of MDD. Diffusion tensor imaging (DTI), which measures white…

  2. School-Based Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy for Adolescent Depression: A Benchmarking Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shirk, Stephen R.; Kaplinski, Heather; Gudmundsen, Gretchen

    2009-01-01

    The current study evaluated cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT) for adolescent depression delivered in health clinics and counseling centers in four high schools. Outcomes were benchmarked to results from prior efficacy trials. Fifty adolescents diagnosed with depressive disorders were treated by eight doctoral-level psychologists who followed a…

  3. The Treatment for Adolescents with Depression Study (TADS): Methods and Message at 12 Weeks

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    March, John; Silva, Susan; Vitiello, Benedetto

    2006-01-01

    Funded by the National Institute of Mental Health, the Treatment for Adolescents With Depression Study (TADS) is intended to evaluate the short-term (12 weeks) and longer-term (36 weeks) effectiveness of four treatments for adolescents with DSM-IV major depressive disorder: clinical management with fluoxetine (FLX), cognitive-behavioral therapy…

  4. A prospective follow-up study of ECT outcome in older depressed patients

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Henry Brodaty; Ian Hickie; Catherine Mason; Leanne Prenter

    2000-01-01

    Background: This study examined the relationship between age and outcome of electroconvulsive therapy (ECT). Method: This was a naturalistic, prospective follow-up of 81 consecutive in-patients with primary major depression. ECT outcome was compared for three age groups — under 65, 65–74 and 75 years and over — on the Hamilton Rating Scale for Depression (HRSD), Global Assessment of Functioning scale

  5. Neurasthenia and depression: A study of somatization and culture in China

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Arthur Kleinman

    1982-01-01

    The author reviews conceptual and empirical issues regarding the interaction of neurasthenia, somatization and depression in Chinese culture and in the West. The historical background of neurasthenia and its current status are discussed, along with the epidemiology and phenomenology of somatization and depression. Findings are presented from a combined clinical and anthropological field study of 100 patients with neurasthenia in

  6. Behavioral Activation Treatment for Depression in Older Adults Delivered via Videoconferencing: A Pilot Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lazzari, Claudia; Egan, Sarah J.; Rees, Clare S.

    2011-01-01

    Depression affects up to 25% of older adults. Underdetection and subsequent undertreatment of depression in older adults has been attributed in part to difficulties in older adults being able to access treatment. This uncontrolled pilot study, N = 3, explored the acceptability and efficacy of a brief behavioral activation treatment delivered via…

  7. Validation study of a Portuguese version of the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale

    Microsoft Academic Search

    J. Pais-Ribeiro; I. Silva; T. Ferreira; A. Martins; R. Meneses; M. Baltar

    2007-01-01

    The study aims to develop and assess metric proprieties of the Portuguese version of the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale. A sequential sample includes 1322 participants diagnosed with cancer, stroke, epilepsy, coronary heart disease, diabetes, myotonic dystrophy, obstructive sleep apnoea, depression and a non-disease group, which completed the HADS. The first step includes translation, retroversion, inspection for lexical equivalence and

  8. A Prospective Study of Risk Factors for the Development of Depression and Disordered Eating in Adolescents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ferreiro, Fatima; Seoane, Gloria; Senra, Carmen

    2011-01-01

    There is evidence that females display higher levels of depressive symptoms and disordered eating than males from adolescence onward. This study examined whether different risk factors and their interaction with sex (moderator effect) prospectively predicted depressive symptoms and disordered eating in adolescents. A total of 415 female…

  9. Impact of Childhood Trauma on Treatment Outcome in the Treatment for Adolescents with Depression Study (TADS)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lewis, Cara C.; Simons, Anne D.; Nguyen, Lananh J.; Murakami, Jessica L.; Reid, Mark W.; Silva, Susan G.; March, John S.

    2010-01-01

    Objective: The impact of childhood trauma was examined in 427 adolescents (54% girls, 74% Caucasian, mean = 14.6, SD = 1.5) with major depressive disorder participating in the Treatment for Adolescents with Depression Study (TADS). Method: TADS compared the efficacy of cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT), fluoxetine (FLX), their combination (COMB),…

  10. A Longitudinal Study of the Relation between Depressive Symptomatology and Parenting Practices

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arellano, Paula A. Errazuriz; Harvey, Elizabeth A.; Thakar, Dhara A.

    2012-01-01

    This longitudinal study examined whether mothers' depressive symptomatology predicted parenting practices in a sample of 199 mothers of 3-year-old children with behavior problems who were assessed yearly until age 6. Higher maternal depressive symptoms were associated with higher overreactivity and laxness and lower warmth when children were 6…

  11. The Clinical Interview for Depression: A Comprehensive Review of Studies and Clinimetric Properties

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Jenny Guidi; Giovanni A. Fava; Per Bech; Eugene Paykel

    2011-01-01

    Background: A comprehensive assessment of the wide spectrum of depressive symptomatology, particularly in its subclinical forms, is lacking in standard rating scales. There is also an emerging need for instruments that can detect small differences in therapeutic studies and have good sensitivity. The purpose of this paper is to review the clinimetric characteristics of Paykel’s Clinical Interview for Depression (CID)

  12. The development of a brief psychodynamic intervention (dynamic interpersonal therapy) and its application to depression: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Lemma, Alessandra; Target, Mary; Fonagy, Peter

    2011-01-01

    This paper describes a protocol for a brief psychodynamic intervention (Dynamic Interpersonal Therapy; DIT) for use with depressed patients and a pilot study set out to test its acceptability and compatibility with session-by-session monitoring as a prelude to a future randomized controlled trial. Sixteen consecutively referred, depressed patients (aged 20-53) were offered 16 sessions of DIT. Patient outcomes were collected pre-post, and on a session-by-session basis, using the PHQ-9 and GAD-7. Therapist and supervision feedback indicates that this structured psychodynamic treatment could be effectively taught, and that the key competences involved were acquired and demonstrated in the clinical work supervised. Patients found the treatment acceptable and relevant to their problems. The treatment appeared compatible with session-by-session monitoring of symptoms of anxiety and depression. DIT was associated with a significant reduction in reported symptoms in all but one case, to below clinical levels in 70% of the patients. Random regression models revealed highly significant linear and quadratic components, confirming the decrease in reported symptom severity but cautioning about slight increase in symptoms around the ending phase of the treatment. The results suggest that DIT is promising in its acceptability and effectiveness with an unselected group of primary care patients, and is easily acquired by psychodynamically trained clinicians. PMID:21463169

  13. Cognitive evolutionary therapy for depression: a case study

    PubMed Central

    Giosan, Cezar; Muresan, Vlad; Moldovan, Ramona

    2014-01-01

    Key Clinical Message We present an evolutionary-driven cognitive–behavioral intervention for a moderately depressed patient. Standard cognitive and behavioral therapy techniques focused on the patient's perfectionistic and self-downing beliefs, while novel, evolutionary-informed techniques were used to guide behavioral activation and conceptualize secondary emotional problems related to anger. The treatment reduced depressive symptomatology and increased evolutionary fitness. PMID:25614817

  14. A study on professional stress, depression and alcohol use among Indian IT professionals

    PubMed Central

    Darshan, M. S.; Raman, Rajesh; Rao, T. S. Sathyanarayana; Ram, Dushad; Annigeri, Bindu

    2013-01-01

    Background: Stress has touched almost all professions posing threat to mental and physical health. India being the Information Technology (IT) hub with lakhs involved as IT Professionals, there is a need to assess prevalence of professional stress, depression and problem alcohol use and understand their association. Objectives: (1) To screen for the prevalence of professional stress, risk for depression and harmful alcohol use among software engineers. (2) To study the association between professional stress, risk for depression and harmful alcohol use. Materials and Methods: This is a cross-sectional online study conducted using screeing questionnaires like professional life stress scale, centre for epidemiological studies depression scale and alcohol use disorders identification test. This study was conducted specifically on professionals working in an IT firm with the designation of a software engineer. Results: A total of 129 subjects participated in the study. 51.2% of the study sample was found to be professionally stressed at the time of the interview. 43.4% of the study population were found to be at risk for developing depression. 68.2% of those who were professionally stressed were at risk for developing depression compared with only 17.5% of those who were not professionally stressed. Odds ratio revealed that subjects who were professionally stressed had 10 times higher risk for developing depression compared to those who were not professionally stressed. Subjects who were professionally stressed had 5.9 times higher prevalence of harmful alcohol use compared to those who were not professionally stressed. Subjects who were at risk for developing depression had 4.1 times higher prevalence of harmful alcohol use compared with those who were not at risk for developing depression. Conclusion: Such higher rates of professional stress, risk for developing depression and harmful alcohol use among software engineers could hinder the progress of IT development and also significantly increase the incidence of psychiatric disorders. PMID:23439801

  15. Cohort study of depressive moods in Thai women during late pregnancy and 6–8 weeks of postpartum using the Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale (EPDS)

    Microsoft Academic Search

    N. Limlomwongse; T. Liabsuetrakul

    2006-01-01

    Summary  Objective: To identify depressive moods as measured by the Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale in late pregnancy and postpartum, explore\\u000a associated factors and assess changes in depressive moods.\\u000a \\u000a Methods: A cohort study of 610 pregnant Thai women was conducted. The self-reporting EPDS was completed at 36–40 weeks and at 6–8\\u000a weeks postpartum.\\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a Result: The prevalence of depressive moods (scores of 10

  16. A prospective study of existential issues in therapeutic horticulture for clinical depression.

    PubMed

    Gonzalez, Marianne Thorsen; Hartig, Terry; Patil, Grete Grindal; Martinsen, Egil Wilhelm; Kirkevold, Marit

    2011-01-01

    Two studies with single-group design (Study 1 N = 18, Study 2 N = 28) addressed whether horticultural activities ameliorate depression severity and existential issues. Measures were obtained before and after a 12-week therapeutic horticulture program and at 3-month follow-up. In both studies, depression severity declined significantly during the intervention and remained low at the follow-up. In both studies the existential outcomes did not change significantly; however, the change that did occur during the intervention correlated (rho > .43) with change in depression severity. Participants' open-ended accounts described the therapeutic horticulture experience as meaningful and influential for their view of life. PMID:21208054

  17. Home-delivered Problem Adaptation Therapy (PATH) for Depressed, Cognitively Impaired, Disabled Elders: A Preliminary Study

    PubMed Central

    Kiosses, Dimitris N.; Arean, Patricia A.; Teri, Linda; Alexopoulos, George S.

    2010-01-01

    Objectives This preliminary study examines the efficacy of 12-week home-delivered Problem Adaptation Therapy (PATH) vs. home-delivered Supportive Therapy (ST) in reducing depression and disability in 30 depressed, cognitively impaired, disabled older adults. Design A 12-week randomized clinical trial. Research assistants were unaware of the participants' randomization status. Assessments were conducted at baseline, 6 and 12 weeks. Setting Weill Cornell - Advanced Center for Interventions and Services Research (ACISR). Participants Thirty elders with major depression, cognitive impairment, and disability were recruited through advertisement and the Home-Delivered Meals Program of the Westchester County Department of Senior Programs and Services. Intervention PATH is a home-delivered intervention designed to reduce depression and disability in depressed, cognitively impaired, disabled elders. PATH is based on Problem Solving Therapy (PST) and integrates environmental adaptation and caregiver participation. PATH is consistent with Lawton's ecological model of adaptive functioning in aging. Measurements Depression and disability were measured with Hamilton Depression Rating Scale – 24 items and Sheehan Disability Scale, respectively. Client Satisfaction Questionnaire was used to assess patient satisfaction with treatment. Results Mixed-effects model analyses revealed that PATH was more efficacious than ST in reducing depression and disability at 12 weeks. Participants in both treatment groups were satisfied with treatment. Conclusions This preliminary study suggests that PATH is well accepted and efficacious in depressed elders with major depression, cognitive impairment, and disability. Because this population may not adequately respond to antidepressant medication treatment, PATH may provide relief to many patients who would otherwise remain depressed and suffer. PMID:20808092

  18. Depression and Oxidative Stress: Results From a Meta-Analysis of Observational Studies

    PubMed Central

    Palta, Priya; Samuel, Laura J.; Miller, Edgar R.; Szanton, Sarah L.

    2014-01-01

    Objective To perform a systematic review and meta-analysis that quantitatively tests and summarizes the hypothesis that depression results in elevated oxidative stress and lower antioxidant levels. Methods We performed a meta-analysis of studies that reported an association between depression and oxidative stress and/or antioxidant status markers. PubMed and EMBASE databases were searched for articles published from January 1980 through December 2012. A random-effects model, weighted by inverse variance, was performed to pool standard deviation (Cohen’s d) effect size estimates across studies for oxidative stress and antioxidant status measures, separately. Results Twenty-three studies with 4980 participants were included in the meta-analysis. Depression was most commonly measured using the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fourth Edition criteria. A Cohen’s d effect size of 0.55 (95% confidence interval = 0.47–0.63) was found for the association between depression and oxidative stress, indicating a roughly 0.55 of 1-standard-deviation increase in oxidative stress among individuals with depression compared with those without depression. The results of the studies displayed significant heterogeneity (I2 = 80.0%, p < .001). A statistically significant effect was also observed for the association between depression and antioxidant status markers (Cohen’s d = ?0.24, 95% confidence interval = ?0.33 to ?0.15). Conclusions This meta-analysis observed an association between depression and oxidative stress and antioxidant status across many different studies. Differences in measures of depression and markers of oxidative stress and antioxidant status markers could account for the observed heterogeneity. These findings suggest that well-established associations between depression and poor heath outcomes may be mediated by high oxidative stress. PMID:24336428

  19. Predictors of Dementia Caregiver Depressive Symptoms in a Population: The Cache County Dementia Progression Study

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Objectives. Previous research has consistently reported elevated rates of depressive symptoms in dementia caregivers, but mostly with convenience samples. This study examined rates and correlates of depression at the baseline visit of a population sample of dementia caregivers (N = 256). Method. Using a modified version of Williams (Williams, I. C. [2005]. Emotional health of black and white dementia caregivers: A contextual examination. The Journals of Gerontology, Series B: Psychological Sciences and Social Sciences, 60, P287–P295) ecological contextual model, we examined 5 contexts that have contributed to dementia caregiver depression. A series of linear regressions were performed to determine correlates of depression. Results. Rates of depressive symptoms were lower than those reported in most convenience studies. We found fewer depressive symptoms in caregivers with higher levels of education and larger social support networks, fewer health problems, greater likelihood of using problem-focused coping, and less likelihood of wishful thinking and with fewer behavioral disturbances in the persons with dementia. Discussion. These results suggest that depression may be less prevalent in populations of dementia caregivers than in clinic-based samples, but that the correlates of depression are similar for both population and convenience samples. Interventions targeting individuals with small support networks, emotion-focused coping styles, poorer health, low quality of life, and those caring for persons with higher numbers of behavioral problems need development and testing. PMID:23241850

  20. A pilot study of depression among older people in Rawalpindi, Pakistan

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Depression is common among elderly in developed countries and it is more pronounced in institutional settings. In Pakistan there is a lack of empirical data on depression among this segment of the population particularly with reference to their living arrangements. The objectives of the present study are to report the magnitude of depression among elderly having two different residential arrangements and to examine the association of depression and its established demographic factors. Findings Data were collected from 141 respondents. 108 were community residents (m?=?57 and f?=?51) and 33 were living in the care homes (m?=?29 and f?=?4). Prevalence of depression as assessed by Geriatric Depression Scale (GDS) among community and Care Homes (CHs) participants was 31.5 percent and 60.6 percent, respectively. On Centre of Epidemiological Studies Depression Scale (CES-D), 42.6 percent of the community and 69.7 percent of the CH respondents were deemed depressed. Before adjusting for any other potential risk factors the odds of being depressed was significantly increased if the study participants were living in CH, relatively older, female, not currently married, had low educational level, had lower Mini Mental State Examination (MMSE) scores, and reported lower perceived emotional and practical support. In a partially adjusted logistic regression model an increased risk of depression was not confounded by any of the above mentioned risk factors. However, the risk associated was not significant when it was adjusted for social support. Conclusions The findings of the current study are consistent with previous research and throws light on the dire need for interventions to address mental health needs of Pakistani elderly. Implications for improving the mental health status of elderly are also presented. PMID:24973800

  1. Cognitive patterns and depression: study of a Japanese university student population.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Nao; Uji, Masayo; Hiramura, Hidetoshi; Chen, Zi; Shikai, Noriko; Kitamura, Toshinori

    2006-06-01

    According to Beck's cognitive theory, individuals who endure negative self-schemas (dysfunctional attitudes) are more likely to present automatic thoughts consisting of negative schemata of oneself and one's world while experiencing depression. In order to examine the relationships between depression, automatic thought, and dysfunctional attitude, 329 Japanese university students were given a set of questionnaires, including the Center for Epidemiologic Studies Depression Scale (CES-D), Automatic Thought Questionnaire-revised (ATQ-R), and Dysfunctional Attitude Scale (DAS). A structural equation model revealed that depression was predicted predominantly by automatic thought, which was in turn predicted by dysfunctional attitude. The male gender had a tendency to predict dysfunctional attitude. The link between a student's depression and dysfunctional attitude was mediated by automatic thought. PMID:16732754

  2. Importance of Social and Cultural Factors for Attitudes, Disclosure and Time off Work for Depression: Findings from a Seven Country European Study on Depression in the Workplace

    PubMed Central

    Evans-Lacko, Sara; Knapp, Martin

    2014-01-01

    Objectives Depression is experienced by a large proportion of the workforce and associated with high costs to employers and employees. There is little research on how the social costs of depression vary by social and cultural context. This study investigates individual, workplace and societal factors associated with greater perceived discomfort regarding depression in the workplace, greater likelihood of employees taking time off of work as a result of depression and greater likelihood of disclosure of depression to one's employer. Methods Employees and managers (n?=?7,065) were recruited from seven European countries to participate in the IDEA survey. Multivariable logistic regression models were used to examine associations between individual characteristics and country contextual characteristics in relation to workplace perceptions, likelihood of taking time off work and disclosing depression to an employer. Results Our findings suggest that structural factors such as benefit systems and flexible working hours are important for understanding workplace perceptions and consequences for employees with depression. However, manager responses that focus on offering help to the employee with depression appear to have stronger associations with positive perceptions in the workplace, and also with openness and disclosure by employees with depression. Conclusion This study highlights the importance of individual, workplace and societal factors that may be associated with how people with depression are perceived and treated in the workplace, and, hence, factors that may be associated with openness and disclosure among employees with depression. Some responses, such as flexible working hours, may be helpful but are not necessarily sufficient, and our findings also emphasise the importance of support and openness of managers in addition to flexible working hours. PMID:24622046

  3. Prevalence of and factors associated with poststroke depression: a Malaysian study.

    PubMed

    Glamcevski, Mihajlo Tome; Pierson, Jane

    2005-01-01

    This study investigated the prevalence of depression 3-6 months poststroke and examined specific factors associated with depression in a stroke population of the University Malaya Medical Centre, Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia. It was hypothesised that poststroke depression (PSD) is prevalent in the poststroke population of University Hospital Malaysia and that PSD is significantly correlated with demographics, educational background, medical history, rehabilitation attendance, traditional medicine use, prestroke and poststroke activities, religiousness, activities of daily living, and social support. The study group comprised 80 patients admitted to the hospital with stroke of any etiology. Mean patient age was 56.8 years (standard deviation +/- 12.5 years). The results were derived by comparing the 80 stroke patients with 80 controls matched for age, sex, race, and medication use. Results were also derived from comparisons between depressed and nondepressed members of the stroke population (n = 80). The diagnosis of depression was based on the Zung Self-Rating Scale and confirmed by a psychiatrist, based on DSM-IV criteria. Interviews were conducted based on a 26-item questionnaire, modified Barthel Index, and Social Resources Scale were used to assess which factors correlated with depression. Depression was found to be common among Malaysians 3-6 months after stroke. A total of 66% of the patients were depressed, with depression considered mild in 51% and moderate to severe in 15%. It was demonstrated that the occurrence of depression was significantly correlated with age, ethnicity, noncontinuance of prestroke lifestyles, and poor performance in the activities of daily living rating. PMID:17904018

  4. Fear induced neuronal alterations in a genetic model of depression: An fMRI study on awake animals

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Wei Huang; Meghan E. Heffernan; Zhixin Li; Nanyin Zhang; David H. Overstreet; Jean A. King

    2011-01-01

    Previous human imaging studies used facial stimuli to explore the potential association between depression and fear. This study aimed at investigating brain alterations in a rodent model of depression when innate fear was induced in the form of the predator odor trimethylthiazoline (TMT). Flinders sensitive line (FSL) rats, a genetic animal model of depression, and their control counterpart Flinders resistant

  5. A longitudinal study of processes predicting the specificity of autobiographical memory in the adolescent offspring of depressed parents

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Adhip Rawal; Frances Rice

    2012-01-01

    Deficits in specific autobiographical memory retrieval are closely associated with depression. The ability to retrieve specific autobiographical memories develops throughout childhood and adolescence and is associated with adolescent depression within and across time. Studying young samples before they first experience depression provides an approach for testing processes that underlie reduced autobiographical memory specificity. This study is the first to examine

  6. Leisure-Time Physical Activity and Marital Status in Relation to Depression Between Men and Women: A Prospective Study

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Feng Wang; Marie DesMeules; Wei Luo; Sulan Dai; Claudia Lagace; Howard Morrison

    2011-01-01

    Background: Previous studies have identified the preventive effect of leisure-time physical activity (LTPA) on depression. Women and men have different emotional vulnerabilities. The impact of LTPA on depression varies by gender. Little is known about the impact of LTPA on depression for people with different marital status. Objectives: The objective of this study was to assess the long-term effects of

  7. Study of freezing-point depression of selected food extracts

    SciTech Connect

    Tanaka, Fumihiko [Kagoshima Univ. (Japan). Dept. of Agricultural Systems Engineering; Murata, Satoshi; Habara, Kazuhiro; Amaratunga, K.S.P. [Kyushu Univ., Fukuoka (Japan). Dept. of Agricultural Engineering

    1996-12-31

    The phenomenon of freezing-point depression that accompanies the solute concentration of selected food extracts was investigated to reveal the characteristics of solid-liquid phase equilibrium. The freezing curves of various food extracts did not exhibit ideal solution behavior in the higher concentration range. The experimental data were fitted to new freezing-point depression equations by the method of nonlinear least squares, and the results clearly indicated that the calculated freezing points at various concentrations were in good agreement with the experimental data. Furthermore, by using the determined parameters, the freezing ratio and the activation coefficient were derived.

  8. Adjunctive triple chronotherapy (combined total sleep deprivation, sleep phase advance, and bright light therapy) rapidly improves mood and suicidality in suicidal depressed inpatients: an open label pilot study.

    PubMed

    Sahlem, Gregory L; Kalivas, Benjamin; Fox, James B; Lamb, Kayla; Roper, Amanda; Williams, Emily N; Williams, Nolan R; Korte, Jeffrey E; Zuschlag, Zachary D; El Sabbagh, Salim; Guille, Constance; Barth, Kelly S; Uhde, Thomas W; George, Mark S; Short, E Baron

    2014-12-01

    Previous studies have demonstrated that combined total sleep deprivation (Wake therapy), sleep phase advance, and bright light therapy (Triple Chronotherapy) produce a rapid and sustained antidepressant effect in acutely depressed individuals. To date no studies have explored the impact of the intervention on unipolar depressed individuals with acute concurrent suicidality. Participants were suicidal inpatients (N = 10, Mean age = 44 ± 16.4 SD, 6F) with unipolar depression. In addition to standard of care, they received open label Triple Chronotherapy. Participants underwent one night of total sleep deprivation (33-36 h), followed by a three-night sleep phase advance along with four 30-min sessions of bright light therapy (10,000 lux) each morning. Primary outcome measures included the 17 item Hamilton depression scale (HAM17), and the Columbia Suicide Severity Rating Scale (CSSRS), which were recorded at baseline prior to total sleep deprivation, and at protocol completion on day five. Both HAM17, and CSSRS scores were greatly reduced at the conclusion of the protocol. HAM17 scores dropped from a mean of 24.7 ± 4.2 SD at baseline to a mean of 9.4 ± 7.3 SD on day five (p = .002) with six of the ten individuals meeting criteria for remission. CSSRS scores dropped from a mean of 19.5 ± 8.5 SD at baseline to a mean of 7.2 ± 5.5 SD on day five (p = .01). The results of this small pilot trial demonstrate that adjunctive Triple Chronotherapy is feasible and tolerable in acutely suicidal and depressed inpatients. Limitations include a small number of participants, an open label design, and the lack of a comparison group. Randomized controlled studies are needed. PMID:25231629

  9. Association of Cystatin C and Depression in Healthy Elders: The Health, Aging and Body Composition Study

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Evgueni Minev; Mark Unruh; Michael G. Shlipak; Eleanor Simsonick; Kristine Yaffe; Tennille S. Leak; Anne B. Newman; Linda F. Fried

    2010-01-01

    Background\\/Aims: Depression is highly prevalent in individuals with advanced kidney disease, but is less well studied in individuals with milder disease. We evaluated the association between kidney function and depression in the Health, Aging and Body Composition (Health ABC) study. Methods: The study enrolled 3,075 community-dwelling black and white adults aged 70–79 years. Kidney function was measured by cystatin C

  10. Prevalence of Depression among University Students: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis Study

    PubMed Central

    Sarokhani, Diana; Delpisheh, Ali; Veisani, Yousef; Sarokhani, Mohamad Taher; Manesh, Rohollah Esmaeli; Sayehmiri, Kourosh

    2013-01-01

    Introduction. Depression is one of the four major diseases in the world and is the most common cause of disability from diseases. The aim of this study is to estimate the prevalence of depression among Iranian university students using meta-analysis method. Materials and Methods. Keyword depression was searched in electronic databases such as PubMed, Scopus, MAGIran, Medlib, and SID. Data was analyzed using meta-analysis (random-effects model). Heterogeneity of studies was assessed using the I2 index. Data was analyzed using STATA software Ver.10. Results. In 35 studies conducted in Iran from 1995 to 2012 with sample size of 9743, prevalence of depression in the university students was estimated to be 33% (95% CI: 32–34). The prevalence of depression among boys was estimated to be 28% (95% CI: 26–30), among girls 23% (95% CI: 22–24), single students 39% (95% CI: 37–41), and married students 20% (95% CI: 17–24). Metaregression model showed that the trend of depression among Iranian students was flat. Conclusions. On the whole, depression is common in university students with no preponderance between males and females and in single students is higher than married ones. PMID:24187615

  11. Self-referential processing in depressed adolescents: A high-density event-related potential study.

    PubMed

    Auerbach, Randy P; Stanton, Colin H; Proudfit, Greg Hajcak; Pizzagalli, Diego A

    2015-05-01

    Despite the alarming increase in the prevalence of depression during adolescence, particularly among female adolescents, the pathophysiology of depression in adolescents remains largely unknown. Event-related potentials (ERPs) provide an ideal approach to investigate cognitive-affective processes associated with depression in adolescents, especially in the context of negative self-referential processing biases. In this study, healthy (n = 30) and depressed (n = 22) female adolescents completed a self-referential encoding task while ERP data were recorded. To examine cognitive-affective processes associated with self-referential processing, P1, P2, and late positive potential (LPP) responses to negative and positive words were investigated, and intracortical sources of scalp effects were probed using low-resolution electromagnetic tomography (LORETA). Additionally, we tested whether key cognitive processes (e.g., maladaptive self-view, self-criticism) previously implicated in depression related to ERP components. Relative to healthy female subjects, depressed females endorsed more negative and fewer positive words, and free recalled and recognized fewer positive words. With respect to ERPs, compared with healthy female adolescents, depressed adolescents exhibited greater P1 amplitudes following negative words, which was associated with a more maladaptive self-view and self-criticism. In both early and late LPP responses, depressed females showed greater activity following negative versus positive words, whereas healthy females demonstrated the opposite pattern. For both P1 and LPP, LORETA revealed reduced inferior frontal gyrus activity in response to negative words in depressed versus healthy female adolescents. Collectively, these findings suggest that the P1 and LPP reflect biased self-referential processing in female adolescents with depression. Potential treatment implications are discussed. (PsycINFO Database Record PMID:25643205

  12. Internet-based treatment of major depression for patients on a waiting list for inpatient psychotherapy: protocol for a multi-centre randomised controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Major depressive disorder (MDD) is a prevalent and severe disorder. Although effective treatments for MDD are available, many patients remain untreated, mainly because of insufficient treatment capacities in the health care system. Resulting waiting periods are often associated with prolonged suffering and impairment as well as a higher risk of chronification. Web-based interventions may help to alleviate these problems. Numerous studies provided evidence for the efficacy of web-based interventions for depression. The aim of this study is to evaluate a new web-based guided self-help intervention (GET.ON-Mood Enhancer-WL) specifically developed for patients waiting to commence inpatient therapy for MDD. Methods In a two-armed randomised controlled trial (n?=?200), the web-based guided intervention GET.ON-Mood Enhancer-WL in addition to treatment as usual (TAU) will be compared with TAU alone. The intervention contains six modules (psycho education, behavioural activation I & II, problem solving I & II, and preparation for subsequent inpatient depression therapy). The participants will be supported by an e-coach, who will provide written feedback after each module. Inclusion criteria include a diagnosis of MDD assessed with a structured clinical interview [SCID] and a waiting period of at least three weeks before start of inpatient treatment. The primary outcome is observer-rated depressive symptom severity (HRSD24). Further (explorative) questions include whether remission will be achieved earlier and by more patients during inpatient therapy because of the web-based preparatory intervention. Discussion If GET.ON-Mood Enhancer-WL is proven to be effective, patients may start inpatient therapy with reduced depressive symptom severity, ideally leading to higher remission rates, shortened inpatient therapy, reduced costs, and decreased waiting times. Trial registration German Clinical Trial Registration (DRKS): DRKS00004708. PMID:24279841

  13. Depression and Diabetes

    MedlinePLUS

    ... see the NIMH booklet on Depression . What is diabetes? Diabetes is an illness that affects the way ... are starved of energy. How are depression and diabetes linked? Studies show that depression and diabetes may ...

  14. Analysis of Grooming Behavior and Its Utility in Studying Animal Stress, Anxiety, and Depression

    E-print Network

    Kalueff, Allan V.

    Chapter 2 Analysis of Grooming Behavior and Its Utility in Studying Animal Stress, Anxiety-depth analysis of the behavior would immensely benefit fields utilizing rodent research. Here, we present: Grooming behavior, stress, anxiety, depression, behavioral organization (sequencing), animal experimental

  15. A study of arc force, pool depression and weld penetration during gas tungsten arc welding

    SciTech Connect

    Rokhlin, S.I.; Guu, A.C. (Ohio State Univ., Columbus, OH (United States). Dept. of Welding Engineering)

    1993-08-01

    Weld pool depression, arc force, weld penetration, and their interrelations have been studied as a function of welding current. Pool depression and welding arc force have been measured simultaneously using a recently developed technique. The authors found quadratic dependence of arc force on current, confirming similar findings in previous studies. Pool depression is essentially zero below a threshold level of current (200 A in this experiment) and then increases quadratically with current. A perfectly linear relation between arc force and pool depression was found in the current range from 200 to 350 A, with pool depression onset at about 0.35 g force (0.34 [center dot] 10[sup [minus]2]N). The total surface tension and gravitational forces were calculated, from the measured surface topography, and found to be about five times that required to balance the arc force at 300 A. Thus electromagnetic and hydrodynamic forces must be taken into account to explain the measured levels of pool depression. The relation between weld penetration and pool depression for different welding currents has been established. Three distinct regimes of weld penetration on weld current were found.

  16. Self-Structures, Negative Events, and Adolescent Depression: Clarifying the Role of Self-Complexity in a Prospective, Multiwave Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cohen, Joseph R.; Spiegler, Kevin M.; Young, Jami F.; Hankin, Benjamin L.; Abela, John R. Z.

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this multiwave longitudinal study was to examine the structure of self-complexity and its relation to depressive symptoms in 276 adolescents (M = 12.55; SD = 1.04). Self-complexity, depressive symptoms, and negative events were assessed during a laboratory assessment at baseline, and then depressive symptoms and negative events were…

  17. Does Depression Predict Coronary Heart Disease and Cerebrovascular Disease Equally Well? The HeSSup Prospective Cohort Study

    E-print Network

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Does Depression Predict Coronary Heart Disease and Cerebrovascular Disease Equally Well? The HeSSup Prospective Cohort Study Running Head: Depression, Coronary heart and cerebrovascular diseases Hermann Nabi depression and cerebrovascular disease (CBVD) continues to be debated although little research has compared

  18. Depression is a serious public-health problem and the leading cause of disability worldwide. Studies have shown neighbourhood

    E-print Network

    Kambhampati, Patanjali

    Abstract MOTIVATION Depression is a serious public-health problem and the leading cause of disability worldwide. Studies have shown neighbourhood characteristics to be associated with depression, but it is not clear which neighbourhood features matter most for depression, for whom this effect is most relevant

  19. A clinical and EEG sleep study in the differential diagnosis of pre-pubertal depression: State of the art

    Microsoft Academic Search

    David A. Brent; Charles F. Reynolds

    1981-01-01

    The diagnosis of depression in childhood and adolescence remains problematic. We present an overview of the literature on the diagnosis of childhood and adolescent depression with particular reference to the potential utility of EEG sleep studies. A case of a pre-pubertal boy with depressive symptomatology is presented to illustrate some of the diagnostic difficulties and the application of EEG sleep

  20. Severe deep white matter lesions and outcome in elderly patients with major depressive disorder: follow up study

    Microsoft Academic Search

    John O'Brien; David Ames; Edmond Chiu; Isaac Schweitzer; Patricia Desmond; Brian Tress

    Objective To determine the difference in outcome among elderly people with major depression who do and do not have severe white matter lesions on magnetic resonance imaging. Design Follow up study. Setting Two psychiatric and two general hospitals in Melbourne, Australia. Subjects 60 depressed subjects aged over 55 referred to hospital psychiatric services with major depressive disorder meeting American Psychiatric

  1. Association between metabolic syndrome and depressive symptoms in middle-aged adults: Results from the Whitehall II study

    E-print Network

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    1 Association between metabolic syndrome and depressive symptoms in middle-aged adults: Results from the Whitehall II study Running Title: metabolic syndrome and depressive symptoms Tasnime N and the metabolic syndrome is a "two- way street", the metabolic syndrome as a predictor of depression has been

  2. Prevalence of Students with Symptoms of Depression among High School Students in a District of Western Turkey: An Epidemiological Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Unsal, Alaaddin; Ayranci, Unal

    2008-01-01

    Background: To determine the factors affecting the prevalence of depression and also to present some pertinent comments concerning prevention of depression among high school students. This study was deemed important and relevant due to the increasing importance of depression among high school students. Methods: A sample of students aged 14-19…

  3. Differences and similarities between obsessive and ruminative thoughts in obsessive-compulsive and depressed patients: A comparative study

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Karina Wahl; Sabine Schönfeld; Johanna Hissbach; Sebastian Küsel; Bartosz Zurowski; Steffen Moritz; Fritz Hohagen; Andreas Kordon

    2011-01-01

    Repetitive, intrusive cognitive phenomena are central both to obsessive-compulsive patients - typically as obsessive thoughts - and to depressed patients - typically as ruminative thoughts. The objective of the present study is to compare obsessive and ruminative thoughts in non-depressed obsessive-compulsive and depressed patients. Thirty-four patients diagnosed with obsessive-compulsive disorder and 34 patients diagnosed with major depression disorder were asked to

  4. A study of MANET routing protocols: Joint node density, packet length and mobility

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Nurul I. Sarkar; Wilford G. Lol

    2010-01-01

    The dynamic topology of a mobile ad hoc network (MANET) poses a real challenge in the design of a MANET routing protocol. Over the last 10 years, a variety of routing protocols have been developed and their performance simulations are made by network researchers. Most of the previous research on MANET routing protocols have focused on simulation study by varying

  5. Antenatal Depression is Not Associated with Low-Birth Weight: A Study from Urban Pakistan

    PubMed Central

    Husain, Nusrat; Munshi, Tariq; Jafri, Farhat; Husain, Meher; Parveen, Asia; Saeed, Qamar; Tomenson, Barbara; Naeem, Farooq; Chaudhry, Nasim

    2014-01-01

    Background: Low-birth weight (LBW) (<2500?g) is considered to be a leading cause of cognitive impairment and physical disabilities in children. Incidence of LBW in South Asia has been reported to be as high as 33%. We investigated the association between antenatal depression and LBW in an urban community, in Karachi, Pakistan. Methods: A total of 1357 pregnant women in their third trimester were recruited into the study. They were screened for antenatal depression with Edinburgh postnatal depression scale. Self-reporting questionnaire was also used to measure psychological distress. Birth weights of 763 newborns were obtained from the hospital records. Results: We did not find a significant association between antenatal depression and LBW (odds ratio 0.881, 95%CI 0.732–1.060) in mothers attending a charity run hospital in an urban setting in Pakistan. Conclusion: Antenatal depression is not associated with LBW in this urban population in Pakistan. However, the prevalence of depression is high during pregnancy. There is a need to develop culturally adapted psychosocial interventions to address the high rates of depression for this population group. PMID:25540627

  6. The relationship between pain intensity and severity and depression in older people: exploratory study

    PubMed Central

    Iliffe, Steve; Kharicha, Kalpa; Carmaciu, Claudia; Harari, Danielle; Swift, Cameron; Gillman, Gerhard; Stuck, Andreas E

    2009-01-01

    Background Pain and depression are known to be associated in later life, and both have a negative effect on physical performance both separately and in combination. The nature of the relationships between pain intensity and depression in elderly persons experiencing pain is less clear. The objectives of this study were to explore which factors are associated with depressed mood in older people experiencing pain, and to test the hypothesis that older people experiencing pain are at risk of depressed mood according to the severity or frequency of their pain. In addition we explored whether other potentially modifiable factors might increase the risk of depressed mood in these persons. Methods The study is a secondary analysis of baseline data for four hundred and six community-dwelling non-disabled people aged 65 and over registered with three group practices in suburban London who had experienced pain in the past 4 weeks. Intensity and frequency of pain was measured using 24 item Geriatric Pain Measure (GPM) and the presence of depressive symptoms using the 5 item Mental Health Inventory. Risk for social isolation was measured using the 6 item Lubben Social Network scale and instrumental activities of daily living (IADL) were also measured. Results Overall 76 (19%) had depressed mood. Pain frequency and severity were not statistically significantly associated with depressed mood in this population. In multivariate analyses, significant predictors of the presence of depressive symptoms were difficulties with basic ADLs (OR 2.8, 95% CI 1.1.7.8), risk for social isolation (OR 4.1, 95% CI 1.8–9.3), and basic education only (OR 2.2, 95% CI 1.1–4.4). Conclusion Older people experiencing pain are also likely to experience depression. Among those experiencing pain, social network and functional status seem to be more important predictors of depressive symptoms than the severity of pain. Further studies should evaluate whether improvement of social network and functional status might reduce depressive symptoms in older patients. PMID:19638205

  7. Anxiety, depression and behavioral problems among adolescents with recurrent headache: the Young-HUNT study

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background It is well documented that both anxiety and depression are associated with headache, but there is limited knowledge regarding the relation between recurrent primary headaches and symptoms of anxiety and depression as well as behavioral problems among adolescents. Assessment of co-morbid disorders is important in order to improve the management of adolescents with recurrent headaches. Thus the main purpose of the present study was to assess the relationship of recurrent headache with anxiety and depressive symptoms and behavioral problems in a large population based cross-sectional survey among adolescents in Norway. Methods A cross-sectional, population-based study was conducted in Norway from 1995 to 1997 (Young-HUNT1). In Young-HUNT1, 4872 adolescents aged 12 to 17 years were interviewed about their headache complaints and completed a comprehensive questionnaire that included assessment of symptoms of anxiety and depression and behavioral problems, i.e. conduct and attention difficulties. Results In adjusted multivariate analyses among adolescents aged 12–14 years, recurrent headache was associated with symptoms of anxiety and depression (OR: 2.05, 95% CI: 1.61-2.61, p?depressive symptoms was evident for all headache categories; i.e. migraine, tension-type headache and non-classifiable headache. Among adolescents aged 15–17 years there was a significant association between recurrent headache and symptoms of anxiety and depression (OR: 1.64, 95% CI: 1.39-1.93, p?depressive symptoms and attention difficulties, while tension-type headache was significantly associated only with symptoms of anxiety and depression. Non-classifiable headache was associated with attention difficulties and conduct difficulties, but not with anxiety and depressive symptoms. Headache frequency was significantly associated with increasing symptoms scores for anxiety and depressive symptoms as well as attention difficulties, evident for both age groups. Conclusions The results from the present study indicate that both anxiety and depressive symptoms and behavioral problems are associated with recurrent headache, and should accordingly be considered a part of the clinical assessment of children and adolescents with headache. Identification of these associated factors and addressing them in interventions may improve headache management. PMID:24925252

  8. Evaluating a Brief, Internet-Based Intervention for Co-Occurring Depression and Problematic Alcohol Use in Young People: Protocol for a Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Teesson, Maree; Kay-Lambkin, Frances; Mills, Katherine L

    2014-01-01

    Background Depression and alcohol misuse represent two of the major causes of disease burden in young adults. These conditions frequently co-occur and this co-occurrence is associated with increased risks and poorer outcomes than either disorder in isolation. Integrated treatments have been shown to be effective, however, there remains a significant gap between those in need of treatment and those receiving it, particularly in young people. The increased availability of Internet-based programs to complement health care presents a unique opportunity in the treatment of these conditions. Objective The objective of our study was to evaluate whether a brief, Internet-based, self-help intervention (the DEAL [DEpression-ALcohol] Project) can be effective in treating co-occurring depression and problematic alcohol use in young people (18-25 years old). Methods The evaluation will take the form of a randomized controlled trial (RCT), comparing the DEAL Project with an attention-control condition (HealthWatch). The RCT will consist of a four-week intervention phase and a 24-week follow-up. It will be entirely Internet-based and open Australia-wide to young people 18 to 25 years old. The primary outcomes will be change in depression symptoms and alcohol use at 5, 12, and 24 weeks post baseline. Secondary outcomes include change in general functioning and quality of life, anxiety/stress symptomatology, and a number of other depression/alcohol related outcomes. Process analysis will also measure engagement across the conditions. Results This study is currently ongoing with preliminary results expected in late 2014. Conclusions This study, to our knowledge, will be the first RCT of a Internet-based treatment for comorbid depression and problematic alcohol use in any age group. If successful, the program represents a novel and innovative approach to addressing the significant harms associated with these conditions and will be an invaluable resource to those not receiving help elsewhere. Trial Registration Australian New Zealand Clinical Trials Registry; ACTRN12613000033741; https://www.anzctr.org.au/Trial/Registration/TrialReview.aspx?id=363461 (Archived by WebCite at http://www.webcitation.org/6Mrg9VFX4). PMID:24583824

  9. Mediational Pathways Through Which Positive and Negative Emotionality Contribute to Anhedonic Symptoms of Depression: A Prospective Study of Adolescents

    PubMed Central

    Hankin, Benjamin L.

    2009-01-01

    This study takes a developmental psychopathological approach to examine mechanisms through which baseline levels of positive emotionality (PE) and negative emotionality (NE) prospectively predict increases in anhedonic depressive symptoms in a community sample of 350 adolescents (6th–10th graders). Dependent stressors mediated the relationship between baseline levels of NE and anhedonic depressive symptoms after controlling for initial symptoms. Supportive relationships mediated the relationship between baseline levels of PE and anhedonic depressive symptoms, after controlling for baseline symptoms. In addition, NE × PE interacted to predict later anhedonic depressive symptoms, such that adolescents with low levels of PE and high levels of NE experienced the greatest increase in anhedonic depressive symptoms. Last, supportive relationships interacted with baseline PE to predict prospective changes in anhedonic depressive symptoms, such that adolescents with low PE and low supportive relationships experienced the greatest increase in anhedonic depressive symptoms. Results are discussed in terms of current theoretical models of the link between temperament and depression. PMID:19184402

  10. Depression and general anxiety in the prisoner of war's children: a cross sectional study

    PubMed Central

    Razavi, Seyed Hossein; Razavi-Ratki, Seid Kazem; Nojomi, Marzieh Molavi

    2012-01-01

    Background The main aim of this study was to assess the prevalence of depression and general anxiety of the prisoners of war (POW) children. The study was also designed to compare the prevalence of depression and general anxiety amongst the POW's children and normal adults, 20 years after the Iraq-Iran war. Method An analytic cross-sectional study carried out in June 2009 in Yazd (the centre of Yazd province in Iran). The target and sampled population were the children of the Iranian POW who lived in Yazd. One hundred and twenty six POW's children, who were born before 1990 (date of father's freedom) were assessed. The duration of father's captivation was between 29-119 months. Ninety-five subjects accepted to participate. General anxiety and major depression were assessed by Persian version of Hamilton Scale for anxiety and Beck depression Inventory. This study was a combination of the psychological interview and questionnaire. Ninety five of normal adult group were also paired matched and assessed. Result Among 126 POW's children who fulfilled the inclusion criteria, the responsive rate was 75.3% (95 participants). The mean age of participants was 28.3 (SD: 5.34).The father's captivation duration were 29-119 months (mean: 79.2, SD: 21.6). The prevalence of depression and general anxiety amongst the POW's children were 48.4% and 79%. The prevalence of depression and general anxiety among the paired group were 21.1% and 63.2%.The differences between two groups were significant (p =0.000). Conclusion In this study we have demonstrated the prevalence of major depression and general anxiety in POW's children and a normal adult sample. The differences of major depression and general anxiety among the two groups were significant. PMID:23482674

  11. Depression and sexual satisfaction among female medical students: surprising findings from a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Peleg-Sagy, Tal; Shahar, Golan

    2012-01-01

    We report surprising findings from a pilot study aimed at assessing the psychological price paid by female medical students who are also involved in serious romantic relationships. Sixty female medical students were assessed as to their depressive symptoms, level of self-criticism, sexual satisfaction, role commitment, and perceived rewards derived from their professional, marital, and domestic roles. The high levels of depressive symptoms found among participants in this study were the sole predictor of low sexual satisfaction. Professional role reward was positively associated with depressive symptoms. Consistent with the notion of multiple roles conflict among self-critical students, role commitment and reward in the professional and domestic domains interacted to predict depressive symptoms. Results suggest that female medical students involved in romantic relationships pay a high emotional price for their conflicting role demands. PMID:22642435

  12. The F0 Protocol for Diuretic Renography Results in Fewer Interrupted Studies Due to Voiding Than the F-15 Protocol

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Yiyan Liu; Nasrin V. Ghesani; Joan H. Skurnick; Lionel S. Zuckier

    Timing of diuretic administration is not universally standard- ized in renography. Over the past year, our practice has changed from F-15 administration of furosemide to an F0 protocol. Therefore, we have retrospectively compared these 2 cohorts to assess if the shorter interval between diuretic administration and study completion in the F0 study results in a greater frequency of patients able

  13. Depression and the nature of Trinidadian family practice: a cross-sectional study

    PubMed Central

    Maharaj, Rohan G

    2007-01-01

    Background Depression is the most common mental disorder; in an ambulatory-care setting 5 to 10% of patients meet the criteria for major depression. Despite extensive documentation in primary care internationally, Trinidadian studies published on depression have been primarily hospital-based and focussed on suicide. The objectives of this study were to determine the prevalence of depression, the variables associated with depression and the commonest reason for the encounter (RFE) among adult patients attending Trinidadian fee-for-service family practice? Methods This was a cross-sectional descriptive survey of consecutive patients taken from a stratified random sample of family practices in the north-west region of Trinidad. To measure depression the Zung scale was modified for use as a brief diagnostic tool. This modified Zung scale, when tested against a psychiatric interview, revealed that at a cut off point of 60, the scale had a specificity of 94% (95% CI 87–100), a sensitivity of 60% (95% CI 45–75), and a likelihood ratio for a positive test result of 10 (95% CI 6–42). Results 508 patients from 28 practices participated; a response rate of 85%. Participants were primarily younger 18–49 years (66.7%), female (69.5%), and educated, with 72.8% having received a secondary school, technical school or university education. Sixty-five (12.8%) of the respondents (95% CI 9.9–15.7) were determined to be depressed. Chi-square analysis revealed no statistically significant association between depression and age, ethnicity, education levels, occupation or marital status (p > 0.05). Binary logistic regression indicated that the likelihood of being depressed (p < 0.05) decreased with the increasing age of the patient and was inversely proportional to patient's achieved level of education; and that patients not presently in a relationship were more likely to be depressed than patients who were currently in a relationship. The 508 participants had 630 RFE, with 'check-ups' (17.5%) being the commonest, followed by joint pains (13.4%) and upper respiratory infections (10.5%). Conclusion The Trinidadian family physician has to maintain a high index of suspicion in the knowledge that as many as one of every eight adult patients may be depressed and that younger patients of lower educational status who were not currently in a relationship were more likely to be depressed. PMID:17462096

  14. Patient choice of treatment for postpartum depression: a pilot study

    Microsoft Academic Search

    T. B. Pearlstein; C. Zlotnick; C. L. Battle; S. Stuart; M. W. O’Hara; A. B. Price; M. A. Grause; M. Howard

    2006-01-01

    Summary  \\u000a Objective: The lack of systematic efficacy research makes the selection of optimal treatment for postpartum depression (PPD) difficult.\\u000a Moreover, the treatment decisions for women with PPD who are breastfeeding are heavily influenced by their concerns about\\u000a infant exposure to antidepressant medication. The objective of this pilot trial was to examine the clinical characteristics\\u000a of women with PPD associated with

  15. Irritable Mood as a Symptom of Depression in Youth: Prevalence, Developmental, and Clinical Correlates in the Great Smoky Mountains Study

    PubMed Central

    Stringaris, Argyris; Maughan, Barbara; Copeland, William S.; Costello, E. Jane; Angold, Adrian

    2013-01-01

    Objective DSM-IV grants episodic irritability an equal status to low mood as a cardinal criterion for the diagnosis of depression in youth, yet not in adults; however, evidence for irritability as a major criterion of depression in youth is lacking. This article examines the prevalence, developmental characteristics, associations with psychopathology, and longitudinal stability of irritable mood in childhood and adolescent depression. Method Data from the prospective population-based Great Smoky Mountains Study (N = 1,420) were used. We divided observations on 9- to 16-year-olds who met criteria for a diagnosis of depression into 3 groups: those with depressed mood and no irritability, those with irritability and no depressed mood, and those with both depressed and irritable mood. We compared these groups using robust regression models on adolescent characteristics and early adult (ages 19–21 years) depression outcomes. Results Depressed mood was the most common cardinal mood in youth meeting criteria for depression (58.7%), followed by the co-occurrence of depressed and irritable mood (35.6%); irritable mood alone was rare (5.7%). Youth with depressed and irritable mood were similar in age and developmental stage to those with depression, but had significantly higher rates of disruptive disorders. The co-occurrence of depressed and irritable mood was associated with higher risk for comorbid conduct disorder in girls (gender-by-group interaction, F1,132 = 4.66, p = .03). Conclusions Our study findings do not support the use of irritability as a cardinal mood criterion for depression. However, the occurrence of irritability in youth depression is associated with increased risk of disruptive behaviors, especially in girls. PMID:23880493

  16. Depression-like deficits in rats improved by subchronic modafinil

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Ralf Regenthal; Holger Koch; Christian Köhler; Rainer Preiss; Ute Krügel

    2009-01-01

    Rationale  Attentional and sensorimotor gating deficits in human depression are observed as residual symptoms irrespective of antidepressant\\u000a treatment. Clinical studies point to a benefit of modafinil in depression. No data are available on modafinil effects in depression-like\\u000a animal models.\\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a Objectives  We investigated effects of modafinil on attention and sensorimotor gating after subchronic treatment during a restraint stress\\u000a protocol inducing depression-like changes in

  17. Elevation in Plasma Abeta42 in Geriatric Depression: A Pilot Study

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Nunzio Pomara; P. Murali Doraiswamy; Lisa M. Willoughby; Amy E. Roth; Benoit H. Mulsant; John J. Sidtis; Pankaj D. Mehta; Charles F. Reynolds; Bruce G. Pollock

    2006-01-01

    Elevated plasma amyloid beta 1–42 (A?42) level has been linked to increased risk for incident AD in cognitively-intact elderly. However, plasma A? levels in individuals with late-life depression (LLMD), especially those with a late age of onset of first depressive episode, who are at a particularly increased risk for Alzheimer’s disease, have not been studied. We compared plasma A? in

  18. A multicentre, double-blind, amitriptyline-controlled study of mirtazapine in patients with major depression

    Microsoft Academic Search

    John Mullin; Adrian Lodge; Ernest Bennie; Robin McCreadie; Ganga Singh Bhatt; George Fenton

    1996-01-01

    Background: the efficacy and tolerability of the new antidepressant mirtazapine were evaluated in a multicentre, randomized, double-blind, amitriptyline-controlled, 5 week clinical study. Method: 156 patients with a DSM-III diagnosis of major depressive episode and 21-item Hamilton Psychiatric Rating Scale for Depression (HPRSD) score ? 18, were randomized to treatment with either mirtazapine 20-60 mg\\/day or amitriptyline 75-225 mg\\/day. Results: mirtazapine

  19. Association between Depressive Symptoms and Bone Stiffness Index in Young Adults: The Kangwha Study

    PubMed Central

    Oh, Sun Min; Kim, Hyeon Chang; Kim, Kyoung Min; Ahn, Song Vogue; Choi, Dong Phil; Suh, Il

    2013-01-01

    Objective Young adulthood is an important period for both bone and mental health. This study investigated the association between depressive symptoms and bone density in apparently healthy Korean men and women aged 29?32 years. Methods This study is a cross-sectional analysis of data from 123 men and 133 women who completed follow-up examinations of the Kangwha study in 2010?2011. Bone stiffness index (SI) was measured at the os calcis using a quantitative ultrasound device. Depressive symptoms were evaluated using the Korean version of the Beck Depression Inventory (K-BDI) and classified as normal (K-BDI <10), mild (K-BDI 10–15), and moderate to severe (K-BDI ?16). Results Moderate to severe depressive symptoms were prevalent among 11.4% of men and 19.6% of women. Higher K-BDI scores were significantly correlated to SI in men, before (??=?–0.286, p?=?0.001) and after (??=?–0.228, p?=?0.013) adjustment for covariates. Men with depressive symptoms tended to have a lower SI; multivariate-adjusted mean SI in men with normal, mild, and moderate to severe depressive symptoms was 104.1±3.1, 100.9±5.9, and 94.1±7.8, respectively (p for trend?=?0.021). In contrast, no significant correlations were identified in women. Conclusions Depressive symptoms were significantly associated with lower SI in men, but not in women. Further studies are necessary to evaluate the impact of depression on developing osteoporosis or osteoporotic fractures later in life. PMID:23894562

  20. Depression and Anxiety Disorders among Patients with Psoriasis: A Hospital-Based Case-Control Study

    PubMed Central

    Golpour, Masoud; Hosseini, Seyed Hamzeh; Khademloo, Mohammad; Ghasemi, Maryam; Ebadi, Aghdas; Koohkan, Fatemeh; Shahmohammadi, Soheila

    2012-01-01

    Background. Psoriasis is a common, genetically determined inflammatory and proliferative disease of the skin. Psychological stress can exacerbate the disease. This study sought to investigate the depression and anxiety disorders among patients with psoriasis and control group. Method. In this hospital-based case-control study, One hundred patients with psoriasis (case) referred to the dermatology department and 100 patients with otolaryngology problems and dermatological healthy volunteers (control) who referred to the Otolaryngology Department of Bouali Sina Hospital in Sari, Iran, in 2007 were studied. Demographic characteristics were recorded. Beck Depression Inventory and Spielberger State-Trait Anxiety Scale I-II were administered to the patients in both groups. Data were analyzed using SPSS statistical software and descriptive statistical tests. Results. From One-hundred patients in each group, 44 (45%) were men. Depression score was 67% and 12% in psoriatic patients and control, respectively. The Beck depression scores of patients with psoriasis were significantly higher than scores of the control group (P < 0.05). Based on Spielberger State-Trait Anxiety Scale, anxiety was found in 45% of patients in case group and 18% of controls. Conclusion. The results revealed that psoriatic patients reported significantly higher degrees of depression and anxiety than controls. In addition, psoriatic women were more depressed than psoriatic men. PMID:22844272

  1. Prevalence and characteristics of Postpartum Depression symptomatology among Canadian women: a cross-sectional study

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background This study aims to look at the prevalence and characteristics of postpartum depression symptomatology (PPDS) among Canadian women. Studies have found that in developed countries, 10-15% of new mothers were affected by major postpartum depression. Mothers who suffer from postpartum depression may endure difficulties regarding their ability to cope with life events, as well as negative clinical implications for maternal-infant attachment. Methods An analysis based on 6,421 Canadian women, who had a live birth between 2005 and 2006 and were part of the Maternity Experience Survey (MES), was performed. PPDS was measured based on the Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale. Various factors that assessed socio-economic status, demographic factors, and maternal characteristics were considered for the multinomial regression model. Results The national prevalence of minor/major and major PPDS was found to be 8.46% and 8.69% respectively. A mother's stress level during pregnancy, the availability of support after pregnancy, and a prior diagnosis of depression were the characteristics that had the strongest significant association with the development of PPDS. Conclusions A significant number of Canadian women experience symptoms of postpartum depression. Findings from this study may be useful to increase both the attainment of treatment and the rate at which it can be obtained among new mothers. Interventions should target those with the greatest risk of experiencing PPDS, specifically immigrant and adolescent mothers. PMID:21569372

  2. Evaluating depressive symptoms in mania: a naturalistic study of patients with bipolar disorder

    PubMed Central

    Young, Allan H; Eberhard, Jonas

    2015-01-01

    Objective This study aimed to evaluate patients with bipolar I disorder (BD-I) who have mania with depressive symptoms and who meet the new “with mixed features” specifier of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, fifth edition (DSM-5). Method This prospective, multinational, naturalistic study surveyed psychiatrists and their patients with BD-I from October 2013 to March 2014. Eligible patients had BD-I, had a (current) manic episode, and had experienced onset of a manic episode within the previous 3 months. Psychiatrists provided patient information on depressive symptoms (DSM-5 criteria); symptoms of anxiety, irritability, and agitation; suicide attempts; and physician satisfaction with treatment response. Data were stratified according to whether patients met the criteria for the BD-I “with mixed features” specifier of DSM-5 (?3 depressive symptoms) or not, and characteristics were compared between the two subgroups. Patients also self-reported on depressive symptoms using the Mini-International Neuropsychiatric Interview module questionnaire. Results Overall, 34% of 1,035 patients met the criteria for BD-I “with mixed features,” exhibiting ?3 depressive symptoms during their current manic episode. This correlated with the matched patient self-reports of depressive symptoms. During their current manic episode, BD-I patients “with mixed features” had more severe symptoms of anxiety, irritability, and agitation (average composite severity score of 4.1 vs 3.4), a higher incidence of suicide attempts (38% vs 9%), and more physician dissatisfaction with treatment response (22% vs 14%), compared to patients with 0–2 depressive symptoms (all P<0.05). Conclusion This study found that patients with BD-I “with mixed features” (ie, ?3 depressive symptoms during a manic episode), suffered, on average, from a greater burden of disease than patients with pure mania. Improved identification of these patients may help to optimize treatment outcomes. PMID:25995638

  3. Protocol and Rationale-The Efficacy of Minocycline as an Adjunctive Treatment for Major Depressive Disorder: A Double Blind, Randomised, Placebo Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Maes, Michael; Ashton, Melanie; Berk, Lesley; Kanchanatawan, Buranee; Sughondhabirom, Atapol; Tangwongchai, Sookjareon; Ng, Chee; Dowling, Nathan; Malhi, Gin S.; Berk, MIchael

    2014-01-01

    While current pharmacotherapies are efficacious, there remain a clear shortfall between symptom remission and functional recovery. With the explosion in our understanding of the biology of these disorders, the time is ripe for the investigation of novel therapies. Recently depression is conceptualized as an immune-inflammatory and nitro-oxidative stress related disorder. Minocycline is a tetracycline antibiotic that has anti-inflammatory, pro-oxidant, glutamatergic, neurotrophic and neuroprotective properties that make it a viable target to explore as a new therapy. This double blind, randomised, placebo controlled adjunctive trial will investigate the benefits of 200 mg/day of minocycline treatment, in addition to any usual treatment, as an adjunctive treatment for moderate-severe major depressive disorder. Sixty adults are being randomised to 12 weeks of treatment (with a 4 week follow-up post-discontinuation). The primary outcome measure for the study is mean change on the Montgomery-Asberg Depression Rating Scale (MADRS), with secondary outcomes including the Social and Occupational Functioning Assessment Scale (SOFAS), Clinical Global Impressions (CGI), Hamilton Rating Scale for Anxiety (HAM-A), Patient Global Impression (PGI), Quality of Life Enjoyment and Satisfaction Questionnaire (Q-LES-Q) and Range of Impaired Functioning Tool (LIFE-RIFT). Biomarker analyses will also be conducted at baseline and week 12. The study has the potential to provide new treatment targets, both by showing efficacy with a new class of 'antidepressant' but also through the analysis of biomarkers that may further inform our understanding of the pathophysiology of unipolar depression. PMID:25598820

  4. Posterior fossa abnormalities in major depression: a controlled magnetic resonance imaging study.

    PubMed

    Shah, S A; Doraiswamy, P M; Husain, M M; Escalona, P R; Na, C; Figiel, G S; Patterson, L J; Ellinwood, E H; McDonald, W M; Boyko, O B

    1992-06-01

    High-field magnetic resonance (MR) images were used to study posterior fossa morphology in 27 patients with major depression and 36 normal control subjects. Depressed patients demonstrated smaller brain stem and cerebellar vermis than controls. These differences were highly significant for the anterior cerebellar vermis and medulla. There was also a striking age-related decline in midbrain size in depressed patients as well as in controls. Our results are consistent with several lines of evidence implicating a role for the cerebellar vermis in affective disorders and, in addition, provide the first MR documentation of the differential effects of aging on posterior fossa morphology in normal subjects compared with patients with major depression. PMID:1642132

  5. A Comparative Study of Various Routing Protocols in VANET

    E-print Network

    Kumar, Rakesh

    2011-01-01

    Vehicular Ad Hoc Networks (VANET) is a subclass of Mobile ad hoc networks which provides a distinguished approach for Intelligent Transport System (ITS). The survey of routing protocols in VANET is important and necessary for smart ITS. This paper discusses the advantages / disadvantages and the applications of various routing protocols for vehicular ad hoc networks. It explores the motivation behind the designed, and traces the evolution of these routing protocols. F inally the paper concludes by a tabular comparison of the various routing protocols for VANET.

  6. Immigrant women’s experiences of postpartum depression in Canada: a protocol for systematic review using a narrative synthesis

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Literature documents that immigrant women in Canada have a higher prevalence of postpartum depression symptomatology than Canadian-born women. There exists a need to synthesize information on the contextual factors and social determinants of health that influence immigrant women’s reception of and behavior in accessing existing mental health services. Our research question is: what are the ethnoculturally defined patterns of help-seeking behaviors and decision-making and other predictive factors for therapeutic mental health care access and outcomes with respect to postpartum depression for immigrant women in Canada? Methods/design Our synthesis incorporates a systematic review using narrative synthesis of reports (peer- and non-peer reviewed) of empirical research and aims to provide stakeholders with perspectives on postpartum mental health care services as experienced by immigrant women. To reach this goal we are using integrated knowledge translation, thus partnering with key stakeholders throughout the planning, implementation and dissemination stages to ensure topic relevancy and impact on future practice and policy. The search and selection strategies draw upon established systematic review methodologies as outlined by the Centre for Reviews and Dissemination and also incorporate guidelines for selection and appraisal of gray literature. Two search phases (a database and a gray literature phase) will identify literature for screening and final selection based on an inclusion/exclusion checklist. Quality appraisal will be performed using the tools produced by the Centre for Evidence Based Management. The narrative synthesis will be informed by Popay et al. (2006) framework using identified tools for each of its four elements. The integrated knowledge translation plan will ensure key messages are delivered in an audience-specific manner to optimize their impact on policy and practice change throughout health service, public health, immigration and community sectors. Discussion The narrative synthesis methodology will facilitate understandings and acknowledgement of the broader influences of theoretical and contextual variables, such as race, gender, socio-economic status, pre-migration history and geographical location. Our review aims to have a substantive and sustainable impact on health outcomes, practice, programs and/or policy in the context of postpartum mental health of immigrant women. PROSPERO registration number CRD42012003020. PMID:23965183

  7. Predictors of anxiety and depression in Egyptian thalassemic patients: a single center study.

    PubMed

    Yahia, Sohier; El-Hadidy, Mohamed Adel; El-Gilany, Abdel-Hady; Anwar, Rokiah; Darwish, Ahmad; Mansour, A K

    2013-05-01

    Thalassemic patients are vulnerable to emotional and behavioral problems. Each patient age group exhibits problems unique to that stage of development, and although up to 80 % of thalassemic patients are likely to have psychological disorders, e.g., anxiety and depression, predictors of these disorders remain poorly understood. The present study was designed to assess the prevalence of anxiety and depression in a sample of Egyptian thalassemic patients and to identify predictors of these psychiatric disorders. A case-control study was conducted in 218 thalassemic patients, with 244 healthy subjects as a control. All patients and control subjects were subjected to thorough evaluation of medical history and clinical examination, and examined by a psychiatrist using the clinician version of the structured clinical interview for DSM-IV (SCID-CV), hospital anxiety and depression scale and Coopersmith self-esteem inventory. Abnormal and borderline anxieties were reported by 36.7 and 20.6 % of thalassemic patients, respectively, while abnormal and borderline depressions were reported by 32.1 and 16.1 % of patients, respectively. Hospitalization, low self-esteem, diabetes mellitus and heart failure were independent predictors of anxiety. The independent predictors of depression were heart failure, hospitalization, diabetes mellitus, short stature and delayed puberty. Thalassemic patients were more vulnerable to anxiety and depression, indicating that screening and management for such psychiatric disorders should be considered in treating all such patients. PMID:23595950

  8. Selenium exposure and depressive symptoms: the Coronary Artery Risk Development in Young Adults Trace Element Study

    PubMed Central

    Colangelo, Laura A; He, Ka; Whooley, Mary A; Daviglus, Martha L.; Morris, Steven; Liu, Kiang

    2014-01-01

    Selenium is an essential trace element important to neurotransmission, but toxic at high levels. Some studies suggest beneficial effects on mood. We assessed the association of selenium exposure with presence of depressive symptoms. Selenium exposure was measured in toenail samples collected in 1987 from 3,735 US participants (age 20–32 years) and depressive symptoms assessed in 1990, 1995, 2000, 2005, and 2010 using the Center for Epidemiologic Studies Depression Scale (CES-D). Binary and polytomous logistic regression models were used to assess the relation of log2(selenium) and selenium quintiles with presence of depressive symptoms (CES-D score ? 27 or on antidepressant medication). Relative to selenium quintile 1, the adjusted odds ratio (OR) for having depressive symptoms in 1990 for quintile 5 was 1.59 (95% CI: 1.01, 2.51) and a unit increase in log2(selenium), which represents a doubling of the selenium level, was associated with an OR=2.03 (95% CI: 1.12, 3.70). When examining 1, 2 or 3+ exams vs no exams with symptoms, the OR for quintile 5 was 1.73 (1.04, 2.89) for 3+ exams and for one exam and two exams, there were no associations. In a generalized estimating equations longitudinal model, a doubling of the selenium level was associated with a 56% higher odds of having depressive symptoms at an exam. Contrary to previously reported findings related to mood, higher level of selenium exposure was associated with presence of elevated depressive symptoms. More research is needed to elucidate the role of selenium in depressive disorders. PMID:24560993

  9. Low birth-weight and risk for major depression: a community-based longitudinal study.

    PubMed

    Levine, Stephen Z

    2014-03-30

    The current study examines the association between low birth weight and risk for major depression from early adolescence to early adulthood. It accounts for eight documented confounders, and depression within families. Data were analyzed from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth 1979 on mothers and offspring. Major depression was assessed with the Center for Epidemiologic Studies Depression Scale Short-Form (CES-D-SF) among offspring (N=3398) biannually, from 2000 to 2010 (aged 14-25). Competing models were examined with survival analysis and Generalized Estimated Equations (GEE). CES-D-SF based major depression was reported by 33.46% (n=1137) of participants. Among persons with very low birth weight (<1500 g), 47.5% (n=19/40) were classified with CES-D-SF depression (OR=1.81, 95% CI=0.97, 3.39). Similar results were found with survival analysis (HR=1.97, 95% CI=0.97, 4.01). Among multiple offspring families, GEE modeling showed a similar trend. On aggregate (unadjusted OR=2.46, 95% CI=1.07, 5.63; adjusted OR=2.43, 95% CI=0.94, 6.23), and within families of mothers with CES-D-SF depression (unadjusted OR=2.54, 95% CI=0.55, 11.66; adjusted OR=1.79, 95% CI=0.28, 11.42). Compelling evidence is lacking in favor of an association between very low birth weight (<1500 g), and suspected major depression from early adolescence to early adulthood after accounting for documented confounders. PMID:24485407

  10. Utilization and Barriers to Mental Health Services Among Depressed Medical Interns: A Prospective Multisite Study

    PubMed Central

    Guille, Constance; Speller, Heather; Laff, Rachel; Epperson, C. Neill; Sen, Srijan

    2010-01-01

    Background Compared with graduate students and young adults in the general population, depression is more prevalent among training physicians, yet physicians are often reluctant to seek mental health treatment. The purpose of this study is to identify perceived barriers to mental health treatment among depressed training physicians. Methods Subjects for this study were drawn from intern classes during the 2007–2008 and 2008–2009 academic years from 6 and 13 participating community and university hospitals, respectively. At 3-month intervals throughout the intern year, participants completed the Patient Health Questionnaire regarding current depressive symptoms and questions regarding current mental health treatment. We explored potential barriers to mental health treatment at the end of the intern year and determined the proportion of subjects screening positive for depression and seeking treatment through analysis of subject responses. Stepwise binary logistic regression was conducted to compare baseline characteristics among depressed interns who sought mental health treatment and those that did not. Results Of the 42.5% (278 of 654) of interns who screened positive for depression, 22.7% (63 of 278) reported receiving treatment during the intern year. The most frequently cited barriers to seeking treatment were time (91.5%), preference to manage problems on their own (75.1%), lack of convenient access (61.8%), and concerns about confidentiality (57.3%). Interns who had previously sought treatment for depression were more likely to seek treatment during internship. Conclusions Despite high rates of depression, few interns appear to seek mental health treatment due to time constraints, lack of convenient access, concerns about confidentiality, and a preference to manage problems on their own. By identifying barriers to mental health treatment we can begin to remove obstacles to the delivery of evidence-based treatments and implement prevention, screening, and early detection programs to improve the mental health of physicians in training. PMID:21975622

  11. A controlled study on the cognitive effect of alpha neurofeedback training in patients with major depressive disorder

    PubMed Central

    Escolano, Carlos; Navarro-Gil, Mayte; Garcia-Campayo, Javier; Congedo, Marco; De Ridder, Dirk; Minguez, Javier

    2014-01-01

    Cognitive deficits are core symptoms of depression. This study aims to investigate whether neurofeedback (NF) training can improve working memory (WM) performance in patients with major depressive disorder (MDD). The NF group (n = 40) underwent eight NF sessions and was compared to a non-interventional control group (n = 20). The NF protocol aimed to increase the individual upper alpha power in the parieto-occipital area of the scalp. Main cognitive variable was WM, which was measured pre- and post- training along with other variables such as attention and executive functions. EEG was recorded in both eyes closed resting state and eyes open task-related activity, pre- and post- NF training, and pre- and post- the NF trials within each session. A power EEG analysis and an alpha asymmetry analysis were conducted at the sensor level. Frequency domain standardized low resolution tomography (sLORETA) was used to assess the effect at brain source level. Correlation analysis between the clinical/cognitive and EEG measurements was conducted at both the sensor and brain source level. The NF group showed increased performance as well as improved processing speed in a WM test after the training. The NF group showed pre-post enhancement in the upper alpha power after the training, better visible in task-related activity as compared to resting state. A current density increase appeared in the alpha band (8–12 Hz) for the NF group, localized in the subgenual anterior cingulate cortex (sgACC, BA 25). A positive correlation was found for the NF group between the improvement in processing speed and the increase of beta power at both the sensor and brain source level. These results show the effectiveness of this NF protocol in improving WM performance in patients with MDD. PMID:25228864

  12. Qualitative study of depression management in primary care: GP and patient goals, and the value of listening

    PubMed Central

    Johnston, Olwyn; Kumar, Satinder; Kendall, Kathleen; Peveler, Robert; Gabbay, John; Kendrick, Tony

    2007-01-01

    Background Guidelines for depression management have been developed but little is known about GP and patient goals, which are likely to influence treatment offers, uptake, and adherence. Aim To identify issues of importance to GPs, patients, and patients' supporters regarding depression management. GP and patient goals for depression management became a focus of the study. Design of study Grounded theory-based qualitative study. Setting GPs were drawn from 28 practices. The majority of patients and supporters were recruited from 10 of these practices. Method Sixty-one patients (28 depressed, 18 previously depressed, 15 never depressed), 18 supporters, and 32 GPs were interviewed. Results GPs described encouraging patients to view depression as separate from the self and ‘normal’ sadness. Patients and supporters often questioned such boundaries, rejecting the notion of a medical cure and emphasising self-management. The majority of participants who were considering depression-management strategies wanted to ‘get out’ of their depression. However, a quarter did not see this as immediately relevant or achievable. They focused on getting by from day to day, which had the potential to clash with GP priorities. GP frustration and uncertainty could occur when depression was resistant to cure. Participants identified the importance of GPs listening to patients, but often felt that this did not happen. Conclusion Physicians need greater awareness of the extent to which their goals for the management of depression are perceived as relevant or achievable by patients. Future research should explore methods of negotiating agreed strategies for management. PMID:17976282

  13. Distinct seasonality of depressive episodes differentiates unipolar depressive patients with and without depressive mixed states

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Tetsuya Sato; Ronald Bottlender; Marcus Sievers; Hans-Jürgen Möller

    2006-01-01

    BackgroundThe bipolar nature of unipolar depression with depressive mixed sates (DMX) needs further validation studies. The seasonality of depressive episodes is indicated to be different between unipolar and bipolar depressions. We therefore explored the seasonal pattern of depressive episodes in unipolar depressive patients with DMX.

  14. Neurofeedback As a Treatment for Major Depressive Disorder – A Pilot Study

    PubMed Central

    Peeters, Frenk; Oehlen, Mare; Ronner, Jacco; van Os, Jim; Lousberg, Richel

    2014-01-01

    Background There is growing interest in neurofeedback as a treatment for major depressive disorder. Reduction of asymmetry of alpha-activity between left and right prefrontal areas with neurofeedback has been postulated as effective in earlier studies. Unfortunately, methodological shortcomings limit conclusions that can be drawn from these studies. In a pilot-study, we investigated the effectiveness of reduction of asymmetry of alpha-activity with neurofeedback in depressed participants with the use of a stringent methodological approach. Methods Nine participants meeting DSM-IV criteria for major depressive disorder were treated with a maximum of 30 neurofeedback-sessions, aimed at reducing asymmetry of alpha-activity, over a 10-week period. No changes in the use of antidepressants were allowed 6 weeks before and during the intervention. Changes in depressive symptomatology were assessed with the Quick Inventory of Depressive Symptoms, self-report version. Results We observed response in 1 and remission in 4 out of a total of 9 participants. The effectiveness appeared largest in female participants. The mean asymmetry of alpha-activity decreased significantly over sessions in a quadratic fashion. This decrease was associated with clinical response. Conclusions This pilot study suggests that neurofeedback aimed at a reduction of frontal asymmetry of alpha-activity may be effective as a treatment for depression. However, this was an open label pilot study. Non-specific effects of the procedure and/or a beneficial natural course may have confounded the results. Randomized controlled trials will have to establish the efficacy of neurofeedback for depression. Trial Registration Nederlands Trial Register NTR1629 PMID:24642756

  15. Physical Activity Related to Depression and Predicted Mortality Risk: Results from the Americans' Changing Lives Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, Pai-Lin; Lan, William; Lee, Charles C.-L.

    2012-01-01

    This study examined the association between three types of physical activities (PA) and depression, and the relationship between PA and later mortality. Previous studies rarely assessed these associations in one single study in randomly selected population samples. Few studies have assessed these relations by adjusting the covariate of…

  16. Comorbid anxiety disorders in late-life depression: results of a cohort study.

    PubMed

    van der Veen, D C; van Zelst, W H; Schoevers, R A; Comijs, H C; Voshaar, R C Oude

    2014-11-01

    ABSTRACT Background: Comorbid anxiety disorders are common in late-life depression and negatively impact treatment outcome. This study aimed to examine personality characteristics as well as early and recent life-events as possible determinants of comorbid anxiety disorders in late-life depression, taking previously examined determinants into account. Methods: Using the Composite International Diagnostic Interview (CIDI 2.0), we established comorbid anxiety disorders (social phobia (SP), panic disorder (PD), generalized anxiety disorder (GAD), and agoraphobia (AGO)) in 350 patients (aged ?60 years) suffering from a major depressive disorder according to DSM-IV-TR criteria within the past six months. Adjusted for age, sex, and level of education, we first examined previously identified determinants of anxious depression: depression severity, suicidality, partner status, loneliness, chronic diseases, and gait speed in multiple logistic regression models. Subsequently, associations were explored with the big five personality characteristics as well as early and recent life-events. First, multiple logistic regression analyses were conducted with the presence of any anxiety disorder (yes/no) as dependent variable, where after analyses were repeated for each anxiety disorder, separately. Results: In our sample, the prevalence rate of comorbid anxiety disorders in late-life depression was 38.6%. Determinants of comorbid anxiety disorders were a lower age, female sex, less education, higher depression severity, early traumatization, neuroticism, extraversion, and conscientiousness. Nonetheless, determinants differed across the specific anxiety disorders and lumping all anxiety disorder together masked some determinants (education, personality). Conclusions: Our findings stress the need to examine determinants of comorbid anxiety disorder for specific anxiety disorders separately, enabling the development of targeted interventions within subgroups of depressed patients. PMID:25370017

  17. Spouse health status, depressed affect, and resilience in mid and late life: a longitudinal study.

    PubMed

    Bookwala, Jamila

    2014-04-01

    This study used longitudinal data to examine the effects of spousal illness on depressive symptoms among middle-aged and older married individuals and the extent to which the adverse effects of illness in a spouse were mitigated by 2 psychological resources, mastery and self-esteem. Using 1,704 married participants who were 51 years of age on average, depressive symptoms were compared in 4 groups varying in their experience of spousal health transitions: those whose spouse remained ill at T1 and T2, those whose spouse declined in health from T1 to T2, those whose spouse's health improved from T1 to T2, and those whose spouse remained healthy at both time points. Mixed analyses of covariance showed that, as hypothesized, having a spouse who became or remained ill over time was linked to greater depressed affect by T2, whereas having a spouse improve in health was associated with a decline in depressive symptomatology. Moderated regression analyses indicated that while higher mastery and self-esteem were linked to lower depressed affect in general, these resources were especially protective against depressed affect for those whose spouse remained ill at both time points. These findings are at the intersection of life course theory and the stress process model highlighting the contextual forces in and the interconnectedness of individual development as well as the plasticity and resilience evident in adaptation to stress during mid and late life. PMID:24364828

  18. Physical activity correlates in young women with depressive symptoms: a qualitative study

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Young women are at high risk for developing depression and participation in physical activity may prevent or treat the disorder. However, the influences on physical activity behaviors of young women with depression are not well understood. The aim of this study was to gather in-depth information about the correlates of physical activity among young women with and without depressive symptoms. Methods A sample of 40 young women (aged 18-30 years), 20 with depressive symptoms (assessed using the CES-D 10) and 20 without depressive symptoms participated in one-on-one semi-structured interviews. A social-ecological framework was used, focusing on the individual, social and physical environmental influences on physical activity. Thematic analyses were performed on transcribed interview data. Results The results indicated several key themes that were unique to women with depressive symptoms. These women more often described negative physical activity experiences during their youth, more barriers to physical activity, participating in more spontaneous than planned activity, lower self-efficacy for physical activity and being influenced by their friends' and family's inactivity. Conclusions Interventions designed to promote physical activity in this important target group should consider strategies to reduce/overcome early life negative experiences, engage support from family and friends and plan for activity in advance. PMID:20157440

  19. Comparing Cognitive, Metacognitive, and Acceptance and Commitment Therapy Models of Depression: a Longitudinal Study Survey.

    PubMed

    Ruiz, Francisco J; Odriozola-González, Paula

    2015-01-01

    This study analyzed the interrelationships between key constructs of cognitive therapy (CT; depressogenic schemas), metacognitive therapy (MCT; dysfunctional metacognitive beliefs), and acceptance and commitment therapy (ACT; psychological inflexibility) in the prediction of depressive symptoms. With a lapse of nine months, 106 nonclinical participants responded twice to an anonymous online survey containing the following questionnaires: the Depression subscale of the Depression Anxiety and Stress Scales (DASS), the Dysfunctional Attitude Scale Revised (DAS-R), the Positive beliefs, Negative beliefs and Need to control subscales of the Metacognitions Questionnaire-30 (MCQ-30), and the Acceptance and Action Questionnaire - II (AAQ-II). Results showed that when controlling for baseline levels of depressive symptoms and demographic variables, psychological inflexibility longitudinally mediated the effect of depressogenic schemas (path ab = .023, SE = .010; 95% BC CI [.008, .048]) and dysfunctional metacognitive beliefs on depressive symptoms (positive metacognitive beliefs: path ab = .052, SE = .031; 95% BC CI [.005, .134]; negative metacognitive beliefs: path ab = .087, SE = .049; 95% BC CI [.016, .214]; need to control: path ab = .087, SE = .051; 95% BC CI [.013, .220]). Results are discussed emphasizing the role of psychological inflexibility in the CT and MCT models of depression. PMID:26076977

  20. Planning Attacks to Security Protocols: Case Studies in Logic Programming

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Luigia Carlucci Aiello; Fabio Massacci

    2002-01-01

    Formal verification of security protocols has become a key issue in computer security. Yet, it has proven to be a hard task often error prone and discouraging for non-experts in formal methods. In this paper we show how security protocols can be specified and verified efficiently and effectively by embedding reasoning about actions into a logic programming language. In a

  1. Connection-oriented protocols over ATM: a case study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Damaskos, Spiridon; Gavras, Anastassios

    1994-04-01

    Efficient mapping of connection oriented protocols on ATM needs the identification of the protocol elements and their association to the corresponding ATM elements. In this context the functions provided by connection oriented protocols are structured like the B-ISDN reference model. The control of higher power (transport- or network-) layer protocol connections is done using procedures and parameters that are currently defined in the ATM control plane. With regard to that a simultaneous establishment of an ATM connection and the corresponding higher layer protocol connection is presented. The Quality of Service (QoS) parameters of the connection oriented protocol are identified and associated to the corresponding QoS parameters of the ATM layer. The possibilities of dealing with not matching parameters are examined and evaluated. Some observations from a real system (BERKOM Transport System) concerning the simultaneous connection establishment and the efficient mapping of the QoS parameters onto the ATM performance parameters are given. Finally, additional requirements for the connection oriented protocols and the ATM signalling protocol, to fully support the simultaneous connection establishment and the QoS mapping, are discussed.

  2. Associations between teacher emotional support and depressive symptoms in Australian adolescents: a 5-year longitudinal study.

    PubMed

    Pössel, Patrick; Rudasill, Kathleen Moritz; Sawyer, Michael G; Spence, Susan H; Bjerg, Annie C

    2013-11-01

    Approximately 1/5 of adolescents develop depressive symptoms. Given that youths spend a good deal of their lives at school, it seems plausible that supportive relationships with teachers could benefit their emotional well-being. Thus, the purpose of this study is to examine the association between emotionally supportive teacher relationships and depression in adolescence. The so-called principle-effect and stress-buffer models could explain relationships between teacher emotional support and depressive symptoms, yet no study has used both models to test bidirectional relationships between teacher support and depressive symptoms in students separately by sex. Four-thousand three-hundred forty-one students (boys: n = 2,063; girls: n = 2,278) from Grades 8 to 12 completed the Center for Epidemiological Studies Depression Scale (CES-D), List of Threatening Experiences Questionnaire (LTEQ), and an instrument developed for the study to measure teacher support annually for 5 years. Results support neither of the 2 proposed models. Instead, they indicate that in the 1st years of high school, students of both sexes with average and high numbers of stressful events benefit from teacher support, while teacher support might have iatrogenic effects on students experiencing low numbers of stressful events. Possible explanations for the findings and future research are discussed. PMID:23379297

  3. Auricular transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation in depressed patients: a randomized controlled pilot study.

    PubMed

    Hein, Ernst; Nowak, Magdalena; Kiess, Olga; Biermann, Teresa; Bayerlein, Kristina; Kornhuber, Johannes; Kraus, Thomas

    2013-05-01

    Invasive vagus nerve stimulation has been demonstrated to be an effective treatment in major depressive episodes. Recently, a novel non-invasive method of stimulating the vagus nerve on the outer canal of the ear has been proposed. In healthy subjects, a prominent fMRI BOLD signal deactivation in the limbic system was found. The present pilot study investigates the effects of this novel technique of auricular transcutaneous electric nerve stimulation in depressed patients for the first time. A total of 37 patients suffering from major depression were included in two randomized sham controlled add-on studies. Patients were stimulated five times a week on a daily basis for the duration of 2 weeks. On days 0 and 14, the Hamilton Depression Rating Scale (HAMD) and the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI) were assessed. In contrast to sham-treated patients, electrically stimulated persons showed a significantly better outcome in the BDI. Mean decrease in the active treatment group was 12.6 (SD 6.0) points compared to 4.4 (SD 9.9) points in the sham group. HAMD score did not change significantly in the two groups. An antidepressant effect of a new transcutaneous auricular nerve stimulation technique has been shown for the first time in this controlled pilot study. Regarding the limitations of psychometric testing, the risk of unblinding for technical reasons, and the small sample size, further studies are necessary to confirm the present results and verify the practicability of tVNS in clinical fields. PMID:23117749

  4. Symptoms of depression and anxiety before and after myocardial infarction: The HUNT 2 and HUNT 3 study.

    PubMed

    Langvik, Eva; Hjemdal, Odin

    2015-07-01

    The long-term effect of having a myocardial infarction (MI) and to what extent post-MI anxiety and depression can be attributed to pre-MI anxiety and depression are not known. Anxiety as an independent risk factor for the onset of MI is not clear and studies treating anxiety and depression as continuous variables are lacking. Baseline data in this prospective study were obtained from the Health Study of Nord-Trøndelag County (HUNT 2). Anxiety and depression were measured with the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS) at HUNT 2. Age, gender, waist circumference, hypertension, total cholesterol, diabetes, and years of daily smoking were included as control variables. In the sample of 28,859 participants, 770 MI were reported in the follow-up study 5-8 years later (HUNT 3). The level of depressive symptoms at HUNT 2 was a significant and independent predictor of MI at HUNT 3, while symptoms of anxiety were not. Level of anxiety and depression at HUNT 3 was best predicted by baseline anxiety and depression. Having an MI had only a marginal effect on the levels of anxiety and depressive symptoms at HUNT 3. In the MI group, time since MI was not a significant predictor of anxiety and depression. PMID:25495669

  5. An Open Trial Investigation of a Transdiagnostic Group Treatment for Children with Anxiety and Depressive Symptoms

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bilek, Emily L.; Ehrenreich-May, Jill

    2012-01-01

    The current study investigates the feasibility and preliminary outcomes associated with a transdiagnostic emotion-focused group protocol for the treatment of anxiety disorders and depressive symptoms in youth. Twenty-two children (ages 7 to 12; M = 9.79) with a principal anxiety disorder and varying levels of comorbid depressive symptoms were…

  6. Comparison of effects of desipramine and amitriptyline on EEG sleep of depressed patients

    Microsoft Academic Search

    James E. Shipley; David J. Kupfer; Suzanne J. Griffin; Robert S. Dealy; Patricia A. Coble; Ann B. McEachran; Victoria J. Grochocinski; Richard Ulrich; James M. Perel

    1985-01-01

    Despite their widespread use, there are few data concerning the effects of tricyclic antidepressants on EEG sleep in depression. The present study documented the effects of desipramine (DMI, n=17) and amitriptyline (AT, n=16) upon EEG sleep in hospitalized depressed patients as part of a double-blind protocol involving 28 days of active treatment. Compared to placebo, patients receiving DMI showed somewhat

  7. Symptoms of anxiety and depression and risk of heart failure: the HUNT Study

    PubMed Central

    Gustad, Lise T; Laugsand, Lars E; Janszky, Imre; Dalen, Håvard; Bjerkeset, Ottar

    2014-01-01

    Aims Symptoms of anxiety and depression often co-exist with cardiovascular disease, yet little is known about the prospective risk for heart failure (HF) in people with symptoms of depression and anxiety. We aimed to study these prospective associations using self-reported symptoms of anxiety, depression, and mixed symptoms of anxiety and depression (MSAD) in a large population sample. Methods and results In the second wave of the Nord-Trøndelag Health Study (HUNT 2, 1995–1997), Norway, baseline data on symptoms of anxiety and depression, socio-demographic variables, health status including cardiovascular risk factors, and common chronic somatic diseases were registered for 62?567 adults, men and women, free of known HF. The cohort was followed for incident HF from baseline throughout 2008. A total of 1499 cases of HF occurred during a mean follow-up of 11.3?years (SD?=?2.9), identified either in hospital registers or by the National Cause of Death Registry. There was no excess risk for future HF associated with symptoms of anxiety or MSAD at baseline. For depression, the multi-adjusted hazard ratios for HF were 1.07 (0.87–1.30) for moderate symptoms and 1.41 (1.07–1.87) for severe symptoms (P for trend 0.026). Established cardiovascular risk factors, acute myocardial infarction (AMI) prior to baseline, and adjustment for incident AMI as a time-dependent covariate during follow-up had little influence on the estimates. Conclusion Symptoms of depression, but not symptoms of anxiety or MSAD, were associated with increased risk for HF in a dose–response manner. The increased risk could not be fully explained by cardiovascular or socio-economic risk factors, or by co-morbid AMI. PMID:25044493

  8. Symptoms of anxiety and depression and risk of acute myocardial infarction: the HUNT 2 study

    PubMed Central

    Gustad, Lise Tuset; Laugsand, Lars Erik; Janszky, Imre; Dalen, Håvard; Bjerkeset, Ottar

    2014-01-01

    Aims The nature of the association of depression and anxiety with risk for acute myocardial infarction (AMI) remains unclear. We aimed to study the prospective association of single and recurrent self-reported symptoms of anxiety and depression with a risk of AMI in a large Norwegian population based cohort. Methods and results In the second wave of the Nord-Trøndelag Health Study (HUNT2, 1995–97) baseline data on anxiety and depression symptoms, sociodemographic variables, health status including cardiovascular risk factors and common chronic disorders were registered for 57 953 adult men and women free of cardiovascular disease. The cohort was followed up during a mean (SD) 11.4 (2.9) years for a first AMI from baseline through 2008. A total of 2111 incident AMIs occurred, either identified at hospitals or by the National Cause of Death Registry. The multi-adjusted hazard ratios were 1.31 (95% CI 1.03–1.66) for symptoms of depression and 1.25 (CI 0.99–1.57) for anxiety. Two episodes of mixed symptoms of anxiety and depression (MSAD), reported 10 years apart, increased the risk for AMI by 52% (11–108%). After exclusion of the first 5 years of follow-up, the association of depression symptoms with AMI risk was attenuated. Relative risk for AMI with anxiety symptoms and MSAD weakened when participants with chronic disorders were excluded. Conclusion Self-reported symptoms of depression and anxiety, especially if recurrent, were moderately associated with the risk of incident AMI. We had some indications that these associations might partly reflect reverse causation or confounding from common chronic diseases. PMID:24057077

  9. Sleep difficulties and the development of depression and anxiety: a longitudinal study of young Australian women.

    PubMed

    Jackson, Melinda L; Sztendur, Ewa M; Diamond, Neil T; Byles, Julie E; Bruck, Dorothy

    2014-06-01

    Previous longitudinal studies have demonstrated that poor sleep may precede depression and anxiety. The current study examined the association between self-reported sleeping difficulties and new onset depression and anxiety in young women. A nationally representative sample of 9,683 young women from the Australian Longitudinal Study of Women's Health was analyzed. Women were surveyed in 2000 (aged 22 to 25 years), 2003, 2006, and 2009. Generalized estimating equations were used to examine the association between sleeping difficulties in 2000 and new-onset depression (excluding postnatal depression) and anxiety at each subsequent survey. Significant increased risk of new onset depression (odds ratio (OR)=2.6 in 2003; OR=4.4 in 2006; OR=4.4 in 2009) and anxiety (OR=2.4 in 2006; OR=2.9 in 2009) was found at each follow-up survey in women who reported sleeping difficulties "often" in 2000. Further research is needed to uncover the mechanisms underlying the link between sleep problems and mental health. PMID:24647705

  10. Genome-wide association of major depression: description of samples for the GAIN Major Depressive Disorder Study: NTR and NESDA biobank projects

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Dorret I Boomsma; Gonneke Willemsen; Patrick F Sullivan; Peter Heutink; Piet Meijer; David Sondervan; Cornelis Kluft; Guus Smit; Willem A Nolen; Frans G Zitman; Johannes H Smit; Witte J Hoogendijk; Richard van Dyck; Eco J C de Geus; Brenda W J H Penninx; DI Boomsma

    2008-01-01

    To identify the genomic regions that confer risk and protection for major depressive disorder (MDD) in humans, large-scale studies are needed. Such studies should collect multiple phenotypes, DNA, and ideally, biological material that allows gene expression analysis, transcriptomic, proteomic, and metabolomic studies. In this paper, we briefly review linkage studies of MDD and then describe the large-scale nationwide biological sample

  11. Comparing telehealth-based and clinic-based group cognitive behavioral therapy for adults with depression and anxiety: a pilot study

    PubMed Central

    Khatri, Nasreen; Marziali, Elsa; Tchernikov, Illia; Shepherd, Nancy

    2014-01-01

    Background The primary objective of this pilot study was to demonstrate reliable adherence to a group cognitive behavioral (CBT) therapy protocol when delivered using on-line video conferencing as compared with face-to-face delivery of group CBT. A secondary aim was to show comparability of changes in subject depression inventory scores between on-line and face-to-face delivery of group CBT. Methods We screened 31 individuals, 18 of whom met the criteria for a DSM-IV (Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, 4th Edition) diagnosis of mood and/or anxiety disorder. All qualifying participants had the necessary equipment (computer, webcam, Internet) for participation in the study, but could exercise their preference for either the on-line or face-to-face format. Eighteen completed the 13 weekly session intervention program (ten face-to-face; eight video conferencing). We coded adherence to protocol in both intervention formats and generated pre–post changes in scores on the Beck Depression Inventory Second Edition (BDI-II) for each participant. Results Application of the CBT protocol coding system showed reliable adherence to the group CBT intervention protocol in both delivery formats. Similarly, qualitative analysis of the themes in group discussion indicated that both groups addressed similar issues. Pre–post intervention scores for the BDI-II were comparable across the two delivery formats, with 60% of participants in each group showing a positive change in BDI-II severity classification (eg, from moderate to low symptoms). Conclusion This pilot study demonstrates that group CBT could be delivered in a technology-supported environment (on-line video conferencing) and can meet the same professional practice standards and outcomes as face-to-face delivery of the intervention program. PMID:24855345

  12. Study protocol: the Childhood to Adolescence Transition Study (CATS)

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Puberty is a multifaceted developmental process that begins in late-childhood with a cascade of endocrine changes that ultimately lead to sexual maturation and reproductive capability. The transition through puberty is marked by an increased risk for the onset of a range of health problems, particularly those related to the control of behaviour and emotion. Early onset puberty is associated with a greater risk of cancers of the reproductive tract and cardiovascular disease. Previous studies have had methodological limitations and have tended to view puberty as a unitary process, with little distinction between adrenarche, gonadarche and linear growth. The Childhood to Adolescence Transition Study (CATS) aims to prospectively examine associations between the timing and stage of the different hormonally-mediated changes, as well as the onset and course of common health and behavioural problems that emerge in the transition from childhood to adolescence. The initial focus of CATS is on adrenarche, the first hormonal process in the pubertal cascade, which begins for most children at around 8 years of age. Methods/Design CATS is a longitudinal population-based cohort study. All Grade 3 students (8–9 years of age) from a stratified cluster sample of schools in Melbourne, Australia were invited to take part. In total, 1239 students and a parent/guardian were recruited to participate in the study. Measures are repeated annually and comprise student, parent and teacher questionnaires, and student anthropometric measurements. A saliva sample was collected from students at baseline and will be repeated at later waves, with the primary purpose of measuring hormonal indices of adrenarche and gonadarche. Discussion CATS is uniquely placed to capture biological and phenotypic indices of the pubertal process from its earliest manifestations, together with anthropometric measures and assessment of child health and development. The cohort will provide rich detail of the development, lifestyle, external circumstances and health of children during the transition from childhood through to adolescence. Baseline associations between the hormonal measures and measures of mental health and behaviour will initially be examined cross-sectionally, and then in later waves longitudinally. CATS will make a unique contribution to the understanding of adrenarche and puberty in children’s health and development. PMID:24103080

  13. A study of sociodemographic clinical and glycemic control factors associated with co-morbid depression in type 2 diabetes mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Hritu; Raju, M. S. V. K.; Dubey, Vaibhav; Kurrey, Ravindra; Bansal, Shaifali; Malik, Mustafa

    2014-01-01

    Context: Diabetes affects 9.2% of adults in India. About 8–16% of its population also suffer from depression. Both diseases pose a serious health challenge at individual and system level. The prevalence of depression in diabetes is much higher than in the general population. Undiagnosed and untreated depression puts people at higher morbidity and mortality risk. Aim: To study the prevalence of depression in diabetes and to identify associated risk factors. Settings and Design: Case control study carried out in an outpatient setting of a tertiary hospital in central India. Materials and Methods: One hundred and nine type 2 diabetes patients and 91 healthy controls formed the subjects of the study. Sociodemographic data were obtained on seven parameters. Comprehensive clinical data were obtained by means of standard procedures. Blood sugar levels and glycosylated hemoglobin levels were measured to assess glycemic control. Data of diabetic patients and controls as well as that of depressed and nondepressed diabetics were subjected to statistical analysis. Results: About 42.2% of diabetes patients and only 4.39% of controls had depression. About 19% of diabetics had peripheral neuropathy but had much higher neuropathic symptoms. Depression was not related to any sociodemographic or clinical factors but was strongly associated with poor glycemic control. Conclusion: Depression is highly prevalent in diabetes. Physical symptoms mask depression. Special attention needs to be paid to diagnose depression in diabetes and treat it appropriately along with effective glycemic control. Diabetes patients need to be treated collaboratively by physicians and psychiatrists. PMID:25788803

  14. EHS-Net Hand Hygiene Study EHS-Net Hand Hygiene Study Protocol

    E-print Network

    is to collect descriptive data on restaurant hygiene policies, environments, and food worker hygiene practices practices. Data for this study will be collected through interviews with restaurant managers-Net Hand Hygiene Study Protocol Summary Good hand hygiene is of critical importance in preventing

  15. Individual empowerment in overweight and obese patients: a study protocol

    PubMed Central

    Struzzo, Pierluigi; Fumato, Raffaella; Tillati, Silvia; Cacitti, Anita; Gangi, Fabrizio; Stefani, Alessia; Torcutti, Alessia; Crapesi, Lucia; Tubaro, Gianni; Balestrieri, Matteo

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Obesity is a growing health problem in Europe and it causes many diseases. Many weight-reducing methods are reported in medical literature, but none of them proved to be effective in maintaining the results achieved over time. Self-empowerment can be an important innovative method, but an effectiveness study is necessary. In order to standardise the procedures for a randomised controlled study, a pilot study will be run to observe, measure and evaluate the effects of a period of self-empowerment group treatment on overweight/obese patients. Methods and analysis Non-controlled, experimental, pilot study. A selected group of patients with body mass index >25, with no severe psychiatric disorders, with no aesthetic or therapeutic motivation will be included in the study. A set of quantitative and qualitative measures will be utilised to evaluate the effects of a self-empowerment course in a 12?month time. Group therapy and medical examinations will also complete this observational phase. At the end of this pilot study, a set of appropriate measures and procedures to determine the effectiveness of individual empowerment will be identified and agreed among the different professional figures. Results will be recorded and analysed to start a randomised controlled trial to evaluate the effectiveness of the proposed methodology. Ethics and dissemination This protocol was approved by the local Ethics Committee of Udine in March 2012. The findings of the trial will be disseminated through peer-reviewed journals, national and international conference presentations and public events involving the local administrations of the towns where the trial participants are resident. Trial Registration http://www.clinicalstrials.gov identifier NCT01644708. PMID:23676799

  16. The Great Depression

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    RandyandAmber

    2007-11-30

    Students will understand the personal impact of the depression on the lives of Americans. We will follow Utah\\'s Social Studies core curriculum Standard 6: Students will understand how the Great Depression and the New Deal affected the United States. Objective 1 Investigate the impact of the Great Depression on the United States. * Analyze the major causes of the Great Depression. ...

  17. Asymmetric Synaptic Depression in

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Mircea I. Chelaru; Valentin Dragoi

    Synaptic depression is essential for controlling the balance be- tween excitation and inhibition in cortical networks. Several studies have shown that the depression of intracortical synapses is asymmetric, that is, inhibitory synapses depress less than excit- atory ones. Whether this asymmetry has any impact on cortical function is unknown. Here we show that the differential depression of intracortical synapses provides

  18. A Comparative experimental study of media access protocols for wireless radio networks

    SciTech Connect

    Barrett, C. L. (Christopher L.); Drozda, M. (Martin); Marathe, M. V. (Madhav V.)

    2001-05-24

    We conduct a comparative experimental analysis of three well known media access protocols: 802.11, CSMA, and MACA for wireless radio networks. Both fixed and ad-hoc networks are considered. The experimental analysis was carried out using GloMoSim: a tool for simulating wireless networks. The main focus of experiments was to study how (i) the size of the network, (ii) number of open connections, (iii) the spatial location of individual connections, (iv) speed with which individual nodes move and (v) protocols higher up in the protocol stack (e,g. routing layer) affect the performance of the media access sublayer protocols. The performance of the protocols was measured w.r.t. three important parameters: (1) number of received packets, (2) average latency of each packet, and (3) throughput. The following general qualitative conclusions were obtained; some of the conclusions reinforce the earlier claims by other researchers. (1) Although 802.11 performs better than the other two protocols with respect to fairness of transmission, packets dropped, and latency, its performance is found to (i) show a lot of variance with changing input parameters and (ii) the overall performance still leaves a lot of room for improvement. (2) CSMA does not perform too well under the fairness criteria, however, was the best in terms of the latency criteria. (3) MACA also shows fairness problems and has poor performance at high packet injection rates. (4) Protocols in the higher level of the protocol stack affect the MAC layer performance. The main general implications of our work is two folds: (1) No single protocol dominated the other protocols across various measures of efficiency. This motivates the design of a new class of parameterized protocols that adapt to changes in the network connectivity and loads. We refer to these class of protocols as parameterized dynamically adaptive efficient protocols and as a first step suggest key design requirements for such a class of protocols. (2) Performance analysis of protocols at a given level in the protocol stack need to be studied not locally in isolation but as a part of the complete protocol stack. The results suggest that in order to improve the performance of a communication network, it will be important to study the entire protocol stuck as a single algorithmic construct; optimizing individual layers in the 7 layer OSI stack will not yield performance improvements beyond a point.

  19. Protocol matters: which methylome are you actually studying?

    PubMed Central

    Robinson, Mark D; Statham, Aaron L; Speed, Terence P; Clark, Susan J

    2011-01-01

    The field of epigenetics is now capitalizing on the vast number of emerging technologies, largely based on second-generation sequencing, which interrogate DNA methylation status and histone modifications genome-wide. However, getting an exhaustive and unbiased view of a methylome at a reasonable cost is proving to be a significant challenge. In this article, we take a closer look at the impact of the DNA sequence and bias effects introduced to datasets by genome-wide DNA methylation technologies and where possible, explore the bioinformatics tools that deconvolve them. There remains much to be learned about the performance of genome-wide technologies, the data we mine from these assays and how it reflects the actual biology. While there are several methods to interrogate the DNA methylation status genome-wide, our opinion is that no single technique suitably covers the minimum criteria of high coverage and, high resolution at a reasonable cost. In fact, the fraction of the methylome that is studied currently depends entirely on the inherent biases of the protocol employed. There is promise for this to change, as the third generation of sequencing technologies is expected to again ‘revolutionize’ the way that we study genomes and epigenomes. PMID:21566704

  20. The effects of a regional telepathology project: a study protocol

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Telepathology, which is an emerging form of telemedicine in Canada, is defined as the electronic transmission of pathological images, usually derived from microscopes, from one location to another. There are various applications of telepathology, including case referral for an expert opinion, provision of an emergency service in the absence of a resident pathologist, and education. Until now, there has been relatively little use of telepathology for core diagnostic services in the absence of a local pathologist, but this practice is likely to increase in the future. The Laval University Integrated Health Network is in the process of deploying a telepathology system, primarily to provide an intraoperative frozen section service to small hospitals in sparsely populated areas which are experiencing a severe shortage of on-site pathologists. The telepathology project involves 17 hospitals located in five regions of eastern Quebec, Canada. This paper describes the study protocol that will be used to evaluate the benefits associated with the project. Methods/Design A panel of experts was first assembled by Canada Health Infoway to agree on a set of benefits indicators that could be applied to all telepathology projects across Canada. Using the set of indicators as an input, we have developed a three-step study protocol. First, a survey questionnaire will be distributed to appraise the way pathologists, pathology technologists and surgeons perceive the telepathology system and its impacts. Second, a series of semi-structured interviews will be conducted with project leaders and telepathology users at sites that are representative of all the hospitals in the Laval University Integrated Health Network. The overall aim is to better understand the expected and unexpected effects of telepathology on health care professionals and patients as well as on the regional organization and delivery of care services. Finally, a pre-post design using secondary data is proposed to evaluate a wide array of tangible benefits to the patients, the health care providers, the hospitals, and the region as a whole. Discussion The Laval University Integrated Health Network's telepathology project is expected to yield positive and significant results that are relevant internationally. Our findings will provide valuable information on the nature and extent of benefits associated with telepathology systems intended to provide an intraoperative frozen section service to remote hospitals experiencing a shortage of specialists. PMID:22420301

  1. Nutritional Interventions in Depression and Perinatal Depression

    PubMed Central

    Rechenberg, Kaitlyn; Humphries, Debbie

    2013-01-01

    Depression is the leading cause of mental disability worldwide. Women who are depressed during pregnancy are at a higher risk for preterm delivery, preeclampsia, birth difficulties, and postpartum depression. The treatment of depression in conventional medicine has focused on physiological factors that lead to impaired neurotransmitter function and treatments to improve neurotransmitter function. Pharmaceutical substances pose risks for pregnant and lactating women, and lower risk options are preferred. Micronutrients, including certain B vitamins, folate, and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA), play a role in the synthesis and absorption of neurotransmitters. Experimental studies suggest that supplementation with specific micronutrients may alleviate depressive symptoms and improve birth outcomes in patients with perinatal depression. Alternative treatments for depression, including nutritional supplements, are an important treatment option for depressive symptoms while limiting potential side effects and treatment costs. This article explores the biological basis of perinatal depression and reviews the potential benefits of non-pharmacological interventions. PMID:23766734

  2. Efficacy, quality of life, and acceptability outcomes of atypical antipsychotic augmentation treatment for treatment-resistant depression: protocol for a systematic review and network meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Major depressive disorder (MDD) is a debilitating and costly mental disorder. Although commercially available antidepressants have proliferated over the last 20 years, a substantial number of patients either do not respond adequately to these drugs or are unable to tolerate their adverse effects. One common approach has been to augment conventional antidepressants with an adjunctive agent, but the optimal selection of atypical antipsychotic agents for adjunctive treatment of treatment-resistant depression (TRD) remains controversial. Methods/Design An electronic literature search of PubMed, the Cochrane Library, Embase, Web of Science, LiLACS, CINAHL, and PsycINFO for studies will be conducted with no restrictions on language, publication year, or publication type. Several clinical trial registry agencies, pharmaceutical company websites, and FDA reports will also be reviewed. Randomized clinical trials (RCTs) with atypical antipsychotic augmentation treatment for treatment-resistant depression will be considered. Data will be independently extracted by two reviewers. Traditional pairwise meta-analyses will be performed for RCTs that directly compare different treatment arms. Then, Bayesian network meta-analyses will be performed to compare the relative efficacy and acceptability of different atypical antipsychotic agents (and doses). A sensitivity analysis will be performed by excluding studies classified as a small sample size, having a high placebo effect. Discussion This systematic review and network meta-analysis will comparatively analyze the efficacy, quality of life, and acceptability profiles of atypical antipsychotic medications used for the adjunctive treatment of TRD. The findings should provide clinically relevant implications for comprehensively understanding the risk–benefit profiles of these adjunctive treatments. Systematic review registration PROSPERO CRD 42014009666. PMID:25373601

  3. Interoception in insula subregions as a possible state marker for depression—an exploratory fMRI study investigating healthy, depressed and remitted participants

    PubMed Central

    Wiebking, Christine; de Greck, Moritz; Duncan, Niall W.; Tempelmann, Claus; Bajbouj, Malek; Northoff, Georg

    2015-01-01

    Background: Interoceptive awareness (iA), the awareness of stimuli originating inside the body, plays an important role in human emotions and psychopathology. The insula is particularly involved in neural processes underlying iA. However, iA-related neural activity in the insula during the acute state of major depressive disorder (MDD) and in remission from depression has not been explored. Methods: A well-established fMRI paradigm for studying (iA; heartbeat counting) and exteroceptive awareness (eA; tone counting) was used. Study participants formed three independent groups: patients suffering from MDD, patients in remission from MDD or healthy controls. Task-induced neural activity in three functional subdivisions of the insula was compared between these groups. Results: Depressed participants showed neural hypo-responses during iA in anterior insula regions, as compared to both healthy and remitted participants. The right dorsal anterior insula showed the strongest response to iA across all participant groups. In depressed participants there was no differentiation between different stimuli types in this region (i.e., between iA, eA and noTask). Healthy and remitted participants in contrast showed clear activity differences. Conclusions: This is the first study comparing iA and eA-related activity in the insula in depressed participants to that in healthy and remitted individuals. The preliminary results suggest that these groups differ in there being hypo-responses across insula regions in the depressed participants, whilst non-psychiatric participants and patients in remission from MDD show the same neural activity during iA in insula subregions implying a possible state marker for MDD. The lack of activity differences between different stimulus types in the depressed group may account for their symptoms of altered external and internal focus. PMID:25914633

  4. A Population-Based Longitudinal Study of Depression in Children with Developmental Disabilities in Manitoba

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shooshtari, Shahin; Brownell, Marni; Dik, Natalia; Chateau, Dan; Yu, C. T.; Mills, Rosemary S. L.; Burchill, Charles A.; Wetzel, Monika

    2014-01-01

    In this population-based study, prevalence of depression was estimated and compared between children with and without developmental disability (DD). Twelve years of administrative data were linked to identify a cohort of children with DD living in the Canadian province of Manitoba. Children in the study cohort were matched with children without DD…

  5. The CRF system, stress, depression and anxiety—insights from human genetic studies

    Microsoft Academic Search

    E B Binder; C B Nemeroff

    2010-01-01

    A concatenation of findings from preclinical and clinical studies support a preeminent function for the corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF) system in mediating the physiological response to external stressors and in the pathophysiology of anxiety and depression. Recently, human genetic studies have provided considerable support to several long-standing hypotheses of mood and anxiety disorders, including the CRF hypothesis. These data, reviewed in

  6. A Family Study of Major Depressive Disorder in a Community Sample of Adolescents

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Daniel N. Klein; Peter M. Lewinsohn; John R. Seeley; Paul Rohde

    2001-01-01

    Background: Family studies provide a useful approach to exploring the continuities and discontinuities be- tween major depressive disorder (MDD) in children and adolescents and MDD in adults. We report a family study of MDD in a large community sample of adolescents. Methods: Probands included 268 adolescents with a his- tory of MDD, 110 adolescents with a history of non- mood

  7. The Depression Anxiety and Stress Scale (DASS): The Study of Validity and Reliability

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Akin, Ahmet; Cetin, Bayram

    2007-01-01

    This study investigated the validity and reliability of the Turkish version of the Depression Anxiety Stress Scale (DASS). The sample of the study consisted of 590 university students, 121 English teachers and 136 emotionally disturbed individuals who sought treatment in various clinics and counseling centers. Factor loadings of the scale ranged…

  8. Risk factors for depression at 12-month follow-up in adult primary health care patients with major depression: an international prospective study

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Katrin Barkow; Wolfgang Maier; T. Bedirhan Üstün; Michael Gänsicke; Hans-Ulrich Wittchen; Reinhard Heun

    2003-01-01

    Background: The aim of this study was to identify internationally relevant risk factors for the persistence of depression in primary care. None of the previous studies examining primary care patients could examine an equivalently large international sample. The findings from the WHO Collaborative Study on ‘Psychological Problems in General Health Care’ might be generalised to different cultural environments. Methods: A

  9. Examining the world of the depressed: do depressed people prefer others who are depressed?

    PubMed

    Rosenblatt, A; Greenberg, J

    1991-04-01

    Two studies were conducted to examine the interpersonal world of the depressed person. In Study 1, depression levels and perceptions of depressed and nondepressed people and their best friend were assessed to test the hypothesis that depressed Ss have best friends who are themselves more depressed than the best friends of nondepressed Ss. The hypothesis was confirmed, suggesting that depressed persons may prefer others who also tend toward depression. To examine this possibility, in Study 2 depressed and nondepressed college students spoke with one another in either depressed-depressed, nondepressed-depressed, or nondepressed-nondepressed pairs. It was found that depressed Ss felt worse than nondepressed Ss after speaking with nondepressed targets, but not after speaking with depressed targets. There were no differences in liking or in perceived similarity between the groups. Implications for the social world of the depressed person are discussed. PMID:2037970

  10. NHEXAS PHASE I MARYLAND STUDY--LIST OF AVAILABLE DOCUMENTS: PROTOCOLS AND SOPS

    EPA Science Inventory

    This document lists available protocols and SOPs for the NHEXAS Phase I Maryland study. It identifies protocols and SOPs for the following study components: (1) Sample collection and field operations, (2) Sample analysis and general laboratory procedures, (3) Data Analysis Proced...

  11. A genome-wide association study points to multiple loci predicting antidepressant treatment outcome in depression

    PubMed Central

    Binder, Elisabeth B.; Bettecken, Thomas; Uhr, Manfred; Ripke, Stephan; Kohli, Martin A.; Hennings, Johannes M.; Horstmann, Sonja; Kloiber, Stefan; Menke, Andreas; Bondy, Brigitta; Rupprecht, Rainer; Domschke, Katharina; Baune, Bernhard T.; Arolt, Volker; Rush, A. John; Holsboer, Florian; Müller-Myhsok, Bertram

    2015-01-01

    Context Efficacy of antidepressant treatment in depression is unsatisfactory as one in three patients does not fully recover even after several treatment trials. Genetic factors and clinical characteristics contribute to the failure of a favorable treatment outcome. Objective To identify genetic and clinical determinants of antidepressant treatment outcome in depression. Design Genome-wide pharmacogenetic association study with two independent replication samples. Setting We performed a genome-wide association (GWA) study in patients from the Munich-Antidepressant-Response-Signature (MARS) project and in pooled DNA from an independent German replication sample. A set of 328 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) highly related to outcome in both GWA studies was genotyped in a sample of the Sequenced-Treatment-Alternatives-to-Relieve-Depression (STAR*D) study. Participants 339 inpatients suffering from a depressive episode (MARS sample), further 361 depressed inpatients (German replication sample), and 832 outpatients with major depression (STAR*D sample). Main Outcome Measures We generated a multi-locus genetic variable describing the individual number of alleles of the selected SNPs associated with beneficial treatment outcome in the MARS sample (“response” alleles) to evaluate additive genetic effects on antidepressant treatment outcome. Results Multi-locus analysis revealed a significant contribution of a binary variable categorizing patients as carriers of a high vs. low number of response alleles in predicting antidepressant treatment outcome in both samples, MARS and STAR*D. In addition, we observed that patients with a comorbid anxiety disorder in combination with a low number of response alleles showed the least favorable outcome. Conclusion Our results demonstrate the importance of multiple genetic factors in combination with clinical features to predict antidepressant treatment outcome underscoring the multifactorial nature of this trait. PMID:19736353

  12. Sigma-1 receptor concentration in plasma of patients with late-life depression: a preliminary study

    PubMed Central

    Shimizu, Hideyuki; Takebayashi, Minoru; Tani, Masayuki; Tanaka, Hiroaki; Yamagata, Bun; Kurosawa, Kenzo; Yamada, Hiroki; Hachisu, Mitsugu; Hisaoka-Nakashima, Kazue; Okada-Tsuchioka, Mami; Mimura, Masaru; Iwanami, Akira

    2013-01-01

    Background Recently, the sigma-1 receptor has been shown to play a significant role in the neural transmission of mood by regulating N-methyl-D-aspartate receptors. Additionally, the sigma-1 receptor has been reported to influence cognitive functions including learning and memory. In this study, we measured plasma sigma-1 receptor concentrations before and after antidepressant treatment in patients with late-life major depressive disorder (MDD) and explored whether changes in depressive status are related to sigma-1 receptor concentrations. Methods The study participants were 12 subjects with late-life MDD diagnosed according to the criteria of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fourth Edition. All of the participants were over 60 years old. Immediately prior to and 8 weeks after the start of treatment, sigma-1 receptor concentration and mental status, including depressive symptoms (Hamilton Depression Rating Scale; HAM-D), were measured. Treatment for depression was performed according to a developed algorithm based on the choice of treatments. We examined the association between changes in sigma-1 receptor concentration and HAM-D scores during antidepressant treatment. For the measurement of plasma sigma-1 receptor concentration, blood plasma samples were separated by sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. Western blots were performed using a specific antibody that acts against the sigma-1 receptor, and the net densities of each band were quantified. Results All participants showed improvement in depressive symptoms, which was indicated by a significant decrease in the HAM-D scores. The mean plasma sigma-1 receptor concentration also increased significantly following antidepressant treatment. However, no significant correlations were found between changes in plasma sigma-1 receptor concentration and changes in HAM-D scores. Conclusion In this preliminary study, we demonstrated that the sigma-1 receptor concentration in plasma increases following antidepressant treatment in patients with late-life MDD. Further studies are warranted to confirm this finding with a larger number of patients. PMID:24353420

  13. Latent Class-Derived Subgroups of Depressive Symptoms in a Community Sample of Older Adults: The Cache County Study

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Chien-Ti; Leoutsakos, Jeannie-Marie; Lyketsos, Constantine G.; Steffens, David C.; Breitner, John C.S.; Norton, Maria C.

    2012-01-01

    Objective We sought to identify possible subgroups of elders that varied in depressive symptomatology, and to examine symptom pattern and health status differences between subgroups. Methods The Cache County Memory Study is a population-based epidemiological study of dementia with 5,092 participants. Depressive symptoms were measured with a modified version of the Diagnostic Interview Schedule-Depression. There were 400 non-demented participants who endorsed currently (i.e. in the past 2 weeks) experiencing at least one of three “gateway” depressive symptoms and then completed a full depression interview, responses to all nine current depressive symptoms were modeled using Latent Class Analysis (LCA). Results Three depression subgroups were identified: a significantly depressed subgroup (62%), with the remainder split evenly between a subgroup with low probability of all symptoms (21%) and a subgroup with primarily psychomotor changes, sleep symptoms and fatigue (17%). LCA derived subgroups of depressive symptoms and DSM-IV depression diagnostic group were non-redundant. Age, gender, education, marital status, whether early vs. late onset, number of episodes, current episode duration, and functional status were not significant predictors of depression subgroup. The first subgroup was more likely to be recently bereaved and had less physical health problems whereas the third subgroup were less likely to be using antidepressants, compared with the second subgroup. Conclusions There are distinct subgroups of depressed elders, which are not redundant with the DSM-IV classification scheme, offering an alternative diagnostic approach to clinicians and researchers. Future work will examine whether these depressive symptom profiles are predictive of incident dementia and earlier mortality. PMID:22135008

  14. Postpartum Depression

    MedlinePLUS

    ... postpartum depression occur? • What causes postpartum depression? • If I think I have postpartum depression, when should I see ... greatly increase the risk of postpartum depression. If I think I have postpartum depression, when should I see ...

  15. Recognition of Facial Expressions in Individuals with Elevated Levels of Depressive Symptoms: An Eye-Movement Study

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Lingdan; Pu, Jie; Allen, John J. B.; Pauli, Paul

    2012-01-01

    Previous studies consistently reported abnormal recognition of facial expressions in depression. However, it is still not clear whether this abnormality is due to an enhanced or impaired ability to recognize facial expressions, and what underlying cognitive systems are involved. The present study aimed to examine how individuals with elevated levels of depressive symptoms differ from controls on facial expression recognition and to assess attention and information processing using eye tracking. Forty participants (18 with elevated depressive symptoms) were instructed to label facial expressions depicting one of seven emotions. Results showed that the high-depression group, in comparison with the low-depression group, recognized facial expressions faster and with comparable accuracy. Furthermore, the high-depression group demonstrated greater leftwards attention bias which has been argued to be an indicator of hyperactivation of right hemisphere during facial expression recognition. PMID:22288009

  16. Exergames for Subsyndromal Depression in Older Adults: A Pilot Study of a Novel Intervention

    PubMed Central

    Rosenberg, Dori; Depp, Colin A.; Vahia, Ipsit V.; Reichstadt, Jennifer; Palmer, Barton W.; Kerr, Jacqueline; Norman, Greg; Jeste, Dilip V.

    2009-01-01

    Objectives Subsyndromal depression (SSD) is several times more common than major depression in older adults, and is associated with significant negative health outcomes. Physical activity can improve depression, yet adherence is often poor. We assessed the feasibility, acceptability, and short-term efficacy and safety of a novel intervention using exergames (entertaining video games that combine game play with exercise) for SSD in older adults. Methods Community-dwelling older adults (N = 19, age 63–94) with SSD participated in a 12-week pilot study (with follow-up at 20 to 24 weeks) of Nintendo’s Wii Sports, with three 35-minute sessions a week. Results 86% of enrolled participants completed the 12-week intervention. There was a significant improvement in depressive symptoms, mental health-related quality of life, and cognitive performance, but not physical health-related quality of life. There were no major adverse events, and improvement in depression was maintained at follow-up. Conclusions The findings provide preliminary indication of the benefits of exergames in seniors with SSD. Randomized controlled trials of exergames for late-life SSD are warranted. PMID:20173423

  17. IGF-I levels and depressive disorders: results from the Study of Health in Pomerania (SHIP).

    PubMed

    Sievers, C; Auer, M K; Klotsche, J; Athanasoulia, A P; Schneider, H J; Nauck, M; Völzke, H; John, U; Schulz, A; Freyberger, H J; Friedrich, N; Biffar, R; Stalla, G K; Wallaschofski, H; Grabe, H J

    2014-06-01

    In vitro and in vivo models revealed that the somatotropic system exerts central effects on the central nervous system. Disturbances to this system such as in the case of growth hormone deficiency or growth hormone excess, are associated with a wide range of psychiatric disorders. Nonetheless, there is no epidemiological data available regarding the influence of growth hormone and its mediator, insulin-like growth factor I (IGF-I), on depressive disorders. The objective of this study was to investigate whether endogenous IGF-I levels may predict depression in humans. We included 4079 adult subjects from the Study of Health in Pomerania (SHIP), a population-based study with a 5-year follow-up period. The main predictor was the baseline IGF-I value categorized in three levels as <10th percentile, between the 10th and the 90th percentile (the reference group) and >90th percentile. The outcome measure was the incidence of depressive disorders according to the Composite International Diagnostic-Screener (CID-S). After adjustment for potential confounding variables, females with IGF-I levels below the 10th percentile had a higher incidence of depressive disorders during follow-up (OR 2.70 95% CI 1.38-5.28, p=0.004) compared to females within the reference group (10th-90th percentile). Among males, those with IGF-I levels above the 90th percentile had a higher risk of depressive disorder (OR 3.26 95% CI 1.52-6.98, p=0.002) than those within the 10th-90th percentile. In conclusion we can demonstrate that low IGF-I levels in females and high IGF-I levels in males predict the development of depressive disorders in this general adult population sample. PMID:24507017

  18. Genome-wide methylation study on depression: differential methylation and variable methylation in monozygotic twins

    PubMed Central

    Córdova-Palomera, A; Fatjó-Vilas, M; Gastó, C; Navarro, V; Krebs, M-O; Fañanás, L

    2015-01-01

    Depressive disorders have been shown to be highly influenced by environmental pathogenic factors, some of which are believed to exert stress on human brain functioning via epigenetic modifications. Previous genome-wide methylomic studies on depression have suggested that, along with differential DNA methylation, affected co-twins of monozygotic (MZ) pairs have increased DNA methylation variability, probably in line with theories of epigenetic stochasticity. Nevertheless, the potential biological roots of this variability remain largely unexplored. The current study aimed to evaluate whether DNA methylation differences within MZ twin pairs were related to differences in their psychopathological status. Data from the Illumina Infinium HumanMethylation450 Beadchip was used to evaluate peripheral blood DNA methylation of 34 twins (17 MZ pairs). Two analytical strategies were used to identify (a) differentially methylated probes (DMPs) and (b) variably methylated probes (VMPs). Most DMPs were located in genes previously related to neuropsychiatric phenotypes. Remarkably, one of these DMPs (cg01122889) was located in the WDR26 gene, the DNA sequence of which has been implicated in major depressive disorder from genome-wide association studies. Expression of WDR26 has also been proposed as a biomarker of depression in human blood. Complementarily, VMPs were located in genes such as CACNA1C, IGF2 and the p38 MAP kinase MAPK11, showing enrichment for biological processes such as glucocorticoid signaling. These results expand on previous research to indicate that both differential methylation and differential variability have a role in the etiology and clinical manifestation of depression, and provide clues on specific genomic loci of potential interest in the epigenetics of depression. PMID:25918994

  19. Occurrence Risk and Structure of Depression in Parkinson Disease With and Without Dementia: Results From the GEPAD Study

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Oliver Riedel; Isabella Heuser; Jens Klotsche; Richard Dodel; Hans-Ulrich Wittchen

    2010-01-01

    Background: This study examined the age- and gender-specific risk of depression in demented and non-demented participants, its symptom structure, and associated clinical factors in a nationwide random sample of n = 1449 outpatients with Parkinson disease (PD). Methods: Depression ratings were based on a cross-sectional clinical assessment including the clinical Montgomery-Asberg Depression Rating Scale (MADRS ? 14). Parkinson disease severity

  20. Risk for New Onset of Depression During the Menopausal Transition: The Harvard Study of Moods and Cycles

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Lee S. Cohen; Claudio N. Soares; Allison F. Vitonis; Michael W. Otto; Bernard L. Harlow

    2006-01-01

    Context:Transitiontomenopausehaslongbeenconsid- ered a period of increased risk for depressive symptoms. However,itisunclearwhetherthisperiodisoneofincreased riskformajordepressivedisorder,particularlyforwom- en who have not had a previous episode of depression. Objective:Toexaminetheassociationbetweenthemeno- pausal transition and onset of first lifetime episode of de- pressionamongwomenwithnohistoryofmooddisturbance. Design: Longitudinal, prospective cohort study. Setting: A population-based cross-sectional sample. Participants:Premenopausal women, 36 to 45 years of age, with no lifetime diagnosis of major depression (N=460),

  1. Gender differences in the association between religious involvement and depression: the Cache County (Utah) study.

    PubMed

    Norton, Maria C; Skoog, Ingmar; Franklin, Lynn M; Corcoran, Christopher; Tschanz, JoAnn T; Zandi, Peter P; Breitner, John C S; Welsh-Bohmer, Kathleen A; Steffens, David C

    2006-05-01

    We examined the relation between religious involvement, membership in the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-Day Saints, and major depression in a population-based study of aging and dementia in Cache County, Utah. Participants included 4,468 nondemented individuals between the ages of 65 and 100 years who were interviewed in person. In logistic regression models adjusting for demographic and health variables, frequent church attendance was associated with a reduced prevalence of depression in women but increased prevalence in men. Social role loss and the potential impact of organizational power differential by sex are discussed. Though causality cannot be determined here, these findings suggest that the association between religious involvement and depression may differ substantially between men and women. PMID:16670181

  2. Hypertension and risk of depression in the elderly: a meta-analysis of prospective cohort studies.

    PubMed

    Long, J; Duan, G; Tian, W; Wang, L; Su, P; Zhang, W; Lan, J; Zhang, H

    2015-08-01

    The objective of the study was to assess the relationship between hypertension and risk of depression. The relationship between hypertension and depression has been discussed for a long time, but the results are controversial. Studies were searched from PubMed and Cochrane up to 24 March 2014. Any prospective cohort study, which possibly reported the relationship between hypertension and depression, was included. The random effect model was used to calculate the pooled relative risk (RR). Finally, five prospective cohort studies were included for analysis, with a total of 9647 participants involved. Our meta-analysis does not support that hypertension is probably a risk factor of depression. The pooled RR was 1.16 (95% confidence interval: 0.91, 1.42) when those exposed to hypertension were compared with those who were not. Subgroup analysis, sensitivity analysis and publication bias test suggested that the overall result of this analysis was robust. Further studies are needed to exclude the effects of other confounding factors. PMID:25411056

  3. Neuroimaging of Cognitive Dysfunction and Depression in Aging Retired NFL Players: A cross-sectional study

    PubMed Central

    Hart, John; Kraut, Michael A.; Womack, Kyle B.; Strain, Jeremy; Didehbani, Nyaz; Bartz, Elizabeth; Conover, Heather; Mansinghani, Sethesh; Lu, Hanzhang; Cullum, C. Munro

    2013-01-01

    Objective To assess for the presence of cognitive impairment and depression in aging former NFL players, and identify neuroimaging correlates of these dysfunctions. Design Comparison of aging NFL players with cognitive impairment and depression to those without these dysfunctions and with matched healthy controls Setting Research center in the North Texas region of the United States. Patients We performed a cross-sectional study of retired professional football players with and without a history of concussion recruited from the North Texas region, along with age-, education-, and IQ-matched controls. We studied thirty-four retired NFL players (mean age 62) neurologically and neuropsychologically. A subset of 26 also underwent detailed neuroimaging; imaging data in this subset were compared to imaging data acquired in 26 healthy matched controls. Main Outcome Measures Neuropsychological measures, clinical diagnoses of depression, neuroimaging measures of white matter pathology, and a measure of cerebral blood flow (CBF). Results Of the 34 participants, 20 were cognitively normal, 4 were diagnosed with a fixed cognitive deficit, 8 with Mild Cognitive Impairment, and 2 with dementia; 8 were diagnosed with depression. Of the subgroup in which neuroimaging data were acquired, cognitively impaired (CI) participants showed greatest deficits on tests of naming, word finding, and visual/verbal episodic memory. We found significant differences in white matter abnormalities in CI players and depressed players compared to their respective controls. Regional blood flow differences in the CI group (left temporal pole, inferior parietal lobule, superior temporal gyrus) corresponded to regions associated with impaired neurocognitive performance (problems with memory, naming and word finding). Conclusions Cognitive deficits and depression appear to be more common in aging NFL players compared to controls. These deficits are correlated with white matter abnormalities and changes in regional CBF. PMID:23303193

  4. Early and delayed personality changes associated with depression recovery? A one-year follow-up study.

    PubMed

    Corruble, Emmanuelle; Duret, Caroline; Pelissolo, Antoine; Falissard, Bruno; Guelfi, Julien Daniel

    2002-01-31

    Many studies have shown the state effect of depression on personality. However, the chronology of personality changes associated with depression recovery remains unstudied. The objective of this study is to assess early (first month) and delayed personality changes associated with depression recovery. Fifty-seven depressed inpatients were assessed with the Temperament and Character Inventory (TCI) at admission, 1 month, and 1 year post-treatment. Patients were divided into poor and favorable outcome. No significant personality change was observed in patients with poor depression outcome. Conversely, a favorable outcome of depression was associated with early and delayed personality changes. Early changes were: decrease in Harm avoidance (HA(1):Worry and pessimism), increase in Cooperativeness and Self-directedness (SD(1):Responsibility, SD(4):Self-acceptance, SD(2):Purposefulness and SD(3):Resourcefulness). Delayed changes were changes in character: increase in Self-Directedness (SD(1):Responsibility, SD(4):Self-acceptance, SD(5): Congruent second nature), decrease in Self-transcendence (ST(2):Transpersonal identification). This study shows the different status of personality changes associated with depression recovery, and it contributes to a better knowledge of the state effect and of subtle clinical changes in patients who are recovering from depression. It may also have implications for the prediction of depression outcome. PMID:11850047

  5. Church attendance and new episodes of major depression in a community study of older adults: the Cache County Study.

    PubMed

    Norton, Maria C; Singh, Archana; Skoog, Ingmar; Corcoran, Christopher; Tschanz, Joann T; Zandi, Peter P; Breitner, John C S; Welsh-Bohmer, Kathleen A; Steffens, David C

    2008-05-01

    We examined the relation between church attendance, membership in the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-Day Saints (LDS), and major depressive episode, in a population-based study of aging and dementia in Cache County, Utah. Participants included 2,989 nondemented individuals aged between 65 and 100 years who were interviewed initially in 1995 to 1996 and again in 1998 to 1999. LDS church members reported twice the rate of major depression that non-LDS members did (odds ratio = 2.56, 95% confidence interval = 1.07-6.08). Individuals attending church weekly or more often had a significantly lower risk for major depression. After controlling for demographic and health variables and the strongest predictor of future episodes of depression, a prior depression history, we found that church attendance more often than weekly remained a significant protectant (odds ratio = 0.51, 95% confidence interval = 0.28-0.92). Results suggest that there may be a threshold of church attendance that is necessary for a person to garner long-term protection from depression. We discuss sociological factors relevant to LDS culture. PMID:18559677

  6. Establishing the reliability and validity of the Zagazig Depression Scale in a UK student population: an online pilot study

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background It is thought that depressive disorders will be the second leading cause of disability worldwide by 2020. Recently, there is a steady increase in the number of university students diagnosed and treated as depression patients. It can be assumed that depression is a serious mental health problem for university students because it affects all age groups of the students either younger or older equally. The current study aims to establish the reliability and validity of the Zagazig Depression scale in a UK sample. Methods The study was a cross-sectional online survey. A sample of 133 out of 275 undergraduate students from a range of UK Universities in the academic year 2008-2009, aged 20.3 ± 6.3 years old were recruited. A modified back translated version of Zagazig Depression scale was used. In order to validate the Zagazig Depression scale, participants were asked to complete the Patient Health Questionnaire. Statistical analysis includes Kappa analysis, Cronbach's alpha, Spearman's correlation analysis, and Confirmatory Factor analysis. Results Using the recommended cut-off of Zagazig Depression scale for possible minor depression it was found that 30.3% of the students have depression and higher percentage was identified according to the Patient Health Questionnaire (37.4%). Females were more depressed. The mean ZDS score was 8.3 ± 4.2. Rates of depression increase as students get older. The reliability of The ZDS was satisfactory (Cronbach's alpha was .894). For validity, ZDS score was strongly associated with PHQ, with no significant difference (p-value > 0.05), with strong positive correlation (r = +.8, p-value < 0.01). Conclusion The strong, significant correlation between the PHQ and ZDS, along with high internal consistency of the ZDS as a whole provides evidence that ZDS is a reliable measure of depressive symptoms and is promising for the use of the translated ZDS in a large-scale cross-culture study. PMID:21143972

  7. The role of depressive symptoms in recovery from injuries to the extremities in older persons. A prospective study

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Gertrudis I. J. M. Kempen; Robbert Sanderman; Winnie Scaf-Klomp; Johan Ormel

    2003-01-01

    SUMMARY Background Previous research suggested that depressive symptoms play a role in recovery after hip fracture. However none of these studies were prospective and included only patients with hip fractures. Objective To examine the effect of depressive symptoms on the recovery of (instrumental) activities of daily living after fall-related injuries to the extremities in older persons. Design Prospective cohort study.

  8. Genome-wide association study of recurrent major depressive disorder in two European case–control cohorts

    Microsoft Academic Search

    P Muglia; F Tozzi; N W Galwey; C Francks; R Upmanyu; X Q Kong; A Antoniades; E Domenici; J Perry; S Rothen; C L Vandeleur; V Mooser; G Waeber; P Vollenweider; M Preisig; S Lucae; B Müller-Myhsok; F Holsboer; L T Middleton; A D Roses

    2010-01-01

    Major depressive disorder (MDD) is a highly prevalent disorder with substantial heritability. Heritability has been shown to be substantial and higher in the variant of MDD characterized by recurrent episodes of depression. Genetic studies have thus far failed to identify clear and consistent evidence of genetic risk factors for MDD. We conducted a genome-wide association study (GWAS) in two independent

  9. Fluoxetine Treatment in Poststroke Depression, Emotional Incontinence, and Anger Proneness A Double-Blind, Placebo-Controlled Study

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Smi Choi-Kwon; Sung W. Han; Sun U. Kwon; Dong-Wha Kang; Ji M. Choi; Jong S. Kim

    2010-01-01

    Background and Purpose—The efficacy and safety of the selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor fluoxetine have rarely been studied in the treatment of poststroke emotional disturbances. Methods—Stroke patients (152) who had poststroke depression (PSD), emotional incontinence (PSEI), or anger proneness (PSAP) were studied. PSD was evaluated by Beck Depression Inventory and Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fourth Edition, PSEI by

  10. The characteristics of asymptomatic female adolescents at high risk for depression: the baseline assessment from a prospective 8-year study

    Microsoft Academic Search

    S Kutcher; V Kusumakar; J LeBlanc; D Santor; D Lagace; R Morehouse

    2004-01-01

    Objective: This longitudinal 8-year study assesses potential predictors of major depressive disorder (MDD) in a cohort of healthy adolescent females at high familial risk for MDD. The objective of this study was to ascertain whether risk factors for female onset MDD would differentiate youth at high or usual risk for MDD, prior to the onset of depressive symptomology. Method: Subjects

  11. Factors Associated with Recruitment and Screening in the Treatment for Adolescents with Depression Study (TADS)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    May, Diane E.; Hallin, Mary J.; Kratochvil, Christopher J.; Puumala, Susan E.; Smith, Lynette S.; Reinecke, Mark A.; Silva, Susan G.; Weller, Elizabeth B.; Vitiello, Benedetto; Breland-Noble, Alfiee; March, John S.

    2007-01-01

    Objective: To examine factors associated with eligibility and randomization and consider the efficiency of recruitment methods. Method: Adolescents, ages 12 to 17 years, were telephone screened (N = 2,804) followed by in-person evaluation (N = 1,088) for the Treatment for Adolescents With Depression Study. Separate logistic regression models,…

  12. Pilot Study: Fluvoxamine Treatment for Depression and Anxiety Disorders in Children and Adolescents with Cancer

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gothelf, Doron; Rubinstein, Maly; Shemesh, Eyal; Miller, Orit; Farbstein, Ilana; Klein, Anat; Weizman, Abraham; Apter, Alan; Yaniv, Isaac

    2005-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the safety, tolerability, and benefit of fluvoxamine for the treatment of major depressive disorder or anxiety disorders in children and adolescents with cancer. Method: The study was conducted from 2001 to 2004 at a pediatric hematology-oncology center. Fifteen children and adolescents with cancer were treated with…

  13. Spouse Health Status, Depressed Affect, and Resilience in Mid and Late Life: A Longitudinal Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bookwala, Jamila

    2014-01-01

    This study used longitudinal data to examine the effects of spousal illness on depressive symptoms among middle-aged and older married individuals and the extent to which the adverse effects of illness in a spouse were mitigated by 2 psychological resources, mastery and self-esteem. Using 1,704 married participants who were 51 years of age on…

  14. An Exploratory Study of the Relationship Between Night Eating Syndrome and Depression Among College Students

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Sharon H. Thompson; Rita DiGioacchino DeBate

    2009-01-01

    Night eating syndrome criteria include skipping breakfast, night eating, and sleep difficulties. It is associated with mood disturbances, particularly depression, and may contribute to later obesity development. Most research on night eating syndrome has focused on obese persons seeking weight loss treatment, and little is known about night eating syndrome in other populations; therefore, the purpose of this exploratory study

  15. Reward-Related Decision-Making in Pediatric Major Depressive Disorder: An fMRI Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Forbes, Erika E.; Christopher May, J.; Siegle, Greg J.; Ladouceur, Cecile D.; Ryan, Neal D.; Carter, Cameron S.; Birmaher, Boris; Axelson, David A.; Dahl, Ronald E.

    2006-01-01

    Background: Although reward processing is considered an important part of affective functioning, few studies have investigated reward-related decisions or responses in young people with affective disorders. Depression is postulated to involve decreased activity in reward-related affective systems. Methods: Using functional magnetic resonance…

  16. Behavioral Activation for Comorbid PTSD and Major Depression: A Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mulick, Patrick S.; Naugle, Amy E.

    2004-01-01

    The present investigation details the assessment and use of Behavioral Activation (BA) therapy to treat a 37-year-old male police officer/military veteran suffering from posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and major depressive disorder (MDD). This case study is an attempt to expand empirical knowledge regarding BA, comorbid PTSD and MDD, and…

  17. The INDDEP study: inpatient and day hospital treatment for depression – symptom course and predictors of change

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Depression can be treated in an outpatient, inpatient or day hospital setting. In the German health care system, episodes of inpatient or day hospital treatment are common, but there is a lack of studies evaluating effectiveness in routine care and subgroups of patients with a good or insufficient treatment response. Our study aims at identifying prognostic and prescriptive outcome predictors as well as comparative effectiveness in psychosomatic inpatient and day hospital treatment in depression. Methods/Design In a naturalistic study, 300 consecutive inpatient and 300 day hospital treatment episodes in seven psychosomatic hospitals in Germany will be included. Patients are assessed at four time points of measurement (admission, discharge, 3-months follow-up, 12-months follow-up) including a broad range of variables (self-report and expert ratings). First, the whole sample will be analysed to identify prognostic and prescriptive predictors of outcome (primary outcome criterion: Quick Inventory of Depressive Symptoms QIDS-total score, expert rating). Secondly, for a comparison of inpatient and day hospital treatment, samples will be matched according to known predictors of outcome. Discussion Naturalistic studies with good external validity are needed to assess treatment outcome in depression in routine care and to identify subgroups of patients with different therapeutic needs. Trial registration Current Controlled Trials ISRCTN20317064 PMID:23531019

  18. Psychosocial Outcomes of Children of Unipolar Depressed, Bipolar, Medically Ill, and Normal Women: A Longitudinal Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anderson, Carolyn A.; Hammen, Constance L.

    1993-01-01

    Studied behavior problems, social competence, internalizing/externalizing behaviors, academic performance, and school behavior of 96 children (ages 8-16) of unipolar depressed, bipolar, medically ill, and psychiatrically normal women over 2 years. Children of unipolar mothers showed significantly poorer functioning on all measures; greater…

  19. Associations between Teacher Emotional Support and Depressive Symptoms in Australian Adolescents: A 5-Year Longitudinal Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pössel, Patrick; Rudasill, Kathleen Moritz; Sawyer, Michael G.; Spence, Susan H.; Bjerg, Annie C.

    2013-01-01

    Approximately 1/5 of adolescents develop depressive symptoms. Given that youths spend a good deal of their lives at school, it seems plausible that supportive relationships with teachers could benefit their emotional well-being. Thus, the purpose of this study is to examine the association between emotionally supportive teacher relationships and…

  20. How and why do people with depression access and utilize online drug information: A qualitative study

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Marika Pohjanoksa-Mäntylä; Johanna K. Saari; Ulla Närhi; Anna Karjalainen; Kari Pylkkänen; Marja S. Airaksinen; J. Simon Bell

    2009-01-01

    BackgroundPeople with depression commonly use the Internet to access antidepressant information, but the quality of this information is highly variable. The objective of this study was to assess how and why people use the Internet to access antidepressant information, and the self-reported impact of information obtained online.

  1. Psychotherapy for Depression in Adults: A Meta-Analysis of Comparative Outcome Studies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cuijpers, Pim; van Straten, Annemieke; Andersson, Gerhard; van Oppen, Patricia

    2008-01-01

    Although the subject has been debated and examined for more than 3 decades, it is still not clear whether all psychotherapies are equally efficacious. The authors conducted 7 meta-analyses (with a total of 53 studies) in which 7 major types of psychological treatment for mild to moderate adult depression (cognitive-behavior therapy, nondirective…

  2. Slow versus standard up-titration of paroxetine for the treatment of depression in cancer patients: a pilot study

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Laura Amodeo; Lorys Castelli; Paolo Leombruni; Daniela Cipriani; Alessia Biancofiore; Riccardo Torta

    Objectives  This study aimed to compare the tolerability and efficacy of two different titrations of paroxetine (slow and standard) in\\u000a a population of cancer patients with depression.\\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a Methods  This randomized open trial included 30 cancer patients with depression (major depressive disorder, dysthymic disorder, or\\u000a adjustment disorder with depressed mood) and aimed to compare the safety of slow up-titration (arm A) versus standard

  3. Predicting relatedness and self-definition depressive experiences in aging women based on personality traits: a preliminary study.

    PubMed

    Henriques-Calado, Joana; Duarte-Silva, Maria Eugénia; Campos, Rui C; Sacoto, Carlota; Keong, Ana Marta; Junqueira, Diana

    2013-01-01

    As part of the research relating personality and depression, this study seeks to predict depressive experiences in aging women according to Sidney Blatt's perspective based on the Five-Factor Model of Personality. The NEO-Five Factor Inventory and the Depressive Experiences Questionnaire were administered. The domains Neuroticism, Agreeableness, and Conscientiousness predicted self-criticism, explaining 68% of the variance; the domains Neuroticism and Extraversion predicted dependency, explaining 62% of the variance. The subfactors Neediness and Connectedness were differently related to personality traits. These findings are relevant to the research relating personality and anaclitic / introjective depressive experiences in late adulthood. PMID:24020611

  4. A Case Study on Reactive Protocols for Aircraft Electric Power Distribution

    E-print Network

    Xu, Huan

    by physical constraints and per- formance criteria. Because safety of the aircraft is solely or mostlyA Case Study on Reactive Protocols for Aircraft Electric Power Distribution Huan Xu1, Ufuk Topcu2, and Richard M. Murray3 Abstract-- We consider the problem of designing a control protocol for the aircraft

  5. The association of depressive, anxiety, and stress symptoms and postpartum relapse to smoking: A longitudinal study

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Yuchiao; Quinn, Virginia; Regan, Susan; Cohen, Lee; Viguera, Adele; Psaros, Christina; Ross, Kaile; Rigotti, Nancy

    2009-01-01

    Introduction The aim of this prospective repeated measures, mixed-methods observational study was to assess whether depressive, anxiety, and stress symptoms are associated with postpartum relapse to smoking. Methods A total of 65 women who smoked prior to pregnancy and had not smoked during the last month of pregnancy were recruited at delivery and followed for 24 weeks. Surveys administered at baseline and at 2, 6, 12, and 24 weeks postpartum assessed smoking status and symptoms of depression (Beck Depression Inventory [BDI]), anxiety (Beck Anxiety Inventory [BAI]), and stress (Perceived Stress Scale [PSS]). In-depth interviews were conducted with women who reported smoking. Results Although 92% of the participants reported a strong desire to stay quit, 47% resumed smoking by 24 weeks postpartum. Baseline factors associated with smoking at 24 weeks were having had a prior delivery, not being happy about the pregnancy, undergoing counseling for depression or anxiety during pregnancy, and ever having struggled with depression (p < .05). In a repeated measures regression model, the slope of BDI scores from baseline to the 12-week follow-up differed between nonsmokers and smokers (?0.12 vs. +0.11 units/week, p?=?.03). The slope of PSS scores also differed between nonsmokers and smokers (?0.05 vs. +0.08 units/week, p?=?.04). In qualitative interviews, most women who relapsed attributed their relapse and continued smoking to negative emotions. Discussion Among women who quit smoking during pregnancy, a worsening of depressive and stress symptoms over 12 weeks postpartum was associated with an increased risk of smoking by 24 weeks. PMID:19436040

  6. The Link between Sleep Disturbance and Depression among Mexican Americans: A Project FRONTIER Study

    PubMed Central

    Roane, Brandy M.; Johnson, Leigh; Edwards, Melissa; Hall, James; Al-Farra, Sherif; O'Bryant, Sid E.

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To examine the link between disturbed sleep and depression scores in Mexican Americans and non-Hispanic Whites. Methods: Data were analyzed for 566 participants (45% Mexican Americans) who were part of a rural healthcare study, Project FRONTIER. Mean age was 55.5 years for Mexican Americans (70% female) and 65.6 years for non-Hispanic Whites (69% female). Self-reported sleep disturbance was entered as the predictor, GDS-30 total and factor scores as the outcome variables, and age, sex, education, BMI, and medical diagnoses (hyperlipidemia, diabetes mellitus, and hypertension) entered as covariates. Results: Mexican Americans reported higher rates of sleep disturbances (25%) than non-Hispanic whites (17%). Sleep disturbances were significantly associated with GDS-30 total scores and the factors Dysphoria and Cognitive Impairment in both Mexican Americans and non-Hispanic whites. Conclusions: In this study, Mexican Americans reported higher rates of sleep disturbances than non-Hispanic whites. Disturbed sleep was positively associated with depression and the factor scores for Dysphoria and Cognitive Impairment in both groups. Given the paucity of research on sleep disorders in Mexican Americans, identifying what sleep disorders are present and the impact treating these sleep disorders have on depression warrant further investigation. Citation: Roane BM; Johnson L; Edwards M; Hall J; Al-Farra S; O'Bryant SE. The link between sleep disturbance and depression among Mexican Americans: a Project FRONTIER study. J Clin Sleep Med 2014;10(4):427-431. PMID:24733989

  7. Study of Routing Protocols in Wireless Sensor Networks

    Microsoft Academic Search

    K. Pavai; A. Sivagami; D. Sridharan

    2009-01-01

    Recent advances in Wireless Sensor Networks (WSN) now witness the increased interest in the potential use in applications like disaster management, combat field reconnaissance, border protection and security surveillance. Sensors are expected to be remotely deployed in large numbers and operate autonomously in unattended environments. Many routing protocols have been specifically designed for WSNs where energy awareness is an essential

  8. An analysis of functional neuroimaging studies of dorsolateral prefrontal cortical activity in depression.

    PubMed

    Fitzgerald, Paul B; Oxley, Tom J; Laird, Angela R; Kulkarni, Jayashri; Egan, Gary F; Daskalakis, Zafiris J

    2006-11-22

    Repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) is currently undergoing active investigation for use in the treatment of major depression. Recent research has indicated that current methods used to localize the site of stimulation in dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC) are significantly inaccurate. However, little information is available on which to base a choice of stimulation site. The aim of the current study was to systematically examine imaging studies in depression to attempt to identify whether there is a pattern of imaging results that suggests an optimal site of stimulation localization. We analysed all imaging studies published prior to 2005 that examined patients with major depression. Studies reporting activation in DLPFC were identified. The DLPFC regions identified in these studies were analysed using the Talairach and Rajkowska-Goldman-Rakic coordinate systems. In addition, we conducted a quantitative meta-analysis of resting studies and studies of serotonin reuptake inhibitor antidepressant treatment. There was considerable heterogeneity in the results between studies. Changes in Brodmann area 9 were relatively consistently identified in resting, cognitive activation and treatment studies included in the meta-analysis. However, there was little consistency in the direction of these changes or the hemisphere in which they were identified. At this stage, the results of imaging studies published to date have limited capacity to inform the choice of optimal prefrontal cortical region for the use in rTMS treatment studies. PMID:17029760

  9. Acupuncture for functional dyspepsia: study protocol for a two-center, randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Functional dyspepsia (FD) is a common health problem currently without any optimal treatments. Acupuncture has been traditionally sought as a treatment for FD. The aim of this study is to investigate whether acupuncture treatment helps improve symptoms of FD. Methods/design A two-center, randomized, waitlist-controlled trial will be carried out to evaluate whether acupuncture treatment improves FD symptoms. Seventy six participants aged 18 to 75 years with FD as diagnosed by Rome III criteria will be recruited from August 2013 to January 2014 at two Korean Medicine hospitals. They will be randomly allocated either into eight sessions of partially individualized acupuncture treatment over 4 weeks or a waitlist group. The acupuncture group will then be followed-up for 3 weeks with six telephone visits and a final visit will be paid at 8 weeks. The waitlist group will receive the identical acupuncture treatment after a 4-week waiting period. The primary outcome is the proportion of responders with adequate symptom relief and the secondary outcomes include Nepean dyspepsia index, EQ-5D, FD-related quality of life, Beck’s depression inventory, state-trait anxiety inventory questionnaire, and level of ghrelin hormone. The protocol was approved by the participating centers’ Institutional Review Boards. Discussion Results of this trial will help clarify not only whether the acupuncture treatment is beneficial for symptom improvement in FD patients but also to elucidate the related mechanisms of how acupuncture might work. Trial registration ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT01921504. PMID:24655542

  10. Predictors of Persistence After a Positive Depression Screen Among Adolescents

    PubMed Central

    McCauley, Elizabeth; McCarty, Carolyn A.; Grossman, David C.; Myaing, Mon; Zhou, Chuan; Richards, Julie; Rockhill, Carol; Katon, Wayne

    2012-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To examine predictors of depression persistence after a positive screening test to inform management protocols for screened youth. METHODS: We conducted a cohort study of 444 youth (aged 13–17 years) from a large health care delivery system. Youth with depressive symptoms, based on a 2-item depression screen, were oversampled for the baseline interview. Baseline assessments included the Patient Health Questionnaire 9-item (PHQ-9) depression screen as well as clinical factors that were hypothesized to influence depression persistence (family history of depression, functional impairment, perceived social support, anxiety symptoms, externalizing symptoms, and medical comorbidity). Logistic regression analysis was used to examine factors associated with the persistence of depression at 6 months postbaseline. RESULTS: Of 113 youth with a positive baseline screen (PHQ-9 ?11), 47% and 35% continued to be positive at 6-week and 6-month follow-up, respectively. After controlling for treatment status, only 2 factors were significantly associated with depression persistence at 6 months: baseline depressive symptom score and continuing to have a positive screen at 6 weeks. For each 1-point increase on the PHQ-9 score at baseline, youth had a 16% increased odds of continuing to be depressed at 6 months (odds ratio: 1.16, 95% confidence interval: 1.01–1.34). Youth who continued to screen positive 6 weeks later had almost 3 times the odds of being depressed at 6 months (odds ratio: 2.89, 95% confidence interval: 1.09–7.61). CONCLUSIONS: Depressive symptom severity at presentation and continued symptoms at 6 weeks postscreening are the strongest predictors of depression persistence. Patients with high depressive symptom scores and continued symptoms at 6 weeks should receive active treatment. PMID:23166342

  11. Depression Among Methamphetamine Users

    PubMed Central

    Glasner-Edwards, Suzette; Marinelli-Casey, Patricia; Hillhouse, Maureen; Ang, Alfonso; Mooney, Larissa J.; Rawson, Richard

    2009-01-01

    Although depression is highly comorbid with substance use disorders, little is known about the clinical course and outcomes of methamphetamine (MA) users with depressive symptoms and syndromes. In this study of MA-dependent individuals entering psychosocial treatment, we predicted that (1) depressive symptoms would decline during treatment, an effect that would vary as a function of MA use and (2) depression diagnoses post-treatment would be associated with poorer outcomes. Participants (N = 526) were assessed for depression, substance use, and psychosocial outcomes at baseline, treatment discharge, and 3-year follow-up. Depressive symptoms declined significantly during treatment, an effect that was greatest among those who abstained from MA. Major depression at follow-up was associated with poorer MA use outcomes and impairment across multiple domains of functioning. The findings highlight the relationship of depressive symptoms and diagnoses to treatment outcomes, and suggest a need for further studies of depression in populations using MA. PMID:19363377

  12. Preventing Depression among Early Adolescents in the Primary Care Setting: A Randomized Controlled Study of the Penn Resiliency Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gillham, Jane E.; Hamilton, John; Freres, Derek R.; Patton, Ken; Gallop, Robert

    2006-01-01

    This study evaluated the Penn Resiliency Program's effectiveness in preventing depression when delivered by therapists in a primary care setting. Two-hundred and seventy-one 11- and 12-year-olds, with elevated depressive symptoms, were randomized to PRP or usual care. Over the 2-year follow-up, PRP improved explanatory style for positive events.…

  13. A Daily Diary Study of Co-Rumination, Stressful Life Events, and Depressed Mood in Late Adolescents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    White, Megan E.; Shih, Josephine H.

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to extend the research on co-rumination and depressed mood by examining the impact of co-rumination on depressed mood on a daily basis while controlling for the effects of daily stress events in a sample of late adolescents. Two-hundred and seventy-nine predominantly Caucasian college students (95 male, 184 female)…

  14. A Longitudinal Study of the Associations among Adolescent Conflict Resolution Styles, Depressive Symptoms, and Romantic Relationship Longevity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ha, Thao; Overbeek, Geertjan; Cillessen, Antonius H. N.; Engels, Rutger C. M. E.

    2012-01-01

    This study investigated whether adolescents' conflict resolution styles mediated between depressive symptoms and relationship longevity. Data were used from a sample of 80 couples aged 13-19 years old (Mage = 15.48, SD = 1.16). At Time 1 adolescents reported their depressive symptoms and conflict resolution styles. Additionally, time until…

  15. Effects of group songwriting on depression and quality of life in acute psychiatric inpatients: a randomized three group effectiveness study

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Michael J. Silverman

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the immediate effects of group psychoeducational songwriting on quality of life, depression, and treatment perceptions in acute psychiatric inpatients during a randomized three group design. Participants were randomly assigned by cluster to one of three conditions: Group songwriting (n = 33), psychoeducation (n = 32), or recreational music therapy (n = 40). Quality of life and depression were

  16. Depression associated with alcohol intake and younger age in Japanese office workers: A case-control and a cohort study

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Kazuyoshi Ogasawara; Yukako Nakamura; Branko Aleksic; Keizo Yoshida; Katsuhisa Ando; Nakao Iwata; Yuhei Kayukawa; Norio Ozaki

    2011-01-01

    BackgroundDepression influences a worker's productivity and health substantially. Recently, the Japanese society and government reported that working overtime is one of the primary causes of depression and suicide in workers. However, only a few studies have investigated the relation between overtime hours and mental health status, and conclusions vary. In addition, prior findings are inconsistent in terms of the relation

  17. Prospective Study on Suicidal Ideation Among Japanese Undergraduate Students: Correlation with Stressful Life Events, Depression, and Depressogenic Cognitive Patterns

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Hidetoshi Hiramura; Masahiro Shono; Nao Tanaka; Toshiaki Nagata; Toshinori Kitamura

    2008-01-01

    The present study examines the effects of stressful life events, depression, and depressogenic cognitive patterns on suicidal ideation in 500 Japanese undergraduate students. The above factors were assessed at baseline (T1) and two weeks later (T3). At T1, structural equation modeling confirmed that (1) cognitive patterns and depression, but not stressful life events, influence suicidal ideation, and (2) cognitive patterns

  18. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) studies have reported that patients with depression have smaller hippocampal volume (HcV) than healthy

    E-print Network

    Barthelat, Francois

    of Human Genetics, McGill University 2001 -2007 BSc, Biology Department of Biology, McGill University alterations that accompany depression and stress; it is supported by studies reporting an association between understanding of the links between depression and its associated brain alterations. Second, it is of particular

  19. Ice slurry cooling research: Microscale study of ice particles characteristics, role of freezing point depressant, and influence on slurry fluidity

    Microsoft Academic Search

    K. Hayashi; K. Kasza

    2000-01-01

    The influences of freezing-point-depressants on ice slurry characteristics in the form of ice slurry fluidity and on the microscale ice particle features are studied. The results identify microscale features of ice particles such as surface roughness that greatly influence slurry fluidity that are altered favorably by the use of a freezing point depressant. The engineering of a workable and efficient

  20. Combined Effects of Depressive Symptoms and Resting Heart Rate on Mortality: The Whitehall II Prospective Cohort Study

    E-print Network

    Boyer, Edmond

    1 Combined Effects of Depressive Symptoms and Resting Heart Rate on Mortality: The Whitehall II Prospective Cohort Study Running title: Depression, Resting Heart Rate and Mortality Hermann Nabi, PhD1* Mika and resting heart rate (RHR) on mortality. Methods: Data come from 5936 participants, aged 61 ±6 years, from

  1. Neighborhood socioeconomic status, depression, and health status in the Look AHEAD (Action for health in diabetes) study

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Depression and diminished health status are common in adults with diabetes, but few studies have investigated associations with socio-economic environment. The objective of this manuscript was to evaluate the relationship between neighborhood-level SES and health status and depression. Individual-le...

  2. Depressed parents' attachment: effects on offspring suicidal behavior in a longitudinal, family study

    PubMed Central

    MacGregor, Erica K.; Grunebaum, Michael F.; Galfalvy, Hanga C.; Melhem, Nadine; Burke, Ainsley K.; Brent, David A.; Oquendo, Maria A.; Mann, J. John

    2015-01-01

    Objective To investigate relationships of depressed parents' attachment style to offspring suicidal behavior. Method 244 parents diagnosed with a DSM-IV depressive episode completed the Adult Attachment Questionnaire at study entry. Baseline and yearly follow-up interviews of their 488 offspring tracked suicidal behavior and psychopathology. Survival analysis and marginal regression models with correlated errors for siblings investigated the relationship between parent insecure attachment traits and offspring characteristics. Data analyzed were collected 1992–2008 during a longitudinal family study completed January 31, 2014. Results Parent avoidant attachment predicted offspring suicide attempts at a trend level (p=0.083). Parent anxious attachment did not predict offspring attempts (p=0.961). In secondary analyses, anxious attachment in parents was associated with offspring impulsivity (p=0.034), and in offspring suicide attempters, was associated with greater intent (p=0.045) and lethality of attempts (p=0.003). Avoidant attachment in parents was associated with offspring impulsivity (p=0.025) and major depressive disorder (p=0.012). Parent avoidant attachment predicted a greater number of suicide attempts (p=0.048) and greater intent in offspring attempters (p=0.003). Results were comparable after adjusting for parent diagnosis of borderline personality disorder. Conclusion Insecure avoidant, but not anxious, attachment in depressed parents may predict offspring suicide attempt. Insecure parent attachment traits were associated with impulsivity and major depressive disorder in all offspring, and with more severe suicidal behavior in offspring attempters. Insecure parental attachment merits further study as a potential target to reduce risk of offspring psychopathology and more severe suicidal behavior. PMID:25098943

  3. Evaluation of anxiety, depression and suicidal intent in undergraduate dental students: A cross-sectional study

    PubMed Central

    Bathla, Manish; Singh, Manpreet; Kulhara, Paramanand; Chandna, Shalu; Aneja, Jitender

    2015-01-01

    Background: There is an increasing amount of stress in undergraduate dental students leading to anxiety, depression, and suicidal attempts/suicide. Aims: This study aims to evaluate anxiety, depression and suicidal intent in undergraduate dental students and to find out the various areas of stress. Materials and Methods: A cross-sectional study was conducted using a semi-structured questionnaire (to assess academic and nonacademic areas of stress) and three scales-Hamilton scale for anxiety (HAM-A); Hamilton depression rating scale (HDRS) and Beck's Suicide Intent Scale (BSI). Descriptive statistics; Pearson's Chi-square test; Multiple ANOVA; Kruskal–Wallis test and Mann–Whitney test were used to analyze the data at the significant level of P ? 0.05. Results: In a total of 258 dental undergraduate students, academic areas of stress that were found to be statistically significant were long teaching hours (P = 0.002); high workload (P ? 0.001); frequency of tests (P ? 0.001) and competition/fear of failure (P = 0.009). Lack of interest in the profession was a statistically significant nonacademic area for stress (P ? 0.001). The students of first and final year reported higher anxiety (HAM-A 13.93 ± 6.908 and 16.44 ± 7.637 respectively) and depression (HDRS 14.29 ± 6.302 and 14.22 ± 5.422); whereas suicidal intent was reported almost the same throughout the study sample (BSI 5.65 ± 5.465). Conclusion: An increasing level of anxiety, depression and suicidal intent due to various stressors in undergraduate dental students indicate a need to modify current education system and timely help to have psychological healthy dental professionals in future.

  4. Struggling at work - a qualitative study of working Danes with depressive symptoms.

    PubMed

    Hjarsbech, Pernille U; Nielsen, Maj Britt D; Andersen, Malene Friis; Rugulies, Reiner; Christensen, Ulla

    2014-10-28

    Abstract Purpose: Little is known on how employees at work with mental health problems experience their work environment. This study explores how a selected sample of Danish employees with depressive symptoms experience the interaction with their work environment and how they respond to and deal with problems at work. Methods: From a survey study on work and mental health in Denmark, we invited participants for in-depth interviews. Using grounded theory, we conducted 13 semi structured interviews with employees, at work, experiencing depressive symptoms. Findings: Work was pivotal for the informants who were in an on-going process that we conceptualised as struggling at work. Informants struggled with the negative experiences of work that led to emotional, cognitive and somatic symptoms. Relationships with supervisors and colleagues, work load and work pressure and their self-image as a good worker conditioned the struggle. The informants found themselves unable to change their problematic working situation. This gradually led to different strategies to endure work and take care of one-self. These strategies were as follows: tending to symptoms and altering prospects for their future. The consequence of the on-going struggle was that the informants distanced themselves from their work. Conclusions: This study provided insight to the process of struggling at work, which the interviewed employees with depressive symptoms experienced. Implications for Rehabilitation Behaviour of supervisors is a key element for employees with depressive symptoms struggling at work. Practitioners and other health and rehabilitation practitioners working with people with depressive symptoms and other mental health problems could inquire about supervisor's behaviour and relation between supervisors and employees. Interventions that targets both the individual employee as well as work environment focused interventions at the organisational level could be beneficial for employees with mental health problems as well as the workplaces. PMID:25350663

  5. Prevalence of depression among people with type 2 diabetes mellitus: a cross sectional study in Palestine

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Diabetes mellitus is a common chronic metabolic disorder and one of the main causes of death in Palestine. Palestinians are continuously living under stressful economic and military conditions which make them psychologically vulnerable. The purpose of this study was to investigate the prevalence of depression among type II diabetic patients and to examine the relationship between depression and socio-demographic factors, clinical factors, and glycemic control. Methods This was a cross-sectional study at Al-Makhfiah primary healthcare center, Nablus, Palestine. Two hundred and ninety-four patients were surveyed for the presence of depressive symptoms using Beck Depression Inventory (BDI-II) scale. Patients' records were reviewed to obtain data pertaining to age, sex, marital status, Body Mass Index (BMI), level of education, smoking status, duration of diabetes mellitus, glycemic control using HbA1C test, use of insulin, and presence of additional illnesses. Patients’ medication adherence was assessed using the 8-item Morisky Medication Adherence Scale (MMAS-8). Results One hundred and sixty four patients (55.8%) of the total sample were females and 216 (73.5%) were?depression found in our study was higher than that reported in other countries. Although 40% of the screened patients were potential cases of depression, none were being treated with anti-depressants. Psychosocial assessment should be part of routine clinical evaluation of these patients at primary healthcare clinics to improve quality of life and decrease adverse outcomes among diabetic patients. PMID:24524353

  6. U.S.-MEXICO BORDER PROGRAM ARIZONA BORDER STUDY--LIST OF STUDY DOCUMENTS: PROTOCOLS AND SOPS

    EPA Science Inventory

    This document lists available protocols and SOPs for the NHEXAS Phase I Region 5 study. It identifies protocols and SOPs for the following study components: (1) Sample collection and field operations, (2) Sample analysis, (3) RTI's trace metals facility, (4) General laboratory pr...

  7. Effects of Internet Use on Health and Depression: A Longitudinal Study

    PubMed Central

    Bessière, Katie; Pressman, Sarah; Kiesler, Sara

    2010-01-01

    Background The rapid expansion of the Internet has increased the ease with which the public can obtain medical information. Most research on the utility of the Internet for health purposes has evaluated the quality of the information itself or examined its impact on clinical populations. Little is known about the consequences of its use by the general population. Objective Is use of the Internet by the general population for health purposes associated with a subsequent change in psychological well-being and health? Are the effects different for healthy versus ill individuals? Does the impact of using the Internet for health purposes differ from the impact of other types of Internet use? Methods Data come from a national US panel survey of 740 individuals conducted from 2000 to 2002. Across three surveys, respondents described their use of the Internet for different purposes, indicated whether they had any of 13 serious illnesses (or were taking care of someone with a serious illness), and reported their depression. In the initial and final surveys they also reported on their physical health. Lagged dependent variable regression analysis was used to predict changes in depression and general health reported on a later survey from frequency of different types of Internet use at an earlier period, holding constant prior depression and general health, respectively. Statistical interactions tested whether uses of the Internet predicted depression and general health differently for people who initially differed on their general health, chronic illness, and caregiver status. Results Health-related Internet use was associated with small but reliable increases in depression (ie, increasing use of the Internet for health purposes from 3 to 5 days per week to once a day was associated with .11 standard deviations more symptoms of depression, P = .002). In contrast, using the Internet for communication with friends and family was associated with small but reliable decreases in depression (ie, increasing use of the Internet for communication with friends and family purposes from 3 to 5 days per week to once a day was associated with .07 standard deviations fewer symptoms of depression, P = .007). There were no significant effects of respondents’ initial health status (P = .234) or role as a caregiver (P = .911) on the association between health-related Internet use and depression. Neither type of use was associated with changes in general health (P = .705 for social uses and P = .494 for health uses). Conclusions Using the Internet for health purposes was associated with increased depression. The increase may be due to increased rumination, unnecessary alarm, or over-attention to health problems. Additionally, those with unmeasured problems or those more prone to health anxiety may self-select online health resources. In contrast, using the Internet to communicate with friends and family was associated with declines in depression. This finding is comparable to other studies showing that social support is beneficial for well-being and lends support to the idea that the Internet is a way to strengthen and maintain social ties. PMID:20228047

  8. A Longitudinal Study of the Relationship between Attributional Style, Life Events, and Depression in Japanese Undergraduates.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sakamoto, Shinji; Kambara, Masahiko

    1998-01-01

    Investigates relationships among attributional style, life events, and depression in 143 Japanese undergraduates. Results indicate that negative experiences and depressogenic attributional styles increase the likelihood of depression, while positive experiences and enhancing attributional styles decrease the likelihood of depression. Suggests…

  9. STUDY ON THE PROTOCOL OF E-COMMERCE FOR CHINA

    Microsoft Academic Search

    GAO Cong; KAN Kaili

    This article explains small-sum payments should have a high priority is second-best solution to China's conditions where business services and management systems are comparatively immature. Moreover, it demonstrates that mobile payment is to be promising in the development of China's small-sum payment services. The conclusion is that the SET protocol does not fit China's situation, though it has been the

  10. Preliminary Study: Effects of Social Instability Stress on Depressive Behaviours in Ovariectomised Rats

    PubMed Central

    Al-Rahbi, Badriya; Zakaria, Rahimah; Muthuraju, Sangu; Othman, Zahiruddin; Hassan, Asma

    2013-01-01

    Background: Depression is one of the common post-menopausal symptoms. In addition to estrogen deficiency, social instability stress may contribute as an additional underlying factor in the development of depressive behaviour in females. Therefore, this study was aimed at examining the influence of social instability stress on depressive behaviour in ovariectomized rats. Methods: The rats were divided into four groups (n = 5 per group); (i) sham-operated control without stress, (ii) sham-operated control with stress, (iii) ovariectomized without stress, and (iv) ovariectomized with stress. These rats were subjected to social instability stress procedures for 15 days prior to an enforced swimming test. Struggling, immobility, and swimming times were recorded promptly. Results: The results were analysed using the one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) and a P value of < 0.05 was considered as significant. The mean durations of struggling, immobility, and swimming behaviour were significantly distinct among the four groups. Ovariectomized rats exhibited a substantial decrease in struggling and swimming behaviour, and an increase in immobility behaviour in comparison with the sham-operated controls (P < 0.05). Ovariectomized rats with stress displayed a supplementary decrease in struggling and swimming behaviour as well as an advanced increase in immobility behaviour, compared to sham-operated controls with or without stress (P < 0.05). Conclusion: In summary, these findings suggest that ovariectomized rats encountered an augmented amount of depressive behaviour following social instability stress. PMID:23983575

  11. Aripiprazole adjunct treatment in bipolar I or II disorder, depressed state: a 2-year clinical study.

    PubMed

    Malempati, Rao N

    2015-01-01

    The symptomatic course of bipolar disorder (BPD) is chronic and dominated by depression. As recurrence rates are high, maintenance therapy is required. Although efficacious, mood stabilizers may be hampered by poor adherence, and second-generation antipsychotic medications may be associated with weight gain and metabolic abnormalities. There is evidence to suggest that aripiprazole is beneficial in major depressive disorder and BPD with depression. We therefore investigated 2-year clinical outcomes with aripiprazole adjunct therapy at 5 to 15 mg once daily alongside a mood stabilizer in 40 patients with BPD. All patients experienced marked improvements in Montgomery-Åsberg Depression Rating Scale scores by 6 weeks and substantial reductions in Clinical Global Impressions Scale scores by 6 months. All patients were able to return to optimal or premorbid functioning by 6 months to 1 year. By 1 year, all patients made a complete functional recovery on the Sheehan Disability Scale. Improvements were maintained on all measures up to 2 years. There were minimal adverse events, all of which decreased during therapy. Our findings indicate that aripiprazole adjunct treatment is safe and effective as an acute and maintenance therapy for BPD. However, the findings will need to be replicated by larger studies. PMID:25536100

  12. Cannabis use and depression: a longitudinal study of a national cohort of Swedish conscripts

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background While there is increasing evidence on the association between cannabis use and psychotic outcomes, it is still unclear whether this also applies to depression. We aim to assess whether risk of depression and other affective outcomes is increased among cannabis users. Methods A cohort study of 45 087 Swedish men with data on cannabis use at ages 18–20. Diagnoses of unipolar disorder, bipolar disorder, affective psychosis and schizoaffective disorder were identified from inpatient care records over a 35-year follow-up period. Cox proportional hazard modeling was used to assess the hazard ratio (HR) of developing these disorders in relation to cannabis exposure. Results Only subjects with the highest level of cannabis use had an increased crude hazard ratio for depression (HR 1.5, 95% confidence interval (CI), 1.0-2.2), but the association disappeared after adjustment for confounders. There was a strong graded association between cannabis use and schizoaffective disorder, even after control for confounders, although the numbers were small (HR 7.4, 95% CI, 1.0-54.3). Conclusion We did not find evidence for an increased risk of depression among those who used cannabis. Our finding of an increased risk of schizoaffective disorder is consistent with previous findings on the relation between cannabis use and psychosis. PMID:22897939

  13. Eye movement desensitization and reprocessing (EMDR) therapy in the treatment of depression: a matched pairs study in an inpatient setting

    PubMed Central

    Hase, Michael; Balmaceda, Ute Mirian; Hase, Adrian; Lehnung, Maria; Tumani, Visal; Huchzermeier, Christian; Hofmann, Arne

    2015-01-01

    Background Depression is a severe mental disorder that challenges mental health systems worldwide as the success rates of all established treatments are limited. Eye Movement Desensitization and Reprocessing (EMDR) therapy is a scientifically acknowledged psychotherapeutic treatment for PTSD. Given the recent research indicating that trauma and other adverse life experiences can be the basis of depression, the aim of this study was to determine the effectiveness of EMDR therapy with this disorder. Method In this study, we recruited a group of 16 patients with depressive episodes in an inpatient setting. These 16 patients were treated with EMDR therapy by reprocessing of memories related to stressful life events in addition to treatment as usual (TAU). They were compared to a group of 16 controls matched regarding diagnosis, degree of depression, sex, age and time of admission to hospital, which were receiving TAU only. Results Sixty-eight percent of the patients in the EMDR group showed full remission at end of treatment. The EMDR group showed a greater reduction in depressive symptoms as measured by the SCL-90-R depression subscale. This difference was significant even when adjusted for duration of treatment. In a follow-up period of more than 1 year the EMDR group reported less problems related to depression and less relapses than the control group. Conclusions EMDR therapy shows promise as an effective treatment for depressive disorders. Larger controlled studies are necessary to replicate our findings. PMID:26085967

  14. Long Working Hours and Subsequent Use of Psychotropic Medicine: A Study Protocol

    PubMed Central

    Albertsen, Karen

    2014-01-01

    Background Mental ill health is the most frequent cause of long-term sickness absence and disability retirement in Denmark. Some instances of mental ill health might be due to long working hours. A recent large cross-sectional study of a general working population in Norway found that not only “very much overtime”, but also “moderate overtime” (41-48 work hours/week) was significantly associated with increased levels of both anxiety and depression. These findings have not been sufficiently confirmed in longitudinal studies. Objective The objective of the study is to give a detailed plan for a research project aimed at investigating the possibility of a prospective association between weekly working hours and use of psychotropic medicine in the general working population of Denmark. Methods People from the general working population of Denmark have been surveyed, at various occasions in the time period 1995-2010, and interviewed about their work environment. The present study will link interview data from these surveys to national registers covering all inhabitants of Denmark. The participants will be followed for the first occurrence of redeemed prescriptions for psychotropic medicine. Poisson regression will be used to analyze incidence rates as a function of weekly working hours (32-40; 41-48; > 48 hours/week). The analyses will be controlled for gender, age, sample, shift work, and socioeconomic status. According to our feasibility studies, the statistical power is sufficient and the exposure is stable enough to make the study worth the while. Results The publication of the present study protocol ends the design phase of the project. In the next phase, the questionnaire data will be forwarded to Statistics Denmark where they will be linked to data on deaths, migrations, socioeconomic status, and redeemed prescriptions for psychotropic medication. We expect the analysis to be completed by the end of 2014 and the results to be published mid 2015. Conclusions The proposed project will be free from hindsight bias, since all hypotheses and statistical models are completely defined, peer-reviewed, and published before we link the exposure data to the outcome data. The results of the project will indicate to what extent and in what direction the national burden of mental ill health in Denmark has been influenced by long working hours. PMID:25239125

  15. Factors associated with depressive state in patients with myasthenia gravis: a multicentre cross-sectional study

    PubMed Central

    Suzuki, Yasushi; Suzuki, Shigeaki; Nagane, Yuriko; Masuda, Masayuki; Kabasawa, Chiaki; Shimizu, Yuko; Utsumi, Hiroya; Uchiyama, Shinichiro; Fujihara, Kazuo; Suzuki, Norihiro

    2011-01-01

    Objectives The objective of this study was to examine clinical factors associated with depressive state in patients with myasthenia gravis (MG). Design Cross-sectional study. Setting and participants We evaluated 287 consecutive cases of MG seen at six neurological centres located in Eastern Japan. Outcome measures All MG patients completed the Japanese version of the Beck Depression Inventory–Second Edition (BDI-II). Disease severity was determined according to the MG Foundation of America (MGFA) quantitative MG score, MG activities of daily living scale and MG composite scale (MG composite). Clinical state following treatment was categorised according to MGFA postintervention status. Associations between detailed clinical parameters of MG and BDI-II score were then examined statistically. Results Mean BDI-II score for patients with MG (11.0±8.1) did not differ substantially from and overlapped with that reported as the Japanese standard (8.7±6.4). The mean +2 SDs for the Japanese standard is 21.5, approximately equal to the cut-off level indicative of moderate or worse depression (>20 points) in the original English version. We thus defined BDI-II >21.5 as depressive state, with a frequency of 13.6% in patients with MG. Multivariate logistic regression analysis revealed current dose of oral prednisolone (OR 1.09, 95% CI 1.02 to 1.17; p=0.01), unchanged MGFA postintervention status (OR 3.55, 95% CI 1.18 to 10.71; p=0.02), time since onset (OR 0.93, 95% CI 0.87 to 0.99; p=0.03) and MG composite (OR 1.16, 95% CI 1.00 to 1.34; p=0.046) as factors independently associated with depressive state in MG. Conclusions Dose of oral corticosteroids appears to represent the major factor associated with depressive state in MG. Unchanged status despite treatment and early disease stage are also significant background factors for depressive state, along with disease severity. PMID:22184587

  16. Ambient Air Pollution and Depressive Symptoms in Older Adults: Results from the MOBILIZE Boston Study

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yi; Eliot, Melissa N.; Koutrakis, Petros; Gryparis, Alexandros; Schwartz, Joel D.; Coull, Brent A.; Mittleman, Murray A.; Milberg, William P.; Lipsitz, Lewis A.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Exposure to ambient air pollution, particularly from traffic, has been associated with adverse cognitive outcomes, but the association with depressive symptoms remains unclear. Objectives: We investigated the association between exposure to ambient air and traffic pollution and the presence of depressive symptoms among 732 Boston-area adults ? 65 years of age (78.1 ± 5.5 years, mean ± SD). Methods: We assessed depressive symptoms during home interviews using the Revised Center for Epidemiological Studies Depression Scale (CESD-R). We estimated residential distance to the nearest major roadway as a marker of long-term exposure to traffic pollution and assessed short-term exposure to ambient fine particulate matter (PM2.5), sulfates, black carbon (BC), ultrafine particles, and gaseous pollutants, averaged over the 2 weeks preceding each assessment. We used generalized estimating equations to estimate the odds ratio (OR) of a CESD-R score ? 16 associated with exposure, adjusting for potential confounders. In sensitivity analyses, we considered CESD-R score as a continuous outcome and mean annual residential BC as an alternate marker of long-term exposure to traffic pollution. Results: We found no evidence of a positive association between depressive symptoms and long-term exposure to traffic pollution or short-term changes in pollutant levels. For example, we found an OR of CESD-R score ? 16 of 0.67 (95% CI: 0.46, 0.98) per interquartile range (3.4 ?g/m3) increase in PM2.5 over the 2 weeks preceding assessment. Conclusions: We found no evidence suggesting that ambient air pollution is associated with depressive symptoms among older adults living in a metropolitan area in attainment of current U.S. regulatory standards. Citation: Wang Y, Eliot MN, Koutrakis P, Gryparis A, Schwartz JD, Coull BA, Mittleman MA, Milberg WP, Lipsitz LA, Wellenius GA. 2014. Ambient air pollution and depressive symptoms in older adults: results from the MOBILIZE Boston Study. Environ Health Perspect 122:553–558;?http://dx.doi.org/10.1289/ehp.1205909 PMID:24610154

  17. A comparative study of wireless sensor networks and their routing protocols.

    PubMed

    Bhattacharyya, Debnath; Kim, Tai-hoon; Pal, Subhajit

    2010-01-01

    Recent developments in the area of micro-sensor devices have accelerated advances in the sensor networks field leading to many new protocols specifically designed for wireless sensor networks (WSNs). Wireless sensor networks with hundreds to thousands of sensor nodes can gather information from an unattended location and transmit the gathered data to a particular user, depending on the application. These sensor nodes have some constraints due to their limited energy, storage capacity and computing power. Data are routed from one node to other using different routing protocols. There are a number of routing protocols for wireless sensor networks. In this review article, we discuss the architecture of wireless sensor networks. Further, we categorize the routing protocols according to some key factors and summarize their mode of operation. Finally, we provide a comparative study on these various protocols. PMID:22163483

  18. A Comparative Study of Wireless Sensor Networks and Their Routing Protocols

    PubMed Central

    Bhattacharyya, Debnath; Kim, Tai-hoon; Pal, Subhajit

    2010-01-01

    Recent developments in the area of micro-sensor devices have accelerated advances in the sensor networks field leading to many new protocols specifically designed for wireless sensor networks (WSNs). Wireless sensor networks with hundreds to thousands of sensor nodes can gather information from an unattended location and transmit the gathered data to a particular user, depending on the application. These sensor nodes have some constraints due to their limited energy, storage capacity and computing power. Data are routed from one node to other using different routing protocols. There are a number of routing protocols for wireless sensor networks. In this review article, we discuss the architecture of wireless sensor networks. Further, we categorize the routing protocols according to some key factors and summarize their mode of operation. Finally, we provide a comparative study on these various protocols. PMID:22163483

  19. Childhood sexual abuse, parenting and postpartum depression—a 3-year follow-up study

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Anne Buist; Helen Janson

    2001-01-01

    Objective: This study is the second and final phase of a 3-year follow-up study of women who had been admitted with a major depressive episode in the postpartum period, along with their children and partners where present. The effect of a maternal sexual abuse history on the women’s well-being and child outcome compared to those women without such a history

  20. In search of a depressed mouse: utility of models for studying depression-related behavior in genetically modified mice

    Microsoft Academic Search

    J F Cryan; C Mombereau

    2004-01-01

    The ability to modify mice genetically has been one of the major breakthroughs in modern medical science affecting every discipline including psychiatry. It is hoped that the application of such technologies will result in the identification of novel targets for the treatment of diseases such as depression and to gain a better understanding of the molecular pathophysiological mechanisms that are

  1. Depressive symptoms in acute stroke: a cross-sectional study of their association with sociodemographics and clinical factors.

    PubMed

    Kouwenhoven, Siren E; Gay, Caryl L; Bakken, Linda N; Lerdal, Anners

    2013-01-01

    The aim of the study was to estimate the prevalence of post-stroke depression (PSD) in the acute phase following first-ever stroke, and to identify its sociodemographic and clinical correlates. Data were collected in a cross-sectional correlational study from face-to-face interviews using structured questionnaires and patients' medical records. The sample consisted of 109 patients with first-ever stroke. Depressive symptoms after stroke were measured with Beck Depression Inventory II. Mild, moderate or severe depressive symptoms were reported by 27% of the participants. PSD was uniquely associated with post-stroke fatigue, sleep latency and sleep disturbance. Patients with PSD also reported slightly more bodily pain. Stroke type, stroke location, and the sociodemographic characteristics we examined were unrelated to PSD. Further research is needed to assess the role sleep changes, fatigue and bodily pain might have in relation to depression in the acute phase after stroke. PMID:23721380

  2. Developmental aspects of cortical excitability and inhibition in depressed and healthy youth: an exploratory study

    PubMed Central

    Croarkin, Paul E.; Nakonezny, Paul A.; Lewis, Charles P.; Zaccariello, Michael J.; Huxsahl, John E.; Husain, Mustafa M.; Kennard, Betsy D.; Emslie, Graham J.; Daskalakis, Zafiris J.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: The objective of this post-hoc exploratory analysis was to examine the relationship between age and measures of cortical excitability and inhibition. Methods: Forty-six participants (24 with major depressive disorder and 22 healthy controls) completed MT, SICI, ICF, and CSP testing in a cross-sectional protocol. Of these 46 participants, 33 completed LICI testing. Multiple linear robust regression and Spearman partial correlation coefficient were used to examine the relationship between age and the TMS measures. Results: In the overall sample of 46 participants, age had a significant negative relationship with motor threshold (MT) in both the right (rs = ?0.49, adjusted p = 0.007; ? = ?0.08, adjusted p = 0.001) and left (rs = ?0.42, adjusted p = 0.029; ? = ?0.05, adjusted p = 0.004) hemispheres. This significant negative relationship of age with MT was also observed in the sample of depressed youth in both the right (rs = ?0.70, adjusted p = 0.002; ? = ?0.09, adjusted p = 0.001) and left (rs = ?0.54, adjusted p = 0.034; ? = ?0.05, adjusted p = 0.017) hemispheres, but not in healthy controls. In the sample of the 33 participants who completed LICI testing, age had a significant negative relationship with LICI (200 ms interval) in both the right (rs = ?0.48, adjusted p = 0.05; ? = ?0.24, adjusted p = 0.007) and left (rs = ?0.64, adjusted p = 0.002; ? = ?0.23, adjusted p = 0.001) hemispheres. This negative relationship between age and LICI (200 ms interval) was also observed in depressed youth in both the right (rs = ?0.76, adjusted p = 0.034; ? = ?0.35, adjusted p = 0.004) and left (rs = ?0.92, adjusted p = 0.002; ? = ?0.25, adjusted p = 0.001) hemispheres. Conclusion: These findings suggest that younger children have higher MTs. This is more pronounced in depressed youth than healthy controls. LICI inhibition may also increase with age in youth. PMID:25228870

  3. Conduct of a personal radiofrequency electromagnetic field measurement study: proposed study protocol

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Martin Röösli; Patrizia Frei; John Bolte; Georg Neubauer; Elisabeth Cardis; Maria Feychting; Peter Gajsek; Sabine Heinrich; Wout Joseph; Simon Mann; Luc Martens; Evelyn Mohler; Roger C Parslow; Aslak Harbo Poulsen; Katja Radon; Joachim Schüz; György Thuroczy; Jean-François Viel; Martine Vrijheid

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The development of new wireless communication technologies that emit radio frequency electromagnetic fields (RF-EMF) is ongoing, but little is known about the RF-EMF exposure distribution in the general population. Previous attempts to measure personal exposure to RF-EMF have used different measurement protocols and analysis methods making comparisons between exposure situations across different study populations very difficult. As a result,

  4. Employment status, depressive symptoms, and waist circumference change in midlife women: The Study of Women's Health Across the Nation (SWAN)

    PubMed Central

    Appelhans, Bradley M.; Segawa, Eisuke; Janssen, Imke; Kazlauskaite, Rasa; Thurston, Rebecca C.; Lewis, Tené T.; Kravitz, Howard M.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Changes in employment status have shown inconsistent associations with adiposity. This study tested whether the presence of elevated depressive symptoms explains variability in the time-varying association between employment status and central adiposity. Method Employment status, depressive symptoms, and waist circumference were assessed annually over 10 years in a multi-ethnic sample of 3220 midlife women enrolled in the Study of Women’s Health Across the Nation. Linear mixed-effects models tested time-varying associations of employment status, depressive symptoms, and their interaction with waist circumference. Results Waist circumference increases were greatest during years of combined nonemployment and elevated depressive symptoms (1.00 cm/year), and lowest in years of full-time employment and elevated depressive symptoms (0.25 cm/year), compared to years of full-time employment and non-elevated depressive symptoms (0.51 cm/year). Employment status was unrelated to waist circumference in years without elevated depressive symptoms. The pattern of results was unchanged when analyses were restricted to pre-retirement observations, and did not vary according to waist circumference at baseline or ethnicity/race. Conclusions Identifying and managing depressive symptoms in midlife women who are not working may help prevent increases in central adiposity. PMID:24462272

  5. Patients’ Opinions about Knowing Their Risk for Depression and What to Do about It. The PredictD-Qualitative Study

    PubMed Central

    Bellón, Juan Á.; Moreno-Peral, Patricia; Moreno-Küstner, Berta; Motrico, Emma; Aiarzagüena, José M.; Fernández, Anna; Fernández-Alonso, Carmen; Montón-Franco, Carmen; Rodríguez-Bayón, Antonina; Ballesta-Rodríguez, María Isabel; Rüntel-Geidel, Ariadne; Payo-Gordón, Janire; Serrano-Blanco, Antoni; Oliván-Blázquez, Bárbara; Araujo, Luz; Muñoz-García, María del Mar; King, Michael; Nazareth, Irwin; Amezcua, Manuel

    2014-01-01

    Background The predictD study developed and validated a risk algorithm for predicting the onset of major depression in primary care. We aimed to explore the opinion of patients about knowing their risk for depression and the values and criteria upon which these opinions are based. Methods A maximum variation sample of patients was taken, stratified by city, age, gender, immigrant status, socio-economic status and lifetime depression. The study participants were 52 patients belonging to 13 urban health centres in seven different cities around Spain. Seven Focus Groups (FGs) were given held with primary care patients, one for each of the seven participating cities. Results The results showed that patients generally welcomed knowing their risk for depression. Furthermore, in light of available evidence several patients proposed potential changes in their lifestyles to prevent depression. Patients generally preferred to ask their General Practitioners (GPs) for advice, though mental health specialists were also mentioned. They suggested that GPs undertake interventions tailored to each patient, from a “patient-centred” approach, with certain communication skills, and giving advice to help patients cope with the knowledge that they are at risk of becoming depressed. Conclusions Patients are pleased to be informed about their risk for depression. We detected certain beliefs, attitudes, values, expectations and behaviour among the patients that were potentially useful for future primary prevention programmes on depression. PMID:24646951

  6. Depressive symptoms and alcohol correlates among Brazilians aged 14 years and older: a cross-sectional study

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The associations between depressive symptoms and alcohol-related disorders, drinking patterns and other characteristics of alcohol use are important public health issues worldwide. This study aims to study these associations in an upper middle-income country, Brazil, and search for related socio-demographic correlations in men and women. Methods A cross-sectional study was conducted between November 2005 and April 2006. The sample of 3,007 participants, selected using a multistage probabilistic sampling method, represents the Brazilian population aged 14 and older. Depressive symptoms were assessed using the Center for Epidemiologic Studies Depression Scale and alcohol dependence was assessed using the Composite International Diagnostic Interview. Associations assessed using bi-variate analysis were tested using Rao-Scott measures. Gender specific multinomial logistic regression models were developed. Results Among the participants with alcohol dependence, 46% had depressive symptoms (17.2% mild/moderate and 28.8% major/severe; p?depressive symptoms. Alcohol abstainers and infrequent drinkers had the highest prevalence of major/severe depressive symptoms, whereas frequent heavy drinkers had the lowest prevalence of major/severe depressive symptoms. In women, alcohol dependence and the presence of one or more problems related to alcohol consumption were associated with higher risks of major/severe depressive symptoms. Among men, alcohol dependence and being ?45 years old were associated with higher risks of major/severe depressive symptoms. Conclusions In Brazil, the prevalence of depressive symptoms is strongly related to alcohol dependence; the strongest association was between major/severe depressive symptoms and alcohol dependence in women. This survey supports the possible association of biopsychosocial distress, alcohol consumption and the prevalence of depressive symptoms in Brazil. Investing in education, social programs, and care for those with alcohol dependence and major/severe depressive symptoms, especially for such women, and the development of alcohol prevention policies may be components of a strategic plan to reduce the prevalence of depression and alcohol problems in Brazil. Such a plan may also promote the socio-economic development of Brazil and other middle-income countries. PMID:25027830

  7. The Direction of Longitudinal Associations Between Sleep Problems and Depression Symptoms: A Study of Twins Aged 8 and 10 Years

    PubMed Central

    Gregory, Alice M.; Rijsdijk, Früuhling V.; Lau, Jennifer Y. F.; Dahl, Ronald E.; Eley, Thalia C.

    2009-01-01

    Study Objectives: To establish the direction and etiology of longitudinal associations between sleep problems and depression symptoms in children. Design: Data on twins aged 8 and 10 years were obtained. At assessments, parents completed the Child Sleep Habits Questionnaire, and twins completed the Children's Depression Inventory. Setting: Participants were mainly interviewed at the Institute of Psychiatry, London. Patients or Participants: Three hundred twin pairs initially enrolled in the study. Interventions: N/A. Measurements and Results: A genetically informative cross-lagged model examined links between sleep and depression. Sleep problems at age 8 predicted depression at age 10 (partial regression coefficient [95% confidence intervals] = 0.10 [0.01-0.18]). The converse was not found. Stability of sleep problems across time was mainly due to genes (46% of the genetic influence on sleep at 10 was due to the same genetic influence on sleep aged 8). Stability of depression was mainly due to nonshared environmental influences (19% of the nonshared environmental influence on depression at 10 was due to the same nonshared environmental influence on depression at age 8). The cross-lagged association between sleep problems at 8 and depression at 10 years was largely due to genes, although this finding was nonsignificant. Conclusions: This study adds to our understanding of the temporal precedence of sleep problems and depression and the risks underlying their associations. There are implications regarding the value of specifying genes linked to sleep problems and potential opportunities for informing early intervention strategies in high-risk groups at key points in the progression to developing more serious problems. Citation: Gregory AM; Rijsdijk FV; Lau JYF; Dahl RE; Eley TC. The direction of longitudinal associations between sleep problems and depression symptoms: a study of twins aged 8 and 10 years. SLEEP 2009;32(2):189–199. PMID:19238806

  8. Prevalence and Associated Positive Psychological Variables of Depression and Anxiety among Chinese Cervical Cancer Patients: A Cross-Sectional Study

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Yi-Long; Liu, Li; Wang, Xiao-Xi; Wang, Yang; Wang, Lie

    2014-01-01

    Background The prevalence of depression and anxiety and its associated factors in cervical cancer are not well evaluated in China. Meanwhile, with increasing attention given to positive psychological variables in oncology field, there is a need to conduct a study to explore the integrative effects of positive psychological variables on depression/anxiety so as to provide patients a more holistic cancer care. The aim of this study was to assess the prevalence of depression/anxiety as well as the integrative effects of hope, optimism and general self-efficacy on depression/anxiety among Chinese cervical cancer patients. Methods A multi-centre, cross-sectional study was conducted of consecutive inpatients at the Liaoning Cancer Hospital & Institute and the Shengjing Hospital of China Medical University in Liaoning Province, northeast China. A total of 224 cervical cancer patients eligible for this study completed questionnaires on demographic and clinic variables, Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale, Herth Hope Index, Life Orientation Scale-Revised, and General Self-Efficacy Scale during February and August 2013. Results The prevalence of depression and anxiety was 52.2% and 65.6% in cervical cancer patients. The anxiety score was significantly higher in patients at the period of 4–6 months after diagnose and at cancer stage II. Hierarchical regression analyses indicated that hope, optimism and general self-efficacy as a whole accounted for 31.3% variance of depression and 35.6% variance of anxiety. Under standardized estimate (?) sequence, hope, optimism and general self-efficacy significantly associated with depression, respectively; hope and optimism were also significant individual predictors of anxiety. Conclusions The high prevalence of depression and anxiety among cervical cancer patients should receive more attention in Chinese medical settings. More importantly, efforts to develop the integrated psychosocial interventions are effective and necessary to alleviate depression/anxiety in cervical cancer patients by synthesizing and integrating the individual protective effects of hope, optimism and general self-efficacy. PMID:24722558

  9. Right temporal activation differs between melancholia and nonmelancholic depression: a multichannel near-infrared spectroscopy study.

    PubMed

    Tsujii, Noa; Mikawa, Wakako; Akashi, Hiroyuki; Tsujimoto, Emi; Adachi, Toru; Kirime, Eiji; Takaya, Masahiko; Yanagi, Masaya; Shirakawa, Osamu

    2014-08-01

    The aim of this study was to determine whether melancholia differs from nonmelancholic depression in frontotemporal functioning by means of multichannel near-infrared spectroscopy. We recruited 32 major depressive disorder (MDD) patients with melancholic features (MDD-MF), 28 MDD patients with nonmelancholic features (MDD-NMF), and 24 healthy controls. Regional hemodynamic changes induced by a verbal fluency task (VFT) were monitored, and their correlations with depressive symptoms were examined. In comparison with the controls, significant differences were observed in mean oxygenated hemoglobin (oxy-Hb) changes induced by VFT in patients with MDD-MF in 25 channels (p = 0.000-0.047) and in those with MDD-NMF in 12 channels (p = 0.000-0.023). Moreover, patients with MDD-MF had significantly smaller mean oxy-Hb changes than those with MDD-NMF in 8 channels of the right temporal region (p = 0.001-0.048). No significant correlations were observed between mean oxy-Hb changes and the Hamilton rating scale for depression (HAMD) 17 total score in both groups of patients with MDD. On examining each item of HAMD17, psychomotor retardation in patients with MDD-MF showed a significant positive correlation with mean oxy-Hb changes in the right temporal region (ch43; ? = 0.55; p = 0.001), whereas that in patients with MDD-NMF showed a significant negative correlation with mean oxy-Hb changes in the frontal and left temporal regions in 3 channels (? = -0.60 to -0.53; p = 0.000-0.004). In conclusion, our results indicate that melancholia is qualitatively distinct from nonmelancholic depression both clinically and biologically. PMID:24780385

  10. Bee venom acupuncture, NSAIDs or combined treatment for chronic neck pain: study protocol for a randomized, assessor-blind trial

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Chronic neck pain (CNP) is a common painful medical condition with a significant socioeconomic impact. In spite of widespread usage, the effectiveness and safety of combined treatments between conventional and complementary alternative medical treatment modalities has not been fully established in a rigorous randomized clinical trial (RCT). This pilot study will provide the clinical evidence to evaluate the feasibility and refine the protocol for a full-scale RCT on combined treatment of bee venom acupuncture (BVA) and non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) in patients with CNP. Methods/Design This is a randomized, single-blind clinical trial with three parallel arms. Sixty patients between 18 and 65 years of age with non-specific, uncomplicated neck pain lasting for at least three months will be enrolled. Participants will be randomly allocated into the BVA, NSAIDs or combined treatment group. Assessors and statisticians will be blinded to the random allocation. All researchers will receive training to ensure their strict adherence to the study protocol. Patients from the BVA and combined treatment group will be treated with a bee venom increment protocol into predefined acupoints for six sessions over a three week period. BVA intervention is developed through a comprehensive discussion among interdisciplinary spine disorder experts, according to the guidelines of Standards for Reporting Interventions in Clinical Trials of Acupuncture (STRICTA). Patients from the NSAIDs and combined treatment groups will be prescribed loxoprofen (one tablet to be taken orally, three times a day for three weeks). Bothersomeness from CNP measured using a visual analogue scale (VAS) will be the primary outcome assessed at screening, visit two (baseline), four, six, eight (4th week assessment) and nine (8th week assessment) follow-up session. VAS for pain intensity, neck disability index (NDI), quality of life, depressive status and adverse experiences will also be analyzed. Discussion Our study results will contribute to feasibility evaluation and to relevant RCT protocol development for a full-scale RCT on combined treatment of BVA and NSAIDs for CNP patients. Trial registration This study is registered with the United States (US) National Institutes of Health Clinical Trials Registry: NCT01922466. PMID:24746224

  11. Tavistock Adult Depression Study (TADS): a randomised controlled trial of psychoanalytic psychotherapy for treatment-resistant/treatment-refractory forms of depression

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Long-term forms of depression represent a significant mental health problem for which there is a lack of effective evidence-based treatment. This study aims to produce findings about the effectiveness of psychoanalytic psychotherapy in patients with treatment-resistant/treatment-refractory depression and to deepen the understanding of this complex form of depression. Methods/Design INDEX GROUP: Patients with treatment resistant/treatment refractory depression. DEFINITION & INCLUSION CRITERIA: Current major depressive disorder, 2 years history of depression, a minimum of two failed treatment attempts, ?14 on the HRSD or ?21 on the BDI-II, plus complex personality and/or psycho-social difficulties. EXCLUSION CRITERIA: Moderate or severe learning disability, psychotic illness, bipolar disorder, substance dependency or receipt of test intervention in the previous two years. DESIGN: Pragmatic, randomised controlled trial with qualitative and clinical components. TEST INTERVENTION: 18 months of weekly psychoanalytic psychotherapy, manualised and fidelity-assessed using the Psychotherapy Process Q-Sort. CONTROL CONDITION: Treatment as usual, managed by the referring practitioner. RECRUITMENT: GP referrals from primary care. RCT MAIN OUTCOME: HRSD (with ?14 as remission). SECONDARY OUTCOMES: depression severity (BDI-II), degree of co-morbid disorders Axis-I and Axis-II (SCID-I and SCID-II-PQ), quality of life and functioning (GAF, CORE, Q-les-Q), object relations (PROQ2a), Cost-effectiveness analysis (CSRI and GP medical records). FOLLOW-UP: 2 years. Plus: a). Qualitative study of participants’ and therapists’ problem formulation, experience of treatment and of participation in trial. (b) Narrative data from semi-structured pre/post psychodynamic interviews to produce prototypes of responders and non-responders. (c) Clinical case-studies of sub-types of TRD and of change. Discussion TRD needs complex, long-term intervention and extended research follow-up for the proper evaluation of treatment outcome. This pushes at the limits of the design of randomised therapeutic trials. We discuss some of the consequent problems and suggest how they may be mitigated. Trial registration Current Controlled Trials ISRCTN40586372 PMID:22686185

  12. Conduct of a personal radiofrequency electromagnetic field measurement study: proposed study protocol

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background The development of new wireless communication technologies that emit radio frequency electromagnetic fields (RF-EMF) is ongoing, but little is known about the RF-EMF exposure distribution in the general population. Previous attempts to measure personal exposure to RF-EMF have used different measurement protocols and analysis methods making comparisons between exposure situations across different study populations very difficult. As a result, observed differences in exposure levels between study populations may not reflect real exposure differences but may be in part, or wholly due to methodological differences. Methods The aim of this paper is to develop a study protocol for future personal RF-EMF exposure studies based on experience drawn from previous research. Using the current knowledge base, we propose procedures for the measurement of personal exposure to RF-EMF, data collection, data management and analysis, and methods for the selection and instruction of study participants. Results We have identified two basic types of personal RF-EMF measurement studies: population surveys and microenvironmental measurements. In the case of a population survey, the unit of observation is the individual and a randomly selected representative sample of the population is needed to obtain reliable results. For microenvironmental measurements, study participants are selected in order to represent typical behaviours in different microenvironments. These two study types require different methods and procedures. Conclusion Applying our proposed common core procedures in future personal measurement studies will allow direct comparisons of personal RF-EMF exposures in different populations and study areas. PMID:20487532

  13. Possible structural abnormality of the brainstem in unipolar depressive illness: a transcranial ultrasound and diffusion tensor magnetic resonance imaging study

    PubMed Central

    Steele, J; Bastin, M; Wardlaw, J; Ebmeier, K

    2005-01-01

    Background: Most empirically derived antidepressants increase monoamine levels. The nuclei of cells synthesising these monoamines are located in the brainstem, and projection tracts such as the medial forebrain bundle reach virtually all other brain areas. Two studies of unipolar depressive illness using transcranial ultrasound have reported reduced echogenicity of the brainstem midline in unipolar depressed patients. This may be consistent with disruption of white matter tracts, including the medial forebrain bundle, and it has been suggested that the effect of such disruption could be reversed by antidepressants. Objective: To replicate these findings in a group of unipolar depressed patients and controls. Methods: Fifteen unipolar depressed patients and 15 controls were studied using transcranial ultrasound imaging and diffusion tensor magnetic resonance imaging (DT-MRI). Results: No difference in echogenicity of the brainstem midline of unipolar depressed patients was found. A possible trend (Cohen's d = 0.39) in the direction of previous studies was found. Although the echogenicity of the brainstem midline of the control group was found to be similar to previous reports, there was no reduction in the patient group. Additionally, no structural abnormality of the brainstem was identified using DT-MRI. Conclusions: While these data do not replicate the findings of previous studies reporting a significant reduction in the echogenicity of the brainstem midline in unipolar depressed patients, the ultrasound investigation indicated that there may be a trend in this direction. Given the importance of identifying the causes of depressive illness, it is important that other groups attempt similar studies. PMID:16227541

  14. Developmental pathways to depressive symptoms in adolescence: A multi-wave prospective study of negative emotionality, stressors, and anxiety

    PubMed Central

    Barrocas, Andrea L.; Hankin, Benjamin L.

    2014-01-01

    This study examined two potential developmental pathways through which the temperament risk factor of negative emotionality (NE) leads to prospective increases in depressive symptoms through the mediating role of stressors and anxious symptoms in a sample of early to middle adolescents (N=350, 6th–10th graders). The primary hypothesized model was that baseline NE leads to increased stressors, which results in increases in anxious arousal, which culminates with elevated depressive symptoms. An alternate model hypothesized that baseline NE leads to increased anxious arousal, which results in increases in stressors, and this culminates in elevated depressive symptoms. Youth completed self-report measures of NE, stressors, anxious arousal, and depressive symptoms at four time-points. Path analysis supported the primary model and showed that the mediating influence of stressors and anxious arousal explained 78% of the association between NE and prospective elevations in depressive symptoms. The alternate model was not supported. Neither gender nor age were moderators. PMID:21249517

  15. Validation study of a Portuguese version of the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale.

    PubMed

    Pais-Ribeiro, J; Silva, I; Ferreira, T; Martins, A; Meneses, R; Baltar, M

    2007-03-01

    The study aims to develop and assess metric proprieties of the Portuguese version of the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale. A sequential sample includes 1322 participants diagnosed with cancer, stroke, epilepsy, coronary heart disease, diabetes, myotonic dystrophy, obstructive sleep apnoea, depression and a non-disease group, which completed the HADS. The first step includes translation, retroversion, inspection for lexical equivalence and content validity, and cognitive debriefing. Then we reproduce oblique exploratory factor analysis and use confirmatory factor analysis. We explore the sensibility of the questionnaire. The validation process of the Portuguese HADS version shows metric properties similar to those in international studies, suggesting that it measures the same constructs, in the same way, as the original HADS form. PMID:17365902

  16. Heart rate variability and treatment outcome in major depression: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Jain, Felipe A; Cook, Ian A; Leuchter, Andrew F; Hunter, Aimee M; Davydov, Dmitry M; Ottaviani, Cristina; Tartter, Molly; Crump, Caroline; Shapiro, David

    2014-08-01

    Variations in heart rate variability (HRV) have been associated with major depressive disorder (MDD), but the relationship of baseline HRV to treatment outcome in MDD is unclear. We conducted a pilot study to examine associations between resting baseline HRV and MDD treatment outcome. We retrospectively tested several parameters of HRV in an MDD treatment study with escitalopram (ESC, N=26) to generate a model of how baseline HRV related to treatment outcome, and cross-validated the model in a separate trial of MDD treatment with Iyengar yoga (IY, N=16). Lower relative power of very low frequency (rVLF) HRV at baseline predicted improvement in depressive symptoms when adjusted for age and gender (R2>.43 and p<0.05 for both trials). Although vagal parasympathetic measures were correlated with antidepressant treatment outcome, their predictive power was not significant after adjusting for age and gender. In conclusion, baseline resting rVLF was associated with depression treatment outcome in two independent MDD treatment studies. These results should be interpreted with caution due to limited sample size, but a strength of this study is its validation of the rVLF predictor in an independent sample. rVLF merits prospective confirmation as a candidate biomarker. PMID:24769434

  17. Inbreeding Depression and IQ in a Study of 72 Countries

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Woodley, Michael A.

    2009-01-01

    In this ecological study, a robust negative correlation of r = - 0.62 (P less than 0.01) is reported between national IQs and consanguinity as measured by the log10 transformed percentage of consanguineous marriages for 72 countries. This correlation is reduced in magnitude, when IQ is controlled for GDP per capita (r = - 0.41, P less than 0.01);…

  18. Carbamazepine augmentation in depressive patients non-responding to citalopram: a pharmacokinetic and clinical pilot study

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Lina Steinacher; Pierre Vandel; Daniele F. Zullino; Chin B. Eap; Marlyse Brawand-Amey; Pierre Baumann

    2002-01-01

    Citalopram is a chiral antidepressant drug. Its eutomer, S-citalopram (escitalopram), has recently been introduced as an antidepressant. In an open pilot study, four outpatients and two inpatients with a major depressive episode (ICD-10), and who were nonresponders to a 4-week pretreatment with 40–60 mg\\/day citalopram, were comedicated for another 4-week period with carbamazepine (200–400 mg\\/day). Some of the patients suffered

  19. Polymer depressants at the talc–water interface: adsorption isotherm, microflotation and electrokinetic studies

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Gayle E Morris; Daniel Fornasiero; John Ralston

    2002-01-01

    The behaviour of polymer depressants at the talc–water interface was investigated as a function of ionic strength and pH. Adsorption isotherms, microflotation and electrokinetic studies were used to examine the surface interactions involved. The polymers examined were carboxymethyl cellulose (CMC) and two synthetic polyacrylamides (PAM-A and PAM-N).The adsorption of the two anionic polymers, CMC and PAM-A, on talc, and hence,

  20. Genome-wide association study of recurrent early-onset major depressive disorder

    Microsoft Academic Search

    J Shi; J B Potash; J A Knowles; M M Weissman; W Coryell; W A Scheftner; W B Lawson; J R DePaulo; P V Gejman; A R Sanders; J K Johnson; P Adams; S Chaudhury; D Jancic; O Evgrafov; A Zvinyatskovskiy; N Ertman; M Gladis; K Neimanas; M Goodell; N Hale; N Ney; R Verma; D Mirel; P Holmans; D F Levinson

    2011-01-01

    A genome-wide association study was carried out in 1020 case subjects with recurrent early-onset major depressive disorder (MDD) (onset before age 31) and 1636 control subjects screened to exclude lifetime MDD. Subjects were genotyped with the Affymetrix 6.0 platform. After extensive quality control procedures, 671 424 autosomal single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and 25 068 X chromosome SNPs with minor allele

  1. Non-professional-help-seeking among young people with depression: a qualitative study

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Adolescents and young adults often suffer from depression, but tend to avoid seeking professional help. The aim of this study was to explore the reasons for non-professional-help-seeking in a sample of young adults resident in Catalonia with depressive symptoms through a qualitative study. In addition, the subjects were invited to offer their recommendations for making mental health care services more accessible. Methods We recruited 105 young persons (17–21 years of age) who had participated in a national survey on adolescents. The sample was divided into thirds, with 37 who had a previous diagnosis of depression, 33 who had self-perceived emotional distress, and 35 controls. The participants were interviewed in depth about their reasons for avoiding professional mental health care services, and the interview results were analyzed using both qualitative and cultural domain techniques and corroborated through comparison with the results of three focus groups. Results Participants’ reasons for avoidance varied both by gender and according to prior experience with health services. Male study participants and female controls mainly understood depressive symptoms as normal and therefore not requiring treatment. Female participants with self-perceived distress were more likely to cite problems of access to treatment and fear of speaking to an unknown person about their problems. Females with a diagnosis expressed lack of trust in the benefits of treatment and fear of the social consequences of help-seeking. In their recommendations for best practices, the study participants suggested educational initiatives, as well as changes in the organization of mental health care services. Conclusions A better understanding of the views of young people and a greater effort to involve them as active participants is important for facilitating help-seeking in this age group, and for adapting mental health care services to adolescent users and their social context. PMID:24774644

  2. Effects of trazodone on the sleep of depressed subjects — a polygraphic study

    Microsoft Academic Search

    J. Mouret; P. Lemoine; M. P. Minuit; C. Benkelfat; M. Renardet

    1988-01-01

    The effects of 400–600 mg trazodone on the sleep patterns of ten depressed in-patients treated for 5 weeks were studied during the initial (days 1–3) and terminal (days 26–28) treatment periods. The sleep parameters were compared to those obtained from three sleep recordings performed just prior to the initiation of the treatment and after 2 adaptation nights at the end

  3. A Benchmarked Feasibility Study of a Self-Hypnosis Treatment for Depression in Primary Care

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Alastair Dobbin; Margaret Maxwell; Robert Elton

    2009-01-01

    This investigation assessed the effectiveness of a self-help, self-hypnosis treatment in a primary-care setting in Edinburgh, UK. A partially randomized preference (PRP) study design was used, with benchmarking results to trials of CBT and counseling. Patients seeing their general practitioner for depression were offered randomization to, or their treatment preference of, either self-help (self-hypnosis) or antidepressant medication. Evaluation measures were

  4. Predictors of the Severity of Depressive Symptoms Among Intravenous Heroin Users Receiving Methadone Maintenance Treatment in Taiwan: An 18Month Follow-Up Study

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Peng-Wei Wang; Hung-Chi Wu; Chia-Nan Yen; Yi-Chun Yeh; Kuan-Sheng Chung; Hsun-Cheng Chang; Cheng-Fang Yen

    2012-01-01

    This 18-month follow-up study examined the predictors of the severity of depressive symptoms among intravenous heroin users receiving methadone maintenance treatment (MMT) in Taiwan. The severity of depressive symptoms in 368 intravenous heroin users receiving MMT in southern Taiwan was assessed using the Center for Epidemiological Studies Depression scale at baseline and at 3, 6, 9, 12, 15, and 18

  5. The role of childhood parent figure loss in the etiology of adult depression: findings from a prospective longitudinal study.

    PubMed

    Coffino, Brianna

    2009-09-01

    The underlying question of this study is whether childhood parental loss between infancy and sixth grade is a predictor of adult depression at age 26 years when a rating of loss severity is used. The loss rating considered the length of the separation/loss, the familiarity of substitute caregivers, the primary or supporting role of the lost parent figure, and traumatic features of the loss. The study also investigated the role of gender, developmental timing of the loss, life stress, SES, prior parental care and attachment history, and follow-up family relationships in the pathways between loss and depression. Results are reported from a prospective longitudinal study of children (N = 164) born into poverty. Measures were collected prenatally through age 26 years and included multiple methods and multiple reporters. Results indicated that the most robust predictor of adult depression was loss history between 5 years old and grade 2. Earlier and later measures of loss were not related to adult depression. However, intervening loss experiences predicted change in depression scores from childhood to adulthood. Loss continued to predict adult depression after controlling for SES, maternal life stress, participant life stress, gender, early caregiving, and follow up family functioning. This study found no significant gender differences. These results suggest that loss is a risk factor for adult depression for both boys and girls and that the quality of early and later caregiving do not entirely buffer children from the effects of parental loss. PMID:19946805

  6. Does Low Self-Esteem Predict Depression and Anxiety? A Meta-Analysis of Longitudinal Studies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sowislo, Julia Friederike; Orth, Ulrich

    2013-01-01

    Low self-esteem and depression are strongly related, but there is not yet consistent evidence on the nature of the relation. Whereas the vulnerability model states that low self-esteem contributes to depression, the scar model states that depression erodes self-esteem. Furthermore, it is unknown whether the models are specific for depression or…

  7. Memory and Depressive Symptoms are Dynamically Linked among Married Couples: Longitudinal Evidence from the AHEAD Study

    PubMed Central

    Gerstorf, Denis; Hoppmann, Christiane A.; Kadlec, Kelly M.; McArdle, John J.

    2010-01-01

    This study examined dyadic interrelations between episodic memory and depressive symptom trajectories of change in old and advanced old age. We applied dynamic models to 10-year incomplete longitudinal data of initially 1,599 married couples from the Study of Asset and Health Dynamics Among the Oldest Old (AHEAD; Mage = 75 years at T1). We found domain-specific lead-lag associations (time lags of two years) among and between spouses. For memory, better performance among husbands protected against subsequent memory decline among wives with no evidence of a directed effect in the other direction. For depressive symptoms, wives’ scores predicted subsequent depression increase and memory decline among husbands. Possible individual covariates (age, education, functional limitations) and spousal covariates (length of marriage, number of children, and whether or not the couple remained intact over the study period) did not account for differential lead–lag associations. Our findings of antecedent–consequent relations between wives and husbands are consistent with lifespan notions that individual development both influences and is influenced by contextual factors such as close social relationships. PMID:19899917

  8. Winter Depression

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    A U.K. psychologist has developed a complex mathematical formula using seven variables to predict winter's emotional low point. The good news is the worst day of the year was last week; nonetheless, seasonal depression remains a problem for many. The first link (1) is to an article about the equation worked out by Dr. Cliff Arnall, who specializes in seasonal disorders at the University of Cardiff, Wales. The second link is to a WebMD page (2) about winter depression, often referred to as Seasonal Affective Disorder (SAD). The next link (3) is to a recent news story about the results of a five-year study that found, rather than antidepressant drug therapy or air ionizers, light box therapy is the best remedy for the seasonal condition. The fourth link is to a set of Frequently Asked Questions (4) about SAD offered by Columbia Presbyterian Medical Center in New York City. The fifth link, to the Winter Depression Research Group at the University of Tromso in Norway(5), explains why Norway is a natural SAD research laboratory. The next link is to a international portal site (6) maintained by medical professionals and researchers in the field of light therapy and biological rhythms. The final webpage(7), from Psychology Today, compares the symptoms of winter depression with summer depression.

  9. Reduced metabotropic glutamate receptor 5 in the Flinders Sensitive Line of rats, an animal model of depression: An autoradiographic study

    PubMed Central

    Kova?evi?, Tomislav; Skelin, Ivan; Minuzzi, Luciano; Rosa-Neto, Pedro; Diksic, Mirko

    2013-01-01

    Depression is a brain disorder and there is still only a partial understanding of its underlying pathophysiology. Antidepressant medications with a fast onset have not yet been developed. In addition to the monoaminergic systems, the brain glutaminergic system has been implicated in the etiology of depression. Animal studies of depression have gained importance because they permit a more invasive manipulation of the subjects than human studies. In the present study, we measured the densities of the brain regional metabotropic glutaminergic receptor 5 (mGluR5) in the Flinders Sensitive Line (FSL) rat model of depression and two groups of control rats, the Flinders Resistant Line (FRL) and Sprague Dawley (SPD), the parent strain for both the FSL and FRL rats. The FSL rats showed lower densities of mGluR5 in many brain regions compared to either the SPD and/or FRL rats. In addition, the densities in the FRL rats were larger than in the SPD rats, suggesting possible problems in using FRL rats as controls. The presented data suggest that mGluR5 is lower in animal models of depression which could be related to the cognitive and emotional dysfunctions in the FSL rat model of depression and could be relevant to a better understanding of depression in humans. PMID:22310150

  10. Quality of life and depression in multiple sclerosis patients: longitudinal results of the BetaPlus study.

    PubMed

    Pozzilli, Carlo; Schweikert, Bernd; Ecari, Ugo; Oentrich, Wolfgang; Bugge, Jörg-Peter

    2012-11-01

    Enhancing quality of life (QoL) is an important objective of disease-modifying therapies in multiple sclerosis (MS). Strategies to substantiate the effect on QoL and depression have been suggested, including injection devices and nursing support. This study assesses QoL and depression in MS patients treated with interferon beta-1b (IFNB-1b) and evaluates the impact of different elements of a patient support programme and of coping strategies on QoL and depression. A prospective, observational, 2-year cohort study was conducted. MS patients were eligible if they had previously switched to IFNB-1b. Data were collected every 6 months. For the measurement of QoL the Functional Assessment of MS (FAMS) was used. Depression symptoms were assessed using the Center for Epidemiologic Studies Depression Scale (CES-D); coping strategies were assessed using the 66-item version of Ways of Coping Questionnaire. A total of 1,077 patients were recruited into the study. Seven hundred (65 %) patients completed the study. Within the subgroup completing questionnaires on QoL (N = 472) and depression (N = 363), QoL increased (110.4 vs. 115.8, p < 0.001), and the proportion of depressed patients decreased from 53.7 to 43.3 % (p < 0.001). Modelling QoL and depressions, the use of the autoinjector Betaject(®) over time showed a positive association with QoL (p = 0.049). The support from a nurse was positively associated with lower depressive symptoms (p = 0.039). The coping strategies 'planful problem-solving' and 'positive reappraisal' were associated with higher QoL and lower depressive symptoms. Patients on IFNB-1b treatment who were included in the patient support programme and completed the study showed an improvement in QoL. Moreover, compared to baseline the proportion of depressive patients decreased. Coping strategies as well as supportive elements such as autoinjectors and nurses had a significant impact on QoL and depression. However, the study had the general limitations of a non-controlled design. PMID:22527232

  11. Implementation of Mass Transfusion Protocol in the Outpatient Operating Room Setting: A Case Study.

    PubMed

    Robins, Holly-May; Warner, Brenda

    2015-06-01

    The current definition of massive transfusion is replacement of 5 U of packed red blood cells in 3 hours because of uncontrolled hemorrhage or replacement of the entire blood volume within a 24-hour period. The prompt activation of a transfusion protocol can quickly restore hemodynamic stability. Effective teamwork and communication is critical for a favorable patient outcome. This case study demonstrates the effectiveness of using a massive transfusion protocol in an outpatient setting. PMID:26137761

  12. Performance studies of a selfhealing network protocol in Telecom Canada long haul networks

    Microsoft Academic Search

    W. D. Grover; B. D. Venables; J. H. Sandham; A. F. Mine

    1990-01-01

    Telecom Canada commissioned a study to verify the speed and routing performance of a newly developed self-healing network (SHN) restoration technique. The particular SHN protocol is based on a unique paradigm for rapid, distributed, physical-layer interaction among digital cross-connect system (DCS) machines. An implementation of the protocol, as it would be installed in a DCS machine, was executed concurrently in

  13. A computational modelling study of transcranial direct current stimulation montages used in depression.

    PubMed

    Bai, Siwei; Dokos, Socrates; Ho, Kerrie-Anne; Loo, Colleen

    2014-02-15

    Transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) is a neuromodulatory technique which involves passing a mild electric current to the brain through electrodes placed on the scalp. Several clinical studies suggest that tDCS may have clinically meaningful efficacy in the treatment of depression. The objective of this study was to simulate and compare the effects of several tDCS montages either used in clinical trials or proposed, for the treatment of depression, in different high-resolution anatomically-accurate head models. Detailed segmented finite element head models of two subjects were presented, and a total of eleven tDCS electrode montages were simulated. Sensitivity analysis on the effects of changing the size of the anode, rotating both electrodes and displacing the anode was also conducted on selected montages. The F3-F8 and F3-F4 montages have been used in clinical trials reporting significant antidepressant effects and both result in relatively high electric fields in dorsolateral prefrontal cortices. Other montages using a fronto-extracephalic or fronto-occipital approach result in greater stimulation of central structures (e.g. anterior cingulate cortex) which may be advantageous in treating depression, but their efficacy has yet to be tested in randomised controlled trials. Results from sensitivity analysis suggest that electrode position and size may be adjusted slightly to accommodate other priorities, such as skin discomfort and damage. PMID:24246487

  14. The built environment and depressive symptoms among urban youth: A spatial regression study

    PubMed Central

    Duncan, Dustin T.; Piras, Gianfranco; Dunn, Erin C.; Johnson, Renee M.; Melly, Steven J.; Molnar, Beth E.

    2013-01-01

    This study evaluated spatial relationships between features of the built environment and youth depressive symptoms. Data used in this study came from the 2008 Boston Youth Survey Geospatial Dataset, which includes Boston high school students with complete residential information (n = 1170). Features of the built environment (such as access to walking destinations and community design features) were created for 400- and 800-m street network buffers of the youths’ residences. We computed standard Ordinary Least Squares (OLS) regression and spatial simultaneous autoregressive models. We found significant positive spatial autocorrelation in all of the built environment features at both spatial scales (all p = 0.001), depressive symptoms (p = 0.034) as well as in the OLS regression residuals (all p < 0.001), and, therefore, fit spatial regression models. Findings from the spatial regression models indicate that the built environment can have depressogenic effects, which can vary by spatial scale, gender and race/ethnicity (though sometimes in unexpected directions, i.e. associations opposite to our expectations). While our results overall suggest that the built environment minimally influences youth depressive symptoms, additional research is needed, including to understand our results in the unexpected direction. PMID:23725884

  15. The built environment and depressive symptoms among urban youth: A spatial regression study.

    PubMed

    Duncan, Dustin T; Piras, Gianfranco; Dunn, Erin C; Johnson, Renee M; Melly, Steven J; Molnar, Beth E

    2013-06-01

    This study evaluated spatial relationships between features of the built environment and youth depressive symptoms. Data used in this study came from the 2008 Boston Youth Survey Geospatial Dataset, which includes Boston high school students with complete residential information (n=1170). Features of the built environment (such as access to walking destinations and community design features) were created for 400- and 800-m street network buffers of the youths' residences. We computed standard Ordinary Least Squares (OLS) regression and spatial simultaneous autoregressive models. We found significant positive spatial autocorrelation in all of the built environment features at both spatial scales (all p=0.001), depressive symptoms (p=0.034) as well as in the OLS regression residuals (all p<0.001), and, therefore, fit spatial regression models. Findings from the spatial regression models indicate that the built environment can have depressogenic effects, which can vary by spatial scale, gender and race/ethnicity (though sometimes in unexpected directions, i.e. associations opposite to our expectations). While our results overall suggest that the built environment minimally influences youth depressive symptoms, additional research is needed, including to understand our results in the unexpected direction. PMID:23725884

  16. Exploring the impact of depressive symptoms and medication beliefs on medication adherence in hypertension—A primary care study

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Lisa K. Maguire; Carmel M. Hughes; James C. McElnay

    2008-01-01

    ObjectiveThis study aimed to assess the levels of adherence in a sample of hypertensive patients being cared for in primary care in Northern Ireland and to explore the impact of depressive symptoms and medication beliefs on medication adherence.

  17. A case study of a mother's intertwining experiences with incest and postpartum depression.

    PubMed

    Røseth, Idun; Bongaardt, Rob; Binder, Per-Einar

    2011-01-01

    The association between childhood sexual abuse (CSA) and major depression disorder (MDD) gives reason to suspect that many mothers with postpartum depression (PPD) have a history of CSA. However, few studies have investigated how CSA and PPD are related. In this case study we explore how the experience of incest intertwines with the experience of postpartum depression. We focus on participant subject "Nina," who has experienced both. We interviewed her three times and we analysed the interviews with Giorgi's phenomenological descriptive method to arrive at a contextualised meaning structure. Nina's intruding fantasies of men who abuse her children merge with her recollections of her own incest experiences. She may succeed in forcing these fantasies out of her consciousness, but they still alter her perceptions, thoughts, and emotions. She feels overwhelmed and succumbs to sadness, while she also is drawn towards information about CSA, which in turn feeds her fantasies. The psychodynamic concepts of repetition compulsion, transference, and projection may provide some explanation of Nina's actions, thoughts, and emotions through her past experiences. With our phenomenological stance, we aim to acknowledge Nina's descriptions of her everyday life here and now. With reference to Husserl, Heidegger, Merleau-Ponty, and Minkowski, we show that Nina's past is not a dated memory; rather it determines the structure of her consciousness that constitutes her past as her true present and future. Incest dominates Nina's world, and her possibilities for action are restricted by this perceived world. Any suspension of action implies anguish, and she resolves this by incest-structured action that in turn feeds and colours her expectations. Thus anxiety and depression are intertwined in the structure of this experience. PMID:21760836

  18. A case study of a mother's intertwining experiences with incest and postpartum depression

    PubMed Central

    Røseth, Idun; Bongaardt, Rob; Binder, Per-Einar

    2011-01-01

    The association between childhood sexual abuse (CSA) and major depression disorder (MDD) gives reason to suspect that many mothers with postpartum depression (PPD) have a history of CSA. However, few studies have investigated how CSA and PPD are related. In this case study we explore how the experience of incest intertwines with the experience of postpartum depression. We focus on participant subject “Nina,” who has experienced both. We interviewed her three times and we analysed the interviews with Giorgi's phenomenological descriptive method to arrive at a contextualised meaning structure. Nina's intruding fantasies of men who abuse her children merge with her recollections of her own incest experiences. She may succeed in forcing these fantasies out of her consciousness, but they still alter her perceptions, thoughts, and emotions. She feels overwhelmed and succumbs to sadness, while she also is drawn towards information about CSA, which in turn feeds her fantasies. The psychodynamic concepts of repetition compulsion, transference, and projection may provide some explanation of Nina's actions, thoughts, and emotions through her past experiences. With our phenomenological stance, we aim to acknowledge Nina's descriptions of her everyday life here and now. With reference to Husserl, Heidegger, Merleau-Ponty, and Minkowski, we show that Nina's past is not a dated memory; rather it determines the structure of her consciousness that constitutes her past as her true present and future. Incest dominates Nina's world, and her possibilities for action are restricted by this perceived world. Any suspension of action implies anguish, and she resolves this by incest-structured action that in turn feeds and colours her expectations. Thus anxiety and depression are intertwined in the structure of this experience. PMID:21760836

  19. Genome-wide association study of comorbid depressive syndrome and alcohol dependence

    PubMed Central

    Edwards, Alexis C.; Aliev, Fazil; Bierut, Laura J.; Bucholz, Kathleen K.; Edenberg, Howard; Hesselbrock, Victor; Kramer, John; Kuperman, Samuel; Nurnberger, John I.; Schuckit, Marc A.; Porjesz, Bernice; Dick, Danielle M.

    2011-01-01

    Objective Depression and alcohol dependence are common psychiatric disorders that often co-occur. Both disorders are genetically influenced, with heritability estimates in the range of 35–60%. In addition, evidence from twin studies suggests that alcohol dependence and depression are genetically correlated. Here we report results from a genome-wide association study (GWAS) of a comorbid phenotype in which cases meet the DSM-IV symptom threshold for major depressive symptomatology and DSM-IV criteria for alcohol dependence. Methods Samples (N=467 cases and N=407 controls) were of European-American descent, and were genotyped using the Illumina Human 1M BeadChip array. Results Although no SNP meets genome-wide significance criteria, we identify ten markers with p-values < 1 × 10?5, seven of which are located in known genes, which have not been previously implicated in either disorder. Genes harboring SNPs yielding p<1 × 10?3 are functionally enriched for a number of gene ontology categories, notably several related to glutamatergic function. Investigation of expression localization using online resources suggests that these genes are expressed across a variety of tissues, including behaviorally relevant brain regions. Genes that have been previously associated with depression, alcohol dependence, or other addiction-related phenotypes – such as CDH13, CSMD2, GRID1, and HTR1B – were implicated by nominally significant SNPs. Finally, the degree of overlap of significant SNPs between a comorbid phenotype and an alcohol dependence-only phenotype is modest. Conclusions These results underscore the complex genomic influences on psychiatric phenotypes, and suggest that a comorbid phenotype is partially influenced by genetic variants that do not affect alcohol dependence alone. PMID:22064162

  20. Atypical Antipsychotics in the Treatment of Depressive and Psychotic Symptoms in Patients with Chronic Schizophrenia: A Naturalistic Study

    PubMed Central

    Baratta, Stefano; Di Vittorio, Cristina; Lester, David; Girardi, Paolo; Pompili, Maurizio

    2013-01-01

    Objectives. The aim of this naturalistic study was to investigate whether treatment with clozapine and other atypical antipsychotics for at least 2 years was associated with a reduction in psychotic and depressive symptoms and an improvement in chronic schizophrenia patients' awareness of their illness. Methods. Twenty-three adult outpatients (15 men and 8 women) treated with clozapine and 23 patients (16 men and 7 women) treated with other atypical antipsychotics were included in the study. Psychotic symptoms were evaluated using the Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale (PANSS), depressive symptoms were assessed with the Calgary Depression Scale for Schizophrenia (CDSS), and insight was assessed with the Scale to Assess Unawareness of Mental Disorder (SUMD). Results. The sample as a whole had a significant reduction in positive, negative, and general symptoms, whereas the reduction in depression was significant only for patients with CDSS scores of 5 and higher at the baseline. At the follow-up, patients treated with other atypical antipsychotics reported a greater reduction in depression than patients treated with clozapine, but not when limiting the analyses to those with clinically relevant depression. Conclusions. Atypical antipsychotics may be effective in reducing psychotic and depressive symptoms and in improving insight in patients with chronic schizophrenia, with no differences in the profiles of efficacy between compounds. PMID:23401771

  1. Interviews for the assessment of long-term incapacity for work: a study on adherence to protocols and principles

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Wout EL de Boer; Haije Wind; Frank JH van Dijk; Han HBM Willems

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Assessments for long-term incapacity for work are performed by Social Insurance Physicians (SIPs) who rely on interviews with claimants as an important part of the process. These interviews are susceptible to bias. In the Netherlands three protocols have been developed to conduct these interviews. These protocols are expert- and practice-based. We studied to what extent these protocols are adhered

  2. Proving safety properties of an aircraft landing protocol using timed and untimed I/O automata: a case study

    E-print Network

    Lynch, Nancy

    Proving safety properties of an aircraft landing protocol using timed and untimed I/O automata of an aircraft landing protocol using timed and untimed I/O automata: a case study by Shinya Umeno Submitted This thesis presents an assertional-style verification of the aircraft landing protocol of NASA's SATS (Small

  3. Relationship among Dexamethasone Suppression Test, personality disorders and stressful life events in clinical subtypes of major depression: An exploratory study

    Microsoft Academic Search

    KN Fountoulakis; A Iacovides; F Fotiou; M Karamouzis; A Demetriadou; G Kaprinis

    2004-01-01

    : BACKGROUND: The present study aimed to investigate the relationship between dexamethasone suppression test, personality disorder, stressful life events and depression. MATERIAL: Fifty patients (15 males and 35 females) aged 41.0 ± 11.4 years, suffering from Major Depression according to DSM-IV criteria entered the study. METHOD: Diagnosis was obtained with the aid of the SCAN v 2.0 and the IPDE.

  4. Postnatal depression and infant growth and development in low income countries: a cohort study from Goa, India

    Microsoft Academic Search

    V Patel; N DeSouza; M Rodrigues

    2003-01-01

    Background: Postnatal depression is a recognised cause of delayed cognitive development in infants in developed countries. Being underweight is common in South Asia.Aims: To determine whether postnatal depression contributes to poor growth and development outcomes in Goa, India.Methods: Cohort study for growth outcomes with nested case-control study for developmental outcomes. A total of 171 babies were weighed and measured at

  5. Leisure time physical activity in relation to depressive symptoms in the black women’s health study

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Lauren A. Wise; Lucile L. Adams-Campbell; Julie R. Palmer; Lynn Rosenberg

    2006-01-01

    Background: A growing body of evidence suggests that physical activity might reduce the risk of depressive symptoms, but there are limited\\u000a data on Black women.Purpose: The objective was to evaluate the association between leisure time physical activity and depressive symptoms in U.S. Black\\u000a women.Methods: Participants included 35,224 women ages 21 to 69 from the BlackWomen’s Health Study, a follow-up study

  6. Predicting the onset and persistence of episodes of depression in primary health care. The predictD-Spain study: Methodology

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Juan Ángel Bellón; Berta Moreno-Küstner; Francisco Torres-González; Carmen Montón-Franco; María Josefa GildeGómez-Barragán; Marta Sánchez-Celaya; Miguel Ángel Díaz-Barreiros; Catalina Vicens; Juan de Dios Luna; Jorge A Cervilla; Blanca Gutierrez; María Teresa Martínez-Cañavate; Bárbara Oliván-Blázquez; Ana Vázquez-Medrano; María Soledad Sánchez-Artiaga; Sebastia March; Emma Motrico; Victor Manuel Ruiz-García; Paulette Renée Brangier-Wainberg; María del Mar Muñoz-García; Irwin Nazareth; Michael King

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The effects of putative risk factors on the onset and\\/or persistence of depression remain unclear. We aim to develop comprehensive models to predict the onset and persistence of episodes of depression in primary care. Here we explain the general methodology of the predictD-Spain study and evaluate the reliability of the questionnaires used. METHODS: This is a prospective cohort study.

  7. DEPRESSION AND PESTICIDE EXPOSURES IN FEMALE SPOUSES OF LICENSED PESTICIDE APPLICATORS IN THE AGRICULTURAL HEALTH STUDY COHORT

    PubMed Central

    Beseler, Cheryl; Stallones, Lorann; Hoppin, Jane A.; Alavanja, Michael C.R.; Blair, Aaron; Keefe, Thomas; Kamel, Freya

    2006-01-01

    Objective This nested case control study evaluated the association between depression and pesticide exposure among women. Methods The study population included 29,074 female spouses of private pesticide applicators enrolled in the Agricultural Health Study between 1993–1997. Cases were women who had physician diagnosed depression requiring medication. Lifetime pesticide use was categorized as never mixed/applied pesticides, as low exposure (up to 225 days), high exposure (>225 days) and a history of diagnosed pesticide poisoning. Results After adjustment for state, age, race, off-farm work, alcohol, cigarette smoking, physician visits and solvent exposure, depression was significantly associated with a history of pesticide poisoning (OR 3.26; 95% CI 1.72, 6.19) but not low (OR 1.09; CI 0.91, 1.31) or high (OR 1.09; 95% CI 0.91, 1.31) cumulative pesticide exposure. Conclusion Pesticide poisoning may contribute to risk of depression. PMID:17033500

  8. Title: Association between dietary patterns and depressive symptoms over time: A 10-year follow-up study of the GAZEL cohort

    E-print Network

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    1 Title: Association between dietary patterns and depressive symptoms over time: A 10-year follow: Data on the association between dietary patterns and depression are scarce. The objective of this study was to examine the longitudinal association between dietary patterns and depressive symptoms assessed repeatedly

  9. Prevalence and risk factors of depressive symptoms in a Canadian palliative home care population: a cross-sectional study

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Depression in palliative care patients is important because of its intrinsic burden and association with elevated physical symptoms, reduced immunity and increased mortality risk. Identifying risk factors associated with depression can enable clinicians to more readily diagnose it, which is important since depression is treatable. The purpose of this cross-sectional study was to determine the prevalence of depressive symptoms and risk factors associated with them in a large sample of palliative home care patients. Methods The data come from interRAI Palliative Care assessments completed between 2006 and 2012. The sample (n?=?5144) consists of adults residing in Ontario (Canada), receiving home care services, classified as palliative, and not experiencing significant cognitive impairment. Logistic regression identified the risk factors associated with depressive symptoms. The dependent variable was the Depression Rating Scale (DRS) and the independent variables were functional indicators from the interRAI assessment and other variables identified in the literature. We examined the results of the complete case and multiple imputation analyses, and found them to be similar. Results The prevalence of depressive symptoms was 9.8%. The risk factors associated with depressive symptoms were (pooled estimates, multiple imputation): low life satisfaction (OR?=?3.01 [CI?=?2.37-3.82]), severe and moderate sleep disorders (2.56 [2.05-3.19] and 1.56 [1.18-2.06]), health instability (2.12 [1.42-3.18]), caregiver distress 2.01 [1.62-2.51]), daily pain (1.73 [1.35-2.22]), cognitive impairment (1.45 [1.13-1.87]), being female (1.37 [1.11-1.68]), and gastrointestinal symptoms (1.27 [1.03-1.55]). Life satisfaction mediated the effect of prognostic awareness on depressive symptoms. Conclusions The prevalence of depressive symptoms in our study was close to the median of 10-20% reported in the palliative care literature, suggesting they are present but by no means inevitable in palliative patients. Most of the factors associated with depressive symptoms in our study are amenable to clinical intervention and often targeted in palliative care programs. Designing interventions to address them can be challenging, however, requiring careful attention to patient preferences, the spectrum of comorbid conditions they face, and their social supports. Life satisfaction was one of the strongest factors associated with depressive symptoms in our study, and is likely to be among the most challenging to address. PMID:24636452

  10. Resilience as a predictor of depressive symptoms: a correlational study with young adolescents.

    PubMed

    Hjemdal, Odin; Aune, Tore; Reinfjell, Trude; Stiles, Tore C; Friborg, Oddgeir

    2007-01-01

    This correlational study explored the Resilience Scale for Adolescents (READ) as a predictor for developing depressive symptoms controlling for known risk factors. A young adolescent sample (N = 387) completed the READ, the Short Mood and Feeling Questionnaire (SMFQ), Social Phobia Anxiety Index for Children (SPAI-C), and the occurrence of Stressful Life Events (SLE). In addition, a subsample of their parents (N = 240) completed a parental version of READ (READ-P). The results indicated that the READ assesses important protective factors that are associated with fewer depressive symptoms among young adolescents even when controlling for known risk factors. All five READ-factors were predictors of depressive symptoms, while the READ-P showed no predictive value. There were no significant interaction effects between READ and SLE. There were, however, significant main-effects supporting a compensatory model of protective factors. The findings suggest that the READ is a significant predictor of mental health and a useful tool for further research examining differences in stress tolerance among young adolescents. PMID:17375811

  11. A prospective study of group cohesiveness in therapeutic horticulture for clinical depression.

    PubMed

    Gonzalez, Marianne Thorsen; Hartig, Terry; Patil, Grete Grindal; Martinsen, Egil W; Kirkevold, Marit

    2011-04-01

    This study aimed to assess changes in psychological distress and social participation in adults diagnosed with clinical depression during and after participating in a therapeutic horticulture programme, and to investigate if the changes covaried with levels of group cohesiveness during the intervention. An intervention with a single-group design was repeated with different samples in successive years (pooled n = 46). In each year, five groups of 3-7 participants went through the intervention. Data were collected before, twice during, and immediately after a 12-week therapeutic horticulture programme, as well as at 3-months' follow up. Mental health assessments included the Beck Depression Inventory, the State Subscale of Spielberger State-Trait Anxiety Inventory, the Positive Affect Scale from the Positive and Negative Affect Scale, the Perceived Stress Scale, and the Therapeutic Factors Inventory-Cohesiveness Scale. The analysis of the pooled data confirmed significant beneficial change in all mental health variables during the intervention. Change from baseline in depression severity persisted at 3-months' follow up. Increased social activity after the intervention was reported for 38% of the participants. The groups quickly established strong cohesiveness, and this continued to increase during the intervention. The average level of group cohesiveness correlated positively, but not significantly, with change in all mental health outcome variables. PMID:21371227

  12. Homeopathy for Depression: A Randomized, Partially Double-Blind, Placebo-Controlled, Four-Armed Study (DEP-HOM)

    PubMed Central

    Adler, Ubiratan C.; Krüger, Stephanie; Teut, Michael; Lüdtke, Rainer; Schützler, Lena; Martins, Friederike; Willich, Stefan N.; Linde, Klaus; Witt, Claudia M.

    2013-01-01

    Background The specific clinical benefit of the homeopathic consultation and of homeopathic remedies in patients with depression has not yet been investigated. Aims To investigate the 1) specific effect of individualized homeopathic Q-potencies compared to placebo and 2) the effect of an extensive homeopathic case taking (case history I) compared to a shorter, rather conventional one (case history II) in the treatment of acute major depression (moderate episode) after six weeks. Methods A randomized, partially double-blind, placebo-controlled, four-armed trial using a 2×2 factorial design with a six-week study duration per patient was performed. Results A total of 44 from 228 planned patients were randomized (2?1?2?1 randomization: 16 homeopathic Q-potencies/case history I, 7 placebo/case history I, 14 homeopathic Q-potencies/case history II, 7 placebo/case history II). Because of recruitment problems, the study was terminated prior to full recruitment, and was underpowered for the preplanned confirmatory hypothesis testing. Exploratory data analyses showed heterogeneous and inconclusive results with large variance in the sample. The mean difference for the Hamilton-D after 6 weeks was 2.0 (95%CI ?1.2;5.2) for Q-potencies vs. placebo and ?3.1 (?5.9;?0.2) for case history I vs. case history II. Overall, no consistent or clinically relevant results across all outcomes between homeopathic Q-potencies versus placebo and homeopathic versus conventional case taking were observed. The frequency of adverse events was comparable for all groups. Conclusions Although our results are inconclusive, given that recruitment into this trial was very difficult and we had to terminate early, we cannot recommend undertaking a further trial addressing this question in a similar setting. Prof. Dr. Claudia Witt had full access to all the data in the study and takes responsibility for the integrity of the data and the accuracy of the data analysis. Trial registration clinicaltrials.gov identifier NCT01178255. Protocol publication: http://www.trialsjournal.com/content/12/1/43 PMID:24086352

  13. Peer victimisation during adolescence and its impact on depression in early adulthood: prospective cohort study in the United Kingdom

    PubMed Central

    Joinson, Carol; Wolke, Dieter; Lewis, Glyn

    2015-01-01

    Objective To investigate the strength of the association between victimisation by peers at age 13 years and depression at 18 years. Design Longitudinal observational study. Setting Avon Longitudinal Study of Parents and Children, a UK community based birth cohort. Participants 6719 participants who reported on peer victimisation at age 13 years. Main outcome measures Depression defined according to international classification of diseases, 10th revision (ICD-10) criteria, assessed using the clinical interview schedule-revised during clinic assessments with participants when they were aged 18 years. 3898 participants had data on both victimisation by peers at age 13 years and depression at age 18 years. Results Of the 683 participants who reported frequent victimisation at age 13 years, 101 (14.8%) were depressed according to ICD-10 criteria at 18 years; of the 1446 participants reporting some victimisation at age 13 years, 103 (7.1%) were depressed at age 18 years; and of the 1769 participants reporting no victimisation at age 13 years, 98 (5.5%) were depressed at age 18 years. Compared with children who were not victimised those who were frequently victimised by peers had over a twofold increase in odds of depression (odds ratio 2.96, 95% confidence interval 2.21 to 3.97, P<0.001). This association was slightly reduced when adjusting for confounders (2.32, 1.49 to 3.63, P<0.001). The population attributable fraction suggested that 29.2% (95% confidence interval 10.9% to 43.7%) of depression at age 18 years could be explained by peer victimisation if this were a causal relation. Conclusion When using observational data it is impossible to be certain that associations are causal. However, our results are consistent with the hypothesis that victimisation by peers in adolescence is associated with an increase in the risk of developing depression as an adult. PMID:26037951

  14. A Prospective Study of Depression Following Combat Deployment in Support of the Wars in Iraq and Afghanistan

    PubMed Central

    LeardMann, Cynthia A.; Fortuna, Sarah O.; Smith, Besa; Smith, Tyler C.; Ryan, Margaret A. K.; Boyko, Edward J.; Blazer, Dan

    2010-01-01

    Objective. We investigated relations between deployment and new-onset depression among US service members recently deployed to the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan. Methods. We included 40 219 Millennium Cohort Study participants who completed baseline and follow-up questionnaires and met inclusion criteria. Participants were identified with depression if they met the Primary Care Evaluation of Mental Disorders Patient Health Questionnaire criteria for depression at follow-up, but not at baseline. Results. Deployed men and women with combat exposures had the highest onset of depression, followed by those not deployed and those deployed without combat exposures. Combat-deployed men and women were at increased risk for new-onset depression compared with nondeployed men and women (men: adjusted odds ratio [AOR] = 1.32; 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.13, 1.54; women: AOR = 2.13; 95% CI = 1.70, 2.65). Conversely, deployment without combat exposures led to decreased risk for new-onset depression compared with those who did not deploy (men: AOR = 0.66; 95% CI = 0.53, 0.83; women: AOR = 0.65; 95% CI = 0.47, 0.89). Conclusions. Deployment with combat exposures is a risk factor for new-onset depression among US service members. Post-deployment screening may be beneficial for US service members exposed to combat. PMID:19910353

  15. Pilot studies for the North American Soil Geochemical Landscapes Project - Site selection, sampling protocols, analytical methods, and quality control protocols

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Smith, D.B.; Woodruff, L.G.; O'Leary, R. M.; Cannon, W.F.; Garrett, R.G.; Kilburn, J.E.; Goldhaber, M.B.

    2009-01-01

    In 2004, the US Geological Survey (USGS) and the Geological Survey of Canada sampled and chemically analyzed soils along two transects across Canada and the USA in preparation for a planned soil geochemical survey of North America. This effort was a pilot study to test and refine sampling protocols, analytical methods, quality control protocols, and field logistics for the continental survey. A total of 220 sample sites were selected at approximately 40-km intervals along the two transects. The ideal sampling protocol at each site called for a sample from a depth of 0-5 cm and a composite of each of the O, A, and C horizons. The <2-mm fraction of each sample was analyzed for Al, Ca, Fe, K, Mg, Na, S, Ti, Ag, As, Ba, Be, Bi, Cd, Ce, Co, Cr, Cs, Cu, Ga, In, La, Li, Mn, Mo, Nb, Ni, P, Pb, Rb, Sb, Sc, Sn, Sr, Te, Th, Tl, U, V, W, Y, and Zn by inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry and inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectrometry following a near-total digestion in a mixture of HCl, HNO3, HClO4, and HF. Separate methods were used for Hg, Se, total C, and carbonate-C on this same size fraction. Only Ag, In, and Te had a large percentage of concentrations below the detection limit. Quality control (QC) of the analyses was monitored at three levels: the laboratory performing the analysis, the USGS QC officer, and the principal investigator for the study. This level of review resulted in an average of one QC sample for every 20 field samples, which proved to be minimally adequate for such a large-scale survey. Additional QC samples should be added to monitor within-batch quality to the extent that no more than 10 samples are analyzed between a QC sample. Only Cr (77%), Y (82%), and Sb (80%) fell outside the acceptable limits of accuracy (% recovery between 85 and 115%) because of likely residence in mineral phases resistant to the acid digestion. A separate sample of 0-5-cm material was collected at each site for determination of organic compounds. A subset of 73 of these samples was analyzed for a suite of 19 organochlorine pesticides by gas chromatography. Only three of these samples had detectable pesticide concentrations. A separate sample of A-horizon soil was collected for microbial characterization by phospholipid fatty acid analysis (PLFA), soil enzyme assays, and determination of selected human and agricultural pathogens. Collection, preservation and analysis of samples for both organic compounds and microbial characterization add a great degree of complication to the sampling and preservation protocols and a significant increase to the cost for a continental-scale survey. Both these issues must be considered carefully prior to adopting these parameters as part of the soil geochemical survey of North America.

  16. Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor use associates with apathy among depressed elderly: a case-control study

    PubMed Central

    Wongpakaran, Nahathai; van Reekum, Robert; Wongpakaran, Tinakon; Clarke, Diana

    2007-01-01

    Background It has been reported for over the past decade that the use of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRI's) may associate with the emergence of apathy. The authors hypothesized that depressed patients treated with SSRI's would show more signs of apathy than patients treated with non-SSRI antidepressants. This case control study was conducted to investigate the possibility of the association between SSRI use and the occurrence of apathy. Methods Baycrest Centre for Geriatric Care's Day Hospital Database of elderly depressed patients who received antidepressants was divided into 2 groups depending on antidepressant use at discharge: SSRI user group-SUG, and non-SSRI user group-NSUG. Apathy scales developed by the authors were selected from the Geriatric depression Scale (GDS) and the Hamilton Rating Scale for Depression (HAMD), and were titled as GDS-apathy subscale (GAS) and HAMD-apathy subscale (HAS). Demographic data, baseline apathy, underlying medical conditions and medication use were studied. Proportion, analysis of variances, Chi-square test, odds ratio with 95% confidence interval were reported. Results Among 384 patients (160 SUG and 224 NSUG), mean GDS and HAM-D at discharge were 12.46 and 10.61 in SUG, and were 11.37 and 9.30 in NSUG, respectively. Using GAS for apathy assessment, 83.7% of patients in SUG and 73.4% in NSUG stayed apathetic at discharge. As evaluated by HAS, 44.2% of patients in SUG and 36.5% in NSUG stayed apathetic. SSRI use was not a predictor of apathy at admission, while it was at discharge, p = 0.029. The SUG showed more patients with apathy than that found in NSUG (adjusted OR = 1.90 (1.14–3.17). Age 70–75 years tended to be a predictor for the apathy (p = 0.058). Using HAS, age 70–75 years and living situation were associated with apathy at discharge, p = 0.032 and 0.038 respectively. Conclusion Even though depression was improved in elderly patients receiving antidepressants, apathy appeared to be greater in patients who were treated with SSRI than that found in patients who were not. Frontal lobe dysfunction due to alteration of serotonin is considered to be one of the possibilities. PMID:17313684

  17. Towards clinically useful neuroimaging in depression treatment: Is subgenual cingulate activity robustly prognostic for depression outcome in Cognitive Therapy across studies, scanners, and patient characteristics?

    PubMed Central

    Siegle, Greg J.; Thompson, Wesley K.; Collier, Amanda; Berman, Susan R.; Feldmiller, Joshua; Thase, Michael E.; Friedman, Edward S.

    2013-01-01

    Context 40–60% of unmedicated depressed individuals respond to Cognitive Therapy (CT) in controlled trials. Multiple previous studies suggest that activity in the subgenual anterior cingulate predicts outcome in CT for depression, but there have been no prospective replications. Objective This study prospectively examined whether subgenual cingulate activity is a reliable and robust prognostic outcome marker for CT for depression and whether its activity changes in treatment. Design Two inception cohorts were assessed with fMRI on different scanners on a task sensitive to sustained emotional information processing before and after 16–20 sessions of CT, along with a sample of control participants tested at comparable intervals. Setting Therapy took place in a hospital outpatient clinic. Patients Participants included 49 unmedicated depressed adults and 35 healthy control participants. Main Outcome Measures Pre-treatment subgenual anterior cingulate activity in an a priori region in response to negative words was correlated with residual severity and used to classify response and remission. Results As expected, in both samples, participants with the lowest pre-treatment sustained subgenual cingulate (sgACC; BA25) reactivity in response to negative words displayed the most improvement in CT (R2=.29, >75% correct classification of response, >70% correct classification of remission). Other a priori regions explained additional variance. Response/Remission in Cohort 2 was predicted based on thresholds from Cohort 1. sgACC activity remained low for remitters following treatment. Conclusions Neuroimaging provides a quick, valid, and clinically applicable way of assessing neural systems associated with treatment response/remission. sgACC activity, in particular, may reflect processes which interfere with treatment, e.g,. emotion generation in addition to its putative regulatory role; alternately, its absence may facilitate treatment response. PMID:22945620

  18. Social support and the incidence and persistence of depression between antenatal and postnatal examinations in Turkey: a cohort study

    PubMed Central

    Cankorur, Vesile Senturk; Abas, Melanie; Berksun, Oguz; Stewart, Robert

    2015-01-01

    Objectives This study aims to measure incidence and persistence of depression and to investigate the influence of self-reported antenatal social support and traditional/nuclear family structure on incidence and persistence of depression between the third trimester of pregnancy and following childbirth. We hypothesised that lower antenatal social support would be associated with incidence and persistence of case-level depressive symptoms and the family structure would have an effect on the incidence and persistence of depressive symptoms. Settings The cohort study described here was carried out in and around Ankara the capital of Turkey, because of the considerable heterogeneity of the population in terms of traditional Middle Eastern and ‘modern’ Western lifestyle and social environment. Samples were drawn from 20 urban and rural antenatal clinics (mainly primary care settings) within the geographic catchment. Participants Of 730 women recruited in their third trimester, 578 (79.2%) were re-examined between 2 and 6?months after childbirth. Exclusion criteria were as follows: aged younger than 18?years, illiteracy, significant health problems and refusal to participate. Primary and secondary outcome measures Close Persons Questionnaire items enquired about relationships with the husband, mother and mother-in-law and depression was ascertained using the Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale at the each assessments. Results In those followed, onset of postnatal depression occurred in 13.9% and persistence of antenatal depression in 49.7%. After adjustment, worse emotional support from the mother-in-law was significantly associated with postnatal depression incidence (OR=0.93, 95% CI 0.87 to 0.99) and worse emotional support from the husband with postnatal persistence (OR=0.89, 95% CI 0.83 to 0.96) of antenatal depression. Family structure was not a risk or modifying factor. Conclusions The incidence and persistence of postnatal depression in this Middle Eastern cohort were comparable to international findings. Certain family relationships predicted incidence and persistence of postnatal depression but no role of traditional/nuclear family structure was found. PMID:25833665

  19. Aging, Depression, and Wisdom: A Pilot Study of Life-Review Intervention and PTSD Treatment With Two Groups of Vietnam Veterans.

    PubMed

    Daniels, Lori R; Boehnlein, James; McCallion, Phillip

    2015-01-01

    Vietnam War veterans are a sometimes overlooked subgroup of the aging baby boomer generation. Forty years after the war ended, war veterans still seek out VA or Vet Center counselors to assist with traumatic stress symptoms. However, there currently are no specific age-related protocols for treating older war veterans suffering from posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD), nor have established PTSD interventions incorporated gerontology content for these older trauma survivors. This pilot study juxtaposed life review within regular PTSD group counseling for 12 Vietnam veterans at a community-based Vet Center using a partial crossover design. The Life Review and Experiencing Form (LREF) structured the delivery of the life review component. T-tests and repeated measures ANOVA were used to examine depression and self-assessed wisdom outcomes using measures previously tested with older adults. Findings suggest that life review prior to PTSD group therapy has clinical benefits for reducing symptoms of depression and increasing self-assessed wisdom. The study illuminates the possible relationship of traumatic stress symptom effects on the natural reminiscing process for older veterans and provides insights into methods for more age-appropriate treatment for trauma survivors participating in Vet Center and VA programs nationwide. PMID:25751708

  20. Maternal lifetime history of depression and depressive symptoms in the prenatal and early postnatal period do not predict infant-mother attachment quality in a large, population-based Dutch cohort study.

    PubMed

    Tharner, Anne; Luijk, Maartje P C M; van Ijzendoorn, Marinus H; Bakermans-Kranenburg, Marian J; Jaddoe, Vincent W V; Hofman, Albert; Verhulst, Frank C; Tiemeier, Henning

    2012-01-01

    We examined the effects of maternal history of depressive disorder and the effects of depressive symptoms during pregnancy and the early postpartum period on attachment insecurity and disorganization. A total of 627 mother-infant dyads from the Generation R Study participated in a population-based cohort from fetal life onwards. Maternal history of depression was assessed by diagnostic interviews during pregnancy; maternal peri- and postnatal depressive symptoms were assessed with questionnaires in 506 of these women at 20 weeks pregnancy and two months postpartum; and infant-mother attachment security was observed when infants were aged 14 months. A history of maternal depressive disorder, regardless of severity or psychiatric comorbidity, was not associated with an increased risk of infant attachment insecurity or disorganization. Likewise, maternal peri- and postnatal depressive symptoms were not related to attachment insecurity or disorganization at 14 months. These results are important because mothers from otherwise low risk backgrounds often have previously been depressed or are struggling with non-clinical depressive symptoms during pregnancy and after giving birth. Our findings are discussed in terms of protective factors that may limit the potentially negative effects of maternal depressive symptoms on the infant-mother attachment relationship in the general population. The role of selective attrition and lack of information about the mothers' attachment status for the current null-findings are also discussed. PMID:22191607

  1. No effect of vitamin B12 treatment on cognitive function and depression: a randomized placebo controlled study

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Anne-Mette Hvas; Svend Juul; Lise Lauritzen; Ebba Nexø; Jørgen Ellegaard

    2004-01-01

    Background: Associations between vitamin B-12 deficiency and impaired cognitive function and depression have been reported. Methods: A randomized placebo controlled study including 140 individuals with an increased plasma methylmalonic acid (0.40–2.00 ?mol\\/l) not previously treated with vitamin B-12. Cognitive function was assessed by the Cambridge Cognitive Examination (CAMCOG), Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE), and a 12-words learning test. Symptoms of depression

  2. Short term effects of inpatient cognitive behavioral treatment of adolescents with anxious-depressed school absenteeism: an observational study

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Daniel Walter; Christopher Hautmann; Saada Rizk; Maike Petermann; Johannes Minkus; Judith Sinzig; Gerd Lehmkuhl; Manfred Doepfner

    2010-01-01

    This observational study examined the changes during inpatient cognitive-behavioral treatment (CBT) of adolescents with chronic\\u000a anxious-depressive school absenteeism with or without comorbid disruptive symptoms. 147 adolescents (aged 12–18 years) with\\u000a a specific phobia or other anxiety disorder or a depressive episode or a mixed disorder of conduct and emotions and who had\\u000a completely ceased to attend school or showed irregular school

  3. The Relationship Between Multiple Sex Partners and Anxiety, Depression, and Substance Dependence Disorders: A Cohort Study

    PubMed Central

    Paul, Charlotte; Bell, Melanie L.; Dickson, Nigel; Moffitt, Terrie E.; Caspi, Avshalom

    2013-01-01

    Changes in sexual behavior have resulted in longer periods of multiple serial or concurrent relationships. This study investigated the effects of multiple heterosexual partners on mental health, specifically, whether higher numbers of partners were linked to later anxiety, depression, and substance dependency. Data from the Dunedin Multidisciplinary Health and Development Study, a prospective, longitudinal study of a birth cohort born in 1972–1973 in Dunedin, New Zealand were used. The relationship between numbers of sex partners over three age periods (18–20, 21–25, and 26–32 years) and diagnoses of anxiety, depression, and substance dependence disorder at 21, 26, and 32 years were examined, using logistic regression. Interaction by gender was examined. Adjustment was made for prior mental health status. There was no significant association between number of sex partners and later anxiety and depression. Increasing numbers of sex partners were associated with increasing risk of substance dependence disorder at all three ages. The association was stronger for women and remained after adjusting for prior disorder. For women reporting 2.5 or more partners per year, compared to 0–1 partners, the adjusted odd ratios (and 95 % CIs) were 9.6 (4.4–20.9), 7.3 (2.5–21.3), and 17.5 (3.5–88.1) at 21, 26, and 32 years, respectively. Analyses using new cases of these disorders showed similar patterns. This study established a strong association between number of sex partners and later substance disorder, especially for women, which persisted beyond prior substance use and mental health problems more generally. The reasons for this association deserve investigation. PMID:23400516

  4. Neural activity to intense positive versus negative stimuli can help differentiate bipolar disorder from unipolar major depressive disorder in depressed adolescents: A pilot fMRI study

    PubMed Central

    Diler, Rasim Somer; Renner Cardoso de Almeida, Jorge; Ladouceur, Cecile; Birmaher, Boris; Axelson, David; Phillips, Mary

    2013-01-01

    Failure to distinguish bipolar depression (BDd) from the unipolar depression of major depressive disorder (UDd) in adolescents has significant clinical consequences. We aimed to identify differential patterns of functional neural activity in BDd versus UDd and employed two (fearful and happy) facial expression/gender labeling functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) experiments to study emotion processing in 10 BDd (8 females, mean age=15.1±1.1) compared to age- and gender-matched 10 UDd and 10 healthy control (HC) adolescents who were age- and gender-matched to the BDd group. BDd adolescents, relative to UDd, showed significantly lower activity to both intense happy (e.g., insula and temporal cortex) and intense fearful faces (e.g., frontal precentral cortex). Although the neural regions recruited in each group were not the same, both BDd and UDd adolescents, relative to HC, showed significantly lower neural activity to intense happy and mild happy faces, but elevated neural activity to mild fearful faces. Our results indicated that patterns of neural activity to intense positive and negative emotional stimuli can help differentiate BDd from UDd in adolescents. PMID:24080517

  5. Hippocampal volume in geriatric depression

    Microsoft Academic Search

    David C Steffens; Christopher E Byrum; Douglas R McQuoid; Daniel L Greenberg; Martha E Payne; Timothy F Blitchington; James R MacFall; K. Ranga Rama Krishnan

    2000-01-01

    Background: There is a growing literature on the importance of hippocampal volume in geriatric depression.Methods: We examined hippocampal volume in a group of elderly depressed patients and a group of elderly control subjects (N = 66 geriatric depressed patients and 18 elderly nondepressed control subjects) recruited through Duke’s Mental Health Clinical Research Center for the Study of Depression in the

  6. A critical review of model-based economic studies of depression: modelling techniques, model structure and data sources.

    PubMed

    Haji Ali Afzali, Hossein; Karnon, Jonathan; Gray, Jodi

    2012-06-01

    Depression is the most common mental health disorder and is recognized as a chronic disease characterized by multiple acute episodes/relapses. Although modelling techniques play an increasingly important role in the economic evaluation of depression interventions, comparatively little attention has been paid to issues around modelling studies with a focus on potential biases. This, however, is important as different modelling approaches, variations in model structure and input parameters may produce different results, and hence different policy decisions. This paper presents a critical review of literature on recently published model-based cost-utility studies of depression. Taking depression as an illustrative example, through this review, we discuss a number of specific issues in relation to the use of decision-analytic models including the type of modelling techniques, structure of models and data sources. The potential benefits and limitations of each modelling technique are discussed and factors influencing the choice of modelling techniques are addressed. This review found that model-based studies of depression used various simulation techniques. We note that a discrete-event simulation may be the preferred technique for the economic evaluation of depression due to the greater flexibility with respect to handling time compared with other individual-based modelling techniques. Considering prognosis and management of depression, the structure of the reviewed models are discussed. We argue that a few reviewed models did not include some important structural aspects such as the possibility of relapse or the increased risk of suicide in patients with depression. Finally, the appropriateness of data sources used to estimate input parameters with a focus on transition probabilities is addressed. We argue that the above issues can potentially bias results and reduce the comparability of economic evaluations. PMID:22462694

  7. A cluster randomised controlled trial of a brief couple-focused psychoeducational intervention to prevent common postnatal mental disorders among women: study protocol

    PubMed Central

    Rowe, Heather; Wynter, Karen; Lorgelly, Paula; Amir, Lisa H; Ranasinha, Sanjeeva; Proimos, Jenny; Cann, Warren; Hiscock, Harriet; Bayer, Jordana; Burns, Joanna; Ride, Jemimah; Bobevski, Irene; Fisher, Jane

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Postnatal common mental disorders among women are an important public health problem internationally. Interventions to prevent postnatal depression have had limited success. What Were We Thinking (WWWT) is a structured, gender-informed, psychoeducational group programme for parents and their first infant that addresses two modifiable risks to postnatal mental health. This paper describes the protocol for a cluster randomised controlled trial to test the clinical effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of WWWT when implemented in usual primary care. Methods and analysis 48 maternal and child health (MCH) centres from six diverse Local Government Areas, in Victoria, Australia are randomly allocated to the intervention group (usual care plus WWWT) or the control group (usual care). The required sample size is 184 women in each group. English-speaking primiparous women receiving postpartum healthcare in participating MCH centres complete two computer-assisted telephone interviews: baseline at 4?weeks and outcome at 6?months postpartum. Women attending intervention MCH centres are invited to attend WWWT in addition to usual care. The primary outcome is meeting Diagnostic and Statistical Manual-IV (DSM-IV) diagnostic criteria for major depressive episode; generalised anxiety disorder; panic disorder with or without agoraphobia, agoraphobia with or without panic, social phobia, adult separation anxiety or adjustment disorder with depressed mood, anxiety or mixed depressed mood and anxiety within the past 30?days at 6?months postpartum. Secondary outcomes are self-rated general and emotional health, infant sleep problems, method of infant feeding, quality of mother–infant relationship and intimate partner relationship, and healthcare costs and outcomes. Ethics and dissemination Approval to conduct the study has been granted. A comprehensive dissemination plan has been devised. Trial registration number Australian New Zealand Clinical Trials Registry ACTRN12613000506796. UTN U1111-1125-8208. PMID:25248497

  8. Disrupting the rhythm of depression: design and protocol of a randomized controlled trial on preventing relapse using brief cognitive therapy with or without antidepressants

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Claudi LH Bockting; Hermien J Elgersma; Gerard D van Rijsbergen; Peter de Jonge; Johan Ormel; Erik Buskens; A Dennis Stant; Peter J de Jong; Frenk PML Peeters; Marcus JH Huibers; Arnoud Arntz; Peter Muris; Willem A Nolen; Aart H Schene; Steven D Hollon

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Maintenance treatment with antidepressants is the leading strategy to prevent relapse and recurrence in patients with recurrent major depressive disorder (MDD) who have responded to acute treatment with antidepressants (AD). However, in clinical practice most patients (up to 70-80%) are not willing to take this medication after remission or take too low dosages. Moreover, as patients need to take

  9. A Prospective Study of Parentally Bereaved Youth, Caregiver Depression, and Body Mass Index

    PubMed Central

    Weinberg, Rebecca J.; Dietz, Laura J.; Stoyak, Samuel; Melhem, Nadine M.; Porta, Giovanna; Payne, Monica W.; Brent, David A.

    2014-01-01

    Objective To examine the relationship between body mass index (BMI) in bereaved youth and nonbereaved controls 5 years after a parent’s death. The study was conducted from August 9, 2002, through December 31, 2013. Design A prospective, longitudinal, controlled study of the effects of sudden parental death on youth. Setting Bereaved families were recruited through coroner records and by advertisement. Nonbereaved families were recruited using random-digit dialing and by advertisement. Participants 123 parentally bereaved offspring were compared with 122 nonbereaved control offspring, all of whom were aged 11–25 years at the 5-year assessment. Main Exposure Bereavement status, type of parental death (accident, suicide, or sudden natural death), and history of depression in caregivers prior to parental death. Outcome Measures BMI categories (normal, overweight, and obese), according to International Obesity Task Force guidelines for adults and Centers for Disease Control and Prevention guidelines for children, and DSM-IV psychiatric disorder in offspring and caregivers before and after time of parental death. Results Bereaved offspring were more likely to have a BMI in the obese range compared to nonbereaved controls (?22 = 7.13, P <.01). There were no differences in BMI category by death type among bereaved offspring. Caregiver history of depression was a significant correlate of offspring obesity in nonbereaved youth but had a protective effect on the BMI of bereaved youth. Conclusions Bereaved youth were more likely to be obese than nonbereaved youth 5 years after parental death, and caregiver history of depression was associated with increased risk for obesity in nonbereaved youth only. Future studies are necessary to identify mechanisms that increase risk for obesity in parentally bereaved youth. PMID:24021503

  10. The Bidirectional Association between Depressive Symptoms and Gait Speed: Evidence from the English Longitudinal Study of Ageing (ELSA)

    PubMed Central

    Demakakos, Panayotes; Cooper, Rachel; Hamer, Mark; de Oliveira, Cesar; Hardy, Rebecca; Breeze, Elizabeth

    2013-01-01

    Background Depressive symptoms and physical performance are inversely associated, but it is unclear whether their association is bidirectional. We examined whether the association between depressive symptoms and physical performance measured using gait speed is bidirectional. Methods We used a national sample of 4,581 community-dwelling people aged 60 years and older from the English Longitudinal Study of Ageing (from 2002–03 to 2008-09). We fitted Generalized Estimating Equation (GEE) regression models to analyse repeated measurements of gait speed (m/sec) and elevated depressive symptoms (defined as a score of ?4 on the eight-item Center for Epidemiological Studies-Depression scale). Results Slower gait speed was associated with elevated depressive symptoms both concurrently and two years later. After adjustment for previous depressive symptoms and sociodemographic, clinical, lifestyle, psychosocial, and cognitive factors the concurrent association was partially explained (Odds Ratio [OR] 0.42, 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.30 to 0.59, per 1m/sec increase in gait speed) and the two-year lagged association fully (OR 0.75, 95% CI, 0.56 to 1.00). Elevated depressive symptoms were associated with slower gait speed. Full adjustment for covariates (including previous gait speed) partially explained both the concurrent (? regression coefficient [?] -0.038, 95% CI, -0.050 to -0.026, for participants with elevated depressive symptoms compared with those with no or one symptom) and the two-year lagged associations (? -0.017, 95% CI, -0.030 to -0.005). Subthreshold depressive symptoms (defined as a score of two or three on the eight-item Center for Epidemiological Studies-Depression scale) were also associated with slower gait speed. Full adjustment for covariates partially explained both the concurrent (? -0.029, 95% CI, -0.039 to -0.019, for participants with subthreshold symptoms compared with those with no or one symptom) and the two-year lagged associations (? -0.011, 95% CI, -0.021 to -0.001). Conclusions The inverse association between gait speed and depressive symptoms appears to be bidirectional. PMID:23874698

  11. Depressive symptoms among immigrant and Canadian born mothers of preterm infants at neonatal intensive care discharge: a cross sectional study

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Mothers of preterm infants are considered at higher risk for depressive symptoms, higher than for mothers of healthy term infants. Predictors of depressive symptoms in mothers of preterm infants are not yet well established. Immigrant mothers of term infants have higher prevalence of depressive symptoms than Canadian born mothers but the relative prevalence for immigrant mothers of preterm infants is unknown. This study had two aims: (i) to investigate the prevalence of depressive symptoms in immigrant as compared to Canadian born mothers of preterm infants, and (ii) to determine what factors are associated with depressive symptoms in mothers of preterm infants. Methods This is a multi-site, cross sectional study of mothers whose preterm infants required hospitalization in neonatal intensive care unit (NICU). Consecutive eligible mothers (N = 291) were recruited during the week prior to their infant’s NICU discharge. Mothers completed a self-administered questionnaire booklet of validated psychosocial/cultural measures including the Center for Epidemiological Studies Depression Scale (CES-D), Parental Stressor Scale:NICU, General Functioning Subscale of the McMaster Family Assessment Device, Social Support Index, and Vancouver Index of Acculturation; and demographic characteristics questions. Infant characteristics included gestational age, birth weight, sex, singleton/multiple birth, and Score for Neonatal Acute Physiology-II. Results Immigrant mothers (N = 107), when compared to Canadian born mothers (N = 184), reported more depressive symptoms, poorer family functioning, less social support, and less mainstream acculturation. Hierarchical regression for a subsample of 271 mothers indicated that single parent status, high stress, poorer family functioning, and less social support were associated with increased depressive symptoms and accounted for 39% of the variance on the CES-D. Immigrant status did not contribute significantly to the final regression model. Conclusions Immigrant mothers of preterm infants are at increased risk for depressive symptoms. For immigrant and Canadian born mothers of preterm infants hospitalized in NICU and particularly for single mothers, interventions to reduce stress and increase family functioning and social support may reduce depressive symptoms. Given the effects of depression on maternal health and functioning, such an intervention may improve child outcomes. PMID:23445606

  12. Strategies to assess the validity of recommendations: a study protocol

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Clinical practice guidelines (CPGs) become quickly outdated and require a periodic reassessment of evidence research to maintain their validity. However, there is little research about this topic. Our project will provide evidence for some of the most pressing questions in this field: 1) what is the average time for recommendations to become out of date?; 2) what is the comparative performance of two restricted search strategies to evaluate the need to update recommendations?; and 3) what is the feasibility of a more regular monitoring and updating strategy compared to usual practice?. In this protocol we will focus on questions one and two. Methods The CPG Development Programme of the Spanish Ministry of Health developed 14 CPGs between 2008 and 2009. We will stratify guidelines by topic and by publication year, and include one CPG by strata. We will develop a strategy to assess the validity of CPG recommendations, which includes a baseline survey of clinical experts, an update of the original exhaustive literature searches, the identification of key references (reference that trigger a potential recommendation update), and the assessment of the potential changes in each recommendation. We will run two alternative search strategies to efficiently identify important new evidence: 1) PLUS search based in McMaster Premium LiteratUre Service (PLUS) database; and 2) a Restrictive Search (ReSe) based on the least number of MeSH terms and free text words needed to locate all the references of each original recommendation. We will perform a survival analysis of recommendations using the Kaplan-Meier method and we will use the log-rank test to analyse differences between survival curves according to the topic, the purpose, the strength of recommendations and the turnover. We will retrieve key references from the exhaustive search and evaluate their presence in the PLUS and ReSe search results. Discussion Our project, using a highly structured and transparent methodology, will provide guidance of when recommendations are likely to be at risk of being out of date. We will also assess two novel restrictive search strategies which could reduce the workload without compromising rigour when CPGs developers check for the need of updating. PMID:23967896

  13. A pilot randomised controlled trial of personalised care for depressed patients with symptomatic coronary heart disease in South London general practices: the UPBEAT-UK RCT protocol and recruitment

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Community studies reveal people with coronary heart disease (CHD) are twice as likely to be depressed as the general population and that this co-morbidity negatively affects the course and outcome of both conditions. There is evidence for the efficacy of collaborative care and case management for depression treatment, and whilst NICE guidelines recommend these approaches only where depression has not responded to psychological, pharmacological, or combined treatments, these care approaches may be particularly relevant to the needs of people with CHD and depression in the earlier stages of stepped care in primary care settings. Methods This pilot randomised controlled trial will evaluate whether a simple intervention involving a personalised care plan, elements of case management and regular telephone review is a feasible and acceptable intervention that leads to better mental and physical health outcomes for these patients. The comparator group will be usual general practitioner (GP) care. 81 participants have been recruited from CHD registers of 15 South London general practices. Eligible participants have probable major depression identified by a score of ?8 on the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale depression subscale (HADS-D) together with symptomatic CHD identified using the Modified Rose Angina Questionnaire. Consenting participants are randomly allocated to usual care or the personalised care intervention which involves a comprehensive assessment of each participant’s physical and mental health needs which are documented in a care plan, followed by regular telephone reviews by the case manager over a 6-month period. At each review, the intervention participant’s mood, function and identified problems are reviewed and the case manager uses evidence based behaviour change techniques to facilitate achievement of goals specified by the patient with the aim of increasing the patient’s self efficacy to solve their problems. Depressive symptoms measured by HADS score will be collected at baseline and 1, 6- and 12 months post randomisation. Other outcomes include CHD symptoms, quality of life, wellbeing and health service utilisation. Discussion This practical and patient-focused intervention is potentially an effective and accessible approach to the health and social care needs of people with depression and CHD in primary care. Trial registration ISRCTN21615909. PMID:22672407

  14. Integrating EMDR into an evolutionary-based therapy for depression: a case study

    PubMed Central

    Krupnik, Valery

    2015-01-01

    Key Clinical Message We present an intervention in a case of major depression, where eye movement desensitization and reprocessing (EMDR) therapy was integrated into an evolutionary-based psychotherapy for depression. At the end of the treatment and at follow up assessment we observed a more accepting disposition and decreased depressive but not anxiety symptoms. PMID:25984310

  15. Depressive Symptoms Are Associated with Analgesic Use in People with Alzheimer’s Disease: Kuopio ALSOVA Study

    PubMed Central

    Gilmartin, Julia Fiona-Maree; Väätäinen, Saku; Törmälehto, Soili; Bell, J. Simon; Lönnroos, Eija; Salo, Lotta; Hallikainen, Ilona; Martikainen, Janne; Koivisto, Anne M.

    2015-01-01

    Neuropsychiatric symptoms of Alzheimer’s disease (AD) such as depression may be associated with pain, which according to the literature may be inadequately recognized and managed in this population. This study aimed to identify the factors associated with analgesic use in persons with AD; in particular, how AD severity, functional status, neuropsychiatric symptoms of AD, co-morbidities and somatic symptoms are associated with analgesic use. 236 community-dwelling persons with very mild or mild AD at baseline, and their caregivers, were interviewed over five years as part of the prospective ALSOVA study. Generalized Estimating Equations (GEEs) were used to estimate unadjusted and adjusted odds ratios (ORs) for the factors associated with analgesic use over a five year follow-up. The proportion of persons with AD using any analgesic was low (13.6%) at baseline and remained relatively constant during the follow-up (15.3% at Year 5). Over time, the most prevalent analgesic changed from non-steroidal anti-inflammatories (8.1% of persons with AD at Year 1) to acetaminophen (11.1% at Year 5). Depressive symptoms (measured by the Beck Depression Inventory, BDI) were independently associated with analgesic use, after effects of age, gender, education, AD severity, comorbidities and somatic symptoms were taken into account. For every one unit increase in BDI, the odds of analgesic use increased by 4% (OR = 1.04, 95% confidence interval CI = 1.02-1.07). Caregiver depressive symptoms were not statistically significantly associated with analgesic use of the person with AD. Depressive symptoms were significantly associated with analgesic use during the five year follow-up period. Possible explanations warranting investigation are that persons with AD may express depressive symptoms as painful somatic complaints, or untreated pain may cause depressive symptoms. Greater awareness of the association between depressive symptoms and analgesic use may lead to safer and more effective prescribing for these conditions. PMID:25688858

  16. Depression and Health Related Quality of Life in Adolescent Survivors of a Traumatic Brain Injury: A Pilot Study

    PubMed Central

    Di Battista, Ashley; Godfrey, Celia; Soo, Cheryl; Catroppa, Cathy; Anderson, Vicki

    2014-01-01

    Traumatic brain injury is (TBI) a leading cause of morbidity and mortality in youth. Adult survivors of a severe pediatric TBI are vulnerable to global impairments, including greater employment difficulties, poor quality of life (HRQoL) and increased risk of mental health problems. When estimating the health related quality of life in adolescents, the presence of anxiety and depression and the quality of social relationships are important considerations, because adolescents are entrenched in social development during this phase of maturation. The influence of anxiety, depression and loneliness on health related quality of life in adolescent survivors of TBI has not been documented. This pilot study aimed to identify and measure the relationship between anxiety, depression and loneliness and perceived health related quality of life in adolescent survivors of a TBI. Method: mixed method/cohort pilot study (11 adolescents, mild to severe TBI; 9 parents), using self-report and proxy-report measures of anxiety, depression, health related quality of life, loneliness and clinical psychiatric interviews (adolescent only). Results: Self-reported depression was significantly correlated with self-reported HRQoL (rs [11]?=??0.88, p<0.001). Age at injury was significantly correlated with self-reported HRQoL (rs [11]?=??0.68, p?=?0.02). Self-reported depression predicted self-reported HRQoL (R2?=?0.79, F [1, 10]?=?33.48, p<0.001), but age at injury did not (R2?=?0.19, F [1, 10]?=?2.09, p?=?0.18). Conclusions: Our results suggest that depression is a predictor of health related quality of life in youth post-TBI. The possibility of using targeted assessment and therapy for depression post-TBI to improve health related quality of life should be explored. PMID:25010719

  17. Physical inactivity is strongly associated with anxiety and depression in Iraqi immigrants to Sweden: a cross-sectional study

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Increasing evidence on associations between mental health and chronic diseases like cardio-vascular disease and diabetes together with the fact that little is known about the prevalence of anxiety/depression and associated risk factors among Iraqi immigrants to Sweden, warrants a study in this group. The aim was to study the prevalence of anxiety and depression in immigrants from Iraq compared to native Swedes and compare socioeconomic and lifestyle-related factors associated with these conditions. Method A population-based, cross-sectional study of residents of Malmö, Sweden, aged 30–75 years, born in Iraq or Sweden. The overall response rate was 49% for Iraqis and 32% for Swedes. Anxiety and depression were assessed using the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale. Associations were studied using multivariate logistic regression models. The outcome was odds of depression and/or anxiety. Results Compared to Swedes (n?=?634), anxiety was three times as prevalent (52.6 vs. 16.3%, p?depression five times as prevalent (16.3 vs. 3.1%, p?depressed compared to Swedes (odds ratio (OR) 3.02, 95% confidence interval (CI) 2.06-4.41). Among Iraqis, physical inactivity (<150 min/week) (OR 2.00, 95% CI 1.49-2.69), economic insecurity (OR 2.16, 95% CI 1.56-3.01), inability to trust people (OR 1.75, 95% CI 1.28-2.39) and smoking (OR 1.43, 95% CI 1.02-2.01), were strongly associated with anxiety/depression. Among Swedes, living alone (OR 2.10, 95% CI 1.36-3.25) and economic insecurity (OR 2.38, 95% CI 1.38-4.12) showed the strongest associations with anxiety/depression. Country of birth modified the effect of physical inactivity (P interaction =0.058) as well as of marital status (P interaction =0.001). Conclusion Our study indicates that economic insecurity has a major impact on poor mental health irrespective of ethnic background but that physical inactivity may be more strongly associated with anxiety/depression in immigrants from the Middle East compared to native Swedes. Preventive actions emphasizing increased physical activity may reduce the risk of poor mental health in immigrants from the Middle East, however intervention studies are warranted to test this hypothesis. PMID:24884440

  18. The role of rumination in depressive disorders and mixed anxiety\\/depressive symptoms

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Susan Nolen-Hoeksema

    2000-01-01

    Several studies have shown that people who engage in ruminative responses to depressive symptoms have higher levels of depressive symptoms over time, after accounting for baseline levels of depressive symptoms. The analyses reported here showed that rumination also predicted depressive disorders, including new onsets of depressive episodes. Rumination predicted chronicity of depressive disorders before accounting for the effects of baseline

  19. Noncontinuous use of antidepressant in adults with major depressive disorders – a retrospective cohort study

    PubMed Central

    Yau, Wai-Yin; Chan, Man-Chi; Wing, Yun-Kwok; Lam, Ho-Bun; Lin, Wei; Lam, Siu-Ping; Lee, Chui-Ping

    2014-01-01

    Background Noncontinuous antidepressant use is frequently observed in clinical practice despite the standard recommendation of at least 6–9 months of continuous treatment. The problem may be more serious in Chinese populations where stigmatization is common. This retrospective cohort study investigated the rate of noncontinuous antidepressant use and subsequent rate of relapse and recurrence in psychiatric Chinese outpatients by examining the prescription records, electronic medical records, and written medical records. Factors associated with noncontinuous antidepressant use were also identified. Methods We reviewed the medical records of 189 patients newly dispensed with an antidepressant in the psychiatric outpatient clinic during year 2006 and 2007. Primary outcome was the rate of noncontinuous antidepressant use within 6 months of therapy. Secondary outcomes included the factors associated with noncontinuous antidepressant use and the rate of subsequent depression relapse and recurrence within 1 year of starting treatment. Results Among the 189 subjects included in this study, 46% were noncontinuous users of the newly prescribed antidepressant therapy. The noncontinuous users were found to have an eightfold increase (OR: 8.42, 95% CI: 3.30–21.47) in the risks of relapse/recurrence depressive episodes within 1 year after treatment initiation. Younger age (P = 0.008), female, (P = 0.029), residency in public housing estate (P = 0.029), experiencing side effects (P = 0.024), infrequent follow-ups (P = 0.006), and earlier onset of diagnosis (P = 0.034) were factors significantly associated with noncontinuous antidepressant use. Conclusions Noncontinuous antidepressant use is common in the local Chinese depressive patients and associated with a high rate of relapse and recurrence. Collaborative multidisciplinary approaches that target patient education and enhancement of follow-up adherence are needed. PMID:24944868

  20. Comparison of protocols efficacy in poor responders: differences in oocytes/embryos competence with different protocols, a retrospective study.

    PubMed

    Manno, Massimo; Tomei, Francesco; Cervi, Marta; Favretti, Cristina; Adamo, Valter

    2009-04-01

    At present, there is no agreement on poor ovarian response definition, and no definitive evidence that this prognosis can be changed by a specific protocol. Our data suggest that a flare-up protocol with a depot gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) agonist formulation gives higher total pregnancy and implantation rates than a GnRH antagonist, possibly by improving oocyte/embryo competence. PMID:18706554

  1. Psychological Distress, Depression, Anxiety, and Burnout among International Humanitarian Aid Workers: A Longitudinal Study

    PubMed Central

    Lopes Cardozo, Barbara; Gotway Crawford, Carol; Eriksson, Cynthia; Zhu, Julia; Sabin, Miriam; Ager, Alastair; Foy, David; Snider, Leslie; Scholte, Willem; Kaiser, Reinhard; Olff, Miranda; Rijnen, Bas; Simon, Winnifred

    2012-01-01

    Background International humanitarian aid workers providing care in emergencies are subjected to numerous chronic and traumatic stressors. Objectives To examine consequences of such experiences on aid workers' mental health and how the impact is influenced by moderating variables. Methodology We conducted a longitudinal study in a sample of international non-governmental organizations. Study outcomes included anxiety, depression, burnout, and life and job satisfaction. We performed bivariate regression analyses at three time points. We fitted generalized estimating equation multivariable regression models for the longitudinal analyses. Results Study participants from 19 NGOs were assessed at three time points: 212 participated at pre-deployment; 169 (80%) post-deployment; and 154 (73%) within 3–6 months after deployment. Prior to deployment, 12 (3.8%) participants reported anxiety symptoms, compared to 20 (11.8%) at post-deployment (p?=?0·0027); 22 (10.4%) reported depression symptoms, compared to 33 (19.5%) at post-deployment (p?=?0·0117) and 31 (20.1%) at follow-up (p?=?.00083). History of mental illness (adjusted odds ratio [AOR] 4.2; 95% confidence interval [CI] 1·45–12·50) contributed to an increased risk for anxiety. The experience of extraordinary stress was a contributor to increased risk for burnout depersonalization (AOR 1.5; 95% CI 1.17–1.83). Higher levels of chronic stress exposure during deployment were contributors to an increased risk for depression (AOR 1·1; 95% CI 1·02–1.20) comparing post- versus pre-deployment, and increased risk for burnout emotional exhaustion (AOR 1.1; 95% CI 1.04–1.19). Social support was associated with lower levels of depression (AOR 0·9; 95% CI 0·84–0·95), psychological distress (AOR?=?0.9; [CI] 0.85–0.97), burnout lack of personal accomplishment (AOR 0·95; 95% CI 0·91–0·98), and greater life satisfaction (p?=?0.0213). Conclusions When recruiting and preparing aid workers for deployment, organizations should consider history of mental illness and take steps to decrease chronic stressors, and strengthen social support networks. PMID:22984592

  2. Multicenter study on the clinical effectiveness, pharmacokinetics, and pharmacogenetics of mirtazapine in depression.

    PubMed

    Jaquenoud Sirot, Eveline; Harenberg, Sabine; Vandel, Pierre; Lima, Carlos A Mendonça; Perrenoud, Patrick; Kemmerling, Klaus; Zullino, Daniele F; Hilleret, Henriette; Crettol, Séverine; Jonzier-Perey, Michèle; Golay, Kerry Powell; Brocard, Muriel; Eap, Chin B; Baumann, Pierre

    2012-10-01

    Pharmacogenetic tests and therapeutic drug monitoring may considerably improve the pharmacotherapy of depression. The aim of this study was to evaluate the relationship between the efficacy of mirtazapine (MIR) and the steady-state plasma concentrations of its enantiomers and metabolites in moderately to severely depressed patients, taking their pharmacogenetic status into account. Inpatients and outpatients (n = 45; mean age, 51 years; range, 19-79 years) with major depressive episode received MIR for 8 weeks (30 mg/d on days 1-14 and 30-45 mg/d on days 15-56). Mirtazapine treatment resulted in a significant improvement in mean Hamilton Depression Rating Scale total score at the end of the study (P < 0.0001). There was no evidence for a significant plasma concentration-clinical effectiveness relationship regarding any pharmacokinetic parameter. The enantiomers of MIR and its hydroxylated (OH-MIR) and demethylated (DMIR) metabolites in plasma samples on days 14 and 56 were influenced by sex and age. Nonsmokers (n = 28) had higher mean MIR plasma levels than smokers (n = 17): S(+)-enantiomer of MIR, 9.4 (SD, 3.9) versus 6.2 (SD, 5.5) ng/mL (P = 0.005); R(-)-enantiomer of MIR, 24.4 (SD, 6.5) versus 18.5 (SD, 4.1) ng/mL (P = 0.003). Only in nonsmokers, plasma levels of S(+)-enantiomer of MIR and metabolites depended on the CYP2D6 genotype. Therefore, high CYP1A2 activity seen in smokers seems to mask the influence of the CYP2D6 genotype. In patients presenting the CYP2B6 *6/*6 genotype (n = 8), S-OH-MIR concentrations were higher those in the other patients (n = 37). Although it is not known if S-OH-MIR is associated with the therapeutic effect of MIR, the reduction of the Hamilton scores was significantly (P = 0.016) more pronounced in the CYP2B6 *6/*6-genotyped patients at the end of the study. The role of CYP2B6 in the metabolism and effectiveness of MIR should be further investigated. PMID:22926595

  3. Childhood adversity, depression, age and gender effects on white matter microstructure: a DTI study.

    PubMed

    Ugwu, Izuchukwu D; Amico, Francesco; Carballedo, Angela; Fagan, Andrew J; Frodl, Thomas

    2015-07-01

    Previous diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) studies have shown that various factors can affect white matter (WM) tract diffusivity. The aim of the present study was to investigate the effects of childhood adversity (CA), age and gender on WM diffusivity in tracts that are thought to be involved in emotional regulation in individuals with major depressive disorder (MDD) and healthy controls (HC). DTI was obtained from 46 subjects with MDD and 46 HC subjects. Data were pre-processed and deterministic tractography was applied in the cingulum, uncinate fasciculus (UF), fornix, superior longitudinal fasciculus (SLF) and fronto-occipital fasciculus (FOF). In subjects with a history of CA, fractional anisotropy (FA) was greater in the rostral cingulum (RC) and dorsal cingulum, whereas radial diffusivity (RD) was smaller in the RC when compared with subjects with no history of CA. In the UF, FOF and parahippocampal cingulum, FA was greater in the left hemisphere in the subjects with CA when compared with those without CA. Age affected FA, longitudinal diffusivity and RD in the UF, fornix, FOF and SLF, reflecting axonal and myelin degeneration with increasing age. Depression or gender did not have any effects on the diffusivity measures. Due to the cross-sectional nature of the study, a recall bias for CA and possible effects of medical treatment on diffusivity measures could have played a role. CA and age could increase the likelihood to develop WM microstructural anomalies in the brain affective network. Moreover, subjects with CA could be more vulnerable to FA changes. PMID:24744150

  4. Genome-wide association of major depression: description of samples for the GAIN Major Depressive Disorder Study: NTR and NESDA biobank projects.

    PubMed

    Boomsma, Dorret I; Willemsen, Gonneke; Sullivan, Patrick F; Heutink, Peter; Meijer, Piet; Sondervan, David; Kluft, Cornelis; Smit, Guus; Nolen, Willem A; Zitman, Frans G; Smit, Johannes H; Hoogendijk, Witte J; van Dyck, Richard; de Geus, Eco J C; Penninx, Brenda W J H

    2008-03-01

    To identify the genomic regions that confer risk and protection for major depressive disorder (MDD) in humans, large-scale studies are needed. Such studies should collect multiple phenotypes, DNA, and ideally, biological material that allows gene expression analysis, transcriptomic, proteomic, and metabolomic studies. In this paper, we briefly review linkage studies of MDD and then describe the large-scale nationwide biological sample collection in Dutch twin families from the Netherlands Twin Register (NTR) and in participants in the Netherlands Study of Depression and Anxiety (NESDA). Within these studies, 1,862 participants with a diagnosis of MDD and 1,857 controls at low liability for MDD have been selected for genome-wide genotyping by the US Foundation for the National Institutes of Health Genetic Association Information Network. Stage 1 genome-wide association results are scheduled to be accessible before the end of 2007. Genome-wide association results are open-access and can be viewed at the dbGAP web portal (http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov). Approved users can download the genotype and phenotype data, which have been made available as of 9 October 2007. PMID:18197199

  5. The characteristics of depressive symptoms in medical students during medical education and training: a cross-sectional study

    PubMed Central

    Baldassin, Sergio; Alves, Tânia Correa de Toledo Ferraz; de Andrade, Arthur Guerra; Nogueira Martins, Luiz Antonio

    2008-01-01

    Background Medical education and training can contribute to the development of depressive symptoms that might lead to possible academic and professional consequences. We aimed to investigate the characteristics of depressive symptoms among 481 medical students (79.8% of the total who matriculated). Methods The Beck Depression Inventory (BDI) and cluster analyses were used in order to better describe the characteristics of depressive symptoms. Medical education and training in Brazil is divided into basic (1st and 2nd years), intermediate (3rd and 4th years), and internship (5th and 6th years) periods. The study organized each item from the BDI into the following three clusters: affective, cognitive, and somatic. Statistical analyses were performed using analysis of variance (ANOVA) with post-hoc Tukey corrected for multiple comparisons. Results There were 184 (38.2%) students with depressive symptoms (BDI > 9). The internship period resulted in the highest BDI scores in comparison to both the basic (p < .001) and intermediate (p < .001) periods. Affective, cognitive, and somatic clusters were significantly higher in the internship period. An exploratory analysis of possible risk factors showed that females (p = .020) not having a parent who practiced medicine (p = .016), and the internship period (p = .001) were factors for the development of depressive symptoms. Conclusion There is a high prevalence towards depressive symptoms among medical students, particularly females, in the internship level, mainly involving the somatic and affective clusters, and not having a parent who practiced medicine. The active assessment of these students in evaluating their depressive symptoms is important in order to prevent the development of co-morbidities and suicide risk. PMID:19077227

  6. Rural/urban Background, Depression and Suicidal Ideation in Chinese College Students: A Cross-Sectional Study

    PubMed Central

    Meng, Heng; Li, Jian; Loerbroks, Adrian; Wu, Jiao; Chen, Hui

    2013-01-01

    Objectives The objective of this study was to examine, first, the relationship of having a rural vs. urban background with suicidal ideation in Chinese college students, and second, whether a potential relationship was mediated by depression. Methods A survey was conducted among 1,145 undergraduate students at a university in China. Suicidal ideation and depressive symptoms were measured by the revised Hopkins’ Symptom checklist (SCL-90-R). Associations between rural vs. urban background, depression and suicidal ideation were estimated by multivariable linear regression-based ? coefficients, logistic regression-based odds ratios (ORs), and corresponding 95% confidence intervals (CIs). The magnitude of indirect effect and bias-corrected 95% CIs were obtained through bootstrap techniques. Results Rural background was positively associated with depression, which was in turn associated with suicidal ideation. The OR for rural status and suicidal ideation equaled 2.15 (95% CI?=?1.36–3.41). This OR was slightly, though significantly (p<0.05) attenuated by additional adjustment for depressive symptoms (OR?=?1.99, 95% CI?=?1.15–3.44). Conclusion Having a rural background is a determinant of suicidal ideation in Chinese college students. Depression may only marginally mediate this association. PMID:23977015

  7. Automatic thoughts and meta-cognition as predictors of depressive or anxious symptoms: a prospective study of two trajectories.

    PubMed

    Hjemdal, Odin; Stiles, Tore; Wells, Adrian

    2013-04-01

    The purpose of this prospective study was to explore the Automatic Thought Questionnaire Negative (ATQ-30-N) and the Meta-cognitions Questionnaire (MCQ-30) as predictors in the development of depressive or anxious symptoms. A sample (N = 201) completed the ATQ-30-N, MCQ-30, and the Hopkins Symptom Checklist-25 (HSCL-25) twice with a three month interval. The HSCL-25 measures both depressive and anxiety symptoms. Separate multiple hierarchical regression analyses indicated that the ATQ-30-N was a positive predictor for levels of depressive symptoms, while the MCQ-30 was a predictor of both levels of anxiety and depressive symptoms, at follow-up, when controlling for gender, age and pre-test levels of symptoms. However, the MCQ-30 did not predict future levels of depressive symptoms, when levels of automatic negative thoughts measured by the ATQ-30-N were statistically controlled for. The findings suggested that the ATQ-30-N predicts future levels of depressive symptoms, while the MCQ-30 primarily predicts future levels of anxiety. PMID:23253125

  8. The effects of depression and chronic diseases on the work outcomes of employees: a prospective study in Northwest China.

    PubMed

    Wang, X; Guo, J; Zhang, X; Qu, Z; Tian, D; Ma, S

    2014-08-01

    A prospective cohort study was conducted to examine the impact of physical and mental health status on the job loss and job turnover rates in Northwestern China. There were 1778 employees included in the baseline survey at April 2006 and were followed-up in October 2006. They were classified into four groups: those with chronic diseases (n = 205), depression (n = 273), both chronic diseases and depression (n = 96), and a control group (n = 1204). Logistic regression was used to examine the impact of depression and chronic diseases on employment between the baseline and the 6-month follow-up interviews. The results of the analyses showed that participants suffering from depression were more likely to be unemployed (OR, 1.44; P < 0.05), recently changed jobs (OR, 3.28, P < 0.001) and earning a lower salary (B = -135.28RMB, P < 0.001). Depression accompanying chronic diseases had an increased risk of unemployment (OR, 2.05; P < 0.01). The participants with chronic diseases were more likely to change their jobs (OR, 2.53; P < 0.05), but this had no significant impact on unemployment and monthly salary. Overall, the findings suggest that people with depression were at a higher risk of unemployment and job turnover than people with chronic disease. PMID:25132392

  9. Taste identification used as a potential discriminative test among depression and Alzheimer?s disease in elderly: A pilot study.

    PubMed

    Naudin, Marine; Mondon, Karl; El-Hage, Wissam; Perriot, Elise; Boudjarane, Mohamed; Desmidt, Thomas; Lorette, Adrien; Belzung, Catherine; Hommet, Caroline; Atanasova, Boriana

    2015-08-15

    Major Depression and Alzheimer?s disease (AD) are two diseases in the elderly characterized by an overlap of early symptoms including memory and emotional disorders. The identification of specific markers would facilitate their diagnosis. The aim of this study was to identify such markers by investigating gustatory function in depressed and AD patients. We included 20 patients with unipolar major depressive episodes (MDE), 20 patients with mild to moderate AD and 24 healthy individuals. We investigated the cognitive profile (depression, global cognitive efficiency and social/physical anhedonia) and gustatory function (ability to identify four basic tastes and to judge their intensity and hedonic value) in all participants. We found that AD patients performed worse than healthy participants in the taste identification test (for the analysis of all tastants together); however, this was not the case for depressed patients. We found no significant differences among the three groups in their ability to evaluate the intensity and hedonic value of the four tastes. Overall, our findings suggest that a taste identification test may be useful to distinguish AD and healthy controls but further investigation is required to conclude whether such a test can differentiate AD and depressed patients. PMID:25998001

  10. Is Low Self-Esteem a Risk Factor for Depression? Findings from a Longitudinal Study of Mexican-Origin Youth

    PubMed Central

    Orth, Ulrich; Robins, Richard W.; Widaman, Keith F.; Conger, Rand D.

    2013-01-01

    We examined the relation between low self-esteem and depression using longitudinal data from a sample of 674 Mexican-origin early adolescents who were assessed at age 10 and 12 years. Results supported the vulnerability model, which states that low self-esteem is a prospective risk factor for depression. Moreover, results suggested that the vulnerability effect of low self-esteem is driven, for the most part, by general evaluations of worth (i.e., global self-esteem), rather than by domain-specific evaluations of academic competence, physical appearance, and competence in peer relationships. The only domain-specific self-evaluation that showed a prospective effect on depression was honesty–trustworthiness. The vulnerability effect of low self-esteem held for male and female adolescents, for adolescents born in the United States vs. Mexico, and across different levels of pubertal status. Finally, the vulnerability effect held when we controlled for several theoretically relevant third variables (i.e., social support, maternal depression, stressful events, and relational victimization), and for interactive effects between self-esteem and the third variables. The present study contributes to an emerging understanding of the link between self-esteem and depression and provides much needed data on the antecedents of depression in ethnic minority populations. PMID:23895172

  11. The association between stressful life events and depressive symptoms among Cypriot university students: a cross-sectional descriptive correlational study

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Previous findings suggest that stressful life events have a causal relationship with depressive symptoms. However, to date little is known concerning the contribution of the number and severity of recent stressful life events on the prevalence of depressive symptoms among university students. The aim of this study was to investigate the prevalence of depressive symptoms and its association with the number and the severity of self-reported stressful life events among university students in Cyprus. Methods A descriptive correlational design with cross sectional comparison was used. The CES-D scale was applied for the assessment of depressive symptoms and the LESS instrument for stressful life events. Both scales were completed anonymously and voluntarily by 1.500 students (response rate 85%). Results The prevalence of mild to moderate depressive symptoms [CES-D score between 16 and 21] and of clinically significant depressive symptoms [CES-D score???22] were 18.8% and 25.3% respectively. There were statistically significant differences in clinically significant depressive symptoms by gender, with higher rates among women (x2?=?8.53, df?=?1, p?=?0.003). Higher scores on the LESS scale were associated with more frequent reports of clinical depressive symptoms (x2?=?70.63, df?=?4, p?depressive symptoms (x2?=?40.06, df?=?4, p??351, OR?=?3.03 95% CI: 1.66, 5.39) were more likely to manifest clinical depressive symptoms. Conclusions The high frequency of occurrence of depressive symptoms among Cypriot university students, as well as the strong association with stressful life events, highlights the need for psychological empowerment strategies towards students by institutional counseling services. PMID:24304515

  12. Manic/hypomanic Symptom Burden Predicts Cardiovascular Mortality with Bipolar Disorder in the Collaborative Depression Study

    PubMed Central

    Fiedorowicz, Jess G.; Solomon, David A.; Endicott, Jean; Leon, Andrew C.; Li, Chunshan; Rice, John P.; Coryell, William H.

    2009-01-01

    Objectives Bipolar disorder conveys an increased risk of cardiovascular mortality. We compared the risk for cardiovascular mortality between bipolar I and bipolar II subtypes and determined correlates of cardiovascular mortality. Methods Participants with major affective disorders were recruited for the National Institute of Mental Health Collaborative Depression Study and followed prospectively for up to twenty-five years. A total of 435 participants met diagnostic criteria for bipolar I (N=288) or bipolar II (N=147) disorder based on Research Diagnostic Criteria at intake and measures of psychiatric symptoms during follow-up. Diagnostic subtypes were contrasted by cardiovascular mortality risk using Cox proportional-hazards regression. Affective symptom burden (the proportion of time with clinically significant manic/hypomanic or depressive symptoms) and treatment exposure were additionally included in the models. Results Thirty-three participants died from cardiovascular causes. Participants with bipolar I disorder had more than double the cardiovascular mortality risk of those with bipolar II disorder, after controlling for age and gender (HR=2.35, 95% C.I. 1.04–5.33, p=0.04). The observed difference in cardiovascular mortality between these subtypes was at least partially confounded by the burden of clinically significant manic/hypomanic symptoms which predicted cardiovascular mortality independent of diagnosis, treatment exposure, age, gender, and cardiovascular risk factors at intake. Selective serotonin uptake inhibitors appeared protective though were introduced late in follow-up. Depressive symptom burden was not related to cardiovascular mortality. Conclusions Participants with bipolar I disorder may face greater risk of cardiovascular mortality than those with bipolar II disorder. This difference in cardiovascular mortality risk may reflect manic/hypomanic symptom burden. PMID:19561163

  13. Depressive Symptoms in Severely Obese Compared to Normal Weight Adolescents: Results from a Community-Based Longitudinal Study

    PubMed Central

    Goodman, Elizabeth; Must, Aviva

    2010-01-01

    Purpose Little is known about the relationship between severe obesity and depressive symptoms, particularly in community as opposed to clinic-based samples. This study determined the relationship of severe obesity and depressive symptoms over three years in a community-based sample of non–Hispanic black and white adolescents in grades 7–12 at baseline. Methods Nested matched cohort study using data from a longitudinal school-based study of youth followed for three years. 51 severely obese participants (BMI-for-age ? 99% and a BMI ? 40 at one or more study visit) were identified and paired with an age-, sex-, and race-matched normal weight subject. Depressive symptoms (CESD scale) were assessed at baseline, 2 and 3 years later. CESD score above cut points predictive of major depressive disorder or use of antidepressant medication defined High Depressive Symptoms (HDS). Results Pairs were 73% non-Hispanic black, 67% female. There was no relationship between weight status and HDS at any assessment point. However, a positive association between weight status and CESD scores, while not present at baseline or 2 years, emerged at 3 years (p=0.02). This relationship was present only among non-Hispanic whites (p=0.006 whites, p=0.25 blacks) and did not differ by sex. Conclusions Severely obese youth in this community sample did not have increased likelihood of high levels of depressive symptoms. However, significantly increased depressive symptoms among non-Hispanic white youth at the end of the follow up period suggests that this racial/ethnic group may be particularly vulnerable to the psychological effects of obesity in late adolescence/early adulthood. PMID:21700159

  14. Suicide risk management for the sequenced treatment alternatives to relieve depression study: applied NIMH guidelines.

    PubMed

    Nierenberg, Andrew A; Trivedi, Madhukar H; Ritz, Louise; Burroughs, Diane; Greist, John; Sackeim, Harold; Kornstein, Susan; Schwartz, Terry; Stegman, Diane; Fava, Maurizio; Wisniewski, Stephen R

    2004-01-01

    NIMH guidelines to manage subjects who are suicidal during their participation in clinical trials include a full range of procedures to minimize suicidal risk, yet no reports to date have shown how researchers should best implement these guidelines. The architects of the sequenced treatment alternatives to relieve depression (STAR*D) study operationalized and implemented the NIMH guidelines by developing a comprehensive set of procedures to detect, monitor, and manage suicidal subjects during a large, complex, multisite clinical trial. Because of the large size of the study (anticipated n = 4000), the wide geographic distribution, the large number of treating STAR*D clinicians, the broad array of subjects with psychiatric and medical comorbidities, and the focus on treatment-resistant depression, along with the complexity of multiple treatment steps and randomization points in STAR*D, the risk of suicide, safety monitoring of suicidal subjects presented a unique challenge. This paper describes methods derived from the NIMH guidelines used to manage suicidal risk in STAR*D including the use of an interactive voice response system to alert clinicians, regional center directors, and safety officers. PMID:15458854

  15. Treatment of chronically depressed patients: A multisite randomized controlled trial testing the effectiveness of 'Cognitive Behavioral Analysis System of Psychotherapy' (CBASP) for chronic depressions versus usual secondary care

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Jenneke E Wiersma; Digna JF van Schaik; Patricia van Oppen; James P McCullough Jr; Robert A Schoevers; Jack J Dekker; Marc BJ Blom; Kristel Maas; Johannes H Smit; Brenda WJH Penninx; Aartjan TF Beekman

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: 'Cognitive Behavioral Analysis System of Psychotherapy' (CBASP) is a form of psychotherapy specifically developed for patients with chronic depression. In a study in the U.S., remarkable favorable effects of CBASP have been demonstrated. However, no other studies have as yet replicated these findings and CBASP has not been tested outside the United States. This protocol describes a randomized controlled

  16. The interrelationships among acculturation, social support, and postpartum depression symptoms among marriage-based immigrant women in Taiwan: a cohort study.

    PubMed

    Chen, Hung-Hui; Hwang, Fang-Ming; Tai, Chen-Jei; Chien, Li-Yin

    2013-02-01

    This cohort study assessed the structural relationships among social support, acculturation, and postpartum depressive symptoms experienced by marriage-based immigrant mothers in Taiwan. Data were collected at 1 and 6 months postpartum from 203 immigrant mothers married to Taiwanese men in Taipei, Taiwan. The structural equation modeling results showed that social support and postpartum depression were directly and negatively related. Higher social support and lower depression at 1 month postpartum were related to a positive social attitude (i.e., accepting attitude toward mainstream society). Social attitude was a moderator of the relationship between depression at 1 month and social support at 6 months postpartum, where a positive social attitude decreased the negative effect of depression at 1 month on social support at 6 months. Social support in the early postpartum period not only directly decreased postpartum depression, but also indirectly decreased postpartum depression through improving social attitude. PMID:22865022

  17. Choosing between Internet-based psychodynamic versus cognitive behavioral therapy for depression: a pilot preference study

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Major depression is a world-wide problem that can be treated with various forms of psychotherapy. There is strong research support for treating major depression using cognitive behavior therapy delivered in the format of guided self-help via the Internet (ICBT). Recent research also suggests that psychodynamic psychotherapy can be delivered as guided self-help via the Internet (IPDT) and that it seem to be as effective as ICBT for mild to moderate depression. However, no head-to-head comparison between the two treatments exists. In the field of Internet interventions it is largely unexplored if treatment preference affects outcome and adherence. Methods Participants were allocated to IPDT or ICBT based on their stated preference. More than half of the participants preferred ICBT (N?=?30) over IPDT (N?=?14). Differences in efficacy between treatments were explored. Correlations between strength of preference and treatment outcome, adherence to treatment and completion of the whole treatment program were explored. Data were collected before and after treatment, as well as in a 7-month follow-up. Results During the treatment period, both programs performed equally well in reducing symptoms. More participants who received IPDT completed the entire program. At follow-up, mixed-effects models showed that participants who chose ICBT improved more in terms of quality of life. The ICBT group also had a significant increase in participants who recovered from their depression from post-treatment to follow-up. Exploratory analyses indicated that strength of preference was correlated with adherence to treatment and completion of the whole program, and long-term outcome for the ICBT group. Conclusions Few differences were found during the acute treatment phase, but the long-term effects are in favor of ICBT. Strength of preference for treatment seems to have a predictive value. Further research comparing the efficacy of ICBT and IPDT, and the effects of preference matching and strength of preference, is warranted. Trial registration This trial is a continuation of the study registered as NCT01324050 at Clinicaltrials.gov. PMID:24139066

  18. Depression, anxiety, and suicidal ideation among Vietnamese secondary school students and proposed solutions: a cross-sectional study

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background There is a rapidly growing public awareness of mental health problems among Vietnamese secondary school students. This study aims to determine the prevalence of anxiety, depression, and suicidal ideation, to identify related risk factors, and to explore students’ own proposals for improving their mental health. Methods A cross-sectional study was conducted among 1161 secondary students in Can Tho City, Vietnam during September through December, 2011. A structured questionnaire was used to assess anxiety, depression, suicidal ideation and proposed solutions. Depression was measured using the Center for Epidemiology Studies Depression Scale. Results The prevalence estimates of symptoms reaching a threshold comparable to a diagnosis of anxiety and depression were 22.8% and 41.1%, respectively. Suicide had been seriously considered by 26.3% of the students, while 12.9% had made a suicide plan and 3.8% had attempted suicide. Major risk factors related to anxiety and depression were physical or emotional abuse by the family, and high educational stress. As proposed solutions, nearly 80% of students suggested that the academic workload should be reduced and that confidential counselors should be appointed at schools. About half the students stated that the attitudes of their parents and teachers needed to change. A significant majority said that they would visit a website that provided mental health support for students. Conclusions Anxiety, depression, and suicidal ideation are common among Vietnamese secondary school students. There are strong associations with physical and emotional abuse in the family and high educational stress. Academic curricula and attitudes of parents and teachers need to be changed from a punitive to a more supportive approach to reduce the risk of poor mental health. An internet-based mental health intervention could be a feasible and effective first step to improve students’ mental health. PMID:24341792

  19. Body image satisfaction and depression in midlife women: the Study of Women's Health Across the Nation (SWAN).

    PubMed

    Jackson, Kathryn L; Janssen, Imke; Appelhans, Bradley M; Kazlauskaite, Rasa; Karavolos, Kelly; Dugan, Sheila A; Avery, Elizabeth A; Shipp-Johnson, Karla J; Powell, Lynda H; Kravitz, Howard M

    2014-06-01

    With aging, women's bodies undergo changes that can affect body image perception, yet little is known about body image in midlife. The purpose of this study was to examine associations between body image and depressive symptoms in Caucasian and African-American midlife women from the Study of Women's Health Across the Nation (SWAN) Chicago site. Body image was measured using the Stunkard Adult Female Figure Rating Scale, and a clinically significant level of depressive symptoms was defined as Center for Epidemiologic Studies Depression Scale (CES-D) score of ?16 (N=405; N=63 (15.6%) with clinically significant levels of depressive symptoms). Differences between perceived actual, perceived ideal, and actual body size and responses to questions concerning weight satisfaction and attractiveness were examined using logistic regression for associations with a CES-D score of ?16. Women with body image dissatisfaction (odds ratio (OR)=1.91; p=0.04) or who perceived themselves as "unattractive" (OR=7.74; p<0.01) had higher odds of CES-D of ?16. We found no significant difference by race. Our results were not confounded by BMI. These results suggest that midlife women with poor body image may be more likely to have clinically significant levels of depressive symptoms. Larger prospective studies are needed to better understand this association. PMID:24623160

  20. Relationships between stress, coping and depressive symptoms among overseas university preparatory Chinese students: a cross-sectional study

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Mental health problems in young people are an important public health issue. Students leaving their hometown and family at a young age to pursue better educational opportunities overseas are confronted with life adjustment stress, which in turn affects their mental health and academic performance. This study aimed to examine the relationships among stress, coping strategies, and depressive symptoms using the stress coping framework in overseas Chinese university preparatory students in Taiwan. Methods A cross-sectional study was conducted at an overseas Chinese university preparatory institute in Taiwan. Of enrolled overseas Chinese university preparatory students at 2009, 756 completed a structured questionnaire measuring stress, strategies for coping with it, and the Center for Epidemiologic Studies Depression Scale. Results High levels of stress significantly predicted the adoption of active, problem-focused coping strategies (R2 = 0.13, p < .01) and passive, emotion-focused coping strategies (R2 = 0.24, p < .01). Acceptable CFI, SRMR, and RMSEA values from the structural equation modeling analysis demonstrated that the model satisfactorily fits the stress coping framework, after active coping strategies were eliminated from the model. Results from the Sobel test revealed that passive coping strategies mediated the relation between stress and depressive symptoms (z = 8.06, p < .001). Conclusion Our study results suggested that stress is associated with coping strategies and depressive symptoms and passive strategies mediate the relation between stress and depressive symptoms in overseas Chinese university preparatory students. PMID:21595974

  1. Body image satisfaction and depression in midlife women: the Study of Women's Health Across the Nation (SWAN)

    PubMed Central

    Jackson, Kathryn L.; Janssen, Imke; Appelhans, Bradley M.; Kazlauskaite, Rasa; Karavolos, Kelly; Dugan, Sheila A.; Avery, Elizabeth A.; Shipp-Johnson, Karla J.; Powell, Lynda H.; Kravitz, Howard M.

    2014-01-01

    With aging, women's bodies undergo changes that can affect body image perception, yet little is known about body image in midlife. The purpose of this study was to examine associations between body image and depressive symptoms in Caucasian and African–American midlife women from the Study of Women's Health Across the Nation (SWAN) Chicago site. Body image was measured using the Stunkard Adult Female Figure Rating Scale, and a clinically significant level of depressive symptoms was defined as Center for Epidemiologic Studies Depression Scale (CES-D) score of ?16 (N=405; N=63 (15.6 %) with clinically significant levels of depressive symptoms). Differences between perceived actual, perceived ideal, and actual body size and responses to questions concerning weight satisfaction and attractiveness were examined using logistic regression for associations with a CES-D score of ?16. Women with body image dissatisfaction (odds ratio (OR)=1.91; p=0.04) or who perceived themselves as “unattractive” (OR=7.74; p<0.01) had higher odds of CES-D of ?16. We found no significant difference by race. Our results were not confounded by BMI. These results suggest that midlife women with poor body image may be more likely to have clinically significant levels of depressive symptoms. Larger prospective studies are needed to better understand this association. PMID:24623160

  2. A Study of Long Distance Traffic Using the AODV Protocol in a Vehicular Ad Hoc Network

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Robin Pomplun; Amitava Datta

    2007-01-01

    In vehicular ad hoc networks (VANETs) vehicles communicate with each other without any fixed infrastructure (inter-vehicular communication). VANETs have received wide attention in the research community in recent years. Wireless routing protocols (e.g. DSR or AODV) were studied in freeway scenarios. But whereas recent research dealt with different vehicle density rates (number of vehicles per km) the distance and especially

  3. A team study of the IEEE 802.16 collision resolution protocol

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Abdelillah Karouit; Abdelkrim Haqiq; Luis Orozco-Barbosa

    2010-01-01

    In this paper, we study the collision resolution protocol of the IEEE 802.16 standard for metropolitan broadband wireless access systems. The standard specifies the use of a random access scheme based on the slotted binary exponential backoff (BEB) algorithm during the bandwidth request phase. We follow a team problem approach towards the analysis of the throughput and the delay during

  4. Metacognitive Protocols: A Qualitative Study of Perceptions of "Smartness" of Adults and Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morse, Linda W.; Smith-Mallette, Geraldine; Talento-Miller, Eileen

    Metacognition is a theoretical construct used to describe individuals' perceptions of their thinking processes and their own control over their thinking processes. This study examined the protocols of 78 undergraduates who responded to 3 questions from the Swanson Metacognitive Questionnaire: (1) What makes someone really smart? (2) How do…

  5. Acute symptoms related to air pollution in urban areas: a study protocol

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Masud Yunesian; Fariba Asghari; Javad Homayoun Vash; Mohammad Hossein Forouzanfar; Dariush Farhud

    2006-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The harmful effects of urban air pollution on general population in terms of annoying symptoms are not adequately evaluated. This is in contrast to the hospital admissions and short term mortality. The present study protocol is designed to assess the association between the level of exposure to certain ambient air pollutants and a wide range of relevant symptoms. Awareness

  6. STUDY PROTOCOL Open Access Use of biological mesh versus standard wound

    E-print Network

    Boyer, Edmond

    [1]. Their repair with a synthetic non-absorbable mesh to reinforce the abdominal wall leads. In those patients, synthetic non-absorbable meshes are not recommended because of the high rates of meshSTUDY PROTOCOL Open Access Use of biological mesh versus standard wound care in infected incisional

  7. Children and depression--the children of depressed parents; the childhood of depressed patients; depression in children.

    PubMed

    Orvaschel, H; Weissman, M M; Kidd, K K

    1980-03-01

    In order to understand the development of depression in children, three types of data are reviewed: (1) studies of the children of depressed parents; (2) studies of the childhood histories of depressed adults; (3) direct studies of depression in children. These data support an increased frequency of depression and other psychopathology in the children of depressed adults. An examination of the homes of children with a depressed parent reveals a disruptive, hostile, and rejecting environment. This atmosphere is also found in the homes of depressed children and in the homes of children who become depressed as adults. Methodological issues are discussed which will help sort out the relative influences of genes and environment in future studies. PMID:6448876

  8. Effect of Music Therapy on Anxiety and Depression in Patients with Alzheimer’s Type Dementia: Randomised, Controlled Study

    Microsoft Academic Search

    S. Guétin; F. Portet; M. C. Picot; C. Pommié; M. Messaoudi; L. Djabelkir; A. L. Olsen; M. M. Cano; E. Lecourt; J. Touchon

    2009-01-01

    Background\\/Aims: Numerous studies have indicated the value of music therapy in the management of patients with Alzheimer’s disease. A recent pilot study demonstrated the feasibility and usefulness of a new music therapy technique. The aim of this controlled, randomised study was to assess the effects of this new music therapy technique on anxiety and depression in patients with mild to

  9. Patient safety in Dutch primary care: a study protocol

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Insight into the frequency and seriousness of potentially unsafe situations may be the first step towards improving patient safety. Most patient safety attention has been paid to patient safety in hospitals. However, in many countries, patients receive most of their healthcare in primary care settings. There is little concrete information about patient safety in primary care in the Netherlands. The overall aim of this study was to provide insight into the current patient safety issues in Dutch general practices, out-of-hours primary care centres, general dental practices, midwifery practices, and allied healthcare practices. The objectives of this study are: to determine the frequency, type, impact, and causes of incidents found in the records of primary care patients; to determine the type, impact, and causes of incidents reported by Dutch healthcare professionals; and to provide insight into patient safety management in primary care practices. Design and methods The study consists of three parts: a retrospective patient record study of 1,000 records per practice type was conducted to determine the frequency, type, impact, and causes of incidents found in the records of primary care patients (objective one); a prospective component concerns an incident-reporting study in each of the participating practices, during two successive weeks, to determine the type, impact, and causes of incidents reported by Dutch healthcare professionals (objective two); to provide insight into patient safety management in Dutch primary care practices (objective three), we surveyed organizational and cultural items relating to patient safety. We analysed the incidents found in the retrospective patient record study and the prospective incident-reporting study by type of incident, causes (Eindhoven Classification Model), actual harm (severity-of-outcome domain of the International Taxonomy of Medical Errors in Primary Care), and probability of severe harm or death. Discussion To estimate the frequency of incidents was difficult. Much depended on the accuracy of the patient records and the professionals' consensus about which types of adverse events have to be recognized as incidents. PMID:20584268

  10. Study Protocol: Asymptomatic Intracranial Atherosclerotic Disease in Pakistanis

    PubMed Central

    Kamal, Ayeesha Kamran; Majeed, Farzin; Pasha, Omrana; Islam, Muhammad; Azam, Iqbal; Ilyas, Muhammad Saleem; Hussain, Munawar; Masood, Kamran; Ahmed, Bilal; Nazir, Sumaira; Sajjad, Zafar; Kasner, Scott E.

    2015-01-01

    Background Intracranial atherosclerotic disease (ICAD) is the most frequent subtype of ischemic stroke globally. It is important to describe the determinants of early ICAD as a strategy to prevent strokes from clinically evident and progressive ICAD. Our objective is to report the determinants of asymptomatic ICAD by linking the presence or absence of ICAD on magnetic resonance angiogram (MRA) with detailed risk assessment in asymptomatic adults. Methods This is an observational cross-sectional analytical study. We plan to recruit 200 adult participants from the radiology departments of two tertiary care centers of Karachi, Pakistan. The participants will first be screened for the absence of stroke symptoms via the Questionnaire for Verifying Stroke Free Status (QVSFS). QVSFS negative will be participants will be eligible. After written informed consent, participants will undergo detailed medical, sociodemographic, lifestyle, and anthropometric evaluation by a detailed interview. They will, in addition, undergo MRA to study the presence, degree, and distribution of asymptomatic ICAD. All MRA scans will be reviewed centrally by vascular neurologists blinded to clinical information. These images would be reviewed on DICOM Viewer 3.0 used for calculating the degree of stenosis using Warfarin–Aspirin Symptomatic Intracranial Disease (WASID) study defined criteria employing electronic calipers. A sample size of 200 will achieve 80% power for detecting a minimum difference of 20% in the prevalence of exposure factors (medical and lifestyle) between asymptomatic ICAD positive and ICAD negative persons. This study will generate regional data on risks for ICAD development and prevention in a high-risk susceptible population. Study ID: NCT02072876 PMID:25825629

  11. The Beck Depression Inventory and General Health Questionnaire as measures of depression in the general population: a validation study using the Composite International Diagnostic Interview as the gold standard.

    PubMed

    Aalto, Anna-Mari; Elovainio, Marko; Kivimäki, Mika; Uutela, Antti; Pirkola, Sami

    2012-05-15

    The Beck Depression Inventory (BDI) and the General Health Questionnaire (GHQ) are commonly used in population studies as measures of depression. We examined in a population sample the validity of four scales for depressive symptoms, the GHQ-12, the 21- and 13-item versions of the BDI, and a new 6-item version of the BDI developed for this study. A total of 5561 participants in the "Health 2000" survey (30-79 years) completed the four scales and were assessed with the Composite International Diagnostic Interview (CIDI), which was used as the validation criterion. We selected items for the BDI-6 through an exploratory factor analysis for the BDI-21. The accuracy of the scales, including the BDI-6, was satisfactory (c-statistics 0.88-0.92 for depression within the past 2 weeks and 0.80-0.83 within the past 12 months) and slightly better for men (0.92-0.96 and 0.85-0.87) than for women (0.86-0.88 and 0.78-0.79). Higher scores in all the scales were associated with more severe depression and more recent depressive episodes. This study suggests that various versions of the BDI and the GHQ-12 are useful in detecting depressive disorders in the general population. Even the 6-item version of the BDI showed acceptable criterion validity, although replication in an independent dataset is needed to confirm its validity. PMID:22365275

  12. Physical Activity Patterns of People Affected by Depressive and Anxiety Disorders as Measured by Accelerometers: A Cross-Sectional Study

    PubMed Central

    Helgadóttir, Björg; Forsell, Yvonne; Ekblom, Örjan

    2015-01-01

    Background Exercise can relieve both depressive and anxiety disorders and it is therefore of importance to establish movement patterns of mildly to moderately affected sufferers to estimate the treatment potential. The aim is to describe the physical activity patterns of people affected by mild to moderate depressive and/or anxiety symptoms using objective measures of physical activity. Methods The design of the study was cross-sectional using data from 165 people aged 18–65 years, with mild to moderate depressive and/or anxiety disorder symptoms (scoring ?10 on the PHQ-9). Diagnoses were made using Mini International Neuropsychiatric Interview (MINI) and symptom severity was measured with the Montgomery-Åsberg Depression Rating Scale (MADRS). The participants wore accelerometers for a week to evaluate physical activity patterns. Results No statistically significant differences were detected between different diagnoses, though depressed participants tended to be less active and more sedentary. Only one-fifth of the sample followed public health guidelines regarding physical activity. Each one point increase in MADRS was associated with a 2.4 minute reduction in light physical activity, independent of moderate-to-vigorous physical activity and sedentary time. MADRS was positively associated with number of sedentary bouts. Conclusions The physical activity pattern of people with depressive and/or anxiety disorders was characterized by large amounts of sedentary time and low fulfillment of physical activity guidelines. There is therefore a large treatment potential for this group by increasing exercise. The results suggest that instead of focusing exclusively on high intensity exercise for treating depressive and anxiety disorders, health care providers might encourage patients to reduce sedentary time by increasing light physical activity and decreasing the number of sedentary bouts, though further studies are needed that can determine directionality. PMID:25585123

  13. Does depression and substance abuse co-morbidity affect socioeconomic status? Evidence from a prospective study of urban African Americans.

    PubMed

    Dagher, Rada K; Green, Kerry M

    2015-01-30

    Studies have established a graded association between mental health and socioeconomic status (SES). However, scarce research has examined the impact of substance use disorders (SUD) and depression comorbidity on SES. We use data from the Woodlawn Study, a longitudinal cohort study, which recruited a cohort of first graders from Chicago starting 1966-1967 (N=1242). Analyses focus on those interviewed in young adulthood and followed up through midlife. Regression analyses adjusting for childhood confounders showed that young adults with depression and SUD comorbidity had higher likelihood of having any periods of unemployment, higher likelihood of being unemployed for 3 or more months, and lower household income in midlife than those with neither disorder. Moreover, young adults with SUD without depression had higher odds of having any periods of unemployment and higher odds of being unemployed for 3 or more months than those with neither disorder. Findings point to the possibility of social selection where depression and SUD comorbidity contributes to a downward drift in SES. Clinical interventions that integrate the treatment of SUD and depression may be more effective at reducing socioeconomic disparities among minority populations. PMID:25467698

  14. Using consumer perspectives to inform the cultural adaptation of psychological treatments for depression: A mixed methods study from South Asia

    PubMed Central

    Aggarwal, Neil Krishan; Balaji, Madhumitha; Kumar, Shuba; Mohanraj, Rani; Rahman, Atif; Verdeli, Helena; Araya, Ricardo; Jordans, M.J.D.; Chowdhary, Neerja; Patel, Vikram

    2014-01-01

    Background Integrating consumer perspectives in developing and adapting psychological treatments (PTs) can enhance their acceptability in diverse cultural contexts. Objective To describe the explanatory models (EMs) of depression in South Asia with the goal of informing the content of culturally appropriate PTs for this region. Methods Two methods were used: a systematic review of published literature on the EMs of depression in South Asia; and in-depth interviews with persons with depression and family caregivers in two sites in India. Findings from both were analysed independently and then triangulated. Results There were 19 studies meeting our inclusion criteria. Interviews were conducted with 27 patients and 10 caregivers. Findings were grouped under four broad categories: illness descriptions, perceived impact, causal beliefs and self-help forms of coping. Depression was characterised predominantly by somatic complaints, stress, low mood, and negative and ruminative thoughts. Patients experienced disturbances in interpersonal relationships occupational functioning, and stigma. Negative life events, particularly relationship difficulties, were perceived as the main cause. Patients mostly engaged in distracting activities, religious practices, and received support from family and friends to cope with the illness. Limitations The primary data are entirely from India but the studies from the literature review covering South Asia are consistent with these findings. This study also does not include literature in local languages or explore how consumer perspectives change over time. Conclusions EMs can inform cultural adaptations to PTs for depression in South Asia by defining target outcomes, content for psycho-education, and culturally appropriate treatment strategies. PMID:24836093

  15. Antidepressants Ease Postpartum Depression

    MedlinePLUS

    ... depression and few studies to date have included women with severe depression," study co-author Kylee Trevillion, from King's College London, ... the Journal of the American Medical Association . The study's senior ... College London, pointed out that women who are breast-feeding need to let all ...

  16. Bipolar II Depression with Melancholic Features

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Franco Benazzi

    2000-01-01

    Bipolar II depression with melancholic features has been understudied. The aims of the present study were to find the prevalence of melancholic features in bipolar II depression and in unipolar depression, and to compare melancholic with nonmelancholic bipolar II\\/ unipolar depression in private practice. One hundred and sixty two consecutive unipolar and bipolar II depressed outpatients were interviewed with the

  17. Adult attachment style and vulnerability to depression

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Barbara Murphy; Glen W. Bates

    1997-01-01

    The present study examined the role of adult attachment styles in differentiating ‘depressed’ and ‘non-depressed’ college students, and the association between attachment styles and the depressive personality vulnerabilities, sociotropy and autonomy. High scores on the fearful and, to a lesser extent, preoccupied attachment scales were associated with higher levels of depression, highlighting negative self-representation as a key factor in depression.

  18. Iran's Multiple Indicator Demographic and Health Survey - 2010: Study Protocol

    PubMed Central

    Rashidian, Arash; Karimi-Shahanjarini, Akram; Khosravi, Ardeshir; Elahi, Elham; Beheshtian, Maryam; Shakibazadeh, Elham; Khabiri, Roghayeh; Arab, Mohammad; Zakeri, Mohammad-Reza

    2014-01-01

    Background: There is an international emphasis on providing timely and high quality data to monitor progress of countries toward Millennium Development Goals. Iran's Multiple Indicator Demographic and Health Survey (IrMIDHS) aimed to provide valid information on population and health outcomes to monitor progress in achieving national priorities and health programs and to assist policy makers to design effective strategies for improving health outcomes and equity in access to care. Methods: A cross-sectional multi-stage stratified cluster-random survey is conducted through face-to-face household interviews. The sampling frame is developed using Iran's 2006 population and housing census. Provincial samples ranging are from a minimum of 400 households per province to 6400 households in Tehran province. Cluster size is 10 households. The target sample includes 3096 clusters: 2187 clusters in urban and 909 clusters in rural areas. IrMIDHS instruments include three questionnaires: Household questionnaire, women aged 15-54 questionnaire, children under five questionnaire, supervision and quality assessment checklists and data collection sheets and standard weight and height measurement tools for under-five children. A cascading decentralized training method is used for training data collection and supervision teams. Quality assurance procedures are defined for the five steps of conducting the survey including: Sampling, training data collection and training teams, survey implementation, data entry and analysis. A multi-layer supervision and monitoring procedure is established. All the questionnaires are double entered. Conclusions: IrMIDHS will provide valuable data for policymakers in Iran. Designing and implementation of the study involve contributions from academics as well as program managers and policy makers. The collaborative nature of the study may facilitate better usage of its results. PMID:24932396

  19. Pruritus in psoriasis: a study of personality traits, depression and anxiety.

    PubMed

    Remröd, Charlotta; Sjöström, Karin; Svensson, Åke

    2015-04-15

    Pruritus intensity is often not proportional to disease severity in patients with psoriasis or other pruritic dermatoses. Increasing evidence indicates that psychological factors may play an important role in the overall aetiology of pruritus. The aim of this study was to examine whether patients with psoriasis and severe pruritus differ psychologically from those with mild pruritus. In this study of 101 patients with plaque psoriasis, those with severe pruritus reported significantly higher scores for both depression and anxiety. Using the Swedish universities Scales of Personality, 4 personality traits were significantly associated with severe pruritus: Somatic trait anxiety, Embitterment, Mistrust, and Physical trait aggression. These results indicate that patients with psoriasis and severe pruritus might have a more vulnerable psychological constitution. This suggests important opportunities for clinicians to identify patients who could benefit from psychological interventions. PMID:25229695

  20. Validation of the Center for Epidemiologic Studies Depression Scale in Black Single Mothers

    PubMed Central

    Atkins, Rahshida

    2015-01-01

    Background and Purpose The purpose of this study was to investigate the factor structure of the Center for Epidemiologic Studies Depression (CES-D) scale in a community sample of Black single mothers and to evaluate the scale’s construct validity. Methods Principal components and exploratory factor analysis were used. The participants responded to the CES-D scale and Spielberger’s State-Trait Anger Expression Inventory. Results The final sample consisted of 208 Black single mothers aged 18–45 years. A 2-factor structure was accepted. Construct validity was confirmed via significant correlations with the anger scales. A method artifact for the 2-factor solution was ruled out. Conclusion The CES-D scale is valid for use with Black single mothers. Additional psychometric evidence for the CES-D for Black single mothers is warranted. PMID:25608436

  1. Study Protocol for the Fukushima Health Management Survey

    PubMed Central

    Yasumura, Seiji; Hosoya, Mitsuaki; Yamashita, Shunichi; Kamiya, Kenji; Abe, Masafumi; Akashi, Makoto; Kodama, Kazunori; Ozasa, Kotaro

    2012-01-01

    Background The accidents that occurred at the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant after the Great East Japan Earthquake on 11 March 2011 have resulted in long-term, ongoing anxiety among the residents of Fukushima, Japan. Soon after the disaster, Fukushima Prefecture launched the Fukushima Health Management Survey to investigate long-term low-dose radiation exposure caused by the accident. Fukushima Medical University took the lead in planning and implementing this survey. The primary purposes of this survey are to monitor the long-term health of residents, promote their future well-being, and confirm whether long-term low-dose radiation exposure has health effects. This report describes the rationale and implementation of the Fukushima Health Management Survey. Methods This cohort study enrolled all people living in Fukushima Prefecture after the earthquake and comprises a basic survey and 4 detailed surveys. The basic survey is to estimate levels of external radiation exposure among all 2.05 million residents. It should be noted that internal radiation levels were estimated by Fukushima Prefecture using whole-body counters. The detailed surveys comprise a thyroid ultrasound examination for all Fukushima children aged 18 years or younger, a comprehensive health check for all residents from the evacuation zones, an assessment of mental health and lifestyles of all residents from the evacuation zones, and recording of all pregnancies and births among all women in the prefecture who were pregnant on 11 March. All data have been entered into a database and will be used to support the residents and analyze the health effects of radiation. Conclusions The low response rate (<30%) to the basic survey complicates the estimation of health effects. There have been no cases of malignancy to date among 38 114 children who received thyroid ultrasound examinations. The importance of mental health care was revealed by the mental health and lifestyle survey and the pregnancy and birth survey. This long-term large-scale epidemiologic study is expected to provide valuable data in the investigation of the health effects of low-dose radiation and disaster-related stress. PMID:22955043

  2. The utility of screening for perinatal depression in the second trimester among Chinese: a three-wave prospective longitudinal study

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Daniel Fu Keung; Chan, Kin Sin

    2010-01-01

    This paper aims to study the pattern of perinatal depressive symptomatology and determine the predictive power of second trimester perinatal depressive symptoms for future perinatal periods. A population-based sample of 2,178 women completed the Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale (EPDS) in the second and third trimesters and at 6 weeks postpartum. Repeated measures ANOVAs were used to determine the EPDS scores across three stages. The predictive power of the second trimester EPDS score in identifying women with an elevated EPDS score in the third trimester and at 6 weeks postpartum were determined. The predictive power of the second trimester EPDS score was further assessed using stepwise logistic regression and receiver operator characteristic curves. EPDS scores differed significantly across three stages. The rates were 9.9%, 7.8%, and 8.7% for an EPDS score of >14 in the second and third trimesters and at 6 weeks postpartum, respectively. Using a cut-off of 14/15, the second trimester EPDS score accurately classified 89.6% of women in the third trimester and 87.2% of those at 6 weeks postpartum with or without perinatal depressive symptomatology. Women with a second trimester EPDS score >14 were 11.78 times more likely in the third trimester and 7.15 times more likely at 6 weeks postpartum to exhibit perinatal depressive symptomatology after adjustment of sociodemographic variables. The area under the curve for perinatal depressive symptomatology was 0.85 in the third trimester and 0.77 at 6 weeks postpartum. To identify women at high risk for postpartum depression, healthcare professionals could consider screening all pregnant women in the second trimester so that secondary preventive intervention may be implemented. PMID:20058040

  3. Depression Screening in Adolescents in the United States: A National Study of Ambulatory, Office-Based Practice

    PubMed Central

    Zenlea, Ian S.; Milliren, Carly E.; Mednick, Lauren; Rhodes, Erinn T.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives We aimed to determine the frequency of depression screening during ambulatory, office-based visits for adolescents seen in general/family medicine or pediatric practices in the United States using nationally representative data; determine the patient-, provider-, and visit-level factors associated with depression screening during ambulatory visits to inform recommendations to promote screening. Methods This was a cross-sectional study using the 2005–2010 National Ambulatory Medical Care and National Hospital Ambulatory Medical Care Surveys. Data were limited to ambulatory, office-based visits to general/family medicine or pediatrics clinics for adolescents aged 12 - 18 years old who did not have a documented diagnosis of depression. Results Depression screening was rare (0.2%; 95% CI 0.1 – 0.3), and 80% less likely to occur during visits for Hispanic compared to non-Hispanic, white adolescents (aOR 0.2, 95% CI 0.1 – 0.7). Depression screening was 9.1 times more likely in the Northeast compared to the West (aOR 9.1, 95% CI 2.2 – 38.1), if there were no visits within past 12 months as compared to 6 or more visits (aOR 6.1; 95% CI 1.8 – 20.4), and if stress management (aOR 24.2, 95% CI 11.8 – 49.5) or other mental health counseling (aOR 5.2, 95% CI 1.2 – 23.6) were provided. Conclusions Depression screening for adolescents is rare and associated with racial/ethnic and regional disparities. The integration of behavioral and mental health services within the patient-centered medical home might assist providers in identifying and treating depression and in addressing such disparities. PMID:24602582

  4. Depression, anxiety and stress symptoms among diabetics in Malaysia: a cross sectional study in an urban primary care setting

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Diabetes mellitus is a highly prevalent condition in Malaysia, increasing from 11.6% in 2006 to 15.2% in 2011 among individuals 18 years and above. Co-morbid depression in diabetics is associated with hyperglycemia, diabetic complications and increased health care costs. The aims of this study are to determine the prevalence and predictors of depression, anxiety and stress symptoms in Type II diabetics attending government primary care facilities in the urban area of Klang Valley, Malaysia. Methods The study was cross sectional in design and carried out in 12 randomly selected primary care government clinics in the Klang Valley, Malaysia. A total of 2508 eligible consenting respondents participated in the study. The Depression, Anxiety and Stress Scale (DASS) 21 questionnaire was used to measure depression, anxiety and stress symptoms. Data was analyzed using the SPSS version 16 software using both descriptive and inferential statistics. Results The prevalence of depression, anxiety and stress symptoms among Type II diabetics were 11.5%, 30.5% and 12.5% respectively. Using multiple logistic regression, females, Asian Indians, marital status (never married, divorced/widowed/separated), a family history of psychiatric illness, less than 2 years duration of diabetes and current alcohol consumption were found to be significant predictors of depression. For anxiety, unemployment, housewives, HbA1c level of more than 8.5%, a family history of psychiatric illness, life events and lack of physical activity were independent risk factors. Stress was significantly associated with females, HbA1c level of more than 8.5%, presence of co-morbidity, a family history of psychiatric illness, life events and current alcohol consumption. For depression (adjusted OR 2.8, 95% CI 1.1; 7.0), anxiety (adjusted OR 2.4, 95% CI 1.1;5.5) and stress (adjusted OR 4.2, 95% CI 1.8; 9.8), a family history of psychiatric illness was the strongest predictor. Conclusion We found the prevalence of depression, anxiety and stress symptoms to be high among Type II diabetics, with almost a third being classified as anxious. Screening of high risk Type II diabetics for depression, anxiety and stress symptoms in the primary care setting is recommended at regular intervals. PMID:23710584

  5. Prediction of Parkinson's disease subsequent to severe depression: a ten-year follow-up study.

    PubMed

    Walter, Uwe; Heilmann, Robert; Kaulitz, Lara; Just, Tino; Krause, Bernd Joachim; Benecke, Reiner; Höppner, Jacqueline

    2015-06-01

    Major depressive disorder (MDD) has been associated with an increased risk of subsequent Parkinson's disease (PD) in case-control and cohort studies. However, depression alone is unlikely to be a useful marker of prodromal PD due to its low specificity. In this longitudinal observational study, we assessed whether the presence of other potential markers of prodromal PD predicts the subsequent development of PD in MDD patients. Of 57 patients with severe MDD but no diagnosis of PD who underwent a structured interview, olfactory and motor investigation and transcranial sonography at baseline, 46 (36 women; mean age 54.9 ± 11.7 years) could be followed for up to 11 (median, 10) years. Three patients (2 women; age 64, 65 and 70 years) developed definite PD after 1, 7, and 9 years, respectively. The combined finding of mild asymmetric motor slowing, idiopathic hyposmia, and substantia nigra hyperechogenicity predicted subsequent PD in all patients who could be followed for longer than 1 year. Out of the whole study cohort, only the subjects with subsequent PD presented with the triad of asymmetric motor slowing, idiopathic hyposmia, and substantia nigra hyperechogenicity in combination with at least two out of four reportable risk factors (family history of PD, current non-smoker, non-coffee drinker, constipation) at baseline investigation. Post-hoc analysis revealed that additional rating of eye and eye-lid motor abnormalities might further improve the prediction of PD in larger cohorts. Findings of this pilot-study suggest that MDD patients at risk of subsequent PD can be identified using an inexpensive non-invasive diagnostic battery. PMID:25217967

  6. An Open, Multisite Pilot Study of Cognitive Therapy for Depressed Adolescents

    PubMed Central

    BELSHER, GAYLE; WILKES, T. C. R.; RUSH, A. J.

    1995-01-01

    In a 12-session open trial of cognitive therapy, depressed adolescent outpatients showed significant decreases in depressive symptomatology, although there was less improvement in a subgroup with comorbid attention-deficit hyperactivity or schizoid personality disorder. Decreases on measures of depressive symptoms and depressotypic cognition were maintained up to 5 months after acute-phase treatment. Outcome was not associated with age, gender, other comorbid diagnoses, concurrent use of antidepressants, duration of acute-phase therapy, or participation in subsequent booster sessions. Data suggest that cognitive therapy is a promising intervention for depressed adolescents and provide a rationale for pursuit of controlled cognitive therapy trials with this population. PMID:22700213

  7. Relationship between social support during pregnancy and postpartum depressive state: a prospective cohort study

    PubMed Central

    Morikawa, Mako; Okada, Takashi; Ando, Masahiko; Aleksic, Branko; Kunimoto, Shohko; Nakamura, Yukako; Kubota, Chika; Uno, Yota; Tamaji, Ai; Hayakawa, Norika; Furumura, Kaori; Shiino, Tomoko; Morita, Tokiko; Ishikawa, Naoko; Ohoka, Harue; Usui, Hinako; Banno, Naomi; Murase, Satomi; Goto, Setsuko; Kanai, Atsuko; Masuda, Tomoko; Ozaki, Norio

    2015-01-01

    Although the association between social support and postpartum depression has been previously investigated, its causal relationship remains unclear. Therefore, we examined prospectively whether social support during pregnancy affected postpartum depression. Social support and depressive symptoms were assessed by Japanese version of Social Support Questionnaire (J-SSQ) and Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale (EPDS), among 877 pregnant women in early pregnancy and at one month postpartum. First, J-SSQ was standardized among peripartum women. The J-SSQ was found to have a two-factor structure, with Number and Satisfaction subscales, by exploratory and confirmatory factor analyses. Analysis of covariance was performed to examine how EPDS and J-SSQ scores during pregnancy affected the EPDS score at postpartum. Significant associations were found between postpartum EPDS score and both EPDS and total scores on the Number subscales during pregnancy (??=?0.488 and -0.054, ps?depressive than non-depressive groups. Meanwhile, total score on Satisfaction subscales was not significantly associated with postpartum EPDS score. These results suggest that having a larger number of supportive persons during pregnancy helps protect against postpartum depression, and that this effect is greater in depressive than non-depressive pregnant women. This finding is expected to be vitally important in preventive interventions. PMID:26022720

  8. The incentive to publish negative studies: how beta-blockers and depression got stuck in the publication cycle

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Hendrika J. Luijendijk; Xander Koolman

    ObjectiveThe hypothesis that use of beta-blockers causes depression has been proposed more than forty years ago. However, despite publication of numerous studies, the issue remains unresolved. The aim of this paper is to describe a publication pattern in these studies.

  9. Incidental Retrieval of Emotional Contexts in Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder and Depression: An fMRI Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Whalley, Matthew G.; Rugg, Michael D.; Smith, Adam P. R.; Dolan, Raymond J.; Brewin, Chris R.

    2009-01-01

    In the present study, we used fMRI to assess patients suffering from post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) or depression, and trauma-exposed controls, during an episodic memory retrieval task that included non-trauma-related emotional information. In the study phase of the task neutral pictures were presented in emotional or neutral contexts.…

  10. A Feasibility Study on Recruiting Fathers of Young Children to Examine the Impact of Paternal Depression on Child Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sherr, Lorraine; Dave, Shreya; Lucas, Patricia; Senior, Rob; Nazareth, Irwin

    2006-01-01

    Fathers are underrepresented in research on mental health and child outcome. We tested a range of methods of recruitment of fathers to establish feasibility and recruitment rates to obtain a sample for a study on paternal depression and child development. The study took place in North London. Fathers of children aged 6 years and under were…

  11. Cognitive deficits in depression 

    E-print Network

    Haines, Mary Ellen

    1993-01-01

    used to detect cognitive deficits may not have tested for the types of impairments that occur specifically for individuals with mild depression; 3) perhaps due to the high rate of comorbidity of anxiety and depression, studies that have found... cognitive deficits in depression have actually tapped cognitive deficits due to a concomitant anxiety disorder; or, 4) the demanding nature of the PASAT may have elicited test anxiety, a transitory state of anxiety that results in decreased performance...

  12. Do adverts increase the probability of finding online cognitive behavioural therapy for depression? Cross-sectional study

    PubMed Central

    Goldsmith, Lesley; Hewson, Paul; Kamel Boulos, Maged N; Williams, Christopher J

    2012-01-01

    Objective To estimate the effect of online adverts on the probability of finding online cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT) for depression. Design Exploratory online cross-sectional study of search experience of people in the UK with depression in 2011. (1) The authors identified the search terms over 6?months entered by users who subsequently clicked on the advert for online help for depression. (2) A panel of volunteers across the UK recorded websites presented by normal Google search for the term ‘depression’. (iii) The authors examined these websites to estimate probabilities of knowledgeable and naive internet users finding online CBT and the improved probability by addition of a Google advert. Participants (1) 3868 internet users entering search terms related to depression into Google. (2) Panel, recruited online, of 12 UK participants with an interest in depression. Main outcome measures Probability of finding online CBT for depression with/without an advert. Results The 3868 users entered 1748 different search terms but the single keyword ‘depression’ resulted in two-thirds of the presentations of, and over half the ‘clicks’ on, the advert. In total, 14 different websites were presented to our panel in the first page of Google results for ‘depression’. Four of the 14 websites had links enabling access to online CBT in three clicks for knowledgeable users. Extending this approach to the 10 most frequent search terms, the authors estimated probabilities of finding online CBT as 0.29 for knowledgeable users and 0.006 for naive users, making it unlikely CBT would be found. Adding adverts that linked directly to online CBT increased the probabilities to 0.31 (knowledgeable) and 0.02 (naive). Conclusions In this case, online CBT was not easy to find and online adverts substantially increased the chance for naive users. Others could use this approach to explore additional impact before committing to long-term Google AdWords advertising budgets. Trial registration This exploratory case study was a substudy within a cluster randomised trial, registered on http://www.clinicaltrials.gov (reference: NCT01469689). (The trial will be reported subsequently). PMID:22508957

  13. A Pilot Study Evaluating the Stigma and Public Perception about the Causes of Depression and Schizophrenia

    PubMed Central

    Khan, TM; Hassali, MA; Tahir, H; Khan, A

    2011-01-01

    Background: To evaluate public perceptions towards the causes of depression and schizophrenia and identifications of factors resulting stigma towards mental ill. Method: A cross-sectional study was conducted among the inhabitants of Pulau-Pinang, Malaysia in March, 2009. A 24-item questionnaire was used to obtain respondent views. A non-probability (i.e convenient sampling method) was used to approach the potential respondents. Data analysis was conducted using SPSS version 13 ®, non-parametric statistics (Chi-square) was applied to determine the association. Alpha value less than 0.05 were considered significant. Results: One hundred respondents showed their willingness to participate in the study; overall response of the study was 40.0%. Majority 69% of the respondents were Malays, followed by Chinese and Indians. Public recognition toward depression was higher than schizophrenia. Lack of social support (X2= 4.832, P= 0.049), chemical imbalance in Brian (X2=6.132, P= 0.013*) and believes in supernatural factors (X2= 6.700, P= 0.050) were the commonly shared reasons for the mental disorders. Evaluation in terms of stigma revealed that majority 61 (55.0%). Individuals with mental disorders were not friendly (X2= 1.008, P= 0.050). Furthermore, one third of the population believe that they are moody, dangerous and unpredictable, it is better to avoid them. Conclusion: Overall findings revealed that Malaysians believe in supernatural reasons for the prevalence of mental disorders. Similarly the level of stigma towards mentally ill was higher among the respondents. PMID:23113054

  14. Clinical Depression and Daily Activity Level

    E-print Network

    McCurdy, Danyale Patrice

    2008-04-28

    Depression has been linked to a number of health problems, including cardiovascular disease (CVD). One link may be depression-related decreases in physical activity. This study was designed to examine physical activity in clinically depressed...

  15. Perceived Social Isolation Makes Me Sad: Five Year Cross-Lagged Analyses of Loneliness and Depressive Symptomatology in the Chicago Health, Aging, and Social Relations Study

    PubMed Central

    Cacioppo, John T.; Hawkley, Louise C.; Thisted, Ronald A.

    2009-01-01

    We present evidence from a five year longitudinal study for the prospective associations between loneliness and depressive symptoms in a population-based, ethnically diverse sample of 229 men and women who were 50-68 years old at study onset. Cross-lagged panel models were used in which the criterion variables were loneliness and depressive symptoms considered simultaneously. Variations on this model evaluated the possible effects of gender, ethnicity, education, physical functioning, medications, social network size, neuroticism, stressful life events, perceived stress, and social support on the observed associations between loneliness and depressive symptoms. Cross-lag analyses indicated that loneliness predicted subsequent changes in depressive symptomatology but not vice versa, and that this temporal association was not attributable to demographic variables, objective social isolation, dispositional negativity, stress, or social support. The importance of distinguishing between loneliness and depressive symptoms and the implications for loneliness and depressive symptomatology in older adults are discussed. PMID:20545429

  16. Does psychological resilience mediate the impact of social support on geriatric depression? An exploratory study among Chinese older adults in Singapore.

    PubMed

    Li, Jinhui; Theng, Yin-Leng; Foo, Schubert

    2015-04-01

    Social support and resilience were considered to be two significant influential factors for depression in late life. The study aims to present a mediation model for understanding the interrelations among social support, resilience, and geriatric depression. A cross-sectional survey study was conducted among 162 community-dwelling Chinese older adults in Singapore. Findings indicated a significant indirect effect of social support on geriatric depression through the mediation of resilience, by controlling demographic variables. Further, an identical influencing pattern between problem-solving resilience and emotion regulation resilience were found in the two individual models, suggesting a similar mediation role in linking social support and geriatric depression. These results extended and integrated earlier findings on the relationship of psychosocial factors and geriatric depression, and pointed out practical implications for future work on depression interventions. PMID:25703041

  17. Depressed College Students and Tricyclic Antidepressant Therapy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Ben Maurice

    1978-01-01

    Depressed college students representing several distinct diagnostic groups were studied. Evidence indicates that patients with depressive neurosis show optimal treatment outcomes following tricyclic antidepressant therapy. (JMF)

  18. Association between actual weight status, perceived weight and depressive, anxious symptoms in Chinese adolescents: a cross-sectional study

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Backgroud The purpose of this study was to describe actual measured weight and perceived weight and to explore associations with depressive, anxiety symptoms in school adolescents in China. Methods A sample of 1144 Chinese adolescents was randomly selected from four schools in Wuhan, China, including 665 boys and 479 girls with ages ranging between 10 and 17 years. Actual measured weight and height and perceived weight status were compared to anxiety and depressive symptoms measured using the revised Self-Rating Anxiety Scale and Children's Depression Inventory. A general linear model was used to compare differences in psychological symptoms among the teenagers with different measured and perceived weights. Results When compared with standardized weight tables (WHO age- and gender-specific body mass index (BMI) cutoffs (2007 reference)), girls were more likely to misperceive themselves as overweight, whereas more boys misclassified their weight status as underweight. The adolescents who perceived themselves as overweight were more likely to experience depressive and anxiety symptoms (except girls) than those who perceived themselves as normal and/or underweight. However, no significant association was found between depressive and anxiety symptoms actual measured weight status. Conclusions Perceived weight status, but not the actual weight status, was associated with psychological symptoms. PMID:20932280

  19. Association between serotonin transporter genotype, brain structure and adolescent-onset major depressive disorder: a longitudinal prospective study

    PubMed Central

    Little, K; Olsson, C A; Whittle, S; Youssef, G J; Byrne, M L; Simmons, J G; Yücel, M; Foley, D L; Allen, N B

    2014-01-01

    The extent to which brain structural abnormalities might serve as neurobiological endophenotypes that mediate the link between the variation in the promoter of the serotonin transporter gene (5-HTTLPR) and depression is currently unknown. We therefore investigated whether variation in hippocampus, amygdala, orbitofrontal cortex (OFC) and anterior cingulate cortex volumes at age 12 years mediated a putative association between 5-HTTLPR genotype and first onset of major depressive disorder (MDD) between age 13–19 years, in a longitudinal study of 174 adolescents (48% males). Increasing copies of S-alleles were found to predict smaller left hippocampal volume, which in turn was associated with increased risk of experiencing a first onset of MDD. Increasing copies of S-alleles also predicted both smaller left and right medial OFC volumes, although neither left nor right medial OFC volumes were prospectively associated with a first episode of MDD during adolescence. The findings therefore suggest that structural abnormalities in the left hippocampus may be present prior to the onset of depression during adolescence and may be partly responsible for an indirect association between 5-HTTLPR genotype and depressive illness. 5-HTTLPR genotype may also impact upon other regions of the brain, such as the OFC, but structural differences in these regions in early adolescence may not necessarily alter the risk for onset of depression during later adolescence. PMID:25226554

  20. Psychosocial Risk Factors for Cognitive Decline in Late-Life Depression: Findings from the MTLD-III Study

    PubMed Central

    Rej, Soham; Begley, Amy; Gildengers, Ariel; Dew, Mary Amanda; Reynolds, Charles F.; Butters, Meryl A.

    2015-01-01

    Background Cognitive impairment and depression frequently co-occur in late life. There remains a need to better characterize psychosocial risk factors of cognitive decline in older adults with depression. We hypothesized that certain psychosocial factors would be associated with higher risk of cognitive decline in individuals with late-life depression. Methods 130 individuals aged ? 65 years who had achieved remission from a major depressive episode were randomized to donepezil or placebo and then closely followed for two years. Using Cox proportional hazard models, we examined the association between baseline median household income, education level, race, marital status, and social support and cognitive decline over the follow-up. Results Lower interpersonal support (OR = 0.86 [0.74–0.99], p = .04) and lower baseline global neuropsychological score (OR = 0.56 [0.36–0.87], p = .001) predicted shorter time to conversion to MCI or dementia in univariate models. These exposures did not remain significant in multivariate analyses. Neither socioeconomic status nor other psychosocial factors independently predicted cognitive diagnostic conversion (p > .05). Conclusions We did not find reliable associations between cognitive outcome and any of the psychosocial factors examined. Future large-scale, epidemiological studies, ideally using well-validated subjective measures, should better characterize psychosocial risk factors for cognitive decline in late-life depression. PMID:26180559