Science.gov

Sample records for depth charges

  1. DEPTH-CHARGE static and time-dependent perturbation/sensitivity system for nuclear reactor core analysis. Revision I. [DEPTH-CHARGE code

    SciTech Connect

    White, J.R.

    1985-04-01

    This report provides the background theory, user input, and sample problems required for the efficient application of the DEPTH-CHARGE system - a code black for both static and time-dependent perturbation theory and data sensitivity analyses. The DEPTH-CHARGE system is of modular construction and has been implemented within the VENTURE-BURNER computational system at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. The DEPTH module (coupled with VENTURE) solves for the three adjoint functions of Depletion Perturbation Theory and calculates the desired time-dependent derivatives of the response with respect to the nuclide concentrations and nuclear data utilized in the reference model. The CHARGE code is a collection of utility routines for general data manipulation and input preparation and considerably extends the usefulness of the system through the automatic generation of adjoint sources, estimated perturbed responses, and relative data sensitivity coefficients. Combined, the DEPTH-CHARGE system provides, for the first time, a complete generalized first-order perturbation/sensitivity theory capability for both static and time-dependent analyses of realistic multidimensional reactor models. This current documentation incorporates minor revisions to the original DEPTH-CHARGE documentation (ORNL/CSD-78) to reflect some new capabilities within the individual codes.

  2. Depth profile of halide anions under highly charged biological membrane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sung, Woongmo; Wang, Wenjie; Lee, Jonggwan; Vaknin, David; Kim, Doseok

    2015-03-01

    Halide ion (Cl- and I-) distribution under a cationic Langmuir monolayer consisting of 1,2-dipalmitoyl-3 trimethylammonium-propane (DPTAP) molecules was investigated by vibrational sum-frequency generation (VSFG) and X-ray spectroscopy. From VSFG spectra, it was observed that large halide anions (I-) screen surface charge more efficiently so that interfacial water alignment becomes more randomized. On the other hand, number density of ions directly measured by X-ray fluorescence spectroscopy at grazing incidence angle reveals that the ion densities within 6 ~ 8 nm are the same for both I- and Cl-. Since the observed ion densities in both cases are almost equal to the charge density of the DPTAP monolayer, we propose that larger halide anions are attracted closer to the surface making direct binding with the charged headgroups of the molecules in the monolayer, accomplishing charge neutrality in short distance. This direct adsorption of anions also disturbs the monolayer structure both in terms of the conformation of alkyl chains and the vertical configuration of the monolayer, with iodine having the stronger effect. Our study shows that the length scale that ions neutralize a charged interface varies significantly and specifically even between monovalent ions.

  3. Depth

    PubMed Central

    Koenderink, Jan J; van Doorn, Andrea J; Wagemans, Johan

    2011-01-01

    Depth is the feeling of remoteness, or separateness, that accompanies awareness in human modalities like vision and audition. In specific cases depths can be graded on an ordinal scale, or even measured quantitatively on an interval scale. In the case of pictorial vision this is complicated by the fact that human observers often appear to apply mental transformations that involve depths in distinct visual directions. This implies that a comparison of empirically determined depths between observers involves pictorial space as an integral entity, whereas comparing pictorial depths as such is meaningless. We describe the formal structure of pictorial space purely in the phenomenological domain, without taking recourse to the theories of optics which properly apply to physical space—a distinct ontological domain. We introduce a number of general ways to design and implement methods of geodesy in pictorial space, and discuss some basic problems associated with such measurements. We deal mainly with conceptual issues. PMID:23145244

  4. Resonant charge transfer in low-energy ion scattering: Information depth in the reionization regime.

    PubMed

    Primetzhofer, D; Spitz, M; Taglauer, E; Bauer, P

    2011-11-01

    Time-Of-Flight Low-energy ion scattering (TOF-LEIS) experiments were performed for He(+) ions scattered from Cu(100) and Cu(0.5)Au(0.5)(100). Probabilities for resonant neutralization and reionization in close collisions were deduced in a wide energy range. To learn about the information depth in LEIS, in a next step ion spectra were analyzed for polycrystalline Cu samples. The relative yield of backscattered projectiles, which have undergone distinct charge exchange processes, was calculated. Results indicate a strong contribution to the ion yield that origins from particles reionized in a close collision in deeper layers when experiments are performed at energies where reionization is prominent. The surface sensitivity of the ion signal at different energies is quantified. Based on these results, the total ion spectrum was quantitatively modelled by two consistent, but different approaches. PMID:22053118

  5. Depth profiling charge accumulation from a ferroelectric into a doped Mott insulator.

    PubMed

    Marinova, Maya; Rault, Julien E; Gloter, Alexandre; Nemsak, Slavomir; Palsson, Gunnar K; Rueff, Jean-Pascal; Fadley, Charles S; Carrétéro, Cécile; Yamada, Hiroyuki; March, Katia; Garcia, Vincent; Fusil, Stéphane; Barthélémy, Agnès; Stéphan, Odile; Colliex, Christian; Bibes, Manuel

    2015-04-01

    The electric field control of functional properties is a crucial goal in oxide-based electronics. Nonvolatile switching between different resistivity or magnetic states in an oxide channel can be achieved through charge accumulation or depletion from an adjacent ferroelectric. However, the way in which charge distributes near the interface between the ferroelectric and the oxide remains poorly known, which limits our understanding of such switching effects. Here, we use a first-of-a-kind combination of scanning transmission electron microscopy with electron energy loss spectroscopy, near-total-reflection hard X-ray photoemission spectroscopy, and ab initio theory to address this issue. We achieve a direct, quantitative, atomic-scale characterization of the polarization-induced charge density changes at the interface between the ferroelectric BiFeO3 and the doped Mott insulator Ca(1-x)Ce(x)MnO3, thus providing insight on how interface-engineering can enhance these switching effects. PMID:25768912

  6. Depth profiles of the Doppler-broadening S parameter for polymers obtained with two measuring patterns: The role of accumulated charges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, J.; Zhang, P.; Lu, E. Y.; Cao, X. Z.; Yu, R. S.; Wang, B. Y.

    2014-03-01

    Depth profiles of Doppler broadening S parameter for oxygen containing polymer polycarbonate (PC), fluoropolymer poly (tetrafluoroethylene) (PTFE) and chlorine containing polymer polyvinylchloride-unplasticized (UPVC) were obtained with two measuring patterns, i.e. energy increase pattern and energy decrease pattern. The two curves can't coincide with each other for that a trough appeared between 1 and 5 keV in the curve obtained with energy decrease pattern. It was found that charges induced by high energy incident positrons greatly influenced the annihilation of low energy incident positrons, while charges induced by low energy incident positrons showed little influence on the annihilation of high energy incident positrons. With energy increase measuring pattern, charges induced by low energy incident positrons showed little influence on the annihilation of later incident high energy positrons, thus the measurement can give the depth profile of S parameter in polymer as it was.

  7. Noncontacting laser photocarrier radiometric depth profilometry of harmonically modulated band bending in the space-charge layer at doped SiO{sub 2}-Si interfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Mandelis, Andreas; Batista, Jerias; Gibkes, Juergen; Pawlak, Michael; Pelzl, Josef

    2005-04-15

    Laser infrared photocarrier radiometry (PCR) was used with a harmonically modulated low-power laser pump and a superposed dc superband-gap optical bias (a secondary laser beam) to control and monitor the space-charge-layer (SCL) width in oxidized p-Si-SiO{sub 2} and n-Si-SiO{sub 2} interfaces (wafers) exhibiting charged interface-state related band bending. Applying the theory of PCR-SCL dynamics [A. Mandelis, J. Appl. Phys. 97, 083508 (2005)] to the experiments yielded various transport parameters of the samples as well as depth profiles of the SCL exhibiting complete ( p-type Si) or partial (n-type Si) band flattening, to a degree controlled by widely different minority-carrier capture cross section at each interface. The uncompensated charge density at the interface was also calculated from the theory.

  8. Temperature Dependence of the Magnetic Penetration Depth in the Case of the Coexistence of Charge Density Waves and Superconductivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eremin, M. V.; Sunyaev, D. A.

    2015-12-01

    An analytical expression for the temperature dependence of the superfluid density in the regime of the coexistence of charge density waves (CDW) and superconductivity has been derived beyond the effective mass approximation. In contrast to the previous research on this subject, possible dispersions of both order parameters have been taken into account. In particular, it was found that when the CDW gap parameter depends on the wave vector, London's type current is nonzero even above T_c , i.e., in the interval T_c

  9. Skin-depth lattice strain, core-level trap depression and valence charge polarization of Al surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yan; Bo, Maolin; Liu, Yonghui; Guo, Yongling; Wang, Haibin; Yue, Jian; Huang, Yongli

    2016-01-01

    Clarifying the origin for surface core-level shift (SCLS) and gaining quantitative information regarding the coordination-resolved local strain, binding energy (BE) shift and cohesive energy change have been a challenge. Here, we show that a combination of the bond order-length-strength (BOLS) premise, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and the ab initio density functional theory (DFT) calculations of aluminum (Al) 2p3/2 energy shift of Al surfaces has enabled us to derive such information, namely, (i) the 2p3/2 energy of an isolated Al atom (72.146 ± 0.003eV) and its bulk shift (0.499 eV); (ii) the skin lattice contracts by up to 12.5% and the BE density increases by 70%; and (iii) the cohesive energy drops up to 38%. It is affirmed that the shorter and stronger bonds between under-coordinated atoms provide a perturbation to the Hamiltonian and hence lead to the local strain, quantum entrapment and valence charge polarization. Findings should help in understanding the phenomena of surface pre-melting and skin-high elasticity, in general.

  10. Deep depth undex simulator

    SciTech Connect

    Higginbotham, R. R.; Malakhoff, A.

    1985-01-29

    A deep depth underwater simulator is illustrated for determining the dual effects of nuclear type underwater explosion shockwaves and hydrostatic pressures on a test vessel while simulating, hydrostatically, that the test vessel is located at deep depths. The test vessel is positioned within a specially designed pressure vessel followed by pressurizing a fluid contained between the test and pressure vessels. The pressure vessel, with the test vessel suspended therein, is then placed in a body of water at a relatively shallow depth, and an explosive charge is detonated at a predetermined distance from the pressure vessel. The resulting shockwave is transmitted through the pressure vessel wall so that the shockwave impinging on the test vessel is representative of nuclear type explosive shockwaves transmitted to an underwater structure at great depths.

  11. Apparent Depth.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nassar, Antonio B.

    1994-01-01

    Discusses a well-known optical refraction problem where the depth of an object in a liquid is determined. Proposes that many texts incorrectly solve the problem. Provides theory, equations, and diagrams. (MVL)

  12. Oxygen depth profiling with subnanometre depth resolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kosmata, Marcel; Munnik, Frans; Hanf, Daniel; Grötzschel, Rainer; Crocoll, Sonja; Möller, Wolfhard

    2014-10-01

    A High-depth Resolution Elastic Recoil Detection (HR-ERD) set-up using a magnetic spectrometer has been taken into operation at the Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf for the first time. This instrument allows the investigation of light elements in ultra-thin layers and their interfaces with a depth resolution of less than 1 nm near the surface. As the depth resolution is highly influenced by the experimental measurement parameters, sophisticated optimisation procedures have been implemented. Effects of surface roughness and sample damage caused by high fluences need to be quantified for each kind of material. Also corrections are essential for non-equilibrium charge state distributions that exist very close to the surface. Using the example of a high-k multilayer SiO2/Si3N4Ox/SiO2/Si it is demonstrated that oxygen in ultra-thin films of a few nanometres thickness can be investigated by HR-ERD.

  13. Depth keying

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gvili, Ronen; Kaplan, Amir; Ofek, Eyal; Yahav, Giora

    2003-05-01

    We present a new solution to the known problem of video keying in a natural environment. We segment foreground objects from background objects using their relative distance from the camera, which makes it possible to do away with the use of color for keying. To do so, we developed and built a novel depth video camera, capable of producing RGB and D signals, where D stands for the distance to each pixel. The new RGBD camera enables the creation of a whole new gallery of effects and applications such as multi-layer background substitutions. This new modality makes the production of real time mixed reality video possible, as well as post-production manipulation of recorded video. We address the problem of color spill -- in which the color of the foreground object is mixed, along its boundary, with the background color. This problem prevents an accurate separation of the foreground object from its background, and it is most visible when compositing the foreground objects to a new background. Most existing techniques are limited to the use of a constant background color. We offer a novel general approach to the problem with enabling the use of the natural background, based upon the D channel generated by the camera.

  14. Stereoscopic depth constancy.

    PubMed

    Guan, Phillip; Banks, Martin S

    2016-06-19

    Depth constancy is the ability to perceive a fixed depth interval in the world as constant despite changes in viewing distance and the spatial scale of depth variation. It is well known that the spatial frequency of depth variation has a large effect on threshold. In the first experiment, we determined that the visual system compensates for this differential sensitivity when the change in disparity is suprathreshold, thereby attaining constancy similar to contrast constancy in the luminance domain. In a second experiment, we examined the ability to perceive constant depth when the spatial frequency and viewing distance both changed. To attain constancy in this situation, the visual system has to estimate distance. We investigated this ability when vergence, accommodation and vertical disparity are all presented accurately and therefore provided veridical information about viewing distance. We found that constancy is nearly complete across changes in viewing distance. Depth constancy is most complete when the scale of the depth relief is constant in the world rather than when it is constant in angular units at the retina. These results bear on the efficacy of algorithms for creating stereo content.This article is part of the themed issue 'Vision in our three-dimensional world'. PMID:27269596

  15. Stereoscopic depth constancy

    PubMed Central

    Guan, Phillip

    2016-01-01

    Depth constancy is the ability to perceive a fixed depth interval in the world as constant despite changes in viewing distance and the spatial scale of depth variation. It is well known that the spatial frequency of depth variation has a large effect on threshold. In the first experiment, we determined that the visual system compensates for this differential sensitivity when the change in disparity is suprathreshold, thereby attaining constancy similar to contrast constancy in the luminance domain. In a second experiment, we examined the ability to perceive constant depth when the spatial frequency and viewing distance both changed. To attain constancy in this situation, the visual system has to estimate distance. We investigated this ability when vergence, accommodation and vertical disparity are all presented accurately and therefore provided veridical information about viewing distance. We found that constancy is nearly complete across changes in viewing distance. Depth constancy is most complete when the scale of the depth relief is constant in the world rather than when it is constant in angular units at the retina. These results bear on the efficacy of algorithms for creating stereo content. This article is part of the themed issue ‘Vision in our three-dimensional world’. PMID:27269596

  16. Depth Optimization Study

    DOE Data Explorer

    Kawase, Mitsuhiro

    2009-11-22

    The zipped file contains a directory of data and routines used in the NNMREC turbine depth optimization study (Kawase et al., 2011), and calculation results thereof. For further info, please contact Mitsuhiro Kawase at kawase@uw.edu. Reference: Mitsuhiro Kawase, Patricia Beba, and Brian Fabien (2011), Finding an Optimal Placement Depth for a Tidal In-Stream Conversion Device in an Energetic, Baroclinic Tidal Channel, NNMREC Technical Report.

  17. Depth from water reflection.

    PubMed

    Linjie Yang; Jianzhuang Liu; Xiaoou Tang

    2015-04-01

    The scene in a water reflection image often exhibits bilateral symmetry. In this paper, we design a framework to reconstruct the depth from a single water reflection image. This problem can be regarded as a special case of two-view stereo vision. It is challenging to obtain correspondences from the real scene and the mirror scene due to their large appearance difference. We first propose an appearance adaptation method to transform the appearance of the mirror scene so that it is much closer to the real scene. We then present a stereo matching algorithm to obtain the disparity map of the real scene. Compared with other depth-from-symmetry work that deals with man-made objects, our algorithm can recover the depth maps of a variety of scenes, where both natural and man-made objects may exist. PMID:25643408

  18. Radon depth migration

    SciTech Connect

    Hildebrand, S.T. ); Carroll, R.J. )

    1993-02-01

    A depth migration method is presented that used Radon-transformed common-source seismograms as input. It is shown that the Radon depth migration method can be extended to spatially varying velocity depth models by using asymptotic ray theory (ART) to construct wavefield continuation operators. These operators downward continue an incident receiver-array plane wave and an assumed point-source wavefield into the subsurface. The migration velocity model is constrain to have longer characteristic wavelengths than the dominant source wavelength such that the ART approximations for the continuation operators are valid. This method is used successfully to migrate two synthetic data examples: (1) a point diffractor, and (2) a dipping layer and syncline interface model. It is shown that the Radon migration method has a computational advantage over the standard Kirchhoff migration method in that fewer rays are computed in a main memory implementation.

  19. Depth remapping using seam carving for depth image based rendering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsubaki, Ikuko; Iwauchi, Kenichi

    2015-03-01

    Depth remapping is a technique to control depth range of stereo images. Conventional remapping which uses a transform function in the whole image has a stable characteristic, however it sometimes reduces the 3D appearance too much. To cope with this problem, a depth remapping method which preserves the details of depth structure is proposed. We apply seam carving, which is an effective technique for image retargeting, to depth remapping. An extended depth map is defined as a space-depth volume, and a seam surface which is a 2D monotonic and connected manifold is introduced. The depth range is reduced by removing depth values on the seam surface from the space-depth volume. Finally a stereo image pair is synthesized from the corrected depth map and an input color image by depth image based rendering.

  20. Burn Depth Monitor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1993-01-01

    Supra Medical Systems is successfully marketing a device that detects the depth of burn wounds in human skin. To develop the product, the companyused technology developed by NASA Langley physicists looking for better ultrasonic detection of small air bubbles and cracks in metal. The device is being marketed to burn wound analysis and treatment centers. Through a Space Act agreement, NASA and the company are also working to further develop ultrasonic instruments for new medical applications.

  1. Burn Depth Monitor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1993-01-01

    Supra Medical Systems is successfully marketing a device that detects the depth of burn wounds in human skin. To develop the product, the company used technology developed by NASA Langley physicists looking for better ultrasonic detection of small air bubbles and cracks in metal. The device is being marketed to burn wound analysis and treatment centers. Through a Space Act agreement, NASA and the company are also working to further develop ultrasonic instruments for new medical applications

  2. Burn Depth Monitor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1993-01-01

    Supra Medical Systems is successfully marketing a device that detects the depth of burn wounds in human skin. To develop the product, the company used technology developed by NASA Langley physicists looking for better ultrasonic detection of small air bubbles and cracks in metal. The device is being marketed to burn wound analysis and treatment centers. Through a Space Act agreement, NASA and the company are also working to further develop ultrasonic instruments for new medical applications.

  3. Variable depth core sampler

    DOEpatents

    Bourgeois, P.M.; Reger, R.J.

    1996-02-20

    A variable depth core sampler apparatus is described comprising a first circular hole saw member, having longitudinal sections that collapses to form a point and capture a sample, and a second circular hole saw member residing inside said first hole saw member to support the longitudinal sections of said first hole saw member and prevent them from collapsing to form a point. The second hole saw member may be raised and lowered inside said first hole saw member. 7 figs.

  4. Variable depth core sampler

    DOEpatents

    Bourgeois, Peter M.; Reger, Robert J.

    1996-01-01

    A variable depth core sampler apparatus comprising a first circular hole saw member, having longitudinal sections that collapses to form a point and capture a sample, and a second circular hole saw member residing inside said first hole saw member to support the longitudinal sections of said first hole saw member and prevent them from collapsing to form a point. The second hole saw member may be raised and lowered inside said first hole saw member.

  5. Variable depth core sampler

    SciTech Connect

    Bourgeois, P.M.; Reger, R.J.

    1994-12-31

    This invention relates to a sampling means, more particularly to a device to sample hard surfaces at varying depths. Often it is desirable to take samples of a hard surface wherein the samples are of the same diameter but of varying depths. Current practice requires that a full top-to-bottom sample of the material be taken, using a hole saw, and boring a hole from one end of the material to the other. The sample thus taken is removed from the hole saw and the middle of said sample is then subjected to further investigation. This paper describes a variable depth core sampler comprimising a circular hole saw member, having longitudinal sections that collapse to form a point and capture a sample, and a second saw member residing inside the first hole saw member to support the longitudinal sections of the first member and prevent them from collapsing to form a point. The second hole saw member may be raised and lowered inside the the first hole saw member.

  6. CHARGE IMBALANCE

    SciTech Connect

    Clarke, John

    1980-09-01

    The purpose of this article is to review the theory of charge imbalance, and to discuss its relevance to a number of experimental situations. We introduce the concepts of quasiparticle charge and charge imbalance, and discuss the generation and detection of charge imbalance by tunneling. We describe the relaxation of the injected charge imbalance by inelastic scattering processes, and show how the Boltzmann equation can be solved to obtain the steady state quasiparticle distribution and the charge relaxation rate. Details are given of experiments to measure charge imbalance and the charge relaxation rate when inelastic scattering is the predominant relaxation mechanism. Experiments on and theories of other charge relaxation mechanisms are discussed, namely relaxation via elastic scattering in the presence of energy gap anisotropy, or in the presence of a pair breaking mechanism such as magnetic impurities or an applied supercurrent or magnetic field. We describe three other situations in which charge imbalance occurs, namely the resistance of the NS interface, phase slip centers, and the flow of a supercurrent in the presence of a temperature gradient.

  7. Internal Charging

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Minow, Joseph I.

    2014-01-01

    (1) High energy (>100keV) electrons penetrate spacecraft walls and accumulate in dielectrics or isolated conductors; (2) Threat environment is energetic electrons with sufficient flux to charge circuit boards, cable insulation, and ungrounded metal faster than charge can dissipate; (3) Accumulating charge density generates electric fields in excess of material breakdown strenght resulting in electrostatic discharge; and (4) System impact is material damage, discharge currents inside of spacecraft Faraday cage on or near critical circuitry, and RF noise.

  8. Depth inpainting by tensor voting.

    PubMed

    Kulkarni, Mandar; Rajagopalan, Ambasamudram N

    2013-06-01

    Depth maps captured by range scanning devices or by using optical cameras often suffer from missing regions due to occlusions, reflectivity, limited scanning area, sensor imperfections, etc. In this paper, we propose a fast and reliable algorithm for depth map inpainting using the tensor voting (TV) framework. For less complex missing regions, local edge and depth information is utilized for synthesizing missing values. The depth variations are modeled by local planes using 3D TV, and missing values are estimated using plane equations. For large and complex missing regions, we collect and evaluate depth estimates from self-similar (training) datasets. We align the depth maps of the training set with the target (defective) depth map and evaluate the goodness of depth estimates among candidate values using 3D TV. We demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed approaches on real as well as synthetic data. PMID:24323102

  9. Charging machine

    DOEpatents

    Medlin, John B.

    1976-05-25

    A charging machine for loading fuel slugs into the process tubes of a nuclear reactor includes a tubular housing connected to the process tube, a charging trough connected to the other end of the tubular housing, a device for loading the charging trough with a group of fuel slugs, means for equalizing the coolant pressure in the charging trough with the pressure in the process tubes, means for pushing the group of fuel slugs into the process tube and a latch and a seal engaging the last object in the group of fuel slugs to prevent the fuel slugs from being ejected from the process tube when the pusher is removed and to prevent pressure liquid from entering the charging machine.

  10. Jupiter Clouds in Depth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] 619 nm [figure removed for brevity, see original site] 727 nm [figure removed for brevity, see original site] 890 nm

    Images from NASA's Cassini spacecraft using three different filters reveal cloud structures and movements at different depths in the atmosphere around Jupiter's south pole.

    Cassini's cameras come equipped with filters that sample three wavelengths where methane gas absorbs light. These are in the red at 619 nanometer (nm) wavelength and in the near-infrared at 727 nm and 890 nm. Absorption in the 619 nm filter is weak. It is stronger in the 727 nm band and very strong in the 890 nm band where 90 percent of the light is absorbed by methane gas. Light in the weakest band can penetrate the deepest into Jupiter's atmosphere. It is sensitive to the amount of cloud and haze down to the pressure of the water cloud, which lies at a depth where pressure is about 6 times the atmospheric pressure at sea level on the Earth). Light in the strongest methane band is absorbed at high altitude and is sensitive only to the ammonia cloud level and higher (pressures less than about one-half of Earth's atmospheric pressure) and the middle methane band is sensitive to the ammonia and ammonium hydrosulfide cloud layers as deep as two times Earth's atmospheric pressure.

    The images shown here demonstrate the power of these filters in studies of cloud stratigraphy. The images cover latitudes from about 15 degrees north at the top down to the southern polar region at the bottom. The left and middle images are ratios, the image in the methane filter divided by the image at a nearby wavelength outside the methane band. Using ratios emphasizes where contrast is due to methane absorption and not to other factors, such as the absorptive properties of the cloud particles, which influence contrast at all wavelengths.

    The most prominent feature seen in all three filters is the polar stratospheric haze that makes Jupiter

  11. Mechanistic evaluation of virus clearance by depth filtration.

    PubMed

    Venkiteshwaran, Adith; Fogle, Jace; Patnaik, Purbasa; Kowle, Ron; Chen, Dayue

    2015-01-01

    Virus clearance by depth filtration has not been well-understood mechanistically due to lack of quantitative data on filter charge characteristics and absence of systematic studies. It is generally believed that both electrostatic interactions and sized based mechanical entrapment contribute to virus clearance by depth filtration. In order to establish whether the effectiveness of virus clearance correlates with the charge characteristics of a given depth filter, a counter-ion displacement technique was employed to determine the ionic capacity for several depth filters. Two depth filters (Millipore B1HC and X0HC) with significant differences in ionic capacities were selected and evaluated for their ability to eliminate viruses. The high ionic capacity X0HC filter showed complete porcine parvovirus (PPV) clearance (eliminating the spiked viruses to below the limit of detection) under low conductivity conditions (≤2.5 mS/cm), achieving a log10 reduction factor (LRF) of > 4.8. On the other hand, the low ionic capacity B1HC filter achieved only ∼2.1-3.0 LRF of PPV clearance under the same conditions. These results indicate that parvovirus clearance by these two depth filters are mainly achieved via electrostatic interactions between the filters and PPV. When much larger xenotropic murine leukemia virus (XMuLV) was used as the model virus, complete retrovirus clearance was obtained under all conditions evaluated for both depth filters, suggesting the involvement of mechanisms other than just electrostatic interactions in XMuLV clearance. PMID:25683459

  12. Learning Sparse Representations of Depth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tosic, Ivana; Olshausen, Bruno A.; Culpepper, Benjamin J.

    2011-09-01

    This paper introduces a new method for learning and inferring sparse representations of depth (disparity) maps. The proposed algorithm relaxes the usual assumption of the stationary noise model in sparse coding. This enables learning from data corrupted with spatially varying noise or uncertainty, typically obtained by laser range scanners or structured light depth cameras. Sparse representations are learned from the Middlebury database disparity maps and then exploited in a two-layer graphical model for inferring depth from stereo, by including a sparsity prior on the learned features. Since they capture higher-order dependencies in the depth structure, these priors can complement smoothness priors commonly used in depth inference based on Markov Random Field (MRF) models. Inference on the proposed graph is achieved using an alternating iterative optimization technique, where the first layer is solved using an existing MRF-based stereo matching algorithm, then held fixed as the second layer is solved using the proposed non-stationary sparse coding algorithm. This leads to a general method for improving solutions of state of the art MRF-based depth estimation algorithms. Our experimental results first show that depth inference using learned representations leads to state of the art denoising of depth maps obtained from laser range scanners and a time of flight camera. Furthermore, we show that adding sparse priors improves the results of two depth estimation methods: the classical graph cut algorithm by Boykov et al. and the more recent algorithm of Woodford et al.

  13. Magnetic depths to basalts: extension of spectral depths method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clifton, Roger

    2015-11-01

    Although spectral depth determination has played a role in magnetic interpretation for over four decades, automating the procedure has been inhibited by the need for manual intervention. This paper introduces the concept of a slope spectrum of an equivalent layer, to be used in an automated depth interpretation algorithm suitable for application to very large datasets such as the complete Northern Territory aeromagnetic grid. In order to trace the extensive basalts across the Northern Territory, profiles of spectral depths have been obtained at 5 km intervals across the NT stitched grid of total magnetic intensity (TMI). Each profile is a graph from 0 to 1000 m of the probability of a magnetic layer occurring at each depth. Automating the collection of the 50 000 profiles required the development of a formula that relates slopes along the power spectrum to depths to an equivalent magnetic layer. Model slabs were populated with a large number of randomly located dipoles and their power spectra correlated with modelled depth to provide the formula. Depth profiles are too noisy to be used singly, but when a series of depth profiles are lined up side-by-side as a transect, significant magnetic layers can be traced for large distances. Transects frequently show a second layer. The formula is quite general in its derivation and would apply to any mid-latitude area where significant magnetic bodies can be modelled as extensive layers. Because the method requires a radial power spectrum, it fails to provide signal at depths much shallower than the flight line spacing. The method is convenient for a fast first pass at depth estimation, but its horizontal resolution is rather coarse and errors can be quite large.

  14. Stereo depth distortions in teleoperation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Diner, Daniel B.; Vonsydow, Marika

    1988-01-01

    In teleoperation, a typical application of stereo vision is to view a work space located short distances (1 to 3m) in front of the cameras. The work presented here treats converged camera placement and studies the effects of intercamera distance, camera-to-object viewing distance, and focal length of the camera lenses on both stereo depth resolution and stereo depth distortion. While viewing the fronto-parallel plane 1.4 m in front of the cameras, depth errors are measured on the order of 2cm. A geometric analysis was made of the distortion of the fronto-parallel plane of divergence for stereo TV viewing. The results of the analysis were then verified experimentally. The objective was to determine the optimal camera configuration which gave high stereo depth resolution while minimizing stereo depth distortion. It is found that for converged cameras at a fixed camera-to-object viewing distance, larger intercamera distances allow higher depth resolutions, but cause greater depth distortions. Thus with larger intercamera distances, operators will make greater depth errors (because of the greater distortions), but will be more certain that they are not errors (because of the higher resolution).

  15. Depth-based computational photography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Ziwei; Xu, Tingfa; Liu, Jingdan; Li, Xiangmin; Zhao, Peng

    2015-05-01

    A depth-based computational photography model is proposed for all-in-focus image capture. A decomposition function, a defocus matrix, and a depth matrix are introduced to construct the photography model. The original image acquired from a camera can be decomposed into several sub-images on the basis of depth information. The defocus matrix can be deduced from the depth matrix according to the sensor defocus geometry for a thin lens model. And the depth matrix is reconstructed using the axial binocular stereo vision algorithm. This photography model adopts an energy functional minimization method to acquire the sharpest image pieces separately. The implementation of the photography method is described in detail. Experimental results for an actual scene demonstrate that our model is effective.

  16. Multistep joint bilateral depth upsampling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riemens, A. K.; Gangwal, O. P.; Barenbrug, B.; Berretty, R.-P. M.

    2009-01-01

    Depth maps are used in many applications, e.g. 3D television, stereo matching, segmentation, etc. Often, depth maps are available at a lower resolution compared to the corresponding image data. For these applications, depth maps must be upsampled to the image resolution. Recently, joint bilateral filters are proposed to upsample depth maps in a single step. In this solution, a high-resolution output depth is computed as a weighted average of surrounding low-resolution depth values, where the weight calculation depends on spatial distance function and intensity range function on the related image data. Compared to that, we present two novel ideas. Firstly, we apply anti-alias prefiltering on the high-resolution image to derive an image at the same low resolution as the input depth map. The upsample filter uses samples from both the high-resolution and the low-resolution images in the range term of the bilateral filter. Secondly, we propose to perform the upsampling in multiple stages, refining the resolution by a factor of 2×2 at each stage. We show experimental results on the consequences of the aliasing issue, and we apply our method to two use cases: a high quality ground-truth depth map and a real-time generated depth map of lower quality. For the first use case a relatively small filter footprint is applied; the second use case benefits from a substantially larger footprint. These experiments show that the dual image resolution range function alleviates the aliasing artifacts and therefore improves the temporal stability of the output depth map. On both use cases, we achieved comparable or better image quality with respect to upsampling with the joint bilateral filter in a single step. On the former use case, we feature a reduction of a factor of 5 in computational cost, whereas on the latter use case, the cost saving is a factor of 50.

  17. Development and Applications of Time of Flight Neutron Depth Profiling

    SciTech Connect

    Bingham Cady; Kenan Unlu

    2005-03-17

    The depth profiles of intentional or intrinsic constituents of a sample provide valuable information for the characterization of materials. For example, the subtle differences in spatial distribution and composition of many chemical species in the near surface region and across interfacial boundaries can significantly alter the electronic and optical properties of materials. A number of analytical techniques for depth profiling have been developed during the last two decades. neutron Depth Profiling (NDP) is one of the leading analytical techniques. The NDP is a nondestructive near surface technique that utilizes thermal/cold neutron beam to measure the concentration of specific light elements versus their depth in materials. The depth is obtained from the energy loss of protons, alphas or recoil atoms in substrate materials. Since the charged particle energy determination using surface barrier detector is used for NDP, the depth resolution is highly dependent on the detectors an d detection instruments. The depth resolutions of a few tens of nm are achieved with available NDP facilities in the world. However, the performance of NDP needs to be improved in order to obtain a few A depth resolutions.

  18. On evaluation of depth accuracy in consumer depth sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abd Aziz, Azim Zaliha; Wei, Hong; Ferryman, James

    2015-12-01

    This paper presents an experimental study of different depth sensors. The aim is to answer the question, whether these sensors give accurate data for general depth image analysis. The study examines the depth accuracy between three popularly used depth sensors; ASUS Xtion Prolive, Kinect Xbox 360 and Kinect for Windows v2. The main attention is to study on the stability of pixels in the depth image captured at several different sensor-object distances by measuring the depth returned by the sensors within specified time intervals. The experimental results show that the fluctuation (mm) of the random selected pixels within the target area, increases with increasing distance to the sensor, especially on the Kinect for Xbox 360 and the Asus Xtion Prolive. Both of these sensors provide pixels fluctuation between 20mm and 30mm at a sensor-object distance beyond 1500mm. However, the pixel's stability of the Kinect for Windows v2 not affected much with the distance between the sensor and the object. The maximum fluctuation for all the selected pixels of Kinect for Windows v2 is approximately 5mm at sensor-object distance of between 800mm and 3000mm. Therefore, in the optimal distance, the best stability achieved.

  19. Submerged AUV Charging Station

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, Jack A.; Chao, Yi; Curtin, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    Autonomous Underwater Vehicles (AUVs) are becoming increasingly important for military surveillance and mine detection. Most AUVs are battery powered and have limited lifetimes of a few days to a few weeks. This greatly limits the distance that AUVs can travel underwater. Using a series of submerged AUV charging stations, AUVs could travel a limited distance to the next charging station, recharge its batteries, and continue to the next charging station, thus traveling great distances in a relatively short time, similar to the Old West “Pony Express.” One solution is to use temperature differences at various depths in the ocean to produce electricity, which is then stored in a submerged battery. It is preferred to have the upper buoy submerged a reasonable distance below the surface, so as not to be seen from above and not to be inadvertently destroyed by storms or ocean going vessels. In a previous invention, a phase change material (PCM) is melted (expanded) at warm temperatures, for example, 15 °C, and frozen (contracted) at cooler temperatures, for example, 8 °C. Tubes containing the PCM, which could be paraffin such as pentadecane, would be inserted into a container filled with hydraulic oil. When the PCM is melted (expanded), it pushes the oil out into a container that is pressurized to about 3,000 psi (approx equals 20.7 MPa). When a valve is opened, the high-pressure oil passes through a hydraulic motor, which turns a generator and charges a battery. The low-pressure oil is finally reabsorbed into the PCM canister when the PCM tubes are frozen (contracted). Some of the electricity produced could be used to control an external bladder or a motor to the tether line, such that depth cycling is continued for a very long period of time. Alternatively, after the electricity is generated by the hydraulic motor, the exiting low-pressure oil from the hydraulic motor could be vented directly to an external bladder on the AUV, such that filling of the bladder

  20. Repulsion between Oppositely Charged Planar Macroions

    PubMed Central

    Jho, YongSeok; Brown, Frank L. H.; Kim, MahnWon; Pincus, Philip A.

    2013-01-01

    The repulsive interaction between oppositely charged macroions is investigated using Grand Canonical Monte Carlo simulations of an unrestricted primitive model, including the effect of inhomogeneous surface charge and its density, the depth of surface charge, the cation size, and the dielectric permittivity of solvent and macroions, and their contrast. The origin of the repulsion is a combination of osmotic pressure and ionic screening resulting from excess salt between the macroions. The excess charge over-reduces the electrostatic attraction between macroions and raises the entropic repulsion. The magnitude of the repulsion increases when the dielectric constant of the solvent is lowered (below that of water) and/or the surface charge density is increased, in good agreement with experiment. Smaller size of surface charge and the cation, their discreteness and mobility are other factors that enhance the repulsion and charge inversion phenomenons. PMID:23940518

  1. Blast wave from buried charges

    SciTech Connect

    Reichenbach, H.; Behrens, K.; Kuhl, A.L.

    1993-08-01

    While much airblast data are available for height-of-burst (HOB) effects, systematic airblast data for depth-of-burst (DOB) effects are more limited. It is logical to ask whether the spherical 0.5-g Nitropenta charges that, proved to be successful for HOB tests at EMI are also suitable for experiments with buried charges in the laboratory scale; preliminary studies indicated in the alternative. Of special interest is the airblast environment generated by detonations just above or below the around surface. This paper presents a brief summary of the test results.

  2. Medium-depth chemical peels.

    PubMed

    Monheit, G D

    2001-07-01

    The combination medium-depth chemical peel (Jessner's solution +35% TCA) has been accepted as a safe, reliable, and effective method for the treatment of moderate photoaging skin. This article discusses the procedure in detail, including postoperative considerations. PMID:11599398

  3. Teaching Depth of Field Concept

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ross, Frederick C.; Smith, Rodney J.

    1978-01-01

    This activity utilizes an overhead projector, a wax pencil, and a petri-dish to demonstrate the depth of field concept to students learning the use of the microscope. Illustrations and directions are included. (MA)

  4. Development of neutron depth profiling at CMRR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Run-dong; Yang, Xin; Wang, Guan-bo; Dou, Hai-feng; Qian, Da-zhi; Wang, Shu-yu

    2015-07-01

    A neutron depth profiling (NDP) system has been developed at China Mianyang Research Reactor (CMRR) at Institute of Nuclear Physics and Chemistry (INPC), CAEP. The INPC-NDP system utilizes cold neutrons which are transported along the C1 neutron guide from the cold neutron source. It consists of a beam entrance, a target chamber, a beam stopper, and data acquisition electronics for charged particle pulse-height analysis. A 90 cm in diameter stainless steel target chamber was designed to control the positions of the sample and detector. The neutron beam intensity of 2.1×108 n cm-2 s-1 was calibrated by the Au foil activation method at the sample position. The INPC-NDP system was tested by using a Standard Reference Materials SRM-2137. The measured results agreed well with the reference values.

  5. Nonlinear photorefractive response at high modulation depths

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vachss, Frederick; Hesselink, Lambertus

    1988-01-01

    The response of photorefractive materials to sinusoidal intensity patterns of high modulation depths is considered. It is shown that the induced refractive-index response in this regime is highly nonlinear. Concise analytic expressions for the various nonlinear harmonics of the photorefractive response field are developed and compared with exact numerical solutions of the underlying charge-transport equations as well as with the results of previous theoretical models over a broad range of physical parameters. We show that the nonlinear response characteristics are strongly dependent on both the magnitude of applied electric fields and the relative concentrations of charge donor and acceptor sites in the material. For drift dominated recording, in particular, we determine analytically that in the limit of a minimal acceptor/donor ratio, the amplitudes of higher spatial harmonics of the response reach a maximum and eventually decay as functions of increasing applied field, whereas these amplitudes reach a nonzero limit in the case of a near-unity acceptor/donor ratio. Finally, we generalize our results to account for diffusion effects in an appended derivation.

  6. The antiproton depth-dose curve in water.

    PubMed

    Bassler, N; Holzscheiter, M H; Jäkel, O; Knudsen, H V; Kovacevic, S

    2008-02-01

    We have measured the depth-dose curve of 126 MeV antiprotons in a water phantom using ionization chambers. Since the antiproton beam provided by CERN has a pulsed structure and possibly carries a high-LET component from the antiproton annihilation, it is necessary to correct the acquired charge for ion recombination effects. The results are compared with Monte Carlo calculations and were found to be in good agreement. Based on this agreement we calculate the antiproton depth-dose curve for antiprotons and compare it with that for protons and find a doubling of the physical dose in the peak region for antiprotons. PMID:18199915

  7. Monitoring the Depth of Anaesthesia

    PubMed Central

    Musizza, Bojan; Ribaric, Samo

    2010-01-01

    One of the current challenges in medicine is monitoring the patients’ depth of general anaesthesia (DGA). Accurate assessment of the depth of anaesthesia contributes to tailoring drug administration to the individual patient, thus preventing awareness or excessive anaesthetic depth and improving patients’ outcomes. In the past decade, there has been a significant increase in the number of studies on the development, comparison and validation of commercial devices that estimate the DGA by analyzing electrical activity of the brain (i.e., evoked potentials or brain waves). In this paper we review the most frequently used sensors and mathematical methods for monitoring the DGA, their validation in clinical practice and discuss the central question of whether these approaches can, compared to other conventional methods, reduce the risk of patient awareness during surgical procedures. PMID:22163504

  8. Flexible depth of field photography.

    PubMed

    Kuthirummal, Sujit; Nagahara, Hajime; Zhou, Changyin; Nayar, Shree K

    2011-01-01

    The range of scene depths that appear focused in an image is known as the depth of field (DOF). Conventional cameras are limited by a fundamental trade-off between depth of field and signal-to-noise ratio (SNR). For a dark scene, the aperture of the lens must be opened up to maintain SNR, which causes the DOF to reduce. Also, today's cameras have DOFs that correspond to a single slab that is perpendicular to the optical axis. In this paper, we present an imaging system that enables one to control the DOF in new and powerful ways. Our approach is to vary the position and/or orientation of the image detector during the integration time of a single photograph. Even when the detector motion is very small (tens of microns), a large range of scene depths (several meters) is captured, both in and out of focus. Our prototype camera uses a micro-actuator to translate the detector along the optical axis during image integration. Using this device, we demonstrate four applications of flexible DOF. First, we describe extended DOF where a large depth range is captured with a very wide aperture (low noise) but with nearly depth-independent defocus blur. Deconvolving a captured image with a single blur kernel gives an image with extended DOF and high SNR. Next, we show the capture of images with discontinuous DOFs. For instance, near and far objects can be imaged with sharpness, while objects in between are severely blurred. Third, we show that our camera can capture images with tilted DOFs (Scheimpflug imaging) without tilting the image detector. Finally, we demonstrate how our camera can be used to realize nonplanar DOFs. We believe flexible DOF imaging can open a new creative dimension in photography and lead to new capabilities in scientific imaging, vision, and graphics. PMID:21088319

  9. Sampling Depths, Depth Shifts, and Depth Resolutions for Bi(n)(+) Ion Analysis in Argon Gas Cluster Depth Profiles.

    PubMed

    Havelund, R; Seah, M P; Gilmore, I S

    2016-03-10

    Gas cluster sputter depth profiling is increasingly used for the spatially resolved chemical analysis and imaging of organic materials. Here, a study is reported of the sampling depth in secondary ion mass spectrometry depth profiling. It is shown that effects of the sampling depth leads to apparent shifts in depth profiles of Irganox 3114 delta layers in Irganox 1010 sputtered, in the dual beam mode, using 5 keV Ar₂₀₀₀⁺ ions and analyzed with Bi(q+), Bi₃(q+) and Bi₅(q+) ions (q = 1 or 2) with energies between 13 and 50 keV. The profiles show sharp delta layers, broadened from their intrinsic 1 nm thickness to full widths at half-maxima (fwhm's) of 8-12 nm. For different secondary ions, the centroids of the measured delta layers are shifted deeper or shallower by up to 3 nm from the position measured for the large, 564.36 Da (C₃₃H₄₆N₃O₅⁻) characteristic ion for Irganox 3114 used to define a reference position. The shifts are linear with the Bi(n)(q+) beam energy and are greatest for Bi₃(q+), slightly less for Bi₅(q+) with its wider or less deep craters, and significantly less for Bi(q+) where the sputtering yield is very low and the primary ion penetrates more deeply. The shifts increase the fwhm’s of the delta layers in a manner consistent with a linearly falling generation and escape depth distribution function (GEDDF) for the emitted secondary ions, relevant for a paraboloid shaped crater. The total depth of this GEDDF is 3.7 times the delta layer shifts. The greatest effect is for the peaks with the greatest shifts, i.e. Bi₃(q+) at the highest energy, and for the smaller fragments. It is recommended that low energies be used for the analysis beam and that carefully selected, large, secondary ion fragments are used for measuring depth distributions, or that the analysis be made in the single beam mode using the sputtering Ar cluster ions also for analysis. PMID:26883085

  10. Rotating drum variable depth sampler

    DOEpatents

    Nance, Thomas A.; Steeper, Timothy J.

    2008-07-01

    A sampling device for collecting depth-specific samples in silt, sludge and granular media has three chambers separated by a pair of iris valves. Rotation of the middle chamber closes the valves and isolates a sample in a middle chamber.

  11. Perceived depth from shading boundaries.

    PubMed

    Kim, Juno; Anstis, Stuart

    2016-01-01

    Shading is well known to provide information the visual system uses to recover the three-dimensional shape of objects. We examined conditions under which patterns in shading promote the experience of a change in depth at contour boundaries, rather than a change in reflectance. In Experiment 1, we used image manipulation to illuminate different regions of a smooth surface from different directions. This manipulation imposed local differences in shading direction across edge contours (delta shading). We found that increasing the angle of delta shading, from 0° to 180°, monotonically increased perceived depth across the edge. Experiment 2 found that the perceptual splitting of shading into separate foreground and background surfaces depended on an assumed light source from above prior. Image regions perceived as foreground structures in upright images appeared farther in depth when the same images were inverted. We also found that the experienced break in surface continuity could promote the experience of amodal completion of colored contours that were ambiguous as to their depth order (Experiment 3). These findings suggest that the visual system can identify occlusion relationships based on monocular variations in local shading direction, but interprets this information according to a light source from above prior of midlevel visual processing. PMID:27271807

  12. Subpixel Resolution In Depth Perceived Via 3-D Television

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Diner, Daniel B.; Von Sydow, Marika; Fender, Derek H.

    1993-01-01

    Report describes experiment in which two black vertical bars on featureless white background placed near intersection of optical axes of two charge-coupled-device video cameras positioned to give stereoscopic views. Trained human observers found to perceive depths at subpixel resolutions in stereoscopic television images. This finding significant for remote stereoscopic monitoring, expecially during precise maneuvers of remotely controlled manipulators. Also significant for research in processing of visual information by human brain.

  13. Explosive shaped charge penetration into tuff rock

    SciTech Connect

    Vigil, M.G.

    1988-10-01

    Analysis and data for the use of Explosive Shaped Charges (ESC) to generate holes in tuff rock formation is presented. The ESCs evaluated include Conical Shaped Charges (CSC) and Explosive Formed Projectiles (EFP). The CSCs vary in size from 0.158 to 9.1 inches inside cone diameter. The EFPs were 5.0 inches in diameter. Data for projectile impact angles of 30 and 90 degrees are presented. Analytically predicted depth of penetration data generally compared favorably with experimental data. Predicted depth of penetration versus ESC standoff data and hole profile dimensions in tuff are also presented. 24 refs., 45 figs., 6 tabs.

  14. Ultrasonic material hardness depth measurement

    DOEpatents

    Good, M.S.; Schuster, G.J.; Skorpik, J.R.

    1997-07-08

    The invention is an ultrasonic surface hardness depth measurement apparatus and method permitting rapid determination of hardness depth of shafts, rods, tubes and other cylindrical parts. The apparatus of the invention has a part handler, sensor, ultrasonic electronics component, computer, computer instruction sets, and may include a display screen. The part handler has a vessel filled with a couplant, and a part rotator for rotating a cylindrical metal part with respect to the sensor. The part handler further has a surface follower upon which the sensor is mounted, thereby maintaining a constant distance between the sensor and the exterior surface of the cylindrical metal part. The sensor is mounted so that a front surface of the sensor is within the vessel with couplant between the front surface of the sensor and the part. 12 figs.

  15. Photon counting compressive depth mapping.

    PubMed

    Howland, Gregory A; Lum, Daniel J; Ware, Matthew R; Howell, John C

    2013-10-01

    We demonstrate a compressed sensing, photon counting lidar system based on the single-pixel camera. Our technique recovers both depth and intensity maps from a single under-sampled set of incoherent, linear projections of a scene of interest at ultra-low light levels around 0.5 picowatts. Only two-dimensional reconstructions are required to image a three-dimensional scene. We demonstrate intensity imaging and depth mapping at 256 × 256 pixel transverse resolution with acquisition times as short as 3 seconds. We also show novelty filtering, reconstructing only the difference between two instances of a scene. Finally, we acquire 32 × 32 pixel real-time video for three-dimensional object tracking at 14 frames-per-second. PMID:24104293

  16. Ultrasonic material hardness depth measurement

    DOEpatents

    Good, Morris S.; Schuster, George J.; Skorpik, James R.

    1997-01-01

    The invention is an ultrasonic surface hardness depth measurement apparatus and method permitting rapid determination of hardness depth of shafts, rods, tubes and other cylindrical parts. The apparatus of the invention has a part handler, sensor, ultrasonic electronics component, computer, computer instruction sets, and may include a display screen. The part handler has a vessel filled with a couplant, and a part rotator for rotating a cylindrical metal part with respect to the sensor. The part handler further has a surface follower upon which the sensor is mounted, thereby maintaining a constant distance between the sensor and the exterior surface of the cylindrical metal part. The sensor is mounted so that a front surface of the sensor is within the vessel with couplant between the front surface of the sensor and the part.

  17. Underwater camera with depth measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Wei-Chih; Lin, Keng-Ren; Tsui, Chi L.; Schipf, David; Leang, Jonathan

    2016-04-01

    The objective of this study is to develop an RGB-D (video + depth) camera that provides three-dimensional image data for use in the haptic feedback of a robotic underwater ordnance recovery system. Two camera systems were developed and studied. The first depth camera relies on structured light (as used by the Microsoft Kinect), where the displacement of an object is determined by variations of the geometry of a projected pattern. The other camera system is based on a Time of Flight (ToF) depth camera. The results of the structural light camera system shows that the camera system requires a stronger light source with a similar operating wavelength and bandwidth to achieve a desirable working distance in water. This approach might not be robust enough for our proposed underwater RGB-D camera system, as it will require a complete re-design of the light source component. The ToF camera system instead, allows an arbitrary placement of light source and camera. The intensity output of the broadband LED light source in the ToF camera system can be increased by putting them into an array configuration and the LEDs can be modulated comfortably with any waveform and frequencies required by the ToF camera. In this paper, both camera were evaluated and experiments were conducted to demonstrate the versatility of the ToF camera.

  18. Nonextensive statistics and skin depth of transverse wave in collisional plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hashemzadeh, M.

    2016-05-01

    Skin depth of transverse wave in a collisional plasma is studied taking into account the nonextensive electron distribution function. Considering the kinetic theory for charge particles and using the Bhatnagar-Gross-Krook collision model, a generalized transverse dielectric permittivity is obtained. The transverse dispersion relation in different frequency ranges is investigated. Obtaining the imaginary part of the wave vector from the dispersion relation, the skin depth for these frequency ranges is also achieved. Profiles of the skin depth show that by increasing the q parameter, the penetration depth decreases. In addition, the skin depth increases by increasing the electron temperature. Finally, it is found that in the high frequency range and high electron temperature, the penetration depth decreases by increasing the collision frequency. In contrast, by increasing the collision frequency in a highly collisional frequency range, the skin depth of transverse wave increases.

  19. Atom depth analysis delineates mechanisms of protein intermolecular interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Alocci, Davide; Bernini, Andrea; Niccolai, Neri

    2013-07-12

    Highlights: •3D atom depth analysis is proposed to identify different layers in protein structures. •Amino acid contents for each layers have been analyzed for a large protein dataset. •Charged amino acids in the most external layer are present at very different extents. •Atom depth indexes of K residues reflect their side chains flexibility. •Mobile surface charges can be responsible for long range protein–protein recognition. -- Abstract: The systematic analysis of amino acid distribution, performed inside a large set of resolved protein structures, sheds light on possible mechanisms driving non random protein–protein approaches. Protein Data Bank entries have been selected using as filters a series of restrictions ensuring that the shape of protein surface is not modified by interactions with large or small ligands. 3D atom depth has been evaluated for all the atoms of the 2,410 selected structures. The amino acid relative population in each of the structural layers formed by grouping atoms on the basis of their calculated depths, has been evaluated. We have identified seven structural layers, the inner ones reproducing the core of proteins and the outer one incorporating their most protruding moieties. Quantitative analysis of amino acid contents of structural layers identified, as expected, different behaviors. Atoms of Q, R, K, N, D residues are increasingly more abundant in going from core to surfaces. An opposite trend is observed for V, I, L, A, C, and G. An intermediate behavior is exhibited by P, S, T, M, W, H, F and Y. The outer structural layer hosts predominantly E and K residues whose charged moieties, protruding from outer regions of the protein surface, reorient free from steric hindrances, determining specific electrodynamics maps. This feature may represent a protein signature for long distance effects, driving the formation of encounter complexes and the eventual short distance approaches that are required for protein

  20. Focus cues affect perceived depth

    PubMed Central

    Watt, Simon J.; Akeley, Kurt; Ernst, Marc O.; Banks, Martin S.

    2007-01-01

    Depth information from focus cues—accommodation and the gradient of retinal blur—is typically incorrect in three-dimensional (3-D) displays because the light comes from a planar display surface. If the visual system incorporates information from focus cues into its calculation of 3-D scene parameters, this could cause distortions in perceived depth even when the 2-D retinal images are geometrically correct. In Experiment 1 we measured the direct contribution of focus cues to perceived slant by varying independently the physical slant of the display surface and the slant of a simulated surface specified by binocular disparity (binocular viewing) or perspective/texture (monocular viewing). In the binocular condition, slant estimates were unaffected by display slant. In the monocular condition, display slant had a systematic effect on slant estimates. Estimates were consistent with a weighted average of slant from focus cues and slant from disparity/texture, where the cue weights are determined by the reliability of each cue. In Experiment 2, we examined whether focus cues also have an indirect effect on perceived slant via the distance estimate used in disparity scaling. We varied independently the simulated distance and the focal distance to a disparity-defined 3-D stimulus. Perceived slant was systematically affected by changes in focal distance. Accordingly, depth constancy (with respect to simulated distance) was significantly reduced when focal distance was held constant compared to when it varied appropriately with the simulated distance to the stimulus. The results of both experiments show that focus cues can contribute to estimates of 3-D scene parameters. Inappropriate focus cues in typical 3-D displays may therefore contribute to distortions in perceived space. PMID:16441189

  1. Assimilation of Aerosol Optical Depths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verver, Gé; Henzing, Bas

    Climate predictions are hampered by the large uncertainties involved in the estima- tion of the effects of atmospheric aerosol (IPCC,2001). These uncertainties are caused partly because sources and sinks as well as atmospheric processing of the different types of aerosol are not accurately known. Moreover, the climate impact (especially the indirect effect) of a certain distribution of aerosol is hard to quantify. There have been different approaches to reduce these uncertainties. In recent years intensive ob- servational campaigns such as ACE and INDOEX have been carried out, aiming to in- crease our knowledge of atmospheric processes that determine the fate of atmospheric aerosols and to quantify the radiation effects. With the new satellite instruments such as SCIAMACHY and OMI it will be possible in the near future to derive the ge- ographical distribution of the aerosol optical depths (AOD) and perhaps additional information on the occurrence of different aerosol types. The goal of the ARIA project (started in 2001) is to assimilate global satellite de- rived aerosol optical depth (AOD) in an off-line chemistry/transport model TM3. The TM3 model (Jeuken et al. 2001) describes sources, sinks, transformation and transport processes of different types of aerosol (mineral dust, carbon, sulfate, nitrate) that are relevant to radiative forcing. All meteorological input is provided by ECMWF. The assimilation procedure constrains the aerosol distribution produced by the model on the basis of aerosol optical depths observed by satellite. The product, i.e. an optimal estimation of global aerosol distribution, is then available for the calculation of radia- tive forcing. Error analyses may provide valuable information on deficiencies of the model. In the ARIA project it is tried to extract additional information on the type of aerosol present in the atmosphere by assimilating AOD at multiple wavelengths. First results of the ARIA project will be presented. The values

  2. Static stereo vision depth distortions in teleoperation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Diner, D. B.; Von Sydow, M.

    1988-01-01

    A major problem in high-precision teleoperation is the high-resolution presentation of depth information. Stereo television has so far proved to be only a partial solution, due to an inherent trade-off among depth resolution, depth distortion and the alignment of the stereo image pair. Converged cameras can guarantee image alignment but suffer significant depth distortion when configured for high depth resolution. Moving the stereo camera rig to scan the work space further distorts depth. The 'dynamic' (camera-motion induced) depth distortion problem was solved by Diner and Von Sydow (1987), who have quantified the 'static' (camera-configuration induced) depth distortion. In this paper, a stereo image presentation technique which yields aligned images, high depth resolution and low depth distortion is demonstrated, thus solving the trade-off problem.

  3. Quick spacecraft charging primer

    SciTech Connect

    Larsen, Brian Arthur

    2014-03-12

    This is a presentation in PDF format which is a quick spacecraft charging primer, meant to be used for program training. It goes into detail about charging physics, RBSP examples, and how to identify charging.

  4. Accelerators for charged particle therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flanz, Jacob

    2015-04-01

    History has shown that energetic particles can be useful for medical applications. From the time, in 1895 when Roentgen discovered X-rays, and in 1913 when Coolidge developed the vacuum X-ray tube, energetic particles have been an important tool for medicine. Development of the appropriate tool for effective and safe radiotherapy requires an in-depth understanding of the application and constraints. Various solutions are possible and choices must be analyzed on the basis of the suitability for meeting the requirements. Some of the requirements of charged particle therapy are summarized and various accelerator options are described and discussed.

  5. Aeration equipment for small depths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sluše, Jan; Pochylý, František

    2015-05-01

    Deficit of air in water causes complications with cyanobacteria mainly in the summer months. Cyanobacteria is a bacteria that produces poison called cyanotoxin. When the concentration of cyanobacteria increases, the phenomena "algal bloom" appears, which is very toxic and may kill all the organisms. This article describes new equipment for aeration of water in dams, ponds and reservoirs with small depth. This equipment is mobile and it is able to work without any human factor because its control is provided by a GPS module. The main part of this equipment consists of a floating pump which pumps water from the surface. Another important part of this equipment is an aerator where water and air are blended. Final aeration process runs in the nozzles which provide movement of all this equipment and aeration of the water. Simulations of the flow are solved by multiphase flow with diffusion in open source program called OpenFOAM. Results will be verified by an experiment.

  6. Measurements of Shaped Charge Jet Velocity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Hongfa

    2013-06-01

    Penetration depth is an important requirement in oil/gas well perforating jobs. The depth determines how far the wellbore can directly communicate with reservoir fluids. Deep perforation charges are widely used in oilfield industry and most of those are powder metal liner charge for no carrot-like slug left as solid liner does. Comprehensive measurements for the powder metal liner shaped charge jet characteristics, namely, the jet density and velocity, are needed to predict the shaped charge performance and to plan the perforating job. This paper focuses on an experimental work of jet velocity measurements. A medium size of powder metal liner charges (27 grams HMX) is used in the tests. The powder jet shoots through a stack of limestone blocks with shorting switch set in between. Half inch air-gap between two blocks is design to provide space for jet traveling in air to record free fly velocity, meanwhile the jet penetration velocity in the limestone is measured. Aluminum foil switches are used to record the jet Time of Arrival (TOA). The charged switch shorted by the metal jet when it arrives. The shorting signal is recorded. The two velocities can be used to estimate the jet penetration effectiveness. A series of TOA tests show that jet velocity along its length linearly decreases from jet tip to tail until the stagnation points referring to which jet material moves in opposite direction.

  7. Electrostatic attraction of charged drops of water inside dropwise cluster

    SciTech Connect

    Shavlov, A. V.; Dzhumandzhi, V. A.

    2013-08-15

    Based on the analytical solution of the Poisson-Boltzmann equation, we demonstrate that inside the electrically neutral system of charges an electrostatic attraction can occur between the like-charged particles, where charge Z ≫ 1 (in terms of elementary charge) and radius R > 0, whereas according to the literature, only repulsion is possible inside non-electrically neutral systems. We calculate the free energy of the charged particles of water inside a cluster and demonstrate that its minimum is when the interdroplet distance equals several Debye radii defined based on the light plasma component. The deepest minimum depth is in a cluster with close spatial packing of drops by type, in a face-centered cubic lattice, if almost all the electric charge of one sign is concentrated on the drops and that of the other sign is concentrated on the light compensation carriers of charge, where the charge moved by equilibrium carriers is rather small.

  8. Visual Cues for Enhancing Depth Perception.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Donnell, L. M.; Smith, A. J.

    1994-01-01

    This article describes the physiological mechanisms involved in three-dimensional depth perception and presents a variety of distance and depth cues and strategies for detecting and estimating curbs and steps for individuals with impaired vision. (Author/DB)

  9. Nanometric depth resolution from multi-focal images in microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Dalgarno, Heather I. C.; Dalgarno, Paul A.; Dada, Adetunmise C.; Towers, Catherine E.; Gibson, Gavin J.; Parton, Richard M.; Davis, Ilan; Warburton, Richard J.; Greenaway, Alan H.

    2011-01-01

    We describe a method for tracking the position of small features in three dimensions from images recorded on a standard microscope with an inexpensive attachment between the microscope and the camera. The depth-measurement accuracy of this method is tested experimentally on a wide-field, inverted microscope and is shown to give approximately 8 nm depth resolution, over a specimen depth of approximately 6 µm, when using a 12-bit charge-coupled device (CCD) camera and very bright but unresolved particles. To assess low-flux limitations a theoretical model is used to derive an analytical expression for the minimum variance bound. The approximations used in the analytical treatment are tested using numerical simulations. It is concluded that approximately 14 nm depth resolution is achievable with flux levels available when tracking fluorescent sources in three dimensions in live-cell biology and that the method is suitable for three-dimensional photo-activated localization microscopy resolution. Sub-nanometre resolution could be achieved with photon-counting techniques at high flux levels. PMID:21247948

  10. Uterine caliper and depth gauge

    DOEpatents

    King, Loyd L.; Wheeler, Robert G.; Fish, Thomas M.

    1977-01-01

    A uterine caliper and sound consisting of an elongated body having outwardly biased resilient caliper wings and a spring-loaded slidable cervical stop. A slide on the body is operatively connected to the wings by a monofilament and operates with respect to a first scale on the body as a width indicator. A rod extending longitudinally on the body is connected to the cervical stop and cooperates with a second scale on the body as a depth indicator. The instrument can be positioned to measure the distance from the outer cervical ostium to the fundus, as read on said second scale. The wings may be allowed to open by moving the slide, and when the wings engage the utero-tubal junctions, the width may be read on said first scale. By adjustment of the caliper wings the instrument may be retracted until the resistance of the inner ostium of the cervix is felt, enabling the length of the cervical canal to be read directly by the position of the longitudinal indicator rod with respect to said second scale. The instrument may be employed to measure the width of the uterine cavity at any position between the inner ostium of the cervix and the fundus.

  11. Mapping the Ice Depth of Europa with Ultrahigh Energy Particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Romero-Wolf, A.; Naudet, C. J.

    2012-12-01

    There has been recent interest in applying radio emission of ultra-high energy neutrinos interacting in the ice of Europa. The idea was first described by Gorham (2004)[1] in the context of ultra-high energy particle detection. Shoji, Kurita, and Tanaka (2011)[2] proposed a technique for measuring ice depth using the radio intensity distribution of radio impulses emitted by interactions deep in the Europan ice. Miller, Schaefer, and Sequeira (2012)[3] follow up this study with a simulation of a radio detector mission to constrain the ice depth of Europa. The radio signal results from an effect proposed by Askar'yan (1962)[4] where the particle shower induced by the neutrino interaction accumulates a charge excess traveling faster than the speed of light in the medium and produces a coherent Cherenkov pulse at radio frequencies. We evaluate the feasibility of such a mission given the current state of knowledge of ultra-high energy particle detection and radio pulse production. References [1] Gorham (2004), Planet-sized Detectors for Ultra-high Energy Neutrinos & Cosmic Rays, NASA Advanced Planning Office's Capability Roadmap Public Workshop, Nov. 30, 2004, astro-ph/0411510 [2] Shoji, Kurita, and Tanaka (2011), Constraint of Europan ice thickness by measuring electromagnetic emissions induced by neutrino interaction, Geophysical Research Letters, 38, L08202 [3] Miller, Shaefer, Sequeira, PRIDE (Passive Radio [frequency] Ice Depth Experiment): An instrument to passively measure ice depth from a Europan orbiter using neutrinos, Icarus 220 877-888 [4] Askar'yan (1962), Excess negative charge of an electron photon shower and its coherent radiation originating from it. Radio recording of showers under the ground and on the Moon, Sov. Phys. JETP, 14, 441-443.

  12. Depth map generation from geometry and motion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Qianmin; Ge, Chenyang; Ren, Pengju; Yao, Huimin

    2013-07-01

    As the demand for 3DTV keep increasing these years, the conversion from exist 2D videos to 3D ones becomes a new area of research. Depth map generation plays a key point in the process. Two most important clues of depth are geometry of the scene and motion vector. This paper presents an algorithm of depth map generation, which intends to get the depth map combines two aspects of information. Compared to the previous work, our method is improved in finding vanishing point, detect motion vectors, and depth map generation.

  13. Multistep Charge Method by Charge Arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Segami, Go; Kusawake, Hiroaki; Shimizu, Yasuhiro; Iwasa, Minoru; Kibe, Koichi

    2008-09-01

    We studied reduction of the size and weight of the Power Control Unit (PCU). In this study, we specifically examined the weight of the Battery Charge Regulator (BCR), which accounts for half of the PCU weight for a low earth orbit (LEO) satellite. We found a multistep charge method by charge arrays and adopted a similar method for GEO satellites, thereby enabling the BCR reduction. We found the possibility of reducing the size and weight of PCU through more detailed design than that for a conventional PCU.BCRC1R1batterySAPower Control UnitBCRC1R1batterySAPower UnitHowever, this method decreases the state of charge (SOC) of the battery. Battery tests, a battery simulator test, and numerical analysis were used to evaluate the SOC decrease. We also studied effects of this method on the battery lifetime. The multistep charge method by charge arrays enabled charging to the same level of SOC as the conventional constant current/ constant voltage (CC/CV) charge method for a LEO satellite.

  14. True amplitude prestack depth migration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deng, Feng

    Reliable analysis of amplitude variation with offset (or with angle) requires accurate amplitudes from prestack migration. In routine seismic data processing, amplitude balancing and automatic gain control are often used to reduce amplitude lateral variations. However, these methods are empirical and lack a solid physical basis; thus, there are uncertainties that might produce erroneous conclusions, and hence cause economic loss. During wavefield propagation, geometrical spreading, intrinsic attenuation, transmission losses and the energy conversion significantly distort the wavefield amplitude. Most current true-amplitude migrations usually compensate only for geometrical spreading. A new prestack depth migration based on the framework of reverse-time migration in the time-space domain was developed in this dissertation with the aim of compensating all of the propagation effects in one integrated algorithm. Geometrical spreading is automatically included because of the use of full two-way wave extrapolation. Viscoelastic wave equations are solved to handle the intrinsic attenuation with a priori quality factor. Transmission losses for both up- and down-going waves are compensated using a two-pass, recursive procedure based on extracting the angle-dependent reflection/transmission coefficients from prestack migration. The losses caused by the conversion of energy from one elastic model to another are accounted for through elastic wave extrapolation; the influence of the S wave velocity contrast on the P wave reflection coefficient is implicitly included by using the Zoeppritz equations to describe the reflection and transmission at an elastic interface. Only smooth background models are assumed to be known. The contrasts/ratios of the model parameters can be estimated by fitting the compensated angle-dependent reflection coefficients obtained from data for multiple sources. This is one useful by-product of the algorithm. Numerical tests on both 2D and 3D scalar

  15. Morphology Effects on Space Charge Characteristics of Low Density Polyethylene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou; Yuanxiang; Wang; Yunshan; Zahn, Markus; Wang; Ninghua; Sun; Qinghua; Liang; Xidong; Guan; Zhichen

    2011-01-01

    Low density polyethylene (LDPE) film samples with different morphology were prepared by three kinds of annealing methods which were different in cooling rates in this study. A pulsed electro-acoustic (PEA) space charge measurement system was improved to solve the surface discharge problems for small samples applied with a high voltage. Negative direct current (DC) fields from 50 to above 220 kV/mm were applied to the samples. The influences of morphologies on space charge and space charge packet characteristics were measured by the improved high voltage withstand (HVW) PEA system. Mobility and trap depth of released charges were calculated by space charge decay. It was found that there is a different probability of space charge packet initiation under applied field from -60 to -100 kV/mm. Average velocity and mobility of the space charge packets were calculated by space charge packet dynamics. It was found that the lower cooling rate samples have higher crystallinity, more homo-charge accumulation, lower mobility and deeper trap depth. The mechanism of morphological effects on space charge phenomena have been presumed to give a plausible explanation for their inherent relationships. The morphology in the metal-dielectric interface and in the bulk is convincingly suggested to be responsible for the injection and propagation processes of space charge. A model of positive space charge initiation in LDPE samples was also suggested and analyzed. The mechanism of morphological effects and the charge injection model are well fit with the injection and propagation processes of space charge. The different effects of morphology in the metal-dielectric interface and in the bulk of polymers are stressed.

  16. Charge regulation circuit

    DOEpatents

    Ball, Don G.

    1992-01-01

    A charge regulation circuit provides regulation of an unregulated voltage supply in the range of 0.01%. The charge regulation circuit is utilized in a preferred embodiment in providing regulated voltage for controlling the operation of a laser.

  17. Image inpainting strategy for Kinect depth maps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yao, Huimin; Chen, Yan; Ge, Chenyang

    2013-07-01

    The great advantage of Microsoft Kinect makes the depth acquisition real-time and inexpensive. But the depth maps directly obtained with the Microsoft Kinect device have absent regions and holes caused by optical factors. The noisy depth maps affect lots of complex tasks in computer vision. In order to improve the quality of the depth maps, this paper presents an efficient image inpainting strategy which is based on watershed segmentation and region merging framework of the corresponding color images. The primitive regions produced by watershed transform are merged into lager regions according to color similarity and edge among regions. Finally, mean filter operator to the adjacent pixels is used to fill up missing depth values and deblocking filter is applied for smoothing depth maps.

  18. Learning the missing values in depth maps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yin, Xuanwu; Wang, Guijin; Zhang, Chun; Liao, Qingmin

    2013-12-01

    In this paper, we consider the task of hole filling in depth maps, with the help of an associated color image. We take a supervised learning approach to solve this problem. The model is learnt from the training set, which contain pixels that have depth values. Then we apply supervised learning to predict the depth values in the holes. Our model uses a regional Markov Random Field (MRF) that incorporates multiscale absolute and relative features (computed from the color image), and models depths not only at individual points but also between adjacent points. The experiments show that the proposed approach is able to recover fairly accurate depth values and achieve a high quality depth map.

  19. The stochastic variability of asteroidal regolith depths

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Housen, K. R.

    1982-01-01

    Modeling the depth of regolith on asteroids is approached from a statistical point of view. It is demonstrated that average values are not good descriptors of regolith depth on asteroids. Large deviations from the average can be expected to occur due to both large variations in depth over the surface of a body and to the fact that each asteroid has a unique regolith. The utility of the average depth is not significantly increased by excluding the parts of a surface which are occupied by large craters; a procedure adopted in existing regolith models. Although an asteroid's surface may be 'smoothed out' by movement of debris into gravitationally low spots, the regolith depth retains its variability because of variations in topography at the bottom of the regolith layer. The large variability associated with regolith depth severely limits the power of regolith models in predicting parent body size for the brecciated meteorites.

  20. Charge exchange system

    DOEpatents

    Anderson, Oscar A.

    1978-01-01

    An improved charge exchange system for substantially reducing pumping requirements of excess gas in a controlled thermonuclear reactor high energy neutral beam injector. The charge exchange system utilizes a jet-type blanket which acts simultaneously as the charge exchange medium and as a shield for reflecting excess gas.

  1. Spacecraft Charging Technology, 1980

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1981-01-01

    The third Spacecraft Charging Technology Conference proceedings contain 66 papers on the geosynchronous plasma environment, spacecraft modeling, charged particle environment interactions with spacecraft, spacecraft materials characterization, and satellite design and testing. The proceedings is a compilation of the state of the art of spacecraft charging and environmental interaction phenomena.

  2. Clutter depth discrimination using the wavenumber spectrum.

    PubMed

    Benjamin Reeder, D

    2014-01-01

    Clutter depth is a key parameter in mid-frequency active sonar systems to discriminate between sources of clutter and targets of interest. A method is needed to remotely discriminate clutter depth by information contained in the backscattered signal-without a priori knowledge of that depth. Presented here is an efficient approach for clutter depth estimation using the structure in the wavenumber spectrum. Based on numerical simulations for a simple test case in a shallow water waveguide, this technique demonstrates the potential capability to discriminate between a clutter source in the water column vs one on the seabed. PMID:24437850

  3. Temporal and Spatial Denoising of Depth Maps

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Bor-Shing; Su, Mei-Ju; Cheng, Po-Hsun; Tseng, Po-Jui; Chen, Sao-Jie

    2015-01-01

    This work presents a procedure for refining depth maps acquired using RGB-D (depth) cameras. With numerous new structured-light RGB-D cameras, acquiring high-resolution depth maps has become easy. However, there are problems such as undesired occlusion, inaccurate depth values, and temporal variation of pixel values when using these cameras. In this paper, a proposed method based on an exemplar-based inpainting method is proposed to remove artefacts in depth maps obtained using RGB-D cameras. Exemplar-based inpainting has been used to repair an object-removed image. The concept underlying this inpainting method is similar to that underlying the procedure for padding the occlusions in the depth data obtained using RGB-D cameras. Therefore, our proposed method enhances and modifies the inpainting method for application in and the refinement of RGB-D depth data image quality. For evaluating the experimental results of the proposed method, our proposed method was tested on the Tsukuba Stereo Dataset, which contains a 3D video with the ground truths of depth maps, occlusion maps, RGB images, the peak signal-to-noise ratio, and the computational time as the evaluation metrics. Moreover, a set of self-recorded RGB-D depth maps and their refined versions are presented to show the effectiveness of the proposed method. PMID:26230696

  4. Directional Joint Bilateral Filter for Depth Images

    PubMed Central

    Le, Anh Vu; Jung, Seung-Won; Won, Chee Sun

    2014-01-01

    Depth maps taken by the low cost Kinect sensor are often noisy and incomplete. Thus, post-processing for obtaining reliable depth maps is necessary for advanced image and video applications such as object recognition and multi-view rendering. In this paper, we propose adaptive directional filters that fill the holes and suppress the noise in depth maps. Specifically, novel filters whose window shapes are adaptively adjusted based on the edge direction of the color image are presented. Experimental results show that our method yields higher quality filtered depth maps than other existing methods, especially at the edge boundaries. PMID:24971470

  5. Temporal and Spatial Denoising of Depth Maps.

    PubMed

    Lin, Bor-Shing; Su, Mei-Ju; Cheng, Po-Hsun; Tseng, Po-Jui; Chen, Sao-Jie

    2015-01-01

    This work presents a procedure for refining depth maps acquired using RGB-D (depth) cameras. With numerous new structured-light RGB-D cameras, acquiring high-resolution depth maps has become easy. However, there are problems such as undesired occlusion, inaccurate depth values, and temporal variation of pixel values when using these cameras. In this paper, a proposed method based on an exemplar-based inpainting method is proposed to remove artefacts in depth maps obtained using RGB-D cameras. Exemplar-based inpainting has been used to repair an object-removed image. The concept underlying this inpainting method is similar to that underlying the procedure for padding the occlusions in the depth data obtained using RGB-D cameras. Therefore, our proposed method enhances and modifies the inpainting method for application in and the refinement of RGB-D depth data image quality. For evaluating the experimental results of the proposed method, our proposed method was tested on the Tsukuba Stereo Dataset, which contains a 3D video with the ground truths of depth maps, occlusion maps, RGB images, the peak signal-to-noise ratio, and the computational time as the evaluation metrics. Moreover, a set of self-recorded RGB-D depth maps and their refined versions are presented to show the effectiveness of the proposed method. PMID:26230696

  6. Are face representations depth cue invariant?

    PubMed

    Dehmoobadsharifabadi, Armita; Farivar, Reza

    2016-06-01

    The visual system can process three-dimensional depth cues defining surfaces of objects, but it is unclear whether such information contributes to complex object recognition, including face recognition. The processing of different depth cues involves both dorsal and ventral visual pathways. We investigated whether facial surfaces defined by individual depth cues resulted in meaningful face representations-representations that maintain the relationship between the population of faces as defined in a multidimensional face space. We measured face identity aftereffects for facial surfaces defined by individual depth cues (Experiments 1 and 2) and tested whether the aftereffect transfers across depth cues (Experiments 3 and 4). Facial surfaces and their morphs to the average face were defined purely by one of shading, texture, motion, or binocular disparity. We obtained identification thresholds for matched (matched identity between adapting and test stimuli), non-matched (non-matched identity between adapting and test stimuli), and no-adaptation (showing only the test stimuli) conditions for each cue and across different depth cues. We found robust face identity aftereffect in both experiments. Our results suggest that depth cues do contribute to forming meaningful face representations that are depth cue invariant. Depth cue invariance would require integration of information across different areas and different pathways for object recognition, and this in turn has important implications for cortical models of visual object recognition. PMID:27271993

  7. Directional joint bilateral filter for depth images.

    PubMed

    Le, Anh Vu; Jung, Seung-Won; Won, Chee Sun

    2014-01-01

    Depth maps taken by the low cost Kinect sensor are often noisy and incomplete. Thus, post-processing for obtaining reliable depth maps is necessary for advanced image and video applications such as object recognition and multi-view rendering. In this paper, we propose adaptive directional filters that fill the holes and suppress the noise in depth maps. Specifically, novel filters whose window shapes are adaptively adjusted based on the edge direction of the color image are presented. Experimental results show that our method yields higher quality filtered depth maps than other existing methods, especially at the edge boundaries. PMID:24971470

  8. Rank order scaling of pictorial depth

    PubMed Central

    van Doorn, Andrea; Koenderink, Jan; Wagemans, Johan

    2011-01-01

    We address the topic of “pictorial depth” in cases of pictures that are unlike photographic renderings. The most basic measure of “depth” is no doubt that of depth order. We establish depth order through the pairwise depth-comparison method, involving all pairs from a set of 49 fiducial points. The pictorial space for this study was evoked by a capriccio (imaginary landscape) by Francesco Guardi (1712–1793). In such a drawing pictorial space is suggested by the artist through a small set of conventional depth cues. As a result typical Western observers tend to agree largely in their visual awareness when looking at such art. We rank depths for locations that are not on a single surface and far apart in pictorial space. We find that observers resolve about 40 distinct depth layers and agree largely in this. From a previous experiment we have metrical data for the same observers. The rank correlations between the results are high. Perhaps surprisingly, we find no correlation between the number of distinct depth layers and the total metrical depth range. Thus, the relation between subjective magnitude and discrimination threshold fails to hold for pictorial depth. PMID:23145256

  9. Depth Perception In Remote Stereoscopic Viewing Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Diner, Daniel B.; Von Sydow, Marika

    1989-01-01

    Report describes theoretical and experimental studies of perception of depth by human operators through stereoscopic video systems. Purpose of such studies to optimize dual-camera configurations used to view workspaces of remote manipulators at distances of 1 to 3 m from cameras. According to analysis, static stereoscopic depth distortion decreased, without decreasing stereoscopitc depth resolution, by increasing camera-to-object and intercamera distances and camera focal length. Further predicts dynamic stereoscopic depth distortion reduced by rotating cameras around center of circle passing through point of convergence of viewing axes and first nodal points of two camera lenses.

  10. An Exploration of the Needling Depth in Acupuncture: The Safe Needling Depth and the Needling Depth of Clinical Efficacy

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Jaung-Geng; Chou, Pei-Chi; Chu, Heng-Yi

    2013-01-01

    Objective. To explore the existing scientific information regarding safe needling depth of acupuncture points and the needling depth of clinical efficacy. Methods. We searched the PubMed, EMBASE, Cochrane, Allied and Complementary Medicine (AMED), The National Center for Complementary and Alternative Medicine (NCCAM), and China National Knowledge Infrastructure (CNKI) databases to identify relevant monographs and related references from 1991 to 2013. Chinese journals and theses/dissertations were hand searched. Results. 47 studies were recruited and divided into 6 groups by measuring tools, that is, MRI, in vivo evaluation, CT, ultrasound, dissected specimen of cadavers, and another group with clinical efficacy. Each research was analyzed for study design, definition of safe depth, and factors that would affect the measured depths. Depths of clinical efficacy were discussed from the perspective of de-qi and other clinical observations. Conclusions. Great inconsistency in depth of each point measured from different subject groups and tools exists. The definition of safe depth should be established through standardization. There is also lack of researches to compare the clinical efficacy. A well-designed clinical trial selecting proper measuring tools to decide the actual and advisable needling depth for each point, to avoid adverse effects or complications and promote optimal clinical efficacy, is a top priority. PMID:23935678

  11. Effect of LEO cycling at shallow depths of discharge on MANTECH IPV nickel-hydrogen cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smithrick, John J.

    1988-01-01

    An individual pressure vessel nickel-hydrogen battery is being considered as an alternate for a nickel-cadmium battery on the Hubble Space Telescope. The space telescope battery will primarily be operating at a shallow depth of discharge (10 percent DOD) with an occasional 40 percent DOD. This shallow DOD raises several issues: (1) What is the cycle life. It is projected to be acceptable; however, there is no reported real time data base for validation. (2) The state of charge of the nickel electrode at the beginning of charge is 90 percent. Will this cause an acceleration of divergence in the battery individual cell voltages. (3) After prolonged cycling at 10 percent DOD, will there be enough capacity remaining to support the 40 percent DOD. (4) Is the state of charge really 90 percent during cycling. There is no reported real time data base at shallow depths of discharge. A data base to address the above issues was initiated.

  12. Depth image enhancement using perceptual texture priors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bang, Duhyeon; Shim, Hyunjung

    2015-03-01

    A depth camera is widely used in various applications because it provides a depth image of the scene in real time. However, due to the limited power consumption, the depth camera presents severe noises, incapable of providing the high quality 3D data. Although the smoothness prior is often employed to subside the depth noise, it discards the geometric details so to degrade the distance resolution and hinder achieving the realism in 3D contents. In this paper, we propose a perceptual-based depth image enhancement technique that automatically recovers the depth details of various textures, using a statistical framework inspired by human mechanism of perceiving surface details by texture priors. We construct the database composed of the high quality normals. Based on the recent studies in human visual perception (HVP), we select the pattern density as a primary feature to classify textures. Upon the classification results, we match and substitute the noisy input normals with high quality normals in the database. As a result, our method provides the high quality depth image preserving the surface details. We expect that our work is effective to enhance the details of depth image from 3D sensors and to provide a high-fidelity virtual reality experience.

  13. Improved Boundary Layer Depth Retrievals from MPLNET

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lewis, Jasper R.; Welton, Ellsworth J.; Molod, Andrea M.; Joseph, Everette

    2013-01-01

    Continuous lidar observations of the planetary boundary layer (PBL) depth have been made at the Micropulse Lidar Network (MPLNET) site in Greenbelt, MD since April 2001. However, because of issues with the operational PBL depth algorithm, the data is not reliable for determining seasonal and diurnal trends. Therefore, an improved PBL depth algorithm has been developed which uses a combination of the wavelet technique and image processing. The new algorithm is less susceptible to contamination by clouds and residual layers, and in general, produces lower PBL depths. A 2010 comparison shows the operational algorithm overestimates the daily mean PBL depth when compared to the improved algorithm (1.85 and 1.07 km, respectively). The improved MPLNET PBL depths are validated using radiosonde comparisons which suggests the algorithm performs well to determine the depth of a fully developed PBL. A comparison with the Goddard Earth Observing System-version 5 (GEOS-5) model suggests that the model may underestimate the maximum daytime PBL depth by 410 m during the spring and summer. The best agreement between MPLNET and GEOS-5 occurred during the fall and they diered the most in the winter.

  14. Predicting Maximum Lake Depth from Surrounding Topography

    PubMed Central

    Hollister, Jeffrey W.; Milstead, W. Bryan; Urrutia, M. Andrea

    2011-01-01

    Information about lake morphometry (e.g., depth, volume, size, etc.) aids understanding of the physical and ecological dynamics of lakes, yet is often not readily available. The data needed to calculate measures of lake morphometry, particularly lake depth, are usually collected on a lake-by-lake basis and are difficult to obtain across broad regions. To span the gap between studies of individual lakes where detailed data exist and regional studies where access to useful data on lake depth is unavailable, we developed a method to predict maximum lake depth from the slope of the topography surrounding a lake. We use the National Elevation Dataset and the National Hydrography Dataset – Plus to estimate the percent slope of surrounding lakes and use this information to predict maximum lake depth. We also use field measured maximum lake depths from the US EPA's National Lakes Assessment to empirically adjust and cross-validate our predictions. We were able to predict maximum depth for ∼28,000 lakes in the Northeastern United States with an average cross-validated RMSE of 5.95 m and 5.09 m and average correlation of 0.82 and 0.69 for Hydrological Unit Code Regions 01 and 02, respectively. The depth predictions and the scripts are openly available as supplements to this manuscript. PMID:21984945

  15. Polarization lidar for shallow water depth measurement.

    PubMed

    Mitchell, Steven; Thayer, Jeffrey P; Hayman, Matthew

    2010-12-20

    A bathymetric, polarization lidar system transmitting at 532 nm and using a single photomultiplier tube is employed for applications of shallow water depth measurement. The technique exploits polarization attributes of the probed water body to isolate surface and floor returns, enabling constant fraction detection schemes to determine depth. The minimum resolvable water depth is no longer dictated by the system's laser or detector pulse width and can achieve better than 1 order of magnitude improvement over current water depth determination techniques. In laboratory tests, an Nd:YAG microchip laser coupled with polarization optics, a photomultiplier tube, a constant fraction discriminator, and a time-to-digital converter are used to target various water depths with an ice floor to simulate a glacial meltpond. Measurement of 1 cm water depths with an uncertainty of ±3 mm are demonstrated using the technique. This novel approach enables new approaches to designing laser bathymetry systems for shallow depth determination from remote platforms while not compromising deep water depth measurement. PMID:21173834

  16. Learning in Depth: Students as Experts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Egan, Kieran; Madej, Krystina

    2009-01-01

    Nearly everyone who has tried to describe an image of the educated person, from Plato to the present, includes at least two requirements: first, educated people must be widely knowledgeable and, second, they must know something in depth. The authors would like to advocate a somewhat novel approach to "learning in depth" (LiD) that seems likely to…

  17. Evaluating approaches for estimating peat depth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parry, L. E.; West, L. J.; Holden, J.; Chapman, P. J.

    2014-04-01

    Estimates of peat depth are required to inform understanding of peatland development, functioning, and ecosystem services such as carbon storage. However, there is a considerable lack of peat depth data at local, national, and global scales. Recent studies have attempted to address this knowledge deficit by using manual probing and ground-penetrating radar (GPR) to estimate depth. Despite increasing application, little consideration has been given to the accuracy of either of these techniques. This study examines the accuracy of probing and GPR for measuring peat depth. Corresponding GPR and probing surveys were carried out at a catchment scale in a blanket peatland. GPR depth estimations, calibrated using common midpoint (CMP) surveys, were found to be on average 35% greater than probe measurements. The source of disagreement was found to be predominantly caused by depth probes becoming obstructed by artifacts within the peat body, although occasionally probing rods also penetrated sediments underlying the peat. Using the Complex Refractive Index Model, it was found that applying a single velocity of 0.036 m ns-1 across a single site may also result in -8 to +17% error in estimation of peat depth due to spatial variability in water content and porosity. It is suggested that GPR calibrated at each site using CMP surveys may provide a more accurate method for measuring peat depth.

  18. Improving depth maps with limited user input

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vandewalle, Patrick; Klein Gunnewiek, René; Varekamp, Chris

    2010-02-01

    A vastly growing number of productions from the entertainment industry are aiming at 3D movie theaters. These productions use a two-view format, primarily intended for eye-wear assisted viewing in a well defined environment. To get this 3D content into the home environment, where a large variety of 3D viewing conditions exists (e.g. different display sizes, display types, viewing distances), we need a flexible 3D format that can adjust the depth effect. This can be provided by the image plus depth format, in which a video frame is enriched with depth information for all pixels in the video frame. This format can be extended with additional layers, such as an occlusion layer or a transparency layer. The occlusion layer contains information on the data that is behind objects, and is also referred to as occluded video. The transparency layer, on the other hand, contains information on the opacity of the foreground layer. This allows rendering of semi-transparencies such as haze, smoke, windows, etc., as well as transitions from foreground to background. These additional layers are only beneficial if the quality of the depth information is high. High quality depth information can currently only be achieved with user assistance. In this paper, we discuss an interactive method for depth map enhancement that allows adjustments during the propagation over time. Furthermore, we will elaborate on the automatic generation of the transparency layer, using the depth maps generated with an interactive depth map generation tool.

  19. Differential Cognitive Cues in Pictorial Depth Perception.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Omari, Issa M.; Cook, Harold

    The experiment described in this report investigates the effects of various cognitive cues in questions asked regarding the relationship of elements in pictorial depth perception. The subjects of this study are 40 third grade Black and Puerto Rican children. They are confronted with four pictures from the Hudson Depth Perception Tests and asked to…

  20. Depth of origin of magma in eruptions

    PubMed Central

    Becerril, Laura; Galindo, Ines; Gudmundsson, Agust; Morales, Jose Maria

    2013-01-01

    Many volcanic hazard factors - such as the likelihood and duration of an eruption, the eruption style, and the probability of its triggering large landslides or caldera collapses - relate to the depth of the magma source. Yet, the magma source depths are commonly poorly known, even in frequently erupting volcanoes such as Hekla in Iceland and Etna in Italy. Here we show how the length-thickness ratios of feeder dykes can be used to estimate the depth to the source magma chamber. Using this method, accurately measured volcanic fissures/feeder-dykes in El Hierro (Canary Islands) indicate a source depth of 11–15 km, which coincides with the main cloud of earthquake foci surrounding the magma chamber associated with the 2011–2012 eruption of El Hierro. The method can be used on widely available GPS and InSAR data to calculate the depths to the source magma chambers of active volcanoes worldwide. PMID:24067336

  1. Depth of origin of magma in eruptions.

    PubMed

    Becerril, Laura; Galindo, Ines; Gudmundsson, Agust; Morales, Jose Maria

    2013-01-01

    Many volcanic hazard factors--such as the likelihood and duration of an eruption, the eruption style, and the probability of its triggering large landslides or caldera collapses--relate to the depth of the magma source. Yet, the magma source depths are commonly poorly known, even in frequently erupting volcanoes such as Hekla in Iceland and Etna in Italy. Here we show how the length-thickness ratios of feeder dykes can be used to estimate the depth to the source magma chamber. Using this method, accurately measured volcanic fissures/feeder-dykes in El Hierro (Canary Islands) indicate a source depth of 11-15 km, which coincides with the main cloud of earthquake foci surrounding the magma chamber associated with the 2011-2012 eruption of El Hierro. The method can be used on widely available GPS and InSAR data to calculate the depths to the source magma chambers of active volcanoes worldwide. PMID:24067336

  2. Three-dimensional charge coupled device

    DOEpatents

    Conder, Alan D.; Young, Bruce K. F.

    1999-01-01

    A monolithic three dimensional charged coupled device (3D-CCD) which utilizes the entire bulk of the semiconductor for charge generation, storage, and transfer. The 3D-CCD provides a vast improvement of current CCD architectures that use only the surface of the semiconductor substrate. The 3D-CCD is capable of developing a strong E-field throughout the depth of the semiconductor by using deep (buried) parallel (bulk) electrodes in the substrate material. Using backside illumination, the 3D-CCD architecture enables a single device to image photon energies from the visible, to the ultra-violet and soft x-ray, and out to higher energy x-rays of 30 keV and beyond. The buried or bulk electrodes are electrically connected to the surface electrodes, and an E-field parallel to the surface is established with the pixel in which the bulk electrodes are located. This E-field attracts charge to the bulk electrodes independent of depth and confines it within the pixel in which it is generated. Charge diffusion is greatly reduced because the E-field is strong due to the proximity of the bulk electrodes.

  3. Process for fabricating a charge coupled device

    DOEpatents

    Conder, Alan D.; Young, Bruce K. F.

    2002-01-01

    A monolithic three dimensional charged coupled device (3D-CCD) which utilizes the entire bulk of the semiconductor for charge generation, storage, and transfer. The 3D-CCD provides a vast improvement of current CCD architectures that use only the surface of the semiconductor substrate. The 3D-CCD is capable of developing a strong E-field throughout the depth of the semiconductor by using deep (buried) parallel (bulk) electrodes in the substrate material. Using backside illumination, the 3D-CCD architecture enables a single device to image photon energies from the visible, to the ultra-violet and soft x-ray, and out to higher energy x-rays of 30 keV and beyond. The buried or bulk electrodes are electrically connected to the surface electrodes, and an E-field parallel to the surface is established with the pixel in which the bulk electrodes are located. This E-field attracts charge to the bulk electrodes independent of depth and confines it within the pixel in which it is generated. Charge diffusion is greatly reduced because the E-field is strong due to the proximity of the bulk electrodes.

  4. Depth Analogy: Data-Driven Approach for Single Image Depth Estimation Using Gradient Samples.

    PubMed

    Choi, Sunghwan; Min, Dongbo; Ham, Bumsub; Kim, Youngjung; Oh, Changjae; Sohn, Kwanghoon

    2015-12-01

    Inferring scene depth from a single monocular image is a highly ill-posed problem in computer vision. This paper presents a new gradient-domain approach, called depth analogy, that makes use of analogy as a means for synthesizing a target depth field, when a collection of RGB-D image pairs is given as training data. Specifically, the proposed method employs a non-parametric learning process that creates an analogous depth field by sampling reliable depth gradients using visual correspondence established on training image pairs. Unlike existing data-driven approaches that directly select depth values from training data, our framework transfers depth gradients as reconstruction cues, which are then integrated by the Poisson reconstruction. The performance of most conventional approaches relies heavily on the training RGB-D data used in the process, and such a dependency severely degenerates the quality of reconstructed depth maps when the desired depth distribution of an input image is quite different from that of the training data, e.g., outdoor versus indoor scenes. Our key observation is that using depth gradients in the reconstruction is less sensitive to scene characteristics, providing better cues for depth recovery. Thus, our gradient-domain approach can support a great variety of training range datasets that involve substantial appearance and geometric variations. The experimental results demonstrate that our (depth) gradient-domain approach outperforms existing data-driven approaches directly working on depth domain, even when only uncorrelated training datasets are available. PMID:26529766

  5. Helium-3 and boron-10 concentration and depth measurements in alloys and semiconductors using NDP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ünlü, Kenan; Saglam, Mehmet; Wehring, Bernard W.

    1999-02-01

    Neutron Depth Profiling (NDP) is a nondestructive near surface technique that is used to measure concentration versus absolute depth of several isotopes of light mass elements in various substrates. NDP is based on absorption reaction of thermal neutrons with the isotope of interest. Charged particles and recoil atoms are generated in the reaction. The depth profiles are determined by measuring the residual energy of the charged particles or the recoil atoms. The NDP technique has became an increasingly important method to measure depth profiles of 3He and 10B in alloys and semiconductor materials. A permanent NDP facility has been installed on the tangential beam port of the University of Texas (UT) TRIGA Mark-II research reactor. One of the standard applications of the UT-NDP facility involves the determination of boron profiles of borophosphosilicate glass (BPSG) samples. NDP is also being used in combination with electron microscopy measurements to determine radiation damage and microstructural changes in stainless steel samples. This is done to study the long-term effects of high-dose alpha irradiation for weapons grade plutonium encapsulation. Measurements of implanted boron-10 concentration and depth profiles of semiconductor materials in order to calibrate commercial implanters is another application at the UT-NDP facility. The concentration and depth profiles measured with NDP and SIMS are compared with reported data given by various vendors or different implanters in order to verify implant quality of semiconductor wafers. The results of the measurements and other possible applications of NDP are presented.

  6. Stress among charge nurses: tool development and stress measurement.

    PubMed

    Admi, Hanna; Moshe-Eilon, Yael

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this study was to develop and implement a tool for measuring the role stress of charge nurses. Tools are lacking regarding measurement of nursing role stressors, particularly for charge nurses. Based on focus groups and in-depth interviews with charge nurses within a large tertiary hospital, a charge nurse stress questionnaire was developed which measures six factors of stress: authority-responsibility conflict, patient-nurse interaction, deficient resources, managerial decision making, role conflict, and overload. The prominent stressors on charge nurses were specific to the role. Mean levels of stress were significantly higher for nurses who attended post-graduate clinical courses than for those who did not. The mean level of stress was higher for department nurse managers than for nurses without a managerial position. This tool was designed to measure charge nurse stress demonstrates reliability, and highlights the specific stressors demanded by the role. Preparation and ongoing support for fulfilling this position are recommended. PMID:20672537

  7. Learning joint intensity-depth sparse representations.

    PubMed

    Tosic, Ivana; Drewes, Sarah

    2014-05-01

    This paper presents a method for learning overcomplete dictionaries of atoms composed of two modalities that describe a 3D scene: 1) image intensity and 2) scene depth. We propose a novel joint basis pursuit (JBP) algorithm that finds related sparse features in two modalities using conic programming and we integrate it into a two-step dictionary learning algorithm. The JBP differs from related convex algorithms because it finds joint sparsity models with different atoms and different coefficient values for intensity and depth. This is crucial for recovering generative models where the same sparse underlying causes (3D features) give rise to different signals (intensity and depth). We give a bound for recovery error of sparse coefficients obtained by JBP, and show numerically that JBP is superior to the group lasso algorithm. When applied to the Middlebury depth-intensity database, our learning algorithm converges to a set of related features, such as pairs of depth and intensity edges or image textures and depth slants. Finally, we show that JBP outperforms state of the art methods on depth inpainting for time-of-flight and Microsoft Kinect 3D data. PMID:24723574

  8. Binocular depth perception in the pigeon.

    PubMed Central

    McFadden, S A; Wild, J M

    1986-01-01

    By means of a discrete-trial simultaneous discrimination procedure, pigeons were trained to respond differentially to visual arrays that were identical except that one of them contained a circle displaced in depth when viewed stereoscopically. Performance was severely disrupted when one eye was occluded. The monocular deficit was peculiar to the depth task, inasmuch as no such decrement was seen on a pattern discrimination. The results imply that presence of the displaced circle was discriminated on the basis of a binocular cue. It was also found that pigeons could discriminate the direction of the displacement. Discrimination of depth was independent of the global form and still occurred when elements of the array were randomly displaced in depth. Performance was not disrupted when the absolute convergence angle of the depth stimulus was changed. The cue that consistently accounted for the behavior seen was the detection of the relative angles of convergence--that is, the retinal disparity of the two planes in depth. Thus, despite the lateral position of the eyes of the pigeon, a small binocular field mediates the binocular discrimination of near objects in depth. PMID:3958661

  9. Boundary Depth Information Using Hopfield Neural Network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Sheng; Wang, Ruisheng

    2016-06-01

    Depth information is widely used for representation, reconstruction and modeling of 3D scene. Generally two kinds of methods can obtain the depth information. One is to use the distance cues from the depth camera, but the results heavily depend on the device, and the accuracy is degraded greatly when the distance from the object is increased. The other one uses the binocular cues from the matching to obtain the depth information. It is more and more mature and convenient to collect the depth information of different scenes by stereo matching methods. In the objective function, the data term is to ensure that the difference between the matched pixels is small, and the smoothness term is to smooth the neighbors with different disparities. Nonetheless, the smoothness term blurs the boundary depth information of the object which becomes the bottleneck of the stereo matching. This paper proposes a novel energy function for the boundary to keep the discontinuities and uses the Hopfield neural network to solve the optimization. We first extract the region of interest areas which are the boundary pixels in original images. Then, we develop the boundary energy function to calculate the matching cost. At last, we solve the optimization globally by the Hopfield neural network. The Middlebury stereo benchmark is used to test the proposed method, and results show that our boundary depth information is more accurate than other state-of-the-art methods and can be used to optimize the results of other stereo matching methods.

  10. Elevation dependency of mountain snow depth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grünewald, T.; Bühler, Y.; Lehning, M.

    2014-07-01

    Elevation strongly affects quantity and distribution of precipitation and snow. Positive elevation gradients were identified by many studies, usually based on data from sparse precipitation stations or snow depth measurements. We present a systematic evaluation of the elevation - snow depth relationship. We analyse areal snow depth data obtained by remote sensing for seven mountain sites. Snow depths were averaged to 100 m elevation bands and then related to their respective elevation level. The assessment was performed at three scales ranging from the complete data sets by km-scale sub-catchments to slope transects. We show that most elevation - snow depth curves at all scales are characterised through a single shape. Mean snow depths increase with elevation up to a certain level where they have a distinct peak followed by a decrease at the highest elevations. We explain this typical shape with a generally positive elevation gradient of snow fall that is modified by the interaction of snow cover and topography. These processes are preferential deposition of precipitation and redistribution of snow by wind, sloughing and avalanching. Furthermore we show that the elevation level of the peak of mean snow depth correlates with the dominant elevation level of rocks.

  11. Elevation dependency of mountain snow depth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grünewald, T.; Bühler, Y.; Lehning, M.

    2014-12-01

    Elevation strongly affects quantity and distribution patterns of precipitation and snow. Positive elevation gradients were identified by many studies, usually based on data from sparse precipitation stations or snow depth measurements. We present a systematic evaluation of the elevation-snow depth relationship. We analyse areal snow depth data obtained by remote sensing for seven mountain sites near to the time of the maximum seasonal snow accumulation. Snow depths were averaged to 100 m elevation bands and then related to their respective elevation level. The assessment was performed at three scales: (i) the complete data sets (10 km scale), (ii) sub-catchments (km scale) and (iii) slope transects (100 m scale). We show that most elevation-snow depth curves at all scales are characterised through a single shape. Mean snow depths increase with elevation up to a certain level where they have a distinct peak followed by a decrease at the highest elevations. We explain this typical shape with a generally positive elevation gradient of snow fall that is modified by the interaction of snow cover and topography. These processes are preferential deposition of precipitation and redistribution of snow by wind, sloughing and avalanching. Furthermore, we show that the elevation level of the peak of mean snow depth correlates with the dominant elevation level of rocks (if present).

  12. Improved tilt-depth method for fast estimation of top and bottom depths of magnetic bodies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yan-Guo; Zhang, Jin; Ge, Kun-Peng; Chen, Xiao; Nie, Feng-Jun

    2016-06-01

    The tilt-depth method can be used to make fast estimation of the top depth of magnetic bodies. However, it is unable to estimate bottom depths and its every inversion point only has a single solution. In order to resolve such weaknesses, this paper presents an improved tilt-depth method based on the magnetic anomaly expression of vertical contact with a finite depth extent, which can simultaneously estimate top and bottom depths of magnetic bodies. In addition, multiple characteristic points are selected on the tilt angle map for joint computation to improve reliability of inversion solutions. Two- and threedimensional model tests show that this improved tilt-depth method is effective in inverting buried depths of top and bottom bodies, and has a higher inversion precision for top depths than the conventional method. The improved method is then used to process aeromagnetic data over the Changling Fault Depression in the Songliao Basin, and inversion results of top depths are found to be more accurate for actual top depths of volcanic rocks in two nearby drilled wells than those using the conventional tilt-depth method.

  13. Control of electrode depth in electroslag remelting

    DOEpatents

    Melgaard, David K.; Shelmidine, Gregory J.; Damkroger, Brian K.

    2002-01-01

    A method of and apparatus for controlling an electroslag remelting furnace by driving the electrode at a nominal speed based upon melting rate and geometry while making minor proportional adjustments based on a measured metric of the electrode immersion depth. Electrode drive speed is increased if a measured metric of electrode immersion depth differs from a set point by a predetermined amount, indicating that the tip is too close to the surface of a slag pool. Impedance spikes are monitored to adjust the set point for the metric of electrode immersion depth based upon one or more properties of the impedance spikes.

  14. Exploratory depth-of-burst experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Reichenbach, H.; Behrens, K.; Kuhl, A.

    1991-12-12

    This report describes the first small-scale explosion experiments with aerated grout (i.e., YTONG). Apart from data referring to crater depth and volume versus depth of burst (DOB), isobaric DOB curves in the range of 1.5 psi {le} p {le} 15 psi were established. The comparison with previous HOB values shows that the ground range to a given overpressure is considerably reduced with increasing depth of burst. The authors plan to continue the airblast investigations with different types of soil materials.

  15. Battery formation charging apparatus

    SciTech Connect

    Stewart, J.L.

    1987-08-04

    An apparatus is describe for charging electric storage batteries, the apparatus comprising: (a) a host computer for providing charging information to and receiving status information from at least one slave computer by means of a data link; and (b) at least one control module coupled to the slave computer for applying charging current to at least one electric storage battery in response to instructions received from the slave computer, and for providing feedback and status information to the slave computer.

  16. Charge Islands Through Tunneling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Robinson, Daryl C.

    2002-01-01

    It has been recently reported that the electrical charge in a semiconductive carbon nanotube is not evenly distributed, but rather it is divided into charge "islands." This paper links the aforementioned phenomenon to tunneling and provides further insight into the higher rate of tunneling processes, which makes tunneling devices attractive. This paper also provides a basis for calculating the charge profile over the length of the tube so that nanoscale devices' conductive properties may be fully exploited.

  17. Charging of interplanetary grains

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baragiola, R. A.; Johnson, R. E.; Newcomb, John L.

    1995-01-01

    The objective of this program is to quantify, by laboratory experiments, the charging of ices and other insulators subject to irradiation with electrons, ions and ultraviolet photons and to model special conditions based on the data. The system and conditions to be studied are those relevant for charging of dust in magnetospheric plasmas. The measurements are supplemented by computer simulations of charging or grains under a variety of conditions. Our work for this period involved experiments on water ice, improved models of charging of ice grains for Saturn's E-ring, and the construction of apparatus for electron impact studies and measurements of electron energy distributions.

  18. Water depth estimation with ERTS-1 imagery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ross, D. S.

    1973-01-01

    Contrast-enhanced 9.5 inch ERTS-1 images were produced for an investigation on ocean water color. Such images lend themselves to water depth estimation by photographic and electronic density contouring. MSS-4 and -5 images of the Great Bahama Bank were density sliced by both methods. Correlation was found between the MSS-4 image and a hydrographic chart at 1:467,000 scale, in a number of areas corresponding to water depth of less than 2 meters, 5 to 10 meters and 10 to about 20 meters. The MSS-5 image was restricted to depths of about 2 meters. Where reflective bottom and clear water are found, ERTS-1 MSS-4 images can be used with density contouring by electronic or photographic methods for estimating depths to 5 meters within about one meter.

  19. Getting to the bottom of orthographic depth.

    PubMed

    Schmalz, Xenia; Marinus, Eva; Coltheart, Max; Castles, Anne

    2015-12-01

    Orthographic depth has been studied intensively as one of the sources of cross-linguistic differences in reading, and yet there has been little detailed analysis of what is meant by orthographic depth. Here we propose that orthographic depth is a conglomerate of two separate constructs: the complexity of print-to-speech correspondences and the unpredictability of the derivation of the pronunciations of words on the basis of their orthography. We show that on a linguistic level, these two concepts can be dissociated. Furthermore, we make different predictions about how the two concepts would affect skilled reading and reading acquisition. We argue that refining the definition of orthographic depth opens up new research questions. Addressing these can provide insights into the specific mechanisms by which language-level orthographic properties affect cognitive processes underlying reading. PMID:25893713

  20. Monocular depth effects on perceptual fading.

    PubMed

    Hsu, Li-Chuan; Kramer, Peter; Yeh, Su-Ling

    2010-08-01

    After prolonged viewing, a static target among moving non-targets is perceived to repeatedly disappear and reappear. An uncrossed stereoscopic disparity of the target facilitates this Motion-Induced Blindness (MIB). Here we test whether monocular depth cues can affect MIB too, and whether they can also affect perceptual fading in static displays. Experiment 1 reveals an effect of interposition: more MIB when the target appears partially covered by, than when it appears to cover, its surroundings. Experiment 2 shows that the effect is indeed due to interposition and not to the target's contours. Experiment 3 induces depth with the watercolor illusion and replicates Experiment 1. Experiments 4 and 5 replicate Experiments 1 and 3 without the use of motion. Since almost any stimulus contains a monocular depth cue, we conclude that perceived depth affects perceptual fading in almost any stimulus, whether dynamic or static. PMID:20580732

  1. Apparent extended body motions in depth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hecht, Heiko; Proffitt, Dennis R.

    1991-01-01

    Five experiments were designed to investigate the influence of three-dimensional (3-D) orientation change on apparent motion. Projections of an orientation-specific 3-D object were sequentially flashed in different locations and at different orientations. Such an occurrence could be resolved by perceiving a rotational motion in depth around an axis external to the object. Consistent with this proposal, it was found that observers perceived curved paths in depth. Although the magnitude of perceived trajectory curvature often fell short of that required for rotational motions in depth (3-D circularity), judgments of the slant of the virtual plane on which apparent motions occurred were quite close to the predictions of a model that proposes circular paths in depth.

  2. Capturing Motion and Depth Before Cinematography.

    PubMed

    Wade, Nicholas J

    2016-01-01

    Visual representations of biological states have traditionally faced two problems: they lacked motion and depth. Attempts were made to supply these wants over many centuries, but the major advances were made in the early-nineteenth century. Motion was synthesized by sequences of slightly different images presented in rapid succession and depth was added by presenting slightly different images to each eye. Apparent motion and depth were combined some years later, but they tended to be applied separately. The major figures in this early period were Wheatstone, Plateau, Horner, Duboscq, Claudet, and Purkinje. Others later in the century, like Marey and Muybridge, were stimulated to extend the uses to which apparent motion and photography could be applied to examining body movements. These developments occurred before the birth of cinematography, and significant insights were derived from attempts to combine motion and depth. PMID:26684420

  3. Depth of field in modern thermal imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schuster, Norbert; Franks, John

    2015-05-01

    Modern thermal imaging lenses for uncooled detectors are high aperture systems. Very often, their aperture based fnumber is faster than 1.2. The impact of this on the depth of field is dramatic, especially for narrow field lenses. The users would like to know how the image quality changes with and without refocusing for objects at different distances from the camera core. The Depth of Field approach presented here is based on the lens specific Through Focus MTF. It will be averaged for the detector area. The lens specific Through Focus MTF will be determined at the detector Nyquist frequency, which is defined by the pixel pitch. In this way, the specific lens and the specific FPA-geometry (pixel pitch, detector area) are considered. The condition, that the Through Focus MTF at full Nyquist must be higher than 0.25, defines a certain symmetrical depth of focus. This criterion provides a good discrimination for reasonable lens/detector combinations. The examples chosen reflect the actual development of uncooled camera cores. The symmetrical depth of focus is transferred to object space using paraxial relations. This defines a typical depth of field diagram containing three functions: Hyperfocal distance, nearest and furthest distance versus sharp distance (best focus). Pictures taken with an IR Camera illustrate the effect in the depth of field and its dependence on focal length. These pictures confirm the methodology. A separate problem is the acceptable drop of resolution in combination with a specific camera core and specific object scenes. We propose to evaluate the MTF-graph at half Nyquist frequency. This quantifies the resolution loss without refocus in accordance with the IR-picture degradation at the limits of the Depth of Field. The approach is applied to different commercially available lenses. Pictures illustrate the Depth of Field for different pixel pitches and pixel counts.

  4. Reference surfaces for bridge scour depths

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Landers, Mark N.; Mueller, David S.

    1993-01-01

    Depth of scour is measured as the vertical distance between scoured channel geometry and a measurement reference surface. A scour depth measurement can have a wide range depending on the method used to establish the reference surface. A consistent method to establish reference surfaces for bridge scour measurements is needed to facilitate transferability of scour data an scour analyses. This paper describes and evaluates techniques for establishing reference surfaces from which local and contraction scour are measured.

  5. RGB-D depth-map restoration using smooth depth neighborhood supports

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Wei; Xue, Haoyang; Yu, Zhongjie; Wu, Qiang; Yang, Jie

    2015-05-01

    A method to restore the depth map of an RGB-D image using smooth depth neighborhood (SDN) supports is presented. The SDN supports are computed based on the corresponding color image of the depth map. Compared with the most widely used square supports, the proposed SDN supports can well-capture the local structure of the object. Only pixels with similar depth values are allowed to be included in the support. We combine our SDN supports with the joint bilateral filter (JBF) to form the SDN-JBF and use it to restore depth maps. Experimental results show that our SDN-JBF can not only rectify the misaligned depth pixels but also preserve sharp depth discontinuities.

  6. Modeling depth distributions of overland flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Mark W.; Cox, Nicholas J.; Bracken, Louise J.

    2011-02-01

    Hydrological and erosion models use water depth to estimate routing velocity and resultant erosion at each spatial element. Yet the shear stress distribution imposed on the soil surface and any resulting flow detachment and rill incision is controlled by the full probability distribution of depths of overland flow. Terrestrial Laser Scanning (TLS) is used in conjunction with simple field-flume experiments to provide high-resolution measures of overland flow depth-distributions for three semi-arid hillslope transects with differing soil properties. A two-parameter gamma distribution is proposed as the optimum model for depths of both interrill and rill flows. The shape and scale parameters are shown to vary consistently with distance downslope reflecting the morphological signature of runoff processes. The scale parameter is related to the general increase of depths with discharge ( P < 0.0001) as flows gradually concentrate; the shape parameter is more related to the soil surface roughness and potentially provides a control on the rate of depth, but also velocity increase with discharge. Such interactions between surface roughness and overland flows are of crucial importance for flow hydraulics and modeling sediment transport.

  7. Volcanic ash layer depth: Processes and mechanisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dacre, H. F.; Grant, A. L. M.; Harvey, N. J.; Thomson, D. J.; Webster, H. N.; Marenco, F.

    2015-01-01

    The long duration of the 2010 Eyjafjallajökull eruption provided a unique opportunity to measure a widely dispersed volcanic ash cloud. Layers of volcanic ash were observed by the European Aerosol Research Lidar Network with a mean depth of 1.2 km and standard deviation of 0.9 km. In this paper we evaluate the ability of the Met Office's Numerical Atmospheric-dispersion Modelling Environment (NAME) to simulate the observed ash layers and examine the processes controlling their depth. NAME simulates distal ash layer depths exceptionally well with a mean depth of 1.2 km and standard deviation of 0.7 km. The dominant process determining the depth of ash layers over Europe is the balance between the vertical wind shear (which acts to reduce the depth of the ash layers) and vertical turbulent mixing (which acts to deepen the layers). Interestingly, differential sedimentation of ash particles and the volcano vertical emission profile play relatively minor roles.

  8. Relationship between hovering depth and viewing position

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Chang-Ming; Forrest, Andrew K.

    1992-08-01

    Random-dot stereograms first generated by Julesz have since been much used for research in vision and perception. When stereograms are binocularly viewed, three-dimensional surfaces can be perceived hovering over the random-dot background. It can be observed that when the viewing distance alters, the hovering depth of the surface also changes and that if we move our eyes to and fro sideways while viewing, the hovering surface moves with our eye movement. It is believed that the information about depth and three-dimensional shape available from the horizontal component of the stereo disparity field requires interpretation in conjunction with information about egocentric viewing distance. This paper shows the relationship between hovering depth and viewing position. The hovering depth can be calculated providing the interocular distance, the convergence angle and the disparity are known. The ratio of the hovering depths at two different viewing positions is equal to the ratio of the corresponding viewing distances. A mathematical explanation is given of the fact that changing viewing position results in changing of the perceived depth of the hovering surface in stereograms. The horizontal shift of the hovering surface has a linear relationship with the amount of eye movement, and the ratio between them is determined by a the disparity and the interocular distance.

  9. Molecular Depth Profiling by Wedged Crater Beveling

    PubMed Central

    Mao, Dan; Lu, Caiyan; Winograd, Nicholas; Wucher, Andreas

    2011-01-01

    Time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry and atomic force microscopy are employed to characterize a wedge-shaped crater eroded by a 40keV C60+ cluster ion beam on an organic film of Irganox 1010 doped with Irganox 3114 delta layers. From an examination of the resulting surface, the information about depth resolution, topography and erosion rate can be obtained as a function of crater depth for every depth in a single experiment. It is shown that when measurements are performed at liquid nitrogen temperature, a constant erosion rate and reduced bombardment induced surface roughness is observed. At room temperature, however, the erosion rate drops by ~1/3 during the removal of the 400 nm Irganox film and the roughness gradually increased to from 1 nm ~4 nm. From SIMS lateral images of the beveled crater and AFM topography results, depth resolution was further improved by employing glancing angles of incidence and lower primary ion beam energy. Sub-10 nm depth resolution was observed under the optimized conditions on a routine basis. In general, we show that the wedge-crater beveling is an important tool for elucidating the factors that are important for molecular depth profiling experiments. PMID:21744861

  10. Crack depth determination with inductive thermography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oswald-Tranta, B.; Schmidt, R.

    2015-05-01

    Castings, forgings and other steel products are nowadays usually tested with magnetic particle inspection, in order to detect surface cracks. An alternative method is active thermography with inductive heating, which is quicker, it can be well automated and as in this paper presented, even the depth of a crack can be estimated. The induced eddy current, due to its very small penetration depth in ferro-magnetic materials, flows around a surface crack, heating this selectively. The surface temperature is recorded during and after the short inductive heating pulse with an infrared camera. Using Fourier transformation the whole IR image sequence is evaluated and the phase image is processed to detect surface cracks. The level and the local distribution of the phase around a crack correspond to its depth. Analytical calculations were used to model the signal distribution around cracks with different depth and a relationship has been derived between the depth of a crack and its phase value. Additionally, also the influence of the heating pulse duration has been investigated. Samples with artificial and with natural cracks have been tested. Results are presented comparing the calculated and measured phase values depending on the crack depth. Keywords: inductive heating, eddy current, infrared

  11. Depth-aware image seam carving.

    PubMed

    Shen, Jianbing; Wang, Dapeng; Li, Xuelong

    2013-10-01

    Image seam carving algorithm should preserve important and salient objects as much as possible when changing the image size, while not removing the secondary objects in the scene. However, it is still difficult to determine the important and salient objects that avoid the distortion of these objects after resizing the input image. In this paper, we develop a novel depth-aware single image seam carving approach by taking advantage of the modern depth cameras such as the Kinect sensor, which captures the RGB color image and its corresponding depth map simultaneously. By considering both the depth information and the just noticeable difference (JND) model, we develop an efficient JND-based significant computation approach using the multiscale graph cut based energy optimization. Our method achieves the better seam carving performance by cutting the near objects less seams while removing distant objects more seams. To the best of our knowledge, our algorithm is the first work to use the true depth map captured by Kinect depth camera for single image seam carving. The experimental results demonstrate that the proposed approach produces better seam carving results than previous content-aware seam carving methods. PMID:23893762

  12. Motion parallax thresholds for unambiguous depth perception.

    PubMed

    Holmin, Jessica; Nawrot, Mark

    2015-10-01

    The perception of unambiguous depth from motion parallax arises from the neural integration of retinal image motion and extra-retinal eye movement signals. It is only recently that these parameters have been articulated in the form of the motion/pursuit ratio. In the current study, we explored the lower limits of the parameter space in which observers could accurately perform near/far relative depth-sign discriminations for a translating random-dot stimulus. Stationary observers pursued a translating random dot stimulus containing relative image motion. Their task was to indicate the location of the peak in an approximate square-wave stimulus. We measured thresholds for depth from motion parallax, quantified as motion/pursuit ratios, as well as lower motion thresholds and pursuit accuracy. Depth thresholds were relatively stable at pursuit velocities 5-20 deg/s, and increased at lower and higher velocities. The pattern of results indicates that minimum motion/pursuit ratios are limited by motion and pursuit signals, both independently and in combination with each other. At low and high pursuit velocities, depth thresholds were limited by inaccurate pursuit signals. At moderate pursuit velocities, depth thresholds were limited by motion signals. PMID:26232612

  13. Single image defogging by multiscale depth fusion.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yuan-Kai; Fan, Ching-Tang

    2014-11-01

    Restoration of fog images is important for the deweathering issue in computer vision. The problem is ill-posed and can be regularized within a Bayesian context using a probabilistic fusion model. This paper presents a multiscale depth fusion (MDF) method for defog from a single image. A linear model representing the stochastic residual of nonlinear filtering is first proposed. Multiscale filtering results are probabilistically blended into a fused depth map based on the model. The fusion is formulated as an energy minimization problem that incorporates spatial Markov dependence. An inhomogeneous Laplacian-Markov random field for the multiscale fusion regularized with smoothing and edge-preserving constraints is developed. A nonconvex potential, adaptive truncated Laplacian, is devised to account for spatially variant characteristics such as edge and depth discontinuity. Defog is solved by an alternate optimization algorithm searching for solutions of depth map by minimizing the nonconvex potential in the random field. The MDF method is experimentally verified by real-world fog images including cluttered-depth scene that is challenging for defogging at finer details. The fog-free images are restored with improving contrast and vivid colors but without over-saturation. Quantitative assessment of image quality is applied to compare various defog methods. Experimental results demonstrate that the accurate estimation of depth map by the proposed edge-preserved multiscale fusion should recover high-quality images with sharp details. PMID:25248180

  14. Nuclear Charge Radii Systematics

    SciTech Connect

    Marinova, Krassimira

    2015-09-15

    This paper is a brief overview of the existing systematics on nuclear mean square charge radii, obtained by a combined analysis of data from different types of experiment. The various techniques yielding data on nuclear charge radii are summarized. Their specific feature complexities and the accuracy and precision of the obtained information are also discussed.

  15. Rain Drop Charge Sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    S, Sreekanth T.

    begin{center} Large Large Rain Drop Charge Sensor Sreekanth T S*, Suby Symon*, G. Mohan Kumar (1) , S. Murali Das (2) *Atmospheric Sciences Division, Centre for Earth Science Studies, Thiruvananthapuram 695011 (1) D-330, Swathi Nagar, West Fort, Thiruvananthapuram 695023 (2) Kavyam, Manacaud, Thiruvananthapuram 695009 begin{center} ABSTRACT To study the inter-relations with precipitation electricity and precipitation microphysical parameters a rain drop charge sensor was designed and developed at CESS Electronics & Instrumentation Laboratory. Simultaneous measurement of electric charge and fall speed of rain drops could be done using this charge sensor. A cylindrical metal tube (sensor tube) of 30 cm length is placed inside another thick metal cover opened at top and bottom for electromagnetic shielding. Mouth of the sensor tube is exposed and bottom part is covered with metal net in the shielding cover. The instrument is designed in such a way that rain drops can pass only through unhindered inside the sensor tube. When electrically charged rain drops pass through the sensor tube, it is charged to the same magnitude of drop charge but with opposite polarity. The sensor tube is electrically connected the inverted input of a current to voltage converter operational amplifier using op-amp AD549. Since the sensor is electrically connected to the virtual ground of the op-amp, the charge flows to the ground and the generated current is converted to amplified voltage. This output voltage is recorded using a high frequency (1kHz) voltage recorder. From the recorded pulse, charge magnitude, polarity and fall speed of rain drop are calculated. From the fall speed drop diameter also can be calculated. The prototype is now under test running at CESS campus. As the magnitude of charge in rain drops is an indication of accumulated charge in clouds in lightning, this instrument has potential application in the field of risk and disaster management. By knowing the charge

  16. Physical Mechanisms for Earthquakes at Intermediate Depths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Green, H. W.; Green, H. W.

    2001-12-01

    Conventional brittle shear failure it is strongly inhibited by pressure because it relies on local tensile failure. In contrast, plastic flow processes are thermally activated, making them sensitive functions of temperature, but their pressure dependence is only moderate. As a consequence, in Earth, faulting by unassisted brittle failure is probably restricted to depths less than ~ 30 km because the rocks flow at lower stresses than they fracture. To enable faulting at greater depths, mineral reactions must occur that generate a fluid or fluid-like solid that is much weaker than the parent assemblage. Although a variety of plastic instabilities have been and continue to be proposed to explain earthquakes at depth, dehydration embrittlement remains the only experimentally verified faulting mechanism consistent with the pressures and compositions existing at depths of 50-300km within subducting lithosphere. However, low pressure hydrous phases potentially abundant in subducting lithosphere (e.g. chlorite and antigorite) exhibit a temperature maximum in their stability, implying that the bulk volume change at depths of more than 70-100 km. becomes negative, thereby raising questions about mechanical instability upon dehydration. Further, it is now well-accepted that intermediate-depth earthquakes occur within the descending slab (double seismic zones present in several slabs dramatically demonstrate this fact), in conflict with the maximum depth of 10-12 km accepted for hydration of the lithosphere at oceanic spreading centers. Thus, on the one hand these earthquakes may be evidence that hydrous phases exist deep within subducting slabs but on the other hand, a mechanism for hydration to such depths is not known. One possibility is that large earthquakes outboard of trenches break the surface and allow hydration of the fault zone that can later dehydrate to yield earthquakes at depth, but no mechanism is known for pumping H2O into such fault zones to depths of tens of

  17. Charged topological entanglement entropy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsuura, Shunji; Wen, Xueda; Hung, Ling-Yan; Ryu, Shinsei

    2016-05-01

    A charged entanglement entropy is a new measure which probes quantum entanglement between different charge sectors. We study symmetry-protected topological (SPT) phases in (2+1)-dimensional space-time by using this charged entanglement entropy. SPT phases are short-range entangled states without topological order and hence cannot be detected by the topological entanglement entropy. We demonstrate that the universal part of the charged entanglement entropy is nonzero for nontrivial SPT phases and therefore it is a useful measure to detect short-range entangled topological phases. We also discuss that the classification of SPT phases based on the charged topological entanglement entropy is related to that of the braiding statistics of quasiparticles.

  18. Charging black Saturn?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chng, Brenda; Mann, Robert; Radu, Eugen; Stelea, Cristian

    2008-12-01

    We construct new charged static solutions of the Einstein-Maxwell field equations in five dimensions via a solution generation technique utilizing the symmetries of the reduced Lagrangian. By applying our method on the multi-Reissner-Nordström solution in four dimensions, we generate the multi-Reissner-Nordström solution in five dimensions. We focus on the five-dimensional solution describing a pair of charged black objects with general masses and electric charges. This solution includes the double Reissner-Nordström solution as well as the charged version of the five-dimensional static black Saturn. However, all the black Saturn configurations that we found contain either a conical or naked singularity. We also obtain a non-extremal configuration of charged black strings that reduces in the extremal limit to a Majumdar-Papapetrou like solution in five dimensions.

  19. Handheld White Light Interferometer for Measuring Defect Depth in Windows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Youngquist, Robert; Simmons, Stephen; Cox, Robert

    2010-01-01

    Accurate quantification of defects (scratches and impacts) is vital to the certification of flight hardware and other critical components. The amount of damage to a particular component contributes to the performance, reliability, and safety of a system, which ultimately affects the success or failure of a mission or test. The launch-commit criteria on a Space Shuttle Orbiter window are governed by the depth of the defects that are identified by a visual inspection. This measurement of a defect is not easy to obtain given the environment, size of the defect, and location of the window(s). The determination of depth has typically been performed by taking a mold impression and measuring the impression with an optical profiling instrument. Another method of obtaining an estimate of the depth is by using a refocus microscope. To use a refocus microscope, the surface of the glass and bottom of the defect are, in turn, brought into focus by the operator. The amount of movement between the two points corresponds to the depth of the defect. The refocus microscope requires a skilled operator and has been proven to be unreliable when used on Orbiter windows. White light interferometry was chosen as a candidate to replace the refocus microscope. The White Light Interferometer (WLI) was developed to replace the refocus microscope as the instrument used for measuring the depth of defects in Orbiter windows. The WLI consists of a broadband illumination source, interferometer, detector, motion control, displacement sensor, mechanical housing, and support electronics. The illumination source for the WLI is typically a visible light emitting diode (LED) or a near-infrared superluminescent diode (SLD) with power levels of less than a milliwatt. The interferometer is a Michelson configuration consisting of a 1-in. (2.5-cm) cube beam splitter, a 0.5-in. (1.3-cm) optical window as a movable leg (used to closely match the return intensity of the fixed leg from the window), and a

  20. Cold neutron depth profiling of lithium-ion battery materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lamaze, G. P.; Chen-Mayer, H. H.; Becker, D. A.; Vereda, F.; Goldner, R. B.; Haas, T.; Zerigian, P.

    We report the characterization of two thin-film battery materials using neutron techniques. Neutron depth profiling (NDP) has been employed to determine the distribution of lithium and nitrogen simultaneously in lithium phosphorous oxynitride (LiPON) deposited by ion beam assisted deposition (IBAD). The depth profiles are based on the measurement of the energy of the charged particle products from the 6Li(n,α) 3H and 14N(n,p) 14C reactions for lithium and nitrogen, respectively. Lithium at the level of 10 22 atoms/cm 3 and N of 10 21 atoms/cm 3, distributed in the film thickness on the order of 1 μm, have been determined. This information provides insights into nitrogen incorporation and lithium concentration in the films under various fabrication conditions. NDP of lithium has also been performed on IBAD LiCoO 2 films, in conjunction with instrumental neutron activation analysis (INAA) to determine the cobalt concentration. The Li/Co ratio thus obtained serves as an ex situ control for the thin-film evaporation process. The non-destructive nature of the neutron techniques is especially suitable for repeated analysis of these materials and for actual working devices.

  1. Real-time structured light depth extraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keller, Kurtis; Ackerman, Jeremy D.

    2000-03-01

    Gathering depth data using structured light has been a procedure for many different environments and uses. Many of these system are utilized instead of laser line scanning because of their quickness. However, to utilize depth extraction for some applications, in our case laparoscopic surgery, the depth extraction must be in real time. We have developed an apparatus that speeds up the raw image display and grabbing in structured light depth extraction from 30 frames per second to 60 and 180 frames per second. This results in an updated depth and texture map of about 15 times per second versus about 3. This increased update rate allows for real time depth extraction for use in augmented medical/surgical applications. Our miniature, fist-sized projector utilizes an internal ferro-reflective LCD display that is illuminated with cold light from a flex light pipe. The miniature projector, attachable to a laparoscope, displays inverted pairs of structured light into the body where these images are then viewed by a high-speed camera set slightly off axis from the projector that grabs images synchronously. The images from the camera are ported to a graphics-processing card where six frames are worked on simultaneously to extract depth and create mapped textures from these images. This information is then sent to the host computer with 3D coordinate information of the projector/camera and the associated textures. The surgeon is then able to view body images in real time from different locations without physically moving the laparoscope imager/projector, thereby, reducing the trauma of moving laparoscopes in the patient.

  2. Depth-Charge in the Archive: The Documentation of Performance Revisited in the Digital Age

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Allen, Jess

    2010-01-01

    The debate surrounding the documentation of performance is principally concerned with the ephemerality of the live event, set against the stasis and "death" that the archive is conventionally believed to represent. The advent of digital technology in live performance has complexified this still further, by altering the architecture, space and…

  3. TRENDS IN ESTIMATED MIXING DEPTH DAILY MAXIMUMS

    SciTech Connect

    Buckley, R; Amy DuPont, A; Robert Kurzeja, R; Matt Parker, M

    2007-11-12

    Mixing depth is an important quantity in the determination of air pollution concentrations. Fireweather forecasts depend strongly on estimates of the mixing depth as a means of determining the altitude and dilution (ventilation rates) of smoke plumes. The Savannah River United States Forest Service (USFS) routinely conducts prescribed fires at the Savannah River Site (SRS), a heavily wooded Department of Energy (DOE) facility located in southwest South Carolina. For many years, the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) has provided forecasts of weather conditions in support of the fire program, including an estimated mixing depth using potential temperature and turbulence change with height at a given location. This paper examines trends in the average estimated mixing depth daily maximum at the SRS over an extended period of time (4.75 years) derived from numerical atmospheric simulations using two versions of the Regional Atmospheric Modeling System (RAMS). This allows for differences to be seen between the model versions, as well as trends on a multi-year time frame. In addition, comparisons of predicted mixing depth for individual days in which special balloon soundings were released are also discussed.

  4. Robust depth filter sizing for centrate clarification.

    PubMed

    Lutz, Herb; Chefer, Kate; Felo, Michael; Cacace, Benjamin; Hove, Sarah; Wang, Bin; Blanchard, Mark; Oulundsen, George; Piper, Rob; Zhao, Xiaoyang

    2015-01-01

    Cellulosic depth filters embedded with diatomaceous earth are widely used to remove colloidal cell debris from centrate as a secondary clarification step during the harvest of mammalian cell culture fluid. The high cost associated with process failure in a GMP (Good Manufacturing Practice) environment highlights the need for a robust process scale depth filter sizing that allows for (1) stochastic batch-to-batch variations from filter media, bioreactor feed and operation, and (2) systematic scaling differences in average performance between filter sizes and formats. Matched-lot depth filter media tested at the same conditions with consecutive batches of the same molecule were used to assess the sources and magnitudes of process variability. Depth filter sizing safety factors of 1.2-1.6 allow a filtration process to compensate for random batch-to-batch process variations. Matched-lot depth filter media in four different devices tested simultaneously at the same conditions was used with a common feed to assess scaling effects. All filter devices showed <11% capacity difference and the Pod format devices showed no statistically different capacity differences. PMID:26518411

  5. Folding without charges

    PubMed Central

    Kurnik, Martin; Hedberg, Linda; Danielsson, Jens; Oliveberg, Mikael

    2012-01-01

    Surface charges of proteins have in several cases been found to function as “structural gatekeepers,” which avoid unwanted interactions by negative design, for example, in the control of protein aggregation and binding. The question is then if side-chain charges, due to their desolvation penalties, play a corresponding role in protein folding by avoiding competing, misfolded traps? To find out, we removed all 32 side-chain charges from the 101-residue protein S6 from Thermus thermophilus. The results show that the charge-depleted S6 variant not only retains its native structure and cooperative folding transition, but folds also faster than the wild-type protein. In addition, charge removal unleashes pronounced aggregation on longer timescales. S6 provides thus an example where the bias toward native contacts of a naturally evolved protein sequence is independent of charges, and point at a fundamental difference in the codes for folding and intermolecular interaction: specificity in folding is governed primarily by hydrophobic packing and hydrogen bonding, whereas solubility and binding relies critically on the interplay of side-chain charges. PMID:22454493

  6. Bound charges and currents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herczyński, Andrzej

    2013-03-01

    Bound charges and currents are among the conceptually challenging topics in advanced courses on electricity and magnetism. It may be tempting for students to believe that they are merely computational tools for calculating electric and magnetic fields in matter, particularly because they are usually introduced through abstract manipulation of integral identities, with the physical interpretation provided a posteriori. Yet these charges and currents are no less real than free charges and currents and can be measured experimentally. A simpler and more direct approach to introducing this topic, suggested by the ideas in the classic book by Purcell and emphasizing the physical origin of these phenomena, is proposed.

  7. Nonuniform depth grids in parabolic equation solutions.

    PubMed

    Sanders, William M; Collins, Michael D

    2013-04-01

    The parabolic wave equation is solved using a finite-difference solution in depth that involves a nonuniform grid. The depth operator is discretized using Galerkin's method with asymmetric hat functions. Examples are presented to illustrate that this approach can be used to improve efficiency for problems in ocean acoustics and seismo-acoustics. For shallow water problems, accuracy is sensitive to the precise placement of the ocean bottom interface. This issue is often addressed with the inefficient approach of using a fine grid spacing over all depth. Efficiency may be improved by using a relatively coarse grid with nonuniform sampling to precisely position the interface. Efficiency may also be improved by reducing the sampling in the sediment and in an absorbing layer that is used to truncate the computational domain. Nonuniform sampling may also be used to improve the implementation of a single-scattering approximation for sloping fluid-solid interfaces. PMID:23556565

  8. Flexible Ablators Char Depths LHMEL Test Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    White, Susan; Qu, Vince; Fan, Wendy; Stackpoole, Mairead; Thornton, Jeremy

    2012-01-01

    Char and pyrolysis zone depths give physical evidence of peak temperature reached in depth: The pyrolyzing material acts as a temperature indicator within its characteristic thermal decomposition range. A matrix of novel flexible ablators were laser tested in one component of material screening for NASA Entry, Descent and Landing research for future Mars missions. LHMEL tests were run both on virgin materials, and on previously charred materials for a dual pulse simulation of the heating due to aerocapture followed by atmospheric entry. The test models were machined to expose the cross-sections. Char measurements were made at three locations near the center of the exposed area. Data are presented showing the char depths developed in these flexible materials, grouped by reinforcing fiber and pyrolyzing material type.

  9. Depth profile characterization with noncollinear beam mixing

    SciTech Connect

    Freed, Shaun L. E-mail: jeong.na@wyle.com; Na, Jeong K. E-mail: jeong.na@wyle.com

    2015-03-31

    Noncollinear beam mixing is an ultrasonic approach to quantify elastic nonlinearity within a subsurface volume of material. The technique requires interaction between two beams of specific frequency, angle, and vibration mode to generate a third beam propagating from the intersection volume. The subsurface depth to interaction zone is controlled by changing the separation distance between the two input transducers, and the amplitude of the third generated beam is proportional to the elastic nonlinearity within the interaction zone. Therefore, depth profiling is possible if a suitable parameter is established to normalize the detected signal independent of propagation distances and input amplitudes. This foundational effort has been conducted toward developing such a parameter for depth profile measurements in homogeneous aluminum that includes corrective terms for attenuation, beam overlap noise, beam spread, and input amplitudes. Experimental and analytical results are provided, and suggested applications and improvements are discussed toward characterizing subsurface material property profiles.

  10. Depth-resolved fluorescence of biological tissue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Yicong; Xi, Peng; Cheung, Tak-Hong; Yim, So Fan; Yu, Mei-Yung; Qu, Jianan Y.

    2005-06-01

    The depth-resolved autofluorescence ofrabbit oral tissue, normal and dysplastic human ectocervical tissue within l20μm depth were investigated utilizing a confocal fluorescence spectroscopy with the excitations at 355nm and 457nm. From the topmost keratinizing layer of oral and ectocervical tissue, strong keratin fluorescence with the spectral characteristics similar to collagen was observed. The fluorescence signal from epithelial tissue between the keratinizing layer and stroma can be well resolved. Furthermore, NADH and FADfluorescence measured from the underlying non-keratinizing epithelial layer were strongly correlated to the tissue pathology. This study demonstrates that the depth-resolved fluorescence spectroscopy can reveal fine structural information on epithelial tissue and potentially provide more accurate diagnostic information for determining tissue pathology.

  11. A modified model of the just noticeable depth difference and its application to depth sensation enhancement.

    PubMed

    Jung, Seung-Won

    2013-10-01

    The just noticeable depth difference (JNDD) describes the threshold of human perception of the difference in the depth. In flat-panel-based three-dimensional (3-D) displays, the JNDD is typically measured by changing the depth difference between displayed image objects until the difference is perceivable. However, not only the depth, but also the perceived size changes when the depth difference increases. In this paper, we present a modified JNDD measurement method that adjusts the physical size of the object such that the perceived size of the object is maintained. We then apply the proposed JNDD measurement method to depth sensation enhancement. When the depth value difference between the objects is increased to enable the viewer to perceive the depth difference, the size of the objects is adjusted to maintain the perceived size of the objects. In addition, since the size change of the objects can produce a whole region, a depth-adaptive hole-inpainting technique is proposed to compensate for the hole region with high accuracy. The experimental results demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed method. PMID:23686954

  12. Binocular disparity magnitude affects perceived depth magnitude despite inversion of depth order.

    PubMed

    Matthews, Harold; Hill, Harold; Palmisano, Stephen

    2011-01-01

    The hollow-face illusion involves a misperception of depth order: our perception follows our top-down knowledge that faces are convex, even though bottom-up depth information reflects the actual concave surface structure. While pictorial cues can be ambiguous, stereopsis should unambiguously indicate the actual depth order. We used computer-generated stereo images to investigate how, if at all, the sign and magnitude of binocular disparities affect the perceived depth of the illusory convex face. In experiment 1 participants adjusted the disparity of a convex comparison face until it matched a reference face. The reference face was either convex or hollow and had binocular disparities consistent with an average face or had disparities exaggerated, consistent with a face stretched in depth. We observed that apparent depth increased with disparity magnitude, even when the hollow faces were seen as convex (ie when perceived depth order was inconsistent with disparity sign). As expected, concave faces appeared flatter than convex faces, suggesting that disparity sign also affects perceived depth. In experiment 2, participants were presented with pairs of real and illusory convex faces. In each case, their task was to judge which of the two stimuli appeared to have the greater depth. Hollow faces with exaggerated disparities were again perceived as deeper. PMID:22132512

  13. Micrometeorological conditions under different soil frost depths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nemoto, M.; Hirota, T.; Iwata, Y.; Suzuki, S.; Hasegawa, S.

    2007-12-01

    Eastern Hokkaido, where is one of the largest agricultural production regions in Japan, is characterized by low air temperature and relatively thin snow covers resulting in soil frost over the winter. However, the soil frost depth has been significantly decreasing since late 1980's due to an insulation from the cold air by a thick snow cover developing in early winter. In the current study, soil water movement, soil temperature, and surface heat balance under different soil frost conditions were monitored to obtain a knowledge of changes in micrometeorological condition of the agricultural production systems in the Eastern Hokkaido associated with the decreasing soil frost depth in the region. A paired soil plot experiment was conducted from Nov. 2005 to May 2006, where the frost depth was artificially enhanced by removing snow for 24 days in the retreatment plot and the natural condition was maintained in the control plot. The soil in the experimental field was classified as Andisol with much porosity and high drainability. In each plot, water content and soil temperature were measured by TDR and thermocouple, respectively. The maximum soil-frost depth in the treatment and control plots resulted in 43.8 and 13.6ċm, respectively. Changes in snow water equivalent volume SWE) and snow depth were manually recorded. The difference of SWE just before melting snow was same. The day of snow disappearing was 18th April 2006 for both plots. The control plot with a thin frozen layer allowed infiltration of snow melt water, and water content at the lower subsoil increased accordance in snowmelting, whereas a thick frozen layer in the treatment plot impeded the infiltration resulting in waterlogging being observed on the soil surface. These differences in profile of water content and in developing soil frost depth results in more delay in increasing soil temperature at the deeper depth. At the surface, however, the difference in soil temperature was quickly disappeared, and

  14. Moho depth and age in southern Norway

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stratford, W.; Thybo, H.

    2010-05-01

    Moho ages beneath the Fennoscandian shield are highly variable due to the method of crustal accretion and to the long history of extensional and compressional tectonics. In southern Norway, the Moho and crust are inferred to be the youngest of the shield, however, it is likely that a large discrepancy between crustal age and Moho age exists beneath the high southern scandes where the Caledonian orogeny was in effect. Moho structure in southern Norway was targeted recently with a seismic refraction study (Magnus-Rex - Mantle investigations of Norwegian uplift Structure, refraction experiment). Three ~400 km long active source seismic profiles across the high southern Scandes Mountains, the youngest section of the Fennoscandian shield were recorded. Moho depths beneath the high mountains are 36-40 km, thinning towards the Atlantic Margin and the Oslo graben. A new Moho depth map is constructed for southern Norway by compiling new depth measurements with previous refraction Moho measurements. Gaining better constraint on Moho depths in this area is timely, as debate over the source of support for the mountains has provided the impetus for a new focus project, TopoScandesdeep, to find the depth and mechanisms of compensation. P and S-wave arrivals were recorded in the Magnus-Rex project, from which Poisson ratios for the crust in southern Norway are calculated. Unusually strong S-wave arrivals allow rare insight into crustal Poisson's ratio structure that is not normally available from active source data and are usually determined by earthquake tomography studies where only bulk crustal values are available. An average Poisson's ratio of 0.25 is calculated for the crust in southern Norway, suggesting it is predominantly of felsic-intermediate composition and lacks any significant mafic lower crust. This differs significantly from the adjacent crust in the Svecofennian domain of the Fennoscandian shield where Moho depths reach ~50 km and an up to 20 km thick mafic lower

  15. Depth selective acousto-optic flow measurement

    PubMed Central

    Tsalach, Adi; Schiffer, Zeev; Ratner, Eliahu; Breskin, Ilan; Zeitak, Reuven; Shechter, Revital; Balberg, Michal

    2015-01-01

    Optical based methods for non-invasive measurement of regional blood flow tend to incorrectly assess cerebral blood flow, due to contribution of extra-cerebral tissues to the obtained signal. We demonstrate that spectral analysis of phase-coded light signals, tagged by specific ultrasound patterns, enables differentiation of flow patterns at different depths. Validation of the model is conducted by Monte Carlo simulation. In-vitro experiments demonstrate good agreement with the simulations' results and provide a solid validation to depth discrimination ability. These results suggest that signal contamination originating from extra-cerebral tissue may be eliminated using spectral analysis of ultrasonically tagged light. PMID:26713201

  16. Benchmark Airport Charges

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    de Wit, A.; Cohn, N.

    1999-01-01

    The Netherlands Directorate General of Civil Aviation (DGCA) commissioned Hague Consulting Group (HCG) to complete a benchmark study of airport charges at twenty eight airports in Europe and around the world, based on 1996 charges. This study followed previous DGCA research on the topic but included more airports in much more detail. The main purpose of this new benchmark study was to provide insight into the levels and types of airport charges worldwide and into recent changes in airport charge policy and structure. This paper describes the 1996 analysis. It is intended that this work be repeated every year in order to follow developing trends and provide the most up-to-date information possible.

  17. Benchmark Airport Charges

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    deWit, A.; Cohn, N.

    1999-01-01

    The Netherlands Directorate General of Civil Aviation (DGCA) commissioned Hague Consulting Group (HCG) to complete a benchmark study of airport charges at twenty eight airports in Europe and around the world, based on 1996 charges. This study followed previous DGCA research on the topic but included more airports in much more detail. The main purpose of this new benchmark study was to provide insight into the levels and types of airport charges worldwide and into recent changes in airport charge policy and structure, This paper describes the 1996 analysis. It is intended that this work be repeated every year in order to follow developing trends and provide the most up-to-date information possible.

  18. Space charge in proton linacs

    SciTech Connect

    Wangler, T. P.; Merrill, F.; Rybarcyk, L.; Ryne, R.

    1998-11-05

    Space charge effects on beam dynamics in linear accelerators are discussed. Practical linac beam dynamics calculation methods which include space charge effects are discussed. Also, the status of beam performance experiments including space charge studies are summarized.

  19. Electrically charged targets

    DOEpatents

    Goodman, Ronald K.; Hunt, Angus L.

    1984-01-01

    Electrically chargeable laser targets and method for forming such charged targets in order to improve their guidance along a predetermined desired trajectory. This is accomplished by the incorporation of a small amount of an additive to the target material which will increase the electrical conductivity thereof, and thereby enhance the charge placed upon the target material for guidance thereof by electrostatic or magnetic steering mechanisms, without adversely affecting the target when illuminated by laser energy.

  20. Modeling of spacecraft charging

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whipple, E. C., Jr.

    1977-01-01

    Three types of modeling of spacecraft charging are discussed: statistical models, parametric models, and physical models. Local time dependence of circuit upset for DoD and communication satellites, and electron current to a sphere with an assumed Debye potential distribution are presented. Four regions were involved in spacecraft charging: (1) undisturbed plasma, (2) plasma sheath region, (3) spacecraft surface, and (4) spacecraft equivalent circuit.

  1. MOSFET Electric-Charge Sensor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Robinson, Paul A., Jr.

    1988-01-01

    Charged-particle probe compact and consumes little power. Proposed modification enables metal oxide/semiconductor field-effect transistor (MOSFET) to act as detector of static electric charges or energetic charged particles. Thickened gate insulation acts as control structure. During measurements metal gate allowed to "float" to potential of charge accumulated in insulation. Stack of modified MOSFET'S constitutes detector of energetic charged particles. Each gate "floats" to potential induced by charged-particle beam penetrating its layer.

  2. Expansive Soil Crack Depth under Cumulative Damage

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Bei-xiao; Chen, Sheng-shui; Han, Hua-qiang; Zheng, Cheng-feng

    2014-01-01

    The crack developing depth is a key problem to slope stability of the expansive soil and its project governance and the crack appears under the roles of dry-wet cycle and gradually develops. It is believed from the analysis that, because of its own cohesion, the expansive soil will have a certain amount of deformation under pulling stress but without cracks. The soil body will crack only when the deformation exceeds the ultimate tensile strain that causes cracks. And it is also believed that, due to the combined effect of various environmental factors, particularly changes of the internal water content, the inherent basic physical properties of expansive soil are weakened, and irreversible cumulative damages are eventually formed, resulting in the development of expansive soil cracks in depth. Starting from the perspective of volumetric strain that is caused by water loss, considering the influences of water loss rate and dry-wet cycle on crack developing depth, the crack developing depth calculation model which considers the water loss rate and the cumulative damages is established. Both the proposal of water loss rate and the application of cumulative damage theory to the expansive soil crack development problems try to avoid difficulties in matrix suction measurement, which will surely play a good role in promoting and improving the research of unsaturated expansive soil. PMID:24737974

  3. Depth of burial experiments at Balapan

    SciTech Connect

    Glenn, L.A.; Myers, S.C.

    1997-11-01

    We report of a series of experiments designed to discriminate underground explosion sources at various depths by means of their seismic signatures at regional distances. This series was a joint effort of the US Department of Energy (DOE), the US Defense Special Weapons Agency (DSWA), and the National Nuclear Center of the Republic of Kazakhstan (NNC). The series consisted of three 25-ton explosions, at depths of 55 m, 300 m, and 50 m. In addition, a 5-ton checkout explosion was fired at a depth of 630 m, and small-scale explosions at each site were carried out so that the empirical Green`s functions could be derived. Broadband and short-period seismic data were recorded at an eight-station network within Kazakhstan, at nominal ranges varying from 100-1500 km, and with good azimuthal coverage for regional phases. In addition, seismic measurements were made at former NRDC sites (BAY and KKL), infrasound recordings were made at the cross array at Kurchatov, and close-in seismic measurements were also made at ranges from ground zero to 20 km. Although the main objective of this series was to study depth-of- burial (DOB) effects on the excitation of regional phases such as LG and RG, and to determine whether peaks in the coda spectral shape correlate well with DOB, a secondary objective was to help calibrate the site of the Kazakhstan seismic network, especially the primary IMS station at MAKanchi, and the auxiliary IMS stations at KURchatov and AKTyubinsk.

  4. How Item Writers Understand Depth of Knowledge

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wyse, Adam E.; Viger, Steven G.

    2011-01-01

    An important part of test development is ensuring alignment between test forms and content standards. One common way of measuring alignment is the Webb (1997, 2007) alignment procedure. This article investigates (a) how well item writers understand components of the definition of Depth of Knowledge (DOK) from the Webb alignment procedure and (b)…

  5. Expansive soil crack depth under cumulative damage.

    PubMed

    Shi, Bei-xiao; Chen, Sheng-shui; Han, Hua-qiang; Zheng, Cheng-feng

    2014-01-01

    The crack developing depth is a key problem to slope stability of the expansive soil and its project governance and the crack appears under the roles of dry-wet cycle and gradually develops. It is believed from the analysis that, because of its own cohesion, the expansive soil will have a certain amount of deformation under pulling stress but without cracks. The soil body will crack only when the deformation exceeds the ultimate tensile strain that causes cracks. And it is also believed that, due to the combined effect of various environmental factors, particularly changes of the internal water content, the inherent basic physical properties of expansive soil are weakened, and irreversible cumulative damages are eventually formed, resulting in the development of expansive soil cracks in depth. Starting from the perspective of volumetric strain that is caused by water loss, considering the influences of water loss rate and dry-wet cycle on crack developing depth, the crack developing depth calculation model which considers the water loss rate and the cumulative damages is established. Both the proposal of water loss rate and the application of cumulative damage theory to the expansive soil crack development problems try to avoid difficulties in matrix suction measurement, which will surely play a good role in promoting and improving the research of unsaturated expansive soil. PMID:24737974

  6. Continuous Depth Map Reconstruction From Light Fields.

    PubMed

    Li, Jianqiao; Lu, Minlong; Li, Ze-Nian

    2015-11-01

    In this paper, we investigate how the recently emerged photography technology--the light field--can benefit depth map estimation, a challenging computer vision problem. A novel framework is proposed to reconstruct continuous depth maps from light field data. Unlike many traditional methods for the stereo matching problem, the proposed method does not need to quantize the depth range. By making use of the structure information amongst the densely sampled views in light field data, we can obtain dense and relatively reliable local estimations. Starting from initial estimations, we go on to propose an optimization method based on solving a sparse linear system iteratively with a conjugate gradient method. Two different affinity matrices for the linear system are employed to balance the efficiency and quality of the optimization. Then, a depth-assisted segmentation method is introduced so that different segments can employ different affinity matrices. Experiment results on both synthetic and real light fields demonstrate that our continuous results are more accurate, efficient, and able to preserve more details compared with discrete approaches. PMID:26054068

  7. Case Studies in Managing Psychological Depth.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ringer, Martin; Gillis, H. L.

    This paper outlines a model for assessing and managing psychological depth in outdoor and experiential group work, and presents two case studies of the complexity of such management in real life. The model contains eight levels of emotional risk and presents four criteria for assessing the level to which a particular event or discussion may lead…

  8. Microwave interferometer controls cutting depth of plastics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heisman, R. M.; Iceland, W. F.

    1969-01-01

    Microwave interferometer system controls the cutting of plastic materials to a prescribed depth. The interferometer is mounted on a carriage with a spindle and cutting tool. A cross slide, mounted on the carriage, allows the interferometer and cutter to move toward or away from the plastic workpiece.

  9. "Learning in Depth" in Teaching Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Egan, Kieran

    2015-01-01

    The "Learning in Depth" program is a simple but radical innovation, which was first implemented in Canada in 2008/2009 and is now being used in a dozen countries with many thousand students. The aim of the program is to ensure that every student becomes an expert on something during schooling. The unusualness of the program and the fact…

  10. 21 CFR 882.1330 - Depth electrode.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Depth electrode. 882.1330 Section 882.1330 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL... signals at, subsurface levels of the brain. (b) Classification. Class II (performance standards)....

  11. 21 CFR 882.1330 - Depth electrode.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Depth electrode. 882.1330 Section 882.1330 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL... signals at, subsurface levels of the brain. (b) Classification. Class II (performance standards)....

  12. 21 CFR 882.1330 - Depth electrode.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Depth electrode. 882.1330 Section 882.1330 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL... signals at, subsurface levels of the brain. (b) Classification. Class II (performance standards)....

  13. 21 CFR 882.1330 - Depth electrode.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Depth electrode. 882.1330 Section 882.1330 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL... signals at, subsurface levels of the brain. (b) Classification. Class II (performance standards)....

  14. 21 CFR 882.1330 - Depth electrode.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Depth electrode. 882.1330 Section 882.1330 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL... signals at, subsurface levels of the brain. (b) Classification. Class II (performance standards)....

  15. Electro-optical liquid depth sensor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heppner, D. B.; Atwood, S. O.

    1976-01-01

    Transducer utilizes absorptive properties of water to determine variations in depth without disturbing liquid. Instrument is inexpensive, simple, and small and thus can be used in lieu of direct graduated scale readout or capacitive, ultrasonic, resistive or inducive sensors when these are impractical because of complexity or cost.

  16. Modified algesimeter provides accurate depth measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Turner, D. P.

    1966-01-01

    Algesimeter which incorporates a standard sensory needle with a sensitive micrometer, measures needle point depth penetration in pain tolerance research. This algesimeter provides an inexpensive, precise instrument with assured validity of recordings in those biomedical areas with a requirement for repeated pain detection or ascertaining pain sensitivity.

  17. Fluctuations of development maximum depth and nuclear composition of primary cosmic radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dyakonov, M. N.; Knurenko, S. P.; Krasilnikov, D. D.; Sleptsov, I. Y.; Pavlov, V. N.; Ivanov, A. A.; Kolosov, V. A.; Struchkov, G. G.

    1985-01-01

    The extensive air showers (EAS) cascade curves from the Cerenkov light lateral distribution measurements are recovered and the maximum depth fluctuations of the shower development theta x sub m both on the Cerenkov and charged EAS components are defined. At E sub 0 approximates 10 to the 18th power eV the mean content of protons is greater than 85%, and p-air cross section theta sub 0 p-air 750mb.

  18. Flaw depth sizing using guided waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cobb, Adam C.; Fisher, Jay L.

    2016-02-01

    Guided wave inspection technology is most often applied as a survey tool for pipeline inspection, where relatively low frequency ultrasonic waves, compared to those used in conventional ultrasonic nondestructive evaluation (NDE) methods, propagate along the structure; discontinuities cause a reflection of the sound back to the sensor for flaw detection. Although the technology can be used to accurately locate a flaw over long distances, the flaw sizing performance, especially for flaw depth estimation, is much poorer than other, local NDE approaches. Estimating flaw depth, as opposed to other parameters, is of particular interest for failure analysis of many structures. At present, most guided wave technologies estimate the size of the flaw based on the reflected signal amplitude from the flaw compared to a known geometry reflection, such as a circumferential weld in a pipeline. This process, however, requires many assumptions to be made, such as weld geometry and flaw shape. Furthermore, it is highly dependent on the amplitude of the flaw reflection, which can vary based on many factors, such as attenuation and sensor installation. To improve sizing performance, especially depth estimation, and do so in a way that is not strictly amplitude dependent, this paper describes an approach to estimate the depth of a flaw based on a multimodal analysis. This approach eliminates the need of using geometric reflections for calibration and can be used for both pipeline and plate inspection applications. To verify the approach, a test set was manufactured on plate specimens with flaws of different widths and depths ranging from 5% to 100% of total wall thickness; 90% of these flaws were sized to within 15% of their true value. A description of the initial multimodal sizing strategy and results will be discussed.

  19. Electron spectra derived from depth dose distributions.

    PubMed

    Faddegon, B A; Blevis, I

    2000-03-01

    The technique of extracting electron energy spectra from measured distributions of dose along the central axis of clinical electron beams is explored in detail. Clinical spectra measured with this simple spectroscopy tool are shown to be sufficient in accuracy and resolution for use in Monte Carlo treatment planning. A set of monoenergetic depth dose curves of appropriate energy spacing, precalculated with Monte Carlo for a simple beam model, are unfolded from the measured depth dose curve. The beam model is comprised of a point electron and photon source placed in vacuum with a source-to-surface distance of 100 cm. Systematic error introduced by this model affects the calculated depth dose curve by no more than 2%/2 mm. The component of the dose due to treatment head bremsstrahlung, subtracted prior to unfolding, is estimated from the thin-target Schiff spectrum within 0.3% of the maximum total dose (from electrons and photons) on the beam axis. Optimal unfolding parameters are chosen, based on physical principles. Unfolding is done with the public-domain code FERDO. Comparisons were made to previously published spectra measured with magnetic spectroscopy and to spectra we calculated with Monte Carlo treatment head simulation. The approach gives smooth spectra with an average resolution for the 27 beams studied of 16+/-3% of the mean peak energy. The mean peak energy of the magnetic spectrometer spectra was calculated within 2% for the AECL T20 scanning beam accelerators, 3% for the Philips SL25 scattering foil based machine. The number of low energy electrons in Monte Carlo spectra is estimated by unfolding with an accuracy of 2%, relative to the total number of electrons in the beam. Central axis depth dose curves calculated from unfolded spectra are within 0.5%/0.5 mm of measured and simulated depth dose curves, except near the practical range, where 1%/1 mm errors are evident. PMID:10757603

  20. Airblast environments from buried HE charges

    SciTech Connect

    Reichenbach, H.; Behrens, K.; Kuhl, A.

    1993-01-01

    Laboratory experiments were conducted to measure the airblast environment generated by the detonation of buried HE charges. Spherical 0.5-g charges of Nitropenta were used as the HE source. Three ground materials were used: (1) a porous, crushable grout (YTONG, {rho} = 0.4 g/cm{sup 3}); (2) a water-saturated grout ({rho} {approx_equal} 0.7 g/Cm{sup 3}) to investigate the effects of density increase; and (3) a clay-loam material ({rho} {approx_equal} 1.8 g/cm{sup 3}) to simulate some of the previous field tests conducted in clay. Diagnostics consisted of 13 flush-mounted pressure gauges, and single-frame schlieren photography. A special shock isolation system was used to eliminate the acceleration effects on the gauges that were induced by the cratering process. Analysis of the pressure measurements resulted in an experimental definition of the airblast environment as a function of ground range (GR) and depth-of-burst (DOB). Synthesis of these results allowed one to construct airblast DOB curves, similar to the airblast height-of-burst curves that we published previously for Nitropenta charges. Variables analyzed were: peak pressure, arrival time, positive phase duration and impulse. As in field tests, we found that the airblast waveforms changed character with increasing DOB. The crater characteristics (e.a., depth, radius and volume) were also measured. The cube-root-scaled crater volume was in qualitative agreement with data from field tests (e.g., charge weights up to 10{sup 4} lbs.). Since the present scaled results compare well with data from large-scale HE tests, we conclude that the present experimental technique provides a useful tool for parametric investigations of explosion effects in the laboratory.

  1. When depth is no refuge: cumulative thermal stress increases with depth in Bocas del Toro, Panama

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neal, B. P.; Condit, C.; Liu, G.; dos Santos, S.; Kahru, M.; Mitchell, B. G.; Kline, D. I.

    2014-03-01

    Coral reefs are increasingly affected by high-temperature stress events and associated bleaching. Monitoring and predicting these events have largely utilized sea surface temperature data, due to the convenience of using large-scale remotely sensed satellite measurements. However, coral bleaching has been observed to vary in severity throughout the water column, and variations in coral thermal stress across depths have not yet been well investigated. In this study, in situ water temperature data from 1999 to 2011 from three depths were used to calculate thermal stress on a coral reef in Bahia Almirante, Bocas del Toro, Panama, which was compared to satellite surface temperature data and thermal stress calculations for the same area and time period from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Coral Reef Watch Satellite Bleaching Alert system. The results show similar total cumulative annual thermal stress for both the surface and depth-stratified data, but with a striking difference in the distribution of that stress among the depth strata during different high-temperature events, with the greatest thermal stress unusually recorded at the deepest measured depth during the most severe bleaching event in 2005. Temperature records indicate that a strong density-driven temperature inversion may have formed in this location in that year, contributing to the persistence and intensity of bleaching disturbance at depth. These results indicate that depth may not provide a stress refuge from high water temperature events in some situations, and in this case, the water properties at depth appear to have contributed to greater coral bleaching at depth compared to near-surface locations. This case study demonstrates the importance of incorporating depth-stratified temperature monitoring and small-scale oceanographic and hydrologic data for understanding and predicting local reef responses to elevated water temperature events.

  2. Focal Depth of the WenChuan Earthquake Aftershocks from modeling of Seismic Depth Phases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Y.; Zeng, X.; Chong, J.; Ni, S.; Chen, Y.

    2008-12-01

    After the 05/12/2008 great WenChuan earthquake in Sichuan Province of China, tens of thousands earthquakes occurred with hundreds of them stronger than M4. Those aftershocks provide valuable information about seismotectonics and rupture processes for the mainshock, particularly accurate spatial distribution of aftershocks is very informational for determining rupture fault planes. However focal depth can not be well resolved just with first arrivals recorded by relatively sparse network in Sichuan Province, therefore 3D seismicity distribution is difficult to obtain though horizontal location can be located with accuracy of 5km. Instead local/regional depth phases such as sPmP, sPn, sPL and teleseismic pP,sP are very sensitive to depth, and be readily modeled to determine depth with accuracy of 2km. With reference 1D velocity structure resolved from receiver functions and seismic refraction studies, local/regional depth phases such as sPmP, sPn and sPL are identified by comparing observed waveform with synthetic seismograms by generalized ray theory and reflectivity methods. For teleseismic depth phases well observed for M5.5 and stronger events, we developed an algorithm in inverting both depth and focal mechanism from P and SH waveforms. Also we employed the Cut and Paste (CAP) method developed by Zhao and Helmberger in modeling mechanism and depth with local waveforms, which constrains depth by fitting Pnl waveforms and the relative weight between surface wave and Pnl. After modeling all the depth phases for hundreds of events , we find that most of the M4 earthquakes occur between 2-18km depth, with aftershocks depth ranging 4-12km in the southern half of Longmenshan fault while aftershocks in the northern half featuring large depth range up to 18km. Therefore seismogenic zone in the northern segment is deeper as compared to the southern segment. All the aftershocks occur in upper crust, given that the Moho is deeper than 40km, or even 60km west of the

  3. Quantitative operando visualization of the energy band depth profile in solar cells.

    PubMed

    Chen, Qi; Mao, Lin; Li, Yaowen; Kong, Tao; Wu, Na; Ma, Changqi; Bai, Sai; Jin, Yizheng; Wu, Dan; Lu, Wei; Wang, Bing; Chen, Liwei

    2015-01-01

    The energy band alignment in solar cell devices is critically important because it largely governs elementary photovoltaic processes, such as the generation, separation, transport, recombination and collection of charge carriers. Despite the expenditure of considerable effort, the measurement of energy band depth profiles across multiple layers has been extremely challenging, especially for operando devices. Here we present direct visualization of the surface potential depth profile over the cross-sections of operando organic photovoltaic devices using scanning Kelvin probe microscopy. The convolution effect due to finite tip size and cantilever beam crosstalk has previously prohibited quantitative interpretation of scanning Kelvin probe microscopy-measured surface potential depth profiles. We develop a bias voltage-compensation method to address this critical problem and obtain quantitatively accurate measurements of the open-circuit voltage, built-in potential and electrode potential difference. PMID:26166580

  4. The effect of nanoparticle surfactant polarization on trapping depth of vegetable insulating oil-based nanofluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Jian; Du, Bin; Wang, Feipeng; Yao, Wei; Yao, Shuhan

    2016-02-01

    Nanoparticles can generate charge carrier trapping and reduce the velocity of streamer development in insulating oils ultimately leading to an enhancement of the breakdown voltage of insulating oils. Vegetable insulating oil-based nanofluids with three sizes of monodispersed Fe3O4 nanoparticles were prepared and their trapping depths were measured by thermally stimulated method (TSC). It is found that the nanoparticle surfactant polarization can significantly influence the trapping depth of vegetable insulating oil-based nanofluids. A nanoparticle polarization model considering surfactant polarization was proposed to calculate the trapping depth of the nanofluids at different nanoparticle sizes and surfactant thicknesses. The results show the calculated values of the model are in a fairly good agreement with the experimental values.

  5. Quantitative operando visualization of the energy band depth profile in solar cells

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Qi; Mao, Lin; Li, Yaowen; Kong, Tao; Wu, Na; Ma, Changqi; Bai, Sai; Jin, Yizheng; Wu, Dan; Lu, Wei; Wang, Bing; Chen, Liwei

    2015-01-01

    The energy band alignment in solar cell devices is critically important because it largely governs elementary photovoltaic processes, such as the generation, separation, transport, recombination and collection of charge carriers. Despite the expenditure of considerable effort, the measurement of energy band depth profiles across multiple layers has been extremely challenging, especially for operando devices. Here we present direct visualization of the surface potential depth profile over the cross-sections of operando organic photovoltaic devices using scanning Kelvin probe microscopy. The convolution effect due to finite tip size and cantilever beam crosstalk has previously prohibited quantitative interpretation of scanning Kelvin probe microscopy-measured surface potential depth profiles. We develop a bias voltage-compensation method to address this critical problem and obtain quantitatively accurate measurements of the open-circuit voltage, built-in potential and electrode potential difference. PMID:26166580

  6. Quantitative operando visualization of the energy band depth profile in solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Qi; Mao, Lin; Li, Yaowen; Kong, Tao; Wu, Na; Ma, Changqi; Bai, Sai; Jin, Yizheng; Wu, Dan; Lu, Wei; Wang, Bing; Chen, Liwei

    2015-07-01

    The energy band alignment in solar cell devices is critically important because it largely governs elementary photovoltaic processes, such as the generation, separation, transport, recombination and collection of charge carriers. Despite the expenditure of considerable effort, the measurement of energy band depth profiles across multiple layers has been extremely challenging, especially for operando devices. Here we present direct visualization of the surface potential depth profile over the cross-sections of operando organic photovoltaic devices using scanning Kelvin probe microscopy. The convolution effect due to finite tip size and cantilever beam crosstalk has previously prohibited quantitative interpretation of scanning Kelvin probe microscopy-measured surface potential depth profiles. We develop a bias voltage-compensation method to address this critical problem and obtain quantitatively accurate measurements of the open-circuit voltage, built-in potential and electrode potential difference.

  7. Aerosol Optical Depth Determinations for BOREAS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wrigley, R. C.; Livingston, J. M.; Russell, P. B.; Guzman, R. P.; Ried, D.; Lobitz, B.; Peterson, David L. (Technical Monitor)

    1994-01-01

    Automated tracking sun photometers were deployed by NASA/Ames Research Center aboard the NASA C-130 aircraft and at a ground site for all three Intensive Field Campaigns (IFCs) of the Boreal Ecosystem-Atmosphere Study (BOREAS) in central Saskatchewan, Canada during the summer of 1994. The sun photometer data were used to derive aerosol optical depths for the total atmospheric column above each instrument. The airborne tracking sun photometer obtained data in both the southern and northern study areas at the surface prior to takeoff, along low altitude runs near the ground tracking sun photometer, during ascents to 6-8 km msl, along remote sensing flightlines at altitude, during descents to the surface, and at the surface after landing. The ground sun photometer obtained data from the shore of Candle Lake in the southern area for all cloud-free times. During the first IFC in May-June ascents and descents of the airborne tracking sun photometer indicated the aerosol optical depths decreased steadily from the surface to 3.5 kni where they leveled out at approximately 0.05 (at 525 nm), well below levels caused by the eruption of Mt. Pinatubo. On a very clear day, May 31st, surface optical depths measured by either the airborne or ground sun photometers approached those levels (0.06-0.08 at 525 nm), but surface optical depths were often several times higher. On June 4th they increased from 0.12 in the morning to 0.20 in the afternoon with some evidence of brief episodes of pollen bursts. During the second IFC surface aerosol optical depths were variable in the extreme due to smoke from western forest fires. On July 20th the aerosol optical depth at 525 nm decreased from 0.5 in the morning to 0.2 in the afternoon; they decreased still further the next day to 0.05 and remained consistently low throughout the day to provide excellent conditions for several remote sensing missions flown that day. Smoke was heavy for the early morning of July 24th but cleared partially by 10

  8. Taming Highly Charged Radioisotopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chowdhury, Usman; Eberhardt, Benjamin; Jang, Fuluni; Schultz, Brad; Simon, Vanessa; Delheij, Paul; Dilling, Jens; Gwinner, Gerald

    2012-10-01

    The precise and accurate mass of short-lived radioisotopes is a very important parameter in physics. Contribution to the improvement of nuclear models, metrological standard fixing and tests of the unitarity of the Caibbibo-Kobayashi-Maskawa (CKM) matrix are a few examples where the mass value plays a major role. TRIUMF's ion trap for atomic and nuclear physics (TITAN) is a unique facility of three online ion traps that enables the mass measurement of short-lived isotopes with high precision (˜10-8). At present TITAN's electron beam ion trap (EBIT) increases the charge state to increase the precision, but there is no facility to significantly reduce the energy spread introduced by the charge breeding process. The precision of the measured mass of radioisotopes is linearly dependent on the charge state while the energy spread of the charged radioisotopes affects the precision adversely. To boost the precision level of mass measurement at TITAN without loosing too many ions, a cooler Penning trap (CPET) is being developed. CPET is designed to use either positively (proton) or negatively (electron) charged particles to reduce the energy spread via sympathetic cooling. Off-line setup of CPET is complete. Details of the working principles and updates are presented

  9. Object-adaptive depth compensated inter prediction for depth video coding in 3D video system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, Min-Koo; Lee, Jaejoon; Lim, Ilsoon; Ho, Yo-Sung

    2011-01-01

    Nowadays, the 3D video system using the MVD (multi-view video plus depth) data format is being actively studied. The system has many advantages with respect to virtual view synthesis such as an auto-stereoscopic functionality, but compression of huge input data remains a problem. Therefore, efficient 3D data compression is extremely important in the system, and problems of low temporal consistency and viewpoint correlation should be resolved for efficient depth video coding. In this paper, we propose an object-adaptive depth compensated inter prediction method to resolve the problems where object-adaptive mean-depth difference between a current block, to be coded, and a reference block are compensated during inter prediction. In addition, unique properties of depth video are exploited to reduce side information required for signaling decoder to conduct the same process. To evaluate the coding performance, we have implemented the proposed method into MVC (multiview video coding) reference software, JMVC 8.2. Experimental results have demonstrated that our proposed method is especially efficient for depth videos estimated by DERS (depth estimation reference software) discussed in the MPEG 3DV coding group. The coding gain was up to 11.69% bit-saving, and it was even increased when we evaluated it on synthesized views of virtual viewpoints.

  10. Applications of just-noticeable depth difference model in joint multiview video plus depth coding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Chao; An, Ping; Zuo, Yifan; Zhang, Zhaoyang

    2014-10-01

    A new multiview just-noticeable-depth-difference(MJNDD) Model is presented and applied to compress the joint multiview video plus depth. Many video coding algorithms remove spatial and temporal redundancies and statistical redundancies but they are not capable of removing the perceptual redundancies. Since the final receptor of video is the human eyes, we can remove the perception redundancy to gain higher compression efficiency according to the properties of human visual system (HVS). Traditional just-noticeable-distortion (JND) model in pixel domain contains luminance contrast and spatial-temporal masking effects, which describes the perception redundancy quantitatively. Whereas HVS is very sensitive to depth information, a new multiview-just-noticeable-depth-difference(MJNDD) model is proposed by combining traditional JND model with just-noticeable-depth-difference (JNDD) model. The texture video is divided into background and foreground areas using depth information. Then different JND threshold values are assigned to these two parts. Later the MJNDD model is utilized to encode the texture video on JMVC. When encoding the depth video, JNDD model is applied to remove the block artifacts and protect the edges. Then we use VSRS3.5 (View Synthesis Reference Software) to generate the intermediate views. Experimental results show that our model can endure more noise and the compression efficiency is improved by 25.29 percent at average and by 54.06 percent at most compared to JMVC while maintaining the subject quality. Hence it can gain high compress ratio and low bit rate.

  11. Reliable Fusion of Stereo Matching and Depth Sensor for High Quality Dense Depth Maps

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Jing; Li, Chunpeng; Fan, Xuefeng; Wang, Zhaoqi

    2015-01-01

    Depth estimation is a classical problem in computer vision, which typically relies on either a depth sensor or stereo matching alone. The depth sensor provides real-time estimates in repetitive and textureless regions where stereo matching is not effective. However, stereo matching can obtain more accurate results in rich texture regions and object boundaries where the depth sensor often fails. We fuse stereo matching and the depth sensor using their complementary characteristics to improve the depth estimation. Here, texture information is incorporated as a constraint to restrict the pixel’s scope of potential disparities and to reduce noise in repetitive and textureless regions. Furthermore, a novel pseudo-two-layer model is used to represent the relationship between disparities in different pixels and segments. It is more robust to luminance variation by treating information obtained from a depth sensor as prior knowledge. Segmentation is viewed as a soft constraint to reduce ambiguities caused by under- or over-segmentation. Compared to the average error rate 3.27% of the previous state-of-the-art methods, our method provides an average error rate of 2.61% on the Middlebury datasets, which shows that our method performs almost 20% better than other “fused” algorithms in the aspect of precision. PMID:26308003

  12. Higher resolution stimulus facilitates depth perception: MT+ plays a significant role in monocular depth perception.

    PubMed

    Tsushima, Yoshiaki; Komine, Kazuteru; Sawahata, Yasuhito; Hiruma, Nobuyuki

    2014-01-01

    Today, we human beings are facing with high-quality virtual world of a completely new nature. For example, we have a digital display consisting of a high enough resolution that we cannot distinguish from the real world. However, little is known how such high-quality representation contributes to the sense of realness, especially to depth perception. What is the neural mechanism of processing such fine but virtual representation? Here, we psychophysically and physiologically examined the relationship between stimulus resolution and depth perception, with using luminance-contrast (shading) as a monocular depth cue. As a result, we found that a higher resolution stimulus facilitates depth perception even when the stimulus resolution difference is undetectable. This finding is against the traditional cognitive hierarchy of visual information processing that visual input is processed continuously in a bottom-up cascade of cortical regions that analyze increasingly complex information such as depth information. In addition, functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) results reveal that the human middle temporal (MT+) plays a significant role in monocular depth perception. These results might provide us with not only the new insight of our neural mechanism of depth perception but also the future progress of our neural system accompanied by state-of- the-art technologies. PMID:25327168

  13. Reliable Fusion of Stereo Matching and Depth Sensor for High Quality Dense Depth Maps.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jing; Li, Chunpeng; Fan, Xuefeng; Wang, Zhaoqi

    2015-01-01

    Depth estimation is a classical problem in computer vision, which typically relies on either a depth sensor or stereo matching alone. The depth sensor provides real-time estimates in repetitive and textureless regions where stereo matching is not effective. However, stereo matching can obtain more accurate results in rich texture regions and object boundaries where the depth sensor often fails. We fuse stereo matching and the depth sensor using their complementary characteristics to improve the depth estimation. Here, texture information is incorporated as a constraint to restrict the pixel's scope of potential disparities and to reduce noise in repetitive and textureless regions. Furthermore, a novel pseudo-two-layer model is used to represent the relationship between disparities in different pixels and segments. It is more robust to luminance variation by treating information obtained from a depth sensor as prior knowledge. Segmentation is viewed as a soft constraint to reduce ambiguities caused by under- or over-segmentation. Compared to the average error rate 3.27% of the previous state-of-the-art methods, our method provides an average error rate of 2.61% on the Middlebury datasets, which shows that our method performs almost 20% better than other "fused" algorithms in the aspect of precision. PMID:26308003

  14. Nanoparticle coagulation in fractionally charged and charge fluctuating dusty plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Nunomura, Shota; Kondo, Michio; Shiratani, Masaharu; Koga, Kazunori; Watanabe, Yukio

    2008-08-15

    The kinetics of nanoparticle coagulation has been studied in fractionally charged and charge fluctuating dusty plasmas. The coagulation occurs when the mutual collision frequency among nanoparticles exceeds their charging and decharging/neutralization frequency. Interestingly, the coagulation is suppressed while a fraction (several percent) of nanoparticles are negatively charged in a plasma, in which stochastic charging plays an important role. A model is developed to predict a phase diagram of the coagulation and its suppression.

  15. The effect of additives on charge decay in electron-beam charged polypropylene films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hillenbrand, J; Motz, T; Sessler, G M; Zhang, X; Behrendt, N; von Salis-Soglio, C; Erhard, D P; Altstädt, V; Schmidt, H-W

    2009-03-01

    The charge decay in isotactic polypropylene (i-PP) films of 50 µm thickness, containing three kinds of additives, namely a trisamide, a bisamide and a fluorinated compound, with concentrations in the range 0.004-1 wt% was studied. Compression molding was used to produce the films. The samples were either surface-charged by a corona method or volume-charged by mono-energetic electron beams of different energies, having penetration depths up to 6 µm. In all cases, surface potentials of about 200 V were chosen. After charging the films, the decay of the surface potential was studied either by an isothermal discharge method at 90 °C or by thermally stimulated discharge measurements. The results show a dependence of the decay rate on the kind of additive used, on additive concentration and on the energy of the injected charges. In particular, for samples with fluorinated additives, the stability of the surface potential decreases markedly with increasing electron energy, while such a dependence is very weak for samples containing the bisamide additive and does not exist at all for samples with the trisamide additive. These observations are tentatively explained by the radiation-induced generation of relatively mobile negative ions originating from the bisamide and fluorinated additives.

  16. DEPTH: a web server to compute depth and predict small-molecule binding cavities in proteins.

    PubMed

    Tan, Kuan Pern; Varadarajan, Raghavan; Madhusudhan, M S

    2011-07-01

    Depth measures the extent of atom/residue burial within a protein. It correlates with properties such as protein stability, hydrogen exchange rate, protein-protein interaction hot spots, post-translational modification sites and sequence variability. Our server, DEPTH, accurately computes depth and solvent-accessible surface area (SASA) values. We show that depth can be used to predict small molecule ligand binding cavities in proteins. Often, some of the residues lining a ligand binding cavity are both deep and solvent exposed. Using the depth-SASA pair values for a residue, its likelihood to form part of a small molecule binding cavity is estimated. The parameters of the method were calibrated over a training set of 900 high-resolution X-ray crystal structures of single-domain proteins bound to small molecules (molecular weight <1.5  KDa). The prediction accuracy of DEPTH is comparable to that of other geometry-based prediction methods including LIGSITE, SURFNET and Pocket-Finder (all with Matthew's correlation coefficient of ∼0.4) over a testing set of 225 single and multi-chain protein structures. Users have the option of tuning several parameters to detect cavities of different sizes, for example, geometrically flat binding sites. The input to the server is a protein 3D structure in PDB format. The users have the option of tuning the values of four parameters associated with the computation of residue depth and the prediction of binding cavities. The computed depths, SASA and binding cavity predictions are displayed in 2D plots and mapped onto 3D representations of the protein structure using Jmol. Links are provided to download the outputs. Our server is useful for all structural analysis based on residue depth and SASA, such as guiding site-directed mutagenesis experiments and small molecule docking exercises, in the context of protein functional annotation and drug discovery. PMID:21576233

  17. Aerosol optical depth measuring network - project description

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aaltonen, A.; Koskela, K.; Lihavainen, L.

    2003-04-01

    The Finnish Meteorological Institute (FMI), in collaboration with Servicio Meteorológico Nacional (SMN), Argentina, is constructing a network for aerosol optical depth (AOD) measurements. Measurements are to be started in the summer 2003 with three sunphotometers, model PFR, Davos. One of them will be sited in Marambio (64°S), Antarctica, and the rest two in the Observatory of Jokioinen (61°N) and Sodankylä GAW station (67°N), Finland. Each instrument consists of a precision filter radiometer and a suntracker. Due to the harsh climate conditions special solutions had to be introduced to keep the instrument warm and free from snow. Aerosol optical depth measured at Pallas-Sodankylä GAW station can be compared with estimated aerosol extinction, which is calculated from ground base aerosol scattering and absorption coefficient measurements.

  18. DNA Brick Crystals with Prescribed Depth

    PubMed Central

    Ke, Yonggang; Ong, Luvena L.; Sun, Wei; Song, Jie; Dong, Mingdong; Shih, William M.; Yin, Peng

    2014-01-01

    We describe a general framework for constructing two-dimensional crystals with prescribed depth and sophisticated three-dimensional features. These crystals may serve as scaffolds for the precise spatial arrangements of functional materials for diverse applications. The crystals are self-assembled from single-stranded DNA components called DNA bricks. We demonstrate the experimental construction of DNA brick crystals that can grow to micron-size in the lateral dimensions with precisely controlled depth up to 80 nanometers. They can be designed to display user-specified sophisticated three-dimensional nanoscale features, such as continuous or discontinuous cavities and channels, and to pack DNA helices at parallel and perpendicular angles relative to the plane of the crystals. PMID:25343605

  19. Fast neutron background measurements at shallow depths

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, M.; Hertenberger, R.; Novikov, V.; Dougherty, B.

    1993-10-01

    We report on measurements of the neutron backgrounds for neutrino experiments at shallow depth (such as the proposed San Onofre neutrino oscillation experiment). A detector capable of pulse-shape discrimination measured the flux of fast neutrons at 20 mwe depth in the Stanford Underground Facility to be (1.07 {+-} 0.30) X 10{sup -6} cm{sup -2} s{sup -1}. An experiment, situated in the Tendon Gallery of the San Onofre Unit 2 reactor. studied spallation neutrons from muons traversing Pb and Cu. An underground experiment in the SUF, employing a detector filled with Gd-loaded liquid scintillator, is measuring the neutron production rate and multiplicity for muon spallation in low-A material (hydrocarbon-based liquid scintillator).

  20. Intermediate depth seismicity - a reflection seismic approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haberland, C.; Rietbrock, A.

    2004-12-01

    During subduction the descending oceanic lithosphere is subject to metamorphic reactions, some of them associated with the release of fluids. It is now widely accepted, that these reactions and associated dehydration processes are directly related with the generation of intermediate depth earthquakes (dehydration embrittlement). However, the structure of the layered oceanic plate at depth and the location of the earthquakes relative to structural units of the subducting plate (sources within the oceanic crust and/or in the upper oceanic mantle lithosphere?) are still not resolved yet. This is in mainly due to the fact that the observational resolution needed to address these topics (in the range of only a few kilometers) is hardly achieved in field experiments and related studies. Here we study the wavefields of intermediate depth earthquakes typically observed by temporary networks in order to assess their high-resolution potential in resolving structure of the down going slab and locus of seismicity. In particular we study whether the subducted oceanic Moho can be detected by the analysis of secondary phases of local earthquakes (near vertical reflection). Due to the irregular geometry of sources and receivers we apply an imaging technique similar to diffraction stack migration. The method is tested using synthetic data both based on 2-D finite difference simulations and 3-D kinematic ray tracing. The accuracy of the hypocenter location and onset times crucial for the successful application of stacking techniques (coherency) was achieved by the use of relatively relocated intermediate depth seismicity. Additionally, we simulate the propagation of the wavefields at larger distance (wide angle) indicating the development of guided waves traveling in the low-velocity waveguide associated with the modeled oceanic crust. We also present application on local earthquake data from the South American subduction zone.

  1. Device for determining frost depth and density

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huneidi, F.

    1983-01-01

    A hand held device having a forward open window portion adapted to be pushed downwardly into the frost on a surface, and a rear container portion adapted to receive the frost removed from the window area are described. A graph on a side of the container enables an observer to determine the density of the frost from certain measurements noted. The depth of the frost is noted from calibrated lines on the sides of the open window portion.

  2. Mobile Variable Depth Sampling System Design Study

    SciTech Connect

    BOGER, R.M.

    2000-08-25

    A design study is presented for a mobile, variable depth sampling system (MVDSS) that will support the treatment and immobilization of Hanford LAW and HLW. The sampler can be deployed in a 4-inch tank riser and has a design that is based on requirements identified in the Level 2 Specification (latest revision). The waste feed sequence for the MVDSS is based on Phase 1, Case 3S6 waste feed sequence. Technical information is also presented that supports the design study.

  3. Dispersion and space charge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Venturini, Marco; Kishek, Rami A.; Reiser, Martin

    1998-11-01

    The presence of space charge affects the value of the dispersion function. On the other hand dispersion has a role in shaping the beam distribution and therefore in determining the resulting forces due to space charge. In this paper we present a framework where the interplay between space charge and dispersion for a continuous beam can be simultaneously treated. We revise the derivation of a new set of rms envelope-dispersion equations we have recently proposed in [1]. The new equations generalize the standard rms envelope equations currently used for matching to the case where bends and a longitudinal momentum spread are present. We report a comparison between the solutions of the rms envelope-dispersion equations and the results obtained using WARP, a Particle in Cell (PIC) code, in the modeling of the Maryland Electron Ring.

  4. Charged polymers in high dimensions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kantor, Yacov

    1990-01-01

    A Monte Carlo study of charged polymers with either homogeneously distributed frozen charges or with mobile charges has been performed in four and five space dimensions. The results are consistent with the renormalization-group predictions and contradict the predictions of Flory-type theory. Introduction of charge mobility does not modify the behavior of the polymers.

  5. Searches for Fractionally Charged Particles

    SciTech Connect

    Perl, Martin L.; Lee, Eric R.; Loomba, Dinesh; /New Mexico U.

    2012-04-12

    Since the initial measurements of the electron charge were made a century ago, experimenters have faced the persistent question of the existence of elementary particles with charges that are fractional multiples of the electron charge. In this review, we discuss the results of recent searches for these fractionally charged particles.

  6. Evolution of aftershock statistics with depth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Narteau, C.; Shebalin, P.; Holschneider, M.

    2013-12-01

    The deviatoric stress varies with depth and may strongly affect earthquake statistics. Nevertheless, if the Anderson faulting theory may be used to define the relative stress magnitudes, it remains extremely difficult to observe significant variations of earthquake properties from the top to the bottom of the seismogenic layer. Here, we concentrate on aftershock sequences in normal, strike-slip and reverse faulting regimes to isolate specific temporal properties of this major relaxation process with respect to depth. More exactly, we use Bayesian statistics of the Modified Omori Law to characterize the exponent p of the power-law aftershock decay rate and the duration c of the early stage of aftershock activity that does not fit with this power-law regime. Preliminary results show that the c-value decreases with depth without any significant variation of the p-value. Then, we infer the duration of a non power-law aftershock decay rate over short times can be related to the level of stress in the seismogenic crust.

  7. Depth perception deficits in glaucoma suspects

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, N; Krishnadev, N; Hamstra, S J; Yücel, Y H

    2006-01-01

    Aim To investigate depth perception in glaucoma suspects compared to glaucoma patients and controls. Methods Glaucoma suspects (n = 16), patients (n = 18), and normal age matched controls (n = 19) aged 40–65 years were prospectively evaluated for depth perception deficits using the Frisby test. Stereoacuity was measured by stereothreshold in seconds of arc for each group. Results Glaucoma suspects showed significantly increased mean stereothreshold compared to age matched normals (144.1 (SE 35.2) v 26.6 (3.7) seconds of arc; p = 0.0004). The mean stereothreshold in glaucoma patients was also increased compared to age matched normals 148.1 (33.8) v 26.6 (3.7) seconds of arc; p = 0.0004). Conclusions Glaucoma suspects show depth perception deficits. The impaired stereovision in glaucoma suspects suggests that binocular interactions can be disrupted in the presence of normal visual fields by standard achromatic automated perimetry. PMID:16672326

  8. Automatic dynamic depth focusing for NDT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Camacho, Jorge; Cruza, Jorge F.; Fritsch, Carlos; Moreno, José M.

    2014-02-01

    Automatic Dynamic Depth Focusing (ADDF) is a function currently not available in state of the art phased array NDT instruments. However, it would be a valuable tool to inspect arbitrarily shaped parts or when the part-array geometry is not accurately known. ADDF will avoid the burden of computing and programming focal laws, the complications of CAD-based geometry descriptions and is an effective tool to adapt to changes in the probe-part geometry during the inspection. Furthermore, the dynamic depth focusing feature will yield the best possible image quality with phased array technology. This work proposes an ADDF technique based on a procedure that automatically obtains the array-part geometry and sets up all the required focusing parameters. The array-part geometry is estimated from the first echo time of arrival using a few trigger shots. A virtual array that operates in the second medium only allows computing the initial values for a real-time dynamic depth focusing hardware. This technique is well adapted to inspect parts of unknown or variable geometry, or when the distance and/or the alignment of the array probe with the part changes during the inspection. The overall procedure is relatively fast (about 2 seconds using standard computers), even faster than currently available geometry-based focal law calculators.

  9. Fast planar segmentation of depth images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Javan Hemmat, Hani; Pourtaherian, Arash; Bondarev, Egor; de With, Peter H. N.

    2015-03-01

    One of the major challenges for applications dealing with the 3D concept is the real-time execution of the algorithms. Besides this, for the indoor environments, perceiving the geometry of surrounding structures plays a prominent role in terms of application performance. Since indoor structures mainly consist of planar surfaces, fast and accurate detection of such features has a crucial impact on quality and functionality of the 3D applications, e.g. decreasing model size (decimation), enhancing localization, mapping, and semantic reconstruction. The available planar-segmentation algorithms are mostly developed using surface normals and/or curvatures. Therefore, they are computationally expensive and challenging for real-time performance. In this paper, we introduce a fast planar-segmentation method for depth images avoiding surface normal calculations. Firstly, the proposed method searches for 3D edges in a depth image and finds the lines between identified edges. Secondly, it merges all the points on each pair of intersecting lines into a plane. Finally, various enhancements (e.g. filtering) are applied to improve the segmentation quality. The proposed algorithm is capable of handling VGA-resolution depth images at a 6 FPS frame-rate with a single-thread implementation. Furthermore, due to the multi-threaded design of the algorithm, we achieve a factor of 10 speedup by deploying a GPU implementation.

  10. Diurnal variations in optical depth at Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Colburn, D. S.; Pollack, J. B.; Haberle, R. M.

    1989-01-01

    Viking lander camera images of the Sun were used to compute atmospheric optical depth at two sites over a period of 1 to 1/3 martian years. The complete set of 1044 optical depth determinations is presented in graphical and tabular form. Error estimates are presented in detail. Otpical depths in the morning (AM) are generally larger than in the afternoon (PM). The AM-PM differences are ascribed to condensation of water vapor into atmospheric ice aerosols at night and their evaporation in midday. A smoothed time series of these differences shows several seasonal peaks. These are simulated using a one-dimensional radiative convective model which predicts martial atmospheric temperature profiles. A calculation combinig these profiles with water vapor measurements from the Mars Atmospheric Water Detector is used to predict when the diurnal variations of water condensation should occur. The model reproduces a majority of the observed peaks and shows the factors influencing the process. Diurnal variation of condensation is shown to peak when the latitude and season combine to warm the atmosphere to the optimum temperature, cool enough to condense vapor at night and warm enough to cause evaporation at midday.

  11. Depth constraint of electric submersible pumps

    SciTech Connect

    Powers, M.L.

    1994-05-01

    This paper summarizes the various factors that limit electric submersible pump (ESP) operation at increasing depth. It explores in detail two parametrically related constraints, pump-shaft horsepower capacity and thrust-bearing load capacity. The former limits the product of head and rate; the latter limits head. Optimum shaft diameter for standard-configuration pumps is shown to be a compromise between these two factors. Head and rate limits resulting from these constraints are mathematically defined and graphically displayed, and means for expanding deep pumping capabilities are discussed. This paper also analyzes the effect of increased pumping depth on motor cooling. It shows that the temperature increase of fluid traversing a motor is proportional to head, independent of rate, and very sensitive to pump and motor efficiencies. This work also demonstrates the effect of elevated fluid temperatures associated with increasing depth on motor heat transfer coefficients. The purpose of this paper is to help resolve a perceived dilemma. Pump manufacturers do not develop pumps with ultradeep capability because there is no market for them. Oil producers might abandon ultradeep discovery wells with low reservoir pressure because there is no way to pump them. This paper is intended to promote the interest of both groups in potential deep pumping capabilities.

  12. Quick charge battery

    SciTech Connect

    Parise, R.J.

    1998-07-01

    Electric and hybrid electric vehicles (EVs and HEVs) will become a significant reality in the near future of the automotive industry. Both types of vehicles will need a means to store energy on board. For the present, the method of choice would be lead-acid batteries, with the HEV having auxiliary power supplied by a small internal combustion engine. One of the main drawbacks to lead-acid batteries is internal heat generation as a natural consequence of the charging process as well as resistance losses. This limits the re-charging rate to the battery pack for an EV which has a range of about 80 miles. A quick turnaround on recharge is needed but not yet possible. One of the limiting factors is the heat buildup. For the HEV the auxiliary power unit provides a continuous charge to the battery pack. Therefore heat generation in the lead-acid battery is a constant problem that must be addressed. Presented here is a battery that is capable of quick charging, the Quick Charge Battery with Thermal Management. This is an electrochemical battery, typically a lead-acid battery, without the inherent thermal management problems that have been present in the past. The battery can be used in an all-electric vehicle, a hybrid-electric vehicle or an internal combustion engine vehicle, as well as in other applications that utilize secondary batteries. This is not restricted to only lead-acid batteries. The concept and technology are flexible enough to use in any secondary battery application where thermal management of the battery must be addressed, especially during charging. Any battery with temperature constraints can benefit from this advancement in the state of the art of battery manufacturing. This can also include nickel-cadmium, metal-air, nickel hydroxide, zinc-chloride or any other type of battery whose performance is affected by the temperature control of the interior as well as the exterior of the battery.

  13. Charged conformal Killing spinors

    SciTech Connect

    Lischewski, Andree

    2015-01-15

    We study the twistor equation on pseudo-Riemannian Spin{sup c}-manifolds whose solutions we call charged conformal Killing spinors (CCKSs). We derive several integrability conditions for the existence of CCKS and study their relations to spinor bilinears. A construction principle for Lorentzian manifolds admitting CCKS with nontrivial charge starting from CR-geometry is presented. We obtain a partial classification result in the Lorentzian case under the additional assumption that the associated Dirac current is normal conformal and complete the classification of manifolds admitting CCKS in all dimensions and signatures ≤5 which has recently been initiated in the study of supersymmetric field theories on curved space.

  14. Effect of depth of discharge on lead-acid battery overcharge requirements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deluca, W. H.; Tummillo, A. F.

    1986-02-01

    The develop an optimal charge procedure, the relation between battery available capacity, applied overcharge, and the depth-of-discharge (DOD) level prior to charging needed to be established. Therefore, a series of parametric tests was conducted to measure the charge acceptance of lead-acid batteries from initial DOD levels of 25, 50, 75, and 100%. Because the available capacity and charge acceptance of the lead-acid battery are dependent on operating temperature, all the charges and discharges were initiated at a fixed temperature. Also because of the typical variation in available capacity of the lead-acid battery with age, baseline performance measurements were periodically acquired for normalization of the charge acceptance test data. The results from these tests show that the amount of overcharge needed to obtain the maximum available capacity from an EV-3000 improved lead-acid battery (which uses electrolyte mixing) is greatly reduced from that needed for commercially available golf-car lead-acid batteries. This was true for all initial DOD levels. The overcharges needed by the EV-3000 battery was a function of the DOD level prior to charging, but the overcharge needed for the golf-car battery was independent of DOD level. The acquired data can be used to derive an optium charge algorithm that relates capacity, overcharge, and DOD level. Applying only the minimum overcharge level needed for full capacity offers advantages of: (1) reduced generation of gases, (2) reduced water consumption, (3) cleaner battery containers, (4) reduced maintenance, and (5) increased battery life.

  15. ION PRODUCING MECHANISM (CHARGE CUPS)

    DOEpatents

    Brobeck, W.W.

    1959-04-21

    The problems of confining a charge material in a calutron and uniformly distributing heat to the charge is described. The charge is held in a cup of thermally conductive material removably disposed within the charge chamber of the ion source block. A central thermally conducting stem is incorporated within the cup for conducting heat to the central portion of the charge contained within the cup.

  16. Internal space charge measurement of materials in a space environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Griseri, V.; Fukunaga, K.; Maeno, T.; Payan, D.; Laurent, C.; Levy, L.

    2003-09-01

    The charging/discharging effect produced by space environment on space vehicles are known but not fully identified yet. Experiments performed in laboratory in vacuum chamber that simulates spatial environment and the most realistic charge condition occurring in space have been developed in the last past forty years. A very small Pulse Electro-Acoustic space charge detection unit (mini-PEA) that can be mounted in a vacuum chamber, to measure internal space charges of materials in-situ during the irradiation has been developed. Several materials used in spatial environment such as Teflon®, and Kapton ® films on addition to PMMA films have been studied. The comparison and the good agreement between measured and calculated depth of penetration for electrons of given energy depending on the material nature contribute in the validation of the detection system and encourage us for further studies and development.

  17. Charge collection spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Reed, R.A.; McNulty, P.J.; Beauvais, W.J.; Roth, D.R. . Dept. of Physics and Astronomy)

    1993-12-01

    Monitoring pulses measured between the power pins of a microelectronic device exposed to high LET ions yields important information on the SEU response of the circuit. Analysis is complicated for p-well CMOS devices by the possibility of competition between unctions, but the results suggest that charge collection measurements are still sufficient to determine SEU parameters accurately.

  18. Who's in Charge Here?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Humphries, Jack W.

    1986-01-01

    Even though most decisions are made before they reach the superintendent's desk, and even though these are times of "litigious paranoia," the superintendent is still in charge of the public schools. Some of the responsibilities of the superintendent are outlined. (MLW)

  19. Improving Focal Depth Estimates: Studies of Depth Phase Detection at Regional Distances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stroujkova, A.; Reiter, D. T.; Shumway, R. H.

    2006-12-01

    The accurate estimation of the depth of small, regionally recorded events continues to be an important and difficult explosion monitoring research problem. Depth phases (free surface reflections) are the primary tool that seismologists use to constrain the depth of a seismic event. When depth phases from an event are detected, an accurate source depth is easily found by using the delay times of the depth phases relative to the P wave and a velocity profile near the source. Cepstral techniques, including cepstral F-statistics, represent a class of methods designed for the depth-phase detection and identification; however, they offer only a moderate level of success at epicentral distances less than 15°. This is due to complexities in the Pn coda, which can lead to numerous false detections in addition to the true phase detection. Therefore, cepstral methods cannot be used independently to reliably identify depth phases. Other evidence, such as apparent velocities, amplitudes and frequency content, must be used to confirm whether the phase is truly a depth phase. In this study we used a variety of array methods to estimate apparent phase velocities and arrival azimuths, including beam-forming, semblance analysis, MUltiple SIgnal Classification (MUSIC) (e.g., Schmidt, 1979), and cross-correlation (e.g., Cansi, 1995; Tibuleac and Herrin, 1997). To facilitate the processing and comparison of results, we developed a MATLAB-based processing tool, which allows application of all of these techniques (i.e., augmented cepstral processing) in a single environment. The main objective of this research was to combine the results of three focal-depth estimation techniques and their associated standard errors into a statistically valid unified depth estimate. The three techniques include: 1. Direct focal depth estimate from the depth-phase arrival times picked via augmented cepstral processing. 2. Hypocenter location from direct and surface-reflected arrivals observed on sparse

  20. Kinect Fusion improvement using depth camera calibration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pagliari, D.; Menna, F.; Roncella, R.; Remondino, F.; Pinto, L.

    2014-06-01

    Scene's 3D modelling, gesture recognition and motion tracking are fields in rapid and continuous development which have caused growing demand on interactivity in video-game and e-entertainment market. Starting from the idea of creating a sensor that allows users to play without having to hold any remote controller, the Microsoft Kinect device was created. The Kinect has always attract researchers in different fields, from robotics to Computer Vision (CV) and biomedical engineering as well as third-party communities that have released several Software Development Kit (SDK) versions for Kinect in order to use it not only as a game device but as measurement system. Microsoft Kinect Fusion control libraries (firstly released in March 2013) allow using the device as a 3D scanning and produce meshed polygonal of a static scene just moving the Kinect around. A drawback of this sensor is the geometric quality of the delivered data and the low repeatability. For this reason the authors carried out some investigation in order to evaluate the accuracy and repeatability of the depth measured delivered by the Kinect. The paper will present a throughout calibration analysis of the Kinect imaging sensor, with the aim of establishing the accuracy and precision of the delivered information: a straightforward calibration of the depth sensor in presented and then the 3D data are correct accordingly. Integrating the depth correction algorithm and correcting the IR camera interior and exterior orientation parameters, the Fusion Libraries are corrected and a new reconstruction software is created to produce more accurate models.

  1. Composite hull for full-ocean depth

    SciTech Connect

    Garvey, R.E.; Hawkes, G.S.

    1990-01-01

    A lightweight and economical modular design concept for a manned submersible is proposed to give two passengers repeated access to the deepest parts of the ocean in a safe, comfortable, and efficient manner. This versatile craft will allow work and exploration to be accomplished at moderate to maximum depths without any compromise in terms of capabilities or operating cost. Its design follows the experience acquired from the numerous existing minimum volume'' pressure hull submersible, and represents a radical departure from conventional designs. This paper addresses issues of gaining effective, safe working access for full ocean depth. Cylindrical composite hulls have the potential to achieve positive buoyancy sufficient to carry personnel and equipment swiftly back to the surface after completing exploration of the deepest ocean. Buoyancy for a submersible is similar to lift for an airplane, except that without lift, the airplane remains on the surface, but without buoyancy, the submersible never returns to the surface. There are two means of achieving buoyancy. The traditional method used to steel, titanium, or aluminium alloy deep-ocean vehicles is to add a very large buoy to compensate for the negative buoyancy of the hull. The alternate method is for the hull to displace more than its weight in water. This requires at least twice compression strength per unit mass of hull than steel, titanium, or aluminum alloys can provide. Properly constructed organic-matrix composites are light and strong enough to form a dry, 1-atm cabin with buoyancy to carry research staff and equipment to any depth in the ocean. Three different composite hull configurations are presented. Each is capable of serving as a cabin for a two-person crew. None would displace more than 4 tons of seawater. 30 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  2. Nonclassical depth of a quantum state

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Ching Tsung

    1992-01-01

    A measure is defined for how nonclassical a quantum state is, with values ranging from 0 to 1. When it is applied to the photon-number states, the calculated value is 1, the maximum possible. For squeezed states, it is a monotonically increasing function of the squeeze parameter with values varying from 0 to 1/2. The physical meaning of the nonclassical depth is found to be just the number of thermal photons necessary to ruin the nonclassical nature of the quantum state.

  3. Evaporative cooling at low trap depth

    SciTech Connect

    Carvalho, Robert de; Doyle, John

    2004-11-01

    A quantitative, analytic model of evaporative cooling covering both the small- (<4) and large- (>4) {eta} regimes is presented. {eta} is the dimensionless parameter defined as the trap depth divided by the temperature of the trapped sample. Although some of the same general properties present at large {eta} are also present at small {eta}, there are significant quantitative differences. These differences must be taken into account in order to accurately extract from the trapping data quantitative measurements of, for example, collisional atomic cross sections.

  4. THEMIS Observations of Atmospheric Aerosol Optical Depth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Michael D.; Bandfield, Joshua L.; Christensen, Philip R.; Richardson, Mark I.

    2003-01-01

    The Mars Odyssey spacecraft entered into Martian orbit in October 2001 and after successful aerobraking began mapping in February 2002 (approximately Ls=330 deg.). Images taken by the Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS) on-board the Odyssey spacecraft allow the quantitative retrieval of atmospheric dust and water-ice aerosol optical depth. Atmospheric quantities retrieved from THEMIS build upon existing datasets returned by Mariner 9, Viking, and Mars Global Surveyor (MGS). Data from THEMIS complements the concurrent MGS Thermal Emission Spectrometer (TES) data by offering a later local time (approx. 2:00 for TES vs. approx. 4:00 - 5:30 for THEMIS) and much higher spatial resolution.

  5. The equivalent depth of burst for impact cratering

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holsapple, K. A.

    1980-01-01

    The concept of modeling an impact cratering event with an explosive event with the explosive buried at some equivalent depth of burst (d.o.b.) is discussed. Various and different ways to define this equivalent d.o.b. are identified. Recent experimental results for a dense quartz sand are used to determine the equivalent d.o.b. for various conditions of charge type, event size, and impact conditions. The results show a decrease in equivalent d.o.b. with increasing energy for fixed impact velocity and a decrease in equivalent d.o.b. with increasing velocity for fixed energy. The values for an iron projectile are on the order of 2-3 projectile radii for energy equal to one ton of TNT, decreasing to about 1.5 radii at a megaton of TNT. The dependence on projectile and target mass density matches that included in common jet-penetration formulas for projectile densities greater than target densities and for the higher energies.

  6. Optimization of BEV Charging Strategy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ji, Wei

    This paper presents different approaches to optimize fast charging and workplace charging strategy of battery electric vehicle (BEV) drivers. For the fast charging analysis, a rule-based model was built to simulate BEV charging behavior. Monte Carlo analysis was performed to explore to the potential range of congestion at fast charging stations which could be more than four hours at the most crowded stations. Genetic algorithm was performed to explore the theoretical minimum waiting time at fast charging stations, and it can decrease the waiting time at the most crowded stations to be shorter than one hour. A deterministic approach was proposed as a feasible suggestion that people should consider to take fast charging when the state of charge is approaching 40 miles. This suggestion is hoped to help to minimize potential congestion at fast charging stations. For the workplace charging analysis, scenario analysis was performed to simulate temporal distribution of charging demand under different workplace charging strategies. It was found that if BEV drivers charge as much as possible and as late as possible at workplace, it could increase the utility of solar-generated electricity while relieve grid stress of extra intensive electricity demand at night caused by charging electric vehicles at home.

  7. Gated charged-particle trap

    DOEpatents

    Benner, W. Henry

    1999-01-01

    The design and operation of a new type of charged-particle trap provides simultaneous measurements of mass, charge, and velocity of large electrospray ions. The trap consists of a detector tube mounted between two sets of center-bored trapping plates. Voltages applied to the trapping plates define symmetrically-opposing potential valleys which guide axially-injected ions to cycle back and forth through the charge-detection tube. A low noise charge-sensitive amplifier, connected to the tube, reproduces the image charge of individual ions as they pass through the detector tube. Ion mass is calculated from measurement of ion charge and velocity following each passage through the detector.

  8. Oxygen depth profiling by nuclear resonant scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Gibson, G. T.; Sheu, W. J.; Glass, G. A.; Wang, Y. Q.

    1999-06-10

    Nuclear resonance scattering (NRS) {sup 16}O({alpha},{alpha}){sup 16}O at 3.045 MeV ({gamma}=10 keV) has been used for oxygen depth profiling in various thin oxide films. There are two ways by which the oxygen concentration versus depth profile can be obtained from the experimental data: energy spectrum simulation or yield distribution analysis. Energy spectrum simulation is done using the standard RBS software/Rutherford Universal Manipulation Program (RUMP) where only one spectrum is usually needed from the measurement. Yield distribution analysis is accomplished by using a custom developed software/Resonance Analysis Program (RAP) and involves a series of spectra obtained by stepping up the beam energy above the resonance energy. This article aims at comparing the fundamentals of both methods and also discussing their advantages and disadvantages in terms of the data acquisition and the post data analysis. A thermally grown thick SiO{sub 2} film and a thin titanium oxide film grown by corona point discharge were examined.

  9. Oxygen depth profiling by nuclear resonant scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Gibson, G.T.; Sheu, W.J.; Glass, G.A. Wang, Y.Q.

    1999-06-01

    Nuclear resonance scattering (NRS) {sup 16}O({alpha},{alpha}){sup 16}O at 3.045 MeV ({Gamma}=10&hthinsp;keV) has been used for oxygen depth profiling in various thin oxide films. There are two ways by which the oxygen concentration versus depth profile can be obtained from the experimental data: energy spectrum simulation or yield distribution analysis. Energy spectrum simulation is done using the standard RBS software/Rutherford Universal Manipulation Program (RUMP) where only one spectrum is usually needed from the measurement. Yield distribution analysis is accomplished by using a custom developed software/Resonance Analysis Program (RAP) and involves a series of spectra obtained by stepping up the beam energy above the resonance energy. This article aims at comparing the fundamentals of both methods and also discussing their advantages and disadvantages in terms of the data acquisition and the post data analysis. A thermally grown thick SiO{sub 2} film and a thin titanium oxide film grown by corona point discharge were examined. {copyright} {ital 1999 American Institute of Physics.}

  10. Relative Burial Depths of Nakhlites: An Update

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mikouchi, T.; Miyamoto, M.; Koizumi, E.; Makishima, J.; McKay, G.

    2006-01-01

    Nakhlites are augite-rich cumulate rocks with variable amounts of olivine and groundmass plus minor Fe, Ti oxides [e.g., 1]. Our previous studies revealed that nakhlites showed correlated petrography and mineralogy that could be explained by different locations (burial depths) in a common cooling cumulate pile [e.g., 2]. We so far analyzed six of the seven currently known nakhlites, Nakhla (Nak), Governador Valadares (GV), Lafayette (Laf), NWA817, Y000593 (Y) and MIL03346 (MIL) [e.g., 2,3] and calculated cooling rates of four nakhlites (Nak, GV, Laf, and NWA817) by using chemical zoning of olivine [e.g., 4]. In this abstract, we complete our examination of petrographic and mineralogical variation of all currently known nakhlites by adding petrology and mineralogy of NWA998. We also report results of cooling calculations for Y, MIL and NWA998. Then, we update our model of the nakhlite igneous body in terms of relative burial depth of each sample.

  11. Optical design for large depth of field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Yang; Wang, Hu; Yue, Pan; Xue, Yaoke; Liu, Jie; Ye, Shuifu

    2016-01-01

    Optical system with large depth of field and large field of view has been designed. To enforce optical system with focal length of 6 mm to imaging the object with object length of 200mmm-1200mm, accord to the equation of depth of field, in case of the CCD sensor with pixel of 5.5umx 5.5um square area, the entrance pupil diameter to ideal imaging will be 0.423mm. To enlarge the modulation transfer function (MTF) at spatial frequency of 90 lp/mm, the entrance pupil diameter is enlarged to 1mm.After design and optimization, with field of view of 80°, within object length of 200mm - 1200mm, the optical system can imaging well, the modulation transfer function (MTF) at spatial frequency of 90lp/mm is larger than 0.1, the distortion of full field of viewed is less than 3%.The optical system can be widely used in machine vision, surveillance cameras, etc.

  12. Contour completion through depth interferes with stereoacuity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vreven, Dawn; McKee, Suzanne P.; Verghese, Preeti

    2002-01-01

    Local disparity signals must interact in visual cortex to represent boundaries and surfaces of three-dimensional (3D) objects. We investigated how disparity signals interact in 3D contours and in 3D surfaces generated from the contours. We compared flat (single disparity) stimuli with curved (multi-disparity) stimuli. We found no consistent differences in sensitivity to contours vs. surfaces; for equivalent amounts of disparity, however, observers were more sensitive to flat stimuli than curved stimuli. Poor depth sensitivity for curved stimuli cannot be explained by the larger range of disparities present in the curved surface, nor by disparity averaging, nor by poor sensitivity to the largest disparity in the stimulus. Surprisingly, sensitivity to surfaces curved in depth was improved by removing portions of the surface and thus removing disparity information. Stimulus configuration had a profound effect on stereo thresholds that cannot be accounted for by disparity-energy models of V1 processing. We suggest that higher-level 3D contour or 3D shape mechanisms are involved.

  13. Z-depth integration: a new technique for manipulating z-depth properties in composited scenes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steckel, Kayla; Whittinghill, David

    2014-02-01

    This paper presents a new technique in the production pipeline of asset creation for virtual environments called Z-Depth Integration (ZeDI). ZeDI is intended to reduce the time required to place elements at the appropriate z-depth within a scene. Though ZeDI is intended for use primarily in two-dimensional scene composition, depth-dependent "flat" animated objects are often critical elements of augmented and virtual reality applications (AR/VR). ZeDI is derived from "deep image compositing", a capacity implemented within the OpenEXR file format. In order to trick the human eye into perceiving overlapping scene elements as being in front of or behind one another, the developer must manually manipulate which pixels of an element are visible in relation to other objects embedded within the environment's image sequence. ZeDI improves on this process by providing a means for interacting with procedurally extracted z-depth data from a virtual environment scene. By streamlining the process of defining objects' depth characteristics, it is expected that the time and energy required for developers to create compelling AR/VR scenes will be reduced. In the proof of concept presented in this manuscript, ZeDI is implemented for pre-rendered virtual scene construction via an AfterEffects software plug-in.

  14. Charge Detection Mass Spectrometry with Almost Perfect Charge Accuracy.

    PubMed

    Keifer, David Z; Shinholt, Deven L; Jarrold, Martin F

    2015-10-20

    Charge detection mass spectrometry (CDMS) is a single-particle technique where the masses of individual ions are determined from simultaneous measurement of each ion's mass-to-charge ratio (m/z) and charge. CDMS has many desirable features: it has no upper mass limit, no mass discrimination, and it can analyze complex mixtures. However, the charge is measured directly, and the poor accuracy of the charge measurement has severely limited the mass resolution achievable with CDMS. Since the charge is quantized, it needs to be measured with sufficient accuracy to assign each ion to its correct charge state. This goal has now been largely achieved. By reducing the pressure to extend the trapping time and by implementing a novel analysis method that improves the signal-to-noise ratio and compensates for imperfections in the charge measurement, the uncertainty has been reduced to less than 0.20 e rmsd (root-mean-square deviation). With this unprecedented precision peaks due to different charge states are resolved in the charge spectrum. Further improvement can be achieved by quantizing the charge (rounding the measured charge to the nearest integer) and culling ions with measured charges midway between the integral values. After ions with charges more than one standard deviation from the mean are culled, the fraction of ions assigned to the wrong charge state is estimated to be 6.4 × 10(-5) (i.e., less than 1 in 15 000). Since almost all remaining ions are assigned to their correct charge state, the uncertainty in the mass is now almost entirely limited by the uncertainty in the m/z measurement. PMID:26418830

  15. Charging control techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schmidt, R. E.

    1981-01-01

    Transparent conductive thin films of indium oxide and indium-tin oxide were evaluated for their properties to control charge buildup on satellite materials. Both oxide coatings were evaluated for their uniformity, stability, reproducibility and characteristics on various substrate materials such as FEP Teflon, Kapton, and glass. The process development toward optimization and characterization of these thin semiconductor oxide coatings and the evaluation on large sizes performed for qualification for use on thermal control satellite materials is described. The materials have been characterized in multiple energy electron plasma environment and at low temperatures. All radiation measurements of the coatings under simulated substorm conditions have exhibited the characteristics of stable charge control. Measurement of surface potential during and after irradiation by electrons up to 30 KeV and ionizing gamma radiation show an effective stable grounding surface.

  16. Controlling charge on levitating drops.

    PubMed

    Hilger, Ryan T; Westphall, Michael S; Smith, Lloyd M

    2007-08-01

    Levitation technologies are used in containerless processing of materials, as microscale manipulators and reactors, and in the study of single drops and particles. Presented here is a method for controlling the amount and polarity of charge on a levitating drop. The method uses single-axis acoustic levitation to trap and levitate a single, initially neutral drop with a diameter between 400 microm and 2 mm. This drop is then charged in a controllable manner using discrete packets of charge in the form of charged drops produced by a piezoelectric drop-on-demand dispenser equipped with a charging electrode. The magnitude of the charge on the dispensed drops can be adjusted by varying the voltage applied to the charging electrode. The polarity of the charge on the added drops can be changed allowing removal of charge from the trapped drop (by neutralization) and polarity reversal. The maximum amount of added charge is limited by repulsion of like charges between the drops in the trap. This charging scheme can aid in micromanipulation and the study of charged drops and particles using levitation. PMID:17580951

  17. General 2 charge geometries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taylor, Marika

    2006-03-01

    Two charge BPS horizon free supergravity geometries are important in proposals for understanding black hole microstates. In this paper we construct a new class of geometries in the NS1-P system, corresponding to solitonic strings carrying fermionic as well as bosonic condensates. Such geometries are required to account for the full microscopic entropy of the NS1-P system. We then briefly discuss the properties of the corresponding geometries in the dual D1-D5 system.

  18. Plumbing the depths of Ligeia: considerations for depth sounding in Titan's hydrocarbon seas.

    PubMed

    Arvelo, Juan; Lorenz, Ralph

    2013-12-01

    Saturn's moon Titan is the only satellite in this solar system with a dense atmosphere and hydrocarbon seas. The Titan Mare Explorer (TiME) mission would splashdown a capsule to float for 3 months on Ligeia Mare, a several-hundred-kilometer wide sea near Titan's north pole. Among TiME's scientific goals is the determination of the depth of Ligeia, to be achieved with an acoustic depth sounder. Since Titan's surface temperature is known to vary around 92 K, all instruments must be ruggedized to operate at cryogenic temperatures. This paper's contributions include an approach to infer key acoustic properties of this remote environment and the extraterrestrial environment's influence on the development of a cryogenic depth sounder. Additionally, an approach is formulated to infer the transducer's response, sensitivity, and performance when in situ calibration is impossible or when replicating key environmental conditions is too costly. PMID:25669245

  19. Charge transfer reaction of multi-charged oxygen ions with O2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holzscheiter, H. M.; Church, D. A.

    1981-10-01

    The reaction rates for charge transfer from O2 to doubly and triply charged oxygen atoms are measured in a demonstration of the measurement capabilities of a system at ultrahigh vacuum with low-energy magnetically confined ions. Ions were produced by electron impact ionization of gas within a Penning-type ion trap, with selective removal of unwanted ionization states by radio-frequency resonant excitation. Ion number mass-to-charge ratio spectra obtained at partial pressures of O2 from 9.9 x 10 to the -9th to 1.5 x 10 to the -7th torr yield rate constants of 1.0 x 10 to the -9th cu cm/sec and 2.5 x 10 to the -9th cu cm/sec for the O(2+) and O(3+) reactions, respectively. Measurements made at a 30% increase of the effective axial well depth of the trap demonstrate that the rate constant is essentially energy independent in the energy range studies, implying that the O(2+) cross section for charge transfer has an inverse velocity dependence of the Langevin type, despite a reaction rate lower than the Langevin valve.

  20. An Innovative Magnetic Charging Chute to Improve Productivity of Sinter Machine at Rourkela Steel Plant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Selvam, Sambandham Thirumalai; Chaudhuri, Subhasis; Das, Arunaba; Singh, Mithilesh Kumar; Mahanta, H. K.

    Sintering is a process in sinter machine for agglomeration of iron ore and other raw material fines into a compact porous mass, i.e., sinter, used in Blast Furnaces as an iron bearing input charge material for hot metal production. 'Permeability' of sinter-bed on sinter machine i.e., the porosity in sinter-bed of charged materials, facilitates atmospheric air passes from the top to bottom across the depth of sinter-bed, when suction created from the bottom of the bed, for efficient heat carry over from top to bottom of the bed for complete burning of charged materials for effective sintering process controls the productivity of the sinter machine. The level of 'permeability' in sinter-bed is depending upon the effectiveness of 'charging chute' in size-wise 'segregation' of charge materials across the depth in sinter-bed, achieved due to differences in the sliding velocities of particles during charging into the moving sinter-bed. The permeability achieved by the earlier conventional 'charging chute' was limited due to its design and positional constraints in sinter machine. Improving the productivity of sinter machine, through increased permeability of sinter bed is successfully achieved through implementation of an innovatively designed and developed, "Magnetic Charging Chute" at Sinter Plant no. 2 of Rourkela Steel Plant. The induced magnetic force on the charged materials while the charge materials dropping down through the charge chute has improved the permeability of sinter bed through an unique method of segregating the para-magnetic materials and the finer materials of the charge materials to top layer of sinter bed along with improved size-wise segregation of charge materials. This has increased the productivity of the sinter machine by 3% and also reduced the solid fuel consumption i.e., coke breeze in input charge materials by 1 kg/t of sinter.

  1. Crater and cavity depth in hypervelocity impact

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kadono, T.; Fujiwara, A.

    2003-04-01

    Hypervelocity impact experiments with low-density mediums (e.g., foams) have been so far carried out to develop the instruments for intact capture of interplanetary dust particles. The results show that the impact leads a "cavity", a cylindrical or carrot (spindle) shaped vestige. Its shape depends on the condition of projectiles; when impact velocity is so low that projectiles are intact, the depth increases with impact velocity, while it decreases or is constant with impact velocity when the impact velocity is so high that projectiles are broken (e.g., Kadono, Planet. Space Sci. 47, 305--318, 1999). On the other hand, as described by Summers (NASA TN D-94, 1959), crater shape with high density targets (comparable to projectile density) also changes with impact velocity. At low velocities, the strength of projectile's materials is greater than the dynamic impact pressure and the projectile penetrates the target intact. The crater produced is deep and narrow. With increase in impact velocity, a point is reached at which the impact pressure is sufficient to cause the projectile to fragment into a few large pieces at impact. Then as the impact velocity is increased further, the projectile shatters into numerous small pieces and the penetration actually decreases. Finally a velocity is reached at which the typical fluid impact occurs, the crater formed is nearly hemispherical in shape. It appears that the situation in cavity formation with low density targets is quite similar to that in cratering with high density targets at low impact velocity. This similarity allows us to discuss cavity formation and cratering in a unified view. As described above, the previous experiments clearly suggest that the condition of projectiles plays important roles in both cratering and cavity formation. Hence here, by introducing a parameter that characterizes the condition of projectiles at the instance of impact, cratering processes such as projectile penetration and shock wave

  2. Variation of curve number with storm depth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banasik, K.; Hejduk, L.

    2012-04-01

    The NRCS Curve Number (known also as SCS-CN) method is well known as a tool in predicting flood runoff depth from small ungauged catchment. The traditional way of determination the CNs, based on soil characteristics, land use and hydrological conditions, seemed to have tendency to overpredict the floods in some cases. Over 30 year rainfall-runoff data, collected in two small (A=23.4 & 82.4 km2), lowland, agricultural catchments in Center of Poland (Banasik & Woodward 2010), were used to determine runoff Curve Number and to check a tendency of changing. The observed CN declines with increasing storm size, which according recent views of Hawkins (1993) could be classified as a standard response of watershed. The analysis concluded, that using CN value according to the procedure described in USDA-SCS Handbook one receives representative value for estimating storm runoff from high rainfall depths in the analyzes catchments. This has been confirmed by applying "asymptotic approach" for estimating the watershed curve number from the rainfall-runoff data. Furthermore, the analysis indicated that CN, estimated from mean retention parameter S of recorded events with rainfall depth higher than initial abstraction, is also approaching the theoretical CN. The observed CN, ranging from 59.8 to 97.1 and from 52.3 to 95.5, in the smaller and the larger catchment respectively, declines with increasing storm size, which has been classified as a standard response of watershed. The investigation demonstrated also changeability of the CN during a year, with much lower values during the vegetation season. Banasik K. & D.E. Woodward (2010). "Empirical determination of curve number for a small agricultural watrshed in Poland". 2nd Joint Federal Interagency Conference, Las Vegas, NV, June 27 - July 1, 2010 (http://acwi.gov/sos/pubs/2ndJFIC/Contents/10E_Banasik_ 28_02_10. pdf). Hawkins R. H. (1993). "Asymptotic determination of curve numbers from data". Journal of Irrigation and Drainage

  3. Depth-encoded synthetic aperture optical coherence tomography of biological tissues with extended focal depth.

    PubMed

    Mo, Jianhua; de Groot, Mattijs; de Boer, Johannes F

    2015-02-23

    Optical coherence tomography (OCT) has proven to be able to provide three-dimensional (3D) volumetric images of scattering biological tissues for in vivo medical diagnostics. Unlike conventional optical microscopy, its depth-resolving ability (axial resolution) is exclusively determined by the laser source and therefore invariant over the full imaging depth. In contrast, its transverse resolution is determined by the objective's numerical aperture and the wavelength which is only approximately maintained over twice the Rayleigh range. However, the prevailing laser sources for OCT allow image depths of more than 5 mm which is considerably longer than the Rayleigh range. This limits high transverse resolution imaging with OCT. Previously, we reported a novel method to extend the depth-of-focus (DOF) of OCT imaging in Mo et al.Opt. Express 21, 10048 (2013)]. The approach is to create three different optical apertures via pupil segmentation with an annular phase plate. These three optical apertures produce three OCT images from the same sample, which are encoded to different depth positions in a single OCT B-scan. This allows for correcting the defocus-induced curvature of wave front in the pupil so as to improve the focus. As a consequence, the three images originating from those three optical apertures can be used to reconstruct a new image with an extended DOF. In this study, we successfully applied this method for the first time to both an artificial phantom and biological tissues over a four times larger depth range. The results demonstrate a significant DOF improvement, paving the way for 3D high resolution OCT imaging beyond the conventional Rayleigh range. PMID:25836528

  4. Wind Power Charged Aerosol Generator

    SciTech Connect

    Marks, A.M.

    1980-07-01

    This describes experimental results on a Charged Aerosol Wind/Electric Power Generator, using Induction Electric Charging with a water jet issuing under water pressure from a small diameter (25-100 ..mu..m) orifice.

  5. Distributed charging of electrical assets

    DOEpatents

    Ghosh, Soumyadip; Phan, Dung; Sharma, Mayank; Wu, Chai Wah; Xiong, Jinjun

    2016-02-16

    The present disclosure relates generally to the field of distributed charging of electrical assets. In various examples, distributed charging of electrical assets may be implemented in the form of systems, methods and/or algorithms.

  6. Tritium Depth Profiles in 316 Stainless Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torikai, Yuji; Murata, Daiju; Penzhorn, Ralf-Dieter; Akaishi, Kenya; Watanabe, Kuniaki; Matsuyama, Masao

    To investigate the behavior of hydrogen uptake and release by 316 stainless steel (SS316), as-received and finely polished stainless steel specimens were exposed at 573 K to tritium gas diluted with hydrogen. Then tritium concentration in the exposed specimens was measured as a function of depth using a chemical etching method. All the tritium concentration profiles showed a sharp drop in the range of 10 μm from the top surface up to the bulk. The amount of tritium absorbed into the polished specimens was three times larger than that into the as-received specimen. However, the polishing effects disappeared by exposing to the air for a long time.

  7. The neural mechanism of binocular depth discrimination

    PubMed Central

    Barlow, H. B.; Blakemore, C.; Pettigrew, J. D.

    1967-01-01

    1. Binocularly driven units were investigated in the cat's primary visual cortex. 2. It was found that a stimulus located correctly in the visual fields of both eyes was more effective in driving the units than a monocular stimulus, and much more effective than a binocular stimulus which was correctly positioned in only one eye: the response to the correctly located image in one eye is vetoed if the image is incorrectly located in the other eye. 3. The vertical and horizontal disparities of the paired retinal images that yielded the maximum response were measured in 87 units from seven cats: the range of horizontal disparities was 6·6°, of vertical disparities 2·2°. 4. With fixed convergence, different units will be optimally excited by objects lying at different distances. This may be the basic mechanism underlying depth discrimination in the cat. PMID:6065881

  8. Geoengineering with Charged Droplets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gokturk, H.

    2011-12-01

    Water molecules in a droplet are held together by intermolecular forces generated by hydrogen bonding which has a bonding energy of only about 0.2 eV. One can create a more rugged droplet by using an ion as a condensation nucleus. In that case, water molecules are held together by the interaction between the ion and the dipole moments of the water molecules surrounding the ion, in addition to any hydrogen bonding. In this research, properties of such charged droplets were investigated using first principle quantum mechanical calculations. A molecule which exhibits positive electron affinity is a good candidate to serve as the ionic condensation nucleus, because addition of an electron to such a molecule creates an energetically more stable state than the neutral molecule. A good example is the oxygen molecule (O2) where energy of O2 negative (O2-) ion is lower than that of the neutral O2 by about 0.5 eV. Examples of other molecules which have positive electron affinity include ozone (O3), nitrogen dioxide (NO2) and sulfur oxides (SOx, x=1-3). Atomic models used in the calculations consisted of a negative ion of one of the molecules mentioned above surrounded by water molecules. Calculations were performed using the DFT method with B3LYP hybrid functional and Pople type basis sets with polarization and diffuse functions. Energy of interaction between O2- ion and the water molecule was found to be ~0.7 eV. This energy is an order of magnitude greater than the thermal energy of even the highest temperatures encountered in the atmosphere. Once created, charged rugged droplets can survive in hot and dry climates where they can be utilized to create humidity and precipitation. The ion which serves as the nucleus of the droplet can attract not only water molecules but also other dipolar gases in the atmosphere. Such dipolar gases include industrial pollutants, for example nitrogen dioxide (NO2) or sulfur dioxide (SO2). Energy of interaction between O2- ion and pollutant

  9. Modular Battery Charge Controller

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Button, Robert; Gonzalez, Marcelo

    2009-01-01

    A new approach to masterless, distributed, digital-charge control for batteries requiring charge control has been developed and implemented. This approach is required in battery chemistries that need cell-level charge control for safety and is characterized by the use of one controller per cell, resulting in redundant sensors for critical components, such as voltage, temperature, and current. The charge controllers in a given battery interact in a masterless fashion for the purpose of cell balancing, charge control, and state-of-charge estimation. This makes the battery system invariably fault-tolerant. The solution to the single-fault failure, due to the use of a single charge controller (CC), was solved by implementing one CC per cell and linking them via an isolated communication bus [e.g., controller area network (CAN)] in a masterless fashion so that the failure of one or more CCs will not impact the remaining functional CCs. Each micro-controller-based CC digitizes the cell voltage (V(sub cell)), two cell temperatures, and the voltage across the switch (V); the latter variable is used in conjunction with V(sub cell) to estimate the bypass current for a given bypass resistor. Furthermore, CC1 digitizes the battery current (I1) and battery voltage (V(sub batt) and CC5 digitizes a second battery current (I2). As a result, redundant readings are taken for temperature, battery current, and battery voltage through the summation of the individual cell voltages given that each CC knows the voltage of the other cells. For the purpose of cell balancing, each CC periodically and independently transmits its cell voltage and stores the received cell voltage of the other cells in an array. The position in the array depends on the identifier (ID) of the transmitting CC. After eight cell voltage receptions, the array is checked to see if one or more cells did not transmit. If one or more transmissions are missing, the missing cell(s) is (are) eliminated from cell

  10. Depth Echolocation Learnt by Novice Sighted People

    PubMed Central

    Tonelli, Alessia; Brayda, Luca; Gori, Monica

    2016-01-01

    Some blind people have developed a unique technique, called echolocation, to orient themselves in unknown environments. More specifically, by self-generating a clicking noise with the tongue, echolocators gain knowledge about the external environment by perceiving more detailed object features. It is not clear to date whether sighted individuals can also develop such an extremely useful technique. To investigate this, here we test the ability of novice sighted participants to perform a depth echolocation task. Moreover, in order to evaluate whether the type of room (anechoic or reverberant) and the type of clicking sound (with the tongue or with the hands) influences the learning of this technique, we divided the entire sample into four groups. Half of the participants produced the clicking sound with their tongue, the other half with their hands. Half of the participants performed the task in an anechoic chamber, the other half in a reverberant room. Subjects stood in front of five bars, each of a different size, and at five different distances from the subject. The dimension of the bars ensured a constant subtended angle for the five distances considered. The task was to identify the correct distance of the bar. We found that, even by the second session, the participants were able to judge the correct depth of the bar at a rate greater than chance. Improvements in both precision and accuracy were observed in all experimental sessions. More interestingly, we found significantly better performance in the reverberant room than in the anechoic chamber. The type of clicking did not modulate our results. This suggests that the echolocation technique can also be learned by sighted individuals and that room reverberation can influence this learning process. More generally, this study shows that total loss of sight is not a prerequisite for echolocation skills this suggests important potential implications on rehabilitation settings for persons with residual vision. PMID