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Sample records for derived interaction parameters

  1. Chemical potential derivatives and preferential interaction parameters in biological systems from Kirkwood-Buff theory.

    PubMed

    Smith, Paul E

    2006-08-01

    New expressions for chemical potential derivatives and preferential interaction parameters for ternary mixtures are derived for open, semiopen, and closed ensembles in terms of Kirkwood-Buff integrals, where all three components are present at finite concentrations. This is achieved using a simple approach that avoids the use of the general matrix formulation of Kirkwood-Buff theory. The resulting expressions provide a rigorous foundation for the analysis of experimental and simulation data. Using the results, a simple model is developed and used to investigate the possible effects of finite protein concentrations on the corresponding cosolvent dependent chemical potential and denaturation thermodynamics. PMID:16679363

  2. Derivation of Pitzer Interaction Parameters for an Aqueous Species Pair of FeCitrate- and Mg2+

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jang, J.; Olivas, T.; Nemer, M.

    2013-12-01

    The Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) is a deep underground repository for the disposal of transuranic (TRU) radioactive waste developed by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). The WIPP is located within the bedded salts of the Permian Salado Formation, which consists of interbedded halite and anhydrite layers overlaying the Castile Formation. The waste includes, but is not limited to, the salts of citric acid and iron. To calculate the solution chemistry for brines of WIPP-relevance, WIPP Performance Assessment (PA) employs the Pitzer formulation to determine the activity coefficients of aqueous species in brine. The current WIPP thermodynamic database, however, does not include iron species and their Pitzer parameters, in spite of the fact that there will be a large amount of iron in the WIPP. Iron would be emplaced as part of the waste, as well as the containers for the waste. The objective of this analysis is to derive the Pitzer binary interaction parameters for the pair of Mg2+ and FeCitrate-. Briefly, an aqueous model for dissolution of Fe(OH)2(s) in MgNa2Citrate solution was fitted to the experimentally measured solubility data. The aqueous model consists of several chemical reactions and related Pitzer interaction parameters. Specifically, Pitzer binary interaction parameters for the Mg2+ and FeCitrate- pair (β(0), β(1), and Cφ) were fitted to the experimental data. Anoxic gloveboxes were used to keep the oxygen level low (less than 6 ppm) throughout the experiments. Aging time was more than 800 days to ensure equilibrium. EQ3NR packaged in EQ3/6 v.8.0a calculates the aqueous speciation and saturation index using an aqueous model addressed in EQ3/6's database. The saturation index indicates how far the system is from equilibrium with respect to the solid of interest. Thus, the smaller the sum of squared saturation indices that the aqueous model calculates for the given number of experiments, the more closely the model attributes equilibrium to each

  3. Derivation of Pitzer Interaction Parameters for an Aqueous Species Pair of Sodium and Iron(II)-Citrate Complex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jang, J. H.; Nemer, M.

    2015-12-01

    The U.S. DOE Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) is a deep underground repository for the permanent disposal of transuranic (TRU) radioactive waste. The WIPP is located in the Permian Delaware Basin near Carlsbad, New Mexico, U.S.A. The TRU waste includes, but is not limited to, iron-based alloys and the complexing agent, citric acid. Iron is also present from the steel used in the waste containers. The objective of this analysis is to derive the Pitzer activity coefficients for the pair of Na+ and FeCit- complex to expand current WIPP thermodynamic database. An aqueous model for the dissolution of Fe(OH)2(s) in a Na3Cit solution was fitted to the experimentally measured solubility data. The aqueous model consists of several chemical reactions and related Pitzer interaction parameters. Specifically, Pitzer interaction parameters for the Na+ and FeCit- pair (β(0), β(1), and Cφ) plus the stability constant for species of FeCit- were fitted to the experimental data. Anoxic gloveboxes were used to keep the oxygen level low (<1 ppm) throughout the experiments due to redox sensitivity. EQ3NR, a computer program for geochemical aqueous speciation-solubility calculations, packaged in EQ3/6 v.8.0a, calculates the aqueous speciation and saturation index using an aqueous model addressed in EQ3/6's database. The saturation index indicates how far the system is from equilibrium with respect to the solid of interest. Thus, the smaller the sum of squared saturation indices that the aqueous model calculates for the given number of experiments, the more closely the model attributes equilibrium to each individual experiment with respect to the solid of interest. The calculation of aqueous speciation and saturation indices was repeated by adjusting stability constant of FeCit-, β(0), β(1), and Cφ in the database until the values are found that make the sum of squared saturation indices the smallest for the given number of experiments. Results will be presented at the time of

  4. Hexagonal boron nitride and water interaction parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Yanbin; Wagner, Lucas K.; Aluru, Narayana R.

    2016-04-01

    The study of hexagonal boron nitride (hBN) in microfluidic and nanofluidic applications at the atomic level requires accurate force field parameters to describe the water-hBN interaction. In this work, we begin with benchmark quality first principles quantum Monte Carlo calculations on the interaction energy between water and hBN, which are used to validate random phase approximation (RPA) calculations. We then proceed with RPA to derive force field parameters, which are used to simulate water contact angle on bulk hBN, attaining a value within the experimental uncertainties. This paper demonstrates that end-to-end multiscale modeling, starting at detailed many-body quantum mechanics and ending with macroscopic properties, with the approximations controlled along the way, is feasible for these systems.

  5. Hexagonal boron nitride and water interaction parameters.

    PubMed

    Wu, Yanbin; Wagner, Lucas K; Aluru, Narayana R

    2016-04-28

    The study of hexagonal boron nitride (hBN) in microfluidic and nanofluidic applications at the atomic level requires accurate force field parameters to describe the water-hBN interaction. In this work, we begin with benchmark quality first principles quantum Monte Carlo calculations on the interaction energy between water and hBN, which are used to validate random phase approximation (RPA) calculations. We then proceed with RPA to derive force field parameters, which are used to simulate water contact angle on bulk hBN, attaining a value within the experimental uncertainties. This paper demonstrates that end-to-end multiscale modeling, starting at detailed many-body quantum mechanics and ending with macroscopic properties, with the approximations controlled along the way, is feasible for these systems. PMID:27131542

  6. Perturbative unitarity of Higgs derivative interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kikuta, Yohei; Yamamoto, Yasuhiro

    2013-05-01

    We study the perturbative unitarity bound given by dimension six derivative interactions consisting of Higgs doublets. These interactions emerge from kinetic terms of composite Higgs models or integrating out heavy particles that interact with Higgs doublets. They lead to new phenomena beyond the Standard Model. One of characteristic contributions from derivative interactions appear in vector boson scattering processes. Longitudinal modes of massive vector bosons can be regarded as Nambu Goldstone bosons eaten by each vector field. Since their effects become larger and larger as the collision energy of vector bosons increases, vector boson scattering processes become important in the high energy region around the TeV scale. On the other hand, in such a high energy region, we have to take into account the unitarity of amplitudes. We have obtained the unitarity condition in terms of the parameter included in the effective Lagrangian for one Higgs doublet models. Applying it to some models, we have found that contributions of derivative interactions are not so large enough to clearly discriminate them from the Standard Model ones. We also study the unitarity bound in two Higgs doublet models. Because they are too complex to obtain it in the general effective Lagrangian, we have calculated it in explicit models. These analyses tell that the perturbative unitarity bounds are highly model dependent.

  7. Dissipative Particle Dynamics interaction parameters from ab initio calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sepehr, Fatemeh; Paddison, Stephen J.

    2016-02-01

    Dissipative Particle Dynamics (DPD) is a commonly employed coarse-grained method to model complex systems. Presented here is a pragmatic approach to connect atomic-scale information to the meso-scale interactions defined between the DPD particles or beads. Specifically, electronic structure calculations were utilized for the calculation of the DPD pair-wise interaction parameters. An implicit treatment of the electrostatic interactions for charged beads is introduced. The method is successfully applied to derive the parameters for a hydrated perfluorosulfonic acid ionomer with absorbed vanadium cations.

  8. Application of Statistically Derived CPAS Parachute Parameters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Romero, Leah M.; Ray, Eric S.

    2013-01-01

    The Capsule Parachute Assembly System (CPAS) Analysis Team is responsible for determining parachute inflation parameters and dispersions that are ultimately used in verifying system requirements. A model memo is internally released semi-annually documenting parachute inflation and other key parameters reconstructed from flight test data. Dispersion probability distributions published in previous versions of the model memo were uniform because insufficient data were available for determination of statistical based distributions. Uniform distributions do not accurately represent the expected distributions since extreme parameter values are just as likely to occur as the nominal value. CPAS has taken incremental steps to move away from uniform distributions. Model Memo version 9 (MMv9) made the first use of non-uniform dispersions, but only for the reefing cutter timing, for which a large number of sample was available. In order to maximize the utility of the available flight test data, clusters of parachutes were reconstructed individually starting with Model Memo version 10. This allowed for statistical assessment for steady-state drag area (CDS) and parachute inflation parameters such as the canopy fill distance (n), profile shape exponent (expopen), over-inflation factor (C(sub k)), and ramp-down time (t(sub k)) distributions. Built-in MATLAB distributions were applied to the histograms, and parameters such as scale (sigma) and location (mu) were output. Engineering judgment was used to determine the "best fit" distribution based on the test data. Results include normal, log normal, and uniform (where available data remains insufficient) fits of nominal and failure (loss of parachute and skipped stage) cases for all CPAS parachutes. This paper discusses the uniform methodology that was previously used, the process and result of the statistical assessment, how the dispersions were incorporated into Monte Carlo analyses, and the application of the distributions in

  9. qPIPSA: Relating enzymatic kinetic parameters and interaction fields

    PubMed Central

    Gabdoulline, Razif R; Stein, Matthias; Wade, Rebecca C

    2007-01-01

    Background The simulation of metabolic networks in quantitative systems biology requires the assignment of enzymatic kinetic parameters. Experimentally determined values are often not available and therefore computational methods to estimate these parameters are needed. It is possible to use the three-dimensional structure of an enzyme to perform simulations of a reaction and derive kinetic parameters. However, this is computationally demanding and requires detailed knowledge of the enzyme mechanism. We have therefore sought to develop a general, simple and computationally efficient procedure to relate protein structural information to enzymatic kinetic parameters that allows consistency between the kinetic and structural information to be checked and estimation of kinetic constants for structurally and mechanistically similar enzymes. Results We describe qPIPSA: quantitative Protein Interaction Property Similarity Analysis. In this analysis, molecular interaction fields, for example, electrostatic potentials, are computed from the enzyme structures. Differences in molecular interaction fields between enzymes are then related to the ratios of their kinetic parameters. This procedure can be used to estimate unknown kinetic parameters when enzyme structural information is available and kinetic parameters have been measured for related enzymes or were obtained under different conditions. The detailed interaction of the enzyme with substrate or cofactors is not modeled and is assumed to be similar for all the proteins compared. The protein structure modeling protocol employed ensures that differences between models reflect genuine differences between the protein sequences, rather than random fluctuations in protein structure. Conclusion Provided that the experimental conditions and the protein structural models refer to the same protein state or conformation, correlations between interaction fields and kinetic parameters can be established for sets of related enzymes

  10. Photon Interaction Parameters for Some Borate Glasses

    SciTech Connect

    Mann, Nisha; Kaur, Updesh; Singh, Tejbir; Sharma, J. K.; Singh, Parjit S.

    2010-11-06

    Some photon interaction parameters of dosimetric interest such as mass attenuation coefficients, effective atomic number, electron density and KERMA relative to air have been computed in the wide energy range from 1 keV to 100 GeV for some borate glasses viz. barium-lead borate, bismuth-borate, calcium-strontium borate, lead borate and zinc-borate glass. It has been observed that lead borate glass and barium-lead borate glass have maximum values of mass attenuation coefficient, effective atomic number and KERMA relative to air. Hence, these borate glasses are suitable as gamma ray shielding material, packing of radioactive sources etc.

  11. Photon Interaction Parameters for Some Borate Glasses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mann, Nisha; Kaur, Updesh; Singh, Tejbir; Sharma, J. K.; Singh, Parjit S.

    2010-11-01

    Some photon interaction parameters of dosimetric interest such as mass attenuation coefficients, effective atomic number, electron density and KERMA relative to air have been computed in the wide energy range from 1 keV to 100 GeV for some borate glasses viz. barium-lead borate, bismuth-borate, calcium-strontium borate, lead borate and zinc-borate glass. It has been observed that lead borate glass and barium-lead borate glass have maximum values of mass attenuation coefficient, effective atomic number and KERMA relative to air. Hence, these borate glasses are suitable as gamma ray shielding material, packing of radioactive sources etc.

  12. A new fifth parameter for transverse isotropy II: partial derivatives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawakatsu, Hitoshi

    2016-07-01

    Kawakatsu et al. and Kawakatsu introduced a new fifth parameter, ηκ, to describe transverse isotropy (TI). Considering that ηκ characterizes the incidence angle dependence of body wave phase velocities for TI models, its relevance for body wave seismology is obvious. Here, we derive expressions for partial derivatives (sensitivity kernels) of surface wave phase velocity and normal mode eigenfrequency for the new set of five parameters. The partial derivative for ηκ is about twice as large as that for the conventional η, indicating that ηκ should be more readily resolved. While partial derivatives for S velocities are not so changed, those for P velocities are significantly modified; the sensitivity for anisotropic P velocities is greatly reduced. In contrary to the suggestion by Dziewonski & Anderson and Anderson & Dziewonski, there is not much control on the anisotropic P velocities. On the other hand, the significance of ηκ for long-period seismology has become clear.

  13. Deriving sea-state parameters using RISAT-1 SAR data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ganguly, Debojyoti; Mishra, Manoj K.; Chauhan, Prakash

    2015-01-01

    A technique has been demonstrated for deriving various sea-wave parameters such as peak wavelength, peak direction, and significant wave height from two-dimensional synthetic aperture radar (SAR) data acquired by Indian active microwave remote-sensing satellite RISAT-1 (Radar Imaging Satellite 1). The significant wave height is obtained using the method of azimuth cutoff wavelength, which is the minimum wavelength that can be imaged in the azimuth direction and results due to the roll-off of the SAR image spectra at higher wave numbers. In the present paper, RISAT-1 SAR fine-resolution scan mode intensity image data are used for deriving various wave parameters at a high spatial resolution of 300 m. The changes in wavelength, wave height, and wave direction of sea waves are studied for a coastal wave system using high-resolution sea-wave spectral information. The SAR-derived coastal wave parameters are then compared with JASON-2 altimeter Geophysical Data Record (GDR) products and The European Center for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts (ECMWF)-modeled values, and are found to be in reasonable agreement.

  14. A new fifth parameter for transverse isotropy II: partial derivatives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawakatsu, Hitoshi

    2016-04-01

    Kawakatsu et al. (2015) and Kawakatsu (2016) introduced a new fifth parameter, ηκ, to describe transverse isotropy (TI). Considering that ηκ characterizes the incidence angle dependence of bodywave phase velocities for TI models, its relevance for bodywave seismology is obvious. Here we derive expressions for partial derivatives (sensitivity kernels) of surface wave phase velocity and normal mode eigen-frequency for the new set of five parameters. The partial derivative for ηκ is about twice as large as that for the conventional η, indicating that ηκ should be more readily resolved. While partial derivatives for S-velocities are not so changed, those for P-velocities are significantly modified; the sensitivity for anisotropic P-velocities is greatly reduced. In contrary to the suggestion by Dziewonski & Anderson (1981) and Anderson & Dziewonski (1982), there is not much control on the anisotropic P-velocities. On the other hand, the significance of ηκ for long-period seismology has become clear.

  15. Modeling Interactions of Erythromycin Derivatives with Ribosomes.

    PubMed

    Shishkina, A V; Makarova, T M; Tereshchenkov, A G; Makarov, G I; Korshunova, G A; Bogdanov, A A

    2015-11-01

    Using a method of static simulation, a series of erythromycin A analogs was designed with aldehyde functions introduced instead of one of the methyl substituents in the 3'-N-position of the antibiotic that was potentially capable of forming a covalent bond with an amino group of one of the nucleotide residues of the 23S rRNA in the ribosomal exit tunnel. Similar interaction is observed for antibiotics of the tylosin series, which bind tightly to the large ribosomal subunit and demonstrate high antibacterial activity. Binding of novel erythromycin derivatives with the bacterial ribosome was investigated with the method of fluorescence polarization. It was found that the erythromycin analog containing a 1-methyl-3-oxopropyl group in the 3'-N-position demonstrates the best binding. Based on the ability to inhibit protein biosynthesis, it is on the same level as erythromycin, and it is significantly better than desmethyl-erythromycin. Molecular dynamic modeling of complexes of the derivatives with ribosomes was conducted to explain the observed effects. PMID:26615442

  16. Evaluation of hail suppression programme effectiveness using radar derived parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tani, Satyanarayana; Paulitsch, Helmut; Teschl, Reinhard; Süsser-Rechberger, Barbara

    2016-04-01

    The objective of this study is evaluating "the operational hail suppression programme" in the province of Styria, Austria "for the year 2015". For the evaluation purpose the HAILSYS software tool was developed by integrating single polarization C-band weather radar data, aircraft trajectory, radiosonde freezing level data, hail events and crop damages information from the ground. The hail related radar derived parameters are: hail mass aloft, hail mass flux, probability of hail, vertical integrated hail mass, hail kinetic energy flux, and storm severity index. The spatial maps of hail kinetic energy and hail mass were developed to evaluate the seeding effect. The time history plots of vertical integrated hail mass, hail mass aloft and the probability of hail are drawn over an entire cell lifetime. The sensitivity and variation of radar hail parameters over time and associated changes due to cloud seeding will be presented.

  17. Relationship between Cole-Cole model parameters and spectral decomposition parameters derived from SIP data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weigand, M.; Kemna, A.

    2016-06-01

    Spectral induced polarization (SIP) data are commonly analysed using phenomenological models. Among these models the Cole-Cole (CC) model is the most popular choice to describe the strength and frequency dependence of distinct polarization peaks in the data. More flexibility regarding the shape of the spectrum is provided by decomposition schemes. Here the spectral response is decomposed into individual responses of a chosen elementary relaxation model, mathematically acting as kernel in the involved integral, based on a broad range of relaxation times. A frequently used kernel function is the Debye model, but also the CC model with some other a priorly specified frequency dispersion (e.g. Warburg model) has been proposed as kernel in the decomposition. The different decomposition approaches in use, also including conductivity and resistivity formulations, pose the question to which degree the integral spectral parameters typically derived from the obtained relaxation time distribution are biased by the approach itself. Based on synthetic SIP data sampled from an ideal CC response, we here investigate how the two most important integral output parameters deviate from the corresponding CC input parameters. We find that the total chargeability may be underestimated by up to 80 per cent and the mean relaxation time may be off by up to three orders of magnitude relative to the original values, depending on the frequency dispersion of the analysed spectrum and the proximity of its peak to the frequency range limits considered in the decomposition. We conclude that a quantitative comparison of SIP parameters across different studies, or the adoption of parameter relationships from other studies, for example when transferring laboratory results to the field, is only possible on the basis of a consistent spectral analysis procedure. This is particularly important when comparing effective CC parameters with spectral parameters derived from decomposition results.

  18. VLBI-derived troposphere parameters during CONT08

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heinkelmann, R.; Böhm, J.; Bolotin, S.; Engelhardt, G.; Haas, R.; Lanotte, R.; MacMillan, D. S.; Negusini, M.; Skurikhina, E.; Titov, O.; Schuh, H.

    2011-07-01

    Time-series of zenith wet and total troposphere delays as well as north and east gradients are compared, and zenith total delays ( ZTD) are combined on the level of parameter estimates. Input data sets are provided by ten Analysis Centers (ACs) of the International VLBI Service for Geodesy and Astrometry (IVS) for the CONT08 campaign (12-26 August 2008). The inconsistent usage of meteorological data and models, such as mapping functions, causes systematics among the ACs, and differing parameterizations and constraints add noise to the troposphere parameter estimates. The empirical standard deviation of ZTD among the ACs with regard to an unweighted mean is 4.6 mm. The ratio of the analysis noise to the observation noise assessed by the operator/software impact (OSI) model is about 2.5. These and other effects have to be accounted for to improve the intra-technique combination of VLBI-derived troposphere parameters. While the largest systematics caused by inconsistent usage of meteorological data can be avoided and the application of different mapping functions can be considered by applying empirical corrections, the noise has to be modeled in the stochastic model of intra-technique combination. The application of different stochastic models shows no significant effects on the combined parameters but results in different mean formal errors: the mean formal errors of the combined ZTD are 2.3 mm (unweighted), 4.4 mm (diagonal), 8.6 mm [variance component (VC) estimation], and 8.6 mm (operator/software impact, OSI). On the one hand, the OSI model, i.e. the inclusion of off-diagonal elements in the cofactor-matrix, considers the reapplication of observations yielding a factor of about two for mean formal errors as compared to the diagonal approach. On the other hand, the combination based on VC estimation shows large differences among the VCs and exhibits a comparable scaling of formal errors. Thus, for the combination of troposphere parameters a combination of the two

  19. Effect of plasma surface interactions on PLT plasma parameters

    SciTech Connect

    Meservey, E.B.; Arunasalam, V.; Barnes, C.

    1980-07-01

    This paper gives a brief description of the geometry and parameters of the PLT tokamak, reviews some of the last four years' results that are particularly relevant to plasma-boundary interactions, and then concentrates on two specific problems.

  20. A study of photon interaction parameters in lung tissue substitutes.

    PubMed

    Manjunatha, H C

    2014-04-01

    The study of photon interaction with different composite materials has become a topic of prime importance for radiation physicists. Some parameters of dosimetric interest are the mass attenuation coefficient, effective atomic number, and electron density; these help in the basic understanding of photon interactions with composite materials. The photon interaction parameters such as mass attenuation coefficient (μ/ρ), effective atomic number (Zeff), and effective electron density (N el) must be identical for the phantom material and their tissue. In the present study, we have evaluated the photon interaction parameters such as (μ/ρ), Z eff and N el of 13 lung tissue substitutes. The variations of these parameters of lung tissue substitutes with photon energy are graphically represented. The photon interaction parameters of lung tissue substitutes are compared with that of lung tissue. The variation of photon interaction parameters of the studied lung tissue substitutes is similar that of the lung. Logically, it can be shown that Alderson lung is good substitute for lung than the other substitutes. PMID:24872609

  1. Upscaling water cycle parameters using geomorphometric terrain parameters and topographic indices derived from interferometric DEM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Etzrodt, N.; Zimmermann, R.; Conrad, O.

    2002-01-01

    For assessing a regional water balance in boreal landscapes the extend to which evapo-transpiration is subject to spatial variations needs to be known. Water cycle parameters such as transpiration rates of vegetation are depending on both the vegetation type and hydro-pedologic stand conditions since poor soil drainage respective seasonal soil drought affect water consumption by vegetation. The spatial distribution of the pristine boreal vegetation types can be obtained by SAR or optical remote sensing sensors on a regional scale. Many works have been dealing with this subject in the past and it is widely known how remote sensing can contribute to vegetation mapping. To assess hydro-pedologic stand conditions on a regional scale an alternative method is required. Our approach to resolve this problem is based on the fact that soil water status is essentially a function of topographic properties. For that reason morphometric terrain parameters derived from a Digital Elevation Model (DEM) has been used to indicate regions with homogeneous hydro-pedologic stand conditions, so called "hydropedotopes". To delineate the required hydropedotopes two indicators pertaining to soilwater status and pedo-hydrology were derived from InSAR DEM: (1) The wetness-index and (2) the vertical distance to streams and bottom lines. In a further step the resulting map of hydropedotopes is intersected with a remote sensing derived map of the actual spatial distribution of the boreal vegetation types. This step results in a map which marks out landscape units of homogeneous properties in terms of vegetation type and hydro-pedologic conditions which is the basis for upscaling canopy transpiration measurements. From our approach which uses in addition to conventional remote sensing data the results of an automated digital terrain analysis we expect a substantially enhanced knowledge of the spatial variability of water flux rates conditional on canopy transpiration. The process of our approach

  2. Derivation of Delaware Bay tidal parameters from space shuttle photography

    SciTech Connect

    Zheng, Quanan; Yan, Xiaohai; Klemas, V. )

    1993-06-01

    The tide-related parameters of the Delaware Bay are derived from space shuttle time-series photographs. The water areas in the bay are measured from interpretation maps of the photographs with a CALCOMP 9100 digitizer and ERDAS Image Processing System. The corresponding tidal levels are calculated using the exposure time annotated on the photographs. From these data, an approximate function relating the water area to the tidal level at a reference point is determined. Based on the function, the water areas of the Delaware Bay at mean high water (MHW) and mean low water (MLW), below 0 m, and for the tidal zone are inferred. With MHW and MLW areas and the mean tidal range, the authors calculate the tidal influx of the Delaware Bay, which is 2.76 x 1O[sup 9] m[sup 3]. Furthermore, the velocity of flood tide at the bay mouth is determined using the tidal flux and an integral of the velocity distribution function at the cross section between Cape Henlopen and Cape May. The result is 132 cm/s, which compares well with the data on tidal current charts.

  3. Predicting pharmacokinetic profiles using in silico derived parameters.

    PubMed

    Hosea, Natalie A; Jones, Hannah M

    2013-04-01

    Human pharmacokinetic (PK) predictions play a critical role in assessing the quality of potential clinical candidates where the accurate estimation of clearance, volume of distribution, bioavailability, and the plasma-concentration-time profiles are the desired end points. While many methods for conducting predictions utilize in vivo data, predictions can be conducted successfully from in vitro or in silico data, applying modeling and simulation techniques. This approach can be facilitated using commercially available prediction software such as GastroPlus which has been reported to accurately predict the oral PK profile of small drug-like molecules. Herein, case studies are described where GastroPlus modeling and simulation was employed using in silico or in vitro data to predict PK profiles in early discovery. The results obtained demonstrate the feasibility of adequately predicting plasma-concentration-time profiles with in silico derived as well as in vitro measured parameters and hence predicting PK profiles with minimal data. The applicability of this approach can provide key information enabling decisions on either dose selection, chemistry strategy to improve compounds, or clinical protocol design, thus demonstrating the value of modeling and simulation in both early discovery and exploratory development for predicting absorption and disposition profiles. PMID:23427934

  4. Interaction between gliadins and anthocyan derivatives.

    PubMed

    Mazzaracchio, Palmira; Tozzi, Silvia; Boga, Carla; Forlani, Luciano; Pifferi, Pier Giorgio; Barbiroli, Giancarlo

    2011-12-01

    The interaction of gliadins with some anthocyanins (e.g. myrtillin, malvin, keracyanin, callistephin) and anthocyanidins (e.g. delphinidin, pelargonidin, cyanidin) has been analysed in aqueous solution at pH condition of the stomach, in which these compounds are initially metabolized. NMR, FT-IR and UV-Vis spectroscopic methods have been employed to determine the anthocyanin binding mode. The spectroscopic data seem to indicate that anthocyans are located along the polypeptide chains of gliadins in a generical molecular interaction between the two moieties. Our data do not exclude that hydrogen bonding interaction too is operating. Anthocyan-gliadins complexes are very soluble in acidic conditions. The results provide new insights into anthocyan-protein interaction and may have relevance to human health. PMID:25212343

  5. Counterintuitive interaction of anions with benzene derivatives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quiñonero, David; Garau, Carolina; Frontera, Antonio; Ballester, Pau; Costa, Antonio; Deyà, Pere M.

    2002-06-01

    Ab initio calculations were carried out on complexes between 1,3,5-trinitrobenzene (TNB) and anions, where the anion is positioned over the ring along the C3 axis. This study combines crystallographic and computational evidences to demonstrate an attractive interaction between the anion and the π-cloud of TNB. This interaction is rationalized based on the important role of the quadrupole moment of TNB and the anion-induced polarization. In addition, this study has been extended to 1,3,5-trifluorobenzene (TFB), which possesses a very small quadrupole moment. As a result, minimum energy complexes have been found between TFB and both anions and cations due to the stabilization obtained from the ion-induced polarization.

  6. Effects of Ignoring Item Interaction on Item Parameter Estimation and Detection of Interacting Items

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chen, Cheng-Te; Wang, Wen-Chung

    2007-01-01

    This study explores the effects of ignoring item interaction on item parameter estimation and the efficiency of using the local dependence index Q[subscript 3] and the SAS NLMIXED procedure to detect item interaction under the three-parameter logistic model and the generalized partial credit model. Through simulations, it was found that ignoring…

  7. Inflationary magnetogenesis, derivative couplings, and relativistic Van der Waals interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giovannini, Massimo

    2015-08-01

    When the gauge fields have derivative couplings to scalars, like in the case of the relativistic theory of Van der Waals (or Casimir-Polder) interactions, conformal invariance is broken but the magnetic and electric susceptibilities are not bound to coincide. We analyze the formation of large-scale magnetic fields in slow-roll inflation and find that they are generated at the level of a few hundredths of a nG and over typical length scales between few Mpc and 100 Mpc. Using a new time parametrization that reduces to conformal time but only for coincident susceptibilities, the gauge action is quantized while the evolution equations of the corresponding mode functions are more easily solvable. The power spectra depend on the normalized rates of variation of the two susceptibilities (or of the corresponding gauge couplings) and on the absolute value of their ratio at the beginning of inflation. We pin down explicit regions in the parameter space where all the physical requirements (i.e., the backreaction constraints, the magnetogenesis bounds and the naturalness of the initial conditions of the scenario) are jointly satisfied. Weakly coupled initial data are favored if the gauge couplings are of the same order at the end of inflation. Duality is systematically used to simplify the analysis of the wide parameter space of the model.

  8. Interacting Dark Fluid in Anisotropic Universe with Dynamical Deceleration Parameter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adhav, K. S.; Bokey, V. D.; Bansod, A. S.; Munde, S. L.

    2016-06-01

    In this paper we have studied the anisotropic and homogeneous Bianchi Type-I and V universe filled with Interacting Dark Matter and Holographic Dark Energy. The solutions of field equations are obtained for both models under the assumption of linearly varying deceleration parameter which yields dynamical deceleration parameter. It has been observed that the anisotropy of expansion dies out very quickly (soon after inflation) in both models (B-I, B-V). The physical and geometrical parameters for the both models have been obtained and discussed in details.

  9. Toward the Computational Prediction of Muon Sites and Interaction Parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonfà, Pietro; De Renzi, Roberto

    2016-09-01

    The rapid developments of computational quantum chemistry methods and supercomputing facilities motivate the renewed interest in the analysis of the muon/electron interactions in μSR experiments with ab initio approaches. Modern simulation methods seem to be able to provide the answers to the frequently asked questions of many μSR experiments: where is the muon? Is it a passive probe? What are the interaction parameters governing the muon-sample interaction? In this review we describe some of the approaches used to provide quantitative estimations of the aforementioned quantities and we provide the reader with a short discussion on the current developments in this field.

  10. A Flexible Terpyridine Derivative Interacts Specifically with G-Quadruplexes.

    PubMed

    De Rache, Aurore; Gueddouda, Nassima Meriem; Bourdoncle, Anne; Hommes, Paul; Reissig, Hans-Ulrich; Mergny, Jean-Louis

    2016-08-26

    G-quadruplexes formed by nucleic acids are implicated in pathologies ranging from cancers to neurodegenerative diseases. We evaluated interactions of 29 bi- and terpyridine derivatives with G-quadruplexes and duplexes. FRET-melting, circular dichroism, and (1) H NMR spectroscopy showed that one terpyridine derivative interacted very selectively with G-quadruplexes. This G-quadruplex ligand inhibited helicase activity and should influence G-quadruplex-related biological processes. PMID:27410717

  11. Parameter uncertainty and interaction in complex environmental models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spear, Robert C.; Grieb, Thomas M.; Shang, Nong

    1994-11-01

    Recently developed models for the estimation of risks arising from the release of toxic chemicals from hazardous waste sites are inherently complex both structurally and parametrically. To better understand the impact of uncertainty and interaction in the high-dimensional parameter spaces of these models, the set of procedures termed regional sensitivity analysis has been extended and applied to the groundwater pathway of the MMSOILS model. The extension consists of a tree-structured density estimation technique which allows the characterization of complex interaction in that portion of the parameter space which gives rise to successful simulation. Results show that the parameter space can be partitioned into small, densely populated regions and relatively large, sparsely populated regions. From the high-density regions one can identify the important or controlling parameters as well as the interaction between parameters in different local areas of the space. This new tool can provide guidance in the analysis and interpretation of site-specific application of these complex models.

  12. Validating a large geophysical data set: Experiences with satellite-derived cloud parameters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kahn, Ralph; Haskins, Robert D.; Knighton, James E.; Pursch, Andrew; Granger-Gallegos, Stephanie

    1992-01-01

    We are validating the global cloud parameters derived from the satellite-borne HIRS2 and MSU atmospheric sounding instrument measurements, and are using the analysis of these data as one prototype for studying large geophysical data sets in general. The HIRS2/MSU data set contains a total of 40 physical parameters, filling 25 MB/day; raw HIRS2/MSU data are available for a period exceeding 10 years. Validation involves developing a quantitative sense for the physical meaning of the derived parameters over the range of environmental conditions sampled. This is accomplished by comparing the spatial and temporal distributions of the derived quantities with similar measurements made using other techniques, and with model results. The data handling needed for this work is possible only with the help of a suite of interactive graphical and numerical analysis tools. Level 3 (gridded) data is the common form in which large data sets of this type are distributed for scientific analysis. We find that Level 3 data is inadequate for the data comparisons required for validation. Level 2 data (individual measurements in geophysical units) is needed. A sampling problem arises when individual measurements, which are not uniformly distributed in space or time, are used for the comparisons. Standard 'interpolation' methods involve fitting the measurements for each data set to surfaces, which are then compared. We are experimenting with formal criteria for selecting geographical regions, based upon the spatial frequency and variability of measurements, that allow us to quantify the uncertainty due to sampling. As part of this project, we are also dealing with ways to keep track of constraints placed on the output by assumptions made in the computer code. The need to work with Level 2 data introduces a number of other data handling issues, such as accessing data files across machine types, meeting large data storage requirements, accessing other validated data sets, processing speed

  13. Bulk Surface Momentum Parameters for Satellite-Derived Vegetation Fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jasinski, Michael F.; Borak, Jordan; Crago, Richard

    2005-01-01

    The bulk aerodynamic parameters associated with the absorption of surface momentum by vegetated landscapes are theoretically estimated within the context of Raupach's roughness sublayer formulation. The parameters include the bulk plant drag coefficient, maximum u*/U(sub h), sheltering coefficient, and canopy area density at onset of sheltering. Parameters are estimated for the four principal IGBP land cover classes within the U.S. Southern Great Plains: evergreen needleleaf forests, grasslands, croplands, and open shrublands. The estimation approach applies the Method of Moments to roughness data from several international field experiments and other published sources. The results provide the necessary land surface parameters for satellite-based estimation of momentum aerodynamic roughness length and zero-plane displacement height for seasonally variable vegetation fields employed in most terrestrial and atmospheric simulation models used today. Construction of sample displacement and roughness maps over the Southern United States using MODIS land products demonstrates the potential of this approach for regional to global applications.

  14. Quality assessment parameters for EST-derived SNPs from catfish

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Two factors were found to be most significant for validation of EST-derived SNPs: the contig size and the minor allele sequence frequency. The larger the contigs were, the greater the validation rate although the validation rate was reasonably high when the contig sizes were equal to or larger than...

  15. Derivative self-interactions for a massive vector field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beltrán Jiménez, Jose; Heisenberg, Lavinia

    2016-06-01

    In this work we revisit the construction of theories for a massive vector field with derivative self-interactions such that only the 3 desired polarizations corresponding to a Proca field propagate. We start from the decoupling limit by constructing healthy interactions containing second derivatives of the Stueckelberg field with itself and also with the transverse modes. The resulting interactions can then be straightforwardly generalized beyond the decoupling limit. We then proceed to a systematic construction of the interactions by using the Levi-Civita tensors. Both approaches lead to a finite family of allowed derivative self-interactions for the Proca field. This construction allows us to show that some higher order terms recently introduced as new interactions trivialize in 4 dimensions by virtue of the Cayley-Hamilton theorem. Moreover, we discuss how the resulting derivative interactions can be written in a compact determinantal form, which can also be regarded as a generalization of the Born-Infeld lagrangian for electromagnetism. Finally, we generalize our results for a curved background and give the necessary non-minimal couplings guaranteeing that no additional polarizations propagate even in the presence of gravity.

  16. Density functional theory studies of Pb (II) interaction with chitosan and its derivatives.

    PubMed

    Hassan, Basila; Muraleedharan, K; Abdul Mujeeb, V M

    2015-03-01

    Density functional theory (DFT) studies of Pb (II) ions interaction with biopolymer chitosan and its derivatives are presented. Schiff bases and N-alkylated/arylated derivatives of chitosan were characterized as adsorbents of lead ions and are studied at monomer level. Natural bond orbital (NBO) analysis was carried out for chitosan and derivatives to understand the donor-acceptor interactions. Molecular electrostatic potential (MEP) maps of the adsorbents were plotted with color code. Global reactivity parameters of adsorbents were calculated on the basis of frontier molecular orbital (FMO) energies. Structure of complexes formed between chitosan and derivatives with Pb (II) ion were examined at B3LYP/LanL2DZ level of DFT. The stability of the complexes are discussed based on the values of Eads. We observed that the N-reduced pyridine carboxaldehyde derivative of chitosan (RPC) forms more stable complex with Pb (II) ions than with other derivatves. PMID:25583020

  17. Three-parameter tunable Tilt-Integral-Derivative (TID) controller

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lurie, Boris J. (Inventor)

    1994-01-01

    A feedback control system compensator of the PID type is provided, wherein the proportional component of the compensator is replaced with a tilted component having a transfer function s to the power of -1/n. The resulting transfer function of the entire compensator more closely approximates an optimal transfer function, thereby achieving improved feedback controller. Further, as compared to conventional PID compensators, the TID compensator allows for simpler tuning, better disturbance rejection ratio, and smaller effects of plant parameter variations on closed loop response.

  18. Peptiderive server: derive peptide inhibitors from protein-protein interactions.

    PubMed

    Sedan, Yuval; Marcu, Orly; Lyskov, Sergey; Schueler-Furman, Ora

    2016-07-01

    The Rosetta Peptiderive protocol identifies, in a given structure of a protein-protein interaction, the linear polypeptide segment suggested to contribute most to binding energy. Interactions that feature a 'hot segment', a linear peptide with significant binding energy compared to that of the complex, may be amenable for inhibition and the peptide sequence and structure derived from the interaction provide a starting point for rational drug design. Here we present a web server for Peptiderive, which is incorporated within the ROSIE web interface for Rosetta protocols. A new feature of the protocol also evaluates whether derived peptides are good candidates for cyclization. Fast computation times and clear visualization allow users to quickly assess the interaction of interest. The Peptiderive server is available for free use at http://rosie.rosettacommons.org/peptiderive. PMID:27141963

  19. Characterizing Tissue with Acoustic Parameters Derived from Ultrasound Data

    SciTech Connect

    Littrup, P; Duric, N; Leach, R R; Azevedo, S G; Candy, J V; Moore, T; Chambers, D H; Mast, J E; Johnson, S A; Holsapple, E

    2002-01-23

    In contrast to standard reflection ultrasound (US), transmission US holds the promise of more thorough tissue characterization by generating quantitative acoustic parameters. We compare results from a conventional US scanner with data acquired using an experimental circular scanner operating at frequencies of 0.3 - 1.5 MHz. Data were obtained on phantoms and a normal, formalin-fixed, excised breast. Both reflection and transmission-based algorithms were used to generate images of reflectivity, sound speed and attenuation.. Images of the phantoms demonstrate the ability to detect sub-mm features and quantify acoustic properties such as sound speed and attenuation. The human breast specimen showed full field evaluation, improved penetration and tissue definition. Comparison with conventional US indicates the potential for better margin definition and acoustic characterization of masses, particularly in the complex scattering environments of human breast tissue. The use of morphology, in the context of reflectivity, sound speed and attenuation, for characterizing tissue, is discussed.

  20. Linear elastic properties derivation from microstructures representative of transport parameters.

    PubMed

    Hoang, Minh Tan; Bonnet, Guy; Tuan Luu, Hoang; Perrot, Camille

    2014-06-01

    It is shown that three-dimensional periodic unit cells (3D PUC) representative of transport parameters involved in the description of long wavelength acoustic wave propagation and dissipation through real foam samples may also be used as a standpoint to estimate their macroscopic linear elastic properties. Application of the model yields quantitative agreement between numerical homogenization results, available literature data, and experiments. Key contributions of this work include recognizing the importance of membranes and properties of the base material for the physics of elasticity. The results of this paper demonstrate that a 3D PUC may be used to understand and predict not only the sound absorbing properties of porous materials but also their transmission loss, which is critical for sound insulation problems. PMID:24907783

  1. Source parameters derived from seismic spectrum in the Jalisco block

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gutierrez, Q. J.; Escudero, C. R.; Nunez-Cornu, F. J.

    2012-12-01

    The direct measure of the earthquake fault dimension represent a complicated task nevertheless a better approach is using the seismic waves spectrum. With this method we can estimate the dimensions of the fault, the stress drop and the seismic moment. The study area comprises the complex tectonic configuration of Jalisco block and the subduction of the Rivera plate beneath the North American plate; this causes that occur in Jalisco some of the most harmful earthquakes and other related natural disasters. Accordingly it is important to monitor and perform studies that helps to understand the physics of earthquake rupture mechanism in the area. The main proposue of this study is estimate earthquake seismic source parameters. The data was recorded by the MARS network (Mapping the Riviera Subduction Zone) and the RESAJ network. MARS had 51 stations and settled in the Jalisco block; that is delimited by the mesoamerican trench at the west, the Colima grabben to the south, and the Tepic-Zacoalco to the north; for a period of time, of January 1, 2006 until December 31, 2007 Of this network was taken 104 events, the magnitude range of these was between 3 to 6.5 MB. RESJAL has 10 stations and is within the state of Jalisco, began to record since October 2011 and continues to record. We firs remove the trend, the mean and the instrument response, then manually chosen the S wave, then the multitaper method was used to obtain the spectrum of this wave and so estimate the corner frequency and the spectra level. We substitude the obtained in the equations of the Brune model to calculate the source parameters. Doing this we obtained the following results; the source radius was between .1 to 2 km, the stress drop was between .1 to 2 MPa.

  2. Interaction between subdaily Earth rotation parameters and GPS orbits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panafidina, Natalia; Seitz, Manuela; Hugentobler, Urs

    2013-04-01

    In processing GPS observations the geodetic parameters like station coordinates and ERPs (Earth rotation parameters) are estimated w.r.t. the celestial reference system realized by the satellite orbits. The interactions/correlations between estimated GPS orbis and other parameters may lead to numerical problems with the solution and introduce systematic errors in the computed values: the well known correlations comprise 1) the correlation between the orbital parameters determining the orientation of the orbital plane in inertial space and the nutation and 2) in the case of estimating ERPs with subdaily resolution the correlation between retrograde diurnal polar motion and nutation (and so the respective orbital elements). In this contribution we study the interaction between the GPS orbits and subdaily model for the ERPs. Existing subdaily ERP model recommended by the IERS comprises ~100 terms in polar motion and ~70 terms in Universal Time at diurnal and semidiurnal tidal periods. We use a long time series of daily normal equation systems (NEQ) obtaine from GPS observations from 1994 till 2007 where the ERPs with 1-hour resolution are transformed into tidal terms and the influence of the tidal terms with different frequencies on the estimated orbital parameters is considered. We found that although there is no algebraic correlation in the NEQ between the individual orbital parameters and the tidal terms, the changes in the amplitudes of tidal terms with periods close to 24 hours can be better accmodated by systematic changes in the orbital parameters than for tidal terms with other periods. Since the variation in Earth rotation with the period of siderial day (23.93h, tide K1) in terrestrial frame has in inertial space the same period as the period of revolution of GPS satellites, the K1 tidal term in polar motion is seen by the satellites as a permanent shift. The tidal terms with close periods (from ~24.13h to ~23.80h) are seen as a slow rotation of the

  3. Natural Rubber-Filler Interactions: What Are the Parameters?

    PubMed

    Chan, Alan Jenkin; Steenkeste, Karine; Canette, Alexis; Eloy, Marie; Brosson, Damien; Gaboriaud, Fabien; Fontaine-Aupart, Marie-Pierre

    2015-11-17

    Reinforcement of a polymer matrix through the incorporation of nanoparticles (fillers) is a common industrial practice that greatly enhances the mechanical properties of the composite material. The origin of such mechanical reinforcement has been linked to the interaction between the polymer and filler as well as the homogeneous dispersion of the filler within the polymer matrix. In natural rubber (NR) technology, knowledge of the conditions necessary to achieve more efficient NR-filler interactions is improving continuously. This study explores the important physicochemical parameters required to achieve NR-filler interactions under dilute aqueous conditions by varying both the properties of the filler (size, composition, surface activity, concentration) and the aqueous solution (ionic strength, ion valency). By combining fluorescence and electron microscopy methods, we show that NR and silica interact only in the presence of ions and that heteroaggregation is favored more than homoaggregation of silica-silica or NR-NR. The interaction kinetics increases with the ion valence, whereas the morphology of the heteroaggregates depends on the size of silica and the volume percent ratio (dry silica/dry NR). We observe dendritic structures using silica with a diameter (d) of 100 nm at a ∼20-50 vol % ratio, whereas we obtain raspberry-like structures using silica with d = 30 nm particles. We observe that in liquid the interaction is controlled by the hydrophilic bioshell, in contrast to dried conditions, where hydrophobic polymer dominates the interaction of NR with the fillers. A good correlation between the nanoscopic aggregation behavior and the macroscopic aggregation dynamics of the particles was observed. These results provide insight into improving the reinforcement of a polymer matrix using NR-filler films. PMID:26488560

  4. Derived parameters for NGC 6791 from high-metallicity isochrones

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dorman, Ben; Hufnagel, Beth

    1995-01-01

    We have computed 8, 10, and 12 Gyr isochrones and physically consistent models of zero-age red horizontal branch stars for stellar masses between 0.55 and 1.3 solar mass, all at (fe/H) = +0.15. Comparison to the NGC 6791 BVI photometry of Kaluzny & Udalski (1992) and Montgomery et al. (1994) yields an age of 10.0 +/- 0.5 Gyr at an apparent distance modulus 13.49 less than (m-M)(sub V) less than 13.70. The color offsets required to fit the isochrones, combined with the spectroscopic results of Friel & Janes (1993), imply that the foreground reddening to NGC 6791 lies in the range 0.24 greater than E(B -V) greater than 0.19 with +0.27 less than (Fe/H) less than + 0.44. These results are derived using a technique by which we predict color shifts and apply these to the isochrones to simulate progressively higher metallicities. The zero-age horizontal branch model suggest that the red horizontal branch stars of NGC 6791 have masses approximately less than 0.7 solar mass. The masses are similar to those found for M67 red horizontal branch stars by Tripicco et al. (1993) and for globular cluster red horizontal branch stars, even though the M67 progenitors are approximately 0.2 solar-mass more massive, while the progenitors of globular cluster horizontal branch stars are similarly less massive. This suggests the presence of a mechanism, not strongly dependent on metallicity, which reduces stellar envelopes on the zero-age horizontal branch to a given mass rather than by a given amount.

  5. Power Saving Optimization for Linear Collider Interaction Region Parameters

    SciTech Connect

    Seryi, Andrei; /SLAC

    2009-10-30

    Optimization of Interaction Region parameters of a TeV energy scale linear collider has to take into account constraints defined by phenomena such as beam-beam focusing forces, beamstrahlung radiation, and hour-glass effect. With those constraints, achieving a desired luminosity of about 2E34 would require use of e{sup +}e{sup -} beams with about 10 MW average power. Application of the 'travelling focus' regime may allow the required beam power to be reduced by at least a factor of two, helping reduce the cost of the collider, while keeping the beamstrahlung energy loss reasonably low. The technique is illustrated for the 500 GeV CM parameters of the International Linear Collider. This technique may also in principle allow recycling the e{sup +}e{sup -} beams and/or recuperation of their energy.

  6. Cubic derivative interactions and asymptotic dynamics of the galileon vacuum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Arcia, Roberto; Gonzalez, Tame; Leon, Genly; Nucamendi, Ulises; Quiros, Israel

    2016-06-01

    In this paper we apply the tools of the dynamical systems theory in order to uncover the whole asymptotic structure of the vacuum interactions of a galileon model with a cubic derivative interaction term. It is shown that, contrary to what occurs in the presence of background matter, the galileon interactions of vacuum appreciably modify the late-time cosmic dynamics. In particular, a local late-time attractor representing phantom behavior arises which is inevitably associated with a big rip singularity. It seems that the gravitational interactions of the background matter with the galileon screen the effects of the gravitational self-interactions of the galileon, thus erasing any potential modification of the late-time dynamics by the galileon vacuum processes. Unlike other galileon models inspired in the DGP scenario, self-accelerating solutions do not arise in this model.

  7. Technique for Calculating Solution Derivatives With Respect to Geometry Parameters in a CFD Code

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mathur, Sanjay

    2011-01-01

    A solution has been developed to the challenges of computation of derivatives with respect to geometry, which is not straightforward because these are not typically direct inputs to the computational fluid dynamics (CFD) solver. To overcome these issues, a procedure has been devised that can be used without having access to the mesh generator, while still being applicable to all types of meshes. The basic approach is inspired by the mesh motion algorithms used to deform the interior mesh nodes in a smooth manner when the surface nodes, for example, are in a fluid structure interaction problem. The general idea is to model the mesh edges and nodes as constituting a spring-mass system. Changes to boundary node locations are propagated to interior nodes by allowing them to assume their new equilibrium positions, for instance, one where the forces on each node are in balance. The main advantage of the technique is that it is independent of the volumetric mesh generator, and can be applied to structured, unstructured, single- and multi-block meshes. It essentially reduces the problem down to defining the surface mesh node derivatives with respect to the geometry parameters of interest. For analytical geometries, this is quite straightforward. In the more general case, one would need to be able to interrogate the underlying parametric CAD (computer aided design) model and to evaluate the derivatives either analytically, or by a finite difference technique. Because the technique is based on a partial differential equation (PDE), it is applicable not only to forward mode problems (where derivatives of all the output quantities are computed with respect to a single input), but it could also be extended to the adjoint problem, either by using an analytical adjoint of the PDE or a discrete analog.

  8. An interacting dark energy model with nonminimal derivative coupling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nozari, Kourosh; Behrouz, Noushin

    2016-09-01

    We study cosmological dynamics of an extended gravitational theory that gravity is coupled non-minimally with derivatives of a dark energy component and there is also a phenomenological interaction between the dark energy and dark matter. Depending on the direction of energy flow between the dark sectors, the phenomenological interaction gets two different signs. We show that this feature affects the existence of attractor solution, the rate of growth of perturbations and stability of the solutions. By considering an exponential potential as a self-interaction potential of the scalar field, we obtain accelerated scaling solutions that are attractors and have the potential to alleviate the coincidence problem. While in the absence of the nonminimal derivative coupling there is no attractor solution for phantom field when energy transfers from dark matter to dark energy, we show an attractor solution exists if one considers an explicit nonminimal derivative coupling for phantom field in this case of energy transfer. We treat the cosmological perturbations in this setup with details to show that with phenomenological interaction, perturbations can grow faster than the minimal case.

  9. Ultlra-intense laser-matter interactions at extreme parameters

    SciTech Connect

    Hegellich, Bjorn M

    2010-11-24

    The field of shortpulse lasers has seen rapid growth in the recent years with the three major boundaries of energy, pulse duration and repetition rate being pushed in ever extremer regions. At peak powers, already exceeding 10{sup 22} W/cm{sup 2}, in virtually every experiment in relativistic laser physics, the laser pulse interacts with a more or less extended and heated plasma, due to prepulses and ASE-like pedestals on ps - ns time scales. By developing a new technique for ultrahigh contrast, we were able to initiate the next paradigm shift in relativistic laser-matter interactions, allowing us to interact ultrarelativistic pulses volumetrically with overdense targets. This becomes possible by using target and laser parameters that will turn the target relativistically transparent during the few 10s-100s femtoseconds fo the interaction. Specifically, we interact an ultraintese, ultrahigh contrast pulse with solid density, free standing, nanometer diamond target. This paradigm change towards a volumetric overdense interaction in turn enables new particle acceleration mechanisms for both electrons and ions, as well as forward directed relativistic surface harmonics. We report here on first experiments done on those topics at the 200 TW Trident laser at Los Alamos as well as at the Ti:Sapphire system at MBI. We will compare the experimental data to massive large scale 3D simulations done on the prototype of LANL's new Petafiop supercomputer Roadrunner, which is leading the current top 500 list. Specifically, we developed a shortpulse OPA based pulse cleaning technique. Fielding it at the Trident 200 TW laser at Los Alamos, we were able to improve the pulse contrast by 6 orders of magnitude to better than 2 x 10{sup -12} at less than a ps. This enabled for the first time the interaction of a 100J, 200TW laser pulse with a truly solid target with virtually no expansion before the main pulse - target interaction, making possible the use of very thin targets, The

  10. Analytical first derivatives of the RE-squared interaction potential

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Babadi, M.; Ejtehadi, M. R.; Everaers, R.

    2006-12-01

    We derive exact expressions for the forces and torques between biaxial molecules interacting via the RE-squared potential, a recent variant of the Gay-Berne potential. Moreover, efficient routines have been provided for rigid body MD simulations, resulting in 1.6 times speedup compared to the two-point finite difference approach. It has also been shown that the time cost of a MD simulation will be almost equal to a similar MC simulation, making use of the provided routines.

  11. Derivation of Cinnamon Blocks Leukocyte Attachment by Interacting with Sialosides.

    PubMed

    Lin, Wei-Ling; Guu, Shih-Yun; Tsai, Chan-Chuan; Prakash, Ekambaranellore; Viswaraman, Mohan; Chen, Hsing-Bao; Chang, Chuan-Fa

    2015-01-01

    Molecules derived from cinnamon have demonstrated diverse pharmacological activities against infectious pathogens, diabetes and inflammatory diseases. This study aims to evaluate the effect of the cinnamon-derived molecule IND02 on the adhesion of leukocytes to host cells. The anti-inflammatory ability of IND02, a pentameric procyanidin type A polyphenol polymer isolated from cinnamon alcohol extract, was examined. Pretreatment with IND02 significantly reduced the attachment of THP-1 cells or neutrophils to TNF-α-activated HUVECs or E-selectin/ICAM-1, respectively. IND02 also reduced the binding of E-, L- and P-selectins with sialosides. Furthermore, IND02 could agglutinate human red blood cells (RBC), and the agglutination could be disrupted by sialylated glycoprotein. Our findings demonstrate that IND02, a cinnamon-derived compound, can interact with sialosides and block the binding of selectins and leukocytes with sialic acids. PMID:26076445

  12. Derivation of Cinnamon Blocks Leukocyte Attachment by Interacting with Sialosides

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Wei-Ling; Guu, Shih-Yun; Tsai, Chan-Chuan; Prakash, Ekambaranellore; Viswaraman, Mohan; Chen, Hsing-Bao; Chang, Chuan-Fa

    2015-01-01

    Molecules derived from cinnamon have demonstrated diverse pharmacological activities against infectious pathogens, diabetes and inflammatory diseases. This study aims to evaluate the effect of the cinnamon-derived molecule IND02 on the adhesion of leukocytes to host cells. The anti-inflammatory ability of IND02, a pentameric procyanidin type A polyphenol polymer isolated from cinnamon alcohol extract, was examined. Pretreatment with IND02 significantly reduced the attachment of THP-1 cells or neutrophils to TNF-α-activated HUVECs or E-selectin/ICAM-1, respectively. IND02 also reduced the binding of E-, L- and P-selectins with sialosides. Furthermore, IND02 could agglutinate human red blood cells (RBC), and the agglutination could be disrupted by sialylated glycoprotein. Our findings demonstrate that IND02, a cinnamon-derived compound, can interact with sialosides and block the binding of selectins and leukocytes with sialic acids. PMID:26076445

  13. Derivation of tree stem structural parameters from static terrestrial laser scanning data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, Wei; Lin, Yi; Liu, Yajing; Niu, Zheng

    2014-11-01

    Accurate tree-level characteristic information is increasingly demanded for forest management and environment protection. The cutting-edge remote sensing technique of terrestrial laser scanning (TLS) shows the potential of filling this gap. This study focuses on exploring the methods for deriving various tree stem structural parameters, such as stem position, diameter at breast height (DBH), the degree of stem shrinkage, and the elevation angle and azimuth angle of stem inclination. The data for test was collected with a Leica HDS6100 TLS system in Seurasaari, Southern Finland in September 2010. In the field, the reference positions and DBHs of 100 trees were measured manually. The isolation of individual trees is based on interactive segmentation of point clouds. The estimation of stem position and DBH is based on the schematic of layering and then least-square-based circle fitting in each layer. The slope of robust fit line between the height of each layer and DBH is used to characterize the stem shrinkage. The elevation angle of stem inclination is described by the angle between the ground plane and the fitted stem axis. The angle between the north direction and the fitted stem axis gives the azimuth angle of stem inclination. The estimation of the DBHs performed with R square (R2) of 0.93 and root mean square error (RMSE) of 0.038m.The average angle corresponding to stem shrinkage is -1.86°. The elevation angles of stem inclinations are ranged from 31° to 88.3°. The results have basically validated TLS for deriving multiple structural parameters of stem, which help better grasp tree specialties.

  14. Composition dependence of the interaction parameter in isotopic polymer blends

    SciTech Connect

    Londono, J.D.; Narten, A.H.; Wignall, G.D. ); Honnell, K.G.; Hsieh, E.T.; Johnson, T.W. . Research and Development); Bates, F.S. . Dept. of Chemical Engineering)

    1994-05-09

    Isotopic polymer mixtures lack the structural asymmetries and specific interactions encountered in blends of chemically distinct species. In this respect, they form ideal model systems for exploring the limitations of the widely-used Flory-Huggins (FH) lattice model and for testing and improving new theories of polymer thermodynamics. The FH interaction parameter between deuterium-labeled and unlabeled segments of the same species ([sub [chi]HD]) should in principle be independent of concentration ([phi]), through previous small-angle neutron scattering (SANS) experiments have shown that it exhibits a minimum at [phi] [approximately] 0.5 for poly(vinylethylene) (PVE) and poly(ethylethylene) (PEE). The authors report new data on polyethylene (PE) as a function of molecular weight, temperature (T), and [phi], which show qualitatively similar behavior. However, measurements on [sub [chi]HD]([phi]) for polystyrene (PS) show a maximum at [phi] [approximately]0.5, in contrast to PVE, PEE, and PE. Reproducing the concentration dependence of [phi] in different model isotopic systems should serve as a sensitive test of the way in which theories of polymer thermodynamics can account for the details of the local packing and also the effects of noncombinatorial entropy, which appear to be the main cause of the variation of [sub [chi]HD]([phi]) for PE. These data also serve to quantify the effects of isotopic substitution in SANS experiments on polyolefin blends and thus lay the ground work for definitive studies of the compatibility of branched and linear polyethylenes.

  15. Binding interactions of water-soluble camptothecin derivatives with bovine serum albumin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Qingyong; Zhu, Qiaochu; Deng, Xiaoqiu; He, Wuna; Zhao, Tengfei; Zhang, Baoyou

    2012-02-01

    In this study, the binding interactions of the water-soluble camptothecin derivatives hydroxycamptothecin (10-HCPT), topotecan (TPT), and camptothecin quaternary salt (CPT8), to bovine serum albumin (BSA) were determined using fluorescence spectra and UV-vis spectra. The results revealed that the fluorescence of BSA was strongly quenched by the binding of camptothecin derivatives to BSA. The quenching mechanism of the camptothecin derivatives was found to be static according to the Stern-Volmer equation. The binding constant and binding sites were confirmed by fluorescence quenching spectra. The thermodynamic parameters Gibbs free energy change (Δ G < 0), enthalpy change (Δ H > 0), and entropy change (Δ S > 0) implied that the interaction process was spontaneous and endothermic, and the interaction forces between camptothecin compounds and BSA were found to be hydrophobic. According to Föster non-radioactive energy transfer, the binding distances between 10-HCPT, TPT, and CPT8, and BSA were determined to be 1.73 nm, 1.63 nm, and 1.61 nm, respectively. The synchronous fluorescence spectra confirmed that the camptothecin compounds cannot cause conformational changes in BSA. A rapid and sensitive method for determining the binding interaction between water-soluble camptothecin derivatives and BSA was established based on these principles of fluorescence quenching.

  16. On consistent kinetic and derivative interactions for gravitons

    SciTech Connect

    Noller, Johannes

    2015-04-17

    The only known fully ghost-free and consistent Lorentz-invariant kinetic term for a graviton (or indeed for any spin-2 field) is the Einstein-Hilbert term. Here we propose and investigate a new candidate family of kinetic interactions and their extensions to derivative interactions involving several spin-2 fields. These new terms generically break diffeomorphism invariance(s) and as a result can lead to the propagation of 5 degrees of freedom for a single spin-2 field — analogous to ghost-free Massive Gravity. We discuss under what circumstances these new terms can be used to build healthy effective field theories and in the process establish the ‘Jordan’ and ‘Einstein’ frame pictures for Massive-, Bi- and Multi-Gravity.

  17. Mass-based hygroscopicity parameter interaction model and measurement of atmospheric aerosol water uptake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mikhailov, E.; Vlasenko, S.; Rose, D.; Pöschl, U.

    2013-01-01

    In this study we derive and apply a mass-based hygroscopicity parameter interaction model for efficient description of concentration-dependent water uptake by atmospheric aerosol particles with complex chemical composition. The model approach builds on the single hygroscopicity parameter model of Petters and Kreidenweis (2007). We introduce an observable mass-based hygroscopicity parameter κm which can be deconvoluted into a dilute hygroscopicity parameter (κm0) and additional self- and cross-interaction parameters describing non-ideal solution behavior and concentration dependencies of single- and multi-component systems. For reference aerosol samples of sodium chloride and ammonium sulfate, the κm-interaction model (KIM) captures the experimentally observed concentration and humidity dependence of the hygroscopicity parameter and is in good agreement with an accurate reference model based on the Pitzer ion-interaction approach (Aerosol Inorganic Model, AIM). Experimental results for pure organic particles (malonic acid, levoglucosan) and for mixed organic-inorganic particles (malonic acid - ammonium sulfate) are also well reproduced by KIM, taking into account apparent or equilibrium solubilities for stepwise or gradual deliquescence and efflorescence transitions. The mixed organic-inorganic particles as well as atmospheric aerosol samples exhibit three distinctly different regimes of hygroscopicity: (I) a quasi-eutonic deliquescence & efflorescence regime at low-humidity where substances are just partly dissolved and exist also in a non-dissolved phase, (II) a gradual deliquescence & efflorescence regime at intermediate humidity where different solutes undergo gradual dissolution or solidification in the aqueous phase; and (III) a dilute regime at high humidity where the solutes are fully dissolved approaching their dilute hygroscopicity. For atmospheric aerosol samples collected from boreal rural air and from pristine tropical rainforest air (secondary

  18. Derivatives of buckling loads and vibration frequencies with respect to stiffness and initial strain parameters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haftka, Raphael T.; Cohen, Gerald A.; Mroz, Zenon

    1990-01-01

    A uniform variational approach to sensitivity analysis of vibration frequencies and bifurcation loads of nonlinear structures is developed. Two methods of calculating the sensitivities of bifurcation buckling loads and vibration frequencies of nonlinear structures, with respect to stiffness and initial strain parameters, are presented. A direct method requires calculation of derivatives of the prebuckling state with respect to these parameters. An adjoint method bypasses the need for these derivatives by using instead the strain field associated with the second-order postbuckling state. An operator notation is used and the derivation is based on the principle of virtual work. The derivative computations are easily implemented in structural analysis programs. This is demonstrated by examples using a general purpose, finite element program and a shell-of-revolution program.

  19. Derivative-free optimization for parameter estimation in computational nuclear physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wild, Stefan M.; Sarich, Jason; Schunck, Nicolas

    2015-03-01

    We consider optimization problems that arise when estimating a set of unknown parameters from experimental data, particularly in the context of nuclear density functional theory. We examine the cost of not having derivatives of these functionals with respect to the parameters. We show that the POUNDERS code for local derivative-free optimization obtains consistent solutions on a variety of computationally expensive energy density functional calibration problems. We also provide a primer on the operation of the POUNDERS software in the Toolkit for advanced optimization.

  20. Interactions of salicylic acid derivatives with calcite crystals.

    PubMed

    Ukrainczyk, Marko; Gredičak, Matija; Jerić, Ivanka; Kralj, Damir

    2012-01-01

    Investigation of basic interactions between the active pharmaceutical compounds and calcium carbonates is of great importance because of the possibility to use the carbonates as a mineral carrier in drug delivery systems. In this study the mode and extent of interactions of salicylic acid and its amino acid derivates, chosen as pharmaceutically relevant model compounds, with calcite crystals are described. Therefore, the crystal growth kinetics of well defined rhombohedral calcite seed crystals in the systems containing salicylic acid (SA), 5-amino salicylic acid (5-ASA), N-salicyloil-l-aspartic acid (N-Sal-Asp) or N-salicyloil-l-glutamic acid (N-Sal-Glu), were investigated. The precipitation systems were of relatively low initial supersaturation and of apparently neutral pH. The data on the crystal growth rate reductions in the presence of the applied salicylate molecules were analyzed by means of Cabrera & Vermileya's, and Kubota & Mullin's models of interactions of the dissolved additives and crystal surfaces. The crystal growth kinetic experiments were additionally supported with the appropriate electrokinetic, spectroscopic and adsorption measurements. The Langmuir adsorption constants were determined and they were found to be in a good correlation with values obtained from crystal growth kinetic analyses. The results indicated that salicylate molecules preferentially adsorb along the steps on the growing calcite surfaces. The values of average spacing between the adjacent salicylate adsorption active sites and the average distance between the neighboring adsorbed salicylate molecules were also estimated. PMID:21963207

  1. Comprehensive derivation of bond-valence parameters for ion pairs involving oxygen

    PubMed Central

    Gagné, Olivier Charles; Hawthorne, Frank Christopher

    2015-01-01

    Published two-body bond-valence parameters for cation–oxygen bonds have been evaluated via the root mean-square deviation (RMSD) from the valence-sum rule for 128 cations, using 180 194 filtered bond lengths from 31 489 coordination polyhedra. Values of the RMSD range from 0.033–2.451 v.u. (1.1–40.9% per unit of charge) with a weighted mean of 0.174 v.u. (7.34% per unit of charge). The set of best published parameters has been determined for 128 ions and used as a benchmark for the determination of new bond-valence parameters in this paper. Two common methods for the derivation of bond-valence parameters have been evaluated: (1) fixing B and solving for R o; (2) the graphical method. On a subset of 90 ions observed in more than one coordination, fixing B at 0.37 Å leads to a mean weighted-RMSD of 0.139 v.u. (6.7% per unit of charge), while graphical derivation gives 0.161 v.u. (8.0% per unit of charge). The advantages and disadvantages of these (and other) methods of derivation have been considered, leading to the conclusion that current methods of derivation of bond-valence parameters are not satisfactory. A new method of derivation is introduced, the GRG (generalized reduced gradient) method, which leads to a mean weighted-RMSD of 0.128 v.u. (6.1% per unit of charge) over the same sample of 90 multiple-coordination ions. The evaluation of 19 two-parameter equations and 7 three-parameter equations to model the bond-valence–bond-length relation indicates that: (1) many equations can adequately describe the relation; (2) a plateau has been reached in the fit for two-parameter equations; (3) the equation of Brown & Altermatt (1985 ▸) is sufficiently good that use of any of the other equations tested is not warranted. Improved bond-valence parameters have been derived for 135 ions for the equation of Brown & Altermatt (1985 ▸) in terms of both the cation and anion bond-valence sums using the GRG method and our complete data set. PMID

  2. Parameter derivation for an acoustic cloak based on scattering theory and realization with tunable metamaterials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Huijie; Wen, Jihong; Païdoussis, Michael P.; Yu, Dianlong; Cai, Li; Wen, Xisen

    2013-09-01

    This work derives the set of acoustic parameters of a metamaterial for an ideal cylindrical cloak through scattering theory. A multilayered cloak with homogeneous isotropic materials is introduced to approximate the ideal cloak. An active metamaterial, consisting of active arrays of acoustic cavities separated by piezo-diaphragms, is addressed to achieve the required parameters for each layer of the multilayered cloak. In particular, with the aid of a multi-control strategy that takes into account the coupling between adjacent cells, the effective parameters for the cloak can be accurately realized.

  3. The evolution of MICOS: Ancestral and derived functions and interactions

    PubMed Central

    Muñoz-Gómez, Sergio A; Slamovits, Claudio H; Dacks, Joel B; Wideman, Jeremy G

    2015-01-01

    The MItochondrial Contact Site and Cristae Organizing System (MICOS) is required for the biogenesis and maintenance of mitochondrial cristae as well as the proper tethering of the mitochondrial inner and outer membranes. We recently demonstrated that the core components of MICOS, Mic10 and Mic60, are near-ubiquitous eukaryotic features inferred to have been present in the last eukaryote common ancestor. We also showed that Mic60 could be traced to α-proteobacteria, which suggests that mitochondrial cristae evolved from α-proteobacterial intracytoplasmic membranes. Here, we extend our evolutionary analysis to MICOS-interacting proteins (e.g., Sam50, Mia40, DNAJC11, DISC-1, QIL1, Aim24, and Cox17) and discuss the implications for both derived and ancestral functions of MICOS. PMID:27065250

  4. First-principles derivation of reactive transport modeling parameters for particle tracking and PDE approaches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hansen, Scott K.; Scher, Harvey; Berkowitz, Brian

    2014-07-01

    Both Eulerian and Lagrangian reactive transport simulations in natural media require selection of a parameter that controls the “promiscuity” of the reacting particles. In Eulerian models, measurement of this parameter may be difficult because its value will generally differ between natural (diffusion-limited) systems and batch experiments, even though both are modeled by reaction terms of the same form. And in Lagrangian models, there previously has been no a priori way to compute this parameter. In both cases, then, selection is typically done by calibration, or ad hoc. This paper addresses the parameter selection problem for Fickian transport by deriving, from first principles and D (the diffusion constant) the reaction-rate-controlling parameters for particle tracking (PT) codes and for the diffusion-reaction equation (DRE). Using continuous time random walk analysis, exact reaction probabilities are derived for pairs of potentially reactive particles based on D and their probability of reaction provided that they collocate. Simultaneously, a second PT scheme directly employing collocation probabilities is derived. One-to-one correspondence between each of D, the reaction radius specified for a PT scheme, and the DRE decay constant are then developed. These results serve to ground reactive transport simulations in their underlying thermodynamics, and are confirmed by simulations.

  5. Derivation of the Direct-Interaction Approximation Using Novikov's Theorem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krommes, J. A.

    2015-11-01

    The direct-interaction approximation (DIA) is a crucially important statistical closure for both neutral fluids and plasmas. Kraichnan's original derivation proceeded in k space and assumed a large number N of interacting Fourier modes. That is problematic; the DIA can be formulated even for N = 3 . In the present work an alternate x-space procedure based on Novikov's theorem is described. That theorem is a statement about the correlations of certain Gaussian functionals. Turbulence cannot be Gaussian due to nonlinearity, but Novikov's theorem can be used to formulate self-consistent equations for a Gaussian component of the turbulence. The DIA emerges under the assumption that certain higher-order correlations are small. In essence, this procedure is merely a restatement of Kraichnan's arguments, but it adds additional perspective because the assumption of large N is not required. Details can be found in a lengthy set of tutorial Lecture Notes. Work supported by U.S.D.o.E. Contract DE-AC02-09CH11466.

  6. Nonperturbative overproduction of axionlike particles via derivative interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mazumdar, Anupam; Qutub, Saleh

    2016-02-01

    Axionlike particles (ALPs) are quite generic in many scenarios for physics beyond the Standard Model. They are pseudoscalar Nambu-Goldstone bosons that appear once any global U (1 ) symmetry is broken spontaneously. The ALPs can gain mass from various nonperturbative quantum effects, such as anomalies or instantons. ALPs can couple to the matter sector including a scalar condensate such as inflaton or moduli field via derivative interactions, which are suppressed by the axion decay constant, fχ . Although weakly interacting, the ALPs can be produced abundantly from the coherent oscillations of a homogeneous condensate. In this paper we will study such a scenario where the ALPs can be produced abundantly, and in some cases can even overclose the Universe via odd- and even-dimensional operators, as long as fχ/ΦI≪1 , where ΦI denotes the initial amplitude of the coherent oscillations of the scalar condensate, ϕ . We will briefly mention how such dangerous overproduction would affect dark matter and dark radiation abundances in the Universe.

  7. Structural consequences of weak interactions in dispirooxindole derivatives.

    PubMed

    Ravikumar, Krishnan; Sridhar, Balasubramanian; Nanubolu, Jagadeesh Babu; Karthik, Govindaraju; Reddy, Basi Venkata Subba

    2015-11-01

    Spiro scaffolds are being increasingly utilized in drug discovery due to their inherent three-dimensionality and structural variations, resulting in new synthetic routes to introduce spiro building blocks into more pharmaceutically active molecules. Multicomponent cascade reactions, involving the in situ generation of carbonyl ylides from α-diazocarbonyl compounds and aldehydes, and 1,3-dipolar cycloadditon with 3-arylideneoxindoles gave a novel class of dispirooxindole derivatives, namely 1,1''-dibenzyl-5'-(4-chlorophenyl)-4'-phenyl-4',5'-dihydrodispiro[indoline-3,2'-furan-3',3''-indoline]-2,2''-dione, C44H33ClN2O3, (I), 1''-acetyl-1-benzyl-5'-(4-chlorophenyl)-4'-phenyl-4',5'-dihydrodispiro[indoline-3,2'-furan-3',3''-indoline]-2,2''-dione, C39H29ClN2O4, (II), 1''-acetyl-1-benzyl-4',5'-diphenyl-4',5'-dihydrodispiro[indoline-3,2'-furan-3',3''-indoline]-2,2''-dione, C39H30N2O4, (III), and 1''-acetyl-1-benzyl-4',5'-diphenyl-4',5'-dihydrodispiro[indoline-3,2'-furan-3',3''-indoline]-2,2''-dione acetonitrile hemisolvate, C39H30N2O4·0.5C2H3N, (IV). All four compounds exist as racemic mixtures of the SSSR and RRRS stereoisomers. In these structures, the two H atoms of the dihydrofuran ring and the two substituted oxindole rings are in a trans orientation, facilitating intramolecular C-H···O and π-π interactions. These weak interactions play a prominent role in the structural stability and aid the highly regio- and diastereoselective synthesis. In each of the four structures, the molecular assembly in the crystal is also governed by weak noncovalent interactions. Compound (IV) is the solvated analogue of (III) and the two compounds show similar structural features. PMID:26524175

  8. Interactions of Some Divalent Metal Ions with Thymine and Uracil Thiosemicarbazide Derivatives.

    PubMed

    Hammud, Hassan H; El-Dakdouki, Mohammad H; Sonji, Nada; Sonji, Ghassan; Bouhadir, Kamal H

    2016-05-01

    The study of interactions between metal ions and nucleobases, nucleosides, nucleotides, or nucleic acids has become an active research area in chemical, biological, and therapeutic fields. In this respect, the coordination behavior of nucleobase derivatives to transition metals was studied in order to get a better understanding about DNA-metal interactions in in vitro and in vivo systems. Two nucleobase derivatives, 3-benzoyl-1-[3-(thymine-1-yl)propamido]thiourea and 3-benzoyl-1-[3-(uracil-1-yl)propamido]thiourea, were synthesized and their dissociation constants were determined at different temperatures and 0.3 ionic strength. Potentiometric studies were carried out on the interaction of the derivatives towards some divalent metals in 50% v/v ethanol-water containing 0.3 mol.dm(-3) KCl, at five different temperatures. The formation constants of the metal complexes for both ligands follow the order: Cu(2+) > Ni(2+) > Co(2+) > Zn(2+) > Pb(2+) > Cd(2+) > Mn(2+). The thermodynamic parameters were estimated; the complexation process has been found to be spontaneous, exothermic, and entropically favorable. PMID:27049340

  9. Auroral energy deposition rate, characteristic electron energy, and ionospheric parameters derived from Dynamics Explorer 1 images

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rees, M. H.; Lummerzheim, D.; Roble, R. G.; Winningham, J. D.; Craven, J. D.

    1988-01-01

    Auroral images obtained by the Spin Scan Auroral Imager (SAI) aboard the DE-1 satellite were used to derive auroral energy deposition rate, characteristic electron energy, and ionospheric parameters. The principles involved in the imaging technique and the physical mechanisms that underlie the relationship between the spectral images and the geophysical parameters are discussed together with the methodology for implementing such analyses. It is shown that images obtained with the SAI provide global parameters at 12-min temporal resolution; the spatial resolution is limited by the field of view of a pixel. The analysis of the 12-min images presented yielded a representation of ionospheric parameters that was better than can be obtained using empirical models based on local measurements averaged over long periods of time.

  10. An empirically-derived taxonomy of interaction primitives for interactive cartography and geovisualization.

    PubMed

    Roth, Robert E

    2013-12-01

    Proposals to establish a 'science of interaction' have been forwarded from Information Visualization and Visual Analytics, as well as Cartography, Geovisualization, and GIScience. This paper reports on two studies to contribute to this call for an interaction science, with the goal of developing a functional taxonomy of interaction primitives for map-based visualization. A semi-structured interview study first was conducted with 21 expert interactive map users to understand the way in which map-based visualizations currently are employed. The interviews were transcribed and coded to identify statements representative of either the task the user wished to accomplish (i.e., objective primitives) or the interactive functionality included in the visualization to achieve this task (i.e., operator primitives). A card sorting study then was conducted with 15 expert interactive map designers to organize these example statements into logical structures based on their experience translating client requests into interaction designs. Example statements were supplemented with primitive definitions in the literature and were separated into two sorting exercises: objectives and operators. The objective sort suggested five objectives that increase in cognitive sophistication (identify, compare, rank, associate, & delineate), but exhibited a large amount of variation across participants due to consideration of broader user goals (procure, predict, & prescribe) and interaction operands (space-alone, attributes-in-space, & space-in-time; elementary & general). The operator sort suggested five enabling operators (import, export, save, edit, & annotate) and twelve work operators (reexpress, arrange, sequence, resymbolize, overlay, pan, zoom, reproject, search, filter, retrieve, & calculate). This taxonomy offers an empirically-derived and ecologically-valid structure to inform future research and design on interaction. PMID:24051802

  11. Identification of fractional-derivative-model parameters of viscoelastic materials from measured FRFs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Sun-Yong; Lee, Doo-Ho

    2009-07-01

    The dynamic properties of viscoelastic damping materials are highly frequency- and temperature-dependent. Numerical methods of structural and acoustic systems require the mathematical model for these dependencies. The fractional-derivative model on damping material has become a powerful solution that describes the frequency-dependent dynamic characteristics of damping materials. The model parameters on a damping material are very important information both for describing the responses of damped structures and in the design of damped structures. The authors proposed an efficient identification method of the material parameters using an optimization technique, showing its applicability through numerical studies in a previous work. In this study, the proposed procedure is applied to a damping material to identify the fractional-derivative-model parameters of viscoelastic materials. In the proposed method, frequency response functions (FRFs) are measured via a cantilever beam impact test. The FRFs on the points identical to those measured are calculated using an FE model with the equivalent stiffness approach. The differences between the measured and the calculated FRFs are minimized using a gradient-based optimization algorithm in order to estimate the true values of the parameters. The FRFs of a damped beam structure are measured in an environmental chamber at different temperatures and used as reference responses. A light impact hammer and a laser vibrometer are used to measure the reference responses. Both linear and nonlinear relationships between the logarithmically scaled shift factors and temperatures are examined during the identification of the material parameters. The applied results show that the proposed method accurately identifies the fractional-derivative-model parameters of a viscoelastic material.

  12. On the coverage dependence of Arrhenius parameters in thermal desorption of interacting adsorbates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zuniga-Hansen, Nayeli; Silbert, Leonardo E.; Calbi, M. Mercedes

    2014-03-01

    In temperature programmed desorption (TPD) the ``compensation effect'' is a linear relationship between the activation energy, Ea, and the preexponential factor, νn, of the Arrhenius equation. From the Arrhenius plot ln -θ/˙ θ vs. 1/T, we can extract the activation energy and the preexponential factor to test the validity of linearity. A linear relationship has been demonstrated to be valid when the kinetic parameters are independent of the surface coverage. In the presence of adsorbate-adsorbate interactions this analysis fails because the second order effects come into play. The compensation effect arises from the assumption that the second order terms in the derivative of the plot sum to zero. Some authors refer to this as a ``forced'' compensation effect and show that it can yield misleading results. Therefore this effect has not been completely understood. We use kinetic Monte Carlo simulations on ordered and disordered surface configurations to investigate the coverage dependence of the kinetic parameters to verify whether the compensation effect provides reliable information for our system, we do this over a range of binding and interaction energies.

  13. On the design derivatives of eigenvalues and eigenvectors for distributed parameter systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reiss, R.

    1985-01-01

    In this paper, analytic expressions are obtained for the design derivatives of eigenvalues and eigenfunctions of self-adjoint linear distributed parameter systems. Explicit treatment of boundary conditions is avoided by casting the eigenvalue equation into integral form. Results are expressed in terms of the linear operators defining the eigenvalue problem, and are therefore quite general. Sufficiency conditions appropriate to structural optimization of eigenvalues are obtained.

  14. Drug-DNA Interaction Studies of Acridone-Based Derivatives.

    PubMed

    Thimmaiah, Kuntebomanahalli; Ugarkar, Apoorva G; Martis, Elvis F; Shaikh, Mushtaque S; Coutinho, Evans C; Yergeri, Mayur C

    2015-01-01

    N10-alkylated 2-bromoacridones are a novel series of potent antitumor compounds. DNA binding studies of these compounds were carried out using spectrophotometric titrations, Circular dichroism (CD) measurements using Calf Thymus DNA (CT DNA). The binding constants were identified at a range of K=0.3 to 3.9×10(5) M(-1) and the percentage of hypochromism from the spectral titrations at 28-54%. This study has identified a compound 9 with the good binding affinity of K=0.39768×10(5) M(-1) with CT DNA. Molecular dynamics (MD) simulations have investigated the changes in structural and dynamic features of native DNA on binding to the active compound 9. All the synthesized compounds have increased the uptake of Vinblastine in MDR KBChR-8-5 cells to an extent of 1.25- to1.9-fold than standard modulator Verapamil of similar concentration. These findings allowed us to draw preliminary conclusions about the structural features of 2-bromoacridones and further chemical enhancement will improve the binding affinity of the acridone derivatives to CT-DNA for better drug-DNA interaction. The molecular modeling studies have shown mechanism of action and the binding modes of the acridones to DNA. PMID:25874941

  15. Interaction of aldehydes derived from lipid peroxidation and membrane proteins

    PubMed Central

    Pizzimenti, Stefania; Ciamporcero, Eric; Daga, Martina; Pettazzoni, Piergiorgio; Arcaro, Alessia; Cetrangolo, Gianpaolo; Minelli, Rosalba; Dianzani, Chiara; Lepore, Alessio; Gentile, Fabrizio; Barrera, Giuseppina

    2013-01-01

    A great variety of compounds are formed during lipid peroxidation of polyunsaturated fatty acids of membrane phospholipids. Among them, bioactive aldehydes, such as 4-hydroxyalkenals, malondialdehyde (MDA) and acrolein, have received particular attention since they have been considered as toxic messengers that can propagate and amplify oxidative injury. In the 4-hydroxyalkenal class, 4-hydroxy-2-nonenal (HNE) is the most intensively studied aldehyde, in relation not only to its toxic function, but also to its physiological role. Indeed, HNE can be found at low concentrations in human tissues and plasma and participates in the control of biological processes, such as signal transduction, cell proliferation, and differentiation. Moreover, at low doses, HNE exerts an anti-cancer effect, by inhibiting cell proliferation, angiogenesis, cell adhesion and by inducing differentiation and/or apoptosis in various tumor cell lines. It is very likely that a substantial fraction of the effects observed in cellular responses, induced by HNE and related aldehydes, be mediated by their interaction with proteins, resulting in the formation of covalent adducts or in the modulation of their expression and/or activity. In this review we focus on membrane proteins affected by lipid peroxidation-derived aldehydes, under physiological and pathological conditions. PMID:24027536

  16. Site-Specific Reference Person Parameters and Derived Concentration Standards for the Savannah River Site

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Stone, Daniel K.; Higley, Kathryn A.; Jannik, G. Timothy

    2014-05-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy Order 458.1 states that the compliance with the 1 mSv annual dose constraint to a member of the public may be demonstrated by calculating dose to the maximally exposed individual (MEI) or to a representative person. Historically, the MEI concept was used for dose compliance at the Savannah River Site (SRS) using adult dose coefficients and adult male usage parameters. For future compliance, SRS plans to use the representative person concept for dose estimates to members of the public. The representative person dose will be based on the reference person dose coefficients from the U.S.more » DOE Derived Concentration Technical Standard and on usage parameters specific to SRS for the reference and typical person. Usage parameters and dose coefficients were determined for inhalation, ingestion and external exposure pathways. The parameters for the representative person were used to calculate and tabulate SRS-specific derived concentration standards (DCSs) for the pathways not included in DOE-STD-1196-2011.« less

  17. Site-Specific Reference Person Parameters and Derived Concentration Standards for the Savannah River Site

    SciTech Connect

    Stone, Daniel K.; Higley, Kathryn A.; Jannik, G. Timothy

    2014-05-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy Order 458.1 states that the compliance with the 1 mSv annual dose constraint to a member of the public may be demonstrated by calculating dose to the maximally exposed individual (MEI) or to a representative person. Historically, the MEI concept was used for dose compliance at the Savannah River Site (SRS) using adult dose coefficients and adult male usage parameters. For future compliance, SRS plans to use the representative person concept for dose estimates to members of the public. The representative person dose will be based on the reference person dose coefficients from the U.S. DOE Derived Concentration Technical Standard and on usage parameters specific to SRS for the reference and typical person. Usage parameters and dose coefficients were determined for inhalation, ingestion and external exposure pathways. The parameters for the representative person were used to calculate and tabulate SRS-specific derived concentration standards (DCSs) for the pathways not included in DOE-STD-1196-2011.

  18. Superconducting order parameter in NbSe2 derived from the specific heat

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Jiunn-Yuan; Shen, H. Y.; Yang, H. D.; Huang, C. L.; Sun, C. P.; Lee, T. K.; Berger, H.

    2007-03-01

    To resolve the discrepancies on the superconducting order parameter of quasi-2D NbSe2, the comprehensive specific heat measurements have been carried out.The thermodynamic consistence requires more than one energy scale of the order parameters The zero field data and the results of the mixed states respectively with H//c and Hc conclude: (1) δL=1.26 meV and δS=0.73 meV; (2) NSe(0)/ N(0)=11%˜20%; (3) δS is 3-D and like on the Se derived Fermi surface. This present scenario largely removes the dispute over the order parameter existing in the previous literature. The alternative anisotropic s-wave model is also discussed.

  19. Studies on interaction between an imidazole derivative and bovine serum by spectral methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jayabharathi, Jayaraman; Thanikachalam, Venugopal; Venkatesh Perumal, Marimuthu

    The interaction between a trifluoromethyl substituted imidazole derivative 2-(4-(trifluoromethyl)phenyl)-1-phenyl-1H-imidazo[4,5-f] [1,10] phenanthroline (tfmppip) and bovine serum albumin (BSA) was investigated by solution spectral studies. The observed experimental result shows that the imidazole derivative has strong ability to quench the fluorescence of BSA by forming complex which is stabilized by electrostatic interactions. The effective quenching constants (ksv) were 2.79 × 104, 2.51 × 104, and 2.32 × 104 at 301, 310 and 318 K respectively. The Stern-Volmer quenching constant (Ksv), binding site number (n), apparent binding constant (KA) and corresponding thermodynamic parameters (ΔG, ΔH and ΔS) were calculated. The distance between the donor (BSA) and acceptor (tfmppip) was obtained according to fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET). Conformational changes of BSA were observed from synchronous fluorescence technique. The effect of metal ions such as Cu2+, Zn2+, Ca2+, Mg2+, Ni2+, Co2+ and Fe2+ on the binding constants between the imidazole derivative and BSA were also studied.

  20. SP_Ace: a new code to derive stellar parameters and elemental abundances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boeche, C.; Grebel, E. K.

    2016-03-01

    Context. Ongoing and future massive spectroscopic surveys will collect large numbers (106-107) of stellar spectra that need to be analyzed. Highly automated software is needed to derive stellar parameters and chemical abundances from these spectra. Aims: We developed a new method of estimating the stellar parameters Teff, log g, [M/H], and elemental abundances. This method was implemented in a new code, SP_Ace (Stellar Parameters And Chemical abundances Estimator). This is a highly automated code suitable for analyzing the spectra of large spectroscopic surveys with low or medium spectral resolution (R = 2000-20 000). Methods: After the astrophysical calibration of the oscillator strengths of 4643 absorption lines covering the wavelength ranges 5212-6860 Å and 8400-8924 Å, we constructed a library that contains the equivalent widths (EW) of these lines for a grid of stellar parameters. The EWs of each line are fit by a polynomial function that describes the EW of the line as a function of the stellar parameters. The coefficients of these polynomial functions are stored in a library called the "GCOG library". SP_Ace, a code written in FORTRAN95, uses the GCOG library to compute the EWs of the lines, constructs models of spectra as a function of the stellar parameters and abundances, and searches for the model that minimizes the χ2 deviation when compared to the observed spectrum. The code has been tested on synthetic and real spectra for a wide range of signal-to-noise and spectral resolutions. Results: SP_Ace derives stellar parameters such as Teff, log g, [M/H], and chemical abundances of up to ten elements for low to medium resolution spectra of FGK-type stars with precision comparable to the one usually obtained with spectra of higher resolution. Systematic errors in stellar parameters and chemical abundances are presented and identified with tests on synthetic and real spectra. Stochastic errors are automatically estimated by the code for all the parameters

  1. Alkylating derivative of oxotremorine interacts irreversibly with the muscarinic receptor

    SciTech Connect

    Ehlert, F.J.; Jenden, D.J.; Ringdahl, B.

    1984-03-05

    A 2-chloroethylamine derivative of oxotremorine was studied in pharmacological experiments and muscarinic receptor binding assays. The compound, N-(4-(2-chloroethylmethylamino)-2-butynyl)-2-pyrrolidone (BM 123), forms an aziridinium ion in aqueous solution at neutral pH that stimulates contractions of guinea pig ileum with a potency similar to that of oxotremorine. Following the initial stimulation, there is a long lasting period of lack of sensitivity of the guinea pig ileum to muscarinic agonists. BM 123 also produces muscarinic effects in vivo. When homogenates of the rat cerebral cortex were incubated with BM 123 and assayed subsequently in muscarinic receptor binding assays, a loss of binding capacity for the muscarinic antagonist, (/sup 3/H)N-methylscopolamine ((/sup 3/H)NMS), was noted without a change in affinity. Similar observations were made in (/sup 3/H)1-3-quinuclidinyl benzilate ((/sup 3/H)-QNB) binding assays on the forebrains of mice that had been injected with BM 123 24 hr earlier. The loss in receptor capacity for both (/sup 3/H)NMS and (/sup 3/H)-QNB was prevented by atropine treatment. Kinetic studies of the interaction of BM 123 with homogenates of the rat cerebral cortex in vitro showed that the half-time for the loss of (/sup 3/H)-QNB binding sites increased from 10 to 45 min as the concentration of BM 123 decreased from 10 to 1 ..mu..M. In contrast to the aziridinium ion, the parent 2-chloroethylamine compound and the alcoholic hydrolysis product were largely devoid of pharmacological and binding activity.

  2. CONSTRAINING THE SYMMETRY PARAMETERS OF THE NUCLEAR INTERACTION

    SciTech Connect

    Lattimer, James M.; Lim, Yeunhwan E-mail: yeunhwan.lim@gmail.com

    2013-07-01

    One of the major uncertainties in the dense matter equation of state has been the nuclear symmetry energy. The density dependence of the symmetry energy is important in nuclear astrophysics, as it controls the neutronization of matter in core-collapse supernovae, the radii of neutron stars and the thicknesses of their crusts, the rate of cooling of neutron stars, and the properties of nuclei involved in r-process nucleosynthesis. We show that fits of nuclear masses to experimental masses, combined with other experimental information from neutron skins, heavy ion collisions, giant dipole resonances, and dipole polarizabilities, lead to stringent constraints on parameters that describe the symmetry energy near the nuclear saturation density. These constraints are remarkably consistent with inferences from theoretical calculations of pure neutron matter, and, furthermore, with astrophysical observations of neutron stars. The concordance of experimental, theoretical, and observational analyses suggests that the symmetry parameters S{sub v} and L are in the range 29.0-32.7 MeV and 40.5-61.9 MeV, respectively, and that the neutron star radius, for a 1.4 M{sub Sun} star, is in the narrow window 10.7 km

  3. Constraining the nonstandard interaction parameters in long baseline neutrino experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huitu, Katri; Kärkkäinen, Timo J.; Maalampi, Jukka; Vihonen, Sampsa

    2016-03-01

    In this article we investigate the prospects for probing the strength of the possible nonstandard neutrino interactions (NSI) in long baseline neutrino oscillation experiments. We find that these experiments are sensitive to NSI couplings down to the level of 0.01-0.1 depending on the oscillation channel and the baseline length, as well as on the detector's fiducial mass. We also investigate the interference of the leptonic C P angle δC P with the constraining of the NSI couplings. It is found that the interference is strong in the case of the νe↔νμ and νe↔ντ transitions but not significant in other transitions. In our numerical analysis we apply the GLoBES software and use the LBNO setup as our benchmark.

  4. Solar wind and its interaction with the magnetosphere - Measured parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwenn, R.

    The sun and the solar wind are considered in terms of the 'ballerina' model first proposed by Alfven (1977), taking into account high speed streams, the slow solar wind, stream-stream interactions, the relation of streams and magnetic structure, and transients caused by solar activity. The main features of the solar wind behavior are illustrated with the aid of data, covering one complete solar rotation in 1974/1975, which were obtained with instruments aboard the Helios-1 solar probe. It is pointed out that the solar wind acts like a huge buffer pushing onto the earth's magnetosphere with a highly variable pressure. Of the energy in the highly variable solar wind reservoir only a tiny fraction is absorbed by the magnetosphere in an obviously very nonstationary way.

  5. Ground Motion Simulations for Bursa Region (Turkey) Using Input Parameters derived from the Regional Seismic Network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Unal, B.; Askan, A.

    2014-12-01

    Earthquakes are among the most destructive natural disasters in Turkey and it is important to assess seismicity in different regions with the use of seismic networks. Bursa is located in Marmara Region, Northwestern Turkey and to the south of the very active North Anatolian Fault Zone. With around three million inhabitants and key industrial facilities of the country, Bursa is the fourth largest city in Turkey. Since most of the focus is on North Anatolian Fault zone, despite its significant seismicity, Bursa area has not been investigated extensively until recently. For reliable seismic hazard estimations and seismic design of structures, assessment of potential ground motions in this region is essential using both recorded and simulated data. In this study, we employ stochastic finite-fault simulation with dynamic corner frequency approach to model previous events as well to assess potential earthquakes in Bursa. To ensure simulations with reliable synthetic ground motion outputs, the input parameters must be carefully derived from regional data. In this study, using strong motion data collected at 33 stations in the region, site-specific parameters such as near-surface high frequency attenuation parameter and amplifications are obtained. Similarly, source and path parameters are adopted from previous studies that as well employ regional data. Initially, major previous events in the region are verified by comparing the records with the corresponding synthetics. Then simulations of scenario events in the region are performed. We present the results in terms of spatial distribution of peak ground motion parameters and time histories at selected locations.

  6. Analysis of shallow landslides by morphometry parameters derived from terrestrial laser scanning point clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mayr, A.; Rutzinger, M.; Bremer, M.; Wiegand, C.; Kringer, K.; Geitner, C.

    2012-04-01

    Erosion by shallow landslides is a widespread and growing phenomenon in mountainous areas. The major consequences are loss of soil and regolith as well as damages on infrastructure and provision of unconsolidated material for secondary processes such as mudflows. In this study we present a concept for extracting morphometry parameters from terrestrial laser scanning (TLS) point clouds in order to investigate the relation between slope surface structure and regolith depth. TLS is used to collect high-resolution point cloud data of an affected slope in the Schmirn Valley (Tyrol, Austria). Regolith depth is considered to be one of the important factors for the development of shallow landslides. However, direct field measurements are labour- and time-consuming. In this study we developed an approach, to investigate the relation between regolith depth and surface morphometry parameters. The reference regolith depth information is derived from lightweight dynamic cone penetrometer tests (DCPT) within the test site. The suggested approach integrates spatial analysis of Geographic Information Systems and point cloud processing algorithms. It will help to enhance the prediction of shallow landslide occurrence by (i) deriving high resolution 3D morphometric parameters and (ii) determining regolith depth with a reasonable effort due to automation. In future we want to be able to contribute with this concept to the detailed modelling of shallow landslide susceptibility on alpine slopes.

  7. On the relationship between NMR-derived amide order parameters and protein backbone entropy changes

    PubMed Central

    Sharp, Kim A.; O’Brien, Evan; Kasinath, Vignesh; Wand, A. Joshua

    2015-01-01

    Molecular dynamics simulations are used to analyze the relationship between NMR-derived squared generalized order parameters of amide NH groups and backbone entropy. Amide order parameters (O2NH) are largely determined by the secondary structure and average values appear unrelated to the overall flexibility of the protein. However, analysis of the more flexible subset (O2NH < 0.8) shows that these report both on the local flexibility of the protein and on a different component of the conformational entropy than that reported by the side chain methyl axis order parameters, O2axis. A calibration curve for backbone entropy vs. O2NH is developed which accounts for both correlations between amide group motions of different residues, and correlations between backbone and side chain motions. This calibration curve can be used with experimental values of O2NH changes obtained by NMR relaxation measurements to extract backbone entropy changes, e.g. upon ligand binding. In conjunction with our previous calibration for side chain entropy derived from measured O2axis values this provides a prescription for determination of the total protein conformational entropy changes from NMR relaxation measurements. PMID:25739366

  8. Usefulness of Derived Frank Lead Parameters in Screening for Coronary Artery Disease and Cardiomyopathy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    DePalma, J. L.; Schlegel, T. T.; Arenare, B.; Greco, E. C.; Starc, V.; Rahman, M. A.; Delgado, R.

    2007-01-01

    We investigated the accuracy of several known as well as newly-introduced derived Frank-lead ECG parameters in differentiating healthy individuals from patients with obstructive coronary artery disease (CAD) and cardiomyopathy (CM). Advanced high-fidelity 12-lead ECG tests (approx. 5-min supine) were first performed on a "training set" of 99 individuals: 33 with ischemic or dilated CM and low ejection fraction (EF less than 40%); 33 with catheterization-proven obstructive CAD but normal EF; and 33 age-/gender-matched healthy controls. The following derived Frank lead parameters were studied for their accuracy in detecting CAD and CM: the spatial ventricular gradient (VG), including its beat-to-beat coefficient of variability (VG CV); the spatial mean QRS (SM-QRS) and T-waves (SM-T) and their beat-to-beat coefficients of variability; the spatial ventricular activation time (VAT); the mean and maximum spatial QRS-T angles; and standard late potentials parameters (RMS40, fQRSD and LAS). Several of these parameters were accurate in discriminating between the control group and both diseased groups at p less than 0.0001. For example the fQRSD, VG CV, mean spatial QRS-T angle and VG minus SM-QRS (which is similar to the SM-T) had retrospective areas under the ROC curve of 0.78, 0.78, 0.80, and 0.84 (CAD vs. controls) and 0.93, 0.88, 0.98 and 0.99 (CM vs. controls), respectively. The single most effective parameter in discriminating between the CAD and CM groups was the spatial VAT (44 plus or minus 5.8 vs. 53 plus or minus 9.9 ms, p less than 0.0001), with an area under the ROC curve of 0.80. Since subsequent prospective analyses using new groups of patients and healthy subjects have yielded only slightly less accurate results, we conclude that derived Frank-lead parameters show great promise for potentially contributing to the development of a rapid and inexpensive resting ECG-based screening test for heart disease.

  9. Geometric order parameters derived from the Voronoi tessellation show signatures of the jamming transition.

    PubMed

    Morse, Peter K; Corwin, Eric I

    2016-01-28

    A jammed packing of frictionless spheres at zero temperature is perfectly specified by the network of contact forces from which mechanical properties can be derived. However, we can alternatively consider a packing as a geometric structure, characterized by a Voronoi tessellation which encodes the local environment around each particle. We find that this local environment characterizes systems both above and below jamming and changes markedly at the transition. A variety of order parameters derived from this tessellation carry signatures of the jamming transition, complete with scaling exponents. Furthermore, we define a real space geometric correlation function which also displays a signature of jamming. Taken together, these results demonstrate the validity and usefulness of a purely geometric approach to jamming. PMID:26611105

  10. Understanding Variability in the AVIRIS-Derived Parameters from Vegetation Cover

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goetz, Alexander F. H.

    2000-01-01

    This project was carried out in two phases, the first was an investigation of the possible sources of variability in the canopy leaf chemistry parameters derived from AVERJS data on a year-to-year basis, and the second was a follow-on effort to improve the atmospheric correction program ATREM as well as to provide support to the community on the use of ATREM. This final report embodies a general review of the results obtained over the life of the contract as well as detailed interim reports and copies of the six papers published in AVIRIS Workshop Proceedings over the last 3 years.

  11. Morphology analysis of EKG R waves using wavelets with adaptive parameters derived from fuzzy logic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caldwell, Max A.; Barrington, William W.; Miles, Richard R.

    1996-03-01

    Understanding of the EKG components P, QRS (R wave), and T is essential in recognizing cardiac disorders and arrhythmias. An estimation method is presented that models the R wave component of the EKG by adaptively computing wavelet parameters using fuzzy logic. The parameters are adaptively adjusted to minimize the difference between the original EKG waveform and the wavelet. The R wave estimate is derived from minimizing the combination of mean squared error (MSE), amplitude difference, spread difference, and shift difference. We show that the MSE in both non-noise and additive noise environment is less using an adaptive wavelet than a static wavelet. Research to date has focused on the R wave component of the EKG signal. Extensions of this method to model P and T waves are discussed.

  12. Sensitivity derivatives for advanced CFD algorithm and viscous modelling parameters via automatic differentiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Green, Lawrence L.; Newman, Perry A.; Haigler, Kara J.

    1993-01-01

    The computational technique of automatic differentiation (AD) is applied to a three-dimensional thin-layer Navier-Stokes multigrid flow solver to assess the feasibility and computational impact of obtaining exact sensitivity derivatives typical of those needed for sensitivity analyses. Calculations are performed for an ONERA M6 wing in transonic flow with both the Baldwin-Lomax and Johnson-King turbulence models. The wing lift, drag, and pitching moment coefficients are differentiated with respect to two different groups of input parameters. The first group consists of the second- and fourth-order damping coefficients of the computational algorithm, whereas the second group consists of two parameters in the viscous turbulent flow physics modelling. Results obtained via AD are compared, for both accuracy and computational efficiency with the results obtained with divided differences (DD). The AD results are accurate, extremely simple to obtain, and show significant computational advantage over those obtained by DD for some cases.

  13. Using a scoop to derive soil mechanical parameters on the surface of Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kargl, Günter; Poganski, Joshua; Kömle, Norbert I.; Schweiger, Helmut; Macher, Wolfgang

    2016-04-01

    We will report on the possibility of using the scoop attached to the instrument deployment arm to perform soil mechanical experiments directly on the surface of Mars. The Phoenix mission flown 2009 had an instrument deployment arm which was also used to sample surface material indo instruments mounted on the lander deck. The flight spare of this arm will again be flown to Mars on board the InSight mission. Although, the primary purpose of the arm and the attached scoop was not soil mechanical investigations it was already demonstrated by the Phoenix mission that the arm can be used to perform auxiliary investigations of the surface materials. We will report on modelling efforts using a Discrete Element Software package to demonstrate that simple soil mechanical experiments can be used to derive essential material parameters like e.g. angle of repose and others. This is of particular interest since it would be possible to implement experiments using the hardware of the InSight mission. PIC Cross section cut through a trench dug out by the scoop and the pile of the deposed material which both can be used to derive soil mechanical parameters.

  14. Virchow-Robin Spaces: Correlations with Polysomnography-Derived Sleep Parameters

    PubMed Central

    Berezuk, Courtney; Ramirez, Joel; Gao, Fuqiang; Scott, Christopher J.M.; Huroy, Menal; Swartz, Richard H.; Murray, Brian J.; Black, Sandra E.; Boulos, Mark I.

    2015-01-01

    Study Objectives: To test the hypothesis that enlarged Virchow-Robin space volumes (VRS) are associated with objective measures of poor quality sleep. Design: Retrospective cross-sectional study. Setting: Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre. Patients: Twenty-six patients being evaluated for cerebrovascular disease were assessed using polysomnography and high-resolution structural magnetic resonance imaging. Measurements and Results: Regionalized VRS were quantified from three-dimensional high-resolution magnetic resonance imaging and correlated with measures of polysomnography-derived sleep parameters while controlling for age, stroke volume, body mass index, systolic blood pressure, and ventricular cerebrospinal fluid volume. Sleep efficiency was negatively correlated with total VRS (rho = −0.47, P = 0.03) and basal ganglia VRS (rho = −0.54, P = 0.01), whereas wake after sleep onset was positively correlated with basal ganglia VRS (rho = 0.52, P = 0.02). Furthermore, VRS in the basal ganglia were negatively correlated with duration of N3 (rho = −0.53, P = 0.01). Conclusions: These preliminary results suggest that sleep may play a role in perivascular clearance in ischemic brain disease, and invite future research into the potential relevance of Virchow-Robin spaces as an imaging biomarker for nocturnal metabolite clearance. Citation: Berezuk C, Ramirez J, Gao F, Scott CJ, Huroy M, Swartz RH, Murray BJ, Black SE, Boulos MI. Virchow-Robin spaces: correlations with polysomnography-derived sleep parameters. SLEEP 2015;38(6):853–858. PMID:26163465

  15. CRISM-Derived Spectral Scattering Parameters for Surfaces in the Vicinity of Opportunity Mars Rover Traverses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shaw, A.; Arvidson, R. E.; Wolff, M. J.; Seelos, F. P.; Wiseman, S. M.; Cull, S.

    2011-12-01

    CRISM (Compact Reconnaissance Imaging Spectrometer for Mars) data were used to retrieve scattering parameters of surfaces traversed by the Opportunity Mars rover, as well as adjacent areas. Our estimates agree with those retrieved by Johnson et al. [2006] using Opportunity's Panoramic Camera data, and we are able to extend estimates of the Hapke single particle scattering albedo and asymmetry parameter (from the one-term Henyey Greenstein single particle phase function) to a greater spectral resolution and spectral range. This analysis allows us to distinguish between surface units that otherwise look relatively uniform spectrally. This work also provides photometric functions essential for converting spectra to a single viewing geometry which will yield more accurate spectral comparisons. Our method involves simultaneously modeling surface and atmospheric contributions, iterating through surface scattering parameters until a Levenberg-Marquardt least squares best fit is achieved. Retrieved single scattering albedos range from 0.42 to 0.57 (0.5663 - 2.2715 micrometers), and retrieved asymmetry parameters range from -0.27 to -0.17 (moderately backscattering). All surfaces become more backscattering with increasing wavelength. Further, the northern and western portions of Victoria crater's ejecta apron are more backscattering than surrounding regions, indicating a change in physical properties. In images taken when the rover traversed this unit, a surface with small ripples and a dense cover of hematitic spherules is apparent, providing agreement with lab experiments by Johnson et al. [2006] showing increased backscattering with the addition of hematitic spherules. The CRISM-derived scattering parameters also show that bedrock-dominated surfaces are less backscattering than soil-covered surfaces.

  16. Derivation of Forest Inventory Parameters for Carbon Estimation Using Terrestrial LIDAR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prasad Kalwar, Om Prakash; Hussin, Yousif A.; Weir, Michael J. C.; Karna, Yogendra K.

    2016-06-01

    This research was conducted to derive forest sample plot inventory parameters from terrestrial LiDAR (T-LiDAR) for estimating above ground biomass (AGB)/carbon stocks in primary tropical rain forest. Inventory parameters of all sampled trees within circular plots of 500 m2 were collected from field observations while T-LiDAR data were acquired through multiple scanning using Reigl VZ-400 scanner. Pre-processing and registration of multiple scans were done in RSCAN PRO software. Point cloud constructing individual sampled tree was extracted and tree inventory parameters (diameter at breast height-DBH and tree height) were measured manually. AGB/carbon stocks were estimated using Chave et al., (2005) allometric equation. An average 80 % of sampled trees were detected from point cloud of the plots. The average of plots values of R2 and RMSE for manually measured DBHs were 0.95, 2.7 cm respectively. Similarly, the average of plots values of R2 and RMSE for manually measured trees heights were 0.77, 2.96 m respectively. The average value of AGB/carbon stocks estimated from field measurements and T-LiDAR manually derived DBHs and trees heights were 286 Mg ha-1 and 134 Mg ha-1; and 278 M ha-1 and 130 Mg ha-1 respectively. The R2 values for the estimated AGB and AGC were both 0.93 and corresponding RMSE values were 42.4 Mg ha-1 and 19.9 Mg ha-1 respectively. AGB and AGC were estimated with 14.8 % accuracy.

  17. ELECTRONIC FACTOR IN QSAR: MO-PARAMETERS, COMPETING INTERACTIONS, REACTIVITY AND TOXICITY

    EPA Science Inventory

    Reactive chemicals pose unique problems in the development of SAR and QSAR in environmental chemistry and toxicology. odels of the stereoelectronic interactions of reactive toxicants with biological systems require formulation of parameters that quantify the electronic structure ...

  18. Shifts of neutrino oscillation parameters in reactor antineutrino experiments with non-standard interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yu-Feng; Zhou, Ye-Ling

    2014-11-01

    ,15]. They induce effective four-fermion interactions after integrating out some heavy particles beyond the SM, where the heavy particles can be scalars, pseudo-scalars, vectors, axial-vectors, or tensors [16]. For reactor antineutrino experiments NSIs may appear in the antineutrino production and detection processes, and can modify the neutrino oscillation probability. Therefore, the neutrino mixing angles and mass-squared differences can be shifted and the mass ordering (MO) measurement will be affected. There are some previous discussions on NSIs in reactor antineutrino experiments [17-19] and other types of oscillation experiments [20]. In this work, we study the NSI effect in reactor antineutrino oscillations in both specific models and also the most general case. Taking JUNO as an example, we apply our general framework to the medium baseline reactor antineutrino experiment. We discuss how NSIs influence the standard 3-generation neutrino oscillation measurements and to what extent we can constrain the NSI parameters.The remaining part of this work is organized as follows. Section 2 is to derive the analytical formalism. We develop a general framework on the NSI effect in reaction antineutrino oscillations, and calculate the neutrino survival probability in the presence of NSIs. In Section 3, we give the numerical analysis for the JUNO experiment. We analyze the NSI impacts on the precision measurement of mass-squared differences and the determination of the neutrino mass ordering, and present the JUNO sensitivity of the relevant NSI parameters. Finally, we conclude in Section 4.

  19. Troposphere Parameters Derived from Multi-GNSS Data Processing at GFZ

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deng, Zhiguo; Uhlemann, Maik; Fritsche, Mathias; Dick, Galina; Wickert, Jens

    2015-04-01

    Usually, the processing of Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS) observations requires a thorough consideration of atmospheric parameters for precise applications. Accordingly, GPS meteorology has become a tool which uses measurements from ground-based GPS receivers for atmospheric water vapor sounding. Zenith total delay (ZTD) products derived from GNSS complement different other meteorological observing systems. GPS-based ZTD estimates have also been assimilated into numerical weather prediction (NWP) models. In addition to GPS and GLONASS, the new and emerging satellite navigation systems BeiDou and Galileo provide the potential for extended and more precise GNSS applications. Accordingly, the International GNSS Service (IGS) has initiated the Multi-GNSS Experiment (MGEX) to acquire and analyze data from all four constellations. In view of the increased number of actively transmitting satellites, the ZTD parameter estimation will particularly benefit from an improved spatial distribution of observations tracked by the ground-based receivers. In this contribution, we report on the status of our multi-system (GPS, GLONASS, BeiDou, Galileo) data processing at GFZ. Based on data from the MGEX network we produce multi-GNSS solutions including parameter estimates for satellite orbits, clock, station coordinates and site-specific ZTDs. Our presentation focusses on the validation of ZTDs from the multi-GNSS processing and a comparison with single-system ZTD solutions and GFZ's operational near real-time troposphere products.

  20. Urban thermal environment and its biophysical parameters derived from satellite remote sensing imagery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zoran, Maria A.; Savastru, Roxana S.; Savastru, Dan M.; Tautan, Marina N.; Baschir, Laurentiu V.

    2013-10-01

    In frame of global warming, the field of urbanization and urban thermal environment are important issues among scientists all over the world. This paper investigated the influences of urbanization on urban thermal environment as well as the relationships of thermal characteristics to other biophysical variables in Bucharest metropolitan area of Romania based on satellite remote sensing imagery Landsat TM/ETM+, time series MODIS Terra/Aqua data and IKONOS acquired during 1990 - 2012 period. Vegetation abundances and percent impervious surfaces were derived by means of linear spectral mixture model, and a method for effectively enhancing impervious surface has been developed to accurately examine the urban growth. The land surface temperature (Ts), a key parameter for urban thermal characteristics analysis, was also retrieved from thermal infrared band of Landsat TM/ETM+, from MODIS Terra/Aqua datasets. Based on these parameters, the urban growth, urban heat island effect (UHI) and the relationships of Ts to other biophysical parameters have been analyzed. Results indicated that the metropolitan area ratio of impervious surface in Bucharest increased significantly during two decades investigated period, the intensity of urban heat island and heat wave events being most significant. The correlation analyses revealed that, at the pixel-scale, Ts possessed a strong positive correlation with percent impervious surfaces and negative correlation with vegetation abundances at the regional scale, respectively. This analysis provided an integrated research scheme and the findings can be very useful for urban ecosystem modeling.

  1. Sensor-derived physical activity parameters can predict future falls in people with dementia

    PubMed Central

    Schwenk, Michael; Hauer, Klaus; Zieschang, Tania; Englert, Stefan; Mohler, Jane; Najafi, Bijan

    2014-01-01

    Background There is a need for simple clinical tools that can objectively assess fall risk in people with dementia. Wearable sensors seem to have potential for fall prediction, however, there has been limited work performed in this important area. Objective To explore the validity of sensor-derived physical activity (PA) parameters for predicting future falls in people with dementia. To compare sensor-based fall risk assessment with conventional fall risk measures. Methods A cohort study of people with confirmed dementia discharged from a geriatric rehabilitation ward. PA was quantified using 24-hour motion-sensor monitoring at the beginning of the study. PA parameters (percentage of walking, standing, sitting, lying; duration of single walking, standing, and sitting bouts) were extracted using specific algorithms. Conventional assessment included performance-based tests (Timed-up-and-go test, Performance-Oriented-Mobility-Assessment, 5-chair stand) and questionnaires (cognition, ADL-status, fear of falling, depression, previous faller). Outcome measures were fallers (at least one fall in the 3-month follow-up period) versus non-fallers. Results Seventy-seven people were included in the study (age 81.8 ± 6.3; community dwelling 88%, institutionalized 12%). Surprisingly, fallers and non-fallers did not differ on any conventional assessment (p= 0.069–0.991), except for ‘previous faller’ (p= 0.006). Interestingly, several PA parameters discriminated between groups. The ‘walking bouts average duration’, ‘longest walking bout duration’ and ‘walking bouts duration variability’ were lower in fallers, compared to non-fallers (p= 0.008–0.027). The ‘standing bouts average duration’ was higher in fallers (p= 0.050). Two variables, ‘walking bouts average duration’ [odds ratio (OR) 0.79, p= 0.012] and ‘previous faller’ [OR 4.44, p= 0.007] were identified as independent predictors for falls. The OR for a ‘walking bouts average duration’ of

  2. SITE SPECIFIC REFERENCE PERSON PARAMETERS AND DERIVED CONCENTRATION STANDARDS FOR THE SAVANNAH RIVER SITE

    SciTech Connect

    Jannik, T.

    2013-03-14

    The purpose of this report is twofold. The first is to develop a set of behavioral parameters for a reference person specific for the Savannah River Site (SRS) such that the parameters can be used to determine dose to members of the public in compliance with Department of Energy (DOE) Order 458.1 “Radiation Protection of the Public and the Environment.” A reference person is a hypothetical, gender and age aggregation of human physical and physiological characteristics arrived at by international consensus for the purpose of standardizing radiation dose calculations. DOE O 458.1 states that compliance with the annual dose limit of 100 mrem (1 mSv) to a member of the public may be demonstrated by calculating the dose to the maximally exposed individual (MEI) or to a representative person. Historically, for dose compliance, SRS has used the MEI concept, which uses adult dose coefficients and adult male usage parameters. Beginning with the 2012 annual site environmental report, SRS will be using the representative person concept for dose compliance. The dose to a representative person will be based on 1) the SRS-specific reference person usage parameters at the 95th percentile of appropriate national or regional data, which are documented in this report, 2) the reference person (gender and age averaged) ingestion and inhalation dose coefficients provided in DOE Derived Concentration Technical Standard (DOE-STD-1196-2011), and 3) the external dose coefficients provided in the DC_PAK3 toolbox. The second purpose of this report is to develop SRS-specific derived concentration standards (DCSs) for all applicable food ingestion pathways, ground shine, and water submersion. The DCS is the concentration of a particular radionuclide in water, in air, or on the ground that results in a member of the public receiving 100 mrem (1 mSv) effective dose following continuous exposure for one year. In DOE-STD-1196-2011, DCSs were developed for the ingestion of water, inhalation of

  3. Derivatives of the local ballooning growth rate with respect to surface label, field line label, and ballooning parameter

    SciTech Connect

    Hudson, S.R.

    2006-04-15

    Expressions for the derivative of the local ballooning growth rate with respect to surface label, field line label, and ballooning-parameter are presented. Such expressions lead to increased computational efficiency for ballooning stability applications.

  4. Sounding-derived parameters associated with tornado occurrence in Poland and Universal Tornadic Index

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taszarek, M.; Kolendowicz, L.

    2013-12-01

    This study is mainly devoted to operational meteorology, to improve tornado forecast in Poland and create a Universal Tornadic Index formula. A study is focusing on climatology of sounding-derived parameters associated with tornadoes in Poland and their potential value for tornado forecasting. The data was collected from soundings made in 10 stations in and around Poland which were closely in time and space connected with tornado occurrence. The main aim of the study was to analyze the thermodynamic and kinematic parameters derived from soundings and formulate an index. The information about tornado incidents was taken from media reports and the European Severe Weather Database for the years 1977-2012. Total of 97 tornado cases were divided according to their strength for significant (F2/F3), weak (F0/F1) and unrated cases, and also according to their environmental surface temperature, for warm (> 18 °C) and cold (< 18 °C) tornadoes. As it turned out, depending on the temperature, tornadoes tended to present different environmental conditions for tornadogenesis. In warm cases, the most important factor was instability while for cold cases it was dynamic wind field. It was also proven that significant tornadoes in Poland occur in conditions accompanied by high moisture content, moderate instability and high wind shear conditions. The results of this study were used to create a Universal Tornadic Index designed to forecast activity in warm and cold, and weak and strong tornadic environments. The quality of this index was tested for the period with increased tornado activity in Poland from 2008 to 2010.

  5. Sounding-derived parameters associated with large hail and tornadoes in the Netherlands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Groenemeijer, P. H.; van Delden, A.

    2007-02-01

    A study is presented focusing on the potential value of parameters derived from radiosonde data or data from numerical atmospheric models for the forecasting of severe weather associated with convective storms. Parameters have been derived from soundings in the proximity of large hail, tornadoes (including tornadoes over water: waterspouts) and thunderstorms in the Netherlands. 66,365 radiosonde soundings from six stations in and around the Netherlands between 1 Dec. 1975 to 31 Aug. 2003 were classified as being associated or not associated with these weather phenomena using observational data from voluntary observers, the Dutch National Meteorological Institute (KNMI) and lightning data from the U.K. Met. Office. It was found that instability as measured by the Lifted Index or CAPE and 0-6 km wind shear independently have considerable skill in distinguishing environments of large hail and of non-hail-producing thunderstorms. It was also found that CAPE released below 3 km above ground level is on average high near waterspouts and weak tornadoes that mostly occur with low shear in the lowest 1 km above the Earth's surface. On the other hand, low-level shear is strong in environments of stronger (F1 and F2) tornadoes and increases with increasing F-scale. This is consistent with the notion that stretching of pre-existing vertical vorticity is the most important mechanism for the formation of weak tornadoes while the tilting of vorticity is more important with stronger tornadoes. The presented results may assist forecasters to assess the likelihood of severe hail or tornadoes.

  6. Parametric computation predicts a multiplicative interaction between synaptic strength parameters that control gamma oscillations

    PubMed Central

    Chambers, Jordan D.; Bethwaite, Blair; Diamond, Neil T.; Peachey, Tom; Abramson, David; Petrou, Steve; Thomas, Evan A.

    2012-01-01

    Gamma oscillations are thought to be critical for a number of behavioral functions, they occur in many regions of the brain and through a variety of mechanisms. Fast repetitive bursting (FRB) neurons in layer 2 of the cortex are able to drive gamma oscillations over long periods of time. Even though the oscillation is driven by FRB neurons, strong feedback within the rest of the cortex must modulate properties of the oscillation such as frequency and power. We used a highly detailed model of the cortex to determine how a cohort of 33 parameters controlling synaptic drive might modulate gamma oscillation properties. We were interested in determining not just the effects of parameters individually, but we also wanted to reveal interactions between parameters beyond additive effects. To prevent a combinatorial explosion in parameter combinations that might need to be simulated, we used a fractional factorial design (FFD) that estimated the effects of individual parameters and two parameter interactions. This experiment required only 4096 model runs. We found that the largest effects on both gamma power and frequency came from a complex interaction between efficacy of synaptic connections from layer 2 inhibitory neurons to layer 2 excitatory neurons and the parameter for the reciprocal connection. As well as the effect of the individual parameters determining synaptic efficacy, there was an interaction between these parameters beyond the additive effects of the parameters alone. The magnitude of this effect was similar to that of the individual parameters, predicting that it is physiologically important in setting gamma oscillation properties. PMID:22837747

  7. Regionalization of subsurface stormflow parameters of hydrologic models: Derivation from regional analysis of streamflow recession curves

    SciTech Connect

    Ye, Sheng; Li, Hongyi; Huang, Maoyi; Ali, Melkamu; Leng, Guoyong; Leung, Lai-Yung R.; Wang, Shaowen; Sivapalan, Murugesu

    2014-07-21

    Subsurface stormflow is an important component of the rainfall–runoff response, especially in steep terrain. Its contribution to total runoff is, however, poorly represented in the current generation of land surface models. The lack of physical basis of these common parameterizations precludes a priori estimation of the stormflow (i.e. without calibration), which is a major drawback for prediction in ungauged basins, or for use in global land surface models. This paper is aimed at deriving regionalized parameterizations of the storage–discharge relationship relating to subsurface stormflow from a top–down empirical data analysis of streamflow recession curves extracted from 50 eastern United States catchments. Detailed regression analyses were performed between parameters of the empirical storage–discharge relationships and the controlling climate, soil and topographic characteristics. The regression analyses performed on empirical recession curves at catchment scale indicated that the coefficient of the power-law form storage–discharge relationship is closely related to the catchment hydrologic characteristics, which is consistent with the hydraulic theory derived mainly at the hillslope scale. As for the exponent, besides the role of field scale soil hydraulic properties as suggested by hydraulic theory, it is found to be more strongly affected by climate (aridity) at the catchment scale. At a fundamental level these results point to the need for more detailed exploration of the co-dependence of soil, vegetation and topography with climate.

  8. Regionalization of subsurface stormflow parameters of hydrologic models: Derivation from regional analysis of streamflow recession curves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ye, Sheng; Li, Hong-Yi; Huang, Maoyi; Ali, Melkamu; Leng, Guoyong; Leung, L. Ruby; Wang, Shao-wen; Sivapalan, Murugesu

    2014-11-01

    Subsurface stormflow is an important component of the rainfall-runoff response, especially in steep terrain. Its contribution to total runoff is, however, poorly represented in the current generation of land surface models. The lack of physical basis of these common parameterizations precludes a priori estimation of the stormflow (i.e. without calibration), which is a major drawback for prediction in ungauged basins, or for use in global land surface models. This paper is aimed at deriving regionalized parameterizations of the storage-discharge relationship relating to subsurface stormflow from a top-down empirical data analysis of streamflow recession curves extracted from 50 eastern United States catchments. Detailed regression analyses were performed between parameters of the empirical storage-discharge relationships and the controlling climate, soil and topographic characteristics. The regression analyses performed on empirical recession curves at catchment scale indicated that the coefficient of the power-law form storage-discharge relationship is closely related to the catchment hydrologic characteristics, which is consistent with the hydraulic theory derived mainly at the hillslope scale. As for the exponent, besides the role of field scale soil hydraulic properties as suggested by hydraulic theory, it is found to be more strongly affected by climate (aridity) at the catchment scale. At a fundamental level these results point to the need for more detailed exploration of the co-dependence of soil, vegetation and topography with climate.

  9. Stabilization of Satellite derived Gravity Field Coefficients by Earth Rotation Parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heiker, A.; Kutterer, H.; Müller, J.

    2009-04-01

    Recent gravity field missions (e.g. GRACE) provide monthly solutions for the time-variable Earth gravity field. However, the low-degree harmonic coefficients are poorly resolved, especially those of degree 2. The Earth rotation parameters (ERP), consisting of polar motion and lod, and the gravity field coefficients (GFC) of degree 2 are linked by the Euler-Liouville Equation. Thus the consideration of ERP time series helps to improve the estimates of GFC2. Due to the covariances between the GFC of degree 2 and further low-degree gravity field coefficients (up to degree 10) the residuals of the first group of coefficients has to be propagated to the second group in order to guarantee an overall consistency. Previous work has shown a significant influence of ERP on GFC up to degree 4 with the results depending on the covariances assumed a priori. This presentation shows the result of a consistent joint analysis of GRACE derived GFC and ERP in an extended Gauss-Helmert model which includes a sophisticated variance-covariance component estimation (VCCE). As the covariances of the GRACE derived GFC are largely not known, some different variance-covariance structures are assumed and estimated with the VCCE. The results are compared and discussed.

  10. Resolution dependence of petrophysical parameters derived from X-ray tomography of chalk

    SciTech Connect

    Müter, D.; Sørensen, H. O.; Jha, D.; Harti, R.; Dalby, K. N.; Stipp, S. L. S.; Suhonen, H.; Feidenhans'l, R.; Engstrøm, F.

    2014-07-28

    X-ray computed tomography data from chalk drill cuttings were taken over a series of voxel dimensions, ranging from 320 to 25 nm. From these data sets, standard petrophysical parameters (porosity, surface area, and permeability) were derived and we examined the effect of the voxel dimension (i.e., image resolution) on these properties. We found that for the higher voxel dimensions, they are severely over or underestimated, whereas for 50 and 25 nm voxel dimension, the resulting values (5%–30% porosity, 0.2–2 m{sup 2}/g specific surface area, and 0.06–0.34 mD permeability) are within the expected range for this type of rock. We compared our results to macroscopic measurements and in the case of surface area, also to measurements using the Brunauer-Emmett-Teller (BET) method and found that independent of the degree of compaction, the results from tomography amount to about 30% of the BET method. Finally, we concluded that at 25 nm voxel dimension, the essential features of the nanoscopic pore network in chalk are captured but better resolution is still needed to derive surface area.

  11. Poromechanics Parameters of Fluid-Saturated Chemically Active Fibrous Media Derived from a Micromechanical Approach.

    PubMed

    Misra, Anil; Parthasarathy, Ranganathan; Singh, Viraj; Spencer, Paulette

    2013-01-01

    The authors have derived macroscale poromechanics parameters for chemically active saturated fibrous media by combining microstructure-based homogenization with Hill's volume averaging. The stress-strain relationship of the dry fibrous media is first obtained by considering the fiber behavior. The constitutive relationships applicable to saturated media are then derived in the poromechanics framework using Hill's Lemmas. The advantage of this approach is that the resultant continuum model assumes a form suited to study porous materials, while retaining the effect of discrete fiber deformation. As a result, the model is able to predict the influence of microscale phenomena such as fiber buckling on the overall behavior, and in particular, on the poromechanics constants. The significance of the approach is demonstrated using the effect of drainage and fiber nonlinearity on monotonic compressive stress-strain behavior. The model predictions conform to the experimental observations for articular cartilage. The method can potentially be extended to other porous materials such as bone, clays, foams, and concrete. PMID:25419475

  12. Poromechanics Parameters of Fluid-Saturated Chemically Active Fibrous Media Derived from a Micromechanical Approach

    PubMed Central

    Parthasarathy, Ranganathan; Singh, Viraj; Spencer, Paulette

    2014-01-01

    The authors have derived macroscale poromechanics parameters for chemically active saturated fibrous media by combining microstructure-based homogenization with Hill's volume averaging. The stress-strain relationship of the dry fibrous media is first obtained by considering the fiber behavior. The constitutive relationships applicable to saturated media are then derived in the poromechanics framework using Hill's Lemmas. The advantage of this approach is that the resultant continuum model assumes a form suited to study porous materials, while retaining the effect of discrete fiber deformation. As a result, the model is able to predict the influence of microscale phenomena such as fiber buckling on the overall behavior, and in particular, on the poromechanics constants. The significance of the approach is demonstrated using the effect of drainage and fiber nonlinearity on monotonic compressive stress-strain behavior. The model predictions conform to the experimental observations for articular cartilage. The method can potentially be extended to other porous materials such as bone, clays, foams, and concrete. PMID:25419475

  13. Derivative interactions and perturbative UV contributions in N Higgs doublet models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kikuta, Yohei; Yamamoto, Yasuhiro

    2016-05-01

    We study the Higgs derivative interactions on models including arbitrary number of the Higgs doublets. These interactions are generated by two ways. One is higher order corrections of composite Higgs models, and the other is integration of heavy scalars and vectors. In the latter case, three point couplings between the Higgs doublets and these heavy states are the sources of the derivative interactions. Their representations are constrained to couple with the doublets. We explicitly calculate all derivative interactions generated by integrating out. Their degrees of freedom and conditions to impose the custodial symmetry are discussed. We also study the vector boson scattering processes with a couple of two Higgs doublet models to see experimental signals of the derivative interactions. They are differently affected by each heavy field.

  14. Intermolecular interaction of thiosemicarbazone derivatives to solvents and a potential Aedes aegypti target

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    da Silva, João Bosco P.; Hallwass, Fernando; da Silva, Aluizio G.; Moreira, Diogo Rodrigo; Ramos, Mozart N.; Espíndola, José Wanderlan P.; de Oliveira, Ana Daura T.; Brondani, Dalci José; Leite, Ana Cristina L.; Merz, Kenneth M.

    2015-08-01

    DFT calculations were used to access information about structure, energy and electronic properties of series of phenyl- and phenoxymethyl-(thio)semicarbazone derivatives with demonstrated activity against the larvae of Aedes aegypti in stage L4. The way as the thiosemicarbazone derivatives can interact with solvents like DMSO and water were analyzed from the comparison between calculated and experimental 1H NMR chemical shifts. The evidences of thiosemicarbazone derivatives making H-bond interaction to solvent have provide us insights on how they can interact with a potential A. aegypti's biological target, the Sterol Carrier Protein-2.

  15. Use of remote sensing derived parameters in a crop model for biomass prediction of hay crop

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El Hajj, Mohammad; Baghdadi, Nicolas; Cheviron, Bruno; Belaud, Gilles; Zribi, Mehrez

    2016-04-01

    Pre-harvest yield forecasting is a critical challenge for producers, especially for large agricultural areas. During previous decades, numerous crop models were developed to predict crop growth and yield at daily time, most often for wheat or maize, and also for grasslands. Crop models require several input parameters that describe soil properties (e.g. field capacity), plant characteristics (e.g. maximal rooting depth) and management options (e.g. sowing dates, irrigation and harvest dates), which are referred to as the soil, plant and management families of parameters. Remote sensing technology has been extensively applied to identify spatially distributed values of some of the accessible parameters in the soil, plant and management families. The aim of this study was to address the feasibility, merits and limitations of forcing remote-sensing-derived parameters (LAI values, harvest and irrigation dates) in the PILOTE crop model, targeting the Total Dry Matter (TDM) of hay crops. Results show that optical images are suitable to feed PILOTE with LAI values without inducing significant errors on the predicted Total Dry Matter (TDM) values (Root Mean Square Error "RMSE" = 0.41 t/ha and Mean Absolute Percentage Error "MAPE" = 22%). Moreover, optical images with revisit times lower than 16 days are adequate to feed PILOTE with remotely sensed harvest dates (RMSE < 0.44 t/ha, MAPE < 10.8%). Finally, feeding PILOTE with noisy irrigation dates that were estimated from SAR images also enabled reliable model predictions, at least when attaching a random uncertainty of "only" 3 days to the real known irrigation dates. The case of one or several undetected irrigations has also been explored, with the expected conclusion that undetected irrigations significantly affect model predictions only in dry periods. For the tested soil properties and climatic conditions, a maximum underestimation of TDM of approximately 1.55 t/ha (reference TDM of 3.43 t/ha) was observed in the second

  16. Emergent Learning and Interactive Media Artworks: Parameters of Interaction for Novice Groups

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kawka, Marta; Larkin, Kevin; Danaher, P. A.

    2011-01-01

    Emergent learning describes learning that occurs when participants interact and distribute knowledge, where learning is self-directed, and where the learning destination of the participants is largely unpredictable (Williams, Karousou, & Mackness, 2011). These notions of learning arise from the topologies of social networks and can be applied to…

  17. The Atlas of Vesta Spectral Parameters derived from the mapping spectrometer VIR onboard NASA/Dawn

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frigeri, A.; De Sanctis, M.; Ammannito, E.; Tosi, F.; Capria, M.; Capaccioni, F.; Zambon, F.; Palomba, E.; Magni, G.; Jaumann, R.; Raymond, C. A.; Russell, C. T.

    2013-12-01

    From 2011 to 2012 the Visible and Infrared Mapping Spectrometer (VIR) onboard NASA/Dawn spacecraft has mapped the surface of Vesta from three different orbital heights, acquiring infrared and visible spectra from 0.2 to 5 microns, sampled in 864 channels with a spatial resolution up to about 150 m/pixel. From the large amount of spectra retrieved we have derived spectral parameters which can be combined to identify specific physical and compositional states. To start with, we have computed the band center and depth for band I and band II of pyroxenes. Pyroxene's band center I and II are commonly associated with a compositional variation. For example, orthopyroxene bands shift towards longer wavelengths with increasing amounts of iron, while clinopyroxene bands shift towards longer wavelengths with increasing calcium content. Band depths are related to scattering effects, associated to the abundance and the grain size of the absorber. Mapping these parameters on the surface allow to detect terrain units compositions and physical-state in their stratigraphic context. We have produced an atlas of digital maps, projected following the 15-quadrangle scheme commonly adopted for small sized planetary bodies. The digital maps have geospatial metadata and are available in GIS and other scientific programming language formats. A special imagery product has been produced, where the geomorphologic context from the Framing Camera, and the IAU nomenclature have been added to the mineralogic maps. This way we have both quantitative digital maps and print-ready maps. Digital maps are useful in statistical and geo-processing studies, while print-ready maps represent an easy to be consulted high-level data products. As with the atlas we are combining data acquired at very different observing geometries and in different phases of the mission, filtering has been necessary and an iterative process to project data produces results that are incrementally more consistent as we detect and

  18. Higher-order semirational solutions and nonlinear wave interactions for a derivative nonlinear Schrödinger equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Lei; Zhu, Yu-Jie; Wang, Zi-Zhe; Qi, Feng-Hua; Guo, Rui

    2016-04-01

    We present the semirational solution in terms of the determinant form for the derivative nonlinear Schrödinger equation. It describes the nonlinear combinations of breathers and rogue waves (RWs). We show here that the solution appears as a mixture of polynomials with exponential functions. The k-order semirational solution includes k - 1 types of nonlinear superpositions, i.e., the l-order RW and (k-l)-order breather for l = 1 , 2 , … , k - 1 . By adjusting the shift and spectral parameters, we display various patterns of the semirational solutions for describing the interactions among the RWs and breathers. We find that k-order RW can be derived from a l-order RW interacting with 1/2(k - l) (k + l + 1) neighboring elements of a (k - l)-order breather for l = 1 , 2 , … , k - 1 .

  19. Connection between Dynamically Derived Initial Mass Function Normalization and Stellar Population Parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McDermid, Richard M.; Cappellari, Michele; Alatalo, Katherine; Bayet, Estelle; Blitz, Leo; Bois, Maxime; Bournaud, Frédéric; Bureau, Martin; Crocker, Alison F.; Davies, Roger L.; Davis, Timothy A.; de Zeeuw, P. T.; Duc, Pierre-Alain; Emsellem, Eric; Khochfar, Sadegh; Krajnović, Davor; Kuntschner, Harald; Morganti, Raffaella; Naab, Thorsten; Oosterloo, Tom; Sarzi, Marc; Scott, Nicholas; Serra, Paolo; Weijmans, Anne-Marie; Young, Lisa M.

    2014-09-01

    We report on empirical trends between the dynamically determined stellar initial mass function (IMF) and stellar population properties for a complete, volume-limited sample of 260 early-type galaxies from the ATLAS3D project. We study trends between our dynamically derived IMF normalization αdyn ≡ (M/L)stars/(M/L)Salp and absorption line strengths, and interpret these via single stellar population-equivalent ages, abundance ratios (measured as [α/Fe]), and total metallicity, [Z/H]. We find that old and alpha-enhanced galaxies tend to have on average heavier (Salpeter-like) mass normalization of the IMF, but stellar population does not appear to be a good predictor of the IMF, with a large range of αdyn at a given population parameter. As a result, we find weak αdyn-[α/Fe] and αdyn -Age correlations and no significant αdyn -[Z/H] correlation. The observed trends appear significantly weaker than those reported in studies that measure the IMF normalization via the low-mass star demographics inferred through stellar spectral analysis.

  20. CONNECTION BETWEEN DYNAMICALLY DERIVED INITIAL MASS FUNCTION NORMALIZATION AND STELLAR POPULATION PARAMETERS

    SciTech Connect

    McDermid, Richard M.; Cappellari, Michele; Bayet, Estelle; Bureau, Martin; Davies, Roger L.; Alatalo, Katherine; Blitz, Leo; Bois, Maxime; Bournaud, Frédéric; Duc, Pierre-Alain; Davis, Timothy A.; De Zeeuw, P. T.; Emsellem, Eric; Kuntschner, Harald; Khochfar, Sadegh; Krajnović, Davor; Morganti, Raffaella; Oosterloo, Tom; Naab, Thorsten; and others

    2014-09-10

    We report on empirical trends between the dynamically determined stellar initial mass function (IMF) and stellar population properties for a complete, volume-limited sample of 260 early-type galaxies from the ATLAS{sup 3D} project. We study trends between our dynamically derived IMF normalization α{sub dyn} ≡ (M/L){sub stars}/(M/L){sub Salp} and absorption line strengths, and interpret these via single stellar population-equivalent ages, abundance ratios (measured as [α/Fe]), and total metallicity, [Z/H]. We find that old and alpha-enhanced galaxies tend to have on average heavier (Salpeter-like) mass normalization of the IMF, but stellar population does not appear to be a good predictor of the IMF, with a large range of α{sub dyn} at a given population parameter. As a result, we find weak α{sub dyn}-[α/Fe] and α{sub dyn} –Age correlations and no significant α{sub dyn} –[Z/H] correlation. The observed trends appear significantly weaker than those reported in studies that measure the IMF normalization via the low-mass star demographics inferred through stellar spectral analysis.

  1. High-resolution polar climate parameters derived from 1-km AVHRR data

    SciTech Connect

    Hutchinson, T.A.; Scambos, T.A.

    1997-11-01

    This paper describes the development of a time-series of composites of albedo, surface temperature, and sea ice motion. The composites will be generated from high-resolution (Local Area Coverage and High Resolution Picture Transmission) Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR). Composites of albedo and surface (skin) temperature will be derived from AVHRR data within three hours of two selected local times (0400 and 1400 for the northern hemisphere, and 0200 and 1600 for the southern hemisphere) for each day. These products will be gridded at 1.25 km cell size in an equal-area projection compatible with recent gridded products from Special Sensor Microwave/Imager data and planned products from the TIROS Operational Verticle Sounder and other AVHRR data sets. Sea ice motion will be calculated once per day by comparing clear-sky image data of sea ice over a three-day period, and reported on a 1.25 km grid. A brief discussion of a reconnaissance survey of the output geophysical parameters for the Northern Hemisphere between August and October 1993 is also presented. 9 refs., 5 figs., 2 tabs.

  2. The derivation of constraints on the msugra parameter space from the entropy of dark matter halos

    SciTech Connect

    Cabral-Rosetti, L. G.; Mondragon, M.; Nellen, L.; Nunez, D.; Sussmann, R.; Zavala, J.

    2009-04-20

    We derive an expression for the entropy of a present dark matter halo described by a Navarro-Frenk-White modified model with a central core. We obtain an expression for the relic abundance of neutralinos by comparing this entropy of the halo with the value it had during the freeze-out era. Using WMAP observations, we constrain the parameter space for mSUGRA models. Combining our results with the usual abundance criteria, we are able to discriminate clearly among different validity regions for tan {beta} values. For this, we require both criteria to be consistent within a 2{sigma} bound of the WMAP observations for the relic density: 0.112<{omega}h{sup 2}<0.122. We find that for sgn {mu} = +1, small values of tan {beta} are not favored; only for tan {beta}{approx}50 are both criteria significantly consistent. Both criteria allow us to put a lower bound on the neutralino mass, m{sub {chi}}{>=}141 GeV.

  3. Effect of including torsional parameters for histidine-metal interactions in classical force fields for metalloproteins.

    PubMed

    Mera-Adasme, Raúl; Sadeghian, Keyarash; Sundholm, Dage; Ochsenfeld, Christian

    2014-11-20

    Classical force-field parameters of the metal site of metalloproteins usually comprise only the partial charges of the involved atoms, as well as the bond-stretching and bending parameters of the metal-ligand interactions. Although for certain metal ligands such as histidine residues, the torsional motions at the metal site play an important role for the dynamics of the protein, no such terms have been considered to be crucial in the parametrization of the force fields, and they have therefore been omitted in the parametrization. In this work, we have optimized AMBER-compatible force-field parameters for the reduced state of the metal site of copper, zinc superoxide dismutase (SOD1) and assessed the effect of including torsional parameters for the histidine-metal interactions in molecular dynamics simulations. On the basis of the obtained results, we recommend that torsion parameters of the metal site are included when processes at the metal site are investigated or when free-energy calculations are performed. As the torsion parameters mainly affect the structure of the metal site, other kinds of structural studies can be performed without considering the torsional parameters of the metal site. PMID:25410708

  4. An Analysis of Interaction of Anxiety, Aspiration Level and Ability Derived From Ecological Systems Theory.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Loose, Kenneth D.; Unruh, Waldemar R.

    A technique for the analysis of ecosystems developed by Odum focuses on the nature of interactions which take place within the system being considered. This technique can be used to assess the contribution of any variable to an interaction. Using data derived from previous research conducted by Feather, the authors employ this technique to examine…

  5. Crystallization processes derived from the interaction of urine and dolostone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cámara, Beatriz; Alvarez de Buergo, Monica; Fort, Rafael

    2015-04-01

    The increase in the number of pets (mostly dogs), homeless people and the more recent open-air drinking sessions organized by young people in historical centers of European cities, derive on the augmentation of urinations on stone façades of the built cultural heritage. Up to now this process has been considered only under an undesirable aesthetical point of view and the insalubrious conditions it creates, together with the cleaning costs that the local governments have to assume. This study aims to confirm urine as a real source of soluble salts that can trigger the decay of building materials, especially of those of built cultural heritage of the historical centers of the cities, which are suffering the new social scenario described above. For this purpose, an experimental setup was designed and performed in the laboratory to simulate this process. 5 cm side cubic specimens of dolostone were subjected to 100 testing cycles of urine absorption by capillarity. The necessary amount of urine was collected by donors and stored following clinical protocol conditions. Each cycle consisted of imbibitions of the specimens in 3 mm high urine sheet for 3 hours, drying at 40°C in an oven for 20 hours and 1 hour cooling in a dessicator. At the end of the 100 cycles, small pieces of the specimens were cut, observed and analyzed with the aid of an environmental scanning electron microscope, which presents the advantage of no sample preparation. The sampled pieces were selected considering there were different sections in height in the specimens: a) a bottom section that corresponds to the section that has been immersed in the urine solution (3 mm); b) an interface section, immediately above the immersed area, which is the area most affected by the urine capillarity process, characterized by a strong yellowish color; c) the section that we have named as section of influence, which is subjected to the capillary absorption, although not so strongly than the interface section

  6. Intermolecular interactions between imidazole derivatives intercalated in layered solids. Substituent group effect

    SciTech Connect

    González, M.; Lemus-Santana, A.A.; Rodríguez-Hernández, J.; Aguirre-Velez, C.I.; Knobel, M.; Reguera, E.

    2013-08-15

    This study sheds light on the intermolecular interactions between imidazole derive molecules (2-methyl-imidazole, 2-ethyl-imidazole and benzimidazole) intercalated in T[Ni(CN){sub 4}] layers to form a solid of formula unit T(ImD){sub 2}[Ni(CN){sub 4}]. These hybrid inorganic–organic solids were prepared by soft chemical routes and their crystal structures solved and refined from X-ray powder diffraction data. The involved imidazole derivative molecules were found coordinated through the pyridinic N atom to the axial positions for the metal T in the T[Ni(CN){sub 4}] layer. In the interlayers region ligand molecules from neighboring layers remain stacked in a face-to-face configuration through dipole–dipole and quadrupole–quadrupole interactions. These intermolecular interactions show a pronounced dependence on the substituent group and are responsible for an ImD-pillaring concatenation of adjacent layers. This is supported by the structural information and the recorded magnetic data in the 2–300 K temperature range. The samples containing Co and Ni are characterized by presence of spin–orbit coupling and pronounced temperature dependence for the effective magnetic moment except for 2-ethyl-imidazole related to the local distortion for the metal coordination environment. For this last one ligand a weak ferromagnetic ordering ascribed to a super-exchange interaction between T metals from neighboring layers through the ligands π–π interaction was detected. - Graphical abstract: In the interlayers region imidazole derivative molecules are oriented according to their dipolar and quadrupolar interactions and minimizing the steric impediment. Highlights: • Imidazole derivatives intercalation compounds. • Intermolecular interaction between intercalated imidazole derivatives. • Hybrid inorganic–organic solids. • Pi–pi interactions and ferromagnetic coupling. • Dipolar and quadrupolar interactions between intercalated imidazole derivatives.

  7. The Thirring interaction in the two-dimensional axial-current-pseudoscalar derivative coupling model

    SciTech Connect

    Belvedere, L.V. . E-mail: armflavio@if.uff.br

    2006-12-15

    We reexamine the two-dimensional model of massive fermions interacting with a massless pseudoscalar field via axial-current derivative coupling. The hidden Thirring interaction in the axial-derivative coupling model is exhibited compactly by performing a canonical field transformation on the Bose field algebra and the model is mapped into the Thirring model with an additional vector-current-scalar derivative interaction (Schroer-Thirring model). The Fermi field operator is rewritten in terms of the Mandelstam soliton operator coupled to a free massless scalar field. The charge sectors of the axial-derivative model are mapped into the charge sectors of the massive Thirring model. The complete bosonized version of the model is presented. The bosonized composite operators of the quantum Hamiltonian are obtained as the leading operators in the Wilson short distance expansions.

  8. Estimating crop net primary production using inventory data and MODIS-derived parameters

    SciTech Connect

    Bandaru, Varaprasad; West, Tristram O.; Ricciuto, Daniel M.; Izaurralde, Roberto C.

    2013-06-03

    National estimates of spatially-resolved cropland net primary production (NPP) are needed for diagnostic and prognostic modeling of carbon sources, sinks, and net carbon flux. Cropland NPP estimates that correspond with existing cropland cover maps are needed to drive biogeochemical models at the local scale and over national and continental extents. Existing satellite-based NPP products tend to underestimate NPP on croplands. A new Agricultural Inventory-based Light Use Efficiency (AgI-LUE) framework was developed to estimate individual crop biophysical parameters for use in estimating crop-specific NPP. The method is documented here and evaluated for corn and soybean crops in Iowa and Illinois in years 2006 and 2007. The method includes a crop-specific enhanced vegetation index (EVI) from the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS), shortwave radiation data estimated using Mountain Climate Simulator (MTCLIM) algorithm and crop-specific LUE per county. The combined aforementioned variables were used to generate spatially-resolved, crop-specific NPP that correspond to the Cropland Data Layer (CDL) land cover product. The modeling framework represented well the gradient of NPP across Iowa and Illinois, and also well represented the difference in NPP between years 2006 and 2007. Average corn and soybean NPP from AgI-LUE was 980 g C m-2 yr-1 and 420 g C m-2 yr-1, respectively. This was 2.4 and 1.1 times higher, respectively, for corn and soybean compared to the MOD17A3 NPP product. Estimated gross primary productivity (GPP) derived from AgI-LUE were in close agreement with eddy flux tower estimates. The combination of new inputs and improved datasets enabled the development of spatially explicit and reliable NPP estimates for individual crops over large regional extents.

  9. Estimating crop net primary production using national inventory data and MODIS-derived parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bandaru, Varaprasad; West, Tristram O.; Ricciuto, Daniel M.; César Izaurralde, R.

    2013-06-01

    National estimates of spatially-resolved cropland net primary production (NPP) are needed for diagnostic and prognostic modeling of carbon sources, sinks, and net carbon flux between land and atmosphere. Cropland NPP estimates that correspond with existing cropland cover maps are needed to drive biogeochemical models at the local scale as well as national and continental scales. Existing satellite-based NPP products tend to underestimate NPP on croplands. An Agricultural Inventory-based Light Use Efficiency (AgI-LUE) framework was developed to estimate individual crop biophysical parameters for use in estimating crop-specific NPP over large multi-state regions. The method is documented here and evaluated for corn (Zea mays L.) and soybean (Glycine max L. Merr.) in Iowa and Illinois in 2006 and 2007. The method includes a crop-specific Enhanced Vegetation Index (EVI), shortwave radiation data estimated using the Mountain Climate Simulator (MTCLIM) algorithm, and crop-specific LUE per county. The combined aforementioned variables were used to generate spatially-resolved, crop-specific NPP that corresponds to the Cropland Data Layer (CDL) land cover product. Results from the modeling framework captured the spatial NPP gradient across croplands of Iowa and Illinois, and also represented the difference in NPP between years 2006 and 2007. Average corn and soybean NPP from AgI-LUE was 917 g C m-2 yr-1 and 409 g C m-2 yr-1, respectively. This was 2.4 and 1.1 times higher, respectively, for corn and soybean compared to the MOD17A3 NPP product. Site comparisons with flux tower data show AgI-LUE NPP in close agreement with tower-derived NPP, lower than inventory-based NPP, and higher than MOD17A3 NPP. The combination of new inputs and improved datasets enabled the development of spatially explicit and reliable NPP estimates for individual crops over large regional extents.

  10. Thermodynamic Interactions between Polystyrene and Long-Chain Poly(n-Alkyl Acrylates) Derived from Plant Oils.

    PubMed

    Wang, Shu; Robertson, Megan L

    2015-06-10

    Vegetable oils and their fatty acids are promising sources for the derivation of polymers. Long-chain poly(n-alkyl acrylates) and poly(n-alkyl methacrylates) are readily derived from fatty acids through conversion of the carboxylic acid end-group to an acrylate or methacrylate group. The resulting polymers contain long alkyl side-chains with around 10-22 carbon atoms. Regardless of the monomer source, the presence of alkyl side-chains in poly(n-alkyl acrylates) and poly(n-alkyl methacrylates) provides a convenient mechanism for tuning their physical properties. The development of structured multicomponent materials, including block copolymers and blends, containing poly(n-alkyl acrylates) and poly(n-alkyl methacrylates) requires knowledge of the thermodynamic interactions governing their self-assembly, typically described by the Flory-Huggins interaction parameter χ. We have investigated the χ parameter between polystyrene and long-chain poly(n-alkyl acrylate) homopolymers and copolymers: specifically we have included poly(stearyl acrylate), poly(lauryl acrylate), and their random copolymers. Lauryl and stearyl acrylate were chosen as model alkyl acrylates derived from vegetable oils and have alkyl side-chain lengths of 12 and 18 carbon atoms, respectively. Polystyrene is included in this study as a model petroleum-sourced polymer, which has wide applicability in commercially relevant multicomponent polymeric materials. Two independent methods were employed to measure the χ parameter: cloud point measurements on binary blends and characterization of the order-disorder transition of triblock copolymers, which were in relatively good agreement with one another. The χ parameter was found to be independent of the alkyl side-chain length (n) for large values of n (i.e., n > 10). This behavior is in stark contrast to the n-dependence of the χ parameter predicted from solubility parameter theory. Our study complements prior work investigating the interactions between

  11. Interaction of human serum albumin with novel imidazole derivatives studied by spectroscopy and molecular docking.

    PubMed

    Yue, Yuanyuan; Sun, Yangyang; Dong, Qiao; Liu, Ren; Yan, Xuyang; Zhang, Yajie; Liu, Jianming

    2016-05-01

    This study was a detailed characterization of the interaction of a series of imidazole derivatives with a model transport protein, human serum albumin (HSA). Fluorescence and time-resolved fluorescence results showed the existence of a static quenching mode for the HSA-imidazole derivative interaction. The binding constant at 296 K was in the order of 10(4) M(-1) , showing high affinity between the imidazole derivatives and HSA. A site marker competition study combined with molecular docking revealed that the imidazole derivatives bound to subdomain IIA of HSA (Sudlow's site I). Furthermore, the results of synchronous, 3D, Fourier transform infrared, circular dichroism and UV-vis spectroscopy demonstrated that the secondary structure of HSA was altered in the presence of the imidazole derivatives. The specific binding distance, r, between the donor and acceptor was obtained according to fluorescence resonance energy transfer. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:26364804

  12. Analysis and validation of severe storm parameters derived from TITAN in Southeast Brazil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gomes, Ana Maria; Held, Gerhard; Vernini, Rafael; Demetrio Souza, Caio

    2014-05-01

    The implementation of TITAN (Thundestorm Identification, Tracking and Nowcasting) System at IPMet in December 2005 has provided real-time access to the storm severity parameters derived from radar reflectivity, which are being used to identify and alert of potentially severe storms within the 240 km quantitative ranges of the Bauru and Presidente Prudente S-band radars. The potential of these tools available with the TITAN system is being evaluated by using the hail reports received from voluntary hail observers to cross-check the occurrence of hail within the radar range against the TITAN predictions. Part of the ongoing research at IPMet aims to determine "signatures" in severe events and therefore, as from 2008, an online standard form was introduced, allowing for greater detail on the occurrence of a severe event within the 240 km ranges of both radars. The model for the hail report was based on the one initially deployed by the Alberta Hail Program, in Canada, and also by the Hail Observer Network established by the CSIR (Council for Scientific and Industrial Research), in Pretoria, South Africa, where it was used for more than 25 years. The TITAN system was deployed to obtain the tracking properties of storms for this analysis. A cell was defined by the thresholds of 40 dBZ for the reflectivity and 16 km3 for the volume, observed at least in two consecutive volume scans (15 minutes). Besides tracking and Nowcasting the movement of storm cells, TITAN comprises algorithms that allow the identification of potentially severe storm "signatures", such as the hail metrics, to indicate the probability of hail (POH), based on a combination of radar data and the knowledge of the vertical temperature distribution of the atmosphere. Another two parameters, also related to hail producing storms, called FOKR (Foote-Krauss) index and HMA (Hail Mass Aloft) index is also included. The period from 2008 to 2013 was used to process all available information about storm

  13. A state parameter-based model for static recrystallization interacting with precipitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buken, Heinrich; Sherstnev, Pavel; Kozeschnik, Ernst

    2016-03-01

    In the present work, we develop a state parameter-based model for the treatment of simultaneous precipitation and recrystallization based on a single-parameter representation of the total dislocation density and a multi-particle multi-component framework for precipitation kinetics. In contrast to conventional approaches, the interaction of particles with recrystallization is described with a non-zero grain boundary mobility even for the case where the Zener pressure exceeds the driving pressure for recrystallization. The model successfully reproduces the experimentally observed particle-induced recrystallization stasis and subsequent continuation in micro-alloyed steel with a single consistent set of input parameters. In addition, as a state parameter-based approach, our model naturally supports introspection into the physical mechanisms governing the competing recrystallization and recovery processes.

  14. Pulse-to-pulse interaction analysis and parameter optimization for future-generation ophthalmic laser systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tinne, N.; Kaune, B.; Bleeker, S.; Lubatschowski, H.; Krüger, A.; Ripken, T.

    2014-02-01

    The immediate pulse-to-pulse interaction becomes more and more important for future-generation high-repetition rate ophthalmic laser systems. Therefore, we investigated the interaction of two laser pulses with different spatial and temporal separation by time-resolved photography. There are various different characteristic interaction mechanisms which are divided into 11 interaction scenarios. Furthermore, the parameter range has been constricted regarding the medical application; here, the efficiency was optimized to a maximum jet velocity along the scanning axis with minimum applied pulse energy as well as unwanted side effects at the same time. In conclusion, these results are of great interest for the prospective optimization of the ophthalmic surgical process with future-generation fs-lasers.

  15. Estimating cropland NPP using national crop inventory and MODIS derived crop specific parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bandaru, V.; West, T. O.; Ricciuto, D. M.

    2011-12-01

    Estimates of cropland net primary production (NPP) are needed as input for estimates of carbon flux and carbon stock changes. Cropland NPP is currently estimated using terrestrial ecosystem models, satellite remote sensing, or inventory data. All three of these methods have benefits and problems. Terrestrial ecosystem models are often better suited for prognostic estimates rather than diagnostic estimates. Satellite-based NPP estimates often underestimate productivity on intensely managed croplands and are also limited to a few broad crop categories. Inventory-based estimates are consistent with nationally collected data on crop yields, but they lack sub-county spatial resolution. Integrating these methods will allow for spatial resolution consistent with current land cover and land use, while also maintaining total biomass quantities recorded in national inventory data. The main objective of this study was to improve cropland NPP estimates by using a modification of the CASA NPP model with individual crop biophysical parameters partly derived from inventory data and MODIS 8day 250m EVI product. The study was conducted for corn and soybean crops in Iowa and Illinois for years 2006 and 2007. We used EVI as a linear function for fPAR, and used crop land cover data (56m spatial resolution) to extract individual crop EVI pixels. First, we separated mixed pixels of both corn and soybean that occur when MODIS 250m pixel contains more than one crop. Second, we substituted mixed EVI pixels with nearest pure pixel values of the same crop within 1km radius. To get more accurate photosynthetic active radiation (PAR), we applied the Mountain Climate Simulator (MTCLIM) algorithm with the use of temperature and precipitation data from the North American Land Data Assimilation System (NLDAS-2) to generate shortwave radiation data. Finally, county specific light use efficiency (LUE) values of each crop for years 2006 to 2007 were determined by application of mean county inventory

  16. Derivation of site-specific relationships between hydraulic parameters and p-wave velocities based on hydraulic and seismic tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Brauchler, R.; Doetsch, J.; Dietrich, P.; Sauter, M.

    2012-01-10

    In this study, hydraulic and seismic tomographic measurements were used to derive a site-specific relationship between the geophysical parameter p-wave velocity and the hydraulic parameters, diffusivity and specific storage. Our field study includes diffusivity tomograms derived from hydraulic travel time tomography, specific storage tomograms, derived from hydraulic attenuation tomography, and p-wave velocity tomograms, derived from seismic tomography. The tomographic inversion was performed in all three cases with the SIRT (Simultaneous Iterative Reconstruction Technique) algorithm, using a ray tracing technique with curved trajectories. The experimental set-up was designed such that the p-wave velocity tomogram overlaps the hydraulic tomograms by half. The experiments were performed at a wellcharacterized sand and gravel aquifer, located in the Leine River valley near Göttingen, Germany. Access to the shallow subsurface was provided by direct-push technology. The high spatial resolution of hydraulic and seismic tomography was exploited to derive representative site-specific relationships between the hydraulic and geophysical parameters, based on the area where geophysical and hydraulic tests were performed. The transformation of the p-wave velocities into hydraulic properties was undertaken using a k-means cluster analysis. Results demonstrate that the combination of hydraulic and geophysical tomographic data is a promising approach to improve hydrogeophysical site characterization.

  17. Quantum integrable models of interacting bosons and classical r-matrices with spectral parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skrypnyk, T.

    2015-11-01

    Using the technique of classical r-matrices with spectral parameters we construct a general form of quantum Lax operators of interacting boson systems corresponding to an arbitrary simple (or reductive) Lie algebra. We prove quantum integrability of these models in the physically important case of g = gl(n) and "diagonal" in the root basis classical r-matrices. We consider in detail two classes of non-skew-symmetric classical r-matrices with spectral parameters and obtain the corresponding quantum Lax operators and quantum integrable many-boson hamiltonians that generalize Bose-Hubbard dimer hamiltonians.

  18. Variation of photon interaction parameters with energy for some Cu-Pb alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Singh, Tejbir Kaur, Sarpreet; Kaur, Parminder; Kaur, Harvinder; Singh, Parjit S.

    2015-08-28

    Various photon interaction parameters (mass attenuation coefficients, effective atomic numbers and effective electron numbers) have been computed for different compositions of Cu-Pb alloys in the wide energy regime of 1 keV to 100 GeV. The mass attenuation coefficients have been computed using mixture rule with the help of WinXCom (mass attenuation coefficient database for elements). The variation of mass attenuation coefficients, effective atomic numbers and electron density has been analysed and discussed in terms of dominance of different photon interaction processes viz. Compton scattering, photoelectric effect and pair production.

  19. Variation of photon interaction parameters with energy for some Cu-Pb alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Tejbir; Kaur, Sarpreet; Kaur, Parminder; Kaur, Harvinder; Singh, Parjit S.

    2015-08-01

    Various photon interaction parameters (mass attenuation coefficients, effective atomic numbers and effective electron numbers) have been computed for different compositions of Cu-Pb alloys in the wide energy regime of 1 keV to 100 GeV. The mass attenuation coefficients have been computed using mixture rule with the help of WinXCom (mass attenuation coefficient database for elements). The variation of mass attenuation coefficients, effective atomic numbers and electron density has been analysed and discussed in terms of dominance of different photon interaction processes viz. Compton scattering, photoelectric effect and pair production.

  20. Estimation of the solubility parameters of model plant surfaces and agrochemicals: a valuable tool for understanding plant surface interactions

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Most aerial plant parts are covered with a hydrophobic lipid-rich cuticle, which is the interface between the plant organs and the surrounding environment. Plant surfaces may have a high degree of hydrophobicity because of the combined effects of surface chemistry and roughness. The physical and chemical complexity of the plant cuticle limits the development of models that explain its internal structure and interactions with surface-applied agrochemicals. In this article we introduce a thermodynamic method for estimating the solubilities of model plant surface constituents and relating them to the effects of agrochemicals. Results Following the van Krevelen and Hoftyzer method, we calculated the solubility parameters of three model plant species and eight compounds that differ in hydrophobicity and polarity. In addition, intact tissues were examined by scanning electron microscopy and the surface free energy, polarity, solubility parameter and work of adhesion of each were calculated from contact angle measurements of three liquids with different polarities. By comparing the affinities between plant surface constituents and agrochemicals derived from (a) theoretical calculations and (b) contact angle measurements we were able to distinguish the physical effect of surface roughness from the effect of the chemical nature of the epicuticular waxes. A solubility parameter model for plant surfaces is proposed on the basis of an increasing gradient from the cuticular surface towards the underlying cell wall. Conclusions The procedure enabled us to predict the interactions among agrochemicals, plant surfaces, and cuticular and cell wall components, and promises to be a useful tool for improving our understanding of biological surface interactions. PMID:23151272

  1. Automated Optimization of Water–Water Interaction Parameters for a Coarse-Grained Model

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    We have developed an automated parameter optimization software framework (ParOpt) that implements the Nelder–Mead simplex algorithm and applied it to a coarse-grained polarizable water model. The model employs a tabulated, modified Morse potential with decoupled short- and long-range interactions incorporating four water molecules per interaction site. Polarizability is introduced by the addition of a harmonic angle term defined among three charged points within each bead. The target function for parameter optimization was based on the experimental density, surface tension, electric field permittivity, and diffusion coefficient. The model was validated by comparison of statistical quantities with experimental observation. We found very good performance of the optimization procedure and good agreement of the model with experiment. PMID:24460506

  2. Automated optimization of water-water interaction parameters for a coarse-grained model.

    PubMed

    Fogarty, Joseph C; Chiu, See-Wing; Kirby, Peter; Jakobsson, Eric; Pandit, Sagar A

    2014-02-13

    We have developed an automated parameter optimization software framework (ParOpt) that implements the Nelder-Mead simplex algorithm and applied it to a coarse-grained polarizable water model. The model employs a tabulated, modified Morse potential with decoupled short- and long-range interactions incorporating four water molecules per interaction site. Polarizability is introduced by the addition of a harmonic angle term defined among three charged points within each bead. The target function for parameter optimization was based on the experimental density, surface tension, electric field permittivity, and diffusion coefficient. The model was validated by comparison of statistical quantities with experimental observation. We found very good performance of the optimization procedure and good agreement of the model with experiment. PMID:24460506

  3. Comparison of photon interaction parameters of some tissues and their substitutes.

    PubMed

    Manjunatha, H C

    2014-02-01

    The photon interaction parameters such as mass attenuation coefficient (μ/ρ), effective atomic number (Z eff) and effective electron density (N el) must be identical for the phantom material and their tissue. In the present study, the μ/ρ, Z eff, and N el for muscle, breast, lung tissue have been computed, and their substitutes such as Griffith muscle, Griffith breast, Griffith lung, Alderson muscle A, Alderson muscle, and Alderson lung. Also compared were μ/ρ, Z eff, and N el for muscle, breast, lung tissue, and their substitutes. It can be shown that Alderson muscle B is better substitute for muscle than Griffith muscle and Alderson muscle A. Similarly, the photon interaction parameters of tissue substitutes of lung and breast with their original tissue were also compared. PMID:24378560

  4. Interaction of the Heparin-Binding Consensus Sequence of β-Amyloid Peptides with Heparin and Heparin-Derived Oligosaccharides.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Khanh; Rabenstein, Dallas L

    2016-03-10

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is characterized by the presence of amyloid plaques in the AD brain. Comprised primarily of the 40- and 42-residue β-amyloid (Aβ) peptides, there is evidence that the heparan sulfate (HS) of heparan sulfate proteoglycans (HSPGs) plays a role in amyloid plaque formation and stability; however, details of the interaction of Aβ peptides with HS are not known. We have characterized the interaction of heparin and heparin-derived oligosaccharides with a model peptide for the heparin- and HS-binding domain of Aβ peptides (Ac-VHHQKLV-NH2; Aβ(12-18)), with mutants of Aβ(12-18), and with additional histidine-containing peptides. The nature of the binding interaction was characterized by NMR, binding constants and other thermodynamic parameters were determined by isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC), and relative binding affinities were determined by heparin affinity chromatography. The binding of Aβ(12-18) by heparin and heparin-derived oligosaccharides is pH-dependent, with the imidazolium groups of the histidine side chains interacting site-specifically within a cleft created by a trisaccharide sequence of heparin, the binding is mediated by electrostatic interactions, and there is a significant entropic contribution to the binding free energy as a result of displacement of Na(+) ions from heparin upon binding of cationic Aβ(12-18). The binding constant decreases as the size of the heparin-derived oligosaccharide decreases and as the concentration of Na(+) ion in the bulk solution increases. Structure-binding relationships characterized in this study are analyzed and discussed in terms of the counterion condensation theory of the binding of cationic peptides by anionic polyelectrolytes. PMID:26872053

  5. Strong Ligand-Protein Interactions Derived from Diffuse Ligand Interactions with Loose Binding Sites

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Many systems in biology rely on binding of ligands to target proteins in a single high-affinity conformation with a favorable ΔG. Alternatively, interactions of ligands with protein regions that allow diffuse binding, distributed over multiple sites and conformations, can exhibit favorable ΔG because of their higher entropy. Diffuse binding may be biologically important for multidrug transporters and carrier proteins. A fine-grained computational method for numerical integration of total binding ΔG arising from diffuse regional interaction of a ligand in multiple conformations using a Markov Chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) approach is presented. This method yields a metric that quantifies the influence on overall ligand affinity of ligand binding to multiple, distinct sites within a protein binding region. This metric is essentially a measure of dispersion in equilibrium ligand binding and depends on both the number of potential sites of interaction and the distribution of their individual predicted affinities. Analysis of test cases indicates that, for some ligand/protein pairs involving transporters and carrier proteins, diffuse binding contributes greatly to total affinity, whereas in other cases the influence is modest. This approach may be useful for studying situations where “nonspecific” interactions contribute to biological function. PMID:26064949

  6. Strong Ligand-Protein Interactions Derived from Diffuse Ligand Interactions with Loose Binding Sites.

    PubMed

    Marsh, Lorraine

    2015-01-01

    Many systems in biology rely on binding of ligands to target proteins in a single high-affinity conformation with a favorable ΔG. Alternatively, interactions of ligands with protein regions that allow diffuse binding, distributed over multiple sites and conformations, can exhibit favorable ΔG because of their higher entropy. Diffuse binding may be biologically important for multidrug transporters and carrier proteins. A fine-grained computational method for numerical integration of total binding ΔG arising from diffuse regional interaction of a ligand in multiple conformations using a Markov Chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) approach is presented. This method yields a metric that quantifies the influence on overall ligand affinity of ligand binding to multiple, distinct sites within a protein binding region. This metric is essentially a measure of dispersion in equilibrium ligand binding and depends on both the number of potential sites of interaction and the distribution of their individual predicted affinities. Analysis of test cases indicates that, for some ligand/protein pairs involving transporters and carrier proteins, diffuse binding contributes greatly to total affinity, whereas in other cases the influence is modest. This approach may be useful for studying situations where "nonspecific" interactions contribute to biological function. PMID:26064949

  7. Study of interaction between human serum albumin and three phenanthridine derivatives: Fluorescence spectroscopy and computational approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Jianming; Yue, Yuanyuan; Wang, Jing; Yan, Xuyang; Liu, Ren; Sun, Yangyang; Li, Xiaoge

    2015-06-01

    Over the past decades, phenanthridine derivatives have captured the imagination of many chemists due to their wide applications. In the present work, the interaction between phenanthridine derivatives benzo [4,5]imidazo[1,2-a]thieno[2,3-c]quinoline (BTQ), benzo[4,5]imidazo[1,2-a]furo[2,3-c]quinoline (BFQ), 5,6-dimethylbenzo[4,5]imidazo[1,2-a]furo[2,3-c]quinoline (DFQ) and human serum albumin (HSA) were investigated by molecular modeling techniques and spectroscopic methods. The results of molecular modeling simulations revealed that the phenanthridine derivatives could bind on both site I in HSA. Fluorescence data revealed that the fluorescence quenching of HSA by phenanthridine derivatives were the result of the formation of phenanthridine derivatives-HSA complex, and the binding intensity between three phenanthridine derivatives and HSA was BTQ > BFQ > DFQ. Thermodynamics confirmed that the interaction were entropy driven with predominantly hydrophobic forces. The effects of some biological metal ions and toxic ions on the binding affinity between phenanthridine derivatives and HSA were further examined.

  8. Bottom-up modeling approach for the quantitative estimation of parameters in pathogen-host interactions

    PubMed Central

    Lehnert, Teresa; Timme, Sandra; Pollmächer, Johannes; Hünniger, Kerstin; Kurzai, Oliver; Figge, Marc Thilo

    2015-01-01

    Opportunistic fungal pathogens can cause bloodstream infection and severe sepsis upon entering the blood stream of the host. The early immune response in human blood comprises the elimination of pathogens by antimicrobial peptides and innate immune cells, such as neutrophils or monocytes. Mathematical modeling is a predictive method to examine these complex processes and to quantify the dynamics of pathogen-host interactions. Since model parameters are often not directly accessible from experiment, their estimation is required by calibrating model predictions with experimental data. Depending on the complexity of the mathematical model, parameter estimation can be associated with excessively high computational costs in terms of run time and memory. We apply a strategy for reliable parameter estimation where different modeling approaches with increasing complexity are used that build on one another. This bottom-up modeling approach is applied to an experimental human whole-blood infection assay for Candida albicans. Aiming for the quantification of the relative impact of different routes of the immune response against this human-pathogenic fungus, we start from a non-spatial state-based model (SBM), because this level of model complexity allows estimating a priori unknown transition rates between various system states by the global optimization method simulated annealing. Building on the non-spatial SBM, an agent-based model (ABM) is implemented that incorporates the migration of interacting cells in three-dimensional space. The ABM takes advantage of estimated parameters from the non-spatial SBM, leading to a decreased dimensionality of the parameter space. This space can be scanned using a local optimization approach, i.e., least-squares error estimation based on an adaptive regular grid search, to predict cell migration parameters that are not accessible in experiment. In the future, spatio-temporal simulations of whole-blood samples may enable timely

  9. Investigation of interaction parameters in mixed micelle using pulsed field gradient NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Gharibi, H; Javadian, S; Sohrabi, B; Behjatmanesh, R

    2005-05-01

    Pulsed field gradient NMR spectroscopy was used to determine the partitioning of surfactant between monomeric and micellar forms in a mixed CTAB (hexadecyltetramethylammonium bromide) and Triton X-100 [p-(1,1,3-tetramethylbutyl)polyoxyethylene] system. In addition, potentiometric and surface tension measurements were used to determine the free concentration of ionic surfactant and the critical micelle concentration (CMC) of mixtures of n-alkyltrimethylammonium bromide (C(n)TAB, n=12, 14, 16, 18) and Triton X-100. Regular solution theory cannot describe the behavior of the activity coefficient and the excess Gibbs free energy of mixtures of ionic and nonionic surfactants. To overcome these shortcomings, we developed a new model that combines Van Laar expressions and the theory of nonrandom mixing in mixed micelles. The Van Laar expressions contain an additional parameter, rho, which reflects differences in the size of the components of the mixture. Nonrandom mixing theory was introduced to describe nonrandom mixing in mixed micelles. This effect was modeled by a packing parameter, P*. The proposed model provided a good description of the behavior of binary surfactant mixtures. The results indicated that head group size and packing constraints are important contributors to nonideal surfactant behavior. In addition, the results showed that as the chain length of the C(n)TAB molecule in C(n)TAB/Triton X-100 mixtures was increased, the head group size parameter remained constant, but the interaction and packing parameters increased. Increase of the temperature caused an increase in the interaction parameter beta and a decrease in the packing parameter (P*). PMID:15797433

  10. Enthalpic parameters of interaction between diglycylglycine and polyatomic alcohols in aqueous solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mezhevoi, I. N.; Badelin, V. G.

    2015-12-01

    Integral enthalpies of solution Δsol H m of diglycylglycine in aqueous solutions of glycerol, ethylene glycol, and 1,2-propylene glycol are measured via solution calorimetry. The experimental data are used to calculate the standard enthalpies of solution (Δsol H°) and transfer (Δtr H°) of the tripeptide from water to aqueous solutions of polyatomic alcohols. The enthalpic pairwise coefficients h xy of interactions between the tripeptide and polyatomic alcohol molecules are calculated using the McMillan-Mayer solution theory and are found to have positive values. The findings are discussed using the theory of estimating various types of interactions in ternary systems and the effect the structural features of interacting biomolecules have on the thermochemical parameters of diglycylglycine dissolution.

  11. Theory of electronic structure and nuclear quadrupole interactions in the BF3-NH3 complex and methyl derivatives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pink, R. H.; Dubey, Archana; Mahato, Dip N.; Badu, S. R.; Scheicher, R. H.; Mahanti, Mahendra K.; Huang, M. B.; Saha, H. P.; Chow, Lee; Das, T. P.

    Magnetic Hyperfine and Nuclear Quadrupole Interactions (HPI and NQI) are now important tools for characterization of systems of interest in materials research and industry. Boron-Trifluoride is an inorganic compound that is very important in this respect as a catalyst in chemical physics research and industry, forming complexes in the process with compounds like ammonia, water and methyl alcohol. The present paper deals with the BP3-NH3 complex and methyl derivatives BP3NHx(CH3)3-x for which we have studied the electronic structures, binding energies, and 19F* (I=5/2) nuclear quadrupole interactions using the first-principles Hartree-Fock-Roothaan procedure combined with electron correlation effects. Our results for the 19F* nuclear quadrupole coupling constant (e 2qQ/h) in units of MHz compare well with experiment. Trends in the binding energies and NQI parameters between the complexes are discussed.

  12. Theory of electronic structure and nuclear quadrupole interactions in the BF3 NH3 complex and methyl derivatives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pink, R. H.; Dubey, Archana; Mahato, Dip N.; Badu, S. R.; Scheicher, R. H.; Mahanti, Mahendra K.; Huang, M. B.; Saha, H. P.; Chow, Lee; Das, T. P.

    2007-04-01

    Magnetic Hyperfine and Nuclear Quadrupole Interactions (HFI and NQI) are now important tools for characterization of systems of interest in materials research and industry. Boron-Trifluoride is an inorganic compound that is very important in this respect as a catalyst in chemical physics research and industry, forming complexes in the process with compounds like ammonia, water and methyl alcohol. The present paper deals with the BF3 NH3 complex and methyl derivatives BF3NHx(CH3)3-x for which we have studied the electronic structures, binding energies, and 19F* ( I = 5/2) nuclear quadrupole interactions using the first-principles Hartree Fock Roothaan procedure combined with electron correlation effects. Our results for the 19F* nuclear quadrupole coupling constant ( e 2 qQ/ h) in units of MHz compare well with experiment. Trends in the binding energies and NQI parameters between the complexes are discussed.

  13. An investigation of ab initio shell-model interactions derived by no-core shell model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, XiaoBao; Dong, GuoXiang; Li, QingFeng; Shen, CaiWan; Yu, ShaoYing

    2016-09-01

    The microscopic shell-model effective interactions are mainly based on the many-body perturbation theory (MBPT), the first work of which can be traced to Brown and Kuo's first attempt in 1966, derived from the Hamada-Johnston nucleon-nucleon potential. However, the convergence of the MBPT is still unclear. On the other hand, ab initio theories, such as Green's function Monte Carlo (GFMC), no-core shell model (NCSM), and coupled-cluster theory with single and double excitations (CCSD), have made many progress in recent years. However, due to the increasing demanding of computing resources, these ab initio applications are usually limited to nuclei with mass up to A = 16. Recently, people have realized the ab initio construction of valence-space effective interactions, which is obtained through a second-time renormalization, or to be more exactly, projecting the full-manybody Hamiltonian into core, one-body, and two-body cluster parts. In this paper, we present the investigation of such ab initio shell-model interactions, by the recent derived sd-shell effective interactions based on effective J-matrix Inverse Scattering Potential (JISP) and chiral effective-field theory (EFT) through NCSM. In this work, we have seen the similarity between the ab initio shellmodel interactions and the interactions obtained by MBPT or by empirical fitting. Without the inclusion of three-body (3-bd) force, the ab initio shell-model interactions still share similar defects with the microscopic interactions by MBPT, i.e., T = 1 channel is more attractive while T = 0 channel is more repulsive than empirical interactions. The progress to include more many-body correlations and 3-bd force is still badly needed, to see whether such efforts of ab initio shell-model interactions can reach similar precision as the interactions fitted to experimental data.

  14. Weak Interactions Govern the Viscosity of Concentrated Antibody Solutions: High-Throughput Analysis Using the Diffusion Interaction Parameter

    PubMed Central

    Connolly, Brian D.; Petry, Chris; Yadav, Sandeep; Demeule, Barthélemy; Ciaccio, Natalie; Moore, Jamie M.R.; Shire, Steven J.; Gokarn, Yatin R.

    2012-01-01

    Weak protein-protein interactions are thought to modulate the viscoelastic properties of concentrated antibody solutions. Predicting the viscoelastic behavior of concentrated antibodies from their dilute solution behavior is of significant interest and remains a challenge. Here, we show that the diffusion interaction parameter (kD), a component of the osmotic second virial coefficient (B2) that is amenable to high-throughput measurement in dilute solutions, correlates well with the viscosity of concentrated monoclonal antibody (mAb) solutions. We measured the kD of 29 different mAbs (IgG1 and IgG4) in four different solvent conditions (low and high ion normality) and found a linear dependence between kD and the exponential coefficient that describes the viscosity concentration profiles (|R| ≥ 0.9). Through experimentally measured effective charge measurements, under low ion normality where the electroviscous effect can dominate, we show that the mAb solution viscosity is poorly correlated with the mAb net charge (|R| ≤ 0.6). With this large data set, our results provide compelling evidence in support of weak intermolecular interactions, in contrast to the notion that the electroviscous effect is important in governing the viscoelastic behavior of concentrated mAb solutions. Our approach is particularly applicable as a screening tool for selecting mAbs with desirable viscosity properties early during lead candidate selection. PMID:22828333

  15. Physicochemical study on interactions between T-2 and HT-2 toxin derivatives and cyclodextrins

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Physicochemical interactions occurring between fluorescent anthracene derivatives of T-2 and HT-2 toxins and different cyclodextrins (CDs) were investigated in aqueous solutions by means of UV-Vis absorption, fluorescence emission, and Dynamic Light Scattering. Binding constant values and physicoche...

  16. Automation of SimSphere Land Surface Model Use as a Standalone Application and Integration With EO Data for Deriving Key Land Surface Parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petropoulos, George P.; Konstas, Ioannis; Carlson, Toby N.

    2013-04-01

    Use of simulation process models has played a key role in extending our abilities to study Earth system processes and enhancing our understanding on how different components of it interplay. Use of such models combined with Earth Observation (EO) data provides a promising direction towards deriving accurately spatiotemporal estimates of key parameters characterising land surface interactions, by combining the horizontal coverage and spectral resolution of remote sensing data with the vertical coverage and fine temporal continuity of those models. SimSphere is such a software toolkit written in Java for simulating the interactions of soil, vegetation and atmosphere layers of the Earth's land surface. Its use is at present continually expanding worldwide both as an educational and as a research tool for scientific investigations. It is being used either as a stand-alone application or synergistically with EO data. Herein we present recent advancements introduced to SimSphere in different aspects of the model aiming to make its use more robust when used both as a standalone application and synergistically with EO data. We have extensively tested and updated the model code, as well as enhanced it with new functionalities. These included for example taking into account the thermal inertia variation in soil moisture, simulating additional parameters characterising land surface interactions, automating the model use when integrating it with EO data via the "triangle" method and developing batch processing operations. Use of these recently introduced to the model functionalities are illustrated herein using a variety of examples. Our work is significant to the users' community of the model and very timely, given the potential use of SimSphere in an EO-based method being under development for deriving operationally regional estimates of energy fluxes and soil moisture from EO data provided by non-commercial vendors. KEYWORDS: land surface interactions, land surface process

  17. Evaluating the Spatio-Temporal Factors that Structure Network Parameters of Plant-Herbivore Interactions

    PubMed Central

    López-Carretero, Antonio; Díaz-Castelazo, Cecilia; Boege, Karina; Rico-Gray, Víctor

    2014-01-01

    Despite the dynamic nature of ecological interactions, most studies on species networks offer static representations of their structure, constraining our understanding of the ecological mechanisms involved in their spatio-temporal stability. This is the first study to evaluate plant-herbivore interaction networks on a small spatio-temporal scale. Specifically, we simultaneously assessed the effect of host plant availability, habitat complexity and seasonality on the structure of plant-herbivore networks in a coastal tropical ecosystem. Our results revealed that changes in the host plant community resulting from seasonality and habitat structure are reflected not only in the herbivore community, but also in the emergent properties (network parameters) of the plant-herbivore interaction network such as connectance, selectiveness and modularity. Habitat conditions and periods that are most stressful favored the presence of less selective and susceptible herbivore species, resulting in increased connectance within networks. In contrast, the high degree of selectivennes (i.e. interaction specialization) and modularity of the networks under less stressful conditions was promoted by the diversification in resource use by herbivores. By analyzing networks at a small spatio-temporal scale we identified the ecological factors structuring this network such as habitat complexity and seasonality. Our research offers new evidence on the role of abiotic and biotic factors in the variation of the properties of species interaction networks. PMID:25340790

  18. On the Origin of Differences in Helicity Parameters Derived from Data of Two Solar Magnetographs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Haiqing; Zhang, Hongqi; Kuzanyan, K.; Sakurai, T.

    2016-09-01

    We analyzed how sensitivity and accuracy in solar magnetic field measurements may affect the values of mean current helicity density hc and twist parameter α_{av} by comparing these values obtained from two magnetographs (SMFT at Beijing and SFT at Mitaka, Tokyo). When we computed the helicity parameters from the SFT data, we replaced the values of the longitudinal field component, transverse field strength, and transverse field azimuth angle with those from the SMFT data and examined the differences. The results show that the correlation coefficient and the fraction of the data that agree in signs of hc or α_{av} increase when an SFT parameter is substituted by the corresponding SMFT parameter because one source of discrepancy is removed. The increase in correlation coefficient is largest when the azimuthal angles and transverse field strengths are set identical in the two instruments; the correlation coefficient of hc ( α_{av}) increases from 0.74 (0.56) to 0.86 (0.78), respectively, indicating that the differences in the transverse field strength and its azimuthal angle are the largest source of discrepancy in the values of hc or α_{av}. We found a nonlinear relationship in the components of the magnetic field between the two instruments for some data samples; we conclude that this is due to the discrepancy in the calibration procedure between the two instruments. This nonlinearity can be another source of difference in determining helical parameters between the two instruments.

  19. Derivation and Implementation of the Gradient of the R(-7) Dispersion Interaction in the Effective Fragment Potential Method.

    PubMed

    Guidez, Emilie B; Xu, Peng; Gordon, Mark S

    2016-02-01

    The dispersion interaction energy may be expressed as a sum over R(-n) terms, with n ≥ 6. Most implementations of the dispersion interaction in model potentials are terminated at n = 6. Those implementations that do include higher order contributions commonly only include even power terms, despite the fact that odd power terms can be important. Because the effective fragment potential (EFP) method contains no empirically fitted parameters, the EFP method provides a useful vehicle for examining the importance of the leading R(-7) odd power term in the dispersion expansion. To fully evaluate the importance of the R(-7) contribution to the dispersion energy, it is important to have analytic energy first derivatives for all terms. In the present work, the gradients of the term E7 ∼ R(-7) are derived analytically, implemented in the GAMESS software package, and evaluated relative to other terms in the dispersion expansion and relative to the total EFP interaction energy. Periodic boundary conditions in the minimum image convention are also implemented. A more accurate dispersion energy contribution can now be obtained during molecular dynamics simulations. PMID:26745447

  20. Spectroscopic studies on the interaction of cinnamic acid and its hydroxyl derivatives with human serum albumin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Min, Jiang; Meng-Xia, Xie; Dong, Zheng; Yuan, Liu; Xiao-Yu, Li; Xing, Chen

    2004-04-01

    Cinnamic acid and its derivatives possess various biological effects in remedy of many diseases. Interaction of cinnamic acid and its hydroxyl derivatives, p-coumaric acid and caffeic acid, with human serum albumin (HSA), and concomitant changes in its conformation were studied using fluorescence and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopic methods. Fluorescence data revealed the presence of one binding site on HSA for cinnamic acid and its hydroxyl derivatives, and their binding constants ( KA) are caffeic acid> p-coumaric acid> cinnamic acid when Cdrug/ CHSA ranging from 1 to 10. The changes of the secondary structure of HSA after interacting with the three drugs are estimated, respectively by combining the curve-fitting results of amid I and amid III bands. The α-helix structure has a decrease of ≈9, 5 and 3% after HSA interacted with caffeic acid, p-coumaric acid and cinnamic acid, respectively. It was found that the hydroxyls substituted on aromatic ring of the drugs play an important role in the changes of protein's secondary structure. Combining the result of fluorescence quenching and the changes of secondary structure of HSA after interaction with the three drugs, the drug-HSA interaction mode was discussed.

  1. Reconstructed historical land cover and biophysical parameters for studies of land-atmosphere interactions within the eastern United States

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Steyaert, L.T.; Knox, R.G.

    2008-01-01

    Over the past 350 years, the eastern half of the United States experienced extensive land cover changes. These began with land clearing in the 1600s, continued with widespread deforestation, wetland drainage, and intensive land use by 1920, and then evolved to the present-day landscape of forest regrowth, intensive agriculture, urban expansion, and landscape fragmentation. Such changes alter biophysical properties that are key determinants of land-atmosphere interactions (water, energy, and carbon exchanges). To understand the potential implications of these land use transformations, we developed and analyzed 20-km land cover and biophysical parameter data sets for the eastern United States at 1650, 1850, 1920, and 1992 time slices. Our approach combined potential vegetation, county-level census data, soils data, resource statistics, a Landsat-derived land cover classification, and published historical information on land cover and land use. We reconstructed land use intensity maps for each time slice and characterized the land cover condition. We combined these land use data with a mutually consistent set of biophysical parameter classes, to characterize the historical diversity and distribution of land surface properties. Time series maps of land surface albedo, leaf area index, a deciduousness index, canopy height, surface roughness, and potential saturated soils in 1650, 1850, 1920, and 1992 illustrate the profound effects of land use change on biophysical properties of the land surface. Although much of the eastern forest has returned, the average biophysical parameters for recent landscapes remain markedly different from those of earlier periods. Understanding the consequences of these historical changes will require land-atmosphere interactions modeling experiments.

  2. Effect of the structure of gallic acid and its derivatives on their interaction with plant ferritin.

    PubMed

    Wang, Qunqun; Zhou, Kai; Ning, Yong; Zhao, Guanghua

    2016-12-15

    Gallic acid and its derivatives co-exist with protein components in foodstuffs, but there is few report on their interaction with proteins. On the other hand, plant ferritin represents not only a novel class of iron supplement, but also a new nanocarrier for encapsulation of bioactive nutrients. However, plant ferritin is easy to be degraded by pepsin in the stomach, thereby limiting its application. Herein, we investigated the interaction of gallic acid and its derivatives with recombinant soybean seed H-2 ferritin (rH-2). We found that these phenolic acids interacted with rH-2 in a structure-dependent manner; namely, gallic acid (GA), methyl gallate (MEGA) and propyl gallate (PG) having three HO groups can bind to rH-2, while their analogues with two HO groups cannot. Consequently, such binding largely inhibited ferritin degradation by pepsin. These findings advance our understanding of the relationship between the structure and function of phenolic acids. PMID:27451180

  3. Fundamental electron-precursor-solid interactions derived from time dependent electron beam induced deposition simulations and experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Fowlkes, Jason Davidson; Rack, Philip D

    2010-01-01

    Unknown parameters critical to understanding the electron-precursor substrate interactions during electron beam induced deposition (EBID) have long limited our ability to fully control this nanoscale, directed assembly method. We report here values for the fundamental interaction parameters of D, the precursor surface diffusion coefficient, delta, the sticking probability and tau, the mean surface residence time which are critical parameters for understanding the assembly of EBID deposits. Values of D=6.4um2s-1, delta=0.0250 and tau=3.2ms were determined for a commonly used precursor molecule tungsten hexacarbonyl W(CO)6. Space and time predictions of the adsorbed precursor coverage C(r,t) were solved by an explicit finite differencing numerical scheme. Evolving nanopillar surface morphology was derived from solutions of C(r,t) considering electron induced dissociation as the critical depletion term. This made it possible to infer the space and time dependent precursor coverage both on, and around nanopillar structures to better understand local precursor dynamics during mass transport limited (MTL) and reaction rate limited (RRL) EBID.

  4. Deriving parameters of a fundamental detachment model for cohesive soils from flume and jet erosion tests

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The erosion rate of cohesive soils is commonly quantified using the excess shear stress equation, dependent on two major soil parameters: the critical shear stress and the erodibility coefficient. A submerged jet test (JET – Jet Erosion Test) is one method that has been developed for measuring thes...

  5. Photometric parameter maps of the Moon derived from LROC WAC images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sato, H.; Robinson, M. S.; Hapke, B. W.; Denevi, B. W.; Boyd, A. K.

    2013-12-01

    Spatially resolved photometric parameter maps were computed from 21 months of Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter Camera (LROC) Wide Angle Camera (WAC) images. Due to a 60° field-of-view (FOV), the WAC achieves nearly global coverage of the Moon each month with more than 50% overlap from orbit-to-orbit. From the repeat observations at various viewing and illumination geometries, we calculated Hapke bidirectional reflectance model parameters [1] for 1°x1° "tiles" from 70°N to 70°S and 0°E to 360°E. About 66,000 WAC images acquired from February 2010 to October 2011 were converted from DN to radiance factor (I/F) though radiometric calibration, partitioned into gridded tiles, and stacked in a time series (tile-by-tile method [2]). Lighting geometries (phase, incidence, emission) were computed using the WAC digital terrain model (100 m/pixel) [3]. The Hapke parameters were obtained by model fitting against I/F within each tile. Among the 9 parameters of the Hapke model, we calculated 3 free parameters (w, b, and hs) by setting constant values for 4 parameters (Bco=0, hc=1, θ, φ=0) and interpolating 2 parameters (c, Bso). In this simplification, we ignored the Coherent Backscatter Opposition Effect (CBOE) to avoid competing CBOE and Shadow Hiding Opposition Effect (SHOE). We also assumed that surface regolith porosity is uniform across the Moon. The roughness parameter (θ) was set to an averaged value from the equator (× 3°N). The Henyey-Greenstein double lobe function (H-G2) parameter (c) was given by the 'hockey stick' relation [4] (negative correlation) between b and c based on laboratory measurements. The amplitude of SHOE (Bso) was given by the correlation between w and Bso at the equator (× 3°N). Single scattering albedo (w) is strongly correlated to the photometrically normalized I/F, as expected. The c shows an inverse trend relative to b due to the 'hockey stick' relation. The parameter c is typically low for the maria (0.08×0.06) relative to the

  6. Relationships between 6.7 micrometer imagery and radiosonde-derived parameters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stewart, Michael R.; Fuelberg, Henry E.

    1986-01-01

    The relationships between water vapor images and various thermodynamic and kinematic patterns derived from ground-based data obtained on March 6-7, 1982 are investigated. The synoptic-scale characteristics of the observed image streaks are studied. Water vapor budgets were calculated from sonde data. Variations in black body temperatures are analyzed using water vapor budgets. The data reveal that the observed warm image streaks are caused by subsidence and horizontal flux divergence of vapor.

  7. Low-energy parameters of neutron-neutron interaction in the effective-range approximation

    SciTech Connect

    Babenko, V. A.; Petrov, N. M.

    2013-06-15

    The effect of the mass difference between the charged and neutral pions on the low-energy parameters of nucleon-nucleon interaction in the {sup 1}S{sub 0} state is studied in the effective-range approximation. On the basis of experimental values of the singlet parameters of neutron-proton scattering and the experimental value of the virtual-state energy for the neutron-neutron systemin the {sup 1}S{sub 0} state, the following values were obtained for the neutron-neutron scattering length and effective range: a{sub nn} = -16.59(117) fm and r{sub nn} = 2.83(11) fm. The calculated values agree well with present-day experimental results.

  8. Identification and calibration of the interaction matrix parameters for AO and MCAO systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neichel, Benoit; Parisot, Amelie; Petit, Cyril; Fusco, Thierry; Rigaut, François

    2012-07-01

    New tomographic Adaptive Optics (AO) concepts require a good knowledge of the system geometry and characteristics. These parameters are used to feed the tomographic reconstructors. In this paper we present a method to precisely identify the parameters required to construct an accurate synthetic set of models such as inuence functions, mis-registrations, directions of analysis or altitude of the DMs. The method is based on a multiparameter t of the interaction matrix. This identication method nds also its application in high contrast AO systems, such as SPHERE : in that case it is used as a diagnostic tool in order to precisely realign the system. The method has been tested and successfully implemented on HOMER, SPHERE and GeMS. Experimental results for these three systems are presented.

  9. Sequential Model-Based Parameter Optimization: an Experimental Investigation of Automated and Interactive Approaches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hutter, Frank; Bartz-Beielstein, Thomas; Hoos, Holger H.; Leyton-Brown, Kevin; Murphy, Kevin P.

    This work experimentally investigates model-based approaches for optimizing the performance of parameterized randomized algorithms. Such approaches build a response surface model and use this model for finding good parameter settings of the given algorithm. We evaluated two methods from the literature that are based on Gaussian process models: sequential parameter optimization (SPO) (Bartz-Beielstein et al. 2005) and sequential Kriging optimization (SKO) (Huang et al. 2006). SPO performed better "out-of-the-box," whereas SKO was competitive when response values were log transformed. We then investigated key design decisions within the SPO paradigm, characterizing the performance consequences of each. Based on these findings, we propose a new version of SPO, dubbed SPO+, which extends SPO with a novel intensification procedure and a log-transformed objective function. In a domain for which performance results for other (modelfree) parameter optimization approaches are available, we demonstrate that SPO+ achieves state-of-the-art performance. Finally, we compare this automated parameter tuning approach to an interactive, manual process that makes use of classical

  10. Adsorption interaction parameter of polyethers in ternary mobile phases: the critical adsorption line.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, V Cuong; Trathnigg, Bernd

    2010-04-01

    It is shown that in LC of polymers, the interaction parameter in ternary mobile phases can be described by a plane, which is determined by the dependencies in binary mobile phases. Instead of a critical adsorption point, critical conditions are observed along a straight line of composition between the two critical points in binary mobile phases. Consequently, a separation of block copolymers under critical conditions for one block by an adsorption mechanism for the other block can be achieved in ternary mobile phases of different compositions, which allows an adjustment of the retention of the adsorbing block. PMID:20222074

  11. LEOrbit: A program to calculate parameters relevant to modeling Low Earth Orbit spacecraft-plasma interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marchand, R.; Purschke, D.; Samson, J.

    2013-03-01

    Understanding the physics of interaction between satellites and the space environment is essential in planning and exploiting space missions. Several computer models have been developed over the years to study this interaction. In all cases, simulations are carried out in the reference frame of the spacecraft and effects such as charging, the formation of electrostatic sheaths and wakes are calculated for given conditions of the space environment. In this paper we present a program used to compute magnetic fields and a number of space plasma and space environment parameters relevant to Low Earth Orbits (LEO) spacecraft-plasma interaction modeling. Magnetic fields are obtained from the International Geophysical Reference Field (IGRF) and plasma parameters are obtained from the International Reference Ionosphere (IRI) model. All parameters are computed in the spacecraft frame of reference as a function of its six Keplerian elements. They are presented in a format that can be used directly in most spacecraft-plasma interaction models. Catalogue identifier: AENY_v1_0 Program summary URL:http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/summaries/AENY_v1_0.html Program obtainable from: CPC Program Library, Queen's University, Belfast, N. Ireland Licensing provisions: Standard CPC licence, http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/licence/licence.html No. of lines in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 270308 No. of bytes in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 2323222 Distribution format: tar.gz Programming language: FORTRAN 90. Computer: Non specific. Operating system: Non specific. RAM: 7.1 MB Classification: 19, 4.14. External routines: IRI, IGRF (included in the package). Nature of problem: Compute magnetic field components, direction of the sun, sun visibility factor and approximate plasma parameters in the reference frame of a Low Earth Orbit satellite. Solution method: Orbit integration, calls to IGRF and IRI libraries and transformation of coordinates from geocentric to spacecraft

  12. Effect of thermal history on Mossbauer signature and hyperfine interaction parameters of copper ferrite

    SciTech Connect

    Modi, K. B. Raval, P. Y.; Dulera, S. V.; Kathad, C. R.; Shah, S. J.; Trivedi, U. N.; Chandra, Usha

    2015-06-24

    Two specimens of copper ferrite, CuFe{sub 2}O{sub 4}, have been synthesized by double sintering ceramic technique with different thermal history i.e. slow cooled and quenched. X-ray diffractometry has confirmed single phase fcc spinel structure for slow cooled sample while tetragonal distortion is present in quenched sample. Mossbauer spectral analysis for slow-cooled copper ferrite reveals super position of two Zeeman split sextets along with paramagnetic singlet in the centre position corresponds to delafossite (CuFeO{sub 2}) phase that is completely absent in quenched sample. The hyperfine interaction parameters are highly influenced by heat treatment employed.

  13. Liquid metal magnetohydrodynamic flows in circular ducts at intermediate Hartmann numbers and interaction parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Molokov, S.; Reed, C. B.

    2003-12-01

    Magnetohydrodynamic flows in circular ducts in nonuniform magnetic fields are studied with reference to liquid metal blankets and divertors of fusion reactors. Flows in small and medium size reactors are characterized by moderate and low values of the Hartmann number (˜ 50-2000) and the interaction parameter (˜ 0.1-1000). The validity of the high-Hartmann number flow model for the intermediate range is discussed and the results of theoretical and experimental investigations are presented. Tables 2, Figs 5, Refs 8.

  14. Microscopic calculation of interacting boson model parameters by potential-energy surface mapping

    SciTech Connect

    Bentley, I.; Frauendorf, S.

    2011-06-15

    A coherent state technique is used to generate an interacting boson model (IBM) Hamiltonian energy surface which is adjusted to match a mean-field energy surface. This technique allows the calculation of IBM Hamiltonian parameters, prediction of properties of low-lying collective states, as well as the generation of probability distributions of various shapes in the ground state of transitional nuclei, the last two of which are of astrophysical interest. The results for krypton, molybdenum, palladium, cadmium, gadolinium, dysprosium, and erbium nuclei are compared with experiment.

  15. Comparison of CME three-dimensional parameters derived from single and multi-spacecraft

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    LEE, Harim; Moon, Yong-Jae; Na, Hyeonock; Jang, Soojeong

    2014-06-01

    Several geometrical models (e.g., cone and flux rope models) have been suggested to infer three-dimensional parameters of CMEs using multi-view observations (STEREO/SECCHI) and single-view observations (SOHO/LASCO). To prepare for when only single view observations are available, we have made a test whether the cone model parameters from single-view observations are consistent with those from multi-view ones. For this test, we select 35 CMEs which are identified as CMEs, whose angular widths are larger than 180 degrees, by one spacecraft and as limb CMEs by the other ones. For this we use SOHO/LASCO and STEREO/SECCHI data during the period from 2010 December to 2011 July when two spacecraft were separated by 90±10 degrees. In this study, we compare the 3-D parameters of these CMEs from three different methods: (1) a triangulation method using STEREO/SECCHI and SOHO/LASCO data, (2) a Graduated Cylindrical Shell (GCS) flux rope model using STEREO/SECCHI data, and (3) an ice cream cone model using SOHO/LASCO data. The parameters used for comparison are radial velocities, angular widths and source location (angle γ between the propagation direction and the plan of the sky). We find that the radial velocities and the γ-values from three methods are well correlated with one another (CC > 0.8). However, angular widths from the three methods are somewhat different with the correlation coefficients of CC > 0.4. We also find that the correlation coefficients between the locations from the three methods and the active region locations are larger than 0.9, implying that most of the CMEs are radially ejected.

  16. Novel interactions of fluorinated nucleotide derivatives targeting orotidine-5′-monophosphate decarboxylase

    PubMed Central

    Lewis, Melissa; Avina, Maria Elena Meza; Wei, Lianhu; Crandall, Ian E.; Bello, Angelica Mara; Poduch, Ewa; Liu, Yan; Paige, Christopher J.; Kain, Kevin C.; Pai, Emil F.; Kotra, Lakshmi P.

    2011-01-01

    Fluorinated nucleosides and nucleotides are of considerable interest to medicinal chemists due to their antiviral, anticancer, and other biological activities. However, their direct interactions at target binding sites are not well understood. A new class of 2′-deoxy-2′-fluoro-C6-substituted uridine and UMP derivatives were synthesized and evaluated as inhibitors of orotidine-5′-monophosphate decarboxylase (ODCase). These compounds were synthesized from the key intermediate, fully-protected 2′-deoxy-2′-fluorouridine. Among the synthesized compounds, 2′-deoxy-2′-fluoro-6-iodo-UMP covalently inhibited human ODCase with a second-order rate constant of 0.62 ± 0.02 M−1sec−1. Interestingly, the 6-cyano-2′-fluoro derivative covalently interacted with ODCase defying the conventional thinking, where its ribosyl derivative undergoes transformation into BMP by ODCase. This confirms that the 2′-fluoro moiety influences the chemistry at the C6 position of the nucleotides, thus interactions in the active site of ODCase. Molecular interactions of the 2′-fluorinated nucleotides are compared to those with the 3′-fluorinated nucleotides bound to the corresponding target enzyme, and the carbohydrate moieties were shown to bind in different conformations. PMID:21417464

  17. Running of oscillation parameters in matter with flavor-diagonal non-standard interactions of the neutrino

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agarwalla, Sanjib Kumar; Kao, Yee; Saha, Debashis; Takeuchi, Tatsu

    2015-11-01

    In this article we unravel the role of matter effect in neutrino oscillation in the presence of lepton-flavor-conserving, non-universal non-standard interactions (NSI's) of the neutrino. Employing the Jacobi method, we derive approximate analytical expressions for the effective mass-squared differences and mixing angles in matter. It is shown that, within the effective mixing matrix, the Standard Model (SM) W -exchange interaction only affects θ 12 and θ 13, while the flavor-diagonal NSI's only affect θ 23. The CP-violating phase δ remains unaffected. Using our simple and compact analytical approximation, we study the impact of the flavor-diagonal NSI's on the neutrino oscillation probabilities for various appearance and disappearance channels. At higher energies and longer baselines, it is found that the impact of the NSI's can be significant in the ν μ → ν μ channel, which can probed in future atmospheric neutrino experiments, if the NSI's are of the order of their current upper bounds. Our analysis also enables us to explore the possible degeneracy between the octant of θ 23 and the sign of the NSI parameter for a given choice of mass hierarchy in a simple manner.

  18. Mitochondrial DNA Fragmentation to Monitor Processing Parameters in High Acid, Plant-Derived Foods.

    PubMed

    Caldwell, Jane M; Pérez-Díaz, Ilenys M; Harris, Keith; Hassan, Hosni M; Simunovic, Josip; Sandeep, K P

    2015-12-01

    Mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) fragmentation was assessed in acidified foods. Using quantitative polymerase chain reaction, Ct values measured from fresh, fermented, pasteurized, and stored cucumber mtDNA were determined to be significantly different (P > 0.05) based on processing and shelf-life. This indicated that the combination of lower temperature thermal processes (hot-fill at 75 °C for 15 min) and acidified conditions (pH = 3.8) was sufficient to cause mtDNA fragmentation. In studies modeling high acid juices, pasteurization (96 °C, 0 to 24 min) of tomato serum produced Ct values which had high correlation to time-temperature treatment. Primers producing longer amplicons (approximately 1 kb) targeting the same mitochondrial gene gave greater sensitivity in correlating time-temperature treatments to Ct values. Lab-scale pasteurization studies using Ct values derived from the longer amplicon differentiated between heat treatments of tomato serum (95 °C for <2 min). MtDNA fragmentation was shown to be a potential new tool to characterize low temperature (<100 °C) high acid processes (pH < 4.6), nonthermal processes such as vegetable fermentation and holding times of acidified, plant-derived products. PMID:26556214

  19. Thermal analysis to derive energetic quality parameters of soil organic matter?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peikert, Benjamin; Schaumann, Gabriele Ellen

    2014-05-01

    Many studies have dealt with thermal analysis for characterisation of soil and soil organic matter. It is a versatile tool assessing various physicochemical properties of the sample during heating and/or cooling. Especially the combination of different detection methods is highly promising. In this contribution, we will discuss the combination of thermogravimetry (TGA) with differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) in one single thermal analysis device. TGA alone helps distinguishment of soil and soil organic matter fractions with respect to their resistance towards combustion and allows a quantitative assignment of thermolabile and recalcitrant OM fractions. Combination with DSC in the same device, allows determination of energy transformation during the combustion process. Therefore, it becomes possible to determine not only the calorific value of the organic matter, but also of its fractions. We will show the potential of using the calorific values of OM fractions as quality parameter - exemplified for the analysis of soils polluted with organic matter from the olive oil production. The pollution history of these samples is largely unknown. As expected, TGA indicated a relative enrichment of the labile carbon fraction in contaminated samples with respect to the controls. The calorific values of the thermolabile and the recalcitrant fractions differ from each other, and those of the recalcitrant fractions of the polluted samples were higher than of those of the unpolluted controls. Further analyses showed correlation of the calorific value of this fraction with soil water repellency and the carbon isotopic ratio. The synthesis of our current data suggests that the content of thermolabile fraction, the isotopic ratio and calorific value of the recalcitrant fraction are useful indicators for characterizing the degree of decomposition of OMW organic matter. In this contribution, we will further discuss the potential of using the energetic parameters a quality

  20. Derivation of the physical parameters for strong and weak flares from the Hα line

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Semeida, M. A.; Rashed, M. G.

    2016-06-01

    The two flares of 19 and 30 July 1999 were observed in the Hα line using the multichannel flare spectrograph (MFS) at the Astronomical Institute in Ondřejov, Czech Republic. We use a modified cloud method to fit the Hα line profiles which avoids using the background profile. We obtain the four parameters of the two flares: the source function, the optical thickness at line center, the line-of-sight velocity and the Doppler width. The observed asymmetry profiles have been reproduced by the theoretical ones based on our model. A discussion is made about the results of strong and weak flares using the present method.

  1. Plant-Derived Polyphenols Interact with Staphylococcal Enterotoxin A and Inhibit Toxin Activity.

    PubMed

    Shimamura, Yuko; Aoki, Natsumi; Sugiyama, Yuka; Tanaka, Takashi; Murata, Masatsune; Masuda, Shuichi

    2016-01-01

    This study was performed to investigate the inhibitory effects of 16 different plant-derived polyphenols on the toxicity of staphylococcal enterotoxin A (SEA). Plant-derived polyphenols were incubated with the cultured Staphylococcus aureus C-29 to investigate the effects of these samples on SEA produced from C-29 using Western blot analysis. Twelve polyphenols (0.1-0.5 mg/mL) inhibited the interaction between the anti-SEA antibody and SEA. We examined whether the polyphenols could directly interact with SEA after incubation of these test samples with SEA. As a result, 8 polyphenols (0.25 mg/mL) significantly decreased SEA protein levels. In addition, the polyphenols that interacted with SEA inactivated the toxin activity of splenocyte proliferation induced by SEA. Polyphenols that exerted inhibitory effects on SEA toxic activity had a tendency to interact with SEA. In particular, polyphenol compounds with 1 or 2 hexahydroxydiphenoyl groups and/or a galloyl group, such as eugeniin, castalagin, punicalagin, pedunculagin, corilagin and geraniin, strongly interacted with SEA and inhibited toxin activity at a low concentration. These polyphenols may be used to prevent S. aureus infection and staphylococcal food poisoning. PMID:27272505

  2. Deriving Heterospecific Self-Assembling Protein-Protein Interactions Using a Computational Interactome Screen.

    PubMed

    Crooks, Richard O; Baxter, Daniel; Panek, Anna S; Lubben, Anneke T; Mason, Jody M

    2016-01-29

    Interactions between naturally occurring proteins are highly specific, with protein-network imbalances associated with numerous diseases. For designed protein-protein interactions (PPIs), required specificity can be notoriously difficult to engineer. To accelerate this process, we have derived peptides that form heterospecific PPIs when combined. This is achieved using software that generates large virtual libraries of peptide sequences and searches within the resulting interactome for preferentially interacting peptides. To demonstrate feasibility, we have (i) generated 1536 peptide sequences based on the parallel dimeric coiled-coil motif and varied residues known to be important for stability and specificity, (ii) screened the 1,180,416 member interactome for predicted Tm values and (iii) used predicted Tm cutoff points to isolate eight peptides that form four heterospecific PPIs when combined. This required that all 32 hypothetical off-target interactions within the eight-peptide interactome be disfavoured and that the four desired interactions pair correctly. Lastly, we have verified the approach by characterising all 36 pairs within the interactome. In analysing the output, we hypothesised that several sequences are capable of adopting antiparallel orientations. We subsequently improved the software by removing sequences where doing so led to fully complementary electrostatic pairings. Our approach can be used to derive increasingly large and therefore complex sets of heterospecific PPIs with a wide range of potential downstream applications from disease modulation to the design of biomaterials and peptides in synthetic biology. PMID:26655848

  3. Deriving Heterospecific Self-Assembling Protein–Protein Interactions Using a Computational Interactome Screen

    PubMed Central

    Crooks, Richard O.; Baxter, Daniel; Panek, Anna S.; Lubben, Anneke T.; Mason, Jody M.

    2016-01-01

    Interactions between naturally occurring proteins are highly specific, with protein-network imbalances associated with numerous diseases. For designed protein–protein interactions (PPIs), required specificity can be notoriously difficult to engineer. To accelerate this process, we have derived peptides that form heterospecific PPIs when combined. This is achieved using software that generates large virtual libraries of peptide sequences and searches within the resulting interactome for preferentially interacting peptides. To demonstrate feasibility, we have (i) generated 1536 peptide sequences based on the parallel dimeric coiled-coil motif and varied residues known to be important for stability and specificity, (ii) screened the 1,180,416 member interactome for predicted Tm values and (iii) used predicted Tm cutoff points to isolate eight peptides that form four heterospecific PPIs when combined. This required that all 32 hypothetical off-target interactions within the eight-peptide interactome be disfavoured and that the four desired interactions pair correctly. Lastly, we have verified the approach by characterising all 36 pairs within the interactome. In analysing the output, we hypothesised that several sequences are capable of adopting antiparallel orientations. We subsequently improved the software by removing sequences where doing so led to fully complementary electrostatic pairings. Our approach can be used to derive increasingly large and therefore complex sets of heterospecific PPIs with a wide range of potential downstream applications from disease modulation to the design of biomaterials and peptides in synthetic biology. PMID:26655848

  4. Plant-Derived Polyphenols Interact with Staphylococcal Enterotoxin A and Inhibit Toxin Activity

    PubMed Central

    Shimamura, Yuko; Aoki, Natsumi; Sugiyama, Yuka; Tanaka, Takashi; Murata, Masatsune; Masuda, Shuichi

    2016-01-01

    This study was performed to investigate the inhibitory effects of 16 different plant-derived polyphenols on the toxicity of staphylococcal enterotoxin A (SEA). Plant-derived polyphenols were incubated with the cultured Staphylococcus aureus C-29 to investigate the effects of these samples on SEA produced from C-29 using Western blot analysis. Twelve polyphenols (0.1–0.5 mg/mL) inhibited the interaction between the anti-SEA antibody and SEA. We examined whether the polyphenols could directly interact with SEA after incubation of these test samples with SEA. As a result, 8 polyphenols (0.25 mg/mL) significantly decreased SEA protein levels. In addition, the polyphenols that interacted with SEA inactivated the toxin activity of splenocyte proliferation induced by SEA. Polyphenols that exerted inhibitory effects on SEA toxic activity had a tendency to interact with SEA. In particular, polyphenol compounds with 1 or 2 hexahydroxydiphenoyl groups and/or a galloyl group, such as eugeniin, castalagin, punicalagin, pedunculagin, corilagin and geraniin, strongly interacted with SEA and inhibited toxin activity at a low concentration. These polyphenols may be used to prevent S. aureus infection and staphylococcal food poisoning. PMID:27272505

  5. Geostatistical analysis of tritium, groundwater age and other noble gas derived parameters in California.

    PubMed

    Visser, A; Moran, J E; Hillegonds, Darren; Singleton, M J; Kulongoski, Justin T; Belitz, Kenneth; Esser, B K

    2016-03-15

    Key characteristics of California groundwater systems related to aquifer vulnerability, sustainability, recharge locations and mechanisms, and anthropogenic impact on recharge are revealed in a spatial geostatistical analysis of a unique data set of tritium, noble gases and other isotopic analyses unprecedented in size at nearly 4000 samples. The correlation length of key groundwater residence time parameters varies between tens of kilometers ((3)H; age) to the order of a hundred kilometers ((4)Heter; (14)C; (3)Hetrit). The correlation length of parameters related to climate, topography and atmospheric processes is on the order of several hundred kilometers (recharge temperature; δ(18)O). Young groundwater ages that highlight regional recharge areas are located in the eastern San Joaquin Valley, in the southern Santa Clara Valley Basin, in the upper LA basin and along unlined canals carrying Colorado River water, showing that much of the recent recharge in central and southern California is dominated by river recharge and managed aquifer recharge. Modern groundwater is found in wells with the top open intervals below 60 m depth in the southeastern San Joaquin Valley, Santa Clara Valley and Los Angeles basin, as the result of intensive pumping and/or managed aquifer recharge operations. PMID:26803267

  6. Prognostic value of parameters derived from white blood cell and differential counts in patients receiving palliative radiotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Saito, Tetsuo; Toya, Ryo; Matsuyama, Tomohiko; Semba, Akiko; Matsuyama, Keiya; Oya, Natsuo

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to identify white blood cell (WBC) parameters with high prognostic value for the survival of patients receiving palliative radiotherapy. The prognostic value of seven parameters derived from WBC and differential counts was retrospectively evaluated in patients who underwent palliative radiotherapy between October, 2010 and June, 2013. The analyzed parameters were the total WBC count, the absolute and relative lymphocyte count, the absolute and relative neutrophil count, and the neutrophil-to-lymphocyte and lymphocyte-to-monocyte ratios. Following univariate analysis, multivariate Cox regression analysis was performed to adjust for gender, age, disease type, previous chemotherapy, previous radiotherapy and the levels of albumin and lactate dehydrogenase. A total of 220 patients with a median survival of 4.7 months were identified. All seven parameters were found to be statistically significant predictors of survival on univariate Cox regression analysis (P<0.05). Of these parameters, the low relative lymphocyte and high relative neutrophil counts were consistent predictors of poor survival in patients who received chemotherapy within 1 month prior to blood sampling (n=68) and in patients who received steroid treatment at the time of sampling (n=49). Multivariate Cox regression analysis revealed that the relative lymphocyte and neutrophil counts were independent predictors of survival in all 220 patients (P<0.05). In conclusion, relative lymphocyte and neutrophil counts were of high prognostic value for the survival of patients receiving palliative radiotherapy, even in those receiving medications that affect WBC and differential counts. PMID:27602221

  7. A quantitative analysis of weak intermolecular interactions & quantum chemical calculations (DFT) of novel chalcone derivatives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chavda, Bhavin R.; Gandhi, Sahaj A.; Dubey, Rahul P.; Patel, Urmila H.; Barot, Vijay M.

    2016-05-01

    The novel chalcone derivatives have widespread applications in material science and medicinal industries. The density functional theory (DFT) is used to optimized the molecular structure of the three chalcone derivatives (M-I, II, III). The observed discrepancies between the theoretical and experimental (X-ray data) results attributed to different environments of the molecules, the experimental values are of the molecule in solid state there by subjected to the intermolecular forces, like non-bonded hydrogen bond interactions, where as isolated state in gas phase for theoretical studies. The lattice energy of all the molecules have been calculated using PIXELC module in Coulomb -London -Pauli (CLP) package and is partitioned into corresponding coulombic, polarization, dispersion and repulsion contributions. Lattice energy data confirm and strengthen the finding of the X-ray results that the weak but significant intermolecular interactions like C-H…O, Π- Π and C-H… Π plays an important role in the stabilization of crystal packing.

  8. Fermi orbital derivatives in self-interaction corrected density functional theory: Applications to closed shell atoms.

    PubMed

    Pederson, Mark R

    2015-02-14

    A recent modification of the Perdew-Zunger self-interaction-correction to the density-functional formalism has provided a framework for explicitly restoring unitary invariance to the expression for the total energy. The formalism depends upon construction of Löwdin orthonormalized Fermi-orbitals which parametrically depend on variational quasi-classical electronic positions. Derivatives of these quasi-classical electronic positions, required for efficient minimization of the self-interaction corrected energy, are derived and tested, here, on atoms. Total energies and ionization energies in closed-shell singlet atoms, where correlation is less important, using the Perdew-Wang 1992 Local Density Approximation (PW92) functional, are in good agreement with experiment and non-relativistic quantum-Monte-Carlo results albeit slightly too low. PMID:25681892

  9. Interactive Visual Analytics Approch for Exploration of Geochemical Model Simulations with Different Parameter Sets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jatnieks, Janis; De Lucia, Marco; Sips, Mike; Dransch, Doris

    2015-04-01

    Many geoscience applications can benefit from testing many combinations of input parameters for geochemical simulation models. It is, however, a challenge to screen the input and output data from the model to identify the significant relationships between input parameters and output variables. For addressing this problem we propose a Visual Analytics approach that has been developed in an ongoing collaboration between computer science and geoscience researchers. Our Visual Analytics approach uses visualization methods of hierarchical horizontal axis, multi-factor stacked bar charts and interactive semi-automated filtering for input and output data together with automatic sensitivity analysis. This guides the users towards significant relationships. We implement our approach as an interactive data exploration tool. It is designed with flexibility in mind, so that a diverse set of tasks such as inverse modeling, sensitivity analysis and model parameter refinement can be supported. Here we demonstrate the capabilities of our approach by two examples for gas storage applications. For the first example our Visual Analytics approach enabled the analyst to observe how the element concentrations change around previously established baselines in response to thousands of different combinations of mineral phases. This supported combinatorial inverse modeling for interpreting observations about the chemical composition of the formation fluids at the Ketzin pilot site for CO2 storage. The results indicate that, within the experimental error range, the formation fluid cannot be considered at local thermodynamical equilibrium with the mineral assemblage of the reservoir rock. This is a valuable insight from the predictive geochemical modeling for the Ketzin site. For the second example our approach supports sensitivity analysis for a reaction involving the reductive dissolution of pyrite with formation of pyrrothite in presence of gaseous hydrogen. We determine that this reaction

  10. Nonstandard interaction effects on neutrino parameters at medium-baseline reactor antineutrino experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohlsson, Tommy; Zhang, He; Zhou, Shun

    2014-01-01

    Precision measurements of leptonic mixing parameters and the determination of the neutrino mass hierarchy are the primary goals of the forthcoming medium-baseline reactor antineutrino experiments, such as JUNO and RENO-50. In this work, we investigate the impact of nonstandard neutrino interactions (NSIs) on the measurements of {sin2 θ12,Δm212} and {sin2 θ13,Δm312}, and on the sensitivity to the neutrino mass hierarchy, at the medium-baseline reactor experiments by assuming a typical experimental setup. It turns out that the true mixing parameter sin2 θ12 can be excluded at a more than 3σ level if the NSI parameter ɛ or ɛ is as large as 2% in the most optimistic case. However, the discovery reach of NSI effects has been found to be small, and depends crucially on the CP-violating phases. Finally, we show that NSI effects could enhance or reduce the discrimination power of the JUNO and RENO-50 experiments between the normal and inverted neutrino mass hierarchies.

  11. Cooperative water-SOM interactions derived from the organic compound effect on SOM hydration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borisover, Mikhail

    2014-05-01

    Interactions of water molecules with soil organic matter (SOM) may affect the ability of SOM to participate in multiple physical, chemical and biological processes. Specifically, water-SOM interactions may have a profound effect on interactions of organic compounds with SOM which is often considered as a major natural sorbent controlling the environmental fate of organic pollutants in the soil environment. Quantification of water - SOM interactions may be carried out by using water vapor sorption isotherms. However, water sorption isotherms providing macroscopic thermodynamic data do not allow examining water-SOM interactions on a microenvironment scale. The examination of water-SOM interactions in a local SOM environment may be carried out by determining the response of the SOM hydration to sorption of probe organic compounds. Recently, the model-free approach was proposed which allows quantifying effects of sorbing organic molecules on water - SOM interactions, by using relatively more available data on the effect of water activity on organic compound - SOM interactions. Therefore, this thermodynamic approach was applied to the experimental data describing sorption of organic compounds by SOM, both from the vapor and liquid phases, at various water activities. Hence, the response of water interactions with the model SOM materials such as a humic acid and an organic matter-rich peat soil to the presence of various organic sorbates was evaluated. Depending on a molecular structure of organic sorbates probing various molecular environments in SOM, the SOM-bound water may be driven in or out of the SOM sorbents. Organic compounds containing the atoms of oxygen, nitrogen or sulfur and preferring a relatively "polar" SOM microenvironment demonstrate the distinct enhancing effect on water-SOM interactions. In contrast, the "low-polarity" organic compounds, e.g., hydrocarbons or their halogen-substituted derivatives, produce a weakening effect on water-SOM interactions

  12. Comprehensive Reference Ranges for Hematology and Clinical Chemistry Laboratory Parameters Derived from Normal Nigerian Adults

    PubMed Central

    Miri-Dashe, Timzing; Osawe, Sophia; Tokdung, Monday; Daniel, Nenbammun; Choji, Rahila Pam; Mamman, Ille; Deme, Kurt; Damulak, Dapus; Abimiku, Alash’le

    2014-01-01

    Background Interpretation of laboratory test results with appropriate diagnostic accuracy requires reference or cutoff values. This study is a comprehensive determination of reference values for hematology and clinical chemistry in apparently healthy voluntary non-remunerated blood donors and pregnant women. Methods and findings Consented clients were clinically screened and counseled before testing for HIV, Hepatitis B, Hepatitis C and Syphilis. Standard national blood donors’ questionnaire was administered to consented blood donors. Blood from qualified volunteers was used for measurement of complete hematology and chemistry parameters. Blood samples were analyzed from a total of 383 participants, 124 (32.4%) males, 125 (32.6%) non-pregnant females and 134 pregnant females (35.2%) with a mean age of 31 years. Our results showed that the red blood cells count (RBC), Hemoglobin (HB) and Hematocrit (HCT) had significant gender difference (p = 0.000) but not for total white blood count (p>0.05) which was only significantly higher in pregnant verses non-pregnant women (p = 0.000). Hemoglobin and Hematocrit values were lower in pregnancy (P = 0.000). Platelets were significantly higher in females than men (p = 0.001) but lower in pregnant women (p = 0.001) with marked difference in gestational period. For clinical chemistry parameters, there was no significant difference for sodium, potassium and chloride (p>0.05) but gender difference exists for Bicarbonate (HCO3), Urea nitrogen, Creatinine as well as the lipids (p<0.05). Total bilirubin was significantly higher in males than females (p = 0.000). Significant differences exist for all chemistry parameters between pregnant and non-pregnant women in this study (p<0.05), except Amylase and total cholesterol (p>0.05). Conclusions Hematological and Clinical Chemistry reference ranges established in this study showed significant gender differences. Pregnant women also differed from non

  13. Development of the smooth orthogonal decomposition method to derive the modal parameters of vehicle suspension system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rezaee, Mousa; Shaterian-Alghalandis, Vahid; Banan-Nojavani, Ali

    2013-04-01

    In this paper, the smooth orthogonal decomposition (SOD) method is developed to the light damped systems in which the inputs are time shifted functions of one or more random processes. An example of such practical cases is the vehicle suspension system in which the random inputs due to the road roughness applied to the rear wheels are the shifted functions of the same random inputs on the front wheels with a time lag depending on the vehicle wheelbase as well as its velocity. The developed SOD method is applied to determine the natural frequencies and mode shapes of a certain vehicle suspension system and the results are compared with the true values obtained by the structural eigenvalue problem. The consistency of the results indicates that the SOD method can be applied with a high degree of accuracy to calculate the modal parameters of vibrating systems in which the system inputs are shifted functions of one or more random processes.

  14. Lunar tidal acceleration obtained from satellite-derived ocean tide parameters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goad, C. C.; Douglas, B. C.

    1978-01-01

    One hundred sets of mean elements of GEOS-3 computed at 2-day intervals yielded observation equations for the M sub 2 ocean tide from the long periodic variations of the inclination and node of the orbit. The 2nd degree Love number was given the value k sub 2 = 0.30 and the solid tide phase angle was taken to be zero. Combining obtained equations with results for the satellite 1967-92A gives the M sub 2 ocean tide parameter values. Under the same assumption of zero solid tide phase lag, the lunar tidal acceleration was found mostly due to the C sub 22 term in the expansion of the M sub 2 tide with additional small contributions from the 0 sub 1 and N sub 2 tides. Using Lambeck's (1975) estimates for the latter, the obtained acceleration in lunar longitudal in excellent agreement with the most recent determinations from ancient and modern astronomical data.

  15. Assessing sounding-derived parameters as storm predictors in different latitudes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sánchez, José Luis; Marcos, José Luis; Dessens, Jean; López, Laura; Bustos, Carlos; García-Ortega, Eduardo

    Many thermodynamic parameters and indices are currently being used as thunderstorm predictors because of their high correlations with the beginning and development of convection. Many of these indices have been developed for one specific area and their forecasting accuracy has generally been assessed in that zone and not in others. It is a highly intriguing question whether there are parameters or indices that may function adequately as thunderstorm predictors, as far as the Probability of Detection is concerned, irrespective of the latitude of the study zone. In order to approach this issue the present study focuses on data from 1692 sounding days in León (Spain), Zaragoza (Spain), Bordeaux (France) and Mendoza (Argentina). Specific discriminant models have already been developed for these areas. When comparing the results found by the different models constructed for each of the four study zones it may be noticed that there are no indices that function extremely well in all of the zones. Rather, a common ingredient pattern is observed for the beginning of convection): atmospheric instability and moist layers in the low atmosphere. It may also be concluded that sounding data alone are not enough to detect accurately the triggering mechanism, which is the third ingredient necessary for convection. The aim of this paper is to build a logistic equation integrating the four study zones. The stepwise method was employed with this purpose because it allows for the gradual inclusion of variables in the final equation according to their discriminating power. The results obtained suggest that Showalter Index and 850 hPa Dew Point Temperature are the variables that best characterize preconvective conditions irrespective of the geographic area considered. The values for POD (Probability of Detection) and FAR (False Alarm Ratio) are acceptable, but they are clearly lower than the ones obtained by each of the models in the study zone for which they were developed.

  16. Accuracy of Geophysical Parameters Derived from AIRS/AMSU as a Function of Fractional Cloud Cover

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Susskind, Joel; Barnet, Chris; Blaisdell, John; Iredell, Lena; Keita, Fricky; Kouvaris, Lou; Molnar, Gyula; Chahine, Moustafa

    2005-01-01

    AIRS was launched on EOS Aqua on May 4,2002, together with AMSU A and HSB, to form a next generation polar orbiting infrared and microwave atmospheric sounding system. The primary products of AIRS/AMSU are twice daily global fields of atmospheric temperature-humidity profiles, ozone profiles, sea/land surface skin temperature, and cloud related parameters including OLR. The sounding goals of AIRS are to produce 1 km tropospheric layer mean temperatures with an rms error of 1K, and layer precipitable water with an rms error of 20%, in cases with up to 80% effective cloud cover. The basic theory used to analyze AIRS/AMSU/HSB data in the presence of clouds, called the at-launch algorithm, was described previously. Pre-launch simulation studies using this algorithm indicated that these results should be achievable. Some modifications have been made to the at-launch retrieval algorithm as described in this paper. Sample fields of parameters retrieved from AIRS/AMSU/HSB data are presented and validated as a function of retrieved fractional cloud cover. As in simulation, the degradation of retrieval accuracy with increasing cloud cover is small. HSB failed in February 2005, and consequently HSB channel radiances are not used in the results shown in this paper. The AIRS/AMSU retrieval algorithm described in this paper, called Version 4, become operational at the Goddard DAAC in April 2005 and is being used to analyze near-real time AIRS/AMSU data. Historical AIRS/AMSU data, going backwards from March 2005 through September 2002, is also being analyzed by the DAAC using the Version 4 algorithm.

  17. Accuracy of Geophysical Parameters Derived from AIRS/AMSU as a Function of Fractional Cloud Cover

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Susskind, Joel; Barnet, Chris; Blaisdell, John; Iredell, Lena; Keita, Fricky; Kouvaris, Lou; Molnar, Gyula; Chahine, Moustafa

    2006-01-01

    AIRS was launched on EOS Aqua on May 4,2002, together with AMSU A and HSB, to form a next generation polar orbiting infrared and microwave atmospheric sounding system. The primary products of AIRS/AMSU are twice daily global fields of atmospheric temperature-humidity profiles, ozone profiles, sea/land surface skin temperature, and cloud related parameters including OLR. The sounding goals of AIRS are to produce 1 km tropospheric layer mean temperatures with an rms error of lK, and layer precipitable water with an rms error of 20 percent, in cases with up to 80 percent effective cloud cover. The basic theory used to analyze Atmospheric InfraRed Sounder/Advanced Microwave Sounding Unit/Humidity Sounder Brazil (AIRS/AMSU/HSB) data in the presence of clouds, called the at-launch algorithm, was described previously. Pre-launch simulation studies using this algorithm indicated that these results should be achievable. Some modifications have been made to the at-launch retrieval algorithm as described in this paper. Sample fields of parameters retrieved from AIRS/AMSU/HSB data are presented and validated as a function of retrieved fractional cloud cover. As in simulation, the degradation of retrieval accuracy with increasing cloud cover is small and the RMS accuracy of lower tropospheric temperature retrieved with 80 percent cloud cover is about 0.5 K poorer than for clear cases. HSB failed in February 2003, and consequently HSB channel radiances are not used in the results shown in this paper. The AIRS/AMSU retrieval algorithm described in this paper, called Version 4, become operational at the Goddard DAAC (Distributed Active Archive Center) in April 2003 and is being used to analyze near-real time AIRS/AMSU data. Historical AIRS/AMSU data, going backwards from March 2005 through September 2002, is also being analyzed by the DAAC using the Version 4 algorithm.

  18. Fast spinning strange stars: possible ways to constrain interacting quark matter parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhattacharyya, Sudip; Bombaci, Ignazio; Logoteta, Domenico; Thampan, Arun V.

    2016-04-01

    For a set of equation of state (EoS) models involving interacting strange quark matter, characterized by an effective bag constant (Beff) and a perturbative quantum chromodynamics corrections term (a4), we construct fully general relativistic equilibrium sequences of rapidly spinning strange stars for the first time. Computation of such sequences is important to study millisecond pulsars and other fast spinning compact stars. Our EoS models can support a gravitational mass (MG) and a spin frequency (ν) at least up to ≈3.0 M⊙ and ≈1250 Hz, respectively, and hence are fully consistent with measured MG and ν values. This paper reports the effects of Beff and a4 on measurable compact star properties, which could be useful to find possible ways to constrain these fundamental quark matter parameters, within the ambit of our EoS models. We confirm that a lower Beff allows a higher mass. Besides, for known MG and ν, measurable parameters, such as stellar radius, radius-to-mass ratio and moment of inertia, increase with the decrease of Beff. Our calculations also show that a4 significantly affects the stellar rest mass and the total stellar binding energy. As a result, a4 can have signatures in evolutions of both accreting and non-accreting compact stars, and the observed distribution of stellar mass and spin and other source parameters. Finally, we compute the parameter values of two important pulsars, PSR J1614-2230 and PSR J1748-2446ad, which may have implications to probe their evolutionary histories, and for constraining EoS models.

  19. An Updated Natural History Model of Cervical Cancer: Derivation of Model Parameters

    PubMed Central

    Campos, Nicole G.; Burger, Emily A.; Sy, Stephen; Sharma, Monisha; Schiffman, Mark; Rodriguez, Ana Cecilia; Hildesheim, Allan; Herrero, Rolando; Kim, Jane J.

    2014-01-01

    Mathematical models of cervical cancer have been widely used to evaluate the comparative effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of preventive strategies. Major advances in the understanding of cervical carcinogenesis motivate the creation of a new disease paradigm in such models. To keep pace with the most recent evidence, we updated a previously developed microsimulation model of human papillomavirus (HPV) infection and cervical cancer to reflect 1) a shift towards health states based on HPV rather than poorly reproducible histological diagnoses and 2) HPV clearance and progression to precancer as a function of infection duration and genotype, as derived from the control arm of the Costa Rica Vaccine Trial (2004–2010). The model was calibrated leveraging empirical data from the New Mexico Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results Registry (1980–1999) and a state-of-the-art cervical cancer screening registry in New Mexico (2007–2009). The calibrated model had good correspondence with data on genotype- and age-specific HPV prevalence, genotype frequency in precancer and cancer, and age-specific cancer incidence. We present this model in response to a call for new natural history models of cervical cancer intended for decision analysis and economic evaluation at a time when global cervical cancer prevention policy continues to evolve and evidence of the long-term health effects of cervical interventions remains critical. PMID:25081182

  20. Mathematical models for prediction of rheological parameters in vinasses derived from sugar cane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chacua, Leidy M.; Ayala, Germán; Rojas, Hernán; Agudelo, Ana C.

    2016-04-01

    The rheological behaviour of vinasses derived from sugar cane was studied as a function of time (0 and 600 s), soluble solids content (44 and 60 °Brix), temperature (10 and 50°C), and shear rate (0.33 and 1.0 s-1). The results indicated that vinasses were time-independent at 25°C, where shear stress values ranged between 0.01 and 0.08 Pa. Flow curves showed a shear-thinning rheological behaviour in vinasses with a flow behaviour index between 0.69 and 0.89, for temperature between 10 and 20°C. With increasing temperature, the flow behaviour index was modified, reaching values close to 1.0. The Arrhenius model described well the thermal activation of shear stress and the consistency coefficient as a function of temperature. Activation energy from the Arrhenius model ranged between 31 and 45 kJ mol-1. Finally, the consistency coefficient as a function of the soluble solids content and temperature was well fitted using an exponential model (R2 = 0.951), showing that the soluble solids content and temperature have an opposite effect on consistency coefficient values.

  1. An updated natural history model of cervical cancer: derivation of model parameters.

    PubMed

    Campos, Nicole G; Burger, Emily A; Sy, Stephen; Sharma, Monisha; Schiffman, Mark; Rodriguez, Ana Cecilia; Hildesheim, Allan; Herrero, Rolando; Kim, Jane J

    2014-09-01

    Mathematical models of cervical cancer have been widely used to evaluate the comparative effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of preventive strategies. Major advances in the understanding of cervical carcinogenesis motivate the creation of a new disease paradigm in such models. To keep pace with the most recent evidence, we updated a previously developed microsimulation model of human papillomavirus (HPV) infection and cervical cancer to reflect 1) a shift towards health states based on HPV rather than poorly reproducible histological diagnoses and 2) HPV clearance and progression to precancer as a function of infection duration and genotype, as derived from the control arm of the Costa Rica Vaccine Trial (2004-2010). The model was calibrated leveraging empirical data from the New Mexico Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results Registry (1980-1999) and a state-of-the-art cervical cancer screening registry in New Mexico (2007-2009). The calibrated model had good correspondence with data on genotype- and age-specific HPV prevalence, genotype frequency in precancer and cancer, and age-specific cancer incidence. We present this model in response to a call for new natural history models of cervical cancer intended for decision analysis and economic evaluation at a time when global cervical cancer prevention policy continues to evolve and evidence of the long-term health effects of cervical interventions remains critical. PMID:25081182

  2. Predictive value of various Doppler-derived parameters of atrial conduction time for successful atrial fibrillation ablation

    PubMed Central

    Valtuille, Lucas; Choy, Jonathan B; Becher, Harald

    2015-01-01

    Various Doppler-derived parameters of left atrial electrical remodeling have been demonstrated to predict recurrence of atrial fibrillation (AF) after AF ablation. The aim of this study was to compare three Doppler-derived measures of atrial conduction time in patients undergoing AF ablation, and to investigate their predictive value for successful procedure. In 32 prospectively enrolled patients undergoing the first AF ablation, atrial conduction time was estimated by measuring the time delay between the onset of P-wave on the surface ECG to the peak of the a′-wave on the pulsed-wave Doppler and color-coded tissue Doppler imaging of the left atrial lateral wall, and to the peak of the A-wave on the pulsed-wave Doppler of the mitral inflow. There was a significant difference in the baseline atrial conduction time measured by different echocardiographic techniques. Most (88%) patients had normal or only mildly dilated left atrium. At 6 months, 12 patients (38%) had recurrent AF/atrial tachycardia. The duration of history of AF was the only predictor of AF/atrial tachycardia recurrence following the first AF ablation (P=0.024; OR 1.023, CI 1.003–1.044). A combination of normal left atrial volume and history of paroxysmal AF of ≤48 months was associated with the best outcome. Predictive value of the Doppler derived parameters of atrial conduction time may be reduced in the early stages of left atrial remodeling. Future studies may determine which echocardiographic parameter correlates best with the extent of left atrial remodeling and is most predictive of successful AF ablation. PMID:26795694

  3. Urban Heat Island Modeling in Conjunction with Satellite-Derived Surface/Soil Parameters.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hafner, Jan; Kidder, Stanley Q.

    1999-04-01

    Although it has been studied for over 160 years, the urban heat island (UHI) effect is still not completely understood, yet it is increasingly important. The main purpose of this work is to improve UHI modeling by using AVHRR (Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer) satellite data to retrieve the surface parameters (albedo, as well as soil thermal and moisture properties). In this study, a hydrostatic three-dimensional mesoscale model was used to perform the numerical modeling. The Carlson technique was applied to retrieve the thermal inertia and moisture availability using the thermal AVHRR channels 4 and 5. The net urban effect was determined as the difference between urban and nonurban simulations, in which urban parameters were replaced by rural parameters.Two winter days were each used for two numerical simulations: a control and an urban-to-rural replacement run. Moisture availability values on the less windy day showed generally a south to north gradient downwind of the city and urban values less than rural values (the urban dry island day). Moisture availability was higher on the windy day, with uniform values in the rural and urban areas (uniform soil moisture day). The only exceptions were variations in the rural hills north of the city and the low rural values under the polluted urban plume downwind of the city.While thermal inertia values showed no urban-rural differences on the uniform soil moisture day, they exhibited larger values over Atlanta than in surrounding rural area on the (less moist) dry island day. Two puzzling facts exist in the data: 1) lack of a north-south thermal inertia gradient on the dry soil day to correspond to its above-mentioned moisture availability gradient and 2) rural thermal inertia values do not change between both days in spite of their large difference in soil moisture. The observed lack of corresponding urban change is expected, as its thermal inertia values depend more on urban building materials than on moisture of

  4. Coupling parameters of many-body interactions for the Al(100) surface state: A high-resolution angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, J.; Shimada, K.; Hayashi, H.; Iwasawa, H.; Aiura, Y.; Namatame, H.; Taniguchi, M.

    2011-10-01

    We examined the dimensionless coupling parameters of many-body interactions for a free-electron-like surface-derived state in Al(100) by means of high-resolution angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy. A kink structure was found to exist in the energy-band dispersion near the Fermi level (EF), which was attributed to the electron-phonon interaction. At 50 K, the coupling parameters of the electron-phonon and electron-electron interactions were estimated as λep=0.67±0.05 and λee˜0.003, respectively, indicating that the effective mass enhancement was mainly derived from the electron-phonon interaction. The temperature dependence of the kink structure, as measured by λep(T), was consistent with a theoretical calculation based on the Eliashberg function. A quasiparticle peak with a width of 15-20 meV was found near EF, which was explained well by the simulated spectral function incorporating the self-energy evaluated in this study. We found that the electrons at the surface were strongly scattered by the defects at the surface and that the linewidth was significantly broadened (Γ0=0.238±0.006 eV).

  5. Large-scale erosion processes and parameters derived from a modeling of the Messinian salinity crisis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loget, N.; Davy, P.; van den Driessche, J.

    2003-04-01

    The closing of the Gibraltar strait during Messinian have produced a drop of the sea level of about 1500 m in less than half a million year. This certainly constitutes one of the largest perturbation of erosion systems in the Earth, whose analysis in terms of form and dynamics should bring invaluable constraints on erosion processes and parameters. In addition to a precise chronology of the bulk crisis, the main data consists of the reconstruction of paleocanyons, that were eroded during sea drop and refilled during sea rise. The Rhone's canyon is certainly the most documented, with numerous seismic lines and boreholes. We have now a reasonable estimation of the canyon profile from its outlet to the Bresse graben, more 500 km upslope. Sparse data are also available in the Languedoc region, in the Pyrenees, for some drainage basins of the Var-Ligure coast, in the gulf of Valence. A particularity of this erosion phase was to propagate very far inland along the main rivers, but in a very localized way in the sense that hillslopes or upslope drainage basins were barely affected. All these data were compiled in a database that we used to constrain erosion processes. We assume that the erosion law belongs to the classical power-law framework, where the erosion flux depends on local slope s, and water flow q, such as: e=k qmsn-ec, where k and ec are two constants which depend on material strength properties, and m and n are two exponents which are found to play an important role in the time-length scaling. The transfer model must be completed by a transfer or deposition terms that we assume to be controlled by a deposition length Ld. If Ld is very small, the model comes to the transport-limited case where the height variation is proportional to the gradient of the erosion flux e. In contrast if Ld is very large, rivers can carry all the eroded sediment out; the process is usually called detachment-limited. We simulate the erosion dynamics, induced by the Messinian sea

  6. Quantifying Parameter Sensitivity, Interaction and Transferability in Hydrologically Enhanced Versions of Noah-LSM over Transition Zones

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rosero, Enrique; Yang, Zong-Liang; Wagener, Thorsten; Gulden, Lindsey E.; Yatheendradas, Soni; Niu, Guo-Yue

    2009-01-01

    We use sensitivity analysis to identify the parameters that are most responsible for shaping land surface model (LSM) simulations and to understand the complex interactions in three versions of the Noah LSM: the standard version (STD), a version enhanced with a simple groundwater module (GW), and version augmented by a dynamic phenology module (DV). We use warm season, high-frequency, near-surface states and turbulent fluxes collected over nine sites in the US Southern Great Plains. We quantify changes in the pattern of sensitive parameters, the amount and nature of the interaction between parameters, and the covariance structure of the distribution of behavioral parameter sets. Using Sobol s total and first-order sensitivity indexes, we show that very few parameters directly control the variance of the model output. Significant parameter interaction occurs so that not only the optimal parameter values differ between models, but the relationships between parameters change. GW decreases parameter interaction and appears to improve model realism, especially at wetter sites. DV increases parameter interaction and decreases identifiability, implying it is overparameterized and/or underconstrained. A case study at a wet site shows GW has two functional modes: one that mimics STD and a second in which GW improves model function by decoupling direct evaporation and baseflow. Unsupervised classification of the posterior distributions of behavioral parameter sets cannot group similar sites based solely on soil or vegetation type, helping to explain why transferability between sites and models is not straightforward. This evidence suggests a priori assignment of parameters should also consider climatic differences.

  7. Probing NMR parameters, structure and dynamics of 5-nitroimidazole derivatives. Density functional study of prototypical radiosensitizers.

    PubMed

    Ramalho, Teodorico C; Bühl, Michael

    2005-02-01

    The 15N chemical shifts of metronidazole (1), secnidazole (2), nimorazole (3) and tinidazole (4), radiosensitizers based on the 5-nitroimidazole motif, are reported. A detailed computational study of 1 is presented, calling special attention to the performance of various theoretical methods in reproducing the 13C and 15N data observed in solution. The most sophisticated approach involves density functional-based Car-Parrinello molecular dynamics simulations (CPMD) of 1 in aqueous solution (BP86 level) and averaging chemical shifts over snapshots from the trajectory. In the NMR calculations for these snapshots (performed at the B3LYP level), a small number of discrete water molecules are retained, and the remaining bulk solution effects are included via a polarizable continuum model (PCM). A similarly good accord with experiment is obtained from much less involved, static geometry optimization and NMR computation of pristine 1 employing a PCM approach. Solvent effects on delta(15N), which are of the order of up to 20 ppm, are not due to changes in geometric parameters upon solvation, but arise from the direct response of the electronic wavefunction to the presence of the solvent, which can be represented by discrete molecules and/or the dielectric bulk. PMID:15558660

  8. Composite genome map and recombination parameters derived from three archetypal lineages of Toxoplasma gondii

    PubMed Central

    Khan, Asis; Taylor, Sonya; Su, Chunlei; Mackey, Aaron J.; Boyle, Jon; Cole, Robert; Glover, Darius; Tang, Keliang; Paulsen, Ian T.; Berriman, Matt; Boothroyd, John C.; Pfefferkorn, Elmer R.; Dubey, J. P.; Ajioka, James W.; Roos, David S.; Wootton, John C.; Sibley, L. David

    2005-01-01

    Toxoplasma gondii is a highly successful protozoan parasite in the phylum Apicomplexa, which contains numerous animal and human pathogens. T.gondii is amenable to cellular, biochemical, molecular and genetic studies, making it a model for the biology of this important group of parasites. To facilitate forward genetic analysis, we have developed a high-resolution genetic linkage map for T.gondii. The genetic map was used to assemble the scaffolds from a 10X shotgun whole genome sequence, thus defining 14 chromosomes with markers spaced at ∼300 kb intervals across the genome. Fourteen chromosomes were identified comprising a total genetic size of ∼592 cM and an average map unit of ∼104 kb/cM. Analysis of the genetic parameters in T.gondii revealed a high frequency of closely adjacent, apparent double crossover events that may represent gene conversions. In addition, we detected large regions of genetic homogeneity among the archetypal clonal lineages, reflecting the relatively few genetic outbreeding events that have occurred since their recent origin. Despite these unusual features, linkage analysis proved to be effective in mapping the loci determining several drug resistances. The resulting genome map provides a framework for analysis of complex traits such as virulence and transmission, and for comparative population genetic studies. PMID:15911631

  9. Five organic salts assembled from carboxylic acids and bis-imidazole derivatives through collective noncovalent interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, Shouwen; Guo, Jianzhong; Liu, Li; Wang, Daqi

    2011-10-01

    Five multicomponent crystals of bis(imidazole) derivatives have been prepared with 5-nitrosalicylic acid, 5-sulfosalicylic acid, and phthalic acid. The five crystalline forms reported are organic salts of which the crystal structures have all been determined by X-ray diffraction. The results presented herein indicate that the strength and directionality of the N sbnd H⋯O, O sbnd H⋯O, and N sbnd H⋯N hydrogen bonds (ionic or neutral) between carboxylic acids and ditopic imidazoles are sufficient to bring about the formation of binary organic salts. All supramolecular architectures of the organic salts 1- 5 involve extensive O sbnd H⋯O, and N sbnd H⋯O hydrogen bonds as well as other noncovalent interactions. The role of weak and strong noncovalent interactions in the crystal packing is ascertained. These noncovalent interactions combined, all the complexes displayed 3D framework structure.

  10. Retrieving high-resolution surface solar radiation with cloud parameters derived by combining MODIS and MTSAT data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, W.; Qin, J.; Yang, K.; Liu, S.; Lu, N.; Niu, X.

    2015-12-01

    Cloud parameters (cloud mask, effective particle radius and liquid/ice water path) are the important inputs in determining surface solar radiation (SSR). These parameters can be derived from MODIS with high accuracy but their temporal resolution is too low to obtain high temporal resolution SSR retrievals. In order to obtain hourly cloud parameters, the Artificial Neural Network (ANN) is applied in this study to directly construct a functional relationship between MODIS cloud products and Multi-functional Transport Satellite (MTSAT) geostationary satellite signals. Meanwhile, an efficient parameterization model for SSR retrieval is introduced and, when driven with MODIS atmospheric and land products, its root mean square error (RMSE) is about 100 W m-2 for 44 Baseline Surface Radiation Network (BSRN) stations. Once the estimated cloud parameters and other information (such as aerosol, precipitable water, ozone and so on) are input to the model, we can derive SSR at high spatio-temporal resolution. The retrieved SSR is first evaluated against hourly radiation data at three experimental stations in the Haihe River Basin of China. The mean bias error (MBE) and RMSE in hourly SSR estimate are 12.0 W m-2 (or 3.5 %) and 98.5 W m-2 (or 28.9 %), respectively. The retrieved SSR is also evaluated against daily radiation data at 90 China Meteorological Administration (CMA) stations. The MBEs are 9.8 W m-2 (5.4 %); the RMSEs in daily and monthly-mean SSR estimates are 34.2 W m-2 (19.1 %) and 22.1 W m-2 (12.3 %), respectively. The accuracy is comparable or even higher than other two radiation products (GLASS and ISCCP-FD), and the present method is more computationally efficient and can produce hourly SSR data at a spatial resolution of 5 km.

  11. Retrieving high-resolution surface solar radiation with cloud parameters derived by combining MODIS and MTSAT data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Wenjun; Qin, Jun; Yang, Kun; Liu, Shaomin; Lu, Ning; Niu, Xiaolei

    2016-03-01

    Cloud parameters (cloud mask, effective particle radius, and liquid/ice water path) are the important inputs in estimating surface solar radiation (SSR). These parameters can be derived from MODIS with high accuracy, but their temporal resolution is too low to obtain high-temporal-resolution SSR retrievals. In order to obtain hourly cloud parameters, an artificial neural network (ANN) is applied in this study to directly construct a functional relationship between MODIS cloud products and Multifunctional Transport Satellite (MTSAT) geostationary satellite signals. In addition, an efficient parameterization model for SSR retrieval is introduced and, when driven with MODIS atmospheric and land products, its root mean square error (RMSE) is about 100 W m-2 for 44 Baseline Surface Radiation Network (BSRN) stations. Once the estimated cloud parameters and other information (such as aerosol, precipitable water, ozone) are input to the model, we can derive SSR at high spatiotemporal resolution. The retrieved SSR is first evaluated against hourly radiation data at three experimental stations in the Haihe River basin of China. The mean bias error (MBE) and RMSE in hourly SSR estimate are 12.0 W m-2 (or 3.5 %) and 98.5 W m-2 (or 28.9 %), respectively. The retrieved SSR is also evaluated against daily radiation data at 90 China Meteorological Administration (CMA) stations. The MBEs are 9.8 W m-2 (or 5.4 %); the RMSEs in daily and monthly mean SSR estimates are 34.2 W m-2 (or 19.1 %) and 22.1 W m-2 (or 12.3 %), respectively. The accuracy is comparable to or even higher than two other radiation products (GLASS and ISCCP-FD), and the present method is more computationally efficient and can produce hourly SSR data at a spatial resolution of 5 km.

  12. On the ability of molecular dynamics force fields to recapitulate NMR derived protein side chain order parameters.

    PubMed

    O'Brien, Evan S; Wand, A Joshua; Sharp, Kim A

    2016-06-01

    Molecular dynamics (MD) simulations have become a central tool for investigating various biophysical questions with atomistic detail. While many different proxies are used to qualify MD force fields, most are based on largely structural parameters such as the root mean square deviation from experimental coordinates or nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) chemical shifts and residual dipolar couplings. NMR derived Lipari-Szabo squared generalized order parameter (O(2) ) values of amide NH bond vectors of the polypeptide chain were also often employed for refinement and validation. However, with a few exceptions, side chain methyl symmetry axis order parameters have not been incorporated into experimental reference sets. Using a test set of five diverse proteins, the performance of several force fields implemented in the NAMDD simulation package was examined. It was found that simulations employing explicit water implemented using the TIP3 model generally performed significantly better than those using implicit water in reproducing experimental methyl symmetry axis O(2) values. Overall the CHARMM27 force field performs nominally better than two implementations of the Amber force field. It appeared that recent quantum mechanics modifications to side chain torsional angles of leucine and isoleucine in the Amber force field have significantly hindered proper motional modeling for these residues. There remained significant room for improvement as even the best correlations of experimental and simulated methyl group Lipari-Szabo generalized order parameters fall below an R(2) of 0.8. PMID:26990788

  13. Ab initio DFT study of bisphosphonate derivatives as a drug for inhibition of cancer: NMR and NQR parameters.

    PubMed

    Aghabozorg, Hussein; Sohrabi, Beheshteh; Mashkouri, Sara; Aghabozorg, Hamid Reza

    2012-03-01

    DFT computations were carried out to characterize the (17)Oand (2)H electric field gradient, EFG, in various bisphosphonate derivatives. The computations were performed at the B3LYP level with 6-311++G (d,P) standard basis set. Calculated EFG tensors were used to determine the (17)O and (2)H nuclear quadrupole coupling constant, χ and asymmetry parameter, η. For better understanding of the bonding and electronic structure of bisphosphonates, isotropic and anisotropic NMR chemical shieldings were calculated for the (13)C, (17)O and (31)P nuclei using GIAO method for the optimized structure of intermediate bisphosphonates at B3LYP level of theory using 6-311++G (d, p) basis set. The results showed that various substituents have a strong effect on the nuclear quadrupole resonance (NQR) parameters (χ, η) of (17)O in contrast with (2)H NQR parameters. The NMR and NQR parameters were studied in order to find the correlation between electronic structure and the activity of the desired bisphosphonates. In addition, the effect of substitutions on the bisphosphonates polarity was investigated. Molecular polarity was determined via the DFT calculated dipole moment vectors and the results showed that substitution of bromine atom on the ring would increase the activity of bisphosphonates. PMID:21633790

  14. Kinetics of surface segregation in metallic alloys with first-principles interaction parameters

    SciTech Connect

    Wille, L.T. |; Ouannasser, S.; Dreysse, H.

    1996-12-31

    The authors report the results of Monte Carlo simulations of the kinetics of surface segregation at the (001) face of CuNi and MoW alloys. These two systems were selected because they are based on different lattice structures and show contrasting segregation behavior: CuNi exhibits a monotonic profile, while that of MoW is oscillatory. To describe the energetics they have determined a set of effective cluster interactions (ECI) which govern the ordering or clustering tendencies of these alloys. The ECI were obtained by means of tight-binding electronic structure calculations in which no adjustable or experimentally determined parameters were used. Equilibrium segregation profiles are calculated and a series of quenches are performed. The layer concentrations are studied as a function of time and the existence of metastable phases in the surface region is investigated.

  15. Polymerase/DNA interactions and enzymatic activity: multi-parameter analysis with electro-switchable biosurfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Langer, Andreas; Schräml, Michael; Strasser, Ralf; Daub, Herwin; Myers, Thomas; Heindl, Dieter; Rant, Ulrich

    2015-07-01

    The engineering of high-performance enzymes for future sequencing and PCR technologies as well as the development of many anticancer drugs requires a detailed analysis of DNA/RNA synthesis processes. However, due to the complex molecular interplay involved, real-time methodologies have not been available to obtain comprehensive information on both binding parameters and enzymatic activities. Here we introduce a chip-based method to investigate polymerases and their interactions with nucleic acids, which employs an electrical actuation of DNA templates on microelectrodes. Two measurement modes track both the dynamics of the induced switching process and the DNA extension simultaneously to quantitate binding kinetics, dissociation constants and thermodynamic energies. The high sensitivity of the method reveals previously unidentified tight binding states for Taq and Pol I (KF) DNA polymerases. Furthermore, the incorporation of label-free nucleotides can be followed in real-time and changes in the DNA polymerase conformation (finger closing) during enzymatic activity are observable.

  16. Convex Lens-induced Confinement to Visualize Biopolymers and Interaction Parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stabile, Frank; Berard, Daniel; Henkin, Gil; Shayegan, Marjan; Michaud, François; Leslie, Sabrina

    In this poster, we present a versatile CLiC (Convex Lens-induced Confinement) microscopy system to access a broad range of biopolymer visualization and interaction parameters. In the CLiC technique, the curved surface of a convex lens is used to deform a flexible coverslip above a glass substrate, creating a nanoscale gap that can be tuned during an experiment to load and confine molecules into nanoscale features, both linear and circular, embedded in the bottom substrate. We demonstrate and characterize massively parallel DNA nanochannel-based stretching, building on prior work. Further, we demonstrate controlled insertion of reagent molecules within the CLiC imaging chamber. We visualize real-time reaction dynamics of nanoconfined species, including dye/DNA intercalation and DNA/DNA ligation reactions, demonstrating the versatility of this nanoscale microscopy platform.

  17. Structural evolution in Pt isotopes with the interacting boson model Hamiltonian derived from the Gogny energy density functional

    SciTech Connect

    Nomura, K.; Otsuka, T.; Rodriguez-Guzman, R.; Sarriguren, P.; Robledo, L. M.

    2011-01-15

    Spectroscopic calculations are carried out for the description of the shape/phase transition in Pt nuclei in terms of the interacting boson model (IBM) Hamiltonian derived from (constrained) Hartree-Fock-Bogoliubov (HFB) calculations with the finite range and density-dependent Gogny-D1S energy density functional. Assuming that the many-nucleon driven dynamics of nuclear surface deformation can be simulated by effective bosonic degrees of freedom, the Gogny-D1S potential energy surface (PES) with quadrupole degrees of freedom is mapped onto the corresponding PES of the IBM. By using this mapping procedure, the parameters of the IBM Hamiltonian, relevant to the low-lying quadrupole collective states, are derived as functions of the number of valence nucleons. Merits of both Gogny-HFB and IBM approaches are utilized so that the spectra and the wave functions in the laboratory system are calculated precisely. The experimental low-lying spectra of both ground-state and sideband levels are well reproduced. From the systematics of the calculated spectra and the reduced E2 transition probabilities B(E2), the prolate-to-oblate shape/phase transition is shown to take place quite smoothly as a function of neutron number N in the considered Pt isotopic chain, for which the {gamma} softness plays an essential role. All of these spectroscopic observables behave consistently with the relevant PES and the derived parameters of the IBM Hamiltonian as functions of N. Spectroscopic predictions are also made for those nuclei that do not have enough experimental E2 data.

  18. Spatial Prediction of Soil Classes by Using Soil Weathering Parameters Derived from vis-NIR Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramirez-Lopez, Leonardo; Alexandre Dematte, Jose

    2010-05-01

    There is consensus in the scientific community about the great need of spatial soil information. Conventional mapping methods are time consuming and involve high costs. Digital soil mapping has emerged as an area in which the soil mapping is optimized by the application of mathematical and statistical approaches, as well as the application of expert knowledge in pedology. In this sense, the objective of the study was to develop a methodology for the spatial prediction of soil classes by using soil spectroscopy methodologies related with fieldwork, spectral data from satellite image and terrain attributes in simultaneous. The studied area is located in São Paulo State, and comprised an area of 473 ha, which was covered by a regular grid (100 x 100 m). In each grid node was collected soil samples at two depths (layers A and B). There were extracted 206 samples from transect sections and submitted to soil analysis (clay, Al2O3, Fe2O3, SiO2 TiO2, and weathering index). The first analog soil class map (ASC-N) contains only soil information regarding from orders to subgroups of the USDA Soil Taxonomy System. The second (ASC-H) map contains some additional information related to some soil attributes like color, ferric levels and base sum. For the elaboration of the digital soil maps the data was divided into three groups: i) Predicted soil attributes of the layer B (related to the soil weathering) which were obtained by using a local soil spectral library; ii) Spectral bands data extracted from a Landsat image; and iii) Terrain parameters. This information was summarized by a principal component analysis (PCA) in each group. Digital soil maps were generated by supervised classification using a maximum likelihood method. The trainee information for this classification was extracted from five toposequences based on the analog soil class maps. The spectral models of weathering soil attributes shown a high predictive performance with low error (R2 0.71 to 0.90). The spatial

  19. Assessment of Speckle-Tracking Echocardiography-Derived Global Deformation Parameters During Supine Exercise in Children.

    PubMed

    Liu, Michael Y; Tacy, Theresa; Chin, Clifford; Obayashi, Derek Y; Punn, Rajesh

    2016-03-01

    Exercise echocardiography is an underutilized tool in pediatrics with current applications including detecting segmental wall abnormalities, assessing the utility of global ventricular function, and measuring pulmonary hemodynamics. No prior study has applied speckle-tracking echocardiography (STE) during exercise echocardiography in children. The aim of this study was to determine the feasibility of measuring speckle-tracking-derived peak systolic velocities, global longitudinal and circumferential strain, and global strain rates at various phases of exercise. Ninety-seven healthy children underwent cardiopulmonary exercise testing using supine cycle ergometry. The exercise stress test consisted of baseline pulmonary function testing, monitoring of blood pressure and heart rate responses, electrocardiographic recordings, and oxygen saturations while subjects pedaled against a ramp protocol based on body weight. Echocardiographic measurements and specifically speckle-tracking analysis were performed during exercise at baseline, at a heart rate of 160 beats per minute and at 10 min after exercise. Peak systolic velocity, peak systolic strain, and peak systolic strain rate at these three phases were compared in the subjects in which all measurements were accurately obtained. We were able to complete peak velocity, strain, and strain rate measurements in all three exercise phases for 36 out of the 97 subjects tested. There was no significant difference between the feasibility of measuring circumferential versus longitudinal strain (p = 0.25, B-corrected = 0.75). In the 36 subjects studied, the magnitude of circumferential strain values decreased from -18.3 ± 4.8 to -13.7 ± 4.0 % from baseline to HR 160 (p < 0.0001, B-corrected < 0.0001), before returning to -19.6 ± 4.4 % at recovery (p = 0.19 when compared to baseline). Longitudinal strain did not vary significantly from baseline to HR 160 (from -17.7 ± 4.4 to -16.6 ± 4.4 %, p = 0

  20. ESTIMATES OF GENETIC PARAMETERS AND AN EVALUATION OF GENOTYPE X ENVIRONMENT INTERACTION FOR WEANING WEIGHT IN NELLORE CATTLE

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Records of 105,645 Nellore calves born from 1977 to 1994 in eight different regions of Brazil were used to estimate genetic parameters for weaning weight (kg). The objective of this study was to estimate genetic and environmental parameters and evaluate genotype x environment interaction for weaning...

  1. Interactions among thermal parameters determine offspring sex under temperature-dependent sex determination

    PubMed Central

    Warner, Daniel A.; Shine, Richard

    2011-01-01

    In many animals, temperatures experienced by developing embryos determine offspring sex (e.g. temperature-dependent sex determination, TSD), but most studies focus strictly on the effects of mean temperature, with little emphasis on the importance of thermal fluctuations. In the jacky dragon (Amphibolurus muricatus), an Australian lizard with TSD, data from nests in the field demonstrate that offspring sex ratios are predictable from thermal fluctuations but not from mean nest temperatures. To clarify this paradox, we incubated eggs in a factorial experiment with two levels of mean temperature and three levels of diel fluctuation. We show that offspring sex is determined by an interaction between these critical thermal parameters. Intriguingly, because these two thermal descriptors shift in opposing directions throughout the incubation season, this interactive effect inhibits seasonal shifts in sex ratio. Hence, our results suggest that TSD can yield offspring sex ratios that resemble those produced under genotypic sex-determining systems. These findings raise important considerations for understanding the diversity of TSD reaction norms, for designing experiments that evaluate the evolutionary significance of TSD, and for predicting sex ratios under past and future climate change scenarios. PMID:20685704

  2. Concentration dependence of the Flory-Huggins interaction parameter in aqueous solutions of capped PEO chains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chaudhari, M. I.; Pratt, L. R.; Paulaitis, M. E.

    2014-12-01

    The dependence on volume fraction φ of the Flory-Huggins interaction parameter χ wp (φ) describing the free energy of mixing of polymers in water is obtained by exploiting the connection of χ wp (φ) to the chemical potential of the water, for which quasi-chemical theory is satisfactory. We test this theoretical approach with simulation data for aqueous solutions of capped PEO (polyethylene oxide) oligomers. For CH3(CH2-O-CH2)mCH3 (m = 11), χ wp (φ) depends strongly on φ, consistent with experiment. These results identify coexisting water-rich and water-poor solutions at T = 300 K and p = 1 atm. Direct observation of the coexistence of these two solutions on simulation time scales supports that prediction for the system studied. This approach directly provides the osmotic pressures. The osmotic second virial coefficient for these chains is positive, reflecting repulsive interactions between the chains in the water, a good solvent for these chains.

  3. Concentration dependence of the Flory-Huggins interaction parameter in aqueous solutions of capped PEO chains.

    PubMed

    Chaudhari, M I; Pratt, L R; Paulaitis, M E

    2014-12-28

    The dependence on volume fraction φ of the Flory-Huggins interaction parameter χwp(φ) describing the free energy of mixing of polymers in water is obtained by exploiting the connection of χwp(φ) to the chemical potential of the water, for which quasi-chemical theory is satisfactory. We test this theoretical approach with simulation data for aqueous solutions of capped PEO (polyethylene oxide) oligomers. For CH3(CH2-O-CH2)mCH3 (m = 11), χwp(φ) depends strongly on φ, consistent with experiment. These results identify coexisting water-rich and water-poor solutions at T = 300 K and p = 1 atm. Direct observation of the coexistence of these two solutions on simulation time scales supports that prediction for the system studied. This approach directly provides the osmotic pressures. The osmotic second virial coefficient for these chains is positive, reflecting repulsive interactions between the chains in the water, a good solvent for these chains. PMID:25554181

  4. The effects of isoflurane anaesthesia on some Doppler-derived cardiac parameters in the common buzzard (Buteo buteo).

    PubMed

    Straub, Jens; Forbes, Neil A; Thielebein, Jens; Pees, Michael; Krautwald-Junghanns, Maria E

    2003-11-01

    In order to gain an initial overview of the influence of anaesthesia on the results of Doppler-derived blood flow measurements in raptors, the heart rate as well as three different sample volumes of pulsed-wave spectral Doppler-derived flow velocity (diastolic flow across the left and right atrioventricular valve, systolic flow across the aortic valve) were determined in 10 common buzzards (Buteo buteo). Measurements were taken once in conscious and once in anaesthetized birds. Anaesthesia was shown to produce significant changes in cardiac parameters recorded in the same birds whilst conscious. When comparing conscious birds with each other (with one exception for right sided ventricular inflow velocity) no correlation between the heart frequency and measured blood flow velocities was evident. This was also the case under anaesthesia. However, significant differences in these parameters were evident when comparing the results obtained before and under anaesthesia. The results suggest that the influence of anaesthesia in raptors is more than a simple reduction of heart rate and that there is also reduction in blood flow velocity. PMID:14550740

  5. Comparison of radiation and cloud parameters derived from satellite and aircraft measurements during FIRE 2 cirrus IFO

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heck, Patrick W.; Mayor, Shalini; Young, David F.; Minnis, Patrick; Takano, Yoshihide; Liou, Kuo-Nan; Spinhirne, James D.

    1993-01-01

    Meteorological satellite instrument pixel sizes are often much greater than the individual cloud elements in a given scene. Partially cloud-filled pixels can be misinterpreted in many analysis schemes because the techniques usually assume that all of the cloudy pixels are cloud filled. Coincident Landsat and Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite (GOES) data and degraded-resolution Landsat data were used to study the effects of both sensor resolution and analysis techniques on satellite-derived cloud parameters. While extremely valuable for advancing the understanding of these effects, these previous studies were relatively limited in the number of cloud conditions that were observed and by the limited viewing and illumination conditions. During the First ISCCP Regional Experiment (FIRE) Phase 2 (13 Nov. - 7 Dec. 1991), the NASA ER-2 made several flights over a wide range of cloud fields and backgrounds with several high resolution sensors useful for a variety of purposes including serving as ground truth for satellite-based cloud retrievals. This paper takes a first look at utilizing the ER-2 for validating cloud parameters derived from GOES and NOAA-11 Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR) data.

  6. Analysis of Toxic Amyloid Fibril Interactions at Natively Derived Membranes by Ellipsometry

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Rachel A. S.; Nabok, Aleksey; Blakeman, Ben J. F.; Xue, Wei-Feng; Abell, Benjamin; Smith, David P.

    2015-01-01

    There is an ongoing debate regarding the culprits of cytotoxicity associated with amyloid disorders. Although small pre-fibrillar amyloid oligomers have been implicated as the primary toxic species, the fibrillar amyloid material itself can also induce cytotoxicity. To investigate membrane disruption and cytotoxic effects associated with intact and fragmented fibrils, the novel in situ spectroscopic technique of Total Internal Reflection Ellipsometry (TIRE) was used. Fibril lipid interactions were monitored using natively derived whole cell membranes as a model of the in vivo environment. We show that fragmented fibrils have an increased ability to disrupt these natively derived membranes by causing a loss of material from the deposited surface when compared with unfragmented fibrils. This effect was corroborated by observations of membrane disruption in live cells, and by dye release assay using synthetic liposomes. Through these studies we demonstrate the use of TIRE for the analysis of protein-lipid interactions on natively derived lipid surfaces, and provide an explanation on how amyloid fibrils can cause a toxic gain of function, while entangled amyloid plaques exert minimal biological activity. PMID:26172440

  7. Synthesis and description of intermolecular interactions in new sulfonamide derivatives of tranexamic acid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ashfaq, Muhammad; Arshad, Muhammad Nadeem; Danish, Muhammad; Asiri, Abdullah M.; Khatoon, Sadia; Mustafa, Ghulam; Zolotarev, Pavel N.; Butt, Rabia Ayub; Şahin, Onur

    2016-01-01

    Tranexamic acid (4-aminomethyl-cyclohexanecarboxylic acid) was reacted with sulfonyl chlorides to produce structurally related four sulfonamide derivatives using simple and environmental friendly method to check out their three-dimensional behavior and van der Walls interactions. The molecules were crystallized in different possibilities, as it is/after alkylation at its O and N atoms/along with a co-molecule. All molecules were crystallized in monoclinic crystal system with space group P21/n, P21/c and P21/a. X-ray studies reveal that the molecules stabilized themselves by different kinds of hydrogen bonding interactions. The molecules are getting connected through O-H⋯O hydrogen bonds to form inversion dimers which are further connected through N-H⋯O interactions. The molecules in which N and O atoms were alkylated showed non-classical interaction and generated centro-symmetric R22(24) ring motif. The co-crystallized host and guest molecules are connected to each other via O-H⋯O interactions to generate different ring motifs. By means of the ToposPro software an analysis of the topologies of underlying nets that correspond to molecular packings and hydrogen-bonded networks in structures under consideration was carried out.

  8. Characterization of Lesion Formation and Bubble Activities during High Intensity Focused Ultrasound Ablation using Temperature-Derived Parameters

    PubMed Central

    Hsiao, Yi-Sing; Kumon, Ronald E.; Deng, Cheri X.

    2013-01-01

    Successful high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) thermal tissue ablation relies on accurate information of the tissue temperature and tissue status. Often temperature measurements are used to predict and monitor the ablation process. In this study, we conducted HIFU ablation experiments with ex vivo porcine myocardium tissue specimens to identify changes in temperature associated with tissue coagulation and bubble/cavity formation. Using infrared (IR) thermography and synchronized bright-field imaging with HIFU applied near the tissue surface, parameters derived from the spatiotemporal evolution of temperature were correlated with HIFU-induced lesion formation and overheating, of which the latter typically results in cavity generation and/or tissue dehydration. Emissivity of porcine myocardium was first measured to be 0.857 ± 0.006 (n = 3). HIFU outcomes were classified into non-ablative, normal lesion, and overheated lesion. A marked increase in the rate of temperature change during HIFU application was observed with lesion formation. A criterion using the maximum normalized second time derivative of temperature change provided 99.1% accuracy for lesion identification with a 0.05 s−1 threshold. Asymmetric temperature distribution on the tissue surface was observed to correlate with overheating and/or bubble generation. A criterion using the maximum displacement of the spatial location of the peak temperature provided 90.9% accuracy to identify overheated lesion with a 0.16 mm threshold. Spatiotemporal evolution of temperature obtained using IR imaging allowed determination of the cumulative equivalent minutes at 43 °C (CEM43) for lesion formation to be 170 min. Similar temperature characteristics indicative of lesion formation and overheating were identified for subsurface HIFU ablation. These results suggest that parameters derived from temperature changes during HIFU application are associated with irreversible changes in tissue and may provide useful

  9. Characterization of Lesion Formation and Bubble Activities during High Intensity Focused Ultrasound Ablation using Temperature-Derived Parameters.

    PubMed

    Hsiao, Yi-Sing; Kumon, Ronald E; Deng, Cheri X

    2013-09-01

    Successful high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) thermal tissue ablation relies on accurate information of the tissue temperature and tissue status. Often temperature measurements are used to predict and monitor the ablation process. In this study, we conducted HIFU ablation experiments with ex vivo porcine myocardium tissue specimens to identify changes in temperature associated with tissue coagulation and bubble/cavity formation. Using infrared (IR) thermography and synchronized bright-field imaging with HIFU applied near the tissue surface, parameters derived from the spatiotemporal evolution of temperature were correlated with HIFU-induced lesion formation and overheating, of which the latter typically results in cavity generation and/or tissue dehydration. Emissivity of porcine myocardium was first measured to be 0.857 ± 0.006 (n = 3). HIFU outcomes were classified into non-ablative, normal lesion, and overheated lesion. A marked increase in the rate of temperature change during HIFU application was observed with lesion formation. A criterion using the maximum normalized second time derivative of temperature change provided 99.1% accuracy for lesion identification with a 0.05 s(-1) threshold. Asymmetric temperature distribution on the tissue surface was observed to correlate with overheating and/or bubble generation. A criterion using the maximum displacement of the spatial location of the peak temperature provided 90.9% accuracy to identify overheated lesion with a 0.16 mm threshold. Spatiotemporal evolution of temperature obtained using IR imaging allowed determination of the cumulative equivalent minutes at 43 °C (CEM 43) for lesion formation to be 170 min. Similar temperature characteristics indicative of lesion formation and overheating were identified for subsurface HIFU ablation. These results suggest that parameters derived from temperature changes during HIFU application are associated with irreversible changes in tissue and may provide useful

  10. Characterization of lesion formation and bubble activities during high-intensity focused ultrasound ablation using temperature-derived parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsiao, Yi-Sing; Kumon, Ronald E.; Deng, Cheri X.

    2013-09-01

    Successful high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) thermal tissue ablation relies on accurate information of the tissue temperature and tissue status. Often temperature measurements are used to predict and monitor the ablation process. In this study, we conducted HIFU ablation experiments with ex vivo porcine myocardium tissue specimens to identify changes in temperature associated with tissue coagulation and bubble/cavity formation. Using infrared (IR) thermography and synchronized bright-field imaging with HIFU applied near the tissue surface, parameters derived from the spatiotemporal evolution of temperature were correlated with HIFU-induced lesion formation and overheating, of which the latter typically results in cavity generation and/or tissue dehydration. Emissivity of porcine myocardium was first measured to be 0.857 ± 0.006 (n = 3). HIFU outcomes were classified into non-ablative, normal lesion, and overheated lesion. A marked increase in the rate of temperature change during HIFU application was observed with lesion formation. A criterion using the maximum normalized second time derivative of temperature change provided 99.1% accuracy for lesion identification with a 0.05 s-1 threshold. Asymmetric temperature distribution on the tissue surface was observed to correlate with overheating and/or bubble generation. A criterion using the maximum displacement of the spatial location of the peak temperature provided 90.9% accuracy to identify overheated lesion with a 0.16 mm threshold. Spatiotemporal evolution of temperature obtained using IR imaging allowed determination of the critical cumulative equivalent minutes at 43 °C (CEM43) for lesion formation to be 170 min. Similar temperature characteristics indicative of lesion formation and overheating were identified for subsurface HIFU ablation. These results suggest that parameters derived from temperature changes during HIFU application are associated with irreversible changes in tissue and may provide

  11. Interactions of Indole Derivatives with β-Cyclodextrin: A Quantitative Structure-Property Relationship Study

    PubMed Central

    Šoškić, Milan; Porobić, Ivana

    2016-01-01

    Retention factors for 31 indole derivatives, most of them with auxin activity, were determined by high-performance liquid chromatography, using bonded β-cyclodextrin as a stationary phase. A three-parameter QSPR (quantitative structure-property relationship) model, based on physico-chemical and structural descriptors was derived, which accounted for about 98% variations in the retention factors. The model suggests that the indole nucleus occupies the relatively apolar cavity of β-cyclodextrin while the carboxyl group of the indole -3-carboxylic acids makes hydrogen bonds with the hydroxyl groups of β-cyclodextrin. The length and flexibility of the side chain containing carboxyl group strongly affect the binding of these compounds to β-cyclodextrin. Non-acidic derivatives, unlike the indole-3-carboxylic acids, are poorly retained on the column. A reasonably well correlation was found between the retention factors of the indole-3-acetic acids and their relative binding affinities for human serum albumin, a carrier protein in the blood plasma. A less satisfactory correlation was obtained when the retention factors of the indole derivatives were compared with their affinities for auxin-binding protein 1, a plant auxin receptor. PMID:27124734

  12. Interactions of Indole Derivatives with β-Cyclodextrin: A Quantitative Structure-Property Relationship Study.

    PubMed

    Šoškić, Milan; Porobić, Ivana

    2016-01-01

    Retention factors for 31 indole derivatives, most of them with auxin activity, were determined by high-performance liquid chromatography, using bonded β-cyclodextrin as a stationary phase. A three-parameter QSPR (quantitative structure-property relationship) model, based on physico-chemical and structural descriptors was derived, which accounted for about 98% variations in the retention factors. The model suggests that the indole nucleus occupies the relatively apolar cavity of β-cyclodextrin while the carboxyl group of the indole -3-carboxylic acids makes hydrogen bonds with the hydroxyl groups of β-cyclodextrin. The length and flexibility of the side chain containing carboxyl group strongly affect the binding of these compounds to β-cyclodextrin. Non-acidic derivatives, unlike the indole-3-carboxylic acids, are poorly retained on the column. A reasonably well correlation was found between the retention factors of the indole-3-acetic acids and their relative binding affinities for human serum albumin, a carrier protein in the blood plasma. A less satisfactory correlation was obtained when the retention factors of the indole derivatives were compared with their affinities for auxin-binding protein 1, a plant auxin receptor. PMID:27124734

  13. New Amphiphilic Neamine Derivatives Active against Resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Their Interactions with Lipopolysaccharides

    PubMed Central

    Sautrey, Guillaume; Zimmermann, Louis; Deleu, Magali; Delbar, Alicia; Souza Machado, Luiza; Jeannot, Katy; Van Bambeke, Françoise; Buyck, Julien M.; Decout, Jean-Luc

    2014-01-01

    The development of novel antimicrobial agents is urgently required to curb the widespread emergence of multidrug-resistant bacteria like colistin-resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa. We previously synthesized a series of amphiphilic neamine derivatives active against bacterial membranes, among which 3′,6-di-O-[(2″-naphthyl)propyl]neamine (3′,6-di2NP), 3′,6-di-O-[(2″-naphthyl)butyl]neamine (3′,6-di2NB), and 3′,6-di-O-nonylneamine (3′,6-diNn) showed high levels of activity and low levels of cytotoxicity (L. Zimmermann et al., J. Med. Chem. 56:7691–7705, 2013). We have now further characterized the activity of these derivatives against colistin-resistant P. aeruginosa and studied their mode of action; specifically, we characterized their ability to interact with lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and to alter the bacterial outer membrane (OM). The three amphiphilic neamine derivatives were active against clinical colistin-resistant strains (MICs, about 2 to 8 μg/ml), The most active one (3′,6-diNn) was bactericidal at its MIC and inhibited biofilm formation at 2-fold its MIC. They cooperatively bound to LPSs, increasing the outer membrane permeability. Grafting long and linear alkyl chains (nonyl) optimized binding to LPS and outer membrane permeabilization. The effects of amphiphilic neamine derivatives on LPS micelles suggest changes in the cross-bridging of lipopolysaccharides and disordering in the hydrophobic core of the micelles. The molecular shape of the 3′,6-dialkyl neamine derivatives induced by the nature of the grafted hydrophobic moieties (naphthylalkyl instead of alkyl) and the flexibility of the hydrophobic moiety are critical for their fluidifying effect and their ability to displace cations bridging LPS. Results from this work could be exploited for the development of new amphiphilic neamine derivatives active against colistin-resistant P. aeruginosa. PMID:24867965

  14. Evaluation of morphometric parameters of drainage networks derived from topographic maps and DEM in point of floods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ozdemir, Hasan; Bird, Deanne

    2009-02-01

    An evaluation of morphometric parameters of two drainage networks derived from different sources was done to determine the influence of sub-basins to flooding on the main channel in the Havran River basin (Balıkesir-Turkey). Drainage networks for the sub-basins were derived from both topographic maps scaled 1:25.000 and a 10-m resolution digital elevation model (DEM) using geographic information systems (GIS). Blue lines, representing fluvial channels on the topographic maps were accepted as a drainage network, which does not depict all exterior links in the basin. The second drainage network was extracted from the DEM using minimum accumulation area threshold to include all exterior links. Morphometric parameters were applied to the two types of drainage networks at sub-basin levels. These parameters were used to assess the influence of the sub-basins on the main channel with respect to flooding. The results show that the drainage network of sub-basin 4—where a dam was constructed on its outlet to mitigate potential floods—has a lower influence morphometrically to produce probable floods on the main channel than that of sub-basins 1, 3, and 5. The construction of the dam will help reduce flooding on the main channel from sub-basin 4 but it will not prevent potential flooding from sub-basin 1, 3 and 5, which join the main channel downstream of sub-basin 4. Therefore, flood mitigation efforts should be considered in order to protect the settlement and agricultural lands on the floodplain downstream of the dam. In order to increase our understanding of flood hazards, and to determine appropriate mitigation solutions, drainage morphometry research should be included as an essential component to hydrologic studies.

  15. Interactions of Lysozyme and Azobenzene Derivatives in the Solution and on a Surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Tao; Shing, Katherine

    2015-03-01

    The reversible isomerization of the azobenzene and its derivatives can control protein structure in an aqueous environment with the alternation of visible and UV lights for very promising applications in drug delivery. However, an atomistic description of Azo-molecules and protein amino acid residues is still lacking. In this study we performed atomistic molecular dynamics simulation to study the interactions between a lysozyme molecule and the Azobenzene derivative (in the bulk solution and grafted on the Silica surfaces). Protein structural arrangements (i.e., the shape and secondary structures) and its mobility, as a function of tran/cis ratio in the bulk solution and on the self-assembling monolayer surface's density and morphology, are systematically investigated.

  16. SCS macrophages suppress melanoma by restricting tumor-derived vesicle-B cell interactions.

    PubMed

    Pucci, Ferdinando; Garris, Christopher; Lai, Charles P; Newton, Andita; Pfirschke, Christina; Engblom, Camilla; Alvarez, David; Sprachman, Melissa; Evavold, Charles; Magnuson, Angela; von Andrian, Ulrich H; Glatz, Katharina; Breakefield, Xandra O; Mempel, Thorsten R; Weissleder, Ralph; Pittet, Mikael J

    2016-04-01

    Tumor-derived extracellular vesicles (tEVs) are important signals in tumor-host cell communication, yet it remains unclear how endogenously produced tEVs affect the host in different areas of the body. We combined imaging and genetic analysis to track melanoma-derived vesicles at organismal, cellular, and molecular scales to show that endogenous tEVs efficiently disseminate via lymphatics and preferentially bind subcapsular sinus (SCS) CD169(+) macrophages in tumor-draining lymph nodes (tdLNs) in mice and humans. The CD169(+) macrophage layer physically blocks tEV dissemination but is undermined during tumor progression and by therapeutic agents. A disrupted SCS macrophage barrier enables tEVs to enter the lymph node cortex, interact with B cells, and foster tumor-promoting humoral immunity. Thus, CD169(+) macrophages may act as tumor suppressors by containing tEV spread and ensuing cancer-enhancing immunity. PMID:26989197

  17. Protein interaction hotspot identification using sequence-based frequency-derived features.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Quang-Thang; Fablet, Ronan; Pastor, Dominique

    2013-11-01

    Finding good descriptors, capable of discriminating hotspot residues from others, is still a challenge in many attempts to understand protein interaction. In this paper, descriptors issued from the analysis of amino acid sequences using digital signal processing (DSP) techniques are shown to be as good as those derived from protein tertiary structure and/or information on the complex. The simulation results show that our descriptors can be used separately to predict hotspots, via a random forest classifier, with an accuracy of 79% and a precision of 75%. They can also be used jointly with features derived from tertiary structures to boost the performance up to an accuracy of 82% and a precision of 80%. PMID:21742567

  18. Thermodynamics and kinetic studies in the binding interaction of cyclic naphthalene diimide derivatives with double stranded DNAs.

    PubMed

    Islam, Md Monirul; Fujii, Satoshi; Sato, Shinobu; Okauchi, Tatsuo; Takenaka, Shigeori

    2015-08-01

    Previously, we reported our investigations of the interaction between a cyclic naphthalene diimide derivative (cNDI 1) and double stranded DNA (dsDNA) (Bioorg. Med. Chem.2014, 22, 2593). Here, we report the synthesis of the novel cNDI 2, which has shorter linker chains than cNDI 1. We performed comparative investigations of the interactions of both cNDI 1 and cNDI 2 with different types of dsDNA, including analysis of their thermodynamics and kinetics. Interactions between the cNDIs and calf thymus DNA (CT-DNA), poly[d(A-T)]2, or poly[d(G-C)]2 were explored by physicochemical and biochemical methods, including UV-Vis spectroscopy, circular dichroism (CD) spectroscopy, stopped-flow kinetics, and a topoisomerase I assay. Upon addition of cNDIs to CT-DNA, the existence of an induced CD signal at approximately the wavelength of the naphthalene diimide chromophore and unwinding of the DNA duplex, as detected by the topoisomerase I assay, revealed that cNDIs bound to the DNA duplex. As indicated by the steric constraint in the formation of the complex, bis-threading intercalation was the more favorable binding mode. UV-Vis spectroscopic titration of the cNDIs with DNA duplexes showed affinities on the order of 10(5)-10(6)M(-1), with a stoichiometry of one cNDI molecule per four DNA base pairs. Thermodynamic parameters (ΔG, ΔH, and ΔS) based on the van't Hoff equation indicated that exothermic and entropy-dependent hydrophobic interactions played a major role in the reaction. Stopped-flow association and dissociation analysis showed that cNDI interactions with poly[d(G-C)]2 were more stable and had a slower dissociation rate than their interactions with poly[d(A-T)]2 and CT-DNA. Measurement of ionic strength indicated that electrostatic attraction is also an important component of the interaction between cNDIs and CT-DNA. Because of its longer linker chain, cNDI 1 showed higher binding selectivity, a more entropically favorable interaction, and much slower dissociation

  19. Interaction of Salmonella Typhimurium with Dendritic Cells Derived from Pluripotent Embryonic Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Rossi, Raffaella; Hale, Christine; Goulding, David; Andrews, Robert; Abdellah, Zarah; Fairchild, Paul J.; Dougan, Gordon

    2012-01-01

    Using an in vitro differentiation protocol we isolated cells with the properties of dendritic cells (DCs) from immunologically refractive pluripotent murine embryonic stem cells (ESCs). These ES-derived dendritic cells (ESDCs) expressed cytokines and were able to present antigen to a T cell line. Infection of ESDCs with Salmonella Typhimurium stimulated the expression of immune cell markers and thousands of murine genes, many associated with the immune response. Consequently, this system provides a novel in vitro model, amenable to genetic modification, for monitoring host/pathogen interactions. PMID:23284947

  20. Rational Design, Synthesis and Evaluation of Coumarin Derivatives as Protein-protein Interaction Inhibitors.

    PubMed

    De Luca, Laura; Agharbaoui, Fatima E; Gitto, Rosaria; Buemi, Maria Rosa; Christ, Frauke; Debyser, Zeger; Ferro, Stefania

    2016-09-01

    Herein we describe the design and synthesis of a new series of coumarin derivatives searching for novel HIV-1 integrase (IN) allosteric inhibitors. All new obtained compounds were tested in order to evaluate their ability to inhibit the interaction between the HIV-1 IN enzyme and the nuclear protein lens epithelium growth factor LEDGF/p75. A combined approach of docking and molecular dynamic simulations has been applied to clarify the activity of the new compounds. Specifically, the binding free energies by using the method of molecular mechanics-generalized Born surface area (MM-GBSA) was calculated, whereas hydrogen bond occupancies were monitored throughout simulations methods. PMID:27546050

  1. Specific interactions between amyloid-β peptide and curcumin derivatives: Ab initio molecular simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishimura, Hiromi; Kadoya, Ryushi; Suzuki, Tomoya; Murakawa, Takeru; Shulga, Sergiy; Kurita, Noriyuki

    2015-07-01

    Alzheimer's disease is caused by accumulation of amyloid-β (Aβ) peptides in a brain. To suppress the production of Aβ peptides, it is effective to inhibit the cleavage of amyloid precursor protein (APP) by secretases. However, because the secretases also play important roles to produce vital proteins for human body, inhibitors for the secretases may have side effects. To propose new agents for protecting the cleavage site of APP from the attacking of the γ-secretase, we have investigated here the specific interactions between a short APP peptide and curcumin derivatives, using protein-ligand docking as well as ab initio molecular simulations.

  2. Structure-activity relationship of selected polyphenol derivatives as inhibitors of Bax/Bcl-xL interaction.

    PubMed

    Vo, Duc Duy; Gautier, Fabien; Juin, Philippe; Grée, René

    2012-05-01

    This paper describes the synthesis of nine selected diaryl/heteroaryl-containing phenol and polyphenol derivatives which have been evaluated against Bax/Bcl-xL interaction in comparison with ABT-737. Using a BRET assay, six of these derivatives exhibit activity comparable to ABT-737 to disrupt Bax/Bcl-xL interaction. These preliminary results demonstrate that such polyphenol-derived molecules are attractive compounds regarding anticancer activity and that the phenol at position 3 is important regarding disruption of Bax/Bcl-xL interaction. PMID:22425031

  3. Bayes cost of parameter estimation for a quantum system interacting with an environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ban, Masashi

    2016-05-01

    The Bayes cost of parameter estimation is studied for a quantum system which is influenced by an external environment, where the cost function is assumed to be a quadratic function of a difference between true and estimated values. When the reduced time evolution of a quantum system is determined by the time-dependent Lindblad equation, it is found how the Bayes cost changes with time. The Bayes cost increases monotonously with time for the Markovian environment, while it shows an oscillatory behavior for the non-Markovian environment due to the memory effect. Furthermore, in order to investigate how initial correlation between quantum system and environment, an analytic expression of the Bayes cost is derived for a qubit-oscillator system. It is found for both Markovian and non-Markovian environments that the Bayes cost can take a value smaller than the initial one in the presence of the initial correlation. The decrease in the Bayes cost is due to the backflow of information that is included in the initially correlated part.

  4. Interactions of a Tetrazine Derivative with Biomembrane Constituents: A Langmuir Monolayer Study.

    PubMed

    Nakahara, Hiromichi; Hagimori, Masayori; Mukai, Takahiro; Shibata, Osamu

    2016-07-01

    Tetrazine (Tz) is expected to be used for bioimaging and as an analytical reagent. It is known to react very fast with trans-cyclooctene under water in organic chemistry. Here, to understand the interaction between Tz and biomembrane constituents, we first investigated the interfacial behavior of a newly synthesized Tz derivative comprising a C18-saturated hydrocarbon chain (rTz-C18) using a Langmuir monolayer spread at the air-water interface. Surface pressure (π)-molecular area (A) and surface potential (ΔV)-A isotherms were measured for monolayers of rTz-C18 and biomembrane constituents such as dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine (DPPC), dipalmitoylphosphatidylglycerol (DPPG), dipalmitoyl phosphatidylethanolamine (DPPE), palmitoyl sphingomyelin (PSM), and cholesterol (Ch). The lateral interaction between rTz-C18 and the lipids was thermodynamically elucidated from the excess Gibbs free energy of mixing and two-dimensional phase diagram. The binary monolayers except for the Ch system indicated high miscibility or affinity. In particular, rTz-C18 was found to interact more strongly with DPPE, which is a major constituent of the inner surface of cell membranes. The phase behavior and morphology upon monolayer compression were investigated by using Brewster angle microscopy (BAM), fluorescence microscopy (FM), and atomic force microscopy (AFM). The BAM and FM images of the DPPC/rTz-C18, DPPG/rTz-C18, and PSM/rTz-C18 systems exhibited a coexistence state of two different liquid-condensed domains derived mainly from monolayers of phospholipids and phospholipids-rTz-C18. From these morphological observations, it is worthy to note that rTz-C18 is possible to interact with a limited amount of the lipids except for DPPE. PMID:27280946

  5. Herb–drug interaction prediction based on the high specific inhibition of andrographolide derivatives towards UDP-glucuronosyltransferase (UGT) 2B7

    SciTech Connect

    Ma, Hai-Ying; Sun, Dong-Xue; Cao, Yun-Feng; Ai, Chun-Zhi; Qu, Yan-Qing; Hu, Cui-Min; Jiang, Changtao; Dong, Pei-Pei; Sun, Xiao-Yu; Hong, Mo; Tanaka, Naoki; Gonzalez, Frank J.; and others

    2014-05-15

    Herb–drug interaction strongly limits the clinical application of herbs and drugs, and the inhibition of herbal components towards important drug-metabolizing enzymes (DMEs) has been regarded as one of the most important reasons. The present study aims to investigate the inhibition potential of andrographolide derivatives towards one of the most important phase II DMEs UDP-glucuronosyltransferases (UGTs). Recombinant UGT isoforms (except UGT1A4)-catalyzed 4-methylumbelliferone (4-MU) glucuronidation reaction and UGT1A4-catalyzed trifluoperazine (TFP) glucuronidation were employed to firstly screen the andrographolide derivatives' inhibition potential. High specific inhibition of andrographolide derivatives towards UGT2B7 was observed. The inhibition type and parameters (K{sub i}) were determined for the compounds exhibiting strong inhibition capability towards UGT2B7, and human liver microsome (HLMs)-catalyzed zidovudine (AZT) glucuronidation probe reaction was used to furtherly confirm the inhibition behavior. In combination of inhibition parameters (K{sub i}) and in vivo concentration of andrographolide and dehydroandrographolide, the potential in vivo inhibition magnitude was predicted. Additionally, both the in vitro inhibition data and computational modeling results provide important information for the modification of andrographolide derivatives as selective inhibitors of UGT2B7. Taken together, data obtained from the present study indicated the potential herb–drug interaction between Andrographis paniculata and the drugs mainly undergoing UGT2B7-catalyzed metabolic elimination, and the andrographolide derivatives as potential candidates for the selective inhibitors of UGT2B7. - Highlights: • Specific inhibition of andrographolide derivatives towards UGT2B7. • Herb-drug interaction related withAndrographis paniculata. • Guidance for design of UGT2B7 specific inhibitors.

  6. Interaction between tachyplesin I, an antimicrobial peptide derived from horseshoe crab, and lipopolysaccharide.

    PubMed

    Kushibiki, Takahiro; Kamiya, Masakatsu; Aizawa, Tomoyasu; Kumaki, Yasuhiro; Kikukawa, Takashi; Mizuguchi, Mineyuki; Demura, Makoto; Kawabata, Shun-ichiro; Kawano, Keiichi

    2014-03-01

    Lipopolysaccharide (LPS) is a major constituent of the outer membrane of Gram-negative bacteria and is the very first site of interactions with antimicrobial peptides (AMPs). In order to gain better insight into the interaction between LPS and AMPs, we determined the structure of tachyplesin I (TP I), an antimicrobial peptide derived from horseshoe crab, in its bound state with LPS and proposed the complex structure of TP I and LPS using a docking program. CD and NMR measurements revealed that binding to LPS slightly extends the two β-strands of TP I and stabilizes the whole structure of TP I. The fluorescence wavelength of an intrinsic tryptophan of TP I and fluorescence quenching in the presence or absence of LPS indicated that a tryptophan residue is incorporated into the hydrophobic environment of LPS. Finally, we succeeded in proposing a structural model for the complex of TP I and LPS by using a docking program. The calculated model structure suggested that the cationic residues of TP I interact with phosphate groups and saccharides of LPS, whereas hydrophobic residues interact with the acyl chains of LPS. PMID:24389234

  7. Improving Rotor-Stator Interaction Noise Code Through Analysis of Input Parameters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Unton, Timothy J.

    2004-01-01

    There are two major sources of aircraft noise. The first is from the airframe and the second is from the engines. The focus of the acoustics branch at NASA Glenn is on the engine noise sources. There are two major sources of engine noise; fan noise and jet noise. Fan noise, produced by rotating machinery of the engine, consists of both tonal noise, which occurs at discrete frequencies, and broadband noise, which occurs across a wide range of frequencies. The focus of my assignment is on the broadband noise generated by the interaction of fan flow turbulence and the stator blades. such as the sweep and stagger angles and blade count, as well as the flow parameters such as intensity of turbulence in the flow. The tool I employed in this work is a computer program that predicts broadband noise from fans. The program assumes that the complex shape of the curved blade can be represented as a single flat plate, allowing it to use fairly simple equations that can be solved in a reasonable amount of time. While the results from such representation provided reasonable estimates of the broadband noise levels, they did not usually represent the entire spectrum accurately. My investigation found that the discrepancy between data and theory can be improved if the leading edge and the trailing edge of the blade are treated separately. Using this approach, I reduced the maximum error in noise level from a high of 30% to less than 5% for the cases investigated. Detailed results of this investigation will be discussed at my presentation. The objective of this study is to investigate the influence of geometric parameters

  8. [Optical Analysis of the Interaction of Mercaptan Derivatives of Nanogold Particles with Carcinoembryonic Antigen].

    PubMed

    Zeng, Hong-juan; Zhao, Ran-lin; Wang, De-shun; Li, Cai-xia; Liu, Yi-yao

    2016-02-01

    be prepared. In this paper, novel mercaptan derivative of nanogold particles are prepared and studied using transmission electron microscopy (TEM), ultra-violet-visible absorption spectra (UV-Vis), fluorescence emission (FE) spectrum and infrared spectrum (IR) methods. The UV-Vis and FE results show the presence of new ligands mercaptan, more electrons from the orbit of ligand which can excite to the central ion related orbits and increase fluorescence of gold. Fluorescence sensitization effect was observed when mercaptan derivatives of nanogold interacted with carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) and no fluorescence sensitization effect was found when nanogold interacted with carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA). The study of CEA hyperchromic mechanism of mercaptan derivatives nanogold and the CEA by the method of infrared spectrum, shows that the randomized OH bonds in the Au-protein interaction, showed more on the outside of the plane of bending vibration after the interaction with the mercaptan derivative nanogold, making the energy transfer from mercaptan derivatives nanogold to protein easy; leading to its fluorescence sensitization effect. PMID:27209753

  9. A compilation of rate parameters of water-mineral interaction kinetics for application to geochemical modeling

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Palandri, James L.; Kharaka, Yousif K.

    2004-01-01

    Geochemical reaction path modeling is useful for rapidly assessing the extent of water-aqueous-gas interactions both in natural systems and in industrial processes. Modeling of some systems, such as those at low temperature with relatively high hydrologic flow rates, or those perturbed by the subsurface injection of industrial waste such as CO2 or H2S, must account for the relatively slow kinetics of mineral-gas-water interactions. We have therefore compiled parameters conforming to a general Arrhenius-type rate equation, for over 70 minerals, including phases from all the major classes of silicates, most carbonates, and many other non-silicates. The compiled dissolution rate constants range from -0.21 log moles m-2 s-1 for halite, to -17.44 log moles m-2 s-1 for kyanite, for conditions far from equilibrium, at 25 ?C, and pH near neutral. These data have been added to a computer code that simulates an infinitely well-stirred batch reactor, allowing computation of mass transfer as a function of time. Actual equilibration rates are expected to be much slower than those predicted by the selected computer code, primarily because actual geochemical processes commonly involve flow through porous or fractured media, wherein the development of concentration gradients in the aqueous phase near mineral surfaces, which results in decreased absolute chemical affinity and slower reaction rates. Further differences between observed and computed reaction rates may occur because of variables beyond the scope of most geochemical simulators, such as variation in grain size, aquifer heterogeneity, preferred fluid flow paths, primary and secondary mineral coatings, and secondary minerals that may lead to decreased porosity and clogged pore throats.

  10. Interaction of tetraphenyl-porphyrin derivatives with DPPC-liposomes: an EPR study.

    PubMed

    Voszka, István; Szabó, Zsófia; Csík, Gabriella; Maillard, Philip; Gróf, Pál

    2005-05-13

    The effect of the symmetry and polarity of the porphyrin molecules on their membrane localization and interaction with membrane lipids were investigated by electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR). For this purpose, two glycoconjugated tetraphenyl porphyrin derivatives were selected, respectively, symmetrically and asymmetrically substituted. Small unilamellar liposomes composed of dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine (DPPC) and spin labeled stearic acids were prepared. The spin probe was located at the 5th or 7th or 12th or 16th position of the hydrocarbon chain in order to monitor various regions of the lipid bilayer. EPR spectra of porphyrin-free and porphyrin-bound liposomes were recorded at various temperatures below and above the phase transition temperature of DPPC. The effect on membrane fluidity proved to be stronger with the asymmetrical porphyrin derivative than with the symmetrical one. The rigidity increased when the spin label was near lipid head groups. The difference observed between control and porphyrin-treated samples when measured below the main lipid transition temperature disappeared at higher temperature. When the spin label was near the end of the hydrophobic tails, the symmetrical porphyrin derivative caused increase in fluidity, while the asymmetrical one slightly decreased it. To explain this phenomenon we propose that the asymmetrical derivative exerts a stronger ordering effect caused by its fluorophenyl group located at the level of the lipid heads, which is attenuated to the hydrophobic tails. The perturbing effect of the symmetric derivative could not lead to similar extent of ordering at the head groups and looses the hydrocarbon chains deeper in the membrane. PMID:15878112