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Sample records for dermal collagen implant

  1. Type VI Collagen Regulates Dermal Matrix Assembly and Fibroblast Motility.

    PubMed

    Theocharidis, Georgios; Drymoussi, Zoe; Kao, Alexander P; Barber, Asa H; Lee, David A; Braun, Kristin M; Connelly, John T

    2016-01-01

    Type VI collagen is a nonfibrillar collagen expressed in many connective tissues and implicated in extracellular matrix (ECM) organization. We hypothesized that type VI collagen regulates matrix assembly and cell function within the dermis of the skin. In the present study we examined the expression pattern of type VI collagen in normal and wounded skin and investigated its specific function in new matrix deposition by human dermal fibroblasts. Type VI collagen was expressed throughout the dermis of intact human skin, at the expanding margins of human keloid samples, and in the granulation tissue of newly deposited ECM in a mouse model of wound healing. Generation of cell-derived matrices (CDMs) by human dermal fibroblasts with stable knockdown of COL6A1 revealed that type VI collagen-deficient matrices were significantly thinner and contained more aligned, thicker, and widely spaced fibers than CDMs produced by normal fibroblasts. In addition, there was significantly less total collagen and sulfated proteoglycans present in the type VI collagen-depleted matrices. Normal fibroblasts cultured on de-cellularized CDMs lacking type VI collagen displayed increased cell spreading, migration speed, and persistence. Taken together, these findings indicate that type VI collagen is a key regulator of dermal matrix assembly, composition, and fibroblast behavior and may play an important role in wound healing and tissue regeneration. PMID:26763426

  2. Polarized Microscopy in Lesions With Altered Dermal Collagen.

    PubMed

    Elbendary, Amira; Valdebran, Manuel; Parikh, Kruti; Elston, Dirk M

    2016-08-01

    Alterations in dermal collagen are noted in dermatofibroma, dermatofibrosarcoma protuberans, morphea, lichen sclerosus et atrophicus, hypertrophic scars, and keloids. The authors sought to determine whether variations in birefringence of collagen by polarized microscopy could be of help in diagnosing such conditions. Representative hematoxylin and eosin sections of 400 cases, including dermatofibroma, dermatofibrosarcoma protuberans, hypertrophic scars, keloid, morphea, and lichen sclerosus, were examined under polarized microscopy. Distinct patterns of birefringence of collagen for each disease were noted under polarized microscopy. This study highlights the use of polarized microscopy as adjunctive tool in differentiating different diseases with collagen alteration. PMID:26959692

  3. Dermal ultrastructure in collagen VI myopathy.

    PubMed

    Hermanns-Lê, Trinh; Piérard, Gérald E; Piérard-Franchimont, Claudine; Delvenne, Philippe

    2014-04-01

    The COL VI mutations are responsible for a spectrum of myopathies. The authors report cutaneous ultrastructural alterations in a patient with COL6A2 myopathy. The changes include variations in size of collagen fibrils, flower-like sections of collagen fibrils, as well as thickening of vessel and nerve basement membranes. Electron microscopy of a skin biopsy contributes to the diagnosis of COL VI myopathies. PMID:24134684

  4. Localized controlled release of stratifin reduces implantation-induced dermal fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Rahmani-Neishaboor, Elham; Hartwell, Ryan; Jalili, Reza; Jackson, John; Brown, Erin; Ghahary, Aziz

    2012-10-01

    Localized controlled release of anti-fibrogenic factors can potentially prevent tissue fibrosis surrounding biomedical prostheses, such as vascular stents and breast implants. We have previously demonstrated that therapeutic intervention with topically applied stratifin in a rabbit ear fibrotic model not only prevents dermal fibrosis but also promotes more normal tissue repair by regulating extracellular matrix deposition. In this work, the anti-fibrogenic effect of a controlled release form of stratifin was investigated in the prevention of fibrosis induced by dermal poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) microsphere/poly(vinyl alcohol) (PVA) hydrogel implants. Pharmacodynamic effects were evaluated by histopathological examination of subcutaneous tissue surrounding implanted composites. Controlled release of stratifin from PLGA microsphere/PVA hydrogel implants significantly moderated dermal fibrosis and inflammation by reducing collagen deposition (30%), total tissue cellularity (48%) and infiltrated CD3(+) immune cells (81%) in the surrounding tissue compared with the stratifin-free implants. The controlled release of stratifin from implants markedly increased the level of matrix metalloproteinase-1 expression in the surrounding tissue, which resulted in less collagen deposition. These stratifin-eluting PLGA/PVA composites show promise as coatings to decrease the typical fibrosis exhibited around implanted biomedical prostheses, such as breast implants and vascular stents. PMID:22743110

  5. [Ossification of the collagen implant].

    PubMed

    Walter, M; Müller, J M; Keller, H W; Brenner, U

    1985-12-01

    Native collagen type I was studied morphologically and fluorescent-histologically after implantation in bony defects. As criteria for revitalisation we used depth and density of immigration, type of immigrated cells, revascularisation, formation of new cartilage and bone. Furthermore the deposition of fluorochromes was studied. The maximum of cellular immigration was reached after 8 weeks and remained at this level for the period of observation. The implants were impregnated only with fibroblasts and fibrocytes, developing into chondroblasts, chondrocytes, osteoblasts and osteocytes. Only in one case basophilic round-cells could be seen. The centres of the implants were after 6 weeks rarely, after 8 weeks fully revascularized. Formation of new cartilage and bone could be seen after 6 weeks, increasing in number and extension during the observation-period. Osteoneogenesis was performed both by desmal and enchondral ossification, enchondral ossification much more in evidence. The deposition of fluorochromes could be seen in each implant. After 8 weeks fluorochromes could only be seen at the bone-implant interface, after 12 and 16 weeks even the centres were well impregnated. In a single case reossification in a control-rib could be seen as well morphologically as fluorescent-histologically. PMID:2868614

  6. Dermal type I collagen assessment by digital image analysis*

    PubMed Central

    Brianezi, Gabrielli; Grandi, Fabrizio; Bagatin, Ediléia; Enokihara, Mílvia Maria S. S.; Miot, Hélio Amante

    2015-01-01

    Type I collagen is the main dermal component, and its evaluation is relevant to quantitative studies in dermatopathology. However, visual gradation (0 to 4+) has low precision and high subjectivity levels. This study aimed to develop and validate a digital morphometric analysis technique to estimate type I collagen levels in the papillary dermis. Four evaluators visually quantified (0 to 4+) the density of type I collagen in 63 images of forearm skin biopsies marked by immunohistochemistry and two evaluators analyzed the same images using digital morphometric techniques (RGB split colors (I) and color deconvolution (II)). Automated type I collagen density estimation in the papillary dermis (two techniques) were correlated with visual evaluations (Spearman's rho coefficients of 0.48 and 0.62 (p<0.01)). With regard to the inter-observer repeatability, the four evaluators who used visual classification had an intraclass correlation coefficient (for absolute agreement) of 0.53, while the other two evaluators who used digital analysis (algorithm II) had an intraclass correlation coefficient of 0.97. PMID:26560217

  7. Effect of Surface Chemical Functionalities on Collagen Deposition by Primary Human Dermal Fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Bachhuka, Akash; Hayball, John; Smith, Louise E; Vasilev, K

    2015-10-28

    Surface modification has been identified as an important technique that could improve the response of the body to implanted medical devices. Collagen production by fibroblasts is known to play a vital role in wound healing and device fibrous encapsulation. However, how surface chemistry affects collagen I and III deposition by these cells has not been systematically studied. Here, we report how surface chemistry influences the deposition of collagen I and III by primary human dermal fibroblasts. Amine (NH3), carboxyl acid (COOH), and hydrocarbon (CH3) surfaces were generated by plasma deposition. This is a practically relevant tool to deposit a functional coating on any type of substrate material. We show that fibroblasts adhere better and proliferate faster on amine-rich surfaces. In addition, the initial collagen I and III production is greater on this type of coating. These data indicates that surface modification can be a promising route for modulating the rate and level of fibrous encapsulation and may be useful in informing the design of implantable biomedical devices to produce more predictable clinical outcomes. PMID:26457649

  8. Effects of soybean peptide and collagen peptide on collagen synthesis in normal human dermal fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Tokudome, Yoshihiro; Nakamura, Kyosuke; Kage, Madoka; Todo, Hiroaki; Sugibayashi, Kenji; Hashimoto, Fumie

    2012-09-01

    The collagen present in the dermis of the skin is a fibrous protein that fills the gaps between cells and helps maintain tissue flexibility. Effectively increasing the collagen present in the skin is an important goal for cosmetic research. Recent research has shown that soybean peptide (SP) has anti-fatigue activity, antioxidant activity, and the ability to increase type I collagen, while collagen peptide (CP) has the ability to enhance corneal moisture content and viscoelasticity, as well as to increase levels of hyaluronic acid synthesizing enzymes in human skin. Little documented research, however, has been conducted on collagen formation in relation to these peptides. Therefore, this research applied SP and CP with molecular weights primarily around 500 and preparations containing both SP and CP to normal human dermal fibroblasts together with magnesium ascorbyl phosphate (VC-PMg), and used real-time PCR to determine the gene expression of type I collagen (COL1A1), which contributes to collagen synthesis, and Smad7, which contribute to collagen breakdown. In addition, enzyme linked immuno sorbent assay (ELISA) was used to measure collagen content in the media. COL1A1 gene expression at 24 h after sample addition showed higher tendency in all samples and increased with time at 4, 8 and 24 h after addition. Smad7 gene expression was not substantially different at 4 h after addition. matrix metalloproteinase-1 gene expression was higher following SP addition, but was lower after the addition of CP and SP+CP. Medium collagen content was higher in all samples and increased with time at 8 h after addition. Collagen levels were higher when SP and CP were added together. PMID:22264122

  9. Temporal variation in the deposition of different types of collagen within a porous biomaterial implant.

    PubMed

    White, Jacinta F; Werkmeister, Jerome A; Bisucci, Teresa; Darby, Ian A; Ramshaw, John A M

    2014-10-01

    The deposition of new collagen in association with a medical implant has been studied using expanded polytetrafluoroethylene vascular replacement samples implanted subcutaneously in sheep, for up to 28 days. New type I collagen mRNA synthesis was followed by in situ hybridization, while the accumulation of new collagen types III, V, VI, XII, and XIV was followed by immunohistochemistry. All the collagen detected in the pores of the implant were newly deposited at various times after implantation and were not due to any pre-existing dermal collagen that may have been present around the implant. Collagen deposition was seen initially surrounding the implant and, with time, was seen to infiltrate within its pores. In situ hybridization showed that the majority of infiltrating cells had switched on mRNA that coded for type I collagen production. Histology showed that cellular infiltration increased with time, accompanied by increasing collagen deposition. The deposition of different collagen types happened at different rates. The type V and VI collagens preceded the major interstitial collagens in the newly deposited tissue, although at longer time points, detection of type V collagen appeared to decrease. After disruption of the interstitial collagens with enzyme, the "masked" type V collagen was clearly still visible by immunohistochemistry. Little type XII collagen could be seen within the porous mesh, although it was seen in the surrounding tissues. By contrast, type XIV was seen throughout the porous structure of the implanted mesh, with less being visible outside the material where type XII was more abundant. PMID:24243831

  10. Cytotoxic evaluation of biomechanically improved crosslinked ovine collagen on human dermal fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Awang, M A; Firdaus, M A B; Busra, M B; Chowdhury, S R; Fadilah, N R; Wan Hamirul, W K; Reusmaazran, M Y; Aminuddin, M Y; Ruszymah, B H I

    2014-01-01

    Earlier studies in our laboratory demonstrated that collagen extracted from ovine tendon is biocompatible towards human dermal fibroblast. To be able to use this collagen as a scaffold in skin tissue engineering, a mechanically stronger scaffold is required that can withstand manipulation before transplantation. This study was conducted to improve the mechanical strength of this collagen sponge using chemical crosslinkers, and evaluate their effect on physical, chemical and biocompatible properties. Collagen sponge was crosslinked with 1-ethyl-3-(3-dimethylaminopropyl) carbodiimide (EDC) and glutaraldehyde (GA). Tensile test, FTIR study and mercury porosimetry were used to evaluate mechanical properties, chemical property and porosity, respectively. MTT assay was performed to evaluate the cytotoxic effect of crosslinked collagen sponge on human dermal fibroblasts. The FTIR study confirmed the successful crosslinking of collagen sponge. Crosslinking with EDC and GA significantly increased the mechanical strength of collagen sponge, with GA being more superior. Crosslinking of collagen sponge significantly reduced the porosity and the effect was predominant in GA-crosslinked collagen sponge. The GA-crosslinked collagen showed significantly lower, 60% cell viability towards human dermal fibroblasts compared to that of EDC-crosslinked collagen, 80% and non-crosslinked collagen, 100%. Although the mechanical strength was better when using GA but the more toxic effect on dermal fibroblast makes EDC a more suitable crosslinker for future skin tissue engineering. PMID:24948455

  11. Preparation of (3H)collagen for studies of the biologic fate of xenogenic collagen implants in vivo

    SciTech Connect

    McPherson, J.M.; Sawamura, S.J.; Conti, A.

    1986-06-01

    Reduction of a commercially available, pepsin-solubilized, bovine dermal collagen (Vitrogen 100) with sodium (3H)borohydride provided radiolabeled collagen preparations with specific activities ranging from 7.1-12.0 muCi/mg collagen. These specific activities were 2-3 times greater than those obtained by reduction of intact rat tail tendon collagen under similar conditions. The alpha, beta, and higher aggregate components of type I collagen were radiolabeled as well as the alpha component of a small amount of type III collagen present in the samples. Fractionation of cyanogen bromide peptides showed that alpha 1(I)CB7, alpha 1(I)CB8, and alpha 2(I)CB3,5 were the predominant peptides labeled by this procedure. Amino acid analysis indicated that the majority of the radioactivity was in reducible cross-links, precursors of these cross-links, and in hexosyllysine residues. Reconstitution experiments comparing this radiolabeled collagen with nonlabeled collagen showed them to be indistinguishable. Bacterial collagenase digestion of this reconstituted fibrillar collagen in both a lightly cross-linked (glutaraldehyde 0.0075%) and noncross-linked form provided evidence that digestion of labeled and nonlabeled collagens proceeded at similar rates. Thus, labeling did not change the properties of the collagen. Cross-linking made the preparation refractory to proteolytic degradation. Injection of fibrillar collagen preparations, spiked with radiolabeled collagen, into the guinea pig dermis followed by quantitation of the amount of radioactivity recovered from implant sites as a function of time, indicated that the lightly cross-linked samples also were more resistant to degradation in vivo than the noncross-linked preparation. The half-life of noncross-linked collagen was about 4 days while that of the cross-linked collagen was about 25 days.

  12. Temporary granulomatous inflammation following collagen implantation.

    PubMed

    Heise, H; Zimmermann, R; Heise, P

    2001-08-01

    Injections of bovine collagen are a common procedure for correction of folds in the face. However, this therapy is not free from side effects. We present a patient in whom a granulomatous inflammation occurred following implantation of this material. We therefore now insist on an observation interval of 4 weeks between test injection and actual treatment, as is recommended by the manufacturer. PMID:11562094

  13. Laminin peptide YIGSR induces collagen synthesis in Hs27 human dermal fibroblasts

    SciTech Connect

    Yoon, Jong Hyuk; Kim, Jaeyoon; Lee, Hyeongjoo; Kim, So Young; Jang, Hwan-Hee; Ryu, Sung Ho; Kim, Beom Joon; Lee, Taehoon G.

    2012-11-23

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We identify a function of the YIGSR peptide to enhance collagen synthesis in Hs27. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer YIGSR peptide enhanced collagen type 1 synthesis both of gene and protein levels. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer There were no changes in cell proliferation and MMP-1 level in YIGSR treatment. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The YIGSR effect on collagen synthesis mediated activation of FAK, pyk2 and ERK. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The YIGSR-induced FAK and ERK activation was modulated by FAK and MEK inhibitors. -- Abstract: The dermal ECM is synthesized from fibroblasts and is primarily compromised of fibrillar collagen and elastic fibers, which support the mechanical strength and resiliency of skin, respectively. Laminin, a major glycoprotein located in the basement membrane, promotes cell adhesion, cell growth, differentiation, and migration. The laminin tyrosine-isoleucine-glycine-serine-arginine (YIGSR) peptide, corresponding to the 929-933 sequence of the {beta}1 chain, is known to be a functional motif with effects on the inhibition of tumor metastasis, the regulation of sensory axonal response and the inhibition of angiogenesis through high affinity to the 67 kDa laminin receptor. In this study, we identified a novel function of the YIGSR peptide to enhance collagen synthesis in human dermal fibroblasts. To elucidate this novel function regarding collagen synthesis, we treated human dermal fibroblasts with YIGSR peptide in both a time- and dose-dependent manner. According to subsequent experiments, we found that the YIGSR peptide strongly enhanced collagen type 1 synthesis without changing cell proliferation or cellular MMP-1 level. This YIGSR peptide-mediated collagen type 1 synthesis was modulated by FAK inhibitor and MEK inhibitor. This study clearly reveals that YIGSR peptide plays a novel function on the collagen type 1 synthesis of dermal fibroblasts and also suggests that YIGSR is a strong candidate

  14. Endoplasmic reticulum stress inhibits collagen synthesis independent of collagen-modifying enzymes in different chondrocyte populations and dermal fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Vonk, Lucienne A; Doulabi, Behrouz Zandieh; Huang, Chun-Ling; Helder, Marco N; Everts, Vincent; Bank, Ruud A

    2010-06-01

    Chondrocytes respond to glucose deprivation with a decreased collagen synthesis due to disruption of a proper functioning of the endoplasmic reticulum (ER): ER stress. Since the mechanisms involved in the decreased synthesis are unknown, we have investigated whether chaperones and collagen-modifying enzymes are affected by glucose deprivation. Chondrocytes obtained from nucleus pulposus, annulus fibrosus, articular cartilage, and meniscus and dermal fibroblasts were cultured under control conditions or exposed to the ER stress-inducing treatments of tunicamycin addition or glucose withdrawal. Both treatments resulted in an up-regulation of the gene expression of the ER stress markers in all cell types, but dermal fibroblasts showed a delayed response to glucose deprivation. Collagen gene expression was down-regulated, and less collagen protein was present in the cells under both ER stress-inducing conditions. The expression levels of the prolyl 4-hydroxylases were either not affected (P4ha3) or increased (P4ha1 and P4ha2), the levels of the lysyl hydroxylases decreased, and the N-propeptidase Adamts2 decreased. Both treatments induced apoptosis. Chondrocytes respond more quickly to glucose deprivation, but it appears that chondrocytes can cope better with tunicamycin-induced ER stress than fibroblasts. Although collagen synthesis was inhibited by the treatments, some collagen-modifying enzymes and chaperones were up-regulated, suggesting that there is no causal relation between them. PMID:20555395

  15. Apigenin Induces Dermal Collagen Synthesis Via smad2/3 Signaling Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Y.; Wang, J.; Cheng, X.; Yi, B.; Zhang, X.; Li, Q.

    2015-01-01

    Decrease in fibroblast-produced collagen has been proven to be the pivotal cause of skin aging, but there is no satisfactory drug which directly increases dermal thickness and collage density. Here we found that a flavonoid natural product, apigenin, could significantly increase collagen synthesis. NIH/3T3 and primary human dermal fibroblasts (HDFs) were incubated with various concentrations of apigenin, with dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) serving as the negative control. Real-time reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction (PCR), Western Blot, and Toluidine blue staining demonstrated that apigenin stimulated type-I and type-III collagen synthesis of fibroblasts on the mRNA and protein levels. Meanwhile, apigenin did not induce expression of alpha smooth muscle actin (α-SMA) in vitro and in vivo, a fibrotic marker in living tissues. Then the production of collagen was confirmed by Masson’s trichrome stain, Picrosirius red stain and immunohistochemistry in mouse models. We also clarified that this compound induced collagen synthesis by activating smad2/3 signaling pathway. Taken together, without obvious influence on fibroblasts’ apoptosis and viability, apigenin could promote the type-I and type-III collagen synthesis of dermal fibroblasts in vitro and in vivo, thus suggesting that apigenin may serve as a potential agent for esthetic and reconstructive skin rejuvenation. PMID:26150153

  16. [Granulomatous reactions from aesthetic dermal micro-implants].

    PubMed

    Rongioletti, F

    2008-01-01

    Granulomatous reactions to dermal fillers for tissue augmentation is a rare but possible late complication occurring both with permanent (more frequent) and biodegradable or resorbable products. Predictions cannot be made for possible late reactions, sometimes occurring even after 18 years. Although clinical diagnosis seems to be an easy task, the issue is sometimes challenging if cosmetic intervention is denied or not mentioned by the patient or by the referring physician. Identifying the filler is therefore difficult and experts may be called in trials to solve the problem. Histopathology is the best means to obtain the correct diagnosis and to identify the type of filler particles. In fact, the particular configuration of the vacuoles and cystic structures inside the granulomas reflects the shape of the injected implants particles. The clinical and microscopic features, the pathogenesis and the treatment of the granulomatous reactions to dermal fillers for tissue augmentation will be presented and discussed. PMID:18442665

  17. Alterations of Dermal Connective Tissue Collagen in Diabetes: Molecular Basis of Aged-Appearing Skin

    PubMed Central

    Argyropoulos, Angela J.; Robichaud, Patrick; Balimunkwe, Rebecca Mutesi; Fisher, Gary J.; Hammerberg, Craig; Yan, Yan

    2016-01-01

    Alterations of the collagen, the major structural protein in skin, contribute significantly to human skin connective tissue aging. As aged-appearing skin is more common in diabetes, here we investigated the molecular basis of aged-appearing skin in diabetes. Among all known human matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs), diabetic skin shows elevated levels of MMP-1 and MMP-2. Laser capture microdissection (LCM) coupled real-time PCR indicated that elevated MMPs in diabetic skin were primarily expressed in the dermis. Furthermore, diabetic skin shows increased lysyl oxidase (LOX) expression and higher cross-linked collagens. Atomic force microscopy (AFM) further indicated that collagen fibrils were fragmented/disorganized, and key mechanical properties of traction force and tensile strength were increased in diabetic skin, compared to intact/well-organized collagen fibrils in non-diabetic skin. In in vitro tissue culture system, multiple MMPs including MMP-1 and MM-2 were induced by high glucose (25 mM) exposure to isolated primary human skin dermal fibroblasts, the major cells responsible for collagen homeostasis in skin. The elevation of MMPs and LOX over the years is thought to result in the accumulation of fragmented and cross-linked collagen, and thus impairs dermal collagen structural integrity and mechanical properties in diabetes. Our data partially explain why old-looking skin is more common in diabetic patients. PMID:27104752

  18. Prostaglandin E2 inhibits collagen synthesis in dermal fibroblasts and prevents hypertrophic scar formation in vivo.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Jingling; Shu, Bin; Chen, Lei; Tang, Jinming; Zhang, Lijun; Xie, Julin; Liu, Xusheng; Xu, Yingbin; Qi, Shaohai

    2016-08-01

    Hypertrophic scarring is a common dermal fibroproliferative disorder characterized by excessive collagen deposition. Prostaglandin E2 (PGE2 ), an important inflammatory product synthesized via the arachidonic acid cascade, has been shown to act as a fibroblast modulator and to possess antifibroblastic activity. However, the mechanism underlying the antifibrotic effect of PGE2 remains unclear. In this study, we explored the effects of PGE2 on TGF-β1-treated dermal fibroblasts in terms of collagen production and to determine the regulatory pathways involved, as well as understand the antiscarring function of PGE2 in vivo. We found that PGE2 inhibited TGF-β1-induced collagen synthesis by regulating the balance of matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) and tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase (TIMP). It did so by upregulating cAMP through the E prostanoid (EP)2 receptor. We determined that inhibition of the TGF-β1/Smad pathway by PGE2 is associated with its ability to inhibit collagen synthesis. An in vivo study further confirmed that PGE2 inhibits hypertrophic scar formation by decreasing collagen production. Our results demonstrate that the novel anti-scarring function of PGE2 is achieved by balancing MMPs/TIMP expression and decreasing collagen production. PMID:26997546

  19. Development of biomimetic tilapia collagen nanofibers for skin regeneration through inducing keratinocytes differentiation and collagen synthesis of dermal fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Tian; Wang, Nanping; Xue, Yang; Ding, Tingting; Liu, Xin; Mo, Xiumei; Sun, Jiao

    2015-02-11

    In this study, tilapia skin collagen sponge and electrospun nanofibers were developed for wound dressing. The collagen sponge was composed of at least two α-peptides, and its denaturation temperature was 44.99 °C. It did not change the number of spleen-derived lymphocytes in BALB/c mice, the ratio of CD4+/CD8+ lymphocytes, and the level of IgG or IgM in Sprague-Dawley rat. The contact angle, tensile strength, and weight loss temperature of collagen nanofibers were 21.2°, 6.72±0.44 MPa, and 300 °C, respectively. The nanofibers could promote the viabilities of human keratinocytes (HaCaTs) and human dermal fibroblasts (HDFs), inducing epidermal differentiation through the gene expression of involucrin, filaggrin, and type I transglutaminase of HaCaTs, and they could also accelerate migration of HaCaTs with the expression of matrix metalloproteinase-9 and transforming growth factor-β1 (TGF-β1). Besides, the nanofibers could upregulate the protien level of Col-I in HDFs both via a direct effect and TGF-β1 secreted from HaCaTs, thus facilitating the formation of collagen fibers. Furthermore, the collagen nanofibers stimulated the skin regeneration rapidly and effectively in vivo. These biological effects could be explained as the contributions from the biomimic extracellular cell matrix structure, hydrophilicity, and the multiple amino acids of the collagen nanofibers. PMID:25598076

  20. Biotinylated GHK peptide incorporated collagenous matrix: A novel biomaterial for dermal wound healing in rats.

    PubMed

    Arul, V; Gopinath, D; Gomathi, K; Jayakumar, R

    2005-05-01

    Matrikines are small peptide fragments of extracellular matrix proteins that display potent tissue repair activities. Difficulties in achieving sustained delivery of bioactive concentration of matrikines in the affected area limits their therapeutic use. The present study evaluates the effects biotinylated matrikine peptide (bio-glycyl-histidyl-lysine) incorporated collagen membrane for dermal wound healing processes in rats. Biotinylated peptide incorporated collagen matrix (PIC) showed better healing when compared to wounds treated with collagen matrix [CF (collagen film)] and without collagen [CR (control)]. Binding studies indicate that biotinylated GHK (Bio-GHK) binds effectively to the collagen matrix and red blood cell (RBC) membrane when compared with t-butyloxycarbonyl substituted GHK (Boc-GHK). Wound contraction, increased cell proliferation, and high expression of antioxidant enzymes in PIC treated group indicate enhanced wound healing activity when compared to CF and CR groups. Interestingly Bio-GHK incorporated collagen increases the copper concentration by ninefold at the wound site indicating the wound healing property of Bio-GHK can also be linked with both copper localization and matrikine activities. These results demonstrate the possibility of using Bio-GHK incorporated collagen film as a therapeutic agent in the wound healing process. PMID:15803494

  1. Effect of Collagen Nanotopography on Keloid Fibroblast Proliferation and Matrix Synthesis: Implications for Dermal Wound Healing

    PubMed Central

    Muthusubramaniam, Lalitha; Zaitseva, Tatiana; Paukshto, Michael; Martin, George

    2014-01-01

    Keloids are locally exuberant dermal scars characterized by excessive fibroblast proliferation and matrix accumulation. Although treatment strategies include surgical removal and intralesional steroid injections, an effective regimen is yet to be established due to a high rate of recurrence. The regressing center and growing margin of the keloid have different collagen architecture and also differ in the rate of proliferation. To investigate whether proliferation is responsive to collagen topography, keloid, scar, and dermal fibroblasts were cultured on nanopatterned scaffolds varying in collagen fibril diameter and alignment-small and large diameter, aligned and random fibrils, and compared to cells grown on flat collagen-coated substrates, respectively. Cell morphology, proliferation, and expression of six genes related to proliferation (cyclin D1), phenotype (α-smooth muscle actin), and matrix synthesis (collagens I and III, and matrix metalloproteinase-1 and -2) were measured to evaluate cell response. Fibril alignment was shown to reduce proliferation and matrix synthesis in all three types of fibroblasts. Further, keloid cells were found to be most responsive to nanotopography. PMID:24724556

  2. Effects of Panax ginseng extract on human dermal fibroblast proliferation and collagen synthesis.

    PubMed

    Lee, Geum-Young; Park, Kang-Gyun; Namgoong, Sik; Han, Seung-Kyu; Jeong, Seong-Ho; Dhong, Eun-Sang; Kim, Woo-Kyung

    2016-03-01

    Current studies of Panax ginseng (or Korean ginseng) have demonstrated that it has various biological effects, including angiogenesis, immunostimulation, antimicrobial and anti-inflammatory effects. Therefore, we hypothesised that P. ginseng may also play an important role in wound healing. However, few studies have been conducted on the wound-healing effects of P. ginseng. Thus, the purpose of this in vitro pilot study was to determine the effects of P. ginseng on the activities of fibroblasts, which are key wound-healing cells. Cultured human dermal fibroblasts were treated with one of six concentrations of P. ginseng: 0, 1, 10 and 100 ng/ml and 1 and 10 µg/ml. Cell proliferation was determined 3 days post-treatment using the 3-(4, 5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2, 5-diphenyl tetrazolium bromide assay, and collagen synthesis was evaluated by the collagen type I carboxy-terminal propeptide method. Cell proliferation levels and collagen synthesis were compared among the groups. The 10 ng/ml to 1 µg/ml P. ginseng treatments significantly increased cell proliferation, and the 1 ng/ml to 1 µg/ml concentrations significantly increased collagen synthesis. The maximum effects for both parameters were observed at 10 ng/ml. P. ginseng stimulated human dermal fibroblast proliferation and collagen synthesis at an optimal concentration of 10 ng/ml. PMID:26507878

  3. The effect of collagen-chitosan porous scaffold thickness on dermal regeneration in a one-stage grafting procedure.

    PubMed

    Haifei, Shi; Xingang, Wang; Shoucheng, Wu; Zhengwei, Mao; Chuangang, You; Chunmao, Han

    2014-01-01

    Dermal substitutes are used as dermal regeneration templates to reduce scar formation and improve wound healing. Unlike autografts, dermal substitutes lack normal vascular networks. The increased distance required for diffusion of oxygen and nutrients to the autograft following interpositioning of the substitute dramatically affects graft survival. To evaluate the effect of collagen-chitosan scaffold thickness on dermal regeneration, single-layer collagen-chitosan porous scaffolds of 0.5-, 1- and 2-mm thicknesses were fabricated and used to treat full-thickness wounds in a one-stage grafting procedure in a rat model. Skin-graft viability, wound contraction, histological changes, and wound tensile strength were evaluated. The results indicated that the distance for the diffusion of oxygen and nutrients to the autograft in the 2-mm-thick scaffold provided less support for graft take, which resulted in graft necrosis, extensive inflammatory reaction, marked foreign-body reaction (FBR), rapid scaffold degradation, and abnormal collagen deposition and remodeling. In contrast, the thinner scaffolds, especially of that 0.5-mm thickness, promoted earlier angiogenesis, ensuring skin-graft viability with a mild FBR, and ordered fibroblast infiltration and better collagen remodeling. It can be concluded that collagen-chitosan porous scaffolds with a thickness of <1mm are more suitable for dermal regeneration and can be used as dermal templates for treatment of dermal defects using a one-stage grafting procedure. PMID:24076783

  4. Collagen-Based Films Containing Liposome-Loaded Usnic Acid as Dressing for Dermal Burn Healing

    PubMed Central

    Nunes, Paula S.; Albuquerque-Júnior, Ricardo L. C.; Cavalcante, Danielle R. R.; Dantas, Marx D. M.; Cardoso, Juliana C.; Bezerra, Marília S.; Souza, Jamille C. C.; Serafini, Mairim Russo; Quitans-Jr, Lucindo J.; Bonjardim, Leonardo R.; Araújo, Adriano A. S.

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this study was assess the effect of collagen-based films containing usnic acid as a wound dressing for dermal burn healing. Second-degree burn wounds were performed in forty-five Wistar rats, assigned into nine groups: COL—animals treated with collagen-based films; PHO—animals treated with collagen films containing empty liposomes; UAL—animals treated with collagen-based films containing usnic acid incorporated into liposomes. After 7, 14, and 21 days the animals were euthanized. On 7th day there was a moderate infiltration of neutrophils, in UAL, distributed throughout the burn wounds, whereas in COL and PHO, the severity of the reaction was slighter and still limited to the margins of the burn wounds. On the 14th day, the inflammatory reaction was less intense in UAL, with remarkable plasma cells infiltration. On the 21st day, there was reduction of the inflammation, which was predominantly composed of plasma cells in all groups, particularly in UAL. The use of the usnic acid provided more rapid substitution of type-III for type-I collagen on the 14th day, and improved the collagenization density on the 21st day. It was concluded that the use of reconstituted bovine type-I collagen-based films containing usnic acid improved burn healing process in rats. PMID:21274404

  5. Engineered Pullulan–Collagen Composite Dermal Hydrogels Improve Early Cutaneous Wound Healing

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Victor W.; Rustad, Kristine C.; Galvez, Michael G.; Neofytou, Evgenios; Glotzbach, Jason P.; Januszyk, Michael; Major, Melanie R.; Sorkin, Michael; Longaker, Michael T.; Rajadas, Jayakumar

    2011-01-01

    New strategies for skin regeneration are needed to address the significant medical burden caused by cutaneous wounds and disease. In this study, pullulan–collagen composite hydrogel matrices were fabricated using a salt-induced phase inversion technique, resulting in a structured yet soft scaffold for skin engineering. Salt crystallization induced interconnected pore formation, and modification of collagen concentration permitted regulation of scaffold pore size. Hydrogel architecture recapitulated the reticular distribution of human dermal matrix while maintaining flexible properties essential for skin applications. In vitro, collagen hydrogel scaffolds retained their open porous architecture and viably sustained human fibroblasts and murine mesenchymal stem cells and endothelial cells. In vivo, hydrogel-treated murine excisional wounds demonstrated improved wound closure, which was associated with increased recruitment of stromal cells and formation of vascularized granulation tissue. In conclusion, salt-induced phase inversion techniques can be used to create modifiable pullulan–collagen composite dermal scaffolds that augment early wound healing. These novel biomatrices can potentially serve as a structured delivery template for cells and biomolecules in regenerative skin applications. PMID:20919949

  6. B lymphocytes and B-cell activating factor promote collagen and profibrotic markers expression by dermal fibroblasts in systemic sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Introduction B lymphocytes might play a pathogenic role in dermal fibrosis in systemic sclerosis (SSc). B-cell activating factor (BAFF), a key cytokine for B-cell activation, is increased in the serum and the skin of patients with SSc. However, the ability of B cells directly to stimulate dermal fibroblasts and the role of BAFF are not fully understood. We therefore investigated the involvement of B cells and BAFF in the expression of collagen and profibrotic markers by dermal fibroblasts. Methods Cocultures of blood B cells from healthy blood donors and normal or SSc dermal fibroblasts stimulated with anti-IgM and BAFF were performed. Alpha-SMA, TIMP1, MMP9, COL1A1, COL1A2, and COL3A1 mRNA expression were determined by quantitative RT-PCR. Soluble collagen, BAFF, IL-6, IL-1β, TGF-β1, and CCL2 protein secretion were assessed. Results Coculture of blood B cells and dermal fibroblasts isolated from SSc patients induced IL-6, TGF-β1, CCL2, and collagen secretion, as well as Alpha-SMA, TIMP1, and MMP9 expression in dermal fibroblasts. Transwell assays demonstrated that this induction was dependent on cell-cell contact. Addition of anti-IgM and BAFF to the coculture increased IL-6, CCL2, TGF-β1, and collagen secretion. B cell- and BAFF-induced collagen secretion was highly reduced by anti-TGF-β1 antibodies. Conclusions Our results showed for the first time a direct role of B cells on the production of collagen by dermal fibroblasts, which is further enhanced by BAFF. Thus, these results demonstrate a new pathogenic role of B cells and BAFF in fibrosis and systemic sclerosis. PMID:24289101

  7. Preparation and characterization of an advanced collagen aggregate from porcine acellular dermal matrix.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xinhua; Dan, Nianhua; Dan, Weihua

    2016-07-01

    The objective of this study was to extract and characterize an advanced collagen aggregate (Ag-col) from porcine acellular dermal matrix (pADM). Based on histological examination, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and atomic force microscope (AFM), Ag-col was composed of the D-periodic cross-striated collagen fibrils and thick collagen fiber bundles with uneven diameters and non-orientated arrangement. Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectra of pADM, Ag-col and Col were similar and revealed the presence of the triple helix. Circular dichroism (CD) analysis exhibited a slightly higher content of α-helix but inappreciably less amount of random coil structure in Ag-col compared to Col. Moreover, imino acid contents of pADM, Ag-col and Col were 222.43, 218.30 and 190.01 residues/1000 residues, respectively. From zeta potential analysis, a net charge of zero was found at pH 6.45 and 6.11 for Ag-col and Col, respectively. Differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) study suggested that the Td of Ag-col was 20°C higher than that of Col as expected, and dynamic mechanical analysis (DMA) indicated that Ag-col possessed a higher storage modulus but similar loss factor compared to Col. Therefore, the collagen aggregate from pADM could serve as a better alternative source of collagens for further applications in food and biological industries. PMID:27039117

  8. Use of a porcine dermal collagen graft (Permacol) in parotid surgery.

    PubMed

    Papadogeorgakis, Nikolaos; Petsinis, Vasilis; Christopoulos, Panagiotis; Mavrovouniotis, Nikolaos; Alexandridis, Constantinos

    2009-07-01

    Our aim was to present the results of the use of porcine dermal collagen graft (Permacol) in the prevention of Frey's syndrome and face-contouring aesthetic deformities after operations on the parotid. We treated 19 patients with parotid tumours. After resection, a Permacol sheet was applied to the perimeter of the tissue deficit so that it was fully covered, and was sutured firmly. This technique produced satisfactory aesthetic results with good facial contouring in all patients. It also protected the exposed parotid nerve plexus, and none of the patients developed Frey's syndrome. Permacol produced good results in both postoperative facial contouring and prevention of Frey's syndrome. PMID:18963286

  9. Sterile acellular dermal collagen as a treatment for rippling deformity of breast.

    PubMed

    Busse, Brittany; Orbay, Hakan; Sahar, David E

    2014-01-01

    Prosthetic implants are frequently used for breast augmentation and breast reconstruction following mastectomy. Unfortunately, long-term aesthetic results of prosthetic breast restoration may be hindered by complications such as rippling, capsular contracture, and implant malposition. The advent of use of acellular dermal matrices has greatly improved the outcomes of prosthetic breast reconstruction. We describe a case of rippling deformity of breast that was treated using an acellular dermal matrix product, AlloMax. The patient presented with visible rippling of bilateral prosthetic breast implants as well as significant asymmetry of the breasts after multiple excisional biopsies for right breast ductal carcinoma in situ. A 6 × 10 cm piece of AlloMax was placed on the medial aspect of each breast between the implant and the skin flap. Follow-up was performed at 1 week, 3 months, and 1 year following the procedure. The patient recovered well from the surgery and there were no complications. At her first postoperative follow-up the patient was extremely satisfied with the result. At her 3-month and 1-year follow-up she had no recurrence of her previous deformity and no new deformity. PMID:25610697

  10. Investigation of the effect of hydration on dermal collagen in ex vivo human skin tissue using second harmonic generation microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samatham, Ravikant; Wang, Nicholas K.; Jacques, Steven L.

    2016-02-01

    Effect of hydration on the dermal collagen structure in human skin was investigated using second harmonic generation microscopy. Dog ears from the Mohs micrographic surgery department were procured for the study. Skin samples with subject aged between 58-90 years old were used in the study. Three dimensional Multiphoton (Two-photon and backward SHG) control data was acquired from the skin samples. After the control measurement, the skin tissue was either soaked in deionized water for 2 hours (Hydration) or kept at room temperature for 2 hours (Desiccation), and SHG data was acquired. The data was normalized for changes in laser power and detector gain. The collagen signal per unit volume from the dermis was calculated. The desiccated skin tissue gave higher backward SHG compared to respective control tissue, while hydration sample gave a lower backward SHG. The collagen signal decreased with increase in hydration of the dermal collagen. Hydration affected the packing of the collagen fibrils causing a change in the backward SHG signal. In this study, the use of multiphoton microscopy to study the effect of hydration on dermal structure was demonstrated in ex vivo tissue.

  11. Collagen VII Half-Life at the Dermal-Epidermal Junction Zone: Implications for Mechanisms and Therapy of Genodermatoses.

    PubMed

    Kühl, Tobias; Mezger, Markus; Hausser, Ingrid; Guey, Lin T; Handgretinger, Rupert; Bruckner-Tuderman, Leena; Nyström, Alexander

    2016-06-01

    The tissue half-life of proteins largely determines treatment frequency of non-gene-editing-based therapies targeting the cause of genodermatoses. Surprisingly, such knowledge is missing for a vast number of proteins involved in pathologies. The dermal-epidermal junction zone is believed to be a rather static structure, but to our knowledge no detailed analysis of the stability of proteins within this zone has been performed. Here, we addressed the in vivo half-life of collagen type VII using genetic ablation of its expression and therapeutic introduction of exogenous collagen VII in a preclinical model. A similar in vivo stability of collagen VII was observed in the skin, tongue, and esophagus, with a half-life of about 1 month. Collagen VII expressed by intradermally injected mesenchymal stromal cells also exhibited a similar half-life. Our study provides key information needed for the development of protein replacement or cell-based therapies for dystrophic epidermolysis bullosa caused by genetic deficiency of collagen VII. Moreover, by showing what we define as an intermediate half-life of collagen VII, our study challenges the view of the dermal-epidermal junction zone as a static structure with very slow turnover. PMID:26899947

  12. Multiphoton microscopy of engineered dermal substitutes: assessment of 3-D collagen matrix remodeling induced by fibroblast contraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pena, Ana-Maria; Fagot, Dominique; Olive, Christian; Michelet, Jean-François; Galey, Jean-Baptiste; Leroy, Frédéric; Beaurepaire, Emmanuel; Martin, Jean-Louis; Colonna, Anne; Schanne-Klein, Marie-Claire

    2010-09-01

    Dermal fibroblasts are responsible for the generation of mechanical forces within their surrounding extracellular matrix and can be potentially targeted by anti-aging ingredients. Investigation of the modulation of fibroblast contraction by these ingredients requires the implementation of three-dimensional in situ imaging methodologies. We use multiphoton microscopy to visualize unstained engineered dermal tissue by combining second-harmonic generation that reveals specifically fibrillar collagen and two-photon excited fluorescence from endogenous cellular chromophores. We study the fibroblast-induced reorganization of the collagen matrix and quantitatively evaluate the effect of Y-27632, a RhoA-kinase inhibitor, on dermal substitute contraction. We observe that collagen fibrils rearrange around fibroblasts with increasing density in control samples, whereas collagen fibrils show no remodeling in the samples containing the RhoA-kinase inhibitor. Moreover, we show that the inhibitory effects are reversible. Our study demonstrates the relevance of multiphoton microscopy to visualize three-dimensional remodeling of the extracellular matrix induced by fibroblast contraction or other processes.

  13. A heterocyclic molecule kartogenin induces collagen synthesis of human dermal fibroblasts by activating the smad4/smad5 pathway.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jing; Zhou, Jia; Zhang, Ning; Zhang, Xiaoling; Li, Qingfeng

    2014-07-18

    Declined production of collagen by fibroblasts is one of the major causes of aging appearance. However, only few of compounds found in cosmetic products are able to directly increase collagen synthesis. A novel small heterocyclic compound called kartogenin (KGN) was found to stimulate collagen synthesis of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs). So, we hypothesized and tested that if KGN could be applied to stimulate the collagen synthesis of fibroblasts. Human dermal fibroblasts in vitro were treated with various concentrations of KGN, with dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) serving as the negative control. Real-time reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction, Western blot, and immunofluorescence analyses were performed to examine the expression of collagen and transforming growth factor beta (TGF-β) signaling pathway. The production of collagen was also tested in vivo by Masson's trichrome stain and immunohistochemistry in the dermis of mice administrated with KGN. Results showed that without obvious influence on fibroblasts' apoptosis and viability, KGN stimulated type-I collagen synthesis of fibroblasts at the mRNA and protein levels in a time-dependent manner, but KGN did not induce expression of α-skeletal muscle actin (α-sma) or matrix metallopeptidase1 (MMP1), MMP9 in vitro. Smad4/smad5 of the TGF-β signaling pathway was activated by KGN while MAPK signaling pathway remained unchanged. KGN also increased type-I collagen synthesis in the dermis of BALB/C mice. Our results indicated that KGN promoted the type-I collagen synthesis of dermal fibroblasts in vitro and in the dermis of mice through activation of the smad4/smad5 pathway. This molecule could be used in wound healing, tissue engineering of fibroblasts, or aesthetic and reconstructive procedures. PMID:24928394

  14. [The injectable collagens. Technique of implantation, indications, limits].

    PubMed

    Schnitzler, L

    1991-06-01

    Collagen implants have extended our therapeutic possibilities: used either alone or as a complement to surgical methods, they are an answer to the demand of many patients (who are carefully selected on clinical and immunological criteria) for obvious short-term efficacy, the frequency of complementary injections to complete filling, depending on the location of the areas treated. The main reservation lies in the onset of phenomena of local delayed hypersensitivity, which appears to be reduced as far as possible by concomitant performance of the skin and serum tests for anti-collagen antibody. Human, placental collagen, which has not yet been marketed nor have the purified fluid silicones which are currently experiencing a revival of interest, may be the future hope for these often ignored allergies. PMID:1891677

  15. Cyclic mechanical strain induces TGFβ1-signalling in dermal fibroblasts embedded in a 3D collagen lattice.

    PubMed

    Peters, Andreas S; Brunner, Georg; Krieg, Thomas; Eckes, Beate

    2015-03-01

    Many tissues are constantly exposed to mechanical stress, e.g. shear stress in vascular endothelium, compression forces in cartilage or tensile strain in the skin. Dermal fibroblasts can differentiate into contractile myofibroblasts in a process requiring the presence of TGFβ1 in addition to mechanical load. We aimed at investigating the effect of cyclic mechanical strain on dermal fibroblasts grown in a three-dimensional environment. Therefore, murine dermal fibroblasts were cultured in collagen gels and subjected to cyclic tension at a frequency of 0.1 Hz (6 cycles/min) with a maximal increase in surface area of 10 % for 24 h. This treatment resulted in a significant increase in active TGFβ1 levels, leaving the amount of total TGFβ1 unaffected. TGFβ1 activation led to pSMAD2-mediated transcriptional elevation of downstream mediators, such as CTGF, and an auto-induction of TGFβ1, respectively. PMID:25348252

  16. Dynamic testing and in vivo evaluation of dermally implantable luminescent microparticle glucose sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Long, Ruiqi; Collier, Bradley; Roberts, Jason; McShane, Michael

    2010-02-01

    We have been developing dermally-implantable microparticle glucose sensors to monitor interstitial glucose levels. For these sensors to be deployed in vivo, a matched opto-electronic system to interrogate implanted sensors has been designed and constructed. The aim of this study is to test the capability of the sensor system, including in vivo sensor performance, hardware efficiency and hardware optimization based on test results. This paper will report the results of dynamic in vitro tests of sensor performance and the results of preliminary experiments of implants in animal models.

  17. Application of second-harmonic generation microscopy for in-vivo observation of structural change in human dermal collagen fiber caused by aging and/or UV exposure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yasui, T.; Yonetsu, M.; Tanaka, R.; Fukushima, S.; Yamashita, T.; Ogura, Y.; Hirao, T.; Araki, T.

    2012-03-01

    Second-harmonic-generation (SHG) microscopy is useful to visualize collagen fiber in biological tissues in vivo. In this paper, we applied our SHG microscopy equipped with a Cr:Forsterite laser to visualize human dermal collagen fiber in vivo. The obtained SHG images indicated the structural difference of dermal collagen fiber between different ages, for example, fine collagen fiber is densely distributed in 20's subjects whereas only thick collagen fiber is remained in 60's subjects. These results reflect structural change of collagen fiber caused by natural aging and/or photoaging. The SHG microscopy has a potential to become an in vivo collagen-sensitive microscopy for assessment of skin aging.

  18. Modulation of human dermal microvascular endothelial cell and human gingival fibroblast behavior by micropatterned silica coating surfaces for zirconia dental implant applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laranjeira, Marta S.; Carvalho, Ângela; Pelaez-Vargas, Alejandro; Hansford, Derek; Ferraz, Maria Pia; Coimbra, Susana; Costa, Elísio; Santos-Silva, Alice; Fernandes, Maria Helena; Monteiro, Fernando Jorge

    2014-04-01

    Dental ceramic implants have shown superior esthetic behavior and the absence of induced allergic disorders when compared to titanium implants. Zirconia may become a potential candidate to be used as an alternative to titanium dental implants if surface modifications are introduced. In this work, bioactive micropatterned silica coatings were produced on zirconia substrates, using a combined methodology of sol-gel processing and soft lithography. The aim of the work was to compare the in vitro behavior of human gingival fibroblasts (HGFs) and human dermal microvascular endothelial cells (HDMECs) on three types of silica-coated zirconia surfaces: flat and micropatterned (with pillars and with parallel grooves). Our results showed that cells had a higher metabolic activity (HGF, HDMEC) and increased gene expression levels of fibroblast-specific protein-1 (FSP-1) and collagen type I (COL I) on surfaces with pillars. Nevertheless, parallel grooved surfaces were able to guide cell growth. Even capillary tube-like networks of HDMEC were oriented according to the surface geometry. Zirconia and silica with different topographies have shown to be blood compatible and silica coating reduced bacteria adhesion. All together, the results indicated that microstructured bioactive coating seems to be an efficient strategy to improve soft tissue integration on zirconia implants, protecting implants from peri-implant inflammation and improving long-term implant stabilization. This new approach of micropatterned silica coating on zirconia substrates can generate promising novel dental implants, with surfaces that provide physical cues to guide cells and enhance their behavior.

  19. High-throughput spectral system for interrogation of dermally-implanted luminescent sensors.

    PubMed

    Long, Ruiqi; McShane, Mike

    2012-01-01

    Ratiometric luminescent microparticle sensors have been developed for sensing biochemical targets such as glucose in interstitial fluid, enabling use of dermal implants for on-demand monitoring. For these sensor systems to be deployed in vivo, a matched optoelectronic system for interrogation of dermally-implanted sensors was previously designed, constructed, and evaluated experimentally. During evaluation experiments, it revealed that the system efficiency was compromised by losses due to fiber connections of a commercial spectrometer. In this work, a high-throughput spectral system was presented to solve the photon loss problem. This system was designed, constructed, and tested. The throughput was around hundred time more than the previous system we used, and it was cost-effective, as well. It enables use of an integrated system for excitation, collection and measurement of luminescent emission, and will be used as a tool for in vivo studies with animal models or human subjects. PMID:23366396

  20. Induction of dermal-epidermal separation in mice by passive transfer of antibodies specific to type VII collagen

    PubMed Central

    Sitaru, Cassian; Mihai, Sidonia; Otto, Christoph; Chiriac, Mircea T.; Hausser, Ingrid; Dotterweich, Barbara; Saito, Hitoshi; Rose, Christian; Ishiko, Akira; Zillikens, Detlef

    2005-01-01

    Epidermolysis bullosa acquisita (EBA) is a subepidermal blistering disorder associated with tissue-bound and circulating autoantibodies specific to type VII collagen, a major constituent of the dermal-epidermal junction. Previous attempts to transfer the disease by injection of patient autoantibodies into mice have been unsuccessful. To study the pathogenic relevance of antibodies specific to type VII collagen in vivo, we generated and characterized rabbit antibodies specific to a murine form of this antigen and passively transferred them into adult nude, BALB/c, and C57BL/6 mice. Immune rabbit IgG bound to the lamina densa of murine skin and immunoblotted type VII collagen. Mice injected with purified IgG specific to type VII collagen, in contrast to control mice, developed subepidermal skin blisters, reproducing the human disease at the clinical, histological, electron microscopical, and immunopathological levels. Titers of rabbit IgG in the serum of mice correlated with the extent of the disease. F(ab′)2 fragments of rabbit IgG specific to type VII collagen were not pathogenic. When injected into C5-deficient mice, antibodies specific to type VII collagen failed to induce the disease, whereas C5-sufficient mice were susceptible to blister induction. This animal model for EBA should facilitate further dissection of the pathogenesis of this disease and development of new therapeutic strategies. PMID:15841176

  1. Polyurethane membrane/knitted mesh-reinforced collagen-chitosan bilayer dermal substitute for the repair of full-thickness skin defects via a two-step procedure.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xingang; Wu, Pan; Hu, Xiuyuan; You, Chuangang; Guo, Rui; Shi, Haifei; Guo, Songxue; Zhou, Hanlei; Chaoheng, Yu; Zhang, Yuanhai; Han, Chunmao

    2016-03-01

    The advent of dermal substitutes provides a revolutionary strategy for the repair and reconstruction of deep skin defects. Dermal substitutes form a regenerative template that provides the porous structure and mechanical support necessary to guide cell migration, deposition of the extracellular matrix (ECM) and angiogenesis. Commercially available dermal substitutes, particularly collagen-based dermal scaffolds, are widely used in clinical practice. However, the poor mechanical properties of collagen-based dermal scaffolds compromise their biological effects, as well as the repair outcomes. Here, we describe a bilayer dermal substitute prepared by integrating a hybrid dermal scaffold with a polyurethane (PU) membrane to obtain a PU membrane/knitted mesh-reinforced collagen-chitosan bilayer dermal substitute (PU-PLGAm/CCS). The morphology of PU-PLGAm/CCS was investigated and, to characterize the effects of PU-PLGAm/CCS on tissue regeneration, dermal substitutes were transplanted to repair full-thickness skin wounds in Sprague-Dawley rats using a two-step surgical procedure. These results were then compared with those obtained using the PELNAC™ Artificial Dermis. In the weeks after the first operation, wound changes were analysed based on macroscopic observations, and tissue specimens were harvested for histology, immunohistochemistry, immunofluorescence real-time quantitative PCR, and Western blotting analysis. Following the second operation (i.e., transplantation of split-thickness skin grafts), the repair outcomes were investigated based on the mechanical strength and ECM expression. PU-PLGAm/CCS significantly inhibited wound contracture, promoted angiogenesis, and facilitated the ordered arrangement of neotissue, such that the repair outcomes were improved in the PU-PLGAm/CCS group compared with the PELNAC™ group. In conclusion, the favourable microstructure and structural stability of dermal substitutes facilitated tissue regeneration. PU-PLGAm/CCS achieved

  2. Kynurenine Modulates MMP-1 and Type-I Collagen Expression Via Aryl Hydrocarbon Receptor Activation in Dermal Fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Poormasjedi-Meibod, Malihe-Sadat; Salimi Elizei, Sanam; Leung, Victor; Baradar Jalili, Reza; Ko, Frank; Ghahary, Aziz

    2016-12-01

    Dermal fibrosis is characterized by a high deposition of extracellular matrix (ECM) and tissue cellularity. Unfortunately all means of treating this condition are unsatisfactory. We have previously reported the anti-fibrotic effects of Kynurenine (Kyn), a tryptophan metabolite, in fibrotic rabbit ear model. Here, we report the mechanism by which Kyn modulates the expression of key ECM components in dermal fibroblasts. The results showed that Kyn activates aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AHR) nuclear translocation and up-regulates cytochrome-P450 (CYP1A-1) expression, the AHR target gene. A specific AHR antagonist, 6,2',4'-trimethoxyflavone, inhibited the Kyn-dependent modulation of CYP1A-1, MMP-1, and type-I collagen expression. Establishing the anti-fibrogenic effect of Kyn and its mechanism of action, we then developed nano-fibrous Kyn slow-releasing dressings and examined their anti-fibrotic efficacy in vitro and in a rat model. Our results showed the feasibility of incorporating Kyn into PVA/PLGA nanofibers, prolonging the Kyn release up to 4 days tested. Application of medicated-dressings significantly improved the dermal fibrosis indicated by MMP-1 induction, alpha-smooth muscle actin and type-I collagen suppression, and reduced tissue cellularity, T-cells and myofibroblasts. This study clarifies the mechanism by which Kyn modulates ECM expression and reports the development of a new slow-releasing anti-fibrogenic dressing. J. Cell. Physiol. 231: 2749-2760, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26992058

  3. Evaluation of porcine dermal collagen (Permacol) used in abdominal wall reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Hsu, Patrick W; Salgado, Christopher J; Kent, Kathryn; Finnegan, Matthew; Pello, Mark; Simons, Robert; Atabek, Umur; Kann, Brian

    2009-11-01

    Various methods have been employed to reconstruct complex abdominal wall defects. Structural prosthetic materials such as polypropylene mesh and ePTFE (expanded polytetrafluoroethylene) have been widely used to close these large fascial defects, however, complications with infection and adhesions have led to the recent use of more biocompatible implants. Permacol (acellular porcine dermis) is used as a dermal scaffold, which eventually becomes vascularised and remodelled to reconstruct the abdominal wall in these complex patients. A retrospective review was performed of all patients who underwent consecutive abdominal wall reconstruction with Permacol at our institution in the year 2006. Twenty-eight patients were identified and included in our study. Factors evaluated were: body mass index, relevant co-morbidities, aetiology of hernia, hernia defect size based on CT scan and intraoperative measurement, size of Permacol implant, length of hospital stay, and postoperative complications. Surgical technique was standardised among six surgeons and involved a single layer of acellular porcine dermis as a subfascial 'underlay' graft under moderate tension upon maximal hernia reduction. Tissue expanders were not required for skin closure. Out of 28 patients, 12 were male and 16 were female. Mean intraoperative hernia size was 150 cm(2) (range of 10 cm(2) to 600 cm(2)). Mean age was 55 years with an average body mass index (BMI) of 34 (largest BMI of 61.4). Defects were attributed to either a previous laparotomy incision or open abdomen. Mean hospital stay was 9.67 days. At a mean follow-up of sixteen months, there were three recurrent hernias (10.7%) based on physical examination and postoperative CT scan evaluation. One patient developed a superficial wound dehiscence which was successfully treated with local wound care and one patient developed a cellulitis which was successfully treated with antibiotic therapy. Four patients (14.3%) developed a chronic, non

  4. Altered dermal fibroblast behavior in a collagen V haploinsufficient murine model of classic Ehlers-Danlos syndrome.

    PubMed

    DeNigris, John; Yao, Qingmei; Birk, Erika K; Birk, David E

    2016-01-01

    Mutations in collagen V are associated with classic Ehlers-Danlos syndrome (EDS). A significant percentage of these mutations result in haploinsufficiency for collagen V. The purpose of this work was to determine if changes in collagen V expression are associated with altered dermal fibroblast behavior contributing to the poor wound healing response. A haploinsufficient Col5a1(+/-) mouse model of EDS was utilized. In vivo wound healing studies demonstrated that mutant mice healed significantly slower than Col5a1(+/+) mice. The basis for this difference was examined in vitro using dermal fibroblast strains isolated from Col5a1(+/-) and Col5a1(+/+) mice. Fibroblast proliferation was determined for each strain by counting cells at different time points after seeding as well as using the proliferation marker Ki-67. Fibroblast attachment to collagens I and III and fibronectin also was analyzed. In addition, in vitro scratch wounds were used to analyze fibroblast wound closure. Significantly decreased fibroblast proliferation was observed in Col5a1(+/-) compared to Col5a1(+/+) fibroblasts. Our data indicate that the decreased fibroblast number was not due to apoptosis. Wildtype Col5a1(+/+) fibroblasts attached significantly better to components of the wound matrix (collagens I and III and fibronectin) than Col5a1(+/-) fibroblasts. A significant difference in in vitro scratch wound closure rates also was observed. Col5a1(+/+) fibroblasts closed wounds in 22 h, while Col5a1(+/-) fibroblasts demonstrated ~80% closure. There were significant differences in closure at all time points analyzed. Our data suggest that decreased fibroblast proliferation, extracellular matrix attachment, and migration contribute to the decreased wound healing response in classic EDS. PMID:26713685

  5. Periplanosides A-C: new insect-derived dihydroisocoumarin glucosides from Periplaneta americana stimulating collagen production in human dermal fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yong-Xun; Luo, Qi; Hou, Bo; Yan, Yong-Ming; Wang, Yue-Hu; Tang, Jian-Jun; Dong, Xiao-Ping; Ma, Xiu-Ying; Yang, Tong-Hua; Zuo, Zhi-Li; Cheng, Yong-Xian

    2015-01-01

    Three new dihydroisocoumarin glucosides, termed periplanosides A-C (1-3), a known analog, pericanaside (4), and the other twenty known compounds were isolated from the insect Periplaneta americana. Their structures including absolute configurations were determined by comprehensive spectroscopic analyses and computational methods. Biological evaluation showed that compound 2 could stimulate collagen production by 31.2% in human dermal fibroblasts-adult (HDFa) at the concentration of 30 μM, indicating its significance in skin repair and ulcer. PMID:26499169

  6. Aging decreases collagen IV expression in vivo in the dermo-epidermal junction and in vitro in dermal fibroblasts: possible involvement of TGF-β1.

    PubMed

    Feru, Jezabel; Delobbe, Etienne; Ramont, Laurent; Brassart, Bertrand; Terryn, Christine; Dupont-Deshorgue, Aurelie; Garbar, Christian; Monboisse, Jean-Claude; Maquart, Francois-Xavier; Brassart-Pasco, Sylvie

    2016-08-01

    Collagen IV is a major component of the dermo-epidermal junction (DEJ). To study expression of collagen IV upon aging in the DEJ and dermal fibroblasts isolated from the same patients. A model of senescent fibroblasts was developed in order to identify biological compounds that might restore the level of collagen IV. Skin fragments of women (30 to 70 years old) were collected. Localisation of collagen IV expression in the DEJ was studied by immunofluorescence. Fibroblast collagen IV expression was studied by real-time PCR, ELISA, and western blotting. Premature senescence was simulated by exposing fibroblasts to subcytotoxic H2O2 concentrations. Collagen IV decreased in the DEJ and fibroblasts relative to age. TGF-β1 treatment significantly increased collagen IV gene and protein expression in fibroblasts and restored expression in the model of senescence. Addition of TGF-β1-neutralizing antibody to fibroblast cultures decreased collagen IV expression. Taken together, the results suggest that the decrease in collagen IV in the DEJ, relative to age, could be due to a decrease in collagen IV expression by senescent dermal fibroblasts and may involve TGF-β1 signalling. PMID:27124123

  7. Three-dimensional, multiwavelength Monte Carlo simulations of dermally implantable luminescent sensors.

    PubMed

    Long, Ruiqi; McShane, Mike

    2010-01-01

    Dermally implanted luminescent sensors have been proposed for monitoring of tissue biochemistry, which has the potential to improve treatments for conditions such as diabetes and kidney failure. Effective in vivo monitoring via noninvasive transdermal measurement of emission from injected microparticles requires a matched optoelectronic system for excitation and collection of luminescence. We applied Monte Carlo modeling to predict the characteristics of output luminescence from microparticles in skin to facilitate hardware design. Three-dimensional, multiwavelength Monte Carlo simulations were used to determine the spatial and spectral distribution of the escaping luminescence for different implantation depths, excitation light source properties, particle characteristics, and particle packing density. Results indicate that the ratio of output emission to input excitation power ranged 10(-3) to 10(-6) for sensors at the upper and lower dermal boundaries, respectively, and 95% of the escaping emission photons induced by a 10-mm-diam excitation beam were confined within an 18-mm circle. Tightly packed sensor configurations yielded higher output intensity with fewer particles, even after luminophore concentration effects were removed. Most importantly, for the visible wavelengths studied, the ability to measure spectral changes in emission due to glucose changes was not significantly affected by absorption and scattering of tissue, which supports the potential to accurately track changes in luminescence of sensor implants that respond to the biochemistry of the skin. PMID:20459285

  8. Three-dimensional, multiwavelength Monte Carlo simulations of dermally implantable luminescent sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Long, Ruiqi; McShane, Mike

    2010-03-01

    Dermally implanted luminescent sensors have been proposed for monitoring of tissue biochemistry, which has the potential to improve treatments for conditions such as diabetes and kidney failure. Effective in vivo monitoring via noninvasive transdermal measurement of emission from injected microparticles requires a matched optoelectronic system for excitation and collection of luminescence. We applied Monte Carlo modeling to predict the characteristics of output luminescence from microparticles in skin to facilitate hardware design. Three-dimensional, multiwavelength Monte Carlo simulations were used to determine the spatial and spectral distribution of the escaping luminescence for different implantation depths, excitation light source properties, particle characteristics, and particle packing density. Results indicate that the ratio of output emission to input excitation power ranged 10-3 to 10-6 for sensors at the upper and lower dermal boundaries, respectively, and 95% of the escaping emission photons induced by a 10-mm-diam excitation beam were confined within an 18-mm circle. Tightly packed sensor configurations yielded higher output intensity with fewer particles, even after luminophore concentration effects were removed. Most importantly, for the visible wavelengths studied, the ability to measure spectral changes in emission due to glucose changes was not significantly affected by absorption and scattering of tissue, which supports the potential to accurately track changes in luminescence of sensor implants that respond to the biochemistry of the skin.

  9. Three-dimensional, multiwavelength Monte Carlo simulations of dermally implantable luminescent sensors

    PubMed Central

    Long, Ruiqi; McShane, Mike

    2010-01-01

    Dermally implanted luminescent sensors have been proposed for monitoring of tissue biochemistry, which has the potential to improve treatments for conditions such as diabetes and kidney failure. Effective in vivo monitoring via noninvasive transdermal measurement of emission from injected microparticles requires a matched optoelectronic system for excitation and collection of luminescence. We applied Monte Carlo modeling to predict the characteristics of output luminescence from microparticles in skin to facilitate hardware design. Three-dimensional, multiwavelength Monte Carlo simulations were used to determine the spatial and spectral distribution of the escaping luminescence for different implantation depths, excitation light source properties, particle characteristics, and particle packing density. Results indicate that the ratio of output emission to input excitation power ranged 10−3 to 10−6 for sensors at the upper and lower dermal boundaries, respectively, and 95% of the escaping emission photons induced by a 10-mm-diam excitation beam were confined within an 18-mm circle. Tightly packed sensor configurations yielded higher output intensity with fewer particles, even after luminophore concentration effects were removed. Most importantly, for the visible wavelengths studied, the ability to measure spectral changes in emission due to glucose changes was not significantly affected by absorption and scattering of tissue, which supports the potential to accurately track changes in luminescence of sensor implants that respond to the biochemistry of the skin. PMID:20459285

  10. Evaluation of an Amniotic Membrane-Collagen Dermal Substitute in the Management of Full-Thickness Skin Defects in a Pig

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Hyunji; Choi, Tae Hyun; Jung, Samhyun; Kwon, Sunyoung; Kim, Junhyung; Han, Kihwan

    2013-01-01

    Background To minimize the inflammatory reaction and improve healing, a new modified dermal substitute composed of an atelocollagen, chondroitin-6-sulfate, and amniotic membrane (AM) was applied to full-thickness skin defects in a pig. Atelocollagen was extracted from bovine skin, and two modified dermal substitutes were generated according to the cross-linking type. Methods The AM-collagen dermal substitutes were characterized and compared with currently used dermal substitutes in a pig skin defect model. There were five experimental groups: dehydrothermal (DHT) cross-linking atelocollagen with the AM on the top (AM-DHT), DHT and chemical cross-linking atelocollagen with the AM on the top (AM-DHT/chemical), Terudermis, Integra, and AlloDerm. After 3×3 cm full-thickness skin defects on the back of a pig were created, each dermal substitutes dermal substitutes was randomly grafted on the defects. Two weeks after grafting, autologous partial-thickness skin was over-grafted on the neodermis. The take rate of the dermal substitutes, skin, and histological sections were all assessed at 1, 2, and 4 weeks postoperatively. Results More rapid healing and a higher take rate were evident in the AM-DHT and Terudermis groups. Histological examination revealed fewer inflammatory cells and more fibroblast hyperplasia in these two groups. Four weeks after surgery, the amount of newly formed collagen was significantly more appropriate in the AM-DHT group. Conclusions These observations provide supporting evidence that a newly developed amniotic-collagen dermal substitute may inhibit inflammatory reactions and promote wound healing. PMID:23362475

  11. Implantation of sepiolite-collagen complexes in surgically created rat calvaria defects.

    PubMed

    Herrera, J I; Olmo, N; Turnay, J; Sicilia, A; Bascones, A; Gavilanes, J G; Lizarbe, M A

    1995-05-01

    The response of osseous tissue to the implantation of sepiolite-collagen complexes has been studied. Sepiolite, sepiolite-collagen complex and 0.5% glutaraldehyde-treated sepiolite-collagen complex were implanted in created circular defects in rat calvaria. The tissue reactions were analysed using light, transmission and scanning electron microscopies. The patterns of bone growth were radiographically analysed and the bone activity was indirectly quantified by using a point-count method. The reaction against the three implanted materials is characteristic of a foreign body reaction with abundant macrophages and giant cells. Implanted products have been detected in macrophages, which suggest the involvement of phagocytosis in the resorptive process. Bone grew at the implantation sites originating excrescences or sometimes a thin bridge at the defect margins. The studied materials, after implantation in contact with bone tissue, did not produce any toxic effect or necrosis, allowing bone activity. PMID:7548613

  12. Suppression of α Smooth Muscle Actin Accumulation by Bovine Fetal Dermal Collagen Matrix in Full Thickness Skin Wounds

    PubMed Central

    Lineaweaver, William; Bush, Katie; James, Kenneth

    2015-01-01

    Abstract The suppression of elements associated with wound contracture and unfavorable scarring is a potentially important strategy in clinical wound management. In this study, the presence of α smooth muscle actin (αSMA), a protein involved in wound contraction, was analyzed in a series of wounds in which bovine fetal collagen (BFC) acellular dermal matrix (PriMatrix) was used in staged split thickness skin graft procedures. The results obtained through histological and quantitative image analyses of incidental biopsies from these wounds demonstrated a suppression of αSMA in the wound regions occupied by assimilated BFC relative to increased levels of αSMA found in other areas of the wound. The αSMA levels found in assimilated BFC were similar to αSMA levels in uninjured human dermis. These findings suggest a mechanism by which application of BFC could decrease contraction of full thickness skin wounds. PMID:25695450

  13. Chum salmon egg extracts induce upregulation of collagen type I and exert antioxidative effects on human dermal fibroblast cultures.

    PubMed

    Yoshino, Atsushi; Polouliakh, Natalia; Meguro, Akira; Takeuchi, Masaki; Kawagoe, Tatsukata; Mizuki, Nobuhisa

    2016-01-01

    Components of fish roe possess antioxidant and antiaging activities, making them potentially very beneficial natural resources. Here, we investigated chum salmon eggs (CSEs) as a source of active ingredients, including vitamins, unsaturated fatty acids, and proteins. We incubated human dermal fibroblast cultures for 48 hours with high and low concentrations of CSE extracts and analyzed changes in gene expression. Cells treated with CSE extract showed concentration-dependent upregulation of collagen type I genes and of multiple antioxidative genes, including OXR1, TXNRD1, and PRDX family genes. We further conducted in silico phylogenetic footprinting analysis of promoter regions. These results suggested that transcription factors such as acute myeloid leukemia-1a and cyclic adenosine monophosphate response element-binding protein may be involved in the observed upregulation of antioxidative genes. Our results support the idea that CSEs are strong candidate sources of antioxidant materials and cosmeceutically effective ingredients. PMID:27621603

  14. Chum salmon egg extracts induce upregulation of collagen type I and exert antioxidative effects on human dermal fibroblast cultures

    PubMed Central

    Yoshino, Atsushi; Polouliakh, Natalia; Meguro, Akira; Takeuchi, Masaki; Kawagoe, Tatsukata; Mizuki, Nobuhisa

    2016-01-01

    Components of fish roe possess antioxidant and antiaging activities, making them potentially very beneficial natural resources. Here, we investigated chum salmon eggs (CSEs) as a source of active ingredients, including vitamins, unsaturated fatty acids, and proteins. We incubated human dermal fibroblast cultures for 48 hours with high and low concentrations of CSE extracts and analyzed changes in gene expression. Cells treated with CSE extract showed concentration-dependent upregulation of collagen type I genes and of multiple antioxidative genes, including OXR1, TXNRD1, and PRDX family genes. We further conducted in silico phylogenetic footprinting analysis of promoter regions. These results suggested that transcription factors such as acute myeloid leukemia-1a and cyclic adenosine monophosphate response element-binding protein may be involved in the observed upregulation of antioxidative genes. Our results support the idea that CSEs are strong candidate sources of antioxidant materials and cosmeceutically effective ingredients. PMID:27621603

  15. Second harmonic generation imaging of dermal collagen component in human keloid tissue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, H. B.; Chen, S.; Zhu, X. Q.; Yang, H. Q.; Chen, J. X.

    2011-01-01

    In this paper, we report second harmonic generation (SHG) imaging of human keloid tissue. High resolution SHG images of collagen component were obtained in the superficial, medial and deep dermis of human keloid tissue, respectively. Our results show that this method has a capability to observe the structure of collagen component in human keloid tissue, which will help to better understand the formation process of human keloid scar at the molecular level.

  16. Regulation of collagen synthesis in human dermal fibroblasts by ascorbic-induced lipid peroxidation

    SciTech Connect

    Geesin, J.C. Johnson and Johnson Consumer Products, Inc., Skillman, NJ ); Gordon, J.S. ); Gordon, J.S. ); Berg, R.A. )

    1991-03-11

    Ascorbic acid has been shown to stimulate collagen synthesis through the induction of lipid peroxidation which leads to increased transcription of the collagen genes. To test the ability of aldehyde products of lipid peroxidation to mediate this effect, the authors treated cultured fibroblasts with 1-200{mu}M of malondialdehyde, acetaldehyde, glyoxal or hexenal in the presence of lipid peroxidation inducing or noninducing concentrations of ascorbic acid. The treatment process involved either pretreatment of cells for 66hrs with either concentration of ascorbate before a 6hr treatment in the presence of ascorbate and the aldehydes, or 6 or 72hr treatment of the cells in the presence of either concentration of ascorbate plus the aldehydes. No effect of any of these aldehydes was seen on ascorbate-stimulated collagen synthesis. Also, pretreatment of fibroblasts for 24hrs with 100nM phorbol myristate acetate (PMA), which produces down regulation of protein kinase C(PKC), failed to alter the ascorbate-stimulation of collagen synthesis. Additionally, the authors tested the ability of benzamide, a poly ACP ribosylation inhibitor, to inhibit the ascorbate response with no specific effect noted. These results do not support the proposed roles for aldehydes, PKC, or poly ADP ribosylation in the mediation of the lipid peroxidation induced stimulation of collagen synthesis.

  17. Angelica archangelia Prevented Collagen Degradation by Blocking Production of Matrix Metalloproteinases in UVB-exposed Dermal Fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Sun, Zhengwang; Hwang, Eunson; Park, Sang Yong; Zhang, Mengyang; Gao, Wei; Lin, Pei; Yi, Tae-Hoo

    2016-07-01

    Angelica archangelia (AA), a traditional herb, has attracted attention as an agent with potential for use in the prevention of chronic skin diseases. This study examined the photoprotective effects of AA on the inhibition of matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) and collagen degradation in UVB-irradiated normal human dermal fibroblasts. Our results showed that AA markedly blocked collagen degradation by restraining the production of MMPs in UVB-exposed fibroblasts. We also investigated the underlying mechanism behind the effects of AA. AA attenuated UVB-triggered interleukin-6 (IL-6) and promoted the expression of transforming growth factor β1. Application of AA extract (10, 100 μg mL(-1) ) significantly diminished UVB-induced extracellular signal-regulated kinase and Jun-N-terminal kinase phosphorylation, which consequently reduced phosphorylated c-Fos and c-Jun. Our results indicated that AA inhibited the UVB-induced expression of MMPs by inhibiting mitogen-activated protein kinase signaling pathways and activator protein-1 activation. Our results suggest that AA is a promising botanical agent for use against skin photoaging. PMID:27128690

  18. [Morphological tissue changes after the implantation of a biodegradable material on collagen basis].

    PubMed

    Maĭborodin, I V; Beregovoĭ, E A; Shevela, A I; Kuznetsova, I V; Barannik, M I; Manaev, A A; Maĭborodina, V I

    2013-01-01

    The objective of this study was to examine the peculiarities of tissue reactions during the degradation of "Collost" bioplastic material on the collagen basis with completely preserved fibrous structure, after its implantation into the bone tissue defect. The defect in bone tissue sized 1-2 mm x 3-5 mm was created in tibial condyle. The study was performed on 24 Wistar rats using light microscopic methods. The tissue reactions were studied at different time intervals (1, 2, 6 and 12 months) after the implantation of collagenic material. It was found that after the implantation, the material became impregnated with blood, and due to fibrin, densely adhered to the damaged tissues. Further, the cells were found to migrate along the blood clot into its depth from the surrounding tissues. These were primarily the fibroblasts which were located in a network of fibers and started to absorb collagen from a surrounding material and to synthesize new collagen. Gradually, the collagenic material became similar to a cell-containing network. The volume of the newly synthesized collagen increased, and after some time all the foreign material was absorbed by fibroblasts and replaced with connective tissue. After 1 year, a large "Collost" fragment was completely degraded and replaced by loose connective tissue. The implantation of a collagenic material did not stimulate the formation of a delimiting connective tissue capsule PMID:24707743

  19. Autoantibodies to Type VII Collagen Mediate Fcγ-Dependent Neutrophil Activation and Induce Dermal-Epidermal Separation in Cryosections of Human Skin

    PubMed Central

    Sitaru, Cassian; Kromminga, Arno; Hashimoto, Takashi; Bröcker, Eva B.; Zillikens, Detlef

    2002-01-01

    Epidermolysis bullosa acquisita is an autoimmune subepidermal blistering disease associated with autoantibodies to type VII collagen, the major constituent of anchoring fibrils. Previous attempts to demonstrate the blister-inducing potential of autoantibodies to this protein have failed. To address this question, we used an in vitro model involving cryosections of human skin incubated with patients’ autoantibodies and leukocytes from healthy donors. We show that sera from 14 of 16 epidermolysis bullosa acquisita patients, in contrast to sera from healthy controls, induced dermal-epidermal separation in the cryosections. Recruitment and activation of neutrophils at the dermal-epidermal junction was necessary for split induction, whereas mononuclear cells were not required. Importantly, patients’ autoantibodies affinity-purified against a recombinant form of the noncollagenous 1 domain of type VII collagen retained their blister-inducing capacity in a dose-dependent manner, whereas patients’ IgG that was depleted of reactivity to type VII collagen lost this ability. Monoclonal antibody LH7.2 to the noncollagenous 1 domain of type VII collagen also induced subepidermal splits in the cryosections; F(ab′)2 fragments of autoantibodies to type VII collagen were not pathogenic. We demonstrate the capacity of autoantibodies to type VII collagen to trigger an Fcγ-dependent inflammation leading to split formation in cryosections of human skin. PMID:12107115

  20. Surface engineering of stainless steel materials by covalent collagen immobilization to improve implant biocompatibility.

    PubMed

    Müller, Rainer; Abke, Jochen; Schnell, Edith; Macionczyk, Frank; Gbureck, Uwe; Mehrl, Robert; Ruszczak, Zbigniev; Kujat, Richard; Englert, Carsten; Nerlich, Michael; Angele, Peter

    2005-12-01

    It was shown recently that the deposition of thin films of tantalum and tantalum oxide enhanced the long-term biocompatibility of stainless steel biomaterials due to an increase in their corrosion resistance. In this study, we used this tantalum oxide coating as a basis for covalent immobilization of a collagen layer, which should result in a further improvement of implant tissue integration. Because of the high degradation rate of natural collagen in vivo, covalent immobilization as well as carbodiimide induced cross-linking of the protein was performed. It was found that the combination of the silane-coupling agent aminopropyl triethoxysilane and the linker molecule N,N'-disulphosuccinimidyl suberate was a very effective system for collagen immobilizing. Mechanical and enzymatic stability testing revealed a higher stability of covalent bound collagen layers compared to physically adsorbed collagen layers. The biological response induced by the surface modifications was evaluated by in vitro cell culture with human mesenchymal stem cells as well as by in vivo subcutaneous implantation into nude mice. The presence of collagen clearly improved the cytocompatibility of the stainless steel implants which, nevertheless, significantly depended on the cross-linking degree of the collagen layer. PMID:15967497

  1. Management of failed and infected first metatarsophalangeal joint implant arthroplasty by reconstruction with an acellular dermal matrix: a case report.

    PubMed

    Khoury, Wissam E; Fahim, Ramy; Sciulli, Jessica M; Ehredt, Duane J

    2012-01-01

    Management of failed first metatarsophalangeal joint implant arthroplasty, especially in the face of infection, is an area of debate without a clear consensus. The purpose of the present report was to explore a new option of reconstructing the joint with an acellular dermal matrix substance in a single case study during a 12-month follow-up period. A staged approach that began with removal of the failed 2-component great toe implant, Koenig(®), excisional debridement of the wound with resection of the necrotic bone (proximal phalanx and distal portion of the first metatarsal bones), and culture-specific antibiosis therapy. The final stage included incorporating the acellular dermal matrix, Graftjacket(®) into the joint in an accordion-type fashion, and reconstruction of the joint capsule. Postoperative radiographs revealed a more rectus joint with some improvement in length. At 6 months postoperatively, magnetic resonance imaging revealed incorporation of the graft material into the joint. Finally, at the 1-year mark, the patient was pain free with satisfactory function at the first metatarsophalangeal joint during gait. This is the first reported case of salvaging failed and infected first metatarsophalangeal joint implant arthroplasty with incorporation of the acellular dermal matrix and provides a new option to consider in the future. PMID:22704789

  2. Experimental Validation of an Optical System for Interrogation of Dermally-Implanted Microparticle Sensors

    PubMed Central

    Long, Ruiqi; McShane, Mike

    2013-01-01

    Dermally-implanted microparticle sensors are being developed for on-demand monitoring of blood sugar levels. For these to be deployed in vivo, a matched opto-electronic system for delivery of excitation, collection and analysis of escaping fluorescent signal is needed. Previous studies predicted the characteristics of fluorescence from microparticle sensors to facilitate design of hardware system. Based on the results of simulations, we designed and constructed the optical part of this opto-electronic system. This study experimentally verified the simulation results and tested the capability of the designed optical system. Reliable skin phantoms sufficient for future dynamic tests were developed. Skin phantoms with different thicknesses were made and the optical properties of skin phantoms were determined with an integrating sphere system and Inverse Adding-Doubling method. Measurements of sensor emission spectrum through phantoms with different thicknesses were done with the designed optical system. Simulations for the experiment situation were performed. The experimental measurements agreed well with simulations in most cases. The results of hardware experiment and validation with skin phantoms provided us with critical information for future dynamic tests and animal experiments. PMID:19964925

  3. Enhanced regeneration of corneal tissue via a bioengineered collagen construct implanted by a nondisruptive surgical technique.

    PubMed

    Koulikovska, Marina; Rafat, Mehrdad; Petrovski, Goran; Veréb, Zoltán; Akhtar, Saeed; Fagerholm, Per; Lagali, Neil

    2015-03-01

    Severe shortage of donor corneas for transplantation, particularly in developing countries, has prompted the advancement of bioengineered tissue alternatives. Bioengineered corneas that can withstand transplantation while maintaining transparency and compatibility with host cells, and that are additionally amenable to standardized low-cost mass production are sought. In this study, a bioengineered porcine construct (BPC) was developed to function as a biodegradable scaffold to promote corneal stromal regeneration by host cells. Using high-purity medical-grade type I collagen, high 18% collagen content and optimized EDC-NHS cross-linker ratio, BPCs were fabricated into hydrogel corneal implants with over 90% transparency and four-fold increase in strength and stiffness compared with previous versions. Remarkably, optical transparency was achieved despite the absence of collagen fibril organization at the nanoscale. In vitro testing indicated that BPC supported confluent human epithelial and stromal-derived mesenchymal stem cell populations. With a novel femtosecond laser-assisted corneal surgical model in rabbits, cell-free BPCs were implanted in vivo in the corneal stroma of 10 rabbits over an 8-week period. In vivo, transparency of implanted corneas was maintained throughout the postoperative period, while healing occurred rapidly without inflammation and without the use of postoperative steroids. BPC implants had a 100% retention rate at 8 weeks, when host stromal cells began to migrate into implants. Direct histochemical evidence of stromal tissue regeneration was observed by means of migrated host cells producing new collagen from within the implants. This study indicates that a cost-effective BPC extracellular matrix equivalent can incorporate cells passively to initiate regenerative healing of the corneal stroma, and is compatible with human stem or organ-specific cells for future therapeutic applications as a stromal replacement for treating blinding

  4. Direct Hospital Cost of Outcome Pathways in Implant-Based Reconstruction with Acellular Dermal Matrices

    PubMed Central

    Qureshi, Ali A.; Broderick, Kristen; Funk, Susan; Reaven, Nancy; Tenenbaum, Marissa M.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Current cost data on tissue expansion followed by exchange for permanent implant (TE/I) reconstruction lack a necessary assessment of the experience of a heterogenous breast cancer patient population and their multiple outcome pathways. We extend our previous analysis to that of direct hospital cost as bundling of payments is likely to follow the changing centralization of cancer care at the hospital level. Methods: We performed a retrospective analysis (2003–2009) of TE/I reconstructions with or without an acellular dermal matrix (ADM), namely Alloderm RTM. Postreconstructive events were analyzed and organized into outcome pathways as previously described. Aggregated and normalized inpatient and outpatient hospital direct costs and physician reimbursement were generated for each outcome pathway with or without ADM. Results: Three hundred sixty-seven patients were analyzed. The average 2-year hospital direct cost per TE/I breast reconstruction patient was $11,862 in the +ADM and $12,319 in the −ADM groups (P > 0.05). Initial reconstructions were costlier in the +ADM ($6,868) than in the −ADM ($5,615) group, but the average cost of subsequent postreconstructive events within 2 years was significantly lower in +ADM ($5,176) than −ADM ($6,704) patients (P < 0.05). When a complication occurred, but reconstruction was still completed within 2 years, greater costs were incurred in the −ADM than in the +ADM group for most scenarios, leading to a net equalization of cost between study groups. Conclusion: Although direct hospital cost is an important factor for resource and fund allocation, it should not remain the sole factor when deciding to use ADM in TE/I reconstruction.

  5. A titanium surface with nano-ordered spikes and pores enhances human dermal fibroblastic extracellular matrix production and integration of collagen fibers.

    PubMed

    Yamada, Masahiro; Kato, Eiji; Yamamoto, Akiko; Sakurai, Kaoru

    2016-02-01

    The acquisition of substantial dermal sealing determines the prognosis of percutaneous titanium-based medical devices or prostheses. A nano-topographic titanium surface with ordered nano-spikes and pores has been shown to induce periodontal-like connective tissue attachment and activate gingival fibroblastic functions. This in vitro study aimed to determine whether an alkali-heat (AH) treatment-created nano-topographic titanium surface could enhance human dermal fibroblastic functions and binding strength to the deposited collagen on the titanium surface. The surface topographies of commercially pure titanium machined discs exposed to two different AH treatments were evaluated. Human dermal fibroblastic cultures grown on the discs were evaluated in terms of cellular morphology, proliferation, extracellular matrix (ECM) and proinflammatory cytokine synthesis, and physicochemical binding strength of surface-deposited collagen. An isotropically-patterned, shaggy nano-topography with a sponge-like inner network and numerous well-organized, anisotropically-patterned fine nano-spikes and pores were observed on each nano-topographic surface type via scanning electron microscopy. In contrast to the typical spindle-shaped cells on the machined surfaces, the isotropically- and anisotropically-patterned nano-topographic titanium surfaces had small circular/angular cells containing contractile ring-like structures and elongated, multi-shaped cells with a developed cytoskeletal network and multiple filopodia and lamellipodia, respectively. These nano-topographic surfaces enhanced dermal-related ECM synthesis at both the protein and gene levels, without proinflammatory cytokine synthesis or reduced proliferative activity. Deposited collagen fibers were included in these surfaces and sufficiently bound to the nano-topographies to resist the physical, enzymatic and chemical detachment treatments, in contrast to machined surfaces. Well-organized, isotropically

  6. Potential of a cryopreserved cultured dermal substitute composed of hyaluronic acid and collagen to release angiogenic cytokine.

    PubMed

    Sawa, Manami; Kuroyanagi, Yoshimitsu

    2013-01-01

    An allogeneic cultured dermal substitute (CDS) was prepared by culturing fibroblasts on a spongy matrix of hyaluronic acid (HA) and collagen (Col), which was then cryopreserved. This cryopreserved allogeneic CDS (CDS-1; cryopreserved for 1 month, CDS-6; cryopreserved for 6 months) was thawed and re-cultured for a period of 7 days to investigate the potential of the CDS for wound treatment. The cell metabolic activity in the CDS and their cytokine production were measured using an MTT assay and ELISA. Fibroblast metabolic activity in each CDS-1 and CDS-6 immediately after thawing and following 3 and 7 days of re- cultivation was 56, 67 and 93%, and 49, 64 and 86%, respectively, of that before cryopreservation. The amount of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) released from the CDS-1 on days 1, 3 and 7 of re-cultivation after thawing was 8, 44 and 92% (VEGF) and 3, 7 and 28% (HGF), respectively, of that before cryopreservation. The amount of VEGF and HGF released from the CDS-6 on days 1, 3 and 7 of re-cultivation after thawing was 9, 32 and 45% (VEGF) and 6, 10 and 27% (HGF), respectively, of that before cryopreservation. These findings showed that the potential of the CDS was restored to some extent over the first 3 days of re-cultivation after thawing. The potential of the CDS for wound treatment was then evaluated using a wound surface model, in which the each CDS-1 and CDS-6 that was re-cultured for 3 days after thawing was elevated at the air/culture medium interface, and a wound dressing was placed on top, and then cultured for 5 days. Two different types of wound dressing were tested. Fibroblasts in the CDS in Group II (placing a wound dressing with EGF) released increased amount of VEGF and HGF compared with that in Group I (placing a wound dressing without EGF). These findings suggest that re-culture of the CDS for 3 days following thawing results in a CDS with improved wound healing potential and that an EGF

  7. [Implantation of collagen coated hydroxyapatite particles. A clinical-histological study in humans].

    PubMed

    Sanz, M; Bascones, A; Kessler, A; García Nuñez, J; Newman, M G; Robertson, M A; Carranza, F A

    1989-05-01

    In this study, histologic behaviour of collagen coated hydroxylapatite particles implanted in human periodontal osseous defects has been analyzed. This material was surgically implanted in four patients, and reentry and block biopsies were carried out 4 and 6 months later. The histologic results demonstrate that this material is well tolerated by surrounding tissues, not eliciting an inflammatory reaction. At four months, the hydroxylapatite particles appear encapsulated by a very cellular connective tissue and at 6 months are found in direct contact with osteoid and mature bone. This material acts as a filler material, being fully biocompatible and stimulating an osseoconductive reaction of the adjacent alveolar bone. PMID:2637052

  8. Enriched Astaxanthin Extract from Haematococcus pluvialis Augments Growth Factor Secretions to Increase Cell Proliferation and Induces MMP1 Degradation to Enhance Collagen Production in Human Dermal Fibroblasts

    PubMed Central

    Chou, Hsin-Yu; Lee, Chelsea; Pan, Jian-Liang; Wen, Zhi-Hong; Huang, Shu-Hung; Lan, Chi-Wei John; Liu, Wang-Ta; Hour, Tzyh-Chyuan; Hseu, You-Cheng; Hwang, Byeong Hee; Cheng, Kuo-Chen; Wang, Hui-Min David

    2016-01-01

    Among many antioxidants that are used for the repairing of oxidative stress induced skin damages, we identified the enriched astaxanthin extract (EAE) from Haematococcus pluvialis as a viable ingredient. EAE was extracted from the red microalgae through supercritical fluid carbon dioxide extraction. To compare the effectiveness, EAE wastreated on human dermal fibroblasts with other components, phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA), and doxycycline. With sirius red staining and quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR), we found that PMA decreased the collagen concentration and production while overall the addition of doxycycline and EAE increased the collagen concentration in a trial experiments. EAE increased collagen contents through inhibited MMP1 and MMP3 mRNA expression and induced TIMP1, the antagonists of MMPs protein, gene expression. As for when tested for various proteins through western blotting, it was seen that the addition of EAE increased the expression of certain proteins that promote cell proliferation. Testing those previous solutions using growth factor assay, it was noticeable that EAE had a positive impact on cell proliferation and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) than doxycycline, indicating that it was a better alternative treatment for collagen production. To sum up, the data confirmed the possible applications as medical cosmetology agentsand food supplements. PMID:27322248

  9. Enriched Astaxanthin Extract from Haematococcus pluvialis Augments Growth Factor Secretions to Increase Cell Proliferation and Induces MMP1 Degradation to Enhance Collagen Production in Human Dermal Fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Chou, Hsin-Yu; Lee, Chelsea; Pan, Jian-Liang; Wen, Zhi-Hong; Huang, Shu-Hung; Lan, Chi-Wei John; Liu, Wang-Ta; Hour, Tzyh-Chyuan; Hseu, You-Cheng; Hwang, Byeong Hee; Cheng, Kuo-Chen; Wang, Hui-Min David

    2016-01-01

    Among many antioxidants that are used for the repairing of oxidative stress induced skin damages, we identified the enriched astaxanthin extract (EAE) from Haematococcus pluvialis as a viable ingredient. EAE was extracted from the red microalgae through supercritical fluid carbon dioxide extraction. To compare the effectiveness, EAE wastreated on human dermal fibroblasts with other components, phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA), and doxycycline. With sirius red staining and quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR), we found that PMA decreased the collagen concentration and production while overall the addition of doxycycline and EAE increased the collagen concentration in a trial experiments. EAE increased collagen contents through inhibited MMP1 and MMP3 mRNA expression and induced TIMP1, the antagonists of MMPs protein, gene expression. As for when tested for various proteins through western blotting, it was seen that the addition of EAE increased the expression of certain proteins that promote cell proliferation. Testing those previous solutions using growth factor assay, it was noticeable that EAE had a positive impact on cell proliferation and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) than doxycycline, indicating that it was a better alternative treatment for collagen production. To sum up, the data confirmed the possible applications as medical cosmetology agentsand food supplements. PMID:27322248

  10. Quantitative characterization of collagen in the fibrotic capsule surrounding implanted polymeric microparticles through second harmonic generation imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Akilbekova, Dana; Bratlie, Kaitlin M.; Abraham, Thomas

    2015-06-30

    The collagenous capsule formed around an implant will ultimately determine the nature of its in vivo fate. To provide a better understanding of how surface modifications can alter the collagen orientation and composition in the fibrotic capsule, we used second harmonic generation (SHG) microscopy to evaluate collagen organization and structure generated in mice subcutaneously injected with chemically functionalized polystyrene particles. SHG is sensitive to the orientation of a molecule, making it a powerful tool for measuring the alignment of collagen fibers. Additionally, SHG arises from the second order susceptibility of the interrogated molecule in response to the electric field. Variation in these tensor components distinguishes different molecular sources of SHG, providing collagen type specificity. Here, we demonstrated the ability of SHG to differentiate collagen type I and type III quantitatively and used this method to examine fibrous capsules of implanted polystyrene particles. Data presented in this work shows a wide range of collagen fiber orientations and collagen compositions in response to surface functionalized polystyrene particles. Dimethylamino functionalized particles were able to form a thin collagenous matrix resembling healthy skin. These findings have the potential to improve the fundamental understanding of how material properties influence collagen organization and composition quantitatively.

  11. Quantitative characterization of collagen in the fibrotic capsule surrounding implanted polymeric microparticles through second harmonic generation imaging

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Akilbekova, Dana; Bratlie, Kaitlin M.; Abraham, Thomas

    2015-06-30

    The collagenous capsule formed around an implant will ultimately determine the nature of its in vivo fate. To provide a better understanding of how surface modifications can alter the collagen orientation and composition in the fibrotic capsule, we used second harmonic generation (SHG) microscopy to evaluate collagen organization and structure generated in mice subcutaneously injected with chemically functionalized polystyrene particles. SHG is sensitive to the orientation of a molecule, making it a powerful tool for measuring the alignment of collagen fibers. Additionally, SHG arises from the second order susceptibility of the interrogated molecule in response to the electric field. Variationmore » in these tensor components distinguishes different molecular sources of SHG, providing collagen type specificity. Here, we demonstrated the ability of SHG to differentiate collagen type I and type III quantitatively and used this method to examine fibrous capsules of implanted polystyrene particles. Data presented in this work shows a wide range of collagen fiber orientations and collagen compositions in response to surface functionalized polystyrene particles. Dimethylamino functionalized particles were able to form a thin collagenous matrix resembling healthy skin. These findings have the potential to improve the fundamental understanding of how material properties influence collagen organization and composition quantitatively.« less

  12. Quantitative Characterization of Collagen in the Fibrotic Capsule Surrounding Implanted Polymeric Microparticles through Second Harmonic Generation Imaging.

    PubMed

    Akilbekova, Dana; Bratlie, Kaitlin M

    2015-01-01

    The collagenous capsule formed around an implant will ultimately determine the nature of its in vivo fate. To provide a better understanding of how surface modifications can alter the collagen orientation and composition in the fibrotic capsule, we used second harmonic generation (SHG) microscopy to evaluate collagen organization and structure generated in mice subcutaneously injected with chemically functionalized polystyrene particles. SHG is sensitive to the orientation of a molecule, making it a powerful tool for measuring the alignment of collagen fibers. Additionally, SHG arises from the second order susceptibility of the interrogated molecule in response to the electric field. Variation in these tensor components distinguishes different molecular sources of SHG, providing collagen type specificity. Here, we demonstrated the ability of SHG to differentiate collagen type I and type III quantitatively and used this method to examine fibrous capsules of implanted polystyrene particles. Data presented in this work shows a wide range of collagen fiber orientations and collagen compositions in response to surface functionalized polystyrene particles. Dimethylamino functionalized particles were able to form a thin collagenous matrix resembling healthy skin. These findings have the potential to improve the fundamental understanding of how material properties influence collagen organization and composition quantitatively. PMID:26125551

  13. Percutaneous Implants with Porous Titanium Dermal Barriers: An In Vivo Evaluation of Infection Risk

    PubMed Central

    Isackson, Dorthyann; McGill, Lawrence D.; Bachus, Kent N.

    2010-01-01

    Osseointegrated percutaneous implants are a promising prosthetic alternative for a subset of amputees. However, as with all percutaneous implants, they have an increased risk of infection since they breach the skin barrier. Theoretically, host tissues could attach to the metal implant creating a barrier to infection. When compared with smooth surfaces, it is hypothesized that porous surfaces improve the attachment of the host tissues to the implant, and decrease the infection risk. In this study, 4 titanium implants, manufactured with a percutaneous post and a subcutaneous disk, were placed subcutaneously on the dorsum of eight New Zealand White rabbits. Beginning at four weeks post-op, the implants were inoculated weekly with 108 CFU Staphylococcus aureus until signs of clinical infection presented. While we were unable to detect a difference in the incidence of infection of the porous metal implants, smooth surface (no porous coating) percutaneous and subcutaneous components had a 7-fold increased risk of infection compared to the implants with a porous coating on one or both components. The porous coated implants displayed excellent tissue ingrowth into the porous structures; whereas, the smooth implants were surrounded with a thick, organized fibrotic capsule that was separated from the implant surface. This study suggests that porous coated metal percutaneous implants are at a significantly lower risk of infection when compared to smooth metal implants. The smooth surface percutaneous implants were inadequate in allowing a long-term seal to develop with the soft tissue, thus increasing vulnerability to the migration of infecting microorganisms. PMID:21145778

  14. An aqueous extract of the leaves of Chromolaena odorata (formerly Eupatorium odoratum) (Eupolin) inhibits hydrated collagen lattice contraction by normal human dermal fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Phan, T T; Hughes, M A; Cherry, G W; Le, T T; Pham, H M

    1996-01-01

    Chromolaena odorata (formerly Eupatorium odoratum) is used as a traditional medicine in Vietnam (Nghiem, 1992), where its Vietnamese common name is "co hoi." While it has been widely considered a weed by agriculturalists (Holm et al., 1991), the aqueous extract and the decoction from the leaves of this plant have been used throughout Vietnam for the treatment of soft tissue wounds, burn wounds, and skin infections. A number of clinical studies done by Vietnamese as well as foreign medical workers has demonstrated the efficacy of this extract on the wound-healing process. In this article, the effect of the Eupolin extract on hydrated collagen lattice contraction by human dermal fibroblasts, an in vitro model of wound contraction, is described. The significant inhibition of collagen gel contraction by Eupolin extract at 50 to 200 micrograms/ml is demonstrated in various concentrations of collagen. When the extract at 50 to 150 micrograms/ml was washed out of the lattices and replaced by fresh medium without Eupolin, the contraction of collagen by cells was resumed. The visualization of cells in the lattices by incubation in a tetrazolium salt for 2 h showed live cells at 50 to 150 micrograms/ml of extract. In contrast, all cells were killed in the higher extract doses of 300 or 400 micrograms/ml. These preliminary results showing the inhibitory effect of Eupolin extract on collagen contraction suggest that a clinical evaluation of its effect on wound contraction and scar quality should be made. This work illustrates that traditional remedies that are used by folk practitioners to improve healing can be examined in a scientific manner using in vitro wound-healing models. It could be that the synergistic properties of components of the natural extract contribute to the positive effects demonstrated on various wound-healing mechanisms. PMID:9395667

  15. Comparison of Dermal Substitutes in Wound Healing Utilizing a Nude Mouse Model

    PubMed Central

    Truong, Anh-Tuan N.; Kowal-Vern, Areta; Latenser, Barbara A.; Wiley, Dorion E.; Walter, Robert J.

    2005-01-01

    Background: Dermal skin substitutes have become a standard of care in burn treatment. Objective: To compare and assess wound contracture reduction and histologic incorporation into the wound, dermal substitutes were implanted into full-thickness skin wounds in nude mice. Materials and Methods: Thirty-seven mice received a full-thickness 2 × 2 cm dorsal skin wound, and were either implanted with an acellular dermal matrix, Alloderm, Dermagraft-TC, Dermalogen, or Integra or assigned to the control group (with no dermal substitute). At 28 days postsurgery, the wounds were assessed for contraction, epithelialization, and other histological characteristics. Results: Each dermal substitute decreased wound contracture, but Alloderm and the acellular dermal matrix did so significantly compared to the control (P < .01 and P < .03, respectively). Within-group and control comparisons showed no significant differences with respect to the presence of dystrophic calcification, squamous hyperplasia, infiltration of neutrophils, fibroblasts, and macrophages, epidermal keratinocyte stratification, or collagen fiber configuration. Conclusions: Integra elicited the greatest foreign body response. Although the Dermalogen group had the thickest elastin fiber fragments, Dermagraft may have initiated the earliest elastin fiber formation in the wounds. While all dermal substitutes were incorporated into the wound bed and wound contracture was decreased, acellular dermal matrix and Alloderm, both human skin–derived products, produced less contraction and the thickest new “dermis” in the healed wounds compared to the control or synthetic dermal substitutes. PMID:16921409

  16. Age-associated reduction of cellular spreading/mechanical force up-regulates matrix metalloproteinase-1 expression and collagen fibril fragmentation via c-Jun/AP-1 in human dermal fibroblasts

    PubMed Central

    Qin, Zhaoping; Voorhees, John J; Fisher, Gary J; Quan, Taihao

    2014-01-01

    The dermal compartment of human skin is largely composed of dense collagen-rich fibrils, which provide structural and mechanical support. Skin dermal fibroblasts, the major collagen-producing cells, are interact with collagen fibrils to maintain cell spreading and mechanical force for function. A characteristic feature of aged human skin is fragmentation of collagen fibrils, which is initiated by matrix metalloproteinase 1 (MMP-1). Fragmentation impairs fibroblast attachment and thereby reduces spreading. Here, we investigated the relationship among fibroblast spreading, mechanical force, MMP-1 expression, and collagen fibril fragmentation. Reduced fibroblast spreading due to cytoskeletal disruption was associated with reduced cellular mechanical force, as determined by atomic force microscopy. These reductions substantially induced MMP-1 expression, which led to collagen fibril fragmentation and disorganization in three-dimensional collagen lattices. Constraining fibroblast size by culturing on slides coated with collagen micropatterns also significantly induced MMP-1 expression. Reduced spreading/mechanical force induced transcription factor c-Jun and its binding to a canonical AP-1 binding site in the MMP-1 proximal promoter. Blocking c-Jun function with dominant negative mutant c-Jun significantly reduced induction of MMP-1 expression in response to reduced spreading/mechanical force. Furthermore, restoration of fibroblast spreading/mechanical force led to decline of c-Jun and MMP-1 levels and eliminated collagen fibril fragmentation and disorganization. These data reveal a novel mechanism by which alteration of fibroblast shape/mechanical force regulates c-Jun/AP-1-dependent expression of MMP-1 and consequent collagen fibril fragmentation. This mechanism provides a foundation for understanding the cellular and molecular basis of age-related collagen fragmentation in human skin. PMID:25201474

  17. Role of xenogenous bovine platelet gel embedded within collagen implant on tendon healing: an in vitro and in vivo study.

    PubMed

    Oryan, Ahmad; Moshiri, Ali; Meimandi-Parizi, Abdolhamid; Maffulli, Nicola

    2015-02-01

    Surgical reconstruction of large Achilles tendon defects is demanding. Platelet concentrates may be useful to favor healing in such conditions. The characteristics of bovine platelet-gel embedded within a collagen-implant were determined in vitro, and its healing efficacy was examined in a large Achilles tendon defect in rabbits. Two cm of the left Achilles tendon of 60 rabbits were excised, and the animals were randomly assigned to control (no implant), collagen-implant, or bovine-platelet-gel-collagen-implant groups. The tendon edges were maintained aligned using a Kessler suture. No implant was inserted in the control group. In the two other groups, a collagen-implant or bovine-platelet-gel-collagen-implant was inserted in the defect. The bioelectricity and serum platelet-derived growth factor levels were measured weekly and at 60 days post injury, respectively. After euthanasia at 60 days post injury, the tendons were tested at macroscopic, microscopic, and ultrastructural levels, and their dry matter and biomechanical performances were also assessed. Another 60 rabbits were assigned to receive no implant, a collagen-implant, or a bovine-platelet-gel-collagen-implant, euthanized at 10, 20, 30, and 40 days post injury, and their tendons were evaluated grossly and histologically to determine host-graft interactions. Compared to the control and collagen-implant, treatment with bovine-platelet-gel-collagen-implant improved tissue bioelectricity and serum platelet-derived growth factor levels, and increased cell proliferation, differentiation, and maturation. It also increased number, diameter, and density of the collagen fibrils, alignment and maturation of the collagen fibrils and fibers, biomechanical properties and dry matter content of the injured tendons at 60 days post injury. The bovine-platelet-gel-collagen-implant also increased biodegradability, biocompatibility, and tissue incorporation behavior of the implant compared to the collagen-implant alone

  18. In situ visualization of dermal collagen dynamics during skin burn healing using second-harmonic-generation microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yasui, Takeshi; Hase, Eiji; Tanaka, Ryosuke; Fukushima, Shu-ichiro; Araki, Tsutomu

    2015-06-01

    Burn healing is a process to repair thermally damaged tissues. Although burn healing has many aspects, it is common for dynamics of collagen fiber, such as decomposition, production, or growth, to be closely related with burn healing. If such healing process can be visualized from the viewpoint of the collagen dynamics, one may obtain new findings regarding biological repairing mechanisms in the healing process. To this end, second-harmonic-generation (SHG) light will be an effective optical probe because of high selectivity and good image contrast to collagen molecules as well as high spatial resolution, optical three-dimensional (3D) sectioning, minimal invasiveness, deep penetration, the absence of interference from background light, and in situ measurement without additional staining. Furthermore, since SHG light arises from a non-centrosymmetric triple helix of three polypeptide chains in the collagen molecule, its intensity decreases and finally disappears when thermal denaturation caused by the skin burn changes the structure of this molecule to a centrosymmetric random coil. Therefore, optical assessment of skin burn has been investigated by SHG microscopy. In this paper, we applied SHG microscopy for in situ imaging of the healing process in animal skin burn and successfully visualized the decomposition, production, and growth of renewal collagen fibers as a series of time-lapse images in the same subject.

  19. Surgical Therapy by Sandwich Transplantation using a Dermal Collagen-Elastin Matrix and Full Thickness Split Grafts and Gait Rehabilitation with Individualized Orthesis

    PubMed Central

    Wollina, Uwe; Heinig, Birgit

    2012-01-01

    Painful callosities of the feet (PCOF) are a rare complaint in children with severe impairment of mobility and quality of life. There is no medical treatment available. We investigated the usefulness of a recently developed combined transplant technique-the sandwich transplantation with dermal collagen-elastin template in this rare condition. A 14-year-old boy suffered from PCOF for several years without any improvement by topical therapy, dermabrasion, and oral retinoids. He was unable to walk normally and suffered from severe pain. We performed a complete deep excision of the hyperkeratotic plantar tissue in general anaesthesia in combination with sandwich transplantation in the same setting. Dry sheets of collagen-elastin matrix (1 mm thickness) were placed on the soft tissue defects and covered by full-thickness mesh graft transplants from the upper leg. An individualized orthosis was produced for gait rehabilitation. Two weeks after surgery the gait-related pain was reduced remarkably. Using the orthosis, the boy was able to walk pain-free even on staircase. Surgery of PCOF with sandwich transplantation and gait rehabilitation appears to be a promising strategy for this rare condition. PMID:23378711

  20. Surgical Therapy by Sandwich Transplantation using a Dermal Collagen-Elastin Matrix and Full Thickness Split Grafts and Gait Rehabilitation with Individualized Orthesis.

    PubMed

    Wollina, Uwe; Heinig, Birgit

    2012-10-01

    Painful callosities of the feet (PCOF) are a rare complaint in children with severe impairment of mobility and quality of life. There is no medical treatment available. We investigated the usefulness of a recently developed combined transplant technique-the sandwich transplantation with dermal collagen-elastin template in this rare condition. A 14-year-old boy suffered from PCOF for several years without any improvement by topical therapy, dermabrasion, and oral retinoids. He was unable to walk normally and suffered from severe pain. We performed a complete deep excision of the hyperkeratotic plantar tissue in general anaesthesia in combination with sandwich transplantation in the same setting. Dry sheets of collagen-elastin matrix (1 mm thickness) were placed on the soft tissue defects and covered by full-thickness mesh graft transplants from the upper leg. An individualized orthosis was produced for gait rehabilitation. Two weeks after surgery the gait-related pain was reduced remarkably. Using the orthosis, the boy was able to walk pain-free even on staircase. Surgery of PCOF with sandwich transplantation and gait rehabilitation appears to be a promising strategy for this rare condition. PMID:23378711

  1. Noninvasive and High-Resolution Optical Monitoring of Healing of Diabetic Dermal Excisional Wounds Implanted with Biodegradable In Situ Gelable Hydrogels

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Zhijia; Zakhaleva, Julia; Ren, Hugang; Liu, Jingxuan; Chen, Weiliam

    2010-01-01

    Closure of diabetic dermal chronic wounds remains a clinical challenge. Implant-assisted healing is emerging as a potential class of therapy for dermal wound closure; this advancement has not been paralleled by the development in complementary diagnostic techniques to objectively monitor the wound-healing process in conjunction with assessing/monitoring of implant efficacy. Biopsies provide the most objective morphological assessments of wound healing; however, they not only perpetuate the wound presence but also increase the risk of infection. A noninvasive and high-resolution imaging technique is highly desirable to provide objective longitudinal diagnosis of implant-assisted wound healing. We investigated the feasibility of deploying optical coherence tomography (OCT) for noninvasive monitoring of the healing of full-thickness excisional dermal wounds implanted with a novel in situ gelable hydrogel composed of N-carboxyethyl chitosan, oxidized dextran, and hyaluronan, in both normal and db/db mice. The results showed that OCT was able to differentiate the morphological differences (e.g., thickness of dermis) between normal and diabetic mice as validated by their corresponding histological evaluations (p < 0.05). OCT could detect essential morphological changes during wound healing, including re-epithelization, inflammatory response, and granulation tissue formation as well as impaired wound repair in diabetic mice. Importantly, by tracking specific morphological changes in hydrogel-assisted wound healing (e.g., implants' degradation and resorption, cell-mediated hydrogel degradation, and accelerated re-epithelization), OCT could also be deployed to monitor and evaluate the transformation of implanted biomaterials, thus holding the promise for noninvasive and objective monitoring of wound healing longitudinally and for objective efficacy assessment of implantable therapeutics in tissue engineering. PMID:19496703

  2. Development of salmon collagen vascular graft: mechanical and biological properties and preliminary implantation study.

    PubMed

    Nagai, Nobuhiro; Nakayama, Yasuhide; Zhou, Yue-Min; Takamizawa, Keiichi; Mori, Kazuo; Munekata, Masanobu

    2008-11-01

    Elastic salmon collagen (SC) vascular grafts were prepared by incubating a mixture of acidic SC solution and a fibrillogenesis-inducing buffer containing a crosslinking agent [water-soluble carbodiimide (WSC)] in a tubular mold at 4 degrees C for 24 h and then at 60 degrees C for 5 min. Subsequently, re-crosslinking in ethanol solution containing WSC was performed. The dimension of the SC grafts was easily controlled by changing the size of the mold used. The compliance (stiffness parameter: beta) and burst strength of the SC grafts (internal diameter, 2 mm; length, 20 mm; and wall thickness, 0.75 mm) that were prepared for implantation were 18.2 and 1434 mmHg, respectively; both these values were comparable with those of native vessels. Upon placement in rat subcutaneous pouches, the SC grafts were gradually biodegraded with little inflammatory reaction. The SC grafts were preliminarily implanted in rat abdominal aortas by using specially designed vascular connecting system. This system was used because the graft exhibited easy tearing and thus inadequate suturability. There was neither aneurysm formation nor graft rupture, but mild thrombus formation was seen within the 4-week observation period. These grafts may be ideal for use in regenerative medicine because we believe that SC would be completely replaced with native vascular tissues after implantation, although further improvement in the mechanical properties of the graft is needed for anastomosis. PMID:18478534

  3. Collagen-Glycosaminoglycan Matrix Implantation Promotes Angiogenesis following Surgical Brain Trauma

    PubMed Central

    Hsu, Wei-Cherng; Hsiao, Jong-Kai; Chen, Gunng-Shinng; Wang, Jia-Yi

    2014-01-01

    Surgical brain injury (SBI) is unavoidable during many neurosurgical procedures intrinsically linked to postoperative neurological deficits. We have previously demonstrated that implantation of collagen glycosaminoglycan (CG) following surgical brain injury could significantly promote functional recovery and neurogenesis. In this study we further hypothesized that this scaffold may provide a microenvironment by promoting angiogenesis to favor neurogenesis and subsequent functional recovery. Using the rodent model of surgical brain injury as we previously established, we divided Sprague-Dawley male rats (weighting 300–350 g) into three groups: (1) sham (2) surgical injury with a lesion (L), and (3) L with CG matrix implantation (L + CG). Our results demonstrated that L + CG group showed a statistically significant increase in the density of vascular endothelial cells and blood vessels over time. In addition, tissue concentrations of angiogenic growth factors (such as VEGF, FGF2, and PDGF) significantly increased in L + CG group. These results suggest that implantation of a CG scaffold can promote vascularization accompanied by neurogenesis. This opens prospects for use of CG scaffolds in conditions such as brain injury including trauma and ischemia. PMID:25309917

  4. Clinical and radiographic evaluation of copolymerized Polylactic/polyglycolic acids as a bone filler in combination with a cellular dermal matrix graft around immediate implants

    PubMed Central

    Soliman, Mahitab M.; Zaki, Azza Abdulrahman; El Gazaerly, Hanaa Mohamed; Shemmrani, Ammar Al; Sorour, Abd El Latif

    2014-01-01

    Objective This study was conducted to evaluate clinically and radiographically the use of a cellular dermal matrix allograft (Alloderm) in combination with PLA/PGA (Fisiograft) around immediate implants. Materials and Methods Fourteen patients were included in this study, three patients received two implants, total of seventeen implants were placed. Periapical radiographs and orthopantomographs were taken. The selected teeth were extracted atraumatically after the reflection of full thickness flaps. One-piece Zimmer implants were placed immediately into the sockets. Weeks from implantation, radiographic evaluation was made at 6 Fisiograft in powder form was placed in the osseous defects around the implants. The implants were immediately restored with provisional crowns free from occlusion. Patients were clinically evaluated at 3, 6, and 14 months after loading which was done after 6 weeks from implantation. Radiographic evaluation was made at 6 and 14 months from implant placement. Results showed that immediate implantation was successful in sixteen out of seventeen implants, clinical parameters regarding plaque index, gingival index, there was a slight decrease through the follow-up periods from 3 to 14 months but it was non-significant, while there was a significant decrease in the probing depth. Radiographically there was a significant increase in the bone density from 6 to 14 months post loading, while the vertical bone defect was significantly decreased. The fisiograft functioned well as space maker and scaffolding material. The Alloderm performed well as a membrane to be used in association with immediate implants and it has a good potentiality for increasing the width of the keratinized gingiva, which is an important feature for implant esthetics. Conclusion the combination technique between the bone graft and the membrane proved to be successful to overcome dehiscence and osseous defects around immediate implants. PMID:25780357

  5. Autologous implantation of BMP2-expressing dermal fibroblasts to improve bone mineral density and architecture in rabbit long bones.

    PubMed

    Ishihara, Akikazu; Weisbrode, Steve E; Bertone, Alicia L

    2015-10-01

    Cell-mediated gene therapy may treat bone fragility disorders. Dermal fibroblasts (DFb) may be an alternative cell source to stem cells for orthopedic gene therapy because of their rapid cell yield and excellent plasticity with bone morphogenetic protein-2 (BMP2) gene transduction. Autologous DFb or BMP2-expressing autologous DFb were administered in twelve rabbits by two delivery routes; a transcortical intra-medullar infusion into tibiae and delayed intra-osseous injection into femoral drill defects. Both delivery methods of DFb-BMP2 resulted in a successful cell engraftment, increased bone volume, bone mineral density, improved trabecular bone microarchitecture, greater bone defect filling, external callus formation, and trabecular surface area, compared to non-transduced DFb or no cells. Cell engraftment within trabecular bone and bone marrow tissue was most efficiently achieved by intra-osseous injection of DFb-BMP2. Our results suggested that BMP2-expressing autologous DFb have enhanced efficiency of engraftment in target bones resulting in a measurable biologic response by the bone of improved bone mineral density and bone microarchitecture. These results support that autologous implantation of DFb-BMP2 warrants further study on animal models of bone fragility disorders, such as osteogenesis imperfecta and osteoporosis to potentially enhance bone quality, particularly along with other gene modification of these diseases. PMID:25418909

  6. The effect on bone growth enhancement of implant coatings with hydroxyapatite and collagen deposited electrochemically and by plasma spray

    PubMed Central

    Daugaard, Henrik; Elmengaard, Brian; Bechtold, Joan E.; Jensen, Thomas; Soballe, Kjeld

    2013-01-01

    Skeletal bone consists of hydroxyapatite (HA) [Ca10(PO4)6(OH)2] and collagen type I, both of which are osseoconductive. The goal of osseointegration of orthopedic and dental implants is the rapid achievement of a mechanically stable long-lasting fixation between bone and an implant surface. In this study, we evaluated the mechanical fixation and tissue distribution surrounding implants coated with three surfaces: plasma-sprayed HA coating, thinner coating of electrochemical-assisted deposition of HA, and an identical thin coating with a top layer of mineralized collagen. Uncoated plasma-sprayed titanium (Ti-6Al-4V) served as negative control. The electrochemical-assisted deposition was performed near physiological conditions. We used a canine experimental joint replacement model with four cylindrical implants (one of each treatment group) inserted in the humeri cancellous metaphyseal bone in a 1 mm gap. Observation time was 4 weeks. The mechanical fixation was quantified by push-out test to failure, and the peri-implant tissue formation by histomorphometric evaluation. HA coatings deposited by plasma spray technique or electrochemically, increased the mechanical fixation and bone ongrowth, but there was no statistical difference between the individual HA applications. Addition of collagen to the mineralized phase of the coating to create a more bone natural surface did not improve the osseoconductive effect of HA. PMID:19291683

  7. Fibrin and Collagen Differentially but Synergistically Regulate Sprout Angiogenesis of Human Dermal Microvascular Endothelial Cells in 3-Dimensional Matrix

    PubMed Central

    Tonnesen, Marcia G.; Mousa, Shaker A.; Clark, Richard A. F.

    2013-01-01

    Angiogenesis is a highly regulated event involving complex, dynamic interactions between microvascular endothelial cells and extracellular matrix (ECM) proteins. Alteration of ECM composition and architecture is a hallmark feature of wound clot and tumor stroma. We previously reported that during angiogenesis, endothelial cell responses to growth factors are modulated by the compositional and mechanical properties of a surrounding three-dimensional (3D) extracellular matrix (ECM) that is dominated by either cross-linked fibrin or type I collagen. However, the role of 3D ECM in the regulation of angiogenesis associated with wound healing and tumor growth is not well defined. This study investigates the correlation of sprout angiogenesis and ECM microenvironment using in vivo and in vitro 3D angiogenesis models. It demonstrates that fibrin and type I collagen 3D matrices differentially but synergistically regulate sprout angiogenesis. Thus blocking both integrin alpha v beta 3 and integrin alpha 2 beta 1 might be a novel strategy to synergistically block sprout angiogenesis in solid tumors. PMID:23737792

  8. Collagen implant with gentamicin sulphate as an option to treat a neuroischaemic diabetic foot ulcer: Case report

    PubMed Central

    Costa Almeida, C.E.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction The ischaemic diabetic foot is associated with a faster evolving atherosclerosis affecting preferentially the bellow knee arteries. This distal ischemia associated with a wide distribution of multiple stenosis and occlusions throughout lower limb arteries, makes revascularization very hard or even impossible. This represents a major factor responsible for non-healing diabetic foot ulcer. In these cases all efforts should be made to find treatment alternatives that can promote ulcer healing. Case presentation Male patient with neuroischaemic diabetic foot ulcer with exposure tendon, without possibility for endovascular or surgical revascularization, was treated unsuccessfully with prostaglandin and several types of dressings for 7 months. Skin graft failed. Weekly dressings with collagen implant impregnated with gentamicin sulphate were then started and continued in an outpatient setting. Evolution was very positive, with 99% of epithelisation in 9 months. No pain or infection since the beginning of this treatment. Discussion Successful treatment of a neuroischaemic diabetic foot ulcer rests with the possibility of increasing the perfusion to the foot. Whether or not a revascularization procedure is possible will set the tone for the ensuing treatment. Using collagen implant with gentamicin sulphate, collagen is delivered to the wound bed helping in the granulation tissue formation, will increase microcirculation, and topic gentamicin will decrease bacterial load, exudate and proteases production, increasing cicatrisation. Conclusion In neuroischaemic diabetic foot ulcer weekly dressings with collagen implant impregnated with gentamicin sulphate can be a good option for ulcer healing. PMID:26927956

  9. Attachment of an aminoglycoside, amikacin, to implantable collagen for local delivery in wounds.

    PubMed Central

    Boyce, S T; Supp, A P; Warden, G D; Holder, I A

    1993-01-01

    Cultured skin substitutes consisting of implantable collagen (COL) and cultured human skin cells often fail clinically from destruction by microbial contamination. Hypothetically, addition of selected antimicrobial drugs to the implant may control microbial contamination and increase healing of skin wounds with these materials. As a model for drug delivery, bovine skin COL (1 mg/ml) and amikacin (AM; 46 micrograms/ml) were modified by covalent addition of biotin (B-COL and B-AM, respectively) from B-N-hydroxysuccinimide and bound together noncovalently with avidin (A). B-COL was incubated with A and then with B-peroxidase (B-P) or by serial incubation with B-AM and B-P, before P-dependent chromogen formation. Colorimetric data (n = 12 per condition) from spot tests on nitrocellulose paper were collected by transmission spectrophotometry. Specificity of drug binding in spot tests was determined by (i) serial dilution of B-COL; (ii) reactions with COL, AM, or P that had no B; (iii) removal of A; or (iv) preincubation of B-COL-A with B before incubation with B-P. Binding of B-AM was (i) dependent on the concentration of B-COL; (ii) specific to B-COL, A, and B-P (P < 0.05); and (iii) not eluted by incubation in 0.15 or 1.0 M NaCl. B-AM was found to block binding of B-P to the B-COL-A complex and to retain bacteriocidal activity against 10 clinical isolates of wound bacteria in the wet disc assay. Antimicrobial activity of B-AM was removed from solution by treatment with magnetic A and a permanent magnet. These results suggest that selected antimicrobial drugs can be biotinylated for attachments to COL-cultured cell implants without loss of pharmacologic activity. Because this chemistry utilizes a common ligand, any molar ratio of agents may be administered simultaneously and localized to the site of implantation. Images PMID:8239602

  10. Natural flexible dermal armor.

    PubMed

    Yang, Wen; Chen, Irene H; Gludovatz, Bernd; Zimmermann, Elizabeth A; Ritchie, Robert O; Meyers, Marc A

    2013-01-01

    Fish, reptiles, and mammals can possess flexible dermal armor for protection. Here we seek to find the means by which Nature derives its protection by examining the scales from several fish (Atractosteus spatula, Arapaima gigas, Polypterus senegalus, Morone saxatilis, Cyprinius carpio), and osteoderms from armadillos, alligators, and leatherback turtles. Dermal armor has clearly been developed by convergent evolution in these different species. In general, it has a hierarchical structure with collagen fibers joining more rigid units (scales or osteoderms), thereby increasing flexibility without significantly sacrificing strength, in contrast to rigid monolithic mineral composites. These dermal structures are also multifunctional, with hydrodynamic drag (in fish), coloration for camouflage or intraspecies recognition, temperature and fluid regulation being other important functions. The understanding of such flexible dermal armor is important as it may provide a basis for new synthetic, yet bioinspired, armor materials. PMID:23161399

  11. Flexible Dermal Armor in Nature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Wen; Chen, Irene H.; Mckittrick, Joanna; Meyers, Marc A.

    2012-04-01

    Many animals possess dermal armor, which acts primarily as protection against predators. We illustrate this through examples from both our research and the literature: alligator, fish (alligator gar, arapaima, and Senegal bichir), armadillo, leatherback turtle, and a lizard, the Gila monster. The dermal armor in these animals is flexible and has a hierarchical structure with collagen fibers joining mineralized units (scales, tiles, or plates). This combination significantly increases the strength and flexibility in comparison with a simple monolithic mineral composite or rigid dermal armor. This dermal armor is being studied for future bioinspired armor applications providing increased mobility.

  12. Development of a cultured dermal substitute composed of a spongy matrix of hyaluronic acid and atelo-collagen combined with fibroblasts: cryopreservation.

    PubMed

    Kubo, Kentaro; Kuroyanagi, Yoshimitsu

    2004-02-01

    An allogeneic cultured dermal substitute (CDS) was prepared by cultivating fibroblasts on a two-layered spongy matrix of hyaluronic acid (HA) and atelo-collagen (Col). The ability of fibroblasts to secrete cytokines is dependent on the conditions of freezing and thawing. The first experiment was designed to investigate the effects of supplements in a cryoprotective medium, that is, dimethylsulfoxide (DMSO), glycerol, and fetal bovine serum (FBS). In each experiment we measured the cell viability after thawing and the cell growth in CDS recultured after thawing. In addition, the amount of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) released from the CDS recultured for one week after thawing was measured. The highest values of cell viability, cell growth, and the amount of VEGF released were obtained when CDS was frozen in Dulbecco's modified Eagle's medium (DMEM) supplemented with 10% DMSO and 40% FBS, and then thawed quickly in a water bath at 37 degrees C. However, due to the high cost of FBS, in clinical applications CDS is usually frozen in DMEM supplemented with 10% DMSO and 20% FBS. In practice, however, physicians often cannot use CDS immediately after thawing, depending on clinical conditions. Therefore, in the second experiment we investigated cell viability at different time points after thawing. In addition, we investigated cell growth and the amount of VEGF released from fibroblasts in CDS at different time points after thawing under different conditions, and after further reculturing for one week. We recommend that CDS be rinsed with lactated Ringer's solution immediately after thawing, and that it be used within 4 h after thawing. PMID:14961958

  13. Collagen type-I leads to in vivo matrix mineralization and secondary stabilization of Mg-Zr-Ca alloy implants.

    PubMed

    Mushahary, Dolly; Wen, Cuie; Kumar, Jerald Mahesh; Lin, Jixing; Harishankar, Nemani; Hodgson, Peter; Pande, Gopal; Li, Yuncang

    2014-10-01

    Biodegradable magnesium-zirconia-calcium (Mg-Zr-Ca) alloy implants were coated with Collagen type-I (Coll-I) and assessed for their rate and efficacy of bone mineralization and implant stabilization. The phases, microstructure and mechanical properties of these alloys were analyzed using X-ray diffraction (XRD), optical microscopy and compression test, respectively, and the corrosion behavior was established by their hydrogen production rate in simulated body fluid (SBF). Coll-I extracted from rat tail, and characterized using fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy, was used for dip-coating the Mg-based alloys. The coated alloys were implanted into the femur bones of male New Zealand white rabbits. In vivo bone formation around the implants was quantified by measuring the bone mineral content/density (BMC/BMD) using dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA). Osseointegration of the implant and new bone mineralization was visualized by histological and immunohistochemical analysis. Upon surface coating with Coll-I, these alloys demonstrated high surface energy showing enhanced performance as an implant material that is suitable for rapid and efficient new bone tissue induction with optimal mineral content and cellular properties. The results demonstrate that Coll-I coated Mg-Zr-Ca alloys have a tendency to form superior trabecular bone structure with better osteoinduction around the implants and higher implant secondary stabilization, through the phenomenon of contact osteogenesis, compared to the control and uncoated ones in shorter periods of implantation. Hence, Coll-I surface coating of Mg-Zr-Ca alloys is a promising method for expediting new bone formation in vivo and enhancing osseointegration in load bearing implant applications. PMID:25179112

  14. Role of topical application of gentamicin containing collagen implants in cardiac surgery

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Sternal wound infections (SWI) continue to be a major cause of concern after cardiac surgery. It leads to prolonged hospital stay and increased morbidity, mortality and increased hospital costs. Prophylactic systemic antibiotics have been used to prevent surgical site infection (SSI). However, prolonged postoperative use of systemic antibiotics can lead to emergence of resistant organisms. Gentamycin Containing Collagen Implants (GCCI) when used during sternotomy closure produces high local antibiotic concentrations in the wound with a low serum concentration. There is evidence that the concentration of gentamicin in the mediastinal fluid reaches levels high enough to be effective against bacteria that are considered resistant to gentamycin and other antibiotics. However, questions have been raised about the safety and efficacy of GCCI. There were concerns whether GCCI can lead to systemic absorption with renal impairment and whether use of topical antibiotics can lead to emergence of antimicrobial resistance. We, hereby, review the literature on GCCI (Collatamp) and take the opportunity to appraise the scientific community about their role in cardiac surgery. Several recent studies have supported their clinical effectiveness. They should be used in dry condition and should not be soaked in saline even for a short period prior to use. However, for GCCI to become part of routine practice in cardiac surgery further large randomised studies are required. As the incidence of sternal wound infection is low in the specialty of cardiac surgery, for any study to be sufficiently powered to address this issue, multicenter studies might be the way forward. Based on the evidence presented in this manuscript it is recommended GCCI (Collatamp) can be a cost effective adjunct for prevention of sternal wound infection. They can also be used for treatment of Deep Sternal Wound Infection. PMID:25005533

  15. Characterization and evolution of dermal filaments from patients with Morgellons disease.

    PubMed

    Middelveen, Marianne J; Mayne, Peter J; Kahn, Douglas G; Stricker, Raphael B

    2013-01-01

    Morgellons disease is an emerging skin disease characterized by formation of dermal filaments associated with multisystemic symptoms and tick-borne illness. Some clinicians hypothesize that these often colorful dermal filaments are textile fibers, either self-implanted by patients or accidentally adhering to lesions, and conclude that patients with this disease have delusions of infestation. We present histological observations and electron microscopic imaging from representative Morgellons disease samples revealing that dermal filaments in these cases are keratin and collagen in composition and result from proliferation and activation of keratinocytes and fibroblasts in the epidermis. Spirochetes were detected in the dermatological specimens from our study patients, providing evidence that Morgellons disease is associated with an infectious process. PMID:23326202

  16. Characterization and evolution of dermal filaments from patients with Morgellons disease

    PubMed Central

    Middelveen, Marianne J; Mayne, Peter J; Kahn, Douglas G; Stricker, Raphael B

    2013-01-01

    Morgellons disease is an emerging skin disease characterized by formation of dermal filaments associated with multisystemic symptoms and tick-borne illness. Some clinicians hypothesize that these often colorful dermal filaments are textile fibers, either self-implanted by patients or accidentally adhering to lesions, and conclude that patients with this disease have delusions of infestation. We present histological observations and electron microscopic imaging from representative Morgellons disease samples revealing that dermal filaments in these cases are keratin and collagen in composition and result from proliferation and activation of keratinocytes and fibroblasts in the epidermis. Spirochetes were detected in the dermatological specimens from our study patients, providing evidence that Morgellons disease is associated with an infectious process. PMID:23326202

  17. Bone formation around rhBMP-2-coated implants in rabbit sinuses with or without absorbable collagen sponge grafting

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of this study was to evaluate bone formation around recombinant human bone morphogenetic protein (rhBMP-2)-coated implants placed with or without absorbable collagen sponge (ACS) in rabbit maxillary sinuses. Methods The Schneiderian membrane was elevated and an implant was placed in 24 sinuses in 12 rabbits. The space created beneath the elevated membrane was filled with either blood (n=6) or ACS (n=6). In the rabbits in which this space was filled with blood, rhBMP-2-coated and non-coated implants were alternately placed on different sides. The resulting groups were referred to as the BC and BN groups, respectively. The AC and AN groups were produced in ACS-grafted rabbits in the same manner. Radiographic and histomorphometric analyses were performed after eight weeks of healing. Results In micro-computed tomography analysis, the total augmented volume and new bone volume were significantly greater in the ACS-grafted sinuses than in the blood-filled sinuses (P<0.05). The histometric analysis showed that the areas of new bone and bone-to-implant contact were significantly larger in the AC group than in the AN group (P<0.05). In contrast, none of the parameters differed significantly between the BC and BN groups. Conclusions The results of this pilot study indicate that the insertion of ACS after elevating the Schneiderian membrane, simultaneously with implant placement, can significantly increase the volume of the augmentation. However, in the present study, the rhBMP-2 coating exhibited limited effectiveness in enhancing the quantity and quality of regenerated bone. PMID:26734494

  18. Keloid-derived, plasma/fibrin-based skin equivalents generate de novo dermal and epidermal pathology of keloid fibrosis in a mouse model.

    PubMed

    Lee, Yun-Shain; Hsu, Tim; Chiu, Wei-Chih; Sarkozy, Heidi; Kulber, David A; Choi, Aaron; Kim, Elliot W; Benya, Paul D; Tuan, Tai-Lan

    2016-03-01

    Keloids are wounding-induced tumor-like human scars. Unclear etiology and lack of animal models to reveal disease mechanisms and invent therapies deepen the grievous health and psychosocial state of vulnerable individuals. Epitomizing the injury-repair environment which triggers and fosters keloid formation and essential dermal/epidermal interactions in disease development, the novel animal model was established by implanting porous polyethylene ring-supported plasma/fibrin-based epidermal-dermal skin constructs on the dorsum of athymic NU/J mice. The implants were stable to 18 weeks, contained abundant human cells, and remodeled to yield scar architecture characteristic of keloid fibrosis compared with normal implants and clinical specimens: (1) macroscopic convex or nodular scar morphology; (2) morphogenesis and accumulation of large collagen bundles from collagen-null initial constructs; (3) epidermal hyperplasia, aberrant epidermal-dermal patency, and features of EMT; (4) increased vasculature, macrophage influx, and aggregation; and (5) temporal-spatial increased collagen-inducing PAI-1 and its interactive partner uPAR expression. Development of such pathology in the NU/J host suggests that T-cell participation is less important at this stage than at keloid initiation. These accessible implants also healed secondary excisional wounds, enabling clinically relevant contemporaneous wounding and treatment strategies, and evaluation. The model provides a robust platform for studying keloid formation and testing knowledge-based therapies. PMID:26683740

  19. Beneficial regulation of fibrillar collagens, heat shock protein-47, elastin fiber components, transforming growth factor-β1, vascular endothelial growth factor and oxidative stress effects by copper in dermal fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Philips, Neena; Samuel, Philips; Parakandi, Harit; Gopal, Sesha; Siomyk, Halyna; Ministro, Abraham; Thompson, Terrel; Borkow, Gadi

    2012-01-01

    Skin aging is associated with the loss of the structural collagens and the elastin fiber components that form the extracellular matrix (ECM). It is associated with reduced transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β), angiogenesis and increased oxidative stress. Copper has been incorporated into cosmetics for anti-skin aging. This research investigated the mechanism for the anti-skin aging effect copper ions, from cuprous oxide powders. Dermal fibroblasts were exposed to copper and examined for expression (protein and/or promoter levels) of types I, III, V collagen, heat shock protein-47 (HSP-47), elastin, fibrillin-1, and fibrillin-2, TGF-β1, vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), and in addition for membrane damage and lipid peroxidation. The direct antioxidant activity of copper was also determined. The research indicates that copper's anti-skin aging and skin regeneration potential is through its stimulation of ECM proteins, TGF-β1, VEGF, and inhibition of oxidative stress effects at physiological concentrations; and supports its use in cosmetics. PMID:22324999

  20. Biodegradable PTLGA Terpolymers versus Collagen Implants Used as an Adjuvant in Trabeculectomy in Rabbit Eye.

    PubMed

    Niu, Weiran; Shen, Guanglin; Yuan, Yuanzhi; Ma, Xiaoping; Li, Suming; Wang, Jingzhao; Fan, Zhongyong; Liao, Lan

    2015-01-01

    Purpose. To evaluate the effectiveness and safety of three biodegradable terpolymers prepared from L-lactide, trimethylene carbonate, and glycolide (PTLGA) as an aid for trabeculectomy compared with the Ologen (OLO). Methods. Trabeculectomy was carried out on rabbits with implantation made from OLO or three PTLGA terpolymers. Intraocular pressure (IOP) was recorded 1, 2, 3, and 6 months postoperatively and bleb evaluations were performed using ultrasound biomicroscopy (UBM) 3 months after surgery, optical coherence tomography (OCT) every month, and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) six months after surgery followed by histological examination 1, 2, 3, and 6 months postoperatively. Result. IOP was significantly reduced in all groups after surgery. There were no significant differences in the IOL between groups at any time after implantation. There was no significant difference between the groups examined by OCT, UBM, and TEM. Exposure of the implant was observed in one eye from the OLO group and one eye in the P1. Subconjunctiva hyperblastosis was observed in one eye from group P3 and two eyes from the OLO group. Conclusions. Subconjunctival implantation of filtering devices made from PTLGA may present a safe and effective additional surgical tool for the treatment of filtering surgery. Fewer complications were observed in the group with P2 implants compared to other groups. PMID:26697212

  1. Biodegradable PTLGA Terpolymers versus Collagen Implants Used as an Adjuvant in Trabeculectomy in Rabbit Eye

    PubMed Central

    Niu, Weiran; Shen, Guanglin; Yuan, Yuanzhi; Ma, Xiaoping; Li, Suming; Wang, Jingzhao; Fan, Zhongyong; Liao, Lan

    2015-01-01

    Purpose. To evaluate the effectiveness and safety of three biodegradable terpolymers prepared from L-lactide, trimethylene carbonate, and glycolide (PTLGA) as an aid for trabeculectomy compared with the Ologen (OLO). Methods. Trabeculectomy was carried out on rabbits with implantation made from OLO or three PTLGA terpolymers. Intraocular pressure (IOP) was recorded 1, 2, 3, and 6 months postoperatively and bleb evaluations were performed using ultrasound biomicroscopy (UBM) 3 months after surgery, optical coherence tomography (OCT) every month, and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) six months after surgery followed by histological examination 1, 2, 3, and 6 months postoperatively. Result. IOP was significantly reduced in all groups after surgery. There were no significant differences in the IOL between groups at any time after implantation. There was no significant difference between the groups examined by OCT, UBM, and TEM. Exposure of the implant was observed in one eye from the OLO group and one eye in the P1. Subconjunctiva hyperblastosis was observed in one eye from group P3 and two eyes from the OLO group. Conclusions. Subconjunctival implantation of filtering devices made from PTLGA may present a safe and effective additional surgical tool for the treatment of filtering surgery. Fewer complications were observed in the group with P2 implants compared to other groups. PMID:26697212

  2. In vivo observation of age-related structural changes of dermal collagen in human facial skin using collagen-sensitive second harmonic generation microscope equipped with 1250-nm mode-locked Cr:Forsterite laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yasui, Takeshi; Yonetsu, Makoto; Tanaka, Ryosuke; Tanaka, Yuji; Fukushima, Shu-ichiro; Yamashita, Toyonobu; Ogura, Yuki; Hirao, Tetsuji; Murota, Hiroyuki; Araki, Tsutomu

    2013-03-01

    In vivo visualization of human skin aging is demonstrated using a Cr:Forsterite (Cr:F) laser-based, collagen-sensitive second harmonic generation (SHG) microscope. The deep penetration into human skin, as well as the specific sensitivity to collagen molecules, achieved by this microscope enables us to clearly visualize age-related structural changes of collagen fiber in the reticular dermis. Here we investigated intrinsic aging and/or photoaging in the male facial skin. Young subjects show dense distributions of thin collagen fibers, whereas elderly subjects show coarse distributions of thick collagen fibers. Furthermore, a comparison of SHG images between young and elderly subjects with and without a recent life history of excessive sun exposure show that a combination of photoaging with intrinsic aging significantly accelerates skin aging. We also perform image analysis based on two-dimensional Fourier transformation of the SHG images and extracted an aging parameter for human skin. The in vivo collagen-sensitive SHG microscope will be a powerful tool in fields such as cosmeceutical sciences and anti-aging dermatology.

  3. In vivo observation of age-related structural changes of dermal collagen in human facial skin using collagen-sensitive second harmonic generation microscope equipped with 1250-nm mode-locked Cr:Forsterite laser.

    PubMed

    Yasui, Takeshi; Yonetsu, Makoto; Tanaka, Ryosuke; Tanaka, Yuji; Fukushima, Shu-ichiro; Yamashita, Toyonobu; Ogura, Yuki; Hirao, Tetsuji; Murota, Hiroyuki; Araki, Tsutomu

    2013-03-01

    In vivo visualization of human skin aging is demonstrated using a Cr:Forsterite (Cr:F) laser-based, collagen-sensitive second harmonic generation (SHG) microscope. The deep penetration into human skin, as well as the specific sensitivity to collagen molecules, achieved by this microscope enables us to clearly visualize age-related structural changes of collagen fiber in the reticular dermis. Here we investigated intrinsic aging and/or photoaging in the male facial skin. Young subjects show dense distributions of thin collagen fibers, whereas elderly subjects show coarse distributions of thick collagen fibers. Furthermore, a comparison of SHG images between young and elderly subjects with and without a recent life history of excessive sun exposure show that a combination of photoaging with intrinsic aging significantly accelerates skin aging. We also perform image analysis based on two-dimensional Fourier transformation of the SHG images and extracted an aging parameter for human skin. The in vivo collagen-sensitive SHG microscope will be a powerful tool in fields such as cosmeceutical sciences and anti-aging dermatology. PMID:23212157

  4. Dermal peels.

    PubMed

    Coleman, W P

    2001-07-01

    Dermal chemical peeling is a very satisfying procedure for patients and physicians alike. Although not providing the ablation of deep wrinkles and scars that dermabrasion and laser procedures may accomplish, trichloroacetic acid peels usually result in few complications and rapid recovery. Patients can usually expect photographic improvement in their skin. The results are usually long lasting, and most patients do not need to repeat dermal peels for at least 2 years. Of all resurfacing procedures, dermal peeling provides the best benefit-to-risk ratio. PMID:11599397

  5. Toward angiogenesis of implanted bio-artificial liver using scaffolds with type I collagen and adipose tissue-derived stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jae Geun; Bak, Seon Young; Nahm, Ji Hae; Lee, Sang Woo; Min, Seon Ok

    2015-01-01

    Backgrounds/Aims Stem cell therapies for liver disease are being studied by many researchers worldwide, but scientific evidence to demonstrate the endocrinologic effects of implanted cells is insufficient, and it is unknown whether implanted cells can function as liver cells. Achieving angiogenesis, arguably the most important characteristic of the liver, is known to be quite difficult, and no practical attempts have been made to achieve this outcome. We carried out this study to observe the possibility of angiogenesis of implanted bio-artificial liver using scaffolds. Methods This study used adipose tissue-derived stem cells that were collected from adult patients with liver diseases with conditions similar to the liver parenchyma. Specifically, microfilaments were used to create an artificial membrane and maintain the structure of an artificial organ. After scratching the stomach surface of severe combined immunocompromised (SCID) mice (n=4), artificial scaffolds with adipose tissue-derived stem cells and type I collagen were implanted. Expression levels of angiogenesis markers including vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), CD34, and CD105 were immunohistochemically assessed after 30 days. Results Grossly, the artificial scaffolds showed adhesion to the stomach and surrounding organs; however, there was no evidence of angiogenesis within the scaffolds; and VEGF, CD34, and CD105 expressions were not detected after 30 days. Conclusions Although implantation of cells into artificial scaffolds did not facilitate angiogenesis, the artificial scaffolds made with type I collagen helped maintain implanted cells, and surrounding tissue reactions were rare. Our findings indicate that type I collagen artificial scaffolds can be considered as a possible implantable biomaterial. PMID:26155277

  6. Assessment of dehydrothermally cross‐linked collagen membrane for guided bone regeneration around peri-implant dehiscence defects: a randomized single-blinded clinical trial

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Purpose The aim of this study was to determine the clinical feasibility of using dehydrothermally cross‐linked collagen membrane (DCM) for bone regeneration around peri-implant dehiscence defects, and compare it with non-cross-linked native collagen membrane (NCM). Methods Dehiscence defects were investigated in twenty-eight patients. Defect width and height were measured by periodontal probe immediately following implant placement (baseline) and 16 weeks afterward. Membrane manipulation and maintenance were clinically assessed by means of the visual analogue scale score at baseline. Changes in horizontal thickness at 1 mm, 2 mm, and 3 mm below the top of the implant platform and the average bone density were assessed by cone-beam computed tomography at 16 weeks. Degradation of membrane was histologically observed in the soft tissue around the implant prior to re-entry surgery. Results Five defect sites (two sites in the NCM group and three sites in the DCM group) showed soft-tissue dehiscence defects and membrane exposure during the early healing period, but there were no symptoms or signs of severe complications during the experimental postoperative period. Significant clinical and radiological improvements were found in all parameters with both types of collagen membrane. Partially resorbed membrane leaflets were only observed histologically in the DCM group. Conclusions These findings suggest that, compared with NCM, DCM has a similar clinical expediency and possesses more stable maintenance properties. Therefore, it could be used effectively in guided bone regeneration around dehiscence-type defects. PMID:26732806

  7. Preliminary investigation of a biological augmentation of rotator cuff repairs using a collagen implant: a 2-year MRI follow-up

    PubMed Central

    Bokor, Desmond John; Sonnabend, David; Deady, Luke; Cass, Ben; Young, Allan; Van Kampen, Craig; Arnoczky, Steven

    2015-01-01

    Summary Background the inability to restore the normal tendon footprint and limit strains on the repair site are thought to contribute to re-tearing following rotator cuff repair. The purpose of this study was to use a collagen implant to augment rotator cuff repairs through the restoration of the native tendon footprint and the induction of new tissue to decrease overall tendon strain. Methods repairs of full-thickness rotator cuff lesions in 9 adult patients were augmented with a novel collagen implant placed over the bursal surface of the repair. Tendon thickness and footprint anatomy were evaluated using MRI at 3, 6, 12, and 24 months. Clinical results were assessed using standard outcome metrics. Mean follow-up for all patients was 25.8 months. Results the implant induced significant new tissue formation in all patients by 3 months. This tissue matured over time and became indistinguishable from the underlying tendon. At 24 months all repairs remained intact and normal footprint anatomy of the tendon was restored in all patients. All clinical scores improved significantly over time. Conclusion the ability of a collagen implant to induce new host tissue formation and restore the normal footprint anatomy may represent a significant advancement in the biological augmentation and ultimate durability of rotator cuff repairs. PMID:26605186

  8. Infrared microscopic investigation of skin biopsies after application of implant material for correction of aesthetic deficiencies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heise, H. M.; Seifert, L.; Kuckuk, R.; Lenzen, C.

    2003-06-01

    Different implant materials are currently applied for correction of inborn and acquired aesthetic deficiencies of the human skin. Several commercial products are used as dermal fillers for aesthetic facial surgery, which contain bovine collagen and cross-linked substances, or hyaluronic acid derivatives, both also in combination with polymethylmethacrylate or co-polymerisates of methacrylate derivatives. Gels containing polylactate or dimethylpolysiloxane were also available. Infrared spectra of such products are presented after dry film preparation. Infrared microscopy using attenuated total reflection was employed to identify previously applied dermal filler products in excised tissue without embedding the sample in a matrix material such as paraffin as needed for microtoming. Several tissue spots guided by inspecting the different color grades were found with increased single implant component concentrations, as supported by the dominating spectral features and difference spectroscopy. The chemistry within dermal biopsies after material implantation can be uniquely investigated based on their infrared spectra.

  9. Treatment of Pseudoangiomatous Stromal Hyperplasia of the Breast: Implant-Based Reconstruction with a Vascularized Dermal Sling.

    PubMed

    Jung, Bok Ki; Nahm, Ji Hae; Lew, Dae Hyun; Lee, Dong Won

    2015-09-01

    Pseudoangiomatous stromal hyperplasia (PASH) of the breast is a benign mesenchymal lesion with incidental histologic findings. Surgical excision is recommended as the treatment of choice for PASH, although the recurrence rates after excision range from 15% to 22%. A 46-year-old-female presented with a six-month history of bilateral breast enlargement and painful sensation mimicking inflammatory carcinoma. Imaging studies demonstrated innumerable enhancing nodules in both breasts. Due to the growth of the lesions and progressive clinical symptoms, bilateral subcutaneous mastectomy was performed. Grossly, the specimens were round and well-circumscribed, and the histologic examination revealed PASH. After mastectomy, we created a pocket with the pectoralis major muscle and a lower skin flap, which was deepithelized. Anatomical mammary implants were inserted, and the nipple areolar complex was transferred to a new position as a free graft. The aesthetic result was satisfactory after twelve months of follow-up. PMID:26430637

  10. Treatment of Pseudoangiomatous Stromal Hyperplasia of the Breast: Implant-Based Reconstruction with a Vascularized Dermal Sling

    PubMed Central

    Jung, Bok Ki; Nahm, Ji Hae; Lew, Dae Hyun

    2015-01-01

    Pseudoangiomatous stromal hyperplasia (PASH) of the breast is a benign mesenchymal lesion with incidental histologic findings. Surgical excision is recommended as the treatment of choice for PASH, although the recurrence rates after excision range from 15% to 22%. A 46-year-old-female presented with a six-month history of bilateral breast enlargement and painful sensation mimicking inflammatory carcinoma. Imaging studies demonstrated innumerable enhancing nodules in both breasts. Due to the growth of the lesions and progressive clinical symptoms, bilateral subcutaneous mastectomy was performed. Grossly, the specimens were round and well-circumscribed, and the histologic examination revealed PASH. After mastectomy, we created a pocket with the pectoralis major muscle and a lower skin flap, which was deepithelized. Anatomical mammary implants were inserted, and the nipple areolar complex was transferred to a new position as a free graft. The aesthetic result was satisfactory after twelve months of follow-up. PMID:26430637

  11. Microporous Dermal-Like Electrospun Scaffolds Promote Accelerated Skin Regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Bonvallet, Paul P.; Culpepper, Bonnie K.; Bain, Jennifer L.; Schultz, Matthew J.; Thomas, Steven J.

    2014-01-01

    The goal of this study was to synthesize skin substitutes that blend native extracellular matrix (ECM) molecules with synthetic polymers which have favorable mechanical properties. To this end, scaffolds were electrospun from collagen I (col) and poly(ɛ-caprolactone) (PCL), and then pores were introduced mechanically to promote fibroblast infiltration, and subsequent filling of the pores with ECM. A 70:30 col/PCL ratio was determined to provide optimal support for dermal fibroblast growth, and a pore diameter, 160 μm, was identified that enabled fibroblasts to infiltrate and fill pores with native matrix molecules, including fibronectin and collagen I. Mechanical testing of 70:30 col/PCL scaffolds with 160 μm pores revealed a tensile strength of 1.4 MPa, and the scaffolds also exhibited a low rate of contraction (<19%). Upon implantation, scaffolds should support epidermal regeneration; we, therefore, evaluated keratinocyte growth on fibroblast-embedded scaffolds with matrix-filled pores. Keratinocytes formed a stratified layer on the surface of fibroblast-remodeled scaffolds, and staining for cytokeratin 10 revealed terminally differentiated keratinocytes at the apical surface. When implanted, 70:30 col/PCL scaffolds degraded within 3–4 weeks, an optimal time frame for degradation in vivo. Finally, 70:30 col/PCL scaffolds with or without 160 μm pores were implanted into full-thickness critical-sized skin defects. Relative to nonporous scaffolds or sham wounds, scaffolds with 160 μm pores induced accelerated wound closure, and stimulated regeneration of healthy dermal tissue, evidenced by a more normal-appearing matrix architecture, blood vessel in-growth, and hair follicle development. Collectively, these results suggest that microporous electrospun scaffolds are effective substrates for skin regeneration. PMID:24568584

  12. The promotion of osteochondral repair by combined intra-articular injection of parathyroid hormone-related protein and implantation of a bi-layer collagen-silk scaffold.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Wei; Chen, Jialin; Tao, Jiadong; Hu, Changchang; Chen, Longkun; Zhao, Hongshi; Xu, Guowei; Heng, Boon C; Ouyang, Hong Wei

    2013-08-01

    The repair of osteochondral defects can be enhanced with scaffolds but is often accompanied with undesirable terminal differentiation of bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (BMSCs). Parathyroid hormone-related protein (PTHrP) has been shown to inhibit aberrant differentiation, but administration at inappropriate time points would have adverse effects on chondrogenesis. This study aims to develop an effective tissue engineering strategy by combining PTHrP and collagen-silk scaffold for osteochondral defect repair. The underlying mechanisms of the synergistic effect of combining PTHrP administration with collagen-silk scaffold implantation for rabbit knee joint osteochondral defect repair were investigated. In vitro studies showed that PTHrP treatment significantly reduced Alizarin Red staining and expression of terminal differentiation-related markers. This is achieved in part through blocking activation of the canonical Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway. For the in vivo repair study, intra-articular injection of PTHrP was carried out at three different time windows (4-6, 7-9 and 10-12 weeks) together with implantation of a bi-layer collagen-silk scaffold. Defects treated with PTHrP at the 4-6 weeks time window exhibited better regeneration (reconstitution of cartilage and subchondral bone) with minimal terminal differentiation (hypertrophy, ossification and matrix degradation), as well as enhanced chondrogenesis (cell shape, Col2 and GAG accumulation) compared with treatment at other time windows. Furthermore, the timing of PTHrP administration also influenced PTHrP receptor expression, thus affecting the treatment outcome. Our results demonstrated that intra-articular injection of PTHrP at 4-6 weeks post-injury together with collagen-silk scaffold implantation is an effective strategy for inhibiting terminal differentiation and enhancing chondrogenesis, thus improving cartilage repair and regeneration in a rabbit model. PMID:23702148

  13. Microporous dermal-mimetic electrospun scaffolds pre-seeded with fibroblasts promote tissue regeneration in full-thickness skin wounds.

    PubMed

    Bonvallet, Paul P; Schultz, Matthew J; Mitchell, Elizabeth H; Bain, Jennifer L; Culpepper, Bonnie K; Thomas, Steven J; Bellis, Susan L

    2015-01-01

    Electrospun scaffolds serve as promising substrates for tissue repair due to their nanofibrous architecture and amenability to tailoring of chemical composition. In this study, the regenerative potential of a microporous electrospun scaffold pre-seeded with dermal fibroblasts was evaluated. Previously we reported that a 70% collagen I and 30% poly(Ɛ-caprolactone) electrospun scaffold (70:30 col/PCL) containing 160 μm diameter pores had favorable mechanical properties, supported fibroblast infiltration and subsequent cell-mediated deposition of extracellular matrix (ECM), and promoted more rapid and effective in vivo skin regeneration when compared to scaffolds lacking micropores. In the current study we tested the hypothesis that the efficacy of the 70:30 col/PCL microporous scaffolds could be further enhanced by seeding scaffolds with dermal fibroblasts prior to implantation into skin wounds. To address this hypothesis, a Fischer 344 (F344) rat syngeneic model was employed. In vitro studies showed that dermal fibroblasts isolated from F344 rat skin were able to adhere and proliferate on 70:30 col/PCL microporous scaffolds, and the cells also filled the 160 μm pores with native ECM proteins such as collagen I and fibronectin. Additionally, scaffolds seeded with F344 fibroblasts exhibited a low rate of contraction (~14%) over a 21 day time frame. To assess regenerative potential, scaffolds with or without seeded F344 dermal fibroblasts were implanted into full thickness, critical size defects created in F344 hosts. Specifically, we compared: microporous scaffolds containing fibroblasts seeded for 4 days; scaffolds containing fibroblasts seeded for only 1 day; acellular microporous scaffolds; and a sham wound (no scaffold). Scaffolds containing fibroblasts seeded for 4 days had the best response of all treatment groups with respect to accelerated wound healing, a more normal-appearing dermal matrix structure, and hair follicle regeneration. Collectively these

  14. Microporous Dermal-Mimetic Electrospun Scaffolds Pre-Seeded with Fibroblasts Promote Tissue Regeneration in Full-Thickness Skin Wounds

    PubMed Central

    Bonvallet, Paul P.; Schultz, Matthew J.; Mitchell, Elizabeth H.; Bain, Jennifer L.; Culpepper, Bonnie K.; Thomas, Steven J.; Bellis, Susan L.

    2015-01-01

    Electrospun scaffolds serve as promising substrates for tissue repair due to their nanofibrous architecture and amenability to tailoring of chemical composition. In this study, the regenerative potential of a microporous electrospun scaffold pre-seeded with dermal fibroblasts was evaluated. Previously we reported that a 70% collagen I and 30% poly(Ɛ-caprolactone) electrospun scaffold (70:30 col/PCL) containing 160 μm diameter pores had favorable mechanical properties, supported fibroblast infiltration and subsequent cell-mediated deposition of extracellular matrix (ECM), and promoted more rapid and effective in vivo skin regeneration when compared to scaffolds lacking micropores. In the current study we tested the hypothesis that the efficacy of the 70:30 col/PCL microporous scaffolds could be further enhanced by seeding scaffolds with dermal fibroblasts prior to implantation into skin wounds. To address this hypothesis, a Fischer 344 (F344) rat syngeneic model was employed. In vitro studies showed that dermal fibroblasts isolated from F344 rat skin were able to adhere and proliferate on 70:30 col/PCL microporous scaffolds, and the cells also filled the 160 μm pores with native ECM proteins such as collagen I and fibronectin. Additionally, scaffolds seeded with F344 fibroblasts exhibited a low rate of contraction (~14%) over a 21 day time frame. To assess regenerative potential, scaffolds with or without seeded F344 dermal fibroblasts were implanted into full thickness, critical size defects created in F344 hosts. Specifically, we compared: microporous scaffolds containing fibroblasts seeded for 4 days; scaffolds containing fibroblasts seeded for only 1 day; acellular microporous scaffolds; and a sham wound (no scaffold). Scaffolds containing fibroblasts seeded for 4 days had the best response of all treatment groups with respect to accelerated wound healing, a more normal-appearing dermal matrix structure, and hair follicle regeneration. Collectively these

  15. A novel dermal matrix generated from burned skin as a promising substitute for deep-degree burns therapy

    PubMed Central

    YU, GUANYING; YE, LAN; TAN, WEI; ZHU, XUGUO; LI, YAONAN; JIANG, DUYIN

    2016-01-01

    The extensive skin defects induced by severe burns are dangerous and can be fatal. Currently, the most common therapy is tangential excision to remove the necrotic or denatured areas of skin, followed by skin grafting. Xenogeneic dermal substitutes, such as porcine acellular dermal matrix (ADM), are typically used to cover the burn wounds, and may accelerate wound healing. It is assumed that burned skin that still maintains partial biological activity may be recycled to construct an autologous acellular dermal matrix, termed 'deep-degree burned dermal matrix (DDBDM)'. In theory, DDBDM may avoid the histoincompatibility issues associated with foreign or xenogeneic dermal matrices, and reduce therapy costs by making full use of discarded skin. In the present study, the collagens within prepared DDBDM were thickened, disorganized and partially fractured, however, they still maintained their reticular structure and tensile strength (P<0.01). Through microarray analysis of the cytokines present in ADM and DDBDM, it was determined that the DDBDM did not produce excessive levels of harmful burn toxins. Following 4 weeks of subcutaneous implantation, ADM and DDBDM were incompletely degraded and maintained good integrity. No significant inflammatory reaction or rejection were observed, which indicated that ADM and DDBDM have good histocompatibility. Therefore, DDBDM may be a useful material for the treatment of deep-degree burns. PMID:26846279

  16. A novel dermal matrix generated from burned skin as a promising substitute for deep-degree burns therapy.

    PubMed

    Yu, Guanying; Ye, Lan; Tan, Wei; Zhu, Xuguo; Li, Yaonan; Jiang, Duyin

    2016-03-01

    The extensive skin defects induced by severe burns are dangerous and can be fatal. Currently, the most common therapy is tangential excision to remove the necrotic or denatured areas of skin, followed by skin grafting. Xenogeneic dermal substitutes, such as porcine acellular dermal matrix (ADM), are typically used to cover the burn wounds, and may accelerate wound healing. It is assumed that burned skin that still maintains partial biological activity may be recycled to construct an autologous acellular dermal matrix, termed 'deep‑degree burned dermal matrix (DDBDM)'. In theory, DDBDM may avoid the histoincompatibility issues associated with foreign or xenogeneic dermal matrices, and reduce therapy costs by making full use of discarded skin. In the present study, the collagens within prepared DDBDM were thickened, disorganized and partially fractured, however, they still maintained their reticular structure and tensile strength (P<0.01). Through microarray analysis of the cytokines present in ADM and DDBDM, it was determined that the DDBDM did not produce excessive levels of harmful burn toxins. Following 4 weeks of subcutaneous implantation, ADM and DDBDM were incompletely degraded and maintained good integrity. No significant inflammatory reaction or rejection were observed, which indicated that ADM and DDBDM have good histocompatibility. Therefore, DDBDM may be a useful material for the treatment of deep‑degree burns. PMID:26846279

  17. Rapid onset of perfused blood vessels after implantation of ECFCs and MPCs in collagen, PuraMatrix and fibrin provisional matrices.

    PubMed

    Allen, Patrick; Kang, Kyu-Tae; Bischoff, Joyce

    2015-05-01

    We developed an in vivo vascularization model in which human endothelial colony-forming cells (ECFCs) and human mesenchymal progenitor cells (MPCs) form blood vessel networks when co-injected (ECFC + MPC) into nude mice in rat tail type I collagen, bovine fibrin or synthetic peptide PuraMatrix matrices. We used three approaches to determine the onset of functional vascularization when ECFC + MPC suspended in these matrices were implanted in vivo. The first was immunohistochemistry to detect vessels lined by human endothelial cells and filled with red blood cells. The second was in vivo vascular staining by tail vein injection of a mixture of Ulex europaeus agglutinin I (UEA-I), a lectin specific for human endothelium, and Griffonia simplicifolia isolectin B4 (GS-IB4 ), a lectin specific for rodent endothelium. The third approach employed contrast-enhanced ultrasound to measure the perfusion volumes of implants in individual animals over time. Human endothelial-lined tubular structures were detected in vivo on days 1 and 2 after implantation, with perfused human vessels detected on days 3 and 4. Contrast-enhanced ultrasound revealed significant perfusion of ECFC + MPC/collagen implants on days 1-4, at up to 14% perfused vascular volume. ECFC + MPC implanted in fibrin and PuraMatrix matrices also supported perfusion at day 1, as assessed by ultrasound (at 12% and 23% perfused vascular volume, respectively). This model demonstrates that ECFC + MPC suspended in any of the three matrices initiated a rapid onset of vascularization. We propose that ECFC + MPC delivered in vivo provide a means to achieve rapid perfusion of tissue-engineered organs or for in situ tissue repair. PMID:23955835

  18. A feasibility study to investigate the use of a bupivacaine-collagen implant (XaraColl) for postoperative analgesia following laparoscopic surgery

    PubMed Central

    Hemsen, Lisa; Cusack, Susan L; Minkowitz, Harold S; Kuss, Michael E

    2013-01-01

    Background XaraColl, a collagen-based implant that delivers bupivacaine to sites of surgical trauma, has been shown to reduce postoperative pain and use of opioid analgesia in patients undergoing open surgery. We therefore designed and conducted a preliminary feasibility study to investigate its application and ease of use for laparoscopic surgery. Methods We implanted four XaraColl implants each containing 50 mg of bupivacaine hydrochloride (200 mg total dose) in ten men undergoing laparoscopic inguinal or umbilical hernioplasty. Postoperative pain intensity and use of opioid analgesia were recorded through 72 hours for comparison with previously reported data from efficacy studies performed in men undergoing open inguinal hernioplasty. Safety was assessed for 30 days. Results XaraColl was easily and safely implanted via a laparoscope. The summed pain intensity and total use of opioid analgesia through the first 24 hours were similar to the values observed in previously reported studies for XaraColl-treated patients after open surgery, but were lower through 48 and 72 hours. Conclusion XaraColl is suitable for use in laparoscopic surgery and may provide postoperative analgesia in laparoscopic patients who often experience considerable postoperative pain in the first 24–48 hours following hospital discharge. Randomized controlled trials specifically to evaluate its efficacy in this application are warranted. PMID:23390367

  19. Type V collagen controls the initiation of collagen fibril assembly.

    PubMed

    Wenstrup, Richard J; Florer, Jane B; Brunskill, Eric W; Bell, Sheila M; Chervoneva, Inna; Birk, David E

    2004-12-17

    Vertebrate collagen fibrils are heterotypically composed of a quantitatively major and minor fibril collagen. In non-cartilaginous tissues, type I collagen accounts for the majority of the collagen mass, and collagen type V, the functions of which are poorly understood, is a minor component. Type V collagen has been implicated in the regulation of fibril diameter, and we reported recently preliminary evidence that type V collagen is required for collagen fibril nucleation (Wenstrup, R. J., Florer, J. B., Cole, W. G., Willing, M. C., and Birk, D. E. (2004) J. Cell. Biochem. 92, 113-124). The purpose of this study was to define the roles of type V collagen in the regulation of collagen fibrillogenesis and matrix assembly. Mouse embryos completely deficient in pro-alpha1(V) chains were created by homologous recombination. The col5a1-/- animals die in early embryogenesis, at approximately embryonic day 10. The type V collagen-deficient mice demonstrate a virtual lack of collagen fibril formation. In contrast, the col5a1+/- animals are viable. The reduced type V collagen content is associated with a 50% reduction in fibril number and dermal collagen content. In addition, relatively normal, cylindrical fibrils are assembled with a second population of large, structurally abnormal collagen fibrils. The structural properties of the abnormal matrix are decreased relative to the wild type control animals. These data indicate a central role for the evolutionary, ancient type V collagen in the regulation of fibrillogenesis. The complete dependence of fibril formation on type V collagen is indicative of the critical role of the latter in early fibril initiation. In addition, this fibril collagen is important in the determination of fibril structure and matrix organization. PMID:15383546

  20. Safety and Visual Outcome of Visian Toric ICL Implantation after Corneal Collagen Cross-Linking in Keratoconus: Up to 2 Years of Follow-Up

    PubMed Central

    Chelala, Elias; Hamade, Adib; Cherfane, Carole

    2015-01-01

    Purpose. To evaluate the long-term safety and clinical outcome of phakic Visian toric implantable collamer lens (ICL) insertion after corneal collagen cross-linking (CXL) in progressive keratoconus. Methods. This was a retrospective study of 30 eyes (19 patients), with progressive keratoconus, who underwent sequential CXL followed by Visian toric ICL implantation after 6 months. Results. At baseline, 6 eyes had stage I, 14 eyes stage II, and 10 eyes stage III keratoconus graded by Amsler-Krumeich classification. At 6 months after CXL, only K (steep) and K (max) decreased significantly from baseline, with no change in visual acuity or refraction. Flattening in keratometric readings was stable thereafter. There was significant improvement in mean uncorrected distance visual acuity (1.57 ± 0.56 to 0.17 ± 0.06 logMAR, P < 0.001) and mean corrected distance visual acuity (0.17 ± 0.08 to 0.11 ± 0.05 logMAR, P < 0.001) at 12 months after ICL implantation that was maintained at the 2-year follow-up. Mean cylinder power and mean spherical equivalent (SE) also decreased significantly after ICL implantation. A small hyperopic shift in SE (+0.25 D) was observed at 2 years that did not alter visual outcomes. Conclusions. Visian toric ICL implantation following CXL is an effective option for improving visual acuity in patients with keratoconus up to 2 years. PMID:25874116

  1. Structure of collagen adsorbed on a model implant surface resolved by polarization modulation infrared reflection-absorption spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Brand, Izabella; Habecker, Florian; Ahlers, Michael; Klüner, Thorsten

    2015-03-01

    The polarization modulation infrared reflection-absorption spectra of collagen adsorbed on a titania surface and quantum chemical calculations are used to describe components of the amide I mode to the protein structure at a sub-molecular level. In this study, imino acid rich and poor fragments, representing the entire collagen molecule, are taken into account. The amide I mode of the collagen triple helix is composed of three absorption bands which involve: (i) (∼1690cm(-1)) the CO stretching modes at unhydrated groups, (ii) (1655-1673cm(-1)) the CO stretching at carbonyl groups at imino acids and glycine forming intramolecular hydrogen bonds with H atoms at both NH2 and, unusual for proteins, CH2 groups at glycine at a neighbouring chain and (iii) (∼1640cm(-1)) the CO stretching at carbonyl groups forming hydrogen bonds between two, often charged, amino acids as well as hydrogen bonds to water along the entire helix. The IR spectrum of films prepared from diluted solutions (c<50μgml(-1)) corresponds to solution spectra indicating that native collagen molecules interact with water adsorbed on the titania surface. In films prepared from solutions (c⩾50μgml(-1)) collagen multilayers are formed. The amide I mode is blue-shifted by 18cm(-1), indicating that intramolecular hydrogen bonds at imino acid rich fragments are weakened. Simultaneous red-shift of the amide A mode implies that the strength of hydrogen bonds at the imino acid poor fragments increases. Theoretically predicted distortion of the collagen structure upon adsorption on the titania surface is experimentally confirmed. PMID:25498816

  2. Viscoelastic, physical, and bio-degradable properties of dermal scaffolds and related cell behaviour.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Vaibhav; Patel, Nimesha; Kohli, Nupur; Ravindran, Nivedita; Hook, Lilian; Mason, Chris; García-Gareta, Elena

    2016-01-01

    Dermal scaffolds promote healing of debilitating skin injuries caused by burns and chronic skin conditions. Currently available products present disadvantages and therefore, there is still a clinical need for developing new dermal substitutes. This study aimed at comparing the viscoelastic, physical and bio-degradable properties of two dermal scaffolds, the collagen-based and clinically well established Integra(®) and a novel fibrin-based dermal scaffold developed at our laboratory called Smart Matrix(®), to further evaluate our previous published findings that suggested a higher influx of cells, reduced wound contraction and less scarring for Smart Matrix(®) when used in vivo. Rheological results showed that Integra(®) (G'  =  313.74 kPa) is mechanically stronger than Smart Matrix(®) (G'  =  8.26 kPa), due to the presence of the silicone backing layer in Integra(®). Micro-pores were observed on both dermal scaffolds, although nano-pores as well as densely packed nano-fibres were only observed for Smart Matrix(®). Average surface roughness was higher for Smart Matrix(®) (Sa  =  114.776 nm) than for Integra(®) (Sa  =  75.565 nm). Both scaffolds possess a highly porous structure (80-90%) and display a range of pore micro-sizes that represent the actual in vivo scenario. In vitro proteolytic bio-degradation suggested that Smart Matrix(®) would degrade faster upon implantation in vivo than Integra(®). For both scaffolds, the enzymatic digestion occurs via bulk degradation. These observed differences could affect cell behaviour on both scaffolds. Our results suggest that fine-tuning of scaffolds' viscoelastic, physical and bio-degradable properties can maximise cell behaviour in terms of attachment, proliferation and infiltration, which are essential for tissue repair. PMID:27586397

  3. Sinus floor elevation using a bovine bone mineral (Bio-Oss) with or without the concomitant use of a bilayered collagen barrier (Bio-Gide): a clinical report of immediate and delayed implant placement.

    PubMed

    Tawil, G; Mawla, M

    2001-01-01

    Xenografts have been used extensively, either alone or in combination with autogenous bone, in sinus floor elevation techniques. However, controversy exists regarding the need to cover the lateral osteotomy site with a membrane. Also, the healing period before loading remains undefined when machined-surface implants are placed. Twenty-nine patients showing reduced bone volume in the posterior maxilla had 61 Brånemark System implants placed in 30 sinuses augmented with a lateral osteotomy approach. Sinuses grafted with Bio-Oss and covered with a collagen membrane Bio-Gide (M+) received 29 implants, while grafted but uncovered sites (M-) received 32 implants. An immediate procedure was followed to place 41 implants and a staged procedure was used for 20 implants. Abutment connection was made in 2 distinct postoperative periods: 6 to 9 months and over 9 months. The patients were followed for an average of 22.4 months. The survival rate of the implants was dependent on the postoperative healing time and membrane presence. In case of the immediate procedure and in M- sites, when residual bone height was less than 5 mm, more failures occurred when the loading was done at 6 to 9 months than after 9 months. No failures occurred in the M- series when a staged approach was followed. The overall survival rate was 78.1% for the M- sites and 93.1% for the M+ sites. No failures occurred (0/35) in the control implants placed in adjacent native bone. Implant survival rate was related to the quality of the reconstructed cortical plate and to implant length. The concomitant use of a collagen barrier to cover the osteotomy site, when machined-surface implants were used in sinus grafting, seemed to improve the quality of the graft healing and survival rate of the implants loaded between 6 and 9 months after placement. PMID:11669254

  4. Evidence of healing of partial-thickness rotator cuff tears following arthroscopic augmentation with a collagen implant: a 2-year MRI follow-up

    PubMed Central

    Bokor, Desmond John; Sonnabend, David; Deady, Luke; Cass, Ben; Young, Allan; Van Kampen, Craig; Arnoczky, Steven

    2016-01-01

    Summary Background partial-thickness rotator cuff tears frequently enlarge due to increased local strain and often progress to full-thickness tears. Studies suggest the addition of new tendinous tissue to injured cuff tendons would significantly decrease peak strain, possibly protecting against tear progression. The aim of this study was to assess the ability of a highly-porous collagen implant to induce new tissue formation and limit tear progression when placed on the bursal surface of partial-thickness cuff tears. Methods following arthroscopic subacromial decompression, the implant was attached to the bursal surface of the supraspinatus tendon in a prospective series of 13 consecutive patients with intermediate – (3–6 mm) to high-grade (>6 mm) partial – thickness cuff tears (5 articular, 3 bursal, 5 intra-substance). Tendon thickness, defect size, and tendon quality were evaluated using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) preoperatively and at 3, 6, 12, and 24 months postoperatively. Clinical outcomes were assessed using the Constant and American Shoulder and Elbow Society scores at the same preoperative and follow-up times. All 13 patients completed all follow-up exams (mean length of follow-up 27.0 months, range 23.3–32.0); no patients were lost to follow-up. Results the implant induced significant new tissue formation in all patients by 3 months (mean increase in tendon thickness 2.2 ± 0.26 mm). This tissue matured over time and became radiologically indistinguishable from the underlying tendon. The partial-thickness cuff tears showed consistent filling of the defects, with complete healing in 7 patients at 12 months, and a progressive improvement in tendon quality in the remaining patients. No tear progression was observed by MRI in any of the patients at 24 months. All clinical scores improved significantly over time. At 24 months, 12 of 13 patients (92%) had satisfactory or better results. Conclusions the results of this clinical study demonstrated

  5. PLLA-collagen and PLLA-gelatin hybrid scaffolds with funnel-like porous structure for skin tissue engineering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Hongxu; Oh, Hwan Hee; Kawazoe, Naoki; Yamagishi, Kozo; Chen, Guoping

    2012-12-01

    In skin tissue engineering, a three-dimensional porous scaffold is necessary to support cell adhesion and proliferation and to guide cells moving into the repair area in the wound healing process. Structurally, the porous scaffold should have an open and interconnected porous architecture to facilitate homogenous cell distribution. Moreover, the scaffolds should be mechanically strong to protect deformation during the formation of new skin. In this study, the hybrid scaffolds were prepared by forming funnel-like collagen or gelatin sponge on a woven poly(l-lactic acid) (PLLA) mesh. The hybrid scaffolds combined the advantages of both collagen or gelatin (good cell-interactions) and PLLA mesh (high mechanical strength). The hybrid scaffolds were used to culture dermal fibroblasts for dermal tissue engineering. The funnel-like porous structure promoted homogeneous cell distribution and extracellular matrix production. The PLLA mesh reinforced the scaffold to avoid deformation. Subcutaneous implantation showed that the PLLA-collagen and PLLA-gelatin scaffolds promoted the regeneration of dermal tissue and epidermis and reduced contraction during the formation of new tissue. These results indicate that funnel-like hybrid scaffolds can be used for skin tissue regeneration.

  6. Cellular Response to a Novel Fetal Acellular Collagen Matrix: Implications for Tissue Regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Rennert, Robert C.; Garg, Ravi K.; Gurtner, Geoffrey C.

    2013-01-01

    Introduction. PriMatrix (TEI Biosciences Inc., Boston, MA, USA) is a novel acellular collagen matrix derived from fetal bovine dermis that is designed for use in partial- and full-thickness wounds. This study analyzes the cellular response to PriMatrix in vivo, as well as the ability of this matrix to facilitate normal tissue regeneration. Methods. Five by five mm squares of rehydrated PriMatrix were implanted in a subcutaneous fashion on the dorsum of wild-type mice. Implant site tissue was harvested for histology, immunohistochemistry (IHC), and flow cytometric analyses at multiple time points until day 28. Results. PriMatrix implants were found to go through a biological progression initiated by a transient infiltrate of inflammatory cells, followed by mesenchymal cell recruitment and vascular development. IHC analysis revealed that the majority of the implanted fetal dermal collagen fibers persisted through day 28 but underwent remodeling and cellular repopulation to form tissue with a density and morphology consistent with healthy dermis. Conclusions. PriMatrix implants undergo progressive in vivo remodeling, facilitating the regeneration of histologically normal tissue through a mild inflammatory and progenitor cell response. Regeneration of normal tissue is especially important in a wound environment, and these findings warrant further investigation of PriMatrix in this setting. PMID:23970899

  7. Role of tissue engineered collagen based tridimensional implant on the healing response of the experimentally induced large Achilles tendon defect model in rabbits: a long term study with high clinical relevance

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Tendon injury is one of the orthopedic conditions poses with a significant clinical challenge to both the surgeons and patients. The major limitations to manage these injuries are poor healing response and development of peritendinous adhesions in the injured area. This study investigated the effectiveness of a novel collagen implant on tendon healing in rabbits. Results Seventy five mature White New-Zealand rabbits were divided into treated (n = 55) and control (n = 20) groups. The left Achilles tendon was completely transected and 2 cm excised. The defects of the treated animals were filled with collagen implants and repaired with sutures, but in control rabbits the defects were sutured similarly but the gap was left untreated. Changes in the injured and normal contralateral tendons were assessed weekly by measuring the diameter, temperature and bioelectrical characteristics of the injured area. Clinical examination was done and scored. Among the treated animals, small pilot groups were euthanized at 5, 10, 15, 20, 30, 40 and 60 (n = 5 at each time interval) and the remainder (n = 20) and the control animals at 120 days post injury (DPI). The lesions of all animals were examined at macroscopic and microscopic levels and the dry matter content, water delivery and water uptake characteristics of the lesions and normal contralateral tendons of both groups were analyzed at 120 DPI. No sign of rejection was seen in the treated lesions. The collagen implant was invaded by the inflammatory cells at the inflammatory phase, followed by fibroplasia phase in which remnant of the collagen implant were still present while no inflammatory reaction could be seen in the lesions. However, the collagen implant was completely absorbed in the remodeling phase and the newly regenerated tendinous tissue filled the gap. Compared to the controls, the treated lesions showed improved tissue alignment and less peritendinous adhesion, muscle atrophy and fibrosis

  8. Collagen structural alterations contribute to stiffening of tissue after split-thickness skin grafting.

    PubMed

    Rosin, Nicole L; Agabalyan, Natacha; Olsen, Katherine; Martufi, Giampaol; Gabriel, Vincent; Biernaskie, Jeff; Di Martino, Elena S

    2016-03-01

    The gold standard treatment for full thickness injuries of the skin is autologous split-thickness skin grafting. This involves harvesting the epidermis and superficial dermis from healthy skin and transplanting it onto the prepared wound bed. The donor site regenerates spontaneously, but the appendages and cellular components from the dermal layer are excluded from the graft. As a result, the new tissue is inferior; the healed graft site is dry/itchy, has decreased elasticity, increased fragility, and altered sensory function. Because this dermal layer is composed of collagen and other extracellular matrix proteins, the aim was to characterize the changes in the dermal collagen after split thickness grafting that could contribute to a deficit in functionality. This will serve as a baseline for future studies designed to improve skin function using pharmacological or cell-based therapies for skin repair. A xenograft model whereby human split-thickness grafts were implanted into full-thickness defects on immunocompromised (athymic Nu/Nu) mice was used. The grafts were harvested 4 and 8 weeks later. The collagen microstructure was assessed with second harmonic generation with dual-photon microscopy and light polarization analysis. Collagen fiber stiffness and engagement stretch were estimated by fitting the results of biaxial mechanical tensile tests to a histo-mechanical constitutive model. The stiffness of the collagen fibril-proteoglycan complex increased from 682 ± 226 kPa/sr to 1016 ± 324 kPa/sr between 4 and 8 weeks postgrafting. At the microstructural level there were significant decreases in both thickness of collagen fibers (3.60 ± 0.34 μm vs. 2.10 ± 0.27 μm) and waviness ratio (2.04 ± 0.17 vs. 1.43 ± 0.08) of the collagen fibers postgrafting. The decrease of the macroscopic engagement stretch from 1.19 ± 0.11 to 1.09 ± 0.08 over time postgrafting mirrored the decrease in waviness measured at the microscopic level

  9. Development and preparation of a low-immunogenicity porcine dermal scaffold and its biocompatibility assessment.

    PubMed

    Song, Guodong; Wu, Yan; Wang, Fang; Shao, Yang; Jiang, Jinzhu; Fan, Chunjie; Li, Peilong; Zhang, Yonghu; Zuo, Haibin

    2015-04-01

    Acellular dermal matrix (ADM) has been widely used in repair and reconstruction of tissue defect. Therapeutic effect of porcine ADM (PADM) is inferior to that of human ADM (HADM). Relatively high immunogenicity and the resulting strong inflammatory response are major issue in application of PADM. We therefore treated reticular layer PADM (Rl-PADM) with matrix metalloproteinase-7 (MMP-7) and obtained a low-immunogenicity porcine dermal scaffold (LIPDS). Highly immunogenic components, tissue structure, cytocompatibility, and postgrafting histological changes of LIPDS were further investigated. Compared with Rl-PADM, LIPDS showed that the epithelial root sheath, cell debris, laminin, and type IV collagen were almost entirely removed, the structure remained normal, and the interfibrous space was relatively enlarged. Cytocompatibility of LIPDS was similar to that of HADM but superior to Rl-PADM. With regard to the extent of tissue ingrowth in terms of host fibroblasts infiltration and vascularization, LIPDS exhibited clear advantages over Rl-PADM after they had been subcutaneously transplanted in a rat model. In addition, no excessive inflammatory response was observed in LIPDS group up to 28 days postgraft, and the morphosis of collagenous fibers kept essentially normal. However, there were stronger inflammatory response and obvious collagen spallation in Rl-PADM group. The processes of integration and remodeling after the LIPDS grafting were similar to those of a normal wound healing response. The LIPDS graft was vascularized at a relatively high speed. Thus, as an implantable scaffold material, LIPDS is a superior template for guiding tissue regeneration and remodeling. PMID:25804306

  10. Combined femtosecond laser-assisted intracorneal ring segment implantation and corneal collagen cross-linking for correction of keratoconus

    PubMed Central

    Ibrahim, Osama; Elmassry, Ahmed; Said, Amr; Abdalla, Moones; El Hennawi, Hazem; Osman, Ihab

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To assess the safety, predictability, and effectiveness of Keraring intrastromal corneal ring segments (ICRS) insertion assisted by femtosecond laser and corneal collagen cross-linking (CXL) for keratoconus correction. Patients and methods In this prospective, noncomparative, and interventional case series, 160 eyes of 100 adult keratoconus patients with poor best-corrected visual acuity (BCVA) (less than 0.7) and intolerance to contact lens wear were included. Patients underwent femtosecond laser-assisted placement of ICRS and CXL. All patients were examined for a complete ophthalmological test: uncorrected visual acuity (UCVA), BCVA, spherical equivalent, keratometry (K1-flat and K2-steep), pachymetry, and Scheimpflug imaging with the Pentacam at 1 week and at 1, 3, and 6 months postoperatively. Results At 6 months, a significant difference was observed (P<0.001) in mean UCVA and BCVA from 0.92±0.677 and 0.42±0.600 logMAR preoperatively to 0.20±0.568 and 0.119±0.619 logMAR, respectively. Mean spherical equivalent refractions were significantly lower (P<0.001) at 6 months. Mean keratometry (K) also significantly reduced (P<0.001) from 50.93±5.53 D (K1-flat) and 55.37±5.76 D (K2-steep) to 47.32±4.61 and 51.08±5.38 D, respectively. In terms of pachymetry, no significant difference was observed preoperatively versus postoperatively (P=1.000). Conclusion Keraring ICRS insertion assisted by femtosecond laser and corneal CXL provided significant improvement in visual acuity, spherical equivalent, and keratometry, which suggests that it may be effective, safe, and predictable for keratoconus correction. PMID:27041991

  11. Heterogeneity in dermatosparaxis is shown by contraction of collagen gels.

    PubMed

    Ramshaw, J A; Mitrangas, K; Bateman, J F

    1991-01-01

    Dermal fibroblasts from sheep exhibiting a mild form of dermatosparaxis were able to contract reconstituted, fibrillar collagen gels at the same rate as control dermal fibroblasts, indicating a normal interaction between the cells and a collagenous matrix. An extract from dermatosparactic skin was shown, after partial purification, to have N-proteinase activity, although the level of activity was much lower than found in normal skin. These data show that dermatosparaxis is a heterogeneous disease, since in the severe forms of the disease the defect has been characterized as an absence of N-proteinase and an inability of the cells to interact with and contract collagen gels. PMID:2060304

  12. COLLAGEN PROCESSING

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Collagen dispersions, produced from fibrils recovered from milled bovine collagen, have shown promise in environmental remediation in applications as settling aids, filtration aids, fractionation media, oil drop stabilizers, and water purification aids. Macroporous structures, processed by controll...

  13. Lipoid proteinosis: an inherited disorder of collagen metabolism?

    PubMed

    Harper, J I; Duance, V C; Sims, T J; Light, N D

    1985-08-01

    The dermal collagen of a patient with lipoid proteinosis was investigated by immunohistochemistry and biochemical analysis. The affected skin was found to contain significantly less collagen per unit dry weight than normal dermis but showed elevated levels of type 3 collagen with respect to type I. Purification of collagen types from affected skin after pepsin digestion showed no novel forms, but a doubling in the yield of type 5 collagen. These results correlated well with those of immunohistochemistry which showed a patchy, diffuse, widely distributed type 3 collagen and an increase in types 4 and 5 collagens associated with 'onion skin' endothelial basement membrane thickening. Estimation of collagen cross-links showed an abnormal pattern with a preponderance of the keto-imine form not normally associated with skin. These results strongly suggest that lipoid proteinosis involves a primary perturbation of collagen metabolism. PMID:3896292

  14. Dermal fillers: an update.

    PubMed

    Ballin, Annelyse Cristine; Brandt, Fredric S; Cazzaniga, Alex

    2015-08-01

    Injection of dermal fillers is the second most frequent nonsurgical cosmetic procedure performed in the USA. Dermal fillers are an option in the treatment of volume deficiency, scars, and rhytides; facial sculpting; facial contouring; and augmentation of specific anatomical sites such as the lips. The number of injectable dermal fillers available on the market increases yearly. Dermatologists and cosmetic surgeons should regularly review treatment options to provide patients with safe and effective filler options. This paper extensively reviews the properties of the available fillers, such as their rheology, longevity, and adverse effects, and how these properties affect the choice of filler agent for a particular patient or a particular site. Also, trends in dermal filler injections are discussed. PMID:26081021

  15. Neocollagenesis in human tissue injected with a polycaprolactone-based dermal filler.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jongseo Antonio; Van Abel, Daan

    2015-04-01

    A novel dermal filler containing polycaprolactone (PCL) has been introduced into the aesthetic market. A recently published study has shown that the PCL-based dermal filler induces neocollagenesis, a process associated with improvement in appearance of the skin, in rabbit tissue. In this pilot study, we investigated whether the PCL-based dermal filler induces neocollagenesis in human tissue by histological analysis. Two patients who were enrolled in the study, and were willing to undergo temple lifting surgery, were injected intra-dermally with the PCL-based dermal filler. Thirteen months post-injection, biopsies were obtained for subsequent histological analysis. Histological analysis of tissue obtained from the biopsies (13 months post-injection) revealed that the PCL-based dermal filler shows collagen formation around the PCL particles and, therefore, supports similar findings previously shown in rabbit tissue. In conclusion, PCL particles are maintained in their original state 13 months post-injection. PMID:25260139

  16. Demineralized bone promotes chondrocyte or osteoblast differentiation of human marrow stromal cells cultured in collagen sponges.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Shuanhu; Yates, Karen E; Eid, Karim; Glowacki, Julie

    2005-01-01

    Demineralized bone implants have been used for many types of craniomaxillofacial, orthopedic, periodontal, and hand reconstruction procedures. In previous studies, we showed that demineralized bone powder (DBP) induces chondrogenesis of human dermal fibroblasts in a DBP/collagen sponge system that optimized interactions between particles of DBP and target cells in cell culture. In this study, we test the hypothesis that DBP promotes chondrogenesis or osteogenesis of human marrow stromal cells (hMSCs) in 3-D collagen sponge culture, depending upon the culture conditions. We first confirmed that hMSCs have chondrogenic potential when treated with TGF-beta, either in 2-D monolayer cultures or in 3-D porous collagen sponges. Second, we found that DBP markedly enhanced chondrogenesis in hMSCs in 3-D sponges, as assessed by metachromasia and expression of chondrocyte-specific genes AGGRECAN, COL II, and COL X. Human dermal fibroblasts (hDFs) were used to define mechanisms of chondroinduction because unlike hMSCs they have no inherent chondrogenic potential. In situ hybridization revealed that hDFs vicinal to DBPs express chondrocyte-specific genes AGGRECAN or COL II. Macroarray analysis showed that DBP activates TGF-beta/BMP signaling pathway genes in hDFs. Finally, DBP induced hMSCs to express the osteoblast phenotype when cultured with osteogenic supplements. These studies show how culture conditions can influence the differentiation pathway that human marrow stromal cells follow when stimulated by DBP. These results support the potential to engineer cartilage or bone in vitro by using human bone marrow stromal cells and DBP/collagen scaffolds. PMID:15735899

  17. Collagen telopeptides (cross-linking sites) play a role in collagen gel lattice contraction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woodley, D. T.; Yamauchi, M.; Wynn, K. C.; Mechanic, G.; Briggaman, R. A.

    1991-01-01

    Solubilized interstitial collagens will form a fibrillar, gel-like lattice when brought to physiologic conditions. In the presence of human dermal fibroblasts the collagen lattice will contract. The rate of contraction can be determined by computer-assisted planemetry. The mechanisms involved in contraction are as yet unknown. Using this system it was found that the rate of contraction was markedly decreased when collagen lacking telopeptides was substituted for native collagen. Histidinohydroxylysinonorleucine (HHL) is a major stable trifunctional collagen cross-link in mature skin that involves a carboxyl terminal, telopeptide site 16c, the sixteenth amino acid residue from the carboxy terminal of the telopeptide region of alpha 1 (I) in type I collagen. Little, if any, HHL was present in native, purified, reconstituted, soluble collagen fibrils from 1% acetic acid-extracted 2-year-old bovine skin. In contrast, HHL cross-links were present (0.22 moles of cross-link per mole of collagen) in lattices of the same collagen contracted by fibroblasts. However, rat tail tendon does not contain HHL cross-links, and collagen lattices made of rat tail tendon collagen are capable of contraction. This suggests that telopeptide sites, and not mature HHL cross-links per se, are essential for fibroblasts to contract collagen lattices. Beta-aminopropionitrile fumarate (BAPN), a potent lathyrogen that perturbs collagen cross-linking by inhibition of lysyl oxidase, also inhibited the rate of lattice cell contraction in lattices composed of native collagen. However, the concentrations of BAPN that were necessary to inhibit the contraction of collagen lattices also inhibited fibroblast growth suggestive of cellular toxicity. In accordance with other studies, we found no inhibition of the rate of lattice contraction when fibronectin-depleted serum was used. Electron microscopy of contracted gels revealed typical collagen fibers with a characteristic axial periodicity. The data

  18. Dermal reflectivity determined by optical coherence tomography is an indicator of epidermal hyperplasia and dermal edema within inflamed skin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Phillips, Kevin G.; Wang, Yun; Levitz, David; Choudhury, Niloy; Swanzey, Emily; Lagowski, James; Kulesz-Martin, Molly; Jacques, Steven L.

    2011-04-01

    Psoriasis is a common inflammatory skin disease resulting from genetic and environmental alterations of cutaneous immune responses. While numerous therapeutic targets involved in the immunopathogenesis of psoriasis have been identified, the in vivo dynamics of inflammation in psoriasis remain unclear. We undertook in vivo time course focus-tracked optical coherence tomography (OCT) imaging to noninvasively document cutaneous alterations in mouse skin treated topically with Imiquimod (IMQ), an established model of a psoriasis-like disease. Quantitative appraisal of dermal architectural changes was achieved through a two parameter fit of OCT axial scans in the dermis of the form A(x, y, z) = ρ(x, y)exp [ - μ(x, y)z]. Ensemble averaging over 2000 axial scans per mouse in each treatment arm revealed no significant changes in the average dermal attenuation rate, <μ>, however the average local dermal reflectivity <ρ>, decreased significantly following 1, 3, and 6 days of IMQ treatment (p < 0.001) in comparison to vehicle-treated control mice. In contrast, epidermal and dermal thickness changes were only significant when comparing controls and 6-day IMQ treated mice. This suggests that dermal alterations, attributed to collagen fiber bundle enlargement, occur prior to epidermal thickness changes due to hyperplasia and dermal thickness changes due to edema. Dermal reflectivity positively correlated with epidermal hyperplasia (repi2 = 0.78) and dermal edema (rderm2 = 0.86). Our results suggest that dermal reflectivity as measured by OCT can be utilized to quantify a psoriasis-like disease in mice, and thus has the potential to aid in the quantitative assessment of psoriasis in humans.

  19. Age-related disruption of autophagy in dermal fibroblasts modulates extracellular matrix components

    SciTech Connect

    Tashiro, Kanae; Shishido, Mayumi; Fujimoto, Keiko; Hirota, Yuko; Yo, Kazuyuki; Gomi, Takamasa; Tanaka, Yoshitaka

    2014-01-03

    Highlights: •Autophagosomes accumulate in aged dermal fibroblasts. •Autophagic degradation is impaired in aged dermal fibroblasts. •Autophagy disruption affects extracellular matrix components in dermal fibroblasts. -- Abstract: Autophagy is an intracellular degradative system that is believed to be involved in the aging process. The contribution of autophagy to age-related changes in the human skin is unclear. In this study, we examined the relationship between autophagy and skin aging. Transmission electron microscopy and immunofluorescence microscopy analyses of skin tissue and cultured dermal fibroblasts derived from women of different ages revealed an increase in the number of nascent double-membrane autophagosomes with age. Western blot analysis showed that the amount of LC3-II, a form associated with autophagic vacuolar membranes, was significantly increased in aged dermal fibroblasts compared with that in young dermal fibroblasts. Aged dermal fibroblasts were minimally affected by inhibition of autophagic activity. Although lipofuscin autofluorescence was elevated in aged dermal fibroblasts, the expression of Beclin-1 and Atg5—genes essential for autophagosome formation—was similar between young and aged dermal fibroblasts, suggesting that the increase of autophagosomes in aged dermal fibroblasts was due to impaired autophagic flux rather than an increase in autophagosome formation. Treatment of young dermal fibroblasts with lysosomal protease inhibitors, which mimic the condition of aged dermal fibroblasts with reduced autophagic activity, altered the fibroblast content of type I procollagen, hyaluronan and elastin, and caused a breakdown of collagen fibrils. Collectively, these findings suggest that the autophagy pathway is impaired in aged dermal fibroblasts, which leads to deterioration of dermal integrity and skin fragility.

  20. Dermal exposure assessment techniques.

    PubMed

    Fenske, R A

    1993-12-01

    Exposure of the skin to chemical substances can contribute significantly to total dose in many workplace situations, and its relative importance will increase when airborne occupational exposure limits are reduced, unless steps to reduce skin exposure are undertaken simultaneously. Its assessment employs personal sampling techniques to measure skin loading rates, and combines these measurements with models of percutaneous absorption to estimate absorbed dose. Knowledge of dermal exposure pathways is in many cases fundamental to hazard evaluation and control. When the skin is the primary contributor to absorbed dose, dermal exposure measurements and biological monitoring play complementary roles in defining occupational exposures. Exposure normally occurs by one of three pathways: (i) immersion (direct contact with a liquid or solid chemical substance); (ii) deposition of aerosol or uptake of vapour through the skin; or (iii) surface contact (residue transfer from contaminated surfaces). Sampling methods fall into three categories: surrogate skin; chemical removal; and fluorescent tracers. Surface sampling represents a supplementary approach, providing an estimate of dermal exposure potential. Surrogate skin techniques involve placing a chemical collection medium on the skin. Whole-body garment samplers do not require assumptions relating to distribution, an inherent limitation of patch sampling. The validity of these techniques rests on the ability of the sampling medium to capture and retain chemicals in a manner similar to skin. Removal techniques include skin washing and wiping, but these measure only what can be removed from the skin, not exposure: laboratory removal efficiency studies are required for proper interpretation of data. Fluorescent tracer techniques exploit the visual properties of fluorescent compounds, and combined with video imaging make quantification of dermal exposure patterns possible, but the need to introduce a chemical substance (tracer

  1. The presence of both bone sialoprotein-binding protein gene and collagen adhesin gene as a typical virulence trait of the major epidemic cluster in isolates from orthopedic implant infections.

    PubMed

    Campoccia, Davide; Speziale, Pietro; Ravaioli, Stefano; Cangini, Ilaria; Rindi, Simonetta; Pirini, Valter; Montanaro, Lucio; Arciola, Carla Renata

    2009-12-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is a major, highly clonal, pathogen causing implant infections. This study aimed at investigating the diverse distribution of bacterial adhesins in most prevalent S. aureus strain types causing orthopaedic implant infections. 200 S. aureus isolates, categorized into ribogroups by automated ribotyping, i.e. rDNA restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis, were screened for the presence of a panel of adhesins genes. Within the collection of isolates, automated ribotyping detected 98 distinct ribogroups. For many ribogroups, characteristic tandem genes arrangements could be identified. In the predominant S. aureus cluster, enlisting 27 isolates, the bbp gene encoding bone sialoprotein-binding protein appeared a typical virulence trait, found in 93% of the isolates. Conversely, the bbp gene was identified in just 10% of the remaining isolates of the collection. In this cluster, co-presence of bbp with the cna gene encoding collagen adhesin was a pattern consistently observed. These findings indicate a crucial role of both these adhesins, able to bind the most abundant bone proteins, in the pathogenesis of orthopaedic implant infections, there where biomaterials interface bone tissues. This study suggests that specific adhesins may synergistically act in the onset of implant infections and that anti-adhesin strategies should be targeted to adhesins conjointly present. PMID:19758694

  2. Human Dermal Stem/Progenitor Cell-Derived Conditioned Medium Improves Senescent Human Dermal Fibroblasts

    PubMed Central

    Jung, Ji-Yong; Shim, Joong Hyun; Choi, Hyun; Lee, Tae Ryong; Shin, Dong Wook

    2015-01-01

    Adult skin stem cells are recognized as potential therapeutics to rejuvenate aged skin. We previously demonstrated that human dermal stem/progenitor cells (hDSPCs) with multipotent capacity could be enriched from human dermal fibroblasts using collagen type IV. However, the effects of hDSPCs on cellular senescence remain to be elucidated. In the present study, we investigated whether conditioned medium (CM) collected from hDSPC cultures (hDSPC-CM) exhibits beneficial effects on senescent fibroblasts. We found that hDSPC-CM promoted proliferation and decreased the expression level of senescence-associated β-galactosidase in senescent fibroblasts. In addition, p53 phosphorylation and p21 expression were significantly reduced in senescent fibroblasts treated with hDSPC-CM. hDSPC-CM restored the expression levels of collagen type I, collagen type III, and tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase, and antagonized the increase of matrix metalloproteinase 1 expression. Finally, we demonstrated that hDSPC-CM significantly reduced reactive oxygen species levels by specifically up-regulating the expression level of superoxide dismutase 2. Taken together, these data suggest that hDSPC-CM can be applied as a potential therapeutic agent for improving human aged skin. PMID:26287165

  3. Effectiveness of xenogenous-based bovine-derived platelet gel embedded within a three-dimensional collagen implant on the healing and regeneration of the Achilles tendon defect in rabbits

    PubMed Central

    Moshiri, Ali; Oryan, Ahmad; Meimandi-Parizi, Abdolhamid; Koohi-Hosseinabadi, Omid

    2014-01-01

    Background and objective: Tissue engineering is an option in reconstructing large tendon defects and managing their healing and regeneration. We designed and produced a novel xenogeneic-based bovine platelet, embedded it within a tissue-engineered collagen implant (CI) and applied it in an experimentally induced large tendon defect model in rabbits to test whether bovine platelets could stimulate tendon healing and regeneration in vivo. Methods: One hundred twenty rabbits were randomly divided into two experimental and pilot groups. In all the animals, the left Achilles tendon was surgically excised and the tendon edges were aligned by Kessler suture. Each group was then divided into three groups of control (no implant), treated with CI and treated with collagen-platelet implant. The pilot groups were euthanized at 10, 15, 30 and 40 days post-injury (DPI), and their gross and histologic characteristics were evaluated to study host–graft interaction mechanism. To study the tendon healing and its outcome, the experimental animals were tested during the experiment using hematologic, ultrasonographic and various methods of clinical examinations and then euthanized at 60 DPI and their tendons were evaluated by gross pathologic, histopathologic, scanning electron microscopic, biophysical and biochemical methods. Results: Bovine platelets embedded within a CI increased inflammation at short term while it increased the rate of implant absorption and matrix replacement compared with the controls and CI alone. Treatment also significantly increased diameter, density, amount, alignment and differentiation of the collagen fibrils and fibers and approximated the water uptake and delivery behavior of the healing tendons to normal contralaterals (p < 0.05). Treatment also improved echogenicity and homogenicity of the tendons and reduced peritendinous adhesion, muscle fibrosis and atrophy, and therefore, it improved the clinical scores and physical activity related to the

  4. Histologic, Molecular, and Clinical Evaluation of Explanted Breast Prostheses, Capsules, and Acellular Dermal Matrices for Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Poppler, Louis; Cohen, Justin; Dolen, Utku Can; Schriefer, Andrew E.; Tenenbaum, Marissa M.; Deeken, Corey; Chole, Richard A.; Myckatyn, Terence M.

    2015-01-01

    Background Subclinical infections, manifest as biofilms, are considered an important cause of capsular contracture. Acellular dermal matrices (ADMs) are frequently used in revision surgery to prevent recurrent capsular contractures. Objective We sought to identify an association between capsular contracture and biofilm formation on breast prostheses, capsules, and ADMs in a tissue expander/implant (TE/I) exchange clinical paradigm. Methods Biopsies of the prosthesis, capsule, and ADM from patients (N = 26) undergoing TE/I exchange for permanent breast implant were evaluated for subclinical infection. Capsular contracture was quantified with Baker Grade and intramammary pressure. Biofilm formation was evaluated with specialized cultures, rtPCR, bacterial taxonomy, live:dead staining, and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Collagen distribution, capsular histology, and ADM remodeling were quantified following fluorescent and light microscopy. Results Prosthetic devices were implanted from 91 to 1115 days. Intramammary pressure increased with Baker Grade. Of 26 patients evaluated, one patient had a positive culture and one patient demonstrated convincing evidence of biofilm morphology on SEM. Following PCR amplification 5 samples randomly selected for 16S rRNA gene sequencing demonstrated an abundance of suborder Micrococcineae, consistent with contamination. Conclusions Our data suggest that bacterial biofilms likely contribute to a proportion, but not all diagnosed capsular contractures. Biofilm formation does not appear to differ significantly between ADMs or capsules. While capsular contracture remains an incompletely understood but common problem in breast implant surgery, advances in imaging, diagnostic, and molecular techniques can now provide more sophisticated insights into the pathophysiology of capsular contracture. Level of Evidence PMID:26229126

  5. Bioengineered collagens

    PubMed Central

    Ramshaw, John AM; Werkmeister, Jerome A; Dumsday, Geoff J

    2014-01-01

    Mammalian collagen has been widely used as a biomedical material. Nevertheless, there are still concerns about the variability between preparations, particularly with the possibility that the products may transmit animal-based diseases. Many groups have examined the possible application of bioengineered mammalian collagens. However, translating laboratory studies into large-scale manufacturing has often proved difficult, although certain yeast and plant systems seem effective. Production of full-length mammalian collagens, with the required secondary modification to give proline hydroxylation, has proved difficult in E. coli. However, recently, a new group of collagens, which have the characteristic triple helical structure of collagen, has been identified in bacteria. These proteins are stable without the need for hydroxyproline and are able to be produced and purified from E. coli in high yield. Initial studies indicate that they would be suitable for biomedical applications. PMID:24717980

  6. Alteration of Skin Properties with Autologous Dermal Fibroblasts

    PubMed Central

    Thangapazham, Rajesh L.; Darling, Thomas N.; Meyerle, Jon

    2014-01-01

    Dermal fibroblasts are mesenchymal cells found between the skin epidermis and subcutaneous tissue. They are primarily responsible for synthesizing collagen and glycosaminoglycans; components of extracellular matrix supporting the structural integrity of the skin. Dermal fibroblasts play a pivotal role in cutaneous wound healing and skin repair. Preclinical studies suggest wider applications of dermal fibroblasts ranging from skin based indications to non-skin tissue regeneration in tendon repair. One clinical application for autologous dermal fibroblasts has been approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) while others are in preclinical development or various stages of regulatory approval. In this context, we outline the role of fibroblasts in wound healing and discuss recent advances and the current development pipeline for cellular therapies using autologous dermal fibroblasts. The microanatomic and phenotypic differences of fibroblasts occupying particular locations within the skin are reviewed, emphasizing the therapeutic relevance of attributes exhibited by subpopulations of fibroblasts. Special focus is provided to fibroblast characteristics that define regional differences in skin, including the thick and hairless skin of the palms and soles as compared to hair-bearing skin. This regional specificity and functional identity of fibroblasts provides another platform for developing regional skin applications such as the induction of hair follicles in bald scalp or alteration of the phenotype of stump skin in amputees to better support their prosthetic devices. PMID:24828202

  7. THE IMPACT OF CHEMOTHERAPY AND RADIATION ON THE REMODELING OF ACELLULAR DERMAL MATRICES IN STAGED, PROSTHETIC BREAST RECONSTRUCTION

    PubMed Central

    Myckatyn, Terence M.; Cavallo, Jaime A.; Sharma, Ketan; Gangopadhyay, Noopur; Dudas, Jason R.; Roma, Andres A.; Baalman, Sara; Tenenbaum, Marissa M.; Matthews, Brent D.; Deeken, Corey R.

    2015-01-01

    Background An acellular dermal matrix (ADM) used in prosthetic breast reconstruction will typically incorporate, in time, with the overlying mastectomy skin flap. This remodeling process may be adversely impacted in patients that require chemotherapy and radiation therapies that influence neovascularization and cellular proliferation. Methods Multiple biopsies of the submuscular capsule and ADM were procured from 86 women (N=94 breasts) undergoing exchange of a tissue expander for a breast implant. These were divided by biopsy location : submuscular capsule (control) as well as superiorly, centrally and inferiorly along the ADM. Specimens were assessed grossly for incorporation and semi-quantitatively for cellular infiltration, cell type, fibrous encapsulation, scaffold degradation, extracellular matrix deposition, neovascularization, mean composite remodeling score, as well as Type I and III collagen area and ratio. Five oncologic treatment groups were compared : no adjuvant therapy (untreated), neoadjuvant chemotherapy ± radiation ; and chemotherapy ± radiation. Results ADM and submuscular capsule biopsies were procured 45 to 1805 days after ADM insertion and demonstrated a significant reduction in Type I collagen over time. Chemotherapy adversely impacted fibrous encapsulation relative to the untreated group (p=0.03). Chemotherapy with or without radiation adversely impacted Type I collagen area (p=0.02), cellular infiltration (p<0.01), extracellular matrix deposition (p<0.04), and neovascularization (p<0.01). Radiation exacerbated the adverse impact of chemotherapy for gross incorporation as well as several remodeling parameters. Neoadjuvant chemotherapy also caused a reduction in Type I (p=0.01) and III collagen (p=0.05), extracellular matrix deposition (p=0.03), and scaffold degradation (p=0.02). Conclusions Chemotherapy and radiation therapy limit ADM remodeling. PMID:25539350

  8. Influence of neutral salts on the hydrothermal stability of acid-soluble collagen.

    PubMed

    Brown, E M; Farrell, H M; Wildermuth, R J

    2000-02-01

    The thermal stability of acid-soluble collagens was studied by circular dichroism (CD) spectroscopy. Adult bovine dermal collagen (BDC), rat-tail tendon collagen (RTC), and calf skin collagen (CSC) were compared. Despite some variability in amino acid composition and apparent molecular weight, the CD spectra for helical and unordered collagen structures were essentially the same for all the sources. The melting of these collagens occurs as a two-stage process characterized by a pretransition (Tp) followed by complete denaturation (Td). The characteristic temperatures vary with the source of the collagen; for mature collagens (BDC, RTC) Tp = 30 degrees C and Td = 36 degrees C, and for CSC Tp = 34 degrees C and Td = 40 degrees C. Neutral salts, NaCl or KCl, at low concentrations (0.02-0.2 M) appear to bind to the collagens and shift the thermal transitions of these collagens to lower temperatures. PMID:10945432

  9. Discrimination of collagen in normal and pathological dermis through polarization second harmonic generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, Ping-Jung; Chen, Wei-Liang; Hong, Jin-Bon; Li, Tsung-Hsien; Wu, Ruei-Jr; Chou, Chen-Kuan; Lin, Sung-Jan; Dong, Chen-Yuan

    2010-02-01

    We used polarization-resolved, second harmonic generation (P-SHG) microscopy at single pixel resolution for medical diagnosis of pathological skin dermis, and found that P-SHG can be used to distinguish normal and dermal pathological conditions of keloid, morphea, and dermal elastolysis. We find that the histograms of the d33/d31 ratio for the pathological skins to contain two peak values and to be wider than that of the normal case, suggesting that the pathological dermal collagen fibers tend to be more structurally heterogeneous. Our work demonstrates that pixel-resolved, second-order susceptibility microscopy is effective for detecting heterogeneity in spatial distribution of collagen fibers.

  10. Synthetic facial implants.

    PubMed

    Quatela, Vito C; Chow, Jen

    2008-02-01

    This article presents a range of synthetic implant materials for use in facial plastic surgery. The authors discuss alternatives to autogenous tissue transfer in terms of biocompatibility, technique, complications, controversies, and cautions. The reader is presented information about a range of synthetic implant materials such as silicone, polyester fiber, polyamide mesh, metal, polyethylene, polyacrylamide gel, hydroxyapatite, polylactic acid, collagen, and others. PMID:18063244

  11. Molecular mechanisms and in vivo mouse models of skin aging associated with dermal matrix alterations.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Kyung-A; Yi, Bo-Rim; Choi, Kyung-Chul

    2011-03-01

    Skin is the most superficial body organ and plays an important role in protecting the body from environmental damage and in forming social relations. With the increase of the aging population in our society, dermatological and cosmetic concerns of skin aging are rapidly increasing. Skin aging is a complex process combined with intrinsic and extrinsic factors. Intrinsic or chronological skin aging results from the passage of time and is influenced by genetic factors. Extrinsic skin aging is mainly determined by UV irradiation, also called photoaging. These two types of aging processes are superimposed on sun-exposed skin, and have a common feature of causing dermal matrix alterations that mostly contribute to the formation of wrinkles, laxity, and fragility of aged skin. The dermal matrix contains extracellular matrix proteins such as collagen, elastin, and proteoglycans that confer the strength and resiliency of skin. Skin aging associated with dermal matrix alterations and atrophy can be caused by cellular senescence of dermal cells like fibroblasts, and decreased synthesis and accelerated degradation of dermal matrix components, especially collagen fibers. Both intrinsic aging and photoaging exert influence during each step of dermal matrix alteration via different mechanisms. Mouse models of skin aging have been extensively developed to elucidate intrinsic aging and photoaging processes, to validate in vitro biochemical data, and to test the effects of pharmacological tools for retarding skin aging because they have the advantages of being genetically similar to humans and are easily available. PMID:21826153

  12. Dermal Lipogenesis Inhibits Adiponectin Production in Human Dermal Fibroblasts while Exogenous Adiponectin Administration Prevents against UVA-Induced Dermal Matrix Degradation in Human Skin.

    PubMed

    Fang, Chien-Liang; Huang, Ling-Hung; Tsai, Hung-Yueh; Chang, Hsin-I

    2016-01-01

    Adiponectin is one of the most abundant adipokines from the subcutaneous fat, and regulates multiple activities through endocrine, paracrine, or autocrine mechanisms. However, its expression in adipogenic induced fibroblasts, and the potential role in photoaging has not been determined. Here, human dermal fibroblasts, Hs68, were presented as a cell model of dermal lipogenesis through stimulation of adipogenic differentiation medium (ADM). Similar to other studies in murine pre-adipocyte models (i.e., 3T3-L1), Hs68 fibroblasts showed a tendency to lipogenesis based on lipid accumulation, triglyceride formation, and the expressions of PPAR-γ, lipoprotein lipase (LPL), and FABP4 mRNA. As expected, ADM-treated fibroblasts displayed a reduction on adiponectin expression. Next, we emphasized the photoprotective effects of adiponectin against UVA-induced damage in Hs68 fibroblasts. UVA radiation can downregulate cell adhesion strength and elastic modulus of Hs68 fibroblasts. Moreover, UVA radiation could induce the mRNA expressions of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), adiponectin receptor 1 (AdipoR1), matrix metalloproteinase-1 (MMP-1), MMP-3, and cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2), but downregulate the mRNA expressions of type I and type III collagen. On the other hand, post-treatment of adiponectin can partially overcome UVA-induced reduction in the cell adhesion strength of Hs68 fibroblasts through the activation of AdipoR1 and the suppression of EGF-R. In addition, post-treatment of adiponectin indicated the increase of type III collagen and elastin mRNA expression and the decrease of MMP-1 and MMP-3 mRNA expression, but a limited degree of recovery of elastic modulus on UVA-irradiated Hs68 fibroblasts. Overall, these results suggest that dermal lipogenesis may inhibit the expression of adiponectin while exogenous adiponectin administration prevents against UVA-induced dermal matrix degradation in Hs68 fibroblasts. PMID:27428951

  13. Dermal Lipogenesis Inhibits Adiponectin Production in Human Dermal Fibroblasts while Exogenous Adiponectin Administration Prevents against UVA-Induced Dermal Matrix Degradation in Human Skin

    PubMed Central

    Fang, Chien-Liang; Huang, Ling-Hung; Tsai, Hung-Yueh; Chang, Hsin-I

    2016-01-01

    Adiponectin is one of the most abundant adipokines from the subcutaneous fat, and regulates multiple activities through endocrine, paracrine, or autocrine mechanisms. However, its expression in adipogenic induced fibroblasts, and the potential role in photoaging has not been determined. Here, human dermal fibroblasts, Hs68, were presented as a cell model of dermal lipogenesis through stimulation of adipogenic differentiation medium (ADM). Similar to other studies in murine pre-adipocyte models (i.e., 3T3-L1), Hs68 fibroblasts showed a tendency to lipogenesis based on lipid accumulation, triglyceride formation, and the expressions of PPAR-γ, lipoprotein lipase (LPL), and FABP4 mRNA. As expected, ADM-treated fibroblasts displayed a reduction on adiponectin expression. Next, we emphasized the photoprotective effects of adiponectin against UVA-induced damage in Hs68 fibroblasts. UVA radiation can downregulate cell adhesion strength and elastic modulus of Hs68 fibroblasts. Moreover, UVA radiation could induce the mRNA expressions of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), adiponectin receptor 1 (AdipoR1), matrix metalloproteinase-1 (MMP-1), MMP-3, and cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2), but downregulate the mRNA expressions of type I and type III collagen. On the other hand, post-treatment of adiponectin can partially overcome UVA-induced reduction in the cell adhesion strength of Hs68 fibroblasts through the activation of AdipoR1 and the suppression of EGF-R. In addition, post-treatment of adiponectin indicated the increase of type III collagen and elastin mRNA expression and the decrease of MMP-1 and MMP-3 mRNA expression, but a limited degree of recovery of elastic modulus on UVA-irradiated Hs68 fibroblasts. Overall, these results suggest that dermal lipogenesis may inhibit the expression of adiponectin while exogenous adiponectin administration prevents against UVA-induced dermal matrix degradation in Hs68 fibroblasts. PMID:27428951

  14. The impact of intrinsic ageing on the protein composition of the dermal-epidermal junction.

    PubMed

    Langton, Abigail K; Halai, Poonam; Griffiths, Christopher E M; Sherratt, Michael J; Watson, Rachel E B

    2016-06-01

    The dermal-epidermal junction of human skin exhibits age-related remodelling, resulting in a flattened appearance and reduced surface area. Despite this, a paucity of information is available regarding which protein components change with advancing age. Here we report a significant reduction in the protein distribution of collagen IV (P<0.0001), collagen VII (P<0.001), collagen XVII (P<0.01), integrin β4 (P<0.001) and laminin-332 (P<0.0001) in intrinsically aged skin. The functional implication of this altered protein composition appears to be loss of structural integrity and may, in part, explain the increased fragility of aged skin. PMID:27013376

  15. Evaluation of collagen immobilized to silicon plates by ion beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yokoyama, Y.; Kobayashi, T.; Iwaki, M.

    2006-01-01

    A study has been made of immobilization of collagen coated on the substrate by ion beam in order to elucidate the effects of ion bombardment on cell adhesion strength. Substrates used were silicon plates, on which 0.3% type-I collagen solution was coated using a spin coater. The collagen-coated silicon was bombarded with 50 keV He+ ions at doses from 1 × 1013 to 1 × 1015 ions/cm2 using a RIKEN TK-100 ion implanter. The collagen-immobilized specimens were mounted on a parallel-plate flow chamber to perform the collagen adhesion tests with a flowing shear stress. Morphological observations of collagen were performed by scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM). The chemical condition of collagen was detected by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The collagen layer in the non-bombarded specimen was about 20 nm in thickness. STEM micrographs showed that collagen layer has thinned due to contraction by ion bombardment as the dose increased. After the collagen adhesion test, collagen layer surface with the non-bombarded specimen was peeled off by shear stress. As the dose increased, the detachment of collagen was suppressed. Detachment of collagen was hardly observed for the dose of 1 × 1015 ions/cm2. The XPS results of collagen structures showed that ion bombardment generated new bonds between collagen molecules in the collagen layer. It is concluded that the increase of collagen adhesion at higher doses is due to the ion-beam immobilization of collagen molecules resulting from new bond generation by displaced atoms and excited atoms between collagen molecules in the collagen layer.

  16. Generalized mid dermal elastolysis

    PubMed Central

    Cruz, Maria João; Barros, Ana Margarida; Azevedo, Filomena

    2011-01-01

    Mid-dermal elastolysis (MDE) is a rare skin disorder clinically characterized by the appearance of diffuse fine wrinkling, most often of the trunk and arms. This entity is distinguished from other elastolytic disorders by its characteristic selective loss of elastic fibers of the mid dermis. The aetiopathogenesis of the disease is still unclear as well as the effective treatment. Half of the cases described in the literature are associated with ultraviolet radiation exposure. Other reported triggering conditions such as urticaria, eczema and granuloma annulare suggests different eliciting inflammatory pathways. The authors describe the case of a 38-year-old woman who developed an urticarial eruption during months which progressed to generalized and severe fine wrinkling. PMID:25386304

  17. Fabrication of duck's feet collagen-silk hybrid biomaterial for tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Kim, Soo Hyeon; Park, Hae Sang; Lee, Ok Joo; Chao, Janet Ren; Park, Hyun Jung; Lee, Jung Min; Ju, Hyung Woo; Moon, Bo Mi; Park, Ye Ri; Song, Jeong Eun; Khang, Gilson; Park, Chan Hum

    2016-04-01

    Collagen constituting the extracellular matrix has been widely used as biocompatible material for human use. In this study, we have selected duck's feet for extracting collagen. A simple method not utilizing harsh chemical had been employed to extract collagen from duck's feet. We fabricated duck's feet collagen/silk hybrid scaffold for the purpose of modifying the degradation rate of duck's feet collagen. This study suggests that extracted collagen from duck's feet is biocompatible and resembles collagen extracted from porcine which is commercially used. Duck's feet collagen is also economically feasible and it could therefore be a good candidate as a tissue engineering material. Further, addition of silk to fabricate a duck's feet collagen/silk hybrid scaffold could enhance the biostability of duck's feet collagen scaffold. Duck's feet collagen/silk scaffold increased the cell viability compared to silk alone. Animal studies also showed that duck's feet collagen/silk scaffold was more biocompatible than silk alone and more biostable than duck's feet or porcine collagen alone. Additionally, the results revealed that duck's feet collagen/silk hybrid scaffold had high porosity, cell infiltration and proliferation. We suggest that duck's feet collagen/silk hybrid scaffold could be used as a dermal substitution for full thickness skin defects. PMID:26748068

  18. Enhanced bone healing using collagen-hydroxyapatite scaffold implantation in the treatment of a large multiloculated mandibular aneurysmal bone cyst in a thoroughbred filly.

    PubMed

    David, Florent; Levingstone, Tanya J; Schneeweiss, Wilfried; de Swarte, Marie; Jahns, Hanne; Gleeson, John P; O'Brien, Fergal J

    2015-10-01

    An unmet need remains for a bone graft substitute material that is biocompatible, biodegradable and capable of promoting osteogenesis safely in vivo. The aim of this study was to investigate the use of a novel collagen-hydroxyapatite (CHA) bone graft substitute in the clinical treatment of a mandibular bone cyst in a young horse and to assess its potential to enhance repair of the affected bone. A 2 year-old thoroughbred filly, presenting with a multilobulated aneurysmal bone cyst, was treated using the CHA scaffold. Post-operative clinical follow-up was carried out at 2 weeks and 3, 6 and 14 months. Cortical thickening in the affected area was observed from computed tomography (CT) examination as early as 3 months post-surgery. At 14 months, reduced enlargement of the operated mandible was observed, with no fluid-filled area. The expansile cavity was occupied by moderately dense mineralized tissue and fat and the compact bone was remodelled, with a clearer definition between cortex and medulla observed. This report demonstrates the promotion of enhanced bone repair following application of the CHA scaffold material in this craniomaxillofacial indication, and thus the potential of this material for translation to human applications. PMID:25712436

  19. Human acellular dermal matrix allograft: A randomized, controlled human trial for the long-term evaluation of patients with extensive burns.

    PubMed

    Li, Xueyong; Meng, Xianghai; Wang, Xiaolin; Li, Yuejun; Li, Wangzhou; Lv, Xiaoxing; Xu, Xiaoli; Lei, Zhanjun; Li, Jinqing

    2015-06-01

    The potential of acellular dermal matrix (ADM) to improve cosmetic and functional outcomes has been demonstrated; however, there have been few clinical comparative studies assessing the long-term morphological, histological and functional changes after ADM placement. This study was designed to retrospectively evaluate the long-term outcomes of the cograft acellular dermal matrix with autologous thin split-thickness skin for the coverage of wounds in extensively burned patients. Thirty burn patients treated with a composite graft of ADM with autologous split-thickness skin from January 2007 to December 2009 were enrolled in this study. Another group of thirty patients who received only an autogenous split-thickness skin implant served as the control. Our study revealed that the collagen in the dermis treated with ADM were ordered, and the proportion of collagen III/I was much higher in the control group than in the ADM group. The basement membrane was prominent and continuous. Meanwhile, the VBSS (Vancouver Burn Skin Score) was used to evaluate skin quality, which shows a significant differences between the two group (P<0.001). Then the functional level was evaluated by the BI (Barthel Index), and the ADM group was much better than the control group (P=0.005). Based on these results, we concluded that the composite graft of ADM with autologous thin split-thickness skin was suitable for repairing the defects in functional areas after a burn. This technique might facilitate wound management with acceptable esthetic outcomes, good functional recovery and less scar hyperplasia at the donor site. PMID:25687834

  20. Extracellular Matrix and Dermal Fibroblast Function in the Healing Wound

    PubMed Central

    Tracy, Lauren E.; Minasian, Raquel A.; Caterson, E.J.

    2016-01-01

    Significance: Fibroblasts play a critical role in normal wound healing. Various extracellular matrix (ECM) components, including collagens, fibrin, fibronectin, proteoglycans, glycosaminoglycans, and matricellular proteins, can be considered potent protagonists of fibroblast survival, migration, and metabolism. Recent Advances: Advances in tissue culture, tissue engineering, and ex vivo models have made the examination and precise measurements of ECM components in wound healing possible. Likewise, the development of specific transgenic animal models has created the opportunity to characterize the role of various ECM molecules in healing wounds. In addition, the recent characterization of new ECM molecules, including matricellular proteins, dermatopontin, and FACIT collagens (Fibril-Associated Collagens with Interrupted Triple helices), further demonstrates our cursory knowledge of the ECM in coordinated wound healing. Critical Issues: The manipulation and augmentation of ECM components in the healing wound is emerging in patient care, as demonstrated by the use of acellular dermal matrices, tissue scaffolds, and wound dressings or topical products bearing ECM proteins such as collagen, hyaluronan (HA), or elastin. Once thought of as neutral structural proteins, these molecules are now known to directly influence many aspects of cellular wound healing. Future Directions: The role that ECM molecules, such as CCN2, osteopontin, and secreted protein, acidic and rich in cysteine, play in signaling homing of fibroblast progenitor cells to sites of injury invites future research as we continue investigating the heterotopic origin of certain populations of fibroblasts in a healing wound. Likewise, research into differently sized fragments of the same polymeric ECM molecule is warranted as we learn that fragments of molecules such as HA and tenascin-C can have opposing effects on dermal fibroblasts. PMID:26989578

  1. Infection in the Nasal Tip Caused by Acellular Dermal Matrix.

    PubMed

    Lee, Kun Hee

    2015-12-01

    A 19-year-old female patient visited our clinic for rhinoplasty. She complained about her low take-off point, which was apparent in profile view, and wanted slight tip projection. She refused additional cartilage harvesting from ears or ribs but consented to the use of homologous tissue, including acellular dermal matrix, for her dorsum and tip. Septoturbinoplasty was performed, and only a very small amount of septal cartilage could be harvested. It was used as both the columellar strut and the alar rim graft. Nasal dorsum and tip were augmented with acellular dermal matrix. Three months postoperatively, she experienced a few episodes of edema and redness on her nasal tip, followed by pus exudation from the nasal skin. Six months postoperatively, she underwent revision rhinoplasty for removal of inflamed grafts, and onlay tip graft with homologous rib cartilage was performed. Nasal dorsum or tip grafts are an integral part of Asian rhinoplasty. Autogenous tissue is the gold standard for grafting materials. However, the limited availability of autogenous tissue and the preference of patients and surgeons for artificial surgical implants make Asian rhinoplasty challenging. Unavailability of autogenous cartilage and patient refusal of artificial implants led to the use of acellular dermal matrix (ADM) in the nasal dorsum and tip for this case. This is the first report of postoperative complication because of infection rather than absorption after ADM use. PMID:26894006

  2. Collagen degradation in rat skin but not in intestine during rapid growth: effect on collagen types I and III from skin.

    PubMed Central

    Klein, L; ChandraRajan, J

    1977-01-01

    Metabolic degradation of prelabeled collagen in whole body skin and whole intestine was compared to that of types I and III collagens from skin in young, rapidly growing rats. Pregnant rats were given [3H]proline during the last week of gestation; and after birth, littermates were compared. Between the second and sixth weeks of age, there was a 43% loss of radioactivity from dermal collagen but no significant loss of radioactivity from intestinal collagen. Pepsin treatment solubilized 90% of the dermal collagen but only 12% of intestinal collagen. Skin from 2- and 6-week-old rats yielded the same proportions of type I and type III collagens (type I, 82%; type III, 18%). The relative losses of total radioactivity from types I and III were similar to each other (50 and 44%, respectively) and to the loss from whole skin. Because types I and III collagens are known to be present in both skin and intestine, the marked degradation of both collagen types in skin but not in the intestine may be related to the amount and kind of intermolecular crosslinks present. PMID:266184

  3. Tenascin-X deficiency mimics Ehlers-Danlos syndrome in mice through alteration of collagen deposition.

    PubMed

    Mao, Jau Ren; Taylor, Glen; Dean, Willow B; Wagner, Diane R; Afzal, Veena; Lotz, Jeffrey C; Rubin, Edward M; Bristow, James

    2002-04-01

    Tenascin-X is a large extracellular matrix protein of unknown function. Tenascin-X deficiency in humans is associated with Ehlers-Danlos syndrome, a generalized connective tissue disorder resulting from altered metabolism of the fibrillar collagens. Because TNXB is the first Ehlers-Danlos syndrome gene that does not encode a fibrillar collagen or collagen-modifying enzyme, we suggested that tenascin-X might regulate collagen synthesis or deposition. To test this hypothesis, we inactivated Tnxb in mice. Tnxb-/- mice showed progressive skin hyperextensibility, similar to individuals with Ehlers-Danlos syndrome. Biomechanical testing confirmed increased deformability and reduced tensile strength of their skin. The skin of Tnxb-/- mice was histologically normal, but its collagen content was significantly reduced. At the ultrastructural level, collagen fibrils of Tnxb-/- mice were of normal size and shape, but the density of fibrils in their skin was reduced, commensurate with the reduction in collagen content. Studies of cultured dermal fibroblasts showed that although synthesis of collagen I by Tnxb-/- and wildtype cells was similar, Tnxb-/- fibroblasts failed to deposit collagen I into cell-associated matrix. This study confirms a causative role for TNXB in human Ehlers-Danlos syndrome and suggests that tenascin-X is an essential regulator of collagen deposition by dermal fibroblasts. PMID:11925569

  4. Tenascin-x deficiency mimics ehlers-danlos syndrome in mice through alteration of collagen deposition

    SciTech Connect

    Mao, J.R.; Taylor, G.; Dean, W.B.; Wagner, D.R.; Afzal, V.; Lotz, J.C.; Rubin, E.M.; Bristow, J.

    2002-03-01

    Tenascin-X is a large extracellular matrix protein of unknown function1-3. Tenascin-X deficiency in humans is associated with Ehlers-Danlos syndrome4,5, a generalized connective tissue disorder resulting from altered metabolism of the fibrillar collagens6. Because TNXB is the first Ehlers-Danlos syndrome gene that does not encode a fibrillar collagen or collagen-modifying enzyme7-14, we suggested that tenascin-X might regulate collagen synthesis or deposition15. To test this hypothesis, we inactivated Tnxb in mice. Tnxb-/- mice showed progressive skin hyperextensibility, similar to individuals with Ehlers-Danlos syndrome. Biomechanical testing confirmed increased deformability and reduced tensile strength of their skin. The skin of Tnxb-/- mice was histologically normal, but its collagen content was significantly reduced. At the ultrastructural level, collagen fibrils of Tnxb-/- mice were of normal size and shape, but the density of fibrils in their skin was reduced, commensurate with the reduction in collagen content. Studies of cultured dermal fibroblasts showed that although synthesis of collagen I by Tnxb-/- and wildtype cells was similar, Tnxb-/- fibroblasts failed to deposit collagen I into cell-associated matrix. This study confirms a causative role for TNXB in human Ehlers-Danlos syndrome and suggests that tenascin-X is an essential regulator of collagen deposition by dermal fibroblasts.

  5. Effect of photon energy in collagen generation by interstitial low level laser stimulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jun, Eunkwon; Ha, Myungjin; Lee, Sangyeob; Radfar, Edalat; Park, Jihoon; Jung, Byungjo

    2015-03-01

    Although the mechanism of low level laser therapy (LLLT) is unclear, many studies demonstrated the positive clinical performance of LLLT for skin rejuvenation. An increase in dermal collagen plays an important role in skin rejuvenation and wound healing. This study aimed to investigate collagen generation after interstitial low level laser stimulation (ILLS). Rabbits were divided into two groups: surfacing irradiation and minimally invasive irradiation. 660nm diode laser of 20mW with 10J, 13J and 15J was applied to the backside of rabbits. Collagen formation was evaluated with ultrasound skin scanner every 12 hours. Results shows that ILLS groups have denser collagen density than surfacing groups.

  6. Efficient In Vitro Electropermeabilization of Reconstructed Human Dermal Tissue.

    PubMed

    Madi, Moinecha; Rols, Marie-Pierre; Gibot, Laure

    2015-10-01

    DNA electrotransfer is a successful technic for gene delivery. However, its use in clinical applications is limited since little is known about the mechanisms governing DNA electrotransfer in the complex environment occurring in a tissue. The objectives of this work were to investigate the role of the extracellular matrix (ECM) in that process. Tumor ECM composition was shown to modulate in vivo gene electrotransfer efficiency. In order to assess the effects of ECM composition and organization, as well as intercellular junctions and communication, in normal tissue response to electric pulses, we developed an innovative three-dimensional (3D) reconstructed human connective tissue model. 3D human dermal tissue was reconstructed in vitro by a tissue engineering approach and was representative of in vivo cell organization since cell-cell contacts were present as well as complex ECM. This human cell model presented multiple layers of primary dermal fibroblasts embedded in a native, collagen-rich ECM. This dermal tissue could become a useful tool to study skin DNA electrotransfer mechanisms. As proof of the concept, we show here that the cells within this standardized 3D tissue can be efficiently electropermeabilized by milliseconds electric pulses. We believe that a better comprehension of gene electrotransfer in such a model tissue would help improve electrogene therapy approaches such as the systemic delivery of therapeutic proteins and DNA vaccination. PMID:25788148

  7. Antioxidant effects of the sarsaparilla via scavenging of reactive oxygen species and induction of antioxidant enzymes in human dermal fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Park, Gunhyuk; Kim, Tae-mi; Kim, Jeong Hee; Oh, Myung Sook

    2014-07-01

    Ultraviolet (UV) radiation from sunlight causes distinct changes in collagenous skin tissues as a result of the breakdown of collagen, a major component of the extracellular matrix. UV irradiation downregulates reactive oxygen species (ROS)-elimination pathways, thereby promoting the production of ROS, which are implicated in skin aging. Smilax glabra Roxb (sarsaparilla) has been used in folk medicine because of its many effects. However, no study on the protective effects of sarsaparilla root (SR) on human dermal fibroblasts has been reported previously. Here, we investigated the protective effect of SR against oxidative stress in dermal fibroblasts. SR significantly inhibited oxidative damage and skin-aging factor via mitogen-activated protein kinase signaling pathways. Also, SR decreased Ca(2+) and ROS, mitochondrial membrane potential, dysfunction, and increased glutathione, NAD(P)H dehydrogenase and heme oxygenase-1. These results demonstrate that SR can protect dermal fibroblasts against UVB-induced skin aging via antioxidant effects. PMID:25022355

  8. Visualization of dermal alteration in skin lesions with discoid lupus erythematosus by multiphoton microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, L. H.; Yu, H. B.; Zhu, X. Q.; Zhuo, S. M.; Wang, Y. Y.; Yang, Y. H.; Chen, J. X.

    2013-04-01

    Discoid lupus erythematosus (DLE) is a chronic dermatological disease which lacks valid methods for early diagnosis and therapeutic monitoring. Considering the collagen and elastin disorder due to mucin deposition of DLE, multiphoton microscopy (MPM) imaging techniques were employed to obtain high-resolution collagen and elastin images from the dermis. The content and distribution of collagen and elastin were quantified to characterize the dermal pathological status of skin lesions with DLE in comparison with normal skin. Our results showed a significant difference between skin lesions with DLE and normal skin in terms of the morphological structure of collagen and elastin in the dermis, demonstrating the possibility of MPM for noninvasively tracking the pathological process of DLE even in its early stages and evaluating the therapeutic efficacy at the molecular level.

  9. Treatment of photoaged skin with topical tretinoin increases epidermal-dermal anchoring fibrils

    SciTech Connect

    Woodley, D.T.; Briggaman, R.A. ); Zelickson, A.S. ); Hamilton, T.A.; Weiss, J.S.; Ellis, C.N.; Voorhees, J.J. )

    1990-06-13

    Topical 0.1% tretinoin or vehicle control was applied daily to the forearm skin of six caucasian adults for 4 months. Two-millimeter punch biopsy specimens were obtained from treatment sites at the beginning and end of the study period for electron microscopy. Anchoring fibrils within the epidermal-dermal junction of skin treatment sites were quantitated by blinded, standardized, computer-assisted morphometry. After 4 months of continual daily treatment, skin sites that received topical tretinoin showed double the anchoring fibril density compared with vehicle control sites. The possible mechanism by which topical tretinoin increases anchoring fibrils in skin include the drug's property of inhibiting collagenase, a dermal enzyme that degrades anchoring fibril collagen. The authors speculate that increased numbers of collagenous anchoring fibrils within the papillary dermis of human skin is one of the connective-tissue correlates of the clinical improvement observed in photoaged skin after treatment with topical tretinoin.

  10. Chronic UVB-irradiation actuates perpetuated dermal matrix remodeling in female mice: Protective role of estrogen.

    PubMed

    Röck, Katharina; Joosse, Simon Andreas; Müller, Julia; Heinisch, Nina; Fuchs, Nicola; Meusch, Michael; Zipper, Petra; Reifenberger, Julia; Pantel, Klaus; Fischer, Jens Walter

    2016-01-01

    Chronic UVB-exposure and declined estradiol production after menopause represent important factors leading to extrinsic and intrinsic aging, respectively. Remodeling of the extracellular matrix (ECM) plays a crucial role in both responses. Whether the dermal ECM is able to recover after cessation of UVB-irradiation in dependence of estradiol is not known, however of relevance when regarding possible treatment options. Therefore, the endogenous sex hormone production was depleted by ovariectomy in female mice. Half of the mice received estradiol substitution. Mice were UVB-irradiated for 20 weeks and afterwards kept for 10 weeks without irradiation. The collagen-, hyaluronan- and proteoglycan- (versican, biglycan, lumican) matrix, collagen cleavage products and functional skin parameters were analyzed. The intrinsic aging process was characterized by increased collagen fragmentation and accumulation of biglycan. Chronic UVB-irradiation additionally augmented the lumican, versican and hyaluronan content of the dermis. In the absence of further UVB-irradiation the degradation of collagen and accumulation of biglycan in the extrinsically aged group was perpetuated in an excessive matter. Whereas estradiol increased the proteoglycan content, it reversed the effects of the perpetuated extrinsic response on collagen degradation. Suspension of the intrinsic pathway might therefore be sufficient to antagonize UVB-evoked long-term damage to the dermal ECM. PMID:27460287

  11. Chronic UVB-irradiation actuates perpetuated dermal matrix remodeling in female mice: Protective role of estrogen

    PubMed Central

    Röck, Katharina; Joosse, Simon Andreas; Müller, Julia; Heinisch, Nina; Fuchs, Nicola; Meusch, Michael; Zipper, Petra; Reifenberger, Julia; Pantel, Klaus; Fischer, Jens Walter

    2016-01-01

    Chronic UVB-exposure and declined estradiol production after menopause represent important factors leading to extrinsic and intrinsic aging, respectively. Remodeling of the extracellular matrix (ECM) plays a crucial role in both responses. Whether the dermal ECM is able to recover after cessation of UVB-irradiation in dependence of estradiol is not known, however of relevance when regarding possible treatment options. Therefore, the endogenous sex hormone production was depleted by ovariectomy in female mice. Half of the mice received estradiol substitution. Mice were UVB-irradiated for 20 weeks and afterwards kept for 10 weeks without irradiation. The collagen-, hyaluronan- and proteoglycan- (versican, biglycan, lumican) matrix, collagen cleavage products and functional skin parameters were analyzed. The intrinsic aging process was characterized by increased collagen fragmentation and accumulation of biglycan. Chronic UVB-irradiation additionally augmented the lumican, versican and hyaluronan content of the dermis. In the absence of further UVB-irradiation the degradation of collagen and accumulation of biglycan in the extrinsically aged group was perpetuated in an excessive matter. Whereas estradiol increased the proteoglycan content, it reversed the effects of the perpetuated extrinsic response on collagen degradation. Suspension of the intrinsic pathway might therefore be sufficient to antagonize UVB-evoked long-term damage to the dermal ECM. PMID:27460287

  12. Collagen expression in fibroblasts with a novel LMNA mutation

    SciTech Connect

    Nguyen, Desiree; Leistritz, Dru F.; Turner, Lesley; MacGregor, David; Ohson, Kamal; Dancey, Paul; Martin, George M.; Oshima, Junko . E-mail: picard@u.washington.edu

    2007-01-19

    Laminopathies are a group of genetic disorders caused by LMNA mutations; they include muscular dystrophies, lipodystrophies, and progeroid syndromes. We identified a novel heterozygous LMNA mutation, L59R, in a patient with the general appearance of mandibuloacral dysplasia and progeroid features. Examination of the nuclei of dermal fibroblasts revealed the irregular morphology characteristic of LMNA mutant cells. The nuclear morphological abnormalities of LMNA mutant lymphoblastoid cell lines were less prominent compared to those of primary fibroblasts. Since it has been reported that progeroid features are associated with increased extracellular matrix in dermal tissues, we compared a subset of these components in fibroblast cultures from LMNA mutants with those of control fibroblasts. There was no evidence of intracellular accumulation or altered mobility of collagen chains, or altered conversion of procollagen to collagen, suggesting that skin fibroblast-mediated matrix production may not play a significant role in the pathogenesis of this particular laminopathy.

  13. Collagen Expression in Fibroblasts with a Novel LMNA Mutation

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Desiree; Leistritz, Dru F.; Turner, Lesley; MacGregor, David; Ohson, Kamal; Dancey, Paul; Martin, George M.; Oshima, Junko

    2007-01-01

    Laminopathies are a group of genetic disorders caused by LMNA mutations; they include muscular dystrophies, lipodystrophies and progeroid syndromes. We identified a novel heterozygous LMNA mutation, L59R, in a patient with the general appearance of mandibuloacral dysplasia and progeroid features. Examination of the nuclei of dermal fibroblasts revealed the irregular morphology characteristic of LMNA mutant cells. The nuclear morphological abnormalities of LMNA mutant lymphoblastoid cell lines were less prominent compared to those of primary fibroblasts. Since it has been reported that progeroid features are associated with increased extracellular matrix in dermal tissues, we compared a subset of these components in fibroblast cultures from LMNA mutants with those of control fibroblasts. There was no evidence of intracellular accumulation or altered mobility of collagen chains, or altered conversion of procollagen to collagen, suggesting that skin fibroblast-mediated matrix production may not play a significant role in the pathogenesis of this particular laminopathy. PMID:17150192

  14. Cutaneous collagenous vasculopathy: a rare cause of generalised cutaneous telangiectasia.

    PubMed

    Toda-Brito, Helena; Resende, Cristina; Catorze, Goreti; Viana, Isabel

    2015-01-01

    Cutaneous collagenous vasculopathy is a rare cutaneous microangiopathy of unknown aetiology with only 27 cases reported to date. It is characterised clinically by generalised cutaneous telangiectasias and microscopically by dilation and marked thickening of the walls of superficial dermal blood vessels. Differential diagnosis should be performed with other causes of disseminated telangiectasias, including generalised essential telangiectasia, from which it is clinically indistinguishable. We report a new case of cutaneous collagenous vasculopathy in a 61-year-old woman presenting with a 5-year history of asymptomatic telangiectasias distributed symmetrically on her upper and lower limbs and highlight the importance of clinicopathological correlation for the diagnosis of this disease. PMID:26156838

  15. Ovine-Based Collagen Matrix Dressing: Next-Generation Collagen Dressing for Wound Care

    PubMed Central

    Bohn, Gregory; Liden, Brock; Schultz, Gregory; Yang, Qingping; Gibson, Daniel J.

    2016-01-01

    Significance: Broad-spectrum metalloproteinase (MMP) reduction along with inherent aspects of an extracellular matrix (ECM) dressing can bring about improved wound healing outcomes and shorter treatment duration. Initial reports of clinical effectiveness of a new ovine-based collagen extracellular matrix (CECM) dressing demonstrate benefits in chronic wound healing. Recent Advances: CECM dressings are processed differently than oxidized regenerated cellulose/collagen dressings. CECM dressings consist primarily of collagens I and III arranged as native fibers that retain the three-dimensional architecture present in tissue ECM. As such, ovine-based ECM dressings represent a new generation of collagen dressings capable of impacting a broad spectrum of MMP excess known to be present in chronic wounds. Critical Issues: While MMPs are essential in normal healing, elevated presence of MMPs has been linked to wound failure. Collagen has been shown to reduce levels of MMPs, acting as a sacrificial substrate for excessive proteases in a chronic wound. Preserving collagen dressings in a more native state enhances bioactivity in terms of the ability to affect the chronic wound environment. Clinical observation and assessment may not be sufficient to identify a wound with elevated protease activity that can break down ECM, affect wound fibroblasts, and impair growth factor response. Future Directions: Collagen dressings that target broad-spectrum excessive MMP levels and can be applied early in the course of care may positively impact healing rates in difficult wounds. Next-generation collagen dressings offer broader MMP reduction capacity while providing a provisional dermal matrix or ECM. PMID:26858910

  16. Open collagen membrane technique in socket preservation.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Wen-Yen

    2016-01-01

    Both hard and soft tissue undergo change after tooth extraction. In particular, the bone tissue surrounding teeth with fenestration or dehiscence defects undergoes dramatic change following tooth extraction, which can compromise further rehabilitation of the area. Adequate alveolar bone volume and keratinized mucosa are critical to the success of implant therapy. Therefore, the anatomic dimension of the alveolar ridge must be adequate to achieve an esthetically acceptable outcome of implant therapy. Previous studies have proposed many clinical techniques for preserving the extraction socket. This article presents a procedure in which an open collagen membrane technique was adopted to maintain an adequate volume of hard tissue and a sufficient width of the keratinized mucosa for further esthetic and functional implantation. Through this simple technique, an adequate volume and architecture around the implant can be achieved, with a long-term prognosis for implant therapy expected. PMID:27433553

  17. Quantitative analysis of intrinsic skin aging in dermal papillae by in vivo harmonic generation microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Liao, Yi-Hua; Kuo, Wei-Cheng; Chou, Sin-Yo; Tsai, Cheng-Shiun; Lin, Guan-Liang; Tsai, Ming-Rung; Shih, Yuan-Ta; Lee, Gwo-Giun; Sun, Chi-Kuang

    2014-01-01

    Chronological skin aging is associated with flattening of the dermal-epidermal junction (DEJ), but to date no quantitative analysis focusing on the aging changes in the dermal papillae (DP) has been performed. The aim of the study is to determine the architectural changes and the collagen density related to chronological aging in the dermal papilla zone (DPZ) by in vivo harmonic generation microscopy (HGM) with a sub-femtoliter spatial resolution. We recruited 48 Asian subjects and obtained in vivo images on the sun-protected volar forearm. Six parameters were defined to quantify 3D morphological changes of the DPZ, which we analyzed both manually and computationally to study their correlation with age. The depth of DPZ, the average height of isolated DP, and the 3D interdigitation index decreased with age, while DP number density, DP volume, and the collagen density in DP remained constant over time. In vivo high-resolution HGM technology has uncovered chronological aging-related variations in DP, and sheds light on real-time quantitative skin fragility assessment and disease diagnostics based on collagen density and morphology. PMID:25401037

  18. The Collagen Family

    PubMed Central

    Ricard-Blum, Sylvie

    2011-01-01

    Collagens are the most abundant proteins in mammals. The collagen family comprises 28 members that contain at least one triple-helical domain. Collagens are deposited in the extracellular matrix where most of them form supramolecular assemblies. Four collagens are type II membrane proteins that also exist in a soluble form released from the cell surface by shedding. Collagens play structural roles and contribute to mechanical properties, organization, and shape of tissues. They interact with cells via several receptor families and regulate their proliferation, migration, and differentiation. Some collagens have a restricted tissue distribution and hence specific biological functions. PMID:21421911

  19. Fibroblast-Derived MMP-14 Regulates Collagen Homeostasis in Adult Skin.

    PubMed

    Zigrino, Paola; Brinckmann, Jürgen; Niehoff, Anja; Lu, Yinhui; Giebeler, Nives; Eckes, Beate; Kadler, Karl E; Mauch, Cornelia

    2016-08-01

    Proteolytic activities in the extracellular matrix by the matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-14 have been implicated in the remodeling of collagenous proteins during development. To analyze the function of fibroblast-derived MMP-14 in adult skin homeostasis, we generated mice with inducible deletion of MMP-14 in the dermal fibroblast (MMP-14(Sf-/-)). These mice are smaller and display a fibrosis-like phenotype in the skin. The skin of these mice showed increased stiffness and tensile strength but no altered collagen cross-links. In vivo, we measured a significantly increased amount of collagen type I accumulated in the skin of MMP-14(Sf-/-) mice without an increase in collagen fibril diameters. However, bleomycin-induced fibrosis in skin proceeded in a comparable manner in MMP-14(Sf+/+) and MMP-14(Sf-/-) mice, but resolution over time was impaired in MMP-14(Sf-/-) mice. Increased accumulation of collagen type I was detected in MMP-14(Sf-/-) fibroblasts in culture without significant enhancement of collagen de novo synthesis. This points to a degradative but not synthetic phenotype. In support of this, MMP-14(Sf-/-) fibroblasts lost their ability to process fibrillar collagen type I and to activate proMMP-2. Taken together, these data indicate that MMP-14 expression in fibroblasts plays a crucial role in collagen remodeling in adult skin and largely contributes to dermal homeostasis underlying its pathogenic role in fibrotic skin disease. PMID:27066886

  20. Biomedical applications of collagens.

    PubMed

    Ramshaw, John A M

    2016-05-01

    Collagen-based biomedical materials have developed into important, clinically effective materials used in a range of devices that have gained wide acceptance. These devices come with collagen in various formats, including those based on stabilized natural tissues, those that are based on extracted and purified collagens, and designed composite, biosynthetic materials. Further knowledge on the structure and function of collagens has led to on-going developments and improvements. Among these developments has been the production of recombinant collagen materials that are well defined and are disease free. Most recently, a group of bacterial, non-animal collagens has emerged that may provide an excellent, novel source of collagen for use in biomaterials and other applications. These newer collagens are discussed in detail. They can be modified to direct their function, and they can be fabricated into various formats, including films and sponges, while solutions can also be adapted for use in surface coating technologies. PMID:26448097

  1. Collagen vascular disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/001223.htm Collagen vascular disease To use the sharing features on ... were previously said to have "connective tissue" or "collagen vascular" disease. We now have names for many ...

  2. Comparative study of bovine, porcine and avian collagens for the production of a tissue engineered dermis.

    PubMed

    Parenteau-Bareil, Rémi; Gauvin, Robert; Cliche, Simon; Gariépy, Claude; Germain, Lucie; Berthod, François

    2011-10-01

    Combining bovine collagen with chitosan followed by freeze-drying has been shown to produce porous scaffolds suitable for skin and connective tissue engineering applications. In this study collagen extracted from porcine and avian skin was compared with bovine collagen for the production of tissue engineered scaffolds. A similar purity of the collagen extracts was shown by electrophoresis, confirming the reliability of the extraction process. Collagen was solubilized, cross-linked by adding chitosan to the solution and freeze-dried to generate a porous structure suitable for tissue engineering applications. Scaffold porosity and pore morphology were shown to be source dependant, with bovine collagen and avian collagen resulting into the smallest and largest pores, respectively. Scaffolds were seeded with dermal fibroblasts and cultured for 35 days to evaluate the suitability of the different collagen-chitosan scaffolds for long-term tissue engineered dermal substitute maturation in vitro. Cell proliferation and scaffold biocompatibility were found to be similar for all the collagen-chitosan scaffolds, demonstrating their capability to support long-term cell adhesion and growth. The scaffolds contents was assessed by immunohistochemistry and showed increased deposition of extracellular matrix by the cells as a function of time. These results correlate with measurements of the mechanical properties of the scaffolds, since both the ultimate tensile strength and tensile modulus of the cell seeded scaffolds had increased by the end of the culture period. This experiment demonstrates that porcine and avian collagen could be used as an alternative to bovine collagen in the production of collagen-chitosan scaffolding materials. PMID:21723967

  3. Panax ginseng induces human Type I collagen synthesis through activation of Smad signaling.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jongsung; Jung, Eunsun; Lee, Jiyoung; Huh, Sungran; Kim, Jieun; Park, Mijung; So, Jungwoon; Ham, Younggeun; Jung, Kwangseon; Hyun, Chang-Gu; Kim, Yeong Shik; Park, Deokhoon

    2007-01-01

    Skin aging appears to be principally related to a decrease in levels of Type I collagen, the primary component of the dermal layer of skin. It is important to introduce an efficient agent for effective management of skin aging; this agent should have the fewest possible side effects and the greatest wrinkle-reducing effect. In the course of screening collagen production-promoting agents, we obtained Panax ginseng C.A. Meyer. This study was designed to investigate the possible collagen production-promoting activities of Panax ginseng C.A. Meyer root extract (PGRE) in human dermal fibroblast cells. As a first step to this end, human COL1A2 promoter luciferase assay was performed in human dermal fibroblast cells. In this assay, PGRE activated human COL1A2 promoter activity in a concentration-dependent manner. Human Type I procollagen synthesis was also induced by PGRE. These results suggest that PGRE promotes collagen production in human dermal fibroblast cells. Additionally, we have attempted to characterize the mechanism of action of PGRE in Type I procollagen synthesis. PGRE was found to induce the phosphorylation of Smad2, an important transcription factor in the production of Type I procollagen. When applied topically in a human skin primary irritation test, PGRE did not induce any adverse reactions. Therefore, based on these results, we suggest the possibility that PGRE may be considered as an attractive, wrinkle-reducing candidate for topical application. PMID:16890388

  4. Generation of a Functional Non-Shedding Collagen XVII Mouse Model: Relevance of Collagen XVII Shedding in Wound Healing.

    PubMed

    Jacków, Joanna; Schlosser, Andreas; Sormunen, Raija; Nyström, Alexander; Sitaru, Cassian; Tasanen, Kaisa; Bruckner-Tuderman, Leena; Franzke, Claus-Werner

    2016-02-01

    Collagen XVII is a hemidesmosomal anchorage molecule of basal keratinocytes that promotes stable epidermal-dermal adhesion. One unique feature of collagen XVII is that its collagenous ectodomain is constitutively released from the cell surface by a disintegrin and metalloproteinases (ADAMs) through cleavage within its juxtamembranous linker domain. The responsivity of shedding to environmental stimuli and the high stability of the released ectodomain in several tissues suggests functions in cell detachment during epidermal morphogenesis, differentiation, and regeneration, but its physiologic relevance remained elusive. To investigate this, we generated knock-in mice, which express a functional non-sheddable collagen XVII mutant, with a 41 amino acid deletion in the linker domain spanning all ADAM cleavage sites. These mice showed no macroscopic phenotypic changes, were fertile, and had a normal lifespan. Prevention of collagen XVII shedding interfered neither with skin development nor with epidermal adhesion and differentiation. However, it led to faster wound closure due to accelerated re-epithelialization at the wound edges where shedding of wild-type collagen XVII was strongly induced. Taken together, we have successfully generated a functional non-shedding collagen XVII mouse model, which represents a powerful tool to investigate the pathophysiologic relevance of ectodomain shedding during wound regeneration and cancer invasion. PMID:26967482

  5. Zosteriform Collagen Nevus in an Infant.

    PubMed

    Aksu Çerman, Aslı; Aktaş, Ezgi; Kıvanç Altunay, Ilknur Kıvanç; Demirkesen, Cuyan

    2016-06-01

    Connective tissue nevi (CTN) are dermal hamartomas characterized by an imbalance in the amount and distribution of the normal components of the extracellular dermal matrix, specifically collagen, elastin, and/or proteoglicans. The term "CTN" was first mentioned by Lewandowsky in 1921 (1), although it was not accepted until the review by Gutmann in 1926 (2). Classification of CTN was established by Uitto et al. (3) in 1980 according to clinical, genetic, and histopathological features. But this classification did not include zosteriform nevi. The more recent Pierard and Lapiere (4) classification seems to be a more suitable method of classification for zosteriform nevi. They classified CTN into two groups: (1) reticular and (2) adventitial. Zosteriform nevus is a rare form of reticular CTN that is diagnosed according to its clinical distribution. Here we report a collagen nevus in an infant that followed a zosteriform pattern. An 8-month-old girl presented with flesh-colored plaques on the right buttock in a zosteriform distribution, which had been present since birth. The plaques appeared to be well-defined cobblestone-like nodules on palpation (Figure 1). Systemic examination, laboratory tests and radiologic examinations did not reveal any abnormalities. The patient had no associated disease and no history of similar skin findings among family members. A skin punch biopsy was performed from one of the nodules. The histopathologic examination showed significantly increased density of thickened collagen fibers in the lower dermis and subcutaneous tissue. Verhoeff-van Gieson and orcein stains demonstrated the presence of dense collagen fibers with diminished elastic fibers (Figure 2). Four subtypes of collagen tissue nevus have been described: (I) familial cutaneous collagenoma, (II) shagreen patches in tuberous sclerosis, (III) eruptive collagenoma, (IV) and isolated collagenoma (5). Isolated collagenoma with lack of family history is fairly rare. It is sporadic

  6. Hair matrix germinative epidermal cells confer follicle-inducing capabilities on dermal sheath and high passage papilla cells.

    PubMed

    Reynolds, A J; Jahoda, C A

    1996-10-01

    Low passage cultured dermal papilla cells from adult rats stimulate complete hair follicle neogenesis when re-implanted into heterotypic skin. In contrast, cultured sheath cells are non-inductive despite sharing other behavioural characteristics (a common lineage and in situ proximity) with papilla cells. However, since sheath cells can behave inductively in amputated follicles after regenerating the papilla, this poses the question of what influences the sheath to papilla cell transition? During reciprocal tissue interactions specific epidermal cues are crucial to skin appendage development, and while in vivo assays to date have focussed on dermal interactive influence, our aim was to investigate epidermal potential. We have previously observed that hair follicle epidermal cells display exceptional interactive behaviour when combined with follicle dermal cells in vitro. Thus in the present study, hair follicle germinative, outer root sheath or skin basal epidermal cells were separately combined with each of three non-inductive dermal cell types (high passage papilla, low passage sheath or fibroblast) and then implanted into small ear skin wounds. The sheath/germinative and papilla/germinative cell implants repeatedly induced giant vibrissa-type follicles and fibres. In complete contrast, any single cell type and all other forms of recombination were consistently non-inductive. Hence, the adult germinative epidermal cells enable non-inductive adult dermal cells to stimulate hair follicle neogenesis, effectively, by altering their 'status', causing the sheath cells to 'specialise' and the 'aged' papilla cells to 'rejuvenate'. PMID:8898222

  7. Discrete papular dermal mucinosis with Hashimoto thyroiditis: a case report.

    PubMed

    Ertam, Ilgen; Karaca, Nezih; Ceylan, Can; Kazandi, Alican; Alper, Sibel

    2011-03-01

    The cutaneous focal mucinoses are a group of connective tissue disorders characterized by deposition of mucin found either focally or diffusely in the dermis. A 47-year-old woman presented with asymptomatic flesh-colored papules on the neck, inguinal area, intergluteal area, vulvar area, and extremities of 5 months' duration. There was no history of preceding trauma or insect bites. The patient had undergone a subtotal thyroidectomy 21 years prior but had not used any thyroid medication before she was referred to our clinic. Thyroid ultrasonography was consistent with Hashimoto thyroiditis. During dermatologic examination, flesh-colored, well-defined, smooth papules that measured approximately 1.5 x 1 cm in size on the genital region, fingers, face, and scalp were seen. Histopathologic examination of a lesional biopsy revealed no abnormalities in the epidermis. Alcian blue staining showed that abundant deposits of dermal mucin had replaced collagen in the dermis. PMID:21488572

  8. Primary cutaneous dermal mucinosis on herpes zoster scars.

    PubMed

    Camacho, Diana; Feltes, Federico; Machán, Salma; Pielasinski, Úrsula; Fariña, María C; Gavin, Eduardo; Requena, Luis

    2016-07-01

    The term isotopic response refers to the appearance of a new skin disease at the site of another unrelated and already healed skin disorder. Often, the first disease is herpes zoster (HZ). Several cutaneous reactions have been described in a dermatome recently affected by HZ. We present the case of a 33-year-old man who developed whitish papules with a zosteriform distribution on HZ scars. Histopathologic study with hematoxylin and eosin and Alcian blue (pH 2.5) staining demonstrated abundant deposits of mucin interstitially arranged between collagen bundles of the papillary dermis. Cutaneous dermal mucinosis as a postherpetic isotopic response is rare, but it should be added to the list of cutaneous reactions arising in HZ scars. PMID:27529717

  9. Gene Electrotransfer in 3D Reconstructed Human Dermal Tissue.

    PubMed

    Madi, Moinecha; Rols, Marie-Pierre; Gibot, Laure

    2016-01-01

    Gene electrotransfer into the skin is of particular interest for the development of medical applications including DNA vaccination, cancer treatment, wound healing or treatment of local skin disorders. However, such clinical applications are currently limited due to poor understanding of the mechanisms governing DNA electrotransfer within human tissue. Nowadays, most studies are carried out in rodent models but rodent skin varies from human skin in terms of cell composition and architecture. We used a tissue-engineering approach to study gene electrotransfer mechanisms in a human tissue context. Primary human dermal fibroblasts were cultured according to the self-assembly method to produce 3D reconstructed human dermal tissue. In this study, we showed that cells of the reconstructed cutaneous tissue were efficiently electropermeabilized by applying millisecond electric pulses, without affecting their viability. A reporter gene was successfully electrotransferred into this human tissue and gene expression was detected for up to 48h. Interestingly, the transfected cells were solely located on the upper surface of the tissue, where they were in close contact with plasmid DNA solution. Furthermore, we report evidences that electrotransfection success depends on plasmid mobility within tissue- rich in collagens, but not on cell proliferation status. In conclusion, in addition to proposing a reliable alternative to animal experiments, tissue engineering produces valid biological tool for the in vitro study of gene electrotransfer mechanisms in human tissue. PMID:27029947

  10. COLLAGEN STRUCTURE AND STABILITY

    PubMed Central

    Shoulders, Matthew D.; Raines, Ronald T.

    2010-01-01

    Collagen is the most abundant protein in animals. This fibrous, structural protein comprises a right-handed bundle of three parallel, left-handed polyproline II-type helices. Much progress has been made in elucidating the structure of collagen triple helices and the physicochemical basis for their stability. New evidence demonstrates that stereoelectronic effects and preorganization play a key role in that stability. The fibrillar structure of type I collagen–the prototypical collagen fibril–has been revealed in detail. Artificial collagen fibrils that display some properties of natural collagen fibrils are now accessible using chemical synthesis and self-assembly. A rapidly emerging understanding of the mechanical and structural properties of native collagen fibrils will guide further development of artificial collagenous materials for biomedicine and nanotechnology. PMID:19344236

  11. Fibrillar assembly and stability of collagen coating on titanium for improved osteoblast responses.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hae-Won; Li, Long-Hao; Lee, Eun-Jung; Lee, Su-Hee; Kim, Hyoun-Ee

    2005-12-01

    Collagen, as a major constituent of human connective tissues, has been regarded as one of the most important biomaterials. As a coating moiety on Ti hard-tissue implants, the collagen has recently attracted a great deal of attention. This article reports the effects of fibrillar assembly and crosslinking of collagen on its chemical stability and the subsequent osteoblastic responses. The fibrillar self-assembly of collagen was carried out by incubating acid-dissolved collagen in an ionic-buffered medium at 37 degrees C. The degree of assembly was varied with the incubation time and monitored by the turbidity change. The differently assembled collagen was coated on the Ti and crosslinked with a carbodiimide derivative. The partially assembled collagen contained fibrils with varying diameters as well as nonfibrillar aggregates. On the other hand, the fully assembled collagen showed the complete formation of fibrils with uniform diameters of approximately 100-200 nm with periodic stain patterns within the fibrils, which are typical of native collagen fibers. Through this fibrillar assembly, the collagen coating had significantly improved chemical stability in both the saline and collagenase media. The subsequent crosslinking step also improved the stability of the collagen coating, particularly in the unassembled collagen. The fibrillar assembly and the crosslinking of collagen significantly influenced the osteoblastic cell responses. Without the assembly, the collagen layer on Ti adversely affected the cell attachment and proliferation. However, those cellular responses were improved significantly when the collagen was assembled to fibrils and the assembly degree was increased. After crosslinking the collagen coating, these cellular responses were significantly enhanced in the case of the unassembled collagen but were not altered much in the assembled collagen. Based on these observations, it is suggested that the fibrillar assembly and the crosslinking of collagen

  12. Differentiation of human umbilical cord mesenchymal stem cells into dermal fibroblasts in vitro

    SciTech Connect

    Han, Yanfu; Chai, Jiake; Sun, Tianjun; Li, Dongjie; Tao, Ran

    2011-10-07

    Highlights: {yields} Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are potential seed cells for tissue-engineered skin. {yields} Tissue-derived umbilical cord MSCs (UCMSCs) can readily be isolated in vitro. {yields} We induce UCMSCs to differentiate into dermal fibroblasts via conditioned medium. {yields} Collagen type I and collagen type III mRNA level was higher in differentiated cells. {yields} UCMSCs-derived fibroblast-like cells strongly express fibroblast-specific protein. -- Abstract: Tissue-derived umbilical cord mesenchymal stem cells (UCMSCs) can be readily obtained, avoid ethical or moral constraints, and show excellent pluripotency and proliferation potential. UCMSCs are considered to be a promising source of stem cells in regenerative medicine. In this study, we collected newborn umbilical cord tissue under sterile conditions and isolated UCMSCs through a tissue attachment method. UCMSC cell surface markers were examined using flow cytometry. On the third passage, UCMSCs were induced to differentiate into dermal fibroblasts in conditioned induction media. The induction results were detected using immunofluorescence with a fibroblast-specific monoclonal antibody and real time PCR for type I and type III collagen. UCMSCs exhibited a fibroblast-like morphology and reached 90% confluency 14 to 18 days after primary culture. Cultured UCMSCs showed strong positive staining for CD73, CD29, CD44, CD105, and HLA-I, but not CD34, CD45, CD31, or HLA-DR. After differentiation, immunostaining for collagen type I, type III, fibroblast-specific protein, vimentin, and desmin were all strongly positive in induced cells, and staining was weak or negative in non-induced cells; total transcript production of collagen type I and collagen type III mRNA was higher in induced cells than in non-induced cells. These results demonstrate that UCMSCs can be induced to differentiate into fibroblasts with conditioned induction media and, in turn, could be used as seed cells for tissue

  13. Deficiency of CRTAP in non-lethal recessive osteogenesis imperfecta reduces collagen deposition into matrix

    PubMed Central

    Valli, M; Barnes, AM; Gallanti, A; Cabral, WA; Viglio, S; Weis, MA; Makareeva, E; Eyre, D; Leikin, S; Antoniazzi, F; Marini, JC; Mottes, M

    2013-01-01

    Deficiency of any component of the ER-resident collagen prolyl 3-hydroxylation complex causes recessive osteogenesis imperfecta (OI). The complex modifies the α1(I)Pro986 residue and contains cartilage-associated protein (CRTAP), prolyl 3-hydroxylase 1 (P3H1) and cyclophilin B (CyPB). Fibroblasts normally secrete about 10% of CRTAP. Most CRTAP mutations cause a null allele and lethal type VII OI. We identified a 7-year-old Egyptian boy with non-lethal type VII OI and investigated the effects of his null CRTAP mutation on collagen biochemistry, the prolyl 3-hydroxylation complex, and collagen in extracellular matrix. The proband is homozygous for an insertion/deletion in CRTAP (c.118_133del16insTACCC). His dermal fibroblasts synthesize fully overmodified type I collagen, and 3-hydroxylate only 5% of α1(I)Pro986. CRTAP transcripts are 10% of control. CRTAP protein is absent from proband cells, with residual P3H1 and normal CyPB levels. Dermal collagen fibril diameters are significantly increased. By immunofluorescence of long-term cultures, we identified a severe deficiency (10–15% of control) of collagen deposited in extracellular matrix, with disorganization of the minimal fibrillar network. Quantitative pulse-chase experiments corroborate deficiency of matrix deposition, rather than increased matrix turnover. We conclude that defects of extracellular matrix, as well as intracellular defects in collagen modification, contribute to the pathology of type VII OI. PMID:21955071

  14. Type II achondrogenesis-hypochondrogenesis: identification of abnormal type II collagen.

    PubMed

    Godfrey, M; Hollister, D W

    1988-12-01

    We have extended the study of a mild case of type II achondrogenesis-hypochondrogenesis to include biochemical analyses of cartilage, bone, and the collagens produced by dermal fibroblasts. Type I collagen extracted from bone and types I and III collagen produced by dermal fibroblasts were normal, as was the hexosamine ratio of cartilage proteoglycans. Hyaline cartilage, however, contained approximately equal amounts of types I and II collagen and decreased amounts of type XI collagen. Unlike the normal SDS-PAGE mobility. Two-dimensional SDS-PAGE revealed extensive overmodification of all type II cyanogen bromide peptides in a pattern consistent with heterozygosity for an abnormal pro alpha 1(II) chain which impaired the assembly and/or folding of type II collagen. This interpretation implies that dominant mutations of the COL2A1 gene may cause type II achondrogenesis-hypochondrogenesis. More generally, emerging data implicating defects of type II collagen in the type II achondrogenesis-hypochondrogenesis-spondyloepiphyseal dysplasia congenita spectrum and in the Kniest-Stickler syndrome spectrum suggest that diverse mutations of this gene may be associated with widely differing phenotypic outcome. PMID:3195588

  15. Cell therapy for full-thickness wounds: are fetal dermal cells a potential source?

    PubMed

    Akershoek, J J; Vlig, M; Talhout, W; Boekema, B K H L; Richters, C D; Beelen, R H J; Brouwer, K M; Middelkoop, E; Ulrich, M M W

    2016-04-01

    The application of autologous dermal fibroblasts has been shown to improve burn wound healing. However, a major hurdle is the availability of sufficient healthy skin as a cell source. We investigated fetal dermal cells as an alternative source for cell-based therapy for skin regeneration. Human (hFF), porcine fetal (pFF) or autologous dermal fibroblasts (AF) were seeded in a collagen-elastin substitute (Novomaix, NVM), which was applied in combination with an autologous split thickness skin graft (STSG) to evaluate the effects of these cells on wound healing in a porcine excisional wound model. Transplantation of wounds with NVM+hFF showed an increased influx of inflammatory cells (e.g., neutrophils, macrophages, CD4(+) and CD8(+) lymphocytes) compared to STSG, acellular NVM (Acell-NVM) and NVM+AF at post-surgery days 7 and/or 14. Wounds treated with NVM+pFF presented only an increase in CD8(+) lymphocyte influx. Furthermore, reduced alpha-smooth muscle actin (αSMA) expression in wound areas and reduced contraction of the wounds was observed with NVM+AF compared to Acell-NVM. Xenogeneic transplantation of NVM+hFF increased αSMA expression in wounds compared to NVM+AF. An improved scar quality was observed for wounds treated with NVM+AF compared to Acell-NVM, NVM+hFF and NVM+pFF at day 56. In conclusion, application of autologous fibroblasts improved the overall outcome of wound healing in comparison to fetal dermal cells and Acell-NVM, whereas application of fetal dermal fibroblasts in NVM did not improve wound healing of full-thickness wounds in a porcine model. Although human fetal dermal cells demonstrated an increased immune response, this did not seem to affect scar quality. PMID:26453400

  16. 40 CFR 798.2250 - Dermal toxicity.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 33 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Dermal toxicity. 798.2250 Section 798.2250 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) TOXIC SUBSTANCES CONTROL ACT (CONTINUED) HEALTH EFFECTS TESTING GUIDELINES Subchronic Exposure § 798.2250 Dermal toxicity. (a) Purpose. In the assessment and evaluation of...

  17. ISSUES IN DERMAL EXPOSURE OF INFANTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Infants' dermal exposures to environmental contaminants are expected to be different and, in many cases, much higher than adults. Because of the potential importance of the dermal exposure route, there is currently a significant amount of work being conducted to reduce the uncer...

  18. 40 CFR 798.4100 - Dermal sensitization.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Dermal sensitization. 798.4100 Section 798.4100 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) TOXIC SUBSTANCES CONTROL ACT (CONTINUED) HEALTH EFFECTS TESTING GUIDELINES Specific Organ/Tissue Toxicity § 798.4100 Dermal sensitization. (a) Purpose. In the...

  19. Paracrine Effects of Adipose-Derived Stem Cells on Keratinocytes and Dermal Fibroblasts

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Seung Ho; Jin, Sang Yun; Song, Jin Seok; Seo, Kyle K.

    2012-01-01

    Background Adipose-derived stem cells (ASCs) are mesenchymal stem cells that have recently been applied to tissue repair and regeneration. Keratinocytes and dermal fibroblasts play key roles in cutaneous wound healing. Objective We investigated the paracrine effects of ASCs on HaCaT cells (i.e., immortalized human keratinocytes) and human dermal fibroblasts to explore the mechanism of the effects of ASCs on cutaneous wound healing. Methods HaCaT cells and primary cultured human dermal fibroblasts were treated with 50% conditioned medium of ASCs (ASC-CM). Viability, in vitro wound healing, and fibroblast-populated collagen lattice contraction assays were conducted, and reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) for the type I procollagen α1 chain gene was performed. Results The proliferation of HaCaT cells and fibroblasts was increased by ASC-CM in the viability assay. ASC-CM promoted in vitro wound healing of HaCaT cells and increased the contraction of the fibroblast-populated collagen lattice. RT-PCR showed that the transcription of the type I procollagen α1 chain gene in fibroblasts was upregulated by ASC-CM. Conclusion The stimulatory effect of ASC on cutaneous wound healing may be partially mediated by paracrine effects of ASCs on other skin cells. Application of ASCs or ASC-derived molecules could be an innovative therapeutic approach in the treatment of chronic wounds and other conditions. PMID:22577262

  20. The fine structure of the developing pelvic fin dermal skeleton in the trout Salmo gairdneri.

    PubMed

    Géraudie, J; Landis, W J

    1982-02-01

    The morphogenetic and ultrastructural features of the dermal skeleton in the pelvic fin bud of a teleost, the rainbow trout Salmo gairdneri, have been examined by light and electron microscopy. The principal structural components observed are lepidotrichia and actinotrichia. Lepidotrichia consist of two parallel and symmetrical bony demirays that form jointed segments within the fin. The demirays calcify in a proximodistal direction within the extracellular collagen network of the basal lamella belonging to the epidermal-dermal interface of the fin. Needle- and plate-like particles of a solid mineral phase appear to be associated with the collagen fibrils and with a fine, granular, interfibrillar material central to the demirays. Cellular processes and membrane-bound vesicles are absent from the regions of calcification. During fin growth, the bony, acellular lepidotrichia are separated from the epidermal-dermal interface by infiltrating mesenchymal cells in proximal fin regions; in distal areas, the lepidotrichia remain within the basal lamella. The actinotrichia are extensive unmineralized rods of elastoidin that occupy the distal margin of the fin and precede the differentiation of lepidotrichia. Once the lepidotrichia form, actinotrichia lie preferentially between their demirays. In some instances, structural interactions are suggested between actinotrichia and lepidotrichia. Considerations of embryologic and structural features of fin components fail to support the hypothesis that individual segments of lepidotrichia are modified scales in all fish. PMID:7072614

  1. Pioneering technique using Acellular Dermal Matrix in the rescue of a radiation ulcer

    PubMed Central

    NASEEM, S.; PATEL, A.D.; DEVALIA, H.

    2016-01-01

    Background Radiotherapy as an adjuvant to mastectomy is integral to the treatment of breast cancer, but can result in skin ulceration. Skin ulceration following radiotherapy is traditionally managed by removing the implant and allowing the skin to heal by secondary intention. Case report A 42-year-old woman underwent radiotherapy following a breast reconstruction. She developed a 2 x 3cm radiation ulcer. The ulcer was managed by removing the implant and performing capsulectomy. A Beckers 50 expander was placed and reinforced with acellular dermal matrix inferolaterally. At follow-up the patient had a good cosmetic outcome. Conclusion Post-radiation skin ulcers present a challenge to treat with no current standardised management. The use of acellular dermal matrix may present a new technique to promote healing in these testing cases. PMID:27142826

  2. Pulsed low-intensity ultrasound increases proliferation and extracelluar matrix production by human dermal fibroblasts in three-dimensional culture

    PubMed Central

    Bohari, Siti PM; Grover, Liam M; Hukins, David WL

    2015-01-01

    This study evaluated the effect of pulsed low-intensity ultrasound on cell proliferation, collagen production and glycosaminoglycan deposition by human dermal fibroblasts encapsulated in alginate. Hoechst 33258 assay for cell number, hydroxyproline assay for collagen content, dimethylmethylene blue assay for glycosaminoglycan content and scanning electron microscopy were performed on the encapsulated cells treated with pulsed low-intensity ultrasound and a control group that remained untreated. Pulsed low-intensity ultrasound showed a significant effect on cell proliferation and collagen deposition but no consistent pattern for glycosaminoglycan content. Alcian blue staining showed that glycosaminoglycans were deposited around the cells in both treated and control groups. These results suggest that pulsed low-intensity ultrasound alone shows a positive effect on cell proliferation and collagen deposition even without growth factor supplements. PMID:26668710

  3. Periodontal regeneration with stem cells-seeded collagen-hydroxyapatite scaffold.

    PubMed

    Liu, Zeping; Yin, Xing; Ye, Qingsong; He, Wulin; Ge, Mengke; Zhou, Xiaofu; Hu, Jing; Zou, Shujuan

    2016-07-01

    Re-establishing compromised periodontium to its original structure, properties and function is demanding, but also challenging, for successful orthodontic treatment. In this study, the periodontal regeneration capability of collagen-hydroxyapatite scaffolds, seeded with bone marrow stem cells, was investigated in a canine labial alveolar bone defect model. Bone marrow stem cells were isolated, expanded and characterized. Porous collagen-hydroxyapatite scaffold and cross-linked collagen-hydroxyapatite scaffold were prepared. Attachment, migration, proliferation and morphology of bone marrow stem cells, co-cultured with porous collagen-hydroxyapatite or cross-linked collagen-hydroxyapatite, were evaluated in vitro. The periodontal regeneration capability of collagen-hydroxyapatite scaffold with or without bone marrow stem cells was tested in six beagle dogs, with each dog carrying one sham-operated site as healthy control, and three labial alveolar bone defects untreated to allow natural healing, treated with bone marrow stem cells - collagen-hydroxyapatite scaffold implant or collagen-hydroxyapatite scaffold implant, respectively. Animals were euthanized at 3 and 6 months (3 animals per group) after implantation and the resected maxillary and mandibular segments were examined using micro-computed tomography scan, H&E staining, Masson's staining and histometric evaluation. Bone marrow stem cells were successfully isolated and demonstrated self-renewal and multi-potency in vitro. The porous collagen-hydroxyapatite and cross-linked collagen-hydroxyapatite had average pore sizes of 415 ± 20 µm and 203 ± 18 µm and porosity of 69 ± 0.5% and 50 ± 0.2%, respectively. The attachment, proliferation and migration of bone marrow stem cells were satisfactory on both porous collagen-hydroxyapatite and cross-linked collagen-hydroxyapatite scaffolds. Implantation of bone marrow stem cells - collagen-hydroxyapatite or collagen-hydroxyapatite scaffold in

  4. Distinct fibroblast lineages determine dermal architecture in skin development and repair

    PubMed Central

    Driskell, Ryan R.; Simons, Ben D.; Charalambous, Marika; Ferron, Sacri R.; Herault, Yann; Pavlovic, Guillaume; Ferguson-Smith, Anne C.; Watt, Fiona M.

    2013-01-01

    Fibroblasts are the major mesenchymal cell type in connective tissue and deposit the collagen and elastic fibers of the extracellular matrix (ECM)1. Even within a single tissue fibroblasts exhibit remarkable functional diversity, but it is not known whether this reflects the existence of a differentiation hierarchy or is a response to different environmental factors. Here we show, using transplantation assays and lineage tracing, that the fibroblasts of skin connective tissue arise from two distinct lineages. One forms the upper dermis, including the dermal papilla that regulates hair growth and the arrector pili muscle (APM), which controls piloerection. The other forms the lower dermis, including the reticular fibroblasts that synthesise the bulk of the fibrillar ECM, and the pre-adipocytes and adipocytes of the hypodermis. The upper lineage is required for hair follicle formation. In wounded adult skin, the initial wave of dermal repair is mediated by the lower lineage and upper dermal fibroblasts are recruited only during re-epithelialisation. Epidermal beta-catenin activation stimulates expansion of the upper dermal lineage, rendering wounds permissive for hair follicle formation. Our findings explain why wounding is linked to formation of ECM-rich scar tissue that lacks hair follicles2-4. They also form a platform for discovering fibroblast lineages in other tissues and for examining fibroblast changes in ageing and disease. PMID:24336287

  5. Enigmatic insight into collagen.

    PubMed

    Deshmukh, Shrutal Narendra; Dive, Alka M; Moharil, Rohit; Munde, Prashant

    2016-01-01

    Collagen is a unique, triple helical molecule which forms the major part of extracellular matrix. It is the most abundant protein in the human body, representing 30% of its dry weight. It is the fibrous structural protein that makes up the white fibers (collagen fibers) of skin, tendons, bones, cartilage and all other connective tissues. Collagens are not only essential for the mechanical resistance and resilience of multicellular organisms, but are also signaling molecules defining cellular shape and behavior. The human body has at least 16 types of collagen, but the most prominent types are I, II and III. Collagens are produced by several cell types and are distinguishable by their molecular compositions, morphologic characteristics, distribution, functions and pathogenesis. This is the major fibrous glycoprotein present in the extracellular matrix and in connective tissue and helps in maintaining the structural integrity of these tissues. It has a triple helical structure. Various studies have proved that mutations that modify folding of the triple helix result in identifiable genetic disorders. Collagen diseases share certain similarities with autoimmune diseases, because autoantibodies specific to each collagen disease are produced. Therefore, this review highlights the role of collagen in normal health and also the disorders associated with structural and functional defects in collagen. PMID:27601823

  6. Collagen and gelatin.

    PubMed

    Liu, Dasong; Nikoo, Mehdi; Boran, Gökhan; Zhou, Peng; Regenstein, Joe M

    2015-01-01

    Collagen and gelatin have been widely used in the food, pharmaceutical, and cosmetic industries due to their excellent biocompatibility, easy biodegradability, and weak antigenicity. Fish collagen and gelatin are of renewed interest, owing to the safety and religious concerns of their mammalian counterparts. The structure of collagen has been studied using various modern technologies, and interpretation of the raw data should be done with caution. The structure of collagen may vary with sources and seasons, which may affect its applications and optimal extraction conditions. Numerous studies have investigated the bioactivities and biological effects of collagen, gelatin, and their hydrolysis peptides, using both in vitro and in vivo assay models. In addition to their established nutritional value as a protein source, collagen and collagen-derived products may exert various potential biological activities on cells in the extracellular matrix through the corresponding food-derived peptides after ingestion, and this might justify their applications in dietary supplements and pharmaceutical preparations. Moreover, an increasing number of novel applications have been found for collagen and gelatin. Therefore, this review covers the current understanding of the structure, bioactivities, and biological effects of collagen, gelatin, and gelatin hydrolysates as well as their most recent applications. PMID:25884286

  7. Enigmatic insight into collagen

    PubMed Central

    Deshmukh, Shrutal Narendra; Dive, Alka M; Moharil, Rohit; Munde, Prashant

    2016-01-01

    Collagen is a unique, triple helical molecule which forms the major part of extracellular matrix. It is the most abundant protein in the human body, representing 30% of its dry weight. It is the fibrous structural protein that makes up the white fibers (collagen fibers) of skin, tendons, bones, cartilage and all other connective tissues. Collagens are not only essential for the mechanical resistance and resilience of multicellular organisms, but are also signaling molecules defining cellular shape and behavior. The human body has at least 16 types of collagen, but the most prominent types are I, II and III. Collagens are produced by several cell types and are distinguishable by their molecular compositions, morphologic characteristics, distribution, functions and pathogenesis. This is the major fibrous glycoprotein present in the extracellular matrix and in connective tissue and helps in maintaining the structural integrity of these tissues. It has a triple helical structure. Various studies have proved that mutations that modify folding of the triple helix result in identifiable genetic disorders. Collagen diseases share certain similarities with autoimmune diseases, because autoantibodies specific to each collagen disease are produced. Therefore, this review highlights the role of collagen in normal health and also the disorders associated with structural and functional defects in collagen. PMID:27601823

  8. Camphor Induces Proliferative and Anti-senescence Activities in Human Primary Dermal Fibroblasts and Inhibits UV-Induced Wrinkle Formation in Mouse Skin.

    PubMed

    Tran, Thao Anh; Ho, Manh Tin; Song, Yeon Woo; Cho, Moonjae; Cho, Somi Kim

    2015-12-01

    Camphor ((1R)-1,7,7-trimethylbicyclo[2.2.1]heptan-2-one), a bicyclic monoterpene, is one of the major constituents of essential oils from various herbs such as rosemary, lavender, and sage. In this study, we investigated the beneficial effects of camphor as a botanical ingredient in cosmetics. Camphor induced the proliferation of human primary dermal fibroblasts in a dose-dependent manner via the PI3K/AKT and ERK signaling pathways. Camphor attenuated the elevation of senescence associated with β-galactosidase (SA-β-gal) activity. Elastase activity decreased, while the total amount of collagen increased, in a dose- and time-dependent manner in human primary dermal fibroblasts treated with camphor. Camphor induced the expression of collagen IA, collagen IIIA, collagen IVA, and elastin in human primary dermal fibroblasts. In addition, posttreatment with 26 and 52 mM camphor for 2 weeks led to a significant reduction in the expression of MMP1 but increases in the expression of collagen IA, IIIA, and elastin in mouse skin exposed to UV for 4 weeks. These posttreatments also reduced the depths of the epidermis and subcutaneous fat layer in UV-exposed mouse skin. Taken together, these findings suggest camphor to be a potent wound healing and antiwrinkle agent with considerable potential for use in cosmeceuticals. PMID:26458283

  9. Three Dimensional Collagen Scaffold Promotes Intrinsic Vascularisation for Tissue Engineering Applications

    PubMed Central

    Chan, Elsa C.; Kuo, Shyh-Ming; Kong, Anne M.; Morrison, Wayne A.; Dusting, Gregory J.; Mitchell, Geraldine M.

    2016-01-01

    Here, we describe a porous 3-dimensional collagen scaffold material that supports capillary formation in vitro, and promotes vascularization when implanted in vivo. Collagen scaffolds were synthesized from type I bovine collagen and have a uniform pore size of 80 μm. In vitro, scaffolds seeded with primary human microvascular endothelial cells suspended in human fibrin gel formed CD31 positive capillary-like structures with clear lumens. In vivo, after subcutaneous implantation in mice, cell-free collagen scaffolds were vascularized by host neovessels, whilst a gradual degradation of the scaffold material occurred over 8 weeks. Collagen scaffolds, impregnated with human fibrinogen gel, were implanted subcutaneously inside a chamber enclosing the femoral vessels in rats. Angiogenic sprouts from the femoral vessels invaded throughout the scaffolds and these degraded completely after 4 weeks. Vascular volume of the resulting constructs was greater than the vascular volume of constructs from chambers implanted with fibrinogen gel alone (42.7±5.0 μL in collagen scaffold vs 22.5±2.3 μL in fibrinogen gel alone; p<0.05, n = 7). In the same model, collagen scaffolds seeded with human adipose-derived stem cells (ASCs) produced greater increases in vascular volume than did cell-free collagen scaffolds (42.9±4.0 μL in collagen scaffold with human ASCs vs 25.7±1.9 μL in collagen scaffold alone; p<0.05, n = 4). In summary, these collagen scaffolds are biocompatible and could be used to grow more robust vascularized tissue engineering grafts with improved the survival of implanted cells. Such scaffolds could also be used as an assay model for studies on angiogenesis, 3-dimensional cell culture, and delivery of growth factors and cells in vivo. PMID:26900837

  10. Cutaneous collagenous vasculopathy: A rare case report

    PubMed Central

    Rambhia, Kinjal Deepak; Hadawale, Snehal D.; Khopkar, Uday S.

    2016-01-01

    Cutaneous collagenous vasculopathy (CCV) is a distinct, rare, and underdiagnosed condition. We report a case of CCV in a 50-year-old woman presenting as asymptomatic, erythematous to hyperpigmented nonblanchable macules over both the lower extremities. The clinical differential diagnosis of the lesions was pigmented purpuric dermatoses (Schamberg's purpura) and cutaneous small vessel vasculitis. Histology of the lesions revealed dilated superficial dermal vessels with abundant pink hyaline material in the vessel wall, which stained with periodic acid Schiff stain. The patient was diagnosed as CCV. This condition remains largely underdiagnosed and is commonly mistaken for pigmented purpuric dermatosis or generalized essential telangiectasia. Emphasis on the differentiation of CCV from its clinical and histological mimicks is made. PMID:26955587

  11. Species Typing in Dermal Leishmaniasis

    PubMed Central

    Dujardin, Jean-Claude

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY Leishmania is an infectious protozoan parasite related to African and American trypanosomes. All Leishmania species that are pathogenic to humans can cause dermal disease. When one is confronted with cutaneous leishmaniasis, identification of the causative species is relevant in both clinical and epidemiological studies, case management, and control. This review gives an overview of the currently existing and most used assays for species discrimination, with a critical appraisal of the limitations of each technique. The consensus taxonomy for the genus is outlined, including debatable species designations. Finally, a numerical literature analysis is presented that describes which methods are most used in various countries and regions in the world, and for which purposes. PMID:25672782

  12. Differentiation within autologous fibrin scaffolds of porcine dermal cells with the mesenchymal stem cell phenotype

    SciTech Connect

    Puente, Pilar de la

    2013-02-01

    Porcine mesenchymal stem cells (pMSCs) are an attractive source of cells for tissue engineering because their properties are similar to those of human stem cells. pMSCs can be found in different tissues but their dermal origin has not been studied in depth. Additionally, MSCs differentiation in monolayer cultures requires subcultured cells, and these cells are at risk of dedifferentiation when implanting them into living tissue. Following this, we attempted to characterize the MSCs phenotype of porcine dermal cells and to evaluate their cellular proliferation and differentiation in autologous fibrin scaffolds (AFSs). Dermal biopsies and blood samples were obtained from 12 pigs. Dermal cells were characterized by flow cytometry. Frozen autologous plasma was used to prepare AFSs. pMSC differentiation was studied in standard structures (monolayers and pellets) and in AFSs. The pMSCs expressed the CD90 and CD29 markers of the mesenchymal lineage. AFSs afforded adipogenic, osteogenic and chondrogenic differentiation. The porcine dermis can be proposed to be a good source of MSCs with adequate proliferative capacity and a suitable expression of markers. The pMSCs also showed optimal proliferation and differentiation in AFSs, such that these might serve as a promising autologous and implantable material for use in tissue engineering. -- Highlights: ► Low fibrinogen concentration provides a suitable matrix for cell migration and differentiation. ► Autologous fibrin scaffolds is a promising technique in tissue engineering. ► Dermal cells are an easily accessible mesenchymal stem cell source. ► Fibrin scaffolds afforded adipogenic, osteogenic and chondrogenic differentiation.

  13. Collagen: Biochemistry, biomechanics, biotechnology

    SciTech Connect

    Nimni, M.E.

    1988-01-01

    This book is an up-to-date reference for new ideas, information, and concepts in collagen research. The first volume emphasizes the relationship between the molecular structure and function of collagen, including descriptions of collagen types which exist in tissues as well as how these molecules organize into fibrils and the nature of the chemical crosslinks which stabilize them. In Volume II the biomechanical behavior of various specialized tissues, abnormal accumulation of collagen in the form of scars of fibrous infiltration are examined/and wound healing, tissue regulation and repair are covered in detail. Volume III explores the increasing application of collagen technology to the field of bioprosthesis, including the production of heart valve bioprosthesis, blood vessels, ligament substitutes, and bone substitutes.

  14. Oxidative damage to collagen.

    PubMed

    Monboisse, J C; Borel, J P

    1992-01-01

    Extracellular matrix molecules, such as collagens, are good targets for oxygen free radicals. Collagen is the only protein susceptible to fragmentation by superoxide anion as demonstrated by the liberation of small 4-hydroxyproline-containing-peptides. It seems likely that hydroxyl radicals in the presence of oxygen cleave collagen into small peptides, and the cleavage seems to be specific to proline or 4-hydroxyproline residues. Hydroxyl radicals in the absence of oxygen or hypochlorous acid do not induce fragmentation of collagen molecules, but they trigger a polymerization of collagen through the formation of new cross-links such as dityrosine or disulfure bridges. Moreover, these cross-links can not explain the totality of high molecular weight components generated under these experimental conditions, and the nature of new cross-links induced by hydroxyl radicals or hypochlorous acid remains unclear. PMID:1333311

  15. Assessment of dermal exposure and histopathologic changes of different sized nano-silver in healthy adult rabbits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    kazem Koohi, Mohammad; Hejazy, Marzie; Asadi, Farzad; Asadian, Peyman

    2011-07-01

    The purpose of this study is to evaluate the dermal toxicity (Irritation/Corrosion) of three sizes of nanosilver particles (10, 20 and 30 nm) during 3 min, 1 and 4 hours according to the OECD/OCDE guideline Histopathological effects in secondary organs from liver, kidney, heart, spleen and brain 14 day post dermal administration are also reported. 10 and 20 nm Ag nanoparticles treated group showed well defined dermal erythema and oedema. Histopathological findings of 10 and 20 nm (4 hours exposure) on 14-day post dermal administration showed hyperkeratosis, acanthosis, hair-filled follicles and papillomatosis in an irregular epidermis, fibrosis, hyperemia, erythema, intracellular oedema and hyalinisation of collagen in dermis of skin. Liver revealed midzonal and periacinar necrosis, portal mononuclear infiltration, liver fatty change, liver congestion and hyperemic central vein. Splenic red pulp congestion and white pulp hyperreactivity, splenic trabeculae and sinusoidal congestion and hyaline change were found in spleen. Fatty degeneration in some cardiovascular cells and subendocardial hemorrhage without inflammation was perceived. Picnotic appearance of pyramidal neurons in the brain cortex, gliosis and mild perineuronal oedema ischemic cell change and hyperemic meninges was observed in brain. Our research concluded that dermal exposure to lesser sizes of silver nanoparticles is more disastrous than greater ones.

  16. The in vitro growth of a three-dimensional human dermal replacement using a single-pass perfusion system.

    PubMed

    Halberstadt, C R; Hardin, R; Bezverkov, K; Snyder, D; Allen, L; Landeen, L

    1994-04-01

    A human dermal replacement has been developed by seeding human neonatal dermal fibroblasts onto a biosorbable polyglactin (polyglycolide/polylactide) mesh and culturing in a bioreactor. The mesh provides the proper environment for the cells to attach, grow in a three-dimensional array, and establish a tissue matrix over a 2- to 3-week culture period. The dermal replacement has been characterized and found to contain a variety of naturally occurring dermal matrix proteins, including fibronectin, glycosaminoglycans, and collagen types I and III. To efficiently and reproducibly produce this dermal tissue equivalent, a closed, single-pass perfusion system was developed and compared with a static process. In the single-pas perfusion system, growth medium (containing ascorbic acid) was perfused around the 4 x 6 in. pieces of mesh at specific flow rates determined by nutrient consumption and waste production rates. The flow rates used for this system indicate that a diffusion-limited regime exists with a mean residence time greater than 1 h for essential nutrients and factors. By controlling glucose concentrations in the system to a delta of 0.70 g/L from the inlet to the outlet of the bioreactor, it took 6 fewer days to grow a tissue similar to that produced by the static system. PMID:18615797

  17. Osteocalcin enhances bone remodeling around hydroxyapatite/collagen composites.

    PubMed

    Rammelt, Stefan; Neumann, Mirjam; Hanisch, Uwe; Reinstorf, Antje; Pompe, Wolfgang; Zwipp, Hans; Biewener, Achim

    2005-06-01

    The effect of osteocalcin (OC), an extracellular bone matrix protein, on bone healing around hydroxyapatite/collagen composites was investigated. Cylindrical nanocrystalline hydroxyapatite implants of 2.5-mm diameter containing 2.5% biomimetically mineralized collagen type I were inserted press-fit into the tibial head of adult Wistar rats. To one implant group, 10 mug/g OC was added. Six specimens per group were analyzed at 2, 7, 14, 28, and 56 days. After 14 days, newly formed woven bone had reached the implant surface of the OC implants whereas a broad fibrous interface could still be observed around controls. Woven bone was formed directly around both implant groups after 28 days and had been replaced partially by lamellar bone around the OC implants only. No significant differences in total bone contact were seen between both groups after 56 days. The higher number of phagocytosing cells and osteoclasts characterized immunohistochemically with ED1, cathepsin D, and tartate-resistant alkaline phosphatase around the OC implants at the early stages of bone healing suggests an earlier onset of bone remodeling. The earlier and increased expression of bone-specific matrix proteins and multifunctional adhesion proteins (osteopontin, bone sialoprotein, CD44) at the interface around the OC implants indicates that OC may accelerate bone formation and regeneration. This study supports the observations from in vitro studies that OC activates both osteoclasts and osteoblasts during early bone formation. PMID:15800855

  18. A Prospective Study Assessing Complication Rates and Patient-Reported Outcomes in Breast Reconstructions Using a Novel, Deep Dermal Human Acellular Dermal Matrix

    PubMed Central

    Vu, Michael M.; De Oliveira, Gildasio S.; Mayer, Kristen E.; Blough, Jordan T.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Background: The value proposition of an acellular dermal matrix (ADM) taken from the deep dermis is that the allograft may be more porous, allowing for enhanced integration and revascularization. In turn, this characteristic may attenuate complications related to foreign body reactions, seromas, and infection. However, this is juxtaposed against the potential loss of allograft structural integrity, with subsequent risk of malposition and extrusion. Despite the active use of novel, deep dermal ADMs, the clinical outcomes of this new technology has not been well studied. Methods: This is a prospective study to evaluate surgical and patient-reported outcomes using a deep dermal ADM, FlexHD Pliable. Surgical outcomes and BREAST-Q patient-reported outcomes were evaluated postoperatively at 2- and 6-month time points. Results: Seventy-two breasts (41 patients) underwent reconstruction. Complication rate was 12.5%, including 2 hematomas and 7 flap necroses. One case of flap necrosis led to reconstructive failure. Notably, there were no cases of infection, seroma, or implant extrusion or malposition. Average BREAST-Q scores were satisfaction with outcome (70.13 ± 23.87), satisfaction with breasts (58.53 ± 20.00), psychosocial well being (67.97 ± 20.93), sexual well being (54.11 ± 27.72), and physical well being (70.45 ± 15.44). Two-month postoperative BREAST-Q scores decreased compared with baseline and returned to baseline by 6 months. Postoperative radiation therapy had a negative effect on satisfaction with breasts (P = 0.004) and sexual well being (P = 0.006). Conclusions: Deep dermal ADM is a novel modification of traditional allograft technology. Use of the deep dermal ADM yielded acceptably low complication rates and satisfactory patient-reported outcomes. PMID:26894010

  19. Dermal filler complications: a clinicopathologic study with a spectrum of histologic reaction patterns.

    PubMed

    El-Khalawany, Mohamed; Fawzy, Sameh; Saied, Asmaa; Al Said, Mohammed; Amer, Ahmed; Eassa, Bayoumi

    2015-02-01

    Although dermal fillers are generally accepted as safe and well-tolerable cosmetic tools, adverse reaction still forms a prognostic problem. The aim of this study was to demonstrate the clinicopathologic patterns of dermal filler complications in our center. A 5-year single-center study that included patients complained from filler complications and referred to the dermatopathology unit in Al-Azhar University for histologic assessment. The study included 38 female patients with an average age of 47 years. The mean onset of complications was 14.6 ± 5.27 months after injection. The injected material included hyaluronic acid (18.4%), silicone (52.6%), bovine collagen (15.8%) and polyacrylamide hydrogel (13.2%). Most lesions were located on the face (55.3%), less commonly on the hands (18.4%), buttocks (21%), and rarely on the vulva (5.3%). The clinical spectrum included indurated plaque (23.7%), nodular lesion (31.6%), inflammatory mass (15.8%), atrophic lesion (10.5%), skin discoloration (13.1%) and ulceration (5.3%). Histologically, granulomatous reaction was the major finding, either a foreign body granuloma (34.2%) or infectious granuloma (13.2%). Other histologic reactions included dermal pseudocysts with chronic inflammation (26.3%), dermal fibrosis (15.8%), and eosinophilic panniculitis (10.5%). Our results confirmed that dermal fillers could be manifested with variable clinical presentations and show different histologic reactions. Because of long-standing duration until complications occur, history taking is crucial and should be emphasized in every suspected patient. It is hoped that this article will increase awareness for recognition of these variable complications and help select the appropriate therapy. PMID:25553966

  20. Collagenous Colitis and Spondylarthropathy

    PubMed Central

    Ben Abdelghani, Kaouther; Sahli, Hana; Souabni, Leila; Chekili, Selma; Belhadj, Salwa; Kassab, Selma; Laatar, Ahmed; Zakraoui, Leith

    2012-01-01

    Collagenous colitis is a recent cause of chronic diarrhea. Cooccurrence with spondylarthropathy is rare. We describe two cases: one man and one woman of 33 and 20 years old were suffering from spondylarthropathy. They then developed collagenous colitis, 4 and 14 years after the onset of spondylarthropathy. The diagnosis was based on histological features. A sicca syndrome and vitiligo were observed with the female case. The presence of colitis leads to therapeutic problems. This association suggests a systemic kind of rheumatic disease of collagenous colitis. PMID:22701491

  1. Comparison of Calcium and Barium Microcapsules as Scaffolds in the Development of Artificial Dermal Papillae.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yang; Lin, Changmin; Zeng, Yang; Li, Haihong; Cai, Bozhi; Huang, Keng; Yuan, Yanping; Li, Yu

    2016-01-01

    This study aimed to develop and evaluate barium and calcium microcapsules as candidates for scaffolding in artificial dermal papilla. Dermal papilla cells (DPCs) were isolated and cultured by one-step collagenase treatment. The DPC-Ba and DPC-Ca microcapsules were prepared by using a specially designed, high-voltage, electric-field droplet generator. Selected microcapsules were assessed for long-term inductive properties with xenotransplantation into Sprague-Dawley rat ears. Both barium and calcium microcapsules maintained xenogenic dermal papilla cells in an immunoisolated environment and induced the formation of hair follicle structures. Calcium microcapsules showed better biocompatibility, permeability, and cell viability in comparison with barium microcapsules. Before 18 weeks, calcium microcapsules gathered together, with no substantial immune response. After 32 weeks, some microcapsules were near inflammatory cells and wrapped with fiber. A few large hair follicles were found. Control samples showed no marked changes at the implantation site. Barium microcapsules were superior to calcium microcapsules in structural and mechanical stability. The cells encapsulated in hydrogel barium microcapsules exhibited higher short-term viability. This study established a model to culture DPCs in 3D culture conditions. Barium microcapsules may be useful in short-term transplantation study. Calcium microcapsules may provide an effective scaffold for the development of artificial dermal papilla. PMID:27123456

  2. Comparison of Calcium and Barium Microcapsules as Scaffolds in the Development of Artificial Dermal Papillae

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yang; Lin, Changmin; Zeng, Yang; Li, Haihong; Cai, Bozhi; Huang, Keng; Yuan, Yanping; Li, Yu

    2016-01-01

    This study aimed to develop and evaluate barium and calcium microcapsules as candidates for scaffolding in artificial dermal papilla. Dermal papilla cells (DPCs) were isolated and cultured by one-step collagenase treatment. The DPC-Ba and DPC-Ca microcapsules were prepared by using a specially designed, high-voltage, electric-field droplet generator. Selected microcapsules were assessed for long-term inductive properties with xenotransplantation into Sprague-Dawley rat ears. Both barium and calcium microcapsules maintained xenogenic dermal papilla cells in an immunoisolated environment and induced the formation of hair follicle structures. Calcium microcapsules showed better biocompatibility, permeability, and cell viability in comparison with barium microcapsules. Before 18 weeks, calcium microcapsules gathered together, with no substantial immune response. After 32 weeks, some microcapsules were near inflammatory cells and wrapped with fiber. A few large hair follicles were found. Control samples showed no marked changes at the implantation site. Barium microcapsules were superior to calcium microcapsules in structural and mechanical stability. The cells encapsulated in hydrogel barium microcapsules exhibited higher short-term viability. This study established a model to culture DPCs in 3D culture conditions. Barium microcapsules may be useful in short-term transplantation study. Calcium microcapsules may provide an effective scaffold for the development of artificial dermal papilla. PMID:27123456

  3. Mechanical adaptability of the Bouligand-type structure in natural dermal armour.

    PubMed

    Zimmermann, Elizabeth A; Gludovatz, Bernd; Schaible, Eric; Dave, Neil K N; Yang, Wen; Meyers, Marc A; Ritchie, Robert O

    2013-01-01

    Arapaima gigas, a fresh water fish found in the Amazon Basin, resist predation by piranhas through the strength and toughness of their scales, which act as natural dermal armour. Arapaima scales consist of a hard, mineralized outer shell surrounding a more ductile core. This core region is composed of aligned mineralized collagen fibrils arranged in distinct lamellae. Here we show how the Bouligand-type (twisted plywood) arrangement of collagen fibril lamellae has a key role in developing their unique protective properties, by using in situ synchrotron small-angle X-ray scattering during mechanical tensile tests to observe deformation mechanisms in the fibrils. Specifically, the Bouligand-type structure allows the lamellae to reorient in response to the loading environment; remarkably, most lamellae reorient towards the tensile axis and deform in tension through stretching/sliding mechanisms, whereas other lamellae sympathetically rotate away from the tensile axis and compress, thereby enhancing the scale's ductility and toughness to prevent fracture. PMID:24129554

  4. Mechanical adaptability of the Bouligand-type structure in natural dermal armour

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zimmermann, Elizabeth A.; Gludovatz, Bernd; Schaible, Eric; Dave, Neil K. N.; Yang, Wen; Meyers, Marc A.; Ritchie, Robert O.

    2013-10-01

    Arapaima gigas, a fresh water fish found in the Amazon Basin, resist predation by piranhas through the strength and toughness of their scales, which act as natural dermal armour. Arapaima scales consist of a hard, mineralized outer shell surrounding a more ductile core. This core region is composed of aligned mineralized collagen fibrils arranged in distinct lamellae. Here we show how the Bouligand-type (twisted plywood) arrangement of collagen fibril lamellae has a key role in developing their unique protective properties, by using in situ synchrotron small-angle X-ray scattering during mechanical tensile tests to observe deformation mechanisms in the fibrils. Specifically, the Bouligand-type structure allows the lamellae to reorient in response to the loading environment; remarkably, most lamellae reorient towards the tensile axis and deform in tension through stretching/sliding mechanisms, whereas other lamellae sympathetically rotate away from the tensile axis and compress, thereby enhancing the scale’s ductility and toughness to prevent fracture.

  5. Aseptic versus Sterile Acellular Dermal Matrices in Breast Reconstruction: An Updated Review

    PubMed Central

    Mendenhall, Shaun D.; Neumeister, Michael W.; Cederna, Paul S.; Momoh, Adeyiza O.

    2016-01-01

    Background: As the use of acellular dermal matrices in breast reconstruction has become more commonplace and efforts are made to improve on postoperative outcomes, the method of acellular dermal matrix (ADM) processing (aseptic versus sterile) has become a subject of interest. This article provides an updated overview of the critical aspects of ADM processing in addition to application of ADMs in single- and two-stage breast reconstruction, a review of the morbidity associated with ADM use, and alternatives. Methods: A literature review was performed in PubMed identifying recent systematic reviews, meta-analyses, and head-to-head comparisons on aseptically processed ADM and sterile-processed ADM in implant-based breast reconstruction. Results: Recent meta-analyses have shown a 2- to 3-fold increase in infections and tissue expander/implant explantation rates and a 3- to 4-fold increase in seroma formation compared with non-ADM reconstruction techniques. Comparisons of aseptic and sterile ADMs in multiple studies have shown no significant difference in infection rates and equivocal findings for other specific complications such as seroma formation. Conclusions: Current evidence on the impact of processing techniques that improve ADM sterility on postoperative morbidity in implant breast reconstruction is unclear. Deficiencies of the available data highlight the need for well-designed, multicenter, randomized controlled studies that will aid in optimizing outcomes in implant-based breast reconstruction. PMID:27536502

  6. Interleukin-1 inhibits the synthesis of collagen by fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Bhatnagar, R; Penfornis, H; Mauviel, A; Loyau, G; Saklatvala, J; Pujol, J P

    1986-10-01

    Human dermal fibroblasts, exposed to human or porcine Interleukin-1, responded by an inhibition of collagen synthesis in a dose dependent manner. Incubation with Il-1 for more than 8 h was required to see an appreciable effect. The phenomenon was not dependent on the presence of serum in the culture medium. Since a stimulation of prostaglandin E2 secretion was also observed in presence of Il-1, we investigated the eventual role of arachidonic acid metabolites in the phenomenon. Inhibitors interfering with arachidonate metabolism, namely indomethacin, acetyl salicylic acid, BW 755 C and NDGA had no influence on the inhibition of collagen synthesis caused by Il-1. These data suggest that both cyclooxygenase and lipoxygenase derived metabolites of arachidonic acid are unlikely to play a role in the mechanism. PMID:3492206

  7. Manipulating Cx43 expression triggers gene reprogramming events in dermal fibroblasts from oculodentodigital dysplasia patients.

    PubMed

    Esseltine, Jessica L; Shao, Qing; Huang, Tao; Kelly, John J; Sampson, Jacinda; Laird, Dale W

    2015-11-15

    Oculodentodigital dysplasia (ODDD) is primarily an autosomal dominant disorder linked to over 70 GJA1 gene [connexin43 (Cx43)] mutations. For nearly a decade, our laboratory has been investigating the relationship between Cx43 and ODDD by expressing disease-linked mutants in reference cells, tissue-relevant cell lines, 3D organ cultures and by using genetically modified mouse models of human disease. Although salient features of Cx43 mutants have been revealed, these models do not necessarily reflect the complexity of the human context. To further overcome these limitations, we have acquired dermal fibroblasts from two ODDD-affected individuals harbouring D3N and V216L mutations in Cx43, along with familial controls. Using these ODDD patient dermal fibroblasts, which naturally produce less GJA1 gene product, along with RNAi and RNA activation (RNAa) approaches, we show that manipulating Cx43 expression triggers cellular gene reprogramming. Quantitative RT-PCR, Western blot and immunofluorescent analysis of ODDD patient fibroblasts show unusually high levels of extracellular matrix (ECM)-interacting proteins, including integrin α5β1, matrix metalloproteinases as well as secreted ECM proteins collagen-I and laminin. Cx43 knockdown in familial control cells produces similar effects on ECM expression, whereas Cx43 transcriptional up-regulation using RNAa decreases production of collagen-I. Interestingly, the enhanced levels of ECM-associated proteins in ODDD V216L fibroblasts is not only a consequence of increased ECM gene expression, but also due to an apparent deficit in collagen-I secretion which may further contribute to impaired collagen gel contraction in ODDD fibroblasts. These findings further illuminate the altered function of Cx43 in ODDD-affected individuals and highlight the impact of manipulating Cx43 expression in human cells. PMID:26349540

  8. Analysis of finite dose dermal absorption data: Implications for dermal exposure assessment

    PubMed Central

    Frasch, H Frederick; Dotson, G Scott; Bunge, Annette L; Chen, Chen-Peng; Cherrie, John W; Kasting, Gerald B; Kissel, John C; Sahmel, Jennifer; Semple, Sean; Wilkinson, Simon

    2014-01-01

    A common dermal exposure assessment strategy estimates the systemic uptake of chemical in contact with skin using the fixed fractional absorption approach: the dermal absorbed dose is estimated as the product of exposure and the fraction of applied chemical that is absorbed, assumed constant for a given chemical. Despite the prominence of this approach there is little guidance regarding the evaluation of experiments from which fractional absorption data are measured. An analysis of these experiments is presented herein, and limitations to the fixed fractional absorption approach are discussed. The analysis provides a set of simple algebraic expressions that may be used in the evaluation of finite dose dermal absorption experiments, affording a more data-driven approach to dermal exposure assessment. Case studies are presented that demonstrate the application of these tools to the assessment of dermal absorption data. PMID:23715085

  9. Correlative nonlinear optical microscopy and infrared nanoscopy reveals collagen degradation in altered parchments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Latour, Gaël; Robinet, Laurianne; Dazzi, Alexandre; Portier, François; Deniset-Besseau, Ariane; Schanne-Klein, Marie-Claire

    2016-05-01

    This paper presents the correlative imaging of collagen denaturation by nonlinear optical microscopy (NLO) and nanoscale infrared (IR) spectroscopy to obtain morphological and chemical information at different length scales. Such multiscale correlated measurements are applied to the investigation of ancient parchments, which are mainly composed of dermal fibrillar collagen. The main issue is to characterize gelatinization, the ultimate and irreversible alteration corresponding to collagen denaturation to gelatin, which may also occur in biological tissues. Key information about collagen and gelatin signatures is obtained in parchments and assessed by characterizing the denaturation of pure collagen reference samples. A new absorbing band is observed near the amide I band in the IR spectra, correlated to the onset of fluorescence signals in NLO images. Meanwhile, a strong decrease is observed in Second Harmonic signals, which are a structural probe of the fibrillar organization of the collagen at the micrometer scale. NLO microscopy therefore appears as a powerful tool to reveal collagen degradation in a non-invasive way. It should provide a relevant method to assess or monitor the condition of collagen-based materials in museum and archival collections and opens avenues for a broad range of applications regarding this widespread biological material.

  10. Correlative nonlinear optical microscopy and infrared nanoscopy reveals collagen degradation in altered parchments.

    PubMed

    Latour, Gaël; Robinet, Laurianne; Dazzi, Alexandre; Portier, François; Deniset-Besseau, Ariane; Schanne-Klein, Marie-Claire

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents the correlative imaging of collagen denaturation by nonlinear optical microscopy (NLO) and nanoscale infrared (IR) spectroscopy to obtain morphological and chemical information at different length scales. Such multiscale correlated measurements are applied to the investigation of ancient parchments, which are mainly composed of dermal fibrillar collagen. The main issue is to characterize gelatinization, the ultimate and irreversible alteration corresponding to collagen denaturation to gelatin, which may also occur in biological tissues. Key information about collagen and gelatin signatures is obtained in parchments and assessed by characterizing the denaturation of pure collagen reference samples. A new absorbing band is observed near the amide I band in the IR spectra, correlated to the onset of fluorescence signals in NLO images. Meanwhile, a strong decrease is observed in Second Harmonic signals, which are a structural probe of the fibrillar organization of the collagen at the micrometer scale. NLO microscopy therefore appears as a powerful tool to reveal collagen degradation in a non-invasive way. It should provide a relevant method to assess or monitor the condition of collagen-based materials in museum and archival collections and opens avenues for a broad range of applications regarding this widespread biological material. PMID:27194180

  11. Correlative nonlinear optical microscopy and infrared nanoscopy reveals collagen degradation in altered parchments

    PubMed Central

    Latour, Gaël; Robinet, Laurianne; Dazzi, Alexandre; Portier, François; Deniset-Besseau, Ariane; Schanne-Klein, Marie-Claire

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents the correlative imaging of collagen denaturation by nonlinear optical microscopy (NLO) and nanoscale infrared (IR) spectroscopy to obtain morphological and chemical information at different length scales. Such multiscale correlated measurements are applied to the investigation of ancient parchments, which are mainly composed of dermal fibrillar collagen. The main issue is to characterize gelatinization, the ultimate and irreversible alteration corresponding to collagen denaturation to gelatin, which may also occur in biological tissues. Key information about collagen and gelatin signatures is obtained in parchments and assessed by characterizing the denaturation of pure collagen reference samples. A new absorbing band is observed near the amide I band in the IR spectra, correlated to the onset of fluorescence signals in NLO images. Meanwhile, a strong decrease is observed in Second Harmonic signals, which are a structural probe of the fibrillar organization of the collagen at the micrometer scale. NLO microscopy therefore appears as a powerful tool to reveal collagen degradation in a non-invasive way. It should provide a relevant method to assess or monitor the condition of collagen-based materials in museum and archival collections and opens avenues for a broad range of applications regarding this widespread biological material. PMID:27194180

  12. Cochlear Implants.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clark, Catherine; Scott, Larry

    This brochure explains what a cochlear implant is, lists the types of individuals with deafness who may be helped by a cochlear implant, describes the process of evaluating people for cochlear implants, discusses the surgical process for implanting the aid, traces the path of sound through the cochlear implant to the brain, notes the costs of…

  13. Nanomechanics of collagen microfibrils

    PubMed Central

    Vesentini, Simone; Redaelli, Alberto; Gautieri, Alfonso

    2013-01-01

    Summary Collagen constitutes one third of the human proteome, providing mechanical stability, elasticity and strength to organisms and is thus the prime construction material in biology. Collagen is also the dominating material in the extracellular matrix where its stiffness controls cell differentiation, growth and pathology. We use atomistic-based hierarchical multiscale modeling to describe this complex biological material from the bottom up. This includes the use and development of large-scale computational modeling tools to investigate several aspects related to collagen-based tissues, including source of visco-elasticity and deformation mechanisms at the nanoscale level. The key innovation of this research is that until now, collagen materials have primarily been described at macroscopic scales, without explicitly understanding the mechanical contributions at the molecular and fibrillar levels. The major impact of this research will be the development of fundamental models of collagenous tissues, important to the design of new scaffolding biomaterials for regenerative medicine as well as for the understanding of collagen-related diseases. PMID:23885342

  14. A novel component of epidermal cell-matrix and cell-cell contacts: transmembrane protein type XIII collagen.

    PubMed

    Peltonen, S; Hentula, M; Hägg, P; Ylä-Outinen, H; Tuukkanen, J; Lakkakorpi, J; Rehn, M; Pihlajaniemi, T; Peltonen, J

    1999-10-01

    Type XIII collagen is a short chain collagen which has recently been shown to be a transmembrane protein. The purpose of this study was to elucidate the presence and localization of type XIII collagen in normal human skin and cultured keratinocytes. Expression of type XIII collagen was demonstrated in normal human skin and epidermis at the RNA level using reverse transcription followed by polymerase chain reaction and at the protein level using western blotting and indirect immunofluorescence labeling. Immunolabeling of epidermis revealed type XIII collagen both in the cell-cell contact sites and in the dermal-epidermal junction. In cultured keratinocytes type XIII collagen epitopes were detected in focal contacts and in intercellular contacts. The results of this study show very little colocalization of type XIII collagen and desmosomal components at the light microscopic level. Thus, these results suggest that type XIII collagen is unlikely to be a component of desmosomes. Instead, the punctate labeling pattern of type XIII collagen at the cell-cell contact sites and high degree of colocalization with E-cadherin suggests that type XIII collagen is very likely to be closely associated with adherens type junctions, and may, in fact, be a component of these junctions. PMID:10504453

  15. A comparative study of skin cell activities in collagen and fibrin constructs.

    PubMed

    Law, Jia Xian; Musa, Faiza; Ruszymah, Bt Hj Idrus; El Haj, Alicia J; Yang, Ying

    2016-09-01

    Collagen and fibrin are widely used in tissue engineering due to their excellent biocompatibility and bioactivities that support in vivo tissue formation. These two hydrogels naturally present in different wound healing stages with different regulatory effects on cells, and both of them are mechanically weak in the reconstructed hydrogels. We conducted a comparative study by the growth of rat dermal fibroblasts or dermal fibroblasts and epidermal keratinocytes together in collagen and fibrin constructs respectively with and without the reinforcement of electrospun poly(lactic acid) nanofiber mesh. Cell proliferation, gel contraction and elastic modulus of the constructs were measured on the same gels at multiple time points during the 22 day culturing period using multiple non-destructive techniques. The results demonstrated considerably different cellular activities within the two types of constructs. Co-culturing keratinocytes with fibroblasts in the collagen constructs reduced the fibroblast proliferation, collagen contraction and mechanical strength at late culture point regardless of the presence of nanofibers. Co-culturing keratinocytes with fibroblasts in the fibrin constructs promoted fibroblast proliferation but exerted no influence on fibrin contraction and mechanical strength. The presence of nanofibers in the collagen and fibrin constructs played a favorable role on the fibroblast proliferation when keratinocytes were absent. Thus, this study exhibited new evidence of the strong cross-talk between keratinocytes and fibroblasts, which can be used to control fibroblast proliferation and construct contraction. This cross-talk activity is extracellular matrix-dependent in terms of the fibrous network morphology, density and strength. PMID:27349492

  16. Collagen cross-linking in sun-exposed and unexposed sites of aged human skin

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yamauchi, M.; Prisayanh, P.; Haque, Z.; Woodley, D. T.

    1991-01-01

    A recently described nonreducible, acid-heat stable compound, histidinohydroxylysinonorleucine (HHL), is a collagen cross-link isolated from mature skin tissue. Its abundance is related to chronologic aging of skin. The present communication describes the quantity of HHL from aged human skin of the same individuals in sun-exposed (wrist) and unexposed (buttock) sites. Punch biopsies were obtained from these sites from nine people of age 60 or older. HHL contents (moles/mole of collagen) at these sites were for wrist 0.13 +/- 0.07 and for buttock 0.69 +/- 0.17 (mean +/- SD, p less than 0.001). In addition, it was found that acute irradiation of the cross-linked peptides with UVA (up to 250 J/cm2) and UVB (up to 1 J/cm2) had no effect on HHL structure. The same treatment significantly degraded another nonreducible, stable collagen cross-link, pyridinoline. The results suggest that chronic sunlight exposure may be associated with an impediment to normal maturation of human dermal collagen resulting in tenuous amount of HHL. Thus, the process of photoaging in dermal collagen is different from that of chronologic aging in human skin.

  17. The Importance of Collagen Tissue in Papular Elastorrhexis, Eruptive Collagenoma, and Nevus Anelasticus

    PubMed Central

    Sung, Nam Hee

    2016-01-01

    Background Papular elastorrhexis (PE), eruptive collagenoma (EC), and nevus anelasticus (NA) are described as multiple small papules with decrease, fragmentation, or lack of dermal elastic fibers. These diseases are suggested to be the same entity. The change of collagen fibers in the conditions has not been addressed to date. Objective We compared the clinical features of the 3 diseases and investigated changes in the collagen fibers involved. Methods Twenty-four cases of PE, 12 cases of EC, and 2 cases of NA found in PubMed and the Korean database were reviewed. Changes in dermal collagen fibers in 10 cases with histological figures were investigated. Results There were significant similarities between the 3 entities in terms of their clinical features. Four patients with PE and 2 with EC with fine, dense collagen fibers were women who had multiple white to hypopigmented, slightly indurated to firm, millimeter-size papules on the trunk and/or extremities that progressed gradually after developing in the patients' first to third decades. Conclusion The 3 conditions are the same clinical entity in our opinion; such cases with fine, dense collagen manifest typical features. PMID:27081269

  18. Hair follicle dermal stem cells regenerate the dermal sheath, repopulate the dermal papilla, and modulate hair type.

    PubMed

    Rahmani, Waleed; Abbasi, Sepideh; Hagner, Andrew; Raharjo, Eko; Kumar, Ranjan; Hotta, Akitsu; Magness, Scott; Metzger, Daniel; Biernaskie, Jeff

    2014-12-01

    The dermal papilla (DP) provide instructive signals required to activate epithelial progenitors and initiate hair follicle regeneration. DP cell numbers fluctuate over the hair cycle, and hair loss is associated with gradual depletion/atrophy of DP cells. How DP cell numbers are maintained in healthy follicles remains unclear. We performed in vivo fate mapping of adult hair follicle dermal sheath (DS) cells to determine their lineage relationship with DP and found that a subset of DS cells are retained following each hair cycle, exhibit self-renewal, and repopulate the DS and the DP with new cells. Ablating these hair follicle dermal stem cells and their progeny retarded hair regrowth and altered hair type specification, suggesting that they function to modulate normal DP function. This work identifies a bipotent stem cell within the adult hair follicle mesenchyme and has important implications toward restoration of hair growth after injury, disease, and aging. PMID:25465495

  19. Evaluation of dermal extracellular matrix and epidermal-dermal junction modifications using matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometric imaging, in vivo reflectance confocal microscopy, echography, and histology: effect of age and peptide applications.

    PubMed

    Mondon, Philippe; Hillion, Mélanie; Peschard, Olivier; Andre, Nada; Marchand, Thibault; Doridot, Emmanuel; Feuilloley, Marc Gj; Pionneau, Cédric; Chardonnet, Solenne

    2015-06-01

    This study was conducted to establish a new methodology for evaluating elements of dermal extracellular matrix (ECM), of epidermal-dermal junction (EDJ), and effects of molecules which can modulate their synthesis. This methodology is based on matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometric imaging (MALDI-MSI). In vivo reflectance confocal microscopy (in vivo RCM) and echography were also used. Using immunohistochemistry methods on explants, age-related modification data were obtained for selected dermal ECM and EDJ proteins (collagen I, collagen IV, collagen VII, collagen XVII, nidogen I, decorin/decorunt) and used as reference for MALDI-MSI studies. A methodology was developed with MALDI-MSI to map epidermis and dermis proteins. Then MALDI-MSI was used to study age modifications. In vivo RCM and high-frequency ultrasounds were used to evaluate ECM and EDJ undulation modifications caused by aging. Anti-aging molecule evaluations were performed with a blend of palmitoyl oligopeptide and palmitoyl tetrapeptide-7. Immunohistochemistry studies demonstrated that the selected proteins were found to be less abundant in aged group explants vs. young group except for decorin. MALDI-MSI studies correlated the results obtained for decorin. In vivo RCM measurements indicated a decrease of EDJ undulation depth with age and ECM modifications in the upper part of dermis. Echography demonstrated that the peptide blend reduced subepidermal low-echogenic band thickness and improved its density. In vivo RCM studies indicated that the peptides improved the ECM structure vs. placebo. This preliminary MALDI-MSI study raised some technical difficulties that were overcome. Further studies will be conducted to identify more proteins and to demonstrate the interest of this method for cosmetic evaluations. PMID:25817264

  20. Can superoxide dismutase prevent postburn dermal ischemia?

    PubMed

    Tan, Q; Ma, W X; Wang, L; Chen, H R

    1997-05-01

    Decreasing progressive dermal ischemia after burning could theoretically limit the amount of skin necrosis. It is controversial whether the use of free radical scavengers could prevent the progressive dermal ischemia of the postburn stasis zone. We evaluated the effect of superoxide dismutase (SOD) on preventing postburn dermal ischemia in animal models by the India ink perfusion and skin transparent preparation techniques. The closely clipped backs of guinea-pigs were bathed in 75 degrees C water for 10 s. Within 5 min postburn, SOD-treated groups were administered SOD (10,000 u/kg) intra-peritoneally every 6 h. All animals were perfused with 70 per cent India ink via cervical artery cannula by 16 kPa constant pressure at 0, 8, 16, 24 h postburn, and the skin transparent preparations were made, while the level of malonyl dialdehyde (MDA) in skin tissue was assessed. The results showed that with prolongation of postburn time, the rate of filling of India ink in skin capillary plexuses decreased gradually (p < 0.01). MDA increased continuously, which was related to postburn dermal ischemia (r = 0.689, p < 0.01). Though the level of MDA decreased in SOD-treated groups, the India ink filling rates showed no significant difference between controls and experimental groups (p > 0.05). The results were also confirmed by observation of skin transparent preparations and TEM. This study suggests that superoxide dismutase fails to prevent progressive dermal ischemia after burning. PMID:9232283

  1. Platelet-Rich Fibrin Lysate Can Ameliorate Dysfunction of Chronically UVA-Irradiated Human Dermal Fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Wirohadidjojo, Yohanes Widodo; Budiyanto, Arief; Soebono, Hardyanto

    2016-09-01

    To determine whether platelet-rich fibrin lysate (PRF-L) could restore the function of chronically ultraviolet-A (UVA)-irradiated human dermal fibroblasts (HDFs), we isolated and sub-cultured HDFs from six different human foreskins. HDFs were divided into two groups: those that received chronic UVA irradiation (total dosages of 10 J cm⁻²) and those that were not irradiated. We compared the proliferation rates, collagen deposition, and migration rates between the groups and between chronically UVA-irradiated HDFs in control and PRF-L-treated media. Our experiment showed that chronic UVA irradiation significantly decreased (p<0.05) the proliferation rates, migration rates, and collagen deposition of HDFs, compared to controls. Compared to control media, chronically UVA-irradiated HDFs in 50% PRF-L had significantly increased proliferation rates, migration rates, and collagen deposition (p<0.05), and the migration rates and collagen deposition of chronically UVA-irradiated HDFs in 50% PRF-L were equal to those of normal fibroblasts. Based on this experiment, we concluded that PRF-L is a good candidate material for treating UVA-induced photoaging of skin, although the best method for its clinical application remains to be determined. PMID:27401663

  2. Transperineal repair of a persistent rectourethral fistula using a porcine dermal graft

    PubMed Central

    Imperatore, Vittorio; Creta, Massimiliano; Di Meo, Sergio; Buonopane, Roberto; Fusco, Ferdinando; Imbimbo, Ciro; Longo, Nicola; Mirone, Vincenzo

    2014-01-01

    INTRODUCTION Rectourethral fistula (RUF) is a rare major complication after radical prostatectomy (RP). Management of patients with persistent RUFs after primary repair is controversial and technically challenging. PRESENTATION OF CASE We describe the case of a patient with history of RUF secondary to rectal injury during laparoscopic RP and failed trans-abdominal repair. A further attempt to repair the persistent RUF was done through a perineal approach. The fistula was excised, the anterior rectal wall was closed in two layers and the defect at the level of the urethrovesical anastomosis (UVA) was repaired with an interrupted suture. A porcine dermal graft was interposed between the UVA and the rectum and was sutured to the rectal wall. There were neither clinical nor radiological evidences of fistula recurrence at one-year follow-up after transperineal surgical repair. DISCUSSION We used, for the first time, a porcine dermal collagen allograft as interposition tissue in a persistent RUF secondary to rectal injury during laparoscopic RP. The use of this allograft allows the potential advantage of less surgical invasivity if compared to gracilis muscle graft. CONCLUSIONS Transperineal repair of persistent RUFs with porcine dermal graft interposition is a safe and feasible surgical procedure. PMID:25305599

  3. An in vitro evaluation of fibrinogen and gelatin containing cryogels as dermal regeneration scaffolds.

    PubMed

    Allan, I U; Tolhurst, B A; Shevchenko, R V; Dainiak, M B; Illsley, M; Ivanov, A; Jungvid, H; Galaev, I Y; James, S L; Mikhalovsky, S V; James, S E

    2016-06-24

    Macroporous cryogels containing mixtures of two key components of the dermal extracellular matrix, fibrinogen and collagen-derived gelatin, were evaluated for use as dermal tissue regeneration scaffolds. The infiltration of human dermal fibroblasts into these matrices was quantitatively assessed in vitro using a combination of cell culture and confocal laser scanning microscopy. The extent of cellular infiltration, as measured by the number of cells per distance travelled versus time, was found to be positively correlated with the fibrinogen concentration of the cryogel scaffolds; a known potentiator of cell migration and angiogenesis within regenerating tissue. An analysis of the proteins expressed by infiltrating fibroblasts revealed that the cells that had migrated into the interior portion of the scaffolds expressed predominantly F-actin along their cytoplasmic stress fibres, whereas those present on the periphery of the scaffolds expressed predominantly α-smooth muscle actin, indicative of a nonmotile, myofibroblast phenotype associated with wound contraction. In conclusion, the cryogels produced in this study were found to be biocompatible and, by alteration of the fibrinogen content, could be rendered more amenable to cellular infiltration. PMID:27138753

  4. Approach to quantify human dermal skin aging using multiphoton laser scanning microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Puschmann, Stefan; Rahn, Christian-Dennis; Wenck, Horst; Gallinat, Stefan; Fischer, Frank

    2012-03-01

    Extracellular skin structures in human skin are impaired during intrinsic and extrinsic aging. Assessment of these dermal changes is conducted by subjective clinical evaluation and histological and molecular analysis. We aimed to develop a new parameter for the noninvasive quantitative determination of dermal skin alterations utilizing the high-resolution three-dimensional multiphoton laser scanning microscopy (MPLSM) technique. To quantify structural differences between chronically sun-exposed and sun-protected human skin, the respective collagen-specific second harmonic generation and the elastin-specific autofluorescence signals were recorded in young and elderly volunteers using the MPLSM technique. After image processing, the elastin-to-collagen ratio (ELCOR) was calculated. Results show that the ELCOR parameter of volar forearm skin significantly increases with age. For elderly volunteers, the ELCOR value calculated for the chronically sun-exposed temple area is significantly augmented compared to the sun-protected upper arm area. Based on the MPLSM technology, we introduce the ELCOR parameter as a new means to quantify accurately age-associated alterations in the extracellular matrix.

  5. Type IV collagen is a novel DEJ biomarker that is reduced by radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    McGuire, J D; Gorski, J P; Dusevich, V; Wang, Y; Walker, M P

    2014-10-01

    The dental basement membrane (BM) is composed of collagen types IV, VI, VII, and XVII, fibronectin, and laminin and plays an inductive role in epithelial-mesenchymal interactions during tooth development. The BM is degraded and removed during later-stage tooth morphogenesis; however, its original position defines the location of the dentin-enamel junction (DEJ) in mature teeth. We recently demonstrated that type VII collagen is a novel component of the inner enamel organic matrix layer contiguous with the DEJ. Since it is frequently co-expressed with and forms functional complexes with type VII collagen, we hypothesized that type IV collagen should also be localized to the DEJ in mature human teeth. To identify collagen IV, we first evaluated defect-free erupted teeth from various donors. To investigate a possible stabilizing role, we also evaluated extracted teeth exposed to high-dose radiotherapy--teeth that manifest post-radiotherapy DEJ instability. We now show that type IV collagen is a component within the morphological DEJ of posterior and anterior teeth from individuals aged 18 to 80 yr. Confocal microscopy revealed that immunostained type IV collagen was restricted to the 5- to 10-µm-wide optical DEJ, while collagenase treatment or previous in vivo tooth-level exposure to > 60 Gray irradiation severely reduced immunoreactivity. This assignment was confirmed by Western blotting with whole-tooth crown and enamel extracts. Without reduction, type IV collagen contained macromolecular α-chains of 225 and 250 kDa. Compositionally, our results identify type IV collagen as the first macromolecular biomarker of the morphological DEJ of mature teeth. Given its network structure and propensity to stabilize the dermal-epidermal junction, we propose that a collagen-IV-enriched DEJ may, in part, explain its well-known fracture toughness, crack propagation resistance, and stability. In contrast, loss of type IV collagen may represent a biochemical rationale for the DEJ

  6. Collagen bioengineered systems: in situ advanced optical spatiotemporal analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hwang, Yu Jer; Lang, Xuye; Granelli, Joseph; Turgman, Cassandra C.; Gigante, Jackie; Lyubovitsky, Julia G.

    2014-05-01

    The architecture of collagen is important in maintenance and regeneration of higher vertebrates' tissues. We had been studying the changes to this architecture with in situ multi-photon optical microscopy that combines nonlinear optical phenomena of second harmonic generation (SHG) and two-photon fluorescence (TPF) signals from collagen hydrogels prepared from different collagen solid content, polymerized at different temperatures, with different ions as well as modified with reducing sugars. We incubated 2 g/l collagen hydrogels with 0.1 M fructose at 37 °C and after about 20 days observed a significant induction of in situ fluorescence. The twophoton fluorescence emission was centered at about 460 nm for 730 nm excitation wavelength and shifted to 480 nm when we changed the excitation wavelength to 790 nm. The one-photon fluorescence emission was centered at about 416 nm when excitation was 330 nm. It red shifted and split into two peaks centered at about 430 nm and 460 nm for 370 nm excitation; 460 nm peak became predominant for 385 nm excitation and further shifted to 470 nm for 390 nm excitation. SHG and TPF imaging showed restructuring of hydrogels upon this modification. We will discuss these findings within the context of our ongoing dermal wound repair research.

  7. Estimating terrestrial amphibian pesticide body burden through dermal exposure

    EPA Science Inventory

    Dermal exposure presents a potentially significant but understudied route for pesticide uptake in terrestrial amphibians. Our study measured dermal uptake of pesticides of varying hydrophobicity (logKow) in frogs. Amphibians were indirectly exposed to one of five pesticide active...

  8. Collagen type VI myopathies.

    PubMed

    Bushby, Kate M D; Collins, James; Hicks, Debbie

    2014-01-01

    Mutations in each of the three collagen VI genes COL6A1, COL6A2 and COL6A3 cause two main types of muscle disorders: Ullrich congenital muscular dystrophy, a severe phenotype, and a mild to moderate phenotype Bethlem myopathy. Recently, two additional phenotypes, including a limb-girdle muscular dystrophy phenotype and an autosomal recessive myosclerosis reported in one family with mutations in COL6A2 have been reported. Collagen VI is an important component of the extracellular matrix which forms a microfibrillar network that is found in close association with the cell and surrounding basement membrane. Collagen VI is also found in the interstitial space of many tissues including muscle, tendon, skin, cartilage, and intervertebral discs. Thus, collagen VI mutations result in disorders with combined muscle and connective tissue involvement, including weakness, joint laxity and contractures, and abnormal skin findings.In this review we highlight the four recognized clinical phenotypes of collagen VI related - myopathies; Ullrich congenital muscular dystrophy (UCMD), Bethlem myopathy (BM), autosomal dominant limb-girdle muscular dystrophy phenotype and autosomal recessive myosclerosis. We discuss the diagnostic criteria of these disorders, the molecular pathogenesis, genetics, treatment, and related disorders. PMID:24443028

  9. A composite graft material containing bone particles and collagen in osteoinduction in mouse.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Chung-Hung; Chou, Ming-Yung; Jonas, Mecrehild; Tien, Yung-Tico; Chi, Emily Y

    2002-01-01

    Demineralized allogenic bone matrices (DABM) and demineralized freeze-dried bone allograft (DFDBA) have been successfully used as bone-graft materials in the treatment of acquired and congenital cranio-maxillofacial defects and in some orthopedic surgery. However, these bone-graft "powders" have many shortcomings. For example, placement of particulate graft material in a hemorrhaging site can result in inadequacies or inaccurate attachment as well as loss of the graft materials. To minimize the inadequacies of powderlike graft materials, xenogenic collagen isolated from human tendon, skin, or bone was added to the bone-graft particles to form a composite spongelike implant. This material is commercially available and consists of 60% collagen and 40% DFDBA (DynaGraft, GenSci Co., Irvine, CA). The goal of this study was to evaluate the characteristics of composite graft implants in the mineralization process in an animal model in comparison with DFDBA powder and pure collagen. Seventy-two Swiss Webster mice were divided into three groups: an experimental group implanted with DynaGraft, two comparison groups implanted with either DFDBA or collagen only. All the graft materials were surgically implanted and inserted into the left thigh muscle. Mice were humanely killed at 1, 2, 3, 4, 6, 8, and 12 weeks. Then the muscle tissues in the vicinity of the implants were excised and processed for histology. Paraffin sections were stained with hematoxylin and eosin (H&E), the Von Kossa method, and Masson's trichrome. Some selected specimens were processed for transmission electron microscopic observation. After 1 week of implantation, the DynaGraft group showed calcium deposition on the collagen material and on the periphery of the DFDBA particles. Increased calcification and bone-forming cells were observed at 4-6 weeks. After 8 weeks, the implant formed a calcified nodule and only heavily mineralized connective tissue was observed at the implanted site. The group implanted

  10. Injectable poly-L: -lactic acid: a novel sculpting agent for the treatment of dermal fat atrophy after severe acne.

    PubMed

    Sadove, Richard

    2009-01-01

    Acne vulgaris affects up to 80% of people 11 to 30 years of age, and scarring can occur for up to 95% of these patients. Scarring may be pitted or hypertrophic in nature, although in most cases it is atrophic. Atrophic acne scarring follows dermal collagen and fat loss after moderate to severe acne infection. Injectable poly-L-acid (PLLA) is a biocompatible, biodegradable, synthetic polymer device that is hypothesized to enhance dermal volume via the endogenous production of fibroblasts and, subsequently, collagen. The gradual improvements in cutaneous volume observed after treatment with injectable PLLA have been noted to last up to 2 years. The case studies presented describe the use of injectable PLLA to correct dermal fat loss in macular atrophic acne scarring of the cheeks. Two female patients underwent three treatment sessions with injectable PLLA over a 12-week period. At each treatment session, the reconstituted product was injected into the deep dermis under the depressed portion of the scar. Both patients were extremely pleased with their results at, respectively, 1- and 4-year follow-up evaluations. Patients experienced minimal swelling and redness after injection and no product-related adverse events such as papule and/or nodule formation. The author believes these data suggest that injectable PLLA is a good treatment option for the correction of macular atropic scarring with thin dermis (off-label use), particularly compared with other injectable fillers currently used for this indication that have shorter durations of effect. PMID:18923863

  11. Dermal lymphatic dilation in a mouse model of alopecia areata.

    PubMed

    Sundberg, John P; Pratt, C Herbert; Silva, Kathleen A; Kennedy, Victoria E; Stearns, Timothy M; Sundberg, Beth A; King, Lloyd E; HogenEsch, Harm

    2016-04-01

    Mouse models of various types of inflammatory skin disease are often accompanied by increased dermal angiogenesis. The C3H/HeJ inbred strain spontaneously develops alopecia areata (AA), a cell mediated autoimmune disorder that can be controllably expanded using full thickness skin grafts to young unaffected mice. This provides a reproducible and progressive model for AA in which the vascularization of the skin can be examined. Mice receiving skin grafts from AA or normal mice were evaluated at 5, 10, 15, and 20 weeks after engraftment. Lymphatics are often overlooked as they are small slit-like structures above the hair follicle that resemble artifact-like separation of collagen bundles with some fixatives. Lymphatics are easily detected using lymphatic vessel endothelial hyaluronan receptor 1 (LYVE1) by immunohistochemistry to label their endothelial cells. Using LYVE1, there were no changes in distribution or numbers of lymphatics although they were more prominent (dilated) in the mice with AA. Lyve1 transcripts were not significantly upregulated except at 10 weeks after skin grafting when clinical signs of AA first become apparent. Other genes involved with vascular growth and dilation or movement of immune cells were dysregulated, mostly upregulated. These findings emphasize aspects of AA not commonly considered and provide potential targets for therapeutic intervention. PMID:26960166

  12. Mass transfer of large molecules through collagen and collagen-silica hybrid membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jofre-Lora, Pedro

    Diabetes is a growing concern in the United States and around the world that must be addressed through new treatment options. Current standard treatment options of diabetes are limiting and have tremendous impacts on patient's lives. Emerging therapies, such as the implantation of encapsulated islets, are promising treatment options, but have not yet materialized due to unsolved problems with material properties. Hybrid silica-collagen membranes address some of these unsolved problems and are a promising material for cell encapsulation. However, the mass transfer properties of large molecules, such as insulin, TNF-alpha, IL1beta, and other important proteins in the etiology of diabetes, through these hybrid membranes are poorly characterized. In order to begin characterizing these properties, a device was constructed to accurately and efficiently measure the mass transfer of other similar large molecules, fluorescein isothiocyanate dextrans (FITC-dextran), through collagen-silica hybrid membranes. The device was used to measure diffusion coefficients of 4, 20, 40, and 150 kDa FITC-dextrans through non-silicified and silicified samples of 200 and 1000 Pa porcine skin collagen. Diffusion coefficients were found to be in the 10-7-10-6 cm2s -1 range, which is in agreement with previously published data for similar molecules through similar hydrogels. The effects of collagen stiffness, FITC-dextran molecular weight, and silicification treatment on diffusion were investigated. It was found that collagen stiffness and FITC-dextran molecular weight had a negative correlation with diffusion, whereas silicification treatment had no global impact on diffusion. The device created, and the results of this preliminary investigation, can be used to develop collagen-silica hybrid membranes as an alternative material for cell encapsulation in a forward-design manner.

  13. Irradiated PVAl membrane swelled with chitosan solution as dermal equivalent

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodas, A. C. D.; Ohnuki, T.; Mathor, M. B.; Lugao, A. B.

    2005-07-01

    Synthetic membranes as dermal equivalent can be applied at in vitro studies for developing new transdermal drugs or cosmetics. These membranes could be composed to mimic the dermis and seed cultivated keratinocytes as epidermal layer on it. The endothelial cells ingrowth to promote neovascularization and fibroblasts ingrowth to promote the substitution of this scaffold by natural components of the dermis. As, they can mimic the scaffold function of dermis; the membranes with biological interaction could be used for in vivo studies as dermal equivalent. For this application, poly(vinyl alcohol) (PVAl) membranes crosslinked by gamma radiation were swelled with chitosan solution. PVAl do not interact with the organism when implanted and is intended to mimic the mechanical characteristics of the dermal scaffold. The chitosan as a biocompatible biosynthetic polysaccharide were incorporated into PVAl membranes to improve the organism response. Degradation of chitosan by the organism occurs preferably by hydrolysis or enzymatic action, for example, by lysozyme. For this purpose the swelling kinetic of PVAl membranes with chitosan solution were performed and it was verified their degradation in vitro. The results showed that the swelling equilibrium of the PVAl membranes with chitosan membranes was reached in 120 h with average swelling of 1730%. After swelling, PVAl and chitosan/PVAl membranes were dried and immersed in phosphate buffer solution pH 5.7 and pH 7.4, with and without lysozyme, as those pH values are the specific physiologic pH for external skin and the general physiological pH for the organism, respectively. It was verified that the pure PVAl membrane did not showed change in their mass during 14 days. PVAl membranes swelled with chitosan solution showed mass decrease from 1 to 14 days inside these solutions. The highest mass decrease was verified at pH 5.7 in phosphate buffer solution without lysozyme. The smallest mass decrease was verified at pH 7.4 in

  14. Own Experience From The Use Of A Substitute Of An Allogeneic Acellular Dermal Matrix Revitalized With In Vitro Cultured Skin Cells In Clinical Practice.

    PubMed

    Łabuś, Wojciech; Kawecki, Marek; Glik, Justyna; Maj, Mariusz; Kitala, Diana; Misiuga, Marcelina; Klama-Baryła, Agnieszka; Kraut, Małgorzata; Nowak, Mariusz

    2015-10-01

    As a result of the removal of cells from human allogeneic dermis, a collagen scaffold is obtained, which can be populated de novo with autologous/allogeneic skin cells and transplanted onto the area of skin loss. The optimal method for production of acellular dermal matrices (ADM) has been selected. Three female patients (a mean age of 54 years) were subjected to the transplantation of either autologous or allogeneic keratinocytes and fibroblasts into the holes of acellular dermal matrix (ADM) mesh graft. The method for burn wound treatment based on the use of a viable dermal-epidermal skin substitute (based on ADM and in vitro cultured fibroblasts and keratinocytes) may be the optimal method of burn treatment. PMID:26812752

  15. Collagen in organ development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hardman, P.; Spooner, B. S.

    1992-01-01

    It is important to know whether microgravity will adversely affect developmental processes. Collagens are macromolecular structural components of the extracellular matrix (ECM) which may be altered by perturbations in gravity. Interstitial collagens have been shown to be necessary for normal growth and morphogenesis in some embryonic organs, and in the mouse salivary gland, the biosynthetic pattern of these molecules changes during development. Determination of the effects of microgravity on epithelial organ development must be preceded by crucial ground-based studies. These will define control of normal synthesis, secretion, and deposition of ECM macromolecules and the relationship of these processes to morphogenesis.

  16. Interstitial Collagen Catabolism*

    PubMed Central

    Fields, Gregg B.

    2013-01-01

    Interstitial collagen mechanical and biological properties are altered by proteases that catalyze the hydrolysis of the collagen triple-helical structure. Collagenolysis is critical in development and homeostasis but also contributes to numerous pathologies. Mammalian collagenolytic enzymes include matrix metalloproteinases, cathepsin K, and neutrophil elastase, and a variety of invertebrates and pathogens possess collagenolytic enzymes. Components of the mechanism of action for the collagenolytic enzyme MMP-1 have been defined experimentally, and insights into other collagenolytic mechanisms have been provided. Ancillary biomolecules may modulate the action of collagenolytic enzymes. PMID:23430258

  17. Nanostructure and mechanics of mummified type I collagen from the 5300-year-old Tyrolean Iceman

    PubMed Central

    Janko, Marek; Zink, Albert; Gigler, Alexander M.; Heckl, Wolfgang M.; Stark, Robert W.

    2010-01-01

    Skin protects the body from pathogens and degradation. Mummified skin in particular is extremely resistant to decomposition. External influences or the action of micro-organisms, however, can degrade the connective tissue and lay the subjacent tissue open. To determine the degree of tissue preservation in mummified human skin and, in particular, the reason for its durability, we investigated the structural integrity of its main protein, type I collagen. We extracted samples from the Neolithic glacier mummy known as ‘the Iceman’. Atomic force microscopy (AFM) revealed collagen fibrils that had characteristic banding patterns of 69 ± 5 nm periodicity. Both the microstructure and the ultrastructure of dermal collagen bundles and fibrils were largely unaltered and extremely well preserved by the natural conservation process. Raman spectra of the ancient collagen indicated that there were no significant modifications in the molecular structure. However, AFM nanoindentation measurements showed slight changes in the mechanical behaviour of the fibrils. Young's modulus of single mummified fibrils was 4.1 ± 1.1 GPa, whereas the elasticity of recent collagen averages 3.2 ± 1.0 GPa. The excellent preservation of the collagen indicates that dehydration owing to freeze-drying of the collagen is the main process in mummification and that the influence of the degradation processes can be addressed, even after 5300 years. PMID:20356896

  18. Morphogenesis of chimeric hair follicles in engineered skin substitutes with human keratinocytes and murine dermal papilla cells.

    PubMed

    Sriwiriyanont, Penkanok; Lynch, Kaari A; Maier, Elizabeth A; Hahn, Jennifer M; Supp, Dorothy M; Boyce, Steven T

    2012-10-01

    Engineered skin substitutes (ESS) have been used successfully to treat life-threatening burns, but lack cutaneous appendages. To address this deficiency, dermal constructs were prepared using collagen-glycosaminoglycan scaffolds populated with murine dermal papilla cells expressing green fluorescent protein (mDPC-GFP), human dermal papilla cells (hDPC) and/or human fibroblasts (hF). Subsequently, human epidermal keratinocytes (hK) or hK genetically modified to overexpress stabilized β-catenin (hK') were used to prepare ESS epithelium. After 10 days incubation at air-liquid interface, ESS were grafted to athymic mice and were evaluated for 6 weeks. Neofollicles were observed in ESS containing mDPC-GFP, but not hDPC or hF, independent of whether or not the hK were genetically modified. Based on detection of GFP fluorescence, mDPC were localized to the dermal papillae of the well-defined follicular structures of grafted ESS. In addition, statistically significant increases in LEF1, WNT10A and WNT10B were found in ESS with neofollicles. These results demonstrate a model for generation of chimeric hair in ESS. PMID:23078401

  19. Adamts5 Deletion Blocks Murine Dermal Repair through CD44-mediated Aggrecan Accumulation and Modulation of Transforming Growth Factor β1 (TGFβ1) Signaling*

    PubMed Central

    Velasco, Jennifer; Li, Jun; DiPietro, Luisa; Stepp, Mary Ann; Sandy, John D.; Plaas, Anna

    2011-01-01

    ADAMTS5 has been implicated in the degradation of cartilage aggrecan in human osteoarthritis. Here, we describe a novel role for the enzyme in the regulation of TGFβ1 signaling in dermal fibroblasts both in vivo and in vitro. Adamts5−/− mice, generated by deletion of exon 2, exhibit impaired contraction and dermal collagen deposition in an excisional wound healing model. This was accompanied by accumulation in the dermal layer of cell aggregates and fibroblastic cells surrounded by a pericellular matrix enriched in full-length aggrecan. Adamts5−/− wounds exhibit low expression (relative to wild type) of collagen type I and type III but show a persistently elevated expression of tgfbRII and alk1. Aggrecan deposition and impaired dermal repair in Adamts5−/− mice are both dependent on CD44, and Cd44−/−/Adamts5−/− mice display robust activation of TGFβ receptor II and collagen type III expression and the dermal regeneration seen in WT mice. TGFβ1 treatment of newborn fibroblasts from wild type mice results in Smad2/3 phosphorylation, whereas cells from Adamts5−/− mice phosphorylate Smad1/5/8. The altered TGFβ1 response in the Adamts5−/− cells is dependent on the presence of aggrecan and expression of CD44, because Cd44−/−/Adamts5−/− cells respond like WT cells. We propose that ADAMTS5 deficiency in fibrous tissues results in a poor repair response due to the accumulation of aggrecan in the pericellular matrix of fibroblast progenitor cells, which prevents their transition to mature fibroblasts. Thus, the capacity of ADAMTS5 to modulate critical tissue repair signaling events suggests a unique role for this enzyme, which sets it apart from other members of the ADAMTS family of proteases. PMID:21566131

  20. Effect of orally administered collagen hydrolysate on gene expression profiles in mouse skin: a DNA microarray analysis.

    PubMed

    Oba, Chisato; Ito, Kyoko; Ichikawa, Satomi; Morifuji, Masashi; Nakai, Yuji; Ishijima, Tomoko; Abe, Keiko; Kawahata, Keiko

    2015-08-01

    Dietary collagen hydrolysate has been hypothesized to improve skin barrier function. To investigate the effect of long-term collagen hydrolysate administration on the skin, we evaluated stratum corneum water content and skin elasticity in intrinsically aged mice. Female hairless mice were fed a control diet or a collagen hydrolysate-containing diet for 12 wk. Stratum corneum water content and skin elasticity were gradually decreased in chronologically aged control mice. Intake of collagen hydrolysate significantly suppressed such changes. Moreover, we used DNA microarrays to analyze gene expression in the skin of mice that had been administered collagen hydrolysate. Twelve weeks after the start of collagen intake, no significant differences appeared in the gene expression profile compared with the control group. However, 1 wk after administration, 135 genes were upregulated and 448 genes were downregulated in the collagen group. This suggests that gene changes preceded changes of barrier function and elasticity. We focused on several genes correlated with functional changes in the skin. Gene Ontology terms related to epidermal cell development were significantly enriched in upregulated genes. These skin function-related genes had properties that facilitate epidermal production and differentiation while suppressing dermal degradation. In conclusion, our results suggest that altered gene expression at the early stages after collagen administration affects skin barrier function and mechanical properties. Long-term oral intake of collagen hydrolysate improves skin dysfunction by regulating genes related to production and maintenance of skin tissue. PMID:26058835

  1. LINKING DERMAL MODELING AND LOADING DATA TO PREDICT LONG-TERM DOSES FROM INTERMITTENT DERMAL CONTACT

    EPA Science Inventory

    In this paper we assess dermal exposure and dose resulting from intermittent contact with residue-contaminated surfaces. These estimates require an understanding of (1) the quantitative relationship between exposure and absorbed dose; (2) the impact of intermittent exposure on ...

  2. Repair of Avascular Meniscus Tears with Electrospun Collagen Scaffolds Seeded with Human Cells.

    PubMed

    Baek, Jihye; Sovani, Sujata; Glembotski, Nicholas E; Du, Jiang; Jin, Sungho; Grogan, Shawn P; D'Lima, Darryl D

    2016-03-01

    The self-healing capacity of an injured meniscus is limited to the vascularized regions and is especially challenging in the inner avascular regions. As such, we investigated the use of human meniscus cell-seeded electrospun (ES) collagen type I scaffolds to produce meniscal tissue and explored whether these cell-seeded scaffolds can be implanted to repair defects created in meniscal avascular tissue explants. Human meniscal cells (derived from vascular and avascular meniscal tissue) were seeded on ES scaffolds and cultured. Constructs were evaluated for cell viability, gene expression, and mechanical properties. To determine potential for repair of meniscal defects, human meniscus avascular cells were seeded and cultured on aligned ES collagen scaffolds for 4 weeks before implantation. Surgical defects resembling "longitudinal tears" were created in the avascular zone of bovine meniscus and implanted with cell-seeded collagen scaffolds and cultured for 3 weeks. Tissue regeneration and integration were evaluated by histology, immunohistochemistry, mechanical testing, and magentic resonance imaging. Ex vivo implantation with cell-seeded collagen scaffolds resulted in neotissue that was significantly better integrated with the native tissue than acellular collagen scaffolds or untreated defects. Human meniscal cell-seeded ES collagen scaffolds may therefore be useful in facilitating meniscal repair of avascular meniscus tears. PMID:26842062

  3. Corneal Collagen Cross-Linking

    PubMed Central

    Jankov II, Mirko R.; Jovanovic, Vesna; Nikolic, Ljubisa; Lake, Jonathan C.; Kymionis, Georgos; Coskunseven, Efekan

    2010-01-01

    Corneal collagen cross-linking (CXL) with riboflavin and ultraviolet-A (UVA) is a new technique of corneal tissue strengthening by using riboflavin as a photosensitizer and UVA to increase the formation of intra and interfibrillar covalent bonds by photosensitized oxidation. Keratocyte apoptosis in the anterior segment of the corneal stroma all the way down to a depth of about 300 microns has been described and a demarcation line between the treated and untreated cornea has been clearly shown. It is important to ensure that the cytotoxic threshold for the endothelium has not been exceeded by strictly respecting the minimal corneal thickness. Confocal microscopy studies show that repopulation of keratocytes is already visible 1 month after the treatment, reaching its pre-operative quantity and quality in terms of functional morphology within 6 months after the treatment. The major indication for the use of CXL is to inhibit the progression of corneal ectasias, such as keratoconus and pellucid marginal degeneration. CXL may also be effective in the treatment and prophylaxis of iatrogenic keratectasia, resulting from excessively aggressive photoablation. This treatment has also been used to treat infectious corneal ulcers with apparent favorable results. Combination with other treatments, such as intracorneal ring segment implantation, limited topography-guided photoablation and conductive keratoplasty have been used with different levels of success. PMID:20543933

  4. Focal Dermal Hypoplasia: A Rare Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Srinivas, Sahana M; Hiremagalore, Ravi

    2015-01-01

    Focal dermal hypoplasia (Goltz syndrome) is a rare genetic multisystem disorder primarily involving the skin, skeletal system, eyes, and face. We report the case of an eight-month-old female child who presented with multiple hypopigmented atrophic macules along the lines of blaschko, skeletal anomalies, umbilical hernia, developmental delay, hypoplastic nails, syndactyly, and lobster claw deformity characteristic of Goltz syndrome. PMID:25657436

  5. Focal dermal hypoplasia: a rare case report.

    PubMed

    Srinivas, Sahana M; Hiremagalore, Ravi

    2015-01-01

    Focal dermal hypoplasia (Goltz syndrome) is a rare genetic multisystem disorder primarily involving the skin, skeletal system, eyes, and face. We report the case of an eight-month-old female child who presented with multiple hypopigmented atrophic macules along the lines of blaschko, skeletal anomalies, umbilical hernia, developmental delay, hypoplastic nails, syndactyly, and lobster claw deformity characteristic of Goltz syndrome. PMID:25657436

  6. Collagen Hydrogel Scaffold and Fibroblast Growth Factor-2 Accelerate Periodontal Healing of Class II Furcation Defects in Dog

    PubMed Central

    Momose, Takehito; Miyaji, Hirofumi; Kato, Akihito; Ogawa, Kosuke; Yoshida, Takashi; Nishida, Erika; Murakami, Syusuke; Kosen, Yuta; Sugaya, Tsutomu; Kawanami, Masamitsu

    2016-01-01

    Objective: Collagen hydrogel scaffold exhibits bio-safe properties and facilitates periodontal wound healing. However, regenerated tissue volume is insufficient. Fibroblast growth factor-2 (FGF2) up-regulates cell behaviors and subsequent wound healing. We evaluated whether periodontal wound healing is promoted by application of collagen hydrogel scaffold in combination with FGF2 in furcation defects in beagle dogs. Methods: Collagen hydrogel was fabricated from bovine type I collagen with an ascorbate-copper ion cross-linking system. Collagen hydrogel was mingled with FGF2 and injected into sponge-form collagen. Subsequently, FGF2 (50 µg)/collagen hydrogel scaffold and collagen hydrogel scaffold alone were implanted into class II furcation defects in dogs. In addition, no implantation was performed as a control. Histometric parameters were assessed at 10 days and 4 weeks after surgery. Result: FGF2 application to scaffold promoted considerable cell and tissue ingrowth containing numerous cells and blood vessel-like structure at day 10. At 4 weeks, reconstruction of alveolar bone was stimulated by implantation of scaffold loaded with FGF2. Furthermore, periodontal attachment, consisting of cementum-like tissue, periodontal ligament-like tissue and Sharpey’s fibers, was also repaired, indicating that FGF2-loaded scaffold guided self-assembly and then re-established the function of periodontal organs. Aberrant healing, such as ankylosis and root resorption, was not observed. Conclusion: FGF2-loaded collagen hydrogel scaffold possessed excellent biocompatibility and strongly promoted periodontal tissue engineering, including periodontal attachment re-organization. PMID:27583044

  7. A Comparison of Conventional Collagen Sponge and Collagen-Gelatin Sponge in Wound Healing

    PubMed Central

    Jinno, Chizuru; Morimoto, Naoki; Ito, Ran; Sakamoto, Michiharu; Ogino, Shuichi; Taira, Tsuguyoshi; Suzuki, Shigehiko

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this study was to compare the effectiveness of the collagen-gelatin sponge (CGS) with that of the collagen sponge (CS) in dermis-like tissue regeneration. CGS, which achieves the sustained release of basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF), is a promising material in wound healing. In the present study, we evaluated and compared CGSs and conventional CSs. We prepared 8 mm full-thickness skin defects on the backs of rats. Either CGSs or CSs were impregnated with normal saline solution (NSS) or 7 μg/cm2 of bFGF solution and implanted into the defects. At 1 and 2 weeks after implantation, tissue specimens were obtained from the rats of each group (n = 3, total n = 24). The wound area, neoepithelial length, dermis-like tissue area, and the number and area of capillaries were evaluated at 1 and 2 weeks after implantation. There were no significant differences in the CGS without bFGF and CS groups. Significant improvements were observed in the neoepithelial length, the dermis-like tissue area, and the number of newly formed capillaries in the group of rats that received CGSs impregnated with bFGF. The effects on epithelialization, granulation, and vascularization of wound healing demonstrated that, as a scaffold, CGSs are equal or superior to conventional CSs. PMID:27218103

  8. Genetic disorders of collagen.

    PubMed Central

    Tsipouras, P; Ramirez, F

    1987-01-01

    Osteogenesis imperfecta, Ehlers-Danlos syndrome, and Marfan syndrome form a group of genetic disorders of connective tissue. These disorders exhibit remarkable clinical heterogeneity which reflects their underlying biochemical and molecular differences. Defects in collagen types I and III have been found in all three syndromes. PMID:3543367

  9. Collagen and injectable fillers.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Jacqueline T; Perkins, Stephen W; Hamilton, Mark M

    2002-02-01

    Soft tissue augmentation of facial rhytids, scars, and deformities is a frequently performed office procedure. This article reviews the available biologic (collagen, Dermalogen, Autologen, Isolagen, autologous fat, Fibrel, hyaluronic acid derivatives, particulate fascia lata, micronized Alloderm) and alloplastic (silicone, Bioplastique, and Artecoll) soft tissue injectable fillers. PMID:11781208

  10. Collagen hydrolysate based collagen/hydroxyapatite composite materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ficai, Anton; Albu, Madalina Georgiana; Birsan, Mihaela; Sonmez, Maria; Ficai, Denisa; Trandafir, Viorica; Andronescu, Ecaterina

    2013-04-01

    The aim of this study was to study the influence of collagen hydrolysate (HAS) on the formation of ternary collagen-hydrolysate/hydroxyapatite composite materials (COLL-HAS/HA). During the precipitation process of HA, a large amount of brushite is resulted at pH = 7 but, practically pure HA is obtained at pH ⩾ 8. The FTIR data reveal the duplication of the most important collagen absorption bands due to the presence of the collagen hydrolysate. The presence of collagen hydrolysate is beneficial for the management of bone and joint disorders such as osteoarthritis and osteoporosis.

  11. Collagen Self-Assembly on Orthopedic Magnesium Biomaterials Surface and Subsequent Bone Cell Attachment

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Nan; Zhu, Donghui

    2014-01-01

    Magnesium (Mg) biomaterials are a new generation of biodegradable materials and have promising potential for orthopedic applications. After implantation in bone tissues, these materials will directly interact with extracellular matrix (ECM) biomolecules and bone cells. Type I collagen, the major component of bone ECM, forms the architecture scaffold that provides physical support for bone cell attachment. However, it is still unknown how Mg substrate affects collagen assembly on top of it as well as subsequent cell attachment and growth. Here, we studied the effects of collagen monomer concentration, pH, assembly time, and surface roughness of two Mg materials (pure Mg and AZ31) on collagen fibril formation. Results showed that formation of fibrils would not initiate until the monomer concentration reached a certain level depending on the type of Mg material. The thickness of collagen fibril increased with the increase of assembly time. The structures of collagen fibrils formed on semi-rough surfaces of Mg materials have a high similarity to that of native bone collagen. Next, cell attachment and growth after collagen assembly were examined. Materials with rough surface showed higher collagen adsorption but compromised bone cell attachment. Interestingly, surface roughness and collagen structure did not affect cell growth on AZ31 for up to a week. Findings from this work provide some insightful information on Mg-tissue interaction at the interface and guidance for future surface modifications of Mg biomaterials. PMID:25303459

  12. Dermal absorption potential of industrial chemicals: Criteria for skin notation

    SciTech Connect

    Fiserova-Bergerova, V.; Pierce, J.T.; Droz, P.O. )

    1990-01-01

    A dermal penetration rate (flux), predicted from physical properties of 132 chemicals, is suggested as an index of the dermal absorption potential of industrial chemicals. The prediction is designed for organic nonelectrolytes. Two reference values are recommended as criteria for skin notation: (1) dermal absorption potential, which relates to dermal absorption raising the dose of nonvolatile chemicals or biological levels of volatile chemicals 30% above those observed during inhalation exposure to TLV-TWA only--dermal absorption of chemicals belonging to this category should be considered when data obtained by biological monitoring are interpreted; and (2) dermal toxicity potential, which relates to dermal absorption that triples biological levels as compared with levels observed during inhalation exposure to TLV-TWA only. Chemicals belonging in this category should carry a skin notation. The toxicity criteria may not be valid for chemicals whose TLVs are based on preventing irritation and discomfort.

  13. The Use of Dermal Substitutes in Burn Surgery: Acute Phase

    PubMed Central

    Shahrokhi, Shahriar; Anna, Arno; Jeschke, Marc G.

    2013-01-01

    Dermal substitutes are increasingly becoming an essential part of the burn care strategy. During the acute phase of burn treatment, dermal substitutes improve functional and cosmetic results long-term and thus increase quality of life. In the chronic wound setting, dermal substitutes are used to reconstruct and improve burn scars and other defects. Despite some successes in the use of dermal substitutes there are more needs and requirements to further improve outcomes and hence further research is required not only to strengthen scientific evidence regarding their effects but also to develop new technology and products. Dermal substitutes also emerge as pivotal research strategies to develop adequate scaffolds for stem cells, tissue engineering and regenerative medicine applications to obtain long-lasting and scarless artificial skin. This review discusses status-quo of dermal substitutes and novel strategies in the use of dermal substitutes with a focus on burn care. PMID:24393152

  14. A physiological toxicokinetic model for dermal absorption of waterborne pyrene by trout

    SciTech Connect

    Namdari, R.; Law, F.C.P.

    1995-12-31

    A physiologically-based toxicokinetic (PB-TK) model was developed to describe the disposition of pyrene in trout following a bolus injection into the dorsal aorta. In the present study, the PB-TK model was adapted for dermal absorption of waterborne pyrene by trout. A skin compartment with transdermal flux described mathematically by the permeability-area-concentration product was added to the PB-TK model to allow prediction of pyrene concentrations in target organs and blood on the basis of exposure concentration at the skin surface. Physiologically relevant parameters e.g., organ volume, blood flow rate, and tissue/blood partitioning coefficient which were derived from the model were similar to those reported in the previous publication. The dermal PB-TK model was validated by exposing the trunk of trout (400--500 g) to stagnant water containing 24 ppm pyrene in a specially designed chamber for 4 hr, 24 hr or 48 hr. The trout were sacrificed at the conclusion of pyrene exposure and the tissues analyzed for unchanged pyrene by HPLC. In separate experiments, trout were implanted with dorsal aorta cannuli before the trunks were exposed to stagnant water containing 24 ppm pyrene in the chamber for 4 hr. At specific time intervals during and after pyrene exposure, blood samples were withdrawn through the cannula and analyzed for pyrene by HPLC. The agreement between simulated and experimentally obtained values shows that this model is an appropriate tool to predict dermal absorption of waterborne pyrene by trout.

  15. Electrospun polyvinyl alcohol-collagen-hydroxyapatite nanofibers: a biomimetic extracellular matrix for osteoblastic cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Wei; Markel, David C.; Wang, Sunxi; Shi, Tong; Mao, Guangzhao; Ren, Weiping

    2012-03-01

    The failure of prosthesis after total joint replacement is due to the lack of early implant osseointegration. In this study polyvinyl alcohol-collagen-hydroxyapatite (PVA-Col-HA) electrospun nanofibrous meshes were fabricated as a biomimetic bone-like extracellular matrix for the modification of orthopedic prosthetic surfaces. In order to reinforce the PVA nanofibers, HA nanorods and Type I collagen were incorporated into the nanofibers. We investigated the morphology, biodegradability, mechanical properties and biocompatibility of the prepared nanofibers. Our results showed these inorganic-organic blended nanofibers to be degradable in vitro. The encapsulated nano-HA and collagen interacted with the PVA content, reinforcing the hydrolytic resistance and mechanical properties of nanofibers that provided longer lasting stability. The encapsulated nano-HA and collagen also enhanced the adhesion and proliferation of murine bone cells (MC3T3) in vitro. We propose the PVA-Col-HA nanofibers might be promising modifying materials on implant surfaces for orthopedic applications.

  16. Development and evaluation of cross-linked collagen-hydroxyapatite scaffolds for tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Panda, Niladri Nath; Jonnalagadda, Sriramakamal; Pramanik, Krishna

    2013-01-01

    This study examines the tissue engineering potential of type I collagen cross-linked in the presence of hydroxyapatite (HAp). Scaffolds were prepared by controlled freezing followed by lyophilization of composite mixtures of collagen and HAp in acetic acid, followed by cross-linking with 0.3% glutaraldehyde. Scaffolds of three ratios were prepared, corresponding to collagen/HAp ratios of 1:2, 1:4, and 1:6. The scaffolds were evaluated for their microstructure, chemical and physical properties, swelling behavior, mechanical strength, biodegradability hemocompatability, cytocompatibility, and histopathology following subcutaneous implantation in Sprague Dawley rats. The collagen/HAp matrices showed a smaller pore size of 10-40 μm compared to 50-100 μm for pure collagen scaffolds. Pure collagen showed a mechanical strength of 0.25 MPa, and the value almost doubled for cross-linked composites with collagen/HAp ratio 1:6. The improvement in mechanical strength corresponded to a decrease in swelling and enzymatic degradation (measured by resistance to collagenases). FTIR spectra results in conjunction with scanning electron micrographs showed that cross-linking in the presence of HAp did not significantly alter the structure of collagen. MTT assay and calcein AM staining revealed prominent and healthy growth of mesenchymal stem cells in both the pure collagen as well as collagen:HAp composites of ratio 1:2. In vivo implantation in Sprague Dawley rats showed an initial acute inflammatory response during days 3 and 7, followed by a chronic, macrophage-mediated inflammatory response on days 14 and 28. Overall, a cross-linked collagen/HAp composite scaffold of ratio 1:2 was identified as having potential for further development in tissue engineering. PMID:23905722

  17. Cross-reactivity of autoantibodies from patients with epidermolysis bullosa acquisita with murine collagen VII.

    PubMed

    Csorba, Kinga; Sesarman, Alina; Oswald, Eva; Feldrihan, Vasile; Fritsch, Anja; Hashimoto, Takashi; Sitaru, Cassian

    2010-04-01

    The pathomechanism of antibody-mediated tissue damage in autoimmune diseases can be best studied in experimental models by passively transferring specific autoantibodies into animals. The reproduction of the disease in animals depends on several factors, including the cross-reactivity of patient autoantibodies with the animal tissue. Here, we show that autoantibodies from patients with epidermolysis bullosa acquisita (EBA), a subepidermal autoimmune blistering disease, recognize multiple epitopes on murine collagen VII. Indirect immunofluorescence microscopy revealed that EBA patients' IgG cross-reacts with mouse skin. Overlapping, recombinant fragments of murine collagen VII were used to characterize the reactivity of EBA sera and to map the epitopes on the murine antigen by ELISA and immunoblotting. The patients' autoantibody binding to murine collagen VII triggered pathogenic events as demonstrated by a complement fixing and an ex vivo granulocyte-dependent dermal-epidermal separation assay. These findings should greatly facilitate the development of improved disease models and novel therapeutic strategies. PMID:20084423

  18. Zonal dermal separation: a distinctive histopathological lesion associated with hyperelastosis cutis in a Quarter Horse.

    PubMed

    Brounts, S H; Rashmir-Raven, A M; Black, S S

    2001-08-01

    This case report describes a distinctive deep cutaneous lesion in a 1-year-old Quarter Horse filly with hyperelastosis cutis. The horse had a typical clinical presentation of hyperelastic skin associated with a 6-month history of cutaneous wounds that developed following minor cutaneous trauma. Punch biopsies of skin from the affected horse were thinner than similar biopsies from an age- and breed-matched control. Significant microscopic lesions were not seen in cutaneous punch biopsies stained with haematoxylin and eosin and Masson's trichrome stains, but the ultrastructure of the dermis from the affected horse was characterized by variation in collagen fibre diameter and loose packing of collagen fibres within bundles. The horse was euthanized and necropsied, and full-thickness sections of skin were collected and examined microscopically. Affected skin was of normal thickness; however, the deep dermis contained a distinctive horizontal linear zone in which separation of collagen bundles resulted in the formation of large empty cleft-like spaces between the upper and lower regions of the deep dermis. We suggest the term 'zonal dermal separation' for this microscopic lesion. Incisional full-thickness skin biopsies should be taken in suspected cases of equine hyperelastosis cutis because punch biopsies may not obtain enough deep dermis to adequately represent pathological change in the skin of horses with this disorder. PMID:11493407

  19. Epoxy Cross-Linked Collagen and Collagen-Laminin Peptide Hydrogels as Corneal Substitutes

    PubMed Central

    Koh, Li Buay; Islam, Mohammad Mirazul; Mitra, Debbie; Noel, Christopher W.; Merrett, Kimberley; Odorcic, Silvia; Fagerholm, Per; Jackson, William. Bruce; Liedberg, Bo; Phopase, Jaywant; Griffith, May

    2013-01-01

    A bi-functional epoxy-based cross-linker, 1,4-Butanediol diglycidyl ether (BDDGE), was investigated in the fabrication of collagen based corneal substitutes. Two synthetic strategies were explored in the preparation of the cross-linked collagen scaffolds. The lysine residues of Type 1 porcine collagen were directly cross-linked using l,4-Butanediol diglycidyl ether (BDDGE) under basic conditions at pH 11. Alternatively, under conventional methodology, using both BDDGE and 1-Ethyl-3-(3-dimethyl aminopropyl) carbodiimide (EDC)/N-hydroxysuccinimide (NHS) as cross-linkers, hydrogels were fabricated under acidic conditions. In this latter strategy, Cu(BF4)2·XH2O was used to catalyze the formation of secondary amine bonds. To date, we have demonstrated that both methods of chemical cross-linking improved the elasticity and tensile strength of the collagen implants. Differential scanning calorimetry and biocompatibility studies indicate comparable, and in some cases, enhanced properties compared to that of the EDC/NHS controls. In vitro studies showed that human corneal epithelial cells and neuronal progenitor cell lines proliferated on these hydrogels. In addition, improvement of cell proliferation on the surfaces of the materials was observed when neurite promoting laminin epitope, IKVAV, and adhesion peptide, YIGSR, were incorporated. However, the elasticity decreased with peptide incorporation and will require further optimization. Nevertheless, we have shown that epoxy cross-linkers should be further explored in the fabrication of collagen-based hydrogels, as alternatives to or in conjunction with carbodiimide cross-linkers. PMID:24956085

  20. Controlled release of an extract of Calendula officinalis flowers from a system based on the incorporation of gelatin-collagen microparticles into collagen I scaffolds: design and in vitro performance.

    PubMed

    Jiménez, Ronald A; Millán, Diana; Suesca, Edward; Sosnik, Alejandro; Fontanilla, Marta R

    2015-06-01

    Aiming to develop biological skin dresses with improved performance in the treatment of skin wounds, acellular collagen I scaffolds were modified with polymeric microparticles and the subsequent loading of a hydroglycolic extract of Calendula officinalis flowers. Microparticles made of gelatin-collagen were produced by a water-in-oil emulsion/cross-linking method. Thereafter, these microparticles were mixed with collagen suspensions at three increasing concentrations and the resulting mixtures lyophilized to make microparticle-loaded porous collagen scaffolds. Resistance to enzymatic degradation, ability to associate with the C. officinalis extract, and the extract release profile of the three gelatin-collagen microparticle-scaffold prototypes were assessed in vitro and compared to collagen scaffolds without microparticles used as control. Data indicated that the incorporation of gelatin-collagen microparticles increased the resistance of the scaffolds to in vitro enzymatic degradation, as well as their association with the C. officinalis flower extract. In addition, a sharp decrease in cytotoxicity, as well as more prolonged release of the extract, was attained. Overall results support the potential of these systems to develop innovative dermal substitutes with improved features. Furthermore, the gelatin-collagen mixture represents a low-cost and scalable alternative with high clinical transferability, especially appealing in developing countries. PMID:25787728

  1. Characterization of dermal structural assembly in normal and pathological connective tissues by intrinsic signal multiphoton optical microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lyubovitsky, Julia G.; Xu, Xiaoman; Sun, Chung-ho; Andersen, Bogi; Krasieva, Tatiana B.; Tromberg, Bruce J.

    2008-02-01

    Employing a reflectance multi-photon microscopy (MPM) technique, we developed novel method to quantitatively study the three-dimensional assembly of structural proteins within bulk of dermal ECMs. Using a structurally simplified model of skin with enzymatically dissected epidermis, we find that low resolution MPM clearly discriminates between normal and pathological dermis. High-resolution images revealed that the backscattered MPM signals are affected by the assembly of collagen fibrils and fibers within this system. Exposure of tissues to high concentrations of potentially denaturing chemicals also resulted in the reduction of SHG signals from structural proteins which coincided with the appearance of aggregated fluorescent structures.

  2. Collagen Homeostasis and Metabolism.

    PubMed

    Magnusson, S Peter; Heinemeier, Katja M; Kjaer, Michael

    2016-01-01

    The musculoskeletal system and its collagen rich tissue is important for ensuring architecture of skeletal muscle, energy storage in tendon and ligaments, joint surface protection, and for ensuring the transfer of muscular forces into resulting limb movement. Structure of tendon is stable and the metabolic activity is low, but mechanical loading and subsequent mechanotransduction and molecular anabolic signaling can result in some adaptation of the tendon especially during youth and adolescence. Within short time, tendon will get stiffer with training and lack of mechanical tissue loading through inactivity or immobilization of the human body will conversely result in a dramatic loss in tendon stiffness and collagen synthesis. This illustrates the importance of regular mechanical load in order to preserve the stabilizing role of the connective tissue for the overall function of the musculoskeletal system in both daily activity and exercise. Adaptive responses may vary along the tendon, and differ between mid-substance and insertional areas of the tendon. PMID:27535245

  3. A method for measuring dermal exposure to solvents and fumigants

    SciTech Connect

    Cohen, B.S.M.

    1988-01-01

    This study aimed to develop a method for evaluating dermal exposure to deposits of volatile liquids. Telone II, a fumigant containing 1,3-dichloropropene (DCP), was used as an example. The approach included direct monitoring of dermal deposits and estimating the dermal absorbed dose. Charcoal cloth dermal dosimeters were developed for retaining the volatile deposits. Estimates are given for the retention efficiencies to be expected in various field conditions. The dermally absorbed dose is affected by the evaporation rate from the skin and by the percutaneous absorption rate (flux). Both factors were studied by the dermal dosing of ras with Telone, and monitoring evaporation and urine metabolites of cis-DCP. While relatively high flux values were calculated for rat and estimated for man, due to fast evaporation, the estimated absorbed fraction from a localized dermal deposit was less than 0.2%. Charcoal cloth dermal dosimeters and charcoal tubes were used in ten studies to monitor dermal and respiratory exposure of field applicators to Telone. The charcoal cloth dosimeter method is applicable for monitoring dermal exposure to other volatile chemicals also. However, evaluation of the exposure could be associated with relatively large variability, rendering the method semiquantitative.

  4. Stabilized Collagen Scaffolds for Heart Valve Tissue Engineering

    PubMed Central

    Tedder, Mary E.; Liao, Jun; Weed, Benjamin; Stabler, Christopher; Zhang, Henry; Simionescu, Agneta

    2009-01-01

    Scaffolds for heart valve tissue engineering must function immediately after implantation but also need to tolerate cell infiltration and gradual remodeling. We hypothesized that moderately cross-linked collagen scaffolds would fulfill these requirements. To test our hypothesis, scaffolds prepared from decellularized porcine pericardium were treated with penta-galloyl glucose (PGG), a collagen-binding polyphenol, and tested for biodegradation, biaxial mechanical properties, and in vivo biocompatibility. For controls, we used un-cross-linked scaffolds and glutaraldehyde-treated scaffolds. Results confirmed complete pericardium decellularization and the ability of scaffolds to encourage fibroblast chemotaxis and to aid in creation of anatomically correct valve-shaped constructs. Glutaraldehyde cross-linking fully stabilized collagen but did not allow for tissue remodeling and calcified when implanted subdermally in rats. PGG-treated collagen was initially resistant to collagenase and then degraded gradually, indicating partial stabilization. Moreover, PGG-treated pericardium exhibited excellent biaxial mechanical properties, did not calcify in vivo, and supported infiltration by host fibroblasts and subsequent matrix remodeling. In conclusion, PGG-treated acellular pericardium is a promising scaffold for heart valve tissue engineering. PMID:18928400

  5. Cochlear Implants

    MedlinePlus

    ... electrodes are inserted. The electronic device at the base of the electrode array is then placed under ... FDA approval for implants The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) regulates cochlear implant devices for both adults ...

  6. Goserelin Implant

    MedlinePlus

    Goserelin implant is used in combination with radiation therapy and other medications to treat localized prostate cancer and is ... treatment of abnormal bleeding of the uterus. Goserelin implant is in a class of medications called gonadotropin- ...

  7. Cochlear Implants

    MedlinePlus

    A cochlear implant is a small, complex electronic device that can help to provide a sense of sound. People who are ... of-hearing can get help from them. The implant consists of two parts. One part sits on ...

  8. Carmustine Implant

    MedlinePlus

    Carmustine implant is used along with surgery and sometimes radiation therapy to treat malignant glioma (a certain type of ... Carmustine implant comes as a small wafer that is placed in the brain by a doctor during surgery to ...

  9. Cochlear implant

    MedlinePlus

    ... antenna. This part of the implant receives the sound, converts the sound into an electrical signal, and sends it to ... implants allow deaf people to receive and process sounds and speech. However, these devices do not restore ...

  10. Breast Implants

    MedlinePlus

    ... Updated Safety Information (Consumer Article) FDA Provides Updated Safety Data on Silicone Gel-Filled Breast Implants (Press Announcement) [ARCHIVED] Breast Implant Guidance for Industry (2006) Post Approval Studies Webpage Freedom of Information ...

  11. Label-free nonenzymatic glycation monitoring of collagen scaffolds in type 2 diabetic mice by confocal Raman microspectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Panpan; Liu, Hanping; Deng, Xiaoyuan; Jin, Ying; Wang, Qiannan; Liu, Hao; Chen, Maosheng; Han, Xue

    2015-02-01

    Collagen is the key target of nonenzymatic glycation during physiopathological processes such as diabetes. The induced changes in the biochemical property of collagen by nonenzymatic glycation remain a major challenge to probe. This study investigated the use of confocal Raman microspectroscopy to label-free monitor the nonenzymatic glycation of collagen scaffolds from type 2 diabetic (T2D) mice at different timepoints (0, 4, 8, and 12 weeks). The glycated collagen scaffolds were obtained through the decellularized dermal matrix method to remove the epidermis layer, subcutaneous tissue, and cells in the dermis and to retain the collagen fibrils. Raman spectra showed no changes in Raman peak positions, which indicated that nonenzymatic glycation could produce no significant changes in the triple-helix structure of collagen in T2D mice. However, the relative intensity of the Raman bands at 921, 1033, 1244, 1274, 1346, 1635, and 1672 cm-1 increased as diabetic time progressed. Correlation analysis suggested that the spectra of these bands had a high positive correlation with the expression of anti-advanced glycation end products obtained by immunofluorescence imaging of the same collagen scaffolds. Confocal Raman microspectroscopy proves a potential tool to label-free monitor the collagen changes caused by nonenzymatic glycation in T2D mice.

  12. Characterization and mechanisms of photoageing-related changes in skin. Damages of basement membrane and dermal structures.

    PubMed

    Amano, Satoshi

    2016-08-01

    Sun-exposed skin is characterized by superficial changes such as wrinkles, sagging and pigmentary changes, and also many internal changes in the structure and function of epidermis, basement membrane (BM) and dermis. These changes (so-called photoageing) are predominantly induced by the ultraviolet (UV) component of sunlight. Epidermis of UV-irradiated skin produced several enzymes such as matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs), urinary plasminogen activator (uPA)/plasmin and heparanase, which degrade dermal collagen fibres and elastic fibres in the dermis, and components of epidermal BM. The BM at the dermal-epidermal junction (DEJ) controls dermal-epidermal signalling and plays an important role in the maintenance of a healthy epidermis and dermis. BM is repetitively damaged in sun-exposed skin compared with unexposed skin, leading to epidermal and dermal deterioration and accelerated skin ageing. UV exposure also induces an increase in vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), an angiogenic factor, while thrombospondin-1 (TSP-1), an anti-angiogenic factor, is decreased; these changes induce angiogenesis in papillary dermis with increased migration of elastase-positive leucocytes, leading to dermal elastic fibre damage. Elastic fibres, such as oxytalan fibres in papillary dermis, are associated with not only skin resilience, but also skin surface texture, and elastic fibre formation by fibroblasts is facilitated by increased expression of fibulin-5. Thus, induction of fibulin-5 expression is a damage-repair mechanism, and fibulin-5 is an early marker of photoaged skin. UV-induced skin damage is cumulative and leads to premature ageing of skin. However, appropriate daily skincare may ameliorate photoageing by inhibiting processes causing damage and enhancing repair processes. PMID:27539897

  13. Ovine tendon collagen: Extraction, characterisation and fabrication of thin films for tissue engineering applications.

    PubMed

    Fauzi, M B; Lokanathan, Y; Aminuddin, B S; Ruszymah, B H I; Chowdhury, S R

    2016-11-01

    Collagen is the most abundant extracellular matrix (ECM) protein in the human body, thus widely used in tissue engineering and subsequent clinical applications. This study aimed to extract collagen from ovine (Ovis aries) Achilles tendon (OTC), and to evaluate its physicochemical properties and its potential to fabricate thin film with collagen fibrils in a random or aligned orientation. Acid-solubilized protein was extracted from ovine Achilles tendon using 0.35M acetic acid, and 80% of extracted protein was measured as collagen. SDS-PAGE and mass spectrometry analysis revealed the presence of alpha 1 and alpha 2 chain of collagen type I (col I). Further analysis with Fourier transform infrared spectrometry (FTIR), X-ray diffraction (XRD) and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS) confirms the presence of triple helix structure of col I, similar to commercially available rat tail col I. Drying the OTC solution at 37°C resulted in formation of a thin film with randomly orientated collagen fibrils (random collagen film; RCF). Introduction of unidirectional mechanical intervention using a platform rocker prior to drying facilitated the fabrication of a film with aligned orientation of collagen fibril (aligned collagen film; ACF). It was shown that both RCF and ACF significantly enhanced human dermal fibroblast (HDF) attachment and proliferation than that on plastic surface. Moreover, cells were distributed randomly on RCF, but aligned with the direction of mechanical intervention on ACF. In conclusion, ovine tendon could be an alternative source of col I to fabricate scaffold for tissue engineering applications. PMID:27524008

  14. Dermal Adipocytes: From Irrelevance to Metabolic Targets?

    PubMed

    Kruglikov, Ilja L; Scherer, Philipp E

    2016-01-01

    Dermal white adipose tissue (dWAT) has received little appreciation in the past as a distinct entity from the better recognized subcutaneous white adipose tissue (sWAT). However, recent work has established dWAT as an important contributor to a multitude of processes, including immune response, wound healing and scarring, hair follicle (HF) growth, and thermoregulation. Unique metabolic contributions have also been attributed to dWAT, at least in part due to its thermic insulation properties and response to cold exposure. Dermal adipocytes can also undergo an adipocyte-myofibroblast transition (AMT), a process that is suspected to have an important role in several pathophysiological processes within the skin. Here, we discuss emerging concepts regarding dWAT physiology and its significance to a variety of cellular processes. PMID:26643658

  15. Optical coherence tomography: imaging architect for dermal microdialysis in psoriasis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Connell, M.-L.; O'Connor, W.; Ramsay, B.; Guihen, E.; Ho, W. L.; Leahy, M. J.

    2011-03-01

    Optical coherence tomography (OCT) has been used as part of a ground breaking translational study to shed some light on one of the worlds most prevalent autoimmune diseases; psoriasis. The work successfully integrates the fields of optical imaging, biochemistry and dermatology in conducting a dermal microdialysis (DMD) trial for quantitative histamine assessment amongst a group of psoriasis sufferers. The DMD process involves temporary insertion of microscopic hollow tubes into a layer of skin to measure the levels of histamine and other important biological molecules in psoriasis. For comparison purposes, DMD catheters were implanted into healthy, peri-lesional and lesional skin regions. The catheters' entry and exit points and their precise locations in the epidermal layer of the skin were confirmed using OCT thus obtaining high resolution, wide-field images of the affected skin as well as catheter placement whilst local microdialysis enabled a tissue chemistry profile to be obtained from these three skin regions including histamine, a local immune system activator known to contribute towards itch and inflammation. Together these tools offer a synergistic approach in the clinical assessment of the disease. In addition, OCT delivered a non-invasive and rapid method for analyzing the affected skin architecture.

  16. Serpin A1 C-Terminal Peptides as Collagen Turnover Modulators.

    PubMed

    Pascarella, Simona; Tiberi, Caterina; Sabatino, Giuseppina; Nuti, Francesca; Papini, Anna Maria; Giovannelli, Lisa; Rovero, Paolo

    2016-08-19

    The modulation of collagen turnover can be a relevant pharmacological target in the context of treating either pathological or pathophysiological conditions, such as collagen-related diseases and skin aging. Our recent work has focused on the search for short-chain peptides as lead compounds for further development of compounds that enhance the production of type I collagen. In this study we selected and synthesized overlapping peptides of the C-terminal portion of serpin A1 (residues 393-418), the impact of which on collagen production has been reported previously, in order to identify shorter and still active fragments and to provide insight on the mechanisms involved. The biological activity of each fragment was evaluated with cultured normal human dermal fibroblasts, and changes in the amounts of collagen were monitored in collected culture media by a sandwich ELISA technique developed in house. Interestingly, we identified a decapeptide, termed SA1-III (Ac-MGKVVNPTQK-NH2 ), as a promising candidate for our purposes; it is able to induce a significant increase in type I collagen levels in the culture medium of treated cells at micromolar concentrations. PMID:26615979

  17. Acute oral, dermal, and inhalation studies.

    PubMed

    Thomann, P; Krüger, L

    1975-01-01

    By appropriate testing procedures, it has been demonstrated that the compounds used as fluorescent whitening agents (FWAs) have a very low order of systemic toxicity in acute experiments. No evidence of dermal toxicity has been found. The full chemical names of the fluorescent whitening agents (FWAs) investigated in this study are listed below. They have been numbered for easy identification and classified by chemical groups. PMID:1064537

  18. Poisoning from dermal absorption of promethazine.

    PubMed Central

    Shawn, D H; McGuigan, M A

    1984-01-01

    Two cases in which dermal absorption of promethazine hydrochloride resulted in a toxic neurologic syndrome are reported. The symptoms included central nervous system depression, acute excitomotor manifestations, ataxia and visual hallucinations. In addition, peripheral anticholinergic effects occurred. These symptoms are comparable with those of oral, intramuscular and rectal overdose of promethazine. The demonstrated risks of the topical use of promethazine outweigh any benefits. PMID:6733616

  19. A morphoelastic model for dermal wound closure.

    PubMed

    Bowden, L G; Byrne, H M; Maini, P K; Moulton, D E

    2016-06-01

    We develop a model of wound healing in the framework of finite elasticity, focussing our attention on the processes of growth and contraction in the dermal layer of the skin. The dermal tissue is treated as a hyperelastic cylinder that surrounds the wound and is subject to symmetric deformations. By considering the initial recoil that is observed upon the application of a circular wound, we estimate the degree of residual tension in the skin and build an evolution law for mechanosensitive growth of the dermal tissue. Contraction of the wound is governed by a phenomenological law in which radial pressure is prescribed at the wound edge. The model reproduces three main phases of the healing process. Initially, the wound recoils due to residual stress in the surrounding tissue; the wound then heals as a result of contraction and growth; and finally, healing slows as contraction and growth decrease. Over a longer time period, the surrounding tissue remodels, returning to the residually stressed state. We identify the steady state growth profile associated with this remodelled state. The model is then used to predict the outcome of rewounding experiments designed to quantify the amount of stress in the tissue, and also to simulate the application of pressure treatments. PMID:26264498

  20. Ventral vs. dorsal chick dermal progenitor specification.

    PubMed

    Fliniaux, Ingrid; Viallet, Jean P; Dhouailly, Danielle

    2004-01-01

    The dorsal and the ventral trunk integuments of the chick differ in their dermal cell lineage (originating from the somatic and somatopleural mesoderm respectively) and in the distribution of their feather fields. The dorsal macropattern has a large spinal pteryla surrounded by semi-apteria, whereas the ventral skin has a true medial apterium surrounded by the ventral pterylae. Comparison of the results of heterotopic transplantations of distal somatopleure in place of somatic mesoderm (Mauger 1972) or in place of proximal somatopleure (our data), leads to two conclusions. These are that the fate of the midventral apterium is not committed at day 2 of incubation and that the signals from the environment which specify the ventral and dorsal featherforming dermal progenitors are different. Effectively, Shh, but not Wnt -1 signalling can induce the formation of feather forming dermis from the embryonic somatopleure. Shh is not able, however, to trigger the formation of a feather forming dermis from the extra embryonic somatopleure. This brief report constitutes the first attempt, by comparing old and new preliminary results, to understand whether dermal progenitors at different sites are specified by different signalling pathways. PMID:15272375

  1. Oleanane-type triterpene saponins with collagen synthesis-promoting activity from the flowers of Bellis perennis.

    PubMed

    Morikawa, Toshio; Ninomiya, Kiyofumi; Takamori, Yasunobu; Nishida, Eriko; Yasue, Misato; Hayakawa, Takao; Muraoka, Osamu; Li, Xuezheng; Nakamura, Seikou; Yoshikawa, Masayuki; Matsuda, Hisashi

    2015-08-01

    The methanol extract from Bellis perennis (Asteraceae) flowers was found to promote collagen synthesis in normal human dermal fibroblasts (NHDFs). Seven oleanane-type triterpene saponins, perennisosides XIII-XIX, and two known saponins, bellissaponins BS5 and BS9, were isolated from the methanol extract. The structures were determined based on chemical and physicochemical data, and confirmed using previously isolated related compounds as references. Among the isolates, including 19 previously reported saponins, perennisosides XVIII, I, II, VII, IX, and XI, asterbatanoside D, bernardioside B2, and bellissaponins BS5 and BS9 significantly promoted collagen synthesis at 3-30μM without cytotoxicity. PMID:26028520

  2. IL-13 mediates collagen deposition via STAT6 and microRNA-135b: a role for epigenetics

    PubMed Central

    O’Reilly, Steven; Ciechomska, Marzena; Fullard, Nicola; Przyborski, Stefan; van Laar, Jacob M.

    2016-01-01

    Systemic sclerosis is an autoimmune connective tissue disease in which T cells play a prominent role. We and others have previously demonstrated a role for T cell-derived IL-13 in mediating the induction of collagen in dermal fibroblasts and that blockade with IL-13 antibodies attenuates this increase. In this study we want to probe the signalling that underpins IL-13 mediated matrix deposition. Isolated dermal fibroblasts were incubated with recombinant IL-13 and gene expression by qRT-PCR was performed for collagen1A1 and TGF-β1. Small interfering RNA (siRNA) was used to knock down STAT6 and a small molecule inhibitor was also used to block this pathway. MiR-135b was transfected into fibroblasts plus and minus IL-13 to see if this miR plays a role. miR-135b was measured in systemic sclerosis fibroblasts isolated from patients and also in serum. Results showed that IL-13 increased collagen expression and that this is independent from TGF-β1. This is dependent on STAT6 as targeting this blocked induction. MiR-135b reduces collagen induction in fibroblasts and scleroderma fibroblasts have lower constitutive levels of the miR. We further demonstrate that miR135b is repressed by methylation and may include MeCP2. In conclusion we show that STAT6 and miR-135b regulate IL-13-mediated collagen production by fibroblasts. PMID:27113293

  3. IL-13 mediates collagen deposition via STAT6 and microRNA-135b: a role for epigenetics.

    PubMed

    O'Reilly, Steven; Ciechomska, Marzena; Fullard, Nicola; Przyborski, Stefan; van Laar, Jacob M

    2016-01-01

    Systemic sclerosis is an autoimmune connective tissue disease in which T cells play a prominent role. We and others have previously demonstrated a role for T cell-derived IL-13 in mediating the induction of collagen in dermal fibroblasts and that blockade with IL-13 antibodies attenuates this increase. In this study we want to probe the signalling that underpins IL-13 mediated matrix deposition. Isolated dermal fibroblasts were incubated with recombinant IL-13 and gene expression by qRT-PCR was performed for collagen1A1 and TGF-β1. Small interfering RNA (siRNA) was used to knock down STAT6 and a small molecule inhibitor was also used to block this pathway. MiR-135b was transfected into fibroblasts plus and minus IL-13 to see if this miR plays a role. miR-135b was measured in systemic sclerosis fibroblasts isolated from patients and also in serum. Results showed that IL-13 increased collagen expression and that this is independent from TGF-β1. This is dependent on STAT6 as targeting this blocked induction. MiR-135b reduces collagen induction in fibroblasts and scleroderma fibroblasts have lower constitutive levels of the miR. We further demonstrate that miR135b is repressed by methylation and may include MeCP2. In conclusion we show that STAT6 and miR-135b regulate IL-13-mediated collagen production by fibroblasts. PMID:27113293

  4. Evaluation of electric arc furnace-processed steel slag for dermal corrosion, irritation, and sensitization from dermal contact.

    PubMed

    Suh, Mina; Troese, Matthew J; Hall, Debra A; Yasso, Blair; Yzenas, John J; Proctor, Debora M

    2014-12-01

    Electric arc furnace (EAF) steel slag is alkaline (pH of ~11-12) and contains metals, most notably chromium and nickel, and thus has potential to cause dermal irritation and sensitization at sufficient dose. Dermal contact with EAF slag occurs in many occupational and environmental settings because it is used widely in construction and other industrial sectors for various applications including asphaltic paving, road bases, construction fill, and as feed for cement kilns construction. However, no published study has characterized the potential for dermal effects associated with EAF slag. To assess dermal irritation, corrosion and sensitizing potential of EAF slag, in vitro and in vivo dermal toxicity assays were conducted based on the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) guidelines. In vitro dermal corrosion and irritation testing (OECD 431 and 439) of EAF slag was conducted using the reconstructed human epidermal (RHE) tissue model. In vivo dermal toxicity and delayed contact sensitization testing (OECD 404 and 406) were conducted in rabbits and guinea pigs, respectively. EAF slag was not corrosive and not irritating in any tests. The results of the delayed contact dermal sensitization test indicate that EAF slag is not a dermal sensitizer. These findings are supported by the observation that metals in EAF slag occur as oxides of low solubility with leachates that are well below toxicity characteristic leaching procedure (TCLP) limits. Based on these results and in accordance to the OECD guidelines, EAF slag is not considered a dermal sensitizer, corrosive or irritant. PMID:24395402

  5. Release and retention of biomolecules in collagen deposited on orthopedic biomaterials.

    PubMed

    Puleo, D A

    1999-01-01

    Delivery of osteotropic biomolecules directly to the bone-implant interface can alter initial interactions between tissue and biomaterial. To this end, type I collagen coatings containing a model biomolecule, lysozyme, were deposited on Co-Cr-Mo and Ti-6Al-4V. Two deposition methods were examined. In the first, lysozyme was deposited concurrently with collagen, while in the second, protein was impregnated into previously deposited collagen coatings. The amount of collagen and the amount of lysozyme loaded into collagen were varied to provide different amounts of weakly and strongly bound protein. Release and retention of lysozyme were monitored over a 7 d period of incubation in physiological saline. For both methods, larger amounts of collagen in the coatings allowed incorporation of more lysozyme. Additionally, loading collagen coatings with greater amounts of lysozyme resulted in release of more protein. During the first 24-96 h of incubation, loosely bound protein was eluted, resulting in release of 2 micrograms to 55 mg (5-75% of the amount available) of enzymatically active lysozyme. This left 25-95% of the protein bound to the collagen-coated biomaterials and, thus, available for later release during degradation of the collagen. PMID:10063439

  6. Collagen incorporation within electrospun conduits reduces lipid oxidation and impacts conduit mechanics.

    PubMed

    Birthare, Karamveer; Shojaee, Mozhgan; Jones, Carlos Gross; Brenner, James R; Bashur, Chris A

    2016-01-01

    Modulating the host response, including the accumulation of oxidized lipid species, is important for improving tissue engineered vascular graft (TEVG) viability. Accumulation of oxidized lipids promotes smooth muscle cell (SMC) hyper-proliferation and inhibits endothelial cell migration, which can lead to several of the current challenges for small-diameter TEVGs. Generating biomaterials that reduce lipid oxidation is important for graft survival and this assessment can provide a reliable correlation to clinical situations. In this study, we determined the collagen to poly(ε-caprolactone) (PCL) ratio required to limit the production of pro-inflammatory species, while maintaining the required mechanical strength for the graft. Electrospun conduits were prepared from 0%, 10%, and 25% blends of collagen/PCL (w/w) and implanted in the rat peritoneal cavity for four weeks. The results showed that adding collagen to the PCL conduits reduced the accumulation of oxidized lipid species within the implanted conduits. In addition, the ratio of collagen had a significant impact on the recruited cell phenotype and construct mechanics. All conduits exhibited greater than 44% yield strain and sufficient tensile strength post-implantation. In conclusion, these results demonstrate that incorporating collagen into synthetic electrospun scaffolds, both 10% and 25% blend conditions, appears to limit the pro-inflammatory characteristics after in vivo implantation. PMID:27099237

  7. Protective Effects of Triphala on Dermal Fibroblasts and Human Keratinocytes

    PubMed Central

    Varma, Sandeep R.; Sivaprakasam, Thiyagarajan O.; Mishra, Abheepsa; Kumar, L. M. Sharath; Prakash, N. S.; Prabhu, Sunil; Ramakrishnan, Shyam

    2016-01-01

    Human skin is body’s vital organ constantly exposed to abiotic oxidative stress. This can have deleterious effects on skin such as darkening, skin damage, and aging. Plant-derived products having skin-protective effects are well-known traditionally. Triphala, a formulation of three fruit products, is one of the most important rasayana drugs used in Ayurveda. Several skin care products based on Triphala are available that claim its protective effects on facial skin. However, the skin protective effects of Triphala extract (TE) and its mechanistic action on skin cells have not been elucidated in vitro. Gallic acid, ellagic acid, and chebulinic acid were deduced by LC-MS as the major constituents of TE. The identified key compounds were docked with skin-related proteins to predict their binding affinity. The IC50 values for TE on human dermal fibroblasts (HDF) and human keratinocytes (HaCaT) were 204.90 ± 7.6 and 239.13 ± 4.3 μg/mL respectively. The antioxidant capacity of TE was 481.33 ± 1.5 mM Trolox equivalents in HaCaT cells. Triphala extract inhibited hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) induced RBC haemolysis (IC50 64.95 μg/mL), nitric oxide production by 48.62 ± 2.2%, and showed high reducing power activity. TE also rescued HDF from H2O2-induced damage; inhibited H2O2 induced cellular senescence and protected HDF from DNA damage. TE increased collagen-I, involucrin and filaggrin synthesis by 70.72 ± 2.3%, 67.61 ± 2.1% and 51.91 ± 3.5% in HDF or HaCaT cells respectively. TE also exhibited anti-tyrosinase and melanin inhibition properties in a dose-dependent manner. TE increased the mRNA expression of collagen-I, elastin, superoxide dismutase (SOD-2), aquaporin-3 (AQP-3), filaggrin, involucrin, transglutaminase in HDF or HaCaT cells, and decreased the mRNA levels of tyrosinase in B16F10 cells. Thus, Triphala exhibits protective benefits on skin cells in vitro and can be used as a potential ingredient in skin care formulations. PMID:26731545

  8. Protective Effects of Triphala on Dermal Fibroblasts and Human Keratinocytes.

    PubMed

    Varma, Sandeep R; Sivaprakasam, Thiyagarajan O; Mishra, Abheepsa; Kumar, L M Sharath; Prakash, N S; Prabhu, Sunil; Ramakrishnan, Shyam

    2016-01-01

    Human skin is body's vital organ constantly exposed to abiotic oxidative stress. This can have deleterious effects on skin such as darkening, skin damage, and aging. Plant-derived products having skin-protective effects are well-known traditionally. Triphala, a formulation of three fruit products, is one of the most important rasayana drugs used in Ayurveda. Several skin care products based on Triphala are available that claim its protective effects on facial skin. However, the skin protective effects of Triphala extract (TE) and its mechanistic action on skin cells have not been elucidated in vitro. Gallic acid, ellagic acid, and chebulinic acid were deduced by LC-MS as the major constituents of TE. The identified key compounds were docked with skin-related proteins to predict their binding affinity. The IC50 values for TE on human dermal fibroblasts (HDF) and human keratinocytes (HaCaT) were 204.90 ± 7.6 and 239.13 ± 4.3 μg/mL respectively. The antioxidant capacity of TE was 481.33 ± 1.5 mM Trolox equivalents in HaCaT cells. Triphala extract inhibited hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) induced RBC haemolysis (IC50 64.95 μg/mL), nitric oxide production by 48.62 ± 2.2%, and showed high reducing power activity. TE also rescued HDF from H2O2-induced damage; inhibited H2O2 induced cellular senescence and protected HDF from DNA damage. TE increased collagen-I, involucrin and filaggrin synthesis by 70.72 ± 2.3%, 67.61 ± 2.1% and 51.91 ± 3.5% in HDF or HaCaT cells respectively. TE also exhibited anti-tyrosinase and melanin inhibition properties in a dose-dependent manner. TE increased the mRNA expression of collagen-I, elastin, superoxide dismutase (SOD-2), aquaporin-3 (AQP-3), filaggrin, involucrin, transglutaminase in HDF or HaCaT cells, and decreased the mRNA levels of tyrosinase in B16F10 cells. Thus, Triphala exhibits protective benefits on skin cells in vitro and can be used as a potential ingredient in skin care formulations. PMID:26731545

  9. Heterogeneity of collagens in rabbit cornea: type VI collagen

    SciTech Connect

    Cintron, C.; Hong, B.S.

    1988-05-01

    Normal adult rabbit corneas were digested with 5% pepsin and their collagens extracted with acetic acid. Collagen extracts were fractionated by differential salt precipitation. The 2.5 M NaCl fraction was then redissolved with tris buffer and precipitated with sodium acetate. The precipitate contained a high-molecular-weight disulfide-bonded aggregate which, upon reduction with mercaptoethanol, was converted into three distinct polypeptides having molecular weights between 45 and 66 Kd. These physical characteristics, together with the susceptibility of these polypeptides to collagenase and their amino acid composition, identified the high molecular weight aggregate as type VI collagen. Corneas from neonate rabbits and adult corneas containing 2-week-old scars were organ cultured in the presence of (/sup 14/C) glycine to incorporate radiolabel into collagen. Tissues were digested with 0.02% pepsin and their collagens extracted with formic acid. The total radioactivity of the extracts and tissue residues was determined before the collagens were separated by SDS-polyacrylamide slab gel electrophoresis. Radioactive collagen polypeptides bands were then stained with Coomassie blue, processed for fluorography, and analyzed by densitometry. The results show that: (1) type VI collagen is synthesized by neonate corneas and healing adult corneas; (2) it is not readily solubilized from either corneal tissue by 0.02% pepsin digestion and formic acid extraction; and (3) the proportion of type VI collagen deposited in scar tissue is markedly lower than that found in neonate corneas.

  10. Heterogeneity of collagens in rabbit cornea: type III collagen

    SciTech Connect

    Cintron, C.; Hong, B.S.; Covington, H.I.; Macarak, E.J.

    1988-05-01

    Whole neonate rabbit corneas and adult corneas containing 2-week-old scars were incubated in the presence of (/sup 14/C) glycine. Radiolabeled collagen extracted from the corneas and scar tissue were analyzed by sodium dodecylsulfate/polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and fluorography to determine the types and relative quantity of collagen polypeptides present and synthesized by these tissues. In addition to other collagen types, type III was found in both neonate cornea and scar tissue from adult cornea, albeit in relatively small quantities. Type III collagen in normal cornea was associated with the residue after pepsin digestion and formic acid extraction of the tissue, and the same type of collagen was extracted from scar tissue after similar treatment. Type III collagen-specific monoclonal antibody bound to developing normal corneas and healing adult tissue sections, as determined by immunofluorescence. Antibody binding was localized to the endothelium and growing Descemet's membrane in fetal and neonate corneas, and restricted to the most posterior region of the corneal scar tissue. Although monoclonal antibody to keratan sulfate, used as a marker for stromal fibroblasts, bound to most of the scar tissue, the antibody failed to bind to the posterior scar tissue positive for type III collagen. We conclude that endothelial cells from fetal and neonate rabbit cornea and endothelium-derived fibroblasts from healing wounds of adult cornea synthesize and deposit type III collagen. Moreover, this collagen appears to be incorporated into the growing Descemet's membrane of normal corneas and narrow posterior portion of the scar tissue.

  11. Aldosterone and mineralocorticoid receptor antagonists modulate elastin and collagen deposition in human skin.

    PubMed

    Mitts, Thomas F; Bunda, Severa; Wang, Yanting; Hinek, Aleksander

    2010-10-01

    We have shown that the steroid hormone aldosterone, recognized for its action on the kidney and the cardiovascular system, also modulates deposition of extracellular matrix in human skin. We have shown that treatment of primary cultures of normal skin fibroblasts with aldosterone (10 n-1 μM), in addition to stimulation of collagen type I expression, induces elastin gene expression and elastic fiber deposition. We have further shown that the elastogenic effect of aldosterone, which can be enhanced in the presence of mineralocorticoid receptor (MR) antagonists spironolactone and eplerenone, is executed in a MR-independent manner via amplification of IGF-I receptor-mediated signaling. Because aldosterone applied alone stimulates both collagen and elastin deposition in cultures of fibroblasts and in cultures of skin explants derived from dermal stretch marks, we postulate that this steroid should be used in the treatment of damaged skin that loses its volume and elasticity. Moreover, aldosterone applied in conjunction with spironolactone or eplerenone induces matrix remodeling and exclusively enhances elastogenesis in cultures of fibroblasts and explants derived from dermal scars and keloids. We therefore propose that intra-lesional injection of these factors should be considered in therapy for disfiguring dermal lesions and especially in prevention of their recurrence after surgical excision. PMID:20535129

  12. Establishment of banking system for allogeneic cultured dermal substitute.

    PubMed

    Kuroyanagi, Yoshimitsu; Kubo, Kentaro; Matsui, Hiromich; Kim, Hyun Jung; Numari, Shinichiro; Mabuchi, Yho; Kagawa, Shizuko

    2004-01-01

    Allogeneic cultured dermal substitute (CDS) was prepared by culturing fibroblasts on a two-layered spongy matrix of hyaluronic acid (HA) and atelo-collagen (Col). Allogeneic CDS can be cryopreserved and transported to other hospitals in a frozen state. Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF), hepatocyte growth factor (HGF), platelet derived growth factor (PDGF)-AA, transforming growth factor (TGF)-beta1, keratinocytes growth factor (KGF), interleukin (IL)-6 and IL-8 were contained in the culture medium which was used in preparing CDS over a cultivation period of one week (fresh CDS culture medium sample). After thawing a cryopreserved CDS, the CDS was recultured in a culture medium for one week. VEGF, bFGF, HGF, TGF-beta1 and IL-8 were contained in the culture medium which was used in reculturing CDS for one week (cryopreserved CDS culture medium sample), although some cytokines were detected at a lower level than those before freezing. This finding suggests that the cryopreserved CDS retains its ability to release these cytokines. Clinical research on allogeneic CDS, which was newly developed at the R & D Center for Artificial Skin of Kitasato University, has been carried out in medical centers across Japan with the support of the Millennium Project of the Ministry of Health, Labor and Welfare. It was demonstrated that the allogeneic CDS functions as an excellent cell therapy for intractable skin ulcers as well as burn injuries. The spongy matrix itself, as well as the cytokines released from the allogeneic CDS, seemed to be beneficial for the treatment of intractable skin defect. PMID:14720283

  13. Rapid Fabrication of Living Tissue Models by Collagen Plastic Compression: Understanding Three-Dimensional Cell Matrix Repair In Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Cheema, Umber; Brown, Robert A.

    2013-01-01

    Objective To produce biomimetic collagen scaffolds for tissue modeling and as tissue-engineered implants. Approach Control of collagen fibril material parameters in collagen hydrogel scaffolds by using plastic compression (PC), resulting in direct control of cell proliferation, cell migration, and cell–cell interaction. Results We were able to control the density of collagen in such scaffolds from between 0.2% and 30%, and controllably layer the fibrils in the Z-plane. Cell migration was observed in gels where a gradient of collagen density was present. In these gels, cells preferentially migrated toward the collagen-dense areas. Cell proliferation rates were measurably higher in dense collagen gels. Innovation The use of PC to control material properties of collagen hydrogels results in collagen scaffolds that are biomimetic. These collagen gels reproduce the relevant matrix-mechanical environment in which behavior is more representative of that found in vivo. Conclusion The material properties of native collagen type I gels can be engineered to match those found in tissues in vivo to elicit more biomimetic cell behavior. PMID:24527341

  14. Effect of Protein Kinase C delta (PKC-δ) Inhibition on the Transcriptome of Normal and Systemic Sclerosis Human Dermal Fibroblasts In Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Wermuth, Peter J.; Addya, Sankar; Jimenez, Sergio A.

    2011-01-01

    Previous studies demonstrated that protein kinase C- δ (PKC-δ) inhibition with the selective inhibitor, rottlerin, resulted in potent downregulation of type I collagen expression and production in normal human dermal fibroblasts and abrogated the exaggerated type I collagen production and expression in fibroblasts cultured from affected skin from patients with the fibrosing disorder systemic sclerosis (SSc). To elucidate the mechanisms involved in the ability of PKC-δ to regulate collagen production in fibroblasts, we examined the effects of PKC-δ inhibition on the transcriptome of normal and SSc human dermal fibroblasts. Normal and SSc human dermal fibroblasts were incubated with rottlerin (5 µM), and their gene expression was analyzed by microarrays. Pathway analysis and gene ontology analysis of differentially expressed genes in each comparison were performed. Identification of significantly overrepresented transcriptional regulatory elements (TREs) was performed using the Promoter Analysis and Interaction Network Toolset (PAINT) program. PKC-δ activity was also inhibited using RNA interference (siRNA) and by treating fibroblasts with a specific PKC-δ inhibitory cell permeable peptide. Differential gene expression of 20 genes was confirmed using real time PCR. PKC-δ inhibition caused a profound change in the transcriptome of normal and SSc human dermal fibroblasts in vitro. Pathway and gene ontology analysis identified multiple cellular and organismal pathways affected by PKC-δ inhibition. Furthermore, both pathway and PAINT analyses indicated that the transcription factor NFκB played an important role in the transcriptome changes induced by PKC-δ inhibition. Multiple genes involved in the degradation of the extracellular matrix components were significantly reduced in SSc fibroblasts and their expression was increased by PKC-δ inhibition. These results indicate that isoform-specific inhibition of PKC-δ profibrotic effects may represent a novel

  15. Facial granulomas secondary to Dermalive microimplants: Report of a case with histopathologic differential diagnosis among the granulomas secondary to different injectable permanent filler materials.

    PubMed

    Vargas-Machuca, Inmaculada; González-Guerra, Elena; Angulo, Jorge; del Carmen Fariña, María; Martín, Lucia; Requena, Luis

    2006-04-01

    Wrinkle reduction and the correction of skin defects using injectable aesthetic microimplants are now widely performed by dermatologists and plastic surgeons. In recent years, dermal filler substances containing polymer particle suspensions such as Bioplastique, Artecoll, and Dermalive are the most commonly used materials. These microimplants are permanent, non-biodegradable, and generally well tolerated, although various adverse reactions are still possible. We describe here a patient with facial granulomas secondary to Dermalive injections for correction of naso-labial folds and wrinkles. The particular shape of the injected particles allows for correct identification of the implanted material. Therefore, histopathologic examination is the best means to obtain the correct diagnosis of foreign body granuloma and to identify the type of filler particles. We discuss the histopathologic differential diagnosis among the granulomas secondary to the most commonly used aesthetic permanent filler materials. PMID:16625084

  16. Arterial calcification: Conscripted by collagen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, Jordan D.

    2016-03-01

    In atherosclerotic plaques, patterns of calcification -- which have profound implications for plaque stability and vulnerability to rupture -- are determined by the collagen's content and patterning throughout the plaque.

  17. Adenosine A2A receptor plays an important role in radiation-induced dermal injury.

    PubMed

    Perez-Aso, Miguel; Mediero, Aránzazu; Low, Yee Cheng; Levine, Jamie; Cronstein, Bruce N

    2016-01-01

    Ionizing radiation is a common therapeutic modality and following irradiation dermal changes, including fibrosis and atrophy, may lead to permanent changes. We have previously demonstrated that occupancy of A2A receptor (A2AR) stimulates collagen production, so we determined whether blockade or deletion of A2AR could prevent radiation-induced fibrosis. After targeted irradiation (40 Gy) of the skin of wild-type (WT) or A2AR knockout (A2ARKO) mice, the A2AR antagonist ZM241385 was applied daily for 28 d. In irradiated WT mice treated with the A2AR antagonist, there was a marked reduction in collagen content and skin thickness, and ZM241385 treatment reduced the number of myofibroblasts and angiogenesis. After irradiation, there is an increase in loosely packed collagen fibrils, which is significantly diminished by ZM241385. Irradiation also induced an increase in epidermal thickness, prevented by ZM241385, by increasing the number of proliferating keratinocytes. Similarly, in A2ARKO mice, the changes in collagen alignment, skin thickness, myofibroblast content, angiogenesis, and epidermal hyperplasia were markedly reduced following irradiation. Radiation-induced changes in the dermis and epidermis were accompanied by an infiltrate of T cells, which was prevented in both ZM241385-treated and A2ARKO mice. Radiation therapy is administered to a significant number of patients with cancer, and radiation reactions may limit this therapeutic modality. Our findings suggest that topical application of an A2AR antagonist prevents radiation dermatitis and may be useful in the prevention or amelioration of radiation changes in the skin. PMID:26415936

  18. Angiotensin II induces skin fibrosis: a novel mouse model of dermal fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Introduction Systemic sclerosis (SSc) is an autoimmune inflammatory disorder of unknown etiology characterized by fibrosis of the skin and internal organs. Ang II (angiotensin II), a vasoconstrictive peptide, is a well-known inducer of kidney, heart, and liver fibrosis. The goal of this study was to investigate the profibrotic potential of Ang II in the mouse skin. Methods Ang II was administered by subcutaneous osmotic mini pumps to C57BL/6 male mice. Collagen-content measurements were performed with Gomori Trichrome staining and hydroxyproline assay. The mRNA expression level of collagens, TGF-β1, TGF-β2, TGF-β3, CTGF, αSMA, CD3, Emr1, CD45/B220, MCP1, and FSP1 were quantified with real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Immunostaining was performed for markers of inflammation and fibrosis, including, phospho-Smad2, αSMA, CD3, Mac3, CD45/B220, and CD163B. Fibrocytes were identified by double staining with CD45/FSP1 and CD45/PH4. Endothelial cells undergoing endothelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EndoMT) were identified by double staining with VE-cadherin/FSP1. Results Ang II-infused mice develop prominent dermal fibrosis in the area proximal to the pump, as shown by increased collagen and CTGF mRNA levels, increased hydroxyproline content, and more tightly packed collagen fibers. In addition, elevated mRNA levels of TGF-β2 and TGF-β3 along with increased expression of pSmad2 were observed in the skin of Ang II-treated mice. Dermal fibrosis was accompanied by an increased number of infiltrating fibrocytes, and an increased number of αSMA-positive cells, as well as CD163B+ macrophages in the upper dermis. This correlated with significantly increased mRNA levels of αSMA, Emr1, and MCP1. Infiltration of CD3-, CD45/B220-, and Mac3-positive cells was observed mainly in the hypodermis. Furthermore, an increased number of double-positive VE-cadherin/FSP1 cells were detected in the hypodermis only. Conclusions This work demonstrates that Ang II induces both

  19. An anatomic comparison of the skin of five donor sites for dermal fat graft.

    PubMed

    Hwang, K; Kim, D J; Lee, I J

    2001-03-01

    Kim performed more than 3,000 augmentation rhinoplasties using the dermal fat graft. He preferred the sacral area as the donor site over other areas because the dermis is thick and the fat is more compact. The authors conducted a comparative study of the thickness of the epidermis and dermis, and the numbers of fibroblasts and fibrocytes in the dermis of the abdominal wall, groin, lateral gluteal area, gluteal fold, and sacrum of 7 adult cadavers. The sacrum had the thickest epidermis (86.1 +/- 7.8 microm) and dermis (1,510.7 +/- 201.7 microm), and the groin had the thinnest epidermis (57.3 +/- 22.9 microm) and dermis (783.3 +/- 244.5 microm). The dermal thickness of the abdomen, lateral gluteal area, and gluteal fold was 913.3 +/- 271.7 microm, 1,018.7 +/- 305.6 microm, and 1,107.0 +/- 272.6 microm respectively. The sacral dermis was significantly thicker than the other four sites (p < 0.008), and the groin dermis was the thinnest (p < 0.039). The number of fibroblasts and fibrocytes in the sacral area and the gluteal skin folds was significantly higher than the other areas (p < 0.05). The sacral area, gluteal fold, and lateral gluteal region had relatively thicker panniculus adiposus than the abdomen and groin. The panniculus adiposus of the sacral skin was especially well developed and was comprised of several compact layers that were connected by parallel, thick collagen fibers. The authors conclude that the sacral skin is a suitable donor site for dermal grafting because its dermis has more fibroblasts and fibrocytes than the other areas studied, and its dermis is more viable and durable. PMID:11293528

  20. Identification of the First Prokaryotic Collagen Sequence Motif That Mediates Binding to Human Collagen Receptors, Integrins α2β1 and α11β1*

    PubMed Central

    Caswell, Clayton C.; Barczyk, Malgorzata; Keene, Douglas R.; Lukomska, Ewa; Gullberg, Donald E.; Lukomski, Slawomir

    2008-01-01

    Many pathogenic bacteria interact with human integrins to enter host cells and to augment host colonization. Group A Streptococcus (GAS) employs molecular mimicry by direct interactions between the cell surface streptococcal collagen-like protein-1 (Scl1) and the human collagen receptor, integrin α2β1. The collagen-like (CL) region of the Scl1 protein mediates integrin-binding, although, the integrin binding motif was not defined. Here, we used molecular cloning and site-directed mutagenesis to identify the GLPGER sequence as the α2β1 and the α11β1 binding motif. Electron microscopy experiments mapped binding sites of the recombinant α2-integrin-inserted domain to the GLPGER motif of the recombinant Scl (rScl) protein. rScl proteins and a synthetic peptide harboring the GLPGER motif mediated the attachment of C2C12-α2 + myoblasts expressing the α2β1 integrin as the sole collagen receptor. The C2C12-α11 + myoblasts expressing the α11β1 integrin also attached to GLPGER-harboring rScl proteins. Furthermore, the C2C12-α11 + cells attached to rScl1 more efficiently than C2C12-α2 + cells, suggesting that the α11β1 integrin may have a higher binding affinity for the GLPGER sequence. Human endothelial cells and dermal fibroblasts adhered to rScl proteins, indicating that multiple cell types may recognize and bind the Scl proteins via their collagen receptors. This work is a stepping stone toward defining the utilization of collagen receptors by microbial collagen-like proteins that are expressed by pathogenic bacteria. PMID:18990704

  1. Short-term biocompatibility studies of hydrogel-grafted collagen copolymers.

    PubMed

    Amudeswari, S; Nagarajan, B; Reddy, C R; Joseph, K T

    1986-10-01

    Synthetic hydrogels are an interesting class of biomaterials. Hydrogels were prepared by the graft copolymerization of either HEMA and MMA or HEMA and GDMA onto soluble collagen using different cross linking agents. The tissue compatibility of these hydrogels was studied by implantation in rats. It was observed that there were no untoward rejection phenomena of these gels when implanted in vivo except for the typical healing process. The hydrogels were well tolerated and might well serve as good tissue equivalents. PMID:3782173

  2. The use of collagen-based matrices in the treatment of full-thickness wounds.

    PubMed

    Petersen, Wiebke; Rahmanian-Schwarz, Afshin; Werner, Jan-Ole; Schiefer, Jennifer; Rothenberger, Jens; Hübner, Gunnar; Schaller, Hans-Eberhard; Held, Manuel

    2016-09-01

    Chronic and complex full-thickness wounds have become increasingly prevalent. Besides autologous skin transplantation, innovative wound dressing products have gained interest, as the functional and esthetic outcome is still limited. In this respect, the effect of a novel modifiable collagen-gelatin fleece on the healing of deep dermal wounds was examined and compared with untreated controls and Matriderm(®). A total of 48 full-thickness skin defects were generated on six minipigs and treated with the novel collagen-gelatin fleece of different thicknesses in single or multiple application (n=36) or treated with Matriderm(®) in a single application (n=6), or the wounds were left untreated (n=6). Wound healing was analyzed planimetrically by wound closure per time and histologically with regard to epidermal thickness and cell density. Compared to untreated wounds, wound closure per time and histological skin quality with regard to the mean epidermal thickness and epidermal cell amount were enhanced in both treatment groups. Overall, the best results for the novel collagen-gelatin fleece were achieved for multiple applications with a thickness of 150g/m(2). The novel biomaterial shows accelerated and improved dermal wound repair in a minipig model. As the manufacturing process of the scaffold allows the integration of bioactive substances such as antibiotics and growth factors, we intend to design a composite biomaterial using this scaffold as a carrier matrix. PMID:27297940

  3. Test in canine extraction site preservations by using mineralized collagen plug with or without membrane.

    PubMed

    Sun, Yi; Wang, Cheng-Yue; Wang, Zhi-Ying; Cui, Yun; Qiu, Zhi-Ye; Song, Tian-Xi; Cui, Fu-Zhai

    2016-04-01

    The aim of this study was to discuss the feasibility of porous mineralized collagen plug and bilayer mineralized collagen-guided bone regeneration membrane in site preservation in extraction sockets. The third mandibular premolars on both sides were extracted from four dogs, thus there were 16 alveolar sockets in all dogs and were randomly assigned into three groups. Group A had six alveolar sockets, and groups B and C had five alveolar sockets, respectively. Each alveolar socket of group A was immediately implanted with a porous mineralized collagen plug and covered with a bilayer mineralized collagen-guided bone regeneration membrane after tooth extraction. Alveolar sockets of group B were implanted with porous mineralized collagen plug only, and group C was set as blank control without any implantation. The healing effects of the extraction sockets were evaluated by gross observation, morphological measurements, and X-ray micro-computed tomography after twelve weeks. Twelve weeks after operation, both groups A and B had more amount of new bone formation compared with group C; in terms of the degree of alveolar bone height, group A was lower than groups B and C with significant differences; the bone mineral density in the region of interest and bone remodeling degree in group A were higher than those of groups B and C. As a result, porous mineralized collagen plug could induce the regeneration of new bone in extraction socket, and combined use of porous mineralized collagen plug and bilayer mineralized collagen guided bone regeneration membrane could further reduce the absorption of alveolar ridge and preserve the socket site. PMID:26721867

  4. Implantable Microimagers

    PubMed Central

    Ng, David C.; Tokuda, Takashi; Shiosaka, Sadao; Tano, Yasuo; Ohta, Jun

    2008-01-01

    Implantable devices such as cardiac pacemakers, drug-delivery systems, and defibrillators have had a tremendous impact on the quality of live for many disabled people. To date, many devices have been developed for implantation into various parts of the human body. In this paper, we focus on devices implanted in the head. In particular, we describe the technologies necessary to create implantable microimagers. Design, fabrication, and implementation issues are discussed vis-à-vis two examples of implantable microimagers; the retinal prosthesis and in vivo neuro-microimager. Testing of these devices in animals verify the use of the microimagers in the implanted state. We believe that further advancement of these devices will lead to the development of a new method for medical and scientific applications.

  5. A Novel Compound Rasatiol Isolated from Raphanus sativus Has a Potential to Enhance Extracellular Matrix Synthesis in Dermal Fibroblasts

    PubMed Central

    Roh, Seok-Seon; Park, Seung-Bae; Park, Seong-Mo; Choi, Byoung Wook; Lee, Min-Ho; Hwang, Yul-Lye; Kim, Chang Hun; Jeong, Hyun-Ah; Kim, Chang Deok

    2013-01-01

    Background The fibrous proteins of extracellular matrix (ECM) produced by dermal fibroblast contributes to the maintenance of connective tissue integrity. Objective This study is carried out to identify the bioactive ingredient from natural products that enhances ECM production in dermal fibroblasts. Methods Bioassay-directed fractionation was used to isolate the active ingredient from natural extracts. The effects of rasatiol (isolated from Raphanus sativus) on ECM production in primary cultured human dermal fibroblasts was investigated by enzyme linked immunosorbent assay and western blot analysis. Results Rasatiol accelerated fibroblast growth in a dose-dependent manner and increased the production of type 1 collagen, fibronectin and elastin. Phosphorylation of p42/44 extracellular signal-regulated kinase, p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase, and Akt was remarkably increased by rasatiol, indicating that enhanced ECM production is linked to the activation of intracellular signaling cascades. Conclusion These results indicate that rasatiol stimulates the fibrous components of ECM production, and may be applied to the maintenance of skin texture. PMID:24003274

  6. Porokeratotic eccrine ostial and dermal duct nevus

    PubMed Central

    Bandyopadhyay, Debabrata; Saha, Abanti; Das, Dipti; Das, Anupam

    2015-01-01

    Porokeratotic eccrine ostial and dermal duct nevus (PEODDN) is a rare nevoid condition characterized by asymptomatic grouped keratotic papules and plaques with a linear pattern on the extremities, having distinct porokeratotic histopathological features. The lesions usually present at birth or in childhood. We present here a case of late-onset PEODDN in a 23-year-old man who had lesions on the palm, forearm, arm and the chest along the lines of Blaschko, strictly localized to the left side of the body. PMID:25821735

  7. High Productivity Implantation ''PARTIAL IMPLANT''

    SciTech Connect

    Hino, Masayoshi; Miyamoto, Naoki; Sakai, Shigeki; Matsumoto, Takao

    2008-11-03

    The patterned ion implantation 'PARTIAL IMPLANT' has been developed as a productivity improvement tool. The Partial Implant can form several different ion dose areas on the wafer surface by controlling the speed of wafer moving and the stepwise rotation of twist axis. The Partial Implant system contains two implant methods. One method is 'DIVIDE PARTIAL IMPLANT', that is aimed at reducing the consumption of the wafer. The Divide Partial Implant evenly divides dose area on one wafer surface into two or three different dose part. Any dose can be selected in each area. So the consumption of the wafer for experimental implantation can be reduced. The second method is 'RING PARTIAL IMPLANT' that is aimed at improving yield by correcting electrical characteristic of devices. The Ring Partial Implant can form concentric ion dose areas. The dose of wafer external area can be selected to be within plus or minus 30% of dose of wafer central area. So the electrical characteristic of devices can be corrected by controlling dose at edge side on the wafer.

  8. Effect of Surgical Technique on Corneal Implant Performance

    PubMed Central

    Ljunggren, Monika Kozak; Elizondo, Rodolfo A.; Edin, Joel; Olsen, David; Merrett, Kimberley; Lee, Chyan-Jang; Salerud, Göran; Polarek, James; Fagerholm, Per; Griffith, May

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Our aim was to determine the effect of a surgical technique on biomaterial implant performance, specifically graft retention. Methods Twelve mini pigs were implanted with cell-free, 1-ethyl-3-(3-dimethyl aminopropyl) carbodiimide (EDC)/N-hydroxysuccinimide (NHS) cross-linked recombinant human collagen type III (RHCIII) hydrogels as substitutes for donor corneal allografts using overlying sutures with or without human amniotic membrane (HAM) versus interrupted sutures with HAM. The effects of the retention method were compared as well as the effects of collagen concentration (13.7% to 15% RHCIII). Results All implanted corneas showed initial haze that cleared with time, resulting in corneas with optical clarity matching those of untreated controls. Biochemical analysis showed that by 12 months post operation, the initial RHCIII implants had been completely remodeled, as type I collagen, was the major collagenous protein detected, whereas no RHCIII could be detected. Histological analysis showed all implanted corneas exhibited regeneration of epithelial and stromal layers as well as nerves, along with touch sensitivity and tear production. Most neovascularization was seen in corneas stabilized by interrupted sutures. Conclusions This showed that the surgical technique used does have a significant effect on the overall performance of corneal implants, overlying sutures caused less vascularization than interrupted sutures. Translational Relevance Understanding the significance of the suturing technique can aid the selection of the most appropriate procedure when implanting artificial corneal substitutes. The same degree of regeneration, despite a higher collagen content indicates that future material development can progress toward stronger, more resistant implants. PMID:24749003

  9. Collagen dynamics of partial small bowel obstruction

    SciTech Connect

    Stromberg, B.V.; Klein, L.

    1984-08-01

    The response of intestinal collagen to obstruction and stress was studied in the rat. Partial small bowel obstructions were created. Preobstruction collagen was measured by injection of tritium labeled proline. New collagen formation after obstruction occurred was followed by injection of carbon-14 labeled proline. At 3 weeks, collagen fractions were identified. Throughout the study, preexisting preobstruction intestinal collagen was metabolically stable with no breakdown or remodeling demonstrable. New collagen formation was rapid and occurred to the largest degree close to the obstruction.

  10. Clinical Outcomes for Breast Cancer Patients Undergoing Mastectomy and Reconstruction with Use of DermACELL, a Sterile, Room Temperature Acellular Dermal Matrix

    PubMed Central

    Vashi, Christopher

    2014-01-01

    Background. Decellularized human skin has been used in a variety of medical applications, primarily involving soft tissue reconstruction, wound healing, and tendon augmentation. Theoretically, decellularization removes potentially immunogenic material and provides a clean scaffold for cellular and vascular in growth. The use of acellular dermal matrix in two-stage postmastectomy breast reconstruction is described. Methods. Ten consecutive breast cancer patients were treated with mastectomies and immediate reconstruction from August to November 2011. There were 8 bilateral and 1 unilateral mastectomies for a total of 17 breasts, with one exclusion for chronic tobacco use. Reconstruction included the use of a new 6 × 16 cm sterile, room temperature acellular dermal matrix patch (DermACELL) soaked in a cefazolin bath. Results. Of the 17 breasts, 15 reconstructions were completed; 14 of them with expander to implant sequence and acellular dermal matrix. Histological analysis of biopsies obtained during trimming of the matrix at the second stage appeared nonremarkable with evidence of normal healing, cellularity, and vascular infiltration. Conclusion. Postoperative observations showed that this cellular dermal matrix appears to be an appropriate adjunct to reconstruction with expanders. This acellular dermal matrix appeared to work well with all patients, even those receiving postoperative chemotherapy, postoperative radiation, prednisone, or warfarin sodium. PMID:24738030

  11. Transformation of amorphous calcium carbonate to rod-like single crystal calcite via "copying" collagen template.

    PubMed

    Xue, Zhonghui; Hu, Binbin; Dai, Shuxi; Du, Zuliang

    2015-10-01

    Collagen Langmuir films were prepared by spreading the solution of collagen over deionized water, CaCl2 solution and Ca(HCO3)2 solution. Resultant collagen Langmuir monolayers were then compressed to a lateral pressure of 10 mN/m and held there for different duration, allowing the crystallization of CaCO3. The effect of crystallization time on the phase composition and microstructure of CaCO3 was investigated. It was found that amorphous calcium carbonate (ACC) was obtained at a crystallization time of 6 h. The amorphous CaCO3 was transformed to rod-like single crystal calcite crystals at an extended crystallization time of 12 h and 24 h, via "copying" the symmetry and dimensionalities of collagen fibers. Resultant calcite crystallites were well oriented along the longitudinal axis of collagen fibers. The ordered surface structure of collagen fibers and electrostatic interactions played key roles in tuning the oriented nucleation and growth of the calcite crystallites. The mineralized collagen possessing both desired mechanical properties of collagen fiber and good biocompatibility of calcium carbonate may be assembled into an ideal biomaterial for bone implants. PMID:26117783

  12. CARD14 Expression in Dermal Endothelial Cells in Psoriasis

    PubMed Central

    Harden, Jamie L.; Lewis, Steven M.; Pierson, Katherine C.; Suárez-Fariñas, Mayte; Lentini, Tim; Ortenzio, Francesca S.; Zaba, Lisa C.; Goldbach-Mansky, Raphaela; Bowcock, Anne M.; Lowes, Michelle A.

    2014-01-01

    Mutations in the caspase recruitment domain, family member 14 (CARD14) gene have recently been described in psoriasis patients, and explain the psoriasis susceptibility locus 2 (PSORS2). CARD14 is a scaffolding protein that regulates NF-κB activation, and psoriasis-associated CARD14 mutations lead to enhanced NF-κB signaling. CARD14 is expressed mainly in epidermal keratinocytes, but also in unidentified dermal cells. In this manuscript, the identity of the dermal cell types expressing CARD14, as well the potential functional consequence of overactive CARD14 in these dermal cell types, was determined. Using two-color immunofluorescence, dermal CARD14 did not co-localize with T-cells, dendritic cells, or macrophages. However, dermal CARD14 did highly co-localize with CD31+ endothelial cells (ECs). CARD14 was also expressed non-dermal endothelial cells, such as aortic endothelial cells, which may indicate a role of CARD14+ECs in the systemic inflammation and cardiovascular comorbidities associated with psoriasis. Additionally, phosphorylated NF-κB was found in psoriatic CARD14+ CD31+ ECs, demonstrating this pathway is active in dermal ECs in psoriasis. Transfection of dermal ECs with psoriasis-associated CARD14 mutations resulted in increased expression of several chemokines, including CXCL10, IL-8, and CCL2. These results provide preliminary evidence that CARD14 expression in ECs may contribute to psoriasis through increased expression of chemokines and facilitating recruitment of immune cells into skin. PMID:25369198

  13. CARD14 expression in dermal endothelial cells in psoriasis.

    PubMed

    Harden, Jamie L; Lewis, Steven M; Pierson, Katherine C; Suárez-Fariñas, Mayte; Lentini, Tim; Ortenzio, Francesca S; Zaba, Lisa C; Goldbach-Mansky, Raphaela; Bowcock, Anne M; Lowes, Michelle A

    2014-01-01

    Mutations in the caspase recruitment domain, family member 14 (CARD14) gene have recently been described in psoriasis patients, and explain the psoriasis susceptibility locus 2 (PSORS2). CARD14 is a scaffolding protein that regulates NF-κB activation, and psoriasis-associated CARD14 mutations lead to enhanced NF-κB signaling. CARD14 is expressed mainly in epidermal keratinocytes, but also in unidentified dermal cells. In this manuscript, the identity of the dermal cell types expressing CARD14, as well the potential functional consequence of overactive CARD14 in these dermal cell types, was determined. Using two-color immunofluorescence, dermal CARD14 did not co-localize with T-cells, dendritic cells, or macrophages. However, dermal CARD14 did highly co-localize with CD31(+) endothelial cells (ECs). CARD14 was also expressed non-dermal endothelial cells, such as aortic endothelial cells, which may indicate a role of CARD14(+)ECs in the systemic inflammation and cardiovascular comorbidities associated with psoriasis. Additionally, phosphorylated NF-κB was found in psoriatic CARD14(+) CD31(+) ECs, demonstrating this pathway is active in dermal ECs in psoriasis. Transfection of dermal ECs with psoriasis-associated CARD14 mutations resulted in increased expression of several chemokines, including CXCL10, IL-8, and CCL2. These results provide preliminary evidence that CARD14 expression in ECs may contribute to psoriasis through increased expression of chemokines and facilitating recruitment of immune cells into skin. PMID:25369198

  14. Spectrum of PORCN mutations in Focal Dermal Hypoplasia

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Focal Dermal Hypoplasia (FDH), also known as Goltz syndrome (OMIM 305600), is a genetic disorder that affects multiple organ systems early in development. Features of FDH include skin abnormalities, (hypoplasia, atrophy, linear pigmentation, and herniation of fat through dermal defects); papillomas...

  15. Pseudoxantoma elasticum-like dermal elastolysis: a case report.

    PubMed

    López, Verónica; Revert, Angeles; Santonja, Nuria; Jordá, Esperanza

    2011-01-01

    Elastic fibers are components of dermal connective tissue that can be affected in several acquired disorders. Recently, a new entity known as pseudoxanthoma-like papillary dermal elastolysis has been described. We present a case in a 61-year-old woman. PMID:21549088

  16. IN VITRO DERMAL ABSORPTION OF FLAME RETARDANT CHEMICALS

    EPA Science Inventory

    ABSTRACT
    The use of flame retardant chemicals in furniture fabric could pose a potential health risk to consumers from dermal absorption of these compounds. The objective of this study was to examine the in vitro dermal absorption of two flame retardant chemicals, [14C]-d...

  17. Mesenchymal stem cells induce dermal fibroblast responses to injury

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, Andria N.; Willis, Elise; Chan, Vincent T.; Muffley, Lara A.; Isik, F. Frank; Gibran, Nicole S.; Hocking, Anne M.

    2010-01-01

    Although bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells have been shown to promote repair when applied to cutaneous wounds, the mechanism for this response remains to be determined. The aim of this study was to determine the effects of paracrine signaling from mesenchymal stem cells on dermal fibroblast responses to injury including proliferation, migration and expression of genes important in wound repair. Dermal fibroblasts were co-cultured with bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells grown in inserts, which allowed for paracrine interactions without direct cell contact. In this co-culture model, bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells regulate dermal fibroblast proliferation, migration and gene expression. When co-cultured with mesenchymal stem cells, dermal fibroblasts show increased proliferation and accelerated migration in a scratch assay. A chemotaxis assay also demonstrated that dermal fibroblasts migrate towards bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells. A PCR array was used to analyze the effect of mesenchymal stem cells on dermal fibroblast gene expression. In response to mesenchymal stem cells, dermal fibroblasts up-regulate integrin alpha 7 expression and down-regulate expression of ICAM1, VCAM1 and MMP11. These observations suggest that mesenchymal stem cells may provide an important early signal for dermal fibroblast responses to cutaneous injury.

  18. Socket repair utilizing collagen membrane and mineralized allograft in the esthetic zone: a case report.

    PubMed

    Minichetti, John C; D'Amore, Joseph C

    2010-01-01

    As the number of patients seeking implants increases, so do the esthetic challenges. Adequate bone is necessary to place an implant with an esthetically pleasing outcome. Failing teeth that require implant replacement often have bony deficiencies, and several surgical techniques have been advocated for maintaining bone volume at the time of extraction. This case report utilized a predictable conservative technique for treating a facial bony defect prior to implant surgery. Atraumatic flapless tooth extraction and the placement of a resorbable collagen membrane and mineralized allograft allowed for adequate regeneration of the alveolar socket prior to implant placement. The dentition was later restored with a zirconia abutment and crown. Socket repair utilizing this technique was a clinically acceptable method for obtaining an esthetic implant restoration. PMID:20829166

  19. Type VII Collagen Replacement Therapy in Recessive Dystrophic Epidermolysis Bullosa-How Much, How Often?

    PubMed

    South, Andrew P; Uitto, Jouni

    2016-06-01

    Recessive dystrophic epidermolysis bullosa is a devastating blistering disease caused by mutations in the COL7A1 gene, which encodes type VII collagen, the major component of anchoring fibrils. The anchoring fibrils in patients with recessive dystrophic epidermolysis bullosa can be morphologically altered, reduced in number, or absent entirely. There is no specific treatment for this disease, but recent advances in gene, protein replacement, or cell-based therapies, with the purpose of delivering functional type VII collagen to the skin, have shown encouraging results in both preclinical and clinical settings. One critical issue is the stability of type VII collagen in anchoring fibrils, which will ultimately determine the dose and frequency of administration of the missing protein. Kühl et al. attempted to determine the half-life of type VII collagen in the skin, tongue, and esophagus of genetically altered mice that express type VII collagen constitutively, but with its expression abrogated by genetic manipulation. Their results revealed a half-life much shorter than previously anticipated, some 30 days. These findings have implications for strategies to be used for protein replacement therapy, and they also suggest that the basement membrane components at the dermal-epidermal junction are subject to ongoing remodeling and turnover. PMID:27212645

  20. Arrangement of Peri-implant Connective Tissue Fibers Around Platform-Switching Implants with Conical Abutments and Its Relationship to the Underlying Bone: A Human Histologic Study.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez, Xavier; Navajas, Alvaro; Vela, Xavier; Fortuño, Angels; Jimenez, Jaime; Nevins, Myron

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this study was to clarify and evaluate the orientation of the collagen fibers around platform-switching (PS) implants with conical abutments in humans after 8 weeks of healing, and to determine how this orientation would help stabilize the soft tissue and prevent bone resorption. On PS implants, circular orientation of collagen fiber was observed as the main arrangement in a cross-sectional view. The circular collagen fibers might be the key factor in stabilizing the soft tissues around the rehabilitation, inhibiting apical migration of the soft tissues and, in turn, protecting the underlying bone. PMID:27333011

  1. Type I Collagen and Collagen Mimetics as Angiogenesis Promoting Superpolymers

    SciTech Connect

    Twardowski, T.; Fertala, A.; Orgel, J.P.R.O.; San Antonio, J.D.

    2008-07-18

    Angiogenesis, the development of blood vessels from the pre-existing vasculature, is a key component of embryogenesis and tissue regeneration. Angiogenesis also drives pathologies such as tumor growth and metastasis, and hemangioma development in newborns. On the other hand, promotion of angiogenesis is needed in tissues with vascular insufficiencies, and in bioengineering, to endow tissue substitutes with appropriate microvasculatures. Therefore, much research has focused on defining mechanisms of angiogenesis, and identifying pro- and anti-angiogenic molecules. Type I collagen, the most abundant protein in humans, potently stimulates angiogenesis in vitro and in vivo. Crucial to its angiogenic activity appears to be ligation and possibly clustering of endothelial cell (EC) surface {alpha}1{beta}1/{alpha}2{beta}1 integrin receptors by the GFPGER502-507 sequence of the collagen fibril. However, additional aspects of collagen structure and function that may modulate its angiogenic properties are discussed. Moreover, type I collagen and fibrin, another angiogenic polymer, share several structural features. These observations suggest strategies for creating 'angiogenic superpolymers', including: modifying type I collagen to influence its biological half-life, immunogenicity, and integrin binding capacity; genetically engineering fibrillar collagens to include additional integrin binding sites or angiogenic determinants, and remove unnecessary or deleterious sequences without compromising fibril integrity; and exploring the suitability of poly(ortho ester), PEG-lysine copolymer, tubulin, and cholesteric cuticle as collagen mimetics, and suggesting means of modifying them to display ideal angiogenic properties. The collagenous and collagen mimetic angiogenic superpolymers described here may someday prove useful for many applications in tissue engineering and human medicine.

  2. The structural and optical properties of type III human collagen biosynthetic corneal substitutes.

    PubMed

    Hayes, Sally; Lewis, Phillip; Islam, M Mirazul; Doutch, James; Sorensen, Thomas; White, Tomas; Griffith, May; Meek, Keith M

    2015-10-01

    The structural and optical properties of clinically biocompatible, cell-free hydrogels comprised of synthetically cross-linked and moulded recombinant human collagen type III (RHCIII) with and without the incorporation of 2-methacryloyloxyethyl phosphorylcholine (MPC) were assessed using transmission electron microscopy (TEM), X-ray scattering, spectroscopy and refractometry. These findings were examined alongside similarly obtained data from 21 human donor corneas. TEM demonstrated the presence of loosely bundled aggregates of fine collagen filaments within both RHCIII and RHCIII-MPC implants, which X-ray scattering showed to lack D-banding and be preferentially aligned in a uniaxial orientation throughout. This arrangement differs from the predominantly biaxial alignment of collagen fibrils that exists in the human cornea. By virtue of their high water content (90%), very fine collagen filaments (2-9 nm) and lack of cells, the collagen hydrogels were found to transmit almost all incident light in the visible spectrum. They also transmitted a large proportion of UV light compared to the cornea which acts as an effective UV filter. Patients implanted with these hydrogels should be cautious about UV exposure prior to regrowth of the epithelium and in-growth of corneal cells into the implants. PMID:26159106

  3. The structural and optical properties of type III human collagen biosynthetic corneal substitutes

    PubMed Central

    Hayes, Sally; Lewis, Phillip; Islam, M. Mirazul; Doutch, James; Sorensen, Thomas; White, Tomas; Griffith, May; Meek, Keith M.

    2015-01-01

    The structural and optical properties of clinically biocompatible, cell-free hydrogels comprised of synthetically cross-linked and moulded recombinant human collagen type III (RHCIII) with and without the incorporation of 2-methacryloyloxyethyl phosphorylcholine (MPC) were assessed using transmission electron microscopy (TEM), X-ray scattering, spectroscopy and refractometry. These findings were examined alongside similarly obtained data from 21 human donor corneas. TEM demonstrated the presence of loosely bundled aggregates of fine collagen filaments within both RHCIII and RHCIII-MPC implants, which X-ray scattering showed to lack D-banding and be preferentially aligned in a uniaxial orientation throughout. This arrangement differs from the predominantly biaxial alignment of collagen fibrils that exists in the human cornea. By virtue of their high water content (90%), very fine collagen filaments (2–9 nm) and lack of cells, the collagen hydrogels were found to transmit almost all incident light in the visible spectrum. They also transmitted a large proportion of UV light compared to the cornea which acts as an effective UV filter. Patients implanted with these hydrogels should be cautious about UV exposure prior to regrowth of the epithelium and in-growth of corneal cells into the implants. PMID:26159106

  4. Engineering 3D Cellularized Collagen Gels for Vascular Tissue Regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Meghezi, Sébastien; Seifu, Dawit G.; Bono, Nina; Unsworth, Larry; Mequanint, Kibret; Mantovani, Diego

    2015-01-01

    Synthetic materials are known to initiate clinical complications such as inflammation, stenosis, and infections when implanted as vascular substitutes. Collagen has been extensively used for a wide range of biomedical applications and is considered a valid alternative to synthetic materials due to its inherent biocompatibility (i.e., low antigenicity, inflammation, and cytotoxic responses). However, the limited mechanical properties and the related low hand-ability of collagen gels have hampered their use as scaffold materials for vascular tissue engineering. Therefore, the rationale behind this work was first to engineer cellularized collagen gels into a tubular-shaped geometry and second to enhance smooth muscle cells driven reorganization of collagen matrix to obtain tissues stiff enough to be handled. The strategy described here is based on the direct assembling of collagen and smooth muscle cells (construct) in a 3D cylindrical geometry with the use of a molding technique. This process requires a maturation period, during which the constructs are cultured in a bioreactor under static conditions (without applied external dynamic mechanical constraints) for 1 or 2 weeks. The “static bioreactor” provides a monitored and controlled sterile environment (pH, temperature, gas exchange, nutrient supply and waste removal) to the constructs. During culture period, thickness measurements were performed to evaluate the cells-driven remodeling of the collagen matrix, and glucose consumption and lactate production rates were measured to monitor the cells metabolic activity. Finally, mechanical and viscoelastic properties were assessed for the resulting tubular constructs. To this end, specific protocols and a focused know-how (manipulation, gripping, working in hydrated environment, and so on) were developed to characterize the engineered tissues. PMID:26132527

  5. Engineering 3D Cellularized Collagen Gels for Vascular Tissue Regeneration.

    PubMed

    Meghezi, Sébastien; Seifu, Dawit G; Bono, Nina; Unsworth, Larry; Mequanint, Kibret; Mantovani, Diego

    2015-01-01

    Synthetic materials are known to initiate clinical complications such as inflammation, stenosis, and infections when implanted as vascular substitutes. Collagen has been extensively used for a wide range of biomedical applications and is considered a valid alternative to synthetic materials due to its inherent biocompatibility (i.e., low antigenicity, inflammation, and cytotoxic responses). However, the limited mechanical properties and the related low hand-ability of collagen gels have hampered their use as scaffold materials for vascular tissue engineering. Therefore, the rationale behind this work was first to engineer cellularized collagen gels into a tubular-shaped geometry and second to enhance smooth muscle cells driven reorganization of collagen matrix to obtain tissues stiff enough to be handled. The strategy described here is based on the direct assembling of collagen and smooth muscle cells (construct) in a 3D cylindrical geometry with the use of a molding technique. This process requires a maturation period, during which the constructs are cultured in a bioreactor under static conditions (without applied external dynamic mechanical constraints) for 1 or 2 weeks. The "static bioreactor" provides a monitored and controlled sterile environment (pH, temperature, gas exchange, nutrient supply and waste removal) to the constructs. During culture period, thickness measurements were performed to evaluate the cells-driven remodeling of the collagen matrix, and glucose consumption and lactate production rates were measured to monitor the cells metabolic activity. Finally, mechanical and viscoelastic properties were assessed for the resulting tubular constructs. To this end, specific protocols and a focused know-how (manipulation, gripping, working in hydrated environment, and so on) were developed to characterize the engineered tissues. PMID:26132527

  6. The effect of tissue-engineered cartilage biomechanical and biochemical properties on its post-implantation mechanical behavior.

    PubMed

    Khoshgoftar, Mehdi; Wilson, Wouter; Ito, Keita; van Donkelaar, Corrinus C

    2013-01-01

    The insufficient load-bearing capacity of today's tissue-engineered (TE) cartilage limits its clinical application. Focus has been on engineering cartilage with enhanced mechanical stiffness by reproducing native biochemical compositions. More recently, depth dependency of the biochemical content and the collagen network architecture has gained interest. However, it is unknown whether the mechanical performance of TE cartilage would benefit more from higher content of biochemical compositions or from achieving an appropriate collagen organization. Furthermore, the relative synthesis rate of collagen and proteoglycans during the TE process may affect implant performance. Such insights would assist tissue engineers to focus on those aspects that are most important. The aim of the present study is therefore to elucidate the relative importance of implant ground substance stiffness, collagen content, and collagen architecture of the implant, as well as the synthesis rate of the biochemical constituents for the post-implantation mechanical behavior of the implant. We approach this by computing the post-implantation mechanical conditions using a composition-based fibril-reinforced poro-viscoelastic swelling model of the medial tibia plateau. Results show that adverse implant composition and ultrastructure may lead to post-implantation excessive mechanical loads, with collagen orientation being the most critical variable. In addition, we predict that a faster synthesis rate of proteoglycans compared to that of collagen during TE culture may result in excessive loads on collagen fibers post-implantation. This indicates that even with similar final contents, constructs may behave differently depending on their development. Considering these aspects may help to engineer TE cartilage implants with improved survival rates. PMID:22389193

  7. [Implant allergies].

    PubMed

    Thomas, P; Thomsen, M

    2010-03-01

    An increasing number of patients receive and benefit from osteosynthesis materials or artificial joint replacement. The most common complications are mechanical problems or infection. Metals like nickel, chromium and cobalt as well as bone cement components like acrylates and gentamicin are potential contact allergens which can cause intolerance reactions to implants. Eczema, delayed wound/bone healing, recurrent effusions, pain and implant loosening all have been described as manifestation of implant allergy. In contrast to the high incidence of cutaneous metal allergy, allergies associated with implants are rare. Diagnosis of metal implant allergy is still difficult. Thus differential diagnoses--in particular infection--have to be excluded and a combined approach of allergologic diagnostics by patch test and histopathology of peri-implant tissue is recommended. It is still unknown which conditions induce allergic sensitization to implants or trigger peri-implant allergic reactions in the case of preexisting cutaneous metal allergy. Despite the risk of developing complications being unclear, titanium based osteosynthesis materials are recommended for metal allergic patients and the use of metal-metal couplings in arthroplasty is not recommended for such patients. If the regular CoCr-polyethylene articulation is employed, the patient should give informed written consent. PMID:20204719

  8. Interleukin-1β attenuates myofibroblast formation and extracellular matrix production in dermal and lung fibroblasts exposed to transforming growth factor-β1.

    PubMed

    Mia, Masum M; Boersema, Miriam; Bank, Ruud A

    2014-01-01

    One of the most potent pro-fibrotic cytokines is transforming growth factor (TGFβ). TGFβ is involved in the activation of fibroblasts into myofibroblasts, resulting in the hallmark of fibrosis: the pathological accumulation of collagen. Interleukin-1β (IL1β) can influence the severity of fibrosis, however much less is known about the direct effects on fibroblasts. Using lung and dermal fibroblasts, we have investigated the effects of IL1β, TGFβ1, and IL1β in combination with TGFβ1 on myofibroblast formation, collagen synthesis and collagen modification (including prolyl hydroxylase, lysyl hydroxylase and lysyl oxidase), and matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs). We found that IL1β alone has no obvious pro-fibrotic effect on fibroblasts. However, IL1β is able to inhibit the TGFβ1-induced myofibroblast formation as well as collagen synthesis. Glioma-associated oncogene homolog 1 (GLI1), the Hedgehog transcription factor that is involved in the transformation of fibroblasts into myofibroblasts is upregulated by TGFβ1. The addition of IL1β reduced the expression of GLI1 and thereby also indirectly inhibits myofibroblast formation. Other potentially anti-fibrotic effects of IL1β that were observed are the increased levels of MMP1, -2, -9 and -14 produced by fibroblasts exposed to TGFβ1/IL1β in comparison with fibroblasts exposed to TGFβ1 alone. In addition, IL1β decreased the TGFβ1-induced upregulation of lysyl oxidase, an enzyme involved in collagen cross-linking. Furthermore, we found that lung and dermal fibroblasts do not always behave identically towards IL1β. Suppression of COL1A1 by IL1β in the presence of TGFβ1 is more pronounced in lung fibroblasts compared to dermal fibroblasts, whereas a higher upregulation of MMP1 is seen in dermal fibroblasts. The role of IL1β in fibrosis should be reconsidered, and the differences in phenotypical properties of fibroblasts derived from different organs should be taken into account in future anti

  9. Interleukin-1β Attenuates Myofibroblast Formation and Extracellular Matrix Production in Dermal and Lung Fibroblasts Exposed to Transforming Growth Factor-β1

    PubMed Central

    Mia, Masum M.; Boersema, Miriam; Bank, Ruud A.

    2014-01-01

    One of the most potent pro-fibrotic cytokines is transforming growth factor (TGFβ). TGFβ is involved in the activation of fibroblasts into myofibroblasts, resulting in the hallmark of fibrosis: the pathological accumulation of collagen. Interleukin-1β (IL1β) can influence the severity of fibrosis, however much less is known about the direct effects on fibroblasts. Using lung and dermal fibroblasts, we have investigated the effects of IL1β, TGFβ1, and IL1β in combination with TGFβ1 on myofibroblast formation, collagen synthesis and collagen modification (including prolyl hydroxylase, lysyl hydroxylase and lysyl oxidase), and matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs). We found that IL1β alone has no obvious pro-fibrotic effect on fibroblasts. However, IL1β is able to inhibit the TGFβ1-induced myofibroblast formation as well as collagen synthesis. Glioma-associated oncogene homolog 1 (GLI1), the Hedgehog transcription factor that is involved in the transformation of fibroblasts into myofibroblasts is upregulated by TGFβ1. The addition of IL1β reduced the expression of GLI1 and thereby also indirectly inhibits myofibroblast formation. Other potentially anti-fibrotic effects of IL1β that were observed are the increased levels of MMP1, −2, −9 and −14 produced by fibroblasts exposed to TGFβ1/IL1β in comparison with fibroblasts exposed to TGFβ1 alone. In addition, IL1β decreased the TGFβ1-induced upregulation of lysyl oxidase, an enzyme involved in collagen cross-linking. Furthermore, we found that lung and dermal fibroblasts do not always behave identically towards IL1β. Suppression of COL1A1 by IL1β in the presence of TGFβ1 is more pronounced in lung fibroblasts compared to dermal fibroblasts, whereas a higher upregulation of MMP1 is seen in dermal fibroblasts. The role of IL1β in fibrosis should be reconsidered, and the differences in phenotypical properties of fibroblasts derived from different organs should be taken into account in future anti

  10. Effect of cross-linking reagents for hyaluronic acid hydrogel dermal fillers on tissue augmentation and regeneration.

    PubMed

    Yeom, Junseok; Bhang, Suk Ho; Kim, Byung-Soo; Seo, Moo Seok; Hwang, Eui Jin; Cho, Il Hwan; Park, Jung Kyu; Hahn, Sei Kwang

    2010-02-17

    A novel, biocompatible, and nontoxic dermal filler using hyaluronic acid (HA) hydrogels was successfully developed for tissue augmentation applications. Instead of using highly reactive cross-linkers such as divinyl sulfone (DVS) for Hylaform, 1,4-butanediol diglycidyl ether (BDDE) for Restylane, and 1,2,7,8-diepoxyoctane (DEO) for Puragen, HA hydrogels were prepared by direct amide bond formation between the carboxyl groups of HA and hexamethylenediamine (HMDA) with an optimized carboxyl group modification for effective tissue augmentation. The HA-HMDA hydrogels could be prepared within 5 min by the addition of HMDA to HA solution activated with 1-ethyl-3-[3-(dimethylamino)propyl]carbodiimide (EDC) and 1-hydroxybenzotriazole monohydrate (HOBt). Five kinds of samples, a normal control, a negative control, a positive control of Restylane, adipic acid dihydrazide grafted HA (HA-ADH) hydrogels, and HA-HMDA hydrogels, were subcutaneously injected to wrinkled model mice. According to the image analysis on dorsal skin augmentation, the HA-HMDA hydrogels exhibited the best tissue augmentation effect being stable longer than 3 months. Furthermore, histological analyses after hematoxylin-eosin (H&E) and Masson's trichrome staining revealed the excellent biocompatibility and safety of HA-HMDA hydrogels. The dermal thickness and the dermal collagen density in wrinkled mice after treatment with HA-HMDA hydrogels for 12 weeks were comparable to those of normal mice. Compared with HA-DVS hydrogels and Restylane, the excellent tissue augmentation by HA-HMDA hydrogels might be ascribed to the biocompatible residues of amine groups in the cross-linker of HMDA. The HA-HMDA hydrogels will be investigated further as a novel dermal filler for clinical applications. PMID:20078098

  11. Biocompatibility of choline salts as crosslinking agents for collagen based biomaterials.

    PubMed

    Vijayaraghavan, R; Thompson, B C; MacFarlane, D R; Kumar, Ramadhar; Surianarayanan, M; Aishwarya, S; Sehgal, P K

    2010-01-14

    A series of novel choline based salts, some of which can be described as ionic liquids, are prepared and evaluated for their biocompatibility; when combined with collagenous biomaterials they exhibit good cell viability and adhesion properties as required for biomedical implant applications. PMID:20024356

  12. Collagen fibril formation during development

    SciTech Connect

    Fleischmajer, R.; Perlish, J.S.; Timpl, R.; Olsen, B.R.

    1987-05-01

    Studies with embryonic skin and bone suggested that the aminopropeptide (AP) and carboxylpropeptide (CP) of type I pro-callagen (pro-col) play a role in fibril formation. Chick leg metatarsal tendons were studied by electron microscopy. AP and CP of type I pro-col were purified from chick leg tendons; antibodies developed in rabbits and purity tested by radioimmunoassays. Antibodies were used for immunofluorescence microscopy (IFM) and immunoblotting (IB). The peritendineum, consisting of thin 20-30 nm fibrils, revealed the AP of type I and type III procol. In the tendon area, collagen fibrils were arranged within small compartments and were of uniform diameter at 10d, 14d and 18d. However, beyond 21d, there was confluency of the compartments and a wide range of fibril diameters. IFM revealed fine streaks of collagen, staining with the AP of type I throughout the tendon. The CP was mainly intracellular with only a small amount present in the extracellular space. IB revealed procollagen, pN-collagen (AP+collagen) and pC-collagen, (CP+collagen) at all stages of development. Ratios of pN/pC collagen, determined by spectrophotometric scanning of autoradiographs, correlated well with the distribution of fibril diameter. This study suggests the hypothesis that AP initiates fibrillogenesis while CP may regulate additional fibril growth.

  13. A Direct Comparison of Alloderm-Ready to Use (RTU) and DermACELL in Immediate Breast Implant Reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Salzberg, C. Andrew

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this study was to compare the 2 leading human acellular dermal matrices in breast reconstruction with implants. This retrospective study draws on the experience of 2 expert surgeons with a history of long-standing use of the Alloderm-RTU (LifeCell Corporation, Branchburg, NJ) product who switched to the DermACELL acellular dermal matrix (LifeNet Health, Virgina Beach, Va) product. The consecutive nature of these data over this change allowed comparison between the 2 products without the confounding effects of patient selection or change in technique. The postoperative complications of seroma, infection, implant loss, and unplanned return to the operating room were studied, and no statistical differences were noted between these 2 products. The overall complications rates were low, with implant loss and infection less than 2% in 249 cases. Recommendations are for continued use of acellular dermal matrix in breast reconstruction and product selection based on price and availability.

  14. A Direct Comparison of Alloderm-Ready to Use (RTU) and DermACELL in Immediate Breast Implant Reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Zenn, Michael R; Salzberg, C Andrew

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this study was to compare the 2 leading human acellular dermal matrices in breast reconstruction with implants. This retrospective study draws on the experience of 2 expert surgeons with a history of long-standing use of the Alloderm-RTU (LifeCell Corporation, Branchburg, NJ) product who switched to the DermACELL acellular dermal matrix (LifeNet Health, Virgina Beach, Va) product. The consecutive nature of these data over this change allowed comparison between the 2 products without the confounding effects of patient selection or change in technique. The postoperative complications of seroma, infection, implant loss, and unplanned return to the operating room were studied, and no statistical differences were noted between these 2 products. The overall complications rates were low, with implant loss and infection less than 2% in 249 cases. Recommendations are for continued use of acellular dermal matrix in breast reconstruction and product selection based on price and availability. PMID:27602176

  15. Osteogenic activity and antibacterial effect of zinc ion implanted titanium.

    PubMed

    Jin, Guodong; Cao, Huiliang; Qiao, Yuqin; Meng, Fanhao; Zhu, Hongqin; Liu, Xuanyong

    2014-05-01

    Titanium (Ti) and its alloys are widely used as orthopedic and dental implants. In this work, zinc (Zn) was implanted into oxalic acid etched titanium using plasma immersion ion implantation technology. Scanning electron microscopy and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy were used to investigate the surface morphology and composition of Zn-implanted titanium. The results indicate that the depth profile of zinc in Zn-implanted titanium resembles a Gaussian distribution, and zinc exists in the form of ZnO at the surface whereas in the form of metallic Zn in the interior. The Zn-implanted titanium can significantly stimulate proliferation of osteoblastic MC3T3-E1 cells as well as initial adhesion, spreading activity, ALP activity, collagen secretion and extracellular matrix mineralization of the rat mesenchymal stem cells. The Zn-implanted titanium presents partly antibacterial effect on both Escherichia coli and Staphylococcus aureus. The ability of the Zn-implanted titanium to stimulate cell adhesion, proliferation and differentiation as well as the antibacterial effect on E. coli can be improved by increasing implantation time even to 2 h in this work, indicating that the content of zinc implanted in titanium can easily be controlled within the safe concentration using plasma immersion ion implantation technology. The Zn-implanted titanium with excellent osteogenic activity and partly antibacterial effect can serve as useful candidates for orthopedic and dental implants. PMID:24632388

  16. Electrostatic effects in collagen fibrillization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morozova, Svetlana; Muthukumar, Murugappan

    2014-03-01

    Using light scattering and AFM techniques, we have measured the kinetics of fibrillization of collagen (pertinent to the vitreous of human eye) as a function of pH and ionic strength. At higher and lower pH, collagen triple-peptides remain stable in solution without fibrillization. At neutral pH, the fibrillization occurs and its growth kinetics is slowed upon either an increase in ionic strength or a decrease in temperature. We present a model, based on polymer crystallization theory, to describe the observed electrostatic nature of collagen assembly.

  17. Topical all-trans retinoic acid stimulates collagen synthesis in vivo.

    PubMed

    Schwartz, E; Cruickshank, F A; Mezick, J A; Kligman, L H

    1991-06-01

    Histochemical and ultrastructural studies demonstrate that topical all-trans retinoic acid (RA) stimulates the deposition of a subepidermal band of collagen in photoaged hairless mice. The aim of this study was to examine the effect of RA treatment on collagen synthesis using biochemical and immunochemical techniques. Albino hairless mice were irradiated three times a week for 10 weeks with four minimal erythema doses of UVB from Westinghouse FS-40 bulbs. In the post-UV period, mice were either nontreated or treated with 0.05% RA or the ethanol-propylene glycol vehicle for up to 10 weeks. Antibodies against the aminopropeptide (AP) of type III procollagen were used in immunofluorescence microscopy and radioimmunoassay techniques. The AP of type III collagen is normally present throughout the dermis and in areas of active collagen synthesis (i.e., the dermal-epidermal junction). In this study, a similar distribution was seen in all untreated and vehicle-treated mice, and in mice treated with RA for 2, 4, and 6 weeks. However, increased staining, in a subepidermal band, was detected in the 8-week RA-treated skin. This region became intensely fluorescent to a depth of 100 mu in the 10-week RA-treated skins. As determined by radioimmunoassay, the content of the AP of type III procollagen increased twofold with 10-week RA treatment. Because the ratio of type I to type III collagens remained constant in treated and untreated skins, it is reasonable to assume that the content of type I collagen increased in proportion to type III collagen in RA-treated skins. PMID:2045685

  18. Characterization of collagenous meshworks by volume exclusion of dextrans.

    PubMed Central

    Bert, J L; Pearce, R H; Mathieson, J M; Warner, S J

    1980-01-01

    The volumes from which 3H-labelled dextrans are excluded by dermal collagenous fibres were calculated by dilution of dextran probes. Five dextrans, of average Stokes' radii 1.72, 2.53, 3.92, 4.54 and 14.24nm, were investigated at concentrations between 0.1 and 3% (w/w). The excluded volume was dependent on dextran concentration only for the two smaller probes. The largest dextran was shown not to bind to the fibres. A plot of the square root of excluded volume against Stokes' radius was linear for the four smallest dextrans, corresponding to the predictions of Ogston's [(1958) Trans. Faraday Soc. 54, 1754--1757] rod-and-sphere model of fibrous exclusion, and suggesting that dextrans of Stokes' radius between 1.72 and 4.54 nm were excluded by a cylindrical solid fibre of radius 2.90 +/- 0.72 nm. Larger molecules were excluded by a structure of much greater size, since the volume exclusion for the largest dextran was only slightly greater than that of the dextran less than one-third its radius. The excluded volume of 3H2O fell slightly below the line describing the dextran data, indicating that water had access to most of the volume not occupied by the collagenous fibres. PMID:6169339

  19. A mouse 3T6 fibroblast cell culture model for the study of normal and protein-engineered collagen synthesis and deposition into the extracellular matrix.

    PubMed

    Lamandé, S R; Bateman, J F

    1993-07-01

    Mouse 3T6 fibroblasts deposited an organized collagenous extracellular matrix during long-term culture in the presence of ascorbic acid. The matrix produced by the cells had a similar distribution of collagen types as the mouse dermal matrix, comprising predominantly type I with smaller amounts of types III and V collagens. By day 8 of culture more than 70% of the collagen in the 3T6 matrix was involved in covalent crosslinkages and required pepsin digestion for extraction. Incorporation of NaB3H4 into reducible crosslinks and aldehydes directly demonstrated the involvement of the alpha 1 (I)CB6 and alpha 2(I)CB3.5 in crosslinks. The pattern of reducible crosslinks in the in vitro 3T6 matrix was similar to that in mouse skin suggesting a comparable fibril organization. Processing of procollagen to collagen occurred efficiently throughout the culture period and the rate of collagen production was unaltered during 15 days of culture, indicating that the development of a collagenous matrix does not directly play a role in procollagen processing or biosynthetic regulation. The existence of a preformed matrix did however, increase the efficiency with which newly synthesised collagen was incorporated into the pericellular matrix. At day 0, when there was no measurable matrix present, 29% of the collagen synthesised was deposited, while by day 15, 88% of the collagen was laid down in the matrix. The development of this 3T6 culture system, where collagen is efficiently incorporated into an organized extracellular matrix, will facilitate detailed studies on matrix organization and regulation and provide a system in which protein-engineered mutant collagens can be expressed to determine their effects on the production of a functional extracellular matrix. PMID:8412990

  20. Nature designs tough collagen: Explaining the nanostructure of collagen fibrils

    PubMed Central

    Buehler, Markus J.

    2006-01-01

    Collagen is a protein material with superior mechanical properties. It consists of collagen fibrils composed of a staggered array of ultra-long tropocollagen (TC) molecules. Theoretical and molecular modeling suggests that this natural design of collagen fibrils maximizes the strength and provides large energy dissipation during deformation, thus creating a tough and robust material. We find that the mechanics of collagen fibrils can be understood quantitatively in terms of two critical molecular length scales χS and χR that characterize when (i) deformation changes from homogeneous intermolecular shear to propagation of slip pulses and when (ii) covalent bonds within TC molecules begin to fracture, leading to brittle-like failure. The ratio χS/χR indicates which mechanism dominates deformation. Our modeling rigorously links the chemical properties of individual TC molecules to the macroscopic mechanical response of fibrils. The results help to explain why collagen fibers found in nature consist of TC molecules with lengths in the proximity of 300 nm and advance the understanding how collagen diseases that change intermolecular adhesion properties influence mechanical properties. PMID:16895989

  1. Dermal exposure to environmental contaminants in the Great Lakes.

    PubMed

    Moody, R P; Chu, I

    1995-12-01

    This paper reviews the literature to determine the importance of the dermal route of exposure for swimmers and bathers using Great Lakes waters and summarizes the chemical water contaminants of concern in the Great Lakes along with relevant dermal absorption data. We detail in vivo and in vitro methods of quantifying the degree of dermal absorption and discuss a preference for infinite dose data as opposed to finite dose data. The basic mechanisms of the dermal absorption process, routes of chemical entry, and the environmental and physiological factors affecting this process are also reviewed, and we discuss the concepts of surface slick exposure to lipophilic compounds and the adsorption of contaminants to water sediment. After presenting mathematical constructs for calculating the degree of exposure, we present in vitro data concerning skin absorption of polyaromatic hydrocarbons adsorbed to Great Lakes water sediment to show that in a worst-case scenario exposure via the dermal route can be equally important to the oral route. We have concluded that prolonged exposure of the skin, especially under conditions that may enhance dermal absorption (e.g., sunburn) may result in toxicologically significant amounts of certain water contaminants being absorbed. It is recommended that swimming should be confined to public beaches, people should refrain from swimming if they are sunburned, and skin should be washed with soap as soon as possible following exposure. Future studies should be conducted to investigate the importance of the dermal exposure route to swimmers and bathers. PMID:8635434

  2. Dermal exposure to environmental contaminants in the Great Lakes.

    PubMed Central

    Moody, R P; Chu, I

    1995-01-01

    This paper reviews the literature to determine the importance of the dermal route of exposure for swimmers and bathers using Great Lakes waters and summarizes the chemical water contaminants of concern in the Great Lakes along with relevant dermal absorption data. We detail in vivo and in vitro methods of quantifying the degree of dermal absorption and discuss a preference for infinite dose data as opposed to finite dose data. The basic mechanisms of the dermal absorption process, routes of chemical entry, and the environmental and physiological factors affecting this process are also reviewed, and we discuss the concepts of surface slick exposure to lipophilic compounds and the adsorption of contaminants to water sediment. After presenting mathematical constructs for calculating the degree of exposure, we present in vitro data concerning skin absorption of polyaromatic hydrocarbons adsorbed to Great Lakes water sediment to show that in a worst-case scenario exposure via the dermal route can be equally important to the oral route. We have concluded that prolonged exposure of the skin, especially under conditions that may enhance dermal absorption (e.g., sunburn) may result in toxicologically significant amounts of certain water contaminants being absorbed. It is recommended that swimming should be confined to public beaches, people should refrain from swimming if they are sunburned, and skin should be washed with soap as soon as possible following exposure. Future studies should be conducted to investigate the importance of the dermal exposure route to swimmers and bathers. PMID:8635434

  3. DREAM: a method for semi-quantitative dermal exposure assessment.

    PubMed

    Van-Wendel-de-Joode, Berna; Brouwer, Derk H; Vermeulen, Roel; Van Hemmen, Joop J; Heederik, Dick; Kromhout, Hans

    2003-01-01

    This paper describes a new method (DREAM) for structured, semi-quantitative dermal exposure assessment for chemical or biological agents that can be used in occupational hygiene or epidemiology. It is anticipated that DREAM could serve as an initial assessment of dermal exposure, amongst others, resulting in a ranking of tasks and subsequently jobs. DREAM consists of an inventory and evaluation part. Two examples of dermal exposure of workers of a car-construction company show that DREAM characterizes tasks and gives insight into exposure mechanisms, forming a basis for systematic exposure reduction. DREAM supplies estimates for exposure levels on the outside clothing layer as well as on skin, and provides insight into the distribution of dermal exposure over the body. Together with the ranking of tasks and people, this provides information for measurement strategies and helps to determine who, where and what to measure. In addition to dermal exposure assessment, the systematic description of dermal exposure pathways helps to prioritize and determine most adequate measurement strategies and methods. DREAM could be a promising approach for structured, semi-quantitative, dermal exposure assessment. PMID:12505908

  4. Evaluation of systemic and dermal toxicity and dermal photoprotection by sour cherry kernels.

    PubMed

    Bak, Istvan; Czompa, Attila; Csepanyi, Evelin; Juhasz, Bela; Kalantari, Heibatullah; Najm, Khadija; Aghel, Nasreen; Varga, Balazs; Haines, David D; Tosaki, Arpad

    2011-11-01

    The present report describes outcomes of animal studies conducted to determine the systemic and dermal toxicity of Prunus cerasus (sour cherry) seed kernel contents; and a separate evaluation of the photoprotective capacity of the kernel oil fraction. B6 mice and Hartley guinea-pigs were used for these experiments. Dosage groups of 6-8 animals were administered whole kernel meal in a dose range of 0-3000 mg/kg by gavage for 8 days, following which they were killed. The liver and kidney weights were recorded and histological examination performed on sections of these organs. Kidney function was assessed as blood urea nitrogen and creatinine and liver function by measurement of serum glutamic oxaloacetic transaminase, glutamic pyruvic transaminase and alkaline phosphatase. Dermal toxicity was evaluated in a Hartley guinea-pig model by comparing UVB-irradiated shaved skin to which the kernel oil had been applied with distilled water controls. In conclusion, no evidence of toxicity was observed to result from the consumption or dermal application of sour cherry seed kernel in the dose range at which it is likely to be used in foods or healthcare. Moreover, it was shown to have a powerful capacity to protect skin from UV damage. These results suggest it will prove to be a highly safe and effective addition to a wide range of products for general use. PMID:21751269

  5. Collagen scaffolds combined with collagen-binding ciliary neurotrophic factor facilitate facial nerve repair in mini-pigs.

    PubMed

    Lu, Chao; Meng, Danqing; Cao, Jiani; Xiao, Zhifeng; Cui, Yi; Fan, Jingya; Cui, Xiaolong; Chen, Bing; Yao, Yao; Zhang, Zhen; Ma, Jinling; Pan, Juli; Dai, Jianwu

    2015-05-01

    The preclinical studies using animal models play a very important role in the evaluation of facial nerve regeneration. Good models need to recapitulate the distance and time for axons to regenerate in humans. Compared with the most used rodent animals, the structure of facial nerve in mini-pigs shares more similarities with humans in microanatomy. To evaluate the feasibility of repairing facial nerve defects by collagen scaffolds combined with ciliary neurotrophic factor (CNTF), 10-mm-long gaps were made in the buccal branch of mini-pigs' facial nerve. Three months after surgery, electrophysiological assessment and histological examination were performed to evaluate facial nerve regeneration. Immunohistochemistry and transmission electron microscope observation showed that collagen scaffolds with collagen binding (CBD)-CNTF could promote better axon regeneration, Schwann cell migration, and remyelination at the site of implant device than using scaffolds alone. Electrophysiological assessment also showed higher recovery rate in the CNTF group. In summary, combination of collagen scaffolds and CBD-CNTF showed promising effects on facial nerve regeneration in mini-pig models. PMID:25098760

  6. In vivo quantification of human dermal skin aging using SHG and autofluorescence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Puschmann, Stefan; Rahn, Christian-Dennis; Wenck, Horst; Gallinat, Stefan; Fischer, Frank

    2012-03-01

    There are visible changes during skin aging. In the extracellular matrix these changes referred to as intrinsic aging (skin areas not exposed to sunlight) and extrinsic aging can be measured using various methods, such as subjective clinical evaluation, histology and molecular analysis. In this study we developed a new parameter for the non-invasive quantitative determination of dermal skin aging utilizing a five-dimensional intravital tomography (5D-IVT). This device, also known as 5D - multi-photon laser scanning microscopy, is a powerful tool to investigate (photo)aging-associated alterations in vivo. Structural alterations in the dermis of extrinsically aged (chronically sun-exposed) and intrinsically aged (sun-protected) human skin were recorded utilizing the collagen-specific second harmonic generation (SHG) signal and the elastin-specific autofluorescence (AF) signal. Recording took place in young and elderly volunteers. The resulting images were processed in order to gain the elastin percentage and the collagen percentage per image. Then, the elastin - to - collagen ratio (ELCOR) was calculated. With respect to volar forearm skin, the ELCOR significantly increased with age. In elderly volunteers, the ELCOR value calculated for the chronically sun-exposed temple area was significantly augmented compared with the sun-protected upper arm area. Based on 5D-IVT we introduce the ELCOR as a new means to quantify age-associated alterations in the extracellular matrix of in vivo human skin. This novel parameter is compared to the currently used "SHG to AF aging index" of the dermis (SAAID).

  7. Prenatal Diagnosis of Congenital Dermal Sinus

    PubMed Central

    Sakr, Sharif; Mohan, Yedathore; Malik, Asif; Malik, Ghaus; Gonik, Bernard

    2015-01-01

    Background Congenital dermal sinus (CDS) is an uncommon form of spinal dysraphism. Although postdelivery identification in the neonate is aided by several associated physical examination findings, establishing this diagnosis prenatally has proven to be elusive. Case Report We present a case of CDS where the prenatal findings at 20 weeks gestation led to the diagnosis, which was confirmed postnatally. The associated protrusion of fibrotic membranes through the sinus tract helped in the identification of this lesion prenatally, but created confusion with a more common type of lesion, an open neural tube defect. This is the first case report in the literature describing prenatal diagnosis of fetal CDS. Conclusion Prenatal diagnosis with postnatal confirmation of CDS leads to early intervention, better long-term outcomes, and lesser complications. PMID:26199797

  8. Formulation of diclofenac for dermal delivery.

    PubMed

    Goh, Choon Fu; Lane, Majella E

    2014-10-01

    Diclofenac (DF) was first synthesized in the 1960's and is currently available as ophthalmic, oral, parenteral, rectal and skin preparations. This review focuses on the administration of DF to the skin. As a member of the non-steroidal anti-inflammatory (NSAID) group of drugs the primary indications of DF are for the management of inflammation and pain but it is also used to treat actinic keratosis. The specific aims of this paper are to: (i) provide an overview of the pharmacokinetics and metabolism of DF following oral and topical administration; (ii) examine critically the various formulation approaches which have been investigated to enhance dermal delivery of DF; and (iii) identify new formulation strategies for enhanced DF skin penetration. PMID:25091375

  9. Porokeratotic Eccrine Ostial and Dermal Duct Nevus

    PubMed Central

    Naraghi, Mona Masoumeh; Goodarzi, Azadeh

    2013-01-01

    PEODDN is a rare benign cutaneous disorder that clinically resembles comedo nevus but favors the palms and soles, where pilosebaceous follicles are absent. Widespread involvement along Blaschko's lines can also occur. It is a disorder of keratinization involving the intraepidermal eccrine duct (acrosyringium) and is characterized by eccrine hamartoma and cornoid lamellation in pathology. The patient is a 29-year-old man with an 8-year history of pruritic skin lesions on his right lateral ankle. In the pathologic examination, multiple small epidermal invagination with overlying parakeratotic cornoid lamellation, loss of granular layer, and few dyskeratotic cells at the base of epidermal invagination are revealed. After clinic-pathologic correlation, the diagnosis of porokeratotic eccrine ostial and dermal duct nevus (PEODDN) was made. Late-onset and rare clinical presentation as pruritic lesion are the characteristic features that make this patient an extraordinary presentation of PEODDN. PMID:24307955

  10. Childhood Epidermolysis Bullosa Acquisita: Confirmation of Diagnosis by Skin Deficient in Type VII Collagen, Enzyme-linked Immunosorbent Assay, and Immunoblotting

    PubMed Central

    Goyal, Nupur; Rao, Raghavendra; Balachandran, C; Pai, Sathish; Bhogal, Balbir S; Schmidt, Enno; Zillikens, Detlef

    2016-01-01

    Epidermolysis bullosa acquisita (EBA) is an acquired subepidermal bullous disorder characterized by autoantibodies against Type VII collagen. It usually affects adults; childhood EBA is rare. We describe a 10-year-old girl presenting with recurrent tense blisters predominantly on legs, dorsa of hands and feet accompanied by oral erosions since the age of 5 years. Direct immunofluorescence (IF) microscopy showed linear deposition of IgG and C3 along the basement membrane zone (BMZ); indirect IF microscopy on salt-split skin revealed staining of IgG to the dermal side of the split. The patient's serum did not show BMZ staining in recessive dystrophic epidermolysis bullosa skin deficient for Type VII collagen, thus confirming autoantibody reactivity against Type VII collagen. Circulating antibodies against the immunodominant noncollagenous 1 domain of Type VII collagen were detected by ELISA and immunoblotting studies. The patient was treated with oral corticosteroids and dapsone with good improvement. PMID:27293257

  11. Childhood Epidermolysis Bullosa Acquisita: Confirmation of Diagnosis by Skin Deficient in Type VII Collagen, Enzyme-linked Immunosorbent Assay, and Immunoblotting.

    PubMed

    Goyal, Nupur; Rao, Raghavendra; Balachandran, C; Pai, Sathish; Bhogal, Balbir S; Schmidt, Enno; Zillikens, Detlef

    2016-01-01

    Epidermolysis bullosa acquisita (EBA) is an acquired subepidermal bullous disorder characterized by autoantibodies against Type VII collagen. It usually affects adults; childhood EBA is rare. We describe a 10-year-old girl presenting with recurrent tense blisters predominantly on legs, dorsa of hands and feet accompanied by oral erosions since the age of 5 years. Direct immunofluorescence (IF) microscopy showed linear deposition of IgG and C3 along the basement membrane zone (BMZ); indirect IF microscopy on salt-split skin revealed staining of IgG to the dermal side of the split. The patient's serum did not show BMZ staining in recessive dystrophic epidermolysis bullosa skin deficient for Type VII collagen, thus confirming autoantibody reactivity against Type VII collagen. Circulating antibodies against the immunodominant noncollagenous 1 domain of Type VII collagen were detected by ELISA and immunoblotting studies. The patient was treated with oral corticosteroids and dapsone with good improvement. PMID:27293257

  12. Horizontal posterior ridge augmentation: the use of a collagen membrane over a bovine particulate graft: technique note.

    PubMed

    Block, Michael S; Kelley, Brian

    2013-09-01

    The purpose of this technique note is to describe an improvement of a previously published method to augment the thin posterior mandibular ridge. The technique uses a subperiosteal tunnel to place a collagen membrane within the tunnel to maintain the shape of the augmentation. After the collagen membrane has been placed, a sintered xenograft is packed as an onlay graft, with implant placement 6 to 9 months later. PMID:23948364

  13. Dermal-exposure assessment: Principles and applications. Interim report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-01-01

    The purpose of the document is to describe the principles of dermal absorption and show how to apply these principles in actual human exposure scenarios. The primary focus of the document is on dermal contact with water, soils and vapors. For each of these media, the experimental data on the dermal properties of specific compounds are summarized and methods are provided for predicting these properties when data is lacking. Additionally, scenario factors describing the frequency, duration and intensity of contact are presented for the soil and water media.

  14. Matrix-directed differentiation of human adipose-derived mesenchymal stem cells to dermal-like fibroblasts that produce extracellular matrix.

    PubMed

    Sivan, Unnikrishnan; Jayakumar, K; Krishnan, Lissy K

    2014-02-25

    Commercially available skin substitutes lack essential non-immune cells for adequate tissue regeneration of non-healing wounds. A tissue-engineered, patient-specific, dermal substitute could be an attractive option for regenerating chronic wounds, for which adipose-derived mesenchymal stem cells (ADMSCs) could become an autologous source. However, ADMSCs are multipotent in nature and may differentiate into adipocytes, osteocytes and chondrocytes in vitro, and may develop into undesirable tissues upon transplantation. Therefore, ADMSCs committed to the fibroblast lineage could be a better option for in vitro or in vivo skin tissue engineering. The objective of this study was to standardize in vitro culture conditions for ADMSCs differentiation into dermal-like fibroblasts which can synthesize extracellular matrix (ECM) proteins. Biomimetic matrix composite, deposited on tissue culture polystyrene (TCPS), and differentiation medium (DM), supplemented with fibroblast-conditioned medium and growth factors, were used as a fibroblast-specific niche (FSN) for cell culture. For controls, ADMSCs were cultured on bare TCPS with either DM or basal medium (BM). Culture of ADMSCs on FSN upregulated the expression of differentiation markers such as fibroblast-specific protein-1 (FSP-1) and a panel of ECM molecules specific to the dermis, such as fibrillin-1, collagen I, collagen IV and elastin. Immunostaining showed the deposition of dermal-specific ECM, which was significantly higher in FSN compared to control. Fibroblasts derived from ADMSCs can synthesize elastin, which is an added advantage for successful skin tissue engineering as compared to fibroblasts from skin biopsy. To obtain rapid differentiation of ADMSCs to dermal-like fibroblasts for regenerative medicine, a matrix-directed differentiation strategy may be employed. Copyright © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:24616295

  15. The use of acellular dermal matrix as a scaffold for periosteum replacement.

    PubMed

    Beniker, Dan; McQuillan, David; Livesey, Stephen; Urban, Robert M; Turner, Thomas M; Blum, Barbara; Hughes, Kim; Haggard, Warren O

    2003-05-01

    Three preclinical models were used to evaluate GraftJacket Acellular Periosteum Replacement Scaffold (Wright Medical Technology, Inc, Arlington, Tenn). The studies assessed the ability of the acellular dermal matrix to repopulate with cells, revascularize, provide a protected environment for bone defect restoration, and minimize fibrous tissue infiltration. An athymic nude rat muscle implantation study demonstrated a steady increase in cellular repopulation through days 2-21. The formation of blood vessels occurred between days 7-14 in this study. Results from a porcine femoral drill hole study indicated that the scaffold material was intact and adherent to surrounding bone and allowed cellular repopulation and vascular infiltration at a 5-week time period. A preliminary porcine segmental bone defect model at a 6-week time period demonstrated the ability of the scaffold material to protect the bone defect site as revealed by new bone formation within the margins of the defect and adjacent to the scaffold. The segmental model also indicated minimal to no soft tissue invasion into the defect site. The combined studies provided preliminary evidence that the dermal membrane material may be used as a scaffold for periosteum regeneration by allowing for cellular repopulation, revascularization, and bone defect restoration. PMID:12755232

  16. Nonlinear microscopy of collagen fibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strupler, M.; Pena, A.-M.; Hernest, M.; Tharaux, P.-L.; Fabre, A.; Marchal-Somme, J.; Crestani, B.; Débarre, D.; Martin, J.-L.; Beaurepaire, E.; Schanne-Klein, M.-C.

    2007-02-01

    We used intrinsic Second Harmonic Generation (SHG) by fibrillar collagen to visualize the three-dimensional architecture of collagen fibrosis at the micrometer scale using laser scanning nonlinear microscopy. We showed that SHG signals are highly specific to fibrillar collagen and provide a sensitive probe of the micrometer-scale structural organization of collagen in tissues. Moreover, recording simultaneously other nonlinear optical signals in a multimodal setup, we visualized the tissue morphology using Two-Photon Excited Fluorescence (2PEF) signals from endogenous chromophores such as NADH or elastin. We then compared different methods to determine accurate indexes of collagen fibrosis using nonlinear microscopy, given that most collagen fibrils are smaller than the microscope resolution and that second harmonic generation is a coherent process. In order to define a robust method to process our three-dimensional images, we either calculated the fraction of the images occupied by a significant SHG signal, or averaged SHG signal intensities. We showed that these scores provide an estimation of the extension of renal and pulmonary fibrosis in murine models, and that they clearly sort out the fibrotic mice.

  17. Human collagen produced in plants

    PubMed Central

    Shoseyov, Oded; Posen, Yehudit; Grynspan, Frida

    2014-01-01

    Consequential to its essential role as a mechanical support and affinity regulator in extracellular matrices, collagen constitutes a highly sought after scaffolding material for regeneration and healing applications. However, substantiated concerns have been raised with regard to quality and safety of animal tissue-extracted collagen, particularly in relation to its immunogenicity, risk of disease transmission and overall quality and consistency. In parallel, contamination with undesirable cellular factors can significantly impair its bioactivity, vis-a-vis its impact on cell recruitment, proliferation and differentiation. High-scale production of recombinant human collagen Type I (rhCOL1) in the tobacco plant provides a source of an homogenic, heterotrimeric, thermally stable “virgin” collagen which self assembles to fine homogenous fibrils displaying intact binding sites and has been applied to form numerous functional scaffolds for tissue engineering and regenerative medicine. In addition, rhCOL1 can form liquid crystal structures, yielding a well-organized and mechanically strong membrane, two properties indispensable to extracellular matrix (ECM) mimicry. Overall, the shortcomings of animal- and cadaver-derived collagens arising from their source diversity and recycled nature are fully overcome in the plant setting, constituting a collagen source ideal for tissue engineering and regenerative medicine applications. PMID:23941988

  18. Characterisations of collagen-silver-hydroxyapatite nanocomposites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ciobanu, C. S.; Popa, C. L.; Petre, C. C.; Jiga, G.; Trusca, R.; Predoi, D.

    2016-05-01

    The XRD analysis were performed to confirm the formation of hydroxyapatite structure in collagen-silver-hydroxyapatite nanocomposites. The molecular interaction in collagen-hydroxyapatite nanocomposites was highlighted by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) analysis. The SEM showed a nanostructure of collagen-silverhydroxyapatite nanocomposites composed of nano needle-like particles in a veil with collagen texture. The presence of vibrational groups characteristics to the hydroxyapatite structure in collagen-silver-hydroxyapatite (AgHApColl) nanocomposites was investigated by FTIR.

  19. Cochlear Implants

    MedlinePlus

    ... additional visits are needed for activating, adjusting, and programming the various electrodes that have been implanted. Also, ... to the center for checkups once the final programming is made to the speech processor. Both children ...

  20. Histrelin Implant

    MedlinePlus

    ... bone growth and development of sexual characteristics) in girls usually between 2 and 8 years of age ... MRI scans (radiology techniques designed to show the images of body structures) to find the implant when ...

  1. Goserelin Implant

    MedlinePlus

    ... which the type of tissue that lines the uterus [womb] grows in other areas of the body ... with the treatment of abnormal bleeding of the uterus. Goserelin implant is in a class of medications ...

  2. Ion Implantation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Langouche, G.; Yoshida, Y.

    In this tutorial we describe the basic principles of the ion implantation technique and we demonstrate that emission Mössbauer spectroscopy is an extremely powerful technique to investigate the atomic and electronic configuration around implanted atoms. The physics of dilute atoms in materials, the final lattice sites and their chemical state as well as diffusion phenomena can be studied. We focus on the latest developments of implantation Mössbauer spectroscopy, where three accelerator facilities, i.e., Hahn-Meitner Institute Berlin, ISOLDE-CERN and RIKEN, have intensively been used for materials research in in-beam and on-line Mössbauer experiments immediately after implantation of the nuclear probes.

  3. Dental Implants

    MedlinePlus Videos and Cool Tools

    ... facts so you can make an informed decision as to whether dental implants are right for your ... the jaw bone. It’s obviously not the same as the original connection , but functions just the same. ...

  4. Tissue Inhibitor of Metalloproteinase-2 Suppresses Collagen Synthesis in Cultured Keloid Fibroblasts

    PubMed Central

    Dohi, Teruyuki; Aoki, Masayo; Ogawa, Rei; Akaishi, Satoshi; Shimada, Takashi; Okada, Takashi; Hyakusoku, Hiko

    2015-01-01

    Background: Keloids are defined as a kind of dermal fibroproliferative disorder resulting from the accumulation of collagen. In the remodeling of extracellular matrix, the balance between matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) and the tissue inhibitors of metalloproteinases (TIMPs) is as critical as the proper production of extracellular matrix. We investigate the role of TIMPs and MMPs in the pathogenesis of keloids and examine the therapeutic potential of TIMP-2. Methods: The expression of TIMPs and MMPs in most inflamed parts of cultured keloid fibroblasts (KFs) and peripheral normal skin fibroblasts (PNFs) in the same individuals and the reactivity of KFs to cyclic mechanical stretch were analyzed by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (n = 7). To evaluate the effect of treating KFs with TIMP-2, collagen synthesis was investigated by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, and microscopic analysis was used to examine the treatment effects of TIMP-2 on ex vivo cultures of keloid tissue (n = 6). Results: TIMP-2 was downregulated in cultured KFs compared with PNFs in the same individuals, and the reduction in TIMP-2 was exacerbated by cyclic mechanical stretch. Administration of TIMP-2 (200 or 300 ng/mL) significantly suppressed expression of Col1A2 and Col3A1 mRNA and collagen type I protein in KFs. TIMP-2 also significantly reduced the skin dermal and collagen bundle thickness in ex vivo cultures of keloid tissue. Conclusion: These results indicated that downregulation of TIMP-2 in KFs is a crucial event in the pathogenesis of keloids, and the TIMP-2 would be a promising candidate for the treatment of keloids. PMID:26495233

  5. Ascorbyl coumarates as multifunctional cosmeceutical agents that inhibit melanogenesis and enhance collagen synthesis.

    PubMed

    Kwak, Jun Yup; Park, Soojin; Seok, Jin Kyung; Liu, Kwang-Hyeon; Boo, Yong Chool

    2015-09-01

    L-Ascorbic acid (AA) and p-coumaric acid (p-CA) are naturally occurring antioxidants that are known to enhance collagen synthesis and inhibit melanin synthesis, respectively. The purpose of this study was to examine hybrid compounds between AA and p-CA as multifunctional cosmeceutical agents. Ascorbyl 3-p-coumarate (A-3-p-C), ascorbyl 2-p-coumarate (A-2-p-C), and their parent compounds were tested for their effects on cellular melanin synthesis and collagen synthesis. At 100 μM, A-3-p-C and A-2-p-C decreased melanin content of human dermal melanocytes stimulated by L-tyrosine, by 65 and 59%, respectively, compared to 11% inhibition of AA and 70% inhibition of p-CA. A-3-p-C and A-2-p-C were less effective than p-CA but more effective than AA at inhibiting tyrosinase activity. A-3-p-C and A-2-p-C were more effective than p-CA at inhibiting the autoxidation of L-3,4-dihydroxyphenylalanine. At 100-300 μM, A-3-p-C and A-2-p-C augmented collagen release from human dermal fibroblasts by 120-144% and 125-191%, respectively, compared to 126-133% increase of AA and 120-146% increase of p-CA. They increased procollagen type I C-peptide release (A-3-p-C, and A-2-p-C) like AA, and decreased matrix metalloproteinase 1 level (A-2-p-C) like p-CA, implicating that they might regulate collagen metabolism by multiple mechanisms. This study suggests that A-3-p-C and A-2-p-C could be used as multifunctional cosmeceutical agents for the attenuation of certain aspects of skin aging. PMID:26078014

  6. Endothelial Cell Growth and Differentiation on Collagen-Immobilized Polycaprolactone Nanowire Surfaces.

    PubMed

    Leszczak, Victoria; Baskett, Dominique A; Popat, Ketul C

    2015-06-01

    The success of cardiovascular implants is associated with the development of an endothelium on material surface, critical to the prevention of intimal hyperplasia, calcification and thrombosis. A thorough understanding of the interaction between vascular endothelial cells and the biomaterial involved is essential in order to have a successful application which promotes healing and regeneration through integration with native tissue. In this study, we have developed collagen immobilized nanostructured surfaces with controlled arrays of high aspect ratio nanowires for the growth and maintenance of human microvascular endothelial cells (HMVECs). The nanowire surfaces were fabricated from polycaprolactone using a novel nanotemplating technique, and were immobilized with collagen utilizing an aminolysis method. The collagen immobilized nanowire surfaces were characterized using contact angle measurements, scanning electron microscopy and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. Human microvascular endothelial cells were used to evaluate the efficacy of the collagen immobilized nanowire surfaces to promote cell adhesion, proliferation, viability and differentiation. The results presented here indicate significantly higher cellular adhesion, proliferation and viability on nanowire and collagen immobilized surfaces as compared to the control surface. Further, HMVECs have a more elongated body and low shape factor on nanostructured surfaces. The differentiation potential of collagen immobilized nanowire surfaces was also evaluated by immunostaining and western blotting for key endothelial cell markers that are expressed when human microvascular endothelial cells are differentiated. Results indicate that expression of VE-cadherin is increased on collagen immobilized surfaces while the expression of von Willebrand factor is statistically similar on all surfaces. PMID:26353596

  7. Morphofunctional evaluation of the effect of collagen-1-based dressing on skin regeneration after burn trauma in mice of two genetic strains.

    PubMed

    Kolokolchikova, E G; Zhirkova, E A; Golovatenko-Abramov, P K; Platonov, E S; Botcharova, V S; Khvatov, V B

    2010-07-01

    Morphofunctional evaluation of the effect of biological dressing with collagen-1 on healing of 3A degree burn wound in outbred and mutant Hr(hr)/Hr(hr)(hairless) mice was carried out by the histological method and optic radioautography. A pronounced stimulatory effect of the dressing on skin regeneration in mice was demonstrated. According to radioautography data, early dressing of the burn wounds in Hr(hr)/Hr(hr)mice led to active proliferation of epithelial cells in dermal cyst and vascular endotheliocytes. The possible mechanisms of the stimulatory effect of collagen-based dressing on wound healing are discussed. PMID:21113480

  8. Development of a nonthrombogenic collagenous blood-prosthetic interface.

    PubMed Central

    Bernhard, W F; Colo, N A; Szycher, M; Wesolowski, J S; Haudenschild, C C; Franzblau, C C; Parkman, R; Liss, R H

    1980-01-01

    Investigations to develop an implantable assist pump for prolonged circulatory support have been impeded by accumulation of friable thrombus on the prosthetic interface, with subsequent embolization. To circumvent this problem, the textured, fibril surface of a polyurethane pump chamber (mat thickness 430 microns) was inoculated with cultured bovine fetal fibroblasts (labelled with thymidine-14C) prior to animal implantation. The pneumatically actuated device (stroke volume 75 ml), maintained a pulsatile blood flow throughout each study. In 20 calf experiments, extending up to 335 days, 30 X 10(6) fibroblasts (in 50 ml media) derived from a single Holstein fetus were distributed on the urethane surface (360 +/- 50 cells/mm2) by rotation of a sealed device for three hours (12 revolutions/hour). Following connection to the circulation, cell washout was minimal. Resultant biologic linings, examined after animal sacrifice, were densely adherent to the underlying polymer matrix, and varied in thickness from 250 micron-1.5 mm. Microscopically, fibroblasts were identified from the surface to base, accompanied by numerous collagen bundles and abundant ground substance. Amino acid analysis in 10/20 pumps implanted for 31--335 days, revealed 50 +/- 5 Hydroxyproline residues/1000 residues (50% collagen) and scant elastin. Donor fibroblasts were identified by radioautography and karyotyping. Lack of immunologic response in 12 Hereford pump recipients as confirmed by serial fibroblast cytotoxicity assays. In conclusion, an induced collagenous-blood interface permitted prolonged mechanical circulatory support in animals without thromboembolic complications. Images Fig. 1. Fig. 2. Figs. 3A and B. Fig. 4A. Fig. 4B. PMID:6448027

  9. Clinicopathologic correlate of a fresh eyelid pigment implantation

    SciTech Connect

    Tse, D.T.; Folberg, R.; Moore, K.

    1985-10-01

    An eyelid with freshly applied black eyeliner pigment was examined histologically. X-ray microanalysis of the pigment suspension from the manufacturer's vial indicated that its composition was 98% iron and 2% titanium. Transmission electron microscopic examination disclosed that particles were in the extracellular matrix; intracellular particles were not seen. By light microscopy, implant material was detected in various levels of the dermis and was found in dermal lymphatics as well as within and surrounding a hair follicle. This study suggests that systemic exposure to the implant material is possible and offers explanations for permanent eyelash loss, which the authors have seen following this procedure.

  10. Making more matrix: enhancing the deposition of dermal-epidermal junction components in vitro and accelerating organotypic skin culture development, using macromolecular crowding.

    PubMed

    Benny, Paula; Badowski, Cedric; Lane, E Birgitte; Raghunath, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Skin is one of the most accessible tissues for experimental biomedical sciences, and cultured skin cells represent one of the longest-running clinical applications of stem cell therapy. However, culture-generated skin mimetic multicellular structures are still limited in their application by the time taken to develop these constructs in vitro and by their incomplete differentiation. The development of a functional dermal-epidermal junction (DEJ) is one of the most sought after aspects of cultured skin, and one of the hardest to recreate in vitro. At the DEJ, dermal fibroblasts and epidermal keratinocytes interact to form an interlinked basement membrane of extracellular matrix (ECM), which forms as a concerted action of both keratinocytes and fibroblasts. Successful formation of this basement membrane is essential for take and stability of cultured skin autografts. We studied interactive matrix production by monocultures and cocultures of primary human keratinocytes and fibroblasts in an attempt to improve the efficiency of basement membrane production in culture using mixed macromolecular crowding (mMMC); resulting ECM were enriched with the deposition of collagens I, IV, fibronectin, and laminin 332 (laminin 5) and also in collagen VII, the anchoring fibril component. Our in vitro data point to fibroblasts, rather than keratinocytes, as the major cellular contributors of the DEJ. Not only did we find more collagen VII production and deposition by fibroblasts in comparison to keratinocytes, but also observed that decellularized fibroblast ECM stimulated the production and deposition of collagen VII by keratinocytes, over and above that of keratinocyte monocultures. In confrontation cultures, keratinocytes and fibroblasts showed spontaneous segregation and demarcation of cell boundaries by DEJ protein deposition. Finally, mMMC was used in a classical organotypic coculture protocol with keratinocytes seeded over fibroblast-containing collagen gels. Applied during

  11. Is Sterile Better Than Aseptic? Comparing the Microbiology of Acellular Dermal Matrices

    PubMed Central

    Klein, Gabriel M.; Nasser, Ahmed E.; Phillips, Brett T.; Gersch, Robert P.; Fourman, Mitchell S.; Lilo, Sarit E.; Fritz, Jason R.; Khan, Sami U.; Dagum, Alexander B.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Postoperative infections are a major complication associated with tissue-expander-based breast reconstruction. The use of acellular dermal matrix (ADM) in this surgery has been identified as a potential reservoir of infection, prompting the development of sterile ADM. Although aseptic and sterile ADMs have been investigated, no study has focused on the occurrence and clinical outcome of bacterial colonization before implantation. Methods: Samples of aseptic AlloDerm, sterile Ready-To-Use AlloDerm, and AlloMax were taken before implantation. These samples were incubated in Tryptic soy broth overnight before being streaked on Trypticase soy agar, MacConkey agar, and 5% blood agar plates for culture and incubated for 48 hours. Culture results were cross-referenced with patient outcomes for 1 year postoperatively. Results: A total of 92 samples of ADM were collected from 63 patients. There were 15 cases of postoperative surgical site infection (16.3%). Only 1 sample of ADM (AlloMax) showed growth of Escherichia coli, which was likely a result of contamination. That patient did not develop any infectious sequelae. Patient outcomes showed no difference in the incidence of seroma or infection between sterile and aseptic ADMs. Conclusions: This study evaluates the microbiology of acellular dermal matrices before use in breast reconstruction. No difference was found in the preoperative bacterial load of either aseptic or sterile ADM. No significant difference was noted in infection or seroma formation. Given these results, we believe aseptic processing used on ADMs is equivalent to sterile processing in our patient cohort in terms of clinical infection and seroma occurrence postoperatively. PMID:27482500

  12. High-strength mineralized collagen artificial bone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiu, Zhi-Ye; Tao, Chun-Sheng; Cui, Helen; Wang, Chang-Ming; Cui, Fu-Zhai

    2014-03-01

    Mineralized collagen (MC) is a biomimetic material that mimics natural bone matrix in terms of both chemical composition and microstructure. The biomimetic MC possesses good biocompatibility and osteogenic activity, and is capable of guiding bone regeneration as being used for bone defect repair. However, mechanical strength of existing MC artificial bone is too low to provide effective support at human load-bearing sites, so it can only be used for the repair at non-load-bearing sites, such as bone defect filling, bone graft augmentation, and so on. In the present study, a high strength MC artificial bone material was developed by using collagen as the template for the biomimetic mineralization of the calcium phosphate, and then followed by a cold compression molding process with a certain pressure. The appearance and density of the dense MC were similar to those of natural cortical bone, and the phase composition was in conformity with that of animal's cortical bone demonstrated by XRD. Mechanical properties were tested and results showed that the compressive strength was comparable to human cortical bone, while the compressive modulus was as low as human cancellous bone. Such high strength was able to provide effective mechanical support for bone defect repair at human load-bearing sites, and the low compressive modulus can help avoid stress shielding in the application of bone regeneration. Both in vitro cell experiments and in vivo implantation assay demonstrated good biocompatibility of the material, and in vivo stability evaluation indicated that this high-strength MC artificial bone could provide long-term effective mechanical support at human load-bearing sites.

  13. Intravenously Administered Recombinant Human Type VII Collagen Derived from Chinese Hamster Ovary Cells Reverses the Disease Phenotype in Recessive Dystrophic Epidermolysis Bullosa Mice.

    PubMed

    Hou, Yingping; Guey, Lin T; Wu, Timothy; Gao, Robert; Cogan, Jon; Wang, Xinyi; Hong, Elizabeth; Ning, Weihuang Vivian; Keene, Douglas; Liu, Nan; Huang, Yan; Kaftan, Craig; Tangarone, Bruce; Quinones-Garcia, Igor; Uitto, Jouni; Francone, Omar L; Woodley, David T; Chen, Mei

    2015-12-01

    Recessive dystrophic epidermolysis bullosa (RDEB) is an inherited disorder characterized by skin fragility, blistering, and multiple skin wounds with no currently approved or consistently effective treatment. It is due to mutations in the gene encoding type VII collagen (C7). Using recombinant human C7 (rhC7) purified from human dermal fibroblasts (FB-rhC7), we showed previously that intravenously injected rhC7 distributed to engrafted RDEB skin, incorporated into its dermal-epidermal junction (DEJ), and reversed the RDEB disease phenotype. Human dermal fibroblasts, however, are not used for commercial production of therapeutic proteins. Therefore, we generated rhC7 from Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells. The CHO-derived recombinant type VII collagen (CHO-rhC7), similar to FB-rhC7, was secreted as a correctly folded, disulfide-bonded, helical trimer resistant to protease degradation. CHO-rhC7 bound to fibronectin and promoted human keratinocyte migration in vitro. A single dose of CHO-rhC7, administered intravenously into new-born C7-null RDEB mice, incorporated into the DEJ of multiple skin sites, tongue and esophagus, restored anchoring fibrils, improved dermal-epidermal adherence, and increased the animals' life span. Furthermore, no circulating or tissue-bound anti-C7 antibodies were observed in the mice. These data demonstrate the efficacy of CHO-rhC7 in a preclinical murine model of RDEB. PMID:26203639

  14. Dermal and epidermal chromatophores of the Antarctic teleost Trematomus bernacchii.

    PubMed

    Obika, M; Meyer-Rochow, V B

    1990-01-01

    The physiological response and ultrastructure of the pigment cells of Trematomus bernacchii, an Antarctic teleost that lives under the sea ice north of the Ross Ice Shelf, were studied. In the integument, two types of epidermal chromatophores, melanophores and xanthophores, were found; in the dermis, typically three types of chromatophores--melanophores, xanthophores, and iridophores--were observed. The occurrence of epidermal xanthophore is reported for the first time in fish. Dermal melanophores and xanthophores have well-developed arrays of cytoplasmic microtubules. They responded rapidly to epinephrine and teleost melanin-concentrating hormone (MCH) with pigment aggregation and to theophylline with pigment dispersion. Total darkness elicited pigment aggregation in the majority of dermal xanthophores of isolated scales, whereas melanophores remained dispersed under both light and dark conditions. Pigment organelles of epidermal and dermal xanthophores that translocate during the pigmentary responses are carotenoid droplets of relatively large size. Dermal iridophores containing large reflecting platelets appeared to be immobile. PMID:2377579

  15. Succinyl hydroxamates as potent and selective non-peptidic inhibitors of procollagen C-proteinase: design, synthesis, and evaluation as topically applied, dermal anti-scarring agents.

    PubMed

    Bailey, Simon; Fish, Paul V; Billotte, Stephane; Bordner, Jon; Greiling, Doris; James, Kim; McElroy, Andrew; Mills, James E; Reed, Charlotte; Webster, Robert

    2008-12-15

    Succinyl hydroxamates 1 and 2 are disclosed as novel series of potent and selective inhibitors of procollagen C-proteinase (PCP) which may have potential as anti-fibrotic agents. Carboxamide 7 demonstrated good PCP inhibition and had excellent selectivity over MMPs involved in wound healing. In addition, 7 was effective in a cell-based model of collagen deposition (fibroplasia model) and was very effective at penetrating human skin in vitro. Compound 7 (UK-383,367) was selected as a candidate for evaluation in clinical studies as a topically applied, dermal anti-scarring agent. PMID:18945617

  16. Heterogeneity of Collagen VI Microfibrils

    PubMed Central

    Maaß, Tobias; Bayley, Christopher P.; Mörgelin, Matthias; Lettmann, Sandra; Bonaldo, Paolo; Paulsson, Mats; Baldock, Clair; Wagener, Raimund

    2016-01-01

    Collagen VI, a collagen with uncharacteristically large N- and C-terminal non-collagenous regions, forms a distinct microfibrillar network in most connective tissues. It was long considered to consist of three genetically distinct α chains (α1, α2, and α3). Intracellularly, heterotrimeric molecules associate to form dimers and tetramers, which are then secreted and assembled to microfibrils. The identification of three novel long collagen VI α chains, α4, α5, and α6, led to the question if and how these may substitute for the long α3 chain in collagen VI assembly. Here, we studied structural features of the novel long chains and analyzed the assembly of these into tetramers and microfibrils. N- and C-terminal globular regions of collagen VI were recombinantly expressed and studied by small angle x-ray scattering (SAXS). Ab initio models of the N-terminal globular regions of the α4, α5, and α6 chains showed a C-shaped structure similar to that found for the α3 chain. Single particle EM nanostructure of the N-terminal globular region of the α4 chain confirmed the C-shaped structure revealed by SAXS. Immuno-EM of collagen VI extracted from tissue revealed that like the α3 chain the novel long chains assemble to homotetramers that are incorporated into mixed microfibrils. Moreover, SAXS models of the C-terminal globular regions of the α1, α2, α4, and α6 chains were generated. Interestingly, the α1, α2, and α4 C-terminal globular regions dimerize. These self-interactions may play a role in tetramer formation. PMID:26742845

  17. Nanomechanics of Type I Collagen.

    PubMed

    Varma, Sameer; Orgel, Joseph P R O; Schieber, Jay D

    2016-07-12

    Type I collagen is the predominant collagen in mature tendons and ligaments, where it gives them their load-bearing mechanical properties. Fibrils of type I collagen are formed by the packing of polypeptide triple helices. Higher-order structures like fibril bundles and fibers are assembled from fibrils in the presence of other collagenous molecules and noncollagenous molecules. Curiously, however, experiments show that fibrils/fibril bundles are less resistant to axial stress compared to their constituent triple helices-the Young's moduli of fibrils/fibril bundles are an order-of-magnitude smaller than the Young's moduli of triple helices. Given the sensitivity of the Young's moduli of triple helices to solvation environment, a plausible explanation is that the packing of triple helices into fibrils perhaps reduces the Young's modulus of an individual triple helix, which results in fibrils having smaller Young's moduli. We find, however, from molecular dynamics and accelerated conformational sampling simulations that the Young's modulus of the buried core of the fibril is of the same order as that of a triple helix in aqueous phase. These simulations, therefore, suggest that the lower Young's moduli of fibrils/fibril bundles cannot be attributed to the specific packing of triple helices in the fibril core. It is not the fibril core that yields initially to axial stress. Rather, it must be the portion of the fibril exposed to the solvent and/or the fibril-fibril interface that bears the initial strain. Overall, this work provides estimates of Young's moduli and persistence lengths at two levels of collagen's structural assembly, which are necessary to quantitatively investigate the response of various biological factors on collagen mechanics, including congenital mutations, posttranslational modifications and ligand binding, and also engineer new collagen-based materials. PMID:27410733

  18. Dermal exposure and urinary 1-hydroxypyrene among asphalt roofing workers

    SciTech Connect

    McClean, M.D.; Rinehart, R.D.; Sapkota, A.; Cavallari, J.M.; Herrick, R.F.

    2007-07-01

    The primary objective of this study was to identify significant determinants of dermal exposure to polycyclic aromatic compounds (PACs) among asphalt roofing workers and use urinary 1-hydroxyprene (1-OHP) measurements to evaluate the effect of dermal exposure on total absorbed dose. The study population included 26 asphalt roofing workers who performed three primary tasks: tearing off old roofs, putting down new roofs, and operating the kettle at ground level. During multiple consecutive work shifts, dermal patch samples were collected from the underside of each worker's wrists and were analyzed for PACs, pyrene, and benzo(a)pyrene (BAP). During the same work week, urine samples were collected at pre-shift, post-shift, and bedtime each day and were analyzed for 1-OHP (205 urine samples). Linear mixed effects models were used to evaluate the dermal measurements for the purpose of identifying important determinants of exposure, and to evaluate urinary 1-OHP measurements for the purpose of identifying important determinants of total absorbed dose. Dermal exposures to PAC, pyrene, and BAP were found to vary significantly by roofing task and by the presence of an old coal tar pitch roof. For each of the three analytes, the adjusted mean dermal exposures associated with tear-off were approximately four times higher than exposures associated with operating the kettle. Exposure to coal tar pitch was associated with a 6-fold increase in PAC exposure, an 8-fold increase in pyrene exposure and a 35-fold increase in BAP exposure. The presence of coal tar pitch was the primary determinant of dermal exposure, particularly for exposure to BAP. However, the task-based differences that were observed while controlling for pitch suggest that exposure to asphalt also contributes to dermal exposures.

  19. Morphological and physiological characteristics of dermal photoreceptors in Lymnaea stagnalis

    PubMed Central

    Takigami, Satoshi; Sunada, Hiroshi; Horikoshi, Tetsuro; Sakakibara, Manabu

    2014-01-01

    Dermal photoreceptors located in the mantle of Lymnaea stagnalis were histologically and physiologically characterized. Our previous study demonstrated that the shadow response from dermal photoreceptors induces the whole-body withdrawal response. Through the interneuron, RPeD11, we detected that the light-off response indirectly originated from a dermal photoreceptor. Previous observations, based on behavioral pharmacology, revealed that cyclic guanosine monophosphate acts as a second messenger in the dermal photoreceptor. Furthermore, gastropods possess dermal photoreceptors containing rhodopsin, as a photopigment, and another photo-sensitive protein, arrestin, responsible for terminating the light response. Thus, we chose three antibodies, anti-cGMP, anti-rhodopsin, and anti-β-arrestin, to identify the dermal photoreceptor molecules in Lymnaea mantle. Extracellular recording, using a suction electrode on the mantle, revealed a light off-response from the right parietal nerve. Overlapping structures, positive against each of the antibodies, were also observed. Numerous round, granular particles of 3–47 μm in diameter with one nucleus were distributed around pneumostome and/or inside the mantle. The cells surrounding the pneumostome area, located 10 μm beneath the surface, tended to have smaller cell soma ranging from 3 to 25 μm in diameter, while cells located in other areas were distributed uniformly inside the mantle, with a larger diameter ranging from 12 to 47 μm. The histological examination using back-filing Lucifer Yellow staining of the right parietal nerve with the three dermal photoreceptor antibodies confirmed that these overlapping-stained structures were dermal photoreceptors in Lymnaea. PMID:27493502

  20. Osteopontin (OPN) Is an Important Protein to Mediate Improvements in the Biocompatibility of C Ion-Implanted Silicone Rubber

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yi-ming; Shen, Li-ru; Lei, Ze-yuan; Zhang, Zhi-qing; Cao, Cong; Fan, Dong-li

    2014-01-01

    Medical device implants are drawing increasing amounts of interest from modern medical practitioners. However, this attention is not evenly spread across all such devices; most of these implantable devices can cause adverse reactions such as inflammation, fibrosis, thrombosis, and infection. In this work, the biocompatibility of silicone rubber (SR) was improved through carbon (C) ion implantation. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM), atomic force microscopy (AFM), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), and X-ray diffraction (XRD) results confirmed that these newly generated carbon-implanted silicone rubbers (C-SRs) had large, irregular peaks and deep valleys on their surfaces. The water contact angle of the SR surface decreased significantly after C ion implantation. C ion implantation also changed the surface charge distribution, silicone oxygen rate, and chemical-element distribution of SR to favor cell attachment. The dermal fibroblasts cultured on the surface C-SR grew faster and showed more typical fibroblastic shapes. The expression levels of major adhesion proteins, including talin-1, zyxin, and vinculin, were significantly higher in dermal fibroblasts cultured on C-SR coated plates than in dermal fibroblasts cultured on SR. Those same dermal fibroblasts on C-SRs showed more pronounced adhesion and migration abilities. Osteopontin (OPN), a critical extracellular matrix (ECM) protein, was up-regulated and secreted from dermal fibroblasts cultured on C-SR. Matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9) activity was also increased. These cells were highly mobile and were able to adhere to surfaces, but these abilities were inhibited by the monoclonal antibody against OPN, or by shRNA-mediated MMP-9 knockdown. Together, these results suggest that C ion implantation significantly improves SR biocompatibility, and that OPN is important to promote cell adhesion to the C-SR surface. PMID:24911051

  1. Implantable arterial grafts from human fibroblasts and fibrin using a multi-graft pulsed flow-stretch bioreactor with noninvasive strength monitoring

    PubMed Central

    Syedain, Zeeshan H.; Meier, Lee A.; Bjork, Jason W.; Lee, Ann; Tranquillo, Robert T.

    2011-01-01

    Tissue-engineered arteries based on entrapment of human dermal fibroblasts in fibrin gel yield completely biological vascular grafts that possess circumferential alignment characteristic of native arteries and essential to their mechanical properties. A bioreactor was developed to condition six grafts in the same culture medium while being subjected to similar cyclic distension and transmural flow resulting from pulsed flow distributed among the graft lumens via a manifold. The lumenal pressure and circumferential stretch were noninvasively monitored and used to calculate stiffness in the range of 80-120 mmHg and then to successfully predict graft burst strength. The length of the graft was incrementally shortened during bioreactor culture to maintain circumferential alignment and achieve mechanical anisotropy comparable to native arteries. After 7-9 weeks of bioreactor culture, the fibrin-based grafts were extensively remodeled by the fibroblasts into circumferentially-aligned tubes of collagen and other extracellular matrix with burst pressures in the range of 1400-1600 mmHg and compliance comparable to native arteries. The tissue suture retention force was also suitable for implantation in the rat model and, with poly(lactic acid) sewing rings entrapped at both ends of the graft, also in the ovine model. The strength achieved with a biological scaffold in such a short duration is unprecedented for an engineered artery. PMID:20934214

  2. Surface modification of electrospun PLGA scaffold with collagen for bioengineered skin substitutes.

    PubMed

    Sadeghi, A R; Nokhasteh, S; Molavi, A M; Khorsand-Ghayeni, M; Naderi-Meshkin, H; Mahdizadeh, A

    2016-09-01

    In skin tissue engineering, surface feature of the scaffolds plays an important role in cell adhesion and proliferation. In this study, non-woven fibrous substrate based on poly (lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) (75/25) were hydrolyzed in various concentrations of NaOH (0.05N, 0.1N, 0.3N) to increase carboxyl and hydroxyl groups on the fiber surfaces. These functional groups were activated by EDC/NHS to create chemical bonding with collagen. To improve bioactivity, the activated substrates were coated with a collagen solution (2mg/ml) and cross-linking was carried out using the EDC/NHS in MES buffer. The effectiveness of the method was evaluated by contact angle measurements, porosimetry, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), tensile and degradation tests as well as in vitro cell attachment and cytotoxicity assays. Cell culture results of human dermal fibroblasts (HDF) and keratinocytes cell line (HaCat) revealed that the cells could attach to the scaffold. Further investigation with MTT assay showed that the cell proliferation of HaCat significantly increases with collagen coating. It seems that sufficient stability of collagen on the surface due to proper chemical bonding and cross-linking has increased the bioactivity of surface remarkably which can be promising for bioengineered skin applications. PMID:27207046

  3. Collagen-chitosan scaffold modified with Au and Ag nanoparticles: Synthesis and structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rubina, M. S.; Kamitov, E. E.; Zubavichus, Ya. V.; Peters, G. S.; Naumkin, A. V.; Suzer, S.; Vasil'kov, A. Yu.

    2016-03-01

    Nowadays, the dermal biomimetic scaffolds are widely used in regenerative medicine. Collagen-chitosan scaffold one of these materials possesses antibacterial activity, good compatibility with living tissues and has been already used as a wound-healing material. In this article, collagen-chitosan scaffolds modified with Ag and Au nanoparticles have been synthesized using novel method - the metal-vapor synthesis. The nanocomposite materials are characterized by XPS, TEM, SEM and synchrotron radiation-based X-ray techniques. According to XRD data, the mean size of the nanoparticles (NPs) is 10.5 nm and 20.2 nm in Au-Collagen-Chitosan (Au-CollCh) and Ag-Collagen-Chitosan (Ag-CollCh) scaffolds, respectively in fair agreement with the TEM data. SAXS analysis of the composites reveals an asymmetric size distribution peaked at 10 nm for Au-CollCh and 25 nm for Ag-CollCh indicative of particle's aggregation. According to SEM data, the metal-carrying scaffolds have layered structure and the nanoparticles are rather uniformly distributed on the surface material. XPS data indicate that the metallic nanoparticles are in their unoxidized/neutral states and dominantly stabilized within the chitosan-rich domains.

  4. Enhanced stabilization of collagen by furfural.

    PubMed

    Lakra, Rachita; Kiran, Manikantan Syamala; Usha, Ramamoorthy; Mohan, Ranganathan; Sundaresan, Raja; Korrapati, Purna Sai

    2014-04-01

    Furfural (2-furancarboxaldehyde), a product derived from plant pentosans, has been investigated for its interaction with collagen. Introduction of furfural during fibril formation enhanced the thermal and mechanical stability of collagen. Collagen films treated with furfural exhibited higher denaturation temperature (Td) (p<0.04) and showed a 3-fold increase in Young's modulus (p<0.04) at higher concentration. Furfural and furfural treated collagen films did not have any cytotoxic effect. Rheological characterization showed an increase in shear stress and shear viscosity with increasing shear rate for treated collagen. Circular dichroism (CD) studies indicated that the furfural did not have any impact on triple helical structure of collagen. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) of furfural treated collagen exhibited small sized porous structure in comparison with untreated collagen. Thus this study provides an alternate ecologically safe crosslinking agent for improving the stability of collagen for biomedical and industrial applications. PMID:24468046

  5. Defining the identity of mouse embryonic dermal fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Budnick, Isadore; Hamburg-Shields, Emily; Chen, Demeng; Torre, Eduardo; Jarrell, Andrew; Akhtar-Zaidi, Batool; Cordovan, Olivia; Spitale, Rob C; Scacheri, Peter; Atit, Radhika P

    2016-08-01

    Embryonic dermal fibroblasts in the skin have the exceptional ability to initiate hair follicle morphogenesis and contribute to scarless wound healing. Activation of the Wnt signaling pathway is critical for dermal fibroblast fate selection and hair follicle induction. In humans, mutations in Wnt pathway components and target genes lead to congenital focal dermal hypoplasias with diminished hair. The gene expression signature of embryonic dermal fibroblasts during differentiation and its dependence on Wnt signaling is unknown. Here we applied Shannon entropy analysis to identify the gene expression signature of mouse embryonic dermal fibroblasts. We used available human DNase-seq and histone modification ChiP-seq data on various cell-types to demonstrate that genes in the fibroblast cell identity signature can be epigenetically repressed in other cell-types. We found a subset of the signature genes whose expression is dependent on Wnt/β-catenin activity in vivo. With our approach, we have defined and validated a statistically derived gene expression signature that may mediate dermal fibroblast identity and function in development and disease. genesis 54:415-430, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27265328

  6. Safety and efficacy of composite collagen-silver nanoparticle hydrogels as tissue engineering scaffolds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alarcon, Emilio I.; Udekwu, Klas I.; Noel, Christopher W.; Gagnon, Luke B.-P.; Taylor, Patrick K.; Vulesevic, Branka; Simpson, Madeline J.; Gkotzis, Spyridon; Islam, M. Mirazul; Lee, Chyan-Jang; Richter-Dahlfors, Agneta; Mah, Thien-Fah; Suuronen, Erik J.; Scaiano, Juan C.; Griffith, May

    2015-11-01

    The increasing number of multidrug resistant bacteria has revitalized interest in seeking alternative sources for controlling bacterial infection. Silver nanoparticles (AgNPs), are amongst the most promising candidates due to their wide microbial spectrum of action. In this work, we report on the safety and efficacy of the incorporation of collagen coated AgNPs into collagen hydrogels for tissue engineering. The resulting hybrid materials at [AgNPs] < 0.4 μM retained the mechanical properties and biocompatibility for primary human skin fibroblasts and keratinocytes of collagen hydrogels; they also displayed remarkable anti-infective properties against S. aureus, S. epidermidis, E. coli and P. aeruginosa at considerably lower concentrations than silver nitrate. Further, subcutaneous implants of materials containing 0.2 μM AgNPs in mice showed a reduction in the levels of IL-6 and other inflammation markers (CCL24, sTNFR-2, and TIMP1). Finally, an analysis of silver contents in implanted mice showed that silver accumulation primarily occurred within the tissue surrounding the implant.The increasing number of multidrug resistant bacteria has revitalized interest in seeking alternative sources for controlling bacterial infection. Silver nanoparticles (AgNPs), are amongst the most promising candidates due to their wide microbial spectrum of action. In this work, we report on the safety and efficacy of the incorporation of collagen coated AgNPs into collagen hydrogels for tissue engineering. The resulting hybrid materials at [AgNPs] < 0.4 μM retained the mechanical properties and biocompatibility for primary human skin fibroblasts and keratinocytes of collagen hydrogels; they also displayed remarkable anti-infective properties against S. aureus, S. epidermidis, E. coli and P. aeruginosa at considerably lower concentrations than silver nitrate. Further, subcutaneous implants of materials containing 0.2 μM AgNPs in mice showed a reduction in the levels of IL-6 and

  7. Collagen cross-linking and resorption: effect of glutaraldehyde concentration.

    PubMed

    Roe, S C; Milthorpe, B K; Schindhelm, K

    1990-12-01

    Cross-linked collagen bioprostheses usually are designed to be inert and nonresorbable, resulting in fatigue and wear failure in high-stress environments. Eventual replacement of the implant, although minimizing strength loss during resorption, would result in a graft with reparative ability. Kangaroo tail tendon (KTT) partially cross-linked with glutaraldehyde (GA) was evaluated in vitro for resistance to bacterial collagenase digestion and in vivo for biocompatibility and resorbability in an intramuscular implant assay. Cross-linking was quantified by thermal denaturation studies. Incomplete cross-linking was achieved with concentrations of GA less than 0.1% (w/v). KTT cross-linked in greater than or equal to 0.05% GA were collagenase resistant being incompletely digested after 240 h. Cross-linking of KTT with low concentrations of GA resulted in partial collagenase resistance and slowed resorption. PMID:2126427

  8. Under-dermal emulator of vascular identification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Landa, Joseph; Blake, Robert; Rich, Alex; Szu, Harold

    2012-06-01

    The goal of this paper and research effort is to develop a simple and clear apparatus and approach to quantify the effectiveness of sensor systems as it relates to their ability to penetrate camouflage and resolve skin depth. Over the last decade, several attempts have been made to leverage advances in Infrared (IR) imaging, made by the military, into medical sensing [1]. Several promising technologies have been evaluated and thus far determined to be lacking when compared to the current standards of care based on x-ray imaging [2]. While progress has been made this general class of technology has not generated wide spread interest from the medical community. This lack of interest is discouraging, especially when considering the great potential for good that would result in successfully demonstrating a truly passive tumor detection system based on thermal signatures. Recently, this team participated as part of a larger group in the development and testing of a novel class of algorithms using images from two separate IR spectra. This area of spectral fusing algorithms is called the Single Pixel-Blind Source Separation (SP-BSS). While the goal of experiment is not new, our results showed this approach provided potential improvements over more traditional thermography, particularly in the area of overcoming environmental noise. These promising results have motivated us to develop a method for running controlled experiments so that the equipment and algorithms can be optimized and the significant engineering challenges of frame registration, data standardization, and sensor optimization for wellness screening can be accomplished. Conducting these efforts using data from human subjects is both impractical and unwarranted at this time. We have developed a physics-physiological under-dermal model of internal vascular circulation that approximates not only a healthy human body (angiogenesis effect) but also a human body developing a tumor (neo-angiogenesis effect). This

  9. Silk electrogel coatings for titanium dental implants.

    PubMed

    Elia, Roberto; Michelson, Courtney D; Perera, Austin L; Harsono, Masly; Leisk, Gray G; Kugel, Gerard; Kaplan, David L

    2015-04-01

    The aim of this study was to develop biocompatible, biodegradable dental implant coatings capable of withstanding the mechanical stresses imparted during implant placement. Two techniques were developed to deposit uniform silk fibroin protein coatings onto dental implants. Two novel coating techniques were implemented to coat titanium shims, studs, and implants. One technique involved electrodeposition of the silk directly onto the titanium substrates. The second technique consisted of melting electrogels and dispensing the melted gels onto the titanium to form the coatings. Both techniques were tested for coating reproducibility using a stylus profilometer and a dial thickness gauge. The mechanical strength of adhered titanium studs was assessed using a universal mechanical testing machine. Uniform, controllable coatings were obtained from both the electrodeposition and melted electrogel coating techniques, tunable from 35 to 1654 µm thick under the conditions studied, and able to withstand delamination during implantation into implant socket mimics. Mechanical testing revealed that the adhesive strength of electrogel coatings, 0.369 ± 0.09 MPa, rivaled other biologically derived coating systems such as collagen, hydroxyapatite, and chitosan (0.07-4.83 MPa). These novel silk-based techniques offer a unique approach to the deposition of safe, simple, mechanically robust, biocompatible, and degradable implant coatings. PMID:25425563

  10. Human acellular dermal matrix for repair of abdominal wall defects: review of clinical experience and experimental data.

    PubMed

    Holton, Luther H; Kim, Daniel; Silverman, Ronald P; Rodriguez, Eduardo D; Singh, Navin; Goldberg, Nelson H

    2005-01-01

    The use of prosthetic mesh for the tension-free repair of incisional hernias has been shown to be more effective than primary suture repair. Unfortunately, prosthetic materials can be a suboptimal choice in a variety of clinical scenarios. In general, prosthetic materials should not be implanted into sites with known contamination or infection because they lack an endogenous vascular network and are thus incapable of clearing bacteria. This is of particular relevance to the repair of recurrent hernias, which are often refractory to repair because of indolent bacterial colonization that weakens the site and retards appropriate healing. Although fascia lata grafts and muscle flaps can be employed for tension-free hernia repairs, they carry the potential for significant donor site morbidity. Recently, a growing number of clinicians have used human acellular dermal matrix as a graft material for the tension-free repair of ventral hernias. This material has been shown to become revascularized in both animal and human subjects. Once repopulated with a vascular network, this graft material is theoretically capable of clearing bacteria, a property not found in prosthetic graft materials. Unlike autologous materials such as fascial grafts and muscle flaps, acellular dermal matrix can be used without subjecting the patient to additional morbidity in the form of donor site complications. This article presents a thorough review of the current literature, describing the properties of human acellular dermal matrix and discussing both animal and human studies of its clinical performance. In addition to the review of previously published clinical experiences, we discuss our own preliminary results with the use of acellular dermal matrix for ventral hernia repair in 46 patients. PMID:16218902

  11. Configurational effects of collagen/ALP coatings on enzyme immobilization and surface mineralization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bosco, R.; Leeuwenburgh, S. C. G.; Jansen, J. A.; van den Beucken, J. J. J. P.

    2014-08-01

    The ultimate goal for surface modifications in bone implants is to achieve biologically active surface able to control and trigger specific tissue response. In this study was evaluated the effects of organic compound, derived from extracellular matrix, involved in tissue mineralization. Alkaline phosphatase (ALP) plays a fundamental role in bone mineralization concurrently with collagen, the main organic components of bones. Electrospray deposition (ESD) was used to coat titanium disks with ALP and collagen at room temperature. To verify the synergistic role of ALP and collagen different conformations of coatings (mixed and layered) were obtained and their mineralization capacity was tested in vitro. The mineralization tests indicated the fundamental role of collagen to increase ALP coating retention. Analyses indicated that the coating conformation has a role; in fact the mixed group showed improved ALP retention, enzymatic activity and unique mineralized surface morphology. ESD demonstrated to be a successful method to deposit organic molecules preserving their properties as indicated by the in vitro results. These findings proved the synergistic effect of ALP and collagen in inducing mineralization offering an intriguing coating constituent for medical device that aim to trigger surface mineralization such as bone implants.

  12. Collagen type I-coating of Ti6Al4V promotes adhesion of osteoblasts.

    PubMed

    Geissler, U; Hempel, U; Wolf, C; Scharnweber, D; Worch, H; Wenzel, K

    2000-09-15

    The initial contact of osteoblasts with implant surfaces is an important event for osseointegration of implants. Osseointegration of Ti6Al4V may be improved by precoating of its surface with collagen type I. In this study, the adhesion of rat calvarial osteoblasts to uncoated and collagen type I-coated titanium alloy was investigated over a period of 24 h. Collagen type I-coating accelerates initial adhesion of osteoblasts in the presence of fetal calf serum. One hour after plating, no differences in the percentage of adherent cells between the surfaces investigated were found. Adhesion of osteoblasts to uncoated surfaces was reduced by the GRGDSP peptide by about 70%, whereas adhesion to collagen type I-coated surfaces remained unaffected by treatment of the cells with the peptide. Cell adhesion to coated materials was reduced by about 80% by anti-integrin beta1 antibody. The integrin beta1 antibody did not influence the adhesion to uncoated titanium alloy. The results suggest that osteoblasts adhere to collagen type I-coated materials via integrin beta1 but not by interacting with RGD peptides, whereas adhesion to uncoated titanium alloy is mediated by RGD sequences but not via integrin beta1. Fibronectin does not seem to be involved in the adhesion of osteoblasts to either coated or uncoated titanium alloy. PMID:10880125

  13. 3D Printing of Composite Calcium Phosphate and Collagen Scaffolds for Bone Regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Inzana, Jason A.; Olvera, Diana; Fuller, Seth M.; Kelly, James P.; Graeve, Olivia A.; Schwarz, Edward M.; Kates, Stephen L.; Awad, Hani A.

    2014-01-01

    Low temperature 3D printing of calcium phosphate scaffolds holds great promise for fabricating synthetic bone graft substitutes with enhanced performance over traditional techniques. Many design parameters, such as the binder solution properties, have yet to be optimized to ensure maximal biocompatibility and osteoconductivity with sufficient mechanical properties. This study tailored the phosphoric acid-based binder solution concentration to 8.75 wt% to maximize cytocompatibility and mechanical strength, with a supplementation of Tween 80 to improve printing. To further enhance the formulation, collagen was dissolved into the binder solution to fabricate collagen-calcium phosphate composites. Reducing the viscosity and surface tension through a physiologic heat treatment and Tween 80, respectively, enabled reliable thermal inkjet printing of the collagen solutions. Supplementing the binder solution with 1–2 wt% collagen significantly improved maximum flexural strength and cell viability. To assess the bone healing performance, we implanted 3D printed scaffolds into a critically sized murine femoral defect for 9 weeks. The implants were confirmed to be osteoconductive, with new bone growth incorporating the degrading scaffold materials. In conclusion, this study demonstrates optimization of material parameters for 3D printed calcium phosphate scaffolds and enhancement of material properties by volumetric collagen incorporation via inkjet printing. PMID:24529628

  14. Comparative evaluation of a biomimic collagen/hydroxyapatite/β-tricaleium phosphate scaffold in alveolar ridge preservation with Bio-Oss Collagen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Tong; Li, Qing; Zhang, Gui-feng; Zhou, Gang; Yu, Xin; Zhang, Jing; Wang, Xiu-mei; Tang, Zhi-hui

    2016-04-01

    Bone scaffolds are critical in current implant and periodontal regeneration approaches. In this study, we prepared a novel composite type-I collagen and hydroxyapatite (HA)/β-tricaleium phosphate (TCP) scaffold (CHTS) by incorporating type-I collagen and bovine calcined bone granules, prepared as a mixture of 50% HA and 50% TCP, by freeze drying. We then characterized the CHTS and determined its cytotoxic effects. Additionally, ridge preservation experiments were carried out to evaluate the clinical effects of the CHTS. The results demonstrated that the composite scaffolds had good surface morphology and no cytotoxicity. Additionally, an in vivo experiment in an animal model showed that the CHTS performed equally as well as Bio-Oss Collagen, a widely used bone graft in ridge preservation. These findings revealed that the CHTS, which contained natural constituents of bone, could be used as a scaffold for bone regeneration and clinical use.

  15. Comparative evaluation of a biomimic collagen/hydroxyapatite/β-tricaleium phosphate scaffold in alveolar ridge preservation with Bio-Oss Collagen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Tong; Li, Qing; Zhang, Gui-feng; Zhou, Gang; Yu, Xin; Zhang, Jing; Wang, Xiu-mei; Tang, Zhi-hui

    2016-06-01

    Bone scaffolds are critical in current implant and periodontal regeneration approaches. In this study, we prepared a novel composite type-I collagen and hydroxyapatite (HA)/β-tricaleium phosphate (TCP) scaffold (CHTS) by incorporating type-I collagen and bovine calcined bone granules, prepared as a mixture of 50% HA and 50% TCP, by freeze drying. We then characterized the CHTS and determined its cytotoxic effects. Additionally, ridge preservation experiments were carried out to evaluate the clinical effects of the CHTS. The results demonstrated that the composite scaffolds had good surface morphology and no cytotoxicity. Additionally, an in vivo experiment in an animal model showed that the CHTS performed equally as well as Bio-Oss Collagen, a widely used bone graft in ridge preservation. These findings revealed that the CHTS, which contained natural constituents of bone, could be used as a scaffold for bone regeneration and clinical use.

  16. Biomaterial and antibiotic strategies for peri-implantitis: a review.

    PubMed

    Norowski, P Andrew; Bumgardner, Joel D

    2009-02-01

    Dental implants have 89% plus survival rates at 10-15 years, but peri-implantitis or dental implant infections may be as high as 14%. Peri-implantitis can limit clinical success and impose health and financial burdens to patients and health providers. The pathogenic species associated with periodontitis (e.g., Fusobacterium ssp, A. actinomycetemcomitans, P. gingivalis) are also associated with peri-implantitis. Incidence of peri-implantitis is highest within the first 12 months after implantation, and is higher in patients who smoke or have poor oral health as well as with calcium-phosphate-coated or surface-roughened implants. Biomaterial therapies using fibers, gels, and beads to deliver antibiotics have been used in the treatment of Peri-implantitis though clinical efficacy is not well documented. Guided tissue regeneration membranes (e.g., collagen, poly-lactic/glycolic acid, chitosan, ePTFE) loaded with antimicrobials have shown success in reosseointegrating infected implants in animal models but have not been proven in humans. Experimental approaches include the development of anti-bioadhesion coatings, coating surfaces with antimicrobial agents (e.g., vancomycin, Ag, Zn) or antimicrobial releasing coatings (e.g., calcium phosphate, polylactic acid, chitosan). Future strategies include the development of surfaces that become antibacterial in response to infection, and improvements in the permucosal seal. Research is still needed to identify strategies to prevent bacterial attachment and enhance normal cell/tissue attachment to implant surfaces. PMID:18698626

  17. Corneal epithelialisation on surface-modified hydrogel implants: artificial cornea.

    PubMed

    Ma, Aihua; Zhao, Bojun; Bentley, Adam J; Brahma, Arun; MacNeil, Sheila; Martin, Francis L; Rimmer, Stephen; Fullwood, Nigel J

    2011-03-01

    The objective was to investigate corneal re-epithelialisation of surface-modified polymethacrylate hydrogel implants in order to evaluate them as potential materials for an artificial cornea. Polymethacrylate hydrogels were modified with amines and then coated with different extracellular matrix proteins (collagen I, IV, laminin and fibronectin). The modified hydrogels were surgically implanted into bovine corneas maintained in a 3-D culture system for 5 days. The epithelial growth across the implant surface was evaluated using fluorescent, light and electron microscopy. Full epithelialisation was achieved on 1,4-diaminobutane-modified hydrogels after coating with collagen IV. Hydrogels modified with 1,4-diaminobutane but without further coating only showed partial re-epithelialisation. Hydrogels modified with other amines (1,2-diaminoethane or 1,3-diaminopropane) showed only partial re-epithelialisation; further coating with extracellular matrix proteins improved epithelialisation of these surfaces but did not result in complete re-epithelialisation. Evaluation of the corneas implanted with the 1,4-diaminobutane-modified hydrogels coated with collagen IV showed that the artificial corneas remain clear, integrate well and become covered by a healthy stratified epithelium. In conclusion the 1,4-diaminobutane surface-modified hydrogel coated with collagen IV supported the growth of a stable stratified epithelium. With further refinement this hydrogel has the potential to be used clinically for an artificial cornea. PMID:21287242

  18. Biomimetic implant coatings.

    PubMed

    Eisenbarth, E; Velten, D; Breme, J

    2007-02-01

    Biomaterials and tissue engineering technologies are becoming increasingly important in biomedical practice, particularly as the population ages. Cellular responses depend on topographical properties of the biomaterial at the nanometer scale. Structures on biomaterial surfaces are used as powerful tools to influence or even control interactions between implants and the biological system [; ]. The influence of nanometer sized surface structures on osteoblastlike cell interactions was tested with niobium oxide coatings on polished titanium slices (cp-Ti grade 2). The aim of the study was to investigate the influence of nanoscopic surface structures on osteoblast interactions in order to support collagen I production and cell adhesion. The coatings were done by means of the sol-gel process. The surface structure was adjusted by annealing of the metaloxide ceramic coatings due to temperature depended crystal growth. The applied annealing temperatures were 450, 550 and 700 degrees C for 1 h, corresponding to Ra-numbers of 7, 15 and 40 nm. The surfaces were characterized by means of AFM, DTA/TG, diffractometry and white light interferometry. The cell reactions were investigated concerning adhesion kinetics, migration, spreading, cell adhesion, and collagen I synthesis. The smooth surface (Ra=7 nm) resulted in the fastest cell anchorage and cell migration. The closest cell adhesion was reached with the surface structure of Ra=15 nm. The roughest surface (Ra=40 nm) impedes the cell migration as well as a proper spreading of the cells. The best results concerning cell adhesion and spreading was reached with an intermediate surface roughness of Ra=15 nm of the niobium oxide coating on cp-titanium slices. PMID:16828342

  19. Vesicular carriers for dermal drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Sinico, Chiara; Fadda, Anna Maria

    2009-08-01

    The skin can offer several advantages as a route of drug administration although its barrier nature makes it difficult for most drugs to penetrate into and permeate through it. During the past decades there has been a lot of interest in lipid vesicles as a tool to improve drug topical delivery. Vesicular systems such as liposomes, niosomes, ethosomes and elastic, deformable vesicles provide an alternative for improved skin drug delivery. The function of vesicles as topical delivery systems is controversial with variable effects being reported in relation to the type of vesicles and their composition. In fact, vesicles can act as drug carriers controlling active release; they can provide a localized depot in the skin for dermally active compounds and enhance transdermal drug delivery. A wide variety of lipids and surfactants can be used to prepare vesicles, which are commonly composed of phospholipids (liposomes) or non-ionic surfactants (niosomes). Vesicle composition and preparation method influence their physicochemical properties (size, charge, lamellarity, thermodynamic state, deformability) and therefore their efficacy as drug delivery systems. A review of vesicle value in localizing drugs within the skin at the site of action will be provided with emphasis on their potential mechanism of action. PMID:19569979

  20. ABCB5 identifies immunoregulatory dermal cells

    PubMed Central

    Schatton, Tobias; Yang, Jun; Kleffel, Sonja; Uehara, Mayuko; Barthel, Steven R.; Schlapbach, Christoph; Zhan, Qian; Dudeney, Stephen; Mueller, Hansgeorg; Lee, Nayoung; de Vries, Juliane C.; Meier, Barbara; Vander Beken, Seppe; Kluth, Mark A.; Ganss, Christoph; Sharpe, Arlene H.; Waaga-Gasser, Ana Maria; Sayegh, Mohamed H.; Abdi, Reza; Scharffetter-Kochanek, Karin; Murphy, George F.; Kupper, Thomas S.; Frank, Natasha Y.; Frank, Markus H.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Cell-based strategies represent a new frontier in the treatment of immune-mediated disorders. However, the paucity of markers for isolation of molecularly-defined immunomodulatory cell populations poses a barrier to this field. Here we show that ATP-binding cassette member B5 (ABCB5) identifies dermal immunoregulatory cells (DIRCs) capable of exerting therapeutic immunoregulatory functions through engagement of programmed cell death 1 (PD-1). Purified Abcb5+ DIRCs suppressed T-cell proliferation, evaded immune rejection, homed to recipient immune tissues and induced Tregs in vivo. In fully MHC-mismatched cardiac allotransplantation models, allogeneic DIRCs significantly prolonged allograft survival. Blockade of DIRC-expressed PD-1 reversed the inhibitory effects of DIRCs on T-cell activation, inhibited DIRC-dependent Treg induction, and attenuated DIRC-induced prolongation of cardiac allograft survival, indicating that DIRC immunoregulatory function is mediated, at least in part, through PD-1. Our results identify ABCB5+ DIRCs as a distinct immunoregulatory cell population and suggest promising roles of this expandable cell subset in cellular immunotherapy. PMID:26321644

  1. Acellular Dermal Matrix in Rotator Cuff Surgery.

    PubMed

    Cooper, Joseph; Mirzayan, Raffy

    2016-01-01

    The success of rotator cuff repair (RCR) surgery can be measured clinically (validated outcome scores, range of motion) as well as structurally (re-tear rates using imaging studies). Regardless of repair type or technique, most studies have shown that patients do well clinically. However, multiple studies have also shown that structurally, the failure rate can be very high. A variety of factors, including poor tendon quality, age over 63 years, smoking, advanced fatty infiltration into the muscle, and the inability of the tendon to heal to bone, have been implicated as the cause of the high re-tear rate in RCRs. The suture-tendon interface is felt to be the weakest link in the RCR construct, and suture pullout through the tendon is believed to be the most common method of failure. This review of the published literature seeks to determine if there is support for augmentation of RCR with acellular dermal matrices to strengthen the suture-tendon interface and reduce the re-tear rate. PMID:27552454

  2. Human dermal fibroblasts in psychiatry research.

    PubMed

    Kálmán, S; Garbett, K A; Janka, Z; Mirnics, K

    2016-04-21

    In order to decipher the disease etiology, progression and treatment of multifactorial human brain diseases we utilize a host of different experimental models. Recently, patient-derived human dermal fibroblast (HDF) cultures have re-emerged as promising in vitro functional system for examining various cellular, molecular, metabolic and (patho)physiological states and traits of psychiatric disorders. HDF studies serve as a powerful complement to postmortem and animal studies, and often appear to be informative about the altered homeostasis in neural tissue. Studies of HDFs from patients with schizophrenia (SZ), depression, bipolar disorder (BD), autism, attention deficit and hyperactivity disorder and other psychiatric disorders have significantly advanced our understanding of these devastating diseases. These reports unequivocally prove that signal transduction, redox homeostasis, circadian rhythms and gene*environment (G*E) interactions are all amenable for assessment by the HDF model. Furthermore, the reported findings suggest that this underutilized patient biomaterial, combined with modern molecular biology techniques, may have both diagnostic and prognostic value, including prediction of response to therapeutic agents. PMID:26855193

  3. Application of the Skin and Bone Integrated Pylon (SBIP) with titanium oxide nanotubes and seeded with dermal fibroblasts

    PubMed Central

    Shevtsov, Maxim A.; Yudintceva, Natalia M.; Blinova, Miralda I.; Pinaev, Grigoriy P.; Galibin, Oleg V.; Potokin, Igor L.; Popat, Ketul C.; Pitkin, Mark R.

    2014-01-01

    Study Design The feasibility and safety of in bone implantation of the skin and bone integrated pylons (SBIP) with nanotubes was investigated in vitro and in vivo in the animal model. Background Direct Direct skeletal attachment of limb prostheses is associated with high rate of transcutaneous infection and loosening of the fixture in the medullary canal prompting for careful assessment of various means for enhancing the skin-device and bone-device interface. The SBIP system constitutes a technological platform for different modifications being evaluated previously. Objectives The current study assessed the combination of nano treatment SBIP with its pre seeding with dermal fibroblasts. We hypothesized that this combination will enhance cell interaction with SBIP compared to nano treatment and the fibroblast seeding when done separately. Methods TiO2 nanotubes were fabricated on the SBIP, and the fibroblasts taken from rabbit's skin were cultured on the pylons before implantation. Results The in vitro experiments demonstrated higher cellular density in the samples with a nanotubular surface than in the non modified pylons used as control. There were no postoperative complications in any of the animals during the 6 month observation period. Subsequent SEM of the pylon extracted from the rabbit's femur showed the stable contact between the pylon and soft tissues in comparison to control samples where the patchy fibrovascular ingrowth was detected. Conclusions The promising results prompt further investigation of the integrative properties of the nanotextured SBIP system seeded with dermal fibroblasts and its optimization for clinical application. PMID:25249382

  4. Implantable electrode for recording nerve signals in awake animals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ninomiya, I.; Yonezawa, Y.; Wilson, M. F.

    1976-01-01

    An implantable electrode assembly consisting of collagen and metallic electrodes was constructed to measure simultaneously neural signals from the intact nerve and bioelectrical noises in awake animals. Mechanical artifacts, due to bodily movement, were negligibly small. The impedance of the collagen electrodes, measured in awake cats 6-7 days after implantation surgery, ranged from 39.8-11.5 k ohms at a frequency range of 20-5 kHz. Aortic nerve activity and renal nerve activity, measured in awake conditions using the collagen electrode, showed grouped activity synchronous with the cardiac cycle. Results indicate that most of the renal nerve activity was from postganglionic sympathetic fibers and was inhibited by the baroceptor reflex in the same cardiac cycle.

  5. Collagen and Elastic Fiber Content Correlation Analysis between Horizontal and Vertical Orientations of Skin Samples of Human Body

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Naveen; Kumar, Pramod; Nayak Badagabettu, Satheesha; Kudva, Ranjini; Surendran, Sudarshan; Adiga, Murali

    2015-01-01

    Background. Unequal distribution of dermal collagen and elastic fibers in different orientations of skin is reported to be one of the multifocal causes of scar related complications. Present study is to understand the correlation pattern between collagen in horizontal (CH) and in vertical (CV) directions as well as that of elastic in horizontal (EH) and vertical (EV) directions. Materials and Method. A total of 320 skin samples were collected in two orientations from suprascapular, anterior chest, lateral chest, anterior abdominal wall, and inguinal regions of 32 human cadavers. Spearman correlation coefficient (r) was calculated between the variables (CH, CV, EH, and EV). Results. Significant positive correlation between CH and CV, and between EH and EV observed in all 5 areas tested. A negative correlation between CV and EV at suprascapular, lateral chest, and inguinal regions and negative correlation between CH and EH at anterior chest and anterior abdominal wall have been identified. Conclusion. Knowledge of asymmetric content of dermal collagen and elastic fibers together with the varied strength and degree of association in the given area provides guidelines to the dermatologists and aesthetic surgeons in placing elective incisions in the direction maximally utilizing the anatomical facts for aesthetically pleasing result. PMID:26472957

  6. Collagen and Elastic Fiber Content Correlation Analysis between Horizontal and Vertical Orientations of Skin Samples of Human Body.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Naveen; Kumar, Pramod; Nayak Badagabettu, Satheesha; Kudva, Ranjini; Surendran, Sudarshan; Adiga, Murali

    2015-01-01

    Background. Unequal distribution of dermal collagen and elastic fibers in different orientations of skin is reported to be one of the multifocal causes of scar related complications. Present study is to understand the correlation pattern between collagen in horizontal (CH) and in vertical (CV) directions as well as that of elastic in horizontal (EH) and vertical (EV) directions. Materials and Method. A total of 320 skin samples were collected in two orientations from suprascapular, anterior chest, lateral chest, anterior abdominal wall, and inguinal regions of 32 human cadavers. Spearman correlation coefficient (r) was calculated between the variables (CH, CV, EH, and EV). Results. Significant positive correlation between CH and CV, and between EH and EV observed in all 5 areas tested. A negative correlation between CV and EV at suprascapular, lateral chest, and inguinal regions and negative correlation between CH and EH at anterior chest and anterior abdominal wall have been identified. Conclusion. Knowledge of asymmetric content of dermal collagen and elastic fibers together with the varied strength and degree of association in the given area provides guidelines to the dermatologists and aesthetic surgeons in placing elective incisions in the direction maximally utilizing the anatomical facts for aesthetically pleasing result. PMID:26472957

  7. Use of acellular dermal replacement in reconstruction of nonhealing lower extremity wounds.

    PubMed

    Kahn, Steven Alexander; Beers, Ryan J; Lentz, Christopher W

    2011-01-01

    Dermal templates are well established in the treatment of burn wounds and acute nonburn wounds. However, the literature regarding their use for reconstruction of chronic, nonhealing wounds is limited. This study describes a series of patients with chronic wounds reconstructed with a commercially available bilayer, acellular dermal replacement (ADR) containing a collagen-glycosaminoglycan dermal template and a silicone outer layer. A retrospective review was performed of 10 patients treated for chronic wounds with ADR and negative pressure dressing followed by split-thickness skin graft between July 2006 and January 2009. Data collected included age, gender, comorbidities, medications, wound type or location, wound size, the number of applications of ADR, the amount of ADR applied (in square centimeter), the amount of time between ADR placement and grafting, complications, need for reoperation, and percentage of graft take after 5 and 14 days. The mean age of study subjects was 44 years. All patients in the study had comorbidities that interfere with wound healing and were treated for lower extremity wounds (four to legs, five to ankles, and one to foot). The wounds had a variety of causative factors including venostasis ulcers (6, 60%), trauma in diabetic patients (2, 20%), brown recluse bite (1, 10%), and a wound caused from purpura fulminans (1, 10%). The average wound size and amount of ADR applied was 162±182 cm². Each patient required only one application of ADR. The average time between ADR placement and skin grafting was 36.5 days. The mean percentage of graft take at 5 days was 89.55%, 14 days was 90%, and 21 days was 87.3%. Only two patients required regrafting, and one of these grafts was lost because of patient noncompliance. ADR can be used successfully in the treatment of chronic wounds. ADR provides direct wound coverage and can conform to a variety of anatomical sites. This study demonstrates that the use of ADR in treating chronic wounds results

  8. Collagen VI related muscle disorders

    PubMed Central

    Lampe, A; Bushby, K

    2005-01-01

    Mutations in the genes encoding collagen VI (COL6A1, COL6A2, and COL6A3) cause Bethlem myopathy (BM) and Ullrich congenital muscular dystrophy (UCMD), two conditions which were previously believed to be completely separate entities. BM is a relatively mild dominantly inherited disorder characterised by proximal weakness and distal joint contractures. UCMD was originally described as an autosomal recessive condition causing severe muscle weakness with proximal joint contractures and distal hyperlaxity. Here we review the clinical phenotypes of BM and UCMD and their diagnosis and management, and provide an overview of the current knowledge of the pathogenesis of collagen VI related disorders. PMID:16141002

  9. Study of chemical properties and evaluation of collagen in mantle, epidermal connective tissue and tentacle of Indian Squid, Loligo duvauceli Orbigny.

    PubMed

    Raman, Maya; Mathew, Saleena

    2014-08-01

    The chemical composition and evaluation of Indian squid (Loligo duvauceli) mantle, epidermal connective tissue and tentacle is investigated in this current study. It is observed that squid mantle contains 22.2% total protein; 63.5% of the total protein is myofibrillar protein. The unique property of squid myofibrillar protein is its water solubility. Squid mantle contains 12.0% total collagen. Epidermal connective tissue has highest amounts of total collagen (17.8%). SDS-PAGE of total collagen identified high molecular weight α-, β- and γ- sub-chains. Amino acid profile analysis indicates that mantle and tentacle contain essential amino acids. Arginine forms a major portion of mantle collagen (272.5 g/100 g N). Isoleucine, glutamic acid and lysine are other amino acids that are found in significantly high amounts in the mantle. Sulphur containing cystine is deficit in mantle collagen. Papain digest of mantle and epidermal connective tissue is rich in uronic acid, while papain digest, collagenase digest and urea digest of epidermal connective tissue has significant amounts of sialic acid (25.2, 33.2 and 99.8 μmol /100 g, respectively). PAS staining of papain digest, collagenase digest and urea digest also identify the association of hexoses with low molecular weight collagen fragments. Histochemical sectioning also emphasized the localized distribution of collagen in epidermal and dermal region and very sparse fibres traverse the myotome bundles. PMID:25114341

  10. The IκB kinase inhibitor ACHP strongly attenuates TGFβ1-induced myofibroblast formation and collagen synthesis.

    PubMed

    Mia, Masum M; Bank, Ruud A

    2015-12-01

    Excessive accumulation of a collagen-rich extracellular matrix (ECM) by myofibroblasts is a characteristic feature of fibrosis, a pathological state leading to serious organ dysfunction. Transforming growth factor beta1 (TGFβ1) is a strong inducer of myofibroblast formation and subsequent collagen production. Currently, there are no remedies for the treatment of fibrosis. Activation of the nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB) pathway by phosphorylating IκB with the enzyme IκB kinase (IKK) plays a major role in the induction of fibrosis. ACHP {2-Amino-6-[2-(cyclopropylmethoxy)-6-hydroxyphenyl]-4-(4-piperidinyl)-3 pyridinecarbonitrile}, a selective inhibitor of IKK, prohibits the activation of the NF-κB pathway. It is not known whether ACHP has potential anti-fibrotic properties. Using adult human dermal and lung fibroblasts we have investigated whether ACHP has the ability to inhibit the TGFβ1-induced transition of fibroblasts into myofibroblasts and its excessive synthesis of ECM. The presence of ACHP strongly suppressed the induction of the myofibroblast markers alpha-smooth muscle actin (αSMA) and SM22α, as well as the deposition of the ECM components collagen type I and fibronectin. Furthermore, post-treatment with ACHP partly reversed the expression of αSMA and collagen type I production. Finally, ACHP suppressed the expression of the three collagen-modifying enzymes lysyl hydroxylase (PLOD1, PLOD2 and PLOD3) in dermal fibroblasts, but did not do so in lung fibroblasts. We conclude that the IKK inhibitor ACHP has potent antifibrotic properties, and that the NF-κB pathway plays an important role in myofibroblast biology. PMID:26337045

  11. Asphalt fume dermal carcinogenicity potential: I. dermal carcinogenicity evaluation of asphalt (bitumen) fume condensates.

    PubMed

    Clark, Charles R; Burnett, Donald M; Parker, Craig M; Arp, Earl W; Swanson, Mark S; Minsavage, Gary D; Kriech, Anthony J; Osborn, Linda V; Freeman, James J; Barter, Robert A; Newton, Paul E; Beazley, Shelley L; Stewart, Christopher W

    2011-10-01

    Asphalt (bitumen) fume condensates collected from the headspace above paving and Type III built up roofing asphalt (BURA) tanks were evaluated in two-year dermal carcinogenicity assays in male C3H/HeNCrl mice. A third sample was generated from the BURA using a NIOSH laboratory generation method. Similar to earlier NIOSH studies, the BURA fume condensates were applied dermally in mineral oil twice per week; the paving sample was applied 7 days/week for a total weekly dose of 50 mg/wk in both studies. A single benign papilloma was observed in a group of 80 mice exposed to paving fume condensate at the end of the two-year study and only mild skin irritation was observed. The lab generated BURA fume condensate resulted in statistically significant (P<0.0001) increases in squamous cell carcinomas (35 animals or 55% of animals at risk). The field-matched BURA condensate showed a weaker but significant (P=0.0063) increase (8 carcinomas or 13% of animals) and a longer average latency (90 weeks vs. 76 for the lab fume). Significant irritation was observed in both BURA condensates. It is concluded that the paving fume condensate was not carcinogenic under the test conditions and that the field-matched BURA fume condensate produced a weak tumor response compared to the lab generated sample. PMID:21524677

  12. The evolution of fibrillar collagens: a sea-pen collagen shares common features with vertebrate type V collagen.

    PubMed

    Tillet, E; Franc, J M; Franc, S; Garrone, R

    1996-02-01

    The extracellular matrix of marine primitive invertebrates (sponges, polyps and jellyfishes) contains collagen fibrils with narrow diameters. From various data, it has been hypothesized that these primitive collagens could represent ancestral forms of the vertebrate minor collagens, i.e., types V or XI. Recently we have isolated a primitive collagen from the soft tissues of the sea-pen Veretillum cynomorium. This report examines whether the sea-pen collagen shares some features with vertebrate type V collagen. Rotary shadowed images of acid-soluble collagen molecules extracted from beta-APN treated animals, positive staining of segment-long-spacing crystallites precipitated from pepsinized collagen, Western blots of the pepsinized alpha1 and alpha2 chains with antibodies to vertebrate types I, III and V collagens, and in situ gold immunolabeling of ECM collagen fibrils were examined. Our results showed that the tissue form of the sea-pen collagen is a 340-nm threadlike molecule, which is close to the vertebrate type V collagen with its voluminous terminal globular domain, the distribution of most of its polar amino-acid residues, and its antigenic properties. PMID:8653581

  13. Cochlear Implants

    MedlinePlus

    ... outside of the body, behind the ear. A second part is surgically placed under the skin. An implant does not restore normal hearing. It can help a person understand speech. Children and adults can benefit from them. National Institute on Deafness and Other Communication Disorders

  14. Cochlear implant

    MedlinePlus

    ... are sent along the auditory nerve to the brain. A deaf person does not have a functioning inner ear. A cochlear implant tries to replace the function of the inner ear by ... signals to the brain. Sound is picked up by a microphone worn ...

  15. Clinical evaluations of mineralized collagen in the extraction sites preservation

    PubMed Central

    Feng, Lu; Zhang, Liang; Cui, Yun; Song, Tian-Xi; Qiu, Zhi-Ye; Wang, Xiu-Mei; Tan, Bao-Sheng

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore the different effects between biomimetic mineralized collagen (MC) and ordinary physically blended hydroxyapatite/collagen (HA/Col) composite in evaluating new bone formation and regenerated bone height in human extraction sockets. Thirty-four patients who cannot retain teeth caused by trauma or decay were randomly selected from Department of Stomatology of Dongzhimen Hospital from December 2013 to December 2014. The patients were randomly divided into two groups. After the operation of tooth extraction, 17 patients were implanted with biomimetic MC (MC group), and other 17 patients were implanted with ordinary physically blended nHA/Col composite (nHA/Col group). X-ray positioning projection by auto-photographing was taken to test the distance between the lowest position and the neighboring CEJm-CEJd immediately, 1 month and 3 months after the operation. The height of new bone formation of the MC group was significantly higher than the nHA/Col group. Biomimetic MC showed better clinical outcomes in the bone formation for extraction site preservation and would have broad application prospect in the field of oral and maxillofacial surgeries. PMID:26815224

  16. Multiscale Analyses of the Bone-implant Interface

    PubMed Central

    Cha, J.Y.; Pereira, M.D.; Smith, A.A.; Houschyar, K.S.; Yin, X.; Mouraret, S.; Brunski, J.B.

    2015-01-01

    Implants placed with high insertion torque (IT) typically exhibit primary stability, which enables early loading. Whether high IT has a negative impact on peri-implant bone health, however, remains to be determined. The purpose of this study was to ascertain how peri-implant bone responds to strains and stresses created when implants are placed with low and high IT. Titanium micro-implants were inserted into murine femurs with low and high IT using torque values that were scaled to approximate those used to place clinically sized implants. Torque created in peri-implant tissues a distribution and magnitude of strains, which were calculated through finite element modeling. Stiffness tests quantified primary and secondary implant stability. At multiple time points, molecular, cellular, and histomorphometric analyses were performed to quantitatively determine the effect of high and low strains on apoptosis, mineralization, resorption, and collagen matrix deposition in peri-implant bone. Preparation of an osteotomy results in a narrow zone of dead and dying osteocytes in peri-implant bone that is not significantly enlarged in response to implants placed with low IT. Placing implants with high IT more than doubles this zone of dead and dying osteocytes. As a result, peri-implant bone develops micro-fractures, bone resorption is increased, and bone formation is decreased. Using high IT to place an implant creates high interfacial stress and strain that are associated with damage to peri-implant bone and therefore should be avoided to best preserve the viability of this tissue. PMID:25628271

  17. [Biological implant in single-stage reconstruction of mammary gland for cancer].

    PubMed

    Zikiriakhodzhaev, A D; Ermoshchenkova, M V

    2015-01-01

    Brief literature review about features of biological implants application for mammary gland reconstruction is presented in the article. Possible complications after such materials use, first experience of acellular dermal matrix administration for single-stage mammary gland reconstruction in 6 patients with breast cancer are also described. We offered surgical techniques, complications and methods of its treatment. We presented advantages of biological implant use which are consisted in decrease of surgical damage and duration of surgery, opportunity for enlargement of pocket for implant, decrease of pain syndrome. PMID:25909549

  18. Biology, chemistry and pathology of collagen

    SciTech Connect

    Fleischmajer, R.; Olsen, B.R.; Kuhn, K.

    1985-01-01

    This book consists of five parts and a section of poster papers. Some of the articles are: Structure of the Type II Collagen Gene; Structural and Functional Analysis of the Genes for ..cap alpha..2(1) and ..cap alpha..1(III) collagens; Structure and Expression of the Collagen Genes of C. Elegans; Molecular Basis of Clinical Heterogeneity in the Ehlers-Danlos Syndrome; and Normal and Mutant Human Collagen Genes.

  19. N-Phenethyl caffeamide and photodamage: protecting skin by inhibiting type I procollagen degradation and stimulating collagen synthesis.

    PubMed

    Chiang, Hsiu-Mei; Chen, Chien-Wen; Lin, Tzu-Yu; Kuo, Yueh-Hsiung

    2014-10-01

    Skin is mainly damaged by genetic and environmental factors such as ultraviolet (UV) light and pollutants. UV light is a well-known factor that causes various types of skin damage and premature aging. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) are commonly involved in the pathogenesis of skin damage by activating the metalloproteinases that break down type I collagen. This study investigated the antioxidant and antiphotodamage activity and mechanisms of N-phenethyl caffeamide (K36) in human skin fibroblasts. The results indicated that K36 demonstrated strong 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl radical (DPPH) scavenging activity, which dose-dependently reduced the production of UVB-induced intracellular ROS in human dermal fibroblasts. K36 prevented UVB-irradiation-induced type I collagen degradation by inhibiting the expression of matrix metalloproteins-1, -3, and -9 and the phosphorylation of mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinases. Furthermore, K36 elevated collagen synthesis in skin fibroblasts by inhibiting UVB-induced Smad7 overexpression. K36 downregulated the expression of the transcription factor, activator protein-1 (AP-1). Our results indicated that K36 exhibited antioxidant properties and prevented skin collagen degradation caused by UV exposure and the stimulation of collagen synthesis, which suggests the potential use of K36 in preventing photodamage. PMID:25019243

  20. [Comparison of fibroblastic cell compatibility of type I collagen-immobilized titanium between electrodeposition and immersion].

    PubMed

    Kyuragi, Takeru

    2014-03-01

    Titanium is widely used for medical implants. While many techniques for surface modification have been studied for optimizing its biocompatibility with hard tissues, little work has been undertaken to explore ways of maximizing its biocompatibility with soft tissues. We investigated cell attachment to titanium surfaces modified with bovine Type I collagen immobilized by either electrodeposition or a conventional immersion technique. The apparent thickness and durability of the immobilized collagen layer were evaluated prior to incubation of the collagen-immobilized titanium surfaces with NIH/3T3 mouse embryonic fibroblasts. The initial cell attachment and expression of actin and vinculin were evaluated. We determined that the immobilized collagen layer was much thicker and more durable when placed using the electrodeposition technique than the immersion technique. Both protocols produced materials that promoted better cell attachment, growth and structural protein expression than titanium alone. However, electrodeposition was ultimately superior to immersion because it is quicker to perform and produces a more durable collagen coating. We conclude that electrodeposition is an effective technique for immobilizing type I collagen on titanium surfaces, thus improving their cytocompatibility with fibroblasts. PMID:24812763

  1. Delayed and Deficient Dermal Maturation in Mice Lacking the CXCR3 ELR-Negative CXC Chemokine Receptor

    PubMed Central

    Yates, Cecelia C.; Whaley, Diana; Kulasekeran, Priya; Hancock, Wayne W.; Lu, Bao; Bodnar, Richard; Newsome, Joseph; Hebda, Patricia A.; Wells, Alan

    2007-01-01

    Replacement of wounded skin requires the initially florid cellular response to abate and even regress as the dermal layer returns to a relatively paucicellular state. The signals that direct this “stop and return” process have yet to be deciphered. CXCR3 chemokine receptor and its ligand CXCL11/IP-9/I-TAC are expressed by basal keratinocytes and CXCL10/IP-10 by keratinocytes and endothelial cells during wound healing in mice and humans. In vitro, these ligands limit motility in dermal fibroblasts and endothelial cells. To examine whether this signaling pathway contributes to wound healing in vivo, full-thickness excisional wounds were created on CXCR3 wild-type (+/+) or knockout (−/−) mice. Even at 90 days, long after wound closure, wounds in the CXCR3−/− mice remained hypercellular and presented immature matrix components. The CXCR3−/− mice also presented poor remodeling and reorganization of collagen, which resulted in a weakened healed dermis. This in vivo model substantiates our in vitro findings that CXCR3 signaling is necessary for inhibition of fibroblast and endothelial cell migration and subsequent redifferentiation of the fibroblasts to a contractile state. These studies establish a pathophysiologic role for CXCR3 and its ligand during wound repair. PMID:17600132

  2. Characterization of Ovine Dermal Papilla Cell Aggregation

    PubMed Central

    Sari, Agnes Rosarina Prita; Rufaut, Nicholas Wolfgang; Jones, Leslie Norman; Sinclair, Rodney Daniel

    2016-01-01

    Context: The dermal papilla (DP) is a condensation of mesenchymal cells at the proximal end of the hair follicle, which determines hair shaft size and regulates matrix cell proliferation and differentiation. DP cells have the ability to regenerate new hair follicles. These cells tend to aggregate both in vitro and in vivo. This tendency is associated with the ability of papilla cells to induce hair growth. However, human papilla cells lose their hair-inducing activity in later passage number. Ovine DP cells are different from human DP cells since they do not lose their aggregative behavior or hair-inducing activity in culture. Nonetheless, our understanding of ovine DP cells is still limited. Aim: The aim of this study was to observe the expression of established DP markers in ovine cells and their association with aggregation. Subjects and Methods: Ovine DP cells from three different sheep were compared. Histochemistry, immunoflourescence, and polymerase chain reaction experiments were done to analyze the DP markers. Results: We found that ovine DP aggregates expressed all the 16 markers evaluated, including alkaline phosphatase and versican. Expression of the versican V0 and V3 isoforms, neural cell adhesion molecule, and corin was increased significantly with aggregation, while hey-1 expression was significantly decreased. Conclusions: Overall, the stable expression of numerous markers suggests that aggregating ovine DP cells have a similar phenotype to papillae in vivo. The stability of their molecular phenotype is consistent with their robust aggregative behavior and retained follicle-inducing activity after prolonged culture. Their phenotypic stability in culture contrasts with DP cells from other species, and suggests that a better understanding of ovine DP cells might provide opportunities to improve the hair-inducing activity and therapeutic potential of human cells. PMID:27625564

  3. Exposure to Mimivirus Collagen Promotes Arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Shah, Nikunj; Hülsmeier, Andreas J.; Hochhold, Nina; Neidhart, Michel; Gay, Steffen

    2014-01-01

    Collagens, the most abundant proteins in animals, also occur in some recently described nucleocytoplasmic large DNA viruses such as Mimiviridae, which replicate in amoebae. To clarify the impact of viral collagens on the immune response of animals exposed to Mimiviridae, we have investigated the localization of collagens in Acanthamoeba polyphaga mimivirus particles and the response of mice to immunization with mimivirus particles. Using protein biotinylation, we have first shown that viral collagen encoded by open reading frame L71 is present at the surface of mimivirus particles. Exposure to mimivirus collagens elicited the production of anti-collagen antibodies in DBA/1 mice immunized intradermally with mimivirus protein extracts. This antibody response also targeted mouse collagen type II and was accompanied by T-cell reactivity to collagen and joint inflammation, as observed in collagen-induced arthritis following immunization of mice with bovine collagen type II. The broad distribution of nucleocytoplasmic large DNA viruses in the environment suggests that humans are constantly exposed to such large virus particles. A survey of blood sera from healthy human subjects and from rheumatoid arthritis patients indeed demonstrated that 30% of healthy-subject and 36% of rheumatoid arthritis sera recognized the major mimivirus capsid protein L425. Moreover, whereas 6% of healthy-subject sera recognized the mimivirus collagen protein L71, 22% of rheumatoid arthritis sera were positive for mimivirus L71. Accordingly, our study shows that environmental exposure to mimivirus represents a risk factor in triggering autoimmunity to collagens. PMID:24173233

  4. Biomimetic Analogs for Collagen Biomineralization

    PubMed Central

    Gu, L.; Kim, Y.K.; Liu, Y.; Ryou, H.; Wimmer, C.E.; Dai, L.; Arola, D.D.; Looney, S.W.; Pashley, D.H.; Tay, F.R.

    2011-01-01

    Inability of chemical phosphorylation of sodium trimetaphosphate to induce intrafibrillar mineralization of type I collagen may be due to the failure to incorporate a biomimetic analog to stabilize amorphous calcium phosphates (ACP) as nanoprecursors. This study investigated adsorption/desorption characteristics of hydrolyzed and pH-adjusted sodium trimetaphosphate (HPA-Na3P3O9) to collagen. Based on those results, a 5-minute treatment time with 2.8 wt% HPA-Na3P3O9 was used in a single-layer reconstituted collagen model to confirm that both the ACP-stabilization analog and matrix phosphoprotein analog must be present for intrafibrillar mineralization. The results of that model were further validated by complete remineralization of phosphoric-acid-etched dentin treated with the matrix phosphoprotein analog and lined with a remineralizing lining composite, and with the ACP-stabilization analog supplied in simulated body fluid. An understanding of the basic processes involved in intrafibrillar mineralization of reconstituted collagen fibrils facilitates the design of novel tissue engineering materials for hard tissue repair and regeneration. PMID:20940362

  5. Methylisothiazolinone: dermal and respiratory immune responses in mice.

    PubMed

    Devos, Fien C; Pollaris, Lore; Van Den Broucke, Sofie; Seys, Sven; Goossens, An; Nemery, Benoit; Hoet, Peter H M; Vanoirbeek, Jeroen A J

    2015-06-15

    Methylisothiazolinone (MI), a widely used chemical preservative in industrial and household products, and cosmetics, has been associated with allergic contact dermatitis. However, the asthmogenic capacity of MI is currently unknown. In this study, we investigated the capacity of MI to elicit asthma-like responses in a validated mouse model. On days 1 and 8, mice (C57Bl/6 and BALB/c) were dermally treated with MI or vehicle on each ear. On day 15, mice received a single intranasal challenge with MI or vehicle. Immediately after the challenge, the early ventilatory response was measured using a double chamber plethysmograph. One day later, airway hyperreactivity, pulmonary inflammation and immune-related parameters were assessed. Dermal treatment with MI in both C57Bl/6 and BALB/c mice induced increased T- and B-cell proliferation in the auricular lymph nodes, along with IFN-γ production and limited increases in total serum IgE, confirming dermal sensitization. An airway challenge with MI led to an early ventilatory response (decreased breathing frequency), indicative for acute sensory irritation. However, 24h later no allergic respiratory response (no airway hyperreactivity (AHR) nor pulmonary inflammation) was found in either mouse strains. Our study indicates that MI can be classified as a strong dermal sensitizer and irritant, but not an asthmogen after initial dermal sensitization, followed by an airway challenge. PMID:25907379

  6. Ciprofloxacin Improves the Stemness of Human Dermal Papilla Cells

    PubMed Central

    Kiratipaiboon, Chayanin; Tengamnuay, Parkpoom; Chanvorachote, Pithi

    2016-01-01

    Improvement in the expansion method of adult stem cells may augment their use in regenerative therapy. Using human dermal papilla cell line as well as primary dermal papilla cells as model systems, the present study demonstrated that ciprofloxacin treatment could prevent the loss of stemness during culture. Clonogenicity and stem cell markers of dermal papilla cells were shown to gradually decrease in the culture in a time-dependent manner. Treatment of the cells with nontoxic concentrations of ciprofloxacin could maintain both stem cell morphology and clonogenicity, as well as all stem cells markers. We found that ciprofloxacin exerted its effect through ATP-dependent tyrosine kinase/glycogen synthase kinase3β dependent mechanism which in turn upregulated β-catenin. Besides, ciprofloxacin was shown to induce epithelial-mesenchymal transition in DPCs as the transcription factors ZEB1 and Snail were significantly increased. Furthermore, the self-renewal proteins of Wnt/β-catenin pathway, namely, Nanog and Oct-4 were significantly upregulated in the ciprofloxacin-treated cells. The effects of ciprofloxacin in preserving stem cell features were confirmed in the primary dermal papilla cells directly obtained from human hair follicles. Together, these results revealed a novel application of ciprofloxacin for stem cell maintenance and provided the underlying mechanisms that are responsible for the stemness in dermal papilla cells. PMID:26649051

  7. Lip Injection Techniques Using Small-Particle Hyaluronic Acid Dermal Filler.

    PubMed

    Chiu, Annie; Fabi, Sabrina; Dayan, Steven; Nogueira, Alessandra

    2016-09-01

    The shape and fullness of the lips have a significant role in facial aesthetics and outward appearance. The corrective needs of a patient can range from a subtle enhancement to a complete recontouring including correction of perioral rhytides. A comprehensive understanding of the lower face anatomical features and injection site techniques are foundational information for injectors. Likewise, the choice of filler material contributes to the success of the injection techniques used, and facilitates a safe, effective, and natural appearing outcome. The small-particle HA 20 mg/mL with lidocaine 0.3% (SP-HAL, Restylane® Silk; Galderma Laboratories, Fort Worth, Texas) is indicated for submucosal implantation for lip augmentation and dermal implantation for correction of perioral rhytides. Due to its rheological properties and smaller particle size, SP-HAL is a well-suited filler for the enhancement and correction of lip shape and volume, as well as for the correction of very fine perioral rhytides. This work is a combined overview of techniques found in the current literature and recommendations provided by contributing authors.

    J Drugs Dermatol. 2016;15(9):1076-1082. PMID:27602969

  8. Chondrogenesis of Human Infrapatellar Fat Pad Stem Cells on Acellular Dermal Matrix

    PubMed Central

    Ye, Ken; Traianedes, Kathy; Choong, Peter F. M.; Myers, Damian E.

    2016-01-01

    Acellular dermal matrix (ADM) has been in clinical use for decades in numerous surgical applications. The ability for ADM to promote cellular repopulation, revascularisation and tissue regeneration is well documented. Adipose stem cells have the ability to differentiate into mesenchymal tissue types, including bone and cartilage. The aim of this study was to investigate the potential interaction between ADM and adipose stem cells in vitro using TGFβ3 and BMP6. Human infrapatellar fat pad-derived adipose stem cells (IPFP-ASC) were cultured with ADM derived from rat dermis in chondrogenic (TGFβ3 and BMP6) medium in vitro for 2 and 4 weeks. Histology, qPCR, and immunohistochemistry were performed to assess for markers of chondrogenesis (collagen Type II, SOX9 and proteoglycans). At 4 weeks, cell-scaffold constructs displayed cellular changes consistent with chondrogenesis, with evidence of stratification of cell layers and development of a hyaline-like cartilage layer superficially, which stained positively for collagen Type II and proteoglycans. Significant cell–matrix interaction was seen between the cartilage layer and the ADM itself with seamless integration between each layer. Real time qPCR showed significantly increased COL2A1, SOX9, and ACAN gene expression over 4 weeks when compared to control. COL1A2 gene expression remained unchanged over 4 weeks. We believe that the principles that make ADM versatile and successful for tissue regeneration are applicable to cartilage regeneration. This study demonstrates in vitro the ability for IPFP-ASCs to undergo chondrogenesis, infiltrate, and interact with ADM. These outcomes serve as a platform for in vivo modelling of ADM for cartilage repair. PMID:26858950

  9. Chondrogenesis of Human Infrapatellar Fat Pad Stem Cells on Acellular Dermal Matrix.

    PubMed

    Ye, Ken; Traianedes, Kathy; Choong, Peter F M; Myers, Damian E

    2016-01-01

    Acellular dermal matrix (ADM) has been in clinical use for decades in numerous surgical applications. The ability for ADM to promote cellular repopulation, revascularisation and tissue regeneration is well documented. Adipose stem cells have the ability to differentiate into mesenchymal tissue types, including bone and cartilage. The aim of this study was to investigate the potential interaction between ADM and adipose stem cells in vitro using TGFβ3 and BMP6. Human infrapatellar fat pad-derived adipose stem cells (IPFP-ASC) were cultured with ADM derived from rat dermis in chondrogenic (TGFβ3 and BMP6) medium in vitro for 2 and 4 weeks. Histology, qPCR, and immunohistochemistry were performed to assess for markers of chondrogenesis (collagen Type II, SOX9 and proteoglycans). At 4 weeks, cell-scaffold constructs displayed cellular changes consistent with chondrogenesis, with evidence of stratification of cell layers and development of a hyaline-like cartilage layer superficially, which stained positively for collagen Type II and proteoglycans. Significant cell-matrix interaction was seen between the cartilage layer and the ADM itself with seamless integration between each layer. Real time qPCR showed significantly increased COL2A1, SOX9, and ACAN gene expression over 4 weeks when compared to control. COL1A2 gene expression remained unchanged over 4 weeks. We believe that the principles that make ADM versatile and successful for tissue regeneration are applicable to cartilage regeneration. This study demonstrates in vitro the ability for IPFP-ASCs to undergo chondrogenesis, infiltrate, and interact with ADM. These outcomes serve as a platform for in vivo modelling of ADM for cartilage repair. PMID:26858950

  10. An improved method for the preparation of type I collagen from skin.

    PubMed

    Pacak, Christina A; MacKay, Allison A; Cowan, Douglas B

    2014-01-01

    Soluble type 1 collagen (COL1) is used extensively as an adhesive substrate for cell cultures and as a cellular scaffold for regenerative applications. Clinically, this protein is widely used for cosmetic surgery, dermal injections, bone grafting, and reconstructive surgery. The sources of COL1 for these procedures are commonly nonhuman, which increases the potential for inflammation and rejection as well as xenobiotic disease transmission. In view of this, a method to efficiently and quickly purify COL1 from limited quantities of autologously-derived tissues would circumvent many of these issues; however, standard isolation protocols are lengthy and often require large quantities of collagenous tissues. Here, we demonstrate an efficient COL1 extraction method that reduces the time needed to isolate and purify this protein from about 10 days to less than 3 hr. We chose the dermis as our tissue source because of its availability during many surgical procedures. This method uses traditional extraction buffers combined with forceful agitation and centrifugal filtration to obtain highly-pure, soluble COL1 from small amounts of corium. Briefly, dermal biopsies are washed thoroughly in ice-cold dH2O after removing fat, connective tissue, and hair. The skin samples are stripped of noncollagenous proteins and polysaccharides using 0.5 M sodium acetate and a high speed bench-top homogenizer. Collagen from residual solids is subsequently extracted with a 0.075 M sodium citrate buffer using the homogenizer. These extracts are purified using 100,000 MW cut-off centrifugal filters that yield COL1 preparations of comparable or superior quality to commercial products or those obtained using traditional procedures. We anticipate this method will facilitate the utilization of autologously-derived COL1 for a multitude of research and clinical applications. PMID:24473107

  11. Histological characteristics of peri-implant mucosa around Brånemark and single-crystal sapphire implants.

    PubMed

    Arvidson, K; Fartash, B; Hilliges, M; Köndell, P A

    1996-03-01

    Soft tissues surrounding Brånemark titanium implants and single crystal sapphire implants were studied by conventional light- and transmission electron microscopy and by immunohistochemical markers for cytokeratin, protein S-100, Factor VIII and KP1. Histological sections of biopsies obtained from clinically healthy peri-implant mucosa were separated into a keratinized outer implant epithelium and an inner, non-keratinized epithelium, both immunoreactive towards cytokeratin. The inner implant epithelium terminated in a junctional epithelium, apically not a few cell layers thick. The cells adjacent to the implant showed a condensed cytoplasm, resembling hemidesmosomes. In the underlying connective tissue, rich in fibroblasts and factor VIII immunoreactive blood vessels, the bundles of collagen ran in different directions. S-100 immunoreactive nerve structures were more frequently found beneath the outer than the inner implant epithelium. Inflammatory cell infiltrates, some KP1 positive, were observed in the apical parts of the inner implant epithelium. S-100 positive Langerhans' cells were present mainly within the the outer implant epithelium. For the two implant systems, the techniques disclosed no qualitative structural differences in the adjacent soft tissues. PMID:9002817

  12. Pesticides re-entry dermal exposure of workers in greenhouses.

    PubMed

    Caffarelli, V; Conte, E; Correnti, A; Gatti, R; Musmeci, F; Morali, G; Spagnoli, G; Tranfo, G; Triolo, L; Vita, M; Zappa, G

    2004-01-01

    This research has the aim to evaluate the risk of pesticide dermal exposure for workers in greenhouses. We considered the following crops: tomato, cucumber and strawberry, largely spread in Bracciano lake district. The pesticides monitored were: tetradifon on strawberry: metalaxyl, azoxystrobin and fenarimol on cucumber; acrinathrin, azoxystrobin and chlorpyrifos ethyl on tomato. The dermal exposure was evaluated by Dislodgeable Foliar Residue (DFR) measurements employing transfer coefficients got from literature. For risk evaluation, we have compared the dermal exposures with Acceptable Operator Exposure Levels (AOEL). The re-entry time were obtained intercepting the dose decay curves with AOEL values. The re-entry times result higher than two days in the cases of chlorpyrifos on tomato (re-entry time: 3 days), azoxystrobin on tomato (4 days), and tetradifon on strawberry (8 days). The need of measuring specific transfer coefficients is pointed out. PMID:15756864

  13. Mycobacterium chelonae Facial Infections Following Injection of Dermal Filler

    PubMed Central

    Rodriguez, Jan M.; Xie, Yingda L.; Winthrop, Kevin L.; Schafer, Sean; Sehdev, Paul; Solomon, Joel; Jensen, Bette; Toney, Nadege C.; Lewis, Paul F.

    2015-01-01

    A cluster of 3 facial Mycobacterium chelonae infections occurred after cosmetic dermal filler injections at a plastic surgery clinic. Pulsed-field gel electrophoresis showed that M chelonae isolated from the clinic tap water were identical to the patient wound isolates. Review of injection procedures identified application of nonsterile ice to the skin prior to injection as a possible source of M chelonae. Surveys of regional laboratories and a national plastic surgery listserv identified no other cases related to the injection of this brand of dermal filler. This is the first report of cutaneous M chelonae infections following the injection of dermal fillers. It adds to a growing body of literature on postinjection M chelonae infections and reinforces the importance of optimal skin disinfection steps prior to percutaneous procedures. PMID:23335647

  14. Porcine dermal lesions produced by 1540-nm laser radiation pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roach, William P.; Johnson, Thomas E.

    2001-07-01

    Completion of recent studies within our group indicates a breed-based difference in dermal response to 1540 nm 0.8 millisecond laser pulses. Laser exposure to Yucatan Mini- Pigs (highly pigmented skin) and Yorkshire pigs (lightly pigmented skin) demonstrate statistical differences between the ED50's of the two breeds. Laser delivery is accomplished using an Er:Glass system producing 1540 nm of light at millisecond exposure times and in the range of 5 to 95 J/cm2. Dermal lesion development was evaluated for acute, 1 hour, and 24-hour post exposure presentation. Our data contradicts the theory that water absorption is the sole mechanism of dermal tissue damage observed from 1540 nm laser exposures, as skin chromophores appear to play a role in lesion development.

  15. Mechanical properties and osteogenic potential of hydroxyapatite-PLGA-collagen biomaterial for bone regeneration.

    PubMed

    Bhuiyan, Didarul B; Middleton, John C; Tannenbaum, Rina; Wick, Timothy M

    2016-08-01

    A bone graft is a complicated structure that provides mechanical support and biological signals that regulate bone growth, reconstruction, and repair. A single-component material is inadequate to provide a suitable combination of structural support and biological stimuli to promote bone regeneration. Multicomponent composite biomaterials lack adequate bonding among the components to prevent phase separation after implantation. We have previously developed a novel multistep polymerization and fabrication process to construct a nano-hydroxyapatite-poly(D,L-lactide-co-glycolide)-collagen biomaterial (abbreviated nHAP-PLGA-collagen) with the components covalently bonded to each other. In the present study, the mechanical properties and osteogenic potential of nHAP-PLGA-collagen are characterized to assess the material's suitability to support bone regeneration. nHAP-PLGA-collagen films exhibit tensile strength very close to that of human cancellous bone. Human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) are viable on 2D nHAP-PLGA-collagen films with a sevenfold increase in cell population after 7 days of culture. Over 5 weeks of culture, hMSCs deposit matrix and mineral consistent with osteogenic differentiation and bone formation. As a result of matrix deposition, nHAP-PLGA-collagen films cultured with hMSCs exhibit 48% higher tensile strength and fivefold higher moduli compared to nHAP-PLGA-collagen films without cells. More interestingly, secretion of matrix and minerals by differentiated hMSCs cultured on the nHAP-PLGA-collagen films for 5 weeks mitigates the loss of mechanical strength that accompanies PLGA hydrolysis. PMID:27120980

  16. Fabrication and evaluation of a biodegradable cohesive plug based on reconstituted collagen/γ-polyglutamic acid.

    PubMed

    Hsu, Fu-Yin; Cheng, Ya-Yun; Tsai, Shiao-Wen; Tsai, Wei-Bor

    2010-10-01

    In the past decade, numerous studies have been devoted to developing natural bioadhesives that have the notable capacity to adhere to wet surfaces. Collagen and γ-polyglutamic acid (γ-PGA) are well-known natural hydrophilic polymers that have both been utilized for their versatility in a wide range of biomedical applications. The aim of this study was the construction and characterization of a cohesive plug composed of γ-PGA and reconstituted collagen fibrils crosslinked with water-soluble carbodiimide. Transmission electron microscopy examinations confirmed that the collagen fibrils in the reconstituted collagen/γ-PGA gel retained their native specific D-period structure. This unique D-pattern structure of collagen plays a major role in hemostasis and is also related to several cellular behaviors. The bonding strength of the reconstituted collagen/γ-PGA adhesive was approximately 42.9 ± 4.0 KPa after 5 min of application and increased to 76.5 ± 15.1 KPa after 24 h. This was much stronger than the fibrin adhesive, whose bonding strength was 30.9 ± 0.2 KPa. Furthermore, the reconstituted collagen/γ-PGA gel degraded gradually after subcutaneous implantation in the backs of rats over a period of 8 weeks, without any severe inflammatory response. On the basis of the histological analysis, fibroblasts migrated into the gel while it degraded, which indicates that the gel is not harmful to cellular activity. Together, these findings demonstrate that using reconstituted collagen with retained D-periodicity as a component of the bioadhesive is a possibly better option to formulate effective adhesiveness and is promising as a scaffold for tissue repair. PMID:20665682

  17. Implantation of a Novel Biologic and Hybridized Tissue Engineered Bioimplant in Large Tendon Defect: An In Vivo Investigation

    PubMed Central

    Oryan, Ahmad; Moshiri, Ali; Parizi, Abdolhamid Meimandi

    2014-01-01

    Surgical reconstruction of large Achilles tendon defects is technically demanding. There is no standard method, and tissue engineering may be a valuable option. We investigated the effects of 3D collagen and collagen-polydioxanone sheath (PDS) implants on a large tendon defect model in rabbits. Ninety rabbits were divided into three groups: control, collagen, and collagen-PDS. In all groups, 2 cm of the left Achilles tendon were excised and discarded. A modified Kessler suture was applied to all injured tendons to retain the gap length. The control group received no graft, the treated groups were repaired using the collagen only or the collagen-PDS prostheses. The bioelectrical characteristics of the injured areas were measured at weekly intervals. The animals were euthanized at 60 days after the procedure. Gross, histopathological and ultrastructural morphology and biophysical characteristics of the injured and intact tendons were investigated. Another 90 pilot animals were also used to investigate the inflammatory response and mechanism of graft incorporation during tendon healing. The control tendons showed severe hyperemia and peritendinous adhesion, and the gastrocnemius muscle of the control animals showed severe atrophy and fibrosis, with a loose areolar connective tissue filling the injured area. The tendons receiving either collagen or collagen-PDS implants showed lower amounts of peritendinous adhesion, hyperemia and muscle atrophy, and a dense tendon filled the defect area. Compared to the control tendons, application of collagen and collagen-PDS implants significantly improved water uptake, water delivery, direct transitional electrical current and tissue resistance to direct transitional electrical current. Compared to the control tendons, both prostheses showed significantly increased diameter, density and alignment of the collagen fibrils and maturity of the tenoblasts at ultrastructure level. Both prostheses influenced favorably tendon healing

  18. Mutations in the collagen XII gene define a new form of extracellular matrix-related myopathy.

    PubMed

    Hicks, Debbie; Farsani, Golara Torabi; Laval, Steven; Collins, James; Sarkozy, Anna; Martoni, Elena; Shah, Ashoke; Zou, Yaqun; Koch, Manuel; Bönnemann, Carsten G; Roberts, Mark; Lochmüller, Hanns; Bushby, Kate; Straub, Volker

    2014-05-01

    Bethlem myopathy (BM) [MIM 158810] is a slowly progressive muscle disease characterized by contractures and proximal weakness, which can be caused by mutations in one of the collagen VI genes (COL6A1, COL6A2 and COL6A3). However, there may be additional causal genes to identify as in ∼50% of BM cases no mutations in the COL6 genes are identified. In a cohort of -24 patients with a BM-like phenotype, we first sequenced 12 candidate genes based on their function, including genes for known binding partners of collagen VI, and those enzymes involved in its correct post-translational modification, assembly and secretion. Proceeding to whole-exome sequencing (WES), we identified mutations in the COL12A1 gene, a member of the FACIT collagens (fibril-associated collagens with interrupted triple helices) in five individuals from two families. Both families showed dominant inheritance with a clinical phenotype resembling classical BM. Family 1 had a single-base substitution that led to the replacement of one glycine residue in the triple-helical domain, breaking the Gly-X-Y repeating pattern, and Family 2 had a missense mutation, which created a mutant protein with an unpaired cysteine residue. Abnormality at the protein level was confirmed in both families by the intracellular retention of collagen XII in patient dermal fibroblasts. The mutation in Family 2 leads to the up-regulation of genes associated with the unfolded protein response (UPR) pathway and swollen, dysmorphic rough-ER. We conclude that the spectrum of causative genes in extracellular matrix (ECM)-related myopathies be extended to include COL12A1. PMID:24334769

  19. In-situ Damage Assessment of Collagen within Ancient Manuscripts Written on Parchment: A Polarized Raman Spectroscopy Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schütz, R.; Rabin, I.; Hahn, O.; Fratzl, P.; Masic, A.

    2010-08-01

    The collection generally known as Qumran scrolls or Dead Sea Scrolls (DSS) comprises some 900 highly fragmented manuscripts (mainly written on parchment) from the Second Temple period. In the years since their manufacture the writing materials have undergone serious deterioration due to a combination of natural ageing and environmental effects. Therefore, understanding quantitatively state of conservation of such manuscripts is a challenging task and a deep knowledge of damage pathways on all hierarchical levels (from molecular up to macroscopic) results of fundamental importance for a correct protection and conservation strategy. However, the degradation of parchments is very complex and not well understood process. Parchment is a final product of processing of animal skin and consist mainly of type I collagen, which is the most abundant constituent of the dermal matrix. Collagen molecule is built by folding of three polypeptide α-chains into a right-handed triple helix. Every α-chain is made by a repetitive sequence of (Gly-X-Y)n, where X and Y are often proline and hydroxyproline. Parallel and staggered collagen triple helices associate into fibrils, which than assemble into fibers. Deterioration of parchment is caused by chemical changes due to gelatinization, oxidation and hydrolysis of the collagen chains, promoted by several factors, summarized as biological and microbiological (bacteria, fungi etc.), heat, light, humidity and pollutants (1, 2). In this work we have focused on studying the collagen within parchments on two different levels of organization (molecular and fibrilar) by applying polarized Raman spectroscopic technique. Beside spectral information related to chemical bonding, polarization anisotropy of some collagen bands (i.e. amide I) has been used to explore organization of collagen on higher levels (three-dimensional arrangement of the triple-helix molecules and their alignment within a fibril of collagen). To this aim we have compared

  20. Dermal Filler Injection: A Novel Approach for Limiting Infarct Expansion

    PubMed Central

    Ryan, Liam P.; Matsuzaki, Kanji; Noma, Mio; Jackson, Benjamin M.; Eperjesi, Thomas J.; Plappert, Theodore J.; St. John-Sutton, Martin G.; Gorman, Joseph H.; Gorman, Robert C.

    2011-01-01

    Background Early infarct expansion after coronary occlusion compromises contractile function in perfused myocardial regions and promotes adverse long-term left ventricular (LV) remodeling. We hypothesized that injection of a tissue-expanding dermal filler material into a myocardial infarction (MI) would attenuate infarct expansion and limit LV remodeling. Methods Fifteen sheep were subjected to an anteroapical MI involving approximately 20% of the LV followed by the injection of 1.3 mL of a calcium hydroxyapatite–based dermal filler into the infarct. Real-time three-dimensional echocardiography was performed at baseline, 30 minutes after MI, and 15 minutes after injection to assess infarct expansion. Sixteen additional sheep were subjected to the same infarction and followed echocardiographically and hemodynamically for 4 weeks after MI to assess chronic remodeling. Eight animals had injection with dermal filler as described above immediately after MI, and 8 animals were injected with an equal amount of saline solution. Results All animals exhibited infarct expansion soon after coronary occlusion. The regional ejection fraction of the apex became negative after infarction, consistent with systolic dyskinesia. Injection of the dermal filler converted the apical wall motion from dyskinetic to akinetic and resulted immediately in significant decreases in global, regional, and segmental LV volumes. Chronically, relative to saline control, dermal filler injection significantly reduced LV end-systolic volume (62.2 ± 3.6 mL versus 44.5 ± 3.9 mL; p < 0.05) and improved global ejection fraction (0.295 ± 0.016 versus 0.373 ± 0.017; p < 0.05) at 4 weeks after infarction. Conclusions Injection of an acellular dermal filler into an MI immediately after coronary occlusion reduces early infarct expansion and limits chronic LV remodeling. PMID:19101288

  1. Carbofuran occupational dermal toxicity, exposure and risk assessment†

    PubMed Central

    Gammon, Derek W; Liu, Zhiwei; Becker, John M

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND Carbofuran is a carbamate insecticide that inhibits AChE. Although toxic by ingestion in mammals, it has low dermal toxicity, with relatively few confirmed worker illnesses. This risk assessment describes its time of onset, time to peak effect and time to recovery in rats using brain AChE inhibition in acute and 21 day dermal studies; in vitro rat/human relative dermal absorption for granular (5G) and liquid (4F) formulations; occupational exposure estimates using the Pesticide Handlers' Exposure Database and Agricultural Handlers' Exposure Database (PHED/AHED). RESULTS The point of departure for acute risk calculation (BMDL10) was 6.7 mg kg−1 day−1 for brain AChE inhibition after 6 h exposure. In a 21 day study, the BMDL10 was 6.8 mg kg−1 day−1, indicating reversibility. At 75 mg kg−1 day−1, time of onset was ≤30 min and time to peak effect was 6–12 h. Rat skin had ca tenfold greater dermal absorption of carbofuran (Furadan® 5G or 4F) than human skin. Exposure estimates for 5G in rice and 4F in ten crops had adequate margins of exposure (>100). CONCLUSION Rat dermal carbofuran toxicity was assessed in terms of dose and time-related inhibition of AChE. Comparative dermal absorption in rats was greater than in humans. Worker exposure estimates indicated acceptable risk for granular and liquid formulations of carbofuran. Copyright © 2011 Society of Chemical Industry PMID:21834090

  2. Accuracy of a semiquantitative method for Dermal Exposure Assessment (DREAM)

    PubMed Central

    van Wendel, de Joo... B; Vermeulen, R; van Hemmen, J J; Fransman, W; Kromhout, H

    2005-01-01

    Background: The authors recently developed a Dermal Exposure Assessment Method (DREAM), an observational semiquantitative method to assess dermal exposures by systematically evaluating exposure determinants using pre-assigned default values. Aim: To explore the accuracy of the DREAM method by comparing its estimates with quantitative dermal exposure measurements in several occupational settings. Methods: Occupational hygienists observed workers performing a certain task, whose exposure to chemical agents on skin or clothing was measured quantitatively simultaneously, and filled in the DREAM questionnaire. DREAM estimates were compared with measurement data by estimating Spearman correlation coefficients for each task and for individual observations. In addition, mixed linear regression models were used to study the effect of DREAM estimates on the variability in measured exposures between tasks, between workers, and from day to day. Results: For skin exposures, spearman correlation coefficients for individual observations ranged from 0.19 to 0.82. DREAM estimates for exposure levels on hands and forearms showed a fixed effect between and within surveys, explaining mainly between-task variance. In general, exposure levels on clothing layer were only predicted in a meaningful way by detailed DREAM estimates, which comprised detailed information on the concentration of the agent in the formulation to which exposure occurred. Conclusions: The authors expect that the DREAM method can be successfully applied for semiquantitative dermal exposure assessment in epidemiological and occupational hygiene surveys of groups of workers with considerable contrast in dermal exposure levels (variability between groups >1.0). For surveys with less contrasting exposure levels, quantitative dermal exposure measurements are preferable. PMID:16109819

  3. Characteristics and Young's Modulus of Collagen Fibrils from Expanded Skin Using Anisotropic Controlled Rate Self-Inflating Tissue Expander.

    PubMed

    Manssor, Nur Aini S; Radzi, Zamri; Yahya, Noor Azlin; Mohamad Yusof, Loqman; Hariri, Firdaus; Khairuddin, Nurul Hayah; Abu Kasim, Noor Hayaty; Czernuszka, Jan T

    2016-01-01

    Mechanical properties of expanded skin tissue are different from normal skin, which is dependent mainly on the structural and functional integrity of dermal collagen fibrils. In the present study, mechanical properties and surface topography of both expanded and nonexpanded skin collagen fibrils were evaluated. Anisotropic controlled rate self-inflating tissue expanders were placed beneath the skin of sheep's forelimbs. The tissue expanders gradually increased in height and reached equilibrium in 2 weeks. They were left in situ for another 2 weeks before explantation. Expanded and normal skin samples were surgically harvested from the sheep (n = 5). Young's modulus and surface topography of collagen fibrils were measured using an atomic force microscope. A surface topographic scan showed organized hierarchical structural levels: collagen molecules, fibrils and fibers. No significant difference was detected for the D-banding pattern: 63.5 ± 2.6 nm (normal skin) and 63.7 ± 2.7 nm (expanded skin). Fibrils from expanded tissues consisted of loosely packed collagen fibrils and the width of the fibrils was significantly narrower compared to those from normal skin: 153.9 ± 25.3 and 106.7 ± 28.5 nm, respectively. Young's modulus of the collagen fibrils in the expanded and normal skin was not statistically significant: 46.5 ± 19.4 and 35.2 ± 27.0 MPa, respectively. In conclusion, the anisotropic controlled rate self-inflating tissue expander produced a loosely packed collagen network and the fibrils exhibited similar D-banding characteristics as the control group in a sheep model. However, the fibrils from the expanded skin were significantly narrower. The stiffness of the fibrils from the expanded skin was higher but it was not statistically different. PMID:26836267

  4. Collagen interactions: Drug design and delivery.

    PubMed

    An, Bo; Lin, Yu-Shan; Brodsky, Barbara

    2016-02-01

    Collagen is a major component in a wide range of drug delivery systems and biomaterial applications. Its basic physical and structural properties, together with its low immunogenicity and natural turnover, are keys to its biocompatibility and effectiveness. In addition to its material properties, the collagen triple-helix interacts with a large number of molecules that trigger biological events. Collagen interactions with cell surface receptors regulate many cellular processes, while interactions with other ECM components are critical for matrix structure and remodeling. Collagen also interacts with enzymes involved in its biosynthesis and degradation, including matrix metalloproteinases. Over the past decade, much information has been gained about the nature and specificity of collagen interactions with its partners. These studies have defined collagen sequences responsible for binding and the high-resolution structures of triple-helical peptides bound to its natural binding partners. Strategies to target collagen interactions are already being developed, including the use of monoclonal antibodies to interfere with collagen fibril formation and the use of triple-helical peptides to direct liposomes to melanoma cells. The molecular information about collagen interactions will further serve as a foundation for computational studies to design small molecules that can interfere with specific interactions or target tumor cells. Intelligent control of collagen biological interactions within a material context will expand the effectiveness of collagen-based drug delivery. PMID:26631222

  5. [Use of collagen-polyvinylpirrolidone in the treatment of Parry-Romberg syndrome.

    PubMed

    Hernández-Vega, Giovanni Ahmed; Ruiz-Eng, Rafael; Montiel-Jarquín, Alvaro; Gómez-Conde, Eduardo; López-Colombo, Aurelio; Pérez-Aguilar, Aldo; Bejarano-Huertas, Ruth

    2013-01-01

    Background: Parry-Romberg syndrome is characterized by the presence of progressive hemifacial atrophy that affects the growth and development of structures on one side of the face. Our objective was to introduce collagen-polyvinylpirrolidone as a new therapeutic option for Parry-Romberg syndrome in two clinical cases. Clinical cases: two women, aging 56 and 28 years old, with facial hypocrhomic lesions, and right and left fronto-malar sunken area respectively, treated with topic steroids + penicilamina, fat grafts and silicone implants without improvement. We used collagen-polyvinylpirrolidone and they showed improvement: after six months there were not clinical or esthetical complications. Conclusions: collagen-polivinilpirrolidone could be a new therapeutic option for Parry-Romberg syndrome with good clinical and esthetical results. It is easy to apply and it has few side effects and without complications. PMID:24290024

  6. Electrospun Nanostructured Fibers of Collagen-Biomimetic Apatite on Titanium Alloy

    PubMed Central

    Iafisco, Michele; Foltran, Ismaela; Sabbatini, Simona; Tosi, Giorgio; Roveri, Norberto

    2012-01-01

    Titanium and its alloys are currently the mainly used materials to manufacture orthopaedic implants due to their excellent mechanical properties and corrosion resistance. Although these materials are bioinert, the improvement of biological properties (e.g., bone implant contact) can be obtained by the application of a material that mimics the bone extracellular matrix. To this aim, this work describes a new method to produce nanostructured collagen-apatite composites on titanium alloy substrate, by combining electrospinning and biomimetic mineralization. The characterization results showed that the obtained mineralized scaffolds have morphological, structural, and chemical compositional features similar to natural bone extracellular matrix. Finally, the topographic distribution of the chemical composition in the mineralized matrix evaluated by Fourier Transform Infrared microspectroscopy demonstrated that the apatite nanocrystals cover the collagen fibers assembled by the electrospinning. PMID:22400013

  7. Scales and dermal skeletal histology of an early bony fish Psarolepis romeri and their bearing on the evolution of rhombic scales and hard tissues.

    PubMed

    Qu, Qingming; Zhu, Min; Wang, Wei

    2013-01-01

    Recent discoveries of early bony fishes from the Silurian and earliest Devonian of South China (e.g. Psarolepis, Achoania, Meemannia, Styloichthys and Guiyu) have been crucial in understanding the origin and early diversification of the osteichthyans (bony fishes and tetrapods). All these early fishes, except Guiyu, have their dermal skeletal surface punctured by relatively large pore openings. However, among these early fishes little is known about scale morphology and dermal skeletal histology. Here we report new data about the scales and dermal skeletal histology of Psarolepis romeri, a taxon with important implications for studying the phylogeny of early gnathostomes and early osteichthyans. Seven subtypes of rhombic scales with similar histological composition and surface sculpture are referred to Psarolepis romeri. They are generally thick and show a faint antero-dorsal process and a broad peg-and-socket structure. In contrast to previously reported rhombic scales of osteichthyans, these scales bear a neck between crown and base as in acanthodian scales. Histologically, the crown is composed of several generations of odontodes and an irregular canal system connecting cylindrical pore cavities. Younger odontodes are deposited on older ones both superpositionally and areally. The bony tissues forming the keel of the scale are shown to be lamellar bone with plywood-like structure, whereas the other parts of the base are composed of pseudo-lamellar bone with parallel collagen fibers. The unique tissue combination in the keel (i.e., extrinsic Sharpey's fibers orthogonal to the intrinsic orthogonal sets of collagen fibers) has rarely been reported in the keel of other rhombic scales. The new data provide insights into the early evolution of rhombic (ganoid and cosmoid) scales in osteichthyans, and add to our knowledge of hard tissues of early vertebrates. PMID:23585902

  8. Scales and Dermal Skeletal Histology of an Early Bony Fish Psarolepis romeri and Their Bearing on the Evolution of Rhombic Scales and Hard Tissues

    PubMed Central

    Qu, Qingming; Zhu, Min; Wang, Wei

    2013-01-01

    Recent discoveries of early bony fishes from the Silurian and earliest Devonian of South China (e.g. Psarolepis, Achoania, Meemannia, Styloichthys and Guiyu) have been crucial in understanding the origin and early diversification of the osteichthyans (bony fishes and tetrapods). All these early fishes, except Guiyu, have their dermal skeletal surface punctured by relatively large pore openings. However, among these early fishes little is known about scale morphology and dermal skeletal histology. Here we report new data about the scales and dermal skeletal histology of Psarolepis romeri, a taxon with important implications for studying the phylogeny of early gnathostomes and early osteichthyans. Seven subtypes of rhombic scales with similar histological composition and surface sculpture are referred to Psarolepis romeri. They are generally thick and show a faint antero-dorsal process and a broad peg-and-socket structure. In contrast to previously reported rhombic scales of osteichthyans, these scales bear a neck between crown and base as in acanthodian scales. Histologically, the crown is composed of several generations of odontodes and an irregular canal system connecting cylindrical pore cavities. Younger odontodes are deposited on older ones both superpositionally and areally. The bony tissues forming the keel of the scale are shown to be lamellar bone with plywood-like structure, whereas the other parts of the base are composed of pseudo-lamellar bone with parallel collagen fibers. The unique tissue combination in the keel (i.e., extrinsic Sharpey's fibers orthogonal to the intrinsic orthogonal sets of collagen fibers) has rarely been reported in the keel of other rhombic scales. The new data provide insights into the early evolution of rhombic (ganoid and cosmoid) scales in osteichthyans, and add to our knowledge of hard tissues of early vertebrates. PMID:23585902

  9. Volume correction in the aging hand: role of dermal fillers.

    PubMed

    Rivkin, Alexander Z

    2016-01-01

    The hands, just like the face, are highly visible parts of the body. They age at a similar rate and demonstrate comparable changes with time, sun damage, and smoking. Loss of volume in the hands exposes underlying tendons, veins, and bony prominences. Rejuvenation of the hands with dermal fillers is a procedure with high patient satisfaction and relatively low risk for complications. This study will review relevant anatomy, injection technique, clinical safety, and efficacy of dermal filler volumization of the aging hand. PMID:27621659

  10. Volume correction in the aging hand: role of dermal fillers

    PubMed Central

    Rivkin, Alexander Z

    2016-01-01

    The hands, just like the face, are highly visible parts of the body. They age at a similar rate and demonstrate comparable changes with time, sun damage, and smoking. Loss of volume in the hands exposes underlying tendons, veins, and bony prominences. Rejuvenation of the hands with dermal fillers is a procedure with high patient satisfaction and relatively low risk for complications. This study will review relevant anatomy, injection technique, clinical safety, and efficacy of dermal filler volumization of the aging hand. PMID:27621659

  11. Dermal eosinophilic infiltrate in junctional epidermolysis bullosa.

    PubMed

    Saraiya, Ami; Yang, Catherine S; Kim, Jinah; Bercovitch, Lionel; Robinson-Bostom, Leslie; Telang, Gladys

    2015-08-01

    Junctional epidermolysis bullosa (JEB) is a rare genodermatosis characterized by a split in the lamina lucida usually because of mutations in LAMA3, LAMB3 and LAMC2 resulting in absence or reduction of laminin-332. Rare subtypes of JEB have mutations in COL17A1, ITGB4, ITGA6 and ITGA3 leading to reduction or dysfunction of collagen XVII, integrin α6β4 and integrin α3. The classic finding under light microscopy is a paucicellular, subepidermal split. We describe the unusual presence of an eosinophilic infiltrate in the bullae and subjacent dermis in a neonate with JEB, generalized intermediate (formerly known as non-Herlitz-type JEB), discuss the histologic differential diagnosis for a subepidermal blister in a neonate, review the literature regarding cases of epidermolysis bullosa (EB) presenting with inflammatory infiltrates, and discuss mechanisms to explain these findings. This case highlights that eosinophils can rarely be seen in EB and should not mislead the dermatopathologist into diagnosing an autoimmune blistering disorder. PMID:25950805

  12. Two-Photon deep tissue ex vivo imaging of mouse dermal and subcutaneous structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    So, Peter; Kim, Hyun; Kochevar, Irene E.

    1998-10-01

    The non-invasive determination of deep tissue three dimensional structure and biochemistry is the ultimate goal of optical biopsy. Two-photon microscopy has been shown to be a particularly promising approach. The use of infrared radiation in two-photon microscopy is critical for deep tissue imaging since tissue absorption and scattering coefficients for infrared light are much lower than for shorter wavelengths. Equally important, tissue photodamage is localized to the focal region where fluorescence excitation occurs. This report demonstrates that, by means of high resolution two-photon microscopy, skin and subcutaneous tissue structures can be imaged utilizing their endogenous fluorescence. From a freshly prepared tissue punch of a mouse ear, we were able to 3D resolve both the living and cornified keratinocytes in the epidermis, the collagen/elastin fibers in the dermal layer and the cartilage in the subcutaneous layer. The ability to non-invasively acquire 3D structures of these tissue components may find application in areas such as non-invasive diagnosis of skin cancer and the study of wound healing processes.

  13. Keratinocyte Microvesicles Regulate the Expression of Multiple Genes in Dermal Fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Huang, Ping; Bi, Jiarui; Owen, Gethin R; Chen, Weimin; Rokka, Anne; Koivisto, Leeni; Heino, Jyrki; Häkkinen, Lari; Larjava, Hannu

    2015-12-01

    Extracellular vesicles released from cells regulate many normal and pathological conditions. Little is known about the role of epidermal keratinocyte microvesicles (KC-MVs) in epithelial-stromal interaction that is essential for wound healing. We investigated, therefore, whether MV-like structures are present in human wounds and whether they affect wound healing-associated gene expression in dermal fibroblasts. In human wounds, MV-like vesicles were observed during active epithelial migration and early granulation tissue formation. When KC-MVs derived from keratinocyte-like cells (HaCaT) were added to fibroblast cultures, expression of 21 genes was significantly regulated (P<0.05) out of 80 genes investigated, including matrix metalloproteinase-1 and -3, interleukin-6 and -8, and genes associated with transforming growth factor-β signaling. Similar changes were observed at the protein level. MVs from normal epidermal keratinocytes showed similar response to HaCaT cells. KC-MVs activated ERK1/2, JNK, Smad, and p38 signaling pathways in fibroblasts with ERK1/2 signaling having the most prominent role in the MV-induced gene expression changes. KC-MVs stimulated fibroblast migration and induced fibroblast-mediated endothelial tube formation but did not affect collagen gel contraction by fibroblasts. The results demonstrate that keratinocyte microvesicles have a strong and a specific regulatory effect on fibroblasts that may modulate several aspects of wound healing. PMID:26288358

  14. Centella asiatica extracts modulate hydrogen peroxide-induced senescence in human dermal fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Kim, Young Joo; Cha, Hwa Jun; Nam, Ki Ho; Yoon, Yeongmin; Lee, Hyunjin; An, Sungkwan

    2011-12-01

    Centella asiatica (C. asiatica) is a pharmacological plant in South Asia. It has been demonstrated that C. asiatica extracts containing various pentacyclic triterpenes exert healing effects, especially wound healing and collagen synthesis in skin. However, there are few studies on the effect of C. asiatica extracts on stress-induced premature senescence (SIPS). To determine whether H(2) O(2) -induced senescence is affected by C. asiatica extracts, we performed senescence analysis on cultured human dermal fibroblasts (HDFs). We also analysed whole gene expression level using microarrays and showed that 39 mRNAs are differentially expressed in H(2) O(2) -induced HDFs with and without treatment with C. asiatica extracts. These genes regulate apoptosis, gene silencing, cell growth, transcription, senescence, DNA replication and the spindle checkpoint. Differential expression of FOXM1, E2F2, MCM2, GDF15 and BHLHB2 was confirmed using semi-quantitative PCR. In addition, C. asiatica extracts rescued the H(2) O(2) -induced repression of replication in HDFs. Therefore, the findings presented here suggest that C. asiatica extracts might regulate SIPS by preventing repression of DNA replication and mitosis-related gene expression. PMID:22092576

  15. Adverse effects of titanium dioxide nanoparticles on human dermal fibroblasts and how to protect cells.

    PubMed

    Pan, Zhi; Lee, Wilson; Slutsky, Lenny; Clark, Richard A F; Pernodet, Nadine; Rafailovich, Miriam H

    2009-04-01

    The effects of exposure of human dermal fibroblasts to rutile and anatase TiO(2) nanoparticles are reported. These particles can impair cell function, with the latter being more potent at producing damage. The exposure to nanoparticles decreases cell area, cell proliferation, mobility, and ability to contract collagen. Individual particles are shown to penetrate easily through the cell membrane in the absence of endocytosis, while some endocytosis is observed for larger particle clusters. Once inside, the particles are sequestered in vesicles, which continue to fill up with increasing incubation time till they rupture. Particles coated with a dense grafted po