Science.gov

Sample records for dermatology

  1. Dermatology Procedures

    MedlinePlus

    ... Sections of the JAOCD JAOCD Archive Published Members Online Dermatology Journals Edit This Favorite Name: Category: Share: Yes ... 2/2017 2017 AOCD Spring Current Concepts in Dermatology Meeting more Latest News ... About AOCD The AOCD was recognized in ...

  2. Triads in Dermatology

    PubMed Central

    Agrawal, Prachi G; Khopkar, Uday S; Mahajan, Sunanda A; Mishra, Sunil N

    2013-01-01

    It is imperative for any dermatology resident to have a good knowledge of the various triads in dermatology. For an easy grasp over this topic, we have grouped the various triads on the basis of their etiologies. PMID:24082177

  3. Dermatology on instagram.

    PubMed

    Karimkhani, Chante; Connett, Jessica; Boyers, Lindsay; Quest, Tyler; Dellavalle, Robert P

    2014-07-01

    The novel photo-sharing social networking platform, Instagram, has an impressive following of 75 million daily users, with a predominantly younger and female demographic. This study investigated the presence of dermatology-related content on Instagram. The most popular professional dermatological organizations, dermatology journals, and dermatology related patient advocate groups on Facebook and Twitter, determined from a prior study, were searched for established profiles on Instagram. In addition, dermatology-related terms (i.e. dermatology, dermatologist, alopecia, eczema, melanoma, psoriasis, and skin cancer) and dermatology-related hashtags (i.e. #dermatology, #dermatologist, #melanoma, #acne, #psoriasis, and #alopecia) were searched. None of the top ten dermatological journals or professional dermatological organizations were found on Instagram. Although only one of the top ten patient advocate groups related to dermatology conditions, Melanoma Research Foundation, had an Instagram presence, there were many private offices, cosmetic products, and some patient advocacy groups. This novel social networking platform could grant dermatology journals and other professional organizations a unique opportunity to reach younger demographic populations, particularly women, with the potential for true educational and life-changing impact. PMID:25046455

  4. Animals Eponyms in Dermatology

    PubMed Central

    Jindal, Nidhi; Jindal, Pooja; Kumar, Jeevan; Gupta, Sanjeev; Jain, VK

    2014-01-01

    The world of Dermatology is flooded with inflexions among clinical conditions and signs and syndromes; making it interesting, but a tougher subject to remember. Signs and syndromes have always fascinated residents, but simultaneously burdened their minds, as these attractive names are difficult to remember. This work was undertaken to review dermatological conditions and signs based on commonly encountered daily words and objects like animals, etc. Fifty dermatological conditions were found to be based on animal eponyms. For example, the usage of animal terminology in dermatology like leonine facies is present in leprosy, sarcoidosis, mycosis fungoides (MF), and airborne contact dermatitis (ABCD). PMID:25484417

  5. Men's aesthetic dermatology.

    PubMed

    Rossi, Anthony M

    2014-12-01

    Cosmetic dermatology is continuing to see a dramatic increase in both procedures performed and technological advancements. Men's aesthetic dermatology is burgeoning with more men seeking cosmetic consultations and intervention. Whether it is targeted cosmeceuticals for men or male-specific procedures, dermatologists must be aware of this evolving demographic and understand the biological, anatomical, and psychological aspects that separate this cohort from their female counterparts. Cosmetic dermatology has moved beyond just applying the same techniques used for females onto males. The use of our cosmetic toolbox can differ for men in terms of technique and dosage. This article will review the state of men's aesthetic dermatology with. PMID:25830252

  6. Eponymous signs in dermatology

    PubMed Central

    Madke, Bhushan; Nayak, Chitra

    2012-01-01

    Clinical signs reflect the sheer and close observatory quality of an astute physician. Many new dermatological signs both in clinical and diagnostic aspects of various dermatoses are being reported and no single book on dermatology literature gives a comprehensive list of these “signs” and postgraduate students in dermatology finds it difficult to have access to the description, as most of these resident doctor do not have access to the said journal articles. “Signs” commonly found in dermatologic literature with a brief discussion and explanation is reviewed in this paper. PMID:23189246

  7. Thalidomide in Dermatology: Revisited

    PubMed Central

    Hassan, Iffat; Dorjay, Konchok; Anwar, Parvaiz

    2015-01-01

    The use of thalidomide in relation to dermatology is well- known and enough data is available in the literature about various aspects of thalidomide. Despite being an interesting and useful drug for many dermatoses, it is associated with many health hazards including the birth defects, phocomelia. We hereby present a comprehensive review about thalidomide and its application in dermatology. PMID:25814738

  8. Vitamin E in dermatology

    PubMed Central

    Keen, Mohammad Abid; Hassan, Iffat

    2016-01-01

    Vitamin E is an important fat-soluble antioxidant and has been in use for more than 50 years in dermatology. It is an important ingredient in many cosmetic products. It protects the skin from various deleterious effects due to solar radiation by acting as a free-radical scavenger. Experimental studies suggest that vitamin E has antitumorigenic and photoprotective properties. There is a paucity of controlled clinical studies providing a rationale for well-defined dosages and clinical indications of vitamin E usage in dermatological practice. The aim of this article is to review the cosmetic as well as clinical implications of vitamin E in dermatology. PMID:27559512

  9. Yoga for dermatologic conditions.

    PubMed

    Jalalat, Sheila

    2015-04-01

    As both a dermatology resident and yoga instructor, I find the potential correlation between the 2 disciplines to be interesting and a growing topic of attention in the media today. With the rising trend of practicing yoga, which encompasses physical postures, breathing exercises, and meditation or mindfulness, it is inevitable that patients will inquire about the benefits of yoga in managing dermatologic problems. In this column, I will discuss the dermatologic manifestations of stress as well as the known health benefits of yoga as described in the literature so that residents may offer an objective opinion about yoga in response to patient inquiries. PMID:25942035

  10. Dermatology on Tumblr.

    PubMed

    Correnti, Christina; Boyers, Lindsay; Karimkhani, Chante; Roth, Gretchen; Dellavalle, Robert P

    2014-05-01

    Tumblr broke into the social media scene in 2007 as a micro-blogging platform that hosts 169 million blogs, 75 billion total posts, and 111 million posts daily to date. This study aimed to determine the presence of dermatology-focused journals, organizations, and groups on Tumblr. These were entered into the Tumblr search query to identify affiliated Tumblr blogs and 'dermatology Tumblr' was searched on Google to determine the first four distinct results that were active within the last six months. None of the dermatology-focused journals, organizations, or groups maintained a Tumblr blog and three of the first four blogs on Google were maintained by private practices. In conclusion, Tumblr remains a social media domain that lacks a strong presence from dermatology journals and organizations, remaining an untapped resource for information dissemination and interaction with the public. PMID:24852781

  11. Aspirin in dermatology: Revisited

    PubMed Central

    Bubna, Aditya Kumar

    2015-01-01

    Aspirin has been one of the oldest drugs in the field of medicine, with a wide range of applications. In dermatology, aspirin has shown benefit in a variety of disorders. Recently, reduction of melanoma risk with aspirin has been demonstrated. Although an analgesic to begin with, aspirin has come a long way; after cardiology, it is now found to be useful even in dermatology. PMID:26753146

  12. Surgical lasers in dermatology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szymanczyk, Jacek; Nowakowski, Wlodzimierz; Golebiowska, Aleksandra; Michalska, I.; Mindak, Marek K.

    1997-10-01

    Almost every laser for medical applications was first tried in dermatology. The efficiency of YAG, CO2, and Argon lasers on this area and their potential advantages over conventional methods were mostly evaluated by cosmetic effect of laser therapy. The indications for different laser treatment in such dermatological cases as: angiomas, telangiectasias, pigmented lesions, nevus flammeus congenitus, deep cavernous angiomas, skin neoplasms and condylomata acuminata are discussed in this paper and the results of the laser therapy are also presented.

  13. Dermatology in Doximity.

    PubMed

    Ashack, Kurt A; Burton, Kyle A; Dellavalle, Robert P

    2016-01-01

    Doximity, currently the largest online social networking service for United States (US) health care professionals and medical students, provides a wide variety of content to a large audience. In fact, its database includes 1,078,305 physicians in the US. It is therefore important to evaluate this content from time to time. Our objective is to analyze both the residency rankings and news content presented in Doximity, with respect to dermatology. The study compared the residency rankings created by Doximity to another dermatology residency ranking system that used a different algorithm. In terms of dermatology content, seven dermatology-related search terms were entered into the Doximity search query and data was collected on the first 20 "relevant" articles. Our study evaluated a total of 140 articles. The search term "skin cancer" yielded the most articles totaling 6,001. Informative articles were the most common type of article for each content item searched except for "dermatology", yielding research articles as the most common content type (70%). The search term "melanoma awareness" had the largest number of shares (19,032). In comparing dermatology residency rankings on Doximity with another ranking system that accounted for scholarly achievement, there was 50% overlap. In conclusion, it is vital to evaluate content on social media websites that are utilized by US medical students and health care professionals. We hope this information presented provides an up-to-date analysis on the quality of one particular social media platform. PMID:27267188

  14. Diet and Dermatology

    PubMed Central

    Desai, Samir P.

    2014-01-01

    For decades, it was thought that many common dermatological conditions had no relationship to diet. Studies from recent years, however, have made it clear that diet may influence outcome. In this review, the authors focus on conditions for which the role of diet has traditionally been an underappreciated aspect of therapy. In some cases, dietary interventions may influence the course of the skin disease, as in acne. In others, dietary change may serve as one aspect of prevention, such as in skin cancer and aging of the skin. In others, dermatological disease may be linked to systemic disease, and dietary changes may affect health outcomes, as in psoriasis. Lastly, systemic medications prescribed for dermatological disease, such as steroids, are known to raise the risk of other diseases, and dietary change may reduce this risk. PMID:25053983

  15. Hippocrates on Pediatric Dermatology.

    PubMed

    Sgantzos, Markos; Tsoucalas, Gregory; Karamanou, Marianna; Giatsiou, Styliani; Tsoukalas, Ioannis; Androutsos, George

    2015-01-01

    Hippocrates of Kos is well known in medicine, but his contributions to pediatric dermatology have not previously been examined. A systematic study of Corpus Hippocraticum was undertaken to document references of clinical and historical importance of pediatric dermatology. In Corpus Hippocraticum, a variety of skin diseases are described, along with proposed treatments. Hippocrates rejected the theory of the punishment of the Greek gods and supported the concept that dermatologic diseases resulted from a loss of balance in the body humors. Many of the terms that Hippocrates and his pupils used are still being used today. Moreover, he probably provided one of the first descriptions of skin findings in smallpox, Henoch-Schönlein purpura (also known as anaphylactoid purpura, purpura rheumatica, allergic purpura), and meningococcal septicemia. PMID:26058689

  16. Autologous Therapies in Dermatology

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Sumir; Mahajan, Bharat Bhushan; Singh, Amarbir

    2014-01-01

    Autologous therapy is a therapeutic intervention that uses an individual’s cells or tissues, which are processed outside the body, and reintroduced into the donor. This emerging field presently represents a mere tip of the iceberg with much knowledge and applications yet to be discovered. It, being free from risks of hypersensitivity reactions and transmission of infectious agents, has been explored in various fields, such as plastic surgery, orthopedics, and dermatology. This review article focuses on various forms of autologous therapies used in dermatology along with their applications and mechanisms of action. PMID:25584137

  17. Drug therapies in dermatology.

    PubMed

    Aslam, Arif; Griffiths, Christopher E M

    2014-02-01

    This article explores the current and emerging therapies for skin disease, with a particular focus on chronic plaque psoriasis and metastatic malignant melanoma. We discuss the current biological therapies used for psoriasis and those on the horizon, including small molecules and biosimilars. We also summarise the recent advances in the use of novel therapeutic agents in other dermatological diseases and outline the promise of translational research and stratified medicine approaches in dermatology. Better matching of patients with therapies is anticipated to have a major effect on both clinical practice and the development of new drugs and diagnostics. PMID:24532745

  18. Paradoxes in dermatology

    PubMed Central

    Adya, Keshavmurthy A.; Inamadar, Arun C.; Palit, Aparna

    2013-01-01

    Many paradoxical phenomena related to clinical, immunological, and therapeutic dermatology have been described. While some of them can be explained logically, the cause for others can only be speculated. Whenever encountered in clinical practice, background knowledge of such paradoxes may be useful to the clinician. PMID:23741675

  19. Dermatologic problems of musicians.

    PubMed

    Rimmer, S; Spielvogel, R L

    1990-04-01

    The unique occupational dermatologic disorders of musicians are reviewed and compiled to provide the clinician with a reference list. Our results were obtained by a survey of 24 members of a professional symphony orchestra. The results of the survey revealed a significant incidence of occupationally related skin problems in musicians. PMID:2138638

  20. Vaccines in dermatological diseases.

    PubMed

    Magel, G D; Mendoza, N; Digiorgio, C M; Haitz, K A; Lapolla, W J; Tyring, S K

    2011-06-01

    Vaccines have been a cornerstone in medicine and public health since their inception in the 18th century by Edward Jenner. Today, greater than 20 vaccines are used worldwide for the prevention of both viral and bacterial diseases. This article will review the vaccines used for the following dermatological diseases: smallpox, measles, mumps, rubella, chickenpox, shingles, and human papillomavirus. PMID:21566552

  1. Dyslipidemia in Dermatological Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Shenoy, Chetana; Shenoy, Manjunath Mala; Rao, Gururaja K.

    2015-01-01

    Dyslipidemias are one of the common metabolic disorders. A link between dermatological disorders like psoriasis and dyslipidemia has been established in the recent past. Many dermatological disorders could have a systemic inflammatory component which explains such association. Chronic inflammatory dermatological disorders could also have other metabolic imbalances that may contribute to dyslipidemia. Presence of such abnormal metabolism may justify routine screening of these disorders for associated dyslipidemia and other metabolic abnormalities and early treatment of such comorbidities to improve quality of life. Some of the drugs used by dermatologists such as retinoids are also likely to be a cause of dyslipidemia. Hence, it is imperative that the dermatologists obtain scientific knowledge on the underlying mechanisms involved in dyslipidemia and understand when to intervene with therapies. A systematic review of the English language literature was done by using Google Scholar and PubMed. In this review, attempts are made to list the dermatological disorders associated with dyslipidemia; to simplify the understanding of underlying mechanisms; and to give a brief idea about the interventions. PMID:26713286

  2. Stem cells in dermatology*

    PubMed Central

    Ogliari, Karolyn Sassi; Marinowic, Daniel; Brum, Dario Eduardo; Loth, Fabrizio

    2014-01-01

    Preclinical and clinical research have shown that stem cell therapy could be a promising therapeutic option for many diseases in which current medical treatments do not achieve satisfying results or cure. This article describes stem cells sources and their therapeutic applications in dermatology today. PMID:24770506

  3. Dermatology for the Allergist

    PubMed Central

    Lockey, Richard

    2010-01-01

    Abstract: Allergists/immunologists see patients with a variety of skin disorders. Some, such as atopic and allergic contact dermatitis, are caused by abnormal immunologic reactions, whereas others, such as seborrheic dermatitis or rosacea, lack an immunologic basis. This review summarizes a select group of dermatologic problems commonly encountered by an allergist/immunologist. PMID:23268431

  4. Ethics in pediatric dermatology.

    PubMed

    Kelly, John B; Makkar, Hanspaul S

    2012-01-01

    The patient-parent-physician relationship is central to studying medical ethics in pediatric dermatology. The rights of children in medical decision making are ambiguous, and parents and physicians will often override the autonomy of a child when a particular treatment is deemed to be in the child's best interest. The use of physical restraint to enforce a treatment should be justified, and a reasonable attempt should be made to ensure the cooperation of the child, if possible. Medical photography is central to the practice of pediatric dermatology in that it allows for serial observation of cutaneous lesions over time. Established guidelines and standards should be followed. Pediatric dermatologists frequently prescribe medications off-label; if following established professional standards, and prescribing with good intention, off-label prescribing can be appropriate and rational. PMID:22902215

  5. Psychological Interventions in Dermatology

    PubMed Central

    de Zoysa, Piyanjali

    2013-01-01

    The objective of this paper is to introduce and emphasize the importance of psychological interventions for those with dermatological conditions. In keeping with the current literature, the author envisages a two-tier approach in the provision of such psychological interventions. Firstly, most patients with dermatology conditions may not require psychological change. Instead, they could be approached with effective doctor–patient communication skills, within a context of empathy and positive regard. At the second tier, however, based on the clinical interview, some patients may require varying degrees of psychological change in order to better manage their illness. In such a context, a dermatologist with training in psychotherapy would be required. In the absence of such a person, the patient may be referred to a psychologist or another mental health professional trained in psychotherapy. PMID:23372215

  6. [What's new in dermatology?].

    PubMed

    Ingber, Arieh

    2012-10-01

    Skin diseases have been the focus of many innovations in the last decade. These innovations are mainly in the classification of skin diseases (primarily due to the dramatic development of research into the genetics of skin diseases, but not only because of this element), a new understanding of the processes underlying various diseases, improvements in diagnosis and innovations in drug treatment. In the current issue of "Harefuah", we review some advances in the field of skin diseases discovered in recent years. We review psoriasis as a multi-system disease, describe new insights into polyarteritis nodosa, parapsoriasis, autoinflammatory syndromes, and pustular psoriasis of pregnancy (impetigo herpetiformis). We also describe the new immunotherapy for metastatic melanoma. Dermatology aLso has new technological developments, especially the in vivo reflected mode confocal laser microscopy. We describe in detail the use of this technique in dermatology. PMID:23316658

  7. Cell Therapy in Dermatology

    PubMed Central

    Petrof, Gabriela; Abdul-Wahab, Alya; McGrath, John A.

    2014-01-01

    Harnessing the regenerative capacity of keratinocytes and fibroblasts from human skin has created new opportunities to develop cell-based therapies for patients. Cultured cells and bioengineered skin products are being used to treat patients with inherited and acquired skin disorders associated with defective skin, and further clinical trials of new products are in progress. The capacity of extracutaneous sources of cells such as bone marrow is also being investigated for its plasticity in regenerating skin, and new strategies, such as the derivation of inducible pluripotent stem cells, also hold great promise for future cell therapies in dermatology. This article reviews some of the preclinical and clinical studies and future directions relating to cell therapy in dermatology, particularly for inherited skin diseases associated with fragile skin and poor wound healing. PMID:24890834

  8. Countertransference in Dermatology.

    PubMed

    Consoli, Sylvie G; Consoli, Silla M

    2016-08-23

    The doctor-patient relationship in dermatology, as in all the fields of medicine, is not a neutral relationship, removed from affects. These affects take root in the sociocultural, professional, family and personal history of both persons in the relationship. They underpin the psychic reality of the patients, along with a variety of representations, preconceived ideas, and fantasies concerning dermatology, the dermatologists or the psychiatrists. Practitioners call these "countertransference feelings", with reference to the psychoanalytical concept of "countertransference". These feelings come forward in a more or less conscious way and are active during the follow-up of any patient: in fact they can facilitate or hinder such a follow-up. Our purpose in focusing on this issue is to sensitize the dermatologists to recognizing these countertransference feelings in themselves (and the attitudes generated by them), in order to allow the patients and doctors to build a dynamic, creative, trustful and effective relationship. PMID:27282987

  9. Thermotherapy in dermatology.

    PubMed

    Bayata, Sedef; Türel Ermertcan, Aylin

    2012-09-01

    Heat has been used as a medicinal and healing modality throughout human history. Today, thermotherapy is being studied in the treatment of many diseases. Although the exact anti-infective mechanism of thermotherapy is yet to be solved, this historically important healing method has shown significant results in the treatments of a variety of dermatological infectious diseases ranging from simple acne to bacterial, parasitic and viral infections, in modern medicine. Induction of cellular apoptosis in medium doses and necrosis in high doses has made thermotherapy an important modality in the treatment of malignant tumors. Especially in dermatology, significant results have been achieved in the treatment of Bowen's disease, melanoma and simple warts. Thermotherapy, which today has also shown advancements in cosmetology, can be delivered by liquid nitrogen in the form of hypothermia and a variety of ways ranging from hot water pads to ultrasound and even to lasers, in the form of hyperthermia. In this article, the place of this historically important treatment method in modern medicine, especially in dermatology, has been reviewed by an extensive search of the literature. PMID:22107049

  10. Spa therapy in dermatology.

    PubMed

    Riyaz, Najeeba; Arakkal, Faiz Riyaz

    2011-01-01

    Spa therapy constitutes the use of mineral springs and thermal mud to soothe and heal various ailments. Like the mineral springs, seas and oceans are also important centers for spa therapy of which the most important is Dead Sea (DS). DS has been famous for thousands of years for its miraculous curative and cosmetic properties. Intensive research is going on using DS minerals in a wide range of dermatological conditions especially psoriasis, atopic dermatitis, vitiligo and other eczemas and several papers have been published in various international and pharmacological journals. PMID:21393940

  11. [Lifestyle diseases in dermatology].

    PubMed

    Harth, W; Hillert, A

    2007-10-01

    Psychosocial disorders and lifestyle trends have become more important in dermatology. Lifestyle diseases are a biopsychosocial phenomenon that can only be diagnosed and treated by paying attention to the quickly changing sociocultural aspects. The naming and popularization of the particular lifestyle diseases takes place by the media, but there is only an imprecise medical classification of these phenomena. This article gives an overview of the current situation and medical conditions of lifestyle diseases and try to assign them to an established psychosomatic diagnosis, based on the clinical symptomatic. Most often somatoform disorders, somatization disorders with a repeated presentation of physical symptoms which cannot be medically objectified or depressive disturbances are found. PMID:17701144

  12. OCT in Dermatology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holmes, John; Welzel, Julia

    OCT is increasingly interesting for non-invasive skin imaging in Dermatology. Due to its resolution and imaging depth, OCT is already routinely established for diagnosis of nonmelanoma skin cancer, whereas for pigmented lesions, the resolution is still not high enough. OCT has also a high value for monitoring of treatment effects, for example to control healing after non-surgical topical treatment of basal cell carcinomas. In summary, there are several indications for applications of OCT to image skin diseases, and its importance will grow in the future due to further technical developments like speckle variance OCT.

  13. Balneotherapy in dermatology.

    PubMed

    Matz, Hagit; Orion, Edith; Wolf, Ronni

    2003-01-01

    Balneotherapy and spa therapy emerged as an important treatment modality in the 1800s, first in Europe and then in the United States. Balneotherapy involves immersion of the patient in mineral water baths or pools. Today, water therapy is being practiced in many countries. Examples of unique and special places for balneotherapy are the Dead Sea in Israel, the Kangal hot spring in Turkey, and the Blue Lagoon in Iceland. Bathing in water with a high salt concentration is safe, effective, and pleasant for healing and recovery. This approach needs no chemicals or potentially harmful drugs. There are almost no side effects during and after treatment, and there is a very low risk to the patient's general health and well-being. Mineral waters and muds are commonly used for the treatment of various dermatologic conditions. The major dermatologic diseases that are frequently treated by balneotherapy with a high rate of success are psoriasis and atopic dermatitis. The mechanisms by which broad spectrums of diseases are alleviated by spa therapy have not been fully elucidated. They probably incorporate chemical, thermal, mechanical, and immunomodulatory effects. The major importance of balneotherapy and spa therapy both individually and as complements to other therapies lies in their potential effectiveness after standard medical treatments have failed to give comfort to these patients. PMID:12919115

  14. Nanotechnology in Dermatology*

    PubMed Central

    Antonio, João Roberto; Antônio, Carlos Roberto; Cardeal, Izabela Lídia Soares; Ballavenuto, Julia Maria Avelino; Oliveira, João Rodrigo

    2014-01-01

    The scientific community and general public have been exposed to a series of achievements attributed to a new area of knowledge: Nanotechnology. Both abroad and in Brazil, funding agencies have launched programs aimed at encouraging this type of research. Indeed, for many who come into contact with this subject it will be clear the key role that chemical knowledge will play in the evolution of this subject. And even more, will see that it is a science in which the basic structure is formed by distilling different areas of inter-and multidisciplinary knowledge along the lines of new paradigms. In this article, we attempt to clarify the foundations of nanotechnology, and demonstrate their contribution to new advances in dermatology as well as medicine in general. Nanotechnology is clearly the future. PMID:24626657

  15. New described dermatological disorders.

    PubMed

    Gönül, Müzeyyen; Cevirgen Cemil, Bengu; Keseroglu, Havva Ozge; Kaya Akis, Havva

    2014-01-01

    Many advances in dermatology have been made in recent years. In the present review article, newly described disorders from the last six years are presented in detail. We divided these reports into different sections, including syndromes, autoinflammatory diseases, tumors, and unclassified disease. Syndromes included are "circumferential skin creases Kunze type" and "unusual type of pachyonychia congenita or a new syndrome"; autoinflammatory diseases include "chronic atypical neutrophilic dermatosis with lipodystrophy and elevated temperature (CANDLE) syndrome," "pyoderma gangrenosum, acne, and hidradenitis suppurativa (PASH) syndrome," and "pyogenic arthritis, pyoderma gangrenosum, acne, and hidradenitis suppurativa (PAPASH) syndrome"; tumors include "acquired reactive digital fibroma," "onychocytic matricoma and onychocytic carcinoma," "infundibulocystic nail bed squamous cell carcinoma," and "acral histiocytic nodules"; unclassified disorders include "saurian papulosis," "symmetrical acrokeratoderma," "confetti-like macular atrophy," and "skin spicules," "erythema papulosa semicircularis recidivans." PMID:25243162

  16. Laser in dermatology.

    PubMed

    Boord, Mona

    2006-08-01

    The laser is a tool that will augment the surgical techniques available to the veterinarian. When using the laser compared with traditional surgery there are multiple procedures that can be performed with much greater ease, and some procedures that previously could not be performed. Specialty and academic practices have used lasers for photodynamic therapy, lithotripsy of urinary calculi, and percutaneous disk ablation. This article will focus on the lasers use in dermatology. It is essential that the surgeon learn the basics of laser physics, how the laser interacts with tissue and the safety issues one needs to consider during its use. On deciding to use the laser the surgical techniques chosen should always be based on considering the advantages and disadvantages the laser has to offer. The use of biomedical lasers is a "cutting edge" technique now available to our veterinary field. PMID:16933481

  17. Rituximab: Uses in Dermatology.

    PubMed

    Gleghorn, K; Wilson, J; Wilkerson, M

    2016-09-01

    Rituximab is an anti-CD20 monoclonal antibody with considerable potential in dermatology due to an increase in off-label indications. Chronic graft-versus-host disease and pemphigus vulgaris are two of the most promising indications for off-label use of rituximab. It is a generally safe alternative that should be considered when traditional therapy with corticosteroids or immunosuppressants has failed or caused significant intolerance. Currently, rituximab is only FDA-approved for treatment of follicular and diffuse large B-cell non-Hodgkin's lymphoma, rheumatoid arthritis, chronic lymphocytic leukemia, granulomatosis with polyangiitis (formerly Wegener's granulomatosis) and microscopic polyangiitis. Herein, off-label uses of rituximab and its efficacy in the treatment of cutaneous diseases are reviewed. PMID:27603326

  18. Somatization disorders in dermatology.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Madhulika A

    2006-02-01

    This paper reviews a wide range of somatization-related symptoms that are encountered in dermatology. These include the unexplained cutaneous sensory syndromes especially the cutaneous dysesthesias associated with pain, numbness and pruritus; traumatic memories in post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) which are experienced on a sensory level as 'body memories' and may present as local or generalized pruritic states, urticaria and angioedema; and unexplained flushing reactions and profuse perspiration, in addition to unexplained exacerbations of stress-reactive dermatoses such as psoriasis and atopic eczema secondary to the autonomic hyperarousal in PTSD; classic 'pseudoneurologic' symptoms associated with dissociation including unexplained loss of touch or pain, in addition to the self-induced dermatoses such as dermatitis artefacta and trichotillomania that are encountered with dissociative states; and body dysmorphic disorder where the patient often presents with a somatic preoccupation involving the skin or hair. PMID:16451879

  19. Perspectives in Occupational Dermatology

    PubMed Central

    Mathias, C. G. Toby; Maibach, Howard I.

    1982-01-01

    Because large surface areas of the skin are exposed directly to the environment, skin is an organ particularly vulnerable to occupationally induced disease. Statistics show that, excluding accidental injury, nearly half of all occupational illnesses occur in this organ; a fourth of all workers suffering from occupational skin disease lose an average of 10 to 12 workdays. The constant evolution of new industrial chemicals and methods of manufacture continue to bring new skin hazards and disease into the workplace. Occupational health physicians and practitioners, who usually have minimal training in dermatology, must diagnose and treat unfamiliar diseases in a setting of even less familiar, often overwhelming, technology. A thorough understanding of cutaneous defense mechanisms, clinical patterns of occupational skin disease and methods for establishing accurate diagnoses is essential. PMID:6219498

  20. Morgellons in dermatology.

    PubMed

    Harth, Wolfgang; Hermes, Barbara; Freudenmann, Roland W

    2010-04-01

    Delusional parasitosis (DP) is the most frequent delusional disorder in dermatology. In DP there is a fixed belief of a usually skin-related invasion or infestation by a number of alleged infectious species (usually parasites and bacteria), whose identity has varied over the decades. Since 2002 worldwide an increasing number of patients have complained of unverifiable fibers and filaments in or on the skin, associated with numerous nonspecific complaints (arthralgias, altered cognitive function and extreme fatigue). This entity has been named "Morgellons disease" by the patients themselves, although medical evidence for its existence is lacking. As an example, we discuss a 55-year-old woman who complained of Morgellons disease and was treated as if she had DP. Currently the delusional assumption of infestation with Morgellons should be considered as a new type of DP with some kind of inanimate material. We therefore recommend in case of DP including Morgellons the use of the broader term "delusional infestation". PMID:19878403

  1. American Osteopathic College of Dermatology

    MedlinePlus

    ... Events Find a Dermatology DO Osteopathic Medicine Disease Database Contributors Doctor Derm App Skin Facts Aging and ... the site. Popular features include the Skin Disease Database and Find a D.O. Dermatologist . AOCD members ...

  2. Dermatological complications of obesity.

    PubMed

    García Hidalgo, Linda

    2002-01-01

    Obesity is a health problem of considerable magnitude in the Western world. Dermatological changes have been reported in patients with obesity, including: acanthosis nigricans and skin tags (due to insulin resistance); hyperandrogenism; striae due to over extension; stasis pigmentation due to peripheral vascular disease; lymphedema; pathologies associated with augmented folds; morphologic changes in the foot anatomy due to excess load; and complications that may arise from hospitalization. Acanthosis nigricans plaques can be managed by improved control of hyperinsulinemia; the vitamin D3 analog calcipitriol has also been shown to be effective. Skin tags can be removed by snipping with curved scissors, by cryotherapy or by electrodesiccation. Hyperandrogenism, a result of increased production of endogenous androgens due to increased volumes of adipose tissue (which synthesizes testosterone) and hyperinsulinemia (which increases the production of ovarian androgens) needs to be carefully assessed to ensure disorders such as virilizing tumors and congenital adrenal hyperplasia are treated appropriately. Treatment of hyperandrogenism should be centred on controlling insulin levels; weight loss, oral contraceptive and antiandrogenic therapies are also possible treatment options. The etiology of striae distensae, also known as stretch marks, is yet to be defined and treatment options are unsatisfactory at present; striae rubra and alba have been treated with a pulsed dye laser with marginal success. The relationship between obesity and varicose veins is controversial; symptoms are best prevented by the use of elastic stockings. Itching and inflammation associated with stasis pigmentation, the result of red blood cells escaping into the tissues, can be treated with corticosteroids. Lymphedema is associated with dilatation of tissue channels, reduced tissue oxygenation and provides a culture medium for bacterial growth. Lymphedema treatment is directed towards reducing the

  3. Facticious disorders in dermatology.

    PubMed

    Harth, Wolfgang; Taube, Klaus-Michael; Gieler, Uwe

    2010-05-01

    Facticious Disorders are self inflicted skin lesions and includes the creation of physical or psychiatric symptoms in oneself or other reference persons. In dermatology frequently, there are mechanical injuries by pressures, friction, occlusion, biting, cutting, stabbing, thermal burns or self-inflicted infections with wound-healing impairment, abscesses, mutilations or damages by acids and other toxic to the skin. The current classification differentiates between four groups: 1. Dermatitis artefacta syndrome in the narrower sense as unconscious/dissociated self-injury, 2. Dermatitis paraartefacta syndrome: Disorders of impulse control, often as manipulation of an existing specific dermatosis (often semi-conscious, admitted - self-injury), 3. Malingering: consciously simulated injuries and diseases to obtain material gain, 4. special forms, such as the Gardner Diamond Syndrome, Münchhausen Syndrome and Münchhausen-by-Proxy Syndrome. This categorization is helpful in understanding the different pathogenic mechanisms and the psychodynamics involved, as well as in developing various therapeutic avenues and determining the prognosis. PMID:20163503

  4. New Described Dermatological Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Cevirgen Cemil, Bengu; Keseroglu, Havva Ozge; Kaya Akis, Havva

    2014-01-01

    Many advances in dermatology have been made in recent years. In the present review article, newly described disorders from the last six years are presented in detail. We divided these reports into different sections, including syndromes, autoinflammatory diseases, tumors, and unclassified disease. Syndromes included are “circumferential skin creases Kunze type” and “unusual type of pachyonychia congenita or a new syndrome”; autoinflammatory diseases include “chronic atypical neutrophilic dermatosis with lipodystrophy and elevated temperature (CANDLE) syndrome,” “pyoderma gangrenosum, acne, and hidradenitis suppurativa (PASH) syndrome,” and “pyogenic arthritis, pyoderma gangrenosum, acne, and hidradenitis suppurativa (PAPASH) syndrome”; tumors include “acquired reactive digital fibroma,” “onychocytic matricoma and onychocytic carcinoma,” “infundibulocystic nail bed squamous cell carcinoma,” and “acral histiocytic nodules”; unclassified disorders include “saurian papulosis,” “symmetrical acrokeratoderma,” “confetti-like macular atrophy,” and “skin spicules,” “erythema papulosa semicircularis recidivans.” PMID:25243162

  5. Nanoparticles in dermatology.

    PubMed

    Papakostas, Dimitrios; Rancan, Fiorenza; Sterry, Wolfram; Blume-Peytavi, Ulrike; Vogt, Annika

    2011-10-01

    Recent advances in the field of nanotechnology have allowed the manufacturing of elaborated nanometer-sized particles for various biomedical applications. A broad spectrum of particles, extending from various lipid nanostructures such as liposomes and solid lipid nanoparticles, to metal, nanocrystalline and polymer particles have already been tested as drug delivery systems in different animal models with remarkable results, promising an extensive commercialization in the coming years. Controlled drug release to skin and skin appendages, targeting of hair follicle-specific cell populations, transcutaneous vaccination and transdermal gene therapy are only a few of these new applications. Carrier systems of the new generation take advantage of improved skin penetration properties, depot effect with sustained drug release and of surface functionalization (e.g., the binding to specific ligands) allowing specific cellular and subcellular targeting. Drug delivery to skin by means of microparticles and nanocarriers could revolutionize the treatment of several skin disorders. However, the toxicological and environmental safety of micro- and nanoparticles has to be evaluated using specific toxicological studies prior to a wider implementation of the new technology. This review aims to give an overview of the most investigated applications of transcutaneously applied particle-based formulations in the fields of cosmetics and dermatology. PMID:21837474

  6. Immunofluorescence in dermatology.

    PubMed

    Chhabra, Seema; Minz, Ranjana Walker; Saikia, Biman

    2012-01-01

    Direct immunofluorescence (DIF) and indirect immunofluorescence (IIF) tests on skin biopsy are being done mostly in academic teaching hospitals. These tests provide a useful diagnostic aid to dermatologists. Immunohistology and serology can, in conjunction with histology, provide considerable help in delineation and diagnosis of various skin disorders as well as systemic diseases with skin involvement, e.g. systemic lupus erythematosus. Immunofluorescence (IF) studies have now become an invaluable supplement to clinical and histological examination in a variety of dermatological diseases. These skin diseases now include not only bullous and connective tissue disorders, vasculitides, and conditions such as lichen planus, but also the scaling dermatoses, notably psoriasis. In this review article, we share our experience of providing such a diagnostic facility for more than 30 years in a large tertiary care health center in North India and also help to outline the conditions, which can be diagnosed confidently, and others where IF can help in confirming a diagnosis or the immune component of the disease. The article also deals with handling of skin biopsy specimens and interpretation of biopsy findings on DIF and IIF examination. PMID:23075636

  7. Immunoadsorption in dermatology.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, Enno; Zillikens, Detlef

    2010-05-01

    Immunoadsorption (IA), also termed immunoapheresis, has been established as effective and specific tool advantageous to plasmapheresis to remove immunoglobulin and immune complexes and in cytapheresis, immune cells from the circulation. IA was successfully used in various autoantibody-mediated diseases, e.g. acquired hemophilia, myasthenia gravis, dilated cardiomyopathy, and Guillain-Barré syndrome. In dermatology, IA has been applied as an effective adjuvant treatment for autoimmune bullous diseases. Autoimmune blistering disorders are a heterogeneous group of diseases that are associated with autoantibodies to desmosomal (pemphigus group) and basal membrane zone proteins (pemphigoid group, epidermolysis bullosa acquisita). Because the pathogenic relevance of autoantibodies was clearly demonstrated in the majority of these disorders, removal of autoantibodies, therefore, appears to be a rational therapeutic approach for these patients. IA has been shown to effectively lower the autoantibody levels and leads to rapid clinical responses in patients with immunobullous disorders. Here, clinical effects and adverse events of IA in more than 50 reported patients with autoimmune blistering disorders are reviewed. In addition, an overview of the available IA systems and treatment protocols is provided and guidelines of a recent consensus of German, Austrian, and Swiss experts for the use of IA in autoimmune bullous diseases are summarized. PMID:20049466

  8. Biosimilars in dermatology

    PubMed Central

    Olek-Hrab, Karolina; Karczewski, Jacek; Teresiak-Mikołajczak, Ewa; Adamski, Zygmunt

    2015-01-01

    Over the last decade the availability of biological drugs for the treatment of psoriasis vulgaris, psoriatic arthritis and many other inflammatory diseases has revolutionized the treatment of these diseases around the world. Due to the high cost of therapy, the search has started for biosimilars. In dermatology the greatest interest in biosimilar medicines concerns inhibitors of tumor necrosis factor a (TNF-α), for use in the treatment of psoriasis vulgaris and psoriatic arthritis (infliximab, etanercept, adalimumab). The most important element of the safety of biologicals is their immunogenicity. Therefore, when discussing biosimilars, attention needs to be paid to the dangers of their immune activity. In view of the fact that the drugs contain and aggregates, produced by living organisms or cultures of living cells, they cannot be compared in any way to low molecular weight synthetic generics (called generics). Biosimilars are authorized for use in patients and treated as equivalent to the reference medicine only after passing a number of studies and assessments. As it is well known, the development of medicine and pharmacology is extremely intense, and the market in biological medicine is developing much faster than that of all other drugs, which underlines their important role in modern medicine. Currently, the subject of biosimilars is one of the most important challenges and topics of discussion around the world, including pharmacovigilance and legal and economic regulatory standards. It seems inevitable that biosimilar products will be introduced for the treatment of diseases with indications corresponding to the original product on which they are based. PMID:26759547

  9. Biosimilars in dermatology.

    PubMed

    Mazur, Małgorzata; Olek-Hrab, Karolina; Karczewski, Jacek; Teresiak-Mikołajczak, Ewa; Adamski, Zygmunt

    2015-10-01

    Over the last decade the availability of biological drugs for the treatment of psoriasis vulgaris, psoriatic arthritis and many other inflammatory diseases has revolutionized the treatment of these diseases around the world. Due to the high cost of therapy, the search has started for biosimilars. In dermatology the greatest interest in biosimilar medicines concerns inhibitors of tumor necrosis factor a (TNF-α), for use in the treatment of psoriasis vulgaris and psoriatic arthritis (infliximab, etanercept, adalimumab). The most important element of the safety of biologicals is their immunogenicity. Therefore, when discussing biosimilars, attention needs to be paid to the dangers of their immune activity. In view of the fact that the drugs contain and aggregates, produced by living organisms or cultures of living cells, they cannot be compared in any way to low molecular weight synthetic generics (called generics). Biosimilars are authorized for use in patients and treated as equivalent to the reference medicine only after passing a number of studies and assessments. As it is well known, the development of medicine and pharmacology is extremely intense, and the market in biological medicine is developing much faster than that of all other drugs, which underlines their important role in modern medicine. Currently, the subject of biosimilars is one of the most important challenges and topics of discussion around the world, including pharmacovigilance and legal and economic regulatory standards. It seems inevitable that biosimilar products will be introduced for the treatment of diseases with indications corresponding to the original product on which they are based. PMID:26759547

  10. Eponyms in dermatology literature linked to Japan

    PubMed Central

    Al Aboud, Ahmad; Al Aboud, Khalid

    2012-01-01

    There are many different eponyms in common use in dermatology today, originating from a variety of countries worldwide. This review discusses a selection of dermatological eponyms that are linked to Japan. PMID:22291476

  11. Nose: Applied Aspects in Dermatology.

    PubMed

    Lakshmi, Dammaningala Venkataramaiah; Shilpa, Kanathur; Nataraja, Holavanahally Veerabhadrappa; Divya, Kallapa Gorur

    2016-01-01

    Nose is the most prominent part of the mid-face and has important physiological, aesthetic and psychological functions. Skin diseases on the nose are commonly seen by dermatologists, otorhinolaryngologists, and plastic surgeons. Because of its exposed, highly visible localization, lesions on the skin of the nose are often noticed by patients themselves, typically very early in the course of the disease. Similarly, the dermatological lexicon is well known with descriptive terminologies, synonyms, acronyms, eponyms, toponyms, misnomers. We have tried to compile the anatomical applications of nose in cosmetology and dermatosurgery subspecialities with nasal eponyms and signs encountered in clinical dermatology that would be helpful for residents. PMID:27057038

  12. Tick-borne dermatologic diseases.

    PubMed

    Modly, C E; Burnett, J W

    1988-04-01

    Inquiries regarding tick exposure can be important in dermatologic diagnosis and treatment since ticks can be vectors of a diversity of infectious diseases. The classic teaching is that ticks are best removed with nail polish, solvents, petrolatum, mineral oil, or a hot match. However, a recent evaluation of tick removal revealed that mechanical removal with forceps preceded and followed by disinfection is the most effective method. In most cases, should the characteristic dermatologic lesion or systemic symptoms appear, appropriate treatment should be initiated for presumptive diseases. PMID:3366010

  13. Nose: Applied Aspects in Dermatology

    PubMed Central

    Lakshmi, Dammaningala Venkataramaiah; Shilpa, Kanathur; Nataraja, Holavanahally Veerabhadrappa; Divya, Kallapa Gorur

    2016-01-01

    Nose is the most prominent part of the mid-face and has important physiological, aesthetic and psychological functions. Skin diseases on the nose are commonly seen by dermatologists, otorhinolaryngologists, and plastic surgeons. Because of its exposed, highly visible localization, lesions on the skin of the nose are often noticed by patients themselves, typically very early in the course of the disease. Similarly, the dermatological lexicon is well known with descriptive terminologies, synonyms, acronyms, eponyms, toponyms, misnomers. We have tried to compile the anatomical applications of nose in cosmetology and dermatosurgery subspecialities with nasal eponyms and signs encountered in clinical dermatology that would be helpful for residents. PMID:27057038

  14. Patient Education Strategies in Dermatology

    PubMed Central

    Holder, Jessica L.

    2009-01-01

    Patient education is an important aspect of patient care in dermatology. Successful education increases patient satisfaction and results in improved outcomes and adherence. This article discusses the role of patient education in dermatology. Specifically, Part I of the review examines evidence demonstrating the benefits of patient education and recognizes the challenges that limit effective patient education. These challenges can be summarized as barriers to understanding, poor patient recall, conflicting information, and barriers to physician delivery. Further descriptions and an assessment of these limitations along with methods to combat them are included in the review. PMID:20725581

  15. Misnomers in Dermatology: An Update

    PubMed Central

    Savitha, Somaiah A; Sacchidanand, Sarvajnamurthy A; Gowda, Shilpa K

    2013-01-01

    The name of a condition in dermatology, gives a clue regarding the clinical feature, etiology, or histopathology of the disease. A disease might have been termed wrongly due to its resemblance to another known condition. Misnomers often mislead a physician regarding the etiology or histopathology of the condition. Here is a list of misnomers, with explanation, and the appropriate name in parentheses. PMID:24249901

  16. Two hundred years of dermatology.

    PubMed

    Crissey, J T; Parish, L C

    1998-12-01

    Two hundred years ago the English physician Robert Willan published the first section of his masterwork, On cutaneous diseases. In it he described and demonstrated a new way of examining cutaneous eruptions that enabled physicians dealing with skin diseases to impose, for the first time, a significant degree of order on a field in which disorder had been the rule. The utility and successful application of the new approach soon attracted the attention of a talented cadre of physicians who embraced the study of the skin and its problems with enthusiasm, and dermatology as a specialty came into its own. The details of the Willan approach and the overwhelming influence it exerted on the future of the specialty are described in this article. 1798, the year the section was published, was an annus mirabilis for dermatology, and 1998 can be considered the bicentennial of the birth of the specialty. PMID:9843016

  17. Tele-dermatology in Australia.

    PubMed

    Muir, Jim; Lucas, Lex

    2008-01-01

    Australia is a large country with a small and scattered population. Specialist dermatology services are concentrated in the capital cities and larger urban centers on the coast. This has meant access to these services for Australians in rural and remote areas has been limited to those able to travel the often long distances to their nearest dermatologist. Due to a considerable shortage of dermatologists, waiting times to see one are more than six months. The challenge was to provide a dermatology service that overcame these twin obstacles of distance and demand. Telecommunication infrastructure in Australia is good and most towns have at least one general practitioner. More than 75% of all general practices are equipped with computers and have broadband internet access.Dermatology is a specialty with few life threatening disorders. However short delays in diagnosis and management of a skin condition rarely have any serious impact on a patient's long-term health. At the same time many skin problems are distressing, and difficult to diagnose and treat. Many skin conditions last for considerable periods of time and patients need ongoing care. Due to the highly visual nature of the specialty, most skin conditions can be diagnosed from an image especially if there is some history available. This often requires a trained specialist. Paradoxically, any needed investigations such as skin biopsy or blood tests can be performed by any qualified doctor. Dermatological treatments can be instituted and monitored by these same practitioners without any specialist training. These factors make tele-medicine an ideal solution to the problems of isolation from and excess demand for specialist dermatological services. In 2004 the Australian College of Rural and Remote Medicine (ACRRM) in a joint initiative with Queensland Divisions of General Practice (QDGP) set up Tele-Derm with funding from the Commonwealth Department of Health and Ageing under the Medical Specialist Outreach

  18. [What's new in pediatric dermatology].

    PubMed

    Czernielewski, Justine; Hohl, Daniel

    2015-04-01

    Progress in paediatric dermatology is achieved in both research and therapeutic fields. In infectiology, scabies and bed bugs are a scourge for dermatologists, with an important recent outbreak. This article describes the fundamental clinical signs to look for, when suspecting such diagnosis. Hair dermatoscopy seems to be also very precious as a new tool for the diagnosis of ringworm. Regarding eczemas, atopic dermatitis is supported by S. Aureus's skin colonization, the target of eradication of new products in ongoing studies. We will also explain the role of Hemangiol, recently marketed in Switzerland for the treatment of haemangiomas. Alternative beta blockers have also a large number of ongoing projects in the dermatological vascular diseases field. Other various news is to be discovered.... PMID:26021137

  19. Current status of surgery in dermatology.

    PubMed

    Hanke, C William; Moy, Ronald L; Roenigk, Randall K; Roenigk, Henry H; Spencer, James M; Tierney, Emily P; Bartus, Cynthia L; Bernstein, Robert M; Brown, Marc D; Busso, Mariano; Carruthers, Alastair; Carruthers, Jean; Ibrahimi, Omar A; Kauvar, Arielle N B; Kent, Kathryn M; Krueger, Nils; Landau, Marina; Leonard, Aimee L; Mandy, Stephen H; Rohrer, Thomas E; Sadick, Neil S; Wiest, Luitgard G

    2013-12-01

    An article titled "Current issues in dermatologic office-based surgery" was published in the JAAD in October 1999 (volume 41, issue 4, pp. 624-634). The article was developed by the Joint American Academy of Dermatology/American Society for Dermatologic Surgery Liaison Committee. A number of subjects were addressed in the article including surgical training program requirements for dermatology residents and selected advances in dermatologic surgery that had been pioneered by dermatologists. The article concluded with sections on credentialing, privileging, and accreditation of office-based surgical facilities. Much has changed since 1999, including more stringent requirements for surgical training during dermatology residency, and the establishment of 57 accredited Procedural Dermatology Fellowship Training Programs. All of these changes have been overseen and approved by the Residency Review Committee for Dermatology and the Accreditation Committee for Graduate Medical Education. The fertile academic environment of academic training programs with interaction between established dermatologic surgeons and fellows, as well as the inquisitive nature of many of our colleagues, has led to the numerous major advances in dermatologic surgery, which are described herein. PMID:24099730

  20. Basic digital photography in dermatology.

    PubMed

    Kaliyadan, Feroze; Manoj, Jayasree; Venkitakrishnan, S; Dharmaratnam, A D

    2008-01-01

    Digital photography has virtually replaced conventional film photography as far as clinical imaging is concerned. Though most dermatologists are familiar with digital cameras, there is room for improvement in the quality of clinical images. We aim to give an overview of the basics of digital photography in relation to dermatology, which would be useful to a dermatologist in his or her future clinical practice. PMID:19052435

  1. Recent advances in laser dermatology.

    PubMed

    Butani, Anjali; Dudelzak, Jacob; Goldberg, David J

    2009-03-01

    Lasers have revolutionized the practice of modern dermatology. Our understanding of laser physics and selective photothermolysis has expanded greatly over the last 20 years. In the last 2 years, we have looked beyond the traditional lasers and explored new concepts. This article will look at five of these new concepts. A strong understanding of these new techniques will allow dermatologists to use them either primarily or in combination with more conventional methods. PMID:18991153

  2. Hemorrhagic complications in dermatologic surgery

    PubMed Central

    Bunick, Christopher G.; Aasi, Sumaira Z.

    2014-01-01

    The ability to recognize, manage, and, most importantly, prevent hemorrhagic complications is critical to performing dermatologic procedures that have safe and high quality outcomes. This article reviews the preoperative, intraoperative, and postoperative factors and patient dynamics that are central to preventing such an adverse outcome. Specifically, the role that anticoagulants and antiplatelet agents, hypertension, and other medical conditions play in the development of postoperative hemorrhage are discussed. In addition, this article provides practical guidelines on managing bleeding during and after surgery. PMID:22515669

  3. Forensics in dermatology: part II.

    PubMed

    Reddy, Kalpana; Lowenstein, Eve J

    2011-05-01

    The evaluation of skin findings is critical in identifying many types of injury, whether self- inflicted or accidentally or intentionally inflicted. Specific causes of injury include homicide, abuse, neglect, assault, self-inflicted injury, suicide, torture, poisoning, and bioterrorism. Forensic findings in hair and nails are also discussed. This overview of dermatologic findings in forensic pathology highlights the significance of the cutaneous manifestations of injury. PMID:21496700

  4. Evidence-Based Integrative Dermatology

    PubMed Central

    Narahari, Saravu R; Prasanna, Kodimoole S; Sushma, Kandathu V

    2013-01-01

    American recognition for medical pluralism arrived in 1991. The National Center for Complementary and Alternative Medicine was established under the National Institutes of Health in 1998. Following this, patients and researchers began exploring use of integrative medicine. Terence Ryan with Gerry Bodeker in Europe, Brian Berman in America, and the Indian council of Medical Research advocated traditional medicine and integrative medicine. The Institute of Applied Dermatology (IAD), Kerala has developed integrated allopathic (biomedical) and ayurvedic therapies to treat Lymphatic Filariasis, Lichen planus, and Vitiligo. Studies conducted at the IAD have created a framework for evidence-based and integrative dermatology (ID). This paper gives an overview of advances in ID with an example of Lichen Planus, which was examined jointly by dermatologists and Ayurveda doctors. The clinical presentation in these patients was listed in a vikruthi table of comparable biomedical terms. A vikruthi table was used for drug selection in ayurvedic dermatology. A total of 19 patients were treated with ayurvedic prescriptions to normalize the vatha-kapha for 3 months. All patients responded and no side effects were recorded. In spite of advancing knowledge on ID, several challenges remain for its use on difficult to treat chronic skin diseases. The formation of new integrative groups and financial support are essential for the growth of ID in India. PMID:23716802

  5. Dermatology resources on the internet.

    PubMed

    George, Dean D; Wainwright, Brent D

    2012-09-01

    Both patients and medical professionals are increasingly accessing the Internet for health information. Today's Web enables features that facilitate information sharing in a social and collaborative manner, thus transforming the way we access data and communicate with our patients and colleagues. The visual nature of the field of dermatology lends itself to the use of the Internet for reference and educational purposes. To generate a list of Web sites commonly used by academic dermatologists, the authors polled the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education Dermatology Program Directors for their top 3 Web resources. The purpose of this article is to identify resources used by dermatologists as well as patients and examine factors that can influence Internet search results. Concerns regarding professionalism in the era of social media are also explored. As the volume of health information on the Internet continues to increase, it is essential for physicians to be aware of what is available in cyberspace. Reference and learning tools for the physician, learning and support tools for the patient, and physician Internet presence are key aspects of modern dermatology practice. PMID:22929356

  6. Ethics education for dermatology residents.

    PubMed

    Bercovitch, Lionel; Long, Thomas P

    2009-01-01

    The Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education and the Royal College of Physicians and Surgeons of Canada both require the teaching and demonstration of general competencies, which include professionalism and ethics as a condition of training program accreditation and specialty certification, respectively. Residents in dermatology and other specialties perceive their training in ethics is inadequate in numerous areas. Residents and specialists in dermatology encounter numerous ethical and professional issues throughout their workday. A dermatoethics curriculum was developed at The Warren Alpert Medical School of Brown University in 2001 to address the need for training in bioethics and professionalism. The subject matter of the curriculum and didactic methods are reviewed. Guidelines for effective teaching of ethics and professionalism to dermatology residents are presented. It is important to make the teaching sessions relevant to the residents' day-to-day work experiences and personal needs. Honesty and openness on the part of faculty and trainees is important. Although informality fosters such exchanges, the sessions should be a learning experience. Resources outside the residency program should be used as necessary. Evaluation of ethics and professionalism in trainees is addressed. PMID:19539170

  7. Nonhuman primate dermatology: a literature review

    PubMed Central

    Bernstein, Joseph A.; Didier, Peter J.

    2015-01-01

    In general, veterinary dermatologists do not have extensive clinical experience of nonhuman primate (NHP) dermatoses. The bulk of the published literature does not provide an organized evidence-based approach to the NHP dermatologic case. The veterinary dermatologist is left to extract information from both human and veterinary dermatology, an approach that can be problematic as it forces the clinician to make diagnostic and therapeutic decisions based on two very disparate bodies of literature. A more cohesive approach to NHP dermatology – without relying on assumptions that NHP pathology most commonly behaves similarly to other veterinary and human disease – is required. This review of the dermatology of NHP species includes discussions of primary dermatoses, as well as diseases where dermatologic signs represent a significant secondary component, provides a first step towards encouraging the veterinary community to study and report the dermatologic diseases of nonhuman primates. PMID:19490576

  8. Relevance of psychiatry in dermatology: Present concepts

    PubMed Central

    Basavaraj, K. H.; Navya, M. A; Rashmi, R.

    2010-01-01

    Skin is an organ that has a primary function in tactile receptivity and reacts directly upon emotional stimuli. Dermatological practice involves a psychosomatic dimension. A relationship between psychological factors and skin diseases has long been hypothesized. Psychodermatology addresses the interaction between mind and skin. It is divided into three categories according to the relationship between skin diseases and mental disorders. This article reviews different dermatological conditions under each of the three categories namely psychosomatic disorders, dermatological conditions due to primary and secondary psychiatric disorders. Dermatological conditions resulting from psychiatric conditions like stress/depression and those caused by psychiatric disorders are discussed. This review intends to present the relationship between the ‘skin’ and the ‘mind’ specifically from the dermatology point of view. The effects on the quality of life as a result of psychodermatological conditions are highlighted. A multidisciplinary approach for treatment from both dermatologic and psychiatric viewpoints are suggested. PMID:21180416

  9. Distinction between forensic evidence and dermatological findings.

    PubMed

    Hammer, U; Boy, D; Rothaupt, D; Büttner, A

    2015-07-01

    The external examination after death requires knowledge in forensics/pathology, dermatology, as well as associated diseases and age-related alterations of the skin. This article highlights some findings with forensic evidence versus dermatological findings. The lectures in forensic medicine should be structured interdisciplinarily, especially to dermatology, internal medicine, surgery, pathology, and toxicology in order to train the overlapping skills required for external and internal postmortem examinations. PMID:26048487

  10. Psychiatric treatments in dermatology: an update.

    PubMed

    Sambhi, R; Lepping, P

    2010-03-01

    There is a considerable degree of connection between psychiatry and dermatology. This connection is relevant both for diagnosis and management of dermatological pathology. This article summarises common psychiatric conditions seen in patients with skin disease, both primary psychiatric disorders and psychiatric disorders secondary to dermatological pathology. Diagnosis of relevant psychiatric conditions such as anxiety, depression, obsessive-compulsive disorder, delusional parasitosis and dermatitis artefacta, and psychiatric treatments are discussed. It gives an update of psychopharmacology relevant to the dermatologist including important interactions between psychotropic and dermatological agents. PMID:19874324

  11. Fumaric acid esters in dermatology

    PubMed Central

    Wollina, Uwe

    2011-01-01

    Fumaric acid esters (FAE) are substances of interest in dermatology. FAE exert various activities on cutaneous cells and cytokine networks. So far only a mixture of dimethylfumarate (DMF) and three salts of monoethylfumarate (MEF) have gained approval for the oral treatment of moderate-to-severe plaque-type psoriasis in Germany. DMF seems to be the major active component. There is evidence that FAE are not only effective and safe in psoriasis but granulomatous non-infectious diseases like granuloma annulare, necrobiosis lipoidica and sarcoidosis. In vitro and animal studies suggest some activity in malignant melanoma as well. PMID:23130241

  12. "Natural" ingredients in cosmetic dermatology.

    PubMed

    Baumann, Leslie; Woolery-Lloyd, Heather; Friedman, Adam

    2009-06-01

    Recently, both clinical and bench research has begun to provide scientific validation for the use of certain botanical ingredients. Related findings regarding proposed biological mechanisms of action have translated into clinical practice. Botanical compounds for which dermatologic and cosmetic applications have emerged include: olive oil, chamomile, colloidal oatmeal, oat kernal extract, feverfew, acai berry, coffee berry, curcumin, green tea, pomegranate, licorice, paper mulberry, arbutin, and soy. Many of these botanical sources offer biologically active components that require further in vitro and in vivo investigation in order for us to properly educate ourselves, and our patients, regarding over-the-counter products based on these ingredients. PMID:19562883

  13. GENE PROFILING: IMPLICATIONS IN DERMATOLOGY

    PubMed Central

    Blumenberg, Miroslav; Tomic-Canic, Marjana

    2016-01-01

    Summary DNA microarrays are capable of following the level of expression of, virtually, all genes in a human tissue. This has been employed to determine the aberrant gene expression profiles in many skin diseases, including ultraviolet light damage, inflammatory processes and cancers. Because of its accessibility, skin also served as one of the initial targets of basic research using DNA microarrays. Both the epidermis and dermis have been extensively investigated. Development of bed-side uses of DNA arrays, and the concomitant price reduction of the materials and methods of microarray analyses, holds great promise for improved diagnosis, treatment and prevention of dermatologic disorders.

  14. Nonsteroidal Topical Immunomodulators in Allergology and Dermatology

    PubMed Central

    Jovanović, Marina; Golušin, Zoran

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to review currently available literature data concerning pathomechanisms of action, indications, treatment efficacy, as well as side effects of nonsteroidal immunomodulators used in dermatology, primarily for the treatment of allergic dermatoses. MEDLINE search was undertaken using the key words “Topical Immunomodulators, Dermatology and Allergy”. Full articles, and nothing but full articles, were used. PMID:27144167

  15. Psychiatric Evaluation in Dermatology: An Overview

    PubMed Central

    Ghosh, Sreyoshi; Behere, Rishikesh V; Sharma, PSVN; Sreejayan, K

    2013-01-01

    Psychodermatology is an exciting field which deals with the close relationship that exists between dermatological and psychiatric disorders. A combined bio-psycho-social approach is essential for effective evaluation and treatment of these conditions. This review aims to give the practicing clinician an overview of psychiatric evaluation in patients with dermatological conditions. PMID:23372211

  16. Adverse drug reactions in dermatology.

    PubMed

    Ferner, R E

    2015-03-01

    Adverse drug reactions (ADRs) - that is, unintended and harmful responses to medicines - are important to dermatologists because many present with cutaneous signs and because dermatological treatments can cause serious ADRs. The detection of ADRs to new drugs is often delayed because they have a long latency or are rare or unexpected. This means that ADRs to newer agents emerge only slowly after marketing. ADRs are part of the differential diagnosis of unusual rashes. A good drug history that includes details of drug dose, time-course of the reaction and factors that may make the patient more susceptible, will help. For example, Stevens-Johnson syndrome with abacavir is much commoner in patients with HLA-B*5701, and has a characteristic time course. Newer agents have brought newer reactions; for example, acneiform rashes associated with epidermal growth factor receptor inhibitors such as erlotinib. Older systemic agents used to treat skin disease, including corticosteroids and methotrexate, cause important ADRs. The adverse effects of newer biological agents used in dermatology are becoming clearer; for example, hypersensitivity reactions or loss of efficacy from antibody formation and progressive multifocal leucoencephalopathy due to reactivation of latent JC (John Cunningham) virus infections during efalizumab treatment. Unusual or serious harm from medicines, including ADRs, medication errors and overdose, should be reported. The UK Yellow Card scheme is online, and patients can report their own ADRs. PMID:25622648

  17. Medical student Dermatology Interest Groups.

    PubMed

    Jalalat, Sheila Z; Hunter-Ellul, Lindsey; Wagner, Richard F

    2013-01-01

    The Dermatology Interest Group (DIG) at the University of Texas Medical Branch (UTMB) blog (digutmb.blogspot.com) was created in 2004 with the aims of increasing communication and collaboration among students, faculty, residents, and alumni, promoting educational opportunities, and fostering the missions for which DIG was created. This blog is unique, because its frequent activity is directed toward the educational and professional needs of medical students and residents. We assessed the use of this blog by evaluating the number of blog views and audience members with relationship to the number of posts and post content over time via a tracking system. We found that there has been an increase in blog posts, views, and subscribers, as well as in areas of post content including dermatology resources/news/articles, residency applications, and resident-related information. Usefulness of such posts expands beyond UTMB students, which increases blog views and widens viewer audience. An international viewer population also was evaluated. Recorded blog viewing time was 1 minute, 57 seconds, which is more time than needed to read a post, suggesting use of additional blog information. This review of the DIG at the UTMB blog demonstrates how the use of web-based tools, in addition to the inherent benefits of medical student interests groups, are valuable resources for students, residents, and faculty. PMID:24079594

  18. Applications of Nanotechnology in Dermatology

    PubMed Central

    DeLouise, Lisa A.

    2014-01-01

    What are nanoparticles and why are they important in dermatology? These questions are addressed by highlighting recent developments in the nanotechnology field that have increased the potential for intentional and unintended nanoparticle skin exposure. The role of environmental factors in the interaction of nanoparticles with skin and the potential mechanisms by which nanoparticles may influence skin response to environmental factors are discussed. Trends emerging from recent literature suggest that the positive benefit of engineered nanoparticles for use in cosmetics and as tools for understanding skin biology and curing skin disease, out weigh potential toxicity concerns. Discoveries reported in this journal are highlighted. This review begins with a general introduction to the field of nanotechnology and nanomedicine. This is followed by a discussion of the current state of understanding of nanoparticle skin penetration and their use in three different therapeutic applications. Challenges that must be overcome to derive clinical benefit from the application of nanotechnology to skin are discussed last, providing perspective on the significant opportunity that exists for future studies in investigative dermatology. PMID:22217738

  19. Quantitative evaluation of dermatological antiseptics.

    PubMed

    Leitch, C S; Leitch, A E; Tidman, M J

    2015-12-01

    Topical antiseptics are frequently used in dermatological management, yet evidence for the efficacy of traditional generic formulations is often largely anecdotal. We tested the in vitro bactericidal activity of four commonly used topical antiseptics against Staphylococcus aureus, using a modified version of the European Standard EN 1276, a quantitative suspension test for evaluation of the bactericidal activity of chemical disinfectants and antiseptics. To meet the standard for antiseptic effectiveness of EN 1276, at least a 5 log10 reduction in bacterial count within 5 minutes of exposure is required. While 1% benzalkonium chloride and 6% hydrogen peroxide both achieved a 5 log10 reduction in S. aureus count, neither 2% aqueous eosin nor 1 : 10 000 potassium permanganate showed significant bactericidal activity compared with control at exposure periods of up to 1 h. Aqueous eosin and potassium permanganate may have desirable astringent properties, but these results suggest they lack effective antiseptic activity, at least against S. aureus. PMID:26456933

  20. Dermatological toxicity of hexavalent chromium.

    PubMed

    Shelnutt, Susan R; Goad, Phillip; Belsito, Donald V

    2007-06-01

    Hexavalent chromium causes two types of dermatological toxicities: allergic contact dermatitis (ACD) and skin ulcers. This report reviews the etiology, prevalence, pathology, dose-response, and prognosis of both of these reactions. Reports in the literature indicate that repeated exposure to hexavalent chromium in concentrations of 4-25 ppm can both induce sensitization and elicit chromium ACD. Exposure to 20 ppm hexavalent chromium can cause skin ulcers in nonsensitized people. The prevalence of chromium sensitivity in cement workers, exposed to 10-20 ppm hexavalent chromium for years, is approximately 4-5%. Chromium ACD can be a chronic debilitating disease, perhaps because chromium is ubiquitous in foods and in the environment and is difficult to avoid. Due to the high rates of sensitization in populations chronically exposed to chromium and the chronic nature of chromium ACD, some investigators recommend reducing the hexavalent chromiumconcentrations in consumer products, such as detergents, to less than 5 ppm. PMID:17612952

  1. [Modern psychosomatic aspects of dermatology].

    PubMed

    Jovanović, M; Duran, V; Poljacki, M; Misić-Pavkov, G; Matović, L; Subotić, M; Golub, R

    1994-01-01

    Concerning their origin most diseases are multifactorial and that goes for skin diseases too. Emphasizing just one must not exclude further research and other aspects of etiopathogenetic mechanisms. It has been known for along time that psychological factors have a certain influence on the start, aggravation and maintenance on skin changes and that cosmetic defects of this kind disturb the psychological peace of the sick person and his capacity of establishing satisfactory social relations. Psychosomatic approach in dermatology cannot be reduced to investigation of specific etiology in the field of psyche without physical or social spheres. It unites all of them and in that way the old question what cause and what the consequence is has no importance, because there is no time or distance limit among them. They act simultaneously, holistically. PMID:7739438

  2. [Telemedicine in dermatological practice: teledermatology].

    PubMed

    Danis, Judit; Forczek, Erzsébet; Bari, Ferenc

    2016-03-01

    Technological advances in the fields of information and telecommunication technologies have affected the health care system in the last decades, and lead to the emergence of a new discipline: telemedicine. The appearance and rise of internet and smart phones induced a rapid progression in telemedicine. Several new applications and mobile devices are published every hour even for medical purposes. Parallel to these changes in the technical fields, medical literature about telemedicine has grown rapidly. Due to its visual nature, dermatology is ideally suited to benefit from this new technology and teledermatology became one of the most dynamically evolving fields of telemedicine by now. Teledermatology is not routinely practiced in Hungary yet, however, it promises the health care system to become better, cheaper and faster, but we have to take notice on the experience and problems faced in teledermatologic applications so far, summarized in this review. PMID:26920326

  3. Prophylactic antibiotics in dermatological surgery.

    PubMed

    Lee, Michael R; Paver, Robert

    2016-05-01

    This is a review of the common pathogens of surgical site infections, antibiotic coverage for particular anatomical sites, mechanisms by which surgical site infections occur and the latest data and recommendations for prophylactic antibiotics in the prevention of surgical site infections, infective endocarditis and haematogenous joint infections. Recent evidence-based guidelines on surgical prophylaxis is for restricted indications and a shorter duration of antibiotic prophylaxis in situations where no clinical benefit of prolonged therapy has been proven, in order to minimise the potential adverse ecological and clinical effects associated with antibiotic therapy. This review recommends the cautious use of prophylactic antibiotics in dermatological surgery to help prevent the growing problem of bacterial resistance as well as other morbidity and health-care costs. PMID:25752777

  4. Use of spironolactone in dermatology.

    PubMed

    Rathnayake, Deepani; Sinclair, Rodney

    2010-01-01

    Spironolactone has been used as a potassium-sparing diuretic for more than 30 years. It is a synthetic 17-lactone steroid and primarily acts as an aldosterone antagonist. Since the accidental discovery of its antiandrogenic effects, it has been used in the treatment of many dermatologic conditions in which androgen plays a role in the pathogenesis. Antiandrogenic effects of spironolactone are exerted by reducing testosterone production and inhibiting its action on the target tissues. Spironolactone is used as a primary medical treatment for hirsutism and female pattern hair loss. Continuous treatment is required to sustain the effect. It is an effective alternative treatment for acne in women. It has the benefit of a long-term safety profile. Spironolactone should not be used in pregnancy due to its teratogenic effects and is not used in men due to the risk of feminization. PMID:21413648

  5. Biologics in dermatology: adverse effects.

    PubMed

    Sehgal, Virendra N; Pandhi, Deepika; Khurana, Ananta

    2015-12-01

    Biologics are a group of drugs that precisely affect certain specific steps in the immune response and are an extremely useful group when used in an appropriate setting. However, their use can often be a double-edged sword. Careful patient selection and thorough knowledge of adverse effects is a key to their successful use in various disorders. The initial enthusiasm has gradually given way to a more cautious approach wherein a balance is sought between clinical usefulness and expected side effects. The adverse effects of the biologics most commonly used in dermatology have been carefully listed for ready reference. The plausible causes of the adverse reactions are succinctly outlined along with their incriminating factor(s). Besides, in brief, the attention has been focused on their management. The content should provide an essential didactic content for educating the practitioner. PMID:26147909

  6. Analysis of original contributions in three dermatology journals.

    PubMed

    Dunst, Karin M; Burgdorf, Walter H C; Huemer, Georg M; Zelger, Bernhard

    2005-02-01

    In a cross-sectional analysis, the three top ranking dermatology journals ( Archives of Dermatology , British Journal of Dermatology , and the Journal of the American Academy of Dermatology ) were evaluated for their scientific content, the characteristics of their authors, and funding aspects in 2002. A flood of scientific papers are published each year covering a broad variety of dermatologic topics. Aside from the actual content, a scientific article provides information about the number of authors, their nationality and affiliations, and, with some limitation, about previous presentations and funding. The present study analyzes this situation in dermatology by evaluating the content in the three top dermatologic journals. PMID:15692487

  7. Social Media Use in Pediatric Dermatology.

    PubMed

    Fogel, Alexander L; Teng, Joyce M C

    2016-01-01

    Social media is predicted to become increasingly important in dermatology because of its potential to serve as a platform for public health campaigns, aid in participant recruitment for clinical trials, increase public engagement in health care, and facilitate scientific discourse. No study of social media use in pediatric dermatology has been performed, so we analyzed the use of the seven leading social media platforms in pediatric dermatology, with a focus on patient advocacy groups, professional societies, research journals, and research institutions. We observed that 89% of patient advocacy groups, 100% of professional societies, 62.5% of research journals, and 0% of academic pediatric dermatology departments maintained one or more social media accounts. Our observations suggest that all stakeholder groups, and in particular members of the research community, have the potential to further their engagement, connections, and communications through social media. PMID:26821563

  8. Pentoxifylline and its applications in dermatology

    PubMed Central

    Hassan, Iffat; Dorjay, Konchok; Anwar, Parvaiz

    2014-01-01

    Pentoxifylline is a methyl-xanthine derivative with many anti inflammatory effects. Pentoxifylline has been found to be effective for many dermatological as well as non-dermatological conditions. It has been used both as primary drug as well as adjuvant and is a safe and relatively cost-effective alternative drug. In this article, we review the literature and highlight various important aspects of pentoxifylline. PMID:25396144

  9. Trends in dermatologic surgery research over the past decade.

    PubMed

    Akerman, Lehavit; Hodak, Emmilia; Pavlovsky, Lev; Mimouni, Francis B; David, Michael; Mimouni, Daniel

    2010-01-01

    We aimed to study the rate of change in number and categories of publications in dermatologic surgery in dermatology versus non-dermatology journals. PubMed was searched for articles on dermatologic surgery from January 1, 1998 to December 31, 2007, using the search word "dermatology" AND "surgery". Articles were characterized by publication and journal type per year. Regression analysis was used to determine the effect of year of publication on number of publications of each type. The search yielded 7570 publications on dermatologic surgery. Seventy-three percent appeared in dermatology journals. Overall, the number of publications increased linearly with time. Most of this increase was accounted for by publications in non-dermatology journals. However, there was an increase in randomized control trials over the course of the study period in dermatology journals only, while low quality-of-evidence publications accounted for most of the increase in non-dermatology journals. Over the past 10 years the field of dermatologic surgery has had a significant yearly increase in published original studies. It appears that high quality evidence on dermatologic surgery is mostly published in dermatology journals. Current trends towards evidence-based dermatology might impact future research and publications in the field of dermatologic surgery. PMID:20167567

  10. [What's new in clinical dermatology?].

    PubMed

    Janier, M

    2013-11-01

    2013 has been the year of large genetic studies of the GWAS type (Genome wide association studies) in common diseases such as psoriasis and atopic dermatitis, aimed at localization of candidate genes. It was also the year of population-based studies from huge public or private registers. Thus, epidemiologic correlations have been put forward: psoriasis and vascular risk, psoriasis and rhinosinusitis, rosacea and migraine, acne and food habits, eczema and basal-cell carcinoma, vitiligo and lower risk of skin cancer, cutaneous Ro/SS-A pos lupus and cancer, chronic eczema and calcium-channel inhlbitors, pemphigoid and loop diuretics. Risk of IBD induced by isotretinoin has not been confirmed but risk of skin cancer under azathioprine is real. New drug reactions have appeared (pigmentation due to interferon, hypodermitis and sarcoidosis to anti-BRAF, vandetanib) and old ones are revisited (patch-testing of Severe Cutaneous adverse cutaneous reactions, pigmentation due to anti-malarial drugs, neutrophilic dermatosis due to azathioprine). Diane35(®) has been transiently withdrawn in January 2013 but tetrazepam has been withdrawn definitively in July 2013. Original aspects of cutaneous infections will be discussed along with new data on STDs (meningococcemia in MSMs, HPV, Herpes, congenital syphilis). Finally, some important papers about dermoscopy, confocal microscopy and aesthetic dermatology will be presented. PMID:24365496

  11. [Current trends in occupational dermatology].

    PubMed

    Skudlik, Christoph; Geier, Johannes; John, Swen Malte

    2014-11-01

    In clinical practice occupational skin diseases usually present as hand dermatitis. Occupationally acquired contact allergies are of eminent relevance in many work place products e.g. skin care products, dyes and paints, epoxy resins or protective gloves. However, not infrequently, a range of other dermatoses of different etiology and localization can be occupationally induced and, at least in Germany, thus be medically treated and--if necessary--compensated for with full coverage by the statutory employers' liability insurance. Examples regarding non-eczematous skin diseases triggered by external factors are psoriatic lesions, cutaneous type-1-allergies, occupationally acquired infections, and dermatoses in other localizations which are occupationally exposed to irritant influences (e.g. feet in workers wearing occlusive safety boots). Moreover, outdoor workers deserve specific attention by the dermatologist if squamous cell carcinomas including precursor lesions like actinic keratoses or Bowen disease have occurred. In Germany, recently the scientific advisory committee to the Ministry of Labor has recommended including these skin cancers caused by occupational solar UV exposure in the national list of occupational diseases. The framework for dermatological preventive care of occupationally-induced inflammatory dermatoses has been continuously improved in the last years. The aim is to reach a similar level of care and preventive measures for patients with occupational skin cancer, including primary preventive workers' education. PMID:25359544

  12. Dermatological problems of the puberty

    PubMed Central

    Brzezińska-Wcisło, Ligia

    2013-01-01

    Puberty is a period of life between childhood and adulthood. It is characterized by many changes in morphology and appearance of the body (biological maturation), in the psyche – development of personality (psychological maturation), and in the attitude towards one's own and the opposite sex (psychosexual maturation), and in the social role (social maturation). Dermatological problems of adolescence are mainly related to fluctuations in hormone levels, mainly androgens. They include acne, hair problems and excessive sweating. Acne vulgaris is the most frequently diagnosed dermatosis in patients aged between 11 and 30 years. It is believed that it affects about 80% of persons in this age group or even, taking into account lesions of low intensity, 100% of young people. Excessive sweating is a condition characterised by excessive production of sweat, resulting from high activity of sweat glands. The sweat glands are localised in almost all areas of the body surface but on the hands, feet, armpits and around the groin they are found at the highest density. Seborrhoeic dermatitis of the scalp is a chronic, relapsing, inflammatory dermatosis, which currently affects about 5% of the population. It affects mostly young people, particularly men. PMID:24278071

  13. [What's new in instrumental dermatology?].

    PubMed

    Amici, J-M

    2014-12-01

    This "What's new in instrumental dermatology" focuses on cutaneous oncologic surgery, base on a review of the 2012-2014 literature. First, the ability of dermatologists to make a good "oncologic reading of tumors" is the key of radical surgical treatment. Advantages and disadvantages of the biopsy are discussed. Then, the second message is the management of anticoagulants, that should not be interrupted for skin surgery. Despite recommendations, this practice is not followed in 40% of cases; this point is critical because bleeding complications are minor compared to potential morbidity of thrombotic events when stopping these medications. Regarding infection, nasal carriage of Staphylococcus aureus is identified as a risk factor for wound infection. A preoperative shower with chlorhexidine and mupirocin topical decolonization of nostril reduces this risk. Surgical techniques are trying to reach minimalism, by reducing undermining and scarring. On the trunk, using deep slow resorbable sutures improve scarring. In addition using adhesive sutures (strip) reduce the wideness of scar. On the face, the lower third of the nose is the most challenging because of the free edges, which are deformable. In this location bilobed or trilobed transposition flap offer the advantage of remaining in the nasal aesthetic unit and not disturbing the free edges of the nasal orifices. Regarding scarring, early hypertrophic scar is now well defined and linked with transposition flaps of the nasal region. An early treatment with intralesional corticosteroid injection appears to be effective. Finally, the biological mechanism of the effectiveness of compression in the prevention and treatment of dystrophic scar is now clear. The mechanotransduction explain how a mechanical stress of the skin activates biological cell pathways, which regulate the quality of collagen synthesis and the arrangement of skin fibrosis. PMID:25539752

  14. [What's new in dermatological research?].

    PubMed

    Aubin, F

    2011-12-01

    Dermatological research has been very active this year. Most of the numerous fields investigated involve the mechanisms of cutaneous regeneration and barrier function. A novel target of early ultraviolet-induced skin photodamage, the Syk kinase, has been recently identified. Synergistic relationship between telomere damage and cutaneous progerin production during cell senescence may also participate in the natural skin aging process. Interestingly, ultraviolet radiation induces an inhibitory effect on subcutaneous lipogenesis. Androgenetic alopecia or common baldness is not characterized by loss of hair follicle stem cells but by a defect in the conversion of hair follicle stem cells into active progenitor cells. It has been shown that the cornified envelope functions not only as a physicomechanical barrier, but also as both a biochemical line of antoxidant defense and an immunological line of defense. Like human papillomaviruses, Merckel cell polyomavirus belongs to the skin microbiome and different studies have demonstrated the protective role of epidermal resident microflora through the activation of innate immunity. Production of antimicrobial peptides and the activation of inflammasome and plasmacytoid dendritic cells are involved in the modulation of the cutaneous barrier function. Results from different studies suggest that IL-22 and IL-36 may be common mediators of both innate and adaptive immune responses. All these pathways interact not only to maintain cutaneous homeostasis and integrity (wound healing) but also to regulate autoinflammatory and autoimmune dermatoses (psoriasis, lupus, rosacea, atopic dermatitis, etc...). In addition, molecular mechanisms that regulate T helper type 2 differentiation and the retention at the site of inflammation of Th2 cells have been identified. New promising therapeutic targets for different chronic dermatosis are thus suggested. Mechanobiology and mechanotransduction are also emerging fields that investigate mechanical

  15. The role of capsaicin in dermatology.

    PubMed

    Boyd, Katherine; Shea, Sofia M; Patterson, James W

    2014-01-01

    Neurogenic pain and pruritus are the common chief complaints at dermatology office visits. Unfortunately, they are also notoriously difficult conditions to treat. Topical capsaicin used as a single therapy or as an adjuvant offers a low-risk option for patients who do not achieve control on other therapies. This chapter presents the evidence behind topical capsaicin use in dermatologic conditions characterized by neurogenic pain or pruritus, including postherpetic neuralgia, notalgia paresthetica, brachioradial pruritus, lichen simplex chronicus, prurigo nodularis, pruritus ani, pruritus of hemodialysis, aquagenic pruritus, apocrine chromhidrosis, lipodermatosclerosis, alopecia areata, and psoriasis. It presents the most common capsaicin formulations, dosages, and durations of treatment for each condition. Additionally, the chapter addresses various adverse effects and limitations in the use of topical capsaicin in dermatology. PMID:24941674

  16. Serendipity and its role in dermatology.

    PubMed

    Coondoo, Arijit; Sengupta, Sujata

    2015-01-01

    Serendipity is a pleasant surprise of finding a particularly useful information while not looking for it. Significant historic events occurring as a result of serendipity include the discovery of the law of buoyancy (Archimedes principle) by the Greek mathematician Archimedes, of the Americas by Christopher Columbus and of gravity by Sir Isaac Newton. The role of serendipity in science has been immensely beneficial to mankind. A host of important discoveries in medical science owe their origin to serendipity of which perhaps the most famous is the story of Sir Alexander Fleming and his discovery of Penicillin. In the field of dermatology, serendipity has been responsible for major developments in the therapy of psoriasis, hair disorders, aesthetic dermatology and dermatosurgery. Besides these many other therapeutic modalities in dermatology were born as a result of such happy accidents. PMID:25814699

  17. Serendipity and its Role in Dermatology

    PubMed Central

    Coondoo, Arijit; Sengupta, Sujata

    2015-01-01

    Serendipity is a pleasant surprise of finding a particularly useful information while not looking for it. Significant historic events occurring as a result of serendipity include the discovery of the law of buoyancy (Archimedes principle) by the Greek mathematician Archimedes, of the Americas by Christopher Columbus and of gravity by Sir Isaac Newton. The role of serendipity in science has been immensely beneficial to mankind. A host of important discoveries in medical science owe their origin to serendipity of which perhaps the most famous is the story of Sir Alexander Fleming and his discovery of Penicillin. In the field of dermatology, serendipity has been responsible for major developments in the therapy of psoriasis, hair disorders, aesthetic dermatology and dermatosurgery. Besides these many other therapeutic modalities in dermatology were born as a result of such happy accidents. PMID:25814699

  18. Brazilian Society of Dermatology against leprosy*

    PubMed Central

    Lastória, Joel Carlos; de Abreu, Marilda Aparecida Milanez Morgado

    2016-01-01

    The Brazilian Society of Dermatology promoted a national campaign against leprosy in 2012, involving their State Regional, Accredited Services of Dermatology and Referral Services in Leprosy. Consisted of clarification to the population about the disease and a day of medical voluntary service. Ninety services (57 Accredited Services and 33 Reference Services) participated, distributed in 23 states. The campaign examined 3,223 people and 421 new cases were diagnosed, 54,4% female, 74,3% between 19 and 64 years and 8,3% in children under 15 years. Of the 217 classified cases, 58,5% was paucibacillary and 41,5% was multibacillary. The results were posted on the Brazilian Society of Dermatology website. PMID:27438217

  19. Oatmeal in dermatology: a brief review.

    PubMed

    Pazyar, Nader; Yaghoobi, Reza; Kazerouni, Afshin; Feily, Amir

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this review is to gather and summarize in vitro, in vivo, and clinical trials on oatmeal preparations and their uses in dermatology. Literature searches have been carried out to collect in vivo and in vitro studies as well as clinical trials on this subject. The results suggest that oatmeal possesses antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties and its administration is effective on a variety of dermatologic inflammatory diseases such as pruritus, atopic dermatitis, acneiform eruptions, and viral infections. Additionally, oatmeal plays a role in cosmetics preparations and skin protection against ultraviolet rays. Although some promising results citing the use of oatmeal to treat numerous dermatologic conditions have been found, the complete efficacy of oatmeal has not been sufficiently explored. This paper proposes accurate and useful information concerning the use of oatmeal in clinical practice to dermatologists. PMID:22421643

  20. Review of digital image security in Dermatology.

    PubMed

    Nielson, Colton; West, Cameron; Shimizu, Ikue

    2015-10-01

    The inherently visual nature of dermatology naturally lends itself to photography. As technology has evolved, smartphone cameras have become ubiquitous and have the potential to improve education and patient care in dermatology. Although patients and physicians may agree that photography can improve patient care, there are certain risks involved with smartphone photography in the medical field. Perhaps most concerning is the number of dermatologists using smartphones to take unsecured images in their daily practice. A recent study revealed that 22% of surveyed dermatologists used smartphone cameras multiple times per day in their practice. Dermatologists may also overestimate patient comfort with smartphone use in clinical photography. We present a review of the use of smartphones in dermatology and address the potential lack of security and accompanying ethical dilemmas. PMID:26632792

  1. Ethnic and socioeconomic disparities in dermatology.

    PubMed

    Jackson, Chantal; Maibach, Howard

    2016-06-01

    Ethnic and socioeconomic disparities exist within healthcare. Specifically, minority group members experience more deleterious health outcomes than do majority group members. In this paper, we explore the factors that influence such variety, with a focus on the field of dermatology, in an attempt to understand the ways to improve minority group results. We also highlight how the prevalence of mental health issues within minority group and low socioeconomic status individuals can differentially influence dermatological disease states, such as the relationship between depression and psoriasis. PMID:26418077

  2. Bibliographic landmarks in the history of dermatology.

    PubMed

    Potter, Bernard S

    2003-06-01

    The current advancements in our understanding of cutaneous diseases should not obscure our appreciation for the past and the achievements of the founders of dermatology. Their observations, ideas, discoveries, and writings shaped the development of the specialty, influence daily practices today, and serve as the foundation for future research endeavors. This article reviews the history of outstanding contributions that were preserved in enduring landmark works on which the whole knowledge of skin diseases rests. From the earliest books written with meager prior information to the impressive 19th century texts and atlases providing significant advances, these volumes marked and recorded defining moments in the evolution of dermatology. PMID:12789185

  3. Dermatology Interest Groups in Medical Schools.

    PubMed

    Quirk, Shannon K; Riemer, Christie; Beers, Paula J; Browning, Richard J; Correa, Mark; Fawaz, Bilal; Lehrer, Michael; Mounessa, Jessica; Lofgreen, Seth; Oetken, Tara; Saley, Taylor P; Tinkey, Katherine; Tracey, Elisabeth H; Dellavalle, Robert; Dunnick, Cory

    2016-01-01

    Involvement in a Dermatology Interest Group (DIG) allows students to learn about dermatology, partake in service projects, get involved in research, and ask questions about the application process for residency programs. In this article, we review the activities and member involvement of DIGs from 11 medical schools. To our knowledge, this is the first descriptive analysis of DIGs across the United States. This comparison of DIGs is not only potentially helpful for medical schools interested in establishing a DIG, but it also offers insight into how previously established DIGs could improve and have a greater impact both in individual medical schools and in the community at-large. PMID:27617719

  4. Safety of Topical Dermatologic Medications in Pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Patel, Viral M; Schwartz, Robert A; Lambert, W Clark

    2016-07-01

    Dermatologic drugs should be employed with caution in women of childbearing age who are pregnant or considering pregnancy. Topical drugs have little systemic absorption. Therefore, they are deemed safer than oral or parenteral agents and less likely to harm the fetus. However, their safety profile must be assessed cautiously, as there is limited available data. In this article, we aggregate human and animal studies and provide recommendations on using topical dermatologic medications in pregnancy.

    J Drugs Dermatol. 2016;15(7):830-834. PMID:27391632

  5. Fruit and Food Eponyms in Dermatology

    PubMed Central

    Jindal, Nidhi; Jindal, Pooja; Kumar, Jeevan; Gupta, Sanjeev; Jain, VK

    2015-01-01

    Dermatology world is brimming with myriad of interesting clinical conditions, signs and syndromes. It is infinite, which has systemic clinical connotations too. Complicated pronunciations of diagnosis have always placed residents in an intricate state. Each one is trying his best to make this cumbersome subject comparatively more acceptable and convenient. The present paper is an attempt to further simplify the subject by correlating difficult conditions with commonly used and seen things such as fruit and food. A total of 45 dermatological conditions were found to be based on fruit and food eponyms. For example, strawberries can remind us of strawberry gums of Wegener's granulomatosis and strawberry nevus. PMID:25814737

  6. Dermatologic Practice: Implications for a Primary Care Residency Curriculum.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Branch, William T., Jr.; And Others

    1983-01-01

    The problems encountered, diagnostic procedures performed, and treatments prescribed in dermatology were studied in a primary care practice and in a dermatology clinic. It is proposed that the findings of this study be the basis for designing a curriculum in dermatology for residents in primary care medicine. (Author/MLW)

  7. 21 CFR 878.4630 - Ultraviolet lamp for dermatologic disorders.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... Ultraviolet lamp for dermatologic disorders. (a) Identification. An ultraviolet lamp for dermatologic disorders is a device (including a fixture) intended to provide ultraviolet radiation of the body to... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Ultraviolet lamp for dermatologic disorders....

  8. 21 CFR 878.4630 - Ultraviolet lamp for dermatologic disorders.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... Ultraviolet lamp for dermatologic disorders. (a) Identification. An ultraviolet lamp for dermatologic disorders is a device (including a fixture) intended to provide ultraviolet radiation of the body to... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Ultraviolet lamp for dermatologic disorders....

  9. 21 CFR 878.4630 - Ultraviolet lamp for dermatologic disorders.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... Ultraviolet lamp for dermatologic disorders. (a) Identification. An ultraviolet lamp for dermatologic disorders is a device (including a fixture) intended to provide ultraviolet radiation of the body to... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Ultraviolet lamp for dermatologic disorders....

  10. 21 CFR 878.4630 - Ultraviolet lamp for dermatologic disorders.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... Ultraviolet lamp for dermatologic disorders. (a) Identification. An ultraviolet lamp for dermatologic disorders is a device (including a fixture) intended to provide ultraviolet radiation of the body to... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Ultraviolet lamp for dermatologic disorders....

  11. 21 CFR 878.4630 - Ultraviolet lamp for dermatologic disorders.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... Ultraviolet lamp for dermatologic disorders. (a) Identification. An ultraviolet lamp for dermatologic disorders is a device (including a fixture) intended to provide ultraviolet radiation of the body to... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Ultraviolet lamp for dermatologic disorders....

  12. [What's new in dermatological research?].

    PubMed

    Humbert, P

    2008-12-01

    which play a crucial role in the adaptive immunological response. It was shown that activation of the proliferation of the lymphocytes T after the migration of dendritic cells on the level of the lymphatic ganglion depended not on Langerhans cell, but of the dendritic cell. A new way appears to control the autoimmunity in the psoriasis and involves the plasmacytoid dendritic cells which are sensitized with the DNA itself when it is coupled with an antibacterial peptide. Mast cells express cathelicidin, which acts like an antibiotic with broad spectrum and influences the defence system of the epitheliums. We have perhaps found a new therapeutic target for rosacea by disclosing high rates of cathelicidin and a series of associated proteases in skin lesions. The sebocytes express antibacterial functional peptides deriving from cathelicidin which can have a bactericidal effect against P. Acnes. A vast genomic study in the androgenetic alopecia highlighted the existence of new loci localized on the 20p11 chromosome, associated with the risk of androgenetic alopecia. New alleles to determine the color of hair and the cutaneous pigmentation were identified. Two loci (IRF 4 and SLC24A4) are highly associated with the color of hair, like three other areas. The blue color of the eyes could be due to a change of an element located in gene HERC2 preventing of the expression of OCA2. Thus, many fields of dermatology were the object of research which opens new prospects for diagnosis and treatment. PMID:19264208

  13. [What's new in pediatric dermatology in 2011?].

    PubMed

    Hadj-Rabia, S

    2011-12-01

    Based on the review of the medical publications, this article summarizes the main advances in the field of pediatric dermatology which occurred during the last year. The main results concern psoriasis, atopic dermatitis, acne and hemangiomas. A particular attention was given to genodermatoses. PMID:22202646

  14. Synopsis of antinuclear antibodies in dermatology.

    PubMed

    Nelson, Michael M; Heffernan, Michael P

    2002-06-01

    Antinuclear antibodies (ANA) provide a powerful tool in diagnosing the connective tissue diseases. The fundamentals of antinuclear antibody testing and the sensitivity, specificity, and prognostic value of antinuclear antibodies and their associated illnesses will be discussed. As skin manifestations are common with connective tissue diseases, knowledge of the diagnostic and prognostic value of ANA testing is essential to the nurse in dermatology. PMID:12099064

  15. [The use of lasers in dermatology].

    PubMed

    Lecocq, C; Pirard, D; del Marmol, V; Berlingin, E

    2013-01-01

    Albert Einstein is undoubtedly the father of lasers. But it is not until 1964 that the first dermatological lasers were introduced. The Nd-YAG laser, the CO2 laser were developed by Kumar Patel. In a 40 year period lasers not only were diversified but have also become safer and miniaturized. This article hopes to strengthen general practionners' and specialist's knowledge of the different categories of available lasers. The most frequently used ones are ablative lasers (CO2-Erbium), vascular lasers (Nd-YAG, KTP, pulsed dye laser) and the pigment lasers (Q-Switched Nd-YAG, Alexandrite). A description of these lasers and their indications in dermatology will be discussed. PMID:23534310

  16. HIPAA, dermatology images, and the law.

    PubMed

    Scheinfeld, Noah; Rothstein, Brooke

    2013-12-01

    From smart phones to iPads, the world has grown increasingly reliant on new technology. In this ever-expanding digital age, medicine is at the forefront of these new technologies. In the field of dermatology and general medicine, digital images have become an important tool used in patient management. Today, one can even find physicians who use their cellular phone cameras to take patient images and transmit them to other physicians. However, as digital imaging technology has become more prevalent so too have concerns about the impact of this technology on the electronic medical record, quality of patient care, and medicolegal issues. This article will discuss the advent of digital imaging technology in dermatology and the legal ramifications digital images have on medical care, abiding by HIPAA, the use of digital images as evidence, and the possible abuses digital images can pose in a health care setting. PMID:24800426

  17. Current Concepts in Dermatology: Part I

    PubMed Central

    Jackson, Robert

    1963-01-01

    Some of the more recent advances and newer concepts about certain dermatological conditions are presented. Untoward reactions to drugs, whether to systemic or topical agents, are discussed in detail; emphasis is placed on their frequency and on the diversity of clinical findings. In the management of certain skin tumours (hemangiomas and melanocytic nevi) it is essential that the natural history of the lesion be considered. It is generally agreed that the answer to the problem of staphylococcal infection of the skin will be found in the host rather than the staphylococcus. Keratoacanthoma is a pseudocarcinoma of unknown etiology and sometimes gives rise to considerable difficulty in diagnosis. Diffuse alopecia in women is now a common dermatological problem, the cause of which is unknown. The hair loss associated with it is not permanent. ImagesFig. 1 PMID:13964259

  18. Web-based training modules in dermatology.

    PubMed

    Bittorf, A; Bauer, J; Simon, M; Diepgen, T L

    1997-01-01

    With the goal of using the full power of the World Wide Web for computer-based education, we developed an interactive system for training in dermatology with a database of several thousand color images. The system consists of lecture scripts, case reports with recorded sound, an online atlas, and a quiz system--all relying on the underlying image database. The images used have been reviewed and rated by a senior dermatologist. At present, they are described with a hierarchical key system that permits searching for images by their content. We have evaluated our statistics on access and the results of an open user survey based on an adaptive questionnaire. The responses to 200 questionnaires completed in a two-month study period are encouraging. The online resources are being used not only for training in dermatology but also for continuing education and reference. PMID:9308346

  19. 308nm excimer laser in dermatology.

    PubMed

    Mehraban, Shadi; Feily, Amir

    2014-01-01

    308nm xenon-chloride excimer laser, a novel mode of phototherapy, is an ultraviolet B radiation system consisting of a noble gas and halide. The aim of this systematic review was to investigate the literature and summarize all the experiments, clinical trials and case reports on 308-nm excimer laser in dermatological disorders. 308-nm excimer laser has currently a verified efficacy in treating skin conditions such as vitiligo, psoriasis, atopic dermatitis, alopecia areata, allergic rhinitis, folliculitis, granuloma annulare, lichen planus, mycosis fungoides, palmoplantar pustulosis, pityriasis alba, CD30+ lympho proliferative disorder, leukoderma, prurigo nodularis, localized scleroderma and genital lichen sclerosus. Although the 308-nm excimer laser appears to act as a promising treatment modality in dermatology, further large-scale studies should be undertaken in order to fully affirm its safety profile considering the potential risk, however minimal, of malignancy, it may impose. PMID:25606333

  20. Zinc therapy in dermatology: a review.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Mrinal; Mahajan, Vikram K; Mehta, Karaninder S; Chauhan, Pushpinder S

    2014-01-01

    Zinc, both in elemental or in its salt forms, has been used as a therapeutic modality for centuries. Topical preparations like zinc oxide, calamine, or zinc pyrithione have been in use as photoprotecting, soothing agents or as active ingredient of antidandruff shampoos. Its use has expanded manifold over the years for a number of dermatological conditions including infections (leishmaniasis, warts), inflammatory dermatoses (acne vulgaris, rosacea), pigmentary disorders (melasma), and neoplasias (basal cell carcinoma). Although the role of oral zinc is well-established in human zinc deficiency syndromes including acrodermatitis enteropathica, it is only in recent years that importance of zinc as a micronutrient essential for infant growth and development has been recognized. The paper reviews various dermatological uses of zinc. PMID:25120566

  1. Current state of imaging in dermatology.

    PubMed

    Hibler, Brian P; Qi, Qiaochu; Rossi, Anthony M

    2016-03-01

    Medical imaging has dramatically transformed the practice of medicine, especially the field of dermatology. Imaging is used to facilitate the transfer of information between providers, document cutaneous disease, assess response to therapy, and plays a crucial role in monitoring and diagnosing skin cancer. Advancements in imaging technology and overall improved quality of imaging have augmented the utility of photography. We provide an overview of current imaging technologies used in dermatology with a focus on their role in skin cancer diagnosis. Future technologies include three-dimensional, total-body photography, mobile smartphone applications, and computerassisted diagnostic devices. With these advancements, we are better equipped to capture and monitor skin conditions longitudinally and achieve improved diagnostic accuracy of skin cancer. PMID:26963110

  2. Zinc Therapy in Dermatology: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Mahajan, Vikram K.; Mehta, Karaninder S.; Chauhan, Pushpinder S.

    2014-01-01

    Zinc, both in elemental or in its salt forms, has been used as a therapeutic modality for centuries. Topical preparations like zinc oxide, calamine, or zinc pyrithione have been in use as photoprotecting, soothing agents or as active ingredient of antidandruff shampoos. Its use has expanded manifold over the years for a number of dermatological conditions including infections (leishmaniasis, warts), inflammatory dermatoses (acne vulgaris, rosacea), pigmentary disorders (melasma), and neoplasias (basal cell carcinoma). Although the role of oral zinc is well-established in human zinc deficiency syndromes including acrodermatitis enteropathica, it is only in recent years that importance of zinc as a micronutrient essential for infant growth and development has been recognized. The paper reviews various dermatological uses of zinc. PMID:25120566

  3. Infectious Disease Practice Gaps in Dermatology.

    PubMed

    Hopp, Shelby; Quest, Tyler L; Wanat, Karolyn A

    2016-07-01

    The article highlights different educational and practice gaps in infectious diseases as they pertain to dermatology. These gaps include the use of antibiotics in relation to atopic dermatitis and acne vulgaris, treatment of skin and soft tissue infection, and diagnosis and treatment of onychomycosis. In addition, practice gaps related to use of imiquimod for molluscum contagiosum, risk of infections related to immunosuppressive medications and rates of vaccination, and the use of bedside diagnostics for diagnosing common infections were discussed. PMID:27363885

  4. The mystical effects of dermatological vehicles.

    PubMed

    Surber, Christian; Smith, Eric W

    2005-01-01

    Topical treatment of the skin is as old as the evolution of man. Instinctively, we try to treat a skin injury or irritation with cooling or soothing substances. Even animals lick their wounds, trusting instinctively in the healing power of saliva. When did this archaic pattern of treatment take the gigantic leap from folk medicine to modern drug therapy? This text illustrates the evolution of topical dermatological vehicles, their application (guidelines) and future use. In particular, a phenomenon that has so far been ignored in product development and clinical testing is the vehicle metamorphosis. In clinical and experimental situations, most dermatological vehicles undergo considerable changes after they have been removed from the primary container and are applied to the skin. Subsequently, the initial structural matrix, and the quantitative composition of the vehicle, will most likely change during and after the mechanical shear associated with application of the product and/or evaporation of ingredients. This natural, but highly dynamic process will generate mini-environments for the active moiety that are difficult to predict and that are crucial to the fate of the active moiety. Despite the reasonable wishes of formulators, clinicians, patients and customers, there are still no universal vehicles. Each drug, at each concentration, requires a different vehicle for optimized therapy. Stability and compatibility of excipients and active moiety are crucial for any commercially available pharmaceutical or cosmetic formulation, together with local and systemic safety of all components. Nonetheless, more diverse and molecularly complex classes of new dermatological vehicles are continuously being researched and refined. The scientific progress has been remarkable when one considers the simple emulsion mixtures that were commonplace in dermatological therapy and still persist to this day in commercial products. It is to be hoped that the result of these research

  5. Impact on facial rejuvenation with dermatological preparations

    PubMed Central

    Bowler, Patrick J

    2009-01-01

    The treatment options for facial rejuvenation using dermatological, nonsurgical techniques have dramatically increased in the past 10 years. This follows the introduction of botulinum toxin and a variety of dermal fillers. The public interest in noninvasive treatments has changed the market beyond recognition with more physicians involved in providing services to satiate the demand. The impact on the public and medical profession is discussed. PMID:19503770

  6. Sternocostoclavicular hyperostosis: rheumatologic, radiologic, and dermatologic characteristics.

    PubMed

    Resnik, C S; Waters, B K; Wilkin, J K

    1987-05-01

    Two recently observed patients with sternocostoclavicular hyperostosis exemplify the characteristic presentation of this rheumatologic disorder. We describe its manifestations, review the literature on this subject, and discuss clinical and radiologic aspects, including the frequently associated dermatologic disorder palmoplantar pustulosis. Sternocostoclavicular hyperostosis is an increasingly common diagnosis, and practicing physicians should be aware of the distinctive features that allow accurate differentiation from psoriatic arthritis and other diseases. PMID:3554532

  7. Update on TNF Inhibitors in Dermatology.

    PubMed

    Sobell, Jeffrey M

    2016-06-01

    Emerging data describe new potential indications for tumor necrosis factor (TNF) inhibitors in dermatology, including pediatric psoriasis and hidradenitis suppurativa. New biosimilar TNF agents are in late stages of development and may be available in the United States in the near future. Biosimilar agents are similar but not identical to available TNF inhibitors, and approval requires extensive analytic, toxicity, pharmacokinetic, pharmacodynamic, and clinical testing. Semin Cutan Med Surg 35(supp6):S104-S106. PMID:27537073

  8. A new alternative therapy in dermatology: tocilizumab.

    PubMed

    Koryürek, Özgül Muştu; Kalkan, Göknur

    2016-06-01

    Tocilizumab (TCZ) is a recombinant-humanized anti-human interleukin 6 receptor monoclonal antibody of the immunoglobulin (Ig) IgG1 subclass with a H2L2 polypeptide structure. Even if it was approved by the US Food and Drug Administration for the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis, systemic juvenile idiopathic arthritis and polyarticular juvenile idiopathic arthritis, satisfying results have also been reported with TCZ in various refractory dermatological diseases such as psoriasis, psoriatic arthritis, Behçet's disease, systemic lupus erythematosus, systemic sclerosis, relapsing polychondritis, vasculitis and atopic dermatitis. TCZ treatment in dermatology and adverse effects of the drug were reviewed here after the pharmacological properties, mechanism of action, dosage and administration of the drug were summarized. We estimate that by the help of newly well-designed studies with wider spectrum of subjects to comprehensively investigate the efficacy and safety will be able to contribute to the clinical management of the diseases especially refractory to the other treatments. Therefore, during the next decade, TCZ will be promising drugs in the treatment of refractory dermatological diseases. PMID:26023856

  9. History, dermatology, and medicine: another outlook.

    PubMed

    Goihman-Yahr, Mauricio

    2014-01-01

    The History of Medicine and of Dermatology tends to analyze what happened in these disciplines in a given time and place. Contributions of relevant leaders are studied carefully, and their appropriate value to knowledge is determined. This is fundamental to understanding present knowledge and what might be expected in the future. There is, yet, an additional perspective, namely, the relationships between the above and historical phenomena in their wider sense; particularly, the correlation between politics, economy, psychohistory, and medicine. Evolution of medical knowledge does not occur in a vacuum. This contribution provides examples of this viewpoint and how knowledge of history makes clearer the development of medicine and vice versa. Emphasis is also made on the history and development of dermatology, but rather as an illustration of the overall philosophical point of view of the writer than as an analysis of the history of dermatology in itself. One may summarize metaphorically this viewpoint by stating that while the microscope and the dermatoscope are very important, the telescope is vital for integral knowledge. PMID:24314391

  10. The International Dermatology Outcome Measures Group: formation of patient-centered outcome measures in dermatology.

    PubMed

    Gottlieb, Alice B; Levin, Adriane A; Armstrong, April W; Abernethy, April; Duffin, Kristina Callis; Bhushan, Reva; Garg, Amit; Merola, Joseph F; Maccarone, Mara; Christensen, Robin

    2015-02-01

    As quality standards are increasingly in demand throughout medicine, dermatology needs to establish outcome measures to quantify the effectiveness of treatments and providers. The International Dermatology Outcome Measures Group was established to address this need. Beginning with psoriasis, the group aims to create a tool considerate of patients and providers using the input of all relevant stakeholders in assessment of disease severity and response to treatment. Herein, we delineate the procedures through which consensus is being reached and the future directions of the project. PMID:25486914

  11. Employing an aesthetician in a dermatology practice: facts and controversies.

    PubMed

    Slade, Karren; Grant-Kels, Jane M

    2013-01-01

    Employment of aestheticians in dermatology offices is becoming an everyday occurrence, as the dermatology patients' demand for cosmetic services taxes the availability of limited resources. Proponents of the practice state that aestheticians can help meet patients' expectations, while allowing dermatologists to focus their practice on the medical needs of patients. Opponents believe employment of fee-for-service aesthetic technicians compromises our ethical duties to our patients and diminishes the stature of dermatology as a profession. PMID:24160286

  12. PSYCHOSOMATIC ASPECTS IN PATIENTS WITH DERMATOLOGIC DISEASES.

    PubMed

    Tsintsadze, N; Beridze, L; Tsintsadze, N; Krichun, Y; Tsivadze, N; Tsintsadze, M

    2015-06-01

    The aim of our study was to find out the magnitude of anxiety and depression in our common dermatological patients and its correlation with age, sex. For this purpose, we used Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale HADS. The psychometric validity of HADS has been established by validating the questionnaire against the structured psychiatric interviews. A study of anxiety and depression in patients with dermatologic diseases was conducted on the basis of outpatients department in 211 patients with dermatologic diseases; among them were 107 male and 104 female, aged 16 to 75 years. Among them were patients with Acne, Alopecia Areata, Psoriasis, Vitiligo, Neurodermatitis, Scabies, Eczema and Other diseases (Atopic Dermatitis, Chronic Urticaria, Lichen Planus, Herpes Zoster, Melasma, Warts and Etc.). Based on studies of patients reveals that 65.4% of them are anxiety, depression - 56.2%, both anxiety and depression in 24.7%, there figures higher than the dates of other authorizes. As a result of a direct link research risk disorder depressive spectrum with sex, age; in woman anxiety and depression occurs more frequently than men, and anxiety occurs more frequently in young age. Especially there are hight frequencies of manifestation of abuse in patients with Psoriasis (anxiety - 83.3%, depression - 69.4%, both - 38.8%), Eczema (anxiety - 73.3%, depression - 56.6%, both - 26.7%), Acne (anxiety - 78.4%, depression - 54%, both - 21.6%), Vitiligo (anxiety - 66.7%, depression - 60%, both - 33.3%). Our study noticed higher dates of anxiety and depression than the dates of other outhorizes. PMID:26087735

  13. Alitretinoin in Dermatology-An Update.

    PubMed

    Bubna, Aditya Kumar

    2015-01-01

    Alitretinoin is a pan retinoic acid agonist. It was initially used as 0.1% gel in the management of localized Kaposi's sarcoma. At present, the use of systemic alitretinoin has proved extremely efficacious in the management of recalcitrant chronic hand eczema. Furthermore, there have been other retinoid responsive dermatosis that have demonstrated remission post usage of systemic alitretinoin. With a better toxicity profile, compared to the other systemic retinoids, alitretinoin could be considered a valuable treatment option in the near future for the treatment of these dermatologic disorders. PMID:26538721

  14. Home-use devices in aesthetic dermatology.

    PubMed

    Keller, Emily C

    2014-12-01

    The world of aesthetic medicine is increasingly a consumer-driven market with a wide variety of home-use devices from which the consumer can choose for treating hair removal, hair loss, acne, facial rejuvenation, and other dermatologic conditions. Where these devices fit in the physician practice and consumer routine can be confusing, as scientific studies may be weak or lacking. The specifications, price, ease-of-use, maintenance, and technology can differ greatly between devices. Thus, the physician and consumer need to define exp. PMID:25830253

  15. Sleep-wake disorders and dermatology.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Madhulika A; Gupta, Aditya K

    2013-01-01

    Sleep is an active process that occupies about one-third of the lives of humans; however, there are relatively few studies of skin disorders during sleep. Sleep disruption in dermatologic disorders can significantly affect the quality of life and mental health of the patient and in some situations may even lead to exacerbations of the dermatologic condition. Sleep and skin disorders interface at several levels: (1) the role of the skin in normal sleep physiology, such as thermoregulation, core body temperature control, and sleep onset; (2) the effect of endogenous circadian rhythms and peripheral circadian "oscillators" on cutaneous symptoms, such as the natural trough in cortisol levels during the evening in patients with inflammatory dermatoses, which most likely results in increased pruritus during the evening and night; (3) the effect of symptoms such as pruritus, hyperhidrosis, and problems with thermoregulation, on sleep and sleep-related quality of life of the patients and their families; (4) the possible effect of primary sleep disorders, such as insomnia, sleep apnea, sleep deprivation, and circadian rhythm disorders, on dermatologic disorders; for example, central nervous system arousals from sleep in sleep apnea can result in increased sympathetic neural activity and increased inflammation; and (5) comorbidity of some dermatologic disorders with stress and psychiatric disorders, for example, major depressive disorder and attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) that are also associated with sleep-related complaints. Sleep loss in atopic dermatitis (AD) is likely involved in the pathogenesis of ADHD-like symptoms in AD. Scratching during sleep, which may be proportional to the overall level of sympathetic nervous activity during the respective stages of sleep, usually occurs most frequently during non-rapid eye movement (NREM) stages 1 and 2 (vs stages 3 and 4 which are the deeper stages of sleep), and in rapid eye movement (REM) sleep, where the

  16. Fillers in dermatology: from past to present.

    PubMed

    Chacon, Anna H

    2015-11-01

    Injectable fillers were introduced in dermatology as a method for reconstructing facial deformities and restoring the aging face. Although fillers have become a popular option among cosmetic patients, clinical experience has shown that fillers must be used with caution, as complications can occur. This article provides a brief review of the history of filler agents currently available for soft tissue augmentation. Although no single filler is ideal for all patients, indications, and situations, residents should be aware of the properties and characteristics that make each product unique. PMID:26682563

  17. Oxidative stress and antioxidant strategies in dermatology.

    PubMed

    Baek, Jinok; Lee, Min-Geol

    2016-07-01

    Oxidative stress results from a prooxidant-antioxidant imbalance, leading to cellular damage. It is mediated by free radicals, such as reactive oxygen species or reactive nitrogen species, that are generated during physiological aerobic metabolism and pathological inflammatory processes. Skin serves as a protective organ that plays an important role in defending both external and internal toxic stimuli and maintaining homeostasis. It is becoming increasingly evident that oxidative stress is involved in numerous skin diseases and that antioxidative strategies can serve as effective and easy methods for improving these conditions. Herein, we review dysregulated antioxidant systems and antioxidative therapeutic strategies in dermatology. PMID:26020527

  18. [Dermatologic aspects of SAPHO-syndrome].

    PubMed

    Károlyi, Z; Harhai, I; Erós, N

    2001-08-19

    SAPHO syndrome (synovitis, acne, pustulosis, hyperostosis, osteitis) as a new disease entity was first described in 1987. The syndrome is characterized by the presence of pustular dermatoses together with aseptic osteoarticular lesions. The bone involvement includes hyperostosis, aseptic osteomyelitis or arthritis of the anterior chest wall, sacroiliac joints or long bones. Skin diseases include acne conglobata or acne fulminans, palmoplantar pustulosis and hidradenitis suppurativa. Authors describe the dermatological relationship of SAPHO syndrome reporting their 7 cases (3 acne fulminans, 4 palmoplantar pustulosis). Authors draw attention to the isotretinoin therapy as a possible provoking factor of the articular symptoms, and they emphasize the diagnostic role of bone scintigraphy. PMID:11573450

  19. The use of photodynamic therapy in dermatology.

    PubMed

    Babilas, P; Szeimies, R M

    2010-10-01

    In dermatology, topical photodynamic therapy (PDT) is a well established treatment modality which has mainly shown to be effective for dermato-oncologic conditions like actinic keratosis, Bowen's disease, in-situ squamous cell carcinoma and superficial basal cell carcinoma. However, a therapeutical benefit of PDT is also evident for inflammatory dermatoses like localized scleroderma, acne vulgaris and granuloma annulare as well as for aesthetic indications like photo aged skin or sebaceous gland hyperplasia. Recent work has been focused on the development and evaluation of topical photosensitizers like the hem precursor 5-aminolevulinic acid or its methyl ester inducing photosensitizing porphyrins. These drugs do not induce strong generalized cutaneous photosensitization like the systemically applied porphyrins or their derivatives. For dermatological purposes incoherent lamps or LED arrays can be used for light activation. Depending on the applied light dose and the concentration of the photosensitizer either cytotoxic effects resulting in tumor destruction or immunomodulatory effects improving the inflammatory conditions occur. Treating superficial oncologic lesions (tumor thickness < 2-3 mm) cure rates achieved by PDT are equal to the cure rates of the respective standard therapeutic procedure. The benefits of PDT are the low level of invasiveness and the excellent cosmetic results after treatment. PMID:20930696

  20. Jojoba in dermatology: a succinct review.

    PubMed

    Pazyar, N; Yaghoobi, R; Ghassemi, M R; Kazerouni, A; Rafeie, E; Jamshydian, N

    2013-12-01

    Phytomedicine has been successfully used in dermatology horizon for thousands of years. Jojoba (Simmondsia chinensis) is a long-lived, drought resistant, perennial plant with interesting economic value as it is processed for liquid wax production. The jojoba plant produces esters of long-chain alcohols and fatty acids (waxes) as a seed lipid energy reserve. The liquid wax is an important substrate for a variety of industrial applications and is used in skin treatment preparations. The oil from the jojoba plant is the main biological source of wax esters and has a multitude of potential applications. The review of literatures suggest that jojoba has anti-inflammatory effect and it can be used on a variety of skin conditions including skin infections, skin aging, as well as wound healing. Moreover, jojoba has been shown to play a role in cosmetics formulas such as sunscreens and moisturizers and also enhances the absorption of topical drugs. The intention of the review is to summarize the data regarding the uses of jojoba in dermatology for readers and researchers. PMID:24442052

  1. Obsessive-compulsive disorder in dermatology.

    PubMed

    Mavrogiorgou, Paraskevi; Bader, Armin; Stockfleth, Eggert; Juckel, Georg

    2015-10-01

    Patients with obsessive-compulsive (OCD) and related disorders - primarily trichotillomania, body dysmorphic disorder, and skin picking disorder - frequently present to dermatologists due to associated hair and skin symptoms. It is therefore crucial that dermatologists be familiar with these disorders. In this review article, we provide an update on clinical features, neurobiology factors, and treatment options for OCD spectrum disorders. Employing PubMed and Cochrane Library databases, a selective literature search was conducted using keywords related to dermatological disorders within the OCD spectrum. OCD and its related disorders share several phenomenological as well as pathophysiological similarities, thus warranting their classification within a separate nosological category of psychiatric disorders. Another similarity of OCD spectrum disorders is the frequent concurrence of hair and skin diseases. Besides symptomatic dermatological treatment, the combination of psychotherapy (behavioral therapy) and psychopharmacotherapy (SSRIs) may be helpful. Although recent insights into OCD have contributed to a better understanding and treatment thereof, more research is required, especially with respect to OCD spectrum disorders, for which large controlled treatment studies are still lacking. PMID:26408459

  2. Relaxation strategies for patients during dermatologic surgery.

    PubMed

    Shenefelt, Philip D

    2010-07-01

    Patient stress and anxiety are common preoperatively and during dermatologic procedures and surgeries. Stress and anxiety can occasionally interfere with performance of procedures or surgery and can induce hemodynamic instability, such as elevated blood pressure or syncope, as well as producing considerable discomfort for some patients. Detection of excess stress and anxiety in patients can allow the opportunity for corrective or palliative measures. Slower breathing, biofeedback, progressive muscular relaxation, guided imagery, hypnosis, meditation and music can help calm and rebalance the patient's autonomic nervous system and immune functioning. Handheld miniaturized heart rate variability biofeedback devices are now available. The relaxation response can easily be taught. Guided imagery can be recorded or live. Live rapid induction hypnosis followed by deepening and then self-guided imagery requires no experience on the part of the patient but does require training and experience on the part of a provider. Recorded hypnosis inductions may also be used. Meditation generally requires more prior experience and training, but is useful when the patient already is skilled in it. Live, guided meditation or meditation recordings may be used. Relaxing recorded music from speakers or headphones or live performance music may also be employed to ease discomfort and improve the patient's attitude for dermatologic procedures and surgeries. PMID:20677535

  3. Evaluating clinical dermatology practice in medical undergraduates.

    PubMed

    Casanova, J M; Sanmartín, V; Martí, R M; Morales, J L; Soler, J; Purroy, F; Pujol, R

    2014-06-01

    The acquisition of competences (the set of knowledge, skills and attitudes required to perform a job to a professional level) is considered a fundamental part of medical training. Dermatology competences should include, in addition to effective clinical interviewing and detailed descriptions of skin lesions, appropriate management (diagnosis, differentiation, and treatment) of common skin disorders and tumors. Such competences can only be acquired during hospital clerkships. As a way of certifying these competences, we propose evaluating the different components as follows: knowledge, via clinical examinations or critical incident discussions; communication and certain instrumental skills, via structured workplace observation and scoring using a set of indicators; and attitudes, via joint evaluation by staff familiar with the student. PMID:23664251

  4. Formulation Patents and Dermatology and Obviousness

    PubMed Central

    Mei, Dan-Feng; Liu, Josephine; Davitz, Michael A.

    2011-01-01

    Most patents covering dermatologic products contain patent claims directed to the pharmaceutical formulation of the product. Such patents, known as formulation patents, are vulnerable to attacks based on the legal argument that the formulations covered are obvious over formulations already known prior to the filing of the patent application. Because obviousness is an important concept in patent law, recent court cases concerning obviousness and formulation patents were examined and discussed below. Courts have ruled that patent claims are obvious when features of the claimed formulation are found in the prior art, even if the features or characteristics of the formulation are not explicitly disclosed in the prior art. However, patentees have successfully overcome obviousness challenges where there were unexpected results or properties and/or the prior art taught away from the claimed invention. PMID:24309313

  5. Psychologic trauma, posttraumatic stress disorder, and dermatology.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Madhulika A; Lanius, Ruth A; Van der Kolk, Bessel A

    2005-10-01

    Psychologic trauma refers to events (such as sexual assault, major earthquake, or plane crashes) that overwhelm an individual's capacity to cope. Psychologic trauma can result in chronic and recurring dermatologic symptoms that persist after the trauma subsides. Examples are cutaneous sensory flashbacks (which may be fragments of the sensory component of the traumatic experience), autonomic hyperarousal (with symptoms such as profuse sweating or flare-up of an underlying stress-reactive dermatosis), conversion symptoms (such as numbness, pain, or other medically unexplained cutaneous symptoms), and cutaneous self-injury (manifesting in many forms, including trichotillomania, dermatitis artefacta, and neurotic excoriations--tension-reducing behaviors in patients who have posttraumatic stress disorder). PMID:16112441

  6. Platelet-rich plasma: applications in dermatology.

    PubMed

    Conde Montero, E; Fernández Santos, M E; Suárez Fernández, R

    2015-03-01

    In recent years, the use of platelet-rich plasma has increased notably in a range of diseases and settings. Uses of these products now go beyond skin rejuvenation therapy in patients with facial ageing. Good outcomes for other dermatological indications such as skin ulcers and, more recently, alopecia have been reported in case series and controlled studies. However, these indications are not currently included in the labeling given that stronger scientific evidence is required to support their real benefits. With the increased use of these products, dermatologists need to become familiar with the underlying biological principles and able to critically assess the quality and outcomes of the studies of these products in different skin diseases. PMID:24795093

  7. Common dermatologic manifestations of primary immune deficiencies.

    PubMed

    Relan, Manisha; Lehman, Heather K

    2014-12-01

    The skin is the largest organ of our body; it consists of the epidermis, dermis, hair follicles, sweat glands, blood vessels, and connective tissue matrix. Its main function is to act as a barrier to the outside world and protect us from infections. Any component of the skin is subject to insults from the environment and/or from within the body. Primary immune deficiency patients present with recurrent or prolonged infections not frequently seen in healthy individuals. Oftentimes, these infections involve the skin. Primary immune deficiency may also present with noninfectious cutaneous signs, such as eczema; erythroderma; granulomas; dysplasia of the skin, hair, nails, or teeth; pigmentary changes; angioedema; urticaria; vasculitis; or autoimmune skin disease due to immune dysregulation. Prompt recognition of the underlying diagnosis and initiation of treatment decrease morbidity. This review provides the reader with an up-to-date summary of the common dermatologic manifestations of primary immune deficiency diseases. PMID:25269404

  8. Ozone production by dermatologic phototherapy equipment

    SciTech Connect

    Edwards, E.K. Jr.

    1981-10-01

    Phototherapy is an extremely effective and popular physical modality used by many dermatologists to treat a wide variety of cutaneous disorders. The major dermatologic journals frequently have articles on new applications for phototherapy. The science of photobiology has advanced rapidly over the last ten years and probably will continue to do so. One fact that should be kept in mind when using an ultraviolet light apparatus is the possibility of the generation of ozone, a toxic gas. In this study, a number of devices commonly used by many dermatologists in phototherapy were monitored for ozone production. Although some of the equipment examined can produce ozone, it is produced at very low levels, dissipates quickly, and poses no health threat.

  9. Dermatological medication effects on male fertility.

    PubMed

    Millsop, Jillian Wong; Heller, Misha M; Eliason, Mark J; Murase, Jenny E

    2013-01-01

    Many drugs have been reported to impair semen parameters, leading to temporary or persistent infertility. Therefore, potential fathers may be concerned about the effect of medications on fertility. We searched the MEDLINE database of articles in English combining key terms including "male infertility," "spermatogenesis," "fertility," "drug effects," and "dermatology." Administration of methotrexate and finasteride has resulted in severe oligospermia and reversible infertility. Ketoconazole has had negative effects on sperm motility and testosterone production. Few individual case reports and a limited number of studies have demonstrated negative effects of tetracyclines, erythromycin, chloroquine, glucocorticoids, spironolactone, and antihistamines on fertility. It is important to counsel male patients when appropriate about the reversible negative effect on fertility when taking methotrexate and finasteride, and the adverse effect of ketoconazole. Patients may be reassured that taking oral retinoids, cyclosporine, azathioprine, and tumor necrosis factor alpha inhibitors should not affect their fertility. PMID:23914891

  10. Platelet-rich plasma in dermatology: boon or a bane?

    PubMed

    Kumaran, M Sendhil

    2014-01-01

    There has been a recent spurt in application of platelet-rich plasma (PRP) in dermatology and aesthetic medicine. However, the details regarding use of PRP in various dermatological indications ranging from hair restoration to chronic ulcers are dispersed in literature, herein we have tried to focus all under one heading. Overall, PRP seems to be a promising therapeutic modality but the level of evidence as of now, from the available published data is low. This review will also stimulate readers to carry out well designed, larger population based trials, so as to validate its use in dermatology practice. PMID:24448117

  11. A Concentrated Teaching Exercise for Introducing Clinical Dermatology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Binford, Robert T.; And Others

    1973-01-01

    At Cornell University Medical College one 3-hour session in dermatology is required during the second year. A teaching exercise has been developed that combines a lecture, laboratory exercises, and presentations of patients. (Author)

  12. Textiles in dermatology: our experience and literature review.

    PubMed

    Brambilla, Lucia; Brena, Michela; Tourlaki, Athanasia

    2016-06-01

    Skin protects its host from its environment and allows their interactions by providing a physical permeability barrier, protection from infectious agents, thermoregulation, and ultraviolet protection. Textiles, in particular clothing, interact with skin functions in a dynamic pattern. For years cotton has been considered as the only comfortable tissue suitable for patients with dermatologic disorders. Nowadays new synthetic fibers with important functions, for example breathability and waterproofing have leaned out and new tissues can be used as a complementary tool in dermatologic treatments. Our purpose is to report the main fibers used for dermatological problems and to review the literature on their use in dermatological field; finally, we also report our personal experience on this topic. PMID:25366891

  13. Dermatological problems following spinal cord injury in Korean patients

    PubMed Central

    Han, Zee-A; Choi, Ja Young; Ko, Young Jin

    2015-01-01

    Objective To identify dermatological conditions following spinal cord injury (SCI) and analyze these conditions in relation to various characteristics of SCI. Design Retrospective chart review. Setting National Health Insurance Corporation Ilsan Hospital of Korea, Rehabilitation Center, Spinal Cord Unit. Participants Patients treated for SCI who were referred to dermatology for dermatological problems, 2000–2012. Results Of the 1408 SCI patients treated at the spinal cord unit, 253 patients with SCI were identified to have been referred to dermatology for skin problems and a total of 335 dermatological conditions were diagnosed. The most common dermatological finding was infectious (n = 123, 36.7%) followed by eczematous lesions (n = 109, 32.5%). Among the infectious lesions, fungal infection (n = 76, 61.8%) was the most common, followed by bacterial (n = 27, 21.9%) lesions. Seborrheic dermatitis (n = 59, 64.1%) was the most frequent eczematous lesion. Ingrown toenail occurred more frequently in tetraplegics whereas vascular skin lesions occurred more commonly in patients with paraplegia (P < 0.05). Xerotic dermatitis showed a higher occurrence within 12 months of injury rather than thereafter (P < 0.05). Of these, 72.4% of the infectious and 94.7% of the fungal skin lesions manifested below the neurological level of injury (NLI; P < 0.001) and 61.5% of the eczematous lesions and 94.9% of seborrheic dermatitis cases occurred above the NLI (P < 0.001). There was no significant difference in dermatological diagnoses between patients with neurologically complete and incomplete SCI. Conclusion The most common dermatological condition in patients with SCI among those referred to dermatology was fungal infection, followed by seborrheic dermatitis. Although dermatological problems after SCI are not critical in SCI outcome, they negatively affect the quality of life. Patients and caregivers should be educated about appropriate skin care and routine

  14. Antimalarials in dermatology: mechanism of action, indications, and side effects.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez-Caruncho, C; Bielsa Marsol, I

    2014-04-01

    Antimalarial drugs have been in common use in dermatology since the 1950s. Their mechanism of action is complex, and it is now known that they act through various pathways. We review the indications for antimalarials in dermatology, their adverse effects, and some less well-known effects, such as their antithrombotic and hypolipidemic action. The most recent recommendations concerning ophthalmological screening in patients on antimalarials are also reviewed. PMID:24656224

  15. High frequency ultrasound with color Doppler in dermatology*

    PubMed Central

    Barcaui, Elisa de Oliveira; Carvalho, Antonio Carlos Pires; Lopes, Flavia Paiva Proença Lobo; Piñeiro-Maceira, Juan; Barcaui, Carlos Baptista

    2016-01-01

    Ultrasonography is a method of imaging that classically is used in dermatology to study changes in the hypoderma, as nodules and infectious and inflammatory processes. The introduction of high frequency and resolution equipments enabled the observation of superficial structures, allowing differentiation between skin layers and providing details for the analysis of the skin and its appendages. This paper aims to review the basic principles of high frequency ultrasound and its applications in different areas of dermatology. PMID:27438191

  16. [The history of nosology in dermatology].

    PubMed

    Tilles, G; Wallach, D

    1989-01-01

    The Hippocratic texts give evidence of the first structured interest in skin diseases. Nosological preoccupations, then at their beginning, put the stress on the connections between general pathology and diseases affecting the skin, and by creating a vocabulary. The Hippocratic texts give evidence of the first structured interest in skin diseases. Nosological preoccupations, then at their beginning, put the stress on the connections between general pathology and diseases affecting the skin, and by creating a vocabulary drawn from the vegetal world initiated a long-lasting relationship between dermatology and botany. The centuries which followed witnessed a wealth of descriptions which, thanks in particular to the works of Celsus, Galen and the Arab authors, led to the formation of true medical encyclopaedias, although the diagnosis of skin diseases could not be approached. The outline of a rational dermatological thinking did not appear until the 17th century with Haffenreffer, Riolan and Willis, all influenced by Malpighi, Harvey and Sydenham. Then came the 18th century with Astruc, Turner and Lorry. But it was in fact J. Plenck who devised the first nosology that could be used in clinical practice by creating the elementary lesion principle, later revised and refined by Willan and Bateman. In contradistinction with this artificial nosology, the French school of Alibert endeavoured to set up a natural nosology unfortunately spoiled by a certain lack of pragmatism. In the second half of the 19th century three main schools of thought emerged: Hebra's, who raised the nosological approach to an anatomical level, Hardy, Bazin's, who gave predominance to diathesis, and Wilson's, who attempted a synthesis of the first two schools. At the dawn of the 20th century the dogmatism of morphological systematization seemed to wane and be superseded by an aetiological approach, then reappeared in Degos' treatise published in 1953. The latest nosologies acknowledge the importance

  17. Role of direct immunofluorescence in dermatological disorders

    PubMed Central

    Mysorekar, Vijaya V.; Sumathy, T. K.; Shyam Prasad, A. L.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Direct immunofluorescence (DIF) test for tissue-bound autoantibodies, has been found to be of value in the diagnosis of several dermatological disorders. The location and pattern of deposition of immunoreactants helps in classifying various immune-mediated diseases. Aims and Objectives: The aim of this study was to analyze the concordance between the clinical, histopathological and DIF diagnosis in bullous and nonbullous lesions of the skin, and thus determine the impact of immunofluorescence on diagnosis. Materials and Methods: A total of 215 skin biopsies performed in suspected immune-mediated vesiculobullous disease, vasculitis or dermatosis, were studied. Histopathological examination was done along with DIF study for deposits of immunoglobulin G(IgG), IgA, IgM, and C3. Results: Direct immunofluorescence was positive in 103/215 cases. There was very good concordance between the clinical, histological and DIF results (observed agreement = 93.4%, κ =0.90, with 95% confidence interval = 0.86–0.94). The overall sensitivity of DIF in immune-mediated skin disorders was 98.0%. DIF was positive in 52/53 cases (98.1%) in the pemphigus group and 24/25 (96.0%) bullous pemphigoid cases. None of the clinically suspected cases of dermatitis herpetiformis showed DIF positivity. A positive lupus band test was seen in 9/9 (100%) cases of lupus erythematosus. DIF was positive in 10/10 (100%) clinically suspected cases of Henoch–Schönlein purpura. In 110 cases, negative DIF results helped to rule out immune-mediated vesiculobullous disorders, lupus erythematosus and vasculitis, and the final diagnosis was made on the basis of the clinical features and/or histopathology. Conclusion: Direct immunofluorescence is a useful supplement for the accurate diagnosis of immune-mediated dermatological disorders, and helps to classify various autoimmune bullous disorders. When the clinical features/histopathology are inconclusive, the diagnosis often can be made on the basis

  18. Dermatologic signs in patients with eating disorders.

    PubMed

    Strumia, Renata

    2005-01-01

    Eating disorders are significant causes of morbidity and mortality in adolescent females and young women. They are associated with severe medical and psychological consequences, including death, osteoporosis, growth delay and developmental delay. Dermatologic symptoms are almost always detectable in patients with severe anorexia nervosa (AN) and bulimia nervosa (BN), and awareness of these may help in the early diagnosis of hidden AN or BN. Cutaneous manifestations are the expression of the medical consequences of starvation, vomiting, abuse of drugs (such as laxatives and diuretics), and of psychiatric morbidity. These manifestations include xerosis, lanugo-like body hair, telogen effluvium, carotenoderma, acne, hyperpigmentation, seborrheic dermatitis, acrocyanosis, perniosis, petechiae, livedo reticularis, interdigital intertrigo, paronychia, generalized pruritus, acquired striae distensae, slower wound healing, prurigo pigmentosa, edema, linear erythema craquele, acral coldness, pellagra, scurvy, and acrodermatitis enteropathica. The most characteristic cutaneous sign of vomiting is Russell's sign (knuckle calluses). Symptoms arising from laxative or diuretic abuse include adverse reactions to drugs. Symptoms arising from psychiatric morbidity (artefacta) include the consequences of self-induced trauma. The role of the dermatologist in the management of eating disorders is to make an early diagnosis of the 'hidden' signs of these disorders in patients who tend to minimize or deny their disorder, and to avoid over-treatment of conditions which are overemphasized by patients' distorted perception of skin appearance. Even though skin signs of eating disorders improve with weight gain, the dermatologist will be asked to treat the dermatological conditions mentioned above. Xerosis improves with moisturizing ointments and humidification of the environment. Acne may be treated with topical benzoyl peroxide, antibacterials or azaleic acid; these agents may be

  19. Biologics in Dermatology: An Integrated Review

    PubMed Central

    Sehgal, Virendra N; Pandhi, Deepika; Khurana, Ananta

    2014-01-01

    The advent of biologics in dermatologic treatment armentarium has added refreshing dimensions, for it is a major breakthrough. Several agents are now available for use. It is therefore imperative to succinctly comprehend their pharmacokinetics for their apt use. A concerted endeavor has been made to delve on this subject. The major groups of biologics have been covered and include: Drugs acting against TNF-α, Alefacept, Ustekinumab, Rituximab, IVIG and Omalizumab. The relevant pharmacokinetic characteristics have been detailed. Their respective label (approved) and off-label (unapproved) indications have been defined, highlighting their dosage protocol, availability and mode of administration. The evidence level of each indication has also been discussed to apprise the clinician of their current and prospective uses. Individual anti-TNF drugs are not identical in their actions and often one is superior to the other in a particular disease. Hence, the section on anti-TNF agents mentions the literature on each drug separately, and not as a group. The limitations for their use have also been clearly brought out. PMID:25284845

  20. Segmentation and classification of dermatological lesions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sáez, Aurora; Acha, Begoña; Serrano, Carmen

    2010-03-01

    Certain skin diseases are chronic, inflammatory and without cure. However, there are many treatment options that can clear them for a period of time. Measuring their severity and assessing their extent, is a fundamental issue to determine the efficacy of the treatment under test. Two of the most important parameters of severity assessment are Erythema (redness) and Scaliness. Physicians classify these parameters into several grades by visual grading method. In this paper a color image segmentation and classification algorithm is developed to obtain an assessment of erythema and scaliness of dermatological lesions. Color digital photographs taken under an acquisition protocol form the database. Difference between green band and blue band of images in RGB color space shows two modes (healthy skin and lesion) with clear separation. Otsu's method is applied to this difference in order to isolate the lesion. After the skin disease is segmented, some color and texture features are calculated and they are the inputs to a Fuzzy-ARTMAP neural network. The neural network classifies them into the five grades of erythema and the five grades of scaliness. The method has been tested with 31 images with a success percentage of 83.87 % when the images are classified in erythema, and 77.42 % for scaliness classification.

  1. Dermatologic conditions in teenage adolescents in Nigeria

    PubMed Central

    Henshaw, Eshan B; Olasode, Olayinka A; Ogedegbe, Evelyn E; Etuk, Imaobong

    2014-01-01

    Background Skin disorders are common in adolescents, and the impact on quality of life can be enormous, particularly when viewed against the backdrop of the visibility of skin diseases and the psychologically vulnerable period of adolescence. However, few studies have documented the magnitude of skin disorders in this subset of individuals. We therefore estimated the point prevalence and pattern of dermatologic conditions in adolescents attending various secondary schools in Calabar, Southern Nigeria. Methods Using a structured questionnaire, relevant sociodemographic information was obtained from 1,447 teenage adolescents from eight secondary schools. Thereafter, a whole body examination was conducted to determine the presence and types of skin disorders seen. Results Skin diseases were seen in 929 students. The point prevalence was higher in males (72.1%) than in females (58.3%). Private schools had a higher prevalence than public schools. The six most common dermatoses were acne vulgaris, pityriasis versicolor, nevi, tinea, miliaria, and keloid/hypertrophic scars, and accounted for over 80% of the dermatoses seen. Conclusion The point prevalence of dermatoses in senior secondary school adolescents was 64.2%. Although a large number of skin disorders were observed, only a handful accounted for a significant proportion of the diseases seen. This increases the ease of training community health workers in the recognition and treatment of common skin diseases. Age, race, and climatic factors are important determinants of skin diseases in adolescents in Nigeria. PMID:24966708

  2. [Histamine intolerance--possible dermatologic sequences].

    PubMed

    Lugović-Mihić, Liborija; Seserko, Ana; Duvancić, Tomislav; Situm, Mirna; Mihić, Josip

    2012-12-01

    Although histamine intolerance (HIT) is not very frequently encountered, it can have serious consequences. Food intolerance is a non allergic hypersensitivity to food that does not include the immune system even though the symptoms are similar to those of IgE-mediated allergic reactions. HIT apparently develops as a result of an impaired diamine oxidase (DAO) activity due to gastrointestinal disease or through DAO inhibition, as well as through a genetic predisposition which was proven in a number of patients. The intake of histamine-rich foods as well as alcohol or drugs which cause either the release of histamine or the blocking of DAO can lead to various disorders in many organs (gastrointestinal system, skin, lungs, cardiovascular system and brain), depending on the expression of histamine receptors. Dermatologic sequels can be rashes, itch, urticaria, angioedema, dermatitis, eczema and even acne, rosacea, psoriasis, and other. Recognizing the symptoms due to HIT is especially important in treating such patients. The significance of HIT in patients with atopic dermatitis in whom the benefit of a low histamine diet has been proven is becoming increasingly understood recently. Because of the possibility of symptoms affecting numerous organs, a detailed history of symptoms following the intake of histamine-rich foods or drugs that interfere with histamine metabolism is essential for making the diagnosis of HIT. Considering that such symptoms can be the result of multiple factors, the existence of HIT is usually underestimated, but considerable expectations are being made from future studies. PMID:23814966

  3. Use of Polyphenolic Compounds in Dermatologic Oncology.

    PubMed

    Costa, Adilson; Bonner, Michael Yi; Arbiser, Jack L

    2016-08-01

    Polyphenols are a widely used class of compounds in dermatology. While phenol itself, the most basic member of the phenol family, is chemically synthesized, most polyphenolic compounds are found in plants and form part of their defense mechanism against decomposition. Polyphenolic compounds, which include phenolic acids, flavonoids, stilbenes, and lignans, play an integral role in preventing the attack on plants by bacteria and fungi, as well as serving as cross-links in plant polymers. There is also mounting evidence that polyphenolic compounds play an important role in human health as well. One of the most important benefits, which puts them in the spotlight of current studies, is their antitumor profile. Some of these polyphenolic compounds have already presented promising results in either in vitro or in vivo studies for non-melanoma skin cancer and melanoma. These compounds act on several biomolecular pathways including cell division cycle arrest, autophagy, and apoptosis. Indeed, such natural compounds may be of potential for both preventive and therapeutic fields of cancer. This review evaluates the existing scientific literature in order to provide support for new research opportunities using polyphenolic compounds in oncodermatology. PMID:27164914

  4. Dermatologic Extrahepatic Manifestations of Hepatitis C

    PubMed Central

    Dedania, Bhavtosh; Wu, George Y.

    2015-01-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) affects millions of people worldwide, and an estimated 3.2 million people in the United States. HCV is a hepatotropic and lymphotropic virus that causes not only liver disease, but also a significant number of extrahepatic manifestations (EHMs). Up to 74% of patients affected by HCV will have HCV-related EHMs of some severity in their lifetime. The EHMs vary from simple cutaneous palpable purpura to complex lymphoproliferative disorders, including lymphomas and immune-complex deposit diseases causing local and/or systemic complications. Mixed cryoglobulinemia (MC) is manifested by multiple systemic organ involvement, mainly skin, kidney, peripheral nerves, and salivary glands, and less frequently causes widespread vasculitis and malignant lymphoma. MC affects up to 3% of HCV-infected patients with cryoglobulinemia of clinical significance, i.e. >6%. Severe disease requires immunosuppressive or plasma exchange therapy. HCV prevalence in the United States in patients with porphyria cutanea tarda (PCT) was reported to be 66%, much higher than that in general population. Therefore, all patients with PCT should be screened for HCV. The skin rash of PCT varies from large blisters to small vesicles and/or milia on the hands. Skin manifestations due to PCT usually respond to anti‐HCV treatment together with reducing skin sun exposure, avoiding triggers, having routine phlebotomy (especially for people with chronic iron overload states), and using chloroquine. Lichen planus (LP), which typically affects both the skin and oral mucosa is a chronic inflammatory disease of squamous cell origin affecting about 1% of the worldwide population. The prevalence of HCV in patients with LP varies based on geographic location. We review here the basic pathophysiology, clinical features, and management of dermatologic manifestations of HCV. PMID:26357639

  5. [Dermatological diseases of the external male genitalia : Part 2: Infectious and malignant dermatological].

    PubMed

    Köhn, F M; Schultheiss, D; Krämer-Schultheiss, K

    2016-07-01

    The urological and andrological examination of male patients should include inspection of the genital skin in order to detect malignant neoplasms, such as erythroplasia of Queyrat and infectious diseases, such as genital warts (condylomata acuminata). Independent of the incidental finding of relevant dermatological alterations in the genital area, sexually transmitted diseases such as syphilis must again be considered more often as the incidence has greatly increased in Germany during the last few years. In addition, urologists should be able to adequately advise patients on all aspects of diseases caused by human papillomavirus. As patients are often alarmed by genital skin lesions and worried that the sex life can be impaired, the initiation of adequate therapy is of great importance. PMID:27364818

  6. Management of egfr tki–induced dermatologic adverse events

    PubMed Central

    Melosky, B.; Leighl, N.B.; Rothenstein, J.; Sangha, R.; Stewart, D.; Papp, K.

    2015-01-01

    Targeting the epidermal growth factor receptor (egfr) pathway has become standard practice for the treatment of advanced non-small-cell lung cancer. Compared with chemotherapy, egfr tyrosine kinase inhibitors (tkis) have been associated with improved efficacy in patients with an EGFR mutation. Together with the increase in efficacy comes an adverse event (ae) profile different from that of chemotherapy. That profile includes three of the most commonly occurring dermatologic aes: acneiform rash, stomatitis, and paronychia. Currently, no randomized clinical trials have evaluated the treatments for the dermatologic aes that patients experience when taking egfr tkis. Based on the expert opinion of the authors, some basic strategies have been developed to manage those key dermatologic aes. Those strategies have the potential to improve patient quality of life and compliance and to prevent inappropriate dose reductions. PMID:25908911

  7. Dermatologic signs in anorexia nervosa and bulimia nervosa.

    PubMed

    Gupta, M A; Gupta, A K; Haberman, H F

    1987-10-01

    The dermatologic changes in anorexia nervosa and bulimia nervosa may be the first signs to give the clinician a clue that an eating disorder is present, as many of these patients either deny their symptoms or secretly refuse to comply with treatment. The dermatologic signs are a result of (1) starvation or malnutrition, eg, lanugolike body hair, asteatotic skin, brittle hair and nails, and carotenodermia; (2) self-induced vomiting, eg, hand calluses, dental enamel erosion, gingivitis, and a Sjögrenlike syndrome; (3) use of laxatives, diuretics, or emetics and their dermatologic side effects; and (4) other concomitant psychiatric illness, eg, hand dermatitis from compulsive handwashing. Further, as most of the cutaneous signs are not specific to anorexia nervosa and bulimia nervosa, failure to include eating disorders in the differential diagnosis may lead to misdiagnosis of the cutaneous symptoms. PMID:3310913

  8. The application of nanoemulsion in dermatology: an overview.

    PubMed

    Wu, Yan; Li, Yuan-Hong; Gao, Xing-Hua; Chen, Hong-Duo

    2013-05-01

    Nanotechnology has been introduced into dermatology for years. Nanoemulsions (NEs) are promising drug delivery systems with practical applications for pharmaceutical, cosmetic and chemical industry applications. Herein, we provide an overview of the application of NEs in dermatology during the latest 5 years. We reviewed the antioxidants in NEs form, non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug loaded by NE, NEs in photodynamic therapy, NEs in decontamination of radionuclides, antimicrobial NEs, NEs carrying lipids, NEs containing Octyl Methoxycinnamate, et al. NEs demonstrate good stability, stable physical and chemical properties. NEs are able to enhance the functionality and efficacy of active chemicals and natural ingredients. NEs exhibit great application potential in the field of dermatology. PMID:23600746

  9. Pressure to publish for residency applicants in dermatology.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jordan V; Keller, Matthew

    2016-01-01

    As it grows increasingly difficult to match into a dermatology residency program each year, there is a widening gap in research accomplishments between those who have and have not matched successfully. Applicants should be aware of the current trends in order to maximize their chances of matching. Such research inequality may subsequently lead to increases in the pressure to publish and the incidence of academic misrepresentation. Academic dermatology programs should be aware of these issues in order to help their students successfully match and exercise caution when reviewing the curricula vitae of applicants. We believe that student mentors in dermatology are in the best position to help applicants navigate these challenges until effective checkpoints can be built-in to the application system. PMID:27136640

  10. Applications of the 308-nm excimer laser in dermatology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farkas, A.; Kemeny, L.

    2006-05-01

    Excimer lasers contain a mixture of a noble inert gas and a halogen, which form excited dimers only in the activated state. High-energy current is used to produce these dimers, which have a very short lifetime, and after their fast dissociation they release the excitation energy through ultraviolet photons. The application of these lasers proved to be successful in medicine, including the field of ophthalmology, cardiology, angiology, dentistry, orthopaedics, and, in recent years, dermatology. For medical purposes, the 193-nm argon fluoride, the 248-nm krypton fluoride, the 351-nm xenon fluoride, and the 308-nm xenon chloride lasers are used. Recently, the 308-nm xenon chloride laser has gained much attention as a very effective treatment modality in dermatological disorders. It was successfully utilized in psoriasis; later, it proved to be useful in handling other lightsensitive skin disorders and even in the treatment of allergic rhinitis. This review summarizes the possible applications of this promising tool in dermatology.

  11. Safe Practice of Cosmetic Dermatology: Avoiding Legal Tangles

    PubMed Central

    Sacchidanand, Sarvajnamurthy A; Bhat, Shilpa

    2012-01-01

    The present day dermatologists, in addition to conventional skin physicians, are also dermatologic-surgeons and cosmetologists in their practice. The cosmetic procedures have the inherent risk of malpractice litigations leaving an unsatisfied patient and a troublesome lawsuit against the doctor. A MEDLINE search was conducted for article with words such as legal issues and dermatology, malpractice in dermatology, safe practice of cosmetology etc. The selected articles are scrutinized and compiled so as to help the young dermatologists to have a comprehensive overview of safe cosmetology practice. This article aims at sensitizing the young dermatologists for the possible complications and provides an overview of safe practice. It also provides a list of simple routine precautions which helps the dermatologist to avoid unnecessary trips to the courthouse. PMID:23112511

  12. Achieving hemostasis in dermatology-Part II: Topical hemostatic agents

    PubMed Central

    Glick, Jaimie B.; Kaur, Ravneet R.; Siegel, Daniel

    2013-01-01

    Bleeding is a common occurrence during any dermatologic surgery that disrupts blood vessels. The complications of excess bleeding can include delayed wound healing, hematoma formation, infection, dehiscence, and necrosis. In part one of this review, we discussed the pre-operative, intra-operative, and post-operative management of patients undergoing dermatologic surgery. In Part two, we discuss traditional and new topical hemostatic agents used to achieve hemostasis in dermatological procedures and surgery. We will evaluate the caustic and non-caustic hemostatic agents as well as hemostatic dressings. The mechanisms of action, side effect profile, and advantages and disadvantages of the topical hemostatic agents are provided. Sources for this article were found searching the English literature in PubMed for the time period 1940 to March 2012. A thorough bibliography search was also performed and key references examined. PMID:23984226

  13. Low-level light therapy (LLLT) for cosmetics and dermatology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sawhney, Mossum K.; Hamblin, Michael R.

    2014-02-01

    Over the last few years, low-level laser (light) therapy (LLLT) has been demonstrated to be beneficial to the field of aesthetic medicine, specifically aesthetic dermatology. LLLT encompasses a broad spectrum of procedures, primarily cosmetic, which provide treatment options for a myriad of dermatological conditions. Dermatological disorders involving inflammation, acne, scars, aging and pigmentation have been investigated with the assistance of animal models and clinical trials. The most commercially successful use of LLLT is for managing alopecia (hair loss) in both men and women. LLLT also seems to play an influential role in procedures such as lipoplasty and liposuction, allowing for noninvasive and nonthermal methods of subcutaneous fat reduction. LLLT offers a means to address such conditions with improved efficacy versatility and no known side-effects; however comprehensive literature reports covering the utility of LLLT are scarce and thus the need for coverage arises.

  14. [MRSA clones identified in outpatient dermatology clinics].

    PubMed

    Hosoya, Shino; Ito, Teruyo; Misawa, Shigeki; Yoshiike, Takashi; Oguri, Toyoko; Hiramatsu, Keiichi

    2014-11-01

    To know the characteristics of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) strains disseminating through the Japanese community, we have determined types of Staphylococcal cassette chromosome mec (SCCmec) elements, Multi-Locus Sequence Typing (MLST), and carriages of four exotoxin genes (toxic-shock syndrome toxin, Panton-Valentine Leukocidine, and exfoliative toxins a and b) using 54 MRSA strains isolated from outpatients attending dermatology clinics at the four university hospitals of Juntendo University. Ten clonal complexes and 12 SCCmec types have been identified. As a result, more than 15 MRSA clones that were defined by the combination of genotype and SCCmec type, were identified. Among them, Clonal Complex (CC) 5-type IIa SCCmec strains were the most major (16 strains). In contrast to the fact that CC5- type IIa SCCmec strains known as a hospital-associated MRSA clone in Japan carried toxic-shock syndrome toxin gene (tst), only 2 of 16 strains have been shown to carry tst. Thirty-eight (70.4%) of isolates belonged to the clones distinct from the CC5-type IIa SCCmec strains. Among them, CC8 strains were major (12 strains), which contained 9 tst-positive CC8-type IVl SCCmec clones and a CC8-type IVa SCCmec strain carrying the Panton Valentine Leukocidin gene (lukS, F-PV). Clones related to impetigo were also identified: 7 exfoliative toxin b (etb) -positive clones, CC89-type IIa SCCmec and CC89-type V SCCmec strains; and 2 exfoliative toxin a (eta) -positive CC121-type V SCCmec strains. Other clones were as follows: CC1-type IVa SCCmec, CC8-type I SCCmec, CC81-type IVg SCCmec, CC97-type IVc SCCmec, CC91-type IVa SCCmec, CC59-type IVg SCCmec, CC45-type IIn SCCmec, CC89-SCCmec nontypeable, and CC8-type IVm, novel subtype of type IV SCCmec were identified in this study. Our data showed that many novel MRSA clones have emerged in the community. PMID:25764806

  15. Depression, Anxiety and Stress among Saudi Arabian Dermatology Patients

    PubMed Central

    Ahmed, Anwar E.; Al-Dahmash, Abdulaziz M.; Al-Boqami, Qamra T.; Al-Tebainawi, Yazeed F.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: This study aimed to determine the prevalence of depression, anxiety and stress among Saudi Arabian dermatology patients and to assess associations with sociodemographic and clinical characteristics. Methods: This cross-sectional study was conducted among 300 consecutive dermatology patients visiting King Abdulaziz Medical City in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia, in August 2015. The Arabic version of the Depression, Anxiety and Stress Scale was used to screen for symptoms of depression, anxiety and stress. Quality of life (QOL) was assessed using the Dermatology Life Quality Index. Results: A total of 254 dermatology patients participated in the study (response rate: 84.7%). The prevalence of depression, anxiety and stress was 12.6%, 22.1% and 7.5%, respectively. The presence of at least one of these negative emotional states was noted among 24.4% of the cohort (95% confidence interval: 19.3–30.2%). Depression was significantly higher among subjects who lacked family support (26.5% versus 10.7%; P = 0.006) while anxiety was less common among patients who engaged in physical exercise (14.5% versus 29.4%; P = 0.005). According to the multivariate logistic regression analysis, poor QOL and a lack of family support were significant predictors of a negative emotional state. Conclusion: Almost a quarter of the studied Saudi Arabian dermatology patients were found to suffer from at least one negative emotional state. A lack of family support and poor QOL were the primary factors associated with a negative emotional state. Interventional studies are needed to examine the effects of social and family support on psychological conditions among Saudi Arabian dermatology patients. PMID:27226914

  16. 75 FR 26264 - Dermatologic and Ophthalmic Drugs Advisory Committee; Notice of Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-05-11

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Dermatologic and Ophthalmic Drugs Advisory Committee; Notice... be open to the public. Name of Committee: Dermatologic and Ophthalmic Drugs Advisory...

  17. 76 FR 30176 - Dermatologic and Ophthalmic Drugs Advisory Committee; Notice of Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-05-24

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Dermatologic and Ophthalmic Drugs Advisory Committee; Notice... be open to the public. Name of Committee: Dermatologic and Ophthalmic Drugs Advisory Committee...) 125387, aflibercept ophthalmic solution, proposed trade name EYLEA, sponsored by...

  18. Dermatologic diseases and their effects on male sexual functions.

    PubMed

    Ermertcan, Aylin Türel; Temeltaş, Gökhan

    2010-08-01

    Chronic skin diseases may result in a variety of psychological problems, including distress, demoralization, poor self esteem, sleep disturbances, social phobia, anxiety, depression and obsessive-compulsive disorder. It is known that skin diseases may also cause sexual problems. Sexual activity remains important for most men throughout their adult lives and into old age. Impairment in their sexual experience can cause significant personal and interpersonal distress at any age. Sexual dysfunction in chronic systemic diseases has become a popular and important health concern in recent years. This subject is quite new in the specialty of dermatology. We explore the relationships between dermatologic diseases and male sexual dysfunction. PMID:20438601

  19. Application of in vivo laser scanning microscope in dermatology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lademann, Juergen; Richter, H.; Otberg, N.; Lawrenz, F.; Blume-Peytavi, U.; Sterry, W.

    2003-10-01

    The state of the art of in-vivo and in-vitro penetration measurements of topically applied substances is described. Only optical techniques represent online measuring methods based on the absorption or scattering properties of the topically applied substances. Laser scanning microscopy (LSM) has become a promising method for investigations in dermatology and skin physiology, after it was possible to analyze the skin surface on any body side in-vivo. In the present paper the application of a dermatological laser scanning microscope for penetration and distribution measurements of topically applied substances is described. The intercellular and follicular penetration pathways were studied.

  20. Practice and Educational Gaps in Cosmetic Dermatologic Surgery.

    PubMed

    Waldman, Abigail; Sobanko, Joseph F; Alam, Murad

    2016-07-01

    This article identifies gaps in the practice of cosmetic dermatology and cosmetics education, and how to overcome these limitations. There is a rapid development of new devices and procedures, with limited data, patient-reported outcomes, and comparative effectiveness research from which to develop best cosmetic practice. There is a need for increased research and funding dedicated to these goals, improved and convenient training for staff to adopt new devices/procedures, and continuous evolution of databases to pool outcome data and develop outcome sets. Resident education can be improved by dedicated resident cosmetic clinics, didactic teaching from visiting professors, attendance of cosmetic dermatology courses and meetings, and encouraging postresidency training. PMID:27363891

  1. Managing the patient with psychiatric issues in dermatologic practice.

    PubMed

    Gordon-Elliott, Janna S; Muskin, Philip R

    2013-01-01

    Patients often communicate emotions through their bodies and physical symptoms; the skin commonly serves as a means of expression in the patient-doctor relationship. It is important for the dermatologist to be able to indentify psychological issues that manifest in the skin and the interplay between psychiatric and dermatologic conditions. Delusional parasitosis, dermatitis artefacta, trichotillomania, and somatoform disorders all represent dermatologic conditions with underlying emotional causes. Many chronic dermatoses, such as psoriasis, atopic dermatitis, and acne, modulate and are influenced by psychosocial factors. Special issues, including significant medication interactions and the treatment of the "difficult" patient, are reviewed. PMID:23245968

  2. Practice and Educational Gaps in Radiation Therapy in Dermatology.

    PubMed

    Cognetta, Armand B; Wolfe, Christopher M; Goldberg, David J; Hong, Hyokyoung Grace

    2016-07-01

    Guidelines for appropriate use of superficial radiation therapy are based on decades of research; although no formal appropriate use criteria have been developed, they are warranted. Superficial radiation in the outpatient dermatologic setting is the least expensive form of radiation treatment. Although higher cure rates may be possible with Mohs surgery, this should never argue against dermatologists retaining and refining a modality, nor should we limit its use by our successors. Most important, our elderly and infirm patients should continue to benefit from superficial radiation therapy in outpatient dermatologic settings. PMID:27363889

  3. CLEANSERS AND THEIR ROLE IN VARIOUS DERMATOLOGICAL DISORDERS

    PubMed Central

    Mukhopadhyay, Partha

    2011-01-01

    The art of cleansing has progressed immensely over several thousand years from simply scraping the skin to an exercise in relaxation and improvement in the skin's health and appearance in the present day. Soaps – the basic cleansing agent has also undergone a sea change in its evolution with many variants and newer constituents being incorporated into it. In dermatological disorders like acne, rosacea, atopic dermatitis, photoaging, ‘sensitive skin’, occupational dermatosis cleansers may have a beneficial role along with other therapeutic measures. With the advent of aesthetic dermatology, the act of cleansing and the use of various cleansing agents prior to aesthetic procedures has also assumed significance. PMID:21572782

  4. Simulation of Skin Diseases for Teaching Dermatological Diagnosis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Short, John M.; Hess, Alan C.

    1980-01-01

    A technique for simulating the papulosquamous skin diseases, using a computer, has been developed and tested with medical students and dermatologists to determine whether this type of simulation is suitable for training students in dermatological diagnosis. The results indicate that it appears to be feasible for training students in differential…

  5. Primary Care of Adult Women: Common Dermatologic Conditions.

    PubMed

    Ruiz de Luzuriaga, Arlene M; Mhlaba, Julie; Roman, Carly

    2016-06-01

    Dermatologic disease often presents in the primary care setting. Therefore, it is important for the primary care provider to be familiar with the presentation, diagnosis, and treatment of common skin conditions. This article provides an overview of acne, rosacea, melasma, vitiligo, alopecia, nonmelanoma, and melanoma skin cancer, dermatitis, and lichen sclerosus. PMID:27212088

  6. 75 FR 36101 - Dermatologic and Ophthalmic Drugs Advisory Committee; Cancellation

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-06-24

    ... was announced in the Federal Register of May 11, 2010 (75 FR 26264). The meeting was to discuss new... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Dermatologic and Ophthalmic Drugs Advisory Committee; Cancellation AGENCY: Food and Drug Administration, HHS. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: The meeting of...

  7. Reproducible high-resolution multispectral image acquisition in dermatology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duliu, Alexandru; Gardiazabal, José; Lasser, Tobias; Navab, Nassir

    2015-07-01

    Multispectral image acquisitions are increasingly popular in dermatology, due to their improved spectral resolution which enables better tissue discrimination. Most applications however focus on restricted regions of interest, imaging only small lesions. In this work we present and discuss an imaging framework for high-resolution multispectral imaging on large regions of interest.

  8. Dermatologic Toxicities in Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor and Multikinase Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Eaby-Sandy, Beth; Grande, Carolyn; Viale, Pamela Hallquist

    2012-01-01

    Targeted therapies have produced significant treatment advances for patients diagnosed with a variety of tumor types. These therapies are associated with unique dermatologic toxicities that may hamper treatment efforts and cause significant discomfort for patients. Prevention and management of these toxicities can allow patients to remain on therapy and hence receive maximum clinical benefit from the drug. PMID:25031940

  9. Television depictions about dermatology and skin diseases in Seinfeld.

    PubMed

    Vickers, Jennifer L; Uchida, Tatsuo; Wagner, Richard F

    2010-01-01

    The iconic television situation comedy Seinfeld frequently referenced dermatologists and topics involving the integument, using satire for comedic effect. However, selecting satire to portray an already misunderstood and unknown subject matter may perpetuate incorrect public beliefs and stereotypes about those with skin diseases and diminish cultural sensitivity towards people who have dermatologic conditions and their caregivers. PMID:21199627

  10. The present status of anti-inflammatory agents in dermatology.

    PubMed

    Stüttgen, G

    1988-01-01

    Many classes of drugs exert anti-inflammatory activity through mechanisms which affect all or part of the inflammatory process. Some of these agents are beneficial in the practice of dermatology, while others, such as penicillamine, mast cell blockers and serotonin antagonists, find little or no application. Corticosteroids, for example, are nonspecific in their anti-inflammatory effects and remain a mainstay of therapy, despite their side effect profile. Other drugs, such as the non-steroidal anti-inflammatory agents or gold, can be used in the treatment of diseases associated with rheumatic or autoimmune states. Moreover, antihistamines play an important role in the control of itching, but are mainly indicated in controlling non-dermatological allergic sequelae. Interestingly, chloroquine and dapsone, which were originally developed for use in malaria prophylaxis and leprosy, respectively, have value in treating a wide range of dermatological conditions via mechanisms which include the inhibition of P-450 isoenzymes. In diseases characterised by disturbed cornification (e.g. psoriasis pustulosa), retinoids are of particular value. These drugs are thought to act by inhibition of collagenases, proteases and granulocyte migration. Undoubtedly, further investigation of drug classes such as oxygen radical controllers and immunomodulators will clarify their mechanisms and establish their therapeutic usefulness among the anti-inflammatory agents now available for dermatological use. PMID:3076131

  11. Dermatological Findings in Turkish Paediatric Haematology-Oncology Patients

    PubMed Central

    Uksal, Umit; Ozturk, Pinar; Colgecen, Emine; Taslidere, Nazan; Patiroglu, Turkan; Ozdemir, Mehmet Akif; Torun, Yasemin Altuner; Borlu, Murat

    2016-01-01

    Objective: Diagnoses of skin, mucosae, hair and nail manifestations in malignant diseases are often challenging because of life-threatening drug reactions, opportunistic infections or skin involvement of primary processes. Description of morphology, configuration and distribution of lesions is important in order to differentiate the self-healing eruptions from serious side effects of chemotherapy. There are case reports from Turkey including dermatological manifestations of malignancies and case series in adult patients but there are no published large group studies assessing all manifestations in children. The aim of this study was to evaluate the morphological features of dermatological findings in children with haemato-oncological diseases. Materials and Methods: The study was performed at the Erciyes University, Faculty of Medicine Pediatric Hematology-Oncology Clinic, Turkey. Three dermatologists daily consulted all patients admitted to the clinic during a one-year period. Results: The study group comprised of 157 children (79 female/78 male) aged 1–16 years (mean 7.19±4.63). Detailed dermatological examinations were performed, including oral-genital mucosae, hair and nails. Thorough skin examination revealed that 70% of the patients exhibited at least one dermatological finding. Generalized xerosis and hyperpigmentation were the most common findings among patients undergoing chemotherapy (24.19%). Multiple nevi on at least 10 covered areas were very frequent among patients undergoing long-term chemotherapy (18.47%). Three were identified as dysplastic nevus, but malignant transformation was not observed during the one-year study period. Conclusion: Regular dermatological consultation may help resolve the diagnostic and therapeutic problems in paediatric haemato-oncology clinics. PMID:27551173

  12. Assessment of medical students’ proficiency in dermatology: Are medical students adequately prepared to diagnose and treat common dermatologic conditions in the United States?

    PubMed Central

    Ulman, Catherine A.; Binder, Stephen Bruce; Borges, Nicole J.

    2015-01-01

    This study assessed whether a current medical school curriculum is adequately preparing medical students to diagnose and treat common dermatologic conditions. A 15-item anonymous multiple choice quiz covering fifteen diseases was developed to test students’ ability to diagnose and treat common dermatologic conditions. The quiz also contained five items that assessed students’ confidence in their ability to diagnose common dermatologic conditions, their perception of whether they were receiving adequate training in dermatology, and their preferences for additional training in dermatology. The survey was performed in 2014, and was completed by 85 students (79.4%). Many students (87.6%) felt that they received inadequate training in dermatology during medical school. On average, students scored 46.6% on the 15-item quiz. Proficiency at the medical school where the study was performed is considered an overall score of greater than or equal to 70.0%. Students received an average score of 49.9% on the diagnostic items and an average score of 43.2% on the treatment items. The findings of this study suggest that United States medical schools should consider testing their students and assessing whether they are being adequately trained in dermatology. Then schools can decide if they need to re-evaluate the timing and delivery of their current dermatology curriculum, or whether additional curriculum hours or clinical rotations should be assigned for dermatologic training. PMID:25989840

  13. The role of nutrition in dermatologic diseases: facts and controversies.

    PubMed

    Lakdawala, Nikita; Babalola, Olubukola; Fedeles, Flavia; McCusker, Meagen; Ricketts, Janelle; Whitaker-Worth, Diane; Grant-Kels, Jane M

    2013-01-01

    Many dermatologic diseases are chronic with no definitive cure. For some diseases, the etiology is not completely understood, with treatment being difficult and associated with side effects. In such cases, patients may try alternative treatments to prevent onset, reduce symptom severity, or prevent reoccurrence of a disease. Dietary modification, through supplementation and exclusion, is an extremely popular treatment modality for patients with dermatologic conditions. It is, therefore, important for dermatologists to be aware of the growing body of literature pertaining to nutrition and skin disease to appropriately inform patients on benefits and harms of specific dietary interventions. We address the role of nutrition in psoriasis, atopic dermatitis, urticaria, and bullous diseases and specific dietary modifications as an adjunct or alternative to conventional therapy. PMID:24160272

  14. [Tropical dermatology training in the Bundeswehr: Deployment in Manaus, Brazil].

    PubMed

    Fischer, M

    2015-05-01

    Training in tropical dermatology at the Fundação de Medicina tropical (FMT-AM) in Manaus, Brazil, offers an ideal opportunity to become familiar with the broad spectrum of tropical skin-diseases which are endemic in the tropical rainforest of the Amazon region. Besides frequently observed cases of cutaneous leishmaniasis of the new world, mucocutaneous forms of leishmaniasis and all entities of the different deep mycoses of South America are also regularly diagnosed. Of special importance in the dermatological care of the population is the early diagnosis of all clinical forms of leprosy and the long-term care of HIV patients. Modern diagnostics, including histopathology and molecular biology analytical methods, enable patients at the FMT-AM to be diagnosed without having to solely rely on clinical presentation and epidemiological data. PMID:25903017

  15. A review of vitamin B12 in dermatology.

    PubMed

    Brescoll, Jennifer; Daveluy, Steven

    2015-02-01

    Vitamin B12, also known as cobalamin, is a water-soluble vitamin that is important in the hematological and nervous systems, and it has a complex relationship with the skin. Altered cobalamin levels can lead to dermatological manifestations, which may indicate a deficiency or excess of this vitamin. The biochemistry and metabolism of cobalamin is complex, and diseases can be associated with alterations of this metabolic pathway. The cutaneous manifestations of cobalamin deficiency include hyperpigmentation (most commonly); hair and nail changes; and oral changes, including glossitis. Additionally, several dermatologic conditions, including vitiligo, aphthous stomatitis, atopic dermatitis, and acne are related to cobalamin excess or deficiency. The cutaneous complications of cobalamin therapy include acne, rosacea, and allergic site reactions, or anaphylaxis with cobalamin injections. As cobalt is a component of cobalamin, patients with cobalt sensitivity have been reported to have cutaneous manifestations when receiving cobalamin replacement therapy. PMID:25559140

  16. [Current guidelines in dermatology : A selection of clinically relevant recommendations].

    PubMed

    Nast, A; Rosumeck, S; Erdmann, R; Dressler, C; Werner, R N

    2016-05-01

    Guidelines are systematically developed decision aids for specific medical conditions. The German Dermatological Society, together with the German Professional Association of Dermatologists, takes the lead in the development of the guidelines for dermatology in Germany. In addition to national guidelines, European and international guidelines also exist. In 2014 and 2015 German guidelines on the following topics were newly developed or updated: cutaneous larva migrans, anticoagulation during dermatosurgery, pemphigus vulgaris and bullous pemphigoids, Mohs surgery, anal dysplasia, and anal carcinoma in HIV-infected patients. European guidelines on psoriasis vulgaris and hand eczema were updated among others. An international guideline on actinic keratosis was also published. The guidelines are available at www.awmf.org and www.euroderm.org . PMID:27052528

  17. Allergic contact dermatitis in dermatologic surgery: review of common allergens.

    PubMed

    Butler, Lara; Mowad, Christen

    2013-01-01

    With the growing number of dermatologic surgeries performed each year comes an increased potential for patient exposure and sensitization to allergens. Patients are exposed to many well-documented allergens in the preoperative, intraoperative, and postoperative settings during surgery. Postoperative skin complications of allergic contact dermatitis increase health care costs and cause patient suffering. Early recognition, diagnosis, and treatment by dermatologic surgeons are essential to decrease morbidity related to medically necessary and elective cutaneous surgeries. While a specific standard screening panel for cutaneous surgery-related allergens is not well established, we propose several categories of allergens be strongly considered and tested if a patient is suspected of having allergic contact dermatitis in an attempt to reveal pertinent allergens and prevent future exposures. PMID:24030369

  18. Cumulative dermatologic toxicity with ipilimumab and vemurafenib responsive to corticosteroids.

    PubMed

    Ludlow, Steven P; Pasikhova, Yanina

    2013-12-01

    Dermatologic toxicity is a known reaction of ipilimumab and vemurafenib. Because of the lack of effective treatments and aggressive nature of melanoma, treatments are often discontinued and new treatments are initiated in rapid succession. We report what we believe to be the first case of cumulative dermatologic toxicity secondary to rapid-sequential treatment with ipilimumab and vemurafenib for metastatic melanoma that responded to high-dose steroids. This case highlights the combined toxicity of these two drugs that can occur as a result of overlapping toxicity. It also illustrates the need for a substantial wash out period between rapid cycling of these two drugs secondary to ipilimumab's long half-life. PMID:24025700

  19. [Spironolactone in dermatological treatment. On and off label indications].

    PubMed

    Salavastru, C M; Fritz, K; Tiplica, G S

    2013-10-01

    There are no currently FDA/EMEA-approved dermatologic indications for spironolactone and its off-label uses are, among others, female acne, female pattern hair loss, hidradenitis suppurativa or hirsutism. The rationale behind these relays on the mechanism of action of spironolactone which interferes with the hormone-controlled sebum and sweat gland secretion and with androgen stimulated hair growth. The average dose used by the dermatologits is 50-100 mg daily. It should not be used in pregnant and lactating women and it is not used in men due to the risk of feminization. Although further studies to assess its efficacy and safety are necessary, currently spironolactone is regarded as a useful tool in the dermatologic treatment armamentarium. PMID:24150826

  20. Nanocarriers and nanoparticles for skin care and dermatological treatments

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Sanjeev; Bansal, Radhika; Gupta, Sunita; Jindal, Nidhi; Jindal, Abhinav

    2013-01-01

    Nanotechnology (nano: One billionth) is a novel arena with promising applications in the field of medicine, especially pharmaceuticals for safe and targeted drug delivery. The skin is a phenomenal tool for investigation of nanocarriers for drug delivery for topical and dermatological application. The physicochemical characteristics of the nanoparticles, such as rigidity, hydrophobicity, size and charge are crucial to the skin permeation mechanism. Many nanocarriers such as polymeric, inorganic and lipid nanoparticles and nanoemulsions have been developed and some like carbon nanotubes and fullerenes still need further exploration for future use in skin care and dermatological treatments. Risks of nanopollution and cytotoxicity also need to be kept in mind while exploring various nanoparticles for medical use. PMID:24350003

  1. Osteopathic manipulative treatment: novel application to dermatological disease.

    PubMed

    Campbell, Shannon M; Winkelmann, Richard R; Walkowski, Stevan

    2012-10-01

    Dermatological diseases, such as dysesthesia syndromes, stasis dermatoses, and hyperhidrosis are difficult to treat due to their complex etiologies. Current theories suggest these diseases are caused by physiological imbalances, such as nerve impingement, localized tissue congestion, and impaired autonomic regulation. Osteopathic manipulative therapy targets these physiological dysfunctions and may serve as a beneficial therapeutic option. Osteopathic manipulative therapy techniques include high velocity low amplitude, muscle energy, counterstrain, myofascial release, craniosacral, and lymphatic drainage. An osteopathic manipulative therapy technique is chosen based on its physiological target for a particular disease. Osteopathic manipulative therapy may be useful alone or in combination with standard therapeutic options. However, due to the lack of standardized trials supporting the efficacy of osteopathic manipulative therapy treatment for dermatological disease, randomized, well-controlled studies are necessary to confirm its therapeutic value. PMID:23125887

  2. Current evidence and applications of photodynamic therapy in dermatology

    PubMed Central

    Wan, Marilyn T; Lin, Jennifer Y

    2014-01-01

    In photodynamic therapy (PDT) a photosensitizer – a molecule that is activated by light – is administered and exposed to a light source. This leads both to destruction of cells targeted by the particular type of photosensitizer, and immunomodulation. Given the ease with which photosensitizers and light can be delivered to the skin, it should come as no surprise that PDT is an increasingly utilized therapeutic in dermatology. PDT is used commonly to treat precancerous cells, sun-damaged skin, and acne. It has reportedly also been used to treat other conditions including inflammatory disorders and cutaneous infections. This review discusses the principles behind how PDT is used in dermatology, as well as evidence for current applications of PDT. PMID:24899818

  3. Psychological Morbidity Among Dermatological Patients in a Rural Setting

    PubMed Central

    Kosaraju, Sandeep Krishna Murthy; Reddy, Karumuri Siva Rami; Vadlamani, Naresh; Sandhya, Lakkireddy; Kalasapati, Lokesh; Maganti, Sowmya; Mary, Amudha

    2015-01-01

    Background: Dermatological conditions have an impact on psychology of the patients. There is a dearth of studies regarding this field in Rural population of India. Aims And Objectives: The primary objective of this study is to evaluate the psychiatric morbidity in patients affected with Dermatological condition in a rural population and secondary objective is to assess the morbidity in dimensions of Depression Severity and the quality of life in the Emotional Sphere, Physical Symptoms, Psychosocial Functioning. Subjects And Methods: Seventy three rural patients were included in the study. PHQ9 and SKINDEX-29 was used to assess the psychiatric morbidity and quality of life. Statistical analysis was done using SPSS V 20. Chi-square test was used as a test of significance. Results: Significance has been found for duration of suffering from a dermatological condition and quality of life (p=0.03). Correlation has also been established between dermatological diagnosis with depression severity (p=0.004) or quality of life (p=0.004). In the sub scales of SKINDEX it was noted that overall dysfunction was notably more marked in Emotional Sphere and Psychosocial Functions than the Physical symptoms. Eczema was the most affected diagnosis in Skindex indicating a poor quality of life followed by psoriasis, Acne vulgaris and Seborrhoeic Dermatitis however, It was found that the majorly affected condition in depression severity was Psoriasis followed by Eczema, Acne Vulgaris and Seborrhoeic Dermatitis. Conclusion: There seems to be an increased morbidity among the rural population in depression severity and that of quality of life in terms of emotional sphere and psychosocial functioning. PMID:26677293

  4. Clinical photography in dermatology using smartphones: An overview.

    PubMed

    Ashique, K T; Kaliyadan, Feroze; Aurangabadkar, Sanjeev J

    2015-01-01

    The smartphone is one of the biggest revolutions in the era of information technology. Its built in camera offers several advantages. Dermatologists, who handle a specialty that is inherently visual, are most benefited by this handy technology. Here in this article, we attempt to provide an overview of smartphone photography in clinical dermatology in order to help the dermatologist to get the best out of the available camera for clinical imaging and storage. PMID:26009708

  5. Sternocostoclavicular hyperostosis: two cases with differing dermatologic syndromes.

    PubMed

    Ongchi, D R; Fleming, M G; Harris, C A

    1990-10-01

    Sternocostoclavicular hyperostosis is a rare rheumatic condition characterized by ossification and erosion of the clavicle and the first rib, that has been shown to be associated with pustular skin lesions. We present 2 cases, one of which had features of pustulosis palmaris et plantaris and the other dissecting cellulitis of the scalp. Although the dermatologic manifestations differ, both cases have rheumatologic and roentgenographic features diagnostic of sternocostoclavicular hyperostosis. PMID:2254905

  6. [Guide to buying a camera for dermatological photography].

    PubMed

    Barco, L; Ribera, M; Casanova, J M

    2012-01-01

    Choosing a camera for use in the dermatology office is difficult, particularly in the case of a digital camera because the market is constantly evolving. This article explains the features that should be taken into account, including camera type, sensor, lens and macro capability, aperture priority mode, screen, viewfinder, operating speed, flash, battery, memory card, and image format. The most recent advances in the field of digital photography relevant to the dermatologist are discussed. PMID:22463769

  7. Clinical photography in dermatology using smartphones: An overview

    PubMed Central

    Ashique, K. T.; Kaliyadan, Feroze; Aurangabadkar, Sanjeev J.

    2015-01-01

    The smartphone is one of the biggest revolutions in the era of information technology. Its built in camera offers several advantages. Dermatologists, who handle a specialty that is inherently visual, are most benefited by this handy technology. Here in this article, we attempt to provide an overview of smartphone photography in clinical dermatology in order to help the dermatologist to get the best out of the available camera for clinical imaging and storage PMID:26009708

  8. An Elective Course on Dermatological Topics and Cosmeceutical Compounding

    PubMed Central

    Lunney, Phillip T.

    2014-01-01

    Objective. To implement and assess a pharmacy dermatology and cosmeceutical compounding elective course and its impact on graduates’ careers. Design. A 3-credit elective course that incorporated classroom lectures on ambulatory dermatologic diseases and cosmeceutical products with case studies, weekly quizzes, and a comprehensive business plan project was implemented in a doctor of pharmacy (PharmD) program in 2010. Assessment. Assessment instruments including weekly quizzes, a business plan project, and pre- and post-course tests were used to evaluate course content. Across 3 offerings of the course (2010, 2011, 2012), pre- and post-course test scores improved. Results of a postgraduate survey showed that 54% of respondents worked at a pharmacy offering compounding services, and 57% felt that the course played a significant or very significant role in their counseling on dermatologic conditions. Conclusions. Assessment methods revealed student learning of course content and the course appeared moderately beneficial to graduates’ early careers. A more longitudinal analysis is needed to assess the course’s impact on long-term career choices, particularly those dealing with compounding of cosmeceutical products. PMID:24850940

  9. Dermatology – a compulsory part of the UK medical school curriculum?

    PubMed Central

    Shah, Hemal; Pozo-Garcia, Lucia; Koulouroudias, Marinos

    2015-01-01

    Dermatological conditions form a significant number of consultations seen by general practitioners on a daily basis. There is a lack of training and formal assessment of dermatology during medical school and we propose that there should be a mandatory component in OSCEs for dermatology during medical school to enhance one's diagnostic and clinical reasoning skills which will ultimately lead to better care for the patient and efficacious use of NHS resources. PMID:26701607

  10. In vivo confocal microscopy in dermatology: from research to clinical application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ulrich, Martina; Lange-Asschenfeldt, Susanne

    2013-06-01

    Confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) represents an emerging technique for the noninvasive histomorphological analysis of skin in vivo and has shown its applicability for dermatological research as well as its value as an adjunct tool in the clinical management of skin cancer patients. Herein, we aim to give an overview on the current clinical indications for CLSM in dermatology and also highlight the diverse applications of CLSM in dermatological research.

  11. In vivo confocal microscopy in dermatology: from research to clinical application.

    PubMed

    Ulrich, Martina; Lange-Asschenfeldt, Susanne

    2013-06-01

    Confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) represents an emerging technique for the noninvasive histomorphological analysis of skin in vivo and has shown its applicability for dermatological research as well as its value as an adjunct tool in the clinical management of skin cancer patients. Herein, we aim to give an overview on the current clinical indications for CLSM in dermatology and also highlight the diverse applications of CLSM in dermatological research. PMID:23338938

  12. The impact of fellowship training on scholarly productivity in academic dermatology.

    PubMed

    John, Ann M; Gupta, Arjun B; John, Elizabeth S; Lopez, Santiago A; Lee, Brian; Lambert, William Clark

    2016-05-01

    An increasing number of dermatology residents are pursuing postresidency fellowships to augment their knowledge in dermatology subspecialties. The purpose of this study was to determine whether fellowship training affects the scholarly impact of academic dermatologists, as measured by the h-index. A secondary objective was to compare scholarly productivity among different dermatology subspecialties. Overall, fellowship training is associated with increased scholarly impact; however, when stratifying for academic rank and years of publication activity, this difference does not exist. PMID:27274544

  13. The role of lasers and intense pulsed light technology in dermatology.

    PubMed

    Husain, Zain; Alster, Tina S

    2016-01-01

    The role of light-based technologies in dermatology has expanded dramatically in recent years. Lasers and intense pulsed light have been used to safely and effectively treat a diverse array of cutaneous conditions, including vascular and pigmented lesions, tattoos, scars, and undesired hair, while also providing extensive therapeutic options for cosmetic rejuvenation and other dermatologic conditions. Dermatologic laser procedures are becoming increasingly popular worldwide, and demand for them has fueled new innovations and clinical applications. These systems continue to evolve and provide enhanced therapeutic outcomes with improved safety profiles. This review highlights the important roles and varied clinical applications that lasers and intense pulsed light play in the dermatologic practice. PMID:26893574

  14. Trends in types of dermatology books available over the last ten years.

    PubMed

    Aquino, Lisa L; Wu, Jashin J

    2009-01-01

    Shifts in interest toward cosmetic and surgical dermatology and away from medical and academic dermatology have been observed in recent years. We hypothesized that this trend would be evident in the types of books available for purchase from a major medical textbook supplier. Books published from 1998-2008 were categorized by type and statistical testing was performed to determine if this trend has been reflected in books published. The percentage of medical dermatology books decreased over time, whereas the percentage of cosmetic and surgical dermatology books increased over time. PMID:19723488

  15. The role of lasers and intense pulsed light technology in dermatology

    PubMed Central

    Husain, Zain; Alster, Tina S

    2016-01-01

    The role of light-based technologies in dermatology has expanded dramatically in recent years. Lasers and intense pulsed light have been used to safely and effectively treat a diverse array of cutaneous conditions, including vascular and pigmented lesions, tattoos, scars, and undesired hair, while also providing extensive therapeutic options for cosmetic rejuvenation and other dermatologic conditions. Dermatologic laser procedures are becoming increasingly popular worldwide, and demand for them has fueled new innovations and clinical applications. These systems continue to evolve and provide enhanced therapeutic outcomes with improved safety profiles. This review highlights the important roles and varied clinical applications that lasers and intense pulsed light play in the dermatologic practice. PMID:26893574

  16. End points in dermatologic clinical trials: A review for clinicians.

    PubMed

    Wei, Erin X; Kirsner, Robert S; Eaglstein, William H

    2016-07-01

    Clinical trials are critical for the development of new therapies in dermatology, and their results help determine US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approval and guide care. Of special relevance is the clinical trial efficacy end point, the metric from which statistically significant outcome is derived. Clinicians' understanding of a clinical trial's end point is necessary for critical analysis of the trial results and for applying those results to daily practice. This review provides practical knowledge and critical evaluation of end points used in treatment approvals by the FDA. The end points for actinic keratosis, acne vulgaris, atopic dermatitis, onychomycosis, and cutaneous ulcer serve as examples. PMID:26936300

  17. Publication bias in dermatology systematic reviews and meta-analyses.

    PubMed

    Atakpo, Paul; Vassar, Matt

    2016-05-01

    Systematic reviews and meta-analyses in dermatology provide high-level evidence for clinicians and policy makers that influence clinical decision making and treatment guidelines. One methodological problem with systematic reviews is the under representation of unpublished studies. This problem is due in part to publication bias. Omission of statistically non-significant data from meta-analyses may result in overestimation of treatment effect sizes which may lead to clinical consequences. Our goal was to assess whether systematic reviewers in dermatology evaluate and report publication bias. Further, we wanted to conduct our own evaluation of publication bias on meta-analyses that failed to do so. Our study considered systematic reviews and meta-analyses from ten dermatology journals from 2006 to 2016. A PubMed search was conducted, and all full-text articles that met our inclusion criteria were retrieved and coded by the primary author. 293 articles were included in our analysis. Additionally, we formally evaluated publication bias in meta-analyses that failed to do so using trim and fill and cumulative meta-analysis by precision methods. Publication bias was mentioned in 107 articles (36.5%) and was formally evaluated in 64 articles (21.8%). Visual inspection of a funnel plot was the most common method of evaluating publication bias. Publication bias was present in 45 articles (15.3%), not present in 57 articles (19.5%) and not determined in 191 articles (65.2%). Using the trim and fill method, 7 meta-analyses (33.33%) showed evidence of publication bias. Although the trim and fill method only found evidence of publication bias in 7 meta-analyses, the cumulative meta-analysis by precision method found evidence of publication bias in 15 meta-analyses (71.4%). Many of the reviews in our study did not mention or evaluate publication bias. Further, of the 42 articles that stated following PRISMA reporting guidelines, 19 (45.2%) evaluated for publication bias. In

  18. Overview of Common Sleep Disorders and Intersection with Dermatologic Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Walia, Harneet K.; Mehra, Reena

    2016-01-01

    Sleep disorders are very common, often under-recognized and therefore undertreated, are associated with a myriad of medical conditions and could lead to significant impairment of quality of life. This review provides an up-to-date synopsis of common sleep disorders encompassing insufficient sleep syndrome, insomnia, circadian rhythm disorders and obstructive sleep apnea with a brief overview of epidemiology, screening, diagnostic testing and treatment. We also emphasize the emerging area of the intersection of sleep disorders and dermatologic conditions and present compelling data regarding underlying mechanisms including sleep dysfunction in relation to disorders of skin inflammation, aging and skin cancer. PMID:27144559

  19. Overview of Common Sleep Disorders and Intersection with Dermatologic Conditions.

    PubMed

    Walia, Harneet K; Mehra, Reena

    2016-01-01

    Sleep disorders are very common, often under-recognized and therefore undertreated, are associated with a myriad of medical conditions and could lead to significant impairment of quality of life. This review provides an up-to-date synopsis of common sleep disorders encompassing insufficient sleep syndrome, insomnia, circadian rhythm disorders and obstructive sleep apnea with a brief overview of epidemiology, screening, diagnostic testing and treatment. We also emphasize the emerging area of the intersection of sleep disorders and dermatologic conditions and present compelling data regarding underlying mechanisms including sleep dysfunction in relation to disorders of skin inflammation, aging and skin cancer. PMID:27144559

  20. Medical devices in dermatology using DLP technology from Texas Instruments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kock, M.; Lüllau, F.

    2012-03-01

    The market of medical devices is growing continuously worldwide. With the DLP™ technology from Texas Instruments Lüllau Engineering GmbH in Germany has realized different applications in the medical discipline of dermatology. Especially a new digital phototherapy device named skintrek™ PT5 is revolutionizing the treatment of skin diseases like psoriasis , Vitiligo and other Eczema. The functions of the new phototherapy device can only be realized through DLP™ technology which is not only be used for the selective irradiation process. In combination with other optical systems DLP™ technology undertakes also other functionalities like 3D-topology calculation und patient movement compensation.

  1. Alternative therapies for common dermatologic disorders, part 2.

    PubMed

    Morelli, Vincent; Calmet, Erick; Jhingade, Varalakshmi

    2010-06-01

    The exact pathophysiology and curative treatment of many common dermatologic conditions remains unclear. Often, conventional treatments are only partially effective, leading patients to look for alternative therapy. No new promising alternative treatments for aphthous stomatitis could be found in the literature. Acne may be helped by nicotinamide gel and azelaic acid. Atopic dermatitis may be helped by a trial of elimination diet, n-3 fatty acid supplementation, or Chinese 10-herb tea. Psoriasis may be helped by aloe vera or thermal baths combined with sun exposure. PMID:20493337

  2. Dermatological disorders in Tuvalu between 2009 and 2012.

    PubMed

    Lan, Li-Jung; Lien, Ying-Shuang; Wang, Shao-Chuan; Ituaso-Conway, Nese; Tsai, Ming-Che; Tseng, Pao-Ying; Yeh, Yu-Lin; Chen, Chun-Tzu; Lue, Ko-Huang; Chung, Jing-Gung; Hsiao, Yu-Ping

    2015-09-01

    There is a distinct lack of knowledge on the prevalence of skin disorders in Tuvalu. The aim of the current study was to assess the prevalence of cutaneous diseases and to evaluate access dermatological care in Tuvalu. Cutaneous disorders in the people of Tuvalu between 2009 and 2012 were examined. The most common skin conditions were eczema/dermatitis, superficial fungal infections, impetigo, carbuncles, furuncles, folliculitis, acne, scabies, warts and keloids. Infrequent skin conditions included infectious granulomatous disease, albinism, actinic keratosis, skin cancer, cutaneous lupus erythematosus and mammary Paget's disease, which required medical attention. This is the first epidemiological report on skin disorders in the southwest Pacific Island, Tuvalu. PMID:25998560

  3. Introduction: "The Napkin Area and its Dermatoses" symposium proceedings, World Congress of Pediatric Dermatology, September 2013.

    PubMed

    Torrelo, Antonio

    2016-07-01

    Dr Antonio Torrelo, President of the 12(th) World Congress of Pediatric Dermatology, introduces the supplement as providing an opportunity for readers to access the lectures and related presentations delivered at the World Congress of Pediatric Dermatology held September 25-27, 2013, in Madrid. PMID:27311777

  4. Why don't we use vitamin E in dermatology?

    PubMed Central

    Pehr, K; Forsey, R R

    1993-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To review the possible uses of topical and systemic tocopherols as therapy for skin conditions in light of the widespread use of vitamin E by patients. DATA SOURCES: Index Medicus was searched for articles published from 1922 (when vitamin E was discovered) to 1966 (the beginning of MEDLINE). MEDLINE was searched for articles in English and French on vitamin E or tocopherol in relation to dermatology. Additional original articles were identified from the reference lists of the review articles. STUDY SELECTION: Only well-designed controlled studies were accepted; anecdotes and open studies are cited for completeness and as direction for future research. DATA SYNTHESIS: There was some weak or conflicting evidence that vitamin E is of value in yellow nail syndrome, vibration disease, epidermolysis bullosa, cancer prevention, claudication, cutaneous ulcers, and collagen synthesis and wound healing. It was of no use in atopic dermatitis, dermatitis herpetiformis, psoriasis, subcorneal pustular dermatosis, porphyrias and skin damage induced by ultraviolet light. CONCLUSIONS: After 44 years of research there is still scant proof of vitamin E's effectiveness in treating certain dermatologic conditions. Further research in well-designed controlled trials is needed to clarify vitamin E's role. PMID:8221479

  5. Predictive analysis of optical ablation in several dermatological tumoral tissues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fanjul-Vélez, F.; Blanco-Gutiérrez, A.; Salas-García, I.; Ortega-Quijano, N.; Arce-Diego, J. L.

    2013-06-01

    Optical techniques for treatment and characterization of biological tissues are revolutionizing several branches of medical praxis, for example in ophthalmology or dermatology. The non-invasive, non-contact and non-ionizing character of optical radiation makes it specially suitable for these applications. Optical radiation can be employed in medical ablation applications, either for tissue resection or surgery. Optical ablation may provide a controlled and clean cut on a biological tissue. This is particularly relevant in tumoral tissue resection, where a small amount of cancerous cells could make the tumor appear again. A very important aspect of tissue optical ablation is then the estimation of the affected volume. In this work we propose a complete predictive model of tissue ablation that provides an estimation of the resected volume. The model is based on a Monte Carlo approach for the optical propagation of radiation inside the tissue, and a blow-off model for tissue ablation. This model is applied to several types of dermatological tumoral tissues, specifically squamous cells, basocellular and infiltrative carcinomas. The parameters of the optical source are varied and the estimated resected volume is calculated. The results for the different tumor types are presented and compared. This model can be used for surgical planning, in order to assure the complete resection of the tumoral tissue.

  6. Dermatology in the military field: What physicians should know?

    PubMed Central

    Chong, Wei-Sheng

    2013-01-01

    In the civilian dermatological setting, the top 5 skin diseases usually seen are eczema/dermatitis, acne, benign skin tumors, viral infections and pigmentary disorders. In comparison, the top 5 skin conditions encountered in the military sector are usually fungal infections, eczema/dermatitis, insect bite reactions, bacterial infections and acne. This is not surprising as military personnel, due to the special environment and vocations they are in, are prone to getting eczema as heat, sweating and wearing of the military uniform aggravate the condition. Fungal infections are common in those who wear the army boots. Insect bite reactions are not an uncommon sight among those who have to go to the jungle regularly for outfield training. Grass allergy or intolerance, contact dermatitis or acneiform eruption due to the application of military camouflage cream on the face, contact dermatitis to insect repellents, and military uniform allergy and intolerance are amongst the commonest dermatological problems encountered in the military field, and physicians should recognize them, investigate and manage these problems accordingly. Lastly, a diagnosis not to be missed in the military field is cutaneous melioidosis, especially when a military personnel presents with a non-healing ulcer. PMID:24340268

  7. The elements of dermatology: the legacy of Covisa and Bejarano.

    PubMed

    Leis-Dosil, V M; Garrido-Gutiérrez, C; Díaz-Díaz, R M

    2014-04-01

    In 1936, Covisa and Bejarano published a treatise entitled Elementos de Dermatología (The Elements of Dermatology). In this surprisingly modern book they abandoned the nosological debates characteristic of the 19th century and instead classified diseases according to their etiology and pathogenesis based on the scientific and technical advances of the time. Moreover, unlike other books available at the time, which were essentially adaptations of foreign texts, this was the first medical work to reflect the reality of Spanish medicine. However, the future of both the book and its authors was to be determined by the start of the Spanish Civil War in the same year. Covisa and Bejarano, who were both extremely active in the public health system and medical education during the Second Republic, were obliged to seek exile in America. Due to the difficulties of the time, very few copies of the book reached the public and no new editions were ever printed. We will never know what would have happened if the war had not started, but we believe that this important work should be remembered. PMID:24674985

  8. The science of dermocosmetics and its role in dermatology.

    PubMed

    Dreno, B; Araviiskaia, E; Berardesca, E; Bieber, T; Hawk, J; Sanchez-Viera, M; Wolkenstein, P

    2014-11-01

    Our increased knowledge of normal skin physiology has ushered in a subtle revolution in cosmetic science. Originally designed as preparations to enhance personal appearance by direct application on to the skin, cosmetics have now taken on a new role in dermatology, through the support of the management of many skin disorders. This evolving role of cosmetics in skin care is primarily due to scientific and technological advancements that have changed our understanding of normal skin physiology and how cosmetics modify its appearance both physically and biologically. The vast array of techniques currently available to investigate skin responsivity to multiple stimuli has brought about a new era in cosmetic and dermocosmetic development based on a robust understanding of skin physiology and its varied responses to commonly encountered environmental insults. Most cosmetic research is undertaken on reconstructed skin models crucial in dermatological research, given the strict ban imposed by the European Union on animal testing. In addition, the design and conduct of trials evaluating cosmetics now follow rules comparable to those used in the development and evaluation of pharmaceutical products. Cosmetic research should now aim to ensure all trials adhere to strictly reproducible and scientifically sound methodologies. The objective of this review is to provide an overview of the multidisciplinary scientific approach used in formulating dermocosmetics, and to examine the major advances in dermocosmetic development and assessment, the safety and regulatory guidelines governing their production and the exciting future outlook for these dermocosmetic processes following good practice rules. PMID:24684296

  9. “Pseudo” Nomenclature in Dermatology: What's in a Name?

    PubMed Central

    Ghosh, Sangita; Jain, Vijay Kumar

    2013-01-01

    In the bewildering array of scientific nomenclature in the medical field, it is important to use correct terminology, know their aberrations and the reason behind a specific terminology. This paper is an attempt towards compiling all the pseudo-nomenclatures coined in dermatology, in order to make it easier to retain and recollect these pseudo names, signs, morphology, diseases, and conditions. It is also imperative to know the true entities that these pseudo names masquerade as, so as to understand the explanation for assigning the term ‘pseudo’ to these conditions. A total of 52 pseudo-terms have been compiled here in reference to dermatology. Most of these pseudo-nomenclatures were coined due to some clinical or histopathological resemblance to the true conditions, while some were premature conclusions drawn from a flawed understanding of the basic nature of the condition. Clear understanding of each of these terms and the explanation behind them being pseudo will enable a dermatologist to avoid misdiagnosis and needless confusion. PMID:24082182

  10. Malassezia species in healthy skin and in dermatological conditions.

    PubMed

    Prohic, Asja; Jovovic Sadikovic, Tamara; Krupalija-Fazlic, Mersiha; Kuskunovic-Vlahovljak, Suada

    2016-05-01

    The genus Malassezia comprises lipophilic species, the natural habitat of which is the skin of humans and other warm-blooded animals. However, these species have been associated with a diversity of dermatological disorders and even systemic infections. Pityriasis versicolor is the only cutaneous disease etiologically connected to Malassezia yeasts. In the other dermatoses, such as Malassezia folliculitis, seborrheic dermatitis, atopic dermatitis, and psoriasis, these yeasts have been suggested to play pathogenic roles either as direct agents of infection or as trigger factors because there is no evidence that the organisms invade the skin. Malassezia yeasts have been classified into at least 14 species, of which eight have been isolated from human skin, including Malassezia furfur, Malassezia pachydermatis, Malassezia sympodialis, Malassezia slooffiae, Malassezia globosa, Malassezia obtusa, Malassezia restricta, Malassezia dermatis, Malassezia japonica, and Malassezia yamatoensis. Distributions of Malassezia species in the healthy body and in skin diseases have been investigated using culture-based and molecular techniques, and variable results have been reported from different geographical regions. This article reviews and discusses the latest available data on the pathogenicity of Malassezia spp., their distributions in dermatological conditions and in healthy skin, discrepancies in the two methods of identification, and the susceptibility of Malassezia spp. to antifungals. PMID:26710919

  11. Synopsis of Diet in Dermatology: A one day CME conducted by the Department of Dermatology, Kasturba Medical College, Manipal, March 3, 2013

    PubMed Central

    Prabhu, Smitha S; Nayak, Sudhir UK; Shenoi, Shrutakirthi Damodar; Pai, Sathish Ballambat

    2013-01-01

    Food is intricately related to mind and body and is one of the elements sustaining life, in disease as well as in health. There are many myths and misgivings regarding partake of food and its medicinal properties. The Department of Dermatology, Kasturba Medical College (KMC), Manipal organized a continuing medical education (CME) on Diet in Dermatology on 3rd March 2013 focusing on pertinent issues regarding diet and medicinal use of food. PMID:24350027

  12. Complementary and Alternative Medicine Use in Dermatology in the United States

    PubMed Central

    Landis, Erin T.; Davis, Scott A.; Taylor, Sarah

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Background: Complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) has an increasing presence in dermatology. Complementary therapies have been studied in many skin diseases, including atopic dermatitis and psoriasis. Objectives: This study sought to assess oral CAM use in dermatology relative to medicine as a whole in the United States, using the National Ambulatory Medical Care Survey. Design: Variables studied include patient demographic characteristics, diagnoses, and CAM documented at the visits. A brief literature review of the top 5 CAM treatments unique to dermatology visits was performed. Results: Most CAM users in both dermatology and medicine as a whole were female and white and were insured with private insurance or Medicare. Fish oil, glucosamine, glucosamine chondroitin, and omega-3 were the most common complementary supplements used in both samples. Conclusions: CAM use in dermatology appears to be part of a larger trend in medicine. Knowledge of common complementary therapies can help dermatologists navigate this expanding field. PMID:24517329

  13. Dermatological and immunological conditions due to nerve lesions

    PubMed Central

    Bove, Domenico; Lupoli, Amalia; Caccavale, Stefano; Piccolo, Vincenzo; Ruocco, Eleonora

    2013-01-01

    Summary Some syndromes are of interest to both neurologists and dermatologists, because cutaneous involvement may harbinger symptoms of a neurological disease. The aim of this review is to clarify this aspect. The skin, because of its relationships with the peripheral sensory nervous system, autonomic nervous system and central nervous system, constitutes a neuroimmunoendocrine organ. The skin contains numerous neuropeptides released from sensory nerves. Neuropeptides play a precise role in cutaneous physiology and pathophysiology, and in certain skin diseases. A complex dysregulation of neuropeptides is a feature of some diseases of both dermatological and neurological interest (e.g. cutaneous and nerve lesions following herpes zoster infection, cutaneous manifestations of carpal tunnel syndrome, trigeminal trophic syndrome). Dermatologists need to know when a patient should be referred to a neurologist and should consider this option in those presenting with syndromes of unclear etiology. PMID:24125557

  14. Dermatologic manifestation of hyperandrogenism: a retrospective chart review.

    PubMed

    Clark, Charlotte M; Rudolph, Jennifer; Gerber, Donald A; Glick, Sharon; Shalita, Alan R; Lowenstein, Eve J

    2014-01-01

    Several studies have described a wide spectrum of hyperandrogenism diseases, many of which are difficult to distinguish from each other. In order to better understand diseases of hyperandrogenism, the authors performed a retrospective study of the cutaneous features and metabolic findings in women with hyperandrogenism. A retrospective chart analysis compiled by three dermatologists in both academic and private settings was performed, including patients presenting with > or = 2 manifestations of hyperandrogenism. Relevant dermatologic and associated manifestations and laboratory and imaging study findings were reviewed. Moderate to severe acne was the most common manifestation. Other common manifestations that patients first presented with include hirsutism, acanthosis nigricans, androgenic alopecia, and skin tags. Oligomenorrhea was the most common systemic presenting sign. Statistical analysis of various clinical markers revealed correlations with hyperandrogenemia. Acanthosis nigricans and hirsutism were found to be useful clinical markers for hyperandrogenism, whereas androgenic alopecia was not. This study provides some insights into the presentation and diverse manifestations seen in hyperandrogenism. PMID:24933845

  15. Contact allergic dermatitis "current topic in tropical dermatology".

    PubMed

    Soyinka, F

    1978-11-01

    Out of a total of 2,666 new dermatology patients, 128 (4.8%) were clinically diagnosed as allergic contact dermatitis. Of these, 107 (4%) reacted positively to different antigens in the patch-test. The commonest contact sensitizers among females were nickel and dyes. Among male patients, the commonest sensitizers were mecaptobenzol-thiazole, chrome and nickel. The incidence of occupational contact dermatitis among bricklayers, construction workers and builders were found to be low and the sensitization rate against chromate was 0.6%. There was no sensitization against cobalt and nickel in the group, however, the length of occupational contact with cement among these group was short. Allergic contact dermatitis is not as uncommon among the Nigeria populace as is generally believed. It seems to be on the increase especially with increase rate of industrialization. PMID:753055

  16. Towards a decision support system for hand dermatology.

    PubMed

    Mazzola, Luca; Cavazzina, Alice; Pinciroli, Francesco; Bonacina, Stefano; Pigatto, Paolo; Ayala, Fabio; De Pità, Ornella; Marceglia, Sara

    2014-01-01

    The complexity of the medical diagnosis is faced by practitioners relying mainly on their experiences. This can be acquired during daily practices and on-the-job training. Given the complexity and extensiveness of the subject, supporting tools that include knowledge extracted by highly specialized practitioners can be valuable. In the present work, a Decision Support System (DSS) for hand dermatology was developed based on data coming from a Visit Report Form (VRF). Using a Bayesian approach and factors significance difference over the population average for the case, we demonstrated the potentiality of creating an enhanced VRF that include a diagnoses distribution probability based on the DSS rules applied for the specific patient situation. PMID:25160145

  17. Photodynamic therapy in dermatology: state-of-the-art.

    PubMed

    Babilas, Philipp; Schreml, Stephan; Landthaler, Michael; Szeimies, Rolf-Markus

    2010-06-01

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) has become an established treatment modality for dermatooncologic conditions like actinic keratosis, Bowen's disease, in situ squamous cell carcinoma and superficial basal cell carcinoma. There is also great promise of PDT for many non-neoplastic dermatological diseases like localized scleroderma, acne vulgaris, granuloma anulare and leishmaniasis. Aesthetic indications like photo-aged skin or sebaceous gland hyperplasia complete the range of applications. Major advantages of PDT are the low level of invasiveness and the excellent cosmetic results. Here, we review the principal mechanism of action, the current developments in the field of photosensitizers and light sources, practical aspects of topical PDT and therapeutical applications in oncologic as well as non-oncologic indications. PMID:20584250

  18. The role of epidermal sphingolipids in dermatologic diseases.

    PubMed

    Borodzicz, Sonia; Rudnicka, Lidia; Mirowska-Guzel, Dagmara; Cudnoch-Jedrzejewska, Agnieszka

    2016-01-01

    Sphingolipids, a group of lipids containing the sphingoid base, have both structural and biological functions in human epidermis. Ceramides, as a part of extracellular lipids in the stratum corneum, are important elements of the skin barrier and are involved in the prevention of transepidermal water loss. In addition, ceramides regulate such processes as proliferation, differentiation and apoptosis of keratinocytes. Another important sphingolipid, sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P), inhibits proliferation and induces differentiation of keratinocytes. A recent clinical study of the efficacy and safety of ponesimod (a selective modulator of the S1P receptor 1) suggested that sphingolipid metabolism may become a new target for the pharmacological treatment of psoriasis. The role of sphingolipids in some dermatologic diseases, including psoriasis, atopic dermatitis and ichthyoses was summarized in this article. PMID:26786937

  19. An insight into JAK-STAT signalling in dermatology.

    PubMed

    Palanivel, J A; Macbeth, A E; Chetty, N C; Levell, N J

    2014-06-01

    Many emerging studies have implicated the Janus kinase/signal transducer and activator of transcription (JAK-STAT) cytokine signalling mechanism in disease pathogenesis. This signalling pathway is involved in haematopoiesis and immune development. Mutations in genes regulating JAK-STAT signalling can cause common inflammatory disorders and myeloproliferative disorders. JAK and STAT inhibitors are new management tools for disorders such as myelofibrosis and rheumatoid arthritis. Evidence suggests that the cytokine components of the JAK-STAT pathways play a crucial role in common skin disorders, including psoriasis and atopic dermatitis. We present an overview for the clinical dermatologist of the significance of these signalling pathways in various skin disorders, and introduce the potential application of JAK and STAT inhibition as a new therapeutic tool in dermatology. PMID:24825142

  20. Infrared Imaging Tools for Diagnostic Applications in Dermatology

    PubMed Central

    Gurjarpadhye, Abhijit Achyut; Parekh, Mansi Bharat; Dubnika, Arita; Rajadas, Jayakumar; Inayathullah, Mohammed

    2015-01-01

    Infrared (IR) imaging is a collection of non-invasive imaging techniques that utilize the IR domain of the electromagnetic spectrum for tissue assessment. A subset of these techniques construct images using back-reflected light, while other techniques rely on detection of IR radiation emitted by the tissue as a result of its temperature. Modern IR detectors sense thermal emissions and produce a heat map of surface temperature distribution in tissues. Thus, the IR spectrum offers a variety of imaging applications particularly useful in clinical diagnostic area, ranging from high-resolution, depth-resolved visualization of tissue to temperature variation assessment. These techniques have been helpful in the diagnosis of many medical conditions including skin/breast cancer, arthritis, allergy, burns, and others. In this review, we discuss current roles of IR-imaging techniques for diagnostic applications in dermatology with an emphasis on skin cancer, allergies, blisters, burns and wounds. PMID:26691203

  1. Towards the use of OCT angiography in clinical dermatology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baran, Utku; Choi, Woo June; Wang, Ruikang K.

    2016-02-01

    Optical coherence tomography (OCT) is a popular imaging technique used in ophthalmology, and on the way to become clinically viable alternative in dermatology due to its capability of acquiring histopathology level images of in vivo tissue, noninvasively. In this study, we demonstrate the capabilities of OCT-based angiography (OMAG) in detecting high-resolution, volumetric structural and microvascular features of in vivo human skin with various conditions using a swept source OCT system that operates on a central wavelength of 1310 nm with an A-line rate of 100 kHz. OMAG images provide detailed in vivo visualization of microvasculature of abnormal human skin conditions from face, chest and belly. Moreover, the progress of wound healing on human skin from arm is monitored during longitudinal wound healing process. The presented results promise the clinical use of OCT angiography in treatment of prevalent cutaneous diseases within human skin, in vivo.

  2. Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells in Dermatology: Potentials, Advances, and Limitations

    PubMed Central

    Bilousova, Ganna; Roop, Dennis R.

    2015-01-01

    The discovery of methods for reprogramming adult somatic cells into induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) has raised the possibility of producing truly personalized treatment options for numerous diseases. Similar to embryonic stem cells (ESCs), iPSCs can give rise to any cell type in the body and they are amenable to genetic correction by homologous recombination. These ESC properties of iPSCs allow for the development of permanent corrective therapies for many currently incurable disorders, including inherited skin diseases, without using embryonic tissues or oocytes. Here, we review recent progress and limitations of iPSC research with a focus on clinical applications of iPSCs, and using iPSCs to model human diseases for drug discovery in the field of dermatology. PMID:25368014

  3. Photodynamic therapy in dermatology: past, present, and future

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Darlenski, Razvigor; Fluhr, Joachim W.

    2013-06-01

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) is a noninvasive therapeutic method first introduced in the field of dermatology. It is mainly used for the treatment of precancerous and superficial malignant skin tumors. Today PDT finds new applications not only for nononcologic dermatoses but also in the field of other medical specialties such as otorhinolaryngology, ophthalmology, neurology, gastroenterology, and urology. We are witnessing a broadening of the spectrum of skin diseases that are treated by PDT. Since its introduction, PDT protocol has evolved significantly in terms of increasing method efficacy and patient safety. In this era of evidence-based medicine, it is expected that much effort will be put into creating a worldwide accepted consensus on PDT. A review on the current knowledge of PDT is given, and the historical basis of the method's evolution since its introduction in the 1900s is presented. At the end, future challenges of PDT are focused on discussing gaps that exist for research in the field.

  4. Optimized laser application in dermatology using infrared thermography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, Roderick A.; Donne, Kelvin E.; Clement, Marc; Kiernan, Michael N.

    2002-03-01

    Infrared thermography can be used to optimize the application of lasers in dermatology with particular reference to the treatment of certain skin disorders such as vascular lesions and depilation. The efficacy of treatment is dependent upon a number of factors including: Optimization and correct selection of laser parameters such as wavelength and spot size. Human factors, such as laser operator skill, patient's skin type and anatomical location. By observing the thermal effects of laser irradiation on the skins surface during treatment results in improved efficacy and minimizes the possible threshold to skin damage, reducing the possibility of burning and scarring. This is of particular significance for example, in the control of purpura for the treatment of vascular lesions. The optimization is validated with reference to a computer model that predicts various skin temperatures based on two different laser spot sizes.

  5. Newer Hemostatic Agents Used in the Practice of Dermatologic Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Brewer, Jerry D.

    2013-01-01

    Minor postoperative bleeding is the most common complication of cutaneous surgery. Because of the commonality of this complication, hemostasis is an important concept to address when considering dermatologic procedures. Patients that have a bleeding diathesis, an inherited/acquired coagulopathy, or who are on anticoagulant/antiplatelet medications pose a greater risk for bleeding complications during the postoperative period. Knowledge of these conditions preoperatively is of the utmost importance, allowing for proper preparation and prevention. Also, it is important to be aware of the various hemostatic modalities available, including electrocoagulation, which is among the most effective and widely used techniques. Prompt recognition of hematoma formation and knowledge of postoperative wound care can prevent further complications such as wound dehiscence, infection, or skin-graft necrosis, minimizing poor outcomes. PMID:23997764

  6. In Vitro Antifungal Activities against Moulds Isolated from Dermatological Specimens

    PubMed Central

    Mohd Nizam, Tzar; Binting, Rabiatul Adawiyah AG.; Mohd Saari, Shafika; Kumar, Thivyananthini Vijaya; Muhammad, Marianayati; Satim, Hartini; Yusoff, Hamidah; Santhanam, Jacinta

    2016-01-01

    Background This study aimed to determine the minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs) of various antifungal agents against moulds isolated from dermatological specimens. Methods We identified 29 moulds from dermatological specimens between October 2012 and March 2013 by conventional methods. We performed antifungal susceptibility testing on six antifungal agents, amphotericin B, clotrimazole, itraconazole, ketoconazole, miconazole and terbinafine, according to the Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute guidelines contained in the M38-A2 document. Results Most antifungal agents were active against the dermatophytes, except for terbinafine against Trichophyton rubrum (geometric mean MIC, MICGM 3.17 μg/mL). The dematiaceous moulds were relatively susceptible to amphotericin B and azoles (MICGM 0.17–0.34 μg/mL), but not to terbinafine (MICGM 3.62 μg/mL). Septate hyaline moulds showed variable results between the relatively more susceptible Aspergillus spp. (MICGM 0.25–4 μg/mL) and the more resistant Fusarium spp. (MICGM 5.66–32 μg/mL). The zygomycetes were susceptible to amphotericin B (MICGM 0.5 μg/mL) and clotrimazole (MICGM 0.08 μg/mL), but not to other azoles (MICGM 2.52–4 μg/mL). Conclusion Amphotericin B and clotrimazole were the most effective antifungal agents against all moulds excepting Fusarium spp., while terbinafine was useful against dermatophytes (except T. rubrum) and Aspergillus spp. However, a larger study is required to draw more solid conclusions. PMID:27418867

  7. Botanicals in dermatology: an evidence-based review.

    PubMed

    Reuter, Juliane; Merfort, Irmgard; Schempp, Christoph M

    2010-01-01

    Botanical extracts and single compounds are increasingly used in cosmetics but also in over-the-counter drugs and food supplements. The focus of the present review is on controlled clinical trials with botanicals in the treatment of acne, inflammatory skin diseases, skin infections, UV-induced skin damage, skin cancer, alopecia, vitiligo, and wounds. Studies with botanical cosmetics and drugs are discussed, as well as studies with botanical food supplements. Experimental research on botanicals was considered to a limited extent when it seemed promising for clinical use in the near future. In acne therapy, Mahonia, tea tree oil, and Saccharomyces may have the potential to become standard treatments. Mahonia, Hypericum, Glycyrrhiza and some traditional Chinese medicines appear promising for atopic dermatitis. Some plant-derived substances like dithranol and methoxsalen (8-methoxypsoralen) [in combination with UVA] are already accepted as standard treatments in psoriasis; Mahonia and Capsicum (capsaicin) are the next candidates suggested by present evidence. Oral administration and topical application of antioxidant plant extracts (green and black tea, carotenoids, coffee, and many flavonoids from fruits and vegetables) can protect skin from UV-induced erythema, early aging, and irradiation-induced cancer. Hair loss and vitiligo are also traditional fields of application for botanicals. According to the number and quality of clinical trials with botanicals, the best evidence exists for the treatment of inflammatory skin diseases, i.e. atopic dermatitis and psoriasis. However, many more controlled clinical studies are needed to determine the efficacy and risks of plant-derived products in dermatology. Safety aspects, especially related to sensitization and photodermatitis, have to be taken into account. Therefore, clinicians should not only be informed of the beneficial effects but also the specific adverse effects of botanicals used for dermatologic disorders and

  8. [The death of moulages - wax figures in dermatology].

    PubMed

    Sticherling, M; Euler, U

    1999-09-01

    Wax has been used for illustration purposes back to antiquity. Since the renaissance period human anatomy and different diseases have often been depicted in wax. During the last century the art of moulage preparation evolved to three-dimensional, realistic representations of diseased parts of the human body. Its heyday and wide spread distribution paralleled the growing independence of dermatology. Apart from few exceptions, most mouleurs did not permit access to their technique either to successors or the public. Just like other European hospitals, the Department of Dermatology at Kiel University houses a comprehensive collection of moulages dating back to a century. The 455 objects left today were collected by Professor Viktor Felix Karl Klingmüller (1870-1942) who was head of the department from 1906 to 1937. The mouleur Alfons Kröner from Breslau who died 1937 supplied most (354) of the wax models. Highly esteemed at his time, Kröner was quite secretive about his art of moulagig. 35 of his moulages bear the abbreviation "DRP" standing for Deutsches Reichspatent (German patent); Kröner was granted a patent in 1902. In his patent application both wax mixtures and technical procedure of moulaging are described in great detail. Kröner, similarly to Jules Baretta (Paris), coloured his moulages at the back of the wax layers. Applying for a patent demonstrates his effort to meet increasing commercial pressure among suppliers of teaching aids at that time. Knowledge of individual technical procedures is essential for medical history as well as proper restauration of moulages as they continually deteriorate with time. Because of their three-dimensional and realistic disease representations, moulages still compare well to modern media used today. Consequently, the "dying of moulages" concerning the wax objects themselves as well as public or medical interest has to be stopped to preserve moulages for future generations. PMID:10501686

  9. Climate change, dermatology and ecosystem services; trends and trade-offs.

    PubMed

    Muller, Scott A

    2011-05-01

    Climate change is one of the defining issues for human well-being in the 21st century. As several dermatological diseases have a high sensitivity to climate and ecologic change, dermatologists will have an increasingly important role in public health affairs. The International Society of Dermatology's (ISD) establishment of a task force to track the impact of climate change on the incidence of dermatologic conditions is an example of scientific monitoring critical to future interdisciplinary adaptation and decision making to improve human well-being. PMID:21506962

  10. Poverty, dignity, and forgotten skin care: dermatology in the stream of human mobile population.

    PubMed

    Morrone, Aldo

    2008-04-01

    Skin diseases represent the greatest public health care problem in all developing countries. Tropical diseases tend to cluster in poor populations and often are defined as "neglected" because the investments made to combat them seem negligible compared with the massive amounts expended globally on the health problems of developed countries. After reviewing the worldwide situation, this article explains the principles of community dermatology and discusses the work of the San Gallicano Institute in Rome, which has developed a model for reducing the number of people suffering from dermatologic and other diseases and has established the first dermatologic hospital in Ethiopia. PMID:18346556